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10 October 31, 1990 Budget & Finance053755 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGENDA BUDGET AND FINANCE COMMTI-1r.E 2:30 P.M., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1990 SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY CONFERENCE ROOM 32-505 HARRY OLIVER TRAIL, THOUSAND PALMS 92276 1. Call to Order. 2. Agreement Between RCTC and SanBAG for Modeling Support to SCAG RWSAN. Staff Recommendation Receive and file. 3. FY 1989-90 RCTC Annual Report. Staff Recommendation Receive and file. 4. Financial Reports. A. Quarterly Cost Report. Staff Recommendation Receive and file. B. Contract Status and Commitment Reports. Staff Recommendation Receive and file. • • . • • • Budget and Finance Committee Agenda October 31, 1990 Page 2 5. Congestion Management Plan. A. Congestion Management Plan Work Program. Staff Recommendation That the Commission review and approval the Congestion Management Work Program. B. Contract with Congestion Management Plan Consultant. Staff Recommendation To authorize the Executive Director to amend the existing contract with Valley Research and Planning Associates to have them assist in the preparation of the Congestion Management Plan for an amount not to exceed $40,000. 6. Agreement with Carl Schiermeyer and Associates. Staff Recommendation To authorize renewal of the existing contract with Carl Schiermeyer and Associates with the hourly rate to increase to $85 and the limit to be set at $80,000. 7. Measure A Projects Consultant Agreements. 7A. Dames & Moore for Preliminary Engineering & Environmental Services on Route 79. Staff Recommendation Approve the Agreement with Dames & Moore which will be in the range of $900,000 to $1,100,000. Funds for this contract have been included in the 1991 RCTC budget under Professional Services. • • • • Budget and Finance Committee October 31, 1990 Page 3 7B. Centennial Engineering for Preliminary Engineering Services on Route 79. Staff Recommendation Approve the Agreement with Centennial Engineering which will be in the range of $500,000 to $600,000. Funds for this contract have been included in the 1990-91 RCTC budget under Professional Services. 7C. PBO&D - Route 91 Construction Engineering Support. Staff Recommendation That the Commission approve Amendment No. 2 to Contract R-O-9001 in the amount of $62,500. 8. San Timoteo Canyon Corridor Study MOU. Staff Recommendation That the Commission: 1) Participate with SanBAG in the funding (approximately $117,500) and sponsorship of the San Timoteo Canyon corridor study; 2) Approve the draft MOU between RCTC and SanBAG defining RCTC's funding participation and making SanBAG the lead agency for the study; and, 3) Approve designation of the corridor as a potential alternative to future projects on Route 215 between Route 60 and Route 10. 9. Other Items. 10. Adjournment. e • • • AGENDA ITEM #2 • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission SUBJECT: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreement Between RCTC and SanBAG for Modeling Technical Support to SCAG RIVSAN The Riverside County Transportation Commission, at its meeting on October 10, 1990, discussed the importance of timely accomplishing the objectives of RIVSAN and filling the gap created by Gary Moon's departure at SCAG. The Commission approved staffs proposal to enter into a short term, one-year contract with JHK to provide the modeling technical support to SCAG RIVSAN. In addition, they authorized the Executive Director to proceed to negotiate a contract with SanBAG to be presented to the Commission at their next meeting. SanBAG has agreed to share the cost ($111,568) and will pay 50% of the modeling technical support provided by JHK. The proposed agreement between RCTC and SanBAG is attached. During the Administrative Committee meeting, Chairman Kay Ceniceros requested that staff prepare a brief summary on the importance of transportation models, surveys and studies, and how they relate to local agencies' planning process. Attached is a paper prepared by Jim Werle, RCTC Senior Analyst, on this subject. RECOMMENDATION Receive and file. JR:nk Attachments RIVERSIDE-SAN BERNARDINO MODELING TECHNICAL SUPPORT PARTIES AND DATE. This Agreement is executed on this 14th day of November, 1990 by 1. Commission CRCTC' and the San and between the Riverside County T ransportadonBernardino Associated Governments ("SanBAGl. 2. RECITALS. sates, 2.1 On October 10, 1990, ROTC entered into an agreement with JHK and Assoc for trassistancepianning/tralfic forecasting assistance (the 'Agreements). A copy c JHK h of the Agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit W. scope of services (the 'Scope of Services', fortransportation The proposed Services'. planning/traffic • forecasting � is attached hereto as Exhibit B (the 2.3 Because of significant benefits which may occur to SanBAG under the Agreement, Commission for the Serer• SanBAG wishes to pay'� of all costs incurred by 3. TERMS. been JHK and the byS-- G. In accordance with the Agreement 3.1 Paymmt of the billing request CommN�, JHK will pry monthly billings to RCTC. Upon payment �� invoice send an Invoto SanBAG representing 50% of the amount from JHK, the Comm fission its share of the of the Invoice received from JHK. SanBAG shall reimburse the Comm cost of the Services within 30 days of receiving the Commission's invoice. • • • 3.2 Indemnity. SanBAG shall defend, indemnify and hold harmless Commission, its elected officials, officers, employees, consultants and agents from and against all claims, causes of action, damages or liability arising out of or in connection with the use by SanBAG of any work product prepared by JHK related to the Agreement This indemnity shall extend, but not be limited, to claims, causes of action, damages and liability arising from injuries or damages to persons or property, including wrongful death, worker's compensation claims and awards of attorney's fees. 3.3 Attorney's Fees. If either party commences an action against the other party arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorney's fees and costs and suit. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION SAN BERNARDINO ASSOCIATED COMMISSION GOVERNMENTS By Chairman, Riverside County Transportation Commission REVIEWED AND RECOMMENDED FOR APPROVAL: Br Title Jack Reagan Wes McDaniel Executive Director Executive Director APPROVED AS TO LEGAL FORM: Steven C. DeBaun Title Best, Best & Krieger Legal Counsel Riverside County Transportation Commission • • • • • • • TRANSPORTATION PLANNING/FORECASTING ASSISTANCE PROPOSED SCOPE OF SERVICES TASKS TO BE PERFORMED The following tasks will be part of the one-year contract period and will be performed on a priority basis which will be established monthly by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, in coordination and consultation with other agencies in the Riverside/San Bernardino area. TASK 1 PROVIDE STAFF SUPPORT FOR CODING AND OPERATING FORECAST MODELS JHK do Associates will support the SCAG staff currently working in the Riverside office of SCAG in the areas of ongoing coding, chec; ;, editing, and running the forecast models being used by SCAG in the RIVSAN area. The JHK support for this effort will be derived from two JHK engineers. RCTC and SCAG will provide working space for the two engineers within the Riverside office of SCAG. JHK will provide the personnel and any specialized equipment which JHK believes appropriate for its staff members to use. Such equipment may include a PC microcomputer of the 386 variety. TASK 2 CONSULT WITH RCTC AND PARTNER AGENCIES ON AREA -WIDE MODELING EFFORTS JHK will review and comment on the current effort of RCTC to develop an area -wide working set of models for use in the various Measure A projects which have begun, or will begin, in the next year. JHK will prepare a memorandum which summarizes its review and which may include recommendations for additional efforts or new areas to be addressed in the region -wide modeling effort. TASK 3 CONSULT WITH ROTC AND PARTNER AGENCIES ON COUNTY -WIDE CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PLANS JHK will provide limited consultation, including recommendations and specific memoranda on the framework to be used for congestion management plans. Specifically, JHK will provide information on means of measuring level of service, • • both current and future, and on appropriate software packages and electronic databases which would assist any public agency in the RIVSAN area in the establishment and operation of a congestion management plan. TASK 4 REVIEW AND COMMENT ON ORIGIN -DESTINATION SURVEY FORMATS JHK will review and provide comment to RCTC and to SCAG on the origin - destination survey formats which are proposed for use during 1991 by SCAG in the Los Angeles area. TASK 5 REVIEW AND COMMENT ON RIVSAN-RELATED FORECAST MODELS JHK will be available, on request, to review and comment on transportation forecasting models currently being used in the Riverside/San Bernardino area. The intent of such review will be to ensure that the framework provided by the regional RIVSAN model is being followed by the more localized or project -specific models. 2 • • • • • • • TRANSPORTATION PLANNING/FORECASTING ASSISTANCE PROPOSED CONTRACT ITEMS PROJECT DURATION Twelve months, commencing on October 16, 1990. ASSIGNED JHK PERSONNEL Mr. Steve Smith is assigned as the Project Manager with a total number of hours of 900. Mr. Guoxiong Huang is assigned as Project Engineer with a total number of hours of 900. Additionally the cost estimate for the project includes 30 hours for Mr. William Reilly, 30 hours for Mr. James Schoen, 30 hours for Mr. Brian Fowler, and 40 hours of secretarial and/or graphics support. These supporting hours will be used only on an as -needed basis. The total number of JHK hours in the proposed budget equals 1,930. LOCATION OF WORK Mr. Smith and Mr. Huang will primarily work within the SCAG offices in Riverside for the one-year duration. They may also be required to work within the JHK office in Riverside, California. This office will be opened by December, 1990, and will be within close proximity to the downtown of Riverside. CONTRACT TYPE It is proposed that the contract be based on a time -and -materials basis. That is, for each hour of each individual, an hourly charge will be made. Additionally, direct expenses in the form of telephone or FAX messages, local mileage within the greater Los Angeles/Riverside area, and any reproduction of reports which are directly related to this project would be charged on the monthly invoices. • • TRANSPORTATION PLANNING/FORECASTING ASSISTANCE PROPOSED PROJECT BUDGET Labor F nses Hours $/Hours Total $ Steven Smith 675 98 $ 66,150 225 0* 0 Guoxiong Huang 675 50 33,750 225 0* 0 Subtotal S 99,900 William Reilly 30 133 3,990 James Schoen 30 S8 1,740 Brian Fowler 30 53 1,590 Scretarial/Graphics 40 39 1, 560 Subtotal $ 8,880 Direct Expenses Telephone - 208 calls 4 $5.00 1,040 Local Mileage - 5,200 miles 4 $0.24 1,248 Reproduction - 100 documents Q $5.00 500 Subtotal $ 2,788 TOTAL $111,568 *These hours are considered as "training" to allow JHK staff to become familiar with RIVSAN processes. 4 • • • RCTC MEMO DATE: October 16, 1990 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director FROM: Jim Werle, Senior Staff Analyst SUBJECT: TRANSPORTATION MODELS, SURVEYS AND STUDIES - HOW AND WHY THEY ARE USED BY RCTC AND OTHER AGENCIES Transportation "models" are used to get an idea of what might happen on a transportation system if a certain change, improvement, or policy were implemented. Although models are far from perfect in simulating transportation systems and they are expensive to build and maintain, experience has shown that they are useful, and certainly more effective than testing alternatives in concrete. Transportation "models" are generally not physical models, but rather a combination of mathematical relationships and procedures, (sometimes called algorithms), that produce printed reports describing the state of the transportation system and its individual elements at a specific point in time. For all but the smallest systems, the formulas and procedures are so complicated that they must be executed on a computer in order to save time and minimize errors. A "Transportation Model" is generally not a single program, but a whole set of programs which together attempt to simulate the behavior of a large and diverse group of people. To create a transportation model, the area to be studied is first divided into small geographic areas call Transportation Analysis Zones, (TAZ's) for which socio-economic data or land use data is available. These are linked by a generalized transportation network that usually represents freeways, major arterials, and sometimes transit and HOV networks. Each link in the network is coded with attributes such as facility type, number of lanes, free flow speeds, etc. In a typical modeling run, the TAZ data or network data may be changed to reflect a proposed policy change or improvement. Then trip "productions" and "attractions" are generated for each TAZ based upon the data associated with that area. Next the trips are • • "distributed" among the various TAZ's to produce trip tables that replicate typical trips to work, schools, shopping, and other destinations. The trips may then be processed by the "mode split" model that determines whether they will be single occupancy auto trips, car pool trips, or transit trips. They are then "assigned" to the network to determine how the proposed network will work in relation to the proposed land use or socio-economic data. Multiple runs may be required at this stage to take into account the effects of congestion on portions of the system and to adjust the speeds and routes accordingly. Typical applications of transportation modeling in the Commission's current programs include testing various Measure "A" alternatives to determine the relative cost effectiveness of the projects and their interrelationships in order to help prioritize projects; testing the same alternatives to assess the overall impact on regional air quality and to meet the regional air quality conformity requirements; using the model to help determine existing and future levels of service for the congestion management program; using the model to determine the impacts of major new development proposals on the transportation system; and using the model to help determine the optimum size and location of proposed new facilities. Some parts of the model are relatively logical and straightforward, such as the Trip distribution and assignment modules, which generally assume that a traveler will take the shortest and/or least expensive route to get from one point to another. Other parts of the model cannot be based on such simple assumptions because human behavior is so variable. This is the case for the "Trip Generation" and "Mode Split" modules which attempt to define how many trips will be generated in certain areas based upon the characteristics of those areas, and what mode of transportation will be used to make the trips. Because it would be virtually impossible to determine this kind of information by strict logic, surveys and studies are used to determine the relationships based upon the preferences and travel patterns of the existing population. These basic studies are generally referred to as "Origin and Destination Surveys". In addition to surveying the origin and destination of trips made by a sample set of households, the survey asks questions about other socio-economic characteristics. By using statistical methods to relate the results of the surveys to Census Data and other demographic data collected on an ongoing basis, the modeling staff can relate the trip making characteristics found in the survey to the entire region, and even to future populations. Although the description of the transportation planning and modeling process above is necessarily brief, I believe that it conveys the importance of transportation modeling to the planning process, and the importance of surveys and studies to the design of the transportation model. In the Southern California, the SCAG Regional Transportation Model • • • • • • • • is the primary model that is being used. Both the RIVSAN model, (for the Riverside/San Bernardino area), and the OCTAM model, (for Orange County), are "focused" versions of the Regional Model. (That means that the network and the zonal system are detailed within the local area and generalized outside of the local area.) For the Past few years, the RIVSAN Model has been maintained and updated by SCAG's Inland office in cooperation with the Commission's staff and consultants. It is currently undergoing a major revision by DKS to make it more useful for evaluating Measure "A" alternatives and for use in the Congestion Management Program. For a number of programs in which modeling is used, there is a requirement that the subregional models and local models be consistent with the regional model. RCTC generally agrees with this approach and has worked with and through SCAG to maintain a high level of consistency. The creation of SCAG's Inland Office and the work of Gary Moon have been instrumental in providing RCTC a level of service and cooperation that greatly enhanced our program. Gary has not only been an invaluable liaison between RCTC and SCAG's main office, but he has also supervised the conduct of a number of local studies that would have been impossible to do without someone in his position. To maintain these services and to continue the major programs mentioned above, it is essential to find an interim replacement to continue Gary's work until SCAG can find and train a suitable replacement. That is the reason for the proposal to bring some top level technical assistance from JHK - to bridge the gap and to keep the major programs as well as the local programs going until permanent personnel can be hired and trained., Unfortunately, the Regional Model and its "offspring" such as RIVSAN still have some major problems. Most of the problems can be traced to the fact that the models are based upon an Origin and Destination survey that was originally conducted in 1967 and updated by a smaller survey completed in 1976. We all know from our personal experience how much travel patterns in this area have changed in the past decade because of the rapid growth, the congestion, and the changes that have taken place in the work force and in the rest of our society. In order to have more confidence in the results of our models and to make them more accurately reflect current travel patterns, we need to update the data upon which the model is based. Because of the inter- connections of the models, and the cost of the surveys, they need to be conducted on a regional basis. This is why we are requesting the commission to support SCAG's efforts to fund an area -wide Origin and Destination Study to be conducted next Spring. SCAG needs to have a firm commitment of funding from all participating agencies in order to conduct the survey jointly with Caltrans, which is planning a statewide survey at that time. Other transportation commissions have verbally expressed their support for the survey and are also expected to provide their "fair share" of the funding. 1 • • • • • AGENDA ITEM #3 • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Marilyn Williams, Staff Analyst III THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: FY 1989-90 RCTC Annual Report Commission staff has been in the process of developing the Commission's first annual report covering the 1989-90 fiscal year. In evaluating the types of information to be included in the report, it was clear that much of the activity for the year focused on the development of the Measure "A" program. With that in mind, it was determined that the annual report could also serve as the vehicle to provide an update of the Measure "A" program. Further, the traditional "corporate style" annual report format was felt to be inadequate to disseminate information to the voters of Riverside County. The format selected for the annual report and Measure "A" update is the newspaper. Staff will distribute proofs of the four page layout at the Committee meeting. The material is scheduled to run on November 3rd in the Desert Sun (circulation 62,500) and November 4th in the Press Enterprise (circulation 188,200). The combined cost for the four pages is $30,000 based on non-profit/governmental rates. The cost per unit is $0.12. Funds for production and printing of the annual report where incorporated into the current year's budget. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Receive and file. MW:sc f:\users\pteprint\11-14-90.agd\annutepo.mw • • • • AGENDA ITEM #4A • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Dean Martin, Controller SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Reports Due to timing constraints created by the need to complete the annual audit, the quarterly financial reports could not be completed in time for agenda mailing. Reports will be sent under separate cover on Monday, October 29, 1990 to Commission members. DM:sc • • • • • AGENDA ITEM #4B • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Louie Martin, Project Controls Manager SUBJECT: Quarterly Expenditure Reports and Contract and Status Committment Reports Due to timing constraints created by the need to complete the annual audit, the quarterly expenditure reports, and contract and status committment reports could not be completed in time for agenda mailing. Reports will be sent under separate cover on Monday, October 29, 1990 to Commission members. LEM:sc • • • AGENDA ITEM #5A • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: James W. Werle, Senior Staff Analyst THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Congestion Management Work Program The Commission has been designated as Riverside County's Congestion Management Agency by the resolution of the County and a majority of the cities with a majority of the population. The staff, in conjunction with Valley Research and Planning Associates, the Congestion Management Subcommittee of the Technical Advisory Committee, and the County and cities have prepared the attached Congestion Management Work Program and Schedule. The Work Program provides for the preparation of a Draft Congestion Management Plan by the end of June, 1991. At that time, the Plan may go through concurrent local and regional review leading to its final approval and incorporation into the STIP to be reviewed by SCAG in December of 1991. The Work Program has been reviewed and recommended for approval by the Commission's Technical Advisory Committee, (TAC)/CMP Subcommittee, by the CVAG TAC, and by the WRCOG TAC. The recommendations of the RCTC TAC, the CVAG Executive Committee and the WRCOG will be presented at the meeting. A preliminary Congestion Management Network of highways and principal arterials has been identified and includes all state highways, as the CMP legislation requires, and principal arterials based on a functional classification system applied to the county road network by Caltrans in a study completed several years ago. The network has been adjusted based on comments from local and subregional agencies. Staff will review the network with the Commission as part of their presentation at the meeting. