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05 May 18, 2020 Technical AdvisoryComments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. MEETING AGENDA Technical Advisory Committee Time 10:00 a.m. (PLEASE NOTE TIME) Date May 18, 2020 Location Video Conference or Telephone. Please follow the instructions on the following page to join the meeting remotely. COMMITTEE MEMBERS Chad Blais, City of Norco Brad Brophy, City of Canyon Lake K. George Colangeli, PVVTA John A. Corella, Cathedral City Jesse Eckenroth, City of Rancho Mirage Tom Garcia, City of Palm Desert Christopher Gray, WRCOG Remon Habib, City of Lake Elsinore Jeff Hart, City of Beaumont William Hemsley, City of Eastvale Tom Koper, City of Corona Steve Loriso, City of Jurupa Valley Martin Magana, CVAG Bryan McKinney, City of La Quinta Bob Moehling, City of Murrieta Farshid Mohammadi, City of Riverside Joel Montalvo, City of Palm Springs Dan Ojeda, City of Blythe Gabor Pakozdi, City of Cochella Daniel Porras, City of Desert Hot Springs Patricia Romo, County of Riverside Ken Seumalo, City of Indian Wells Jonathan Smith, City of Menifee Brittney Sowell, SunLine Transit Agency Patrick Thomas, City of Temecula Michael Thornton, City of Calimesa Art Vela, City of Banning Alberto Vergel De Dios, Caltrans District 8 Kristin Warsinski, Riverside Transit Agency Timothy T. Wassil, City of Indio Michael Wolfe, City of Moreno Valley Dan York, City of Wildomar Vacant, City of Hemet Vacant, City of Perris Vacant, City of San Jacinto RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda. TIME: 10:00 A.M. (PLEASE NOTE TIME) DATE: May 18, 2020 LOCATION: Pursuant to Governor Newsom’s Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Technical Advisory Committee meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting - from PC, Laptop or Phone https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85772865240 Meeting ID: 857 7286 5240 Teleconference Dial In +1 669 900 6833 One tap mobile +16699006833,,85772865240# US (San Jose) Phone controls for participants: The following commands can be used on your phone’s dial pad while in Zoom meeting: • *6 - Toggle mute/unmute • *9 - Raise hand In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787‐7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a public meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. APPROVAL OF MARCH 16, 2020 AND APRIL 28, 2020 MINUTES 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS ̶ This is for comments on items not listed on agenda. Comments relating to an item on the agenda will be taken when the item is before the Committee. 5. TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY Overview This item is to receive and file the Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County. 6. INLAND EMPIRE COMPREHENSIVE MULTIMODAL CORRIDOR PLAN UPDATE Overview This is a receive and file item outlining the current development of the IE-CMCP. 7. CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE FUNDING REQUEST FOR CONSTRUCTION OF I-15/MAIN STREET INTERCHANGE PROJECT Overview Staff is seeking concurrence from the Technical Advisory Committee on the city of Lake Elsinore’s request of $5,483,000 to improve the I-15/Main Street Interchange Improvement Project. 8. OBLIGATION DELIVERY PLAN UPDATE – FFY 2019/20 Overview This item is to receive and file an update on Riverside County’s obligation delivery plan. 9. LOCAL ASSISTANCE ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING NEEDS Overview This is a discussion item for the TAC to provide feedback to Caltrans on future environmental training needs. 10. GENERAL PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING UPDATE Overview This item is to receive and file a general planning and programming update. 11. CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING HIGHLIGHTS: MARCH, APRIL, AND MAY 2020 Overview This item is to receive and file the March, April, and May 2020 California Transportation Commission (CTC) meeting highlights. 12. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING HIGHLIGHTS: APRIL AND MAY 2020 Overview This item is to receive and file April and May 2020 Commission meeting highlights. 13. CALTRANS DISTRICT 8 LOCAL ASSISTANCE UPDATE Overview This item is to receive and file an update from Caltrans District 8 Local Assistance. 14. COMMITTEE MEMBER / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the committee members and staff to report on attended and upcoming meetings/conferences and issues related to committee activities. 15. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the TAC is scheduled to be held July 20, 2020, 10:30 a.m., at the Coachella Valley Association of Governments, Board Room, 73710 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert, CA 92260. MINUTES TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES Monday, March 16, 2020 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) was called to order by Chair Farshid Mohammadi at 10:31 a.m. at the Riverside County Transportation Commission, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, CA 92501 via teleconference. 2. ROLL CALL Members Present: Farshid Mohammadi, City of Riverside, Chair By Teleconference: Amer Attar, City of Temecula John Corella, Cathedral City Nick Haecker, City of Desert Hot Springs Jeff Hart, City of Beaumont William Hemsley, City of Eastvale Eric Lewis, City of Moreno Valley Steve Loriso, City of Hemet Martin Magana, CVAG Bryan McKinney, City of La Quinta Bob Moehling, City of Murrieta Gabor Pakozdi, City of Coachella Mojahed Salama, Riverside County Brittney Sowell, SunLine Transit Agency Michael Thornton, City of Calimesa Albert Vergel De Dios, Caltrans District 08 Eric Weck, City of Indio Dan York, City of Wildomar Others Present: Leslie Avila, Caltrans District 8 Jenny Chan, RCTC Aaron Duque, Caltrans District 8 Marlin Feenstra, RCTC Shirley Gooding, RCTC Jillian Guizado, RCTC Martha Masters, RCTC Lorelle Moe-Luna, RCTC Eddie Moreno-Castaneda, Caltrans District 8 3. APPROVAL OF SEPTEMBER 16, 2019 MINUTES M/S/C (Corella/York) to approve minutes after adding Amir Attar, Temecula, as September 16, 2019 attendee. 1 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public comments. 5. TAC BRIEFING AND FEEDBACK SOLICITATION Jillian Guizado, RCTC, provided background information regarding the appointment of the TAC, its membership, function, meetings, officers, voting, and quorum. She pointed out the changes being made to TAC agendas moving forward in an effort to improve TAC engagement, e.g., • Written staff report for each agenda item • Background information on items • Use of PowerPoint more frequently Ms. Guizado reported that staff will explore the possibility of establishing two meeting locations for each TAC meeting with the intent of increasing attendance. She also stated: • The TAC Chair will welcome new TAC members. • The possible engagement of Caltrans on the prospect of doing mini workshops with the TAC on focused topics. • A suggestion that at each TAC meeting a member will be encouraged to make a brief presentation to highlight a project or issue the rest of the TAC may find interesting. She requested the TAC provide feedback on being on the TAC committee and recommendations for additional ways staff can work to improve TAC attendance and engagement. She also suggested TAC members contact her by telephone, email, or in person if they have feedback. Question: Would it be feasible to add page numbers to the agenda? Response: Staff will work toward that for the May TAC agenda. Question: When are you looking for feedback of what topics would be valuable to discuss? Response: Any time would be great. Staff would discuss with Caltrans on how to move forward. If you’d like to send an email, that would be helpful within the next month so staff may present to the TAC at the May meeting. 6. DRAFT TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS Cheryl Donahue, RCTC, reported the PowerPoint presentation she provided was included in the agenda. She provided background information that was included in her staff report and continued that the Draft Traffic Relief Plan was released to the public for comment on January 9. She further stated that staff planned to seek RCTC Commission’s approval to place a half-cent sales tax measure on the November 3 ballot. 2 7. PARK AND RIDE STRATEGY AND TOOLKIT Michelle McCamish, RCTC, provided a brief overview of the RCTC/SANDAG partnership funded by a Caltrans grant to complete a Park and Ride study. The goal was to complete and develop a suite of tools, strategies, and recommendations to improve regional management and planning of existing and future park and rides. She outlined the collaboration process and stated the final report will be distributed following this meeting. Question: How will the plan address vandalism at park and rides? Response: The toolkit does provide recommendations to handle that. Question: It’s identifying Western Riverside County, which is ending at Beaumont/Banning. Is that what’s included in this document? Response: The Strategy focused on Western Riverside County. Ms. Guizado added a brief overview of park and ride lots. Lorelle Moe-Luna indicated park and ride lots are not funded by the current Measure, but it is identified in the Draft Traffic Relief Plan. She further stated that ridesharing is one of the transportation demand management tools that RCTC would want to consider to make a more multi-modal network, especially along congested corridors and strategies and toolkits such as this would be extremely valuable to help RCTC identify various park and rides throughout the county. Ms. Guizado continued by responding to a question regarding the cutoff used in this particular study, RCTC is not aware of park and rides that exist in the Coachella Valley outside of any that Caltrans may have already established. In terms of looking at existing facilities, she is not personally aware of any that exist. 8. SB 743 IMPLEMENTATION UPDATE Lorelle Moe-Luna, RCTC, recapped SB 743 as outlined in her March 16, 2020 staff report. She introduced Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director. He stated the Caltrans Transportation Impact Study Guide (TISG) was released February 28. It is Caltrans’ guide for its staff for Local Development- Intergovernmental Reviews of other agencies’ projects. He further stated that each lead agency will adopt its own thresholds and agencies will receive advice from their own councils. Caltrans will review to make sure they’re consistent with the Office of Planning and Research (OPR) guidance. Caltrans will provide comments if they are not compliant. How to calculate vehicle miles traveled (VMT) will be reviewed by Caltrans. Mr. Feenstra reported Caltrans plans to comment on particular CEQA documents for transportation or land use projects within cities and may strongly recommend significance determinations that are aligned with state greenhouse gas VMT reduction goals if it feels they’re not adequately being addressed. It will be commenting on feasible alternatives as well. Caltrans says it will coordinate with cities, counties, and regional agencies to develop and pilot programmatic methods that fund offsite VMT mitigation projects. The discussion is how much mitigation would be feasible, and how we would mitigate for VMT. 3 Question: If projects are already well into CEQA, will they need to go back and include VMT analysis or are they exempt? Response: The deadline for land use projects is July 1, 2020. Any project that will be approved after that date must comply with SB 743. For transportation projects, it’s more complicated. OPR came out with a technical advisory between December 2018 and July 1 this year. Anything that began environmental between those two dates is in the gray zone. Caltrans has stated that if you’ve begun technical studies for a project before July 1, you will not have to comply with SB 743. If you have an EIR project that will take a couple of years, meaning you won’t get CEQA certification for a couple of years after the July 1 date, you will still have to comply with SB 743. Staff has been seeking more definite guidance from Caltrans on which projects have to comply. Question: What about transportation projects that are off the highway system? Response: If you’re the lead agency, you’ll have to determine that. Most agencies will have to follow Caltrans’ guidance, which means you’ll be watching to see what Caltrans does. Hopefully, Caltrans will come out with more guidance soon. It will release information soon after getting public comments. For off-system projects, you’ll be adopting your own CEQA guidelines. Mr. Feenstra said the Transportation Analysis Framework is expected to come out in a few days. There is not much information on this, but the purpose of this document is to direct agencies on how to select methods for VMT analysis. There is a slide that graphically presents what Caltrans is talking about with regard to induced demand. The VMT that has to be mitigated is the horizon year difference between the VMT with the project and the VMT without the project. The theoretical background growth that has nothing to do with the project is not an impact and doesn’t have to be mitigated but the extra VMT created by the project is impacted and has to be disclosed in the document and mitigated for, if practical. Mr. Feenstra also referenced the following: • RCTC Comment Letter re: Caltrans Draft Implementation Memorandum, February 20, 2020 • Caltrans SB 743 Capacity Increasing Project List, February 21, 2020 • Caltrans Draft TISG Memorandum, February 28, 2020 • BB&K SB 743 Presentation at RCTC Commission Workshop, January 31, 2020 Lorelle Moe-Luna stated that one of the most helpful resources will be to go to Caltrans’ SB 743 Implementation web page where you can request to be added to its distribution list for updates. She also stated that staff will recap what was discussed in an email after this meeting. She said staff will send a link to a YouTube presentation by Chris Schmidt who is the Caltrans Headquarters SB 743 Program Manager. Question: What are the chances that Caltrans will respond to your input? Response: We are trying to work with our various partners throughout the state, for example the Self- Help County Coalition and our other regional partners, SCAG and other MPOs, to provide as many comments as possible. RCTC encourages you to review the available material (the TISG document), which is in draft form. Caltrans will accept comments through March 30. 4 9. 2021 ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM CYCLE 5 UPDATE Martha Masters, RCTC, reported that starting on page two of the Active Transportation Program (ATP) PowerPoint on March 25/26 the CTC will be adopting the ATP guidelines and it marks the opening date of the ATP call for projects. The ATP applications will be due June 15. In December, the CTC will adopt the statewide and small urban and rural portions of the program. In May 2021, the CTC will adopt the MPO projects. There is a link in the agenda and in the PowerPoint to download the ATP guidelines. Cycle 5 will include five years of funding with capacity starting in federal fiscal year 21/22 thru 24/25. Note the funding amounts in the agenda item and the PowerPoint are in millions. For Cycle 5, a total of approximately $446 million will be available statewide, $100M each fiscal year from 21/22 through 22/23 and approximately $123M each for FY 23/24 through 24/25. Slide four of the PowerPoint shows the application types. They will be the same application types as in the last ATP cycle. The total project cost needs to be greater than $7 million to be considered a large project; the total project cost amount should be more than $2 million and up to $7 million for a medium project. For the small projects application type, the total project cost increased from $1.5 million to $2 million to be considered under that category. The non-infrastructure only and ATP plans are still application types with no total project cost restrictions. Applications for infrastructure projects must utilize the application type based on the entire project cost, not the ATP request amount. Also, new infrastructure projects will not be programmed without a complete project study report or project study report equivalent. In addition, the healthy places index has been added to the disadvantaged communities’ criteria. A link is provided in the agenda for more resources. Ms. Masters encouraged attendance at the GoToMeeting scheduled for March 16 at 1:00 p.m., which was announced earlier in the day, for the SCAG/RCTC ATP workshop. Cory Wilkerson, SCAG, who has a lot of experience working on ATP applications is expected to provide useful information. RCTC will record it and will share the link once it becomes available. 10. FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE MEASURES Ms. Masters reminded the TAC of her September 2019 presentation to the TAC regarding the Federal Transportation Improvement Plan (FTIP) Performance Measures attached to the FTIP. She referenced today’s PowerPoint and said that due to the enactment of MAP 21 and FAST Act, performance-based transportation planning became a federally mandated activity. New to the 2021 FTIP process are performance measures for highway safety, infrastructure conditions, congestion, delay, air quality, freight facilities, and transit stations. Caltrans and SCAG are required to adopt targets for those performance measures. The performance measures Caltrans and SCAG adopted have been categorized into three local and highway sections (safety, pavement/bridge condition, and system performance) plus the safety and transit asset management sections related to transit. 5 She also provided a project template that will be required for each project RCTC submitted through the 2021 FTIP. For each applicable category, all an agency has to do is indicate if that certain project under, say, the first measure ‘roadway crash fatality impact’ would provide either a significant improvement because the project is specific for safety, a moderate improvement because the project has a safety element, a minimal improvement, or no impact. Instructions for these are included as attachment 1 to the FTIP Performance Measure agenda item. These will be sent to agencies again in the next few weeks. Staff are currently waiting for SCAG to provide their final due date and to provide their final instructions so they can be sent to all agencies. 11. SB 821 BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES PROGRAM REFRESH Jenny Chan, RCTC, stated this item is for the TAC to approve the formation of a sub-committee to examine the current SB 821 program and potentially update the current policies and procedures. Ms. Chan stated the SB 821 program funds bicycle and pedestrian projects through a competitive call for projects that occurs every odd-numbered year. During the last call, applicants and evaluators provided constructive feedback to staff regarding ways to improve the program. Suggestions included: • Limiting the number of applications an agency can submit; • Refining the questions in the applications; and • Providing points for the quality of an application. Additionally, staff would like to reexamine the methodology in scoring the population equity criteria and look for ways to streamline executing the MOUs between the Commission and awardees. As such, staff recommended forming a subcommittee to examine the current program and update the policies and procedures in time for the next Call for Projects, which will start on February 1 of 2021. Staff will be looking for volunteers within the TAC. The subcommittee will most likely meet after the TAC meeting, and if needed, we can also host a teleconference. Ms. Chan asked if anyone is interested in participating or has suggestions for the SB 821 program that you would want the subcommittee to consider, to email her at jchan@rctc.org. M/S/C (Hemsley/Magana) to form a subcommittee to examine the current program and update the policy and procedures. 12. INLAND EMPIRE COMPREHENSIVE MULTIMODAL CORRIDOR PLAN – SUB-CORRIDOR PROJECT LIST Ms. Chan stated the Commission, in partnership with SBCTA, Caltrans District 8 and SCAG, is developing the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan or IE-CMCP. This Plan is intended to identify multimodal infrastructure opportunities in Western Riverside County and San Bernardino County. Completing this plan will allow SBCTA and RCTC to compete in the SB 1 Solutions for Congested Corridors Program. Per the Program Guidelines, proposed projects must be identified in a multimodal corridor plan. Additionally, all multimodal plans must adhere to the Caltrans Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan guidelines that the CTC adopted in December 2018. Per the guidelines, there is no specific format 6 that the Plan must meet. CTC and Caltrans understand the Plans are unique to the region in which they are prepared. Also, the guidelines are not restrictive in what constitutes a corridor. Land use, origins and destinations, and others can be used to define the limits of a corridor. In the last eight months, staff has been working on an accelerated schedule with our partners and the consultant in order to complete the Plan by June 2020. Thus far, the project team: • Identified and analyzed the travel characteristics of the area; • Engaged with the local entities within the project area; and • Conducted a literature review of existing planning documents such as the SCAG 2016 RTP, RCTC 10-Year Highway Delivery Plan, WRCOG Active Transportation Plan, and RCTC Traffic Relief Plan. Through these efforts, the project team identified 10 specific sub-corridors that will be highlighted in the IE-CMCP. A factsheet will be developed for each sub-corridor with information on land use, demographics, and a discussion on the current state of the transportation network. The factsheet will also include a list of regionally significant multimodal projects that will address the transportation challenges within that corridor. A map and the project list for each of the 10 sub-corridors is attached to the staff report for your review. Staff is expecting a draft Plan by early April and will be emailing the Plan to the TAC for further review. The Plan is expected to be finalized in June so we will be working quickly. 13. CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION RECAP Ms. Guizado stated the next CTC meeting will be next Wednesday; therefore, the information provided today is from the January CTC meeting. She briefly outlined the CTC actions at that meeting, which are included in her staff report attached to the agenda. 14. COMMISSION RECAP Ms. Guizado identified Commission actions at RCTC’s December 2019 Commission meeting, January 2020 workshop and Commission meeting, and March 2020 Commission meeting, which are outlined in her staff report attached to the agenda. 15. CALTRANS DISTRICT 8 LOCAL ASSISTANCE UPDATE Albert Vergel De Dios, Caltrans District 8, introduced Leslie Avila, Eddie Moreno-Castaneda, and Aaron Duque. He provided the following updates: • Southern California Local Assistance management meeting to be held at District 7 March 20 has been postponed. Other training and workshop meetings may be postponed or done by web or teleconferences as well. • There are no new bridge projects that will be added in the March 2020 bridge list. Caltrans is considering revisiting the high cost bridge policy to show a more realistic and accurate cost estimate. Before that, an office bulletin will be provided. Policy and procedure changes 7 considered would focus on sufficiency standards and funding for more infrastructure and efficient projects. • Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) oversight committee meeting: included discussion of adjustment of goals and methodology, review of a front-end certification process, OBEO will monitor DBE to update certification. Caltrans encouraged agencies to provide recommendations to improve the program. • SAFE Vehicle Rule - Caltrans has made available a frequently asked questions for Part 1, dated January 2020. Copies are available upon request. Part 2 is anticipated April 2020. • Senate Bill 743 – Local assistance projects are within the state highway system and projects may be impacted by SB 743. He announced a new Director Toks Omishakin Deputy Director of Planning and Modal Programs Jeanie Ward-Waller Acting Division Chief of Local Assistance Dee Lam In the last council meetings, discussions were held about the new five-year plan focusing on safety, innovation, efficiency, and partnership. Local Assistance will focus on the following four programs to make the policies, guidelines, and procedures clearer for effective delivery of the projects: • APTA agreement • Environmental • DPE • AME consultant selection Mr. Vergel De Dios reported discussions at the council meeting also included Section 130 - the railway, highway crossing safety program that eliminates hazards on the public railway and highway crossings. Senate Bill 137 that makes it possible to de-federalize $100 million of safety projects was also discussed. Guidelines are still being developed. For updates from DMLA implementation, Inactives are still staying below two percent. If you need to extend your project end date, send the request to FHWA. There is an effort to reduce the time process from 280 days to 30 days. Local agencies would still have to submit the hard copies to the district and local assistance will submit them to headquarters electronically. Regarding the lean 6-sigma effort, the average is 21 days and local assistance is attempting to reduce that to 14 days. Mr. Vergel De Dios further reported that Local Assistance is working to improve the bridge-based oversight National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. He said they are also working on the allocation process. It will remain at 15 days, but they want to reduce the errors in the submittals using the Viper software. An agency engagement policy is being initiated in the district and local assistance will contact agencies at least twice this month and monthly thereafter to get a status of all the local assistance projects and provide funding opportunities for those agencies. There will be staff changes in April. 8 Question: Regarding the RFA process, if a local agency needs assistance, who should they contact at local assistance? Response: Mr. Vergel De Dios said to contact him. Leslie Avila, Caltrans Local Assistance, reminded the committee to submit their off-system fund requests by March 16 for the May CTC meeting. If you miss that deadline, the deadline to submit for the June meeting is April 27, 2020. The timeline for the ATP Cycle 5 call for projects will be March 25-26. The deadline to submit applications will be June 15. The Commission will adopt the statewide and small urban and rural portions in December. The MPO portion will be adopted in 2021. The Exhibit 10C process has changed to be more streamlined and simplified. It’s now online; therefore, when a contract will be awarded or amended it must be completed in that database prior to award before the first invoice. Ms. Avila further reported that Office Bulletin 1903 incorporated Office Bulletin 1406, which was a pilot program. Caltrans is now going to review and approve all contract goals on construction contract estimates over $2 million and consulting contracts over $500,000. She said training may be available through teleconferences or websites or just postponed in general. Some online training opportunities are: • UC Berkeley website • Transportation Research Board website • TCAP • Caltrans Guidance and Oversight Training Homepage 16. COMMITTEE MEMBER/STAFF REPORT There were no comments. 17. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Technical advisory Committee, the meeting adjourned at approximately 12:15 p.m. The next meeting will be May 19, 2020, 10:00, at the Riverside County Transportation Commission, March Field Conference Room A, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA 92501. Respectfully submitted, Jillian Guizado Planning and Programming Manager 9 AGENDA ITEM 5 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director SUBJECT: Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file the Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The proposed final Traffic Relief Plan represents the vision, values, and long-term transportation priorities of Riverside County residents, leaders, and community stakeholders. The Traffic Relief Plan contains: •A roadmap for expenditure of $8.8 billion in potential future funding; •Policies to ensure equity and balance of investments; •Accountability requirements; and •Locally-driven implementation in each of Riverside County’s distinct subregions The Commission approved the draft Traffic Relief Plan on January 8, 2020. The Commission’s Traffic Relief Strategy Committee developed the draft plan between September and December 2019. The Committee thoroughly vetted the contents of the draft plan in public meetings and recommended each element of the plan to the Commission for approval. The draft plan was presented to the residents of Riverside County through a comprehensive Commission-approved public engagement program. The public engagement activities resulted in significant response, which is documented in Attachment 2. DISCUSSION: The final Traffic Relief Plan contains several changes based upon public input and recommendations from legal counsel. In summary, those changes are: •Two projects added in Western Riverside County – The final plan adds the I-10/Main Street interchange in Cabazon and Limonite Avenue Gap Closure based on input from the Morongo Band of Mission Indians and the city of Eastvale, respectively; •Palo Verde Valley plan amended – At the request of the city of Blythe, the plan now covers I-10 interchanges and gateway enhancement projects and directs all funds generated 11 through the plan in the Palo Verde Valley to the city of Blythe and County of Riverside, consistent with Measure A. Transit remains an eligible expenditure; •New Technology flexibility clarified – Many members of the public commented that the New Technology expenditure category was vague and needed more detail. The Committee and Commission have previously expressed a desire to remain adaptable to yet-unknown advances in technology. Language was added to convey this intent; •Language modified – Legal counsel amended language throughout the plan to ensure the document is suitable to be placed on the ballot in the future, if the Commission so chooses; and •Compliance with state laws and regulations emphasized – The final plan makes clear that it is not a “project” under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) – a similar statement is made in this staff report below. Additionally, a portion of the funds generated through the plan will be devoted to satisfying the requirements of SB 743, state law requiring particular analysis and mitigation of project impacts, and implementing regulations. An additional expenditure category was created in the plan to highlight this expenditure type. The plan’s new language on mitigation of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) also provides a policy foundation for the Commission to begin addressing VMT as necessary. Qualitative results from the survey offered at trafficreliefplan.org demonstrate a clear majority support for the plan overall, as well as for each of the proposed expenditure categories. Public sentiment data gathered through social media also demonstrates net public support for the plan. Public input collected since the Commission approved the draft Traffic Relief Plan in January is consistent with results of the #RebootMyCommute initiative in 2019 and prior quantitative surveys. Staff halted a final, statistically relevant, quantitative survey due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the Commission’s action on April 8, 2020 to decline to place the plan on the November 2020 ballot. Based on all quantitative and qualitative research conducted to date on public opinion in Riverside County, staff is confident that the proposed final Traffic Relief Plan enjoys support from well more than a majority of residents. The Traffic Relief Plan has independent utility as an aspirational planning document supported by grassroots public input. The Commission can use the Traffic Relief Plan as a reference point for future decisions. The projects and services within the plan are unlikely to be delivered without a funding source. Measure A remains the Commission’s most significant funding source and is tied to specific projects and programs approved by Riverside County voters in 2002. Facts demonstrate that Measure A revenue and status quo funding from state, federal, toll, and development fee programs will not be sufficient to deliver all projects in the Measure A expenditure plan before Measure A sunsets, let alone the additional projects in the Traffic Relief Plan. The Traffic Relief Plan fulfills the objectives of the Commission-adopted 2016 RCTC Strategic Assessment and meets the requirements of Public Utilities Code Section 240302. 