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11 November 13, 2019 Traffic Relief StrategyComments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Time: 11:30 a.m. Date: November 13, 2019 Location: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administration Center 4080 Lemon St, First Floor, Riverside CA 92501 COMMITTEE MEMBERS Jan Harnik, Chair / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Michael Naggar, Vice Chair / Maryann Edwards, City of Temecula Larry Smith / Linda Molina, City of Calimesa Wes Speake / Jim Steiner, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Linda Krupa / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Brian Berkson / Chris Barajas, City of Jurupa Valley Victoria Baca / Carla Thornton, City of Moreno Valley Scott Vinton / To Be Appointed, City of Murrieta V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside, District IV STAFF Anne Mayer, Executive Director Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY Countywide Transportation Improvement and Traffic Relief Plan and implementation ordinance RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE www.rctc.org SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, November 13, 2019 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor Riverside, California In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1.CALL TO ORDER 2.ROLL CALL 3.PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 4.PUBLIC COMMENTS – Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Committee may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Committee, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. Also, the Committee may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Committee shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Board should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda which are not listed on the agenda. Board members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee – Special Meeting November 13, 2019 Page 2 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) 6. APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES – SEPTEMBER 23 AND OCTOBER 28, 2019 7. CONSENT CALENDAR - All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 7A. PUBLIC OUTREACH APPROACH FOR COUNTYWIDE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN Page 1 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the proposed Public Outreach Approach for the countywide Traffic Relief Plan (Plan); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 8. PUBLIC OPINION RESEARCH ON PRIORITIES FOR THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN Page 5 Overview This item is for the Committee to receive and file information on public opinion research on priorities for the Traffic Relief Plan. 9. APPROACH FOR COACHELLA VALLEY COMPONENT OF THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN Page 11 Overview This item is for the Committee to receive, discuss, and provide input on the approach to developing the Coachella Valley component of the draft Traffic Relief Plan. 10. WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN INVESTMENTS Page 14 Overview This item is for the Committee to receive, discuss, provide input on, and consider approval of investments in projects and services to be included in a draft Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee – Special Meeting November 13, 2019 Page 3 11. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and staff to report on attended and upcoming meeting/conferences and issues related to Commission activities. 12. ADJOURNMENT The next Traffic Relief Strategy Committee meeting is scheduled to be held at 11:30 a.m., Monday, November 25, 2019, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. AGENDA ITEM 6 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITEE Monday, September 23, 2019 MINUTES 1. CALL TO ORDER/ ROLL CALL The meeting of the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee was called to order by Commissioner Jan Harnik at 11:32 p.m., in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members/Alternates Present Members Absent Brian Berkson Victoria Baca Jan Harnik Larry Smith Linda Krupa Michael Naggar Scott Matas Scott Vinton V. Manuel Perez Wes Speake* *Arrived after the meeting was called to order 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE At this time, Commissioner Perez led the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee in a flag salute. 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions at this time. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes September 23, 2019 Page 2 6. COUNTYWIDE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT & TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN: VISION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director, provided background information on the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee and invited Commissioners to provide their comments on their goals, vision, and objectives for the committee. Commissioner Michael Naggar stated it is essential the Committee look at future funding and infrastructure from a countywide perspective and not get mired in politics. He expressed his disappointment that the public is not there to participate in the future funding discussion and as such, is hoping for good public outreach. Commissioner V. Manuel Perez stated the Commissioners just need to do the work and the public will come. He believes the purpose of the committee is to work through the struggles and challenges to get to a tax measure that can be pushed forward to a vote. Commissioner Linda Krupa stated the Commissioners need to work together on this and look at it as a Countywide issue even though they each represent their own constituents; noting that constituents from every city impact each other’s communities when they get into their cars for travel. She agreed with her fellow Commissioners in removing the politics and just getting the job done. Commissioner Larry Smith stated he comes from a tax adverse community and his community expects him to represent them in a way that reflects what is important to them, however, he does not see another solution. He does not want to always have to go to the taxpayers to fund projects that are absolutely important to move traffic through the County, however if something is not done through the pass area at Interstate 10 there is going to be another area like the traffic situation going through Corona. He stated he sits on the committee with some reluctance, but understands and recognizes the absolute importance of the Commissioners responsibility to mitigate traffic in Riverside County. He commits to doing everything in his power to improve the traffic situation. He is not a big tax person and wishes there was another solution, but until another solution is brought forward he needs to be supportive of the things that the Commission has a responsibility to do. At this time, Commissioner Wes Speake arrived. Commissioner Scott Matas stated he has served on the Commission for more than 10 years, and the staff has done a fantastic job of trying to move the County into the future without money, which has been the toughest part. He noted he tries not to take things personally, however there were some harsh comments made by the public at the last meeting, which stuck with him. The Commission should not be ashamed for anything they have done, and thinks the group of individuals who addressed the Commission could be a strong advocate for their needs in their community but the Commissioners have to serve the whole County. The Coachella Valley is fortunate as they are able to take a Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes September 23, 2019 Page 3 portion of the money that comes through and program it the way they want to, however he feels it is important to sit on the Committee and help the rest of the County get through some of the major issues that are going on the freeway and highway systems. He referenced a congestion map that was shown to Commissioners at a prior meeting and stated it is difficult to think how long solutions will take to build even if they were programmed today. He noted the plans have always been there, and the question is whether plans for the future can be found that can take the areas of congestion and make them better for people to live. He does not know the answer but he is going to try and that is why he is a part of this committee. Commissioner Brian Berkson stated the Commissioners need to be cognizant of the perspectives of their residents, meaning all County residents. When Commissioners are sitting on the Committee, they are responsible for regional programming for countywide transportation needs and need to look at it from the regional perspective. He stated the residents of the region are looking for more lanes or better scenarios to get them from A- Z without stealing what they have already paid for, which is what the perception is. He stated this has to be dealt with regionally in a way that is fair for everyone so they do not feel they are being ripped off by anyone. He stated he is also not a tax person, however if the tax initiative is moved forward, he looks at is as giving the residents the opportunity to weigh in and make the decision on a new tax. The State and Federal government have not provided enough funding for the improvement deficit so there is no other choice other than to pursue all perspective avenues and let the voters decide. He noted he is not promoting a new tax, he is promoting options. Commissioner Wes Speake stated when residents come in to speak it is indicative of a problem, and the Commissioners are there to help solve those problems. He noted there has been very little investment from the State and Federal government and the County is left to fight for themselves, which the Commission has done a good job at. If the Commission continues to make improvements, the way they have done and finish the things they have been started there will be a lessening of the public complaining. It is not a Corona problem or project, the western part of the County is fed by the 91 and the southern part of the County is fed by the 15 and the projects need to be wrapped up. Commissioner Jan Harnik expressed her appreciation to the other Commissioners for their comments. She stated this has to be looked at holistically, and the ink lines on a map mean little to community members as they travel throughout the region so this has to be looked at as a regional plan. She noted 40 percent of the goods that come in through the port go onto the 10 freeway. She looks at this as both as an opportunity to educate the community members and give them an opportunity to vote, and also as an opportunity to be proactive and get in front of some of the quality of life issues for the community members. She stated there is work to do, let us keep the politics out of it and do the work for our community members and for our County. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes September 23, 2019 Page 4 M/S/C (Matas/Perez) to: 1) Receive background information on the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee; 2) Discuss the vision, goals, and objectives of the Countywide Transportation Improvement &Traffic Relief Plan; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 7. ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, provided an overview of the proposed agreement with the University of California, Riverside School of Business to perform an economic impacts analysis related to the investment of an additional sales tax for transportation improvements in Riverside County. The study will analyze the benefits and costs of implementing a transportation plan. M/S/C (Perez/Matas) to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 20-19-012-00 to University of California, Riverside (UCR) School of Business, Center for Economic Forecasting & Development (UCR Center) to perform an economic impacts analysis related to the investment of an additional sales tax for transportation improvements in Riverside County in an amount not to exceed $199,500; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 8. PROPOSED COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE M/S/C (Vinton/Speake) to approve its meeting schedule as proposed. 9. ELECTION OF OFFICERS Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board, stated this item is for the Committee to select a Chair and Vice Chair. Commissioner Naggar nominated Commissioner Harnik as Chair, and Commissioner Speake seconded. Commissioner Perez nominated Commissioner Naggar as the Vice Chair, noting the entire county would be represented. M/S/C (Perez/Smith) to appoint Commissioner Jan Harnik as Chair and Commissioner Michael Naggar as Vice Chair. