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10 October 14, 2020 CommissionMEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, October 14, 2020 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions on the following page to join the meeting remotely. COMMISSIONERS Chair — Ben J. Benoit Vice Chair —Jan Harnik Second Vice Chair — V. Manuel Perez Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside, District 1 Karen Spiegel, County of Riverside, District 2 Chuck Washington, County of Riverside, District 3 V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside, District4 Jeff Hewitt, County of Riverside, District 5 Art Welch / Daniela Andrade, City of Banning Lloyd White /Julio Martinez, Cityof Beaumont Joseph DeConinck/Johnny Rodriguez, City of Blythe LarrySmith / Linda Molina, Cityof Calimesa Randall Bonner/ JeremySmith, City of Canyon Lake Raymond Gregory/ Mark Carnevale, Cityof Cathedral City Steven Hernandez/ Megan Beaman Jacinto, Cityof Coachella Wes Speake /Jim Steiner, City of Corona Scott Matas /Russell Betts, Cityof Desert Hot Springs Clint Lorimore /Todd Rigby, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Dana Reed/ Kimberly Muzik, City of Indian Wells Waymond Fermon / Oscar Ortiz, City of Indio Brian Berkson / Chris Barajas, CityofJurupa Valley Kathleen Fitzpatrick/ Robert Radi, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, Cityof Lake Elsinore Bill Zimmerman/ Dean Deines, Cityof Menifee Yxstain Gutierrez / Carla Thornton, City of Moreno Valley Scott Vinton / Christi White, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna /Ted Hoffman, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Lisa Middleton / Dennis Woods, City of Palm Springs Michael M. Vargas/Rita Rogers, Cityof Perris Ted Weill / Charles Townsend, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey/Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Russ Utz, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar/Maryann Edwards, City of Temecula Ben J. Benoit/ Joseph Morabito, City of Wildomar Mike Beauchamp, Governor's Appointee Caltrans District 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, October 14, 2020 Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting https://rctc.zoom.us/j/82968555624 US: +1669 900 6833 or +1253 215 8782 Webinar ID: 829 6855 5624 For members of the public wishing to submit comment in connection with the Commission Meeting please email written comments to the Clerk of the Board at Imobley@rctc.org prior to October 13, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. and your comments will be made part of the official record of the proceedings. Members of the public may also make public comments through their telephone or Zoom connection when recognized by the Chair. In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting on the Commission's website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, Executive Order N-29-20, and the Federal TransitAdministration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951)787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of atleast 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL Riverside CountyTransportation Commission Meeting Agenda October 14, 2020 Page 2 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS — Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS — The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5. CONSENT CALENDAR — All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 5A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — SEPTEMBER 9, 2020 5B. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Overview Page 1 Page 9 This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 1, 2020. 5C. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page 18 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the 12 months ended June 30, 2020. 5D. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Page 29 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Reportfor the quarter ended June 30, 2020. Riverside CountyTransportation Commission Meeting Agenda Octobe r 14, 2020 Page 3 5E. INLAND EMPIRE COMPREHENSIVE MULTIMODAL CORRIDOR PLAN ADOPTION Page 116 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Adopt and confirm the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (CMCP) is consistent with California Transportation Commission guidelines for CMCPs; and 2) Authorize staff to make minor changes as needed to keep the document current and accurate. 5F. AMENDMENT TO AGREEMENT RELATED TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE RIVERSIDE DOWNTOWN LAYOVER FACILITY EXPANSION PROJECT Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 478 1) Approve the increase in the contingency for Agreement No. 19-33-029-00 with Reyes Construction, Inc., for the construction of the Riverside Downtown Layover Facility Expansion Project (Project) in the amount of $455,000, for a revised contingency of $875,142, and a total amount not to exceed $5,255,000; and 2) Approve an increase of $300,000 in the FY 2020/21 budget for construction expenditures related to the Project. 5G. AMENDMENT TO CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT FOR THE LA SIERRA STATION EXPANSION PROJECT Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 482 1) Approve Agreement No. 16-24-080-03, Amendment No. 3 to Agreement No. 16-24-080-00, with S2 Engineering, Inc. (S2) to complete construction management (CM) services, materials testing, and construction survey services for the La Sierra Station Expansion Project, for an additional amount of $102,069 and a total amount not to exceed $940,469; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. Riverside CountyTransportation Commission Meeting Agenda October 14, 2020 Page 4 5H. COACHELLA VALLEY-SAN GORGONIO PASS RAIL CORRIDOR PLANNING STUDY UPDATE AND HDR CONTRACT AMENDMENT Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 490 1) Approve Agreement No. 14-25-072-05, Amendment No. 5 to Agreement No.14-25-072-00, with HDR Engineering (HDR) related to the Coachella Valley - San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Planning Study in the amount of $831,653, plus a contingency amount of $83,000, for a total amount of $914,653, and a total amount not to exceed $6,916,748 and a term extension through June 30, 2022; 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or her designee, to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the agreement; and 4) Amend the Commission's Fiscal Year 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) and make appropriate budget amendments to reprogram $2,468,404 of Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) Funds from the Special Events Train Platform at the Indio Station project to the Coachella Valley -San Gorgonia Pass Rail Corridor Study and commuter rail station capital upgrades. 6. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ORGANIZATION RECOMMENDATIONS Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 500 1) Approve revised FY 2020/21 salary ranges; and 2) Approve an increase of $504,000 in the FY 2020/21 budget for salaries and benefits expenditures related to the reinstatement of merit increases, salary range cost of living adjustment (COLA), and funding for Planning and Programming Director approved by the Executive Committee. 7. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 504 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. Riverside CountyTransportation Commission Meeting Agenda October 14, 2020 Page 5 8. INTERSTATE 15 CORRIDOR OPERATIONS PROJECT Overview This item is forthe Commission to: Page 513 1) Authorize staff to implement all project development activities needed to complete construction of the 1-15 Corridor Operations Project (15 COP), including immediately commencing the preliminary engineering/environmental document work phase; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to negotiate and execute a contract amendment to Agreement No. 19-31-025-00 or a new contract with HDR Engineering, Inc. (HDR) to provide final design services for the 15 COP for an amount as necessary to complete the work, currently estimated in the amount of $2,379,000, plus a contingency amount of $238,000, for a total estimated amount of $2,617,000, as it is in the best public interest and best interest of the Commission to conduct a non-competitive procurement; 3) Authorize the Executive Director to negotiate and execute a contract amendment to Agreement No. 19-31-025-00 or a new contract with HDR Engineering, Inc. (HDR) to provide final design services for the 15 COP for an amount as necessary to complete the work, currently estimated in the amount of $2,379,000, plus a contingency amount of $238,000, for a total estimated amount of $2,617,000, as it is in the best public interest and best interest of the Commission to conduct a non-competitive procurement; a. $25.0 million in Measure A sales tax revenue bond proceeds projected to be available for all phases of project development costs for the 15 COP; and b. $13.3 million in federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds for construction phase costs forthe 15 COP and to program this funding in the 2021 Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP); 4) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute all necessary, non -funding, agency agreements or amendments to existing agency agreements for all phases of project development; 5) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work as may be required for the Project; and 6) Approve an increase of $2,000,000 in the FY 2020/21 budget for preliminary engineering/environmental document and final design work phase expenditures related to the 15 COP. 9. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA Riverside CountyTransportation Commission Meeting Agenda Octobe r 14, 2020 Page 6 10. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. • RCA Update, Anne Mayer 11. CLOSED SESSION 11A. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL — EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(d)(1) Case No(s). RIC1903801 12. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled to be held on Thursday, November 12, 2020, via Zoom. AGENDA ITEM 5A MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING MINUTES Wednesday, September9, 2020 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Ben J. Benoit at 9:45 a.m., via Zoom Meeting ID: 860 7666 8991. Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20. 2. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Rusty Bailey Ben J. Benoit Brian Berkson Randall Bonner David Bricker Joseph DeConinck Waymond Fermon Kathleen Fitzpatrick Raymond Gregory Berwin Hanna Jan Harnik Steven Hernandez* Jeff Hewitt* Kevin Jeffries Linda Krupa Clint Lorimore Bob Magee Scott Matas Lisa Middleton Michael Naggar V. Manuel Perez Dana Reed Wes Speake Karen Spiegel* Larry Smith Michael M. Vargas Chuck Washington Ted Weill Lloyd White Art Welch* Russ Utz Scott Vinton Ted Weill Bill Zimmerman *Arrived after the meetingwas called to order. 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. Commissioners Absent Yxstain Gutierrez 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 2 At this time, Commissioner Karen Spiegel joined the meeting. 5. CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Vargas/Lorimore) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. 5A. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — AUGUST 12, 2020 5B. QUARTERLY PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS REPORT, APRIL-JUNE 2020 Receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for April -June 2020. 5C. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 5D. 91 EXPRESS LANES MONTHLY STATUS REPORTS Receive and file the 91 Express Lanes Monthly Reports forthree months from April to June 2020. 5E. TOLL OPERATIONS YEAR IN REVIEW AND COVID-19 IMPACTS UPDATE Receive and file a presentation providing a review of results from the latest fiscal year of toll operations and an update to the impacts that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on toll operations. 5F. DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL AGREEMENT FOR EXPRESS LANES TOLL ENFORCEMENT 1) Approve Agreement No. 21-31-005-00 with the Department of California Highway Patrol (CHP) for toll enforcement on the express lanes for a five-yearterm in the amount of $3,611,479; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 5G. RCTC 91 EXPRESS LANES CHANGEABLE MESSAGE SIGNS MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT 1) Award Agreement No. 21-31-004-00 to Daktronics, Inc. (Daktronics) for the maintenance and repair of the changeable message signs (CMS) for the 91 Express Lanes for a five-year term, in the amount of $148,775, plus a 2 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 3 contingency amount of $14,878, for a total amount not to exceed $163, 653; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to finalize and execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the agreement. 5H. RIVERSIDE EXPRESS AAA REWARDS AND DISCOUNTS PROGRAM Receive and file a presentation on the Riverside Express AAA Rewards and Discounts program. 51. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 STATE OF GOOD REPAIR PROGRAM ALLOCATIONS 1) Approve Resolution No. 20-014, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Approving the FY 2020/21 Project List for the California State of Good Repair Program"; 2) Approve an allocation of $4,211,059 related to Fiscal Year 2020/21 State of Good Repair (SGR) program funds to eligible Riverside County transit operators; 3) Authorize staff to allocate increased SCO revenue estimates up to $421,102, or 10 percent of the current estimate, to eligible Riverside County transit operators; 4) Approve an increase of $258,859 in the FY 2020/21 budget for SGR revenues to reflect updated SCO estimates; 5) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to review, approve and submit projects to Caltrans which are consistent with SGR program guidelines and to execute and submit required documents for the SGR program, including the Authorized Agent Form; and 6) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve administrative amendments to the FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for incorporation of the SGR funds, as necessary. 6. APPROVAL OF METROLINK OPERATING AND CAPITAL SUBSIDIES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020/21, RELATED MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING, AND RCTC SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN AMENDMENT John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, acknowledged Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager, for his hard work on this agenda item and for Agenda Item 7, California High Speed Rail Los Angeles to Anaheim Update, which Mr. Peterson will present next. Mr. Standiford presented the Annual Metrolink Budget update, highlighting the following areas: • RCTC and Metrolink: 3 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 4 o Metrolink operated by five-countyJPA o RCTC has made a significant rail investment Three Lines: Riverside, IEOC, 91/Perris Valley — Nine Stations o Short-term budget previously approved — full budget pending o This presentation focuses primarily on RCTC's portion of the Metrolink Budget • FY 20 Highlights: o Celebrated its 27th year of operations o Increased capital construction and rehabilitation o Delivery of all 40 Tier 4 locomotives by the end of 2020 o Pre-COVID-19 Riverside ridership growth 3% - o COVID-19: 90% Drop - Net Annual: 22% drop • Ridership Cliff - FY 2019/20 Weekday Riverside County Lines Ridership by Line Chart • COVID-19 Recap: o Service Reduction 30% - March 26 o Focus on essential workforce healthcare/law enforcement o Clean — Sanitize — Social Distance (How Full is My Train App) o Conducted COVID-19 Customer Survey o 81 percent likely to return • FY 21 Highlights: o Implement a Recovery Plan Framework — Safety First — Add trains back when ready o Award updated contracts for Operations, Track and Signal and Infrastructure Maintenance Support Services o New promotions targeting riders to get back on the train including Kids Ride Free, Loyalty Program, 5-Day Pass, and enhanced Health Care Corporate Partner Program o Enhancing the Rehabilitation Program to reduce major failures by retrofitting cars o Continue improving the Positive Train Control program system -wide in coordination with the freight railroads • Financial Impact: o Operating Subsidy Requirement $23,780,000 — Federal Share 62% - State and Local 38% o Capital Funding Requirement $7,961,548 FTA 5337 Grant Funds o Update Short Range Transit Plan Accordingly o Update Metrolink MOU with new funding plan At this time, Commissioners Hernandez and Hewitt joined the meeting. 4 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 5 Mr. Standiford expressed appreciation to Commission Representatives Berkson, Hewitt, and Spiegel that are on the Metrolink Board because this is a challenging time to be involved in public transit and the transit systems will need to evolve and advance and Metrolink is well positioned to do that. M/S/C (Reed/Fitzpatrick) to: 1) Receive and file a report on highlights from the Southern California Regional Rail Authority's (SCRRA) services; 2) Approve the Fiscal Year (FY) 2020/21 SCRRA operating and capital budget, which results in an operating subsidy of $23,780,000 and capital subsidy of $7,961,548 for the Commission; 3) Amend the FY 2020/21 RCTC Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to address changes in the funding sources to meet Metrolink's annual request; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director to finalize and execute Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 20-25-091-01, Amendment No. 1 to MOU No. 20-25-091-00, with SCRRA regarding annual funding, including subrecipient matters related to pass -through of federal funding. At this time, Commissioner Welch joined the meeting. 7. CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL LOS ANGELES TO ANAHEIM PROJECT UPDATE Sheldon Peterson presented the California High -Speed Rail (HSR) Los Angeles to Anaheim (LA/ANA) Project update, highlighting the following: • Statewide HSR Program o Phase 1— Bay Area to LA/ANA o Central Valley Priority o 2007 Environmental Studies Continue for Southern California Project Sections o Phase 2 to San Diego via IE and to Sacramento Timeline Uncertain/2050? • LA/ANA Project Section Overview: o Approximately 30 miles o State preferred uses BNSF/OCTA Corridor o Residential, business, and local agency concerns o HSR will not travel at full speed 200 mph only 79 mph o Commission retains purchased Shared Use Rights • A conceptual plan of the Los Angeles Union Station and the first HSR station - Anaheim (ARTIC) photos • LA/ANA Section Scoping, the Colton Intermodal Facility Component, and the Barstow/Lenwood Staging Track Component maps o Revised Notice of Preparation / Notice of Intent on August 25 5 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 6 o Two new components added o "Relieves congestion within LA -A" o Scoping Comment Period ends on September24 o Two Virtual Open House Meetings: September10 (5:00 p.m.) & September12 (10:00 a.m.) • Dedicated HST Alternative map: o Two dedicated HSR train tracks and four other tracks: Amtrak — Metrolink BNSF • Consolidated Shared -Track Alternative Ariel and Consolidated Shared -Track Alternative At -Grade Diagrams • Typical At -Grade Alignment Configuration Design - Current Proposal • High Speed Rail Service Proposal o Daily Train Moves LA-FUL graphic o Passengertrain growth = 279% o If service 4 a.m. to 12 M or 20 hour window o Results = 1 train every 5 minutes all day • LA-FUL Daily freight trains grow 104 to 162 o That is a 56% increase • FUL-RIV Daily freight trains grow without capacity improvements from HSR • Project challenges: o Increased truck and rail freight traffic in our region — Minimum 10 new daily freight trains FUL-RIV — Each train carries 250-300 containers Potentially 3,000 daily new trucks — Impacts SR-60 (Rubidoux Blvd), 1-10, 1-215 — Crossing delays • Increased regional noise and air quality impacts • Project Challenges (Cont.) o HSR track map of the region o Social Justice issues o No increased in local passenger rail benefits o RCTC/BNSF Shared Use Agreement Conflicts o Unrealized benefits to Riverside County o Freight yard happens regardless of HSR moving forward • Next steps o Commission submit official scoping comments o Work with Authority staff to address concerns o Monitor LA -A Project Section progress and Phase 2 development o Provide Commission updates 6 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 7 Chair Benoit expressed appreciation to Mr. Peterson for a great presentation and for his comments about the impact to this region versus the benefit for a HSR, and stated it is difficult to see all the negative impacts with increased freight and traffic, including all the impacts on the air district side. Commissioner Wes Speake expressed concern about the HSR proposal and at the same time the state is preventing the Commission from building lanes, putting every obstacle possible to stop commuters and then encouraging alternative transportation including rail and asked if at the state level are they going to be putting more funding into other types of rail. Sheldon Peterson replied the state through Cap-n-Trade and some other funding sources have done a call for projects called the Transit Intercity Rail Capital Program and they released over $5 million in rail and transit projects over the past five or six years. He explained the challenge is to make sure RCTC's projects are competitive for some of those funding efforts and align with the right funding to compete. Mr. Peterson stated there is some funding out there but with COVID-19 and the economy some of that could be reduced for a while, but hopefully will eventually come back strong. In response to Commissioner Speake's request for clarification, Mr. Peterson clarified it was $5 billion, but there is still a huge investment need and explained how other agencies are coming up with very competitive projects. At this time, Commissioner Dana Reed made the motion. Commissioner V. Manuel Perez seconded the motion. He expressed wanting to reinforce that RCTC work with AQMD to have further discussions on this especially when it comes to social and environment justice. He explained specifically to air quality ultimately Riverside County will be impacted so he wants to make sure this is taken care of and have that collaboration as well with RCTC and AQMD. At this time, Commissioners Jeffries and Naggar left the meeting. M/S/C (Reed/Perez) to: 1) Receive a report on the California High -Speed Rail Authority's Los Angeles to Anaheim Project Section progress and potential impacts to the Commission; and 2) Direct the Chair and/or Executive Director to submit comments that express the Commission's rightful concerns regarding potential environmental impacts of the project. 7 Riverside County Transportation Commission Meeting Minutes September 9, 2020 Page 8 8. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 9. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT • RCA Update, Anne Mayer 9A. Anne Mayer updated the Commission on the RCA and stated the due diligence period with RCA is still going and she will come back with a summary at its October Commission meeting. 10. CLOSED SESSION 10A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Item APN(s) Property Owner Buyer(s) 1 118-160-004 RCTC JDI Ventures Real Estate LLC 2 229-082-006 and 229-082-007 RCTC Kingsfield Development Corp or JDI Ventures Real Estate LLC There were no announcements from Closed Session. 11. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Chair Benoit adjourned the meeting at 10:31 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, October 14, 2020, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board 8 AGENDA ITEM 5B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 14, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Sales Tax Analysis STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 1, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its December 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded an agreement with MuniServices, LLC (MuniServices), an Avenu Company, for quarterly sales tax reporting services plus additional fees contingent on additional sales tax revenues generated from the transactions and use tax (sales tax) audit services. As part of the recurring contracts process in June 2018, the Commission approved a five-year extension through June 30, 2023. The services performed under this agreement pertain to only the Measure A sales tax revenues. Since the commencement of these services, MuniServices submitted audits, which reported findings and submitted to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA), for review and determination of errors in sales tax reporting related to 1,202 businesses. Through 1Q 2020, the CDTFA approved 804 of these accounts for a cumulative sales tax recovery of $11,579,068. If CDTFA concurs with the error(s) for the remaining claims, the Commission will receive additional revenues; however, the magnitude of the value of the remaining findings was not available. It is important to note that while the recoveries of additional revenues will be tangible, it will not be sufficient to alter the overall trend of sales tax revenues. MuniServices provided the Commission with the Quarterly Sales Tax Digest Summary report for 1Q 2020. Most of the 1Q 2020 Measure A sales tax revenues were received in the second quarter of calendar year2020, during April 2020 through June 2020, due to a lag in the sales tax calendar. The summary section of the 1Q 2020 report is attached and includes an overview of California's economic outlook, local results, historical cash collections analysis by quarter, top 25 sales/use tax contributors, historical sales tax amounts, annual sales tax by business category, and five-year economic trend (general retail). Taxable transactions for the top 25 contributors in Riverside County generated 25.3 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2020, slightly higher than the 23.4 percent for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2019. The top 100 tax contributors generated 40 percent for the Agenda Item 5B 9 benchmark year ended 1Q 2020, slightly higher than the 38.1 percent for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2019. In the Economic Category Analysis below, five of the six categories experienced new highs in the 1Q 2020 benchmark year to the prior eight benchmark years. Food products were down slightly due to a warehouse club chain, included under general retail, shifting food sales from grocery retailers. ECONOMIC CATEGORY ANALYSIS % of Total / % Change RCTC State Wide Orange County San Bernardino County S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast General Retail 28.3/6.2 36.0/-5.2 37.7/-11.7 36.6/-2.8 35.1/-4.9 34.1/1.0 37.2/-0.4 36.5/-7.6 34.8/-0.9 35.0/-8.8 Food Products 17.3/-0.9 20.0/-8.2 19.5/-8.1 15.3/-3.9 20.8/-9.5 16.3/-6.6 15.2/-5.0 21.6/-9.0 16.0/-1.8 31.5/-5.8 Transportation 23.9/0.4 22.5/-6.6 22.9/-4.5 24.8/-5.4 20.4/-11.4 26.9/-4.5 23.8/-2.9 22.1/-6.2 26.4/0.5 21.6/-3.6 Construction 10.8/3.1 8.8/-6.4 7.5/-11.4 8.1/1.3 8.9/-7.6 11.3/-2.8 10.4/-4.4 7.8/-8.9 15.1/5.5 7.8/-11.7 Business to Business 16.8/6.6 11.5/-3.7 11.0/-5.5 12.9/-5.6 13.6/-3.9 10.4/-0.5 12.4/6.2 10.8/-5.5 7.0/2.8 3.4/0.7 Miscellaneous 2.9/14.4 1.2/-3.9 1.4/-12.4 2.3/0.0 1.2/6.4 1.1/5.0 0.9/0.0 1.1/-11.0 0.6/-7.1 0.7/17.3 Total 100.0/3.4 100.0/-6.0 100.0/-8.8 100.0/-3.6 100.0/-7.2 100.0/-2.3 100.0/-1.4 100.0/-7.5 100.0/0.5 100.0/-6.6 General Retail: Apparel Stores, Department Stores, Furniture/Appliances, Drug Stores, Recreation Products, Florist/Nursery, and Misc. Retail Food Products: Restaurants, Food Markets, Liquor Stores, and Food Processing Equipment Construction: Building Materials Retail and Building Materials Wholesale Transportation: Auto Parts/Repair, Auto Sales - New, Auto Sales - Used, Service Stations, and Misc. Vehicle Sales Business to Business: Office Equip., Electronic Equip., Business Services, Energy Sales, Chemical Products, Heavy Industry, Light Industry, Leasing, Biotechnology, I.T. Infrastructure, and Green Energy Miscellaneous: Health & Government, Miscellaneous Other, and Closed Account Adjustments An analysis of sales tax performance through 1Q 2020 is attached and illustrates fairly consistent cycles for sales tax performance for most of the economic categories since 1Q 2015. For 5 of the top 10 segments (department stores, miscellaneous retail, building materials — wholesale, building materials — retail, and heavy industry) during the eight benchmark year quarters, sales tax receipts reached a new high point. The segments represent 33.6 percent of the total sales tax receipts. Service stations representing 7.5 percent was higher than the last five benchmark year quarters since 1Q 2014. Auto sales — new, food markets, restaurants and apparel stores were down slightly from 1Q 2019 due to an automobile manufacturer's end for new order incentives; a warehouse club chain, included under department stores, shifting food sales from grocery retailers; and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The top 10 segments represent 72.4 percent of the total sales tax receipts. For the other 21 segments representing 27.6 percent of the total sales tax receipts, 10 segments representing 15.2 percent of the total sales tax receipts reached new high points in the benchmark year 1Q 2020. In the Economic Segment Analysis below, restaurants and auto sales — new reflect declines in the 1Q 2020 benchmark year quarter due to impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Auto sales — new and department stores have been in the top three economic segments since 2014. Restaurants replaced service stations in the top three economic segments beginning in 4Q 2014. The service stations segments high occurred in 4Q 2012 and declined through 1Q 2017 due to lower fuel prices; the 1Q 2020 benchmark year quarter for service stations reflects an increase over the last five benchmark year quarters since 1Q 2014 due to higher fuel prices. Agenda Item 5B 10 ECONOMIC SEG MENT ANALYSIS RCTC State Wide Orange County San Bernardino County S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast Largest Segment Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Department Stores Restaurants Department Stores Department Stores Restaurants Department Stores Restaurants of Total /% Change 11.0/-1.1 14.3/-9.6 14.4/-9.1 10.6/4.0 15.0/-11.5 14.7/8.5 17.8/4.3 16.1/-9.9 15.1/4.1 22.4/-6.3 2nd Largest Segment Auto Sales - New Department Stores Auto Sales - New Restaurants Auto Sales - New Restaurants Restaurants Department Stores Auto Sales - New Misc Retail of Total / % Change 10.6/-1.3 12.8/0.9 12.5/-3.9 10.1/-5.7 10.7/-15.6 11.1/-7.6 10.1/-6.1 12.3/-0.9 11.2/4.0 11.8/-12.3 3rd Largest Segment Department Stores Auto Sales - New Department Stores Service Stations Department Stores Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Restaurants Auto Sales - New %ofTotal /%Change 10.3/9.7 10.7/-7.7 9.1/0.0 9.0/-6.5 10.6/-3.6 11.0/-7.2 9.8/-3.2 11.0/-5.3 9.4/-7.3 11.3/0.3 Information regarding sales tax comparison by city and change in economic segments (two highest gains and two highest losses) from 1Q 2019 to 1Q 2020 is attached. In early March 2020, the federal government as well as the California Governor issued emergency declarations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, on March 19, 2020 the Governor issued an executive stay at home order to protect the health and well-being of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state to slow the spread of COVID-19. The County of Riverside also issued a directive to county residents supporting the Governor's executive order. COVID-19 and the related "stay at home" orders have negatively impacted the local, regional, state, and federal economies; the magnitude and duration of these impacts is uncertain. Additionally, the Governor issued an executive order to allow businesses with under $1 million in tax liability to delay their first quarter sales and use tax filings until the end of July 2020. Another state program allows small business to defer up to $50,000 of their sales and use tax liabilities for the first and second quarters until July 31, 2021, provided that the owed amount is paid in 12 equal installments over the following year. The sales taxes due to RCTC are not waived but may be delayed. Staff will monitor sales tax receipts and other available economic data to determine the need for any adjustments to the revenue projections. Staff will utilize the forecast scenarios with the complete report and receipt trends in assessing such projections. Attachments: 1) Sales Tax Digest Summary 1Q 2020 2) Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter 1Q 2020 3) Quarterly Sales Tax Comparison by City for 1Q 2020 to 1Q 2020 Agenda Item 5B 11 Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTACHMENT 1 Sales Tax Digest Summary Collections through June 2020 Sales through March 2020 (2020Q1) CALIFORNIA'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK California sales tax receipts decreased by -18.4% over the same quarter from the previous year, with Northern California reporting a -16.9% decrease compared to a -19.6% decrease for Southern California. Receipts for the RCTC decreased by -15.4% over the same periods. A significant portion of the first quarter decline in cash receipts is due to programs the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) offered to provide relief and assistance to taxpayers impacted by COVID-19. Actual taxable sales for the first quarter for RCTC have been estimated to have changed by somewhere between -3.4% and +0.3%. The Unemployment Rate in California declined in June to 14.9% from a record high 16.4% in May. That is still far higher than the 12.3% it was during the height of the Great Recession. Unemployment benefits for Californians out of work or working reduced hours since this historic pandemic began now total $63.9 billion. Since March, the Employment Development Department (EDD) has processed more than 10.2 million claims for benefits between the regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) program, extensions, and separate Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. Last week the EDD paid an average of $686 million a day in benefits — about $600 million more than the daily average paid at the height of the Great Recession. (Employment Development Department) U.S. Real gross domestic product (GDP) decreased at an annual rate of -32.9% in the second quarter, compared a -5.0% decrease in the first quarter. (Bureau of Economic Analysis) LOCAL RESULTS Net Cash Receipts Analysis Local Collections Less: Cost of Administration Net 1Q2020 Receipts Net 1Q2019 Receipts Actual Percentage Change $40,615,845 $(477,830) $40,138,015 $47,459,374 -15.4% Business Activity Performance Analysis Local Collections — Economic Basis 1Q2020 Local Collections — Economic Basis 1Q2019 Quarter over Quarter Change Quarter over Quarter Percentage Change $46,561,775 $46,427,762 $134,013 0.3% Avenu Insights & Analytics' On -Going Audit Results Total Recovered Year to Date $11,077,498 www.avenuinsights.com (8l3) 800-8181 Page 1 RCTC HISTORICAL CASH COLLECTIONS ANALYSIS BY QUARTER $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $- (in thousands of $) 402017 102018 202018 302018 402018 102019 202019 302019 402019 102020 Net Receipts fCDTFA Ad min Fees Due $600 $500 $400 $300 $200 $100 $- TOP 25 SALES/USE TAX CONTRIBUTORS The following list identifies RCTC's Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors. The list is in alphabetical order and represents sales from April 2019 to March 2020. The Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors generate 25.3% of RCTC's total sales and use tax revenue. AMAZON SERVICES AMAZON.COM ARCO AM/PM MINI MARTS BEST BUY STORES CARMAX THE AUTO SUPERSTORE CHEVRON SERVICE STATIONS CIRCLE K FOOD STORES CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTORS COSTCO WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES FERGUSON ENTERPRISES HOME DEPOT JACK IN THE BOX RESTAURANTS KOHL'S DEPARTMENT STORES LOWE'S HOME CENTERS MACY'S DEPARTMENT STORE MCDONALD'S RESTAURANTS RALPH'S GROCERY COMPANY ROSS STORES SAM'S CLUB SHELL SERVICE STATIONS STATER BROS MARKETS TARGET STORES VERIZON WIRELESS WAL MART STORES www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800-8181 lg Page 2 RCTC HISTORICAL SALES TAX AMOUNTS The following chart shows the sales tax level from annual sales through March 2020, the highs, and the lows for each segment over the last two years in thousands of $. $25,000 1 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $0 r t i I L ■ I C� Ais Pam`° ` ANNUAL SALES TAX BY BUSINESS CATEGORY 1Q2020 4Q2019 3Q2019 2Q2019 1Q2019 4Q2018 3Q2018 2Q2018 1Q2018 4Q2017 (in thousands of $) 3 1Q2020 • High • Low ZAP •ti x42 ,��� �y�c NA`� 55,793 4,121 47,055 21,373 33,024 5,758 55,280 34,804 47,599 21,059 32,915 5,034 54,906 34,643 47,125 20,975 31,680 5,034 54,108 52,552 34,335 34,425 53,389 34,3 47,158 46,876 21,120 20,722 30,582 4,870 30,965 5,033 46,979 20,622 31,155 51,626 34,068 46,490 20,145 30,795 4,671 51,082 33,493 45,671 19,851 30,660 4,659 50,844 33,054 44,933 19,472 30,263 ,576 50,156 32,141 44,472 19,008 29,703 4,247 $ 0 $ 20,000 $ 40,000 $ 60,000 $ 80,000 $ 100,000 $ 120,000 $ 140,000 $ 160,000 $ 180,000 $ 200,000 • General Retail • Food Products • Transportation • Construction • Business To Business • Miscellaneous www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800-8181 Page 3 RCTC FIVE-YEAR ECONOMIC TREND: General Retail $18,000 $16,000 $14,000 $12,000 $10,000 $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 $2,000 $0 (in thousands of $) 1111111111111111111 L/1 u] In lO CO t0 l0 n N r- N CO 00 CO 00 Ol Ol al 01 0 .--I a --I .--I v--I r-1 .--I r-I .--I v--I r-1 .--I r-I .--I r-I .--I v--I r-1 .--I r-I N O O Oryry O Oryry O Onn O O Oryry O Onn O O Oryry O Oryry O Onn O P Q R Q � Q N Q D Q N P Q R Q ( Q N M � a --I N In V .--I N f+'] � rl N M � ati N In V .--I www.avenuinsights.com (800) 800-8181 Page 4 15 RCTC: Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter ATTACHMENT 2 TOTAL TOTAL $60, 000, 000 $50,000,000 ::::::::: . $10, 000, 000 $8,000,000 TRANSPORTATION IIII Oil 2020Q1 QoQ % QoQ YoY $A $10,559,438 -4.7%-$522,$A543 YoY 0.4%%A $179,601 $6,000,000 % of Total: 22.7% CONSTRUCTION Economic CATEGORY TOTAL $18,000,000 2020Q1 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $46,561,775 0.3% $134,013 4.1% $7,947,979 $16, 000, 000 $30, 000, 000 $10, 000, 000 $0 ti41 ti4') ti(0 ti� ti^ ti ti ti� ti� ti� 0 ti 4A, 'A, ,Ao '1, ,10 '1, ,Vo r1, '1, '1, '1, FQ2 Q3 Q4 Q1 GENERAL RETAIL 2020Q1 QoQ %A $12, 944, 205 % of 2020Q1 Total: 3.8% QoQ $A $471,599 27.8% YoY %A YoY $A 6.2% $3,240,768 $4, 000, 000 $2, 000, 000 FOOD PRODUCTS 2020Q1 $8,162,419 % of Total: QoQ %A -9.1% 17.5% QoQ $A -$818,540 YoY %A -0.9% YoY $A -$304,524 2020Q1 $5,112,398 % of Total: QoQ %A 7.9% QoQ $A $372,796 YoY %A 3.1% YoY $A $650,564 11.0% BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 2020Q1 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $7,553,025 0.9% $65,272 6.6% $2,058,524 % of Total: 16.2% QoQ = 20Q1 / 19Q1 YoY = YE 20Q1 / YE 19Q1 16 Avenu Insights & Analytics ATTACHMENT 3 RCTC: Quarterly Comparison of 2019Q1 and 2020Q1 (January through March Sales) cc c w O a` 0 0 t: 00. CO 0 0 0 w N c c m m Jan - Mar 2020 (2020Q1) Jan - Mar 2019 (2019Q1) % Chg Gain Gain Decline Decline RIVERSIDE COUNTY I BANNING -47.3% -16.4% 0.8% 6.4% -47.1% -8.6% 472,849 551,888 -14.3% MISC. VEHICLE SALES AUTO SALES - NEW RESTAURANTS DRUG STORES BEAUMONT -19.4% -15.9% -19.2% -69.6% 30.3% -42.9% 841,842 1,067,350 -21.1% LIGHT INDUSTRY FOOD PROCESSING EQP BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORES BLYTHE 57.4% -14.8% -26.5% 11.8% -10.9% -92.7% 342,078 354,658 -3.5% MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL FOOD MARKETS SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS CALIMESA -27.3% -8.5% -3.7% -88.9% -56.5% -64.8% 169,272 191,152 -11.4% AUTO PARTS/REPAIR FOOD MARKETS RESTAURANTS DRUG STORES CANYON LAKE -92.7% -42.4% -18.2% -100.0% -73.4% -68.2% 37,031 119,943 -69.1% FOOD MARKETS SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS LIGHT INDUSTRY CATHEDRAL CITY -20.7% -31.2% -28.8% -15.0% -9.3% -9.7% 1,601,668 2,179,700 -26.5% MISC. VEHICLE SALES HEAVY INDUSTRY AUTO SALES - NEW RESTAURANTS COACHELLA -31.4% -32.5% -10.3% -52.9% -74.9% -71.8% 629,465 848,967 -25.9% BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL OFFICE EQUIPMENT FOOD MARKETS SERVICE STATIONS CORONA -19.0% -25.7% -19.5% 1.7% -6.3% 18.6% 7,560,577 8,717,359 -13.3% BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE -18.8% -32.1% -18.0% 1.9% -28.9% -36.4% 5,117,657 6,384,526 -19.8% BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE MISC. VEHICLE SALES APPAREL STORES FOOD PROCESSING EQP DESERT HOT SPRINGS -46.4% -21.7% -5.6% -1.8% -51.7% 41.8% 312,337 396,978 -21.3% MISCELLANEOUS OTHER LIGHT INDUSTRY RESTAURANTS DEPARTMENT STORES EASTVALE -0.9% -30.1% -39.8% -43.3% -4.7% -69.0% 1,577,182 1,897,827 -16.9% DEPARTMENT STORES FLORIST/NURSERY BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL FOOD MARKETS HEMET -19.8% -21.1% 3.4% -54.5% -33.7% -26.0% 2,111,633 2,490,718 -15.2% AUTO SALES - NEW FOOD MARKETS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL RESTAURANTS INDIAN WELLS -40.8% -68.6% 0.0% -98.0% -38.3% -100.0% 215,520 519,843 -58.5% DRUG STORES AUTO PARTS/REPAIR RESTAURANTS RECREATION PRODUCTS INDIO -16.9% -41.3% -15.6% -54.7% 1.0% -27.7% 1,987,606 2,684,909 -26.0% HEAVY INDUSTRY SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE JURUPAVALLEY 5.8% -13.0% 13.6% 25.3% -24.7% -94.2% 2,503,653 2,510,868 -0.3% SERVICE STATIONS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL RESTAURANTS APPAREL STORES LA QUINTA -17.0% -29.1% -43.3% -59.9% -42.2% -29.8% 1,664,087 2,335,541 -28.7% DEPARTMENT STORES BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL LAKE ELSINORE -9.6% -17.9% -31.5% -44.6% -17.8% -0.1% 1,624,991 2,037,378 -20.2% DEPARTMENT STORES BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE AUTO SALES- NEW BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL MENIFEE -27.9% -17.4% -40.0% 2.5% -42.3% 12.3% 1,341,052 1,782,083 -24.7% BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL LIGHT INDUSTRY SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS MORENO VALLEY -28.6% -32.5% -19.7% -32.0% -12.2% -17.1% 3,155,454 4,308,739 -26.8% HEAVY INDUSTRY BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE FOOD MARKETS RESTAURANTS MURRIETA -11.6% -34.4% -18.4% -40.2% -16.3% -55.4% 2,939,241 3,737,146 -21.4% MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL AUTO SALES - NEW RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL NORCO -35.2% -28.2% -27.3% 45.6% -10.1% -14.7% 1,120,959 1,549,787 -27.7% BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE DRUG STORES RESTAURANTS SERVICE STATIONS PALM DESERT -31.5% -49.2% 2.9% -2.6% -33.7% 36.5% 3,387,827 4,928,609 -31.3% AUTO SALES - USED MISCELLANEOUS OTHER RESTAURANTS MISCELLANEOUS RETAIL PALM SPRINGS -35.6% -58.4% -4.8% -45.4% -21.5% 31.6% 2,343,351 3,741,382 -37.4% AUTO SALES - NEW MISCELLANEOUS OTHER RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL PERRIS -70.0% -37.7% -30.9% -76.0% -11.1% -91.4% 1,721,801 4,515,830 -61.9% DRUG STORES BLDG.MATLS-WHSLE FURNITURE/APPLIANCE BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL RANCHO MIRAGE -26.3% -49.8% -16.3% -72.7% -61.1% -0.9% 952,147 1,551,082 -38.6% SERVICE STATIONS FOOD MARKETS RESTAURANTS BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL RIVERSIDE -14.0% -32.8% -14.8% -17.0% -8.3% -23.0% 11,062,067 13,405,802 -17.5% HEAVY INDUSTRY BUSINESS SERVICES RESTAURANTS SERVICE STATIONS SAN JACINTO -7.8% -8.9% -24.1% -9.7% -79.6% 2.3% 562,995 660,445 -14.8% DEPARTMENT STORES FOOD MARKETS SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS TEMECULA -19.8% -35.7% -28.1% -38.4% -19.2% -37.1% 5,660,925 7,679,532 -26.3% DRUG STORES LIQUOR STORES AUTO SALES - NEW RESTAURANTS WILDOMAR -0.1% -22.3% -49.0% -39.2% 47.1% -37.2% 305,035 424,135 -28.1% LIGHT INDUSTRY BLDG.MATLS-RETAIL SERVICE STATIONS RESTAURANTS 17 Avenu Insights & Analytics AGENDA ITEM 5C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 14, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the 12 months ended June 30, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the fiscal year, staff monitored the revenues and expenditures/expenses for the Commission. The attached preliminary financial statements present the revenues and expenditures/expenses for the Fiscal Year 2019/20. Many accrual adjustments for revenues and expenditures/expenses have been made for the year ended June 30, 2020, and are reflected in these financial statements; however, staff will continue to make year-end accrual adjustments depending upon materiality through the completion of the audit in October 2020. In March, the federal government as well as California's Governor Newsom issued emergency declarations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, on March 19, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-33-20, a stay at home order to protect the health and well-being of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. The County of Riverside also issued a directive to county residents supporting the Governor's executive order. COVID-19 and the related "stay at home" orders have negatively impacted the local, regional, state, and federal economies; the magnitude and duration of these impacts is uncertain. Nonetheless, Commission staff determined that it was critical to reassess the FY 2019/20 revenue projections for Measure A and LTF. At its May 13 meeting, the Commission approved the revised FY 2019/20 revenue projections of $178 million for Measure A revenues and $91 million for LTF revenues, reflecting a $24 million and $12 million decrease in Measure A and LTF revenues, respectively. These adjustments to budgeted revenues are included in the attached financial statements. The financial statements show the sales tax revenues comprised of Measure A, Local Transportation Fund (LTF), and State Transit Assistance for the fourth quarter at 108 percent of the budget. Measure A and LTF revenues of $295,319,961 exceeded the budget by 10 percent, primarily as a result of higher actual revenues compared to revised revenue projections approved by the Commission in May that anticipated significant declines due to COVID-19. On Agenda Item 5C 18 a cash basis, the Measure A and LTF sales tax receipts through the fourth quarter are 3.59 and 2.75 percent lower, respectively, than the same period last fiscal year. Additionally, State Transit Assistance revenues of $28.7 million, including State of Good Repair, is lower than the budget by 8 percent. Staff will continue to monitor the trends in the sales taxes and report to the Commission any necessary adjustments in revenue projections. Federal, state, and local reimbursements are generally on a reimbursement basis. The Commission receives these revenues as eligible project costs are incurred and invoiced to the respective agencies. Significant federal and state reimbursements are related to 15/91 Express Lanes Connector project, Interstate 15 Express Lanes project, Pachappa Underpass project, State Route 60 Truck Lanes project, Senate Bill 132 funded local jurisdiction projects, Coachella Valley rail station development, Perris Valley Line operations, Riverside Layover Facility, Riverside Track and Platform, and other station improvements. The following is an analysis of federal and state reimbursements reflected in this quarterly report: FederaI Reimbursements State Rel bursern ents Budget Actual Budget Actual Highways 15/91 Express Lanes Connector S 6,000,000 S 3,709,084 $ 46,848,200 $ 33,773,331 1-15 Express Lanes 2,704,000 2,200,084 - Pachappa Underpass 10,558,400 3,421,470 4,272,000 SR-60 Truck Lanes 33,626,000 11,592,853 35,374,000 24,340,384 SB 132 Funded Projects - 46,663,600 43,012,449 Other 447,100 12,951,100 1,716,681 Total 53,335,500 20,923,491 146,108,900 102,842,845 Rail Coe chelle Valley Rail Station Development 750,000 535,994 5,942,500 Perris Valley Line Operations 4,000,000 3,922,418 1,496,700 1,081,302 Riverside Layover Facility 5,900,000 238,025 - Riverside Track 8 Platform 1,300,000 1,305,771 - Other Station I mprovements 16,000,000 3,256, 234 - Total 27,950,000 9,258,442 7,439,200 1,081,302 Other 8,433,200 5,415,968 7,348,000 5,126,100 Tote1 S 89,718,700 S 35,597,901 S 160,896,100 S 109,050,247 Staff will continue to prepare year-end reimbursement accrual adjustments in connection with the year-end closing and audit process. During the FY 2019/20 budget process, the Commission conservatively estimated Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues of $25 million passed through from the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). Management analyzed TUMF revenues for the first six months of FY 2019/20 and determined an average monthly TUMF revenue amount. The analysis showed a 14 percent decrease in TUMF revenues for the first half of FY 2019/20 compared to the same period for FY 2018/19. Additionally, actual revenues were tracking below the FY 2019/20 projections. As a result of COVID-19, management assumed that TUMF revenues for the last four months of FY 2019/20 would decrease to Agenda Item 5C 19 approximately 10 percent of the average monthly TUMF revenue amount. At its May 13 meeting, the Commission approved the revised FY 2019/20 TUMF revenue projection of $16 million, reflecting an $11 million decrease in revenues. This adjustment to budgeted revenues is included in the attached financial statements. During the FY 2019/20 budget process, the Commission conservatively budgeted RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll revenues at $36.1 million based on estimated toll transactions and current traffic and revenue data. Through the first half of the fiscal year, the RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll transactions and revenues exceeded initial expectations. In March the Commission approved a mid -year budget adjustment of $25.3 million to increase the estimated toll revenues. Very soon after Commission approval of the budget adjustment through June, traffic volumes for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes decreased due to the COVID-19 pandemic and government orders. The operating statement shows toll revenues at 80 percent of the budget and toll violations and fee revenues at 125 percent of the budget. Given the COVID-19 and the related "stay at home" order impacts, staff will continue to monitor the toll transactions. The operating statement shows other revenues at 103 percent of the $553,000 budget and reflects property management lease revenues. The operating statement shows investment income at 191 percent of the $9.5 million budget. During the development of the FY 2019/20 budget, staff estimated investment income rate at 2 percent, as investment income during the first quarter of calendar year 2019 ranged between 2 — 2.5 percent. Since the adoption of the budget in June 2019, the Federal Reserve has cut interest rates five times to a level of 0 — 0.25 percent. Staff lowered its expectations of investment income results, and in March the Commission approved a mid -year budget adjustment of $3.3 million in the third quarter to decrease investment income from $12.8 million to $9.5 million. The expenditures/expenses and other financing sources/uses categories are in line overall with the expectations of the budget with the following exceptions: • Salaries and benefits are under budget due to unfilled Commission full-time equivalents in the Capital Project Development and Delivery, Planning and Programming, and Administration departments; • Professional services are under budget primarily due to unused budget authority for rail operations and development activities, highway general legal services, toll operations, and public outreach activities; • Support costs are under budget due to unused budget authority for administrative activities, rail operations and development activities, toll operations, and public outreach activities; • Program operations are under budget due to unused budget authority for the toll operations, motorist and commuter assistance program operations, highway and rail program management, and station security; Agenda Item 5C 20 • The status of significant Commission capital projects (engineering, construction, design -build, and right of way/land) with budget amounts exceeding $5 million is discussed in the attachment; • Operating and capital disbursements are made as claims are submitted to the Commission by transit operators; • Special studies unused budget authority is related to feasibilities studies; • Local streets and roads expenditures are related to Measure A sales tax revenues. These financial statements reflect the turnback payments through June 2020. The anticipated impacts of COVID-19 on Measure A sales tax revenues resulted in a $7.3 million budget adjustment to decrease FY 2019/20 local streets and roads expenditures approved by the Commission in March. Since actual Measure A sales tax revenues were higher than anticipated, local streets and roads expenditures are greater than the budgeted amount. Accordingly, in connection with the year end closing process, staff will transfer approximately $4.9 million of available budget authority from the Measure A Western County and Coachella Valley programs to local streets and roads expenditures; • Regional arterial expenditures primarily represent expenditures for the highways and regional arterial program administered by Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). CVAG requests reimbursements from the Commission based on available funds and sufficient budget authority; • Debt service principal payments are made annually on June 1, while debt service interest payments are made semiannually on December 1 and June 1. On a quarterly basis in the RCTC 91 Express Lanes Enterprise Fund accounting records, the Commission records accrued interest including compounded interest on the 91 Project Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan and accreted interest on the 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds, Series B (capital appreciation). However, $21.7 million of the $71.4 million interest cost related to toll revenue debt through the fourth quarter will not be paid in the current year and therefore is not included in the FY 2019/20 budget; • Capital outlay expenditures is under budget due to unused budget authority for office and property improvements for station rehabilitation, toll operations transponders, and Commission office, network, hardware, and software improvements; • Depreciation is recorded as part of the accrual adjustments in the RCTC 91 Express Lanes Enterprise Fund accounting records; however, such depreciation is not paid and therefore is not included in the FY 2019/20 budget; • Loss on sale of land is recorded as part of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes Enterprise Fund accounting records and reflects the loss on sale of excess lane purchased for the 91 Project. Loss on sale of land is not a cash -related item and, therefore, is not included in the FY 2019/20 budget; • The Commission entered into a loan agreement with the U.S. Department of Transportation for a $152.5 million TIFIA loan to pay eligible 1-15 Express Lanes project costs. Proceeds of the TIFIA loan may be drawn upon after certain conditions have been met. Through the fourth quarter, the Commission drew down $111.3 million for a Agenda Item 5C 21 cumulative inception to date total in TIFIA loan proceeds of $126.2 million. During construction of the 1-15 Express Lanes project and for a period of up to five years following substantial completion, interest is compounded and added to the TIFIA loan. TIFIA debt service payments are expected to commence in December 2025, which is approximately five years after substantial completion of the 1-15 Express Lanes project, through 2055; and • In March, the Commission approved the refinancing of the 91 Project 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds, Series A (current interest) and TIFIA Loan. Due to COVID-19 and related municipal debt market disruptions, the Commission postponed the refinancing until FY 2020/21. Accordingly, significant variances exist for principal, cost of issuance, and payment to escrow agent included in debt service and for debt proceeds and bond premium included in otherfinancing sources. Attachments: 1) Quarterly Project Status —June 2020 2) Quarterly Financial Statements —June 2020 Agenda Item 5C 22 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY PROJECT STATUS 4th QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2020 FY 2019/20 4th QUARTER BUDGET Project Description EXPENDITURES THROUGH 4th QUARTER ATTACHMENT 1 Project Status 91 Project (P003028) The project connects with Orange County Transportation Authority's tolled express lanes at the Orange County/Riverside County line and continues approximately eight miles to the Interstate (I)-15/State Route (SR)-91 interchange. The project involves widening pavement on the outside of the existing highway to reposition general purpose lanes and repurposing the existing high occupancy vehicle lanes to accommodate two -tolled express lanes in the median in each direction. The 91 Project also involves constructing one new general purpose lane in each direction from SR-71 to 1-15, ultimately providing two -tolled express lanes and five general purpose lanes in each direction. 91 Project development activities began in September 2007, construction work related to roadway and structures began in July 2014, and thetoll lanes opened in March 2017. Thetotal cost of the 91 Project is estimated at $1.4 billion, including capitalized interest, debt service reserves, contingency, and cost of issuance. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $26,195,400. 1-15 Express Lanes project (P003027) The project will generally add two tolled express Ian es in each direction from SR-60 to Cajalco Road in Corona. Project development activities began in April 2008, and lanes are expected to open to traffic in 2020. The total project cost is estimated at $472 million, which includes $42 million of contingency. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $122,809,400. $25,946,200 122,579,500 $6,782,478 111,854,368 The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to no settlement for unresolved property acquisition litigation ($13.3 million), contractor warranty dispute contingency not required ($2.8 million), budgeted but notyet performed city of Corona Ontario Improvements project ($1.5 million), and under runs in the projectand construction management (PCM) contract($1.6 million). The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to under runs in the toll services contractor ($3.9 million), unused toll services contractor contingency ($3.8 million), pre -operations postage and collateral material cost postponed ($0.5 million), and permits not required ($0.5 million). FY 2019/20 23 4th QUARTER BUDGET Project Description EXPENDITURES THROUGH 4th QUARTER Project Status 15/91 Express Lanes Connector (P003039) The 15/91 Express Lane Connector (ELC) project constructs an express lanes median direct connector from south bound 1-15 to westbound SR-91 and from eastbound SR-91 to northbound 1-15 in the city of Corona. The project also adds tolled express lanes in each direction of 1-15 from the 15/91 ELC to Hidden Valley Parkway; adds a tolled express lane in each direction of SR-91 from east of Lincoln Avenue to the 15/91 ELC; extendsthetolled express lane along eastbound SR-91 from 1-15 to west of Promenade Avenue; and extends an eastbound auxiliary lane along SR-91 from west of 1-15 to west of Promenade Avenue. The project also includes the addition of a toll collection system infrastructure along 1-15 and SR-91. The estimated project cost is $270 million and the project is partially funded by state funds allocated under Senate Bill (SB) 132 legislation. The connectoris expected to open to traffic in 2022. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $46, 848, 200. 1-15 Express Lanes Southern Extension (P003044) The project will add express lanes between SR-74 and Cajalco Road. The estimated project cost is $544 million with the Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA/ED) phase of work funded by federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) fundsand Measure A. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $7,522,400. Mid County Parkway (MCP) (P002302, P612302, P002320, & P002317) The environmental document for a newcorridorfrom I-215to SR-79 was approved in April2015. The firstdesign package is anticipated to be completed in FY2018/2019. Construction of this new facility will be completed over many years as funding becomes available; the total project cost is estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $44, 866,100. 46,848,300 7,536,400 44,907,100 32,609,223 4,052,434 16,429,811 The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to the design and widening of the Hidden Valley Parkway ($7.0 million), the PCM contract($3.7 million), and Caltrans ($0.9 million). The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fo u rth quarter is due to a later start to the project approval/environmental documentation contract ($2.4 million) and a budgeted on -call traffic and revenue study that has not occurred ($0.7 million). The under run of th e FY2019/20 budg et at the fourth quarter is primarily due to the following for each project: • MCP: Lower than expected costs for preliminary engineering and permit fee with the Regional Water Quality Board that did not occur ($0.4 million); right of way (ROW) acquisition and ROW support($0.6 million); and program management, other professional services, and staff labor($0.2 million) • MCP Placentia: Construction and construction support will notstartuntil FY2020/21 ($12.0 million). The bulk of projected ROW acquisition and acquisition support is anticipated to be spent in FY 2020/21 ($11.2 million). Lower than planned costs for final design, program management, and staff labor($0.9 million). • MCP Mitigation: Actual construction and construction management costs were lower than projected ($2.9 million), with plant establishment expected to conclude in the second quarter of FY2020/21. 24 FY 2019/20 4th QUARTER BUDGET Project Description EXPENDITURES THROUGH 4th QUARTER Project Status Pachappa Underpass project (P003038) The project will remove the Pach ap pa shoofly structure and associated retaining walls and construct a retaining wall, drainage, and track bed for the permanent Pachappa underpass. Track relocation will be performed by Union Pacific Railroad. The project construction cost is estimated at $16 million. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $16,745,000. SR-60 Truck Lanes (P003029) The project will construct eastbound climbing and westbound descending truck lanes from Gilman Springs Road to west of Jack Rabbit trail and upgrade existing shoulders to standard widths. The estimated project cost is $138 million and the project is funded by CMAQ, State Transportation Improvement Program/Regional Improvement Program, State Highway Operation and Protection Program, and 2009 Measure A highway funds. TheFY2019/20 budget amount is $69,680,300. 71/91 Connector Project (P003021) The project includes ROW acquisition, utility relocation, and environmental revalidation work for improvements to the 71/91 connector. The estimated project cost is $118 million. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $7,494,200. Riverside Layover Facility (P653822) The project includes increased capacity and maintenance service improvements to Metrolink's West Layover Facility, north of the Riverside Downtown station. The improvements include expansion of the facility to accommodate three storage tracks with an overall storage capacity of three 6-train sets. The estimated project cost is $5.3 million. The project is funded by Federal Transit Administration Section 5307. The FY 2019/20 budget amount is $6, 624,100. 16, 745, 000 68, 023, 600 7,566,600 6,041,800 3,697,272 42, 605, 800 The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to construction starting at the end ofthethird quarter and additional time required for UPRR approval of the boulder stabilization plan. Specific under runs are in construction ($5.6 million), construction support services for railroad work including contingency ($5.7 million), and construction management($1.1 million). The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to construction not performing as planned last period as a result of weather delays. The bulk of construction did not occur as anticipated ($23.3 million) and is anticipated to be spent in the first quarter of FY 2020/21. Other lower than expected costs were in construction management ($0.9 million) and towing/operating costs ($0.9 million). 5,964,659 The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to a combination of utility relocation and acquisition costs that did not occur ($0.9 million), lower final design costs ($0.5 million), and lower program management and staff labor costs ($0.2 million). 1,278,587 The under run of the FY 2019/20 budget at the fourth quarter is due to the long lead time to procure a transfer switch and unforeseen contaminated soil issues and underground utility conflicts with a new sewer connection, postponing construction into the first quarter of FY 2020/21 ($3.4 million). Additionally, the projected ROW acquisition, acquisition support, or other environmental testing was not spent ($0.5 million). This list discussesthe significant capital projects (i.e., total budgeted costs in excess of$5million) and related status. Capital project expenditures are generally affected by lags in invoices submitted by contractors and consultants, as well as issues encountered during certain phases of the projects. The capital projects budgets tend to be based on aggressive project schedules. 25 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2020 ATTACHMENT 2 FY 2019/20 4TH QUARTER REMAINING PERCENT BUDGET ACTUAL BALANCE UTILIZATION Revenues Sales tax $ 300,050,600 $ 324,017,852 $ 23,967,252 108% Federal reimbursements 89,718,700 35,597,901 (54,120,799) 40% State reimbursements 160,896,100 109,050,247 (51,845,853) 68% Local reimbursements 9,957,900 3,652,648 (6,305,252) 37% Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee 16,240,000 23,263,524 7,023,524 143% Toll revenues 61,470,000 49,252,190 (12,217,810) 80% Toll violations and fee revenues 5,731,100 7,181,834 1,450,734 125% Other revenues 553,000 569,349 16,349 103% Investment income 9,500,000 18,123,789 8,623,789 191% Total revenues 654,117,400 570,709,334 (83,408,066) 87% Expenditures/Expenses Salaries and benefits 19,902,500 18,186,369 1,716,131 91% Professional and support Professional services 28,386,400 10,427,152 17,959,248 37% Support costs 13,479,200 8,899,759 4,579,441 66% Total Professional and support costs 41,865,600 19,326,911 22,538,689 46% Projects and operations Program operations 34,167,200 23,570,523 10,596,677 69% Engineering 25,343,700 10,868,297 14,475,403 43% Construction 154,420,100 75,779,980 78,640,120 49% Design Build 157,451,500 142,414,139 15,037,361 90% Right of way/land 93,735,500 50,906,871 42,828,629 54% Operating and capital disbursements 214,005,500 125,214,853 88,790,647 59% Special studies 1,119,200 433,849 685,351 39% Local streets and roads 54,061,300 58,983,404 (4,922,104) 109% Regional arterials 28,388,000 14,523,219 13,864,781 51% Total projects and operations 762,692,000 502,695,135 259,996,865 66% Debt service Principal 511,825,300 27,253,685 484,571,615 5% Interest 49,631,400 71,367,047 (21,735,647) 144% Cost of issuance 2,720,000 - 2,720,000 N/A Payment to escrow agent 142,975,000 - 142,975,000 N/A Total debt service 707,151,700 98,620,732 608,530,968 14% Capital outlay 6,470,600 4,214,641 2,255,959 65% Depreciation - 10,784,109 (10,784,109) N/A Loss on sale of land - 6,569,606 (6,569,606) N/A Total Expenditures/Expenses 1,538,082,400 660,397,503 877,684,897 43% Excess revenues over (under) expenditures/expenses (883,965,000) (89,688,169) 894,880,300 10% Other financing sources/(uses) Transfer in 170,828,000 146,977,889 (23,850,1 11) 86% Transfer out (170,828,000) (146,977,889) 23,850,111 86% Debt proceeds 625,425,000 - (625,425,000) N/A TIFIA loan proceeds 75,703,000 111,301,868 35,598,868 147% Bond premium 39,967,400 - (39,967,400) N/A Total financing sources/(uses) 741,095,400 111,301,868 629,793,532 15% Net change in fund balances (142,869,600) 21,613,699 1,524,673,832 -15% Fund balance July 1, 2019 792,310,100 515,617,773 (276,692,327) 65% Fund balance June 30, 2020 $ 649,440,500 $ 537,231,472 $ 1,247,981,505 83% 26 Revenues Sales tax Federal reimbursements State reimbursements Local reimbursements Transportation Uniform Mitiaation Fee Toll revenues Toll violations and fee revenues Other revenues Investment income Total revenues Expenditures/Expenses Salaries and benefits Professional and support Professional services Support costs Total Professional and support costs Proiecfs and operations Proaram operations Enaineerina Construction Desian Build Riahf of wav/land Ooeratina and capital disbursements Special studies Local streets and roads Reaional arterials Total oroiecfs and operations Debt service Principal Interest Total debt service GENERAL FUND RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL BY FUND 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2020 SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS FSP/ SAFE MEASURE A SALES TAX WESTERN COUNTY COACHELLA VALLEY PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND STATE TRANSIT TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM COACHELLA ASSISTANCE STATE OF GOOD REPAIR MITIGATION FEE (TUMF) VALLEY RAIL OTHER AGENCY PROJECTS SB132 $ - $ - $ 152.356.158 $ 3,922,418 - 28,327,801 1,367,076 4,840,327 25,530,036 865,516 352,268 1,638,587 3.409 - 531.670 286.374 143.602 4.063.620 6.444.793 5.336.197 212.447.872 9.798.065 279.330 6.384.868 41.832.335 $ 847.828 $ 100.283.640 $ 24.857.024 $ 3.840.867 1.094.537 4 42.926.872 847.832 56.093 35 4.104.611 361.131 2.822.400 8.695 2.044.564 272.306 3.257.400 244 6.149.175 633.437 6.079.800 8.939 18.916 3.726.788 11.694.278 - 8.926.239 865.000 - 53.982.474 - 112.059.527 - 12.544.272 22.714.120 - 8.505.924 432.214 - 1.635 - 43.755.214 6.206.363 14.413.142 815.048 14.523.219 - 498 - $ - $ - $ - - 535,994 - - 527,029 - - 76,785,779 (1,8921 798,404 - 23.263.524 - - - - 27.103 - - - 1.088.237 2.041.796 123.445 2.108.973 52.827 4.372 12.793 101.371.877 26.899.318 3.964.312 25.924.737 588.821 802.776 76.798.572 73.985.319 560.728 15.549 116.567 188.940 17.370 - 79.461 752.614 8.240 881.922 3.410 - 343 158 17.370 - 82.871 752.614 8.583 882.080 13.045.380 757.747 476.685 3.477 253.420 106.582 925.346 374.858 426.863 214.991 1.196.931 - - 19.709.573 - - - 30.161.171 13.929.537 - 13.045 24.420.017 24.030.250 3.726.788 251.469.563 35.142.724 815.048 8.685 7.076 73.985.319 13.045.380 757.747 16.528.499 378.335 693.328 74.612.334 15.761 Capital outlay 261.302 - 3.536.042 Depreciation Loss on sale of land Total Expenditures/Expenses 40.254.553 4.639.555 267.470.273 35.207.756 815.083 73.985.319 13.062.750 757.747 17.172.098 1.146.498 818.478 75.683.354 Excess revenues over (under) (33,809,760) 696,642 (55,022,401) 7,719,116 32,749 27,386,558 13,836,568 3,206,565 8,752,639 (557,677) (15,702) 1,115,218 expenditures/expenses Other financina sources/luses) Transfer in 32.361.161 2.400.000 41.635.365 142.164 - - - - 177.115 450.000 19.442 166.859 Transfer out 11.448.4951 12.694.5001 184.998.5391 1691.3001 132.9001 122.259.1951 1678.3001 1849.3001 11.051.8001 160.2001 - - TIFIAloanoroceeds - - 111.301.868 - - - - - - - Total financina sources/lusesl 30.912.666 1294.5001 67.938.694 1549.1361 132.9001 122.259.1951 1678.3001 1849.3001 1874.6851 389.800 19.442 166.859 Net chance in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2019 Fund balance June 30, 2020 12.897.0941 402.142 12.916.293 29.124.269 10.501.511 253.925.602 $ 26.227 175 $ 10 903.653 $ 266.841 895 $ 7.169.980 11511 5.127.363 56.410.474 562 91.541.353 63.580 454 $ 411 $ 96.668 716 $ 13.158.268 107.469.411 120.627 679 $ 2.357.265 6.680.556 9.037 821 7.877.954 1167.8771 109.653.332 3.071.729 117 531.286 $ 2903 852 1 3.740 17.017 20.757 $ 1.282.077 11.272.3561 9.721 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL BY FUND 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2020 ENTERPRISE FUND CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS TOLL OPERATIONS COMMERCIAL PAPER SALES TAX BONDS DEBT SERVICE COMBINED TOTAL Revenues Sales tax $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 324.017.852 Federal reimbursements - - - 2,811,688 35,597,901 State reimbursements - - - - 109,050,247 Local reimbursements (823) - - 90 3,652,648 Transportation Uniform Mitiaation Fee - - - 23,263,524 Toll revenues 49.252.190 - - - 49,252,190 Toll violations and fee revenues 7.181.834 - - 7,181,834 Other revenues 7.167 - - - 569,349 Investment income 3.771.007 1.244.268 1.817.811 270.123 18,123,789 Total revenues 60.211.375 1.244.268 1.817.811 3.081.901 570,709,334 Expenditures/Expenses Salaries and benefits 786.194 - - - 18,186,369 Professional and support Professional services 1.390.708 - - - 10,427,152 Support costs 3.321.334 - - - 8,899,759 Total Professional and su000rt costs 4.712.042 - - - 19.326.911 Proiects and operations Proaram operations 7.290.377 - - - 23,570,523 Enaineerina - - - - 10,868,297 Construction 26.002 - - - 75,779,980 Desian Build 193.441 - - - 142,414,139 Right of wav/land - - - - 50,906,871 Operatina and capital disbursements - - - - 125,214,853 Special studies - - - - 433,849 Local streets and roads - - - - 58,983,404 Reaional arterials - - - - 14,523,219 Total oroiects and operations 7.509.820 - - - 502,695,135 Debt service Principal - - - 27.245.000 27,253,685 Interest 28.855.679 - 211.804 42.292.488 71,367,047 Total debt service 28.855.679 - 211.804 69.537.488 98,620,732 Capital outlay 417.297 Depreciation 10.784.109 Loss on sale of land 6.569.606 4,214,641 10,784,109 6,569,606 Total Expenditures/Expenses 59.634.747 211.804 69.537.488 660.397.503 Excess revenues over (under( 576,628 1,244,268 1,606,007 (66,455,587) (89,688,169) expenditures/expenses Other financina sources/fuses) Transfer in - - - 69.625.783 146,977,889 Transfer out (2.923.474) (6.199.608) (20.136.426) (2.953.852) (146,977,889) TIFIA loan proceeds - - - - 111,301,868 Total financina sources/fuses) 12.923.474) 16.199.608) 120.136.426) 66.671.931 111,301,868 Net change in fund balances 12.346.846) 14.955.340) 118.530.419) 216.344 21,613,699 Fund balance July 1, 2019 1274.596.300) 23.091.659 88.561.805 11.437.149 515,617,773 Fund balance June 30, 2020 $ (276 943 1461 $ 18 136 319 $ 70 031 386 $ 11 653 493 $ 537,231,472 28 AGENDA ITEM 5D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 14, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Megan Kavand, Senior Financial Analyst Michele Cisneros, Deputy Finance Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended June 30, 2020. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Prior to Fiscal Year 2013/14, the Commission's quarterly investment reports reflected investments primarily concentrated in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund. Other investments included the state Local Agency Investment Fund and mutual funds. As a result of significant project financings such as the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project or 91 CIP) and the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project (1-15 ELP), the Commission determined it would be prudent to engage an investment manager for the bond proceeds and other required funds. Additionally, the Commission desired to engage an investment manager to provide investment advisory and management services related to the Commission's operating funds. In May 2013, following a competitive procurement, the Commission awarded two investment management services agreements to Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (Logan) for the 91 Project's proceeds generated from the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and to Payden & Rygel Investment Management (Payden & Rygel) for Commission operating funds. At its April 2017 meeting and based on a competitive procurement, the Commission awarded an investment management services agreement to Logan related to the issuance of the sales tax revenue bonds for the 1-15 ELP. Commencing in July 2013, Logan invested the 91 Project debt proceeds and subsequent 91 Project equity contributions in separate accounts of the Short -Term Actively Managed Program (STAMP). Consistent with financing expectations, the Commission expended substantially all of the 91 Project debt proceeds and equity contributions, except for the toll revenue bonds debt service reserve, and subsequent to commencement of operations, established other required accounts. The Commission authorized Payden & Rygel to make specific investments for the Commission's operating funds beginning with the third quarter of Agenda Item 5D 29 FY 2014/15. In July 2017, the 1-15 ELP project and 91 Project completion financing (2017 Financing) was completed and sales tax bond proceeds were in accounts of a separate STAMP portfolio during the first quarter of FY 2017/18. The quarterly investment report for the second quarter of FY 2019/20, as required by state law and Commission policy, reflects the investment activities resulting from the 91 Project, 2017 Financing, and available operating cash. The quarterly investment report includes the following information: • Investment Portfolio Report; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio TIFIA Reserve Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio 1-15 ELP Sales Tax Senior Lien TIFIA Project Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • MetLife Short Duration Second Quarter 2020 Review; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Second Quarter 2020 Review; and • County of Riverside Investment Report for the Quarter Ended June 30, 2020. The Commission's investments were in full compliance with the Commission's investment policy adopted on August 12, 2020, and investments securities permitted under the indenture for the Commission's sales tax revenue bonds and the master indentures for the Commission's toll revenue bonds. Additionally, the Commission has adequate cash flows for the next six months. Attachments: Agenda Item 5D 30 1) Investment Portfolio Report 2) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 3) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account 4) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 5) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 6) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 7) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of Investments 8) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio TIFIA Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 9) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 10) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account 11) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 12) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 13) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio 1-15 ELP Sales Tax Senior Lien TIFIA Project Fund Summary of Investments 14) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of Investments 15) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category 16) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report 17) MetLife Short Duration Quarterly Review 18) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Quarterly Review 19) County of Riverside Investment Report Agenda Item 5D 31 ATTACHMENT 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Investment Portfolio Report Period Ended: June 30, 2020 RATING COUPON PAR PURCHASE MATURITY YIELD TO PURCHASE MARKET UNREALIZED FAIR VALUE MOODYS / S&P RATE VALUE DATE DATE MATURITY COST VALUE GAIN (LOSS) OPERATING FUNDS City National Bank Deposits 26,420,182 A3/BBB+ N/A N/A County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund 543,522,285 Aaa-bf/AAA-V1 N/A 0.93 % Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 3,890,108 N/A N/A N/A Subtotal Operating Funds 573,832,575 FUNDS HELD IN TRUST County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund Subtotal Funds Held in Trust 77,784,207 Aaa-bf/AAA-V1 N/A 77,784,207 0.93% COMMISSION MANAGED PORTFOLIO US Bank Payden & Rygel Operating 55,285,028 See attached report for details First American Government Obligation Fund 26,978,757 N/A N/A N/A Subtotal Commission Managed Portfolio 82,263,785 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 91 CIP Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Residual Fund Required Retained Balance TIFIA Reserve Fund Subtotal STAMP Portfolio - 91 CIP 19,294,128 26,828,172 20,912,127 67,034,426 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 2017 Financing Sales Tax 115 ELP Project Revenue Fund 49,654,516 Ramp Up Fund Subtotal STAMP Portfolio - 2017 Financing TOTAL All Cash and Investments $ 859,033,319 8,463,809 58,118,326 $700,000,000 $600,000,000 $500,000,000 $400,000,000 $300,000,000 $200,000,000 $100,000,000 5- Nature of Investments • STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Reserve • STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Residual Fund • STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP TIFIA Reserve Fund • STAMP Portfolio for 2017 Financing 115 ELP Project Revenue Fund • STAMP Portfolio for 2017 Financing Ramp Up Fund • Commission Managed Portfolio • Trust Funds • Operating Funds See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details 0.21% Money Market Funds 20.80% Fixed Income 0.45% LAIF 3.14% Mutual Funds 75.40% County Pool/Cash 32 ATTACHMENT 2 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account Account Identifier Secun ype Category Issu Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value 'e Original Cost Dat Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Summarized Coupon Yield Credit Rating 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 --- 950,000.00 942,921.50 --- 981,673.00 31,865.06 2.375 0.200 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3I30AFFX0 Agency Federal Home Loan Banks 11/16/2028 09/11/2019 185,000.00 205,766.25 - 220,470.05 16,377.01 3.250 0.872 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EADB2 Agency Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 06/06/2019 500,000.00 505,766.50 --- 516,670.00 13,233.11 2.375 0.200 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3130AFFX0 Agency Federal Home Loan Banks 11/16/2028 09/11/2019 200,000.00 222,450.00 --- 238,346.00 17,704.88 3.250 0.872 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EAEC9 Agency Freddie Mac 08/12/2021 04/29/2020 270,000.00 273,044.52 --- 272,872.80 228.40 1.125 0.171 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 183,703.67 174,518.49 --- 187,454.90 5,125.80 2.482 0.741 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 06/25/2022 --- 150,000.00 151,611.80 --- 154,458.00 4,001.58 2.396 0.700 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 --- 49,879.84 51,238.35 --- 51,891.49 1,171.11 3.500 0.702 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2039 01/26/2015 54,194.05 56,619.23 --- 56,915.67 1,312.68 3.000 0.666 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 89,271.00 89,284.46 --- 92,687.40 3,474.77 2.500 0.691 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2046 11/28/2016 116,195.11 119,449.48 --- 122,811.26 3,881.67 3.000 1.875 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 35,294.27 34,081.02 --- 36,238.03 1,748.14 2.000 0.855 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 --- 150,553.03 154,340.33 --- 160,855.37 6,238.00 4.000 1.795 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2039 _ --- 73,835.56 75,308.64 --- 76,303.14 1,832.85 3.000 1.090 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXHP1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 09/29/2017 140,000.00 142,089.06 --- 145,392.80 4,582.31 2.573 0.677 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 --- 282,110.00 278,085.13 --- 290,339.15 10,357.85 2.373 0.611 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2042 - 450,000.00 427,324.22 --- 468,598.50 30,003.83 2.273 1.279 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CDK0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2035 03/16/2018 248.73 249.90 --- 248.67 (0.06) 3.000 0.581 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378AWX5 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2036 03/28/2018 25,305.68 25,442.09 - 25,417.78 103.09 3.000 1.277 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379HLE3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 05/20/2043 10/18/2018 42,591.91 42,532.02 --- 43,459.08 _ 937.16 3.500 -0.235 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378VC45 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2041 11/23/2018 118,323.73 114,052.99 - 121,556.33 6,856.75 2.250 1.204 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JM59 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 11/21/2018 54,533.09 53,169.76 --- 55,616.12 2,108.72 2.500 1.097 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A5KR6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2022 01/25/2019 30,689.96 30,267.98 - 30,771.91 292.36 1.750 0.905 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378HXH4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2027 03/08/2019 12,459.16 12,083.30 --- 12,588.37 452.96 1.250 0.733 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B5A60 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/15/2028 03/20/2019 18,521.85 18,313.49 - 19,121.96 765.97 2.500 0.842 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B411D1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 12/15/2042 03/20/2019 29,556.78 30,526.61 --- 31,465.85 1,031.49 4.500 0.882 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38375XCM4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2037 05/14/2019 46,607.53 47,927.48 - 48,594.41 1,022.48 5.000 1.237 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136ADFF1 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 06/10/2019 87,196.58 85,943.14 --- 87,663.08 1,452.00 1.500 _ 0.919 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 58,270.67 59,426.98 - 60,255.37 1,053.83 3.500 0.978 AAA 256350023 MtM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377QKH9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 39,646.73 40,366.88 --- 41,537.09 1,217.93 3.000 0.767 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GY53 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2040 08/06/2019 40,770.31 40,899.31 --- 41,125.42 331.59 3.526 1.135 AAA 256350023 MtM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 383791M99 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 39,813.18 40,069.79 --- 40,801.74 775.63 2.500 0.783 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38374C4J7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2020 10/21/2019 1,174.53 1,184.07 --- 1,174.36 (0.16) 5.500 0.525 AAA 256350023 M!M-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378JZD7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 33,608.00 33,187.90 --- 34,038.18 804.27 1.500 0.660 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137BDKF2 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2040 11/13/2019 51,320.49 52,503.27 --- 52,760.54 433.98 3.500 1.528 AAA 256350023 M!M-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/15/2021 --- 52,763.10 52,769.07 --- 53,089.70 362.70 2.500 0.948 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378FRB8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2042 12/30/2019 176,922.47 174,323.92 --- 181,609.14 7,241.72 2.000 1.358 AAA 256350023 MEM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CNY9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/20/2038 02/04/2020 75,271.90 75,765.88 --- 75,865.04 287.34 3.500 1.091 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376TTT9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/20/2039 01/29/2020 42,174.99 43,163.46 --- 43,964.47 846.53 3.000 0.844 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1UG5 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 01/25/2023 05/14/2020 140,000.00 145,758.59 --- 146,431.60 946.57 2.637 0.649 AAA 256350023 MtM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378AU90 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2026 04/28/2020 116,283.27 119,626.42 --- 119,513.62 18.36 3.000 0.781 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ABFH9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 06/25/2021 07/22/2019 100,000.00 102,574.22 --- 102,276.00 1,002.20 3.989 0.674 AAA 256350023 MtM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ARVU7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 08/15/2038 06/30/2020 286,845.06 290,834.01 --- 290,746.15 (87.86) 3.000 1.415 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 447.71 451.84 --- 447.61 (0.11) 3.000 0.581 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 8,435.23 8,516.94 --- 8,472.59 25.63 3.000 1.277 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397LUK3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2023 10/10/2018 80,382.55 82,002.76 --- 82,404.17 1,232.39 4.500 _ 1.073 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A5KR6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2022 01/25/2019 47,144.22 46,495.99 --- 47,270.10 449.10 1.750 0.905 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378BXQ7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 34,020.78 33,680.57 --- 34,023.50 84.11 1.537 0.862 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A2PV7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2022 06/03/2019 23,464.80 23,054.16 --- 23,631.16 477.27 1.500 0.943 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31394GUX9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 08/15/2023 07/02/2019 22,827.31 23,797.47 --- 23,970.04 384.87 5.500 1.333 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/26/2019 25,578.98 25,728.69 --- 26,101.31 379.10 2.482 0.741 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38377REV3 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 124,865.72 127,343.52 --- 129,118.64 2,258.22 3.500 _ 0.978 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AYCE9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2022 08/13/2019 360,000.00 367,790.63 --- 375,246.00 9,793.25 2.682 0.677 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137GAUY1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/15/2022 08/15/2019 122,279.25 121,018.24 --- 123,075.29 1,805.42 1.500 0.940 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 08/19/2019 100,000.00 101,109.38 --- 102,917.00 2,217.54 2.373 0.611 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A1HC2 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2023 01/02/2020 10,485.53 10,562.12 --- 10,498.95 (8.03) 3.500 1.514 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 18,861.77 18,908.93 --- 18,978.53 116.98 2.500 0.948 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378PPK8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2038 01/08/2020 87,776.09 88,396.70 --- 90,600.73 2,259.86 2.500 0.487 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 07/25/2021 03/11/2020 37,866.31 38,599.98 --- 38,704.67 271.01 3.230 0.684 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38377VWQ5 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2038 04/01/2020 54,632.52 54,666.66 --- 54,587.17 (35.11) 2.500 2.258 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ADTJ6 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/25/2021 03/11/2020 478,055.59 487,840.79 --- 485,283.79 731.21 3.871 1.218 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ABFH9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 06/25/2021 03/15/2019 206,000.00 209,846.41 --- 210,688.56 3,085.89 3.989 0.674 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 07/25/2021 06/07/2019 331,330.21 337,193.20 --- 338,665.86 4,482.33 3.230 0.684 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136ADFF1 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 06/10/2019 92,325.79 90,998.61 --- 92,819.74 1,537.41 1.500 0.919 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136A5KR6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2022 06/10/2019 92,439.65 91,746.35 --- 92,686.46 661.00 1.750 0.905 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AS7D0 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/15/2039 06/14/2019 120,407.58 119,504.52 --- 121,045.74 1,302.89 2.000 1.283 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B6DF5 Agency CMG Freddie Mac 11/15/2026 06/18/2019 149,492.49 147,939.17 --- 153,346.41 5,189.13 2.000 0.571 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31397ALN1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/15/2032 06/18/2019 98,731.85 98,670.14 --- 98,744.68 441.77 0.535 0.477 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378BXQ7 Agency CMG Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 45,928.05 45,468.77 --- 45,931.73 113.55 1.537 0.862 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AGFQ0 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 12/25/2038 06/18/2019 124,440.11 126,010.20 --- 126,355.25 806.40 3.500 1.792 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B3HX9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 07/15/2038 06/20/2019 68,032.49 67,819.89 --- 68,101.88 820.16 0.635 0.523 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377YTL4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 05/20/2040 06/17/2019 166,450.80 164,422.18 --- 169,603.38 5,004.68 2.000 1.018 AAA Page 2of41 I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value - .. Original Cost Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Summarized Yield Credit Rating 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378WUY7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2041 06/12/2019 123,868.85 124,062.40 --- 125,725.64 1,747.77 2.500 1.019 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378BSZ3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 04/16/2040 06/25/2019 117,395.27 116,734.92 -- 118,356.74 1,476.06 2.141 1.108 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1UG5 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/25/2023 06/25/2019 200,000.00 204,101.56 --- 209,188.00 6,366.85 2.637 0.649 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BDKF2 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2040 --- 59,427.94 60,673.31 -- 61,095.49 691.04 3.500 1.528 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AGZA3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 09/25/2030 06/25/2019 21,437.81 21,581.01 --- 21,949.31 412.36 3.000 0.689 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378CNY9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/20/2038 06/25/2019 136,858.00 138,632.88 --- 137,936.44 594.20 3.500 1.091 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 06/25/2022 06/28/2019 200,000.00 201,773.44 --- 205,944.00 4,886.80 2.396 0.700 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 06/28/2019 300,000.00 302,496.09 --- 308,751.00 7,311.81 2.373 0.611 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AXFIP1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 06/28/2019 150,000.00 152,232.42 --- 155,778.00 4,319.84 2.573 0.677 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38374C4J7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2020 06/14/2019 2,663.24 2,694.87 --- 2,662.87 (0.37) 5.500 0.525 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 62,432.86 63,671.76 --- 64,559.32 1,129.11 3.500 0.978 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378TAF7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association _ 07/20/2041 07/05/2019 96,710.25 96,891.59 --- 100,411.35 3,559.51 2.500 0.691 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377QK1I9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 42,776.73 43,553.74 --- 44,816.33 1,314.08 3.000 0.767 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137A2B26 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 08/25/2020 06/13/2019 66,482.36 67,271.84 --- 66,515.60 65.83 3.808 0.796 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376V2E6 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2039 08/06/2019 97,948.71 101,927.87 --- 104,321.25 2,850.70 4.000 0.667 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376GY53 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2040 08/06/2019 45,177.91 45,320.86 --- 45,571.41 367.43 3.526 1.135 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38379JM99 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 42,875.73 43,152.08 --- 43,940.34 835.30 2.500 0.783 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 383781ZD7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association _ 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 35,708.49 35,262.13 --- 36,165.56 854.54 1.500 0.660 