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Recommend that the Commission review and approve the Congestion Management Work Program. JW:sc attachment f:\users\preprint\ 11-1490.agd\cmp wp.jw • • • • SEPTEMBER 14, 1990 DRAFT WORK PROGRAM RIVERSIDE COUNTY CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PURPOSE: This Work Program has been prepared to identify Tasks, the Project Schedule (see Exhibit A), and Costs associated with development of a comprehensive Congestion Management Program (CMP) for Riverside County required by AB 471 (Katz) and AB 1791 (amendments). The Work Program will be forwarded to the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) CMP Subcommittee, the TAC, and the Commission for review and approval. Commission staff will be responsible for preparation of the CMP in conjunction with its consultants, member agency staff, Caltrans, Districts 08 and 11, other affected agencies, the Western Riverside County Association of Governments (WRCOG), and the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). An organizational flowchart identifying responsible and affected agencies is provided in Exhibit B. For purpose of this Work Program, Commission staff and the consultant comprise the "Project Team". BACKGROUND: In 1989, a comprehensive, six -bill Transportation and Passenger Rail Bond Funding Package known as the Katz -Kopp -Baker -Campbell Transportation Blueprint for the Twenty -First Century was passed by the State Legislature. Following negotiations to increase the level of financing for transportation improvements and revise the Gann expenditure limit, the bills were signed by the Governor. The new funding package, including the gas tax increase, was approved by voters in California in June and provided for the State Constitutional Amendment to raise the Gann Limit (SCA-1). The expenditure package will provide approximately $18.5 billion in new transportation revenues over the next ten years. The package included a phased increase of a total of nine cents per gallon in the state diesel and gas tax over the next five years. Collection of the first five cents of the gas tax increase (Phase 1), began in August, 1990. A principal component of the funding package is AB 471, authored by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D, Panorama City), Chairman of the Assembly Transportation Committee, and AB 1791 (amendments). The legislation established a number of new requirements governing the • • state and local process for the planning and funding of transportation improvements. A key feature of AB 471 is the requirement that every county with an urbanized area of 50,000 or more population must adopt a comprehensive CMP. The CMP represents a new directive for local governments to measure and mitigate the impact of land use decisions on streets, highways, and the regional transportation systems, or face funding sanctions (the loss of subventions of the revenues derived from the increase in the gas tax). On June 11, 1990, after considering several options, the Commission expressed its willingness to act as the CMP Lead Agency for Riverside County and forwarded a requested the cities and the County to support the designation of the Commission as the CMP agency for Riverside County. To date, the cities of Beaumont, Corona, Lake Elsinore, Perris, Riverside, Cathedral City, La Quinta, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, and the County of Riverside have adopted resolutions in support of the designation. The Commission will develop, adopt, and annually update the CMP in cooperation with the local governments, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, WRCOG and CVAG. The CMP must also be submitted to the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) - the regional transportation planning agency to determine the consistency of the CMP with the regional mobility plan (RMP). The intent of AB 471 and AB 1791 is to dramatically shift transportation and funding priorities in California. Specifically, the CMP component is an effort to more directly link land use, transportation, and air quality, thereby prompting reasonable growth management programs that will more effectively use new transportation funds, to alleviate traffic congestion and related impacts, and to improve air quality. The Congestion Management- Program must contain the following elements: Designation of the CMP Load Agency: The County Board of Supervisors, and a majority of cities representing a majority of population in the incorporated area, must designate by resolution, a public agency to prepare and adopt the Congestion Management Program which has authority to monitor the County's and cities' compliance with the adopted program. The jurisdiction of the CMP agency is Riverside County, including all cities. System of Highways and Roadways: 2 • • • • . • • • - The CMP Lead Agency must designate a system of highways and roadways to include, at a minimum, all state highways and principle arterials. Traffic LOS Standards: - The methodology for measuring LOS must be that contained in Circular 212 or the most recent version of the Highway Capacity Manual unless the CMP agency approves the use of another method determined to be consistent with the Highway Capacity Manual; and - Minimum traffic standards must be set no lower than LOS "E" for any segment or intersection on the CMP system, unless the current LOS is lower (i.e. "F"). Land Use Impact Analysis: - The CMP must include a program to analyze the impact of land use decisions by jurisdictions on the regional transportation system, including an estimate of costs to mitigate those impacts; and - The CMP agency is to provide a uniform database on traffic impacts "for use in a countywide transportation computer model". The CMP agency will approve the computer models used within its jurisdiction -- modeling methodology and data bases must be consistent with those of the regional planning agency. Deficiency Plans: AB 471 and AB 1791 provide for the development of Deficiency Plans. The bills state that a city or county may designate as deficient those individual segments or intersections which do not meet the established level of service standards, if prior to the designation at a noticed public hearing, the city or county has adopted a Deficiency Plan. The bills also identify the minimum requirements for the content of Deficiency Plans. Transit Service Standards: Must be established for service frequency (i.e. headways), routing, and coordination among multiple transit agencies operating within the CMP jurisdiction. Trip Reduction and Travel Demand Element: - Must include alternatives to single occupant auto use, such as carpooling, vanpooling, and transit; and - Must promote strategies to manage overall travel demand, such as jobs/housing balance, flextime, and parking strategies. Capital Improvement Program (CIP): - Is a 7-year program; - CIP projects may be incorporated into the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) to be eligible for Flexible Congestion Relief and Urban and Commuter Rail funds; CIP projects will receive higher priority Traffic Systems Management funds; - CIP Projects must maintain or improve LOS established for traffic and transit; and for state standards CIP projects must conform to transportation -related emission air quality mitigation measures. CMP Compliance and Monitoring Requirements: - SCAG must find the CMP consistent with the RMP. Annually, the CMP lead agency must make a determination that its member cities and the County are conforming to requirements of the CMP, including: Consistency with traffic LOS and transit performance standards; Adoption and implementation of a trip reduction and travel demand ordinance; and Adoption and implementation of a program for analyzing land use impacts on transportation system. - Any county or city can adopt a "Deficiency Plan" to include intersections or segments that will not meet traffic LOS requirements. For these deficient segments, city or county can elect to implement improvements to other parts of the system if alternate improvements will "(1) measurably improve the level of service of the system; and (2) contribute to significant improvements in air quality". 4 • • • • . • • • PREPARATION OF THE DRAFT CMP The tasks associated with preparation of the Draft CMP shall be undertaken by the Project Team unless otherwise specified. Given the expertise of various local, regional, and state agency staffs within Riverside County, task responsibilities will be divided among the Project Team and other agencies. All tasks and subtasks shall be documented, technical policy issues shall be addressed, as necessary, and the Draft CMP shall be prepared. Major policy issues shall be reviewed by the TAC CMP Subcommittee, the WRCOG, and CVAG, and then forwarded to the TAC and Commission for review and approval. TASK 1: DESIGNATION OF THE CMP LEAD AGENCY AB 471 and AB 1791 direct each county to designate a CMP Lead Agency to develop and monitor the CMP. The CMP Lead Agency can either be the County Transportation Commission, or another public agency, as designated by resolutions adopted by the county board of supervisors and the city councils of a majority of the cities representing a majority of the population in the incorporated areas of the county. The county and the cities can, if they agree, designate an existing public agency or form a new agency to develop and monitor the CMP. The Commission discussed alternatives for designating existing agencies or creating a new agency to act as the CMP Lead Agency on June 11, 1990 and forwarded letters requesting support of the designation of the Commission to the County of Riverside and each of the cities. TASK 2: DESIGNATION OF THE SYSTEM OF HIGHWAYS AND ROADWAYS AB 471 and AB 1791 require development of a CMP to establish traffic level of service (LOS) standards for a system of highways and roadways designated by the CMP Lead Agency. This system shall include, at a minimum, all state highways and principal arterials, both new (to be implemented during the STIP cycle), and existing facilities. Once designated, no component of the system can be removed. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research, data compilation, and technical analysis will be assumed by the Project Team. The resulting analysis shall be incorporated into the Draft CMP. Task 2.1: Develop criteria to select the System of Highways • • Task 2.2: Task 2.3: and Roadways within Riverside County, focusing on the designation of Principal Arterials within the incorporated and unincorporated areas; and In consultation with the TAC Subcommittee and other local agencies, describe the range of transportation facilities that could be included in a CMP, including the state highway system, bus and rail transit facilities, and principal arterials. Based upon criteria developed in Tasks 2.1, select the Principal Arterials which together with the State Highways constitute the System of Highways and Roadways. The Designated System of Highways and Roadways for Riverside County shall be forwarded to the TAC CMP Subcommittee for review and then to the TAC, WRCOG, and CVAG for review. TASK 3: TRANSPORTATION MODELING AB 471 and AB 1791, require the CMP Lead Agency (Commission), in consultation with SCAG, the County of Riverside and its cities, to develop a uniform data base to be used as input into the subregional computer traffic modeling processes. Commission shall also review and approve transportation computer models for specific areas within the County which are to be used by local jurisdictions to determine the quantitative impacts of development on the circulation system. Local models and databases must be consistent with the RIVSAN and CVATS subregional models. Both the subregional computer models and their data bases must also be consistent with regional models developed by SCAG. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research, data compilation, and technical analysis will be assumed by SCAG/CVAG through their current modeling programs. These agencies will provide the Project Team with technical analysis in the areas specified. The Project Team shall then document the modeling process in the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 3.2: SCAG/RCTC to validate the 1987 Base Year RIVSAN subregional traffic model. Task 3.2: SCAG/RCTC to validate the 1987 Base Year CVATS subregional traffic model. Task 3.3: SCAG/RCTC and WRCOG will be responsible for 6 • • • • • • Task 3.5: • development of the Future Year RIVSAN subregional traffic model which also incorporates the CMP System of Highways and Roadways designated in Task 2. Task 3.4: SCAG/RCTC and CVAG will be responsible for development of the Future Year CVATS subregional traffic model which also incorporates the CMP System of Highways and Roadways designated in Task 2. The following information shall be documented in Tasks 3.1 through 3.4: o Describe the models and database(s) currently used in Riverside County for subregional travel demand projections (RIVSAN and CVATS). Describe how these models incorporate growth and demographic projections; o Describe other computer models that might be used by local jurisdictions for specific subareas within the County, and their relationship to the RIVSAN and CVATS models, specifically, structure and application. Assess what criteria would be used to determine subareas; o Describe the model(s) used by SCAG (GMA 4 Mod J/H) to project Riverside County growth and traffic, and to establish the assumptions for transportation improvements contained in the Regional Mobility Plan (RMP); o Identify and evaluate how both the Riverside County (RIVSAN and CVATS) and SCAG models project highway and transit demand, and how mode split is determined, or is to be determined; and o Discuss the conflicts and discrepancies between the Riverside County and SCAG input data, and identify the policy issues which should be addressed such as trip reduction, growth management (jobs/housing balance), and transportation improvement requirements. Evaluate the RIVSAN and CVATS models and data base(s) for their consistency with those used by SCAG. The Project Team, working with SCAG modeling staff, shall apply the suggested modeling process to assess land use impacts associated with a recent development proposal which includes a completed traffic impact analysis. The results of this analysis will assist staff in determining the process through which development proposals should be evaluated, and the threshold or level of development which has the potential to impact the • Task 3.6: designated CMP System of Highways and Roadways. Establish procedures for the funding and administration of the land use impact assessment process using the subregional models or their subsets. Prior to the development of Tasks 3.1 through 3.6, the Project Team shall develop and prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o What agency(s) should be responsible for modeling Riverside County's traffic and transportation? o For what purposes should local governments use computer models other than RIVSAN and CVATS, and on what basis should subareas of the County be determined? o What changes are needed to resolve current conflicts between the Riverside County and SCAG data bases for purposes of complying with AB 471's consistency requirements? o Where should Commission, as the CMP Lead Agency, locate the CMP modeling function for purposes of AB 471 and AB 1791, and what are the options with respect to staff support, maintenance and funding? Can AB 471 and AB 1791 requirements be met through existing agency resources devoted to modeling? TASK 4: LEVELS OF SERVICE According to AB 471 and AB 1791, LOS shall be measured by a) Circular 212, b) the most recent version of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM), or c) by an alternative uniform methodology adopted by the CMP Lead Agency (Commission) which SCAG determines is consistent with the Highway Capacity Manual. In no case shall the standards established be below LOS E or the current level, whichever is farthest from LOS A. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research, data compilation, and technical analysis will be assumed by the Project Team. The analysis shall then be incorporated into the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 4.1: Identify the method which should be used for calculating LOS standards. Evaluate differences between the HCM and Circular 212 LOS models and their applicability to existing and future year LOS analysis. Task 4.2: Assess how a LOS standard is to be established and 8 • • • • • • • s Task 4.3: implemented on a Countywide basis for the Base Year which reflects existing and vested development. Discuss how consistency with the established standard is to be determined and monitored. Assess how a LOS standard is to be established and implemented on a Countywide basis for the Future Year which reflects the Base Year and the Future Year socioeconomic data bases developed by SCAG, and the land use factors and socioeconomic data bases developed for the subregional traffic models. Discuss how consistency with the established standard is to be determined and monitored. Task 4.4: Consider alternatives for acquiring traffic count data. Identify existing count locations and additional locations along the CMP network where counts will be necessary. Determine the level and type of counts which will be necessary to develop the LOS analysis. Task 4.5: Discuss how transportation demand management (TDM) measures designed to reduce vehicle trips and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) could, in conjunction with the use of transportation system management (TSM) measures, affect LOS calculations. TASK 5: LAND USE COORDINATION AB 471 and AB 1791 require that the CMP include an element that analyzes the impacts of land use decisions made by local jurisdictions on the regional transportation system, and estimates the costs associated with mitigating those impacts. This program does, however, exclude local land use decisions pertaining to proposed developments specified in development agreements entered into prior to July 10, 1989. Also excluded from the program are costs associated with mitigating the impacts of interregional travel. Credit must be provided for local public and private contributions to improvements on the regional transportation system. For toll road facilities, however, such credit can only be provided for contributions which are not reimbursed from toll revenues or other state or federal funds. The Commission, as the CMP Lead Agency, will be responsible for calculating the amount of credit to be provided. This task is one of the most significant elements of the CMP Work Program since it focuses on a central objective of AB 471 and AB • • 1791, that being to promote a more direct linkage between land use planning and resulting transportation needs. To meet the requirements of this task, the Project Team shall conduct the necessary research, provide appropriate analysis, and incorporate the analysis in the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 5.1: Develop a program to analyze land use impacts and coordinate with the local agencies. Specific components of this task include: Identify and discuss the implications of the CMP on land use decision making by local agencies in Riverside County at the general plan, zoning, subdivision map, site plan and permit issuance levels; Survey and review the extent to which local and regional transportation/traffic impacts are typically assessed by local governments. Describe what techniques or models are used for impact assessment, and how mitigation costs are determined. Specifically include a discussion of any available traffic impact guidelines or practices; - Describe the method(s) by which impacts associated with interregional travel can be identified and isolated, together with accompanying mitigation costs, for purposes of excluding them from the mitigation program; - Describe how credits for local public and private contributions to improvements on the regional transportation system can be calculated. Include a description of how local, public, and private contributions to toll road facilities which are reimbursed from toll revenues or other state and federal funds can be identified and isolated for purposes of excluding them from the credit calculations; - Identify and describe some select tools in use by local agencies in Riverside County for monitoring land use and growth. Discuss the extent to which such tools could be used on a Countywide basis for purposes of meeting AB 471 and AB 1791 land use impact requirements; 10 • • • • . • • • - Based on the above review, evaluate the feasibility of developing a standardized Countywide program for determining land use impacts and resulting mitigation requirements. Discuss the cross -jurisdictional coordination problems that would be involved in project review, permit processing, and monitoring; - With respect to monitoring land use and growth, and determining land use impacts and resulting mitigation requirements, discuss the implications of excluding proposed developments specified in development agreements entered into prior to July 10, 1989, and how that would be accomplished; and - Evaluate the extent to which implementing AB 471 and AB 1791 may necessitate a centralized land use and transportation planning process within Riverside County. Task 5.2: Develop a program which estimates mitigation costs and how they are to be implemented and coordinated Countywide. Prior to the development of Tasks 5.1 and 5.2, the Project Team shall prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations to the TAC CMP Subcommittee on the following issues: o What organizational mechanisms can or should be used to coordinate or centralize the impact assessment and mitigation requirements of AB 471 and AB 1791 between the County and its 20 cities? What alternative roles could be assumed by the Commission as the CMP Lead Agency? What are the principal adjustments needed to local planning, zoning and permitting functions, and how might these be both minimized and accomplished? Can the existing CEQA process be established to accomplish these issues? o Should an explicit process be established requiring each transit operator to review impacts of land use decisions on their system's operating and capital needs? o What is the potential for integrating the impact analysis and mitigation requirements under this Task with the process for meeting the LOS Standard under Task 4? 11 • • o What methods should be used to estimate the costs of mitigating land use impacts? Are such methods capable of being standardized, coordinated, and implemented on a Countywide basis? TASK 6: LOS DEFICIENCY PLAN LOS standards must be established for a Countywide highway/roadway system. However, AB 471 provides an exception for individual segments or intersections which would not meet the established standards. A city or the County is allowed to designate such segments or intersections as deficient, but only if the jurisdiction has adopted a Deficiency Plan prior to making the designation. This Deficiency Plan must include the following principal elements: 1) an analysis of the causes of the deficiency; 2) a list of improvements that would be necessary to maintain the minimum LOS standard and their estimated costs; 3) a list of improvements, programs, or actions, along with their estimated costs, that would measurably improve LOS for the entire system, as well as contribute to significant improvements in air quality if approved by the SCAQMD; and 4) an action plan that includes a specific implementation schedule. The city or the County must submit its adopted Deficiency Plan to the Commission (CMP Lead Agency), which, following a public hearing, must accept or reject the Plan in its entirety. If rejected, the city or the County must be notified of the specific reasons for such action. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research and technical analysis will be assumed by the Project Team, which will also incorporate the analysis into the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 6.1: Develop a plan format to assist local agencies with preparation of Deficiency Plans which incorporates requirements of AB 471 and AB 1791. Task 6.2: Develop a procedure for identifying deficient segments or intersections Countywide. Assess what criteria or methodologies might be employed if 12 • e • • • • • different from those used for LOS calculations under Task 4. Develop a process that the Commission (CMP Lead Agency) could use to review and approve Deficiency Plans; and Discuss how Deficiency Plans developed by individual jurisdictions can be coordinated on a Countywide basis. Task 6.3: Describe a generic range of improvements that a) might be used to maintain the minimum required LOS standard at locations of identified deficiencies (segments or intersections), and b) those which would constitute improvements, programs, or actions that would measurably improve LOS for the entire designated system. Task 6.4: Develop criteria which can be applied to determine the impact of neighbor agency projects on other agency Deficiency Plans. Prior to the development of Tasks 6.1 through 6.4, the Project Team shall develop and .prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o Should the identification of deficiencies and the development of Deficiency Plans be coordinated on a Countywide basis? What are the options for establishing such a process? o If the process is not coordinated, how should the Commission respond to cases of reluctance or inaction by local jurisdictions which could jeopardize Countywide compliance with CMP requirements? o What criteria should be used in determining whether to accept or reject a Deficiency Plan? Further, assess the extent to which: o Improvements to measurably improve air quality could be the same as, or correspond to, those projects in the Seven -Year CIP that are required to mitigate regional impacts and conform to air quality mitigation measures. (See Task 9). o Develop programs or actions designed to measurably improve air quality which are the same as, or correspond to, those programs or actions which are required of local governments to implement select Control Measures and other provisions of the regional Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). (See the AQMP elements of Task 8.) 13 • • o Local governments, in developing their individual Deficiency Plans, could participate in a coordinated process that identifies air quality related improvements, programs or actions as discussed in A and B above so as to maximize their potential for approval by the SCAQMD. o To protect against nonconformity, if the Commission as the Lead Agency, rejects a Deficiency Plan submitted by a city or the County, should Commission subsequently incorporate the improvements listed in the Plan into its own Seven -Year CIP? o If a local agency is found to be in nonconformance, would state subvention funds be placed into an escrow account until conformance is assured, or would the funds be reprogrammed statewide? TASK 7: PUBLIC TRANSIT/PASSENGER RAIL STANDARDS AB 471 and AB 1791 require that the CMP establish LOS standards for the frequency and routing of public transit, and for the coordination of transit service provided by separate operators. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research and technical analysis will be assumed by the Project Team which shall also incorporate the analysis into the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 7.1: Develop transit and passenger rail standards for service frequency, routing, and coordination. Specific components of this task include the following: o Describe operational and performance standards that are applied in providing bus transit services, and how these will relate to CMP requirements under AB 471 and AB 1791; o Describe how transit operations in Riverside County are currently coordinated with transit operations in adjacent jurisdictions; o Evaluate current programs such as the Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) and the triennial Performance Audit process, and how they could be integrated into the CMP; and o Identify existing and proposed plans for rail services, including commuter rail, and privately operated systems (High speed rail, etc.). 14 • • • • • • • Task 7.2: Describe and summarize how the frequency and routing of bus transit services in the County are determined, and identify the principal operational considerations and facility requirements (transit centers, park -and -ride lots, etc.); and Develop a process for determining the impact of transit and rail passenger improvements on the LOS associated with Deficiency Plans, and on adopted LOS standards. Prior to development of Tasks 7.1 and 7.2, the Project Team shall develop and prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o Are the operational standards currently used for determining the frequency and routing of public transit services within Riverside County adequate for purposes of meeting AB 471 and AB 1791 requirements? If not, what changes to these standards should be required? o How should future countywide rail service, including both state and private operations, be incorporated into the CMP? o How can the SRTPs and the Triennial Performance Audit process be integrated into the CMP process? TASK 8: TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT/AIR QUALITY AB 471 and AB 1791 require that the CMP include a trip reduction and travel demand element that promotes alternative transportation methods such as carpools, vanpools, transit, bicycles, and related park -and -ride lots; improvements in the balance between jobs and housing; and development of strategies including flexible work hours and parking management programs. To meet the requirements of this task, responsibility for research, data compilation, and technical analysis will be developed by the Project Team and incorporated into the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include the following: Task 8.1: Evaluate and compare the linkage or interface between the adopted Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP) and the CMP requirements under AB 471 and AB 1791. Consideration should be given to the following AQMP components: - Transportation Demand Management (TDM) - related Control Measures to be developed 15 • through the Attainment Plan required by the California Clean Air Act; - Traffic flow/mobility implications of the jobs/housing balance requirements under SCAG's Growth Management Plan (GMP); - Monitoring consistent with SCAG's Reasonable Further Progress (RFP) requirements under the AQMP; and AQMP Conformity requirements relative to transportation and general development. Evaluate the South Coast Air Quality Management District's (SCAQMD) Regulation XV Program focusing on its objectives, features, and current implementation status. Assess the extent to which this program could meet the trip reduction/alternative mode requirements of AB 471 and AB 1791. Task 8.2: Identify specific funding sources which can be applied to implement TDM strategies. Task 8.3: Task 8.4: Survey TDM programs and model ordinances currently being implemented in Riverside County. Compare these to ordinances in use by other cities and counties in the region. Identify the principal components of such programs or ordinances and assess the range of problems in the TDM field including program design, monitoring, enforcement, and actual effectiveness in achieving such objectives as trip reduction, reduced VMT, and greater use of alternative modes. Review the advantages and disadvantages of establishing a standardized Countywide TDM program or model ordinances, particularly focusing on the issues of implementation and monitoring. Prior to the development of Task 8.1 through 8.4, the Project Team shall develop and prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o To what extent can the processes for implementing AQMP requirements that relate to trip reduction and alternative transportation modes be integrated with the CMP process? 