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes September 23, 2019 Page 5 10. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT Commissioner Perez invited everyone to the McCallum Theater on Saturday, October 19 for the first annual Mariachi Gala, noting he dressed for the occasion. He noted he is trying to establish bi-national and bilateral relationships with the County of Riverside and the nation states of Mexico, particularly Jalisco and Oaxaca. He has been working over the course of two years on these relationships and as a result of that work the Mayor and Governor are coming with some of the best mariachi in the world for this free event. Commissioner Smith stated after listening to the comments from the other Commissioners that this Committee is the right place to be. There is sensitivity to the potential impacts on people but he is serving with a strong group that recognizes and understands that this in not just a government bureaucracy as they actually deliver projects. He stated for the amount of money that is accumulated they deliver something as a Commission that positively impacts people’s lives. They don’t always do it right or get it perfect and sometimes it is difficult to keep up with demand, but he pledges his support to do everything he can to improve traffic in the region even though he may face some local resistance. Historically he has been a resistor in having anything to do with imposing taxes upon people, but in reality, they are not imposing but telling people here is your opportunity. He is going to be supportive of what the Committee can do together as a group to improve the traffic situation in Riverside County. He thanked his fellow Commissioners for their comments, as it is meaningful to know early on where everyone is in order to move forward as a group. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, thanked the Commissioners for volunteering to serve on this very important Committee. She noted there is a lot of work ahead and it is important that staff understands what the Commissioners think as they represent their communities and the County as a whole. She encouraged Commissioners to reach out to her directly with any questions, comments or concerns as the goal is to provide the Commissioners with the data and information so they can make the policy decisions. 11. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITEE Monday, October 28, 2019 MINUTES 1. CALL TO ORDER/ ROLL CALL The meeting of the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee was called to order by Vice Chair Michael Naggar at 11:31 p.m., in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members/Alternates Present Members Absent Victoria Baca Linda Krupa Brian Berkson Jan Harnik Michael Naggar Scott Matas Larry Smith Jim Steiner V. Manuel Perez Scott Vinton Clerk of the Board Lisa Mobley announced there was five members present, short of the required six for a quorum. She noted the Committee could meet as a Committee of the Whole wherein the Committee can discuss and forward items to the Commission for final action, emphasizing no final action could be taken without a quorum. The Chair concurred that they would meet as a Committee of the Whole. 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE At this time, Commissioner Larry Smith led the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee in a flag salute. 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions at this time. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes October 28, 2019 Page 2 6. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – SEPTEMBER 23, 2019 As the committee was meeting as a Committee of the Whole since there was not an established quorum, no action was taken on the minutes. 7. REVENUE ESTIMATE FOR COUNTYWIDE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT AND TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, provided an overview of the purpose of a revenue estimate, a historic perspective of Measure A revenue, and regional forecast model trend factors. The sales tax revenue estimate recommended by staff is $8.6 billion over a 30-year period. Commissioner Linda Krupa requested clarification on the reason for revenue trends based on age group. Ms. Trevino provided clarification on the reasoning behind the revenue estimates provided. M/S/C (Baca/Krupa) as a Committee of the Whole to: 1) Approve a revenue estimate to guide development of the Countywide Transportation Improvement and Traffic Relief Plan (Plan); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 8. TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN STRUCTURE: GEOGRAPHY AND EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director, provided geographic divisions and expenditure categories recommendations for the countywide Traffic Relief Plan. The three geographic subregions in the 1989 and 2009 Measure A expenditure plans were Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. The basis for the proposed geographic areas are consistency with regional governance, sense of identity among residents, and the residents’ desire to see revenues remain within their area and not sent to other parts of the county as expressed in public opinion surveys. Proposed expenditure categories include reducing congestion and connecting communities; improving safety and keeping infrastructure in good condition; and supporting seniors, veterans, students, and individuals with disabilities. Mr. Hake also requested feedback regarding the funding of local streets and roads. Commissioner Larry Smith discussed varying opinions on what a “good condition” road is. He expressed the local needs basis being extremely diverse especially when it is dependent on population base. For example, Calimesa is one of the smallest jurisdictions in the region, however they have a large impact on infrastructure in comparison to the size of their community due to Interstate 10 running through their community. Those who cut through the community to bypass the I-10 will never buy enough coffee or gas to Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes October 28, 2019 Page 3 match the impact they have. He noted the same things happen in Banning and Beaumont and there is some discussion of an I-10 bypass. To drill down locally in Calimesa, the concern is there is nowhere to get off and nowhere to go so locally they are focusing on how the traffic can be moved through the community. When it comes to local needs based funds, he would like to see if they can broaden the scope of how local communities can use money coming forward as they see best, as they may be able to get additional buy in. Commissioner Linda Krupa stated bringing money back into the community is paramount. She noted obstacles in city versus county roads, that there are not enough Measure A funds to improve the city streets. Perhaps if there was an option to tie a larger pot of money through the county or RCTC that the City can contribute to that will improve the street in its entirety regardless if it is a city street or county road. This would impact those driving through the community as well as those living in the community. Commissioner Victoria Baca concurred with both of her colleagues regarding the deterioration local streets and roads, and expressed additional concern with the 60 freeway. She stated she has to sit for 20 minutes to get out of Moreno Valley, which in addition to the delay also causes concerning pollution from all of the cars idling at the bottleneck of the 60/215. She noted it is both a local and regional problem. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, noted the Commissioners have pointed out the challenges faced in trying to balance the varying needs throughout the County. She discussed roadway pavement conditions and the Measure A allocations to the local communities. She added SB1 is a fix-it first program and every community now receives double the gas tax return that they received prior to SB1, and as such local road maintenance is fairly well funded. The challenge are the transformational projects in local cities that they would like to accumulate money for as most jurisdictions cant fund projects on their own. She discussed the proposed expenditure categories capturing most of the local needs. Additionally, she discussed the possibility of a competitive program within the categories. Commissioner Michael Naggar stressed the importance of inter-city collaboration and encouraged the other commissioners to begin those conversations now. Commissioner Krupa stated one of the basics of the conversation needs to be that this is looking to the future and how it is going to impact future generations based on projected growth within the County, noting the impacts of the housing needs. Commissioner Smith expressed support for a call-for projects program that would allow collaboration with other communities, which builds continuity within the region. He noted Hemet and San Jacinto have worked together in the past on projects that impact both communities. He stated the Commissioners are elected to serve locally but have to think regionally. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes October 28, 2019 Page 4 M/S/C (Baca/Smith) as a Committee of the Whole to: 1) Approve a revenue estimate to guide development of the Countywide Transportation Improvement and Traffic Relief Plan (Plan); and Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 9. USE OF TECHNOLOGY FOR TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGIES Marlin Feenstra, Capital Projects Delivery Director, provided a presentation on managing congestion through technology. He showed examples of active traffic management strategies such as dynamic lane use, speed control, dynamic junction control, motorist information, part-time shoulder use, bus on shoulder transit signal priority, and adaptive signal control or ramp meter control. The goals of active traffic management are to increase throughput, increase safety, provide reliable travel times, reduce congestion, provide information to motorists, improve work zone safety, reduce congestion related pollution, and maximize the use of existing infrastructure. Commissioner Larry Smith stated Commissioners who attended the League of California Cities conference realize they are designing cities for future generations, noting an example of a question asked regarding the addition of pickup/drop off pockets at main thorough fares for rideshare services such as Uber and Lyft. Secondly, he noted the importance of never opening or closing streets without making provisions for future technologies, providing an example of fiber-optic lines being pulled under Ocean Boulevard without disrupting traffic as years ago someone had the foresight to add extra sleeves under the street while it was open. Commissioner Smith stated this will continue to happen as we work towards connecting our communities and make them smart communities. He referenced his earlier point of local jurisdictions having the ability with additional Measure A funds to be able to expand themselves and this type of technology is vital. A category is needed to think into the future especially if cooperation can be found to connect modern technology of District 8 to what the local communities see as their own important modern technology. This is an important discussion that needs to happen with the entire Commission and ask where modern technology is taking us in alleviating traffic situation and circumstances. Commissioner Victoria Baca discussed an example in Los Angeles where technology is used in the center lane to add an additional lane based upon the traffic needs depending on the time of day. She would like to see if this can be used on the 60 freeway as in the morning and afternoons most of the traffic is heading in one direction while the other side of the freeway is clear. She expressed her support of the use of technology to alleviate traffic. Commissioner Michael Naggar noted there are strategies we might not be aware of yet therefore it is important to maintain openness. He stated these meetings are the time Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Minutes October 28, 2019 Page 5 and place to have the dialogue and make good recommendations to the entire board. He stated it might behoove Commissioners to contact some of the big tech companies involved in transportation such as Google, Tesla, or the auto manufactures to see what is coming in the future and what their ideas are in an effort to plan for the future. M/S/C (Steiner/Smith) as a Committee of the Whole to: 1) Receive and discuss information on the use of technology for Traffic Relief Strategies; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 10. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT 10A. DISCUSSION OF NEXT TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE AGENDA Anne Mayer, Executive Director, stressed the importance of the next Traffic Relief Strategy Committee meeting on November 25th, stating a draft plan will be brought forward at the meeting where Commissioners can begin discussions on the projects and programs to be included in the plan. Commissioner Victoria Baca stated she will be unable to attend the meeting on the 25th, however she would like to reschedule the meeting as it is important she participate. Commissioner Michael Naggar stated this might require two meetings, as this is a lengthy, important discussion. Anne Mayer stated staff will conduct a quorum check to assess availability of Commissioners in an effort to have as many Committee members in attendance as possible. 11. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board AGENDA ITEM 7A Agenda Item 7A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: November 13, 2019 TO: Traffic Relief Strategy Committee FROM Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager THROUGH: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director SUBJECT: Public Outreach Approach for Countywide Traffic Relief Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the proposed Public Outreach Approach for the countywide Traffic Relief Plan (Plan); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: RCTC is drafting a Plan to help guide future transportation expenditures in Riverside County. The schedule adopted by the Commission calls for the draft Plan to be presented to the public in January 2020 for feedback through April 2020. RCTC will obtain this feedback using a variety of tools, as outlined in the following proposed Public Outreach Approach. In the spring, staff will present to the Commission the public feedback and other data to inform its decisions on the final Plan and whether to place the Plan on the November 2020 general election ballot along with an implementing sales tax ordinance. This decision is anticipated in June 2020. The Public Outreach Approach is intended to have benefit to the public and the Commission regardless of whether the final Plan is submitted to the voters or whether the voters approve the Plan. Proposed Public Outreach Approach In July, the Commission approved an enhanced public engagement program contract with AlphaVu, a communications consultant. Budget and contract authority for all activities proposed in the Public Outreach Approach has been approved by the Commission as part of this contract. The purpose of this agenda item is to receive guidance on the specific strategies and tactics to reach the public. With the assistance of AlphaVu, staff recommends a multi-layered approach for gathering public feedback between January and April 2020. All outreach efforts will be informational with the intent of educating the public and encouraging public engagement about the Plan. Tentatively, staff is planning to initiate public outreach activities following the January 8, 2020 Commission meeting, when the draft Plan is likely to be placed on the agenda for public comment and 1 Agenda Item 7A Commissioner discussion. Staff also recommends placing the draft Plan on the April 8, 2020 Commission meeting agenda to provide another opportunity for public comment and Commissioner direction. The public will be able to submit comments through the spring and leading up to the Commission’s decisions on a final Plan and whether to submit it to the voters. The goal of the Public Outreach Approach is to reach as many residents as possible in Riverside County and to gather data that will help Commissioners understand the projects and services that are most important to residents. A broad spectrum of methods will be used to gather information from the community, with several touch-points planned with seniors, veterans, and individuals with disabilities. At the heart of the Public Outreach Approach is clear messaging and a feedback tool. As much as possible, activities will be conducted in English and Spanish. Outreach strategies include, but are not limited to, the following: 1) Comment tool: A tool will be created in both English and Spanish to gather feedback about the projects and services that are included in the draft Plan. Residents will be asked to identify the projects and services that are important to them from the draft list proposed for the Plan. The listing of projects and services will include brief descriptions for reference. Space will be provided for optional written comments. Some demographic information, including the zip code of residence, will be collected to track the origin of feedback from within the county. 2) Specialized Website: A website, trafficreliefplan.org, will include a description of each of the Plan’s proposed projects and services with key areas also available in Spanish. A link to the comment tool will be featured prominently, and website visitors will be encouraged to provide their comments via the website. 3) RCTC.org Website: The Commission’s website will provide a link to the specialized website described above, as well as a direct link to the comment tool. Visitors may choose instead to use the rctc.org “Contact Us” button to submit comments. If so, these comments will be captured and added to other feedback that is collected. 4) Emails and Blog Posts: The Commission will send emails to the subscribers of “The Point” and prepare three blog posts related to the feedback effort. The blog posts will include graphics and links to the specialized website, comment tool, and videos. 5) Social Media: Digital advertising and organic posts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram will explain the Commission’s efforts to secure feedback and provide links to the website. The posts will feature eye-catching graphics and videos to urge viewers to visit the website, submit their comments, and promote the tool among their social media networks. The Commission will produce approximately six social media posts to help launch the specialized website and comment tool, followed by two to three posts per week. During the final weeks of the public comment period, digital advertising and organic posts will increase to approximately four per week to remind viewers to register their comments and of the upcoming deadline. If residents submit questions in Spanish, staff will respond in Spanish. Commission staff will monitor comments and questions on its social media pages and respond and/or collect the information for reporting purposes. 2 Agenda Item 7A 6) Videos: As noted above, videos will be used to urge public feedback and direct viewers to the website for feedback. Three videos of varying lengths (15 seconds, 30 seconds and 60 seconds) will be used for television, social media, posted to the website, posted to YouTube, and included in presentations. Closed captioning will be provided in English and Spanish. 7) News Media: Commission staff will issue news releases, radio spots, and opinion-editorial pieces to news contacts across the Riverside County media market. Staff also will pursue and respond to requests for television, radio, cable, and podcast interviews and is mindful of the strong television market in the Coachella Valley. Whenever possible, staff will provide opportunities to feature individual Commissioners. The focus of the news media outreach is to build awareness of the Commission’s need for feedback and to promote completion of the survey. The goal is to have 15 news stories run as a result of the outreach effort. 8) Printed Piece/Direct Mail: Postcards printed in English and Spanish will be distributed to specific neighborhoods and sent to community locations, such as city halls, libraries, community centers, and senior centers. The postcards will direct readers to the specialized website and comment tool, as well as the telephone feedback line (described below). 9) Telephone Feedback Line: A call answering center will be used to capture calls from residents, who wish to provide their feedback verbally. The call center representatives will log comments from callers of multiple languages and refer callers to the website for more information and to submit additional comments. 10) Tele-Townhall Meetings: Similar to the tele-townhall meetings conducted last spring, the Commission will host four tele-townhall meetings to target geographical areas in Riverside County. Commissioners and staff will field calls from residents and offer polling options during the call to gather opinions from participants. An English/Spanish interpreter will be available for each of the tele-townhall meetings. 11) Text Messaging: A text opt-in feature will allow residents to text a code and receive a response text with a link to the specialized website and comment tool. Users can opt out of receiving future text messages at any time. 12) Billboards: Roadside billboard advertising will be used to steer motorists to the website. Messaging will be concise to be mindful of motorists. 13) Community Events: The Commission will host booths at approximately 20 community events during the first quarter of 2020. Representatives will provide information about the feedback effort and help booth visitors use the comment tool. Comment cards also will be provided for those who prefer to comment in writing. Booth representatives will be bilingual in English and Spanish. 14) Partner Toolkits: The Commission will compile a “toolkit” with a short news article (available in English and Spanish), graphic images, and website links for cities, elected officials, transit agencies and other key transportation partners to include in their 3 Agenda Item 7A publications, websites, and email networks. Staff also will provide “talking points” to each Commissioner to announce during their council meetings to encourage participation. 15) Presentations: Commission staff will make 25 presentations to stakeholder groups, such as chambers of commerce, service clubs, transportation agencies, environmental organizations, and others upon request. Commissioners may request staff to present to key groups in their communities or may request staff assistance for Commissioners to make their own presentations within their community. Staff is also available to present to city councils at the request of Commissioners. Staff will compile all feedback and provide in a staff report in spring 2020 so that Commissioners can provide direction on any changes to the draft Plan for finalization by June 2020. 4 AGENDA ITEM 8 Agenda Item 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: November 13, 2019 TO: Traffic Relief Strategy Committee FROM: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Public Opinion Research on Priorities for the Traffic Relief Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive and file information on public opinion research on priorities for the Traffic Relief Plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: RCTC commissioned two statistically valid public opinion surveys in 2019 to understand the priorities and attitudes of Riverside County residents towards transportation issues. Data from these surveys provide useful context to the Committee’s decisions regarding what projects, services, and other features should be included in the Traffic Relief Plan (Plan). The surveys also provide a basis to determine whether the electorate in November 2020 might approve the Plan and funding it through a sales tax ordinance. This item briefly summarizes the results of these surveys. Surveys Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz and Associates (FM3) conducted the surveys as a subconsultant to AlphaVu, the prime contractor for the Public Engagement Program approved by the Commission in July 2018 and enhanced in July 2019. FM3 conducted a similar survey for RCTC in 2017 and has completed research on public policy issues for municipalities and school districts throughout Riverside County in recent years. FM3 also has extensive experience conducting public opinion research on transportation issues throughout the state of California. Survey respondents received the surveys by email and by telephone. FM3 selected respondents randomly and weighted the results to be representative of a likely electorate in November 2020 when the Plan may be placed on the ballot by the Commission. FM3 used industry best-practices for public opinion research. The first survey occurred in May and June of 2019 and was countywide in scope. In September 2019, FM3 conducted a second survey in four subregions of western Riverside County to achieve a clearer picture of the priorities in those areas. Sub-regional research is discussed further, below. 