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05 May 13, 2020 Commission MEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, May 13, 2020 Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions on the following page to join the meeting remotely. COMMISSIONERS Chair – Ben J. Benoit Vice Chair – Jan Harnik Second Vice Chair – V. Manuel Perez Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside, District 1 Karen Spiegel, County of Riverside, District 2 Chuck Washington, County of Riverside, District 3 V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside, District 4 Jeff Hewitt, County of Riverside, District 5 Art Welch / Daniela Andrade, City of Banning Lloyd White / Julio Martinez, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Johnny Rodriguez, City of Blythe Larry Smith / Linda Molina, City of Calimesa Randall Bonner / Jeremy Smith, City of Canyon Lake Raymond Gregory / Mark Carnevale, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / Megan Beaman Jacinto, City of Coachella Wes Speake / Jim Steiner, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Clint Lorimore / Todd Rigby, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Dana Reed / Kimberly Muzik, City of Indian Wells Waymond Fermon / Oscar Ortiz, City of Indio Brian Berkson / Chris Barajas, City of Jurupa Valley Kathleen Fitzpatrick / Robert Radi, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Bill Zimmerman / Dean Deines, City of Menifee Yxstain Gutierrez / Carla Thornton, City of Moreno Valley Scott Vinton / Christi White, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Ted Hoffman, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Lisa Middleton / Dennis Woods, City of Palm Springs Michael M. Vargas / Rita Rogers, City of Perris Ted Weill / Charles Townsend, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Russ Utz, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar / Maryann Edwards, City of Temecula Ben J. Benoit / Joseph Morabito, City of Wildomar Mike Beauchamp, Governor’s Appointee Caltrans District 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, May 13, 2020 Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting - from PC, Laptop or Phone Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85121096061 Meeting ID: 851 2109 6061 One tap mobile +16699006833,,85121096061# US (San Jose) Dial by your location +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) For members of the public wishing to submit comment in connection with the Commission Meeting please email written comments to the Clerk of the Board at lmobley@rctc.org prior to May 12, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. and your comments will be made part of the official record of the proceedings and read into the record. Members of the public may also make public comments through their telephone or Zoom connection when recognized by the Chair. In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, Executive Order N-29-20, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda May 13, 2020 Page 2 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS – Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS – The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5. CONSENT CALENDAR – All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – APRIL 8, 2020 Page 1 5B. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Page 7 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 3, 2019 (3Q 2019). Page 16 5C. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2020. 5D. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 18 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda May 13, 2020 Page 3 5E. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION’S SECTION 5310 ENHANCED MOBILITY FOR SENIORS AND INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM FEDERAL FISCAL YEARS 2017/18 AND 2018/19 Page 33 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 20-007, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Certifying Project Consistency with the Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Coordinated Plan”; and 2) Direct staff to program the projects in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP). 5F. LOW CARBON TRANSIT OPERATIONS PROGRAM Page 47 Overview This item is for the Commission to adopt Resolution No. 20-006 “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding Authorization for the Execution of the Certifications and Assurances and Authorized Agent Forms for the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program for Expanded Perris Valley Line Operations FY 21 Project in the Amount of $1,081,302”. 5G. CITIZENS AND SPECIALIZED TRANSIT ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP APPOINTMENTS Page 51 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the appointments of 15 members to the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council (CSTAC) effective May 13, 2020. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda May 13, 2020 Page 4 6. APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES, MATERIALS TESTING, AND CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING AND AUTHORIZATION TO USE 91 EXPRESS LANES SURPLUS TOLL REVENUE FOR CONSTRUCTION SUPPORT EXPENDITURES FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT IN ORANGE AND RIVERSIDE COUNTIES Page 54 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 20-31-033-00 to Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. to perform construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project (91 COP) in Orange and Riverside Counties in the amount of $4,456,957, plus a contingency amount of $445,695 for a total amount not to exceed $4,902,652; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the 91 COP; and 4) Authorize the expenditure of 91 Express Lanes toll revenue designated as surplus in accordance with the 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds Indenture to fund the 91 COP construction support expenditures in the amount of $2 million. 7. REVISED FISCAL YEAR 2020 AND FISCAL YEAR 2021 REVENUE PROJECTIONS FOR MEASURE A, LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND, AND TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE Page 90 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the revised mid-year Fiscal Year 2019/20 revenue projections of $178 million for 2009 Measure A (Measure A) revenues, $91 million for Local Transportation Fund (LTF) revenues and $16 million for Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues; 2) Approve the revised FY 2020/21 revenue projections of $160 million for Measure A revenues, $82 million for LTF revenues, and $11 million for TUMF revenues; 3) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to Measure A revenues of $24 million and expenditures of $9.91 million to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 Measure A projection; 4) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to LTF revenues of $12 million, transfers in of $360,000, and expenditures and transfers out of $450,000 to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 LTF projection; and 5) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to TUMF revenues of $11 million to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 TUMF projection. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda May 13, 2020 Page 5 8. ADOPTION OF TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY Page 100 Overview This item is for the Commission to adopt the Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County. 9. CONSTRUCTION ZONE SAFETY CAMPAIGN Page 134 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update about a construction zone safety campaign for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes and State Route 60 Truck Lanes project areas. 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 11. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. 12. CLOSED SESSION 12A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Item APN(s) Property Owner Buyer(s) 1 206-132-036 and 206-132-037 RCTC Greens Investment Group 13. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, June 10, 2020, Board Room, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. AGENDA ITEM 5A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING MINUTES Wednesday, April 8, 2020 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Ben J. Benoit at 9:31 a.m. Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting was conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. 2. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Rusty Bailey Scott Matas Mike Beauchamp Michael Naggar Ben J. Benoit V. Manuel Perez Brian Berkson Dana Reed Randall Bonner Wes Speake Joseph DeConinck Karen Spiegel Waymond Fermon Larry Smith Kathleen Fitzpatrick Michael M. Vargas Raymond Gregory Chuck Washington Yxstain Gutierrez Ted Weill Berwin Hanna Lloyd White Jan Harnik Art Welch Steven Hernandez Scott Vinton Jeff Hewitt Dennis Woods Kevin Jeffries Bill Zimmerman Andrew Kotyuk Linda Krupa Clint Lorimore Bob Magee 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes April 8, 2020 Page 2 5. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS Per staff’s request, Agenda Item 6G, “Approve Agreement for Construction Management Services, Materials Testing, and Construction Surveying for the State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project in Orange and Riverside Counties,” was pulled from the Consent Calendar to be considered at a future meeting. 6. CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Harnik/Krupa) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. Abstain: Hewitt on Agenda Item 6E 6A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – MARCH 8, 2020 6B. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the six months ended December 31, 2019. 6C. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended December 31, 2019. 6D. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 6E. AGREEMENTS FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL TOW TRUCK SERVICE 1) Approve Agreement No. 20-45-030-00 to Royal Coaches Auto Body & Towing for Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) tow truck services on Interstate 15 (I-15) Beat No. 25 for a five-year term, in an amount of $1,625,473, plus a contingency amount of $81,274, for a total amount not to exceed $1,706,747; 2) Approve Agreement No. 20-45-031-00 to Pepe’s Towing Service Inc. for FSP tow truck services on I-15 Beat No. 26 for a five-year term, in an amount of $1,674,401, plus a contingency amount of $83,720, for a total amount not to exceed $1,758,121; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for these services. 2 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes April 8, 2020 Page 3 6F. CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 2020 STATE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Receive and file the California Transportation Commission (CTC) staff recommendations for 2020 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). 6H. CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT REVALIDATION AND ADDENDUM TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT FOR THE MODIFIED STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FOR THE CORRIDOR OPERATIONS IMPROVEMENTS Adopt Resolution No. 20-003, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Adopting an Addendum to the Previously Certified Environmental Impact Report (SCH #2008071075) Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project and Approving the Proposed Changes to the Project”. 6I. TEMPORARILY DISCONTINUE 91 EXPRESS LANES ACCOUNT FEES 1) Direct staff to temporarily discontinue certain 91 Express Lanes account fees; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director to restore the account fees in conjunction with the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), at the appropriate time, to their prior levels. 7. RESOLUTION APPROVAL: EMERGENCY DECLARATION John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, and Anne Mayer, Executive Director, provided an overview of the resolution proclaiming a local emergency in response to the introduction of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Riverside County. M/S/C (Reed/Welch) to approve Resolution No. 20-005, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Proclaiming a Local Emergency”, in response to the introduction of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Riverside County. 8. EMERGENCY PUBLIC TRANSIT FUNDING ALLOCATIONS DUE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multimodal Services Director, presented the emergency Public Transit funding allocations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Commissioner Jan Harnik expressed how this illustrates the fiscal intelligence the Commission shows and how prudent it has been to have that reserve. 3 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes April 8, 2020 Page 4 M/S/C (Krupa/Fitzpatrick) to: 1) Authorize the Executive Director to allocate up to $15,410,000 in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) fund reserves to the Riverside County transit operators as emergency contingency funds due to a loss of revenues caused by the COVID-19 pandemic; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to approve Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) amendments related to impacts of COVID-19 not to exceed an increase of $15,410,000; 3) Approve a budget increase to the Fiscal Year 2019/20 budget in the amount of $15,410,000 for LTF transit operating expenditures; 4) Direct staff to work with the transit operators to seek state and federal emergency funding to the maximum extent possible to mitigate the use of LTF fund reserves; and 5) Direct staff to submit amendments to the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) as necessary. 9. ACCELERATED ADOPTION OF FINAL TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN AND DEFERRAL OF ELECTION Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director, presented the accelerated adoption of the Final Traffic Relief Plan and deferral of the election. He stated if approved the Commission will have significant budget savings of $3.3 million from the public engagement contract. Commissioner Michael Naggar expressed appreciation to the Commissioners during this process as there was robust debate and it moved forward. He moved staff’s recommendation. Commissioner Wes Speake expressed appreciation to staff for all the significant work that was done to this point with the Traffic Relief Plan. He expressed although the Commission is not moving forward with the half-cent sales tax, all of those projects are still needed. He suggested staff bring back to the Commission an update on how the Commissioners and the public can help to deal with the state and federal government to help fund some of those needs since now is the time to push. Commissioner Linda Krupa concurred with the Commissioners’ comments and expressed appreciation for going through the process with the Traffic Relief Plan, which brought to the forefront with the public the need and necessity for improvements with how traffic flows and the realization of how traffic impacts each city in Riverside County. She expressed gratitude to staff and the Traffic Relief Strategy Committee for their hard work, working towards the final Traffic Relief Plan, and looking to where the Commission goes from here. Commissioner Andrew Kotyuk expressed support for staff’s recommendation and suggested to staff as this pandemic worsens there will be possibly state or federal 4 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes April 8, 2020 Page 5 programs to create jobs and funding infrastructure projects, which should be the next phase the Commission is heading towards. Commissioner Steven Hernandez expressed not being in support of staff’s recommendation and expressed having not heard of any federal plans for infrastructure and suggested to shorten the Traffic Relief Plan and look to do something after the COVID- 19 incident as it is still clear the need is there. He stated the Commission has not put a strategy for the current needs absent this plan to address the needs moving forward. Commissioner Jan Harnik stated this is an opportunity for the Commission to learn and expressed support for staff’s recommendation. She explained there has been a shift in behaviors and perhaps telecommuting can help in some of the infrastructure issues. She stated there are important projects on the table that need to be completed and leverage these funds through construction and doing infrastructure projects. It is important to note the opportunities that have occurred with greenhouse gas reductions and issues such as that and take a look at other things going forward and factor that into what the Commission does. Commissioner Michael Vargas seconded staff’s recommendation and called for the vote. M/S/C (Naggar/Vargas) to: 1) Direct staff to present the Final Traffic Relief Plan for Commission approval at its May 13, 2020 Commission meeting; and 2) Defer placing a measure on the ballot to fund the Traffic Relief Plan to a future election. No: Hernandez 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 11. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT 12A. Anne Mayer announced staff appreciates the Commissioner’s willingness to participate via Zoom as the first Commission meeting went well and suggested for the Commissioners to contact her if they have any input or comments in preparing for the Committee meetings at the end of April. She discussed how staff is actively engaged locally and in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. for administrative relief and advocating for increased funding to keep the Commission projects moving. 5 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes April 8, 2020 Page 6 12B. Chair Benoit expressed appreciation to staff for putting this meeting together and stated he and staff have been working on the technology for the April Commission meeting the past 10 days as it is important to be as publicly accessible as possible. 13. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Chair Benoit adjourned the meeting at 10:13 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 13, 2020, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 6 AGENDA ITEM 5B Agenda Item 5B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Sales Tax Analysis BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 3, 2019 (3Q 2019). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its December 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded an agreement with MuniServices, LLC (MuniServices), an Avenu Company, for quarterly sales tax reporting services plus additional fees contingent on additional sales tax revenues generated from the transactions and use tax (sales tax) audit services. As part of the recurring contracts process in June 2018, the Commission approved a five-year extension through June 30, 2023. The services performed under this agreement pertain to only the Measure A sales tax revenues. Since the commencement of these services, MuniServices submitted audits, which reported findings and submitted to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA), for review and determination of errors in sales tax reporting related to 1,111 businesses. Through 3Q 2019, the CDTFA approved 635 of these accounts for a cumulative sales tax recovery of $10,551,666. If CDTFA concurs with the error(s) for the remaining claims, the Commission will receive additional revenues; however, the magnitude of the value of the remaining findings was not available. It is important to note that while the recoveries of additional revenues will be tangible, it will not be sufficient to alter the overall trend of sales tax revenues. MuniServices provided the Commission with the Quarterly Sales Tax Digest Summary report for 3Q 2019. Most of the 3Q 2019 Measure A sales tax revenues were received in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2019, during October 2019 through December 2019, due to a lag in the sales tax calendar. The summary section of the 3Q 2019 report is attached and includes an overview of California’s economic outlook, local results, historical cash collections analysis by quarter, top 25 sales/use tax contributors, historical sales tax amounts, annual sales tax by business category, and five-year economic trend (general retail). 7 Agenda Item 5B Taxable transactions for the top 25 contributors in Riverside County generated 24.6 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 3Q 2019, slightly higher than the 23.3 percent for the benchmark year ended 3Q 2018. The top 100 tax contributors generated 39.2 percent for the benchmark year ended 3Q 2019, slightly higher than the 37.9 percent for the benchmark year ended 3Q 2018. In the Economic Category Analysis below, all six categories experienced new highs in the 3Q 2019 benchmark year to the prior eight benchmark years. % of Total / % Change RCTC State Wide Orange County San Bernardino County S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast General Retail 28.3 / 6.4 28.2 / 2.4 30.4 / 1.4 25.7 / 0.0 25.6 / 0.9 27.5 / 4.5 28.8 / 1.6 29.5 / -0.1 30.1 / 6.6 28.7 / -1.9 Food Products 17.8 / 1.7 23.3 / 4.0 22.3 / 3.1 19.0 / 10.7 24.9 / 5.3 18.1 / 2.5 17.7 / 5.4 25.2 / 0.8 17.3 / -6.5 37.0 / 8.2 Transportation 24.2 / 1.4 26.5 / 2.4 25.6 / 6.0 26.9 / 2.2 23.9 / 0.4 30.7 / 3.3 28.7 / 4.6 26.0 / 1.2 29.9 / -9.7 23.8 / -0.6 Construction 10.8 / 4.1 8.2 / -9.4 8.3 / -13.7 9.6 / -2.0 8.7 / -8.3 10.8 / -10.8 10.2 / -7.6 6.9 / -13.0 15.9 / -5.7 6.4 / -8.2 Business to Business 16.3 / 2.9 12.8 / -7.6 12.2 / -10.4 13.8 / -15.2 15.8 / -8.0 12.1 / -0.7 13.9 / 10.7 11.6 / -12.0 6.5 / -7.1 3.6 / -16.5 Miscellaneous 2.6 / 7.8 0.9 / -15.3 1.2 / 9.5 5.0 / 37.9 1.0 / -7.5 0.9 / -12.2 0.7 / -30.1 0.9 / -21.2 0.4 / -32.2 0.5 / -19.0 Total 100.0 / 3.5 100.0/ -0.1 100 / -0.1 100.0 / 1.1 100 / -2.0 100.0 / 2.4 100.0 / 1.8 100.0 / -0.5 100.0 / -4.3 100 / -0.2 General Retail: Apparel Stores, Department Stores, Furniture/Appliances, Drug Stores, Recreation Products, Florist/Nursery, and Misc. Retail Food Products: Restaurants, Food Markets, Liquor Stores, and Food Processing Equipment Construction: Building Materials Retail and Building Materials Wholesale Transportation: Auto Parts/Repair, Auto Sales - New, Auto Sales - Used, Service Stations, and Misc. Vehicle Sales Business to Business: Office Equip., Electronic Equip., Business Services, Energy Sales, Chemical Products, Heavy Industry, Light Industry, Leasing, Biotechnology, I.T. Infrastructure, and Green Energy Miscellaneous: Health & Government, Miscellaneous Other, and Closed Account Adjustments ECONOMIC CATEGORY ANALYSIS An analysis of sales tax performance through 3Q 2019 is attached and illustrates fairly consistent cycles for sales tax performance for most of the economic categories since 3Q 2014. For 7 of the top 10 segments (restaurants, department stores, miscellaneous retail, building materials – wholesale, apparel stores, building materials – retail, and heavy industry) during the eight benchmark year quarters, sales tax receipts reached a new high point. The segments represent 49.5 percent of the total sales tax receipts. Service stations representing 7.6 percent was higher than the last five benchmark year quarters since 3Q 2014. Auto sales – new and food markets were down slightly from 3Q 2018 due to an end for new order incentives and a warehouse club chain, included under department stores, taking away food sales from grocery retailers, respectively. The top 10 segments represent 73.1 percent of the total sales tax receipts. For the other 21 segments representing 26.9 percent of the total sales tax receipts, 11 segments representing 18.6 percent of the total sales tax receipts reached new high points in the benchmark year 3Q 2019. In the Economic Segment Analysis below, auto sales – new and department stores have been in the top three economic segments since 2014. Restaurants replaced service stations in the top three economic segments beginning in 4Q 2014. The service stations segments high occurred in 4Q 2012 and declined through 1Q 2017 due to lower fuel prices; the 3Q 2019 benchmark year quarter for service stations reflects an increase over the last five benchmark year quarters since 2Q 2014 due to higher fuel prices. 8 Agenda Item 5B RCTC State Wide Orange County San Bernardino County S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast Largest Segment Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Department Stores Restaurants Department Stores Restaurants % of Total / % Change 11.5 / 4.0 16.8 / 6.2 16.8 / 5.6 11.9 / 9.4 18.1 / 6.3 12.7 / 6.9 13.7 / 6.1 18.7 / 5.8 13.4 / 16.2 25.4 / 10.3 2nd Largest Segment Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Department Stores Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Restaurants Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New % of Total / % Change 10.9/ -1.0 12.0 / 3.3 14.1 / 12.7 11.5 / 8.8 12.5 / -2.2 12.4 / 3.0 12.0 / 8.8 12.2 / 6.4 12.1 / -2.3 11.7 / -0.4 3rd Largest Segment Department Stores Department Stores Department Stores Service Stations Department Stores Department Stores Auto Sales - New Department Stores Restaurants Misc Retail % of Total / % Change 10.1 / 8.2 9.8 / 4.1 9.7 / 4.1 10.5 / 3.5 7.9 / 1.3 11.5 / 8.8 11.1 / 4.6 9.5 / 3.6 10.6 / -5.0 10.5 / 1.5 ECONOMIC SEGMENT ANALYSIS As reported in the 3Q 2018 Sales Tax Analysis Report, staff notified the Commission of a reporting error by one of the top 25 sales/use tax contributors related to a misallocation of the district tax to the Commission during 2Q 2018 through 4Q 2018, resulting in an overpayment to the Commission estimated in the amount of $2.5 million. Staff is not certain in which period the misallocation correction will be completed; however, the Fiscal Year 2019/20 sales tax revenues after the correction are expected to continue to reflect an increase over the FY 2018/19 revenues. Information regarding sales tax comparison by city and change in economic segments (two highest gains and two highest losses) from 3Q 2018 to 3Q 2019 is attached. Staff continues to monitor sales tax receipts and other available economic data to determine the need for any adjustments to the revenue projections. Staff will utilize the forecast scenarios with the complete report and receipt trends in assessing such projections. Attachments: 1) Sales Tax Digest Summary 3Q 2019 2) Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter 3Q 2019 3) Quarterly Sales Tax Comparison by City for 3Q 2018 to 3Q 2019 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 9 Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Digest Summary Collections through December 2019 Sales through September 2019 (2019Q3) www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 1 CALIFORNIA’S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK  California sales tax receipts decreased by ‐8.5% over the same quarter from the previous year, with  Northern California reporting a ‐9.8% decrease compared to a ‐7.5% for Southern California. Receipts for  the RCTC decreased by ‐12.3% over the same periods. Large decreases were mostly due to the California  Department of Tax and Fee Administration implementation of a new reporting system and the  processing of many sales tax returns filed for the for previous quarters in Q3 of the previous year.  Online Sales Tax Windfall: A new California law, (AB147), aimed at collecting sales tax from third‐ party retailers using online platforms like Amazon, ebay, Walmart, Etsy to sell taxable goods in California  generated nearly $475 million in Sales Tax in the fourth quarter of 2019. That is nearly as much as the  $476 million that state and federal agencies, and many tax experts predicted it would generate for an  entire year! (CalMatters, March 4, 2020)  COVID‐19 (Corona Virus): The impact of the virus on the overall economy so far has been mostly to reduce supply and not demand. Though the effect is likely to be temporary, fear has had an impact on  consumer behaviors that may negatively impact “foot traffic and tourism‐sensitive” segments of the  economy. Sales tax revenues may be negatively impacted for 30 to 60 days. Historically pandemics,  (Swine Flu, SARS, Bird Flu), have not had a significant long‐term impact on sales tax revenues.  LOCAL RESULTS  Net Cash Receipts Analysis  Local Collections 48,861,948  Share of County Pool 0.0% 0  Share of State Pool 0.0% 0  SBE Net Collections 48,861,948  Less: Amount Due County 0.0% .00  Less: Cost of Administration (548,970)  Net 3Q2019 Receipts 48,312,978  Net 3Q2018 Receipts 55,057,944  Actual Percentage Change ‐12.3%  Business Activity Performance Analysis  Local Collections – Economic Basis 3Q2019 $48,217,358  Local Collections – Economic Basis 3Q2018 $45,979,925  Quarter over Quarter Change 2,237,433  Quarter over Quarter Percentage Change 4.9%  Avenu Insights & Analytics’ On‐Going Audit Results  Total Recovered Year to Date $10,258,416  ATTACHMENT 1 10 RCTC www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 2 HISTORICAL CASH COLLECTIONS ANALYSIS BY QUARTER      TOP 25 SALES/USE TAX CONTRIBUTORS  The following list identifies RCTC’s Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors. The list is in alphabetical order  and represents sales from August 2018 to September 2019. The Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors  generate 24.6% of RCTC’s total sales and use tax revenue.      AMAZON.COM LOWE’S HOME CENTERS  ARCO AM/PM MINI MARTS MACY’S DEPARTMENT STORE  BEST BUY STORES MCDONALD'S RESTAURANTS  CARMAX THE AUTO SUPERSTORE RALPH'S GROCERY COMPANY  CHEVRON SERVICE STATIONS ROBERTSON’S READY MIX  CIRCLE K FOOD STORES ROSS STORES  CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTORS SAM'S CLUB  COSTCO WHOLESALE SHELL SERVICE STATIONS  DEMATIC STATER BROS MARKETS  DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES TARGET STORES  FOOD 4 LESS VERIZON WIRELESS  HOME DEPOT WAL MART STORES  KOHL'S DEPARTMENT STORES   11 RCTC www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 3 HISTORICAL SALES TAX AMOUNTS                              ANNUAL SALES TAX BY BUSINESS CATEGORY  The following chart shows the sales tax level from annual sales through September 2019, the  highs, and the lows for each segment over the last two years in thousands of $.  12 RCTC www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 4   FIVE‐YEAR ECONOMIC TREND: General Retail        13 RCTC:  Sales Tax Performance Analysis by QuarterTOTALEconomicTOTAL2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$48,217,358 4.9% $2,237,433 4.1% $7,688,593GENERAL RETAIL2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$12,494,625 6.8% $800,648 6.4% $3,279,45525.9%FOOD PRODUCTS2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$8,067,660 1.5% $116,398 1.7% $574,909% of Total: 16.7%TRANSPORTATION2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$12,093,089‐0.3%‐$35,7891.4% $635,366% of Total: 25.1%CONSTRUCTION2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$5,455,693 3.9% $203,702 4.1% $830,559% of Total: 11.3%BUSINESS TO BUSINESS2019Q3 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$8,029,224 8.0% $597,755 2.9% $885,325% of Total: 16.7%Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3TOTALCATEGORY% of 2019Q3 Total:QoQ = 19Q3 / 18Q3 YoY = YE 19Q3 / YE 18Q3$0$2,000,000$4,000,000$6,000,000$8,000,000$10,000,000$12,000,000$14,000,000$16,000,000$18,000,000$0$10,000,000$20,000,000$30,000,000$40,000,000$50,000,000$60,000,000Avenu Insights & AnalyticsATTACHMENT 214 RCTC: Quarterly Comparison of 2018Q3 and 2019Q3 (July through August Sales)General RetailFood ProductsTransportationConstructionBusiness To BusMiscellaneousJul ‐ Aug 2019 (2019Q3)Jul ‐ Aug 2018 (2018Q3)% ChgGainGainDeclineDeclineBANNING6.0%‐2.0%‐14.1%‐17.7% 47.0% 15.9%590,398722,627‐18.3%HEAVY INDUSTRY MISC. VEHICLE SALES AUTO SALES ‐ NEW SERVICE STATIONSBEAUMONT‐0.3%‐0.8% 4.1%‐68.1% 24.4%‐9.3%1,036,4111,106,525‐6.3%LIGHT INDUSTRY SERVICE STATIONS BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSBLYTHE79.3% 1.7%‐19.0% 13.0%‐2.7%‐62.4%335,033343,843‐2.6%FURNITURE/APPLIANCE MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL SERVICE STATIONS AUTO SALES‐NEWCALIMESA‐1.1% 1.7% 4.7% 56.9%‐56.9%‐53.7%213,837206,8073.4%AUTO PARTS/REPAIR FOOD MARKETS CHEMICAL PRODUCTS MISCELLANEOUS RETAILCANYON LAKE38.5% 9.8% 4.6% 4121.5% 5.1%‐0.6%100,861122,316‐17.5%FOOD MARKETS RESTAURANTSLIGHT INDUSTRY SERVICE STATIONSCATHEDRAL CITY‐7.8%‐9.1%‐1.1% 1.5% 2.9%‐14.5%2,007,4482,098,600‐4.3%HEAVY INDUSTRY MISC. VEHICLE SALES AUTO SALES ‐ NEW FOOD MARKETSCOACHELLA‐6.1%‐17.8%‐3.9%24.7%‐61.7% 85.8%694,511788,706‐11.9%BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLE AUTO PARTS/REPAIR FOOD MARKETSENERGY SALESCORONA‐3.0%‐1.9%‐8.2%‐7.7%‐5.9% 40.1%9,371,6729,863,811‐5.0%ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT DEPARTMENT STORES BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL AUTO SALES ‐ NEWCOUNTY OF RIVERSIDE‐0.1%‐0.1%‐7.5%‐4.7%‐17.2%‐1.2%6,571,5796,731,085‐2.4%MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL FOOD PROCESSING EQP SERVICE STATIONS BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLEDESERT HOT SPRINGS18.7% 2.8% 27.0% 1.1% 62.0% 76.8%417,676352,92018.3%SERVICE STATIONS MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL FLORIST/NURSERY FOOD MARKETSEASTVALE22.4%‐19.1%‐3.3%‐38.6%‐0.9%‐79.6%1,875,0051,987,987‐5.7%DEPARTMENT STORES APPAREL STORES BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSHEMET‐1.4%‐3.4% 18.8%‐61.5%‐7.3%10.3%2,650,4842,630,2660.8%AUTO SALES ‐ NEW MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLEINDIAN WELLS‐7.5%‐17.5% 0.0%‐99.2%‐24.5% 437.2%116,179132,127‐12.1%MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL DRUG STORESRESTAURANTSBLDG.MATLS‐WHSLEINDIO7.1%‐9.0%‐3.6%‐38.0% 37.3% 4.4%2,289,3482,411,180‐5.1%APPAREL STORES ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLEJURUPA VALLEY‐16.6% 2.0% 0.6% 35.2%‐1.3%‐46.0%3,307,7872,810,99617.7%BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLE DEPARTMENT STORES MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL SERVICE STATIONSLA QUINTA‐1.9% 7.2% 4.6%‐60.0%‐10.1% 8.2%1,509,1831,604,983‐6.0%AUTO SALES ‐ NEW RESTAURANTSBLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL MISCELLANEOUS RETAILLAKE ELSINORE5.2%‐2.1% 4.4%‐45.9%‐34.6% 26.4%2,103,2462,159,458‐2.6%AUTO SALES ‐ NEW DEPARTMENT STORES BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSMENIFEE3.5% 11.3%‐5.0%‐3.2%‐10.8%‐4.4%1,898,9471,852,6092.5%RESTAURANTSFOOD MARKETS ENERGY SALESSERVICE STATIONSMORENO VALLEY‐2.2%‐10.7%‐5.4%‐39.5% 2.9%‐47.4%4,086,0654,477,084‐8.7%DEPARTMENT STORES HEAVY INDUSTRY BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSMURRIETA4.1%‐8.4% 0.1%‐39.6%‐7.0% 30.5%3,792,9684,018,457‐5.6%MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL MISC. VEHICLE SALES BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSNORCO3.3%‐1.4%‐3.2% 57.0%‐3.3% 1.5%1,625,4771,636,887‐0.7%AUTO SALES ‐ USEDBLDG.MATLS‐WHSLE AUTO SALES ‐ NEW SERVICE STATIONSPALM DESERT1.1% 0.0%‐38.2% 5.6%‐9.9% 253.6%3,375,7843,466,867‐2.6%BUSINESS SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS OTHER AUTO SALES ‐ NEW CHEMICAL PRODUCTSPALM SPRINGS2.1%‐0.2% 9.1%‐39.4% 5.5% 6.0%2,411,2392,482,424‐2.9%AUTO SALES ‐ NEW RESTAURANTSBLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL FOOD MARKETSPERRIS31.1%‐13.5%‐16.3%‐66.1% 108.9% 7.0%4,647,0784,612,1520.8%FURNITURE/APPLIANCE LIGHT INDUSTRY BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL SERVICE STATIONSRANCHO MIRAGE‐4.8%‐3.1% 23.9%‐62.5% 10.6% 58.2%1,050,9511,076,880‐2.4%AUTO SALES ‐ NEW BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLE BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL RESTAURANTSRIVERSIDE‐6.6%‐0.9%‐1.9%‐20.4%‐1.4%‐24.5%13,834,10814,499,916‐4.6%RESTAURANTSBUSINESS SERVICES BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLE MISCELLANEOUS RETAILSAN JACINTO1.3%‐5.9%‐5.6% 0.0%‐1.0% 59.4%697,792727,380‐4.1%FLORIST/NURSERY DEPARTMENT STORES RESTAURANTSAUTO SALES ‐USEDTEMECULA2.1% 4.3%‐2.1%‐39.7%‐1.3% 9.1%7,905,6868,181,062‐3.4%DEPARTMENT STORES AUTO SALES ‐ NEW BLDG.MATLS‐RETAIL BLDG.MATLS‐WHSLEWILDOMAR‐4.0% 12.9%‐42.0% 36.5%‐45.2%‐35.4%400,341470,578‐14.9%FOOD MARKETS RESTAURANTSSERVICE STATIONS LEASINGRIVERSIDE COUNTYAvenu Insights & AnalyticsATTACHMENT 315 AGENDA ITEM 5C Agenda Item 5C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Jose Mendoza, Senior Procurement Analyst Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Certain contracts are executed under single signature authority as permitted in the Commission’s Procurement Policy Manual adopted in September 2019. The Executive Director is authorized to sign services contracts that are less than $250,000 individually and in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1.5 million in any given fiscal year. Additionally, in accordance with Public Utilities Code Section 130323(c), the Executive Director is authorized to sign contracts for supplies, equipment, materials, and construction of all facilities and works under $50,000 individually. The attached report details all contracts that have been executed for the third quarter ended March 31, 2020, under the single signature authority granted to the Executive Director. The unused capacity of single signature authority for services at March 31, 2020 is $1,104,286. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of March 31, 2020 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 16 CONTRACT # CONSULTANT DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES ORIGINAL CONTRACT AMOUNT PAID AMOUNT REMAINING CONTRACT AMOUNT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2019 $1,500,000.00 20-31-020-00 WSP USA, Inc.Managed Freeways - Pre-design report and conceptual design plans 249,983.00 0.00 249,983.00 20-31-024-00 California Highway Patrol Construction Zone Enhancement Program (COZEEP) for SR-91 Pachappa Project 49,981.00 0.00 49,981.00 20-33-045-00 Sapphos Environmental Railroad right-of-way maintenance permit support services 5,750.00 0.00 5,750.00 20-18-053-00 Koff & Associates Compensation, classification, and benefits studies 20,000.00 0.00 20,000.00 20-19-062-00 Eadie & Payne GASB 87 implementation professional services 70,000.00 0.00 70,000.00 AMOUNT USED 395,714.00 395,714.00 $1,104,286.00 None N/A $- $- $- Jose Mendoza Theresia Trevino Prepared by Reviewed by AMOUNT USED SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF March 31, 2020 Note: Shaded area represents new contracts listed in the third quarter. AMOUNT REMAINING through March 31, 2020 Agreements that fall under Public Utilities Code 130323 (C) 17 AGENDA ITEM 5D Agenda Item 5D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee David Knudsen, Legislative Affairs Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: State Update The COVID-19 State Response The California State Legislature went into suspension on March 16, 2020 after approving $1 billion in new funding in response to the COVID-19 public health crisis. The bill, which was signed by Governor Newsom on March 17, 2020, allocated up to $1 billion for a ramp-up of hospital capacity and any purpose related to the Governor’s March 4, 2020 state of emergency declaration. As of April 8, 2020, Governor Newsom has issued thirteen executive orders aimed at enhancing local government’s COVID-19 response, moratorium on evictions, relief for small businesses, ensuring safety net services continue for vulnerable Californians, and some tax relief. On March 25, 2020, RCTC Executive Director Anne Mayer, sent a letter to the Riverside County’s Legislative Delegation in support of public transit operators seeking emergency funding to offset the direct costs and revenue losses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Transit agencies in Riverside County are expected to lose approximately $15.4 million of operating funds due to the unprecedented drop in ridership and escalating operational costs. Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-40-20 Providing Relief to California Small Businesses on March 30, 2020. The order will allow small business taxpayers with annual taxable sales below $5 million to enter into a 12-month payment plan for up to $50,000 of their sales and use tax liability at zero interest. Following the signing of the Executive Order, the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA), which administers California's sales tax, announced sales tax returns for the 1st Quarter 2020 will now be due on July 31, 2020, an addition of three months to file returns and pay taxes. Unclear in the Executive Order and guidance from CDTFA, is if this 18 Agenda Item 5D order also includes local sales tax collection. RCTC staff is working to determine how this might impact Measure A sales tax collection and distribution. The Assembly Budget Committee released a memo on April 6, 2020 recognizing that there will be less money and time to adopt a balanced budget by the constitutionally required deadline of June 15, 2020. The memo further outlined changes to the 2020 budget process including: • The Governor’s May Revision will become a “workload” budget that reflects 2019-2020, or current, service levels. This means that new budget proposals, based on the Governor’s January 2020 budget proposal, will not be heard in Committee. Additionally, when the Assembly Budget Committee reconvenes, no new priorities will be considered from stakeholders, advocates, and Members with the exception of COVID-19 related costs, wildfire prevention, and homelessness funding. • By delaying personal income tax receipts until July 15, 2020 the Legislature will revisit the budget after it is passed in June, likely in August. This second round of budget deliberations will allow for a better picture of revenues, the state of the economy, and determine if additional COVID-19 related responses will be necessary. As of this staff report, the Legislature is expected to stay in recess until May 4, 2020, but legislative leaders in either chamber can decide to reconvene or extend the recess if necessary. It is unclear at this time what additional legislative action the Legislature will take once they return or what will happen to existing bills unrelated to COVID-19 response and recovery. RCTC staff will continue to monitor and provide an update to the Commission on legislation that will impact RCTC. Federal Update The COVID-19 Federal Response Throughout March, Congress and the Trump Administration have been working to enact emergency relief legislation in response to the COVID-19 public health crisis. Three COVID-19 relief packages have been enacted to date: Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (March 4, 2020), Families First Coronavirus Response Act (March 18, 2020), and the $2 trillion CARES Act (March 27, 2020). On March 24, 2020, RCTC Executive Director Anne Mayer, sent a letter to the Riverside County’s Congressional Delegation in support of public transit operators seeking emergency funding to offset the direct costs and revenue losses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The emergency relief bill, the CARES Act, included $25 billion in emergency funding for public transportation. Public transportation funding from this bill is expected to total more than $3.75 billion for California. Congress is currently considering additional coronavirus response legislation (commonly referred to as "Phase 4") that aims to build on the first three emergency relief packages. 19 Agenda Item 5D There has been interest in including funding for some form of infrastructure investment in the Phase 4 or future legislation. However, while House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, along with President Trump, have expressed interest that the next bill could include substantial investment in infrastructure projects, because of the growing substantial economic impacts of the pandemic, it appears that Phase 4 may continue to focus on emergency relief for individuals, small businesses and health care response. As discussions are taking place about what might be included in Phase 4, RCTC Chair Ben J. Benoit sent letters to the Riverside Congressional Delegation on April 7, 2020, urging bipartisan action to invest in infrastructure as a way to stimulate the economy. Three areas were identified as having immediate impact: • Direct Aid Assistance: To keep current and upcoming projects moving and jumpstart economic recovery, RCTC requests direct aid assistance that backfills lost revenue and ensure that projects and jobs are not impacted in a serious manner. • Economic Recovery Funding: Any federal economic recovery funding for surface transportation should be sub-allocated to implementing agencies such as RCTC who are responsible for getting projects delivered. • Surface Transportation Reauthorization: Complete the reauthorization of federal transportation policy prior to the expiration of the current law – the FAST Act – and ask that as part of this reauthorization, ensure that regional transportation agencies receive an increase in federal resources. RCTC staff and finance team are working to develop additional policy ideas, in alignment with the Commission adopted 2020 State and Federal Legislative Platform, that could be proposed to help address the current financial impact of the COVID-19 emergency on RCTC's finance and project plans. Congress is currently in recess until at least April 20, 2020. Congressional staff continue to work developing the Phase 4 legislation and RCTC staff will continue to monitor and provide an update to the Commission on our efforts to impact this legislation to assist RCTC. Attachments: 1) Support letter: State Emergency Transit Funding 2) Support letter: Federal Emergency Transit Funding 3) Support letter: COVID-19 Economic Recovery and Response 4) State COVID-19 Response Timeline 5) Federal COVID-19 Response Timeline 6) Legislative Matrix – April 2020 20 Agenda Item 5D Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 21 March 25, 2020 The Honorable Richard Roth The Honorable Mike Morrell California State Senate California State Senate State Capitol State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 Sacramento, California 95814 The Honorable Marie Waldron The Honorable Sabrina Cervantes California State Assembly California State Assembly State Capitol State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 Sacramento, California 95814 The Honorable Jose Medina The Honorable Eduardo Garcia California State Assembly California State Assembly State Capitol State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 Sacramento, California 95814 The Honorable Chad Mayes The Honorable Melissa Melendez California State Assembly California State Assembly State Capitol State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 Sacramento, California 95814 The Honorable Randy Voepel California State Assembly State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 Dear Members of the Riverside County Legislative Delegation: On behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) and in support of all public transit operators in Riverside County, I write to strongly urge the Legislature to provide emergency funding to public transit agencies to offset the direct costs and revenue losses associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. We are grateful that Congress is working on legislation to provide initial emergency funding for transit operators and we are assessing how much of those funds will come to Riverside County. As communities wisely adhere to “safer at home” policies, transit agencies in Riverside County are expected to lose approximately $15.4 million of operating funds due to the unprecedented drop in ridership and escalating operational costs to ensure healthy and safe rides during the pandemic. Their shortfalls will depend on the duration of this crisis. ATTACHMENT 1 22 Public transportation is an essential element of our regional economy and local communities. Especially during this time of crisis, public transit is a lifeline for many of our residents who have no other option to access healthcare or employment. Public transit operators are on the front lines. Without emergency funding, public transit agencies, particularly those that rely on fare revenue for a significant portion of their operating budgets, will be required to suspend or drastically curtail such important services. While our immediate focus is on maintaining front-line public transit operations, we will also soon need to address the likely significant shortfalls in revenue for capital construction projects that provide thousands of jobs in Riverside County. As we have seen in previous economic downturns, infrastructure is a cornerstone of recovery. Thank you for your consideration of this request. If you have any questions about this request, please contact Aaron Hake at (AHake@rctc.org) and David Knudsen (DKnudsen@rctc.org). Thank you Anne Mayer Executive Director CC: The Honorable Jim Beall, Chair, Senate Transportation Committee The Honorable Bob Wieckowski, Chair, Senate Budget Subcommittee on Resources, Environmental Protection, Energy and Transportation The Honorable Jim Frazier, Chair, Assembly Transportation Committee The Honorable Richard Bloom, Chair, Assembly Budget Subcommittee on Resources and Transportation Al Zelinka, City Manager, City of Riverside Doug Schulze, City Manager City of Banning George Colangeli, General Manager, Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Jacob Ellis, City Manager, City of Corona Larry Rubio, Chief Executive Officer, Riverside Transit Agency Lauren Skiver, Chief Executive Officer, SunLine Transit Agency Mark Watts, Riverside County Transportation Commission Advocate Stephanie Wiggins, Chief Executive Officer, Metrolink Todd Parton, City Manager, City of Beaumont Riverside County Legislative Delegation Page 2 March 25, 2020 23 ATTACHMENT 2 24 25 April 3, 2020 The Honorable Ken Calvert United States House of Representatives U.S. Capitol Washington, DC 20510 Subject: COVID-19 Economic Relief and Recovery Response Dear Congressman Calvert: On behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), thank you for supporting recent legislation to provide relief to our communities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. By quickly providing emergency funding to public transportation agencies through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Congress provided immediate relief and investment in public transportation that will allow transit operators to continue serving the residents of Riverside County. While the assistance to public transportation agencies was very helpful, it will be necessary to further address the negative financial impacts of the pandemic to funding sources that sustain infrastructure development and related employment in Riverside County. RCTC will experience a dramatic reduction in revenue because the very necessary “safer at home” policies have reduced economic activity in Riverside County. As a “self-help” county, our projects are heavily-reliant on voter- approved sales tax revenue, toll revenue, and development fees. The majority of RCTC’s revenues come from these local self-help sources. We also anticipate our revenues from state sources based on sales taxes and fuel consumption to decline dramatically. The anticipated magnitude of revenue loss will impact the delivery of projects that reduce traffic congestion, improve the flow of commerce, increase passenger rail connectivity, and support the jobs of countless residents of Riverside County. Many of these projects have strong support from your constituents. As Congress prepares to consider emergency relief and recovery proposals that will restore our national, state, and local economies, RCTC urges bipartisan action to invest in our nation’s infrastructure as a way to stimulate the economy. I want to share with you a few high-level concepts for future legislation that are important to maintaining and strengthening our regional infrastructure in this time of crisis. In the coming weeks, RCTC will share more specific policy proposals. Direct Aid Assistance To keep current and upcoming projects moving and jumpstart economic recovery, RCTC requests direct aid assistance that backfills lost revenue and ensure that projects and jobs are not impacted in a serious manner. RCTC remains hard at work serving our communities, our region, and our state while adhering to highest level of employee and public safety protocols. Even during this uncertain time, RCTC currently has 11 projects, in or 26 ATTACHMENT 3 beginning construction, worth $738 million. These important projects generate thousands of jobs, expand economic development, increase safety for the traveling public and move people and goods throughout our region’s transportation network. Yet, we are concerned that the drastic reduction in revenue will cause cancellation or indefinite delay of future projects, despite years of work, planning, environmental studies, public engagement, and investment of taxpayer dollars. Economic Recovery Funding Any federal economic recovery funding for surface transportation should be sub-allocated to implementing agencies such as RCTC who are responsible for getting projects delivered. The fewer layers of government through which funds must flow before getting to the construction site, the sooner the economic recovery can get underway and the public can see their tax dollars at work. In addition, we are exploring changes to federal policies and programs that would provide flexibility to RCTC and other transportation agencies to expedite current projects or planned projects without unnecessary bureaucratic delays. Please consider further emergency relief and recovery proposals that both directly funds infrastructure and improves policy to get that funding to work faster. Surface Transportation Reauthorization Finally, we ask that you do everything possible to complete the reauthorization of federal transportation policy prior to the expiration of the current law – the FAST Act – and ask that as part of this reauthorization, you ensure that regional transportation agencies receive an increase in federal resources. Ensuring a robustly funded Surface Transportation Block Grant Program (STBG) and including specific funding for local bridge projects, such as the Hamner Bridge Widening project, are priorities for RCTC. Thank you for considering our recommendations and your historical support for infrastructure investment in Riverside County. We look forward to your leadership in this moment as we work together to get Riverside County moving again. Please contact me or RCTC staff directly to discuss any questions or ideas you have. Sincerely, Ben J. Benoit Chair The Honorable Ken Calvert April 3, 2020 Page 2 27 Timeline of State COVID-19 Emergency Response: April 4, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order to Provide Expanded Access to Child Care for Essential Workers During COVID-19 Response April 2, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order Protecting Homes, Small Businesses from Water Shutoffs April 2, 2020 Governor Newsom Announces New Help for Small Businesses & Workers Displaced by COVID-19 April 1, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order Providing for Expedited Resources for COVID- 19 Response April 1, 2020 Governor Newsom Announces Agreement Between Teachers, Classified Employees and School System Management to Support Student Instruction During COVID-19 Outbreak March 31, 2020 Governor Newsom Launches Campaign to Protect Health and Well-Being of Older Californians During COVID-19 Pandemic March 30, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order Providing Relief to California Small Businesses March 30, 2020 Governor Newsom Announces California Health Corps, a Major Initiative to Expand Health Care Workforce to Fight COVID-19 March 29, 2020 California’s Leading Digital and Media Platforms, Businesses and Celebrities Partner with the State to Amplify COVID-19 “Stay Home. Save Lives.” Public Awareness Campaign March 27, 2020 Governor Newsom Takes Executive Action to Establish a Statewide Moratorium on Evictions March 26, 2020 FPPC to extend Form 700 deadline due to COVID-19 March 25, 2020 Governor Gavin Newsom Announces Major Financial Relief Package: 90-Day Mortgage Payment Relief During COVID-19 Crisis March 24, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order on State Prisons and Juvenile Facilities in Response to the COVID-19 Outbreak March 23, 2020 California Awards $100 Million to Cities, Counties and Continuums of Care to Help People Experiencing Homelessness During COVID-19 Pandemic March 23, 2020 Governor Gavin Newsom announce the closure of state parks and beaches to combat COVID-19 March 22, 2020 California Secures Presidential Major Disaster Declaration to Support State’s COVID-19 Emergency Response March 21, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order to Fight the COVID-19 Surge March 20, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Order to Protect Public Health by Expanding Vote-by-Mail Options and Extending Deadlines for Presidential Primary Canvass March 19, 2020 Governor Issues State-wide "Stay-at-Home" Directive March 18, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order to Protect Ongoing Safety Net Services for Most Vulnerable Californians During COVID-19 Outbreak March 18, 2020 California Launches New Comprehensive, Consumer-Friendly Website and Public Service Announcements to Boost COVID-19 Awareness March 18, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues Executive Order to Suspend Standardized Testing for Students in Response to COVID-19 Outbreak March 17, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order to Allow Timely Delivery of Vital Goods During COVID-19 Outbreak March 17, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Emergency Legislation to Fight COVID-19 March 16, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues New Executive Order authorizing Local Governments to Halt Evictions, Slow Foreclosures, and Protect Against Utility Shut Offs March 16, 2020 California Issues Directive to Fight COVID-19 March 13, 2020 Governor Newsom Signs Executive Order Ensuring State Funding for Schools Even in Event of Physical Closure ATTACHMENT 4 28 Timeline of State COVID-19 Emergency Response: March 12, 2020 Governor Newsom Issues New Executive Order Further Enhancing State and Local Government’s Ability to Respond to COVID-19 Pandemic 29 Timeline of Federal COVID-19 Emergency Response: April 1, 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic Whole-of-America Response March 31, 2020 Coronavirus Guidelines for America March 30, 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic Whole-of-Government Response March 28, 2020 CISA releases Version 2.0 of the Essential Critical Infrastructure Worker Guidance originally published on March 19, 2020 March 27, 2020 President signs Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) – $2 trillion Economic Relief Bill to Aimed at Helping American Workers, Families, and Businesses Impacted by the Coronavirus March 27, 2020 Memorandum on Order Under the Defense Production Act Regarding General Motors Company March 26, 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic Whole-of-Government Response March 25, 2020 USDA Implements Immediate Measures to Help Rural Residents, Businesses and Communities Affected by COVID-19 March 22, 2020 President Donald J. Trump Approves Major Disaster Declaration for California March 18, 2020 President signs Families First Coronavirus Response Act — Guaranteed free coronavirus testing, established paid leave, enhanced unemployment insurance, expanded food security initiatives, and increased federal Medicaid funding March 16, 2020 White House and CDC New Guidance on Preventing the Spread of Coronavirus - "15 Days to Slow the Spread" March 4, 2020 President signs Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2020 — Provided $8.3 billion in emergency funding for federal agencies to respond to the coronavirus outbreak related to developing a vaccine, medical supplies, grants for public health agencies, small business loans, and assistance for health systems in other countries. Allowed for temporarily waiving Medicare restrictions and requirements regarding telehealth services. ATTACHMENT 5 30 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION - POSITIONS ON STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION – APRIL 2019 Legislature reconvened on January 6, 2020 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 252 (Daly, Frazier) Removes the sunset date from the NEPA Reciprocity program. Signed by Governor Newsom. (July 31, 2019) SUPPORT 3/13/19 AB 1402 (Petrie-Norris) Makes substantive changes to the Active Transportation Program administered by the State, allocating 75% of funds to be distributed by large MPOs. Assembly-Died- Transportation. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 4/1/19 SB 152 (Beall) Makes substantive changes to the Active Transportation Program administered by the State, allocating 75% of funds to be distributed by large MPOs. Senate-Died- Appropriations. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 4/1/19 AB 626 (Quirk-Silva) Seeks to dictate that professionals who provide professional services on one phase of a project be deemed not to have a conflict of interest in subsequent project phases, disregarding the Commission’s adopted Procurement Policy. Died on inactive file (February 3, 2020) OPPOSE UNLESS AMENDED 4/10/19 AB 456 (Chiu, Bonta, Low) Removes the January 1, 2020 sunset provision on claims resolution processes. Approved by the Governor. (October 3, 2019) OPPOSE 5/8/19 SB 498 (Hurtado) Takes funds dedicated in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and repurposes them for a new short-line railroad project grant program. Referred to Assembly Transportation Committee. (June 6, 2019) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 5/30/19 SB 742 (Allen) Authorizes existing state funds for Amtrak to be used on intercity passenger bus transportation, regardless of whether the passenger is connecting to or from intercity rail service. Approved by the Governor. (October 8, 2019) SUPPORT 6/12/19 AB 1149 (Fong) Eliminates the ability of petitioners to opt to prepare the record of proceedings and would place that responsibility solely on the lead agency. Assembly-Died-Natural Resources. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 6/12/19 ATTACHMENT 6 31 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption SB 664 (Allen) Revises existing statute in the Streets and Highways Code and the Vehicle Code to allow for improved operations of toll facilities in California. Re-referred to Committees on Privacy & Consumer Protection and Judiciary. (September 10, 2019) SUPPORT Staff action based on platform 6/17/19 SB 277 (Beall) Changes the SB 1-created Local Partnership Program to be administered at 85% formula, rather than 50% formula as is currently in adopted guidelines. Vetoed by the Governor. In Senate. Consideration of Governor’s veto pending. (August 14, 2019) SUPPORT Staff action based on platform 7/1/19 AB 2011 (Holden) Creates West San Bernardino County Rail Construction Authority for purposes of awarding and overseeing all design and construction contracts for completion of an extension of the Metro Gold Line light rail project from the City of Montclair to the Ontario International Airport. The bill would prescribe the powers and duties of the construction authority. Referred to Assembly Transportation Committee. (February 14, 2020) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 3/10/20 SB 1390 (Portantino) Creates the Montclair to Ontario Airport Construction Authority for purposes of awarding and overseeing all design and construction contracts for completion of an extension of the Metro Gold Line light rail project from the City of Montclair to the Ontario International Airport. The bill would prescribe the powers and duties of the construction authority. Referred to Senate Transportation Committee. (March 12, 2020) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 3/10/20 HR 2939 (Napolitano) Protects state and local general sales tax revenues from being directed to airports. Introduced. (May 23, 2019) SUPPORT 7/10/19 32 AGENDA ITEM 5E Agenda Item 5E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Monica Morales, Management Analyst Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multi Modal Services Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Federal Transit Administration’s Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program Federal Fiscal Years 2017/18 and 2018/19 BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 20-007, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Certifying Project Consistency with the Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Coordinated Plan”; and 2) Direct staff to program the projects in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5310 grant program was established in 1975 and has been administered by Caltrans since its inception. The goal of the 5310 program is to improve mobility for seniors and individuals with disabilities by removing barriers to transportation services and expanding the transportation mobility options available. On July 1, 2019, Caltrans issued a call for projects for the FFYs 2017/18 and 2018/19 FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities program. Eligible applicants include private non-profit organizations and public agencies. Projects must be in line with the identified strategies of a local Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Coordinated Plan (Coordinated Plan). The Commission’s current Coordinated Plan was updated in December 2016. Eligible projects are classified as traditional or expanded projects. Traditional projects include vehicles and related equipment and must comprise at least 55 percent of the available funding. Expanded projects are those that exceed the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and mobility management and comprise up to 45 percent of available funding. 33 Agenda Item 5E For large urbanized areas (UZA) in Riverside County, as shown in Table 1.1 below, approximately $3 million was available for programming for the FFYs 2017/18 and 2018/19 grant cycle. Table 1.2 below shows that for the statewide competitive funding for small urban areas such as the Hemet-San Jacinto UZA, a total of $10,170,044 was available and for rural areas a total of $4,078,151. Table 1.1 LARGE URBANIZED AREA Available Funding by UZA and Project Category Western Riverside – San Bernardino UZA Coachella Valley – Indio – Cathedral City UZA Murrieta – Temecula – Menifee UZA TOTAL FUNDS Available for Riverside County FFY 2018 $750,354 $403,589 $321,731 $1,475,674 FFY 2019 $769,915 $412,979 $335,170 $1,518,064 Two-Year Funding Available $1,520,269 $816,568 $656,901 $2,993,738 Table 1.2 SMALL URBAN AND RURAL (STATEWIDE) Available Funding by UZA and Project Category Statewide Small Urban (Hemet-San Jacinto Eligible) Statewide Rural Areas (All Non-Urban Areas Eligible) FFY 2018 & FFY 2019 Two-Year Funding Available $10,170,044 4,078,151 FTA guidelines allow 5310 program funds to be used to provide up to 80 percent federal share of capital costs and require at least 20 percent in local match. For operating costs, federal funds can be awarded up to 50 percent. However, for this FFYs 2017/18 and 2018/19 funding cycle, as in the past three funding cycles, agencies will receive 100 percent project funding in 5310 funds with the usage of California state toll credits as local matching funds. Toll credits are a funding tool that can be utilized by states as a means of meeting local and state matching requirements for federal funding. State credits are accrued when capital investments are made in federally approved tolled facilities including toll roads and bridges. Caltrans was responsible for administering and selecting projects for both the small urban and rural and large urbanized areas in Riverside County; however, Commission staff also reviewed and evaluated traditional project applications in the county. A total of 14 agencies within Riverside County submitted grant applications requesting $5,359,392 for 46 projects that include 21 replacement vehicles, 13 expansion vehicles, 2 computer hardware/software, 8 operating projects, and 2 mobility management projects. Caltrans’ recommendations were approved and awarded by the California Transportation Commission on March 26, 2020. As required by the program, staff recommends that the Commission adopt Resolution No. 20-007 to certify that the projects were derived from a locally developed Coordinated Plan. Additionally, staff will submit the projects to the Southern California Association of Government for inclusion into the FTIP for programming and obligation of funds. 34 Agenda Item 5E There is no financial impact to the Commission, as Caltrans disburses the Section 5310 funds directly to the recipients. Attachments: 1) Caltrans’ FFYs 2017/18 and 2018/19 Section 5310 funding recommendations – Large Urbanized 2) Caltrans’ FFYs 2017/18 and 2018/19 Section 5310 funding recommendations – Small Urban/Rural 3) Resolution No. 20-007 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 35 FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities 2019 Program of Projects - Large Urbanized Areas (LUZAs) - February 21, 2020 #Agency Caltrans District Large UZA Region PA/NP (1) Project Description Vehicles/Equipment (2) FTA Match (Toll Credits) FTA 5310 Share Total Project $Score 1 Eastern Contra Costa 4 Antioch NP Operating Assistance 95,391$ 95,391$ 190,782$ 60 2 Mobility Matters 4 Antioch NP Mobility Management 52,465$ 209,861$ 262,326$ 50 3 Delano Association for the Developmentally Disabled, Inc 6 Bakersfield NP Three (R) Large Buses 48,720$ 194,880$ 243,600$ 84 4 New Advances for People with Disabilities 6 Bakersfield NP One (R) Small Bus 14,240$ 56,960$ 71,200$ 78 5 New Advances for People with Disabilities 6 Bakersfield NP Three (R) Minivans 33,600$ 134,400$ 168,000$ 78 6 Valley Achievement Center 6 Bakersfield NP Three (SE) Medium Buses 46,020$ 184,080$ 230,100$ 80 7 Choice in Aging 4 Concord NP Operating Assistance 55,235$ 55,235$ 110,469$ 82 8 City of Lafayette: Lamorinda Spirit Van 4 Concord PA Operating Assistance 82,500$ 82,500$ 165,000$ 90 9 Contra Costa Transportation Authority 4 Concord NP Mobility Management 37,102$ 148,408$ 185,510$ 64 10 Golden Rain Foundation Walnut Creek 4 Concord NP Three R Large Buses 48,720$ 194,880$ 243,600$ 84 11 Golden Rain Foundation Walnut Creek 4 Concord NP One SE Medium Bus 15,340$ 61,360$ 76,700$ 80 12 Mobility Matters 4 Concord NP Mobility Management 35,601$ 142,404$ 178,005$ 60 13 The Respite Inn 4 Concord NP One R Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 72 14 Angel View, Inc.8 Indio Cathedral NP One R Large Bus 16,240$ 64,960$ 81,200$ 88 15 Angel View, Inc.8 Indio Cathedral NP Operating Assistance 69,398$ 69,398$ 138,795$ 95 16 Desert ARC 8 Indio Cathedral NP Two R Large Buses 32,480$ 129,920$ 162,400$ 87 17 Desert Blind Handicapped Association 8 Indio Cathedral NP Operating Assistance 40,000$ 40,000$ 80,000$ 82 18 Independent Living Partnership 8 Indio Cathedral NP Operating Assistance 84,000$ 84,000$ 168,000$ 96 19 Sunline Transit Agency 8 Indio Cathedral PA Four SE Minivans 44,800$ 179,200$ 224,000$ 89 20 Sunline Transit Agency 8 Indio Cathedral PA Computer Hardware (4)1,030$ 4,120$ 5,150$ 88 21 Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Stockton 10 Modesto NP Operating Assistance 79,040$ 79,040$ 158,079$ 81 22 Howard Training Center 10 Modesto NP Two SE Large Buses 32,480$ 129,920$ 162,400$ 81 23 UCP of Stanislaus 10 Modesto NP Four SE Small Buses 56,960$ 227,840$ 284,800$ 82 24 Independent Living Partnership 8 Murrieta-Temecula NP Operating Assistance 138,295$ 138,295$ 276,590$ 96 25 Riverside Transit Agency 8 Murrieta-Temecula NP Mobility Management 76,062$ 304,249$ 380,311$ 94 26 Independent Living Partnership 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Operating Assistance 121,852$ 121,852$ 243,703$ 96 27 Loma Linda University Health 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Two SE Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 73 28 Loma Linda University Health 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP One SE Small Bus 14,240$ 56,960$ 71,200$ 66 29 Lutheran Social Services 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Operating Assistance 145,641$ 145,641$ 291,282$ 95 30 Mountain Shadows Group 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Three R Minivans 33,600$ 134,400$ 168,000$ 94 31 Mountain Shadows Group 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Three SE Minivans 33,600$ 134,400$ 168,000$ 89 32 Omnitrans 8 Riverside-San Bernardino PA Three R Large Buses (CNG)62,520$ 250,080$ 312,600$ 47 33 OPARC 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Operating Assistance 75,000$ 75,000$ 150,000$ 69 34 Peppermint Ridge 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Three SE Small Buses 42,720$ 170,880$ 213,600$ 53 35 Peppermint Ridge 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Operating Assistance 78,000$ 78,000$ 156,000$ 84 36 Riverside Transit Agency 8 Riverside-San Bernardino PA Mobility Management 56,653$ 226,614$ 283,267$ 94 37 Valley Resources for the Retarded Inc 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP One R Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 79 38 Valley Resources for the Retarded Inc 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Two R Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 79 39 Valley Resources for the Retarded Inc 8 Riverside-San Bernardino NP Operating Assistance 67,877$ 67,877$ 135,754$ 85 (1) PA = Public Agency NP = Non-Profit (2) R = Replacement SE = Service Expansion Page 1 of 4 ATTACHMENT 1 36 FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities 2019 Program of Projects - Large Urbanized Areas (LUZAs) - February 21, 2020 #Agency Caltrans District Large UZA Region PA/NP (1) Project Description Vehicles/Equipment (2) FTA Match (Toll Credits) FTA 5310 Share Total Project $Score 40 Asian Community Center (ACC)3 Sacramento NP Operating Assistance 131,041$ 131,041$ 262,081$ 90 41 City of Roseville 3 Sacramento PA Mobility Management 19,200$ 76,800$ 96,000$ 88 42 County of Sacramento Dept of Child Family and Adult Services 3 Sacramento PA Operating Assistance 123,981$ 123,981$ 247,962$ 76 43 Pride Industries Transit 3 Sacramento NP Two R Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 90/85 44 Pride Industries Transit 3 Sacramento NP Thirteen R Large Buses 211,120$ 844,480$ 1,055,600$ 90/85 45 Shores of Hope 3 Sacramento NP Operating Assistance 75,000$ 75,000$ 150,000$ 71 46 United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Sacramento, Inc.3 Sacramento NP Four R Large Buses 64,960$ 259,840$ 324,800$ 95 47 United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Sacramento, Inc.3 Sacramento NP One SE Small Bus 14,240$ 56,960$ 71,200$ 93 48 United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Sacramento, Inc.3 Sacramento NP One SE Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 93 49 United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Sacramento, Inc.3 Sacramento NP Cameras (6)4,308$ 17,234$ 21,542$ 95 50 United Cerebral Palsy Association of Greater Sacramento, Inc.3 Sacramento NP Operating Assistance 233,813$ 233,813$ 467,625$ 97 (1) PA = Public Agency NP = Non-Profit (2) R = Replacement SE = Service Expansion Page 2 of 437 FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities 2019 Program of Projects - Large Urbanized Areas (LUZAs) - February 21, 2020 #Agency Caltrans District Large UZA Region PA/NP (1) Project Description Vehicles/Equipment (2) FTA Match (Toll Credits) FTA 5310 Share Total Project $Score 51 Alegria Community Living 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Five R Minivans 56,000$ 224,000$ 280,000$ 90 52 Bay Area Outreach Program 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Large Bus 16,240$ 64,960$ 81,200$ 88 53 Casa Allegra Community Services 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 71 54 Center for Elders' Independence 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Five R Medium Buses 76,700$ 306,800$ 383,500$ 87 55 Center for Elders' Independence 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobile Radios (7)1,400$ 5,600$ 7,000$ 82 56 Center for Elders' Independence 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two SE Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 77 57 Eden I&R 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobility Management 35,125$ 140,499$ 175,624$ 91 58 Friends of Children with Special Needs 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two SE Minivans 22,400$ 89,600$ 112,000$ 75 59 Institute on Aging 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two R Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 87 60 Institute on Aging 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two