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137A6B27 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2020 06/27/2019 176,315.63 180,200.07 --- 177,073.78 (23.83) 4.333 1.068 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377RED3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2025 12/11/2019 174,021.24 175,407.98 --- 179,038.28 3,737.04 2.500 0.835 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376WA62 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 12/17/2019 83,718.09 87,825.51 --- 89,446.92 1,727.43 4.000 1.795 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378FRB8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2042 12/30/2019 186,751.49 184,008.58 --- 191,698.54 7,644.03 2.000 1.358 AAA 256350018 ME1M-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377JZ89 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 01/28/2020 57,553.67 58,812.65 --- 59,874.80 1,122.85 3.500 0.702 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B5A60 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/15/2028 02/07/2020 16,911.26 17,069.81 --- 17,459.18 400.50 2.500 0.842 AAA 256350018 ME1M-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376TTT9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/20/2039 01/29/2020 45,842.38 46,916.80 --- 47,787.47 920.15 3.000 0.844 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378AU90 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2026 04/28/2020 126,443.95 130,079.21 --- 129,956.56 19.96 3.000 0.781 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137ABF69 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 06/25/2021 --- 149,000.00 152,765.01 - 152,391.24 1,629.51 3.989 0.674 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379KDN5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2055 08/05/2015 85,703.16 83,513.71 --- 90,171.72 4,904.43 2.223 1.467 AAA 256350023 MGM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202E2E8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2027 - 116,443.99 120,020.27 --- 121,927.34 3,069.38 3.000 0.661 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 221,236.60 223,967.49 --- 232,214.36 8,788.22 2.500 1.367 AAA 256350023 MGM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2041 - 127,878.59 121,513.95 --- 127,955.32 4,007.55 1.400 1.340 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2022 08/29/2016 187,157.94 198,789.51 --- 192,243.02 25.90 2.997 1.368 AAA 256350023 MGM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/25/2022 08/29/2016 238,272.39 245,085.50 - 244,643.80 4,234.12 2.349 0.267 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2030 --- 103,499.77 108,462.94 --- 112,553.93 5,397.11 4.500 0.618 AAA 256350023 MGM -Sr Lim Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 - 463,405.50 19,928.70 2.389 1.336 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/16/2037 12/11/2014 90,110.70 89,674.23 --- 90,611.72 655.14 1.705 1.139 AAA 256350023 MGM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 - 194,726.14 191,958.21 - 202,343.83 8,093.15 2.332 0.471 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2046 --- 425,000.00 415,829.11 --- 450,640.25 31,404.81 2.813 1.874 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AFIAEO Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 10/28/2016 38,989.96 39,830.68 - 40,280.92 749.73 2.708 0.431 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 106,343.46 102,991.15 --- 107,702.53 2,980.45 1.826 1.367 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2023 08/29/2016 361,658.54 375,856.46 --- 374,569.75 8,386.52 2.522 0.519 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 --- 47,071.81 46,455.47 --- 48,821.47 2,070.91 2.622 0.964 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381R5T7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/01/2021 08/29/2018 130,000.00 132,747.27 --- 133,916.90 3,029.65 3.770 1.088 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L1W62 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2022 02/21/2019 162,264.19 161,300.75 --- 162,129.51 _ 634.07 2.500 2.473 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137F4D41 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2028 04/01/2019 35,000.00 36,714.84 --- 41,013.70 4,526.76 3.600 1.179 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 86,292.20 89,433.77 --- 91,113.35 2,330.98 4.000 0.336 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FBAJ5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/25/2027 06/26/2019 200,000.00 211,593.75 --- 229,124.00 18,883.86 3.281 1.091 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1BS0 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 11/25/2022 07/31/2019 360,000.00 363,360.94 --- 374,407.20 12,141.82 2.510 0.677 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FNAD2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 11/25/2028 08/01/2019 132,567.08 135,212.85 --- 145,223.26 10,353.05 2.631 0.784 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138LFGP7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2028 08/07/2019 275,000.00 284,356.45 --- 300,982.00 _ 17,149.92 2.550 1.319 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36178NB99 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 32,922.66 33,287.90 --- 34,477.93 1,216.26 2.500 0.505 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202FA30 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 32,454.78 33,813.83 --- 34,666.58 1,068.19 4.500 -0.194 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 243,447.27 256,342.37 --- 243,342.58 (381.26) 3.370 2.845 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179M4J6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 40,893.90 41,385.90 --- 42,842.09 1,484.06 2.500 0.536 AAA 256350023 MUM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 --- 17,342.71 17,537.82 --- 17,347.40 (51.12) 3.630 3.023 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FPJF3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 06/25/2029 01/08/2020 183,079.46 183,909.04 --- 197,443.88 13,611.47 2.258 0.723 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FQ3Y7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/25/2029 01/08/2020 183,281.96 183,346.40 --- 196,764.19 13,439.87 2.190 0.787 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3132CJAJ2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 89,891.48 92,440.76 --- 94,546.07 _ 2,149.28 3.000 0.533 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381QB54 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2021 11/07/2018 127,173.69 129,806.59 --- 128,250.85 603.62 4.410 2.424 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NNK7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2028 03/31/2020 186,714.55 194,766.61 --- 196,005.47 1,477.79 3.000 0.816 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 25,211.50 26,456.56 --- 26,468.30 24.17 3.000 1.056 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU24 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 04/28/2020 60,099.90 62,672.92 --- 62,803.19 163.01 2.500 0.584 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MZV5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2028 04/28/2020 78,596.78 81,961.71 --- 82,326.20 414.67 2.500 0.515 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NKP2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association _ 08/20/2028 04/28/2020 89,328.97 93,153.36 --- 93,586.39 _ 486.09 2.500 0.589 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MEK2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2027 04/28/2020 101,987.24 106,353.56 --- 106,580.74 291.48 2.500 0.508 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 05/14/2020 23,572.51 23,480.43 --- 23,555.54 335.40 0.530 0.567 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3140JAU97 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/01/2023 05/20/2020 91,388.65 95,015.64 --- 94,087.36 (776.35) 2.496 1.132 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/15/2016 178,405.44 197,862.79 --- 182,906.61 857.35 4.295 1.371 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MKL3 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2027 05/28/2020 108,337.58 112,874.21 --- 112,351.49 (487.82) 2.500 0.867 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMUL5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/01/2031 06/22/2020 142,094.73 148,755.42 --- 149,151.15 275.19 2.500 0.771 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3620ARZE4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/15/2026 06/22/2020 109,672.52 114,744.88 --- 115,332.72 469.49 3.000 0.200 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU32 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 06/22/2020 106,668.70 112,402.15 --- 111,960.53 (570.20) 3.000 0.737 AAA Page 3of41 I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account 256350023 Account MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 Identifier 36176XE21 Security Type Category Agency MBS Issuer Government National Mortgage Association Final Maturity 03/15/2027 Trade Date 06/22/2020 Current Face Value - .. Original Cost Date Base Market Value 203,814.91 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 529.33 Summarized Coupon Yield Credit Rating 3.000 0.459 AAA 193,812.26 203,078.91 --- 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/01/2027 06/23/2020 272,881.74 285,331.98 - 286,403.03 828.34 2.500 0.321 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 40,481.98 42,727.47 --- 42,493.53 (233.94) 3.000 0.779 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F3H7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2027 06/30/2020 71,771.01 75,269.86 --- 75,326.55 56.69 3.000 0.547 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AX}1N6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 17,061.14 16,826.55 --- 17,214.69 267.63 1.749 0.582 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 10,580.65 10,425.25 --- 10,704.66 205.20 1.785 0.550 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 04/25/2022 --- 34,848.41 34,200.44 --- 35,149.50 653.27 1.583 0.569 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381RZ23 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/01/2021 11/02/2018 59,464.67 60,347.35 --- 60,675.38 854.87 3.840 1.479 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381RLL6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2021 11/02/2018 51,628.98 52,395.35 --- 52,561.91 660.62 3.840 1.516 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L2GH4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2021 --- 122,779.70 120,179.90 --- 124,282.52 2,503.03 1.870 0.336 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L1W62 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2022 02/21/2019 124,084.38 123,347.63 --- 123,981.39 484.88 2.500 2.473 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L8H23 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2021 05/02/2019 67,127.99 66,918.28 --- 67,097.78 160.02 2.730 2.647 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPY3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 06/01/2027 05/10/2019 175,443.17 174,675.61 --- 184,148.66 9,401.13 2.500 0.357 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/01/2027 05/10/2019 188,194.31 187,370.96 --- 197,519.34 10,085.65 2.500 0.321 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 56,521.39 58,579.12 --- 59,679.24 1,526.79 4.000 0.336 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378KW47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 69,513.18 69,122.17 --- 69,861.44 567.39 2.150 0.956 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3140J6DU8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/01/2031 07/26/2019 177,913.41 179,108.76 --- 186,698.78 7,712.96 2.500 0.524 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 08/21/2019 42,102.95 42,576.61 --- 43,750.02 1,148.24 2.332 0.471 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AMM48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/25/2022 08/01/2019 331,644.76 333,510.26 --- 338,758.54 5,902.43 2.509 0.770 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137APP61 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2022 09/06/2019 13,808.32 14,033.79 --- 14,157.81 204.76 2.789 0.846 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31418CQM9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2027 09/11/2019 47,152.92 48,353.85 --- 49,547.34 1,287.19 3.000 0.555 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36178NB99 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 109,742.22 110,959.68 --- 114,926.44 4,054.22 2.500 0.505 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3132G5AV1 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/01/2028 10/11/2019 64,994.58 66,213.24 --- 68,350.25 2,223.58 3.000 1.046 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179M416 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 136,313.01 137,953.03 --- 142,806.96 4,946.84 2.500 0.536 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 01/17/2018 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 5.000 2.499 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association _ 01/20/2027 12/12/2019 79,558.01 81,522.10 --- 83,304.39 1,932.98 3.000 0.661 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381QB54 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2021 11/07/2018 97,499.84 99,518.39 --- 98,325.66 462.78 4.410 2.424 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 67,230.67 70,550.19 --- 70,582.12 65.09 3.000 1.056 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179Q2A8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2030 04/30/2020 349,893.78 370,012.68 --- 368,399.66 (1,342.38) 3.000 0.918 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3622A2GC0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/15/2028 04/30/2020 247,098.96 257,060.14 --- 258,771.91 1,919.53 2.500 0.488 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397UPF0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2021 03/15/2019 98,051.05 99,460.53 --- 99,631.63 1,069.02 3.763 0.573 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 172,584.40 178,867.55 --- 182,226.69 4,661.95 4.000 0.336 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620AFYR2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/15/2024 06/12/2019 81,081.85 83,720.19 - 85,568.92 2,377.53 4.000 0.181 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36297GCD0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/15/2025 06/12/2019 87,389.57 91,066.09 --- 91,442.70 1,323.36 4.500 1.363 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620A9T35 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/15/2024 06/13/2019 136,889.96 141,349.58 - 144,454.50 3,948.55 4.000 0.134 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620C4SU5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/15/2025 06/12/2019 79,845.20 82,798.85 --- 84,307.75 2,040.72 4.000 0.604 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378KW47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 179,865.35 178,853.61 - 180,766.48 1,468.11 2.150 0.956 AAA 256350018 MUM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 06/18/2019 22,665.88 22,655.26 --- 22,649.56 149.90 0.530 0.567 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31381R5T7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/01/2021 06/20/2019 101,000.00 103,840.63 - 104,043.13 1,617.60 3.770 1.088 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 04/25/2022 06/07/2019 223,029.81 220,555.57 --- 224,956.79 3,639.79 1.583 0.569 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1BS0 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 11/25/2022 - 645,000.00 652,086.14 --- 670,812.90 21,060.11 2.510 0.677 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137F4D41 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2028 06/27/2019 150,000.00 163,248.05 --- 175,773.00 13,978.58 3.600 1.179 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2023 06/27/2019 356,899.87 360,343.39 --- 369,641.20 10,559.72 2.522 0.519 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BM6P6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/25/2022 06/28/2019 200,000.00 205,437.50 --- 208,204.00 4,700.16 3.090 0.889 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TUTA Reserve 3137F4CY6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2024 06/28/2019 190,000.00 195,907.81 --- 204,983.40 10,243.71 2.920 0.916 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FBAJ5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/25/2027 06/26/2019 200,000.00 211,593.75 --- 229,124.00 18,883.86 3.281 1.091 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31419AM53 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/01/2024 06/28/2019 76,459.99 79,279.45 --- 79,347.12 1,032.50 5.500 0.594 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AHAEO Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 06/28/2019 46,635.05 47,065.49 --- 48,179.14 911.90 2.708 0.431 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2022 07/22/2019 210,552.68 214,393.62 --- 216,273.39 1,988.56 2.997 1.368 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378KWU9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2041 --- 78,470.96 75,029.23 --- 78,518.04 2,906.29 1.400 1.340 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TlFlA Reserve 3137BSRZ8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 06/28/2019 131,129.21 133,715.94 --- 137,086.41 3,495.65 2.838 0.489 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378NWU3 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/16/2048 06/27/2019 0.00 0.00 --- (0.00) (0.00) 2.580 1.255 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FNAD2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 11/25/2028 08/01/2019 147,296.75 150,236.50 --- 161,359.17 11,503.39 2.631 0.784 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138LFGP7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2028 08/07/2019 300,000.00 310,207.03 --- 328,344.00 18,709.01 2.550 1.319 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 08/21/2019 39,471.52 39,915.57 --- 41,015.64 1,076.47 2.332 0.471 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/25/2022 08/22/2019 131,049.81 132,109.47 --- 134,554.08 2,706.76 2.349 0.267 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FL6P4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2029 09/09/2019 275,000.00 307,108.40 --- 325,902.50 21,365.20 3.563 1.243 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BP4K2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/25/2026 09/09/2019 200,000.00 210,125.00 --- 219,962.00 11,055.86 2.849 1.016 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138L2QG5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2028 09/09/2019 257,876.07 273,640.77 --- 287,206.90 14,048.76 3.010 1.432 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138LFP51 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2028 09/09/2019 197,770.14 205,286.95 --- 216,605.77 11,681.99 2.570 1.316 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36178NB99 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 43,896.88 44,383.87 --- 45,970.57 1,621.69 2.500 0.505 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202FA30 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 35,276.94 36,754.16 --- 37,681.06 1,161.07 4.500 -0.194 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1Q71 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 05/25/2025 10/30/2019 200,000.00 206,296.88 --- 217,392.00 11,844.39 2.770 0.918 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BLAC2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 06/25/2025 --- 150,000.00 159,648.05 --- 167,124.00 8,538.93 3.284 0.824 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179M4J6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 163,575.61 165,543.63 --- 171,368.35 5,936.20 2.500 0.536 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 10/07/2019 17,342.72 17,529.70 --- 17,347.40 (76.38) 3.630 3.023 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2027 12/12/2019 180,813.66 185,277.50 --- 189,328.17 4,393.14 3.000 0.661 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FPJF3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 06/25/2029 01/08/2020 197,923.74 198,820.58 --- 213,452.84 14,715.11 2.258 0.723 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FQ3Y7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/25/2029 01/08/2020 198,142.66 198,212.32 --- 212,718.04 14,529.59 2.190 0.787 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3132CJAJ2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 97,708.14 100,479.08 _ --- 102,767.46 2,336.18 3.000 _ 0.533 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2030 02/04/2020 24,353.84 26,203.21 --- 26,484.32 362.48 4.500 0.618 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 25,211.50 26,456.31 --- 26,468.30 24.42 3.000 1.056 AAA Page 4 of 41 I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account 256350018 Account MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve Identifier 36179NKP2 Security Type Category Agency MBS Issuer Government National Mortgage Association Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost - .. Date --- Base Market Value 93,586.39 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 486.09 Coupon 2.500 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 0.589 AAA 08/20/2028 04/28/2020 89,328.97 93,153.36 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MU24 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 04/28/2020 65,108.22 67,895.67 - 68,036.79 176.60 2.500 0.584 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MZV5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2028 04/28/2020 85,257.53 88,907.62 --- 89,303.00 449.80 2.500 0.515 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MEK2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2027 04/28/2020 110,486.17 115,216.37 --- 115,462.47 315.77 2.500 0.508 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3140JAU97 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/01/2023 05/20/2020 99,696.71 103,653.43 --- 102,640.76 (846.92) 2.496 1.132 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138EJRP5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 06/18/2019 128,769.52 132,654.04 --- 132,857.96 2,375.50 4.342 -0.333 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/01/2019 178,405.44 183,903.95 --- 182,906.61 2,017.32 4.295 1.371 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MU32 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 06/22/2020 115,557.76 121,768.99 --- 121,290.59 (617.70) 3.000 0.737 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3128MMUL5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/01/2031 06/22/2020 146,831.22 153,713.93 --- 154,122.86 284.36 2.500 0.771 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620ARZE4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/15/2026 06/22/2020 121,216.99 126,823.28 --- 127,473.00 518.91 3.000 0.200 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36176XE21 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/15/2027 06/22/2020 210,770.83 220,848.32 --- 221,648.71 575.64 3.000 0.459 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/01/2027 06/23/2020 291,701.18 305,010.05 --- 306,154.97 885.47 2.500 0.321 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31397UPF0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2021 06/10/2019 196,102.09 199,319.39 --- 199,263.25 1,791.32 3.763 0.573 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 43,764.30 46,191.86 --- 45,938.95 (252.91) 3.000 0.779 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478DAD9 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2018-A Owner Trust 05/16/2022 06/29/2018 49,626.51 49,370.62 --- 50,048.83 480.91 2.650 0.779 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478HAD0 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2017-C Owner Trust 04/18/2022 09/25/2018 _ 33,721.07 33,195.49 --- 33,937.56 350.78 2.120 0.603 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 47789JAB2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019 10/15/2021 --- 286,183.58 287,470.88 --- 287,485.71 73.44 2.850 0.987 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31680YAB3 Asset Backed Fifth Third Auto Trust 2019-1 05/16/2022 04/30/2019 62,227.16 62,223.74 --- 62,573.77 347.47 2.660 0.336 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 477870AB5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019-B 05/16/2022 07/16/2019 58,196.62 58,196.40 --- 58,552.78 356.20 2.280 0.742 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478LAB5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2019-B 10/15/2021 07/16/2019 60,686.98 60,681.67 --- 61,064.45 378.97 2.270 0.168 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38013FAD3 Asset Backed GM Financial Consumer Automobile Receivables Trust 2018- 10/16/2023 07/24/2019 73,253.42 74,595.45 --- 74,984.40 1,088.24 3.210 0.158 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315PAB1 Asset Backed Carmax Auto Owner Trust 2019-3 12/15/2022 07/24/2019 87,926.45 87,922.50 --- 88,633.38 708.67 2.210 0.668 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 26209AAE1 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-4 01/16/2024 09/09/2019 80,000.00 79,989.10 --- 81,041.60 1,048.60 2.230 1.279 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 12596EAC8 Asset Backed CNH Equipment Trust 2018-B 11/15/2023 12/05/2019 188,479.68 191,557.19 --- 192,876.91 2,372.17 3.190 0.702 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 26208RAD7 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-2 03/15/2023 12/05/2019 83,444.68 83,855.38 --- 83,749.25 211.33 3.040 -0.464 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02582JHJ2 Asset Banked American Express Credit Account Master Trust, Series 2017-t 10/15/2020 12/05/2019 200,000.00 200,375.00 --- 200,962.00 833.91 2.040 0.390 AAA 256350021 M!M-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17305EFM2 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust - 2014-Al 01/23/2023 12/11/2019 200,000.00 202,210.16 --- 202,880.00 1,764.25 2.880 0.297 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315XAC2 Asset Backed Carmax Auto Owner Trust 2020-1 12/16/2024 01/14/2020 60,000.00 59,988.23 --- 61,731.00 1,741.06 1.890 0.733 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17305EGK5 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust 01/20/2021 07/19/2019 100,000.00 100,625.00 --- 101,194.00 960.46 2.490 0.337 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14041NFUO Asset Backed Capital One Multi -Asset Execution Trust, Series 2019-2 09/15/2022 03/13/2020 100,000.00 100,312.50 --- 102,781.00 2,504.06 1.720 0.455 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 87165LBB6 Asset Backed Synchrony Credit Card Master Note Trust 2016-2 05/17/2021 08/02/2019 160,000.00 160,387.50 --- 161,808.00 1,615.21 2.210 0.923 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86565CBD0 CD Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, New York Branch 07/14/2020 04/15/2020 400,000.00 400,069.78 --- 400,164.00 153.92 1.150 0.095 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-R1 10/07/2020 01/22/2019 61,464.87 61,486.49 --- 61,378.82 (89.37) 0.697 1.191 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 05/10/2019 0.01 0.01 --- 0.01 0.00 0.697 0.975 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888UAB6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-R2 11/05/2020 03/15/2019 131,095.42 131,290.03 --- 131,104.60 (32.22) 0.717 0.804 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 06/24/2019 15,155.72 15,148.62 --- 15,134.51 (19.73) 0.697 1.191 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EGP0 CP Catholic Health Initiatives 07/23/2020 05/13/2020 400,000.00 398,808.78 --- 399,964.00 333.11 0.000 0.141 NA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EHT1 CP Catholic Health Initiatives 08/27/2020 05/19/2020 300,000.00 298,741.67 --- 299,916.00 633.25 0.000 0.174 NA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02665//84 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 09/08/2020 06/15/2020 500,000.00 499,291.67 --- 499,820.00 395.00 0.000 0.185 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02665JGL8 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 07/20/2020 06/17/2020 300,000.00 299,887.25 --- 299,976.00 40.92 0.000 0.144 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 172967LC3 Corporate Citigroup Inc. 12/08/2021 --- 450,000.00 449,617.50 11/08/2021 463,563.00 13,770.41 2.900 0.663 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EBD8 Corporate Truitt Bank 05/17/2022 05/14/2019 50,000.00 50,000.00 04/17/2022 50,154.00 154.00 0.976 0.740 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 025816CE7 Corporate American Express Company 05/20/2022 05/15/2019 100,000.00 100,000.00 04/19/2022 100,170.00 170.00 0.997 0.846 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GEC9 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 07/01/2020 --- 200,000.00 207,806.00 --- 200,000.00 0.00 5.625 5.472 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 94974BGM6 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 07/22/2020 04/15/2019 200,000.00 199,590.00 --- 200,244.00 262.71 2.600 0.596 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 55279HAN0 Corporate Manufacturers & Traders Trust Company 08/17/2020 10/11/2018 250,000.00 244,707.50 07/17/2020 250,152.50 531.84 2.050 0.752 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 375558BB8 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc. 09/01/2020 --- 135,000.00 133,439.10 --- 135,487.35 625.02 2.550 0.415 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FBJ1 Corporate Truist Financial Corporation 03/16/2023 09/09/2019 165,000.00 164,877.90 02/13/2023 171,298.05 6,393.36 2.200 0.726 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 10/14/2020 --- 200,000.00 196,622.00 --- 200,988.00 1,440.01 2.100 0.386 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17308CC46 Corporate Citigroup Inc. 11/04/2022 10/28/2019 195,000.00 195,000.00 11/04/2021 198,845.40 _ 3,845.40 2.312 0.873 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17401QANl Corporate Citizens Bank, National Association 10/30/2020 04/15/2019 250,000.00 247,950.00 --- 251,092.50 1,539.78 2.250 0.498 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31677QBK4 Corporate Fifth Third Bank, National Association 10/30/2020 06/21/2019 200,000.00 199,810.00 09/30/2020 200,926.00 972.42 2.200 0.345 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/25/2021 --- 200,000.00 213,237.00 --- 205,972.00 2,749.29 5.750 0.492 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 95000U2B8 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 07/22/2022 02/19/2020 235,000.00 239,479.10 --- 244,825.35 6,002.10 2.625 0.581 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69353RFU7 Corporate PNC Bank, National Association 02/24/2023 02/20/2020 250,000.00 250,000.00 02/24/2022 249,747.50 (252.50) 0.685 0.678 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 74456QBP0 Corporate Public Service Electric and Gas Company 03/15/2021 03/25/2020 125,000.00 122,811.25 02/15/2021 126,192.50 2,796.79 1.900 0.370 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 30231GBL5 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 04/15/2023 04/13/2020 270,000.00 270,000.00 --- 277,106.40 7,106.40 1.571 0.618 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 90331HNP4 Corporate U.S. Bank National Association 04/26/2021 10/11/2018 250,000.00 249,395.00 03/26/2021 255,180.00 5,380.56 3.150 0.340 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 04/26/2021 --- 200,000.00 194,126.00 --- 202,416.00 4,187.91 1.875 0.402 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 166764BV I Corporate Chevron Corporation 05/11/2023 05/07/2020 135,000.00 135,000.00 --- 137,324.70 2,324.70 1.141 0.534 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69371RP34 Corporate PACCAR Financial Corp. 05/10/2021 04/30/2019 200,000.00 200,250.00 --- 200,022.00 (83.89) 0.708 0.587 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14913Q2X6 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 05/17/2021 05/14/2019 120,000.00 120,000.00 --- 120,190.80 190.80 0.776 0.545 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0EH8 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/03/2022 06/12/2020 270,000.00 270,459.00 01/31/2022 271,071.90 624.49 1.037 0.770 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61746BEE2 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/20/2022 06/12/2020 200,000.00 200,870.00 01/20/2021 200,822.00 10.18 2.315 0.853 A 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 1.50 --- 1.50 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 (408,997.63) --- (408,997.63) 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 (175,000.00) --- (175,000.00) 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 (209,959.00) --- (209,959.00) 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31846V401 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 460,940.25 --- 460,940.25 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31846V401 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 122,507.48 --- 122,507.48 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31846V401 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 273,467.35 --- 273,467.35 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 072024WW8 Muni Bay Area Toll Authority 04/01/2022 09/20/2019 95,000.00 95,000.00 --- 96,666.30 1,666.30 2.128 1.114 AA Page 5of41 I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account 256350021 Account MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund Identifier 783186TZ2 Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost ,, Date Base Market Value 106,104.60 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 1,104.60 Coupon 2.057 Summarized Yield Credit Rating Muni Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 05/01/2022 10/18/2019 105,000.00 105,000.00 --- 1.474 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 283062DK0 Muni El Dorado Irrigation District 03/01/2022 06/16/2020 155,000.00 155,000.00 -- 155,354.95 354.95 0.739 0.601 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 650036AS5 Muni The New York State Urban Development Corporation 03/15/2024 06/18/2020 180,000.00 180,000.00 --- 180,509.40 509.40 0.965 0.887 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 194740PF7 Muni Collin County Texas 02/15/2024 06/25/2020 175,000.00 175,000.00 176,146.25 1,146.25 0.867 0.684 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 4581X0CZ9 Non -US Gov Inter -American Development Bank 09/14/2022 09/30/2019 650,000.00 652,067.00 --- 671,053.50 19,498.75 1.750 0.276 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2027 --- 297,256.40 295,913.55 --- 320,290.80 23,949.28 0.375 -0.777 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128285W6 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2029 --- 253,905.00 269,164.49 --- 289,263.81 21,538.85 0.875 -0.703 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 --- 269,452.00 273,816.78 --- 283,188.66 10,191.56 0.500 -0.822 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2023 --- 99,990.90 98,120.58 --- 102,425.68 3,466.59 0.125 -0.820 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 --- 416,888.00 424,263.71 --- 438,140.95 15,248.94 0.500 -0.822 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 9128285W6 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2029 --- 264,061.20 278,924.20 --- 300,834.36 23,382.28 0.875 -0.703 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828V49 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2027 06/25/2019 307,872.70 310,267.85 --- 331,729.76 21,779.88 0.375 -0.777 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 08/01/2019 294,872.00 299,093.53 --- 309,904.57 11,621.40 0.500 -0.822 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 --- 1,400,000.00 1,386,564.45 --- 1,449,602.00 55,430.97 1.750 0.173 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 11/15/2024 04/18/2017 1,350,000.00 1,369,037.11 --- 1,467,652.50 106,298.50 2.250 0.246 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 05/15/2025 --- 1,125,000.00 1,143,342.78 --- 1,225,023.75 90,733.89 2.125 0.287 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828J43 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 02/28/2022 11/26/2019 150,000.00 150,544.92 --- 153,909.00 3,504.32 1.750 0.185 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/15/2022 --- 670,000.00 664,428.32 --- 688,371.40 22,884.14 1.375 0.176 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 --- 1,150,000.00 1,175,230.08 --- 1,162,891.50 9,870.67 2.125 0.207 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 --- 2,150,000.00 2,158,926.57 --- 2,226,174.50 68,756.64 1.750 0.173 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 --- 1,775,000.00 1,774,332.62 --- 1,775,053.25 116.80 0.193 0.162 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VV9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/31/2020 --- 2,150,000.00 2,142,433.60 --- 2,156,923.00 6,897.95 2.125 0.212 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/15/2022 --- 1,030,000.00 1,021,835.16 --- 1,058,242.60 34,628.11 1.375 0.176 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128285H9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 --- 700,000.00 699,678.39 --- 700,077.00 139.71 0.195 0.166 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828T67 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2021 12/09/2019 480,000.00 476,306.25 --- 486,883.20 9,494.95 1.250 0.173 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286U9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 05/15/2022 --- 420,000.00 425,850.01 --- 435,309.00 10,478.84 2.125 0.177 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828J43 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 02/28/2022 12/30/2019 125,000.00 125,463.87 --- 128,257.50 2,898.54 1.750 0.185 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 --- 1,730,000.00 1,727,976.96 --- 1,749,393.30 18,271.53 2.125 0.207 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 09/10/2019 1,000,000.00 1,006,210.94 --- 1,035,430.00 30,820.43 1.750 0.173 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828XB1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 05/15/2025 --- 600,000.00 625,417.97 --- 653,346.00 29,559.81 2.125 0.287 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828L99 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 06/25/2019 1,050,000.00 1,043,683.60 --- 1,054,126.50 5,696.64 1.375 0.198 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/15/2022 --- 750,000.00 763,253.90 --- 770,565.00 7,582.68 1.375 0.176 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 --- 985,000.00 984,986.26 --- 985,029.55 32.02 0.193 0.162 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 06/26/2019 1,500,000.00 1,506,269.53 --- 1,516,815.00 14,499.78 2.125 0.207 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 658886DZ6 VRDN North Dakota Housing Finance Agency 07/01/2038 06/29/2018 100,000.00 100,000.00 --- 100,000.00 0.00 0.180 0.180 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 196480CW5 VRDN Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, Inc. 10/01/2051 03/19/2020 460,000.00 460,000.00 07/20/2020 460,000.00 0.00 0.200 0.200 AAA 64,789,911.51 65,552,894.20 67,034,426.19 1,594,960.35 37 Page 6of41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 3 Source Account Account Security Type Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Identifier Cate or Issuer Final Maturi Trade Date Value Ori'inal o t Dat Ba Market Vain. . nr aliz•d o Vi.J, .co it Rating 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EADB2 Agency 3130AFFX0 Agency Freddie Mac Federal Home Loan Banks 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EAEC9 Agency Freddie Mac 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 06/06/2019 11/16/2028 09/11/2019 500,000.00 200,000.00 505,766.50 222,450.00 516,670.00 238,346.00 13,233.11 2.375 0.200 17,704.88 3.250 0.872 08/12/2021 04/29/2020 270,000.00 273,044.52 272,872.80 228.40 1.125 0.171 07/25/2021 06/07/2019 331,330.21 337,193.20 338,665.86 4,482.33 3.230 0.684 AAA AAA AAA AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136ADFF I Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 3136A5KR6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 06/10/2019 92,325.79 90,998.61 10/25/2022 06/10/2019 92,439.65 91,746.35 92,819.74 1,537.41 1.500 0.919 AAA 92,686.46 661.00 1.750 0.905 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AS7D0 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 3137B6DF5 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/15/2039 06/14/2019 120,407.58 119,504.52 11/15/2026 06/18/2019 149,492.49 147,939.17 121,045.74 1,302.89 2.000 1.283 AAA 153,346.41 5,189.13 2.000 0.571 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31397ALN1 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 38378BXQ7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AGFQ0 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 3137B3HX9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/15/2032 06/18/2019 98,731.85 98,670.14 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 45,928.05 45,468.77 12/25/2038 06/18/2019 124,440.11 126,010.20 07/15/2038 06/20/2019 68,032.49 67,819.89 98,744.68 45,931.73 441.77 0.535 0.477 AAA 113.55 1.537 0.862 AAA 126,355.25 806.40 3.500 1.792 AAA 68,101.88 820.16 0.635 0.523 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377Y FL4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38378WUY7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 05/20/2040 06/17/2019 166,450.80 164,422.18 06/20/2041 06/12/2019 123,868.85 124,062.40 169,603.38 5,004.68 2.000 1.018 AAA 125,725.64 1,747.77 2.500 1.019 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378BSZ3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137BIUG5 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/16/2040 06/25/2019 117,395.27 116,734.92 01/25/2023 06/25/2019 200,000.00 204,101.56 118,356.74 1,476.06 2.141 1.108 AAA 209,188.00 6,366.85 2.637 0.649 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BDKF2 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 3136AGZA3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378CNY9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2040 09/25/2030 06/25/2019 59,427.94 60,673.31 21,437.81 21,581.01 11/20/2038 06/25/2019 136,858.00 138,632.88 06/25/2022 06/28/2019 200,000.00 201,773.44 61,095.49 691.04 3.500 1.528 AAA 21,949.31 412.36 3.000 0.689 AAA 137,936.44 594.20 3.500 1.091 AAA 205,944.00 4,886.80 2.396 0.700 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137ATRW4 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 3137AXHP1 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 06/28/2019 300,000.00 302,496.09 09/25/2022 06/28/2019 150,000.00 152,232.42 308,751.00 7,311.81 2.373 0.611 AAA 155,778.00 4,319.84 2.573 0.677 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38374C4J7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2020 06/14/2019 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 2,663.24 2,694.87 62,432.86 63,671.76 2,662.87 (0.37) 5.500 0.525 AAA 64,559.32 1,129.11 3.500 0.978 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378TAF7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38377QKH9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137A2B26 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 07/20/2041 07/05/2019 96,710.25 96,891.59 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 42,776.73 43,553.74 08/25/2020 06/13/2019 66,482.36 67,271.84 38376V2E6 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2039 08/06/2019 97,948.71 101,927.87 100,411.35 3,559.51 2.500 0.691 AAA 44,816.33 1,314.08 3.000 0.767 AAA 66,515.60 65.83 3.808 0.796 AAA 104,321.25 2,850.70 4.000 0.667 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376GY53 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38379JM99 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2040 08/06/2019 45,177.91 45,320.86 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 42,875.73 43,152.08 45,571.41 367.43 3.526 1.135 AAA 43,940.34 835.30 2.500 0.783 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378JZD7 AgencyCMO 3137A6B27 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 35,708,49 35,262.13 10/25/2020 06/27/2019 176,315.63 180,200.07 36,165.56 177,073.78 854.54 1.500 0.660 AAA (23.83) 4.333 1.068 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377RED3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38376WA62 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2025 12/11/2019 174,021.24 175,407.98 10/20/2039 12/17/2019 83,718.09 87,825.51 179,038.28 3,737.04 2.500 0.835 AAA 89,446.92 1,727.43 4.000 1.795 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378FRB8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38377JZ89 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137B5A60 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 07/20/2042 12/30/2019 186,75 L49 184,008.58 10/20/2039 01/28/2020 57,553.67 58,812.65 10/15/2028 02/07/2020 16,911.26 17,069.81 191,698.54 7,644.03 2.000 1.358 AAA 59,874.80 1,122.85 3.500 0.702 AAA 38376TTT9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/20/2039 01/29/2020 45,842.38 46,916.80 17,459.18 400.50 2.500 0.842 AAA 47,787.47 920.15 3.000 0.844 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378AU90 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137ABFH9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/20/2026 04/28/2020 126,443.95 130,079.21 06/25/2021 149,000.00 152,765.01 129,956.56 19.96 3.000 0.781 AAA 152,391.24 1,629.51 3.989 0.674 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3620AFYR2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 172,584.40 178,867.55 12/15/2024 06/12/2019 81,081.85 83,720.19 182,226.69 4,661.95 4.000 0.336 AAA 85.568.92 2,377.53 4.000 0.181 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36297GCD0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3620A9T35 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/15/2025 06/12/2019 87,389.57 91,066.09 11/15/2024 06/13/2019 136,889.96 141,349.58 91,442.70 1,323.36 4.500 1.363 AAA 144,454.50 3,948.55 4.000 0.134 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620C4SU5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 38378KW47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/15/2025 06/12/2019 79,845.20 82,798.85 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 179,865.35 178,853.61 02/25/2023 06/18/2019 22,665.88 22,655.26 31381R5T7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/01/2021 06/20/2019 101,000.00 103,840.63 84,307.75 2,040.72 4.000 0.604 AAA 180,766.48 1,468.11 2.150 0.956 AAA 22,649.56 149.90 0.530 0.567 AAA 104,043.13 1,617.60 3.770 1.088 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BIBSO Agency MBS Freddie Mac 04/25/2022 06/07/2019 223,029.81 220,555.57 11/25/2022 645,000.00 652,086.14 224,956.79 3,639.79 1.583 0.569 AAA 670,812.90 21,060.11 2.510 0.677 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137F4D41 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3137BIU75 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2028 06/27/2019 150,000.00 163,248.05 01/25/2023 06/27/2019 356,899.87 360,343.39 175,773.00 13,978.58 3.600 1.179 AAA 369,641.20 10,559.72 2.522 0.519 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BM6P6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137F4CY6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/25/2022 06/28/2019 200,000.00 205,437.50 09/25/2024 06/28/2019 190,000.00 195,907.81 208,204.00 4,700.16 3.090 0.889 AAA 204,983.40 10,243.71 2.920 0.916 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FBAJ5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 31419AM53 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/25/2027 06/26/2019 200,000.00 211,593.75 08/01/2024 06/28/2019 76,459.99 79,279.45 229,124.00 18,883.86 3.281 1.091 AAA 79,347.12 1,032.50 5.500 0.594 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AHAEO Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 06/28/2019 46,635.05 47,065.49 07/01/2022 07/22/2019 210.552.68 214,393.62 48,179.14 911.90 2.708 0.431 AAA 216,273.39 1,988.56 2.997 1.368 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378KW U9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3137BSRZ8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378NWU3 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3137FNAD2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 11/16/2041 78,470.96 75,029.23 09/25/2022 06/28/2019 131,129.21 133,715.94 06/16/2048 06/27/2019 0.00 0.00 11/25/2028 08/01/2019 147,296.75 150,236.50 78,518.04 2,906.29 1.400 1.340 AAA 137,086.41 3,495.65 2.838 0.489 AAA (0.00) (0.00) 2.580 1.255 AAA 161,359.17 11,503.39 2.631 0.784 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138LFGP7 Agency MBS 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2028 08/07/2019 300,000.00 310,207.03 03/01/2023 08/21/2019 39,471.52 39,915.57 328,344.00 18,709.01 2.550 1.319 AAA 41,015.64 1,076.47 2.332 0.471 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 3137FL6P4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 08/22/2019 131,049.81 132,109.47 01/25/2029 09/09/2019 275,000.00 307,108.40 134,554.08 2,706.76 2.349 0.267 AAA 325,902.50 21,365.20 3.563 1.243 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BP4K2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3138L2QG5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2026 09/09/2019 200,000.00 210,125.00 01/01/2028 09/09/2019 257,876.07 273,640.77 219,962.00 11,055.86 2.849 1.016 AAA 287,206.90 14,048.76 3.010 1.432 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138LFP51 Agency MBS 36178NB99 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 10/01/2028 09/09/2019 197,770.14 205,286.95 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 43,896.88 44,383.87 216,605.77 11,681.99 2.570 1.316 AAA 45,970.57 1,621.69 2.500 0.505 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202FA30 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3137BJQ71 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 35,276.94 36,754.16 05/25/2025 10/30/2019 200,000.00 206,296.88 37,681.06 1,161.07 4.500 -0.194 AAA 217,392.00 11,844.39 2.770 0.918 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BLAC2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 36179M4J6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/25/2025 150,000.00 159,648.05 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 163.575.61 165,543.63 167,124.00 8,538.93 3.284 0.824 AAA 171.368.35 5,936.20 2.500 0.536 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/0n 10/07/2019 17,342.72 17,529.70 17,347.40 (76.38) 3.630 3.023 AAA Page of41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 INE Source Security Type Account Account Identifier Category Issuer w Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Final Maturity Trade Date Value Original Cost Date Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Cou a on Yield Credit Rating 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202F2H8 Agency MBS 3137FPJF3 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac 01/20/2027 12/12/2019 06/25/2029 01/08/2020 180,813.66 197,923.74 185,277.50 198,820.58 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FQ3Y7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3132CJAJ2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/25/2029 01/08/2020 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 198,142.66 198,212.32 97,708.14 100,479.08 189,328.17 213,452.84 4,393.14 14,715.11 212,718.04 102,767.46 14,529.59 2,336.18 3.000 0.661 AAA 2.258 0.723 AAA 2.190 0.787 AAA 3.000 0.533 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/01/2030 02/04/2020 24,353.84 26,203.21 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 25,211.50 26,456.31 26,484.32 26,468.30 362.48 4.500 0.618 AAA 24.42 3.000 1.056 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179NKP2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 36179MU24 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MZV5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 36179MEK2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2028 04/28/2020 89,328.97 93,153.36 93,586.39 486.09 2.500 0.589 AAA 12/20/2027 04/28/2020 65,108.22 67,895.67 68,036.79 176.60 2.500 0.584 AAA 02/20/2028 04/28/2020 85,257.53 88,907.62 06/20/2027 04/28/2020 110.486.17 115.216.37 89,303.00 115,462.47 449.80 2.500 0.515 AAA 315.77 2.500 0.508 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3140JAU97 Agency MBS 3138EJRP5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association 05/01/2023 05/20/2020 99,696.71 103,653.43 06/01/2021 06/18/2019 128,769.52 132,654.04 102,640.76 (846.92) 2.496 1.132 AAA 132,857.96 2,375.50 4.342 -0.333 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 36179MU32 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/01/2019 178,405.44 183, 903.95 12/20/2027 06/22/2020 115,557.76 121,768.99 182,906.61 2,017.32 4.295 1.371 AAA 121,290.59 (617.70) 3.000 0.737 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 3128MMUL5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3620ARZE4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/01/2031 06/22/2020 146,831.22 153,713.93 02/15/2026 06/22/2020 121,216.99 126,823.28 154,122.86 127,473.00 284.36 2.500 0.771 AAA 518.91 3.000 0.200 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36176XE21 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/15/2027 06/22/2020 210,770.83 220,848.32 03/01/2027 06/23/2020 291,701.18 305,010.05 221,648.71 306,154.97 575.64 3.000 0.459 AAA 885.47 2.500 0.321 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 31397UPF0 Agency MBS 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 06/25/2021 06/10/2019 196,102.09 199,319.39 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 43,764.30 46,191.86 199,263.25 1,791.32 3.763 0.573 AAA 45,938.95 (252.91) 3.000 0.779 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 06/24/2019 15,155.72 15,148.62 15,134.51 (19.73) 0.697 1.191 AAA 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 0.00 (209,959.00) (209,959.00) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 31846V401 MM Fund 9128285W6 TIPS First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 United States Department oflhe Treasury 0.00 273,467.35 01/15/2029 264,061.20 278,924.20 273,467.35 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 300,834.36 23,382.28 0.875 -0.703 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 912828V49 TIPS 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2027 06/25/2019 307,872.70 310,267.85 04/15/2024 08/01/2019 294.872.00 299.093.53 331,729.76 21,779.88 0.375 -0.777 AAA 309,904.57 11.621.40 0.500 -0.822 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 912828XB1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 09/10/2019 1,000,000.00 1,006,210.94 05/15/2025 -- 600,000.00 625,417.97 1,035,430.00 30,820.43 1.750 0.173 AAA 653,346.00 29,559.81 2.125 0.287 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIF!A Reserve 912828L99 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 06/25/2019 1,050,000.00 1,043,683.60 10/15/2022 750,000.00 763,253.90 1,054,126.50 5,696.64 1.375 0.198 AAA 770,565.00 7,582.68 1.375 0.176 AAA 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828Y53 US Gov 912828858 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 985,000.00 984,986.26 01/31/2021 06/26/2019 1,500,000.00 1,506,269.53 985,029.55 32.02 0.193 0.162 AAA 1,516,815.00 14,499.78 2.125 0.207 AAA 19,980,069.21 20,438,022.15 20,912,126.93 529,123.42 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 447.71 451.84 8,435.23 8,516.94 447.61 (0.11) 3.000 0.581 AAA 8,472.59 25.63 3.000 1.277 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397LUK3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A5KR6 AgencyCMO Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2023 10/10/2018 10/25/2022 01/25/2019 80,382.55 82,002.76 47,144.22 46,495.99 82,404.17 1,232.39 4.500 1.073 AAA 47,270.10 449.10 1.750 0.905 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378BXQ7 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 34,020.78 33,680.57 34,023.50 84.11 1.537 0.862 AAA 23,631.16 477.27 1.500 0.943 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A2PV7 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2022 06/03/2019 23,464.80 23,054.16 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31394GUX9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A72D3 AgencyCMO Federal National Mortgage Association 08/15/2023 07/02/2019 22,827.31 23,797.47 04/25/2022 07/26/2019 25,578.98 25.728.69 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AYCE9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 124,865.72 127,343.52 10/25/2022 08/13/2019 360,000.00 367,790.63 23,970.04 384.87 5.500 1.333 AAA 26,101.31 379.10 2.482 0.741 AAA 129,118.64 2,258.22 3.500 0.978 AAA 375,246.00 9,793.25 2.682 0.677 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137GAUY1 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ATRW4 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 10/15/2022 08/15/2019 122,279.25 121,018.24 05/25/2022 08/19/2019 100,000.00 101,109.38 123,075.29 1,805.42 1.500 0.940 AAA 102,917.00 2,217.54 2.373 0.611 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A1HC2 AgencyCMO Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2023 01/02/2020 10,485.53 10,562.12 10,498.95 (8.03) 3.500 1.514 AAA 18,978.53 116.98 2.500 0.948 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 18,861.77 18,908.93 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378PPK8 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 12/20/2038 01/08/2020 87,776.09 88,396.70 07/25/2021 03/11/2020 37,866.31 38,599.98 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38377VWQ5 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2038 04/01/2020 54,632.52 54,666.66 90,600.73 2,259.86 2.500 0.487 AAA 38,704.67 271.01 3.230 0.684 AAA 54,587.17 (35.11) 2.500 2.258 AAA 731.21 3.871 1.218 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ADTJ6 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 04/25/2021 03/11/2020 478,055.59 487,840.79 485,283.79 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ABFH9 Agency CM0 _ Freddie Mac 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 06/25/2021 03/15/2019 206,000.00 209,846.41 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 17,061.14 16,826.55 210,688.56 3,085.89 3.989 0.674 AAA 17,214.69 267.63 1.749 0.582 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 04/25/2022 10,580.65 10,425.25 34,848.41 34,200.44 10,704.66 205.20 1.785 0.550 AAA 35,149.50 653.27 1.583 0.569 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381RZ23 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381RLL6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L2GH4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L1W62 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/01/2021 11/02/2018 59,464.67 60,347.35 07/01/2021 11/02/2018 51.628.98 52,395.35 07/01/2021 122,779.70 120,179.90 12/01/2022 02/21/2019 124,084.38 123,347.63 60,675.38 854.87 3.840 1.479 AAA 52,561.91 660.62 3.840 1.516 AAA 124,282.52 2,503.03 1.870 0.336 AAA 123,981.39 484.88 2.500 2.473 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L8H23 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPY3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 12/01/2021 05/02/2019 67,127.99 66,918.28 06/01/2027 05/10/2019 175,443.17 174,675.61 67,097.78 160.02 2.730 2.647 AAA 184,148.66 9,401.13 2.500 0.357 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/01/2027 05/10/2019 188,194.31 187,370.96 197,519.34 10,085.65 2.500 0.321 AAA 59,679.24 1,526.79 4.000 0.336 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 56,521.39 58,579.12 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378KW47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fand 3140J6DU8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 69,513.18 69,122.17 08/01 /2031 07/26/2019 177,913.41 179,108.76 69,861.44 567.39 2.150 0.956 AAA 186,698.78 7,712.96 2.500 0.524 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AMM48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 08/21/2019 42,102.95 42,576.61 07/25/2022 08/01/2019 331,644.76 333,510.26 43,750.02 1,148.24 2.332 0.471 AAA 338,758.54 5,902.43 2.509 0.770 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137APP61 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31418CQM9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2022 09/06/2019 10/01/2027 09/11/2019 13,808.32 14,033.79 47,152.92 48,353.85 14,157.81 204.76 2.789 0.846 AAA 49,547.34 1,287.19 3.000 0.555 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36178NB99 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3132G5AV I Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 109,742.22 110, 959.68 07/01/2028 10/11/2019 64,994.58 66,213.24 114,926.44 4,054.22 2.500 0.505 AAA 68,350.25 2,223.58 3.000 1.046 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179M416 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 136,313.01 137,953.03 12/01/2020 01/17/2018 0.00 0.00 142,806.96 4,946.84 2.500 0.536 AAA 0.00 0.00 5.000 2.499 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/20H97 12/12/2019 79,558.01 81,522.10 83,304.39 1,932.98 3.000 0.661 AAA Page of41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Security Type Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Account Account Identifier Catetior Issuer Final Maturi. Trade Date Val e Oritrinal lost Dab Ba Market Value nr aliz•d mi o Vi .l, .r ,it Ratin' 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381QB54 Agency MBS 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 03/01/2021 11/07/2018 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 97,499.84 67,230.67 99,518.39 70,550.19 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179Q2A8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3622A2GC0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2030 04/30/2020 349,893.78 370,012.68 03/15/2028 04/30/2020 247,098.96 257,060.14 98,325.66 70,582.12 462.78 65.09 368,399.66 258,771.91 4.410 2.424 3.000 1.056 (1,342.38) 3.000 0.918 1,919.53 2.500 0.488 AAA AAA AAA AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397UPF0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2021 03/15/2019 98,051.05 99,460.53 99,631.63 1,069.02 3.763 0.573 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478DAD9 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2018-A Owner Trust 05/16/2022 06/29/2018 49,626.51 49,370.62 50,048.83 480.91 2.650 0.779 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 654781!ADO Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2017-C Owner Trust 04/18/2022 09/25/2018 33,721.07 33,195.49 33,937.56 350.78 2.120 0.603 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 47789JAB2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019 10/15/2021 286,183.58 287,470.88 287,485.71 73.44 2.850 0.987 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31680YAB3 Asset Backed Fifth Third Auto Trust 2019-1 05/16/2022 04/30/2019 62,227.16 62,223.74 62,573.77 347.47 2.660 0.336 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 477870AB5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019-B 05/16/2022 07/16/2019 58.196.62 58,196.40 58.552.78 356.20 2.280 0.742 AAA 256350021 MBvl-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478LAB5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2019-B 10/15/2021 07/16/2019 60,686.98 60,681.67 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38013FAD3 Asset Banked GM Financial Consumer Automobile Receivables Trust 2018-4 10/16/2023 07/24/2019 73,253.42 74,595.45 61,064.45 378.97 2.270 0.168 AAA 74,984.40 1,088.24 3.210 0.158 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315PAB1 Asset Backed 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 26209AAE1 Asset Backed Carmax Auto Owner Trust 2019-3 Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-4 12/15/2022 07/24/2019 87,926.45 87,922.50 01/16/2024 09/09/2019 80,000.00 79,989.10 88,633.38 708.67 2.210 0.668 AAA 81,041.60 1,048.60 2.230 1.279 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 12596EAC8 Asset Backed CNH Equipment Trust 2018-B 11/15/2023 12/05/2019 188,479.68 191,557.19 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 26208RAD7 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-2 03/15/2023 12/05/2019 83,444.68 83,855.38 192,876.91 2,372.17 3.190 0.702 AAA 83,749.25 211.33 3.040 -0.464 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 025821H12 Asset Backed American Express Credit Accoant Master Trust, Series 2017-6 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17305EFM2 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust - 2014-Al 10/15/2020 12/05/2019 200,000.00 200,375.00 01/23/2023 12/11/2019 200,000.00 202,210.16 200,962.00 833.91 2.040 0.390 AAA 202,880.00 1,764.25 2.880 0.297 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315XAC2 Asset Backed Canvas Auto Owner Trust 2020-1 12/16/2024 01/14/2020 60,000.00 59,988.23 61,731.00 1,741.06 1.890 0.733 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17305EGK5 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust 01/20/2021 07/19/2019 100,000.00 100,625.00 101,194.00 960.46 2.490 0.337 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14041NFU0 Asset Backed Capital One Multi -Asset Execution Trust, Series 2019-2 09/15/2022 03/13/2020 100,000.00 100,312.50 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 87165LBB6 Asset Backed Synchrony Credit Card Master Note Trust 2016-2 05/17/2021 08/02/2019 160,000.00 160,387.50 102,781.00 2,504.06 1.720 0.455 AAA 161,808.00 1,615.21 2.210 0.923 AAA 256350021 M M-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86565CBD0 CD Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, New York Brunch 07/14/2020 04/15/2020 400,000.00 400,069.78i 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 05/10/2019 0.01 0.01 400,164.00 153.92 1.150 0.095 AAA 0.01 0.00 0.697 0.975 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888UAB6 CMO 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 172967LC3 Corporate NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-R2 Citigroup Inc. 11/05/2020 03/15/2019 131,095.42 131,290.03 -- 131,104.60 (32.22) 0.717 0.804 AAA 12/08/2021 --- 450.000.00 449.617.50 11/08/2021 463.563.00 13.770.41 2.900 0.663 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EBD8 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 025816CE7 Corporate Tmist Bank American Express Company 05/17/2022 05/14/2019 50,000.00 50,000.00 04/17/2022 50,154.00 154.00 0.976 0.740 A 05/20/2022 05/15/2019 100,000.00 100,000.00 04/19/2022 100,170.00 170.00 0.997 0.846 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GEC9 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 07/01/2020 200,000.00 207,806.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 94974BGM6 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 07/22/2020 04/15/2019 200,000.00 199,590.00 200,000.00 200,244.00 0.00 5.625 5.472 A 262.71 2.600 0.596 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 552791JAN0 Corporate Manufacturers & Traders Trust Company 08/17/2020 10/11/2018 250,000.00 244,707.50 07/17/2020 250,152.50 531.84 2.050 0.752 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 375558BB8 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc. 09/01/2020 --- 135,000.00 133,439.10 -- 135,487.35 625.02 2.550 0.415 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FBJ1 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 Corporate Truist Financial Corporation Royal Bank of Canada 03/16/2023 09/09/2019 165,000.00 164,877.90 02/13/2023 10/14/2020 --- 200,000.00 196,622.00 --- 171,298.05 6,393.36 2.200 0.726 A 200,988.00 1,440.01 2.100 0.386 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17308CC46 Corporate Citigroup Inc. 11/04/2022 10/28/2019 195,000.00 195,000.00 11/04/2021 198,845.40 3,845.40 2.312 0.873 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17401QANI Corporate Citizens Bank, National Association 10/30/2020 04/15/2019 250,000.00 247,950.00 --- 251,092.50 1,539.78 2.250 0.498 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31677QBK4 Corporate Fifth Third Bank, National Association 10/30/2020 06/21/2019 200,000.00 199,810.00 09/30/2020 200,926.00 972.42 2.200 0.345 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/25/2021 --- 200,000.00 213,237.00 -- 205,972.00 2,749.29 5.750 0.492 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 95000U2B8 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69353RFU7 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company PNC Bank, National Association 07/22/2022 02/19/2020 235,000.00 239,479.10 -- 244,825.35 6,002.10 2.625 0.581 A 02/24/2023 02/20/2020 250,000.00 250,000.00 02/24/2022 249,747.50 (252.50) 0.685 0.678 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 74456QBP0 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 30231GBL5 Corporate Public Service Electric and Gas Company Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/15/2021 03/25/2020 125,000.00 122,811.25 02/15/2021 126,192.50 2,796.79 1.900 0.370 AA 04/15/2023 04/13/2020 270.000.00 270.000.00 --- 277.106.40 7.106.40 1.571 0.618 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9033IHNP4 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 Corporate U.S. Bank National Association The Bank of Nova Scotia 04/26/2021 10/11/2018 250,000.00 249,395.00 03/26/2021 255,180.00 5,380.56 3.150 0.340 AA 04/26/2021 -- 200,000.00 194,126.00 -- 202,416.00 4,187.91 1.875 0.402 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 166764BV 1 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69371RP34 Corporate Chevron Corporation PACCAR Financial Corp. 05/11/2023 05/07/2020 135,000.00 135,000.00 05/10/2021 04/30/2019 200,000.00 200,250.00 137,324.70 2,324.70 1.141 0.534 AA 200,022.00 (83.89) 0.708 0.587 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14913Q2X6 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 05/17/2021 05/14/2019 120,000.00 120,000.00 -- 120,190.80 190.80 0.776 0.545 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0EH8 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/03/2022 06/12/2020 270,000.00 270,459.00 01/31/2022 271,071.90 624.49 1.037 0.770 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61746BEE2 Corporate 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EGPO CP Morgan Stanley Catholic Health Initiatives 01/20/2022 06/12/2020 200,000.00 200,870.00 01/20/2021 200,822.00 10.18 2.315 0.853 A 07/23/2020 05/13/2020 400,000.00 398,808.78 --- 399,964.00 333.11 0.000 0.141 NA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EHT1 CP 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 026657784 CP Catholic Health Initiatives American Honda Finance Corporation 08/27/2020 05/19/2020 300,000.00 298,741.67 09/08/2020 06/15/2020 500,000.00 499,291.67 299,916.00 499,820.00 633.25 0.000 0.174 NA 395.00 0.000 0.185 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02665JGL8 CP 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund CCYUSD Currency American Honda Finance Corporation UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 07/20/2020 06/17/2020 300,000.00 299,887.25 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 (175,000.00) 299,976.00 (175,000.00) 40.92 0.000 0.144 AA 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31846V401 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 0.00 122,507.48 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 072024WW8 Muni Bay Area Toll Authority 04/01/2022 09/20/2019 95,000.00 95,000.00 122,507.48 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 96,666.30 1,666.30 2.128 1.114 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 783186TZ2 Muni Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 05/01/2022 10/18/2019 105,000.00 105,000.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 283062DK0 Muni El Dorado Irrigation District 03/01/2022 06/16/2020 155,000.00 155,000.00 106,104.60 1,104.60 2.057 1.474 AA 155.354.95 354.95 0.739 0.601 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 650036AS5 Muni The New York State Urban Development Corporation 03/15/2024 06/18/2020 180,000.00 180,001).00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 194740PF7 Muni Collin County Texas 02/15/2024 06/25/2020 175,000.00 175,000.00 180,509.40 509.40 0.965 0.887 AA 176,146.25 1,146.25 0.867 0.684 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 4581X0CZ9 Non -US Gov Inter -American Development Bank 09/14/2022 09/30/2019 650,000.00 652,067.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2023 --- 99,990.90 98,120.58 671,053.50 19,498.75 1.750 0.276 AAA 102,425.68 3,466.59 0.125 -0.820 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828665 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 --- 416,888.00 424,263.71 -- 438,140.95 15,248.94 0.500 -0.822 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 --- 2,150,000.00 2,158,926.57 --- 2,226,174.50 68,756.64 1.750 0.173 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 --- 1,775,000.00 1,774,332.62 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VV9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/31/2020 --- 2,150,000.00 2,142,433.60 1,775,053.25 2,156,923.00 116.80 0.193 0.162 AAA 6,897.95 2.125 0.212 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/15/2022 1,030,000.00 1,021,835.16 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128285H9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 700,000.00 699,678.39 1,058,242.60 700,077.00 34,628.11 1.375 0.176 AAA 139.71 0.195 0.166 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828T67 US Gov 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286U9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2021 12/09/2019 480,000.00 476,306.25 United States Department of The Treasury 05/15/2022 --- 420,000.00 425,850.01 486,883.20 9,494.95 1.250 0.173 AAA 435,309.00 10,478.84 2.125 0.177 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828143 US Gov 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128281358 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 02/28/2022 12/30/2019 125,000.00 125,463.87 United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 --- 1,730,000.00 1,727,976.96 128,257.50 2,898.54 1.750 0.185 AAA 1,749,393.30 18,271.53 2.125 0.207 AAA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 658886DZ6 VRDN North Dakota Housing Finance Agency 07/01/2038 06/29/2018 100,000.00 100,000.00 -- 100,000.00 0.00 0.180 0.180 AA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 196480CW5 VRDN Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, Inc. 10/01/2051 03/19/2020 460,000.00 460,000.00 07/20/2020 460,000.00 0.00 0.200 0.200 AAA 40 26,445,097.28 26,475,889.18 26,828,171.50 358,266.64 Page of41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 INE Source Security Type Account Account Identifier Cate •ory Issuer Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Final Maturity 'Trade Date Value Original Cost Date Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Cou on Yield Credit Rating 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 950,000.00 942,921.50 981,673.00 31,865.06 2.375 0.200 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3130AFFX0 Agency Federal Home Loan Banks 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 11/16/2028 09/11/2019 185,000.00 205,766.25 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 183,703.67 174,518.49 220,470.05 16,377.01 3.250 0.872 AAA 187,454.90 5,125.80 2.482 0.741 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 38377JZ89 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 06/25/2022 10/20/2039 150,000.00 151,611.80 49,879.84 51,238.35 154,458.00 4,001.58 2.396 0.700 AAA 51,891.49 1,171.11 3.500 0.702 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 AgencyCMO 38378TAF7 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2039 01/26/2015 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 54,194.05 56,619.23 89,271.00 89,284.46 56,915.67 1,312.68 3.000 0.666 AAA 92,687.40 3,474.77 2.500 0.691 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 AgencyCMO 38378CRT6 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2046 11/28/2016 116,195.11 119,449.48 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 35,294.27 34.081.02 122,811.26 3,881.67 3.000 1.875 AAA 36,238.03 1.748.14 2.000 0.855 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 38377RVK8 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 04/20/2039 150,553.03 154,340.33 73,835.56 75,308.64 160,855.37 6,238.00 4.000 1.795 AAA 76,303.14 1,832.85 3.000 1.090 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXHPI AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 3I37ATRW4 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 09/29/2017 140,000.00 142,089.06 05/25/2022 282,110.00 278,085.13 145,392.80 4,582.31 2.573 0.677 AAA 290,339.15 10,357.85 2.373 0.611 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38378CDK0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2042 03/20/2035 03/16/2018 450,000.00 427,324.22 248.73 249.90 468,598.50 30,003.83 2.273 1.279 AAA 248.67 (0.06) 3.000 0.581 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378AWX5 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 38379HLE3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2036 _ 03/28/2018 05/20/2043 10/18/2018 25,305.68 25,442.09 42,591.91 42,532.02 25,417.78 103.09 3.000 1.277 AAA 43,459.08 937.16 3.500 -0.235 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378VC45 AgencyCMO 383771M59 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2041 11/23/2018 118,323.73 114,052.99 10/20/2039 11/21/2018 54,533.09 53,169.76 121,556.33 6,856.75 2.250 1.204 AAA 55,616.12 2,108.72 2.500 1.097 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A5KR6 AgencyCMO Federal National Mortgage Association 38378HXH4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/25/2022 01/25/2019 30,689.96 30,267.98 09/16/2027 03/08/2019 12,459.16 12,083.30 30,771.91 292.36 1.750 0.905 AAA 12,588.37 452.96 1.250 0.733 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B5A60 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 3137B4HD1 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 10/15/2028 03/20/2019 12/15/2042 03/20/2019 18,521.85 18,313.49 29,556.78 30,526.61 19,121.96 765.97 2.500 0.842 AAA 31,465.85 1,031.49 4.500 0.882 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38375XCM4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3136ADFF I Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 11/16/2037 05/14/2019 46,607.53 47,927.48 04/25/2023 06/10/2019 87,196.58 85.943.14 48,594.41 _ 1,022.48 5.000 1.237 AAA 87,663.08 1.452.00 1.500 0.919 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38377QKH9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 58,270.67 59,426.98 39,646.73 40,366.88 60,255.37 1,053.83 3.500 0.978 AAA 41,537.09 1,217.93 3.000 0.767 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GY53 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38379JM99 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2040 08/06/2019 40,770.31 40,899.31 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 39,813.18 40,069.79 41,125.42 331.59 3.526 1.135 AAA 40,801.74 775.63 2.500 0.783 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38374C4J7 AgencyCMO 38378JZD7 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2020 10/21/2019 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 1,174.53 1,184.07 33,608.00 33,187.90 1,174.36 (0.16) 5.500 0.525 AAA 34,038.18 804.27 1.500 0.660 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137BDKF2 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 3137A5FP4 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 09/15/2040 11/13/2019 01/15/2021 51,320.49 52,503.27 52,763.10 52,769.07 52,760.54 433.98 3.500 1.528 AAA 53,089.70 362.70 2.500 0.948 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378FRB8 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 38378CNY9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2042 12/30/2019 176,922.47 174,323.92 11/20/2038 02/04/2020 75,271.90 75,765.88 181,609.14 7,241.72 2.000 1.358 AAA 75,865.04 287.34 3.500 1.091 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3837611T9 Agency CM() Government National Mortgage Association 3137B1UG5 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 11/20/2039 01/29/2020 42,174.99 43,163.46 01/25/2023 05/14/2020 140,000.00 145,758.59 43,964.47 846.53 3.000 0.844 AAA 146,431.60 946.57 2.637 0.649 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378AU90 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 3137ABFH9 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 10/20/2026 04/28/2020 116,283.27 119,626.42 06/25/2021 07/22/2019 100,000.00 102,574.22 119,513.62 18.36 3.000 0.781 AAA 102,276.00 1,002.20 3.989 0.674 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ARVU7 AgencyCMO Freddie Mac 38379KDN5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2038 06/30/2020 286,845.06 290,834.01 09/16/2055 08/05/2015 85,703.16 83.513.71 290,746.15 (87.86) 3.000 1.415 AAA 90,171.72 4.904.43 2.223 1.467 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 Agency MBS 38378X1'62 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2027 116,443.99 120,020.27 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 221,236.60 223,967.49 121,927.34 3,069.38 3.000 0.661 AAA 232,214.36 8,788.22 2.500 1.367 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/16/2041 127,878.59 121,513.95 07/01/2022 08/29/2016 187,157.94 198,789.51 127,955.32 4,007.55 1.400 1.340 AAA 192,243.02 25.90 2.997 1.368 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/25/2022 08/29/2016 238,272.39 245,085.50 01/01/2030 103,499.77 108,462.94 244,643.80 4,234.12 2.349 0.267 AAA 112,553.93 5,397.11 4.500 0.618 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS Govemment National Mortgage Association 38378KXW4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 02/16/2037 12/11/2014 90,110.70 89,674.23 463,405.50 19,928.70 2.389 1.336 AAA 90,611.72 655.14 1.705 1.139 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 38378KSL4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 12/16/2046 194,726.14 191,958.21 425,000.00 415,829.11 202,343.83 8,093.15 2.332 0.471 AAA 450,640.25 31,404.81 2.813 1.874 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AHAEO Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 10/28/2016 38,989.96 39,830.68 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 106,343.46 102,991.15 40,280.92 749.73 2.708 0.431 AAA 107,702.53 2,980.45 1.826 1.367 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137BIU75 Agency MBS 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2023 08/29/2016 361,658.54 375,856.46 03/25/2023 47,071.81 46,455.47 374,569.75 8,386.52 2.522 0.519 AAA 48,821.47 2,070.91 2.622 0.964 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381R5T7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 3138L1W62 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/01/2021 08/29/2018 130,000.00 132, 747.27 12/01/2022 02/21/2019 162,264.19 161.300.75 133,916.90 3,029.65 3.770 1.088 AAA 162,129.51 634.07 2.500 2.473 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137F4D41 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FBAJ5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3137BIBSO Agency MIS Freddie Mac 01/25/2028 04/01/2019 35,000.00 36,714.84 05/15/2025 06/10/2019 86,292.20 89,433.77 08/25/2027 06/26/2019 200,000.00 211,593.75 11/25/2022 07/31/2019 360,000.00 363,360.94 41,013.70 4,526.76 3.600 1.179 AAA 91,113.35 2,330.98 4.000 0.336 AAA 229,124.00 18,883.86 3.281 1.091 AAA 374,407.20 12,141.82 2.510 0.677 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FNAD2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3138LFGP7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2028 08/01/2019 132,567.08 135,212.85 10/01/2028 08/07/2019 275,000.00 284,356.45 145,223.26 10,353.05 2.631 0.784 AAA 300,982.00 17,149.92 2.550 1.319 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36178NB99 Agency MBS 36202FA30 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 32,922.66 33,287.90 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 32,454.78 33,813.83 34,477.93 1,216.26 2.500 0.505 AAA 34,666.58 1,068.19 4.500 -0.194 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEBO Agency MBS 36179M4J6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 243,447.27 256,342.37 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 40,893.90 41,385.90 243,342.58 (381.26) 3.370 2.845 AAA 42,842.09 1,484.06 2.500 0.536 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 3137FPJF3 Agency MIS Freddie Mac 12/01/2020 17,342.71 17,537.82 06/25/2029 01/08/2020 183,079.46 183,909.04 17,347.40 (51.12) 3.630 3.023 AAA 197,443.88 13,611.47 2.258 0.723 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FQ3Y7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3132CIAJ2 Agency MIS Freddie Mac 07/25/2029 01/08/2020 183,281.96 183,346.40 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 89,891.48 92,440.76 196,764.19 13,439.87 2.190 0.787 AAA 94,546.07 2,149.28 3.000 0.533 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381QB54 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 36179NHK7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03 /01 /2021 11/07/2018 127,173.69 129, 806.59 07/20/2028 03/31/2020 186,714.55 194.766.61 128,250.85 603.62 4.410 2.424 AAA 196,005.47 1,477.79 3.000 0.816 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Govemmanl National Mortgage Association 06/241:10 05/01/2020 25,211.50 26,456.56 26,468.30 24.17 3.000 1.056 AAA Page10 of41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Security Tvpc Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Account Account Identifier Catevory Issuer Final Maturie Trade Date Value Ori final Cost Date Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Coue on Yield Credit Ratin' 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU24 Agency MBS 36179MZV5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 04/28/2020 02/20/2028 04/28/2020 60,099.90 78,596.78 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NKP2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 36179MEK2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2028 04/28/2020 89,328.97 62,672.92 81,961.71 93,153.36 06/20/2027 04/28/2020 101,987.24 106,353.56 62,803.19 82,326.20 93,586.39 106,580.74 163.01 414.67 486.09 2.500 0.584 2.500 0.515 2.500 0.589 291.48 2.500 0.508 AAA AAA AAA AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS 3140JAU97 Agency MBS Freddie Mac Federal National Mortgage Association 02/25/2023 05/14/2020 23,572.51 23,480.43 05/01/2023 05/20/2020 91,388.65 95,015.64 23,555.54 335.40 0.530 0.567 AAA 94,087.36 (776.35) 2.496 1.132 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 36179MKL3 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/15/2016 178,405.44 197,862.79 08/20/2027 05/28/2020 108,337.58 112,874.21 182,906.61 857.35 4.295 1.371 AAA 112,351.49 (487.82) 2.500 0.867 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMUL5 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 3620ARZE4 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/01/2031 06/22/2020 142,094.73 148,755.42 02/15/2026 06/22/2020 109.672.52 1 14.744.88 149,151.15 115.332.72 275.19 2.500 0.771 AAA 469.49 3.000 0.200 AAA 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU32 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2027 06/22/2020 106,668.70 112,402.15 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36176XE21 Agency MBS _ Government National Mortgage Association 03/15/2027 06/22/2020 193,812.26 203,078.91 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMPP2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/01/2027 06/23/2020 272,881.74 285,331.98 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS _ Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 40,481.98 42,727.47 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F3H7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2027 06/30/2020 71,771.01 75,269.86 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 62888VAA6 CMO _ NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 01/22/2019 61,464.87 61,486.49 256350023 MINA -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 -- 0.00 1.50 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 -- 0.00 (408,997.63) 256350023 MINA -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31846V401 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 460,940.25 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2027 --- 297,256.40 295,913.55 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128285W6 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2029 --- 253,905.00 269,164.49 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 --- 269,452.00 273,816.78 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 US Gov United States Department oflhe Treasury 09/30/2022 -- 1,400,000.00 1,386,564.45 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 11/15/2024 04/18/2017 1,350,000.00 1,369,037.11 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 US Gov United States Department oflhe Treasury 05/15/2025 --- 1,125,000.00 1,143,342.78 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828/43 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 02/28/2022 11/26/2019 150,000.00 150,544.92 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department oflhe Treasury 10/15/2022 670,000.00 664,428.32 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 1,150,000.00 1,175,230.08 18,364,745.02 18,638,982.87 111,960.53 (570.20) 3.000 0.737 AAA 203,814.91 529.33 3.000 0.459 AAA 286,403.03 828.34 2.500 0.321 AAA 42,493.53 (233.94) 3.000 0.779 AAA 75,326.55 56.69 3.000 0.547 AAA 61,378.82 (89.37) 0.697 1.191 AAA 1.50 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA (408,997.63) 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 460,940.25 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 320,290.80 23,949.28 0.375 -0.777 AAA 289,263.81 21,538.85 0.875 -0.703 AAA 283,188.66 10,191.56 0.500 -0.822 AAA 1,449,602.00 55,430.97 1.750 0.173 AAA 1,467,652.50 106,298.50 2.250 0.246 AAA 1,225,023.75 90,733.89 2.125 0.287 AAA 153,909.00 3,504.32 1.750 0.185 AAA 688,371.40 22,884.14 1.375 0.176 AAA 1,162,891.50 9,870.67 2.125 0.207 AAA 19,294,127.77 707,570.29 42 Page 11 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 4 Source Beginning Base Base Maturities and Base Base Change In Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 9128286N5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 300,874.51 (1,939.77) 10,969.84 309,904.57 310.18 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828V49 UNITED STATES TREASURY 316,877.00 (1,870.88) 16,723,64 331,729.76 532.86 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 9128285W6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 155,346.31 (1,046.53) 7,687.95 161,987.73 574.22 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,525,905.00 (985.94) (8,104.06) 1,516,815.00 13,310.44 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 9128285W6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 133,153.98 (877.42) 6,570.06 138,846.63 492.19 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137A6B27 FHMS K-010 A2 245,893.69 (67,994.92) (543.47) (829.89) 548,37 177,073.78 636.65 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FL6P4 FHMS K-089 A2 320,185.25 (806.59) 6,523.84 325,902.50 816.52 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31381Q6B7 050468066 184,622.76 (902.62) (15.22) (772.27) (26,04) 182,906.61 638.54 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3137AH6C7 FHMS K-015 A2 341,573.86 (2,107.76) (21.17) (712.89) (66.18) 338,665.86 891.83 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31397UPF0 FNA 2011-MI A3 239,766.70 (39,900.39) (335.76) (564.18) 296,87 199,263.25 614.94 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3130AFFX0 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS 236,390.00 (563.98) 2,519.98 238,346.00 812.50 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 539,704,10 (555.95) 247.35 539,395.50 1,518.70 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 517,535.00 (550.11) (314.89) 516,670.00 5,541.67 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138E1RP5 FN AL2293 152,242.78 (18,180.13) (269.45) (512.06) (423.19) 132,857.96 465.93 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828XB1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 488,934.00 (511.18) 1,586.68 490,009.50 1,221.30 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,037,230.00 (501.04) (1,298.96) 1,035,430.00 4,398.91 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BM6P6 FHMS K-721 A2 206,254.00 (489.33) 2,439.33 208,204.00 515.00 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EAEC9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 273,044.52 (400.12) 228,40 272,872.80 1,172.81 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BP4K2 FHMS K-IR1 A2 221,280.00 (382.20) (935.80) 219,962.00 474.83 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137F4D41 FHMS K-074 A2 172,864,50 (369.75) 3,278.25 175,773.00 450.00 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31381R5T7 FN468958 104,151.20 (351.76) 243.69 104,043.13 317.31 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138EJPZ5 FN AL2239 229,123.40 (9,724.40) (179.06) (350.97) (2,595,58) 216,273.39 525.86 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FBAJ5 FHMS K-IR3 A2 225,738.00 (342.63) 3,728.63 229,124.00 546.83 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1U75 FIIMS K-SOI A2 371,266.93 (3,046.74) (20.55) (339.31) 1,780,87 369,641.20 750.08 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1BS0 FHMS K-026 A2 406,510.30 (334.31) 4,631.91 410,807.90 826.21 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BLUG5 FHMS K-027 A2 206,780.00 (320.14) 2,728.14 209,188.00 439.50 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3137F4CY6 FHMS K-BX1 Al 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B1Q71 FHMS K-PLB A 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 205,247.50 214,506.00 3137B1BS0 FHMS K-026 A2 257,285.00 (296.16) 32.06 204,983.40 462.33 (285.89) 3,171.89 217,392.00 461.67 (285.80) 3,005.80 260,005.00 522.92 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BLAC2 FHMS K-048 A2 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3137ATRW4 FHMS K-020 A2 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137ABFH9 FHMS K-AIV A2 98,223.30 (270.33) 306,114.00 (267.72) 83,060.64 (262.34) 2,321,43 100,274.40 246.30 2,904.72 308,751.00 593.25 45,26 82,843.56 269.26 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378CNY9 GNR 2012-007 MD 202,922.00 (63,142.00) (303.06) (260.21) (1,280.30) 137,936.44 399.17 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137A2B26 FHMS K-009 A2 168,123.37 (100,861.20) (49.85) (236.47) (460.24) 66,515.60 210.97 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137ABFH9 FHMS K-AN A2 69,729.92 (216.22) 33.98 69,547.68 226.04 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202F2H8 G2005276 202,558,33 (13,544.70) (320.57) (206.23) 841.34 189,328.17 452.03 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3137AXHPI FHMS K-024 A2 154,338.00 (196.23) 1,636.23 155,778.00 321.63 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31419AM53 FN AE0379 94,657,07 (14,292.02) (366.60) (183.95) (467.38) 79,347.12 350.44 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AUPE3 FHMS K-021 A2 204,396.00 (181.22) 1,729.22 205,944.00 399.33 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136AGFQ0 FNR2013-92A 150,107.15 (22,061.62) (219.26) (179.39) (1,291,63) 126,355.25 362.95 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BLAC2 FHMS K-048 A2 65,482.20 (168.94) 1,536.34 66,849.60 164.20 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B3HX9 FHR4231 FB 77,829.01 (9,705.56) 79.88 (168.85) 67,40 68,101.88 19.19 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3140JAU97 FN BM6007 103,777.44 (119.28) (4.72) (165.76) (846.92) 102,640.76 207.37 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378AU90 GNR 2011-158 CA 136,245.90 (5,994.35) (168.41) (146.55) 19.96 129,956.56 316.11 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376V2E6 GNR 2010-019 UA 113,279.66 (8,368.26) (308.80) (144.52) (136.84) 104,321.25 326.50 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FNAD2 FHMS K-095 Al 158,510.41 (443.40) (7.96) (120.32) 3,420.43 161,359.17 322.95 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620A9T35 GN 723370 156,590.42 (12,111.80) (325.51) (117.95) 419.34 144,454.50 456.30 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136A7MN9 FNA 2012-M8 A2 145,128.67 (11 483.33) (72.52) (116.56) 1,097.81 134,554.08 256.57 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 36297GCD0 GN 711168 96,879.83 (5,158.99) (166.04) (116.38) 4.28 91,442.70 327.71 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31381SVJ8 FN469617 85,925.83 (84 875.06) (848.27) (109.08) (1,093,42) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36202FA30 G2004526 41,245.54 (3,519.39) (130.87) (87.86) 173.64 37,681.06 132.29 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620C4SU5 GN 748531 87,881.32 (3,738.26) (116.38) (87.28) 368.35 84,307.75 266.15 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3132CJAJ2 FH SA0009 111,169.55 (8,374.74) (238.46) (85.02) 296.14 102,767.46 244.27 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BSRZ8 FHMS K-109 A2 156,521.60 (19,234.98) (358.12) (77.23) 235.14 137,086.41 310.12 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377REV3 GNR 2010-158 HA 73,954.47 (8,708.00) (145.59) (73.88) (467.68) 64,559.32 182.10 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179MEK2 G2 MA0138 118,560,04 (3,206.40) (135.94) (71.00) 315.77 115,462.47 230.18 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3138LFPS1 FN AN3143 214,999.11 (832.35) (30.16) (69.99) 2,539.16 216,605.77 423.56 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138LFGP7 FN AN2905 323,337.00 (68.88) 5,075,88 328,344.00 637.50 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179M4J6 G2 MA0825 181,942.29 (11,738.07) (136.69) (66.58) 1,367.41 171,368.35 340.78 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31417YKF3 FN MA0293 28,190.20 (1,529.15) (114.69) (65.62) 3.58 26,484.32 91.33 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TTFTA Reserve 3620ARB67 GN 737261 199,274.27 (16,942.50) (489.08) (63.31) 447.31 182,226.69 575.28 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BDKF2 FHR4384 LA 46,515.73 (3,769.41) (69.76) (62.95) (405.17) 42,208.43 119.75 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 95,425.23 (5,677.41) (62.59) 35.60 89,446.92 279.06 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 18,886.26 (1,555.25) (60.85) 86.26 17,347.40 52.46 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 286,686.05 (2,246.29) (132.56) (57.25) 2,956.94 287,206.90 646.84 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377RED3 GNR 2010-158 EC 197,339.73 (133.44) (55.31) (407.95) 179,038.28 362.54 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 91,188.96 (2,187.68) (92.84) (55.24) 4.49.80 89,303.00 177.62 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 95,431.69 (2,184.79) (92.79) (53.81) 486.09 93,586.39 186.10 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 68,536.89 (7,946.64) (169.30) (53.72) (492.43) 59,874.80 167.86 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 209,411.75 (3.32) (47.07) 4,867.58 213,452.84 372.43 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 94,171.43 (8,519.89) (223.01) (46.96) 187.35 85,568.92 270.27 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 141,085.53 129.58 (44.26) 10.82 98,744.68 23.47 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 59,167.68 (10,535.70) 361.45 (41.31) 485.17 49,43729 57.64 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 69,853.63 (79.66) (36.20) 176.60 68,036.79 135.64 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 149,321.31 (22,092.43) (23.59) (32.26) 125,725.64 258.06 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 34,804.52 (6,197.47) 225.58 (29.99) 278.13 29,080.76 33.91 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38376ITT9 GNR 2010-006 AB 52,622.00 (4,442.38) (100.86) (29.70) 47,78747 114.61 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 66,256.61 (26.25) 13.18 45,571.41 132.75 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 23,916.69 (21,140.86) (35.74) (26.04) (51.17) 2,662.87 12.21 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38377QKH9 GNR 2011-018 PG 49,655.85 (78.06) (23.35) 44,816.33 106.94 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137BDICF2 FHA 4384 LA 20,814.46 (25.32) (23.35) 18,887.06 53.58 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 48,779.96 (2,978.98) (31.69) 221.22 45,970.57 91.45 Page 12 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Beginning Base Base Maturities and Base Base Change In Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 3136AGZA3 FNR 2013-101 A 26,076.47 (4,046.16) (20.89) (15.83) (44.27) 21,9,19.31 53.59 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 383797M99 GNR 2015-045 AG 51,150.15 (6,472.71) (36.18) (15.13) (685.79) 43,940.34 89.32 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FQ3Y7 FHMS K-101 Al 208,890.75 (787.64) (0.22) (13.73) 4,628.88 212,718.04 361.61 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179RFD6 G2 MA2864 26,978.93 (498.02) (24.56) (12.47) 24.42 26,468.30 63.03 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378TAF7 GNR 2013-071 GA 107,602.17 (6,874.88) (10.59) (293.83) 100,411.35 201.48 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B5A60 FHR 4257 EK 19,176.55 (1,759.14) (16.02) (8.61) 66.40 17,459.18 35.23 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 38376PRM4 GNR 2009-118 YE 11,763.27 (11,713.60) (0.78) (4.76) (44.12) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 31846V401 FIRST AMERGVT OBLG D 324,837.51 1,991,706.10 (2,043,076.26) 273,467.27 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve CCYUSD Payable (209,959.00) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 36179NA77 G2 MA0909 46,191.86 (252.91) 45,938.95 18.24 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828XB1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 163,341.80 (5.30) 163,336.50 407.10 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 62888VAA6 NGN 2010-RI IA 16,800.88 (1,655.76) 0.27 1.44 (12.32) 15,134.51 7.93 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 614,987.70 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 369,992.60 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378NW173 GNR 2014-017 AM 145,846.63 3.09 27.66 4.41 (144,771.26) (2,605.24) 3,384.80 5.93 615,018.45 195.42 14.09 370,011.10 117.57 (1,860.86) (0.00) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3138EKX1A FN AL3382 45,716.22 (4,739.76) (50.45) 13.82 75.81 41,015.64 76.71 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378FRB8 GNR 2013-005 7E 200,548.85 (9,133.35) 132.24 15.00 135.80 191,698.54 311.25 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 383787ZD7 GNR 2013-047 EC 39,692.31 (3,499.98) 40.33 21.06 (88.16) 36,165.56 44.64 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378BSZ3 GNR 2012-053 A 184,726.20 (67,245.99) 303.20 44.39 528.94 118,356.74 209.47 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137B6DF5 FHR 4272 YG 164,618.18 (11,907.38) 109.30 53.83 472.47 153,346.41 249.15 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 38377YT14 GNR 2011-136 GA 189,965.10 (19 796.80) 224.18 54.11 (843.21) 169,603.38 277.42 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3I36AHAEO FNA 2013-MI4 APT 64,041.65 (15 777.63) (192.77) 56.00 51.89 48,179.14 105.24 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 38378BXQ7 GNR 2012-089 A 82,640.27 (37,024.12) 134.32 66.89 114.38 45,931.73 58.83 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3136ADFFI FNR 2013-36 KC 109,310.48 (16,293.87) 190.70 68.28 (455.86) 92,819.74 115.41 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 3136A5KR6 FNR 2012 31 AD 124,403.36 (31,474.26) 159.75 84.38 (486.77) 92,686.46 134.81 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 38378KW47 GNR 2013-138 A 216,925.42 (37,066.58) 129.85 95.94 681.85 180,766.48 322.26 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137FGZN8 FHMS K-IO2 A 156,672.79 (136,945.36) 671.98 97.30 2,152.84 22,649.56 2.00 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137EADR7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 175,159.25 (175,000.00) 101.08 (260.33) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 3137AS7D0 FHR4084 TC 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3128MMUL5 FH G18586 153,989.25 (31,530.51) 196.81 111.05 231,345.00 124.40 153,713.93 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3620ARZE4 GN 737941 126,823.28 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 36179MU32 G2 MA0602 124.57 (1,720.87) 121,045.74 200.68 (299.90) 231,169.50 650.87 284.36 130.81 518.91 121,768.99 139.29 (617.70) 154,122.86 305.90 127,473.00 303.04 121,290.59 288.89 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3137AWQG3 FHMS K-023 Al 253,493.88 (28,794.47) 236.75 190.90 (170.28) 224,956.79 294.21 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFTA Reserve 36176XE21 GN 778953 220,848.32 224.76 575.64 221,648.71 526.93 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3128MMPP2 FH G18429 305,010.05 259.45 885.47 306,154.97 607.71 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 3135G0D75 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION 651,826.50 (650,000.00) 813.03 (2,639.53) 256350018 MIM-RCTC 91 TIFIA Reserve 912828L99 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,057,549.50 1,171.85 (4,594.85) 1,054,126.50 2,432.40 20,733,055.40 4,584,189.55 (2,187,847.52) (825,000.00) (1,249,606.78) (1,675.98) (19,694.30) 88,665.56 20,912,126.85 62,628.08 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ADT76 FHMS K-014 A2 491,223.05 (2,687.27) (47.12) (2,833.99) (370.88) 485,283.79 1,542.13 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286E5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 212,687.15 (1,432.97) 7,816.29 219,070.48 219.26 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286N5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 212,687.15 (1,387.29) 7,770.61 219,070.48 219.26 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,200,378.60 (1,348.68) (5,802.12) 1,193,227.80 10,470.88 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828 V V9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 957,904.00 (1,178.14) (3,666.86) 953,059.00 6,747.45 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 MORGAN STANLEY 102,642.00 (715.81) 1,059.81 102,986.00 2,491.67 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 MORGAN STANLEY 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AYCE9 FHMS K-025 A2 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GEC9 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 102,642.00 (690.07) 371,710.80 (672.25) 100,627.00 (581.54) 1,034.07 102,986.00 2,491.67 4,207.45 375,246.00 804.60 (45.46) 100,000.00 2,812.50 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GEC9 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 100,627.00 (580.31) (46.70) 100,000.00 2,812.50 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286U9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 312,036.00 (497.88) (603.12) 310,935.00 814.20 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 95000112138 WELLS FARGO & CO 235,761.40 (455.59) 9,519.54 244,825.35 2,724.53 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ABF779 FHMS K-AIV A2 211,240.64 (435.35) (116.73) 210,688.56 684.78 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 12596EAC8 CNH 2018-B A3 189,232.40 (1,520.32) (16.53) (402.78) 5,584.14 192,876.91 267.22 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 544,545.75 (382.70) (562.30) 543,600.75 2,309.43 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828 V V9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 252,080.00 (340.23) (934.77) 250,805.00 1,775.65 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 66,240.86 (309.10) 2,352.02 68,283.79 38.46 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381QB54 514467260 99,437.65 (588.12) (3.31) (302.17) (218.39) 98,325.66 358.31 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17305EFM2 CCCIT 2014-Al Al 110,955.90 (273.28) 901.38 111,584.00 1,408.