5 Agenda Item 8 Sub-regionalization Survey results can be analyzed on a countywide basis as well as on a sub-regional basis to understand more localized concerns. Given the size and diversity of Riverside County, staff and consultants have invested a significant effort to ensure that the voices of each unique sub-region of Riverside County can be heard in the results. Therefore, the information presented in this item will provide both countywide statistics and sub-regional statistics. In western Riverside County, the surveys were conducted according to six subregions, which included cities and nearby unincorporated communities: • Northwest County o Cities of Corona, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Norco • City of Riverside • Moreno Valley/Perris • Mid County o Cities of Hemet, San Jacinto • Southwest County o Cities of Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar • San Gorgonio Pass o Cities of Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa The Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley were combined into one subregion. Subregions were created on a somewhat subjective basis according to geography and a general sense of identity. Subregions also needed to consist of a large enough population to generate a statistically meaningful sample size. Each set of sub-regional survey results has a different sample size and a different margin of error (the larger the sample size, the lower the margin of error). This does not mean that the results of each subregion are not valid; rather, it means that results of each subregion are intended to convey priorities within the context of that subregion only and not the entire county. Priority Projects The following are the top five projects according to voters countywide and within each subregion. In some cases, the list of “top” priorities is greater than five. Countywide Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71, and 91 freeways 76 2 Improving on and off-ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91 and 215 freeways and highways 70 6 Agenda Item 8 3 Adding new exits and on-ramps to the 15 and 215 freeways 57 4 Connecting Temecula with other regions with rapid commuter services 53 5 Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60, and 79 meet near Beaumont 50 The table above demonstrates the challenge of identifying a singular – or even two or three – countywide priorities in a county as large and diverse as Riverside County. In general, the county’s residents are most supportive of adding capacity of the major highways in Riverside County, and improving the interchanges at these highways; however, the question posed to residents bundles several routes together and it is possible that, individually, each of the routes would score lower on a countywide basis given that many residents may only rely on one or two of the routes in that list. Sub-regional results demonstrate that there are clear priorities specific to each set of communities that may not appear on the “top” projects list on a countywide basis. Coachella Valley Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Providing daily train service between the Coachella Valley and Los Angeles with stops in the city of Riverside and Orange County 78 2 Reducing bottlenecks and safety concerns on the 10 freeway and Highways 111 and 86 75 3 Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60, and 79 meet near Beaumont 67 4 Reducing holiday and festival-related traffic with shuttles and public transit or rail options 64 5 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71, and 91 freeways 60 City of Riverside Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71, and 91 freeways 69 2 Improving on and off-ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91, and 215 freeways and highways 58 3 Upgrading and improving safety of Cajalco Road 52 4 Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60, and 79 meet near Beaumont 45 5 Constructing a new east-west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto 43 7 Agenda Item 8 Moreno Valley/Perris Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Improving on and off-ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91, and 215 freeways and highways 87 2 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71, and 91 freeways 79 3 Adding new exits and on-ramps to the 15 and 215 freeways 70 4 Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60, and 79 meet near Beaumont 69 5 Constructing a new four-lane Highway 79 to improve traffic flow in San Jacinto, Hemet, and Winchester 66 Northwest County Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Magnolia Ave, Hamner Ave, Limonite Ave, and Temescal Canyon Rd. 66 2 Eliminating traffic bottlenecks on the 15 southbound at Ontario Ave and El Cerrito Road 64 3 Adding at least one lane in each direction to the 15 between Cajalco Road in Corona all the way past Temecula to the San Diego County Line 60 4 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 91 from the 15 in Corona all the way to Pierce Street in Riverside 60 5 Offering rapid commuter service from your community to LA, Orange County, Riverside, Temecula, San Bernardino and the Ontario Airport 55 Mid County Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Ramona Expressway, Florida Ave, Sanderson Ave, Warren Road, State St, and Gillman Springs Road 78 2 Constructing a new four-lane Highway 79 to improve traffic flow in San Jacinto, Hemet, and Winchester 73 3 Adding a new east-west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto 69 8 Agenda Item 8 4 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15, 215, 60, and 91 freeways 67 5 Reconstructing the 10 and 79 interchange in Beaumont to improve safety and traffic flow 65 Southwest County Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15 freeway 74 2 Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Railroad Canyon, Bundy Canyon, Scott Road, Keller Road, Clinton Keith Road, Murrieta Hot Springs Road, Pechanga Parkway, and Jefferson Ave 72 3 Improving on and off-ramps on bridges on the 15 and 215Adding a new east-west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto 69 4 65 5 Adding at least one express lane in each direction on the 15 freeway 60 San Gorgonio Pass Most Important Projects % More Likely to Support the Plan 1 Improving all on and off-ramps and bridges on the 10 through Calimesa, Beaumont and Banning 72 2 Improving traffic flow and safety on roads connecting to I-10 67 3 Improving traffic flow and safety on Oak Valley Parkway, Gillman Springs Road, and San Timoteo Canyon Road 65 4 Easing local traffic congestion and relieving traffic on the 10 by adding another road from Banning to Palm Springs 61 5 Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15, 215, 60, and 91 freeways 60 Frequency of Highway Use The September 2019 survey added a question regarding how often respondents use each of the major highways in Riverside County. FM3 and staff felt that this question may illuminate how important each individual route was to residents of each subregion. Such data can inform investments in roadway projects as well as multi-modal projects that facilitate improved mobility along these corridors. Below is a table of the percent of survey respondents in each subregion who use each route “frequently” or “occasionally,” combined: 9 Agenda Item 8 Area Route 10 15 60 71 74 79 91 215 Northwest 58% 89% 65% 59% 19% 12% 87% 46% Mid 67% 67% 65% 23% 80% 82% 55% 79% Southwest 37% 95% 42% 34% 48% 59% 68% 83% Pass 94% 60% 78% 22% 37% 53% 65% 65% Additional detail on these survey results will be presented as part of staff’s oral presentation to the Committee. 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION PUBLIC OPINION RESEARCH: PRIORITIES FOR TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN ,:q(eo Relief Strategy Committee November 13, 2019 Public Opinion research: Priorities for Traffic Relief Plan Surveys • May/June — Countywide (1,511 respondents) • September — Four western county subregions (5,255 respondents) • Margins of error vary by subregion • English and Spanish • Online and Telephone • Conducted by FM3 • Ascertain transportation priorities in each area of Riverside County • Determine feasibility of a ballot measure TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE, NOVEMBER 13, 2019 Western County Subregions TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE, NOVEMBER 13, 2019 3 RIVERSIDE RCTCCOUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Coachella Valley In Coachella Valley, ensuring Coachella Valley gets its fair share; maintaining highways, local roads and bridges are among the most important features. (Coachella Valley) (Ranked by (6 & 7) Very Important) s (6-7) Very Impt. (5) Smwt. Impt. ■ (4) Neutral ■ (1-3) Not Too/Not at All Impt. • (8) DK Ensuring that the Coachella Valley gets its fair share of County transportation funding Maintaining local roads Reinforcing highways, roads and bridges from flooding, earthquakes and natural hazards Requiring all funds used to benefit Riverside County residents Keeping transportation infrastructure in good condition Requiring that decisions on how funding for the Coachella Valley be used be made by local leaders instead of people in other parts of the County Improving traffic flow Requiring all funds to be controlled locally Mean Score 6% 6.4 12%' 6% 6% 6.5 6.4 6.4 6.1 6.2 6.2 6.1 Q. 1 am now going to mention some features and provisions of the proposed Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan Measure. Regardless of your opinion of the measure, after 1 mention each one, please tell me how important it is to you that the feature or provision be included as part of the measure. We will use a scale of 1-7, where 1 means NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT to you that the feature or provision is included in the measure and 7 means it would be VERY IMPORTANT. Split Sample Measure Features: Coachella Valley, continued (Coachella Valley) (Ranked by (6 & 7) Very Important) ■ (6-7) Very Impt. (5) Smwt. Impt. ■ (4) Neutral ■ (1-3) Not Too/Not at All Impt. ■ (8) DK Repairing potholes Protecting streets, bridges, freeways and highways from closures during major storms Creating local jobs Creating economic growth Requiring independent audits Improving traffic safety Earthquake retrofitting bridges and overpasses Discounting bus fares for seniors, students, and veterans Accelerating the completion of freeway upgrade projects ^Maintaining local streets in every city and unincorporated area 8 Mean Score 6.2 6.0 6.1 6.0 6.3 6.0 6.0 5.9 6.0 6.0 Q. I am now going to mention some features and provisions of the proposed Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan Measure. Regardless of your opinion of the measure, after I mention each one, please tell me how important it is to you that the feature or provision be included as part of the measure. We will use a scale of 1-7, where 1 means NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT to you that the feature or provision is included in the measure and 7 means it would be VERY IMPORTANT. ^Not Part of Split Sam.le RESEARCH In Coachella Valley, daily train service to LA; and reducing bottlenecks and safety concerns on the 10, 111, 86, 60 and 79 are the most influential projects. (Coachella Valley) (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. a No Diff./DK/NA Providing daily train service between the Coachella Valley and Los Angeles with stops in the city of Riverside and Orange County Reducing bottlenecks and safety concerns on the 10 Freeway and Highways 111 and 86 Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60 and 79 meet near Beaumont Reducing holiday and festival -related traffic with shuttles and public transit or rail options Total Total More Less Lkly. Lkly. 78% 9% 75% 8% 67% 9% 64% 13% .74 Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the s measure. Not Part of Split Sample RESEARCH Projects: Coachella Valley, Continued (Coachella Valley) (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. M No Diff./DK/NA Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71 and 91 freeways Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91 and 215 freeways and highways Building an alternative route to the 10 Freeway in the Coachella Valley from the Beaumont -Banning Pass to Palm Springs Total Total More Less Lkly. Lkly. 60% 16% 59% 15% 58% 15% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the w measure. Not Part of Split Sample RESEARCH RIVERSIDE ROTCCOUNTY TRANSPORTATION � COMMISSION Western County In Western Riverside, all funds are used to benefit County residents; improving traffic flow; and repairing potholes are among the most important features. (Western Riverside County) (Ranked by (6 & 7) Very Important) ■ (6-7) Very Impt. (5) Smwt. Impt. ■ (4) Neutral ■ (1-3) Not Too/Not at All Impt. • (8) DK Requiring all funds used to benefit Riverside County residents Improving traffic flow w RESEARC Repairing potholes Maintaining local roads Keeping transportation infrastructure in good condition Creating local jobs ^Maintaining local streets in every city and unincorporated area Accelerating the completion of freeway upgrade projects ^Upgrading freeways and highways 5% Mean Score 6.5 7% 6.3 111 6.3 6.2 6.2 6.0 6.0 6.1 6.0 Q. 1 am now going to mention some features and provisions of the proposed Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan Measure. Regardless of your opinion of the measure, after 1 mention each one, please tell me how important it is to you that the feature or provision be included as part of the measure. We will use a scale of 1-7, where 1 means NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT to you that the feature or provision is included in the measure and 7 means it would be VERY IMPORTANT. ^Not Part of Split Sample RE Measure Features: Western County, Continued (Western Riverside County) (Ranked by (6 & 7) Very Important) ■ (6-7) Very Impt. (5) Smwt. Impt. ■ (4) Neutral ■ (1-3) Not Too/Not at All Impt. • (8) DK Synchronizing traffic signals Reinforcing highways, roads and bridges from flooding, earthquakes and natural hazards Earthquake retrofitting bridges and overpasses Improving traffic safety Requiring public oversight Creating economic growth Requiring all funds to be controlled locally Improving specialized public transportation services for seniors veterans and the disabled ^Discounting bus fares for seniors, students, and veterans Mean Score 5.9 5.9 5.9 5.9 6.0 5.8 6.1 5.6 5.6 Q. I am now going to mention some features and provisions of the proposed Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan Measure. Regardless of your opinion of the measure, after I mention each one, please tell me how important it is to you that the feature or provision be included as part of the measure. We will use a scale of 1-7, where 1 means NOTAT ALL IMPORTANT to you that the feature or provision is included in the measure and 7 means it would be VERY .;.1. IMPORTANT. ^Not Part of Split Sample EARCH � RIVERSIDE RCTC BOUNTY TRANSPORTATION � COMMISSION City of Riverside Projects Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71 and 91 freeways; improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91 and 215; and upgrading and improving safety of Cajalco Road are the projects most likely to lead voters to vote a potential measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) Total Total ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. No Diff./Don't Know More Less Likely Likely Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71 and 91 freeways Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91 and 215 freeways and highways Upgrading and improving safety of Cajalco Road Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60 and 79 meet near Beaumont *Constructing a new east -west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto 69% 14% 58% 17% 52% 7% 45% 15% 43% 17% c � 3 Q6a-m. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes 11 *•r on the measure. If the project or service makes no difference on how you would vote on this measure one way or another, you can tell me that too. *Asked in Western Riverside County Only (Split Sample)tAAsked in Western Riverside Only RESEARCH Projects: City of Riverside, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know Connecting Temecula with other regions with rapid commuter services Adding new exits and on -ramps to the 15 and 215 freeways Providing daily train service between the Coachella Valley and Los Angeles with stops in the city of Riverside and Orange County Improving traffic flow on the 60 and 91 freeways by converting the existing carpool lane into an express lane Total Total More Less Likely Likely 39% 20% 37% 20% 37% 21% 36% 45% Q6a-m. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. If the project or service makes no difference on how you would vote on this measure one way or another, you can tell me that too. —Asked in Western Riverside Only RIVERSIDE ROTC COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Moreno Valley/Perris Projects Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 101 151 601 86, 91 and 215; adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 151 215, 601 71 and 91 freeways; and adding new exits and on -ramps to the 15 and 215 freeways are the projects most likely to lead voters to vote in support of the measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) Total Total ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know More Less Likely Likely Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, 86, 91 and 215 freeways and highways Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 10, 15, 215, 60, 71 and 91 freeways Adding new exits and on -ramps to the 15 and 215 freeways Improving safety and traffic flow of the area where the 10, 60 and 79 meet near Beaumont *Constructing a new four -lane Highway 79 to improve traffic flow in San Jacinto, Hemet and Winchester 87% 5% 79% 10% 70% 11% 69% 12% 66% 15% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. If the project or service makes no difference on how you would vote on this measure one way or another, you can tell me that too. *Asked in Western Riverside County Only (Split Sample)/ —Asked in Western Riverside Only R SEARCH RESEARCH Projects: Moreno Valley/ Perris, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know *Constructing a new east -west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto Upgrading and improving safety of Cajalco Road *Constructing a new east -west highway connecting the 215 in Menifee with the 15 near Lake Elsinore Providing daily train service between the Coachella Valley and Los Angeles with stops in the city of Riverside and Orange County Connecting Temecula with other regions with rapid commuter services *Constructing a new six -lane highway between Highway 79 in San Jacinto and the 215 in Perris Total Total More Less Likely Likely 64% 21% 64% 9% 61% 19% 61% 15% 55% 20% 51% 24% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects or services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether knowing that this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. If the project or service makes no difference on how you would vote on this measure one way or another, you can tell me that too. *Asked in Western Riverside County Only (Split SampleeAsked in Western Riverside Only RIVERSIDE RT+C COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Northwest County Projects Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads; eliminating traffic bottlenecks on the 15 southbound at Ontario Ave and El Cerrito Road; and adding at least one lane in each direction on the 91, from the 15 to Pierce Street, and on the 15 between Cajalco Road and the San Diego County line are the projects most likely to elicit voter support for a measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. E No Diff./Don't Know ^Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Magnolia Avenue, Hamner Avenue, Limonite Avenue and Temescal Canyon Road "Eliminating traffic bottlenecks on the 15 southbound at Ontario Avenue and El Cerrito Road Adding at least one lane in each direction to the 15 between Cajalco Road in Corona all the way past Temecula to the San Diego County line Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 91 from the 15 in Corona all the way to Pierce Street in Riverside Total Total More Less Likely Likely 66% 10% 64% 11% 60% 13% 60% 13% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. ^Not Part of Split Sample RESEARCH Projects: Northwest County, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know Ottering rapid commuter service from your community to LA, Orange County, Riverside, Temecula, San Bernardino and the Ontario Airport Increasing the frequency and reliability of Metrolink trains connecting Corona to Orange, LA, Riverside and San Bernardino ^Improving the safety of Cajalco Road Adding one lane in each direction on the 60 between Jurupa Valley and Riverside ^Completing the Santa Ana River trail through Norco, Eastvale, and Corona Total Total More Less Likely Likely 55% 17% 50% 15% 49% 14% 47% 16% 46% 17% F M 3 Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. ^Not Part of Split Sample R--ESEARCH RIVERSIDE RCTC BOUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Mid County Projects ^Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Ramona Expressway, Florida Avenue, Sanderson Avenue, Warren Road, State Street and Gilman Springs Road "Constructing a new four -lane Highway 79 to improve traffic flow in San Jacinto, Hemet and Winchester "Adding a new east -west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15, 215, 60, and 91 freeways Reconstructing the 10 and 79 interchange in Beaumont to improve safety and traffic flow Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads; constructing a new four lane Highway 79 to improve traffic flow in San Jacinto, Hemet and Winchester; and adding a new east -west highway connecting the 215 in Perris with Hemet and San Jacinto are the projects most likely to draw voter support of a measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) Total Total ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. E Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. E No Diff./Don't Know More Less Likely Likely 78% 8% 73% 11% 69% 12% 67% 12% 65% 11% Q. 1 would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be unded b the measure makes ou more or less likel to vote es on the measure. ^Not Part o S.lit Sam.le R E S E A R CH Projects: Mid County, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. No Diff./Don't Know Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10, 15, 60, and 215 freeways Providing your community with rapid commuter services to the City of Riverside, and Orange and Los Angeles counties Adding at least one express lane in each direction on the 15, 215, 60, and 91 freeways Constructing a new east -west highway connecting the 15 near Lake Elsinore with the 215 in Menifee Providing your community with rapid commuter services to San Diego County Increasing the frequency and reliability of Metrolink trains from Perris and Corona to Orange, LA, Riverside and San Bernardino Total Total More Less Likely Likely 59% 16% 59% 16% 49% 23% 49% 21% 48% 21% 45% 20% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be unded b the measure makes ou more or less likel to vote es on the measure. Slit Sam le RESEARC RIVERSIDE �T COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Southwest County Projects Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15 Freeway; improving traffic flow and safety on local roads; and improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 15 and 215 are the projects most likely to lead voters to support a measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) Total Total ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know More Less Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15 freeway ^Improving traffic flow and safety on local roads such as Railroad Canyon, Bundy Canyon, Scott Road, Keller Road, Clinton Keith Road, Murrieta Hot Springs Road, Pechanga Parkway, and Jefferson Avenue ^Improving on and off -ramps and bridges on the 15 and the 215 Adding at least one express lane in each direction on the 15 freeway Likely Likely 74% 8% 72% 8% 65% 11% 60% 17% a 1 would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. ^Not Part of Split Sample RESEARCH u RESEARC Projects: Southwest County, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. m Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. is No Diff./Don't Know ^Constructing a new east -west highway to connect the 215 in Menifee with the 15 near Lake Elsinore Providing your community with rapid commuter services to San Diego County Providing your community with rapid commuter services to the City of Riverside and Orange and Los Angeles Counties ^Connecting the 15 and the 215 to the French Valley Parkway Total Total More Less Likely Likely 55% 16% 50% 18% 47% 20% 45% 15% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. ^Not Part of Split Sample RIVERSIDE RT COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION San Gorgonio Pass Projects Improving all on and off -ramps and bridges on the 10 through Calimesa, Beaumont and Banning; improving traffic flow and safety on roads connecting to I-10, and improving traffic flow and safety on specific local roads are the projects most likely to lead voters to support a measure. (Ranked by Total More Likely) Total Total IIMuch More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. • Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. No Diff./Don't Know More Less ^Improving all on and off -ramps likely Likely and bridges on the 10 through Calimesa, Beaumont and Banning Improving traffic flow and safety on roads connecting to 1-10 ^Improving traffic flow and safety on Oak Valley Parkway Gilman Springs Road, and San Timoteo Canyon Road Easing local traffic and relieving congestion on the 10 by adding another road from Banning to Palm Springs Adding at least one lane in each direction on the 15, 215 60, and 91 freeways 72% 8% 67% 12% 65% 11% 61% 13% 60% 12% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on .