16 • • • • • o What options should be considered for establishing a TDM program for purposes of AB 471 and AB 1791. Alternatives include: (1) Implementing SCAQMD's Regulation XV Program as the principal TDM component for the CMP and integrating other local programs as appropriate; and (2) Pursuing adoption of TDM model ordinances by local governments Countywide, assuring compatibility with Regulation XV, as required. o What options should be considered for monitoring and enforcement of the TDM program under each of the respective alternatives identified above? o How can TDM and TSM efforts be monitored to ensure the mitigation of LOS deficiencies (see Task 6) and land use impacts (see Task 5)? TABX 9: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (TIP PROCESS) AB 471 and AB 1791 require the CMP to include a Seven -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) to maintain or improve the traffic level of service and transit performance standards developed in Task 7. Further, they require the CMP mitigate regional transportation impacts defined in Task 5 in a manner that conforms to transportation -related vehicle emission air quality mitigation measures. To meet the requirements of this task, the CIP requirements shall be the same as, and accomplished through the RTIP/STIP development process. The Project Team shall document the procedure in the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 9.1: Based on the process for evaluating transportation improvement projects, develop a proposed Model Seven -Year CIP, and coordinate the RTIP and CMP processes; and Evaluate the level of consistency between the model Seven -Year CIP (TIP) and SCAG's Transportation Conformity Guidelines developed for the regional Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). Particular attention should be given to SCAG's definition of a regionally significant project and its environmental review requirements. Discuss any problems that may arise regarding SCAG's responsibility to make a finding that projects in the CIP conform with the Regional Mobility Plan 17 • • the CIP conform with the Regional Mobility Plan (RMP) . Prior to the development of Task 9.1, the Project Team will develop and prepare an additional Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o If there are any conflicts between air quality conformity standards and AB 471 and AB 1791 requirements for a CIP and mitigations, how might these be avoided or resolved? o SCAG Conformity Guidelines defer to a local finding of AQMP/RMP conformity. Should SCAG overrule this local finding, how would this impact development of the CIP? TASK 10: CMP COMPLIANCE AND MONITORING PROCESS CMP Compliance Process: AB 471 requires SCAG to review the CMP for consistency with the Regional Mobility Plan (RMP) and conformance with CMPs from adjacent counties. Every odd -numbered year, SCAG must also adopt a Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) to include projects and programs to be funded from flexible congestion relief funds, urban and commuter rail funds, and local sources. Projects and programs adopted in the RTIP must be consistent with the Seven -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) in the CMP as well as with guidelines for incorporation of these projects as developed by Caltrans. If SCAG finds that a CMP is inconsistent with the RMP, or incompatible with other CMP's in the region, it may exclude projects identified in the CMP from inclusion in the RTIP. To meet the requirements of this task the Project Team shall develop a technical analysis and document the process in the Draft CMP. Specific tasks include: Task 10.1: Identify how AB 471 and AB 1791 affects: a) the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) process; b) California Transportation Commission (CTC) guidelines for commuter rail, urban rail transit and inner-city rail; c) the Flexible Congestion Relief Program, and d) guidelines from Caltrans on capital programming. Further, evaluate how these revisions may affect the process for adoption of the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP); Identify Riverside County's existing projects in the 3-5 year RTIP, the Biennial Element, and 18 • • • • • • • • projected programming for the next several TIP cycles; Compare programmed Riverside County projects against available and projected revenues by source and category, and estimated net contributions from projected CMP subventions; Identify and evaluate what County projects should be included in the CMP Seven -Year CIP, and factors involved in making such determinations, such as local priorities and funding mix; and Identify the parameters which SCAG would use to determine that a CMP is consistent with the RMP, and compatible with other CMPs in the region. Prior to development of Task 10.1, the Project Team shall develop and prepare a Policy Options Paper that discusses and presents recommendations to the TAC CMP Subcommittee on the following issues: o How should Countywide priorities for transportation improvements be determined and who should make this determination? Should the CMP identify such projects by funding source and availability? o How might conflicting priorities from Caltrans or the CTC/STIP be resolved? o How can the problem of a potential finding by SCAG of inconsistency between the CMP and the RMP be avoided or resolved, including the possibility that the CMP might be found incompatible with other programs in the region? Local Agency Conformance/Monitoring: AB 471 and AB 1791 require the CMP Lead Agency (Commission) to monitor implementation of all elements of the CMP, and annually determine if the County and cities are conforming to the CMP including LOS standards, trip and travel demand reduction, and land use impact analyses. Nonconformance may result in the withholding of local gas tax funds. For purposes of conformance with LOS standards, the Commission as the CMP Lead Agency, shall exclude those deficient segments/intersections that are designated on an approved plan, as well as impacts from such sources as: interregional travel; facility construction, rehabilitation or maintenance; freeway ramp metering; traffic signalization done by the state or multi - jurisdictional agencies; and traffic generated by the provision of low income housing. 19 • • Finding(s) of nonconformance must be made by the Commission at a public hearing and written notice provided to respective cities or the County. If these jurisdictions do not come into conformance within ninety (90) days, the finding(s) must be submitted to the State Controller and Caltrans. This work activity focuses on procedural and administrative functions (in this case monitoring and conformity), but also raises numerous policy issues. To meet the requirements of this task, the Project Team shall conduct the necessary research, compile data and provide appropriate analysis incorporating the following tasks: Task 10.2: Task 10.3: Describe and evaluate generic techniques that can be used to monitor LOS, trip and travel demand, and land use impacts on transportation systems; Survey Riverside County local governments to describe how and to what extent the above monitoring techniques have been incorporated into land use and transportation planning; and Evaluate the impact on the CMP implementation process if a local jurisdiction invokes local land use authority, thereby triggering AB 471's and AB 1791's nonconformance provisions; Describe how the exceptions to the LOS conformity standard can be identified and isolated for monitoring purposes; and Growth and development decisions of adjacent jurisdictions beyond the control of Riverside County local governments could adversely impact CMP implementation. Assess how this might effect SCAG's responsibility for evaluating consistency and compatibility of CMPs within the region. Further, identify problems this may present regarding projects identified in the local CMP which are being excluded from the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP). Prior to the development of Tasks 10.2 and 10.3, the Project Team shall prepare a Policy Options Paper which discusses and presents recommendations on the following issues: o What would be the best method for implementing the CMP's monitoring requirements? Can techniques for monitoring LOS standards, land use impacts, etc., Countywide, be effectively centralized under the Lead Agency? Should local agencies, as designated by the Commission as the 20 • • • • • CMP Lead Agency, be utilized to provide traffic data? o What network of transportation facilities, including the state system, transit and rail facilities should be included in the CMP for purposes of monitoring the LOS E standards? o Identify how the problems that may exist in coordinating the monitoring function between multiple jurisdictions Countywide could be resolved. o What constitutes nonconformity, and what process or methods such as peer review or self -certification might Commission as the CMP Lead Agency use to make a local conformity finding? o What steps should be followed if a jurisdiction invokes local authority and refuses to conform with CMP requirements? o Are there options under AB 471 and AB 1791 for the Lead Agency (Commission) to phase in CMP requirements? TASK 11: CMP DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION AB 471 and AB 1791 require that the CMP be developed, adopted and annually updated. Locally, the program must be developed by the Commission (CMP Lead Agency) in consultation and cooperation with SCAG, Caltrans, WRCOG and CVAG, transit operators, Riverside County and its cities, and the SCAQMD. This task focuses largely on the procedural, administrative, and coordination activities related to CMP development, adoption, and the update process. It also raises numerous policy issues regarding the linkage to local growth management. To meet the requirements of this work effort, the Project Team shall process the Draft CMP consistent with the following tasks: Task 11.1: Submit the Draft CMP to the TAC CMP Subcommittee for review. Task 11.2: Upon review of the Draft CMP by the TAC CMP Subcommittee, distribute the Draft CMP for 30 day local, and regional review. Task 11.3: The Project Team shall prepare the Final CMP incorporating comments, as necessary. Task 11.4: Submit the Final Draft CMP to the TAC, WRCOG, and CVAG for review and approval. 21 • • Task 11.5: Submit the Final Draft CMP to the Commission and SCAG for review and approval. Task 11.6: Develop a proposed TIP for Riverside County that incorporates CMP projects. Task 11.7: Submit the proposed TIP to the Commission for review and approval and for submittal to SCAG. The following information shall also be incorporated into this CMP element: o Identify the principal activities that would be required in a process for developing, adopting and annually updating the CMP. Identify administrative and organizational issues such as program management, costs of preparation, required staff resources, scheduling, and coordination. o To provide adequate review time, CMPs should be submitted to SCAG by the end of each August preceding the December submittal of the RTIP to the California Transportation Commission. Given the extremely tight deadline for the first CMP, SCAG may consider special accommodations for the 1992 RTIP cycle. SCAG will make a finding of consistency with the RMP for the initial CMP, and every two years thereafter when the CMP is submitted for RTIP inclusion. o What process should be used for developing and adopting the CMP, and performing the update functions, given the organizational framework identified under Task Area 14: Project Management? o In what ways could the CMP be integrated with other local growth management plans? TASK 12: REGIONAL (SCAG) REVIEW Task 12.1: Submit the Draft CMP to SCAG. Based upon its review of the Riverside County CMP, the SCAG Executive Committee adopts the RTIP following adoption of the CMP by the Commission. Task 12.2: SCAG submits the RTIP to the California Transportation Commission (CTC) for review. Task 12.3: The CTC adopts the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). 22 • • • • • TASK 13: FINAL DRAFT CMP Reports and Exhibits: Task 13.1: The Project Team will prepare a Draft CMP by April, 30, 1991 which combines all the components specified in Tasks 1 through 11 into a single volume. This product shall include any necessary exhibits, charts, tables, and appendices. Task 13.2: The Project Team will be required to verify and defend that all information submitted as services rendered is accurate and current. Furthermore, the consultant will be required to document the source(s) of all compiled _information. All information generated as part of the consultant's or Commission staff's work, shall become part of the public record on the project. Printing Requirements: Task 13.3: The Commission shall be responsible for printing the Policy Papers, Technical Memorandums, and the Draft and Final CMP. Project Schedule: Task 13.3: Development of the Draft CMP shall be performed in accordance with the CMP Work Program Schedule (see Exhibit A). TASK 14: PROJECT MANAGEMENT The Primary Consultant shall work with, and under the direction of, the Commission Project Manager and assigned staff and the Commission TAC CMP Subcommittee toward preparation of the CMP. The Program shall be prepared considering technical papers and alternative policy recommendations to be submitted for review and approval by the TAC, the COG's and the Commission. Management functions will be performed jointly by the TAC CMP Subcommittee and the Project Team. The TAC CMP Subcommittee will provide direction in the development of technical components. The COG's and Commission will provide direction in matters involving final policy decisions and relations with other governmental functions. The Project Team will prepare recommendations for presentation the TAC CMP Subcommittee and will be responsible for carrying the work forward to the COG's and Commission. 23 • • Progress Report: Task 14.1: The Project Team shall prepare and present a progress report each month to the TAC CMP Subcommittee. Included should be a summary of the work accomplished during the preceding month, together with an account of any significant problems that were encountered. Meetings: Task 14.2: Presentations: Task 14.3: Close coordination with the TAC CMP Subcommittee during preparation of the Plan is required. The consultant shall attend regular coordination meetings with the TAC CMP Subcommittee and weekly meetings with the Project Manager and staff, as found necessary. The purpose of these meetings will be to report on the progress of the Plan, receive direction, and discuss and resolve issues. The consultant may be required to attend meetings of the TAC CMP Subcommittee as necessary for purposes of presenting recommendations and other information pertaining to development of the CMP. This could include requests for assistance in compiling whatever supplemental material or information which may be required throughout the development of the Draft CMP, including report writing and display graphics. 24 • • • • • CMP SCHEDULE 1990 1991 1992 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN PREPARE CMP WORK PROGRAM ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••• TASK l Initiate Development of CMP Work Program 1.1 Establish TAC CMP Sub -Committee • 1.2 Develop Tasks/Schedule of Work Activity ••••• 1.3 Identify Reaoosible Agencies ••••• 1.4 Develop Person Year Costs ••••• .•. 1.5 Document CMP Work Program •...• ••• 1.6 Submit Work Program to TAC CMP Sub -Committee • 1.7 Submit Work Program to TAC • 1.8 Submit Work Program to RCTC (Commission) • PREPARE DRAFT CMP ••••• .•... TASK 2 Designate System of Highways and Roadways 2.1 Define Criteria for Selecting Network ••••• 2.2 Select Principal Arterials for Network ..••• 2.3 Forward to TAC CMP Sub -Committee for Review • 2.4 Forward to TAC, WRCOG, do CVAG for Review ••••• •• TASK 3 Develop Transportation Modeling Program 3.1 SCAG (DKS) Validate 1987 Base Year RIVSAN ••••• ..••• ••••• ••••. ••••• ••••• ••••• •...• Model, Add CMP Network 3.2 SCAG/CVAG Validate 1987 Base Year CVATS Model ••••• ••••• ***se ••••• ••••• •.•.• ••••• •...• ••••• ••.•• ••••• •.••• 3.3 SCAG (DKS) Develop Future Year Model ••••• 3.4 SCAG/CVAG Develop Future Year Model •u.. 3.5 Apply Models to Assess Land Use Impacts ♦•••►.•••• 3.6 Establish Procedural for Funding/Administration ••••• •.•.• CMP SCHEDULE TASK 4 Establish LOS Criteria 4.1 Identify LOS Analysis Program 4.2 Develop Base Year LOS Analysis Process 4.3 Develop Future Year LOS Analysis Process 4.4 Develop Expanded Count Program, if Necessary 1990 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1991 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1992 JAN ••*•• ***** test* **es* *at•• ••*e• *tat* O••** •et*• t*t** **t** •e•*t •••*• •O*•• ••OO• *se** ••••• *Oise •*O•• •.00O tee** ••**• Os**• •*O•• *tee* Ott** •*t•• 4.5 Dcfinc relationship between TDM measures and LOS TASK 5 Develop Program to Analyze Land Use Impacts 5.1 Develop Process and Coordinate with Agencies 5.2 Develop Program to Estimate Mitigation Cods TASK 6 Develop LOS for Deficiency Plans 6.1 Develop Format for Deficiency Plans 6.2 Develop Criteria to Evaluate Deficiency Plans 6.3 Identify Links/Intersections with Deficiencies 6.4 Develop Criteria for Evaluating Impact of Neighbor Agency Projects on Deficiency Plans TASK 7 Establish Public Transit and Rail Standards 7.1 Develop Transit and Rail Standards for Service ***** **••• ***** **OO• ***** ♦**** ••••• **Ott ••*•• **44* *so** ••••• ***** Frequency, Routing. and Coordination 7.2 Develop LOS Process TASK 8 Develop Air Quality and TDM Elements 8.1 Identify TDM Strategies 8.2 Identify Funding Sources 8.3 Develop Effectiveness Monitoring Program 8.4 Identify Issues Associated with Development TDM Ordinance *Ot *** ••••* ***t* *See* ***•* *so** ••••t tt*** ••••• *•••• of • • • • • • AGENDA ITEM #5B • • October 31, 1990 TO: • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Administrative Committee FROM: James W. Werle, Senior Staff Analyst THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Contract for Congestion Management Plan Consultant Georgiena Vivian of Valley Research and Planning Associates has worked with RCTC staff, County and city staff and the staff of the regional and subregional agencies to prepare the Work Program and schedule for the Congestion Management Plan. The Riverside County Work Program is discussed and recommended for approval in a separate item. Georgiena's knowledge of transportation planning and traffic analysis and her efforts in preparing the Congestion Management Plan have been very helpful to the Commission staff. In addition to her direct efforts on the Work Program, Georgiena has been instrumental in establishing communications with other Congestion Management Agencies throughout the state and coordinating our efforts with the County and cities. Her work in coordinating our efforts with other Congestion Management Agencies and with local jurisdictions have been especially important because the state legislation lacks specificity in many areas, and a great deal of work will be required in deciding how to implement the program. We have estimated that approximately 550 hours of consulting time would be required to implement the Work Program. Considering the value of Georgiena's work to date and the importance of the tasks coming up, particularly with regard to the methodology for determining Levels of Service and measuring the impacts of development on the Congestion Management system staff recommends retaining Valley Research and Planning Associates to provide assistance to develop the Congestion Management Plan as outlined in the Work Program. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Authorize the Executive Director to amend the existing contract with Valley Research and Planning Associates to have them assist in the preparation of the Congestion Management Plan for an amount not to exceed $40,000. JW:sc f:\users\ preprint\ 11-1490.agd\cmp_vrpa. jw • • • AGENDA ITEM #6 • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Renewal of Contract With Carl Schiermeyer and Associates The approved FY 1990-91 budget earmarked $107,388 for the commuter rail program development, of which $80,000 was assumed for Carl Schiermeyer and Associates. Carl is RCTC's general rail consultant. He is one of the most effective consultants currently under contract with RCTC and his continuing services are required for the success of the commuter rail program. The current contract with Carl Schiermeyer is nearing the $75,000 limit. To date, $61,350 has been obligated. It is necessary to renew the contract to continue to retain his services. His hourly costs will increase from $75 to $85, primarily attributable to increases in overhead and cost of living. STAFF RECOMMENDATION RCTC should authorize renewal of the existing contract with Carl Schiermeyer and Associates with the hourly rate to increase to $85 and the limit to be set at $80,000. JR:nk • • • • AGENDA ITEM #7A • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Mark Massman, Measure "A" Project Manager Karl Sauer, Project Coordinator THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Consultant Agreement with Dames & Moore for: 1. Preliminary Engineering and Environmental Services for the Route 79; Gilman Springs Road to First Street, in the City of Beaumont, Widening Project. 2. Environmental Services for the Route 79; Keller Road to Newport Road, Widening Projects. Through the Measure "A" selection process, Dames & Moore was assigned the opportunity to provide preliminary engineering and environmental services for the above referenced projects on State Route 79. Dames & Moore will function as leader of a consultant team charged with the task of producing all necessary Phase 0 project development activities which will culminate in the production of a Project Report for project 1. Dames & Moore will also perform analysis and prepare documents necessary to achieve environmental clearance under NEPA and CEQA regulations for projects 1 and 2. Negotiations on this agreement are not completed with Dames & Moore at this time, but staff is working to finalize this contract for Board approval at the November Commission meeting. The attached scope of work and schedule, details work activities and costs for project development tasks and environmental clearances to be conducted by Dames & Moore. The Commission's recently approved standard contract will be used for this agreement. Dames & Moore has requested that the Commission consider changes to the model agreement. These changes were forwarded to Steve DeBaun for his review and will be satisfactorily resolved before the contract is finalized. f:\users\preprint\ 11-1490.agd\dames-mull Page Two October 31, 1990 Consultant Agreement with Dames & Moore STAFF RECOMMENDATION Approve the Agreement with Dames & Moore which will be in the range of $ 900,000.00 to $1,100,000.00. Funds for this contract have been included in the 1991 RCTC budget under Professional Services. MTM:sc attachment • • (: \ users \preprint\ 11.1490.agd\dames.mtm RIVER5IOE COUNTY TRANSPORTATI• C OMMISSION 3560 University Avenue Suite 100 • Riverside. California 92501 (714) 787-7141 •FAX 17l4) 787-7920 October 9, 1990 Mr. Dallas Holmes Best, Best & Krieger 3750 University Avenue Riverside, California 92502 Subject: Review of Suggested Modifications to RCTC Model Contract Agreement for Dames & Moore Route 79 Contract Proposal Dear Dallas: We are currently in the process of negotiating a contract with the firm of Dames & Moore, to provide Preliminary Engineering and Environmental Services for the Measure "A" Route 79 Projects. As part of the negotiations, Dames & Moore has reviewed our model contract agreement and has suggested several additions, deletions or revisions to the proposed agreement. I have attached a copy of their suggested modifications to the agreement for your review and comment. Sincerely, k Reagan, Executive Director erside County Transportation Commission JR/KDS:sc Attachments: Comments on Contract Provisions RO-9111 cc: Mark Massman - - - f.-�v % 7.0 COMMITS ON CONTRACT PlOVISIOiis General An initial review of the proposed agreement to be used this project has been completed by Dames i Moore. The followint comments provide suggested additions, deletions or revisions to to proposed agreement. We understand that additional discussions be necessary to arrive at mutually agreeable terms to be inc1::de: in the agreement. 3.1 General Description of Services: After "Exhibit A,: ad= ", dated ".., 3.8 pesnonsibility of Consultant 11:\170\AUC Line 10: delete "applicable law"; replace with "the provisions of article 3.16 of this agreement" -57- • • 3.12 Termination/Cancellation 3.12.2 Effect of Termination for Convenience Line 4: Delete the following, "Such payment shall include a prorated amount of profit, If applicable, but." New sentence shall read: "No amount shall be paid for anticipated profit on unperformed services." 3.12.3 Effect of Termination for Cause: Damages Delete the third sentence in its entirety. 3.13 Revisions in Scone of Services 3.13.1 Extra Work We suggest adding to this paragraph a statement describing method of payment for extra work. 3.14 Ownership of Materials/Confidentiality 3.14.2 Confidentiality Add the following to this paragraph: S: \ 170\RC1'C "Contractor's obligations under this Article 3.14.2 shall apply except to the extent required for 1) performance of services under this Agreement: 2) compliance with professional standards of conduct far preservation of the public safety, health and welfare: 3) compliance with any court order or -58- • other governmental directive; and/or protection of Contractor against claims liabilities arising from performance cf services under this Agreement. Contractor's obligations hereunder shall not apply information in the public domain or lawfully acquired under a non -confidential basis frc others." 3.16 jndemnificatiort • • 1:\170\RCTC 3.16.1 Duties Add the underlined words to the third sentence: "The Consultant yarrants that it shall perform the Services..." Add the following sentence to the paragraph: "No other warranty, expressed or implied, is intended cr included in Consultant's reports proposals." 