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08 August 12, 2020 CommissionMEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, August 12, 2020 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions on the following page to join the meeting remotely. COMMISSIONERS Chair — Ben J. Benoit Vice Chair —Jan Harnik Second Vice Chair — V. Manuel Perez Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside, District 1 Karen Spiegel, County of Riverside, District 2 Chuck Washington, County of Riverside, District 3 V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside, District 4 Jeff Hewitt, County of Riverside, District 5 Art Welch / Daniela Andrade, City of Banning Lloyd White / Julio Martinez, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Johnny Rodriguez, City of Blythe Larry Smith / Linda Molina, City of Calimesa Randall Bonner / Jeremy Smith, City of Canyon Lake Raymond Gregory / Mark Carnevale, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / Megan Beaman Jacinto, City of Coachella Wes Speake / Jim Steiner, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Clint Lorimore / Todd Rigby, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Dana Reed / Kimberly Muzik, City of Indian Wells Waymond Fermon / Oscar Ortiz, City of Indio Brian Berkson / Chris Barajas, City ofJurupa Valley Kathleen Fitzpatrick / Robert Radi, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Bill Zimmerman / Dean Deines, City of Menifee Yxstain Gutierrez / Carla Thornton, City of Moreno Valley Scott Vinton / Christi White, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Ted Hoffman, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Lisa Middleton / Dennis Woods, City of Palm Springs Michael M. Vargas / Rita Rogers, City of Perris Ted Weill / Charles Townsend, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Russ Utz, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar / Maryann Edwards, City of Temecula Ben J. Benoit / Joseph Morabito, City of Wildomar Mike Beauchamp, Governor's Appointee Caltrans District 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, August 12, 2020 Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting - from PC, Laptop or Phone https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85299300561 Meeting ID: 852 9930 0561 One tap mobile +16699006833„852993005611# US (San Jose) Dial by your location +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) Meeting ID: 852 9930 0561 For members of the public wishing to submit comment in connection with the Commission Meeting please email written comments to the Clerk of the Board at Imobley@rctc.org prior to August 11, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. and your comments will be made part of the official record of the proceedings. Members of the public may also make public comments through their telephone or Zoom connection when recognized by the Chair. In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting on the Commission's website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, Executive Order N-29-20, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda August 12, 2020 Page 2 2. ROLL CALL 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS — Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS — The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5. CONSENT CALENDAR — All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — JUNE 10, 2020 5B. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Overview Page 1 Page 14 This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2020. 5C. FISCAL YEARS 2016-2018 TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT STATE TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS FOR THE COMMISSION AND TRANSIT OPERATORS Page 16 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the Fiscal Year 2015/16 through FY 2017/18 state triennial performance audit results for the Commission; and 2) Receive and file the FY 2015/16 through FY 2017/18 state triennial performance audit results for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine). Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda August 12, 2020 Page 3 5D. FISCAL YEAR 2018/19 TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT AND MEASURE A AUDIT RESULTS Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2018/19. 5E. SALARY SCHEDULE FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 Overview Page 366 Page 374 This item is for the Commission to approve the salary schedule effective July 2, 2020, located in Appendix B of the proposed budget. 5F. ANNUAL INVESTMENT POLICY Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 376 1) Adopt Resolution No. 20-012, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Investment Policy"; 2) Adopt the revised annual Investment Policy. 5G. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 391 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 5H. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ANNUAL LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND PLANNING ALLOCATIONS TO WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS AND COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS Page 402 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for planning in the amount of $676,500 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $369,000 for Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency's Fiscal Year 2020/21 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that supports transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs, and requirements. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda August 12, 2020 Page 4 51. FISCAL YEARS 2020/21 — 2024/25 MEASURE A FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANS FOR THE LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM Page 415 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the Fiscal Years 2020/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIPs) for Local Streets and Roads (LSR) as submitted by the participating agencies. 5J. AGREEMENT WITH BNSF RAILWAY COMPANY FOR RAIL SIGNAL DESIGN SERVICES FOR THE RIVERSIDE DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION TRACK AND PLATFORM EXPANSION PROJECT Page 746 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 21-31-001-00, with BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) for rail signal design services for the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station Track and Platform Expansion Project for a total amount not to exceed $150,000; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement. 5K. 2020 STATE ROUTE 91 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Page 752 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the 2020 State Route 91 Implementation Plan. 6. PRESENTATION — THE 2020-2045 REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES STRATEGY OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS 7. UPDATE ON MEASURE A AND LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND SALES TAX REVENUES Page 798 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on Measure A and Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax revenues. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda August 12, 2020 Page 5 8. COACHELLA FESTIVAL SPECIAL EVENTS TRAIN PLATFORM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT UPDATE Page 799 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Take appropriate actions to suspend planning and development for the Coachella Festival Special Events Train Platform Development Project (Platform Project); 2) Rescind the approval of Agreement No. 19-25-103-00 with the California State Transportation Agency (CaISTA) regarding a State Rail Assistance (SRA) grant to fund the Coachella Festival Special Events Train Platform Development Project for an amount not to exceed $5,942,510; 3) Approve Resolution No. 20-013, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, County of Riverside, California, Rescinding Resolution No. 19-012 and Resolution No. 19-013"; 4) Rescind the approval of Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Agreement No. 19-25-102-00 with the Los Angeles — San Diego — San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency (LOSSAN) and Amtrak for the coordination and development of the Platform Project; 5) Amend the Fiscal Year 2019/20 Coachella Valley -San Gorgonio Pass Rail Short Range Transit Plan to eliminate the Platform Project SRA grant funds of $5,942,500 and related expenditures; and 6) Approve budget decreases to the FY 2020/21 budget in the amount of $5,942,500 for revenues and $5,942,500 for expenditures. 9. AWARD OF STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT TO OHL USA Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 809 1) Award Agreement No. 20-31-069-00 to OHL USA to construct the SR-91 Corridor Operations Project (91 COP), in the amount of $18,886,963, plus a contingency amount of $1,888,696, supplemental work in the amount of $406,900, and an incentive payment in the amount of $472,500, for a total amount not to exceed $21,655,059; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work, supplemental work and incentive payments as may be required for the 91 COP. Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Agenda August 12, 2020 Page 6 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 11. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. 12. CLOSED SESSION 12A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Item APN(s) Property Owner Buyer(s) 1 349-090-028 RCTC Michael P. Contreras 12B. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL — EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(d)(1) Orange County Superior Court, Case Nos. 30-2019-01118474 and 30-2019-01108804, and United States District Court, Central District, Case No. 8:19-cv-2233-ODW (JDEx) 13. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, September 9, 2020, Board Room, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. AGENDA ITEM 5A MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING MINUTES Wednesday, June 10, 2020 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Ben J. Benoit at 9:41 a.m. Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Governing Board meeting was conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE - Commissioner Rusty Bailey led in the Commission in a flag salute. 2. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Rusty Bailey Ben J. Benoit Brian Berkson* Mike Beauchamp* Randall Bonner* Joseph DeConinck* Waymond Ferman* Kathleen Fitzpatrick* Raymond Gregory* Yxstain Gutierrez* Berwin Hanna* Jan Harnik Steven Hernandez* Jeff Hewitt Kevin Jeffries* Linda Krupa Clint Lorimore* Bob Magee* *Joined the meeting via Zoom 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS Scott Matas* Lisa Middleton Michael Naggar* V. Manuel Perez* Dana Reed* Wes Speake* Karen Spiegel Larry Smith Michael M. Vargas* Chuck Washington* Ted Weill* Lloyd White* Art Welch Russ Utz* Scott Vinton Bill Zimmerman* Ron Roy, city of Beaumont resident, requested that the Commission adopt a Divergent Diamond Interchange Design as the standard interchange design for all existing and future interchange projects within the County, including rehabilitation and replacement of existing interchanges. He 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 2 provided a description of a DDI design, the key advantages, the benefits to alternative mode transit, and suggested as a starting point to use the DDI on the 1-10 rehabilitation projects. Chair Benoit noted seeing some demonstrations of a DDI and will bring it forward for discussion. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There was a revision to Agenda Item No. 6, "Public Hearing — 15 Express Lanes Toll Schedule Adoption", which is to conduct a public hearing at its June 10, 2020 meeting and take final action instead of forward to the Commission to conduct a public hearing at its June 10, 2020 meeting and take final action. At this time, Commissioner Russ Utz joined the meeting. 5. PUBLIC HEARING — PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, presented the proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2020/21, highlighting the following: • FY 2020/21 Budget considerations — COVID-19 impacts, RCTC projects and programs, financing needs and related costs • Budget summary • Revenues/sources comparison • Summary of expenditures, expenses, and uses by function and by department • Management Services, Regional Programs, and Capital Project and Delivery Development expenditures/uses • Capital Project highlights • Toll operations • Measure A Administrative costs • Next steps At this time, Chair Benoit opened the public hearing and asked if there were any public comments. No comments were received. In response to Commissioner Speake's inquiry about the projections for the recovery and if there is an opportunity to revisit RCTC's revenues, Theresia Trevino replied at the last Commission meeting staff presented revised revenue projections for Measure A, LTF, and TUMF revenues, which had significant decreases for both the revised revenue projections for FY 2020 and then lower projections for FY 2021. That was based on information they used regarding RCTC's sales taxes and projected what the sales tax decreases would be. She stated staff intends to monitor the sales tax revenues on a monthly basis and look at what trends are being noticed and provide updates including budget adjustments if necessary to the Commission. 2 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 3 Commissioner Speake clarified referring to the toll revenues as those numbers are down significantly and how is RCTC forecasting that. Theresia Trevino explained there were several scenarios that were ran for the 91 Express Lanes. One of the scenarios that was used for budget purposes had a decrease and staff was projecting that the impacts of COVID-19 would go through FY 2021. It was a significant decrease in the toll revenues and that is included in the budget. This is with the addition of the 15 Express Lanes toll revenues, which overall toll revenues are lower than prior years. Chair Benoit closed the public hearing. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, explained with respect to toll revenue staff is also monitoring toll activity and the 91 traffic on a weekly basis, which provides excellent data to look at trends. This will be another area with the changes in trends, traffic patterns and traffic coming back to that corridor and staff will provide updates to the Commission as well. M/S/C (Bailey/Harnik) to: 1) Conduct the public hearing on the proposed Budget for FY 2020/21; 2) Approve the salary schedule effective July 2, 2020, located in Appendix B of the proposed budget; 3) Authorize the expenditure of $1.2 million of 91 Express Lanes toll revenues designated as surplus in accordance with the 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds Indenture to fund Commission costs related to the development of agreements related to the funding, construction, operations, maintenance, and use of toll revenues for the future direct, tolled connector linking the SR-241 toll road to the 91 Express Lanes (241/91 connector); and 4) Adopt the proposed Budget for FY 2020/21. 6. PUBLIC HEARING —15 EXPRESS LANES TOLL SCHEDULE ADOPTION Chair Benoit opened the public hearing. Jennifer Crosson, Toll Operations Manager, presented the 15 Express Lanes Toll schedule adoption, highlighting the following: • 15 Express Lanes Toll Policy Resolution Adopted in 2016 — Adopted Dynamic Pricing • Toll schedule adoption requirements • Dynamic Pricing overview: o A complex computer algorithm 3 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 4 o On road traffic detection system o Historical traffic data • Principles and parameters: o Achieve free flow speeds of 60-65 mph; o Consider traffic volume, density, speed, travel time, flow of traffic and historical traffic patterns; o Establish a toll rate for each segment; o Change toll rate no more than every three minutes; o Change in increments up to $3.00 per segment • Minimum toll rate: o 16.9 cents per mile o Southbound total $1.75 o Northbound total $ 1.70 o Annual CPI Index Adjustment • Overhead toll rate signage: o In advance of each entrance o The toll rate to the first exit and the next major exit or the end of the express lane • Abnormal traffic conditions and suspension of tolling o Holidays, incidents, construction, atypical occurrences o Temporary toll schedule or temporary suspension of tolling by Executive Director • Sample peak toll rate schedule Chair Benoit asked if there were any public comments. No comments were received. Chair Benoit closed the public hearing. Commissioner Speake inquired about the toll rate changing every three minutes for toll lane pricing if this is a standard the Commission is looking at for other agencies, if the toll customer could be stuck in a segment for more than three minutes, and if three minutes is too fast. Jennifer Crosson replied the toll price could adjust every three minutes, the standard is three to five minutes, staff is seeking approval for three minutes to have three minutes if needed, but staff intends to program it to five minutes. Commissioner Speake clarified if a toll customer is in a toll lane and judge their trip on what the toll fees will be and is stuck in a segment after three minutes goes by and the price goes up a customer could be upset about that. Jennifer Crosson replied the price that is seen on the toll rate sign is the price the customer will be charged even if the toll rate changes as RCTC has technology that will monitor the flow of traffic between the price sign and the point where they enter the toll point. She noted this pricing is also done on the SR-91 Express Lanes as well. 4 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 5 At this time, Commissioner Bailey left the meeting. In response to Commissioner Speake's inquiry if the SR-91 pricing is set by month, Jennifer Crosson replied they still have "on the hour change", which defaults to the lower price for the customer on the buffer of the hour based on the travel time especially during the peak period when traffic is backed up. M/S/C (Berkson/Speake) to: 1) Approve Resolution No. 20-008, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Adopting the 15 Express Lanes Toll Schedule" and 2) Conduct a public hearing at its June 10, 2020 meeting and take final action. 7. CONSENT CALENDAR Commissioner Karen Spiegel requested to pull Agenda Item 7J, "COVID-19 Impacts to the 91 Express Lanes", for further discussion. Commissioner Speake requested to pull Agenda Item 7E, "Recurring Contracts for Fiscal Year 2020/21", for further discussion. At this time, Commissioner Naggar left the meeting. M/S/C (Hewitt/Smith) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. Abstain: Hewitt on Agenda Item 7N 7A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — MAY 13, 2020 7B. APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FY 2020/21 Adopt Resolution No. 20-009 "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Annual Appropriations Limit", for Fiscal Year 2020/21. 7C. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended March 31, 2020. 5 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 6 7D. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the nine months ended March 31, 2020. 7F. QUARTERLY PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS REPORT, JANUARY-MARCH 2020 Receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for January - March 2020. 7G. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 7H. CITY OF CANYON LAKE'S REQUEST TO CONVERT FEDERAL SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BLOCK GRANT TO LOCAL MEASURE A REGIONAL ARTERIAL FUNDS FOR THE RAILROAD CANYON ROAD PAVEMENT REHABILITATION PROJECT 1) Approve the city of Canyon Lake's (Canyon Lake) request for conversion of federal Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) funds to local 2009 Measure A Western County Regional Arterial (MARA) funds to the Railroad Canyon Road Pavement Rehabilitation Project (Project); and 2) Authorize the Chief Financial Officer to reimburse Canyon Lake upon presentation of invoices associated with the Project. 71. AGREEMENTS FOR ON -CALL MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR SERVICES FOR THE COMMUTER RAIL STATIONS AND TOLL FACILITIES 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call repair, maintenance and minor construction services for the commuter rail stations and toll facilities for a three-year term, with two two-year options to extend the agreements for a total aggregate amount not to exceed $13,282,500: a) Agreement No. 20-24-040-00 to Braughton Construction; and b) Agreement No. 20-24-082-00 to Procell; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to execute task orders awarded to the contractors under the terms of the agreements. 7K. 91 EXPRESS LANES MONTHLY STATUS REPORTS Receive and file the 91 Express Lanes Monthly Reports for three months from January to March 2020. 6 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 7 7L. APPROVAL OF METROLINK OPERATING SUBSIDY FOR FIRST QUARTER OF FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 AND RELATED MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 1) Receive and file a report on the Commission's portion of the FY 2020/21 Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operating budget; 2) Approve the initial FY 2020/21 SCRRA operating budget, which results in an operating subsidy of $4,533,566 from the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to finalize and execute Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 20-25-091-00 with SCRRA regarding annual funding, including subrecipient matters related to pass -through of federal funding. 7M. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN UPDATES AND TRANSIT FUNDING ALLOCATIONS 1) Approve the Fiscal Years 2020/21— FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning (Banning), Beaumont (Beaumont), Corona (Corona), and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission's FY 2020/21 — 2024/25 SRTP for the Rail and Vanpool Programs; 2) Approve FY 2020/21 Transit Operator Funding Allocations for Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; PVVTA; RTA; SunLine; and the Commission's Rail and Vanpool Programs; 3) Adopt Resolution No. 20-010, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission to Allocate Local Transit Assistance Funds and State Transit Assistance Funds For the Fiscal Year 2020/2021"; and 4) Direct staff to add the federally funded and regionally significant projects into the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP). 7N. AMENDMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL TOWING SERVICES SUPPORTING THE 1-10 TUNE-UP PROJECT AND FIRST ONE-YEAR TERM EXTENSION 1) Approve Agreement No. 17-45-061-02 , Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 17-45-061-00 with Pepe's Towing (Pepe's) to include Construction Freeway Service Patrol (CFSP) service for the 1-10 Tune -Up Project (Project) for an additional amount of $741,360, and a total amount not to exceed $4,449,313; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 7 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 8 70. SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY AGREEMENT FOR BI- COUNTY RIDESHARE PROGRAM SERVICES 1) Approve Agreement No. 20-41-090-00 with the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) for a two-year term to reimburse the Commission in an amount not to exceed $2.4 million for commuter/employer rideshare (IE Commuter) programs administered by the Commission, on behalf of both agencies, and for the Commission to reimburse SBCTA an amount not to exceed $200,000, for SBCTA's provision of rideshare and vanpool program web -based software, as part of an ongoing bi-county partnership; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 7P. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 MEASURE A COMMUTER ASSISTANCE BUSPOOL SUBSIDY FUNDING CONTINUATION REQUEST 1) Authorize payment of the $2,350/month maximum subsidy per buspool for the period July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021, to the existing Riverside I buspool; and 2) Require subsidy recipients to meet monthly buspool reporting requirements as supporting documentation to receive payments. 7Q. INLAND EMPIRE TELEWORK INITIATIVE 1) Authorize staff to develop and implement a comprehensive telework assistance program for Riverside County employers and residents, with outreach activities beginning as early as July 1, 2020, in partnership with the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) through the IE Commuter program; 2) Authorize staff to work with local and regional government partners, Riverside County businesses, and other stakeholders to identify and encourage additional options for virtual travel and other cost-effective transportation demand management (TDM) strategies; and 3) Authorize staff to quantify vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reductions resulting from the telework assistance program and additional TDM strategies subsequently developed for the purposes of creating potential mitigation credits for transportation projects subject to SB 743. 8 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 9 7R. CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE FUNDING REQUEST FOR CONSTRUCTION OF INTERSTATE 15/MAIN STREET INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 1) Approve programming $5,483,000 of 2009 Measure A Western County Regional Arterial (MARA) funds for the city of Lake Elsinore's (Lake Elsinore) Interstate 15/Main Street Interchange Improvement Project (Main Street IC); 2) Approve Agreement No. 20-72-089-00 between the Commission and Lake Elsinore for the programming of $5,483,000 of MARA for the construction phase of Main Street IC; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement. 8. AWARD OF INTERSTATE 215/PLACENTIA AVENUE INTERCHANGE PROJECT CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT TO RIVERSIDE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Mark Lancaster, Capital Projects Manager, presented the award construction contract for Interstate 215/Placentia Avenue Interchange project, highlighting the following: • Project location at the west end of the Mid County Parkway project • Project Map: o Adds four ramps o Relocates Frontage Road o Widens Placentia to four lanes and extends to Indian Avenue o Constructs three detention basins and other flood control facilities • Bid results Commissioner Vargas expressed gratitude that this project is finally coming to fruition and confirmed there is going to be monuments on both sides. Mark Lancaster replied yes and stated there will be a monument identifying Mead Valley on the west side of the interchange project and two entry monuments identifying the city of Perris at the intersection of the realigned Frontage Road and Placentia Avenue. Commissioner Vargas made the motion. Commissioner Karen Spiegel seconded the motion. She discussed attending her first committee when she became a member of the Commission several years ago and at that time it was the full Mid County Parkway project and how it took a year to decide to cut the project in half. She expressed gratitude to staff and the project teams for all their efforts. 9 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 10 M/S/C (Vargas/Spiegel) to: 1) Award Agreement No. 20-31-068-00 to Riverside Construction Company to construct the Interstate 215/Placentia Avenue Interchange Project (Project), in the amount of $30,292,082, plus a contingency amount of $3,029,208 for potential change orders, and supplemental work in the amount of $889,500, for a total amount not to exceed $34,210,790, contingent upon action by the California Transportation Commission (CTC) to allocate $14,160,000 of Local Partnership Program (LPP) formula funds to the Project; 2) Approve Agreement No. 20-31-063-00 with the Riverside County Transportation Department (RCTD) for a reimbursement of $30,000 for the Mead Valley Monument to be included in the construction of the Project per County of Riverside request; 3) Approve Agreement No. 20-31-086-00 with the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFC&WCD) for the maintenance of detention basins and drainage culverts to be constructed as part of the Project and to be maintained by RCFC&WCD; 4) Approve the use of $14,160,000 of Senate Bill (SB) 1 Local Partnership Program (LPP) Formula Cycle 3 funds for the Project; 5) Approve match funds by programming $12,354,000 of Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee — Community and Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process (TUMF-CETAP) funds and $1,806,000 of 2009 Measure A Western County New Corridors funds; 6) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 7) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work as may be required for the Project. Abstain: Washington 9. SENATE BILL 743 UPDATE AND REQUEST TO DELAY IMPLEMENTATION Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director, presented an update for the SB 743 (Steinberg) implementation. Commissioner Speake expressed strong concern for the implementation of SB 743 as it is the biggest threat to congestion relief in the County. He urged all of the Commissioners to use the attached delay letter and get it endorsed by all of their councils. He discussed the issues with the costs on transportation due to the state abandoning the County. Commissioner Speake expressed gratitude to Aaron Hake and Anne Mayer for pushing this forward to recognize how big of a threat this is to the County. 10 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 11 In response to Commissioner Harnik's request to receive a copy of the letter for their councils' consideration, Aaron Hake replied yes. M/S/C (Hewitt/Harnik) to: 1) Receive an update on the implementation Senate Bill 743 (Steinberg, 2013) by Caltrans; and 2) Authorize the Chair to request the Governor delay the use of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) as the primary method for assessing transportation impacts on the environment for projects subject to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review. 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION 7E. RECURRING CONTRACTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 Commissioner Speake inquired about the increase in costs for FY 2020/21 with Stantac Consulting Services, Inc. for traffic and revenue consulting services for the 1-15 Express Lanes project and the increase in costs for legal services with Best Best and Krieger, LLP. Anne Mayer replied with respect to the increased legal services costs related to the State Routes 241/91 Express Lanes, there will need to be a significant number of agreements with multiple agencies and it will require extensive legal involvement from all agencies. Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director, replied there are a number of ongoing and new tasks with Stantec to perform their traffic and revenue efforts. He discussed the additional services needed, which includes the 15 Express Lanes project, for RCTC's ratings and rating agency affirmations and presentations for the 15 and 91 Express Lanes facilities, the 15 Express Lanes with SBCTA and a possible extension to the north, and potential analysis of the 241/91 Express Lanes project. Commissioner Speake moved the item. Commissioner Scott Vinton seconded the item. Chair Benoit suggested to hold this vote until after Commissioner Spiegel makes her comments on Agenda Item 7J, in order to vote concurrently on Agenda Items 7E and 7J. 11 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 12 M/S/C (Speake/ Vinton) to: 1) Approve the single -year recurring contracts in an amount not to exceed $18,181,500 for Fiscal Year 2020/21; 2) Approve the recurring contracts for specialized services in an amount not to exceed $110,830 in FY 2020/21 and $456,170 in FYs 2021/22 — 2024/25; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. 7J. COVID-19 IMPACTS TO THE 91 EXPRESS LANES In response to Commissioner Spiegel's request, Michael Blomquist briefly presented the COVID-19 impacts to the Commission's 91 Express Lanes. Commissioner Spiegel clarified what is that trigger point to move forward with resuming the customer service center operations. Michael Blomquist replied RCTC would want to comply with Riverside County health orders, there would need to be a mutual decision between OCTA and RCTC in conjunction with Cofirute to reopen, and when the RCTC offices and the County Building reopens might be an indicator of when it is appropriate to reopen the customer service center for walk ins. Commissioner Spiegel suggested to update the Commissioners when it gets closer to the customer service center reopening. Commissioner Kevin Jeffries stated the County Administrative Center Building is reopening all of its facilities on June 15. Chair Benoit stated since there is no further discussion, and Commissioners Speake and Vinton approved to amend the vote and voted concurrently on Agenda Items 7E and 7J. M/S/C (Speake/Vinton) to receive and file a presentation that provides a summary of COVID-19 impacts to the Commission's 91 Express Lanes. 11. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 11A. Commissioner Spiegel announced the County is focusing on moving forward and it is necessary to work together to continue wearing masks, social distancing, and hand washing as Riverside County is very close to being put on Sacramento's watch list. 12 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes June 10, 2020 Page 13 11B. Anne Mayer expressed appreciation to the Commissioners for helping have a successful hybrid Commission meeting. Anne Mayer assured the Commissioners that the consultants, vendors, and contractors know RCTC is firmly in business and that the Commission's projects and programs are moving forward. She stated with approving RCTC's FY 2020/21 Budget it demonstrates the stability for this industry, and she discussed how RCTC along with other agencies are reaching out on what is being done to keep projects moving forward during these very difficult times. She congratulated Theresia Trevino and her team for making timely payments during this time and expressed appreciation to the Commissioners for all of their leadership during a very difficult period. Chair Benoit announced the July Commission will be dark. 13. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Chair Benoit adjourned the meeting at 11:07 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, August 12, 2020, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board 13 AGENDA ITEM 5B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Jose Mendoza, Senior Procurement Analyst Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Certain contracts are executed under single signature authority as permitted in the Commission's Procurement Policy Manual adopted in September 2019. The Executive Director is authorized to sign services contracts that are less than $250,000 individually and in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1.5 million in any given fiscal year. Additionally, in accordance with Public Utilities Code Section 130323(c), the Executive Director is authorized to sign contracts for supplies, equipment, materials, and construction of all facilities and works under $50,000 individually. The attached report details all contracts that have been executed for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2020, under the single signature authority granted to the Executive Director. The unused capacity of single signature authority for services at June 30, 2020 is $265,244. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of June 30, 2020 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on July 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 5B 14 i CONTRACT # 1 SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF June 30, 2020 CONSULTANT DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES ORIGINAL CONTRACT PAID AMOUNT REMAINING AMOUNT CONTRACT AMOUNT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2019 $1,500,000.00 20-31-020-00 WSP USA, Inc. Managed Freeways - Pre -design report and conceptual design plans 249,983.00 119,265.52 130,717.48 20-31-024-00 California Highway Patrol Construction Zone Enhancement Program (COZEEP) for SR-91 Pachappa 49,981.00 0.00 49,981.00 Project 20-33-045-00 Sapphos Environmental Railroad right-of-way maintenance permit support services 5,750.00 577.41 5,172.59 20-18-053-00 Koff & Associates Compensation, classification, and benefits studies 20,000.00 9,000.00 11,000.00 20-19-062-00 Eadie & Payne GASB 87 implementation professional services 70,000.00 2,350.00 67,650.00 20-31-070-00 18-24-001-04 Stantec Consulting Services Final design services for SART Phase 4 70,000.00 69,494.00 506.00 Braughton Construction On -call station maintenance and repair services 250,000.00 0.00 250,000.00 20-31-066-00 Skanska Ames 91 Eastbound Express Lanes County Line Restriping 193,441.18 193,441.18 0.00 16-24-015-04 Global Pest Solutions COVID-19 Cleaning Services at Stations 40,000.00 5,759.00 34,241.00 18-24-067-01 Ultimate Maintenance Services COVID-19 Cleaning Services at Stations 120,000.00 12,144.00 107,856.00 20-31-081-00 California Highway Patrol Construction Zone Enhancement Program (COZEEP) for Interstate 15 Express Lanes Connector 50,000.00 0.00 50,000.00 20-31-094-00 Valley Power Services Backup Generator services for Toll Facilities 53,336.49 0.00 53,336.49 PO 2771 17-31-021-03 Caltrans Express Lanes Freeway Maintenance Agreement 1,764.00 0.00 1,764.00 AMOUNT USED 1,234,755.67 Total Plan of the Inland Empire Purchase and installation of furniture for Riverside Customer Service Center 60,500.00 0.00 60,500.00 AMOUNT USED 1,234,755.67 AMOUNT REMAINING through June 30, 2020 $265,244.33 None Agreements that fall under Public Utilities Code 130323 (C) N/A $- $- $- Jose Mendoza Prepared by Theresia Trevino Reviewed by Note: Shaded area represents new contracts listed in the fourth quarter. 15 AGENDA ITEM 5C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Eric DeHate, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Years 2016-2018 Transportation Development Act State Triennial Performance Audit Results for the Commission and Transit Operators AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the Fiscal Year 2015/16 through FY 2017/18 state triennial performance audit results for the Commission; and 2) Receive and file the FY 2015/16 through FY 2017/18 state triennial performance audit results for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In accordance with State law (California Public Utilities Code Section 99246), the Commission is required every three years to arrange for performance audits of its activities as well as the activities of the transit operators to which it allocates Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds. At its December 2018 meeting, the Commission approved the selection of Michael Baker International Inc. (MBI) to conduct the Triennial Performance Audits for FYs 2015/16, 2016/17, and 2017/18, which included the Commission and the seven public transit operators consisting of the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; PVVTA;, RTA; and SunLine. The Commission's Rail Program is not included in the audit as this is part of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority's Triennial Performance Audit review. All audits have been completed and reports were transmitted to Caltrans by April 8, 2020, as required by TDA. DISCUSSION: TDA Triennial Performance Audit of the Commission MBI's charge in the Commission's triennial performance audit process was to: • Assess the Commission's compliance with TDA regulations; Agenda Item 5C 16 • Evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the Commission activities related to transportation planning, programming, regional coordination, grant management and oversight; and • Review the Commission's actions and progress on the implementation of prior triennial performance audit recommendations. The Commission's 2019 Triennial Audit (Attachment 1) finds that the Commission is in compliance with all TDA requirements and in some cases exceeds those requirements. The audit also finds that the recommendations of the 2016 audit have either been implemented or are in progress. One prior recommendation was partially implemented regarding the need to verify that the remaining transit operators separate their bus and specialized paratransit services in the annual reporting to the State Controller. Generally, the results of the triennial performance audit of the Commission are positive. The findings further conclude that the Commission has satisfactorily complied with all TDA legislative mandates for regional transportation planning agencies. As a result of the FY 2015/16-2017/18 Triennial Performance Audit of the Commission, five recommendations were provided to improve the Commission's administration and management of TDA and its organization. 1. A carryover from the prior two performance audits, it is recommended that the Commission revisit the TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County bus and commuter rail service, which currently distributes Local Transportation Funds (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA) to bus and commuter rail with a split of 78 percent and 22 percent, respectively. The report cites that the last revisit of the TDA funding formula was in FY 2009/10 and is due for a review to take into account new conditions since the last update including the start of the 2009 Measure A, enhanced bus service and infrastructure, and the opening of the Perris Valley Line. Status: Staff will continue to monitor transit needs under the current economic conditions to assess how transit service in the western county can be better sustained. 2. A carryover from the prior performance audit, it is recommended that the Commission enforce and monitor the transit operators' annual Financial Transactions Report with separate reports for general public transit and demand response. Status: Some operators have separated their reports following the recommendation including SunLine Transit Agency, while others such as the cities of Beaumont and Corona have not prepared separate reports. Staff will continue to work with these transit operators to ensure they adhere to the proper reporting procedures. 3. It is recommended that the Commission's current policy for State Transit Assistance (STA) be updated to reflect Senate Bill 508, which was passed in October 2015 and provides funding relief to transit operators in light of ridership and farebox issues from economic Agenda Item 5C 17 circumstances. SB 508 qualifies an operator to be eligible for STA operating funds even if the operator fails to meet the efficiency standards under TDA law (Public Utilities Code 99314.6). Under the relatively new law, the qualification is based on a sliding scale rather than a pass/fail proposition so that an operator may still receive less than 100 percent of STA for operations and the balance of funds for capital when the efficiency standard is not met. As an example, if the operator fails to meet both efficiency standards for operating cost per hour by 10 percent each, the operator is eligible to receive 90 percent of STA for operations, and 10 percent for capital. Status: As part of implementing a prior audit recommendation, staff brought forward a revised policy to the Commission in June 2019 to enable operators to use STA for operating expenses. Previously, STA was only used for capital projects, and operating was only allowable under emergency or special circumstances. The current policy does not reflect the SB 508 exception. As such in FY 2020/21, staff will update the current policy and bring back a recommendation that includes additional information regarding the sliding scale metrics outlined in SB 508. 4. It is recommended that the Commission update the Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) process to more accurately reflect a mid -range plan that forecasts and provides direction on operating and capital projects and service delivery for the next three to five-year period, instead of the current process which has essentially resulted in an annual budgeting document with changes that reflect year to year service and budget adjustments. Possible changes could include the frequency of updates from annually to every three or five years which is generally a timeframe that shows significant changes in transit operations that are needed to be planned and funded. Status: Staff held a workshop in November 2018 to seek operator feedback on the current process and continued to seek feedback throughout the following year. As a result, staff updated the SRTP process for FY 2020/21 and will continue to implement improvements. 5. It is recommended that a TDA Administrative Guidance Manual be developed to document the administrative process, from apportionment to the claim submittal and adoption, and from payment tracking to performance evaluation and monitoring. Changes in TDA administration and the Commission's interpretation of the statute warrant development of a comprehensive in-house manual as a repository of all localized materials, policies, and processes related to TDA. Status: Staff initiated the development of a scope of work for this effort prior to the triennial performance audit period and hopes to continue moving this effort forward in FY 2020/21. Agenda Item 5C 18 TDA Triennial Performance Audit of the Public Transit Operators The TDA requires that an operator receiving TDA funds be audited for efficiency, effectiveness and economy of the operation. The major elements of performance audits of transit operators include review of compliance requirements, transit operator functions, and performance indicators. The auditor is also required to follow-up on prior performance review recommendations and assess progress made. MBI outlined audit findings and made recommendations for each of the public transit operators. Generally, the transit operators' reports show that they are providing their services effectively and within the requirements of state law, with a few exceptions as noted in each operator report. Highlights of recommendations for each transit operator are summarized as follows: City of Banning 1. Ensure timely completion and submittal of external TDA financial reports. 2. Continue to pursue a reimbursement agreement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College for Go -Pass riders. 3. Include a link to Beaumont Transit on the Banning Transit web page. City of Beaumont 1. Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports for general public transit and specialized service. 2. Continue to work with RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College on fare revenue reimbursement from the College Go -Pass Agreement. 3. Include a link to Banning Transit on the Beaumont Transit web page. 4. Report and track mechanical road calls and other vehicle operation metrics. City of Corona 1. Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports for general public transit and specialized service. 2. Continue process of implementing Americans with Disabilities Act subscription services on Dial -A -Ride. 3. Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. City of Riverside 1. Pursue targeted marketing efforts and rebranding of service. 2. Conduct a strategic planning process. Riverside Transit Agency 1. Focus efforts on evaluating the commuter ridership market. 2. Evaluate plans for RTA facility growth that align with increased transit services in the southern section of the service area. Agenda Item 5C 19 SunLine Transit Agency 1. Update the employee handbook. 2. Coordinate opportunities for SunLine transit redesign with intelligent transportation infrastructure in the Coachella Valley. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 1. Work with local elected officials and stakeholders to expand the Blythe Wellness Express to serve veterans. 2. Ensure that Board meeting agendas and minutes are posted on the PVVTA website. Staff and transit operators will be tracking progress on implementing the above recommendations. As part of the annual SRTP updates, the operators describe the current implementation status of each of their recommendations from the most recent TDA triennial performance audits. Staff will also continue to work with the transit agencies to assist them in developing better administrative practices to ensure that any negative findings found in the recent audits are not repeated in the next triennial performance audit period. There is a no fiscal impact for this item. Attachments: 1) RCTC FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 TDA Triennial Audit 2) City of Banning FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 3) City of Beaumont FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 4) City of Corona FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 5) City of Riverside FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 6) Riverside Transit Agency FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 7) SunLine Transit Agency FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit 8) Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency FY 2015/16 — 2017/18 Triennial Audit Agenda Item 5C 20 ATTACHMENT 1 ROTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside County Transportation Commission April 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 21 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction — Initial Review of RTPA Functions 1 Audit Methodology 7 Section II 8 RTPA Compliance Requirements 8 Section III 17 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations 17 Section IV 20 Detailed Review of RTPA Functions 20 Administration, Management and Coordination 20 Transportation Planning and Programming 25 TDA Claimant Relationships and Oversight 34 Public Information and External Affairs 38 Grant Applications and Management 40 Section V 41 Findings 41 Triennial Audit Recommendations 43 Triennial Performance Audit i Michael Baker International RCTC 22 Section I Introduction — Initial Review of RTPA Functions The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC, Commission) retained Michael Baker International to conduct its Transportation Development Act (TDA) performance audit covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years (FY) 2015-16 through 2017-18. RCTC is required by California Public Utilities Code (PUC) Sections 99246 to prepare and submit an audit of its performance on a triennial basis to the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in order to continue to receive TDA funding. This performance audit is intended to describe how well RCTC is meeting its administrative and planning obligations under the TDA, as well as to present a description of its organizational management and efficiency. To gather information for the TDA performance audit, Michael Baker reviewed various documents, conducted interviews with agency staff and the transit operators within RCTC's jurisdiction, and evaluated RCTC's responsibilities, functions, and performance of the TDA guidelines and regulations. Overview of RCTC RCTC was established by state legislative statute (AB 1276, Chapter 1333) in September 1976. The Commission was initially governed by a board of seven commissioners representing the interests of communities within Riverside County. Today, RCTC's membership totals 34 commissioners comprising one elected official from each of the county's 28 incorporated cities, all five county supervisors and a non -voting ex officio member from Caltrans, District 8 appointed by the governor. The member jurisdictions include the following entities: Table 1-1 RCTC Member Jurisdictions County of Riverside City of Eastvale City of Norco City of Banning City of Hemet City of Palm Desert City of Beaumont City of Indian Wells City of Palm Springs City of Blythe City of Indio City of Perris City of Calimesa City of Jurupa Valley City of Rancho Mirage City of Canyon Lake City of Lake Elsinore City of Riverside City of Cathedral City City of La Quinta City of San Jacinto City of Coachella City of Menifee City of Temecula City of Corona City of Moreno Valley City of Wildomar City of Desert Hot Springs City of Murrieta Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 1 Michael Baker International 23 Riverside County is geographically located in Southern California, stretching nearly 200 miles across. The County is bordered by San Bernardino County on the north, Orange County on the west, San Diego and Imperial Counties on the south, and the Colorado River on the east. Riverside County was created in 1893 from parts of San Bernardino and San Diego Counties. The county derives its name from the City of Riverside, christened when the upper canal of the Santa Ana River reached it in 1871. The county's geography encompasses over 7,200 square miles and is traversed by 886 miles of highways and 2,600 miles of County -maintained roadways. The 2019 countywide State Department of Finance (DOF) population estimate is 2.44 million residents which currently ranks fourth largest in the state. The most populous cities in the county based on DOF estimates include Riverside (328,101), Moreno Valley (208,297), Corona (168,101), Murrieta (118,125), and Temecula (113,826). Against this backdrop of rapid population growth, Riverside County's economy has become increasingly diverse and robust. This is attributed to the economy's construction and industrial capacity. Interstates 10 (1-10), 15 (1-15) and 215 (1-215) corridors and State Routes 60 and 91 are major development corridors for employment centers and trade. As recovery in the local Inland Empire economy continues, the economic and population trends have resulted in a myriad of transportation projects with investments in highway capacity, toll road development, rail transit, and express bus service that links all of it together. RCTC has committed itself to be an effective facilitator of mobility throughout the county. Role of RCTC When RCTC was established by the state legislature in 1976 as part of a reform of transportation planning and programming throughout Southern California, its mission was to plan and program transportation improvements for Riverside County. To this end, RCTC was designated as a regional transportation planning agency (RTPA) for state transportation planning and programming purposes. RCTC is responsible for setting policies, establishing priorities, and coordinating activities among the County's various transit operators and other agencies. The Commission also programs and/or reviews the allocation of federal, state, and local funds for highway, transit, rail, nonmotorized travel (bicycle and pedestrian), and other transportation activities. The Commission serves as the tax authority and implementation agency for the voter -approved Measure A Transportation Improvement Program. Measure A was originally approved by the County's electorate in 1988. On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A commencing in July 2009 and extending through June 2039. Acting in its capacity as the Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE), the Commission also provides motorist aid services designed to expedite traffic flow and enhance highway safety. These services include a call box program that provides roadside call box service for Triennial Performance Audit 2 Michael Baker International RCTC 24 motorists; the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), a roving tow truck service to assist motorists with disabled vehicles on the main highways of the County during peak rush hour traffic periods; and Inland Empire 511 (IE511), a traveler information system. These services are provided at no charge to motorists and are funded through a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations. In March 2017, the Commission commenced toll operations on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes following substantial completion of the State Route 91 corridor improvement project. These operations are accounted for in an enterprise fund. As the RTPA, RCTC is legally responsible for allocating TDA funds, the major source of funds for transit in the County. In addition, the Commission has been designated as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA) for the County. As the CMA, the Commission coordinates with local jurisdictions in the establishment of congestion mitigation procedures for the County's roadway system. RCTC also received state and federal tolling authority to pursue major projects that include tolled roadways. Organizational Structure As noted above, RCTC's governing body comprises 33 voting members and one non -voting member from Caltrans, District 8. The board has eight committees to assist in providing policy recommendations in its decision -making process. Six committees comprise members of the board while two additional committees are comprised of non -board members. The committees consist of the following: Committee Purpose and Function Executive Committee Reviews and makes final decisions on personnel issues and office operational matters. The committee is composed of the chair, vice chair, second vice chair, past chair, four representatives from cities in Western and Eastern Riverside County, and three members of the Board of Supervisors. The executive committee meets the second Wednesday of the month. Budget and Implementation Committee Oversees budgetary and financial matters of the Commission as well as construction contracts, grant allocations, and motorist assistance programs. Composed of up to 15 regular members of the Commission selected by the chair, with at least 9 members being from Western Riverside County and at least 4 members from Eastern Riverside County. The committee provides oversight on annual budget development, competitive state and federal grant programs, countywide communications and outreach programs, countywide strategic plan, legislation, short range transit Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 3 Michael Baker International 25 Committee Purpose and Function plans (SRTP), and other areas as may be prescribed by the Commission. This committee meets the fourth Monday of the month. Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Oversees transportation capital projects in Western Riverside County. Composed of up to 12 Western Riverside County regular members of the Commission. The committee provides policy direction on subject matter that may include, but is not limited to, air quality, capital projects, communications and outreach programs, specific transit projects, intermodal programs, motorist services, new corridors, regional agencies/regional planning, RTIP/STIP, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Program related to Western Riverside County, and other areas as may be prescribed by the Commission. This committee meets the fourth Monday of the month. Toll Policy Operation Committee Addresses policies involving the Commission's toll facilities; setting tolls or rates; considering contracts with vendors working on the toll program; Statewide and federal legislative issues regarding tolling; outreach and marketing of the toll facilities; interactions with neighboring jurisdictions regarding toll matters; and user -based funding programs and future opportunities for toll facility development in Riverside County. The committee meets quarterly on the fourth Thursday of the months of February, May, August and November. Traffic Relief Strategy Committee Oversees countywide transportation improvement and traffic relief plan and implementation ordinance. The committee meets on the fourth Monday of every month. State Route 91 Advisory Committee Senate Bill 1316, as successor to Assembly Bill 1010, the enabling legislation for the Orange County Transportation Authority's purchase of the State Route 91 toll road, calls for the creation of an advisory committee composed of 10 voting members and three non -voting members. The voting members of the advisory committee consist of five members from Orange County Transportation Authority and five members from the Riverside County Transportation Commission. The non -voting members are composed of the California Department of Transportation district directors Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 4 Michael Baker International 26 Committee Purpose and Function from Districts 8 and 12, and a member of the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority. The committee meets quarterly on the first Friday of the months of March, June, September, and December. Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council (non -board member) Composed of citizen members appointed by the Commission. Also meets the statutory requirement for the Social Services Transportation Advisory Council under TDA. This committee reviews SRTPs and transit coordination issues and participates in the transit needs hearings. The committee meets as scheduled. Technical Advisory Committee (non -board member) Composed of city and county public works directors or city managers. This committee meets on the third Monday of every other month. In addition, the Commission chair or the chairs of the policy committees have the authority to create ad hoc committees on specific issues. Ad hoc committees are legally required to be temporary and focused on a single issue and are not required to meet on a regular basis. Prior to hearing by the full Commission, business items related to RCTC's transportation programs are reviewed by the appropriate committees. Committee members are allowed opportunities to examine the items in detail prior to making recommendations to the full Commission. This provides a formal process for staff to communicate its analyses of policies, programs, and projects with its board members, and enables Commissioners to make informed public policy decisions. Documentation provided by RCTC shows that during the audit period, RCTC has provided detailed staff reports on a regular basis to its committees. The RCTC staff organization chart during the audit period is shown in Figure 1-1. Triennial Performance Audit 5 Michael Baker International RCTC 27 Erravwr Mara rmemt Management Trdrrrcal ara ddministrither Staff Chid Ind ORicer Fra urement lianager Pracuremenl 1 Analyst Shim idmiistratm Source: RCTC FY 2017-18 Budget Figure 1-1 Staff Organization Chart Mega CD_lsel Ionian Resomas Alall tratr Fuhlia x=air { era IJanager 1 :hr board SrnarManagomrrt fans psi .2: irdministrabwe Ass scant asputy Cirri d theBc.rd R muds Tcthnidar Beard cf Crmmissicrer Grtut t rtt_r Dro-_ti [weculit+e )irerlar 1Nuhimo-dal Seiwioes Oirednr Inlamatim Terhno-lag}' dminislrator fkail Manager LMa•ugc—ent frralist [omit Marlow filaagrarrrt1 hruFfst Commuter& Ossisiaser maga Manago-ierrt frralist Planing h Prarfann rr, Waage! Managemmi faniFfst Maragement L_ .4nrt PmjrdDeliver. directar Canal Maragrr Right Di r4m. Mvagei Tall Mgr: Oirednr !Senior Maragg�emrst frnallstri Ida nagemmi. Andrpst PadMies Admiailrallpr 4 Tall Pro-jed Alanag<r 1 Toll r;paralirns !Amager To-IITrchralo-girs Manager S im !gimp -melt AraFfs1 Triennial Performance Audit 6 Michael Baker International RCTC 28 According to the annual Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), RCTC's annual revenue for the fiscal years covered by this performance audit ranged from $376.8 million in FY 2016 to $343.2 million in FY 2017, and to $461.6 million in FY 2018.1 The revenues include both program revenue and general revenue, including Measure A and TDA, which increased during the audit period due to economic recovery in the region. RCTC's annual expenses ranged from $503.6 million in FY 2016 to $538.4 million in FY 2017, and to $407.8 million in FY 2018.2 During this period, governmental expenses fluctuated primarily for highways which decreased from $264 million in FY 2017 to $79 million in FY 2018. Transit and specialized transportation expenses increased from $81 million to $90 million. Also, general government expenses declined from $7.3 million in FY 2017 to $3.7 million in FY 2018. It is recognized that RCTC increased its budgeted staffing levels from 46 to 48 FTEs between FYs 2016 and 2018 to manage its growing programs, in particular in management services, public affairs, and outreach. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling of legislation that called for a small staff. Audit Methodology To gather information for this performance audit, Michael Baker International accomplished the following activities: • Document Review: Conducted an extensive review of documents including various RCTC files and internal reports, committee agendas, and public documents. • Interviews: Conducted interviews with RCTC executive and management staff as well as the transit operators under RCTC's jurisdiction. • Analysis: Evaluated the responses from the interviews as well as the documents reviewed about RCTC's responsibilities, functions, and performance to TDA guidelines and regulations. Additional research was conducted in audit areas that required further analysis. The remainder of this report is divided into four sections. In Section II, Michael Baker provides a review of the compliance requirements of the TDA administrative process. Section III describes RCTC's responses to the recommendations of the previous performance audit. Section IV provides a detailed review of RCTC's functions, while Section V summarizes our findings and recommendations for the current FY 2016-2018 triennial cycle. 1 Annual CAFR, Changes in Net Position from governmental and business -type activities. 2 Annual CAFR, Statement of Activities. Triennial Performance Audit 7 Michael Baker International RCTC 29 Section II RTPA Compliance Requirements Fourteen key compliance requirements are suggested in the Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities developed by Caltrans to assess RCTC's conformance with TDA. Our findings concerning RCTC's compliance with state legislative requirements are summarized in Table 11-1. TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts All transportation operators and city or county governments which have responsibility for serving a given area, in total, claim no more than those Local Transportation Fund (LTF) monies apportioned to that area. Public Utilities Code, Section 99231 RCTC accounts for its claimants' areas of apportionment and has not allowed those claimants to claim more than what is apportioned for their area. RCTC makes this finding in each adopted resolution approving LTF claims. RCTC has an adopted LTF reserve and funding disbursement policy for the apportionments. RCTC allocates LTF based on population to determine each claimant's apportionments, according to law. Mid- year projections of LTF provide updated apportionment data to the claimants. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has adopted rules and regulations delineating procedures for the submission of claims for facilities provided for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicycles. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99233.3 and 99234 RCTC has an adopted set of policies governing the Article 3 (SB 821) Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program. Initial policies were adopted in December 1986 with additional policies enacted over time, the last in January 2015. An evaluation committee comprising three non -project proposal submitting Technical Advisory Committee members and up to three additional evaluators annually evaluate proposed projects according to seven evaluation criteria. The evaluation committee will allocate funds to projects in order of Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 8 Michael Baker International 30 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts highest ranking to lowest ranking until all Article 3 funds have been allocated. Payment to the claimant is on a reimbursement basis after submittal of sufficient documentation substantiating satisfactory project completion. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has established a social services transportation advisory council. The RTPA must ensure that there is a citizen participation process which includes at least an annual public hearing. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99238 and 99238.5 RCTC has established a Social Services Transportation Advisory Council (SSTAC) required under PUC 99238. The SSTAC also serves as the Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC). With all TDA funding being spent on transit in the County since 2009, Caltrans provided clarification in a letter dated May 2010 that only one public hearing is required anywhere in the county to carry out the citizen participation process under PUC 99238.5. RCTC has since held at least one public hearing annually. Based on the roster dated May 2017, the committee comprises 9 members which meet the membership requirements for a SSTAC under PUC 99238. A chair and vice -chair are selected by the committee, and subcommittees may be formed as needed, according to the adopted bylaws for the RCTC CAC/SSTAC. Each represents the constituencies identified in state law and resides in a number of communities throughout the county in order to provide a perspective from a wide geographic area. RCTC identifies the area represented by the member, their categorical membership per TDA, and qualifications. Many SSTAC members have served for a number of years. Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 9 Michael Baker International 31 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The SSTAC participates on numerous issues including the annual unmet transit needs hearings, coordination of specialized transportation services, oversight in administering TDA funds, review of SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, participation in the Universal Call for Projects for Specialized Transit, and review of SRTPs. The committee generally meets as scheduled. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has annually identified, analyzed and recommended potential productivity improvements which could lower the operating costs of those operators which operate at least 50 percent of their vehicle service miles within the RTPA's jurisdiction. Recommendations include, but are not limited to, those made in the performance audit. • A committee for the purpose providing advice on productivity improvements may be formed. • The operator has made a reasonable effort to implement improvements recommended by the RTPA, as determined by the RTPA, or else the operator has not received an allocation which Public Utilities Code, Section 99244 The Commission meets this requirement through several means, one being the adoption and approval of the SRTPs which detail the operating and capital costs for planned transit services for both bus and commuter rail. Since July 2014, the Commission has adhered to a policy in which the reporting and review of the existing mandatory and discretionary Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) targets were eliminated and replaced with staff delivering an annual Public Transportation Countywide Performance Report. The Commission approved goals and objectives for crafting the annual report that continues a comprehensive performance reporting program for Riverside County. The Commission also provided direction to require the operators to continue reporting individual performance through the Commission's established online reporting system, TransTrack. Conclusion: Complied Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 10 Michael Baker International 32 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts exceeds its prior year allocation. The RTPA has ensured that all claimants to whom it allocates Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds submits to it and to the state controller an annual certified fiscal and compliance audit within 180 days after the end of the fiscal year (December 27). The RTPA may grant an extension of up to 90 days as it deems necessary (March 26). Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 For the audit period, RCTC received most of the fiscal and compliance audits from the claimants by the established dates set by the State Controller. Select fiscal audits by a few claimants (cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona) were issued shortly after the time extension. RCTC reviews the audited farebox recovery ratios to determine compliance with this key TDA measure and any audit findings. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has designated an independent entity to conduct a performance audit of operators and itself (for the current and previous triennium). For operators, the audit was made and calculated the required performance indicators, and the audit report was transmitted to the entity that allocates the operator's TDA monies and to the RTPA within 12 months after the end of the triennium. If an operator's audit was not transmitted by the start of the second fiscal year following the last fiscal year of the triennium, TDA funds were not allocated to that operator for that or subsequent fiscal years until the audit was transmitted. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99246 and 99248 For the current three-year period, RCTC has retained Michael Baker International to conduct the performance audit of RCTC and the seven transit operators. Michael Baker International was retained to conduct the previous audit of RCTC and the transit operators for the three fiscal years that ended June 30, 2015. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has submitted a copy of its performance audit Public Utilities Code, Section 99246(c) Email communication between RCTC and Caltrans indicated RCTC submitted Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 11 Michael Baker International 33 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts to the Director of the California Department of Transportation. In addition, the RTPA has certified in writing to the Director, that the performance audits of the operators located in the area under its jurisdiction have been completed. performance audits of RCTC and each of the seven transit operators in October 2016. Conclusion: Complied The performance audit of the operator providing public transportation service shall include a verification of the operator's operating cost per passenger, operating cost per vehicle service hour, passengers per vehicle service mile, and vehicle service hours per employee, as defined in Section 99247. The performance audit shall include, but not be limited to, consideration of the needs and types of passengers being served and the employment of part-time drivers and the contracting with common carriers of persons operating under a franchise or license to provide services during peak hours, as defined in subdivision (a) of Section 99260.2 Public Utilities Code, Section 99246(d) The performance audit of each transit operator in Riverside County includes all required elements such as performance metric trends and verification of compliance measures regarding service delivery methods. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has established rules and regulations regarding revenue ratios for transportation operators providing services in urbanized and new urbanized areas. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 and 99270.2 There are two transit operators under RCTC's jurisdiction, RTA and SunLine Transit, that serve both urbanized and non -urbanized areas. RCTC developed rules and regulations with Caltrans approval for determining the minimum fare ratios for these operators using a blended farebox recovery formula. The Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 12 Michael Baker International 34 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Commission reviews the blended farebox prepared by the operators by June 30 each year, and are reflected in the annual operator fiscal audits. The formula methodology and fare ratio calculations are annually submitted to Caltrans for concurrence by April 1 preceding the fiscal year for which the calculation takes place. Conclusion: Complied The RTPA has adopted criteria, rules and regulations for the evaluation of claims under Article 4.5 of the TDA and the determination of the cost- effectiveness of the proposed community transit services. Public Utilities Code, Section 99275.5 RCTC utilizes Measure A local transportation sales tax revenues as well as federal funds to fund specialized community transit services. As such, Article 4.5 funds are not apportioned. Conclusion: Not Applicable State transit assistance funds received by the RTPA are allocated only for transportation planning and mass transportation purposes. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99310.5 and 99313.3 and Proposition 116 RCTC allocates STA funds for transit purposes only. By RCTC policy, operators spend down existing TDA capital balances prior to requesting additional TDA capital funds. In June 2019, new RCTC adopted policy for STA enables use of unallocated and unprogrammed STA funds for transit operating assistance under eligibility standards. Conclusion: Complied The amount received pursuant to Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.3; by each RTPA for state transit assistance is allocated to the operators in the area of its jurisdiction as allocated by the State Controller's Office. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.3 RCTC allocates operator revenue -based STA funds to the operators in accordance with the amounts published by the State Controller's Office. Conclusion: Complied Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 13 Michael Baker International 35 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements If TDA funds are allocated to purposes not directly related Public Utilities Code, Section 99401.5 As also described above, since 2009, all TDA funds are used exclusively for to public or specialized public transit in Riverside County. Per a transportation services, or clarification letter issued by Caltrans in facilities for exclusive use of May 2010, RCTC continues to hold an pedestrians and bicycles, the annual public hearing to solicit transit transit planning agency has comments in compliance with law to annually: gather input on transit needs for analysis and consultation with the • Consulted with the Social CAC/SSTAC and the operators. Services Transportation Advisory Council (SSTAC) established pursuant to Conclusion: Complied Public Utilities Code, Section 99238; • Identified transit needs, including: o Groups that are transit -dependent or transit disadvantaged, o Adequacy of existing transit services to meet the needs of groups identified, and o Analysis of potential alternatives to provide transportation services; • Adopted or re -affirmed definitions of "unmet transit needs" and "reasonable to meet;" • Identified the unmet transit needs and those needs that are reasonable to meet; Adopted a finding that there are no unmet transit needs that are reasonable to meet; or that there are unmet transit needs including needs that are reasonable to meet. Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 14 Michael Baker International 36 TABLE 11-1 RCTC Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts If a finding is adopted that there are unmet transit needs, these needs must have been funded before an allocation was made for streets and roads. The RTPA has caused an audit of its accounts and records to be performed for each fiscal year by the county auditor, or a certified public accountant. The RTPA must transmit the resulting audit report to the State Controller within 12 months of the end of each fiscal year and must be performed in accordance with the Basic Audit Program and Report Guidelines for California Special Districts prescribed by the State Controller. The audit shall include a determination of compliance with the transportation development and accompanying rules and regulations. Financial statements may not commingle the state transit assistance fund, the local transportation fund, or other revenues or funds of any city, county or other agency. The RTPA must maintain fiscal and accounting records and supporting papers for at least four years following the fiscal year close. California Administrative Code, Section 6662 The accounting firm of Macias Gini & O'Connell, LLP provided the independent auditor's reports of RCTC for FYs 2016, 2017, and 2018. The Audited Financial Statements and Compliance Reports were submitted to the State Controller within 12 months of the end of each fiscal year. RCTC also maintains fiscal and accounting records and supporting papers for at least four years following the fiscal year close. Conclusion: Complied Triennial Performance Audit RCTC 15 Michael Baker International 37 Findings and Observations from RTPA Compliance Requirements Matrix RCTC has satisfactorily complied with all relevant state legislative mandates for RTPAs. The membership of the CAC/SSTAC is stable with the nine members shown on the membership list provided by RCTC for the audit period. Also, the TDA mandate for RCTC to analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for the transit operators is accomplished through implementation of several activities, including the approval of SRTPs for each operator, and a combined approach of developing the annual Public Transportation Countywide Performance Report coupled with required reporting by the operators of performance metrics through TransTrack. Triennial Performance Audit 16 Michael Baker International RCTC 38 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations This chapter describes RCTC's response to the recommendations included in the prior triennial performance audit cycle (FYs 2013-2015). For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Revisit TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County bus and commuter rail service. Background: RCTC implements a TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County for distributing LTF between bus and commuter rail service. The formula is 78 percent LTF toward public bus and 22 percent to commuter rail, which was developed in FY 2004-05 and where it has remained since. The policy is to revisit the funding formula every six years, which last occurred in FY 2009-10. The funding formula is due for a revisit to consider new conditions since the last update, including the renewal of Measure A, enhanced bus service and infrastructure, and the opening of the Perris Valley Line (PVL). New performance reporting methods have also been implemented. Prior to adoption of the policy for the funding formula, a process is employed as described in past RCTC records including holding meetings with Western County bus operators and commuter rail staff to determine the appropriate percentage split. Actions taken by RCTC: RCTC's TDA formula was initially adopted in 1995 and revised in FY 2004-05, which allocates 22 percent of Western Riverside County's LTF to commuter rail. The western county bus operators are guaranteed a minimum funding base which was established by the FY 2003-04 LTF/STA apportionment and upwardly adjusted annually by the CPI. The Commission is currently reviewing its allocation formula in light of the 24-mile-long Metrolink 91/PVL extension opening in June 2016. The TDA claim process for commuter rail has remained the same as for bus operations. To increase available funding for operations, RCTC adopted new policy in June 2019 allowing STA funds to be used for operations. Conclusion: This recommendation has been partially implemented and is carried over in this audit for full implementation. Triennial Performance Audit 17 Michael Baker International RCTC 39 Prior Recommendation 2 Communicate new state legislation to the transit operators. Background: Relatively new legislation (SB 508) was passed in October 2015 that significantly modified several provisions of TDA. The legislation achieves several objectives, including simplifying fare recovery requirements; authorizing funding of bicycle and pedestrian safety education programs; and modifying STA qualifying criteria for operations. RCTC should communicate these changes to the transit systems and determine what implication, if any, the changes might have on their respective transit operations. SB 508 rationalizes performance metrics, for example, by applying the same operating cost exemptions to both the farebox recovery ratio and the STA qualifying criteria. In addition, this bill clarifies a few terms that should help ensure that expectations are applied uniformly to the transit operators. Actions taken by RCTC: The new legislation modifying several provisions of the TDA has been reflected in the fiscal audits commissioned by RCTC relative to farebox recovery standards. Also, RCTC adopted new policy in June 2019 allowing STA funds to be used for operations and shows the exemptions from operating cost from the efficiency standards under the new law. However, the new policy does not fully demonstrate the eligibility requirements should the operator fail to meet the standards. The policy should show the sliding scale allowing operators to still qualify for STA operating funds despite not meeting the efficiency standards. Conclusion: This recommendation has been partially implemented with the portion relating to STA operating eligibility carried forward in this audit for full implementation. Prior Recommendation 3 Ensure transit operators complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and for specialized services. Background: One requirement for the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report is that the transit operator prepares separate reports for general public transit and specialized services. The requirement is contained in the State Controller instructions, and on the report cover sheet. Two of the four applicable operators (City of Banning and Riverside Transit Agency) prepare both reports whereas the other two submit one combined report for their entire respective systems. RCTC should verify that these other two operators (SunLine Transit and City of Beaumont) comply with the requirement and submit separate State Controller reports for general public transit and specialized services. Although the State Controller's Office has not Triennial Performance Audit 18 Michael Baker International RCTC 40 provided notice to an operator, the submission of separate reports to the State Controller will demonstrate RCTC's and each operator's proactive approach to compliance with state reporting instructions. Actions taken by RCTC: Beginning with FY 2016, SunLine has reported the required information to the State Controller for general public (SunBus fixed route) separately from the ADA service (SunDial). A review of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports completed and submitted by the agency to the State Controller revealed that separate reports were being prepared. The recommendation for Beaumont Transit was carried forward in the operator's most recent performance audit, since the City had yet to prepare and submit separate reports. In addition, a recommendation for the City of Corona to prepare separate reports was also made since Dial -A -Ride was designated as a specialized service for ADA-certified, senior, and disabled passengers effective January 2018. RCTC staff conduct quarterly analyses of TransTrack report data, which includes checking variances in data month over month. It is recommended that the Commission continue to ensure that the operators adhere to the proper reporting procedures for the Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports. Conclusion: This recommendation has been partially implemented and is carried over in this audit for full implementation. Triennial Performance Audit 19 Michael Baker International RCTC 41 Section IV Detailed Review of RTPA Functions In this section, a detailed assessment of RCTC's functions and performance as an RTPA during this audit period is provided. Adapted from Caltrans's Performance Audit Guidebook, RCTC's activities can be divided into the following activities: • Administration, Management, and Coordination • Transportation Planning and Programming • TDA Claimant Relationships and Oversight • Public Information and External Affairs • Grant Applications and Management Administration, Management, and Coordination RCTC develops policy goals and objectives each fiscal year as part of the budget process that are consistent with the Commission's overall strategic direction. The Commission policy goals and objectives provide an opportunity to match the Commission's spending priorities in a manner that implements the promises made to the citizens of Riverside County in both Measure A Expenditure Plans and that fulfills other Commission responsibilities. The Commission's eight long-term policy goals are: • Promote mobility • Mitigate and address the impact of goods movement • Encourage economic development • Ensure improved system efficiencies • Foster environmental stewardship • Support transportation choices through multimodalism and accessibility • Prioritize public and agency communications • Maintain fiscal and organizational accountability Triennial Performance Audit 20 Michael Baker International RCTC 42 RCTC continued to balance its growing responsibilities as a transportation planning and programming agency with project delivery and implementation. With continuation of the Measure A program, one of RCTC's primary strategies has been project delivery and getting projects into construction. The increased development and delivery of projects programmed through Measure A renewal, combined with the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF), remains a priority of the agency together with multimodal planning, rail development, goods movement, and toll lane implementation. RCTC has both state tolling authority and federal tolling authority for the toll projects and has design -build authorization for the SR-91 corridor improvement project and the 1-15 Express Lanes Project. Despite this increased responsibility, RCTC maintains a relatively small staff. Actual full-time equivalent employees grew from 46 to 48 over the past three years to manage the agency's programs (see Table IV-1). The growth in employees was on target with the agency's budgeted positions. These staffing numbers are complemented by consultants to provide specialized services. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling of legislation that called for a small staff. Table IV-1 Staff Summary by Function/Program FYs 2016-18 Function/Program FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18 Management services and administration 14.7 17.1 19.2 Planning and programming 6.2 4.9 4.2 Rail operations and maintenance 4.5 4.3 4.1 Specialized transit/transportation 2.3 2.7 2.4 Commuter assistance 1.8 1.4 1.7 Motorist assistance 0.7 0.8 0.9 Capital project development and delivery 15.8 15.8 15.5 Total full-time equivalents 46.0 47.0 48.0 Source: FY 2018 CAFR Capital Project Development The agency's implementation of its strategic plan has played a key role in the success to administer the highway capital program as well as other programs such as for transit in Riverside County. The management of the Measure's Expenditure Plan, including program management for rail extension, has continued to be accomplished with the assistance of the Bechtel Infrastructure Corporation. Bechtel provides program management and construction management services for highway and rail infrastructure, including the completion of the PVL commuter rail extension project, which is a significant Measure A transit project. Bechtel assists RCTC in forming and managing contracts between RCTC and its consultants and contractors. Construction of the Metrolink 91/PVL began in October 2013, with rail service beginning in June 2016. The PVL is the first extension of Metrolink service since the Antelope Valley Line was built Triennial Performance Audit 21 Michael Baker International RCTC 43 in 1994 and continues rail service 24 miles from the downtown Riverside Station serving residents in Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula, San Jacinto, Hemet, Lake Elsinore, and Wildomar. The project also included construction and rehabilitation of railroad tracks, upgrading of at - grade crossings, and improvement of existing tracks. RCTC executive management worked to obtain approvals from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), railroads, and the community related to the development of the PVL. The RCTC Rail division continues with the planning and management of capital improvements at the commuter rail stations in Riverside County. The PVL is part of the significant transportation investment delivered by RCTC in Western Riverside County. RCTC has been able to accomplish this level of activity by using Measure A's revenue stream and RCTC's track record of delivering projects to issue bonds at favorable interest rates, as well as competing successfully for awards of federal and state transportation funds, including a $421 million loan from the TIFIA program for the $1.4 billion SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project, and a $152 million TIFIA loan for the $472 million 1-15 Express Lanes Project. The SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Express Lanes) through Corona opened in March 2017. The project extended the 91 Express Lanes from the Riverside County/Orange County Line to 1-15, providing the first tolled express lanes in Riverside County. Since the opening of the 91 Express Lanes, usage has far exceeded expectations and traffic conditions on the corridor have improved with the new capacity. RCTC has been able to forge an effective relationship with Orange County Transportation Authority that is more customer oriented. In addition, the Commission embarked on the construction of the 1-15 Express Lanes Project. RCTC, Caltrans, and the Federal Highway Administration have invested $472 million toward the 1-15 Express Lanes. The project encompasses two bi-directional tolled express lanes of approximately 15 miles in length between Cajalco Road and SR-60, in the median of 1-15. The project is scheduled to open in 2020 and will feature multiple access points and dynamic pricing to reflect traffic demand. Public outreach for the 1-15 Express Lanes Project included open houses held in February 2018. In April 2017, Governor Brown signed SB 132, creating and funding the Riverside County Transportation Efficiency Corridor consisting of five projects in Western Riverside County: • Commission's I-15/SR-91 Express Lanes connector project • City of Corona's McKinley Avenue grade separation project • County's Jurupa Road grade separation project with the City of Jurupa Valley as its partner • County's I-15/Limonite interchange project with the Cities of Eastvale and Jurupa Valley as its partners Triennial Performance Audit 22 Michael Baker International RCTC 44 • County's Hamner Bridge widening project with the City of Norco as its partner Internal Controls As a means for promoting internal coordination and communication among RCTC service lines and achieving greater efficiencies, the agency continues to work with several computer programs. The Commission's Finance Department utilizes the EDEN enterprise resource planning (ERP) system for invoices, contracts, and claims, although the system is outdated and plans are to change the software in 2020 to another ERP system, Munis. Also, the InfoWorks records retention system used for capital projects is planned for an upgrade in the near future. The TransTrack transit performance monitoring system is fully functional with expanded performance and operational templates for data record keeping and performance trends. The Commission refinanced its 2009 Series A Bonds in September 2016 as fixed-rate debt. The remaining 2009 B-C Bonds were also refinanced in April 2018 as fixed-rate debt. In December 2017, RCTC issued tax-exempt fixed-rate refunding bonds (the 2017 Series B Bonds) payable from Measure A sales tax revenues. The 2017 Series B Bonds refunded the 2010 Series A Bonds and a portion of the 2013 Series A Bonds. The $410 million in bonds refunded resulted in a savings of $50 million. New bonds in the amount of $155.8 million were issued in July 2017. During the audit period, the Commission updated its procurement and investment policies. RCTC utilizes the PlanetBids procurement platform. RCTC implements a centralized procurements process in order to strengthen controls and ensure consistency in the application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations. The agency is committed to maintaining a strong electronic records management system that provides storage and accessibility of the Commission's actions and documents, and the retention capability for incoming and internally created records. RCTC increased the executive director's single signature authority. A report on the usage of single signature authority is released quarterly. RCTC has integrated several of the software systems to enable greater functionality and benefit to all staff in the management of accounting and project information while automating a paperless workflow system. Ultimately, these improvements result in enhanced customer service to its members and project delivery to the community. Ongoing process improvement underlies the agency's action to continue the replacement of its financial software system in order to better integrate project accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. Beacon Economics and the University of California, Riverside School of Business Center for Economic Forecasting and Development release revenue forecasts for Measure A and LTF. An independent audit is conducted annually on the Commission's accounting books and records. The Commission is also responsible for ensuring that audits of Measure A and TDA funding recipients are completed and reviewed for compliance and other matters in a timely manner. The chief financial officer reviews the TDA financial audits of the claimants that are completed by outside accounting firms. An audit notification and checklist are sent to the claimants in mid - Triennial Performance Audit 23 Michael Baker International RCTC 45 August. Audit findings are reported to the Audit Committee before the audits go before the board. The Commission hired a senior financial analyst in anticipation of the tolling operations. Two accounting assistants oversee accounts payable transactions. Personnel Management Personnel benefits and rights are stipulated in the RCTC Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual, which was updated twice over the past three years, once in September 2015 and a second time in October 2017. RCTC tries to revisit the manual every few years. In 2015, according to the staff report to the Board, the changes to the manual were language changes made to conform the document to legal requirements from changes in law. Language changes included revisions to the exempt employees' title listings to reflect current position titles based upon results from the classification and compensation study completed in July 2015, and changes based upon the new PEPRA laws and CaIPERS requirements that the employer can no longer pay for member contributions. Although outside the current audit period, the manual was updated most recently in November 2019 with edits in regard to elections and campaigns. Employee evaluations are based on a performance rating scale. The updated evaluations improve upon the method and basis for assessing staff performance and provide greater consistency in the process. The Human Resources Department maintains official records of each employee's job performance each year. Multiple steps are involved, including the employee completing a self -evaluation, the supervisor completing the entire performance evaluation, review by the department director and Human Resources for approval, and an evaluation meeting with the employee to complete the evaluation. Any area of the performance evaluation that is rated at the lowest includes a performance improvement plan. The executive director approves rating/merit percentage increases. The performance criteria and ratings scale differ for evaluations of staff, managers, and directors. More defined roles for staff have been developed, enabling personnel to enhance their focus on their respective responsibilities. RCTC has had an opportunity to evaluate and refine its organizational structure given the challenges of assuming a rapid pace of project delivery and meeting milestones promised to the voters for Measure A. RCTC has continued its internship program of hiring graduate program students with good grade point averages from UC Riverside or other local colleges to work about 20 hours per week up to one year each. The interns worked in RCTC divisions including management, planning and programming, multimodal transportation, and procurement oversight. Job responsibilities for the interns include analyzing technical data and recommending policy alternatives, and assisting in managing and implementing federal, state, and local funding programs. Triennial Performance Audit 24 Michael Baker International RCTC 46 Transportation Planning and Programming This functional area addresses planning functions required of RCTC, including development of the Federal Transportation Improvement Program and the Congestion Management Program, Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, and Transit Planning, including the SRTP process. Additional transportation programs administered by the agency are also discussed, including the Commuter Assistance Program. Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) RCTC is responsible for preparing the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) for Riverside County projects that have been approved for federal and state funding. Federal fund sources that RCTC programs include Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ), Surface Transportation Block Grant Program (STBG), Transportation Alternatives Program funding, and transit formula and discretionary revenue by the Federal Transit Administration. State fund sources include SB 821, STA, and STIP Regional Improvement Program funds. Federal regulations require that all projects funded with state and federal funds be included in an FTIP in order to receive the funds. In addition, projects that are regionally significant but locally funded are required to be included in the FTIP. RCTC submits the county FTIP to SCAG, the metropolitan planning organization for the six - county region (Orange, Los Angeles, Imperial, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura Counties). SCAG is responsible for ensuring that the FTIP is consistent with the long-range Regional Transportation Plan and Sustainable Communities Strategy and adopted air plans. SCAG is the responsible agency for submittal of the FTIP to federal agencies for approval. The FTIP is generally updated every two years with administrative and formal amendments occurring between updates. Project evaluation criteria is developed in conjunction with the Technical Advisory Committee prior to each call for projects. Criteria are modified to meet the specific eligibility requirements for each fund source per state and federal guidelines. RCTC has used the following criteria for past calls for projects for CMAQ, STP, and STIP funds: 1. Emphasis on Measure A 2. Regional Significance 3. Economic Development 4. Project Readiness 5. Air Quality Triennial Performance Audit 25 Michael Baker International RCTC 47 6. Safety 7. Congestion Mitigation 8. Matching Funds 9. System Continuity 10. Geographic Balance Subsequently, in July 2019 (beyond the audit period), the Commission adopted a policy for priority to be given to the 2019-2020 Western County Highway Delivery Plan supporting projects for programming of CMAQ (designated under the South Coast Air Basin) and STBG funds. Planning and programming staff are crossed -trained to work on each of the three different programming documents that comprise the FTIP: local highway, state highway, and transit. The programming of projects by RCTC involves a high level of technical capability and coordination among affected agencies. The 2017 FTIP, including amendments, showed a total transit program cost of $1.4 billion for the six -year FTIP period of FYs 2016-17 through 2021-22. The revenues to support the transit program include FTA, state, and local sources. The 2015 FTIP covering FYs 2014-15 through 2019-20 showed a total transit program cost of $1.2 billion. The transit fund programming in the FTIP is generally for a shorter time horizon (1-2 years) in comparison to highway projects (6 years). Programming staff are highly involved with SCAG committees and served on several subgroups during the SCAG RTP process including finance, transportation modeling, plans and programs, and sustainability. RCTC program staff served as representatives during RTP review. Staff also serve in key statewide associations such as California Association of Council of Governments that provide additional opportunities to interface with the California Transportation Commission and Caltrans. In addition, programming staff have responsibility for the TUMF, which comprises $152 million in programmed arterial roadway projects to date. TUMF funds received by the Commission are split evenly between new corridors, including the Mid County Parkway, and regional arterials, including local projects and the SR-79 realignment project. To date, 18 projects have been completed, six projects are under construction or in preconstruction, and one project is in the development phase and remains to be programmed for future TUMF funds. Congestion Management Program RCTC is the designated Congestion Management Agency (CMA) for Riverside County. As a CMA, RCTC is responsible for updating the Congestion Management Program (CMP) that better links land use, transportation, and air quality and prompts growth management strategies, thereby Triennial Performance Audit 26 Michael Baker International RCTC 48 prompting reasonable growth management programs that will effectively utilize new transportation funds, alleviate traffic congestion and related impacts, and improve air quality. The program involves the monitoring of congestion along a designated system that includes all highway facilities and selected major arterials. The CMP is currently under review and is planned to be incorporated in the Commission's Long -Range Transportation Study which was adopted in December 2019. The system is monitored to ensure that the level of service along these roadways does not fall below the adopted level of service. Should a roadway fall to a deficient level of service, a deficiency plan would be required to identify mitigation measures, including a cost and schedule of the recommended mitigation measures. Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program As an important piece of the County transportation system, nonmotorized transportation is encouraged by RCTC. In its efforts, the agency administers a biennial call for projects process for bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Article 3 of the TDA provides 2 percent of funding for the implementation of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. RCTC has an adopted set of policies governing the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program, which were last updated in January 2015. An evaluation committee comprising a minimum of five evaluators —representing a wide range of interests and geographic areas, such as accessibility, bicycling, Coachella Valley, Western Riverside, public transit, and the region —evaluate proposed projects according to the following six evaluation criteria: 1. Destinations Served 2. Safety 3. Project Enhancement 4. Multimodal Access 5. Matching Funds 6. Population Equity An average weighted score is given to each project to determine funding priorities. During the audit period, the following allocations were made according to the Commission agenda actions taken: • FY 2016: $1,739,374 • FY 2017: $1,795,024 • FY 2018: $1,960,000 Triennial Performance Audit 27 Michael Baker International RCTC 49 The allocations are based on 2 percent of TDA fund apportionments, as allowed by law, plus carryover funds from prior years. Expenditures on bicycle and pedestrian facilities per the CAFR were as follows: • FY 2016: $562,189 • FY 2017: $1,314,932 • FY 2018: $998,575 An unclaimed balance exists because not all projects that are selected to receive funding are ready for construction. Agencies receiving an award are reimbursed in arrears only upon proof of satisfactory project completion, including but not limited to the RCTC claim form for the fiscal year in which the project was awarded, a signed assurance of maintenance and a copy of the notice of completion, and photographs of the completed project. The adopted Commission policy states that agencies will have up to two years to complete the project, or the agency may request an extension of time to complete the project if there are uncontrollable delays in project delivery. Any unused allocations after this time are reprogrammed into the next year's revenues. Transit Planning including the Short -Range Transit Planning Process RCTC has the responsibility of oversight in both the funding and operations of Riverside County's public and specialized transit operators. The Commission is responsible for the coordination of transit among all of the operators in the county to ensure an efficient delivery of services. In this capacity, the agency has provided a regional perspective to facilitating the provision of public transit by the seven transit operators and Southern California Regional Rail Authority. Transit Operators Working Group Ensuring the efficient distribution and expenditure of funds in developing a countywide transit network is a critical element of RCTC's oversight role. RCTC convenes the Transit Operator Working Group (TOWG) made up of the county transit operators to strengthen ability to coordinate efficient and effective transit service. The coordination of services and operations is intended to reduce redundancy, enable transfers, identify deficiencies in connectivity and the means in which to resolve them and, therefore, provide a more efficient transit system for the people of Riverside County. While not a formal group, the mission critical elements of the TOWG are: • To inform the County's public transit operators, as a group, of new policy, policy interpretations and other critical information affecting all operators. Triennial Performance Audit 28 Michael Baker International RCTC 50 • To develop appropriate common statements, among the transit operators, providing a mechanism to craft common messages and develop a common voice around key issues of interest to public transit providers. • To provide a forum for input from the County's public transit operators and dialog with RCTC concerning matters affecting public transit. • To share service and operational information to improve the delivery of public transportation services in Riverside County. • To confer and coordinate on key issues where opportunity for collaboration, coordination, or even consolidation will further public transportation services in Riverside County. • To hold at least one annual joint meeting with the Citizens Advisory Committee. The TOWG meets regularly during the annual SRTP kickoff in February and then as necessary to discuss transit policy issues. Agendas cover several components including operator reports; revenue forecasts for local, state, and federal funds; SRTP timelines and outlines; and current transit program activities such as grant funding opportunities, call for projects, and upcoming audits. The TOWG meetings also enable RCTC to offer assistance with completing the TDA claims. One-on-one assistance is provided to the claimants when requested. The TOWG also participated in the recent RCTC strategic assessment about RCTC's funding plan and public sentiment on expenditures of Measure A revenue and other funding. SRTP Process Each operator, including fixed route bus, specialized transit, and rail, is required to prepare and deliver an SRTP to RCTC that outlines the planned service for the next three years. The SRTP provides the justification for the operator to receive TDA funds for both capital and operating expenditures. Actual and projected performance data from TransTrack are included in the SRTP to provide metrics of service delivery. The SRTP also provides the basis for services and capital projects that are programmed in TIP documents that are approved by RCTC, SCAG, and federal grant -awarding agencies like the FTA for operating and capital grants. RCTC coordinates the annual update to the SRTP through the TOWG. A schedule is prepared by RCTC to guide the process for the coming year. Draft SRTPs are due in April with formal adoption of the plans by the Commission in June. A follow-up debriefing meeting with the TOWG can also be held to discuss potential improvements to the SRTP for the following year. In addition, RTA and SunLine Transit Agency have been updating their respective Comprehensive Operational Analyses (COAs) which take a long-range planning view. Input from some transit operators, as well as RCTC personnel, show a potential need to review the SRTP update process including the frequency of updates and transitioning these plans back Triennial Performance Audit 29 Michael Baker International RCTC 51 as mid -range planning documents. With the requirement to provide annual updates to the SRTPs, some operators expressed that this frequency mirrors a budgeting process that only looks at the current year's performance and next year's actions and projects rather than from a longer term planning perspective. The capital projects have tended to be static as funding often takes multiple years to develop. The updates, therefore, do not have the forward thinking data typically provided in the planning document to serve as a forecasting tool on operating and capital projects for the next three to five year period. The SRTP update process should be reviewed and possible changes made such as the frequency of the updates and emphasis on coordination of services for consistency with countywide transportation and regional transportation plan goals. Productivity Improvement Program The agency uses TransTrack data management software to standardize the regular reporting of key performance data by the operators. TransTrack has provided value in terms of enabling RCTC to monitor and track operator performance by route, analyze new services and service extensions, and calculate performance information. Table 7 in TransTrack provides a service provider performance targets report that shows whether each operator's performance is within a target range for one mandatory and seven discretionary indicators. The system flags indicators that are outside the target. The Annual Public Transportation Countywide Performance Report continues a comprehensive performance reporting program for Riverside County and fulfilling the requirement under PUC 99244 to monitor and provide productivity recommendations. Since 2015, the report examines the performance of public transportation services of rail, bus, demand response and specialized transportation in the County and provides a comprehensive, countywide picture of public transit expenditures and what was provided and consumed for these investments. The performance report describes the County's transit provider experience in relation to key performance areas. The report presents a countywide view of transit performance using a snapshot in time to benchmark measures by which to monitor change, while supporting an expandable performance measurement framework. The various measures are presented in five main categories: 1. Policy and Compliance — farebox recovery ratio calculations based on operating costs and revenue generated from service delivery. 