`•_ the measure. If the project or service has no effect on how you would vote on this measure one way or the other, you can tell me that too. ^Not Part of Split Sample RESEARCH RESEARCH Projects: San Gorgonio Pass, Continued (Ranked by Total More Likely) ■ Much More Lkly. Smwt. More Lkly. Smwt. Less Lkly. ■ Much Less Lkly. • No Diff./Don't Know ^Improving safety and reducing delays by separating local roads from railroad tracks in Beaumont and Banning ^Reducing holiday and festival - related traffic to Palm Springs and the rest of the Coachella Valley with shuttles and public transit or rail options Providing daily roundtrip passenger train service from the Coachella Valley to Los Angeles with stops in the San Gorgonio Pass, the City of Riverside and Orange County Offering rapid commuter service from your community to Riverside, San Bernardino and neighboring cities Adding at least one ex�res_s lane in each direction on the 15, 215, 60, and 91 freeways Total Total More Less Likely Likely 59% 13% 52% 17% 52% 20% 50% 18% 46% 20% Q. I would now like to mention a detailed list of projects and services that could be funded by the measure. Please tell me whether or not knowing this project or service will be funded by the measure makes you more or less likely to vote yes on the measure. If the project or service has no effect on how you would vote on this measure one way or the other, you can tell me that too. ^Not Part of Split Sample Public Opinion research: Priorities for Traffic Relief Plan Conclusions • Coachella Valley: clear priority on local control and accountability, new rail service, relieving bottlenecks on I-10, SR-86, and SR-111. • Western County: sub -regions have distinct priorities; highway and interchange improvements are important, as are specific roads that carry a lot of traffic. • Path Forward: support for certain types of projects makes voter approval of a Traffic Relief Plan feasible TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE, NOVEMBER 13, 2019 30 AGENDA ITEM 9 Agenda Item 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: November 13, 2019 TO: Traffic Relief Strategy Committee FROM Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Approach for Coachella Valley component of the Traffic Relief Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive, discuss, and provide input on the approach to developing the Coachella Valley component of the draft Traffic Relief Plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Transportation Governance Structure in the Coachella Valley Long-standing transportation policy in Riverside County empowers the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) to establish many of the transportation funding priorities and transportation policy decisions for that subregion. CVAG is specified in the 1989 and 2009 Measure A expenditure plan as the implementing agency for state highway and major regional road projects. Interagency memoranda of understanding between RCTC and CVAG provide for CVAG to be the responsible agency for implementing and administering the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program, advising RCTC on administration of other funding sources and nominating projects to RCTC for inclusion in Riverside County’s share of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). It is the observation of RCTC staff that these governance policies have led to numerous positive outcomes including completion of many significant transportation projects in the Coachella Valley. An important factor in this success is the professional and collaborative relationship between RCTC and CVAG staff and their respective governing boards. CVAG is governed by an Executive Committee consisting of the mayor or an elected official representing every city council in the Coachella Valley and the city of Blythe, all five County Supervisors, and the Tribal Chairman from the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians and Cabazon Band of Mission Indians. Once a year, the CVAG General Assembly – comprised of all 65 elected officials from the member jurisdictions – meets to approve the CVAG budget. Transportation Project Prioritization Study Every five years CVAG adopts a new Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS). The latest update, which was finalized in 2016, incorporated an Active Transportation Plan for the region. 11 Agenda Item 9 The TPPS is the guiding document for allocation of funding and regional transportation planning as it evaluates and ranks projects. The TPPS has incorporated the same core criteria since 2005, including roadway surface conditions, system continuity, level of service and accident rates. The criteria for the TPPS are revisited every cycle by the CVAG Executive Committee with input from technical experts representing member jurisdictions of the agency. After all the segments have been analyzed, they can then be merged or divided into logical and feasible constructible buildable projects. This is to provide the member jurisdictions flexibility towards how projects tare planned and how they will compete for funding. CVAG committees do not vote to add or remove individual projects to the TPPS. It has been CVAG’s longstanding policy that all major projects are included in the TPPS. After vetting each project through the established criteria, projects are assigned a total score and then are ranked. Projects ranked at the top of the TPPS are generally given priority for funding. However, there have been instances where projects ranked lower in the TPPS have been advanced for funding due to extenuating circumstances, primarily to take advantage of one-time outside funds. With needs exceeding available dollars, the TPPS provides an objective tool to judge where resources should be focused in the Coachella Valley. As a whole, the TPPS reflects the values of communities in the Coachella Valley. Public Opinion In a statistically valid public opinion survey of Coachella Valley voters conducted in May and June of 2019, 85 percent of respondents said that “ensuring that the Coachella Valley gets its fair share of County transportation funding” was “very important.” Additionally, 77% of respondents said it is “very important” that the Traffic Relief Plan includes a requirement that “decisions on how funding for the Coachella Valley be used be made by local leaders instead of people in other parts of the County.” These results are consistent with previous public opinion research that demonstrates that Coachella Valley residents have a strong sense of identity and are concerned that their tax dollars be spent locally by the leaders closest to them. Recommendation for Traffic Relief Plan Consistent with the success that has been demonstrated, RCTC and CVAG are recommending to the Committee that the new Plan be continue to follow the same model and that all funds generated in the Coachella Valley be expended through CVAG according to a continued TPPS process. According to CVAG staff, the next TPPS update could incorporate the expenditure categories that are identified in the countywide Traffic Relief Plan. Public opinion demonstrates strong support for funding decisions to be made by local leaders in the Coachella Valley. Thus, RCTC is not the most ideal venue for funding decisions impacting the Coachella Valley. CVAG is the agency best suited to administer the Traffic Relief Plan, given that it represents all municipalities and unincorporated areas of the Coachella Valley, is multi-modal in responsibility, and has a professional staff equipped to carry out the Plan. 12 Agenda Item 9 The TPPS process and criteria can be adjusted to account for the expenditure categories and any other policies written to the Plan to ensure that funds are put to use according to the will of voters. Consistent with the Committee’s direction at its October 28, 2019 meeting, RCTC and CVAG staff do not recommend a set-aside within the Coachella Valley for a direct allocation of funds to cities and the County or Riverside for local streets and roads. Instead, it is recommended that the TPPS continue to function as the mechanism to prioritize projects. Understanding that the public may want to see specific projects that will be funded in the Coachella Valley, using the TPPS as the decision-making mechanism does not preclude the Plan from illustrating examples of priority projects that could or would be funded. For example, the 2009 Measure A expenditure plan states the following: The Transportation Improvement Plan is designed to give flexibility to adjust to changing circumstances and to: • Improve Traffic Flow and Reduce Congestion on Highway 111 • Add/Improve Interchanges on Highway 86 and I-10 • Provide funding for Local Streets and Roads Improvements • Improve Safety and Visibility at Major Intersections and Arterial Roads • Reduce Congestion by Improving Major Roadways Identified as Important by Local Governments in the Coachella Valley • Provide Express East-West Transit Routes in the Coachella Valley • Improve and Expand Public and Specialty Transit Service Although the valley has changed in many ways since Measure A was written, the above language still applies today. Durability through time is one of the tenets of the Plan structure adopted by this Committee on October 28, 2019. Priorities that have emerged within the last few years that could also be captured by the above approach could include: • Improved mass transit such as daily rail service to and from the Coachella Valley; • New technologies to reduce congestion and improve travel times; • Projects that reinforce infrastructure from natural disasters; and • Projects that address fundamental infrastructure gaps in disadvantaged communities. CVAG Executive Director Tom Kirk will provide a verbal presentation to the Committee to discuss these policy issues with Committee members. Commission staff seeks the Committee’s direction on how the Plan should be implemented in the Coachella Valley. 