3.16.2 Responsibilities Add the following to the paragraph: "Notwithstanding any other provision of this agreement Consultant's liability for injury cr loss arising from (1) professional errors cr omissions and/or (2) radiation, nuclear reaction, or radioactive substances ^r conditions; and/or (3) any other toxic, irritant, pollutant, or waste gases, liquids, or solid materials shall not exceed $1,000,000. Consultant's comprehensive -59- 1 • • • 3.17 Insurance S:\17o\RcTc general and automobile liability shall nct exceed 51,000,000. The Commission agrees to defend, indemnify, and hold Consultant harmless from any claim, liability, or defense cost in excess of the limits determined above for injury or loss sustained by any party :r7.7 exposures allegedly caused by Consultant's performance of services hereunder. 3.17.1 Commercial General Liability Insurance Note that our insurance is on a combined single limit/annual aggregate basis. Change the first sentence to: "The Consultant shall carry commercial general liability insurance covering third -party liability risks, including contractual liability, in An amount of 51_000.000 combined sincla 1_imitlannua: taareaatt for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage." Change the second sentence to: "The Consultant shall also obtain business automobile liability insurance or equivalent form with a combined single limit/annual aaareaate of 51.000.0OQ. 3.17.2.2 Change the sentence to: "Such policy shall provide for contractual liability assumed under this agreement." 3.17.2.E Substitute sins for "five" years due t� insurance market changes from year to year. -60- d • • 3.17.3 workers' Compensation Insurance Add to the end of the second sentence: "..."losses arising from the services which are covered by this insurance." 3.17.4.1 Additional Insureds Add the underlined to the seccr.t sentence: "... employees, Bechtel civ:: or agents other than the linitaticrs 3areed tg herein." 3.17.4.3 Insurance to Apply Separately to Each Insured Change the sentence ending to: except with respect to limits of the Consultant'* liability AA set for:.: herein• 3.17.4.7 This section should be deleted based cn the changes to Section 3.17.1. 3.26 Compensation and Payment 3.26.1 AMOUNT $:\170\11C7C Add the following sentence to the paragrapr: "Compensation for Extra work shall include costs plus fee adjustment." -61- • • • • • Tit- DAMES & MOORE HLTrO\ CENTRE DRI E. SLI TE':C. SA\TA A\A. CALIFORNIA Q:70' 71.4 FAX (714) 433•=.364 FAX ,".s October 15, 1990 Riverside County Transportation Commission/Bechtel Corporation 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100 Riverside, CA 92501 Attention: Mr. Karl Sauer, P.E. Subject: Draft Scope, Schedule and Cost Estimate for Preliminary Engineering and Environmental Services State Route 79 Improvements Gilman Springs Road/Sanderson Avenue to First Street Dear Mr. Sauer: Transmitted with this letter are six (6) copies of our Draft Scope, Schedule and Cost Estimate to provide Preliminary Engineering and Environmental Services for the project referenced above. After your review of this draft, we look forward to meeting with you to discuss your comments. Thank you for your attention to this matter. Sincerely, DAMES & MOORE GR:LWS:sw Enclosures Gary Rogers Manager Design Services Group Leslie W. Senger Manager Environmental Services Group • • DAMES S MOORE 6 HI.TTON CENTRE DRI\ E. SUITE 700. SANTA ANA. CALIFORNIA 9: 07 k :4'433-:lC FAX (714) 433•:364 FAX :: 433.2365 October 15, 1990 Riverside County Transportation Commission/Bechtel Corporation 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100 Riverside, CA 92501 Attention: Mr. Karl Sauer, P.E. Subject: Draft Environmental Services Scope, Schedule, Cost State Route 79 Improvements Yeller Road to Newuort Road Dear Mr. Sauer: Transmitted with this letter are six (6) copies of our Draft Environmental Services Scope, Schedule, and Cost for the project referenced above. After your review of this draft, we look forward to meeting with you to discuss your comments. Thank you for your attention to this matter. Sincerely, DAMES & MOORE Gary Rogers Manager Design Services Group Leslie W. Senger Manager Environmental Services Group GR:LWS:sw Enclosures • • • • • • APPENDIX A • SCOPE • • • 1.0 INTRODUCTION This technical proposal to Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is for the purpose of preparing environmental studies and preliminary highway design to support project approval and environmental clearance for the segment of State Route 79, between Gilman Springs Road/Sanderson Avenue (PM 33.88) to First Street (PM 40.08) in the City of Beaumont, a distance of 6.2 miles. The project is needed to provide additional capacity in order to accommodate growth in regional through -traffic along the Route 79 corridor as well as from existing and proposed development within the City of Beaumont. Along the segment of Route 79 adjacent to the County landfill, truck traffic causes queuing of vehicles in areas of limited passing opportunities. Caltrans is currently revising the Route Concept Report and Project Study Report to be completed in November 1990. Alternatives under consideration for improving Route 79 consist of: 1) No Project 2) Alignment: Follow Existing Widen to: Four lanes (PM 33.8 to PM 40.08) Outside shoulders: 8-feet Paved Median: 14-feet Left Turn @ Dump Rd.: Pocket In Median 3) Same as Alternative 2 — Except: Realign Approximately one mile of Curve to Position Choice A. 8:\170\RCTC 1- • • • • • 4) Same as Alternative 2 — Except: Realign Approximately one mile of Curve to Position Choice B. 5) Same as Alternative 2 — Except: Widen and Add Interchange at Dump Road Intersection 6) Same as Alternative 2 — Except: Paved Median: 4-feet 7) Same as Alternative 3 — Except: Paved Median: 4-feet 8 ) 8:\170\RCTC Same as Alternative 4 — Except: Paved Median: 4-feet -2- • • 2.0 PROJECT ASSUMPTIONS In preparing this proposal, we have made certain basic assumptions that govern required level of effort and schedule. The following listing identifies key assumptions: o The route is 6.2 miles in length; none of the alternatives will increase this length. o The following corridor widths will accommodate proposed and alternative improvements: - 150-foot width (3.5 miles) - 300-foot width (0.5 mile) - 500-foot width (1 mile) - 600-foot width (1.2 miles) o Eight (8) alternatives (including No Project) will require engineering and environmental evaluation (preparation of an Environmental Assessment). o Screencheck, draft, and final versions will be required for all products. For all major products, the following numbers of copies will be provided: - Screencheck (15 copies) - Draft (30 copies) - Final (30 copies) o Public/agency distribution copies include: 8:\170\RCTC - Draft EA (150 copies) - Final EA (150 copies) -3- • • • • • o RCTC/Caltrans will require 4 to 6 weeks for review of major products. o Contract will be executed such that Consultant work will commence on November 26, 1990. o Materials to be furnished by RCTC/Caltrans: - PSR - RSR - Copies of "As -Built" Plans - Survey Data including Control (within 6 months of N.T.P.) - Existing Geotechnical/Materials Data - Aerial Photos - Right -of -Way Maps (Existing) - Pertinent Correspondence - Two (2) set of Manuals, Standards, Specifications, etc. - Traffic Index o Work to be performed by RCTC/Caltrans: 8:\170\RCTC - All correspondence with FHWA - Encroachment Permits -4- • • 2.0 PROJECT ASSUMPTIONS In preparing this proposal, we have made certain basic assumptions that govern required level of effort and schedule. The following listing identifies key assumptions: o The route is 4.3 miles in length; none of the alternatives will increase this length. o A corridor width of 150 feet is assumed to accommodate proposed and alternative improvements. o Four alternatives will require environmental evaluation to complete an Environmental Assessment. o Screencheck, draft, and final versions will be required for all products. For all products, the following number of copies will be provided: - Screencheck (15 copies) - Draft (30 copies) - Final (30 copies) o Public/agency distribution copies include: Draft EA (150 copies) - Final EA (150 copies) o RCTC/Caltrans will require 4 to 6 weeks for review of products. o Contract will be executed such that Consultant work will be authorized on November 26, 1990. Environmental evaluation work will not start until July 1991 (after completion of PSR in late June 1991). -2- A:001\RCTC.2 • • • • • • • 1.0 INTRODUCTION This proposal with Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is for the purpose of providing environmental studies to support project approval and environmental clearance for the segment of State Route 79 between Keller Road (PM 10.9) and Newport Road (PM 15.2), a distance of 4.3 miles. Caltrans is revising the Route Concept Report. The Project Study Report (PSR) will not be completed until late June 1991. The project is needed to provide additional capacity in order to accommodate growth in traffic generated from new and existing development. Alternatives under consideration for improving Route 79 consist of widening the existing roadway from one to two lanes in each direction with either a 14-foot median, 4-foot median or no median, and the No Project. A:001\RCTC.2 -1- • • 3.0 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING SCOPE 3.1 DATA COLLECTION We will, with the assistance of the RCTC and Caltrans, obtain, to the extent that they are readily available, the required documents, data, and information from governmental agencies, Caltrans, other consultants, and sub -consultants. Throughout the project, we will coordinate with consultants whose projects border ours to facilitate proper matching of projects. Copies of available as -built plans and project files for the area of this project will be furnished by Caltrans. We understand that it may be difficult to locate this information; however, it will be desirable to obtain this information to begin preliminary engineering on the project. We will also require existing right- of-way maps from Caltrans. We understand that RCTC will supply scale photography, and will supply us with magnetic tapes in Intergraph IGDS Version 8.8 containing complete topographic maps of the Project at scale of 1 inch equals 50 feet. We have assumed that this topography will have a contour interval of 2 feet and that it will be available within 6 months of receiving a Notice to Proceed. We will obtain all Encroachment Permits necessary for the performance of the work from Caltrans. The preliminary project development engineering, draft and final Project Reports and Project Approval Report will be prepared in accordance with Caltrans regulations, policies, procedures, manuals, and standards, including compliance with Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) requirements. Pertinent manuals, guidelines and references include the following: o Caltrans Project Development Procedures Manual o Caltrans Highway Design Manual o Caltrans Drafting and Plans Manual o Caltrans CADD Users Manual of Instructions 8:\170\ROTC - 5 - • • • o Caltrans Bridge Design Specifications o Bridge Memos to Designers o Bridge Design Aids o Bridge Design Details o Caltrans Project Development Uniform File System Specific design parameters that will apply to the preliminary design of this project will be summarized in a brief document to provide an ongoing basis for design. We will review readily available geotechnical data to develop a basic understanding of the available construction materials in the area, any geologic hazards such as the fault near Beaumont, foundation materials and types used for existing structures, and existing pavement sections. At this time, we expect this will yield sufficient information for input to the preliminary design. We expect to search for this information in County and Caltrans records, and potentially in documents prepared for the landfill construction. Pertinent correspondence will be reviewed to develop an understanding of the history of the development of the conceptual alternatives that we will be evaluating. The key documents will be the Project Study Report and Route Concept Report. We understand that these will be available by November. Adjacent utilities will be notified of our studies early in the project. We will identify the range of alternatives that we are studying so that they can incorporate these into their planning and scheduling where appropriate and so that we can become aware of any special concerns that they may have. B:\170\RCTC -6- • • A detailed project schedule will be prepared at the end of the data collection stage. The schedule will be presented in computerized critical path format. Milestones will be used as the major progress check points. A Quality Control Plan will be developed using Dames & Moore's Generic Project Procedural Guidelines as a basis. The Quality Control Plan will address calculations, drawings and reports. The implementation of the Quality Control Plan will be audited by a senior engineer who is not working day-to-day on the project. The Quality Control Plan will be submitted to RCTC prior to its implementation. Also within Task 3.1 (Data Collection), we will develop right- of-way program recommendations which will outline the criteria for taking or leaving right-of-way. We will also arrange the composition of the Project Development Team (PDT). 3.2 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING Preliminary engineering services will begin after the data collection process. The scope of services for this task is further described in the following sections. The Caltrans Project Study Report and Route Concept Report for this project will serve as the basis for this work effort. 3.2.1 PRELIMINARY GEOMETRIC PLANS AND PROFILES These drawings will present the approximate alignments and grades, drainage features, cut and fill slopes and right-of-way lines for each of the seven (7) alternatives (excluding No Improvement) for widening Route 79 from Gilman Springs Road and Sanderson Avenue to First Street in the City of Beaumont. B:\170\RCTC _7_ • • • • • • • • The alternate designs will show the following: o Coordinated alignments with stationing o Design roadway geometrics o Structures o Slope limits and retaining walls o Drainage features o Existing topography o Existing utilities and drainage o Existing property boundaries o Access to properties o New right-of-way Products and Documents For each alternative,these plans will be presented on 1" = 200' scale plan and profile sheets. For each alternative, this will result in not more than: Sheets Landfill SR79 Rd. Typical Alternative_PAP_pIP Sections Title 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 2 2 1 3 2 0 1 1 4 2 0 1 1 5 1 2 1 1 6 8 2 2 1 7 2 0 1 1 8 _2. 4 1 1 Totals 25 6 9 7 Preliminary drawings for the Preliminary Typical Cross Section will be included showing lane widths, shoulder widths, median widths, and approximate width of outside slopes and any necessary ditches. We anticipate a total of 39 cross -sections presented on 9 drawings which will represent all alternatives. B:\170\RCTC -8- • • 3.2.2 PRELIMINARY DETOUR PLAN, DETOUR STAGING WITH 0 CONSTRUCTION STAGING The Preliminary Detour Plan will consist of preliminary drawings showing: o Detours proposed o Number of lanes o Order of detour staging o Segment to be completed under each detour The plans contained in this report will be at a scale of 1" = 200' and will be presented on screened plan sheets of the Preliminary Geometric Drawings. Products and Documents The Preliminary Detour Plans, for each alternative, will consist of not more than: Sheets Detour/ Construction Typical Alternatives Stating Sections Title 1 0 0 0 2 8 2 1 3 2 1 1 4 2 1 1 5 2 1 1 6 8 2 1 7 2 1 1 8 _2 1 1 Totals 26 9 7 B:\170\RCTC -9- • • • 3.2.3 PRELIMINARY HYDROLOGY AND DRAINAGE STUDY Hydrology and Drainage Study A hydrology and drainage study will be performed for each of the alternatives. Existing drainage facilities will be identified. Rainfall intensities for the project area will be obtained from Caltrans District 8 hydraulics department. USGS quad maps will be used to determine drainage patterns and size of watersheds. The rational method of hydrologic analysis will be used to develop run- off quantities for each watershed. Roadway cross culverts will be sized to carry a 100-year event storm. Drainage area maps will be included in the report, along with calculations for runoff quantities and sizing of culverts. The hydrologic analysis will conform to criteria set forth in Caltrans Highway Design Manual. 3.2.4 STRUCTURES Bridge design studies, if conducted, will be prepared in accordance with the current Caltrans Bridge Design Specifications, Bridge Memos to Designers, Bridge Design Aids, and Bridge Design Details manuals. Retaining walls will be considered in accordance with Caltrans standards. Alternative 5, Widen and Construct an Interchange, as presently under study as Alternative 3 in the PSR, may require structure Advanced Planning Studies. 3.2.5 UTILITY RELOCATIONS This study will identify existing utilities affected by the proposed widening. This effort could be either inside or outside of the proposed right-of-way. The affected utilities will be identified and a relocation plan documented in Utilities Relocation Technical Memorandum. 8:\170\RCTC -10- . • The Technical Memorandum will contain a description of existing utilities and identify the owner. The prior rights of the utilities will be researched and documented. A viable relocation will be schematically identified, easements located, and an estimated cost for each relocation will be developed. The locations and descriptions will be presented on a screened copy of the Preliminary Geometric Plans and become an exhibit in the Utilities Relocation Technical Memorandum. The utility plans, for each alternative will consist of not more than: Alternative Utility Sheets 2 A A 1 2 8_ 0 8 2 2 2 8 2 2 The Utilities Relocation Technical Memorandum will be delivered at Milestone 2. 3.2.6 PRELIMINARY RIGHT -O7-WAY REQUIREMENTS A preliminary indication of right-of-way requirements will be developed during the generation of the preliminary geometric plans (Task 3.2.1). Areas will be calculated under this task. 3.2.7 PRELIMINARY RELINQUISHMENT COST STUDY We will prepare a preliminary relinquishment cost study, if required. At this time, we understand that one may not be required. 3.2.8 VALUE ENGINEERING REPORT We will study the elements of each alternative to identify which elements have the potential to provide significant cost B:\170\RCTC -11- • • • • savings through design refinement for potentially omission. A Value Engineering Report will be submitted summarizing the results of the study and recommendations for further study. 3.2.9 SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT Dames & Moore will prepare a Safety Analysis Report. This report will identify safety concerns that should be considered in the development of the project. 3.2.10 CONSTRUCTION COST ESTIMLATES Cost estimates for seven alternatives will be project specific and developed using Caltrans pay items required for the construction. Quantities and appropriate unit costs will be multiplied together to arrive at item costs. The item costs will be totalled and an appropriate contingency added to reflect the probable estimated costs. The estimated costs will include: o Roadway construction o Structures a Utility relocations o Signs, striping, and lighting o Drainage features o Traffic maintenance Products and Documents o Construction Cost Estimates. A detailed construction cost estimate will be prepared for each alternative. 8:\170\RCTC -12- • • 3.2.11 INITIAL DRAFT PROJECT REPORT The Initial Draft Project Report (IDPR) will be developed to present the documentation and data to support the proposed construction. It will be subject to review by RCTC and Caltrans. The IDPR will be prepared following the guidelines in the Caltrans Project Development Procedures. The IDPR will specifically address: o Project Category o Background o Existing Facility o Traffic Data o Deficiencies and Justification o Proposal Description c Proposal Funding o Other Considerations o Project Reviews o Public Hearing Process o Environmental Clearance o R/W Certification o Project Personnel o Recommendations o Attachments - Plan and Profile Right -of -Way Maps In addition, the following maps will be included in the Initial Draft Project Report: o Vicinity Map o Regional Location Map o Functional Classification Map o Deficiencies Map o Intersection Deficiencies Map B: \170\RCTC -13 - • • • • • o Strip Map of Project o Strip Map of P.M. Peak Projected 2010 Traffic The report will be submitted for review and the subsequent comments addressed. The revised IDPR will be reissued as the Draft Project Report as part of the next milestone (Milestone #3 or Task 3.3, below). 3.3 RIGHT -OP -WAY ENGINEERING This work involves presenting, on a separate set of right-of- way plans and to the level of detail presented in the preliminary geometric drawings, the existing right-of-way and property boundaries, identifying the new right-of-way needs line, and identifying the location and quantity of proposed new right-of-way required to construct the project for each alternative. The Right -of -Way plans will be prepared at a scale of 1" = 200' and will be presented on screened plan sheets of the Preliminary Geometric Drawings. The Right -of -Way maps, for each alternative, will consist of not more than: Alternative R.O.W. Sheets 7 8 0 8 2 2 1 8 2 2 A Technical Memorandum will be prepared which gives the actual recommended location and quantity of new right-of-way required to construct the project for each alternative. 8:\170\RCTC -14- • • The recommended construction segmentation will be outlined as part of this task. Costs for right-of-way takes will be estimated using the most recent tax assessments and applying appropriate factors to adjust the estimates to present value. We do not plan to adjust the tax based data for changes in market conditions, unless an assessment of these factors is specifically requested by RCTC. The Draft Project Report (DPR) will be prepared and circulated for review as the final submittal for Milestone #3 (Task 3.3). 3.4 HEARINGS The preparation, conduct of meetings, public announcements, arrangement for exhibits, meeting facilities, meeting agendas, and meeting notifications are included scope under Section 4.6 (DEA Public Hearings). Plots of Plans and Maps will be produced in support of two hearings. Engineering personnel will be available at the two hearings to provide the necessary expertise in responses to queries. 3.5 EVALUATE COMMENTS Comments arising out of the agencies' and public review of the Preliminary Engineering aspects of the project will be evaluated and the appropriate responses will be prepared. 3.6 PROJECT APPROVAL REPORT The final project approval for this project will be requested by submittal of a Project Approval Report. This report will consist of a Transmittal Report and the Final Environmental Document. B:\170\ROTC -15- • • • • • • The preferred project alternative will be identified prior to preparation of this report in consultation with the PDT, and will be the subject of this report. The Transmittal Report will be developed using the Caltrans Project Development Procedures and will contain: o Introduction o Changes resulting from Environmental Document circulation o Current construction costs o Public hearing report o Compatibility with local plans o Title VI Considerations o Certification statement The Project Approval Report will be submitted to Caltrans for review. The corrections and comments will be incorporated into the document and the final Project Approval Report will be submitted. 3.7 I88UE DOCUMENTS The actual issuance and distribution of the Project Approval Report will be treated as a distinct subtask, constituting the end of Milestone #7. 3.8 PUBLIC INFORMATION PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT Following Caltrans acceptance of the Project Approval Report, we will prepare a summary report describing the project. This document will be prepared for distribution to members of the public and its content will be generally non -technical in nature. Contents of this report will include the following: a. Executive Summary; B:\170\RCTC -16- b. Background, including design criteria and operational assumptions; c. Operational Issues, including a description of alternatives examined; d. Physical Description of the Project; and e. Construction and Implementation Strategies, including a non -technical summary of the conceptual construction staging plan and traffic management measures. The construction segmentation program will serve as a basis for packaging segments of the project for final design (plans, specifications and estimate). We will submit a draft report for review by and Caltrans, and will incorporate comments received therefrom in a final report. 3.9 PDT MEETINGS Dames & Moore's Project Manager and the Deputy Project Manager will be members and attend meetings of the Project Development Team (PDT) and relevant PDT subcommittees established to guide the study in accordance with the Caltrans Project Development Procedures Manual. It is expected that PDT Meetings will be held monthly. Dames & Moore will serve as staff to the PDT in arranging meetings, providing discussion material, and keeping and distributing minutes. 3.10 TREND MEETINGS Dames & Moore will provide for attendance of the Project Manager to represent the engineer component of the project at Trend B:\170\RCTC -17- • • • • Meetings. This will fulfill the need for face-to-face, timely meetings on work definition, costs, schedule, policy matters, and strategy. Trend Meetings will be held twice monthly. 3.11 COORDINATION WITH CONSULTANTS Dames & Moore will coordinate closely with the RCTC's other consultants working on various elements of this project. Information received from their studies will be used in support of work performed for this project. One meeting per month will be held with other consultants; the Project Manager will represent engineering considerations at this meeting. We have assumed that RCTC will provide us with the information received from RCTC's other consultants. B:\170\RCTC -18- • • 4.0 ENVIRONXENTAL SERVICES SCOPE 4.1 EVALUATION OF PROJECT We understand that the Project Study Report and Route Concept Report are currently under revision. Revised versions of these reports will be reviewed to assess the implications for environmental impacts. We will coordinate with and provide inputs to the PDT to support its assignment of a Project Category. Our inputs will be based on review of the Project Study Report and Route Concept Report, information available from LSA's Alternatives Analysis, a site visit by environmental team members (which will also provide input to the Initial Study), and professional judgment from experience with similar projects and similar environments. An Initial Study will be prepared for the project. The Initial Study will include a brief project description (proposed project and alternatives), purpose and need for the project, summary baseline information relevant to assessing impact significance, and evaluation of impacts. The objective will be to either confirm that a Negative Declaration/FONSI is appropriate for this project or find that an EIR/EIS may be more appropriate. Baseline discussions will be based on a limited literature review and the site visit mentioned in the preceding paragraph. Impact assessments and mitigation recommendations will be based on environmental sensitivities, available information on the project and alternatives, and professional judgment. Screencheck, draft, and final versions of the Initial Study will be provided for RCTC and Caltrans review. For purposes of this proposal, it is assumed that the results of the Initial Study will substantiate RCTC/Caltrans' determination that only an Environmental Assessment (EA) is required for this project. 