2. Utilization — the delivery of passenger trips across all modes of transit. 3. Accessibility and Coverage — measuring the county's population in proximity to available transit service. 4. Connectivity — expanding linkages throughout the transportation network. 5. Resources — monetary investment and available assets to deliver service. Triennial Performance Audit 30 Michael Baker International RCTC 52 Each indicator is measured by metrics that provide a gauge of operator performance. For Policy and Compliance, the primary and only state -mandated indicator described in the Countywide Report is farebox recovery ratio. The countywide farebox ratio compiles the revenues and operating costs from the seven transit operators into one county ratio. During the audit period, this ratio was 22.9 percent in FY 2016 and 20 percent in FY 2017, with the operators exceeding their minimum standards. The Utilization indicator is measured by trips per capita, which reflect total transit trips provided in relation to the overall county population and represents use of public transit by the total population. A trips per capita rate of 6.8 and 6.3 was achieved during FY 2016 and FY 2017 respectively. This metric identifies that even with increasing population, transit ridership continues to grow at the general same rate. Accessibility and Coverage are measured by population coverage expressed as the percentage of residents living within .75 miles of public fixed -route transit. Maps of each operator's service area are depicted with rings drawn .75 miles around the bus routes. In FY 2015-16, Riverside County's public transportation programs provided fixed -route transit within .75 miles of 77 percent of Riverside County residents. In FY 2016-17, transit access within .75 miles averaged 82 percent countywide, while the population coverage within the .75-mile buffer ranged from a low of 73 for the City of Corona to a high of 91 percent for Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency and the Pass Transit systems. The Connectivity indicator counts the existing physical connections and transfers between transit routes, between modes, and between systems and corridors. These may be transfers between routes within a transit property, within the county as a whole or between counties. Transfers and connections were reported at 1,441 in FY 2016 and 1,745 in FY 2017. This is generally positive where rerouting and service enhancements lead to inter -lining of routes and more "one -seat" trips for transit users. The Resources indicator is a composite of metrics, including the amount of state and local funding that support service and can match available federal funding; number of public transit vehicles; revenue miles driven; and performance ratios such as transit vehicle per square mile and vehicle revenue miles per square mile. These ratios give a sense of the physical space that Riverside County transit operators must cover and how much transit service is provided in relation to the size of the service area. Each of the metrics showed general increases during the three-year audit period and are attributed largely to increases in service frequency or in increased operating hours or days, which is much desired by regular transit users and demonstrates the value of public transportation. RCTC personnel will continue review of the existing performance monitoring program and its value as a tool for the operators to improve service. Increased involvement by RCTC in transit policy, planning, and practice is also being reviewed by staff in light of the current evolution of public transit service and statewide initiatives on transit performance measurement and TDA funding. Triennial Performance Audit 31 Michael Baker International RCTC 53 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan In November 2016, RCTC finalized an update to the Riverside County Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan. This document brings current the 2012 Coordinated Plan after an almost year -long public involvement process and outreach to stakeholders across the county. These plans are intended to promote mobility by identifying needs and transportation service gaps of five targeted populations: older adults, persons with disabilities, persons of limited income, persons with limited English proficiency, and military veterans. The Coordinated Plan does not provide for funding, but helps to guide funding decisions, specifically those related to the FTA Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program and other federal and state funding sources as they become available. The 2016 Coordinated Transportation Plan update documents a transit and transportation network that has expanded since 2012. Ten categories of network gaps and areas of unmet need were identified. These were addressed through five mobility goals and 23 accompanying strategies to improve mobility to the target groups. These five mobility goals are: • Grow Mobility Options: Sustain, fund and continue to expand the array of public, human service and private transportation services available in Riverside County. • Connect and Coordinate Services: Improve connectivity among public transportation services and coordination with human service transportation to address identified mobility gaps. • Promote Safety and Comfort: Ensure safety through new and well -maintained rolling stock, attention to passenger safety and physical environments that promote safety for pedestrians and bicyclists. • Improve Health Access: Promote transportation solutions, including new partnerships, to improve the ability of Riverside residents to travel to and from local and regional medical services and treatments. • Promote and Improve Communication: Promote, improve and expand information portals that are multi -cultural and embrace technology and mobility management tools to increase mobility options. Riverside County Lonq-Range Transportation Study The Commission worked on the development of a countywide transportation plan. RCTC conducted a strategic assessment in 2015 to ascertain upcoming transportation priorities and the Commission's ability to address them. The Riverside County Strategic Assessment, completed in 2016, identified $23.4 billion in capital project costs for all projects as well as Triennial Performance Audit 32 Michael Baker International RCTC 54 project funding gaps. The strategic assessment provided the basis for the Long -Range Transportation Study (LRTS), which was released in December 2019. A major component of the LRTS is the identification and evaluation of highway, major roadway, and transit projects. The LRTS is driven by RCTC's four core goals and underlying objectives for the people of Riverside County and the transportation system upon which they rely. These policy goals are: • Quality of Life: RCTC is focused on improving life for the people of Riverside County and empowering them to live life at their pace. • Operational Excellence: RCTC is a responsible and conservative steward of taxpayer dollars. • Connecting the Economy: RCTC is a driver of economic growth in Riverside County. • Responsible Partner: RCTC partners with local, regional, and state governments to deliver road and transit projects. A total of 130 state highway and major roadway projects and 57 major local and regional transit projects were identified for inclusion in the LRTS due to their size and/or level of regional significance. Commuter Assistance Program The focus of the Commuter Assistance Program is to improve mobility throughout the transportation system. While much of the Commission's work focuses on enhancing transportation infrastructure, there is significant value in ensuring that the transportation systems are used efficiently. To foster a more efficient use of infrastructure investments and transit networks, the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program seeks to increase the awareness of and consideration for alternative modes of transportation such as riding a bus or train, carpooling, vanpooling, walking, bicycling, or telecommuting. This transportation demand management strategy, implemented under the "IE Commuter" (www.iecommuter.org) umbrella in partnership with San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, provides services and incentives to Western Riverside and San Bernardino County employers and commuters in an effort to shift behavior away from single -occupant vehicle commuting via the following methods: • Leverage regional campaigns, local outreach, employer health fair and rideshare events, and social media to increase the awareness for transportation alternatives; Triennial Performance Audit 33 Michael Baker International RCTC 55 • Partner with and serve as a resource to employers to implement TDM programs, services, and incentives to increase consideration and adoption of transportation alternatives at worksites throughout the region; • Provide both online access (IECommuter.org) and personal support (866-RIDESHARE) to custom commute information and ridematching services; • Incentivize commuters for beginning and/or maintaining an alternative commute mode; and • Leverage technology to deliver easy -to -use online resources and tools to efficiently engage, educate and serve employer partners, their employees, and other commuters. Also, to help supplement the transit network and to expand commuter transportation options, RCTC launched a new vanpool program called VanClub in May 2018. VanClub provides eligible vanpools with up to $400 monthly subsidy toward the cost of the vanpool lease, which includes vehicle maintenance, roadside assistance, and insurance. Participating vanpools are required to report performance data pursuant to a new FTA reporting requirement. The VanClub program is funded through Measure A and a Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (AB 2766) grant from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. To provide facilities to support vanpool, carpool, and transit modes, RCTC partners with Caltrans and property owners to lease space for park and ride lots. These park and ride lease arrangements supplement large state-owned park and ride facilities throughout the county. The leases are annual and renewable, allowing for adjustments as needed. RCTC provides the financial resources for the lease while Caltrans assumes liability and provides the signage. The Commuter Assistance Program is funded by Measure A. TDA Claimant Relationships and Oversight This functional area addresses RCTC's interaction with the transit operators in Riverside County and its administration of the provisions of TDA. The sub -functions described include costs to administer the program, technical and managerial assistance to operators, TDA claims processing, and the unmet transit needs process. RCTC Administration and Planning The uses of LTF revenues apportioned to Riverside County flow through a priority process prescribed in state law. Prior to apportionment of funds to the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program and the transit operators, the Commission is able to claim LTF revenues for administration of the fund and for transportation planning and programming purposes. By law, the Commission is limited to 3 percent of local transportation funds for planning and programming. The limit does not apply to fund administration, but RCTC has been responsible in the amount it claims, which has remained the same for the triennial period. Triennial Performance Audit 34 Michael Baker International RCTC 56 The Commission also allocates revenues to SCAG for planning purposes as a member of the regional agency. The amount is based on a formula of .75 of 1 percent of the County's total annual LTF. Mid -year adjustments are made from original projections to better reflect revenue receipts from the economy in the Inland Empire region. In each audit year, mid -year adjustments were made upward from original projections, some in the double-digit percentage growth given that finance staff take a conservative approach to forecasting. During the audit years of 2016 through 2018, RCTC claimed the following amounts: Table IV-2 LTF A located for RCTC Administration and Planning Fiscal Year LTF Administration of LTF Planning Total 2016 $84,356,545 $900,000 $2,739,139 $3,639,139 2017 $88,529,320 $1,000,000 $2,828,982 $3,828,982 2018 $90,382,947 $705,900 $3,090,000 $3,795,900 Note: LTF total includes carryover. Source: LTF of Riverside County, Financial and Compliance Reports for FYs 2016 - 2018. In FYs 2016 and 2017, the total amount claimed by RCTC was about 4.31 percent of LTF apportioned to the County. In FY 2018, the amount was about 4.20 percent. Technical and Managerial Assistance to Operators RCTC provides an array of administrative and technical services to the operators. Assistance to the operators is offered through meetings, phone and email correspondence, and site visits. Examples of technical and managerial assistance include meetings to prepare the SRTPs and discuss policy and technical issues, release of TDA apportionment data, allocation of local Measure A funds, federal revenue estimates, monitoring of various funding programs, and administration of TDA claims. The Commission also holds calls for projects to disburse federal transit funds for specialized transportation services. In addition, the Commission holds a biennial (every other year) call for projects in collaboration with an evaluation committee to administer LTF nonmotorized funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects. A weighted point system is used to score applications based on specific criteria, such as destination served, safety, project enhancement, multimodal access, matching funds, and population equity. The highest weighted points are for destination served, which is more quantifiable compared to the other criteria and gives preference to projects that are within .75 mile walking distance of a bus route, or within 2 miles for bicycling. Triennial Performance Audit 35 Michael Baker International RCTC 57 An existing LTF reserve policy and funding disbursement policy are in place to ensure that operator budgets do not exceed available funds. The reserve policy sets aside 10 percent of apportionments to transit operators (bus and rail) that could be drawn down pending approval of a request by an operator and a budget and SRTP amendment. The policy also provides a funding disbursement timeline for the LTF allocation where two -twelfths (16.67 percent) of the operating funds are disbursed the first month and the remaining allocation (83.33 percent) is disbursed over the next 11 months. RCTC implements a TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County bus and commuter rail service. Since 1995, the Commission adopted a formula for distributing LTF between bus and rail operations in Western Riverside County. The original 80 percent public bus and 20 percent commuter rail funding formula was adopted based on projections that the funds would be enough to fund up to a certain level of rail service. The formula was revised to be 78 percent public bus and 22 percent commuter rail funding in FY 2004-05, where it has remained ever since. This formula also applies to the LTF reserves. The western county bus operators are guaranteed a minimum funding base which was established by the FY 2003-04 LTF/STA apportionment and upwardly adjusted annually by the CPI. The policy is to revisit the funding formula every six years, which last occurred in FY 2009-10. The funding formula is due for a revisit to consider new conditions since the last update including the renewal of Measure A, enhanced bus service and new technology, and the opening of the PVL. Operations of the western county bus systems also continue to grow with infrastructure needs. To ensure efficient use of existing capital funds, the Commission has policies requiring operators to spend down existing TDA capital balances prior to requesting additional TDA capital funds. For the public transit operators to claim LTF and/or STA funds, the Commission must allocate funds to support the transit services and capital projects contained in the SRTPs. The requested allocations are consistent with the approved SRTPs, and the funds are explicitly for the projects stated in the approved plans. Commission staff also provide assistance in the planning and programming of federal grants, as the transit operators are eligible for various FTA grant programs. RCTC is the conduit between the operators and SCAG in procuring certain capital grants such as FTA urbanized grants that must pass through SCAG, as the designated recipient of the funds. The Commission must develop and approve a Program of Projects for each urbanized area and conduct a public hearing prior to an operator submitting its Section 5307 grant application to the FTA. A separate Program of Projects is developed for rural Section 5311 funds. Projects must be included in an approved RTIP before the operators can access federal transit funds which include Section 5309 discretionary funds. RCTC tracks the status of capital grants through the quarterly grant tracking program in which each operator submits a quarterly report detailing the status of existing open grants. Triennial Performance Audit 36 Michael Baker International RCTC 58 TDA Claim Processing On an annual basis during this audit period, RCTC was responsible for managing the apportionment and allocation of between $77.4 and $82.0 million in LTF revenues for transit, and between $9.4 and $12.0 million in STA funds.4 Initial claims are generally submitted in July of the year of the claim. Revised claims are submitted throughout the remainder of the fiscal year as funding amounts or spending priorities change. RCTC prepares and distributes several documents during the TDA claims process. The documents include the findings of apportionment by population area and a packet providing claimants with the necessary forms and funding information needed to prepare TDA claims. The claims are prepared by each operator, adopted by the operator's governing board or council, and must include a sign off on the implementation of a number of TDA requirements. These requirements are contained in the "Standards Assurances For Applicants" and include compliance with revenue ratios, attachment of specific documentation, and submittal of compliance audits and reports. Each submitting claimant certifies that all conformance requirements are satisfied to receive both LTF and STA funds. Once the claims are processed and funds are allocated by RCTC, operators can amend claims during the fiscal year as actual transit service is delivered. STA funds are claimed under the procedures and formulas established in the TDA statute. RCTC is required to make annual findings prior to allocation of STA funds to the transit operators. These findings are part of the Standard Assurances checklist and are integrated with the claims for LTF revenues. Although RCTC has not developed an in-house TDA guidance document that describes all applicable TDA rules and regulations pertaining to claimants in Riverside County, staff prepared a report in June 2019 on policy update on the use of state transit assistance funding by operators describe changing the RCTC policy to enable operators to use STA for operating expenses. This changes past policy that reserved STA for capital expenditures only. The report provide details of operator eligibility and the efficiency standards which reflect most provisions of the relatively new law, SB 508. Some elements from the law are not included in the staff report which should be updated that clarifies the amount of STA that could be used for operating expenses under certain eligibility factors. Changes in how TDA is administered and RCTC's interpretation of the statutory language supporting the changes warrant development of a comprehensive in-house guidance manual as a central repository of all materials and processes related to TDA. 4 RCTC annual revenue estimates for transit. Triennial Performance Audit 37 Michael Baker International RCTC 59 Unmet Transit Needs While no TDA has been allocated by the Commission for streets and roads in more than a decade, the Commission must still conduct at least one transit public hearing within its jurisdiction in compliance with Public Utilities Section 99238.5. The Citizens Advisory Committee, which serves as the statutorily required Social Services Transportation Advisory Council, participates on the hearing panel during the meeting and in the review of the comments. While not as formal as the unmet transit needs process, the purpose of the hearing is to receive comments from the public on whether there are reasonable transit needs that are not being met in Riverside County. The public hearing is generally held as part of the CAC/SSTAC meeting at RCTC offices. Public Information and External Affairs RCTC has developed a comprehensive outreach effort to elicit support for its mission and to educate the public of its role in the delivery and maintenance of transportation infrastructure. The outreach program supports several roles at the agency including legislative affairs and media relations. RCTC's Public Information and Government Affairs is tasked with communicating with the state and federal legislative staff and delegations, responding to constituent inquiries, researching pending legislation, pursuing grant opportunities, and partnering with peer agencies such as the SBCTA. The legislative affairs efforts involve the utilization of lobbyists to ensure that adequate funding is maintained for transportation projects. As part of its mission in providing transportation projects services to Riverside County, RCTC plays an active role in Washington D.C. and Sacramento in advocating transportation -friendly policies. At the beginning of every year the Commission adopts a Federal and a State Legislative Program that sets forth basic positions on transportation policy issues. RCTC also works with the SBCTA to establish a unified front in advocating for transportation legislation on behalf of the entire Inland Empire. However, it is noted that the two counties differentiate from one another on other fronts when appropriate, such as for local needs. RCTC's media relations efforts are conveyed through RCTC's website, publications, and public presentations. During the audit period, in May 2018, the Commission rebranded and launched a new website. Tracking of metrics for website and social media usage began in January 2018. The Point is RCTC's electronic newsletter and blog, which replaced On the Move, the monthly email newsletter that highlighted the actions of the Commission and emerging topics. The Commission engaged in extensive public outreach support as part of the project development process for the PVL, the Mid County Parkway and the SR-91, 1-15, and the 1-215 corridor improvement projects. RCTC no longer publishes an annual report. RCTC also maintains a speaker's bureau where Commissioners and staff actively make presentations throughout the county on transportation issues. The newsletter lists the events and dates of the presentations. Triennial Performance Audit 38 Michael Baker International RCTC 60 For the 1-15 Express Lanes outreach, open houses were held in February 2018. Regular SR-91 corridor improvement project videos were posted to the project website via YouTube. Support is provided to the Commission's Rail Department in the development of various marketing materials and advertisements including weekend and holiday train services, as well as in the promotion of goods movement in the region. RCTC also provides a new Commissioner orientation program that enhances Commissioner knowledge and participation in agency projects and activities. RCTC's website, (https://www.rctc.org/), was upgraded and relaunched in May 2018. It serves as the primary portal to the activities of the agency. The website's masthead contains a dropdown menu to meetings and agendas, projects, business opportunities, funding and planning, travel information, search feature, and social media links. The website also contains information about major programs and projects and recent posts from The Point blog and newsletter. RCTC has a presence over four social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. The main website provides users the ability to click on links that will provide further details on projects. For example, the Projects section lists each of the highway and rail projects and links to more information about each project. In addition, several major construction projects have an additional link to their own separate project websites, such as for corridor improvements, express lanes, interchanges, and rail project. The separate websites are still managed by RCTC but have their own respective format and design and can be updated by each manager. The Commission provides information to the public through various channels including: 1) participation at public meetings, chambers of commerce, industry associations, and service clubs; 2) production and provision of resource materials and fact sheets; 3) maintenance and enhancement of the Commission's website; and 4) development of press releases, radio and television interviews, cable television spots, and project videos. Publications continue to be provided on its website in a printable format. Metrics are collected and displayed through infographics for public engagement. Public Affairs staff have been monitoring public engagement activities since January 2018 in a manner and with new tools to prepare Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Reports. These quarterly reports are a data -driven approach to measuring progress toward public engagement goals, allow staff to assess the effectiveness of its efforts on an ongoing basis, and provide transparency into how the Commission is using its resources to engage and educate the public. The quarterly report continues to evolve as staff refine its approaches to measuring public engagement activities and in response to any feedback from Commissioners. The quarterly report includes different sets of data: 1. Metrics for RCTC's overall public engagement activities, including website use and access; website top pages visited; email notifications; social media likes, engagement and reach; and public sentiment Triennial Performance Audit 39 Michael Baker International RCTC 61 2. Metrics for major construction projects such as RCTC's Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project and State Route 60 Truck Lanes Project. Public engagement activities, including email activity, website sessions, and social media are tracked. 3. Metrics for RCTC's #RebootMyCommute public engagement program, which launched on March 6, 2019. Grant Applications and Management RCTC uses a variety of local, state, and federal funding sources. The Commission, as needed, assists Riverside County transit operators and local jurisdictions with grant pursuits. Local funding sources include the TUMF, a development fee administered by RCTC to fund projects in Western Riverside County. RCTC is responsible for the programming of federal funding that public transit operators receive and for providing oversight on regulatory compliance. Project funds for regional transit projects are contained in the 2017 FTIP programmed by RCTC. RCTC does not touch these funds as they are forwarded directly to the operators. Federal funding sources during the audit period include FTA Sections 5307 urbanized area formula grants, 5309 capital investment grants, 5310 enhance mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities, 5311 formula grants for rural areas, and 5339 funding to construct administrative and bus -related facilities, and replace buses and related equipment. The public transit operators in receipt of federal transit funding, including FTA Sections 5307 and 5311, directly manage their federal grants, with the exception that RCTC has administrative and operational responsibility for rail funding allocated to Riverside County by the US Department of Transportation. The SRTPs approved by RCTC contain operating and capital plans and accompanying budget with cost estimates along with an implementation timeline. RCTC receives revenue projections of various funds to support the SRTP projects and prepares a summary of each fund source for approval by the Commission. As part of this process, the Commission conducts a public hearing for funding approval of federal urban transit funds. The Commission develops and approves a Program of Projects for each urbanized area and conducts a public hearing prior to a transit operator submitting its FTA Section 5307 grant application to the FTA. Following the public hearing process, the Program of Projects is included in an approved FTIP, which is subsequently forwarded to SCAG for review and processing. Prompted by the lack of adequate medical facilities in the Palo Verde Valley, RCTC, in partnership with the City of Blythe, sought and successfully won an FTA Rides to Wellness Grant, an 18-month pilot project operated by Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency between Blythe and Coachella Valley medical facilities 110 miles to the west. The service was initiated in July 2017 and operates Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The service is open to the general public and interlines with SunLine Transit Agency at the Indio Transportation Center located at SR 111 and Flower. Triennial Performance Audit 40 Michael Baker International RCTC 62 Section V Findings and Recommendations The following summarizes the findings obtained from the triennial audit covering FYs 2016 through 2018. A set of audit recommendations is then provided. Findings 1. RCTC has satisfactorily complied with all state legislative mandates for regional transportation planning agencies. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling legislation that called for a relatively small staff to carry out its growing responsibilities in planning, programming, and project delivery. 2. The TDA mandate for RCTC to analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for the transit operators is accomplished through implementation of several activities, including the approval of SRTPs for each operator, and a combined approach of developing the annual Public Transportation Countywide Performance Report coupled with required reporting by the operators of performance metrics through TransTrack. 3. RCTC has partially implemented the three prior performance audit recommendations. The prior recommendations pertained to revisiting the TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County, verifying that the remaining transit operators separate their bus and specialized paratransit services in the annual reporting to the State Controller, and communicating new transit legislation to the operators. 4. The Commission refinanced variable rate bonds in September 2016 and issued refunding bonds in December 2017 payable from Measure A sales tax revenues. The remaining variable rate bonds were refinanced in March 2018. The $410 million in bonds refunded resulted in a savings of $50 million. New bonds were issued in July 2017. 5. The Commission updated its procurement and investment policies. RCTC utilizes the PlanetBids procurement platform. RCTC increased the executive director's single signature authority. A report on the usage of single signature authority is released quarterly. 6. RCTC coordinates the annual update to the SRTP through the Transit Operator Working Group (TOWG), comprising the county transit operators as the means to justify transit service and capital expenditures. Input from some transit operators, as well as RCTC personnel, show a potential need to review the SRTP update process including the frequency of updates and transitioning these plans back as mid -range planning documents. Triennial Performance Audit 41 Michael Baker International RCTC 63 7. Personnel benefits and rights are stipulated in the RCTC Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual, which was updated twice during the current audit period, once in September 2015 and a second time in October 2017. A more recent update occurred in November 2019 (outside audit period). RCTC tries to revisit the manual every few years. 8. The SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Express Lanes) through Corona opened in March 2017. The project extended the 91 Express Lanes from the Riverside County/Orange County Line to 1-15, providing the first tolled express lanes in Riverside County. In addition, the Commission embarked on the construction of the 1-15 Express Lanes Project. RCTC, Caltrans, and the Federal Highway Administration have invested $472 million toward the I- 15 Express Lanes. 9. In November 2016, RCTC finalized an update to the Riverside County Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan. This document brings current the 2012 Coordinated Plan after an almost year -long public involvement process and outreach to stakeholders across the county. Ten categories of network gaps and areas of unmet need were identified. These were addressed through five mobility goals and 23 accompanying strategies to improve mobility to the target groups. 10. The Riverside County Strategic Assessment, completed in 2016, identified $23.4 billion in capital project costs for all projects as well as project funding gaps. The strategic assessment provided the basis for the Long -Range Transportation Study (LRTS), which was released in December 2019. A major component of the LRTS is the identification and evaluation of highway, major roadway, and transit projects. 11. In May 2018, RCTC launched a new vanpool program called the RCTC VanClub. Eligible vanpools receive up to $400 monthly toward the cost of their vanpool lease, which includes vehicle maintenance, roadside assistance, and insurance. Participating vanpools are required to report performance data pursuant to a new FTA reporting requirement. The VanClub program is funded through Measure A and a Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (AB 2766) grant from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. 12. RCTC ensures strong internal coordination for consistent messaging and distribution of information to the public and media. The Commission rebranded and launched a new website in May 2018. Tracking of metrics for website and social media usage began in January 2018. The Point is RCTC's electronic newsletter and blog, which replaced On the Move, the monthly email newsletter that highlighted the actions of the Commission and emerging topics. Triennial Performance Audit 42 Michael Baker International RCTC 64 Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Revisit TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County bus and commuter rail service. A carryover from the prior performance audit, RCTC implements a TDA funding formula for Western Riverside County for distributing LTF funds between bus and commuter rail service. The formula is 78 percent LTF toward public bus and 22 percent to commuter rail, which was developed in FY 2004-05 and where it has remained since. The western county bus operators are guaranteed a minimum funding base which was established by the FY 2003- 04 LTF/STA apportionment and upwardly adjusted annually by the CPI. The Commission has been reviewing its allocation formula in light of the Perris Valley Line rail extension opening in June 2016. To expand the use of TDA transit revenue, RCTC developed policy allowing STA funds to be used for transit operations under certain statutory conditions. Continued dialog should continue with Western County bus operators and commuter rail staff to determine the appropriate percentage split. 2. Ensure transit operators complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and for specialized services. A carryover from the prior performance audit, one requirement for the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report is that the transit operator prepares separate reports for general public transit and for specialized services. Some operators have separated their reports following the recommendation including SunLine Transit, while others such as city of Beaumont and city of Corona have not prepared separate reports. It is recommended that the Commission enforce and monitor the requirement that the operators adhere to the proper reporting procedures for the State Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports. 3. Clarify options for operator eligibility to use State Transit Assistance Funds for operations. As part of implementing a prior audit recommendation, the June 2019 RCTC staff report titled "Policy Update on the Use of State Transit Assistance Funding by Operators" describes changing the RCTC policy to enable operators to use STA for operating expenses. The eligibility requirement and efficiency standards under TDA law (PUC 99314.6) are cited in the staff report, but do not reflect changes to the law since passage of SB 508 in October 2015. SB 508 qualifies an operator to be eligible for STA operating funds even if the operator fails to meet either efficiency standard. Under the relatively new law, the qualification is based on a sliding scale rather than a pass/fail proposition so that an operator may still receive less than 100 percent of STA for operations and the balance of funds for capital when the efficiency standard is not met. As an example, if the operator fails to meet both efficiency standards for operating cost per hour by 10 percent each, the operator is eligible to receive 90 percent of STA for operations, and 10 percent for capital. The change in state law was intended to provide funding relief to the operators in light of ridership and farebox issues from economic circumstances. The RCTC policy for STA should Triennial Performance Audit 43 Michael Baker International RCTC 65 be adjusted to reflect this eligibility change to enable operators to access STA for operating expenses although they fail to meet the state efficiency standards. 4. Review purpose of Short Range Transit Plan Updates. RCTC requires annual updates to the SRTPs from the operators as a mean to submit TDA claims for funding. Input from some operators and recognition by RCTC show these annual updates to the SRTPs have essentially become annual budgeting documents with changes that reflect year to year service and budget adjustments. This is contrary to the intended purpose of a SRTP, as is typically practiced elsewhere, to be a mid -range plan that forecasts and provides direction on operating and capital projects and service delivery for the next three to five year period. The SRTP update process should be reviewed by RCTC and with the Transit Operator Working Group. Possible changes could include the frequency of updates from annually to every three or five years which is generally a timeframe that shows significant changes in transit operations that are needed to be planned and funded. Annual performance updates and data tracking could be addressed through existing channels such as regular monitoring by RCTC using TransTrack, operator provided reports, the annual RCTC Countywide Performance Report, and through the annual TDA claims process. RCTC has statutory authority through TDA to create a claims form and process that meets local conditions; that is to say, to require operators to submit performance information and other detail to enable RCTC to make findings for annual allocation of LTF and STA revenue. The SRTP, in turn, should serve as a planning document to enable the operators and RCTC to envision transit for a longer time horizon and coordinate future service delivery, capital projects, and funding for consistency with countywide transportation and regional transportation plan goals. Subsequently, outside of the triennial performance audit period, RCTC has taken steps to revise its SRTP process in February 2020. This recommendation has been partially implemented. 5. Develop an in-house TDA Administrative Guidance Manual. RTPAs such as RCTC play a critical role in administering TDA funding and meeting the spirit of the law. The statute delegates a level of flexibility that enables the transportation planning agency to administer the funds that is conducive to local conditions while remaining within the framework of the law. RCTC's administrative practices have their nuances including the apportionment and allocation split of TDA revenue between bus and rail, the general format of the claim form, and use of performance monitoring tools such as TransTrack. Given the relative complexity of the administrative process, from the apportionment to the claim submittal and adoption, and from payment tracking to performance evaluation and monitoring, RTPAs have developed local guidance manuals that contain the procedures and protocol for TDA. Changes in TDA administration and RCTC's interpretation of the statute warrant development of a comprehensive in-house manual as a repository of all localized materials and processes related to TDA. Such a guidance document provides transparency in funding administration and also serves as a Triennial Performance Audit 44 Michael Baker International RCTC 66 training tool for both RCTC personnel and the claimants for consistency in regional practice. Subsequently, outside of the triennial performance audit period, RCTC has plans to develop the TDA Administrative Guidance Manual. The progress of this recommendation will be reviewed in the next triennial performance audit period. Triennial Performance Audit 45 Michael Baker International RCTC 67 ATTACHMENT 2 RCTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit C]TY OF BANNING 161011. PASSTRANSIT March 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 68 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section 11 6 Operator Compliance Requirements 6 Section III 12 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 12 Section IV 15 TDA Performance Indicators 15 Section V 24 Review of Operator Functions 24 Operations 24 Maintenance 27 Planning 28 Marketing 29 General Administration and Management 30 Section VI 32 Findings 32 Recommendations 35 69 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section I Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for the City of Banning Transit covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017-18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code. This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the code's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with management, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, September 2008 (third edition), published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) was used to guide in the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Banning has provided public transportation service since April 1973, which expanded to two routes in September 1985. The current transit system comprises three fixed -route services and a Dial -a -Ride system that is limited to seniors and persons with disabilities, including riders certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The newest of the three fixed routes, the Cabazon service, which began in July 1995, extends from Banning east to the unincorporated area of Cabazon. This route was extended in January 2000 to provide a route deviation to serve a remote residential area in eastern Cabazon. The City provides transfer opportunities with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Beaumont Transit. RTA runs three intercity services that connect with the local transit system at a Kmart on Michael Baker International - 1 70 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Highland Springs Road. Connections with Beaumont Transit can be made at the Kmart and at San Gorgonio Hospital. Several memorandums of understanding (MOUs) exist between Banning Transit and local transit agencies. The City has two MOUs with RTA. One provides support by RTA for Banning to operate the Cabazon service, which extends beyond the city limits to reduce duplication of service. The second MOU concerns the transfer policy between the two systems. In addition, an MOU was established in December 2002 between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont to provide a conduit for integrating the two municipal systems in their joint efforts to develop the regional Pass Transit system. The Cities of Banning and Beaumont have continued their coordination efforts to implement the Pass Transit Plan, which aims to provide a seamless transit service to the residents of the two cities. The jointly developed service plan included the Cities of Banning and Beaumont, unincorporated areas of Cherry Valley and Cabazon, and the commercial area of the Morongo Indian Reservation. The Pass Transit system consists of two independent but well -coordinated transit systems under a single brand identity and fare structure. The coordinated service area of Pass Transit includes the aforementioned cities and communities. This coordinated transit system allows Dial -a -Ride vehicles to cross jurisdictions and a common trunk line that serves both cities and the Cabazon area east of Banning. After the audit period, the two cities mutually terminated the MOU that had been in place since December 2002 and adopted an interagency service agreement in July 2019. With the termination of the MOU, the Pass Transit branding has been phased out and Beaumont Transit Route 2 service was discontinued in the City of Banning. Based on the 2010 US Census, Banning's population is 29,603, which has grown 25.6 percent since the 2000 US Census. The senior citizen population, comprising residents aged 65 and over, is 25.88 percent. The 2019 population for Banning is estimated to be 31,004 as reported by the California Department of Finance. The city covers 23.10 square miles. System Characteristics Banning Transit operates both fixed -route and demand -responsive transit services. During the audit period, the fixed route operated Monday through Friday from 4:30 a.m. to 10:11 p.m. and weekends from 8:00 a.m. to 5:56 p.m. In July 2015, Banning Transit extended the service hours on its fixed routes. Dial -a -Ride service operates Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Banning Transit does not operate on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. The transit system operates on a limited schedule (7:40 a.m. to 5:44 p.m.) on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Veterans Day, and the Friday following Thanksgiving. Banning Transit's fixed -route services during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-1. Michael Baker International - 2 71 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 1-1 Banning Transit Fixed Route Services Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time Points Route 1 Cabazon Hourly; every 2 hours in evenings and on weekends (Monday through Friday from 6:15 a.m. to 10:45 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:56 p.m.) • San Gorgonio Hospital • Beaumont City Hall • Gas company • Outlet malls • Cabazon Community Center • Casino Cabazon • Banning Police Department • Walmart • Kmart Route 5 Northern Approximately every 75 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:05 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) • Gas company - Ramsey • Indian School Lane • Community Center • Banning library • Armory • Stater's • Walmart • Kmart • San Gorgonio Hospital • Sunset Route 6 Southern Approximately every 75 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.) • Sunset & Ramsey • MSJC College • Banning High School • Gas company - Ramsey • Post office • Sunset • Stater's • Walmart • Kmart • San Gorgonio Hospital Source: City of Banning Banning Transit honors flag stops in residential areas at the corners of the route only. In commercial areas, the bus will only stop at designated marked stops. Dial -a -Ride Dial -A -Ride offers curb -to -curb demand -responsive transit service to persons with disabilities, the frail elderly, and senior citizens age 60 years and older who reside one -quarter mile from any Banning Transit fixed route. Priority service is given to ADA-certified passengers. Accessibility of the ADA paratransit service is within three quarters of a mile of the fixed -route service. Regular Michael Baker International - 3 72 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 hours of operation for Dial -a -Ride are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Persons with ADA certification can access Dial -a -Ride by advance reservation within the City of Banning and into a small portion of the Beaumont area during expanded service days and hours. Such service operates Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 6:45 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. For weekend rides, there must be at least three ADA- certified passengers in order to transport. Reservations for service can be made as early as 21 days in advance but no later than 3:00 p.m. the day prior to the trip. Dial -a -Ride does not operate on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Dial -a -Ride operates on a limited schedule for ADA- certified passengers only with a 24-hour advance reservation on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Veterans Day, and the day following Thanksgiving. Fares Banning Transit's fares are structured based on passenger, route, and service type. Multi -trip passes are also available for purchase. Day passes are only available for purchase from the driver while monthly passes are available for purchase at the Banning Community Center. Ticket booklets and passes do not include the $0.25 zone fare for Cabazon. The fare structures during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-2. Table 1-2 Banning Transit Fare Schedule Fare Category Fares General Public $1.15 Youth (Ages 17 and Under) $1.00 Seniors (Ages 65 and Older) $0.65 Persons with Disabilities (ADA or Medicare Card) $0.65 Military Veterans (with photo ID) $0.65 Child (46" tall or under accompanied by full -fare paying adult) $0.25 Zone Charge (One way to/from Cabazon Route 1) $0.25 10-Ticket Book — General Public $10.35 10-Ticket Book — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $5.85 Day Pass — General Public $3.00 Day Pass — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $1.80 Monthly Pass — General Public $36.00 Monthly Pass — Youth $25.00 Monthly Pass — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $21.50 Dial -a -Ride (one-way) $2.00 Dial -a -Ride 10-Ride Pass $18.00 Source: City of Banning Michael Baker International - 4 73 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Fleet There were 13 vehicles in the transit fleet during the audit period: eight fixed -route and five demand -response vehicles. Vehicles operated on the fixed route are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG), whereas most vehicles operated on Dial -a -Ride are gasoline -powered. In addition, Banning Transit operates five support vehicles. All vehicles in revenue service are wheelchair accessible with tie -downs in compliance with the ADA. Table 1-3 summarizes the Banning Transit fleet. Table 1-3 Banning Transit Fleet Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Service Mode Seating Capacity 2003 Ford E-450 1 Unleaded Dial -a -Ride 16 (1 W/C) 2004 El Dorado Transmark 2 CNG Fixed -Route 31 (1 W/C) 2007 Ford E-450 1 Unleaded Dial -a -Ride 16 (1 W/C) 2010 El Dorado XHF-3 2 CNG Fixed -Route 31 (2 W/C) 2010 Ford E-450 1 Unleaded Dial -a -Ride 16 (1 W/C) 2013 Ford E-450 1 CNG Dial -a -Ride 18 (1 W/C) 2015 Ford F-550 2 CNG Fixed -Route 32 (2 W/C) 2016 El Dorado EZRM-32 1 CNG Fixed -Route 27 (2 W/C) 2017 El Dorado EZRM-32 1 CNG Fixed -Route 27 (2 W/C) 2018 Ford E-450 1 Unleaded Dial -a -Ride 16 (1 W/C) Total 13 Source: City of Banning The two 2004 El Dorado Transmark vehicles were placed out of service toward the end of the audit period. The City also has one 1994 CNG-powered trolley that is operated during special events. Michael Baker International - 5 74 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses Caltrans's Performance Audit Guidebook to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the Public Utilities Code and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator has Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: submitted annual reports to 99243 the RTPA based upon the FY 2016: October 19, 2016 Uniform System of Accounts FY 2017: March 20, 2018* and Records established by (April 5, 2018 Revised)* the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of fiscal year (Sept. 28/29), or 110 days FY 2018: January 30, 2019* Separate Transit Operators (Oct. 19/20) if filed Financial Transaction Reports electronically (Internet). for both general and specialized services were submitted. *Note: New state legislation was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these Michael Baker International - 6 75 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. Conclusion: Partial Compliance. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90- day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: May 22, 2017 FY 2017: April 5, 2018 FY 2018: March 28, 2019 A 90-day extension was granted by RCTC pursuant to the TDA statute. The FY 2016 and FY 2017 fiscal audits were submitted after the 90-day extension period. Conclusion: Partial Compliance. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B The City participates in the California Highway Patrol (CHP) Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections were conducted at the City of Banning located at 176 East Lincoln Street. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were July 8 and 15, 2015; July 11 and 12, 2016; July 10 and 11, 2017; and July 16 and 17, 2018. Michael Baker International - 7 76 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts All inspections conducted were rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Banning's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance are submitted in compliance with the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as Banning Transit only serves a non -urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage change in the City of Banning's transit operating budget: FY 2016: FY 2017: FY 2018: Source: City of Banning Transit Fund Budgets for FYs 2015- 2018. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 The City of Banning's definition of performance is consistent with Public Utilities Code Michael Baker International - 8 77 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. Section 99247. A review of TransTrack performance data reports generated during the audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three -twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as Banning Transit only serves a non -urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 Operating ratios for Banning Transit using audited data were as follows: FY 2016: 13.50% FY 2017: 10.66% FY 2018: 10.31% Source: City of Banning Transit Services Fund Financial Statements (Audited) Michael Baker International - 9 78 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Conclusion: Complied. The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that the City of Banning's retirement system is funded. City staff's retirement is funded through CaIPERS. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of State Transit Assistance funds, the City of Banning does not utilize federal funds available under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 as amended (other than those funds that are passed through RCTC). Conclusion: Not Applicable. Michael Baker International - 10 79 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to Banning, the operator fully complied with six of the eight applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittals of the Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports and the annual fiscal and compliance audits. Three additional compliance requirements did not apply to Banning (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio, exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio, and the utilization of federal funds). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Banning Transit Services Fund Financial Statements, the City's farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 10 percent during the audit period. Farebox recovery was 13.50 percent in FY 2016, 10.66 percent in FY 2017, and 10.31 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox during the triennial period was 11.49 percent. 3. The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited modest fluctuations increases during the audit period. Banning saw increases of 3.5 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively, during FY 2016 and FY 2018. The budget exhibited a slight decrease of 1.6 percent in FY 2017. Michael Baker International - 11 80 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations The City of Banning's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the FY 2013-2015 triennial performance audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the City of Banning's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. Background: Banning's current farebox ratio is slightly above the TDA standard of 10 percent. The revenues in the farebox ratio are composed primarily of passenger fares. New state legislation (SB 508) reinforces current RCTC practice of allowing other locally generated revenues in the farebox ratio. These other revenues could include advertising generated by the transit system, bus wraps on the vehicles, and other local contributions from the City to the transit program. The annual TDA fiscal audit should calculate the farebox ratio inclusive of these additional revenues. It was suggested that transit work with the City Fiscal Services Department to ensure other local transit revenues are included in the farebox ratio in the TDA fiscal audit for Banning Transit. Actions taken by the City of Banning Based on the available data from the audited City of Banning Transit Services Fund Financial Statements, the City's farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 10 percent during the audit period. The average farebox during the triennial period was 11.49 percent. The farebox recovery ratio calculation presented under Note 7 of the Financial Statements for FY 2018 includes passenger fares, the City's contribution, interest, and miscellaneous revenues. The sources of the miscellaneous revenues are not identified. The City is encouraged to consider the inclusion of other locally generated revenues such as advertising in its farebox recovery. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Ensure that the City receives reimbursement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College for Go -Pass riders. Michael Baker International - 12 81 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Background: Banning Transit serves the San Gorgonio Pass Campus of Mt. San Jacinto College. Students are assessed a $6.00 transportation fee when they enroll at the college, which allows for unlimited transit rides on any RTA bus as part of the Go -Pass program. Students participating in the Go -Pass program may use the Banning Transit system at no additional charge with a "Pass Transit" sticker on the card. Currently, the City does not receive any of the revenues generated from this program. Given the concerns cited in the prior recommendation about farebox recovery attainment, it was suggested that the City work with RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College on a reimbursement agreement whereby Banning Transit receives a share of the revenues generated from this program. Actions taken by the City of Banning In response to this recommendation, the City had taken steps to reach a fare revenue reimbursement agreement with Mt. San Jacinto College. In the meantime, Banning Transit has continued to honor RTA's Go -Pass without an agreement in place. Under the Go -Pass program, Mt. San Jacinto College students get unlimited rides on RTA buses. The City was anticipating that the Mt. San Jacinto College student body would vote on the separate fare revenue agreement in early 2018; however, the vote never materialized. It is recommended that the City continue to work with the college on having such an agreement in place as a farebox enhancement measure. Conclusion This recommendation has been partially implemented and is carried forward for full implementation. Prior Recommendation 3 Correct the link to the Beaumont Transit website on the Banning Transit web page. Background: This recommendation is carried forward from the prior performance audit for full implementation. It was noted that a link to Beaumont Transit was placed on the Banning Transit web page. Specifically, the link is to the Beaumont Transit's Commuter Link 120 service; however, this link was broken as of this review. The correct hyperlink for Beaumont Transit is http://www.ci.beaumont.ca.us/index.aspx?NID=160, which should be updated on the Banning Transit web page. Actions taken by the City of Banning The City's website and transit page were updated during the audit period. While there are links to RTA's and SunLine Transit Agency's websites concerning Commuter Link Route 220 and RTA Routes 31 and 35, there were no links to the Beaumont Transit website. The MOU or cooperative services agreement between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont that has been in effect since December 2002 was terminated after the audit period and involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. Michael Baker International - 13 82 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 In its place, an interagency service agreement between the two cities was adopted in July 2019 and provides continued cooperation of both cities in "providing the public with specific transit information, advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general use of transit." Conclusion This recommendation has been not implemented and is carried forward for full implementation. Pursuant to the interagency service agreement with the City of Beaumont, it is recommended that Banning include a link to Beaumont Transit on its transit page. Michael Baker International - 14 83 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Banning Transit's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. The TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators that gauge service effectiveness and revenue, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the performance indicators for Banning Transit system -wide, fixed route, and Dial -a -Ride. Charts are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that the system -wide operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited figures, while fixed route and Dial -a -Ride costs and fare revenues are unaudited. The annual fiscal audits do not provide a modal breakdown. Michael Baker International - 15 84 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 Banning Transit TDA Performance Indicators System -wide Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015- 2018 Operating Cost* $1,543,847 $1,663,164 $1,473,649 $1,626,239 5.3% Total Passengers 145,496 137,594 133,193 126,793 -12.9% Vehicle Service Hours 19,936 20,559 20,715 22,018 10.4% Vehicle Service Miles 494,730 767,543 777,063 798,183 61.3% Employee FTEs 15 18 17 15 0.0% Passenger Fares** $173,976 $224,463 $157,159 $167,720 -3.6% Operating Cost per Passenger $10.61 $12.09 $11.06 $12.83 20.9% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $77.44 $80.90 $71.14 $73.86 -4.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.12 $2.17 $1.90 $2.04 -34.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 7.3 6.7 6.4 5.8 -21.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.29 0.18 0.17 0.16 -46.0% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,329.1 _ 1,142.2 _ 1,218.5 _ 1,467.9 10.4% Average Fare per Passenger $1.20 $1.63 $1.18 $1.32 10.6% Fare Recovery Ratio 11.27% 13.50% 10.66% 10.31% -8.5% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: City of Banning Transit Services Fund Financial Statements (Audited); Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports *Audited system -wide operating cost data exclude depreciation expenses permissible by TDA **Audited system -wide passenger fare data include supplemental revenues such as interest, City and miscellaneous contributions Michael Baker International - 16 85 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-2 Banning Transit TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost $1,380,873 $1,557,540 $1,509,963 $1,444,377 4.6% Total Passengers 135,762 127,524 122,265 116,129 -14.5% Vehicle Service Hours 18,574 19,192 19,225 20,590 10.9% Vehicle Service Miles 465,041 738,641 748,502 771,908 66.0% Employee FTEs 12 16 15 13 8.3% Passenger Fares $135,607 $115,982 $106,607 $94,990 -30.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $10.17 $12.21 $12.35 $12.44 22.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $74.34 $81.16 $78.54 $70.15 -5.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.97 $2.11 $2.02 $1.87 -37.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 7.3 6.6 6.4 5.6 -22.8% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.29 0.17 0.16 0.15 -48.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,547.8 1,199.5 1,281.7 1,583.8 2.3% Average Fare per Passenger $1.00 $0.91 $0.87 $0.82 -18.1% Fare Recovery Ratio 9.82% 7.45% 7.06% 6.58% -33.0% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports Michael Baker International - 17 86 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-3 Banning Transit TDA Performance Indicators Dial -a -Ride Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost $160,218 $136,668 $178,382 $180,848 12.9% Total Passengers 9,734 10,070 10,928 10,664 9.6% Vehicle Service Hours 1,362 1,367 1,490 1,428 4.8% Vehicle Service Miles 29,689 28,902 28,561 26,275 -11.5% Employee FTEs 3 2 2 2 -33.3% Passenger Fares $17,605 $22,770 $23,504 $22,881 30.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $16.46 $13.57 $16.32 $16.96 3.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $117.63 $99.98 $119.72 $126.64 7.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.40 $4.73 $6.25 $6.88 27.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 7.1 7.4 7.3 7.5 4.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.33 0.35 0.38 0.41 23.8% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 454.0 683.5 745.0 714.0 57.3% Average Fare per Passenger $1.81 $2.26 $2.15 $2.15 18.6% Fare Recovery Ratio 10.99% 16.66% 13.18% 12.65% 15.1% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports Michael Baker International - 18 87 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 $1,800,000 $1,600,000 $1, 400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $- 160,000 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride Graph IV-2 Ridership System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride Michael Baker International - 19 88 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 518.00 $16.00 $14.00 $12.00 $10.00 $8.00 $6.00 $4.00 $2.00 $- $140.00 $120.00 $100.00 $80.00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $- Graph IV-3 Operating Cost Per Passenger System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride Graph IV-4 Operating Cost Per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride 1 FY 2018 Michael Baker International - 20 89 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Graph IV-5 Passengers Per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2015 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -a -Ride FY 2015 1 FY 2016 1 FY 2017 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride 1 FY 2015 Michael Baker International - 21 90 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, decreased 4.6 percent system -wide from $77.44 in the FY 2015 base year to $73.86 in FY 2018. Operating costs (based on audited data) increased 5.3 percent system -wide while operating hours increased by 10.4 percent over the same period. Operating costs for fixed route rose higher than Dial -a -Ride in absolute value, but Dial -a -Ride costs grew more quickly in percentage terms. Operating costs on Dial -a -Ride grew 12.9 percent as compared to a 4.6 percent increase in fixed -route operating costs for the same period. Cost increases for both services were from personnel wage increases for minimum wage, and benefits contributions. A fleet manager was also added in which costs were allocated between fixed route and Dial -a -Ride. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 20.9 percent system -wide from $10.61 in FY 2015 to $12.83 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 12.9 percent, from 145,496 passengers in FY 2015 to 126,793 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased 5.3 percent for the same period. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 21.1 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018 from 7.3 passengers per hour to 5.8 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations reflected the system- wide trend with a decrease of 22.8 percent over the same period from 7.3 to 5.6 passengers per hour. Demand -response operations exhibited a modest increase of 4.5 percent from 7.1 to 7.5 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator reflects an overall decline in ridership while overall vehicle hours increased on both fixed -route and demand -response services during the triennial period. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 46 percent system -wide, from 0.29 in FY 2015 to 0.16 in FY 2018. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased 48.5 percent from 0.29 to 0.15 between FY 2015 and FY 2018. In contrast, passengers per service mile increased 23.8 percent over the same period. While vehicle service miles increased and passenger trips decreased on fixed route, Dial -a -Ride exhibited reverse trends. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee increased 10.4 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018. Vehicle service hours per employee for fixed -route service increased 2.3 percent during the reporting period, from 1,547.8 hours in FY 2015 to 1,583.8 hours in FY 2018, as vehicle service hours and the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) increased (from 12 to 13) during the period. For the Dial -A -Ride service mode, vehicle hours per employee increased 57.3 percent in the reporting period. Vehicle service hours increased while Dial -a - Ride employees decreased from 3 to 2 FTEs. This measure is based on the number of employee FTEs using employee pay hours from the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. Michael Baker International - 22 91 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 6. Farebox recovery exhibited an overall percentage decrease of 8.5 percent system -wide from 11.27 percent in FY 2015 to 10.31 percent in FY 2018 based on audited data. System -wide, passenger fares decreased by a modest 3.6 percent and were supplemented by the City's General Fund, interest, and miscellaneous contributions. However, system -wide operating costs increased at 5.3 percent. At a modal level, fixed -route farebox recovery decreased 33 percent whereas Dial -A -Ride farebox recovery increased 15.1 percent. Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The City of Banning's system -wide performance indicators reflect modest increases in operating costs while exhibiting declines in ridership despite service expansion. Ridership on the fixed route decreased 14.5 percent whereas Dial -a -Ride ridership increased nearly 10 percent. The growth in ridership that was projected for the Route 1 did not materialize in a shared corridor service with Beaumont Transit Route 2, which allowed for 30-minute service from Walmart in Beaumont to Casino Morongo through the city of Banning. Service along the main corridor with Banning transit service alone was back to one -hour headways. Due to the service expansion, system -wide vehicle service hours and miles increased 10.4 and 61.3 percent, respectively. The vehicle service hours exhibited the highest increase in FY 2016 on the fixed route. Michael Baker International - 23 92 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions in the Banning Transit system. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the City of Banning Community Services Department: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are subfunctions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations Banning Transit is a local, City -operated transit system serving Banning and the neighboring community of Cabazon located to the east. There were no significant changes to operations during the audit period. The system is composed of three fixed routes and a demand -response service. Major trip generators served by Banning Transit include the Sun Lakes Shopping Center, the 2nd Street Marketplace and Walmart Supercenter in Beaumont, the Banning Justice Center, San Gorgonio Pass Hospital, Beaver and Loma Linda Medical Plazas, the Cabazon Outlet Stores, Desert Hills Premium Outlets, Casino Morongo, and Mt. San Jacinto College, San Gorgonio Pass Campus. The main trunk route, Route 1, operates with two buses along Ramsey Street and operates hourly headways during the weekday and every 2 hours in evenings and on weekends. The route also features a circulator loop departing from Casino Morongo and servicing the Cabazon Community Center and the residential areas of Cabazon. Route 1 is the most productive in the system and accounts for 60 percent of the ridership. The route also deviates to Mt. San Jacinto College around 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Routes 5 and 6 were realigned in August 2015 to provide better service. Route 5 operates in the areas of Banning located to the north of 1-10 and accounts for 25 percent of the system's ridership. Major stops on this route are the Banning Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Michael Baker International - 24 93 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Banning Community Center, library, medical facilities, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, and the commercial area of Beaumont. Route 6 serves the southern areas of Banning and comprises 15 percent of the system's ridership. Major stops on this route are the Mid -County Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, medical offices, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, and the commercial area of Beaumont. Banning Transit's ridership is composed primarily of the transit dependent, many of whom are transfer passengers from RTA. Student ridership has declined due to the local school district's busing program. Anticipated increased ridership to the Justice Center has yet to materialize. The Pass Transit Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont has allowed for each respective agency to cross jurisdictional boundary lines, allowing simplified travel for passengers throughout the Pass area. In addition, an MOU is held with the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, allowing stops within their jurisdiction. In recent years, Banning has expressed concerns about the adverse impacts that Beaumont's Route 2 has had on its system's ridership along the Ramsey Street corridor. The prior MOU between the two cities was terminated in June 2019, which involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. Service along the main route with Banning transit only reverted to one -hour headways. A new interagency services agreement was adopted between the cities in July 2019. The new agreement allows for interline transfers between the two systems at the Walmart in Beaumont and the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital in Banning. Beaumont will limit Banning to no more than three buses per hour at Walmart and Banning will limit Beaumont to no more than three buses per hour at the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital bus stop. Dial -A -Ride trips are booked a minimum of 24 hours in advance; however, same -day requests can be accommodated. There is a 15-minute pickup window for Dial -a -Ride scheduling. No- shows occur when the rider is not ready, forgets, fails to call and cancel in advance, or refuses their ride when the driver arrives. If three no-shows accumulate in a 60-day period, a 30-day suspension will result. Once the rider is reinstated, if an additional three no-shows occur within another 60 days, the suspension will be extended to 45 days. After the third infraction of three no-shows, the suspension is for 60 days. If an individual continues to misuse the program, a reinstatement fee may be charged. No-shows are tracked manually on a specific log, which records the day and time of the scheduled pickup, passenger name, details, and the fare amount owed. Driver trip sheets for both service modes include sections for recording the passenger count and fare categories, fuel mileage, hours, and mileage. Both actual and revenue hours and mileage are recorded and segregated. Michael Baker International - 25 94 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Performance data are entered into TransTrack Manager on a monthly basis. On -time performance data for Dial -A -Ride are entered into TransTrack. If drivers are six to seven minutes behind schedule, they are required to call into dispatch. The Route 6 driver calls in at the San Gorgonio Pass Hospital and high school. As a general practice, drivers call into dispatch upon leaving the corporation yard and during breaks, late runs, and road calls. Communications and dispatching rely on both electronic and manual methods. Banning utilizes Motorola push -talk radios provided by Verizon for communication between the drivers and dispatch. The City is planning to upgrade its communication system in conjunction with the police department's planned upgrade. Banning has been looking to computerize its dispatching and scheduling functions. Dispatch functions have generally been conducted manually with a reliance on typewritten schedules and manifests. The Transit Division staff had been working with the City's IT department in the selection of a suitable software program. The IT department selected RouteMatch as Banning Transit's dispatching and scheduling program, which was to be implemented by December 2015. However, the City decided to forgo the acquisition of RouteMatch and is planning to acquire the Trapeze scheduling and dispatching software program to assist with route schedule selection and address traffic congestion conditions. Banning upgraded the surveillance camera systems on its newer vehicles. Video footage can be downloaded with GateKeeper wireless technology. Vehicles are equipped with six surveillance cameras. Older vehicles are equipped with Safety Vision surveillance camera systems. Camera footage is used to investigate customer complaints and for employee discipline. Farebox revenues are counted and reconciled daily. Vehicles are equipped with Diamond vaulted fareboxes. At the end of each shift, the office specialist and lead driver pull out the vaults from the buses and transport them to City Hall by car. The vaults are taken to the Fiscal Services Department, which has a key to the vaults. Fare revenues are counted by the field supervisor and one person from the Fiscal Services Department in a safe room and reconciled with the trip sheets. Pass and ticket sales are also noted on the trip sheets. The Fiscal Services staff is also able to determine any significant overages or shortages during the reconciliation process. Personnel Banning Transit personnel are City employees. Drivers and nonexempt employees are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), Local 47. Two MOUs were in effect during the audit period. The City and the union entered into a one-year MOU in effect from May 26, 2015, through June 30, 2016. The one-year MOU included general wage and benefit increases to help offset employee CALPERS contributions. Subsequently, the City and the IBEW entered into a three-year MOU covering July 1, 2017, through June 30, 2020. Full-time employees are covered under the general bargaining unit referenced in the MOU. Michael Baker International - 26 95 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 According to the 2018 Transit Division organizational chart, there were 19 employees: the Community Services director, Community Services transit manager, executive secretary, receptionist, transit field supervisor, senior program coordinator, and 13 drivers. As of May 2019, there were seven full-time and three part-time drivers. Two full-time drivers were on leave. Part- time drivers are assigned to Dial -a -Ride trips. The office specialist and receptionist also function as dispatchers. The field supervisor conducts monthly safety trainings. Most new drivers are recruited from outside of the area or were former school bus and Beaumont Transit drivers. Drivers undergo annual performance evaluations, which include ride -along observations, speed monitoring, and customer service skills. At the time of application, driver candidates are required to have a valid Class B California driver license with air brake and passenger endorsements. In addition, drivers must have one of the following certifications: Verification of Transit Training, School Bus Driver, or School Pupil Activity Bus SPAB Certification. Drivers undergo a background investigation and must successfully complete periodic physical examinations as required by federal transportation regulations. The lead driver is a certified trainer and conducts safety meetings on a monthly basis. Safety meetings cover wheelchair placement, emergency evacuations, parking and driving maneuvers, service animals, and passenger etiquette. The City utilizes training resources from the Transportation Safety Institute. Accruals for vacation and sick time commence on the first day of employment for full-time employees. Employees with one to four years of service accrue 10 vacation days, 15 days with five to nine years, and up to 20 vacation days with 10 or more years of service. Employees accrue 3.69 hours of sick time off per 80-hour pay period. Full-time employees and their dependents are provided employer -paid health insurance benefits. Under the current MOU, the City contributed $1,300 per month to each represented employee toward medical and dental insurance, which increased to up $1,400 per month effective July 2019 per the latest MOU. Maintenance Vehicle maintenance is the responsibility of the City's Fleet Maintenance Division and is performed at the City Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. The facility is equipped with five service bays, an outside vehicle wash bay, and a CNG station with both fast and slow fill pumps. The City has secured $400,000 in funding to upgrade the CNG fueling facility. Transit vehicles are serviced in a dedicated service bay with one lift. One of the City mechanics is trained on CNG and is dedicated to the transit system. One other mechanic has also been trained on CNG and serves in a backup capacity. Vehicles operated on the fixed route are CNG-powered whereas all the Dial -a -Ride vehicles, except for one, are gasoline -powered. Drivers perform a 15- minute pre -trip inspection before each run and note any areas that need maintenance attention. Vehicles in need of repair are red tagged. Preventive maintenance inspections (PMIs) are performed on a 3,000-mile or 45-day inspection schedule in accordance with the state's General Public Paratransit Vehicle regulations. Additional preventive maintenance is conducted every 15,000 miles and annually at 36,000 miles. The fleet Michael Baker International - 27 96 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 maintenance division utilizes Ron Turley Associates fleet management software to track PMIs and work orders. The City has not deemed it necessary to maintain a large parts inventory; however, the most common parts kept on hand include brakes and tires. The CHP is responsible for certifying Banning's maintenance facilities and for inspecting vehicles on an annual basis. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. Road calls are tracked and recorded in TransTrack Manager. The monthly road calls report provided by the City does not contain a legend to help discern the type of incidents incurred. A summary of road calls incurred during the audit period is presented in Table V-1. Table V-1 Banning Transit Road calls FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Mechanical Road calls 14 4 53 Non -Mechanical Road calls 105 115 32 Total Road Calls 119 119 85 Source: TransTrack Manager A review of road call summary shows that mechanical road calls fluctuated during the period from 14 in FY 2016 to 4 in FY 2017 to 53 in FY 2018. The total number of road calls decreased from 119 in FYs 2016 and 2017 to 85 in FY 2018. Planning The City of Banning prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and includes a system overview; services and performance analysis for each route and service provided; service changes; and financial and capital plans. Under the Existing Service and Route Performance chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvements is presented for each route or program. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, Banning must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance indicators. There is one mandatory indicator which is the farebox recovery ratio set at 10 percent. Using the SRTP covering FY 2017-18 through FY 2019-20, Table V-2 summarizes the FY 2017-18 performance targets system -wide. Banning met all seven performance indicator targets. Table V-2 Banning Transit Performance Targets Performance Indicators FY 2017-18 Target Actual Performance Met Target Farebox Recovery >=10.00% 10.11%* Yes Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$57.09 $55.50 Yes Subsidy Per Passenger >=$6.49 & <=$8.79 $8.35 Yes Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$2.52 & <=$3.42 $3.25 Yes Michael Baker International - 28 97 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Performance Indicators FY 2017-18 Target Actual Performance Met Target Subsidy Per Hour >=$42.01 & <=$56.83 $49.89 Yes Subsidy Per Mile >=$1.11 & <=$1.50 $1.37 Yes Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=5.53 & <=7.48 6.90 Yes Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.14 & <=0.20 0.16 Yes Source: Banning Transit, TransTrack Manager *Farebox recovery ratio is derived from unaudited cost and revenue data. Subsequent planning efforts involve a commuter service that will connect the Pass area with Palm Springs and the communities of the Coachella Valley. Transit staff will explore routing, service planning, and the budget for service during FY 2020. Additionally, the City projects growth in the demand for paratransit services. Marketing Banning uses several media approaches in marketing its transit services. The Banning Transit system has operated in coordination with Beaumont Transit under a cooperative branding and marketing agreement. This agreement has allowed for a common service brand, coordinating schedules and connections to regional commuter services. In a recent development, in June 2019, the two cities terminated the MOU that created the Pass Transit branding. Under the current interagency service agreement, each agency has agreed to cooperate in providing the public with specific transit information by advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general usage of public transit. Pursuant to a prior audit recommendation, it was suggested that Banning include a link on its transit page to Beaumont Transit. Printed brochures and marketing collateral are published in-house. The City improved the format of its transit brochures. Ride Guide brochures are published for each of the three fixed routes in the system, identifying key local bus stops and timepoints, including interline connections to RTA, SunLine, and Beaumont Transit. Brochures are distributed to the library, Chamber of Commerce, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus, local hotels, and other businesses. The City has made an effort to equip bus stops with schedule cassettes and kiosks. It has also identified the need to provide more bus shelters on Ramsay Street going toward Cabazon. Transit staff also engages in outreach to local schools and senior centers. The redesigned City of Banning website (htta://www.banning.ca.us/351/Bus-Schedules) contains a page devoted to the transit program. A separate page provides information on the Dial -A -Ride service (http://www.banning.ca.us/356/Dial-A-Ride). The main Banning Transit web page provides general information, fares, and modal links to the fixed -route and Dial -a -Ride services as well as links to a customer survey and trip planning tools. Bus schedules for each route are accessible in PDF. Development of social media is restricted by City policy; therefore, Banning Transit does not have a presence on Facebook or Twitter. Michael Baker International - 29 98 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Banning Transit participates in the Go -Pass program in conjunction with Mt. San Jacinto College. Student pass holders ride the system for free by presenting their student identification card with the Go -Pass sticker. RTA has an agreement with the college; however, Banning does not receive any of the revenues stipulated in the agreement. General Administration and Management The City of Banning was incorporated February 6, 1913, as a general law city and currently operates under a council/manager form of government. The five -member City Council serves as the City's principal legislative body and members are elected to four-year terms, which are staggered. The mayor and the mayor pro tem are elected from the City Council and serve one- year terms. The City Council meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 5:00 p.m. in the Banning City Council Chambers. The chief administrative officer for the City is the City manager, who is appointed by the City Council. The City manager oversees and coordinates City departments and services, including Community Services. There has been significant turnover in the City manager position with as many as four City managers serving in the position over a six-month period, and therefore the transit program has not been given priority. Transit services are managed under the purview of the Community Services Department located at the Banning Community Center at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue. The Community Services director administered transit operations and staff. The director has been assisted by an office specialist who has worked with transit for more than 20 years. Both the Community Services director and the office specialist have institutional knowledge of the transit system. The Community Services transit manager position was filled during the audit period. The Community Services director retired from the City in June 2019. Transit administration has been transferred to the Public Works Department and operations are being conducted from the City Yard. Another change impacting transit administration concerns the termination of the Pass Transit MOU and the adoption of an interagency service agreement between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont. In June 2019, administrative staffs from the two cities met to discuss the terms and conditions of the agreement. The interagency service agreement became effective on July 1, 2019 and allows for continued cooperation between the two transit systems under their respective branding. Neither system would board passengers at any other bus stop within the other party's jurisdiction. The primary source of transit funding support is derived from the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) for operations. The City submits the annual TDA claim for funds to RCTC. TDA claims are based on the City's annual budget projections and the financial element of the SRTP. The City's LTF allocation was $1,469,747 in FY 2016; $1,391,723 in FY 2017; and $1,379,447 in FY 2018. State Transportation Assistance (STA) funds received by the City were $304,568 in FY 2016; $444,334 in FY 2017; and $471,195 in FY 2018. STA is used toward capital. Michael Baker International - 30 99 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 During the audit period, the City considered transferring transit operations to RTA due to an insurance claim from an accident involving a Banning Transit vehicle and a pedestrian in the fall of 2016. Grants Management Grant funding allocated toward the transit system has been derived from state sources composed of Proposition 1B, SB 1 State of Good Repair (SGR), and Low Carbon Transit Operation Program (LCTOP) funds. Under the Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) program, Banning received funding for vehicle purchases and bus shelter and CNG facility upgrades. Another component of the Proposition 1B program is the Transit System Safety, Security & Disaster Response Account (TSSSDRA) administered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. TSSSDRA funds awarded to the City have been utilized toward security cameras and equipment. At the end of June 30, 2018, the City had an unexpended balance of $109,037 in PTMISEA funds and $77,305 in TSSSDRA funds. The City applied for $38,307 in SB 1 SGR program funds. In addition, the City received $74,561 in LCTOP funding, which has been applied toward the elimination of the additional zone fare charged for travel to and from Cabazon. Banning does not utilize federal transit funding for operating expenses, thus avoiding federal transit grant and Title VI reporting requirements. Michael Baker International - 31 100 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to Banning, the operator fully complied with six of the eight applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittals of the Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports and the annual fiscal and compliance audits. Three additional compliance requirements did not apply to Banning (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio, exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio, and the utilization of federal funds). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Banning Transit Services Fund Financial Statements, the City's farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 10 percent during the audit period. Farebox recovery was 13.50 percent in FY 2016, 10.66 percent in FY 2017, and 10.31 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox during the triennial period was 11.49 percent. 3. The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited modest fluctuations increases during the audit period. Banning saw increases of 3.5 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively, during FY 2016 and FY 2018. The budget exhibited a slight decrease of 1.6 percent in FY 2017. 5. Banning satisfactorily implemented one of the three prior audit recommendations. The recommendation pertained to the inclusion of additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. One recommendation pertaining to receiving reimbursement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College for Go -Pass riders was partially implemented and the recommendation pertaining to the web link to Beaumont Transit was not implemented; both are carried forward for full implementation. 6. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, decreased 4.6 percent system -wide from $77.44 in the FY 2015 base year to $73.86 in FY 2018. Operating costs (based on audited data) increased 5.3 percent system -wide while operating hours increased by 10.4 percent over the same period. Operating costs for fixed route rose higher than Dial -a - Ride in absolute value, but Dial -a -Ride costs grew more quickly in percentage terms. Operating costs on Dial -a -Ride grew 12.9 percent as compared to a 4.6 percent increase in fixed -route operating costs for the same period. Cost increases for both services were from Michael Baker International - 32 101 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 personnel wage increases for minimum wage, and benefits contributions. A fleet manager was also added in which costs were allocated between fixed route and Dial -a -Ride. 7. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 20.9 percent system -wide from $10.61 in FY 2015 to $12.83 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 12.9 percent, from 145,496 passengers in FY 2015 to 126,793 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased 5.3 percent for the same period. 8. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 21.1 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018 from 7.3 passengers per hour to 5.8 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations reflected the system- wide trend with a decrease of 22.8 percent over the same period from 7.3 to 5.6 passengers per hour. Demand -response operations exhibited a modest increase of 4.5 percent from 7.1 to 7.5 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator reflects an overall decline in ridership while overall vehicle hours increased on both fixed -route and demand -response services during the triennial period. 9. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 46 percent system -wide, from 0.29 in FY 2015 to 0.16 in FY 2018. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased 48.5 percent from 0.29 to 0.15 between FY 2015 and FY 2018. In contrast, passengers per service mile increased 23.8 percent over the same period. While vehicle service miles increased and passenger trips decreased on fixed route, Dial -a -Ride exhibited reverse trends. 10. Banning Transit is a local, City -operated transit system serving Banning and the neighboring community of Cabazon located to the east. There were no significant changes to operations during the audit period. The system is composed of three fixed routes and a demand - response service. 11. Banning has expressed concerns about the adverse impacts that Beaumont's Route 2 has had on its system's ridership along the Ramsey Street corridor. The prior MOU between the two cities was terminated in June 2019, which involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. Service along the main route with Banning transit only reverted to one -hour headways. 12. A new interagency services agreement was adopted between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont in July 2019. The new agreement allows for interline transfers between the two systems at the Walmart in Beaumont and the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital in Banning. Beaumont will limit Banning to no more than three buses per hour at Walmart and Banning will limit Beaumont to no more than three buses per hour at the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital bus stop. Michael Baker International - 33 102 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 13. Banning Transit personnel are City employees. Drivers and nonexempt employees are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), Local 47. Two MOUs were in effect during the audit period. 14. Vehicle maintenance is the responsibility of the City's Fleet Maintenance Division and is performed at the City Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. The facility is equipped with five service bays, an outside vehicle wash bay, and a CNG station with both fast and slow fill pumps. The City has secured $400,000 in funding to upgrade the CNG fueling facility. 15. Transit services are managed under the purview of the Community Services Department located at the Banning Community Center at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue. The Community Services director administered transit operations and staff. The Community Services director retired from the City in June 2019. Transit administration has been transferred to the Public Works Department and operations are being conducted from the City Yard. Michael Baker International - 34 103 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Banning Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Ensure timely completion and submittal of external TDA financial reports. The City was not in compliance with the timely completion and submittal of its annual State Controller transit reports as well as the fiscal and compliance audits. The late submittal may be due to the financial close-out procedures needed to generate the financial information required in the Controller's report. This in turn also impacts the timely submittal of its fiscal and compliance audits which cannot be completed until the financial close-out by the City. The TDA statute provides the submittal timelines and allowable extensions granted by RCTC. Although City financial close-out procedures are not within the scope of this performance audit, it is suggested that a schedule be coordinated between the City's Finance Department, TDA fiscal auditor, and RCTC that anticipates financial close-out by the City and completion of the external TDA financial reports. The financial close-out triggers the undertaking of the TDA financial reports, and close tracking of the timeliness of the close-out could advance some aspects and earlier preparation of the TDA reports. 2. Continue to pursue a reimbursement agreement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College for Go -Pass riders. This recommendation is being carried forward from the prior audit for implementation. The City had taken steps to reach a fare revenue reimbursement agreement with Mt. San Jacinto College. In the meantime, Banning Transit has continued to honor RTA's Go -Pass without an agreement in place. Under the Go -Pass program, Mt. San Jacinto College students get unlimited rides on RTA buses. The City was anticipating that the Mt. San Jacinto College student body would vote on the separate fare revenue agreement in early 2018; however, the vote never materialized. It is recommended that the City continue to work with the college and RTA on having such an agreement in place as a farebox enhancement measure. 3. Include a link to Beaumont Transit on the Banning Transit web page. This recommendation is being carried forward from the prior audit for implementation. The City's website and transit page were updated during the audit period. While there are links to RTA's and SunLine Transit Agency's websites concerning Commuter Link Route 220 and RTA Routes 31 and 35, there are no links to the Beaumont Transit website. The MOU or cooperative services agreement between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont that has been in effect since December 2002 was terminated after the audit period and involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. In its place, an interagency service agreement between the two cities was adopted in July 2019 and provides continued cooperation of both cities in "providing the public with specific transit information, advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general use of transit." Pursuant to the interagency service agreement with the City of Beaumont, it is recommended that Banning include a link to Beaumont Transit on its transit page. Michael Baker International - 35 104 ATTACHMENT 3 RCTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit BEAUMONT -C A L I F O R N I A March 2020 Aida111416N PASSTRANSIT Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 105 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section 11 7 Operator Compliance Requirements 7 Section III 13 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 13 Section IV 17 TDA Performance Indicators 17 Section V 26 Review of Operator Functions 26 Operations 26 Maintenance 29 Planning 30 Marketing 31 General Administration and Management 32 Section VI 34 Findings 34 Recommendations 37 106 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section I Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for the City of Beaumont Transit (Beaumont, City) covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017- 18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code (PUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the PUC's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with management, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Beaumont has provided public transportation service since 1975. The current transit system is composed of both fixed -route and Dial -A -Ride services. Fixed -route service began as a single 15-mile route in 1979, after the existing general public Dial -A -Ride service could not meet the growing demand. The fixed route serves the City of Beaumont and the unincorporated community of Cherry Valley to the north. Dial -A -Ride is limited to elderly and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) certified passengers. However, a combination of Dial -A -Ride and fixed - route deviations is available to the general public to assist passengers who are outside the quarter -mile border of each bus route connection to the fixed -route system. Michael Baker International - 1 107 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 The Cities of Beaumont and Banning have continued their coordination efforts to implement the Pass Transit Plan, which provides a seamless transit service to the residents of the two communities. The jointly developed service plan includes the Cities of Banning and Beaumont, unincorporated areas of Cherry Valley and Cabazon, and commercial area of the Morongo Indian Reservation. The Pass Transit system consists of two independent but well -coordinated transit systems under a single brand identity and fare structure. The coordinated service area of Pass Transit includes the aforementioned cities and communities. This coordinated transit system allows Dial -A -Ride vehicles to cross jurisdictions and a common trunk line that serves both cities and the Cabazon area east of Banning. After the audit period, the two cities mutually terminated the memorandum of understanding (MOU) that had been in place since December 2002 and adopted an interagency service agreement in July 2019. With the termination of the MOU, the Pass Transit branding has been phased out and Beaumont Transit Route 2 service was discontinued in the City of Banning. Based on the 2010 US Census, Beaumont's population is 36,877, which grew 223.9 percent since the 2000 US Census. The senior citizen population, composed of residents aged 65 and over, is 10.55 percent. The 2019 population for Beaumont is estimated to be 48,401 as reported by the California Department of Finance. The city covers a 30.91-square-mile area. System Characteristics Beaumont Transit operates both fixed -route and demand -responsive transit services. During the audit period, the fixed route system was composed of one commuter and seven local routes. Local routes serve Beaumont, Banning, Cherry Valley, and Cabazon. The commuter route provides service between Beaumont and Calimesa, the San Bernardino Metrolink station, and the Loma Linda VA Hospital. The system operates Monday through Friday from 6:20 a.m. to 7:50 p.m. and weekends from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Beaumont Transit does not operate on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Limited service is offered on other holidays based on the weekend operating hours. Beaumont Transit's fixed -route services during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-1. Table 1-1 Beaumont Transit Fixed Route Services Route Destination Frequency/Operation Key Time points Route 2 Beaumont - Every 60 minutes • Cougar Way @ Beaumont Cabazon (Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:50 p.m.) Avenue • Wells Fargo • San Gorgonio Hospital Every 2 hours (Saturday & • Food-4-Less/Stater Bros. Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to • Walmart 6:00 p.m.) • Banning Courthouse • Casino Morongo • Beaumont Civic Center Michael Baker International - 2 108 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Route Destination Frequency/Operation Key Time points Route 3 Beaumont High — Walmart Every 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:24 a.m. to 6:02 p.m.) • Beaumont High School • Cougar Way & Beaumont Avenue • Chatigny Recreation Center • Noble Creek Apartments • Walmart • San Gorgonio Hospital Route 4 Downtown Beaumont Every 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:35 p.m.) • Pennsylvania & 8th Street • Walmart • San Gorgonio Hospital • Three Rings Ranch Park • Beaumont Library • Cougar Way @ Beaumont Avenue • Beaumont High School Route 3/4 (Saturday Only) Walmart — Cherry Valley Every 60 minutes (Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) • Beaumont High School • Brookside Avenue (Sports Park) • Chatigny Recreation Center • Pennsylvania & 8th Street • Walmart • San Gorgonio Hospital • Cougar Way Route 7 Tournament Hills — Fairway Canyon Four a.m. trips & three p.m. trips (Monday through Friday from 6:35 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. when school is in session) • Oak Valley Parkway & Gateway • Palmer & Morris • Palmer & Trevino • Champions & Bay Hill • Monte Verde & Morgan • Beaumont High School • Cougar Way @ Beaumont Avenue • Oak Valley & Rite Aid Route 9 Seneca Springs — Cherry Valley Two a.m. trips & two p.m. trips (Monday through Friday from 6:35 a.m. to 4:18 p.m. when school is in session) • Manzanita Parkway @ Brownie Way • Seneca Springs Park • Walmart • Pennsylvania Avenue @ 8th Street • Cougar Way @ Beaumont Avenue • Beaumont High School Route 1361 Calimesa Every 35 minutes (Monday through Friday • City Hall • County Line & California 1 Service started in August 2016. Michael Baker International - 3 109 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Route Destination Frequency/Operation Key Time points from 6:20 a.m. to 5:32 p.m.) • Avenue L & Douglas Street • Avenue L & 3rd Street • "The Shoppes" West Entrance • Stater Bros. Shopping Center Commuter Link 120 Beaumont Three bidirectional a.m. • Beaumont Walmart Walmart — San trips & four p.m. trips • Beaumont Civic Center Bernardino (Monday through Friday • Beaumont Wells Fargo Metrolink from 5:35 a.m. to 7:25 p.m.). Two bidirectional a.m. trips & two p.m. trips (Saturday from 7:05 a.m. to 6:50 p.m.) • Calimesa Stater Bros. • Calimesa Fresh & Easy • Loma Linda VA Hospital • San Bernardino Metrolink Source: Beaumont Transit Since the audit period, several changes have been made to the fixed -route system. The FY 2019- 2020 Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) included a plan to discontinue the Route 2 alignment through the City of Banning. Route 136 was discontinued at the end of the audit period due to low ridership. Commuter Link 125 was implemented in September 2018 and is the second regional route connecting the Pass Area with San Bernardino County. Commuter Link 125 was designed to provide more direct service to Loma Linda VA Hospital, thus enabling Commuter Link 120 to operate more frequencies to the San Bernardino Transit Center. Dial -A -Ride Dial -A -Ride offers complementary demand -response door-to-door service in the Beaumont/Cherry Valley area to passengers certified under the ADA and seniors (ages 65 years old and older). ADA certification is conducted through the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). Dial -A - Ride service operates daily from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with Sunday -only ADA service. Reservations are required at least 24 hours and up to a month in advance on a first -come, first - serve basis. A $2.00 cancellation fee is charged in the event of a no-show or insufficient notice of a cancelled trip. Fares Beaumont Transit's fares are structured based on passenger, route, and service type. Multi -trip passes are also available for purchase. The fare structures during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-2. Michael Baker International - 4 110 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 1-2 Beaumont Transit Fixed -Route Fare Schedule Fare Category Fares General Public $1.15 Youth (grades K-12) $1.00 Seniors (ages 65 and older) $0.65 Persons with Disabilities (ADA or Medicare Card) $0.65 Military Veterans (with photo ID) $0.65 Active Military Free Go -Pass (during school session only) Free Jury Duty Free Child (46" tall or under accompanied by full -fare paying adult) $0.25 Zone Deviations (one way to/from Route 3) $0.25 Commuter Link 120 — General Public/Go-Pass $3.00 Commuter Link 120 — Youth/Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $2.00 10-Tripper Punch Pass (youth) $10.00 10-Ticket Book —General Public $10.35 10-Ticket Book — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $5.85 Day Pass —General Public $3.00 Day Pass — Youth $3.00 Day Pass — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $1.80 Commuter Link Punch Pass — General Public/Go-Pass $27.00 Commuter Link Punch Pass — Youth $18.00 Commuter Link Punch Pass — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $18.00 Monthly Pass —General Public $36.00 Monthly Pass — Youth $30.00 Monthly Pass — Seniors/Disabled/Veterans $21.50 Source: Beaumont Transit Active military personnel with proper identification and students holding the Go -Pass can ride free. All jurors summoned to serve in Banning courthouses can ride free on Beaumont Transit Route 2, directly to and from the courthouse, by showing their current and valid juror summons badge to the bus driver. Table 1-3 Beaumont Transit Dial -A -Ride Fare Schedule Fare Category Fares One -Way $2.00 Companion $3.00 Personal Care Attendant (with ID) Free Michael Baker International - 5 111 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Fare Category Fares No -Show (collected during the next ride) $2.00 Child (46" tall or under accompanied by full -fare paying adult) $3.00 10-Ride Punch Card $18.00 Source: Beaumont Transit Fleet There were 18 vehicles in the transit fleet during the audit period: 13 fixed -route and 5 demand - response vehicles. In addition, Beaumont Transit uses five support vehicles. Vehicles are wheelchair accessible with tie -downs in compliance with the ADA. Table 1-4 summarizes the Beaumont Transit fleet. Table 1-4 Beaumont Transit Fleet Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Service Mode Seating Capacity 2008 Ford E-450 El Dorado National 1 Gasoline Demand Response 16 (2 W/C) 2009 Chevy C5500 Starcraft 1 CNG Demand Response 28 (2 W/C) 2009 Ford E-450 El Dorado National 1 Gasoline Demand Response 16 (2 W/C) 2009 Chevy C5500 Starcraft 1 CNG Fixed -Route 28 (2 W/C) 2010 Chevy C5500 Starcraft 1 CNG Fixed -Route 28 (2 W/C) 2010 Chevy C5500 Starcraft 1 Gasoline Fixed -Route 30 (2 W/C) 2010 Ford E-450 Starcraft 3 Gasoline Fixed -Route 16 (2 W/C) 2011 Ford F550 El Dorado National 2 Gasoline Fixed -Route 30 (2 W/C) 2011 El Dorado National 1 Gasoline Fixed -Route 30 (2 W/C) 2011 El Dorado National 1 CNG Fixed -Route 30 (2 W/C) 2015 El Dorado National XHF 40 3 CNG Fixed -Route 43 (2 W/C) 2016 Ford E-450 El Dorado National 1 CNG Demand Response 20 (2 W/C) 2016 Ford F550 El Dorado National 1 CNG Demand Response 30 (2 W/C) Total 18 Source: Beaumont Transit Michael Baker International - 6 112 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the Caltrans guidebook Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, September 2008 (third edition) to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the PUC and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator has Public Utilities Code, Completion/submittal dates: submitted annual reports to the Section 99243 RTPA based upon the Uniform FY 2016: December 29, 2016 System of Accounts and Records FY 2017: January 31, 2018* established by the State FY 2018: January 30, 2019* Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of fiscal year (Sept. The FY 2016 Transit Operators 28/29), or 110 days (Oct. 19/20) Financial Transactions Report was if filed electronically (Internet). submitted after the statutory deadline. *Note: New state legislation was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to Michael Baker International - 7 113 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts contain underlying data from audited financial statements. It is also noted that a single Transit Operators Financial Transaction Report was prepared by the City for both fixed route and Dial -A - Ride. Since Dial -A -Ride has been designated as a specialized service for ADA-certified, senior and disabled passengers, State Controller instructions require that separate reports be submitted for each service type. Conclusion: Partial compliance. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90-day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: September 20, 2017 FY 2017: June 15, 2018 FY 2018: March 28, 2019 A 90-day extension was granted by RCTC pursuant to the TDA statute. The FY 2016 & FY 2017 fiscal audits were submitted after the 90-day extension period. Conclusion: Partial Compliance. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections were conducted at the Michael Baker International - 8 114 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts terminal. City of Beaumont located at 550 East 6th Street. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were July 13 & 14, 2015; June 19 & 20, 2017; and June 4 & 6, 2018. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Beaumont's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance are submitted in compliance with the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as Beaumont Transit only serves a nonurbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage change in the City of Beaumont's transit operating budget: FY 2016: +20.2% FY 2017: +14.9% FY 2018: +4.7% The increases in the FY 2016 & FY 2017 budgets were attributed to higher salary and benefit costs and Michael Baker International - 9 115 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts major service expansion and route restructuring. Source: City of Beaumont Annual Budgets for FYs 2015-2018. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 The City of Beaumont's definition of performance is consistent with PUC Section 99247. A review of trip sheets generated during the audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three - twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as Beaumont Transit only serves a nonurbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, Operating ratios for Beaumont Transit using audited data and Michael Baker International - 10 116 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). 99268.4, 99268.5 excluding new or expanded service were as follows: FY 2016: 10.7% FY 2017: 10.4% FY 2018: 9.1% Beaumont Transit is subject to a system -wide farebox standard of 10 percent. The FY 2018 farebox recovery ratio was not attained. Source: City of Beaumont Transit System Financial Statements (audited). Conclusion: Partial Compliance. The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that the City of Beaumont's retirement system is funded. City staff's retirement is funded through the California Public Employees' Retirement System. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of State Transit Assistance funds, the City of Beaumont does not utilize federal funds (other than those funds that are passed through RCTC). Conclusion: Not Applicable. Michael Baker International - 11 117 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to Beaumont, the operator fully complied with five of the eight applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittals of its annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports to the State Controller and the annual fiscal and compliance audits as well as farebox recovery attainment in FY 2018. Three additional compliance requirements did not apply to Beaumont (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio, exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio, and the utilization of federal funds). 2. Beaumont met its system -wide farebox recovery standard of 10 percent during two of the three years of the audit period, although service expansion during the audit period allows for two full fiscal years of exemption. The farebox recovery ratios were 10.7 percent in FY 2016, 10.4 percent in FY 2017, and 9.1 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox recovery ratio for the period was 10.06 percent. 3. The City of Beaumont participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited notable increases during the audit period. Beaumont exhibited a 20.2 percent increase in its transit budget for FY 2016 and a 14.9 percent increase in FY 2017. The increases are attributed to higher salary and benefit costs as well as continued service expansion and route restructuring. The budget increased by a modest 4.7 percent in FY 2018. Michael Baker International - 12 118 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations The City of Beaumont's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the FY 2013-2015 triennial performance audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the City of Beaumont's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Continue to ensure the timely completion and submittal of the annual State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports. Background: This recommendation was carried over from the prior performance audit. Pursuant to PUC 99243 (a), "the operators shall prepare and submit annual reports of their operation to the transportation planning agencies having jurisdictions over them and to the Controller within 90 days of the end of the fiscal year." If the report is filed in electronic format as mandated by the State Controller, the report shall be furnished within 110 days after the close of the fiscal year. Although the City had taken steps to ensure the completion and timely submittal of its annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports, two out of the three reports submitted during the prior audit period were beyond the statutory deadline. The FY 2013 report was submitted in November 2013 and the FY 2015 report was not submitted until April 2016. It is noted that the State Controller granted a one-year extension for the City to submit its FY 2015 report. This was attributed to a major reorganization of the City's administration and an investigation of the City's financial practices by the State Controller in 2015. With more stringent administrative and financial controls in place, the City would be on track to submit these reports within the prescribed time frame. It was recommended that internal procedures be developed that provide the timeline and staff assignments to complete the annual report. The desktop procedures should be made available to all Finance Department staff and made part of a finance orientation package in the event of turnover in the department. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont In response to this recommendation and as part of an overall reorganization of the City's administration during the audit period, the City hired a new finance director in August 2016. With the addition of trained staff, procedures have been implemented to ensure the timely completion and submittal of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports to the State Michael Baker International - 13 119 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Controller. New state legislation was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. Even though the FY 2016 Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report was completed and submitted after the statutory deadline (December 2016), subsequent reports for FY 2017 and FY 2018 were completed and submitted by the new statutory deadline. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service. Background: This recommendation was carried over from the prior performance audit. Beaumont's annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller has historically combined information for both general public (Pass Transit fixed route) and specialized service for seniors and persons with disabilities (ADA-certified and noncertified). Although the State Controller's Office has not provided notice to the City, written instructions by the state to prepare this particular report require separate reporting of these modes. In the General Instruction Form completed by the City, a selection must be made as to which mode of transit is represented in the report. The options are general public use or elderly/disabled. The Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report Instructions contain the following passages under the General Instruction Form: Transit operators providing two types of service, (general public use and transit service exclusively for the elderly/handicapped) must complete a separate report for each type of service. ... a separate report must be filed for each type of service provided: General Public Use Service or Specialized Service exclusive for elderly and/or handicapped. For example, if an agency has received Article 4 and Article 8(c) monies to provide General Public Use Service, the agency should submit one report. If that agency has also received Article 4 monies to provide Specialized Service for the elderly and/or handicapped, then a report must be submitted for the Specialized Service operations. The submission of separate reports to the State Controller would further demonstrate Beaumont's proactive approach to compliance with state reporting instructions. Michael Baker International - 14 120 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Actions taken by the City of Beaumont A review of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports completed and submitted by the City to the State Controller revealed that the City has continued its practice of including information for both general public (Pass Transit fixed route) and specialized service for seniors and persons with disabilities (ADA-certified and noncertified) in the same report. Since Beaumont Dial -a -Ride is considered a specialized service for ADA-certified and seniors, the City would still need to complete the report entitled "Transit Operators Financial Transactions — Specialized Service." Conclusion This recommendation has not been implemented and is carried forward for full implementation. Prior Recommendation 3 Work with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Mt. San Jacinto College on fare revenue reimbursement from the College Go -Pass Revenue Agreement. Background: Beaumont Transit serves the San Gorgonio Pass Campus of Mt. San Jacinto College. Students are assessed a $6.00 transportation fee when they enroll at the college, which allows for unlimited transit rides on any RTA bus as part of the Go -Pass program. Students participating in the Go -Pass program may use the Beaumont Transit system at no additional charge with a "Pass Transit" sticker on the card. The prior audit noted that the City was not receiving any of the revenues generated from this program. Given the recent trend in the audited farebox recovery attainment, it was suggested that the City work with RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College on a reimbursement agreement whereby Beaumont Transit receives a share of the revenues generated from this program. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont In response to this recommendation, the City had taken steps to reach a fare revenue reimbursement agreement with Mt. San Jacinto College. In the meantime, Beaumont Transit has continued to honor RTA's Go -Pass without an agreement in place. Under the Go -Pass program, Mt. San Jacinto College students get unlimited rides on RTA buses. The City was anticipating that the Mt. San Jacinto College student body would vote on the separate fare revenue agreement in early 2018 raising the annual fee in order for the GO -Pass to be applicable to the Pass Transit systems; however, the vote never materialized. It is recommended that the City continue to work with the college on having such an agreement in place as a farebox enhancement measure. Michael Baker International - 15 121 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Conclusion This recommendation has been partially implemented and is carried forward for full implementation. Prior Recommendation 4 Track ridership trends for those using mobility devices. Background: The prior audit discussed how industry trends showed that passengers using mobility devices such as wheelchairs, mobility aids, and other devices were on the rise. With growth in wheelchair -bound riders and those using mobility devices on transit, active tracking of ridership trends for these types of passengers would help with dispatching and proper deployment of vehicles. On driver trip sheets for fixed route and Dial -A -Ride, it was suggested that transit staff add a column to include number of passengers using mobility devices. Daily trip sheets might also be able to identify wheelchair riders by vehicle by day so that trends can be developed on the impact of mobility devices on transit productivity. This information could be part of the statistics being developed by the City's transit management. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont In response to this recommendation, all Beaumont Transit trip sheets now include a column for drivers to capture passengers utilizing mobility devices. City transit staff continues to track overall ridership trends as part of the normal passenger data tracking process. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International - 16 122 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Beaumont Transit's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. The TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators that gauge service effectiveness and revenue, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the performance indicators for Beaumont Transit system -wide, fixed route, and Dial -A -Ride. Charts are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that the system -wide operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited data. Total operating costs and fare revenues are shown in the tables and include the exempted services to illustrate overall expenses and revenue for the transit system. The exempted services are then excluded from expenses and revenue to generate the farebox recovery ratios as allowed by TDA and shown in the audit figures. Michael Baker International - 17 123 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 Beaumont Transit TDA Performance Indicators System -wide Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost* $1,863,516 $2,109,575 $1,599,462 $2,221,266 19.2% Total Passengers 222,752 213,736 196,362 197,775 -11.2% Vehicle Service Hours 21,930 23,460 25,602 24,791 13.0% Vehicle Service Miles 385,704 391,638 429,336 413,009 7.1% Employee FTEs 19 24 24 24 26.3% Passenger Fares** $236,771 $226,051 $166,782 $201,811 -14.8% Operating Cost per Passenger $8.37 $9.87 $8.15 $11.23 34.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $84.98 $89.92 $62.47 $89.60 5.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.83 $5.39 $3.73 $5.38 11.3% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 10.2 9.1 7.7 8.0 -21.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.58 0.55 0.46 0.48 -17.1% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,154.2 977.5 1,066.8 1,033.0 -10.5% Average Fare per Passenger $1.06 $1.06 $0.85 $1.02 -4.0% Farebox Recovery Ratio 12.71% 10.72% 10.43% 9.09% -28.5% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: City of Beaumont Transit System Financial Statements (Audited); RCTC TransTrack Manager; Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports *Audited operating costs exclude depreciation and extension of services permissible by TDA. **Audited system -wide passenger fare data exclude revenues related to new routes or extension of services Michael Baker International - 18 124 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-2 Beaumont Transit TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost $1,500,529 $1,805,146 $2,182,939 $2,270,933 51.3% Total Passengers 204,112 202,826 185,493 187,489 -8.1% Vehicle Service Hours 18,665 19,912 22,164 21,605 15.8% Vehicle Service Miles 336,591 346,064 385,354 380,714 13.1% Employee FTEs 17 22 22 22 29.4% Passenger Fares $206,678 $202,047 $216,632 $236,651 14.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $7.35 $8.90 $11.77 $12.11 64.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $80.39 $90.66 $98.49 $105.11 30.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.46 $5.22 $5.66 $5.96 33.8% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 10.9 10.2 8.4 8.7 -20.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.61 0.59 0.48 0.49 -19.7% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,097.9 905.1 1,007.5 982.0 -10.6% Average Fare per Passenger $1.01 $1.00 $1.17 $1.26 24.7% Farebox Recovery Ratio 13.77% 11.19% 9.92% 10.42% -24.3% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: City of Beaumont Transit System Financial Statements (Audited); RCTC TransTrack Manager; Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports Michael Baker International - 19 125 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-3 Beaumont Transit TDA Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost $335,986 $304,429 $367,000 $400,000 19.1% Total Passengers 18,640 10,910 10,869 10,286 -44.8% Vehicle Service Hours 3,265 3,548 3,438 3,186 -2.4% Vehicle Service Miles 49,113 45,574 43,982 32,295 -34.2% Employee FTEs 2 2 2 2 0.0% Passenger Fares $30,093 $24,004 $25,000 $30,443 1.2% Operating Cost per Passenger $18.03 $27.90 $33.77 $38.89 115.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $102.91 $85.80 $106.75 $125.55 22.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $6.84 $6.68 $8.34 $12.39 81.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 5.7 3.1 3.2 3.2 -43.4% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.38 0.24 0.25 0.32 -16.1% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,632.5 1,774.0 1,719.0 1,593.0 -2.4% Average Fare per Passenger $1.61 $2.20 $2.30 $2.96 83.3% Farebox Recovery Ratio 8.96% 7.88% 6.81% 7.61% -15.0% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.9% 2.8% 3.5% 8.4% Source: City of Beaumont Transit System Financial Statements (Audited); RCTC TransTrack Manager; Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports Michael Baker International - 20 126 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $- 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 1 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs (without exemptions) System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride • I I . FY 2015 FY 2016 i . 1 FY2017 FY2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -A -Ride Graph IV-2 Ridership System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 1.. 11.. II_ FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -A -Ride Michael Baker International - 21 127 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 $45.00 $40.00 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $- $140.00 $120.00 $100.00 $80,00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $- Graph IV-3 Operating Cost per Passenger System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Fixed Route • Dial -A -Ride Graph IV-4 Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride I I 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Fixed Route • Dial -A -Ride Michael Baker International - 22 128 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 12.0 10.0 8.0 6.0 4.0 2.0 0.0 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Graph IV-5 Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ ❑ial-A-Ride Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio (with fixed route exemptions) System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 ■ Systemwide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -A -Ride FY 2018 Michael Baker International - 23 129 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 5.4 percent system -wide from $84.98 in the FY 2015 base year to $89.60 in FY 2018. System -wide operating costs (based on audited data) increased 19.2 percent during the period, while vehicle service hours increased by a lower rate of 13 percent. The average annual increase in operating costs was 9.3 percent. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 34.3 percent system -wide from $8.37 in FY 2015 to $11.23 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased 11.2 percent during the review period from 222,752 passengers in FY 2015 to 197,775 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased by 19.2 percent over the same period. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 21.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 10.2 to 8 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations were consistent with this trend, with a decrease of 20.6 percent over the same period from 10.9 to 8.7 passengers per hour. In contrast, Dial - A -Ride operations exhibited a higher decrease of 43.4 percent from 5.7 to 3.2 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator demonstrates growth in vehicle service hours as compared to the decline in passenger trips. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 17.1 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 0.58 to 0.48 passengers per mile. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased by 19.7 percent from 0.61 to 0.49. Passengers per service mile on Dial -A -Ride decreased by a comparable 16.1 percent during the same period, from 0.38 in FY 2015 to 0.32 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, actual vehicle service miles increased 7.1 percent system -wide. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee decreased 10.5 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018. This increase was associated with a net increase in vehicle service hours from fixed -route services, and an increase of fixed -route full-time equivalents (FTE) in FY 2016. This measure is based on the number of employee FTEs using employee pay hours from the State Controller Report and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. 6. Farebox recovery exhibited an overall decrease of 28.5 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and 2018 from 12.71 percent to 9.09 percent, excluding new routes and service extensions. System -wide, passenger fare revenues decreased 14.8 percent based on audited data while operating costs increased 19.2 percent. At a modal level, fixed -route farebox recovery decreased 24.3 percent whereas Dial -A -Ride farebox recovery decreased 15 percent. City of Beaumont revenue contributions to the operations of the transit system were eliminated starting in FY 2014, according to the annual fiscal audit, further reducing the transit system's ability to maintain farebox recovery. Michael Baker International - 24 130 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators Despite the introduction of new and expanded services along with the associated increases in vehicle service hours and miles, ridership has decreased across both service modes. After an increase in demand over the prior audit period, passenger trips exhibited an annual decline of 3.8 percent from the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018. The decline on fixed route averaged 2.7 percent annually. On the other hand, average annual decreases in Dial -A -Ride ridership averaged 15.7 percent. Fixed -route operating costs grew 51.3 percent during the reporting period while Dial -a -Ride operating costs grew 19.1 percent. The modal increases in cost do not include exclusions for new routes or expanded services. Vehicle service hours increased overall by 13 percent and vehicle service miles increased 7.1 percent. Farebox recovery should be monitored closely as the audited ratios with exclusions have hovered or dipped below the minimum standard of 10 percent system -wide. The City is moving forward with a COA to create a "blueprint" for the future development of the community's public transit service. Michael Baker International - 25 131 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions in the Beaumont Transit System. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the City of Beaumont: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are subfunctions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations Beaumont Transit has continued to expand and harmonize its transit system to meet the growing area population and service demand from commuters and students. The system operates six local fixed routes, two commuter routes, and a demand -response paratransit service. Routes operate on hourly headway, but as more residents and economic development move into the area, the City sees the potential for implementation for 30-minute headways in the future. Route 2 is the system's primary trunk route running between Beaumont, Banning, and Cabazon. The route operates on hourly headways and serves many traffic generators in the Pass area including grocery stores, the DMV, and the Banning Justice Center. Two buses operate on this route during the week and one bus on the weekend. Route 3 has grown to be one of the busiest routes in the system due to the new subdivisions and requests for service in Cherry Valley. Tripper service was added to Route 3 to service Beaumont High School and Cherry Valley. Route 4 was realigned to run in an east —west orientation, while Route 9 was implemented in response to the high student ridership in southern Beaumont. Routes 7 and 9 operate the morning and afternoon peak hours when school is in session. Route 3/4 combines Routes 3 and 4 and operates hourly headway service on Saturday and limited service on holidays. More than 50 percent of the local fixed -route ridership is composed of students. Beaumont Transit also interlines with RTA, Banning Transit, and SunLine routes at Walmart, which serves as the main transit hub for the system. Michael Baker International - 26 132 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 At the request of the City of Calimesa and RTA, Beaumont implemented Route 136 to Calimesa in FY 2017. The route was designed with one -hour headways and an alternative route during peak morning afternoon hours to serve local students. The route only comprised 1 percent of system -wide trips and was eventually discontinued. A second commuter route, Commuter Link 125, was implemented in September 2018 to provide service to the Loma Linda Veterans Administration Hospital and Kaiser in Redlands. Commuter Link Route 120, which was implemented in 2013, was realigned to provide more direct service to the San Bernardino Transit Center. This has allowed for better coordination and interline connections with Omnitrans pursuant to an interagency agreement. Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are equipped with speed governors to ensure that the maximum speed does not exceed 66 miles per hour. Destination signage on the vehicles was updated. Passenger amenities include the installation of 22 bus shelters in Beaumont. Half of the shelters installed are along Route 2. The other half were installed along high -capacity corridors adjacent to high -density residential areas and schools. The City has applied for Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) funding to make improvements at three busy bus stop locations. Vehicles operated on the commuter routes are equipped with USB ports and luggage racks. Transit operations are administered by the Community Services Department from Building D at the Beaumont Civic Center Complex from the Fleet Maintenance facility at 550 North California Avenue. A surveillance camera system was installed with 24-hour monitoring of the bus yard by the Police Department. The City's Transit Division is looking to consolidate its administration, operations, and fleet maintenance functions to a parcel that the City has acquired in an industrial area of town at the intersection of West 4' Street and Veile Avenue. The facility would also feature a CNG fueling station open to the general public with plans to include an electric vehicle charging station in order to meet the state's zero -emission vehicle mandates. The Pass Transit Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont has allowed for each respective agency to cross jurisdictional boundary lines, allowing simplified travel for passengers throughout the Pass area. In recent years, Banning has expressed concerns about the adverse impacts that Beaumont's Route 2 has had on its system's ridership along the Ramsey Street corridor. Coordination of fares was also an issue. The MOU between the two cities was terminated in June 2019, which involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. Route 2 restructuring will create opportunities to shift assets to Commuter Link Routes 120 and 125. Operating costs savings from Route 2 will be used toward an additional bus on Commuter Link Route 120. Michael Baker International - 27 133 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 A new interagency services agreement was adopted between the Cities of Beaumont and Banning in July 2019. The new agreement allows for interline transfers between the two systems at the Walmart in Beaumont and the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital in Banning. Beaumont will limit Banning to no more than three buses per hour at Walmart and Banning will limit Beaumont to no more than three buses per hour at the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital bus stop. Beaumont Transit has seen an increased number of disabled and wheelchair -bound passengers. Newer vehicles that have been ordered will be able to accommodate three wheelchairs. In response to a prior audit recommendation, the City reformatted its trip sheets to account for the number of wheelchair -bound and disabled passengers, given the higher demand. All buses are equipped with five surveillance cameras and Motorola radio systems. The radio system underwent an upgrade as part of an overall upgrade to the City's communication system spearheaded by the City Police Department. The upgrade to a five -channel trunked 800- megahertz system has allowed the Beaumont Police and other City departments to be on the same frequency with other county, state, and federal public safety agencies in the event of a major emergency. In addition, the new radio system has allowed for better reception in more remote areas of the service area. Dial -A -Ride serves Beaumont and the unincorporated community of Cherry Valley with service provided on Sunday for ADA-certified passengers. Three peak vehicles are used for Dial -A -Ride. ADA-certified passengers have priority over other eligible riders on Dial -A -Ride, including seniors. The City uses a self -certification process with professional verification and accepts ADA certification by the RTA. This allows Beaumont to work under the umbrella of RTA's ADA policy as a provider of ADA paratransit. There have been no ADA denials reported. Also, according to the City's website, the City charges a cancellation fee if inadequate notice to cancel is given by the passenger. Beaumont utilizes DoubleMap commuter -aided dispatching with an automatic vehicle locator feature for its fixed and Commuter Link routes. DoubleMap provides real-time bus data which are utilized to track on -time performance. On -time performance has averaged 92 percent for fixed -route and commuter services. ScheduleVlEW software is utilized in the scheduling of Dial -A -Ride trips, generating manifests and tracking no-shows. Driver trip sheets for both service modes include sections for recording the passenger count and fare categories, fuel mileage, revenue hours and miles, and yard hours and miles. The yard hours and miles include deadhead hours and mileage. Drivers also use Samsung -branded tablets to assist with routing and communications with dispatch. Vehicles are equipped with Diamond vaulted fareboxes. At the end of each shift, drivers pull out the vaults but do not handle the revenues. The vaults are placed in a locked cabinet in the office of the transit operations manager overnight. Fare revenues are counted the following day by two Transit Division employees and reconciled with the trip sheets. The transit operations manager prepares the deposit slips and the revenues are picked up by Dunbar Armored service and Michael Baker International - 28 134 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 transported to the bank for deposit. The Finance Department receives a copy of the deposit record and matches it up with the deposit slip for comparison. Beaumont Transit implemented the Token Transit mobile ticketing platform for online pass and ticket purchases at the beginning of FY 2019. Token Transit receives a 10 percent commission on fares in excess of $2.00 per trip. For all other transactions under $2.00, the fee is $0.06 plus 7 percent of the purchase. In addition, Beaumont phased out punch card passes, which were used by students. The overall fare structure remained unchanged during the audit period. The last fare increase was implemented in 2011. In July 2018, the student fares were raised from $1.00 to $1.15 per trip and tickets were raised from $10.85 to $11.50. Monthly passes for all riders were raised to $36.00. Subsequent fare increases are under consideration. Personnel Beaumont Transit personnel are City employees. Drivers and nonexempt employees are represented by Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 721. The current MOU between the City and union is for a two-year term, which included a health and retirement benefit increase and a higher wage scale in anticipation of the increase in the minimum wage. Based on the recent organization chart, the Transit Division is composed of a transit director, management analyst, customer service coordinator, operations supervisor, vehicle maintenance supervisor, 17 full-time equivalent drivers, and 5 full-time equivalent mechanics. The City hired two drivers in November 2015. The management analyst/planner position was hired in November 2016. The customer service coordinator also fills the role of dispatcher. Staff turnover and attrition has been minimal. Prospective drivers are recruited through job postings at City Hall and on the City's website as well as through newspaper classified advertising. Candidates are required to submit an H-6 printout from the Department of Motor Vehicles as well as undergo an interview, background checks, Department of Transportation medical clearance, and fingerprinting. Drivers are required to have a Class B license with a passenger endorsement. School bus operator experience is considered a plus. Training consists of 40 hours behind -the -wheel instruction. There are two driver trainers on staff. Drivers also undergo sensitivity training that includes wheelchair securement, as well as sessions from the CHP and quarterly police training. Maintenance Vehicle maintenance for Beaumont Transit is conducted by the City. Preventive maintenance inspections (PMIs) are performed on a 3,000-mile or 45-day inspection schedule in accordance with the state's General Public Paratransit Vehicle regulations. Additional preventive maintenance is conducted on a 5,000-mile or 90-day interval while newer vehicles are inspected Michael Baker International - 29 135 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 at 6,000 miles. Diesel vehicles are certified annually in October. Fire suppression systems are inspected every six months and CNG tanks are inspected every 36,000 miles. Bus vehicle maintenance occurs at the City Fleet Maintenance facility located at 550 North California Avenue. The garage has three service bays; however, the service bays cannot accommodate the vehicles due to their size. Therefore, a portable lift is used to service the vehicles outside. Maintenance employees are composed of a vehicle maintenance supervisor and five mechanics. The City has been seeking Automotive Service Excellence certification for its mechanics. A—Z Bus Sales offers wheelchair lift maintenance training. During the audit period, the City procured the Dossier fleet maintenance software program, which operates on a web -based platform. In addition, the City acquired Zonar for pre- and post - trip inspections. The City previously used Fleetmate fleet management software to track PMIs and work orders. Under the old program, mechanics would manually complete the repair and work orders before entering the data into the system. An Excel spreadsheet was used to track service mileage for each vehicle. Vehicle parts are procured from a local vendor, O'Reilly Auto Parts, located at 695 East 6th Street in Beaumont. Flyers Energy is the primary fuel vendor. The CNG vehicles are fueled at stations at the Beaumont Unified School District's transportation yard, located at 1001 Cougar Way. During the audit period, Beaumont Transit vehicles were not able to fuel at the school district's facility for up to a year. The City had to arrange for fueling at facilities in Hemet, Redlands, and Moreno Valley. Under construction is a dedicated $1.5 million CNG fueling facility located on a parcel at the intersection of West 4th Street and Veile Avenue. The CHP is responsible for certifying Beaumont's maintenance facilities and inspecting vehicles on an annual basis. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. Road call data were not provided by the operator. The recent implementation of the Dossier fleet maintenance software and Zonar should allow for road call data to be downloaded or migrated into TransTrack. It is recommended that the Transit Division start reporting road call data in TransTrack. Planning The City of Beaumont prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and includes a system overview; services and performance analysis for each route and service provided; service changes; and financial and capital plans. Under the Existing Service and Route Performance chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvements is presented for each route or program. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, Beaumont must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance indicators. There is one mandatory indicator which is the farebox recovery ratio set at 10 percent. Using the SRTP covering FY 2017-18 through FY 2019-20, Table Michael Baker International - 30 136 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 V-1 summarizes the FY 2017-18 performance targets. Beaumont met three out of the seven performance indicator targets. Table V-1 Beaumont Transit Performance Targets Performance Indicators FY 2017-18 Target Actual Performance Met Target Farebox Recovery >=10.00% 10.00%* Yes Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$82.60 $105.87 No Subsidy Per Passenger >=$7.37 & <=$9.97 $10.24 No Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$1.55 & <=$2.09 $1.44 Yes - Better Subsidy Per Hour >=$57.85 & <=$78.27 $95.28 No Subsidy Per Mile >=$3.43 & <=$4.63 $5.64 No Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=6.63 & <=8.97 9.30 Yes - Better Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.39 & <=0.53 0.55 Yes - Better Source: City of Beaumont, TransTrack Manager *Farebox recovery ratio is derived from unaudited cost and revenue data. In addition to the annual SRTP process, Beaumont is intending to conduct a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA). The last COA was conducted in May 2014 and resulted in route changes for the entire system including the addition of a second bus on Route 2 and expansion of the route to Cabazon via Banning. The purpose of this latest COA will be to analyze demographic changes and needs as well as improving connectivity to the commuter routes. The City is moving forward with a COA to create a "blueprint" for the future development of the community's public transit service. Marketing Beaumont uses several media approaches in marketing its transit services. The transit system operates in coordination with Banning Transit under a cooperative branding and marketing agreement. This agreement has allowed for a common service brand, coordinating schedules and connections to regional commuter services. In a recent development, in June 2019, the two cities terminated the MOU that created the Pass Transit branding. Under the current interagency service agreement, each agency has agreed to cooperate in providing the public with specific transit information by advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general usage of public transit. In the spirit of this agreement, it is suggested that Beaumont include a link on its transit page to Banning Transit. Printed schedules and other marketing materials are produced in-house. Nevertheless, the City has relied primarily on electronic media to promote transit. The City of Beaumont website (https://www.beaumontca.gov/90/Transit) contains a page devoted to the transit program, which was updated during the audit period. The transit page provides general information, fares, and modal links to the fixed -route, commuter, and Dial -A -Ride services as well as links to other regional transit services and trip planning tools. The trip planner interactive tool is powered by Michael Baker International - 31 137 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Google Transit. With the phase out of the Pass Transit brand, the City has requested capital funding for a rebrand and logo update. The City offers a text messaging service, which allows for mobile phone users to text "BMTtransit" to 90210 to receive text updates regarding Beaumont Transit. There are quick response (QR) codes on route maps and at bus stops for smartphone users to download transit information. Bus shelters have been equipped with kiosks containing schedule information. In the area of social media, the City posts content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. In addition, transit buses are equipped with GPS locators that can be accessed through a mobile app called DoubleMap which includes website access (http://beaumont.doublemap.com/map/) so that users can access real-time information and GPS coordinates of all routes currently in service. Beaumont Transit staff engages the community through events and presentations. A free shuttle service is offered during the annual Cherry Festival held in Beaumont. During school orientations, staff meets with students and their parents to educate them on their transit options in the service area. In conjunction with the Commuter Link Routes 120 and 125, staff participates in regional veteran committees to promote veteran transportation services from the Pass Area to Loma Linda VA Hospital. Travel training presentations have been conducted at local homeowners' associations. Beaumont Transit participates in the Go -Pass program in conjunction with Mt. San Jacinto College. Student pass holders ride the system for free by presenting their student identification card with the Go -Pass sticker. The agreement for the Go -Pass program is between RTA and the college; however, there are no provisions in the agreement for Beaumont to receive any of the revenues despite participating in the program and offering free rides to the students. General Administration and Management The City of Beaumont was incorporated November 18, 1912, as a general law city and currently operates under a council/manager form of government. The five -member City Council serves as the City's principal legislative body and each councilmember is elected for a four-year term. The mayor and the mayor pro tem are elected from the City Council and serve one-year terms but no more than two consecutive terms. The City Council meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month at 6:00 p.m. at the Beaumont Civic Center. The council is reported to be supportive of the transit service. The chief administrative officer for the City is the City manager, who is appointed by the City Council. The City manager oversees and coordinates City departments and services including transit operations. Transit is a division of the Community Services Department and overseen by a transit operations director who is assisted by two administrative employees: a transit operations manager and a management analyst. Michael Baker International - 32 138 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Another change impacting transit administration concerns the termination of the Pass Transit MOU and the adoption of an interagency service agreement between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont. In June 2019, administrative staff from the two cities met to discuss the terms and conditions of the agreement. The interagency service agreement became effective on July 1, 2019 and allows for continued cooperation between the two transit systems under their respective branding. Neither system would board passengers at any other bus stop within the other party's jurisdiction. The primary source of transit funding support is derived from the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) for operations. The City submits the annual TDA claim for funds to RCTC. TDA claims are based on the City's annual budget projections and the financial element of the SRTP. Based on the audited financial statements, the City's LTF allocation was $2,063,600 in FY 2016; $2,203,702 in FY 2017; and $2,426,067 in FY 2018. State Transportation Assistance (STA) funds received by the City were $227,694 in FY 2017 and $96,671 in FY 2018. STA is used toward operations. The City's annual TDA claim and transit budget are based on the prior year's budget and the finance director's analysis of the SRTP projections. Costs for service expansion are estimated and include projected employee compensation and benefit increases. The finance director is tasked with completion and submittal of the City's TDA claim and external reports such as the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller. The City's recent administrative reorganization has resulted in more financial controls and protocols. Grants Management Grant funding allocated toward the transit system has been derived from state sources composed of Proposition 1B, SB 1 State of Good Repair (SGR) and Low Carbon Transit Operation Program (LCTOP) funds. Under the Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) program, Beaumont received funding for vehicle purchases, bus shelter, and CNG facility upgrades. At the end of June 30, 2018, the City had an unexpended balance of $24,358 in PTMISEA funds. The City applied for SB 1 SGR program funds toward the construction of the new consolidated administrative, fleet maintenance, and operations facility. In addition, the City received LCTOP funding toward the rehabilitation of three bus stops and shelter adjacent to the Walmart transfer station as well as toward free fare days. The finance director tracks the financial element of the SRTP and provides quarterly reporting to RCTC through the capital tracking report. A management analyst in Administrative Services updates the grant spreadsheet and the resources director is responsible for capital project management and procurement with approval of the finance director. The management analyst initiates grant application process and prepares the reporting. Beaumont does not utilize federal transit funding for operating expenses, thus avoiding federal transit grant and Title VI reporting requirements. Michael Baker International - 33 139 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to Beaumont, the operator fully complied with five of the eight applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittals of its annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports to the State Controller and the annual fiscal and compliance audits as well as farebox recovery attainment in FY 2018. Three additional compliance requirements did not apply to Beaumont (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio, exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio, and the utilization of federal funds). 2. Beaumont met its system -wide farebox recovery standard of 10 percent during two of the three years of the audit period, although service expansion during the audit period allows for two full fiscal years of exemption. The farebox recovery ratios were 10.7 percent in FY 2016, 10.4 percent in FY 2017, and 9.1 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox recovery ratio for the period was 10.06 percent. 3. The City of Beaumont participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited notable increases during the audit period. Beaumont exhibited 20.2 percent increase in its transit budget for FY 2016 and a 14.9 percent increase in FY 2017. The increases are attributed to higher salary and benefit costs as well as continued service expansion and route restructuring. The budget increased by a modest 4.7 percent in FY 2018. 5. Beaumont satisfactorily implemented two of the four prior audit recommendations. The two recommendations pertained to the timely submittal of the annual State Controller Reports and the tracking of mobility devices on driver trip sheets. One recommendation pertaining to receiving reimbursement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College for Go -Pass riders was partially implemented and the recommendation pertaining to the completion and submittal of separate State Controller Reports for both general and specialized service was not implemented. Both recommendations are being carried forward for full implementation. 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 5.4 percent system -wide from $84.98 in the FY 2015 base year to $89.60 in FY 2018. System -wide Michael Baker International - 34 140 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit - FYs 2016-2018 operating costs (based on audited data) increased 19.2 percent during the period, while vehicle service hours increased by a lower rate of 13 percent. The average annual increase in operating costs was 9.3 percent. Cost increases were from personnel wage increases for minimum wage and benefits contributions well as continued service expansion and route restructuring. The City is moving forward with a COA to create a "blueprint" for the future development of the community's public transit service. 6. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 34.3 percent system -wide from $8.37 in FY 2015 to $11.23 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased 11.2 percent during the review period from 222,752 passengers in FY 2015 to 197,775 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased by 19.2 percent over the same period. 7. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 21.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 10.2 to 8 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations were consistent with this trend, with a decrease of 20.6 percent over the same period from 10.9 to 8.7 passengers per hour. In contrast, Dial - A -Ride operations exhibited a higher decrease of 43.4 percent from 5.7 to 3.2 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator demonstrates growth in vehicle service hours as compared to the decline in passenger trips. 8. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 17.1 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 0.58 to 0.48 passengers per mile. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased by 19.7 percent from 0.61 to 0.49. Passengers per service mile on Dial -A -Ride decreased by a comparable 16.1 percent during the same period, from 0.38 in FY 2015 to 0.32 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, actual vehicle service miles increased 7.1 percent system -wide. 9. At the request of the City of Calimesa and RTA, Beaumont implemented Route 136 to Calimesa in FY 2017. The route was designed with one -hour headways and an alternative route during peak morning afternoon hours to serve local students. The route only comprised 1 percent of system -wide trips and was eventually discontinued. 10. A second commuter route, Commuter Link 125, was implemented in September 2018 to provide service to the Loma Linda Veterans Administration Hospital and Kaiser in Redlands. Commuter Link Route 120, which was implemented in 2013, was realigned to provide more direct service to the San Bernardino Transit Center. 11. The MOU between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont was terminated in June 2019, which involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. A new interagency services agreement was adopted between the two cities in July 2019. Michael Baker International - 35 141 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 12. The City's Transit Division is looking to consolidate its administration, operations, and fleet maintenance functions to a parcel that the City has acquired in an industrial area of town at the intersection of West 4th Street and Veile Avenue. The facility would also feature a CNG fueling station open to the general public with plans to include an electric vehicle charging station in order to meet the state's zero -emission vehicle mandates. 13. Beaumont Transit personnel are City employees. Drivers and nonexempt employees are represented by Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 721. The current MOU between the City and union is for a two-year term, which included a health and retirement benefit increase and a higher wage scale in anticipation of the increase in the minimum wage. 14. During the audit period, the City procured the Dossier fleet maintenance software program, which operates on a web -based platform. In addition, the City acquired Zonar for pre- and post -trip inspections. Michael Baker International - 36 142 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service. This recommendation is carried over from the prior performance audit. Beaumont's annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller has historically combined information for both general public (fixed route/commuter) and specialized service for seniors and persons with disabilities (ADA-certified and noncertified). Although the State Controller's Office has not provided notice to the City, written instructions by the state to prepare this particular report require separate reporting of these modes. In the General Instruction Form completed by the City, a selection must be made as to which mode of transit is represented in the report. The options are general public use or elderly/disabled. The Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report Instructions contain the following passages under the General Instruction Form: Transit operators providing two types of service, (general public use and transit service exclusively for the elderly/handicapped) must complete a separate report for each type of service. ... a separate report must be filed for each type of service provided: General Public Use Service or Specialized Service exclusive for elderly and/or handicapped. For example, if an agency has received Article 4 and Article 8(c) monies to provide General Public Use Service, the agency should submit one report. If that agency has also received Article 4 monies to provide Specialized Service for the elderly and/or handicapped, then a report must be submitted for the Specialized Service operations. The submission of separate reports to the State Controller will further demonstrate Beaumont's proactive approach to compliance with state reporting instructions. 2. Continue to work with RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College on fare revenue reimbursement from the College GO -PASS Revenue Agreement. This recommendation is being carried forward from the prior performance audit. The City had taken steps to reach a fare revenue reimbursement agreement with Mt. San Jacinto College. In the meantime, Beaumont Transit has continued to honor RTA's Go -Pass without an agreement in place. Under the Go -Pass program, Mt. San Jacinto College students get unlimited rides on RTA buses. The City was anticipating that the Mt. San Jacinto College student body would vote on the separate fare revenue agreement in early 2018; however, the vote never materialized. It is recommended that the City continue to work with the college and RTA on having such an agreement in place as a farebox enhancement measure. Michael Baker International - 37 143 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Beaumont Transit — FYs 2016-2018 3. Include a link to Banning Transit on the Beaumont Transit web page. The City's website and transit page were updated during the audit period. While there are links to the OmniTrans, RTA, and SunLine Transit Agency websites, there are no links to the Banning Transit website. The MOU or cooperative services agreement between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont that has been in effect since December 2002 was terminated after the audit period and involved phasing out the Pass Transit brand and the removal of Beaumont Transit Route 2 from operating within the City of Banning. In its place, an interagency service agreement between the two cities was adopted in July 2019 and provides continued cooperation of both cities in "providing the public with specific transit information, advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general use of transit." Pursuant to the interagency service agreement with the City of Banning, it is recommended that Beaumont include a link to Banning Transit on its transit page. 4. Report mechanical road calls and other vehicle operation metrics in TransTrack Manager. The Transit Division indicated that system road calls were not being regularly tracked. A mechanical failure of a bus in revenue service that causes a delay to service, and which necessitates removing the bus from service until repairs are made, can impact overall system performance. Transit performance data are routinely entered into TransTrack for trends analysis across the different service modes. TransTrack features modules that track customer service complaints, Dial -a -Ride no-shows, accidents, and mechanical road calls. The recent implementation of the Dossier fleet maintenance software and Zonar should allow for road call data to be downloaded or migrated into TransTrack. It is recommended that the Transit Division start reporting road call data in TransTrack. Michael Baker International - 38 144 ATTACHMENT 4 ROTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service City of Corona riir c.Fri r [ STr CRONA CRUISER March 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 145 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I Error! Bookmark not defined. Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section II 5 Operator Compliance Requirements 5 Section III 11 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 11 Section IV 14 TDA Performance Indicators 14 Section V 24 Review of Operator Functions 24 Operations 24 Maintenance 27 Planning 28 Marketing 29 General Administration and Management 30 Section VI 32 Findings 33 Recommendations 36 146 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for the City of Corona Transit Service (City, Corona) covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017-18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code. This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the code's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with city transit management and the contract operator's project manager, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) was used to guide in the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Corona had provided general public Dial -A -Ride service since April 1977. In February 2001, the city began operating a fixed -route service under the brand "Corona Cruiser" in response to its rapid growth in population and to provide better connectivity to other transit services. The City of Corona has had a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) since January 1994 to provide complementary Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) paratransit service to RTA buses that travel through the city. The City also has formal fare transfer agreements with RTA and the Southern California Regional Rail Authority, which operates the Metrolink rail service. In January 2018, the City transitioned the Dial -A -Ride from general public to specialized service. Dial -A -Ride is a shared transportation service that provides curb -to -curb service to eligible riders. The service is available to individuals certified under the ADA, seniors (60+), and persons with disabilities. Michael Baker International - 1 147 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Based on the 2010 US Census, Corona's population is 152,374, an increase of 21.9 percent since the 2000 US Census. The senior citizen population, comprising residents aged 65 and over, is 7.34 percent. The 2019 population for Corona is estimated to be 168,101 as reported by the California Department of Finance. The city covers approximately 39.2 square miles. System Characteristics Corona operates both fixed route for the general public and demand -responsive transit services for ADA-certified residents. The fixed -route service consists of two lines and is branded under the name Corona Cruiser. The system operates Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:09 p.m. and Saturday from 8:52 a.m. to 5:09 p.m. The transit system does not operate on Sunday as well as on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. The Corona Cruiser fixed -route services during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-1. Table 1-1 Corona Transit Fixed -Route Services Route Frequency/Operation Key Time Points Blue Line Approximately every 60 • Walmart @ McKinley minutes (Monday through • Magnolia @ McKinley Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:09 • Magnolia @ Rimpau p.m.; Saturday from 8:52 • Magnolia @ Fullerton a.m. to 3:50 p.m.) • Mountain Gate Park • Corona Library • Corona Transit Center • Fender Museum • River Run Apartments • Metrolink Station Red Line Approximately every 60 • Target @ Cajalco minutes (Monday through • Walmart @ California Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 7:05 • Centennial High School p.m.; Saturday from 9:00 • Rimpau @ Magnolia a.m. to 5:09 p.m.) • E. Grand @ E. Sixth Street • Corona Transit Center • Tenth @ Lincoln • W. Sixth Street@ Smith Ave • Metrolink Station Source: City of Corona Transit Services Dial -A -Ride The Corona Dial -A -Ride is a specialized demand -response service designed to provide curb -to - curb transportation for eligible, ADA-certified area residents only. The Dial -A -Ride service area encompasses the City of Corona, satellite locations in Norco, and the unincorporated Riverside County communities of Home Gardens, Coronita, and El Cerrito. Dial -A -Ride offers complementary and priority service to passengers certified under the ADA. ADA certification is provided through RTA. Reservations are accepted 1-14 days in advance. ADA expanded service Michael Baker International - 2 148 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 operates the same days and hours as the Corona Cruiser. Dial -A -Ride does not operate on Sunday as well as on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Fares City of Corona Transit Service fares are structured based on passenger, mode, and media type. Fixed -route fares were last increased in July 2010; the current Dial -A -Ride fares have been in effect since January 2018. To incentivize public transit usage and reduce emissions, Corona uses Assembly Bill 2766 funds to subsidize the cost of multiday passes on the Corona Cruiser. Tickets and passes are available online or in person at the City Corporation Yard, City Hall, and the Corona Library. The fare structures during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-2. Valid Metrolink pass -holders ride at no charge on Cruiser Blue and Red Lines to and from the Corona Transit Center/North Main Metrolink Station. Table 1-2 Corona Transit Fare Schedule Fare Category Fixed Route Dial -A -Ride Per Trip Day Pass 15-Day Pass 31-Day Pass Adult/General $1.50 $4.00 $17.50 $35.00 N/A Student (K-12 Grade) $1.50 $4.00 $12.25 $24.50 N/A Senior (60+)/Disabled $0.70 $2.00 $8.05 $16.10 $2.50 ADA-Certified $0.70 $2.00 $8.05 $16.10 $2.50 Medicare Card Holders $0.70 $2.00 $8.05 $16.10 $2.50 Children (46" tall or under) $0.25 N/A N/A N/A $0.50 Buddy Fare N/A N/A N/A N/A $1.25 Metrolink N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Source: City of Corona Transit Services The Buddy Fare on Dial -A -Ride allows for two or more seniors or persons with disabilities to ride for half fare ($1.25) when traveling between the same locations. Personal care attendants to an ADA-certified rider may ride at no cost. Fleet The City maintained 20 revenue vehicles in its active transit fleet during the audit period; 7 were utilized exclusively on the fixed -route service and the remaining 13 vehicles utilized on both service modes. All vehicles in the fleet are wheelchair accessible with tie -downs in compliance with the ADA. All vehicles are fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). Most recently, the City took delivery of 11 2017 Glaval/Universal vehicles and retired 11 older vehicles. Table 1-3 summarizes the Corona Transit fleet. Michael Baker International - 3 149 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 1-3 Corona Transit Fleet Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Seating Capacity 2012 El Dorado Aerotech 240 2 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2016 El Dorado/EZ Rider II BRT 7 CNG 29 (2 W/C) 2017 Glaval/Universal/E-450 11 CNG 14 (2 W/C) Total 20 Source: City of Corona Vehicle Fleet Inventory as of September 1, 2018 Michael Baker International - 4 150 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses Caltrans's Performance Audit Guidebook to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the Public Utilities Code and the California Code of Regulations. Each requirement is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, findings from the compliance review are described following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator submitted Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: annual reports to the RTPA 99243 based upon the Uniform FY 2016: November 14, 2016 System of Accounts and FY 2017: January 11, 2018* Records established by the FY 2018: January 29, 2019* State Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of fiscal year *Note: New state legislation was (Sept. 28/29), or 110 days (Oct. passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 19/20) if filed electronically 21, 2017, that changes the (Internet). timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. It is also noted that a single Transit Operators Financial Transaction Report has Michael Baker International - 5 151 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts historically been prepared by the City for both fixed route and general public Dial -A -Ride. Since Dial -A -Ride was designated as a specialized service for ADA- certified, senior, and disabled passengers effective January 2018, State Controller instructions require that separate reports be submitted for each service type. Conclusion: Complied. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90- day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: March 24, 2017 FY 2017: April 5, 2018 FY 2018: March 28, 2019 For the FY 2016 & FY 2018 submittals, a 90-day extension was granted by RCTC pursuant to the TDA statute. The FY 2017 fiscal audit was submitted after the 90-day extension period. Conclusion: Partial Compliance. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections were conducted at the City of Corona Corporation Michael Baker International - 6 152 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Yard at 735 West Public Safety Way. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were September 4, 2015; August 26, 2016; and October 27, 2017. All inspections conducted were rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Corona's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA) funds are submitted in compliance with the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as Corona Transit only serves an urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in the City of Corona's transit operating budget: FY 2016: +4.8% FY 2017: +5.7% FY 2018: +5.5% Source: City of Corona Transit Michael Baker International - 7 153 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Services Fund Budgets for FYs 2015-2018. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, I passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 The City of Corona's definition of performance is consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247. A review of internal performance data reports and trip sheets generated during the audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three- twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 Operating ratios for Corona Transit using audited data were as follows: FY 2016: 20.29% FY 2017: 20.24% FY 2018: 16.25% * *Effective FY 2018, Corona adopted a blended system -wide farebox recovery ratio of 15 percent, in consultation with RCTC. The fixed route would be subject to a 20 percent farebox recovery and Dial -a -Ride would be subject to a 10 percent farebox recovery. Source: City of Corona Transit Michael Baker International - 8 154 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Services Fund Financial Statements (Audited) Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 This requirement is not applicable, as Corona Transit only serves an urbanized area and has historically operated general public Dial -A -Ride. Since Dial -a -Ride was designated as a specialized service for ADA- certified, senior, and disabled passengers effective January 2018, Dial -a -Ride would be subject to a 10 percent farebox recovery ratio as part of an overall system -wide farebox recovery ratio of 15 percent. Conclusion: Not applicable. The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that the City of Corona's retirement system is funded. The City contracts with a private operator, while the City staff's retirement is funded through the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CaIPERS). Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of STA funds, the City of Corona is making full use of federal funds available under Michael Baker International - 9 155 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements funds available to it under the the Urban Mass Transportation Urban Mass Transportation Act Act of 1964 as amended. FTA of 1964 before TDA claims are funds are allocated to transit granted. agencies in the Riverside urbanized area including the City of Corona. FY 2016: $ -0- FY 2017: $ -0- FY 2018: $504,692 (Operators) $208,000 (Capital) Source: Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report Conclusion: Complied. Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to the City of Corona Transit Service, the operator fully complied with eight of the nine applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittal of the FY 2017 fiscal and compliance audit. Two additional compliance requirements are not applicable to Corona (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio and rural area farebox recovery ratio). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Corona Transit Services Fund Financial Statements, the City's system -wide farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 20 percent through FY 2017. Effective FY 2018, Corona adopted a blended system -wide farebox recovery ratio of 15 percent, in consultation with RCTC. System -wide farebox recovery was 20.29 percent in FY 2016, 20.24 percent in FY 2017, and 16.25 percent in FY 2018. Under the revised farebox recovery standard, the fixed route would be subject to a 20 percent farebox recovery and Dial -a -Ride would be subject to a 10 percent farebox recovery. 3. Through its contract operator, the City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The City of Corona Transit Fund operating budget exhibited increases during the audit period. The budget increased by 4.8 percent in FY 2016, by 5.7 percent in FY 2017, and by 5.5 percent in FY 2018. Michael Baker International - 10 156 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations The City of Corona's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the FY 2013-2015 triennial performance audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the City of Corona's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Revise the no-show policy in conformance with Federal Transit Administration (FTA) findings. Background: The prior audit found that the City reported that its rate of no-shows averaged around 8 percent on its Dial -A -Ride service, which is above general industry norms (generally below 5 percent). Since the City's Dial -A -Ride was open to general public ridership and not limited to senior and ADA-certified individuals, general public rides comprised close to 20 percent and seniors and disabled individuals comprised slightly over 80 percent. No-shows affect the timeliness and efficiency of service delivery in the areas of service hours and on -time performance. The City and the FTA agreed that any future no-show policy would not consider no-shows caused by reasons beyond the rider's control and would only suspend riders who truly had established a pattern or practice of no-shows. A pattern or practice involves intentional, repeated, or regular actions, not isolated, accidental, or singular incidents. Actions taken by the City of Corona In FY 2018, the City developed a revised no-show policy and procedure that was implemented in March 2019. The policy was vetted through the FTA's Civil Rights Office, and Access Services was consulted for guidance. The revised policy is printed on the Corona Dial -a -Ride brochure. It stipulates that any Dial -a -Ride customer who is a no-show or cancels their trip within two hours of their scheduled pickup will be marked as a no-show. Customers in violation of the policy may have their service temporarily suspended. The overall no-show rate for all customers will be considered so that customers with average no-show records are not penalized. Customers who have been suspended have the right to appeal. The contract operator sends a letter with the no- show policy attached. In January 2018, the City transitioned Dial -A -Ride from general public to a specialized service mode. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International - 11 157 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Prior Recommendation 2 Review alternative farebox standards under the TDA. Background: The farebox standard for Corona Transit has been a system -wide recovery ratio of 20 percent. This ratio is met by the combination of both fixed -route and Dial -A -Ride services. Other local contributions from the City have made up the difference between passenger fares and revenue needed to meet the required ratio. The local contributions have a cap on how much can be provided to transit. The TDA allows alternative farebox recovery ratios for urban systems. One alternative is a split farebox standard: one for fixed route, and another for Dial -A -Ride. The fixed -route standard would still be 20 percent; however, the Dial -A -Ride standard could be reduced to 10 percent. The caveat with the alternative lower Dial -A -Ride standard is that it applies only to service for seniors and disabled. This means the Dial -A -Ride would need to switch from general public to a specialized service. As noted above, seniors and disabled individuals comprised slightly over 80 percent of the Dial -A -Ride ridership. By complying with a lower farebox standard for Dial -A -Ride, the City might be able to reallocate its transit funds to support enhanced and more productive service and/or possibly reduce its reliance on the local contribution. It was recommended that the alternative farebox standard and the change from general public to specialized Dial -A -Ride be evaluated by the City to further strengthen its ability to maintain the farebox recovery. Any change to the farebox would need to be formally approved by RCTC as required by TDA. Actions taken by the City of Corona On August 17, 2017, the City Council approved a resolution to transition general public Dial -A - Ride to specialized Dial -A -Ride service in order to reduce the farebox recovery ratio to a blended rate of 15 percent, in consultation with RCTC. The specialized Dial -A -Ride service went into effect on January 2, 2018. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Review feasibility of implementing an ADA subscription service. Background: Passengers certified under the ADA have comprised about 25 percent of all Corona Dial -A -Ride passengers. Another 40 percent of riders are disabled but are not ADA-certified. A call must be made to schedule each ride on Corona Dial -A -Ride. Subscription service is a convenience offered to ADA paratransit passengers who take the same trip on a regular basis, as it reduces the need to make repeated calls for each ride. Many agencies have subscription service trips (i.e., having a standing reservation scheduled) that make up a portion of their trip Michael Baker International - 12 158 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 requests. Subscription service trips generally are trips that a patron makes multiple times per month, often multiple times per week, and have a specific origin and destination that do not change. Most often, these types of trips are for employment, medical, and/or educational purposes. These trips can be prescheduled, thus reducing the burden on the scheduler/dispatcher and call in -take system. Actions taken by the City of Corona The City is still in the process of implementing an ADA subscription service. As was previously mentioned, the City transitioned its Dial -a -Ride from general public to a specialized service for ADA-certified and senior passengers. Scheduled trips to the Inland Empire Adult Day Health Care Center have been ongoing. The City will continue working with the contract operator and review the feasibility of establishing a formal ADA subscription services policy. After review and consideration, City will proceed with adopting the policy. This would involve ADA trip monitoring to ensure that there aren't any capacity constraints. Conclusion This recommendation is in process of implementation and is being carried forward for full implementation. Michael Baker International - 13 159 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Corona Transit Service's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. The TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators that gauge service effectiveness and revenue, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the performance indicators for Corona Transit Service system- wide, fixed route, and Dial -A -Ride. Charts are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that the system -wide operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited figures, while fixed route and Dial -A -Ride costs and fare revenues are unaudited. The annual fiscal audits do not provide a modal breakdown. Michael Baker International - 14 160 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 Corona Transit TDA Performance Indicators System -wide Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 Audit Period % Change FY 2015- 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Operating Cost (1) $2,170,801 $2,242,025 $2,196,759 $2,918,211 34.4% Total Passengers 234,318 215,890 198,049 188,061 -19.7% Vehicle Service Hours 31,666 31,970 31,352 29,897 -5.6% Vehicle Service Miles 399,240 394,915 392,380 368,853 -7.6% Employee FTEs 34 34 34 31 -8.8% Passenger Fares $372,165 $338,282 $323,593 $292,647 -21.4% Local Support Revenues $64,201 $116,613 $120,955 $181,598 182.9% Total Fare Revenues $436,366 $454,895 $444,548 $474,245 8.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $9.26 $10.39 $11.09 $15.52 67.5% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $68.55 $70.13 $70.07 $97.61 42.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.44 $5.68 $5.60 $7.91 45.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 7.4 6.8 6.3 6.3 -15.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.59 0.55 0.50 0.51 -13.1% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 931.4 940.3 922.1 964.4 3.6% Average Fare per Passenger $1.59 $1.57 $1.63 $1.56 -2.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 17.14% 15.09% 14.73% 10.03% -41.5% Fare Recovery Ratio with Local Support (2) 20.10% 20.29% 20.24% 16.25% -19.2% Consumer Price Index - (CPI- Los Angeles CSMA) 1.00% 2.10% 3.10% 4.10% 9.60% Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits; NTD; State Controller Reports (1) TDA operating costs are audited data minus depreciation. (2) Fare recovery ratio is the sum of fares plus local funds, interest, and other revenue divided by operating cost. Michael Baker International - 15 161 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-2 Corona Transit TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 Audit Period % Change FY 2015-2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Operating Cost (1) $992,815 $1,000,227 $1,016,026 $1,111,926 12.0% Total Passengers 168,303 152,728 132,469 129,972 -22.8% Vehicle Service Hours 14,671 14,660 14,620 14,559 -0.8% Vehicle Service Miles 172,909 171,376 172,070 173,434 0.3% Employee FTEs 12 12 12 13 8.3% Passenger Fares $171,810 $150,452 $133,079 $132,810 -22.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $5.90 $6.55 $7.67 $8.56 45.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $67.67 $68.23 $69.50 $76.37 12.9% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.74 $5.84 $5.90 $6.41 11.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 11.5 10.4 9.1 8.9 -22.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.97 0.89 0.77 0.75 -23.0% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,222.6 1,221.7 1,218.3 1,119.9 -8.4% Average Fare per Passenger $1.02 $0.99 $1.00 $1.02 0.1% Fare Recovery Ratio 17.31% 15.04% 13.10% 11.94% -31.0% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.00% 2.10% 3.10% 4.10% 9.60% Source: NTD; State Controller Reports; TransTrack Manager (1) Costs are unaudited since annual fiscal and compliance audits do not include costs by mode. Michael Baker International - 16 162 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-3 Corona Transit TDA Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 Audit Period Change FY 2015- 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Operating Cost i1i $1,179,405 $1,209,129 $1,174,351 $1,197,411 1.5% Total Passengers 66,015 63,162 65,580 58,089 -12.0% Vehicle Service Hours 16,995 17,310 16,732 15,338 -9.7% Vehicle Service Miles 226,331 223,539 220,310 195,419 -13.7% Employee FTEs 22 22 22 18 -18.2% Passenger Fares $191,377 $182,258 $183,781 $162,529 -15.1% Operating Cost per Passenger $17.87 $19.14 $17.91 $20.61 15.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour _ $69.40 _ $69.85 $70.19 $78.07 12.5% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.21 $5.41 $5.33 $6.13 17.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.8 -2.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.29 0.28 0.30 0.30 1.9% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 772.5 786.8 760.5 852.1 10.3% Average Fare per Passenger $2.90 $2.89 $2.80 $2.80 -3.5% Fare Recovery Ratio 16.23% 15.07% 15.65% 13.57% -16.4% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.00% 2.10% 3.10% 4.10% 9.60% Source: NTD; State Controller Reports; TransTrack Manager (1) Costs are unaudited since annual fiscal and compliance audits do not include costs by mode. Michael Baker International - 17 163 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $- 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride Id lil hi II 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ ❑ial-a-Ride Graph IV-2 Ridership System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride 1 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 1 i 1 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ ❑ial-a-Ride Michael Baker International - 18 164 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $- $120.00 $100.00 $80.00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $- i Graph IV-3 Operating Cost per Passenger System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 1 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ dial -a -Ride Graph IV-4 Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 1 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ ❑ial-a-Ride Michael Baker International - 19 165 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 14.0 12.0 10.0 8.0 6.0 4.0 2.0 0.0 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% FY 2015 Graph IV-5 Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2016 FY 2017 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio System -wide, Fixed Route, and Dial -A -Ride FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 ■ System -wide U Fixed Route ■ Dial -a -Ride FY 2018 FY 2018 Note: System -wide farebox ratios include local support revenues while modal ratios do not. Corona Transit is subject to system -wide farebox ratio standard. Michael Baker International - 20 166 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 42.4 percent system -wide based on audited data from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. Based on the unaudited NTD reports, this indicator increased 12.9 percent and 12.5 percent on the fixed route and Dial -A -Ride, respectively. These relatively high growth rates are negative indicators of cost efficiency, or in other terms, the cost of producing a unit of transit service. The increase in costs is attributed to reporting of labor benefits in compliance with GASB rules. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 67.5 percent system -wide based on audited data from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. On a modal basis, cost per passenger increased 45 percent and 15.4 percent on fixed route and Dial -A - Ride, respectively, during the audit period. The increased indicator is due to increased costs coupled with decreased ridership for both modes. This higher percentage indicates reduced effectiveness in the delivery of services. Ridership system -wide decreased by 19.7 percent, from 234,318 passengers in FY 2015 to 188,061 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased 34.4 percent for the same period. Reliability issues with the service in terms of meeting on -time performance continues to impact ridership due to service impacts from increased traffic congestion resulting from construction work on the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Projects. Freeway lane reductions and ramp closures, local street and lane closures all contributed to the increase in traffic congestion which slowed transit service. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, declined 15 percent from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. Fixed route experienced a decrease of 22.2 percent from FY 2015. Passengers per hour for Dial -A -Ride declined by 2.5 percent. System -wide, the number of passengers per service hour fell from 7.4 passengers per hour in FY 2015 to 6.3 in FY 2018. On the fixed route, this indicator decreased from 11.5 passengers per hour in FY 2015 to 8.9 passengers in FY 2018. For Dial -A - Ride, the number of passengers per hour decreased from 3.9 to 3.8 during the same time period. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 13.1 percent system -wide, from 0.59 in FY 2015 to 0.51 in FY 2018. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased 23 percent from 0.97 to 0.75 between FY 2015 and FY 2018. In contrast, passengers per service mile increased 1.9 percent on Dial -a -Ride over the same period. While vehicle service miles increased and passenger trips decreased on fixed route, Dial -a -Ride exhibited a higher decrease in vehicle service miles. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee increased 3.6 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018. Vehicle service hours per employee for fixed -route service decreased 8.4 percent during the reporting period, from 1,222.6 hours in FY 2015 to 1,119.9 hours in FY Michael Baker International - 21 167 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 2018, as vehicle service hours decreased and the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) increased (from 12 to 13) during the period. For Dial -A -Ride, vehicle hours per employee increased 10.3 percent over the same period. Dial -a -Ride employees decreased from 22 to 18 FTEs while vehicle service hours decreased 9.7 percent. This measure is based on the number of employee FTEs using employee pay hours from the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. 6. Farebox recovery exhibited an overall percentage decrease of 19.2 percent system -wide from 20.10 percent in FY 2015 to 16.25 percent in FY 2018 based on audited data. Fare recovery ratio was above the 20 percent urban farebox standard for the first two years of the review period and fell to 16.25 percent in FY 2018, due to the large increase in operating costs in this year and the reduction in passenger fares. The drop below 20 percent occurred even as local support revenues substantially increased during the review period. Effective FY 2018, Corona adopted a blended system -wide farebox recovery ratio of 15 percent. The fixed route would be subject to a 20 percent farebox recovery and Dial -a -Ride would be subject to a 10 percent farebox recovery. The City's audited farebox recovery is inclusive of advertising revenues, interest, and local support. Without local support revenues, system -wide farebox recovery decreased by 41.5 percent from 17.14 percent in FY 2015 to 10.03 percent in FY 2018. Farebox for fixed route decreased 31.0 percent exclusive of local support revenues, due to the increase in operating costs coupled with a large decrease in farebox revenue for the service. Dial -A -Ride farebox recovery declined 16.4 percent without local support as the slight growth in operating costs was offset by the decline in Dial -A -Ride fare collection during the audit period. Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The City of Corona's system -wide performance indicators reflect increases in operating costs while exhibiting declines in ridership. Ridership decreased 19.7 percent system -wide during the audit period. Fixed route ridership, comprising over 70 percent of total passengers, decreased by 22.8 percent, while Dial -A -Ride ridership decreased 12 percent. System -wide, ridership decreased steadily from year to year. Dial -A -Ride ridership fluctuated, increasing in FY 2017 then falling again substantially in FY 2018 due to the Dial -A -Ride service provision changing from general public to specialized service. This decline was expected as Dial -A -Ride no longer serves the general public which included many student riders. In addition, increasing traffic congestion due to service impacts from construction work on the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Projects is seen as a major factor in the decline in ridership from the peak of FY 2013-14. Freeway lane reductions and ramp closures, local street and lane closures all contributed to the increase in traffic congestion which slowed transit service. Operating costs system -wide increased 34.4 percent over the review period from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018 based on audited data. By mode (using unaudited data), fixed -route services experienced a 12 percent increase in operating costs during the audit period while Dial - A -Ride increased by 1.5 percent. Vehicle service hours decreased system -wide for both modes Michael Baker International - 22 168 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 during the audit period; fixed -route and Dial -A -Ride vehicle service hours decreased 0.8 and 9 percent, respectively. Fixed -route vehicle service miles increased 0.3 percent while Dial -A -Ride vehicle service miles decreased 13.7 percent. The rates of decline in Dial -A -Ride hours and miles were similar in magnitude to the rate of decline in Dial -A -Ride ridership over the three-year period due to the change from general public to specialized service. In 2017, ridership had increased while operating less revenue hours; and implementing the above changes is when the service level declined as was expected. Michael Baker International - 23 169 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the City of Corona Transit Service. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the City of Corona Public Work Department and Corporation Yard: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are subfunctions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations The City of Corona Transit Service is composed of two fixed routes and a specialized Dial -A -Ride service available to individuals certified under the ADA, seniors (60+), and persons with disabilities. The City changed Dial -A -Ride to a specialized service from general public service on August 17, 2017. The Dial -A -Ride operates the same hours as the fixed -route service. The transit system serves to augment RTA's routes in Corona, which are more commuter oriented. Corona Cruiser has been averaging 9 to 10 passengers an hour whereas Dial -A -Ride has been averaging nearly 4 passengers an hour. The weekday operating hours during the audit period largely remained the same from the schedule reduction of 25 percent implemented in July 2010. Two minor service changes adjustments were implemented to fixed routes in January 2018 in the interest of service efficiencies as follows: • Removed the shadow bus that was following the Blue Line in the morning leaving Walmart 6:46 a.m. to Mountain Gate Park. • Replaced the El Dorado Aerotech bus with the Eldorado/EZ Rider on the Red Line 6:30 a.m. eastbound trip to accommodate additional riders. • Bus stop improvements have been ongoing involving shelter assessment and solar - powered lighting. Michael Baker International - 24 170 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 City staff proposed the following service enhancements in FY 2019: • New weekday schedule — To be an effective and useful transportation option, buses need to consistently operate according to the published schedule. Bus passengers need to be able to rely on the bus to pick them up on schedule and deliver them to their destination on schedule. An unreliable transit system will lose riders. Passenger trips peaked for the Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride in FY 2014 and have declined since. Increased traffic congestion from a growing local and regional population, construction delays, operational challenges, and a slow response by the City to adjust published schedules addressing these challenges have contributed to declining passenger trips. • Increase weekday bus frequency during morning peak hours by adding an additional bus on the Blue Line and the Red Line. This will reduce headway by 30 minutes, thereby improving transit service and opportunity to increase ridership. This will provide patrons with options to utilize Corona Cruiser with additional time intervals. • Implement a Free Fare Program to encourage use of public transit. During the audit period, transit services were operated under contract by Irvine -based Transportation Concepts. The operations contract was awarded to MV Transportation following an RFP process and the contract was executed on July 18, 2018. MV Transportation commenced operations effective September 1, 2018. MV Transportation uses Optibus for bus run cuts. Optibus is a software -as -a -service platform that plans and schedules the movements of vehicles and drivers. Drivers are switched out during the middle of the scheduled run. The RouteMatch dispatching and scheduling program has an automated vehicle locator (AVL) feature and is used primarily for report generation. Corona has reported issues with setting the reporting parameters and has not been using the system's optimization tools. The on -time performance standard is 95 percent and monitored by the RouteMatch AVL system and calls into dispatch. Road supervisors conduct periodic time checks. Schedule adherence has been impacted by ongoing freeway and road construction such as the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Projects and the Cajalco Road/I-15 Interchange Improvement Project. Fixed -route drivers call in at each scheduled time point. In the event a fixed -route bus is running behind schedule, a Dial -a -Ride vehicle may be dispatched to allow the fixed -route bus to get back on schedule. Each vehicle is equipped with eight security cameras. In addition, Corona utilizes DriveCam, a video -based driver safety program that harnesses the power of video, predictive analytics, and a cloud -based platform to help improve driver safety, exonerate drivers from false claims, and significantly reduce collisions and related costs. Another safety feature being implemented is Mobileye, which is a collision avoidance system that prevents tailgating. Before the start of each run, drivers clock in and receive the daily manifest. The drivers perform a pre -trip inspection and note the beginning mileage. Mileage is manually reported and entered Michael Baker International - 25 171 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 into an Access spreadsheet. The contractor's administrative assistant or project manager inputs the data and submits to the City for review. According to monthly and annual operations reports, over 6.28 percent of Dial -A -Ride trips are no-shows. The frequency of no-shows is above general industry norms of less than 5 percent. As described in the prior audit recommendations section, the FTA required the City to cease its existing no-show policy and develop a revised policy. During the audit period, the City developed a revised no-show policy and procedure that was implemented in March 2019. On -time performance is tracked through the Dial -A -Ride trip sheets. There is a 30-minute pick-up window that is monitored by dispatch. For the fixed route during the audit period, drivers made calls into dispatch at designated time points, generally about four per route. On -time performance is also tracked through RouteMatch while City transit staff makes field observations. On -time performance for all service modes averaged just under 95 percent in FY 2018, although growing traffic congestion continues to threaten the ability to efficiently maintain a high level of on -time performance. City transit staff have been adjusting bus time schedules to accommodate the increased congestion. Corona's on -time performance for the audit period is summarized in Table V-1: Table V-1 Corona Transit Service On -Time Performance FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 FY 2017-18 Blue Line 93.45% 91.76% 93.26% Red Line 97.18% 92.51% 89.80% Dial -A -Ride (ADA) 97.97% 96.35% 97.45% Source: City of Corona Productivity Reports Corona Transit vehicles are equipped with non -electronic Diamond fareboxes. The City has budgeted $500,000 for intelligent transportation system upgrades, which may include the procurement of electronic GFI fareboxes. Drivers verify on the spot that proper fares are placed into the farebox. After each run has been completed, the farebox vaults are secured in the dispatch office. Revenues are counted the following day by two contract staff, composed of the general manager and assistant general manager or the assistant general manager and a dispatcher. The count is conducted in a camera -equipped room. After the count is completed and reconciled, the revenues are transported to the bank for deposit. The City conducts periodic spot checks of the fare revenues. In addition, MV Transportation has conducted an audit of its fare counting and reconciliation procedures. The audit found that there was more of a variance on the fixed route, with projected revenues being higher than the actual. This variance may be attributed to the day passes used by most student riders and the possibility that some of the drivers were entering the wrong passenger category on the trip sheets. Michael Baker International - 26 172 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Personnel Transit operations during the audit period were contracted out to Irvine -based Transportation Concepts, which had 33 employees assigned to Corona Transit Services, including three managers. At the end of FY 2017-18, personnel were composed of 28 full-time and 2 part-time employees. The average years of experience span between 15 and 20 years. There has been limited employee turnover and five drivers were hired over the audit period. When operations were transferred to MV Transportation in September 2018, the drivers and dispatchers remained on staff. In addition, more support personnel were added to operations, including road supervisors. Under the Transportation Concepts contract, there were no road supervisors. MV Transportation personnel are composed of a general manager, assistant general manager, five maintenance employees (including manager), three dispatchers, two road supervisors, one trainer, and 20 drivers. Two drivers are classified as part-time and dispatchers are designated back-up drivers. Non-exempt employees are non -union and there is no extraboard. A seniority -based route bidding system is in the process of implementation. Recruitment takes place through MV Transportation's corporate website as well as through online advertisements on Craigslist and Indeed. Drivers are required to have a Class B license with air brake and a passenger endorsement. Fixed -route drivers are Verification Transit Training -certified. General Public Paratransit Vehicle (GPPV) certification is no longer required. Driver candidates with a Class B license undergo 15 hours of classroom training and 20 hours of behind -the -wheel transit plus two to three days of cadet training involving the trainee riding along with an experienced driver. Driver candidates without a Class B license undergo 40 hours of classroom training and 30 hours of behind -the -wheel training. New drivers are sent to MV Transportation's Paramount facility for training and DMV testing prior to cadet training. Monthly safety meetings are held on Saturdays and the last Thursday of the month. Topics are provided by MV Transportation's corporate office and include defensive driving, passenger awareness, operational updates, accidents, work - related injuries, and customer service. The road supervisor conducts a 45- and 90-day evaluation of the drivers, which includes retraining if necessary. Observations are conducted on board the vehicle or from a remote vantage point. Maintenance Transportation Concepts conducted vehicle maintenance in-house and employed two full-time mechanics: a maintenance manager and B level mechanic. The contract with the City included a provision for the contractor to pay prevailing wages under the state prevailing wage laws for public works, which include mechanics. Transportation Concepts used one vehicle bay provided Michael Baker International - 27 173 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 by the City at the corporation yard. The bay has capacity for three transit vehicles plus a hydraulic lift for undercarriage work. Since September 2018, maintenance has been conducted by a third -party contactor overseen by the contract operator. MV Transportation has been in the process of searching for a new maintenance facility to bring maintenance in-house and more quickly address issues in driver pre- and post -inspection reports. Pre -trip inspection discrepancies are noted. Vehicle maintenance follows City standards of 45 days or 3,000 miles, which conforms to the CHP regulations. To allow a scheduling cushion, the transit contractor schedules each preventative maintenance inspection (PMI) every 40 days or 2,500 miles. The City's engineering technician reviews the PMIs. In addition, Transportation Concepts provided maintenance of bus stops and shelters. Fueling is the responsibility of the City, which has a CNG fueling facility at the Corporation Yard where the transit fleet is fueled. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) is responsible for certifying the transit system's maintenance facilities and for inspecting vehicles on an annual basis. Corona Transit vehicles have received satisfactory terminal inspections from the CHP. Planning The City of Corona prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and includes a system overview; services and performance analysis for each route and service provided; service changes; and financial and capital plans. Under the existing services and route performance chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvements is presented for each route or program. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included in the SRTP to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, Corona must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance targets. These indicators are in relation to RCTC's Productivity Improvement Program. There is one mandatory target, which is the farebox recovery ratio set at a blended rate of 15 percent for fixed route and Dial -A -Ride. The following table shows the performance targets during the audit period. Table V-2 Corona Transit Performance Target Performance Indicators FY 2014-16 Target FY 2016-17 Target FY 2017-18 Target Farebox Recovery >=20.00% >=20.00% >=15.00% Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$69.98 <=$68.51 <=$72.17 Subsidy Per Passenger >=$6.32 & <=$8.54 >=$7.01 & <=$9.49 >=$8.11 & <=$10.97 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$1.49 & <=$2.01 >=$1.65 & <=$2.23 >=$1.89 & <=$2.55 Subsidy Per Hour >=$46.84 & <=$63.37 >=$48.08 & <=$65.04 >=$51.19 & <=$69.25 Subsidy Per Mile >=$3.72 & <=$5.04 >=$3.89 & <=$5.27 >=$4.11 & <=$5.55 Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=6.29 & <=8.51 >=5.87 & <=7.94 >=5.36 & <=7.25 Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.50 & <=0.68 >=0.48 & <=0.64 >=0.43 & <=0.59 Source: City of Corona SRTP, TransTrack Manager Michael Baker International - 28 174 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 As shown in the SRTP, the City met the mandatory farebox ratio in FYs 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18. The City met four out of seven discretionary performance targets in FY 2016, failing to meet operating cost per hour, subsidy per passenger, and subsidy per passenger mile. In FY 2017, the City met six out of seven discretionary performance targets, failing to meet only operating cost per hour. In FY 2017-18, the City failed to meet its overall performance targets by meeting only two discretionary performance targets: passengers per hour and per mile. The City has indicated a desire to commission a comprehensive operational analysis that would identify areas of the service area that could be better served by transit and present a strategic vision over a 5- or 10-year time frame. Marketing Corona's transit services are marketed in electronic and print formats. The City's website contains a dedicated page with information about the transit system. The Corona Transit Services web page (https://www.coronaca.gov/government/departments-divisions/public- works/public-transit) includes information about fares, routes, service hours, and tips in both English and Spanish. Brochures and schedules are available as PDF downloads. In the menu on the web page is a link to the Title VI Statement in English and Spanish with links to complaint procedures and forms and disclosures regarding passenger accommodation and non- discrimination. The City of Corona makes transit stop and schedule data available in the General Transit Feed Specification format, subject to the City of Corona Transit Data License Agreement. Downloading and usage of the transit data is based on acceptance and agreement to the data license agreement. Printed brochures are available for both service modes. The fixed -route colored tri-fold brochures, last updated in February 2017, provide a service area map with fare, schedule, and service hour information. The Dial -A -Ride color brochure was last updated in January 2018 and includes the updated no-show policy. The Dial -A -Ride brochure also includes a service area map with the fixed -route lines. Brochures are published in-house. The City has requested the contract operator to document marketing efforts. Complaints are tracked by the contract operator and recorded onto the monthly report to the City. Complaints of a more serious nature are forwarded to the City for follow-up. Complaints are placed into the driver's file for reference. The website also has an email feedback form that transfers customer comments to City transit staff. City transit staff has been working to formalize the complaint process by validating complaints as those that are within the control of the transit service and showing both valid and invalid complaints. The system averages four complaints monthly on the fixed route. The City is planning on implementing a new program for transit travel training and has asked the contract operator to attend and set up transit booth at various events. Corona also refers riders Michael Baker International - 29 175 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 to RTA's full-time travel trainer. A passenger survey was conducted in 2018. Findings from the survey indicated a call for more service and improved on -time performance. As policy, advertising is not sold on the bus. Rather, the City promotes a "Poetry and Art on the Bus" contest in partnership with local high schools to showcase local and cultural talent. Also, through the Transportation Now (T-Now) committee, a video contest is held to promote public transit and relieve traffic congestion in the surrounding communities. Corona allows advertising space on its bus shelters and has expressed interest in allowing advertising on board its vehicles. The City currently does not have an advertising policy and is looking to develop one. Revenue from advertising could be a potential source of farebox support under the provisions of the TDA. Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, the 2018-2020 Title VI Program was adopted by the City Council in August 2017. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes a link to the Title VI policy on the Corona Transit Services web page along with a complaint form in English and Spanish. General Administration and Management The City of Corona was incorporated on July 13, 1896, as a general law city and has a council- manager form of government. The City Council serves as the principal legislative body and each councilmember is elected for a four-year term. Regular meetings of the City Council are convened on the first and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at Corona City Hall. The City treasurer, who is also elected to a four-year term, acts as the fiscal agent for the City. The City Council saw turnover during the audit period. The prior Council was viewed as being supportive of transit. The City manager is responsible for administrative and budgetary oversight of City departments. Transportation services fall under the direction of the Public Works Department. The City's public transit operations are in the Public Works Department and managed and administered daily by the transportation planning supervisor and engineering technician. Managerial support is provided by the Public Works director. The City Finance director and transit staff are responsible for the completion and submittal of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller. The transportation planning manager overseeing transit administration retired in June 2016. The City hired a replacement transportation planning supervisor after a six-month gap in staffing. During that interim period, a consultant was retained to manage the transit system. The transportation planning manager devotes 100 percent of staff time to transit. The engineering technician provides oversight of maintenance. The City's Public Services Committee meets monthly and reviews proposed changes to the Michael Baker International - 30 176 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 transit service. The Public Services Committee comprises two councilmembers, the City manager (or representative), assistant City manager, and department heads. This committee also reviews the SRTP. In addition, the T-NOW local chapter, which an elected official from Corona attends, addresses transit issues in Corona. The Corona Transit System's contract operator during the review period, Transportation Concepts, was headquartered in Irvine, California. The City's transit facility is located at 735 West Public Safety Way in the City's Corporation Yard. From this location the contract operator provides administrative and dispatching services as well as vehicle parking and fueling. The contract operator has an on -site project manager who oversees the day-to-day transit functions and staff. An RFP for contracted fixed -route and Dial -a -Ride operations and maintenance was released by the City in March 2018. MV Transportation was selected by the City to operate the transit system. The contract start date was pushed out to September 1, 2018, from the initial start date of July 1, 2018. In the interim, the City and Transportation Concepts executed a contract amendment for an additional two -month period prior to MV Transportation taking over as contractor. The new contract with MV Transportation contains increased oversight and accountability provisions as well as liquidated damages clauses. The City also consulted the RTA for guidance on contract administration. Upon becoming contract operator, MV Transportation submitted an implementation plan to the City and provides daily reports. The contractor and the City meet every three weeks; meetings include the City's transportation planning supervisor, engineering technician, and public works director. Monthly performance reports are due on the tenth of the month and are formatted on an Excel spreadsheet. The primary source of transit funding support is derived from the LTF. The City submits the annual TDA claim for funds to RCTC. TDA claims are based on the City's annual transit budget and the financial element of the SRTP. Reserve allocations for LTF and STA funds are included as separate line items on the claim form. The City's LTF allocation goes toward operations whereas STA funds are allocated toward capital purchases and improvements. During the audit period, an FTA triennial review took place on March 8 and 9, 2017, with the final report being released on April 18, 2017. The triennial review focused on the City's compliance in 17 areas. No deficiencies were found with FTA requirements in 14 areas. The three areas where the City was found to be deficient were in technical capacity (late Milestone Progress Reports/Federal Financial Reports); Title VI (program not submitted or expired); and satisfactory continuing control (issues with real property management). On April 9, 2018, the FTA issued a report closure letter indicating that satisfactory corrective actions were achieved in all three reviews areas. Michael Baker International - 31 177 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Grants Management Grant funding allocated toward the transit system has been derived from state and federal sources. The City uses an Open Capital Grants report spreadsheet to track grant activity on a quarterly basis. The spreadsheet is configured based on the allocation year, assigned project number, project name, allocation of funds by source, funds spent during the quarter and to date, remaining balance, and project status and milestones. Corona received state Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds as a part of the Proposition 1B bond act. PTMISEA funds have been drawn for the purchase of the new dispatch and reservations system. Air Quality Management District funds are also procured for purchase and installation of two CNG dispensers located at the City of Corona's Corporation Yard. Low Carbon Transit Operations Program funds have been used toward free fare days and subsidized passes to boost ridership. The City allocated $208,000 in FTA Section 5307 funds towards vehicle procurement. LTF and STF revenues are used as matching funds for FTA grants. Over the past decade, Corona has been receiving a $10,000 annual contribution from the Corona Regional Medical Center. The annual SRTP identifies and lists capital projects that are approved through the SRTP process. Using a matrix worksheet for transit grant revenues, the City tracks and categorizes projects by source, project allocation, appropriation, drawdown availability, the amount spent, and amount remaining. Capital project activity over the last three years, including vehicle purchases, draws down remaining older capital grants. These projects include the following: • Bus stop improvements, solar -powered lighting • Replacement Type C Dial -A -Ride buses (10) • CNG slow fill stations • Purchase reservation and dispatch system • Bus stop improvements, security lighting, shelter fabrication, site improvements and installation • Corona Cruiser route development buses (2) Michael Baker International - 32 178 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to the City of Corona Transit Service, the operator fully complied with eight of the nine applicable requirements. The City was in partial compliance regarding the timely submittal of the FY 2017 fiscal and compliance audit. Two additional compliance requirements are not applicable to Corona (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio and rural area farebox recovery ratio). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Corona Transit Services Fund Financial Statements, the City's system -wide farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 20 percent through FY 2017. Effective FY 2018, Corona adopted a blended system -wide farebox recovery ratio of 15 percent, in consultation with RCTC. System -wide farebox recovery was 20.29 percent in FY 2016, 20.24 percent in FY 2017, and 16.25 percent in FY 2018. Under the revised farebox recovery standard, the fixed route would be subject to a 20 percent farebox recovery and Dial -a -Ride would be subject to a 10 percent farebox recovery. 3. Through its contract operator, the City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The City of Corona Transit Fund operating budget exhibited increases during the audit period. The budget increased by 4.8 percent in FY 2016, by 5.7 percent in FY 2017, and by 5.5 percent in FY 2018. 5. Corona satisfactorily implemented two of the three prior audit recommendations. The two recommendations pertained to the adoption of a revised no-show policy and alternative farebox recovery standard. One recommendation pertaining to the implementation of an ADA subscription service was partially implemented and is carried forward for full implementation. 6. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 42.4 percent system -wide based on audited data from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. Based on the unaudited NTD reports, this indicator increased 12.9 percent and 12.5 percent on the fixed route and Dial -A -Ride, respectively. These relatively high growth rates are negative indicators of cost efficiency, or in other terms, the cost of producing a unit of transit service. The increase in costs is attributed to reporting of labor benefits in compliance with GASB rules. Michael Baker International - 33 179 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service - FYs 2016-2018 7. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 67.5 percent system -wide based on audited data from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. On a modal basis, cost per passenger increased 45 percent and 15.4 percent on fixed route and Dial -A - Ride, respectively, during the audit period. The increased indicator is due to increased costs coupled with decreased ridership for both modes. This higher percentage indicates reduced effectiveness in the delivery of services. Ridership system -wide decreased by 19.7 percent, from 234,318 passengers in FY 2015 to 188,061 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased 34.4 percent for the same period. Reliability issues with the service in terms of meeting on -time performance continues to impact ridership due to service impacts from increased traffic congestion resulting from construction work on the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Projects. Freeway lane reductions and ramp closures, local street and lane closures all contributed to the increase in traffic congestion which slowed transit service. 8. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, declined 15 percent from the FY 2015 base year through FY 2018. Fixed route experienced a decrease of 22.2 percent from FY 2015. Passengers per hour for Dial -A -Ride declined by 2.5 percent. System -wide, the number of passengers per service hour fell from 7.4 passengers per hour in FY 2015 to 6.3 in FY 2018. On the fixed route, this indicator decreased from 11.5 passengers per hour in FY 2015 to 8.9 passengers in FY 2018. For Dial -A - Ride, the number of passengers per hour decreased from 3.9 to 3.8 during the same time period. 9. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 13.1 percent system -wide, from 0.59 in FY 2015 to 0.51 in FY 2018. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased 23 percent from 0.97 to 0.75 between FY 2015 and FY 2018. In contrast, passengers per service mile increased 1.9 percent on Dial -a -Ride over the same period. While vehicle service miles increased and passenger trips decreased on fixed route, Dial -a -Ride exhibited a higher decrease in vehicle service miles. 10. The City of Corona Transit Service is composed of two fixed routes and a specialized Dial -A - Ride service available to individuals certified under the ADA, seniors (60+), and persons with disabilities. The City changed Dial -A -Ride to a specialized service from general public service on August 17, 2017. 11. Transit operations during the audit period were contracted out to Irvine -based Transportation Concepts, which had 33 employees assigned to Corona Transit Services, including three managers. At the end of FY 2017-18, personnel were composed of 28 full- time and 2 part-time employees. The average years of experience span between 15 and 20 years. There has been limited employee turnover and five drivers were hired over the audit period. 12. The transportation planning supervisor overseeing transit administration retired in June Michael Baker International - 34 180 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 2016. The City hired a replacement transportation planning supervisor after a six-month gap in staffing. During that interim period, a consultant was retained to manage the transit system. The transportation planning manager devotes 100 percent of staff time to transit. The engineering technician provides oversight of maintenance. 13. An RFP for contracted fixed -route and Dial -a -Ride operations and maintenance was released by the City in March 2018. MV Transportation was selected by the City to operate the transit system. The contract start date was pushed out to September 1, 2018, from the initial start date of July 1, 2018. 14. An FTA triennial review took place on March 8 and 9, 2017, with the final report being released on April 18, 2017. The triennial review focused on the City's compliance in 17 areas. No deficiencies were found with FTA requirements in 14 areas. On April 9, 2018, the FTA issued a report closure letter indicating that satisfactory corrective actions were achieved in all three reviews areas. 15. Grant funding allocated toward the transit system has been derived from state and federal sources. The City uses an Open Capital Grants report spreadsheet to track grant activity on a quarterly basis. The spreadsheet is configured based on the allocation year, assigned project number, project name, allocation of funds by source, funds spent during the quarter and to date, remaining balance, and project status and milestones. Michael Baker International - 35 181 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service. Corona's annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller has historically combined fixed route and dial -a -ride as each provided general public service. With the transition to specialized dial -a -ride, written instructions by the state to prepare this particular report require separate reporting of fixed route and specialized service. In the General Instruction Form completed by the City, a selection must be made as to which mode of transit is represented in the report. The options are general public use or elderly/disabled. The Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report Instructions contain the following passages under the General Instruction Form: Transit operators providing two types of service, (general public use and transit service exclusively for the elderly/handicapped) must complete a separate report for each type of service. ... a separate report must be filed for each type of service provided: General Public Use Service or Specialized Service exclusive for elderly and/or handicapped. For example, if an agency has received Article 4 and Article 8(c) monies to provide General Public Use Service, the agency should submit one report. If that agency has also received Article 4 monies to provide Specialized Service for the elderly and/or handicapped, then a report must be submitted for the Specialized Service operations. The submission of separate reports to the State Controller will demonstrate Corona's proactive approach to compliance with state reporting instructions. 2. Continue process of implementing ADA subscription services on Dial -A -Ride. This recommendation is being carried forward from the prior audit. The City is still in the process of implementing an ADA subscription service. Dial -a -Ride's transition from general public to a specialized service for ADA-certified and senior passengers makes the subscription service option more feasible. Subscription trips to the Inland Empire Adult Day Health Care Center and other adult day care centers have been ongoing. In addition, the City already monitors ADA trips to ensure that there are no capacity constraints. Nevertheless, the City has indicated its willingness to work with the contract operator and review the feasibility of establishing a formal ADA Subscription Services Policy. A call-back function to remind riders of their upcoming trips will also improve operating efficiency and effectiveness. The City will be incorporating call-back function in the next ITS project. Michael Baker International - 36 182 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Corona Transit Service — FYs 2016-2018 3. Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. During the audit period, Corona adopted a blended farebox recovery standard of 15 percent. The revenues in the farebox ratio are composed primarily of passenger fares, City supplemental support revenues, and air district subsidies. New state legislation (SB 508) reinforces current RCTC practice of allowing other locally generated revenues in the farebox ratio. These other revenues could include advertising generated by the transit system, bus wraps on the vehicles, and other local contributions from the City to the transit program. Corona allows advertising space on its bus shelters and has expressed interest in allowing advertising on board its vehicles. The City currently does not have an advertising policy but has expressed interest in developing one. However, staffing and budgetary constraints make it difficult to pursue. Nevertheless, given the farebox recovery trends, the City should pursue this measure to incorporate other locally generated revenue in its farebox recovery. Michael Baker International - 37 183 ATTACHMENT 5 RCTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services r*-1 CITY OF RIVERSIDE March 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 184 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section II 4 Operator Compliance Requirements 4 Section III 10 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 10 Section IV 11 TDA Performance Indicators 13 Section V 20 Review of Operator Functions 20 Operations 20 Maintenance 24 Planning 25 Marketing 26 General Administration and Management 27 Section VI 29 Findings 29 Recommendations 32 185 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section I Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for the City of Riverside Special Transportation Services (City, STS) covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017-18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code. This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the Public Utilities Code's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with management, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) was used to guide in the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Riverside has provided Dial -A -Ride service for the elderly and disabled since the summer of 1975. The service was initially conceived to provide seniors with transportation to nutrition programs. The Dial -A -Ride service has since grown with rides being provided anywhere within the city limits —a service area encompassing close to 82 square miles. Seniors using the service are transported to a variety of destinations, including shopping, adult education, work, social activities, and medical appointments. Based on the 2010 US Census, Riverside's population is 303,871, which has grown 19.1 percent since the 2000 US Census. The 2019 population for Riverside is estimated to be 328,101, as reported by the California Department of Finance. The city covers 81.14 square miles. Michael Baker International - 1 186 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Riverside Special Transportation Services (STS) is administered by the City's Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department as part of the social service programs offered by the City. The department also administers senior centers and programs, youth opportunity centers, and BRIDGE, a gang prevention program. In August 1992, the City entered into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to provide complementary paratransit service to RTA's fixed -route service within the city boundaries under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. An amendment to the MOU was approved in September 1994, which eliminated STS's obligation for the provision of evening ADA service because of low ridership and transferred the hours to increase day service to meet growing demand. In April 2003, an MOU was executed between the City of Riverside and RTA (and later amended and restated in November 2012) that reaffirmed the City's commitment to provide ADA service and included specific criteria for the provisions of service pursuant to the ADA. System Characteristics STS provides curb -to -curb demand -responsive transit services within the city limits of Riverside to senior citizens aged 60 and older as well as to persons with disabilities certified under the ADA. Operating hours are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Service does not operate on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day. Rides are scheduled in 15-minute intervals. STS provides ADA complementary paratransit service during the shoulder hours of RTA fixed -route service within the city limits. Fares The fare for a one-way trip is $3.00. Effective September 2017, STS raised the one-way trip fare from $2.00 to $3.00 in concert with RTA's fare increase. In addition, STS implemented a $2.00 one-way medical fare. General multi -trip booklets are $30.00 and medical multi -trip booklets are $20.00. Attendants accompanying ADA-certified passengers ride free. Fleet STS operates a fleet of 35 minibuses powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) and one 7- passenger unleaded fuel van. All vehicles comply with the ADA requirements by being equipped with wheelchair lifts. A detailed description of STS's fleet is presented in Table 1-1. Table 1-1 STS Fleet Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Seating Capacity 2008 Chevy Van 1 Unleaded 7 (1 W/C) 2010 Ford E450 Glaval III 8 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2011 Ford E450 3 CNG 16 (2 W/C) Michael Baker International - 2 187 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Seating Capacity 2012 Ford E450 2 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2013 Ford E450 5 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2014 Ford E450 9 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2017 Ford E450 8 CNG 16 (2 W/C) Total 36 Source: City of Riverside Specialized Transportation Services Note: W/C=wheelchair STS has recently been testing 9-passenger transit vans with the possibility of implementing a mobility -on -demand type service in the future. The vans would conform to ADA requirements by accommodating one to two wheelchairs. Michael Baker International - 3 188 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, September 2008 (third edition), developed by Caltrans, to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the Public Utilities Code and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: submitted annual reports to 99243 the RTPA based upon the FY 2016: October 21, 2016 Uniform System of Accounts FY 2017: January 24, 2018* and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of FY 2018: January 30, 2019* *Note: New state legislation was fiscal year (Sept. 28/29), or passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 110 days (Oct. 19/20) if filed 21, 2017, that changes the electronically (Internet). timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International - 4 189 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90-day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: March 17, 2017 FY 2017: March 12, 2018 FY 2018: March 28, 2019 A 90-day extension was granted by RCTC pursuant to the TDA statute. Conclusion: Complied. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections were conducted at the City of Riverside General Services Division located at 8095 Lincoln Avenue. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were February 11 and 18, 2016; February 28, 2017; March 1, 2017; and March 6, 7, and 9, 2018. All inspections conducted were rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance are submitted in compliance with the rules and Michael Baker International - 5 190 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non- urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as STS only serves an urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage change in STS's operating budget: FY 2016: +3.4% FY 2017: +13.3% FY 2018: +12.6% Operating budget increases are attributed to salaries and benefits, contract services, and non -personnel costs. Source: City of Riverside Short - Range Transit Plan. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 STS's definition of performance is consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247. A review of TransTrack Manager reports and trip sheets generated during the audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International - 6 191 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three -twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as STS provides exclusive services to ADA- certified individuals and seniors. Conclusion: Not Applicable. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 Operating ratios for STS using audited data were as follows: FY 2016: 11.34% FY 2017: 10.41% FY 2018: 10.93% Source: City of Riverside Special Transit Fund Financial Statements (Audited) Conclusion: Complied. The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that the City of Riverside's retirement Michael Baker International - 7 192 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. system is funded. City staff's retirement is funded through the California Public Employees Retirement System (CaIPERS). Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of State Transit Assistance funds, the City of Riverside is making full use of federal funds available under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 as amended. FY 2016: $264,095 (Operations) FY 2017: $315,198 (Operations) $206,963 (Capital) FY 2018: $294,182 (Capital assistance on operations) $551,759 (Other) Source: Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International - 8 193 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to STS, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements are not applicable to STS (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio and urbanized area farebox recovery ratio). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Riverside Special Transit Fund Financial Statements, the STS farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 10 percent during the review period. Farebox recovery was 11.34 percent in FY 2016, 10.41 percent in FY 2017, and 10.93 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox during the triennial period was 10.89 percent. 3. The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The STS operating budget exhibited modest increases during the audit period. The budget increased 3.4 percent in FY 2016, 13.3 percent in FY 2017, and 12.6 percent in FY 2018. The increases in the operating budget are attributed to salaries and benefits, contract services, and non -personnel costs. Michael Baker International - 9 194 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations STS's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the FY 2013-2015 triennial performance audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of STS's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Implement the planned fare increase. Background: The prior audit noted that the fare structure remained unchanged with no adopted fare increases implemented. The last fare increase took place in April 2005. STS analyzed its fare structure in order to sustain its required farebox recovery ratio and cover increased operating and fringe benefit costs. One consideration in the analysis was to raise the one-way fare to $3.00, which is comparable to RTA's Dial -A -Ride fare. Actions taken by STS The City acted during the audit period to implement the fare increase. On August 8, 2017, the Riverside City Council voted to approve a fare increase from $2.00 to $3.00 for "Regular" trips while implementing the $2.00 rate for "Medical" trips. The rate increase went into effect on September 1, 2017. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. Background: STS's farebox recovery ratio is slightly above the TDA standard of 10 percent. The revenues in the farebox ratio are composed primarily of passenger fares. New state legislation (SB 508) reinforces current RCTC practice of allowing other locally generated revenues in the farebox ratio. Examples of possible other local support revenues are described in the RCTC farebox recovery policy and may include, but are not limited to, interest earnings, gains on the sale of capital assets, lease revenues generated by transit -owned property, alternative fueling services, advertising revenues, donations other than cash donations made in lieu of a prescribed fare, and Measure A specialized transit operating grants. It was recommended that the annual Michael Baker International - 10 195 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 TDA fiscal audit calculate the farebox ratio inclusive of applicable additional revenue. It was also suggested that STS work with the City's finance department to ensure other local transit revenues are included in the farebox ratio in the TDA fiscal audit for STS. Actions taken by STS STS has investigated the possibility of advertising on its buses. After consulting with other transit agencies and looking into what resources are needed to start a program such as this, it was determined that the cost of administering and maintaining this type of program far exceeded the monetary benefit it would generate. STS will continue to look for and examine alternative revenues to enhance the farebox revenues. Conclusion This recommendation has not been implemented; however, STS is encouraged to analyze alternative local sources of farebox revenues pursuant to SB 508. Prior Recommendation 3 Provide Title VI Policy documentation in Spanish and on the STS brochure. Background: Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, the City of Riverside adopted a Title VI Program in July 2014. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes a link on the STS web page that is directed to the Title VI policy on the General Services page along with a complaint form in English. A Spanish language form is still under development. Also, the auditor could not find Title VI information on the printed STS brochure. Title VI provisions include a limited English proficiency (LEP) plan to help identify reasonable steps to provide language assistance for LEP persons seeking meaningful access to STS as required by Executive Order 13166. Based on the latest US Census data, approximately 40 percent of Riverside residents aged 5 years and older speak a primary language other than English at home. More specifically, approximately 31 percent of Riverside residents aged 5 years and older are Spanish speaking. Actions taken by STS The STS brochure is published in a bilingual English and Spanish format. At the bottom of the brochure, the Title VI statement is printed in an inset box in both languages. Information on the Title VI program can be accessed on a dedicated web page from the City's website. In addition, the Spanish complaint form has been developed and is available on the Title VI web page. Michael Baker International - 11 196 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International - 12 197 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews STS's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators that gauge service effectiveness and revenue, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Table IV-1 provides the performance indicators for STS, and the following charts depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that the operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited figures. Michael Baker International - 13 198 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 City of Riverside Special Transportation Services TDA Performance Indicators Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015- 2018 Operating Cost $3,749,768 $3,574,868 $3,665,828 $4,053,083 8.1% Operating Cost (with SB 508 exclusions) $3,749,768 $3,323,668 $3,453,446 $4,053,083 8.1% Total Passengers 175,329 167,440 161,552 153,559 -12.4% Vehicle Service Hours 47,104 47,961 45,448 45,472 -3.5% Vehicle Service Miles 660,734 661,302 640,085 615,113 -6.9% Employee FTEs 46 39 43 40 -13.0% Passenger Fares $384,631 $376,960 $359,596 $443,070 15.2% Operating Cost per Passenger $21.39 $21.35 $22.69 $26.39 23.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $79.61 $74.54 $80.66 $89.13 12.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.68 $5.41 $5.73 $6.59 16.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.4 -9.3% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.27 0.25 0.25 0.25 -5.9% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,024.0 1,229.8 1,056.9 1,136.8 11.0% Average Fare per Passenger $2.19 $2.25 $2.23 $2.89 31.5% Fare Recovery Ratio (with SB 508 exclusions) 10.26% 11.34% 10.41% 10.93% 6.6% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles) 1.3% 2.1% 2.6% 3.9% 10.2% Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits; State Controller Reports Michael Baker International - 14 199 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 $4,100,000 $4,000,000 $3,900,000 $3,800,000 $3,700,000 $3,600,000 $3,500,000 $3,400,000 $3,300,000 180,000 175,000 170,000 165,000 160,000 155,000 150,000 145,000 140,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Graph IV-2 Ridership FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International - 15 200 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 $30,00 $25,00 $20,00 $15.44 $10.00 $5,00 $- $95.00 $90,00 $85,00 $80,00 $75.00 $70,00 $65,00 Graph IV-3 Operating Cost per Passenger FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Graph IV-4 Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International - 16 201 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Graph IV-5 Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3,80 3,70 3.60 3.50 3.40 3.30 3.20 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio 11.6% 11.4% 11.2% 11.0% 10.8% 10.6% 10.4% 10.2% 10,0°% 9.8% 9.6% FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International - 17 202 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 12 percent from $79.61 in the FY 2015 base year to $89.13 in FY 2018. This trend is consistent with the increase in STS operating costs of 8.1 percent during the period and the 3.5 percent decrease in vehicle service hours between FY 2015 and FY 2018. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 23.4 percent from $21.39 in FY 2015 base year to $26.39 in FY 2018. As noted above, STS operating costs increased 8.1 percent during the period; however, STS ridership decreased 12.4 percent during the period from 175,329 passengers in FY 2015 to 153,559 passengers in FY 2018. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 9.3 percent from 3.7 to 3.4 passengers per hour between the FY 2015 base year and FY 2018. The trend in this indicator reflects the 12.4 percent decrease in demand -response trips as vehicle service hours exhibited a decrease of 3.5 percent. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 5.9 percent, from 0.27 in FY 2015 to 0.25 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, vehicle service miles decreased 6.9 percent from 660,734 miles to 615,113 miles. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee increased 11 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018. This increase was associated with the 3.5 percent decrease in STS vehicle service hours, while the number of full-time employee equivalent (FTE) hours decreased 13 percent from 46 to 40 FTEs. This measure is based on the number of FTEs using employee pay hours from the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report submitted to the State Controller and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. 6. Farebox recovery exhibited an overall increase of 6.6 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018. After a 10.6 percent increase in FY 2016, farebox recovery decreased by 8.2 percent in FY 2017 but increased 5 percent in FY 2018. The average annual increase in the farebox recovery ratio was 2.5 percent. Passenger fare revenues increased 15.2 percent while operating costs increased 8.1 percent. Michael Baker International - 18 203 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The City of Riverside STS performance indicators reflect decreases in ridership, vehicle service hours, and mileage during the triennial period. Ridership saw a 4.5 percent decrease in FY 2016 followed by decreases in FY 2017 and FY 2018 of 3.5 and 4.9 percent, respectively. Vehicle service hours exhibited an annualized decrease of 1.1 percent whereas vehicle service miles exhibited an annualized decrease of 2.3 percent. However, STS operating costs grew at an annualized rate of 2.8 percent between the FY 2015 base year and FY 2018. Passenger fare revenue increased at an annualized rate of 5.5 percent. Factors bearing on the performance trends include a fare increase in FY 2017 from $2.00 per trip to $3.00 per trip and lower service demand due to community perceptions about the service, which may require rebranding and focused marketing strategies. Michael Baker International - 19 204 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions in the City of Riverside STS. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the City of Riverside STS office: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are subfunctions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations Riverside STS offers demand -responsive transit services to senior citizens and ADA-certified individuals daily. STS also operates as a complementary service to RTA within the Riverside city limits. ADA-certified passengers can make their reservations 24 hours in advance. The non-ADA reservation period is between three and seven days in advance. Although ridership growth has slowed during the audit period, STS acquired newer vehicles, hired new personnel, and offered expanded service options after regular operating hours. STS operations are located at 8095 Lincoln Avenue within the City of Riverside Corporation Yard. Facilities include an administration building containing offices, a dispatch center, restrooms, and a break room. Adjacent to the administration building is a parking lot for the transit vehicles with each space equipped with a CNG slow fill station, and a maintenance bay for vehicle repair and servicing. STS conducted an analysis of its fare structure in order to sustain its required farebox recovery ratio and cover increased operating and fringe benefit costs. One consideration in the analysis was to raise the one-way fare to $3.00 to be in line with RTA's Dial -A -Ride fare. The last fare increase was adopted in April 2005. On August 8, 2017, the Riverside City Council approved the fare increase on STS, which became effective the following month. STS raised the one-way trip fare from $2.00 to $3.00 in concert with RTA's fare increase. In addition, STS implemented a $2.00 one-way medical fare. Further fare restructuring and handling involved the implementation of a mobile fare collection Michael Baker International - 20 205 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 system. This allows payments to be uploaded electronically online, allowing for less dwell time. Additional runs were scheduled from 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. to accommodate peak hour demand. Most STS trips are generated by local senior programs or workshops conducted by the Friendly Stars program or other services for developmentally disabled adults. Other subscription services include the Inland Regional Center, which conducts morning workshops for the developmentally disabled; Easter Seals; Unlimited Quest, an adult day care and independent living program; and Care Conexxus, which serves Alzheimer's patients. The Inland Regional Center is billed by STS monthly whereas other passenger trips, such as for the Easter Seals, are paid on a per -trip basis. STS reports zero denials. No-shows comprise about 5 percent of the total ridership. The transit supervisor will follow up and counsel repeat offenders. There is a formal no-show policy that conforms to FTA regulations and mirrors that of RTA. The no-show policy is included in the STS rider brochure. STS defines a no-show as "a passenger's failure to show up or cancel a ride before 6 p.m. the day before a scheduled pick-up. Penalty points will be assessed to the passenger if the passenger does not show." The number of cancellations and no-shows exhibited downward trends. Cancellations and no-shows are presented in Table V-1. Table V-1 Cancellations and No -Shows FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Cancellations 10,325 10,249 10,074 9,007 No -Shows 3,475 3,162 2,633 2,453 Source: RouteMatch; City of Riverside STS STS uses RouteMatch dispatch and scheduling software. A software upgrade and migration to a Cloud -based platform were scheduled for July 2019, which would allow STS dispatchers to optimize scheduling. The operator reports that the software program works well and is compatible with National Transit Database reporting. The driver manifest generated by RouteMatch is configured to account for the proper recording of operating data. STS started using expanded RouteMatch functions, such as a passenger notification module. This feature makes automated calls to passengers to confirm their scheduled pick up one day and one hour in advance. It also allows the passenger to cancel their trip the day before. The automated feature can also dial calls in Spanish. Through its global positioning system (GPS) feature, RouteMatch can transmit road and traffic condition data to the drivers. Another feature of the scheduling software is that it does not schedule for more wheelchair trips than the vehicles can accommodate. With growth in wheelchair -bound riders and those using mobility devices, STS actively tracks ridership trends for these types of passengers using RouteMatch, which will help with dispatching and deployment of vehicles. STS utilizes the Q-Straint wheelchair securement system on the vehicles. There is an online training and certification program for the use of Q-Straint. STS also documents those passengers who insist on remaining in their wheelchair instead of transferring to a seat. Vehicle Michael Baker International - 21 206 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 wheelchair lifts were upgraded to a 1,000-pound capacity rating. The driver manifest generated by RouteMatch contains the driver's name, vehicle number, and duration of the run, and accounts for deadhead time and mileage (including breaks) as well as service time and mileage commencing with the first pickup and ending with the last drop-off. In addition, customer information includes the name, requested pickup time, actual pickup time, origin and destination addresses, and actual drop-off time and odometer readings. There is a 30- minute window (15 minutes before and after scheduled pickup time) for all reservations to track on -time performance. On -time performance data are entered into TransTrack Manager for trend analysis and data storage. System on -time performance averaged 96.72 percent, although growing traffic congestion and increased service demand threaten the ability to efficiently maintain a high level of on -time performance. STS's on -time performance for the audit period is summarized in Table V-2. Table V-2 On -Time Performance Summary FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Late Trips 3,750 4,034 6,079 4,199 Total Trips 147,213 141,959 135,697 128,895 Percent of Trips On -time 97.45% 97.16% 95.52% 96.74% Source: RouteMatch; City of Riverside STS STS replaced the Ranger mobile radios with Samsung mobile data tablets in its vehicles. This initiative began as a pilot program with seven tablets and expanded to cover the entire fleet. The tablets have proven to be cost effective since each Ranger costs $2,500 and each tablet costs $300 each. In addition, STS improved the safety features on its vehicles by increasing the number of interior cameras from one to four. The cameras have been useful for investigating complaints and driver training. They also can obscure the faces of passengers on board the vehicle. Farebox collection and reconciliation procedures involve a combination of manual and automated methods. STS vehicles are not equipped with fareboxes. The manifest details how much the drivers are supposed to collect from the passenger. Fares are paid in cash or by check and placed into a pouch. A daily reconciliation is performed using the RouteMatch manifests. Each morning, two administrative staff count the fare revenue from the previous day, a process which takes approximately two hours. Another staff person takes the fare receipts and makes the deposit. The whole process is overseen by the transit supervisor. Michael Baker International - 22 207 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Personnel STS has increased its staffing levels and made part-time employees into full-time employees in an effort to meet ridership demand. Part-time drivers are generally assigned weekend trips. Routes are bid out based on driver seniority with drivers selecting the same route about 70 to 80 percent of the time. Driver shifts are assigned based on service demand. Nonexempt personnel are represented by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 721. The most recent MOU between the City and the SEIU was for a four-year term from July 2016 through June 2020. The City and the SEIU enjoy a good working relationship. There are three shop stewards at STS. STS was successful in recruiting a second operations supervisor as well as converting a vacant senior office specialist position to a management analyst position and filling that vacant position. There has also been an effort to hire a senior dispatcher. STS was also able to convert three vacant full-time drivers' positions to split shift positions, allowing STS to meet the service demands early in the morning and in the afternoon. Driver recruitment has been challenging, particularly among part-time staff. However, retention levels have been healthy. In addition, the City has implemented an employee wellness program to address the relatively high rate of leave time. The special transportation supervisor is also a driver and trainer. STS conducts training bi- monthly with a focus on wheelchair lift operations, sensitivity training, defensive driving, and vehicle inspection training. In addition to possessing a Class B license, driver candidates undergo four hours of orientation on the first day, two weeks (20 hours per week) of classroom and behind -the -wheel training, Vehicle for Developmentally Disabled Persons certification, and live scan fingerprinting. School Pupil Activity Bus certification training is also available, which involves a written and behind -the -wheel test. The bi-monthly safety meetings have been revamped with refreshed content. STS has brought in presenters and topics have covered railroad crossings, team building, sensitivity training, and defensive driving. The City's safety officer has also been invited to give presentations on senior health awareness. The vehicle incidence review board reviews accidents and offers retraining. Accruals for vacation and sick time vary according to the length of service and employment classification. Employees with up through 5 years of continuous service accrue 80 hours of annual vacation time; 120 hours for 6 to 10 years of service; and 160 hours for 11 or more years of service. The City has a two-year maximum vacation hour accumulation policy. Employees accrue 4 hours of sick leave per month. On a monthly basis, the City contributes toward employee group health insurance premiums, which are $915.00 for an employee and one dependent; $1,155.00 for an employee and two or more dependents; and $645.00 for single coverage. In addition, the City contributes toward employees' retirement through CaIPERS based on three tiers, depending on date of hire, which define the various retirement levels for the member's retirement formula, final compensation calculation, and employee contribution/cost sharing. Michael Baker International - 23 208 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Maintenance Vehicle maintenance is performed at the Corporation Yard adjacent to STS's administrative offices. Mechanics from City Fleet Services assigned to STS vehicles are Automotive Service Excellence certified and have undergone CNG tank inspection training. STS vehicles are serviced in a state-of-the-art maintenance facility. The facility comprises five service bays, a CNG ventilation system, brake shop, an administrative office, and parts storage room. This dedicated facility has resulted in improved maintenance efficiencies. Facility service hours are from 2:30 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. In addition, there are 36 slow fill CNG pumps, which allows for every vehicle to be fueled overnight. The station supports both 3,000 PSI (earlier vehicles) and 3,600 PSI pressures. The maintenance bay has experienced multiple issues with the CNG detection system. The issues have caused multiple false alarms, resulting in emergency responses from the Riverside Police Department and other City agencies throughout all hours of the day and night. Additional costs have been incurred in the attempts to repair the current detection system. The City has applied for SB 1 State of Good Repair funds to replace the CNG detection system. Preventive maintenance schedules are managed electronically through the AssetWorks FleetFocus M5 software program. This system is fully integrated and encompasses asset tracking, work orders, workflow, PMI scheduling, billing, and inventory management. PMIs are set up in the M5 system and scheduled according to time, mileage, usage, or a combination of each. Usage is gathered either at fueling times, which are tracked in the M5 Fleet System, through an updated vehicle work order entry, or from manual updates as needed. PMIs are performed every 3,000 miles. Fleet Services can transmit alerts on upcoming PMIs, allowing for a 100 percent schedule adherence rate. Vehicle parts are managed and tracked by the FleetFocus M5 software. Stock part purchases such as brakes, filters, and tires are procured through competitive bidding. Annual purchase orders are approved by the City Council, and then awarded by the Finance and Purchasing Departments. State contract pricing is also utilized for items such as automotive and pickup tires. Other non -stock parts are either competitively bid on an as -needed basis through the Purchasing Department or quoted through vendors with whom the City already has annual purchase orders. Road calls are recorded when a tow truck and/or mechanic responds to a mechanical/service problem for a disabled transit vehicle that is in revenue service. The number of road calls increased, then stabilized during the latter part of the triennial period, as STS added new vehicles to its fleet in 2017. A summary of road calls and failures is presented in Table V-3. Michael Baker International - 24 209 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Table V-3 STS Road Call Summary FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Road Calls 14 0 31 29 Source: City of Riverside STS From the FY 2015 base year, the number of reported road calls fluctuated from 14 to 0 in FY 2016 to 31 in FY 2017 to 29 in FY 2018. Data for FY 2016 may not have been available. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) is responsible for certifying the maintenance facilities and for inspecting vehicles on an annual basis. STS vehicles have received satisfactory terminal inspections from the CHP. Planning The City of Riverside STS prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and includes a system overview, performance analysis, service changes, and financial and capital plans. Under the services and performance chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvement is presented for the transit service. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included in the SRTP to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, STS must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance indicators. There is one mandatory indicator: the farebox recovery ratio set at 10 percent. Using the SRTP covering FY 2017-18 through FY 2019-20, Table V-4 summarizes the FY 2014-15 performance targets for STS. STS met all seven performance indicator targets. Table V-4 STS Performance Targets Performance Indicators FY 2017-18 Target Actual Performance Met Target Farebox Recovery >=10.00% 13.37% Yes Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$72.95 $64.35 Yes Subsidy Per Passenger >=$13.94 & <=$18.86 $15.02 Yes Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$2.41 & <=$3.25 $2.59 Yes Subsidy Per Hour >=$51.29 & <=$69.39 $55.75 Yes Subsidy Per Mile >=$3.73 & <=$5.05 $3.99 Yes Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=3.15 & <=4.26 3.70 Yes Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.23 & <=0.31 0.27 Yes Source: City of Riverside STS, TransTrack Manager STS has expressed interest in developing a strategic plan. Given the changes in the transit funding landscape and challenges in recruitment and marketing that pose potential impediments to growth and sustainability, STS would benefit from a strategic planning process that can Michael Baker International - 25 210 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 provide guidance and momentum. A 5- or 10-year strategic plan would establish guiding principles of how STS can build upon its 45-year legacy as a demand -response transit operator by setting goals, objectives, and strategies for attaining its vision. Marketing STS has used several marketing strategies to promote its special transportation services such as brochures, newspaper advertisements, community events, speakers' bureaus, and electronic media. The STS brochure is a bilingual tri-fold publication that provides service overview, hours of operation, fares and rider etiquette, and policy information. Brochures are distributed primarily at local senior centers. Other printed collateral includes a brochure in Braille for the sight -impaired, a one -page flyer, placement of ads on the prescription bags at Ralph's Pharmacy, and advertisements in the Parks and Recreation Activity Guide and Senior Guide. The Activity Guide is published three times annually and is mailed to over 55,000 residents as well as available online at the City's website. The service is also advertised on the rear of the vehicles. Electronic marketing approaches have included the City of Riverside website (https://www.riversideca.gov/park rec/seniors-transportation.asp), public access cable Channel 3, and announcements on an electronic billboard located near the SR 91 and 14th Street interchange. Further outreach has consisted of presentations at senior centers and before the RCTC Quarterly Transit Operators meetings. Social media outreach is conducted through the marketing division of the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department. The department coordinates structured postings on Facebook and Twitter. Passenger surveys are conducted annually. Implementation of the electronic fare collection system and mobile application will allow riders to pay for fares using a smart card and reserve rides via a web portal or mobile application. In FY 2016, STS embarked on a major rebranding effort through a marketing plan being developed. The Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department has a graphic artist and marketing team who are providing guidance in creating a new brand and logo for STS. The vehicles and marketing collateral will feature the new look. The rebranding initiative will also encompass driver uniforms and grooming standards. Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, a Title VI Program was developed and adopted by the City. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes a link to the Title VI policy on the STS web page directed to the General Services page along with a complaint form in English and Spanish. Michael Baker International - 26 211 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 General Administration and Management The City of Riverside was incorporated in 1883 and has a council-manager form of government. The Riverside City Charter sets forth the number of elected officials for the city and their method of election. The mayor is elected at -large by voters of the entire city while the members of the City Council are voted into office by electors in each of the city's seven wards. Regular elections for members of the City Council occur in June of odd -numbered years. The mayoral election is held in June of US presidential election years. The Council serves as the principal legislative body and each councilmember is elected for a four-year term. Except for the months of July, August, and September, the regular meetings of the mayor and City Council are convened on the first, second, third, and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2:00 p.m. During the months of July, August and September, the regular meetings are held on the second and fourth Tuesdays at 2:00 p.m. The City manager is responsible for administrative and budgetary oversight of City departments. STS is overseen by the director of Parks, Recreation and Community Services. The director is assisted administratively by the deputy director and the community services superintendent. Transit operations are administered by a senior management analyst/transit manager and a special transportation supervisor. Administrative support personnel are composed of a senior office specialist and an office specialist. The current senior management analyst/transit manager joined STS in August 2015 and is tasked with transportation and grants management and interaction with RCTC. The transit manager develops a dashboard of performance statistics to better evaluate the transit service. The special transportation supervisor attends to staff performance, vehicle operations, and maintenance. STS recruited a second transportation supervisor and converted a vacant senior office specialist position to a management analyst position and filled that vacant position. The transportation supervisor hired during the audit period is a certified trainer with over 20 years of experience, having worked for LA Metro and RTA. The primary source of transit funding support is derived from the Local Transportation Fund (LTF). Total LTF revenues received during the audit period were $2,321,560 in FY 2016; $3,604,996 in FY 2017; and $3,374,048 in FY 2018. State Transportation Assistance (STA) funds received by the City were $258,870 in FY 2017 applied toward capital. Cost allocation involves a two-step process based on the City's General Fund and personnel costs at the departmental level. The City submits the annual TDA claim for funds to RCTC. TDA claims are based on the City's annual budget for STS and the financial element of the SRTP. Reserve allocations for LTF and STA funds are included as separate line items on the claim form. STA funds are utilized toward vehicle replacement, fueling infrastructure, and office equipment. The City Finance director and staff are responsible for the completion and submittal of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller. Michael Baker International - 27 212 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 The City's most recent FTA triennial review took place on March 27 and 28, 2018, with the final report being released on May 25, 2018. The triennial review focused on the City's compliance in 20 areas. No deficiencies were found with FTA requirements in 19 areas. The one area where the City was found to be deficient was in technical capacity and award management. This finding was prompted by late submittals of the City's Federal Financial Reports and Milestone Progress Reports in the Transit Award Management System (TrAMS). The City had until October 30, 2018, to submit to the FTA regional office procedures for submitting future reports on time. The City was also required to email the FTA regional office when the FY 2018 annual reports were submitted in TrAMS. In response to the triennial review finding, the City created a protocol of office procedures that ensure the timely submittal of financial and milestone reports in TrAMS. Grants Management Grant funding allocated toward STS has been derived from state and federal sources. The City maintains an annual project summary report listing the grants being managed in a general ledger format. The grants tracked are derived from STA, Proposition 1B (capital and security), and FTA Sections 5307 and 5339 (formula and discretionary). The summary report shows the allocation of funds by source, amount spent during the quarter, amount spent to date, and the remaining balance. The grant allocation year, project grant number, and project name are listed along the left-hand margin. FTA grants have been awarded for operating and capital assistance. FTA Section 5307 grant funds (combined with 20 percent STA match) have been spent on preventative maintenance, vehicle replacement, CNG slow fill stations communications, and office equipment. The City has also received FTA Section 5339 for vehicle replacement. The City replaced eight CNG vehicles with award funds received from the FTA. The City has continued to receive funding through the State Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) program, which has been extended through FY 2022. Another component of the Proposition 1B program is the Transit System Safety, Security & Disaster Response Account (TSSSDRA) administered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. TSSSDRA funds awarded to the City have been utilized toward the installation of an electronic access control system for all interior and exterior doors in the STS administrative office. At the end of June 30, 2018, the City had an unexpended balance of $545,496 in PTMISEA funds and $89,312 in TSSSDRA funds. Michael Baker International - 28 213 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to STS, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements are not applicable to STS (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio and urbanized area farebox recovery ratio). 2. Based on the available data from the audited City of Riverside Special Transit Fund Financial Statements, the STS farebox recovery ratio remained above the required 10 percent during the review period. Farebox recovery was 11.34 percent in FY 2016, 10.41 percent in FY 2017, and 10.93 percent in FY 2018. The average farebox during the triennial period was 10.89 percent. 3. The City participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. The CHP inspection reports submitted for review were found to be satisfactory. 4. The STS operating budget exhibited modest increases during the audit period. The budget increased 3.4 percent in FY 2016, 13.3 percent in FY 2017, and 12.6 percent in FY 2018. The increases in the operating budget are attributed to salaries and benefits, contract services, and non -personnel costs. 5. The City of Riverside STS satisfactorily implemented two of the three prior audit recommendations. The recommendations pertained to the implementation of a fare increase and including Title VI policy information in Spanish on marketing brochures. The third recommendation not implemented pertained to the inclusion of locally generated fare revenues in the farebox calculation. 6. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 12 percent from $79.61 in the FY 2015 base year to $89.13 in FY 2018. This trend is consistent with the increase in STS operating costs of 8.1 percent during the period and the 3.5 percent decrease in vehicle service hours between FY 2015 and FY 2018. 7. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 23.4 percent from $21.39 in FY 2015 base year to $26.39 in FY 2018. As noted above, STS operating costs increased 8.1 percent during the period; however, STS ridership decreased 12.4 Michael Baker International - 29 214 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 percent during the period from 175,329 passengers in FY 2015 to 153,559 passengers in FY 2018. 8. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 9.3 percent from 3.7 to 3.4 passengers per hour between the FY 2015 base year and FY 2018. The trend in this indicator reflects the 12.4 percent decrease in demand -response trips as vehicle service hours exhibited a decrease of 3.5 percent. 9. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 5.9 percent, from 0.27 in FY 2015 to 0.25 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, vehicle service miles decreased 6.9 percent from 660,734 miles to 615,113 miles. 10. On August 8, 2017, the Riverside City Council approved the fare increase on STS, which became effective the following month. STS raised the one-way trip fare from $2.00 to $3.00 in concert with RTA's fare increase. In addition, STS implemented a $2.00 one-way medical fare. 11. Further fare restructuring and handling involved the implementation of a mobile fare collection system. Implementation of the electronic fare collection system and mobile application will allow riders to pay for fares using a smart card and reserve rides via a web portal or mobile application. 12. Nonexempt personnel are represented by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Local 721. The most recent MOU between the City and the SEIU was for a four- year term from July 2016 through June 2020. The City and the SEIU enjoy a good working relationship. There are three shop stewards at STS. 13. In FY 2016, STS embarked on a major rebranding effort through a marketing plan being developed. The Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department has a graphic artist and marketing team who are providing guidance in creating a new brand and logo for STS. The vehicles and marketing collateral will feature the new look. The rebranding initiative will also encompass driver uniforms and grooming standards. 14. The current senior management analyst/transit manager joined STS in August 2015 and is tasked with transportation and grants management and interaction with RCTC. STS recruited a second transportation supervisor and converted a vacant senior office specialist position to a management analyst position and filled that vacant position. The transportation supervisor hired during the audit period is a certified trainer with over 20 years of experience having worked for LA Metro and RTA. 15. The FTA triennial review took place on March 27 and 28, 2018, with the final report being released on May 25, 2018. The triennial review focused on the City's compliance in 20 areas. No deficiencies were found with FTA requirements in 19 areas. The one area Michael Baker International - 30 215 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 where the City was found to be deficient was in technical capacity and award management. Michael Baker International - 31 216 Triennial Performance Audit of City of Riverside Special Transportation Services — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Pursue targeted marketing efforts and rebranding of the service. STS has been tasked with serving the mobility needs of seniors, ADA-certified persons, and persons with disabilities in the City of Riverside. The senior population in the city (those 60 years of age and over) accounts for approximately 15.1 percent of the population based on the 2018 American Community Survey estimates. Riverside remains below the national average of seniors age 60 and over, which is 21.8 percent; however, due to the Baby Boomer generation aging into their sixties, it is anticipated that the senior population will continue to increase. With the slow erosion in ridership in recent years, STS has been contemplating strategies to improve its messaging and outreach to the community. The transportation supervisor has been encouraged to conduct outreach and brainstorm ways to better engage the customer base. There is a perception in the community that the name "Special Transportation" is not particularly appealing and conveys a stodgy image. In the spirit of the City's innovative philosophy, STS should work with the City's marketing team to develop a brand identity for the transit service. This could be done in concert with the implementation of STS's fleet of nine -passenger minibuses and mobile fare collection. With the adoption of the $2.00 medical fare, STS could collaborate with local medical providers and services (such as dialysis centers and adult day-care facilities) that would market trips to their patients. Veterans are also another market that STS could target. 2. Conduct a strategic planning process. The annual Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) process has been a useful tool in monitoring operational trends but it does not provide a strategic vision over a 5-, 10-, or 20-year time frame. STS is self-sustaining in that it does not rely on City General Fund revenues for support. However, given changes in the transit funding landscape and the challenges in recruitment and marketing that pose potential impediments to growth and sustainability, STS needs a process that can provide guidance and momentum. A 5- or 10-year strategic plan would establish guiding principles of how STS can build upon its 45-year legacy as a demand -response transit operator by setting goals, objectives, and strategies for attaining its vision. A strategic plan would also build on the recent efforts of STS to be more technically innovative and offer direction on potential funding opportunities and partnerships. As part of this effort, STS should assess its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges for providing service in a dynamic transit market and capitalize on its position as a regional mobility provider. Furthermore, STS should consider emerging trends and innovative strategies being implemented or considered within the industry. Michael Baker International - 32 217 ATTACHMENT 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency Riverside Transit Agency March 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker INTERNATIONAL 218 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section II 11 Operator Compliance Requirements 11 Section III 17 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations 17 Section IV 20 TDA Performance Indicators 20 Section V 31 Review of Operator Functions 31 Operations 31 Maintenance 37 Administration and Management 42 Planning 47 Marketing 48 Human Resources and Risk Management 50 Procurement 52 Information Technology 52 Section VI 54 Findings 54 Recommendations 57 219 List of Figures, Tables & Graphs Figure 1-1 Organization Chart 2 Table 1-1 4 RTA Route Summary 4 Table 1-2 7 Fare Structure 7 Table 1-3 9 Vehicle Fleet 9 Table 11-1 11 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 11 Table IV-1 21 TDA Performance Indicators Systemwide 21 Table IV-2 22 TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route, Directly Operated 22 Table IV-3 23 TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route, Contracted 23 Table IV-4 24 TDA Performance Indicators General Public Service 24 Table IV-5 25 TDA Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Demand Response Service 25 Graph IV-1 26 Operating Costs Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response 26 Graph IV-2 26 Ridership Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response 26 Graph IV-3 27 Operating Cost per Passenger Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response 27 Graph IV-4 27 Operating Cost per Veh Service Hour Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response 27 Graph IV-5 28 Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response28 Graph IV-6 28 Fare Recovery Ratio Systemwide, General Public, and Demand Response 28 Table V-1 34 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Directly Operated Fixed Route 34 Table V-2 35 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route 35 Table V-3 36 220 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Demand Response 36 Table V-4 40 Maintenance Performance Indicators Directly Operated Fixed Route 40 Table V-5 41 Maintenance Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route 41 Table V-6 42 Maintenance Performance Indicators Demand Response 42 Table V-7 45 Administration Performance Indicators Directly Operated Fixed Route 45 Table V-8 46 Administration Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route 46 Table V-9 46 Administration Performance Indicators Demand Response 46 Table V-10 49 Customer Complaints 49 Table V-11 51 Employee Turnover 51 221 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section Introduction RCTC engaged the Michael Baker consultant team to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction. This performance audit is conducted for Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years (FYs) 2015-16 through 2017- 18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate RTA's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates RTA's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code. This task involves ascertaining whether RTA is meeting the PUC's reporting requirements and is endeavoring to implement prior audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency's departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. This TDA audit is intended to provide RTA with an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with transit management, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities published by the California Department of Transportation was used to guide in the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System RTA is the largest transit operator within Riverside County and has one of the largest service areas in the United States. The agency was established as a Joint Powers Agency on August 15, 1975 and began operating bus service on March 16, 1977. RTA is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) for western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the approximate 2,500 square mile service area including providing driver training and assisting with grant applications. In FY 2018, RTA provided both local and regional services throughout the region with 39 regional, local, rural and trolley service routes, 8 CommuterLink Express routes, RapidLink Gold Line and Dial - A -Ride (DAR) services. In the cities of Corona, Beaumont, and Banning, RTA coordinates regional services with municipal transit systems. In the city of Riverside, RTA coordinates with the city's Riverside Special Transportation Services, which provides ADA complementary service to RTA's fixed -route services. Michael Baker International - 1 222 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 RTA is governed by a board of directors comprised of 22 elected officials from 18 cities in western Riverside County and four members of the County Board of Supervisors. The member jurisdictions include the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Menifee, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula, Wildomar, and the unincorporated areas of Riverside County Supervisorial Districts I, II, III, and V. The RTA Chief Executive Officer reports directly to the Board. RTA is managed and administered by the Chief Executive Officer with support from the entire executive team. RTA's primary facility is located in the city of Riverside and houses the majority of the administration, operations, and maintenance departments with approximately 445 active employees on site. RTA's secondary facility, located in Hemet, opened in June 2000. It now has approximately 63 maintenance and operations employees assigned to the division. Figure 1-1 shows the RTA organization chart. Figure 1-1 Organization Chart ERA Organizational Structure FY 2019 Updated July 1,2018 = Pewee Neat TIming awe wee. iticna Ma Menlo Eulormr tome COL Om, Mined! Yee Yvan aet 111111111.11/11 Source: RTA Transit Services RTA has both directly operated services and contracted services. Southland Transit is a private transportation company that provided Dial -A -Ride (DAR) service for the last four months of FY 2018, taking over from Transdev (formerly Veolia Transportation Services), which provided the service for the first eight months of FY 2018. Supplemental taxi overflow service is provided by Network Paratransit Systems. The supplemental taxi service plays an important role in Michael Baker International - 2 223 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 accommodating unproductive paratransit trips, such as trips during peak period with capacity constraints or trips to remote areas. In FY 2012, Empire Transportation began providing fixed route service and was the fixed route contractor for the entirety of the current audit period. The hours of operations are based on the route classification and service area. The overall span of services is from 3:50 a.m. to 11:55 p.m. The DAR service span mirrors the hours of fixed -route service, excluding the CommuterLink Express service. Transit Centers: RTA has two primary transit centers to support its bus network. These transit centers are the Corona Transit Center and the Perris Station Transit Center. RTA also has other major transfer points including the Galleria at Tyler, University of California Riverside, Moreno Valley Mall, Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno Valley College, Hemet Valley Mall, Mount San Jacinto College, Lake Elsinore Outlet Center, Temecula Promenade Mall, and County Administration Building, among others. New mobility hubs are located at the Temecula Promenade Mall to provide increased transit access to the cities of Temecula and Murrieta, and the Vine Street Layover next to the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station. RTA provides connections to Metrolink Stations located within the RTA service area including stations serving the relatively new Metrolink Perris Valley Line. These stations include North Main Corona, West Corona, Riverside -La Sierra, Pedley, Riverside -Downtown, Hunter Park/UCR, Moreno Valley/March Field, Perris, and South Perris. An overview of each service follows: Regional and Local Fixed Routes: Regional routes comprise the backbone of the bus network between metropolitan areas along primary corridors (including freeways). Local routes supplement regional routes by circulating through various neighborhoods and serving secondary corridors. Local routes also serve as feeders to regional and express routes by transporting customers within a community on shorter trips. All 36 routes operate Monday through Friday with many routes operating on the weekends. CommuterLink Express Routes: These regional express routes provide limited -stop service designed to primarily transport commuters to and from employment sites and provide connectivity to transit operations heading outside of western Riverside County, such as Metrolink. These buses use the freeway system to provide faster service. CommuterLink routes provide service for long-distance commuters traveling to Metrolink, Coaster, and Sprinter rail stations; business parks; shopping malls; and regional transit facilities. Service operates primarily on the weekdays only. Table 1-1 provides a summary of local, regional and CommuterLink routes: Michael Baker International - 3 224 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 1-1 RTA Route Summary Route Number Destinations Service Days/Frequency (minutes) Weekday Saturday Sunday RapidLink Gold Line UCR, Downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler, Corona Transit Center 15 No Service 1 UCR, Downtown Riverside, Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station, Smith & 6thW. Corona Metrolink 15-20 15-20 15-20 3 Eastvale, Norco, Corona Transit Center, 10th & Belle - Corona 50-60 120 120 8 Lake Elsinore, Wildomar 60 60-75 60-75 10 Big Springs & Watkins, Downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler 30 60 60 11 Moreno Valley Mall, March ARB, Alessandro & Frederick 30-60 60 60 12 La Cadena & Stephens, Downtown Riverside, Merced & Magnolia 30-60 60 60 13 Hunter Park Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler - Riverside 30-60 60 60 14 Galleria at Tyler, Downtown Riverside, Loma Linda VA Hospital 30-60 60 60 15 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Merced & Magnolia 30 45 42 16 UCR, Moreno Valley Mall 15-30 30 30 18 Sunnymead Ranch, Moreno Valley Mall, Moreno Valley College 55-60 60 60 19 Moreno Valley Mall, Perris Station Transit Center — Trumble Road 15-30 30-60 30-60 19 F Service to Perris Fairgrounds (Hourly 1:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. from Perris Station Transit Center & Hourly 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. from Perris Fairgrounds) No Service 60 60 20 Magnolia & Elizabeth, Social Security Office, Moreno Valley March Field Metrolink Station, RUMC, Kaiser Permanente, Moreno Valley College 30-45 50-60 50-60 21 Galleria at Tyler, Country Village via Jurupa Valley 60-70 60-80 60-80 22 Downtown Riverside, Perris Station Transit Center, Lake Elsinore Outlet Center 40-60 60 60 23 Temecula , Murrieta, Wildomar 60 60 60 24 Temecula, Pechanga Resort 75-90 75-90 75-90 26 Orange Crest, Moreno Valley March Field Metrolink Station, Moreno Valley Mall 50 No Service 27 Galleria at Tyler, Orange Crest, Perris, Sun City, Hemet, Florida & Lincoln 30-60 60 60 Michael Baker International - 4 225 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Route Number Destinations Service Days/Frequency (minutes) Weekday Saturday Sunday 29 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Eastvale, via Jurupa Valley 50-60 60-70 60-70 30 Weston & Strohm, Perris Station Transit Center, May Ranch 70 70 No Service 31 Moreno Valley Mall, Beaumont, Banning, San Jacinto, Hemet Valley Mall 60-70 60-70 60-70 32 Hemet Valley Mall, Mt. San Jacinto College- San Jacinto 70-75 70 60-70 33 Hemet -Sanderson, East Hemet 70-75 No Service 40 Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake, Quail Valley, Sun City 90 No Service 41 Mead Valley Comm. Center, RUMC 60 45-50 45-50 42 Hemet Valley Mall, San Jacinto, Soboba Casino 70-75 105 No Service 49 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Country Village 35 50 50 50 Jury Trolley — Eden Lutheran Church, Riverside County Courthouse, Downtown Riverside Runs Mon- Thurs: 15-30 No Service 51 Crest Cruiser UCR, Canyon Crest, Riverside 40 No Service 52 UCR, Hunter Park Metrolink Station 35-40 No Service 54 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Shuttle 20-40 Peak No Service 54 F Riverside Festival of Lights Shuttle Seasonal from Late November through Late December 55 Temecula Trolley/Harveston, Promenade mall, County Center Drive 15-20 Peak No Service 61 South Perris Metrolink Station, Sun City, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula 30-40 60-70 No Service 74 San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Sun City, South Perris Metrolink Station, Perris 40-60 60 No Service 79 Hemet, Winchester, Temecula 60-70 60-70 No Service 200 San Bernardino Downtown Transit Center, Downtown Riverside, Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Galleria at Tyler, La Sierra Metrolink Station, Village at Orange, Anaheim, Disneyland 55-60 60-120 60-120 202 Murrieta, Temecula, Oceanside Transit Center 30-40 Peak No Service 204 UCR, Downtown Riverside, Country Village, Ontario Mills, Montclair Transcenter 60-75 Peak No Service 205 Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Outlet Center Park and Ride, Tom's Farms, Dos Lagos, Corona Transit Center, Village at Orange 30-50 Peak No Service 206 Michael Baker International - 5 226 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Route Number Destinations Service Days/Frequency (minutes) Weekday Saturday Sunday 208 Temecula, Murrieta, South Perris Metrolink Station, Perris Station Transit Center, Moreno Valley Mall, UCR, Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside 30-40 Peak No Service 210/SunLine 220 Palm Desert, Thousand Palms, Beaumont Walmart, Moreno Valley, UCR, Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station 20-60 Peak No Service 212 San Jacinto, Hemet, Perris Station Transit Center, UCR, Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside 30-60 Peak No Service 217 San Jacinto, Hemet, Temecula, Escondido 20-30 Peak No Service OCTA 794/794A La Sierra Metrolink Station, Canyon Community Church, South Coast Metro 30 Peak No Service Source: RTA RTA implemented the following service changes during the audit period: • New CommuterLink express Route 200 service on Interstate 215 and State Route 91, utilizing the new express lanes in Riverside County, and replacing existing Route 216 (effective January 14, 2018). • Improved Route 19 Perris to Moreno Valley weekday service to 15-minute frequency (effective January 14, 2018). • Introduced the Riverside Festival of Lights special Route 54F shuttle. • Extended Route 30 in September 2016 to better serve the May Ranch section of city of Perris. • Implemented the Route 54 in October 2016 to connect Perris Valley Line passengers with key job locations in downtown Riverside. • Implemented Sunday service on the remaining three no -service days: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day to meet increased demand from the community. • Streamlined downtown Riverside bus operations with the closure of the Riverside Downtown Terminal in January 2017. • Restructured Route 16 in January 2017 by terminating the route at University of California, Riverside and coordinating the service with Route 1 through efficient passenger connections. • Merged Routes 31 and 35 to provide a one -seat ride between Hemet, San Jacinto, and Moreno Valley via Beaumont/Banning. Dial -A -Ride Service: RTA is the designated CTSA for western Riverside County. RTA's senior disabled and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) service is referred to as Dial -A -Ride (DAR) service. In accordance with the ADA, RTA provides wheelchair lift equipped vehicles for curb -to -curb, shared - ride transportation services. Reservations for service must be made at least 24 hours in advance, with the option to call up to 3 days in advance. DAR operates during the same days and hours as fixed route buses within a % mile range of routes. Pick-up times are scheduled within one hour before or Michael Baker International - 6 227 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 one hour after each rider's requested pick- up time. All ADA Priority DAR riders must apply and be certified for the service to become eligible. RTA has reduced the average application processing time to an average of 10 days. Personal Care Attendants (PCAs) and companions are also able to ride DAR service with an ADA Priority DAR rider. PCAs can ride at no cost, however companions and children are required to pay a fare. ADA Priority DAR riders are eligible for trips throughout the RTA service area within 3/ mile of fixed routes. Seniors 65 years and older and persons with disabilities who do not meet ADA Priority Criteria are eligible for local DAR service within a single city and within % mile of fixed routes. Companions are not eligible for these riders. This policy ensures that space is available for those attending to ADA Priority passengers. The rider will need to present proof of disability or age eligibility at the pick-up location. The base fare for DAR service was $3.00 per passenger, per boarding. The maximum fare was $9.00 per one-way trip and is based on the number of city zones that the rider travels. Depending on where the trip begins and ends, the rider may be required to transfer. In an effort to improve the availability of appointment time slots and make DAR service more efficient for passengers, RTA has adopted a no-show policy that is designed to limit the number of late cancellations and no-shows. Any DAR rider who is a no-show or cancels their trip after 6:00 p.m. the day before their scheduled pick-up may be given penalty points. Ifa passenger accumulates a specific number of points over a period of time, their service will be temporarily suspended. Fares RTA's fare structure during the audit period is shown in Table 1-2. Although there were no fare increases during the audit period, FY 2016-FY 2018, a fare increase was enacted in July 2019. In July 2013, RTA began offering discounted fares to veterans, active duty military, police, and fire personnel. The discount for these groups was set at the senior/disabled/Medicare discount for fixed route and CommuterLinkservices. Table 1-2 Fare Structure (During the Audit Period) Fixed Route (includes Rapid Link) Base Fare Day Pass 7-Day Pass 30-Day Pass General $ 1.50 $ 4.00 $ 16.00 $ 50.00 Student (grades 1-12) $ 1.50 $ 4.00 $ 16.00 $ 35.00 Senior (60+)/Disabled $ 0.70 $ 2.00 $ 16.00 $ 23.00 Medicare Card Holder $ 0.70 $ 2.00 $ 16.00 $ 23.00 Veteran $ 0.70 $ 2.00 $ 16.00 $ 23.00 Children 46" tall or under $ 0.25 n/a n/a n/a CommuterLink Base Fare Day Pass 30-Day Pass General $ 3.00 $ 7.00 $ 75.00 Student (grades 1-12) $ 3.00 $ 7.00 $ 75.00 Senior (60+)/Disabled $ 2.00 $ 5.00 $ 50.00 Michael Baker International - 7 228 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Medicare Card Holder $ 2.00 $ 5.00 $ 50.00 Veteran $ 2.00 $ 5.00 $ 50.00 Children 46" tall or under $ 2.00 n/a n/a Dial -A -Ride Base Fare 10-Ticket Books Senior/Disabled $ 3.00 $ 30.00 Medicare Card Holder $ 3.00 $ 30.00 Children under46" $ 0.50 n/a Source: RTA RTA administers the following cooperative fare agreements and subsidy programs: ■ University of California, Riverside - U-Pass Program, Route 51 Crest Cruiser ■ Riverside City College - Go -Pass Program ■ Moreno Valley College - Go -Pass Program ■ La Sierra University - U-Pass Program ■ California Baptist University - U-Pass Program ■ Mount San Jacinto College - Go -Pass Program ■ City of Riverside - City Pass for Employees ■ City of Temecula - Route 55 Temecula Trolley ■ County of Riverside - Route 50 Jury Trolley ■ Riverside County Transportation Commission — Festival of Lights Shuttle ■ Norco College - Go -Pass Program RTA had transfer agreements with the following transit agencies: • Corona Cruiser, Omnitrans, SunLine and Pass Transit (Banning and Beaumont): 1-Day and multi -day passes are accepted for base fare ($1.50/ for General/Youth and $0.70 for Senior/ Disabled with proper ID) on local fixed route buses at transfer locations only. Transfer media are not valid for Dial -A -Ride service on Sunline, Pass Transit. Omnitrans t ransfer media is valid on CommuterLink with payment of any fare differential. 0 m n i t r a n s t ransfer media is not valid on Dial -A -Ride, and RTA transfer media is not valid on Access (Omnitrans demand response service). • Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA): 1-Day and multi -day are accepted on Routes 200 and 216 only in Orange County and only for base fare ($1.50 for General/Youth and $0.70 for Senior/Disabled/Veteran with proper ID). Additional fare is required. OCTA passes are not accepted in Riverside County. • Metrolink (RCTC has agreement with Metrolink): RTA accepts valid Metrolink passes for the full fare on routes that serve Metrolink stations for customers traveling to or from a Metrolink station during the period from one hour before to one after Metrolink's service Michael Baker International - 8 229 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 hours. The Metrolink pass must be valid on the day of travel. New, unvalidated 10-trip Metrolink passes carried by passengers traveling to Metrolink stations are also accepted on boardings as those pass -holders are required to validate their new passes at the stations. Metrolink passes are not valid on DAR service. Vehicle Fleet In FY 2018, there were a total of 320 revenue vehicles in the RTA fleet. Fixed route vehicles totaled 210 (145 for directly operated service and 65 for contracted service), while demand response vehicles totaled 110 (excluding taxis). The fixed route fleet has been converted to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuel except for 39 contracted fixed route vehicles. Table 1-3 Vehicle Fleet Vehicle Type Year Number of Vehicles Service Mode Seating Directly Operated Fixed Route/CommuterLink (145 vehicles) Gillig G27D102N4 2013 81 Fixed 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2013 16 CommuterLink 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2014 9 Fixed 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2014 2 CommuterLink 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2016 15 Fixed 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2016 7 CommuterLink 38 Gillig G27D102N4 2016 15 Bus Rapid Transit 38 Contracted Fixed Route/CommuterLink (65 vehicles) El Dorado National Aero Elite 2012 5 CommuterLink 28 El Dorado National Aero Elite 2012 5 Fixed 28 El Dorado National Aero Elite 2013 9 Fixed 28 El Dorado National Aero Elite 2013 1 CommuterLink 28 El Dorado National Aero Elite 320 2015 1 Fixed 26 El Dorado National Aero Elite 320 2016 25 Fixed 26 El Dorado National Aero Elite 320 2016 10 CommuterLink 26 Startrans Senator II HD 2018 4 Fixed 28 Hometown Trolley Villager 2018 5 Fixed 28 Contracted Demand Response (110 vehicles) Goshen GCII 2013 5 Dial -A -Ride 12 El Dorado National Aero Tech 220 2016 36 Dial -A -Ride 12 Glaval Universal 2017 30 Dial -A -Ride 12 Startrans Senator II 2018 39 Dial -A -Ride 12 Source: RTA, as of 12/31/18 In addition to the aforementioned revenue vehicles, RTA has a fleet of 58 non -revenue support vehicles. Replacement and expansion of the fleet is determined by the Fleet Management Plan. Due to the shorter useful life of the contracted vehicles, replacement of contracted vehicles is on - Michael Baker International - 9 230 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 going. The contracted fixed route vehicles were operated and maintained by Empire Transportation starting in FY 2012. DAR vehicles were operated and maintained by Transdev starting in February 2014 until Southland Transit took over the operations and maintenance for DAR service in February 2018. The older fleet of directly operated fixed route vehicles reached the end of their useful lives and were replaced during the previous audit period as well as the current review period. RTA purchased 145 40-foot CNG buses from Gillig Corporation. Vehicle delivery began in February 2014. RTA was able to keep a less than 20 percent spare ratio during the fleet replacement. The replacement buses have state-of-the-art technologies to provide enhanced passenger safety, better fuel efficiency, and decreased emissions. Fleet Facilities RTA operates directly operated fixed route service out of two facilities, one located in the city of Riverside and the other in the city of Hemet. While operations and maintenance are provided at both facilities, most of RTA's administration is located in the main Riverside office. Contracted fixed route and DAR services are operated out of two facilities in the city of Perris. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is available at the Riverside and Hemet facilities for the agency's alternative fueled fleet. Because of the extensive investment needed for CNG technology and fueling stations, RTA's maintenance facility in Hemet also serves as a public fueling station for CNG vehicles. Access is available in Riverside for fueling by other agencies including Omnitrans and the city of Riverside on an emergency basis. RTA generates additional revenue from the sale and use of CNG. The current facilities can accommodate present operations and have room for limited expansion if necessary. Michael Baker International - 10 231 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of RTA's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, which was developed by the Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of eleven measures taken from relevant sections of the Public Utilities Code and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator submitted Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: annual reports to the RTPA 99243 (For General Public and Specialized based upon the Uniform Service Submissions) System of Accounts and Records established by the FY 2016: September 15, 2016 State Controller. Report is due FY 2017: November 28, 2017 90 days after end of fiscal year FY 2018: December 15, 2018 (Sept. 28/29), or 110 days (Oct. 19/20) if filed electronically *Note: New state legislation was (Internet). passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. Conclusion: Complied Michael Baker International - 11 232 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90- day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: October 14, 2016 FY 2017: October 9, 2017 FY 2018: October 5, 2018 Source: FY2016-2018 RTA Basic Financial Reports Conclusion: Complied The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B RTA and its contract operators participate in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Terminal inspections were conducted at RTA operation facilities located in Hemet at 700 Scaramella Circle, Hemet, and in Riverside at 1825 3rd Street. Inspections were also conducted at the contract operator facilities located at 110 South G Street, Perris (Transdev/Southland Transit), and at 340 Mountain Avenue, Perris (Empire Transportation). RTA — Hemet: Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were May 12, 2015; May 16, 2016; May 15 & 31, 2017; and May 29 & 30, 2018. RTA — Riverside: Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were May 20, 2015 and May 2 & 3, 2018. Michael Baker International - 12 233 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Transdev/Southland Transit - Perris: Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were May 6-7, 2015; June 8 & 9, 2016; June 6-8 & 13, 2017; and March 12 & 14, 2018. Empire Transportation — Perris: Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were January 20-22, 2015; February 8-11, 2016; February 22 & 23, 2017; February 27, 2017; and March 5-8, 2018. Inspections were rated satisfactory by the CHP. Conclusion: Complied The operator's claim forTDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, RTA's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance are submitted in compliance with the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 RTA is subject to Section 99270.1 and is required to achieve or exceed a mandatory blended farebox recovery ratio target established by RCTC. Target Actual* FY 2016: 17.45% 24.31% FY 2017: 17.48% 20.64% FY 2018: 17.44% 21.69% *Includes eligible non -fare revenue in calculation. Michael Baker International - 13 234 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Source: FY 2016-2018 RTA Basic Financial Reports Conclusion: Complied The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage change in the annual RTA operating budget: FY 2016: + 3.1% FY 2017: + 10.0% FY 2018: + 7.3% Source: Adopted RTA Budgets for FYs 2014-15 through 2017-18 Conclusion: Complied The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 RTA's performance measures are defined in accordance with PUC requirements. RTA collects data electronically and employs a verification method including auto- entry into TransTrack. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.1 RTA must meet a blended farebox recovery ratio target that is under a separate operator compliance requirement. Conclusion: Farebox under this compliance requirement is not Michael Baker International - 14 235 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency— FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three - twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. applicable If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 RTA must meet a blended farebox recovery ratio target that is under a separate operator compliance requirement. Conclusion: Farebox under this compliance requirement is not applicable The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 As described in the annual basic financial statements, RTA contributes to the California Public Employees Retirement System (CaIPERS) under the 2% @ 62 provision on or after January 1, 2013 (2% @ 55 provision prior to January 1, 2013). Participants are required to contribute 6.25%-7% of their annual covered salary. In accordance with labor union MOUs, RTA contributes 8.018% to its employees' retirement. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) RTA utilizes federal funds that are available to the agency, as reported in the Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports as follows: FY 2016: $21,317,679 (Operations) $8,721,936 (Capital) FY 2017: $15,432,001 (Operations) $12,638,030 (Capital) FY 2018: $18,483,000 (Operations) $4,199,182 (Capital) Michael Baker International - 15 236 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to RTA, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. In addition, new state legislation was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to RTA (rural and urbanized farebox recovery ratios), as the transit operator is subject to the blended ratio under PUC 99270.1. 2. The blended farebox recovery ratio target established by RCTC for RTA service was met in each year of the audit. Including eligible non -fare revenue, the farebox recovery ratio was 24.31 percent in FY 2016; 20.64 percent in FY 2017; and 21.69 percent in FY 2018, according to the audited basic financial statements. The average annual farebox recovery ratio was 22.21 percent. 