R Medium Buses 30,680$ 122,720$ 153,400$ 82 61 Kimochi, Inc.4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Large Bus 16,240$ 64,960$ 81,200$ 75 62 Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mapping Software 12,759$ 51,038$ 63,797$ 100 63 Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobility Management 80,000$ 320,000$ 400,000$ 83 64 Marin County Transit District 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobility Management 32,560$ 130,240$ 162,800$ 80 65 Marin Senior Coordinating Council, Inc 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two R Large Buses 32,480$ 129,920$ 162,400$ 85 66 Marin Senior Coordinating Council, Inc 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Four R Large Buses 64,960$ 259,840$ 324,800$ 80 67 Mobility Matters 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Operating Assistance 43,502$ 43,502$ 87,004$ 62 68 Mobility Matters 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobility Management 13,394$ 53,576$ 66,970$ 60 69 On Lok Senior Health Services 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Six R Small Buses 85,440$ 341,760$ 427,200$ 75 70 On Lok Senior Health Services 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 85 71 Peninsula Family Service 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Operating Assistance 136,936$ 136,936$ 273,871$ 68 72 Peninsula Jewish Community Center 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Operating Assistance 156,000$ 156,000$ 312,000$ 68 73 Pomeroy Recreation & Rehabilitation Center 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Small Bus 14,240$ 56,960$ 71,200$ 76 74 SAHA 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One SE Small Bus 14,240$ 56,960$ 71,200$ 80 75 SAHA 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Operating Assistance 52,100$ 52,100$ 104,200$ 76 76 San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority 4 San Francisco-Oakland PA Mobility Management 84,220$ 336,879$ 421,099$ 79 77 Self-Help for the Elderly 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP One R Medium Bus 15,340$ 61,360$ 76,700$ 80 78 Self-Help for the Elderly 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Two R Large Buses 32,480$ 129,920$ 162,400$ 80 79 Self-Help for the Elderly 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Computer Hardware 600$ 2,398$ 2,998$ 76 80 The Center of Independent Living 4 San Francisco-Oakland NP Mobility Management 60,000$ 240,000$ 300,000$ 90 81 Friends of Children with Special Needs 4 San Jose NP Two SE Minivans 22,400$ 89,600$ 112,000$ 75 82 Metropolitan Transportation Commission 4 San Jose PA Mobility Management 41,737$ 166,950$ 208,687$ 81 83 On Lok 4 San Jose NP Six SE Small Buses 85,440$ 341,760$ 427,200$ 75 84 On Lok 4 San Jose NP Eight R Small Buses 113,920$ 455,680$ 569,600$ 85 85 Outreach and Escort 4 San Jose NP Mobility Management 35,116$ 140,465$ 175,581$ 97 86 Outreach and Escort 4 San Jose NP Operating Assistance 200,000$ 200,000$ 400,000$ 95 87 West Valley Community Services 4 San Jose NP Operating Assistance 162,705$ 162,705$ 325,409$ 72 (1) PA = Public Agency NP = Non-Profit (2) R = Replacement SE = Service Expansion Page 3 of 438 FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities 2019 Program of Projects - Large Urbanized Areas (LUZAs) - February 21, 2020 #Agency Caltrans District Large UZA Region PA/NP (1) Project Description Vehicles/Equipment (2) FTA Match (Toll Credits) FTA 5310 Share Total Project $Score 88 Becoming Independent 4 Santa Rosa NP Two R Small Buses 28,480$ 113,920$ 142,400$ 83 89 Becoming Independent 4 Santa Rosa NP One R Medium Bus 15,340$ 61,360$ 76,700$ 83 90 City of Santa Rosa 4 Santa Rosa PA One R Large Bus 16,240$ 64,960$ 81,200$ 75 91 County of Sonoma, Human Services Department, Adult and Aging Division 4 Santa Rosa PA Operating Assistance 57,455$ 57,455$ 114,910$ 90 92 County of Sonoma, Human Services Department, Adult and Aging Division 4 Santa Rosa PA Mobility Management 2,161$ 8,643$ 10,804$ 90 93 County of Sonoma, Human Services Department, Adult and Aging Division 4 Santa Rosa PA Mobility Management 22,269$ 89,078$ 111,347$ 90 94 Catholic Charities of the Dioecies of Stockton 10 Stockton NP One SE Minivan 11,200$ 44,800$ 56,000$ 81 95 Catholic Charities of the Dioecies of Stockton 10 Stockton NP Two I-Pad Ranger Tablets 1,700$ 6,800$ 8,500$ 81 96 Catholic Charities of the Dioecies of Stockton 10 Stockton NP Scheduling Software 4,000$ 16,000$ 20,000$ 81 97 Catholic Charities of the Dioecies of Stockton 10 Stockton NP Mobility Management 51,721$ 206,882$ 258,603$ 81 98 San Joaquin RTD 10 Stockton PA Operating Assistance 49,906$ 199,623$ 249,529$ 81 99 Foothill AIDS Project 8 Victorville-Hesperia NP Operating Assistance 91,940$ 91,940$ 183,879$ 86 100 Victor Valley Community Services Council 8 Victorville-Hesperia NP Mobility Management 20,000$ 80,000$ 100,000$ 95 101 Victor Valley Transit Authority 8 Victorville-Hesperia PA Two R Large Buses (CNG) 41,680$ 166,720$ 208,400$ 83 102 City of Visalia 6 Visalia PA Mobility Management 28,538$ 114,154$ 142,692$ 100 103 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP One R Larger Bus 18,400$ 73,600$ 92,000$ 87 104 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP One R Large Bus 16,240$ 64,960$ 81,200$ 87 105 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP Cameras (4)1,997$ 7,988$ 9,985$ 87 106 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP Mobile Radios (4)317$ 1,266$ 1,583$ 87 107 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP Q- Strains Hardware 738$ 2,954$ 3,692$ 87 108 Porterville Shelter Workshop 6 Visalia NP Computer Hardware (5)1,548$ 6,194$ 7,742$ 87 (1) PA = Public Agency NP = Non-Profit (2) R = Replacement SE = Service Expansion Page 4 of 439 Attachment B - FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Draft 2019 Program of Projects February 5, 2020 Small Urban and Rural Prioritized List (score priority order) #AGENCY County Caltrans District Small Urban or Rural Project Type (1)Vin Year Miles FTA 5310 Share Local (Toll Credits) Project Total Cumulative (Federal $) Score TRADITIONAL PROJECTS 1 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 85544 2013 227183 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 71,200$ 100 2 Colusa County Transit Agency COL 3 Rural Large Bus R 18536 2008 207725 -$ -$ -$ 71,200$ 100 3 Colusa County Transit Agency COL 3 Rural Large Bus R 43831 2007 221979 -$ -$ -$ 71,200$ 100 4 Colusa County Transit Agency COL 3 Rural Large Bus R 18543 2008 251998 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 152,400$ 100 5 Colusa County Transit Agency COL 3 Rural Large Bus R 43837 2007 233259 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 233,600$ 100 6 Help Central Inc BUT 3 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 284,593$ 71,148$ 355,741$ 589,341$ 98 7 Easy Lift Transportation, Inc.SB 5 Small Urban Minivan R 64178 2012 275640 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 645,341$ 97 8 Easy Lift Transportation, Inc.SB 5 Small Urban Minivan R 69067 2012 250290 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 701,341$ 97 9 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Minivan R 80800 2007 151231 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 757,341$ 97 10 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Minivan R 80134 2007 161601 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 813,341$ 97 11 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Minivan R 79938 2007 189443 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 869,341$ 97 12 Nevada-Sierra Connecting Point Public Authority NEV 3 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 276,246$ 69,061$ 345,307$ 1,214,648$ 97 13 United Cerebral Palsy San Luis Obispo - Ride On SLO 5 Small Urban Medium Bus R 86883 2011 286107 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,291,348$ 96 14 United Cerebral Palsy San Luis Obispo - Ride On SLO 5 Small Urban Medium Bus R 63468 2011 264096 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,368,048$ 96 15 United Cerebral Palsy San Luis Obispo - Ride On SLO 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 22799 2011 287432 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 1,449,248$ 96 16 United Cerebral Palsy San Luis Obispo - Ride On SLO 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 22798 2011 297274 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 1,530,448$ 96 17 United Cerebral Palsy San Luis Obispo - Ride On SLO 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 22791 2011 291478 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 1,611,648$ 96 18 Full Access & Coordinated Transportation, Inc.SD 11 Rural Mobility Management MM 284,590$ 71,147$ 355,737$ 1,967,385$ 93 19 County of Nevada Public Works, Transit Services Division NEV 3 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,023,385$ 92 20 County of Nevada Public Works, Transit Services Division NEV 3 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,079,385$ 92 21 County of Nevada Public Works, Transit Services Division NEV 3 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,135,385$ 92 22 County of Nevada Public Works, Transit Services Division NEV 3 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,191,385$ 92 23 Easy Lift Transportation, Inc.SB 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 30963 2013 201162 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 2,262,585$ 92 24 Eastern Sierra Transit Authority INY 9 Rural Cameras (2)OE 14,428$ 3,607$ 18,035$ 2,280,620$ 92 25 Eastern Sierra Transit Authority INY 9 Rural Computer Hardware OE 6,986$ 1,746$ 8,732$ 2,289,352$ 92 26 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Minivan R 94944 2011 62880 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,345,352$ 92 27 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Equipment/Hardware OE 14,080$ 3,520$ 17,600$ 2,362,952$ 92 28 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 10763 2015 179400 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 2,434,152$ 91 29 Smooth SB 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 14962 2011 213863 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 2,515,352$ 91 30 Smooth SB 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 14963 2011 231742 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 2,596,552$ 91 31 Tuolumne County Transit Agency TUL 10 Rural Mobility Management MM 96,837$ 24,209$ 121,046$ 2,717,598$ 91 32 El Dorado County Transit Authority ELD 3 Small Urban Minivan R 51062 2013 185094 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 2,773,598$ 90 33 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Small Bus SE 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 2,844,798$ 90 34 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Medium Bus SE 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 2,921,498$ 90 R = Replacement Vehicle MM = Mobility Management Red Text = Project Added SE = Service Expansion Vehicle OE = Operating Equipment Blue Text = Funding Reduction O = Operating Assistance Page 1 of 5 ATTACHMENT 2 40 Attachment B - FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Draft 2019 Program of Projects February 5, 2020 Small Urban and Rural Prioritized List (score priority order) #AGENCY County Caltrans District Small Urban or Rural Project Type (1)Vin Year Miles FTA 5310 Share Local (Toll Credits) Project Total Cumulative (Federal $) Score 35 County of Sonoma, Human Services Department, Adult and Aging Division SON 4 Rural Mobility Management MM 113,760$ 28,440$ 142,200$ 3,063,698$ 90 36 Redwood Coast Transit Authority DEL 1 Rural Medium Bus R 43107 2011 253393 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 3,140,398$ 89 37 County of Nevada Public Works, Transit Services Division NEV 3 Rural Medium Bus SE 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 3,217,098$ 89 38 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 47565 2006 145351 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 3,273,098$ 89 39 Kings Rehabilitation Center KIN 6 Rural Medium Bus SE 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 3,349,798$ 89 40 Pace Solano SOL 4 Small Urban Small Bus R 66408 2003 158057 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 3,420,998$ 89 41 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 48985 2006 147069 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 3,476,998$ 89 42 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 40513 2008 135200 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 3,532,998$ 89 43 The Arc of Amador and Calaveras AMA 10 Rural Minivan R 99195 2008 75384 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 3,588,998$ 88 44 Care-A-Van RIV 8 Small Urban Minivan R 45398 2011 150443 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 3,644,998$ 88 45 Amador Transit AMA 10 Rural Mobility Management MM 215,082$ 53,771$ 268,853$ 3,913,851$ 88 46 Imperial County Transportation Commission IMP 11 Rural Mobility Management MM 284,581$ 71,145$ 355,726$ 4,269,577$ 88 47 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Small Bus R 11710 2011 139678 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 4,340,777$ 87 48 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 12374 2015 171238 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 4,411,977$ 86 49 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 12375 2015 161411 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 4,483,177$ 86 50 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 12376 2015 146874 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 4,554,377$ 86 51 Monterey-Salinas Transit MON 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 12377 2015 169381 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 4,625,577$ 86 52 San Benito County Local Transportation Authority SBN 5 Rural Large Bus R 84647 2010 127986 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 4,706,777$ 86 53 San Benito County Local Transportation Authority SBN 5 Rural Minivan R 96624 2010 133644 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 4,762,777$ 86 54 Smooth SB 5 Small Urban Medium Bus R 12713 2013 200234 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 4,839,477$ 86 55 Smooth SB 5 Small Urban Large Bus R 46326 2010 189417 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 4,920,677$ 86 56 ARC Imperial Valley IMP 11 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 4,976,677$ 85 57 Redwood Coast Transit Authority DEL 1 Rural Minivan R 85634 2012 165165 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,032,677$ 84 58 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Cameras (3) OE 4,171$ 1,043$ 5,214$ 5,037,891$ 84 59 North Valley Services TEH 2 Rural Large Bus R 85224 2003 271739 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 5,119,091$ 84 60 North Valley Services TEH 2 Rural Large Bus R 23527 2008 358733 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 5,200,291$ 84 61 ARC Imperial Valley IMP 11 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,256,291$ 84 62 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Mobile Radio OE 13,109$ 3,277$ 16,386$ 5,272,677$ 84 63 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Computer Hardware OE 6,363$ 1,591$ 7,954$ 5,280,631$ 84 64 Solano Transportation Authority SOL 4 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 284,590$ 71,147$ 355,737$ 5,636,368$ 84 65 Easy Lift Transportation, Inc.SB 5 Small Urban Small Bus R 39996 2013 166947 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 5,707,568$ 82 66 Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 50778 2004 65301 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,763,568$ 82 67 Ukiah Senior Center, Inc.MEN 1 Rural Minivan R 44149 2008 121862 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,819,568$ 82 68 Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 50855 2004 72081 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,875,568$ 82 69 Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz SC 5 Small Urban Minivan R 51862 2004 85856 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 5,931,568$ 82 70 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Small Bus R 73534 2012 165297 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 6,002,768$ 82 71 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Small Bus R 17017 2012 153920 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 6,073,968$ 82 72 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency RIV 8 Small Urban Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,129,968$ 80 73 Desert Area Resources and Training KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 12650 2010 179289 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,185,968$ 79 R = Replacement Vehicle MM = Mobility Management Red Text = Project Added SE = Service Expansion Vehicle OE = Operating Equipment Blue Text = Funding Reduction O = Operating Assistance Page 2 of 5 41 Attachment B - FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Draft 2019 Program of Projects February 5, 2020 Small Urban and Rural Prioritized List (score priority order) #AGENCY County Caltrans District Small Urban or Rural Project Type (1)Vin Year Miles FTA 5310 Share Local (Toll Credits) Project Total Cumulative (Federal $) Score 74 Desert Area Resources and Training KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 70020 2011 154185 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,241,968$ 79 75 Desert Area Resources and Training KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 70022 2011 116277 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,297,968$ 79 76 Desert Area Resources and Training KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 69994 2011 186493 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,353,968$ 79 77 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Small Bus R 08597 2014 128651 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 6,425,168$ 79 78 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Small Bus R 22494 2014 124332 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,481,168$ 79 79 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Small Bus R 22503 2014 132156 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,537,168$ 79 80 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Small Bus R 22493 2014 123714 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,593,168$ 79 81 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 84304 2014 98255 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,649,168$ 79 82 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Minivan R 84305 2014 86110 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,705,168$ 79 83 North of the River Rec and Park District KER 6 Small Urban Mobile Radios OE 1,163$ 291$ 1,454$ 6,706,622$ 79 84 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,762,622$ 78 85 Care-A-Van RIV 8 Small Urban Minivan R 51038 2013 90733 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 6,818,622$ 78 86 Eastern Sierra Transit Authority INY 9 Rural Large Bus R 59860 2013 109812 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 6,899,822$ 77 87 Eastern Sierra Transit Authority INY 9 Rural Large Bus R 59858 2013 105054 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 6,981,022$ 77 88 Milestones of Development INC SOL 4 Small Urban Minivan SE 64,960$ 16,240$ 56,000$ 7,037,022$ 76 89 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Minivan R 43588 2013 191804 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 7,093,022$ 76 90 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Medium Bus R 93075 2000 281205 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 7,169,722$ 76 91 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Medium Bus R 74136 2002 190101 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 7,246,422$ 76 92 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Medium Bus R 54578 2003 134301 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 7,323,122$ 76 93 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Mobile Radios OE 16,898$ 4,224$ 21,122$ 7,344,244$ 76 94 Valley Resource Center for the Retarded Inc.RIV 8 Small Urban Minivan R 01113 2007 75173 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 7,400,244$ 76 95 Valley Resource Center for the Retarded Inc.RIV 8 Small Urban Small Bus R 58934 2006 110987 $ 56,960 $ 14,240 $ 71,200 7,471,444$ 76 96 Valley Resource Center for the Retarded Inc.RIV 8 Small Urban Large Bus R 70015 2004 181210 $ 64,960 $ 16,240 $ 81,200 7,552,644$ 76 97 Humboldt Transit Authority HUM 1 Rural Small Bus R 21687 2012 203568 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 7,623,844$ 75 98 Dignity Health Connected Living SHA 2 Rural Medium Bus R 21323 2011 172724 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 7,700,544$ 75 99 Dignity Health Connected Living SHA 2 Rural Medium Bus R 21325 2011 170608 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 7,777,244$ 75 100 Butte County Association of Governments BUT 3 Rural Large Bus R 95250 2013 156341 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 7,858,444$ 74 101 Butte County Association of Governments BUT 3 Rural Large Bus R 12720 2013 152344 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 7,939,644$ 74 R = Replacement Vehicle MM = Mobility Management Red Text = Project Added SE = Service Expansion Vehicle OE = Operating Equipment Blue Text = Funding Reduction O = Operating Assistance Page 3 of 5 42 Attachment B - FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Draft 2019 Program of Projects February 5, 2020 Small Urban and Rural Prioritized List (score priority order) #AGENCY County Caltrans District Small Urban or Rural Project Type (1)Vin Year Miles FTA 5310 Share Local (Toll Credits) Project Total Cumulative (Federal $) Score 102 Butte County Association of Governments BUT 3 Rural Large Bus R 95252 2013 157673 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 8,020,844$ 74 103 Butte County Association of Governments BUT 3 Rural Large Bus R 16127 2013 159369 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 8,102,044$ 74 104 Butte County Association of Governments BUT 3 Rural Large Bus R 95249 2013 150723 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 8,183,244$ 74 105 North Valley Services TEH 2 Rural Large Bus R 07595 2015 182777 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 8,264,444$ 74 100% LINE 1 ARC Imperial Valley IMP 11 Rural Large Bus R 19438 2013 216280 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 81,200$ 73 2 Forest Folk Incorporated RIV 8 Rural Minivan R 91413 2002 91413 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 137,200$ 71 3 Humboldt Senior Resource Center HUM 1 Small Urban Medium Bus SE 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 213,900$ 66 4 Humboldt Transit Authority HUM 1 Rural Small Bus R 19276 2012 178984 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 285,100$ 65 5 Humboldt Transit Authority HUM 1 Rural Small Bus R 21688 2012 173163 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 356,300$ 65 6 Roderick Hayfork Senior Nutrition Center TRI 2 Rural Small Bus R 12999 2007 82769 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 427,500$ 65 7 The Latino Equity Advocacy Policy Institute KIN 6 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 483,500$ 65 8 The Latino Equity Advocacy Policy Institute KIN 6 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 539,500$ 65 9 The Latino Equity Advocacy Policy Institute KIN 6 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 595,500$ 65 10 Amador Transit AMA 10 Small Urban Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 651,500$ 63 11 Cambria Community Council SLO 5 Small Urban Medium Bus R 50991 2013 102403 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 728,200$ 62 12 Dignity Health Connected Living SHA 2 Rural Small Bus R 31017 2013 98351 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 799,400$ 60 13 United Cerebral Palsy of Central California FRE 6 Rural Minivan SE 44,800$ 11,200$ 56,000$ 855,400$ 58 14 United Cerebral Palsy of Central California FRE 6 Rural Small Bus SE 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 926,600$ 58 15 United Cerebral Palsy of Central California FRE 6 Rural Small Bus SE 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 997,800$ 57 16 United Cerebral Palsy of Central California FRE 6 Rural Small Bus SE 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 1,069,000$ 55 17 Colusa County Transit Agency COL 3 Rural Large Bus R 30482 2015 141435 64,960$ 16,240$ 81,200$ 1,150,200$ 50 18 Kings County Commission on Aging KIN 6 Rural Small Bus SE 56,960$ 14,240$ 71,200$ 1,221,400$ 48 19 Napa Valley Transportation Authority NAP 4 Small Urban Medium Bus R 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,298,100$ 20 20 Napa Valley Transportation Authority NAP 4 Small Urban Medium Bus R 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,374,800$ 20 21 Napa Valley Transportation Authority NAP 4 Small Urban Medium Bus R 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,451,500$ 20 22 Napa Valley Transportation Authority NAP 4 Small Urban Medium Bus R 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,528,200$ 20 23 Napa Valley Transportation Authority NAP 4 Small Urban Medium Bus R 61,360$ 15,340$ 76,700$ 1,604,900$ 20 Contingency List if Funding Becomes Available R = Replacement Vehicle MM = Mobility Management Red Text = Project Added SE = Service Expansion Vehicle OE = Operating Equipment Blue Text = Funding Reduction O = Operating Assistance Page 4 of 5 43 Attachment B - FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Draft 2019 Program of Projects February 5, 2020 Small Urban and Rural Prioritized List (score priority order) #AGENCY County Caltrans District Small Urban or Rural Project Type (1)Vin Year Miles FTA 5310 Share Local (Toll Credits) Project Total Cumulative (Federal $) Score EXPANDED PROJECTS 1 Seniors Council SC 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 130,893$ 130,893$ 261,786$ 261,786$ 100 2 Common Ground Senior Services CAL 10 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 561,786$ 100 3 Outreach & Escort INC (Outreach)SC 4 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 136,246$ 34,062$ 170,308$ 732,094$ 97 4 Reach Out Morongo Basin SBN 8 Rural Operating Assistance O 80,000$ 80,000$ 160,000$ 892,094$ 97 5 Town of Truckee NEV 3 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,192,094$ 96 6 Outreach & Escort INC (Outreach)SC 4 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 64,846$ 64,846$ 129,692$ 1,321,786$ 95 7 City of Rio Vista SOL 4 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,621,786$ 95 8 Eastern Sierra Transit Authority INY 9 Rural Operating Assistance O 35,000$ 35,000$ 70,000$ 1,691,786$ 94 9 The Arc of Amador and Calaveras AMA 10 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,991,786$ 94 10 Tuolumne County Transit Agency TUL 10 Rural Operating Assistance O 128,331$ 128,331$ 256,662$ 2,248,448$ 93 11 Faith in Action SOL 4 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 2,548,448$ 92 12 Easy Lift Transportation, Inc.SB 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 71,000$ 71,000$ 142,000$ 2,690,448$ 91 13 NCI Affiliates SLO 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 2,990,448$ 91 14 Tehama County Transit Agency TEH 2 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 3,290,448$ 91 15 Consolidated Tribal Health Project, Inc.MEN 1 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 3,590,448$ 91 16 Wilshire Community Services SLO 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 3,890,448$ 90 17 Community Partners In Caring SB 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 4,190,448$ 90 18 Lake Transit Authority LAK 1 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 4,490,448$ 90 19 County of Sonoma, Human Services Department, Adult and Aging Division SON 4 Rural Operating Assistance O 80,000$ 80,000$ 160,000$ 4,650,448$ 90 20 Morongo Basin Transit Authority SBN 8 Rural Operating Assistance O 117,668$ 117,668$ 235,336$ 4,885,784$ 89 21 Lake Links Inc.LAK 1 Rural Operating Assistance O 46,400$ 46,400$ 92,800$ 4,978,584$ 87 22 ARC Imperial Valley IMP 11 Rural Operating Assistance O 101,984$ 101,984$ 203,967$ 5,182,551$ 85 23 Coastal Seniors, Inc.MEN 1 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 5,482,551$ 84 24 Lake Links Inc.LAK 1 Rural Mobility Management MM 160,960$ 40,240$ 201,200$ 5,683,751$ 82 25 San Luis Obispo Council of Governments/SLO Regional Rideshare SLO 5 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 240,000$ 60,000$ 300,000$ 5,983,751$ 81 100% LINE 1 Mental Health Client Action Network (MHCAN)SC 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 108,345$ 108,345$ 216,689$ 216,689$ 80 2 City of Petaluma SON 4 Small Urban Mobility Management MM 77,472$ 19,368$ 96,840$ 313,529$ 80 3 Amador Transit AMA 10 Rural Operating Assistance O 28,242$ 28,242$ 56,484$ 370,013$ 79 4 Community Bridges/Liftline SC 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 99,500$ 99,500$ 199,000$ 569,013$ 78 5 Dignity Health Connected Living SHA 2 Rural Operating Assistance O 87,700$ 87,700$ 175,400$ 744,413$ 75 6 Area 1 Agency on Aging HUM 1 Rural Operating Assistance O 68,815$ 68,815$ 137,629$ 882,042$ 74 7 Humboldt Medi-Trans HUM 1 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,182,042$ 71 8 North Valley Services TEH 2 Rural Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,482,042$ 62 9 Camping Unlimited for Developmentally Disabled SC 5 Small Urban Operating Assistance O 150,000$ 150,000$ 300,000$ 1,782,042$ 37 Contingency List if Additional Funding Becomes Available R = Replacement Vehicle MM = Mobility Management Red Text = Project Added SE = Service Expansion Vehicle OE = Operating Equipment Blue Text = Funding Reduction O = Operating Assistance Page 5 of 5 44 RESOLUTION NO. 20-007 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CERTIFYING PROJECT CONSISTENCY WITH THE PUBLIC TRANSIT – HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATED PLAN WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (“Commission”) is charged with reviewing, evaluating, and programming for Federal Transit Administration’s Section 5310 funding for transportation services to meet the needs of seniors and persons with disabilities for whom public transportation services are otherwise unavailable, insufficient or inappropriate; and WHEREAS, the Commission confirms 46 projects from fourteen agencies were submitted in Riverside County; and WHEREAS, the Commission has scored and ranked the traditional project applications; and WHEREAS, the Commission, as the Regional Transportation Planning Agency (RTPA); and WHEREAS, the Section 5310 process, as interpreted in Federal Transit Administration Circular 9070.1F, Section 4, requires the RTPA to include in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program each request awarded Section 5310 funding by Caltrans and to certify by resolution that the evaluated projects are derived from a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan. NOW, THEREFORE, the Commission does hereby certify and resolve as follows: Section 1. The Commission has determined that the locally evaluated projects approved by Caltrans for Section 5310 funding are derived from the Riverside County Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordinated Plan (adopted by the Commission on April 9, 2008) and the 2016 Update (approved December 2016). ATTACHMENT 3 45 Section 2. Each of the projects awarded Section 5310 funding by Caltrans will be included in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program adopted for Riverside County. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May, 2020. ____________________________________ Ben. J. Benoit, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: ______________________________________ Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 46 AGENDA ITEM 5F Agenda Item 5F RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Ariel Alcon Tapia, Management Analyst Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Low Carbon Transit Operations Program BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION This item is for the Commission to adopt Resolution No. 20-006 “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding Authorization for the Execution of the Certifications and Assurances and Authorized Agent Forms for the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program for Expanded Perris Valley Line Operations FY 21 Project in the Amount of $1,081,302”. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission’s Commuter Rail Program applies for various federal and state funds that are necessary to fund rail projects within Riverside County. There is also the need for grants to meet the Commission’s annual funding responsibility related to rail operations and capital projects. The Commuter Rail Program is currently seeking approval to obtain Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) grant funding which is available through the California Department of Transportation. Projects eligible for this program need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support transit agencies in their effort to increase mode share. The Rail Program is seeking operation funding for the newly extended Perris Valley Line (PVL) commuter rail service. Funding for this grant is formula based. The application is for funding allocated to the Commission in the amount of $1,081,302. As required by the LCTOP grant guidelines, Resolution No. 20-006 is needed to authorize use of the funds on PVL operations and authorize the Executive Director to execute the Certifications, Assurances, and Authorized Agent forms. The resolution is required to submit and file the grant; therefore, staff recommends approval of the resolution related to the FY 2019/20 LCTOP grant. Funding received from this grant will be included in the FY 2020/21 budget and will be reflected in the Commission’s FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan. 47 Agenda Item 5F Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2020/21 Amount: $1,081,302 Source of Funds: LCTOP Budget Adjustment: N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 034198 415 41511 0000 103 25 41501 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/10/2020 Attachment: Resolution No. 20-006 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 48 RESOLUTION NO. 20-006 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION REGARDING AUTHORIZATION FOR THE EXECUTION OF THE CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES AND AUTHORIZED AGENT FORMS FOR THE LOW CARBON TRANSIT OPERATIONS PROGRAM FOR THE EXPANDED PERRIS VALLEY LINE OPERATIONS FY 21 PROJECT IN THE AMOUNT OF $1,081,302 WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission is an eligible project sponsor and may receive state funding from the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) for transit projects; and WHEREAS, the statutes related to state-funded transit projects require a local or regional implementing agency to abide by various regulations; and WHEREAS, Senate Bill 862 (2014) named the California Department of Transportation (Department) as the administrative agency for the LCTOP; and WHEREAS, the Department has developed guidelines for the purpose of administering and distributing LCTOP funds to eligible project sponsors (local agencies); and WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission wishes to delegate authorization to execute these documents and any amendments thereto to Anne Mayer, Executive Director; and WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission wishes to implement the following LCTOP project listed above, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission that the fund recipient agrees to comply with all conditions and requirements set forth in the Certification and Assurances and the Authorized Agent documents and applicable statutes, regulations and guidelines for all LCTOP funded transit projects. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Anne Mayer, Executive Director be authorized to execute all required documents of the LCTOP program and any Amendments thereto with the Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission that it hereby authorizes the submittal of the following project nomination and allocation request to the Department: 49 FY 2019-20 LCTOP funds: List project(s), including the following information: Project Name: Expanded Perris Valley Line Operations FY21 Amount of LCTOP funds requested: $1,081,302 Short description of project: Funding will be used for operating costs associated to expand the commuter rail Perris Valley Line. Contributing Sponsor: Not applicable APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May 2020. Ben J Benoit, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 50 AGENDA ITEM 5G Agenda Item 5G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Ariel Alcon Tapia, Management Analyst Eric DeHate, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council Membership Appointments BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve the appointments of 15 members to the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council (CSTAC) effective May 13, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Transportation Development Act (TDA) provides direction for administering both Local Transportation Fund and State Transit Assistance funds, which are used to support operational and capital expenditures for public transit. Section 99238 and 130105 (d) of the TDA regulations requires the Commission to have a CSTAC as part of the oversight process in administering the TDA funds. The CSTAC serves the Commission by participating in the transit needs hearing and reviewing the Short-Range Transit Plans (SRTP) developed by public transit operators as part of the Commission’s annual budget development process. The TDA regulations require that the membership consist of the following categorical areas: 1) One representative of a potential transit user 60 years of age and older; 2) One representative of a potential transit user who is disabled; 3) Two representatives of the social service providers for seniors; 4) Two representatives of the social service providers for the disabled, including one representative of a social service transportation provider, if one exists; 5) One representative of a social service provider for persons of limited means; and 6) Two representatives of a Consolidated Transportation Service Agency(s) designated as such pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 15975 of the Government Code, including one representative from an operator, if one exists. Membership terms are to be staggered to reduce the likeliness of membership relapse causing a lack of quorum. The adopted bylaws for the CSTAC state that membership can consist of up to 15 members appointed by the Commission and serve at the will and pleasure of the Commission and without compensation. 