8:\170\RCTC -19- • • • • • A Quality Control Plan will be prepared for this project. The principal element of quality control for environmental work will be technical review by senior personnel at each stage of product preparation including development of assumptions, analysis and draft report. 4.2 SCOPING An informal scoping process will be conducted in the project vicinity to allow Responsible Agencies and the public to learn about the intended scope of the project and its purpose, and to provide input concerning issues of perceived public importance as a further step in establishing the scope of issues and the range of reasonable alternatives to be analyzed in the environmental document. Separate agency/public scoping meetings are proposed, but both will be held on the same day. An announcement that includes the scoping meeting purpose, date, location, and time will be advertised in a major local newspaper. An agenda, sign-up sheets, and a form that allows people to provide comments about the potential project environmental impacts will be prepared. The meeting location and logistics will be handled by Dames & Moore. This will include identifying a location accessible to the community with adequate meeting space and providing a public address system if necessary. A court reporter will record meeting comments. It is assumed that the meeting will be held at a public location such that no rental costs are incurred. The presentation at the scoping meetings will include a project overview, including up to 5 exhibits and a handout, environmental issues identified to date, and the purpose of the meeting. 8:\170\RCTC -20- Following the scoping meeting, a report will be prepared summarizing the issues and concerns raised at the meeting. This report will be used to help guide the preparation of the Draft EA. During the initial stages of preliminary design, an open house will be held. This meeting will report the study progress on the alternatives analyses. The meeting will be held during the evening at an accessible location to encourage attendance. A press release and a direct mailing to people and organizations listed on the project mailing list will be sent out two weeks prior to the meeting. A meeting notice will be placed in the local major newspaper. A meeting summary will be prepared after the meeting has been conducted. A project mailing list will be developed in consultation with RCTC and Caltrans. The list will be prepared using postal zip codes in the project area. Exhibits (up to 5 overlays) and handouts will be prepared and approved meetings project. place to by Caltrans. to encourage These sheets add names of Comment sheets will be available at the feedback from participants regarding the will have ample space for comments and a individuals or organizations that should receive further project information. Three fact sheets will be prepared and distributed at appropriate project milestones. We propose preparing and distributing a fact sheet prior to the scoping meetings, prior to release of the technical studies results and after the public hearing on the Draft EA. The fact sheets will summarize information, current activities, and announce upcoming project events. Comments received will be circulated to the PDT and kept in the project file. Telephone inquiries will also be similarly documented. We assume two cycles for review and approval per fact sheet preparation. 8:\170\RCTC -21- • • 4.3 COOPERATIVE STUDY AGREEMENT Upon completion of the scoping meetings, Dames & Moore will prepare a draft Cooperative Study Agreement that identifies the scope, objectives and procedures for completing the project. Substantive agency and public comments submitted at the scoping meeting, as well as coordination with RCTC and Caltrans through the PDT, will form the basis of the Agreement. 411) Upon arriving at an agreement on required project studies, Dames & Moore will prepare a draft Notice of Initiation of Studies for RCTC and Caltrans review. Upon approval, the Notice of Initiation will be distributed to elected officials, local agencies and all Responsible and Cooperating agencies. 4.4 DRAFT REPORTS 4.4.1 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS Pursuant to FHWA guidelines, an Air Quality Analysis and Impact Report will be prepared to address the pertinent ambient air quality issues associated with the proposed widening of State Route 79. The Air Quality Analysis and Impact Report will consist of three components: o Data collection and evaluation will be performed to identify existing ambient air quality, sensitive receptors, attainment or non -attainment status of the air basin and project vicinity for the criteria pollutants, national and state ambient air quality standards (AAQS), and emission mitigation measures (if appropriate). A microscale carbon monoxide (CO) analysis will be conducted and project consistency with the State Implementation Plan (SIP) will be reviewed and discussed. 8:\170\RCTC -22- • • Confirmation that the proposed project is included in the adopted Regional Transportation Improvement Program will be documented. o CO modeling will be performed using the USEPA-approved CALINE 4 highway dispersion model. o The project emissions will be estimated using emission factors provided by Caltrans. These would include emissions from all construction related activities, as well as vehicular traffic associated with project alternatives. The Air Quality Analysis and Impact Report will evaluate the impact of project emissions on applicable AAQS. Using available regional historical data, air quality trends will be reviewed further in terms of attainment of AAQS with focus on establishing whether or not the project will fall under the non -attainment policy promulgated by USEPA under the Clean Air Act. A qualitative assessment will then be made for all pollutants other than CO. CO analysis will include a quantitative evaluation. Our efforts will also include discussions with the SCAQMD and USEPA to obtain the most up-to-date status of SIP revisions. The evaluation will consist of emission inventory development, atmospheric dispersion modeling, and a comparison of cumulative project impacts to the AAQS using information from the LSA regional air quality study. Road construction configurations for both the construction year and design year will be assessed for all alternative scenarios. A discussion of emission mitigation measures will be initiated if the AAQS for a specific pollutant is exceeded. It will be the intent of this discussion to identify the air quality problem as local or regional and to define the appropriate scale of 8:\170\RCTC -23- • • • • • • • • mitigation. Subsequently, general emission reduction/mitigation measures will be described by the appropriate scale of the air quality impact. All work will conform to the referenced studies identified by Caltrans in Air Quality Study/Environmental Process dated October 26, 1988. 4.4.2 AREA OP POTENTIAL EP7ECT MAP Prior to conducting cultural resources surveys, an Area of Potential Effect (APE) map will be prepared illustrating the maximum Route 79 corridor width. The APE map will be used as a basis for finalizing the boundaries of archaeological and historic surveys. The APE map will be prepared on aerial photos using preliminary right-of-way plans and will be submitted to RCTC and Caltrans for approval. 4.4.3 ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY The cultural resources investigation for the proposed Route 79 project will be initiated with a thorough record search and literature review of the project area. During the course of this study, historic, prehistoric, and ethnographic resources relevant to the project area will be examined. This analysis will produce data on known prehistoric and historic site distribution and density within the project area. Additionally, groups with heritage concerns for the project area will be contacted for input. Contacts will include appropriate Native American groups and historical societies. Cultural resources investigations will include prefield research, surface archaeological survey of the proposed Route 79 corridor, preparation of a draft and final Archaeological Survey Report (ASR), preparation of the Historic Properties Survey Report (HPSR), and consultation with RCTC and B:\170\RCTC -24- Caltrans regarding sites that may require additional information for NRHP evaluation. Development of the latter information is not included in our scope. Prefield Research: This will include record searches and literature reviews to identify previously recorded sites and additional locations where sites might be expected. Records will be consulted at the Regional Office of the California Archaeological Inventory at the University of California, Riverside, as well as the National Register of Historic Places, California Historic Landmarks, and the California Inventory of Historic Landmarks. Historic cartographic sources, such as USGLO maps, early USGS maps, and early road maps, will be reviewed to identify potential historic locations. For comparative purposes, the record search will include all areas within 1/4 mile of the route. Archaeological Field Methods: Field investigations will consist of a complete pedestrian survey of the project area. Survey methods will vary in accordance with previous land use and ground visibility at the time of the survey, but will for the most part be conducted in 15 to 20 meter transects paralleling the proposed route. Where ground visibility is poor or where previous disturbance has been relatively low, this level of intensity may be increased. In all cases, however, a level of intensity will be maintained that will facilitate the identification of significant sites. Survey areas will be expanded as necessary to accommodate recording of resources extending outside of the APE. Cultural resources encountered during survey will be fully recorded. Archaeological sites will be recorded in standard California State Parks and Recreation site record format (DPR 422 A(Rev.4/86)) according to guidelines presented in the OHP Draft Guide to the preparation of the Archaeological Site Record. Scaled site maps will be prepared, depicting site composition, 8:\170\RCTC -25- • • • • • • • • extent, presence of midden and artifacts, such site features as milling stations, petroglyphs, or historic structures, and the relationship of sites to existing roads, streams, vegetation, or other topographic features. Feature records will be prepared for bedrock milling stations, rock art, and other features, and will include scaled drawings and photographs. Previously recorded sites will be recorded if the site records lack sufficient details, are incorrect, or if additional information is found. Archaeological Report Preparation: In accordance with Caltrans standards, an ASR will be submitted. In the case of negative results, a Negative ASR form will be prepared; positive results will be reported in a positive ASR. 4.4.4 HISTORIC PROPERTIES SURVEY REPORT (RPBR) The HPSR functions to summarize information from diverse sources to facilitate SHPO review under the Section 106 process. It includes the inventory of historic properties (inclusive of archaeological sites) and provides preliminary evaluations of resource significance. The following sources will be summarized in the Route 79 HPSR: (1) Archaeological Survey Report; (2) Bridge inventory data provided by Caltrans. Inclusion of data on historic structures is not anticipated as the area is undeveloped. The HPSR will be authored by the Principal Investigator, Project Archaeologist, and Project Historian and will conform to guidelines presented in Appendix G of Caltrans' Guide to B:\170\RCTC -26- • • Consultants. It is anticipated that the HPSR will make use of summary tables wherever possible, as SHPO has indicated a preference for such summaries. 4.4.5 FLOODPLAIN EVALUATION A Location Hydraulic Study will be performed according to Caltrans Floodplain Encroachment Evaluation Guidelines (March 1, 1984) which are in agreement with the federal policy and guidelines, as stated in Federal Highway Program Manual (FHPM) 6-7-3-2 and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) procedures. A Floodplain Evaluation Report will be prepared and will utilize the information from the hydraulic study. Summaries including floodplains in general, hydraulics and risks will be presented in the EA. This evaluation will be divided into two subtasks: 1. Locate the existing floodplain and assess the magnitude of flood hazards. 2. Identify the impacts on flood hazards caused by each alternative. This segment of Route 79 parallels and crosses the Lamb Canyon Creek for approximately fifty percent of its length. Along this section and the southern portion, the road will cross many small drainages. Near Beaumont the road will cross a stream immediately south of First Street. Box culverts will be required and lateral encroachment will be required for at least one of the alternative alignments. Therefore, 100-year floodplains will be encroached at various points along the proposed route. 8:\170\RCTC -27- • • • • • Our investigation will begin with a data search to identify hydrologic and hydraulic studies of flood hazards along the proposed route. The Riverside County Flood Control District and other governmental regulatory and resource agencies will be contacted for information, expertise and assistance in developing baseline flood hazard data. After reviewing all readily available data, we will visit the site and collect information about existing hydraulic structures, hydraulic characteristics of the creek channels, hydrologic characteristics of the watershed, limits of past flooding, and site conditions along the proposed highway location. The available data and information from the site visit will form the basis for analyzing the impact on flood hazards that each alternative will cause. The methods of analysis will be consistent with the requirements of FHPM 6-7-3-2, the extent of the flood hazard at the site, and the available data. If the available flood hazard information is incomplete, we will estimate the extent of the 100-year floodplain and the elevation of floodwaters. Water surface elevations will be estimated using the 100-year flood peak flows estimated in the preliminary engineering study, Manning's equation for normal depth and available USGS and RCTC topographic maps. This simplified method using Manning's equation should provide an appropriate level of accuracy for this level of analysis. Final design of the project may require a more detailed backwater analysis. The alternative highway alignments listed in the Project Study Report will be analyzed to identify potential impacts on floodplains. Based on the preliminary results of the LSA study the route does not affect any regulated floodplains. Therefore, no 8:\170\RCTC -28- • • floodway analysis will be required. If impacts are identified beyond those allowed under FHPM policies or the Flood Insurance Guidelines (FEMA regulations), mitigation measures will be addressed. Mitigation may consist of designing the hydraulic structures at stream crossings to provide sufficient capacity for the 100-year flood. Alternatives will be evaluated depending on the severity of the flood hazard. 4.4.6 HAZARDOUS WASTE INITIAL SITE ASSESSMENT (ISA) We understand that Caltrans will prepare the ISA for this project. Dames & Moore will review the ISA and provide comments to Caltrans; we will also discuss any questions we have about the report with Caltrans. Information from the final ISA will be incorporated into the EA. 4.4.7 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT STUDY The objectives of the Natural Environment Study (NES) for the Route 79 widening project are as follows: o Characterize the biological resources of the project corridor based on existing literature, agency contacts, and field surveys. o Assess the occurrence of any threatened or endangered plant or animal species in the corridor. o Evaluate the direct and indirect impacts of the project on the above resources, and develop appropriate mitigation measures. 8:\170\RCTC -29- • • • • • o Document the results in an NES report that meets the Caltrans requirements for content and format. The existing highway traverses a mixture of agricultural fields, grazing lands, and undeveloped native habitat. The latter may support several sensitive plant and animal species, most notably the endangered Stephen's kangaroo rat. In addition, these areas may also contain one or more rare plant species, including those on the list of rare plants maintained by the California Native Plant Society. Finally, the corridor may traverse natural drainages that could contain seasonal wetlands under the jurisdiction of the Corps of Engineers. The major vegetation types along the route will be mapped using air photos and field surveys. A list of common and characteristic species will be developed for each type. Field surveys will be conducted in the spring and early summer of 1991 in areas of native habitat traversed by the proposed widening project. A team of two botanists will examine these areas at 50-foot-wide intervals in order to detect the presence of any plant species considered sensitive by the state or federal government. Their locations will be mapped and described. Prior to the field survey, a literature search will be conducted at the California Natural Diversity Data Base (CNDDB) to identify any rare plant populations in the vicinity. All drainages traversed by the route will be carefully examined to assess if they contain jurisdictional wetlands using the new federal method to delineate wetlands. The functional value of these wetlands will be described. The need for a Section 404 permit from the Corps of Engineers will be assessed; a Nationwide Permit may be required. B:\170\RCTC -30- • • Based on the results of the vegetation mapping, the major wildlife habitats will be identified along the route. In addition, records of sensitive wildlife will be reviewed from the CNDDB search. Finally, a list of threatened and endangered species that could be affected by the project will be requested from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). We will also contact the USFWS to gather the most recent distribution data on the Stephen's kangaroo rat near the project. Using the above information, wildlife surveys will be designed and conducted in the spring of 1991. Areas of native habitat along the route will be surveyed. The surveys will be tailored for any known or likely sensitive species. Any sign of wildlife will be recorded such as tracks or burrows. The quality of undeveloped habitat for wildlife (including small mammals, reptiles, birds, etc.) will be qualitatively evaluated. In addition, a list of wildlife species likely to use wetlands in drainages will be developed. The occurrence of the Stephen's kangaroo rat will be based on the presence of appropriate habitat features and burrow. No trapping of this species will be conducted. Results of the above biological investigations will be documented in the NES. The NES report will include baseline description and impact analysis. The latter will include direct and indirect impacts. Estimates of acreages of habitat to be removed or disturbed will also be provided. The NES report will also include measures to avoid or reduce significant impacts to sensitive resources, developed in consultation with RCTC and Caltrans. The NES will include a Biological Assessment to address impacts to the Stephen's kangaroo rat. The NES will also include documentation of the results of consultation with the Riverside Habitat Conservation Agency. All of the information will be summarized in the EA. 8:\170\RCTC -31- • • • • • • • • 4.5 DRAFT 4A 4.5.1 OVERVIEW Dames & Moore will complete a Draft EA (DEA) in accordance with NEPA and CEQA requirements, as implemented through FHWA and Caltrans regulations. Screencheck, initial draft, and draft versions of the DEA will be prepared for review and approval by RCTC and Caltrans. The DEA will include a summary of information from the Draft Reports discussed in Section 4.4. Other technical studies of lesser scope will be required for the DEA; these are discussed in Sections 4.5.2 through 4.5.8. The major components of the DEA will be sections dealing with summary, purpose and need, alternatives, affected environment, impacts and mitigation, growth inducement, and cumulative effects. Alternatives will be evaluated in equivalent detail. 4.5.2 GEOLOGY Geologic information will be required as part of the DEA. Preliminary geologic data will be accumulated, synthesized and summarized by means of a program that would include: (1) Data review, which would include review of publications available from the USGS; US Soil Conservation Survey; California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG); California Department of Water Resources (DWR); Riverside County technical journals; and Dames & Moore files. 8:\170\RCTC -32- (2) Review and interpretation of available information for the study area primarily to observe topographic and geologic features, including possible landslides and faults. (3) Geologic reconnaissance of the proposed route. (4) Analysis of data to identify potential constraints of a geologic/seismologic nature. The results of data collection would be incorporated into the DEA to describe the geologic setting, including: o Geologic units and structures; e.g., faults, folds, landsliding as well as special features such as expansive soils and erosion potential; o seismologic considerations such as active or potentially active faults and historic seismicity; and o Local groundwater resources. The potential impact(s) of the environment on the project and the project on the environment will be evaluated. Examples of impacts of the environment on the project include the potential for: o Fault rupture across the roadway; o Landsliding onto the roadway; o Ground subsidence due to groundwater extraction or seismic liquefaction; and o Ground heaving due to saturation of expansive soils. 8:\170\ROTC - 3 3 • • • • • • Examples of environmental impact due to construction of the project include the potential for: o Cut slope failures; o Changes to the groundwater regime; and o The possible introduction of hazardous constituents into the shallow soil and/or groundwater. After the impact of the environment on the proposed project and impacts of the proposed project on the environment have been characterized, we will conduct an evaluation of possible mitigation measures. Appropriate mitigation measures will be provided in the DEA, and could include special construction requirements related to potential landslide hazards, expansive soils or compressible materials. 4.3.3 NOISE A noise impact assessment will be performed. This impact assessment will use CALVENO noise emission levels of the highway traffic noise model. The procedures to be used to analyze traffic noise impacts and to develop abatement measures are outlined in Federal -Aid Highway Program Manual Volume 7, Chapter 7, Section 3 (FHPM-7,7,3), Paragraph 6. FHWA requires that for each alternative highway configuration, the existing and planned land use which may be impacted by the proposed highway alternative be identified. For these potentially impacted land uses, the existing noise levels must be identified and the future traffic noise levels be predicted. 8:\170\RCTC -34- • • Traffic noise impacts will occur if: o Future traffic average (Leq) A -weighted sound levels exceed values presented in Table 1 of FHPM-7,7,3. For residential land uses, for the peak traffic criterion of 67 dB, considered; and for example, if the Leq predicted hour approaches or exceeds the mitigation measures should be o Future peak hour traffic Leq increases the day -night average sound level (Ldn) by values approaching or exceeding 10 dB. FHWA studies have shown that the Leq measured during the peak traffic hour is comparable to the day -night average sound level. Lastly, noise mitigation alternatives for reducing or eliminating the noise impact must be examined and evaluated. The California Highway Design Manual expands upon the requirements of FHPM-7,7,3. FHPM-7,7,3 and the HDM Chapter 1100 will be (HDM), Chapter 1100, The requirements of accomplished by: o Identify sensitive land uses that could experience potential traffic noise impacts. This identification process will be closely coordinated with the land use study. Current developed lands and undeveloped lands for which development is planned will be identified through review of zoning maps, General Plan land use maps, and other information. o Measure existing sound levels. The statistical distribution and average A -weighted sound level will be measured at up to 4 sound level measurement locations. At one location at an undeveloped land use distant from 8:\170\RCTC -35- • • • • • • • the existing highway right-of-way, existing sound levels will be measured for at least one-half hour to calibrate the noise prediction model. o Predict traffic sound levels for each alternative. Peak traffic hour vehicle volumes, automobile, medium -duty truck, and heavy-duty truck mix, vehicle speeds, highway geometry and topography, etc. will be used in a traffic noise computer model to predict future sound levels for each alternative at each noise sensitive area. The computer model will conform to FHWA-RD-108, "FHWA Highway Traffic Noise Prediction Model," as modified by the vehicle emission relationships provided by CALVENO. The FHWA average noise emission relationship for automobiles, medium -duty trucks and heavy-duty trucks are: 8:\170\RCTC Auto: 38.1LOG(S)-2.4 M-Tk: 33.9LOG(S)+16.4 H-Tk: 33.9LOG(S)+38.5 where S is the vehicle speed in km/hr. These relationships will be adjusted in the computer program as required. In addition, the center of noise emissions for heavy-duty trucks will be adjusted to reflect the California HDM, Chapter 1100 truck exhaust stack height of 11.5 feet. The highway noise computations will be made using one of three computer programs available to us. They are STAMINA, HIGHWAY, and HWYCONT. HIGHWAY computes average A -weighted sound levels at desired receptor location. -36- • • Barrier configuration can be included in these computations. HWYCONT computes the distance from a desired contour Leq to the center of the near land. o Evaluation of noise impacts. As discussed above, noise impacts are assessed by referring to FHWA criteria presented as Table 1 - Noise Abatement Criteria found in FHPM-7,7,3. The usual procedure is to calculate the distance to the Lec67 dB contour (for Class B land uses). The number of residences located between the contour and the highway provide an indication of the number of residents who may be impacted by noise. In addition, for each noise -sensitive area identified, the change in day -night average sound level is evaluated. Should the change approach or exceed 10 dB, a noise impact is indicated. o Examination and evaluation of noise abatement alternatives. For each noise -sensitive area (or land use) where either the future sound level approaches or exceeds an Leq of 67 dB or the change in Ldn approaches or exceeds 10 dB, noise abatement alternatives in the form of noise control barriers, traffic flow adjustments, highway realignment, building (window and wall) noise abatement (insulation), etc. must be examined for the noise abatement potential. Should barrier use be indicated, the barrier alignment, height, and length must be designed. These designs must conform to California HDM, Chapter 1100. o The results of the above investigations will be presented in the DEA. 8:\170\RCTC -37- • • • • • • • 4.5.4 LAND USE No businesses or residences are expected to be relocated as a result of the project. Therefore, preparation of a Housing and Business Relocation Report is not proposed. However, focused baseline, impact, and mitigation discussions for land use will be prepared for inclusion in the DEA. An inventory of land use in the vicinity of the project will be conducted. Existing land uses will be narratively described based on a brief field reconnaissance. A map showing General Plan designations in the area will be prepared to illustrate potential future uses. Information regarding growth plans in the area will be obtained through discussions with City of Beaumont and Riverside County planning staffs. The potential effects of route improvements on land uses will be qualitatively assessed. This will include potential interference with existing uses during construction and operation, as well as limitations/opportunities for future land development. Mitigation measures will be recommended for potentially significant impacts. 