12 Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act This Traffic Relief Plan is not a “project” under the CEQA and, alternatively, is exempt from CEQA review. This is because the Traffic Relief Plan is intended to provide a funding mechanism for potential future projects and programs related to the Commission’s provision of transportation services. However, the Commission is not approving the construction of any projects or programs that may result in any direct or indirect physical change in the environment; future voter approval is required prior to the establishment of any funding mechanism as set forth in Public Utilities Code Section 240301; and all appropriate state and federal environmental review will be required and completed prior to any future approval of specific transportation projects and programs. Attachments: 1) Final Traffic Relief Plan 2) Executive Summary of Public Engagement for Traffic Relief Plan 13 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN A local strategy to improve traffic flow, safety, and economic opportunity in Riverside County ATTACHMENT 1 14 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Table of Contents Overview of the Traffic Relief Plan ...................................................................................................1 Accountability to Taxpayers .............................................................................................................3 Equity and Balance ..........................................................................................................................4 Traffic Relief Plan: Your Guide to Projects and Services ..................................................................6 Coachella Valley ..............................................................................................................................7 Palo Verde Valley (Blythe) ................................................................................................................9 Western Riverside County .............................................................................................................10 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 15 Your voice. Your plan. The Traffic Relief Plan is a local strategy to reduce traffic bottlenecks, improve safety, and help create a stronger, more sustainable economy for our communities. You and thousands of your neighbors expressed your thoughts about this plan and how you want to improve transportation in Riverside County. From freeways that move faster, to more frequent trains, and specific local streets that need upgrades, you told us that these improvements will make a difference to your life. You also told us that creating more jobs in Riverside County can help solve these transportation issues. We’ve listened. Highlights of the Traffic Relief Plan include: • Improving freeway traffic flow on I-10, I-15, the 60, 91, and I-215 by adding lanes, upgrading on- and off-ramps and bridges, and increasing bus and Metrolink frequencies. • Improving traffic flow and safety on major roads such as Alessandro Boulevard, Bob Hope Drive, Bundy Canyon Road, Clinton Keith Road, Cook Street, Fred Waring Drive, Heacock Street, Highway 111, Indian Canyon Drive, Keller Road, Limonite Avenue, Monroe Street, Redlands Boulevard, Sun Lake Boulevard, Temescal Canyon Road, and Van Buren Boulevard. • Safety improvements on highly-traveled two-lane roads such as Gilman Springs Road and Grand Avenue and at intersections with railroad tracks. • Safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists including for children going to and from school. • Increasing frequency of Metrolink train service by adding new tracks and more trains, and making existing train service more sustainable over the long-term. • Improving the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley by accelerating completion of a new east-west highway called the Mid County Parkway and a new Route 79, and extending Metrolink service to Hemet and San Jacinto. • Increasing frequency and convenience of express bus services throughout Riverside County, enabling more commuters to use alternatives to driving, complete with wi-fi enabled buses. • Improving the condition of existing roads by providing funds to local governments for basic pothole repairs, paving of dirt roads, and synchronizing signals. • Providing more independence and opportunity for residents who rely on public transportation services, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, students, and residents of rural communities. • Using new technologies that can improve the efficiency and safety of the current roadway and public transit systems, paving the way for connected and autonomous vehicles. • Completing the regional trail system in Riverside County to improve safe routes to school, and offer bicycle commuting for those who would take their cars off the road at commute times. • Constructing rail stations in the Coachella Valley and San Gorgonio Pass to prepare for daily train service to the desert from L.A. via Riverside and Orange County. OVERVIEW OF THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 1 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Voter Approval: This Traffic Relief Plan was drafted to serve as an expenditure plan for a possible voter-approved RCTC sales tax measure. Until a sales tax measure to fund the plan is placed before the voters and approved, the plan is aspirational and the financial and other mandatory requirements of the plan are not operative. 16 The Traffic Relief Plan represents a change in the thinking of the past by: • Encouraging more local employment. Incentives are created for cities to plan for local job-creation and the infrastructure to support those new jobs so residents can have careers closer to home. • Addressing the toughest bottlenecks and traffic problems. Speeding up how quickly new lanes and public transit options can be implemented where traffic is the worst and funding is not otherwise available. • Connecting our own county. The Traffic Relief Plan prioritizes modernizing the transportation system within Riverside County. • Providing small, rural, and underserved communities with necessary infrastructure. • Implementing new technology that can increase efficiency of existing infrastructure, increase convenience of public transportation, and prepare for autonomous and connected vehicles. • All funds will stay local. Coachella Valley funds stay in the Coachella Valley. Western Riverside County funds stay in Western Riverside County. Palo Verde Valley (Blythe) funds stay in Palo Verde Valley. Sacramento and D.C. cannot take these locally-controlled funds. • More funds to speed up projects. Many transportation improvements that Riverside County residents have said they want are decades away. The Traffic Relief Plan would provide funding to speed up completion of these projects. • Local leaders representing every city and unincorporated community in Riverside County will oversee implementation of the Traffic Relief Plan. These leaders serve on the board of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), which is the legally responsible public entity for regional transportation planning and funding in Riverside County. To ensure local control in the Coachella Valley, RCTC will delegate implementation of the Traffic Relief Plan to the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). The Blythe City Council and County Board of Supervisors will implement the Traffic Relief Plan in the Palo Verde Valley. • Independent financial audits are required and must be disclosed to the public to ensure that the Traffic Relief Plan is being implemented lawfully and in accordance with the will of voters. • No more than 1% of net revenues generated by the Traffic Relief Plan will be used for administrative salaries and benefits to administer the entire Plan. OVERVIEW OF THE TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN 2Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Questions? If you have questions about the Traffic Relief Plan, please contact the Riverside County Transportation Commission at info@rctc.org or 951-787-7141. 17 Independent Audits Required Upon voter approval of a revenue source for the Plan, no less than annually, RCTC will obtain an independent fiscal audit of the expenditure of all funds raised through the Plan. The audit will determine compliance with requirements of the Plan and its governing Ordinance. The audit will be published on the internet. Efficiency and Local Control Local Voice. Local Control. Riverside County voters will enact the Plan, which will then be implemented through their locally elected representatives and local public works professionals. By law, the Plan is implemented by RCTC, which is governed by local city council members or mayors of every city and all five members of the County Board of Supervisors. No Money Diverted to Sacramento and Washington. State and federal governments cannot legally divert, take, or direct funds raised through this local Plan and its governing ordinance. Fiscal Accountability and Efficiency. Administrative salaries and benefits to administer the Plan are limited to no more than 1% of net revenues generated under the Plan’s governing ordinance. Implementation of this Plan will not require the creation of any new government entity. To achieve efficiency and local control, RCTC may delegate appropriate responsibilities for administering components of the Plan to existing local governments at its discretion. Transparency and Openness Implementation of the Plan will occur in compliance with all transparency, disclosure, and open meetings laws. Mandatory Plan Review and Updates Through a public process, RCTC must formally review this Plan at least every 10 years after it takes effect to ensure the Plan reflects the current and anticipated future needs of Riverside County’s residents. If RCTC wishes to amend the Plan after its review or at any other point in time, RCTC must follow current state law and this Plan’s voter-approved governing ordinance to do so. Innovation and Partnership To reduce the burden on taxpayers to fully fund the transportation needs of Riverside County, there are opportunities to partner with the private sector to offset costs, generate revenue to pay for public services and projects, or increase the efficiency of existing infrastructure. Where the law allows and adequate public benefits can be demonstrated, RCTC may use Plan funds to partner with non-governmental entities on projects, services, and technologies. Examples of potential partnerships include, but are not limited to, joint development of rail stations, leasing of RCTC property, ride-sharing and alternative transportation services, construction of rail tracks on private rights of way, and partnering on advanced roadway and vehicle technologies that improve traffic flow or reduce emissions. Flexibility to Expedite Projects To expedite priority projects and services, reduce costs to taxpayers, or avoid loss of other funding, RCTC may make maximum use of funds by temporarily shifting funds between transportation purposes. In borrowing and making loans, the proportionate shares for areas and purposes over the duration of the Plan may not be changed without an amendment of the Plan as required by law. RCTC may issue bonds or other debt against future revenue to achieve any objectives of the Plan. RCTC will issue bonds or other debt in accordance with applicable laws. The issuances of bonds or other debt will be limited by a threshold adopted by RCTC in a public meeting compliant with open meetings laws. ACCOUNTABILITY TO TAXPAYERS 3 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 18 Equity among Regions and Residents Many residents of Riverside County live in areas that lack infrastructure and public transportation services. A growing number of residents face increasing traffic congestion. Therefore, the Traffic Relief Plan commits to providing equity for Riverside County residents in the following ways: Geography The Plan recognizes the three distinct subregions of Riverside County and ensures that revenues raised by the Plan in each subregion remain there and cannot be moved to other parts of the county: • Coachella Valley • Palo Verde Valley (Blythe area) • Western Riverside County (Riverside and Corona areas, Moreno Valley and Perris areas, Hemet-San Jacinto Valley, San Gorgonio Pass, and Temecula-Murrieta-Lake Elsinore areas) Small, Rural, Underserved Communities Decisions based on needs. Priority for investments in areas requiring significant infrastructure repairs and upgrades will be determined based on objective needs. Maintenance of local roads. All communities will have access to new funding to keep local streets and roads in good condition. Increased options for residents. The Traffic Relief Plan places significant focus on seniors, students, veterans, individuals with disabilities, and residents of rural and underserved communities who use public transportation regularly. Balanced Transportation System The Traffic Relief Plan recognizes all types of transportation needs for Riverside County. Proactively addressing the transportation issues in Riverside County requires a flexible and all-of-the-above approach. Mitigation of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) The Traffic Relief Plan makes significant improvements to the roadway network in Riverside County through adding lanes and improving efficiency through technology. Recent laws and regulations governing implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) for transportation projects require mitigation for any increases to the amount of miles driven by automobiles (referred to as “vehicle miles traveled” or “VMT”). Practically, obtaining state approvals of projects that increase the number of lanes on roads and highways will be very difficult without mitigating increases in VMT resulting from those projects. Mitigation of increased VMT for major transportation projects under state CEQA law can take many forms, including but not limited to: • Public transportation, • Commuting strategies such as ride-sharing, telecommuting, alternative schedules, • Creating employment in Riverside County to reduce commute distances, • Habitat and open space preservation, and • New technologies. EQUITY AND BALANCE 4Traffic Relief Plan 2020 19 EQUITY AND BALANCE 5 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act The Traffic Relief Plan is not a “project” under the California Environmental Quality Act and, therefore, is exempt from CEQA review. This is because the Plan is designed to provide a funding mechanism for potential future projects and programs related to the Commission’s provision of transportation services. However, the Commission is not approving the construction of any projects that may result in a direct or indirect physical change in the environment; future voter approval is required prior to establishing any funding mechanism as set forth in Public Utilities Code Section 240301; and all appropriate state and federal environmental review will be required and completed prior to any future approval of specific projects. 