51 Agenda Item 5G DISCUSSION: In December 2019, the revised CSTAC bylaws were approved to garner more active participation and staff was directed to recruit new members. Membership is required to reflect a broad spectrum of interest among geographic areas of the county and minority representation. An application period took place between January 23, 2020 through March 13, 2020. Various outreach methods were used to solicit membership: • Commissioner recommendations; • Solicitation to existing and previous CAC members and their networks; • Advertisement on the website, social media, and The Point blog article; • Email distributions to the Riverside Transportation Network and Specialized Transit providers, and Transportation NOW chapters; • Personalized emails and calls to universities and colleges transportation and student disabilities services departments; and • Press release A total of 17 applications were received and reviewed. Staff recommends the appointment of 15 individuals and their associated organizations, as identified in the attachment, for membership on the CSTAC. RTA and SunLine are standing members due to their Consolidated Transportation Services Agency (CTSA) designation and are included as part of the 15. Each appointment would represent at least one of the categories identified in state law and several communities throughout the county in order to provide a perspective from a wide geographic area. Citizen appointments are critical to the success of the Commission and its charge to oversee transit services in the county. The new membership opens dialogue between citizen appointee representatives and public transit and specialized transit providers in the county. Upon Commission direction and approval, additional members representing relevant TDA constituencies can be added to the CSTAC membership in the future. There is no financial impact for this item. Attachment: 2020 CSTAC Appointments and Categorical Membership List Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 52 Riverside County Transportation Commission 2020 Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council (CSTAC) Appointments Name/Area Represented Categorical Membership Per TDA Qualifications 1. Ivet Woolridge / Western Riverside and Coachella Valley Social Services Transportation Provider for Seniors Chief Operating Officer, Independent Living Partnership, Specialized Transit Provider 2. Kenneth Woytek / Southwest Riverside Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age Retired Vice Chair, Menifee Senior Advisory Committee 3. Mary Jo Ramirez / Southwest Social Service Provider for Senior, Disabled and Persons of Limited Means Social Services Transportation Provide for Seniors or the Disabled Appointed Member, Riverside County Workforce Development 4. Gloria Sanchez / Southwest Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age Chair, Menifee Senior Advisory Committee, Past Chair, Riverside County Advisory Council on Aging 5. Jack Marty / The Pass Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age Social Service Provider for Senior, Disabled and Persons of Limited Means Past Member, Citizens Advisory Council (RCTC) HICAP Medicare Counselor 6. George Colangeli / Palo Verde Valley Social Service Transportation Provider for Seniors and Disabled General Manager for Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 7. Alejandra Gonzalez / Western Riverside Social Services Transportation Provider for Seniors and Disabled Social Service Provider for Seniors, Disabled and Persons of Limited Means Norco Seniors on the Move Transportation Specialized Transit Provider 8. Priscilla Ochoa / Western Riverside Social Services Provider for Disabled Past Member, Citizens Advisory Council (RCTC) Blindness Support and Transit Trainer 9. Catherine Rips / Coachella Valley Social Service Provider for the Disabled Grants Director, Angel View, Residential and Day Program for Disabled 10. Betty Day / Hemet-San Jacinto Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age Past, Hemet Public Library Board Trustee 11. John Krick / Western Riverside Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age Social Service Provider for the Disabled Member, T-Now Riverside Member, Riverside City Commission on Disabilities 12. John Chavez / The Pass Potential Transit User Over 60 Years of Age. Retired, BNSF 13. Lisa Castilone / Western and Southwest Riverside County Social Services Provider for Seniors, Disabled and Person of Limited Means Social Services Transportation Provide for Seniors or The Disabled Founder, GRID Alternatives Inland Empire 14. Riverside Transit Agency Staff/Western Riverside County Consolidated Transportation Service Agency Consolidated Transportation Service Agency for Western Riverside County 15. SunLine Transit Agency Staff / Coachella Valley Consolidated Transportation Service Agency Consolidated Transportation Service Agency for Coachella Valley 53 AGENDA ITEM 6 Agenda Item 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: David Thomas, Toll Project Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Approval of Agreement for Construction Management Services, Materials Testing, and Construction Surveying and Authorization to Use 91 Express Lanes Surplus Toll Revenue for Construction Support Expenditures for the State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project in Orange and Riverside Counties STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 20-31-033-00 to Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. to perform construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project (91 COP) in Orange and Riverside Counties in the amount of $4,456,957, plus a contingency amount of $445,695 for a total amount not to exceed $4,902,652; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the 91 COP; and 4) Authorize the expenditure of 91 Express Lanes toll revenue designated as surplus in accordance with the 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds Indenture to fund the 91 COP construction support expenditures in the amount of $2 million. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its May 2018 meeting, the Commission authorized all project development activities needed to complete environmental approvals and final design for the 91 COP and to return in fall 2018 with a recommendation regarding the construction. In December 2018, the Commission authorized implementation of the construction phase of the 91 COP after completing environmental and design approvals. The subject of this staff report is the award of the construction management services agreement in anticipation of a construction contract award later this year. The 91 COP will add a 2-mile long general purpose lane in the westbound direction on SR-91 from Green River Road westbound on-ramp to SR-241. A detailed vicinity map of the 91 COP is provided as Attachment 1. The 91 COP involves: 54 Agenda Item 6 1) Adding approximately 9 to 10 feet of outside pavement widening to SR-91 at some locations and restriping in others; 2) Widening the County Line Creek Undercrossing; 3) Constructing new retaining walls approximately 3,200 feet in length and approximately 6 to 28 feet in height on the north side of SR-91; 4) Reconstructing a portion of Green River Road; 5) Replacing overhead signs; and 6) Adding high mast lighting on the north side of the outside barrier. DISCUSSION: Procurement Process Pursuant to Government Code 4525 et seq, selection of architect, engineer, and related services shall be on the basis of demonstrated competence and on professional qualifications necessary for the satisfactory performance of the services required. Therefore, staff used the qualification method of selection for the procurement of construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the 91 COP. Evaluation criteria included elements such as qualifications of firm, staffing and project organization, project understanding and approach, and the ability to respond to the requirements set forth under the terms of a request for qualifications (RFQ). RFQ No. 20-31-033-00 for construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the 91 COP was released by staff on December 12, 2019. A public notice was advertised in the Press Enterprise, and the RFQ was posted on the Commission’s Planet Bids website, which is accessible through the Commission’s website. Through Planet Bids, 70 firms downloaded the RFQ; 15 of these firms are located in Riverside County. A pre-submittal meeting was held on December 19 and attended by 16 firms. Staff responded to all questions submitted by potential proposers prior to the January 9 clarification deadline date. Four firms – Anser Advisory, LLC (San Diego); Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. (Corona); Hill International, Inc. (Ontario); and S2 Engineering, Inc. (Rancho Cucamonga) – submitted responsive and responsible statements of qualifications prior to the 2:00 p.m. submittal deadline on January 23. Based on the evaluation criteria set forth in the RFQ, the firms were evaluated and scored by an evaluation committee comprised of Commission, Bechtel, and Caltrans staff. Based on the evaluation committee’s assessment of the written proposals and pursuant to the terms of the RFQ, the evaluation committee shortlisted and invited three firms (Anser Advisory, LLC; Falcon Engineering Services, Inc.; and Hill International, Inc.) to the interview phase of the evaluation and selection process. Interviews were conducted on February 27. Following the interviews, the evaluation committee conducted a subsequent evaluation of each firm, based on both written and interview components presented to the evaluation committee by each proposer. Accordingly, the evaluation committee recommends contract award to Falcon 55 Agenda Item 6 Engineering Services, Inc. to provide construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the 91 COP, as it earned the highest total evaluation score. Subsequently, staff negotiated the scope of work (including the appropriate level of effort, labor categories/mix, etc.), cost, and schedule proposal received from Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. for the 91 COP services and established a fair and reasonable price. Staff recommends award of Agreement No. 20-31-033-00 with Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. to perform construction management services, materials testing, and construction surveying for the 91 COP, based on the final negotiated project scope and cost of $4,456,957, plus a contingency amount of $445,695, for a total amount not to exceed $4,902,652. Staff also recommends authorizing the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement and the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the 91 COP. Funding for Construction Management At its May 2018 meeting, the Commission authorized execution of all necessary agency agreements to implement the 91 COP including cooperative and funding agreements. Staff is currently working on an agreement with the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) which includes a funding allocation of $15 million from OCTA to the 91 COP. Said agreement permits the OCTA funding to be utilized for the construction management contract (the subject of this staff report) and is expected to be approved by the OCTA board on April 27, 2020. Funding for Construction Support Expenditures In addition to the construction management contract, funding is needed for other construction support expenditures. This includes staff and Bechtel management, design support during construction from Parsons, utility relocation costs, Construction Zone Enhanced Enforcement Program or COZEEP, construction Freeway Service Patrol, public outreach, and other support activities. Surplus toll revenue is the RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll revenue remaining after all other financial obligations have been met. These financial obligations include annual operation and maintenance, debt service, reserve funds, and other obligations. The Commission’s authorizing legislation, SB 1316, requires that all surplus revenue be spent for transportation purposes within the SR-91 corridor. Staff projects that sufficient surplus funds are available to fund the construction support expenditures for the 91 COP. Therefore, staff recommends the use of RCTC 91 Express Lanes surplus toll revenue to fund the construction support expenditures in the amount of $2 million. 56 Agenda Item 6 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21+ Amount: $ 600,000 $6,302,652 Source of Funds: OCTA contribution and RCTC 91 Express Lanes Surplus Toll Revenue Budget Adjustment: No N/A GLA No.: 623046 81302 00000 0000 262 31 81301 $4,902,652 (construction management) 623046 XXXXX 00000 0000 262 31 XXXXX $2,000,000 (construction support) Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/10/2020 Attachments: 1) 91 Corridor Operations Project Vicinity Map 2) Draft Agreement No. 20-31-033-00 with Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. 57 91 91 Project Vicinity C O U N T Y RIVE RSIDE C O U N T Y RIVE RSIDE EA: 08-0F544 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT SR-91 08-RIV SR-91 PM 0.00 12-ORA SR-91 PM 18.88 241 71 SR-91 PM 17.36 BEGIN CONSTRUCTION SR-91 PM 0.54 END CONSTRUCTION BRIDGE WIDENING COUNTY LINE CREEK C O U N T Y O R A N G E C O U N T Y O R A N G E CANYON COAL CANYONCOAL S AN T A ANA R IV E R S AN T A ANA R IV E R GOLF CLUB GREEN RIVER GOLF CLUB GREEN RIVER LIART REVIR ANA ATNAS LIART REVIR ANA ATNAS GYPSUM CANYON RdGYPSUM CANYON RdGREEN RIVER Rd GREEN RIVER Rd DAM PRADO DAM PRADO WIDENING SR-91 WIDENING SR-91 ATTACHMENT 1 58 AGREEMENT NO. 20-31-033-00 MODEL PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT WITH FALCON ENGINEERING SERVICES, INC. FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT, MATERIALS TESTING AND CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING SERVICES FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT IN ORANGE AND RIVERSIDE COUNTIES FROM 1.5 MILES WEST OF THE ORANGE COUNTY LINE TO 0.6 MILES EAST OF THE ORANGE COUNTY LINE 1. PARTIES AND DATE. This Agreement is made and entered into this ___ day of _______, 2020, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("the Commission") and Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. ("Consultant"), a Corporation. 2. RECITALS. 2.1 On November 8, 1988 the Voters of Riverside County approved Measure A authorizing the collection of a one-half percent (1/2 %) retail transactions and use tax (the "tax") to fund transportation programs and improvements within the County of Riverside, and adopting the Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan (the "Plan"). 2.2 Pursuant to Public Utility Code Sections 240000 et seq., the Commission is authorized to allocate the proceeds of the Tax in furtherance of the Plan. 2.3 On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved an extension of the Measure A tax for an additional thirty (30) years for the continued funding of transportation and improvements within the County of Riverside. 2.4 Consultant desires to perform and assume responsibility for the provision of certain professional services required by the Commission on the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement. Consultant represents that it is experienced in providing construction management, engineering surveying and testing services to public clients, is licensed in the State of California (as necessary), and is familiar with the plans of the Commission. DRAFTATTACHMENT 2 59 2.5 The Commission desires to engage Consultant to render such services for the State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project ("Project"), as set forth in this Agreement. 3. TERMS. 3.1 General Scope of Services. Consultant shall furnish all technical and professional services, including labor, material, equipment, transportation, supervision and expertise, and incidental and customary work necessary to fully and adequately supply the professional construction management, engineering surveying and testing services necessary for the Project ("Services"). The Services are more particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. All Services shall be subject to, and performed in accordance with, this Agreement, the exhibits attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, and all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations. 3.2 Commencement of Services. The Consultant shall commence work upon receipt of a written "Notice to Proceed" or "Limited Notice to Proceed" from Commission. 3.3 Term. The term of this Agreement shall be from the date of execution of this Agreement or the date of issuance of the Notice to Proceed by the Commission, whichever occurs first, to the issuance by the Commission to Consultant of a Notice of Final Acceptance, as defined in paragraph 3.12 below, or June 30, 2022, unless earlier terminated as provided herein. Consultant shall complete the Services within the term of this Agreement, and shall meet any other established schedules and deadlines. All applicable indemnification provisions of this Agreement shall remain in effect following the termination of this Agreement. 3.4 Commission's Representative. The Commission hereby designates the Commission's Executive Director, or his or her designee, to act as its Representative for the performance of this Agreement ("Commission’s Representative"). Commission’s Representative shall have the authority to act on behalf of the Commission for all purposes under this Agreement. Commission's Representative shall also review and give approval, as needed, to the details of Consultant's work as it progresses. Consultant shall not accept direction or orders from any person other than the Commission’s Representative or his or her designee. 3.5 Consultant's Representative. Consultant hereby designates Wael Faqih to act as its Representative for the performance of this Agreement ("Consultant’s Representative"). Consultant's Representative shall have full authority to act on behalf of Consultant for all purposes under this Agreement. The Consultant’s Representative shall supervise and direct the Services, using his professional skill and attention, and shall be responsible for all means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for the satisfactory coordination of all portions of the Services under this Agreement. Consultant shall work closely and cooperate fully with Commission's DRAFT60 Representative and any other agencies which may have jurisdiction over, or an interest in, the Services. Consultant's Representative shall be available to the Commission staff at all reasonable times. Any substitution in Consultant's Representative shall be approved in writing by Commission's Representative. 3.6 Substitution of Key Personnel. Consultant has represented to the Commission that certain key personnel will perform and coordinate the Services under this Agreement. Should one or more of such personnel become unavailable, Consultant may substitute other personnel of at least equal competence upon written approval by the Commission. In the event that the Commission and Consultant cannot agree as to the substitution of the key personnel, the Commission shall be entitled to terminate this Agreement for cause, pursuant to the provisions of Section 3.14. The key personnel for performance of this Agreement are identified in the attached organization chart. 3.7 Preliminary Review of Work. All reports, working papers, and similar work products prepared for submission in the course of providing Services under this Agreement shall be submitted to the Commission's Representative in draft form, and the Commission may require revisions of such drafts prior to formal submission and approval. In the event plans and designs are to be developed as part of the Project, final detailed plans and designs shall be contingent upon obtaining environmental clearance as may be required in connection with the Project. In the event that Commission's Representative, in his sole discretion, determines the formally submitted work product to be not in accordance with the standard of care established under this agreement, Commission's Representative may require Consultant to revise and resubmit the work at no cost to the Commission. 3.8 Appearance at Hearings. If and when required by the Commission, Consultant shall render assistance at public hearings or other meetings related to the Project or necessary to the performance of the Services. However, Consultant shall not be required to, and will not, render any decision, interpretation or recommendation regarding questions of a legal nature or which may be construed as constituting a legal opinion. 3.9 Standard of Care; Licenses. Consultant represents and maintains that it is skilled in the professional calling necessary to perform all Services, duties and obligations required by this Agreement to fully and adequately complete the Project. Consultant shall perform the Services and duties in conformance to and consistent with the standards generally recognized as being employed by professionals in the same discipline in the State of California. Consultant warrants that all employees and subcontractors shall have sufficient skill and experience to perform the Services assigned to them. Consultant further represents and warrants to the Commission that its employees and subcontractors have all licenses, permits, qualifications and approvals of whatever nature that are legally required to perform the Services, and that such licenses and approvals shall be maintained throughout the term of this Agreement. Consultant shall perform, at its own cost and expense and without reimbursement from DRAFT61 the Commission, any services necessary to correct errors or omissions which are caused by the Consultant’s failure to comply with the standard of care provided for herein, and shall be fully responsible to the Commission for all damages and other liabilities provided for in the indemnification provisions of this Agreement arising from the Consultant’s errors and omissions. Any employee of Consultant or its sub- consultants who is determined by the Commission to be uncooperative, incompetent, a threat to the adequate or timely completion of the Project, a threat to the safety of persons or property, or any employee who fails or refuses to perform the Services in a manner acceptable to the Commission, shall be promptly removed from the Project by the Consultant and shall not be re-employed to perform any of the Services or to work on the Project. 3.10 Opportunity to Cure. Commission may provide Consultant an opportunity to cure, at Consultant's expense, all errors and omissions which may be disclosed during Project implementation. Should Consultant fail to make such correction in a timely manner, such correction may be made by the Commission, and the cost thereof charged to Consultant. 3.11 Inspection of Work. Consultant shall allow the Commission's Representative to inspect or review Consultant's work in progress at any reasonable time. 3.12 Final Acceptance. Upon determination by the Commission that Consultant has satisfactorily completed the Services required under this Agreement and within the term set forth in Section 3.3, the Commission shall give Consultant a written Notice of Final Acceptance. Upon receipt of such notice, Consultant shall incur no further costs hereunder, unless otherwise specified in the Notice of Final Acceptance. Consultant may request issuance of a Notice of Final Acceptance when, in its opinion, it has satisfactorily completed all Services required under the terms of this Agreement. In the event copyrights are permitted under this Agreement, then in connection with Federal funding, it is hereby acknowledged and agreed that the United States Department of Transportation shall have the royalty-free non-exclusive and irrevocable right to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use, and to authorize others to use, the work for governmental purposes. 3.13 Laws and Regulations. Consultant shall keep itself fully informed of and in compliance with all local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations in any manner affecting the performance of the Project or the Services, including all Cal/OSHA requirements, and shall give all notices required by law. For example, and not by way of limitation, Consultant shall keep itself fully informed of and in compliance with all implementing regulations, design standards, specifications, previous commitments that must be incorporated in the design of the Project, and administrative controls including those of the United States Department of Transportation. Compliance with Federal procedures may include completion of the applicable environmental documents and approved by a governmental body. If the Consultant performs any work knowing it to be contrary to the requirements of laws, rules and regulations and without giving written DRAFT62 notice to the Commission, Consultant shall be solely responsible for all costs arising therefrom. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its officials, directors, officers, employees and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, from any claim or liability arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with such laws, rules or regulations. 3.14 Termination. 3.14.1 Notice; Reason. Commission may, by written notice to Consultant, terminate this Agreement, in whole or in part, at any time by giving written notice to Consultant of such termination, and specifying the effective date thereof (“Notice of Termination”). Such termination may be for Commission's convenience or because of Consultant's failure to perform its duties and obligations under this Agreement, including, but not limited to, the failure of Consultant to timely perform Services pursuant to the Schedule of Services described in Section 3.15 of this Agreement. Consultant may not terminate this Agreement except for cause. 3.14.2 Discontinuance of Services. Upon receipt of the written Notice of Termination, Consultant shall discontinue all affected Services as directed in the Notice or as otherwise provided herein, and deliver to the Commission all Documents and Data, as defined in this Agreement, as may have been prepared or accumulated by Consultant in performance of the Services, whether completed or in progress. 3.14.3 Effect of Termination For Convenience. If the termination is to be for the convenience of the Commission, the Commission shall compensate Consultant for Services fully and adequately provided through the effective date of termination. Such payment shall include a prorated amount of profit, if applicable, but no amount shall be paid for anticipated profit on unperformed Services. Consultant shall provide documentation deemed adequate by Commission's Representative to show the Services actually completed by Consultant prior to the effective date of termination. This Agreement shall terminate on the effective date of the Notice of Termination. 3.14.4 Effect of Termination for Cause. If the termination is for cause, Consultant shall be compensated for those Services which have been fully and adequately completed and accepted by the Commission as of the date the Commission provides the Notice of Termination. In such case, the Commission may take over the work and prosecute the same to completion by agreement or otherwise. Further, Consultant shall be liable to the Commission for any reasonable additional costs incurred by the Commission to revise work for which the Commission has compensated Consultant under this Agreement, but which the Commission has determined in its sole discretion needs to be revised, in part or whole, to complete the Project because it did not meet the standard of care established in Section 3.9. Termination of this Agreement for cause may be considered by the Commission in determining whether to enter into future agreements with Consultant. DRAFT63 3.14.5 Cumulative Remedies. The rights and remedies of the Parties provided in this Section are in addition to any other rights and remedies provided by law or under this Agreement. 3.14.6 Procurement of Similar Services. In the event this Agreement is terminated, in whole or in part, as provided by this Section, the Commission may procure, upon such terms and in such manner as it deems appropriate, services similar to those terminated. 3.14.7 Waivers. Consultant, in executing this Agreement, shall be deemed to have waived any and all claims for damages which may otherwise arise from the Commission's termination of this Agreement, for convenience or cause, as provided in this Section. 3.15 Schedule and Progress of Services. 3.15.1 Schedule of Services. Consultant shall perform the Services expeditiously, within the term of this Agreement, and in accordance with the Schedule of Services set forth in Exhibit "B" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. Consultant represents that it has the professional and technical personnel to perform the Services in conformance with such conditions. In order to facilitate Consultant's conformance with the Schedule, the Commission shall respond to Consultant's submittals in a timely manner. Upon request of Commission's Representative, Consultant shall provide a more detailed schedule of anticipated performance to meet the Schedule of Services. 3.15.2 Modification of the Schedule. Consultant shall regularly report to the Commission, through correspondence or progress reports, its progress in providing required Services within the scheduled time periods. Commission shall be promptly informed of all anticipated delays. In the event that Consultant determines that a schedule modification is necessary, Consultant shall promptly submit a revised Schedule of Services for approval by Commission's Representative. 3.15.3 Trend Meetings. Consultant shall conduct trend meetings with the Commission’s Representative and other interested parties, as requested by the Commission, on a bi-weekly basis or as may be mutually scheduled by the Parties at a standard day and time. These trend meetings will encompass focused and informal discussions concerning scope, schedule, and current progress of Services, relevant cost issues, and future Project objectives. Consultant shall be responsible for the preparation and distribution of meeting agendas to be received by the Commission and other attendees no later than three (3) working days prior to the meeting. 3.15.4 Progress Reports. As part of its monthly invoice, Consultant shall submit a progress report, in a form determined by the Commission, which will indicate the progress achieved during the previous month in relation to the Schedule of Services. Submission of such progress report by Consultant shall be a condition DRAFT64 precedent to receipt of payment from the Commission for each monthly invoice submitted. 3.16 Delay in Performance. 3.16.1 Excusable Delays. Should Consultant be delayed or prevented from the timely performance of any act or Services required by the terms of the Agreement by reason of acts of God or of the public enemy, acts or omissions of the Commission or other governmental agencies in either their sovereign or contractual capacities, fires, floods, epidemics, quarantine restrictions, strikes, freight embargoes or unusually severe weather, performance of such act shall be excused for the period of such delay. 3.16.2 Written Notice. If Consultant believes it is entitled to an extension of time due to conditions set forth in subsection 3.16.1, Consultant shall provide written notice to the Commission within seven (7) working days from the time Consultant knows, or reasonably should have known, that performance of the Services will be delayed due to such conditions. Failure of Consultant to provide such timely notice shall constitute a waiver by Consultant of any right to an excusable delay in time of performance. 3.16.3 Mutual Agreement. Performance of any Services under this Agreement may be delayed upon mutual agreement of the Parties. Upon such agreement, Consultant's Schedule of Services shall be extended as necessary by the Commission. Consultant shall take all reasonable steps to minimize delay in completion, and additional costs, resulting from any such extension. 3.17 Status of Consultant/Subconsultants. 3.17.1 Independent Contractor. The Services shall be performed by Consultant or under its supervision. Consultant will determine the means, methods and details of performing the Services subject to the requirements of this Agreement. Commission retains Consultant on an independent contractor basis and not as an employee, agent or representative of the Commission. Consultant retains the right to perform similar or different services for others during the term of this Agreement. Any additional personnel performing the Services under this Agreement on behalf of Consultant shall at all times be under Consultant's exclusive direction and control. Consultant shall pay all wages, salaries and other amounts due such personnel in connection with their performance of Services and as required by law. Consultant shall be responsible for all reports and obligations respecting such personnel, including but not limited to, social security taxes, income tax withholdings, unemployment insurance, disability insurance, and workers' compensation insurance. 3.17.2 Prevailing Wages. By its execution of this Agreement, Consultant certifies that it is aware of the requirements of California Labor Code DRAFT65 Sections 1720 et seq. and 1770 et seq., as well as California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 16000 et seq. (“Prevailing Wage Laws”), which require the payment of prevailing wage rates and the performance of other requirements on certain “public works” and “maintenance” projects. If the Services are being performed as part of an applicable “public works” or “maintenance” project, as defined by the Prevailing Wage Laws, and if the total compensation is $1,000 or more, Consultant agrees to fully comply with such Prevailing Wage Laws. Copies of the prevailing rate of per diem wages are on file at the Commission’s offices. Consultant shall make copies of the prevailing rates of per diem wages for each craft; classification or type of worker needed to execute the Services available to interested parties upon request, and shall post copies at the Consultant’s principal place of business and at the project site. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its elected officials, officers, employees and agents free and harmless from any claims, liabilities, costs, penalties or interest arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with the Prevailing Wage Laws. Certified Payrolls are to be submitted whenever required by Prevailing Wage laws. 3.17.3 Assignment or Transfer. Consultant shall not assign, hypothecate, or transfer, either directly or by operation of law, this Agreement or any interest herein, without the prior written consent of the Commission. Any attempt to do so shall be null and void, and any assignees, hypothecates or transferees shall acquire no right or interest by reason of such attempted assignment, hypothecation or transfer. 3.17.4 Subcontracting. Consultant shall not subcontract any portion of the work or Services required by this Agreement, except as expressly stated herein, without prior written approval of the Commission. If Consultant wishes to use a firm as a subcontractor which is not specified in the proposal upon which this Agreement was awarded, prior written approval must be obtained from the Commission. The Subcontracts, if any, shall contain a provision making them subject to all provisions stipulated in this Agreement. Consultant has, as part of its proposal, identified certain companies/firms that will be subconsultants utilized by Consultant (“Subconsultants”) for Project delivery. A list of said Subconsultants is attached hereto as Exhibit “C” and made a part hereof. The Commission hereby approves the use by Consultant of the Subconsultants identified in Exhibit “C”. In the event and prior to the replacement of any Subconsultant approved herein, the Consultant shall seek and obtain the Commission's written approval. Exhibit “C” also sets forth the rates at which each Subconsultant shall bill the Consultant for Services and that are subject to reimbursement by the Commission to Consultant. The cost of Addition Direct Costs, as defined in exhibit “C,” shall be the same for both the Consultant and all subconsultants, unless otherwise identified in Exhibit “C”. Consultant acknowledges that approval of Consultant's utilization of the identified Subconsultants together with the incorporation of Subconsultants' rate schedules and cost proposals into this Agreement shall in no way be construed to DRAFT66 create any contractual relationship between any Subconsultant and the Commission. The Subconsultant rate schedules and cost proposals contained herein are for accounting purposes only. In the event that any Subconsultant shall bring any action, claim or proceeding purporting to enforce any right purportedly arising under this Agreement, the Consultant shall be responsible for the Commission's reasonable legal fees without regard to the merits of any such claim. 3.18 Ownership of Materials/Confidentiality. 