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179Q2A8 G2 MA2569 376,590.69 (6,220.34) (356.86) (271.45) (1,342.38) 368,399.66 874.73 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397UPF0 FNA2011-MI A3 119,883.35 (19,950.19) (129.21) (248.14) 75.81 99,631.63 307.47 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828157 UNITED STATES TREASURY 435,636.60 (244.47) (511.53) 434,880.60 1,847.54 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AMM48 FNA 2015-M4 AV2 344,055.97 (7,013.01) (28.54) (242.42) 1,986.53 338,758.54 693.41 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund I7305EFM2 CCCIT 2014-Al Al 90,782.10 (225.18) 739.08 91,296.00 1,152.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3622A2GC0 ON 783795 261,417.98 (4,188.98) (168.00) (208.62) 1,919.53 258,771.91 514.79 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 285,238.25 284,743.25 1,209.70 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9I2828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 860,900.90 (1,291.69) 859,406.90 3,651.09 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 33,120.43 1,193.90 34,141.89 19.23 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 4581XOCZ9 INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK 669,454.50 (171.24) 1,770.24 671,053.50 3,380.90 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 38377REV3 GNR 2010-158 HA 147,908.95 (291.19) (147.75) (935.36) 129,118.64 364.19 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AH6C7 FHMS K-015 A2 39,037.01 (240.89) 54.50 38,704.67 101.92 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 75,973.50 (16.07) (138.16) 911.72 74,984.40 97.98 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128286U9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 124,814.40 (132.46) (307.94) 124,374.00 325.68 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 61,174.78 (349.93) (2.47) (122.58) 60,675.38 190.29 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137ATRW4 FHMS K-020 A2 102,038.00 (120.14) 999.14 102,917.00 197.75 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 52,983.13 (281.17) (1.82) (111.18) 52,561.91 165.21 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 100,730.00 568.75 101,194.00 1,113.58 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 150,405.00 (89.80) (101.08) 90.45 83,749.25 112.74 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89,125.66 (5,959.67) (141.05) (90.74) 370.19 83,304.39 198.90 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 200,260.00 (88.32) 790.32 200,962.00 181.33 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund (12.35) (62.77) 54,587.17 113.82 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residml Fund 31394GUX9 FHA 2666 OD 26,989.37 (2,729.35) (60.35) (134.59) Page 13 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Beginning Base Base Maturities and Base Base Change In Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 25635002 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residua Fund 47789JAB2 JDOT 20 9 A2 251,268.59 (59.88) (91.67) 251,117.04 316.64 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86565CBD0 Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, New York Bra 400,069.78 (59.70) 153.92 400,164.00 996.67 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61746BEE2 MORGAN STANLEY 200,870.00 (58.18) 10.18 200,822.00 926.10 256350021 MIN-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179M4J6 G2 MA0825 151,618.58 (9,781.73) (113.91) (55.49) 1,139.51 142,806.96 283.99 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3140J6DU8 FN BM1914 196,406.95 (11,285.07) (70.70) (54.82) 1,702.41 186,698.78 370.65 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 87165LBB6 SYNCT 2016-2 A 159,568.00 (54.04) 2,294.04 161,808.00 157.16 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828143 UNITED STATES TREASURY 128,652.50 (52.54) (342.46) 128,257.50 731.15 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36178NB99 GN AB2764 121949.92 (7,447.46) (79.21) (49.86) 553.05 114926.44 228.63 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A1HC2 FNR 2011-98 VC 19,590.79 (8,909.75) (42.14) (39.70) (100.24) 10,498.95 30.58 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 36179RFD6 G2 MA2864 71943.82 - - (1,328.06) (65.49) (33.24) 65.09 70,582.12 168.08 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381SVJ8 FN 469617 85,925.82 (83,875.05) (132.90) (32.94) (1,884.93) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69371RP34 PACCAR FINANCIAL CORP 191,850.00 (30.78) 8,202.78 200,022.00 200.50 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14041NFUO COMET 2019-2 A 100,964.00 (30.62) 1,847.62 102,781.00 76.44 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378PPK8 GNR 2013-190 GA 100,514.50 (9,455.86) (62.63) (30.42) (364.86) 90,600.73 182.87 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888UAB6 NGN 2010-R2 2A 137,467.79 (6,357.23) (2.94) (30.18) 27.17 131,104.60 70.52 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3132G5AV 1 FH U79019 72,348.38 (4,127.86) (73.10) (28.95) 231.78 68,350.25 162.49 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31418CQM9 FN MA3159 54,667.48 (5,057.04) (120.11) (23.25) 80.27 49,547.34 117.88 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3620ARB67 GN 737261 65,262.32 (5,548.66) (160.18) (20.73) 146.49 59,679.24 188.40 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137APP61 FHMS K-018 A2 15,254.34 (1,035.87) (11.28) (18.98) (30.40) 14,157.81 32.09 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0EH8 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP - 270,459.00 (11.59) 624.49 271,071.90 217.80 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 GNR 2011-157 QA 13,085.50 (4,509.32) (10.25) (11.28) (82.06) 8,472.59 21.09 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A72D3 FNA 2012-M9 A2 24,783.40 (3,453.33) (20.51) (7.31) 53.36 21,355.62 43.29 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791 DA 21,736.80 (2,650.43) (0.54) (6.44) (100.86) 18,978.53 39.30 256350021 MIN-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 GNR 2011-169 AK 8926.54 - - - (8,450.80) (0.25) (3.44) (24.45) 447.61 1.12 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 459058GK3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 220,066.00 - (219,900.34) - - (114.35) (1.87) (49.44) 256350021 MIN-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A72D3 FNA 2012-M9 A2 5,507.42 - - - (767.41) (4.53) (1.61) 11.82 4,745.69 9.62 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A1N90 FHMS K-008 A2 35,478.15 - - - (35,471.42) 47.36 (1.45) (52.64) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 19,999.60 (1.06) 2.06 20,000.60 6.36 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 459058GK3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 65,019.50 - (64,970.56) - - (37.00) (0.96) (10.98) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 459058G1C3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 15,004.50 - (14,993.21) - - (7.83) (0.13) (3.33) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31846V401 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLG D 181,040.76 5,456,818.55 (5,515,351.83) 122,507.48 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund CCYUSD Payable (175,000.00) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 658886DZ6 NORTH DAKOTA ST HSG FIN AGY MTG REV 100,000.00 100,000.00 624.81 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EBD8 TRUIST BANK 48,758.00 1,396.00 50,154.00 59.62 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14913Q2X6 CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP 117,571.20 2,619.60 120,190.80 113.76 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 025816CE7 AMERICAN EXPRESS CO 95,909.00 4,261.00 100,170.00 116.32 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 459058GK3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 15,004.50 (14,993.21) (6.79) - (4.50) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 072024WW8 BAY AREA TOLL AUTH CALIF TOLL BRDG REV 95,512.05 1,154.25 96,666.30 505.40 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 62888VAA6 NGN 2010-R1 IA 0.01 - - - - (0.00) - - 0.01 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 7831867Z2 RUTGERS ST UNIVN 1 103,963.65 2,140.95 106,104.60 359.98 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17308CC46 CITIGROUP INC 194,257.05 4,588.35 198,845.40 713.83 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 FN 995324 0.00 - - - - (0.00) - - 0.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 69353RFU7 INC BANK NA 235,625.00 14,122.50 249,747.50 171.13 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 196480CW5 COLORADO HSG & FIN AUTH 460,000.00 460,000.00 622.89 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918ED16 CommonSpirit Health 550,000.00 - - (550,000.00) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 55380TC17 MUFG Bank Ltd. (New York Branch) 500,000.00 - (500,000.00) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 30231GBL5 EXXON MOBIL CORP 270,000.00 - - - - - 7,106.40 277,106.40 895.47 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 166764BV1 CHEVRON CORP 135,000.00 - - - - - 2,324.70 137,324.70 213.94 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 283062DK0 EL DORADO CALIF IRR DIST REV 155,000.00 - - - - - 354.95 155,354.95 25.45 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 650036AS5 NEW YORK ST URBAN DEV CORP REV 180,000.00 - - - - - 509.40 180,509.40 28.95 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 194740PF7 COLLIN CNTY TEX 175,000.00 - - - - - 1,146.25 176,146.25 185.44 256350021 MIN-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 477870AB5 JDOT 2019-B A2 89,576.59 - - - (31,254.73) 0.02 0.01 230.90 58,552.78 58.97 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A1LC5 FHR 3710 AB 304.39 - - - (304.44) 0.23 0.14 (0.32) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 47789JAB2 JDOT 2019 A2 60,615.11 - - - (24,250.96) 0.34 0.25 3.93 36,368.67 45.86 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315PAB1 CARMX 2019-3 A2A 112,686.48 - - - (24,434.18) 0.53 0.40 380.15 88,633.38 86.36 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31680YAB3 FITAT 2019-1 A2A 94,898.18 - - - (32,416.42) 0.57 0.52 90.92 62,573.77 73.57 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478IAB5 NALT 2019-B A2A 73,835.49 (13,183.23) 0.40 0.79 411.00 61,064.45 61.23 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14315XAC2 CARMX 2020-1 A3 60,184.80 - - - - - 0.97 1,545.23 61,731.00 50.40 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128285H9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 299,955.00 - - - - - 1.10 76.90 300,033.00 96.36 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 26209AAE1 DRIVE 2019-4 B 78,628.00 - - - - - 1.28 2,412.32 81,041.60 79.29 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31381.81323 FN AM7448 67,433.16 - - - (390.92) 1.11 2.74 51.69 67,097.78 152.72 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137BIUF7 FHMS K-027 Al 11,914.49 (1,231.43) 10.06 8.16 3.37 10,704.66 15.74 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FBJ1 TRUIST FINANCIAL CORP 165,100.65 - - - - - 8.44 6,188.96 171,298.05 1,058.75 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GFN4 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 99,984.00 - - (100,000.00) - - 11.56 4.44 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AXHN6 FHMS K-024 Al 19,662.17 - - - (2,444.59) 17.50 13.04 (33.43) 17,214.69 24.87 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 172967LC3 CITIGROUP INC 251,922.50 - - - - - 14.66 5,597.84 257,535.00 463.19 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138EKXL4 FN AL3382 48,763.97 - - - (5,055.74) (53.82) 14.74 80.87 43,750.02 81.82 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478DAD9 NAROT 2018-A A3 65,751.72 - - - (15,904.37) 21.21 15.41 164.86 50,048.83 58.45 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 FHMS K-023 Al 15,843.37 - - - (1,799.66) 19.38 16.14 (19.43) 14,059.80 18.39 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L2GH4 FN AM1999 34,432.38 - - - (232.35) 0.78 17.96 66.07 34,284.84 52.78 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 172967LC3 CITIGROUP INC 201,538.00 - - - - - 20.30 4,469.70 206,028.00 370.56 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A2PV7 FHR 3760 BA 26,230.53 - - - (2,507.57) 34.74 21.37 (147.90) 23,631.16 29.33 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L1W62 FN AM1568 124,363.49 - - - (608.29) 2.95 22.37 200.88 123,981.39 258.51 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPP2 FH G18429 210,414.34 - - - (14,476.00) 59.92 24.36 1,496.72 197,519.34 392.07 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 FHMS K-023 Al 23,765.05 - - - (2,699.48) 29.40 24.40 (29.68) 21,089.70 27.58 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3128MMPY3 FH 018438 193,346.83 - - - (10,780.60) 44.05 26.59 1,511.79 184,148.66 365.51 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31397LUK3 FNR 2008-45 DB 101,259.34 (17,871.21) (161.10) 30.15 (853.01) 82,404.17 301.43 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31677QBK4 FIFTH THIRD BANK NA (OHIO) 199,358.00 - - - - - 34.79 1,533.21 200,926.00 745.56 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65478114320 NAROT 2017-87A3 45,808.95 - - - (12,067.28) 55.31 36.34 104.23 33,937.56 31.77 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378KW47 GNR 2013-138 A 83,835.91 - - - (14,325.24) 50.17 37.08 263.52 69,861.44 124.54 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9128285H9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 399,940.00 - - - - - 45.68 58.32 400,044.00 128.48 256350021 MIN-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FAU7 TRUIST FINANCIAL CORP 249,537.50 A r - (250,000.00) - 25.09 46.95 390.46 Page 14 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Beginning Base Base Maturities and Base Base Change In Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 25635002 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02665JGL8 American Honda Finance Corporation 299,887.25 47.83 40.92 299,976.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 375558BB8 GILEAD SCIENCES INC 35,104.30 49.15 (27.10) 35,126.35 297.50 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378BXQ7 GNR 2012-089 A 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 90331HNP4 US BANK NA 61,215.01 (27,425.27) 99.49 49.55 754,984.90 54.93 252,107.50 84.72 34,023.50 43.57 (17.18) 755,022.65 239.91 59.98 3,012.52 255,180.00 1,421.88 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137GAUY1 FHR 3737 MA 135,004.75 (11,704.56) 100.67 69.80 (395.38) 123,075.29 152.85 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136A5KR6 FNR 2012-31 AD 63,445.71 (16,051.87) 127.04 75.72 (326.51) 47,270.10 68.75 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 94974BGM6 WELLS FARGO & CO 200,038.00 81.06 124.94 200,244.00 2,296.67 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 50,416.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 99,779.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 185,076.00 86.57 (341.57) 107.06 107.74 50,161.00 355.13 607.94 100,494.00 449.17 (248.14) 184,935.60 520.70 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 026651J84 American Honda Finance Corporation 499,291.67 133.33 395.00 499,820.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 999,980.00 138.91 (88.91) 1,000,030.00 317.76 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 375558BB8 GILEAD SCIENCES INC 100,298.00 152.91 (89.91) 100,361.00 850.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02581RDD2 American Express Credit Corporation 349,860.00 (350,000.00) 169.17 (29.17) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 100,052.00 194.82 961.18 101,208.00 338.54 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3138L2GH4 FNAM1999 90,385.00 (609.92) 7.27 198.83 16.52 89,997.69 138.55 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 103,723.00 223.02 (403.02) 103,543.00 439.89 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 459052XP6 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 599,744.00 (600,000.00) 256.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 23336GD65 DTE Electric Company 599,898.00 (600,000.00) 262.50 (160.50) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 40248CD12 Gulf Power Company 99,779.00 283.84 269,576.55 307.93 199,872.00 (200,000.00) 431.16 100,494.00 449.17 (1,913.83) 267,970.65 2,351.51 332.50 (204.50) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 17401QANl Citizens Bk PA 250,590.00 334.91 167.59 251,092.50 953.13 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 100,052.00 335.50 820.50 101,208.00 338.54 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 463,827.20 (110,700.39) 847.95 419.01 (3,266.77) 351,127.00 2,485.90 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06406FAB9 BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON CORP 200,928.00 (202,794.00) 5,113.10 428.38 (3,675.48) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 50000DDD5 KOCH INDUSTRIES INC 649,740.00 (650,000.00) 455.00 (195.00) 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828T67 UNITED STATES TREASURY 488,025.60 481.50 (1,623.90) 486,883.20 1,010.87 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EHT1 Catholic Health Initiatives 298,741.67 541.08 633.25 299,916.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 74456QBP0 PUBLIC SERVICE ELECTRIC AND GAS CO 123,762.50 554.02 1,875.98 126,192.50 699.31 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 289,921.95 558.38 (2,285.48) 288,194.85 2,528.98 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 873,970.00 572.74 (1,235.74) 873,307.00 2,458.85 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 55279HAN0 MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST CO 249,370.00 734.47 48.03 250,152.50 1,907.64 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14918EGP0 Catholic Health Initiatives 398,808.78 822.11 333.11 399,964.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 50000DF43 Koch Industries, Inc. 499,150.00 (500,000.00) 850.00 256350021 MIM-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828V V9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 554,576.00 1,022.89 (3,827.89) 551,771.00 3,906.42 26,620,709.63 11,403,931.01 (6,143,703.53) (4,300,000.00) (680,161.62) 3,961.51 (7,191.31) 105,625.80 26,828,171.50 100,403.00 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 UNITED STATES TREASURY 245,852.84 (1,342.26) 12,865.95 257,376.53 413.42 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128285W6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 166,442.48 (1,211.52) 8,327.33 173,558.29 615.23 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128286E5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 181,562.20 (1,170.55) 6,619.73 187,011.38 187.18 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 FN468066 184,622.76 (902.62) (21.95) (1,038.22) 246.64 182,906.61 638.54 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 742,607.10 (689.10) (3,734.70) 738,183.30 6,477.75 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128285W6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 110,961.65 (668.40) 5,412.27 115,705.52 410.15 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,059,357.00 (636.05) 2,966.30 1,061,687.25 2,646.14 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9128286N5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 93,374.85 (630.21) 3,432.64 96,177.28 96.26 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1U75 FHMS K-SOI A2 376,217.15 (3,087.36) (42.20) (628.57) 2,110.72 374,569.75 760.09 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,465,911.00 (615.79) 2,357.29 1,467,652.50 3,879.42 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJPZ5 FN AL2239 203,665.25 (8,643.92) (247.97) (577.27) (1,953.06) 192,243.02 467.43 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3130AFFX0 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS 218,660.75 (521.68) 2,330.98 220,470.05 751.56 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381T4E7 FN470721 258,962.42 (252,999.21) (3,925.54) (462.70) (1,574.97) 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEBO FN466430 244,983.67 (1,267.21) (2.94) (440.88) 69.95 243,342.58 683.68 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381QB54 08(467260 129,701.27 (767.11) (4.32) (394.14) (284.85) 128,250.85 467.36 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 207,014.00 (355.43) 9.43 206,668.00 2,216.67 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 UNITED STATES TREASURY 60,097.36 (353.81) 3,170.71 62,914.26 101.06 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ABFH9 FHMS K-AN A2 102,544.00 (346.02) 78.02 102,276.00 332.42 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FBAJ5 FHMS K-IR3 A2 225,738.00 (342.63) 3,728.63 229,124.00 546.83 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 FNA 2012-M8 A2 263,870.33 (20,878.79) (197.37) (326.51) 2,176.13 244,643.80 466.50 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1BS0 FHMS K-026 A2 370,490.40 (304.69) 4,221.49 374,407.20 753.00 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1UG5 FHMS K-027 A2 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 256350023 MOM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381R5T7 FN468958 145,758.59 (273.56) 207,014.00 (272.36) 134,056.00 (257.54) 946.57 146,431.60 307.65 (73.64) 206,668.00 2,216.67 118.44 133,916.90 408.42 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 101,727.00 (250.41) (355.59) 101,121.00 887.36 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FGZN8 FHMS K-IO2 A 127,065.72 (103,991.50) 396.24 (250.32) 335.40 23,555.54 2.08 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NHK7 G2 MA1134 203,119.39 (8,007.46) (342.10) (242.15) 1,477.79 196,005.47 466.79 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 G2005276 105,330.34 (7,043.26) (192.92) (199.70) 556.18 98,450.65 235.06 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 147,504.15 (181.18) (697.52) 146,625.45 1,286.68 256350023 MIMSr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3140JAU97 FN BM6007 95,129.32 (109.34) (4.32) (151.95) (776.35) 94,087.36 190.09 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 239,058.45 (228,228.52) 2,493.22 (135.61) (3,075.44) 10,112.10 88.74 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXIIP1 FHMS K-024 A2 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828E58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 125,297.57 (5,512.66) (154.88) (134.77) 18.36 144,048.80 1,463.97 116,986.05 (110.99) 119,513.62 290.71 145,392.80 300.18 116,289.15 1,020.47 256350023 IVIIM-Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CNY9 GNR 2012-007 MD 111,607.10 (168.99) (109.13) (735.83) 75,865.04 219.54 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FNAD2 FHMS K-095 Al 142,659.37 (399.06) (7.16) (108.29) 3,078.39 145,223.26 290.65 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 FHMS K-021 A2 147,165.12 (102.59) 1,217.15 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 28,627.57 (1,70322) (113.46) (101.93) 125.12 46 Page 15 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account Account Base Base Change In Beginning Base Base Maturities and Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Identifier Description Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Redemptions Base Papdowns Cain/Loss ccretion Gain/Loss Market Value Income Balance 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 GNR 2016-147 DA 256350023 MIM-Se Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137BDKF2 FHR 4384 LA 256350023 M15vl-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202FA30 G2 004526 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 383771Z89 GNR 2010-117 GK 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3132CJA12 FH SA0009 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38375XCM4 GNR 2008-047 PC 128,496.69 58,144.67 37,945.90 36,553.01 102,275.98 53,984.84 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377REV3 GNR 2010-158 HA 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MEK2 G2 MA0138 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138LFGP7 FN AN2905 69,024.18 296,392.25 109,440.03 (4,386.60) (107.02) (4,711.76) (97.70) (3,237.84) (120.40) (4,238.21) (70.48) (7,704.76) (219.39) (5,010.12) (108.55) (8,127.46) (135.89) (2,959.75) (125.49) (95.09) (85.62) (80.83) (80.34) (78.22) (77.47) (68.95) (65.53) (63.14) (1,096.73) (489.05) 159.75 (230.75) 272.45 (194.29) (436.50) 291.48 4,652.89 122,811.26 290.49 52,760.54 34,666.58 31,933.23 94,546.07 48,594.41 60,255.37 106,580.74 300,982.00 149.68 121.71 89.53 224.73 194.20 169.96 212.47 584.38 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 912828743 UNITED STATES TREASURY 154,383.00 (59.23) (414.77) 153,909.00 877.38 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 2010-166 GP 43,431.73 (4,579.41) (52.56) (56.89) (162.62) 38,580.24 93.33 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 GNR 2010-015 PD 114,987.40 (6,841.28) (117.40) (56.41) (188.77) 107,783.54 336.27 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 GNR 2010-004 PD 60,706.96 (3,589.64) (95.77) (55.67) (50.20) 56,915.67 135.49 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 2010-166 GP 26,059.04 (2,747.65) (56.70) (54.15) (52.40) 23,148.15 56.00 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NKP2 G2 MA1202 95,431.69 - - (2,184.79) (92.79) (53.81) 486.09 93,586.39 186.10 256350023 MIvf-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 36179MZV5 G2 MA0756 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137FP1F3 FHMS K-099 AI 50,863.50 193,705.87 84,064.82 - - (2,016.77) (85.59) (50.93) 414.67 82,326.20 163.74 (44.73) (258.27) 50,560.50 443.68 (717.89) (3.07) (43.54) 4,502.51 197,443.88 344.49 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381SVJ8 FN 469617 107,407.27 (104 843.84) (166.11) (41.17) (2,356.15) 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137F4D41 FHMS K-074 A2 34,572.90 (41.06) 622.76 35,154.60 90.00 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MKL3 G2 MA0299 112,874.21 (34.90) (487.82) 112,351.49 225.70 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 GNR 2010-015 PD 27,991.40 (1,665.37) (56.00) (34.10) 1.84 26,237.76 81.86 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU24 G2 MA0601 64,480.27 - - (1,733.15) (73.53) (33.41) 163.01 62,803.19 125.21 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3620AR667 GN 737261 99,637.13 (8,471.25) (244.54) (31.65) 223.66 91,113.35 287.64 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B4HD1 FHR 4247 AK 34,847.81 (3,261.24) (99.25) (29.69) 8.22 31,465.85 110.84 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38376TTT9 GNR 2010-006 AB 48,412.23 (4,086.98) (92.80) (27.32) (240.66) 43,964.47 105.44 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138NJAE8 FN FN0004 11,331.75 (933.15) (2.76) (25.38) 37.98 10,408.44 31.48 256350023 MIvI-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3138NJAE8 FN FN0004 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GY53 ONR 2011-095 C 7,554.50 59,792.55 (622.10) (3.61) (24.34) 34.50 6,938.96 20.98 (18,639.64) (15.69) (23.69) 11.89 41,125.42 119.80 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-096 A 34,804.52 (6,197.47) 290.61 (22.87) 205.97 29,080.76 33.91 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378AWX5 ONR 2011-157 QA 39,256.50 (13,527.93) (12.54) (21.90) (276.35) 25,417.78 63.26 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377QKH9 GNR 2011-018 PG 46,022.50 (4,179.22) (72.34) (21.65) (212.21) 41,537.09 99.12 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 383771Z89 ONR 2010-117 OK 22,845.62 (2,648.88) (56.43) (17.91) (164.14) 19,958.26 55.95 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 36179M4J6 G2 MA0825 45,485.57 (2,934.52) (34.17) (16.65) 341.85 42,842.09 85.20 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36178NB99 ON AB2764 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 383791M99 GNR 2015-045 AG 36,584.97 47,496.57 (2,234.24) (23.76) (14.96) 165.92 34,477.93 68.59 (6,010.38) (33.59) (14.05) (636.81) 40,801.74 82.94 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137FQ3Y7 FHMS K-101 Al 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38374C417 GNR 2003-85 TW 193,223.94 10,547.60 (728.57) (0.20) (12.70) 4,281.72 196,764.19 334.49 (9,323.42) (19.11) (12.65) (18.06) 1,174.36 5.38 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179RFD6 G2 MA2864 26,979.18 - - (498.02) (24.57) (12.47) 24.17 26,468.30 63.03 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791 DA 36,361.12 (4,433.63) (0.88) (10.77) (168.72) 31,747.11 65.73 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378DDC6 GNR 2012-016 GB 25,820.50 (25,736.58) 10.27 (9.03) (85.16) 256350023 ISI M-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137F4D41 FHMS K-074 A2 5,762.15 (5.84) 102.79 5,859.10 15.00 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 GNR 2010-162 PQ 8,258.94 (8,220.39) (13.44) (5.01) (20.10) 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38379HLE3 GNR 2014-184 WK 65,227.05 (20,575.26) 32.09 (4.12) (1,220.68) 43,459.08 124.23 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 62888VAA6 NGN 2010-RI IA 68,136.90 (6,714.98) (0.58) (3.31) (39.21) 61,378.82 32.14 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 31398QTP2 PHR 3747 HW 11,277.17 (11,249.05) (7.56) (3.25) (17.30) 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 G2 005276 25,117.23 (1,679.54) (0.89) (2.98) 42.88 23,476.69 56.05 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378TAP7 GNR 2013-071 GA 99,325.08 (6,346.05) 4.03 (2.65) (293.00) 92,687.40 185.98 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 ONR 2010-162 PQ 2,094.95 (2,085.17) (7.34) (1.96) (0.48) 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC714 FNA 2013-M6 2A 8,657.49 (81.80) (0.16) (1.34) 302.44 8,876.62 18.70 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CDK0 GNR 2011-169 AK 4,959.19 (4,694.89) 2.69 (1.05) (17.27) 248.67 0.62 256350023 Mlvf-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 FHMS K-020 A2 127,547.50 (0.12) 1,098.87 128,646.25 247.19 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31846V401 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLG D 429,104.03 1,833,961.62 (1,802,125.40) - - - - - 460,940.25 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Receivable 64.70 1.50 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Payable (207,606.90) (408,997.63) 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NHK7 G2 MA1134 207,916.99 (207,573.73) - - - - - (343.26) 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179NAJ7 02 MA0909 - 42,727.47 - - - - - (233.94) 42,493.53 16.87 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ARVU7 FHR 4073 AJ - 290,834.01 - - - - - (87.86) 290,746.15 119.52 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F3H7 G2 005300 - 75,269.86 - - - - - 56.69 75,326.55 29.90 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-096 A 13,921.81 (2,478.99) 19.91 4.61 164.96 11,632.30 13.56 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791 DA 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 GNR 2013-105 A 24,444.45 92,935.67 (2,980.59) 5.49 5.39 (132.14) 21,342.59 44.19 (3,129.87) 5.50 5.68 794.74 90,611.72 128.03 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B5A60 FHR 4257 EK 21,002.89 (1,926.69) 17.72 6.26 21.77 19,121.96 38.59 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378HXH4 GNR 2012-119 KB 13,784.96 (1,202.29) 31.57 7.52 (33.39) 12,588.37 12.98 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 FHMS K-021 A2 6,131.88 11.07 35.37 6,178.32 11.98 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 2010-166 GP 16,407.54 (1,730.00) 20.64 11.51 (134.93) 14,574.75 35.26 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 ONR 2013-074 AL 229,576.50 - - - - - 11.70 8,986.05 238,574.25 527.36 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378FRB8 GNR 2013-005 JE 189,993.65 (8,652.64) 125.27 14.21 128.65 181,609.14 294.87 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AHAEO FNA 2013-M14 APT 53,543.02 (13,191.14) (175.40) 16.89 87.55 40,280.92 87.99 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 150,136.50 - - (150,000.00) - - 18.87 (155.37) 256350023 MIN -Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378JZD7 ONR 2013-047 EC 37,357.47 (3,294.11) 37.97 19.82 (82.97) 34,038.18 42.01 256350023 MIN -Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 FN AL3382 12,190.99 (1,263.93) 26.39 27.15 (43.10) 10,937.50 20.46 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-096 A 52,206.77 (9,296.20) 94.44 27.32 588.80 43,621.13 50.86 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-096 A 52,206.77 (9,296.20) 430.53 27.69 252.34 43,621.13 50.86 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L1 W62 FN AM1568 162,629.18 (795.46) 3.86 29.25 262.69 162,129.51 338.05 256350023 MIN -Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXI4 FN AL3382 15,238.74 (1,579.92) 25.68 29.98 (42.61) 13,671.88 25.57 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC714 FNA 2013-M6 2A 40,118.84 (445.35) 4.08 31.69 235.58 39,944.84 84.15 256350023 M!M-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3136A5KR6 PNR 2012-31 AD 41,301.92 (10,449.45) 82.70 49.29 (212.55) 30,771.91 44.76 256350023 MIN -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 ONR 2012-013 EG 40,017.85 (3,444.43) 82.69 50.72 (468.79) 36,238.03 58.82 256350023 MIvf-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 GNR 2013-012 AB 109,001.53 (3,364.58) 52.35 51.18 1,962.05 107,702.53 161.82 47 Page 16 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Source Account Account 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Base Base Change In Beginning Base Base Maturities and Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Identifier Description Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Redemptions Base Papdowns Gain/Loss eeretion Gain/Loss 256350023 MR -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 FN MA0293 61,396.61 256350023 MIM-Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136ADFF1 FNR 2013-36 KC 103,237.68 256350023 ARM -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378VC45 GNR 2013-116 MA 128,881.71 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 GNR 2014-166 PL 245,504.50 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 383771M59 GNR 2010-111 PE 63,416.97 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 210,781.00 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3620ARZE4 GN 737941 (3,330.39) (110.72) 56.18 (330.39) Ending Base Ending Accrued Market Value Income Balance 57,681.29 198.90 (15,388.66) 180.11 64.48 (430.53) (7,172.11) 221.68 64.83 (439.78) (19,832.24) (190.58) 67.96 6,664.72 87,663.08 109.00 121,556.33 221.86 232,214.36 460.91 (7,503.56) 151.23 92.73 (541.25) 55,616.12 113.61 113.34 (273.24) 210,621.10 593.02 114,744.88 - - - - 118.35 469.49 115,332.72 274.18 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38378K2L4 GNR 2013-074 AL 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMUL5 FH G18586 204,068.00 120.01 7,877.99 148,755.42 - - - - 120.55 275.19 212,066.00 468.76 149,151.15 296.03 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 38379KDN5 GNR 2015-029 AD 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36179MU32 G2 MA0602 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 2013-033 B 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 FNA 2012-M9 A2 256350023 MIM-Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 UNTTED STATES TREASURY 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXIA FN AL3382 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 36176XE21 GN 778953 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350023 MIM-Sr Wen Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 FHMS K-020 A2 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMPP2 FH G18429 256350023 MIMSe Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 FN MA0293 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135G0D75 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION 256350023 MIMSe Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 2013-033 B 256350023 MIM-Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 UNTTED STATES TREASURY 256350023 MIM-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 GNR 2013-078 AG 256350023 MIM-Se Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 102,523.51 (15,421.80) 99.37 122.44 2,848.20 112,402.15 - - - 128.58 (570.20) 200,768.00 - - - - - 133.41 7,364.59 217,543.22 - - - (30,312.57) 255.73 176.97 (208.45) 162,978.00 - - - - 179.87 178.63 198,103.62 - - - (20,538.91) 31.89 203.18 (65.33) - 203,078.91 - - - - 206.67 529.33 570,476.50 - - - - - 211.45 (1,201.45) 160,311.90 - - - 233.35 1,147.65 285,331.98 - - - - 242.71 828.34 58,407.05 - - - (3,168.23) (99.27) 243.95 (510.85) 601,686.00 - - (600,000.00) - - 296.15 (1,982.15) 478,113.00 - - - 367.74 (730.44) 250,960.00 - - - 393.96 8,978.54 881,645.50 - - - 419.30 (1,949.30) 454,320.00 - - - 468.46 8,617.04 569,288.50 - - - - - 651.19 (1,602.69) 19,081,117.56 4,097,830.84 (2,030,353.92) (750,000.00) (998,641.77) (3,316.77) (11,839.74) 110,785.49 90,171.72 158.78 111,960.53 266.67 208,266.00 378.83 187,454.90 379.96 163,336.50 407.10 177,734.44 332.39 203,814.91 484.53 569,486.50 2,419.40 161,692.90 310.69 286,403.03 568.50 54,872.64 189.22 477,750.30 1,345.13 260,332.50 473.54 880,115.50 3,739.07 463,405.50 895.72 568,337.00 6,095.83 19,294,127.77 62,423.18 48 Page 17 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 5 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 70,000,000 60,000,000 50,000,000 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000 0 AAA AA+ AA AA- I A+ A NA A-1+ A-2 I Cash (-1.182%) Money Market Funds (1.274%) Fixed Income (99.908%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group GNMA CMO (6.063%) FHLMC CMO/ (7.186%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (15.700%)\ GNMA Collateral (2.774%) GNMA2 Collateral I (4.072%) Agency Collet CMO� (5.171 %) Banks (5.294%) FNMA Collateral/ (6.427%) Commercial MBS (19.518%) Sovereign (41.043%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (0.281 %)` Municipal (1.899%)�_ Asset Backed (2.842%) Agency (3.344%) Industrial (3.527%) Financial (6.460%) Government/ (38.702%) Mortgage Backed (42.945%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued 49 r paRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 6 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 AAA Asset Class Cash (-2.113%)\ Money Market s� Funds (2.379%) Fixed Income (99.734%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Security Type Other (9.043%) AGCY BOND (6.269%) FHLMC CMO (6.656%) FHLMC (8.679%) GNMA CMO (10.427%) FNMA (10.896%) US GOV (31.895%) GNMA (16.135%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (2.570%), FGLMC Collateral ) (2.744%) Agency Collet PAC GNMA2 Collateral (5.743%) Agency Collat CMO (6.909%) FNMA Collateral (9.169%) Commercial MBS (25.958%) Sovereign (42.785%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Market Sector Cash (0.266%) Agency (6.26970) Government (36.516%) Mortgage Backed (56.949%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value +Accrued 50 r paRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 7 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 Asset Class Money Market Cash (-0.650""/0) Funds-(0.459%)11 Fixed Income (100.191 %) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Other (14.804%).\,,iir GNMA .635%)— ) FNMA (4.635 % )�_ FHLMC CMO—' (5.222%) CP (5.569%) ABS (7.099 % ) US GOV (39.967%) cORP (18.357%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (23.511%) Diversified Finan Sery (2.912%) FNMA Collateral�_ (3.003%) Auto Manufacturers (3.713%) US Municipals (4.742%) Commercial MBS (6.918%) Sovereign (41.976%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Markel Sector Other (-0.191%) Utility (0.471 % ) Municipal (4.742%) Asset Backed (7.0997o) Industrial (8.810 % ) Financial (16.134%) Mortgage Backed (18.453%) Government (44.481 %) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value +Accrued 51 r paRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio TIFIA Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 8 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 AAA Asset Class Cash (-1.001%) Money Market Funds (1.301%) Fixed Income (99.700%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Security Type Other (8.668%)\ AGCY BOND (4.937%) GNMA CMO\ (8.304%) FNMA (10.120%) FHLMC CMO (10.197%) US GOV (28.795%) FHLMC (18.461%) GNMA (10.518%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (2.990%), Agency Collat PAC CMO (3.955%) GNMA2 Collateral (4.579%) GNMA Collateral (4.701 %) Agency Collat CMO (7.495%) FNMA Collateral (8.294%) Commercial MBS (29.752%) Sovereign (38.235%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Market Sector Cash (0.300%) Agency (4.93770) Government-- (33.298%) Mortgage Backed (61.466%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value +Accrued 52 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 9 Source Account Account Identifier un •e Category Issuer Ina Maturity Trade Date 09/30/2019 Current Face Value 400,000.00 'e. Call Original Cost Date 406,425.20 --- Base Market Value 413,336.00 Base Net Total Unrealized Summarized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Credit Rating 8,992.79 2.375 0.200 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137EADB2 Agency Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 38377VWQ5 AgencyCMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2038 04/01/2020 107,699.62 107,766.94 -- 107,610.23 (69.21) 2.500 2.258 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38374VGF0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2037 02/20/2020 229,018.26 230,163.35 --- 229,565.61 75.05 4.500 1.565 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 27,054.24 27,591.10 --- 27,975.71 489.28 3.500 0.978 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 07/25/2021 11/29/2018 94,665.77 94,835.88 --- 96,761.67 2,029.85 3.230 0.684 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376V2E6 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2039 08/06/2019 19,045.58 19,819.31 --- 20,284.69 554.30 4.000 0.667 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AJMF8 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2021 11/29/2018 92,100.45 91,794.65 --- 94,107.32 2,244.43 2.968 0.874 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38375XCM4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2037 05/14/2019 20,524.42 21,105.68 --- 21,399.37 450.26 5.000 1.237 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383742C76 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2037 01/31/2018 53,034.62 54,360.49 --- 54,864.32 912.69 4.000 2.009 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378BXQ7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 3,402.08 3,368.06 --- 3,402.35 8.41 1.537 0.862 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YPU9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2038 05/10/2019 11,689.90 11,609.53 - 11,728.71 83.99 2.500 1.367 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 09/26/2018 100,000.00 97,238.28 --- 102,917.00 4,413.11 2.373 0.611 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 11,345.46 11,090.19 --- 11,399.01 151.60 1.573 0.586 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/26/2019 11,626.81 11,694.85 --- 11,864.23 172.33 2.482 0.741 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AYCE9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2022 08/13/2019 100,000.00 102,164.06 --- 104,235.00 2,720.35 2.682 0.677 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31397QWZ7 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 09/25/2029 09/28/2018 261.72 264.01 --- 261.54 (0.18) 4.000 1.154 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378HXH4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2027 03/08/2019 5,663.26 5,368.98 --- 5,721.98 312.62 1.250 0.733 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31392J6N4 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 12/05/2017 254,005.90 276,328.16 --- 265,469.19 (1,055.21) 5.500 1.240 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B84S3 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 02/15/2029 01/31/2018 70,268.45 69,390.09 --- 71,373.07 1,687.00 2.000 0.927 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 32,347.23 32,428.10 --- 32,547.46 200.62 2.500 0.948 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378JZD7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 14,703.50 14,519.71 --- 14,891.70 351.87 1.500 0.660 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377QKH9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 17,736.69 18,058.87 --- 18,582.38 544.86 3.000 0.767 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378CDK0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 1,044.67 1,054.30 --- 1,044.42 (0.25,_3.000 0.581 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378AWX5 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 42,176.13 42,584.71 --- 42,362.97 128.14 3.000 1.277 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARVD7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 08/15/2038 06/30/2020 126,745.49 128,508.05 --- 128,469.23 (38.82,_3.000 1.415 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38379HLE3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 05/20/2043 10/18/2018 30,422.80 30,380.01 --- 31,042.20 669.40 3.500 -0.235 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378VC45 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2041 11/23/2018 53,041.67 51,127.20 --- 54,490.77 3,073.72 2.250 1.204 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377JM59 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 11/21/2018 24,500.37 23,887.87 --- 24,986.95 947.39 2.500 1.097 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARBX3 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 03/15/2039 03/14/2019 27,958.72 27,561.18 --- 27,955.64 627.27 0.535 0.530 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YFF3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2039 06/03/2019 3,383.05 3,408.42 --- 3,404.67 15.03 4.000 1.255 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38379JM99 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 17,354.46 17,466.32 --- 17,785.37 338.10 2.500 0.783 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38374VGF0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2037 02/20/2020 38,169.71 38,360.56 --- 38,260.94 12.51 4.500 1.565 AAA 240907004 MI MI-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31416BTW8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2024 09/03/2019 292,293.96 304,899.14 --- 307,268.17 5,026.00 5.500 0.260 AAA 240907004 MDv1-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 3137B36H6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 10/25/2022 06/12/2020 14,655.34 14,838.53 --- 14,928.51 89.27 2.839 0.548 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137B7YX1 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 04/25/2023 08/19/2019 445,443.93 451,081.58 --- 457,524.37 7,911.20 2.592 0.506 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 3137FJXN4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 08/27/2019 4,939.85 4,935.22 --- 4,932.49 26.05 0.580 0.900 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 3137FQXG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/25/2024 01/16/2020 961,081.29 961,081.29 --- 963,176.45 2,095.16 0.670 0.372 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31283K5N4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 08/01/2020 12/05/2017 8,152.51 8,336.14 --- 8,578.40 425.89 5.000 -91.004 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620A9WV9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 12/15/2024 05/23/2018 8,666.45 8,856.03 --- 9,139.72 351.32 4.000 0.228 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 09/13/2018 18,498.90 18,712.80 --- 18,503.89 (36.57) 3.630 3.023 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381RLL6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2021 11/02/2018 44,507.74 45,168.41 --- 45,311.99 569.50 3.840 1.516 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2027 12/12/2019 28,930.18 29,644.40 --- 30,292.50 702.90 3.000 0.661 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36178NB99 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 32 922.66 33 287.90 --- 34 477.93 1 216.26 2.500 0.505 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 32,094.42 31,566.62 --- 33,287.37 1,473.73 2.622 0.964 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418AU48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2023 05/21/2019 0.00 0.00 --- (0.00) (0.00) 2.500 -0.012 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 01/25/2023 02/27/2018 114,207.96 112,271.78 --- 118,285.18 5,095.53 2.522 0.519 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KWU9 Agency MBS Government National Mortg9ge Association 11/16/2041 05/03/2019 29,063.32 27,265.02 --- 29,080.76 1,420.36 1.400 1.340 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B3NW4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 09/26/2018 62,540.46 62,003.00 --- 64,081.46 1,903.62 2.778 0.457 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F31-F7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2027 06/30/2020 31,744.87 33,292.44 --- 33,317.51 25.07 3.000 0.547 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KW47 Agency MBS Govemment National Mortgage Association 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 34,756.59 34,561.08 --- 34,930.72 283.69 2.150 0.956 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 40,684.26 40,124.85 --- 41,050.42 638.20 1.749 0.582 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AMM48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/25/2022 09/26/2018 78,963.04 77,782.97 --- 80,656.80 2,264.25 2.509 0.770 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179M4J6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 27,262.60 27,590.61 - 28,561.39 989.37 2.500 0.536 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202FA30 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 14,581.13 15,191.72 --- 15,574.83 479.91 4.500 -0.194 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 22,672.83 22,339.82 --- 22,938.56 439.72 1.785 0.550 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179Q2A8 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 02/20/2030 04/30/2020 110,939.04 117,318.03 --- 116,806.60 (425.62) 3.000 0.918 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137BQBY2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 03/25/2022 08/16/2019 58,968.97 59,349.04 --- 60,257.44 1,049.40 2.183 0.694 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 17,505.72 18,476.74 --- 18,375.58 (101.16) 3.000 0.779 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2022 07/22/2019 23,394.74 23,821.51 --- 24,030.37 220.95 2.997 1.368 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620ARB67 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 05/15/2025 05/23/2018 18,984.28 19,435.16 --- 20,044.93 769.20 4.000 0.336 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418CQM9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 10/01/2027 09/11/2019 18,337.25 18,804.28 --- 19,268.41 500.58 3.000 0.555 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3140J6DU8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 08/01/2031 07/26/2019 68,869.71 69,332.43 --- 72,270.49 2,985.66 2.500 0.524 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138L2GH4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2021 07/26/2019 21,168.92 21,054.80 --- 21,428.02 318.53 1.870 0.336 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A96F0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2022 02/27/2018 49,723.66 48,195.05 --- 50,975.20 1,995.92 2.184 0.609 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 06/18/2019 3,399.88 3,398.29 --- 3,397.43 22.48 0.530 0.567 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381QB54 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2021 11/07/2018 55,108.60 56,249.53 --- 55,575.37 261.57 4.410 2.424 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9QE0 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/01/2030 04/29/2020 130,037.93 136,214.73 --- 136,457.91 290.78 2.500 0.670 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9SM0 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 10/01/2031 04/29/2020 76,820.60 80,445.56 --- 80,623.22 184.83 2.500 0.831 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132CJAJ2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 39,083.25 40,191.64 --- 41,106.98 934.46 3.000 0.533 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NI-1K7 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2028 03/31/2020 124,476.37 129,844.41 --- 130,670.31 985.19 3.000 0.816 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3622A2GC0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/15/2028 04/30/2020 77,725.97 80,859.29 --- 81,397.74 603.80 2.500 0.488 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 25,211.50 26,456.31 --- 26,468.30 24.42 3.000 1.056 AAA Page 22 of 41 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Account Account Identifier e . e Category Issucr ma • "oh • .o • ' e Call 1 •. - B•. -e V + V•. Base Net Total Unrealized ' s Coupon Summarized yield Credit Rating 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 17305EFM2 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust - 2014-Al 01/23/2023 12/11/2019 500,000.00 505,531.67 --- 507,200.00 4,407.47 2.880 0.297 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 87165LBB6 Asset Backed Synchrony Credit Card Master Note Trust 2016-2 05/17/2021 08/02/2019 525,000.00 526,271.48 -- 530,932.50 5,299.90 2.210 0.923 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-l5 14041NFN6 Asset Backed Capital One Multi -Asset Execution Trust, Series 2017-4 09/15/2020 04/27/2020 405,000.00 406,588.48 --- 406,328.40 463.39 1.990 0.415 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 02005AGP7 Asset Backed Ally Master Owner Trust, Series 2018-1 01/15/2021 11/18/2019 175,000.00 176,374.02 --- 176,571.50 925.26 2.700 1.039 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 65478DAD9 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2018-A Owner Trust 05/16/2022 06/29/2018 350,304.78 348,498.52 --- 353,285.87 3,394.65 2.650 0.779 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 38013FAD3 Asset Backed GM Financial Consumer Automobile Receivables Trust 2018-, 10/16/2023 07/24/2019 341,849.32 348,112.10 --- 349,927.21 5,078.45 3.210 0.158 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 26208MAE6 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2018-5 07/17/2023 05/05/2020 408,387.74 411,067.78 --- 410,519.52 238.56 3.680 0.751 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 47789JAB2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019 10/15/2021 03/05/2019 182,743.73 182,735.40 --- 183,575.21 833.41 2.850 0.987 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 05586VAC6 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2019-1 11/22/2021 05/05/2020 372,000.00 374,877.19 --- 376,147.80 2,046.53 2.840 0.227 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 65478LAB5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2019-B 10/15/2021 07/16/2019 197,232.68 197,215.42 --- 198,459.46 1,231.65 2.270 0.168 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 477870AB5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019-B 05/16/2022 07/16/2019 187,522.45 187,521.73 --- 188,670.08 1,147.75 2.280 0.742 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 14315PAB1 Asset Backed Carmax Auto Owner Trust 2019-3 12/15/2022 07/24/2019 278,433.76 278,421.26 --- 280,672.37 2,244.13 2.210 0.668 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 26209AAE1 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-4 01/16/2024 09/09/2019 260,000.00 259,964.59 --- 263,385.20 3,407.95 2.230 1.279 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 89239RAA4 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2020-B Owner Trust 05/17/2021 04/20/2020 563,060.18 563,060.18 --- 563,797.79 737.61 1.141 0.433 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-l5 34528GAJ5 Asset Backed Ford Credit Auto Owner Trust 2020-A 10/15/2022 05/07/2020 500,000.00 499,846.89 --- 502,245.00 2,375.97 1.870 0.461 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 12597PAB4 Asset Backed Cnh Equipment Trust 2020-A 07/17/2023 05/19/2020 155,000.00 154,991.58 --- 155,368.90 376.62 1.080 0.840 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 36259PAA4 Asset Backed Gm Financial Automobile Leasing Trust 2020-2 06/21/2021 06/08/2020 600,000.00 600,000.00 --- 600,012.00 12.00 0.280 0.276 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 86565CBD0 CD Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, New York Branch 07/14/2020 04/15/2020 325,000.00 325,056.69 --- 325,133.25 125.06 1.150 0.095 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 65602VF76 CD Norinchukin Bank NY Branch 08/19/2020 05/13/2020 1,500,000.00 1,500,081.54 --- 1,500,120.00 79.23 0.300 0.242 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 01/22/2019 236,597.68 236,680.86 --- 236,266.44 (344.00) 0.697 1.191 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 62888UAB6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-R2 11/05/2020 03/15/2019 196,643.14 196,935.04 --- 196,656.91 (48.33) 0.717 0.804 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 05/10/2019 0.01 0.01 --- 0.01 0.00 0.697 0.975 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 466251BIZ6 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co. 05/10/2021 01/10/2020 1,000,000.00 1,035,920.00 --- 1,036,360.00 12,929.09 4.625 0.391 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31677QBG3 Corporate Fifth Third Bank, National Association 06/14/2021 07/23/2019 500,000.00 500,110.00 05/14/2021 508,015.00 7,956.85 2.250 0.407 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 145 69353RFU7 Corporate PNC Bank, National Association 02/24/2023 02/20/2020 535,000.00 535,000.00 02/24/2022 534,459.65 (540.35) 0.685 0.678 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 30231GBL5 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 04/15/2023 04/13/2020 525,000.00 525,000.00 --- 538,818.00 13,818.00 1.571 0.618 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 67777JAA6 Corporate OhioHealth Corporation 11/15/2020 05/21/2020 460,000.00 460,000.00 --- 460,418.60 418.60 1.069 0.825 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 30229AG86 CP Exxon Mobil Corporation 07/08/2020 04/23/2020 1,500,000.00 1,497,023.33 --- 1,499,955.00 229.17 0.000 0.135 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02665JGL8 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 07/20/2020 06/17/2020 900,000.00 899,661.75 --- 899,928.00 122.75 0.000 0.144 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14918EGP0 CP Catholic Health Initiatives 07/23/2020 05/13/2020 1,500,000.00 1,495,532.92 --- 1,499,865.00 1,249.17 0.000 0.141 NA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 50000DHD1 CP Koch Industries, Inc. 08/13/2020 05/14/2020 1,000,000.00 999,418.61 --- 999,790.00 64.72 0.000 0.172 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 30229AH77 CP Exxon Mobil Corporation 08/07/2020 05/15/2020 1,000,000.00 998,942.50 --- 999,820.00 303.06 0.000 0.171 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 93884EGE9 CP Washington Gas Light Company 07/14/2020 05/20/2020 1,250,000.00 1,248,593.75 --- 1,249,937.50 276.04 0.000 0.129 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02665JJ84 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 09/08/2020 06/15/2020 500,000.00 499,291.67 --- 499,820.00 395.00 0.000 0.185 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357LGQ9 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp. 07/24/2020 06/25/2020 1,000,000.00 999,718.06 --- 999,900.00 123.61 0.000 0.150 AA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE CCYUSD Currency UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 (180,350.56) --- (180,350.56) 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 305,213.64 --- 305,213.64 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 198,023.59 --- 198,023.59 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 73358WT61 Muni Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York 09/15/2020 04/14/2020 210,000.00 210,105.00 --- 210,287.70 235.20 2.477 1.804 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 59447TXK4 Muni Michigan Finance Authority 12/01/2020 12/05/2019 255,000.00 255,000.00 --- 255,793.05 793.05 2.034 1.286 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 64971XBF4 Muni New York City Transitional Finance Authority 08/01/2021 04/15/2020 270,000.00 271,755.00 --- 274,773.60 3,293.19 2.110 0.476 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38611TCS4 Muni Grand Parkway Transportation Corporation 10/01/2020 04/14/2020 555,000.00 555,000.00 --- 555,821.40 821.40 1.531 0.941 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 45818WCP9 Non -US Gov Inter -American Development Bank 09/16/2022 09/10/2019 1,500,000.00 1,500,000.00 --- 1,495,320.00 (4,680.00) 0.345 0.491 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UH1 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 83,325.75 82,255.14 --- 85,354.73 2,582.14 0.125 -0.820 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Pj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286N5 TIPS United States Department of The Treasury 04/15/2024 --- 162,688.00 165,566.33 --- 170,981.83 5,950.80 0.500 -0.822 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828VV9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/31/2020 01/24/2020 500,000.00 501,621.09 --- 501,610.00 1,153.87 2.125 0.212 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 12/24/2019 3,500,000.00 3,517,636.72 --- 3,539,235.00 29,738.28 2.125 0.207 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 --- 5,500,000.00 5,500,541.43 --- 5,500,165.00 166.39 0.193 0.162 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 9128285H9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 12/06/2018 5,300,000.00 5,299,852.27 --- 5,300,583.00 608.97 0.195 0.166 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912796TD1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/13/2020 05/15/2020 2,000,000.00 1,999,467.85 --- 1,999,680.00 (56.98) 0.000 0.133 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912796XF1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/20/2020 --- 1,300,000.00 1,299,585.91 --- 1,299,766.00 5.69 0.000 0.129 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912796XI-17 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/03/2020 06/01/2020 2,000,000.00 1,999,221.44 --- 1,999,500.00 47.56 0.000 0.140 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912796277 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/01/2020 06/02/2020 1,500,000.00 1,499,175.00 --- 1,499,400.00 32.50 0.000 0.157 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Pr RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VV9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/31/2020 --- 775,000.00 766,685.54 --- 777,495.50 3,181.67 2.125 0.212 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828B58 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 --- 550,000.00 547,430.08 - 556,165.50 6,378.13 2.125 0.207 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828743 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 02/28/2022 12/30/2019 40,000.00 40,148.44 --- 41,042.40 927.53 1.750 0.185 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828L57 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/30/2022 --- 705,000.00 707,360.16 --- 729,978.15 23,164.30 1.750 0.173 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828T67 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2021 --- 500,000.00 504,069.33 --- 507,170.00 3,319.26 1.250 0.173 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 --- 725,000.00 724,879.95 --- 725,021.75 36.71 0.193 0.162 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128285H9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 12/06/2018 500,000.00 499,986.06 --- 500,055.00 57.45 0.195 0.166 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286U9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 05/15/2022 02/13/2020 40,000.00 40,606.25 --- 41,458.00 949.50 2.125 0.177 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828YK0 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/15/2022 --- 415,000.00 411,599.22 --- 426,379.30 14,078.57 1.375 0.176 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912796XG9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/27/2020 05/26/2020 525,000.00 524,827.48 --- 524,884.50 (7.44) 0.000 0.139 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 97689P2K3 VRDN Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority 09/01/2037 07/18/2019 1,300,000.00 1,300,000.00 07/30/2020 1,300,000.00 0.00 _ 0.150 0.150 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 196479G29 VRDN Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, Inc. 04/01/2040 07/18/2019 1,500,000.00 1,500,000.00 07/15/2020 1,500,000.00 0.00 0.200 0.200 AAA 57,450,200.88 57,907,309.62 58,118,325.70 239,211.42 54 Page 23 of 41 PERIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 10 Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Summarized Yield Credit Rating 240907004 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 38377VWQ5 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2038 04/01/2020 107,699.62 107,766.94 --- 107,610.23 (69.21) 2.500 2.258 AAA MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 38374VGF0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2037 02/20/2020 229,018.26 230,163.35 --- 229,565.61 75.05 4.500 1.565 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 31416BTW8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2024 09/03/2019 292,293.96 304,899.14 --- 307,268.17 5,026.00 5.500 0.260 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC ToII Revenue:-1-15 3137B36H6 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 10/25/2022 06/12/2020 14,655.34 14,838.53 - 14,928.51 89.27 2.839 0.548 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 3137B7YX1 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 04/25/2023 08/19/2019 445 443.93 451 081.58 - 457 524.37 7 911.20 2.592 0.506 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 3137F1XN4 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 08/27/2019 4,939.85 4,935.22 --- 4,932.49 26.05 0.580 0.900 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 3137FQXG3 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 07/25/2024 01/16/2020 961,081.29 961,081.29 - 963,176.45 2,095.16 0.670 0.372 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 17305EFM2 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust - 2014-A1 01/23/2023 12/11/2019 500,000.00 505,531.67 - 507,200.00 4,407.47 2.880 0.297 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 87165LBB6 Asset Backed Synchrony Credit Card Master Note Trust 2016-2 05/17/2021 08/02/2019 525,000.00 526,271.48 - 530,932.50 5,299.90 2.210 0.923 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 14041NFN6 Asset Backed Capital One Multi -Asset Execution Trust, Series 2017-4 09/15/2020 04/27/2020 405,000.00 406,588.48 - 406,328.40 463.39 1.990 0.415 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 02005AGP7 Asset Backed Ally Master Owner Trust, Series 2018-1 01/15/2021 11/18/2019 175,000.00 176,374.02 - 176,571.50 925.26 2.700 1.039 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 65478DAD9 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2018-A Owner Trust 05/16/2022 06/29/2018 350,304.78 348,498.52 - 353,285.87 3,394.65 2.650 0.779 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 38013FAD3 Asset Backed GM Financial Consumer Automobile Receivables Trust 2018-4 10/16/2023 07/24/2019 341 849.32 348 112.10 - 349 927.21 5 078.45 3.210 0.158 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 26208MAE6 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2018-5 07/17/2023 05/05/2020 408,387.74 411,067.78 - 410,519.52 238.56 3.680 0.751 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 47789JAB2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019 10/15/2021 03/05/2019 182 743.73 182 735.40 - 183 575.21 833.41 2.850 0.987 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 05586VAC6 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2019-1 11/22/2021 05/05/2020 372,000.00 374,877.19 - 376,147.80 2,046.53 2.840 0.227 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 65478LAB5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2019-B 10/15/2021 07/16/2019 197,232.68 197,215.42 - 198,459.46 1,231.65 2.270 0.168 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 477870AB5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2019-B 05/16/2022 07/16/2019 187,522.45 187,521.73 - 188,670.08 1,147.75 2.280 0.742 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 14315PAB1 Asset Backed Camtax Auto Owner Trust 2019-3 12/15/2022 07/24/2019 278,433.76 278,421.26 - 280,672.37 2,244.13 2.210 0.668 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 26209AAE1 Asset Backed Drive Auto Receivables Trust 2019-4 01/16/2024 09/09/2019 260,000.00 259,964.59 - 263,385.20 3,407.95 2.230 1.279 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 89239RAA4 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2020-B Owner Trust 05/17/2021 04/20/2020 563,060.18 563,060.18 - 563,797.79 737.61 1.141 0.433 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 34528GAJ5 Asset Backed Ford Credit Auto Owner Trust 2020-A 10/15/2022 05/07/2020 500,000.00 499,846.89 - 502,245.00 2,375.97 1.870 0.461 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 12597PAB4 Asset Backed Cnh Equipment Trust 2020-A 07/17/2023 05/19/2020 155,000.00 154,991.58 - 155,368.90 376.62 1.080 0.840 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 36259PAA4 Asset Backed Gm Financial Automobile Leasing Trust 2020-2 06/21/2021 06/08/2020 600,000.00 600,000.00 - 600,012.00 12.00 0.280 0.276 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 86565CBD0 CD Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation New York Branch 07/14/2020 04/15/2020 325 000.00 325 056.69 - 325 133.25 125.06 1.150 0.095 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 65602VF76 CD Norinchukin Bank NY Branch 08/19/2020 05/13/2020 1,500,000.00 1,500,081.54 - 1,500,120.00 79.23 0.300 0.242 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 01/22/2019 236 597.68 236 680.86 - 236 266.44 (344.00) 0.697 1.191 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 62888UAB6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-R2 11/05/2020 03/15/2019 196,643.14 196,935.04 - 196,656.91 (48.33) 0.717 0.804 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 46625HHZ6 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co. 05/10/2021 01/10/2020 1,000,000.00 1,035,920.00 - 1,036,360.00 12,929.09 4.625 0.391 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 31677QBG3 Corporate Fifth Third Bank, National Association 06/14/2021 07/23/2019 500,000.00 500,110.00 05/14/2021 508,015.00 7,956.85 2.250 0.407 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 69353RFU7 Corporate PNC Bank, National Association 02/24/2023 02/20/2020 535,000.00 535,000.00 02/24/2022 534,459.65 (540.35) 0.685 0.678 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 30231GBL5 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 04/15/2023 04/13/2020 525,000.00 525,000.00 - 538,818.00 13,818.00 1.571 0.618 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 67777JAA6 Corporate OhioHealth Corporation 11/15/2020 05/21/2020 460,000.00 460,000.00 - 460,418.60 418.60 1.069 0.825 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 30229AG86 CP Exxon Mobil Corporation 07/08/2020 04/23/2020 1,500,000.00 1,497,023.33 - 1,499,955.00 229.17 0.000 0.135 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 026651GL8 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 07/20/2020 06/17/2020 900,000.00 899,661.75 - 899,928.00 122.75 0.000 0.144 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 14918EGPO CP Catholic Health Initiatives 07/23/2020 05/13/2020 1,500,000.00 1,495,532.92 - 1,499,865.00 1,249.17 0.000 0.141 NA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 50000DHD1 CP Koch Industries, Inc. 08/13/2020 05/14/2020 1,000,000.00 999,418.61 - 999,790.00 64.72 0.000 0.172 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 30229AH77 CP Exxon Mobil Corporation 08/07/2020 05/15/2020 1,000,000.00 998,942.50 - 999,820.00 303.06 0.000 0.171 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 93884EGE9 CP Washington Gas Light Company 07/14/2020 05/20/2020 1,250,000.00 1,248,593.75 - 1,249,937.50 276.04 0.000 0.129 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 02665J184 CP American Honda Finance Corporation 09/08/2020 06/15/2020 500,000.00 499,291.67 - 499,820.00 395.00 0.000 0.185 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 43357LGQ9 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp. 07/24/2020 06/25/2020 1 000 000.00 999 718.06 - 999 900.00 123.61 0.000 0.150 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund 06/30/2020 --- 0.00 305,213.64 --- 305,213.64 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 73358WT61 Muni Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, New York 09/15/2020 04/14/2020 210,000.00 210,105.00 - 210,287.70 235.20 2.477 1.804 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 59447TXK4 Muni Michigan Finance Authority 12/01/2020 12/05/2019 255,000.00 255,000.00 - 255,793.05 793.05 2.034 1.286 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 64971XBF4 Muni New York City Transitional Finance Authority 08/01/2021 04/15/2020 270 000.00 271 755.00 - 274 773.60 3 293.19 2.110 0.476 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 38611TCS4 Muni Grand Parkway Transportation Corporation 10/01/2020 04/14/2020 555,000.00 555,000.00 - 555,821.40 821.40 1.531 0.941 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 45818WCP9 Non -US Gov Inter -American Development Bank 09/16/2022 09/10/2019 1 500 000.00 1 500 000.00 - 1,495 320.00 (4 680.00) 0.345 0.491 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC ToII Revenue:-1-15 912828VV9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/31/2020 01/24/2020 500,000.00 501,621.09 - 501,610.00 1,153.87 2.125 0.212 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912828858 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 01/31/2021 12/24/2019 3 500 000.00 3 517 636.72 - 3 539 235.00 29 738.28 2.125 0.207 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC ToII Revenue:-1-15 912828Y53 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 07/31/2020 - 5,500,000.00 5,500,541.43 - 5,500,165.00 166.39 0.193 0.162 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 9128285H9 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/31/2020 12/06/2018 5 300 000.00 5 299 852.27 - 5 300 583.00 608.97 0.195 0.166 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 912796TD1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/13/2020 05/15/2020 2,000,000.00 1,999,467.85 - 1,999,680.00 (56.98) 0.000 0.133 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912796XF1 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 08/20/2020 - 1,300,000.00 1,299,585.91 - 1,299,766.00 5.69 0.000 0.129 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 912796XH7 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 09/03/2020 06/01/2020 2,000,000.00 1,999,221.44 - 1,999,500.00 47.56 0.000 0.140 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912796217 US Gov United States Department of The Treasury 10/01/2020 06/02/2020 1,500,000.00 1,499,175.00 - 1,499,400.00 32.50 0.000 0.157 AAA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - 1-15 97689P2K3 VRDN Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority 09/01/2037 07/18/2019 1,300,000.00 1,300,000.00 07/30/2020 1,300,000.00 0.00 0.150 0.150 AA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 196479G29 VRDN Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, Inc. 04/01/2040 07/18/2019 1,500,000.00 1,500,000.00 07/15/2020 1,500,000.00 0.00 0.200 0.200 AAA 49,174,907.69 49,562,986.42 49,654,516.41 118,691.61 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137EADB2 Agency Freddie Mac 01/13/2022 09/30/2019 400,000.00 406,425.20 --- 413,336.00 8,992.79 2.375 0.200 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377REV3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 10/20/2039 07/01/2019 27,054.24 27,591.10 - 27,975.71 489.28 3.500 0.978 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AH6C7 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 07/25/2021 11/29/2018 94,665.77 94,835.88 - 96,761.67 2,029.85 3.230 0.684 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376V2E6 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 07/16/2039 08/06/2019 19,045.58 19,819.31 - 20,284.69 554.30 4.000 0.667 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AJMF8 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2021 11/29/2018 92,100.45 91,794.65 - 94,107.32 2,244.43 2.968 0.874 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38375XCM4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2037 05/14/2019 20 524.42 21 105.68 - 21 399.37 450.26 5.000 1.237 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383742C76 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2037 01/31/2018 53,034.62 54,360.49 - 54,864.32 912.69 4.000 2.009 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378BXQ7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 01/16/2036 06/17/2019 3,402.08 3,368.06 - 3,402.35 8.41 1.537 0.862 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YPU9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2038 05/10/2019 11,689.90 11,609.53 - 11,728.71 83.99 2.500 1.367 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 05/25/2022 09/26/2018 100,000.00 97,238.28 - 102,917.00 4,413.11 2.373 0.611 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 11,345.46 11,090.19 - 11,399.01 151.60 1.573 0.586 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/26/2019 11,626.81 11,694.85 - 11,864.23 172.33 2.482 0.741 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AYCE9 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 10/25/2022 08/13/2019 100,000.00 102,164.06 - 104,235.00 2,720.35 2.682 0.677 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31397QWZ7 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 09/25/2029 09/28/2018 261.72 264.01 - 261.54 (0.18) 4.000 1.154 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378HXH4 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2027 03/08/2019 5,663.26 5,368.98 - 5,721.98 312.62 1.250 0.733 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 I'd RAMP UP RESERVE 31392J6N4 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 12/05/2017 254,005.90 276,328.16 - 265,469.19 (1,055.21) 5.500 1.240 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 313768453 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 02/15/2029 01/31/2018 70,268.45 69,390.09 - 71,373.07 1,687.00 2.000 0.927 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 I'd RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Freddie Mac 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 32,347.23 32,428.10 - 32,547.46 200.62 2.500 0.948 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378JZD7 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/20/2040 10/16/2019 14,703.50 14,519.71 - 14,891.70 351.87 1.500 0.660 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377QKH9 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/20/2040 08/20/2019 17,736.69 18,058.87 - 18,582.38 544.86 3.000 0.767 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378CDK0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 03/20/203j- 01/30/2018 1,044.67 1,054.30 - 1,044.42 (0.25) 3.000 0.581 AAA Page 24 of 41 FirRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Security Type Next Call Base Net Total Summarized 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378AWX5 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARVU7 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38379HLE3 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378VC45 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377JM59 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARBX3 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YFF3 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383791M99 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38374VGF0 Agency CMO 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31283K5N4 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620A9WV9 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138NJAE8 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381RLL6 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F2H8 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36178NB99 Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 42,176.13 42,584.71 --- 42,362.97 128.14 3.000 1.277 AAA 08/15/2038 06/30/2020 126,745.49 128,508.05 --- 128,469.23 (38.82) 3.000 1.415 AAA 05/20/2043 10/18/2018 30,422.80 30,380.01 - 31,042.20 669.40 3.500 -0.235 AAA 12/16/2041 11 /23 /2018 10/20/2039 11/21/2018 03/15/2039 03/14/2019 03/20/2039 06/03/2019 02/16/2041 08/28/2019 12/16/2037 02/20/2020 08/01/2020 12/05/2017 12/15/2024 05/23/2018 12/01/2020 09/13/2018 07/01/2021 11/02/2018 01/20/2027 12/12/2019 08/15/2027 10/11/2019 53,041.67 24 500.37 27,958.72 3,383.05 17,354.46 38,169.71 8,152.51 8,666.45 18,498.90 44 507.74 28,930.18 32,922.66 51,127.20 23 887.87 27,561.18 3,408.42 17,466.32 38,360.56 8,336.14 8,856.03 18,712.80 45,168.41 29,644.40 33,287.90 54,490.77 24 986.95 27,955.64 3,404.67 17,785.37 38,260.94 8,578.40 9,139.72 18,503.89 45 311.99 30,292.50 34,477.93 3,073.72 2.250 1.204 AAA 947.39 2.500 1.097 AAA 627.27 0.535 0.530 AAA 15.03 4.000 1.255 AAA 338.10 2.500 0.783 AAA 12.51 4.500 1.565 AAA 425.89 5.000 -91.004 AAA 351.32 4.000 0.228 AAA (36.57) 3.630 3.023 AAA 569.50 3.840 1.516 AAA 702.90 3.000 0.661 AAA 1,216.26 2.500 0.505 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418AU48 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1U75 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KWU9 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B3NW4 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F3H7 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KW47 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AX1IN6 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AMM48 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179M4J6 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202FA30 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179Q2A8 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137BQBY2 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NAJ7 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138E0PZ5 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620ARB67 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418CQM9 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3140J6DU8 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138L2GH4 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A96F0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Government National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 07/01/2023 05/21/2019 01/25/2023 02/27/2018 11/16/2041 05/03/2019 09/25/2022 09/26/2018 02/20/2027 06/30/2020 08/16/2035 06/13/2019 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 07/25/2022 09/26/2018 03/20/2028 11/20/2019 09/20/2024 10/23/2019 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 02/20/2030 04/30/2020 03/25/2022 08/16/2019 04/20/2028 06/30/2020 07/01/2022 07/22/2019 05/15/2025 05/23/2018 10/01/2027 09/11/2019 08/01/2031 07/26/2019 07/01/2021 07/26/2019 11/25/2022 02/27/2018 32,094.42 0.00 114,207.96 29,063.32 62,540.46 31,744.87 34,756.59 40,684.26 78,963.04 27 262.60 14,581.13 22 672.83 110,939.04 58,968.97 17,505.72 31,566.62 0.00 112,271.78 27,265.02 62,003.00 33,292.44 34,561.08 40,124.85 77,782.97 27 590.61 15,191.72 22 339.82 117,318.03 59,349.04 18,476.74 33,287.37 1,473.73 2.622 0.964 AAA (0.00) (0.00) 2.500 -0.012 AAA 118,285.18 29,080.76 64,081.46 33,317.51 34,930.72 41,050.42 80,656.80 28 561.39 15,574.83 22 938.56 116,806.60 60,257.44 18,375.58 5,095.53 1,420.36 2.522 0.519 AAA 1.400 1.340 AAA 1,903.62 2.778 0.457 AAA 25.07 3.000 0.547 AAA 283.69 2.150 0.956 AAA 638.20 1.749 0.582 AAA 2,264.25 2.509 0.770 AAA 989.37 2.500 0.536 AAA 479.91 439.72 4.500 -0.194 AAA 1.785 0.550 AAA (425.62) 3.000 0.918 AAA 1,049.40 2.183 0.694 AAA 23,394.74 18,984.28 23,821.51 19,435.16 24,030.37 20,044.93 (101.16) 3.000 0.779 AAA 220.95 2.997 1.368 AAA 18,337.25 68,869.71 21,168.92 49,723.66 18,804.28 69,332.43 21,054.80 48,195.05 19,268.41 72,270.49 21,428.02 50,975.20 769.20 4.000 0.336 AAA 500.58 3.000 0.555 AAA 2,985.66 2.500 0.524 AAA 318.53 1.870 0.336 AAA 1,995.92 2.184 0.609 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137FGZN8 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 02/25/2023 06/18/2019 3,399.88 3,398.29 3,397.43 22.48 0.530 0.567 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381QB54 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9QE0 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9SM0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Freddie Mac Freddie Mac 03/01/2021 11/07/2018 02/01/2030 04/29/2020 10/01/2031 04/29/2020 55,108.60 130,037.93 76,820.60 56,249.53 136,214.73 80,445.56 55,575.37 136,457.91 80,623.22 261.57 4.410 2.424 AAA 290.78 2.500 0.670 AAA 184.83 2.500 0.831 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132CJAJ2 Agency MBS Freddie Mac 09/01/2029 01/28/2020 39 083.25 40 191.64 41 106.98 934.46 3.000 0.533 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179N1RC7 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3622A2GC0 Agency MBS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179RFD6 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association Government National Mortgage Association 07/20/2028 03/31/2020 03/15/2028 04/30/2020 06/20/2030 05/01/2020 124,476.37 77,725.97 25,211.50 129,844.41 80,859.29 26,456.31 130,670.31 81,397.74 26,468.30 985.19 3.000 0.816 AAA 603.80 2.500 0.488 AAA 24.42 3.000 1.056 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2010-RI 10/07/2020 05/10/2019 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.697 0.975 AAA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE CCYUSD Currency 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31846V203 MM Fund 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UH1 TIPS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286N5 TIPS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VV9 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128281358 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828/43 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828L57 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828T67 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828Y53 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128285H9 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286U9 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828YK0 US Gov 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912796XG9 US Gov UNITED STATES OF AMERICA First American Funds, Inc. - Government Obligations Fund United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United Staten Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury United States Department of The Treasury 06/30/2020 06/30/2020 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 04/15/2024 08/31/2020 01/31/2021 02/28/2022 12/30/2019 09/30/2022 10/31/2021 07/31/2020 10/31/2020 12/06/2018 0.00 0.00 83,325.75 162,688.00 775,000.00 550,000.00 40,000.00 705,000.00 500,000.00 725,000.00 500,000.00 05/15/2022 02/13/2020 40,000.00 10/15/2022 - 415,000.00 08/27/2020 05/26/2020 525 000.00 8,275,293.18 (180,350.56) 198 023.59 82,255.14 165,566.33 766,685.54 547,430.08 40,148.44 707,360.16 504,069.33 724,879.95 499,986.06 40,606.25 411,599.22 524 827.48 8.344.323.20 (180,350.56) 198 023.59 85,354.73 170,981.83 777,495.50 556,165.50 41,042.40 729,978.15 507,170.00 725,021.75 500,055.00 41,458.00 426,379.30 524 884.50 8,463,809.30 0.00 0.000 0.000 AAA 0.00 0.010 0.010 AAA 2,582.14 0.125 -0.820 AAA 5,950.80 0.500 -0.822 AAA 3,181.67 2.125 0.212 AAA 6,378.13 2.125 0.207 AAA 927.53 23,164.30 3,319.26 36.71 1.750 0.185 AAA 1.750 0.173 AAA 1.250 0.173 AAA 0.193 0.162 AAA 57.45 0.195 0.166 AAA 949.50 2.125 0.177 AAA 14,078.57 1.375 0.176 AAA (7.44) 0.000 0.139 AAA 120,519.81 56 Page 25 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 11 Source Account Account 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 Identifier Description 46625HHZ6 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO 912828B58 UNITE TES Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases 1,027,680.00 3,560,445.00 Base Sales Base Base Change In Base Maturities and Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Redemptions Base Papdowns Cain/Loss ccretion Gain/Loss Market Value Income Balance (6,719.66) (4,047.67) 15,399. (17,162.33) 1,036,360.00 3,539,235.00 6,552.08 31,057.69 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 17401 QAK7 CITIZENS BANK NA 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 26208MAE6 DRIVE 2018-5 B 1,490,025.00 503,281.25 (1,500000.00) (91,612.27) (1,282.09) (533.75) (854.28) 11,257.09 238.56 410,519.52 667.94 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 38374VGF0 GNR2009-045 PD 461,971.15 (228,827.70) (813.00) (828.83) (1,936.01) 229565.61 858.82 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 05586VAC6 BMWLT2019-1 A3 374,877.19 (775.92) 2,046.53 376,147.80 322.81 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 17305EFM2 CCCIT 2014-Al Al 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 307,650.45 504,160.00 (763.10) (680.45) 2,504.65 (1,869.55) 309,392.00 501,610.00 3,904.00 3,551.29 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 38013FAD3 GMCAR 2018-4 A3 354,543.00 (8,150.68) (75.03) (644.75) 4,254.67 349,927.21 457.22 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 31416BTW8 FN995265 344,052.13 (45,743.90) (1,614.72) (630.35) (1,898.79) 294,164.37 1,282.55 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 14041NFN6 COMET 2017-3 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 048506DN6 ATLANTIC CNTY N J IMPT AUTH REV 266,012.30 326,282.23 (265,000.00) (583.99) (494.70) 367.76 (517.60) 326,066.00 287.44 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 17305EFM2 CCCIT 2014-Al Al 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 3137B7YX1 FHMS K-037 Al 196,694.55 494,386.14 (36,893.42) (365.16) (484.45) (411.67) 1,597.90 808.49 197,808.00 457,524.37 2,496.00 962.16 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 64971XBF4 NEW YORK CITY TRANSITIONAL FINANCE AUTHORITY 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 02005AGP7 AMOT 2018-1 A2 172,149.25 271,755.00 (274.59) (269.16) 3,293.19 4,691.41 274,773.60 176,571.50 2,373.75 210.