3. RTA and its contract operators participate in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Terminal inspections received satisfactory ratings by the CHP. 4. The operating budget exhibited modest increases and did not exceed 15 percent during the period. After a 3.1 percent increase in FY 2016, the budget increased 10 percent in FY 2017. The FY 2018 operating budget increased by a modest 7.3 percent. This increase in operating budget was correlated to service increases made during the study period and reflected increases in vehicle service hours and miles during the period. Michael Baker International - 16 237 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency— FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations RTA's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Enhance analysis of ridership and demographic trends (Starting FY 2017) Background: The prior audit noted that RTA's systemwide ridership increased by 9.7 percent for the previous triennial period (FY 2013-2015). Additionally, the agency implemented several marketing campaigns during this same time. RTA had not formally analyzed the underlying causes of the ridership increase or formally attempted to equate marketing efforts to the increase in ridership. It was suggested that RTA perform more detailed analysis of customer demographic and regional socioeconomic trends in order to determine the causes and trends for increased ridership over the audit period. RTA should also increase customer communication following large scale marketing promotions. Customer communications can include customer surveys, online polls, and social media presence. Increasing these types of communications can help RTA gain better understanding of customer demographics, ridership trends, route trends, agency needs and challenges, overall reception of marketing programs, customer preferences for accessing RTA data, and other feedback relevant to advancing marketing goals. Enhanced understanding of ridership and demographic trends can allow RTA to make more informed and targeted marketing, policy, and service decisions. Actions taken by RTA: RTA completed a Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study (Market Assessment) in October 2018 (FY 2018-19) to better understand the factors contributing to a decline in ridership that was evident starting in FY 2015 (after growth in ridership during the previous audit period) and to understand the motivations and drivers of transit use. The Market Assessment methodology included conducting onboard rider surveys and soliciting feedback from non -riders living in RTA service area. The Market Assessment has helped RTA gain a greater understanding of its customer demographics, market presence and brand strength. The information gathered and analyzed in the Market Assessment is being used to identify opportunities to increase ridership and to enhance communication and outreach to potential riders. RTA filled a new Community Engagement Coordinator position as part of the marketing team to implement the recommendations of the Market Assessment. Michael Baker International - 17 238 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented, having commenced in March 2018 and worked on during the audit period. Prior Recommendation 2 Utilize onboard bus systems on contracted bus service (Starting FY 2017) Background: RTA had been utilizing integrated onboard CAD/AVL data feeds to automate NTD reporting and transfer of maintenance data only on directly operated buses. In order to increase consistency and streamline data transfer, it was suggested that RTA implement the integrated CAD/AVL data feeds on contracted bus services. Additionally, the agency should make real- time arrival information available for all routes, both publicly through GTFS-real time feeds and through an agency -branded mobile app. Expanding these technologies to contracted services would allow RTA to automate annual data reporting and provide better customer service for the entire system. Actions taken by RTA: Effective May 2017, RTA implemented integrated onboard CAD/AVL feeds, as well as Automated Passenger Counters (APCs) on its contracted fleet in an effort to increase consistency and streamline data transfer. The APCs were certified, and passenger miles are being reported for FY 2018. This implementation also made real-time arrival information available for all routes through GTFS real-time feeds and through RTA-branded BusWatch mobile app. The APCs fleet -wide now provide a rigorous level of data at route, trip, and stop level for all RTA fixed routes, setting a solid foundation for service level decisions as well as enhanced on -time performance. This data is reviewed in detail each year for all routes and trips. As an example, the agency used the APC data as a core input to service rationalization at trip level implemented in September 2018. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Monitor preventable accidents for directly operated bus service. (Ongoing) Background: Preventable accidents on directly operated service increased dramatically during the prior audit period. From FY 2012 to FY 2015, the number of preventable accidents increased from 28 to 79, a 182 percent increase. RTA did increase service and implement new buses to directly operated fleet during this period. However, the increase in preventable accidents was disproportionally large compared to the increases in service miles and hours during the audit period, 22.6 percent and 21.9 percent respectively. It was suggested that RTA further investigate primary causes of the accidents, and potentially adjust safety processes and training. Reducing the number of preventable accidents can improve operator safety and decrease maintenance costs. Michael Baker International - 18 239 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency— FYs 2016-2018 Actions taken by RTA: After the increase in preventable accidents in the previous audit period, RTA reviewed its Safety Management System (SMS), which is tasked with the prevention of preventable accidents. The system is comprised of four pillars - Safety Policy, Safety Risk Management, Safety Assurance and Safety Promotion. The system is supported by data collected, beginning with the initial report of an accident. When an accident occurs, or is reported, the operator involved is required to write a report. An Operations Supervisor is dispatched to the location to investigate. The supervisor is required to submit a supplemental report, which includes an analysis of the root cause of the accident. The reports are forwarded to Risk Management, where they are catalogued, categorized and processed. Video from the bus surveillance system is ordered, downloaded and archived. This renewed focus on preventable accidents has resulted in reduction in these accidents from 79 in FY 2015 to 67 in FY 2018. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International - 19 240 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews RTA's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-5 provide the performance indicators for the followingservices: • Systemwide • Fixed Route, Directly Operated • Fixed Route, Contracted • General Public (total of fixed route directly operated and contracted) • Demand Response (Dial -A -Ride) Graphs are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. Data in the tables and graphs were derived from several sources, including National Transit Database (NTD) reports and RTA's State Controller employee count. Sources are noted in footnotes below the tables. Michael Baker International - 20 241 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 TDA Performance Indicators Systemwide Verified TDA Statistics & Performance Indicators Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period cyo Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Operating Costs(l)(a) $58,292,112 $58,672,060 $70,437,592 $76,320,585 30.9% Unlinked Passengers(b) 9,651,592 9,238,265 8,741,975 8,583,410 -11.1% Vehicle Service Hours(b) 734,212 787,797 833,397 871,285 18.7% Vehicle Service Miles(b) 11,565,366 12,289,234 12,874,210 13,314,632 15.1% Employee FTEs(c) 700 739 799 815 16.4% Passenger Fare Revenue(2)(a) $15,435,458 $14,263,722 $14,538,806 $16,551,837 7.2% Operating Cost per Passenger $6.04 $6.35 $8.06 $8.89 47.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $79.39 $74.48 $84.52 $87.60 10.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.04 $4.77 $5.47 $5.73 13.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 13.15 11.73 10.49 9.85 -25.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.83 0.75 0.68 0.64 -22.8% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee FTE 1,049 1,066 1,043 1,069 1.9% Average Fare per Passenger $1.60 $1.54 $1.66 $1.93 20.6% Farebox Recovery Ratio 26.5% 24.3% 20.6% 21.7% -18.1 Percentage Change in Consumer Price Index (CPI -All Items & Consumers, LA -Riverside - Orange Co.) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) RTA Basic Financial Statements - Note 11 (audited data) (b) National Transit Database (c) RTA State Controller Employee Count Notes: (1) Operating costs exclude depreciation, amortization, grant fund expenses and exempt routes. (2) Systemwide passenger fare revenue data exclude exempt routes. Michael Baker International - 21 242 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-2 TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route, Directly Operated Verified TDA Statistics & Performance Indicators Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Operating Costs(1)(a) $36,259,583 $36,450,204 $44,628,874 $48,439,900 33.6% Unlinked Passengers(a) 7,480,111 7,277,474 6,835,663 6,733,159 -10.0% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 362,930 405,531 417,149 454,084 25.1% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 5,137,177 5,744,208 5,877,179 6,414,376 24.9% Employee FTEs(b) 369 396 416 444 20.1% Passenger Fare Revenue(')(a) $7,538,384 $7,449,258 $6,747,347 $6,357,771 -15.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.85 $5.01 $6.53 $7.19 48.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $99.91 $89.88 $106.99 $106.68 6.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $7.06 $6.35 $7.59 $7.55 7.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 20.61 17.95 16.39 14.83 -28.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.46 1.27 1.16 1.05 -27.9% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee FTE 982 1,025 1,002 1,023 4.2% Average Fare per Passenger $1.01 $1.02 $0.99 $0.94 -6.3% Farebox Recovery Ratio 20.8% 20.4% 15.1% 13.1% -36.9% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database (b) RTA State Controller Employee Count - RTA Employees Notes: (1) Data are unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. 243 Michael Baker International - 22 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-3 TDA Performance Indicators Fixed Route, Contracted Verified TDA Statistics & Performance Indicators Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Operating Costs(1)(a) $11,677,645 $11,537,307 $14,966,488 $15,491,469 32.7% Unlinked Passengers(a) 1,753,518 1,534,671 1,479,935 1,434,349 -18.2% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 185,133 187,198 205,960 206,028 11.3% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 3,163,778 3,186,129 3,471,200 3,437,415 8.6% Employee FTEs(b) 151 153 165 162 7.1% Passenger Fare Revenue('>(a> $2,106,473 $1,939,321 $2,035,854 $2,850,017 35.3% Operating Cost per Passenger $6.66 $7.52 $10.11 $10.80 62.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $63.08 $61.63 $72.67 $75.19 19.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.69 $3.62 $4.31 $4.51 22.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 9.47 8.20 7.19 6.96 -26.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.55 0.48 0.43 0.42 -24.7% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee FTE 1,223 1,224 1,251 1,271 3.9% Average Fare per Passenger $1.20 $1.26 $1.38 $1.99 65.4% Farebox Recovery Ratio(2) 18.0% 16.8% 13.6% 18.4% 2.0% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database (b) RTA State Controller Employee Count - Empire Employees Notes: (1) Data are unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. 244 Michael Baker International - 23 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-4 TDA Performance Indicators General Public Service (Directly Operated and Contracted Fixed Route) Verified TDA Statistics & Performance Indicators Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Operating Costs(1)(a) $47,937,228 $47,987,511 $59,595,362 $63,931,369 33.4% Unlinked Passengers(a) 9,233,629 8,812,145 8,315,598 8,167,508 -11.5% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 548,063 592,729 623,109 660,112 20.4% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 8,300,955 8,930,337 9,348,379 9,851,791 18.7% Employee FTEs(b) 521 549 581 606 16.3% Passenger Fare Revenue(')(a) $9,644,857 $9,388,579 $8,783,201 $9,207,788 -4.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $5.19 $5.45 $7.17 $7.83 50.9% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $87.47 $80.96 $95.64 $96.85 10.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.77 $5.37 $6.37 $6.49 12.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 16.85 14.87 13.35 12.37 -26.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.11 0.99 0.89 0.83 -25.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee FTE 1,052 1,080 1,136 1,090 3.6% Average Fare per Passenger $1.04 $1.07 $1.06 $1.13 8.7% Farebox Recovery Ratio(2) 20.1% 19.6% 14.7% 14.4% -28.4% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database (b) RTA State Controller Employee Count - RTA & Empire Employees Notes: (1) Data are unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. 245 Michael Baker International - 24 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-5 TDA Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Demand Response Service Verified TDA Statistics & Performance Indicators Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Operating Costs(1)(a) $11,290,448 $10,859,416 $11,840,455 $13,604,481 20.5% Unlinked Passengers(a) 417,963 426,120 426,377 415,902 -0.5% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 186,149 195,068 210,288 211,173 13.4% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 3,264,411 3,358,897 3,525,831 3,462,841 6.1% Employee FTEs(b) 179 190 218 209 16.8% Passenger Fare Revenue('>(a> $1,599,765 $1,581,407 $1,573,647 $1,505,152 -5.9% Operating Cost per Passenger $27.01 $25.48 $27.77 $32.71 21.1% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $60.65 $55.67 $56.31 $64.42 6.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.46 $3.23 $3.36 $3.93 13.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 2.25 2.18 2.03 1.97 -12.3% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.13 0.13 0.12 0.12 -6.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee FTE 1,040 1,027 965 1,010 -2.8% Average Fare per Passenger $3.83 $3.71 $3.69 $3.62 -5.4% Farebox Recovery Ratio(2) 14.2% 14.6% 13.3% 11.1% -21.9% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database (b) RTA State Controller Employee Count - TD/STI & Network Employees Notes: (1) Data are unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. 246 Michael Baker International - 25 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $90,000,000 $80,000,000 $70,000,000 $60,000,000 $50,000,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response $40,000,000 $30,000,000 $20,000,000 $10,000,000 Ili.. 11111 11111 $dlr. - FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Total Fixed Route • Fixed Route, Directly Operated • Fixed Route, Contracted • Dial -a -Ride 12,000,00(, 10,000,000 8,000,000 6,000,000 4,000,000 2,000,000 Graph IV-2 Ridership Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Total Fixed Route • Fixed Route, Directly Operated • Fixed Route, Contracted • Dial -a -Ride Michael Baker International - 26 247 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $0.00 Graph IV-3 Operating Cost per Passenger Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response 11111 Hill I n d 11111 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Total Fixed Route • Fixed Route, Directly Operated • Fixed Route, Contracted • Dial -a -Ride $120.00 $100.00 $80.00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $0.00 Graph IV-4 Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response Ib' 11111 Ilill 11111 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • Systemwide • Total Fixed Route • Fixed Route, Directly Operated • Fixed Route, Contracted • Dial -a -Ride Michael Baker International - 27 248 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 25.0 20.0 15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Graph IV-5 Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response dill Ilk db. ilk FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Total Fixed Route ■ Fixed Route, Directly Operated ■ Fixed Route, Contracted ■ Dial -a -Ride Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio Systemwide, General Public (Direct & Contracted), and Demand Response FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ Systemwide ■ Total Fixed Route ■ Fixed Route, Directly Operated ■ Fixed Route, Contracted ■ Dial -a -Ride Note: Systemwide ratio is audited; modal ratios are unaudited. Michael Baker International - 28 249 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs for RTA general public service increased by 33.4 percent over the last three years, which is due to several factors including reconfiguration of service, service expansion, and increased service frequencies sustained during the audit period. Operating costs for DAR service increased by 20.5 percent during the audit period from the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018. Systemwide operating costs increased by 30.9 percent while the Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased by 9.6 percent during the same period. While there is a variance, trends are monitored by RCTC through the annual Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) process. As part of implementing its Comprehensive Operations Analysis completed in 2015, and described in the RTA SRTP FYs 2016-18, RTA decentralized its downtown route system from a hub and spoke type route structure to a grid type system in effort to respond to trip generators and ridership growth markets. In the Downtown Riverside Operating Plan (Riverside Downtown and Vine Street Bus Stops), the project was based on a plan to modernize service in downtown Riverside and was developed in conjunction with the COA, which provides RTA with a blueprint for fixed -route operational and capital enhancements for the next 10 years. One of the key recommendations of the COA related to the RTA's service in downtown Riverside was to create an on -street grid system for passenger transfers that would consolidate certain routes to boost productivity and create better spacing between routes. In addition, in August 2017, RTA commenced RapidLink Gold Line service between UCR and Corona primarily along University and Market/Magnolia Avenues for limited -stop service to decrease travel times. 2. As RTA was reconfiguring and implementing new types of services and enhanced connectivity to address the decline in ridership, ridership on general public service decreased by 11.5 percent from FY 2015 to FY 2018, from 9.2 million to 8.2 million passengers. Ridership on DAR service decreased by 0.5 percent, from 418,000 to416,000. Systemwide ridership decreased by 11.1 percent during the audit period which was symptomatic of transit industry trends during the same time period due to the economy, gas prices, automobile ownership, low interest rates on auto loans, and population and demographic changes. Generally, there is a lag between when service adjustments take place and their impacts on ridership and efficiency. 3. The provision of vehicle service hours and miles for general public service increased by 20.4 percent and 18.7 percent respectively, as RTA increased service levels. DAR vehicle service hours and miles increased by 13.4 percent and 6.1 percent respectively. Corresponding total hours and miles also increased which includes non -revenue service. This increase in non -revenue service is most prevalent with contracted services including the commuter services that travel long distance routes. 4. Operating cost per passenger increased by 47.2 percent systemwide, by 50.9 percent for general public service, and by 21.1 percent for DAR service (as compared to a 9.6 percent change in inflation during the audit period). With ridership growth that typically lags implementation of new and expanded services, this performance measure reflects increased cost and existing declining ridership during that time frame. Michael Baker International - 29 250 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 5. Operating cost per vehicle service hour increased by 10.3 percent systemwide and by 6.2 percent for DAR service, and increased by 10.7 percent for general public service. Operating cost per vehicle service mile increased by 13.7 percent systemwide and by 13.6 percent for DAR service, and increased by 12.5 percent for general public service. 6. Passengers per vehicle service hour decreased by 25.1 percent systemwide, by 26.6 percent for general public service, and by 12.3 percent for DAR service. Passengers per vehicle service mile decreased by 22.8 percent systemwide, by 25.2 percent for general public service and by 6.2 percent for DAR service. 7. Vehicle service hours per employee Full Time Equivalent (FTE) for general public service increased by 3.6 percent from 1,052 in FY 2015 to 1,090 in FY 2018. 8. The average fare per passenger increased 20.6 percent systemwide from $1.60 in FY 2015 to $1.93 in FY 2018. Average fare for DAR service decreased by 5.4 percent from $3.83 in FY 2015 to $3.62 in FY 2018. The average fare for general public service increased by 8.7 percent from $1.04 to $1.13 in FY 2018. 9. The fare recovery ratio for general public service decreased from 20.1 percent in FY 2015 to 14.4 percent in FY 2018, while the fare recovery ratio for DAR service decreased from 14.2 percent in FY 2015 to 11.1 percent in FY 2018. These fare recovery ratios do not include eligible non -fare revenue allowed by RCTC. The RCTC-allowed farebox is based on a systemwide audited blended farebox recovery ratio target that accounts for both fixed route and DAR and includes eligible non -fare revenue such as local Measure A sales tax contributions and other locally generated revenue. The non -fare revenues raise the farebox recovery ratio well beyond the minimum standard. Michael Baker International - 30 251 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides a review of various functions within RTA. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed: • Operations / Contract Operations • Maintenance • Administration and Management • Planning • Marketing • Human Resources / Risk Management • Procurement • Information Technology Operations RTA Mission Statement The Riverside Transit Agency, Riverside County's multi -modal transportation provider, shall provide for a variety of transportation needs in a cost-effective and efficient manner for all the residents of our member communities. The Agency is committed to providing safe, reliable, courteous, accessible, and user-friendly services to ourcustomers. Operations and Contract Operations Departments are responsible for delivering transit service for all the agency's fixed route and demand response operations, both directly and via private contractors. These departments comprise the coach operators, dispatchers, supervisors, and managers who provide the daily interface between RTA and the riding public. Operations and Contract Operations work to maintain scheduled service, manage contracted services, adhere to regulatory requirements, and improve labor relations. Operations and Contract Operations Departments prepare key performance indicators (KPI) reports that track indicators on a systemwide level including discipline violations, overtime hours, accidents, and lost service hours. Each KPI is reported at least on a monthly basis. Major accomplishments during the audit period include: • Continued Cooperative Agreements with other transit operators in the region and RCTC for transit station facilities and the operation and maintenance of the Advanced Traveler Michael Baker International - 31 252 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Information System. • Transitioned routes with high ridership from contracted fixed route service to directly operated fixed route service. • RTA continued the "Freedom to Go" Travel Training Program to encourage capable Dial -A - Ride customers to learn how to take general bus service and for RTA to save money on DAR. This program was funded using Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5310 — Enhanced Mobility of Seniors & Individuals with Disabilities program funding. In FY 2016, 464 people took the training and roughly 94,000 fixed -route bus trips were generated. Since the program's inception, through FY 2016, 284,000 trips on fixed routes have been taken. In FY 2016, RTA saved over $900,000 and over $1.8 million since inception through FY2016. The program was recognized by the SCAG as a recipient of the 2013 Compass Blueprint Recognition Award. • RTA completed work on the RapidLink Gold Line project between the University of California at Riverside, Downtown Riverside, and Corona. RTA completed the construction of 14 stops and launched the service in August 2017. RTA decentralized the routing of its bus lines in downtown Riverside, which involved bus stop improvements and the implementation of a grid system from a hub and spoke configuration. An ambassador program was created to assist riders in navigating the new system. In conjunction with the infrastructure changes downtown, RTA implemented the RapidLink Gold Line that runs along the same alignment as Route 1. The Gold Line makes limited stops and has cut down on travel times. RapidLink concept was envisioned in a University of California, Berkeley study. RTA wanted to see densities increase along the corridor before implementation of such a service. In recent years, UCR's student body population has increased and there has been more transit -oriented development along Route 1 to warrant implementation. In addition, RTA has partnered with UCR to develop a mobility hub near the intersection of Canyon Crest and University. Although funding constraints have been an issue, UCR released an RFP for the design and construction of the transit center. The CommuterLink and RapidLink services cater to the school and work commuter markets. About 43 percent of Riverside County residents commute out of county for work. CommuterLink Express Route 200 service to Anaheim and Disneyland was launched in January 2018 and uses the 91 Express Lanes to bypass traffic. RTA purchased the buses as part of the SR-91 widening improvements and was funded during the first two years of operations through the local Measure A program. Buses are equipped with USB charging ports and Wi-fi service. Other routes and markets include the summer Beach Bus service where students rode for $0.25 and feeder service to the Perris Valley Metrolink Station. In addition, students rode for $0.25 on all routes during the summer months. Michael Baker International - 32 253 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 RTA started experiencing a decrease in ridership in January 2015 mirroring an industry trend attributed to a variety of economic factors including an increase in driver licenses and automobile sales, relatively stable gas prices, and from an improved economy. Ridership is anticipated to hold steady with seasonal fluctuations in the short term as planned reconfigured, new, and expanded services are introduced to provide better connectivity and service frequency. The agency has pass program agreements with all the local colleges and universities, such as the U-Pass with UCR. Approximately, 31 percent of UCR students, faculty and staff use RTA. Just outside of the audit period, RTA implemented the first of a two-phase fare increase. The first increase took effect on July 1, 2019. The base cash fare saw a $0.25 increase. An additional $0.25 increase is planned in the next two years (July 1, 2021). In May 2019, RTA released a Request for Proposals for a Zero Emission Bus analysis and Transition Plan. The agency seeks to conduct a system -wide analysis comparing its current fleet of buses operating fixed -route transit in the agency's western Riverside County service area to zero - emission buses (ZEBs) in response to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) mandate. This Plan is required to be submitted to CARB by July 2020 and will assess the feasibility of operating electric versus hydrogen -powered vehicles. RTA will eventually phase out its CNG vehicles due to this mandate as RTA plans for replacement with zero emission vehicles. RTA owns 3 acres of underdeveloped land in Riverside and 10 acres in Hemet. The agency has been exploring the construction of a central maintenance and operations facility. The two contract operators have their own operations facilities. RTA has been looking into consolidating its contract operators into an RTA-owned facility in Hemet to address operational efficiency and growth in service in the central and southern portions of its service area. The CARB Innovative Clean Transit mandate has a caused a pause in this pursuit until a proper study and vetting of the mandate can be completed. Operations Performance Tables V-1, V-2, and V-3 provide several indicators based on National Transit Database data (Form 30) of operations performance for RTA directly operated fixed route, contracted fixed route, and contracted demand response services, respectively. Directly operated fixed route data reflect labor costs of operation. Michael Baker International - 33 254 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table V-1 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Directly Operated Fixed Route Operations Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Operations $19,031,446 $20,611,066 $22,498,514 $24,307,422 27.7% Operator Salaries and Wages $8,052,996 $9,236,004 $9,900,264 $13,431,61 66.8% Operator Pay Hours 511,794 563,653 589,040 641,620 25.4% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 362,930 405,531 417,149 454,084 25.1% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 5,137,177 5,744,208 5,877,179 6,414,376 24.9% Total Vehicle Hours 391,508 438,014 449,449 491,436 25.5% Total Vehicle Miles 5,942,748 6,623,351 6,756,371 7,439,877 25.2% Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,480,111 7,277,474 6,835,663 6,733,159 -10.0% Passenger Miles 50,288,970 48,846,003 45,615,580 52,106,283 3.6% Preventable Accidents 79 84 82 75 -5.1% Performance Indicators Veh Ops Cost per VSH $52.44 $50.82 $53.93 $53.53 2.1% Veh Ops Cost per VSM $3.70 $3.59 $3.83 $3.79 2.3% Veh Ops Cost per Passenger Trip $2.54 $2.83 $3.29 $3.61 41.9% Veh Ops Cost per Passenger Mile $0.38 $0.42 $0.49 $0.47 23.3% Average Wage per Operator Pay Hour $15.73 $16.39 $16.81 $20.93 33.0% VSH per Operator Pay Hour 0.71 0.72 0.71 0.71 -0.2% VSM per Operator Pay Hour 10.04 10.19 9.98 10.00 -0.4% Service Hours / Total Hours 92.7% 92.6% 92.8% 92.4% -0.3% Service Miles / Total Miles 86.4% 86.7% 87.0% 86.2% -0.3% Avg Psgr Miles per Psgr Trip 6.72 6.71 6.67 7.74 15.1% Prev. Accidents per 100,000 Total Miles 1.33 1.27 1.21 1.01 -24.2% On -Time Performance 86.0% 85.0% 86.0% 90.0% 4.7% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: NTD Reports Michael Baker International - 34 255 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Operations costs for directly operated fixed route service saw notable changes over the triennial period, increasing by 27.7 percent. Vehicle service hours per operator pay hour decreased by 0.2 percent. Vehicle service miles per operator pay hour decreased by 0.4 percent. Service hours per total hour and service miles per total mile both decreased by 0.3 percent. Passenger miles per passenger trip, a reflection of average passenger trip length, increased by 15.1 percent from 6.72 miles to 7.74 miles. The number of directly operated fixed route preventable accidents per 100,000 miles was 1.33 in FY 2015, 1.27 in FY 2016, 1.21 in FY 2017, and 1.01 in FY 2018 for a net decrease of 24.2 percent over the audit period. On -time performance increased from 86 percent in FY 2015 to 90 percent in FY 2018. The on -time performance target of 85 percent for directly operated fixed route service was met for all three years of the audit period. Table V-2 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route Operations Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Operations $7,358,165 $7,926,730 $10,364,252 $10,519,540 43.0% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 185,133 187,378 205,960 206,028 11.3% Vehicle Service Miles(VSM) 3,163,778 3,186,129 3,471,200 3,437,415 8.6% Total Vehicle Hours 222,855 224,774 252,458 254,043 14.0% Total Vehicle Miles 4,353,136 4,324,157 4,835,901 4,844,391 11.3% Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,753,518 1,534,671 1,479,935 1,434,349 -18.2% Passenger Miles 13,510,780 11,805,605 11,393,280 14,335,956 6.1% Preventable Accidents 8 8 6 4 -50.0% Performance Indicators Veh Ops Cost per VSH $39.75 $42.30 $50.32 $51.06 28.5% Veh Ops Cost per VSM $2.33 $2.49 $2.99 $3.06 31.6% Veh Ops Cost per Passenger Trip $4.20 $5.17 $7.00 $7.33 74.8% Veh Ops Cost per Passenger Mile $0.54 $0.67 $0.91 $0.73 34.7% Service Hours / Total Hours 83.1% 83.4% 81.6% 81.1% -2.4% Service Miles / Total Miles 72.7% 73.7% 71.8% 71.0% -2.4% Avg Psgr Miles per Psgr Trip 7.70 7.69 7.70 9.99 29.7% Prev Accidents per 100,000 Total Miles 0.18 0.19 0.12 0.08 -55.1% On -Time Performance 93.0% 94.0% 94.0% 91.0% -2.2% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI- All) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Sources: NTD Reports, Contractor Performance Indicator,Monthly, and Preventable Accidents Reports. Michael Baker International - 35 256 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Vehicle operations costs for contracted fixed route service increased by 43 percent during the audit period. By contrast, CPI increased by 9.6 percent during the audit period. Operations cost per vehicle service hour and cost per vehicle service mile increased by 28.5 percent and 31.6 percent, respectively. Cost per passenger trip and cost per passenger mile increased by 74.8 percent and 34.7 percent, respectively. The number of contracted fixed route preventable accidents per 100,000 miles was 0.18 in FY 2015, 0.19 in FY 2016, 0.12 in FY 2017, and 0.08 in FY 2018 for a net decrease of 55.1 percent over the audit period. On -time performance decreased slightly from at 93.0 percent in FY 2015 to 91 percent in FY 2018. The on -time performance target of 90 percent established for the contract operators was met during the audit period. Table V-3 Vehicle Operations Performance Indicators Dial -A -Ride Demand Response Operations Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Operations $8,886,459 $5,974,013 $6,612,704 $7,335,018 -17.5% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 186,148 195,068 210,288 211,174 13.4% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 3,264,411 3,358,897 3,525,831 3,462,841 6.1% Unlinked Passenger Trips 417,963 426,120 426,377 415,902 -0.5% Passenger Miles 5,293,516 5,393,118 4,876,466 4,052,981 -23.4% Preventable Accidents 35 34 55 40 14.3% Veh Ops Cost per VSH $47.74 $30.63 $31.45 $34.73 -27.2% Veh Ops Cost per VSM $2.72 $1.78 $1.88 $2.12 -22.2% Veh Ops Cost per Psgr Trip $21.26 $14.02 $15.51 $17.64 -17.0% Veh Ops Cost per Psgr Mile $1.68 $1.11 $1.36 $1.81 7.8% Passenger Miles per Passenger Trip 12.67 12.66 11.44 9.75 -23.1% Prev Accidents per 100,000 Total Miles 1.07 1.01 1.56 1.16 7.7% On -Time Performance 92.0% 91.0% 92.0% 89.0% -3.3% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: NTD Reports Vehicle operations costs for DAR service decreased by 17.5 percent during the audit period. Operations cost per vehicle service hour and cost per vehicle service mile decreased by 27.2 percent and 22.2 percent, respectively. Cost per passenger trip also decreased by 17 percent, while cost per passenger mile increased by 7.8 percent. Michael Baker International - 36 257 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 The number of contracted DAR preventable accidents per 100,000 miles was 1.07 in FY 2015, 1.01 in FY 2016, 1.56 in FY 2017, and 1.15 in FY 2018 for a net increase of 7.7 percent over the audit period. On -time performance decreased by 3.3 percent from 92 percent in FY 2015 to 89 percent in FY 2018, failing to meet the on -time performance target of 90 percent established for the contract operators for the period. Review of Methodology for Collection and Reporting Operations Data Data collection and reporting of operations data, including hours and miles of service, are performed by several departments within RTA. For Dial -a -Ride operations, Trapeze dispatch and scheduling software is utilized, which ensure the proper calculation of revenue service hours and miles. Initially, hours and miles are estimated by the Planning Department based on the service changes that occur three times per year. The Operations Department measures schedule variances. RTA's primary source of ridership and fare revenue data for directly operated and contracted services is the GFI fareboxes which show passengers by fare type. Ridership counts from the Automated Passenger Counters (APCs) are used to validate the farebox data. For directly and contracted operated fixed route service, on -time performance is measured using a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) based Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) system. Since the AVL system has more observations, it is believed to be moreaccurate. Trapeze is used to monitor Dial -a -Ride on -time performance. RTA staff and the contractors are each responsible for collecting and handling cash from fares. For fixed bus services, the cash reported is compared to what is projected by the GFI farebox. For DAR service, the cash reported is compared to paper slips. The Finance Department reconciles the actual and expected revenues. In the event of a discrepancy, RTA uses the higher revenue number. RTA also conducts surprise in-house audits to maintain staff accountability. Fare revenue and ridership go into the monthly Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) performance summary report produced by Finance. The Contract Operations department oversees contracted transportation services for performance indicators including on -time performance, miles between road calls, DAR no shows, and DAR call abandonment rates. Maintenance The Maintenance Department maintains the directly operated fixed route fleet. CHP and Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) recommendations and requirements are being met or exceeded. For directly operated buses, the current Preventative Maintenance Vehicle Inspections (PMVIs) are due every 6,000 to 9,000 miles or as per manufacturers' recommendations during the warranty period up to 12,000 miles. Each bus that is out of warranty is due for inspection every 10,000 vehicle miles. The inspections are conducted within a variance of 500 miles from the target mileage. Warranty claims are handled through the Procurement Department. The Maintenance Department can perform most service and repairs including body work. Michael Baker International - 37 258 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 The PMVI for contracted buses are inspected to ensure quality control weekly by RTA employees. Contractors perform preventative maintenance on each vehicle in accordance with the contract, OEM specifications, and/or prescribed by law. If any mechanical defect is found, the vehicle is red - tagged and pulled out of service. The contractor uses Zonar for daily vehicle inspections and to identify maintenance issues. Non -revenue licensed vehicles (relief, staff, and service vehicles) are inspected every 6,000 miles in accordance with OEM recommendations and/or as prescribed by law. Non -licensed vehicles have a PMVI every ninety days. RTA utilizes Spear Technologies eMaintenance software. The software program tracks PMVI and parts as well as conducts daily cycle counts. There are 36,000 bin locations where parts are stored and bar coded. Mechanics enter notes on what is being performed on the vehicle. Mobile tablets uploaded with agency's Infor EAM program are scheduled for implementation in early 2020. The Riverside maintenance facility is composed of six service bays and one bus wash bay. Portable lifts are utilized. The Hemet facility is composed of three service bays. There are two fast -fill CNG fueling pumps at the Riverside facility and two fast -fill CNG pumps at the Hemet facility. The Maintenance Department prepares a monthly maintenance standards and performance indicators report that tracks indicators including average miles per gallon, attendance, overtime, OSHA 300 log, maintenance expenses, cost per mile, vehicle availability, daily average of buses down for parts, inventory value, training hours, road calls, miles between road calls, and inspections. Some data is oriented by base facility and is tabulated for each base such as miles per gallon, road calls, and headcounts. The remaining indicators are tracked at a systemwide level. Maintenance staff forecast vehicle replacement needs by mileage. Mileage and age for each individual vehicle are tracked in four separate reports according to service type: directly operated fixed route buses, contracted fixed route buses, DAR vehicles, and other support/staff vehicles. RTA has averaged 32,000 miles between road calls. It is the joint responsibility of Maintenance Department staff and the Parts Department to identify all potential warrantable items. During their routine repair and inspection of vehicles, Maintenance Department staff will mark known parts which have failed and that may be eligible for warranty claims. The Parts Department then determines if an item is eligible to be processed for a warranty claim. The Storeroom Supervisor provides all supporting documentation to Accounts Payable for the collection on warrantable items. Information is entered into the warranty database. The Chief Procurement and Logistics Officer and Director of Maintenance receive a list of all outstanding claims by vendor, a summary of money recovered during the month, and updates on any problems being experienced on a monthly basis or more frequently as needed. Major accomplishments of the Maintenance Department during the audit period include: • Maintenance facilities passed annual CHP terminal inspections. • Added 36 new vehicles to the Dial -A -Ride fleet. Michael Baker International - 38 259 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 • Successfully introduced 37 CNG 40-foot replacement buses from Gillig Corporation during the audit period into the directly operated service and 11 33-foot CNG buses from Aero Elite into the contractor -operated fixed route service. • RTA staff began the first phase of developing plans for a new centralized Operations, Maintenance and Administration Facility. Staff is assessing future operations maintenance and support infrastructure needs to accommodate services expansions and emerging vehicle, energy and fuel technologies and strategies. Following this assessment, staff will develop a comprehensive facilities master plan to advance RTA beyond the current 10-year (2025) planning horizon. Funding for site selection, land acquisition, and conceptual planning has been programmed and RTA has already secured over $12 million in Proposition 1B PTMISEA funds toward the architectural and engineering, land acquisition and construction phases of this project. In addition, RTA has programmed approximately $4 million in FTA 5339 program funds with the required local match funds and $2.4 million of LTF and identified funding from the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) 2016 Nexus Study approved in 2017. The Maintenance Department experienced turnover in the director position during the audit period. The former Director of Maintenance retired in October 2017. The Deputy Director, who had been in the position since April 2016 was appointed to the Director position immediately. The department recognized the need to incorporate standard operating procedures (SOPs) for all tasks performed, including vehicle cleanliness. The process is more systematic and is constantly being refined. The department added two servicers and two mechanics. There are three levels of mechanics categorized as A, B and C. The C category is an entry-level position. Mechanic applicants undergo a hands-on and written test for qualifications. Some mechanics are certified according to specialty and carry Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification. Maintenance Performance Tables V-4, V-5, and V-6 show the trends in maintenance performance based on National Transit Database data (Form 30) for RTA directly operated fixed route, contracted fixed route, and contracted demand response services, respectively. Michael Baker International - 39 260 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table V-4 Maintenance Performance Indicators Direct y Operated Fixed Route Maintenance Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15 - FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Maintenance $7,470,521 $8,374,021 $8,759,006 $8,759,097 17.2% Maintenance Pay Hours 115,100 119,936 129,447 136,871 18.9% Total Vehicle Hours 391,508 438,014 449,449 491,436 25.5% Total Vehicle Miles 5,942,748 6,623,351 6,756,371 7,439,877 25.2% Active Vehicles 124 127 145 145 16.9% Peak Vehicles 92 97 97 115 25.0% Maintenance Cost per Veh. Hour $19.08 $19.12 $19.49 $17.82 -6.6% Maintenance Cost per Veh Mile $1.26 $1.26 $1.30 $1.18 -6.3% Maintenance Cost per Active Veh $60,246 $65,937 $60,407 $60,408 0.3% Veh Hours per Maint Pay Hour 3.40 3.65 3.47 3.59 5.6% Veh Miles per Maint Pay Hour 51.63 55.22 52.19 54.36 5.3% Veh Hours per Active Vehicle 3,157 3,449 3,100 3,389 7.3% Veh Miles per Active Vehicle 47,925 52,152 46,596 51,309 7.1% Spare Ratio 34.8% 30.9% 49.5% 26.1% -25.0% Miles Between Road Calls 56,064 33,117 33,614 27,969 -50.1% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Sources: NTD Reports, Miles Between Road Call Reports Maintenance costs for directly operated fixed route services increased from $7.4 million in FY 2015 to $8.7 million in FY 2018, a 17.2 percent increase. The increase in cost is contrasted with the 9.6 percent growth in the CPI. Maintenance costs per vehicle hour and per vehicle mile, decreased by 6.6 percent and 6.3 percent, respectively. Maintenance cost per active vehicle increased by only 0.3 percent. Maintenance performance increased due to the increase in service hours and miles, and the new buses purchased for the directly operated service during the previous audit period. Vehicle hours per maintenance pay hour and vehicle miles per maintenance pay hour, functions of maintenance productivity, increased by 5.6 percent and 5.3 percent, respectively. Vehicle hours per active vehicle and vehicle miles per active vehicle increased by 7.3 percent and 7.1 percent, respectively. Michael Baker International - 40 261 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Total directly operated fixed route vehicle miles between road calls showed a 50.1 percent decrease during the audit period from 56,064 miles in FY 2015 to 27,969 miles in FY 2018. This decrease in vehicle miles is due to a doubling of major road calls from FY 2015 to FY 2018. The vehicle spare ratio decreased from 34.8 percent to 26.1 percent as the number of peak vehicles increased by two more than active vehicles. Table V-5 Maintenance Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route Maintenance Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15-FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Maintenance $1,533,092 $1,525,081 $1,991,386 $2,046,563 33.5% Total Vehicle Hours 222,855 224,774 252,458 254,043 14.0% Total Vehicle Miles 4,353,136 4,324,157 4,835,901 4,844,391 11.3% Active Vehicles 79 90(a) 79 70 -11.4% Peak Vehicles 67 67 66 66 -1.5% Performance Indicators Maintenance Cost per Veh Hour $6.88 $6.78 $7.89 $8.06 17.1% Maintenance Cost per Veh Mile $0.35 $0.35 $0.41 $0.42 20.0% Maintenance Cost per Active Veh $19,406 $16,945 $25,207 $29,237 50.7% Veh Hours per Active Vehicle 2,821 2,497 3,196 3,629 28.7% Veh Miles per Active Vehicle 55,103 48,046 61,214 69,206 25.6% Miles Between Road Calls 12,160 10,296 14,789 18,923 55.6% Spare Ratio 17.9% 34.3% 19.7% 6.1% -66.2% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% (a) 11 of the vehicles in FY 2016 were no longer active and were retired. Sources: NTD Reports, Contractor Performance Indicator, Monthly, and Preventable Accidents Reports Maintenance costs for contracted fixed route service increased by33.5 percent during the audit period as contracted services increased from service expansion and aging of the fleet. Maintenance cost per vehicle hour, per vehicle mile and per active vehicle increased by 17.1 percent, 20.0 percent and 50.7 percent, respectively. Vehicle hours per active vehicle and vehicle miles per active vehicle increased by 28.7 percent and 25.6 percent, respectively. Michael Baker International - 41 262 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table V-6 Maintenance Performance Indicators Demand Response Maintenance Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Maintenance $1,107,832 $4,022,881 $4,277,812 $4,426,094 299.5% Total Vehicle Hours 228,536 237,897 256,283 255,740 11.9% Total Vehicle Miles 3,991,007 4,136,093 4,469,030 4,352,588 9.1% Active Vehicles 108 116 140 113 4.6% Peak Vehicles 101 110 112 112 10.9% Performance Indicators Maintenance Cost per Vehicle Hour $4.85 $16.91 $16.69 $17.31 257.0% Maintenance Cost per Vehicle Mile $0.28 $0.97 $0.96 $1.02 266.3% Maintenance Cost per Active Vehicle $10,258 $34,680 $30,556 $39,169 281.8% Veh Hours per Active Vehicle 2,116 2,051 1,831 2,263 7.0% Veh Miles per Active Vehicle 36,954 35,656 31,922 38,518 4.2% Miles Between Road Calls 36,679 28,465 65,293 78,701 114.6% Spare Ratio 6.9% 5.5% 25.0% 0.9% -87.1% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI -All) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Sources: NTD Reports, Contractor Performance Indicator, Monthly, and Preventable Accidents Reports Maintenance costs for DAR service increased by close to three -fold during the audit period, according to the NTD. The costs include both vehicle maintenance and contractor facility maintenance. This increase is largely due to an accounting change in FY 2016 that shifted fuel expense from operations to maintenance. Consequently, maintenance cost per vehicle hour, per vehicle mile, and per active vehicle increased by 257 percent, 266.3 percent, and 281.8 percent, respectively. Vehicle hours per active vehicle and vehicle miles per active vehicle increased by 7 percent and 4.2 percent, respectively. Miles between road calls increased by 114.6 percent from 36,679 in FY 2015 to 78,701 in FY 2018. The vehicle spare ratio decreased from 6.9 percent to 0.9 percent during the audit period as the number of peak vehicles increased by 11 while the number of active vehicles increased by only 5 from FY 2015 to FY 2018. Administration and Management Functions of various administrative departments include human resources, labor relations, risk management, marketing, information technology, finance/accounting, and training. Michael Baker International - 42 263 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Each year, the department heads collaboratively develop overarching agency goals. Each department then forms specific department goals with identified activities and measurements. Performance for each department goal is tracked and reported quarterly with an annual presentation to the RTA Board. Some of the identified goals include increased ridership, maximizing cost efficiencies and continuous service improvements. Major accomplishments by administration and management during the audit period include continued use of innovative revenue generating practices to off -set declining funding. Examples of such programs include leasing of facilities, shelter advertising, interest income, and commercial sale of CNG fuel at the RTA facility in Hemet. Many of these locally generated revenue strategies are included in the farebox recovery ratio enabled under RCTC policy and state legislation (SB 508). The annual budgeting process for RTA commences with a kick-off meeting with RCTC in February. Projected funding for the upcoming fiscal year is reviewed along with revenue guidance from the SRTP. An estimate of aggregate revenue sources is determined. LTF revenues are administered through RCTC and in conjunction with the calculation of and comparison against RTA's blended farebox ratio recovery target. RTA utilizes zero -based budgeting, which is a method of budgeting in which all expenses must be justified for each new period. The process starts from a "zero base," and every function within the agency is analyzed for its needs and costs. Working within the total revenue projected, each department provides an estimate for the draft budget. The RTA Budget and Finance Committee convenes in early May to review the draft budget before the RTA Board adopts the final budget in late May. Once the budget is adopted for the fiscal year, the performance against budget is reviewed monthly. RTA's expenditures generally come in under budget. Budget surpluses are rolled over into following fiscal year for certain funding types. During the audit period, department heads never had to request more funds to cover shortfalls. During the audit period, RTA implemented several cost -saving measures. In September 2018, the agency worked with CaIPERS to pay down unfunded liabilities. RTA also utilized $22 million from Western County Bus LTF reserves. In addition, the agency continued to address its Other Post - Employment Benefits (OPEB) liability by attaining a 120 percent funding level. In February 2018, the RTA Board authorized staff to enter into a second multi -year contract with GHI Energy LLC (GHI) for the Agency's natural gas commodity requirements for conversion to CNG. The new contract commenced July 1, 2018. GHI provides a fixed 10 percent discount off the SoCalGas commodity cost from July 2018 through June 2021. The agency's financial software license is renewed annually. The RTA Board has authorized that all legacy software be grandfathered. This measure ensures more transparency with the inclusion of licensing fees and lifecycle costs. Michael Baker International - 43 264 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 An FTA triennial review was conducted in 2016 and involved site visits on February 18 and 19, 2016. The review examined compliance in 17 areas; zero deficiencies were found with FTA requirements in 14 areas. Deficiencies were found in three technical review areas pertaining to Technical Capacity, Title VI, and Procurement. Subsequent to the site visit, RTA was able to provide documentation and take correction regarding the Procurement deficiency relating to contract administration procedures and performance of a price analysis. RTA took immediate corrective action on the remaining two deficiencies after the FTA site visit in May 2016. RTA had another triennial review in 2019; however, the results are unknown at the time of this report. Grants Management RTA tracks grant status through the Capital Tracking Quarterly Report. The report includes federal grants (FTA Sections 5307, 5309, 5316, 5317, 5339), state grants (LTF, STA, Proposition 1-B, LCTOP), and other grant programs. The report tracks grant status by project. Projects are updated based on activities which occurred during the quarter. Quarterly updates are made to project completion dates, major milestones achieved, and projected milestones for the coming quarter. Additionally, the report tracks total allocation of funds by funding source, funds spent, and remaining funds for each project. These provisions enable RTA to stay abreast of outstanding grant monies and to spend down balances of its various grant allocations. In addition, RTA reviews every grant opportunity, which gets presented monthly at the Management Review meeting. The SRTP tracks upcoming grant requests via the Summary of Funds Requested report. The report tracks requested funding at the project level. Each project lists funding requests of federal grants (FTA Sections 5307, 5309, 5316, 5317), state grants (LTF, STA, Proposition 1-B), and other grant programs. An appendix to the report also provides project description and project justification for capital projects requesting funding. FY 2019 was the first year that RTA has been able to program projects under the SB1 State of Good Repair Program as per the guidance of RCTC. FY 2020 will be first year that RTA will be able to program SB1 funds toward service. Administrative Performance Tables V-7, V-8, and V-9 show the trends in administration performance based on National Transit Database data (Form 30) for RTA directly operated fixed route, contracted fixed route, and contracted demand response services, respectively. Michael Baker International - 44 265 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table V-7 Administration Performance Indicators Directly Operated Fixed Route Administrative Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Administration Costs $9,757,616 $9,465,117 $13,371,354 $15,373,381 57.6% Administration Pay Hours 97,528 83,056 91,603 110,563 13.4% Casualty & Liability Costs $1,140,399 $1,451,044 $3,334,188 $2,644,621 131.9% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 362,930 405,531 417,149 454,084 25.1% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 5,137,177 5,744,208 5,877,179 6,414,376 24.9% Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,480,111 7,277,474 6,835,663 6,733,159 -10.0% Passenger Miles 50,288,970 48,846,003 45,615,580 52,106,283 3.6% Performance Indicators Admin Cost per VSH $26.89 $23.34 $32.05 $33.86 25.9% Admin Cost per VSM $1.90 $1.65 $2.28 $2.40 26.2% Admin Cost per PsgrTrip $1.30 $1.30 $1.96 $2.28 75.0% Admin Cost per Psgr Mile $0.19 $0.19 $0.29 $0.30 52.1% Casualty & Liability Costs per VSM $0.22 $0.25 $0.57 $0.41 85.7% VSH per Admin Pay Hour 3.72 4.88 4.55 4.11 10.4% VSM per Admin Pay Hour 52.67 69.16 64.16 58.02 10.1% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: NTD Reports As shown in the National Transit Database, administrative costs allocated to directly operated fixed - route service increased for the period between FYs 2015 and 2018. The increase in administration costs was primarily due to the 131.9 percent increase in casualty and liability costs during the audit period due to an increase in RTA's reserve requirement. Casualty and liability costs increased from $1.14 million to $2.64 million during the audit period. As a result of the increase in costs and decrease in ridership, performance indicators measured by cost per vehicle hour, vehicle mile, and per passenger trip showed negative trends as illustrated by growth in each cost measure. Michael Baker International - 45 266 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table V-8 Administration Performance Indicators Contracted Fixed Route Administration Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Administration $2,786,388 $2,085,496 $2,610,850 $2,925,366 5.0% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 185,133 187,378 205,960 206,028 11.3% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 3,163,778 3,186,129 3,471,200 3,437,415 8.6% Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,753,518 1,534,671 1,479,935 1,434,349 -18.2% Passenger Miles 13,510,780 11,805,605 11,393,280 14,335,956 6.1% Performance Indicators Admin Cost per VSH $15.05 $11.13 $12.68 $14.20 -5.7% Admin Cost per VSM $0.88 $0.65 $0.75 $0.85 -3.4% Admin Cost per PsgrTrip $1.59 $1.36 $1.76 $2.04 28.3% Admin Cost per Psgr Mile $0.21 $0.18 $0.23 $0.20 -1.1% Percentage Change Consumer Price Index (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: NTD Reports Administration costs for contracted fixed route service increased by 5 percent during the audit period. Administration cost per vehicle hour, per vehicle mile and per passenger trip decreased by 5.7 percent and 3.4 percent, respectively; while administrative cost per passenger mile increased by 28.3 percent. Table V-9 Administration Performance Indicators Demand Response Administration Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Cost for Administration $1,296,157 $862,522 $949,939 $1,638,169 26.4% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 186,148 195,068 210,288 211,174 13.4% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 3,264,411 3,358,897 3,525,831 3,462,841 6.1% Unlinked Passenger Trips 417,963 426,120 426,377 415,902 -0.5% Passenger Miles 5,293,516 5,393,118 4,876,466 4,052,981 -23.4% Performance Indicators Admin Cost per VSH $6.96 $4.42 $4.52 $7.76 11.4% Admin Cost per VSM $0.40 $0.26 $0.27 $0.47 19.1% Admin Cost per PsgrTrip $3.10 $2.02 $2.23 $3.94 27.0% Admin Cost per Psgr Mile $0.24 $0.16 $0.19 $0.40 65.1% Percentage Change (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% „Source NTD Reports 267 Michael Baker International - 46 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Administration costs for DAR service increased by 26.4 percent during the audit period. Administration cost per vehicle hour, per vehicle mile, per passenger trip, and per passenger mile increased by 11.4 percent, 19.1 percent, 27 percent, and 65.1 percent, respectively. Planning The Planning Department develops short- and long-range plans and programs including the Short - Range Transit Plan (SRTP) and Comprehensive Operations Analysis. The SRTP is prepared by the Planning Department on a regular basis and serves as RTA's primary financial, planning, and service policy document. Planning is also responsible for NTD reporting, Title VI analyses, and route/trip specificsurveys. The RTA Short Range Transit Plan indicated that the CommuterLink Express ridership market has been hit the hardest by the low gas prices as well as the opening of the Metrolink 91/Perris Valley passenger rail line. CommuterLink Express riders are the most likely to have the greatest discretion when deciding to use RTA, as found in the Market Assessment. The market assessment found that riders on the CommuterLink Express routes are more likely to cite traveling more in general and driving alone; however, the awareness of RTA's specialized services such as CommuterLink is lower than RTA's other services. The SRTP indicated this service type will continue to be monitored, and service levels adjusted, in line with demand. RTA will modify routes to better serve where its ridership is located and constantly evaluates each route segment. The agency has identified potential markets of untapped growth such as the Hemet and Perris areas and entry-level blue-collar workers. Moreno Valley and Perris are seeing growth in the development of industrial warehouses. A rise in shift schedules is also a new commuter pattern. In April 2017, a regional First and Last Mile Mobility Plan was developed in collaboration between RTA, Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), and Caltrans. The goal of the plan is to increase transit ridership through developing strategies that address first and last mile barriers to transit use. The plan highlights the future needs of RTA's customers and to provide improved access to transit to both retain existing and add potential new transit users. The first and last mile strategies developed are applied as templates to a small number of pilot locations (representative station types) that can then be replicated in other similar locations throughout the RTA service area. The preliminary engineering, environmental clearance, final design construction bid documents were completed for the University of California, Riverside Mobility Hub in September 2018. In addition, RTA, working with the city of Temecula, located a new site for a mobility hub at the Promenade Mall in Temecula. The conceptual plan for the Promenade Mall site was approved by the RTA Board and the contract for the architectural and engineering work was awarded in April 2017. RTA secured $1.7 million in funding for the project from the TUMF program. The Promenade Mall Mobility Hub was opened in early 2019. RTA and the city of Riverside are moving forward on the planning for the new Vine Street Mobility Hub, one of the preferred locations identified in the city of Riverside's General Plan 2025. The project site is approximately 4.7 acres owned by RTA and is located adjacent to the Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station and the public park -and -ride lot. An RFP for completion of the conceptual plan was Michael Baker International - 47 268 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 released in August 2019 and a vendor was procured. RTA is also continuing to implement the Bus Stop Amenities Strategic Policy adopted in 2015. The policy is coupled with an inventory of all stop amenities in the service area and will be used to implement a priority plan for the allocation of amenities such as benches, shelters, kiosks, signage and lighting based on ridership and equitable distribution. A portion of the Capital Budget was set aside for the bus stop amenity improvements; 25 bus stop improvements were completed in November 2018. Marketing The Marketing and Planning Departments are responsible for providing information about RTA services, programs, projects, and activities to existing and potential customers, the community at large, other agencies, and the media. The Marketing Department prepares informational materials to support transit operations, including bus schedules, how-to guides, newsletters, and fare media information. Additional marketing initiatives include: • Redesign of RTA's website in May 2019, to optimize web browsing for multiple types ofdevices (computers and mobile phones). • Use of several media outlets to promote and market RTA services, including billboards and radio, and email and social media. • Increasing use of social media to reach customers. RTA posts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram were up 45 percent, 16 percent and 28 percent, respectively. YouTube and Linkedln are additional channels in growing use of social media. • Promotional campaigns including marketing campaigns for the new RapidLink and CommuterLink services and promotion of the Travel Training program, exceeding target goals of training 700 new individuals and 76,000 new trips taken in FY 2018. RTA administrative staff sought to understand the factors that contributed to the ridership decline of the past three years. In response, RTA's Marketing and Planning Department conducted a Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study (Market Assessment) in October 2018. The Market Assessment identifies strategies that can be immediately implemented to encourage additional transit ridership. The objective of the report was to present detailed findings including: • Changes in customer travel patterns compared to a year ago • Changes in the current customer profile since the 2013-2014 Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) where questions from both studies allow comparisons • Current riders' intent to ride RTA one year from now • Factors that would encourage individuals to ride more often • Overall satisfaction and satisfaction with key service attributes • Opportunities and barriers to increase ridership • Potential customer awareness of RTA • Potential customer profiles Michael Baker International - 48 269 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 • Factors that would encourage potential customers to use RTA The results of the Market Assessment helped RTA identify the factors that have contributed to ridership decline over the past three years. The study also sought to identify the conditions that would encourage retention of current riders, the return of riders who no longer use the system regularly and the attraction of new riders. The factors that RTA can control such as changes in services —routes, scheduling and frequencies, were cited by most respondents to the on -board survey. RTA's Customer Information Center and Travel Training Departments are in Hemet. The Community Engagement Coordinator is bilingual in English and Spanish. Despite the transition to more electronic and virtual forms of information, there is still a demand for printed brochures. The implementation of the RapidLink Gold Line involved the development of separate branding, passenger surveys, a direct mail campaign and a free fare pilot program funded by a Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) grant. Marketing of Route 200 involved targeting visitors to Disneyland. In addition, the Disney Corporation subsidizes rides of its employees who commute on Route 200. Social media analytics gauge the number of interactions over the agency's Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube platforms. The findings have revealed that non -riders have been interacting as well with the content. RTA also posts advertisements over social media. The agency also runs advertisement over local radio stations such as KGGI and Spanish radio station KRQB "La Que Buena." Ads are also broadcast over Internet radio platforms such as I -Heart Radio and Pandora. RTA also sponsors booths at local community festivals and events. The Marketing Department also handles customer complaints and comments. Most customer comments are made through the call center, although RTA also receives comments through email/online, mail, and front desk. Comments are entered into a database with the date, time, and customer contact information. Each comment that requires follow up is assigned to a department. All comments have to be closed out with a date stamp inputted into the database. Each department can run a report to see what items are still open for their specific department. Total customer complaints are provided in Table V-10. Table V-10 Customer Complaints Customer Complaints Data Base Year FY15 Audit Review Period % Change FY15- FY18 FY16 FY17 FY18 Unlinked Passenger Trips 9,651,592 9,238,265 8,741,975 8,583,410 -11.1% Complaints 1,771 1,158 1,080 915 -4.8% Complaints per 100,000 Psgr Trips 18 12 12 10 -41.9% Sources: NTD Reports, CustomerComplaints The total number of complaints decreased by 4.8 percent. The number of complaints per 100,000 passenger trips decreased by 41.9 percent from 18 in FY 2015 to 10 in FY 2018. Michael Baker International - 49 270 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 The various complaints are categorized for trend analysis. Complaint statistics for operators are monitored to encourage positive behavior by RTA staff. RTA recognizes best performers (operators with commendations and zero complaints). If three or more valid complaints are found against a specific coach operator in a quarter such as for rudeness or passing up a rider, the driver may be subject to corrective action including additional training, coaching, counseling, or ride-alongs. Human Resources and Risk Management The Human Resources Department recruits new hires for the agency, including providing initial assessment and screening tests. Human Resources is also responsible for worker pay and benefits, and certain labor issues. During the audit period the agency saw an increase in operator salaries and wages of 37.2 percent. The growth in wages was also coupled by a 11.6 percent increase in operator wage hours during the audit period. Directly operated services are provided by both represented and non -represented employees. All RTA drivers and maintenance personnel excluding management, supervisory, professional, and confidential employees are represented by the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1277. All work performed on buses that seat 30 or more passengers must be performed by union employees. Contracted fixed route Empire Transportation employees are represented by the Teamsters Union effective July 2011. Paratransit employees are represented by the International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail, and Transportation Workers (SMART) Union. This representation began in 2013. RTA administrative employees are not represented. In addition, the following trends in fringe benefits costs and liability costs were identified from RTA NTD reports: • Directly operated fixed route fringe benefit costs increased by 29.6 percent during the audit period, from $10.7 million in FY 2015 to $13.9 million in FY 2018. • Directly operated fixed route casualty and liability costs more than doubled during the audit period, from $1.14 million in FY 2015 to $2.64 million in FY 2018. The department also implements safety and development courses including ergonomic, training, and performance improvement classes. In addition, Human Resources is responsible for the discipline of drivers and retraining of operators after accidents, incidents, or customer service issues. The chief administrative services officer oversees Human Resources and is supported by a human resources manager and training manager. The recruitment protocol is composed of an online application that leads to the candidate screening process. In addition, candidates undergo an essential duties assessment, a physical assessment and a 75-question Bus Operator Selection System (BOSS) survey. Candidates are also subject to Live Scan fingerprinting, criminal background checks and an integrity test. Once the screening is completed, candidates are invited to an initial interview and a second interview. RTA utilizes the NEOGOV/governmentjobs.com public employment portal as well as Indeed, Facebook and local radio advertising for job postings. The agency also holds all -day hiring events on Michael Baker International - 50 271 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 designated Saturdays that encompass the employee screening process. Hiring events offer testing, a computer assessment as well as same -day conditional offers of employment. The process averages 4 1/2 hours. Customer service skills is the key attribute that RTA looks for in potential employees. The new hire orientation involves Human Resources, Risk Management, and Training. RTA offers several career development initiatives. The leadership program is open to supervisors in addition to administrative employees with voluntary spots available. RTA offers a tuition reimbursement program for administrative employees and training opportunities for maintenance employees. In effort to remain competitive, the Human Resources Department regularly evaluates job titles and roles to determine whether they can be performed more efficiently. RTA's compensation and salary policies are updated annually. The agency's drug and alcohol policy and equal opportunity policy were updated during the audit period. The department tracks employee turnover, which is summarized in Table V-11: Table V-11 Employee Turnover FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Turnover 17% 14% 15% Source: RTA Turnover has averaged just over 15 percent during the audit period and is attributed to retirements and disciplinary action. Most employee separations from RTA involve coach operators during their first year of employment. Administrative employees are subject to a six-month introductory period with an annual evaluation afterwards. The annual evaluation is conducted on the anniversary of the date of hire and includes a self -evaluation. At the organizational level, the agency and each department set goals for the upcoming fiscal year. Goals are communicated to the employees and feedback is solicited from each department. Training procedures have remained the same other than for DMV testing standards. Coach operators undergo six weeks of training at the regular starting salary. Operators are required to have a Class B commercial license with air brake and passenger endorsements. Training is conducted on -site and involves classroom, behind -the -wheel, and line instruction or cadetting. RTA maintains a recruitment calendar based on service needs and changes in staffing. RTA has also been actively recruiting for mechanics and servicers to staff its maintenance department. Recruitment efforts have included submitting job opening notices to United Technical Institute school sites and trucking companies. RTA has found it challenging to recruit A -level mechanics. Servicers have been promoted to C-level mechanics. Maintenance employees are generally sent to trainings conducted by OCTA. The agency modified its health insurance benefits. Starting in FY 2015, RTA stopped mirroring the medical coverage offered through CaIPERS. In addition, a third tier of retiree medical coverage benefit Michael Baker International - 51 272 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 for new employees was implemented in November 2018. Procurement The Procurement & Logistics Department is responsible for procuring a wide range of equipment, parts, supplies, contractors, vendors, and professional services that are used by RTA. Selected accomplishments and challenges of the Procurement & Logistics Department during the audit period included: • Completed DAR services procurement and contract award to new service provider in FY2017; new vendor (Southland Transit) began operating in February 2018. • Completed procurement for new taxi services; new vendor began in July 2018. • Worked with the Planning Department and member cities to implement additional bus stop amenities. • In FY 2018, the Board of Directors approved the procurement of 37 contracted fixed route buses. • Identified potential DAR replacement vehicles. • Improved procurement process and optimized buying power by eliminating repetitive parts/RTA stationery and office supply purchases. • Progressed in the goal of pursuing all warranty claims; recovering over $600,000 in warranties as of June 2018. The department maintains the agency's vendor list. RTA does not use procurement platforms such as Planet Bid. The reason given is that the cost -to -benefit does not warrant its usage. Procurement tasks are delegated amongst the employees within the department. For any purchases in excess of $100,000, a formal RFP is issued. RTA is transitioning to Infor EAM asset management software, which will be integrated with Oracle ERP system. The agency had been using Spear Technologies eMaintenance software used for maintenance and materials management. Information Technology The Information Technology (IT) Department is responsible for the provision of RTA IT services. Accomplishments of the IT Department during the audit period included: • Maintained the IT help desk system, including ticket tracking and troubleshooting. • Entered negotiations in April 2018 with consultant to develop new asset management system to replace the current system. • Awarded contract for new IT infrastructure management consultant in March 2018. • Completed deployment of Office 365 throughout the Agency in June 2018. • Set up CCTV and access controls for Vine Street Mobility Hub site and Eastvale-Amazon layover restrooms. • IT began the process of implementing the Token Transit mobile ticketing application with the Michael Baker International - 52 273 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Marketing and Planning Departments. The IT Department is staffed with four employees assigned to two facilities. The department handles the agency's software, the ERP/EAM infrastructure as well as provides technical and help desk assistance. RTA outsources hosting. The department was involved in several high -profile upgrades that included the replacement of the firewall and wireless area network. Additional cameras were added to the CCTV system installed at RTA facilities. Intelligent transportation system (ITS) infrastructure was expanded on the fleet. Hardware installed on the directly operated fleet was replaced and expanded to the contracted vehicle fleet. Vehicles are equipped with Wi-fi and CAD/AVL from Clever Devices Limited. All revenue vehicles are equipped with cameras with 30 days of memory storage. The IT Department was also involved in the upgrade of the probing computers and server for the GFI fareboxes. RTA also uses ITS to track ridership, passenger loads, and on -time performance trends. Buses will report location every 30 seconds as well as vehicle maintenance data that are reported to the Maintenance Department. Transit signal priority (TSP) is currently being used on Route 1 along the University Avenue and Magnolia Avenue corridors. RTA is working with other jurisdictions to deploy this technology to other corridors. TSP was approved on two corridors in the city of Riverside encompassing 14 intersections. Michael Baker International - 53 274 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY 2016 through FY 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to RTA, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. In addition, new state legislation was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July 21, 2017, that changes the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to RTA (rural and urbanized farebox recovery ratios), as the transit operator is subject to the blended ratio under PUC 99270.1. 2. The blended farebox recovery ratio target established by RCTC for RTA service was met in each year of the audit. Including eligible non -fare revenue, the farebox recovery ratio was 24.31 percent in FY 2016; 20.64 percent in FY 2017; and 21.69 percent in FY 2018, according to the audited basic financial statements. The average annual farebox recovery ratio was 22.21 percent. While meeting the statutory farebox ratio using a combination of passenger fares and local support, RTA experienced a ridership decline during the audit period which impacted measures of cost effectiveness. Operating cost per passenger increased by 47.6 percent systemwide, by 51.1 percent for general public service, and by 22.0 percent for DAR service [as compared to a 9.6 percent increase in general inflation as measured by the change in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) during the audit period]. With ridership growth that typically lags implementation of new and expanded services, this performance measure reflects increased cost and existing declining ridership during that time frame. 3. Systemwide operating costs increased by 30.9 percent while the Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased by 9.6 percent during the same period. While there is a variance, trends are monitored by RCTC through the annual Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) process. Operating costs for general public service increased by 26.8 percent, while operating costs for the Dial -A - Ride (DAR) increased by 20.9 percent. As part of implementing its Comprehensive Operations Analysis completed in 2015, and described in the RTA SRTP FYs 2016-18, RTA decentralized its downtown route system from a hub and spoke type route structure to a grid type system in effort to respond to trip generators and ridership growth markets. In the Downtown Riverside Operating Plan (Riverside Downtown and Vine Street Bus Stops), the project was based on a plan to modernize service in downtown Riverside and was developed in conjunction with the COA, which provides RTA with a blueprint for fixed -route operational and capital enhancements for the next 10 years. One of the key recommendations of the COA related to the RTA's service in downtown Riverside was to create an on -street grid system for passenger transfers that would consolidate certain routes to boost productivity and create better spacing between routes. In addition, in August 2017, RTA commenced RapidLink Gold Line service between UCR and Corona primarily along University and Market/Magnolia Avenues for higher frequency, limited -stop service. Michael Baker International - 54 275 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 4. As RTA was reconfiguring and implementing new types of services and enhanced connectivity to address the decline in ridership, ridership on general public service decreased by 11.5 percent for the three-year period, from 9.2 million to 8.2 million passengers. Ridership on DAR service decreased by 0.5 percent, from 418,000 to416,000. Systemwide ridership decreased by 11.1 percent during the audit period which were symptomatic of transit industry trends during the same time period due to the economy, gas prices, automobile ownership, low interest rates on auto loans, and population and demographic changes. Generally, there is a lag between when service adjustments take place and their impacts on ridership and efficiency. 5. The provision of vehicle service hours and miles for general public service increased by 20.4 percent and 11.6 percent respectively, as RTA increased service levels. DAR vehicle service hours and miles increased by 13.4 percent and 6.1 percent respectively. Corresponding total hours and miles also increased which includes non -revenue service. This increase in non - revenue service is most prevalent with contracted services including the commuter services that travel long distance routes. 6. Operating cost per passenger increased by 47.2 percent systemwide, by 51.1 percent for general public service, and by 21.5 percent for DAR service (as compared to a 9.6 percent change in inflation during the audit period). With ridership growth that typically lags implementation of new and expanded services, this performance measure reflects increased cost and existing declining ridership during that time frame. 7. The operating budget exhibited modest increases and did not exceed 15 percent year -over - year during the period. After a 3.1 percent increase in FY 2016, the budget increased 10 percent in FY 2017. The FY 2018 operating budget increased by a modest 7.3 percent. This increase in operating budget was correlated to service increases made during the study period and reflected increases in vehicle service hours and miles during the period. 8. RTA implemented the three prior audit recommendations. The recommendations pertained to enhanced analysis of ridership and demographic trends, utilization of onboard bus systems on contracted bus service, and the monitoring of preventable accidents for directly operated bus service. 9. RTA and its contract operators participate in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Terminal inspections received satisfactory ratings by the CHP. 10. RTA completed work on the RapidLink Gold Line limited stop service between the University of California at Riverside, Downtown Riverside, and Corona. RTA completed the construction of 14 stops and launched the service in August 2017. 11. RTA conducted a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) just prior to this audit period to evaluate potential changes to its services. Construction of the downtown Riverside stop improvements as part of the COA were completed in December 2016 in time for the closure of the Riverside Downtown Transit Terminal. As noted above, other COA recommendations Michael Baker International - 55 276 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 were implemented during the last few years. 12. RTA conducted a Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study (Market Assessment) in October 2018. The Market Assessment identifies strategies that can be immediately implemented to encourage additional transit ridership. RTA's administrative staff sought to understand the factors that contributed to the ridership decline of the past three years. 13. In September 2018, the agency worked with CaIPERS to pay down unfunded liabilities. RTA utilized $22 million from Western County Bus LTF reserves. In addition, the agency addressed its Other Post -Employment Benefits (OPEB) liability by attaining a 120 percent funding level. 14. The agency modified its health insurance benefits. Starting in FY 2015, RTA stopped mirroring the medical coverage offered through CaIPERS. In addition, a third tier of retiree medical coverage benefit for new employees was implemented in November 2018. 15. In February 2018, the RTA Board authorized staff to enter into a second multi -year contract with GHI Energy LLC for the Agency's natural gas commodity requirements for conversion to CNG. The new contract commenced July 1, 2018. GHI provides a fixed 10 percent discount off the SoCalGas commodity cost from July 2018 through June 2021. 16. The RTA BusWatch mobile app was implemented and can be accessed from a smartphone, tablet or computer. Using a Global Positioning System, BusWatch pinpoints the location and estimated arrival time of the bus. A mobile ticketing application through Token Transit was in its pilot phase during the audit period; however, the project has since been fully implemented. Michael Baker International - 56 277 Triennial Performance Audit of Riverside Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Focus efforts on evaluating the commuter ridership market. The RTA FY 2018-2020 Short Range Transit Plan indicated that the CommuterLink ridership market has been hit the hardest by the low gas prices as well as the opening of the 91/Perris Valley passenger rail line. Ridership reports during the audit period show the decline in ridership and subsequent farebox recovery from this particular service. CommuterLink riders are the most likely to have the greatest discretion when deciding to use RTA, as found in the recent RTA Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study. The market assessment found that riders on the CommuterLink routes are more likely to cite traveling more in general and driving alone; however, the awareness of RTA's specialized services such as CommuterLink is lower than RTA's other services. Amenities on CommuterLink routes such as the high -back upholstered seating, reading lights, free Wi-Fi and USB charging stations are added values to the service that attract and retain customers. The SRTP indicated this service type will continue to be monitored, and service levels adjusted, in line with demand. Findings from the market assessment study and changes in ridership patterns show a need to continue a focused effort on meeting the varying and growing demand from commuters to employment centers. A new change in demand cited by RTA is from shift work employees who do not have regular peak morning and afternoon work hours. Additional focused surveys for CommuterLink customers and evaluation of these routes using data analytic tools from RTA's investment in technology should help enable the planning and improvement of services to meet the commuter ridership market which will boost performance measures and farebox recovery. 2. Evaluate plans for RTA facility growth that align with increased transit services in the southern section of the service area. Existing RTA operations and maintenance facility divisions are located in the northern and central portions of western Riverside County including in the cities of Riverside and Hemet, and contractor locations in the city of Perris. Tremendous population growth has occurred around the RTA service area including the cities of Temecula and Murrieta in southwestern county. RTA bus services include a growing proportion of local, regional, and commuter routes in these community areas to the south. With limited bus facilities available in this growing part of RTA's service area, vehicles incur relatively high non -revenue service hours and miles prior to and after revenue service by traveling to and from the existing operations facilities. This is shown, for example, in the contracted services data for commuter services. RTA has been reviewing potential options for facility locations that can better serve the southern service area more efficiently, including consolidation of contractor facilities in Hemet on RTA property. Whether through expansion of existing facilities or new locations, RTA should factor in the level of non -revenue service in its planning and implementation of routes connecting the southern areas, and the infrastructure needs that align with this growth. Michael Baker International - 57 278 RCTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ATTACHMENT 7 FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency TRANSIT AGENCY March 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 279 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section II 8 Operator Compliance Requirements 8 Section III 14 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 14 Section IV 17 TDA Performance Indicators 17 Section V 26 Review of Operator Functions 26 Operations 26 Maintenance 32 Planning 36 Marketing 37 General Administration and Management 39 Section VI 44 Findings 44 Recommendations 47 Michael Baker International 280 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section I Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for SunLine Transit Agency covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017-18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate SunLine's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates SunLine's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code (PUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the PUC's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with management and staff, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) was used to guide in the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System SunLine was established under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) on July 1, 1977, between the County of Riverside and the cities in the Coachella Valley, which at the time included the City of Coachella, City of Desert Hot Springs, City of Indio, City of Palm Desert, and the City of Palm Springs. The JPA was later amended to include the Cities of Cathedral City, Indian Wells, La Quinta, and Rancho Mirage. The JPA's governing board is composed of one elected official from each member entity and one county supervisor. SunLine is headquartered in Thousand Palms. SunLine's service area encompasses 1,120 square miles of the Coachella Valley from the San Gorgonio Pass in the west to the Salton Sea in the southeast. From 2000 to 2014, the Coachella Valley population grew from 309,530 to 443,401, for a net gain of 133,871 people, or 43 percent, including adjustments based on the U.S. Census Bureau's 2013 American Community Survey. The Michael Baker International - 1 281 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) projects there will be 581,300 people in the Coachella Valley in 2020, a 38 percent increase in population between 2008 and 2020. Projected growth rates vary significantly across SunLine's service area and not all communities are anticipating significant growth. Development is occurring predominantly in the southeastern end of the valley (Coachella and Indio), south of La Quinta, north of Interstate 10 (1-10) in Palm Desert and Cathedral City and Desert Hot Springs. A demographic snapshot of incorporated cities located in the Coachella Valley is presented in Table 1-1: Table 1-1 Coachella Valley Demographics City 2010 US Census Population Change from 2000 US Census Population 65 years & older 2019 California DOF Estimate Land area (in square miles) Cathedral City 51,200 20.1% 14.4% 54,907 21.50 Coachella 40,704 79.1% 4.5% 46,351 28.95 Desert Hot Springs 25,938 56.4% 9.6% 29,251 23.62 Indian Wells 4,958 29.9% 55.1% 5,445 14.32 Indio 76,036 54.8% 12.4% 89,406 29.18 La Quinta 37,467 58.1% 20.9% 42,098 35.12 Palm Desert 48,445 17.7% 32.9% 53,625 26.81 Palm Springs 44,552 4.1% 26.5% 48,733 94.12 Rancho Mirage 17,218 30.0% 44.0% 18,489 24.45 Source: US Census, California Department of Finance, January 1, 2019 System Characteristics SunLine operates fixed -route, complementary ADA paratransit, and commuter services. The local fixed -route service is composed of 16 routes (3 trunk routes, 11 local routes, and 2 regional/express routes), branded under the name SunBus and operating throughout the Coachella Valley. SunDial is the complementary paratransit service that provides rides to those certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), who cannot ride the fixed -route service. The system operates Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. and weekends from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. SunLine does not operate on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day but operates regular service on all other holidays. The Commuter Link 220 service does not operate on weekends, New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. The SunBus and Commuter Link 220 routes are summarized in Table 1-2. Michael Baker International - 2 282 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 1-2 SunBus Fixed -Route Services Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time points 14 (Trunk Route) Palm Springs — Desert Hot Springs Every 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:53 a.m. to 11:20 p.m.) Every 40 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 5:48 a.m. to 10:41 p.m.) • Indian Canyon & Ramon • Baristo & Farrell • Gene Autry @ Vista Chino • Palm & Two Bunch • West & Pierson • Hacienda & Don English 15 Desert Hot Springs — Desert Edge Every 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:54 a.m. to 8:49 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 6:49 a.m. to 7:44 p.m.) • West & Pierson • Hacienda & Don English Way • Two Bunch Palms & Palm • Dillon & Corkill 20 Express Desert Hot Springs to Palm Desert Every 60 minutes (Weekdays only peak AM & PM trips from 6:32 a.m. to 7:55 p.m.) • West & Pierson • Palm & Two Bunch • Cook & University Park • Town Center Way & Hahn 21 Town Center Way to Gerald Ford Every 60 minutes (Weekdays only from 10:30 a.m. to 3:50 p.m.) • Town Center Way & Hahn • Gerald Ford & Cook 24 Palm Canyon - Stevens Baristo & Farrell Every 40 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:10 a.m. to 8:25 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 6:18 a.m. to 7:38 p.m.) • Ramon & San Luis Rey • Baristo & Farrell • Palm Canyon & Stevens • Vista Chino & Sunrise • Vista Chino & Caballeros 30 (Trunk Route) Palm Springs — Cathedral City Every 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:40 a.m. to 10:44 p.m.) Every 40 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 6:15 a.m. to 9:41 p.m.) • Indian Canyon & Ramon • Baristo & Farrell • Date Palm & Ramon • B Street & Buddy Rogers 32 Palm Springs — Palm Desert Every 50 minutes (Monday through • Ramon & San Luis Rey • Vista Chino & Gene Autry • Ramon & Date Palm Michael Baker International - 3 283 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time points Friday from 5:05 a.m. to 10:40 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 6:54 a.m. to 10:48 p.m.) • Ramon & Monterey • Ramon & Sierra Del Sol • County Club & John L. Sinn • Town Center Way & Hahn 54 Palm Desert - Indio Every 40-45 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:55 a.m. to 7:55 p.m.) • Town Center Way & Hahn • Fred Waring & Washington • Hwy 111 & Flower 70 La Quinta — Bermuda Dunes Every 45 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:15 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.) Every 90 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 5:15 a.m. to 9:28 p.m.) • Harris Lane & Washington • Adams & Blackhawk Way (School Days) • Adams & Hwy 111 • Madrid & Vallejo 80 Coachella -Indio (Southbound Loop) Every 30 minutes (Weekdays from 6:00 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays 6:00 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.) • Hwy 111 & Flower • Dr. Carreon & Monroe • Jackson & Avenue 42 80 Tripper Coachella --Indio (Southbound) Three trips on weekday afternoons • Jefferson & Avenue 39 • Jackson & Avenue 42 • Hwy 111 & Flower 81 Indio (Northbound Loop) Every 60 minutes (Seven days a week from 5:35 a.m. to 8:23 p.m.) • Hwy 111 & Flower • Dr. Carreon & Monroe • Avenue 39 & Jefferson • Jackson & Avenue 42 • Jackson & Avenue 44 90 Indio - Coachella Every 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 9:52 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:52 p.m.) • 5th & Vine • Van Buren & Avenue 50 • Dr. Carreon & Van Buren • Avenue 53 & Shady Lane 91 Coachella — Mecca/Oasis Every 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:48 a.m. to 10:21 p.m.) Every 60 minutes (Weekends & holidays • Hwy 111 & Flower • Airport Blvd & Palm • COD Mecca/Thermal • Family Health Center • Avenue 66 @ Library Michael Baker International - 4 284 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time points from 5:30 a.m. to 10:42 p.m.) • Mt. View Estates & Harrison 95 Indio — North Shore Six bi-directional trips (Seven days a week from 4:04 a.m. to 10:04 p.m.) • 5th & Vine • COD Mecca & Buchanan • Avenue 66 @ Library • Family Health Center • Club View & Windlass 111 (Trunk Route) Palm Springs - Indio Every 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 11:06 p.m.) Every 20 minutes (Weekends & holidays from 5:30 a.m. to 11:07 p.m.) • Palm Canyon & Stevens • Palm Canyon & Ramon • B Street & Buddy Rogers • Town Center Way & Hahn • Hwy 111 & Adams • Hwy 111 & Flower • Hwy 111 & Golf Center • 5th & Vine Commuter Link 220 Palm Desert — Riverside Metrolink Two westbound AM trips & two eastbound PM trips plus one bi- directional reverse trip (Monday through Friday from 5:50 a.m. to 9:31 p.m.) • Town Center Way & Hahn • SunLine Transit Hub • Casino Morongo • Beaumont Wal-Mart • Fir & Nason • Moreno Valley Mall • UCR Lot 30 • Riverside Downtown Metrolink Source: SunLine Transit Agency, September 2018 Since SunDial ADA paratransit service is not provided in the community of North Shore, Route 95 operates as a deviated fixed route. Curbside pickups and drop-offs are available on a reservation basis in North Shore. Riders may utilize this service with a 24-hour advance notice for both pickups and drop-offs. SunDial service can be arranged to meet Route 95 in Coachella at 5th Street and Vine Avenue for qualifying ADA passengers to reach other qualifying destinations in the Coachella Valley; a separate SunDial fare must be paid for these trips. Michael Baker International - 5 285 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 SunDial ADA Paratransit Service SunDial is a curb -to -curb paratransit service for passengers certified under the ADA, who are unable to access the regular SunBus fixed -route service. Service is available at the same time as the fixed route and within .75 mile of any local SunBus route (not including Route 95 and Commuter Link 220). Reservations for service are required prior to pick up. Trips not cancelled a minimum of two hours prior to the scheduled pickup time are considered no-shows. The service does not operate on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. The one-way fare within one city is $1.50 and $2.00 within multiple cities. Fares SunLine's fares are structured based on passenger, media, and service type. The Commuter Link 220 fares are zonal in nature. Zone 1 covers the portion of the route between Riverside and Cabazon and Zone 2 covers Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage. It is also worth noting that SunLine implemented mobile ticketing through the Token Transit platform in May 2019, outside the audit period. The fare structures during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-3. Table 1-3 SunLine Fare Schedule Fixed Route Commuter Link 220 Category Fare Category Fare Adult $1.00 Adult/Youth — One Zone (1 or 2) $3.00 Youth (Ages 5 to 17) $0.85 Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less — One Zone $2.00 Senior (Age 60+)/Disabled $0.50 Adult/Youth — Two Zones (1 and 2) $6.00 Transfer (Valid for two hours) $0.25 Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less — Two Zones $4.00 Children (Ages 4 and under) Free Transfer to/from SunBus $0.25 Passes Passes 31-Day Pass 30-Day Pass — One Zone Adult $34.00 Adult/Youth N/A Youth (Ages 5 to 17) $24.00 Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less N/A Senior (Age 60+)/Disabled $17.00 30-Day Pass — Zones 1 & 2 Day Pass Adult/Youth $150.00 Adult $3.00 Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less $100.00 Youth (Ages 5 to 17) $2.00 Day Pass — One Zone Senior (Age 60+)/Disabled $1.50 Adult/Youth N/A 10-Ride Pass Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less N/A Adult $10.00 Day Pass — Zones 1 & 2 Youth (Ages 5 to 17) $8.50 Adult/Youth $14.00 Senior (Age 60+)/Disabled $5.00 Senior (Age 60+)/Child 46" or less $10.00 Source: SunLine Transit Agency, September 2018 Michael Baker International - 6 286 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Fleet The SunLine fleet is composed of 108 clean fuel vehicles: 104 powered by compressed natural gas (CNG), one by hydrogen fuel cell, and 3 electric battery. Sixty-nine large -sized vehicles are used for the SunBus fixed -route service and 39 are smaller cutaway -type vehicles used for SunDial service. There are an additional 45 non -revenue support vehicles, most of which are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). An additional nine vehicles are used in Van Pool service. All vehicles in revenue service are wheelchair accessible with tie -downs in compliance with ADA. Table 1-4 summarizes the active SunLine fleet during the audit period. Table 1-4 SunLine Active Fleet Inventory During Audit Period Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Seating Capacity Service Mode 2005 Orion V 05.501 3 CNG 44 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2008 New Flyer C40LF 37 CNG 39 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2009 El Dorado Easy Rider 10 CNG 29 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2012 El Dorado Axess 40 1 Hydrogen Fuel Cell 37 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2012 Aerotech 220 2 CNG 12 (2 W/C) SunDial 2013 Ford/Aerotech 14 CNG 12 (2 W/C) SunDial 2014 BYD Electric Bus 2 Electric Battery 35 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2014 El Dorado/Axess 3 CNG 37 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2015 El Dorado E-450 8 CNG 12 (2 W/C) SunDial 2015 BYD Electric Bus 1 Electric Battery 35 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2016 El Dorado E-450 15 CNG 12 (2 W/C) SunDial 2016 New Flyer/XN40 6 CNG 39 (2 W/C)_ Fixed Route 2017 El Dorado/Axess 1 CNG 37 (2 W/C) Fixed Route 2018 El Dorado/Axess 40 5 CNG 37 (2 W/C) Fixed Route Total 108 Source: SunLine Vehicle Listing After the audit period, SunLine received delivery of two 2018 BYD electric battery powered buses and two 2018 New Flyer hydrogen fuel cell buses. Michael Baker International - 7 287 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the agency's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the Public Utilities Code (PUC) and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator has Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: submitted annual reports to 99243 the RTPA based upon the FY 2016: October 18, 2016 Uniform System of Accounts FY 2017: December 18, 2017* and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of fiscal FY 2018: January 30, 2019* *Note: New state legislation was year (Sept. 28/29), or 110 days passed (AB 1113, Bloom) on July (Oct. 19/20) if filed 21, 2017, that changes the electronically (Internet). timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International - 8 288 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90- day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016:September 28, 2016 FY 2017: October 19, 2017 FY 2018: October 24, 2018 Conclusion: Complied. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B The agency participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections for both fixed route (SunBus) and Dial -a -Ride (SunDial) vehicles were conducted at SunLine Transit Agency headquarters located at 32505 Harry Oliver Trail in Thousand Palms. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were June 8-12, 2015; May 16-23, 2016; and June 6, 2017. All inspections conducted were rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, SunLine's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance funds are submitted in compliance with Michael Baker International - 9 289 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 Pursuant to PUC Section 99270.1, RCTC is responsible for calculating an intermediate farebox recovery ratio for SunLine Transit Agency since it serves both urbanized and non - urbanized areas. SunLine Minimum Fare Ratio Ratio FY 2016: 22.56% 18.21% FY 2017: 20.60% 18.23% FY 2018: 21.49% 17.46 % Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits Conclusion: Complied. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage change in SunLine Transit Agency's operating budget: FY 2016: +9.8% FY 2017: +8.7% FY 2018: +4.2% The increases in the operating budget are attributed to costs associated with service improvements, new initiatives, fleet maintenance, and administration. Michael Baker International - 10 290 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts Source: SunLine Transit Agency Approved Budgets for FYs 2015, 2016, 2017 and proposed FY 2018 budget Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 SunLine Transit Agency's definition of performance is consistent with PUC Section 99247. A review of SunLine's monthly miles and hours reports generated during the audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three -twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as SunLine Transit Agency serves both urbanized and non -urbanized areas and is subject to an intermediate farebox recovery ratio. Conclusion: Not Applicable. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 This requirement is not applicable, as SunLine Transit Michael Baker International - 11 291 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Agency serves both urbanized and non -urbanized areas and is subject to an intermediate farebox recovery ratio. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that the SunLine Transit Agency's retirement system is funded. Agency staff retirement is funded through SunLine Transit Retirement Income Plans for Bargaining and Non -Bargaining Personnel Plans, single employer defined benefit plans. The agency administers the plans through a Retirement Committee appointed by the agency's Board of Directors. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of State Transit Assistance funds, SunLine is making full use of federal funds available under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 as amended. FY 2016: $2,805,656 (Operating) $1,892,491(Capital) FY 2017: $1,722,964 (Operating) $3,175,518 (Capital) Michael Baker International - 12 292 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts FY 2018: $1,397,807 (Operating) $8,874,076 (Capital) Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits Conclusion: Complied. Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the nine compliance requirements pertaining to SunLine Transit Agency, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to SunLine (i.e., separate urbanized and rural farebox recovery ratios). 2. SunLine is subject to an intermediate farebox recovery ratio standard set by RCTC pursuant to PUC Section 99270.1. The intermediate ratio is a blended ratio that accounts for both rural and urbanized areas. The minimum farebox recovery ratios that SunLine was required to meet were 18.21 percent in FY 2016; 18.23 percent in FY 2017; and 17.46 percent in FY 2018. SunLine's farebox recovery ratios based on audited data were 22.56 percent in FY 2016; 20.60 percent in FY 2017; and 21.49 percent in FY 2018. SunLine exceeded the minimum standard in all three audit years. The average farebox recovery ratio was 21.55 percent. 3. SunLine Transit Agency participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. All fixed -route and Dial -a -Ride vehicles were inspected at SunLine's Thousand Palms facility. 4. The annual changes in the operating budget exhibited steady increases during the audit period. SunLine's budget for FY 2016 increased by 9.8 percent, by 8.7 percent in FY 2017, and by 4.2 percent in FY 2018. The increases in the operating budgets are attributed to costs associated with service improvements, new initiatives, fleet maintenance, and administration. Michael Baker International - 13 293 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations SunLine Transit Agency's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the FY 2013-2015 triennial performance audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of SunLine's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service. (High Priority) Background: This recommendation was carried over from the prior performance audit. SunLine's annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller has historically combined information for both general public (SunBus fixed route) and specialized service for individuals certified under the ADA (SunDial). Although the State Controller's Office has not provided notice to the agency, written instructions by the state to prepare this report require separate reporting of these modes. In the General Instruction Form completed by the independent auditor, a selection must be made as to which mode of transit is represented in the report. The options are general public use or elderly/disabled. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency Beginning with FY 2016, SunLine has reported the required information to the State Controller for general public (SunBus fixed route) separately from the ADA service (SunDial). A review of the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports completed and submitted by the agency to the State Controller revealed that separate reports were being prepared. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Continue to pursue a fare revenue sharing agreement with College of the Desert (COD). (High Priority) Background: SunLine, the Desert Community College District (DCCD), and the College of the Desert (COD) campuses had been working on an agreement to provide a transit pass embedded on the IDs of enrolled students. The regular monthly SunLine Transit bus passes are available for sale at the COD bookstore at full price. Free monthly SunLine Transit bus passes are available at the Michael Baker International - 14 294 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Alumni Association office at the main Palm Desert campus and at the administrative offices at the Indio and Mecca/Thermal campus to students who are receiving financial aid. An agreement with DCCD would generate additional farebox support through student passes. Students could be assessed a transportation fee as part of their annual student fee when they enroll at COD, which would allow for unlimited transit rides on any SunBus route. It was suggested that the agency continue to pursue a fare revenue sharing agreement with DCCD whereby SunLine receives a share of the revenues generated from student fees. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency The DCCD and SunLine entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on July 26, 2018, for the Haul Pass program, which was launched in August 2018 at COD. Cal State University, San Bernardino —Palm Desert Campus joined the program in September 2019. Students actively enrolled at these campuses may use their valid student ID for unlimited SunLine fixed route. CSUSB has covered program costs from inception. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Engage in long-term planning. (Medium Priority) Background: SunLine was planning to develop a long-range transit plan with time horizons stretching beyond the current Short -Range Transit Plan time period (FY 2018-FY 2020). With emphasis on performance measurement to drive operational decisions, it is prudent for the agency to consider a longer -term vision and the types of services that could be provided with a focus on efficiencies and customer service. Also, given that SunLine has divested itself from some prior services, such as fuel technology development, while maintaining others including fuel sales and implementing advance transit fuel technology vehicles, long-term planning could provide guidance and goals with meeting both transit service enhancement and clean air transit initiatives. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency According to the FY 2019-2021 SRTP, SunLine hired HDR Engineering to review its current operations and service options and provide recommendations on future service and the roles and locations of its existing transit facilities and vehicle maintenance and storage sites. HDR is facilitating a study for SunLine Transit Redesign and Network Analysis that will evaluate the current schedule modifications and make recommendations for longer term sustainability. The study will also consider unmet transit needs and make recommendations for growth during the next 10 years. Further, the study will review fares and recommend adjustments. Also, SunLine developed an overall long-range facilities master plan that identifies the bus storage and maintenance facility requirements and associated capital improvements to the year 2035. Staff is preparing a Michael Baker International - 15 295 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Comprehensive Operational Analysis branded as Refueled. A draft Board Item review has been scheduled for RCTC and public review in April 2020. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International - 16 296 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews SunLine Transit Agency's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. The TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators that gauge service effectiveness and revenue, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the performance indicators for SunLine system -wide, fixed route, and SunDial paratransit. Charts are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that the system -wide operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited figures, while fixed - route and Dial -A -Ride costs and fare revenues are derived from unaudited data. The annual fiscal audits do not provide a modal breakdown. Michael Baker International - 17 297 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 SunLine Transit Agency TDA Performance Indicators System -wide Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost (1)(a) $27,639,140 $31,617,861 $32,962,649 $32,478,309 17.5% Total Passengers (b) 4,827,837 4,522,990 4,316,269 4,103,315 -15.0% Vehicle Service Hours (b) 284,954 295,707 307,317 298,632 4.8% Vehicle Service Miles (b) 4,161,843 4,362,449 4,498,670 4,391,776 5.5% Employee FTEs (b) 291 317 329 332 14.1% Passenger Fares (a) $3,315,354 $3,200,299 $3,055,022 $2,900,114 -12.5% Local Support Funds (2)(a) $2,725,053 $3,934,068 $3,736,653 $4,078,029 49.6% Total Revenues $6,040,407 $7,134,367 $6,791,675 $6,978,143 15.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $5.72 $6.99 $7.64 $7.92 38.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $97.00 $106.92 $107.26 $108.76 12.1% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $6.64 $7.25 $7.33 $7.40 11.4% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 16.9 15.3 14.0 13.7 -18.9% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.16 1.04 0.96 0.93 -19.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 979.2 932.8 934.1 899.5 -8.1% Average Fare per Passenger $0.69 $0.71 $0.71 $0.71 2.9% Fare Recovery Ratio (Passenger fares only) 12.00% 10.12% 9.27% 8.93% -25.6% Fare Recovery Ratio w/local support funds(3) 21.85% 22.56% 20.60% 21.49% -1.7% Consumer Price Index - (CPI-AII) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits (b) National Transit Database Notes: (1) Operating costs exclude depreciation and vehicle leasing. (2) Includes outside CNG and hydrogen fuel sale revenues; state emission credits and CNG rebates; advertising; and interest income. Local support is calculated as the difference between total revenues shown in Note 12, and passenger fares (Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Positioning) of the annual audited financial statements. (3) System -wide farebox recovery is inclusive of local support funds as allowed by RCTC's Fare Box Recovery Ratio Policy. Michael Baker International - 18 298 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-2 SunLine Transit Agency TDA Performance Indicators SunBus - Fixed Route Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015- 2018 Operating Cost (1)(a) $22,720,870 $26,054,758 $27,121,026 $26,286,982 15.7% Total Passengers(a) 4,674,654 4,358,966 4,151,467 3,947,023 -15.6% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 216,738 226,020 238,374 231,781 6.9% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 3,084,147 3,274,830 3,467,184 3,402,692 10.3% Employee FTE'siai 220 240 247 253 15.0% Passenger Faresi2iiai $3,018,126 $2,871,930 $2,716,775 $2,574,580 -14.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.86 $5.98 $6.53 $6.66 37.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $104.83 $115.28 $113.78 $113.41 8.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $7.37 $7.96 $7.82 $7.73 4.9% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 21.6 19.3 17.4 17.0 -21.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.52 1.33 1.20 1.16 -23.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 985.2 941.8 965.1 916.1 -7.0% Average Fare per Passenger $0.65 $0.66 $0.65 $0.65 1.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 13.28% 11.02% 10.02% 9.79% -26.3% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database Notes: (1) Data is unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. (2) Data is unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. Michael Baker International - 19 299 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-3 SunLine Transit Agency TDA Performance Indicators SunDial - Dial -A -Ride Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015- 2018 Operating Cost (1 (a) $4,926,965 $5,563,104 $5,841,622 $5,827,953 18.3% Total Passengers(a) 153,183 164,024 164,802 156,292 2.0% Vehicle Service Hours(a) 68,216 68,822 68,943 66,851 -2.0% Vehicle Service Miles(a) 1,077,696 1,087,619 1,031,486 989,084 -8.2% Employee FTE's(a) 71 77 82 79 11.3% Passenger Faresi2i(a) $297,228 $328,369 $338,247 $325,536 9.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $32.16 $33.92 $35.45 $37.29 15.9% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $72.23 $80.83 $84.73 $87.18 20.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.57 $5.11 $5.66 $5.89 28.9% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 2.2 2.4 2.4 2.3 4.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.14 0.15 0.16 0.16 11.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 960.8 905.0 840.8 846.2 -11.9% Average Fare per Passenger $1.94 $2.00 $2.05 $2.08 7.3% Fare Recovery Ratio 6.03% 5.90% 5.79% 5.59% -7.4% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: (a) National Transit Database Notes: (1) Data is unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. (2) Data is unaudited. Audited financial statements do not provide modal breakdown. Michael Baker International - 20 300 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 $- 6,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 1 1 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ SunDial Graph IV-2 Ridership System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ SunDial Michael Baker International - 21 301 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $40.00 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $- $140.00 $120.00 $100.00 $80.00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $- in 1 Graph IV-3 Operating Cost Per Passenger System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial I I J 11 11 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • System -wide • Fixed Route • SunDial Graph IV-4 Operating Cost Per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial 1 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 • System -wide • Fixed Route • SunDial Michael Baker International - 22 302 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 25.0 20.0 15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% ■ Graph IV-5 Passengers Per Vehicle Service Hour System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial ■ ■ ■ FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 1 FY 2015 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ SunDial Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio System -wide, Fixed Route & SunDial 1 FY 2016 1 1 1 1 FY 2017 FY 2018 ■ System -wide ■ Fixed Route ■ SunDial Note: System -wide fare recovery includes other revenue such as CNG revenue. Modal fares do not include other revenues. Michael Baker International - 23 303 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 12.1 percent system -wide from $97.00 in FY 2015 to $108.76 in FY 2018. System -wide operating costs experienced an increase of 14.4 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2016, increasing only 4.3 percent the following year and reducing by 1.5 percent between FY 2017 and FY 2018. Vehicle service hours increased by 4.8 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 38.3 percent system -wide from $5.72 in FY 2015 to $7.92 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 15 percent during the triennial period from 4,827,837 passengers in FY 2015 to 4,103,315 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased by 17.5 percent during that period. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 18.9 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 16.9 passengers per hour to 13.7 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations were consistent with this trend, with a rate of decrease of 21.0 percent over the same period from 21.6 to 17.0 passengers per hour. SunDial operations exhibited an increase of 4.1 percent, averaging 2.3 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator reflects the larger decrease in passengers relative to the increase in vehicle hours on the fixed -route services. For SunDial services, an increase in passengers combined with the decrease in vehicle hours resulted in an increase in effectiveness. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 19.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 1.16 passengers per mile to 0.93 passengers per mile. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased by 23.5 percent from 1.52 to 1.16. SunDial had an increase in passengers per service mile of 11.2 percent during the triennial period, from 0.14 in FY 2015 to 0.16 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, total vehicle service miles increased 5.5 percent system- wide. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee decreased 8.1 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018. This decrease occurred even with a net increase in vehicle service hours of 4.8 percent due to a 14 percent increase of FTEs between FY 2015 and FY 2018. This measure is based on the number of employee full-time equivalents (FTE) using employee pay hours from the National Transit Data Report (NTD) and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. 6. Farebox recovery exhibited a slight overall annual decrease of 1.8 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and 2018 based on audited data inclusive of ancillary revenues. SunLine is subject to the provisions of PUC Section 99270.1 and was required to maintain a minimum farebox recovery ratio of 18.21 percent in FY 2016; 18.23 percent in FY 2017; and 17.46 percent in FY 2018. SunLine attained the required farebox recovery standard for all three years through a combination of passenger fares and other revenue including CNG and hydrogen fuel sales, interest, and other revenues. Farebox recovery without ancillary revenue for fixed route Michael Baker International - 24 304 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 decreased 26.3 percent, while the SunDial ADA paratransit service saw a decrease of 7.4 percent based on unaudited data. Total system -wide revenues increased 15.5 percent while fixed -route revenues decreased 14.7 percent and ADA paratransit revenues increased 9.5 percent. It is noted that CNG and hydrogen revenue generated by SunLine from commercial sale of the fuel and from fuel rebates is a growing component of operations revenue counted toward the farebox ratio. This allowable revenue source under RCTC farebox policy comprised 44 percent of operations revenue in FY 2016, 44.2 percent in FY 2017, and 50 percent in FY 2018. Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators SunLine Transit Agency's performance indicators reflect increasing operating costs along with notable increases in vehicle service hours and miles due to route expansion and realignment. In FY 2016, SunLine rolled out its new initiatives service for a number of routes which included frequency improvements, route extension, and weekend improvements. Increased revenue fleet maintenance, facility maintenance, administration costs, and personnel costs increases in FY 2016 (pension, insurance, health coverage costs) also contributed significantly to total operating costs. The agency underwent internal restructuring and functions were moved from existing departments into other offices or became stand-alone departments to gain efficiencies. According to the FY 2017 budget, the operations, safety and IT departments underwent a number of changes. As the number of drivers increased, the number of trainers also increased. With more customer amenities such as wi-fi and mobile ticketing to attract customers, additional IT staff were hired. Further, new project management positions in the Performance Office were created as a result of an increased effort to ensure SunLine's growing capital program including complex alternative fuel projects is effectively managed with project controls. System -wide operating costs grew by 17.5 percent during the triennial period, whereas ridership decreased system -wide 15 percent. System -wide vehicle service hours grew 4.8 percent and vehicle service miles grew 5.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018. Farebox revenues increased at a lower rate than operating costs at 15.4 percent, counting CNG fuel sales. Michael Baker International - 25 305 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within SunLine Transit Agency. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed with staff at the SunLine Transit Agency headquarters in Thousand Palms: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub -functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations After significant changes in the previous audit period, SunLine Transit Agency's general administration remained relatively stable during the audit period and continued to enhance service in keeping with its mission statement: To provide safe and environmentally conscious public transportation services and alternative fuel solutions to meet the mobility needs of the Coachella Valley. SunLine commemorated its 40th anniversary as a transit agency in 2017. The anniversary was marked by a new branding campaign, rider awards, recognition from community stakeholders, and renewed partnerships. In 2016, SunLine created a first in the nation dedicated training center for commercial zero emission technology: The West Coast Center of Excellence in Zero Emission Technology. The State of California, through its clean air fleet mandates, strongly supports the procurement of zero emission vehicles, and they are investing in the adoption of technologies that support their use in transit fleets. The costs to purchase, operate, and maintain zero -emission buses have decreased as the technology has improved. During the previous audit period, SunLine implemented a metric -focused performance management initiative to ensure increased accountability and transparency. SunLine applies performance metrics to continuously review and improve its operations in at least three areas — growing efficiencies, meeting compliance with rules and regulations, and better serving the customer. This initiative involved a restructuring of the organization and a shift in the Michael Baker International - 26 306 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 organizational culture that is ongoing. SunLine is considering a series of measures to become more responsive to the mobility needs of its service area. The agency adjusted its route scheduling and alignments during the audit period. In FY 2016, enhancements to improve connectivity to new shopping destinations were made to Routes 14, 24, and 30 in the City of Palm Springs and Routes 90, 91, 95, and 111 in the Cities of Indio and Coachella and the unincorporated communities of Thermal and Mecca. Service was added to Route 24 in Palm Springs on Sunrise Way between Vista Chino and Racquet Club Road, while service along Racquet Club Road and Avenida Caballeros was discontinued. Route 30 in Palm Springs was adjusted along Baristo Road to better serve the Palm Springs International Airport. Route 90 in Coachella and Indio was realigned to serve Avenue 52, west of Harrison Street. Service along the intersection of Orchard Avenue and 7th Street was realigned to the intersection of 5th Street and Vine Avenue to connect with Routes 95 and 111. Route 91 in Coachella was realigned to serve Van Buren Street via Avenue 49, Frederick Street and Avenue 50. The route was also changed to serve areas east of Airport Boulevard and SR 86, including Avenue 57, Pierce Street, and Avenue 58, and provides direct service to COD's Thermal campus. Route 95 in Coachella now terminates at the intersection of 5th Street and Vine Avenue to connect with Routes 90 and 111 and was realigned to serve areas east of Airport Boulevard and SR 86 in Thermal. Route 95 no longer serves the intersection of Highway 111 and Flower Street in Indio. The Requa/Jackson Westbound Loop on Route 111 was eliminated. Commuter Link 220, which runs between Palm Desert and Riverside, no longer serves downtown Riverside bus stops at Lemon Street, University Avenue, and the Riverside Downtown Terminal. SunLine has planned the implementation of Route 111 Express service during the third quarter of calendar year 2020 that would operate during peak hours along the 30-mile corridor. Led by the chief performance officer, monthly administrative and operations performance indicator reviews are conducted that involve a panel of three to four staff members reviewing data to determine trends and efficiencies. Staff are given ownership to present their own performance measures from their respective operational departments. Key performance indicators are selected for data collection and review as part of goal setting and development of dashboard performance measures. Data are made accessible to the public in the Board packets and on the agency's website. In concert with the change in organizational culture, SunLine implemented new enterprise resource planning software through Tyler Technologies to strengthen the agency's financial and payroll systems. In addition, SunLine has been engaged in the repurposing of its Indio facility. SunLine is studying options to rehabilitate or replace the Indio satellite operating and maintenance facility, which had been utilized for fixed -route vehicles. The key transfer point for passengers transferring among routes in Indio is located just outside of this facility. Michael Baker International - 27 307 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Each route is subject to monthly metric reporting, which allows the agency to identify trends in passenger trips and route performance. SunLine is seeking to attract more choice riders. This target market is being reached through large employers in the service area and the local tourism industry. Schedules are updated three times annually in January, May, and September. The updates involve a service standard and on -time performance analysis. SunLine revised its cancellation and no-show policy on February 24, 2016, to conform to FTA rule changes. The former policy was rescinded by the Board of Directors in December 2015. The revised policy, which went into effect on May 1, 2016, is a percentage -based system. The agency has been proactive in addressing no-shows and cancellations by calling passengers, sending follow-up letters and informing them on how no-shows impact the system overall. Implementing the revised policy has resulted in a decrease of late cancellations and no-shows from 7.9 percent to 3.4 percent, contributing to a net savings to the agency. In July 2018, SunLine and DCCD executed an MOU to implement the Haul Pass program. Cal State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB)—Palm Desert Campus joined the program in September 2019. Students enrolled at COD and CSUSB-Palm Desert may swipe their student ID on -board fixed -route buses and ride at no further charge. CSUSB has covered program costs from inception. SunLine looks forward to including other college campuses in the service area, such as the University of California, Riverside and other California State University campuses. On -time performance is one of the metrics closely monitored by the agency. SunLine maintains a summary report driven by its software program detailing on -time performance per route for each service day in the system. The data are categorized by early, late, and the percentage of trips within the on -time window. Daily and monthly averages are calculated as part of the summary. For fixed route, average on -time performance was 83.8 percent in FY 2016; 84.8 in FY 2017; and 88.1 in FY 2018. For demand response, average on -time performance was 89.4 percent in FY 2016; 91.6 in FY 2017; and 92.5 percent in FY 2018. During the previous audit period, there was an issue with the accuracy of the Automated Vehicle Locator -Global Positioning System (AVL-GPS) settings. On Line 220, the GPS waypoints were found to be inaccurate, which resulted in early departures being recorded. In addition, the agency engaged the drivers about on -time performance impacts through the use of report cards. From these investigations and manual data checking, SunLine was able to reduce the average early departures by 77 percent on fixed routes between FY 2015 and FY 2018. Fare counting and reconciliation procedures utilize both manual and electronic handling methods. Trip sheets are counted, and revenue is recorded daily, which has resulted in more accurate accounting. There is a dedicated coin room accessible by a badge lock key, and the counting cage is equipped with multiple cameras. Vehicles are also equipped with GFI/Genfare electronic fareboxes to provide further fare collection accuracy. At the end of the day, the GFI is probed and unlocked, and the farebox vaults are exchanged. Only select administrative personnel have access to the vault keys for handling the fare. GFI software also provides financial printouts for revenue Michael Baker International - 28 308 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 reconciliation. Following the revenue collection process, an armored vehicle picks up the farebox proceeds three times a week to deposit. Personnel In its FY 2018 budget, SunLine proposed 357 FTE employees composed of 332 full-time and 25 FTE part-time employees. Most non-exempt personnel (except for some hourly employees) are represented by the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU), Local 1277 based in Los Angeles. The current MOU between SunLine and the ATU Local went into effect during the audit period on April 1, 2016 and remained in effect until March 31, 2019. The current MOU runs through 2022. Negotiations between the agency and the ATU went smoothly and preparation began one year in advance. Research included a peer review of other transit agencies' MOUs. A facilitator was involved during the negotiation process. Article G-29 of the MOU provides a breakdown of hourly compensation based on job classification. For employees covered under the MOU, accruals for vacation and sick time off commence on the first day of employment for full-time employees. There are two more accrual rates for 1) Non - Bargaining, non-exempt and 2) Non -Bargaining, exempt classifications. Employees with one to four years of service accrue 10 vacation and 8 floating days, while those with 25 or more years of service accrue up to 30 vacation and 8 floating days. Employees accrue 3.08 hours of sick time off per 80 hours each pay period. Full-time employees and their dependents are provided employer - paid health insurance benefits. New hires are subject to a 120-day probationary period. Employees not covered by MOU, have a six-month introductory period. The selection of vacation time off is open to bid in March. Sign-ups for shifts occur three times per year and go into effect in January, May, and September. The agency has been focused on improving attendance as part of the performance indicator management program. Absences and sick leave are tracked carefully and classified, which has resulted in fewer absences. Candidates for driver -operators are required to have a California Class B license or permit, passenger endorsement, and air brake certification prior to hire. New operators receive more than 150 hours combined of classroom and behind the wheel training. Training includes defensive driving, customer service, and ADA compliance. Two new segments were added to the curriculum, Smart Drive and Avail System. The Avail System is SunLine's electronic communication system that reduces paper manifests and run guides as well as aids with driving directions. The system makes all ADA announcements, changes destination signs, and keeps track of bus location. SunLine recruits through its website, Transit Talent, Indeed, Government Jobs/NeoGov, job fairs, veteran services, the Employment Development Department, and partnerships with local colleges. The agency also uses social media sites such as Linkedln for management and professional positions. New employee orientations are scheduled with the employee's date of joining. SunLine reports a low rate of turnover during the audit period. An employee referral program was implemented in July 2019. Michael Baker International - 29 309 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 The Operations office has continued to implement the reporting protocols and procedures that had been established between drivers and supervisors prior to the audit period. A new employee orientation protocol was established that is very structured and meets all federal requirements. The agency is better able to track Family and Medical Leave Act claims, state leave mandates, and workers compensation. In addition, it has been able to piggyback the California Family Rights Act and Family and Medical Leave Act programs. Employment and duty plans have been modified for those employees out on workers compensation leave. The agency has seen a reduction of workers' compensation claims as older cases have fallen off. The SunLine employee manual was last updated three years ago. An update to the employee manual can incorporate the latest policies as well as changes that reflect the agency's organization structure and culture. SunLine provides employee medical plan benefits through CaIPERS, which is able to tailor plans to family needs and conditions. Other employee benefits include the employee assistance program (EAP) and stress management classes. The EAP is tied into the agency's discipline program that requires employees to undergo anger management classes with mandatory referrals. Under the most recent MOU, represented employees contribute 3 percent to the pension plan. Operations Performance Tables V-1 and V-2 show performance metrics for SunBus and SunDial, respectively. Table V-1 SunBus Transportation Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Cost for Operations $11,360,712 $11,789,725 $12,972,678 $12,310,863 8.4% Operator Salaries and Wages $5,493,010 $5,682,777 $6,385,831 $6,356,399 15.7% Cost of Fuel and Lubricants $1,435,239 $1,279,003 $1,503,800 $1,238,759 -13.7% Operator Pay Hours 291,622 307,564 321,438 327,996 12.5% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 216,738 226,020 238,374 231,781 6.9% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 3,084,147 3,274,830 3,467,184 3,402,692 10.3% Total Vehicle Hours 229,642 239,740 254,324 246,941 7.5% Total Vehicle Miles 3,446,488 3,644,250 3,893,092 3,808,757 10.5% Unlinked Passenger Trips 4,674,654 4,358,966 4,151,467 3,947,023 -15.6% Passenger Miles 33,371,743 31,092,789 28,499,208 27,069,767 -18.9% Veh Ops Cost per VSH $52.42 $52.16 $54.42 $53.11 1.3% Veh Ops Cost per VSM $3.68 $3.60 $3.74 $3.62 -1.8% Veh Ops Cost per Psgr Trip $2.43 $2.70 $3.12 $3.12 28.3% Veh Ops Cost per Psgr Mile $0.34 $0.38 $0.46 $0.45 33.6% Avg Wage per Operator Pay Hour $18.84 $18.48 $19.87 $19.38 2.9% Fuel & Lubricants Cost per VSM $0.47 $0.39 $0.43 $0.36 -21.8% VSH per Operator Pay Hour 0.74 0.73 0.74 0.71 -4.9% Michael Baker International - 30 310 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 VSM per Operator Pay Hour 10.58 10.65 10.79 10.37 -1.9% Service Miles per Service Hour 14.2 14.5 14.5 14.7 3.2% Service Hours / Total Hours 94.4% 94.3% 93.7% 93.9% -0.6% Service Miles / Total Miles 89.5% 89.9% 89.1% 89.3% -0.2% Avg Psgr Miles per Psgr Trip 7.1 7.1 6.9 6.9 -3.9% Consumer Price Index (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 SunBus operations costs saw notable changes over the triennial period, increasing by 8.4 percent. Operations costs increased in conjunction with the implementation of new routes and increased service frequencies in FY 2016. Operator salaries and wages exceeded the rate of inflation in FY 2016, increasing by 3.5 percent versus the CPI rate of 2.1 percent, and again in FY 2017, increasing by 12.4 percent versus a 3.1 percent increase in the CPI. In FY 2018, salaries and wages decreased by 0.5 percent versus a 4.1 percent increase in the CPI. Fuel and lubricants cost decreased by 13.7 percent from the base year of FY 2015, and there was a 21.8 percent decrease in fuel cost per vehicle service mile due to the introduction of electric buses. The increase in operations cost over the base year did not have a significant effect on the performance indicators cost per vehicle hour (increased 1.3 percent) and per vehicle mile (decreased 1.8 percent). Table V-2 SunDial Transportation Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Cost for Operations $3,741,674 $3,974,410 $4,373,750 $4,151,717 11.0% Operator Salaries and Wages $1,475,026 $1,639,824 $1,803,019 $1,698,520 15.2% Cost of Fuel and Lubricants $206,019 $204,234 $220,186 $200,086 -2.9% Operator Pay Hours 119,399 128,491 138,848 135,001 13.1% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 68,216 69,687 68,943 66,851 -2.0% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 1,077,696 1,087,619 1,031,486 989,084 -8.2% Total Vehicle Hours 72,443 74,124 69,526 75,800 4.6% Total Vehicle Miles 1,172,096 1,179,761 1,122,020 1,183,817 1.0% Unlinked Passenger Trips 153,183 164,024 164,802 156,292 2.0% Passenger Miles 1,822,878 1,958,885 1,981,739 1,801,819 -1.2% Veh Ops Cost Per VSH $54.85 $57.03 $63.44 $62.10 13.2% Veh Ops Cost Per VSM $3.47 $3.65 $4.24 $4.20 20.9% Veh Ops Cost Per Psgr Trip $24.43 $24.23 $26.54 $26.56 8.8% Veh Ops Cost Per Psgr Mile $2.05 $2.03 $2.21 $2.30 12.3% Michael Baker International - 31 311 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Avg Wage per Operator Pay Hour $12.35 $12.76 $12.99 $10.93 -11.6% Fuel & Lubricants Cost per VSM $0.19 $0.19 $0.21 $0.21 9.0% VSH per Operator Pay Hour 0.57 0.54 0.50 0.50 -13.3% VSM per Operator Pay Hour 9.03 8.46 7.43 7.33 -18.8% Service Miles Per Service Hr 15.8 15.6 15.0 14.8 -6.3% Service Hours / Total Hours 94.2% 94.0% 99.2% 88.2% -6.3% Service Miles / Total Miles 91.9% 92.2% 91.9% 83.6% -9.1% Avg Psgr Miles per Psgr Trip 11.9 11.9 12.0 11.5 -3.1% Consumer Price Index (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 SunDial operations costs increased by 11 percent over the triennial period. Operator salaries and wages grew by 15.2 percent, which is above the 9.6 percent rate of inflation for the three years. Fuel costs decreased by 2.9 percent from the FY 2015 base year with fuel and lubricants expenses decreasing from $206,000 in FY 2015 to $200,000 in FY 2018. Due to the decrease in vehicle service hours and miles and the increase in salaries and wages, performance indicators such as cost per vehicle hour and vehicle mile increased by 13.2 percent and 20.9 percent, respectively . Maintenance SunLine maintains a revenue fleet of 123 vehicles (79 buses, 39 paratransit vans, and 5 trolleys), consisting of CNG, hydrogen fuel cell, and electric vehicles. The newest vehicles delivered during the audit period were 15 paratransit vans used for SunDial service and 16 fixed -route buses. Fifty- six fixed -route buses are approaching or have exceeded their 12-year lifespan or 500,000 miles, which has prompted fleet engine overhauls. SunDial vans are replaced when they reach 150,000 miles. SunLine currently has four 2005 Orion buses in service. The maintenance department oversees the maintenance of vehicles, facilities, and 657 bus stops, of which 394 have shelters. SunLine's vehicle maintenance takes place at the Thousand Palms facility. The Thousand Palms facility is equipped with six maintenance bays and one overflow bay. There are two in -ground, three aboveground, and two portable lifts at that facility. During the audit period, the in -ground lifts were replaced. The maintenance facility is in operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All CHP terminal inspections have been conducted at the Thousand Palms facility since 2014. Approximately 12 to 14 vehicles are staged at the Indio facility where evening shift operations take place. SunLine employed 22 mechanics based on the FY 2018 budget. Entry-level mechanics start at the "C" level and will shadow the "B" and "A" level mechanics. During the audit period, specialized Michael Baker International - 32 312 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 training for mechanics was implemented and included in the MOU for advancement from the "C" to the "A" level. Junior -level mechanics are sent to Orange County Transportation Authority's apprenticeship program. In addition, several mechanics on staff have been through the Automotive Service Excellence certification program. The SunLine Vehicle Maintenance Plan was updated in January 2019. New protocols were added and reflect the newer vehicles added to the fleet. The plan outlines the agency's Preventive Maintenance Inspection (PMI) program based on an A-B-C-D mileage schedule. FleetNet maintenance software is utilized for PMI tracking and forecasts each category of preventative maintenance scheduled. SunLine has considered upgrading to a Trapeze product. Engine oil sample checks are taken every 6,000 miles and oil changes are performed every 12,000 miles. The PMI plan is detailed in Table V-3. Mileage must be manually entered into FleetNet at the facility after bus runs since the fuel reader device does not have capability to transfer mileage data automatically to FleetNet. All PMIs must be completed within a 10 percent plus or minus mileage window before they are due as summarized in Table V-3. Table V-3 SunLine Transit Agency PMI Schedule PM Type PM Due Mileage Forecast Mileage Completion Window Fixed Route APM 6,000 5,400 5,400 to 6,600 BPM 12,000 11,400 11,400 to 12,600 CPM 24,000 23,400 23,400 to 24,600 DPM 48,000 47,400 47,400 to 48,600 Dial -A -Ride APM 6,000 5,400 5,400 to 6,600 BPM 12,000 11,400 11,400 to 12,600 CPM 24,000 23,400 23,400 to 24,600 Source: SunLine Transit Agency The majority of maintenance work is performed in-house; however, any outside repairs would fall under micro -purchases including alternators, smog testing, and wheel alignments. Pre -trip inspections involve oversight of the road supervisor during the morning pull-out. At that time, the operator will report any issues to dispatch, which get conveyed to maintenance. The post -trip inspection involves the operator being queried on the condition of the vehicle. The GFI fareboxes are also probed at that time. Cycle counts are performed on a monthly basis. Only supervisory staff and lead mechanics are allowed to retrieve parts. Parts are bar-coded and categorized according to vehicle make and model. SunLine maintains minimum and maximum inventory thresholds. The Finance Department conducts an annual inventory count involving personnel from accounting, procurement, and maintenance. Vehicle warranties help dictate which parts are ordered. Each part is scanned with a video checkout unit connected to the FleetNet software system. The parts department is camera monitored. Michael Baker International - 33 313 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 FleetNet keeps history of each item in inventory. This program is also utilized for cost pricing comparisons (less than $2,500). The micro -purchase threshold was increased from $3,000 to $10,000. For items or services exceeding $100,000, an Invitation for Bid or a Request for Proposals is made. The majority of inventory as measured in value is at the Thousand Palms facility. SunLine procures parts from a variety of vendors such as Napa Auto Parts, the local Ford dealership, and Carquest for the Orion vehicles. Some after -market parts are procured directly from New Flyer and Cummins. Tires are leased through a contract. Maintenance Performance Tables V-4 and V-5 show performance metrics for both SunBus and SunDial, respectively. Table V-4 SunBus Maintenance Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 Cost for Maintenance $3,922,862 $5,427,594 $5,209,133 $4,993,411 27.3% Maintenance Pay Hours 48,937 65,960 65,824 78,857 61.1% Total Vehicle Hours 229,642 239,740 254,324 246,941 7.5% Total Vehicle Miles 3,446,488 3,644,250 3,893,092 3,808,757 10.5% Active Vehicles 71 74 79 77 8.5% Peak Vehicles 54 57 61 57 5.6% Total Vehicle Failures 136 262 445 563 314.0% Maintenance Cost per Veh Hour $17.08 $22.64 $20.48 $20.22 18.4% Maintenance Cost per Veh Mile $1.14 $1.49 $1.34 $1.31 15.2% Maintenance Cost per Active Veh $55,252 $73,346 $65,938 $64,849 17.4% Veh Hours per Maint Pay Hour 4.69 3.63 3.86 3.13 -33.3% Veh Miles per Maint Pay Hour 70.43 55.25 59.14 48.30 -31.4% Veh Hours per Active Vehicle 3,234 3,240 3,219 3,207 -0.8% Veh Miles per Active Vehicle 48,542 49,247 49,280 49,464 1.9% Veh Miles Between Failures 25,342 13,909 8,749 6,765 -73.3% Spare Ratio 31.5% 29.8% 29.5% 35.1% 11.5% Consumer Price Index (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 Maintenance costs for SunBus increased from $3.9 million in FY 2015 to nearly $5.0 million in FY 2018, a 27.3 percent increase. The increase in cost is contrasted with the 9.6 percent growth in the CPI. The number of vehicle failures reported by SunLine to the FTA exhibited a substantial increase from 136 in FY 2015 to 563 in FY 2018. Maintenance costs using performance metrics such as cost per vehicle hour and per vehicle mile increased due to the increasing cost trend. Michael Baker International - 34 314 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Also, miles between failures decreased steadily during the audit period, overall a 73.3 percent decrease from 25,342 miles in FY 2015 to 6,765 miles in FY 2018, another negative trend. SunLine received further guidance from FTA on better defining service disruptions to include both mechanical and non -mechanical failures, which the agency began reporting in the NTD in FY 2017. The higher rate of service disruptions is attributed to how road calls are interpreted based on FTA definitions. Non -mechanical issues have been included and lumped into one category. Mechanical disruptions have been attributed to fueling and aging vehicles. This revised reporting increased the number of failures in FYs 2017 and 2018 compared to earlier years. This change, along with the updated vehicle maintenance plan keeps SunLine in compliance with FTA reporting. Table V-5 SunDial Maintenance Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Cost for Maintenance $822,718 $1,086,852 $1,007,212 $993,920 20.8% Maintenance Pay Hours 17,266 18,002 17,813 16,307 -5.6% Total Vehicle Hours 72,443 74,124 69,526 75,800 4.6% Total Vehicle Miles 1,172,096 1,179,761 1,122,020 1,183,817 1.0% Active Vehicles 33 36 39 39 18.2% Peak Vehicles 30 31 32 30 0.0% Total Vehicle Failures 48 106 75 144 200.0% Maintenance Cost Per Veh Hour $11.36 $14.66 $14.49 $13.11 15.5% Maintenance Cost Per Veh Mile $0.70 $0.92 $0.90 $0.84 19.6% Maintenance Cost Per Active Veh $24,931 $30,190 $25,826 $25,485 2.2% Veh Hours per Maint Pay Hour 4.20 4.12 3.90 4.65 10.8% Veh Miles per Maint Pay Hour 67.88 65.53 62.99 72.60 6.9% Veh Hours Per Active Vehicle 2,195 2,059 1,783 1,944 -11.5% Veh Miles Per Active Vehicle 35,518 32,771 28,770 30,354 -14.5% Veh Miles Between Failures 24,419 11,130 14,960 8,221 -66.3% Spare Ratio 10.0% 16.1% 21.9% 30.0% 200.0% Consumer Price Index (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 Maintenance costs for SunDial increased 20.8 percent, exceeding the rate of inflation during the audit period. Maintenance cost performance metrics such as cost per vehicle hour and per vehicle mile both increased. Maintenance cost per vehicle was relatively unchanged from FY 2015 to FY 2018. SunDial vehicle miles between failures decreased for the three-year period from 24,419 in FY 2015 to 8,221 in FY 2018. As with fixed -route vehicles, this trend is due to reporting of failures according to FTA definitions to include both mechanical and non -mechanical issues under one lumped category. Michael Baker International - 35 315 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Planning SunLine prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis as part of the funding requirements of RCTC. The SRTP is developed internally and involves the solicitation of input from the nine incorporated cities and the County of Riverside. The process involves review of local municipal planning developments such as single-family housing tracts. In addition, SunLine engages the community and local stakeholder groups, including for input on unmet transit needs. Samples of stakeholders engaged during the process included Lideres Campesinas, the Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, and the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and establishes objectives for the agency's transit services and capital improvement program. Under the Planned Services Changes and Implementation chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvements is presented for each route or program. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included in the SRTP to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, SunLine must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance indicators. There is one mandatory indicator which is the farebox recovery ratio set by formula by RCTC each year. Table V-6 shows the general targets for the performance indicators during the triennial period. The RCTC shows TransTrack data compared against the targets which SunLine has mostly met. Table V-6 SunLine System -wide Performance Targets Performance Indicators FY 2015-16 Target FY 2016-17 Target FY 2017-18 Target Farebox Recovery >=18.21% >=18.23% >=17.46% Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$92.53 <=$96.05 <=$106.94 Subsidy Per Passenger >=$3.47 & <=$4.69 >=$4.30 & <=$5.82 >=$4.78 & <=$6.46 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$0.48 & <=$0.64 >=$0.63 & <=$0.85 >=$0.68 & <=$0.92 Subsidy Per Revenue Hour >=$59.36 & <=$80.32 >=$65.35 & <=$88.41 >=$68.21 & <=$92.29 Subsidy Per Revenue Mile >=$4.06 & <=$5.50 >=$4.50 & <=$6.08 >=$4.64 & <=$6.28 Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=14.54 & <=19.67 >=12.92 & <=17.48 >=112.16 & <=16.45 Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.99 & <=1.35 >=0.89 & <=1.21 >=0.82& <=1.12 Source: Riverside County Transportation Commission, TransTrack Service Provider Performance Targets Report According to the Performance Target Reports, SunLine met two out of seven performance indicator targets for FY 2015-16; for FY 2016-17, SunLine met three of seven performance indicator targets; and in FY 2017-18 the agency met all but one performance target. SunLine is developing a longer -range transit plan with time horizons stretching beyond the current SRTP time period. There will be an emphasis on performance measurement to drive operational decisions. SunLine engaged HDR Engineering to conduct a comprehensive analysis of SunLine's route system, which involved reviewing previous studies and examinations of peer performance and selected best practices to make recommendations for a redesign of its transit operations. This transit redesign would consolidate SunLine's existing 15 routes into 9 routes and create micro - Michael Baker International - 36 316 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 transit service areas. An express service for Route 111 is also proposed, as is a series of phased fare increases over multiple years to sustain farebox recovery. It is prudent for the agency to consider a longer -term vision and the types of services that could be provided with a focus on efficiencies and customer service. The study is evaluating next generation technologies for the long range plan which could warrant future infrastructure investment such as for bus rapid transit. Given the lead time and coordination for such intelligent transportation systems, SunLine has opportunity to engage in partnership with agencies such as the local jurisdictions, CVAG, RCTC, and Caltrans District 8 on future transit technology solutions. Marketing In its 2017-2018 SRTP, SunLine proposed the development of a marketing plan with long-range marketing goals and implementation strategies to assist in branding and retaining current riders and attracting new riders. The agency uses targeted marketing of transit services through print media, including advertisements in local newspapers, as a cost-effectiveness strategy to promote its services. Marketing is also conducted through a variety of other means including social media and its website. Customer service personnel are composed of three representatives and one receptionist. The SunLine website, (http://www.sunline.org/), contains information about routes, schedules, services, and fares, including a system -wide map. The website underwent a major upgrade during the audit period. Passengers are also able to purchase passes online. The website features a quick links menu bar to route and schedule information, service alerts, pass purchases, employment opportunities, taxi services, and contact links. There is also a Google trip planner and link to the SunBus Tracker Mobile App. SunLine developed the app in partnership with Avail Technologies to provide riders a real-time bus tracking system powered by global positioning system technology. SunLine reports that 75 percent of website visits are accessed through mobile devices. About 90 percent of SunLine's ridership has access to a smartphone. Efforts to drive traffic to the website have resulted in 38,000 new hits. SunLine publishes a bilingual (English/Spanish) consolidated timetable or Rider's Guide of its routes. The Rider's Guide provides fare information, schedules, rider etiquette, SunDial information, and a system map. The guide is updated two to three times annually to reflect route and schedule changes. The agency is considering publishing fewer copies of the Rider's Guide as it expands mobile and electronic platforms. Other publications include the SunDial Curb -to -Curb ADA Paratransit Service brochure; the Taxi Voucher Program brochure; and the Half -Fare Program for SunBus. Information is posted at bus stops and other major activity centers such as schools, senior centers, retail outlets, and public facilities. Brochures and schedules are available on buses and at the various activity centers. SunLine utilizes four social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. Social media, particularly Facebook, are used to announce promotions, community events ("Pack the Bus"), service changes, and route detours. SunLine reports increased levels of followers and engagement on its social media platforms. There are creative marketing promotions and events Michael Baker International - 37 317 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 such as the 111 Music Festival held in November that feature live musical performances on Route 111 buses as well as the Coachella Valley Arts Scene. Quick response or QR codes are utilized in marketing materials that direct users to the website. Additional technology enhancements included the launch of Wi-fi on the buses in FY 2016 and the SunBus Tracker, which can be accessed through the website and the myStop mobile app. The Operations office can view live footage on board the buses. The agency also continues to run advertising spots over local radio stations and Spanish -language television as well as on bus shelters and in print publications. SunLine produces an annual report highlighting the agency's accomplishments and activities for the past year. The annual report is distributed to the communities in the Coachella Valley to communicate the message that investment in transit delivers a return beyond simply helping those that ride the bus. There has been a greater emphasis on Spanish language outreach, particularly in the East Valley. Travel training outreach is tailored to both groups and individuals. Travel training presentations are given at area high school campuses, civic groups, senior centers, and disabled groups to provide education about destinations and services available. Individual travel training involves meeting the prospective rider at home and walking to the nearest bus stop. The agency also works with special needs individuals such as the visually impaired and the Guide Dogs of the Desert organization. SunLine posts a series of travel training video clips on its website such as "You're your Route," "How to Ride Your Bus," "Buying a Pass," "Tracking Your Route," and a YouTube video for the Commuter Link (Route 220). SunLine encourages each one of its employees to become "Transit Ambassadors," empowered with the knowledge and communications skills to educate existing and potential riders about SunLine service and programs. SunLine is a member of the Southern California Community Outreach Transit Group, composed of peer agencies such as Foothill Transit, Orange County Transportation Authority, Metrolink, Omnitrans, and Mountain Transit. The group meets quarterly at Omnitrans and Foothills Transit offices by conference call or in person. SunLine retains an outside media consultant for graphic design, press releases, and media interface. Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, a Title VI Program was adopted by the agency and updated in June 2013. The SunLine Transit Agency FY 2017 Title VI Plan Update for use in FY 2018 to FY 2019 conforms to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes Title VI notices and complaint forms published in English and Spanish that are posted on the transit website and vehicles. Customer service requests and issues are logged into the COMS module in Trapeze from the feedback form on the website. The most common complaints reported pertain to bus pass -ups, missed transfers, rude operators, and the conduct of other passengers. The most common compliments received involve extra assistance provided by the operators and personable conduct. Michael Baker International - 38 318 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 General Administration and Management SunLine is a JPA made up of the nine incorporated cities in the Coachella Valley and the County of Riverside. The 10-member Board of Directors is composed of elected officials from each of the nine incorporated cities plus a representative from the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, Fourth District. The Board meets 10 times each year on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon. The July and August meetings are combined and usually held on the last Wednesday in July. The November and December meetings are also combined and are held on the first Wednesday in December. Special meetings may be convened by the chairman as needed. The chair and vice - chair are elected by the other board members for annual terms that commence on July 1 of each year. All meetings are held in the Board Room at the SunLine Transit Agency Thousand Palms Administration Building located at 32-505 Harry Oliver Trail. Serving in an advisory role to the Board are four standing committees: Finance/Audit Committee, Board Operations Committee, Strategic Planning & Operational Committee, and Taxi Committee. The committees have been more empowered and engaged by bringing more items before the Board. The new organizational structure was introduced in 2014. The agency was reorganized into five departments during the audit period as summarized below in Table V-7: Table V-7 SunLine Departmental Structure Department/Office Key Functions & Responsibilities Executive Office Responsible for the overall administration and operation of the agency. This office provides support to the agency Board of Directors and maintains all records of the agency's business. Performance Management Office Responsible for improving the overall efficiency of the systems and processes that support SunLine daily operations. This office focuses on maximizing performance across all agency functions through ongoing performance reviews. It oversees the management of SunFuels, and key capital projects. Safety and Security Office Responsible for providing a safe working environment for employees and ensuring the safety of all passengers. This office investigates and documents all traffic collisions, passenger injuries, and incidents that might cause a liability to the agency. The department is also responsible for reporting to various federal and state regulatory agencies such as Cal -OSHA and the National Transit Database, training all new fixed -route and paratransit operators, and conducting ongoing perishable skills training and remedial training for employees involved in preventable incidents. Operations Office Focuses on all aspects of quality service delivery by utilizing staff, fleet, facilities, and equipment. Finance Office Responsible for the budget, accounting, sales, contracts/procurement, materials management and inventory control, warranty administration, cash management, investment portfolio, payroll, risk management and lost and found for the agency. The office is also responsible for the development of all Michael Baker International - 39 319 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Department/Office Key Functions & Responsibilities financial statements, coordination of financial audits, and development of sales and taxation documents and specialized reports for SunFuels. Administration Office Provides a wide range of support functions for SunLine Transit Agency, including Human Resources, Information Technology, Service Planning, and Community and Customer Relations. Source: SunLine Transit Agency The agency's budget process commences in January. The Finance department compiles two years of information along with current year projections. Protected spreadsheets are sent out to department heads and followed up by a series of three to four meetings with each department. Budget requests are reviewed by the budget analyst and CFO who in turn review the budget data with the CEO/General Manager. A final budget draft is presented to the Board in May for comment as an information item, adopted in June, and becomes effective July 1. The agency's most recent FTA triennial review during the audit period was conducted on January 8, 2016 (scoping meeting) with site visits on March 15-16, 2016. A draft report was completed April 15, 2016. No deficiencies were found in 14 of the 17 areas of FTA requirements. Deficiencies were found in three areas: Technical Capacity, Maintenance, and Procurement. In the Technical Capacity two deficiencies were noted: progress reports lack required information (SunLine did not include updated completion dates for project milestones in its milestone progress reports) and missing cost-effectiveness documentation for capital lease (the agency did not certify that it conducted cost-effectiveness determination prior to its entering into its tire lease). Under Maintenance: late facility/equipment preventive maintenance reporting (there was insufficient data to determine whether facility maintenance was conducted on time due to incomplete maintenance records). Under Procurement: pre -award or post -delivery audits not performed (SunLine relied on vendor self -certification and did not obtain evidence of compliance with Buy America requirements). SunLine responded to all deficiencies, which were closed out. The vehicle maintenance plan was updated to improve on the preventive maintenance program. The agency received its triennial review closeout letter in response to the Summary of Findings and Corrective Actions on March 15, 2017. SunLine University SunLine has implemented several initiatives to nurture career growth and advancement, and provide greater empowerment in decision -making. SunLine University was created in-house and offers in -services courses for employee development. This program is managed under the Performance Office. Employees from different departments are invited to participate in reviewing other department performance metrics and interact with different staff to ask questions about their office performance. These reviews are structured regularly on a monthly basis. The training provided to employees in different departments has enabled more management level advancement for a number of the younger personnel who will be in -line to succeed higher level managers. An employee referral program was also implemented in July 2019. The employee handbook was last updated in April 2016 and does not reflect these developments including Michael Baker International - 40 320 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 modifications to and formalization of the organization chart and movement of personnel positions. An update to the employee handbook can incorporate these latest policies as well as changes that reflect the agency's organization structure and culture. Administrative Performance Tables V-8 and V-9 show performance indicators for administration relative to SunBus and SunDial operations. Table V-8 SunBus Administrative Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Costs for Administration $7,437,296 $8,837,439 $8,939,215 $8,982,708 20.8% Administration Pay Hours 100,347 104,189 106,280 99,575 -0.8% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 216,738 226,020 238,374 231,781 6.9% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 3,084,147 3,274,830 3,467,184 3,402,692 10.3% Unlinked Passenger Trips 4,674,654 4,358,966 4,151,467 3,947,023 -15.6% Passenger Miles 33,371,743 31,092,789 28,499,208 27,069,767 -18.9% Admin Cost Per VSH $34.31 $39.10 $37.50 $38.76 12.9% Admin Cost Per VSM $2.41 $2.70 $2.58 $2.64 9.5% Admin Cost per Psgr Trip $1.59 $2.03 $2.15 $2.28 43.0% Admin Cost per Psgr Mile $0.22 $0.28 $0.31 $0.33 48.9% VSH per Admin Pay Hour 2.16 2.17 2.24 2.33 7.8% VSM per Admin Pay Hour 30.73 31.43 32.62 34.17 11.2% Consumer Price Index (CPI - Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 As shown in the National Transit Database, administrative costs allocated to fixed -route service increased for the period between FYs 2015 and 2018. Described earlier, new positions were added including additional trainers/supervisors, IT, and capital projects managers to handle growing operations and capital programs. As a result of the increase in costs and decrease in ridership, performance indicators measured by cost per vehicle hour, vehicle mile, and per passenger trip showed negative trends as illustrated by growth in each cost measure. Table V-9 SunDial Administrative Performance Indicators Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Change FY 2015-FY 2018 Costs for Administration $362,573 $501,842 $460,660 $682,316 88.2% Michael Baker International - 41 321 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Base Data & Performance Indicators Base Year FY 2015 Audit Review Period % Change FY 2015-FY 2018 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Administration Pay Hours 4,904 6,535 6,392 6,793 38.5% Vehicle Service Hours (VSH) 68,216 69,687 68,943 66,851 -2.0% Vehicle Service Miles (VSM) 1,077,696 1,087,619 1,031,486 989,084 -8.2% Unlinked Passenger Trips 153,183 164,024 164,802 156,292 2.0% Passenger Miles 1,822,878 1,958,885 1,981,739 1,801,819 -1.2% Admin Cost Per VSH $5.32 $7.20 $6.68 $10.21 92.0% Admin Cost Per VSM $0.34 $0.46 $0.45 $0.69 105.0% Admin Cost per Psgr Trip $2.37 $3.06 $2.80 $4.37 84.4% Admin Cost per Psgr Mile $0.20 $0.26 $0.23 $0.38 90.4 VSH per Admin Pay Hour 13.91 10.17 10.56 9.84 -29.3% VSM per Admin Pay Hour 219.76 158.68 158.06 145.60 -33.7% Consumer Price Index (CPI - Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Source: National Transit Database Reports for FY 2015-FY 2018 Administrative costs allocated to Dial -A -Ride service as shown in the National Transit Database increased significantly for the period between FYs 2015 and 2018. Costs increased by over 88 percent, which correlates with the increase in administrative pay hours allocated to Dial -A -Ride. As a result of the increase in costs coupled with decreases in vehicle hours and miles and only a small increase in ridership, performance indicators measured by cost per vehicle hour, per vehicle mile, and per passenger trip showed significant negative trends as illustrated by growth in each cost measure. Grants Management The Performance Management Office oversees key capital projects and monitors grant activity and milestones. The office has been tasked with upgrading the agency's Capital Improvement Program as well as prioritizing grant fund balances to be spent down. This effort has resulted in helping to better align revenues with expenditures which are tracked through key performance indicators. Older grant funds have been used toward the Operations Facility. The oldest open grant is from FY 2009. SunLine utilizes grant funding from local, state, and federal sources to support operations and capital procurement and projects. Grant status is tracked on a grant summary spreadsheet that is configured based on the project type or operational function. The grants summary worksheet details the original grant, budgeted and expended amounts, and remaining grant funds. Estimated completion dates are identified while closed grants are highlighted. A grants analyst keeps track of the status of each grant and ensures the sign -off by the project initiation team. This process also involves the review and approval of allowable expenditures. The analyst is also responsible for programming projects into the SRTP for submittal to RCTC. FTIP Michael Baker International - 42 322 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 programming sheets are submitted by RCTC to SCAG. The senior accountant is authorized to expedite FTA Electronic Clearing House Operation requests. SunLine employs stringent financial control procedures that include a check signing protocol requiring two wet signatures. Any checks issued over $50,000 require the signatures of the CEO and one Board member. Checks issued between $25,000 and $50,000 require the signatures of the CEO and CFO. Checks issued under $25,000 involve monthly drawdowns. Grant funds are derived from FTA Sections 5307, 5310, and 5339 as well as the State Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Account program, California Transit Assistance Fund, State Transit Assistance, Low Carbon Transit Operations Program, California Energy Commission, federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality program, and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Funding for operations is based on a 50/50 federal and state revenue split. SunLine has been utilizing more toll credits as a match for federal grants. The agency received a $12 million grant from CARB toward the development of its alternative fueling facilities. Chief among the facilities being developed is SunLine's new electrolyzer hydrogen production plant, which supports compression and storage equipment along with two 350-bar fueling dispensers. The electrolyzer plant was scheduled for completion in late 2019/early 2020 outside of the audit period. Michael Baker International - 43 323 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the nine compliance requirements pertaining to SunLine Transit Agency, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to SunLine (i.e., separate urbanized and rural farebox recovery ratios). 2. SunLine is subject to an intermediate farebox recovery ratio standard set by RCTC pursuant to PUC Section 99270.1. The intermediate ratio is a blended ratio that accounts for both rural and urbanized areas. The minimum farebox recovery ratios that SunLine was required to meet were 18.21 percent in FY 2016; 18.23 percent in FY 2017; and 17.46 percent in FY 2018. SunLine's farebox recovery ratios were 22.56 percent in FY 2016; 20.60 percent in FY 2017; and 21.49 percent in FY 2018. SunLine exceeded the minimum standard in all three audit years based on audited data which include fare revenue and local support funds. The average farebox recovery ratio was 21.55 percent. 3. The SunLine Transit Agency participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. All fixed -route and Dial -a -Ride vehicles were inspected at SunLine's Thousand Palms facility. 4. The annual changes in the operating budget exhibited steady increases during the audit period. SunLine's budget for FY 2016 increased by 9.8 percent, by 8.7 percent in FY 2017, and by 4.2 percent in FY 2018. The increases in the operating budgets are attributed to costs associated with service improvements, new initiatives, fleet maintenance, and administration. 5. SunLine satisfactorily implemented each of the three prior audit recommendations. The prior recommendations pertained to the preparation and submittal of separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service, implementing a fare revenue sharing agreement with College of the Desert (COD), and conducting long-range planning. 6. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 12.1 percent system -wide from $97.00 in FY 2015 to $108.76 in FY 2015. System -wide operating costs experienced a marked increase of 17.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018, while vehicle service hours increased by a lower rate of 4.8 percent between those years. Cost increases were attributed to higher wages and benefits associated with the memorandum of understanding (MOU), more frequent service and route extensions under the new initiatives Michael Baker International - 44 324 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 program, increased fleet maintenance, and new project management positions to handle a growing complex capital program. 7. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 38.3 percent system -wide from $5.72 in FY 2015 to $7.92 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 15 percent during the triennial period from 4,827,837 passengers in FY 2015 to 4,103,315 passengers in FY 2018. 8. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 18.9 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 16.9 passengers per hour to 13.7 passengers per hour. Fixed -route operations were consistent with this trend, with a rate of decrease of 21 percent over the same period from 21.6 to 17 passengers per hour. SunDial operations exhibited a slight increase of 4.1 percent, averaging 2.3 passengers per hour. The trend in this indicator reflects the increase in hours on fixed -route and decrease in passenger trips versus the decrease in SunDial vehicle service hours and increase in passenger trips. 9. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, decreased 19.5 percent between FY 2015 and FY 2018 system -wide from 1.16 passengers per mile to 0.93 passengers per mile. For fixed -route operations, the number of passengers per service mile decreased by 23.5 percent from 1.52 to 1.16. SunDial had an increase in passengers per service mile of 11.2 percent during the triennial period, from 0.14 in FY 2015 to 0.16 in FY 2018. From the FY 2015 base year to FY 2018, total vehicle service miles increased 5.5 percent system- wide. 10. SunLine commemorated its 40th anniversary as a transit agency in 2017. The anniversary was marked by a new branding campaign, rider awards, recognition from community stakeholders, and renewed partnerships. In 2016, SunLine created a first in the nation dedicated training center for commercial zero emission technology: The West Coast Center of Excellence in Zero Emission Technology. 11. The agency adjusted its route scheduling and alignments during the audit period. In FY 2016, enhancements to improve connectivity to new shopping destinations were made to Routes 14, 24 and 30 in the City of Palm Springs and Routes 90, 91, 95 and 111 in the Cities of Indio and Coachella and the unincorporated communities of Thermal and Mecca. 12. Administrative and operations performance indicator reviews are conducted monthly and involve a panel of three to four staff members reviewing data to determine trends and efficiencies. Key performance indicators are selected for data collection and review as part of goal setting and development of dashboard performance measures. 13. In July 2018, SunLine and the Desert Community College District (DCCD) executed an MOU to implement the Haul Pass program. Cal State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB)—Palm Desert Campus joined the program in September 2019. Students enrolled at COD and CSUSB-Palm Michael Baker International - 45 325 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Desert may swipe their student ID on -board fixed -route buses and SunDial and ride at no further charge. 14. The SunLine website, (http://www.sunline.org/), contains information about routes, schedules, services, and fares, including a system -wide map. The website underwent a major upgrade during the audit period. Passengers are also able to purchase passes online. Additional technology enhancements included the launch of Wi-fi on the buses in FY 2016 and the SunBus Tracker, which can be accessed through the website and the myStop mobile app. 15. SunLine employs stringent financial control procedures that include a check signing protocol requiring two wet signatures. Any checks issued over $50,000 require the signatures of the CEO and one Board member. Checks issued between $25,000 and $50,000 require the signatures of the CEO and CFO. Checks issued under $25,000 involve monthly drawdowns. 16. The agency received a $12 million grant from CARB toward the development of its alternative fueling facilities. Chief among the facilities being developed is SunLine's new electrolyzer hydrogen production plant, which supports compression and storage equipment along with two 350-bar fueling dispensers. The electrolyzer plant was scheduled for completion in late 2019/early 2020 outside of the audit period. Michael Baker International - 46 326 Triennial Performance Audit of SunLine Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Update the employee handbook. (High Priority) The employee handbook was last updated in April 2016. Since that time, the latest MOU between SunLine and the Amalgamated Transit Union has included provisions for specialized training opportunities and employee contributions to the pension plan. In addition, SunLine has implemented several initiatives to nurture career growth and advancement. SunLine University offers in -services courses for employee development. A pilot employee referral program was also implemented in July 2019. Recently initiated, the update to the employee manual can incorporate these latest policies as well as changes that reflect the agency's organization structure and culture. SunLine University in -services courses are also under consideration for addition to the handbook. 2. Coordinate opportunities for SunLine transit redesign with intelligent transportation infrastructure in the Coachella Valley. (Medium Priority) According to the FY 2019-20 SRTP, SunLine's transit redesign will consolidate existing routes and create microtransit service areas. In addition, SunLine will introduce a pilot Route 111-Express service that will offer service with less travel time between Coachella and Palm Springs. While the transit redesign and pilot programs from SunLine's Transit Redesign study may not immediately require heavy investment in new or additional transportation infrastructure, longer term success of next generation transit will likely rely on multiple improvements including vehicle technology and related intelligent infrastructure, such as transit priority systems. Intelligent transportation infrastructure is being planned in the Coachella Valley, including studies conducted by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments. One of the studies develops the concept for a regional traffic signal synchronization program and inter -agency coordination and communication needs. A signal priority system could benefit transit innovations such as bus rapid transit in key corridors. As SunLine progresses through implementation of the transit redesign and identifies opportunities to use advanced technology for its routes, a coordination effort should be outlined with partner agencies to plan for the necessary infrastructure for transit. Partner agencies could include the local municipalities, County of Riverside, RCTC, CVAG, and Caltrans District 8. A listing of priority corridors for signal prioritization is identified in the CVAG study, and SunLine should outline the inter -agency coordination to align the needs of enhance transit with planned infrastructure investment in these corridors. Michael Baker International - 47 327 ATTACHMENT 8 RCTC RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Desert Roadrunner February 2020 Submitted to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Submitted by: Michael Baker 328 INTERNATIONAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I 1 Introduction 1 Overview of the Transit System 1 Section 11 6 Operator Compliance Requirements 6 Section III 12 Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations 12 Section IV 12 TDA Performance Indicators 15 Section V 22 Review of Operator Functions 22 Operations 22 Maintenance 26 Planning 27 Marketing 28 General Administration and Management 29 Section VI 32 Findings 32 Recommendations 35 329 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section I Introduction California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) engaged Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County. This performance audit is conducted for the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA, Agency) covering the most recent triennial period, fiscal years 2015-16 through 2017-18. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the transit agency's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transportation in its service area. This evaluation is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the transit agency's compliance with the conditions specified in the California Public Utilities Code (PUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the transit agency is meeting the PUC's reporting requirements. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the transit administrative functions. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the opportunity for an independent, constructive, and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in -person interviews with management, collection and review of Agency documents, data analysis, and on -site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and conduct of the audit. Overview of the Transit System Under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) between the County of Riverside and the City of Blythe executed on January 24, 1978, the PVVTA was created to provide demand -response and fixed -route transit service branded as PVVTA to the City of Blythe, the adjacent unincorporated areas of Riverside County, and neighboring Ehrenberg, Arizona. PVVTA currently operates as a deviated fixed -route system. Prior to the creation of PVVTA, there were no transit services in the Palo Verde Valley. PVVTA services are operated under contract by Irvine -based Transportation Concepts, Inc. Based on the 2010 US Census, Blythe's population was 20,817, showing growth of 71.3 percent since the 2000 US Census. The senior citizen population, comprising residents aged 65 and over, is 8.62 percent. The 2019 population for Blythe is estimated to be 19,428 as reported by the California Department of Finance. The city covers a 26.19-square-mile area. Michael Baker International -1 330 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Agriculturally based and a winter "snow bird" destination, Blythe is located on the California -Arizona border along the Colorado River and serves as a commercial center for eastern Riverside County. The area's population varies seasonally. The area's largest employer is the California State Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, which operates the Chuckawalla Valley and Ironwood State Prisons, located approximately 20 miles west of Blythe. Growth in the valley is expected to increase at an average annual rate of 2 percent. PVVTA's ridership is expected to grow in concert with the population due to the implementation and stability of new transit services. Major highway connections serving Blythe and the Palo Verde Valley are Interstate 10 (1-10), State Route (SR) 78 and US Highway 95. 1-10 is the main east —west highway connecting Blythe with the Coachella Valley and Inland Empire to the west and Arizona to the east. SR 78 connects Blythe with the community of Ripley and the Imperial Valley to the southwest. US Highway 95 runs northerly along the Colorado River to Needles. Major arterial streets traversing Blythe include Broadway, Hobsonway, Intake Boulevard, Lovekin Boulevard, and 7th Street. System Characteristics PVVTA operates a deviated fixed -route system. The transit system operates Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 6:45 p.m. and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. PVVTA does not operate on New Year's Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Only Silver Route 5 operates the day following Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and New Year's Eve. Red Route 3 Express does not operate on any observed California state or federal holiday. PVVTA's deviated fixed -route services during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-1. Table 1-1 PVVTA Fixed -Route Services Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time Points Blue Route 1 City of Blythe Every 60 minutes • Kmart Transfer Center Circulator (Monday through • Palo Verde High School Friday from 6:25 a.m. to 5:40 p.m.) • 7th Street/Rite Aid • 14th Avenue/7th Street • Palo Verde Hospital • Civic Center Gold Route 2 Palo Verde Every 60 minutes • Hobsonway WB/7th Crosstown College/Ehrenberg (Monday through Street Friday from 6:45 a.m. to 6:40 p.m.) • Palo Verde Hospital • Civic Center • Kmart Transfer Center • Palo Verde College • 7th Street/Rite Aid • Hobsonway/Intake US 95 Michael Baker International -2 331 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Route Description Frequency/Operation Key Time Points Red Route 3 Express Peak Service to California State Prisons Three AM peak trips and three PM peak trips (Monday through Friday from 5:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) • PVVTA Park & Ride • Palos Verde Hospital • Hobsonway/SR 78 Neighbours • Hobsonway WB/Mesa • Chuckawalla Valley State Prison • Ironwood State Prison Green Route 4 Ripley Rider Ripley/Mesa Verde Three round trips (Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 3:55 p.m. — Until 6:55 p.m. upon request) • Ehrenberg AZ/Goodman's • 7th Street/Rite Aid • Kmart • Hobsonway/SR 78 Neighbours • Ripley — Desert Rose Apts. • Mesa Verde — Roy Wilson Community Center Silver Route 5 Saturday/Holidays Blythe/Ripley/Mesa Verde Every 90 minutes (Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.) • Kmart Transfer Center • 7t" Street East/Albertsons • Hobsonway/Intake US 95 • Ehrenberg AZ/Goodman's • Hobsonway/SR-78 Neighbours • Ripley — Desert Rose Apts. • Mesa Verde — Roy Wilson Community Center Route 6 Medical Shuttle On -Demand Blythe Wellness Express One round trip (Monday, Wednesday, & Friday, departing Blythe @ 6:30 a.m., returning @ 4:00 p.m.) • T.C. Park and Ride • Mesa Verde • Desert Center Post Office • Chiriaco Summit • Hwy 111 @ Flower SunLine Transfer Center • Indio-JFK Med Center • Rancho Mirage — Eisenhower Med Center • Palm Springs — Desert Regional Med Center Source: PVVTA Michael Baker International -3 332 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Desert RoadTRIP Desert RoadTRIP is short for the Desert Road Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project, which is a partnership between PVVTA and the Partnership to Preserve Independent Living for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities. Since 1995, the Desert RoadTRIP program has offered this specialized transit service for seniors 60 years of age and disabled persons living in isolated locations in the Palo Verde Valley and eastern Riverside County, who are unable to drive and do not have access to transportation. This service utilizes qualified volunteer drivers, who are reimbursed on a mileage basis. The volunteer drivers are required to have a valid driver's license, a registered vehicle, and auto liability insurance. Each qualified rider identifies his/her own volunteer driver. The driver could be a family friend, neighbor, or some other trusted individual known to the rider. The eligible rider files a reimbursement claim based on the mileage traveled during the month with Desert RoadTRIP and, after receiving the claim, reimburses the driver. The reimbursement is paid at 25 cents per mile. An individual is allowed up to 460 miles per month, and an eligible family is entitled to 690 miles per month. A $5.00 per one- way trip fee is charged to riders. A 2018 SRTP recommendation is for TRIP to be integrated into the Blythe Wellness Express to expand the service to Riverside University Medical Center in Moreno Valley and medical services in Loma Linda. X-Tend-A-Ride In addition to PVVTA's fixed route, Blythe Wellness Express (BWE), and Desert RoadTRIP services, the X-Tend-A-Ride demand- responsive service operates during special events during the evening or on non -service days. The service is accessible to the public for $5.00 a trip. It is designed to be a guaranteed ride home service when the regular fixed route is not in operation. Fares PVVTA's fares are structured based on passenger, route, and service type. Multi -trip passes are also available for purchase in person or by mail at the PVVTA operations office at 415 North Main Street in Blythe. The fare structures during the audit period are summarized in Table 1-2. Table 1-2 PVVTA Fare Schedule Fare Category Fares General Public (Ages 5 to 59 Years Old) $1.65 Seniors (Ages 60 and Older) $0.80 Persons with Disabilities (ADA or Medicare Card) $0.80 Additional Zone Fare to/from Ehrenberg, Arizona $5.00 Children (Under 5 Years of Age) First Boarding with Full Fare Adult Free Children (Under 5 Years of Age) Second & Third Boarding with Full Fare Adult $0.80 Red Route 3 Express (All Adult Categories) $3.30 Route Deviations (One Way To/From Route) $0.80 Michael Baker International -4 333 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Fare Category Fares DV8-Card (8 One Way Deviation Fares) $6.40 10-Ride Punch Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local & 4 & 5) $16.50 Senior/Disabled 10-Ride Punch Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local & 4 & 5) $8.00 General Public 31-Day Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local & 4 & 5) $43.00 Seniors 31-Day Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local & 4 & 5) $28.00 Persons with Disabilities 31-Day Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local & 4 & 5) $28.00 10-Ride Punch Pass (Ehrenberg, Arizona) $50.00 10-Ride Punch Pass (Red Route 3 Express) $33.00 20-Ride Punch Pass (Red Route 3 Express) $66.00 General Public 31-Day Pass (Red Route 3 Express) $120.00 Other Cash Fare—X-tend-A-Ride & Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) X-tend-A-Ride, General Public, Seniors & Persons with Disabilities $5.00 BWE, General Public, Seniors & Persons with Disabilities, One -Way $10.00 BWE, General Public, Seniors & Persons with Disabilities, Round Trip $15.00 Source: PVVTA PVVTA implemented a 6 percent increase in fares in FY 2019, after the audit period. Fleet Ten vehicles were in revenue service during the audit period. In addition, PVVTA has seven support vehicles and four contingency vehicles for emergency usage. Vehicles in the fleet are wheelchair accessible with tie -downs in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). Table 1-3 summarizes the PVVTA fleet. Table 1-3 PVVTA Fleet — Revenue Service Year Make/Model Quantity Fuel Type Seating Capacity 2010 Ford 1 Gasoline 16 (2 W/C) 2011 Ford 1 Gasoline 16 (2 W/C) 2012 Ford 1 CNG 16 (2 W/C) 2013 Ford 3 CNG 32 (2 W/C) 2014 Chevrolet 1 Gasoline 18 (2 W/C) 2016 Ford 2 Gasoline 18 (2 W/C) 2018 Ford 1 Gasoline 18 (2 W/C) Total 10 Source: PVVTA Michael Baker International -5 334 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of PVVTA's ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the Caltrans guidebook Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Agencies to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of 11 measures taken from relevant sections of the PUC and the California Code of Regulations. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system's efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Reference Compliance Efforts Requirements The transit operator submitted Public Utilities Code, Section Completion/submittal dates: annual reports to the RTPA 99243 based upon the Uniform FY 2016: October 12, 2016 System of Accounts and FY 2017: January 29, 2018* Records established by the FY 2018: January 21, 2019* State Controller. Report is due 90 days after end of fiscal year *Note: New state legislation (Sept. 28/29), or 110 days (Oct. was passed (AB 1113, Bloom) 18/19) if filed electronically on July 21, 2017, that changes (Internet). the timeline to submit the annual Transit Operators Financial Transaction Reports to the State Controller effective reporting year FY 2017. The submittal date has been extended from within 110 days after fiscal year end to 7 months after fiscal year end, or end of January. This is an extension of about 100 days from the original deadline. With the change in dates, these reports are required to contain underlying data from audited financial statements. Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International -6 335 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90- day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2016: December 15, 2016 FY 2017: December 27, 2017 FY 2018: January 18, 2019 A 90-day extension was granted by RCTC pursuant to the TDA statute. Conclusion: Complied. The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator's compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator's terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 B PVVTA, through its contract operator, participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections were conducted at the PVVTA operations facility located 415 North Main Street, Blythe. Inspection dates applicable to the audit period were: December 2, 2014; December 7-8, 2015; December 12, 2016; and December 22, 2017. Inspections were rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator's claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, PVVTA's annual claims for Local Transportation Funds (LTF) and State Transit Assistance are Michael Baker International -7 336 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. submitted in compliance with the rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied. If an operator serves urbanized and non -urbanized areas, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to the ratio determined by the rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Section 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as PVVTA serves a non -urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. The operator's operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in PVVTA's transit operating budget: FY 2016: +5.4% FY 2017: +2.3% FY 2018: +19.5% The increase in the FY 2018 operating budget is attributed to the implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express in July 2017 and higher maintenance repair and operations contract costs. Source: PVVTA Board Approved Budgets for FYs 2015-2018 Conclusion: Complied. The operator's definitions of performance measures are consistent with Public Utilities Code Section 99247, including (a) operating cost, Public Utilities Code, Section 99247 PVVTA's definition of performance is consistent with PUC Section 99247. A review of trip sheets and TransTrack reports generated during the Michael Baker International -8 337 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts (b) operating cost per passenger, (c) operating cost per vehicle service hour, (d) passengers per vehicle service hour, (e) passengers per vehicle service mile, (f) total passengers, (g) transit vehicle, (h) vehicle service hours, (i) vehicle service miles, and (j) vehicle service hours per employee. audit period indicates that correct performance data are being collected. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three -twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.12, 99270.1 This requirement is not applicable, as PVVTA serves a non -urbanized area. Conclusion: Not Applicable. If the operator serves a rural area, or provides exclusive services to elderly and disabled persons, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one -tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.4, 99268.5 Operating ratios for PVVTA using audited data were as follows: FY 2016: 12.09% FY 2017: 14.48% FY 2018: 10.41% Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International -9 338 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Table 11-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The current cost of the operator's retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 To be eligible for TDA funds, the annual TDA claims form requires a sign -off from the transit claimant to comply with standard assurances, one of which is that PVVTA's retirement system is funded. PVVTA contracts with a private provider for operations, but since a portion of PVVTA's functions are administered by the City of Blythe, City staff's retirement is funded through the California Public Employees Retirement System. Conclusion: Complied. If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) As a recipient of State Transit Assistance funds, PVVTA utilizes federal funds that are available to the Agency, as reported in the Transit Operator Financial Transactions Reports and fiscal audits as follows: FY 2016: -$0- FY 2017: -$0- FY 2018: $111,387 (BWE Operations) Conclusion: Complied. Michael Baker International -10 339 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to PVVTA, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to PVVTA (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio under PUC 99270.1 and exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio). 2. PVVTA met its farebox recovery standard of 10 percent during the audit period, with the flex route services being exempt for two full fiscal years (FY 2017 and FY 2018) after the year of implementation. The farebox recovery ratio was 12.09 percent in FY 2016; 14.48 percent in FY 2017; and 10.41 percent in FY 2018. The average system -wide farebox recovery ratio was 12.33 percent during the period. 3. Through its contract operator, PVVTA participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited modest changes during the audit period in the first two years of the audit period. PVVTA saw an increase of 5.4 percent in the Board -approved operating budget in FY 2016 and 2.3 percent in FY 2017. In FY 2018 the budget increased by 19.5 percent due to the implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express and higher maintenance and contract costs. Michael Baker International -11 340 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section III Prior Triennial Performance Recommendations PVVTA's efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the Agency is described, followed by a discussion of PVVTA's efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the Agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Continue to pursue and implement a succession plan for the finance manager position. (High Priority) Background: The prior audit noted how the PVVTA finance manager served a vital role in the monitoring of the Agency's financial plan and submittal of its TDA claims. The current manager formerly served as the City of Blythe's finance director for many years and retired from that position in early 2013, and brings years of institutional knowledge about the TDA claims process and dealings with RCTC staff. It was suggested that PVVTA identify and cross -train an assistant capable of assuming the duties of the finance manager in the event of any future staffing changes. Actions taken by PVVTA In response to this recommendation, the Agency has taken steps to document and archive key functions of the finance manager's position. An accounts specialist was hired during the audit period to assist with financial duties. The Board has acted to allow the transfer, if necessary, of such duties to become easier. Conclusion This recommendation has been partially implemented and the Agency is encouraged to further define and delegate the finance manager's duties in the event of any future staffing changes. Prior Recommendation 2 Continue to pursue a fare revenue sharing agreement with Palo Verde College. (High Priority) Background: The PVVTA serves the local Palo Verde College (PVC) campus. The service on Gold Route 2 is aligned with the PVC class schedule. To its credit, PVC does distribute transit passes to qualified students. PVVTA is seeking an agreement with PVC that would generate additional farebox support through student passes. The Agency has been pursuing such an agreement with PVC for nearly a decade. Students could be assessed a transportation fee as part of their annual student fee when they enroll at the college, which would allow for unlimited transit rides on any PVVTA bus. It was suggested Michael Baker International -12 341 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 that the Agency continue to pursue a fare revenue sharing agreement with PVC whereby PVVTA receives a share of the revenues generated from student fees. Actions taken by PVVTA The Agency and PVC have yet to implement a formal subsidy agreement. Each year PVVTA and the Palo Verde Community College District (District) have multiple meetings about service revenue and coordination. The college continues to purchase 31-day passes and tickets in bulk two to three times annually. In addition, PVC has implemented services which pay the full cost for student transportation on PVVTA routes. PVVTA and the District continue to hold ongoing discussions regarding the revenue sharing. Conclusion This recommendation is no longer applicable in light of the efforts made over the past several audit cycles. Prior Recommendation 3 Include Desert RoadTRIP financial and operations data in the PVVTA State Controller Report. (High Priority) Background: Desert RoadTRIP is available to seniors (60+), persons with disabilities, and truly needy passengers. TRIP supplements PVVTA service and uses LTF revenue. RCTC has required TRIP information to be included in TransTrack for performance tracking. This program has not been included in the annual State Controller Report developed for PVVTA. As LTF goes toward TRIP, its fare revenue, expenses, and operating data such as ridership and miles should be included in the Controller Report. TRIP operations data could be added in the "Other" category in the Supplemental Operating Data section of Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report. Actions taken by PVVTA The Desert RoadTRIP data are being reported in the Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report submitted to the State Controller, effective with the FY 2015-16 report. Conclusion This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Provide Title VI policy documentation in Spanish. (Medium Priority) Michael Baker International -13 342 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Background: Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, a Title VI Program was adopted by PVVTA in FY 2011 and updated in March 2015. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes Title VI notices and complaint forms posted at the PVVTA operations office, on the transit vehicles, and website. However, the auditor could not locate Title VI information and complaint forms in Spanish other than the policy summary on Page 4 of the Title VI Program document. Title VI provisions include a Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Plan to help identify reasonable steps to provide language assistance for LEP persons seeking meaningful access to PVVTA services as required by Executive Order 13166. Based on the latest US Census data, approximately 43.5 percent of Blythe residents age 5 years and older speak a language other than English at home, which is primarily Spanish. Therefore, it is recommended that the Agency make the Title VI Plan, procedures, and complaint form available in Spanish. The Google Translate tool is available on the PVVTA website and may be used to translate the online Title VI information including complaint filing procedures. Actions taken by PVVTA PVVTA has been working with a translator to have these documents provided in Spanish. The projected date to complete this task was June 30, 2017. In the meantime, the Google Translate feature on the redesigned PVVTA website can translate Title VI information into Spanish. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Michael Baker International -14 343 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews PVVTA's performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Table IV-1 provides the performance indicators for PVVTA system -wide. Charts are also provided to depict the trends in the indicators. It is noted that operating costs and fare revenues are based on audited figures. Operating costs exclude depreciation, mobility services, and extension of services, permissible by TDA. Fare revenue excludes service extensions permissible by TDA. Michael Baker International -15 344 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Table IV-1 PVVTA TDA Performance Indicators Audit Period Performance Data and Indicators FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 % Change FY 2015-2018 Operating Cost $900,928 $1,017,367 $993,789 $1,124,884 24.9% Operating Costs Related to New Services/Expansion $0 $0 $125,540 $259,011 N/A Adjusted Operating Cost $900,928 $1,017,367 $868,249 $865,873 -3.9% Total Passengers 49,673 45,227 45,807 44,047 -11.3% Vehicle Service Hours 8,734 8,455 8,293 7,956 -8.9% Vehicle Service Miles 212,295 166,423 153,615 182,286 -14.1% Employee FTEs 14 13 13 13 -7.1% Passenger Fares _ $96,037 _ $86,207 $70,493 $71,496 -25.6% Auxiliary Revenue (Advertising, Interest, etc.) $44,241 $36,814 $64,181 $48,365 9.3% Total Revenue $140,278 $123,021 $134,674 $119,861 -14.6% Fare Revenue Related to New Services/Expansion $0 $0 $8,969 $29,700 N/A Adjusted Passenger Fare Revenue $140,278 $123,021 $125,705 $90,161 -35.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $18.14 $22.49 $21.70 $25.54 40.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $103.15 $120.33 $119.83 $141.39 37.1% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.24 $6.11 $6.47 $6.17 45.4% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 5.7 5.3 5.5 5.5 -2.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.23 0.27 0.30 0.24 3.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 623.9 650.4 637.9 612.0 -1.9% Average Fare per Passenger $1.93 $1.91 $1.54 $1.62 -16.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 10.66% 8.47% 7.09% 6.36% -40.4% Fare Recovery Ratio w/Auxiliary Revenue 15.57% 12.09% 14.48% 10.41% -33.1% Consumer Price Index - (CPI -Los Angeles CSMA) 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 9.6% Operating costs exclude depreciation, mobility services, and extension of services, permissible by TDA. Fare revenue excludes service extensions. Source: Annual Fiscal & Compliance Audits, State Controller Reports Michael Baker International -16 345 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $- 51,000 50,000 49,000 48,000 47,000 46,000 45,000 44,000 43,000 42,000 41,000 Graph IV-1 Operating Costs FY 2015 FY 2016 Graph IV-2 Ridership FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International -17 346 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $- $160.00 $140.00 $120.00 $100.00 $80.00 $60.00 $40.00 $20.00 $- Graph IV-3 Operating Cost Per Passenger FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Graph IV-4 Operating Cost Per Vehicle Service Hour FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International -18 347 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.2 5.1 18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Graph IV-5 Passengers Per Vehicle Service Hour FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Graph IV-6 Fare Recovery Ratio FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Michael Baker International -19 348 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 37.1 percent from $103.15 in the FY 2015 base year to $141.39 in FY 2018. Operating costs (before new service exclusions) increased 24.9 percent while operating hours decreased by 8.9 percent during the period. Pursuant to the TDA statute, PVVTA was allowed to exclude new service expansion from its operating cost and farebox revenue calculation for up to two years, in FY 2017 and FY 2018. 2. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 40.8 percent system- wide from $18.14 in FY 2015 to $25.54 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 11.3 percent, from 49,673 passengers in FY 2015 to 44,047 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased for the same period. 3. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 2.7 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018 from 5.7 passengers per hour to 5.5 passengers per hour. The relatively constant number of passengers per hour reflects the levels of ridership and overall vehicle hours decreasing by similar percentages (11.3 percent and 8.9 percent, respectively) during the audit review period. 4. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, also remained relatively unchanged with an annual average of 0.26 passengers with only a slight increase system- wide from FY 2015. The passenger trips and vehicle service miles decreased by about 11 percent and 14 percent, respectively, between FY 2015 and FY 2018. 5. Vehicle service hours per employee decreased 1.9 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018 from 623.9 hours in FY 2015 to 612 hours in FY 2018, as vehicle hours decreased and the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) decreased from 14 to 13 during the period. This measure is based on the number of employee FTEs using employee pay hours from the State Controller's Report and dividing by 2,000 hours per employee. 6. Farebox recovery exhibited a decrease of 40.4 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and 2018, excluding auxiliary revenues. System -wide, passenger fares decreased by 25.6 percent. Auxiliary revenue is composed of advertising, fuel sales, and interest. With the auxiliary revenues factored in, farebox recovery decreased 33.1 percent. Fare revenues related to new services and system expansion were excluded during FY 2017 and FY 2018 from the fare recovery ratio with auxiliary revenue. Commencing in FY 2017, Routes 3 and 5 expenditures and revenues were exempted from the farebox recovery calculation. In FY 2018, BWE expenditures and revenues were exempted from the farebox recovery calculation. Conclusion from the Verification of TDA Performance Indicators Michael Baker International -20 349 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 PVVTA's performance indicators reflect a declining ridership due to a stagnant service area population, competition from vanpools to the local state prisons, and the implementation of the medical shuttle service to the Coachella Valley in FY 2018. Vehicle service hours and service miles decreased by 8.9 percent and 14.1 percent, respectively. The number of passenger trips also decreased by a comparable 11.3 percent. Overall operating costs increased 24.9 percent and includes a portion of the new service contract in effect during FY 2017 and FY 2018. FY 2018 saw the highest increase in operating costs of 13.2 percent due to the implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express in July 2017 as well as higher contract and maintenance costs. Michael Baker International -21 350 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions in the PVVTA transit system. The review highlights accomplishments, issues, and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the PVVTA operations facility in Blythe: • Operations • Maintenance • Planning • Marketing • General Administration and Management Within some departments are subfunctions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that falls under General Administration. Operations The mission statement for PVVTA declares its intention: To provide the residents and visitors of the Palo Verde Valley a public transportation system that maximizes passenger use, comfort, convenience, safety and satisfaction while efficiently using financial resources that benefits our community. As the only public transit operator in eastern Riverside County, PVVTA has been challenged with declines in the service area population and ridership as well as a limited number of trip generators. The Agency's approach has been to have transit grow in tandem with the region's growth. Fares on PVVTA remained unchanged during audit period; however, the Agency implemented a 6 percent fare increase in FY 2019. The closure of Kmart in September 2017, which served as the main transfer point for PVVTA routes, has resulted in the loss of one of the largest trip generators in the service area as well as the loss of $100,000 in annual sales tax revenues to the City. The closure of Blythe's only department store marked the ninth business to shut down in the city over the previous 12 months. Other retail outlets such as Rite Aid, Dollar General, and Dollar Tree have taken up the slack. Since the closure of Kmart, the main transfer point was relocated to the Riverside County Department of Public Social Service office located at 1225 West Hobsonway. Blue Route 1, PVVTA's main trunk route and circulator, has continued to perform well despite the loss of important trip generators. Most of Blythe's population lives within 0.75 miles of this route. The Agency has looked at the addition of a second vehicle and the implementation of 30-minute headways. Route 1 connects with Camel Michael Baker International -22 351 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Express, which provides trips to Quartzsite, Arizona, as well as to intercity Greyhound and FlixBus services. The Agency has continued to reach out to PVC, which is served by Gold Route 2. The route operates with one vehicle on a bidirectional alignment with 60-minute headways. PVVTA has considered reducing its evening schedule from 6:40 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and serving PVC on request up to 6:40 p.m. based on class schedule changes and demand. PVC purchases 31-day passes and tickets for its student body. Passes are purchased in lump sum quantities two to three times annually. Prior audit recommendations have suggested a formal subsidy agreement between PVVTA and PVC as a means to secure stable farebox revenues. Nevertheless, PVC's Extended Opportunity Programs and Services and Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education programs allocate a portion of their budgets for transit and track ridership. PVVTA modified Red Route 3, which serves the Chuckawalla and Ironwood State Prisons, due to the increase in vanpool usage. The Agency has reached out to the vanpool operators and offered incentives for coordination. In addition, PVVTA may consider alternative modes of transportation to serve the prisons over the next few years. The Green Route 4 connects Blythe with the rural communities of Ripley and Mesa Verde. The route operates on two-hour headways and serves four Park-N-Ride lots and local public housing developments. Ridership has increased on this route and the Agency is considering the addition of three round trips to Ripley and Mesa Verde. X-Tend-A-Ride service would be offered upon request to Ehrenberg, Arizona. Buses can deviate three-quarters of a mile from the scheduled route with a 30-minute advance reservation or upon request when boarding. The PVVTA X-Tend-A-Ride program operates as a demand -responsive community -based service with limited weekday afternoon service to the state prisons and the fair, as well as during special community events and outside normal operating hours. X-Tend-A-Ride does not operate in place of fixed -route services. Saturday service is offered on the Silver Route 5 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. During the audit period, PVVTA reduced service hours, modified the route alignment, and eliminated deviation fees. The deviation fee was reinstated in FY 2019 and service to Ehrenberg is now on a request basis only. The changes signaled an emphasis on serving trip generators in the city core. Prompted by the lack of adequate medical facilities in the Palo Verde Valley, PVVTA implemented the BWE to provide transport from Blythe to major medical facilities in the Coachella Valley. The service was initiated in July 2017 and operates Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The service is open to the general public and interlines with SunLine Transit Agency at the Indio Transportation Center located at SR 111 and Flower. Grant funding for the BWE was received from the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) and the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP). Federal grant funds were also applied toward the new service and the Agency is looking at securing rural formula Federal Transit Michael Baker International -23 352 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Administration (FTA) Section 5311 funds to support the service. Another specialized transit service under consideration is for local veterans. The Agency is working with the region's U.S. congressman to secure funding for transit access to Veterans Affairs (VA) services in the Coachella Valley. Veterans in the Palo Verde Valley generally access VA services in Arizona. The implementation of a participant fee on the Desert RoadTRIP has helped with system farebox attainment. PVVTA also requires backup documentation and medical receipts for reimbursement. Desert RoadTRIP participants can travel up to 460 miles a month, including using Greyhound (690 miles for a family). There are approximately 30 participants in the program. Since the implementation of the BWE service, the number of Desert RoadTRIP participants has declined by 20 percent. The contract operator prepares an operations data report for review by PVVTA on a quarterly basis. The operations data report contains a detailed breakdown of ridership, revenue miles, total miles, revenue hours, total hours, deviations, and fare revenue. The data are categorized by route and month. The US Department of Transportation defines an accident as an occurrence involving a commercial motor vehicle which results in: a) a fatality; b) bodily injury to a person who, as a result of the injury, immediately receives medical treatment away from the scene of the accident; or c) one or more of the vehicles incurring disabling damage, requiring it to be towed from the scene. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, a preventable accident is one that occurs because the driver fails to act in a reasonably expected manner to prevent it. Incidents include accidents plus personal casualties (inside vehicles and while boarding and alighting vehicle) and fires. Table V-1 summarizes accidents and incidents that occurred during the audit period for PVVTA. Table V-1 Accidents and Incidents FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Accidents 2 0 2 1 Incidents 9 4 6 7 Total 11 4 8 8 Source: PVVTA The number of accidents has averaged one per year for the audit period. Incidents have shown a steady increase since falling between FY 2015 and FY 2016. However, the average number of incidents during the audit period of 5.7 is well below the average of 22 in the prior audit period. This reduction of incidents is due to driver training and a more streamlined route system, which were implemented during the prior audit period. Each vehicle is equipped with between four and six cameras that can be accessed by wireless remote from dispatch. Dispatching functions are currently handled on a manual basis with no electronic software utilized other than an Excel spreadsheet. On -time performance is monitored by having drivers call in when running five minutes late or longer. Field supervisors also perform periodic checks to ensure schedule adherence. In addition to its bus cameras, PVVTA can access video footage from City security cameras Michael Baker International -24 353 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 mounted near bus stops. Table V-2 summarizes on -time performance during the audit period on PVVTA. Table V-2 On -time Performance FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 On -time Performance 98.89% 99.03% 97.60% 98.00% Source: PVVTA The industry standard is 95 percent on -time performance. PVVTA exceeded the minimum standard during the audit period. Fareboxes installed on the vehicles are standard Diamond F1 rectangular fareboxes. Fares deposited into the farebox are not accessible until the end of the run. Fareboxes are pulled by the dispatcher and are counted by another designated employee in a secured room monitored by cameras. The cash reconciliation form contains a line item for any overages and shortages. Once counted, fare proceeds are placed into a secured locked money pouch and a secondary count is performed by the finance director before being deposited. Random fare checks are conducted on the vehicles. ADA certification is conducted at the PVVTA facility with the whole process typically taking about 24 hours to turn around. Physician verification is not required in every case. There have been up to 18 new applicants processed during the audit period and there are up to 175 names in the ADA database. The applicant's information is shared with the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services, which purchases 20 passes at a time for its clients. Travel training is also offered to passengers as needed. PVVTA staff has attended mobility trainings offered through CaIACT to improve its capability to educate and transition riders onto transit. PVVTA also tracks and responds to customer complaints. Table V-3 summarizes complaints received during the audit period on PVVTA: Table V-3 Complaints FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Complaints 1 1 0 0 Source: PVVTA Complaints received by PVVTA have declined since FY 2015 to zero for two years in a row, which is indicative of the improved route structure, passenger amenities, and responsiveness on the part of the Agency. Personnel Michael Baker International -25 354 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 PVVTA personnel is composed of administrative and operations staff employed by Transportation Concepts. Administrative staff includes a general manager, administrative supervisor/mobility manager, one field supervisor, and a finance manager. An accounts specialist was hired during the audit period to assist with financial duties. The current general manager was appointed by the PVVTA board whereas in the past the general manager position was filled by the City of Blythe City manager. This distinction is important, as the designation of a general manager with true transit management experience shows the independence of the transit Agency from the City and the ability of the Board to provide focused guidance on transit policy and operations. PVVTA has found driver recruitment and retention challenging. This is attributed to the relatively small labor pool, competition from the solar industry, DMV, and drug testing issues. Although the medicinal and recreational use of cannabis is legal in California, the transportation industry is subject to a different set of regulations that preclude the use of cannabis. Tenured drivers have an opportunity to bid on routes. Operations staff includes eight drivers (two full-time, six part-time) and three dispatchers (one full- time, two part-time). Part-time drivers generally work between 20 to 30 hours weekly. Entry-level drivers are hired as part-time. Full-time drivers are generally assigned 30 to 40 hours a week and receive benefits after six months of employment. Turnover in personnel during the audit period has been attributed to retirements, medical leave, and recruitment by local solar energy companies. A 10-year employee retired during the audit period. All personnel are nonunion. Driver training is based on the Transportation Safety Institute model and consists of 40 hours classroom and 80 hours behind -the -wheel training. Overall, candidates undergo a minimum of 100 hours of training including 40 hours of cadet training with a tenured driver. Mobility and customer service training are provided through the Community Transportation Association of America. Drivers are required to have a Class B license with passenger endorsement. Drivers are evaluated every 90 days, a process which involves unobserved road checks, scheduled ride-alongs, and reviews of bus surveillance videos. Maintenance During the audit period, vehicle maintenance was transferred from the City to the contract operator. Transportation Concepts provides maintenance service with its own staff mechanic at the PVVTA operations facility. Prior to this, vehicles were serviced at the City garage located at 440 South Main Street. Vehicle maintenance is performed on a 3,000-mile or 45-day inspection schedule in accordance with the state's General Public Paratransit Vehicle regulations. Additional preventive maintenance is conducted every 15,000 miles and annually at 36,000 miles. Maintenance duties include tire mounting and engine overhauls. Warranty repairs are performed at Larry Green Ford located at 410 East Hobsonway in Blythe. Drivers are allotted 15 minutes to conduct pre -trip inspections. The pre -trip Michael Baker International -26 355 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 inspection form is in triplicate and includes post -trip details. The top white sheet stays with the vehicle during its operation, the pink copy stays in dispatch, and the yellow copy remains on the vehicle as a record. The CHP is responsible for certifying PVVTA's maintenance facilities and for inspecting vehicles on an annual basis. PVVTA vehicles have received satisfactory terminal inspections from the CHP. Preventive maintenance is tracked using Dossier maintenance software and by using service due stickers which are placed in each vehicle. Given Blythe's remote location, vehicle parts are generally ordered in bulk in order to have an ample supply on hand. Parts and equipment such as tires, filters, belts, and Freon are stored in a warehouse behind the operations facility. Vehicle fueling is conducted on a card -lock basis at the Blythe CNG Station in the City Corporation Yard located at 440 South Main Street at 14th Street. The CNG station opened in May 2014 and is accessible by the general public 24 hours a day. The facility also has portable restroom facilities with wash station, 24-hour closed-circuit surveillance cameras, free Blythe visitor information, and free Wi-Fi. Revenues from CNG fueling contribute to the system farebox recovery. Road calls are recorded when a tow truck and/or mechanic responds to a mechanical/service problem for a disabled transit vehicle that is in revenue service. Table V-4 summarizes road calls that occurred during the audit period. Table V-4 Road Calls FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Road Calls 12 7 7 10 Source: PVVTA There have been issues with the air conditioning units due to the extreme summer temperatures. Newer vehicles are equipped with higher -efficiency air conditioning units of 110 British thermal units. Solar tinting is being considered to further cooling efficiencies on the vehicles. SunLine provides operational emergency support to the BWE when the vehicle operates in the SunLine service area. Planning PVVTA prepares a Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) on an annual basis. The SRTP covers a three-year planning horizon and includes a system overview, performance analysis for each route and service, service changes, and financial and capital plans. Under the services and performance chapter, a series of recommendations for service improvements is presented for each route or program. Performance data from TransTrack Manager is also included in the SRTP to provide an annual comparison. In adhering to the SRTP analysis element, PVVTA must meet at least four out of seven discretionary performance indicators. These indicators are in relation to RCTC's Productivity Improvement Program. There is one mandatory indicator which is the farebox recovery ratio set at 10 percent. Table V-5 PVVTA Performance Targets Michael Baker International -27 356 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency - FYs 2016-2018 Performance Indicators FY 2015-16 Target FY 2016-17 Target FY 2017-18 Target Farebox Recovery >=10.00% >=10.00% >=10.00% Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$102.65 <=$114.78 <=$117.05 Subsidy Per Passenger >=$12.23 & <=$16.55 >=$15.30 & <=$20.70 >=$14.64 & <=$19.80 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$0.88 & <=$1.18 >=$1.10 & <=$1.48 >=$1.05 & <=$1.41 Subsidy Per Hour >=$73.03 & <=$98.81 >=$84.41 & <=$114.21 >=$83.43 & <=$112.87 Subsidy Per Mile >=$3.73 & <=$5.05 >=$4.30 & <=$5.82 >=$4.49 & <=$6.07 Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=5.10 & <=6.90 >=4.68 & <=6.33 >=4.85 & <=6.56 Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.26 & <=0.36 >=0.24 & <=0.32 >=0.26 & <=036 Source: PVVTA, TransTrack Manager According to the RCTC SRTP review data, in FY 2015-16, PVVTA met the mandatory farebox recovery target and met two of seven discretionary performance indicator targets, meeting the targets for passengers per revenue hour and passengers per revenue mile. For FY 2016-17, PVVTA met the mandatory target and all seven discretionary performance indicator targets and for FY 2017-18, PVVTA met two of the seven discretionary performance indicator targets, meeting the targets for subsidy per mile and passengers per revenue hour. The SRTP review indicates that PVVTA failed to meet the mandatory farebox recovery ratio target of 10 percent, but in fact the FY 2017-18 fiscal audit indicates the target was met at 10.41 percent. In addition to its collaboration with RCTC, PVVTA contributes to the Western Arizona Council of Governments' planning process since it provides service to Ehrenberg. On a local level, PVVTA participates in the City of Blythe's project review committee process to determine how transit can better serve new development. PVVTA is working with the City to add a transit component or incentives to potential cannabis businesses that are looking to locate to the area. Marketing PVVTA has used several marketing strategies to promote its transit services such as brochures, newspaper and radio advertisements, community events, electronic and social media, and mobility management training. The PVVTA Riders Guide serves as the Agency's principal informational brochure and contains a route map, schedules, fares, and general information about service hours and rider etiquette. The Riders Guide was updated as necessary to reflect the various route changes that have been implemented during the audit period. PVVTA's website (http://pvvta.com/) was updated during the audit period as necessary. The website provides much of the same information as the Riders Guide, but also includes a trip planning tool, service updates, and links to social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The trip planner interactive tool is powered by Google Transit. The website contains links at the bottom of the home page pertaining to the Agency's administration, including the Board of Directors and meeting minutes and agendas. Upon clicking the link entitled "Meeting Minutes/Agency Files" under Administration, the result is a page containing broken links for two meetings in 2018 and some miscellaneous verbiage. Furthermore, there are no other links to meeting agendas and minutes conducted recently. Michael Baker International -28 357 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Social media outreach includes a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Standard multi -ride passes are available for purchase at the PVVTA Operations Office. Radio spots are broadcast over local stations such as KJMB 100.3 FM and Spanish language Radio Bilingue KERU 88.5 FM. With the implementation of the BWE in July 2017, PVVTA offered the first ride free to stimulate ridership. The BWE is branded separately from the mainline routes. Posters and flyers were posted in local hospitals and medical offices. USB chargers are installed on the vehicles. Semi -seats at bus stops are attached to the poles. Water is sold to passengers on the vehicles during the summer months. Another effective outreach tool has been the Mobility Management Program, which is the direct result of needs identified in the RCTC Public Transit Human Services Transportation Plan, funded through FTA Section 5316 and 5317 grants. This program offers training to riders interested in using the transit system. Travel training sessions have been held at local primary and middle schools. PVVTA has also provided safe -ride shuttles through the X-Tend-A-Ride program during homecoming and New Year's Eve events, which have reduced the number of driving under the influence arrests. Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, PVVTA has an adopted Title VI Program. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes Title VI notices and complaint forms posted at the PVVTA operations office and on the transit vehicles and website. General Administration and Management The PVVTA Board of Directors is composed of five members: three members of the Blythe City Council, one member from the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors, and one public member appointed by the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors. The secretary to the board is the City Clerk of the City of Blythe. Regular meetings of the PVVTA Board of Directors are generally held the first Wednesday of the month at noon at the PVVTA Administrative and Operations Facility located at 415 North Main Street in Blythe. The PVVTA Board has been supportive in its advocacy of transit and staff. A board member attends RCTC Board meetings to advocate for the interests of PVVTA. PVVTA operations are managed by the contract general manager provided under the Agency's agreement with Parking Concepts, Inc. Parking Concepts, Inc. dba Transportation Concepts, has served as the PVVTA contract operator since 2003 and was awarded a 2.75-year contract from October 1, 2014, through June 30, 2017. Amendment No. 3 to the professional services agreement between PVVTA and Parking Concepts extended the contract to June 30, 2018, increased the compensation to Parking Concepts, and added the BWE service to the scope of services. PVVTA may further extend the contract through June 30, 2022. The City is still involved in certain administrative functions such as cutting checks for purchase orders. PVVTA's purchasing guidelines involve a bidding process and signing off on purchase orders once the procurement is complete. Purchase orders are logged in and tracked during the budget process. A Michael Baker International -29 358 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 separate tracking spreadsheet is maintained for each project or purchase along with its specific funding source. PVVTA still utilizes the City's EDEN financial management software program for the SRTP and financial projections. A master agreement between the Agency and the City is under consideration that would further define roles and responsibilities. The Transit Advisory Committee (TAC) meets twice annually in a town hall format. The TAC addresses SRTP development and any other major service changes planned by PVVTA. According to PVVTA's administration, it has been difficult to recruit and sustain membership of the TAC. PVVTA's Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report submitted to the State Controller is prepared by an independent CPA firm and signed off by the PVVTA finance director. PVVTA submits the annual TDA claim for funds to RCTC. TDA claims are based on the PVVTA annual budget and the financial element of the SRTP. Reserve allocations for LTF and State Transit Assistance (STA) funds are included as separate line items on the claim form. The primary source of transit funding support is derived from TDA for operations and capital. LTF is used primarily for operations and STA funds are used for both operation and capital expenditures. Based on Transit Operator Financial Transactions Report data, the Agency's LTF revenue was $822,503 in FY 2016; $844,143 in FY 2017; and $879,376 in FY 2018. STA funds received by the Agency were $83,077 in FY 2016; $72,906 in FY 2017; and $109,004 in FY 2018. STA funds are utilized toward operations, vehicle replacement, bulk supplies, and bus stop amenities. Grants Management Grant funding allocated toward the transit system has been derived from state and federal sources. Capital grants are tracked quarterly on an Excel spreadsheet that is configured into sections showing each grant and its funding amount, running balance, purpose, and drawdowns. The finance manager prepares the financial element of the SRTP and provides quarterly reporting to RCTC through the capital tracking report. The administrative supervisor/mobility manager oversees project management and the general manager oversees vehicle procurement. Bus procurement encompasses bulk maintenance supplies, support vehicles, bus shelters, and radio equipment. PVVTA received State Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Account program funds for vehicle purchases. Another component of the Proposition 1B program is the Transit System Safety, Security and Disaster Response Account (TSSSDRA) administered by the Governor's Office of Emergency Services. The Agency was awarded TSSSDRA grant funds for security cameras at the operations facility, Park-N-Ride lot, and on the vehicles. The Agency secured a $353,655 grant from the MDAQMD for the CNG station as well as $32,797 in LCTOP funding toward the launch of the BWE. Based on audited data, $111,387 in federal funds were also secured for the service. PVVTA is also looking at rural formula FTA Section 5311 funding to sustain operations. Michael Baker International -30 359 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 PVVTA submitted a project application for SB 1 State of Good Repair grant funds for installation of an outdoor shade structure for use to maintain alternative fleet vehicles. The shade structure would allow for fleet vehicles to be maintained in a safe and secure area adjacent to the vehicle maintenance facility. Michael Baker International -31 360 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Section VI Findings The following summarizes the findings obtained from this triennial audit covering fiscal years 2016 through 2018. A set of recommendations is then provided. Triennial Audit Findings 1. Of the compliance requirements pertaining to PVVTA, the operator fully complied with all nine applicable requirements. Two additional compliance requirements did not apply to PVVTA (i.e., intermediate farebox recovery ratio under PUC 99270.1 and exclusive urbanized farebox recovery ratio). 2. PVVTA met its farebox recovery standard of 10 percent during the audit period, with the flex route services being exempt for two full fiscal years (FY 2017 and FY 2018) after the year of implementation. The farebox recovery ratio was 12.09 percent in FY 2016; 14.48 percent in FY 2017; and 10.41 percent in FY 2018. The average system -wide farebox recovery ratio was 12.33 percent during the period. 3. Through its contract operator, PVVTA participates in the CHP Transit Operator Compliance Program and received vehicle inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Inspections conducted during the audit period were rated satisfactory. 4. The operating budget exhibited modest changes during the audit period in the first two years of the audit period. PVVTA saw an increase of 5.4 percent in the Board -approved operating budget in FY 2016 and 2.3 percent in FY 2017. In FY 2018 the budget increased by 19.5 percent due to the implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express and higher maintenance and contract costs. 5. PVVTA fully and satisfactorily implemented two of the four prior audit recommendations. The fully implemented recommendations pertained to the inclusion of Desert RoadTRIP financial and operations data in the PVVTA State Controllers Report and the provision of Title VI documentation in Spanish. The succession plan for the Agency's finance manager position was partially implemented. The subsidy agreement with Palo Verde College is no longer applicable in light of the efforts made over the past several audit cycles.. 6. Operating cost per vehicle service hour, an indicator of cost efficiency, increased 37.1 percent from $103.15 in the FY 2015 base year to $141.39 in FY 2018. Operating costs (before new service exclusions) increased 24.9 percent while system -wide operating hours decreased by 8.9 percent during the period. The cost increase in FY 2018 is attributed to the implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express in July 2017, higher maintenance repair, and an operations contract extension increasing the compensation to the private contractor for skilled workers and from minimum wage increases. Although the Blythe Wellness Express was implemented, PVVTA also reduced service systemwide which caused an overall decline in revenue hours due to local conditions Michael Baker International -32 361 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 including closure of key commercial locations and changes in travel. Pursuant to the TDA statute, PVVTA was allowed to exclude new service expansion from its operating cost and farebox revenue calculation for up to two years, in FY 2017 and FY 2018. 7. Operating cost per passenger, an indicator of cost effectiveness, increased 40.8 percent system- wide from $18.14 in FY 2015 to $25.54 in FY 2018. Ridership system -wide decreased by 11.3 percent, from 49,673 passengers in FY 2015 to 44,047 passengers in FY 2018, while operating costs increased for the same period, in particular in FY 2018 as stated above. The service area population has not grown which restricts growth opportunities in ridership combined with local economic factors. 8. Passengers per vehicle service hour, which measures the effectiveness of the service delivered, decreased 2.7 percent system -wide between FY 2015 and FY 2018 from 5.7 passengers per hour to 5.5 passengers per hour. The relatively constant number of passengers per hour reflects the levels of ridership and overall vehicle hours decreasing by similar percentages (11.3 percent and 8.9 percent, respectively) during the audit review period. 9. Passengers per vehicle service mile, another indicator of service effectiveness, also remained relatively unchanged with an annual average of 0.26 passengers with only a slight increase system- wide from FY 2015. The passenger trips and vehicle service miles decreased by about 11 percent and 14 percent, respectively, between FY 2015 and FY 2018. 10. With the closure of Kmart, the main transfer point was relocated to the Riverside County Department of Public Social Service office located at 1225 West Hobsonway. Blue Route 1, PVVTA's main trunk route and circulator, has continued to perform well despite the loss of important trip generators. Most of Blythe's population lives within 0.75 miles of this route. 11. Saturday service is offered on the Silver Route 5 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. During the audit period, PVVTA reduced service hours, modified the route alignment, and eliminated deviation fees. The deviation fee was reinstated in FY 2019 and service to Ehrenberg is now on a request basis only. 12. Prompted by the lack of adequate medical facilities in the Palo Verde Valley, PVVTA implemented the Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) to provide transport from Blythe to major medical facilities in the Coachella Valley. The service was initiated in July 2017 and operates Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The service is open to the general public and interlines with SunLine Transit Agency. 13. Vehicle maintenance was transferred from the City to the contract operator. Transportation Concepts provides maintenance service with its own staff mechanic at the PVVTA operations facility. Prior to this, vehicles were serviced at the City garage located at 440 South Main Street. 14. PVVTA has utilized several marketing strategies to promote its transit services, such as brochures, newspaper and radio advertisements, community events, electronic and social media, and Michael Baker International -33 362 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 mobility management training. PVVTA's website (http://pvvta.com/) was updated during the audit period as necessary. 15. With the implementation of the BWE in July 2017, PVVTA offered the first ride free to stimulate ridership. The BWE is branded separately from the mainline routes. Posters and flyers were posted in local hospitals and medical offices. 16. PVVTA operations are managed by the contract general manager provided under the Agency's agreement with Parking Concepts, Inc. Parking Concepts (dba Transportation Concepts) has served as the PVVTA contract operator since 2003 and was awarded a 2.75-year contract from October 1, 2014, through June 30, 2017. Amendment No. 3 to the professional services agreement between PVVTA and Parking Concepts extended the contract to June 30, 2018, increased the compensation to Parking Concepts, and added the BWE service to the scope of services. Michael Baker International -34 363 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 Recommendations 1. Work with local elected officials and stakeholders to expand upon the Blythe Wellness Express to serve veterans. (High Priority) The implementation of the Blythe Wellness Express during the audit period has provided the means for Palo Verde Valley residents to access medical facilities and services in the Coachella Valley. This service is open to the general public and operates several days during the week. An important sub -component of medical transportation concerns access to veteran services. Currently veterans residing in the Palo Verde Valley have been known to access VA services in Arizona. There are VA services in the Coachella Valley that could be accessed, such as the VA Clinic in Palm Desert. The representative for the 36th Congressional District, which encompasses eastern Riverside County, is a strong advocate for veterans and PVVTA has indicated its intent to work with the congressman to secure federal funding support towards veterans' transportation. It is recommended that PVVTA continue to work with the congressman as well as other stakeholders for such a service. 2. Ensure that Board meeting agendas and minutes are posted on the PVVTA website. (Medium Priority) The PVVTA website contains links at the bottom of the home page pertaining to the Agency's administration, including the Board of Directors and meeting minutes and agendas. Upon clicking the link entitled "Meeting Minutes/Agency Files" under Administration, the result is a page containing broken links for two meetings in 2018 and some miscellaneous verbiage. Furthermore, there are no other links to meeting agendas and minutes conducted recently. In the interest of public outreach and transparency, having the agendas and minutes accessible on the website will keep community stakeholders informed about the issues and developments in the transit system. Therefore, it is recommended that the Agency upload and archive agendas and minutes from its Board meetings on the website. Michael Baker International -35 364 Triennial Performance Audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency — FYs 2016-2018 3. Pursue further discussions with the City of Blythe about defining roles and responsibilities. (Medium Priority) The City is still involved in certain PVVTA administrative functions such as cutting checks for purchase orders. PVVTA's purchasing guidelines involve a bidding process and signing off on purchase orders once the procurement is complete. In addition, PVVTA still utilizes the City's Eden financial management software program for the Short -Range Transit Plan and financial projections. Since most of the PVVTA service area encompasses the City of Blythe, the Agency continues to rely on city infrastructure and services. A master agreement between the Agency and the City that is under consideration would further define roles and responsibilities such as police support services. Michael Baker International -36 365 AGENDA ITEM 5D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2018/19 Transportation Development Act and Measure A Audit Results AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2018/19. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In July 2016, following a competitive procurement, the Commission awarded contracts for a five-year contract term to three audit firms to perform financial and compliance audits and agreed -upon procedures (audits) for TDA claimants and Measure A recipients: • Macias Gini O'Connell LLP (MGO) for Western County TDA claimants and Measure A local streets and roads recipients; • BCA Watson Rice LLP (BCAWR) for Western County Measure A Specialized Transit recipients; and • Conrad LLP (Conrad) for Coachella Valley, Palo Verde Valley, and county of Riverside TDA claimants and Measure A recipients. Initially, this scope of work excluded audits for Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the city of Beaumont (Beaumont), as these jurisdictions elected to hire their own auditors. After its auditors completed Beaumont's FY 2015/16 audit, Beaumont requested, and Commission staff agreed, that the Commission's auditor conduct the required audits beginning with FY 2016/17. MGO, BCAWR, and Conrad, along with the other agencies' auditors, completed the FY 2018/19 audits and issued the audit reports. The following is a summary of the 64 audits performed: Agenda Item 5D 366 Funding Type Type of Procedure MGO (Western County) BCAWR (Western County) Conrad (Eastern County & Riverside Co.) Other Auditors Total TDA Article 3 (bicycle and pedestrian projects) -iim r Financial and compliance audit r TDA Article 4 (transit) Measure A specialized transit Measure A local streets and roads Financial and compliance audit 4 0 1 1 2 7 IAgreed -upon procedures 0 15 0 15 Agreed -upon procedures 18 0 11 0 29 Based on a review of the reports, the following items are highlights from the FY 2018/19 audit results. TDA Article 4 (Transit) • One transit operator (Banning) did not meet the fare ratio requirement. Since this was the first year of noncompliance, it is considered a grace year and does not result in any penalty or loss of eligibility for these funds. Failure to meet the fare ratio requirement in future years could result in the loss of funding. • Three transit operators (Banning, Riverside, and SunLine) restated their beginning balances for a total amount of approximately $1.9 million, related to recognition of revenue earned in the prior year and adjustments related to accounting for pensions. SunLine's auditor identified a significant deficiency in internal control related to the accounting and reporting for pension plans, which resulted in its restatement of $1.2 million. Measure A Specialized Transit • One agency (Care Connexxus) did not meet the adjusted match requirement by $1,294 (less than 1 percent of the adjusted match requirement) due to loss of grants and reduced farebox. • One agency (Community Connect) had a finding related to the tracking and reporting of in -kind volunteer hours. Commission staff will review the agency's tracking and reporting of such in -kind services at a future site visit. • Two agencies (Friends of Moreno Valley and Independent Living Partnership) had excess revenues over expenditures totaling $24,679, of which approximately 4 percent may be payable to the Commission. During site visits to be conducted during FY 2019/20 or through other procedures, Commission staff will review the circumstances for the excess revenues over expenditures in order to determine the return of Measure A funds, if any, to the Commission. • Four agencies (Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County, Care Connexxus, Exceed, and Forest Folk) had an excess of expenditures over revenues aggregating $21,880. Generally, the agencies are responsible to cover the excess of expenditures; however, if there is a Agenda Item 5D 367 balance of Measure A funds allocated to an agency, the agency may submit a revised claim. Measure A Local Streets and Roads • Two jurisdictions (Calimesa and Desert Hot Springs) met their maintenance of effort (MOE) requirements using the prior year carryover, as permitted under the MOE Guidelines. • Seven jurisdictions (Banning, Calimesa, Hemet, Murrieta, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, and San Jacinto) have fund balances in excess of three years of revenues. While the Commission policy suggests such amounts should not exceed three years, the jurisdictions recently submitted status reports and 5-year capital improvement plans to expend those funds in the next five years on projects. Attached is the summary of transportation and transit fund operations and related audit results for the various types of TDA (Articles 3 and 4) and Measure A (specialized transit and local streets and roads) funding. Each schedule provides information for each claimant and recipient regarding the revenues, expenditures/expenses, and change in fund balance/net assets for the year ended June 30, 2019, and other financial and compliance information. Attachments: 1) FY 2018/19 Transportation Development Act Article 3 Schedule 2) FY 2018/19 Transportation Development Act Article 4 Schedule 3) FY 2018/19 Measure A Specialized Transit Schedule 4) FY 2018/19 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Agenda Item 5D 368 ATTACHMENT 1 Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Article 3 Interest income Total revenues Transportation Development Act Article 3 Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2019 Desert Hot Jurupa Lake Moreno Rancho County of Springs Eastvale Hemet Indio Valley Elsinore La Quinta Valley Perris Mirage Riverside Wildomar Riverside $ 293,000 $ - $ 75,000 $ 217,400 $ 53,550 $ 180,021 $ 109,500 $ 22,682 $ 247 $ 234,924 $ 663,403 $ 330,000 - - - 198 293,000 75,000 217,400 53,550 180,021 109,500 22,682 247 234,924 198 663,403 330,000 Total expenditures 277,425 73,333 217,400 3,340 180,021 140,691 22,682 247 234,924 96,292 330,000 Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures 15,575 (73,333) 75,000 50,210 - (31,191) - 198 567,111 Transfers in (out) - - (2,312) 15,749 Excess (deficiency) of revenues and transfers in over (under) expenditures 15,575 (73,333) 75,000 47,898 15,749 (31,191) 198 567,111 Prior period adjustment - - - - (18,386) Fund balances at beginning of year (15,575) - (75,000) - (47,898) (15,749) (19,415) - 11,862 (548,725) Fund balances at end of year $ - $ (73,333) $ - $ - $ - $ - $ (50,606) $ $ $ - $ 12,060 $ - $ Source: 2019 Financial Statements 6/9/2020 369 ATTACHMENT 2 Total operating revenues Operating expenses: Depreciation and amortization Other operating expenses Total operating expenses Operating loss Nonoperating revenues (expenses): Grants: Transportation Development Act Article 4 Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2019 Banning Beaumont Corona Riverside PVVTA RTA1 SunLine' $ 111,068 $ 184,282 $ 388,403 $ 440,478 155,762 $ 11,003,883 $ 5,261,665 264,325 507,920 663,967 593,215 287,360 16,686,267 8,017,830 1,989,651 2,846,003 2,489,197 3,886,137 1,194,417 85,930,268 33,961,966 2,253,976 3,353,923 3,153,164 4,479,352 1,481,777 102,616,535 41,693,668 (2,142,908) (3,169,641) (2,764,761) (4,038,874) (1,326,015) (91,612,652) (36,432,003) Local Transportation Funds 1,531,792 2,380,135 1,484,647 3,088,088 945,456 67,146,839 16,566,469 State Transit Assistance/State of Good Repair - 1,575,040 53,265 24,000 221,645 3,826,714 11,617,501 Federal - - 560,831 350,766 162,181 34,847,230 11,065,398 Measure A specialized transit - - - 4,033,457 6,000,000 Proposition 1 B/Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) 32,088 152,275 3,596 27,429 2,265,961 3,190,194 Other - 25,000 10,000 - 21,497 2,528,308 Interest income 1,089 2,784 20,994 53,157 50 981,148 14,560 Interest expense - - - (12,709) - Transfers in (out), net - 45,914 Gain (loss) on sale of property - 4,169 29,575 5,953 (5,437) Insurance proceeds 1,026 - 14,388 Other - - - 2,011,968 311,415 Total nonoperating revenue (expense) 1,565,995 4,139,403 2,205,226 3,527,239 1,378,258 117,636,188 48,765,537 Net increase (decrease) (576,913) 969,762 (559,535) (511,635) 52,243 26,023,536 12,333,534 Capital Contributions 12,291 - Transfer in from other City funds 78,000 322 - Transfer out from other City Funds - (37,490) - - - Prior period adjustment 124,099 - 551,574 - - 1,190,146 Net assets at beginning of year (607,750) 1,404,174 4,034,362 174,085 2,598,691 85,073,651 60,494,433 Net assets at end of year $ (970,273) $ 2,336,768 $ 3,474,827 $ 214,024 $ 2,650,934 $ 111,097,187 $ 74,018,113 Deferred revenue at end of year: Operating $ 47,249 $ 147,616 $ 560,130 $ 1,174,959 $ 129,381 $ 5,327,792 $ 5,570,203 Capital 177,435 - - 681,116 2,938 31,438,647 3,345,790 Total deferred revenue at end of year $ 224,684 $ 147,616 $ 560,130 $ 1,856,075 $ 132,319 $ 36,766,439 $ 8,915,993 Minimum fare ratio 10.00% 10.00% 15.00% 10.00% 10.00% 17.44% 17.53% Actual fare ratio 9.61% 11.68% 17.56% 11.33% 10.43% 24.77% 17.55% Fare ratio compliance status Did not meet Met Met Met Met Met Met Source: 2019 Financial Statements 1 The audits for RTA and SunLine were completed by other auditors hired by each entity. 6/9/2020 370 ATTACHMENT 3 Operating revenues: Measure A In -kind match Cash match: other revenue Total operating revenues Operating expenses -in kind Operating expenses -salaries & benefits Operating expenses-nonpersonnel Operating expenses -administrative overhead Capital expenditures Total operating expenses/capital expenditures Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures Match requirement (as adjusted) Actual match Match requirement compliance status Source: 2019 Agreed -Upon Procedures Blindness Support Boys & Girls Club of Menifee Valley Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County Measure A Specialized Transit Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2019 Riverside University Health Community Community System - Care Connect - Connect - Behavioral Care -A -Van Connexxus 211 TAP Health Friends of Independent Moreno Living Exceed Forest Folk Valley Partnership City of Operation Norco SafeHouse Riverside University Health System Medical Voices for Center Children $ 71,000 $ 130,000 $ 10,009 26,566 66,974 107,575 196,974 10,009 63,193 191,118 34,373 5,863 190,198 $ 359,140 $ 273,332 $ 56,226 $ 63,202 $ 184,656 $ 57,000 $ 44,754 $ 91,907 $ 306,416 $ 72,248 $ 37,000 $310,000 $ 99,754 - 79,484 6,500 28,935 30,000 24,944 498,569 - - - 308,041 110,474 105,527 142,386 22,465 3,634 95,272 117,451 6,665 46,039 37,219 19,061 182,922 300,672 544,151 415,718 85,191 95,771 279,928 174,451 81,419 162,890 804,985 109,467 56,061 492,922 407,795 164,932 114,981 16,592 4,167 79,484 318,274 146,393 211,655 210,934 6,500 57,143 15,238 28,935 41,272 18,471 6,310 7,093 221,979 57,949 128,280 60,808 30,000 17,783 34,001 24,944 498,569 112,097 114,268 184,669 82,839 27,955 401,165 20,928 23,953 85,413 8,649 5,700 4,153 6,344 308,041 31,175 68,579 107,575 196,981 300,672 544,151 422,589 85,191 95,771 279,928 189,088 81,784 139,212 803,984 109,467 56,061 492,922 407,795 (7) $ $ (6,871) $ - $ (14,637) $ (365) $ 23,678 $ 1,001 $ 36,575 $ 36,575 $ Met 66,970 $ 103,030 $ 185,011 $ 143,680 $ 32,562 $ 28,965 $ 95,176 $ 64,290 $ 66,974 $ 110,474 $ 185,011 $ 142,386 $ 32,569 $ 28,965 $ 95,272 $ 117,451 $ Met Met Met Not met Met Met Met Met 36,665 $ 51,588 $ 223,061 $ 37,219 $ 19,061 $167,593 $ 301,856 36,665 $ 70,983 $ 498,569 $ 37,219 $ 19,061 $ 182,922 $ 308,041 Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Measure A Specialized Transit 371 6/9/2020 ATTACHMENT 4 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Year ended June 30, 2019 Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Measure A Reimbursements Other revenues Interest income Other financing sources -transfers in Total revenues Expenditures and other financing uses: Engineering, construction and maintenance Administrative overhead/indirect costs Capital outlay Debt service Transfers out Total expenditures and other financing uses Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing uses Prior period adjustment/rounding Fund balances at beginning of year Fund balances at end of year Fund balance by year received: 2019 2018 2017 2016 & Prior Total fund balances by year received Cash and investments MOE Base Year requirement Amount of Excess MOE at end of year MOE compliance status Source: 2019 Agreed -Upon Procedures I I 1. Western County Banning Beaumont Calimesa Canyon Lake Corona Eastvale Hemet Jurupa Valley Lake Elsinore Menifee Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco Perris Riverside San Jacinto Temecula $ 650,939 $ 1,038,267 $ 188,686 $ 40,000 50,495 25,897 12,038 204,962 $ 4,658,115 $ 1,491,268 $ 1,927,145 $ 2,306,472 $ 1,496,639 $ 1,918,407 $ 4,720,198 $ 2,675,678 $ 740,527 $ 2,079,994 $ 8,241,029 $ 962,807 $ 3,334,125 5,320 11,511 549,552 55,787 178,079 37,148 9,732 26,959 74,635 7,542 58,951 143,285 24,362 30,478 112,478 148,706 576,866 56,908 75,370 701,434 1,064,164 240,724 669,079 64,035 669,079 64,035 32,355 1,000,129 2,201,513 541,889 $ 2,233,868 $ 1,542,018 $ $ 102,646 13,360 116,006 210,282 5,219,178 1,547,055 2,105,224 2,380,311 1,571,274 1,925,949 4,803,511 2,818,963 771,005 2,192,472 8,966,601 1,019,715 2,969,879 2,643,997 288,558 470,150 15,745 22,896 147,000 - - 1,034,108 503,142 935,074 147,000 2,985,624 2,643,997 288,558 1,527,154 1,438,216 124,718 63,282 2,233,554 (1,096,942) 1,816,666 853,157 133,058 (1) (1) (18,796) 1 549,601 361,858 12, 784, 764 4,405,953 5,816,526 120,195 1,746,002 674,319 $ 425,139 $ 15,018,317 $ 3,309,011 $ 7,614,396 $ 973,352 $ 1,879,061 $ 701,434 $ 1,064,164 $ 240,724 $ 210,282 $ 5,219,178 $ 1,547,055 $ 2,105,224 $ 973,352 $ 1,571,274 579,729 477,854 170,173 183,940 4,144,094 1,444,455 1,787,537 307,787 558,909 195,916 30,917 5,655,045 317,501 1,624,564 393,796 67,506 2,097,071 - $ 2,233,868 $ 1,542,018 $ 674,319 $ 425,139 $ 15,018,317 $ 3,309,011 $ 7,614,396 $ 973,352 $ 1,879,061 $ 2,144,884 $ 1,372,030 $ 612,163 $ 405,583 $ 14,238,718 $ 2,976,413 $ 7,172,079 $ 801,367 $ 1,625,335 416,874 2,333,115 272,125 1,870,435 1,532,970 4,250,578 332,631 - - 65,916 1,305,488 1,487,905 713,502 2,995,488 1,055,000 1,631,798 1,722,362 5,208,651 985,627 1,870,435 1,532,970 7,246,066 1,697,714 203,587 (405,140) 1,833,336 (1,099,430) 659,502 1,720,535 (271) (2) 1 1,009,454 3,974,362 8,515,899 1,686,195 4,365,851 18,318,771 $ 1,212,770 $ 3,569,220 $ 10,349,235 $ 586,766 $ 5,025,353 $ 20,039,306 $ $ 1,212,770 $ 3,569,220 $ 2,818,963 $ 586,766 $ 2,192,472 $ 8,966,601 $ 2,507,512 - 1,632,539 8,228,248 - 2,346,957 - 1,200,342 2,844,457 - 2,675,803 - $ 1,212,770 $ 3,569,220 $ 10,349,235 $ 586,766 $ 5,025,353 $ 20,039,306 $ $ 964,603 $ 3,255,498 $ 9,928,630 $ 514,091 $ 4,697,098 $ 18,570,799 $ (677,999) (1) 3,907,573 3,229,573 1,019,715 913,778 847,427 448,653 3,229,573 1,388,670 3,409,495 1,634,969 1,000,000 2,634,969 774,526 (1) 4,243,589 $ 5,018,114 $ 3,409,495 1,608,619 $ 5,018,114 $ 4,527,409 $ 164,325 $ 515,908 $ 369,518 $ 992,084 Met Met $ 2,401 $ 28,873 $ 2,208,200 $ 38,949 $ 18,924 $ $ 960,771 $ 14,040 $ 162,308 $ 17,827,170 $ 176,611 $ 759,425 $ $ 18,748,403 Met with use Met Met Met Met N/A Met of carryover $ 214,225 $ 1,459,153 $ 595,702 $ 22,536 $ 1,218,470 $ 12,449,203 $ 156,391 $ 7,269,265 $ 7,314,843 $ 284,492 $ 70,782 $ 2,402,923 $ 46,914,664 $ 2,865,902 Met Met Met Met Met Met Met $ 1,431,799 $ 9,101,749 Met Measure A Local Streets Roads 4 of 5 6/9/2020 372 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Year ended June 30, 2019 Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Measure A Reimbursements Other revenues Interest income Other financing sources -transfers in Total revenues Expenditures and other financing uses: Engineering, construction and maintenance Administrative overhead/indirect costs Capital outlay Debt service Transfers out Total expenditures and other financing uses Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing uses Prior period adjustment/rounding Fund balances at beginning of year Fund balances at end of year Fund balance by year received: 2019 2018 2017 2016 & Prior Total fund balances by year received Cash and investments MOE Base Year requirement Amount of Excess MOE at end of year MOE compliance status Source: 2019 Agreed -Upon Procedures I Palo Verde I ` Coachella Valley I Vallea.y I I Cathedral Desert Hot i County of Wildomar City Coachella Springs Indian Wells Indio La Quinta Palm Desert Palm Springs Rancho Mirage Blythe I Riverside $ 705,711 $ 1,583,790 $ 646,744 $ 522,385 $ 54,614 13 1,440 54,168 48,599 497 283,855 $ 2,115,625 $ 742,921 $ 2,928,433 $ 2,308,021 $ 459,909 400,637 2,344,258 167,997 22,146 1,336 4,332 40,527 650,593 164,641 16,058 1,063,312 $ 779,892 $ 8,718,468 106,059 22,671 133,304 705,724 1,694,012 695,343 522,882 534,280 2,037,672 265,011 18,751 20,991 200,000 214,818 126,703 1,300,254 767,849 2,164,375 1,300,254 486,002 (62,125) (470,363) (604,911) 36,880 18,386 (15,086) 431,328 1,473,786 78,387 $ (58,825) $ (39,035) $ 868,875 $ 115,267 285,191 2,763,921 262,650 1,321,711 66,169 729,497 510,812 262,650 2,628,189 22,541 135,732 (8,737) (135,271) 71,467 639,901 $ 85,271 $ 640,362 $ $ (58,825) $ (39,035) $ 695,343 $ 115,267 $ 173,532 $ (58,825) $ (39,035) $ 868,875 $ 115,267 $ $ $ N/A - $ 974 $ 827,898 $ 205,056 - $ 391,688 - $ 5,746,574 Met $ 92,205 $ 6,437,898 Met $ 75,147 $ 1,234,617 Met with use of carryover $ 85,271 $ 640,362 $ 40,380 $ 173,549 $ $ 963,640 $ 2,048,564 $ $ 14,751,451 $ 22,384,270 $ Met Met 783,448 3,979,663 4,839,066 1,169,371 802,563 8,851,772 824,994 3,986,136 319,599 62,391 1,102, 350 236,211 590,183 - 219,064 590,183 824,994 5,088,486 319,599 517,666 193,265 3,154,669 (249,420) 849,772 284,897 4,939,773 223,385 5,163,158 3,688,614 (1) 1,245,548 21,970,019 5,876,514 2,153,611 1,526,126 1,319,260 1,438,813 $ 25,124,688 $ 5,627,094 $ 3,003,383 $ 1,811,023 $ 5,007,873 85,271 $ 640,362 $ 783,448 $ 3,979,663 $ 4,839,066 $ 1,169,371 $ 802,563 $ 5,007,873 655,365 3,295,835 788,028 814,099 769,517 4,172,229 971,911 238,943 13,676,961 48,002 $ 1,438,813 $ 25,124,688 $ 5,627,094 $ 3,003,383 $ 1,811,023 $ 5,007,873 1,368,290 $ 40,119,143 $ 5,004,156 $ 2,841,025 $ 1,728,649 $ 4,972,613 937,007 $ 2,398,146 $ 1,498,732 $ 674,811 $ 170,000 $ 8,165,502 $ 10,672,996 $ 28,887,938 $ 4,373,765 $ 95,629 $ Met Met Met Met Met N/A Measure A Local Streets Roads 5 of 5 6/9/2020 AGENDA ITEM 5E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Salary Schedule for Fiscal Year 2020/21 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve the salary schedule effective July 2, 2020, located in Appendix B of the proposed budget. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its June meeting, the Commission adopted the FY 2020/21 Budget and approved the salary schedule effective July 2, 2020, located in Appendix B of the proposed budget. Staff subsequently determined that the approved salary schedule differed from the salary schedule approved at the May Executive Committee meeting to be included in the FY 2020/21 Budget. The salary schedule approved by the Executive Committee reflects the correct amounts to be used for FY 2020/21. This salary schedule is included in Appendix B to the FY 2020/21 Budget and complies with Government Code §20636, "Compensation Earnable" and California Code of Register §570.5, "Requirements for a Publicly Available Pay Schedule." Staff recommends the Commission approve the salary schedule effective July 2, 2020, which was initially approved by the Executive Committee and is located in Appendix B of the FY 2020/21 Budget. Attachment: Salary Schedule effective July 2, 2020 Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on July 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 5E 374 Appendix B-Salary Schedule Effective 7/2/2020 Department Range Monthly Monthly Exempt / FIE No. Minimum Maximum Non -Exempt ADM INISIRAIION Administrative ServicesManager/Clerk of the Board 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E Deputy Clerk of the Board 1 32 $ 5,973 $ 8,064 NE Human ResourcesAdministrator 1 45 $ 8,205 $ 11,077 E I ITAdministrator 1 45 $ 8,205 $ 11,077 E Records Technician 1 17 $ 4,144 $ 5,595 NE nior Administrative Assistant 2 25 $ 5,037 $ 6,800 NE Senior Office Assistant 1 13 $ 3,759 $ 5,074 NE Administration :Lbtotal 8 CAPITAL PROJECTDEVELOPMENTAND DELIVERY I Capital Projects Manager 5 53 $ 9,973 $ 13,464 E Facilities Administrator 1 45 $ 8,205 $ 11,077 E Project Delivery Director 1 67 $ 14,034 $ 18,945 E Right of Way Manager 1 53 $ 9,973 $ 13,464 E nior Management Analyst 3 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E Capital Project Development and DelieryS,Jbtotal 11 EXEC U11VE MANAGEMENT Deputy Executive Director 1 75 $ 17,058 $ 23,028 E Executive Director 1 83 $ 20,734 $ 27,991 E Executive Management 9abtotal 2 RNANCE Accountant 1 33 $ 6,123 $ 8,266 E Accounting Assistant 2 17 $ 4,144 $ 5,595 NE Accounting 9ipervisor 1 44 $ 8,005 $ 10,807 E Accounting Technician 2 25 $ 5,037 $ 6,800 NE Chief Rnancial Officer 1 67 $ 14,034 $ 18,945 E Deputy Director of Rnance 1 57 $ 10,996 $ 14,844 E Rnancial Analyst 1 35 $ 6,429 $ 8,679 E Procurement Manager 1 53 $ 9,973 $ 13,464 E Senior Rnancial Analyst 1 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E nior Procurement Analyst 1 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E Rnance 9ibtotal 12 EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ExtemalAffairsDirector 1 63 $ 12,729 $ 17,184 E Legislative Affairs Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E Public Affairs Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E %nior Management Analyst 1 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E External Alfa irs9ibtotal 4 MULTIMODAL SERVICES Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E SeniorManagement Analyst 2 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E Multimodal rvicesDirector 1 63 $ 12,729 $ 17,184 E Transit Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E Multimodal Servicesaibtotal 5 PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING SERVICES 1 Planning and Programming Director 1 63 $ 12,729 $ 17,184 E Planning and Programming Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E nior Management Analy 2 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E Planning and Programming 9?rvicesSlbtotal 4 RAIL MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS Rail Manager 1 51 $ 9,498 $ 12,823 E Management Analyst 1 35 $ 6,429 $ 8,679 E Rail Maintenance and OperationsSabtotal 2 10LL OPERATION S nior Management AnaIy 2 43 $ 7,814 $ 10,549 E Toll Operations Manager 1 63 $ 12,729 $ 17,184 E Toll Program Director 1 71 $ 15,472 $ 20,887 E Toll Project Manager 1 65 $ 13,365 $ 18,043 E Toll Technology Manager 1 53 $ 9,973 $ 13,464 E Toll OperationsSabtotal 6 Total Authorized Positions Administration Capital Project Development and Delivery Executive Management Rnance External Affairs Multimodal %rvices Planning and Programming rvices Rail Maintenance and Operations Toll Operations Total Authorized Positions 8 11 2 12 4 5 4 2 6 54 I The FY2020/21 budget includesthe funding for50 FIE The unbudgeted and unfilled positions include two Capital Projects Ma nag ers, ITAd m inistrator, and Planning and Program mitr rector. AGENDA ITEM 5F RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Annual Investment Policy BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 20-012, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Investment Policy"; 2) Adopt the revised annual Investment Policy. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Section XIV of the Investment Policy requires an annual investment policy review and specifically states that the "Chief Financial Officer shall annually render to the Board a statement of investment policy, which the Board must consider at a public meeting. Any changes to the policy shall also be considered by the Board at a public meeting." Staff reviewed the Investment Policy approved by the Commission in March 2019, considered changes to the California Government Code as of July 2020, and consulted with the Commission's investment managers as well as the County Treasurer's Office in order to determine an appropriate level of changes primarily affecting the Commission's operating investment portfolio. Accordingly, staff recommends the following changes to the Commission's investment policy: • Refer to California Government Code Section 53601.6 for ineligible investments, as indicated in Section VI.3; • Replace "Board" with "Commission" throughout the policy for consistency purposes and to clarify that the Commission serves as the governing board; and • Other minor changes that do not affect the investment policy. In regard to ineligible investments, the purpose for the change provides for the Commission's investment policy to adjust based on future changes to the California Government Code. The other changes are clean up items that do not change the investment policy itself. Staff believes Agenda Item 5F 376 that these recommendations continue to adhere to the Commission's investment objectives, in priority order, of safety, liquidity, and return on investment. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 20-012 2) Investment Policy (draft) Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on July 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 5F 377 ATTACHMENT 1 RESOLUTION NO. 20-012 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION REGARDING THE REVISED INVESTMENT POLICY WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") currently retains the authority to add, delete or otherwise modify the Commission's policies and procedures. NOW, THEREFORE, the Riverside County Transportation Commission does hereby resolve as follows: Section 1. The Riverside County Transportation Commission hereby adopts the Investment Policy, as revised on August 12, 2020, and attached as Exhibit A. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 12th day of August, 2020. Ben J. Benoit, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board 378 ATTACHMENT 2 Riverside (aunty iranspartnlian Cammissinn INVESTMENT POLICY I. Introduction The purpose of this document is to identify policies and procedures that enhance opportunities for a prudent investment program and to organize and formalize investment -related activities. II. Scope It is intended that this Policy cover all funds (except retirement funds) and investment activities under the direction of the Commission serving as the Riverside County Transportation Commission's governing board. Investment activities may be classified between operating and bond/debt portfolios. III. Delegation of Authority Pursuant to the Commission's Administrative Code, the Commission's management responsibility for the investment program is hereby delegated for a one-year period to the Executive Director who shall monitor and review all investments for consistency with this investment policy. Subject to review, the Commission may renew the delegation of authority pursuant to this section each year. The Executive Director may delegate these duties to a designee ("Chief Financial Officer"). The Commission may delegate its investment decision making and execution authority to an investment advisor. The advisor shall follow this Policy and such other written instructions as are provided. IV. Prudence All persons authorized to make investment decisions on behalf of the Commission are subject to the prudent investor standard. Investments shall be made with care, skill, prudence and diligence under circumstances then prevailing, including, but not limited to, the general economic conditions and the anticipated needs of the Commission that a prudent person acting in a like capacity and familiarity with those matters would use in the conduct of funds of a like character and with like aims, to safeguard the principal and maintain the liquidity needs of the Commission. Authorized individuals acting in accordance with this Policy and written procedures and exercising due diligence shall be relieved of personal responsibility for an individual Revised August 12, 2020 379 security's credit risk or market price changes, provided deviations from expectations are reported in a timely fashion. V. Objective The Commission's primary investment objectives, in priority order, shall be: 1. Safety. Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the investment program. Investments of the Commission shall be undertaken in a manner that seeks to ensure preservation of capital in the portfolio. 2. Liquidity. The investment portfolio of the Commission will remain sufficiently liquid to enable the Commission to meet its cash flow requirements. 3. Return on Investment. The investment portfolio of the Commission shall be designed with the objective of maximizing return on its investments, but only after ensuring safety and liquidity. The Commission may from time to time sell securities that it owns in order to better reposition its portfolio assets in accordance with updated cash flow schedules, yield opportunities existing between market sectors, or simply market timing. VI. Investments California Government Code Section 53601 governs the investments permitted for purchase by the Commission. Within the investments permitted by Code, the Commission seeks to further restrict eligible investments to the investments listed in Section VI.1 below. Percentage limitations, where indicated, apply at the time of purchase. Percentage holdings with any one non-U.S. Government issuer or non -Federal Agency issuer are further restricted to a maximum of 10% (direct and indirect commitments), except as otherwise noted. Rating requirements where indicated, apply at the time of purchase. In the event a security held by the Commission is subject to a rating change that brings it below the minimum specified rating requirement, the Chief Financial Officer shall be authorized to act immediately and to notify the Commission of any actions taken in regards to the security. The course of action to be followed will then be decided on a case -by -case basis, considering such factors as the reason for the rating drop, prognosis for recovery or further rating drops, and the market price of the security. Revised August 12, 2020 380 1. Eligible Investments A. U.S. Government Issues. United States Treasury notes, bonds, bills, or certificates of indebtedness, or those for which the faith and credit of the United States are pledged for the payment of principal and interest. B. Federal Agency Securities. Federal agency or United States government - sponsored enterprise obligations, participations, or other instruments, including those issued by or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by federal agencies or United States government -sponsored enterprises. C. Supranational Obligations. Obligations issued, or unconditionally guaranteed, by the following supranational institutions: 1. International Bank for Reconstruction and Development; and 2. International Finance Corporation. Such securities must have a maximum maturity of four (4) years and ratings from at least one Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (NRSRO) as follows: at least "Aa/AA/or AA" which denotes "Aa2" by Moody's Investors Service (Moody's), or "AA" by S&P Global Ratings (S&P), or "AA" by Fitch Ratings (Fitch); or as otherwise approved by the Commission. Investments in supranational obligations are limited to a maximum of 20% of Commission funds with no more than 10% of funds invested in any one supranational institution. D. Municipal Bonds. Registered treasury notes or bonds of any of the other 49 United States, in addition to California, payable solely out of the revenues from a revenue - producing property owned, controlled, or operated by a state or by a department, board, agency or authority of any of the other 49 United States, in addition to California. Such securities must have a maximum maturity of five (5) years and ratings from at least one NRSRO as follows: at least "A1/A+/or A+"; or as otherwise approved by the Commission. Registered general obligation treasury notes or bonds of any of the 50 United States. Such securities must have a maximum maturity of five (5) years and ratings from at least one NRSRO as follows: at least "A1/A+/or A+" or as otherwise approved by the Commission. Taxable or tax-exempt bonds, notes, warrants, or other evidences of indebtedness of any local agency within the State of California with a maximum maturity of five (5) years and ratings from at least one NRSRO Revised August 12, 2020 381 as follows: at least "A1/A+/or A+" (the minimum rating shall apply to the local agency, irrespective of any credit enhancement), including bonds, notes, warrants, or other evidences of indebtedness payable solely out of the revenues from a revenue -producing property owned, controlled, or operated by either the local agency, a department, board, agency, or authority of the local agency, or of any local agency within this state. Investments in municipal bonds are further limited to 25% of the Commission's funds. E. Tri-Party Repurchase Agreements. Tri-party repurchase agreements are to be used solely as short-term investments not to exceed 30 days. The Commission may enter into tri-party repurchase agreements with primary government securities dealers rated "A" or better by two NRSROs. Counterparties should also have (i) a short-term credit rating of at least P- 1/A-1/ or F-1; (ii) minimum assets and capital size of $25 billion in assets and $350 million in capital; (iii) five years of acceptable audited financial results; and (iv) a strong reputation among market participants. The following collateral restrictions will be observed: Only U.S. Treasury securities or Federal Agency securities, as described in V.1 A and B, will be acceptable collateral. All securities underlying tri-party repurchase agreements must be delivered to the Commission's custodian or fiscal agent bank versus payment or be handled under a properly executed tri- party repurchase agreement. The total market value of all collateral for each tri-party repurchase agreement must equal or exceed 102% of the total dollar value of the money invested by the Commission for the term of the investment. For any tri-party repurchase agreement with a term of more than one day, the value of the underlying securities must be reviewed on an on -going basis according to market conditions. Market value must be calculated each time there is a substitution of collateral. The Commission or its trustee shall have a perfected first security interest under the Uniform Commercial Code in all securities subject to tri-party repurchase agreement. The Commission shall have properly executed a PSA agreement with each counterparty with which it enters into tri-party repurchase agreements. F. U.S. Corporate Debt. Medium -term notes, defined as all corporate and depository institution securities with a maximum remaining maturity of five (5) years or less, issued by corporations organized and operating within the United States or depository institutions licensed by the United States or any state and operating within the United States. Eligible investment shall be rated at least "A1/A+/ or A+" by at least one NRSRO. Revised August 12, 2020 382 Investments in U.S. Corporate Debt are further limited to 25% of the Commission's funds. G. Commercial Paper. Commercial paper rated in the highest category by one or more nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO). The entity that issues the commercial paper shall meet all of the following conditions in either paragraph (1) or paragraph (2): (1) The entity meets the following criteria: (A) Is organized and operating in the United States as a general corporation. (B) Has total assets in excess of five hundred million dollars ($500,000,000). (C) Has debt other than commercial paper, if any, that is rated "A" or higher by at least one NRSRO. (2) The entity meets the following criteria: (A) Is organized within the United States as a special purpose corporation, trust, or limited liability company. (B) Has program -wide credit enhancements, including, but not limited to, over collateralization, letters of credit, or surety bond. (C) Has commercial paper that is rated at least "P-1/A-1/or F-1", or the equivalent, by at least one NRSRO. Purchases of eligible commercial paper may not exceed 270 days maturity nor represent more than 10% of the outstanding paper of an issuing corporation. Investments in commercial paper are limited to a maximum of 25% of the Commission's funds. H. Banker's Acceptances. Banker's acceptances issued by domestic or foreign banks, which are eligible for purchase by the Federal Reserve System. Purchases of banker's acceptances may not exceed 180 days maturity. Eligible banker's acceptances are restricted to issuing financial institutions with short-term paper rated in the highest category by one or more nationally recognized rating service. Investments in banker's acceptances are further limited to 40% of the Commission's funds with no more than 30% of the Commission's funds invested in the banker's acceptances of any one commercial bank. I. Money Market Mutual Funds. Shares of beneficial interest issued by diversified management companies that are money market funds registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Sec. 80a-1, et seq.) and that invest solely in U.S. treasuries, obligations of the U.S. Treasury, and repurchase agreements relating to such treasury obligations. The Commission may invest in shares of beneficial interest issued by a company that shall have met either of the following criteria: (1) Attained Revised August 12, 2020 383 the highest ranking or the highest letter and numerical rating provided by not less than two nationally recognized rating services. (2) Retained an investment adviser registered or exempt from registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission with not less than five years' experience managing money market mutual funds with assets under management in excess of five hundred million dollars ($500,000,000). The purchase price of shares of beneficial interest purchased pursuant to this subdivision shall not include any commission that the companies may charge. Investments in Money Market Mutual Funds are further limited to 20% of the Commission's funds. J. Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund ("RCPIF"). The Commission may invest in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund. As on -going due diligence, the Chief Financial Officer shall obtain the information listed below: • A description of eligible investment securities and a written statement of investment policy. • A description of the interest calculation, the frequency of interest distributions, and the treatment of gains and losses in the portfolio. • A description of how often the securities are priced, how the securities are safeguarded, and the audit arrangements. • A description of who may invest in the program, how often they may invest, and what size deposits and withdrawals are allowed. • A schedule for receiving statements and portfolio listings. • A fee schedule, and when and how fees are assessed. • The composition of the investment fund for each reporting period. K. State of California Local Agency Investment Fund ("LAIF"). The Commission may invest in LAIF. As on -going due diligence, the Chief Financial Officer shall obtain the information listed below: • A description of eligible investment securities and a written statement of investment policy. • A description of the interest calculation, the frequency of interest distributions, and the treatment of gains and losses in the portfolio. • A description of how often the securities are priced, how the securities are safeguarded, and the audit arrangements. • A description of who may invest in the program, how often they may invest, and what size deposits and withdrawals are allowed. Revised August 12, 2020 384 • A schedule for receiving statements and portfolio listings. • A fee schedule, and when and how fees are assessed. • The composition of the investment fund for each reporting period. L. Certificates of Deposit. Negotiable Certificates of Deposit (NCD's): NCDs are money market instruments issued by a bank. They specify that a sum of money has been deposited, payable with interest to the bearer of the certificates on a certain date. NCDs are issued by nationally or state chartered bank or state or federal savings and loan association. All purchases must be from institutions rated the highest letter and number rating (e.g., P-1/A-1/or F- 1) as provided for by at least one NRSRO, as designated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The maturity of NCDs shall not exceed one (1) year to maturity, and purchases of NCDs shall not exceed 30% of the Commission's investment portfolio. NCDs shall be evaluated in terms of the creditworthiness of the issuing institution, as these deposits are uninsured and uncollateralized promissory notes. FDIC -insured Certificates of Deposit: The principal amount of the investment must be federally insured through the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). No more than the prevailing FDIC insured coverage amount may be invested with any one deposit. Certificates of Deposit placed through the Certificate of Deposit Account Registry Service (CDARS) shall be considered fully insured, assuming that the total amount invested with any participating bank is limited to the prevailing FDIC insured coverage amount. Interest on the principal must be paid to the Commission at least annually. The placement of Certificates of Deposit with local banks that qualify in accordance with Government Code section 53601(h) is encouraged. The Commission, at its discretion, may invest a portion of its funds in certificates of deposit at a commercial bank, savings bank, savings and loan association, or credit union using a private sector entity to assist in the placement of such certificates, provided that it complies with Government Code Section 53601.8. Such investments may not exceed in total 20% of the Commission's funds invested pursuant to Government Code Sections 53601.8, 53635.8 and 53601, and shall have a maximum maturity of one (1) year from the date of the deposit. Collateralized Certificates of Deposit: For investments exceeding $100,000, there will be a waiver of collateral for the first $100,000 deposited and protected by FDIC insurance. The remainder of the deposit shall be fully collateralized by U.S. Treasury and Federal Agency securities having maturities less than five years. The Commission must receive written confirmation that these securities have been pledged in Revised August 12, 2020 385 repayment of the time deposit. The securities pledged as collateral must have a current market value greater than the dollar amount of the deposit in keeping with the ratio requirements specified in Section 53652 of the Government Code. Additionally, a statement of the collateral shall be provided to the Commission on a monthly basis. Such investments may not exceed in total 15% of the Commission's funds invested pursuant to Government Code Sections 53601.8, 53635.8 and 53601, and shall have a maximum maturity of one (1) year from the date of the deposit. M. Time Deposits. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insured money market savings accounts or time deposits which are deposited through depository institutions which are participants of the Money Market Insured Deposit Account Service ("M MIDAS"). N. Mortgage and Asset -backed Securities. Any mortgage pass -through security, collateralized mortgage obligation, mortgage -backed or other pay -through bond, equipment lease -backed certificate, consumer receivable -backed bond of a maximum maturity of five (5) years. Securities eligible for investment under this subdivision shall be issued by an issuer and rated at least "A3/A-/or A-" for the issuer's debt as provided by at least one NRSRO and rated in the rating category of "AAA" or its equivalent (excluding U.S. Government/Agency-backed structured products which will be permitted with their prevailing ratings even if those ratings are below the rating category of "AAA") by at least one NRSRO. Purchase of these securities may not exceed 10% of the Commission's operating investment portfolio. 2. Eligible Investments for Bond Proceeds Bond proceeds shall be invested in securities permitted by the applicable bond documents. If the bond documents are silent as to permitted investments, bond proceeds will be invested in securities permitted by this Policy. With respect to maximum maturities, the Policy authorizes investing bond reserve fund proceeds beyond the five (5) years if prudent in the opinion of the Chief Financial Officer. 3. Ineligible Investments The Commission shall not invest any funds in the types of securities as provided in California Government Code Section 53601.6. Revised August 12, 2020 386 The purchase of any security not listed in Section VI.1 above, but permitted by the California Government Code, is prohibited unless the Commission approves the investment either specifically or as a part of an investment program approved by the Commission. VII. Maximum Maturities Maturities of investments will be selected to provide necessary liquidity, minimize interest rate risk, and maximize earnings. Current and expected yield curve analysis will be monitored and the portfolio will be invested accordingly. Because of inherent difficulties in accurately forecasting cash flow requirements, a portion of the portfolio should be continuously invested in readily available funds. Where this Policy does not specify a maximum remaining maturity at the time of the investment, no investment shall be made in any security, other than a security underlying a repurchase or reverse repurchase agreement authorized by this section, that at the time of the investment has a term remaining to maturity in excess of five (5) years. VIII. Performance Standards The Chief Financial Officer shall continually monitor and evaluate the portfolio's performance. IX. Reporting The Chief Financial Officer shall prepare and provide to the Commission and the Executive Director, within 60 days following the end of the quarter, a portfolio report, which includes the following information: • Type of investment • Name of issuer • Date of maturity • Date of purchase • Par value • Original purchase cost • Call date (if applicable) • Current market value of securities • Unrealized market value gain/loss • Coupon rate, if applicable • Yield to maturity • Credit quality, as determined by one or more NRSROs, of each investment • Average duration of portfolio Revised August 12, 2020 387 • Listing of all investment transactions during the quarter • A statement that the portfolio complies with the investment policy, or the manner in which the portfolio is not in compliance • A statement denoting the ability of the Commission to meet its liquidity requirements for the next six months, or provide an explanation as to why sufficient money shall, or may not be, available. X. Investment Procedures The Chief Financial Officer, as the Commission's designee, is responsible for ensuring compliance with the Commission's investment policies and establishing written procedures and internal controls for the operation of the investment program. No person may engage in investment transactions except as provided under the terms of this Policy and the written procedures established by the Chief Financial Officer. The written procedures should address: delegation of authority to subordinate staff members, control of collusion, separation of transaction authority from accounting and record keeping, written confirmations of transactions, reconciliation of custody statements, and wire transfer procedures and agreements. An independent analysis by an external auditor shall be conducted annually to review internal control, account activity, and compliance with policies and procedures. XI. Authorized Broker Dealers and Financial Institutions The Chief Financial Officer shall maintain a list of authorized broker/dealers and financial institutions which are approved for investment purposes. It shall be the Commission's policy to purchase securities only from those authorized institutions and firms. Separate lists shall be maintained for broker/dealers and financial institutions approved for repurchase agreements and those approved for the purchase of other securities. If an investment advisor is used, they may use their own list of approved broker/dealers and financial institutions for investment purposes. To be eligible, a firm must meet the following minimum criteria: (i) an institution licensed by the state as a broker -dealer, or from a member of a federally regulated securities exchange, from a national or state -chartered bank, from a federal or state association or from a brokerage firm designated as a primary government dealer by the Federal Reserve bank; and (ii) all broker/dealer firms and individuals must be properly registered with the NASD and/or SEC to transact business in the relevant geographic locations and product sectors. In addition, counterparties for Repurchase Agreements shall be limited to primary government securities dealers rated "A" or better by two NRSROs. Counterparties shall also have (i) a short-term credit rating of at least P-1/A-1/or F-1; (ii) minimum assets and capital size of $25 billion in assets and $350 million in capital; (iii) five years of acceptable audited financial results; and (iv) a strong reputation among market participants. Revised August 12, 2020 388 The Chief Financial Officer shall select broker/dealers and other financial institutions on the basis of the firm's expertise and creditworthiness. The Commission shall annually send a copy of the current investment policy to all dealers approved to do business with the Commission. Each broker/dealer or financial institution that has been authorized by the Commission shall be required to submit and annually update a Broker/Dealer Questionnaire which includes the firm's most recent financial statements. The Chief Financial Officer shall maintain a file for each firm approved for investment purposes, which includes the most recent Broker/Dealer Questionnaire. XII. Safekeeping and Custody To protect the Commission's assets, all securities owned by the Commission shall be held in safekeeping in the Commission's name by a third party bank trust department, acting as agent for the Commission under the terms of a custody agreement executed by the bank and the Commission. All securities will be received and delivered using standard delivery versus payment (DVP) procedures; the Commission's safekeeping agent will only release payment for a security after the security has been properly delivered. Physical delivery securities shall be avoided whenever possible, as book entry securities are much easier to transfer and account for since actual delivery of a document never takes place. In addition, delivered securities must be properly safeguarded against loss or destruction. The potential for fraud and loss increases with physically delivered securities. XIII. Ethics and Conflicts of Interest The Commission adopts the following policy concerning conflicts of interest: 1. Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall refrain from personal business activity that could conflict with proper execution of the investment program or which could impair their ability to make impartial investment decisions. 2. Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall disclose any material financial interest in any financial institution that conducts business with the Commission, and they shall further disclose any large personal financial/investment positions that could be related to the performance of the Commission's portfolio. 3. Officers shall refrain from undertaking personal investment transactions with the same individual with whom business is conducted on behalf of the Commission. Revised August 12, 2020 389 XIV. Investment Policy Review The Chief Financial Officer shall annually render to the Commission a statement of investment policy, which the Commission must consider at a public meeting. Any changes to the policy shall also be considered by the Commission at a public meeting. Revised August 12, 2020 390 AGENDA ITEM 5G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee David Knudsen, Legislative Affairs Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: State Update 2020-21 State Budget Governor Gavin Newsom signed the 2020 Budget Act, a $202.1 billion spending plan, on June 29, 2020, that addresses numerous pressing issues related to emergency response, public health and safety, and economic recovery while focusing on the state's $54.3 billion budget deficit resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. In January, the Governor was projecting a surplus of $5.6 billion; by the May Revision, the state confronted a $54.3 billion budget deficit, a swing of $60 billion caused by the COVID-19 recession. To account for the budget deficit, the final budget cuts programs, delays payment plans, borrows from internal funds, reduces business tax breaks, and uses cash reserves from the state's $16 billion "rainy day" fund to enact a balanced budget. The budget also includes $11.1 billion in reductions and deferrals that will be restored if at least $14 billion in federal funds are received by October 15, 2020. lithe state receives a lesser amount between $2 billion and $14 billion, the reductions and deferrals will be partially restored. The enacted 2020-21 budget continues investment in transportation. While fuel tax revenues used to fund transportation projects are expected to decline by a total of $1.8 billion through 2024-25, the budget maintains Caltrans' current planning and engineering staffing levels to continue developing and designing previously programmed projects. Caltrans will accelerate projects to achieve cost savings, support the creation of new jobs in the transportation sector, and improve roads. Caltrans did see a $500 million overall budget reduction, but the Department Agenda Item 5G 391 plans to award all of the projects it currently has programmed for construction in the coming year. The Legislature and the Governor will likely revisit the budget in August once a more precise picture of tax receipts develops after July 15, 2020. Senate Bill 1291 (Beall) Senate Bill 1291 was introduced in the Legislature by Senator Jim Beall to provide flexibility for Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) working to prepare and submit a Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) for 2021, as required by law. RCTC participates in the FTIP process, a comprehensive list of transportation projects that will receive federal funding, as a member of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). SCAG is responsible for finalizing the FTIP for submittal to the California Department of Transportation and the federal funding agencies. Federal law requires the FTIP to be updated every four years but California law requires MPOs to update the FTIP every two years. SB 1291 would temporarily allow for deadline flexibility to the state's requirement that MPOs submit the 2021 FTIP. While the SCAG region is in a position to meet the FTIP state deadline, not all MPOs are in the same situation. SB 1291 will allow those that require more time to have it to ensure that transportation projects can proceed. The 2021 FTIP development has been surrounded by uncertainty since November 2019 due to the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rulemaking - the Safer Affordable Fuel -Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule. The SAFE Rule had the potential to invalidate California's approved emissions models, which would delay or eliminate non -conforming projects, thereby jeopardizing billions of dollars in transportation funding throughout California. With the SAFE Rule released in two parts over the course of six months, California's transportation agencies were left in limbo until the California Air Resources Board (CARB) could confirm whether or not each part of the SAFE Rule would affect California's emissions models. CARB has since made the determination that the adjustment factors approved in response to Part 1 remain valid despite Part 2. Awaiting resolution of the SAFE Rule's effects on California's transportation conformity used in preparing FTIPs left MPOs with significantly less time to meet the October 1, 2020 FTIP deadline. RCTC's support position is in alignment with the Commission adopted 2020 State and Federal Legislative Platform: • Regional Partnerships: Engage in legislative efforts impacting regional transportation agencies, particularly when the efforts have a nexus to the Commission. The support letter is attached to this staff report. Agenda Item 5G 392 Senate Bill 288 (Wiener) Senate Bill 288, the Sustainable Transportation COVID-19 Recovery Act, was introduced in the Legislature by Senator Scott Wiener on June 3, 2020. The bill expands the California Environmental Quality Act's (CEQA) provisions for statutory exemptions to fast -track specific sustainable transportation projects in urbanized areas. The intention is to make the process more streamlined and cost-effective for a narrow group of projects. RCTC staff has met with the bill sponsor, Bay Area Council, and Senator Wiener's staff to understand the legislation's intentions better and identify projects in Riverside County that would meet this new exemption. RCTC staff is communicating with Senator Wiener's office regarding the legislation and a letter was sent by Chair Ben J. Benoit outlining RCTC's interest in the bill. RCTC's work and interest in SB 288 is based on the Commission's adopted 2020 Federal and State Legislative Platform: • Project Delivery Streamlining: Support all efforts to reduce project delivery timelines while maintaining important environmental protections. Senate Bill 743 Implementation At the June 10, 2020 Commission meeting, Commissioners received an update on Caltrans' SB 743 (Steinberg, 2013) implementation and the use of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) as the primary method for assessing transportation impacts on the environment for projects subject to CEQA review. The Commission also approved sending a letter to Governor Newsom requesting a two-year implementation delay. As of this report, RCTC staff has not received a formal response from the Administration to the Chair's request for delay. Instead, the Governor's Office of Planning and Research and Caltrans held a joint stakeholder virtual Town Hall event titled: Rethinking How We Build So Californians Can Drive Less, celebrating July 1, 2020 when SB 743 took effect. During that Town Hall, archived here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=za7vJw4jRuE (17:48), Caltrans Director Toks Omishakin stated it is not the goal to "kill" a self-help county's voter approved project, but he noted that those projects will need to be reviewed to meet state law and "where necessary, push for mitigation where needed, on many cases." This means that the VMT policy will affect CEQA review of capacity -increasing projects on the state highway system that are included in voter approved programs. Caltrans is in the process of developing and organizing research, materials, and best practices related to mitigating induced VMT but actual mitigation policy has not yet been finalized. Transit, bicycle, and pedestrian infrastructure projects are among the project types that will not be subject to VMT analysis. RCTC staff will continue to participate in Caltrans' process so that voter approved transportation projects can be delivered in Riverside County. Agenda Item 5G 393 Legislative Calendar The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant disruption to the annual legislative calendar. Since March 16, 2020, the Legislature has been under COVID-19 protocols: limiting bill introductions, reducing the number of legislative hearings, and reducing the number of staff in the Capitol Building. With an increase of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the Capitol Building, both the Senate and Assembly postponed reconvening session until July 27, 2020. As of the writing of this report, the legislative calendar is as follows: • July 27, 2020 is the possible return date for both the Senate and Assembly; • July 31, 2020 is the last day for policy committees to hear and report fiscal bills to fiscal committees; • August 7, 2020 is the last day for policy committees to meet and report bills; • August 14, 2020 is the last day for fiscal committees to meet and report bills; • August 21, 2020 is the last day to amend bills on the floor; and • August 31, 2020 is the last day for each house to pass bills. Federal Update Surface Transportation Reauthorization Legislation With the current federal surface transportation bill, the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, set to expire on September 30, 2020, Congress continues to work on legislation to reauthorize federal transportation programs. As part of this effort, on June 3, 2020, the House Transportation and Infrastructure (T&I) Committee Chairman, Peter DeFazio (D-OR), introduced the Investing in a New Vision for the Environment and Surface Transportation in America (INVEST) Act, a five-year reauthorization of federal surface transportation programs. The measure would invest nearly $500 billion over five years across highway, transit, and rail programs. The bill's major themes are "Fix It First" policies, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and addressing climate change, and infrastructure resiliency. After more than 24 hours of debate that included the consideration of 177 amendments, the INVEST Act was approved by the T&I Committee by a party -line vote. The INVEST Act has since been incorporated into H.R. 2, The Moving Forward Act, a broader $1.5 trillion infrastructure bill that includes school construction, affordable housing, clean water, broadband, and transportation programs. The bill does not identify a funding source to pay for these programs. The House of Representatives passed H.R. 2, also mostly along a party -line vote, on July 1, 2020. Based on the Commission adopted 2020 State and Federal Legislative Platform, RCTC staff successfully proposed amendments to the legislation that were included in the final bill. These amendments advance priorities in Riverside County by: • Increasing the competitiveness of grade separation projects for federal funding. Agenda Item 5G 394 • Ensuring RCTC and other self-help counties in California are eligible to compete for new grant funding programs. Representative Pete Aguilar of Redlands submitted both adopted amendments. RCTC proposed additional amendments that were not included as part of H.R. 2. These amendments would have: • Added special grant funding consideration for counties that have voter -approved sales taxes. • Added special grant funding consideration for projects that use innovative finance and funding. • Allowed the Coachella Valley Rail project and many other surface transportation projects to be eligible for assistance from the Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council. Assistance from this Council would have expedited federal reviews and approvals and helped resolve disputes. RCTC staff worked closely with the offices of Representatives Calvert, Ruiz, and Takano, as well as Representative Aguilar, Representative Harley Rouda of Newport Beach, and Representative Grace Napolitano of El Monte. These Members supported RCTC's efforts to make our region more competitive for federal transportation dollars. There are still several steps, including bill conference with the Senate, that have to take place before a final surface transportation reauthorization bill can be enacted into law. Last year, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed its FAST Act reauthorization legislation that would authorize $287 billion for only highway programs over five years. Several committees in the Senate have to act before a surface transportation bill can be considered by the full Senate. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated that he does not support the provisions of H.R. 2, but has intimated a willingness to consider a companion Senate bill at the appropriate time. If surface transportation programs are not reauthorized by September 30, 2020, Congress will have to enact an extension of current programs for a period of time. RCTC staff will continue to participate in the federal process to advocate for transportation infrastructure policies that benefit Riverside County residents and commuters. COVID-19 Federal Response Four COVID-19 relief packages have been enacted to date: Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (March 4, 2020), Families First Coronavirus Response Act (March 18, 2020), the $2 trillion CARES Act (March 27, 2020), and Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act (April 24, 2020). With these legislative packages, Congress has appropriated nearly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief spending. In early July, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated there might be a need for a fifth coronavirus relief bill, as the country sees an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases. According to reports, the Agenda Item 5G 395 fifth relief package could focus on liability reform, schools, jobs, local and state government, and healthcare. As a reminder, the House passed the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act, a $3 trillion COVID-19 relief package, on May 15, 2020, with nearly $1 trillion for state, local and tribal governments; direct payments to individuals; hazard pay for essential workers; funding for coronavirus testing and tracing; increased spending on food stamps; housing support; student loan forgiveness; and a new employee retention tax credit and extension of unemployment benefits. The Senate has not taken up the HEROES Act. The Senate is on recess until July 20, 2020 and once they return will only have a few weeks to act before the House is on recess until September. Appropriations A two-year budget deal (FY20 and FY21) passed by Congress and signed by the President in 2019 should help facilitate the appropriations process. The House Appropriations Committee passed their version of the FY21 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations bill on July 14, 2020, and may be considered by the full House the week of July 27, 2020. A date has not been set for the Senate to begin to work on FY21 Appropriations bills. Based on a shortened timeframe and competing COVID-19 issues, it is not anticipated that Congress will be able to pass the 12 appropriations bills before the end of the federal fiscal year on September 30, 2020. Congress had to delay work on the normal appropriations bills to respond to the COVID-19 crisis. In addition, there are considerable policy differences between the House and Senate. Therefore, it is expected that there will need to be a continuing resolution before the end of the federal fiscal year to fund federal programs until sometime after the 2020 November election. Attachments: 1) Legislative Matrix — July 2020 2) Senate Bill 1291 (Beall) Support Letter 3) Senate Bill 288 (Wiener) Interest Letter Agenda Item 5G 396 ATTACHMENT 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION July 6, 2020 The Honorable Jim Frazier California State Assembly State Capitol Building Sacramento, California 95814 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor • Riverside, CA Mailing Address: P.O. Box 12008 • Riverside, CA 92502-2208 951.787.7141 • 951.787.7920 • www.rctc.org Subject: Support for Senate Bill 1291 (Beall) Dear Chair Frazier: The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) lends its support for Senate Bill (SB) 1291. This bill would provide flexibility for Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) that prepare and submit a Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) for 2021. As the region's transportation planning agency, RCTC participates in the FTIP process, a comprehensive list of transportation projects that will receive federal funding, as a member of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). SCAG is responsible for finalizing the FTIP for submittal to the California Department of Transportation and the federal funding agencies. Federal law requires the FTIP to be updated every four years but California law requires MPOs to update the FTIP every two years. SB 1291 would temporarily allow for deadline flexibility to the state's requirement that MPOs submit the 2021 FTIP. The 2021 FTIP development has been surrounded by uncertainty since November 2019 due to the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rulemaking - the Safer Affordable Fuel -Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule. The SAFE Rule had the potential to invalidate California's approved emissions models, which would delay or eliminate non -conforming projects, thereby jeopardizing billions of dollars in transportation funding throughout California. With the SAFE Rule released in two parts over the course of six months, California's transportation agencies were left in limbo until the California Air Resources Board (CARB) could confirm whether or not each part of the SAFE Rule would affect California's emissions model. CARB has since made the determination that the adjustment factors approved in response to Part 1 remain valid despite Part 2. Awaiting resolution of the SAFE Rule's effects on California's transportation conformity used in preparing transportation plans left transportation planning agencies with significantly less time to meet the October 1, 2020 FTIP deadline. While the SCAG region is in a position to meet the FTIP State deadline, not all MPOs are in the same situation. SB 1291 will give more time to agencies that need it to ensure transportation projects, and the associated safety benefits and jobs, can proceed. MPOs would return to the regular two-year FTIP cycle by 2023. Please contact David Knudsen, Legislative Affairs Manager at DKnudsen@rctc.org if you have any questions. Sincerely, akie Anne Mayer Executive Director 397 ATTACHMENT 2 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION - POSITIONS ON STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION - JULY 2020 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 252 (Daly, Frazier) Removes the sunset date from the NEPA Reciprocity program. Signed by Governor Newsom. (July 31, 2019) SUPPORT 3/13/19 AB 1402 (Petrie- r ) Makes substantive changes to the Active Transportation Program administered by the State, allocating 75% of funds to be distributed by large MPOs. Assembly -Died- Transportation. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 4/1/19 SB 152 (Beall) Makes substantive changes to the Active Transportation Program administered by the State, allocating 75% of funds to be distributed by large MPOs. Senate -Died- Appropriations. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 4/1/19 AB 626 (Quirk -Silva) Seeks to dictate that professionals who provide professional services on one phase of a project be deemed not to have a conflict of interest in subsequent project phases, disregarding the Commission's adopted Procurement Policy. Died on inactive file (February 3, 2020) OPPOSE UNLESS AMENDED 4/10/19 AB 456 (Chiu, Bonta, Low) Removes the January 1, 2020 sunset provision on claims resolution processes. Approved by the Governor. (October 3, 2019) OPPOSE 5/8/19 SB 498 (Hurtado) Takes funds dedicated in the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund and repurposes them for a new short -line railroad project grant program. Referred to Assembly Transportation Committee. (June 6, 2019) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 5/30/19 SB 742 (Allen) Authorizes existing state funds for Amtrak to be used on intercity passenger bus transportation, regardless of whether the passenger is connecting to or from intercity rail service. Approved by the Governor. (October 8, 2019) SUPPORT 6/12/19 • July 31, 2020: last day for policy committees to hear and report fiscal bills to fiscal committees • August 7, 2020: last day for policy committees to meet and report bills • August 14, 2020: last day for fiscal committees to meet and report bills • August 21, 2020: last day to amend bills on the floor • August 31, 2020: last day for each house to pass bills 398 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 1149 (Fong) Eliminates the ability of petitioners to opt to prepare the record of proceedings and would place that responsibility solely on the lead agency. Assembly -Died -Natural Resources. (February 3, 2020) SUPPORT 6/12/19 SB 664 (Allen) Revises existing statute in the Streets and Highways Code and the Vehicle Code to allow for improved operations of toll facilities in California. Re -referred to Committees on Privacy & Consumer Protection and Judiciary. (September 10, 2019) SUPPORT Staff action based on platform 6/17/19 SB 277 (Beall) Changes the SB 1-created Local Partnership Program to be administered at 85% formula, rather than 50% formula as is currently in adopted guidelines. Vetoed by the Governor. In Senate. Consideration of Governor's veto pending. (August 14, 2019) SUPPORT St basedonn platform 7/1/19 AB 2011 (Holden) Creates West San Bernardino County Rail Construction Authority for purposes of awarding and overseeing all design and construction contracts for completion of an extension of the Metro Gold Line light rail project from the City of Montclair to the Ontario International Airport. The bill would prescribe the powers and duties of the construction authority. Referred to Assembly Transportation Committee. (February 14, 2020) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 3/10/20 SB 1390 (Portantino) Creates the Montclair to Ontario Airport Construction Authority for purposes of awarding and overseeing all design and construction contracts for completion of an extension of the Metro Gold Line light rail project from the City of Montclair to the Ontario International Airport. The bill would prescribe the powers and duties of the construction authority. Referred to Senate Transportation Committee. (March 12, 2020) OPPOSE Staff action based on platform 3/10/20 SB 1291 (Beall) This bill suspends the 2020 requirement that a Metropolitan Planning Organization submit a Federal Transportation Improvement Program to the Department of Transportation. Referred to Assembly Transportation Committee (June 18, 2020) SUPPORT ff Stabased onn platform 7/6/2020 HR 2939 (Napolitano) Protects state and local general sales tax revenues from being directed to airports. Introduced. (May 23, 2019) SUPPORT 7/10/19 399 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION July 20, 2020 The Honorable Scott Wiener California State Senate State Capitol Sacramento, California 95814 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor • Riverside, CA Mailing Address: P.O. Box 12008 • Riverside, CA 92502-2208 951.787.7141 • 951.787.7920 • www.rctc.org ATTACHMENT 3 SUBJECT: Ensuring equity for inland southern California in accelerating sustainable transportation projects via SB 288 Dear Senator Wiener: With record unemployment and intermittent closing of businesses, COVID-19 is challenging the economic survival of communities across the State, including in Riverside County. As the Legislature considers policies that will stabilize our economy, thank you for introducing legislation with the intent accelerating sustainable infrastructure projects as a way to help rebuild our economy. Thank you to Ann Fryman of your staff for recently taking time to speak with staff representing RCTC and other southern California county transportation commissions regarding SB 288. Throughout the course of our nation's and state's history, investment in infrastructure has led the way to economic recovery. Yet, funding is not always what stands in the way of job -creating projects. Far too often, vital infrastructure projects are delayed and increase in cost as a result of abuse of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Projects that support sustainable mobility of our residents, such as public transit, can be mired in costly litigation for years. For example, the Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension was delayed for years, at a substantial cost to Riverside County taxpayers, due to CEQA abuse. The Perris Valley Line experience is a deterrent to our region's ambitions to develop a more robust and connected multi -modal infrastructure system to support a sustainable high -growth economy. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) supports proposals that modernize CEQA to reduce project delivery timelines while maintaining critical environmental protections and public participation requirements. Your bill, SB 288, the Sustainable Transportation COVID-19 Recovery Act, expands CEQA's provisions for statutory exemptions to fast -track certain sustainable transportation projects in urbanized areas, making the process more streamlined and cost-effective for this narrow group of projects. SB 288 could be effective in Riverside County, where residents experience some of the longest daily commute times in the state and breathe in some of the nation's worst air pollution. However, the bill sponsor has indicated that SB 288 will be amended to exclude CEQA exemption for commuter rail or intercity rail projects, thereby leaving out Riverside County's most viable public transit alternatives to long solo commutes on the 91, 15, 60, 215, 10 freeways. This omission runs counter to what we understand to be the original intent of the bill, provides no meaningful traffic relief or environmental benefit to our county of 2.47 million people, and will only deepen the chasm between the State's investments in coastal and inland transportation systems. 