3.18.1 Documents & Data. This Agreement creates an exclusive and perpetual license for Commission to copy, use, modify, reuse, or sub-license any and all copyrights and designs embodied in plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data and other documents or works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or data magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer diskettes, which are prepared or caused to be prepared by Consultant under this Agreement (“Documents & Data”). Consultant shall require all subcontractors to agree in writing that Commission is granted an exclusive and perpetual license for any Documents & Data the subcontractor prepares under this Agreement. Consultant represents and warrants that Consultant has the legal right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Documents & Data. Consultant makes no such representation and warranty in regard to Documents & Data which were prepared by design professionals other than Consultant or provided to Consultant by the Commission. Commission shall not be limited in any way in its use of the Documents & Data at any time, provided that any such use not within the purposes intended by this Agreement shall be at Commission’s sole risk. 3.18.2 Intellectual Property. In addition, Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest (including copyright, patent, trade secret and other proprietary rights) in all plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data, computer programs or software and source code, enhancements, documents, and any and all works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium or expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or other data magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer media (“Intellectual Property”) prepared or developed by or on behalf of Consultant under this Agreement as well as any other such Intellectual Property prepared or developed by or on behalf of Consultant under this Agreement. The Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest in Intellectual Property developed or modified under this Agreement whether or not paid for wholly or in part by Commission, whether or not developed in conjunction with Consultant, and whether or not developed by Consultant. Consultant will execute DRAFT67 separate written assignments of any and all rights to the above referenced Intellectual Property upon request of Commission. Consultant shall also be responsible to obtain in writing separate written assignments from any subcontractors or agents of Consultant of any and all right to the above referenced Intellectual Property. Should Consultant, either during or following termination of this Agreement, desire to use any of the above-referenced Intellectual Property, it shall first obtain the written approval of the Commission. All materials and documents which were developed or prepared by the Consultant for general use prior to the execution of this Agreement and which are not the copyright of any other party or publicly available and any other computer applications, shall continue to be the property of the Consultant. However, unless otherwise identified and stated prior to execution of this Agreement, Consultant represents and warrants that it has the right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Intellectual Property as provided herein. Commission further is granted by Consultant a non-exclusive and perpetual license to copy, use, modify or sub-license any and all Intellectual Property otherwise owned by Consultant which is the basis or foundation for any derivative, collective, insurrectional, or supplemental work created under this Agreement. 3.18.3 Confidentiality. All ideas, memoranda, specifications, plans, procedures, drawings, descriptions, computer program data, input record data, written information, and other Documents and Data either created by or provided to Consultant in connection with the performance of this Agreement shall be held confidential by Consultant. Such materials shall not, without the prior written consent of Commission, be used by Consultant for any purposes other than the performance of the Services. Nor shall such materials be disclosed to any person or entity not connected with the performance of the Services or the Project. Nothing furnished to Consultant which is otherwise known to Consultant or is generally known, or has become known, to the related industry shall be deemed confidential. Consultant shall not use Commission's name or insignia, photographs of the Project, or any publicity pertaining to the Services or the Project in any magazine, trade paper, newspaper, television or radio production or other similar medium without the prior written consent of Commission. 3.19.1 Indemnification. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, volunteers, and agents free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of or incident to alleged negligent acts, omissions, or willful misconduct of Consultant, its officials, officers, employees, agents, consultants, and contractors arising out of or in connection with the performance of the Services, the Project or this DRAFT68 Agreement, including without limitation the payment of consequential damages, expert witness fees, and attorneys fees and other related costs and expenses. Consultant shall defend, at Consultant's own cost, expense and risk, any and all such aforesaid suits, actions or other legal proceedings of every kind that may be brought or instituted against Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. Consultant shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers, in any such suit, action or other legal proceeding. Consultant shall reimburse Commission and its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, and/or volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs, including reasonable attorney’s fees, incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Consultant's obligation to indemnify shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by Commission, its directors, officials officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. Notwithstanding the foregoing, to the extent Consultant’s Services are subject to Civil Code Section 2782.8, the above indemnity shall be limited, to the extent required by Civil Code Section 2782.8, to claims that arise out of, pertain to, or relate to the negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct of the Consultant. 3.19.2 Indemnification. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold City, its council, officials, officers, employees, consultants, volunteers, and agents free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of or incident to alleged negligent acts, omissions, or willful misconduct of Consultant, its officials, officers, employees, agents, consultants, and contractors arising out of or in connection with the performance of the Services, the Project or this Agreement, including without limitation the payment of consequential damages, expert witness fees, and attorneys fees and other related costs and expenses. Consultant shall defend, at Consultant's own cost, expense and risk, any and all such aforesaid suits, actions or other legal proceedings of every kind that may be brought or instituted against City, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. Consultant shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers, in any such suit, DRAFT69 action or other legal proceeding. Consultant shall reimburse City and its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, and/or volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs, including reasonable attorney’s fees, incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Consultant's obligation to indemnify shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by City, its council, officials officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. Notwithstanding the foregoing, to the extent Consultant’s Services are subject to Civil Code Section 2782.8, the above indemnity shall be limited, to the extent required by Civil Code Section 2782.8, to claims that arise out of, pertain to, or relate to the negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct of the Consultant. 3.20 Insurance. 3.20.1 Time for Compliance. Consultant shall not commence work under this Agreement until it has provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that it has secured all insurance required under this section. In addition, Consultant shall not allow any subcontractor to commence work on any subcontract until it has secured all insurance required under this section. 3.20.2 Minimum Requirements. Consultant shall, at its expense, procure and maintain for the duration of the Agreement insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the Agreement by the Consultant, its agents, representatives, employees or subcontractors. Consultant shall also require all of its subcontractors to procure and maintain the same types of insurance for the duration of the Agreement. Consultant’s insurance shall meet at least the following minimum levels of coverage: (A) Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as the latest version of the following: (1) General Liability: Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability coverage (occurrence form CG 0001); (2) Automobile Liability: Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage form number CA 0001, code 1 (any auto); and (3) if Consultant has employees, Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Workers’ Compensation insurance as required and Employer’s Liability Insurance. (B) Minimum Limits of Insurance. Consultant shall maintain limits no less than: (1) General Liability: $2,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, personal and advertising injury and property damage. If General Liability Insurance or includes a general aggregate limit, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this Agreement/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit; (2) Automobile Liability: $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury and property damage; and (3) Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Statutory Workers’ Compensation limits as required by the applicable Labor Code and DRAFT70 Employer’s Liability limits of no less than $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury or disease. 3.20.3 Professional Liability. Consultant shall procure and maintain, and require its sub-consultants to procure and maintain, for a period of five (5) years following completion of the Project, errors and omissions liability insurance appropriate to their profession. Such insurance shall be in an amount not less than $2,000,000 per claim. 3.20.4 Aircraft Liability Insurance. Consultant, prior to the direct or indirect use of any civil aircraft to provide Service under this Agreement, shall procure and maintain, or cause to be procured and maintained, aircraft liability insurance or equivalent form, with a single limit of not less than $5,000,000 per each occurrence. Such insurance shall include coverage for owned, hired and non-owned aircraft and passengers, and shall name, or be endorsed to name, the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, and agents as additional insureds with respect to the Services or operations performed by or on behalf of the Consultant. 3.20.5 Insurance Endorsements. The insurance policies shall contain the following provisions, or Consultant shall provide endorsements on forms approved by the Commission to add the following provisions to the insurance policies: (A.1) General Liability. The general liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the Services or operations performed by or on behalf of the Consultant, including materials, parts or equipment furnished in connection with such work; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self- insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant’s insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (A.2) General Liability. The general liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the City, its council, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the Services or operations performed by or on behalf of the Consultant, including materials, parts or equipment furnished in connection with such work; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the City, its council, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the City, its council, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant’s insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. DRAFT71 (B.1) Automobile Liability. The automobile liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the ownership, operation, maintenance, use, loading or unloading of any auto owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Consultant or for which the Consultant is responsible; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant's insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (B.2) Automobile Liability. The automobile liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the City, its council, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the ownership, operation, maintenance, use, loading or unloading of any auto owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Consultant or for which the Consultant is responsible; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the City, council, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant's insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (C) Workers’ Compensation and Employers Liability Coverage. The insurer shall agree to waive all rights of subrogation against the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents for losses paid under the terms of the insurance policy which arise from work performed by the Consultant. (D) All Coverages. Each insurance policy required by this Agreement shall be endorsed to state that: (A) coverage shall not be suspended, voided or canceled except after thirty (30) days prior written notice by certified mail, return receipt requested, has been given to the Commission; and (B) any failure to comply with reporting or other provisions of the policies, including breaches of warranties, shall not affect coverage provided to the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents. 3.20.6 Deductibles and Self-Insurance Retentions. Any deductibles or self-insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the Commission. If the Commission does not approve the deductibles or self-insured retentions as presented, Consultant shall guarantee that, at the option of the Commission, either: (1) the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self-insured retentions as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents; or (2) the DRAFT72 Consultant shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigation costs, claims and administrative and defense expenses. 3.20.7 Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best’s rating no less than A: VIII, licensed to do business in California, and satisfactory to the Commission. 3.20.8 Verification of Coverage. Consultant shall furnish Commission with original certificates of insurance and endorsements effecting coverage required by this Agreement on forms satisfactory to the Commission. The certificates and endorsements for each insurance policy shall be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. All certificates and endorsements must be received and approved by the Commission before work commences. The Commission reserves the right to require complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, at any time. 3.20.9 Other Insurance. At its option, the Commission may require such additional coverage(s), limits and/or the reduction of deductibles or retentions it considers reasonable and prudent based upon risk factors that may directly or indirectly impact the Project. In retaining this option Commission does not warrant Consultant’s insurance program to be adequate. Consultant shall have the right to purchase insurance in addition to the insurance required in this Section. 3.21 Safety. Consultant shall execute and maintain its work so as to avoid injury or damage to any person or property. In carrying out its Services, the Consultant shall at all times be in compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations, and shall exercise all necessary precautions for the safety of employees appropriate to the nature of the work and the conditions under which the work is to be performed. Safety precautions as applicable shall include, but shall not be limited to: (A) adequate life protection and life saving equipment and procedures; (B) instructions in accident prevention for all employees and subcontractors, such as safe walkways, scaffolds, fall protection ladders, bridges, gang planks, confined space procedures, trenching and shoring, equipment and other safety devices, equipment and wearing apparel as are necessary or lawfully required to prevent accidents or injuries; and (C) adequate facilities for the proper inspection and maintenance of all safety measures. 3.22 Fees and Payment. 3.22.1 Compensation. Consultant shall receive compensation, including authorized reimbursements, for all Services rendered under this Agreement at the rates set forth in Exhibit "C" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. The total compensation shall be on the basis of direct costs plus a fixed fee as further set forth in Exhibit “C” and shall not exceed the maximum amount of Four Million Four Hundred Fifty-Six Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty-Seven Dollars ($4,456,957), without written approval of Commission's Executive Director. DRAFT73 3.22.2 Payment of Compensation. Consultant shall submit a monthly itemized statement which indicates work completed and hours of Services rendered by Consultant. The statement shall describe the amount of Services and supplies provided since the initial commencement date, or since the start of the subsequent billing periods, as appropriate, through the date of the Statement. Charges specific to each Milestone listed in the Schedule of Services shall be listed separately on an attachment to each statement. Each statement shall be accompanied by a monthly progress report and spreadsheets showing hours expended for each task for each month and the total Project to date. Each statement shall include a cover sheet bearing a certification as to the accuracy of the statement signed by the Consultant's Project Manager or other authorized officer. 3.22.3 Additional Work. Any work or activities that are in addition to, or otherwise outside of, the Services to be performed pursuant to this Agreement shall only be performed pursuant to a separate agreement between the parties. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Commission’s Executive Director may make a change to the Agreement as permitted by law or authorized by the Commission. . (a) In addition to the changes authorized above, a modification which is signed by Consultant and the Commission’s Executive Director, other than a Cardinal Change, may be made in order to: (1) make a negotiated equitable adjustment to the Agreement price, delivery schedule and other terms resulting from the issuance of a Change Order, (2) reflect definitive letter contracts, and (3) reflect other agreements of the parties modifying the terms of this Agreement (“Bilateral Contract Modification”). (b) Consultant shall not perform, nor be compensated for any change, without written authorization from the Commission’s Executive Director as set forth herein. In the event such a change authorization is not issued and signed by the Commission’s Executive Director, Consultant shall not provide such change. 3.22.4 Reimbursement for Expenses. Consultant shall not be reimbursed for any expenses unless authorized in writing by the Commission's Representative. 3.23 Prohibited Interests. 3.23.1 Solicitation. Consultant maintains and warrants that it has not employed nor retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, to solicit or secure this Agreement. Further, Consultant warrants that it has not paid nor has it agreed to pay any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift or other consideration contingent upon or resulting from the award or making of this Agreement. For breach or violation of this warranty, the Commission shall have the right to rescind this Agreement without liability. DRAFT74 3.23.2 Conflict of Interest. For the term of this Agreement, no member, officer or employee of the Commission, during the term of his or her service with the Commission, shall have any direct interest in this Agreement, or obtain any present or anticipated material benefit arising therefrom. 3.23.3 Conflict of Employment. Employment by the Consultant of personnel currently on the payroll of the Commission shall not be permitted in the performance of this Agreement, even though such employment may occur outside of the employee's regular working hours or on weekends, holidays or vacation time. Further, the employment by the Consultant of personnel who have been on the Commission payroll within one year prior to the date of execution of this Agreement, where this employment is caused by and/or dependent upon the Consultant securing this or related Agreements with the Commission, is prohibited. 3.23.4 Covenant Against Contingent Fees. The Consultant represents and warrants that he/she has not employed or retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working for the Consultant, to solicit or secure this Agreement, and that he/she has not paid or agreed to pay any company or person, other than a bona fide employee, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift, or any other consideration, contingent upon or resulting from the award or formation of this Agreement. For breach or violation of this warranty, the Commission shall have the right to terminate this Agreement without liability pursuant to Section 3.14, or at its discretion to deduct from the Agreement price or consideration, or otherwise recover, the full amount of such fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift, or contingent fee. 3.23.5 Covenant Against Expenditure of Local Agency, State or Federal Funds for Lobbying. Omitted Intentionally 3.24 Accounting Records. Consultant shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to all costs and expenses incurred and fees charged under this Agreement. The Federal Acquisition Regulations in Title 48, CFR 31 shall be the governing factors regarding allowable elements of cost. All such records shall be clearly identifiable. Consultant shall allow a representative of the Commission or any duly authorized representative of the Commission during normal business hours to examine, audit, and make transcripts or copies of any and all ledgers and books of account, invoices, vouchers, canceled checks, and any other records or documents created pursuant to this Agreement. All such information shall be retained by Consultant for at least three (3) years following termination of this Agreement. 3.25 Equal Opportunity Employment. Consultant represents that it is an equal opportunity employer and it shall not discriminate against any subcontractor, employee or applicant for employment because of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or age. Such non-discrimination shall include, but not be limited to, all DRAFT75 activities related to initial employment, upgrading, demotion, transfer, recruitment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination. 3.26 Right to Employ Other Consultants. Commission reserves the right to employ other consultants in connection with the Project. As required, Consultant shall cooperate fully with any other consultant engaged by the Commission on the Project. 3.27 Governing Law. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed with the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. 3.28 Attorneys' Fees. If either party commences an action against the other party, either legal, administrative or otherwise, arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorneys' fees and, all other costs of such actions. 3.29 Time of Essence. Time is of the essence for each and every provision of this Agreement. 3.30 Headings. Article and Section Headings, paragraph captions or marginal headings contained in this Agreement are for convenience only and shall have no effect in the construction or interpretation of any provision herein. 3.31 Notices. All notices permitted or required under this Agreement shall be given to the respective parties at the following address, or at such other address as the respective parties may provide in writing for this purpose: CONSULTANT: COMMISSION: Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. Riverside County 341 Corporate Terrace Circle Transportation Commission Suite 101 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Corona, CA 92879 Riverside, CA 92501 Attn: Wael Faqih Attn: Executive Director Such notice shall be deemed made when personally delivered or when mailed, forty- eight (48) hours after deposit in the U.S. mail, first class postage prepaid, and addressed to the party at its applicable address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred, regardless of the method of service. 3.32 Conflicting Provisions. In the event that provisions of any attached exhibits conflict in any way with the provisions set forth in this Agreement, the language, terms and conditions contained in this Agreement shall control the actions and obligations of the Parties and the interpretation of the Parties' understanding concerning the performance of the Services. DRAFT76 3.33 Amendment or Modification. No supplement, modification, or amendment of this Agreement shall be binding unless executed in writing and signed by both Parties. 3.34 Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains the entire agreement of the Parties relating to the subject matter hereof and supersedes all prior negotiations, agreements or understandings. 3.35 Invalidity; Severability. If any portion of this Agreement is declared invalid, illegal, or otherwise unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 3.36 Provisions Applicable When Federal Department of Transportation Funds Are Involved. Omitted Intentionally 3.37 No Waiver. Failure of Commission to insist on any one occasion upon strict compliance with any of the terms, covenants or conditions hereof shall not be deemed a waiver of such term, covenant or condition, nor shall any waiver or relinquishment of any rights or powers hereunder at any one time or more times be deemed a waiver or relinquishment of such other right or power at any other time or times. [Signatures on following page] DRAFT77 SIGNATURE PAGE TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement was executed on the date first written above. RIVERSIDE COUNTY CONSULTANT TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: _________________________ Printed _________________________ __________________________ Anne Mayer Signature Executive Director __________________________ Name __________________________ Title Approved as to Form: By: ____________________________ Best Best & Krieger LLP General Counsel DRAFT78 Exhibit B B-22 RVPUB\HSHANE\758782.1 MODEL AGREEMENT - EXHIBIT "A" SCOPE OF SERVICES [___INSERT___] DRAFT79 RCTC: State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project 1 | P a g e RFQ NO. 20-31-033-00 FALCON will provide following services during various stages of the project. 1.Preconstruction Services: a.Plan Review i.Review construction contract documents prior to construction. ii.Perform detailed constructability review and check for discrepancies, potential conflicts, consistency between plans, specifications and pay items. iii.Review Project reports, RE pending files to verify completeness and consistency. b.Schedule i.Review contractor’s proposed Project schedule to ensure safety, efficiency and expeditious completion of project. ii.Provide contractor’s baseline schedule recommendations to COMMISSION. c.Budget i.Review Project estimate and provide recommendations to COMMISSION for efficient control of project cost. d.Bid Process i.Assist COMMISSION to review bid question, draft responses, draft addenda to bid documents and review bid tabulation. e.Pre-Construction Meetings i.Assist COMMISSION in conducting pre-construction meetings with Contractor, designer, Caltrans, cities, utility companies and other parties as needed. f.Contract Award i.Assist COMMISSION with items related to contract award including review bid for completeness & responsiveness, perform bid analysis, develop contractor payment schedules, check contractor references and coordinate with contractor for award of construction contracts. g.Photo Records/Drone Aerials i.Take photo of the existing conditions prior to construction using drone aerial photography and file in the project records. 2.Construction Services: a.Construction Administration i.Administer project construction contract using Caltrans Construction Manual as a guideline. ii.Conduct regular project coordination meetings with Contractor, COMMISSION, local agencies, and design engineer, as needed. iii.Prepare Contractor progress payments and maintain payment records and supporting documentation shall be reviewed by COMMISSION for approval. iv.Establish and maintain a filing system for the Project using the Caltrans Construction Manual as a guideline. v.Monitor Contractors’ construction schedules on an ongoing basis and alert COMMISSION to conditions that may lead to delays in completion of the Project. vi.Prepare and submit a Monthly Project Report and provide update on the construction activity, accomplishments, and status of Requests for Information (RFIs), submittals, current issues, Contract Change Orders (CCOs) and current project budget and schedule. vii.Review and ensure compliance with environmental requirements.DRAFT80 RCTC: State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project 2 | P a g e RFQ NO. 20-31-033-00 viii. Ensure that the Project meets all provisions of the Caltrans Quality Assurance Program Manual. ix. Review Contractors’ certified payroll records and assist COMMISSION with labor compliance. x. Ensure that the Project meets all provisions of the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). xi. Assure that the Project meets all applicable regulations of the Air Quality Management District (AQMD). b. Construction Administration i. Provide a qualified Resident Engineer and other qualified assistant Resident Engineers, as needed to effectively manage the Project. ii. Maintain regular contact with COMMISSION’s Construction Manager. iii. Review Project plans and special provisions for possible errors and deficiencies prior to construction of any specific element and report such findings to COMMISSION iv. Monitor, coordinate, and track construction progress to ensure the Project proceeds on schedule and according to the order of work required in the plans and special provisions. v. Coordinate review of shop drawings and Requests for Information (RFI) with the Construction Manager. vi. Provide a qualified SWPPP coordinator who shall review contractor-prepared Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans (SWPPP) and coordinate approval with COMMISSION. FALCON team will cooperate with Caltrans and monitoring agency during inspections and field reviews. vii. Coordinate the implementation of any changes with the Construction Manager and the design engineer. viii. Review and approve Traffic Control Plans and forward to COMMISSION as necessary. ix. Coordinate all Project construction activities with other ongoing projects within and adjacent to the Project limits. c. Construction Inspection i. Coordinate all required inspections necessary for the Project. Ensure that appropriate City, and local agency are notified and present as required throughout the Project. ii. Maintain perform and document daily on-site inspections of the progress and quality of construction iii. FALCON team shall exercise reasonable care and diligence to discover and promptly replace, correct, and/or mitigate all defects or deficiencies in the materials or workmanship used in the Project. Any such deficiencies and their resolution shall be reported to COMMISSION iv. FALCON shall assign qualified personnel to: a. Inspect subgrade, aggregate base and paving, bridge widening, retaining wall construction, signing and striping, and related construction activities. b. Identify actual and potential problems associated with the Project and recommend sound engineering solutions. c. Maintain awareness of safety and health requirements. DRAFT81 RCTC: State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project 3 | P a g e RFQ NO. 20-31-033-00 d. Prepare complete and accurate daily reports, engineering calculations, project records, payment quantity documents, reports, and correspondence related to Project activities. e. Prepare construction sketches, drawings, and cross-sections, as necessary. f. Keep contemporaneous records of all additions or deviations from the approved plans for the preparation of as-built plans. g. Provide inspections for environmental compliance. h. Arrange for lane closures in accordance with Caltrans procedures and coordinate any work with the California Highway Patrol. i. Monitoring Contractors’ compliance with applicable regulations required by AQMD. d. Project Support i. Construction Surveys: FALCON shall perform construction surveying services, field calculations, and home office calculations to support the construction of the project. ii. Materials Testing and Geotechnical Services: FALCON will provide experienced personnel, equipment, and facilities to perform various construction materials sampling and testing. Laboratory and field materials testing will be used to ensure that roadway construction work conforms to the California State Department of Transportation (Caltrans) standards, specifications, and special provisions for material quality and workmanship. iii. Permits: shall review the project for permit compliance and coordinate with COMMISSION and the design engineer to ensure that necessary permits are obtained. e. Cost & Schedule i. FALCON shall monitor and track the contract pay item quantities and payments, contract change orders, supplemental work items, Agency and/or State furnished materials, anticipated extra work balance, contingency balance, Project budget. ii. Review and monitor Contractor’s schedule and inform COMMISSION of any significant changes or deviations in the schedule. iii. Provide and maintain a Project staffing plan of field office personnel. f. Contract Change Order and Claims i. Evaluate requests for changes and/or substitutions by the Contractor. Coordinate proposed changes with the COMMISSION’s Construction Manager, prepare and submit Contract Change Orders to the COMMISSION for approval. ii. Attempt to avoid all unnecessary Contract Change Orders. iii. Assist COMMISSION, as requested, in the identification, resolution, and final disposition of claims filed by the Contractor or third parties against COMMISSION or the Project. g. Safety i. Implement and conduct a comprehensive safety program including regular tail-gate safety meetings. ii. Comply with State of California Construction Safety Orders and provisions of the Caltrans Construction Manual. DRAFT82 RCTC: State Route 91 Corridor Operations Project 4 | P a g e RFQ NO. 20-31-033-00 iii. Provide all necessary safety equipment as required for team personnel. 