13 11 •Return to Source / Fair Share •Flexibility How it Currently Works for the Desert •Return to Source / Fair Share •Flexibility How it Currently Works for the Desert History of Partnership But, Founded on Skepticism… But, Founded on Skepticism… Valley is STILL skeptical Support fair share for CV85% Support return to source77% •Return to Source / Fair Share •Flexibility $3B $300M How it Currently Works for the Desert •Return to Source / Fair Share •Flexibility $3B $300M How it Currently Works for the Desert Valley is changing Flexibility allows us to adjust to change 1994 Top Ranked Projects Washington St. I/C Bob Hope Dr. I/C 1994 Top Ranked Projects Indian Ave I/C Palm Dr / Gene Autry Trl I/C 1999 Top Ranked Projects Monterey AveDate Palm Dr. I/C Madison St. 2005 Top Ranked Projects Hwy 111 Jefferson St. I/C 2010 Monroe St. I/C Avenue 50 Jackson St. I/C 2016 2021 New expenditure categories Approach for the Coachella Valley? Follow AGENDA ITEM 10 Agenda Item 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: November 13, 2019 TO: Traffic Relief Strategy Committee FROM: Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Plan Investments STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive, discuss, provide input on, and consider approval of investments in projects and services to be included in a draft Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The following actions by the Commission have guided staff in the preparation of the draft Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan: • January 31, 2019: Commission authorized exploration of a new local funding measure for transportation in Riverside County and discussed myriad specific investments needed throughout the county. • July 10, 2019: Commission authorized staff to develop a Countywide Transportation Improvement & Traffic Relief Plan (Plan) and implementation ordinance (Ordinance) for potential presentation to Riverside County voters in November 2020. • September 11, 2019: Commission adopted the schedule and development process for the Plan that included Traffic Relief Strategy Committee review and recommendation of the Plan in November 2019 followed by the Commission in December 2019. • November 13, 2019 (anticipated): Commission approved a revenue estimate, geographic divisions (Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley), and expenditure categories to guide development of the Plan. DISCUSSION: Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Plan Investments This staff report proposes potential investments in Western Riverside County projects and services for Commission discussion and direction. The intent of this investment list is to help the 14 Agenda Item 10 Commission identify priorities in Western Riverside County that will form the assumptions and scope of the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan (attachment 1). This investment list is not intended to name every conceivable project or service. While the Western Riverside County projects are but one component of the overall Plan, which also includes the Coachella and Palo Verde Valleys, according to statute, the Plan must include some mention of specific highway projects if the Plan and Ordinance are submitted to voters. The Coachella Valley component of the Plan is being addressed concurrently as a separate item. The Palo Verde Valley component will likely focus primarily on return-to-source funds or local street and road improvements consistent with the existing Measure A sales tax program and will be discussed at upcoming meetings with Palo Verde Valley representatives. Stakeholder Input Recent stakeholder input was used to help identify needs and priorities. Qualitative stakeholder input was received via the #RebootMyCommute effort completed in early 2019 and the comprehensive 2017 stakeholder outreach effort presented at the 2018 annual workshop. More recent quantitative stakeholder data was received through the Spring and Fall 2019 public opinion surveys presented concurrently with and separate from this item. Additionally, over the last several months, instrumental input was also received from: • The Future Funding Initiatives Ad Hoc Committee, • The Traffic Relief Strategy Committee, • The Commission, • City staff, • County of Riverside staff, and • Business and civic leadership groups. Nature of the Plan Based on feedback from Commissioners, this Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan (attachment 1) was created to identify a desired state of transportation in Western Riverside County in the decades ahead. The plan is aspirational in nature, putting forth a future vision and challenging goals to meet the long-term needs and desired transportation improvements in Western Riverside County. The plan is comprehensive by addressing a wide range of transportation needs: roads, passenger rail, bus service, trails, operations, maintenance, services, technology, and incentives. While a 30-year horizon was used for planning, revenue projection, and cost estimation purposes, this Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan is not currently intended to be constrained by a specific timeframe. Similarly, the listed investments totaling $8.84 billion contained in attachment 1 exceed the projected $6.71 billion in Western Riverside County revenues over 30 years from a new sales tax measure that could fund the Plan. Staff is 15 Agenda Item 10 seeking direction on the appropriate planning horizon and level of fiscal constraint for investments. Plan of Projects and Services New Sales Tax and Existing Measure A Sales Tax Working Together Some project investments shown in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan (attachment 1) are also planned projects from the existing Measure A sales tax program. The intent of including these investments is to fully fund and/or accelerate those projects which otherwise may take many years, if not decades, to complete. Similarly, some existing services currently provided are also included in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan to ensure sustainable, long-term funding of these services which may otherwise require reductions or elimination if new funding does not materialize. On July 10, 2019 the Commission approved the 2019-2029 Western Riverside County Highway Delivery Plan (attachment 2 map) that includes these planned projects from the existing Measure A sales tax program and other current Measure A priorities. Leveraging Other Fund Sources Dollars shown in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan (attachment 1) are the estimated investments needed from a new sales tax as part of a total investment need for the project or service. For example, the total estimated cost of a local interchange investment may be $50 million while the estimated investment portion from a new sales tax may be 80 percent of the total cost, or $40 million. The balance of funds needed to fully fund the local interchange is expected to come from other fund sources. Based on both historical funding and estimates of future funding, staff has roughly estimated the potential availability of other fund sources to fully fund projects and services. Other fund sources include existing Measure A sales tax, tolls, state and federal formula funds, state and federal grants, Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF), other local funds, etc. General Categories and Call-for-Projects Most entries in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan reflect a specific project or service based on input received identifying distinct needs. A number of entries, such as street repairs, safety improvements, safe routes to school, and emerging technology, are general in nature. These projects and services reflect general categories needing funding and lend themselves to direct allocation to Riverside County cities based on their specific needs. During its October 28, 2019 meeting, several members of the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee cited the benefits of designating some new sales tax funds to be directly allocated to cities through a competitive call-for-projects. Therefore, funding allocations for these general 16 Agenda Item 10 categories of projects and services are expected to be implemented through competitive call-for- project or competitive grant processes administered by the Commission. Funding Operations and Maintaining Facilities New passenger rail track and station improvements are included in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan. This initial capital investment is significant. One-time state and federal grant and formula funding is often available to pay a portion of capital costs for new projects – particularly passenger rail. However, state and federal funding for ongoing operations and facility maintenance is usually much harder to obtain, if available at all. It is financially responsible to adequately fund ongoing operations and maintain these facilities that received the initial investments. Therefore, a substantial investment is currently reflected in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan to provide sustainable funding for various operations and facility maintenance. In addition to new passenger rail track and stations, investments are included for SR-79 and Mid-County Parkway highway maintenance, subsidizing Metrolink passenger rail operations, maintenance of Metrolink stations, replacement of Metrolink trains, and subsidizing bus operations. Mitigating for Increasing Road Capacity A recent California law change (SB 743) and implementing regulations now require using Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMT) as the primary metric to determine the significance of transportation impacts for land use projects during their environmental study phase of project development. SB 743 triggered changes to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its statewide implementation as well as California’s approach to meeting federal air quality conformity standards. Caltrans, as the lead agency for all highway projects, has opted in to also utilize VMT as the primary metric to determine the significance of transportation impacts for highway projects that add capacity. It is our understanding that Caltrans implementation of this new requirement will be effective July 1, 2020, and will impact all projects starting the CEQA process after that date. In addition, projects currently in the CEQA process but not yet approved could be impacted. The impact of SB 743, new CEQA implementation guidelines, and the California State Transportation Agency (CalSTA) policy objective to reduce VMT and greenhouse gas emission will have a significant yet still unknown impact on how highway projects can be delivered in the future. For projects that add capacity and increase VMT, particularly general-purpose lanes, it will be very challenging for RCTC to obtain state and federal project approvals. Mitigation for projects that increase VMT may be possible to allow these projects to be developed while still complying with CEQA and federal air quality conformity standards. Concepts such as VMT banking, transit credits, pricing, and possibly other mechanisms could provide mitigation in the future. Therefore, 17 Agenda Item 10 the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan includes a significant investment for mitigation for increasing road capacity to allow needed projects to move forward in a timely manner. Investing in the SR-60, SR-91, and I-215 Corridors This draft does not include any new mainline highway investments for the SR-60, SR-91, and I-215 corridors in the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan. Further, except for the improvements on SR-91 (I-15 to Pierce Street) and I-215 (Van Buren Boulevard to SR-60), the existing Measure A sales tax program does not include further improvements to the SR-60, SR-91, and I-215 corridors. Staff is seeking direction from the Commission as to whether SR-60, SR-91, and/or I-215 corridors should receive additional investment as part of a new sales tax. If so, which corridors should receive the investment and for what type of improvement. As additional background, three capacity-increasing projects on these corridors began development earlier this year at the direction of the Commission after receiving the results of a feasibility study on potential new express lane facilities. Subsequently, after hearing concerns regarding the potential express lanes project on SR-91 through downtown Riverside, on September 11, 2019, the Commission deferred approval of a funding agreement with Caltrans, effectively putting all three express lane projects on SR-60, SR-91, and I-215 on hold indefinitely. Emerging Technologies and Innovation The multi-decade planning horizon for the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan suggests that emerging technologies and innovation will have a positive and possibly even a transformative impact to our transportation system. Whether better managing highway congestion through more efficient lane usage and traveler information, or transforming 1st/last mile transit connections, or even autonomous and connected vehicles, emerging technologies and innovation will continue to shape our transportation future. What is uncertain is when these impacts will occur and what specific technologies and innovations will lead the way. It is important to embrace and plan for these inevitable changes. A number of investments are included that allocate investment funds to emerging technologies, upgrading existing technologies, fostering innovation pilot programs, and incenting new services and development. Investment Categories Going Forward The Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan investment list is grouped by similar projects and services for ease of discussion. The future Countywide Transportation Improvement & Traffic Relief Plan will be represented in the following three categories recently approved by the Commission: • Reducing Congestion and Connecting Communities 18 Agenda Item 10 • Improving Safety and Keeping Infrastructure in Good Condition • Supporting Seniors, Veterans, Students, and Individuals with Disabilities Should