20 Investment Types The Plan includes nine investment types. In the Coachella Valley, all investment types are funded through the valleywide Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS). In Western Riverside County, a specific percentage of funding is reserved for each investment type, with several sub-types. In the Palo Verde Valley (Blythe), funds can be used on any investment type below. Roads – Widening and extending major roadways for traffic flow and safety; repairing potholes and repaving roads; adding stop signs, signals and other safety features; retrofitting bridges; coordinating traffic signal timing on major streets; adding crosswalks, sidewalks and signage for pedestrians, especially for students traveling to and from school; and separating streets from railroad tracks Highways – Adding lanes to the 91, 60, Interstate 15, and Interstate 215, improving traffic flow on Highway 111 and Interstate 10 in the Coachella Valley, and constructing the Mid County Parkway and a new Route 79 Highway Access – Building and improving interchanges, bridges, on-ramps and off-ramps with interstates and state routes Trains – Increasing frequency and safety of Metrolink trains; building new tracks, parking and stations; extending service from Perris to Hemet and San Jacinto, and building stations in the San Gorgonio Pass and Coachella Valley to support daily passenger service between L.A. and the Coachella Valley; sustaining operation of rail service throughout the county Buses – Expanding express/rapid bus service options; modernizing and adding zero-emission buses; providing targeted transit services and keeping bus fares low for seniors, veterans, students and individuals with disabilities; upgrading bus stops and amenities; and improving connections between home, transit and workplaces Commuter Assistance – Expanding Freeway Service Patrol roadside assistance and maintaining and expanding carpool/vanpool service and Park & Ride Lots Trails – Expanding and improving access to hiking, cycling, and walking/running by completing Riverside County’s master-planned regional trail system to improve safe routes to school, and offer safe bicycle commuting for those who would take their cars off the road at commute times New Technology – Using innovation and new technology to improve traffic flow, provide better information to travelers, improve movement of commerce and support local and regional economic development Flood and Dust Control – Reinforcing roadways and infrastructure against natural hazards in the Coachella Valley TRAFFIC RELIEF PLAN: YOUR GUIDE TO PROJECTS & SERVICES 6Traffic Relief Plan 2020 21 RanchoMirage Palm Springs PalmDesert IndianWells La Quinta Indio DesertHot Springs Coachella CathedralCity Hemet BeaumontBanning Ramon Rd Var n e r R d Fred Waring Dr Country Club Dr Dinah Shore Dr Dillon Rd Vista Chino Ge n e A u t r y T r a i l E Palm C a n y o n D r Avenue 54 Avenue 48 Avenue 50 Washington StCook StPortola AveMonterey AveBob Hope DrDate Palm DrPalm DrLittle Morongo RdIndian Canyon DrSunrise WayMonroe StJefferson StJackson St10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 111 111 243 74 86 86 62 79 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA Palm SpringsInternational Airport El PaseoShopping District The LivingDesert Zoo& Gardens Indian WellsTennis Garden PoloGrounds Agua CalienteResort Casino Spa Joshua Tree National Park UC RiversidePalm DesertCampus FantasySpringsResortCasino Spotlight 29 Casino CSUSBPalm DesertCampus Palm SpringsAerial Tramway Traffic Relief: Coachella Valley Highway Access Highways Trains New Technology Flood & DustControl Highway Access Highways Trains New Technology Flood & DustControl 22 The Coachella Valley component of the Traffic Relief Plan calls for improvements to all aspects of the transportation system. All revenues generated under the Plan in the Coachella Valley will remain in the Coachella Valley for expenditure. Funding will provide investments in communities that fully participate in, and are compliant with, the Coachella Valley’s Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) and Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) policies and procedures. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) will administer the Plan in the Coachella Valley. CVAG is a public agency governed by an Executive Committee consisting of the mayor or an elected official representing every city council in the Coachella Valley and the City of Blythe, all five County Supervisors, and the Tribal Chairmen from the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians and Cabazon Band of Mission Indians. CVAG will establish priorities according to the Transportation Project Prioritization Process (TPPS), which is a merit-based method of scoring all regional projects in the Coachella Valley. Project priorities are based on criteria adopted by the CVAG Executive Committee, as recommended by civil engineers and public works professionals serving on technical sub-committees that represent every CVAG member jurisdiction. The TPPS is the guiding document for transportation investments on regional roadways, including highway interchanges, road widenings and improvements, bridge projects and valleywide signal synchronization. The TPPS will include proposed investments in creating and maintaining transportation infrastructure, including but not limited to: • Passenger rail investments, such as train stations, that help connect the Coachella Valley to Los Angeles and/or Orange County; • Upgrading infrastructure to eliminate or reduce road closures associated with natural disasters, such as flooding and blow sand; • Infrastructure and systems to improve all forms of mass transit; • Active transportation, such as facilities for biking and walking safely; • New mobility concepts and technologies to connect the workforce to the workplace and to reduce seasonal and event-related traffic congestion; and • Creating consistency across the Coachella Valley’s regional roadways by providing additional maintenance programs and enhancements that improve the travel experience for residents and visitors. The Plan in the Coachella Valley will also be consistent with countywide strategies to accelerate investments, achieve balance and equity, provide economic opportunities, and accommodate changing transportation technologies. The Coachella Valley portion of the Plan will also fund operations and maintenance (O&M) of regional transportation corridors as identified in the TPPS. The CVAG regional O&M program would support operations, repairs, and replacement of traffic management systems, pavement surfaces and traffic control devices. This program will enhance existing efforts to promote uniform standards, keep transportation infrastructure in good condition, and extend the life cycle of Coachella Valley’s transportation infrastructure. These regional corridors span cities and unincorporated communities and include, but are not limited to: • Highway 111• Washington Street• Ramon Road• Monterey Avenue • Cook Street• Bob Hope Drive • Fred Waring Drive • Dinah Shore Drive • Gene Autry Trail/Palm Drive • Date Palm Drive• Indio Boulevard • Jefferson Street • Vista Chino• Varner Road • Palm Canyon Drive• Country Club Drive • Monroe Street• Avenue 48• Avenue 50 • Cesar Chavez Street• Sunrise Way• Indian Canyon Drive • Jackson Street TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANCoachella Valley 8Traffic Relief Plan 2020 23 All revenues generated in the Palo Verde Valley will remain in the Palo Verde Valley, with all revenue returned directly to the City of Blythe and County of Riverside. The Blythe City Council will have authority to set priorities and expend funds within the city limits and the County Board of Supervisors will have authority to expend funds in unincorporated areas of the Palo Verde Valley. Investments made by the City of Blythe and County must be for transportation purposes for the benefit of Palo Verde Valley residents and must be approved in an open and transparent manner pursuant to open meetings laws. All revenues generated through the Traffic Relief Plan in the Palo Verde Valley shall remain in the Palo Verde Valley and cannot be diverted to other areas of Riverside County. To address transportation needs in rural areas, such as the Palo Verde Valley, and to strengthen the agricultural economy and tourism, the Plan will focus on: • Safety and maintenance of local streets and roads; • Ensuring public infrastructure complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act; • Closing sidewalk gaps and enhancing bike lanes for improved pedestrian access to and from schools; • Improving the condition of interchanges at Interstate 10, including landscaping and gateway enhancements; • Establishing a new vanpool program for residents commuting to major employment areas, such as Ironwood and Chuckawalla Valley prisons, Coachella Valley, and Arizona; • Providing reduced- or free-fare public transit to increase access to education, healthcare, employment, and services; • Replacing and expanding the bus fleet to improve air quality with low- and zero- emission vehicles; • Upgrading transit operating and maintenance facilities to maintain transit vehicles and infrastructure in good condition; and • Increasing frequency and expanding public transit options for education, healthcare, employment and services in underserved neighborhoods. Transportation investments through the Plan will also serve as a driver for economic development in the community. Improving the transportation network will leverage other public and private investments and encourage new businesses to invest. TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANPalo Verde Valley 9 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 24 Wildomar Canyon Lake Lake Elsinore Menifee Eastvale Temecula LakeMatthews LakeElsinore CanyonLake LakePerris VailLake Murrieta SanJacinto Perris Moreno Valley Highland Hemet Beaumont Banning Cabazon Rialto RanchoCucamonga Norco JurupaValley Fontana Corona Claremont Riverside Calimesa NORTHWEST SANGORGONIOPASS CENTRAL SOUTHWEST R I V E R S I D E C O . O R A N G E C O . RIVE R S I D E C O . SAN D I E G O C O . SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. 241 259 71 30 91 74 74 74 74 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 371 243 74 79 79 38 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 79 Traffic Relief: Western Riverside County Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 25 Western Riverside County traffic relief funds will be allocated to transportation projects and services as shown in the chart above. RCTC will establish criteria to prioritize projects and services based upon the recommendation of civil engineers and public works professionals serving on the Technical Advisory Committee. Prioritization must be consistent with the vision, goals, objectives, principles, policies, and desired outcomes described in the Traffic Relief Plan. For any local jurisdiction to receive funds through the Traffic Relief Plan, the jurisdiction must be a participant in good standing in the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program, which ensures that new development pays for its fair share of impacts on the transportation system, and the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Program (MSHCP), which protects locally endangered and threatened plants and animals and ensures that transportation projects can receive streamlined environmental approvals. The following pages describe the projects and services envisioned to be implemented. These projects and services were identified by RCTC Commissioners, members of the public, local transportation experts, and civic leaders in Riverside County through extensive public outreach and engagement. RCTC may add projects and services not mentioned in the Plan if those projects and services are consistent with the Plan or achieve the same result as a project or service mentioned in the Plan. Three percent of revenues generated through voter-approval of the Plan are dedicated to mitigation of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) to help achieve compliance with state laws and regulations. More Bus Service,40% Trains, 16% Buses, 6% Trails, 2% Commuter Assistance, 3% New Technology, 5% Roads, 18% VMT Mitigation, 3% Highways, 34% Road Improvements,60% Highway Access, 13% Western Riverside County Traffic Relief Investments Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 11 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 26 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 12Traffic Relief Plan 2020 The Traffic Relief Plan makes substantial investments in improving the flow of local highways and residents’ abilities to get on and off them more easily. Many of these improvements have already been identified in local plans and are awaiting funding to be constructed. The Traffic Relief Plan devotes 34% of funding in Western Riverside County toward highway improvements and 13% toward improved highway access. Combined, these investments can achieve the following on the county’s major highway corridors: I-15 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction to I-15 between Cajalco Road in Corona and the San Diego County line • Eliminate the “lane drops” on southbound I-15 between Magnolia Avenue and Cajalco Road in Corona • Construct the final phase of the French Valley Parkway interchange at I-15 in Temecula, which includes: o Widening ramps at Winchester Road o Constructing on and off ramps to I-15 from French Valley Parkway and a bridge over I-15 o Constructing the French Valley Parkway from Jefferson Avenue to Ynez Road • Reconstruct interchanges with: o Central Avenue (Route 74) in Lake Elsinore o Wildomar Trail (formerly Baxter Road) in Wildomar o Bundy Canyon Road in Wildomar I-215 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction between Route 60 and Van Buren Boulevard • Construct new interchanges (on and off ramps) to I-215 at Keller Road in Murrieta and Garbani Road in Menifee • Reconstruct interchange at Harley Knox Boulevard in Moreno Valley 91 Corridor • Accelerate construction of at least one new lane in each direction on Route 91 between I-15 in Corona and Pierce Street in Riverside • Reconstruct interchanges on the 91 at: o Adams Street in Riverside o Tyler Street in Riverside 60 Corridor • Add at least one lane in each direction on Route 60 in Moreno Valley • Reconstruct interchanges on Route 60 at: o Etiwanda Avenue in Jurupa Valley o Rubidoux Boulevard in Jurupa Valley o Redlands Boulevard in Moreno Valley o Potrero Boulevard in Beaumont I-10 Corridor • Reconstruct interchanges on I-10 at: o Route 79 in Beaumont o Highland Springs Avenue in Beaumont and Banning o Pennsylvania Avenue in Beaumont o Morongo Parkway and Main Street in Cabazon o County Line Road and Cherry Valley Boulevard in Calimesa In addition to assisting automobile drivers, many of the above investments will address bottlenecks and safety concerns expressed by the public related to growing truck traffic. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 27 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County In Western Riverside County, 18% of funds will be invested improving the safety, flow, and overall condition of local roads. Maintaining Local Roads and Repairing Potholes Cities and the County of Riverside will receive road maintenance funds for repairing potholes and keeping roads in good condition based on objective factors recommended by local city and county public works directors serving on the Technical Advisory Committee, consisting of representatives of every city and the County of Riverside, and adopted by RCTC. The Technical Advisory Committee shall take into consideration transportation needs for smaller cities and unincorporated communities. Separating Local Roads from Railroad Tracks The large number and length of freight trains operating in Riverside County causes rail crossings to be blocked, creates traffic delays, and restricts first responder access to emergencies. The Plan calls for construction of under- or overpasses at rail crossings, such as: • Bellegrave Avenue • Hargrave Street • Jackson Street • Mary Street • Pennsylvania Avenue • San Gorgonio Avenue • Spruce Street • Tyler Street Projects will be prioritized based on factors including, but not limited to, readiness for construction, accident and fatality rates, hours of vehicle delay at the crossing, noise and air pollution, and availability of matching funds. Funding may be used to make projects more competitive to receive state or federal grants. Reducing Accidents and Fatalities on Major County Roads The Traffic Relief Plan creates a funding program to address roads where high numbers of fatalities occur, such as Gilman Springs Road and Grand Avenue. Improving Traffic Flow on Major Local Roads Some of the most impacted roads in Riverside County are the main roads that connect our neighborhood streets to highways and transit centers. Growing employment and economic activity in Riverside County will continue to add strain on these roads. Therefore, the Traffic Relief Plan would substantially invest in major roads, including but not limited to: • Alessandro Boulevard • Bundy Canyon Road • Clinton Keith Road • Heacock Street • Keller Road • Limonite Avenue • Redlands Boulevard • Sun Lake Boulevard • Temescal Canyon Road • Van Buren Boulevard Safe Routes to School The Plan will provide funding to cities, the County of Riverside, school districts, and other governmental and nonprofit entities through an application process to build infrastructure that provides safer routes for children to walk or bike to school and decreases injuries and fatalities. Eligible improvements include sidewalks, crosswalks, and bicycle lanes. Funding may be used to make projects more competitive to receive state or federal grants. 13 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 28 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 14Traffic Relief Plan 2020 New East-West Routes Routes 60 and 91 are congested at most times of the day. Limited east-west connections leave drivers with few options, especially in the southern parts of Riverside County, where people need to travel I-15 and I-215 to get to these east-west routes. Also, when there is an incident or severe traffic on I-10, especially around the holidays and festival seasons, there are no alternative routes between Banning and Cabazon. The County of Riverside is developing two east-west corridors between I-15 and I-215 and a parallel roadway to I-10 that currently lack funding: • Cajalco Road • Ethanac Expressway • I-10 Bypass between Banning and Cabazon The Traffic Relief Plan would provide funding to construct these routes in the near future. Improving the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley RCTC has invested nearly two decades into obtaining federal and state environmental clearances and community consensus for two major new transportation routes. Commitments for environmental mitigation have been made. However, the funding to construct these routes currently does not exist. Therefore, the Plan provides funding for accelerated construction and local operation and maintenance of the following two major projects: • A new Highway 79, which will align the 79 from Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway to improve traffic flow and safety and allow regional traffic to bypass local roads. • Mid County Parkway, a new 16-mile transportation corridor designed to relieve east-west traffic congestion between the San Jacinto and Perris areas. The Mid County Parkway will connect to Route 79, I-215, and multimodal bus and rail facilities that support the Metrolink 91/Perris Valley Line. Additionally, the Plan calls for construction of a rapid transit system between the Hemet-San Jacinto valley and the Perris/Moreno Valley/Riverside area to provide an alternative mode of travel. RCTC owns a rail line that extends from Perris to San Jacinto, which could be used to provide this new service. Rapid transit connections to the Temecula/Menifee/Murrieta area could also be considered. RCTC will collaborate with local cities, the County of Riverside, public transit agencies, tribal governments and the community in constructing these improvements. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 29 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County The Traffic Relief Plan devotes 16% of revenue to modernize rail service in Western Riverside County. Increased train frequencies, upgraded, and well-maintained stations, and expansion of service into new areas of Riverside County will increase economic opportunities within the region, reduce traffic congestion, and enhance the passenger experience. Increasing Frequency of Metrolink More frequent train service to current and future destinations in Riverside County will support Metrolink’s goal to double ridership by 2025 and support local efforts to attract more employers and jobs to Riverside County. Recognizing the benefit of train transportation to commuters, the economy, and the environment, the Traffic Relief Plan makes the following commitments: • Increasing frequency of Metrolink train service on the 91/Perris Valley Line and Inland Empire-Orange County Line • Constructing new railroad tracks within existing rights of way to allow more Metrolink trains to operate Extending Train Service to New Destinations in Riverside County To make daily train service possible between the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs, Indio, etc.) and Riverside, Orange County, and L.A., the Traffic Relief Plan calls for construction of a new passenger rail station in the San Gorgonio Pass. Additionally, the Traffic Relief Plan provides funding to extend Metrolink service to Hemet and San Jacinto via the existing railroad tracks which would be rehabilitated between Perris and San Jacinto. The Traffic Relief Plan also envisions a new rail station at Ramona Expressway near Perris and the existing rail line. Maintaining, Operating, and Upgrading Train Stations, Tracks, and Service The Traffic Relief Plan will modernize rail-related infrastructure in Riverside County to ensure that services can continue to operate safely and sustainably. Investments include but are not limited to: • Constructing new parking capacity at Metrolink stations in Corona, Riverside, and Perris • Constructing accessibility improvements at the Moreno Valley/March Field station • Operating and maintaining existing and future Metrolink rail stations. There are currently nine stations in Corona, Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Perris, and near Moreno Valley. Future stations are envisioned for an extension of service to Hemet and San Jacinto • Operating Metrolink trains through Riverside County at current and future increased frequencies • Maintaining locally-owned railroad right of way to ensure public safety and proper maintenance of the tracks • Investing in zero-emission trains 15 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 30 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 16Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Attracting Jobs to Riverside County through Rail Investment Rail stations provide opportunity for economic development and bringing new jobs to our communities and increasing the convenience of public transportation. The Traffic Relief Plan will create an incentive program for public-private partnerships to enhance existing and future rail stations through joint development opportunities. The Traffic Relief Plan also calls for new “reverse-commute” trains that bring passengers to Riverside County job centers, in addition to the current schedules that focus more on taking local residents to other counties. RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl The Traffic Relief Plan dedicates 6% of revenue to enhancing Western Riverside County’s bus transit system to reduce traffic congestion, increase sustainability, and provide more options to residents who rely on public transit to access medical care, employment, education, and other services. Expanding Rapid/Express Bus Rapid/Express buses provide an affordable, comfortable, and reduced-stress travel experience, especially for commuters traveling to other counties or across the county. These buses carry wi-fi and more comfortable seats than traditional buses. The Traffic Relief Plan expands rapid/commuter bus service along the major freeway corridors in Riverside County to destinations such as San Diego, Orange, and San Bernardino Counties, downtown Riverside, Temecula, Moreno Valley, Corona, and Perris. Rapid/commuter bus service can also connect to major destinations within Riverside County and the Inland Empire, such as commercial airports, business, retail, and entertainment centers. Modernizing and Sustaining Public Transportation To increase ridership, provide more efficient service, and reduce air pollution, the Traffic Relief Plan invests in new technologies: • Traffic signals and bus equipment that improve bus travel times. • Zero-emission buses and related maintenance and operations. Improving Riverside County’s public transportation system also requires investment in transportation hubs throughout Western Riverside County, where residents can connect to other forms of transportation, employment centers, and services. The Traffic Relief Plan also ensures the continued operation of bus service in Riverside County. Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 31 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County Increasing Options and Mobility for Seniors, Veterans, Students, Individuals with Disabilities, and Underserved and Rural Communities Approximately 13% of Riverside County residents are age 65 and older; about 11% are individuals with disabilities; 11% are low-income; 6% are veterans; and 25% are under age 18. A survey of public and human service providers in Riverside County indicates that about 40% of their constituents’ transportation needs are not being met with existing services. Addressing the needs of these groups requires a multifaceted approach that can be tailored to meet varying degrees of mobility and independence. Transportation needs and gaps of services for these groups are documented in local studies, which have found that increased independence and mobility can be achieved through expanded transit service; transportation for long-distrance regional medical trips; safe pedestrian and bicyclist pathways; transit affordability; and coordination with human service agencies. There is growing concern in many cities that as the population grows, the available resources to meet these target groups’ needs will not keep pace. Specialized Transit Grant Program The Traffic Relief Plan increases investment in specialized transportation providers that serve seniors, veterans, students, individuals with disabilities, and rural and underserved communities. The Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council, with representatives from these populations, will assist RCTC in administering and providing oversight to the program. The Traffic Relief Plan will make investments such as: • Ensuring infrastructure compliance with expansion of destinations and hours of operation for paratransit services such as Dial-A-Ride; • Keeping transit fares low for seniors, veterans, students, and individuals with disabilities; • Improved access to and from schools, colleges and universities, and employment centers for low-income families and rural communities; • Bus fares for those who require access to medical appointments, job interviews, or other needed services; • Bringing infrastructure into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act; and • Continued operation of the 2-1-1 network, which provides individualized assessments with transportation and social service specialists. 17 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 32 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County 18Traffic Relief Plan 2020 Completing the Regional Trail System Riverside County is home to world-renowned natural open spaces with active transportation corridors for cycling, hiking, walking, and running. These trails provide alternative transportation options, as well as options for healthier lifestyles for Riverside County residents. These facilities also provide economic opportunities for local businesses and the tourism economy. The Plan invests in major regional trails identified in the master plan for the Riverside County Parks & Open Space District, to which local cities and the County can connect. These trails include: • Butterfield Overland Trail/Southern Emigrant Trail • Santa Ana River Trail • California Riding and Hiking Trail • Juan Bautista de Anza Historical Trail • Salt Creek Trail Additionally, the Plan will invest in providing trail access to Riverside County’s many publicly owned and preserved open spaces. All together, 2% of the Traffic Relief Plan in Western Riverside County will invest in these improvements. To help commuters with a safer trip, and to provide alternatives to driving alone, the Traffic Relief Plan invests 3% of revenue into Commuter Assistance programs. Freeway Service Patrol When accidents occur on highways or when vehicles break down, traffic can build quickly, creating delays and additional safety hazards to motorists. Freeway Service Patrol provides roving tow trucks to quickly assist motorists so that traffic can flow again. This public service is operated with strict performance and accountability measures by the California Highway Patrol, Caltrans, and RCTC, and must achieve a benefit-to-cost ratio of at least 3:1 (meaning for every dollar invested, the service must yield at least $3 in benefits in the form of reduced congestion, increased safety, and decreased air pollution). The Plan will sustain and increase Freeway Service Patrol levels on Interstates 15 and 215 and Routes 60 and 91, including weekend service. The Plan will also enable new service to begin on Interstate 10. More Park & Rides Creating more convenient locations for commuters to meet and travel together reduces the burdens of solo commuting and decreases the number of cars on the road during peak hours. Through the Traffic Relief Plan, RCTC will be able to enter more partnerships with local businesses and governments to create more Park & Ride options. More Employer Partnerships to Reduce Commutes The Traffic Relief Plan recognizes that improving commutes is not just about the commuter, but also about employers stepping up to help. The Plan calls for enhancing current Commuter Assistance Programs with employers in Riverside County with better options and incentives to encourage ridesharing, vanpooling, telecommuting, and public transit use. RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBuses TrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl Roads Buses TrailsHighway Access Highways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 33 TRAFFIC RELIEF PLANWestern Riverside County Rethinking Transportation New and innovative thinking can help reduce traffic congestion and increase economic productivity as our population increases, technology advances rapidly, and our economy grows. Therefore, 5% of the Traffic Relief Plan in Western Riverside County is devoted to new technologies and innovative public policy. It is difficult to predict how technology and innovations will shape our society in the years ahead; therefore, this section of the Plan is intended to remain flexible to adapt to advances in technology. Creating Smart Roads: deployment of new technologies that better synchronize traffic signals and ramp meters, detect on-road incidents and congestion and proactively manage traffic and improve roadway safety. These technologies lay the foundation for Riverside County’s infrastructure to connect with autonomous and connected vehicles, as well as future innovations in transportation technology. Technologies such as these have begun deployment in other parts of the United States and the world; this program would bring these approaches to Riverside County. This program will also support electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Commuting Alternatives: modernizing and increasing current efforts to help commuters find alternatives to driving alone over long distances to get to work or school and back home and help save time by using technology to make existing infrastructure operate more efficiently. Bringing Jobs Home: an incentive program for local governments to develop infrastructure that will secure new permanent living-wage jobs in Riverside County and reduce the demand for residents to commute to other counties for work. These funds can also be used to invest in public transportation services that will assist local residents in accessing employment opportunities. 