3. Post Construction Services: a. Project Close Out i. Prepare a list of items to be completed and/or corrected by the Contractor for final completion of the Project. ii. Review and verify completeness of as-built drawings. iii. Conduct a final walk-through with COMMISSION, Caltrans, Contractors, and design engineers. iv. Prepare final construction reports including the Project Completion Report. v. Prepare and deliver to COMMISSION all project files in accordance with COMMISSION’S and Caltrans policies. vi. Assist COMMISSION and Contractor in obtaining final release of all project permits. DRAFT83 Exhibit B B-23 RVPUB\HSHANE\758782.1 MODEL AGREEMENT - EXHIBIT "B" SCHEDULE OF SERVICES [___INSERT___] DRAFT84 Activity IDActivity NameOriginalDurationPredecessorsStartFinish20200110 SR-91WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)20200110 SR-91 WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)34108-Apr-2028-Jul-2120200110.1 Pre-Bid Stage20200110.1 Pre-Bid Stage6008-Apr-2030-Jun-200100NTP CM Contract (RCTC Board & NTP) 4/8/2020008-Apr-20*0200Constructability Review & Final Design 4/1/20 - 5/31/202020010008-Apr-2005-May-200300Bid Advertise/ Open Bids and award 6/1/20 - 8/31/202040020006-May-2030-Jun-2020200110.2 Pre-Construction Stage20200110.2 Pre-Construction Stage1501-Oct-2021-Oct-200090CONTRACT AWARD AND START Construction Stage- NTP 10/1/20 -12/31/20210030001-Oct-20*0500SUBMIT BASE LINE SCHEDULE, & Preconstruction Meeting15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-200600SUBMIT TRAFFIC HANDLING PLAN5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-200700SUBMIT CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR BRIDGE& RW STRUCTURES5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-200800SUBMIT CIDH CONCRETE PLAN (SOFT DRY SANDY SOIL16"& 60" CIDH Piles), Concrete MIX DESIGN, & QA/QCMP15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-200900CONSTRUCT SAFETY PLAN (IILP)5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-201000SUBMIT WALL FACIA FORM LINER AND SAMPLE PANEL10009001-Oct-2014-Oct-201100SUBMIT ADL SOIL REMOVAL PLAN & BRIDGE ASBESTOS REMOVAL SAFETY PLAN5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-201200SUBMIT STREET LIGHT POLE FABRICATION SHOP DRAWINGS15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-201300SUBMIT SWPPP FOR REVIEW & APPROVAL10009001-Oct-2014-Oct-201400SUBMIT ENVIRONMENTAL AND REGULATORY PERMITS5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-201500ABANDON VARIOUS UTILITIES (DESIGNATED AS ABANDON) IN STAGE-1 (EAST SIDE)5009001-Oct-2007-Oct-201600Submit Shoring & Falsework Shop drawings10009001-Oct-2014-Oct-201700Submit Shop drawings for MSE Walls PC Panels and Design Plans15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-201800Submite Shop Drawings and Fabrication Plans for Signals, Light Poles, and Traffic Handling Plan15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-201900Submit Shop Drawings & Fabrication Plans for OH sign Structures15009001-Oct-2021-Oct-2020200110.3 Construction Stage 120200110.3 Construction Stage 115522-Oct-2026-May-21Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q42020202128-Jul-21, 20200110 SR-91 WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)30-Jun-20, 20200110.1 Pre-Bid StageNTP CM Contract (RCTC Board & NTP) 4/8/2020, 08-Apr-20*Constructability Review & Final Design 4/1/20 - 5/31/2020Bid Advertise/ Open Bids and award 6/1/20 - 8/31/202021-Oct-20, 20200110.2 Pre-Construction StageCONTRACT AWARD AND START Construction Stage- NTP 10/1/20 -12/31/2021, 01-Oct-20*SUBMIT BASE LINE SCHEDULE, & Preconstruction MeetingSUBMIT TRAFFIC HANDLING PLANSUBMIT CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR BRIDGE & RW STRUCTURESSUBMIT CIDH CONCRETE PLAN (SOFT DRY SANDY SOIL16"& 60" CIDH Piles), Concrete MIX DESIGN, & QA/QCMPCONSTRUCT SAFETY PLAN (IILP)SUBMIT WALL FACIA FORM LINER AND SAMPLE PANELSUBMIT ADL SOIL REMOVAL PLAN & BRIDGE ASBESTOS REMOVAL SAFETY PLANSUBMIT STREET LIGHT POLE FABRICATION SHOP DRAWINGSSUBMIT SWPPP FOR REVIEW & APPROVALSUBMIT ENVIRONMENTAL AND REGULATORY PERMITSABANDON VARIOUS UTILITIES (DESIGNATED AS ABANDON) IN STAGE-1 (EAST SIDE)Submit Shoring & Falsework Shop drawingsSubmit Shop drawings for MSE Walls PC Panels and Design PlansSubmite Shop Drawings and Fabrication Plans for Signals, Light Poles, and Traffic Handling Plan Submit Shop Drawings & Fabrication Plans for OH sign Structures26-May-21, 20200110.3 Construction Stage 1SR-91 WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)Classic Schedule Layout10-Jan-20 09:13Actual Level of EffortActual WorkRemaining WorkCritical Remaining WorkMilestonesummaryPage 1 of 3TASK filter: All Activities© Oracle CorporationDRAFT85 Activity IDActivity NameOriginalDurationPredecessorsStartFinish2000Set Construction Area Signage, Restripe, and Set Temporary K-Railing (with Traffic Screen)~ 18,800LF100500, 0600, 130022-Oct-2004-Nov-202100Remove Existing Concrete Pavemnet, AC pavement, MBGR, Dike, C&G, Remove Fence10200029-Oct-2011-Nov-202200Install Temporary ESA fence and SWPPP protection Measures21300, 050022-Oct-2023-Oct-202300Construct Concrete Barrier (Type 736SV Mod) Sta. 499+20 to 516+60 (~1,740LFT) supported by 238x16" CIDH Piles (grading and CIDH Pile construction) detail B15-830050022-Oct-2002-Dec-202400Construct Concrete Barrier (Type 736SV Mod) Sta. 499+20 to 516+60 (~1740LFT) Form/Rebar/Pour(He @1-4')h30230005-Nov-2016-Dec-202500Bridge Widening (County Line Creek Bridge #56-0366) Partial demo3200005-Nov-2009-Nov-202600Structural Excavations - Bridge & Set Shoring Systems3230003-Dec-2007-Dec-202700Construct Piling CL-200 Alt X Abut-1 & 2 & Retaining Walls5230003-Dec-2009-Dec-202800Construct Bridge Footings, Floor Slab & Walls & Retaining Walls & Tie to RW#2 & 410270010-Dec-2023-Dec-202900Construct Bridge Deck Slab & 7- day Cure12280024-Dec-2008-Jan-213000Structural Backfilling & Remove Shoring5270010-Dec-2016-Dec-203100Construct RW#4 ~375' x 20' H Max, Type-MSE Wall, with Concrete Gutter & Cable Railing50200005-Nov-2013-Jan-213200Construct RW#4 ~399' x 26' H Max (Type-SWBP Mod) with CL-200 (Alt X Piles)50200005-Nov-2013-Jan-213300Construct RW#4 ~400' x 12' H Max (Type-7B Mod) with Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod)40200019-Nov-2013-Jan-213400Construct RW#2 ~347' x 15-H Max MSE Wall, Concrete Gutter, & Cable Railing50310026-Nov-2003-Feb-213500Construct RW#20 ~496' x 20' H Max, (Type 7B Mod) with Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod) with Ground Anchors50330017-Dec-2024-Feb-213600Construct RW#20 ~152' x 28' H Max (Type-SWBP Mod) with Steel Piles HP- 14x89 Driven Piles40320026-Nov-2020-Jan-213700Construct RW#540 (536' x 18' H-Max) (Type 7SWBP) Supported on Top of CL-200 Piles (Alt-X) with topping Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod)50360017-Dec-2024-Feb-213800Construct RW#540 (224' x 16' H-Max) (Type 7B Mod)with Ground Anchors30230003-Dec-2013-Jan-213900Construct Drainage Systems (18" & 24" RCP, 18",24" and 36" CSP) & Abandon Various Existing Culverts (Various Locations) ~670LFT50360031-Dec-2010-Mar-214000Partial Demolition of various Existing RW's (Used Partially as Temporary Shoring) behind RW#20, 540, & 440360031-Dec-2024-Feb-21Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q420202021Set Construction Area Signage, Restripe, and Set Temporary K-Railing (with Traffic Screen)~ 18,800LFRemove Existing Concrete Pavemnet, AC pavement, MBGR, Dike, C&G, Remove FenceInstall Temporary ESA fence and SWPPP protection MeasuresConstruct Concrete Barrier (Type 736SV Mod) Sta. 499+20 to 516+60 (~1,740LFT) supported by 238x16" CIDH Piles (grading and CIDH Pile construction) detail B15-8Construct Concrete Barrier (Type 736SV Mod) Sta. 499+20 to 516+60 (~1740LFT) Form/Rebar/Pour(He @1-4')hBridge Widening (County Line Creek Bridge #56-0366) Partial demoStructural Excavations - Bridge & Set Shoring SystemsConstruct Piling CL-200 Alt X Abut-1 & 2 & Retaining WallsConstruct Bridge Footings, Floor Slab & Walls & Retaining Walls & Tie to RW#2 & 4Construct Bridge Deck Slab & 7- day CureStructural Backfilling & Remove ShoringConstruct RW#4 ~375' x 20' H Max, Type-MSE Wall, with Concrete Gutter & Cable RailingConstruct RW#4 ~399' x 26' H Max (Type-SWBP Mod) with CL-200 (Alt X Piles)Construct RW#4 ~400' x 12' H Max (Type-7B Mod) with Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod)Construct RW#2 ~347' x 15-H Max MSE Wall, Concrete Gutter, & Cable RailingConstruct RW#20 ~496' x 20' H Max, (Type 7B Mod) with Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod) with Ground AnchorsConstruct RW#20 ~152' x 28' H Max (Type-SWBP Mod) with Steel Piles HP- 14x89 Driven PilesConstruct RW#540 (536' x 18' H-Max) (Type 7SWBP) Supported on Top of CL-200 Piles (Alt-X) with topping Concrete Barrier (Type 836 Mod)Construct RW#540 (224' x 16' H-Max) (Type 7B Mod)with Ground AnchorsConstruct Drainage Systems (18" & 24" RCP, 18", 24" and 36" CSP) & Abandon Various Existing Culverts (Various Locations) ~670LFTPartial Demolition of various Existing RW's (Used Partially as Temporary Shoring) behind RW#20, 540, & 4SR-91 WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)Classic Schedule Layout10-Jan-20 09:13Actual Level of EffortActual WorkRemaining WorkCritical Remaining WorkMilestonesummaryPage 2 of 3TASK filter: All Activities© Oracle CorporationDRAFT86 Activity IDActivity NameOriginalDurationPredecessorsStartFinish4100Complete Backfilling Behind RW # 2, 4, 20, and Concrete Barrier Type736SV15370025-Feb-2117-Mar-214200Grading and Roadway Excavation along Full Length alignmnet & CL-@ AB20410004-Mar-2131-Mar-214300Construct Lean Concreete Base (Various Locations)20420011-Mar-2107-Apr-214400Construct Bond Breakers and JPCP & AC Pavement(Various Locations) WB Alignment40420001-Apr-2126-May-214500Construct Irrigation System (Various Locations)20410018-Mar-2114-Apr-214600Construct Temporary Signal system 15200005-Nov-2025-Nov-204700Construct Traffic Signal System and Traffic Monitoring System30410018-Mar-2128-Apr-214800Install Signs at Various Locations along WB Alignment (behind K-Railing)20410018-Mar-2114-Apr-2120200110.4 Construction Stage 220200110.4 Construction Stage 29518-Mar-2128-Jul-214900Retsripe WB lanes and move Temporary k-Railing (with Screens) 5440027-May-2102-Jun-215000Roadway Excavation and Construct CL-II AB & AC Pavement (Various Locations) 15490003-Jun-2123-Jun-215100Roadway Excavation and Construct CL-AB, LCB & JPCP (Various Locations) 20490003-Jun-2130-Jun-215200Drill 60" CIDH Piles and Rebar/Pour Concrete OH Sign Foundations (WB Signs)10410018-Mar-2131-Mar-215300Complete Joint Sealant & Testing / Coring WB direction JPCP Pavements10510001-Jul-2114-Jul-215400Complete Profiling and Gridning pavement WB direction AC & JPCP Pavements5510001-Jul-2107-Jul-215500Remove Temporary K-Railing and Permanent Striping WB direction (Full Alignmnet)5540008-Jul-2114-Jul-215600Install OH Sign Structure10520001-Apr-2114-Apr-215700Install street lighting system40410018-Mar-2112-May-215800Final Cleanup & Punch List105700, 550015-Jul-2128-Jul-21Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q420202021Complete Backfilling Behind RW # 2, 4, 20, and Concrete Barrier Type736SVGrading and Roadway Excavation along Full Length alignmnet & CL-@ ABConstruct Lean Concreete Base (Various Locations)Construct Bond Breakers and JPCP & AC Pavement(Various Locations) WB AlignmentConstruct Irrigation System (Various Locations)Construct Temporary Signal system Construct Traffic Signal System and Traffic Monitoring SystemInstall Signs at Various Locations along WB Alignment (behind K-Railing)28-Jul-21, 20200110.4 Construction Stage 2Retsripe WB lanes and move Temporary k-Railing (with Screens)Roadway Excavation and Construct CL-II AB & AC Pavement (Various Locations)Roadway Excavation and Construct CL-AB, LCB & JPCP (Various Locations)Drill 60" CIDH Piles and Rebar/Pour Concrete OH Sign Foundations (WB Signs)Complete Joint Sealant & Testing / Coring WB direction JPCP PavementsComplete Profiling and Gridning pavement WB directionAC& JPCP PavementsRemove Temporary K-Railing and Permanent Striping WB direction (FullAlignmnet)Install OH Sign StructureInstall street lighting systemFinal Cleanup & Punch ListSR-91 WB Widening (Green River to SR-241)Classic Schedule Layout10-Jan-20 09:13Actual Level of EffortActual WorkRemaining WorkCritical Remaining WorkMilestonesummaryPage 3 of 3TASK filter: All Activities© Oracle CorporationDRAFT87 MODEL AGREEMENT - EXHIBIT "C" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT [___INSERT___] DRAFT88 FIRM PROJECT TASKS/ROLE COST Falcon Engineering Services Construction Management Services 3,362,106.29$ Z&K Consultants, Inc.Roadway/Structures Inspection 299,974.38 Converse Consultants Materials Testing 358,814.18 ZT Consultants, Inc.SIQMP/Source Inspection 95,372.83 David Evans & Assoc.Construction Surveying 292,663.34 Wood Biologist/Monitoring 48,025.56 4,456,956.58$ TOTAL COSTS 1 Commission authorization pertains to total contract award amount. Compensation adjustments between consultants may occur; however, the maximum total compensation authorized may not be exceeded. EXHIBIT "C" Prime Consultant: Sub Consultants: COMPENSATION SUMMARY1 DRAFT89 91 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT (1) Award of Construction Management Contract (2) Project Update Presented by: David Thomas, Toll Project Manager 1 Project Overview 2 •Outside pavement widening •Widening one undercrossing •New retaining walls •Reconstructing a portion of Green River Road •Replacing overhead signs •Adding high mast lighting Background 3 •March 2017, SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project opened •December 2017-April 2018 staff developed options to address hotspots •May 2018, Commission authorized scoping, environmental and final design activities for the 91 COP •December 2018, Commission authorized construction phase Construction Management Procurement 4 •Qualification based selection –Firm qualifications –Staffing and project organization –Project understanding and approach –Ability to respond to requirements in the RFQ •Procurement process –RFQ released on December 12, 2019 –70 firms downloaded the RFQ (15 located in Riverside County) –Pre-submittal meeting held on December 19 and attended by 16 firms –Staff responded to questions by January 9, 2020 –Four firms submitted responsive and responsible SOQs on January 23, 2020 Construction Management Procurement 5 •Evaluation committee shortlisted three firms to interview –Anser Advisory, LLC –Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. –Hill International, Inc. •Interviews conducted on February 27, 2020 –Evaluation committee evaluated both written and interview components –Recommend contract award to Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. •Scope of work, cost and schedule –Staff negotiated a fair and reasonable price –Pre-award audit was conducted Project Update 6 •Project acceleration techniques –Concurrent Scoping, PA/ED and PS&E (at risk) –Project Charter –Multi-agency coordination •PA/ED and PS&E completed •Fully Funded –$15M OCTA 91 Express Lanes surplus toll revenue –$2M RCTC 91 Express Lanes surplus toll revenue –$23.6M Federal STP and HIP (in process) •Utility work authorized 7 Recent Milestone Date PA&ED April 7, 2020 PS&E Approval /Approval to Advertise April 11, 2020 Utility relocation NTPs April 27, 2020 Construction Cooperative Agreement April 27, 2020 Federal Funding RFA May 1, 2020 Construction Management Contract Award May 13, 2020 (TBD) Project Update Project Update 8 •Construction schedule: –Advertise: June 2020 (subject to federal funding approval) –Award: September 2020 –Complete Construction: End of 2021 (completion incentives) •Team effort Board Action 9 •Award Agreement No. 20-31-033-00 to Falcon Engineering Services, Inc. in the amount of $4,456,957, plus a contingency amount of $445,695 for a total amount not to exceed $4,902,652; •Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal council review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; •Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the 91 COP; and •Authorize the expenditure of 91 Express Lanes toll revenue designated as surplus in accordance with the 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds Indenture to fund the 91 COP construction support expenditures in the amount of $2 million. AGENDA ITEM 7 Agenda Item 7 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Revised Fiscal Year 2020 and Fiscal Year 2021 Revenue Projections for Measure A, Local Transportation Fund, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the revised mid-year Fiscal Year 2019/20 revenue projections of $178 million for 2009 Measure A (Measure A) revenues, $91 million for Local Transportation Fund (LTF) revenues and $16 million for Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues; 2) Approve the revised FY 2020/21 revenue projections of $160 million for Measure A revenues, $82 million for LTF revenues, and $11 million for TUMF revenues; 3) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to Measure A revenues of $24 million and expenditures of $9.91 million to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 Measure A projection; 4) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to LTF revenues of $12 million, transfers in of $360,000, and expenditures and transfers out of $450,000 to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 LTF projection; and 5) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to TUMF revenues of $11 million to reflect the revised FY 2019/20 TUMF projection. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its January meeting, the Commission approved the mid-year FY 2019/20 and the FY 2020/21 revenue projections for Measure A, LTF, and TUMF revenues. Subsequently in March, the federal government as well as California’s Governor Newsom issued emergency declarations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, on March 19, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-33-20, a stay at home order to protect the health and well-being of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. The County of Riverside also issued a directive to county residents supporting the Governor’s executive order. 90 Agenda Item 7 COVID-19 and the related “stay at home” orders have negatively impacted the local, regional, state, and federal economies; the magnitude and duration of these impacts is uncertain. Nonetheless, Commission staff determined that it was critical to reassess the FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 revenue projections for Measure A, LTF, and TUMF to establish more realistic projections and expectations for the Commission’s FY 2020/21 budget and impacts on local jurisdictions. DISCUSSION: Measure A Sales Tax Revenues Measure A is the local half-cent transactions and use tax approved by Riverside County voters in November 2002. Measure A funds fund highway, regional arterial, local streets and roads, new corridors, economic development, bond financing, bus transit, commuter rail, commuter assistance, and specialized transportation projects in the three geographic areas of Riverside County, as defined in the Measure A Expenditure Plan. For the Measure A sales tax revenues, management analyzed each economic category (general retail, food products, transportation, construction, business to business, and miscellaneous) and underlying economic segments that generate Measure A sales tax. Management then estimated a percent change in each segment. For example, management estimated a 100 percent decrease in new and used auto sales (transportation); however, management estimated no change in food markets (food products category). The anticipated benefit of the Wayfair decision and implementation of internet sales taxes slightly offset the projected changes in Measure A sales tax revenues due to COVID-19. Management used the most recent benchmark year information from Q3 2019 (separate staff report at this meeting) to estimate a one-month net reduction in Measure A sales tax revenues. Management then applied the estimated monthly reduction to the last four months of FY 2019/20 and the first eight months of FY 2020/21. This reflects a conservative assumption that the COVID-19 impacts extend for a 12-month or one-year period. As a result of this analysis, management projects a significant decrease in the revised FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 Measure A revenues, as follows: Measure A Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 193,000,000 $ 207,000,000 Mid-year 202,000,000 N/A Revised 178,000,000 160,000,000 Decrease ($) 24,000,000 47,000,000 Decrease (%) 12% 22% 91 Agenda Item 7 LTF Sales Tax Revenues LTF sales tax revenues represent a quarter cent of the statewide sales tax and primarily fund transit requirements within the county in addition to planning and administration activities and bicycle and pedestrian projects. These revenues approximate 51 percent of Measure A sales tax revenues; management applied this percentage to the Measure A net reductions for the same period. Accordingly, management projects a significant decrease in the revised FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 LTF revenues, as follows: LTF Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 97,000,000 $ 106,000,000 Mid-year 103,000,000 N/A Revised 91,000,000 82,000,000 Decrease ($) 12,000,000 24,000,000 Decrease (%) 12% 23% TUMF Revenues TUMF revenues represent the Commission’s share of revenues generated from a development fee program administered by the Western Riverside Council of Governments. Local Western County jurisdictions collect fees charged to ensure new development pays for the new transportation facilities needed to accommodate growth. For TUMF revenues, management analyzed TUMF revenues for the first six months of FY 2019/20 and determined an average monthly TUMF revenue amount. The analysis showed a 14 percent decrease in TUMF revenues for the first half of FY 2019/20 compared to the same period for FY 2018/19. Additionally, actual revenues were tracking below the FY 2019/20 projections. Management assumed that TUMF revenues for the last four months of FY 2019/20 and the first eight months of FY 2020/21 would decrease to approximately 10 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of the average monthly TUMF revenue amount. This analysis resulted in the following revised FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 TUMF revenues: TUMF Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 25,000,000 $ 28,000,000 Mid-year 27,000,000 N/A Revised 16,000,000 11,000,000 Decrease ($) 11,000,000 17,000,000 Decrease (%) 41% 61% 92 Agenda Item 7 NEXT STEPS: In recent weeks, the Governor issued additional executive orders that impact the collection of sales tax revenues. Management has not determined the impact, if any, of these orders on the revised Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues. However, staff will continue to monitor FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 sales tax revenues to determine if any required adjustments to the revenue projections. Management recommends the Commission approve the revised revenue projections for FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21. Additionally, management recommends the following FY 2019/20 budget adjustments related to the revised FY 2019/20 revenue projections: • Measure A: $24 million decrease in revenues and related direct effect decreases of $7,331,000 and $2,579,000 on local streets and roads program and Coachella Valley highways and regional arterial expenditures, respectively; • LTF: $12 million decrease in revenues and related direct effect decreases of $360,000 and $90,000 on Commission and Southern California Association of Governments planning allocations, respectively; and • TUMF: $11 million decrease in revenues. While the revised FY 2019/20 revenue projections reflect significant decreases in revenues as a result of the COVID-19 impact, sufficient Measure A, LTF, and TUMF reserves are available to fund budgeted expenditures. However, even greater decreases anticipated in FY 2020/21 revenues may impact Commission programs and projects. Accordingly, staff requires additional time for the development of the FY 2020/21 budget. Staff anticipates that the FY 2020/21 budget will be presented at the June Commission meeting for a public hearing and adoption rather than a preliminary budget in May and final budget in June as in past years. While the FY 2020/21 budget will reflect the best available information at the time of adoption, management anticipates the need for subsequent budget adjustments throughout the year as the economic impacts of COVID-19 become clearer. Upon Commission approval of these revised revenue projections and related FY 2019/20 budget adjustments, staff will continue the development of the FY 2020/21 budget. Additionally, staff will provide this information to the local jurisdictions and transit operators for planning purposes. 93 Agenda Item 7 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2019/20 Amount: Decreases of: $47,360,000 sources $10,360,000 uses Source of Funds: 2009 Measure A, LTF, TUMF Budget Adjustment: Yes GL/Project Accounting No.: Measure A $ (5,683,000) 623999 401 40101 262 31 40101 revenues (2,062,000) 613999 401 40101 261 31 40101 revenues (1,137,000) 654199 401 40101 265 33 40101 revenues (284,000) 269 62 40101 revenues (355,000) 260 26 40101 revenues (118,000) 270 26 40101 revenues (279,000) 632199 401 40101 263 41 40101 revenues (1,671,000) 266 72 40101 revenues (5,404,000) 267 71 40101 revenues (1,505,000) 264 19 40101 revenues (223,000) 683999 401 40101 268 31 40101 revenues (2,579,000) 563999 401 40101 256 31 40101 revenues (1,804,000) 257 71 40101 revenues (773,000) 258 26 40101 revenues (123,000) 234 71 40101 revenues (5,404,000) 267 71 86104 expenditures (2,579,000) 256 31 86405 expenditures (1,804,000) 257 71 86104 expenditures (123,000) 234 71 86104 expenditures LTF $ (12,000,000) 601 62 40102 revenues (360,000) 601 62 97001 transfers out (360,000) 106 65 59001 transfers in (90,000) 601 62 86205 expenditures TUMF $ (5,500,000) 725000 416 41607 210 72 42110 revenues (5,500,000) 735000 416 41607 210 73 42110 revenues Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/16/2020 94 Agenda Item 7 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2020/21 Amount: Decreases in revenues of $47,000,000 Measure A; $24 million LTF; and $17,000,000 TUMF Source of Funds: 2009 Measure A, LTF, TUMF Budget Adjustment: N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: Measure A $ (11,146,000) 623999 401 40101 262 31 40101 revenues (4,043,000) 613999 401 40101 261 31 40101 revenues (2,230,000) 654199 401 40101 265 33 40101 revenues (557,000) 269 62 40101 revenues (697,000) 260 26 40101 revenues (233,000) 270 26 40101 revenues (546,000) 632199 401 40101 263 41 40101 revenues (3,278,000) 266 72 40101 revenues (10,599,000) 267 71 40101 revenues (2,950,000) 264 19 40101 revenues (437,000) 683999 401 40101 268 31 40101 revenues (5,040,000) 563999 401 40101 256 31 40101 revenues (3,528,000) 257 71 40101 revenues (1,512,000) 258 26 40101 revenues (204,000) 234 71 40101 revenues LTF $ (24,000,000) 601 62 40102 revenues TUMF $ (8,500,000) 725000 416 41607 210 72 42110 revenues (8,500,000) 735000 416 41607 210 73 42110 revenues Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/16/2020 Attachments: 1) Measure A Program Allocation FY 2019/20 Revised for COVID-19 Impacts 2) Measure A Program Allocation FY 2020/21 Revised for COVID-19 Impacts 3) Riverside County LTF FY 2019/20 Apportionment Revised for COVID-19 Impacts 4) Riverside County LTF FY 2020/21 Apportionment Revised for COVID-19 Impacts Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on April 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 95 Revised Projection (3/30/2020) Revised Projection (1/8/2020) Original Projection (1/9/2019) Increase (Decrease) Projected Measure A Revenues 178,000,000$ 202,000,000$ 193,000,000$ (24,000,000)$ Less: Administration 2 - - - Projected Apportionment to Programs: Western County Highway Improvements (262)42,146,000$ 47,829,000$ 45,698,000$ (5,683,000)$ New Corridors (261)15,288,000 17,350,000 16,577,000 (2,062,000) Public Transit Commuter Rail (265)8,429,000 9,566,000 9,140,000 (1,137,000) Intercity Bus (269)2,107,000 2,391,000 2,285,000 (284,000) Specialized Transit-Operations (260)2,634,000 2,989,000 2,856,000 (355,000) Specialized Transit-CTSA (270)878,000 996,000 952,000 (118,000) Commuter Services (263)2,066,000 2,345,000 2,240,000 (279,000) Regional Arterial (266)12,396,000 14,067,000 13,441,000 (1,671,000) Local Streets & Roads (267)40,081,000 45,485,000 43,458,000 (5,404,000) BANNING 578,000 656,000 627,000 (78,000) BEAUMONT 922,000 1,046,000 1,000,000 (124,000) CALIMESA 168,000 190,000 182,000 (22,000) CANYON LAKE 182,000 207,000 197,000 (25,000) CORONA 4,137,000 4,695,000 4,486,000 (558,000) EASTVALE 1,325,000 1,503,000 1,436,000 (178,000) HEMET 1,712,000 1,942,000 1,856,000 (230,000) JURUPA VALLEY 2,049,000 2,325,000 2,221,000 (276,000) LAKE ELSINORE 1,329,000 1,508,000 1,441,000 (179,000) MENIFEE 1,704,000 1,934,000 1,847,000 (230,000) MORENO VALLEY 3,918,000 4,446,000 4,248,000 (528,000) MURRIETA 2,376,000 2,697,000 2,577,000 (321,000) NORCO 658,000 746,000 713,000 (88,000) PERRIS 1,847,000 2,096,000 2,003,000 (249,000) RIVERSIDE 7,274,000 8,254,000 7,886,000 (980,000) SAN JACINTO 855,000 970,000 927,000 (115,000) TEMECULA 2,961,000 3,361,000 3,211,000 (400,000) WILDOMAR 627,000 711,000 680,000 (84,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 5,459,000 6,198,000 5,920,000 (739,000) Bond Financing (264)11,156,000 12,661,000 12,096,000 (1,505,000) Economic Development Projects (268)1,653,000 1,876,000 1,792,000 (223,000) SUBTOTAL-Western County 138,834,000 157,555,000 150,535,000 (18,721,000) Coachella Valley Highways & Regional Arterials (256)19,126,000 21,705,000 20,738,000 (2,579,000) Local Street & Roads (257)13,389,000 15,193,000 14,516,000 (1,804,000) CATHEDRAL CITY 1,418,000 1,609,000 1,537,000 (191,000) COACHELLA 579,000 657,000 628,000 (78,000) DESERT HOT SPRINGS 468,000 531,000 507,000 (63,000) INDIAN WELLS 246,000 279,000 267,000 (33,000) INDIO 1,894,000 2,149,000 2,054,000 (255,000) LA QUINTA 1,466,000 1,664,000 1,590,000 (198,000) PALM DESERT 2,622,000 2,975,000 2,842,000 (353,000) PALM SPRINGS 2,066,000 2,345,000 2,240,000 (279,000) RANCHO MIRAGE 890,000 1,010,000 965,000 (120,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 1,740,000 1,974,000 1,886,000 (234,000) Specialized & Public Transit (258)5,738,000 6,511,000 6,221,000 (773,000) SUBTOTAL-Coachella Valley 38,253,000 43,409,000 41,475,000 (5,156,000) Palo Verde Valley Local Street & Roads (234)913,000 1,036,000 990,000 (123,000) BLYTHE 721,000 819,000 782,000 (98,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 192,000 217,000 208,000 (25,000) SUBTOTAL-Palo Verde Valley 913,000 1,036,000 990,000 (123,000) TOTAL 178,000,000$ 202,000,000$ 193,000,000$ (24,000,000)$ Notes: 1 Estimate for planning purposes, subject to change and rounding differences. 2 Administrative costs are allocated in accordance with a cost allocation plan on a quarterly basis. Accordingly, the Measure A allocations to each geographic area by program will be reduced for such quarterly cost allocations. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A PROGRAM ALLOCATION (PROJECTION)1 FY 2019/20 (Revised 3/30/2020) N:\MEASURES\Meas A FY20\REVISED_2020 Measure A Revenue Projections_3.30.2020_COVID-19 4/13/20208:00 AM ATTACHMENT 1 96 Revised Projection (3/30/2020) Original Projection (1/8/2020) Increase (Decrease) Projected Measure A Revenues 160,000,000$ 207,000,000$ (47,000,000)$ Less: Administration 2 - - - Projected Apportionment to Programs: Western County Highway Improvements (262)37,942,000$ 49,088,000$ (11,146,000)$ New Corridors (261)13,763,000 17,806,000 (4,043,000) Public Transit Commuter Rail (265)7,588,000 9,818,000 (2,230,000) Intercity Bus (269)1,897,000 2,454,000 (557,000) Specialized Transit-Operations (260)2,371,000 3,068,000 (697,000) Specialized Transit-CTSA (270)790,000 1,023,000 (233,000) Commuter Services (263)1,860,000 2,406,000 (546,000) Regional Arterial (266)11,160,000 14,438,000 (3,278,000) Local Streets & Roads (267)36,083,000 46,682,000 (10,599,000) BANNING 516,000 668,000 (152,000) BEAUMONT 825,000 1,067,000 (242,000) CALIMESA 154,000 200,000 (46,000) CANYON LAKE 168,000 218,000 (50,000) CORONA 3,655,000 4,729,000 (1,074,000) EASTVALE 1,187,000 1,536,000 (349,000) HEMET 1,537,000 1,989,000 (452,000) JURUPA VALLEY 1,851,000 2,395,000 (544,000) LAKE ELSINORE 1,172,000 1,517,000 (345,000) MENIFEE 1,553,000 2,010,000 (457,000) MORENO VALLEY 3,501,000 4,530,000 (1,029,000) MURRIETA 2,180,000 2,821,000 (641,000) NORCO 578,000 748,000 (170,000) PERRIS 1,667,000 2,157,000 (490,000) RIVERSIDE 6,499,000 8,408,000 (1,909,000) SAN JACINTO 775,000 1,003,000 (228,000) TEMECULA 2,783,000 3,601,000 (818,000) WILDOMAR 565,000 730,000 (165,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 4,917,000 6,355,000 (1,438,000) - Bond Financing (264)10,044,000 12,994,000 (2,950,000) Economic Development Projects (268)1,488,000 1,925,000 (437,000) SUBTOTAL-Western County 124,986,000 161,702,000 (36,716,000) Coachella Valley Highways & Regional Arterials (256)17,159,000 22,199,000 (5,040,000) Local Street & Roads (257)12,011,000 15,539,000 (3,528,000) CATHEDRAL CITY 1,233,000 1,596,000 (363,000) COACHELLA 531,000 687,000 (156,000) DESERT HOT SPRINGS 421,000 544,000 (123,000) INDIAN WELLS 230,000 297,000 (67,000) INDIO 1,681,000 2,175,000 (494,000) LA QUINTA 1,299,000 1,681,000 (382,000) PALM DESERT 2,391,000 3,094,000 (703,000) PALM SPRINGS 1,918,000 2,482,000 (564,000) RANCHO MIRAGE 789,000 1,020,000 (231,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 1,518,000 1,963,000 (445,000) Specialized & Public Transit (258)5,148,000 6,660,000 (1,512,000) SUBTOTAL-Coachella Valley 34,318,000 44,398,000 (10,080,000) Palo Verde Valley Local Street & Roads (234)696,000 900,000 (204,000) BLYTHE 548,000 709,000 (161,000) RIVERSIDE COUNTY 148,000 191,000 (43,000) SUBTOTAL-Palo Verde Valley 696,000 900,000 (204,000) TOTAL 160,000,000$ 207,000,000$ (47,000,000)$ Notes: 1 Estimate for planning purposes, subject to change and rounding differences. 2 Administrative costs are allocated in accordance with a cost allocation plan on a quarterly basis. Accordingly, the Measure A allocations to each geographic area by program will be reduced for such quarterly cost allocations. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 (Revised (3/30/2020) MEASURE A PROGRAM ALLOCATION (PROJECTION)1 ATTACHMENT 2 97 Revised Revised Original Projection Projection Projection (Decrease) (3/30/2020)(1/8/2020)(1/9/2019)Increase Estimated Carryover (Unapportioned)17,983,000$ 17,983,000$ -$ -$ Estimated Receipts1 91,000,000 103,000,000 97,000,000 (12,000,000) TOTAL 108,983,000 120,983,000 97,000,000 (12,000,000) Less: County Auditor-Controller Administration 12,000 12,000 12,000 - Less: Estimated RCTC Administration2 1,100,000 1,100,000 1,100,000 - Less: RCTC Planning (3% of revenues)3,269,000 3,629,000 2,910,000 (360,000) Less: SCAG Planning (3/4 of 1% of revenues)817,000 907,000 728,000 (90,000) BALANCE 103,785,000 115,335,000 92,250,000 (11,550,000) Less: SB 821 (2% of balance)2,076,000 2,307,000 1,845,000 (231,000) BALANCE AVAILABLE BEFORE RESERVES 101,709,000 113,028,000 90,405,000 (11,319,000) Less: 10% Transit Reserves 10,171,000 11,303,000 9,041,000 (1,132,000) BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR APPORTIONMENT 91,538,000$ 101,725,000$ 81,364,000$ (10,187,000)$ FY 2019/20 Revised FY 2019/20 Revised FY 2019/20 Original Population Apportionment Apportionment Apportionment (Decrease) APPORTIONMENT Population % of Total (3/30/2020)(1/8/2020)(1/9/2019)Increase Western:1,923,562 79.62%72,882,000$ 80,992,000$ 64,781,000$ (8,110,000)$ Rail 22%16,034,000 17,818,000 14,252,000 (1,784,000) Transit 78%56,848,000 63,174,000 50,529,000 (6,326,000) Coachella Valley 466,366 19.30%17,670,000 19,637,000 15,706,000 (1,967,000) Palo Verde Valley 26,027 1.08%986,000 1,096,000 877,000 (110,000) 2,415,955 100.00%91,538,000$ 101,725,000$ 81,364,000$ (10,187,000)$ ALLOCATION OF TRANSIT RESERVES (in accordance with Reserve Policy adopted January 12, 2005): Western: Rail 1,782,000$ Transit: RTA 5,285,000$ Banning 159,000 Beaumont 270,000 Corona 189,000 Riverside 413,000 Subtotal Transit 6,316,000$ 6,316,000 Subtotal Western 8,098,000 Coachella Valley 1,963,000 Palo Verde Valley 110,000 Total Reserves 10,171,000$ NOTES: 1 Estimate for planning purposes, subject to change and rounding differences. Rounded to the nearest thousand. 2 Amount is an estimate; administrative costs are allocated in accordance with a cost allocation plan on a quarterly basis. Population Source: California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit as of January 1, 2018. Allocation of reserves: FY 2018/19 SRTP funding allocations approved 7/11/18. RIVERSIDE COUNTY LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND FY 2019/20 APPORTIONMENT (REVISED 03/30/2020) N:\LTF\LTF Projections\2019-2020 Apportionments_REVISED MidYr_03.30.2020_COVID-19 4/13/20207:56 AM ATTACHMENT 3 98 Revised Original Projection Projection (Decrease) (3/30/2020)(1/8/2020)Increase Estimated Carryover (Unapportioned)-$ -$ -$ Estimated Receipts1 82,000,000 106,000,000 (24,000,000) TOTAL 82,000,000 106,000,000 (24,000,000) Less: County Auditor-Controller Administration 12,000 12,000 - Less: Estimated RCTC Administration2 1,000,000 1,000,000 - Less: RCTC Planning (3% of revenues)2,460,000 3,180,000 (720,000) Less: SCAG Planning (3/4 of 1% of revenues)615,000 795,000 (180,000) BALANCE 77,913,000 101,013,000 (23,100,000) Less: SB 821 (2% of balance)1,558,000 2,020,000 (462,000) BALANCE AVAILABLE BEFORE RESERVES 76,355,000 98,993,000 (22,638,000) Less: 10% Transit Reserves 7,636,000 9,899,000 (2,263,000) BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR APPORTIONMENT 68,719,000$ 89,094,000$ (20,375,000)$ FY 2020/21 Revised FY 2020/21 Original Population Apportionment Apportionment (Decrease) APPORTIONMENT Population % of Total (3/30/2020)(1/8/2020)Increase Western: 1,941,646 79.57% 54,680,000$ 70,894,000$ (16,214,000)$ Rail 22%12,030,000 15,597,000 (3,567,000) Transit 78%42,650,000 55,297,000 (12,647,000) Coachella Valley 472,427 19.36%13,305,000 17,249,000 (3,944,000) Palo Verde Valley 26,051 1.07%734,000 951,000 (217,000) 2,440,124 100.00%68,719,000$ 89,094,000$ (20,375,000)$ ALLOCATION OF TRANSIT RESERVES (in accordance with Reserve Policy adopted January 12, 2005): Western: Rail 1,337,000$ Transit: RTA 3,949,000$ Banning 120,000 Beaumont 220,000 Corona 134,000 Riverside 315,000 Subtotal Transit 4,738,000$ 4,738,000 Subtotal Western 6,075,000 Coachella Valley 1,478,000 Palo Verde Valley 82,000 Total Reserves 7,635,000$ NOTES: 1 Estimate for planning purposes, subject to change and rounding differences. Rounded to the nearest thousand. 