400 The Honorable Scott Wiener July 20, 2020 Page 2 As you consider amendments to SB 288, RCTC offers the following recommendations which we have drafted as legislative text and are happy to share with your staff: • Exempt passenger rail projects on existing public rights of way, and • Prevent the disqualification of otherwise eligible transit projects that require ancillary street improvements for safety and efficiency of use for transit, bicycle, and pedestrian users. It will also be important to ensure that all of Riverside County qualifies as an "urbanized area" as defined by the bill, given the diversity of land use within the county and the rapid growth the county will continue to experience. In conclusion, we believe that SB 288 has the potential to benefit sustainable transportation projects in Riverside County and help rebuild our local economy. We are supportive of efforts to improve this legislation. We are willing to engage directly with you, your staff, and with stakeholders with whom you are working to craft this legislation. We appreciate your leadership in giving our communities a voice during this extraordinary time. RCTC staff will be reaching out to your office to highlight these suggestions and provide any further insights to assist you. Should you have questions, please contact David Knudsen, Legislative Affairs Manager at: DKnudsen@RCTC.org. Sincerely, Ben J. Benoit Chair Cc: Riverside County Legislative Delegation 401 AGENDA ITEM 5H RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Martha Masters, Senior Management Analyst Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Annual Local Transportation Fund Planning Allocations to Western Riverside Council of Governments and Coachella Valley Association of Governments BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for planning in the amount of $676,500 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $369,000 for Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency's Fiscal Year 2020/21 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that supports transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs, and requirements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The LTF established in state law by the Transportation Development Act (TDA) is funded through a quarter of one cent of the state's 7.25 percent sales tax (based on point of sale and returned to source). LTF funds are used to fund transportation planning, operations, and capital projects. The action requested at this time is specifically to allocate the planning funds to the two councils of governments, WRCOG and CVAG. Other LTF allocations, such as those for transit and rail operations and capital projects, were approved by the Commission in June 2020. Bicycle and pedestrian facilities are also funded by LTF and are part of the biennial SB 821 Call for Projects, which will be released in February 2021. The LTF funding is distributed by the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration to counties on a pro rata basis, pursuant to Section 99233.2 of the TDA, providing up to 3 percent of annual revenues to fund transportation planning and programming efforts. The Commission, as the regional transportation planning agency, is legally responsible for apportioning the LTF funds. Based on the projected FY 2020/21 revenues of $82 million, 3 percent of the projected revenue, or $2.46 million, is for planning and programming. By statute, the TDA also requires one half of these LTF funds, or $1.23 million, be allocated for planning activities within the Western Riverside County and the Coachella Valley areas, as determined by the Commission. The distribution formula, as confirmed by the Commission in October 2014, is as follows: Agenda Item 5H 402 Planning Agency Percentage Apportionment/Allocation RCTC 15 $184,500 WRCOG 55 676,500 CVAG 30 369,000 Total 100 $1,230,000 WRCOG and CVAG submitted their respective FY 2020/21 Work Plans in accordance with existing guidelines. WRCOG's Work Plan is divided into two program areas and includes the following activities: 1) Planning Programs — including, but not limited, to: Riverside County Model Update 2020 Southern California Association of Government's (SCAG) Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS) SB 743 Implementation Assistance Research on vehicle miles traveled reduction methods Geographic information system/modeling services Research on travel and technology Transportation related climate change and climate adaptation analyses and planning for the WRCOG subregion 2) Regional Transportation Programs - Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program - Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs CVAG's Work Plan consists of nine main program areas: 1) Transportation Department Operations; 2) Project Management and Contract Administration; 3) CV Link Project Development; 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs; 5) Planning, Programming, and Monitoring Program; 6) Miscellaneous Programs including GIS Information Services, support for the countywide transportation model and Regional Arterial Traffic Count Program; 7) Congestion Management/Air Quality Programs; 8) TUMF Program; and 9) Governmental and Special Projects. Staff reviewed the Work Plans and found them to be consistent with the Commission's overall transportation programming and planning objectives and recommends approval. The Work Plans also benefit the respective geographic regions and are consistent with subregional and regional plans, including SCAG's RTP/SCS. WRCOG and CVAG, in conjunction with SCAG, are Agenda Item 5H 403 responsible for subregional planning efforts that implement and are in conformance with the RTP/SCS. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2020/21 Amount: $1,045,500 Source of Funds: LTF Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 106 65 86205 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \Iltaiiiavit2 Date: 07/20/2020 Attachments: 1) WRCOG FY 2020/21 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan 2) CVAG FY 2020/21 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on July 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 5H 404 ATTACHMENT 1 Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) Fiscal Year 2020/2021 Local Transportation Funds Program Objectives The Work Plan for FY 2020/2021 is divided into two Program areas: 1) Planning Programs and 2) Regional Transportation Programs. 1. Planning Programs California Air Resources Board South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Southern California Associations of Governments (SCAG) California Association of Councils of Governments (CALCOG) Local Jurisdictions within WRCOG subregion Planning: This program includes staff time to develop and work on ten main projects/program areas. These are listed below and include a brief description. A. Continued development of the new Riverside County Model (RIVCOM) The RIVCOM Update will provide updates on socio-economic forecasts to reflect SCAG's adopted growth forecasts, updates to the roadway network, utilize data from SCAG's most recent Regional Travel Model to ensure consistency, and correct any significant structural issues related to RIVCOM. A large outreach effort will be conducted to all jurisdictions within Riverside County, including Coachella Valley, to ensure inputs from local jurisdictions are reflected in the RIVCOM. B. Support local jurisdictions on 2020 Connect SoCal Plan (SCAG Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy) Staff will continue to provide support to local jurisdictions as SCAG refines socio-economic data (SED) forecasts to incorporate into the Connect SoCal Plan. The assistance provided will be to ensure that input from the WRCOG subregion will be included in the long-range vision plan that aims to balance future mobility and housing needs with economic, environmental and public health goals. The Plan is vital for the subregion as it allows RCTC and its jurisdictions to qualify for federal funding towards transportation projects. Connect SoCal is supported by a combination of transportation and land use strategies that help the region achieve state greenhouse gas emission reduction goals and federal Clean Air Act requirements, preserve open space areas, improve public health and roadway safety, support our vital goods movement industry and utilize resources more efficiently. 405 C. Continue to assist jurisdictions with Senate Bill (SB) 743 Implementation WRCOG conducted a SB 743 Implementation Study that assisted stakeholders to transition from utilizing level of service methodology for mitigation impacts to vehicle miles traveled. WRCOG will continue to assist jurisdictions as VMT implementation progresses in identifying the necessary steps to implementing SB 743 and as jurisdictions begin to receive questions from stakeholders and work through the approval process for a development project with VMT as the transportation analysis metric. D. Research on VMT reduction methods for Western Riverside County WRCOG will conduct due diligence into regional VMT reduction methods for the jurisdictions in Western Riverside County, such as establishing a Housing Trust Fund and an Economic Development Corporation. Establishing a Housing Trust Fund looks into our subregion's ability to expedite affordable housing production by looking for opportunities to provide a dedicated source(s) of revenue which can be allocated to a wide variety of housing activities, such as grant funding for construction or rehabilitation, infrastructure, land acquisition, or impact fees; low -interest construction, acquisition, or gap financing loans; and grants or loans to implement home weatherization programs, support transitional or emergency housing and homeless shelters, or preserve existing multi -family housing. A housing trust can provide a mechanism for local agencies to make ongoing investments in affordable housing using both direct revenues and leveraged matching funds available from State and federal sources, available exclusively for housing trust programs. Establishing an Economic Development Corporation (EDC) for the Western Riverside County would establish a regional program to help in economic development for the entire subregion. The EDC would be able to assist jurisdictions in attracting businesses from outside of the subregion into Western Riverside County. This would provide jurisdictions much needed relief in reducing their overall VMT. E. GIS/Modeling Services WRCOG will conduct due diligence to create a service to provide GIS and transportation modeling services to the jurisdictions of Western Riverside County. This service is meant to provide GIS/modeling capability and products to WRCOG member agencies, to enhance GIS/Transportation at agencies currently managing their own systems, and to provide quick, inexpensive services to members without need for additional staff, consultants, software licensing, hardware needs. Possible services include: General Plan amendments, traffic volume maps, traffic model scenarios for new development, project mapping, demographics, service area analysis, and SB-743 implementation. 406 F. Research on travel and technology and the impact on the transportation system WRCOG will conduct research on -behalf of jurisdictions in Western Riverside County to help prepare and provide information on the various challenges faced in the subregion. Changes in demographics will have an effect on travel conditions. WRCOG will continue to conduct research on travel behavior, travel pattern and automation in order to highlight potential challenges the subregion may face and the opportunities jurisdictions should strategically be in position to leverage. WRCOG will continue to work to ensure this information is disseminated to jurisdictions and stakeholders through its Committee structure and is presented at forums, conferences, and panels where suitable. G. Research, agenda preparation, and staffing for WRCOG Planning Directors Committee The research, agenda preparation, and staffing for the WRCOG Planning Directors Committee will support WRCOG member agencies to obtain information, access to research, and awareness of applicable grant opportunities, as well as foster discussions between WRCOG member jurisdictions regarding the latest challenges and opportunities facing the WRCOG subregion, in order to achieve more cost effective and efficient solutions to planning -related matters on a monthly basis. H. Research, agenda preparation, and staffing for WRCOG Public Works Committee The research, agenda preparation, and staffing for the WRCOG Public Works Committee will support WRCOG member agencies to obtain information, access to research, and awareness of applicable grant opportunities, as well as foster discussions between WRCOG member jurisdictions regarding the latest challenges and opportunities facing the WRCOG subregion, in order to achieve more cost effective and efficient solutions to public works or engineering -related matters on a monthly basis. I. Outreach for WRCOG Programs and activities and engagement with WRCOG members, partner agencies, and stakeholders The outreach for WRCOG Programs and activities and partner agencies will include assisting local jurisdictions and education institutions on the various WRCOG Programs and subregional challenges faced. Staff will continue to provide content for educational outreach on issues faced in the WRCOG subregion and WRCOG Programs through platforms, such as the "WRCOGCAST", "The Briefing" and the "WRCOG Future Forward Series". "The Briefing" and the "WRCOG Future Forward Series" are productions WRCOG initiated in response to the COVID-19 outbreak in order to disseminate information to local jurisdictions and stakeholders with the hopes of providing substantive, meaningful, and up-to-date content. Outreach will continue on the WRCOG Public Service Fellowship, which encourages students to seek careers in public policy and local government by gaining 407 meaningful, hands-on experience at WRCOG member agencies. In addition, staff will continue to promote and attend member jurisdiction/agency events throughout the year. Lastly, staff will conduct outreach to the subregion's legislatures and their staff to provide updates on issues local jurisdictions and agencies are facing, such as housing. J. Staff time for the subregional Climate Action Plan, climate -related hazards and climate adaptation analyses and planning for the WRCOG subregion. The staff time for the subregional Climate Action Plan, climate -related hazards and climate adaptation efforts for the WRCOG subregion will be to continue overseeing studies and planning efforts to identify effects of climate change to the subregion and opportunities to mitigate these effects, particularly as it relates to transportation infrastructure. One specific effort that will be supported by LTF will be to conduct risk assessments on a sample of vulnerable transportation assets in the subregion and identify the needs of disadvantaged or vulnerable communities. This effort expands on the previous development of design guidelines created be the development of design guidelines to create climate reliant transportation infrastructure. These efforts are to assist jurisdictions better plan for project prioritization and investment on the transportation system. Another specific effort that will be supported by LTF will be the development of the subregional Climate Action Plan that will help ensure the WRCOG subregion complies with state legislation and greenhouse gas emission (GHG) targets through collaborative planning. The study will provide different strategies that jurisdictions can implement to reduce GHG emissions and improve overall health in the region. These funds will be used as matching funds to support the development of this guidebook, as funded through SB 1 Planning Funds. 2. Regional Transportation Programs Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Riverside Transit Agency Caltrans SCAG CALCOG This program includes staff time to develop and work on two main projects/program areas. These are listed below and include a brief description. TUMF: This Program includes staff time to administer the TUMF Program, which includes but is not limited to the following: A. Program contract/agreement administration: Review, coordinate, and finalize Reimbursement Agreements with member agencies for funding allocations based on five-year Zone Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). 408 B. Conduct TUMF Nexus Study California Assembly Bill 1600 requires that all local agencies in California establish a nexus or reasonable relationship between the development impact fee's use and the type of project for which the fee is required. In accordance with this requirement, WRCOG plans to conduct an analysis with the TUMF Program to ensure the adequacy of the developer impact fees and the projects included in the TUMF Network. C. Public outreach/information: Prepare the TUMF Annual Report detailing collections for fiscal year and projects being funded with collections. Develop Press Releases for the TUMF Program highlighting major milestones, groundbreakings, ribbon cuttings. Filming of groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings for TUMF funded projects. Develop and purchase of signage for TUMF funded projects. D. TUMF Zone Transportation Improvement Program (TIP): Preparation and approval of five-year Zone TIPs with programmed funding for delivery of TUMF projects. Convene meetings of the Zone at the request of member agencies for funding additions and adjustments. Review funding requests to ensure that allocations are within limits of the Nexus Study. E. Preparation of annual adjustment for construction costs: Per the TUMF Administrative Plan, annual review of the construction cost index adjustment to the TUMF for consideration by the WRCOG Executive Committee. Preparation of the adjustment to the TUMF Network and develop documents for review by the WRCOG Committee structure. If approved by the WRCOG Executive Committee, prepare TUMF Ordinance/Resolution for member agency approval and assist local jurisdictions and stakeholders with fee adjustment implementation. F. Maintain TUMF payment portal: WRCOG is collecting TUMF on behalf of agencies that have approved a TUMF Ordinance Amendment with the option to delegate fee collection responsibility to WRCOG. To provide efficient and effective calculation and collection of TUMF, WRCOG developed a portal for member agency staff to submit calculation requests and for developers to make payments that will require maintenance and revisions. G. Work with developers on credit and reimbursement agreements: Coordinate with member agencies Credit Agreements with developers to ensure that all policies and procedures are in place prior to execution of agreements. If necessary, convene meetings with applicable stakeholders to memorialize eligible expenses, maximum allocations of the Nexus Study and reconciliation of projects costs. 409 H. Review available data for request made my stakeholders regarding TUMF calculations: At the request of a stakeholder, review available data specific to land uses that may generate trips that don't typically fall within the standard TUMF land uses. Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs: This Program includes staff time to administer assist RCTC as it relates transportation planning and air quality programs, which includes but is not limited to the following: a) Participation in TUMF Program tasks as needed to assist RCTC in the implementation of the Regional TUMF Program. b) Participate in evaluation committees as requested; outreach assisting with RCTC's Programs and goals, and other planning related tasks as determined in consultation with the RCTC Executive Director. 410 ATTACHMENT 2 COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS 73-710 Fred Waring Dr., Suite 200, Palm Desert, CA 92260 • (760) 346-1127 • www.cvag.org July 1, 2020 RCTC FINANCE RECEIVED CVAG 07/02/20 Ms. Theresia Trevino Chief Financial Officer Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside County Regional Complex 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92502 Dear Theresia, Invoice: CV21019-20 Re: 2020/21 Local Transportation Funding (LTF) The allocation to the Coachella Valley Association of Governments' (CVAG) Local Transportation Funding (LTF) for fiscal year 2020/21 is $369,000. Attached is an overview of CVAG's LTF Work Plan objectives utilizing this funding. Please consider this letter as an invoice for the funds. Please do not hesitate to call me if you have any questions. Thank you. Sincerely, COACHELLA ALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS y [ CPA Deputy Executive Director attachment c.c. Martin Magana Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance CITY OF BLYTHE • CITY OF CATHEDRAL CITY • CITY OF COACHELLA • CITY OF DESERT HOT SPRINGS • CITY OF INDIAN WELLS CITY OF INDIO • CITY OF LA QUINTA • CITY OF PALM DESERT • CITY Or PALM SPRINGS • CITY OF RANCHO MIRAGE • COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE AGUA CALIENTE BAND OF CAHUILLA I1,1441 CABAZON BAND OF MISSION INDIANS TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 The Work Plan for 2020/21 is separated into nine main program areas: 1) Transportation Department Operations • Transportation Program Administration • Implementation of Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS), Regional Arterial Cost Estimate (RACE) and Active Transportation Program (ATP) • Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Update • Other Transportation Planning • Operations Management and Administration This program area performs primarily administrative functions which consist of general transportation program administrative activities and various transportation planning duties in support of the Transportation Department. Continued implementation of the 2016 TPPS, RACE and ATP Program and implementation of the Valley —wide Signal Synchronization program are primary consideration this fiscal year, as well as an update to the 2016 TPPS, RACE and ATP Program. (Funded from Measure A, TUMF and Active Transportation Program Funds) 2) Project Management and Contract Administration • Financial Cash Flow • Project Status Tracking • Preparation and Monitoring of Reimbursement Agreements Includes staff time to conduct project oversight (design, environmental, construction and close-out), preparation of reimbursement agreements for regional arterial, interchange and bridge projects, review and approval of project billings in accordance with project scope of work and participation in project development team meetings and associated staff reports. (Funded from Measure A, TUMF, LTF and Special Program Funds) 3) CV Link Project Development (Pliased) • Project Development and Monitoring • Cash Flow Tracking • Grant Condition Monitoring Includes staff time to conduct project oversight of consultant services (environmental compliance, right-of-way and phased construction plans); review of project billings; participation in project development team meetings and preparation of associated reports. Finalizing construction plans, specifications and cost estimates and starting construction of the CV Link Project is a primary consideration this fiscal year. 412 (Funded from Riverside County Regional Park and Open Space District Grant, Caltrans Environmental Justice Grant, California Strategic Growth Council Grant, PP&M, LTF, Sentinel Project AQMD Grant, Desert Healthcare District, CMAQ, STIP, ATP and Measure A) 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Programs • Congestion Management Program/System (CMP/CMS) • RCTC Technical Advisory Committee • SB 821 • Coachella Valley Rail Program • Local Streets & Roads Includes staff time to support the Riverside County Congestion Management Program; analysis of traffic patterns through the traffic count program; provide RCTC staff regional transportation project information for the State Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP); support the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee; support efforts for County -wide SB 821 and Local Streets & Roads funding; Coachella Valley Passenger Rail Service Development Plan. (Funded from LTF, STA, Proposition IB [one-time funds] and TUMF) 5) Planning, Programming and Monitoring Program • Regional Transportation Improvement Program/State Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP/STIP) This area includes staff time in support of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP), support in implementation of the CVAG Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS), coordination of updates to the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP), and monitoring and examining impacts of implementing SB 45. TPPS activities support the regional project construction program which includes staff time to develop an annual prioritized list of construction projects and required financial resources. (Funded from PP&M, LTF and Measure A) 6) Miscellaneous Programs • GIS Information Services • Maintain Transportation Model • Regional Arterial Traffic Count Program This area involves support to multiple programs with a focus on key project areas. These areas include staff time and project management to maintain and provide input for GIS Information Services, the countywide transportation demand model, the regional arterial traffic count program, and transportation legislation review and analysis. GIS Information Services includes staff time to provide regional land use information to CVAG jurisdictions, developers, SCAG and Caltrans. The countywide transportation model involves support for the RIVCOM 413 transportation model for forecasting projected transportation system needs to the year 2039. (Funded from Measure A, TUMF, and Special Program Funds) 7) Congestion Management /Air Quality Programs • CM/AQ Programs • Conformance with SIP requirements Involves Transportation Department staff support to CMAQ program areas. Also includes implementation of State Implementation Plan (SIP) conformance to CVAG regional projects. (Funded from CMAQ and Measure A) 8) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program • TUMF Program Administration • TUMF/GIS Interface • TUMF Audits Includes staff time in support of the TUMF program and TUMF/GIS Interface program. TUMF program activities include staff time to update the program, monitor the implementation of the TUMF program in member jurisdictions, to perform annual fiscal reviews of building permits and monthly TUMF collections, to research, analyze and prepare reports for TUMF appeals, to enter TUMF collections in the TUMF data base, to meet with developers on request to review potential TUMF assessments, and to perform special TUMF analysis on request. The TUMF/GIS Interface program requires support for continuing the development of integrating the TUMF collection process with electronic transmission of new development information for land use coverages. Continued coordination with RCTC on TUMF compliance by Coachella Valley jurisdictions. The TUMF program is a primary consideration this fiscal year. (Funded from TUMF) 9) Governmental and Special Projects • Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) The SCAG program includes staff time to coordinate the CVAG sub -region SCAG Program needs, develop annual growth projections, provide input to the Federal and Regional Transportation Improvement Plans (FTIP and RTIP), and assist SCAG with transportation modeling refinements. Additionally, staff performs specific transportation project work for SCAG. (Funded from Special Program Funds) • Special Projects Some proposed projects may involve general fund money or special grants. Any project not already a part of the regular work programs, will be brought through the committee process for approval of the proposed work. (Funded from Special Grant funds) 414 AGENDA ITEM 51 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: August 12, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Martha Masters, Senior Management Analyst Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Years 2020/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plans for the Local Streets and Roads Program BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to approve the Fiscal Years 2020/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Five - Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIPs) for Local Streets and Roads (LSR) as submitted by the participating agencies. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The 2009 Measure A provides local agencies with funding for street maintenance and operations, street repairs, street improvements, and new infrastructure of their local streets and roads systems. As outlined in Ordinance No. 02-001, Measure A funds are allocated within the three geographic areas: Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. LSR receives approximately 29 percent of the Measure A distribution in Western County, 35 percent in Coachella Valley, and 100 percent in Palo Verde Valley. In Western County and Palo Verde Valley, funds are distributed by a formula based on 75 percent of proportionate population from the State Department of Finance and 25 percent of Measure A sales tax revenues generated within each jurisdiction. In Coachella Valley, funds are distributed based on 50 percent of proportionate dwelling units and 50 percent of Measure A revenues within each jurisdiction. Since the commencement of the 2009 Measure A in July 2009 through April 30, 2020, the cities and the county of Riverside have received over $514 million for LSR. Measure A imposes the following requirements on local agencies in order to receive LSR funds: • Participation in the Western County or Coachella Valley Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program, as applicable; • Participation in the Western Riverside County Regional Conservation Authority's Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP), as applicable; • Annual submittal of a 5-Year CIP list of projects; Agenda Item 51 415 • Annual Maintenance of Effort certification; and • Annual Project Status Report for the prior fiscal year CIP. DISCUSSION: On April 1, 2020, staff provided local agencies with revised five-year Measure A LSR revenue projections (Attachment 1) to assist in preparation of the required CIP. These reflect the most recent revenue projections approved by the Commission which established more conservative projections and expectations based on potential COVID-19 impacts. The required plans and supporting documentation have been received from all of the participating Measure A agencies. The plans have been reviewed by staff to ensure compliance with Measure A requirements and confirm CIP Measure A LSR expenditures are consistent with the state's guidelines for gas tax expenditures. Eligibility determinations related to participation in the TUMF and MSHCP programs, as applicable, have also been verified for every local jurisdiction. Staff recommends approval of the participating agency FYs 2020/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Five -Year CIPs. The FY 2020/21 Measure A LSR disbursements to eligible local agencies with a Commission -approved CIP are expected to begin in September 2020. Attachments: 1) Measure A Local Streets and Road Program Allocation (Projection) FY 2020/21 (Revised 3/30/2020) 2) Cities and County FYs 2020/21— 2024/25 CIPs Approved by the Budget and Implementation Committee on July 27, 2020 In Favor: 10 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 51 416 Attachment 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM ALLOCATION (PROJECTION) FY 2020/21 (Revised (3/30/2020) FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 FY 2021/22 FY 2022/23 FY 2023/24 FY 2024/25 Western County Local Streets & Roads BANNING $ 578,000 $ 516,000 $ 521,000 $ 526,000 $ 531,000 $ 536,000 BEAUMONT 922,000 825,000 833,000 841,000 849,000 857,000 CALIMESA 168,000 154,000 156,000 158,000 160,000 162,000 CANYON LAKE 182,000 168,000 170,000 172,000 174,000 176,000 CORONA 4,137,000 3,655,000 3,692,000 3,729,000 3,766,000 3,804,000 EASTVALE 1,325,000 1,187,000 1,199,000 1,211,000 1,223,000 1,235,000 HEMET 1,712,000 1,537,000 1,552,000 1,568,000 1,584,000 1,600,000 JURUPA VALLEY 2,049,000 1,851,000 1,870,000 1,889,000 1,908,000 1,927,000 LAKE ELSINORE 1,329,000 1,172,000 1,184,000 1,196,000 1,208,000 1,220,000 MENIFEE 1,704,000 1,553,000 1,569,000 1,585,000 1,601,000 1,617,000 MORENO VALLEY 3,918,000 3,501,000 3,536,000 3,571,000 3,607,000 3,643,000 MURRIETA 2,376,000 2,180,000 2,202,000 2,224,000 2,246,000 2,268,000 NORCO 658,000 578,000 584,000 590,000 596,000 602,000 PERRIS 1,847,000 1,667,000 1,684,000 1,701,000 1,718,000 1,735,000 RIVERSIDE 7,274,000 6,499,000 6,564,000 6,630,000 6,696,000 6,763,000 SAN JACINTO 855,000 775,000 783,000 791,000 799,000 807,000 TEMECULA 2,961,000 2,783,000 2,811,000 2,839,000 2,867,000 2,896,000 WILDOMAR 627,000 565,000 571,000 577,000 583,000 589,000 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 5,459,000 4,917,000 4,966,000 5,016,000 5,066,000 5,117,000 SUBTOTAL -Western County 40,081,000 36,083,000 36,447,000 36,814,000 37,182,000 37,554,000 Coachella Valley CATHEDRAL CITY COACHELLA DESERT HOT SPRINGS INDIAN WELLS INDIO LA QUINTA' PALM DESERT PALM SPRINGS RANCHO MIRAGE RIVERSIDE COUNTY CVAG' SUBTOTAL -Coachella Valley 1,418,000 579,000 468,000 246,000 1,894,000 1,466,000 2,622,000 2,066,000 890,000 1,740,000 1,233,000 531,000 421,000 230,000 1,681,000 1,299,000 2,391,000 1,918,000 789,000 1,518,000 1,245,000 536,000 425,000 232,000 1,698,000 1,312,000 2,415,000 1,937,000 797,000 1,533,000 1,257,000 541,000 429,000 234,000 1,715,000 1,325,000 2,439,000 1,956,000 805,000 1,548,000 1,270,000 546,000 433,000 236,000 1,732,000 1,338,000 2,463,000 1,976,000 813,000 1,563,000 1,283,000 551,000 437,000 238,000 1,749,000 1,351,000 2,488,000 1,996,000 821,000 1,579,000 13,389,000 12,01 1,000 12,130,000 12,249,000 12,370,000 12,493,000 Palo Verde Valley BLYTHE 721,000 548,000 553,000 559,000 565,000 571,000 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 192,000 148,000 149,000 150,000 152,000 154,000 SUBTOTAL -Palo Verde Valley 913,000 696,000 702,000 709,000 717,000 725,000 TOTAL 2 $ 54,383,000 $ 48,790,000 $ 49,279,000 $ 49,772,000 $ 50,269,000 $ 50,772,000 ' Under an agreement between CVAG and La Quinta, CVAG receives 50% of La Quinta's allocation and La Quinta the remaining 50% until such time La Quinta has reimbursed CVAG for TUMF fees CVAG would have received from La Quinta if La Quinta had joined the TUMF program when the TUMF was established. 2 Administrative costs are allocated in accordance with a cost allocation plan on a quarterly basis. Accordingly, the Measure A allocations to each geographic area by program will be reduced for such quarterly cost allocations. Note: Estimate for Planning Purposes, subject to change and rounding differences. 417 ATTACHMENT 2 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF BANNING 418 This page left intentionally blank. 419 City of Banning Public Works Department April 29, 2020 Martha Masters, Senior Management Analyst Planning and Programming Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Subject: Five -Year (FY 2020/2021 — 2024/2025) Measure "A" Capital Improvement Plan; and FY 2019/2020 Amendment No. 1 Dear Ms. Masters: The City of Banning respectfully submits its Five -Year Measure "A" Capital Improvement Plan for Fiscal Years 2020/2021 — 2024/2025 as approved by the City Council during its regular meeting on April 14, 2019. Also enclosed with this letter you will find the City's MOE Certification Statement, Project Status Report for FY 2019/2020 along with a copy of the adopted Resolution approving the Five -Year Measure "A" CIP Plan. The City of Banning is also requesting an amendment to its FY 2019/2020 Measure A CIP, with the following revisions: • Addition of a new project "12th St: Williams St to George St" to the approved FY 2019/20. • Addition of a new project "14th St: Williams St to George St" to the approved FY 2019/20. • Addition of a new project "Hargrave Street: Fwy 1-10 to Hoffer Street" to the approved FY 2019/20. • Revision to previously approved FY 2019/20 project, "Ramsey & Sunset Imp (Constr.)". This project and budget will be removed from FY 2019/20 and pushed out to FY 2020/21. • Revision to previously approved FY 2019/20 project, "Ramsey Street: 4th St to 12t" St". This project and budget will be removed from FY 2019/20 and pushed out to FY 2020/21. Should you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to call me at avela@banningca.gov or (951) 922-3130. Sincerely, Art Vela, P.E. Director of Public Works 99 E. Ramsey Street • P.O. Box 998 • Banning, CA 92220-0998 • (951) 922-3100 420 Copy: File Enc. Adopted Resolution Five -Year Measure "A" Plan Project Status Report MOE Certification Statement 99 E. Ramsey Street • P.O. Box 998 • Banning, CA 92220-0998 • (951) 922-3100 421 FY 2020/2021 MEASURE A PROGRAM MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the CITY OF BANNING (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Measure "A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $164,325.00, approved by the Commission at its July 11, 2012 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary Local Funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure "A" funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: Apr: 2 cl , 2020 Doug- .chulze,T ity Manager Attest: Secretary 422 This page left intentionally blank. 423 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 2,233,868* FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 578,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (1,275,210) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 1,536,658 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 516,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 2,052,658 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2021-01 Monroe St: 22nd St to Jefferson St AC Overlay/Rehab $ 100,000 $ 100,000 2021-02 Jefferson St: Monroe St to 22nd St AC Overlay/Rehab 90,000 90,000 2021-03 Lincoln St: Sunset Ave to 22nd St AC Overlay 180,000 180,000 2021-04 George St: Hargrave to Hathaway AC Overlay 140,000 140,000 2021-05 Sun Lakes Boulevard Extension: Highland Home Road to Sunset Environmental and 1,000,000 200,000 Avenue Design 2021-06 Ramsey Street: 12th St to 16th St AC Overlay/Rehab 200,000 200,000 2021-07 Ramsey & Sunset Imp. (Construction) Pavement Rehab 175,000 175,000 2021-08 Ramsey St: 4th St to 12th St AC Overlay/Rehab 300,000 300,000 TOTAL $ 2,185,000 $ 1,385,000 *Fund balance exceeds three years of allocation due to multi -year project: Sun Lakes Boulevard Extension. FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 424 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 667,658 521,000 1,188,658 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022-01 City-wide Slurry Seal Slurry Seal $ 180,000 $ 180,000 2022-02 First St: Livington St to Williams St AC Overlay 85,000 85,000 2022-03 Second St: Hays St to Williams St AC Overlay 13,000 13,000 2022-04 Fourth St: Livington St to George AC Overlay 85,000 85,000 2022-05 Omar Street & Ramsey St Int AC Overlay/Rehab 50,000 50,000 Improvement 2022-06 Ramsey Street: 16th St to 22nd St AC Overlay/Rehab $ 225,000 $ 225,000 TOTAL $ 638,000 $ 638,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 425 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 550,658 526,000 1,076,658 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 Ramsey Street: 22nd St to Sunset Avenue AC Overlay/Rehab $ 800,000 $ 800,000 2023-02 City-wide Slurry Seal Slurry Seal 200,000 200,000 TOTAL $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 426 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 76,658 531,000 607,658 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 Barbour St: San Gorgonio Ave to Hargrave AC Overlay/Rehab 500,000 500,000 2024-01 TOTAL $ 500,000 $ 500,000 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 427 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 107,658 536,000 643,658 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 City-wide Slurry Seal Slurry Seal $ 400,000 $ 400,000 2025-02 Florida Street: Barbour St to Lincoln St AC Overlay/Rehab 100,000 100,000 2025-03 Hermosa St: Barbour St to Lincoln AC Overlay/Rehab 100,000 100,000 TOTAL $ 600,000 $ 600,000 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 428 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: BANNING Prepared by: Kevin Sin Phone #: 951-922-3140 Date: 4/7/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 1 2 3 4 - Al 5 - Al 6 7 8 9 10 - Al Cottonwood Rd: 8th St to l2th St George St: 8th St to 12th St 10th St: Williams St to George St l2th St: Williams to George St l4th St: Williams to George St Ramsey & Sunset Imp. (Design; construction in FY 2020/211 Indian School Lane: 8th St to San Gorgonio Ave Lincoln Street: San Gorgonio Ave to Hargrave St City-wide Slurry Seal Hargrave Street: Fwy 110 to Hoffer Street AC Overlay AC Overlay AC Overlay AC Overlay AC Overlay Pavement Rehab AC Overlay AC Overlay Slurry Seal AC Overlay/Rehab $ 80,000 80,000 80,000 100,000 100,000 45,210 180,000 200,000 110,000 650,000 $ 80,000 80,000 80,000 100,000 100,000 45,210 180,000 200,000 110,000 300,000 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 6/1/2020 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 4/30/2020 10/15/2020 under construction under construction under construction under construction under construction under design under construction under construction under construction under construction TOTAL $ 1,625,210 $ 1,275,210 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 429 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF BEAUMONT This page left intentionally blank. 431 BEAUMONT �.�hXlla April 22, 2020 Attn: Lorelle Moe -Luna, Senior Management Analyst Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 CITY OF BEAUMONT 550 E. 6th Street, Beaumont, CA 92223 Phone (951) 769-8520 Fax (951) 769-8526 www.Beaumont-Ca.gov Subject: City of Beaumont Measure "A" Capital Improvement Plan Dear Ms. Moe -Luna, The City, hereby, submits the below listed documents for your consideration and respectfully request that the Riverside County Transportation Commission accept and approve the City's Measure "A" Five -Year CIP and find the City eligible to continue to receive its fair share of Measure "A" revenues. • Submittal Letter on Agency Letterhead • Five -Year CIP for FYs 2020-2024 and Project Status Report for FY 2019 • MOE Certification Statement Should you have any questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to call me at (951)769- 8520. Thank you, City of Beaumont Jeff Hart City of Beaumont Public Works Director CC: Todd Parton, City Manager Kristine Day, Assistant City Manager Jeff Mohlenkamp, Finance Director Incorporated November 18, 1912 432 FY2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Beaumont (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $515,908 approved by the Commission at its November 8, 2017 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or Toss of Measure Afunds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: / 0..e2c) , 2020 CITY MANAGER ATTEST: 433 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: BEAUMONT Prepared by: Laurie Miller Phone #: 951-769-8520 Date: April 7,2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 1,542,018 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 922,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (1,534,000) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 930,018 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 825,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 1,755,018 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY20 21 (2020-001) Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY20 21(2020-002) Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY19-20 (No.2019-001) Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY19-20 (No.2019-002) Citywide Slurry Seal Street Rehab Citywide Slurry Seal Street Rehab $ 830,000 700,000 1,000,000 800,000 $ 400,000 300,000 $ 200,000 $ 200,000 2021-01 2021-02 2021 03 2021 04 TOTAL $ 3,330,000 $ 1,100,000 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 434 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: BEAUMONT Prepared by: Laurie Miller Phone #: 951-769-8520 Date: April 7,2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 655,018 833,000 1,488,018 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022 Ol Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY21-22 (2021 001) Citywide y Slurry Seal $ 830,000 $ 400,000 2022-02 Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY21-22 Street Rehab 700,000 400,000 (2021-002) TOTAL $ 1,530,000 $ 800,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 435 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: BEAUMONT Prepared by: Laurie Miller Phone #: 951-769-8520 Date: April 7,2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 688,018 841,000 1,529,018 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023 Ol Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY22-23 (2022 001) Citywide Y Slurry Seal $ 590,000 $ 160,000 2023 02 Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY22-23 (2022-002) Street Rehab 460,000 160,000 2023-03 WRCOG SETTLEMENT PAYMENT 60% to WRCOG 504,600 504,600 TOTAL $ 1,554,600 $ 824,600 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 436 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: BEAUMONT Prepared by: Laurie Miller Phone #: 951-769-8520 Date: April 7,2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 704,418 849,000 1,553,418 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY23 24 (2023-001) Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY23-24 (2023-002) WRCOG SETTLEMENT PAYMENT Citywide slurry seal Street Rehab 60% to WRCOG $ 590,000 460,000 509,400 $ 160,000 160,000 509,400 2024-01 2024-02 2024-03 TOTAL $ 1,559,400 $ 829,400 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 437 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: BEAUMONT Prepared by: Laurie Miller Phone #: 951-769-8520 Date: April 7,2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 724,018 857,000 1,581,018 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY24-25 (2024- 001) Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY24-25 (2024-002) WRCOG SETTLEMENT PAYMENT Citywide slurryseal y Street Rehab 60% to WRCOG $ 590,000 460,000 514,200 $ 160,000 160,000 514,200 2025 Ol 2025-02 2025-03 TOTAL $ 1,564,200 $ 834,200 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 438 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: Prepared by: Phone #: Date: BEAUMONT Laurie Miller 951-769-8520 April 7,2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020 Ol Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY19- 20 (No. 2019 001) Citywide SlurrySeal Y $ 1,000,000 $ 200,000 6/30/2021 AWARDED 3/3/2020 2020 02 Annual Citywide Street Rehab FY19-20 (No. 2019-002) Street Rehab $ 800,000 $ 300,000 6/30/2021 AWARDED 3/3/2020 2020-03 Annual Citywide Slurry Seal FY18 19 (2018-001) Citywide SlurrySeal y $ 600,000 $ 300,000 7/31/2020 AWARDED 3/3/2020 2020-04 Beaumont Ave Reconstruction (2018-004) Street Rehab $ 1,953,000 $ 734,000 7/31/2020 AWARDED 3/3/2020 TOTAL $ 4,353,000 $ 1,534,000 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 439 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF BLYTHE 440 This page left intentionally blank. 441 CITY OF BLYTHE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 440 SOUTH MAIN STREET BLYTHE, CALIFORNIA 92225-271 7 PHONE (760) 922-6611 FAX (760) 922-0278 May 4, 2020 Martha Masters Senior Management Analyst 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd. Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Re: City of Blythe Measure A Capital Improvement Plan, FYs 2020/21-2024/2025 Dear Ms. Masters, Enclosed please find the City of Blythe's Measure A Local Streets and Roads Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for Fiscal Years 2020/21-2024/2025, Measure A Project Status Report FY 2019-2020, Maintenance of Effort Certificate, Measure A Projections, and the City of Blythe — Measure A CIP 2020 — 2025. Sincerely, .7etA4)-1Q D4 Daniel Ojeda, P.E. Interim Director of Public Works/City Engineer City of Blythe, CA 442 FY 2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Blythe (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $170,000, approved by the Commission at its April 2016 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or Toss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: Qt1/4,‘,\ , 2020 ATTEST: CITY MANAGER MaddLy etit'fr"-) SECRETARY 443 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 1,81 1,023 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 721,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (787,242) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 1,744,781 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 548,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 2,292,781 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2021-01 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction -Annual Improvements $ 20,000 $ 20,000 2021-02 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Material (Annual Stock) Pot hole repairs/street maintenance 125,000 125,000 2021-03 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive maintenance 150,000 150,000 2021-04 Wells Street/ Willow Street Improvements Pavement Rehabilitation 165,000 54,000 Acacia Street from Hobsonway to Barnard Major reconstruction, AC 2021-05 St pavement, base and drainage 480,000 480,000 2021 06 Lovekin from Hobsonway to Barnard, and Design 125,000 125,000 Barnard to Main 2021-07 Hobsonway from Sparkling Lagoon to Pavement Reconstruction 625,000 300,000 Florence Blvd 2021-08 Outside Equipment Rental (Crack Sealer) Preventive maintenance 15,000 15,000 2021-09 PW Streets & Road Maintenance Costs Preventive maintenance 205,000 205,000 2021-10 Administrative Overhead Administrative Overhead 43,840 43,840 TOTAL $ 1,953,840 $ 1,517,840 Estimated FY2019/20 STIP Trade Balance (From 2018 STIP) : $ 1 1 1,000 FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses : $ Estimated Prior Year STIP Trade Funds Balance : $ 1 1 1,000 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost STIP Trade Funds 2020/21 Wells Street/ Willow Street Improvements AC Thick Layer Overlay- Construction $ 165,000 $ 1 1 1,000 2021-11 TOTAL $ 165,000 $ 111,000 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 444 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 774,941 Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: 553,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 1,327,941 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022-01 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction - Annual Improvements $ 10,000 $ 10,000 2022-02 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Material (Annual Stock) Pot hole repairs/street maintenance 100,000 100,000 2022-03 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive maintenance 150,000 150,000 2022-04 Lovekin from Hobsonway to Barnard, and Barnard to Main Major Reconstruction 550,000 200,000 2022-05 Administrative Overhead Administrative Overhead 44,240 44,240 2022-06 Outside Equipment Rental (Crack Sealer) Preventive maintenance 15,000 15,000 2022-07 PW Streets & Road Maintenance Costs Preventive maintenance 205,000 205,000 TOTAL $ 1,074,240 $ 724,240 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 445 mr MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 603,701 Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: 559,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 1,162,701 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction - Annual Improvements $ 10,000 $ 10,000 2023-02 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Material (Annual Stock) Pot hole repairs/street maintenance 100,000 100,000 2023-04 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive maintenance 150,000 150,000 2023-05 Administrative Overhead Administrative Overhead 44,720 44,720 2023-06 Outside Equipment Rental (Crack Sealer) Preventive maintenance 15,000 15,000 2023-07 PW Streets & Road Maintenance Costs Preventive maintenance 205,000 205,000 2023-08 Lovekin from Hobsonway to Barnard, and Barnard to Main Major Reconstruction 550,000 350,000 TOTAL $ 1,074,720 $ 874,720 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 446 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 287,981 Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: 565,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 852,981 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction - Annual Improvements $ 10,000 $ 10,000 2024-02 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Material (Annual Pot hole repairs/street maintenance 100,000 100,000 Stock) 2024-03 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive maintenance 150,000 150,000 2024-04 Traffic Signal Rehabilitation (various locations) Camera traffic detection system 50,000 25,000 2024-05 San Luis Way from Barnard St. to Wisconsin St. AC pavement, thick overlay 296,000 296,000 2024-06 Administrative Overhead Administrative Overhead 45,200 45,200 2024-07 PW Streets & Road Maintenance Costs Preventive maintenance 205,000 205,000 2024-08 Outside Equipment Rental (Crack Sealer) Preventive maintenance 15,000 15,000 TOTAL $ 871,200 $ 846,200 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 447 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 6,781 571,000 577,781 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction - Annual Improvements $ 10,000 $ 10,000 2025-02 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Material (Annual Stock) Pot hole repairs/street maintenance 100,000 100,000 2025-03 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive maintenance 150,000 150,000 2025-04 Outside Equipment Rental (Crack Sealer) Preventive maintenance 15,000 15,000 2025-05 PW Streets & Road Maintenance Costs Preventive maintenance 205,000 205,000 2025-06 Administrative Overhead Administrative Overhead 45,680 45,680 TOTAL $ 525,680 $ 525,680 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 448 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: BLYTHE Prepared by: Daniel Ojeda Phone #: (760) 922-6611 Date: 4/22/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 1 Wheelchair Ramps (ADA) Construction $ 20,000 $ 12,850 Jun-20 Completed 2 Asphalt Emulsion Oil/Base Preventive Maint 125,000 44,824 Jun-20 Annual Improvements Material (Annual Stock) 3 Fog, Chip & Slurry Seal Preventive Maint 150,000 - Jun-20 Annual Improvements 4 Main Street from 14th Ave to Pavement Rehabilitation 1,153,500 427,518 Jun-20 Completed Chanslorway 5 Outside Equipmen Rental Preventive Maint 15,000 - Jun-20 Annual 6 PW Streets & Road Maint Cost Preventive Maint 205,000 205,000 Jun-20 Annual 7 Lovekin/Chanslorway Loan Debt Payment 39,370 39,370 Jun-20 Completed Advance Payment 8 Wells Street/Willow Street Imp Pavement Rehabilitation 165,000 - Jun-21 Construction Moved to 20-21 9 Administrative Overhead Admin. Overhead 57,680 57,680 Jun-20 Annual Admin 10 Storm Drain Pumps Preventive Maint 56,000 - Project will not be completed TOTAL $ 1,986,550 $ 787,242 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 449 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF CALIMESA This page left intentionally blank. 451 City of Calimesa April 29, 2020 Martha Masters Senior Management Analyst, Planning and Programming Planning and Programming 4080 Lemon St., 3rd Floor Riverside, Ca 92501 Re: City of Calimesa Measure A Capital Improvement Plan for Fiscal Years 2021-2025 Dear Ms. Masters: Enclosed please find the City of Calimesa Measure A Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for Fiscal Years 2021-2025, Maintenance of Effort Certification for Fiscal Year 2020-21 and the Project Status Report for Fiscal Year 2019-20. Please let me know if you should have any questions. Sincer L Bonnie Johnsen City Manager 908 Park Avenue • Calimesa, California 92320 • (909) 795-9801 452 FY2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Calimesa (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $2,401, approved by the Commission at its September 14, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five -Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: April 29, 2020 ATTEST: ` � 1 ELENE GERDES"CITY CLERK 453 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 674,319* FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 168,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (99,062) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 743,257 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 154,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 897,257 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 Indirect Costs - Administration Brady Lane Pavement Rehab Ave L to Myrtlewood County Line Rd - 3rd St to California St County Line Rd - California St to Bryant St Singleton Road Pavement and Striping: Singleton Canyon to Calimesa Blvd. California St County Line Rd to Myrtlewood Indirect Costs R & R Pavement Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab and Striping Pavement Rehab $ 12,320 142,650 130,000 65,000 429,300 120,000 $ 12,320 142,650 130,000 65,000 404,300 120,000 2021-01 2021-02 2021-03 2021-04 2021 05 2021-06 TOTAL $ 899,270 $ 874,270 *Fund balance exceeds three years of allocation due to County Line Road Paving project being delayed to fiscal year 2020, and Calimesa Avenue L Slurry and Brady Lane Rehabilitation projects not begin completed in fiscal year 2020. FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 454 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 22,987 156,000 178,987 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022-01 Indirect Costs - Overhead Indirect Costs $ 12,480 $ 12,480 2022-02 Citywide Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab. 150,000 150,000 TOTAL $ 162,480 $ 162,480 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 455 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 16,507 158,000 174,507 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 Indirect Costs - Overhead Indirect Costs $ 12,640 $ 12,640 2023-02 Citywide Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab. 150,000 150,000 TOTAL $ 162,640 $ 162,640 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 456 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 11,867 Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: 160,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 171,867 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 Indirect Costs - Overhead Indirect Costs $ 12,800 $ 12,800 2024-02 Citywde Pavement Rehab. Pavement Rehab. 150,000 150,000 TOTAL $ 162,800 $ 162,800 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 457 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 9,067 Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: 162,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 171,067 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 Indirect Costs - Overhead Indirect Costs $ 12,960 $ 12,960 2025-02 Citywide Pavement Rehab. Pavement Rehab. 150,000 150,000 TOTAL $ 162,960 $ 162,960 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 458 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: CALIMESA Prepared by: Bonnie Johnson Phone #: (909)795-9801 Date: 4/29/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-01 2020-02 2020-03135,000 2020-04 2020-06 2020-07 2020-08 Indirect Costs - Administration Brady Lane Pavement Rehab Ave L to Myrtlewood County Line Rd 3rd St to California Stproject) County Line Rd California St to Bryant St Avenue L Slurry Seal Singleton Road Pavement and Striping: Singleton Canyon to Calimesa Blvd. San Timoteo Canyon Road Emergency Repair Indirect Costs R & R Pavement Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab Pavement Rehab and Striping Pavement Rehab and Embankment work $ 14,560 152,650 70,000 3,005 434,300 57,700 $ 13,440 10,000 5,000 5,000 3,005 5,000 57,617 6/30/2020 10/30/2020 12/31 /2020 12/31/2020 9/4/2019 12/31/2020 3/31/2020 completed preparing bid docs PS&E (part of a bigger PS&E (part of a bigger project) completed prepraing bid docs completed TOTAL $ 867,215 $ 99,062 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 459 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF CANYON LAKE This page left intentionally blank. 461 CITY OF CANYON BRAD BROPHY, CITY ENGINEER April 20, 2020 Martha Masters Senior Management Analyst Riverside County Transportation Commission P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 Re: Measure "A" Local Streets and Roads CIP FY 2019/20 — 2024/25 Annual Reports The City of Canyon Lake is providing the following Measure A documentation per your request: 1. City of Canyon Lake Five Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) FY 2020/21 — 2024/25; 2. Project Status Report for FY 2019/20 CIP Projects; and 3. Maintenance of Effort (MOE) Signed Certification. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or require additional information. Sincerely, Brad Brophy City Engineer CC: Chris Mann, City Manager Terry Shea, Finance Director CITY OF CANYON LAKE 31516 Railroad Canyon Road, Canyon Lake, CA 92587 TEL.: (951) 244--2955 462 FY 2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Canyon Lake (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $28,873, approved by the Commission at its July 13, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary Iocalfunds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or Toss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: April 20, 2020 CITY MANAGER ATTEST: CITY CLERK 463 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 425,139 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 182,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (46,474) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 560,665 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 168,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 728,665 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 Catch Basin Improvements (Railroad Canyon Road) Block Wall Improvements (Railroad Canyon Road) Storm Drain Improvements Pedestrian Improvements $ 50,000 200,000 $ 50,000 100,000 2021 Ol 2021 02 TOTAL $ 250,000 $ 150,000 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 464 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 578,665 Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: 170,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 748,665 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 Sorrel Lane and Blackhorse Drive Pavement Rehabilitation Lighting Improvements (Railroad Canyon Road) Pavement Rehabilitation Safety Improvements $ 100,000 100,000 $ 100,000 100,000 2022-01 2022-02 TOTAL $ 200,000 $ 200,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 465 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 548,665 Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: 172,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 720,665 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 Railroad Canyon Road Pavement Rehabilitation (between City Limits) Pavement Rehabilitation $ 500,000 $ 500,000 2023 O1 TOTAL $ 500,000 $ 500,000 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 466 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 220,665 174,000 394,665 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 Pedestrian Improvements (Railroad Canyon Road) Pedestrian Improvements $ 100,000 $ 100,000 2024 Ol TOTAL $ 100,000 $ 100,000 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 467 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 294,665 176,000 470,665 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 Miscellaneous Pavement Repairs (Railroad Canyon Road) Pavement Rehabilitation $ 125,000 $ 125,000 2025-01 TOTAL $ 125,000 $ 125,000 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 468 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: CANYON LAKE Prepared by: B. BROPHY & T. SHEA Phone #: 951-943-6504 Date: 4/22/2020 Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est Estimated/ Actual Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost thru 6/30/2020) Completion Status 1 Debt Service Measure A Loan Debt Service $ 19,290 $ 19,290 10/31/19 Completed 2 Debt Service County Debt Service 27,184 27,184 09/30/19 Completed 3 Railroad Canyon Road Pavement Rehab, Signal Maintenance 120,000 - - Ongoing TOTAL $ 166,474 $ 46,474 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 469 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF CATHEDRAL CITY 470 This page left intentionally blank. 471 itt April 24, 2020 Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Attention: Martha Masters, Senior Management Analyst, Planning and Programming P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Re: MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS REVENUE PROJECTIONS, MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT (MOE) CERTIFICATION, and FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANS (FY 2020/21- 2024/25) Dear Ms. Martha Masters: The City of Cathedral City is pleased to submit documentation in support of the above referenced request. Please let me know if you need additional information. Sincerely, Vince t ope , M 4 Senior Analyst Engineering Division 760-770-0349 68-700 AVENIDA LALO GUERRERO • CATHEDRAL CITY, CA 92234 • 760/770-0360 • FAX: 760/202-1460 472 FY 2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Cathedral City (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $391,688, approved by the Commission at its September 14, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: , 2020 CITY MANAGER ATTEST: 3 Q,ALuo 6 SECRE 473 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ (39,035) FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 1,418,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (1,348,051) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 30,914 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 1,233,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 1,263,914 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2021-01 City -Wide Maintenance and Operations City wide maintenance operations including pavement, medians, street light energy, traffic signals; transportation and traffic planning activities; pavement management planning; street design and engineering activities. $ 1,134,360 $ 1,134,360 2021-02 Measure A Administrative Costs Administration 98,640 98,640 TOTAL $ 1,233,000 $ 1,233,000 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 474 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 30,914 Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: 1,245,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 1,275,914 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022-01 City -Wide Maintenance and Operations City wide maintenance operations including pavement, medians, street light energy, traffic signals; transportation and traffic planning activities; pavement management planning; street design and engineering activities. $ 1,145,400 $ 1,145,400 2022-02 Measure A Administrative Costs Administration 99,600 99,600 TOTAL $ 1,245,000 $ 1,245,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 475 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 30,914 Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: 1,257,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 1,287,914 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 City -Wide Maintenance and Operations City wide maintenance operations including pavement, medians, street light energy, traffic signals; transportation and traffic planning activities; pavement management planning; street design and engineering activities. $ 1,156,440 $ 1,156,440 2023-02 Measure A Administrative Costs Administration 100,560 100,560 TOTAL $ 1,257,000 $ 1,257,000 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 476 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 30,914 Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: 1,270,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 1,300,914 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 City -Wide Maintenance and Operations City wide maintenance operations including pavement, medians, street light energy, traffic signals; transportation and traffic planning activities; pavement management planning; street design and engineering activities. $ 1,168,400 $ 1,168,400 2024-02 Measure A Administrative Costs Administration 101,600 101,600 TOTAL $ 1,270,000 $ 1,270,000 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 477 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 30,914 1,283,000 1,313,914 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 City -Wide Maintenance and Operations City wide maintenance operations including pavement, medians, street light energy, traffic signals; transportation and traffic planning activities; pavement management planning; street design and engineering activities. $ 1,180,360 $ 1,180,360 2025-02 Measure A Administrative Costs Administration 102,640 102,640 TOTAL $ 1,283,000 $ 1,283,000 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 478 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: CATHEDRAL CITY Prepared by: Vincent Lopez Phone #: 760-770-0349 Date: 4/20/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 1 2 City-wide Maintenance and Operations Measure A Administrative Costs City-wide street maintenance Administration TOTAL $ 1,304,560 1 13,440 $ 1,418,000 $ 1,234,611 113,440 $ 1,348,051 6/30/2020 6/30/2020 Ongoing Ongoing Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 479 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF COACHELLA This page left intentionally blank. 481 April 22, 2020 Attn: Martha Masters Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street 3`d Floor PO Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Re: City of Coachella's Measure A Expenditure Plan FY 2020/21 — FY 2024/25 Dear Ms. Masters: Please find enclosed the Fiscal Year 2020/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Expenditure Plan for the City of Coachella. Also enclosed are the FY 19/20 Project Status Report and the City's MOE Certification Statement for FY 20/21. Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact myself Gabor Pakozdi, P.E., City Engineer at Gpakozdi@coachella.org or Lynn Germain lgetuiiain@coachella.org (760) 398-5744. Thai you, ynn Germain Senior Management Analyst City of Coachella 760-398-5744 482 FY2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Coachella (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $92,205, approved by the Commission at its September 14, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: }�Qtri L 2-L , 2020 ATTEST: SECRETARY 483 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 868,875 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 579,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (1,048,000) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 399,875 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 531,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 930,875 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021-01 2021 02 2021-03 ST-1 16 Ave 52 & Ave 54 Road Reconstruction ST-1 19 La Ponderosa & ST-88 Street Resurfacing, Phase 15 ST-129 Avenue 50 & Calhoun Avenue 52 and Avenue 54 Street Reconstruction. The existing pavement requires reconstruction from Harrison Street to Grapefruit Blvd. The project will improve street surface The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the installation of handicap ramps as required. The street pavements are identified from the Pavement Management Update. TOTAL 1,300,000 600,000 400,000 $ 2,300,000 526,000 285,875 119,000 $ 930,875 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 484 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 536,000 536,000 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the 2022-01 ST-105 Street Pavement Rehabilitation Phase 17 installation of handicap ramps as required. The street pavements are identified from the Pavement $ 536,000 $ 536,000 Management Update. TOTAL $ 536,000 $ 536,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 485 mr MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 541,000 541,000 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the 2023-01 ST-113 Street Pavement Rehabilitation Phase 18 installation of handicap ramps as required. The street pavements are identified from the Pavement $ 541,000 $ 541,000 Management Update. TOTAL $ 541,000 $ 541,000 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 486 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 546,000 546,000 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 ST-1 18 Street Pavement Rehabilitation The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the installation of handicap ramps as 2024-01 Phase 19 required. The street pavements are identified from the Pavement $ 546,000 $ 546,000 Management Update. TOTAL $ 546,000 $ 546,000 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 487 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 551,000 551,000 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the 2025-01 ST-128 Street Pavement Rehabilitation Phase 20 installation of handicap ramps as required. The street pavements are identified from the Pavement $ 551,000 $ 551,000 Management Update. TOTAL $ 551,000 $ 551,000 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 488 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: COACHELLA Prepared by: Gabor Pakozdi Phone #: 760-398-5744 Date: 5/11/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 14 Locations, Bike Lanes, Crosswalks, Pathways for Estimated June 1 ST-100 Caltrans ATP 2 Pedestrians, Sidewalks, and Asphalt Work. $ 2,900,000 $ 482,000 of 2020 In Construction Avenue 52 and Avenue 54 Street Reconstruction. ST-116 Ave 52 & Ave 54 The existing pavement Estimated June 2 Road Reconstruction requires reconstruction from Harrison Street to 1,300,000 526,000 of 2021 In Construction Grapefruit Blvd. The project will improve street surface, full width of the roadway and the In Design with 3 ST-88 Street Resurfacing, Phase 15 installation of handicap ramps as required. The street pavements are identified from the 102,000 Estimated December 2021 project ST-119 Will combine project in FY 20/21 Pavement Management Update. In Design with 4 ST-119 La Ponderosa The project will improve street surface 600,000 40,000 Estimated December 2021 project ST-88 Will combine projects in FY 20/21 TOTAL $ 4,902,000 $ 1,048,000 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 489 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF CORONA This page left intentionally blank. 491 ❑acu3irantelope ID: BiF }FA-71F2-9B-Br-08-4F47EB8ABFB (951 a 736-2266 (951) 279-3E27 FAX Tnm_#{oper@corona ca. gow May 25, 2020 PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 400 SOUTH VICENTIA AVENUE, P.O. BOX 940, CORONA, CALIF L4 92B79 4a CITY HALL - ON LINE ALL THE TIME (htpJ/ ww.disrcnrercorona.com) Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Manager Riverside County Transportation Commission 4000 Lemon Street; 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92502-2209 SUBJECT: MEASURE A FIVE-YEAR PLAN, MOE CERTIFICATION STATEMENT, AND PROJECT STATUS REPORT Ms. Medina: The fallowing documents are enclosed for your review: + Measure Aproposed Five -Year Capital improvements Plan + Project Status Report for current Fiscal Year 2019120 + Maintenance of Effort{MOE) signed certification statement ▪ Measure A Annual Disbursement Projects received at the City The City's minimum MOE is set at 52,208,200; however, as of June 30, 2024, the City estimates to spend $1,457,304 from Measure A and 536,580,083 from other funds to support Measure A project expenditures_ The document supporting the MOE calculations can be found attached. entitled "FY 2019f20 Construction and Maintenance Expenditures." The Measure A proposed FY 20201 through 2024,25 Capital improvement Plan was presented to our City Council for review at the Budget Workshop on May 2., 2024 and for adoption at the regularly scheduled City Cuuncil Meeting on June 3, 2024_ If you have any questions please contact Kirn Sitton, Acting Finance Director at (951) 279-3532. Sincerely, Uu.o.r3Rrwa try. tea, .1.frur C#, P_E. Acting Public Works Director Attachments c: Jennifer Schaefer, Finance Manager Luis Navarro. Financial Analyst 492 DccuSig^. Envelope : D: E 5E FA 71 F2-18N-P 4E-4F47EBeBABFa FY 2020/21 roAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION' STA TEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies far the City of Corona (the "Agency') that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-00 f of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year mount of S2,208,200 approved by the Commission at its July 13, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shal[ not use such funds to replace discretionary .local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby ackno.;:ledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such locale expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure A funds_ Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capita[ Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County. Transportation Commission. Dated: June 1, 2020 Jacob Ellis, City Manager ATTEST= t:s W Yis City Clerk,. City of Corona 493 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 15,018,317 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 4,137,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (791,351) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 18,363,966 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 3,655,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 22,018,966 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2021-01 Butterfield Drive Road Relocation Street Rehabilitation $ 1,150,000 $ 1,150,000 2021-02 Citywide Traffic Signs Traffic Signs 20,000 - 2021-03 East Grand Boulevard Storm Drain Storm Drains 100,000 - 2021-04 Foothill Parkway Westerly Extension Street Rehabilitation 2,000,000 2,000,000 2021-05 Household Waste Collection Facility Street Improvements Street Rehabilitation 200,000 - 2021-06 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation Annual Street Rehabilitation 2,800,000 1,000,000 2021-07 Major Streets Pavement Rehabilitation Annual Street Rehabilitation 1,200,000 - 2021-08 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Traffic Signal Upgrade 210,000 - 2021-09 Ontario Avenue Widening Street Widening 500,000 500,000 2021-10 Oak Avenue Street Widening West Side of Oak Ave Street Widening - - 2021-11 Pavement Maintenance and Resurfacing Annual Street Maintenance 300,000 150,000 2021-12 Pavement Management Study Street Study 10,000 10,000 2021-13 Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter Install Annual Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter Install 600,000 300,000 2021-14 Striping Rehabilitation Annual Striping Rehabilitation 325,000 325,000 2021-15 Traffic Signals Lighting Upgrade Annual Traffic Signal Light Upgrade 150,000 150,000 2021-16 West Rincon Street Improvements Street Improvement from Alcoa Cir. To Brigeport Rd to Millbrook 500,000 250,000 Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 15,902 15,902 TOTAL $ 10,080,902 $ 5,850,902 FY 2020-21 Pagl4Df 9 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 16,168,064 Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: 3,692,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 19,860,064 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2022-01 Citywide Traffic Signs Traffic Signs 15,000 - 2022-02 Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRA) - SR-91 Corridor Projects Major Street Improvement 1,000,000 500,000 2022-03 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation Annual Street Pavement Rehabilitation 1,000,000 1,000,000 2022-04 Magnolia Avenue Widening Street Widening 700,000 600,000 2022-05 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Traffic Signal Upgrade 200,000 - 2022-06 Oak Avenue Street Widening West Side of Oak Ave Street Widening 750,000 750,000 2022-07 Pavement Maintenance and Resurfacing Annual Pavement Maintenance 150,000 150,000 2022-08 Pavement Management Study Pavement Management Study 50,000 50,000 2022-09 Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter Install Annual Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter Install 600,000 300,000 2022-10 Striping Rehabilitation Annual Striping Rehabilition 325,000 175,000 Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 16,379 16,379 TOTAL $ 4,806,379 $ 3,541,379 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 9 495 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 16,318,685 Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: 3,729,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 20,047,685 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 Citywide Traffic Signs Traffic Signs 15,000 - 2023-02 Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRA) - SR-91 Corridor Projects Major Street Improvements 1,000,000 500,000 2023-03 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation Annual Street Pavement Rehab 1,000,000 1,000,000 2023-04 Magnolia Avenue Widening Street Widening 3,000,000 1,000,000 2023-05 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Traffic Signal Maint 200,000 - 2023-06 Pavement Maintenance and Resurfacing Annual Pavement Maintenance 150,000 150,000 2023-07 Pavement Management Study Pavement Study 10,000 10,000 2023-08 Striping Rehabilitation Annual Striping Rehabilitaion 325,000 175,000 Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 16,870 16,870 TOTAL $ 5,716,870 $ 2,851,870 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 9 496 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 17,195,815 Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: 3,766,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 20,961,815 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 Citywide Traffic Signs Traffic Signs 15,000 - 2024-02 Magnolia Avenue Widening Street Widening 700,000 600,000 2024-03 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Traffic Signal Maint 200,000 - 2024-04 Pavement Management Study Pavement Study 10,000 10,000 Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 17,377 17,377 TOTAL $ 942,377 $ 627,377 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 9 497 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 20,334,438 Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: 3,804,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 24,138,438 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Traffic Signal Maint 200,000 - 2025-01 Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 17,898 17,898 TOTAL $ 217,898 $ 17,898 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 9 498 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: CORONA Prepared by: Luis Navarro Phone #: (951) 817-5742 Date: 4/24/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-03 Auto Center Drive/Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad Grade Separation Construction of a grade separation (bridge) over the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad tracks at Auto Center Drive to eliminate the current at -grade crossing. Street Improvement 4,892,580 289,449 8/1/2020 Close out 2020-04 Bridge Evaluation Maintenance on bridges throughout the City as recommended by the State of California Department of Transportation. Bridge Maintenance 565,675 172,000 On -going On -going 2020-06 Changeable Traffic Message Sign Replacement Replacement of four (4) obsolete traffic message sign trailers. Sign Replacement 32,395 - 7/2021 On -going 2020-08 Citywide Benchmark Update Update of Citywide benchmarks and adjustments to NAD 83. Benchmark Update 230,000 - On -going On -going 2020-09 Citywide Sidewalk and ADA Improvements - Phase I Replacement of curb, gutter, sidewalk, and drive approaches; installation of missing sidewalk, curb, gutter, access ramps, bike paths, root pruning, engineering, and incidental work; and construction, replacement, or installation of ADA-compliant facilities within the public right-of-way. ADA Improvement 77,577 10,000 On -going Design 2020-12 Citywide Traffic Signs Traffic signs required for public roadways citywide. Traffic Signs 36,571 - On -going On -going 2020-14 East Grand Boulevard Storm Drain Construction of a 36-inch storm drain line in East Grand Boulevard from Third Street to Seventh Street. Streets & Storm Drains 641,372 - On -going Design Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 9 499 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-16 Infrastructure for Rebuilding America (INFRA) - SR-91 Corridor Projects Support for Riverside County Transportation Commission's ("RCTC") pursuit of federal funding for the Rebuilding America ("INFRA") program for the State Route 91 Workforce to Workplace Vitality Network, consisting of the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector Project, the 71/91 Interchange Improvement Project, and the 91 Corridor Operations Project and declares the City's intent to financially partner with RCTC on these three projects pursuant to future fiscal year budget actions. Street Improvement 1,000,000 - Cancelled Close project 2020-17 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation Pavement rehabilitation for local streets in accordance with the current Pavement Management Study. Rehabilitation may include reconstruction paving, crack sealing, slurry, etc. Pavement Rehabilitation 1,320,999 100,000 On -going On -going 2020-18 Magnolia Avenue Widening Widening of Magnolia Avenue between El Camino Avenue and All American Way which includes widening of the bridge that crosses the Temescal Wash. Street Widening 2,677,977 30,000 On -going Design 2020-19 Magnolia Median Rehabilitation This project will provide for the redesign and rehabilitation of the existing Magnolia Avenue medians. The project consists of approximately 97,000square feet of landscaping from Ontario to Rimpau Avenue. The medians on Magnolia Avenue have experienced die -off over the past several years as the plant material reaches the end of its life. Additionally, the irrigation is old and inefficient, causing runoff that damages the roadways. The project will provide for several design concepts that will include high efficiency irrigation, use of hardscape or DG, and low water use plants. Street Rehabilitation 457,798 10,000 On -going Design 2020-21 McKinley Grade Separation Construction of a new bridge over the BNSF Railroad tracks at McKinley to eliminate the current at -grade crossing. Bridge Improvement 83,980,855 20,000 On -going Design 2020-22 Miscellaneous Repair and Replacement of Traffic Signals Unscheduled repair/replacement of traffic signals and related facilities at various locations Citywide. Includes the repair or replacement of traffic signals, safety lights, street name signs, traffic control signs, signal poles, heads, etc.; rewiring old signals and damaged loops; and maintenance of the advance traffic management system. Signal Replacement 335,617 20,000 On -going On -going Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 7 of 9 500 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-24 Ontario Avenue Widening Widening of Ontario Avenue between Compton Avenue and State Street. Street Widening 3,511,666 10,000 On -going Design 2020-25 Overlook Road Maintenance Maintenance and grading of existing roads in the Overlook area to ensure accessibility for emergency Police and Fire vehicles. Street Maintenance 48,417 2,000 On -going Design 2020-26 Overlook Street Improvements Pavement rehabilitation for various roads in the Overlook area over several years. Street Improvement 693,233 1,000 On -going Design 2020-27 Pavement Maintenance and Resurfacing Resurface and repair potholes and miscellaneous pavement failures with City staff and/or contracted services. Pavement Maintenance 242,636 10,000 On -going On -going 2020-28 Pavement Management Study Ongoing field survey of local streets to be included in the Street Saver Program for the purpose of completing the City's street inventory, and maintaining current information for rehabilitation project planning. Annual Street Saver license and maintenance. Pavement Study 65,084 - On -going On -going 2020-30 River Road Median Landscape Improvements Landscape and irrigation improvements on River Road Center median from Corydon to Lincoln. The project will remove approximately 80,690 sq. ft. of turf and old plant material and replacing it with a drought tolerant landscape. It will also address irrigation runoff that is damaging the road. Street Maintenance 476,950 1,000 On -going Design 2020-31 Rubberized Asphalt Concrete (RAC) Project Street and pavement rehabilitation using rubberized asphalt concrete (RAC). Pavement Rehabilitation 544,109 - On -going On -going 2020-32 Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter Install Street maintenance program for as -needed repairs or replacement of curb, gutter, sidewalk, and drive approaches. Sidewalk/Curb/Gutter 708,629 20,000 On -going On -going 2020-33 Sixth Street and Yorba Street Waterline Replacement and Pavement Rehabilitation Pavement rehabilitation following waterline construction in Yorba Street between Pleasant View Avenue and West Sixth Street. The extent of pavement rehabilitation/repair will include approximately 35,000 square feet of existing pavement. The scope of work to be determined by the consulting engineering firm contracted to prepare the design. Streets & Storm Drains 500,000 30,000 On -going Construction Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 8 of 9 501 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-34 Sixth Street Revitalization Street Rehabilitation 1,000,000 - Cancelled Project closed Reconfiguration and rehabilitation of West Sixth Street from Main Street to Merrill Street for the purpose of widening and improving existing sidewalks to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Project also involves the modification of curb ramps to meet ADA standards, and introduces angled parking for easier access to local business. 2020-35 Street Pavement Maintenance and Rehabilitation Pavement Rehabilitation 6,817,042 30,000 On -going Design Rehabilitation of approximately 75 lane -miles of local and major streets. Completion of this project will preserve the existing pavement, extend the useful life of the asphalt, and provide a smoother travel surface for motorists and pedestrians. 2020-36 Striping Rehabilitation Striping Rehabilitation 382,459 20,000 On -going On -going Upgrade and maintenance of Citywide striping using City staff and/or contract services; and rehabilitation and maintenance of the City's traffic system and transportation infrastructure. 2020-39 Traffic Signals Lighting Upgrade Signal Lighting Upgrade 221,154 - On -going On -going Upgrade traffic signal safety lighting and Internally Illuminated Street Name Signs (IISNS) to energy efficient, long-lasting, lighting fixtures to reduce energy usage and maintain costs. Upgrades will be phased over a 3-year period. 2020-40 West Rincon Street Improvements Street Improvement 500,000 - On -going Design Phase I: Prepare Design, Specifications and Environmental Plans to improve Rincon Street and drainage facilities between Smith Avenue and Lincoln Avenue to alleviate flooding and debris on the roadway. Phase II: Construction would proceed after completion of the Alcoa Dike on Rincon Street and Auburndale Street which is anticipated in 2022. Cost Allocation Plan (Overhead) Operational 15,902 15,902 On -going On -going TOTAL $ 120,676,670 $ 791,351 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 9 of 9 502 This page left intentionally blank. 503 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF DESERT HOT SPRINGS This page left intentionally blank. 505 CITY OF PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEERING & OPERATIOI' May 7, 2020 DESERT HOT SPRINGS N 65950 Pierson Boulevard • Desert Hot Springs • CA • 92240 (760) 329-641 1 • votinALcitvoldhs.orci Martha Master Riverside County Transportation Commission P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 2502-2208 RE: City of Desert Hot Spring Measure "A" Five Year Capital Improvement Plan (C1P) 2020/21-2024/25 and Maintenance of Effort Dear Ms Masters, Attached is the City of Desert Hot Springs' Measure "A" Five Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) 2021-2025, a Project Status Report for our FY 2019/20 and the City's Maintenance of Effort ( OE) Certification. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at (760) 329-6411 Ext. 216. Sincerely, Daniel Pnrras Public Works Director Attachments: Measure "A' Five Year (CIP) FY 2021-2025 Project Status Report FY 2019/20 CIP Maintenance of Effort Certification 506 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Desert Hot Springs {the 'Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No, 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A'r) shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of S75,147, approved by the Commission at its July 13, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes, The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or Toss of Measure Afunds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: May 7 2020 Signature: CL// y�7t CLMaynard{ ay 7, 2020E Email: cmaynard@cityofdhs.org ATTEST: C L Maynard this CITY MANAGER Jerry! Soriano SECRETARY Signature: .12-rcy�3O`' Jerryl oria no (Ma y7, 2020) Email: jsoriano@cityofdhs.org 507 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 115,267 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 468,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (582,593) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 674 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 421,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 421,674 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & 2021-01 sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance $ 175,000 $ 50,000 Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total Road 2021-02 Improvement Program Services 2012A Debt Service 401,000 200,000 COP'x (Certificate of Participation) 2021-03 SB 821 - Palm Drive Bike Lane Project Construction 631,000 50,000 2021-04 HSIP Cycle 9-2 - Palm Drive Project Construction Safety Improvements 119,400 11,940 2021-05 Jefferson/I 10 and Date Palm/I 10 Interchange Construction 5,000 5,000 2021-06 ATP Cycle 4 - Palm Drive Project Construction 1,498,000 50,000 2021-07 Indirect Costs Overhead 33,680 33,680 TOTAL $ 2,863,080 $ 400,620 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 508 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 21,054 425,000 446,054 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & 2022-01 sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance $ 175,000 $ 175,000 Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total Road 2022-02 Improvement Program Services 2012A Debt Service 401,000 200,000 COP'x (Certificate of Participation) 2022-03 Jefferson/I-10 and Date Palm/I-10 Interchange Construction 5,000 5,000 2022-04 Indirect Costs Overhead 34,000 34,000 TOTAL $ 615,000 $ 414,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 509 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 32,054 429,000 461,054 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total Road Improvement Program Services 2012A COP'x (Certificate of Participation) Jefferson/I-10 and Date Palm/I-10 Interchange Indirect Costs Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance Debt Service Construction Overhead $ 175,000 401,000 5,000 34,320 $ 175,000 200,000 5,000 34,320 2023-01 2023-02 2023-03 2023-04 TOTAL $ 615,320 $ 414,320 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 510 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 46,734 Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: 433,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 479,734 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total Road Improvement Program Services 2012A COP'x (Certificate of Participation) Indirect Costs Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance Debt Service Overhead $ 175,000 401,000 34,640 $ 175,000 200,000 34,640 2024 Ol 2024-02 2024-03 TOTAL $ 610,640 $ 409,640 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 511 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 70,094 437,000 507,094 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance $ 175,000 $ 175,000 Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total Road 2025-02 Improvement Program Services 2012A Debt Service 401,000 200,000 COP'x (Certificate of Participation) 2025-03 Indirect Costs Overhead 34,960 34,960 TOTAL $ 610,960 $ 409,960 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 512 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: DESERT HOT SPRINGS Prepared by: Daniel Porras Phone #: (760)329-6411 ext 216 Date: 5/7/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-01 Citywide resurfacing, curb, gutter & sidewalk repairs and Improvements and signage and striping Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance $ 150,000 $ 140,000 6/30/2020 on -going Debt Service for T.R.I.P. (Total 2020-02 Road Improvement Program Debt Service 401,000 200,000 6/30/2020 on -going Services 2012A COP'x (Certificate of Participation) 2020-04 Jefferson/I 10 and Date Palm/I Construction 800 800 7/2/2019 complete 10 Interchange 2020-05 Indirect Costs Overhead 37,440 37,440 6/30/2020 on -going 2020-06 Replacement of Street Signs Road Sign 175,544 175,544 6/30/2020 on -going Maintenance 2020-07 Speed Hump Construction Road Maintenance 10,600 10,600 12/18/2019 complete 2020-08 Road Rehab 18th Ave and Road Maintenance 18,209 18,209 9/30/2019 complete Manzana TOTAL $ 793,593 $ 582,593 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 513 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF EASTVALE This page left intentionally blank. 515 City of Eastvale 12363 Limonite Avenue, Suite #910 • Eastvale, CA 91752 (951) 361-0900 • Fax: (951) 361-0888 • www.EastvaleCA.gov May 4, 2020 Mrs. Martha Masters Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Re: City of Eastvale's Measure A Expenditure Plan FY 2020/21 — FY 2024/25 Dear Mrs. Masters: Please find enclosed the Fiscal Year 2010/21 — 2024/25 Measure A Expenditure Plan for the City of Eastvale. Also enclosed is the FY19/20 Project Status Report and the City's MOE Certification Statement for FY19/20 for your review. Should you have any questions, or need further information on the above, please feel free to contact Ann Herner at aherner@interwestgrp.com or myself at whemsley.eastvale@interwestgrp.com at (951) 703-4473. Sincerely, it--4.14r Bill Hemsley City Engineer Enclosures 516 FY2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Eastvale (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $38,949, approved by the Commission at its July 8, 2015 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or Toss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation�Commission. i f Dated: pr. 30 , 2020 CITY MANAGER ATTEST: SECRETARY 517 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ 3,309,011 FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: 1,325,000 Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: (1,452,096) Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: 3,181,915 Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 1,187,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 4,368,915 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2021-01 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, pavement markings, signal synchronization, and pedestrians accessibility $ 1,046,000 $ 461,000 2021-02 Street Improvement Program Improvement of roadway and associated trasportation systems to include widening, repair, and reconstruction. 5,038,300 1,066,500 2021-03 Citywide Maintenance Program Maintenance and repair within the City's right of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. 1,125,000 950,000 2021-04 Administrative Costs Administrative costs for operating capital projects 94,960 71,220 TOTAL $ 7,304,260 $ 2,548,720 FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 518 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 1,820,195 1,199,000 3,019,195 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Street Improvement Program Citywide Maintenance Program Administrative Costs Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, Improvement of roadway and associated trasportation systems to include widening, repair, and reconstruction. Maintenance and repair within the City's right of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. Administrative costs for operating capital projects $ 7,245,000 3,000,000 1,175,000 95,920 $ 835,000 657,500 787,500 71,940 2022-01 2022-02 2022-03 2022-04 TOTAL $ 11,515,920 $ 2,351,940 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 519 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ 667,255 Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: 1,211,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 1,878,255 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, pavement markings, signal synchronization, and pedestrians accessibility $ 7,245,000 $ 835,000 2023-02 Citywide Maintenance Program 825,000 612,500 Maintenance and repair within the City's right of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. 2023-03 Administrative Costs Administrative costs for operating capital projects 96,880 72,660 TOTAL $ 8,166,880 $ 1,520,160 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 520 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 358,095 1,223,000 1,581,095 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, pavement markings, signal synchronization, and pedestrians accessibility $ 25,000 $ 25,000 2024-02 Citywide Maintenance Program Maintenance and repair within the 825,000 612,500 City's right of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. 2024-03 Administrative Costs Administrative costs for operating capital projects 97,840 73,380 TOTAL $ 947,840 $ 710,880 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 521 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 870,215 1,235,000 2,105,215 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, pavement markings, signal synchronization, and pedestrians accessibility $ 25,000 $ 25,000 2025-02 Citywide Maintenance Program Maintenance and repair within the City's right of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. 825,000 612,500 2025-03 Administrative Costs 98,800 74,100 Administrative costs for operating capital projects TOTAL $ 948,800 $ 711,600 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 522 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2019/20 Agency: EASTVALE Prepared by: Bill Hemsley, City Engineer Phone #: (951) 703-4473 Date: 5/4/2020 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Cost Anticipated Measure A Funds Expended (Est thru 6/30/2020) Estimated/ Actual Completion Status 2020-01 Road Safety/Traffic Improvements Roadway safety and traffic improvements to include traffic signs, pavement markings, signal synchronization, and pedestrians accessibility $ 748,100 $ 68,014 6/30/2020 This includes an annual program and specific projects. Unexpended costs are carried over to next FY. 2020-02 Street Improvement Program Improvement of roadway and associated trasportation systems to include widening, repair, and reconstruction. 2,015,000 38,224 6/30/2021 This includes an annual program and specific projects. Unexpended costs are carried over to next FY. 2020-03 Citywide Maintenance Program Maintenance and repair within the City's righ of way to include crack sealing, slurry seals, drainage facilities and flood control improvements. 1,263,664 1,263,664 6/30/2020 This includes an annual program. Unexpended costs are carried over to next FY. 2020-04 Administrative Costs Administrative costs for operating capital projects 542,907 82,194 6/30/2020 TOTAL $ 4,569,671 $ 1,452,096 Project Status Report FY19-20 Page 6 of 6 523 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS CITY OF HEMET 524 This page left intentionally blank. 525 510 EAST FLORIDA AVENUE - .;ALIFORNIA 92543 - t-);>1) 765-2360 From [he Office of ENGINEERING DEPT. Martha Masters Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92502 Subject: Hemet Five -Year Measure "A" CIP (2021-2025) Dear Ms. Masters, May 5, 2020 The City Council of the City of Hemet, at its regular meeting of April 28, 2020, adopted the City's Five Year Measure "A" Local Streets and Roads Capital Improvement Program for Fiscal Years 2020/21 — 2024/25. Included with this letter are the following documents: • Five-year Measure "A" CIP for Fiscal years 2020/21 — 2024/25 • Measure "A" Local Funds Program Project Status Report for Fiscal Year 2019/20 • Maintenance of Effort (MOE) certification The City requests that the Riverside County Transportation Commission accept and approve the City's Measure "A" Five -Year CIP and find the City eligible to continue receiving its fair share of Measure "A" revenues. If you should have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact Chase Keys at 951-475- 3613 or via email at ckeys(5h11.green.com. Sincerely, Steve R. Loriso, P.E. Acting City Engineer 526 FY2020/21 MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT CERTIFICATION STATEMENT The undersigned agrees and certifies for the city of Hemet (the "Agency") that sales tax transportation funds received pursuant to Ordinance No. 02-001 of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("Measure A") shall be used in compliance with the Commission's Maintenance of Effort Guidelines and a base year amount of $18,924, approved by the Commission at its October 12, 2011 meeting, and that the Agency shall not use such funds to replace discretionary local funds previously expended by the Agency for local transportation purposes. The Agency hereby acknowledges that the failure of the Agency to continue such local expenditure shall result in a reduction or loss of Measure A funds. Additionally, the Agency commits to expending Measure A Local Streets and Roads funds for projects listed in the Five Year Capital Improvement Plan as approved by Riverside County Transportation Commission. Dated: O ut , 2020 of/ CITY MANAGER ATTEST: 527 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2020/21 Agency: HEMET Prepared by: Chase Keys, PE Phone #: 951-475-3613 Date: 5/11/2020 FY 2018/19 Audited Measure A Balance: $ FY 2019/20 (Revised) Measure A Revenue: Less: FY 2019/20 Project Status Report expenses: Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: Estimated FY 2020/21 Measure A Allocation: 7,614,396* 1,712,000 (2,656,000) 6,670,396 1,537,000 Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2020/21 Projects: $ 8,207,396 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2020/21 2017/18 Pavement Rehabilitation, Central 2021-01 Ave Palm to Santa Fe, Mayberry Ave Palm to Santa Fe, Alessandro St - Mayberry to Kimball Pavement Rehab. $ 1,450,000 $ 1,450,000 Hemet Valley Bikeway, Palm Ave - Johnston to Esplanade, Whittier Ave - Palm Bikeway, Pavement 2021-02 to Gilbert, Johnston Ave - Palm to Gilbert, Gilbert St - Chambers to Whittier, Chambers St - Gilbert to State Rehab. Sidewalks 125,000 125,000 2021-03 2019/20 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD Pavement Rehab. 2,900,000 2,900,000 2021-04 2019/20 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations attached Pavement Maint. 1,150,000 1,150,000 2021-05 2020/21 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD Pavement Rehab. 1,750,000 1,750,000 2021-06 2020/21 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations TBD Pavement Maint. 500,000 500,000 2021-07 Pavement Management Progam Update Study 100,000 100,000 2021-08 Traffic Striping Maintenance Striping Maint. 50,000 50,000 TOTAL $ 8,025,000 $ 8,025,000 *Fund balance exceeds three years of allocation due to the timing of various CIP projects carried from year to year. FY 2020-21 Page 1 of 6 528 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2021/22 Agency: Prepared by: Phone #: Date: HEMET Chase Keys, PE 951-475-3613 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2021/22 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2021/22 Projects: $ 182,396 1,552,000 1,734,396 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2021/22 2021/22 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD 02022-02 TB 2Dl /22 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations Hemet Valley Bikeway, Palm Ave - Johnston to Esplanade, Whittier Ave - Palm to Gilbert, Johntson Ave - Palm to Gilbert, Gilbert St - Chambers to Whittier, Chambers St - Gilbert to State Traffic Striping Maintenance Pavement Rehab. Pavement Maint. Bikeway, Pavement Rehab. Sidewalks Striping Maint. $ 1,000,000 500,000 2,438,000 50,000 $ 1,000,000 500,000 150,000 50,000 2022-01 2022-03 2022-04 TOTAL $ 3,988,000 $ 1,700,000 FY 2021-22 Page 2 of 6 529 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2022/23 Agency: Prepared by: Phone #: Date: HEMET Chase Keys, PE 951-475-3613 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2022/23 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2022/23 Projects: $ 34,396 1,568,000 1,602,396 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2022/23 2023-01 2022/23 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD Pavement Rehab. $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 2023-02 2022/23 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations Pavement Maint. 500,000 500,000 2023-03 Traffic Striping Maintenance Striping Maint. 50,000 50,000 TOTAL $ 1,550,000 $ 1,550,000 FY 2022-23 Page 3 of 6 530 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2023/24 Agency: Prepared by: Phone #: Date: HEMET Chase Keys, PE 951-475-3613 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2023/24 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2023/24 Projects: $ 52,396 1,584,000 1,636,396 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2023/24 2024-01 2023-24 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD Pavement Rehab. $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 2024-02 2023/24 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations Pavement Maint. 500,000 500,000 2024-03 Traffic Striping Maintenance Striping Maint. 50,000 50,000 TOTAL $ 1,550,000 $ 1,550,000 FY 2023-24 Page 4 of 6 531 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM FY 2024/25 Agency: Prepared by: Phone #: Date: HEMET Chase Keys, PE 951-475-3613 5/11/2020 Estimated Prior Year Measure A Balance: $ Estimated FY 2024/25 Measure A Allocation: Estimated Measure A Available for FY 2024/25 Projects: $ 86,396 1,600,000 1,686,396 Item No. Project Name / Limits Project Type Total Project Cost Measure A Funds 2024/25 2025-01 2024/25 Citywide Pavement Rehabilitation, Locations TBD Pavement Rehab. $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 02025-02 TB 2D4/25 Citywide Slurry Seal, Locations Pavement Maint. 500,000 500,000 2025-03 Traffic Striping Maintenance Striping Maint. 50,000 50,000 TOTAL $ 1,550,000 $ 1,550,000 FY 2024-25 Page 5 of 6 532 RIF MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM PROJECT STATUS REPORT FY 2