4.5.5. VISUAL RENOUNCES The visual resource assessment will be prepared as part of the DEA and include: preliminary visual assessment and design support for the preliminary engineering studies; visual impact assessment; mitigation, and visual and landscape design recommendations. The assessment will address the visual issues associated with the widening of Route 79 through Lamb Canyon and focus on treatment of potential rock cuts and loss of significant topographic features and roadside vegetation. B:\170\RCTC -38- • • The proposed scope of work for preparing the visual resource assessment consists of the following tasks: o Perform an on -site reconnaissance to evaluate and document the existing baseline conditions. A photographic inventory will be compiled and recorded on Dames & Moore's standard field logs. o Prepare visual impact assessment to support the DEA. This will include a description of the baseline conditions and the potential impacts associated with the widening of Route 79. Our study approach will utilize photography, graphics for site analysis (sections), and visual simulations as both analytic tools for the DEA and as media for communicating issues to the public. Viewer response data will be developed through the public participation process to identify sensitive viewers and viewpoints in a manner consistent with FHWA recommended procedures. Key visual features, views to and from the road, and sensitive viewpoints will be identified and documented in written and mapped formats. The proposed project will be evaluated for consistency with state, county, and city scenic corridor and open space policies. o Visual Mitigation and Landscape Recommendations. Visual mitigation and landscape recommendations will be developed to address potential for scenic highway viewing opportunities, protection of distinctive visual features, and mitigation of potential visual impacts such as road cuts and views from the road and surrounding land uses. Landscape and design recommendations examined will include typical treatments for planting in the right-of-way, aesthetic treatment of roadway structures, and modifications to vertical and horizontal alignments where feasible to mitigate visual impacts. Typical 8:\170\RCTC -39- • • • • • • cross -sections will be prepared to illustrate recommended landscape concepts and other right-of-way treatments. Grading treatments addressing potential visual effects, and erosion control concepts for cut slopes will also be discussed. o Project Video Simulations. The visual assessment will be closely orchestrated with the production of high -resolution video simulations depicting the appearance of alternatives from selected key viewpoints. Up to 6 views from a maximum of 3 key viewpoints are assumed, with one revision of the views following review by RCTC and Caltrans. Simulations will be used to analyze project visibility and visual contrast. 4.5.6 BOCIOECONOKICB A Technical Study is not proposed for socioeconomics. However, socioeconomic baseline data and impact analysis will be developed for inclusion in the DEA. Baseline data will include population (existing population and population forecasts), housing (existing housing stock), current employment levels, public service capabilities (police, fire, school, recreation, cultural infrastructure), economic base (income, economic activity), and public revenues/expenditures. This information will be placed within the context of Riverside County and the City of Beaumont. Principal information sources will include city and county Chambers of Commerce, Southern California Association of Governments, California Employment Development Department, California Department of Finance, and discussions with city and county agency personnel. B:\170\RCTC -40- • • Impacts on the socioeconomic environment will focus on indirect effects of highway improvement in the Beaumont area; i.e., possible growth in businesses and residential areas to support population and employment growth that may result from route improvements. These impacts will primarily relate to demands on housing, services, and fiscal resources. These impacts are not expected to be significant because major highway improvements are not being proposed. However, mitigation measures will be recommended should potential significant impacts be identified. 4.5.7 ENERGY Dames & Moore will prepare an energy analysis assessing energy consumption associated with each alternative being considered, including the No -Build alternative. Analysis procedures will follow those described in the "Energy and Transportation Systems" (Caltrans, 1983). The analysis will be based on the Caltrans Highway Energy Analysis Program (HEAP). Since a PC version is not yet available, it is anticipated that Caltrans would run the HEAP model using input files formatted by Dames & Moore and provide Dames & Moore with the results. The results will be summarized in the DEA. The input data files will be in the format applicable to HEAP and will be based on available traffic analysis, road parameters, and construction costs. Project alternatives will be compared on a total direct energy basis or normalized by vehicle miles travelled. If this direct energy basis is impractical or infeasible, the alternatives will be compared on an energy efficiency basis (gallons of gasoline per vehicle miles travelled). This analysis will account for indirect energy consumption (vehicle wear, road maintenance). Construction energy requirements will be translated into an equivalent amount of B:\170\RCTC -41- • • • • • • dollars, assuming a certain cost of oil. Knowing the average yearly energy savings (AYES) for a given alternative, the construction energy payback period will be calculated. 4.5.8 PALEONTOLOGY A records search will be conducted prior to field investigations. This will include a search of known paleontological sites within the study area. Records will be consulted at San Bernardino County Museum, Redlands and the Los Angeles Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. The records search will include fossil localities of the study area and within the formations located along the highway. A field survey of the study area will be conducted to assess if there are any unrecorded fossil localities and to reconfirm any recorded localities along the highway. Field investigations will consist of examination of cut slopes, road cuts, exposures of bedrock and natural outcrops. Paleontological sensitivity is a measure of the potential for the discovery of fossils within a given rock unit and the extent of scientific study of the rock unit. A High sensitivity indicates that numerous fossils are known from this unit and that it is likely that additional fossils will be discovered during grading. A Moderate sensitivity indicates that fossils are common in this rock unit or that a few fossils are known from this rock unit but there has not been a great deal of scientific study of the rock unit. A Low sensitivity indicates that there have been some fossils found in these units, but that they occur infrequently and that it is difficult to predict their occurrence. A map showing areas of sensitivity will be prepared based on the results of the records search and field survey. 8:\170\RCTC -42- • • The potential for project construction activities to impact paleontological resources will be identified. Mitigation measures will be recommended as appropriate. A report documenting the above will be prepared for inclusion as an appendix to the DEA. Principal findings from the report will be included in the DEA. 4.5.9 WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS The objective of the water quality study will be to characterize, potential water quality impacts and to identify potential loss of beneficial uses for both surface and ground water. Conclusions reached through this evaluation will be used to characterize potential impacts and identify appropriate mitigation measures. The water quality study will be divided into 4 subtasks for the purpose of characterizing potential impacts. These subtasks will include: 1. Identification of water bodies within the study area and their associated beneficial uses; 2. collection of existing baseline water quality data for the water bodies identified; 3. Characterization of potential impacts to water bodies and loss of beneficial uses; and 4. Identification of appropriate mitigation measures for the protection of water quality and beneficial uses. 8:\170\RCTC -43- • • • • Identification of beneficial uses will focus on available information provided by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Riverside County Flood Control District. If beneficial uses have not been identified, beneficial uses will be assigned. Baseline water quality will focus on previous studies that have characterized storm water runoff water quality for similar land use. Water quality data provided by Caltrans, the USGS, and RWQCB, as well as others will be identified and characterized with relation to the proposed project. The identified data will be used to characterize and if possible estimate pollutant loads as well as potential loss of beneficial uses and water quality. Impacts will include both surface and ground water. Basged upon results of the literature review, potential impacts of each alternative and proposed mitigation measures will be identified. 4.6 DEA PUBLIC HEARINGS Upon approval of the DEA by RCTC, Caltrans and FHWA, the document will be reproduced, bound and distributed for a 30-day period of review and comment. Dames & Moore will prepare a Notice of Availability (NOA) and a notice of opportunity for a public hearing on the DEA. The notice will be published in a local daily newspaper. If requested, a public hearing will be conducted prior to the close of the comment period to allow formal public input. Exhibits (up to 5 overlays) and informational material will be presented, as well as a description of the study process and the alternatives analyzed. 8:\170\RCTC -44- • • As with the scoping meetings, the public hearing will be held at a convenient time and location to enhance public attendance. The public hearing will be recorded by a court reporter and a public hearing record will be prepared. 4.7 RESPONSE TO COMMENTS At the close of the comment and review period, and following the public hearing, we will assemble all comments concerning the project. These comments will be organized and catalogued by topic area, and suggested categories of responses prepared for RCTC/Caltrans review. For those comments that suggest changes to the project, or additional areas of critical concern that the public or agencies feel must be addressed, we will advise RCTC and Caltrans on a method of approach and consult with agencies concerning any additional studies to be performed. 4.8 DEVELOP PREFERRED ALTERNATIVE Dames & Moore will participate within the PDT to assist RCTC and Caltrans in selecting a preferred alternative for discussion in the Final EA. Comments submitted during document circulation and identified significant project impacts (environmental constraints) will be a major component in selecting a preferred alternative. 4.9 FINAL EA After agreement with RCTC and Caltrans, comments and responses to the DEA will be documented and incorporated into the Final EA. If additional studies or changes are necessary, these will also be documented. The complete environmental documentation, in compliance with NEPA and CEQA, will consist of the DEA and Final EA, which will incorporate the Initial Study, changes, additional study, and documentation of comments in the review process. 8:\170\RCTC -45- • • • • • • • • Copies of substantive letters of comment from individuals and agencies, including responses, will be included in the Final EA. 4.10 ISSUE DOCUMENTS Upon Final EA approval by RCTC, Caltrans and FHWA the document will be distributed to agencies, organizations and individuals who submitted substantive comments during the circulation period. 4.11 PDT MEETINGS Dames & Moore project management will participate in PDT meetings. It is anticipated that one (1) meeting per month will be conducted. The PDT will provide an interdisciplinary approach in order to monitor the progress of engineering and environmental studies, share data and information, and to evaluate alternative and feasible mitigation measures. Dames & Moore will prepare agendas for these meetings, as well as monthly minutes documenting items of discussion and decisions made at PDT meetings. 4.12 TREND MEETINGS The Deputy Project Manager will attend trend meetings every 2 weeks to discuss scope, schedule, work progress, and cost issues related to environmental activities. At these meetings, he will address activities and accomplishments for the current week, as well as objectives for the next 2 weeks. Agenda for these meetings will be prepared that include both engineering and environmental matters. Trend meeting minutes will be prepared and distributed within 3 working days after the meetings. A Data Request Log and Submittal Status Register will be prepared and maintained. 8:\170\RCTC -46- • • 4.13 COORDINATION WITH CONSULTANTS Active interaction with other RCTC consultants on this project will be conducted to ensure necessary data exchange and coordination of work schedules. Telephone communications will be used aggressively to maintain dialogue. One meeting per month will be scheduled to accommodate matters requiring face-to-face discussion rather than telephone conversations. The meeting will be attended by the Deputy Project Manager to represent environmental matters, or a designate if more appropriate to the need of the meeting. 8:\170\RCTC -47- • • • • • 5.0 PERSONNEL SUBSTITUTIONS Figures 5-1, 5-2, and 5-3 show our proposed project organization for this assignment. This organization includes recommended personnel substitutions to conduct this assignment in an efficient manner through utilization of qualified personnel who are closer in proximity to the project site than the personnel originally proposed. This primarily reflects substantial growth in our Santa Ana office since the original submittal of qualifications to RCTC. The following sections provide information on personnel substitutions; resumes are also attached. 5.1 ENGINEERING Mr. Gary Rogers will replace Mr. Bill Webb as Dames & Moore's Project Director. Mr. Rogers manages our Design Services Group in Santa Ana and has played a lead technical role and management role in several multidisciplinary studies, including highways through environmentally sensitive areas. Mr. Henry O'Bourke will be the Engineering Team Leader. Mr. O'Bourke has 14 years of civil engineering experience and has been project manager or project engineer on several transportation projects. Mr. O'Bourke is also located in the Santa Ana office. Mr. John Wilson will be the Project Engineer for geometric design and right-of-way engineering, replacing Clif Rope. Mr. Wilson presently handles projects in San Diego and Santa Ana and will work in our Santa Ana office on this project. We still intend to have our subconsultant, Kerchival Engineers (DBE) carry out preliminary design of structures. Mr. Denis Morgan is proposed as their Project Manager and Mr. Chin Chen as their 8:\170\RCTC -48- • • Project Engineer. Mr. Morgan replaced Mr. Charles Augade, who has since left the firm. Messrs. Morgan and Chen are specialists in bridges and box culverts, respectively. 5.2 ENVIRONMENTAL Dr. Les Senger is proposed as Deputy Project Manager and will replace Mr. Terry Clapham. Dr. Senger is a Senior Project Manager and is in charge of our environmental resource personnel in Santa Ana. He has provided senior management consultation and technical review input to highway improvement projects for State Routes 1, 41, and 84. He provides quality control review for environmental reports prepared by our firm in California and Nevada. Mr. Brian Cundelan, P.E., of Dames & Moore will replace Mr. Ji Han, P.E., of Jaykim Engineers for the Water Quality and Floodplain Studies. This substitution is necessary because Jaykim Engineers is no longer a certified DBE. Mr. Cundelan will also be preparing the hydrology studies for Engineering as indicated in our original submittal of qualifications. Mr. Randy Griffith, P.E., will replace Mr. Jeffrey Borum, P.E., for the Hazardous Waste Initial Site Assessment. Mr. Griffith has conducted hazardous waste assessments as part of property transfer assessments. He is based in our Santa Ana office. Ms. Suzanne Pfister will replace Ms. Martha Rozelle for Public Involvement activities. Ms. Pfister has provided this service for transportation projects in Arizona and California. She is based in our Santa Ana office. 8:\170\RCTC -49- • • • • • • • • Paleontology has been identified as an area of investigation that needs to be addressed based on preliminary results of the LSA studies. Mr. Rod Raschke of RMW Paleo Associates will be responsible for this effort. RMW Paleo Associates is a Caltrans certified WBE/DBE. The EIR/EIS will need to include a discussion of geology. Mr. Randy Brandt will be responsible for this effort. He is a registered geologist based in our San Bernardino office. B:\170\RCTC -50- PROJECT PRINCIPALS G. Rogers (DMA) B. Bulley, P.E. Sr. V.P. (HWL) • Corporate Resource • Corporate Commitment (DMA) Dames & Moose (HWL) H W Luc Inc. 1 PROJECT ORGANIZATION CHART STATE ROUTE 79- GILMAN SPRINGS TO FIRST STREET RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ENVIRONMENTAL TEAM LEADER D. Stroup (D&M) PROJECT MANAGER K. Bull, P.E. (DBM) DEPUTY PROJECT MANAGER L. Senger, Ph.D. (DMA) • OTHER RCTC CONSULTANTS ENGINEERING TEAM LEADER It O'Rourke, P.E. (D&M) i & Moore 1 IGUI U 5 I • PROJECT ORGANIZATION CHART ENGINEERING TEAM STATE ROUTE 79- GILIAAN SPRINGS TO FIRST STREET ENGINEERING TEAM LEADER H. O'Bourke ENGINEERING TEA U TRAFFIC MAINTENANCE • Tim Via, P.E. Dames & Moore Traffic Maintenance Plan, Construction Sequencing UTILITY RELOCATION • Philip Douglas, P.E. Associated Engineers (DBE) identify Conflicts, Preliminary Relocation Plans GEOMETRICS • John Wilson, P.E. Dames & Moore Typical Sections, Plan & ProMNe, Cross Sections, ANernative Alignments, Right -of -Way, Easements, Take Quantities STRUCTURES • Denis Morgan, P.E. • Chin Chen, P.E. Kercheval Engineers (DBE) Bridges, Box Culverts, Retaining Wails, Slope Protection, Construction Sequencing DRAINAGE • Brian Cundelan, P.E. Dames & Moore Hydrology/ Hydraulics, Cross Drainage, Roadway/ Bridge Drainage, Drainage Report COST ESTIMATE • Scott Eckman Dames & Moore Quantity Take -Offs, Quantity Summaries, Cost Estimates Dames & Moore 1 ICA 1141 �. 2 PROJECT ORGANIZATION CHART ENVIRONMENTAL TEAM STATE ROUTE 79- GILMAN SPRINGS TO FIRST STREET ENVIRONMENTAL TEAM LEADER D. Stroup PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT • Brian Cundelan, P.E. Dames 8 Moore Water Quality, Flood Plain Studies • Douglas wolf Dames 8 Moore Energy Analysis • Randy Brandt Dames 8 Moore Geology ENVIRONMENTAL TEAM • Randy Griffith, P.E. Dames 8 Moore Hazardous Waste Studies • Vicki Endo, P.E. (DBE) Endo Engineering Al, Quality, Noise Studies • Rod Reschke (WBE) RMW Paleo Associates Paleontology SOCIOECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT • Robert Mott Dames 8 Moore Socioeconomics, Growth inducement • Ralph Kingery, AICP Dames 8 Moore Land Use, Section 4(1) Resources • Suzanne Pfister Dames 8 Moore Public Involvement • Dennis Papillon Dames 8 Moore Aesthetics, Visual Resources • Jamie Cleland, Ph.D. Dames & Moore Archaeology, Historical Resources NATURAL ENVIRONMENT • John Gray, Ph.D., Dames 8 Moore Wetlands, Vegetation Removal, Wildlife, Wildlife Refuge Studies • • Daft Moore f IG(JHL 5 3 • • 6.0 PROJECT MANAGEMENT Dames & Moore's management approach has been structured in response to RCTC's needs. We have assembled the technical and managerial capability necessary to meet RCTC's scientific and management needs and have developed a management framework within which the technical requirements of this assignment can be successfully implemented. Various management tools will be used to provide the appropriate level of direction for the work effort and to ensure that the budget, schedule, and technical quality of the work is properly monitored and controlled. The following is a description of major features of Dames & Moore's management approach, including the basic program organization and internal and external controls. 6.1 PROGRAM ORGANISATION RCTC has overall management control of the activities associated with the project. The RCTC will serve as the focal point for the flow of information between its direct contractors, Dames & Moore, and regulatory agencies, particularly relating to authorization of projects and budgetary and schedule constraints. RCTC will have final decision making responsibility on all policy matters affecting completion of projects. The Dames & Moore Principal assigned to the program, Mr. Gary Rogers, has ultimate responsibility for all aspects of Dames & Moore's work. In his functional capacity as Project Director, Mr. Rogers will be responsible for overall program direction, fee quotations, contracts, overall cost control, and the technical quality of work. He will serve as the principal liaison with RCTC on major policy decisions throughout the work. 8:\170\RCTC -51- • • Supervision, coordination, and direction of the technical effort will be the responsibility of the Dames & Moore Project Manager, Mr. Keith Bull. He will be assisted by the Deputy Project Manager, Dr. Les Senger. They will establish final budgets and schedules; monitor the cost, schedule, and progress of work; ensure availability of adequate staffing to perform the work; assist in contract administration, scope of work definition, and reporting; provide routine communications to RCTC concerning the progress of our services; and, coordinate communications with RCTC subcontractors and regulatory agencies. They will also conduct a quality review of all project deliverables. The work of Principal Investigators (or Project Engineers) will be coordinated by the Team Leaders, Mr. Henry O'Bourke and Mr. Doug Stroup. Principal Investigators are technical specialists in their individual disciplines who will be responsible for conducting the work within each project in accordance with professionally acceptable standards. They are accountable for completing their assigned work tasks within budget and on schedule. They will also be responsible for the routine management of their technical staffs. 6.2 INTERNAL CONTROLS Internal controls are employed as a means for the Project Manager to monitor the project's progress and bring the project back to plan if it veers away. Our management approach includes several internal controls: development of work plans, cost and schedule controls, communication controls, meetings, and reporting procedures. 11:\170\RCTC -52- • • • • • • • 6.2.1 WORN PLAN One of the principal management tools used by Dames & Moore is development of a work plan specific to the needs of a particular project. The Work Plan that will be developed and implemented in this project will enable: o The Project Manager to effectively control the program; o Team Leaders and Principal Investigators to identify their scopes of work, budgets, and schedules as well as ensure that work will be conducted in a safe manner; o All personnel to understand the importance of high quality work and how it is to be achieved; and o The Project Director to understand the overall program and assess whether it is accomplishing its objectives. 6.2.2 COST AND SCNEDUT$ CONTROL Cost information for the various technical efforts required to complete this project will be input to the Dames & Moore computerized Job Reporting System. The Project Manager is provided each week with printouts of all project -related charges in a variety of formats. The reports include weekly charges and a comparison of cumulative charges to date in relation to budgets. All deviations are clearly indicated and provide the Program Manager with an early warning of possible cost problems. They also serve as an internal check on the effectiveness of other management tools. Schedule information will be input to a computerized tracking system such as Timeline or equivalent, distributed to project personnel, and updated as needed. Schedule control will be B:\170\RCTC -53- • • r accomplished by monitoring the progress at appropriate intervals and by making any necessary schedule adjustments as required to accommodate variations in planned activities. Critical and non- critical project tasks are both monitored at appropriate intervals, depending on the amount of slack time available for a particular task. Contingency planning techniques are used in the development of project schedules to help protect against the adverse impact of unplanned events or circumstances. Milestones will be used as progress check points throughout the program. 6.2.3 COMMUNICATIONS CONTROLS Communications controls and documentation procedures will be employed to regulate information flow. They will further aid the Project Manager in monitoring project status. Internally -generated memos, records of telephone conversations, meeting minutes, etc. will be directed through the Project Manager or his designee. These controls and procedures will ensure that the Project Manager is informed in a timely fashion of any major developments that might affect the cost, schedule, and progress of the work. A complete project filing system will be established as a means of organizing all project -related materials and to provide the appropriate level of traceability. A memo describing the system and implementation procedures will be distributed to appropriate project personnel. 