2 Amount is an estimate; administrative costs are allocated in accordance with a cost allocation plan on a quarterly basis. Population Source: California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit as of January 1, 2019. Allocation of reserves: FY 2019/20 SRTP funding allocations approved 7/10/19. RIVERSIDE COUNTY LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND FY 2020/21 APPORTIONMENT N:\LTF\LTF Projections\2020-2021 Apportionments_Original_Revised03.30.20_COVID-19.xlsx 3/31/20208:13 AM ATTACHMENT 4 99 REVISED REVENUE PROJECTIONS FY 2020 and FY 2021 Measure A, Local Transportation Fund and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Theresia Trevino 1 FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections COVID-19 Impact MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 2 FY 2021 Budget Development Duration Magnitude Economic FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Measure A Sales Tax MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 3 Projected adjustment for 12-month period Last 4 months FY 2020 = $24 million First 8 months FY 2021 = $47 million Determined one-month impact = $6.4 million decrease Based on year ended Q3 2019 Offset by internet sales tax = $0.4 million Estimated COVID-19 impact on economic segments in each category General retail Food products Transportation Construction Business to business Miscellaneous FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Economic Category Impacts MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 4 $- $500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,500,000 $4,000,000 $4,500,000 $5,000,000 General Retail Food Products Transportation Construction Business to Business Miscellaneous Comparison of Monthly Revenue -Before & After COVID-19 Monthly Revenue YE 9/30/19 Mo. Revenue After COVID-19 Reduction FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Revised Measure A Revenues MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 5 Measure A Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 193,000,000 $ 207,000,000 Mid-year 202,000,000 N/A Revised 178,000,000 160,000,000 Decrease ($) 24,000,000 47,000,000 Decrease (%) 12% 22% FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Revised LTF Revenues MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 6 LTF about 51% of Measure A •One month net impact = $3.1 million decrease •Gross impact = $3.3 million decrease •Offset by $0.2 million internet sales tax •FY 2020 adjustment = $12 million FY 2021 adjustment = $24 million LTF Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 97,000,000 $ 106,000,000 Mid-year 103,000,000 N/A Revised 91,000,000 82,000,000 Decrease ($) 12,000,000 24,000,000 Decrease (%) 12% 23% FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Revised TUMF Revenues MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 7 Reviewed FY 2020 TUMF revenues through December •14% lower than FY 2019 comparable period •Average of $2 million/month FY 2020 projection = $16 million •Assumed first 8 months at 100% of average monthly revenue •Assumed last 4 months at 10% of average monthly revenue FY 2021 projection = $11 million •Assumed first 8 months at 20% of average monthly revenue •Assumed last 4 months at 100% of average monthly revenue TUMF Projection FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 Original $ 25,000,000 $ 28,000,000 Mid-year 27,000,000 N/A Revised 16,000,000 11,000,000 Decrease ($) 11,000,000 17,000,000 Decrease (%) 41% 61% FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Future Considerations MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 8 Impacts of Executive Orders related to deferral of sales tax payments by sellers Changes in revised projection assumptions compared to actual trends Completion of FY 2021 Budget •Public hearing at June meeting •Adoption at June meeting FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Preliminary FY 2020/21 Budget MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 9 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax 160,000,000$ LTF Sales Tax 82,000,000 STA Sales Tax 29,000,000 Federal, State & Local Reimbursements 277,000,000 TUMF 16,000,000 Tolls, Penalties and Fees 42,000,000 Other Revenues 4,000,000 Total Revenues 610,000,000 Expenditures Personnel Salaries and Benefits 11,000,000 Professional Services/Support Costs 38,000,000 Projects and Operations 658,000,000 Debt Service 77,000,000 Capital Outlay 6,000,000 Total Expenditures 790,000,000 Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures (180,000,000) Other Financing Sources (Uses), net TIFIA Loan Proceeds 47,000,000 Toll Debt Refinancing, net 21,000,000 Total Other Financing Sources, net 68,000,000 Beginning Fund Balance 821,000,000 Ending Fund Balance 709,000,000$ Project-driven budget Availability of reserves reflects conservative management Revised revenue projections Personnel costs remain low Uncertainty requires continuing reevaluation FY 2020 and FY 2021 Revised Revenue Projections Staff Recommendations MAY 13, 2020 COMMISSION MEETING 10 •Approve revised FY 2020 projections •$178 million for Measure A •$91 million for LTF •$16 million for TUMF#1 •Approve revised FY 2021 projections •$160 million for Measure A •$82 million for LTF •$11 million for TUMF#2 •Approve related budget adjustments#3-5 QUESTIONS & COMMENTS 11 AGENDA ITEM 8 Agenda Item 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager Matt Wallace, Procurement Administrator Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multimodal Services Director Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director Steve DeBaun, General Counsel SUBJECT: Adoption of Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to adopt the Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The proposed final Traffic Relief Plan represents the vision, values, and long-term transportation priorities of Riverside County residents, leaders, and community stakeholders. The Traffic Relief Plan contains: • A roadmap for expenditure of $8.8 billion in potential future funding; • Policies to ensure equity and balance of investments; • Accountability requirements; and • Locally-driven implementation in each of Riverside County’s distinct subregions The Commission approved the draft Traffic Relief Plan on January 8, 2020. The Commission’s Traffic Relief Strategy Committee developed the draft plan between September and December 2019. The Committee thoroughly vetted the contents of the draft plan in public meetings and recommended each element of the plan to the Commission for approval. The draft plan was presented to the residents of Riverside County through a comprehensive Commission-approved public engagement program. The public engagement activities resulted in significant response, which is documented in Attachment 2. The final Traffic Relief Plan contains several changes based upon public input and recommendations from legal counsel. In summary, those changes are: • Two projects added in Western Riverside County – The final plan adds the I-10/Main Street interchange in Cabazon and Limonite Avenue Gap Closure based on input from the Morongo Band of Mission Indians and the city of Eastvale, respectively; 100 Agenda Item 8 • Palo Verde Valley plan amended – At the request of the city of Blythe, the plan now covers I-10 interchanges and gateway enhancement projects and directs all funds generated through the plan in the Palo Verde Valley to the city of Blythe and County of Riverside, consistent with Measure A. Transit remains an eligible expenditure; • New Technology flexibility clarified – Many members of the public commented that the New Technology expenditure category was vague and needed more detail. The Committee and Commission have previously expressed a desire to remain adaptable to yet-unknown advances in technology. Language was added to convey this intent; • Language modified – Legal counsel amended language throughout the plan to ensure the document is suitable to be placed on the ballot in the future, if the Commission so chooses; and • Compliance with state laws and regulations emphasized – The final plan makes clear that it is not a “project” under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) – a similar statement is made in this staff report below. Additionally, a portion of the funds generated through the plan will be devoted to satisfying the requirements of SB 743, state law requiring particular analysis and mitigation of project impacts, and implementing regulations. An additional expenditure category was created in the plan to highlight this expenditure type. The plan’s new language on mitigation of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) also provides a policy foundation for the Commission to begin addressing VMT as necessary. Qualitative results from the survey offered at trafficreliefplan.org demonstrate a clear majority support for the plan overall, as well as for each of the proposed expenditure categories. Public sentiment data gathered through social media also demonstrates net public support for the plan. Public input collected since the Commission approved the draft Traffic Relief Plan in January is consistent with results of the #RebootMyCommute initiative in 2019 and prior quantitative surveys. Staff halted a final, statistically relevant, quantitative survey due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the Commission’s action on April 8, 2020 to decline to place the plan on the November 2020 ballot. Based on all quantitative and qualitative research conducted to date on public opinion in Riverside County, staff is confident that the proposed final Traffic Relief Plan enjoys support from well more than a majority of residents. The Traffic Relief Plan has independent utility as an aspirational planning document supported by grassroots public input. The Commission can use the Traffic Relief Plan as a reference point for future decisions. The projects and services within the plan are unlikely to be delivered without a funding source. Measure A remains the Commission’s most significant funding source and is tied to specific projects and programs approved by Riverside County voters in 2002. Facts demonstrate that Measure A revenue and status quo funding from state, federal, toll, and development fee programs will not be sufficient to deliver all projects in the Measure A expenditure plan before Measure A sunsets, let alone the additional projects in the Traffic Relief Plan. The Traffic Relief Plan fulfills the objectives of the Commission-adopted 2016 RCTC Strategic Assessment and meets the requirements of Public Utilities Code Section 240302. 101 Agenda Item 8 Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act This Traffic Relief Plan is not a “project” under the CEQA and, alternatively, is exempt from CEQA review. This is because the Traffic Relief Plan is intended to provide a funding mechanism for potential future projects and programs related to the Commission’s provision of transportation services. However, the Commission is not approving the construction of any projects or programs that may result in any direct or indirect physical change in the environment; future voter approval is required prior to the establishment of any funding mechanism as set forth in Public Utilities Code Section 240301; and all appropriate state and federal environmental review will be required and completed prior to any future approval of specific transportation projects and programs. Attachments: 1) Final Traffic Relief Plan 2) Executive Summary of Public Engagement for Traffic Relief Plan 102 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN A local strategy to improve traffic flow, safety, and economic opportunity in Riverside County ATTACHMENT 1 103 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Table of Contents Overview of the Traffic Relief Plan ...................................................................................................1 Accountability to Taxpayers .............................................................................................................3 Equity and Balance ..........................................................................................................................4 Traffic Relief Plan: Your Guide to Projects and Services ..................................................................6 Coachella Valley ..............................................................................................................................7 Palo Verde Valley (Blythe) ................................................................................................................9 Western Riverside County .............................................................................................................10 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 104 Your voice. Your plan. The Traffic Relief Plan is a local strategy to reduce traffic bottlenecks, improve safety, and help create a stronger, more sustainable economy for our communities. You and thousands of your neighbors expressed your thoughts about this plan and how you want to improve transportation in Riverside County. From freeways that move faster, to more frequent trains, and specific local streets that need upgrades, you told us that these improvements will make a difference to your life. You also told us that creating more jobs in Riverside County can help solve these transportation issues. We’ve listened. Highlights of the Traffic Relief Plan include: • Improving freeway traffic flow on I-10, I-15, the 60, 91, and I-215 by adding lanes, upgrading on- and off-ramps and bridges, and increasing bus and Metrolink frequencies. • Improving traffic flow and safety on major roads such as Alessandro Boulevard, Bob Hope Drive, Bundy Canyon Road, Clinton Keith Road, Cook Street, Fred Waring Drive, Heacock Street, Highway 111, Indian Canyon Drive, Keller Road, Limonite Avenue, Monroe Street, Redlands Boulevard, Sun Lake Boulevard, Temescal Canyon Road, and Van Buren Boulevard. • Safety improvements on highly-traveled two-lane roads such as Gilman Springs Road and Grand Avenue and at intersections with railroad tracks. • Safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists including for children going to and from school. • Increasing frequency of Metrolink train service by adding new tracks and more trains, and making existing train service more sustainable over the long-term. • Improving the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley by accelerating completion of a new east-west highway called the Mid County Parkway and a new Route 79, and extending Metrolink service to Hemet and San Jacinto. • Increasing frequency and convenience of express bus services throughout Riverside County, enabling more commuters to use alternatives to driving, complete with wi-fi enabled buses. • Improving the condition of existing roads by providing funds to local governments for basic pothole repairs, paving of dirt roads, and synchronizing signals. • Providing more independence and opportunity for residents who rely on public transportation services, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, students, and residents of rural communities. • Using new technologies that can improve the efficiency and safety of the current roadway and public transit systems, paving the way for connected and autonomous vehicles. • Completing the regional trail system in Riverside County to improve safe routes to school, and offer bicycle commuting for those who would take their cars off the road at commute times. • Constructing rail stations in the Coachella Valley and San Gorgonio Pass to prepare for daily train service to the desert from L.A. via Riverside and Orange County. OVERVIEW OF THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 1 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Voter Approval: This Traffic Relief Plan was drafted to serve as an expenditure plan for a possible voter-approved RCTC sales tax measure. Until a sales tax measure to fund the plan is placed before the voters and approved, the plan is aspirational and the financial and other mandatory requirements of the plan are not operative. 105 The Traffic Relief Plan represents a change in the thinking of the past by: • Encouraging more local employment. Incentives are created for cities to plan for local job-creation and the infrastructure to support those new jobs so residents can have careers closer to home. • Addressing the toughest bottlenecks and traffic problems. Speeding up how quickly new lanes and public transit options can be implemented where traffic is the worst and funding is not otherwise available. • Connecting our own county. The Traffic Relief Plan prioritizes modernizing the transportation system within Riverside County. • Providing small, rural, and underserved communities with necessary infrastructure. • Implementing new technology that can increase efficiency of existing infrastructure, increase convenience of public transportation, and prepare for autonomous and connected vehicles. • All funds will stay local. Coachella Valley funds stay in the Coachella Valley. Western Riverside County funds stay in Western Riverside County. Palo Verde Valley (Blythe) funds stay in Palo Verde Valley. Sacramento and D.C. cannot take these locally-controlled funds. • More funds to speed up projects. Many transportation improvements that Riverside County residents have said they want are decades away. The Traffic Relief Plan would provide funding to speed up completion of these projects. • Local leaders representing every city and unincorporated community in Riverside County will oversee implementation of the Traffic Relief Plan. These leaders serve on the board of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), which is the legally responsible public entity for regional transportation planning and funding in Riverside County. To ensure local control in the Coachella Valley, RCTC will delegate implementation of the Traffic Relief Plan to the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). The Blythe City Council and County Board of Supervisors will implement the Traffic Relief Plan in the Palo Verde Valley. • Independent financial audits are required and must be disclosed to the public to ensure that the Traffic Relief Plan is being implemented lawfully and in accordance with the will of voters. • No more than 1% of net revenues generated by the Traffic Relief Plan will be used for administrative salaries and benefits to administer the entire Plan. OVERVIEW OF THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 2Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Questions? If you have questions about the Traffic Relief Plan, please contact the Riverside County Transportation Commission at info@rctc.org or 951-787-7141. 106 Independent Audits Required Upon voter approval of a revenue source for the Plan, no less than annually, RCTC will obtain an independent fiscal audit of the expenditure of all funds raised through the Plan. The audit will determine compliance with requirements of the Plan and its governing Ordinance. The audit will be published on the internet. Efficiency and Local Control Local Voice. Local Control. Riverside County voters will enact the Plan, which will then be implemented through their locally elected representatives and local public works professionals. By law, the Plan is implemented by RCTC, which is governed by local city council members or mayors of every city and all five members of the County Board of Supervisors. No Money Diverted to Sacramento and Washington. State and federal governments cannot legally divert, take, or direct funds raised through this local Plan and its governing ordinance. Fiscal Accountability and Efficiency. Administrative salaries and benefits to administer the Plan are limited to no more than 1% of net revenues generated under the Plan’s governing ordinance. Implementation of this Plan will not require the creation of any new government entity. To achieve efficiency and local control, RCTC may delegate appropriate responsibilities for administering components of the Plan to existing local governments at its discretion. Transparency and Openness Implementation of the Plan will occur in compliance with all transparency, disclosure, and open meetings laws. Mandatory Plan Review and Updates Through a public process, RCTC must formally review this Plan at least every 10 years after it takes effect to ensure the Plan reflects the current and anticipated future needs of Riverside County’s residents. If RCTC wishes to amend the Plan after its review or at any other point in time, RCTC must follow current state law and this Plan’s voter-approved governing ordinance to do so. Innovation and Partnership To reduce the burden on taxpayers to fully fund the transportation needs of Riverside County, there are opportunities to partner with the private sector to offset costs, generate revenue to pay for public services and projects, or increase the efficiency of existing infrastructure. Where the law allows and adequate public benefits can be demonstrated, RCTC may use Plan funds to partner with non-governmental entities on projects, services, and technologies. Examples of potential partnerships include, but are not limited to, joint development of rail stations, leasing of RCTC property, ride-sharing and alternative transportation services, construction of rail tracks on private rights of way, and partnering on advanced roadway and vehicle technologies that improve traffic flow or reduce emissions. Flexibility to Expedite Projects To expedite priority projects and services, reduce costs to taxpayers, or avoid loss of other funding, RCTC may make maximum use of funds by temporarily shifting funds between transportation purposes. In borrowing and making loans, the proportionate shares for areas and purposes over the duration of the Plan may not be changed without an amendment of the Plan as required by law. RCTC may issue bonds or other debt against future revenue to achieve any objectives of the Plan. RCTC will issue bonds or other debt in accordance with applicable laws. The issuances of bonds or other debt will be limited by a threshold adopted by RCTC in a public meeting compliant with open meetings laws. ACCOUNTABILITY TO TAXPAYERS 3 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 107 Equity among Regions and Residents Many residents of Riverside County live in areas that lack infrastructure and public transportation services. A growing number of residents face increasing traffic congestion. Therefore, the Traffic Relief Plan commits to providing equity for Riverside County residents in the following ways: Geography The Plan recognizes the three distinct subregions of Riverside County and ensures that revenues raised by the Plan in each subregion remain there and cannot be moved to other parts of the county: • Coachella Valley • Palo Verde Valley (Blythe area) • Western Riverside County (Riverside and Corona areas, Moreno Valley and Perris areas, Hemet-San Jacinto Valley, San Gorgonio Pass, and Temecula-Murrieta-Lake Elsinore areas) Small, Rural, Underserved Communities Decisions based on needs. Priority for investments in areas requiring significant infrastructure repairs and upgrades will be determined based on objective needs. Maintenance of local roads. All communities will have access to new funding to keep local streets and roads in good condition. Increased options for residents. The Traffic Relief Plan places significant focus on seniors, students, veterans, individuals with disabilities, and residents of rural and underserved communities who use public transportation regularly. Balanced Transportation System The Traffic Relief Plan recognizes all types of transportation needs for Riverside County. Proactively addressing the transportation issues in Riverside County requires a flexible and all-of-the-above approach. Mitigation of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) The Traffic Relief Plan makes significant improvements to the roadway network in Riverside County through adding lanes and improving efficiency through technology. Recent laws and regulations governing implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) for transportation projects require mitigation for any increases to the amount of miles driven by automobiles (referred to as “vehicle miles traveled” or “VMT”). Practically, obtaining state approvals of projects that increase the number of lanes on roads and highways will be very difficult without mitigating increases in VMT resulting from those projects. Mitigation of increased VMT for major transportation projects under state CEQA law can take many forms, including but not limited to: • Public transportation, • Commuting strategies such as ride-sharing, telecommuting, alternative schedules, • Creating employment in Riverside County to reduce commute distances, • Habitat and open space preservation, and • New technologies. EQUITY AND BALANCE 4Traffic Relief Plan 2020 108 EQUITY AND BALANCE 5 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act The Traffic Relief Plan is not a “project” under the California Environmental Quality Act and, therefore, is exempt from CEQA review. This is because the Plan is designed to provide a funding mechanism for potential future projects and programs related to the Commission’s provision of transportation services. However, the Commission is not approving the construction of any projects that may result in a direct or indirect physical change in the environment; future voter approval is required prior to establishing any funding mechanism as set forth in Public Utilities Code Section 240301; and all appropriate state and federal environmental review will be required and completed prior to any future approval of specific projects. 109 Investment Types The Plan includes nine investment types. In the Coachella Valley, all investment types are funded through the valleywide Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS). In Western Riverside County, a specific percentage of funding is reserved for each investment type, with several sub-types. In the Palo Verde Valley (Blythe), funds can be used on any investment type below. Roads – Widening and extending major roadways for traffic flow and safety; repairing potholes and repaving roads; adding stop signs, signals and other safety features; retrofitting bridges; coordinating traffic signal timing on major streets; adding crosswalks, sidewalks and signage for pedestrians, especially for students traveling to and from school; and separating streets from railroad tracks Highways – Adding lanes to the 91, 60, Interstate 15, and Interstate 215, improving traffic flow on Highway 111 and Interstate 10 in the Coachella Valley, and constructing the Mid County Parkway and a new Route 79 Highway Access – Building and improving interchanges, bridges, on-ramps and off-ramps with interstates and state routes Trains – Increasing frequency and safety of Metrolink trains; building new tracks, parking and stations; extending service from Perris to Hemet and San Jacinto, and building stations in the San Gorgonio Pass and Coachella Valley to support daily passenger service between L.A. and the Coachella Valley; sustaining operation of rail service throughout the county Buses – Expanding express/rapid bus service options; modernizing and adding zero-emission buses; providing targeted transit services and keeping bus fares low for seniors, veterans, students and individuals with disabilities; upgrading bus stops and amenities; and improving connections between home, transit and workplaces Commuter Assistance – Expanding Freeway Service Patrol roadside assistance and maintaining and expanding carpool/vanpool service and Park & Ride Lots Trails – Expanding and improving access to hiking, cycling, and walking/running by completing Riverside County’s master-planned regional trail system to improve safe routes to school, and offer safe bicycle commuting for those who would take their cars off the road at commute times New Technology – Using innovation and new technology to improve traffic flow, provide better information to travelers, improve movement of commerce and support local and regional economic development Flood and Dust Control – Reinforcing roadways and infrastructure against natural hazards in the Coachella Valley TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN: YOUR GUIDE TO PROJECTS & SERVICES 6Traffic Relief Plan 2020 110 RanchoMirage Palm Springs PalmDesert IndianWells La Quinta Indio DesertHot Springs Coachella CathedralCity Hemet BeaumontBanning Ramon Rd Var n e r R d Fred Waring Dr Country Club Dr Dinah Shore Dr Dillon Rd Vista Chino Ge n e A u t r y T r a i l E Palm C a n y o n D r Avenue 54 Avenue 48 Avenue 50 Washington StCook StPortola AveMonterey AveBob Hope DrDate Palm DrPalm DrLittle Morongo RdIndian Canyon DrSunrise WayMonroe StJefferson StJackson St10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 111 111 243 74 86 86 62 79 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA Palm SpringsInternational Airport El PaseoShopping District The LivingDesert Zoo& Gardens Indian WellsTennis Garden PoloGrounds Agua CalienteResort Casino Spa Joshua Tree National Park UC RiversidePalm DesertCampus FantasySpringsResortCasino Spotlight 29 Casino CSUSBPalm DesertCampus Palm SpringsAerial Tramway Traffic Relief: Coachella Valley Highway Access Highways Trains New Technology Flood & DustControl Highway Access Highways Trains New Technology Flood & DustControl 111 The Coachella Valley component of the Traffic Relief Plan calls for improvements to all aspects of the transportation system. All revenues generated under the Plan in the Coachella Valley will remain in the Coachella Valley for expenditure. Funding will provide investments in communities that fully participate in, and are compliant with, the Coachella Valley’s Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) and Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) policies and procedures. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) will administer the Plan in the Coachella Valley. CVAG is a public agency governed by an Executive Committee consisting of the mayor or an elected official representing every city council in the Coachella Valley and the City of Blythe, all five County Supervisors, and the Tribal Chairmen from the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians and Cabazon Band of Mission Indians. CVAG will establish priorities according to the Transportation Project Prioritization Process (TPPS), which is a merit-based method of scoring all regional projects in the Coachella Valley. Project priorities are based on criteria adopted by the CVAG Executive Committee, as recommended by civil engineers and public works professionals serving on technical sub-committees that represent every CVAG member jurisdiction. The TPPS is the guiding document for transportation investments on regional roadways, including highway interchanges, road widenings and improvements, bridge projects and valleywide signal synchronization. The TPPS will include proposed investments in creating and maintaining transportation infrastructure, including but not limited to: • Passenger rail investments, such as train stations, that help connect the Coachella Valley to Los Angeles and/or Orange County; • Upgrading infrastructure to eliminate or reduce road closures associated with natural disasters, such as flooding and blow sand; • Infrastructure and systems to improve all forms of mass transit; • Active transportation, such as facilities for biking and walking safely; • New mobility concepts and technologies to connect the workforce to the workplace and to reduce seasonal and event-related traffic congestion; and • Creating consistency across the Coachella Valley’s regional roadways by providing additional maintenance programs and enhancements that improve the travel experience for residents and visitors. The Plan in the Coachella Valley will also be consistent with countywide strategies to accelerate investments, achieve balance and equity, provide economic opportunities, and accommodate changing transportation technologies. The Coachella Valley portion of the Plan will also fund operations and maintenance (O&M) of regional transportation corridors as identified in the TPPS. The CVAG regional O&M program would support operations, repairs, and replacement of traffic management systems, pavement surfaces and traffic control devices. This program will enhance existing efforts to promote uniform standards, keep transportation infrastructure in good condition, and extend the life cycle of Coachella Valley’s transportation infrastructure. These regional corridors span cities and unincorporated communities and include, but are not limited to: • Highway 111• Washington Street• Ramon Road• Monterey Avenue • Cook Street• Bob Hope Drive • Fred Waring Drive • Dinah Shore Drive • Gene Autry Trail/Palm Drive • Date Palm Drive• Indio Boulevard • Jefferson Street • Vista Chino• Varner Road • Palm Canyon Drive• Country Club Drive • Monroe Street• Avenue 48• Avenue 50 • Cesar Chavez Street• Sunrise Way• Indian Canyon Drive • Jackson Street TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANCoachella Valley 8Traffic Relief Plan 2020 112 All revenues generated in the Palo Verde Valley will remain in the Palo Verde Valley, with all revenue returned directly to the City of Blythe and County of Riverside. The Blythe City Council will have authority to set priorities and expend funds within the city limits and the County Board of Supervisors will have authority to expend funds in unincorporated areas of the Palo Verde Valley. Investments made by the City of Blythe and County must be for transportation purposes for the benefit of Palo Verde Valley residents and must be approved in an open and transparent manner pursuant to open meetings laws. All revenues generated through the Traffic Relief Plan in the Palo Verde Valley shall remain in the Palo Verde Valley and cannot be diverted to other areas of Riverside County. To address transportation needs in rural areas, such as the Palo Verde Valley, and to strengthen the agricultural economy and tourism, the Plan will focus on: • Safety and maintenance of local streets and roads; • Ensuring public infrastructure complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act; • Closing sidewalk gaps and enhancing bike lanes for improved pedestrian access to and from schools; • Improving the condition of interchanges at Interstate 10, including landscaping and gateway enhancements; • Establishing a new vanpool program for residents commuting to major employment areas, such as Ironwood and Chuckawalla Valley prisons, Coachella Valley, and Arizona; • Providing reduced- or free-fare public transit to increase access to education, healthcare, employment, and services; • Replacing and expanding the bus fleet to improve air quality with low- and zero- emission vehicles; • Upgrading transit operating and maintenance facilities to maintain transit vehicles and infrastructure in good condition; and • Increasing frequency and expanding public transit options for education, healthcare, employment and services in underserved neighborhoods. Transportation investments through the Plan will also serve as a driver for economic development in the community. Improving the transportation network will leverage other public and private investments and encourage new businesses to invest. TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANPalo Verde Valley 9 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 113 Wildomar Canyon Lake Lake Elsinore Menifee Eastvale Temecula LakeMatthews LakeElsinore CanyonLake LakePerris VailLake Murrieta SanJacinto Perris Moreno Valley Highland Hemet Beaumont Banning Cabazon Rialto RanchoCucamonga Norco JurupaValley Fontana Corona Claremont Riverside Calimesa NORTHWEST SANGORGONIOPASS CENTRAL SOUTHWEST R I V E R S I D E C O . O R A N G E C O . RIVE R S I D E C O . SAN D I E G O C O . SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. 241 259 71 30 91 74 74 74 74 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 371 243 74 79 79 38 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 79 Traffic Relief: Western Riverside County Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 114 Western Riverside County traffic relief funds will be allocated to transportation projects and services as shown in the chart above. RCTC will establish criteria to prioritize projects and services based upon the recommendation of civil engineers and public works professionals serving on the Technical Advisory Committee. Prioritization must be consistent with the vision, goals, objectives, principles, policies, and desired outcomes described in the Traffic Relief Plan. For any local jurisdiction to receive funds through the Traffic Relief Plan, the jurisdiction must be a participant in good standing in the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program, which ensures that new development pays for its fair share of impacts on the transportation system, and the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Program (MSHCP), which protects locally endangered and threatened plants and animals and ensures that transportation projects can receive streamlined environmental approvals. The following pages describe the projects and services envisioned to be implemented. These projects and services were identified by RCTC Commissioners, members of the public, local transportation experts, and civic leaders in Riverside County through extensive public outreach and engagement. RCTC may add projects and services not mentioned in the Plan if those projects and services are consistent with the Plan or achieve the same result as a project or service mentioned in the Plan. Three percent of revenues generated through voter-approval of the Plan are dedicated to mitigation of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) to help achieve compliance with state laws and regulations. More Bus Service,40% Trains, 16% Buses, 6% Trails, 2% Commuter Assistance, 3% New Technology, 5% Roads, 18% VMT Mitigation, 3% Highways, 34% Road Improvements,60% Highway Access, 13% Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Investments Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 11 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 115 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 12Traffic Relief Plan 2020 The Traffic Relief Plan makes substantial investments in improving the flow of local highways and residents’ abilities to get on and off them more easily. Many of these improvements have already been identified in local plans and are awaiting funding to be constructed. The Traffic Relief Plan devotes 34% of funding in Western Riverside County toward highway improvements and 13% toward improved highway access. Combined, these investments can achieve the following on the county’s major highway corridors: I-15 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction to I-15 between Cajalco Road in Corona and the San Diego County line • Eliminate the “lane drops” on southbound I-15 between Magnolia Avenue and Cajalco Road in Corona • Construct the final phase of the French Valley Parkway interchange at I-15 in Temecula, which includes: o Widening ramps at Winchester Road o Constructing on and off ramps to I-15 from French Valley Parkway and a bridge over I-15 o Constructing the French Valley Parkway from Jefferson Avenue to Ynez Road • Reconstruct interchanges with: o Central Avenue (Route 74) in Lake Elsinore o Wildomar Trail (formerly Baxter Road) in Wildomar o Bundy Canyon Road in Wildomar I-215 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction between Route 60 and Van Buren Boulevard • Construct new interchanges (on and off ramps) to I-215 at Keller Road in Murrieta and Garbani Road in Menifee • Reconstruct interchange at Harley Knox Boulevard in Moreno Valley 91 Corridor • Accelerate construction of at least one new lane in each direction on Route 91 between I-15 in Corona and Pierce Street in Riverside • Reconstruct interchanges on the 91 at: o Adams Street in Riverside o Tyler Street in Riverside 60 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction on Route 60 in Moreno Valley • Reconstruct interchanges on Route 60 at: o Etiwanda Avenue in Jurupa Valley o Rubidoux Boulevard in Jurupa Valley o Redlands Boulevard in Moreno Valley o Potrero Boulevard in Beaumont I-10 Corridor • Reconstruct interchanges on I-10 at: o Route 79 in Beaumont o Highland Springs Avenue in Beaumont and Banning o Pennsylvania Avenue in Beaumont o Morongo Parkway and Main Street in Cabazon o County Line Road and Cherry Valley Boulevard in Calimesa In addition to assisting automobile drivers, many of the above investments will address bottlenecks and safety concerns expressed by the public related to growing truck traffic. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 116 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County In Western Riverside County, 18% of funds will be invested improving the safety, flow, and overall condition of local roads. Maintaining Local Roads and Repairing Potholes Cities and the County of Riverside will receive road maintenance funds for repairing potholes and keeping roads in good condition based on objective factors recommended by local city and county public works directors serving on the Technical Advisory Committee, consisting of representatives of every city and the County of Riverside, and adopted by RCTC. The Technical Advisory Committee shall take into consideration transportation needs for smaller cities and unincorporated communities. Separating Local Roads from Railroad Tracks The large number and length of freight trains operating in Riverside County causes rail crossings to be blocked, creates traffic delays, and restricts first responder access to emergencies. The Plan calls for construction of under- or overpasses at rail crossings, such as: • Bellegrave Avenue • Hargrave Street • Jackson Street • Mary Street • Pennsylvania Avenue • San Gorgonio Avenue • Spruce Street • Tyler Street Projects will be prioritized based on factors including, but not limited to, readiness for construction, accident and fatality rates, hours of vehicle delay at the crossing, noise and air pollution, and availability of matching funds. Funding may be used to make projects more competitive to receive state or federal grants. Reducing Accidents and Fatalities on Major County Roads The Traffic Relief Plan creates a funding program to address roads where high numbers of fatalities occur, such as Gilman Springs Road and Grand Avenue. Improving Traffic Flow on Major Local Roads Some of the most impacted roads in Riverside County are the main roads that connect our neighborhood streets to highways and transit centers. Growing employment and economic activity in Riverside County will continue to add strain on these roads. Therefore, the Traffic Relief Plan would substantially invest in major roads, including but not limited to: • Alessandro Boulevard • Bundy Canyon Road • Clinton Keith Road • Heacock Street • Keller Road • Limonite Avenue • Redlands Boulevard • Sun Lake Boulevard • Temescal Canyon Road • Van Buren Boulevard Safe Routes to School The Plan will provide funding to cities, the County of Riverside, school districts, and other governmental and nonprofit entities through an application process to build infrastructure that provides safer routes for children to walk or bike to school and decreases injuries and fatalities. Eligible improvements include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bicycle lanes. Funding may be used to make projects more competitive to receive state or federal grants. 13 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 117 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 14Traffic Relief Plan 2020 New East-West Routes Routes 60 and 91 are congested at most times of the day. Limited east-west connections leave drivers with few options, especially in the southern parts of Riverside County, where people need to travel I-15 and I-215 to get to these east-west routes. Also, when there is an incident or severe traffic on I-10, especially around the holidays and festival seasons, there are no alternative routes between Banning and Cabazon. The County of Riverside is developing two east-west corridors between I-15 and I-215 and a parallel roadway to I-10 that currently lack funding: • Cajalco Road • Ethanac Expressway • I-10 Bypass between Banning and Cabazon The Traffic Relief Plan would provide funding to construct these routes in the near future. Improving the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley RCTC has invested nearly two decades into obtaining federal and state environmental clearances and community consensus for two major new transportation routes. Commitments for environmental mitigation have been made. However, the funding to construct these routes currently does not exist. Therefore, the Plan provides funding for accelerated construction and local operation and maintenance of the following two major projects: • A new Highway 79, which will align the 79 from Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway to improve traffic flow and safety and allow regional traffic to bypass local roads. • Mid County Parkway, a new 16-mile transportation corridor designed to relieve east-west traffic congestion between the San Jacinto and Perris areas. The Mid County Parkway will connect to Route 79, I-215, and multimodal bus and rail facilities that support the Metrolink 91/Perris Valley Line. Additionally, the Plan calls for construction of a rapid transit system between the Hemet-San Jacinto valley and the Perris/Moreno Valley/Riverside area to provide an alternative mode of travel. RCTC owns a rail line that extends from Perris to San Jacinto, which could be used to provide this new service. Rapid transit connections to the Temecula/Menifee/Murrieta area could also be considered. RCTC will collaborate with local cities, the County of Riverside, public transit agencies, tribal governments and the community in constructing these improvements. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 118 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County The Traffic Relief Plan devotes 16% of revenue to modernize rail service in Western Riverside County. Increased train frequencies, upgraded, and well-maintained stations, and expansion of service into new areas of Riverside County will increase economic opportunities within the region, reduce traffic congestion, and enhance the passenger experience. Increasing Frequency of Metrolink More frequent train service to current and future destinations in Riverside County will support Metrolink’s goal to double ridership by 2025 and support local efforts to attract more employers and jobs to Riverside County. Recognizing the benefit of train transportation to commuters, the economy, and the environment, the Traffic Relief Plan makes the following commitments: • Increasing frequency of Metrolink train service on the 91/Perris Valley Line and Inland Empire-Orange County Line • Constructing new railroad tracks within existing rights of way to allow more Metrolink trains to operate Extending Train Service to New Destinations in Riverside County To make daily train service possible between the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs, Indio, etc.) and Riverside, Orange County, and L.A., the Traffic Relief Plan calls for construction of a new passenger rail station in the San Gorgonio Pass. Additionally, the Traffic Relief Plan provides funding to extend Metrolink service to Hemet and San Jacinto via the existing railroad tracks which would be rehabilitated between Perris and San Jacinto. The Traffic Relief Plan also envisions a new rail station at Ramona Expressway near Perris and the existing rail line. Maintaining, Operating, and Upgrading Train Stations, Tracks, and Service The Traffic Relief Plan will modernize rail-related infrastructure in Riverside County to ensure that services can continue to operate safely and sustainably. Investments include but are not limited to: • Constructing new parking capacity at Metrolink stations in Corona, Riverside, and Perris • Constructing accessibility improvements at the Moreno Valley/March Field station • Operating and maintaining existing and future Metrolink rail stations. There are currently nine stations in Corona, Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Perris, and near Moreno Valley. Future stations are envisioned for an extension of service to Hemet and San Jacinto • Operating Metrolink trains through Riverside County at current and future increased frequencies • Maintaining locally-owned railroad right of way to ensure public safety and proper maintenance of the tracks • Investing in zero-emission trains 15 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 119 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 16Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Attracting Jobs to Riverside County through Rail Investment Rail stations provide opportunity for economic development and bringing new jobs to our communities and increasing the convenience of public transportation. The Traffic Relief Plan will create an incentive program for public-private partnerships to enhance existing and future rail stations through joint development opportunities. The Traffic Relief Plan also calls for new “reverse-commute” trains that bring passengers to Riverside County job centers, in addition to the current schedules that focus more on taking local residents to other counties. RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl The Traffic Relief Plan dedicates 6% of revenue to enhancing Western Riverside County’s bus transit system to reduce traffic congestion, increase sustainability, and provide more options to residents who rely on public transit to access medical care, employment, education, and other services. Expanding Rapid/Express Bus Rapid/Express buses provide an affordable, comfortable, and reduced-stress travel experience, especially for commuters traveling to other counties or across the county. These buses carry wi-fi and more comfortable seats than traditional buses. The Traffic Relief Plan expands rapid/commuter bus service along the major freeway corridors in Riverside County to destinations such as San Diego, Orange, and San Bernardino Counties, downtown Riverside, Temecula, Moreno Valley, Corona, and Perris. Rapid/commuter bus service can also connect to major destinations within Riverside County and the Inland Empire, such as commercial airports, business, retail, and entertainment centers. Modernizing and Sustaining Public Transportation To increase ridership, provide more efficient service, and reduce air pollution, the Traffic Relief Plan invests in new technologies: • Traffic signals and bus equipment that improve bus travel times. • Zero-emission buses and related maintenance and operations. Improving Riverside County’s public transportation system also requires investment in transportation hubs throughout Western Riverside County, where residents can connect to other forms of transportation, employment centers, and services. The Traffic Relief Plan also ensures the continued operation of bus service in Riverside County. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 120 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County Increasing Options and Mobility for Seniors, Veterans, Students, Individuals with Disabilities, and Underserved and Rural Communities Approximately 13% of Riverside County residents are age 65 and older; about 11% are individuals with disabilities; 11% are low-income; 6% are veterans; and 25% are under age 18. A survey of public and human service providers in Riverside County indicates that about 40% of their constituents’ transportation needs are not being met with existing services. Addressing the needs of these groups requires a multifaceted approach that can be tailored to meet varying degrees of mobility and independence. Transportation needs and gaps of services for these groups are documented in local studies, which have found that increased independence and mobility can be achieved through expanded transit service; transportation for long-distrance regional medical trips; safe pedestrian and bicyclist pathways; transit affordability; and coordination with human service agencies. There is growing concern in many cities that as the population grows, the available resources to meet these target groups’ needs will not keep pace. Specialized Transit Grant Program The Traffic Relief Plan increases investment in specialized transportation providers that serve seniors, veterans, students, individuals with disabilities, and rural and underserved communities. The Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council, with representatives from these populations, will assist RCTC in administering and providing oversight to the program. The Traffic Relief Plan will make investments such as: • Ensuring infrastructure compliance with expansion of destinations and hours of operation for paratransit services such as Dial-A-Ride; • Keeping transit fares low for seniors, veterans, students, and individuals with disabilities; • Improved access to and from schools, colleges and universities, and employment centers for low-income families and rural communities; • Bus fares for those who require access to medical appointments, job interviews, or other needed services; • Bringing infrastructure into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act; and • Continued operation of the 2-1-1 network, which provides individualized assessments with transportation and social service specialists. 17 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 121 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 18Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Completing the Regional Trail System Riverside County is home to world-renowned natural open spaces with active transportation corridors for cycling, hiking, walking, and running. These trails provide alternative transportation options, as well as options for healthier lifestyles for Riverside County residents. These facilities also provide economic opportunities for local businesses and the tourism economy. The Plan invests in major regional trails identified in the master plan for the Riverside County Parks & Open Space District, to which local cities and the County can connect. These trails include: • Butterfield Overland Trail/Southern Emigrant Trail • Santa Ana River Trail • California Riding and Hiking Trail • Juan Bautista de Anza Historical Trail • Salt Creek Trail Additionally, the Plan will invest in providing trail access to Riverside County’s many publicly owned and preserved open spaces. All together, 2% of the Traffic Relief Plan in Western Riverside County will invest in these improvements. To help commuters with a safer trip, and to provide alternatives to driving alone, the Traffic Relief Plan invests 3% of revenue into Commuter Assistance programs. Freeway Service Patrol When accidents occur on highways or when vehicles break down, traffic can build quickly, creating delays and additional safety hazards to motorists. Freeway Service Patrol provides roving tow trucks to quickly assist motorists so that traffic can flow again. This public service is operated with strict performance and accountability measures by the California Highway Patrol, Caltrans, and RCTC, and must achieve a benefit-to-cost ratio of at least 3:1 (meaning for every dollar invested, the service must yield at least $3 in benefits in the form of reduced congestion, increased safety, and decreased air pollution). The Plan will sustain and increase Freeway Service Patrol levels on Interstates 15 and 215 and Routes 60 and 91, including weekend service. The Plan will also enable new service to begin on Interstate 10. More Park & Rides Creating more convenient locations for commuters to meet and travel together reduces the burdens of solo commuting and decreases the number of cars on the road during peak hours. Through the Traffic Relief Plan, RCTC will be able to enter more partnerships with local businesses and governments to create more Park & Ride options. More Employer Partnerships to Reduce Commutes The Traffic Relief Plan recognizes that improving commutes is not just about the commuter, but also about employers stepping up to help. The Plan calls for enhancing current Commuter Assistance Programs with employers in Riverside County with better options and incentives to encourage ridesharing, vanpooling, telecommuting, and public transit use. RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 122 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County Rethinking Transportation New and innovative thinking can help reduce traffic congestion and increase economic productivity as our population increases, technology advances rapidly, and our economy grows. Therefore, 5% of the Traffic Relief Plan in Western Riverside County is devoted to new technologies and innovative public policy. It is difficult to predict how technology and innovations will shape our society in the years ahead; therefore, this section of the Plan is intended to remain flexible to adapt to advances in technology. Creating Smart Roads: deployment of new technologies that better synchronize traffic signals and ramp meters, detect on-road incidents and congestion and proactively manage traffic and improve roadway safety. These technologies lay the foundation for Riverside County’s infrastructure to connect with autonomous and connected vehicles, as well as future innovations in transportation technology. Technologies such as these have begun deployment in other parts of the United States and the world; this program would bring these approaches to Riverside County. This program will also support electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Commuting Alternatives: modernizing and increasing current efforts to help commuters find alternatives to driving alone over long distances to get to work or school and back home and help save time by using technology to make existing infrastructure operate more efficiently. Bringing Jobs Home: an incentive program for local governments to develop infrastructure that will secure new permanent living-wage jobs in Riverside County and reduce the demand for residents to commute to other counties for work. These funds can also be used to invest in public transportation services that will assist local residents in accessing employment opportunities. 19 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 RoadsBusesTrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBusesTrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 123 1 Executive Summary, Public Engagement for Traffic Relief Plan On January 9, 2020, the Commission launched a public engagement program for the draft Traffic Relief Plan. The program was designed to educate residents of Riverside County about the Plan and solicit comments on the Plan. The goal was to reach residents and other stakeholders throughout Riverside County to encourage them to see the draft Plan and complete a public opinion survey. The Traffic Relief Plan public engagement effort was a follow-up to the Commission’s #RebootMyCommute program that was conducted in 2019. The comment period for the draft Traffic Relief Plan lasted 90 days. The comment period was originally intended to close on June 10; however, the COVID-19 pandemic rendered many public engagement activities inappropriate. Further, the Commission voted to conclude the comment period on April 8, defer plans to present a sales tax measure for voter consideration, analyze the feedback received, and present the final Plan for adoption on May 13. The final Traffic Relief Plan reflects the feedback received and is designed to be a reference point for the Commission in the future. During the public comment period, the Commission used multiple tools to solicit feedback from residents and stakeholders, including the TrafficReliefPlan.org website and survey, social media advertising with videos, streaming video, streaming audio, news media articles, presentations, The Point communications, and billboards. The website, survey, and streaming video and audio were available in both English and Spanish. Other public engagement activities had been scheduled for the spring but were canceled because of the pandemic, including polling, tele- townhall meetings, information booths at community events, advertising, and additional billboards. Metrics for completed public engagement activities are contained in this report and summarized in a one-page graphic display in Appendix A. This report also includes a summary of the comments received, summary of the survey results, maps of the origin of the comments received, and a full listing of the comments. Draft Traffic Relief Plan Metrics: January 9 – April 8, 2020 The following is a numerical summary of the metrics for the draft Plan. Appendix A provides a graphic display of these metrics. 1)TrafficReliefPlan.org Website: The site had 42,202 visits by 35,317 unique visitors. Those who visited spent an average of 1 minute, 15 seconds on the site. 2)Survey: The Commission received 3,184 responses and 6,538 comments through the survey housed on the TrafficReliefPlan.org site. 3)Social Media: The Commission placed a series of targeted social media ads, including some with videos. Overall public sentiment was very positive. ATTACHMENT 2 124 2 a. On Facebook, there were 22,302 clicks on the ads to link to the website, 6,783 direct engagements, 458,809 full video views, 3,679,233 impressions, and a reach of 361,196 people. b. On Twitter, there were 26,069 click-throughs to the website, 451 direct engagements, 48,853 views of at least 75% of the videos, and 620,014 impressions. c. On Instagram, there were 1,691 click-throughs to the website, 2,167 direct engagements, 3,996 full video views, 1,260,024 impressions, and a reach of 227,376. d. On YouTube, there were 2.759 clicks, 106,643 full video views, and 343,369 impressions. 4) Streaming Video: The Commission placed advertisements on Hulu, Univision and Ampersand video streaming services, generating 754,201 full video views and 773,314 impressions. 5) Streaming Audio: The Commission placed advertisements on Pandora streaming radio, which generated 1,273,735 impressions, a reach of 162,699 people, and 462 website clicks. 6) News Media: The draft Traffic Relief Plan generated 22 news items, including stories in The Press-Enterprise, Desert Sun, Patch, Inland News Today, iHeartRadio, and various editorials/letters to the editor. 7) Presentations: Commission staff gave 39 presentations to elected officials, community organizations, and industry groups across Riverside County; four additional presentations have been reconfigured as virtual meetings for Commission staff to discuss the Traffic Relief Plan in the post-pandemic era. Twelve other presentations were canceled due to COVID-19. 8) The Point Subscriptions: The Commission publishes a monthly e-newsletter, The Point. As part of the Traffic Relief Plan outreach effort, residents were encouraged to register to receive the newsletter; 801 people subscribed by email and 603 subscribed by text message. 9) Billboards: Three billboards were used to inform motorists of the draft Plan – on Interstate 215 in Perris, on Interstate 10 in the San Gorgonio Pass, and on Interstate 10 in Palm Springs. Survey Responses and Comments The Commission received 3,184 responses to the website survey and 6,538 comments through the survey, social media, and other sources. Included in that number were 13 Spanish comments from the survey and 42 comments from Spanish-language Facebook ads. The survey asked respondents to indicate their level of support for each of the transportation types included in the Traffic Relief Plan. This data is shown in Appendix B. 125 3 Summary, Comments by Topic The 6,538 comments are sorted into topics. Many of the comments addressed more than one topic, so the counts shown in the bar chart and the narrative below add to more than 6,538. The narrative includes a general description of the themes within the comments received. 1. Access – 47 Comments Received: Many comments focused on transportation access needs for seniors, pedestrians, cyclists, students, and those with disabilities. Others saw a need to repair roads and sidewalks for those in wheelchairs, to increase train service (especially in the Coachella Valley), to offer more frequent bus service and free or discounted fares for seniors and those with needs. Some questioned funding for public transit and suggested using smaller shuttles or ride-hailing services instead. 2. Active Transportation – 556 Comments Received: A number of comments expressed a desire for pedestrian and bicycle improvements, including sidewalks, bike lanes, crosswalks and safety additions, creating more walkable communities and safe walking routes for school children. Others voiced support for more traffic signals and stop signs. 126 4 Others voiced the opposite – that bike lanes, trails, and sidewalks are not important traffic relief elements, since very few people travel to work by bike or foot. 3. Carpooling – 449 Comments Received: Many expressed support for carpool lanes on various highways, with a large number mentioning Interstate 15 between Riverside County and San Diego County, more incentives for carpooling, more Park & Ride Lots, and the conversion of express lanes back to carpool lanes on the 91. Others did not support carpool lanes and said that general use lanes should be added, rather than carpool lanes or express lanes. 4. Express Lanes – 789 Comments Received: Many respondents voiced a negative sentiment towards express lanes. Some suggested replacing the express lanes with general-purpose lanes, carpool lanes, or reversible lanes. Others noted the high cost of using the express lanes, accused the Commission of collecting profits, voiced concerns about using taxpayer funds to pay for express lanes, and noted that the plan did not specify what type of lanes would be added. While some expressed support for express lanes, particularly in southwest county, many others said they would support new lanes if they were “free” to use. 5. Funding – 271 Comments Received: Many survey respondents asked how the Plan would be funded, questioned the project costs, and expressed the need for oversight. 6. Highways – 2,419 Comments Received: Respondents provided a wide variety of suggestions for highway improvements across Riverside County, including Interstate 10, Interstate 15, Interstate 215, Route 60, Route 74, Route 79, Route 91, the Mid County Parkway, alternate east-west routes between Riverside County and Orange County, and truck bypass routes. Many noted the specific trouble spots related to maintenance, traffic flow, and trucks. 7. Housing & Development – 597 Comments Received: Many people expressed their opinion that development of homes, offices, and warehouses should stop without preexisting transportation infrastructure. Both the Temecula area and San Gorgonio Pass were frequently mentioned as high-growth areas with significant traffic congestion. Some asserted the Traffic Relief Plan was an effort to “grab land.” Others noted requested more trains and alternate work schedules to reduce traffic during peak hours. 8. Jobs, Incentives & Economy – 183 Comments Received: Many respondents suggested bringing high-paying jobs to Riverside County to avoid the need to commute to Orange, San Diego, and Los Angeles counties. Others voiced support for increasing incentives to use public transit or to carpool. Some said that incentives should be provided for working from home or relocating businesses to Riverside County. 9. Local Roads – 549 Comments Received: Respondents offered multiple suggestions, such as synchronizing traffic signals, separating roads from railroad tracks, repairing potholes, adding bridges to avoid roadway flooding in the Coachella Valley, and preventing cut- 127 5 through traffic on city streets. Many comments related to specific roads or ramps that need repairs. Others believe that widening roads would lead to more traffic. 10. Planning/Studies/Timing – 288 Comments Received: Many respondents praised the plan and said the plan is needed. Comments suggested better long-term planning, that plans should have been implemented years before, too many items are in the plan, the plan is too vague and does not include project costs, timelines or priorities. 11. Public Transportation – 2,072 Comments Received: Respondents provided varied opinions about mass transit, with some voicing support for Metrolink, Coachella Valley Rail, light-rail projects, and bus services. Others said that public transportation is costly and benefits a small fraction of the population. Many advocated for passenger rail service between southwest Riverside County and San Diego County and through the San Gorgonio Pass. Some noted the need for mass transit to be more frequent, flexible, accessible, inexpensive, safer, and appealing. Others expressed support for transit to reduce pollution. 12. Safety – 463 Comments Received: Comments included concern for drivers to follow the speed limit, a desire for increased enforcement, synchronizing traffic signals, building bridges over washes and railroad tracks, adding sidewalks for students to walk to school, add left turn arrows to traffic signals, increase street lighting, add bike lanes, increase divided highways, and safety improvements on specific streets. 13. Taxes/Tax Measure – 1,478 Comments Received: Many respondents expressed concern with the possibility of raising taxes, along with their perspective that residents pay too much in taxes, and that the state gasoline tax increase should pay for improvements. Many said that they support specific improvements, but not if taxes would be raised to pay for these items. 14. Technology – 163 Comments Received: While some expressed support for new technology, many people asked for more specifics and said this section of the plan was too vague. Some noted the need to promote autonomous vehicles, to improve traffic signal timing, and the ability to use technology to monitor traffic flow. 15. Traffic – 926 Comments Received: Many respondents expressed frustration with traffic congestion and said that traffic is hindering the quality of life in Riverside County. Some referenced problem areas along I-15, I-215, the 91, and at various specific interchanges. Many commented about traffic problems along the 91 through Corona and along I-15 through Temecula. Some recommended passenger trains, especially between southwest Riverside County and San Diego and that trucks be restricted to slow lanes. 16. Other – 968 Comments Received: Many of these comments expressed either support for the plan or opposition to it. Some questioned the survey format, others noted that not enough projects were in their specific area, others voiced concerns about the overall cost to taxpayers. 128 6 Summary, Comments by Geography The chart below includes the number of comments received from various geographical areas across Riverside County. Two “heat maps” that show the frequency of comments by zip code are provided in Appendices C and D. Conclusion The Commission has received substantial public feedback on the Traffic Relief Plan through a comprehensive public engagement program. The input reflects the diversity of Riverside County. In general, the public expressed support for the Traffic Relief Plan. Staff considers the engagement effort successful and believes the information collected will be useful to the Commission going forward. 129 7 APPENDIX A 130 8 APPENDIX B 131 9 APPENDIX C APPENDIX D 132 10 Appendix E All Public Comments Sorted by Topic – Click to View 133 AGENDA ITEM 9 Agenda Item 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Construction Zone Safety Campaign STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update about a construction zone safety campaign for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes and State Route 60 Truck Lanes project areas. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is partnering with the California Department of Transportation District 8 and the California Highway Patrol to conduct a construction zone safety campaign. Construction work is designated as an essential function under the governor’s Executive Order, and crews are continuing to work on the Commission’s I-15 Express Lanes Project and the Route 60 Truck Lanes Project. These construction zones have speed limits of 55 miles per hour. Due to COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, the CHP has seen a dramatic increase in speeding motorists. Between mid-March and mid-April, the CHP reported a 87 percent jump in citations for those exceeding 100 miles per hour. On April 17, a vehicle traveling more than 100 miles per hour entered the I-15 Express Lanes construction area, narrowly missing crew members and causing significant damage to the project. The Commission and its partners are conducting a construction zone safety campaign with videos, billboards, social media posts, digital advertising, and a virtual news conference to remind drivers of need to slow down. The CHP also is conducting additional enforcement in both project areas. The “Less Traffic: No License to Speed” campaign is designed to protect construction crews and others on the road. Staff will provide a brief update about the campaign. 134 CONSTRUCTION ZONE SAFETY CAMPAIGN Report to Commission May 13, 2020 Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager 1 2 •Fewer drivers = large increase in 100+ mph citations •Motorist entered I-15 construction site at more than 100 mph, placed crews in danger, caused major damage •RCTC added CHP enforcement to I-15 corridor •Launching safety campaign –reminding drivers to slow down, keep crews safe –I-15, Route 60, Pachappa, Railroad Canyon construction zones News media, social media 3 •Virtual news conference, RCTC, Caltrans, CHP: May 14, 1 pm •Social media posts Billboards 4 •Thank you, General Outdoor, for public service messages on I-15 and 91 billboards •City of Lake Elsinore, SilverLakes also agreed to run our messages on their billboards •Caltrans is running messages on their overhead signs I-15 enforcement 5 •Riverside Area CHP saw 71% increase in 100+ mph citations from last year: •March-April 2019: 35 citations •March-April 2020: 60 citations •Added unit to I-15 construction zone, peak travel hours •Week 1 stats, May 4-8: 0 exceeded 100 mph; 40 exceeded 65 mph Videos 6 QUESTIONS 7 From:Tara Byerly To:Tara Byerly Cc:Anne Mayer; John Standiford; Lisa Mobley Bcc:Steven DeBaun; district3@rivco.org; cmaunz@rivco.org; c.washington@rivco.org; lwhite@beaumontca.gov; alwhite524@gmail.com; mnaggar@citycouncil.org; mike@naggarinc.com; luisa.tovar@temeculaca.gov; Lisa.middleton@palmspringsca.gov; christina.chartier@palmspringsca.gov; cindy.cairns@palmspringsca.gov; llubi.rios@palmspringsca.gov; dreed@indianwells.com; cterrones@indianwells.com; aavila@indianwells.com; bbenoit@cityofwildomar.org; bberkson@jurupavalley.org; trollings@jurupavalley.org; jharnik@cityofpalmdesert.org; jharnik@dc.rr.com; nortega@cityofpalmdesert.org; ksspiegel@rivco.org; lallin@rivco.org; swmatas@gmail.com; smatas@cityofdhs.org; rgregory@cathedralcity.gov; jmeza@cathedralcity.gov; tmartinez@cathedralcity.gov; shernandez@coachella.org; rbailey@riversideca.gov; cmhansberger@riversideca.gov; kyoung@riversideca.gov; rmagee@rivco.org; Haviva.Shane@bbklaw.com; lkrupa@cityofhemet.org; caaron@cityofhemet.org; smccomas@cityofhemet.org; lsmith@cityofcalimesa.net; dgerdes@cityofcalimesa.net; rbonner@cityofcanyonlake.com; jhewitt@rivco.org; kcline@rivco.org; district1@rivco.org; kjustus@rivco.org; mafelix@rivco.org; schedule4@rivco.org; Wes.Speake@CoronaCA.gov; angela.nieto@coronaca.gov; naomi.ramirez@coronaca.gov; Lyndsay.Burgett@CoronaCA.gov; SVinton@MurrietaCA.gov; ssmith@murrietaca.gov; RVega@MurrietaCA.gov; kfitzpatrick@la-quinta.org; carmelabungalow@gmail.com; tthompson@la-quinta.org; clorimore@eastvaleca.gov; akotyuk@sanjacintoca.us; wfermon@indio.org; strujillo@indio.org; ssanchex@indio.org; bzimmerman@cityofmenifee.us; smanwaring@cityofmenifee.us; mstephens@cityofmenifee.us; yxstiang@moval.org; patjn@moval.org; ericle@moval.org; cityclerk@moval.org; reneeb@moval.org; jessical@moval.org; zoilal@moval.org; tedw@ranchomirageca.gov; sylvian@ranchomirageca.gov; mvargas@cityofperris.org; mmartinez@cityofperris.org; joeydeconinck@gmail.com; msutterfield@cityofblythe.ca.gov; blang@cityofblythe.ca.gov; Mike.beauchamp@dot.ca.gov; Exec.Sec.D08@dot.ca.gov; lsampson@ci.banning.ca.us; awelch@ci.banning.ca.us; hooffxr@att.net; droa@ci.norco.ca.us Subject:RCTC: May Commission Agenda - May 13, 2020 Date:Wednesday, May 6, 2020 9:15:00 AM Attachments:Conflict of Interest Form.pdf Conflict of Interest Memo.pdf Good morning Commissioners, The May Agenda for the Commission meeting scheduled for Wednesday, May 13, 2020 @ 9:30 a.m. is now available. https://www.rctc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/May-Commission-Agenda.pdf Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. For any questions regarding the Zoom meeting or to schedule a test run, please contact Lisa Mobley at lmobley@rctc.org or 951- 288-2680. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85121096061 Meeting ID: 851 2109 6061 (applies to all) Teleconference Dial In +1 669 900 6833 Also attached for your review and information is the conflict of interest memo and form. Let me know if you have any questions or concerns. Thank you. Respectfully, Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 951.787.7141 W |951.787.7906 F 4080 Lemon St. 3rd Fl.| P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 rctc.org From:Tara Byerly To:Tara Byerly Cc:Lisa Mobley Bcc:dandrade@ci.banning.ca.us; jmartinez@beaumontca.gov; msutterfield@cityofblythe.ca.gov; lmolina@cityofcalimesa.net; jsmith@cityofcanyonlake.com; MCarnevale@cathedralcity.gov; mbeaman@coachella.org; Jim.Steiner@CoronaCA.gov; rbetts@cityofdhs.org; trigby@Eastvaleca.gov; rbrown@cityofhemet.org; kmuzik@indianwells.com; oortiz@indio.org; cbarajas@jurupavalley.org; rradi@La- quinta.org; njohnson@lake-elsinore.org; ddeines@cityofmenifee.us; carlat@moval.org; thoffman@ci.norco.ca.us; kkelly@cityofpalmdesert.org; dennis.woods@palmspringsca.gov; rrogers@cityofperris.org; charlest@ranchomirageca.gov; asmelendrez@riversideca.gov; RUtz@sanjacintoca.us; Maryann.edwards@citycouncil.org; jmorabito@cityofwildomar.org; kseyarto@MurrietaCA.gov Subject:RCTC: May Commission Agenda - May 13, 2020 Date:Wednesday, May 6, 2020 9:18:00 AM Good morning Commission Alternates, The May Agenda for the Commission meeting scheduled for Wednesday, May 13, 2020 @ 9:30 a.m. is now available. https://www.rctc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/May-Commission-Agenda.pdf Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. For any questions regarding the Zoom meeting or to schedule a test run, please contact Lisa Mobley at lmobley@rctc.org or 951- 288-2680. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85121096061 Meeting ID: 851 2109 6061 (applies to all) Teleconference Dial In +1 669 900 6833 Respectfully, Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 951.787.7141 W |951.787.7906 F 4080 Lemon St. 3rd Fl.| P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 rctc.org RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL MAY 13, 2020 Present Absent County of Riverside, District I X  County of Riverside, District II X  County of Riverside, District III X  County of Riverside, District IV X  County of Riverside, District V X City of Banning X  City of Beaumont X  City of Blythe X  City of Calimesa X  City of Canyon Lake X  City of Cathedral City X  City of Coachella X  City of Corona X  City of Desert Hot Springs X  City of Eastvale X  City of Hemet X  City of Indian Wells X  City of Indio X  City of Jurupa Valley X  City of La Quinta X  City of Lake Elsinore X  City of Menifee X  City of Moreno Valley X  City of Murrieta X  City of Norco X  City of Palm Desert X  City of Palm Springs X  City of Perris X  City of Rancho Mirage X  City of Riverside X  City of San Jacinto X  City of Temecula X  City of Wildomar X  Caltrans District 8, Rebecca Guirado X 