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 3,699,926.00 (500,028.14) 10.71 (218.35) 405.78 3,200,096.00 1,016.82 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 87165LBB6 SYNCT 2016-2 A 523,582.50 (177.31) 7,527.31 530,932.50 515.67 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 14041NFN6 COMET 2017-3 A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 38377VWQ5 GNR 2011-066 LD 80,306.25 204,762.25 (96,934.72) (139.48) (24.34) (123.74) 95.63 (69.21) 80,262.40 107,610.23 70.76 224.37 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 73358WT61 PORTAUTHNY&NJ 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 86565CBD0 Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, New York Bra 210,105.00 325,056.69 (52.50) 235.20 210,287.70 1,531.61 (48.50) 125.06 325,133.25 809.79 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 62888UAB6 NGN 2010-R2 2A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 65602VF76 Norinchukin Bank NY Branch 206,201.69 1,500,081.54 (9,535.88) (4.38) (45.27) (40.77) 40.75 196,656.91 79.23 1,500,120.00 105.78 700.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 31416BTW8 FN995265 15,326.09 (2,037.70) (71.93) (28.08) (8458) 13,103.80 57.13 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 449,991.00 (25.01) 47.51 450,013.50 142.99 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 31677QBG3 FIFTH THIRD BANK NA(OHIO) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 62888VAA6 NGN 2010-RI IA 500,465.00 262,280.42 (25,848.07) (2.23) (15.67) (12.74) 7,565.67 (150.94) 508,015.00 236,266.44 531.25 123.73 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 4590580K3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 500,150.00 (499,773.50) (259.75) (4.22) (112.53) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 4590580K3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 300,090.00 (299,864.10) (155.94) (2.55) (67.41) 240907004 MEN-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 45905801(3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 31846V203 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLG Y 185,055.50 105,302.57 (184,916.20) 37,791,430.43 (37,591,519.36) (96.56) (1.62) (41.13) 305,213.64 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 64986U4H7 NEW YORK ST HSG FINAGY REV 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 196479029 COLORADO HSG & FIN AUTH 1,400,000.00 1,500,000.00 (1,400,000.00) 1,500,000.00 2,031.15 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -I-15 97689P2K3 WLSCONSIN HSG & ECONOMIC DEV AUTH HOME OWNERSHIP R 1,300,000.00 1,300,000.00 4,801.33 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 4590580K3 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 525,157.50 (524,762.18) (237.83) (157.50) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 45818WCP9 INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 072024WU2 BAY AREA TOLL AUTH CALIF TOLL BRDG REV 1,499,460.00 425,000.00 (425,000.00) (4,140.00) 1,495,320.00 215.06 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 59447TXK4 MICHIGAN FIN AUTO REV 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137FQX03 FHMS K-I05 A 256,366.80 999,260.00 (38,918.71) (573.75) 2,835.16 255,793.05 432.23 963,176.45 8,638.07 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 3134GVDW5 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 675,560.25 (675,000.00) (560.25) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 69353RFU7 PNC BANK NA 504,237.50 30,222.15 534,459.65 366.21 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 69511/D10 PacifiCotp 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14918ED16 CommonSpirit Health 1,500,000.00 1,000,000.00 (1,500,000.00) (1,000,000.00) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 55380TC17 MUFG Bank Ltd. (New York Branch) 1,500,000.00 - (1,500,000.00) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -I-15 30231GBL5 EXXON MOBIL CORP 525,000.00 13,818.00 538,818.00 1,741.19 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -I-15 38611TCS4 GRAND PARKWAY TRANSN CORP TEX SYS TOLL REV 555,000.00 821.40 555,821.40 2,926.76 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 89239RAA4 TAOT 2020-B Al 860,000.00 (296,939.82) (0.00) 737.61 563,797.79 285.62 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -I-15 677771AA6 OHIOHEALTH CORP 460,000.00 418.60 460,418.60 437.10 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 36259PAA4 GMALT2020-2 Al 600,000.00 12.00 600,012.00 65.28 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 477870AB5 1DOT2019-B A2 288,635.67 - - - (100,709.70) 0.07 0.03 744.01 188,670.08 190.02 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 65602VXS0 Norinchukin Bank NY Branch 650,344.50 - - (650,000.00) - - 0.10 (344.60) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 12597PAB4 CNH 2020-A A2 154,991.58 0.70 376.62 155,368.90 74.40 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137B36H6 FHMS K-029 Al 14,838.53 0.72 8927 14,928.51 34.67 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 14315PAB1 CARMX2019-3 A2A 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 47789JAB2 JDOT 2019 A2 356,840.51 (77,374.91) 1.70 1.25 1,203.82 280,672.37 273.48 305,962.00 - - - (122,409.62) 1.74 1.28 19.81 183,575.21 231.48 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 65478LAB5 NALT 2019-B A2A 239,965.35 - - - (42,845.50) 1.31 2.57 1,335.74 198,459.46 198.99 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 26209AAE1 DRIVE 20194 B 255,541.00 4.14 7,840.06 263,385.20 257.69 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 9128285H9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 5,299,205.00 19.37 1,358.63 5,300,583.00 1,702.36 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 34528GAJ5 FORDO 2020-A A2 499,846.89 22.15 2,375.97 502,245.00 228.89 240907004 MIM-RCTC ToO Revenue -15 24710RF49 Dehnarva Power& Light Company 1,399,965.00 - (1,400,000.00) - - 35.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 06051GFN4 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 999,840.00 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 50.27 109.73 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 313384WU9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS 3,099,944.03 - (3,100,000.00) - - 55.97 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 43357LGQ9 Hitachi Capital America Corp. - 999,718.06 - - - - 58.33 123.61 999,900.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912796XF1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 499,838.89 - - - - 60.42 10.69 499,910.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 3137F1XN4 FHMS K-103 A 53,75522 (49,844.77) 265.47 82.59 673.97 4,932.49 0.48 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 65478DAD9 NAROT2018-A A3 1,399,972.00 101.55 (31.55) 1,400,042.00 444.86 464,129.78 - - - (112,266.14) 149.74 108.75 1,163.75 353,285.87 412.58 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912796XF1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 799,747.02 - - - - 113.98 (5.00) 799,856.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 449,991.00 122.91 (100.41) 450,013.50 142.99 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 02665/184 American Honda Finance Corporation - 499,291.67 - - - - 133.33 395.00 499,820.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0266510L8 American Honda Finance Corporation - 899,661.75 - - - - 143.50 122.75 899,928.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912796217 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,499,175.00 - - - - 192.50 32.50 1,499,400.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 97665RD66 Wisconsin Electric Power Company 1,499,800.00 - (1,500,000.00) - - 200.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 912796XH7 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,999,221.44 - - - - 231.00 47.56 1,999,500.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 912796TDI UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,999,467.85 - - - - 269.13 (56.98) 1,999,680.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 50000DHD1 Koch Industries, Inc. - 999,418.61 - - - - 306.67 64.72 999,790.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 21201ADU1 Continental Rubber of America, Corp. 1,499,650.00 - (1,500,000.00) - - 350.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14912DDN6 Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 07287CEE8 Baylor Scott & White Holdings 1,499,562.50 - (1,500,000.00) - - 437.50 1,099,560.00 - (1,100,000.00) - - 440.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 30229AH77 Exxon Mobil Corporation - 998,942.50 - - - - 574.44 303.06 999,820.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:- I-15 23336GD65 DTE Electric Company 1,499,745.00 - - (1,500,000.00) - - 656.25 (401.25) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 459052XP6 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM 1,999,146.66 - (2,000,000.00) - - 853.34 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 9127962A6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 3,699,963.00 - - (3,700,000.00) - - 953.98 (916.98) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 50000DDD5 KOCH INDUSTRIES INC 1,499,400.00 - - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,050.00 (450.00) 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 93884E0E9 Washington Gas Light Company - 1,248,593.75 - - - - 1,067.71 276.04 1,249,937.50 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue -15 40248CDQ1 Gulf Power Company 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 50000DF43 Koch Industries, Inc. 1,498,425.00 - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,575.00 ,697,450.00 - (1,500,000.00) - - 2,550.00 Page 26 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Beginning Ba Base Base Change In Base Maturities and Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 30229AG86 on Mobil Corporation 1,497,023.33 2,702.50 229.17 1,499,955.00 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: -1-15 0229AE47 on Mobil Corporation 1,497,263.75 (1,500,000.00) 2,736.25 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-I-15 912796TT6 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue: 1-15 14918EGP0 Catholic Health Initiatives ,999,880.00 1,495,532.92 (2,000,000.00) ,006.00 ,082.91 240907004 MIM-RCTC TOR Revenue.-I-15 912796TS8 UNITED STATES TREASURY 2,499,900.00 (2,500,000.00) 46 240907004 MIM-RCTC Toll Revenue:-1-15 912796TV1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 2,999,730.00 (3,000,000.00) 5,554.17 (2,886.00) 1,249.17 (3,011.46) (5,284.17) 499,865.00 52,475,981,81 78,784,014.56 (4 ,000,86 .47) (39,315,000.00) ( ,386,893.51) (3,823.88) 12,338.25 88,762.64 49,654,516.41 86,946.53 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3139216N4 FNR 0323B EQ 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP 306,963.44 414,028.00 (39,082.72) (1995.58) (838.96) 423.00 265,469.19 1,164.19 (696.95) 4.95 413,336.00 4,433.33 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828T67 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286N5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 82,999.86 340,339.06 (590.53) 55.37 339,803.90 705.50 (559.21) 3,050.26 85,490.92 85.57 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286N5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 82,999.86 82,801.08 (541.38) 3,032.43 85,490.92 85.57 (431.09) 2,984.75 85,354.73 48.07 240907020 RCPC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AYCE9 FHMS K-025 A2 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381QB54 FN 467260 103,253.00 56,203.89 (186.74) 1,168.74 104,235.00 223.50 (332.42) (1.87) (170.79) (123.43) 55,575.37 202.52 240907020 RCTC 1-151'rj RAMP UP RESERVE 31283K5N4 FH G11753 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NHK7 G2 MA1134 61,015.22 - - - (49,981.03) (244.57) (166.72) (2,044.50) 8,578.40 135,412.93 - - (5,338.31) (228.07) (161.43) 985.19 130,670.31 33.97 311.19 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 658,641.05 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 132,245.10 (154.78) (988.22) 657,498.05 2,793.31 (145.70) (642.10) 131,457.30 1,153.57 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128281358 UNITED STATES TREASURY 101,727.00 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38374VGF0 GNR 2009-045 PD 76,995.19 (138.61) (467.39) 101,121.00 887.36 (38,137.95) (135.50) (138.14) (322.67) 38,260.94 143.14 240907020 RCPC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381RLL6 FN468431 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179Q2A8 G2 MA2569 45,675.11 - - - (242.39) (1.56) (95.84) (23.32) 45,311.99 142.42 119,403.69 - - (1,972.25) (113.15) (86.07) (425.62) 116,806.60 277.35 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128286U9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 41,604.80 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3622A2GC0 GN 783795 - (66.38) (80.42) 41,458.00 108.56 82,230.07 - - (1,317.66) (52.85) (65.62) 603.80 81,397.74 161.93 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378AWX5 GNR2011-157 QA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9QE0 FH ZS8553 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383742C76 GNR 2008-032 PA 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138NIAE8 FN FN0004 65,427.50 59,011.49 20,145.34 139,426.14 (22,546.56) (3,065.79) (3,963.14) (1,658.94) (51.28) (145.16) (70.66) (4.90) (56.40) (48.07) (45.83) (45.12) (410.30) 290.78 (67.54) 67.52 42,362.97 136,457.91 54,864.32 18,503.89 105.44 270.91 176.78 55.96 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137BQBY2 FHMS K-722 Al 61,853.22 - - - (1,587.73) (7.20) (42.91) 42.06 60,257.44 107.27 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138E1PZ5 FN AL2239 25,458.15 (1,080.48) (19.90) (39.00) (288.40) 24,030.37 58.43 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202FA30 G2 004526 17,048.15 - - - (1,454.68) (54.10) (36.31) 71.77 15,574.83 54.68 240907020 RCTC I-I5 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARBX3 FHR 4061 CF 33,640.07 (5,837.50) 120.44 (34.95) 67.57 27,955.64 6.64 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38375XCM4 GNR 2008-047 PC 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132CJA12 FH SA0009 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F2H8 G2 005276 62,233.80 - - - - - (34.92) (73.08) 62,125.80 263.93 23,773.14 - - - (2,206.30) (47.79) (34.11) (85.56) 21,399.37 85.52 44,467.81 - - - (3,349.89) (95.39) (34.01) 118.46 41,106.98 97.71 32,409.33 - - - (2,167.15) (51.29) (33.00) 134.61 30,292.50 72.33 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377REV3 GNR 2010-158 HA 32,046.94 - - - (3,773.47) (63.09) (32.01) (202.66) 27,975.71 78.91 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376V2E6 GNR 2010-019 UA 22,026.60 (1,627.17) (60.04) (28.10) (26.61) 20,284.69 63.49 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-096 A 34,804.52 - - - (6,197.47) 290.61 (22.87) 205.97 29,080.76 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 314016DU8 FN BM1914 76,028.50 - - - (4,368.42) (27.36) (21.22) 659.00 72,270.49 33.91 143.48 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828143 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AH6C7 FHMS K-015 A2 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31381SV18 FN469617 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36178NB99 GN AB2764 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3130AEC57 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179RFD6 G2 MA2864 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179M4I6 G2 MA0825 41,168.80 - - - - - (16.81) (109.59) 97,592.53 - - - (602.23) (0.48) (16.50) (211.65) 42,962.91 - - - (41,937.55) (66.43) (16.47) (942.46) 36,584.97 - - - (2,234.24) (23.76) (14.96) 165.92 351,246.00 - - (350,000.00) - - (13.21) (1,232.79) 26,978.93 - - (498.02) (24.56) (12.47) 24.42 224,995.50 - - - - - (11.95) 23.20 30,323.72 - - - (1,956.34) (22.79) (11.10) 227.90 41,042.40 96,761.67 34,477.93 26,468.30 225,006.75 28,561.39 233.97 254.81 68.59 63.03 71.50 56.80 240907020 RCPC I-15Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A5FP4 FHR3791 DA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38377QKH9 GNR 2011-018 PG 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418CQM9 FN MA3159 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378CDK0 GNR 2011-169 AK 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3132A9SM0 FH ZS8624 240907020 RCPC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 37,277.78 20,589.01 21,259.58 20,828.60 10,372.30 82,485.67 (4,545.40) (1,869.65) (1,966.63) (19,718.53) (1,948.18) (091) (32.36) (46.71) (0.59) (91.75) (11.04) (9.68) (9.04) (8.02) (7.36) (7.29) (172.98) (94.93) 31.22 (57.04) 184.83 (10.71) 32,547.46 18,582.38 19,268.41 1,044.42 80,623.22 10,354.30 67.39 44.34 45.84 2.61 160.04 43.99 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YFF3 GNR 2010-046 CH 5,496.03 240907020 RCPC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31397QWZ7 FNR 2011-15 VB 15,072.65 (2,039.02) (6.83) (7.08) (38.43) 3,404.67 11.28 (14,751.18) 10.35 (6.72) (63.57) 261.54 0.87 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383791M99 GNR 2015-045 AG 20,703.63 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378DDC6 GNR 2012-016 GB 15,492.30 (2,619.90) (14.65) (6.12) (277.58) 17,785.37 36.16 (15,441.94) 6.15 (5.42) (51.10) - - 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A72D3 FNA 2012-M9 A2 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38379HLE3 GNR 2014-184 WK 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A72D3 FNA2012-M9 A2 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31846V203 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLGY 11,014.85 - 46,590.75 - - 2,753.71 - 185,913.64 1,126,211.37 (1,114,101.42) (1,534.81) (14,696.63) (383.70) (9.12) 22.94 (2.27) (3.25) (2.94) (0.81) 23.71 (871.91) 5.91 9,491.39 31,042.20 2,372.85 198,023.59 19.24 88.73 4.81 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE CCYUSD Payable 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31398N2K9 FNR 2010-123 DL (138,404.60) - - - - - - 0.42 - - - (0.42) 0.00 - (0.00) (180,350.56) 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418AU48 FN MA1502 (0.00) 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 62888VAA6 NGN 2010-RI IA 0.01 (0.00) (0.00) (0.00) 0.01 240907020 RCPC 1-15 Pp RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NHK7 G2 MA1134 138,611.33 (138,382.49) - - - - (228.84) 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36202F3H7 G2 005300 33,292.44 - - - - 25.07 33,317.51 13.23 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ARVU7 FHR4073 AI - 128,508.05 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 36179NA17 G2 MA0909 (38.82) 128,469.23 52.81 18,476.74 - - - - - (101.16) 18,375.58 7.29 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128285H9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 499,925.00 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620A9W V9 GN 723460 10,268.40 1.83 128.17 500,055.00 160.60 (1,011.40) (13.79) 2.23 (105.71) 9,139.72 28.89 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378BXQ7 GNR 2012-089 A 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378HXH4 GNR 2012-119 KB 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3620ARB67 GN737261 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383781ZD7 GNR 2013-047 EC 6,121.50 6,265.89 21,920.16 16,343.89 (2,742.52) (546.49) (1,863.67) (1,441.17) 9.94 24.75 (27.50) 16.61 4.95 5.81 7.73 8.67 8.47 (27.98) 8.20 (36.30) 3,4112.35 5,721.98 20,044.93 14,891.70 4.36 5.90 63.28 18.38 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3138I2GH4 FN AM1999 21,520.24 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A7MF8 FHMS 2011-K016 A2 95,886.28 (145.22) 0.49 11.22 41.29 21,428.02 32.99 (1,413.39) 3.73 11.65 (380.96) 94,107.32 227.76 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376YPU9 GNR 2010-050 EA 16,665.91 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137FGZN8 FHMS K-IO2 A 23,500.92 (4,859.99) 22.59 12.81 (112.60) 11,728.71 24.35 (20,541.80) 100.79 14.60 322.93 3,397.43 0.30 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137BIUF7 FHMS K-027 Al 25,531.07 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ASR97 FHMS K-020 Al 13,835.05 (2,638.78) 21.55 17.50 7.23 22,938.56 33.73 (2,463.36) 23.76 18.30 (14.74) 11,399.01 14.87 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378KW47 GNR 2013-138 A 41,917.95 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 124,997.50 (7,162.63) 25.10 18.54 131.76 34,930.72 62.27 21.87 (15.62) 125,003.75 39.72 240907020 RCPC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31371384S3 FHR4305 CT 79,859.75 - - - (8,377.02) 71.13 22.22 (203.01) 71,373.07 117.11 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AC714 FNA2013-M62A 33,432.36 58 (371.12) 3.40 26.41 196.32 33,287.37 70.13 Page27 of41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Source Beginning Ba Base Base Change In Base Maturities and Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B3 4 FHMS K-031A 8378VC45 GNR2013-116 MA 70,716.56 57,774.56 (6,637.58) (3,215.08) 40.32 99.37 26.92 29.06 (64.76) (197.14) 64,081.46 54,490.77 144.78 99.45 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AXBN6 FBMS K-024 Al 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828Y53 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383771M59 GNR 2010-111 PE 46,886.73 374,992.50 28.491.67 (5,829.42) 41.75 31.10 (79.73) 41,050.42 35.45 (16.70) 375,011.25 (3,371.17) 67.95 41.66 (243.17) 24,98695 59.30 119.16 51.04 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912796XG9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 524,827.48 64.46 (7.441 524884.50 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A96F0 FNA 2012-M17 A2 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AMM48 FNA2015-M4 AV2 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1U75 FBMS K-S01 A2 54,274.32 81,918.09 118.805.42 (3,566.40) (1,669.77) (974.96) 58.45 13.27 9.27 75.84 79.38 100.02 133.00 315.83 345.44 50,975.20 80,656.80 118285.18 90.50 165.10 240.03 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 190,217.00 132.72 (277.02) 190,072.70 535.16 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828YK0 UNITED STATES TREASURY 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828T67 UNITED STATES TREASURY 236,486.00 167,758.80 154.98 165.52 (334.38) 236,306.60 (558.22) 167,366.10 665.33 347.49 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ATRW4 FBMS K-020 A2 102,038.00 185.13 693.87 102,917.00 197.75 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VA5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 165,136.95 (165,000.00) 195.86 (332.81) 1 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 9128281358 UNITED STATES TREASURY 912828W9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 325,526.40 478,952.00 373.38 504.22 (2,312.58) 323,587.20 (2,926.72) 476,529.50 2,839.56 3,373.73 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 302,496.00 519.41 (2,049.41) 300,966.00 2,130.77 240907020 RCTC 1-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VA5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 500,415.00 (500,000.00) 545.88 (960.88) 8,436,851.44 2,619,210.08 (1,114,101.42) (1,015,000.00) (410,876.73) (2,751.09) (2,554.71) (5,022,31) 8,463,809.30 27,947.55 59 Page 28 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 12 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000 0 AAA / AA A A - NA A-2 Cash (-0.310%)` Money Market _ �rri Funds (0.864%) Fixed Income (99.446%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Other (15.606%) FHLMC (3.468%) VRDN (4.820%) -1 CORP (5.302%)-' Security Type US GOV ABS (10.403%) (32.972%) CP (14.852%) T-BILL (12.576%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (22.097%)\ Healthcare - Services (3.367 %) Commercial MBS (4.148%) Automobile (4.682%) OiI&Gas (5.221 %) Banks (6.720 %)- US Municipals (7.059%) Sovereign (46.706%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (1.272%)\ Utility (2.146%) Municipal (7.059%) Financial (8.437%) Mortgage Backed (9.417%) Asset Backed (10.403%) Industrial (12.709%) Government (48.557%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued 60 or paRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax 115 ELP Project Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 13 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 AAA AA+ AA- A A- NA A-1+ A-2 Asset Class Cash (0.000 %) Money Market Funds (0.614%) Fixed Income (99.386%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Industry Group Security Type Other (11.328 %) CD (3.673%) VRDN (5.643%) - CORP (6.207%)-_ A/ CP (17.388%) T-BILL (13.667%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued ABS (12.179%) US GOV (29.914%) Other (21.746%), Multi -National (3.007%) Healthcare - Services (3.942 %) Automobile ABS (5.481 %) Oil&Gas (6.112 %) Banks (7.867%) Sovereign (43.581 %) US Municipals (8.264%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Markel Sector Other (0.614%) Utility (2.51370) Mortgage Backed (5.087%) Municipal (8.264%) • Financial (9.87770) Asset Backed (12.179%) Industrial" (14.878%) --Government (46.588%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued 61 r paRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 14 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 10,000,000 8,000,000 6,000,000 4,000,000 2,000,000 0 AAA A-1 + Asset Class Cash (-2.124%)ii Money Market Funds (2.330%) Fixed Income (99.794%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Security Type Other (11.243%) AGCY BOND (4.920%) FNMA (4.973%) T-BILL (6.181%)-' FHLMC (6.704%) GNMA (7.188%)" FHLMC CMO' (7.901 %) US GOV (50.889%) Chad calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Other (1.534%) GNMA Collateral (1.712%) FNMA Collateral (3.027%) FGLMC Collateral (3.148%) GNMA2 Collateral' (4.721%) Agency Collet CMO (9.475%) Commercial MBS (11.371%) Sovereign (65.011%) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued Markel Sector Cash (0.206%) Agency (4.920%) Mortgage Backed- 1 (34.783%) Government (60.091 %) Chart calculated by: Base Market Value + Accrued 62 MkRIVERSIDE COUNTY pigeW TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS CO CUSIP Securi T e Cate. ory Issuer Next Call ATTACHMENT 15 Base Market Unrealized Accrued Final Maturi Trade Date Date Ori inal Cost Value Gain/Loss Income Cou on Yield Credit Rating 3130AF5B9 Agencies FHLBDEB 3.000% 10/12/21 10/12/2021 10/12/2018 619,597.00 642,320.00 22,723.00 4,081.67 3.000 2.907 AA+ AA+ 3130AGWK7 Agencies FHLBDEB 1.500% 8/15/24 08/15/2024 08/16/2019 149,647.50 157,048.50 7,401.00 850.00 1.500 1.433 3130AHJY0 Agencies F H L B DEB 1.625% 11/19/21 11/19/2021 11/08/2019 469,196.30 479,263.70 10,067.40 891.04 1.630 1.596 AA+ 3130AHWB5 Agencies F F C B DEB 2.000% 1/21/25 01/21/2025 01/21/2020 07/21/2020 500,000.00 500,500.00 500.00 4,444.44 2.000 2.000 AA+ 3135G04Q3 Agencies FNMA 0.250% 5/22/23 05/22/2023 05/22/2020 588,224.10 589,380.50 1,156.40 159.79 0.250 0.250 AA+ 3135G0W33 Agencies FNMA 1.375% 9/06/22 09/06/2022 09/06/2019 597,912.00 614,904.00 16,992.00 2,635.42 1.380 1.344 AA+ 3135G0X73 Agencies FNMA 1.750% 1/30/23 01/30/2023 01/30/2020 07/30/2020 540,000.00 540,426.60 426.60 3,963.75 1.750 1.750 AA+ 3137EAEQ8 Agencies F H L M C 0.375% 4/20/23 04/20/2023 04/20/2020 558,600.00 561,528.80 2,928.80 414.17 0.380 0.373 AA+ 3137EAER6 Agencies F H L M C 0.375% 5/05/23 05/05/2023 05/07/2020 649,727.00 651,690.00 1,963.00 365.63 0.380 0.374 AA+ 3137EAES4 Agencies F H L M C M T N 0.250% 6/26/23 06/26/2023 06/26/2020 538,423.20 539,157.60 734.40 18.75 0.250 0.250 AA+ 911759MU9 Agencies U S DEPT HSG & URB 2.570% 8/01/21 08/01/2021 03/28/2019 100,000.00 102,414.00 2,414.00 1,070.83 2.570 2.515 N/A 05588CAC6 Asset -Backed BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.920% 1/25/24 01/25/2024 09/18/2019 329,955.65 337,837.50 7,881.85 105.60 1.920 1.878 AAA 14043MAC5 Asset -Backed CAPTIAL ONE PRIME 1.600% 11/15/24 11/15/2024 02/19/2020 289,938.35 295,852.20 5,913.85 206.22 1.600 1.565 AAA 26208VAD8 Asset -Backed DRIVE AUTO 0.830% 5/15/24 05/15/2024 06/17/2020 89,996.56 90,249.30 252.74 29.05 0.830 0.827 AAA 41284WAC4 Asset -Backed HARLEY DAVIDSON 2.340% 2/15/24 02/15/2024 06/26/2019 589,954.33 601,811.80 11,857.47 613.60 2.340 2.296 N/A 43814PAC4 Asset -Backed HONDAAUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 09/20/2021 09/29/2017 35,154.56 35,287.75 133.19 22.73 1.790 1.785 AAA 43815NAC8 Asset -Backed HONDAAUTO 1.780% 8/15/23 08/15/2023 08/27/2019 249,997.93 255,140.00 5,142.07 197.78 1.780 1.746 AAA 47789JAD8 Asset -Backed JOHN DEERE OWNER 2.910% 7/17/23 07/17/2023 03/13/2019 259,968.05 266,801.60 6,833.55 336.27 2.910 2.840 N/A 47789KAC7 Asset -Backed JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.100% 8/15/24 08/15/2024 03/11/2020 429,973.73 433,642.10 3,668.37 210.22 1.100 1.090 N/A 58769TAD7 Asset -Backed MERCEDES BENZ 1.940% 3/15/24 03/15/2024 09/25/2019 269,962.82 275,999.40 6,036.58 232.80 1.940 1.892 AAA 58770FAC6 Asset -Backed MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.840% 12/15/22 12/15/2022 01/29/2020 139,981.55 142,146.20 2,164.65 114.49 1.840 1.808 AAA 89238UAD2 Asset -Backed TOYOTA AUTO 1.910% 9/15/23 09/15/2023 08/14/2019 249,997.95 255,270.00 5,272.05 212.22 1.910 1.867 AAA 89239AAD5 Asset -Backed TOYOTA AUTO 2.910% 7/17/23 07/17/2023 02/13/2019 339,938.05 349,955.20 10,017.15 439.73 2.910 2.834 AAA 023135BP0 Credit AMAZON COM INC SR NT 0.400% 6/03/23 06/03/2023 06/03/2020 269,622.00 269,481.60 (140.40) 84.00 0.400 0.399 AA- 037833DL1 Credit APPLE INC 1.700% 9/11/22 09/11/2022 09/11/2019 524,910.75 540,676.50 15,765.75 2,727.08 1.700 1.654 AA+ 037833DV9 Credit APPLE INC 0.750% 5/11/23 05/11/2023 05/11/2020 194,469.60 197,055.30 2,585.70 203.13 0.750 0.742 AA+ 053015AD5 Credit AUTOMATIC DATA 2.250% 9/15/20 09/15/2020 09/15/2015 08/15/2020 450,883.17 450,994.50 111.33 2,981.25 2.250 2.250 AA 06050TMJ8 Credit BANK OF AMERICA MTN 3.335% 1/25/23 01/25/2023 01/25/2019 01/25/2022 520,000.00 542,677.20 22,677.20 7,514.87 3.340 3.202 A+ 06406FAA1 Credit BANK OF NY MTN 2.500% 4/15/21 04/15/2021 02/19/2016 03/15/2021 451,640.79 456,862.50 5,221.71 2,375.00 2.500 2.469 A 06406RAK3 Credit BANK OF NY MTN 1.950% 8/23/22 08/23/2022 08/23/2019 99,968.00 103,079.00 3,111.00 693.33 1.950 1.889 A 06406RAM9 Credit BANK OF NY MTN 1.850% 1/27/23 01/27/2023 01/28/2020 01/02/2023 299,790.00 310,266.00 10,476.00 2,358.75 1.850 1.790 A 084670BQ0 Credit BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 2.200% 3/15/21 03/15/2021 03/15/2016 02/15/2021 466,436.01 476,647.29 10,211.28 3,051.03 2.200 2.180 AA 144141 DC9 Credit PROG ENERGY CAROLINA 2.800% 5/15/22 05/15/2022 05/18/2012 02/15/2022 252,639.39 259,532.50 6,893.11 894.44 2.800 2.703 A 166764AU4 Credit CHEVRON CORP 1.99275% 3/03/22 03/03/2022 03/03/2015 502,242.55 502,190.00 (52.55) 774.96 0.870 1.979 AA 17325FAQ1 Credit CITIBANK NA 3.400% 7/23/21 07/23/2021 07/23/2018 06/23/2021 253,647.59 257,455.00 3,807.41 3,730.56 3.400 3.312 A+ 17325FAY4 Credit CITIBANK NA 2.844% 5/20/22 05/20/2022 05/22/2019 05/20/2021 510,994.52 520,092.90 9,098.38 1,651.89 2.840 2.795 A+ 210518CT1 Credit CONSUMERS ENERGY CO 2.850% 5/15/22 05/15/2022 05/08/2012 02/15/2022 379,109.23 390,435.00 11,325.77 1,365.63 2.850 2.746 A 250847EJ5 Credit DETROIT EDISON CO 2.650% 6/15/22 06/15/2022 06/22/2012 182,052.39 186,161.40 4,109.01 212.00 2.650 2.566 A 30231GAV4 Credit EXXON MOBIL 2.222% 3/01/21 03/01/2021 03/03/2016 02/01/2021 495,685.00 505,745.00 10,060.00 3,703.33 2.220 2.203 AA 30231GBB7 Credit EXXON MOBIL 1.902% 8/16/22 08/16/2022 08/16/2019 300,000.00 309,351.00 9,351.00 2,139.75 1.900 1.842 AA 46647PBB1 Credit JPMORGAN CHASE CO 3.207% 4/01/23 04/01/2023 03/22/2019 04/01/2022 1,050,000.00 1,093,218.00 43,218.00 8,418.38 3.210 3.075 A- 478160CH5 Credit JOHNSON JOHNSON 1.950% 11/10/20 11/10/2020 11/10/2017 249,732.50 251,540.00 1,807.50 690.63 1.950 1.943 AAA 654106AH6 Credit NIKE INC SR NT 2.400% 3/27/25 03/27/2025 03/27/2020 02/27/2025 19,972.80 21,509.00 1,536.20 125.33 2.400 2.233 AA- 693304AP2 Credit PECO ENERGY CO 2.375% 9/15/22 09/15/2022 09/17/2012 06/15/2022 121,055.60 124,239.60 3,184.00 839.17 2.380 2.292 A 717081EM1 Credit PFIZER INC 3.000% 9/15/21 09/15/2021 09/07/2018 249,662.50 258,032.50 8,370.00 2,208.33 3.000 2.915 AA- 857477AS2 Credit STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 08/18/2020 08/18/2015 789,338.63 790,237.92 899.29 7,423.62 2.550 2.550 N/R 90331 HPAS Credit US BANK NA MTN 3.000% 2/04/21 02/04/2021 02/04/2019 01/04/2021 269,781.30 273,609.90 3,828.60 3,307.50 3.000 2.970 AA- 90331HPF4 Credit US BANK NA MTN 1.950% 1/09/23 01/09/2023 12/09/2019 12/09/2022 549,538.00 570,075.00 20,537.00 6,017.92 1.950 1.884 AA- 91159HHQ6 Credit US BANCORP MTN 0.9035% 1/24/22 01/24/2022 01/24/2017 12/23/2021 251,035.76 251,500.00 464.24 783.89 1.660 0.897 A+ 931142EA7 Credit WALMART STORES INC 1.900% 12/15/20 12/15/2020 10/20/2017 489,760.00 503,310.00 13,550.00 422.22 1.900 1.890 AA 931142EJ8 Credit WALMART INC 3.125% 6/23/21 06/23/2021 06/27/2018 129,993.50 133,623.10 3,629.60 90.28 3.130 3.050 AA 94988J5T0 Credit WELLS FARGO MTN 3.625% 10/22/21 10/22/2021 10/23/2018 09/21/2021 529,941.70 550,055.20 20,113.50 3,682.40 3.630 3.501 A+ 94988J6A0 Credit WELLS FARGO MTN 2.082% 9/09/22 09/09/2022 09/11/2019 09/09/2021 550,000.00 558,871.50 8,871.50 3,626.15 2.080 2.049 A+ 3136AKQM8 Mortgage -Backed F N M A GTD REMIC 3.056% 6/25/24 06/25/2024 07/01/2014 477,793.85 477,939.12 145.27 1,130.70 3.060 2.846 N/A 3136B1XP4 Mortgage -Backed F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 09/25/2021 04/01/2018 121,320.29 122,004.72 684.43 357.31 3.560 3.522 N/A 3137ATRW4 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 05/25/2022 09/01/2012 190,710.17 195,542.30 4,832.13 375.73 2.370 2.312 N/A 3137B1U75 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 01/25/2023 05/07/2013 63 152,822.61 157,713.59 4,890.98 320.04 2.520 2.441 N/A MkRIVERSIDE COUNTY pigeW TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS CO CUSIP 3137B36J2 Security Ty . e Cate! ory Mortgage -Backed Issuer F H L M C MLTCL MT 3.31642% 2/25/23 Final Maturi 02/25/2023 Next Call Trade Date Date 07/01/2013 Ori l inal Cost 496,467.73 Base Market Value 510,460.80 Unrealized Gain/Loss 13,993.07 Accrued Income 1,328.00 Coupon 3.320 Yield 3.112 Credit Rating N/A 3137B4WB8 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 07/25/2023 10/01/2013 512,037.20 523,354.30 11,317.10 1,249.50 3.060 2.871 N/A 3137FJYA1 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 05/25/2023 11/01/2018 61,099.57 62,191.27 1,091.70 175.87 3.450 3.411 N/A 010831DN2 Taxable Muni ALAMEDA CNTY CA JT 2.866% 6/01/21 06/01/2021 04/24/2018 255,000.00 259,046.85 4,046.85 609.02 2.870 2.815 AA+ 010831DQ5 Taxable Muni ALAMEDACNTYCA 3.095% 6/01/23 06/01/2023 04/24/2018 135,242.70 136,318.00 1,075.30 335.29 3.100 2.899 AA+ 072024WN8 Taxable Muni BAY AREA CA TOLL 2.184% 4/01/23 04/01/2023 09/26/2019 680,000.00 701,528.80 21,528.80 3,712.80 2.180 2.097 AA 13032UUZ9 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST HLTH 1.893% 6/01/22 06/01/2022 11/25/2019 520,000.00 526,765.20 6,765.20 820.30 1.890 1.853 AA- 13063BFS6 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST BUILD 6.650% 3/01/22 03/01/2022 04/01/2010 458,136.84 454,669.25 (3,467.59) 9,420.83 6.650 6.250 AA- 13063DGA0 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST 2.800% 4/01/21 04/01/2021 04/25/2018 500,000.00 508,365.00 8,365.00 3,500.00 2.800 2.758 AA- 13066YTY5 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.713% 5/01/21 05/01/2021 09/28/2016 80,813.58 82,452.01 1,638.43 233.07 1.710 1.696 AA+ 13066YTZ2 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 2.000% 5/01/22 05/01/2022 09/28/2016 300,995.91 307,734.00 6,738.09 1,000.00 2.000 1.945 AA+ 156549AA5 Taxable Muni CENTURY HOUSING CORP 3.824% 11/01/20 11/01/2020 02/07/2019 110,000.00 111,109.90 1,109.90 701.07 3.820 3.817 AA- 20772JKP6 Taxable Muni CONNECTICUT ST 2.401% 10/15/21 10/15/2021 11/16/2012 120,142.13 122,310.00 2,167.87 608.25 2.400 2.351 A 20772KGM5 Taxable Muni CONNECTICUT ST SER A 2.921% 4/15/23 04/15/2023 04/11/2019 301,336.95 315,849.00 14,512.05 1,849.97 2.920 2.764 A 20772KJU4 Taxable Muni CONNECTICUT ST 2.500% 7/01/22 07/01/2022 06/11/2020 122,018.40 123,757.20 1,738.80 166.67 2.500 2.417 A 212204JC6 Taxable Muni CONTRA COSTA CA 1.652% 8/01/22 08/01/2022 09/12/2019 300,000.00 303,111.00 3,111.00 2,065.00 1.650 1.618 AA+ 365298Y28 Taxable Muni GARDEN GROVE CA 1.875% 8/01/21 08/01/2021 10/16/2019 300,000.00 302,271.00 2,271.00 2,343.75 1.880 1.852 AA- 378460YB9 Taxable Muni GLENDALE CA 1.041% 9/01/22 09/01/2022 06/02/2020 330,000.00 331,293.60 1,293.60 276.73 1.040 1.031 N/A 419792YL4 Taxable Muni HAWAII ST SER FX 2.770% 1/01/22 01/01/2022 02/21/2019 190,000.00 194,900.10 4,900.10 2,631.50 2.770 2.683 AA+ 544290JC4 Taxable Muni LOS ALTOS CA SCH 2.143% 8/01/23 08/01/2023 10/17/2019 390,000.00 390,195.00 195.00 3,482.38 2.140 2.142 SP-1+ 56052AE77 Taxable Muni MAINE ST 1.250% 6/01/22 06/01/2022 06/24/2020 252,430.00 252,450.00 20.00 60.76 1.250 1.238 AA 576051VW3 Taxable Muni MASSACHUSETTS ST WTR 1.772% 8/01/23 08/01/2023 11/01/2019 110,000.00 112,696.10 2,696.10 812.17 1.770 1.711 AA+ 62451FKF6 Taxable Muni MOUNTAIN VIEW CA 1.043% 9/01/22 09/01/2022 05/19/2020 250,000.00 251,797.50 1,797.50 304.21 1.040 1.032 AA+ 697379UD5 Taxable Muni PALO ALTO CA 2.291% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 08/14/2012 321,873.50 325,360.75 3,487.25 3,102.40 2.290 2.291 N/R 76913CAX7 Taxable Muni RIVERSIDE CNTY CA 2.363% 2/15/23 02/15/2023 05/06/2020 170,000.00 173,274.20 3,274.20 613.72 2.360 2.277 AA 796720ME7 Taxable Muni SAN BERNARDINO CA 1.883% 8/01/22 08/01/2022 12/12/2019 435,000.00 446,375.25 11,375.25 3,412.94 1.880 1.836 AA 797299LT9 Taxable Muni SAN DIEGO CA PUBLIC 2.994% 10/15/21 10/15/2021 06/21/2018 200,000.00 205,336.00 5,336.00 1,264.13 2.990 2.915 AA- 79730CJG0 Taxable Muni SAN DEIGO CA PUB 1.327% 8/01/23 08/01/2023 05/11/2020 80,000.00 81,102.40 1,102.40 147.44 1.330 1.307 N/A 79730WAY6 Taxable Muni SAN DIEGO CA 3.250% 9/01/22 09/01/2022 01/28/2016 260,687.50 262,462.50 1,775.00 2,708.33 3.250 3.088 AA 797669XT0 Taxable Muni SAN FRANCISCO CA 2.169% 7/01/20 07/01/2020 12/28/2017 100,000.00 100,000.00 - 1,084.50 2.170 2.169 N/R 79770GGM2 Taxable Muni SAN FRANCISCO CITY 2.000% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 11/30/2017 299,607.00 300,090.00 483.00 2,500.00 2.000 2.000 N/R 79770GGP5 Taxable Muni SAN FRANCISCO CA 2.375% 8/01/22 08/01/2022 11/30/2017 406,628.00 405,364.00 (1,264.00) 3,958.33 2.380 2.300 AA- 798170AC0 Taxable Muni SAN JOSE CA REDEV 2.259% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 12/21/2017 190,000.00 190,210.90 210.90 1,788.38 2.260 2.259 N/R 79876CB00 Taxable Muni SAN MARCOS CA REDEV 2.000% 10/01/20 10/01/2020 12/14/2017 109,256.40 110,224.40 968.00 550.00 2.000 1.997 AA- 801096AP3 Taxable Muni SANTA ANA CA CMNTY 3.346% 9/01/21 09/01/2021 11/08/2018 240,000.00 246,398.40 6,398.40 2,676.80 3.350 3.246 AA 80136PCY7 Taxable Muni SANTA BARBARA CA 3.300% 12/01/21 12/01/2021 11/28/2018 125,000.00 128,525.00 3,525.00 343.75 3.300 3.188 AA 80168FMA1 Taxable Muni SANTA CLARA VLY CA 2.387% 6/01/21 06/01/2021 03/30/2016 397,756.00 404,612.00 6,856.00 795.67 2.390 2.353 N/A 835569GP3 Taxable Muni SONOMA CNTY CA 1.969% 8/01/22 08/01/2022 11/12/2019 420,000.00 428,391.60 8,391.60 3,445.75 1.970 1.919 AA 882723UC1 Taxable Muni TEXAS ST REF WTR 2.036% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 02/05/2015 250,292.74 250,252.50 (40.24) 2,120.83 2.040 2.036 N/R 91412G2S3 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CALIFORNIA 2.112% 5/15/21 05/15/2021 09/28/2017 140,000.00 141,677.20 1,677.20 377.81 2.110 2.086 AA- 91412HDJ9 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CA 3.283% 5/15/22 05/15/2022 06/05/2018 285,604.55 297,981.75 12,377.20 1,195.56 3.280 3.135 AA- 9128285L0 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 11/15/21 11/15/2021 11/15/2018 885,524.11 917,665.35 32,141.24 3,249.61 2.880 2.782 N/A 9128286U9 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 05/15/2022 05/15/2019 2,866,419.41 2,865,784.25 (635.16) 7,504.19 2.130 2.055 N/A 912828TY6 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 11/15/22 11/15/2022 11/15/2012 3,209,719.41 3,320,359.80 110,140.90 6,662.06 1.630 1.574 N/A 912828YA2 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 8/15/22 08/15/2022 08/15/2019 3,879,170.66 3,984,585.00 105,414.34 21,876.72 1.500 1.461 N/A 912828YT1 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 11/30/21 11/30/2021 12/02/2019 1,071,934.57 1,095,156.25 23,221.68 1,365.78 1.500 1.475 N/A 912828Y1N4 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 12/15/22 12/15/2022 12/15/2019 540,922.13 559,278.00 18,355.87 383.61 1.630 1.572 N/A 912828Z29 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 1/15/23 01/15/2023 01/15/2020 2,233,479.29 2,299,582.00 66,102.71 15,403.85 1.500 1.453 N/A 912828Z86 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 02/15/2023 02/18/2020 3,436,604.79 3,496,615.50 60,010.71 17,159.55 1.380 1.335 N/A 912828ZH6 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.250% 4/15/23 04/15/2023 04/15/2020 2,310,884.75 2,314,874.10 3,989.35 1,214.96 0.250 0.249 N/A 912828ZP8 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.125% 5/15/23 05/15/2023 05/15/2020 1,302,145.31 1,303,068.60 923.29 208.34 0.130 0.125 N/A 31846V203 Money Market FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 415,443.97 415,443.97 - 1.18 0.006 54,292,371.93 55,285,028.44 992,157.02 242,700.13 64 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 ATTACHMENT 16 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Settlement Date Trade Date Date CUSIP Descri•tion Units Price Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Amount Amount Amount INTEREST EARNED ON BAY AREA CA TOLL 2.184% 4/01/23 $1 PV 04/01/2020 072024WN8 ON 680000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/1/2020 - - - - - 7,631.87 - - - - - - 04/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST 2.800% 4/01/21 $1 PV ON 13063DGA0 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/1/2020 - - - - - 7,000.00 04/01/2020 04/01/2020 04/01/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 32,568.62 1.00 - - - (32,568.62) 32,568.62 - - 04/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 31846V203 SHARES DUE 3/31/2020 INTEREST FROM 3/1/20 TO 3/31/20 - - - - - 191.61 - - - 04/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JPMORGAN CHASE CO 3.207% 4/01/23 $1 PV 46647PBB1 ON 1050000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/1/2020 - - - - - 16,836.75 - - - 04/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON SAN MARCOS CA REDEV 2.000% 10/01/20 $1 79876CBQ0 PV ON 110000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/1/2020 - - - - - 1,100.00 - - - 04/02/2020 04/02/2020 04/02/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 191.61 1.00 - - - (191.61) 191.61 - - 04/13/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B DEB 3.000% 10/12/21 $1 PV ON 3130AF5B9 620000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/12/2020 - - - - - 9,300.00 - - - 04/13/2020 04/13/2020 04/13/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOUT OB FD CL Y 9,300.00 1.00 - - - (9,300.00) 9,300.00 - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON BANK OF NY MTN 2.500% 4/15/21 $1 PV ON 06406FAA1 450000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 - - - - - 5,625.00 - - - 04/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BANK OF NY MTN 2.500% 4/15/21 06406FAA1 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (394.58) - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CAPTIAL ONE PRIME 1.600% 11/15/24 $1 PV ON 386.6700 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00133/PV ON 290,000.00 PV 14043MAC5 DUE 4/15/20 - - - - - 386.67 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CONNECTICUT ST 2.401% 10/15/21 $1 PV 20772JKP6 ON 120000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 - - - - - 1,440.60 - - - 04/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CONNECTICUT ST 2.401% 10/15/21 20772JKP6 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (24.58) - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CONNECTICUT ST SER A 2.921% 4/15/23 $1 PV 20772KGM5 ON 300000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 - - - - - 4,381.50 - - - 04/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CONNECTICUT ST SER A 2.921% 4/15/23 20772KGM5 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (121.48) - - 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 34,133.86 1.00 - - - (34,133.86) 34,133.86 - - 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 19,060.47 1.00 - - 19,060.47) 19,060.47 - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HARLEY DAVIDSON 2.340% 2/15/24 $1 PV ON 1150.5000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00195/PV ON 590,000.00 PV 41284WAC4 DUE 4/15/20 - - - - 1,150.50 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.780 % 8/15/23 $1 PV ON 370.8300 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00148/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 43815NAC8 4/15/20 - - - - - 370.83 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 $1 PV ON 7.9400 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00148/PV ON 5 353 83 PV DUE - - - 7.94 - - - 47787XAC1 4/15/20 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 47787XAC1 CMO FINAL PAYDOWN 5,353.83) 373.68 - - - 5,353.83 (5,353.07) - 0.76 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 630.5000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 260,000.00 PV 47789JAD8 DUE 4/15/20 - - 630.50 - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.100% 8/15/24 $1 PV ON 446.7200 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00104/PV ON 430,000.00 PV 47789KAC7 DUE 4/15/20 - 446.72 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ 1.940% 3/15/24 $1 PV ON 436.5000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00162/PV ON 270,000.00 PV 58769TAD7 DUE 4/15/20 - - - 436.50 - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.840% 12/15/22 $1 PV ON 214.6700 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00153/PV ON 140,000.00 58770FAC6 PV DUE 4/15/20 - - - 214.67 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON SAN DIEGO CA PUBLIC 2.994% 10/15/21 $1 PV 797299LT9 ON 200000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 - - - - - 2,994.00 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 $1 PV ON 19.7600 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00144/PV ON 13,706.64 PV DUE 89238MAD0 4/15/20 - - - - - 19.76 - - - 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 04/15/2020 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 CMO 89238MAD0 FINAL PAYDOWN (13,706.64) - - - - - 13,706.64 (13,705.03) - 1.61 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.910% 9/15/23 $1 PV ON 397.9200 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00159/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 89238UAD2 4/15/20 - - - - - 397.92 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 824.5000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 340,000.00 PV DUE 89239AAD5 4/15/20 - - - - - 824.50 - - - 04/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 10/15/21 $1 PV 9128285F3 ON 1030000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2020 - - - - - 14,806.25 - - - 04/20/2020 04/17/2020 04/20/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C 0.375% 4/20/23 3137EAEQ8 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./560,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.75 % 560,000.00 1.00 - - - (558,600.00) - (591,079.14) 558,600.00 - - 04/20/2020 04/20/2020 04/20/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 591,079.14 1.00 - - 591,079.14 - - 04/20/2020 04/20/2020 04/20/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOUT OB FD CL Y (558,600.0a C 1.00 - - - 558,600.00 (558,600.00) - - Page 34 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Transaction Settlement Date Trade Date Date Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM CUSIP Description Units Miscellaneous on L. erm Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Amount Amount Amount INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 82.1400 SHARES DUE 4/18/2020 $0.00149/PV ON 55,066.45 PV DUE 04/20/2020 43814PAC4 4/18/20 04/20/2020 04/18/2020 04/20/2020 43814PAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 11/15/22 04/20/2020 912828TY6 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION (7,078.25) 82.14 7,078.25 (7,077.48) (78.80) 0.77 04/20/2020 04/17/2020 04/20/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 11/15/22 /CITADEL 912828TY6 SECURITIES LLC/560,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.5703125 % (560,000.00) 1.04 - - - 579,993.75 (559,453.13) 20,540.62 - 04/20/2020 04/20/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828TY6 1.625% 11/15/22 - - - - - 3,925.00 - - - 04/22/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.780% 7/13/23 $1 PV ON 3133ELGR9 530000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/22/2020 - - - - - 2,594.35 - - - 04/22/2020 ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON F F C B DEB 1.780% 7/13/23 3133ELGR9 CURRENT YEAR MARKET DISCOUNT - - - - - - 132.50 - - 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 3133ELGR9 FULL CALL PAR VALUE OF F F C B DEB 1.780% 7/13/23 /CALLS/ (530,000.00) 1.00 - - - 530,000.00 (530,000.00) - - 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 539,606.25 1.00 - - - (539,606.25) 539,606.25 - - 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (259,244.19) 1.00 - - - 259,244.19 (259,244.19) - - 04/22/2020 04/20/2020 04/22/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF SAN DIEGO CA 3.250% 9/01/22 79730WAY6 /WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A./SIG/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 104.275 % 250,000.00 1.04 - - - (260,687.50) 260,687.50 - - 04/22/2020 04/22/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF SAN DIEGO CA 79730WAY6 3.250% 9/01/22 - - - - - (1,151.04) - - - 04/22/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON WELLS FARGO MTN 3.625% 10/22/21 $1 PV 94988J5T0 ON 530000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/22/2020 - - - - - 9,606.25 - - - 04/24/2020 04/24/2020 04/24/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 1,542.50 1.00 - - - (1,542.50) 1,542.50 - - 04/24/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON US BANCORP MTN 2.440% 1/24/22 $1 PV 91159HHQ6 ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/24/2020 - - - - - 1,542.50 - - - 04/24/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON US BANCORP MTN 2.440% 1/24/22 91159HHQ6 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (151.79) - - 04/27/2020 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 03/01/2020 THRU 03/31/2020 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - (569.87) - - - 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.920% 1/25/24 $1 PV ON 528.0000 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00160/PV ON 330,000.00 PV 05588CAC6 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - ' - 528.00 - - - 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 404.1200 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00297/PV ON 136,220.82 PV DUE 3136B1XP4 4/25/20 - - - - - 404.12 - - - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 3136B1XP4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (67.52) - - 04/27/2020 04/25/2020 04/27/2020 3136B1XP4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 (2,150.51) 4,618.75 - - - 2,150.51 (2,168.32) - (17.81) 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 3136B1XP4 136220.8200 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 PENALTY PAYMENT - - - - - 2.78 - - - 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 $1 PV ON 375.7300 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00198/PV ON 190,000.00 PV 3137ATRW4 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - - 375.73 - - - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 3137ATRW4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (31.50)MIL - 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 $1 PV ON 322.7700 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00210/PV ON 153,577.23 PV 3137B1U75 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - - 322.77 - - - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 3137B1U75 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (18.06) 04/27/2020 04/25/2020 04/27/2020 3137B1U75 PAID E PAR NE F H L M MLTCL MTG 2.522% (423.58) - - - - 423.58 (425.19) 1.6� 04/27/2020 31/25/23 D INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 $1 PV H T ON 1328.0000 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00277/PV ON 480,000.00 PV 3137B36J2 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - - 1,328.00 - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 3137B36J2 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (523.59) 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 $1 PV ON 1249.5000 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00255/PV ON 490,000.00 PV 3137B4WB8 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - - 1,249.50 - - - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 3137B4WB8 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (1,038.20) - - 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 $1 PV ON 473.3300 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00189/PV ON 250,000.00 PV 3137BQR90 DUE 4/25/20 - - - - - 473.33 - - - 04/27/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 3137BQR90 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (19.98 04/27/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 $1 PV ON 279.0700 SHARES DUE 4/25/2020 $0.00288/PV ON 96,955.42 PV DUE 3137FJYA1 4/25/20 - - - - - 279.07 - - - 04/27/2020 04/25/2020 04/27/2020 3137FJYA1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 (653.58) - - - - 653.58 (653.56) - 0.02 04/27/2020 04/27/2020 04/27/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 5,108.34 1.00 - - - (5,108.34) 5,108.34 - - 04/27/2020 04/27/2020 04/27/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,512.7tC 1.00 - - - (2,512.76) 2,512.76 - - 04/30/2020 04/30/2020 04/30/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 32,050.0 1.00 - - - (32,050.00) 32,050.00 - - Page 35 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Short Term Long Term Miscellaneous Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Amount Amount Amount INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 10/31/21 $1 PV 04/30/2020 912828F96 ON 3205000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/30/2020 32,050.00 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 10/31/21 04/30/2020 912828F96 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 5/01/21 $1 PV ON 942.1500 SHARES DUE 5/1/2020 $0.00907/PV ON 103,915.21 PV 05/01/2020 13066YTY5 DUE 5/ 1/20 942.15 (3,931.23) 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 13066YTY5 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 5/01/21 (22,279.56) 0.00 INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 2.000% 5/01/22 $1 PV 05/01/2020 13066YTZ2 ON 300000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2020 22,279.56 (22,055.20) 224.36 3,000.00 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 2.000% 5/01/22 05/01/2020 13066YTZ2 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION INTEREST EARNED ON CENTURY HOUSING CORP 3.824% 11/01/20 $1 05/01/2020 156549AA5 PV ON 110000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2020 2,103.20 (159.45) 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (280,394.77) 1.00 280,394.77 (280,394.77) INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 05/01/2020 31846V203 SHARES DUE 4/30/2020 INTEREST FROM 4/1/20 TO 4/30/20 2.16 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y - 23,221.71 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 9/30/21 /BOFA 05/01/2020 04/30/2020 05/01/2020 912828YJ3 SECURITIES, INC./FXD INC/2,565,000 PAR VALUE AT 101.85937505 % (2,565,000.00) RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 912828YJ3 1.500% 9/30/21 1.00 1.02 (23,221.71) 23,221.71 2,612,692.97 (2,558,803.52) 53,889.45 3,258.81 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.250% 4/15/23 /NATWEST MKTS SECS/FIXED INCOME/2,900,000 PAR VALUE AT 05/01/2020 04/30/2020 05/01/2020 912828ZH6 100.03906241 % 2,900,000.00 1.00 (2,901,132.81) 2,901,132.81 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 05/01/2020 _AP05/01/2020 912828ZH6 0.250% 4/15/23 PAID DOWN -RV PAR VALUE OF CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 05/04/2020 05/01/2020 05/01/2020 13066YTY5 5/01/21 RATE REVISED 22,279.56 0.00 316.94 (22,279.56) 22,055.20 (224.36) INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 5/01/21 $1 PV 05/04/2020 13066YTY5 ON 942.1500 SHARES DUE 5/1/2020 RATE REVISED (942.15) INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 5/01/21 $1 PV ON 890.0300 SHARES DUE 5/1/2020 $0.00907/PV ON 103,915.21 PV 05/04/2020 13066YTY5 DUE 5/ 1/20 890.03 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.81331% 5/01/21 05/04/2020 05/01/2020 05/04/2020 13066YTY5 PRINC/INT REPOST CORRECTION (22,279.56) 05/04/2020 05/04/2020 05/04/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 05/04/2020 05/04/2020 05/04/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (52.12) 1.00 2.16 1.00 05/05/2020 05/05/2020 05/05/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT GB FD CL Y 201.766.83 1.00 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 05/05/2020 912828Z86 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION (22,055.20) (52.12) 2.16 201,766.83 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 /BOFA 05/05/2020 05/04/2020 05/05/2020 912828Z86 SECURITIES, INC./FXD INC/195,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.16796923 % (195,000.00) 1.03 201,177.54 (197,824.24) 3,353.30 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 05/05/2020 05/05/2020 912828Z86 1.375% 2/15/23 589.29 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C M T N 1.970% 2/06/25 $1 PV ON 05/06/2020 3134GU7H7 530000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/6/2020 2,610.25 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 OF FHLMC MTN 1.970% r. r rrr rr rr 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 r ■ UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT•: FD CL Y 1,032,529.86 530,000.00 rrrrrr 1.00 r1,032,529.86 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,610.25 1.00 (2,610.25) 2,610.25 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF RIVERSIDE CNTY CA 2.363% 2/15/23 05/06/2020 04/23/2020 05/06/2020 76913CAX7 /RAYMOND JAMES/FI/170,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 170,000.00 1.00 (170,000.00) 170,000.00 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 05/06/2020 912828Z86 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 /J.P. 05/06/2020 05/05/2020 05/06/2020 912828Z86 MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/650,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.16015692 % (650,000.00) 1.03 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 05/06/2020 05/06/2020 912828Z86 1.375% 2/15/23 (64.85) 670,541.02 (659,404.93) 11,136.09 1,988.84 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C 0.375% 5/05/23 /WELLS 05/07/2020 05/05/2020 05/07/2020 3137EAER6 FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/650,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.958 % 650,000.00 1.00 (649,727.00) 649,727.00 05/07/2020 05/07/2020 05/07/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT GB FD CL Y (649,727.00) 1.00 649,727.00 (649,727.00) PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 0.750% 5/11/23 /J.P. 05/11/2020 05/04/2020 05/11/2020 037833DV9 MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/195,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.728 % 05/11/2020 05/11/2020 05/11/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 195,000.00 1.00 (272,032.10) 1.00 (194,469.60) 194,469.60 272,032.10 (272,032.10) INTEREST EARNED ON JOHNSON JOHNSON 1.950% 11/10/20 $1 PV 05/11/2020 478160CH5 ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/10/2020 - - - - - 2,437.50 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF SAN DEIGO CA PUB 1.327% 8/01/23 05/11/2020 04/30/2020 05/11/2020 79730CJG0 /RBC CAPITAL MARKETS, LLC/80,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 80,000.00 1.00 (80,000.00) 80,000.00 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B 1.750% 2/14/23 $1 PV ON 05/14/2020 3130AJ5Q8 270000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/14/2020 _ 67 1,181.25 Page 36 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Transaction Settlement Date Trade Date Date Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM CUSIP Descri•tion Units Miscellaneous Price Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Amount Amount Amount 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 3130AJ5Q8 FULL CALL PAR VALUE OF F H L B 1.750% 2/14/23 /CALLS/ (270,000.00) 1.00 - - - 270,000.00 (270,000.00) - - 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 611,580.39 1.00 - - - (611,580.39) 611,580.39 - - 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 1,181.25 1.00 - - - (1,181.25) 1,181.25 - - 05/14/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.750% 7/15/22 9128287C8 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (49.78) - - 05/14/2020 05/13/2020 05/14/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.750% 7/15/22 /NOMURA 9128287C8 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/80,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.4140625 % (80,000.00) 1.03 - - - 82,731.25 (80,329.41) 2,401.84 - 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128287C8 1.750% 7/15/22 - - - - - 461.54 - - - 05/14/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 8/15/22 912828YA2 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (467.99) - 05/14/2020 05/13/2020 05/14/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 8/15/22 /NOMURA 912828YA2 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 102.98828 % (250,000.00) 1.03 - - - 257,470.70 (250,269.08 7,201.62 - 05/14/2020 05/14/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828YA2 1.500% 8/15/22 - - - 916.90 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CAPTIAL ONE PRIME 1.600% 11/15/24 $1 PV ON 386.6700 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00133/PV ON 290,000.00 PV 14043MAC5 DUE 5/15/20 - - - - - 386.67 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON PROG ENERGY CAROLINA 2.800% 5/15/22 $1 144141DC9 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 3,500.00 - - 05/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON PROG ENERGY CAROLINA 2.800% 5/15/22 144141DC9 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (543.46) - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CONSUMERS ENERGY CO 2.850% 5/15/22 $1 210518CT1 PV ON 375000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 5,343.75 - - - 05/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CONSUMERS ENERGY CO 2.850% 5/15/22 210518CT1 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (846.73) - - 05/15/2020 05/15/2020 05/15/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 161,812.07 1.00 - - - (161,812.07) 161,812.07 - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HARLEY DAVIDSON 2.340% 2/15/24 $1 PV ON 1150.5000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00195/PV ON 590,000.00 PV 41284WAC4 DUE 5/15/20 - - - - - 1,150.50 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.780% 8/15/23 $1 PV ON 370.8300 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00148/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 43815NAC8 5/15/20 - - - - - 370.83 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 630.5000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 260,000.00 PV 47789JAD8 DUE 5/15/20 - - - - - 630.50 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.100% 8/15/24 $1 PV ON 394.1700 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00092/PV ON 430,000.00 PV 47789KAC7 DUE 5/15/20 - - - - - 394.17 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON LOS ANGELES CA DEPT 2.092% 5/15/20 $1 PV 544445AZ2 ON 100000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 1,046.00 - - - 05/15/2020 ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON LOS ANGELES CA DEPT 2.092% 5/15/20 544445AZ2 MARKET DISCOUNT - - - - - - 1,212.00 - - 05/15/2020 05/15/2020 05/15/2020 MATURED PAR VALUE OF LOS ANGELES CA DEPT 2.092% 5/15/20 544445AZ2 100,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % (100,000.00) 1.00 - - - 100,000.00 (100,000.00) - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ 1.940% 3/15/24 $1 PV ON 436.5000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00162/PV ON 270,000.00 PV 58769TAD7 DUE 5/15/20 - - - 436.50 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.840% 12/15/22 $1 PV ON 214.6700 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00153/PV ON 140,000.00 58770FAC6 PV DUE 5/15/20 - - - - - 214.67 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.910% 9/15/23 $1 PV ON 397.9200 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00159/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 89238UAD2 5/15/20 - - - - - 397.92 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 824.5000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 340,000.00 PV DUE 89239AAD5 5/15/20 - - - - - 824.50 - - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 11/15/21 $1 PV 9128285L0 ON 1035000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 14,878.13 - - - 05/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 11/15/21 9128285L0 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (13/.94) - - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 11/15/22 $1 PV 912828TY6 ON 3210000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 26,081.25 - - - 05/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 11/15/22 912828TY6 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (8.99- 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON UNIV OF CALIFORNIA 2.112% 5/15/21 $1 PV 91412G2S3 ON 140000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 1,478.40 - 05/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON UNIV OF CA 3.283% 5/15/22 $1 PV ON 91412HDJ9 285000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2020 - - - - - 4,678.28 - - - AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON UNIV OF CA 3.283% 5/15/22 - - - - 05/15/2020 91412HDJ9 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - (100.73) - - 05/18/2020 05/18/2020 05/18/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 6,331.5 p 1.00 - - - (6,331.59) 6,331.59 - - Page 37 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Amount Amount Amount INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 05/18/2020 71.5800 SHARES DUE 5/18/2020 $0.00149/PV ON 47,988.20 PV DUE 43814PAC4 5/18/20 - - - - - 71.58 ' - - 0.68 - - - 05/18/2020 05/18/2020 05/18/2020 43814PAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 (6,260.01) - - - - 6,260.01 (6,259.33) - 05/19/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B DEB 1.625% 11/19/21 $1 PV ON 3130AHJY0 470000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/19/2020 - - - - - 4,052.12 - - 05/19/2020 05/19/2020 05/19/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOUT OB FD CL Y (245,947.88) 1.00 - - - 245,947.88 (245,947.88) - 05/19/2020 05/01/2020 05/19/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF MOUNTAIN VIEW CA 1.043% 9/01/22 62451FKF6 /RBC CAPITAL MARKETS, LLC/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 250,000.00 1.00 - - - (250,000.00) 250,000.00 - 05/20/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CITIBANK NA 2.844% 5/20/22 $1 PV ON 17325FAY4 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/20/2020 - - - - - 7,252.20 - - - AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CITIBANK NA 2.844% 5/20/22 17325FAY4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (373.47) - - 05/20/2020 05/20/2020 05/20/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 7,252.20 1.00 - - - (7,252.20) 7,252.20 - - 05/22/2020 05/20/2020 ■ 05/22/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A 0.250% 5/22/23 3135G04Q3 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./590,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.699 % 590,000.00 1.00 - - - (588,224.10) 588,224.10 - - 05/22/2020 05/22/2020 05/22/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,708.60 1.00 - - - (2,708.60) 2,708.60 - - 05/22/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.250% 4/15/23 912828ZH6 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (22.09) - - 05/22/2020 05/20/2020 05/22/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.250% 4/15/23 /NOMURA 912828ZH6 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/590,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.13281186 % (590,000.00) 1.00 - - - 590,783.59 (590,225.97) 557.62 - 05/22/2020 05/22/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828ZH6 0.250% 4/15/23 - - - - - 149.11 - - - 05/26/2020 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 04/01/2020 THRU 04/30/2020 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - (572.84) - - - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.920% 1/25/24 $1 PV ON 528.0000 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.00160/PV ON 330,000.00 PV 05588CAC6 DUE 5/25/20 - - - - - Fe8.00 - - - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 397.7400 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.00297/PV ON 134,070.31 PV DUE 3136B1XP4 5/25/20 - - - - - 397.74 - - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 3136B1XP4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - (64.31) - - 05/26/2020 05/25/2020 05/26/2020 3136B1XP4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 (10,865.05) - - - - 10,865.05 (10,949.83) - (84.78) 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 3136B1XP4 134070.3100 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 PENALTY PAYMENT - - - - - 26.46 - - - 05/26/2020 _ INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 $1 PV 3137ATRW4 ON 190000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 - - - - - 375.73 - - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 3137ATRW4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (30.48) - - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 $1 PV ON 321.8800 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.00210/PV ON 153,153.65 PV 3137B1U75 DUE 5/25/20 - - - - - 321.88 - - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 3137B1U75 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (17.43) - - 05/26/2020 05/25/2020 05/26/2020 3137B1U75 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 (449.56) - - - - 449.56 (451.22) (1.66) - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 $1 PV ON 1326.5800 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.00277/PV ON 480,000.00 PV 3137B36J2 DUE 5/25/20 - - - - - 1,326.58 - - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 3137B36J2 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (506.70) - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG PV O 3.060% 7/25/23490,0$1.PV ON 1249.5000 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.00255/PV ON 490,000.00 PV 3137B4WB8 DUE 5/25/20 - - - - - 1,249.50 - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 3137B4WB8 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - 587.66- - 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 $1 PV ON 11506.4500 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.04603/PV ON 250,000.00 3137BQR90 PV DUE 5/25/20 - - - - - 11,506.45 - - 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 3137BQR90 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - 19.33 05/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 3137BQR90 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - 0.64 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.272% 1/25/23 3137BQR90 CMO FINAL PAYDOWN (250,000.00) 0.00 - - - 250,000.00 (250,627.63 627.63 05/26/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 $1 PV ON 2807.9000 SHARES DUE 5/25/2020 $0.02916/PV ON 96,301.84 PV DUE 3137FJYA1 5/25/20 - - - - - - 2,807.90 05/26/2020 05/25/2020 05/26/2020 3137FJYA1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 (31,292.57) - - - - 31,292.57 (31,291.72) 0.85 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 251,728.77 1.00 - - - (251,728.77) 251,728.77 - 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 05/26/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CLY 58,845.8tQ 1.00 - - - (58,845.81) 58,845.81 - Page 38 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost GainlLoss GainlLoss Amount Amount Amount 06/01/2020 010831DN2 ON 255000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/1/2020 - - - - - - - - - - - 3,654.15 - - - - - - 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON ALAMEDA CNTY CA 3.095% 6/01/23 $1 PV 010831DQ5 ON 130000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/1/2020 - - 2,011.75 - 06/01/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON ALAMEDA CNTY CA 3.095% 6/01/23 010831DQ5 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - (483.80) - 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST HLTH 1.893% 6/01/22 $1 PV 13032UUZ9 ON 520000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/1/2020 - - - - - 5,085.86 - - - 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (630,632.83) 1.00 - - - 630,632.83 (630,632.83) - - 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 31846V203 SHARES DUE 5/31/2020 INTEREST FROM 5/1/20 TO 5/31/20 - - - - - 5.61 - - - 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON SANTA BARBARA CA 3.300% 12/01/21 $1 PV 80136PCY7 ON 125000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/1/2020 - - - - - 2,062.50 - - - 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON SANTA CLARA VLY CA 2.387% 6/01/21 $1 PV 80168FMA1 ON 400000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/1/2020 - - - - - 4,774.00 - - - 06/01/2020 05/29/2020 06/01/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 10/15/21 /NOMURA 9128285F3 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/1,030,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.71093786 % (1,030,000.00) 1.04 - - - 1,068,222.66 (1,026,577.07) - 41,645.59 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128285F3 2.875% 10/15/21 - - - - - 3,802.70 - - - 06/01/2020 05/29/2020 06/01/2020 ■ PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/3,320,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.81640633 9128286U9 % 3,320,000.00 1.04 - - Mr - (3,446,704.69) 3,446,704.69 - - 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128286U9 2.125% 5/15/22 - - - - 3,259.10 - - - 06/01/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 10/31/21 912828F96 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - (1,066.55) - 06/01/2020 05/29/2020 06/01/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 10/31/21 /NOMURA 912828F96 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/3,205,000 PAR VALUE AT 102.57812512 % 3,205,000.00) 1.03 - - - 3,287,628.91 3,222,219.39 65,409.52 - 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828F96 2.000% 10/31/21 - - - - - - a,573.91 06/01/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 11/30/21 $1 PV 912828YT1 ON 1075000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/31/2020 - - - - 8,062.50 - - - 06/01/2020 05/29/2020 06/01/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.125% 5/15/23 /CITADEL 912828ZP8 SECURITIES LLC/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.800782 % (500,000.00) 1.00 - - - 499,003.91 (498,906.25) 97.66 - 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828ZP8 0.125% 5/15/23 - - - - - 28.87 - - - 06/01/2020 05/29/2020 06/01/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.125% 5/15/23 /BOFA SECURITIES, INC./FXD INC/2,075,000 PAR VALUE AT 912828ZP8 99.78125012 % 2,075,000.00 1.00 - - - (2,070,460.94) 2,070,460.94 - - 06/01/2020 06/01/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828ZP8 0.125% 5/15/23 - - - - - (119.82) - - - 06/02/2020 06/02/2020 06/02/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (60,536.86) 1.00 - - - 60,536.86 (60,536.86) - - 06/02/2020 05/13/2020 06/02/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF GLENDALE CA 1.041% 9/01/22 /RBC 378460YB9 CAPITAL MARKETS, LLC/330,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 330,000.00 1.00 - - - (330,000.00) 330,000.00 - - 06/02/2020 06/01/2020 06/02/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.125% 5/15/23 /NOMURA 912828ZP8 SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/270,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.79297037 % (270,000.00) 1.00 - - - 269,441.02 (269,409.38) 31.64 - 06/02/2020 06/02/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828ZP8 0.125% 5/15/23 - - - - - 16.51 - - - 06/03/2020 06/01/2020 06/03/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF AMAZON COM INC SR NT 0.400% 6/03/23 023135BP0 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/270,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.86 % 270,000.00 1.00 - - - (269,622.00) 269,622.00 - - 06/03/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CHEVRON CORP 1.99275% 3/03/22 $1 PV 166764AU4 ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/3/2020 - - 2,546.29 - - - 06/03/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHEVRON CORP 1.99275% 3/03/22 166764AU4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - m (314.53) - - 06/03/2020 05/29/2020 06/03/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.056% 6/25/24 /CANTOR FITZGERALD & CO./444,741.07 PAR VALUE AT 107.61328159 3136AKQM8 % 444,741.07 1.08 478,600.46) 478,600.46 - - 06/03/2020 06/03/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3136AKQM8 3.056% 6/25/24 - - (75.51) - - - - - 06/03/2020 06/03/2020 06/03/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (745,751.68) 1.00 - - - 745,751.68 (745,751.68) - - 06/10/2020 06/10/2020 06/10/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 156,005.86 1.00 - - - (156,005.86) 156,005.86 - - 06/10/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 11/15/21 9128285L0 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (42.95) - - 06/10/2020 06/09/2020 06/10/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.875% 11/15/21 /HSBC 9128285L0 SECURITIES, INC./150,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.80078 % (150,000.00) 1.04 - - - 155,701.17 (150,088.83) - 5,612.34 06/10/2020 06/10/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128285L0 2.875% 11/15/21 - - - - - 304.69 - - - 06/11/2020 05/29/2020 06/11/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CONNECTICUT ST 2.500% 7/01/22 /NATIONAL FINANCIAL SERVICES CO/120,000 PAR VALUE AT 101.682 20772KJU4 % 120,000.00 1.02 - - - (122,018.40) 122,018.40 - - 06/11/2020 06/11/2020 06/11/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CLY (122,018.40jrn 1.00 - - - 122,018.40 (122,018.40) - - Page 39 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Transaction Settlement Date Trade Date Date Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM CUSIP Descri•tion Units P Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Amount Amount Amount 06/12/2020 05/29/2020 06/03/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.056% 6/25/24 3136AKQM8 /CANTOR FITZGERALD & CO./443,991.53 PAR VALUE AT 107.613281 % 443,991.53 1.08 - - - (477,793.85) 477,793.85 - - - - - - - - 06/12/2020 06/03/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3136AKQM8 3.056% 6/25/24 - - - - - (75.38) - - 06/12/2020 06/12/2020 06/12/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (123,302.71) 1.00 - - - 123,302.71 (123,302.71) - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON CAPTIAL ONE PRIME 1.600% 11/15/24 $1 PV ON 386.6700 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00133/PV ON 290,000.00 PV 14043MAC5 DUE 6/15/20 - - - - - 386.67 - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON DETROIT EDISON CO 2.650% 6/15/22 $1 PV 250847EJ5 ON 180000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 _ - - - - - 2,385.00 - - 06/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON DETROIT EDISON CO 2.650% 6/15/22 250847EJ5 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (454.39) - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HARLEY DAVIDSON 2.340% 2/15/24 $1 PV ON 1150.5000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00195/PV ON 590,000.00 PV 41284WAC4 DUE 6/15/20 - - - - - 1,150.50 - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.780% 8/15/23 $1 PV ON 370.8300 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00148/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 43815NAC8 6/15/20 - - - - - 370.83 - - - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 630.5000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 260,000.00 PV 47789JAD8 DUE 6/15/20 - - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.100% 8/15/24 $1 PV ON 394.1700 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00092/PV ON 430,000.00 PV 47789KAC7 DUE 6/15/20 - - - - - 394.17 - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ 1.940% 3/15/24 $1 PV ON 436.5000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00162/PV ON 270,000.00 PV 58769TAD7 DUE 6/15/20 - - - - - 436.50 - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.840% 12/15/22 $1 PV ON 214.6700 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00153/PV ON 140,000.00 58770FAC6 PV DUE 6/15/20 - - - - - 214.67 - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.910% 9/15/23 $1 PV ON 397.9200 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00159/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 89238UAD2 6/15/20 - - - - - 397.92 - - - 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 2.910% 7/17/23 $1 PV ON 824.5000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 $0.00243/PV ON 340,000.00 PV DUE 89239AAD5 6/15/20 - - - - - 824.50 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 12/15/22 $1 PV 912828YW4 ON 540000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 - - - - - 4,387.50 06/15/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.625% 12/15/22 912828YW4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - 153.65 06/15/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON WALMART STORES INC 1.900% 12/15/20 $1 931142EA7 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2020 - 90,000.00 - - - 1.00 - - - 4,750.00 89,996.56) 89,996.56 - - 06/17/2020 06/10/2020 06/17/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF DRIVE AUTO 0.830% 5/15/24 /J.P. 26208VAD8 MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/90,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99617778 % 06/17/2020 06/03/2020 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3136AKQM8 3.056% 6/25/24 - - - - 75.51- 06/17/2020 05/29/2020 06/03/2020 PURCHASE -REV PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.056% 6/25/24 /CANTOR FITZGERALD & CO./444,741.07 PAR VALUE AT 107.61328159 3136AKQM8 % (444,741.07) (1.08) - - - 478,600.46 (478,600.46) - - 06/17/2020 06/17/2020 06/17/2020 06/17/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 9128286U9 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 206,211.87 - 1.00 - - - - - - (206,211.87) - - 206,211.87 - - - - (2,816.02) 06/17/2020 06/16/2020 06/17/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 /HSBC 9128286U9 SECURITIES, INC./150,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.65625333 % (150,000.00) 1.04 - - - 155,484.38 (155,597.38) (113.00) - 06/17/2020 06/17/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128286U9 2.125% 5/15/22 - - - - - 285.84 - - - 06/18/2020 06/18/2020 06/18/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y r 209,144.60 1.00 - - - (209,144.60) 209,144.60 - - 06/18/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 62.2400 SHARES DUE 6/18/2020 $0.00149/PV ON 41,728.19 PV DUE 43814PAC4 6/18/20 - - - - - 62.24 - - - 06/18/2020 06/18/2020 06/18/2020 43814PAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 (6,569.82) - - - - 6,569.82 (6,569.11) - 0.71 06/18/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 9128286U9 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (168.05) - - 06/18/2020 06/17/2020 06/18/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 /HSBC 9128286U9 SECURITIES, INC./195,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.65625128 % (195,000.00) 1.04 - - - 202,129.69 (202,266.26) (136.57) - 06/18/2020 06/18/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128286U9 2.125% 5/15/22 - - - - - 382.85 - - - 06/23/2020 06/23/2020 06/23/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y I 2,031.25 1.00 - - - (2,031.25) 2,031.25 - - 06/23/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON WALMART INC 3.125% 6/23/21 $1 PV ON 931142EJ8 130000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/23/2020 - - - - - 2,031.25 - - - 06/24/2020 06/24/2020 06/24/2020 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y (252,430.00) 1.00 - - - 252,430.00 (252,430.00) - - 06/24/2020 06/05/2020 06/24/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF MAINE ST 1.250% 6/01/22 56052AE77 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.972 % 250,000.0671 1.01 - - - (252,430.00) 252,430.00 - - Page 40 of 41 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2020 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Short Term Long Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Amount Amount Amount 06/25/2020 05/31/2020 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - - - - - - - - (574.91) - - - - - - 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.920% 1/25/24 $1 PV ON 528.0000 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 $0.00160/PV ON 330,000.00 PV 05588CAC6 DUE 6/25/20 - 528.00 - 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 365.5100 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 $0.00297/PV ON 123,205.26 PV DUE 3136B1XP4 6/25/20 - - - 365.51 - - 06/25/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 3136B1XP4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - (61.07) - - 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 3136B1XP4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 (2,765.06) 19.47 - - - 2,765.06 (2,785.27) - (20.21) 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 3.560% 9/25/21 $1 PV ON 3136B1XP4 123205.2600 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 PENALTY PAYMENT - - - - - 3.96 - - - 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 $1 PV 3137ATRW4 ON 190000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 - - - - - 375.73 - - - 06/25/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MULTICLASS 2.373% 5/25/22 3137ATRW4 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - 31.50 - 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 $1 PV ON 320.9300 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 $0.00210/PV ON 152,704.09 PV 3137B1 U75 DUE 6/25/20 - - - - - 320.93 - - - 06/25/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 3137B1U75 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (17.96) - - 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 3137B1 U75 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 2.522% 1/25/23 (426.80) - - - - 426.80 (428.33) - (1.53) 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 $1 PV 3137B36J2 ON 480000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 - - - - 1,328.00 - - - 06/25/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.320% 2/25/23 3137B36J2 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - (523.59)- 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 $1 PV ON 1249.5000 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 $0.00255/PV ON 490,000.00 PV 3137B4WB8 DUE 6/25/20 - - - - - 1,249.50 - - - 06/25/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 3.060% 7/25/23 3137B4WB8 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (607.25) - - 06/25/2020 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 $1 PV ON 489.3900 SHARES DUE 6/25/2020 $0.00753/PV ON 65,009.27 PV DUE 3137FJYA1 6/25/20 - - - - - 489.39 - - - 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 3137FJYA1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL 3.454% 5/25/23 (3,908.05) - - - - 3,908.05 (3,907.94) - 0.11 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 8,102.36 1.00 - - - (8,102.36) 8,102.36 - - 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 06/25/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 3,083.66 1.00 - - - (3,083.66) 3,083.66 - - 06/26/2020 06/24/2020 06/26/2020 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 0.250% 6/26/23 /TD 3137EAES4 SECURITIES (USA)/540,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.708 % 540,000.00 1.00 - - - (538,423.20) 538,423.20 - - 06/26/2020 06/26/2020 06/26/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 21,060.01 1.00 - - - (21,060.01) 21,060.01 - - 06/26/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 912828Z86 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (2,835.10) - - 06/26/2020 06/24/2020 06/26/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 2/15/23 /J.P. 912828Z86 MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/540,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.10937593 % (540,000.00) 1.03 - - - 556,790.63 (547,423.77) 9,366.86 - 06/26/2020 06/26/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 912828Z86 1.375% 2/15/23 - - - - - 2,692.58 - - - 06/29/2020 06/29/2020 06/29/2020 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 218,240.22 1.00 - - - (218,240.22) 218,240.22 - - 06/29/2020 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 9128286U9 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (1,734.83) - - 06/29/2020 06/26/2020 06/29/2020 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.125% 5/15/22 /HSBC 9128286U9 SECURITIES, INC./210,000 PAR VALUE AT 103.6640619 % (210,000.00) 1.04 - - - 217,694.53 (217,702.74) (8.21) - 06/29/2020 06/29/2020 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 9128286U9 2.125% 5/15/22 - - - - - 545.69 - - - 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 496,312.77 173,097.54 47,363.47 72 Page 41 of 41 ATTACHMENT 17 Riverside County Transportation Commission SHORT DURATION FIXED INCOME J U LY 22, 2020 Scott Pavlak, CFA— Portfolio Management Erin Klepper — Client Service 1 MetLife Investment Management 73 Table of Contents 01 MetLife Investment Management Overview 02 Market Review 03 Portfolio Review 04 Appendix MetLife Investment Management 74 2 1. MetLife Investment Management Overview A MetLife Investment Management 75 Overview MetLife Investment Management (MIM)1 manages Public Fixed Income, Private Capital and Real Estate assets for institutional investors worldwide by applying our deep asset class expertise to build tailored portfolio solutions. We also leverage the broader resources and 150-year history of MetLife to skillfully navigate markets. IM Highlights Total Assets Under Management of $601.4 billion2 as of March 31, 2020 Separate accounts, proprietary commingled funds and client -specific portfolio solutions Experienced and tenured investment teams Deep fundamental research Leverages the broader resources of the MetLife enterprise Philadelphia Santiago Global Presence1'3 Whippany London Tokyo Hong Kong S.A.R. 1.As of March 31, 2020, subsidiaries of MetLife, Inc. that provide investment management services to MetLife's general account, separate accounts and/or unaffiliated/third party investors include Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, MetLife Investment Management, LLC, MetLife Investment Management Limited, MetLife Investments Limited, MetLife Investments Asia Limited, MetLife Latin America Asesorias e Inversiones Limitada, MetLife Asset Management Corp. (Japan), and MIM I LLC. 2.As of March 31, 2020. At estimated fair value. See Appendix — End Notes for additional information. 