19 Traffic Relief Plan 2020 RoadsBusesTrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl RoadsBusesTrailsHighway AccessHighways TrainsCommuterAssistance New Technology Flood & DustControl 34 1 Executive Summary, Public Engagement for Traffic Relief Plan On January 9, 2020, the Commission launched a public engagement program for the draft Traffic Relief Plan. The program was designed to educate residents of Riverside County about the Plan and solicit comments on the Plan. The goal was to reach residents and other stakeholders throughout Riverside County to encourage them to see the draft Plan and complete a public opinion survey. The Traffic Relief Plan public engagement effort was a follow-up to the Commission’s #RebootMyCommute program that was conducted in 2019. The comment period for the draft Traffic Relief Plan lasted 90 days. The comment period was originally intended to close on June 10; however, the COVID-19 pandemic rendered many public engagement activities inappropriate. Further, the Commission voted to conclude the comment period on April 8, defer plans to present a sales tax measure for voter consideration, analyze the feedback received, and present the final Plan for adoption on May 13. The final Traffic Relief Plan reflects the feedback received and is designed to be a reference point for the Commission in the future. During the public comment period, the Commission used multiple tools to solicit feedback from residents and stakeholders, including the TrafficReliefPlan.org website and survey, social media advertising with videos, streaming video, streaming audio, news media articles, presentations, The Point communications, and billboards. The website, survey, and streaming video and audio were available in both English and Spanish. Other public engagement activities had been scheduled for the spring but were canceled because of the pandemic, including polling, tele- townhall meetings, information booths at community events, advertising, and additional billboards. Metrics for completed public engagement activities are contained in this report and summarized in a one-page graphic display in Appendix A. This report also includes a summary of the comments received, summary of the survey results, maps of the origin of the comments received, and a full listing of the comments. Draft Traffic Relief Plan Metrics: January 9 – April 8, 2020 The following is a numerical summary of the metrics for the draft Plan. Appendix A provides a graphic display of these metrics. 1)TrafficReliefPlan.org Website: The site had 42,202 visits by 35,317 unique visitors. Those who visited spent an average of 1 minute, 15 seconds on the site. 2)Survey: The Commission received 3,184 responses and 6,538 comments through the survey housed on the TrafficReliefPlan.org site. 3)Social Media: The Commission placed a series of targeted social media ads, including some with videos. Overall public sentiment was very positive. ATTACHMENT 2 35 2 a. On Facebook, there were 22,302 clicks on the ads to link to the website, 6,783 direct engagements, 458,809 full video views, 3,679,233 impressions, and a reach of 361,196 people. b. On Twitter, there were 26,069 click-throughs to the website, 451 direct engagements, 48,853 views of at least 75% of the videos, and 620,014 impressions. c. On Instagram, there were 1,691 click-throughs to the website, 2,167 direct engagements, 3,996 full video views, 1,260,024 impressions, and a reach of 227,376. d. On YouTube, there were 2.759 clicks, 106,643 full video views, and 343,369 impressions. 4) Streaming Video: The Commission placed advertisements on Hulu, Univision and Ampersand video streaming services, generating 754,201 full video views and 773,314 impressions. 5) Streaming Audio: The Commission placed advertisements on Pandora streaming radio, which generated 1,273,735 impressions, a reach of 162,699 people, and 462 website clicks. 6) News Media: The draft Traffic Relief Plan generated 22 news items, including stories in The Press-Enterprise, Desert Sun, Patch, Inland News Today, iHeartRadio, and various editorials/letters to the editor. 7) Presentations: Commission staff gave 39 presentations to elected officials, community organizations, and industry groups across Riverside County; four additional presentations have been reconfigured as virtual meetings for Commission staff to discuss the Traffic Relief Plan in the post-pandemic era. Twelve other presentations were canceled due to COVID-19. 8) The Point Subscriptions: The Commission publishes a monthly e-newsletter, The Point. As part of the Traffic Relief Plan outreach effort, residents were encouraged to register to receive the newsletter; 801 people subscribed by email and 603 subscribed by text message. 9) Billboards: Three billboards were used to inform motorists of the draft Plan – on Interstate 215 in Perris, on Interstate 10 in the San Gorgonio Pass, and on Interstate 10 in Palm Springs. Survey Responses and Comments The Commission received 3,184 responses to the website survey and 6,538 comments through the survey, social media, and other sources. Included in that number were 13 Spanish comments from the survey and 42 comments from Spanish-language Facebook ads. The survey asked respondents to indicate their level of support for each of the transportation types included in the Traffic Relief Plan. This data is shown in Appendix B. 36 3 Summary, Comments by Topic The 6,538 comments are sorted into topics. Many of the comments addressed more than one topic, so the counts shown in the bar chart and the narrative below add to more than 6,538. The narrative includes a general description of the themes within the comments received. 1. Access – 47 Comments Received: Many comments focused on transportation access needs for seniors, pedestrians, cyclists, students, and those with disabilities. Others saw a need to repair roads and sidewalks for those in wheelchairs, to increase train service (especially in the Coachella Valley), to offer more frequent bus service and free or discounted fares for seniors and those with needs. Some questioned funding for public transit and suggested using smaller shuttles or ride-hailing services instead. 2. Active Transportation – 556 Comments Received: A number of comments expressed a desire for pedestrian and bicycle improvements, including sidewalks, bike lanes, crosswalks and safety additions, creating more walkable communities and safe walking routes for school children. Others voiced support for more traffic signals and stop signs. 37 4 Others voiced the opposite – that bike lanes, trails, and sidewalks are not important traffic relief elements, since very few people travel to work by bike or foot. 3. Carpooling – 449 Comments Received: Many expressed support for carpool lanes on various highways, with a large number mentioning Interstate 15 between Riverside County and San Diego County, more incentives for carpooling, more Park & Ride Lots, and the conversion of express lanes back to carpool lanes on the 91. Others did not support carpool lanes and said that general use lanes should be added, rather than carpool lanes or express lanes. 4. Express Lanes – 789 Comments Received: Many respondents voiced a negative sentiment towards express lanes. Some suggested replacing the express lanes with general-purpose lanes, carpool lanes, or reversible lanes. Others noted the high cost of using the express lanes, accused the Commission of collecting profits, voiced concerns about using taxpayer funds to pay for express lanes, and noted that the plan did not specify what type of lanes would be added. While some expressed support for express lanes, particularly in southwest county, many others said they would support new lanes if they were “free” to use. 5. Funding – 271 Comments Received: Many survey respondents asked how the Plan would be funded, questioned the project costs, and expressed the need for oversight. 6. Highways – 2,419 Comments Received: Respondents provided a wide variety of suggestions for highway improvements across Riverside County, including Interstate 10, Interstate 15, Interstate 215, Route 60, Route 74, Route 79, Route 91, the Mid County Parkway, alternate east-west routes between Riverside County and Orange County, and truck bypass routes. Many noted the specific trouble spots related to maintenance, traffic flow, and trucks. 7. Housing & Development – 597 Comments Received: Many people expressed their opinion that development of homes, offices, and warehouses should stop without preexisting transportation infrastructure. Both the Temecula area and San Gorgonio Pass were frequently mentioned as high-growth areas with significant traffic congestion. Some asserted the Traffic Relief Plan was an effort to “grab land.” Others noted requested more trains and alternate work schedules to reduce traffic during peak hours. 8. Jobs, Incentives & Economy – 183 Comments Received: Many respondents suggested bringing high-paying jobs to Riverside County to avoid the need to commute to Orange, San Diego, and Los Angeles counties. Others voiced support for increasing incentives to use public transit or to carpool. Some said that incentives should be provided for working from home or relocating businesses to Riverside County. 9. Local Roads – 549 Comments Received: Respondents offered multiple suggestions, such as synchronizing traffic signals, separating roads from railroad tracks, repairing potholes, adding bridges to avoid roadway flooding in the Coachella Valley, and preventing cut- 38 5 through traffic on city streets. Many comments related to specific roads or ramps that need repairs. Others believe that widening roads would lead to more traffic. 10. Planning/Studies/Timing – 288 Comments Received: Many respondents praised the plan and said the plan is needed. Comments suggested better long-term planning, that plans should have been implemented years before, too many items are in the plan, the plan is too vague and does not include project costs, timelines or priorities. 11. Public Transportation – 2,072 Comments Received: Respondents provided varied opinions about mass transit, with some voicing support for Metrolink, Coachella Valley Rail, light-rail projects, and bus services. Others said that public transportation is costly and benefits a small fraction of the population. Many advocated for passenger rail service between southwest Riverside County and San Diego County and through the San Gorgonio Pass. Some noted the need for mass transit to be more frequent, flexible, accessible, inexpensive, safer, and appealing. Others expressed support for transit to reduce pollution. 12. Safety – 463 Comments Received: Comments included concern for drivers to follow the speed limit, a desire for increased enforcement, synchronizing traffic signals, building bridges over washes and railroad tracks, adding sidewalks for students to walk to school, add left turn arrows to traffic signals, increase street lighting, add bike lanes, increase divided highways, and safety improvements on specific streets. 13. Taxes/Tax Measure – 1,478 Comments Received: Many respondents expressed concern with the possibility of raising taxes, along with their perspective that residents pay too much in taxes, and that the state gasoline tax increase should pay for improvements. Many said that they support specific improvements, but not if taxes would be raised to pay for these items. 14. Technology – 163 Comments Received: While some expressed support for new technology, many people asked for more specifics and said this section of the plan was too vague. Some noted the need to promote autonomous vehicles, to improve traffic signal timing, and the ability to use technology to monitor traffic flow. 15. Traffic – 926 Comments Received: Many respondents expressed frustration with traffic congestion and said that traffic is hindering the quality of life in Riverside County. Some referenced problem areas along I-15, I-215, the 91, and at various specific interchanges. Many commented about traffic problems along the 91 through Corona and along I-15 through Temecula. Some recommended passenger trains, especially between southwest Riverside County and San Diego and that trucks be restricted to slow lanes. 16. Other – 968 Comments Received: Many of these comments expressed either support for the plan or opposition to it. Some questioned the survey format, others noted that not enough projects were in their specific area, others voiced concerns about the overall cost to taxpayers. 39 6 Summary, Comments by Geography The chart below includes the number of comments received from various geographical areas across Riverside County. Two “heat maps” that show the frequency of comments by zip code are provided in Appendices C and D. Conclusion The Commission has received substantial public feedback on the Traffic Relief Plan through a comprehensive public engagement program. The input reflects the diversity of Riverside County. In general, the public expressed support for the Traffic Relief Plan. Staff considers the engagement effort successful and believes the information collected will be useful to the Commission going forward. 40 7 APPENDIX A 41 8 APPENDIX B 42 9 APPENDIX C APPENDIX D 43 10 Appendix E All Public Comments Sorted by Topic – Click to View 44 AGENDA ITEM 6 45 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jenny Chan, Management Analyst SUBJECT: Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This is a receive and file item outlining the current development of the IE-CMCP. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In partnership with San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA), Caltrans District 8, and Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the Commission is developing the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (Plan). Funded with a Caltrans Sustainable Transportation Planning grant, the Plan is intended to go beyond traditional freeway planning efforts and identify potential multimodal infrastructure opportunities within Western Riverside County, see Figure 1 and 2. In the future, Commission staff can work with Coachella Valley Association of Government (CVAG) on developing a multimodal corridor plan for the Coachella Valley. Completing this Plan is required in order for SBCTA and the Commission to compete in the SB 1 Solutions for Congested Corridor Program (SCCP) for 2022 and thereafter. Proposed projects need to be identified in a multimodal corridor plan to be eligible for SCCP funding. Figure 1: East/West Corridor Study Area 46 SCAG released the Request for Proposals in January 2019 and the project was awarded to Cambridge Systematics. The project kicked off in July 2019. The project team developed the Plan in accordance with the Caltrans Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (CMCP) Guidelines. As specified in the guidelines, “There is no specific format that a CMCP must meet. Plans are unique to the region in which they are prepared.” By the same token, the definition of a corridor is also context sensitive. “A corridor can be defined as a linear geographic area with one or more modes of transportation … Origins and destinations, land use, place types and existing and future developments that surround the transportation infrastructure influences how the corridor and its limits are defined.” The CMCP guidelines requires that a number of topics be discussed in the Plan, such as: • Clear demonstration of collaboration amongst stakeholders; • Short, medium, and long-term planning horizon; • Specific corridor objectives; • Multimodal consideration for and approaches to address transportation issues; • Identification and evaluation of performance measures for recommended projects and strategies; and • Consistency with the SCAG Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), the California Transportation Plan (CTP), and other regional or local planning documents. In the last eleven months, staff has been working closely with the project team to complete the Plan by June 2020. Activities include identifying corridor characteristics, engagement with local entities, reviewing existing transportation plans, and defining specific sub-corridor strategies within the study area. At the last TAC meeting on March 16, the sub-corridor project list was provided to the TAC for initial review. The draft IE-CMCP will be provided in late May for TAC review. Figure 2: North/South Corridor Study Area 47 AGENDA ITEM 7 48 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager SUBJECT: City of Lake Elsinore Funding Request for Construction of I-15/Main Street Interchange Improvement Project STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff is seeking concurrence from the Technical Advisory Committee on the city of Lake Elsinore’s request of $5,483,000 to improve the I-15/Main Street Interchange Improvement Project. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At the March 11, 2020 Commission meeting, staff recommended award of a construction contract for the I-15/Railroad Canyon Road Interchange Project (Railroad Canyon IC), which the Commission is constructing on behalf of the city of Lake Elsinore (Lake Elsinore). The construction contract came in more than $7 million under the engineer’s estimate. As a result, Lake Elsinore is requesting that project cost savings from Railroad Canyon IC be applied to Lake Elsinore’s I- 15/Main Street Interchange Improvement Project (Main Street IC). The project received an environmental Categorical Exemption determination, signed on March 2, 2018. Caltrans approved an encroachment permit on May 31, 2019. Since receiving environmental clearance, the City has spent approximately $475,000 designing the Main Street IC which is now construction-ready. DISCUSSION: Lake Elsinore is requesting $5,483,000 to construct improvements to the Main Street IC in FY 2020/21. The project is planned to be advertised and awarded in summer 2020. The project is located along Interstate 15 (I-15) between Central Avenue/State Route 74 to the north and Railroad Canyon Road to the south. The Main Street IC improvements include: widening Main Street from 2 to 4 lanes, ramp metering, improvements to north- and south- bound on and off ramps, and installation of traffic signals at the ramp intersections. The interchange is currently a diamond configuration and the proposed signalization and ramp widening will extend the life of the interchange. Lake Elsinore and Caltrans are partnering on the project. 49 Lake Elsinore recently completed construction of improvements to Camino Del Norte and completed design for the improved Main Street IC. The nexus between using savings from the Railroad Canyon IC on the Main Street IC is to provide a safe detour and access point to I-15 during Railroad Canyon IC construction (currently underway) and to continue the Railroad Canyon/new Franklin Interchange Project into Phase 2 whereby the Main Street IC is the first component. Improving the Main Street interchange will improve congestion and compliment the I- 15/Railroad Canyon IC project. Staff recommends concurrence of programming Measure A Regional Arterial (MARA) funds to complete the construction. This request will be included in the June 10, 2020 Commission meeting agenda for approval. Attachment: Lake Elsinore Request Letter and Location Map, May 12, 2020 50 51 52 53 AGENDA ITEM 8 54 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jenny Chan, Management Analyst SUBJECT: Obligation Delivery Plan Update – FFY 2019/20 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file an update on Riverside County’s obligation delivery plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As the Regional Transportation Planning Agency (RTPA), the Commission is responsible for ensuring that federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) and Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) funds apportioned to Riverside County are allocated and obligated in a timely manner to prevent funds from lapsing. Federal Obligation Authority (OA) for the region is provided on an annual basis and has to be used in the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) it is provided. The Commission’s goal is to ensure that 100 percent of its OA is obligated. Commission staff work closely with our local agencies and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to ensure projects on the Obligation Delivery Plan are obligated and delivered. Many of these projects are from the 2013 Multi-Funding Call for Projects, 2013 Regional Surface Transportation Program (RSTP, also known as STBG) Call for Projects, Coachella Valley Association of Governments’ 2014 CMAQ Call for Projects, and various other projects that have been awarded CMAQ or STBG funds by the Commission. The attached obligation plan provides an outline of the projects that have CMAQ or STBG programmed in FFY 2019/20. The information provided in the attached obligation plan comes from milestone updates received from your agencies, discussions with project sponsors, and our monthly meetings with Caltrans Local Assistance. It is recommended local agencies begin the federal-aid process as soon as possible, and/or devote the resources needed to secure the federal approvals for obligation, to ensure timely obligation of federal funds. If a local agency anticipates a delay in obligating these funds this year, please update Commission staff with the new schedule. Commission staff is available to assist cities with the processing of Request for Authorization (RFA) submittals and the overall federal-aid process. Attachment: Draft FFY 2019/20 Obligation Plan 55 PA&ED Completion Date R/W Clearance Completion Date Status CVAG RIV140820A 6164(021)Signal Synch Phase II $ 13,882,000 RCTC RIV181106 6054(098)91 COP $ 10,397,000 District Review Rancho Mirage RIV140815 5412(016)Ramon Rd & Dinah Shore Dr $ 31,000 1/23/2019 5/1/2020 Obligated Moreno Valley RIV151202 5441 (060) 5441 (096) ITS & CCTV Post Programming $ 107,000 N/A N/A Obligated RCTC RIV151221 HP21STPL‐6054(082)Pachappa Underpass (SR91 HOV Remnant Work) AC Conversion $ 10,744,000 6/29/2016 Obligated Riverside County RIV071288 5956(221)Ave 66 Grade Separation AC Conversion ‐ $ 12,110,000 N/A 7/3/2019 Obligated Riverside RIV151216 STPL 5058(102) Magnolia Ave from Buchanan to Banbury (Widening 4 ‐6 lns) AC Conversion $ 2,620,000 1/25/2018 6/6/2018 Obligated Riverside County RIV031209 Portola Avenue $ 1,275,000 Obligated Riverside County RIV151210 CML 5956(241)Salt Creek Multi‐Modal Trail Post Programming $ 595,000 10/20/2017 Obligated Obligation to date 733,000$ 26,749,000$ MAY 2020 TAC - DRAFT 19/20 OBLIGATION PLAN Agency FTIP ID FPN Project Location CMAQ 19/20 STBG 19/20 56 AGENDA ITEM 9 57 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jenny Chan, Management Analyst SUBJECT: Local Assistance Environmental Training Needs STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This is a discussion item for the TAC to provide feedback to Caltrans on future environmental training needs. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Caltrans’ Office of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Assignment and Environmental Compliance department is soliciting requests from the TAC on future environmental training needs related to NEPA clearance. A full list of potential topics is provided as Attachment 1. Some topics are listed below: • Emergency Relief; The Environmental Process • Active Transportation Program; Environmental Scoping, Section 106 Screening, & Time-Line Challenges • Navigating the NEPA Process 101 • Location Hydraulics Study/Summary Floodplain Encroachment Report • Local Assistance Environmental Do’s & Don’ts for Local Agencies and Consultants • Environmental Consultants: Procurement, Selection, Coordination, Communication, & Performance Management Attachment: List of Topics for Caltrans Environmental Training 58 Office of NEPA Assignment and Environmental Compliance FY 19/20 – 20/21 Training and Outreach Program Full-Day Trainings: Near-term • Emergency Relief; The Environmental Process (1/2-day matched w/ Bob Baca’s) o Lead: Lupe/Bob Baca o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts o When: Road-show schedule, TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 • Active Transportation Program; Environmental Scoping, Section 106 Screening, & Time-Line Challenges (1/2-day matched w/ Theresa McWilliam’s) o Lead: Neil/Theresa McWilliams o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: TBD, as scheduled by ATP program o When: On Theresa McWilliam’s road-show schedule, TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 • Navigating the NEPA Process 101: A) Environmental Work Planning; Scoping and Project Management (1/2 Day) o Lead: Neil/District Seniors o Target Audience: External o Where: D4, D6, D7, D8, D9, D10, Others upon request o When: TBD B) Local Agency PES Intensive (The Existing Process): Scoping, Studies, Clearance, & Revalidation (1/2 Day) o Lead: Shane/District Seniors o Target Audience: External o Where: D4, D6, D7, D8, D9, D10, Others upon request o When: TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & a 3-day regional travel circuit: D4; D6; D10; D9; D7, D8 59 • Environmental Project Management A) Working with Environmental: For Non-Environmental Staff (External) o Lead: Neil/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal and external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD B) Environmental Roles & Responsibilities for Area Engineers (Internal): The Environmental Process and Common Delivery Challenges o Lead: Neil/ Implementation Offices/District DLAE’s & Env. Seniors o Target Audience: Internal o Where: All Districts, possibly do via Webinar o When: TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 Long-term • Caltrans’ RBSO/NEPA Process Improvements: A) Environmental Work Planning; Scoping and Project Management (1 Hour) o Lead: Neil/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD B) Documentation Requirements; Regulatory Triggers, Guidance, Submittal Standards, and Lessons-Learned (2 Hours) o Lead: Dominic/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal and external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD C) Local Agency PES Intensive (The New Process): Scoping, Studies, Clearance, & Revalidation (3 Hours) o Lead: Shane/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD D) Local Assistance EA Template/Mitigation Summary Sheet; Streamlining Complex Projects & Mitigation Assurance (2 Hours) o Lead: Tom/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 60 ½ Day Workshops: Near-term • Location Hydraulics Study/ Summary Floodplain Encroachment Report o Lead: Lupe/DEA Environmental Engineering/District Seniors o Target Audience: Internal o Where: Do via Webinar o When: TBD Long-term • Environmental Project Management (External): A) Federal Funding: Environmental Requirements & the Color of Money (2 Hours) o Lead: Neil/Implementation, Coops, Programming, DEA, or CTC Staff o Target Audience: External o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD B) Managing Environmental Consultants: Procurement, Selection, Coordination, Communication, & Performance Oversight (2 Hours) o Lead: Neil/District Seniors/Implementation Offices o Target Audience: External o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request o When: TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 • Advanced NEPA Approvals: Lessons-Learned on Complex, A-Typical Projects o Lead: Kelly/District Seniors o Target Audience: Internal o Where: Do via Webinar o When: TBD 2-hour Technical Trainings: Near-term • Local Assistance Environmental Do’s & Don’ts for Local Agencies and Consultants o Lead: Haiyan/Quinten (D7)/District Seniors o Target Audience: External o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request, possibly do via Webinar o When: TBD o Travel: Includes both District-specific visits & week-long regional travel circuits: D3; D4; D10; D9, D6, D5; D7, D8, D11, D12; D1, D2 61 • Air Quality: Conformity & Programming Basics, RTP/FSTIP/FTIP Consistency, Scope Changes & Reevaluation, SAFE-Rule Impacts MFAC o Lead: Jonny/Planning & Tanisha Taylor o Target Audience: Both internal and external o Where: All Districts; Do via webinar o When: TBD • Local Agency Permit Acquisition: Navigating the System o Lead: Kelly/District Seniors/DEA o Target Audience: External o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request; do via webinar o When: TBD Long Term • Federal Funding: Environmental Requirements & the Color of Money o Lead: Neil/Implementation, Coops, Programming, DEA, or CTC Staff o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request, do via Webinar o When: TBD • Environmental Consultants: Procurement, Selection, Coordination, Communication, & Performance Management o Lead: Neil/District Seniors/Implementation Offices o Target Audience: External o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request; do via webinar o When: TBD • Encroachments: Oversight, LD-IGR, & Project Engineering Evaluation Reports (PEER) Projects o Lead: Lupe/LD-IGR/Encroachments Staff o Target Audience: Internal o Where: All Districts, do via Webinar o When: TBD Brown Bag Lunch’s/Webinars/Etc.: Near Term • Local Assistance Environmental Do’s & Don’ts for Local Agencies and Consultants o Lead: Haiyan/Quinten (D7)/District Seniors o Target Audience: External 62 o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request, do via Webinar and have District Seniors deliver locally o When: TBD • NEPA Basics: Federal Aid Environmental Primer for Elected & Executive Officials o Lead: Neil/District Seniors o Target Audience: External o Where: Specific agencies/venues upon request, do via Webinar and have District Seniors deliver locally o When: TBD • Cover Your Assets: Best-Practices in Documenting Critical-Path Problems and Briefing Your Management o Lead: Kelly/District Seniors o Target Audience: Internal o Where: All Districts, do via Webinar o When: TBD Long Term • Avoidance, Minimization, & Mitigation: Feasibility, Assurance in the CE, Late Discovery, & Documentation o Lead: Tom/District Seniors o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts & specific agencies/venues upon request, do via