both the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee and the Commission ultimately approve the Western Riverside County component of the Traffic Relief Plan investment list, staff would combine this effort with the other parts of the overall Countywide Transportation Improvement & Traffic Relief Plan and present to the Commission for approval at the January 2020 Commission meeting. Attachments: 1) Draft Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Plan Investments 2) 2019-2029 Western Riverside County Highway Delivery Plan Map 19 Page 1 of 3 Investment ($2020) Local Streets and Roads $1,535,000,000 1 Cajalco Road widening and safety enhancements (Temescal Canyon Road to I-215) 2 Ethanac Expressway (new east-west inter-regional highway) 3 I-10 Bypass (new east-west road connecting Banning to Cabazon) 4 Temescal Canyon Road widening (Tom Barnes Street to State Street) 5 Gilman Springs Road safety enhancements (SR-60 to SR-79) 6 Van Buren Boulevard (King Avenue to Bountiful Street) 7 Grand Avenue (Corydon Road to SR-74) 8 Clinton Keith Road (Leon Road to SR-79) 9 Sun Lakes Boulevard (Highland Home to Lincoln Street / Sunset Avenue) 10 Street repairs 11 Safety improvements 12 Traffic signal synchronization 13 Safe routes to schools Local Interchanges, Bridges, On and Off Ramps $535,000,000 14 I-10 / Highland Springs Avenue 15 I-10 / Pennsylvania Avenue 16 I-10 / Morongo Parkway 17 I-10 / County Line Road 18 I-10 / Cherry Valley Boulevard 19 I-15 / Bundy Canyon Road 20 I-15 / Baxter Road 21 I-15 / Central Avenue (SR-74) 22 SR-60 / Potrero Boulevard 23 SR-91 / Adams Street 24 SR-91 / Tyler Street 25 I-215 / Keller Road 26 I-215 / Harley Knox Boulevard 27 Rancho California Road roundabouts Highways $3,650,000,000 28 I-15 / French Valley Parkway phase 3 29 SR-79 Realignment 30 Mid-County Parkway 31 I-10 / SR-79 interchange 32 I-15 lane addition (San Diego County line to SR-74) 33 SR-91 lane addition (I-15 to Pierce Street) 34 I-215 lane addition (Van Buren Boulevard to SR-60) 35 Mitigation for increasing road capacity 36 Managing highway congestion through technology (active traffic management, smart freeways) DRAFT Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Plan Investments Dollars represent the estimated investment needed from a new sales tax as part of a total investment. Note: Sequential numbers and investment order are provided for ease of reference only and do not imply priority.20 ATTACHMENT 1 Page 2 of 3 Passenger Rail Transit Expansion $580,000,000 37 Railroad crossing safety improvements Metrolink passenger rail service: 38 New 2nd main track from Moreno Valley to Perris 39 New 3rd main track from Highgrove to Colton 40 New 3rd main track from Riverside to Fullerton 41 New 4th main track and West Corona / Corona / La Sierra station improvements 42 Parking expansion at existing stations 43 New Perris-South station track and layover facility 44 Moreno Valley / March Field station ADA and access improvements 45 New train station, Ramona Expressway 46 New new low / zero-emission technology trains 47 Coachella Valley - San Gorgonio rail service: new San Gorgonio Pass station 48 Perris - San Jacinto rail service: full development and implementation of track and facilities Separating Local Streets from Railroad Tracks $190,000,000 49 San Gorgonio Avenue 50 Hargrave Street 51 Pennsylvania Avenue 52 Bellegrave Avenue 53 Jackson Street 54 Mary Street 55 Spruce Street 56 Tyler Street Bus Transit $285,000,000 57 New operations and maintenance facility for zero emission buses 58 New multimodal transit centers 59 Bus fleet electrification: replacement and expansion program 60 High quality transit corridor improvements to bus stops, transit signal prioritization, amenities 61 Expanded RapidLink service in Riverside, Moreno Valley, and Perris 62 Technology infrastructure modernization, intelligent transportation and traveler information systems Regional Trails $170,000,000 63 Butterfield Ranch Trail / Southern Emigrant Trail (66.8 miles) 64 Santa Ana River Trail (25.7 miles) 65 California Riding and Hiking Trail (89 miles) 66 Juan Bautista de Anza Historical Trail (84.9 miles) 67 Salt Creek Trail (16 miles) 68 Public lands trail access Note: Sequential numbers and investment order are provided for ease of reference only and do not imply priority.21 Page 3 of 3 Operations and Maintenance $1,090,000,000 Metrolink passenger rail service: 69 Existing station routine maintenance 70 Existing station capital reinvestment 71 New station routine maintenance 72 New station capital reinvestment 73 Annual capital subsidy (30 years) 74 Annual operating subsidy (30 years) 75 Maintenance of existing and new RCTC rail property 76 Maintenance and replacement of new low / zero-emission technology trains for the 91 / Perris Valley Line 77 Additional operations and maintenance due to Metrolink expansion (SCORE) 78 SR-79 Realignment roadway maintenance 79 Mid-County Parkway roadway maintenance 80 Freeway active traffic management technology operations and maintenance 81 Bus Service: annual operating subsidy (30 years) Services $575,000,000 82 Motorist assistance: maintain existing and expand Freeway Service Patrol service 83 Commuter assistance: maintain existing rideshare, vanpool, and park and ride services 84 Commuter assistance: expand rideshare, vanpool, and park and ride services, pilot projects, incentives 85 Commuter assistance: park-and-ride lot development 86 Specialized transit: further subsidize fares for seniors, veterans, students, and individuals with disabilities 87 Bus/rail transit: further subsidize fares for seniors, veterans, students, and individuals with disabilities 88 Express bus: subsidize new service and increase frequency of existing service Investments, Incentives, and Technologies $230,000,000 89 Metrolink passenger rail service: Station development incentives to encourage new amenities and services 90 Transportation investments supporting local and regional economic development 91 Emerging technology and other innovative programs 92 1st / last mile transit connections: incentives, subsidize existing / new services, innovation pilot programs Total Investment $8,840,000,000 Note: Sequential numbers and investment order are provided for ease of reference only and do not imply priority.22 YuccaValley Twentynine Palms RanchoMirage Palm Springs PalmDesert La Quinta Indio Desert Hot Springs Coachella CathedralCity Wildomar Menifee Eastvale Temecula CanyonLake LakeMatthews LakePerris VailLake NewportBeach Murrieta LakeElsinore SanJacinto San Bernardino Perris MorenoValley Highland Hemet BeaumontBanning Yorba Linda Walnut Upland Tustin Santa Ana SanDimas Rialto RanchoCucamonga Pomona Placentia Ontario Norco JurupaValley LaVerne Glendora Fontana DiamondBar Corona Claremont Chino Hills Brea Anaheim Riverside Calimesa Diamond ValleyLake SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. R I V E R S I D E C O . O R A N G E C O . RIVERSIDE CO. SAN DIEGO CO. SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. 133 241 142 259 71 1 55 66 57 30 91 74 74 74 60 90 22 5 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 210 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 405 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 73 111 243 247 74 62 79 79 38 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 790510Miles N 17 27 19 20 22 34 24 28 16 15 8 14 29 2 24 30 32 31 33 34 44 26 25 28 37 27 29 35 5 3233 12 21 35 10 9 13A 25 3 11 26 31 6 18 1 4 30 7 23 41 4243 13 2019-2029 Western Riverside County Highway Delivery Plan June 24, 2019 FULLY FUNDED Phase Sponsor 1 91 CIP Completion Design-Build RCTC 2 15 ELP Completion Design-Build RCTC 3 15/91 Express Lanes Connector Design-Build RCTC 4 60 Truck Lanes Construction RCTC 5 Mid-County Parkway: Placentia Interchange at 215 Construction RCTC 6 91 Pachappa UP Project: Railroad Realignment Construction RCTC 7 Mid County Parkway: Sweeney Grading Construction RCTC 8 15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension Environmental/ Design-Build Phase 1 RCTC 9 91 Downtown Riverside Express Lanes Environmental RCTC 10 71/91 Interchange Construction RCTC 11 91 Corridor Operations Project Construction RCTC 12 15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension -Advanced Operations Environmental to Construction RCTC PARTIAL FUNDING AVAILABLE Phase Sponsor 13 Mid County Parkway:Right of Way and Environmental Mitigation ROW/Environmental RCTC 13A Mid County Parkway: Package 2 Design/Construction RCTC 14 15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension Design-Build Phase 2 Construction RCTC 15 60/215 Riverside-Moreno Valley Express Lanes Environmental/ Design/Construction RCTC 16 215 Gap Project Environmental to Construction RCTC 17 Mid County Parkway: 215 Project, Nuevo to Alessandro Design/Construction RCTC 18 91 Downtown Riverside Express Lanes Design/Construction RCTC ASSIST WITH FUNDING – PARTNERS Phase Sponsor 19 Lake Elsinore: 15/Railroad Canyon Interchange (FullyFunded)Construction Lake Elsinore 20 RCTLMA: Cajalco Road Corridor Environmental to Construction County 21 Temecula: French Valley Parkway Phase 2 Environmental to Construction Temecula NO ACTION – RCTC Phase Sponsor 22 Mid County Parkway: Packages 3 and thereafter Environmental to Construction RCTC 23 79 Realignment Design/Right of Way to Construction RCTC 24 15 Corridor (SR-74/Central to I-215)Project Study to Environmental RCTC 25 91 Corridor Ultimate Project: 71 to 241 Environmental RCTC 26 91 Corridor Ultimate Project: 15 to Pierce Street Project Study RCTC 27 10 Truck Climbing Lane Environmental to Construction RCTC 28 15 Corridor (I-215 to County Line)Project Study to Environmental RCTC 29 71 Widening Environmental to Construction RCTC 30 10/60 Interchange Environmental to Construction RCTC 31 215 Ultimate Widening Environmental to Construction RCTC 32 60 Jurupa Valley-Riverside Express Lanes Environmental RCTC NO ACTION – PARTNERS Phase Sponsor 33 SBCTA: 15 Express Lanes Environmental to Construction SBCTA 34 RCTLMA: Ethanac Corridor Environmental to Construction County 35 Temecula: French Valley Parkway Phase 3 Environmental to Construction Temecula •••• Attachment 2 23 WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN INVESTMENTS Traffic Relief Strategy Committee November 13, 2019 1 Commission Action and Input Received 2 •Commission directed staff to prepare: –Countywide Transportation Improvement & Traffic Relief Plan (Plan) –Implementation ordinance (Ordinance) •Stakeholder input –General public –Elected officials –Agency staff –Business/civic leadership groups Nature of the Plan 3 •Desired state of transportation •Aspirational •Comprehensive •Horizon •Fiscal constraint Investment List 4 •New sales tax and existing sales tax •Other fund sources •Operations and maintenance •60, 91, and 215 corridors Direction being sought 5 •Specific investment list items •Planning horizon –30 years or other •Level of fiscal constraint •Investments in 60, 91, and 215 corridors –Which corridors? –What improvements? QUESTIONS, DIALOGUE, FEEDBACK & DIRECTION 6 7 8 9 10 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Wednesday, November 06, 2019 1:03 PM To: Tara Byerly Cc: Lisa Mobley; Anne Mayer; JOHN STANDIFORD Subject: RCTC: Traffic Relief Strategy Committee - Special Meeting - November 13, 2019 Good afternoon Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Members, The November Agenda for the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Special Meeting scheduled for Wednesday, November 13, 2019 @ 11:30 a.m. is now available. Please copy the link: https://www. rctc.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Novem ber-Traffic-Relief-Strategv-Committee-Special-MeetinR.pdf Let me know if there are any questions or concerns. Thank you. Respectfully, Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 951.787.7141 W 1951.787.7906 F 4080 Lemon St. 3rd FI. 1 P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 rctc.org f IF in 0 i RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE SIGN -IN SHEET NOVEMBER 13, 2019 NAME AGENCY E MAIL ADDRESS V1 (Atak, ZZtak%-- Cr l4° l?it2Otll V 1 6/0" �'�•aY G015)1. L ,ar-DrJ Ikk O ? P \ t/ r � � cool x z ‘ P X-//) "-if :9:6, -�-- k `C___ (AL,- � E:' � 1 NP\6471\ -"\--. jZ0S.sc 11 se,h-d at,tv).- )1X d r►.. -b.s 1. ('' tom 6 {,-1c_sd r, _fir vPe �`f,lle�- RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRAFFIC RELIEF STRATEGY COMMITTEE ROLL CALL NOVEMBER 13, 2019 Present Absent County of Riverside, District IV Qr 0 City of Calimesa O City of Corona ❑ City of Desert Hot Springs City of Hemet 0 City of Jurupa Valley City of Moreno Valley 0 City of Murrieta 0 City of Palm Desert 0 City of Temecula 0 0