3.IIIustration shown depicts locations of select MIM regional offices, chosen in MIM's discretion; not a complete representation of MIM's regional offices. MetLife Investment Management 4 76 Short Duration Fixed Income Team Portfolio Management Scott Pavlak, CFA Juan Peruyero Head of Short Duration Fixed Income Portfolio Manager 32 20 Portfolio Management Support Industry Experience (yrs) David Wheeler, CFA Credit Steve Kelly, CFA Credit Kimberley Slough Municipals 34 32 John Palphreyman, CFA Structured Products Phil Tran Treasuries, Agencies, Money Markets 27 21 17 Dana Cottrell Thomas McClintic Jason Valentino Head of Investment Grade Trading Head of High Yield Trading Head of Structured Products Trading Brian Funk, CFA Head of Credit Research 23 lan Bowman Sector Leader — Consumer & Healthcare 5 19 Park Benjamin, CFA Sector Leader— Energy, Basics, Materials 5 13 Scott O'Donnell Sector Leader— Financials 4 13 Richard Davis, CFA Sector Leader— Industrials 4 17 Zach Bauer, CFA Sector Leader — Telecom, Media, 6 13 Technology Susan Young Sector Leader— Utilities & Midstream 3 14 Brent Garrels Sector Leader — Special Situations 2 14 Joseph Gankiewicz, CFA Sector Leader— Municipals Credit Strategy 5 22 2 15 # of Average Industry Analysts Experience (yrs) Francisco Paez, CFA Head of Structured Products Research 5 14 Loritta Cheng Sector Leader— ABS 3 18 Meena Pursnani Sector Leader — CMBS 24 2 17 3 20 8 15 Angela Best Sector Leader— CLO 2 14 MetLife Investment Management 77 5 2. Market Review & Outlook A MetLife Investment Management 6 78 Current Themes Stimulus Measures Although U.S. monetary and fiscal authorities have undertaken stimulus and support measures to ensure market functioning and encourage economic growth, we are not in the "V-shaped" recovery camp. Growth headwinds will persist with reopenings delayed or potentially reversed until a vaccine or therapeutic drug to treat the virus becomes broadly available. In addition, we anticipate a re-emergence of trade tensions with China and potentially the EU. We believe U.S. real GDP growth will bounce back from its second- quarter low in second -half 2020, but it will likely take several years to return to pre- coronavirus levels of economic activity with stubbornly high unemployment as well as dependence on government support and accommodative policy from the Fed. Consumer Consumer confidence has rebounded but sits well below pre-coronavirus levels. Consumer health and spending in the short run has been supported by the CARES Act, related enhanced and extended unemployment benefits, mortgage forbearance as well as rent and installment payment holidays. The boost from the CARES Act has caused real personal income to rise temporarily. Many white-collar employees have successfully transitioned to working from home during the pandemic and there has been an increased focus on essential, non -discretionary purchases. The recent jump in the savings rate is likely skewed toward high -earners but provides hope that as economic uncertainty declines, consumer spending may rise later in the year, especially on items of a more discretionary nature. Employment Unemployment figures have improved from the worst levels ever but will likely remain elevated as measures like the unemployment rate and jobless claims rebound from distressed levels. The CARES Act and any further fiscal support packages or enhanced unemployment benefits are stop -gap measures, as the pace of improvement in the labor markets will taper. Migration of workers from being temporarily to permanently unemployed will likely weigh on the labor market and economy as will delays in reopenings. The ratio of unemployed workers to job openings in the U.S. has spiked to over 4x from below ix pre- coronavirus1. Social distancing will persist, negatively impacting some of the most hard-hit sectors like lodging, leisure, restaurants, transportation/travel, and retail as consumer behavior shifts. Work -from -home policies could also reshape the labor market over time. Business The impact from the pandemic and steep drop in economic activity driven by shutdowns has raised business uncertainty as many management teams have withdrawn forward guidance. Small and midsize businesses continue to grapple with staffing as well as issues with reopening. Material declines in top -line revenues, higher costs and margin pressure, weakened credit metrics (increased debt and leverage), and changes in business models are widespread. Downward ratings pressure on issuers and a higher default rate are likely despite significant monetary and fiscal measures, which mainly address short-term liquidity concerns, but not solvency risk. Central Banks — Monetary and Fiscal Policy Central banks will likely remain accommodative and fiscal stimulus will continue in major economic regions. The Fed seems poised to do "whatever it takes" to maintain liquidity and provide a backstop for markets and ensure access to borrowing. In terms of using its tools, the Fed has gone out of its way to push back against the idea of negative rates and will primarily focus on forward guidance before shifting to yield curve control, if necessary. Another major fiscal package is expected in the U.S. before the August recess as income support and enhanced unemployment benefits start to fall away. The expansion of the U.S. federal deficit to an unheard of 25% of GDP is alarming along with the steep jump in the national debt, which represents a long-term challenge. Election Increasing attention on the November elections as renewed spread of the coronavirus in many Red states could impact political races. In the event of a Democratic sweep, there is expected to be a number of changes including expansion of the ACA, possible implementation of a public option, changes in energy policy, growth in infrastructure spending, broader push for raising the minimum wage, and an increase in both personal and corporate taxes. If corporate tax rates are raised, companies will see a decline in cash flow and profits which would be made worse by higher labor costs across affected businesses. Many of the regulatory reforms would likely be rolled back or reversed. Residential / Commercial Real Estate Government policy responses have blunted the impact of the pandemic on the real estate market. Low single -digit home price growth is supported by low mortgage rates and tight inventories. Mortgage originators are increasing capacity and adapting operations to function in a Covid-19 world. More competitive rates for borrowers and increasing prepayments should persist for the foreseeable future. As forbearance programs begin to phase out, we expect rising delinquency levels. Retail and lodging property metrics appear to be bottoming out although trust delinquencies will likely climb due to lagged data. Low inventories of single-family alternatives and renters have supported multi -family properties. Office properties continue to face challenges in adapting to the new work -from -home environment. Inflation Market -based measures of inflation expectations in the U.S. have risen, driven by the huge increase in the money supply in addition to the rebound in energy prices. Trimmed mean measures of inflation are significantly higher than recent core inflation prints. It will be difficult for the Federal Reserve to achieve its 2% inflation target as meaningful labor market slack could persist through year-end and likely beyond. Despite higher prices for goods due to rejiggered supply chains as some manufacturing is on -shored, a weaker dollar and herculean efforts to stimulate the economy, we believe overall inflation is likely to move only slightly higher from current levels yet remain muted. The views present are MetLife Investment Management's only, are subject to change, and may not reflect the manager's current views. 1 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics MetLife Investment Management 79 L0720005722[exp0221][AII States] 7 Yields As of June 30, 2020 2.50% 2.00% 1.50% 1.00% 0.50% 0.00% 2.32 Source: Bloomberg 2.09 2.09 1.91 1.45 0.30 3-Month USD LIBOR ■ 6/30/2019 MetLife Investment Management 1.82 1.55 0.090.14 U.S. Treasury 3-Month 9/30/2019 1.76 ■ 1.621.57 0.25 10.15 U.S. Treasury 2-Year ■ 12/31/2019 80 1.77 1.55 1.69 0.38 10.29 2.01 1.67 1.92 U.S. Treasury U.S. Treasury 5-Year 10-Year ■ 3/31 /2020 6/30/2020 8 Yield Curves As of June 30, 2020 5-Year Less 2-Year Basis Points 175 150 125 100 4.41611, 75 50 25 -25 OO' 00 b` 0 00 0 00 00 0 0^ Off' 00 OP.` O� 06 O� OO 0 ,�0 '�\ <0' <5 ^t)` �� t\0 �� <0 1\0 �O \0 \O ,\0 '\O ,\0 ,�0 '\0 �O �O (O 'V (O `O (O (O 19 rO (O 19 �O �O 95) `O `O 9O 9O 5-Year Less 2-Year Fed Tightening Recession — — - 5-Year Less 2-Year Avg. 14 10-Year Less 3-Month Basis Points 400 300 200 100 0 -100 0P\ O0, cc) opt 0< OO 1 op 00 00 � 00' 00 0� 00 1 00 00 ,O ,N''\ Ng/ <"5 NIX , 60 '�`o Nil <5 No),\O '\O �O '\0 jO �O '\0 '\O '\O rO rO rO riO �O LO riO ciO rO rO rO rO LO �O riO LO riO 10-Year Less 3-Month Source: Bloomberg MetLife Investment Management Fed Tightening 81 Recession 10-Year Less 3-Month Avg. O 52 9 Federal Reserve Programs Program Description Counterparty/ Who does it help? Rate Program Size Monetary Policy Treasury QE Open Market Treasury Purchases MBS QE Open Market Agency MBS Purchases Fed Funds Cut Rates to Help Recovery Treasury Market N/A Unlimited MBS & CMBS Markets Economy N/A 0-0.25bp Unlimited N/A Liquidity Measures Discount Window Discount Window Central Bank Swap Lines Fed Swap Lines With Foreign Central Banks Depository Institutions 25bp Foreign/Central Banks OIS+25bp Repos Repo Operations with Dealers Primary Dealers IOER & OIS FIMA Repo Facility Repo Operations with Foreign/Intl Monetary Authorities Foreign & Int'I Monetary Authorities IOER +25bp Facilities CPFF Commercial Paper Funding Facility Commercial Paper Issuers PDCF OIS+110bp OIS+200bp N/A Primary Dealer Credit Facility Primary Dealers 25bp N/A PPPLF Paycheck Protection Program Lending Facility Depository Institutions 35bp $350bn MMLF Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility Money Market Funds 125bp for CP, 50bp for Municipals PMCCF Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility US IG & Fallen Angel Market rates Issuers 1% commitment fee SMCCF Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility US IG Credit & Fallen Angel Market TALF Term Asset -Backed Securities Loan Facility MSELF, MSNLF,MSPLF MLF Note: All figures in $ billions.. Source: Federal Reserve, TD, Barclays US ABS Market & Issuers AAA CMBS Market N/A $500bn /$750bn Max Prevailing market rates $250bn/$750bn Max OIS+100bp 10bp fee $100bn Main Street Lending Facilities Municipal Liquidity Program MetLife Investment Management Small Medium Sized L+300bps Enterprises (SMEs) 75-100bps origination fee $600bn 82 US States, Cities, Counties Market rates + 10bp fee $500bn 10 Federal Reserve Balance Sheets As of July 8, 2020 3/18/20 6/11/20 7/8/20 A from 6/11 to 7/8 Securities Holdings $4,010 $5,988 $6,145 $157 Repo Outstanding $442 $167 $0 ($167) Discount Window $28 $8 $5 ($3) PDCF $0 $6 $2 ($4) MMLF $0 $27 $19 ($8) Dollar Swaps $0 $445 $179 ($266) CPFF $0 $13 $13 $0 PPPLF $0 $57 $68 $11 Corporate Credit Facility $0 $37 $43 $6 Municipal Liquidity Facility $0 $16 $16 $0 Main Street Lending Program $0 $31 $38 $7 Other2 $237 $334 $353 $19 Total Reserve Bank Credit $4,717 $7,129 6,881 ($248) Source: Federal Reserve 1 Numbers in billions 2 Includes items such as unamortized premiums on securities held outright, foreign currency denominated assets, gold stock and Treasury currency outstanding MetLife Investment Management 83 11 U.S. Labor & Average Earnings As of June 30, 2020 Current Average (2017 — 2020) Labor Force Participation Rate Unemployment Rate Non -Farm Payroll 61.5% 62.8% 4.6% 4,800,000 (181,905) U.S. Average Hourly Earnings Year over Year 9.0% 8.0% 7.0% 6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% --- 1.0% 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Average Hourly Earnings, All Employees Average Hourly Earnings, Prod. & Non -Supervisory Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics MetLife Investment Management 84 12 ICE BofA Corporate 1-5 Year Index As of June 30, 2020 Basis Points 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 Dec-13 Jun-14 Dec-14 Jun-15 Dec-15 Jun-16 Dec-16 Jun-17 Dec-17 Jun-18 Dec-18 Jun-19 Dec-19 Jun-20 165 OAS (bps) 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Corporate (1-5) 174 70 61 65 62 196 639 166 136 227 110 89 99 121 96 61 114 61 111 Financial(1-5) 165 51 50 57 56 212 663 204 158 308 126 93 96 104 100 60 116 63 116 Industrial(1-5) 176 86 73 75 69 181 624 135 116 164 96 85 103 134 92 61 112 59 109 Utility(1-5) 236 79 63 73 71 175 576 155 131 169 110 99 89 120 101 64 126 70 101 Past performance is not indicative of future results. Source: ICE Data Services MetLife Investment Management 85 13 Short Duration Cross Sector Relative Value As of July 2, 2020 Category WAL Min(bps) Date Range: 01/02/2020 to 07/02/2020 Max(bps) BOP(bps) EOP(bps) Spread Change (Years) (bps) Credit (1-5 Year) Overall 2.5 58 ♦ 363 61 110 49 SingleA's 2.5 46 ♦ 309 48 73 25 Triple BBB's 2.5 78 ♦ 463 82 160 78 Financials 2.5 59 ♦ 376 63 115 52 Industrials 2.5 57 ♦ 362 59 108 49 Utilities 2.5 66 ♦ 313 70 101 31 Municipals (1-5 Year) Taxable 2.5 44 Agency RMBS CM0 PAC CM0 Sequentials 3.0 56 3.0 60 ABS ♦ • • 239 60 137 77 106 63 73 10 110 65 76 11 Auto Floorplan AAA 3,0 45 ♦ 400 59 230 171 Auto Lease AAA 3.0 30 ♦ 237 48 43 -5 Auto Prime AAAL 3,0 24 ♦ 220 40 33 -7 Auto SubPrime AAAL 3.0 40 ♦ 237 50 90 40 Credit Card AAAL 3.0 21 ♦ 220 28 28 0 Equipment AAA 3.0 33 ♦ 230 55 49 -6 CMBS CMBS Agency AAA 3.0 20 ♦ 150 35 45 10 Conduit AAA 3.0 37 ♦ 210 43 105 62 Source: ICE Data Services, MetLife Investment Management Past performance is not indicative of future results. The diamond location is a reflection of the current value vs. all observations over the period as a percentile rank MetLife Investment Management 86 14 3. Portfolio Review A MetLife Investment Management 15 87 Portfolio Performance) - 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Project Fund As of June 30, 2020 Yield to Maturity 1.32% Duration 0.20 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aa1 Portfolio Market Value $52,582,103 Yield to Maturity Duration Average Quality (Moody's) Portfolio Market Value 0.41% 0.24 Years Aa2 $49,727,938 50% Asset Allocation 3/31 /20 • Corporate Municipal Agency • RMBS CMBS ABS • Treasury CP • CD 45% Asset Allocation 6/30/20 17% • Corporate Municipal Agency • RMBS CMBS ABS • Treasury CP • CD Portfolio Performance (%)1 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Project Fund (Gross of Fees) 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Project Fund (Net of Fees) FTSE 3-Month Treasury Bill 0.43 0.40 0.14 Since Inception Annualized (8/1/2017) 1.99 1.89 1.75 1. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The Since Inception performance returns of the portfolio is as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County 1-15 Express Lanes 2017 Toll Revenue Project Portfolio is the FTSE 6-Month U.S. Treasury Bill, which tracks the return of a six-month Treasury Bill to maturity and the FTSE 3-Month Treasury Bill, which tracks the return of a three-month Treasury Bill to maturity and is shown for discussion purposes only. MetLife Investment Management 88 16 Portfolio Performance) - 2o13 SR-91 Project Residual As of June 30, 2020 Yield to Maturity 1.28% Duration 1.08 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aa1 Portfolio Market Value $26,703,468 Yield to Maturity Duration Average Quality (Moody's) Portfolio Market Value 0.53% 1.06 Years Aa1 $26,928,001 43% Asset Allocation 3/31 /20 7% 10% 9% Corporate • Municipal 17% • Agency RMBS 4/444CMBS 3% .ABS 4% • Treasury 7% •CP Asset Allocation 6/30/20 9% 6% 1% • Corporate • Municipal • Agency RMBS CMBS • ABS • Treasury CP • CD Portfolio Performance (%)1 Riverside County 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund (Gross of Fees) Riverside County 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund (Net of Fees) ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 0-2 Year FTSE 6-Month Treasury Bill 0.84 1111 Since Inception Annualized (2/1/2018) 2.97 0.82 0.02 0.26 2.87 2.68 2.01 1.Past performance is not indicative of future results. Inception date 1/4/18. Performance returns are calculated as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County 2013 Residual Fund Portfolio is the ICE BofA 0-2 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad based index that measures short-term Treasury Notes and Bonds with a maturity range between zero and two years, and the FTSE 6-Month U.S. Treasury Bill, which tracks the return of a six-month Treasury Bill to maturity and is presented for discussion purposes only. MetLife Investment Management 89 17 Portfolio Performance) - 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Ramp Up Reserve As of June 30, 2020 Yield to Maturity 0.43% Duration 1.14 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aaa Portfolio Market Value $8,461,658 18% Yield to Maturity Duration Average Quality (Moody's) Portfolio Market Value 0.37% 1.15 Years Aaa $8,491, 588 Asset Allocation 3/31/20 ■ Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS Asset Allocation 6/30/20 13% • Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS Portfolio Performance (%)1 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Ramp Up Reserve (Gross of Fees) 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Ramp Up Reserve (Net of Fees) ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 0-2 Year QTD 0.35 0.33 0.02 Since Inception Annualized (1/1/2018) 2.95 2.85 2.68 1. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Inception date 12/5/17. Performance returns are calculated as of the first full month following the funding date. Performance for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County 1-15 Express Lanes Toll Revenue Reserve Portfolio is the ICE BofA 0-2 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad based index that measures short-term Treasury Notes and Bonds with a maturity range between zero and two years, and is presented for discussion purposes only. Iv MetLife Investment Management 90 18 Portfolio Performance) - Debt Reserve Fund As of June 30, 2020 Yield to Maturity 0.91% Duration 2.87 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aaa Portfolio Market Value $19,143,678 Yield to Maturity Duration Average Quality (Moody's) Portfolio Market Value 0.69% 2.81 Years Aaa $19,356,104 Total Debt Service Fund (Gross of Fees) Total Debt Service Fund (Net of Fees) ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year Asset Allocation 3/31 /20 10% 34% • Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS QTD 1.09 ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 3-7 Year 0.13 Asset Allocation 6/30/20 37% AO. 0 6% • Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS Since Inception Annualized (8/1/2013) 0.60 2.86 2.76 1.55 3.05 1. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Debt Reserve Fund is the ICE BofA US Treasury 3-7 Year, which is a broad -based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater or equal to $1 billion and a maturity range from three to seven years, and the the ICE BofA 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad based index that measures short-term Treasury Notes and Bonds with a maturity range between one and three years, and is presented for discussion purposes only. MetLife Investment Management 91 19 Portfolio Performance) - 91 Subordinate Reserve Account As of June 30, 2020 Yield to Maturity 0.84% Duration 2.29 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aaa Portfolio Market Value $20,789,568 Yield to Maturity Duration Average Quality (Moody's) Portfolio Market Value 0.58% 2.34 Years Aaa $20,973,971 Asset Allocation Asset Allocation 3/31 /20 6/30/20 20% • Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS 38% 1111 33% 410 5% 24% • Treasury Agency • RMBS • CMBS Portfolio Performance (%)1 Total 91 Subordinate Reserve Fund (Gross of Fees) Total 91 Subordinate Reserve Fund (Net of Fees) ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year ICE BofA U.S. Treasury Index 3-7 Year QTD 0.89 0.86 0.13 0.60 Since Inception Annualized (7/1/2019) 4.73 4.63 4.05 8.13 1. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County 91 Subordinate Reserve Account is the ICE BofA US Treasury 3-7 Year, which is a broad - based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater or equal to $1 billion and a maturity range from three to seven years, and the ICE BofA 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad based index that measures short-term Treasury Notes and Bonds with a maturity range between one and three years, and is presented for discussion purposes only. MetLife Investment Management 92 20 RCTC Portfolios 11111111111111111 Debt Service Reserve Fund Beginning Market Value (7/3/2013) $17,667,869 Net Flows ($1,774,770) Market Value Change in (6/30/2020) Market Value $19,356,005 $3,463,005 Portfolio Beginning Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (6/30/2020) Change in Market Value 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund $3,292,782 +$22,338,171 $26,928,001 $1,297,0498 Portfolio Beginning Market Value (6/6/2019) Net Flows Market Value (6/30/2020) Change in Market Value Subordinate Reserve Account $0 +$20,000,000 $20,973,971 $973,971 2017 1-15 Project IFIIIIIIW Beginning Market Value (7/24/2017) Net Flows Market Value (6/30/2020) Change in Market Value 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Project Fund $98,562,718 ($52,980,486) $49,727,938 $4,145,706 Po Beginning Market Value (12/5/2017) Net Flows Market Value (6/30/2020) Change in Market Value 2017 Toll Revenue 1-15 Ramp Up Reserve $7,723,487 $166,500 $8,491,588 $601,601 Total Project $106,286,205 ($52,813,986) $58,219,526 $4,747,307 MetLife Investment Management 93 21 4. Appendix A MetLife Investment Management 22 94 Disclaimers This material is intended for institutional investor, qualified investor and financial professional use only. Not suitable for use with general retail public. Your capital is at risk. Investing in the strategies discussed herein are subject to various risks which must be considered prior to investing. These risks may include, but are not limited to Liquidity Risk, Interest Rate Risk, Credit Risk Prepayment Risk and Counterpartv Risk For a more complete list please contact your sales representative. Risk of loss An investment in the strategy described herein is speculative and there can be no assurance that the strategy's investment objectives will be achieved. Investors must be prepared to bear the risk of a total loss of their investment. This document is being provided to you at your specific request. This document has been prepared by MetLife Investment Management, LLC (formerly, MetLife Investment Advisors, LLC), a U.S. Securities Exchange Commission -registered investment adviser. MetLife Investment Management, LLC is a subsidiary of MetLife, Inc. and part of MIM.' Registration with the SEC does not imply a certain level of skill or that the SEC has endorsed the investment advisor. MetLife, Inc. provides investment management services to affiliates and unaffiliated/third party clients through various subsidiaries.' MetLife Investment Management ("MIM"), MetLife, Inc.'s institutional investment management business, is responsible for investments in a range of asset sectors, public and privately sourced, including corporate and infrastructure private placement debt, real estate equity, commercial mortgage loans, customized index strategies, structured finance, emerging market debt, and high yield debt. The information contained herein is intended to provide you with an understanding of the depth and breadth of MIM's investment management services and investment management experience. This document has been provided to you solely for informational purposes and does not constitute a recommendation regarding any investments or the provision of any investment advice, or constitute or form part of any advertisement of, offer for sale or subscription of, solicitation or invitation of any offer or recommendation to purchase or subscribe for any securities or investment advisory services. Unless otherwise specified, the information and opinions presented or contained in this document are provided as of the quarter end noted herein. It should be understood that subsequent developments may affect the information contained in this document materially, and MIM shall not have any obligation to update, revise or affirm. It is not MIM's intention to provide, and you may not rely on this document as providing, a complete or comprehensive analysis of MIM's investment portfolio, investment strategies or investment recommendations. No money, securities or other consideration is being solicited. No invitation is made by this document or the information contained herein to enter into, or offer to enter into, any agreement to purchase, acquire, dispose of, subscribe for or underwrite any securities or structured products, and no offer is made of any shares in or debentures of a company for purchase or subscription. Prospective clients are encouraged to seek advice from their legal, tax and financial advisors prior to making any investment. Confidentiality. By accepting receipt or reading any portion of this Presentation, you agree that you will treat the Presentation confidentially. This reminder should not be read to limit, in any way, the terms of any confidentiality agreement you or your organization may have in place with MetLife Investment Management, LLC. This document and the information contained herein is strictly confidential (and by receiving such information you agree to keep such information confidential) and are being furnished to you solely for your information and may not be used or relied upon by any other party, or for any other purpose, and may not, directly or indirectly, be forwarded, published, reproduced, disseminated or quoted to any other person for any purpose without the prior written consent of MIM. Any forwarding, publication, distribution or reproduction of this document in whole or in part is unauthorized. Any failure to comply with this restriction may constitute a violation of applicable securities laws. Past performance is not indicative of future results. No representation is being made that any investment will or is likely to achieve profits or losses or that significant losses will be avoided. There can be no assurance that investments similar to those described in this document will be available in the future and no representation is made that future investments managed by MIM will have similar returns to those presented herein. All information has been presented in U.S. dollars. Actual returns may increase or decrease due to currency fluctuations. No offer to purchase or sell securities. This Presentation does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security and may not be relied upon in connection with the purchase or sale of any security. No reliance, no update and use of information. You may not rely on this Presentation as the basis upon which to make an investment decision. To the extent that you rely on this Presentation in connection with any investment decision, you do so at your own risk. This Presentation is being provided in summary fashion and does not purport to be complete. The information in the Presentation is as of the date indicated on the cover of this document unless otherwise specified and MIM does not intend to update the information after its distribution, even in the event that the information becomes materially inaccurate. Certain information contained in this Presentation, includes performance and characteristics of MIM's by independent third parties, or have been prepared internally and have not been audited or verified. Use of different methods for preparing, calculating or presenting information may lead to different results for the information presented, compared to publicly quoted information, and such differences may be material. No tax, legal or accounting advice. This Presentation is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for, accounting, legal or tax advice or investment recommendations. Any statements of U.S. federal tax consequences contained in this Presentation were not intended to be used and cannot be used to avoid penalties under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or to promote, market or recommend to another party any tax -related matters addressed herein. Forward -Looking Statements: This document may contain or incorporate by reference information that includes or is based upon forward -looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward -looking statements give expectations or forecasts of future events. These statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They use words and terms such as "anticipate," "estimate," "expect," "project," "intend," "plan," "believe," "will," and other words and terms of similar meaning, or are tied to future periods in connection with a discussion of future performance. Forward -looking statements are based MIM's assumptions and current expectations, which may be inaccurate, and on the current economic environment which may change. These statements are not guarantees of future performance. They involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward -looking statements. Risks, uncertainties and other factors that might cause such differences include, but are not limited to: (1) difficult conditions in the global capital markets; (2) changes in general economic conditions, including changes in interest rates or fiscal policies; (3) changes in the investment environment; (4) changed conditions in the securities or real estate markets; and (5) regulatory, tax and political changes. MIM does not undertake any obligation to publicly correct or update any forward -looking statement if it later becomes aware that such statement is not likely to be achieved. 1.As of March 31, 2020, subsidiaries of MetLife, Inc. that provide investment management services to MetLife's general account, separate accounts and/or unaffiliated/third party investors include Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, MetLife Investment Management, LLC, MetLife Investment Management Limited, MetLife Investments Limited, MetLife Investments Asia Limited, MetLife Latin America Asesorias e Inversiones Limitada, MetLife Asset Management Corp. (Japan), and MIM I LLC. MetLife Investment Management 95 L0720005948[exp0121][AII States] 23 MetLife Investment Management © 2019 MetLife Services and Solutions, LLC, New York, NY 10166 - All Rights Reserved. 96 ATTACHMENT 18 Payden&Rygel QUARTERLY PORTFOLIO REVIEW Riverside County Transportation Commission 2nd Quarter 2020 What have we learned since my letter to you at the beginning of the pandemic? Three months ago, many of us thought it would be a temporary shutdown, and there was anxiousness about conducting business "at home." The results we believe have been quite extraordinary. Our remote operations have worked smoothly and effectively, attributable to the collaborative culture established 37 years ago. Collaboration is not the norm in our industry, as competitiveness exists internally to a large degree. Having a collaborative culture in a meaningful way has been a massive plus in the management of your accounts. As for financial markets, the Federal Reserve and other global central banks have taken bold, immediate action in flooding the markets with liquidity, and it has worked. As I sit here today, I see the S&P 500 has turned positive for the calendar year, again unexpected. Uncertainty about the path of the virus and the long-term economic implications remain, but central banks provide extraordinary support. As I mentioned, the markets provide some buying opportunities, and a certain amount of liquidity has allowed us to make changes. One thing that has been surprising on a domestic and global basis is the amount of new business activity, such as changing mandates, that one might have thought would be minimized in this uncertain climate. New business opportunities are a positive note, and as a firm, we are benefitting. If you have any specific questions, I am always available. Most importantly, stay healthy and safe. Warmest Regards, .\-,„.,_ 40429- Joan A. Payden President & CEO Iii PAY DEN.COM LOS ANGELES I BOSTUI I LONDON I MILAN MARKET UPDATE HIBERNATION OVER, BUT HOW ROBUST IS THE REBOUND? The second quarter of 2020 was a story of two parts. On the one hand, the global economy experienced a synchronized shut down due to the pandemic but is now reopening. On the other hand, major central banks leaped into action as the pandemic shook the financial system (see chart). BALANCE SHEET OF THE FED, ECB, AND BANK OF JAPAN $20 $15 $10 $5 $0 Bank of Japan European Central Bank Federal Reserve THESE CENTRAL BANKS EXPANDED THEIR BALANCE SHEETS BY$6TRILLION IN 6MONTHS. THE LARGEST BALANCE SHEET EXPANSION ON RECORD! '00 '02 ' 04 ' 06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 As measured by data on worldwide restaurant Beatings, Germans have seized upon the chance to get out of the house for dinner as the global economy reopened. Other countries and regions, such as the U.K. and U.S., remain stuck at home, and restaurants are yet to reopen fully. Coincidentally, the countries seeing the fastest rebound in sit-down dining are also the ones that have made the most progress on combatting the virus. The optimist might point to the fact that the dark days of mid -March to early -May are over and we're unlikely to see the entire world shut down again. The pessimist would say that while a "recovery" is underway, rising cases in some regions mean we will see lockdowns again, keeping activity woefully short of a robust rebound. Taking both views into account, we think the worst is behind us, but "normal" is still a long way off. How then can financial markets do so well? Record central bank asset purchases have alleviated the financial panic and fostered easy monetary conditions around the world. Monetary measures should help the global economy as businesses reopen, and consumers emerge from stay- at-home orders, and maintain market calm. '20 98 2812 Riverside County Transportation Commission Portfolio Review and Market Update - 2nd Quarter 2020 PORTFOLIO CHARACTERISTICS (As of 6/30/2020) Portfolio Market Value Weighted Average Credit Quality Weighted Average Duration Weighted Average Yield to Maturity $55.6 million AA+ 1.90 years 0.48% SECTOR ALLOCATION mi 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% P �0 zY DURATION DISTRIBUTION 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0-1 1-2 2-3 3+ Years PORTFOLIO RETURNS - Periods Ending 6/30/2020 RCTC Operating Portfolio ICE BofA 1-3 Year US Treasury Index Periods over one year are annualized Since 2nd 2020 Trailing Inception Quarter YTD 1 Yr (3/1/15) 0.99% 2.91% 4.16% 0.13% 2.94% 4.07% 2.00% 1.80% pPayden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los AngelA?California 90071 • (213) 625-1900 • www.payden.com Portfolio Review and Market Update - 2nd Quarter 2020 2812 MARKET THEMES After the severe economic shock from COVID-19, market sentiment rebounded strongly in the second quarter driven by an unprecedented and coordinated monetary and fiscal response from central banks and governments globally. This stimulus, coupled with a stabilization in the growth rate of cases, led to a rally in risk assets. With countries easing their respective lockdown restrictions, worldwide GDP contractions observed in the first quarter reversed, as high -frequency data, including airline travel and restaurant bookings, showed nascent signs of a bottom in global economic data. However, a surge in positive cases in the U.S. in the final weeks of the quarter, a roll back of some reopening activity, and a sharp increase in social unrest brought unease to financial markets. Equity volatility increased modestly, and investors struggled to assess the impacl of a potential second wave of COVID-19 cases. Fixed income markets reacted more benignly as central bank intervention helped to quell concerns. • The portfolio continues to hold a diversified mix of non -government sectors for income generation. We continue to utilize corporate bonds, asset -backed securities (ABS) and mortgage -backed securities (MBS) as diversified sources of high -quality income. • We remain constructive on short -dated credit given attractive yields, lack of supply and solid fundamentals. The Federal Reserve's corporate purchase programs provide strong technical support. • We took advantage of market dislocations to add high -quality securities, especially via new issue. We sold several higher beta positions into market strength and continue to look for opportunities to trim exposure. • We targeted a market neutral duration positioning over the quarter. INTEREST RATES v The Federal Reserve announced and began executing substantial open -market policies to help restore confidence and liquidity in financial markets. Rates in the front-end remain pinned near zero, a direct result of the Fed's commitment to a zero Federal Funds rate policy. • After falling sharply in March, short U.S. Treasury yields rose, with the two-year maturity rising by 0.10% to 0.15%. The slope between two- and five-year maturities finished the quarter at 0.15%. • Despite our neutral headline duration, curve positioning contributed positively to performance. • LIBOR experienced an unprecedented move due to massive spread tightening over the quarter coupled with record amounts of cash in the system and the government support programs. One -month LIBOR fell 0.83% to 0.16% and three-month LIBOR decreased 1.15% to 0.30%. SECTORS Credit markets, which experienced a historically poor first quarter, saw a significant bounce back in the second one due to Fed support. In particular, the Primary and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facilities helped support corporate bonds, while the reintroduction of the Term Asset -Backed Securities Loan Facility supported ABS. Spreads on front-end credit products moved significantly tighter and outperformed Treasuries, with corporate bonds leading. pPayden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Ange4Q,Qalifornia goo71 • (213) 625-igoo • www.payden.com OVER 35 YEARS OF INSPIRING CONFIDENCE WITH AN UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO OUR CLIENTS' NEEDS. LOS ANGELES I BOSTON I LONDON I MILAN PAYDEN.COM OUR STRATEGIES Multi -Sector Short Maturity Bonds U.S. Core Bond Absolute Return Fixed Income Strategic Income Global Fixed Income Liability Driven Investing Sector -Specific Emerging Markets Debt Government/Sovereign High Yield Bonds & Loans Inflation-Linked/TIPS Investment Grade Corporate Bonds Municipal Bonds (U.S.) Securitized Bonds Income -Focused Equities Equity Income Available in: Separate Accounts — Mutual Funds (U.S. and UCITS) Collective Trusts ("CITs") — Customized Solutions For more information about Payden & Rygel's strategies, contact us at a location listed below. Payden&Rygel LOS ANGELES 333 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, California 90071 213 625-1900 BOSTON 265 Franklin Street Boston, Massachusetts 02110 617 807-1990 LONDON 1 Bartholmew Lane London EC2N 2AX UK +44 (0) 20-7621-3000 MILAN Corso Matteotti, 1 20121 Milan, Italy +39 02 76067111 101 ATTACHMENT 19 County of Riverside Treasurer'sPooled Investmenii-und June 2020 102 Contents Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund Economy Market Data Portfolio Data Compliance Report Month End Holdings Please see the digital copy of our monthly ?PIF report at Y^ r to listen to the video of the Federal Open Market Gommiftee's March press conference! JEROME P WELL Chair, Federal Reserve Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell during the June 10th FOMC pressconference. Digital Image. Federal Reserve Board. https//www.youtube.com/user/Fed ReserveBoard C O UNIY OF RIVERSD E TREASURER TAX C O LLEC TO R 103 1 Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund Monthly Commentary Short fixed income rates were little changed in June despite the continued gloomy pandemic, geo-political, and nation- al news Protests and social unrest spread in response to the death of George Royd. Ubya and Hong Kong resurfaced as potential risks to global trade and gas markets When add- ed to the continued spread of COVID, events in June contributed to the market surprise in the employment numbers The Treasurers Pooled Investment Fund (1PIF) yield continues to gravitate lower drawn by near zero short term interest rates The worldwide COVID-19 case total sur- passed 10 million, with a death total now surpassing 500,000. lhe United States remains the leading nation in cases, accounting for over 25 percent of both cases and deaths worldwide. The FOMC met on June 10th and voted to leave rates 0.0% to 0.25% and reaf- firmed its commitment to do everything it can to support economic activity. The FED also expressed the limits of monetary policy and the importance of fiscal policy in combating the economic effectsofthe pandemic. China passed the controversial Hong Kong national security law, increasing trade ten- sions and the US threatened economic pen- alties in response. Rrst quarter GDP was re - Treasurer's Statement June Gloom ported as negative 5% Despite the worries, the country produced a surprising 2.5 million jobs in the previous month, greatly surpassing the consensus estimate of negative 7.5 mil- lion! The unemployment rate was 13.3%, a dim figure still above the financial crisis level of 10% however much better than the ex- pected 19% As the month progressed, most economic indicatorswere mixed. As investors continue to move assets into real estate, one exception in economic activ- ity is housing as the sector continues to be a bright spot for optim ists a c ross the nation. lhe Nation Association of Home Builders Index printed at 58, vs expectations of 45; Building Permits came in at +14.4%; and New Home Salesbeat expectationsat 676k. A real estate related trend is the 'flight' from dense urban areas to suburbs and even semi -rural areasasa result of the current envi- ronment. For Riverside County, this could be a positive to both the residential and com- mercial real estate local markets as the County has more affordable building costs, large amountsof available land, and already existing freeway and rail networks In addition, retail sales also reported a promising 17.7% increase from the previous month after reporting a negative 16.4% de - The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is comprised of contributions from the county, schools, special districts, and other discretionary depositors throughout the County of Riverside. The primary objective of the treasurer shall be to safeguard the principal of the funds under the Treasurer's control, meet the liquidity needs of the depositor, and to maximize a retum on the fundswithin the given parameters The Treasurer -Tax Collector and the Capital Markets team are committed to maintaining the highest credit ratings lhe Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is currently rated Aaa-bf by Moody's Investor Service and AAAf/S1 by Fitch Ratings, two of the nation's most trusted bond credit rating services. Snce its inception, the Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund has been in full compliance with the Treasurers Statement of Investment Policy, which is more restrictive than California Government Code 53646. 6-Month Pool Performance crease the previous month. However, the manufacturing sector in the other hand con- tinues to struggle with Factory Orders and Durable Goods Orders, both hitting lows of - 13.0%and -17.7%respectively. Energy markets are keeping a close eye on the situation in Ubya and continue to count the casualties of low demand and supply disruption. Following negotiations with creditors, Chesapeake Energy applied for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the United States The company is experiencing cash flow and liquidity issues due to low energy prices and large amountsof debt. In the early portion of the month, stock pricesand bond yields moved up due to very strong nonfarm payroll numbers. Stock pric- esand bond yieldsthen dropped back down to finish the month basically unchanged. Three-month treasury bills started at 0.129% and ended at 0.125%. Smilariy, the 5-year treasury note started at 0.288%and ended at 0.305%. In the credit space, 3-month Libor started at 0.337%and ended at 0.302%. Jon Christensen Treasurer -Tax Collector Capital Markets Team Jon Christensen Treasurer -Tax Collector Matt Jennings Assistant Treasurer -Tax Collector Giovane Pizano Chief Investment Manager Steve Faeth Senior Investment Manager lsela Ucea Assistant Investment Manager Hayden Nestande Prof Student Intern Month End Market Value ($) Month End Book Valu e (51 Paper Gain or Loss (5) Paper Gain or Book Yield (%) WAM (Yrs) Loss (%) Ju n -20 May-20 7,804,218,376.34 8.196.871 .029.51 8,707,241,840.70 7,300,500,274.82 7.341 ,926,889.86 7.653.741.469.47 Apr-20 Mar-20 Feb-20 Jan-20 7,775,589,310.59 8,166,677,324.99 8.668.716.409.06 7, 261, 665, 325.07 7,315,633,798.80 7,633,961,510.96 28.629.065.75 30.193.704.52 38.525.431.64 38,834,949.75 26,293,091.06 19.779.958.51 0.37% 0.37% 0.44% 0.53% 0.36% 0.77 0.88 1.15 1.46 1.80 0.26% 1.82 '.S si: et . Au33 CS¢ rq1 ncUtle accrued nleresl CO UN1Y OF RIVERSIDE 1REASURER TAX C O LLEC TO R 104 2 Economy National Economy Asrestrictionseased and storefronts began to open in May, retail salessurged quickly asconsumerswere finally able to spend their stimuluschecks. Brick and mortar retail stores were open for businessand dinersfinally made their way to a table at their favorite restaurants. A 17.7%increase isthe largest monthly gain on record, but salesare still 8%below February numbers. While these numbersare encouraging, some officialswarned of the uncertainty still surrounding the recovery- specifically employment and output levels that are still well below pre -pandemic numbers. (NY11MES 06/16/2020) Private Sector Average Hourly EarningsY/Y Percent 7.4 6.5 5.6 4.7 ;o 1111111111111111111111111111111111 `i ti1 �0 ti4+ )0(.. y - mac: - 0°c Thousands 500 700 500 400 200 .a .� .ti .'S .s .5 .b .1 .s New Home SalesSAAR New Home Soles -3D-Y ear Fixed Mortgage Rate Percent 7.0 6.0 Key Economic Indicators 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 State Economy California's housing market saw a 45%YoYdip in closed salesfor May but a 2.7%increase in median price. lhisda- ta reflectsdealswhich closed escrow in May, but offers made in April or even March. Expertssuggest the increase in median price can be attributed to sellersthat are reluc- tant to drop theirprice, aswell as restricted supply due to many ownerstaking theirhomesoffthe market and making price drops less likely. Riverside County salesfell just below the statewide mark at 43.7%and median price in- creased 6.5%to $415,000.00 compared to San Bernardino County where salesfell 33.9%and price increased 6.7%to $368,000.00. (LA 11M ES06/ 18/2020) Percent 15.0 5.0 5-0 -15.0 -25.0 -35.0 Durable GoodsPercent Chg. Y/Y -I1 1 't 1 CO 4 .0 0 4 .0 4 4 .R t1 Nonfarm PayrollsTotal M/M Change SA Thousands 3000.0 •2000.0 -7000.0 -12000.0 -17c00.0 -M/M 6Mo. Traling Avg. -22000.0 oec 11 Release Date Indicator Actual Consensus Prior Year 06/ 25/ 2020 06/05/2020 06/05/2020 06/10/2020 06/10/2020 06/03/2020 06/ 23/ 2020 06/03/2020 06/03/2020 Real GDP-Q/Q Change Unemployment Rate -Seasonally Adjusted Non -Farm Payrolls-M/M Change -thousands CPI -Y/YChange CPI Ex Food and Energy -Y/YChange ISM Non -Manufacturing Index (> 50 indicatesgrowth) New Home Sales- S4AR- Thousands Factory Orders- M/M Change Durable GoodsOrders- New Orders- M/M Change -5.0% 13.3% 2,509 0.1 % 1.2% 45.4 676 -13.0% -17.7% -5.0% 19.0% -7,500 0.3% 1.3% 44.4 640 -13.4% -17.2% 3.1 3.6% 75 1.8% 2.0% 56.9 626 -0.8% -2.1% "Note:'PriorYear" displaysfinal estimatesof indicatorvaluesfrom the equivalent period of the prior year. CO UN1Y OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER TAX C O LLEC TO R 105 3 Market Data Federal Open Market Committee Meeting 06/10/2020 • The FOMC stated that the Corona virus outbreak is causing tremendous human and economic hardship across the U.S., and will weigh heavily on economic activity, employment, and inflation in the nearterm, and posesconsiderable risk to the economic outlook overthe medium term. • The FOMC maintained the Fed FundsTarget Range of 0.0-0.25% • The FOMC stated in their June statement that "it is committed to using itsfull range of toolsto support the U.S. econo- my and to help assure that the recovery from thisdifficult period will be asrobust aspossible." Fed FundsTarget Rate (Upper Limit) 3.00 1.50% 1.01]h OE0% a.oa� Iq ��q 9 1q ,1q y \q �,sq A`� „,fP 'i �0 C`9 ]JP� Sea a� �0 De P� U.S. Treasury Curve 200 -4— 06/01 /2020 t 06/30/2020 5 10 15 Years 20 25 30 Treasury Curve Differentials 3 Mo 6 Mo 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 5 Yr 10 Yr 30 Yr 06/30/2020 - 06/01/2020 06/30/2020 06/01/2020 0.14 0.18 0.02 0.00 -0.01 0.16 0.18 0.16 0.16 0.17 0.14 0.02 -0.02 -0.02 0.18 0.29 0.20 0.31 0.00 -0.05 0.66 1.41 0.66 1.46 The USTreasury Curve and itsvaluesare subject to frequent change and will be updated monthly with each issued TPIF report. CO UN1Y OF RIVERSIDE 1REASURER TAX C O LLEC TO R 106 4 Market Data cont'd Percent 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 to 65.00 55.00 45.00 35.00 25.00 15.00 P 28.600 27.400 26.200 25.000 23.800 22.600 21.400 20.200 Recession 2Y Treasury Yield r•lymex Crude Nymex Not Gas U.S. Treasuries Percent 4.0 -1.0 Recession-3M-10YTreasury yield Spread 5sb -•`ti tin l0 yo i' ,s§" 1JC ,JC 'JC Commodities ti9 �Q oc p� «0 P• Dow Jones 19.000 C.R 19 Nq N.ck q o\a �a `� ,p ;� fP O 5.00 230.00 4.50 210.00 4.00 190.00 3.50 170.00 3.00 150.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 130.00 1 10.0o 90.00 Pac3 0c aer 4e,. 1- Precious Metals Industrial 1Welals Stocks 11,000 10.000 9.000 8.000 7.000 NASDAQ 100 5&P 500 6.000 clAcicickg cpC ocY 451 4.000 3,900 3.800 3.700 3,600 3.500 3.400 3,300 3,200 3.100 3,000 2,900 2.800 2,700 2,600 2.500 `Valueslisted forcommoditiesand stocksare in USdollarsand are asof the final businessday of each month. C O UNITY 0 F RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX C O LLEC TO R 107 5 Portfolio Data The County of Riverside'sTreasurer'sPooled Investment Fund is currently rated AAA-bfby Moody'sInvestor Service and AAAf/S1 by Fitch Ratings. Moody'sAssct Rating (000's) Book MKT/ Book % Book Yield Aa a Aa Aa 1 Aa 2 Aa 3 NR NA Tota Is: 6,890,503.07 100.35% 88.62% 0.75% 10,000.00 101.51% 0.13% 2.22% 168,100.06 100.36% 2.16% 1.74% 15,718.76 100.36% 0.20% 2.68% 136,326.22 102.15% 1.75% 2.50% 529,941.20 100.19% 6.82% 0.28% 25,000.00 99.99% 0.32% 0.19% 7,775,589.31 100.37% 100.00% 0.7713/0 S&PAssct Rating (000's) Book MKT/ Book % Book Yield AAA AA+ AA AA- A+ NR NA Tota Is: 405,069.56 100.38% 5.21% 0.61% 6,539,511.73 100.35% 84.10% 0.77% 38,740.60 100.24% 0.50% 1.82% 87,326.22 103.35% 1.12% 2.86% 150,000.00 100.00% 1.93% 1.70% 529,941.20 100.19% 6.82% 0.28% 25,000.00 99.99% 0.32% 0.19% 7,775,589.31 100.37% 100.00% 0.77% 12-Month Projected Cash How • AP 0% Aal 2% Aa2 D% Ao3 2% NR 7% Nit A� 7%. 2% Required Ma - Monthly Monthly Dis- tured Invest- Actual Invest- Available to In - Month Receipts bursements Difference ments Balance ments Maturing vest> 1 Year 07/2020 07/2020 08/ 2020 09/2020 10/ 2020 11/2020 12/ 2020 01/2021 02/ 2021 03/2021 04/2021 05/2021 06/ 2021 1,034.18 1,472.64 -438.46 986.77 1,164.92 -178.15 1,085.65 1,145.14 -59.49 1,249.55 1,343.18 -93.63 1,205.40 1,074.70 130.70 2,348.61 1,073.38 1,275.23 1,078.90 1,910.81 -831.91 1,005.21 1,217.34 -212.13 1,497.96 1,092.59 405.37 2,103.36 1,289.52 813.84 2,100.00 1,086.87 1013.13 1,044.31 1,802.91 -758.60 386.61 178.15 59.49 93.63 51.85 130.70 1,405.93 574.02 361.89 767.26 1,581.10 2,594.23 1,835.63 2,040.32 664.35 713.98 597.25 470.10 427.75 265.00 215.26 154.08 182.65 25.00 TOTALS 16,739.90 15,674.00 1,065.90 717.88 9.23% 9,302.61 5,755.74 7,057.70 74.02% 90.77% `Valueslisted in Cash Row Table are in millions of UBD. Based on historic and current financial conditionswithin the County, the Pool isexpected to maintain sufficient liquidity of fundsto cover County expensesforthe next twelve months. CO UN1Y OF RIVERSIDE 1REASURER TAX C O LLEC TO R 108 6 Portfolio Data cont'd Asset Maturity Distribution (Par Value, 000's) 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 19.60% 1,524,840.94 16.56% 1,288,326.00 0-1 Mos 1-3Mos Asset Allocation (000's) 31.33% 2,437,089.00 3-12 Mos 13.61% 9.65% 9.25% 1,058,269.00 750,420.00 719,185.00 1-2Yr 2-3Yr 3-5Yr Assets Scheduled Book Scheduled Market Mkt/Book Yield WAL (Yr.) Mat (Yr.) TREAS AGENCIES MMKT CASH CALTRUST FND 2,024,845.95 4,432,499.20 329,000.00 375,000.00 4,023.98 2,031 ,873.85 4,448,909.79 329,000.00 375,000.00 4,023.98 100.35% 100.37% 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 0.71% 0.80% 0.14% 0.12% 10.60% 0.46 0.67 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.46 1 .69 0.00 0.00 0.00 COMM PAPER CDS 249,465.32 100,000.00 249.976.58 100,000.00 100.20% 0.44% 0.07 100.00% 1.63% 0.48 0.70 0.72 NCDS 50,000.00 50,000.00 100.00% 1.85% 0.00 0.00 MEDIUM TERM NOTES 82,836.63 84,802.91 102.37% 2.56% 0.40 0.46 MUNI 127,918.24 130,631.27 102.12% 2.71% 1 .06 1 .06 Totals: 7,775,589.32 7.804,218.38 100.37% 0.77% 0.531 1.12 'For detais o n the Po ol's co mpositio n see M o nth End Portfolio Ho IdLngs, pages 9 to 13 �tiN91v4 ti 2.50% 2.00% 1.50% 1.00% 0.50% 0.00% Pool Yield -m-TIMNII 2.42% 2'31% 2.220 2.13 0 ]il - pil_�9 <e? OG\ N-4o" �4 \q �4 \q 'Dec erat� � p��end The Treasurer's Institutional Money Market Index (11MMI) isa composite index of four AAA rated prime institutional money market funds. Their average yield iscompared to the yield of the Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund in the above graph. 109 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX C O LLEC TO R 7 Compliance Report Compliance Status: Full Compliance the Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund wasin full compliance with the County of Riverside'sTreasurer'sState- ment of Investment Policy. the County'sStatement of Investment Policy ismore restrictive than California Gov- ernment Code 53646. The County'slnvestment Policy isreviewed annually by the County of Riverside'sOver- sight Committee and approved by the Board of Supervisors. Investment Category MUNICIPALBONDS(MUNI) U.S. TREASURIES LOCALAGENCY OBUGATIONS(LAO) FEDERAL AG EN C I ES GOVERNMENT CODE Maximum Authorized % S&P/ Remaining Limit Moody's Maturity COUNTY INVESTMENTPOLICY Maximum Remaining Maturity Authorized % S&P/Moody's/ Limit Fitch Actual % 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 4 YEARS 15% AA-/Aa3/AA- 1.65% 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS 100% NA 26.04% 5YEARS NO LIMIT NA 3YEARS 2.50% INVESTMENT <0.00% GRADE 5 YEARS NO LIMIT AAA 5 YEARS 100% NA 57.01% COM MERC IAL PAPER (C P) 270 DAYS 40% Al/P1 270 DAYS 40% Al/P1/F1 3.21% CERTIFlCAIE&TIME DE- 5YEARS 30% NA 1 YEAR 25% Al/P1/F1 1.93% POSITS(NCD &TCD) Combined INTLBANKFORRECON- SIRUCTION AND DEVELOP- M ENTAND INTL FINANC E CORPORATION REPURCHASE AG REEM ENTS (REPO) REVERSE REPOS MEDIUM TERM NOTES (MTNO) C ALTRUST SHO RT TERM FUND NA NA NA 4 YEARS 20% AA/Aa/AA 0.00% 40%max, 25% 1 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 45 DAYS in term repo Al/P1/F1 0.00% over 7days 92 DAYS 20% NA 60 DAYS 10% NA 0.00% 5 YEARS 30% A 3 YEARS 20% AA/Aa2/AA 1.07% NA NA NA DAILY 1.00% NA 0.05% LIQUIDITY MONEY MARKET 60 DAYS 20% AAA/Aaa (2) DAILY 20% AAA by 2 Of 3 4.23% M UTUAL FUNDS (M M F) LIQUIDITY RATINGS LOCALAGENCY NA NA NA DAILY Max NA 0.00% INVESTMENTFUND (LAIF) LIQUIDITY $50 million CASH/ DEPOSIT COUNT AC- J NA NA NA NA NA NA 4.82% II 1 Money Market Mutual Fundsmaturity may be interpreted asa weighted average maturity not exceeding 60 days. 2Ormust have an investment advisor with no fewerthan 5 yearsexperience and with assetsundermanagement of $500,000,000 USD. THIS COMPLETES-1HEREPO RTREQUIRENIENTSOFCALIFORNIA GOVERNMENTCODE53646. COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 110 8 Month End Portfolio Holdings CUSP Description Maturity Coupon Yield Par Book Market Market Unrealized Modified Years To Date To Mat Value Value Price Value Gain/Loss Duration Maturity Fund: 1 POOLFUND 1060: MMKTACC1S-A/365-6 FFGGXX RDEUIY GOV 07/01/2020 .115 .115 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 100.000000 1,000,000.00 GOFXX FEDERA1EO GOV 07/01/2020 .119 .119 109,000,000.00 109,000,000.00 100.000000 109,000,000.00 WFFXX WELLS FARGO GOV 07/01/2020 .118 .118 66,000,000.00 66,000,000.00 100.000000 66,000,000.00 FG1)OC GOLDMAN SACHSGOV 07/01/2020 .156 .156 151,000,000.00 151,000,000.00 100.000000 151,000,000.00 OGVXX JPMORGAN GOV 07/01/2020 .103 .103 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 100.000000 1,000,000.00 1FDXX BLACKROCKGOV 07/01/2020 .099 .099 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 100.000000 1,000,000.00 W .136 .13629,000,000.00 329,000,000.00 100.00000dir 329,000,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 1065: C L1R A/ 365-6 CL1R CAL1RUSTS-IT1ERM FUND 07/01/2020 1.089 1.063 4,015,944.14 4,023,976.03 100.200000 4,023,976.03 0.00 .003 .003 1.089 1.063 4,015,944.14 4,023,976.03 100.200000 4,023,976.03 0.00 .003 .003 1080: MGD RA1E-A/365-6 CAS -I BANK OF -NEWEST 07/01/2020 .500 .500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 .003 .003 .500 .500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 .003 .003 1170: MGD RA1E-A/360 CAS -I PACIRC PREMIER BANK 07/01/2020 1.530 1.530 0.00 0.00 100.000000 0.00 0.00 .000 .003 CAS -I FIRST REPUBLIC BANK 07/01/2020 1.515 1.515 0.00 0.00 100.000000 0.00 0.00 .000 .003 CAS -I UBMANAGED RATE 07/01/2020 .093 .093 350,000,000.00 350,000,000.00 100.000000 350,000,000.00 0.00 .003 .003 .093 .093 350,000,000.00 350,000,000.00 100.000000 350,000,000.00 1300: U.S 1REASJRY BILL 9127963X5 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 09/08/2020 .146 .146 75,000,000.00 74,953,158.33 99.975000 74,981,250.00 28,091.67 .191 .192 9127961N9 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 10/08/2020 .172 .172 75,000,000.00 74,934,783.00 99.957000 74,967,750.00 32,967.00 .273 .274 9127964A4 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 09/29/2020 .136 .136 50,000,000.00 49,970,911.11 99.966000 49,983,000.00 12,088.89 .249 .249 912796215 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 10/29/2020 .162 .162 50,000,000.00 49,959,176.50 99.948000 49,974,000.00 14,823.50 .331 .332 9127964G1 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 10/06/2020 .136 .136 50,000,000.00 49,970,911.11 99.964000 49,982,000.00 11,088.89 .268 .268 9127961P4 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 11/05/2020 .130 .130 50,000,000.00 49,967,139.00 99.944000 49,972,000.00 4,861.00 .350 .351 9127962Z1 U.S 1REASJRY BILL 11/12/2020 .154 .154 50,000,000.00 49,961,198.50 99.941000 49,970,500.00 9,301.50 .369 .370 9127963P2 U.S 1REASURY BILL 08/18/2020 .110 .110 50,000,000.00 49,985,486.11 99.982000 49,991,000.00 5,513.89 .134 .134 9127963Y3 U.S TREASURY BILL 09/15/2020 .115 .115 50,000,000.00 49,980,833.33 99.970000 49,985,000.00 4,166.67 .211 .211 91279633) U.S 1REASURY BILL 09/22/2020 .128 .128 50,000,000.00 49,977,510.42 99.969000 49,984,500.00 6,989.58 .230 .230 9127964H9 U.S TREASURY BILL 10/13/2020 .133 .133 50,000,000.00 49,972,805.00 99.954000 49,977,000.00 4,195.00 .287 .288 9127964G1 U.S 1REASURY BILL 10/06/2020 .129 .129 50,000,000.00 49,975,370.83 99.964000 49,982,000.00 6,629.17 .268 .268 912796XE4 U.S TREASURY BILL 02/25/2021 .172 .172 50,000,000.00 49,935,211.11 99.894000 49,947,000.00 11,788.89 .656 .658 912796363 U.S 1REASURY BILL 11/27/2020 .161 .161 50,000,000.00 49,959,302.78 99.931700 49,965,850.00 6,547.22 .410 .411 912796XE4 U.S TREASURY BILL 02/25/2021 .167 .167 50,000,000.00 49,938,070.83 99.894000 49,947,000.00 8,929.17 .656 .658 912796303 U.S 1REASURY BILL 09/22/2020 .160 .160 50,000,000.00 49,976,444.44 99.969000 49,984,500.00 8,055.56 .230 .230 912796333 U.S TREASURY BILL 09/22/2020 .175 .175 50,000,000.00 49,974,722.22 99.969000 49,984,500.00 9,777.78 .230 .230 912796XE4 U.S 1REASURY BILL 02/25/2021 .180 .180 50,000,000.00 49,935,000.00 99.894000 49,947,000.00 12,000.00 .656 .658 9127964A4 U.S 1REASURY BILL 09/29/2020 .170 .170 50,000,000.00 49,974,972.22 99.966000 49,983,000.00 8,027.78 .249 .249 912796XE4 U.S TREASURY BILL 02/25/2021 .178 .178 50,000,000.00 49,937,381.94 99.894000 49,947,000.00 9,618.06 .656 .658 9127962R9 U.S 1REASURY BILL 10/15/2020 .170 .170 25,000,000.00 24,985,951.39 99.954000 24,988,500.00 2,548.61 .292 .293 9127963C 1 U.S TREASURY BILL 07/07/2020 .070 .070 50,000,000.00 49,998,736.11 99.998000 49,999,000.00 263.89 .019 .019 912796WZ3 U.S TREASURY BILL 08/06/2020 .120 .120 50,000,000.00 49,992,833.33 99.988000 49,994,000.00 1,166.67 .101 .101 9127963X5 U.S 1REASURY BILL 09/08/2020 .127 .127 50,000,000.00 49,986,583.89 99.975000 49,987,500.00 916.11 .191 .192 912796UC1 U.S TREASURY BILL 01/28/2021 .165 .165 50,000,000.00 49,950,041.67 99.903000 49,951,500.00 1,458.33 .579 .581 .147 .147 1,275,000,000.00 1,274,154,535.17 99.951086 1,274,376,350.00 221,814.83 .320 1310: U.S 1REASURY BOND 912828Y46 U.S 1REASURY BOND 07/31/2020 912828L32 U.S 1REASURY BOND 08/31/2020 912828YC8 U.S 1REASURY BOND 08/31/2021 912828SL7 U.S 1REASURY BOND 06/30/2021 912828YE4 U.S 1REASURY BOND 08/31/2024 912828L99 U.S 1REASURY BOND 10/31/2020 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 912828PC8 U.S 1REASURY BOND 11/15/2020 912828A42 U.S 1REASJRY BOND 11/30/2020 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURYBOND 01/15/2021 912828W6 U.S 1REASURY BOND 11/30/2024 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 9128282M U.S 1REASURY BOND 10/15/2020 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 912828VV9 U.S 1REASURY BOND 08/31/2020 9128283Q1 U.S 1REASURY BOND 01/15/2021 912828L32 U.S 1REASURY BOND 08/31/2020 1400: FHLMC-DISC NO1E 313396Z23 FHLMC DISC N1E 313396E41 FHLMC DISC N1E 2.625 1.375 1.500 1.125 1.250 1.375 2.000 2.625 2.000 2.000 2.000 1.500 2.000 2.000 1.625 2.000 2.125 2.000 1.375 1.662 1.627 1.711 1.735 1.702 1.634 1.647 1.638 1.639 1.643 1.637 1.751 1.626 1.645 1.649 1.606 1.615 1.605 1.591 25,000,000.00 25,179,687.50 100.202000 25,050,500.00 -129,187.50 .084 .085 50,000,000.00 49,898,437.50 100.198000 50,099,000.00 200,562.50 .168 .170 25,000,000.00 24,906,250.00 101.527000 25,381,750.00 475,500.00 1.146 1.170 25,000,000.00 24,753,906.25 100.941000 25,235,250.00 481,343.75 .989 1.000 25,000,000.00 24,479,492.19 104.199000 26,049,750.00 1,570,257.81 4.021 4.173 50,000,000.00 49,876,953.13 100.393000 50,196,500.00 319,546.87 .334 .337 50,000,000.00 50,193,359.38 100.977000 50,488,500.00 295,140.62 .532 .545 50,000,000.00 50,455,078.13 100.898000 50,449,000.00 -6,078.13 .375 .378 50,000,000.00 50,173,828.13 100.734000 50,367,000.00 193,171.87 .415 .419 50,000,000.00 50,193,359.38 100.977000 50,488,500.00 295,140.62 .532 .545 25,000,000.00 25,097,656.25 100.977000 25,244,250.00 146,593.75 .532 .545 25,000,000.00 24,705,078.13 105.496000 26,374,000.00 1,668,921.87 4.247 4.422 25,000,000.00 25,097,656.25 100.977000 25,244,250.00 146,593.75 .532 .545 50,000,000.00 50,185,546.88 100.977000 50,488,500.00 302,953.12 .532 .545 25,000,000.00 24,995,117.19 100.415000 25,103,750.00 108,632.81 .291 .293 50,000,000.00 50,201,171.88 100.977000 50,488,500.00 287,328.12 .532 .545 50,000,000.00 50,166,015.63 100.322000 50,161,000.00 -5,015.63 .168 .170 50,000,000.00 50,195,312.50 100.977000 50,488,500.00 293,187.50 .532 .545 50,000,000.00 49,937,500.00 100.198000 50,099,000.00 161,500.00 .168 .170 750,000,000.00 750,691,406.30 100.999667` 757,497,500.00 6,806,093.70 07/29/2020 .126 .126 50,000,000.00 49,983,725.00 99.991000 49,995,500.00 11,775.00 .079 .079 09/02/2020 .120 .120 50,000,000.00 49,978,666.67 99.976000 49,988,000.00 9,333.33 .175 .175 100,000,000.00 99,962,391.67 99.983500 99,983,500.00 21,108.33 .127 1425: FHLMC-Fxd-S 30/ 360 3134GAX72 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoE 11/25/2020 1.370 1.370 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.421000 25,105,250.00 105,250.00 .402 .405 3134GAYK4 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrE 11/30/2020 1.440 1.440 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.467000 10,046,700.00 46,700.00 .416 .419 3134GS1F9 FHLMC 5YrNc3YrE 05/26/2023 3.000 3.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 102.220000 15,333,000.00 333,000.00 2.756 2.904 3134G1KG7 FHLMC 5YrNc2YrB 05/03/2024 2.600 2.600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 101.726000 10,172,600.00 172,600.00 3.619 3.844 3134G1YT4 FHLMC 1YrNc1YrE 07/01/2024 2.125 2.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 3.778 4.005 3134GM4 FHLMC 1YrNc1YrE 07/01/2024 2.125 2.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 3.778 4.005 3134G1Y96 FHLMC 3YrNc1YrE 07/01/2022 2.000 2.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 1.934 2.003 3134GM4 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrE 07/01/2024 2.125 2.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 3.778 4.005 3134G1XJ7 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrE 07/08/2024 2.190 2.190 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.036000 50,018,000.00 18,000.00 3.791 4.025 3134GTA37 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrE 07/15/2024 2.150 2.150 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.065000 15,009,750.00 9,750.00 3.814 4.044 3134GTA52 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrQ 07/15/2024 2.300 2.300 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.074000 5,003,700.00 3,700.00 3.799 4.044 3134GTA37 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrE 07/15/2024 2.150 2.150 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.065000 5,003,250.00 3,250.00 3.814 4.044 3134G1W82 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrQ 08/07/2024 2.150 2.150 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.168000 5,008,400.00 8,400.00 3.874 4.107 3134GUHK9 FHLMC 5YrNc1Q 10/15/2024 1.875 1.875 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.369000 10,036,900.00 36,900.00 4.090 4.296 3134G UWP1 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrB 11/27/2023 1.800 1.800 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.554000 15,083,100.00 83,100.00 3.286 3.411 3134G U1X8 FHLMC 3.75YrNc9MoB 08/28/2023 1.800 1.814 695,000.00 694,652.50 100.224000 696,556.80 1,904.30 3.054 3.162 3134GUG38 FHLMC 3.5YrNc1YrB 06/23/2023 1.800 1.800 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.734000 15,110,100.00 110,100.00 2.888 2.981 3134GUG38 FHLMC 3.5YrNc1YrB 06/23/2023 1.800 1.822 9,000,000.00 8,993,250.00 100.734000 9,066,060.00 72,810.00 2.888 2.981 3134G UH45 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrB 12/28/2023 1.900 1.900 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.744000 20,148,800.00 148,800.00 3.365 3.496 3134G UM 72 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrB 12/28/2023 1.900 1.900 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.725000 10,072,500.00 72,500.00 3.365 3.496 3134GU2V1 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoQ 01/16/2024 1.900 1.900 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.062000 25,015,500.00 15,500.00 3.383 3.548 3134G UY38 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoQ 01/16/2025 2.000 2.000 24,747,000.00 24,747,000.00 100.026000 24,753,434.22 6,434.22 4.285 4.551 3134G UZ30 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoQ 01/17/2024 1.900 1.900 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.065000 15,009,750.00 9,750.00 3.386 3.551 3134GU4E7 FHLMC 4.5YrNc1YrQ 07/22/2024 1.850 1.850 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.756000 25,189,000.00 189,000.00 3.864 4.063 111 COUNTY OF NVBZ9DE 1REASJRER TAX COLLECTOR 9 Month Bid Portfolio Holdings CUSP Description Maturity Coupon Yield Par Book Market Market Unrealized Modified Years To Date To Mat Value Value Price Value Gain/Loss Duration Maturity 3134GU7L8 FHLMC3.5YrNc6MoQ 3134GVBK3 FHLMC 3.5YrNc6MoB 3134GVAU2 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 3134GVCD8 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 3134GVCZ9 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrB 3134GVCR7 FHLMC5YrNc1YrB 3136G4UG6 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrB 3134GVDC9 FHLMC 3YrNc9MoB 3134GVCP1 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrE 3134GVDPO FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 3134GVBv16 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 3134GVJG4 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoE 3134GVJP4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc3MoE 3134GVJP4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc3MoE 3134GVJP4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc3MoE 3134GVJM 1 FHLMC 2YrNc3MoE 3134GVJW9 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoE 3134GVJR0 FHLMC 1.75YrNc3MoE 3134GVPD4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc6MoB 3134GVPD4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc6MoB 3134GVPD4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc6MoB 3134GVPD4 FHLMC 2.5YrNc6MoB 3134GVRF7 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 3134GVSE9 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 3134GVSJ8 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrB 3134GVTA6 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 3134GVUH9 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoQ 3134GVVG0 RMC 3.25YrNc1YrB 3134GVWU8 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoB 3134GVVU9 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 3134GVVU9 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 3134GVXN3 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 3134GVXL7 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrB 3134GVRV2 FHLMC 5YrNc1YrQ 3134GVZF8 FHLMC 4YrNc 1Q 3134GVWM FHLMC 5YrNc1YrQ 3134GVWM FHLMC 5YrNc1YrQ 3134GVYX0 FHLMC 4YrNc2YrO 3134GVB31 FHLMC 4.9YrNc11MoB 3134GVG36 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoQ 3134GVE95 FHLMC 5YrNc2YrB 3134GVK23 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoQ 3134GV2X5 FHLMC 2.5YrNc1YrO 3136G4XZ1 FHLMC 5YrNc 1YrQ 3134GVX60 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoQ 08/10/2023 08/10/2023 02/12/2024 02/24/2024 02/ 18/ 2025 02/19/2025 02/ 19/ 2025 11/20/2023 02/ 26/ 2024 02/ 27/ 2025 02/ 28/ 2023 04/ 06/ 2023 10/07/2022 10/07/2022 10/07/2022 04/ 08/ 2022 04/ 13/ 2023 04/13/2022 10/27/2022 10/27/2022 10/27/2022 10/27/2022 05/ 06/ 2024 05/ 12/ 2023 05/ 12/ 2025 05/ 13/ 2024 05/ 13/ 2024 08/18/2023 05/ 19/ 2022 11/20/2023 11/20/2023 05/20/2024 05/20/2024 05/ 27/ 2025 05/ 28/ 2024 05/28/2025 05/28/2025 06/ 03/ 2024 05/28/2025 06/02/2022 06/09/2025 06/10/2025 12/ 29/ 2022 06/30/2025 06/30/2025 1.700 1.750 1.800 1.750 1.700 1.800 1.770 1.700 1.600 1.700 1.500 1.150 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.150 1.100 1.050 .500 .500 .500 .500 .625 .550 .800 .625 .650 .450 .350 .570 .570 .650 .600 .750 .600 .730 .730 .500 .750 .375 .650 .950 .350 .740 .800 1.700 1.750 1.800 1.750 1.700 1.800 1.770 1.700 1.605 1.700 1.500 1.150 1.125 1.125 1.125 1.150 1.100 1.050 .500 .500 .500 .500 .625 .550 .800 .625 .656 .450 .350 .570 .570 .650 .600 .750 .600 .730 .730 .500 .760 .375 .650 .950 .350 .740 .800 15,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,785,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 26,400,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,835,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,475,000.00 10,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10 000 000.00 15,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,785,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 9,998,000.00 26,400,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,835,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,472,381.25 10,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 14,992,500.00 50,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 1,072,917,783.75 100.137000 100.137000 100.187000 100.085000 100.652000 100.706000 100.605000 100.391000 100.732000 100.137000 100.149000 100.014000 100.016000 100.016000 100.016000 100.020000 100.028000 100.029000 100.011000 100.011000 100.011000 100.011000 100.007000 100.004000 99.968000 100.016586 99.986000 100.022000 99.998335 100.012000 100.012000 100.019000 100.044000 99.996000 100.028943 100.013206 100.013206 100.014468 100.022000 100.032650 100.042593 100.031839 99.940664 99.855753 100.018704 15,020,550.00 5,006,850.00 5,009,350.00 5,004,250.00 10,065,200.00 5,825,842.10 5,030,250.00 10,039,100.00 10,073,200.00 26,436,168.00 10,014,900.00 25,003,500.00 50,008,000.00 25,004,000.00 25,004,000.00 25,005,000.00 25,007,000.00 5,836,692.15 10,001,100.00 10,001,100.00 10,001,100.00 10,001,100.00 10,000,700.00 50,002,000.00 9,996,800.00 15,002,487.90 10,473,533.50 10,002,200.00 49,999,167.50 10,001,200.00 10,001,200.00 15,002,850.00 25,011,000.00 9,999,600.00 15,004,341.45 10,001,320.60 5,000,660.30 10,001,446.80 15,003,300.00 50,016,325.00 15,006,388.95 10,003,183.90 4,997,033.20 4,992,787.65 10 001,870 40 20,550.00 6,850.00 9,350.00 4,250.00 65,200.00 40,842.10 30,250.00 39,100.00 75,200.00 36,168.00 14,900.00 3,500.00 8,000.00 4,000.00 4,000.00 5,000.00 7,000.00 1,692.15 1,100.00 1,100.00 1,100.00 1,100.00 700.00 2,000.00 -3,200.00 2,487.90 1,152.25 2,200.00 -832.50 1,200.00 1,200.00 2,850.00 11,000.00 -400.00 4,341.45 1,320.60 660.30 1,446.80 10,800.00 16,325.00 6,388.95 3,183.90 -2,966.80 -7,212.35 1,870.40 1,074,802,000.42 1,884,2 2.998 3.112 2.995 3.112 3.463 3.622 3.500 3.655 4.410 4.641 4.401 4.644 4.404 4.644 3.286 3.392 3.518 3.660 4.435 4.666 2.592 2.666 2.709 2.767 2.229 2.271 2.229 2.271 2.229 2.271 1.745 1.773 2.730 2.786 1.761 1.786 2.307 2.326 2.307 2.326 2.307 2.326 2.307 2.326 3.795 3.852 2.838 2.866 4.759 4.868 3.814 3.871 3.812 3.871 3.103 3.134 1.878 1.885 3.350 3.392 3.350 3.392 3.831 3.890 3.836 3.890 4.807 4.910 3.858 3.912 4.813 4.912 4.813 4.912 3.881 3.929 4.810 4.912 1.913 1.923 4.854 4.945 4.817 4.948 2.484 2.499 4.900 5.003 4.892 5.003 1476: FHLMC-Var-SOR-Q A/360 3134GVHN1 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/23/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.201000 25,050,250.00 50,250.00 1.227 1.233 3134GVHN1 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/23/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.201000 25,050,250.00 50,250.00 1.227 1.233 3134GVHN1 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/23/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.201000 25,050,250.00 50,250.00 1.227 1.233 3134GVHN1 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/23/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.201000 25,050,250.00 50,250.00 1.227 1.233 3134GVHN1 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/23/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.201000 25,050,250.00 50,250.00 1.227 1.233 3134GVHV3 FHLMC 1.5Yr 09/30/2021 .400 .400 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.203000 25,050,750.00 50,750.00 1.247 1.252 .400 .400 150,000,000.00 150,000,000.00 100.201333 150,302,000.00 302,000.00 1.230 1.236 1500: FNMA -DISC NO1E 313589CM3 FNMA DISC N1E 03/01/2021 .200 .200 75,000,000.00 74,862,916.67 99.885000 74,913,750.00 50,833.33 .667 668 .200 75,000,000.00 74,862,916.67 99.885000 74,913,750.00 50,833.33 .667 1525: FNMA-Fxd-S30/360 3136G3WC5 FNMA4YrNc6MoE 07/13/2020 1.350 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.039000 10,003,900.00 3,900.00 .035 .036 3135G0160 FNMA 3Yr 07/30/2020 1.500 1.604 10,000,000.00 9,969,700.00 100.111000 10,011,100.00 41,400.00 .081 .082 3135G0178 FNMA 4.83Yr 10/05/2022 2.000 2.322 15,000,000.00 14,782,200.00 103.831000 15,574,650.00 792,450.00 2.189 2.266 3135G0194 FNMA 5Yr 01/19/2023 2.375 2.495 10,000,000.00 9,944,100.00 105.643000 10,564,300.00 620,200.00 2.436 2.556 3135G0U43 FNMA 4.41Yr 09/12/2023 2.875 2.333 30,000,000.00 30,670,500.00 108.371000 32,511,300.00 1,840,800.00 3.021 3.203 3136G41Y9 FNMA 5YrNc1YrQ 10/28/2024 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.418000 10,041,800.00 41,800.00 4.112 4.332 3136G4UG6 FNMA 5YrNc1YrB 02/19/2025 1.770 1.770 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.605000 5,030,250.00 30,250.00 4.404 4.644 3135G0Y49 FNMA 3YrNc6MoB 02/21/2023 1.700 1.700 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.215000 15,032,250.00 32,250.00 2.557 2.647 3135G0X24 FNMA 4.83Yr 01/07/2025 1.625 1.094 10,000,000.00 10,247,300.00 105.353000 10,535,300.00 288,000.00 4.324 4.526 3136G4WN9 FNMA 5YrNC1YrB 06/24/2025 .820 .820 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.167964 10,016,796.40 16,796.40 4.872 4.986 3136G4WB5 FNMA 5YrNc6MoQ 06/09/2025 .800 .794 5,000,000.00 5,001,562.50 99.960406 4,998,020.30 -3,542.20 4.834 4.945 3136G4XK4 FNMA 5YrNc2YrQ 06/30/2025 .650 .650 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.821011 4,991,050.55 -8,949.45 4.912 5.003 3136G4XU2 FNMA 5YrNc1Yr 06/30/2025 .700 .700 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.972000 9,997,200.00 -2,800.00 4.905 5.003 3136G4WH2 FNMA 5YrNc1YrQ 06/30/2025 .800 .800 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.043925 10,004,392.50 4,392.50 4.892 5.003 1.739 1.660 155,000,000.00 155,615,362.50 102.782135 . 9,312,309.75 3,696,947.25 1576: FNMA-Var-SOFT -Q A/360 3135G02H5 FNMA 1.5Yr 09/16/2021 .240 .240 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.024000 25,006,000.00 6,000.00 1.203 1.214 3135G02F9 FNMA 1Yr 03/16/2021 .200 .200 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.986000 24,996,500.00 -3,500.00 .708 .710 3135G02K8 FNMA 2Yr 03/16/2022 .300 .300 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.090000 25,022,500.00 22,500.00 1.693 1.710 3135G0367 FNMA 2Yr 04/07/2022 .430 .430 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.268000 25,067,000.00 67,000.00 1.761 1.770 3135G03J0 FNMA 2Yr 04/15/2022 .470 .470 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.389000 25,097,250.00 97,250.00 1.782 1.792 .328 .328 125,000, 000.00 125,000,000.00 100.151400 125,189,250.00 189,250.00 1.430 1700:FHLB-DISC NO1E 313384A66 FHLB DISC N1E 08/03/2020 .520 .521 50,000,000.00 49,899,611.11 99.986000 49,993,000.00 93,388.89 .093 .093 313384L64 FHLB DISC N1E 10/22/2020 .300 .301 75,000,000.00 74,867,500.00 99.953000 74,964,750.00 97,250.00 .311 .312 313384D71 FHLB DISC ME 08/28/2020 .050 .050 50,000,000.00 49,989,513.89 99.976000 49,988,000.00 -1,513.89 .161 .162 313384ZA0 FHLB DISC N1E 07/06/2020 .120 .120 50,000,000.00 49,984,333.33 99.998000 49,999,000.00 14,666.67 .016 .016 313384ZC6 FHLB DISC ME 07/08/2020 .165 .165 50,000,000.00 49,979,145.83 99.998000 49,999,000.00 19,854.17 .022 .022 313384ZJ1 FHLB DISC N1E 07/14/2020 .145 .145 50,000,000.00 49,980,465.28 99.996000 49,998,000.00 17,534.72 .038 .038 3133847S1 FHLB DISC ME 07/22/2020 .120 .120 25,000,000.00 24,992,416.67 99.993000 24,998,250.00 5,833.33 .060 .060 313384ZU6 FHLB DISC N1E 07/24/2020 .115 .115 25,000,000.00 24,992,732.64 99.992000 24,998,000.00 5,267.36 .066 .066 313384M 63 FHLB DISC ME 10/30/2020 .140 .140 50,000,000.00 49,964,222.22 99.950000 49,975,000.00 10,777.78 .334 .334 313384ZX0 FHLB DISC ME 07/27/2020 .100 .100 50,000,000.00 49,987,638.89 99.991000 49,995,500.00 7,861.11 .074 .074 313384681 FHLB DISC N1E 08/13/2020 .100 .100 50,000,000.00 49,985,416.67 99.982000 49,991,000.00 5,583.33 .120 .121 3133842F15 FHLB DISC NTE 07/13/2020 .090 .090 75,000,000.00 74,986,125.00 99.996000 74,997,000.00 10,875.00 .036 .036 313384A66 FHLB DISC N1E 08/03/2020 .110 .110 40,000,000.00 39,989,000.00 99.986000 39,994,400.00 5,400.00 .093 .093 313384A82 FHLB DISC NTE 08/05/2020 .119 .119 22,000,000.00 21,993,382.28 99.985000 21,996,700.00 3,317.72 .098 .099 313384A82 FHLB DISC N1E 08/05/2020 .119 .119 30,000,000.00 29,990,975.83 99.985000 29,995,500.00 4,524.17 .098 .099 3133847X0 FHLB DISC NTE 07/27/2020 .105 .105 50,000,000.00 49,988,916.67 99.991000 49,995,500.00 6,583.33 .074 .074 112 COUN1Y OFRIVERSIDE1REASJRERTAX COLLECTOR 10 Month End Portfolio Holdings CUSP Description Maturity Coupon Yield Par Book Market Market Unrealized Modified Years To Date To Mat Value Value Price Value Gain/Loss Duration Maturity 313384C64 313384C80 313384C80 313384D71 313384K65 313384N39 313384ZX0 313385BY1 FHLB DISC NTE FHLB DISC N1E FHLB DISC ME FHLB DISC N1E FHLB DISC ME FHLB DISC N1E FHLB DISC N1E FHLBDISC NTE 08/ 19/ 2020 08/21/2020 08/21/2020 08/28/2020 10/14/2020 11/04/2020 07/ 27/ 2020 02/16/2021 .120 .120 .120 .148 .165 .155 .100 .165 .152 .120 .120 .120 .148 .165 .155 .100 .165 .152 29,000,000.00 31,000,000.00 39,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 1,066,000,000.00 28,991,300.00 30,990,596.67 38,988,170.00 49,981,294.44 24,985,447.92 49,971,368.06 49,995,416.67 49,945,687.50 1,065,420,677.57 99.980000 99.979000 99.979000 99.976000 99.956000 99.941000 99.991000 99.891000 99.976229 28,994,200.00 30,993,490.00 38,991,810.00 49,988,000.00 24,989,000.00 49,970,500.00 49,995,500.00 49,945,500.00 1,065,746,600.00 .137 .142 .142 .161 .290 .347 2,900.00 2,893.33 3,640.00 6,705.56 3,552.08 -868.06 83.33 074 .074 -187.50 .631 .633 325,922.43 .156 .137 .142 .142 .162 .290 .348 1725:FHLB-Fxd-S30/360 3130A7PV1 FHLB 5Yr 04/05/2021 1.375 1.390 5,000,000.00 4,996,350.00 100.918000 5,045,900.00 49,550.00 .755 .764 3130AC2C7 FHLB 3YrNc1YrE 08/28/2020 2.000 1.790 10,000,000.00 10,061,000.00 100.279000 10,027,900.00 -33,100.00 .160 .162 3130ABZE9 FHLB 3YrNc1YrE 08/28/2020 1.650 1.650 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.224000 5,011,200.00 11,200.00 .160 .162 313379Q69 FHLB 4.5 Yr 06/10/2022 2.125 2.182 7,975,000.00 7,955,620.75 103.593000 8,261,541.75 305,921.00 1.892 1.945 3130ADFW7 FHLB 3Yr 01/25/2021 2.200 2.212 15,000,000.00 14,994,900.00 101.148000 15,172,200.00 177,300.00 .558 .573 3130A0XD7 FHLB 3Yr 03/12/2021 2.375 2.484 10,000,000.00 9,968,000.00 101.524000 10,152,400.00 184,400.00 .686 .699 3130A0XD7 FHLB 3Yr 03/12/2021 2.375 2.489 10,000,000.00 9,966,500.00 101.524000 10,152,400.00 185,900.00 .686 .699 313378WG2 FHLB 4.08Yr 03/11/2022 2.500 2.619 10,000,000.00 9,954,700.00 103.857000 10,385,700.00 431,000.00 1.639 1.696 313382AX1 FHLB 4.9Yr 03/10/2023 2.125 2.716 11,750,000.00 11,432,397.50 104.846000 12,319,405.00 887,007.50 2.581 2.693 3130ALBU9 FHLB 3Yr 05/07/2021 2.700 2.725 7,650,000.00 7,644,492.00 102.139000 7,813,633.50 169,141.50 .835 .852 3130AE6U9 FHLB 3Yr 05/07/2021 2.700 2.703 10,000,000.00 9,999,100.00 102.139000 10,213,900.00 214,800.00 .835 .852 313378WG2 FHLB 2.91Yr 03/11/2022 2.500 2.308 30,000,000.00 30,158,100.00 103.857000 31,157,100.00 999,000.00 1.642 1.696 3130AHE33 FHLB 5YrNc1YrQ 10/21/2024 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.448000 10,044,800.00 44,800.00 4.093 4.312 3130AHE66 FHLB 5YrNc1YrQ 10/21/2024 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.450000 10,045,000.00 45,000.00 4.093 4.312 3130AHG64 FHLB 5YrNc1YrQ 10/28/2024 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.478000 10,047,800.00 47,800.00 4.112 4.332 3130AHG31 FHLB 5YrNc2YrQ 10/29/2024 1.800 1.800 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 101.852000 25,463,000.00 463,000.00 4.136 4.334 3130AHM59 FHLB 1.75YrNc9MoB 08/27/2024 1.875 1.886 11,200,000.00 11,194,400.00 100.211000 11,223,632.00 29,232.00 3.975 4.162 3130AHM M2 FHLB 4.5YrNc1YrA 06/11/2024 1.850 1.850 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.608000 15,091,200.00 91,200.00 3.786 3.951 3130AHN66 FHLB 5YrNc1YrA 12/16/2024 1.940 1.940 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.668000 10,066,800.00 66,800.00 4.251 4.466 3130AHQ R7 FHLB 5YrNc1YrA 12/23/2024 1.970 1.970 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.548000 5,027,400.00 27,400.00 4.267 4.485 3130AHVZ3 FHLB 5YrNc6MoQ 01/13/2025 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.048000 10,004,800.00 4,800.00 4.276 4.542 3130AHWB5 FHLB 5YrNc6MoQ 01/21/2025 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.100000 10,010,000.00 10,000.00 4.298 4.564 3130AHWB5 FHLB 5YrNc6MoQ 01/21/2025 2.000 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.100000 10,010,000.00 10,000.00 4.298 4.564 3130AHXA6 FHLB 2.5YrNc6MoB 07/22/2022 1.750 1.750 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.075000 50,037,500.00 37,500.00 2.001 2.060 3130AJ5F2 FHLB 5YrNc 1Yr 02/12/2025 1.750 1.750 7,250,000.00 7,250,000.00 100.079000 7,255,727.50 5,727.50 4.388 4.625 3130AJF95 FHLB 5YrNc 1YrA 03/24/2025 1.300 1.300 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.052000 10,005,200.00 5,200.00 4.561 4.734 3130AJB65 FHLB4YrNc6Mo 03/25/2024 1.620 1.620 6,200,000.00 6,200,000.00 100.148000 6,209,176.00 9,176.00 3.596 3.737 3130AJAX7 FHLB 4YrNc1Yr 03/25/2024 1.550 1.550 10,300,000.00 10,300,000.00 100.499000 10,351,397.00 51,397.00 3.602 3.737 3130AJC23 FHLB 5YrNc6MoA 03/25/2025 1.500 1.500 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.054000 5,002,700.00 2,700.00 4.538 4.737 3130AJMP1 FHLB5Mo 10/15/2020 .145 .145 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 99.986079 49,993,039.50 -6,960.50 .293 .293 3130AJSN0 FHLB 7Mo 01/29/2021 .160 .173 50,000,000.00 49,996,250.00 99.987706 49,993,853.00 -2 397.00 .580 .584 1.588 1.604 447,325,000.0(11 447,071,810.25 100.9548551,596,305.25 4, 1767: FHLB-Var-M A/360 3130A9FU0 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 .340 .340 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.040000 10,004,000.00 4,000.00 3130A9FM8 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 .340 .340 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.040000 15,006,000.00 6,000.00 3130A9FR7 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 .334 .334 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.033000 10,003,300.00 3,300.00 3130A9FR7 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 .334 .334 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.033000 15,004,950.00 4,950.00 3130AJ2N8 FHLB 1.16Yr 05/03/2021 .168 .261 25,000,000.00 24,978,764.50 99.958000 24,989,500.00 10,735.50 .281 .312 75,000,000.00 74,978,764.50 100.010333 75,007,750.00 28,985.50 .228 .230 .228 .230 .244 .247 .244 .247 .836 .841 .43R 1770: FHLB-Va r-Q A/360 3130A8NF6 FHLB 3Yr 07/01/2020 1.558 1.558 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 .003 .003 3130AJAS8 FHLB 1.25Yr 05/26/2021 .270 .270 75,000,000.00 75,000,000.00 99.982000 74,986,500.00 -13,500.00 .899 .904 3130AHVB FHLB 6Mo 09/11/2020 .095 -.491 50,000,000.00 50,075,000.00 99.996000 49,998,000.00 -77,000.00 .200 .200 3130AHVB FHLB6Mo 09/11/2020 .095 -.491 50,000,000.00 50,075,000.00 99.996000 49,998,000.00 -77,000.00 .200 .200 .050 200,000,000.00 200,150,000.00 99.991250* 199,982,500.00 -167,500.00 .437 .439 1786: FHLB-Var-SOFR-Q A/360 3130AJEC9 FHLB6Mo 09/11/2020 .165 .165 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.995000 24,998,750.00 -1,250.00 .200 .200 .165 .165 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.995000 24,998,750.00 -1,250.00 .200 .200 1925: FFCB-Fxd-S 30/ 360 3133EHUL5 FFC B 3Yr 08/10/2020 1.890 1.890 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.211000 5,010,550.00 10,550.00 111 112 31330HJ95 FFC B 3Yr 10/26/2020 1.750 1.760 20,000,000.00 19,994,000.00 100.501000 20,100,200.00 106,200.00 .320 .323 3133EH6X6 FFC B4Yr 01/12/2022 2.200 2.365 10,000,000.00 9,938,000.00 103.041000 10,304,100.00 366,100.00 1.483 1.537 3133EJEM7 FFC B 3Yr 03/01/2021 2.500 2.501 10,000,000.00 9,999,700.00 101.648000 10,164,800.00 165,100.00 .655 .668 3133EJCE7 FFC B 2.8Yr 02/12/2021 2.350 2.474 15,000,000.00 14,948,670.00 101.302000 15,195,300.00 246,630.00 .603 .622 3133EJKN8 FFC B 5Yr 04/11/2023 2.700 2.721 10,000,000.00 9,990,300.00 106.630000 10,663,000.00 672,700.00 2.646 2.781 3133EJNS4 FFC B 3Yr 05/10/2021 2.700 2.747 10,000,000.00 9,986,600.00 102.117000 10,211,700.00 225,100.00 .843 .860 3133EJD48 FFC B 5Yr 10/02/2023 3.050 3.095 10,000,000.00 9,979,300.00 108.807000 10,880,700.00 901,400.00 3.054 3.258 3133EJT74 FFC B 2.9Yr 11/15/2021 3.050 2.922 10,000,000.00 10,035,700.00 103.909000 10,390,900.00 355,200.00 1.333 1.378 3133EKRP3 FFC B 5YrNc2YrA 06/21/2024 2.220 2.220 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 101.509000 10,150,900.00 150,900.00 3.783 3.978 3133EKM45 FFC B 3Yr 09/06/2022 1.500 1.529 14,435,000.00 14,422,874.60 102.679000 14,821,713.65 398,839.05 2.130 2.186 31330KM94 FFC B4YrNc1YrA 09/11/2023 1.900 1.900 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.167000 10,016,700.00 16,700.00 3.071 3.200 3133E<2A3 FFC B5YrNc1YrA 10/15/2024 1.920 1.920 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.372000 10,037,200.00 37,200.00 4.085 4.296 3133E4(469 FFC B 5YrNc2YrA 10/28/2024 1.820 1.820 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 101.329000 10,132,900.00 132,900.00 4.131 4.332 3133EKP75 FFC B4.9Yr 09/17/2024 1.600 1.672 6,128,000.00 6,107,471.20 104.987000 6,433,603.36 326,132.16 4.040 4.219 3133EK4A1 FFC B4YrNc1YrA 10/30/2023 1.930 1.930 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.451000 5,022,550.00 22,550.00 3.204 3.334 3133B<QA7 FFCB4.9Yr 09/10/2024 2.080 1.688 2,064,000.00 2,101,585.44 106.967000 2,207,798.88 106,213.44 3.982 4.200 31330LM D3 FFC B 3YrNc1YrA 02/10/2023 1.600 1.600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.579000 10,057,900.00 57,900.00 2.532 2.616 3133ELM D3 FFC B 3YrNc1YrA 02/10/2023 1.600 1.600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.579000 10,057,900.00 57,900.00 2.532 2.616 3133ELMJO FFC B4YrNc1YrC 02/12/2024 1.690 1.690 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.661000 5,033,050.00 33,050.00 3.472 3.622 3133ELJD7 FFC B1.16YrNc5MoC 04/22/2021 1.620 1.620 27,910,000.00 27,910,000.00 100.082000 27,932,886.20 22,886.20 .801 .811 3133ELM D3 FFC B 3YrNc1YrA 02/10/2023 1.600 1.600 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.579000 15,086,850.00 86,850.00 2.532 2.616 3133E1NF7 FFC B 3.5YrNc1YrA 08/18/2023 1.640 1.640 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.670000 10,067,000.00 67,000.00 3.024 3.134 3133EN09 FFC B4YrNc2YrA 02/28/2024 1.550 1.550 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 101.971000 5,098,550.00 98,550.00 3.533 3.666 3133ELQ E7 FFC B5YrNc1YrA 03/03/2025 1.640 1.640 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.919000 10,091,900.00 91,900.00 4.459 4.677 3133ELQ P2 FFC B4YrNc6MoA 03/04/2024 1.600 1.600 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.167000 15,025,050.00 25,050.00 3.540 3.679 3133EL1C8 FFC B5YrNc1YrA 03/17/2025 1.125 1.125 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.233000 10,023,300.00 23,300.00 4.564 4.715 3133ELUX0 FFC B 2YrNc1YrA 03/30/2022 1.000 1.000 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.069000 25,017,250.00 17,250.00 1.726 1.748 3133ELUX0 FFC B 2YrNc1YrA 03/30/2022 1.000 1.000 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.069000 25,017,250.00 17,250.00 1.726 1.748 3133ELVY7 FFC B1YrNc3MoA 04/08/2021 .450 .450 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.003000 50,001,500.00 1,500.00 .769 .773 31330LWF7 FFC B1YrNc3MoA 07/13/2021 .500 .500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.984000 24,996,000.00 -4,000.00 1.030 1.036 3133ELWK6 FFC B1.5YrNc6MoA 10/20/2021 .550 .550 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.999000 14,999,850.00 -150.00 1.298 1.307 31330 XC3 FFC B4YrNc1YrA 04/22/2024 .800 .800 12,000,000.00 12,000,000.00 100.055000 12,006,600.00 6,600.00 3.741 3.814 3133ELYJ7 FFCB4YrNc3MoA 05/06/2024 .740 .740 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.003000 5,000,150.00 150.00 3.785 3.852 3133ELH80 FFC B 5YrNc2YrA 06/10/2025 .680 .680 5,025,000.00 5,025,000.00 100.019142 5,025,961.89 961.89 4.852 4.948 1.477 1.494 447,562,000.00 447,439,201.24 101.054952 452,283,563.98 4,844,362.74 2.070 1930: FFCB-Var-M A/360 3133EGCE3 FFCB5Yr 05/25/2021 .455 .455 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.213000 10,021,300.00 21,300.00 900 .901 113 CO UNIY 0 F PJV EREIDE 1REA9JRER TAX C O LLECIO R 11 Month End Portfolio Holdings CUSP Description Maturity Coupon Yield Date To Mat Pa r Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Modified Years To Gain/Loss Duration Maturity 3133EGCE3 FFCB5Yr 3133EG4C6 FFCB3.9Yr 3133EJDG1 FFCB5Yr 3133EJJEO FFCB3.5Yr 1936: FFCB-Var-SOFR-Q A/360 3133EK163 FFCB2Yr 3133EK6V3 FFCB3Yr 3133B(6V3 FFCB3Yr 31336BV3 FFCB3Yr 3133EK6V3 FFCB3Yr 31336BV3 FFCB3Yr 3133ELCXO FFCB3Yr 3133ELCXO FFCB3Yr 3133ELCXO FFCB3Yr 3133ELCX0 FFCB3Yr 3133ELCXO FFCB3Yr 3133ELCX0 FFCB3Yr 1950: FM AC-Fxd -S 30/ 360 3132X03B5 3132X04F5 31422BWE6 FAMCA 4.9Yr FAMCA 2.91Yr FAMCA 1YrNc6MoB 1965: FMAC-Va r-M A/360 3132X0S77 FAMCA 3Yr 3132X0U90 FAMCA 3Yr 31422BWC0 FAMCA 1.6Yr 31422BYJ3 FAMCA 1.5Yr 1986: FM AC-Va r-SOFR-Q A/360 31422BWG1 FAMCA 1Yr 2350: MUNISS30/360 3733845L6 GEORGIA STALE 419792NF9 HAWAII STAIE 13063DAC2 STAIE OF CA UFO RN IA 76222RWU2 RHODEI9AND ST& PROV 13063DGA0 STAIE OF CA UFO RNIA 13063DAC2 STA1EOFCAUFORNIA 13063DAD0 STAIE OF CA UFO RN IA 544351MM8 CIIY OF LOSANGELES 13063DADO STAIE OF CA UFO RN IA 13063DADO STA1EOFCAUFO RNIA 13063DGA0 STAIE OF CA UFO RN IA 419792YK6 STA1EOFHAWAII 419792YL4 STALE OF HAWAII 368079HQ5 GAVILAN CMN1YCLG GO 365298X94 GARDEN GROVEUSD 835569GM0 SONOMA CO JUNIOR GO 05/ 25/ 2021 01/18/2022 02/21/2023 10/ 04/ 2021 09/24/2021 11/07/2022 11/07/2022 11/07/2022 11/07/2022 11/07/2022 12/09/2022 12/09/2022 12/09/2022 12/09/2022 12/09/2022 12/09/2022 06/30/2023 07/23/2021 03/18/2021 04/ 23/ 2021 05/ 10/ 2021 05/ 28/ 2021 10/18/2021 1111 3020: COMMERCIAL PAPER 03785DJ98 APPLE 63763PGD5 NAIL SEC CLEARING CO RP 63763PGD5 NA1LfC CLEARING CORP 63763PGFO NAIL SEC CLEARING CO RP 63763PGG8 NAILS--C CLEARING CO RP 3130: C O RP-Fxd-S 30/ 360 594918BG8 MICROSOFTCORP 478160BS2 JOHNSON & JOHNSON 478160B82 JOHNSON & JOHNSON 478160BS2 JOHNSON & JOHNSON 594918BG8 MICROSOFTCORP 053015AD5 AUTOMATIC DATA 4070: CD/1D-Q A/365 48128LU72 JP MORGAN 48128LV22 JPMORGAN 4500: NCD-Mat A/360 06052T-178 BANK OF AM ERICA .455 .434 .260 .204 .347 .220 .390 .390 .390 .390 .390 .400 .400 .400 .400 .400 .400 .385 2.850 2.840 .720 1.664 .235 .197 .254 .254 .244 03/25/2021 .190 190 07/01/2020 10/01/2020 04/01/2021 04/01/2021 04/01/2021 04/01/2021 04/01/2022 09/01/2021 04/01/2022 04/01/2022 04/01/2021 01/01/2021 01/01/2022 08/01/2020 08/01/2020 08/01/2020 09/ 09/ 2020 07/ 13/ 2020 07/13/2020 07/ 15/ 2020 07/16/2020 dEL 11/03/2020 03/01/2021 03/01/2021 03/01/2021 11/03/2020 09/ 15/ 2020 Total Fund 11 / 16/ 2020 11/20/2020 3.000 1.370 2.625 2.750 2.800 2.625 2.367 4.000 2.367 2.367 2.800 3.250 2.770 2.470 1.875 1.837 1.630 .140 .140 .140 .150 .455 -.151 .260 .204 .212 .220 .390 .390 .390 .390 .390 .400 .400 .400 .400 .400 .400 .385 2.964 2.864 .720 1.722 .235 .197 .254 .254 .244 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 65,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 9,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 14,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 249,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 45,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 110,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,139,095.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 65,139,095.