Webinar and have District Seniors deliver locally o When: TBD • Communities of Practice: Resources for Subject Matter Experts o Lead: Lupe/District Seniors o Target Audience: Internal o Where: All Districts, do via Webinar o When: TBD o What: DEA Trainings; LMS Courses or In-District Roadshow Workshops; Senior or Coordinator-Lead  EA Intensive  Bio Basics  4F  Traffic Reviews  Environmental Engineering  Architectural History  Cultural for Local Assistance  Technical Document Reviews 63 • Right of Way Utility Relocations: Who’s Who & What’s What? o Lead: Lupe/ROW Staff o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: All Districts, do via Webinar o When: TBD • Archival Webinar Series o Lead: Haiyan/Jonny o Target Audience: Both internal & external o Where: Statewide, On-Demand o When: TBD Industry Venues Targeted Outreach and Overview Presentations: MPO-Hosted Committees & Ad Hoc Workshops • Transportation Cooperative Committee: Kelly o Kelly does updates o Lupe does action item status-list • League of Cities, CSAC, etc.: Kelly o Follow up with Rick T. o Email response coordination • CalRTPA Group: Neil o Ask Ross to Agendize info-item • Rural County Task Force: Lupe o Ask Rick to agendize info-item • North State Super Region: Lupe o Ask Mike to agendize info-item • LA Metro: Neil o Email Patricia for committee contacts, agendize with committees • MTC: Neil o Email Ross for committee contacts, agendize with committees • Other Regional Venues: ? o SCAG o SACOG o Central Valley MPOs o South Velley MPOs o South Coast COGs Focus Meetings • D6/9-Kern County: Kelly • D4/MTC/Locals: Haiyan • D7/LA Metro/Locals: Neil • D2/Trinity County: Done 64 • D1/Humboldt County: Neil • Mitigation Banking & Cooperative Agreements: Kelly; Connect District w/ Amy B./Jen Gilles • Incidental Take Permit Fees: Kelly; Connect District w/ Amy B./Jen Gilles LTAP NEPA Sessions • FY 2019/20: D8, D4, • FY 2020/21: D1, D6, D7, D9, D10 Join Local Agency/Consultant Workshops • D1 • D2 • D3 • D4 • D7 • D8 • D10 65 AGENDA ITEM 10 66 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager SUBJECT: General Planning and Programming Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file a general planning and programming update. DISCUSSION: Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient (S.A.F.E.) Vehicles Rule In August 2018, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed the S.A.F.E. Vehicles Rule to roll back national fuel-efficiency standards and revoke California’s authority to set its own greenhouse gas standards and zero-emission vehicle mandates. Part one of the S.A.F.E. Rule became effective November 26, 2019, which officially revoked California’s authority. Part two of the S.A.F.E. Rule was signed on March 31, 2020 and was published in the Federal Register on April 30, 2020 and will become effective on June 29, 2020. 2020 Connect SoCal (Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy) Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the six-county Metropolitan Planning Organization serving Riverside County, is responsible for adopting every four years a Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS) to be in compliance with various state laws and in order to be eligible to receive federal transportation funding. The 2020 RTP/SCS called, Connect SoCal (Plan), reflects changes in trends and population and progress made on projects. The Plan places transportation into the broader context of future regional economic, environmental, and quality of life goals by including regional transportation projects. Importantly, the Plan also allocates each local agency’s Regional Housing Needs Assessment and projects growth of population, households, and employment. At SCAG’s May 7, 2020 Regional Council (Council) meeting, the Council adopted the RTP piece of the Plan and the associated Connect SoCal Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR). Action on the SCS piece of the Plan was deferred for up to 120 days. Adopting the RTP was a critical step toward the SCAG-region maintaining federal conformity under the Clean Air Act and minimizing the risk of entering a conformity lapse. SCAG is working with state and federal reviewing agencies to facilitate expedited review of the RTP. Once the SCS is approved by SCAG’s Regional Council it will be forwarded to the California Air Resources Board for certification. 67 AGENDA ITEM 11 68 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager SUBJECT: California Transportation Commission Meeting Highlights: March, April, and May 2020 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file the March, April, and May 2020 California Transportation Commission (CTC) meeting highlights. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: March 25, 2020 CTC Meeting (Agenda) TAB 9 – Adoption of 2021 Active Transportation Program (ATP) Fund Estimate. TAB 10 – Safe Affordable Fuel Efficient (S.A.F.E.) Vehicles Rule Update. TAB 12 – Adoption of the 2020 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). TAB 14 – Adoption of the 2019 Program of Projects for Small Urban and Rural Area Federal Transit Administration Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Transit Program. TAB 16 – Adoption of the 2021 ATP Guidelines. TAB 19 – Adoption of the 2020 Local Partnership Program (LPP) Guidelines. TAB 20 – Adoption of the 2020 LPP Formulaic Program Funding Distribution. TAB 21 – Adoption of the 2020 Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) Guidelines. TAB 24 – Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) Allocation Policy. TAB 50 – Approval of Project for Future Consideration of Funding – MND for the County Line Road Transportation Corridor Project. 69 TAB 74 – State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Amendment 18H-015, includes a new project in Lake Elsinore (FY 23/24). TAB 95 – Allocation for locally-administered SB 1 LPP formula projects on the State Highway System, includes: $7,090,000 for I-215/Placentia Avenue Interchange project. TAB 103 – Request to extend the period of project allocation for ATP, per ATP guidelines; Waiver 20-08, includes: County of Riverside “Active Transportation Improvements for the Communities of Thermal and Oasis project.” TAB 110 – Request to extend the period of project development expenditures for ATP, per ATP guidelines; Waiver 20-15, includes: County of Riverside “Cabazon Safe Routes to School Sidewalk and Safety Improvements” and County of Riverside “Cabazon Safe Routes to School Sidewalk Safety Improvements.” TAB 116 – Southern California hearing for the 2020 SHOPP. April 29, 2020 CTC Meeting (Agenda) TAB 4 – Amendment to the Local Streets and Roads Program Schedule for 2020 Funding Eligibility and 2019 Expenditure Reporting. TAB 5 – Amendment to the 2020 SB 1 Competitive Program Schedules. TAB 6 – Amendment to the 2021 ATP Schedule. May 13, 2020 CTC Meeting (Agenda) TAB 15 – Potential impacts to state transportation revenues from COVID-19. TAB 16 – Adoption of the 2020 Interim Timely Use of Funds Policy. TABs 19 & 20 – Overview & Adoption of the Proposed 2020 SHOPP & Complete Streets. TAB 22 – S.A.F.E. Vehicles Rule Update. TABs 35 & 56 – Approval of Projects for Future Consideration of Funding, includes: I-10 Portola Avenue Interchange, SR-241/91 Tolled Express Lanes Connector Project. TAB 44 – Allocation Amendments, includes: SCRRA Prop 1B TCIF Projects, de-allocate a total of $531,000. TAB 91 – Request $20,181,000 in allocation for 21 ATP projects, includes: Moreno Valley “Juan Bautista De Anza Trail Gap Closure.” 70 AGENDA ITEM 12 71 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multimodal Services Director SUBJECT: RCTC Commission Meeting Highlights: April and May 2020 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file April and May 2020 Commission meeting highlights. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: April 2020 Commission Meeting (Agenda) Item 6F – California Transportation Commission (CTC) Staff Recommendations for 2020 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) This item was for the Commission to receive and file the CTC’s proposed 2020 STIP. The CTC’s proposed 2020 STIP differed slightly from the Commission’s submittal due to programming capacity in the first two years. Since then, the 2020 STIP was adopted by the CTC with projects from Riverside County as follows: o I-15/French Valley Interchange, $47.6 million in FY 2020/21. o Coachella Valley Regional Signal Synchronization Phase 2, $2.5 million in FY 2021/22 o SR-71/SR-91 Interchange, $66.4 million in FY 2022/23 o I-10/Avenue 50 Interchange, $2.0 million in FY 2023/24 May 2020 Commission Meeting (Agenda) Item 7 – Revised Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 and FY 2021 Revenue Projections for Measure A, Local Transportation Fund (LTF), and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) This item was for the Commission to approve the revised revenue projections as a result of COVID-19 impacts. Measure A revenue projections are estimated to decrease 12% in FY 2019/20 and 22% in FY 2020/21. LTF revenue projections are estimated to decrease 12% in FY 2019/20 and 23% in FY 2020/21. The Commission’s share of TUMF revenues are estimated to decrease 41% in FY 2019/20 and 61% in FY 2020/21. As local and state public health orders are revised, staff will continue to monitor sales tax revenues to determine if further adjustments are needed. 72 Item 8 – Adoption of the Traffic Relief Plan for Riverside County This item was for the Commission to adopt the Final Traffic Relief Plan, which serves as an aspirational planning document and reference point for future policy decisions. The plan contains a roadmap for expenditure of $8.8 billion in potential future funding; policies to ensure equity and balance of investments; accountability requirements; and locally-driven implementation in each of the subregions in the county. 73 AGENDA ITEM 13 74 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 18, 2020 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Jenny Chan, Management Analyst SUBJECT: Caltrans District 8 Local Assistance Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to receive and file an update from Caltrans District 8 Local Assistance. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Caltrans' Local Assistance Program oversees more than one billion dollars annually available to over 600 cities, counties, and regional agencies for the purpose of improving their transportation infrastructure or providing transportation services. This funding comes from various Federal and State programs specifically designated to assist the transportation needs of local agencies. Annually, over 1,200 new projects are authorized through the Local Assistance Program of which approximately 700 are construction projects. Caltrans District 8 Local Assistance is responsible for obligating and allocating federal and state funds, providing guidance on federal and state regulations, and direction on processes and procedures that are tied to each funding program. Local Assistance is responsible for the current funding programs as identified in Table 1. Table 1: Caltrans Local Assistance funding program responsibilities Federal Programs State Programs Active Transportation Program (ATP) Active Transportation Program (ATP) Emergency Relief (ER) Local Partnership Program (LPP) Off-system Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Solutions for Congested Corridors Program (SCCP) Off-system Highway Bridge Program (HBP) State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Off-system Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) Off-system State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Off-system Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) 75 TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALLAGENCYTAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME BANNING ART VELA Acting Director of Public Works Holly Stuart Public Works Analyst BEAUMONT JEFF HART Director of Public Works/City Engineer BLYTHE DAN OJEDA CALIMESA MICHAEL THORNTON City Engineer CALTRANS ALBERT VERGEL DE DIOS Acting District Local Assistance Engineer Sean Yeung Acting District Local Assistance Engineer CANYON LAKE BRAD BROPHY Mike Borja Administrative Services Manager CATHEDRAL CITY JOHN CORELLA City Engineer Paul T. Mangaudis, P.E. Senior Engineer COACHELLA GABOR PAKOZDI Maritza Martinez Interim Public Works Director COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS MARTIN MAGANA VICE CHAIR Director of Transportation Eric Cowle Transportation Program Manager CORONA TOM KOPER Acting Public Works Director Rosalva Ureno Senior Engineer DESERT HOT SPRINGS DANIEL PORRAS Public Works Director/City Engineer Nick Haecker Public Works Manager AGENCY TAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALLEASTVALEWILLIAM HEMSLEY City Engineer Craig Bradshaw HEMET Nancy Beltran Management Assistant INDIAN WELLS KEN SEUMALO Public Works Director Tanya Williams Senior Management Analyst INDIO TIMOTHY T. WASSIL Public Works Director Eric Weck Principal Civil Engineer JURUPA VALLEY STEVE LORISO Director of Public Works/City Engineer Rod Butler City Manager LA QUINTA BRYAN MC KINNEY City Engineer Julie Mignoga Management Analyst LAKE ELSINORE REMON HABIB Senior Civil Engineer Yu Tagai Associate Engineer MENIFEE JONATHAN SMITH Public Works Director/City Engineer Carlos Geronimo Senior Engineer MORENO VALLEY MICHAEL WOLFE Public Works Director/City Engineer Eric Lewis Transportation Division Manager/City Traffic Engineer MURRIETA BOB MOEHLING City Engineer Jeff Hitch Principal City Engineer NORCO CHAD BLAIS Public Works Director Bill Thompson Water and Sewer Utilities AGENCY TAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALLPALM DESERT TOM GARCIA Director of Public Works Randy Bowman Sr. Project Engineer PALM SPRINGS JOEL MONTALVO Assistant Director of Engineering Services Marcus Fuller Assistant City Manager PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSIT AGENCY K. GEORGE COLANGELI Transit General Manager Dale Reynolds PERRIS Brad Brophy RANCHO MIRAGE JESSE ECKENROTH Public Works Director RIVERSIDE FARSHID MOHAMMADI CHAIR Engineering Manager Gilbert Hernandez Public Works Department RIVERSIDE COUNTY PATRICIA ROMO Director of Transportation Mojahed Salama Deputy Director of Transportation RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY KRISTIN WARSINSKI Director of Planning Jennifer Nguyen Planning and Programming Specialist SAN JACINTO Brad Brophy SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY Brittney B. Sowell Clerk of the Board/Special Assistant to the CEO Rohan Kuruppu TEMECULA PATRICK THOMAS Director of Public Works Amer Attar AGENCY TAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALLWESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS CHRISTOPHER GRAY Director of Transportation Chris Tzeng Program Manager WILDOMAR DAN YORK Assistant City Manager/Director of Public Works/City Engineer Craig Bradshaw TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALLATTENDED VIA ZOOM Art Vela Albert Vergel De Dios Brad Brophy John Corella Martin Magana Daniel Porras ATTENDED VIA ZOOM TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALL William Hemsley Ken Seumalo Tim Wassil Bryan McKinney Remon Habib Jonathan Smith Michael Woilfe Bob Moehling ATTENDED VIA ZOOM TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALL Tom Garcia Brad Brophy Jesse Eckenroth Farshid Mohammadi Patricia Romo & Mojahed Salama Kristin Warsinski Brad Brophy RohanKuruppu Patrick Thomas ATTENDED VIA ZOOM TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALL Gary Hamrick, Cambridge Systematics Alejandro Romero, Twining, Inc. Neal Peacock, Caltrans Leslie Avila, Caltrans Lisa Mobley, RCTC Aaron Hake, RCTC Shirley Gooding, RCTC Jillian Guizado, RCTC TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE May 18, 2020 ROLL CALL Lorelle Mo-Luna, RCTC Martha Masters, RCTC Jenny Chan, RCTC