6.2.4 MEETINGS This project involves multiple consultants under direct contract to RCTC. As such, it is essential that a high level of dialogue be maintained among consultant personnel, particularly those in management positions. This will be accomplished through routine management conference calls and meetings scheduled on an "as needed" basis. 8:\170\RCTC -54- • • • • • • • 6.2.5 REPORTING PROCEDURES Two types of internal reporting procedures will be used: management reporting and technical reporting. The Project Manager is responsible for advising Group and firmwide management of all situations that could adversely affect the project. These impromptu reports are usually delivered verbally and confirmed in writing. The purpose of these reports is to provide an immediate means of identifying and alleviating problem situations. Technical reporting procedures are designed to ensure that all technical reports are technically complete, properly reviewed, and edited for clarity of information presentation. Report outlines will be prepared as early as possible and reviewed for organization and completeness. All reports will be reviewed by technical reviewers for adequacy and completeness, and then edited for clarity. A final review will be conducted by the Project Manager or Deputy Project Manager prior to issuance of any report to RCTC. This protocol will ensure that RCTC receives the quality reports that it requires. 6.3 EXTERNAL CONTROLS The major external controls included in our management approach concern the control of subcontractors, communication controls, meetings, and reporting procedures. 6.3.1 SUBCONTRACTOR CONTROL The work of Dames & Moore subcontractors will be controlled to ensure compliance with cost and schedule commitments and the production of a quality product. Subcontracts and Letters of Authorization for subcontractor services will define the scope, cost, and schedule for completing the work. The terms of the subcontract will also bind the subcontractor to the same 8:\170\RCTC -55- • • contractual terms and conditions required of Dames & Moore. Dames & Moore Principal Investigators and/or Team Leaders will monitor subcontractor work to ensure compliance with the Work Plans. All subcontractor reports will be subject to the review protocol described in Section 6.2.5, consistent with preservation of their independent professional judgments. 6.3.2 COMMUNICATION CONTROLS We understand the need and value of a continuing dialogue with RCTC throughout this project and, thus, will remain in continuous contact with RCTC. courier packages, scheduled progress Telephone communication, correspondence, FAXs, meetings (see Section 6.3.3), and regularly reports (see Section 6.3.4) will all serve to keep the lines of communication open throughout the program. 6.3.3 MEETINGS Dames & Moore will provide for attendance of the Project Manager and Deputy Project Manager at PDT and Trend Meetings. will fulfill the need for face-to-face, timely meeting on definition, costs, schedule, policy matters, and strategy. 6.3.4 REPORTING PROCEDURES This work Monthly progress reports will be submitted to RCTC which describe the progress of Dames & Moore and subcontractor work. These will be supplemented, as appropriate, with telephone updates to keep RCTC fully informed regarding the progress of this program. In addition, RCTC will be placed on the distribution list for all important correspondence pertaining to the program. 8:\170\RCTC -56- • • • • • • • • 7.0 COMMENTS ON CONTRACT PROVISIONS General An initial review of the proposed agreement to be used for this project has been completed by Dames & Moore. The following comments provide suggested additions, deletions or revisions to the proposed agreement. We understand that additional discussions will be necessary to arrive at mutually agreeable terms to be included in the agreement. 3. Terms 3.1 General Description of Services: After "Exhibit A,: add ", dated 11 ... 3.8 Responsibility of Consultant B:\170\RCTC Line 10: delete "applicable law"; replace with "the provisions of article 3.16 of this agreement" -57- 3.12 Termination/Cancellation 3.12.2 Effect of Termination for Convenience Line 4: Delete the following, "Such payment shall include a prorated amount of profit, if applicable, but." New sentence shall read: "No amount shall be paid for anticipated profit on unperformed services." 3.12.3 Effect of Termination for Cause: Damages Delete the third sentence in its entirety. 3.13 Revisions in Scope of Services 3.13.1 Extra Work • We suggest adding to this paragraph a • statement describing method of payment for extra work. 3.14 Ownership of Materials/Confidentiality 3.14.2 Confidentiality Add the following to this paragraph: 8:\170\ROTC "Contractor's obligations under this Article 3.14.2 shall apply except to the extent required for 1) performance of services under this Agreement; 2) compliance with professional standards of conduct for preservation of the public safety, health and welfare; 3) compliance with any court order or -58- • • • • • • other governmental directive; and/or 4) protection of Contractor against claims or liabilities arising from performance of services under this Agreement. Contractor's obligations hereunder shall not apply to information in the public domain or lawfully acquired under a non -confidential basis from others." 3.16 Indemnification 8:\170\RCTC 3.16.1 Duties Add the underlined words to the third sentence: "The Consultant warrants that it shall perform the Services..." Add the following sentence to the paragraph: "No other warranty, expressed or implied, is intended or included in Consultant's reports or proposals." 3.16.2 Responsibilities Add the following to the paragraph: "Notwithstanding any other provision of this agreement Consultant's liability for injury or loss arising from (1) professional errors or omissions and/or (2) radiation, nuclear reaction, or radioactive substances or conditions; and/or (3) any other toxic, irritant, pollutant, or waste gases, liquids, or solid materials shall not exceed $1,000,000. Consultant's comprehensive -59- • • 3.17 Insurance B:\170\RCTC general and automobile liability shall not exceed $1,000,000. The Commission agrees to defend, indemnify, and hold Consultant harmless from any claim, liability, or defense cost in excess of the limits determined above for injury or loss sustained by any party from exposures allegedly caused by Consultant's performance of services hereunder. 3.17.1 Commercial General Liability Insurance Note that our insurance is on a combined single limit/annual aggregate basis. Change the first sentence to: "The Consultant shall carry commercial general liability insurance covering third -party liability risks, including contractual liability, in an amount of S1.000.000 combined sinale limit/annual aaaregate for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage." Change the second sentence to: "The Consultant shall also obtain business automobile liability insurance or equivalent form with a combined single limit/annual aaaregate of S1.000.000. 3.17.2.2 Change the sentence to: "Such policy shall provide for contractual liability assumed under this agreement." 3.17.2.4 Substitute one for "five" years due to insurance market changes from year to year. -60- • • • • • • • • 3.17.3 Workers' Compensation Insurance Add to the end of the second sentence: "..."losses arising from the services which are covered by this insurance." 3.17.4.1 Additional Insureds Add the underlined to the second sentence: "... employees, Bechtel Civil or agents other than the limitations agreed to herein." 3.17.4.3 Insurance to Apply Separately to Each Insured Change the sentence ending to: "... except with respect to limits of the Consultant's liability as set forth herein. 3.17.4.7 This section should be deleted based on the changes to Section 3.17.1. 3.26 Compensation and Payment 3.26.1 AMOUNT B:\170\RCTC Add the following sentence to the paragraph: "Compensation for Extra Work shall include costs plus fee adjustment." -61- • • ATTACHMENT RESUMES • • • • • APPENDIX B SCHEDULE • Milestones 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Months 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Engineering 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Environmental 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 • 1 i € € € R. 2 RCTC / Caltrans Revisions 2 Dames & Moore Revisions i i 1 I 1 i ! I R II € 1 Preliminary Schedule Gilman Springs Roianderson Road to Firsillreet t—+ -r- 28.5 Months 27 Months Milestones Environmental 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R - 2 RC 1 C / (—Altar's Ruwsions 2 & Muoiu Ruvrsrons 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 9 10 11 Months 12 f 13 14 il5 16 17 16 19 20;21 22 23 24 1 I i 1 i . 25 26 } 11 i Preliminary Schedule- Environmental Keller Road to Newport Road 1 27 28 29 30 • CMP SCHEDULE TASK 9 Develop Capital Improvement Program (TIP) 9.1 Coordinate RTIP and CMP Process TASK 10 Develop CMP Compliance Monitoring Process 1990 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1991 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC 1992 JAN ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• and 10.1 Develop Process For Consistency Between the CMP and RTP 10.2 Develop Process for Local Agency Conformance with CMP 10.3 Develop process to handle exceptions to LOS standards and impacts from adjacent jurisdictions LOCAL REVIEW TASK 11 CMP development and Implementation 11. I TAC CMP Sub -Committee Review 11.2 30 Day Local and Regional Agency Review 11.3 Revise Draft CMP Considering 11.1 and 11.2 11.4 Submit Final Draft to TAC, Western COG, and CVAG for Review 11.5 Submit Draft CMP to Commission and SCAG for Review 11.6 Develop TIP Priorities Incorporating CMP Projects 11.E Submit Final TIP do CMP to Commission for Approval and make Air Quality Conformance Finding ••••• ••••• ••• * ••• ••• ••• • • ••••• • REGIONAL (SCAG) REVIEW TASK 12 Submit Draft CMP/TIP to SCAG 11.1 SCAG Executive Committee Adopts RTIP 11.2 RTIP Submitted to CTC ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• • • • April 1, 1992 11.3 CTC Adopts STIP AGENDA ITEM #7B • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 22, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Mark Massman, Measure "A" Project Manager Karl Sauer, Project Coordinator THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: Consultant Agreement with Centennial Engineering for: Preliminary Engineering Services for the Route 79; Keller Road to Newport Road, Widening Project. Through the Measure "A" selection process, Dames & Moore was assigned the opportunity to provide preliminary engineering and environmental services for all Measure "A" projects on State Route 79. But, due to the fact that Caltrans took over the Phase 0 activities for the two Route 60 Measure "A" projects, resulting in an excess of selected category 1 engineering firms, the Route 79 preliminary engineering services were split into two distinct projects. This would allow an additional category 1 selected engineering firm the opportunity to work on a Measure "A" project. Centennial Engineering, the next firm on the category 1 selection list, was assigned the opportunity to provide preliminary engineering services for the above referenced project on State Route 79. Centennial will function as leader of a consultant team charged with the task of producing all necessary Phase 0 project development activities which will culminate in the production of a Project Report. Negotiations on this agreement are not completed with Centennial at this time but, staff is working to finalize this contract for Board approval at the November Commission meeting. The attached scope of work and schedule, details work activities and costs for project development tasks to be conducted by Centennial. The Commission's recently approved standard contract will be used for this agreement. f:\users\preprint\ 11-1490.agd\eenten.tntm • • Page Two October 31, 1990 Consultant Agreement with Centennial Engineering STAFF RECOMMENDATION Approve the Agreement with Centennial Engineering which will be in the range of $ 500,000.00 to $ 600,000.00. Funds for this contract have been included in the 1991 RCTC budget under Professional services. MTM:sc attachment f:\users\preprint\ 11-1490.agd\centen.mtm • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission EXHIBIT A Riverside County Transportation Commission 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100 Riverside, California 92501 Scope of Services For Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project PM 10.9 to PM 15.2 Submitted by: Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc.0 17300 Redhill Avenue, Suite Irvine, California 92714 • Project Approach PROJECT APPROACH This section will identify Centennial's course of action to complete the tasks necessary to prepare, process and obtain Caltrans approval of: Project Study Report; preliminary Project Development Engineering: Project Report; Environmental Documentation; and Project Approval Report. The Project Study Report, preliminary engineering, Project Report, and Project Approval Report will be prepared in accordance with Caltrans' Project Development Procedures Manual (PDPM) and include conceptual plan drawings, alternatives, preliminary right-of-way requirements and preliminary construction cost estimates for the project. The environmental documentation will be prepared by Dames and Moore in accordance with the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Centennial will provide coordination of the environmental requirements with the other project assignments. Centennial's approach will be to provide a Project Study Report, Project Report, Project Approval Report and coordination of the environmental documentation for the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Measure "A" State Highway Program which supports RCTC's goals for the development of area traffic systems, ensuring the most efficient and cost effective design. Our approach will focus on this goal with the additional guidance and input from Caltrans to ensure proposed improvements conform to established design criteria and guidelines for a State Highway. These reports will examine viable alternatives utilizing recent aerial photogrammetric mapping and control surveys from Robert Bein, William Frost & Associates (RBF), accurate traffic data from KORVE Engineering and DKS Associates. environ- mental analysis from LSA Associates and Dames and Moore, and valuable input from local residences and businesses affected by the project. This will be accomplished through effective communication and coordination, proper management control and scheduling utilizing the Project Team's expertise to match the diverse project requirements, and by adopting a quality assurance program that will provide RCTC a quality product on time and within budget. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 1 • • Riverside County Trattsportatioit Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach SCOPE OF TECHNICAL RESPONSIBILITIES The Centennial Team is proposing an effective approach for completing the required tasks. Based on our discussions with RCTC staff, our past experience with similar projects, and our familiarity with Caltrans' policies and procedures, Centennial proposes the following specific tasks to complete the Scope of Services for this project: PROJECT ADMINISTRATION AND MEETINGS o Centennial will conduct site visits to assure familiarity with the existing conditions within the project limits. o Centennial will provide RCTC with a project control schedule of task, subtask, and deliverable submittals, and will provide RCTC regular schedule updates. o Centennial will be a member and attend meetings of the Project Development Team (PDT) and relevant PDT subcommittees established to guide the study in accordance with the PDPM. Centennial will serve as staff to the PDT in arranging meetings, providing discussion material, and keeping and distributing minutes. Meetings of the PDT and its subcommittees will be held pursuant to the provisions of the PDPM. o Centennial will conduct trend meetings with the designated Project Managers of the Commission and Caltrans on a hi -weekly basis, with such meetings scheduled at a standard day and time. Trend meetings will encompass focused and informal discussions concerning scope, schedule, work progress, and cost issues in a three week rolling format: current week - activities and accomplishments; next two weeks - objectives. Centennial will be responsible for the following trend meeting activities: 1. Preparation and distribution of meeting agendas to be received by Commission and Caltrans Project Managers no later than three (3) working days prior to the meeting; Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. Riverside County Transportation Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Rowe 79 Widening Project Project Approach 2. Preparation and distribution of trend meeting minutes within three (3) working days after the meeting; 3. Preparation and maintenance of a Data Request Lou, and Submittal Status Register. o Centennial will develop, implement, and maintain quality control procedures during the preparation of documents, plans, and drawings related to the Project. Centennial will have a quality control plan in effect during the entire time work is being performed under the Project contract. This plan will be submitted to RCTC for approval prior to implementation. o Centennial will be responsible for coordinating closely with other consultants and will use the information produced by their studies in support of work performed on this project. Centennial will schedule and conduct meetings among the consultants throughout this project to ensure necessary data exchange and coordination of work schedules. o Centennial will maintain complete and accurate files concerning, work activities appurtenant to this project. These files shall included contents and be indexed in accordance with the Caltrans Project Development Uniform File System. o Centennial will provide engineering plans and drawings on magnetic tape using an InterGraph IGDS Version 8.S format. One copy of the data on magnetic tape shall be provided to Caltrans upon completion of the contract. o Centennial will be responsible for coordinating the other consultants and will use the information produced by their studies in support of work performed on this project. Centennial will schedule and conduct meetings among the consultants throughout this project to ensure necessary data exchange and coordination of work schedules. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. • • Riverside Comity Transportation Commission Measure "A' State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach MILESTONE 1: RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTION o Immediately after receiving the Notice to Proceed, Centennial will submit the application for an encroachment permit to obtain approval for consultant personnel to enter the State Highway Right -of -Way and conduct on -site investigations and studies. o Copies of the Route Concept Report and all related correspond- ence for this project will be obtained from Caltrans through RCTC and reviewed to incorporate the elements particular to the Route 79 Project into the preliminary engineering tasks. o Copies of any specific Design Standards which are unique to this project will be obtained from Caltrans through RCTC. o As -built plans will be obtained and reviewed to become familiar with the project. ascertain the completeness and accuracy of the information, and determine additional information requirements. This record information will be used, with the photogrammetric control, to establish the existing centerline. o The location and condition of existing utilities will be reviewed and discussed with the respective utility companies and recommendations made regarding any deficiencies found. Necessary replacements or relocates which may be required prior to or during construction of the State Route 79 Project will be recommended and discussed with RCTC and utility companies. o Centennial, through CHJ Geotechnical, Inc., will conduct an investigation of existing pavement condition within the project limits. Information obtained from this investigation will be used to develop preliminary recommendations for pavement widening, rehabilitation and/or replacement. These recommendations will be the basis for the pavement portion of the construction cost estimate to be included in the Project Study Report and Project Report. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. -/ Riverside County Trcnupo utlon Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach o Centennial will coordinate with RBF for any additional surveys required in support of engineering tasks. RBF, the consultant for surveying and mapping, will provide Centennial via RCTC the following specific items: o Vertical and horizontal control information. o Monumentation necessary to establish as -built centerline. o Aerial photogrammetric mapping and accurate present day topographic data in Intergraph IGDS Version 8.8. format. o Cross sections for the project. MILESTONE 2: PROJECT STUDY REPORT Centennial will address the following specific items as a part of the Project Study Report: o Develop typical sections for three alternatives: widen to four lane section with 14' median; widen to four lane section with 4' median; widen to four lane section with no median. A tourth alternative, no improvements, will also be investigated. o Determine existing centerline from available as -built and right-ot- way information. lay out the alternative sections, and identify areas of potential benefit from asymmetrical widening or complete realignment. o Determine existing profile from available as -built and other mapping information, and determine areas of complete profile reconstruction. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. Riverside County Transportation Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach Determine preliminary right-of-way requirements and identify areas of additional right-of-way to be acquired. o Identify utilities within the right-of-way, determine conflicts with the proposed project, and develop preliminary relocations for the conflicting utilities. o Existing drainage facilities will be identified and located, and the impacts to these facilities will be assessed. o Compatibility between the proposed project and the Route Concept Report will be examined, with special emphasis devoted to the traffic operations and the overall design concept. o Preliminary construction cost estimates will be developed for the three alternatives. o Non-standard design features will be addressed from the point of view of sound engineering practice, protection of RCTC and Caltrans against litigation, and to provide sufficient information for a decision by RCTC and Caltrans concerning any non- standard design features. o Base mapping will be required for the Project Study Report to display the alternatives and the engineering details of each. Centennial proposes that this base mapping consist of photo - mosaic prepared from aerial photography to be provided by RCTC which Centennial will be responsible for developing into 1" = 200' base mapping. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 6 • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach MILESTONE 3: PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING o Preliminary geometric drawings at 200 scale will consist of three alternative designs (14 foot median, 4 foot median, and no median) produced from the planimetric base maps furnished by RCTC. These drawings will also show geometric and drainage features, approximate alignments and grades, cut and fill slopes, signing and striping layouts, and right-of-way limits. The drawings will also provide sufficient detail to allow development of cost estimates and identification of the scope of the project and its impacts on the surrounding environment. o The approach geometrics will consider usage and turning radii. Approaches and grades require careful consideration and Centennial will examine them with special attention given to property lines and safety while complying with Caltrans requirements. o Preliminary typical cross -sections will include preliminary drawings showing lane widths, shoulder widths, median widths, and approximate outside slopes and any ditches. o Preliminary utility plans will locate existing utilities and identify any utility conflicts which may arise due to the proposed construction. o The Draft Project Report will be written utilizing much of the data generated during the development of the Project Study Report as the basis for this more refined and developed report. This Draft Project Report will include the conceptual plans of the roadway, intersections, traffic systems, drainage strategy, medians, right-of-way requirements, utility considerations, and preliminary construction cost estimates for the various phases of the work. Centennial will analyze the estimated construction costs versus the functional benefits of the improvements and make recommendations as to the best alternatives for the dollar spent (value engineering). Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 7 • • Riverside Cowuv Transportation Commission Measure 'A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach o The Draft Project Report will also develop recommendations for construction phasing and project segmentation. The construction phasing will analyze the necessary traffic control elements, and develop a strategy for the handling of construction area traffic by means of detours or phasing plan to ensure the safe and efficient movement of construction area traffic. The segmentation plan will examine the entire project and make recommendations on segmenting the project into viable construction contracts based on length of project, cost, traffic control, adjacent land use, and other elements that lead to "natural" construction segments. o Construction cost estimates will be prepared by Centennial for inclusion in the Draft Project Report based on the conceptual design prepared. o Centennial will perform a constructability review to confirm that all plan conflicts have been resolved, that the preliminary engineering results are compatible with construction procedures and equipment, that the plans adequately depict existing site conditions, that construction phasing requirements are appro- priate, that materials and quality are compatible with the locality and purpose of the proposed construction of the improvements, that special limitations on construction imposed by the site havebeen adequately considered, and that observations and comments are made on any other noted potential construction difficulties. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 8 • Riverside County Transportation Commission: .tileasure "A" State Highway Program State Rowe 79 Widening Project Project Approach MILESTONE 4: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS o Dames and Moore will prepare the environmental analysis and documentation, and will also take the lead in preparing and conducting all open houses, scoping meetings, and public hearings. Centennial will coordinate 'with Dames and Moore and provide back up engineering in the form of presentation exhibits for all public meetings. Centennial will also attend and provide engineering support for Dames and Moore at these public hearings. MILESTONE 5: PROJECT REPORT o Centennial will address RCTC and Caltrans review comments from the Draft Project Report and incorporate these comments into a Final Project Report. MILESTONE 6: EVALUATE COMMENTS o After RCTC and Caltrans reviews are complete, Centennial will incorporate any additions and revisions which may be required as a result of the review Project Report. Centennial will also evaluate any comments made on the environmental document which are directed to the technical engineering support. Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 9 • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach • MILESTONE 7: PROJECT APPROVAL REPORT o Centennial will prepare a Project Approval Report for sub- mission with the final environmental document. This report will include any changes or mitigation features proposed in the design as a result of the environmental process, construction costs, support and opposition to the project identified as a result of the public meetings, compatibility with local and regional plans, and the results of local agency contacts and their views on the acceptability of the project. MILESTONE 8: ISSUE DOCUMENTS o Centennial will prepare, for submission to RCTC and Caltrans, the following documents: LIST OF DELIVERABLES PER MILESTONE NUMBER OF COPIES 0.2 Project Control Schedule 1 0.3 Monthly Reports 21 0.6 Quality Control Plan 1 1.1 Encroachment Permit Application 1 2.4 Project Study Report 20 3.0 Preliminary Engineering 20 3.6 Safety Analysis 20 3.9 Draft Project Report 8 4.0 EIR/EIS 20 5.3 Final Project Report 20 5.4 Drainage Report 20 7.1 Project Approval Report 20 8.3 Preferred Alternative Section Report 20 • Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 10 • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project Project Approach PROJECT MILESTONES o Work activities to be performed, and deliverables to be completed by Centennial are organized pursuant to the milestones shown as follows: MILESTONE SCHEDULE MONTHS AFTER CONTRACT EXECUTION TARGET DATE FOR COMPLETION MILESTONE 1: Research and Data Collection 2 January 1991 MILESTONE 2: Project Study Report 7 June 1991 MILESTONE 3: Preliminary Engineering 10 September 1991 MILESTONE 4: Environmental Analysis 16 March 1992 MILESTONE 5: Project Report 16 March 1992 MILESTONE 6: Evaluate Comments 19 June 1992 MILESTONE 7: Project Approval Report 20 July 1992 MILESTONE 8: Issue Documents 21 August 1992 Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 11 • • Riverside County Transportation Commission EXHIBIT B Riverside County Transportation Commission 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100 Riverside, California 92501 Schedule For Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project PM 10.9 to PM 15.2 Submitted by: Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 17300 Redhill Avenue, Suite 200 Irvine, California 92714 • • • • EXHIBIT B - TIME SCHEDULE PROPOSED PROJECT SCHEDULE FOR STATE ROUTE 79 WIDENING PROJECT - Keller Road to Newport Road Riverside County Transportation Commission MILESTONES NUMBER OF MONTHS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 _ 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20f NOTICE TO PROCEED PROJECT ADMINISTRATION & MEETINGS ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 - RESEARCH & DATA COLLECTION 1 , , _ - SURVEYING & MAPPING 1 1 1 1 1 i GEOTECHNICAL EVALUATION 1 1 1 1 1 2- PROJECT STUDY REPORT (PSR) RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 3- PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING 1 1 1 1 '' 1 L RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 1 -• DRAFT PROJECT REPORT• _ 1 RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 1 _ 1 4- ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION 1 I 1 1 RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 5 - PROJECT REPORT RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 6- EVALUATE COMMENTS 1 1 1 1_1 ThEII=CIL 1 1 11 1 7- PROJECT APPROVAL REPORT 11 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1� 11 11 _1 RCTC/CALTRANS REVIEW 1 1_1 T i T-Fl_ 1__ 1 1 1 1 1_ 1 1 1_ 1 1 ___. _I __ __ ____ 8- ISSUE DOCUMENTS 1 1 1 1 T 1 1 _1 I_ 1 1 ___ 1_ ___11 I._ _.LJ 1� • • Riverside County Transportation Commission EXHIBIT C Riverside County Transportation Commission 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100 Riverside, California 92501 Estimated Manhours and Cost For Measure "A" State Highway Program State Route 79 Widening Project PM 10.9 to PM 15.2 Submitted by: Centennial Civil Engineers, Inc. 17300 Redhill Avenue, Suite 200 Irvine, California 92714 • • • • • • EXHIBIT C ESTIMATED MANHOUR AND FEE SCHEDULE ROUTE 79 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING RESPONSIBLE PERSONNEL AND HOURS PER TASK PRIN. PROJ. PROJ. ENGR. DRAFT/ WORD EST. EST. SUB - TASK DESCRIPTION MGR. ENGR. DESIGN CADO PROCESS HRS./ COST/ CONSULTANT $61.62 $36.11 $33.79 $23.99 $17.82 $15.53 TASK TASK COST ONGOING PROJECT MANAGEMENT _ 0.1 Site Visits 8 16 10 10 44 $1.648 52 0.2 Project Control Schedule (CPM Format) 8 60 20 40 4 132 $4.110.28 0.3 Schedule Updates and Monthly Reports 16 60 40 20 60 196 $5,792 32 0.4 Project Development Team (PDT) Meetings 20 96 40 40 20 216 $7.320.76 0.5 Trend Meetings 20 154 110 40 40 364 * 12.091.04 0.6 Quality Control Plan 8 52 20 4 84 $3. t 08.60 0.7 Coordination with Other ConsuNants 10 194 96 6 306 Si0,958.56 MILESTONE 1: RESEARCII AND DATA COI LECTION 1.1 Encroachment Permit Application 2 4 2 8 $238.44 1.2 Ulititles Coordination 12 24 40 76 $2,203.88 1.3 Review Route Concept Report 12 12 8 32 tit ,030.72 1.4 As-BuiN Plan Review 16 20 18 54 $1.685 38 1.5 Survey Coordination 12 16 8 36 $1.165.88 1.6 Right -Of -Way Evaluation 8 32 _ 20 I 60 $1.849.96 _ MILESTONE 2: PROJECT STUDY REPORT 2.1 Preliminary Typical Cross Section 8 8 36 40 92 $2,t35.64 2.2 Geotechnical Evaluation 12 10 12 34 $ 1.059. 1 0� i t 7.411.00 2.3 Preliminary Construction Cost Estimate 12 12 36 6 66 $1.795.62 2.4 Project Study Report 120 378 400 180 28 1106 $30,344.26 2.5 Quality Control 16_ 16 16 48 $2,104 32 _ MILESTONE 3: PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING 3.1 Preliminary Geometric Drawings (3 Alternatives) 28 300 260 182 770 $20.628.72 3.2 Preliminary Right -of -Way Requirements 12 20 26 40 98 $2,445.66 3.3 Preliminary Drainage 16 96 120 60 292 $7,769.60 3.4 Utility Conflicts 12 20 40 40 112 $2,781.52 3.5 Construction Cost Estimates (3 Alternatives) 12 24 60 6 102 $2,776.86 3.6 Safety Analysis (3 Alternatives) 28 130 26 6 190 $6,120.70 3.7 Preliminary Detour Plan 12 40 40 60 152 $3,813.72 Construction Staging Plans 20 40 60 60 180 $4,582.40 3.8 3.9 Preliminary Draft Project Report 20 168 40 120 46 394 $10.211.30 3.10 Quality Control 20 20 20 60 $2.630 40 EXHIBIT C (CONTINUED) ESTIMATED MANHOUR AND FEE SCHEDULE ROUTE 79 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING RESPONSIBLE PERSONNEL AND HOURS PER TASK TASK DESCRIPTION ONGOING PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPAL PROJECT MANAGER PROJECT ENGINEER ROBERT LARRY CARL WILLIS GIL DAVID WILLIS GIL GONZALO RODNEY CELLARS THOMAS MILLER COLE SALAZAR POTTER COLE SALAZAR PENA PIMENTEL 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 Site Visits Project Control Schedule (CPM Format) Schedule Updates and Monthly Reports Project Development Team (PDT) Meetings 10 8 8 16 10 16 40 40 76 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 20 5 10 20 20 t0 20 0.5 0.6 0.7 Trend Meetings Quality Control Plan Coordination with Other Consultants MILESTONE 1: RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTION 10 8 10 10 114 36 134 20 8 30 20 8 30 20 40 20 40 10 28 30 10 28 1.1 Encroachment Permit Application 2 4 1.2 Utilities Coordination _ 12 8 16 1.3 Review Route Concept Report 6 6 4 4 4 1.4 As -Built Plan Review 8 8 10 10 1.5 Survey Coordination 12 12 4 1.6 Right -Of -Way Evaluation 8 12 20 2.1 Preliminary Typical Cross Section 8 8 2.2 Geotechnical Evaluation 12 10 2.3 Preliminary Construction Cost Estimate 6 6 6 6 2.4 Project Study Report 50 50 20 69 69 120 120 2.5 Quality Control 16 16 16 MILESTONE 3: PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING 3.1 Preliminary Geometric Drawings (3 Alternatives) 16 12 30 30 40 200 3.2 3.3 Preliminary Right -of -Way Requirements Preliminary Drainage 12 8 8 80 20 16 3.4 Utility Conflicts 12 16 4 3.5 Construction Cost Estimates (3 Alternatives) 6 6 12 12 3.6 Safety Analysis (3 Alternatives) 12 16 40 90 3.7 Preliminary Detour Plan 12 20 20 3.8 Preliminary Construction Staging Plans 12 8 20 20 3.9 Draft Project Report 8 12 52 52 32 32 3.10 Quality Control 20 20 20 • • • EXHIBIT C (CONTINUED) ESTIMATED MANHOUR AND FEE SCHEDULE • ROUTE 79 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING RESPONSIBLE PERSONNEL AND HOURS PER TASK TASK DESCRIPTION PRINCIPAL PROJECT MANAGER PROJECT ENGINEER __CELLARS ROBERT LARRY THOMAS CARL MILLER WILLIS COLE GIL SALAZAR DAVID POTTER_ WILLIS COLE GIL SALAZAR GONZALO PENA RODNEY PIMENTEL MILESTONE 4: ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 4.1 Scoping Meetings 12 12 8 8 4.2 Community Work Shops 8 8 8 8 4.3 Public Hearings 10 10 8 8 4.4 Draft EIRIEIS 4.5 Quality Control 4 4 4 MILESTONE 5: PROJECT REPORT 5.1 Develop Recommended Construction Segmentation 10 10 8 10 10 20 5.2 Develop Final Construction Cost Estimate 4 6 4 6 12 5.3 Submit Final Project Report 6 6 35 45 25 35 5.4 Preliminary Hyrology and Drainage Report 8 12 10 60 10 5.5 Constructability Review 4 4 10 10 10 30 5.6 Value Engineering 6 6 12 12 16 5.7 Quality Control 20 _ 20 20 MILESTONE 6: EVALUATE COMMENTS 6.1 Respond to Comments 10 10 I 10 10 20 20 6.2 Quality Control 4 4 �-11 4 MILESTONE 7: PROJECT APPROVAL REPORT 7.1 Protect Approval Report 10 20 10 20 50 i 20 50 7.2 Quality Control 4 _ _ 4 4 . MILESTONE 8: ISSUE DOCUMENTS 8.1 Project Study Report 4 8.2 Project Report 4 8.3 Preferred Alternative Section Report 12 16 8 8.4 Project Approval Report 8 16 8 8.5 Quality Control _ 4 4 4 PROJECT TOTAL 20 1 80 621 748 1 322 1 2401 3001 553 1 686 I 903 STATE ROUTE 79 WIDENINGROJECT COST SUMMARY CENTENNIAL CIVIL ENGINEERS, INC. DIRECT SALARY COSTS Personnel Category Avg. Rate , Hours Total Principal S61.62 162 59.982.44 Project Manager S36.11 1310 47.304.10 Project Engineer S33.79 2442 82.515.18 Engineer/Designer S23.99 1946 46.684.54 Drafter/Technician _ S17.82 1089 19,405.98 Clerical $15.53 314 _ 4.876.42 Subtotal $ 210.768.66 (1) II. INDIRECT RATE TOTAL INDIRECT RATE 150.4 % x $ 210.768.66 Subtotal (1) as Subtotal $ 316.996.06 (2) III. NET FEE, 12.00 % x $ 527.764.72 Total (1) • (2) = Subtotal $ 63.331.77 (3) IV. OTHER DIRECT COSTS Item Amount Travel 60 @ 150 mi. @ $.25/mi. S2.250.00 Telephone 19 mo. @ $20/mo. S380.00 Computer/CADD 800 hr. @ S25/hr. S20,000.00 8.640 sheets @ 52.151sht. 12.240 pages @ S•10/09• S19.800.00 Reproduction/Commercial Printing Subtotal $ 42,430.00 (4) SUBCONTRACTOR'S COSTS CHJ Geotechnology Crafty Graphics Subtotal $ 317,411.00 S600.00 18,011.00 (5) VI. TOTAL AMOUNT Total $ 651,537.49 (Total 1-5) • CSTSUMM (SR79 925) • • • AGENDA ITEM #7C • • October 31, TO: FROM: THROUGH: SUBJECT: • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 1990 Administrative Committee Mark T. Massman, Measure "A" Project Manager Mike Limbaugh, Measure "A" Project Coordinator Jack Reagan, Executive Director Contract amendment for Agreement No. R-89-2 with Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, for Advertisement and Construction Support Services. The Route 91 Median Widening project has been approved by Caltrans District 8 and is currently being processed through the Office Engineer in Caltrans Headquarters in preparation for construction advertisement. This signals the beginning of a new phase of activity for the project. During the advertising and construction phase, the design engineer (PBQ&D) is needed to provide technical support. This support can be separated into three activities as follows: 1. Response to office engineer questions related the PS&E package. 2. Responding to technical questions from prospective bidders during the bidding phase. 3. Provision of engineering support for design changes that may occur during project construction. 4. Compiling "as -built" information for inclusion in the project plans upon project completion. Staff has requested that PBQ&D submit a proposed budget amendment to cover these activities. Amendment No. 2 to Contract R-O-89-2 is included in your agenda package. Estimated budgets have been set up for each of these activities totaling $ 62,500.00. The amendment would provide for additional funds of $ 62,500.00 over the current lump - sum design contract amount of $ 676,500. The funds for additional work would be authorized on an as needed basis based on direction from the Executive Director. f:\users\ preprint\ 11-14-90.agd\amend2pb. m1 • • • Page Two October 31, 1990 Contract amendment for Agreement No. R-89-2 with Parsons Brinkerhoff Quade & Douglas, for Advertisement and Construction Support Services. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends that the Commission approve Amendment No. 2 to Contract R-O-9001 in the amount of $62,500.00. JR/ML:sc • f:\users\preprint\11-14.90.agd\amend2pb.m1 • • • • AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO AGREEMENT NO. R-89-2 BETWEEN THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF QUADE & DOUGLAS, INC. This amendment to Agreement No. R-89-02 is executed this date of 1990, by the Riverside County Transportation Commission and between Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc. Location and Purpose The Project is located in Riverside County on Route 91 between Magnolia Avenue in the City of Riverside and Main Street in the City of Corona. It includes the widening of Route 91 both in the median areas and on the outside of existing travel ways within the CHP Enforcement Area. Construction work to be done will include grading and paving for the additional lanes, modification to existing drainage facilities, construction of CHP Enforcement Area, construction of retaining walls and sound walls, and, construction of auxiliary lanes, and modifications to roadway signing and delineation. The purpose of this amendment is to provide Engineering support from the project Designer to Caltrans throughout the advertisement and construction phases of this project. Scope of Added Services The scope of added services include: - Support to Caltrans Safety Review Committee - Support to the Office of Office Engineer - Construction bidding services - Engineering support during Construction Phase - Post -Construction Engineering support schedule of Added Services The additional services will be provided on an as needed basis. PBQ&D will be required to provide adequate staff to support the work required under Scope of Added Services per this amendment. It is anticipated that the construction will be complete by June 1993. The post -construction work will be done thereafter. • • Added Cost of Services The total cost of additional services shall not exceed $ 62,500.00. The additional services shall be performed upon the receipt of written authorizations for the Commission. Each written authorization from the Commission shall specify the specific tasks to be completed and the cost of the requested tasks. The consultant's commencement of such tasks shall indicate acceptance of the costs set forth in the written authorization All services added by this amendment are in addition to those services set forth in the original agreement between the parties. The Validity of Contract The original agreement between the parties (No. R-89-2) shall remain in full force and effect to the extent that it is not inconsistent with this amendment, and all services provided hereunder shall be provided in manner consistent with and governed by the original agreement. In witness thereof, Commission and Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas, Inc. have by order caused the Agreement to be amended and Subscribed on their behalf by the binding authority of each, caused the Agreement to be amended and subscribed on its behalf by duly authorized signees. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BY Kay Ceniceros, Chairperson Date PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF QUADE & DOUGLAS, INC. BY Martin Rubin Date Principal -in -Charge Approved to Form and Legality BY Best, Best & Krieger Counsel for the Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 Date • • • • AGENDA ITEM #8 • or • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION October 31, 1990 TO: Administrative Committee FROM: Mark T. Massman, Measure A Project Manager J. Michael Davis, Measure A Environmental Manager THROUGH: Jack Reagan, Executive Director SUBJECT: MOU for San Timoteo Transportation Corridor Study Exploring the potential for establishing a new corridor between the Moreno Valley and San Bernardino is jointly of interest to Riverside County, RCTC, SanBAG, and Caltrans. SanBAG has indicated a willingness to be lead agency for a corridor study which would look at all potential corridors including San Timoteo and Reche Canyons. On October 10,1990 the SanBAG Board approved an action indicating that they would like to participate with RCTC in funding the San Timoteo Transportation Corridor Study (STTCS). SanBAG has proposed to contribute 67% and the "fair share" for RCTC would be 33%. A consultant has been selected with RCTC participation. P&D Technologies is the selected consultant and is proposing to conduct the STTCS for approximately $352,500. With the 33 percent breakdown RCTC's total cost for participating in the study will be approximately $117,500. Staff believes that RCTC should participate in the corridor study. It is felt that the new corridor (particularly Reche Canyon) could be a viable alternative to future projects on Route 215 between Route 60 and Route 10. Attached is a draft of the Memorandum Of Understanding(MOU) between RCTC and SanBAG which outlines the terms and conditions that both agencies will abide by under the proposed STTCS. f:\users\preprint\novag.j and • • Page Two October 31, 1990 MOU for San Timoteo Transportation Corridor Study STAFF RECOMMENDATION 1. That the RCTC participate with SanBAG in the funding (approximately $117,500.) and sponsorship of the San Timoteo Canyon corridor study. 2. That RCTC approve the draft MOU between RCTC and SanBAG defining RCTC's funding participation and making SanBAG the lead agency for the study. 3. That the Commission approve designation of the corridor as a potential alternative to future projects on Route 215 between Route 60 and Route 10. MTM:sc attachment f:\users\preprint\novag.j and • • • • • • • RCTC Agreement No. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND SAN BERNARDINO ASSOCIATED GOVERNMENTS FOR PROJECT DEVELOPMENT RESPONSIBILITIES AND COST SHARING FOR THE SAN TIMOTEO TRANSPORTATION CORRIDOR STUDY This memorandum of Understanding is entered on this day of , 1990, by and between the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") and the San Bernardino Associated Governments ("SanBAG"). This Memorandum of Understanding sets for the guidelines for coordinated participation in preliminary transportation, engineering and environmental activities and cost sharing between the RCTC and SanBAG for the San Timoteo Transportation Corridor Study. The study will encompass the area between Interstate 10 (I-10) on the north and State Route 60 (SR-60) on the south; Interstate 215 (I-215) on the west and SR-60/City of Beaumont on the east. Phase I of the study will identify future capacity requirements on routes connecting the Moreno Valley and Hemet areas of Riverside County with the southern East Valley region of San Bernardino County, and will identify possible corridor alignments. Existing routes in the study area include San Timoteo Canyon Road/Redlands Boulevard, Live Oak Canyon Road, Reche Canyon, and SR-60/Interstate 215. Future corridors may include, but are not limited to, the San Timoteo corridor, Reche Canyon, and a California Street/Perris Boulevard connection. The capacity requirements for the San Timoteo corridor will be assessed as a basis for determination of the type of facility needed, but the capacity needs assessment should consider the concomitant upgrading of one or more other • • north -south routes to ease pressures on the San Timoteo corridor. Live Oak Canyon should be considered as an additional access route to the San Timoteo corridor. Phase II of the study will focus on identification of alignment alternatives within the San Timoteo corridor, and selection of a preferred alternative based on the needed facility capacity identified in Phase I, and environmental, engineering, and planning criteria. Between RCTC and SanBAG, the SanBAG shall serve as the lead agency on this Project with responsibility to contract for consultant services and act as contract administrator. The RCTC shall participate in the review of consultant scope of services and contract negotiations. The SanBAG shall provide quarterly Project progress and cost reports to RCTC. Any amendment to this Agreement or significant change in the Project scope, or cost allocation procedure must be agreed to by both parties in writing. The SanBAG will pay all consultant invoices when due and submit a request for proportionate reimbursement from RCTC within 30 days of receipt of the request, as provided herein. All costs incurred in the preparation of the Transportation Corridor Study Report shall be initially borne 33 percent by RCTC and 67 percent by SanBAG. A consultant has been selected with RCTC participation. P&D Technologies is the selected consultant and is proposing to conduct the study for a total cost of $345251. With the 33/67 percent breakdown, RCTC's total cost for participating in the study will be approximately $113,935 and SanBAG's total cost will be $231,320. Upon completion of the final report, the Parties (RCTC and SanBAG) shall determine the actual benefit, accruing to each party from the percentage of construction costs, which are actually spent within each of the parties jurisdiction to construct the improvement evaluated. SanBAG shall refund to RCTC or RCTC shall pay to SanBAG any amount by which the actual costs deviate from the initial 33/67 apportionment. RCTC shall also fund a proportionate share of SanBAG's management costs for administering the consultant contracts for the preparation of the Transportation Corridor Study Report in an amount not to exceed 10 percent of RCTC's proportionate share of the project development activities. Such management costs shall be billed concurrently, with other invoices required hereunder, and shall be determined based on the actual time spent by SanBAG staff and consultants to administer and manage the Project. All invoices and other moneys due hereunder shall be paid within 30 days of receipt or request. 2 • • • . r • • • Upon approval of the Final Transportation Corridor Study Report, the project development costs sharing account will be rectified, through negotiations between RCTC and SanBAG staff, to reflect the proportional share of the Project's estimated construction costs within each county. To facilitate final cost accounting, consultant service agreements will require an itemization of costs where appropriate and feasible to more accurately reflect the proportionate cost of project development activities within each county. This cost sharing agreement shall apply only to corridor study activities outlined above. Any extra work items identified in pursuit of project development activities or subsequent phases of Project implementation shall be the subject of a separate and future cost sharing agreement. The provisions of this Memorandum of Understanding may be modified, altered or revised only with the written consent of both parties. RCTC or its authorized representatives shall have the right to review any and all books, accounts, financial, cost and accounting records, bills and other documents of the SanBAG concerning any of the services rendered on this Project. The SanBAG shall retain and make available such records for inspection by RCTC staff or other authorized representatives of the RCTC for at least a three year period following completion of project development activities. It is understood and agreed that neither RCTC nor any officer, employee, consultant or agent thereof is responsible for any damage or liability occurring by reasons of anything done or omitted to be done by SanBAG under or in connection with any work, authority or jurisdiction delegated by SanBAG under this Agreement. It is understood and agreed that, pursuant to Government Code Section 895.4 SanBAG shall fully defend, indemnify and save harmless RCTC, all officers, employees, consultants and agents from all claims, suits or actions of every name, kind and description brought for or on account of injury (as defined in Government Code Section 810.8) occurring by reasons of anything done or omitted to be done by SanBAG under or in connection with any work, authority or jurisdiction delegated to SanBAG under this Agreement. It is understood and agreed that neither SanBAG nor any officer, employee thereof is responsible for any damage or liability occurring by reasons of anything done or omitted to be done by RCTC under or in connection with any work, authority or jurisdiction delegated to RCTC under this Agreement. It is understood and agreed that, pursuant to Government Code Section 895.4 RCTC shall fully defend, indemnify and save harmless SanBAG from all claims, suits or actions of every name, kind and description brought for or on account of injury (as defined in Government Code Section 810.8) 3 • • • r occurring by reason of anything done or omitted to be done by RCTC under or in connection with any work, authority or jurisdiction delegated to RCTC under this Agreement. This Agreement constitutes the entire Agreement between the parties hereto relating to the subject matter hereof and supersedes any previous agreements or understandings. If either party commences an action against the other party arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorneys' fees and costs of suit. 4 • • • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY SAN BERNARDINO TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ASSOCIATED GOVERNMENTS By: By: Kay Ceniceros, Chairperson Larry Walker, Chairperson REVIEWED AND RECOMMENDED FOR APPROVAL: By: By: Jack Reagan, Executive Wes McDaniel, Executive Director, Riverside County Director, San Bernardino Transportation Commission Associated Governments • APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGAL CONTENT: By: Steven C. DeBaun Best, Best & Krieger County Transportation Commission • By: Counsel for San Bernardino Associated Governments