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 9,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 14,000,000.00 24,000,000.00 249,000,000.00 9,947,900.00 9,993,300.00 25,000,000.00 44,941,200.00 25,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 110,000,000.00 100.213000 100.268000 99.611000 100.009000 100.039692 99.972000 99.916000 99.916000 99.916000 99.916000 99.916000 99.914000 99.914000 99.914000 99.914000 99.914000 99.914000 99.918418 107.465000 102.539000 100.011000 102.229222 99.971000 99.942000 99.982000 99.974000 99.972227 .190 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.985000 _.1.90 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.985000 1.370 1.319 2.011 2.551 2.799 2.850 2.960 2.919 3.120 3.290 2.680 2.733 2.770 2.470 1.875 1.837 2.724 1.647 .140 .140 .140 .150 .440 .443 2.000 1.650 1.650 1.650 2.000 2.250 1.895 1.648 1.623 1.629 2.543 2.646 2.625 3.149 2.912 1.812 2.568 1.648 1.623 1.629 6,825,000.00 2,250,000.00 14,400,000.00 3,150,000.00 16,000,000.00 1,795,000.00 1,500,000.00 8,915,000.00 17,695,000.00 25,000,000.00 10,825,000.00 12,745,000.00 3,500,000.00 1,650,000.00 1,000,000.00 700,000.00 127,950,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 250 000 000.00 25,000,000.00 12,000,000.00 12,969,000.00 10,295,000.00 10,100,000.00 13,976,000.00 84,340,000.00 25,000,000.00 75,000,000.00 100,000,000.00 7,254,770.25 2,254,320.00 14,688,720.00 3,167,766.00 16,000,640.00 1,784,301.80 1,468,800.00 9,200,993.20 17,256,340.95 24,275,250.00 10,852,170.75 12,864,165.75 3,500,000.00 1,650,000.00 1,000,000.00 700,000.00 127,918,238.70 100.000000 100.113000 101.543000 101.274000 101.673000 101.543000 103.029000 104.134000 103.029000 103.029000 101.673000 101.092000 102.579000 100.127000 100.056000 100.088000 102.09556` 49,481,569.44 99.970833 49,996,111.11 99.996000 49,996,305.56 99.996000 49,995,916.67 99.995333 49,995,416.67 99.995000 249,465,319.45 99.990633 24,649,750.00 11,663,160.00 12,617,410.41 9,955,059.10 9,929,411.00 14,021,841.28 82,836,631.79 100.407000 100.820000 100.820000 100.820000 100.407000 100.221000 100.548860 25,000,000.00 100.000000 75,000,000.00 100.000000 100,000,000.00 100.000000 10,021,300.00 15,040,200.00 14,941,650.00 15,001,350.00 65,025,800.00 14,995,800.00 24,979,000.00 24,979,000.00 24,979,000.00 14,987,400.00 24,979,000.00 8,992,260.00 23,979,360.00 23,979,360.00 23,979,360.00 13,987,960.00 23,979,360.00 248,796,860.00 10,746,500.00 10,253,900.00 25,002,750.00 46,003,150.00 24,992,750.00 9,994,200.00 24,995,500.00 49,987,000.00 109,969,450.00 24,996,250.00 24,996,250.00 6,825,000.00 2,252,542.50 14,622,192.00 3,190,131.00 16,267,680.00 1,822,696.85 1,545,435.00 9,283,546.10 18,230,981.55 25,757,250.00 11,006,102.25 12,884,175.40 3,590,265.00 1,652,095.50 1,000,560.00 700,616.00 130,631,269.15 49,985,416.50 49,998,000.00 49,998,000.00 49,997,666.50 49,997,500.00 249 976.583.00 25,101,750.00 12,098,400.00 13,075,345.80 10,379,419.00 10,141,107.00 14,006,886.96 84,802,908.76 25,000,000.00 75,000,000.00 100,000,000.00 21,300.00 .900 .901 -98,895.00 1.529 1.553 -58,350.00 2.585 2.647 1,350.00 1.245 1.263 -113,295.00 1.512 -4,200.00 1.220 1.236 -21,000.00 2.299 2.356 -21,000.00 2.299 2.356 -21,000.00 2.299 2.356 -12,600.00 2.299 2.356 -21,000.00 2.299 2.356 -7,740.00 2.388 2.444 -20,640.00 2.388 2.444 -20,640.00 2.388 2.444 -20,640.00 2.388 2.444 -12,040.00 2.388 2.444 -20,640.00 2.388 2.444 -203,140.00 2.276 798,600.00 2.854 3.000 260,600.00 1.028 1.063 2,750.00 .712 .715 1,061,950.00 1.283 -7,250.00 .808 .814 -5,800.00 .854 .860 -4,500.00 .913 .910 -13,000.00 1.293 1.301 -30,550.00 1.057 1.061 -3,750.00 .736 .734 -3,750.00 .736 .734 -429,770.25 .003 .003 -1,777.50 .253 .255 -66,528.00 .739 .753 22,365.00 .737 .753 267,040.00 .736 .753 38,395.05 .736 .753 76,635.00 1.693 1.753 82,552.90 1.124 1.173 974,640.60 1.691 1.753 1,482,000.00 1.690 1.753 153,931.50 .736 .753 20,009.65 .488 .507 90,265.00 1.442 1.507 2,095.50 .087 .088 560.00 087 .088 616.00 087 088 2,713,030.45 1.028 503,847.06 .191 .195 1,888.89 .036 .036 1,694.44 .036 .036 1,749.83 .041 .041 2,083.33 .044 .044 511.263.55 .0l 452,000.00 .341 .345 435,240.00 .657 .668 457,935.39 .657 .668 424,359.90 .655 .668 211,696.00 .340 .345 -14,954.32 .209 .211 1,966,276.97 .451 0.00 .375 .381 0.00 .386 .392 0.00 .383 .389 07/01/2020 1.850 1.850 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 1.850 1.850 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 .790 .774 7,778,129,944.14 7,775,589,310.59 100.335408 7,804,218,376.34 28,629,065.75 .003 .003 .003 .003 1.093 1.124 Grand Total .790 .774 7,778,129,944.14 7,775,589,310.59 100.335408 7,804,218,376.34 28,629,065.75 1.093 1.124 114 COUNTY OF RVERSDEIREASJR RTAX COLLECTOR 12 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX C O LLEC TO R CAPITAL MARKETS COUNTY A D M IN ISTRA TIV E CENTER 4080 LEMON STREET, 4TH FLOOR, RIVERSIDE, CA 92502-2205 WWW.0 0 UNTYTREASURER.O RG AGENDA ITEM 5E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 14, 2020 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Jillian Guizado, Planning and Programming Manager Jenny Chan, Senior Management Analyst THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Adoption WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Adopt and confirm the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (CMCP) is consistent with California Transportation Commission guidelines for CMCPs; and 2) Authorize staff to make minor changes as needed to keep the document current and accurate. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In 2017, the California state legislature approved Senate Bill (SB 1), which created and funded a new competitive grant program: Solutions for Congested Corridors Program (SCCP), among others. SB 1 requires that SCCP funding be available for projects that make specific performance improvements and are part of a comprehensive corridor plan designed to reduce congestion in highly traveled corridors by providing more transportation choices for residents, commuters, and visitors to the area of the corridor while preserving the character of the local community and creating opportunities for neighborhood enhancement projects. SB 1 dictates that the California Transportation Commission (CTC) will develop guidelines for the programs the legislation created. The SCCP guidelines the CTC adopted require that projects awarded funding be included in a CMCP. The CTC adopted guidelines for CMCPs in 2018. As such, regional transportation planning agencies and county transportation commissions throughout California have begun developing CMCPs to ensure their projects' eligibility in upcoming cycles of SCCP grant funding. DISCUSSION: In partnership with San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA), Caltrans District 8, and Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), Commission staff applied for a Caltrans Sustainable Transportation Planning Grant to prepare the Inland Empire Comprehensive Agenda Item 5E 116 Multimodal Corridor Plan (IE CMCP). The team received a $500,000 grant and SCAG, as the lead for the project, awarded a contract to Cambridge Systematics. Staff has been developing the IE CMCP since July 2019 in coordination with Cambridge Systematics as the lead consultant. The IE CMCP is intended to go beyond traditional freeway planning efforts and identify potential multimodal infrastructure opportunities within Westem Riverside County and the valley -area of San Bernardino County. In the future, Commission staff can work with Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) on developing a multimodal corridor plan for the Coachella Valley or to update the IE CMCP to include the Coachella Valley. Completing the IE CMCP is required for regional transportation planning agencies to compete for SCCP funding in the current cycle and thereafter. Projects proposed for SCCP funding need to be identified in a multimodal corridor plan to be eligible. The project team developed the IE CMCP in accordance with the adopted CMCP Guidelines. As specified in the guidelines, "There is no specific format that a CMCP must meet. Plans are unique to the region in which they are prepared." By the same token, the definition of a corridor is also context sensitive. "A corridor can be defined as a linear geographic area with one or more modes of transportation ... Origins and destinations, land use, place types and existing and future developments that surround the transportation infrastructure influences how the corridor and its limits are defined." The CMCP guidelines require that a number of topics be discussed in the plan, such as: • Clear demonstration of collaboration amongst stakeholders; • Short, medium, and long-term planning horizon; • Specific corridor objectives; • Multimodal consideration for, and approaches to, addressing transportation issues; • Identification and evaluation of performance measures for recommended projects and strategies; and • Consistency with the SCAG Regional Transportation Plan, the California Transportation Plan, and other regional or local planning documents. The IE CMCP was originally structured as two very large corridors: north -south from Temecula to Victorville and east -west, from Banning/Beaumont to Los Angeles and Orange counties. It was realized during the study process that these very large corridors contain within them a great deal of diversity, so much so that it was becoming difficult to define the problems and analyze the solutions in an effective, multimodal way. Variations include: terrain/geography, land uses, congestion levels, community composition and needs, existing multimodal networks, and strategies and solutions. As such, it was determined the problems and strategies could be more clearly identified by breaking down the two corridors into sub -corridors. The study team engaged in a collaborative process for determining local geographic sub -corridors. Ultimately, five sub - corridors were identified for each of the two large corridors. The sub -corridors are described as areas between cities or geographically definable points, such as county lines, and are identified below: Agenda Item 5E 117 North -South Sub -Corridors (Figure 1) 1. Victorville to San Bernardino 2. San Bernardino to Riverside 3. Cajon Pass to Eastvale 4. Riverside to Temecula 5. Beaumont to Temecula Figure 1. North -South IE CMCP Sub -Corridors r e Valley / 1} 1 i)7.n! Sub -corridors I 1 'Vctorville to San Bemare.no 1-1 San Bema,dino to Riverside Cajon 10 Eastuale 77 Riverside to Temecula Beaumont 10 Temecula East-West Sub -Corridors (Figure 2) 1. Apple Valley to LA County Line 2. Banning to Rialto 3. Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line 4. Riverside to Orange County Line 5. Hemet to Corona Agenda Item 5E 118 Figure 2. East-West IE CMCP Sub -Corridors Foil Da R:alFa �. rr 1 / C N :. _enanron�u Sub -corridors ▪ Apple Valley to LA County Line ▪ Banning to Rlalto ▪ Riverside to LA County Line Riverside to Orange County Lune Hemet to Corona N 275 55 Miles The IE CMCP (Attachment 1) provides a review of the characteristics, future growth potential, problems, opportunities, strategic issues, and approaches that may apply to each of the 10 identified sub -corridors. To illustrate such strategies intended to define future multimodal investments, consider the Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor, which contains the State Route 71/91 Interchange Improvement Project for which the Commission recently submitted an SCCP grant application to fully fund the construction phase of the project. After defining the sub -corridor and identifying: key transportation facilities, land use and socioeconomic factors, travel patterns, congestion/delay and vehicle miles traveled, transit usage, and projected future conditions, each IE CMCP sub -corridor analysis results in a list of problems to be addressed and the strategies for doing so. In summary, the problems to be addressed in this sub -corridor are: • SR-91 being heavily congested by long commute and freight trips connecting multiple counties; • Lack of adequate alternate routes due to topography; • Jobs -housing imbalance due to the affordable housing dichotomy between Riverside County and Los Angeles and Orange counties. Agenda Item 5E 119 Some of the strategies identified for addressing these problems include: • Complete the SR-71/91 connector and SR-241/91 connector to facilitate commute and goods movement from Orange County to Riverside and San Bernardino counties; • Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the IE/OC line and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements to existing Metrolink stations; and • Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. Each sub -corridor may have features in common with other sub -corridors, as well as features that are unique to that sub -corridor. Thus, the strategies will be tailored accordingly to the problems identified in each sub -corridor. The intent is to capture the themes or strategies that define the future investments in multimodal improvements in each sub -corridor while being responsive to its environmental and community characteristics. Overthe last 15 months, the project team worked diligently to complete the IE CMCP by October 1, the date the team committed to completing the plan. Some of the more recent activities completed include: identifying corridor characteristics, engaging with local agencies, reviewing existing transportation plans, and defining specific sub -corridor strategies within the study area. Staff presented elements of the IE CMCP to the Commission's Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) in both March and May 2020. The TAC also approved in concept the final draft I E CMCP on September 21, 2020 and the Commission's Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee voted unanimously to adopt the IE CMCP on September 28, 2020. Staff recommends that the Commission adopt the final draft IE CMCP and authorize staff to make minor updates as necessary to keep the plan current. Once the IE CMCP is finalized, the study team will continue collaborating to make minor revisions as needed. The study team envisions updating the IE CMCP every few years. There is no financial impact for this item. Attachment: IE CMCP Final Draft Approved by the Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee on September 28, 2020 In Favor: 9 Abstain: 0 No: 0 Agenda Item 5E 120 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Eh. edfrans CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Alm cta San Bernardino co-12i Transpoilation Authaltt- h.h BETTER TOMO'', 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 122 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Table of Contents Executive Summary ES-1 Multimodal Corridor Planning Guidelines ES-3 Goals, Objectives and Performance Metrics ES-5 Sub -corridor Focus ES-6 Sub -corridor Problems and Strategic Approach ES-7 Strategic Approach for Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor ES-8 Problems to Be Addressed ES-8 Strategies ES-8 Strategic Approach for San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor ES-9 Problems to Be Addressed ES-9 Strategies ES-10 Strategic Approach for Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor ES-11 Problems to Be Addressed ES-11 Strategies ES-11 Strategic Approach for Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor ES-13 Problems to Be Addressed ES-13 Strategies ES-13 Strategic Approach for Beaumont to Temecula Sub -corridor ES-15 Problems to Be Addressed ES-15 Strategies ES-15 Strategic Approach for Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -corridor ES-16 Problems to Be Addressed ES-16 Strategies ES-16 Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor ES-17 Problems to Be Addressed ES-17 Strategies ES-17 Strategic Approach for Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor ES-19 Problems to be Addressed ES-19 Strategies ES-19 Strategic Approach for Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor ES-21 Problems to Be Addressed ES-21 Strategies ES-21 Strategic Approach for Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor ES-22 Problems to Be Addressed ES-22 4 11 Strategies ES-22 Recommended Project List ES-23 COVID-19 Considerations ES-24 Next Steps ES-24 1.0 Introduction/Overview 1-1 1.1 Solutions for Congestion Corridors Guidelines 1-1 1.2 Area Covered by the Inland Empire CMCP 1-2 1.2.1 Land Use 1-6 1.2.2 Disadvantaged Communities, Communities of Concern, and CalEnviroScreen Scores 1-6 1.2.3 Home to Work Mode Share 1-7 1.2.4 Transit 1-8 1.2.5 Vehicle Miles Traveled on Freeway Versus Non -Freeway Facilities 1-10 1.2.6 Trip Origin -Destination and Length Characteristics 1-10 1.2.7 Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Per Service Population 1-11 1.2.8 Future Growth Projections 1-12 2.0 Inland Empire's Strategic Approach to the CMCP: Transportation Planning Sustainability, Land Use Integration, and Project Evaluation 2-1 2.1 Multimodal Planning, Community, and Environmental Initiatives 2-1 2.2 Multimodal Transportation Programs 2-4 2.3 Inland Empire CMCP Goals, Objectives and Performance Metrics 2-7 3.0 Corridor Characteristics 3-1 3.1 Socioeconomic and Land Use Assessment 3-3 3.1.1 Socioeconomic Characteristics 3-3 3.1.2 Land Use 3-11 3.2 Corridor Trip Characteristics 3-19 3.2.1 Trip Characteristics 3-20 3.2.2 Journey -to -Work 3-23 3.2.3 Rideshare 3-27 3.3 Safety 3-27 3.3.1 Freeway Safety Assessment 3-28 3.3.2 Arterial Safety Assessment 3-33 3.3.3 High Frequency Collision Locations 3-38 3.4 Active Transportation 3-41 3.4.1 Active Transportation 3-41 3.5 Transit 3-43 3.5.1 Metrolink 3-43 i? Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.5.2 Bus Transit Service 3-45 3.5.3 High Quality Transit Area 3-48 3.6 Freeway and Arterial Assessment 3-50 3.6.1 Freeway Assessment 3-50 3.6.2 Arterial Assessment 3-57 3.7 Freight Network 3-65 3.7.1 Ground 3-65 3.7.2 Air Cargo 3-65 3.7.3 Rail 3-65 3.8 Future Growth and Projected Changes 3-68 3.8.1 Future Growth 3-68 3.8.2 High Quality Transit Area 3-68 4.0 Stakeholder Outreach 4-1 4.1 RCTC Reboot My Commute Campaign Summary 4-3 4.2 San Bernardino County CMCP Survey 4-5 4.3 Comparison of Riverside and San Bernardino County Outreach Responses 4-11 5.0 Sub -Corridor Definitions and Strategic Approaches 5-1 5.1 Sub -Corridor Analysis Summary 5-1 5.2 Victorville to San Bernardino 5-2 5.2.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-2 5.2.2 Strategic Approach for Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-15 5.3 San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-16 5.3.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-16 5.3.2 Strategic Approach for San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-28 5.4 Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-30 5.4.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-30 5.4.2 Strategic Approach for Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-43 5.5 Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-44 5.5.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-44 5.5.2 Strategic Approach for Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-57 5.6 Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-59 5.6.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-59 5.6.2 Strategic Approach for Beaumont to Temecula Sub -corridor 5-72 5.7 Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-73 5.7.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-73 5.7.2 Strategic Approach for Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -corridor: 5-82 125 aoao0-0; r r.i■ fl' t 5.8 Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-86 5.8.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-86 5.8.2 Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-99 5.9 Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-101 5.9.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-101 5.9.2 Strategic Approach for Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 5-114 5.10 Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-115 5.10.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-115 5.10.2 Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-128 5.11 Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-130 5.11.1 Sub -Corridor Definition 5-130 5.11.2 Strategic Approach for Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-143 6.0 Multimodal Transportation Projects 6-1 7.0 Implementation and Funding Plan 7-1 7.1 Federal Funding Sources 7-1 7.2 Project Type 7-4 7.2.1 Transit -oriented Development Projects 7-5 7.2.2 Rural Infrastructure Projects 7-5 7.2.3 Local Infrastructure Projects 7-5 7.2.4 State Funding Sources 7-5 7.2.5 Local Funding Sources 7-7 List of Tables Table ES.1 I IE CMCP Sub -corridors ES-1 Table 1.1 I Land Use and Socioeconomic Characteristics of the Sub -Corridors 1-7 Table 1.2 I Transportation Characteristics of the Sub -Corridors 1-9 Table 1.3 I Projected Growth by Sub -Corridor 1-12 Table 2.1 I Areawide Multimodal Programs (not specific to a sub -corridor) 2-6 Table 3.1 I SCAG Designated Communities of Concern in Study Area 3-9 Table 3.2 I Land Use Type by Share of Study Area 3-13 Table 3.3 12016 Daily Trips by Type 3-20 Table 3.4 I Regional Statistical Area by Cities 3-22 Table 3.5 I County -to -County Commuting Flows 3-24 Table 3.6 I Journey -to -Work Model Share by RSA (ACS) 3-25 Table 3.7 I Journey -to -Work Travel Time Distribution 3-26 Table 3.8 1 Metrolink Daily Ridership (2018-19) 3-43 Table 3.9 1 Study Area Managed Lane Network -Existing in April 2017 3-50 Table 3.10 I Top Bottlenecks in the Study Area (2018) 3-51 Table 3.11 I Arterial Level of Service 3-63 Table 5.1 1 Internal and External Trips Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-7 Table 5.2 1 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-11 Table 5.3 1 Internal and External Trips San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-20 Table 5.4 1 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-24 Table 5.5 1 Internal and External Trips Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-34 Table 5.6 1 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-38 Table 5.7 1 Internal and External Trips Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-48 Table 5.8 1 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-52 Table 5.9 1 Internal and External Trips Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-63 Table 5.10 I VMT by Facility Type Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-67 Table 5.11 I Internal and External Trips Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-77 Table 5.12 I VMT by Facility Type Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-81 Table 5.13 I Internal and External Trips Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-90 Table 5.14 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-94 Table 5.15 I Internal and External Trips Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-105 Table 5.16 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Corridor 5-109 Table 5.17 I Internal and External Trips Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-119 Table 5.18 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-123 • t Table 5.19 I Internal and External Trips Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-134 Table 5.20 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-138 Table 6.1 I Recommended Projects By Sub -Corridor 6-2 Table 7.1 I Relevant Federal Funding Sources 7-2 Table 7.2 I Relevant State Funding Sources 7-6 128 V List of Figures Figure ES.1 I IE CMCP North -South Oriented Sub -Corridors ES-2 Figure ES.2 I IE CMCP East-West Oriented Sub -Corridors ES-2 Figure 1.1 I North -South Oriented Sub -Corridors 1-3 Figure 1.2 I East-West Oriented Sub -Corridors 1-4 Figure 3.1 I Overall Study Area 3-2 Figure 3.2 I Household Income Below Poverty Levels 3-4 Figure 3.3 I Labor Force Age Distribution 3-5 Figure 3.4 I Senior Population Density 3-7 Figure 3.5 I Youth Population Density 3-8 Figure 3.6 I CalEnviroScreen and SCAG Communities of Concern 3-10 Figure 3.7 I Study Area Land Use 3-12 Figure 3.8 I Employment Density 3-15 Figure 3.9 I Population Density 3-17 Figure 3.10 I Population -Employment Ratio 3-19 Figure 3.11 I Existing Daily Auto Trips in and to/from Study Area 3-21 Figure 3.12 I Trip Patterns by Regional Statistical Area 3-23 Figure 3.13 I Study Area Journey -to -Work Mode Share for Study Area 3-25 Figure 3.14 I Journey -to -Work Travel Time Distribution by RSA 3-26 Figure 3.15 I Freeway Collisions per Million VMT, 2018 3-28 Figure 3.16 I Study Area Freeway Collisions by Severity, 2016-2018 3-29 Figure 3.17 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Bicycles by Severity, 2016-2018 3-30 Figure 3.18 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Pedestrians by Severity, 2016-2018 3-31 Figure 3.19 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Trucks by Severity, 2016-2018 3-32 Figure 3.20 I Primary Collision Factors for Freeway Collisions in the Study Area 3-33 Figure 3.21 I Arterial Collisions by Severity, 2016-2018 3-34 Figure 3.22 I Arterial Collisions Involving Bicyclists by Severity, 2016-2018 3-35 Figure 3.23 I Arterial Collisions Involving Pedestrians by Severity, 2012-2016 3-36 Figure 3.24 I Arterial Collisions Involving Trucks by Severity, Total 2016-2018 3-37 Figure 3.25 I Primary Collision Factors for Arterial Collisions 3-38 Figure 3.26 I Location of Bicycle and Pedestrian Collisions, 2016-2018 3-39 Figure 3.27 I Location of Truck Collisions, 2016-2018 3-40 Figure 3.28 I Bicycle Facilities in the Study Area 3-42 Figure 3.29 I Metrolink Service in Study Area 3-44 Figure 3.30 I Bus Routes 3-46 129 .aoao1P /.C17 Figure 3.31 1 Bus Transit Ridership 3-47 Figure 3.32 1 Existing High -Quality Transit Areas (HQTA) 3-49 Figure 3.33 1 Number of Existing Freeway Mainline Lanes 3-52 Figure 3.34 1 Existing Managed Lane Network 3-53 Figure 3.35 1 PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes 3-54 Figure 3.36 1 PM Peak Hour Volume/Capacity Ratio 3-55 Figure 3.37 I Top Bottlenecks 3-56 Figure 3.38 I WRCOG Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional System of Highways and Arterials (RSHA) 3-58 Figure 3.39 I SBCTA Nexus of Highways and Arterials 3-59 Figure 3.40 I Arterial AM Peak Hour Level of Service 3-61 Figure 3.41 I Arterial PM Peak Hour Level of Service 3-62 Figure 3.42 I Existing Daily Arterial VMT per Service Population (Residents + Employees) 3-64 Figure 3.43 I Truck Network and Warehouse 3-66 Figure 3.44 I Freight Rail Network 3-67 Figure 3.45 I Future High -Quality Transit Areas (HQTA) 3-69 Figure 5.1 1 Sub -Corridor Study Area Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-3 Figure 5.2 1 Land Use Types Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-5 Figure 5.3 1 Land Use Map Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-6 Figure 5.4 1 Journey to Work Mode Share Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-8 Figure 5.5 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-9 Figure 5.6 1 Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-10 Figure 5.7 1 Collisions Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-12 Figure 5.8 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-13 Figure 5.9 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 5-14 Figure 5.10 1 Sub -Corridor Study Area San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-17 Figure 5.11 1 Land Use Types San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-18 Figure 5.12 1 Land Use Map San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-19 Figure 5.13 1 Journey to Work Mode Share San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-21 Figure 5.14 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-22 Figure 5.15 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-23 Figure 5.16 1 Collisions San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-25 Figure 5.17 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-26 Figure 5.18 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 5-27 Figure 5.19 1 Sub -corridor Study Area Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-31 Figure 5.20 1 Land Use Types Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-32 Figure 5.21 1 Land Use Map Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-33 vii? Figure 5.22 Figure 5.23 1 Figure 5.24 1 Figure 5.25 1 Figure 5.26 1 Figure 5.27 1 Figure 5.28 1 Figure 5.29 1 Figure 5.30 1 Figure 5.31 1 Figure 5.32 1 Figure 5.33 1 Figure 5.34 1 Figure 5.35 1 Figure 5.36 1 Figure 5.37 1 Figure 5.38 1 Figure 5.39 1 Figure 5.40 1 Figure 5.41 1 Figure 5.42 1 Figure 5.43 1 Figure 5.44 1 Figure 5.45 1 Figure 5.46 1 Figure 5.47 1 Figure 5.48 1 Figure 5.49 1 Figure 5.50 1 Journey to Work Mode Share Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-35 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-36 Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-37 Collisions Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-40 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-41 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 5-42 Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-45 Land Use Types Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-46 Land Use Map Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-47 Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-49 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-50 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-51 Collisions Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-54 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-55 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-56 Sub -Corridor Study Area Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-60 Land Use Types Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-61 Land Use Map Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-62 Journey to Work Mode Share Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-64 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-65 Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-66 Collisions Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-69 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-70 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 5-71 Sub -Corridor Study Area Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-74 Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-75 Land Use Map Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-76 Journey to Work Mode Share Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-78 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Corridor 5-79 Figure 5.51 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Figure 5.52 Figure 5.53 Figure 5.54 Figure 5.55 Figure 5.56 Figure 5.57 Corridor Collisions Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-80 5-83 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub-Corridor5-84 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub-Corridor5-85 Sub -Corridor Study Area Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-87 Land Use Types Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-88 Land Use Map Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-89 131 .aoao;0� ���• III ® r Figure 5.58 I Journey to Work Mode Share Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-91 Figure 5.59 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-92 Figure 5.60 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-93 Figure 5.61 1 Collisions Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-95 Figure 5.62 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-97 Figure 5.63 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 5-98 Figure 5.64 1 Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-102 Figure 5.65 1 Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub-Corridor5-103 Figure 5.66 1 Land Use Map Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-104 Figure 5.67 1 Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor5-106 Figure 5.68 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Corridor 5-107 Figure 5.69 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-108 Figure 5.70 1 Collisions Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 5-110 Figure 5.71 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Corridor 5-112 Figure 5.72 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub - Corridor 5-113 Figure 5.73 1 Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-116 Figure 5.74 1 Land Use Types Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-117 Figure 5.75 1 Land Use Map Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-118 Figure 5.76 1 Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-120 Figure 5.77 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-121 Figure 5.78 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-122 Figure 5.79 1 Collisions Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-125 Figure 5.80 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-126 Figure 5.81 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 5-127 Figure 5.82 1 Sub -Corridor Study Area Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-131 Figure 5.83 1 Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-132 Figure 5.84 1 Land Use Map Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-133 Figure 5.85 1 Journey to Work Mode Share Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-135 Figure 5.86 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-136 Figure 5.87 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-137 Figure 5.88 1 Collisions Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-139 Figure 5.89 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -AM Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-140 Figure 5.90 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions -PM Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 5-141 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Executive Summary The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) was awarded a Caltrans grant in the "Strategic Partnerships/Transit" category to examine the multi -modal corridors of the Inland Empire as part of a Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (CMCP). The strategic partners with SCAG included Caltrans District 8, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA), and the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). The Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (IE CMCP) has multiple uses that will benefit local, regional, and state agencies as they deal with the balancing of infrastructure, livability, economic, and sustainability needs as they relate to the transportation system. The IE CMCP covers the urbanized portion of both Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, excluding the Coachella Valley. The original concept for the IE CMCP was to have two corridors, a north/south and an east/west corridor. However, as the study progressed, it was decided to create focused smaller "sub -corridors" to facilitate more detailed assessment of corridor conditions and to focus the recommended improvements and strategies. Five sub -corridors were identified for north/south travel and five for east/west travel, as listed in Table ES.1 and illustrated by Figures ES.1 and ES.2. Table ES.1 I IE CMCP Sub -corridors • North/South Sub -corridors: • East/West Sub -corridors: 1. Victorville to San Bernardino 1. Apple Valley to LA County Line 2. San Bernardino to Riverside 2. Banning to Rialto 3. Cajon Pass to Eastvale 3. Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line 4. Riverside to Temecula 4. Riverside to Orange County Line 5. Beaumont to Temecula 5. Hemet to Corona ES-1 Figure ES.1 I IE CMCP North -South Oriented Sub -Corridors Sub -corridors p Vlctorville to San Bernardino ▪ San Bemaral,n to Prvenlee p Gainn Pass to EasNsk ▪ Rweaile to Temecula Beaumont to Temecula N Miles Figure ES.2 I IE CMCP East-West Oriented Sub -Corridors Sub -corridors = MGle Valley to LAC unry une o Banning to Rialto lzarsaerizmta to L. = .x..,tleb Crave Canty Lx Hemet toGomm N N Mlles 2�55.5 134 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan A strategic approach to the development of the IE CMCP has been crafted for each sub -corridor. There also are some overarching strategic initiatives and programs which are countywide or Inland Empire -wide in nature that relate to the overall Study Area and related sub -corridors. Planning and decision -making within the sub -corridors would be influenced and/or enhanced through these larger -area strategies. There are programs underway at the Inland Empire level or at the County level that are very much a part of the multimodal transportation strategy but do not fall neatly into the individual sub -corridors. As the sub -corridor strategies are presented in this document, it is important to remember that these programs serve as overlays to the lists of strategies or projects listed at the sub -corridor level. So if a certain sub -corridor does not seem as multimodal as others, it is important to remember that these program -level activities are still at work to reduce GHGs and VMT, as well as to improve system safety, efficiency, and operations. Many of these involve partnerships across state, regional, and local agencies. The Inland Empire transportation programs are generally categorized as follows: • Active Transportation (AT). While some AT activities are project -specific, others are programmatic, such as Safe Routes to School or local/regional funding programs, like the Transportation Development Act (TDA) that funds local active transportation projects through a competitive call for projects every odd numbered year. • Intelligent Transportation System/Incident Management (ITS/IM). Examples include signal coordination and freeway service patrols. • Rail. Regional improvements and funding programs are in place that benefit upgrades in the Metrolink commuter rail system and new passenger rail initiatives are underway. • Safety. Caltrans sponsors ongoing transportation funding initiatives to maintain and provide safety upgrades to local and state highways. • Transit (other than rail). Each transit agency has its own investment plan for improving the customer experience and customer/driver safety. • Transportation Demand Management (TDM). A wide array of TDM strategies is promoted through IE Commuter, from ridesharing to vanpooling to alternative work schedules. • Zero Emission Vehicles and Alternative Fuel Programs (ZEV/AF). There are numerous statewide and regional programs for funding and incentivizing more rapid turnover of auto and truck fleets to benefit air quality and GHG reduction. Both Riverside and San Bernardino County transit agencies are pursuing funding to address the state's zero -emission bus objectives. Multimodal Corridor Planning Guidelines The California Transportation Commission (CTC) developed and published their CMCP guidelines and Caltrans developed their Corridor Planning Guidebook. These corridor planning guides provide the framework for assessing ES-3 M■ it transportation improvement projects as part of the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, or Senate Bill (SB) 1. SB 1 requires that funding shall be available for projects that make specific performance improvements and are part of a comprehensive corridor plan designed to reduce congestion in highly traveled corridors by providing more transportation choices for residents, commuters, and visitors to the area of the corridor while preserving the character of the local community and creating opportunities for neighborhood enhancement projects. The Inland Empire CMCP closely follows both the CTC and Caltrans corridor planning guides, and Caltrans was a partner agency in the development of the IE CMCP. Key tasks completed as part of the IE CMCP: • Developed IE CMCP goals, objectives, and performance measures. • Defined the study area by organizing it into 10 key sub -corridors based upon technical and policy considerations, including input from key stakeholders. • Conducted regular meetings with a core Project Development Team (PDT) of partner agencies including SCAG, Caltrans, RCTC, SBCTA, and WRCOG. • Developed and implemented a stakeholder engagement strategy which included leveraging recent stakeholder outreach in Riverside County with a new online survey instrument that was implemented for San Bernardino County. Multiple meetings were also held with local agency transportation and planning staff through each county's Technical Advisory Committee structure. • Conducted detailed data collection and analysis as part of current conditions and future baseline conditions assessment including socioeconomic data, travel demand and travel patterns, safety analysis, congestion analysis, and transit demand analysis. • Identified planned investments and recommended projects as part of the CMCP to address known deficiencies, pivoting off of state, regional, and local plans and programs. • Developed an evaluation framework to assess the current conditions and future baseline conditions, and to evaluate the potential improvements. • Conducted qualitative assessment of the sub -corridor improvement projects based on project type and measured against metrics such as VMT reduction, accessibility, person delay, air quality, safety, reliability, mode shift, person throughput, and congestion. • Determined the funding need and available transportation financing resources to support corridor investments. ES-4 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Metrics As discussed, the CTC and Caltrans guiding documents contain recommended corridor planning goals, objectives, performance metrics, and evaluation criteria for assessing transportation improvement projects at the corridor level. In addition, many other state, regional, and local transportation plans include transportation system improvement goals, objectives, and performance metrics, such as the Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework, the Regional Transportation Plan, the San Bernardino County Countywide Plan, Transportation and Mobility Element, and the Riverside County Long Range Transportation Study. The CTC Solutions for Congested Corridors Program (SCCP) guidelines also state that "the primary objective of the Congested Corridors Program is to fund projects designed to reduce congestion in highly traveled and highly congested corridors through performance improvements that balance transportation improvements, community impacts, and that provide environmental benefits." Based on the CTC and Caltrans guidance, objectives of the comprehensive multimodal corridor planning process may include but are not necessarily limited to: • Define multimodal transportation deficiencies and opportunities for optimizing system operations. • Identify the types of projects necessary to reduce congestion, improve mobility, and optimize multimodal system operations along highly traveled corridors. • Identify funding needs. • Further state and Federal ambient air standards and greenhouse gas emissions reduction standards pursuant to the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Division 25.5, commencing with Section 38550, of the Health and Safety Code) and Senate Bill 375 (Chapter 728, Statutes of 2008). • Preserve the character of local communities and create opportunities for neighborhood enhancement. • Identify projects that achieve a balanced set of transportation, environmental, and community access improvements. A key element of the CMCP is to reduce congestion in highly traveled and highly congested corridors through performance improvements. To measure projects or groups of projects which result in performance improvements in the study area and sub -corridors, a set of transportation performance metrics is applied. Some of these metrics can be assessed using quantitative data such as transportation model output, while others are qualitatively evaluated based on project type, project location, and other factors. This is consistent with the CTC guidelines which state "in recognition that data availability and modeling capabilities vary by agency based on available resources, the Commission expects agencies to address plan and project performance qualitatively and quantitatively to the degree reasonable given technical and financial resources available during the planning process. As part of the comprehensive multimodal corridor planning process, a plan -level corridor performance ES-5 assessment must be conducted and documented to clearly outline system performance and trends." The evaluations provided in this plan clearly document the conditions, including congestion levels, in the overall study area and the ten sub -corridors. Per the CTC and Caltrans CMCP guidelines, it is critical to create multimodal corridor plans that closely match the local and regional goals and objectives for transportation planning. With that in mind, a summary of the goals and objectives of Riverside County and San Bernardino County from the latest transportation plans include: Riverside County:1 • Provide a first class transportation system that supports a vibrant, dynamic and livable county; • A multimodal system that will promote sustainability, access, safety, economic opportunities, public health, environmental stewardship, and balanced job/housing ratio. • Utilize best available technology. • Provide reliable and efficient mobility for people, goods, and services. • Preserve values of Riversides County's communities. San Bernardino County:2 • Consolidate and integrate countywide transportation and land use planning to provide consistent input to the RTP/SCS. • Improve safety and mobility for all modes of travel. • Deliver transportation projects and services to promote economic competitiveness, affordable housing, environmental quality, and overall sustainability. • Promote stewardship of public resources through cost effective delivery, maintenance and operations of projects. • Promote the planning and funding of sustainable transportation systems via collaboration with local, regional, state, federal, and private stakeholders. Sub -corridor Focus The results of the IE CMCP as summarized in this report include a detailed assessment of the corridor conditions, a list of recommended projects and programs to improve corridor conditions in each of the 10 sub -corridors, and a framework for evaluating the potential improvements. To understand the transportation issues facing the corridors 1 Riverside County Long Range Transportation Study, December 2019. 2 San Bernardino County Countywide Plan, Transportation and Mobility Element, May 2019. 138 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan and to inform the recommendations of the study, the IE CMCP included detailed assessments of both current and projected transportation future conditions. This included an analysis of all modes (roadway, transit, active transportation, and freight) as well as cross -cutting themes such as safety. The Corridor Characteristics assessment presents an assessment of land use, demographics, and multimodal transportation conditions in the corridors and provides a baseline assessment upon which future projected conditions will be compared. Sub -corridor Problems and Strategic Approach In developing the strategic approach for each sub -corridor, the classes of strategies considered are highly multimodal in nature, and they also consider the types of "customers" that will be served: 1) passenger travel and freight; 2) trips by purpose: for work, school, business, shopping, recreation, social interaction; and 3) specific activity centers: airports, downtowns, hospitals, educational institutions, commercial clusters, mixed -use clusters, and transit hubs. The transportation modes reflect an emphasis on public transportation, non -motorized travel, shared -ride (carpool/vanpool), and virtual travel (i.e., work -at-home, web -based business, teleconferencing, etc.); a highway network focused on effective management and operations (e.g., through HOV/managed lanes, traveler information, and signal coordination); as well as accommodation of freight and logistics through strategic access improvements. There is a large pool of existing and emerging multimodal options to draw from and build on in the Inland Empire: commuter rail (Metrolink IEOC, 91/Perris Valley, Riverside, and San Bernardino lines), light rail (with the Gold Line extension to Pomona by 2025), regional "hybrid rail" initially using Tier 4 Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) self -powered trainsets (migrating to zero -emission trainsets in the near term), and the privately - funded Brightline West high-speed train from the San Bernardino Valley, through the Victor Valley to Las Vegas). Efficient and frequent local bus, express bus, and BRT options also exist and are being expanded with the forthcoming West Valley Connector BRT. Lyft is now providing an important connection to Ontario International Airport from the Riverside and San Bernardino Metrolink lines, and first/last mile connections are being advanced linking transit and key destinations. Regional bike networks are creating a backbone that provides the regional connectivity needed to service those who can take these modes for daily commutes. Land use and housing are intertwined with the regional transportation network in a way that, because of much higher costs in coastal counties, has historically produced longer commutes and travel times for inland residents. The challenge before us now is to encourage better balance in jobs and housing regionally for the sake of livability, cost, and VMT/GHG reduction, and to continue pursuing the Inland Empire's proactive sustainability initiatives on local climate action plans (CAPs) for GHG reduction, habitat conservation plans, climate adaptation plans, low- income housing initiatives, and transportation -efficient land use planning implemented through local General Plans and Specific Plans. The discussion of problems and recommended strategies for each of the 10 sub -corridors follows. The intent of these one -page summaries is to highlight the key issues and challenges in each sub -corridor and to articulate the ES-7 key strategies, projects, and programs that are being emphasized in the near term for each. These strategies are anchored in the data developed through the analysis documented later in this CMCP. Strategic Approach for Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Substantial "down -the -hill" commuting from the Victor Valley to San Bernardino, Riverside, and LA, with residents motivated to endure the commutes as a result of more affordable housing in the High Desert. • 1-15 is a nationally significant freight corridor, but travel through the Cajon Pass is congested and unreliable. • High number of serious traffic accidents and incidents on State Routes: 1-15 in Cajon Pass, U.S.-395, and SR-138. • Significant weekend congestion, not just weekday. Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor O� • Lack of adequate alternate routes when the regionally significant corridor shuts down as a result of incidents. Strategies 1. Enhance the ease and reliability of freight and passenger travel in the Cajon Pass and High Desert through the addition of express lanes on 1-15, consistent with the SCAG Regional Express Lane Network in the RTP/SCS, with toll discounts/exemptions for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. 2. Conduct operational studies on 1-15 in the Cajon Pass geared toward improving safety and reducing the frequency and severity of traffic incidents. Also conduct operational studies on alternate routes to 1-15 for use in the event of extended 1-15 closures. Program operational improvements into the Caltrans SHOPP. If crashes are associated to the long routes, weather, and fatigue, perhaps rest areas could also be added to allow drivers to take a break before continuing their destination. 3. Pursue multimodal solutions. Continue growth of vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the Valley and greater LA Basin and monitor express bus operation from Victorville to San Bernardino for evidence of expansion opportunity. Pursue the extension of Brightline West down the Cajon Pass to Rancho Cucamonga to provide an additional privately funded solution to peak hour and weekend congestion. ES-3 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 4. Through economic development and other strategies, increase employment opportunities in the High Desert for High Desert residents to reduce jobs -to -housing imbalance and reduce long commutes from the High Desert to San Bernardino / Los Angeles / Riverside. 5. Complete Mojave Riverwalk, the principal north/south Class I trail in the High Desert. 6. Consider developing a comprehensive signal synchronization network for the High Desert and prioritize arterial corridors for early implementation. 7. Complete the widening of 2-lane segments on SR-138 west of 1-15 for safety purposes. 8. Complete widening of U.S. 395 for safety and operational purposes and as a significant north/south freight and recreational route connecting to the Tehachapi Mountains via SR-58 and to the eastern Sierra Mountains. 9. Implement policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. Strategic Approach for San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Large off -campus university student and employee populations that make daily commutes to and from schools, creating congestion at entry points to universities. • Specific bottleneck locations: (southbound 1-215 at Orange Show Road, southbound 1-215 at SR-60 junction, northbound 1-215 at merge with SR-60 on -ramps). • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Antiquated interchange designs. • Large concentration of bike and pedestrian collisions in the Riverside and San Bernardino urban centers. • Generally difficult environment for walking and cycling. • Truck congestion and air quality challenges in San Bernardino and Riverside with convergence of rail lines and intermodal freight facilities. sanae,.,a at uno L. O RW er - Freeways k,dlFu,,,kS,,,wb - 9„,.R.Val P,r,e - Snn - 0emnirlin, Line Linr San Bernardino to Riverside 0 Sub -Corridor ES-9 .acaoo:D® r-ii.■11i 17 Strategies 1. Build on existing multimodal strategy to enhance rail, transit and shared -ride access to and from California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) and UCR. 2. Coordinate express transit/rail service between San Bernardino and Riverside County cities. 3. Focus on north/south arterial operations and safety improvements for parallel facilities such as Riverside Avenue, Mt. Vernon Avenue, and Reche Canyon Road. 4. Complete Divergent Diamond Interchange (DDI) at the I-215/University Avenue interchange to accommodate continued CSUSB growth. 5. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on 1-215 between SR-60 and Orange Show Road to address bottlenecks. 6. Implement managed -lane system on SR-91 in downtown Riverside. 7. Build on substantial existing transit assets (e.g., move forward with SCORE program on multiple Metrolink lines —increasing frequency and improving service). 8. Implement first/last mile transit connections (particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations). 9. Work with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of the truck fleets. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-10 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • 1-10/1-15 interchange is 12th on American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI)'s national list of the top 100 truck bottlenecks. • Nationally significant freight corridor, with heavy congestion on 1-15 between SR-60 and SR-210. • Southern end of the corridor houses some of the largest and most intense logistics activities in the Nation, with attendant local traffic and environmental impacts. • Lack of north/south transit service and need for improved transit service to Ontario International Airport. • Large population and housing growth with a large number of master planned communities. Strategies 1. Implement managed -lane system on 1-15, with toll discounts or exemptions for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. O Rod, N. - Freeway; U McPolink5U7ots Metrolink 'Rain Routes - 9'; , 1-, L o, - 1.Lod Eii . i_-O S :ye C.ui ply Line - .... fimi,.n. nIiris 35 "0 Mlles Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 2. Complete the West Valley Connector BRT, Phase 1. The north/south portion parallels 1-15 from Victoria Gardens to Rancho Cucamonga Metrolink Station, through Ontario employment centers, to Ontario International Airport (ONT). Integrate with potential new zero -emission tunnel connection from Metrolink San Bernardino Line to ONT. 3. Pursue the extension of Brightline West down the Cajon Pass to Rancho Cucamonga to provide an additional privately funded solution to peak hour and weekend congestion. 4. Coordinate operational strategies for managed lanes between Riverside and San Bernardino counties. 5. Grow vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the Valley, Riverside County, and greater LA Basin. ES-11 6. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution facility development). 7. Work with SCAQMD and CARB to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of truck fleets. 8. Implement San Sevaine Class I Trail System, running north/south along 1-15. 9. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-12 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Significant and growing congestion in both directions at the I-215/SR-60 junction in Riverside. • Significant and growing congestion at the 1-15/1-215 merge/diverge in Temecula and on 1-15 northbound and southbound in Corona. • Congestion at critical interchanges on 1-15 and 1-215 (e.g., Newport Road, Railroad Canyon Road, SR-74, etc.). • Lack of parallel facilities to 1-15 and 1-215 throughout the corridor (due largely to topography). • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. O5r„droms - Freeways ® McMHnk Stemma Metra6ek wain Res. - 91/ Ferns Valley Line - Inland Empire -Orange County Line - Riverside Line - San Bernardino Line Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 • Large amount of housing development concentrated along the corridor; exacerbating the job -housing imbalance. Strategies 1. Extend the managed -lane system on 1-15 southerly from Cajalco Road in Corona to SR-74 (Central Avenue) in Lake Elsinore (underway), with toll discounts for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. 2. Continue commuter bus operations on 1-15 and 1-215 to Metrolink stations and continue express bus service utilizing managed lanes. 3. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on 1-15 and 1-215, such as Franklin Street and French Valley Parkway. 4. Improve the north/south arterial network along 1-15 and 1-215, where possible, to better accommodate local short -distance trips that are now occurring on the freeway system, such as Temescal Canyon Road. 5. Enhance marketing and incentives for ridership on the Perris Valley Line to Riverside. ES-13 6. Grow vanpool and carpool formation from southwest Riverside County to employment centers in Riverside, Corona, and San Bernardino County. 7. Deploy new technologies to proactively manage traffic and improve roadway conditions. 8. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line, construct accessibility improvements to existing 91/Perris Valley Metrolink stations. 9. Work with SCAQMD and CARB to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of truck fleets. 10. Invest in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency and passenger rail movement. 11. Provide an additional east west regional arterial extending east from the City of Perris that will run parallel to SR-74, serving as an alternative route to better connect the cities within the region. 12. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-14 v Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Beaumont to Temecula Sub -corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Overall lack of north/south mobility, particularly in the Hemet/San Jacinto Area. Local traffic gets mixed with regional traffic. • Major bottlenecks at the I-10/SR-79 interchange and the northbound I-15/SR-79 interchange. • Lack of north/south transit service. • Major tourism destinations result in travel at all times and on all days. Strategies 1. Fund and implement the SR-79 realignment project. 2. Make operational improvements on existing north/south arterials from San Jacinto to Temecula. Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 25 3. Grow vanpool and carpool formation to reduce vehicle flows connecting Beaumont, San Jacinto, Hemet, and Temecula. 4. Examine ways to improve north/south transit connectivity. 5. Deploy new technologies to proactively manage traffic and improve roadway conditions. 6. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on the I-10/Highland Springs, I-215/Keller Road, and Garbani Road interchanges. 7. Investment in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency. 8. Work with Tribal governments to facilitate employee commute options and explore funding opportunities for regional improvements. 9. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line, and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements at existing Metrolink stations. Additionally, support rapid bus services between Hemet to San Jacinto and Perris to Moreno Valley/Riverside. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-15 Strategic Approach for Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Lack of east/west connectivity between the High Desert and Antelope Valley. • Lack of east/west connectivity within the High Desert, constrained by limited crossings of the Mojave River and the BNSF Railway rights - of -way. • Congestion at arterial junctions with 1-15 interchanges. Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Strategies Uo 25 I 17 MiIcs 1. Enhance east/west access by completing improvements in the Greentree Corridor, linking Apple Valley, Victorville, and 1-15. 2. Work with Brightline West and the State to facilitate future High Speed Rail connection to the Antelope Valley Metrolink line. 3. Conduct necessary studies to improve the operations and safety of SR-18 from U.S.-395 to SR-138 and potentially program its widening. 4. Look for opportunities to fund the High Desert Corridor but recognize SR-18 widening as a partial solution to improve east/west mobility between the Antelope Valley and High Desert. 5. Fund and implement strategic 1-15 interchange improvements as identified in the Measure 1 Strategic Plan. 6. Fund and implement other improvements identified in the Victor Valley portion of the SBCTA 10-Year Delivery Plan. 7. Continue growth of vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the San Bernardino Valley and Antelope Valley. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-16 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Several significant bottlenecks on 1-10: eastbound and westbound merge/diverge with 1-215, eastbound merge with SR-210, eastbound upgrade in Yucaipa, and I-10/SR-60 junction. • Significant and growing congestion in both directions at the I-215/SR-60 junction in Riverside and I-10/SR-60 junction in Beaumont due to population and housing increases. Rudy Alta - Freeways Meuohnk 5[anan klatadink Tram Rota. - 91/ Perris Valley line - Inland Empire -Orange County Lire - Riverside Line - San Bernardino Line Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor • Multiple congested interchanges: I-10/SR-79 interchange in Beaumont and interchanges on 1-10 at Mountain View Avenue, California Street, Alabama Street, and University Avenue. • Ongoing congestion on SR-210 westbound north of 1-10 and eastbound at Highland Avenue. • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Metrolink San Bernardino line and Riverside line are well -used, but capacity limitations limit substantial additional growth. • Cities with Metrolink stations would like to take advantage of those locations for transit -oriented development (TOD), but parcel assembly/development costs are high and train frequencies are not always conducive to the mid -day and bi-directional mobility needed to support TOD type uses. Strategies 1. Construct Redlands Passenger Rail Project from University of Redlands to downtown San Bernardino, including use of zero -emission multiple unit (ZEMU) trainsets. 2. Implement managed lane systems on SR-60 from downtown Riverside to Moreno Valley and on 1-10 from Redlands westerly. ES-17 3. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on SR-60/Potrero Blvd, SR- 60/Gilman Springs Road, and 1-10 interchanges at SR-79, County Line Road, University Avenue, Alabama Street, and California Street. 4. Implement 1-10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane in Yuciapa, addressing one of the most serious freight bottlenecks in the Inland Empire. 5. Invest in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency and passenger rail movement. 6. Accelerate truck fleet turnover for air quality improvement. 7. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution development). 8. Extend Sun Lakes Boulevard from Highland Home Road to Westward Avenue and Sunset avenue. 9. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the IE/OC, San Bernardino, and Riverside lines as described in the SCRRA SCORE Program; construct accessibility improvements and station improvements to existing Metrolink stations. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-18 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Problems to be Addressed • 1-10 and SR-60 are nationally significant freight corridors, with heavy congestion on 1-10 between the LA County Line and Sierra Interchange and throughout SR-60. • 1-10/1-15 interchange is 12th on ATRI's national list of the top 100 truck bottlenecks. • Metrolink stations represent some of the Inland Empire's best opportunities for TOD, but need to increase train frequency over time and make it easier for O Study Area - Freeways Metmlink Stallone- Metrolink Train Routes - 91f Verris Valley line - Inland Empire orange Counnj Line - Riverside Line - San Bernardino Line nencnn Cucamonga r tiL upran� ' pia .1:1 Momclair Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor jurisdictions/developers to build on infill sites (limited capabilities since loss of redevelopment funding). • Lack of good transit connection to Ontario International Airport. • Major housing and population increases, especially in parts of the corridor south of SR-60 and north of SR-210. Strategies 10 nu e9 1. Build on substantial existing transit assets (e.g., move forward with SCORE program on the multiple Metrolink lines —increasing frequency and improving service on Riverside, San Bernardino, 91/Perris, and IE/OC lines). Build West Valley Connector BRT connecting Pomona, Montclair, Ontario, and Rancho Cucamonga, with significant destinations in each jurisdiction, including Ontario International Airport. Integrate with potential new zero -emission tunnel connection from Metrolink San Bernardino Line to ONT. 2. Implement first/last mile transit connections (particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations). 3. Enhance freight access at freeway interchanges to improve first/last mile efficiency (list key interchanges for freight access). 4. Implement managed lane system on 1-10 from LA County line to Ford Street; and SR-60 from 1-15 to Moreno Valley. 5. Accelerate truck fleet turnover for air quality improvement. ES-1 9 6. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution development). 7. Encourage TOD and affordable housing at transit stations. 8. Implement "next -generation" shared -ride and virtual travel systems. 9. Build out regional active transportation network. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-20 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Strategic Approach for Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • SR-91 connects Riverside County to Orange and San Bernardino counties and results in one of the most congested freeways in Southern California. SR-91 is a nationally significant freight corridor that connects the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach to the vast array of warehousing and distribution centers in the Inland Empire. However, with heavy congestion along the corridor goods movement is significantly impacted. Q Study Area - Freeways ® Melrelink Stollens Metrnlink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line - Inland Errpire-Orange County Line - R'i.m.,sirle Iine - San Bernardino Line Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor • Lack of adequate alternate routes into Orange County; largely due to topography. SR-91 is the only route into Orange County from Riverside County and San Bernardino County. SR-60/57 is the highest capacity alternate, but is also highly congested. SR-74 provides a low -capacity highway alternative which is available to south Orange County. • Job -housing imbalance; Riverside County provides more affordable housing options compared to Orange County and Los Angeles County, but less job opportunities. Strategies 1. Complete Santa Ana River trail. 2. Complete the SR-71/91 connector and SR-241/91 connector to facilitate commute and goods movement from Orange County to Riverside and San Bernardino counties. 3. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the IE/OC line and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements to existing Metrolink stations. 4. Implement first/last mile transit connections (particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations). 5. Continue multimodal investment into the managed lane system on SR-91; continue collaborating with OCTA on 91 Express Lanes. 6. Continue express bus service utilizing managed lanes for time and cost savings on shared rides. 7. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-21 Strategic Approach for Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Lack of good east/west routes. No adequate east/west routes to connect communities. • Need to preserve environmentally sensitive areas and habitats. • SR-74 is an east -west principal arterial that transects the cities of Perris and Hemet. It functions as the cities' main street with a large concentration of local businesses and retailers but lacks adequate driveway access control, safe sidewalks and bike lanes, and traffic signals. • High number of traffic incidents on east/west roadways. Q Study Area - Freeways ® metrom Statane Metrolink Train Routes - 91/ Perris Valley Line - Inland Empire -orange County Line - R versrde Line - San Bernardino Line Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 0 0 s.s s to Mlles Strategies 1. Complete regional Salt Creek Trail 2. Complete Mid -County Parkway to provide an additional regional east/west corridor, minimize use of local roads, and shift traffic away from SR-74. 3. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements at existing Metrolink stations. 4. Implement first/last mile transit connections, particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations. 5. Complete SR-79 realignment; improve access to SR-74. 6. Extend 1-15 Express Lanes to SR-74 with new express lanes to improve trip relaibility for commuters and transit riders and provide additional incentives for carpool and vanpoolers. 7. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. ES-22 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Recommended Project List A total of 386 highway, arterial, transit, and goods movement projects are identified, plus an additional 936 bikeway projects were identified for inclusion in the IE CMCP. These projects were identified through review of existing plans and studies from Caltrans, SCAG, SBCTA, RCTC, WRCOG, and corridor cities. The project lists were compiled and shared with the Project Development Team to ensure projects were consistent with current local priorities and plans. The projects were then evaluated based on the evaluation framework and the goals and objectives of the IE CMCP developed by the Project Development Team and input from stakeholders early in the process. Projects included in the IE CMCP were qualitatively evaluated based on project type and how they would fulfill the objectives of the study and address the identified deficiencies in the transportation system based on key performance metrics, such as: decreasing VMT, reducing person delay, shifting mode share from single occupant auto, improving safety, increasing person throughput, improving accessibility, and improving air quality. The recommended projects include the following modal categories and projects by type: • Highway — HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - 42 projects — ITS/Operational Improvements — 13 projects — Auxiliary Lane — 5 projects — Capacity Enhancement — 21 projects — Interchange Enhancement — 74 projects — New Interchange — 17 projects — Rehabilitation and Safety Improvement — 64 projects • Arterial — Corridor Improvements — 3 projects — Capacity Enhancement — 8 projects — Intersection Improvement — 1 project — Bridge and Grade Separation — 36 projects • Goods Movement — Truck Climbing Lane — 8 projects — Bridge and Grade Separation — 2 projects ES-23 • Transit — New Bus — 28 projects Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) — 11 projects New Rail — 7 projects — New Rapid Transit — 4 projects — Bus Replacement/Transit Maintenance/Transit Operations — 17 projects — Transit Centers/Park and Ride/Bus Stations/Bus Stops — 12 projects • Active Transportation — Bikeways Class I, II, II and IV — 935 projects COVID-19 Considerations The development of the IE CMCP began well before COVID-19 began to affect transportation and mobility in the Inland Empire, but the final report is published while the impacts of the pandemic are still unfolding The Project Development Team discussed this issue and determined that it was not feasible to change the analysis or findings of the report, but it is important to acknowledge that many elements of the Inland Empire transportation system have changed, including reduced automobile travel (fewer trips, lower VMT, less congestion), decreased transit ridership, increased local truck movements for deliveries, decreased use of ride -booking services, worsened safety, and other affects. The long term changes to the transportation system are unknown, including when or if the level of auto travel or transit demand will return to pre-COVID conditions. The potential longer term effects could change the forecasted transportation system conditions and result in different priorities in the future for improvement projects. However, it is still too soon to determine what long term effects will occur, if any. Thus, this report is submitted based on our understanding of pre-COVID travel demand patterns with the understanding that future updates may need to account for changes to roadway travel demand, transit ridership, work at home, and other factors. Next Steps The IE CMCP identified opportunities to improve the mobility and sustainability of the five north/south and five east/west corridors. It established a framework and process for evaluating the current conditions and potential improvements to the corridor from a multimodal perspective. Local agencies and Caltrans can leverage this report, in collaboration with surrounding jurisdictions, to help identify and acquire funding for projects that will benefit the mobility for a wide variety of corridor users. The final report and supporting research results can also be used by the jurisdictions in the sub -region to support future transportation plans and to guide implementation of mobility improvements that are both multi -jurisdictional as well as multimodal. Finally, more detailed and focused analysis ES-24 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan of the recommended projects in the 10 sub -corridors can be conducted as part of the project development process and environmental review including technical studies and analysis that were not feasible for such a large study area. The resulting information would be used in future SB 1 SCCP applications as well as for other planning purposes. ES-25 158 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 1.0 Introduction/Overview The Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (IE CMCP) has multiple uses that will benefit local, regional, and state agencies as they deal with the balancing of infrastructure, livability, economic, and sustainability needs. The CMCP also is specifically created to address the intent of California SB 1 Solutions for Congested Corridors Program (SCCP) by: • Promoting the integration of transportation, land use, environmental, economic, and other sustainability projects and initiatives. • Identifying a set of principles for better integrating transportation, development, and environmental decisions. • Identifying projects for potential funding that are consistent with the SCCP guidelines. • Incorporating principles, goals, policies, and objectives of the key stakeholder agencies, including the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA), Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), and Caltrans. The development of the IE CMCP closely incorporates recent planning efforts in the Inland Empire. Riverside and San Bernardino County transportation and planning agencies have been engaged in multimodal transportation, land use, and sustainability projects and programs over many years, ranging in geographic level from countywide to local, from subareas to linear corridors. This activity has accelerated with the statewide emphasis on greenhouse gas reduction with the passage of the Global Warming Solutions Act in AB 32 and subsequent legislation such as SB 375, SB 743, SB 32, as well as several Executive Orders. The IE CMCP captures these initiatives to leverage all of the progress that already has been made in both counties. One of the purposes of the Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plans is to synthesize all of these prior and ongoing efforts and to build on these initiatives. 1.1 Solutions for Congestion Corridors Guidelines The Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, or Senate Bill (SB) 1 (Beall, Statutes of 2017) created the SCCP and continuously appropriates two hundred and fifty million dollars ($250,000,000) annually to be allocated by the California Transportation Commission (CTC) to projects designed to achieve a balanced set of transportation, environmental, and community access improvements within highly congested travel corridors throughout the state. The CTC has established guidelines which describe the policy, standards, criteria and procedures for the development, adoption, and management of the SCCP. The guidelines were developed in consultation with the California Air Resources Board, Department of Housing and Community Development, California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, advocacy groups, and other transportation stakeholders. 1-1 The primary objective of the SCCP is to fund projects designed to reduce congestion in highly traveled and highly congested corridors through performance improvements that balance transportation and community impacts, and that provide environmental benefits. Ultimately, all projects nominated for the SCCP must be included in a multimodal corridor plan. All multimodal corridor plans are to be prepared in accordance with the Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan (Corridor Plan) Guidelines adopted by the CTC. As such, the IE CMCP follows the CTC guidelines. 1.2 Area Covered by the Inland Empire CMCP The IE CMCP was originally structured as two very large corridors: North/South, from Victorville to Temecula, and East/West, from the Banning/Beaumont area to the LA and Orange County lines. This approach was logical, because so much travel in the Inland Empire is interconnected. In the east/west direction, for example, one could find reasons to use any one of the four major east/west freeways (1-10, SR-60, SR-91, or SR-210) to travel to Los Angeles, and many people and logistics firms make those tradeoffs by looking at real-time traffic and routing information. But it was recognized during the study process that within these corridors there also was a great deal of diversity, so much so that it would have been challenging to define the problems and analyze solutions in an effective, multimodal way. The terrain varies, the land uses vary, the congestion levels vary, the community needs vary, the existing multimodal network varies, and the strategies/solutions vary. It was therefore determined that the problems and strategies could be more clearly identified by breaking down the two major corridors into ten sub -corridors. The study team then engaged in a collaborative process for determining logical geographic sub -corridors, and defined five sub -corridors for each of the two major corridors. The sub -corridors are defined as areas between cities or geographically definable points (like county lines) and include the following: • North/South Sub -corridors: • East/West Sub -corridors: 1. Victorville to San Bernardino 1. Apple Valley to LA County Line 2. San Bernardino to Riverside 2. Banning to Rialto 3. Cajon Pass to Eastvale 3. Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line 4. Riverside to Temecula 4. Riverside to Orange County Line 5. Beaumont to Temecula 5. Hemet to Corona Figure 1.1 illustrates the north -south oriented sub -corridors and Figure 1.2 illustrates the eas-west woriented sub - corridors. 1-2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 1.1 I North -South Oriented Sub -Corridors sr_y_c. 1 ann ram, \ s • • 4 15 4 •'a larenV CoinrY Son ro God afentworna 215 15 ti Lake Isinore 215 T- meca RhwFs�ila Sub -corridors r� Victorville to San Bernardino [ 1 San Bernardino to Riverside I— I Cajon Pass to East/ale I— I Riverside to Temecula Beaumont to Temecula aument 11) ;erne. Mies 1-3 Figure 1.2 I East-West Oriented Sub -Corridors ui t • ti 162 Sub -corridors 1-7 Apple Valley to €A County line F1 Banning to Rialto 1-1 Riverside I Rialto to LA County Line 11 Riverside to Orange County Line Hemet to Corona N 0 2.75 5.5 Miles — Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan V A description of each sub -corridor has been prepared which includes data and analysis within each sub -corridor, including the following types of descriptive information: • Which jurisdictions are included entirely or partially within the sub -corridors. • Key transportation facilities, including freeways, major arterials, major transit routes, and active transportation in each sub -corridor. • Key socioeconomic characteristics, including: — Land use patterns. — CalEnviroScreen scores. — SCAG Communities of Concern. • Travel Patterns: — Total trips generated and internal versus external trips in the sub -corridor and IE CMCP area. — Average trip length. — Journey to work mode share. • Congestion, Delay, and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), including: — Recurrent freeway congestion locations. — Daily VMT by facility type (freeway general purpose lanes, freeway HOV lanes, major arterial roadways). • Transit usage. • Safety data, including crash concentrations on the freeways, bicycle and pedestrian crash concentrations, and truck crash concentrations. • Future growth in population, employment, travel demand, and VMT. Each sub -corridor synopsis also includes a description of the strategic approach to addressing the transportation challenges in that sub -corridor, based on the identified problems, issues, and opportunities. Finally, a list of proposed transportation projects also is included for each sub -corridor. acoa®=®1� 4 Tables 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 provide comparisons of the key characteristics of each sub -corridor, including socioeconomic data, transportation characteristics, and projected growth. A summary and comparison of the sub - corridors is provided in this Section. These comparisons help to identify the key characteristics of each sub -corridor and the key transportation issues in each area. This helps in the subsequent identification of the best projects and improvements to recommend in each corridor. 1.2.1 Land Use The top three land uses in each sub -corridor are noted in Table 1.1 along with the percentage of the sub -corridor that consists of that land use. The land use type that appears as the most common type is rural residential, which accounts for up to 40 percent of the land uses in two corridors.3 The other two most common land use types are open space and single family residential, followed by agriculture. Most of the sub -corridors have some type of residential use as their predominant land use type while two have more open space than any other type of use. 1.2.2 Disadvantaged Communities, Communities of Concern, and CalEnviroScreen Scores Disadvantaged communities indicators relate to the need for transportation services, among other needs. Areas with lower income and other related disadvantages, such as higher pollution burdens, often have lower auto ownership and less access to transportation to get residents to places of employment, shopping, doctors' offices, and other destinations. The CalEnviroScreen is a tool that helps identify California communities that are most affected by many sources of pollution, especially those vulnerable to pollution effects. CalEnviroScreen uses environmental, health, and socioeconomic information to produce scores for every census tract in the state. The scores are mapped so that different communities can be compared. An area with a high score is one that experiences a much higher pollution burden than areas with low scores. CalEnviroScreen ranks communities based on data that are available from state and Federal Government sources. CalEnviroScreen scores range up to 100, with higher scores indicating more impacted communities. For the IE CMCP, any areas with scores in the 75 to 100 range are reported. The sub -corridors with the highest CalEnviroScreen scores include San Bernardino to Riverside with 64 percent of the area experiencing a score of 75 to 100, Riverside to the LA County line, with 46 percent and Cajon Pass to Eastvale with 44 percent. All of the remaining areas are under 40 percent, with the Beaumont to Temecula having the lowest percentage of area with a high score, at only 7 percent. In terms of low income communities, as shown in Table 1.1, the corridors with the most area considered low income are the Victorville to San Bernardino and San Bernardino to Riverside corridors, at nearly 50 percent of the area 3 Rural Residential units include ranches, farmsteads, single mobile homes, and residences located in rural setting. Rural residential density varies from one (1) unit per acre to one (1) unit per 10 acre. 1-6 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan with low income.' The areas with the lowest percentage of low income areas include Cajon Pass to Eastvale, Riverside to Orange County Line, Beaumont to Temecula and Riverside to Temecula, each with under 27 percent low income area. Another measure of need is the SCAG Communities of Concern. Communities of Concern are Census Designated Places that fall in the upper third for their concentration of minority population households in poverty. This designation is significant in severity due to the degree of poverty. The sub -corridor that has the most area included in the Communities of Concern is the San Bernardino to Riverside corridor, with 44 percent of the area designated as a Community of Concern. Other sub -corridors have much lower percentage of their area considered Communites of Concern, mostly below 15 percent. Table 1.1 I Land Use and Socioeconomic Characteristics of the Sub -Corridors Victorville to San Bernardino San Bernardino to Riverside Cajon Pass to Eastvale Riverside to Temecula Beaumont to Temecula Apple Valley to LA County Line Banning to Rialto Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Riverside to Orange County Line Hemet to Corona Source: Note: Predominant Land Uses (top three land use by %) OS (38%) OS (26%) IP7300/0)11 RR (32%) I RR (23%) RR 40°/ SFR (24%) SFR (26%) SFR (26%) SFR (24%) OS (24%) SFR (17%) SFR (19%) AGR (17%) AGR 17% SFR (13%) Fac (10%) Ind (11%) SP (13%) OS (19%) Ind (11%) RR (11%) ASP (11111. % of CalEnviro Disadvantage Low Income Communities Communities 31% 44% 36% 7% di 47% 13% 27% 26% 13%j 32% 46% 35% 41% 38% 31% SCAG Communities of Concern 13% 10% 14% 14% 39% 34% 12% SCAG 2012 Land Use; CaIEPA CalEnviroScreen 3.0; SCAG 2016 RTP. OS —Open Space; RR —Rural Residential, SFR—Single Family Residential; Fac—Facilities; SP—Specific Plan; Ind —Industrial; AGR—Agriculture. 1.2.3 Home to Work Mode Share Table 1.2 displays how people travel to work, including whether they drive alone, carpool, or use transit. The method of travel from home to work does not vary considerably among the ten sub -corridors. All of the ten sub -corridors have between 75 to 80 percent of residents who drive themselves to work in a single occupant vehicle (SOV). Two 4 "Low-income communities" are census tracts with median household incomes at or below 80 percent of the statewide median income or with median household incomes at or below the threshold designated as low-income by Department of Housing and Community Development's State Income Limits adopted pursuant to Section 50093. 165 of the ten sub -corridors are at 80 percent SOV, including Cajon Pass to Eastvale and Apple Valley to LA County line. Similarly, the rate of carpooling is relatively consistent and ranges from 12 to 14 percent of all home to work trips in each sub -corridor. Finally, the transit percentage throughout the entire area is very low at only 1 or 2 percent in each sub -corridor. 1.2.4 Transit Table 1.2 also displays whether the sub -corridors include High Quality Transit. High Quality Transit service is defined as bus or rail transit service, or the intersection of two or more major bus routes with a frequency of service interval of 15 minutes or less during the morning and afternoon peak commute periods. Four of the ten sub -corridors have high -quality transit service, including Victorville to San Bernardino, San Bernardino to Riverside, Banning to Rialto and Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line. The remaining six sub -corridor areas have transit service but do not qualify as High Quality Transit. 1-8 Table 1.2 I Transportation Characteristics of the Sub -Corridors Sub -Corridor Victorville to San Bernardino San Bernardino to Riverside Home -Work Trips SOV (%) 78% Cajon Pass to Eastvale Riverside to Temecula Beaumont to Temecula Apple Valley to LA County Line Banning to Rialto Riverside/Rialt o to LA County Line Riverside to Orange County Line Hemet to Corona 75% 80% 77% 77% 78% 78% 76% Carpool (%) 14% Transit (%) 1% High Quality Transit Percent of VMT on Freeways Corridor Stop Total (HOV) Yes No 70% (1%) Percent of VHT on Freeways Total (HOV) 63% (1%) 14% 12% 2% Yes Yes 61% (3%) 60% (3%) Percent Trips Internal to CMCP 86% No Yes 70% (2%) 61% (1%) 14% 1% No Yes 60% (2%) 13% 12% 1% 50% (2%) No No 41% (0%) 1 % No No 49% (0%) 30% (0%) 45% (0%) 13% 12% 2% Yes Yes 2% Yes Yes 13% 77% 14% 64% (2%) 65% (5%) 42% (1%) 56% (4%) 2% No Yes 70% (3%) 1% No Yes 68% (2%) 53% (1%) 45% (1%) k 92% J 85% 88% 90% 86% Avg. Trip Length External to CMCP 35.4 VMT per Service Population 29.7 29.4 k 32.5 34.2 Ai 80% Source: SCAG Model 2016; ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. 167 41.5 41.8 T44.4 I * 44.8 27.0 27.6 88% I 40.0 27.1 26.9 26.8 26.6 30.6 30.8 1.2.5 Vehicle Miles Traveled on Freeway Versus Non -Freeway Facilities The percent of trips made on freeways in each sub -corridor is an indicator of the demand for freeway travel versus other modes (arterial, transit, or active transportation). The percent of VMT on the freeway system versus other modes is shown in Table 1.2 and it ranges from a low of 41 percent in the Beaumont to Temecula sub -corridor up to 70 percent in three other sub -corridors (Victorville to San Bernardino, Cajon Pass to Eastvale, and Riverside to Orange County line). In the areas with the higher freeway VMT, opportunities to reduce VMT and shift some VMT to other modes would be desirable. 1.2.6 Trip Origin -Destination and Length Characteristics The percentage of internal vs. external trips, defined below, as well as average length of trips made by residents and employees of each sub -corridor, contributes to vehicle miles traveled and consequently vehicle hours of travel (VHT) or time spent on the road. These statistics, which are shown in two separate columns in Table 1.2 reveal certain characteristics about travel patterns, mix of land uses, and strategic location of the sub -corridor and is generally independent of transportation facilities supply and choice of mode. • Percent Trips Internal to IE CMCP. These numbers describe what percentage of trips originating or destined to the particular sub -corridor are entirely to and from points within the Inland Empire CMCP study Area. The larger the percentage, generally the more "self-sufficient" the sub -corridor is and the people have to travel shorter distances for employment and services. The percentages vary in a relatively narrow range from a high of 92 percent to a low of 79 percent. As seen, the three sub -corridors with the highest percentage of internal trips are San Bernardino to Riverside (92 percent), Banning to Rialto (91 percent), and Beaumont to Temecula (90 percent). These higher percentages also are consistent with the fact that these three sub - corridors are generally on the eastern end of the IE CMCP Study Area with less travel to outside the IE CMCP. On the opposite end, the three sub -corridors with the lowest percentage of internal trips are Riverside to Los Angeles County line (79 percent), Riverside to Orange County line (80 percent) and Cajon Pass to Eastvale (85 percent). Consistent with the previous trend, but in the opposite direction, these three sub - corridors are all generally on the west side of the IE CMCP Study Area and have a higher interaction of trips to and from Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Furthermore, it also is intuitive that the two east/west corridors connecting Riverside to Los Angeles and Orange counties have the lowest percentage of "trip retention" and is an indication of the traditional heavy traffic demand on highways and transit corridors connecting these counties and emphasizes the need for mobility improvements. • Average Trip Length External to IE CMCP. These average trip lengths in miles describe the distances that people travel between each sub -corridor and points outside the overall IE CMCP Study Area. The longer the average trip length, the more VMT and vehicle hours of delay and indicates the demand for people to travel outside the IE CMCP for work or services. The range of these average external trip lengths is quite wide, varying from a low of 27 miles to a high of almost 45 miles. Since the majority of external trips are to/from points west of the IE CMCP, intuitively, the two lowest average external trip lengths are to/from Riverside to 1-10 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Los Angeles County Line (27 miles) and Riverside to Orange County Line (27.6 miles) sub -corridors, both of which are close to the western boundary of the IE CMCP Study Area. The next lowest average external trip lengths belong to Cajon Pass to Eastvale (32.5 miles) and Victorville to San Bernardino (35.4 miles) sub - corridors, again both on the western side of the IE CMCP. Conversely, the longest average external trip lengths are for Banning to Rialto (44.8 miles), Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line (44.4 miles), and San Bernardino to Riverside (43.7 miles). Again, intuitively, these are the farthest sub -corridors from the western boundaries of the IE CMCP area, indicating longer average travel distances from the external areas. These numbers provide a generalized picture of average trip lengths that have to be served for people in various sub -corridors, when traveling to/from external points. This emphasize the need for types of mobility improvements. • VMT and VHT on Freeways. All sub -corridors have a larger share of VMT on freeways than VHT on freeways. This suggests that traffic using freeways has less delay in comparison to the arterials. VMT on freeways within sub -corridors varies from 70% to 41% and VHT on freeways varies from 68% to 30%. Beaumont to Temecula sub -corridor has only 41 % of VMT on the freeway and 30% of VHT on the freeway. 1.2.7 Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Per Service Population VMT per service population measures total VMT in the sub -corridor against the service population, which consists of the total number of residents plus workers in the area, and is shown in Table 1.2. The VMT per service population ranges from a low of 25.6 vehicle miles traveled in the Banning to Rialto sub -corridor to a high of 34.2 in the Cajon Pass to Eastvale sub -corridor. Low VMT per service population happens in sub -corridors with either low travel markets or those with high service populations, or both. The two lowest VMT/service populations (Banning to Rialto and Riverside to Los Angeles County line) have high service populations due to their relative urbanization and better balance in jobs and housing creating low levels of VMT. Additionally, these two sub -corridors have metrolink lines connecting them to Los Angeles and Orange County, However, the third lowest (Apple Valley to Los Angeles County line) has a low level of travel market due to fewer transportation facilities. High VMT per service population happens in sub -corridors with either high travel markets or those with low service populations or both. The highest VMT numbers belong to the Cajon Pass to Eastvale sub -corridor with a high travel market along 1-15 and a relatively low service population due to it being a small sub -corridor. The same is true for the next -highest, Riverside to Orange County line, which has high travel market along SR-91 and a relatively low service population due to the small sub - corridor. However, the Hemet to Corona sub -corridor, which is the third highest, has both a large area with high travel markets along 1-215 and SR-91 but a low service population due to its generally low population and employment density. The significance of these analyses is that it provides better understanding of the travel characteristics and needs in each sub -corridor as future mobility investments are prioritized. 1.2.8 Future Growth Projections Potential future growth has been assessed using the SCAG regional model data to project growth in population, employment, total trips, and average speed, as shown on Table 1.3. The forecast reduction in speed is shown as a metic to assess future growth in congestion levels. Table 1.3 I Projected Growth by Sub -Corridor Sub -Corridor Expected Pop. Growth to Emp. 2040 (%)** Victorville to San Bernardino 43% 40% 34% -29% San Bernardino to Riverside 16% 37% -19% Cajon Pass to Eastvale 17% 33% -16% Riverside to Temecula 22% 49% 28% -19% Beaumont to Temecula 33% 42% -13% Apple Valley to LA County Line 50% 33% Banning to Rialto 22% 39% 23% -16% Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line 19% 31% Riverside to Orange County Line 13% 51 % 27% -15% Hemet to Corona 34% 52% 31 % -21 % Source: SCAG Model 2016. • Population. The overall population growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 16 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 647,000 residents. Within the sub -corridors, the increase in population ranges from a low of 13 percent (Riverside to Orange County line) to 50 percent (Apple Valley to LA County line). • Employment. The overall employment growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 35 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 452,000 jobs. Within the sub -corridors, the increase in employment ranges from a low of 31 percent (Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line) to 52 percent (Hemet to Corona). • Trips. The overall trip growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 33 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 3 million daily trips. The growth in the sub corridors ranges from a low of 20 percent (Riverside to Los Angeles line) to a high of 39 percent (Apple Valley to LA County line). • Speed. The change in speed measures average daily speeds on the freeways within each sub -corridor. The changes range from speed reduction of 10 percent in the Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line sub -corridor to a reduction in speed of 29 percent in the Victorville to San Bernardino sub -corridor. Most of the sub -corridors experience speed reductions of 20 percent or lower.. The following five sub -corridors fall in the top five in growth in at least two and up to four of the growth measures: 170 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan • Victorville to San Bernardino. This sub -corridor has the highest projected growth in VHT, the second highest growth in population and trip making, and the fifth highest growth in employment • Riverside to Temecula. This sub -corridor has the fourth highest projected growth in employment, the fifth highest growth in trips, and the fourth highest growth in VHT. • Beaumont to Temecula. This sub -corridor has the second highest projected growth in trips and the fourth highest growth in population and employment. • Appley Valley to LA County line. This sub -corridor has the highest projected growth in both population and trips and the second highest growth in VHT. • Hemet to Corona. This sub -corridor has the highest projected growth in employment, third highest projected growth in VHT and the third highest growth in population. 1-13 172 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 2.0 Inland Empire's Strategic Approach to the CMCP: Transportation Planning Sustainability, Land Use Integration, and Project Evaluation As noted in Chapter 1, a strategic approach to the develoment of the IE CMCP has been crafted for each sub - corridor. There also are some overarching strategic initiatives and programs which are countywide or Inland Empire - wide in nature, that relate to the overall Study Area and related sub -corridors. Planning and decision -making within the sub -corridors would be influenced and/or enhanced through these larger -area strategies. A brief description of these areawide initiatives and programs is provided below, prior to addressing the sub -corridor -specific strategic approaches. Initiatives focus primarily on planning efforts, especially in the environmental arena, that will lead to implementation by countywide or regional agencies. Programs refer to ongoing areawide investments in operational activities (i.e., are not corridor -specific) that are part of the multimodal implementation process. For example, Riverside and San Bernardino counties have a robust rideshare program called IE Commuter. In effect, this program promotes trip - reduction in every sub -corridor. And rather than repeat all of these programs in the lists of multimodal strategies and projects in every sub -corridor, a table has been provided to highlight each program and its geographic extent. The initiatives are presented first, followed by the programs. 2.1 Multimodal Planning, Community, and Environmental Initiatives 1. Inland Empire Initiatives: a. Climate Adaptation Partnership between San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG) and Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) "Resilient IE"—This plan has been prepared to address the potential effects of climate change in Riverside and San Bernardino counties and identify ways to work together to address the challenges. A completed climate adaptation report has been prepared and can be found here: https://wrcog.us/285/Resilient-IE.. Resilient IE was developed in collaboration with the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) with funding from Caltrans. Resilient IE works to support regional and local efforts to prepare for and mitigate risks associated with climate adaptation on the region's transportation infrastructure with five primary project components: i. A newly established regional climate collaborative, the Inland Southern California Climate Collaborative (ISC3) ii. Subregional vulnerability assessments and adaptation strategies; iii. City -level, climate -related transportation hazards and evacuation maps; iv. A regionally -tailored climate resilient transportation infrastructure guidebook; and v. A regional climate adaptation and resiliency element template. 2-1 b. Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies: A Toolkit for Goods Movement (2009)—This effort was completed jointly by RCTC, SBCTA, and LA Metro to provide practical tools for minimizing and mitigating the impacts of goods movement activities on local communities while also recognizing the economic benefits that the logistics industry brings. c. Inland Empire Next Generation Shared Ride and Virtual Travel Study —This effort will be an Inland Empire - wide look at ways to increase use of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies such as shared -ride systems and virtual travel opportunities like work -at-home and digital business. The Coronavirus has forced the entire country to quickly adapt to virtual travel wherever possible and the study would examine how to capture some of these opportunities long-term. d. Managed Lanes Study led by Caltrans District 8 in partnership with RCTC and SBCTA. The purpose of this ongoing study is to assess viability of conversion, addition, and implementation of managed lanes (High Occupancy Vehicle, High Occupancy Toll, and Toll lanes) within San Bernardino and Riverside Counties for the next 20 years. Currently, Caltrans District 8 has planned 56-lane miles of managed lane systems in the region and the study will identify the potential for additional managed lanes. The study will complement other long-range regional studies and plans. As part of this effort, Caltrans is coordinating with local and regional transportation agencies to gather input on identifying and evaluating potential corridors to implement managed lanes. The study is expected to be completed in late 2021. e. Caltrans District -level Active Transportation Plan —This is an upcoming effort and will identify many strategies and improvements needed for advancing non -motorized travel in the Inland Empire. Every district will develop a plan under the HQ contract in place. This plan will complement existing county -level and local -level plans. 2. San Bernardino County Initiatives: a. Countywide Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduction Plan —The Countywide GHG Plan and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) were prepared in 2014 to address 2020 GHG reduction goals. Individual jurisdictions have prepared their own Climate Adaptation Plans (CAPs) based on the countywide plan and EIR. The Countywide GHG Reduction Plan is now being updated to address 2030 goals. b. Countywide Zero Emission Bus Initiative (2020)—Infrastructure and funding needs are being identified for the five transit operators in the County in response to the California Air Resources Board Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) regulation. c. Countywide SB 743 VMT Implementation Study (2020)—Lead agencies throughout California have been transitioning from use of level of service (LOS) analysis for California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documents to the use of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). This countywide effort is providing guidance to local jurisdictions for adoption and implementation of their local processes governing VMT analysis. 2=2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan d. Zero -Emission Vehicle Readiness and Implementation Plan (2019)—This was a countywide effort to identify, prioritize, and implement electric vehicle charging stations to facilitate the attainment of the State's vehicle electrification goals in San Bernardino County. e. Healthy Communities Best Practices Toolkit—The San Bernardino County Department of Public Health created a strategic plan for the implementation of Healthy Communities policies. The toolkit, a collaboration between SBCOG and the County, will contain sample policies, resolutions, processes, organizational structure, and lessons learned from agencies that have implemented health -related policies. f. Habitat Conservation —San Bernardino County and SBCOG are collaborating on an effort to create a Regional Conservation Investment Strategy (RCIS) through the process established by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife under AB 2087. A first draft plan was submitted to CDFW in late 2018 and will be developed further in conjunction with resource agencies and a range of stakeholder groups. Habitat connectivity is an important consideration. 3. Western Riverside County: a. Western Riverside County Climate Action Plan (CAP) —The subregional CAP was prepared in 2014 to address 2020 and 2035 GHG reduction goals. The subregional CAP is now being updated to address 2030 and 2045 goals. b. WRCOG SB 743 VMT Implementation Study —Lead agencies throughout California have been transitioning from use of LOS analysis for CEQA documents to the use of VMT. This Western Riverside County effort is providing guidance to local jurisdictions for adoption and implementation of their local processes governing VMT analysis. c. Sustainability Framework for Western Riverside County —The framework is a blueprint that serves as a beginning point to establish, implement, and refine a subregional sustainability plan. It provides an integrated approach to sustainability which consists of six core components: economic development; education; health; transportation; water, wastewater, and energy; and the environment. d. Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP—in place since 2002)—A comprehensive, multi - jurisdictional conservation plan focusing on maintaining biological and ecological diversity within the urbanizing region. The MSHCP captures approximately 1.26 million acres covering multiple species and multiple habitats within a diverse landscape, from urban centers to undeveloped foothills and montane forests, and many bioregions like the Santa Ana Mountains, Riverside Lowlands, San Jacinto Foothills, and San Bernardino Mountains. e. Park and Ride Strategy and Toolkit—In partnership with San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), RCTC completed the Park and Ride Strategy and Toolkit in 2019. It identifies strategies and 2=? tools to help improve the planning, operation, and management of site -specific lots and the regional network as a whole. 4. County or City -level Initiatives: a. Riverside County's Good Neighbor Policy —The Policy provides a framework for how logistics centers or warehouses greater than 250,000 square feet are designed, constructed, and operated to lessen impacts on surrounding communities and the environment. One such requirement is establishing a 300-foot minimum buffer between truck bays and loading docks and surrounding homes. b. San Bernardino Countywide Vision —The Countywide Vision Statement, approved in 2011 by SBCTA/SBCOG, its member cities, and the County of San Bernardino, was a bold step toward a sustainable future, setting the County on a sustainable course for nine distinct sectors or elements. The Vision states that: "We envision a sustainable system of high -quality education, community health, public safety, housing, retail, recreation, arts and culture, and infrastructure, in which development complements our natural resources and environment." c. Inclusion of transportation -efficient land use policies and other sustainability policies in local general plans and specific plans corridor -wide. See SCAG Local Profiles at https://www.scag.ca.gov/DataAndTools/ Pages/LocalProfiles.aspx for additional information on characteristics of each Inland Empire jurisdiction. 2.2 Multimodal Transportation Programs As indicated earlier, there are programs underway at the Inland Empire level or at the County level that are very much a part of the multimodal transportation strategy but do not fall neatly into the individual sub -corridors. As the sub -corridor strategies are presented, it is important to remember that these programs serve as overlays to the lists of strategies or projects listed at the sub -corridor level. So if a certain sub -corridor does not seem as multimodal as others, it is important to remember that these program -level activities are still at work to reduce GHGs and VMT as well as to improve system safety, efficiency, and operations. Many of these involve partnerships across state, regional, and local agencies. The programs are generally categorized as follows: • Active Transportation (AT). While some AT activities are project -specific, others are programmatic, such as Safe Routes to School or local/regional funding programs, like the Transportation Development Act (TDA) that funds local active transportation projects through a competitive call for projects every odd numbered years. • Intelligent Transportation System/Incident Management (ITS/IM). Examples include signal coordination and freeway service patrols. • Rail. Regional improvements and funding programs are in place that benefit upgrades in the Metrolink commuter rail system. 176 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan • Safety. Caltrans sponsors ongoing transportation funding initiatives to maintain and provide safety upgrades to local and state highways. • Transit (other than rail). Each transit agency has its own investment plan for improving the customer experience and customer/driver safety. • Transportation Demand Management (TDM). A wide array of TDM strategies is promoted through IE Commuter, from ridesharing to vanpooling to alternative work schedules. • Zero Emission Vehicles and Alternative Fuel Programs (ZEV/AF). There are numerous statewide and regional programs for funding and incentivizing more rapid turnover of auto and truck fleets to benefit air quality and GHG reduction. A listing of relevant areawide programs is provided in Table 2.1. 2-5 Table 2.1 1 Areawide Multimodal Programs (not specific to a sub -corridor) Program Type Project Title/Description II Partners Status • urce AT Safe Routes to School/for Seniors— Education, Encouragement, Enforcement RCTC, SBCTA and cities/counties Ongoing RCTC Traffic Relief Plan, WRCOG Active Transportation Plan, and SBCo Non- Motorized/AT Plan AT Transportation Development Act Article 3 Funding (bike/ped infrastructure, transit operations) RCTC, SBCTA, Ongoing cities/counties, transit agencies TDA ITS/IM Freeway Traffic Management System/TMC Caltrans Ongoing Caltrans Planning for Operations ITS/IM Interchange and arterial signal coordination and local TMCs Caltrans Local Jurisdiction TMC Ongoing Caltrans Planning for Operations ITS/IM Freeway Service Patrols RCTC, SBCTA, Caltrans, CHP Ongoing RCTC/SBCTA FSP —1 Programs Rail Ongoing maintenance and schedule upgrades SCRRA, RCTC, SBCTA Ongoing SCRRA SRTP Rail Southern California Optimized Rail Expansion (SCORE) Program SCRRA, SCAQMD, RCTC, SBCTA Ongoing SCORE Rail Acquisition of clean locomotives SCRRA, SCAQMD, RCTC, SBCTA Ongoing TRP Safety State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Caltrans Ongoing SHOPP Safety Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP)—Competitive program for local safety projects Cities/counties Ongoing HSIP Guidelines Transit Ongoing route and schedule upgrades RTA, Omnitrans, VVTA, and other transit agencies Ongoing SRTPs Transit Expansion of express and regional bus network with improved frequencies RTA Ongoing SRTPs, RCTC Traffic Relief Plan Transit Transit agency responses to CARB Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) rule RTA, Omnitrans, VVTA, and other transit agencies, and CTCs Ongoing Transit Agencies/ SRTPs Transit Fare equipment and ITS technology upgrades to improve operations RTA, Omnitrans, other transit agencies, and CTCs Ongoing SRTPs TDM Design and construction of Park and Ride Facilities Caltrans, RCTC, SBCTA, Cities Ongoing TRP/CTP TDM IE Commuter Rideshare Program and Telework Initiative RCTC, SBCTA Ongoing TRP/CTP TDM Vanclub—Riverside County Vanpool Program RCTC Ongoing TRP/CTP TDM Loop and VVTA Vanpool Programs SBCTA, VVTA Ongoing TRP/CTP VE/AF CARB funding programs (e.g., AQIP) CARB Ongoing VE/AF Electric vehicle and charging infrastructure rebates/incentives State, Utility Cos. Ongoing 178 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 2.3 Inland Empire CMCP Goals, Objectives and Performance Metrics The CTC Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Guidelines (2018), the CTC Solutions for Congestion Corridor Program (SCCP) Guidelines (2020) and the Caltrans Corridor Planning Process Guide (2020) are all guiding documents which contain corridor planning goals, objectives, performance metrics and evaluation criteria for assessing transportation improvement projects at the corridor level. In addition, many other state, regional and local transportation plans include transportation system improvement goals, objectives and performance metrics, such as the Caltrans Smart Mobility Framework, the Regional Transportation Plan, the San Bernardino County Countywide Plan, Transportation and Mobility Element and the Riverside County Draft Long Range Transportation Plan. The CTC Solutions for Congested Corridors Program guidelines also state that "the primary objective of the Congested Corridors Program is to fund projects designed to reduce congestion in highly traveled and highly congested corridors through performance improvements that balance transportation improvements, community impacts, and that provide environmental benefits." Based on the CTC and Caltrans guidance, objectives of the comprehensive multimodal corridor planning process may include but are not necessarily limited to: • Define multimodal transportation deficiencies and opportunities for optimizing system operations. • Identify the types of projects necessary to reduce congestion, improve mobility, and optimize multimodal system operations along highly traveled corridors. • Identify funding needs. • Further state and Federal ambient air standards and greenhouse gas emissions reduction standards pursuant to the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Division 25.5, commencing with Section 38550, of the Health and Safety Code) and Senate Bill 375 (Chapter 728, Statutes of 2008). • Preserve the character of local communities and create opportunities for neighborhood enhancement. • Identify projects that achieve a balanced set of transportation, environmental, and community access improvements. As noted, a key element of the CMCP is to reduce congestion in highly traveled and highly congested corridors through performance improvements. To measure projects or groups of projects which result in performance improvements in the study area and sub -corridors, a set of transportation performance metrics is applied. Some of these are metrics can be assessed using quantitative data such as transportation model output, while others are qualitatively evaluated based on project type, project location and other factors. This is consistent with the CTC guidelines which state "in recognition that data availability and modeling capabilities vary by agency based on available resources, the Commission expects agencies to address plan and project performance qualitatively and 2=7 quantitatively to the degree reasonable given technical and financial resources available during the planning process. As part of the comprehensive multimodal corridor planning process, a plan -level corridor performance assessment must be conducted and documented to clearly outline system performance and trends." The evaluations provided in this plan clearly document the conditions, including congestion levels, in the overall study area and sub -corridors. Per the CTC and Caltrans corridor guidelines, it is critical to create the multimodal corridor plan that closely match the local and regional goals and objectives for transportation planning. With that in mind, a summary of the goals an objectives of Riverside County and San Bernardino County from the latest transportation plans include: Riverside County:5 • Provide a first class transportation system and supports a vibrant, dynamic and livable county; • A multimodal system that will promote sustainability, access, safety, economic opportunities, public health, environmental stewardship and balanced job/housing ratio; • Utilize best available technology; • Provide reliable and efficient mobility for people goods and services; • Preserve values of Riversides County's communities. San Bernardino County:5 • Consolidate and integrate countywide transportation and land use planning to provide consistent input to the RTP/SCS. • Improve safety and mobility for all modes of travel. • Deliver transportation projects and services to promote economic competitiveness, affordable housing, environmental quality and overall sustainability. • Promote stewardship of public resources through cost effective delivery, maintenance and operations of projects. • Promote the planning and funding of sustainable transportation systems via collaboration with local, regional, state, Federal and private stakeholders. 5 Draft Riverside County Long Range Transportation Plan, July 2019. 6 San Bernardino County Countywide Plan, Transportation and Mobility Element, May 2019. 2-R Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Based on a combination of state, regional and local plans, goals and objectives, the following key performance measures were discussed and chosen by the Inland Empire CMCP Project Management Team to assess the sub - corridor improvements: • VMT Reduction. • Person Delay Reduction. • Safety Improvement. • Mode Shift. • Person Throughput. • Improve Accessibility. • Reduce GHG and Improve Air Quality. • Improve System Reliability. • Project Deliverability. • Congestion Relief. These performance metrics are used to assess the potential transportation system improvements in each sub - corridor. The intent is not to rank the improvements or measure them against each other, but rather to inform the CMCP and SCCP process regarding how the projects address the overall goals and objectives related to state, regional and local plans. It is also recognized that the county -level plans and Caltrans plans have carefully developed short range, ten year and long range improvement plans with sets of projects that have been reviewed by residents, system users and elected officials. Those plans are used as a backbone for the sub -corridor recommendations, with additional analysis related specifically to the CMCP. 2-9 182 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.0 Corridor Characteristics This section provides a baseline assessment of existing travel characteristics and transportation conditions in the overall IE CMCP Study Area. The analysis includes key information needed to understand the flows of people and goods in the Study Area and the mobility deficiencies within the corridors. Transportation choices are a primary theme, but community characteristics and sustainability are major themes of the IE CMCP analysis as well. Information in this section includes commute and non -commute trip characteristics, transportation facility and operational characteristics (all modes), corridor demographics, existing and forecast flows of people and goods, safety, congestion levels, and bottlenecks. The Corridor Characteristics assessment presents an assessment of land use, demographics, and multimodal transportation conditions in the corridors and provides a baseline assessment upon which future projected conditions will be compared. The section includes the following key sub -sections describing the Study Area: • Socioeconomic and Land Use. • Corridor Trip Characteristics. • Safety. • Active Transportation. • Freeway and Arterials. • Transit. • Freight Network. • Future Growth and Projected Changes. Figure 3.1 illustrates the overall Study Area, which includes substantial portions of the urbanized Inland Empire of the Southern California region (excluding the Coachella Valley area), which is defined generally as the western portions of the counties of Riverside and San Bernardino. As mentioned elsewhere in this report, the Study Area is further disaggregated into ten sub -corridors for strategic planning, assessments, and project recommendations. However, this section of the report describes conditions throughout the overall Study Area, and the ten sub -corridors are discussed in detail in Chapter 5. 3-1 Figure 3.1 I Overall Study Area Upland Claremont Montclair Pomona Diamond Bar Chino Chino Hills !1 Yorba Linda 3 Adelanto Apple Valley Victorville Hesperia San Bernardino Fontana Rancho Cucamonga Rialto Highland Ontario Eastvale Colton Grand Terrace Loma Linda Jurupa Valley Redlands Riverside 60 Norco 91 Moreno Valley Corona Perris Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore Wildomar Murrieta Yucaipa Calimesa Ban ing Be u on cip San Jacinto Hemet Temecula O I I I I 0 5 10 Miles 3-2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.1 Socioeconomic and Land Use Assessment This section presents an assessment of the socioeconomic and land use characteristics of the Study Area, to help understand transportation conditions and choices. This assessment examines characteristics about the population living and working in the corridors, including population density, employment density, income, and other characteristics that influence travel behavior. The assessment is based on SCAG's 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS) data and data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS) 2015 5-year estimates. 3.1.1 Socioeconomic Characteristics Income and Poverty Levels Household income is a key measurement of the Study Area's residents' financial well-being, and the region's standard of living. In addition to salary or wage increases, household income grows when additional household members join the rank of workers —which often aligns with times of economic prosperity, just as it typically shrinks when household members retire or remove themselves from the workforce. Income also is directly related to travel choices. Those who can afford to own a car often choose to not ride transit. Recent studies indicate that rising incomes, combined with lower interest rates and longer terms for new and used cars, have made auto ownership more affordable in recent years. This has resulted in reduced transit ridership in the SCAG region as well as throughout the country. The Study Area's highest -income households are generally concentrated in communities on the western portion of the Study Area such as neighborhoods in the cities of Corona, Chino, Chino Hills, Eastvale, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, and Fontana. Figure 3.2 illustrates the locations within the Study Area with income levels below poverty level, by percentile. The residents in these areas would be expected to be more transit dependent than the rest of the Study Area. The Study Area has low- and moderate -income households that are dispersed in various areas. As housing costs are rising in other parts of the Southern California region, many low- and middle -income households are relocating to the Study Area. Areas with relatively lower income and higher poverty rates include neighborhoods in portions of San Bernardino, Riverside, Hemet, Moreno Valley, Adelanto, and others. Related to transportation corridors, some of the lowest income areas are located at the junction of the SR-91/1-215/SR-60, along the 1-215 and SR-210, SR- 74, as well as to the far northern end of the Study Area near the communities of Apple Valley, Victorville, and Adelanto. 3=3 Figure 3.2 I Household Income Below Poverty Levels { r .r-.L R.j P-fl9 G1JG.WTrQn' 71.m1 tipldr1+1 __-- - ---- Crrrom Churn Ji r.F 4 Jvrt pa Va41?y ies Source: ACS 2018, 5-year estimates. Haspiirra 'Wahl" Legend %of Households with Income Below Poverty Level in Last 12 Months in& I."- 2% 20% - 30%r 30% - 50% SO% 51 AyAre8 — Meijer Highways Crtyr84urlarres Iivhfand nrartir,eo fontend 1 c !Irma t_,rlda arta.7PrY 4. _'— air yam -- _._.I .'drly tare y . � Ihr errfee r \ TLakvfh rr ru t'uC410.1 &ann+ng ek aurrl0+7# Sart lacrnto anWr1 •r 186 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Labor Force Population Around 2.1 million people make up the labor force of San Bernardino and Riverside counties. The average age of the labor force is around 40.5 years old. Detailed distribution of labor force by age is shown in Figure 3.3. Breaking the workforce down by race and ethnicicty, approximatly 52 percent —the majority —of the labor force is Hispanic or Latino. The second largest racial group is non -Hispanic white. Other significant population groups are Black (7 percent) and Asian (7 percent). Figure 3.3 I Labor Force Age Distribution 25% — 20% — 15% — 10% — 5% — 0% San Bernardino and Riverside Counties ■ 16 to 19 ■ 20 to 24 ■ 25 to 29 30 to 34 ■ 35 to 44 ■ 45 to 54 ■ 44 to 59 ■ 60 to 64 ■ 65 to 74 ■ 75 and over Source: ACS 2018, 1-year estimates. Senior and Youth Population Density Neighborhoods with high senior and youth populations require different transportation solutions compared to the general population. The senior population typically faces greater challenges for getting around due to their fixed income, age, and disabilities. The population under the driving age also has more limited access to mobility due to cost, limited access to vehicles, and restrictions to obtaining a driver's license. The driving age in California is 16. Enhancements to transit and active transportation may be some of the appropriate solutions that help seniors and youths get around independently to meet everyday needs. Senior Population Around 421,000 residents in the Study Area are age 65 and older, representing nearly 11 percent of the population. Figure 3.4 illustrates the population density of the senior population. The neighborhoods with the highest share of senior population are in the eastern edge of the Study Area in Banning/Beaumont and the southern section of the 3=5 Study Area in Menifee/Temecula. The Inland Empire, particularly in the eastern and southern portion of the Study Area, is an attractive location for seniors to live in Southern California where housing is more affordable. The highest concentration of seniors can be found in retirement communities in Beaumont and Menifee where there is a 55+ age minimum for residents. Youth Population Around 1,044,800 residents in the Study Area are under the age of 18, representing nearly 27 percent of the population. Figure 3.5 illustrates the population density of the youth population. The neighborhoods with the highest shares of population under 18 can be found throughout the Study Area. At the northern edge of the Study Area, some neighborhoods in Adelanto, Victorville, and Hesperia have neighborhoods with one in three residents under 18. Along the I-10/SR-210 corridor, the cities of Rialto and San Bernardino have significant populations under 18. North of SR-91, neighborhoods in Jurupa Valley have high shares of youth residents. In the southern portion of the Study Area, neighborhoods in Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, and Perris have a large share of population under age 18. 3-6 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.4 I Senior Population Density Source: 2017 5-yearACS. 189 Figure 3.5 I Youth Population Density ppre Valley . San Bernardino' Lama Linda .eraiikrerraee Redlands • e Chino HiYJs Moreno Valley Can • n Lake Legend StudyArea Percent Under Age 18 _,.. Less than 10°%G 10 - 20% 20 - 30% -30-40% More than 40% Source: 2017 5-yearACS. Tempe -Zia - Banning Beaumont 190 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Environmental Justice Measures Communities of Concern SCAG maintains a list of "Communities of Concern" (COC), which are Census Designated Places (CDP) that represent the top 33 percent of minority and low-income residents. SCAG tracks changes to the composition of these areas as part of their Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategies (RTP/SCS) updates. Out of the 80 COCs in the six -county SCAG region, portions of nine COCs are within the Study Area (see Table 3.1). Table 3.1 I SCAG Designated Communities of Concern in Study Area Community of Concern Mead Valley Perris Muscovy Montclair Rialto Source: SCAG 2016. CalEnviroScreen Adelanto Bloomington Colton San Bernardino The California Environmental Protection Agency (CaIEPA) and the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) developed CalEnviroScreen to compare the relative pollution burden for communities across the state. Based on 20 pollution and socioeconomic indicators, the tool ranks each census tract based on the population's vulnerability to environmental pollution. Various statewide funding programs, including the Cap and Trade and Active Transportation Programs, use the CalEnviroScreen definition of "disadvantaged community." This definition includes the Census Tracts with the top 25 percent most disadvantaged scores in the state. Most of these Disadvantaged Communities are represented by the orange and red colored census tracts illustrated in Figure 3.6. The Study Area's combination of pollution burden and population characteristics give it high CalEnviroScreen scores in some areas, meaning there are many pollution -burdened and vulnerable communities throughout the Study Area. In general, many census tracts in the Study Area are more likely to have a high CalEnviroScreen score compared to the Southern California region as a whole, and the Study Area has comparatively higher concentrations of air pollutants (ozone + particulate matter) and higher poverty rates than the region as a whole. Communities of concern are located along the 1-10 corridor, Jurupa Valley, Riverside, Moreno Valley, Perris, Corona, Temescal Valley, and San Jacinto Valley. There are generally no Disadvantaged Communities in the areas south of SR-74 and south of the communities of Lake Elsinore, Perris, and Hemet. This is likely attributed to higher household incomes and lower poverty rates for census tracts in the southern portion of the Study Area which is more proximate to San Diego County. 3-0 Figure 3.6 I CalEnviroScreen and SCAG Communities of Concern - Major Highways [ 1 City Boundaries SCAG Communities of Concern Cal Enviroscreen Score Percentile 2° Rancho G'ucamong= _om a Linda h_Terrace_} Redfan t"r ' r{ Morrie t3 Source: CaIEPA CalEnviroScreen 3.0; SCAG 2016 RTP. Banning ,f Beaumont f, 192 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.1.2 Land Use The Study Area covers over 1.2 million acres of land in the Inland Empire. Development in the Study Area is spread over two dozen jurisdictions and unincorporated areas. In the region's early history, development began as vacant land was converted to agricultural use. Farming plays a less prominent role in the Study Area today, but large swaths of undeveloped, vacant, open space/recreation, and agriculture lands still exist between urbanized areas as presented in Figure 3.7 and Table 3.2. These types of land represent over half (53 percent) of the Study Area. Agriculture land is primarily located in the Temecula Valley, Menifee Valley, Perris Valley, and San Jacinto Valley in the southern portion of the Study Area, as well as in Chino and southern Ontario in the western portion of the Study Area. 193 Figure 3.7 I Study Area Land Use mar.. 1 1 .�ycus Vr �� � •lJplan Elmo Hills ll Clevisrd Y f r` r` i. J l v►_ iNs 0 3.76 7.6 - glebey { -r . s ... . brim t—=-5�!Gr�ni¢7er #Ae�dlan. — Y+J��ipra y. Gafrmesa Legend 9Vdy Area !Oar liiglrwwap Bmndaries angle • Family Reidenli31 kl lFFamly Residence _ OFe.lAb,ed Residarkel - GUMMI Oise Use _ carlraer®IaJ Services - Pubic raoiin �d�cbim _ ii,rr - I.rcLis. -u , Cvnrnurmmla,1 & J_s-cs - uRed uee Open Space & Reorealnn ▪ AgricElve ▪ Linderco.s.ncfmn Vamnl - .*odic Plan I1nde.ehpatleAProte d Highland . � •Ridersi-rt Lake Els Banning 421.1 Beaumont. ..cinurid •: i Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Table 3.2 I Land Use Type by Share of Study Area Land Use Type Acreage Percent of Study Area Vacant 367,000 30.3% Single -Family Residential 208,573 17.2% Open Space/Recreation 175,702 14.5% Agriculture 93,439 7.7% Other/Mixed Residential 86,558 7.1% Unknown 66,448 5.5% Industrial 49,630 4.1 Transportation, Communication, and Utilities 44,411 3.7% Commercial 22,436 1.9% Water 17,860 1.5% Facilities 16,155 1.3% Education 15,546 1.3% Multifamily Residential 15,467 1.3% Undevelopable or Protected Land 9,977 0.8% Military 8,110 0.7% Under Construction 6,233 0.5% Office 5,052 0.4% Mixed Commercial/Industrial 2,395 0.2% Specific Plan 418 0.0% Mixed Residential/Commercial 176 0.0% Grand Total 1,211,587 100.0% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. The region also has a long history of industrial and commercial land use. During World War II, military installations — such as March Air Reserve Base, which is still active today —brought manufacturing and steel production to the region. While the manufacturing industry has declined in the Inland Empire, it has been superseded by a booming logistics industry which is characterized by enormous warehouse and distribution facilities. So much so that Amazon Air currently operates six flights a day out of the March Air Base, in addition to Ontario International Airport. Warehouse and distribution centers have large footprints and require big parcels of land with access to transportation facilities. Abundant and more affordable land adjacent to a strong regional transportation system has made the Inland Empire a particularly attractive location for companies to position their distribution facilities. Today, industrial and commercial land use represents 6 percent of the land in the Study Area. The greatest concentration of industrial and commercial land use is along the 1-10 and 1-15 corridors stretching from Ontario to San Bernardino. This land is proximate to trucking corridors that transport goods from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach to the rest of the country and Ontario International and San Bernardino International airports, both of which are major cargo hubs. The southern edge of Moreno Valley and northern edge of Perris along the 1-215 has another concentration of industrial land use for warehousing. The cities of Corona (along the SR-91), Murrieta (near 1-15), and Temecula (near 1-15) also have industrial and commercial centers. Of the remaining land in the Study Area, the vast majority is single-family residential land use representing 17 percent of the Study Area. Rising home and land prices in neighboring coastal zones have brought housing booms 195 to the region. Developers have converted large vacant or agriculture lands into new single-family residential subdivisions attracting homeowners seeking more affordable housing. Concentrations of single-family subdivisions can be found from the Victor Valley area in the most northern edge of the Study Area, through the SR-210/Foothill Boulevard (SR-66) corridor between Upland and Highland, in Chino and Chino Hills at the western edge of the Study Area, Jurupa Valley, along SR-91 corridor, Moreno Valley, Redlands, and Murrieta/Temecula in the south portions of the Study Area. The Temecula Valley area in the southern most region of the Study Area is an international resort destination with nearly 3 million visitors each year.' Major destinations in Temecula Valley include Wine Country, the Historic Old Town Temecula, and Pechanga Resort & Casino. Employment Density 1.2 million workers are employed in the Study Area, representing over 80 percent of the total jobs in San Bernardino and Riverside counties. The industries with the most jobs include: health care and social assistance, retail trade, accommodations, food services, educational services, and transportation and warehousing. Since the end of the Great Recession, the Inland Empire has had one of the fastest growing economies of large metro areas in the country, with job growth in San Bernardino and Riverside counties outpacing the growth statewide. Job growth in the Study Area has been fueled by new transportation and warehousing, construction, health care, accommodation, and food services jobs. Between 2010 and 2019, transportation and warehousing industry added 74,600 jobs (115% growth), construction industry added 43,000 jobs (73% growth), health care and social assistance indutry added 79,900 jobs (55% growth), and accommdation/food service industry added 47,100 jobs (45% growth) in Sanbernardino and Riverside counties. Existing jobs are dispersed throughout the urbanized areas of the Study Area and, unlike most metropolitan areas, there are no typical dense urban job core areas, as only a handful of census tracts have employment density of greater than 5,000 jobs per square mile as shown in Figure 3.8. The areas with relatively dense concentrations of jobs can be found in the cities of Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ontario, primarily along the 1-10, SR-60 and SR- 91 corridors. https://www.visittemeculavalley.com/about/. 3-14 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.8 1 Employment Density Cucamonga Adelento Fontana Legend StudyArea Employment Density (Jobs per Sq. Mile) - <500 501 - 1,000 1,001 - 2,500 2,501 - 5,000 - > 5,000 Source: SCAG 2016 RTP/SCS. alley San Bemardino Colton ®Grand Murrieta Yucaipa Banning Beaumon 3-15 Population Density The areas with the greatest population density generally fall along the SR-210/I-10 and SR-91 corridors in a number of cities, with population density greater than 5,000 persons per square mile, as shown in Figure 3.9. Some additional concentrations of higher population density also occur in the southern area along 1-15 in Murrieta and Temecula, as well as in the Hemet/San Jacinto areas. Note that areas of higher population density also generally correlate with areas of higher employment density, with the exception of the southern portion of the Study Area which has higher population density but fewer jobs. 3-1 S Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.9 I Population Density 18 Upland Ontario. Eastvale 3MeXtEb Apph 395 - Jurupa Valley Norco Legend StudyArea Population Density (Residents per Sq. Mile) - <500 - 501 - 1,000 1,001 -2,500 2,501 - 5000 - > 5,000 Source: SCAG 2016 RTP/SCS. Hesperia Riverside all Highlanii __ Redlands Moreno Valley Murrieta Yucaipa Calimesa Temecul Banning Beaumon 199 Population to Employment Ratio Recent job growth in the region has helped move the needle in reducing the population to employment ratio imbalance in the Study Area. Overall, there are 3.1 persons per job in the Study Area which is high compared to the SCAG region's 2.3 persons per job. The population to employment ratios are lowest along the 1-10 corridor and SR-91 corridors, ranging from 2.4 to 3.1 person per job as shown in Figure 3.10. The Jurupa Valley, SR-74 corridor, and Victor Valley areas have the highest population to employment ratios where there are fewer jobs. This means many residents in these areas must commute long distances to other areas inside or outside the Study Area for work. 3-1 R Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.10 I Population -Employment Ratio Legend `QR.'S Garrido r RSA Pop-Empl Ratio 2.4 - 2.7 2.9 31 3.3 3.5 4.4 = 4.7 — 4.8 Source: SCAG 2016 RTP/SCS. 3.2 Corridor Trip Characteristics This section identifies trip origins and destinations and other trip characteristics in the Study Area to convey an understanding of the nature of travel activities that may be directly addressed by complementarily transportation improvements. The analysis of the origins and destinations of travelers is primarily based on SCAG's regional travel demand model data, as well as American Community Survey census data. 3-19 460000®� M■ it 3.2.1 Trip Characteristics There are over nine million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the Study Area. These trips represent most of the travel in the Study Area as it is heavily auto -centric with 92 percent of commute activities occurring by car. Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. As illustrated in Table 3.3, about eight out of 10 of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the Study Area. Internal -internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the Study Area, as well as local trips for daily activities such as grocery shopping, school drop-off/ pick-up, and leisure which are often proximate to home. The remaining trips travel to or originate from outside of the Study Area (internal -external or external -internal trips). Around one million trips are made between the Study Area and Los Angeles County every day, representing around six percent of all trips. Around 400,000 daily trips are made between the Study Area and Orange County as well as 150,000 daily trips between the Study Area and San Diego County. Table 3.3 12016 Daily Trips by Type r Trip Type Internal —Internal Trips Internal —External and External —Internal Trips Study Area —Los Angeles County Trips Number of Tr Study Area —San Bernardino County Trips Study Area —Orange County Trips Study Area—Riverside/Imperial County Trips Study Area —San Diego Trips Total Trips Source: SCAG Model 2016. 7,299,000 1,713,000 997,000 55,000 448,000 84,000 129,000 9,012,000 ps Percentage 81% 19% 11% 1% 5% 1% 1% 100% Figure 3.11 shows both internal and external trips. As shown, the following trip patterns are observed for the external trips (19 percent of all trips): • Eleven percent of the trips or about 1 million daily trips (equaling almost two thirds of the external trips) are to/from the Los Angeles County area to the west. • Five Percent of the trips or about 400,000 daily trips (equaling about a quarter of the external trips) are to/from Orange County to the southwest. • Approximately 1 percent of the trips are to/from areas to the south, east and north. 3-20 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.11 I Existing Daily Auto Trips in and to/from Study Area Rancho Cucamonga Adelanro WerorvNle Angie Vane 215 320 N206 ..r ■ s10 zan R' I . 11.21 Highland San Bernardino Colton Canaria assNale Jurupa Vaflay Loma Linda Grand Terrace Radlanda MOrtha Yafley Canyon Late Mendee eke Eisino Legend StudyArea - Major Highways Source: SCAG Model, 2016. Wifdo,xr Yucaipa Canmcse fM Temecula 0.1 IVI 1 To Banning Beaumont San Jacinto 0.15 1% The study area is divided into areas called Regional Statstical Areas (RSAs) as defined by SCAG. RSAs are based on census blocks and provide a common ground for transportation analysis. Table 3.4 lists the RSA by Study Area cities. The daily distribution of trips at the level of the RSA is illustrated in Figure 3.12. As shown, for trips within the Study Area, many of the internal -external trips originate from places in the Study Area along the 1-10 and SR-91 corridors. In those corridors, there is approximately a 50-50 split for trips that stay within their RSA and those that go elsewhere. In the Victor Valley, Temecula Valley/Lake Elsinore, and Hemet RSAs, more trips stay within their RSA. Conversely, in the Jurupa Valley, Perris/Moreno Valley, and Banning RSAs, more trips leave than stay within 3-21 their RSA. Areas which have a higher share of trips that leave the RSA likely have residents that must commute longer distances for work. Table 3.4 I Regional Statistical Area by Cities RSA City 28 Chino 28 Chino Hills 28 Fontana 28 Montclair 28 Ontario 28 Rancho Cucamonga 28 Upland 29 Colton 29 Grand Terrace 29 Highland 29 Loma Linda 29 Redlands 29 Rialto 29 San Bernardino 29 Yucaipa 45 Eastvale 45 Jurupa Valley 46 Corona 46 Norco 46 Riverside 47 Canyon Lake 47 Menifee 47 Moreno Valley 47 Perris 48 Hemet 48 San Jacinto 49 Lake Elsinore 49 Murrieta 49 Temecula 49 Wildomar 50 Banning 50 Beaumont 50 Calimesa The largest RSA -to -RSA flow of trips is between the Ontario and San Bernardino areas. The second largest RSA - to -RSA flows are between the Ontario and Riverside/Corona areas and the San Bernardino and Riverside/Corona areas. There are also a sizable number of trips from Perris/Moreno Valley to the Murrieta/Temecula areas and the Riverside/Corona areas. 204 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.12 I Trip Patterns by Regional Statistical Area Legend I=INIS Corridor RSA ally Trips 0 BOOK IIfII k IX Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 3.2.2 Journey -to -Work Table 3.5 shows the county -to -county commuting flows and indicate that a fair number of residents in the Study Area work in neighboring counties. 17 percent of workers living in San Bernardino County and 6 percent of workers living in Riverside County commute to jobs in Los Angeles County. Eight percent of workers who live in Riverside 3-23 County commute to Orange County and four percent of workers who live in San Bernardino County commute to Orange County. Five percent of workers who live in Riverside County and 0.3 percent of workers who live in San Bernardino County commute to jobs in San Diego. Housing costs in the coastal counties continue to rise and many workers in adjacent counties either choose or are forced to live in the Study Area where housing is more affordable. Table 3.5 I County -to -County Commuting Flows County of Residence Pia •ymen Percentage of Workers Riverside County Riverside County San Bernardino County Orange County San Bernardino County 69% 11% 8% Los Angeles County San Diego County Other San Bernardino County Los Angeles County Riverside County Orange County San Diego County Other 6% 5% 1% Source: ACS 2012-2016 via CTPP (Census Transportation Planning Products) County to County Flows. Note: This data includes all Riverside County (including outside of the Study Area). Journey to work mode share is shown in Figure 3.13. Overall, 92 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are completed by car. High auto use is often found in suburban and rural areas with lower -density land use patterns such as the Inland Empire. Transit accounts for just one percent of commutes, while 5 percent of residents work at home. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, there is a sizeable portion of commuters that carpool. In the Study Area, 78 percent of workers drive alone and 14 percent carpool. The share of commuters that carpool is higher in the Study Area as compared to California as a whole (14 percent in the Study Area compared to 10 percent in California). Carpooling is particularly popular in Hemet/Perris/Moreno Valley areas where 16-17 percent of residents in the Study Area carpool to work. Work at home is the third most popular option in the Study Area after drive alone and carpool as presented in Table 3.6. Five percent of workers in the Study Area work at home. It is particularly popular in the Murrieta/Temecula area where six percent of workers work from home. 3-24 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.13 I Study Area Journey -to -Work Mode Share for Study Area Non -Motorized, 2% Transit, 1 Carpool, 14% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Work At Home, 5% Drove Alone, 78% Table 3.6 I Journey -to -Work Model Share by RSA (ACS) RSA Drive Alone Carpool Transit Non- Motorized Work at Home 28—Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Upland 79% 13% 2% 1% 5% 29—Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, Rialto, San Bernardino, Yucipa 78% 14% 2% 2% 4% 45—Eastvale, Jurupa Valley 77% 14% 2% 0% 6% 46—Corona, Norco, Riverside 76% 15% 2% 3% 5% 47—Canyon Lake, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Perris 78% 16% 1% 1% 4% 48—Hemet, San Jacinto 75% 17% 1% 3% 4% 49—Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar 78% 14% 0% 1% 6% 50—Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa 80% 11% 1% 2% 4% All 78% 14% 1% 2% 5% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions is reflected in the commute times for the Study Area as presented in Figure 3.14 and Table 3.7. Nine percent of workers in the Study Area commute less than 10 minutes while nearly half (46 percent) of all workers' commute are between 10 to 30 minutes.. Thirty-two percent have a 30 to 60 minute commute and 13 percent commute over one hour. 207 Commuting time varies based on place of residence, place of employment, and mode of travel. Typically, in metro areas, commute time distribution skews toward shorter commutes. In the Study Area, however, only RSA 29 (Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, Rialto, San Bernardino, Yucaipa) for the San Bernardino area has commute time distribution that is skewed toward shorter commutes. The other RSAs have commute times which skew toward long commutes (over 30 minutes). When it comes to long commutes, RSA 45 (Jurupa Valley) stands out for having particularly long commutes with the plurality of commuters traveling over 30 minutes to work and about 25 percent commuting over one hour. Jurupa Valley is primarily a bedroom community with many residents having to travel outside of the RSA for work. In addition to long distances, congestion on highways in the Study Area also lengthens door-to-door commute times. Figure 3.14 I Journey -to -Work Travel Time Distribution by RSA 25% 20% 10% 0% UM Less than 5to9 10to14 15to19 20to24 25 to 30to34 35to39 4Dto44 45to59 6Dta89 9Dor 5 minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes minutes more minutes 5% i Al 111.. ■28 •29 ■45 ■46 ■47 •48 •49 •50 Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Table 3.7 I Journey -to -Work Travel Time Distribution RSA <10 mins 10 to 30 mins 30-60 mins >60 mins 28—Chino, Chino Hills, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Upland 8% 47% 33% 12% 29—Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Loma Linda, Redlands, Rialto, San Bernardino, Yucipa 10% 55% 27% 7% 45—Eastvale, Jurupa Valley 4% 31% 43% 22% 46—Corona, Norco, Riverside 9% 45% 33% 13% 47—Canyon Lake, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Perris 6% 42% 37% 15% 48—Hemet, San Jacinto 14% 39% 32% 14% 49—Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar 10% 42% 28% 20% 50—Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa 14% 42% 35% 9% Average 9% 46% 32% 13% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.2.3 Rideshare Rideshare programs provide the flexibility to improve the overall commuting experience and provide a broad range of benefits by helping to match commuters with similar origins and destinations. These programs encourage commuters to carpool, vanpool, use public transit, cycle, or walk to work by working directly with large and small employers to provide support to commuters that are candidates for using alternative forms of transportation. RCTC and SBCTA provide rideshare program assistance in the Study Area through the IE Commuter program. The IE Commuter Program assists San Bernardino and Riverside County employers of all sizes with their rideshare programs. IE Commuter also assists employers with development and maintenance of rideshare programs by providing information and support services free of charge to San Bernardino and Riverside County employers. Based on SCAG model data shown in the prior section, the share of work trips made by carpools is 14 percent. However, the ability to effectively carpool is reduced due to the degradation in speeds and operating conditions throughout much of the freeway system both in general purpose lanes and HOV lanes. An HOV lane is considered degraded if the average traffic speed during the morning or evening weekday peak commute hour is less than 45 miles per hour for more than 10 percent of the time over a consecutive 180-day period. Based on the "2017 California High -Occupancy Vehicle Lane Degradation Report," HOV lane degradation in Caltrans District 8 increased from 93 lane -miles to 110 lane -miles between the first and second halves of 2016, respectively. Significant portions of SR-210, 1-10, and SR-91 HOV lanes are considered degraded. Only I-215 HOV lanes between SR-60 and SR-210, and SR-91 HOV lanes between 1-15 and 1-215 are operating well. In reviewing the degradation trend from 2010 to 2016, several locations experienced notable changes in degradation. Most notably, eastbound SR-210 in San Bernardino County (from postmile 0.000 to postmile 4.933) experienced an increase in degradation from slightly degraded to extremely degraded between 2012 and 2013. The changes may be attributable to changes in traffic patterns and increased traffic demand from Los Angeles and the Inland Empire, as well as higher automobile usage overall. 3.3 Safety This section presents a generalized assessment of transportation system safety for the Study Area. This assessment examines recent trends in collisions involving vehicles, bicycles, pedestrians, and trucks; highlights key statistics; identifies areas of high collision frequency; and highlights areas for improvement throughout the corridor. This assessment utilizes data from the Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS), obtained from Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), and the Caltrans Performance Measurement System (PeMS). 20 7 3.3.1 Freeway Safety Assessment Collision Rates on Freeways and Ramps Figure 3.15 compares Study Area freeway collision rates to those of other freeways, the Riverside County average, San Bernardino County average, and the Caltrans District 8 average. Data is taken from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018 from PeMS. The PeMS system receives incident information from the Traffic Accident and Surveillance Analysis System (TASAS) (i.e., number of collisions and types of collisions) and California Highway Patrol (i.e., incident data from its computer -aided dispatch system). The average for Riverside County freeway collisions is 2.5 collisions per million VMT, while the average for San Bernardino County is 2.14 collisions per million VMT. Freeways in Caltrans District 8 (Riverside and San Bernardino counties combined) have an average of 2.32 collisions per million VMT. As shown, the highest collision rates by facility occur on SR-91 eastbound, SR-91 westbound, 1-215 southbound, and 1-10 eastbound, which all have collision rates greater than 4.0 per million VMT. Figure 3.15 I Freeway Collisions per Million VMT, 2018 S.50 S.o0 1- 2.50 5 0.50 0.01) Source: Caltrans PeMS. Collision Breakdown by Severity and Mode Freeway Collisions Involving All Modes 1 Figure 3.16 shows freeway collisions by severity type: Fatal, Severe, Other Visible Injury, and Minor Injury. In the three-year period between January 1, 2016 and December 31, 2018, there were 17,048 collisions along the Study Area freeway mainline or ramps that resulted in injury. Of these collisions, approximately 2 percent (309 fatal collisions) resulted in fatalities, 6 percent in severe injuries, 27 percent in other visible injuries, and 65 percent in 3-28 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan minor injuries. While fatal collisions remained relatively consistent from year to year, the number of severe injuries has steadily increased. By 2018, severe injury collisions had risen over 50 percent compared to 2016. Figure 3.16 I Study Area Freeway Collisions by Severity, 2016-2018 4000 35013 MOD 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Nurnber of Collisions 1 1 1 v16 2017 'v1 • =atal ■ Severe ■ Other Viable Injury ■ Mirr Injurer Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Bicyclists Figure 3.17 shows the severity type of freeway collisions involving bicycles. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 54 reported collisions along the Study Area freeway mainline or ramps involving bicyclists that resulted in injury. Of these collisions, three resulted in fatalities, five in severe injuries, 22 in other visible injuries, and 27 in minor injuries. Collisions involving bicyclists make up 0.3 percent of all collisions along the Study Area freeways, and 1 percent of fatal collisions along the Study Area freeways. 3-29 Figure 3.17 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Bicycles by Severity, 2016-2018 12 1a 6 4 .- 1 I I 2016 2017 2D18 • Fata' • Severe • Other Visible Injury • Minor Injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Pedestrians Figure 3.18 shows the severity type of freeway collisions involving pedestrians. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 248 collisions along the Study Area freeway mainline or ramps involving pedestrians that resulted in injury. Of the injury collisions, approximately 27 percent resulted in fatalities, 24 percent in severe injuries, 31 percent in other visible injuries, and 18 percent in minor injuries. Over the three-year period there were 68 fatal collisions. Fatal collisions involving pedestrians have been on the rise since 2016 and, not surprisingly, represent a disproportionally large percentage of injury collisions. Collisions involving bicyclists make up 1.5 percent of all collisions along the Study Area freeways, and 22 percent of fatal collisions along the Study Area freeways. 3-30 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.18 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Pedestrians by Severity, 2016- 2018 1 2016 2017 • Fetal ■ Severe ■ Other Viable Injury • Minor injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Trucks Figure 3.19 shows the severity type of freeway collisions involving trucks. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 1,599 collisions along the Study Area freeway mainline or ramps involving trucks that resulted in injury. Of the injury collisions, approximately 4 percent resulted in fatalities, 8 percent in severe injuries, 29 percent in other visible injuries, and 59 percent in minor injuries. Over the three-year period there were 60 fatal collisions. Collisions involving trucks make up 9.4 percent of all collisions along the Study Area freeways, and 19 percent of fatal collisions along the Study Area freeways. 3-31 Figure 3.19 I Study Area Freeway Collisions Involving Trucks by Severity, 2016-2018 350 300 L50 200 150 100 50 0 � ■ 2016 1 1 llllllll� ■ 2017 1 ■ FaaI ■ Severe ■ Other Visible Injury ■ Minor Injure • 1 Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Factors Influencing Safety on Study Area Freeways The TIMS database categorizes each injury collision by its Primary Collision Factor (PCF). It should be noted that the PCF is a subjective determination and there are often multiple factors that may lead to a collision. Based on these designations, the most common factors causing injury collisions along the Study Area freeways mainline or ramps are Unsafe Speed (55 percent), Improper Turning (18 percent), Unsafe Lane Change (10 percent), and Driving or Bicycling under the influence (9 percent). Figure 3.20 displays the freeway collision factors. 214 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.20 I Primary Collision Factors for Freeway Collisions in the Study Area Other 8-- 6 m proper Tu ruing_ 186 Unsafe Lane Changellir 1::� -- --__Driving or Bicycling Underthelnfluence UnsafeSpeed 55% Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. 3.3.2 Arterial Safety Assessment Collision Breakdown by Severity and Mode on Arterial Roadways Collisions Involving All Modes Figure 3.21 shows the severity type of arterial collisions involving all modes. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 15,684 collisions on arterials in the Study Area which resulted in injury. Of these collisions, approximately 2 percent resulted in fatalities, 6 percent in severe injuries, 28 percent in other visible injuries, and 63 percent in minor injuries. Over the three-year period there were 386 fatal collisions that resulted in deaths. Overall, total injury collisions increased each year between 2016 and 2018, with other visible injuries and minor injuries showing a steady upward trend. 3-33 Figure 3.21 I Arterial Collisions by Severity, 2016-2018 400D 35ci0 MOD z500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 I 1 1 2.016 2017 'v 1 ■ Fata' ■ E a.ere ■ Other Viable Injury ■ Minor Injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Bicyclists Figure 3.22 shows the severity type of arterial collisions involving bicyclists. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018 on arterials in the Study Area, there were 774 collisions involving bicyclists that resulted in injury. Of the injury collisions, approximately 2 percent resulted in fatalities, 9 percent in severe injuries, 47 percent in other visible injuries, and 43 percent in minor injuries. Collisions involving bicyclists make up 4.9 percent of all collisions along the Study Area arterials, and 4 percent of fatal collisions along the Study Area arterials. Over the three-year period, the number of collisions involving bicyclists increased steadily. 3-34 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.22 I Arterial Collisions Involving Bicyclists by Severity, 2016-2018 1=� 120 1M so 50 40 20 0 201b 2017 'v1 ■ Fr • ■ Severe ■ Other Vi5ble Injury ■ Minor Injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Pedestrians Figure 3.23 shows the severity type of arterial collisions involving pedestrians. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 1,128 collisions involving pedestrians that resulted in injury. Of the injury collisions, around 11 percent resulted in fatalities, 15 percent in severe injuries, 38 percent in other visible injuries, and 36 percent in minor injuries. Collisions involving pedestrians make up 7.2 percent of all collisions along the Study Area arterials and 31 percent of fatal collisions. 217 Figure 3.23 I Arterial Collisions Involving Pedestrians by Severity, 2012-2016 1.80 160 140 120 100 8+0 60 40 20 0 1 1 1 2015 2017 'v1 ■ Fata ■ Severe ■ Other Visible Injury ■ Minor Injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Collisions Involving Trucks Figure 3.24 shows the severity type of arterial collisions involving trucks. In the three-year period between 2016 and 2018, there were 463 collisions involving trucks that resulted in injury. Of the injury collisions, around 3 percent resulted in fatalities, 8 percent in severe injuries, 27 percent in other visible injuries, and 62 percent in minor injuries. Collisions involving trucks make up 3 percent of all collisions along the Study Area arterials and 4 percent of fatal collisions. 3-36 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.24 I Arterial Collisions Involving Trucks by Severity, Total 2016-2018 12: 1uv 5,0 40 20 0 _ ■ - ■ 2017 2012 ■ :F.a ■Sew ere ■Other Viable Injury ■Minor Injury Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. Factors Influencing Safety on Study Area Arterials The TIMS database categorizes each injury collision by its PCF. It should be noted that the PCF is a subjective determination and there are often multiple factors that may lead to a collision. Based on these designations, the most common factors causing injury collisions along the Study Area arterials are Unsafe Speed (25 percent), Automobile Right -of -Way (20 percent), Improper Turning (16 percent), Traffic Signals and Signs (13 percent), and Driving or Bicycling under the influence (8 percent). Figure 3.25 displays the arterial collision factors. 3-37 Figure 3.25 I Primary Collision Factors for Arterial Collisions Other__ 18% Traffic SignaFand_ Signs 1S% ImproperTurning 1 b% — — _Driving or Bicycling Lind erthe Influence 86 ._U nsafeSp eed J utomot}iieRight of Way 2 Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. 3.3.3 High Frequency Collision Locations Collisions involving bicyclists and pedestrians are spread throughout the Study Area, however, the highest density of collisions in the Study Area generally occur in certain neighborhoods of cities of Riverside, Colton, Rialto, San Bernardino, Moreno Valley, Hemet, and San Jacinto (See Figure 3.26). The highest concentration of truck collisions occurs along SR-60 and 1-10 near 1-15 and 1-215 freeway interchanges (See Figure 3.27). Other high concentration areas for truck collisions are 1-15 near Cajon Pass and 1-215 near City of San Bernardino. (see Figure 3.27) 3-38 • Inland Empire Comprehen Multimodal Corridor Figure 3.26 I Location of Bicycle and Pedestrian Collisions, 2016-2018 ' Upland Claremont Montclair 0 0 CI omona Apnal Diamond Bar Chino Chino Hills 71 Yorba • •Apple Valley o Victorrville o Hesperia 0 Fontana 0 O @Rancho Cucamonga • Rialto @Rancho °° "•07 o r• • 8 0° °§0 o o� 9 0 u• • go. Colton • Redlands 0 `Grand Terrace Loma Linda 0 Yucaipa Ontario 0 J4uru a Val ley) , m o o a ° EastvaleR .-2g3 ®a°o ��8 •�..u•s• % o co 0 Riverside') Norco 0� Linda ° 01. o o �o Eb o °�•m Corona] sit 8 0 ell 0 0 0 eo °San Beinard o9 0 4•4 •••ewe• • 0 ° 0 0 00 0 0 0 • 0 goiia 0 0 Bike and Pedestrian Collision Density 0 Fatality 0 Serious Injury 0 Other Injury mut High Concentration Low Concentration Q Study Area Freeways Highland Moreno Valley 0 0 g 0° • caij 0 °d:, o 0 OF rrrris o Calirnesa 0 0 0 COco •°Banning o Beaumont • 0 79 • * • 0 74 ° 0 Qo o Canyon Lake Menifee o 0 L-aketElsinore o 0 0 0 Wildomar 0 o 0 ° {{Murrieta O 0 g Temecula ® O San Jacinto00,„) Hemet Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. 3-39 ....,i, 4 @I Figure 3.27 1 Location of Truck Collisions, 2016-2018 Adelanto 0 O 00 O 0 ®Apple Valley Victorville 0 0 0 Hesperia ° 0 0 0 0 elr cP O O on 0 (San Bernardino° Upland Claremont Montclair 'Dor) oEO coaccioucv Pomona Diamond Bar Chino - Ontario Chino Hills Yorba1Linda o c 0 om Corona 8 cb0 0 Eastvale Norco Fontana Rancho Cucamonga Rialto 66 0 too ° o m0)18; IS 0 c� Couo° 00 oJurupa Valley O o 0 0 Riverside oOoo 0 Collision Density • Fatality 0 Serious Injury High Concentration Low Concentration o Other Injury Study Area Freeways °r•O° t%o 6:0w O® er Colton Redlands °'`- 0 Loma Linda co ° o—"Grad Ted?ace ®Yucaipa Y/ O Calimesa 0 ghland 0 0 O Hi 0,,0 0 0 CaO � co 6O CO ° cMoreno Vailey O o0 Perris 0° 0 'to Canyon Lake Lake Elsinore 0 Wildomar 0 0 CCD • 74 0 Menifee 0 0 0 0 0 • 0 0 Murrieta 0 of 0 • acI1emecula3 0 79 • • o o Beaumont 79 0 0 San Jacinto °-'Banning 0 o ° Hemet O 00 Source: Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS), Safe Transportation Research and Education Center, University of California, Berkeley. 2019. 3-40 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.4 Active Transportation 3.4.1 Active Transportation Active transportation generally refers to bicycle and pedestrian transportation but also can include other wheeled devices such as scooters, wheelchairs, and skateboards. Active transportation is an important mode of transportation for short trips as well as connecting to other modes, most notably transit, providing first-mile/last-mile connections. Additionally, bicycle and pedestrian accommodation is often central to complete streets discussions due to the vulnerability of those modes. This section outlines the availability of bicycle and pedestrian facilities and data on active transportation trips in the Study Area. Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Figure 3.28 illustrates the bicycle routes in the Study Area. In San Bernardino County, the bike plan is part of the County's active transportation network. As of 2011, there were 468 miles of bicycle lanes and trails with an additional 1,282 future miles planned in the overall program (2013 SBCTA Active Transportation Vision Update). In Riverside County, most jurisdictions have established bikeway and/or trails plans. Due to the rural nature of parts of the County, there are many multi -use trails in addition to an assortment of Class I, Class II, and Class III bike lanes. WRCOG's Western Riverside Active Transportation Plan is a "network of 24 distinct regional routes spanning more than 440 miles" (WRCOG Active Transportation Plan, 2018). The plan includes 24 Class I/II/III regional routes that connect local jurisdictions and provide access to transit stations/centers. 3-41 Figure 3.28 I Bicycle Facilities in the Study Area Upland '! Ranch d Claremntl- M Montcl ir— ram ��� O�t•�io [)iamoTdu of Chino_ Chino Hills-` Yorba Linda Eastvale Adelano_�� Apple Valley 15 >ti 1nli` 'Fohtaria Cucam_$nga ill:ul� _ a■ Viet° ±TdIF ;.IUlerpj •Hes erialm- IMP .111 ille w ` _Bernardincil Rialto � I � �CJ`u aVayy Norco Corona �Co4'o Gram d_Teir "`�� Riverside Legend Study Area WRCOG Regional Bike Routes San Bernardino County Bike Plan 11'Y■ raj r�. "` Redlands eL ma Linda Pi rYuc-ipa� Highland —Moreno Valley P rris Canyon Lake Lakd•Elsinore Wildomar a) Menifee� Murrie a ►_ v Temecula alimesa Ban mg JJ Beaumont San Jacinto He Source: 2013 SBCTA Active Transportation Vision Update; WRCOG Active Transportation Plan, 2018. 224 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.5 Transit The transit assessment examines the public transportation network in the Study Area, including Metrolink commuter trains and regional bus systems. This assessment includes an evaluation of the ridership, and coverage of public transportation in the Study Area. 3.5.1 Metrolink The Southern California Regional Rail Authority operates the region's commuter rail service, Metrolink, which serves the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, Riverside, and Ventura. There are 17 Metrolink stations in the Study Area: Corona -North Main, Corona -West, Fontana, Jurupa Valley-Pedley, Montclair, Moreno Valley/March Field, Ontario -East, Perris -South, Perris -Downtown, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Riverside -Downtown, Riverside - Hunter Park/UCR, Riverside -La Sierra, San Bernardino, San Bernardino Downtown, and Upland. The Study Area is served with four Metrolink lines: Inland Empire --Orange County, Riverside, San Bernardino, and 91/Perris Valley. The San Bernardino line, serving San Bernardino to LA Union Station, has the highest daily riders of any line in the Metrolink system as shown in Table 3.8. Figure 3.29 illustrates the Metrolink Lines and stations in the Study Area. Table 3.8 I Metrolink Daily Ridership (2018-19) Antelope Valley Lin Inland Empire —Ora Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Lin Ventura County Lin 91/Perris Valley Lin e e e e Weekday 5,729 Saturday 2,282 Sunday 1,818 Stations 12 nge County Line 4,501 542 373 15 8,699 2,331 1,794 15 4,251 n/a n/a 7 9,736 3,794 2,332 14 3,639 n/a n/a 12 2,934 799 548 13 Source: Metrolink Q3 '18-19 Fact Sheet. 3-43 Figure 3.29 I Metrolink Service in Study Area Adelanto Apple Valley Victorville Hesperia 1 m7' San Bernardinol— Fontana Upland Rancho Cucamonga Rialto Glaremont,� 1:17-e1r1 Montclair `® Colto�n '' G ar nd Te ce Loma Linda r Ontario Juruga Valley El CI .s� omon Diamond Bar Chino Chino Hills 71 1 Eastvale Norco YorbaiL-indaJ I v Corona Riverside Metrolink Train Routes - 91/ Perris Valley Line - Inland Empire -Orange County (IEOC) Line - Riverside Line - San Bernardino Line 113 Metrolink Stations Q Study Area Freeways Source: Metrolink Highland Redlands Yucaipa 3fl—Moreno Valley Perris i Y i Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore r Wildomar Murrieta 10 Calimesa `L- ,anning Beaumont San Jacinto ri Hemet Temecula 011 1 0 5 10 Miles 3-44 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.5.2 Bus Transit Service Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Omnitrans are the regional bus transit providers in the Study Area Figure 3.30 shows their transit routes in the Study Area. RTA serves western Riverside County and provides regional connections to Orange, San Bernardino, and San Diego counties. RTA operates 39 fixed -route local services, eight Commuter Link express routes, and on -demand Dial -a -Ride service throughout its 2,500 square mile service area. In fiscal year 2019, RTA had ridership of 8.7 million, with average weekday boardings of 28,900 and average weekend boardings of 12,200. Omnitrans serves San Bernardino valley with a service area of 480 square miles, covering 15 cities and portions of the unincorporated areas of San Bernardino County. Omnitrans operates 30 local and express bus routes, as well as sbX bus rapid transit service, OmniGo hometown shuttle service, and Access, a paratransit service for the disabled. In fiscal year 2018-2019, Omnitrans had ridership of 11.1 million from fixed routes. Figure 3.31 shows the bus transit stops in the Study Area. This figure also shows the high ridership bus stops, with more than 300 daily boardings/alightings. Some of the high ridership bus stops are as follows: • San Bernardino Transit Center. • Canyon Crest at Bannockburn Village. • Moreno Valley Mall. • Perris Transit Center. • Galleria @ Tyler. • University Market. • Corona Transit Center. 3-45 Figure 3.30 I Bus Routes Clarem Montclair inktoo!ctr- Adelanto AAappl'e Valley V.icton!ille 9110k__ I Hesperia - 15 .01 ,SamBernardino I _r L LL r Fontana I W Upland w -,Rancho Cucamonga Rialto mil IIP Hi ont 66.1 .jmr' 1 �,Col �ion _��� �r Gar nd TerrLoma Linda 01 Or -not Diamond Bar Ch no Chino Hills Yorba einda 83 Ontario Bus Rapid Transit (sbX) - RapidLink - Commuter Routes - B-V Link Local Fixed Routes 0 Study Area Freeways Redlands . -... ^�! iv - J` ucupa Valley ., %!' Ri�ersid I ' 1��m��I r� Moreno Valley141111 I, nyon Lake lylenife Lake Elsinore `J OMurrieta Yucaipa •f, 10 Calimesa - ,- Banning Beaumont San Jacinto Hemet Temecula Transit Routes Source: RTA and Omnitrans. I I l 5 10 Miles Source: RTA and OmniTrans 3-46 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.31 I Bus Transit Ridership Upland Claremont Montclair Pomonaa Diamond Bar -Chino Chino Hills Yorba Linda Adelanto idt11111111kioVr Appfee-Val Victorville '11 ifrr Hesperia y ertSa\.Bernardino�.,.• Fontana i 66 Rancho Cucamonga Rialto drr 'i'»"H'''�'-'-" �ighlarid ri -.ra'see -s-• ' � • - _ •) I, • „,..,.� L-. Colton'• Redlands .` F0.A� G ar nd Tefa�ae�Loma Linda1 Ontario .,Jurupa Valley Eastv_ale.���.�..� [S Riversides brco N••• 91 •r•., Moreno Valley Corona Bus stops Top 30 Ridership Bus Stops Q Study Area Freeways Bus Transit Ridership Source: RTA and Omnitrans. ... ;. Fens e.•-- I �. • 6'y Canyon Lake M a in fee; Lake Elsinore • "'� ' Wildomar \" 1 ?Murnetay„• si Yucaipa Calimesa Banning Beaumont San Jacinto 74 0_ Hemet ] GD Temecula 5 10 Miles Source: RTA and OmniTrans 229 3.5.3 High Quality Transit Area SCAG defines High Quality Transit Areas (HQTA) as an area within one-half mile from major transit stops and high - quality transit corridors. A major transit stop is defined as a site containing an existing rail transit station, a ferry terminal served by either a bus or rail transit service, or the intersection of two or more major bus routes with a frequency of service interval of 15 minutes or less during the morning and afternoon peak commute periods. A high - quality transit corridor is a corridor with fixed -route bus service with service intervals no longer than 15 minutes during peak commute hours. Figure 3.32 shows the HQTA in the Study Area. The Study Area has both major transit stops and high -quality transit corridors. The cities of San Bernardino, Fontana, Rialto, Colton, and Loma Linda have high quality transit corridors. Major transit stops are generally located at Metrolink stations. 3-48 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.32 I Existing High -Quality Transit Areas (HQTA) *SCAG's HQTA is within one-half mile from major transit stops and High Quality Transit Corridors (HQTC). HQTCs have fixed route bus service with service intervals no longer than 15 minutes during peak commute hours. Upland Clarem�• nt Mo'RPir Po Diamond Bar Chino Chino Hills YorbaLindaj Adelanto Fontana Rancho Cucamonga •� j r Ontario Eastvale Norco Corona Apple Vail Victorville Hesperia w yx� Rialto Jurupa Valley Riverside Legend High Quality Transit Areas* rStudy Area rSan Bi lardin Fr • y Highland •I'o Redlands G ar nd Te rr aceLoma Lind 'a �'�j} Yucaipa 19 • C2 alimesa Moreno Valley 2��KIs IP Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore Wildomar Murrieta Temecula L' 'Li, Ban mg JJ Beaumont San -' Hemet Existing High Quality Transit Areas Source: SCAG. I I I 0 5 10 Miles 231 3.6 Freeway and Arterial Assessment 3.6.1 Freeway Assessment Figures 6.1 to 6.5 display key characteristics of the freeway system, including number of lanes on the freeway system, PM peak hour traffic volumes, PM peak hour volume to capacity ratios, the managed lane network, and the truck network. Key findings for the freeway network include: • Nearly all the freeway system provides 3 to 4 lanes in each direction, with a few higher -volume areas consisting of more than four lanes (particularly along 1-10 and SR-91) in each direction and some limited areas with two lanes per direction (SR-60 and portions of 1-215 and SR-71). • Managed lanes, including High Occupancy Vehicle ( HOV) lanes and Express lanes cover approximately 211 lane miles, with 178 HOV lane miles and 33 Express lane miles as shown in Table 3.8. Figure 3.34 shows the managed lanes network in the Study Area. Table 3.9 I Study Area Managed Lane Network —Existing in April 2017 Route Counties Served 1-10 1-15 SR-60 SR-71 SR-91 SR-210 1-215 San Bernardino Riverside, San Bernardino Riverside, San Bernardino San Bernardino Riverside San Bernardino Riverside, San Bernardino Total otal Managed Lane Miles HOV Lane Miles Express Lane Miles 17 0 59 14 45 43 33 211 17 0 0 0 59 0 14 0 12 33 43 0 33 Source: District System Management Plan, District 8, June 2017. 211 0 • The HOV system covers portions of SR-91, SR-60, SR-71, 1-10, and SR-210. 33 • Much of the freeway system, including the entire Interstate freeway system and portions of the State Highway System is designated as the National Highway Freight Network and several local jurisdictions have designated truck networks, which serve trucks and goods movement. • During the PM peak hour, the freeways with the highest vehicle throughput (over 6,000 vehicles per hour) include the following: SR-91 between the Orange County line and 1-15, 1-10 between the Los Angeles County line and 1-210, and portions of 1-210 and 1-215. • Freeways that carry between 4,000 to 6,000 vehicle throughput during the PM peak hour include much of 1-15, SR-60 west of 1-215, and SR-91 east of 1-15. Relatively lower volume throughput facilities include SR-60 east of 1-215, SR-71, portions of 1-215, and 1-10 on the eastern limits of the Study Area. Figure 3.35 shows the PM peak hour volume in 2018. 3-50 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan • Volume to Capacity (V/C) ratio is one indication of the operating conditions along a freeway or arterial facility. Higher V/C ratios mean that a facility is operating closer to its maximum possible throughput. Very high V/C can sometimes indicate a facility that experiences poor operating conditions, slower speeds, more congestion, and more delay to travelers. In the Study Area, the freeways with the highest V/C ratios generally match the facilities with the highest throughput, and they include SR-91 from the Orange County line to 1-15, SR-60 from the Los Angeles County line to 1-15, 1-10 from the Los Angeles County line to 1-15, 1-210 through the western edge of the Study Area, 1-15 south of SR-91 and SR-60 between SR-91 and 1-215. In general, SR-91 and 1-215 exhibit the most lengthy and continuous segments with over -capacity conditions. Figure 3.36 illustrates the V/C ratio during PM peak hour. • In the Study Area, the delay contributed by the top 10 bottlenecks in 2018 was 6,449 vehicle hours. The biggest bottleneck occurs during the peak morning commute on SR-91 westbound near Green River Road, just east of Orange County line. Table 3.10 and Figure 3.37 show the top bottlenecks in 2018 during AM and PM peak period in the Study Area. Table 3.10 I Top Bottlenecks in the Study Area (2018) Rank Freeway Segment Time Period # Days Active Average Extend (miles) Average Delay (Vehicle- hrs) Average Duration (hrs) 1 SR-91 WB at Green River Road AM 260 4.21 2,490 3.6 2 1-15 SB at Cajalco Road PM 233 3.22 680 2.4 3 SR-71 SB north of SR-91 IC AM 227 3.13 590 3.3 4 1-15 NB at 4th Street on -ramp PM 310 1.25 540 3.7 5 1-10 EB east of Cherry Avenue PM 261 2.33 470 3.1 6 SR-91 WB at Lincoln Avenue AM 193 0.99 390 2.7 7 1-15 NB south of Cajalco Road AM 122 2.74 340 2.8 8 1-210 EB at Milliken Avenue on -ramp PM 203 4.02 340 1.5 9 I-15-SB north of SR-60 IC PM 131 2.34 310 2.0 10 SR-60 WB west of Main Street AM 220 3.25 300 2.2 Source: Caltrans PeMS, 2018. Generally, the freeway segments through the western end of the Study Area are more congested and carry higher volumes than those to the east, correlating with the areas of higher population and employment density, as well as reflecting the abundance of trip connections between the Study Area and points in Los Angeles and Orange counties to the west. 233 Figure 3.33 I Number of Existing Freeway Mainline Lanes Pomona`• Diam'on�d Bar Chino Chino Hills 71 Yorba Adelanto 1 Apple Vail Victorville Hesperia y Fontana San Bernard Upland -7" Rancho. ucamonga ��Rialto ;� y Highland Claremoill nt 66 .OP Montclair — : — • , Mn l'IM �;i �F • . 1.,, -� °Colton^ Redlan • I'G and Terrace Lfnem' a Linda CDOntario ^ Jurupa Valley �.� r Eastvale, •- f • Riverside el 60 Norco ' 91 r Corona Linda Number of Lanes <2 3-4 >4 Study Area Freeways Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 10 21, 15 5 . Yucaipa Moreno Valley Perris Canyon [Lake Menifee Lake El inore Murrieta 10 Calimesa Temecula Banning mi Beaumont San Jacinto Hemet 3-52. Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.34 I Existing Managed Lane Network 10 Adelanto Fontana Upland 66 Rancho Cucamonga Claremont Montclair onio na Dia4.4 mond Bar Chino Hills Chino Yorba L-inda i Ontario Managed Lanes HOV HOT Apple Valley t:Lz! Hesperia fJ ,San B rnardina Rialto [Highland Corona Study Area Freeways -Colton rid Te geloma Lind Redlands Moreno Valley erris Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore Wildomar— M u rrieta Yucaipa 10 Calimesa Temecula `TT,,Tanning Beaumont San 71— `l ' Hemet st Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 3-53 Figure 3.35 I PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes Upland Claremont� Montclair Yorb1Linda Adelanto Hesperia amen 10 Fontana Rancho Cucamonga Rialto Ontario Eastvale Source: Caltrans PeMS, 2018. Jurupa Valley Riverside a, pple Valley \ _Moreno Valley Perris Wildomar PM Peak Volume < 2,000 2,000 - 4,000 4,001 - 6,000 > 6,000 ® Study Area Freeways Yucaipa Calimesa Temecula Banning Beaumont San Jacinto ' Hemet Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.36 I PM Peak Hour Volume/Capacity Ratio S Upland Claremont Montclair Pomona Diamond Bar Chino Hills Chino Yorba Linda] 10 Adelanto Apple Valley Victov ille Hesperia Fontana Rancho Cucamonga Rialto Ontario Eastvale Jurupa Valley Riverside SanZBernardi Highland Colton G ar nd Ter eILloma Linda 15 • IN Volume by Capacity (PM) s -<0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9-1 >1 = Study Area Freeways Redlands Yucaipa Moreno Valley Perriss c Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsina 'L E Wildomar r Murrieta 10 Calimesa Banning Beaumont San Jacinto 174) Hemet Temecula Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 237 Figure 3.37 I Top Bottlenecks Adelanto • • • Upland G6 Rancho Cucamonga Claremont rI CO —Montclair • •• • Diamon▪ d Bar Chino Chino Hills 71 J YorbaLinda 1 Apple Valley Victorville 395 :(OC) iY Fontana 1Ontario Eastval.e Norco •) • •c Corona: ,410 Hesperia rSan Bernardino. ? I Rialto Highland f.; • } JColto t� hand Terrace ▪ Loma Linda �'. • Jurupa Valley • AM • PM J Study Area Freeways • Redlands Yucaipa Riverside ` `+0,0 60 • • ••(-) • Moreno Valley � V • Perris Canyon Menifee Lake Elsinore Wildomar Murrieta Temecula 10 alimesa u L,- 1 Banning sk Beaumont San Hemet Source: Caltrans PeMS, 2018. ?-56 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.6.2 Arterial Assessment WRCOG, which represents 18 incorporated cities and portions of unincorporated Riverside County, in collaboration with other regional agencies, has developed and administers the Western Riverside County Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program. The TUMF is a funding program for "critical transportation infrastructure to accommodate the traffic created by new population growth and commercial development throughout western Riverside County" (2018 TUMF Program Annual Report, WRCOG). The TUMF program collects fees from new residential and non-residential projects and funds improvements on the Regional System of Highways and Arterials (RSHA). The RSHA, as illustrated in Figure 3.38, is the set of roads, bridges, interchanges, and railroad grade separations that the member agenciesin Western Riverside County have identified as being impacted by further development. As of 2018, the TUMF program has collected $780 million and has been used to fund 98 projects on the RSHA. There are 58 TUMF-funded projects in the pipeline. SBCTA, which represents the entirety of San Bernardino County, has developed and administers the Measure I Nexus Study to identify "fair share contributions from new development for regional transportation improvements (freeway interchanges, railroad grade separations, and regional arterial highways)" (2018 SBCTA Development Mitigation Nexus Study Appendix G, SBCTA). The Nexus Study identifies a Nexus Study Network as illustrated in Figure 3.39. The Nexus Study network are the arterial roadways that satisfy a set of criteria which involve "functional classification, propensity to carry inter -jurisdictional traffic, connection to freeway system, etc." Improvement projects in the Nexus Study Network are qualified to receive funds from the Nexus Study, Measure I, 2010-2040 Valley Freeway Interchanges, and Valley Major Streets. 23 7 Figure 3.38 I WRCOG Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional System of Highways and Arterials (RSHA) Legend O • FPI WRCOG t1I wu Source: WRCOG TUMF. 240 Figure 3.39 I SBCTA Nexus of Highways and Arterials imtim rAss II 44190111111 id P1■1=1. giTAIJi■1■1��� F ;Mk _s �■�1�lf� ■ rt1�M$EI■� 1 l�� s�T !1■i��i. i�ni�wlr�m � �V Nag .4 BM I1 ■■ r//Air��I�./ ��1■I�iill111011■■■ ■11�� _Ens =AZ mg/ is I mow immom .I , i" — Mil Ei■MII►��> = s � NR1 .■ Al■1M1 , it M yin 1�, 11111.r ■M 111--:— I■E�11■grip ■< ■ aw 1■■� II'■ = a ill • ..1.1...rE "16 '1■■■■ E INM• Ni! in Mar UMW Ai Maw■ IPP els / Legend Sphere Lints 'N.—! News NIAypek Source: 2018 SBCTA Development Mitigation Nexus Study. 241 a3.= �■1-.4imad.:;..711..11 _p:::,rss_: oM., .nw. ; WWM.e Ur mu ianw. ga.mn m• air ace pnen muwa c. fl mama mThe .w.u.:amr 4 Level of Service Analysis Figure 3.40 and Figure 3.41 illustrate the levels of service on the arterial system for the AM and PM peak hours, respectively, based on the SCAG model. That data shows that the plurality of arterials is operating below capacity (LOS A to LOS D), but there is congestion on arterials throughout the Study Area during AM and PM peak hours in various locations. During the AM Peak Hour, 90 percent of arterials are under capacity, 4 percent are near capacity (LOS E), and 7 percent are over capacity (LOS F). Congestion is slightly worse during the evening peak. During the PM Peak Hour, 88 percent of arterials are under capacity, 4 percent are near capacity, and 8 percent are over capacity. Many of the arterials which are near or over capacity are adjacent to Study Area freeways, parallel the freeways, and act as alternative routes or connect to major freeway interchanges and move traffic to and from the freeway system. Arterials which are at the western side of the Study Area, closer to Los Angeles County and Orange County, are more likely to be over capacity, similar to the patterns shown for the freeway system. Table 3.11 shows the levels of service on the arterial system as well as arterial lane miles under, near, and over capacity on the system. A v , Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan * barn? Laid@ Figure 3.40 I Arterial AM Peak Hour Level of Service AcrePanto .f/ r 4,„ .. Apple Valley Victopillie .:•7 — j lirt 17:es' Pe6a Ak i Rancho Cucamonga- - _4'` .9 1. Sari Bernarthno ? 7 , .11 I -Highland 7,5rarltrerrace "Recitand. yuca4m '`Jurupa Miley r Cultorhe - Fertan., • :47 Z.'can pan ,2ke L.,filain(fe.7. Lake Erskiore Under Capacity {LOS D or Better) Near Capacity (LDS E) Over Capacity (LDS F) Source: SCAG Model, 2016. IN\Altirrieta •:' .... .,,.....- v% Temecula •-'K tiu Cairrrpesa N..... Ig--6 ...., 0 @ hiorenalVailey 164rBail7117.iilg . . IL ariBeaumorn • 7%.%. e . San Jacinto:1*, . Pi- 1...1".... -fiemer Figure 3.41 I Arterial PM Peak Hour Level of Service Linder Capacity (LOS D orBtterF Near Capacity (LOS E) Over Capacity (LOS F) Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 244 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Table 3.11 I Arterial Level of Service Table Header AM Peak Hour (Lane Miles) PM Peak Hour (Lane Miles) < 10 % or more under capacity 5,070 90% 4,970 88% Near Capacity 220 4% 230 4% Over Capacity Total Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 370 7% 460 8% 5,660 100% Vehicle -Miles -Traveled (VMT) 5,660 100% Federal Highway Administration Highway Statistics Series data for 2017 shows that VMT per capita in the Riverside - San Bernardino, CA urbanized area (UZA) which includes areas outside of the Study Area is 24.8 daily VMT per capita. This is slightly higher than the Los Angeles -Long Beach -Anaheim UZA (23.1 daily VMT per capita) and on par with the San Diego UZA (24.7 daily VMT per capita). Within the Study Area, areas with higher than SCAG regional average VMT per service population (residents + employees) are generally in predominantly residential areas such as Jurupa Valley or in industrial/commercial areas such as those south of the 1-10 freeway where there is a high concentration of warehousing. Figure 3.42 illustrates the Existing Daily Arterial VMT per Service Population (Residents + Employees). The graphic displays traffic analysis zones with VMT per service population as follows: • Higher than the SCAG regional average VMT. • Zero to 15% below the SCAG regional average VMT. • Greater than 15% below the SCAG regional average VMT. The areas with higher than the SCAG regional average VMT are the area's most in need of measures which reduce VMT. As shown, the areas with the highest VMT are predominantly the central, eastern, and northern portions of the Study Area. 245 Figure 3.42 I Existing Daily Arterial VMT per Service Population (Residents + Employees) Nu I 261 Adelan O 395 .39741 A Fri 10121 Has NL 1 15 iitZarlipattarazzo ir71 Wirlia i %4r-61 trJ 119!IIII. gi rte Ya fey 138 Chino ,. 4 App 173 189 330 gllana Colton a. m Loa Lln a 11�,s „GrandyT nave_ - . 15 �a, 142' 71 �3 317 del, Chino 3 "litir42 Pri San Ja 'Info r Canyon (7+Y.'tl II% malt 1r `\ 7'Lake lsln, tYucaipa Legend 81uRyArea VMT Per Service Population < 15%below $CAS Regional Average oto 15%bebwSCAG ReoionaiAverege n Higher than SCAG Regional Average CCalimesa 11101.1111111.11411 44" WS 44 Mumeta 38 — 38 3an4ning. eeaumo_nt I. J Source: SCAG Model, 2016. 3-54 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 3.7 Freight Network Goods movement plays an important role in both the circulation network and the economy of a region. Due to the location of the Study Area between the Los Angeles metropolitan area and destinations in the remainder of the country, the Study Area serves as an important path for goods movement via airports, railways, and roadways. Goods movement in the Study Area is accommodated by an extensive rail network and set of designated truck routes. This section outlines the freight network, including ground, air, and rail in the Study Area. 3.7.1 Ground Close to 40 percent of the Nation's goods travel through the Inland Empire and . are stored in warehouses.' Within the Study Area, there are six primary goods movement routes, which are integral to the distribution of goods to the rest of the state and Nation. The primary goods movement routes are Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) routes and considered the priority freight corridors. The six Primary Goods Movement Routes are 1-10, 1-15, SR-60, SR-91, SR-210, and 1-215. Figure 3.43 shows Study Area truck network and warehouse locations. Intermodal freight facilities, major freight generators, and warehouse distribution centers are significant contributors to goods movement in the Study Area. Warehousing and logistics facilities are major employment and trip generators, with many facilities located along the State Highway System. Many logistics companies, as well as retail and online vendors, have warehouses in the Inland Empire region. Among the largest facilities throughout the Study Area, Amazon has multiple distribution and fulfillment centers in various cities and uses the March Air Reserve Base, Ontario International Airport, and the San Bernardino International Airport for goods movement. 3.7.2 Air Cargo The Ontario International Airport currently handles an average of 454,800 tons of air cargo a year, making it the second largest air cargo operation in the state after Los Angeles International and the fifth largest air cargo port in the United States.' 3.7.3 Rail Rail network terminals in Southern California are mainly located at the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports, with intermodal terminals, freight, and rail maintenance yards located throughout the SCAG region. There are several rail yards owned by both BNSF Railway (BNSF) and Union Pacific Railroad (UP) located primarily in southwestern San Bernardino and western Riverside counties that handle rail -to -truck transfers, vehicle, and cargo shipments. Figure 3.44 shows the freight rail network in the Study Area. 8 Riverside County Long Range Transportation Study, RCTC, December 2019. 9 District System Management Plan, Caltrans District 8, June 2017. 247 Figure 3.43 I Truck Network and Warehouse Upla Clar-mon_ 1 Mont lai1r ��P$m`ona Diamond Bar A Adelan o ?` n APP le Valley Victoeville Hesperia 15 Rancho Cucamonga-- 10 - I■` LIF :mil on ana Rialto Wig Chino . Chino Hills Ontario YorbaLinda J Eastvale Norco Corona Jurupa Valley Riverside 91 P � Warehouses National Highway Freight Network (2016) SCAG Truck Routes r Study Area Freeways Source: SCAG 'San Bernardmo , Highland ?Colton...d Grand Thrice' L ma Linda • • Redlands Yucai.a 10V 1 I ,_Moreno Valley 111 I11 ®9 erris CanyonLake Menifee Lake Elsinore Wildomar I Murrieta Calimesa Temecula.. `'Bann Beaumont ng San Jacinto 1 Hemet Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.44 I Freight Rail Network Upland Claremont Montclair Adelanto Apple Valley Victorville Hesperia 215 10 Fontana Rancho Cucamonga Rialto I San Bernardino �,LHighland Pomona Diamond Bar Chino iittChino Hills Yorba Linda Ontario Eastvale Norco Corona E_ LJColton� Grand TerracelLoma Linda Jurupa"VaIley Riverside ROW Owner: BNSF SCRRA UP Study Area Freeways Redlands 10 Moreno Valley Perris Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore - E Wildomar Murrieta Yucaipa Calimesa L Temecula ▪ Banning JJ Beaumont San Jacinto Herne sk Source: Caltrans (2013). 3-67 3.8 Future Growth and Projected Changes This section presents the future growth in the Study Area and the projected changes in terms of socioeconomics, trips, and VMT. Future growth projections are calculated from SCAG's 2016 RTP/SCS. The 2016 RTP/SCS has detailed and disaggregated data for the base year (2016) and a horizon year (2040). Data assessed includes growth in population and employment, as well as growth in number of total trips and VMT. 3.8.1 Future Growth Potential future growth has been assessed using the SCAG regional model data, including projected growth in population, employment, total trips, and VMT. • Population: The overall population growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 16 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 647,000 residents. Within the sub -corridors, the increase in population ranges from a low of 13 percent (Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line) to 50 percent (Apple Valley to LA County line). • Employment: The overall employment growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 35 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 452,000 jobs. Within the sub -corridors, the increase in employment ranges from a low of 31 percent (Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line) to 42 percent (Beaumont to Temecula). • Trips: the overall trip growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 33 percent by 2040, which represents an increase of 3 million daily trips. The growth in the sub corridors ranges from a low of 22 percent (Cajon Pass to Eastvale) to a high of 39 percent (Apple Valley to LA County line). • Vehicle Miles Traveled: The overall VMT growth for the entire Inland Empire Study Area is projected to be 17 percent by 2040, which represents an increase in VMT of 17.9 millions. The growth in VMT in the sub - corridors ranges from a low of 10 percent (Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line) to 34 percent (Beaumont to Temecula). 3.8.2 High Quality Transit Area Figure 3.45 shows the future HQTA in the Study Area. There are several new corridors identified as HQTC in 2045 including Perris Boulevard, Magnolia Avenue, and Main Street in Riverside County, and Euclid Avenue, Holt Boulevard, Foothill Boulevard and Riverside Avenue in San Bernardino County. V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 3.45 l Future High -Quality Transit Areas (HQTA) *SCAG's HQTA is within one-half mile from major transit stops and High Quality Transit Corridors (HQTC). HQTCs have fixed route bus service with service intervals no longer than 15 minutes during peak commute hours. Clar �Ponro Diamond B r Chin 71 Chino Hills YorbalLinda on' Mon clay .r+ a Legend High Quality Transit Areas* Study Area Adelanto Fonta ne o Cucamong Eastvale IP/ 15 Norco Corona `L Jurupa Valley Riverside Apple Vali y Victorville Hesperia San B Grand Te rr acelL'ma Linfdal nardin Highl d Radian s Moreno Valley pe is Canyon Lake Menifee Lake Elsinore Future 2045 High Quality Transit Areas Source: SCAG. Wildomar Murrieta m Yucaipa 'Calimesa Temecula • ,,Banning Beaumont San Jacinto Hemet elI I I I I 0 5 10 Miles 251 252 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 4.0 Stakeholder Outreach This chapter provides a summary of outreach efforts conducted for the IE CMCP project, including the Project Management Team (Team) meetings with key stakeholder agencies, other meetings with agencies, separate public surveys conducted in Riverside and San Bernardino counties and attendance at technical meetings conducted in each county. The Team is at the core of the stakeholder outreach and it includes the following key agencies: • Caltrans, both District 8 and Headquarters representatives • San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) • Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) • Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) • Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Project Management Team meetings were an important component of the stakeholder outreach process as they included all of the key agencies involved in transportation planning in the study area. held regularly throughout the IE CMCP development effort. At those meetings, key project tasks were discussed, including, but not limited to, the following: • Overall project purpose, goals, and objectives; • Unique goals and objectives of each stakeholder agency; • Define the basic structure of CMCPs; • CMCP Study Area and ten sub -corridor areas; • Corridor characteristics, including travel patterns, socioeconomic data, and facility condition and characteristics; • Project evaluation framework and performance measures; • Key project lists for each county; • Integration of multimodal project needs; • Outline of CMCP report; and • Project schedule and progress. In addition to the Team meetings described above, the Team sought feedback from representatives from the cities and counties and transit operators in the Study Area through the following advisory committees: 4=1 .acaoo:D® rii.■ p Ilr i July 8, 2019 • SBCTA Transportation Technical Advisory Committee Meeting August 8, 2019 • Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG)—Planning Directors Committee August 8, 2019 • Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG)—Public Works Directors Committee October 8, 2019 • San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA)—Public and Specialized Transportation Advisory and Coordinating Council (PASTACC) April 1, 2020 • Caltrans Headquarters and District briefing May 4, 2020 • SBCTA Transportation Technical Advisory Committee Meeting May 18, 2020 • RCTC Technical Advisory Committee Meeting At these meetings, the Team provided an overview of the IE CMCP and requested comments. Most comments were related to specific projects to ensure that they were included. These comments were then incorporated into the project list. Another key part of the stakeholder outreach effort was to obtain opinions and information from residents, workers, and commuters that use the transportation system. Separate public outreach efforts for the two counties were conducted, as described in the following sections. The public comments have been used to help assess the current conditions assessment as well as during the process of developing the recommended improvement projects. In general, the public concerns and comments about existing transportation problems and future solutions correlate with the results of the analysis in the CMCP and the recommended projects address many of the congested locations to the extent feasible given funding, environemental and other constraints. 4=2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 4.1 RCTC Reboot My Commute Campaign Summary In Riverside County, public feedback was received through RCTC's Reboot My Commute Campaign (#RebootMyCommute). #RebootMyCommute enabled residents, workers, and commuters to provide open-ended ideas and feedback on how to create a better transportation system in Riverside County. The program offered opportunities for the public to tell their stories and to recommend how and where RCTC's limited transportation dollars should be spent. Using the theme, "We are Listening," #RebootMyCommute acknowledged the public's desire to address issues such as traffic congestion, late trains, potholed streets, and how long it takes for improvements to happen. RCTC accepted comments from March 6 to June 3, 2019, a 90-day period. For Riverside County, public feeback on transportion issues and solutions was recently received through the County's #RebootMyCommute campaign. The County's #RebootMyCommute outreach effort included opportunity for residents and users of the transportatoin system to provide their opinions on transportatoin issues, challenges and solutions. As that effort was recently completed, it was used as a key compnent of the public comment and input for the CMCP for Riverside County. Multiple channels were available for residents and commuters to learn about #RebootMyCommute and share feedback, as follows: 5. RebootMyCommute.org website: the site had 19,556 unique visitors; nearly half of comments received were submitted via the site. 6. Social media advertising with videos. 7. Tele-townhall meetings on March 19 and 20 attracted 7,539 participants. 8. Community booths at six community events publicized the effort. 9. News media: ten news stories featured the #RebootMyCommute program; advertisements were placed with several news outlets. 10. The Point (RCTC's monthly newsletter) promoted the effort. 11. Helpline: a toll -free number was provided for residents who wished to express their views by telephone. 12. Presentations were made to several agencies and City Councils. 13. Text messaging was offered to subscribers of The Point. 14. Brochures and postcards: More than 5,500 brochures in English and Spanish were distributed. RCTC received comments from 948 individuals via the website, social media, and other sources. Since some commenters addressed more than one topic, a total of 1,150 comments were tallied. Following is a summary of comments received, as organized by RCTC staff under seven topics. 1. Active Transportation-53 Comments Received: Most of these comments focused on the need to complete the Santa Ana River Trail between Riverside County and Orange County and improvements to CV Link, the 4_3 �..■ it I, transportation route and recreational pathway in the Coachella Valley. A number of comments noted the need for more bike lanes, walkable communities, sidewalk improvements, ADA signs for pedestrians, and motorized scooters. 2. Economy and Jobs-81 Comments Received: Many comments noted the need to bring higher -paying jobs to Riverside County to reduce the need to commute to other counties, to offer incentives to businesses or employees who work from home, to provide more incentives for ridesharing, and to allow tax breaks for employers who hire local. A number of people were concerned about the high volume of residential and commercial development in Riverside County and the impact to traffic. Several individuals voiced concerns about any possible new taxes and suggested that gas tax revenue should fund only freeway and roadway improvements. 3. Highways and Traffic-383 Comments Received: The Commission received wide-ranging comments about increasing traffic congestion on highways throughout Riverside County. Frequently mentioned were the need to improve the State Route 91 corridor, including the area between Green River Road and SR-241, the 71/91 interchange, 91 Express Lanes access, and the need for an alternate route between Riverside County and Orange County. A large number of residents voiced the need to widen and improve 1-15 between Riverside County and San Diego County, particularly near the 15/215 split. The number of comments increased greatly following an "1-15 Traffic Crisis" video posted on Facebook by the City of Temecula in mid -May. Other residents mentioned the need for traffic congestion relief along 1-10 through the San Gorgonio Pass. Residents also expressed concerns about increasing congestion along 1-215 in Perris and Moreno Valley. Some motorists suggested removing express lanes, expanding carpool lanes, using reversible lanes, building double -decked highways, and limiting travel times for big -rig vehicles. 4. Streets and Local Issues-207 Comments Received: Many comments in the category focused on the need to fix potholes, repave roads, improve timing and coordination of traffic signals, add left -turn phases to traffic signals, and add left -turn lanes. Other comments addressed the need for more sidewalks, the effectiveness of roundabouts, the need to install more stop signs, and the need for red-light cameras for traffic enforcement. A number of comments noted specific streets that require repair, widening, and extension. 5. Public Transportation and Specialized Services-318 Comments Received: Comments centered on the need for more rail and bus options throughout Riverside County, although some comments noted that public transit is ineffective in Southern California. Many comments supported establishing daily train service to and from the Coachella Valley. A number of residents requested the Metrolink or a light rail service for southwestern Riverside County and into San Diego County, to the San Gorgonio Pass, and to the Hemet -San Jacinto area. Others asked for greater train frequency, free weekend rides for families, discounted train tickets, weekend service on the 91/Perris Valley Line (PVL), and extending the 91/PVL to San Bernardino. Residents asked for more bus options between the Coachella Valley and Riverside, greater bus frequency, 24-hour bus systems, more station amenities, improved bus stop safety, bus -only lanes, more compressed natural gas buses, and greater 4-4 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan assistance for veterans, seniors, and riders with disabilities. Riders also voiced the need for better on -time performance for trains and buses and additional ridesharing/vanpooling incentives. 6. Safety-38 Comments Received: Comments noted the need for more police presence on roadways with larger fines for texting and driving, more stop signs, diagonal parking spaces, buses to enhance safety during the Coachella festivals, Park & Ride lot security, and the removal of homeless individuals from bus shelters. Other comments noted the need for improvements to the I-15/Railroad Canyon Road/Diamond Drive interchange, Alessandro Boulevard, and Columbia Avenue, and the need to reopen Pigeon Pass Road, San Timoteo Canyon Road, and the connector between Watkins Drive and Poarch Road. Residents also questioned the effectiveness of a planned raised median on Florida Avenue in Hemet. 7. Express Lanes-70 Comments Received: A significant number of comments suggested removing the 91 Express Lanes or stopping construction of new express lanes. Some suggested replacing the express lanes with general-purpose lanes, carpool lanes, or a light rail system. Others noted the high cost of using the express lanes, accused RCTC of profiteering, questioned various design features of the 91 Express Lanes, expressed concerns about using taxpayer funds to pay for express lanes, and advocated for an additional lane on westbound 91 between Green River Road and SR-241. Additional comments noted the need to extend the 15 Express Lanes past Lake Elsinore, the lack of access to the 91 Express Lanes from mid -city Corona, improving the 71/91 Interchange, and adding highways below ground. The campaign successfully collected more public feedback from the general public than ever before. The volume and variety of feedback received was significant, as well as the overall constructive nature of the comments. Moreover, the extensive outreach channels improved RCTC's rapport and standing with its stakeholders and provided a platform for name recognition. Overall, the outreach effort revealed that the public has a good understanding of where transportation investment is needed and is willing to recommend potential solutions. 4.2 San Bernardino County CMCP Survey In San Bernardino County, a new public survey was designed and conducted specifically for the IE CMCP project. The survey was conducted using Survey Monkey software, and it was advertised to people on SANBAG's contact list through email with a link to the survey included in the email, and further circulated via links on various city and community websites as well as through Facebook and other social media. SBCTA advertised the survey using its email database comprised of members of the public who have signed up at various times to be informed of SBCTA activities. Because the survey was conducted on a public website, there were a few non-residents of San Bernardino County who participated and provided responses. The survey for this effort was completed in fall 2019. Questions and responses included in the survey are provided below. A total of 337 responses to all questions were received as part of the San Bernardino County IE CMCP survey. 4=5 Question 1: Please identify the community where you live. The respondents lived in the following areas: • 18 different San Bernardino County cities. • 12 different San Bernardino County unincorporated communities. Question 1: Freeway Congestion • Critical Problem: 36% • Slight Problem: 7% • Definite Problem: 36% • No Problem: 2% • Moderate Problem: 19% Question 2: Surface Street Congestion • Critical Problem: 12% • Slight Problem: 16% • Definite Problem: 29% • No Problem: 7% • Moderate Problem: 36% Question 2: Lack of Bus/Train Service • Critical Problem: 40% • Slight Problem: 14% • Definite Problem: 14% • No Problem: 17% • Moderate Problem: 15% Question 2: Lack of Bike Lanes • Critical Problem: 27% • Slight Problem: 17% • Definite Problem: 13% • No Problem: 26% • Moderate Problem: 17% Question 2: Inadequate Sidewalks • Critical Problem: 25% • Definite Problem: 16% • Moderate Problem: 16% • Slight Problem: 17% • No Problem: 16% 4-6 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan V Question 3: Rate Improvements (% who rated the improvements extremely important) • Freeway Lanes: 48% • Transit: 45% • Freeway Interchanges/Ramps: 39% • Sidewalks:35% • Bike Routes: 29% • Surface Street Lanes: 21% Question 4: Most significant transportation problem in San Bernardino County? • Traffic Congestion-125 • Lack of bus/train service-70 • Other (including truck traffic, road conditions, emissions, construction, more carpools)-60 Question 5: Most significant transportation problem in your community? • Traffic Congestion-104 • Lack of bus/train service-73 • Other (including truck traffic, road conditions, emissions, construction, more carpools)-67 Question 6: What specific improvements would you like to see? • No Answer-10 • Enforcement-5 • People who work too far from where they live-5 • Freeway Lanes-51 • Increased Transit /Mass Transit-45 • Light Rail/Metrol Link-37 • Road Conditions-27 • Bicycle Lanes-17 • Pothole Repair-16 • Express Lanes-15 • Transit Service Times-13 • Sidewalks-13 • Surface Street Lanes-13 • Van Pools/Commuter Buses-5 • Better Signal Timing/Synchronization-5 • No Answer-25 • Enforcement-10 • Better/Cleaner Buses-3 • Toll Roads-3 • Traffic Enforcement-3 • Bus System Safety-2 • More Ramps-2 • Crosswalks-2 • Flying Cars-1 • Pick-up Passenger Lane Parking-1 • Traffic Calming-1 • Second Story Freeway-1 • Sound Walls-1 259 Question 7: Do you have anything else to suggest? • Similar answers to previous questions. • Other various responses. The following transportation issues were identified by the respondents. Priority Transportation Issues • Reducing highway traffic congestion. • Maintaining local roads and filling potholes. • Expanding Metrolink and Amtrak rail services. • Expanding local bus services. High Priority Types of Transportation Improvements • Widen congested highways and roadways. • Increase transit lines and frequency. • Fix potholes, resurface roads, and road maintenance. • More light rail and Metrolink options. • Adding bike lanes and bike paths. Key needs and desires identified include: • More freeway and roadway lanes. • Improved accessibility to public transit, including extended hours of service, more routes and improved frequency, better/easier connections, and improved access to schedules and availability information. • Safer sidewalks, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible curb ramps, and first and last mile access, including access for seniors. • Ensure better connectivity between rural and urban area. Active Transportation • Add bike lanes. • Create more walkable communities. • Improve sidewalks and ADA signs for pedestrians. 4=R Economy and Jobs • Reduce the need to commute, bring higher -paying jobs to the county. • Provide more incentives for ridesharing. • Allow tax breaks for employers who hire local. • Concerns about the high volume of residential and commercial development and the impact to traffic. Express Lanes • Add new express lanes. • Replace express lanes with general-purpose lanes, carpool lanes, or a light rail system. Highways and Traffic • Widen and improve freeways. • Additional suggestions included: — Remove express lanes. — Expand carpool lanes. — Build double -decked highways. — Limit travel times for big -rig vehicles. Safety • More police presence. • Larger fines for texting and driving. • More signals. • Park and Ride lot security. • Remove homeless individuals from bus shelters. Streets and Local Issues • Fix potholes. • Repave, widen, and extend roads. • Improve timing and coordination of traffic signals. 4.-10 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan V • Add left -turn lanes and left -turn phases to traffic signals. • More sidewalks. • Install more stop signs. • More enforcement. Public Transportation • More rail and bus options. • Establish daily train service to and from the Coachella Valley. • Provide more Metrolink or light rail service. • Greater train frequency. • Build the Gold Line to Montclair. • Greater bus frequency. • Improved bus stop safety. • Bus -only lanes. • Better on -time performance for trains and buses. • Additional ridesharing/vanpooling incentives. • Regional highway/local streets network connectivity, maintenance, and operations. • Transit and paratransit system and service providers' connectivity, maintenance, and operations. In general, the respondents indicated a heavy focus on traffic congestion and better transit service as key issues, along with a number of other responses that point to the need for a multimodal transportation network. 4.3 Comparison of Riverside and San Bernardino County Outreach Responses Although they were two separate efforts to solicit outreach from the residents and system users in each county, the questions asked were closely correlated and the public responses also reflected similar and shared visions of both exisiting transportation system problems as well as recommended solutions. Under Highways, common themes of the responses in both counties included frustration with significant congestion. In terms of improvements, in both counties there were suggestions to widen and improve freeways, expand carpool lanes, double deck freeways, limit times for large trucks and limit express lane expansion were mentioned. While all of these may not all be feaasible due to funding constraints, environmental impacts or other reasons, all have 262 been noted as resposnes from the public. For streets and local issues, common themes included fixing potholes, improving signal timing and coordination and adding left turn lanes at key locations. For public transportation, comment themes included adding more bus and rail services, greater bus frequency in key areas, adding rail service to the Coachella Valley, adding bus -only lanes and improving bus stop safety. For active transportation (bike and pedestrian), common themes included adding bike lanes/routes, improving walkable communities and improving ADA signs for pedestrians. For the economy and jobs, common themes included bringing higher paying jobs to both counties to reduce the need for commuting and providing more incentives for employers to encourage employee ridesharing. 4.-12 264 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.0 Sub -Corridor Definitions and Strategic Approaches 5.1 Sub -Corridor Analysis Summary The purpose of this section is to present a review of the characteristics, future growth potential, problems, opportunities, strategic issues, and approaches that may apply to each of the ten identified sub -corridors in the IE CMCP. Each sub -corridor may have features in common with other sub -corridors, as well as features that are unique to that sub -corridor. The intent is to capture the themes or strategies that define "where each sub -corridor is headed," in terms of how we should invest in its multimodal improvement and be responsive to its environmental and community characteristics. For each corridor discussion, there is an introduction to each corridor and a brief bullet list of "Problems to be Addressed," followed by a listing of strategies that may be appropriate to guide the overall development of the sub -corridor. This is followed by a more detailed review of the demographic and land use characteristics of each sub -corridor, various attributes of the transportation system, and forecasts of what the sub -corridor may look like in the future. At the end of each sub -corridor discussion, a listing is presented of proposed multimodal improvements, with an emphasis on the near -term (generally the next 10 years), and with some longer - term projects identified, as well. In developing the strategic approach for each sub -corridor, the classes of strategies considered are highly multimodal in nature, and they also consider the types of "customers" that will be served: 1) passenger travel and freight; 2) trips by purpose: for work, school, business, shopping, recreation, social interaction; and 3) specific activity centers: airports, downtowns, hospitals, educational institutions, commercial clusters, mixed -use clusters, and transit hubs. Overlaying the strategies are the statewide and regional goals to: reduce VMT, criteria pollutants, and GHG emissions; improve mobility and accessibility; enhance the quality of life in our local communities; and protect habitat and aquatic resources. This requires integrated, multi -pronged approaches that consider all modes of transportation and complementary strategies for land use, environment, and protection of community character. The transportation modes reflect an emphasis on public transportation, non -motorized travel, shared -ride (carpool/vanpool), and virtual travel (i.e., work -at-home, web -based business, teleconferencing, etc.); a highway network focused on effective management and operations (e.g., through HOV/managed lanes, traveler information, and signal coordination); as well as accommodation of freight and logistics through strategic access improvements. There is a large pool of existing and emerging multimodal options to draw from and build on in the Inland Empire: commuter rail (Metrolink IEOC, 91/Perris Valley, Riverside, and San Bernardino lines), light rail (with the Gold Line extension to Pomona by 2025), regional Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) rail (with self -powered zero - emission trainsets), and high speed rail (California High -Speed Rail Phase 2, Virgin Rail from Apple Valley to Las Vegas). Efficient and frequent local bus, express bus, and BRT options also exist and are being expanded with the forthcoming West Valley Connector BRT. Lyft is now providing an important connection to Ontario 5=1 International Airport from the Riverside and San Bernardino Metrolink lines, and first/last mile connections are being advanced linking transit and key destinations. Regional bike networks are creating a backbone that provides the regional connectivity needed to service those who can take these modes for daily commutes. Land use and housing are intertwined with the regional transportation network in a way that, because of much higher costs in coastal counties, has historically produced longer commutes and travel times for inland residents. The challenge before us now is to encourage better balance in jobs and housing regionally for the sake of livability, cost, and VMT/GHG reduction. 5.2 Victorville to San Bernardino The Victorville to San Bernardino sub -corridor is one of five north/south oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.1 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.2.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This important north/south sub -corridor is entirely within San Bernardino County and is a key connection between the County's High Desert, Mountain, and Valley subregions, passing through the Cajon Pass. This sub -corridor also is an important link connecting points north and east in the U.S., including Las Vegas, to other parts of Southern California. The corridor addresses flows of people and freight within and through portions of unincorporated San Bernardino County and the cities of Adelanto, Apple Valley, Victorville, Hesperia, San Bernardino, Rialto, and Fontana. This sub -corridor includes parts of RSAs 32, 30, 28, and 29, all within San Bernardino County. The sub - corridor is generally 40 miles in length north to south and between 5 to 20 miles wide east to west. Key Transportation Facilities Key north/south oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: 1-15, SR-395, SR-138, 1-215, and SR-259. Arterials: Key north/south arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the sub -corridor include: Citrus Avenue, Sierra Avenue, Ayala Drive, Riverside Avenue, Pepper Avenue, State Street, Medical Center Drive, Mt. Vernon Avenue, Escondido Avenue, Cottonwood Avenue, Amethyst Road, Arrowhead Drive, Hesperia Road, El Evado Road, Amargosa Road, Adelanto Road, and Bellflower Street. Freight: 1-15 is a major goods movement corridor. Union Pacific Railroad and BNSF pass through the sub -corridor, carrying significant volumes of freight between Southern California and the U.S. There are many warehousing and distribution facilities in the sub -corridor in the cities of San Bernardino, Rialto, and Victorville. Transit: There are only a limited number of bus routes in this sub -corridor, which are operated by Victor Valley Transit Authority and Omnitrans. There is no north/south SCRRA (Metrolink) service in this sub -corridor. 5-2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.1 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 15 Unincorporated San Bernardino County Adelanto Victorville Hesperia Allibibbfk 10 , , Rialto San Bernardino �r Apple Valley b, Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 53 4600C:B it M■ iI Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.2 illustrates the land use types and Figure 5.3 shows the land use patterns in the sub -corridor. As illustrated in these figures, the subarea includes large portions of National Forest, open space, and recreational land, at 38 percent of the total land area. Other predominant land uses in the sub - corridor are residential, including single family residential at 13 percent of the area and rural residential at 23 percent. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has 3 percent industrial, 3 percent commercial and services, and over 2 percent mixed -use designated zones. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor include higher scores in the southern (Valley) portion of the sub - corridor in San Bernardino, Rialto, and Fontana and the northern (High Desert) portion in Adelanto, Victorville, and Hesperia. Most portions of Apple Valley have lower scores. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the community of Muscoy and cities of San Bernardino and Adelanto in the sub -corridor. 5-4 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.2 I Land Use Types Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 9% Single Family Residential 13% Open Space and Recreation 38% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Single Family Residential ■ Multi Family Residential Mobile -Homes Mixed Residential ■ Rural Residential ■ General Office ■ Commercial and Services ■ Facilities ■ Education ■ Industrial ■ Transportation, Communications, and Utilities ■ Mixed Commercial and Industrail ■ Mixed Residential and Commerical ■ Open Space and Recreation ■ Agriculture Water it Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protect Land 5-5 Figure 5.3 I Land Use Map Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor n Hesperia -NJ Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential _ Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential ▪ Rural Residential ▪ Commercial and Services ▪ General Office Use _ Public Facilities - Educational Institutions - Industrial ▪ Transportation, Communications, and Utilities ▪ Mixed Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential and Commercial - Open Space and Recreation _ Agriculture Water - Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 270 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Employment density is relatively low in much of the sub -corridor, especially in the Cajon Pass and in unincorporated parts of the High Desert. Employment density is highest in the Valley cities, south of the Cajon Pass and on parcels directly adjacent to 1-15, SR-395, and SR-18 in the High Desert. There is little employment density outside of these areas. Population is spread across single-family residential and rural residential lands that is primarily in the cities of San Bernardino, Victorville, Hesperia, and Apple Valley, and Unincorporated San Bernardino County. Given the predominance of residential land uses, the the sub -corridor has a population -to -employment statistical ratio of 4.6, which is relatively high compared to some of the other areas of the overall IE CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute longer distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.1 displays the magnitude and average sizes of trips within and external to the subarea. There are nearly 1.3 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the sub -corridor. As illustrated in Table 5.1, 39 percent of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor. These sub - corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the sub -corridor as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. Around half of the trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end either inside or outside the IE CMCP area and 14 percent are to or from outside the IE CMCP area. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are 2.6 and 7.4 times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.1 I Internal and External Trips Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Sub -corridor Trips to/ Sub -corridor Trips Internal Trips from CMCP Study Area to/from Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016 501,000 593,000 182,000 39% 46% 14% 4.8 12.6 35.4 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.4 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 92 percent of commute trips in the sub -corridor are made by automobile. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 14 percent of workers carpooled. The share of carpoolers is higher in this sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This is reflective of the relatively longer commute trips from the sub -corridor either to other job locations in San Bernardino or Southern California and lack of Metrolink services in this sub -corridor. Transit accounts for just one percent of commute trips, while five percent of residents work at home. Non -motorized trips account for just one percent of commute trips. 5=7 Transit, 1% Carpool, 14 Figure 5.4 I Journey to Work Mode Share Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Work at Home, 5% Non -Motorized, 1% r � I I Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates Other, 1% Drove Alone, 78% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the sub -corridor must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions is reflected in the commute times for the sub -corridor. Nearly 54 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work. 28 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, 18 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, and Vehicle Miles Traveled: Figure 5.5 and Figure 5.6 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system from Google traffic data. The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs on the I-15/SR-210 junction, 1-15 in the Cajon Pass, and SR-395 between 1-15 and SR-18. At the I-15/SR-210 area during the AM peak, westbound SR-210 and southbound 1-15 are congested and during the PM peak, eastbound SR-210 is heavily congested. 1-15 in the Cajon Pass is congested during the PM peak in both directions. SR-395 is congested during the PM peak. Other small segments that are congested are around the SR-210/I-215 interchange and the I-15/SR-18 interchange. 5=8 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.5 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor • Creek fend Adelanto anro CB Mesa 'S ./ Rialto Helendale Unincorporated San Bernardino County Bryrnan La Delta Victorville Mountai Vow Ac GIB,o Hesperia } i tetietarville Val 15 15 ti elf Mountal Apple Valley Typical traffic - Fasf • . S M TOT F S 1 - ▪ ' 1 I I BAM 121,M 4PA 1PM an Bernardino Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 0 2.5 5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 10 Miles 273 Figure 5.6 I Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Adelantoa Ai;ay CejonPJ'unctian nd SIERRA LAKES Rialto 9 HeIerelaie Unincorporated San Be"rnardino County Burner � La [rake Oro Grande Victorville Mountain View Acre Hesperia Bali Mountain 15 Apple Valley vas Typical traffic Fastaaaaaaaa51a, S M T O T F S 'Yednesdav, 8:CCI AM PAM 12PM 4PM SPM an Bernardino Mu+ 10 Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5-10 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the sub -corridor, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.2 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 30 percent of the daily VMT. Daily VHT is nearly split 60/40 between freeways and arterial network. Average speeds on arterials are nearly as a fast as speeds on freeways. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively more VMT per service population and it ranks fourth out of the ten sub -corridors for highest VMT per service population. Table 5.2 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway HOV Arterials Total 10,424,000 69% 189,000 62% 79,000 1% 1,000 0% Source: SCAG Model 2016. 4,505,000 30% 15,008,000 100% 113,000 37% 303 000 100% Transit Usage: In this sub -corridor 1 percent of commute trips use transit. This sub -corridor does not have high quality transit corridors or stops. Safety: Figure 5.7 illustrates the report crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, the collision rates for 1-15 are higher than the County average and Caltrans District 8 averages. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in the southern portion of the sub -corridor in San Bernardino and Rialto, possibly reflecting higher rates of walking and bicycling in the Valley area. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along 1-15 with the largest concentrations along portions between 1-215 and the Cajon Pass. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040 according to SCAG projections: • Population-43 percent increase. • Employment-40 percent increase. Commensurate with these projected relatively high rates of growth for the area's demographics, total trip making in the sub -corridor is expected to increase by 436,000 daily trips, representing a 34 percent increase. VMT are expected to increase by 18 percent and VHT are projected to increase by 65 percent. The disproportionate increase in VHT over VMT indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected relatively high growth rates for this sub -corridor. The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.8 and Figure 5.9 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system based on SCAG 2040 model. 5-1 1 Figure 5.7 1 Collisions Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor • • • • CAD • • • • Adelanto +Aft .,_ 15 • • • • • • G Unincorporated • San Bernardino County • • • •. • • cp • • • •• • 4.rApple Valley •U•• • 1,69 • Victorville •_ • s • M • • • • • / • • • • Hesperia 409 • • • • • 'o • SanfBernardino • 0 • • •- • • • ft • ••_, • Rialto i•. Collisions 2018 Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision Truck Collision • All Collisions Sub corridor Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5 12 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.8 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County ■ Adelanto i* gow '■SM l� .9Mik►�1 ■ Vic Orville weir IM■ L�■wl:'� f7 -11r ■■ . Ms;♦■■r R u■!�C ��'�` w�a. i■r�ll�_I .72f7111� ����n $II ■ �. iiii � rr�m■ 7a - �r�■ .■■�5IIIP Rialo I,In ■III■�1■■��" Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor O I 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5.1? Figure 5.9 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor / Unincorporated San Bernardino County ir�. J i1 milk,.pia t o y ! ll:.. uair I�l"'i• iiiii1°l� Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor €111 l i i l i l 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.2.2 Strategic Approach for Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Victorville to San Bernardino Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Substantial "down -the -hill" commuting from the Victor Valley to San Bernardino, Riverside, and LA, with residents motivated to endure the commutes as a result of more affordable housing in the High Desert. • 1-15 is a nationally significant freight corridor, but travel through the Cajon Pass is congested and unreliable. • High number of serious traffic accidents and incidents on State Routes: 1-15 in Cajon Pass, U.S.-395, and SR-138. • Significant weekend congestion, not just weekday. • Lack of adequate alternate routes when the regionally significant corridor shuts down as a result of incidents. Strategies 1. Enhance the ease and reliability of freight and passenger travel in the Cajon Pass and High Desert through the addition of express lanes on 1-15, consistent with the SCAG Regional Express Lane Network in the RTP/SCS, with toll discounts/exemptions for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. 2. Conduct operational studies on 1-15 in the Cajon Pass geared toward improving safety and reducing the frequency and severity of traffic incidents. Also conduct operational studies on alternate routes to 1-15 for use in the event of extended 1-15 closures. Program operational improvements into the Caltrans SHOPP. If crashes are associated to the long routes, weather, and fatigue, perhaps rest areas could also be added to allow drivers to take a break before continuing their destination. 3. Pursue multimodal solutions. Continue growth of vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the Valley and greater LA Basin and monitor express bus operation from Victorville to San Bernardino for evidence of expansion opportunity. Pursue the extension of Brightline West down the Cajon Pass to Rancho Cucamonga to provide an additional privately funded solution to peak hour and weekend congestion. 4. Through economic development and other strategies, increase employment opportunities in the High Desert for High Desert residents to reduce jobs -to -housing imbalance and reduce long commutes from the High Desert to San Bernardino / Los Angeles / Riverside. 5. Complete Mojave Riverwalk, the principal north/south Class 1 trail in the High Desert. 6. Consider developing a comprehensive signal synchronization network for the High Desert and prioritize arterial corridors for early implementation. 7. Complete the widening of 2-lane segments on SR-138 west of 1-15 for safety purposes. 5-15 8. Complete widening of U.S. 395 for safety and operational purposes and as a significant north/south freight and recreational route connecting to the Tehachapi Mountains via SR-58 and to the eastern Sierra Mountains. 9. Implement policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5.3 San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor The San Bernardino to Riverside sub -corridor is one of five north/south oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.10 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.3.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is primarily centered on 1-215 and SR-91, serving as a key north/south link (on the eastern side of the urbanized valley), between San Bernardino and Riverside counties connecting their respective urban centers. This sub -corridor addresses north/south flows of people and freight within and through portions of the cities of San Bernardino, Colton, Loma Linda, Grand Terrace, Riverside, and portions of unincorporated San Bernardino and Riverside counties. This sub -corridor encompasses parts of RSAs 46, 45, 29, and 30. The sub -corridor is approximately 25 miles in length north to south and six miles wide east to west. Key Transportation Facilities Key north/south-oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: I-215 is the primary north/south freeway facility, with its extension/connection to SR-91 in the south and 1-15 in the north. Arterials: Key north/south arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the Study Area include: Pepper Avenue, La Cadena Drive, Main Street, Chicago Avenue, Iowa Avenue, Mt. Vernon Avenue, Reche Canyon Road, E Street, Waterman Avenue, Tippecanoe Avenue, Route 66, and Kendal Drive. Freight: I-215 is a major goods movement corridor. UP Railroad, BNSF and SCRRA pass through the sub -corridor. There are major warehousing facilities in the sub -corridor along 1-215 in the cities of Riverside, Colton, and San Bernardino. Transit: This sub -corridor includes portions of Metrolink's Inland Empire/Orange County line and San Bernardino line. The San Bernardino line terminates in Downtown San Bernardino within this sub -corridor. The Redlands extension will provide additional service to the east from Downtown San Bernardino. The OmniTrans sbX Green Line, a bus rapid transit route, runs primarily within the area serving major north/south movements. This key BRT facility is the first service with exclusive bus lanes in the Inland Empire. The RTA Commuterlink route 200 and Omnitrans connect Riverside and San Bernardino. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. 5_1 6 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.10 I Sub -Corridor Study Area San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Study Area Freeways CI Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line San Bernardino to Riverside 0 Sub -Corridor 2.5 5 10 Miles 281 Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.11 illustrates the land use type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.12 shows the land use patterns. As illustrated in these figures, this sub -corridor includes a wide variety of land uses depending on location, with significant amounts of open space at the northern end, while urban land uses are most prevalent in the middle and southern portions. Predominant land uses in the sub -corridor include single family residential at 24 percent, followed by open space and recreation at 26 percent, facilities at 10 percent, and industrial at 9 percent. Where is the 31% of land use?In terms of employment -generating land uses, the Study Area has 9 percent industrial, 5 percent commercial and services, and some mixed -use designated zones. This sub -corridor includes important Government centers for both San Bernardinoo and Riverside counties, including county halls of administrations, courts, transportation agencies, State agencies, and world -class high education institutions UC- Riverside and CSU—San Bernardino. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are high in the central portion of the area in downtown San Bernardino and Colton areas with some areas of higher scores also located in Riverside and Jurupa Valley. The farthest north, south, and eastern portions of the corridor have much lower CalEnviroScreen scores indicating better overall economic and environmental conditions in those areas. A significant portion of the sub -corridor area is designated as a SCAG "Community of Concern," including portions of San Bernardino, Colton, Grand Terrace, and Riverside. Figure 5.11 I Land Use Types San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 7% Agriculture 5% Open Space and Recreation 26% Mixed Residential and Commerical 3% Mixed Commercial and Industrail 4% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. `I Industrial 9% Single Family Residential 24% Facilities 10% Multi Family Residential 7— 4% Commercial and Services 5% 5-18 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.12 I Land Use Map San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential An Rural Residential - Commercial and Services General Office Use - Public Facilities Educational Institutions - Industrial Transportation, Communicatlons, and Utilities Mixed Commercial and Industrial - Mixed Residential and Commercial Open Space and Recreation - Agriculture 'Hater - Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 283 Employment density is relatively high in the middle and southern portion of this subarea which include downtown San Bernardino and Riverside, respectively, while density is much lower in the northern portion of the Study Area. Overall employment density for the sub -corridor is 2.48 employees per acre. Population density follows a similar pattern to employment density, with relatively high densities throughout much of the middle portion of the sub - corridor. Overall population density for the sub -corridor is 5.71 residents per acre. Given the higher employment opportunities, the the sub -corridor has a population -to -employment statistical ratio of 2.3, which is relatively low compared to some of the other areas of the overall IE CMCP Study Area, indicating a relatively better balance of jobs and population. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.3 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. There are nearly 1.5 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the corridor Study Area. As illustrated, in the table below, just over a third of the trips stay within the sub -corridor and well over half of the trips are to and from outside of the sub -corridor but within the overall Inland Empire Study Area. Less than ten percent of the trips go outside of the Inland Empire Study Area, emphasizing the attractiveness and importance of this sub-corridor's travel destinations in serving trip origins within the Inland Empire in general. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the study and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are more than three times and ten times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. The relatively shorter length (12.8 miles) of the large volume of sub -corridor to IE CMCP trips is again an indication of a good jobs/housing balance within the sub -corridor. Table 5.3 I Internal and External Trips San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Trips Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. 535,000 35% 3.9 837,000 121,000 57% 8% 12.8 43.7 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.13 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 89 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are made by automobile. Transit accounts for just two percent of commute trips, while four percent of residents work at home. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 14 percent carpooled. The share of commuters who carpool is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). Non -motorized trips account for four percent of commute trips. Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 96 percent of the workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected 5-20 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan in the commute times for the Study Area. Over 60 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, while 25 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, 11 percent commute over one hour. Again, these figures reflect a better jobs/housing balance in this sub -corridor, which result in relatively shorter commute times compared to others. Figure 5.13 I Journey to Work Mode Share San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Transit, 2% Carpool, 14% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Walk, 3% Work At Home, 4% ! Drive Alone, 75% Congestion, Delay, and VMT: Figure 5.14 and Figure 5.15 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectiveley, on the freeway system for 2018 from Google traffic data. In general, the most consistent congestion patterns occur on the 1-215 segment between 1-10 and SR-60 in both peak periods. More specifically, the traffic data indicate that during the AM peak, there is congestion on 1-215 on the entire segment from 1-10 to SR-60. The level of congestion is approximately the same in both directions in this area. There also is congestion on 1-215 southbound south of SR-210 as well as 1-215 southbound south of the 1-15/1-215 interchange. During the PM peak, the southbound direction of the segment between 1-10 and SR-60 is significantly congested and a portion of the same segment is congested in the northbound direction. Also the segment of 1-215 north of 1-10 up to 5th Street in San Bernardino is congested. There also is congestion along 1-215 north of SR-210 in the northbound direction during the PM peak as well as north of the 1-15/1-215 interchange, again in the northbound direction. Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the Study Area are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.4 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the freeway system carries 71 percent and the arterial network carries 29 percent of the daily VMT. The significantly higher share of freeway VMT is a reflection of the importance of the freeways in mobility and county -to -county connectivity in this sub -corridor. The proportion of VHT is somewhat different than VMT, with freeways (including HOV lanes) carrying 60 percent of the VHT and arterial network carrying 40 percent of the VHT, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively more VMT per service population and it ranks number five highest VMT out of the ten sub -corridors. Figure 5.14 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor eenbro Unincorporated San Bernardino County r •� GI - Helen Re. Canal Park 10-- Rialto re Jurupa Val ley+n Fairrnoun Park Riversi • e Typical traffic - Faet — Sk • S M TOT F S 1 I I 6/ednesaay,8,00AM PAM12PM4PI aPM w •.xo WHr•. San Bernardino wry n sr.L.$dr-Bernardi 0 10 V.III. -o.Lror Conon Colton 15 Ighgrove A Terrace Grand Terrace University of California_ Riverside Riverside 9 Sy Splash Kin Wat Loma Laniurrifidfis San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. (1.0 I 0 2.25 45 9 Miles 286 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.15 I Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Typical traffic eenbrook 15 Unincorporated San Bernardino County Gr R Helen nal Park 10 MOSCOr Rialto ore Jurupa Valleywn Fairmoun Park Riverside FastSb.v 9 M T O T F 9 I • SAM 12PM 4PM aPM 472. 10 •PROWI1kA San Bernardino w.5trovLS-8ernardin Millkv c : lrnr Colton Colton 15 ghgrave nd Te rate Grand Terrace University of California. Riverside Riverside 9 s Splash Kin War Loma Lartindas San Bernardino to Riverside 0 Sub -Corridor 0 2.25 4.5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 9 Miles 5-2 Table 5.4 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway 8,053,242 HOV 397,166 Arterials 3,451,905 Total 11,902,313 Source: SCAG Model 2016. 68% 3% 151,538 57% 6,737 3% 29% 100% 104,039 262,314 40% 100% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor has several high -quality transit services, including the Metrolink Commuter Rail as well as other transit services, including bus rapid transit (BRT) sbX between CSU-San Bernardino and Loma Linda University and Medical Center. This sub -corridor also includes portions of the Inland Empire -Orange County Metrolink stations providing north/south service. Safety: Figure 5.16 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, 1-215 experiences some of the highest collision rates for the IE CMCP Study Area's freeways. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in the southern portion of the sub -corridor in and around University of California at Riverside (UCR) and in the central portion near the city of San Bernardino. This possibly reflects relatively higher rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along freeways with the largest concentration along 1-215 between SR-60 and SR-210. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-16 percent increase. • Employment-37 percent increase. This subcorridor will experience the lowest level of population increase compared to the other nine sub -corridors, likely reflecting the built out nature of much of the Study Area. However, the higher rate of employment to population growth suggests a further improvement to future jobs/housing ratios. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 362,000 daily trips, representing a 24 percent increase. VMT is expected to increase by 22 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 51 percent. The disproportionate increase in VHT over VMT suggest increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected growth rates and increased congestion. The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.17 and Figure 5.18 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5.24 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.16 I Collisions San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor 15 • Collisions 2018 c Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision C Truck Collision • All Collisions 1=1 Sub corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County • • • w. • • • ••• s • • • f • • •.ipinyis � •� • 1• • > •s% • • •..•• ••ems • 11 ▪ • rs • Rialto • • i • S• •• a •• San Bernardino] o • •_1 • •• •• • • o • • s �� • • p • •• •• • d• Jurupa • • • •• alley oe • y • • • • • • •e 7rR • • •• • • • • • Colton •• • e.rsidei • •0 • • Loma Linda • • k m Io • • e•_ • Ga.. IOW 0 • • 1• • 07 ▪ w• •• • 0 0 • 7.• •• • • • Grand Terrace • • San Bernardino to Riverside 0 Sub -Corridor 25 5 10 Miles 5-25 Figure 5.17 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County San Bernardino to Riverside f Sub -Corridor 1 I 2.5 1 5 1 10 Miles 5-2 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.18 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County San Bernardino to Riverside 0 Sub -Corridor 2.5 5 10 Miles 5-27 5.3.2 Strategic Approach for San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for San Bernardino to Riverside Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Large off -campus university student and employee populations that make daily commutes to and from schools, creating congestion at entry points to universities. • Specific bottleneck locations: (southbound 1-215 at Orange Show Road, southbound 1-215 at SR-60 junction, northbound 1-215 at merge with SR-60 on -ramps). • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Antiquated interchange designs. • Large concentration of bike and pedestrian collisions in the Riverside and San Bernardino urban centers. • Generally difficult environment for walking and cycling • Truck congestion and air quality challenges in San Bernardino and Riverside with convergence of rail lines and intermodal freight facilities. Strategies 1. Build on existing multimodal strategy to enhance rail, transit and shared -ride access to and from California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) and UCR. 2. Coordinate express transit/rail service between San Bernardino and Riverside County cities. 3. Focus on north/south arterial operations and safety improvements for parallel facilities such as Riverside Avenue, Mt. Vernon Avenue, and Reche Canyon Road. 4. Complete Divergent Diamond Interchange (DDI) at the I-215/University Avenue interchange to accommodate continued CSUSB growth. 5. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on 1-215 between SR-60 and Orange Show Road to address bottlenecks. 6. Implement managed -lane system on SR-91 in downtown Riverside. 7. Build on substantial existing transit assets (e.g., move forward with SCORE program on multiple Metrolink lines —increasing frequency and improving service). 8. Implement first/last mile transit connections (particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations). 5_28 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 9. Work with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and California Air Resources Board (CARB) to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of the truck fleets. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-29 .acaoo�D® I( _ I 1 5.4 Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor The Cajon Pass to Eastvale sub -corridor is one of five north/south oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.19 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.4.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is primarily centered on 1-15, serving as a key north/south link (on the western side of the urbanized valley), between San Bernardino and Riverside counties. This sub -corridor addresses north/south flows of people and freight within and through portions of the cities of San Bernardino, Rialto, Fontana, Rancho Cucamonga, Ontario, Eastvale and Norco, and portions of county unincorporated areas. This sub -corridor encompasses portions of both Riverside and San Bernardino counties and includes parts of RSAs 28, 45, 29, and 30. The sub -corridor is approximately 26 miles in length north to south and six miles wide east to west. Key Transportation Facilities Key north/south oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: 1-15 is the primary north/south freeway facility. Arterials: Key north/south arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the Study Area include Glen Hellen Parkway, Sierra Avenue, Etiwanda Avenue, Hamner Avenue and Milliken Avenue. Freight: 1-15 is a major goods movement corridor. UP Railroad, BNSF, and SCRRA pass through the sub -corridor. Some of the most significant warehousing facilities in the Inland Empire are in this sub -corridor along 1-15 in the cities of Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, and Eastvale. Transit: There is no transit connectivity along 1-15 in this sub -corridor. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. 5-30 Figure 5.19 I Sub -corridor Study Area Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County OStudy Area Freeways © Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 295 Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.20 illustrates the land use types in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.21 shows the land use patterns. As illustrated in these figures, this sub -corridor includes a wide variety of land uses depending on location, with significant amounts of open space at the northern end, while urban land uses are most prevalent in the middle and southern portions. A significant distinguishing characteristic of this sub -corridor is the predominance of specific plans (mostly in Fontana, Rancho Cucamonga, and Ontario) at 30 percent of the total land area. Other predominant land uses include open space at 24 percent, lindustrial at 11 percent, agriculture at 10 percent, and relatively lower single family residential at 9 percent. The CalEnviroScreen scores are high in the central portion of the sub -corridor, including parts of Rialto and Ontario. Overall CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are among the highest of the ten sub -corridors. Figure 5.20 I Land Use Types Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 30% Agriculture/ 10% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use Single Family Residential 9% Industrial 11% Mixed Residential and Commerical 4% Open Space and Recreation 24% Employment density is relatively low in the northern and southern portion of the sub -corridor and moderate to high employment density in portions between SR-210 and SR-60. The population/employment ratio is mixed with high ratios in the northern and southern portion and a low ratio in middle of the sub -corridor between SR-210 and SR- 60. Overall, the sub -corridor has a relatively lower population -to -employment statistical ratio of 1.8 compared to some of the other areas of the overall IE CMCP sStudy Area, indicating a need for residents to commute shorter distances to work. 5-32 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.21 I Land Use Map Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential ▪ Commercial and Services ▪ General Office Use Public Facilities Educational Institutions ▪ Industrial Transportation, Communications, and Utilities Mixed Commercial and Industrial ▪ Mixed Residential and Commercial Open Space and Recreation - Agriculture Water _ Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.5 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. There are over 1.3 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the Study Area. As illustrated in the table below, just over a quarter of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor Study Area. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the Study Area, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. The remaining trips are evenly split between having one end in the Study Area and the other end either inside or outside the IE CMCP area. Approximately 60 percent of the trips have one end in the sub - corridor and other end in the IE CMCP Study Area. The remaining trips end outside the IE CMCP sStudy Area. With 85 percent of the trips within the IE CMCP area, this reflects the attractiveness and importance of this sub- corridor's travel destinations in serving trip origins within the Inland Empire in general. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are three times and eight times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. The relatively shorter length (almost 12 miles) of the large volume of sub -corridor to IE CMCP trips is again an indication of a good jobs/housing balance within the sub -corridor. Table 5.5 I Internal and External Trips Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Sub -corridor Internal Trips 361,000 27% 4.1 Sub -corridor Trips to/from CMCP Study Area 787,000 58% 11.9 Source: SCAG Model 2016 Sub -corridor Trips to/from Rest of Region 203,000 15% 32.5 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.22 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 92 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are made by automobile. Transit accounts for just two percent of commute trips, while five percent of residents work at home. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 12 percent carpooled. The share of commuters who carpool is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). Non -motorized trips account for less than one percent of commute trips. 5-34 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.22 I Journey to Work Mode Share Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Walk, 0% Work At Home, 5% Transit, 2% Carpool, 12% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Drive Alone, 80% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the Study Area. Nearly half of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 31 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 19 percent commute over one hour. These are a reflection of relatively high availability of jobs to serve the population in this sub -corridor. Congestion, Delay, and VMT: Figure 5.23 and Figure 5.24 show the snapshot of Google traffic conditions during a typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. In general, the most consistent congestion patterns occur on the 1-15 segment from 1-10 to the southern end of the sub -corridor in both peak periods. More specifically, the traffic data indicate that during the AM peak hour there is significant congestion on 1-15 in both directions south of 1-10 to the southern edge of the sub -corridor and it is the heaviest in the northbound direction during the morning period. On 1-15, both north and south of 1-10, there is significant congestion in the northbound direction during the AM peak hour. There also is congestion at the I-10/SR-210 interchange. The PM peak hour experiences similar patterns along 1-15 but the congestion extends further north of 1-10 and again extends all the way to the southern boundary of the sub -corridor. 5-35 Figure 5.23 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 10 Miles 300 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.24 I Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 10 Miles 5_37 Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the Study Area are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.6 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the freeways carry 70 percent of the daily VMT and the arterials 30 percent. The significantly higher share of freeway VMT is a reflection of the importance of the freeways in mobility and county -to -county connectivity in this sub -corridor. However, daily VHT is about 60/40 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has the highest VMT per service population and it ranks number one out of the ten sub -corridors. Table 5.6 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway 9,089,517 68% 172,414 60% HOV 245,953 2% Arterials 3,984,639 30% Total 13,320,109 100% Source: SCAG Model 2016. 3,935 1% 487,000 39% 663,349 100% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor also has some high -quality transit stops at Metrolink stations in Rancho Cucamonga and Ontario. In this sub -corridor, only 2 percent of commute trips use transit. Safety: Figure 5.25 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, 1-15 has higher collision rates than the County average and Caltrans District 8 averages. Bicycle and pedestrian collisions are sparsely spread across the sub -corridor, possibly reflecting lower rates of bicycling and walking in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along freeways with the largest concentrations along portions of 1-15 between SR-210 and SR-60. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-17 percent increase. • Employment-33 percent increase. These are among the lowest levels of projected increase in population of all ten sub -corridors, likely reflecting the built out nature of much of the Study aArea. However, the higher rate of employment to population growth suggests a further improvement to future jobs/housing ratios. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 293,000 daily trips, representing a 22 percent increase. VMT is projected to increase by 17 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 39 percent. The disproportionate increase in VHT over VMT indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the relatively high growth rates that are projected. 5-38 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.26 and Figure 5.27 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-39 .auk, i 4 @I 1 Figure 5.25 I Collisions Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 15 Nealeys Co !IeR11A LAKfi Q ngd shale 15 1 10 a) Keiser Jul MiNA LOMA Typical traffic - Faars•e���51or S M T O T F S Wednesday, 5:00 PM I I I I I? AM 12 PM 4.Ph1 9PM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor o 2.5 5 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.26 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Typical traffic FastSlaw S M T O T F S vVedneaday, 5:00 PM � 1 � � i� El AM 12 PM 4PM 9PM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 0 0 25 5 10 Miles 5-41 Figure 5.27 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor ,\N Henley Co R IFFlUA LAKE/ ng rnillilogifturate MIRA LOMA Ka for Typical Traffic FastSlaw S M TOT F S Wednesday, 5'00 PM I I • I RAM 12PM 4PM @P1t Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5-42 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.4.2 Strategic Approach for Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Cajon Pass to Eastvale Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • 1-10/1-15 interchange is 12th on American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI)'s national list of the top 100 truck bottlenecks. • Nationally significant freight corridor, with heavy congestion on 1-15 between SR-60 and SR-210. • Southern end of the corridor houses some of the largest and most intense logistics activities in the Nation, with attendant local traffic and environmental impacts. • Lack of north/south transit service and need for improved transit service to Ontario International Airport. • Large population and housing growth with a large number of master planned communities. Strategies 1. Implement managed -lane system on 1-15, with toll discounts or exemptions for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. 2. Complete the West Valley Connector BRT, Phase 1. The north/south portion parallels 1-15 from Victoria Gardens to Rancho Cucamonga Metrolink Station, through Ontario employment centers, to Ontario International Airport (ONT). Integrate with potential new zero -emission tunnel connection from Metrolink San Bernardino Line to ONT. 3. Pursue the extension of Brightline West down the Cajon Pass to Rancho Cucamonga to provide an additional privately funded solution to peak hour and weekend congestion. 4. Coordinate operational strategies for managed lanes between Riverside and San Bernardino counties. 5. Grow vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the Valley, Riverside County, and greater LA Basin. 6. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution facility development). 7. Work with SCAQMD and CARB to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of truck fleets. 8. Implement San Sevaine Class I Trail System, running north/south along 1-15. 9. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5.5 Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor The Riverside to Temecula sub -corridor is one of five north/south oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.28 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.5.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is located entirely within Riverside County, covering a significant portion of the Western Riverside County subregion. This is an important intercounty corridor traversing through Riverside County and linking San Bernardino County to San Diego County via 1-15 and 1-215 and other connecting routes. This sub -corridor addresses north/south flows of people and freight within and through portions of unincorporated Riverside County and the cities of Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Norco, Riverside, Corona, Moreno Valley, Perris, Menifee, Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore, Wildomar, Murrieta, and Temecula. This sub -corridor includes parts of RSAs 29, 45, 46, 47, and 49. It is generally 45 miles in length north to south and 20 miles wide east to west at the northern edge of the sub - corridor narrowing to about five miles wide east to west at the southern edge of the sub -corridor, as 1-15 and 1-215 merge. Key Transportation Facilities Key north/south oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: I-15, 1-215, SR-91 and SR-79. Arterials: Key north/south arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the sub -corridor include: Ynez Road, Margarita Road/Redhawk Parkway, Meadows Parkway, Whitewood Road/Menifee Road, California Oaks Road, Clinton Keith Road, Grand Avenue, Temescal Canyon Road/Ontario Avenue, Foothill Parkway, Hamner Avenue/Main Street, La Sierra Avenue, Van Buren Boulevard, Sycamore Canyon Boulevard, Central Avenue/Alessandro Boulevard, and Perris Boulevard. Freight: I-15 and 1-215 SR-91 are major goods movement corridors. UP Railroad, BNSF Railway, and SCRRA pass through the sub -corridor. There are many warehousing and distribution centers in the sub -corridor in the cities of Corona, Jurupa Valley, Riverside, Moreno Valley, Perris, and Temecula. Transit: This sub -corridor includes portions of Metrolink route 91/Perris Valley line, which runs through a portion of the area and it transitions from an east/west route to a north/south route. There are several bus routes in this sub - corridor operated by RTA, including communter link service 208 connecting Temecula, Murrieta, Perris, Moreno Valley and Downtown Riverside. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, there are several proposed Regional Routes. These routes would cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. 5-44 Inland Empire Compre Multimodal Corrid V Figure 5.28 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Unincorporated Riverside County QStudy Area Freeways 0 Metrolink Stations i Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 01 1 0 375 7.5 15 Miles 309 Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.29 illustrates the land use by type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.30 shows the land use patterns. As illustrated in these figures, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor is residential at 49 percent of the total land area, comprised of single family residential at 17 percent, and rural residential at 32 percent. Other key land uses include agriculture at 12 percent, and open space and recreational at 38 percent. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has five percent industrial, two percent commercial and services, and over two percent mixed -use designated zones. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor include higher scores in the eastern portion of the area in Moreno Valley, Perris, Canyon Lake, northern portion of Menifee, and north-west edge of Lake Elsinore. There also are higher scores along SR-91 in Riverside and Corona. There are moderate scores in western Lake Elsinore, small portions of Murrieta, and western Temecula. The sub -corridor has lower scores outside of those areas. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the sub -corridor in the county unincorporated communities of Home Gardens, Mead Valley, and Good Hope and city of Perris. Figure 5.29 I Land Use Types Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 13% Agriculture 12% Open Space and Recreation 6% Industrial 5% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Single Family Residential 17% Rural Residential 32% 5-46 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.30 I Land Use Map Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Land Use (SLAG) Single Family Residential MuIti-Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential ▪ Commercial and Services ▪ General Office Use Public Facilities Educational Institutions Industrial Transportation, Communications, and Utilities Mixed Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential and Commercial Open Space and Recreation Agriculture Water ▪ Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 5 47 460000B R M■ iI Employment density is concentrated along freeways in the incorporated areas of the sub -corridor. The highest employment density is along SR-91 in the cities of Corona and Riverside. Other pockets of higher density employment are in Moreno Valley, Perris, Menifee, Murrieta, and Temecula. Population is spread across single- family residential and rural residential land. Single-family residential neighborhoods are along SR-91 in the cities of Corona and Riverside; north of the Santa Ana River in the cities of Eastvale and Jurupa Valley; and in the southern portion of the sub -corridor in the cities of Perris, Menifee, Canyon Lake, Murrieta, and Temecula. Given the predominance of residential land uses, the sub -corridor has a population -to -employment statistical ratio of 2.9, which is relatively low compared to some of the other areas of the overall IE CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for fewer residents to commute longer distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.7 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the sub -corridor area. Due to the large size of the sub -corridor area, there are high volumes of travel, at nearly 3.7 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees. As illustrated in the table below, the majority of these trips, or 60 percent, are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the sub -corridor as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. Twenty-eight percent of trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end inside the IE CMCP area and 12 percent of trips have one end in the sub - corridor and the other end outside the sub -corridor. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of the IE CMCP area are 2.6 and 6.8 times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.7 I Internal and External Trips Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from Trips CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. 2,247,000 1,038,000 447,000 60% 28% 12% 6.1 16.1 41.5 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.31 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 91 percent of commute trips in the sub -corridor are made by automobile. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 14 percent of workers carpooled. The share of carpoolers is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This is reflective of the relatively longer commute trips from the sub -corridor either to other job locations in San Bernardino and San Diego and general lack of north/south commuter rail services in this sub -corridor. Transit accounts for just one percent of commute trips, while five percent of residents work at home. Non -motorized trips account for just two percent of commute trips. 5-48 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.31 I Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Work at Home, 5% I - Non -Motorized, 2% Transit, 1% Carpool, 14% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Other, 1% Drove Alone, 77% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the sub -corridor must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the sub -corridor. Forty-nine percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 30 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 21 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, and VMT: Figure 5.32 and Figure 5.33 show the snapshot of Google traffic conditions during a typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs around the I-15/SR-91 junction, SR-911-215/SR-60 junction, and 1-215/1-15 south of Menifee. The most congested portions of 1-15 are between SR-91 and 1-215 during both AM and PM peaks, northbound during the AM peak at Temescal Valley, southbound during the PM peak south of SR-91, and northbound during the PM peak in Temecula. The most congested portions of 1-215 are northbound north of 1-15 during the PM peak, southbound north of 1-15 during the AM peak, and near the SR-60 junction during AM and PM peaks. 5-49 Figure 5.32 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor €aslvele OICO Jura.:. alley AOernnuA A R I iPF•W .011 IA SIEMRA e Gardens Lake Mathews Estelle Mountain Reserve c Ula T ui Valle .� 1•i 1 Riverside Box Sprl Mountain Reserve Park M,Ss1A'A=000Vr— Y.e rch Air M100dCreOM- • BSe Terra Cal Lake E lsl.n land Mead Valley EID Canyon Lake Wi ddnar Typical trafFlc Fast ----Starr 5 M TO T s Wednesday, 8:00 AM • RAM 12PM 4PIA aFM Zl„ Ok ANO ?IS AIiM r+ . Men't • Murrlela Tem'. Lila Los r3anchltns Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor O 3.75 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020 7.5 15 Miles 5-50 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.33 I Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Easwele HI, I 4 4VON JurupaVa1ley M1RA IdR44 CI N AalING1 ON 4A SIEltRA ome Gardens Riverside Box SW Mountain Reserve Park M I SStGN_ehoV[ arch Air ties rve Bas errlto Mead Valley LakeMathews Estelle Reserve Typical traffic = take Elsinare �— S ILA TOT F S Wednesday, 5:00 PM BAM 12 PM 4PM S RA of ANP SUN C�f1bl Mel -rate Canyon Lake Weldomar De Luz Mlurrieta Ter' ula Los -- nch Il Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. O 0 3.75 7.5 15 Miles 5-51 Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the sub -corridor, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.8 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 58 percent of the daily VMT. Daily VHT is nearly split 50/50 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and arterial network. Average speeds on the freeway and arterials are similar. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively more VMT per service population and ranks seventh out of the ten sub -corridors for most VMT per service population. Table 5.8 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway 19, 883, 000 58% 2% 40% 100% HOV Arterials Total 800,000 13, 613, 000 34,296,000 Source: SCAG Model 2016. 388,000 15,000 396,000 799,000 49% 2% 50% 101?% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor has several high -quality transit stops along Metrolink lines at Corona, Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Moreno Valley, and Perris. It also has some of the highest ridership bus stops in the overall IE CMCP Study Area, which are located at Corona Transit Center, Galleria at Tyler, Moreno Valley Mall, University Market (UCR), UCR Campus, and Perris Transit Center. In this sub -corridor, one percent of commute trips use transit. Safety: Figure 5.34 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, SR-91 and 1-215 experience some of the highest collision rates for the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. The collision rates for 1-15 are higher than the County average and Caltrans District 8 averages, but less than the rates for 1-215 and SR-91, in general. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in the northern portion of the sub -corridor, possibly reflecting higher rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along freeways with the largest concentrations near I-215/SR-91/SR-60 interchange. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-22 percent increase. • Employment-49 percent increase. As seen, population growth is expected to be lower than employment growth, suggesting better jobs/housing balance and possibly shorter trips in the future. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 1.0 million daily trips, representing a 28 percent increase. VMT are projected to increase by 25 percent and VHT are projected to increase by 55 percent. The disproportionate increase in VHT over VMT indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected relatively high growth rates for this sub -corridor. 5-52 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.35 and Figure 5.36 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-5? Figure 5.34 I Collisions Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Jurupa Ontario • •41. }4• • • Valley •o• • East• wale � ° •• • • 4cmoi,o ••••• ;•= • • • •. • Riverside •• Norco 8 1• • • •. • 0 • • • • o•tor, •• • • • • Collisions 2018 • Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision • Truck Collision • All Collisions 0 Sub corridor • • Q •• • ti • • • .. LMgreenno • Val ley.. • light o • •• • • • .s e. • • ' • •• •, • o• 1i• • • •• • • • • • • 6 • ! o••• • a ••�� N tee. Unincorporated 'Rivers ideeCou my rib t• .. • • • • t • 1 • • • •o• • • • ••fir 1 • • • a s f O • • a • 7.5 Cany,on • 'Lake i • i •••Men . eei LakeEl�oe• • �y •• •ou •• • o • • • • ••. Wildomar • •• • • ♦ L.•° • • • •• of 2% • • �I 53 —if Morrieta • •• • • • • • Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 3.75 7.5 15 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.35 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Unincorporated Riverside County Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Q F-1 0 3.75 7.5 i 15 Miles Figure 5.36 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Unincorporated Riverside•County Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 3.75 7.5 15 Miles 5-56 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.5.2 Strategic Approach for Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Riverside to Temecula Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Significant and growing congestion in both directions at the I-215/SR-60 junction in Riverside. • Significant and growing congestion at the 1-15/1-215 merge/diverge in Temecula and on 1-15 northbound and southbound in Corona. • Congestion at critical interchanges on 1-15 and 1-215 (e.g., Newport Road, Railroad Canyon Road, SR-74, etc.). • Lack of parallel facilities to 1-15 and 1-215 throughout the corridor (due largely to topography). • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Large amount of housing development concentrated along the corridor; exacerbating the job -housing imbalance. Strategies 1. Extend the managed -lane system on 1-15 southerly from Cajalco Road in Corona to SR-74 (Central Avenue) in Lake Elsinore (underway), with toll discounts for transit, vanpools, and 3+ carpools. 2. Continue commuter bus operations on 1-15 and 1-215 to Metrolink stations and continue express bus service utilizing managed lanes. 3. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on 1-15 and 1-215, such as Franklin Street and French Valley Parkway. 4. Improve the north/south arterial network along 1-15 and 1-215, where possible, to better accommodate local short -distance trips that are now occurring on the freeway system, such as Temescal Canyon Road. 5. Enhance marketing and incentives for ridership on the Perris Valley Line to Riverside. 6. Grow vanpool and carpool formation from southwest Riverside County to employment centers in Riverside, Corona, and San Bernardino County. 7. Deploy new technologies to proactively manage traffic and improve roadway conditions. 8. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line, construct accessibility improvements to existing 91/Perris Valley Metrolink stations. 9. Work with SCAQMD and CARB to provide incentives for accelerating turnover of truck fleets. 5-57 10. Invest in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency and passenger rail movement. 11. Provide an additional east west regional arterial extending east from the City of Perris that will run parallel to SR-74, serving as an alternative route to better connect the cities within the region. 12. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-58 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.6 Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor The Beaumont to Temecula sub -corridor is one of five north/south oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.37 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.6.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is located entirely within Riverside County, is generally centered along the conventional SR-79, which provides a vital link in absence of north/south freeways in the area. Although the sub -corridor does not have a freeway that covers its entire length, it includes a portion of 1-215 between SR-74 and 1-15 that parallels SR-79 in the southern area and 1-10. This sub -corridor addresses north/south flows of people and freight within and through portions of the cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Hemet, San Jacinto, and Beaumont. This sub -corridor encompasses portions of Riverside County and includes parts of RSAs 49, 47, 48, and 50. The sub -corridor is generally 30-35 miles in length north to south and about 15-20 miles wide east to west in Riverside County. Key Transportation Facilities Key north/south oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways / Highways: SR-79, section of 1-15 and 1-215. Arterials: Key north/south arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the Study Area include: Sanderson Avenue, Whitewood Road and Warren Road. Freight: I-215 is s major goods movement corridor. This sub -corridor has some warehouses in the southern portion near Temecula. Transit: There are few bus routes in the sub -corridor including RTA commuter link service 217 connecting San Jacinto, Hemet and Temecula. There is no Metrolink service in this sub -corridor. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, there are several proposed Regional Routes. These routes would cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.38 illustrates the land use by type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.39 shows the land use pattern. As illustrated in these figures, due to the generally rural nature of this sub -corridor, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor includes rural residential at 23 percent and agriculture at 22 percent. However, there is a sizeable percentage of specific plan at 17 percent, as well as single family residential at 13 percent. Despite the mostly rural nature, open space and recreational uses are only 6 percent. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has seven percent industrial, 2 percent commercial and services, and some mixed -use designated zones. 5-59 Figure 5.37 l Sub -Corridor Study Area Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Me Unincorpo ated Riverside County Temecula nifee 0 Study Area Freeway HOV Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5-50 V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are generally low, with a moderate score in the San Jacinto area. Low score areas include Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, and Hemet. Low scores indicate less exposure indicators, less environmental effects indicators, less sensitive population indicators, less socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. There are no SCAG "Communities of Concern" in this sub -corridor. Figure 5.38 I Land Use Types Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 17% Agriculture 22% Open Space and Recreation 6% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Industrial 7% Single Family Residential 13% Mixed Residential 2% Rural Residential 23% Commercial and Services 2% Employment density is relatively low in much of the sub -corridor. Employment density is highest in the southern portion, near Temecula and Murrieta, and in the central portion, near Hemet and San Jacinto. Population density follows a similar pattern to employment density, with relatively lower densities throughout the sub -corridor and higher densities along the southern and central portion of the sub -corridor. The population -to -employment statistical ratio of the sub -corridor is 3.3, which is relatively low compared to some of the other areas of the overall IE CMCP Study Area, reflecting the rural nature and indicating a need for residents to commute longer distances to work. 5_51 Figure 5.39 I Land Use Map Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential - Commercial and Services General Office Use Public Facilities Educational Institutions ▪ Industrial Transportation, Communications, and Utilities Mixed Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential and Commercial ▪ Open Space and Recreation ▪ Agriculture Water - Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 5-62 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan V Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.9 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. There are over 1.2 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the Study Area. As illustrated, in the table below, slightly over half of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor Study Area. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the Study Area as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. Just over one-third of trips are between the sub -corridor and the rest of the IE CMCP area. The remaining low 10 percent of the trips are between the sub -corridor area and outside the IE CMCP area, indicating the relative lower density and remoteness of this area. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside the IE CMCP area are, intuitively, more than three times and eight times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.9 I Internal and External Trips Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from Trips CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips 683,000 446,000 55% 36% Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. 4.6 16.5 120,000 10% 41.8 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.40 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 90 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are made by automobile. Transit accounts for just one percent of commute trips, while a relatively high six percent of residents work at home, which is likely an indication of the more rural and remote nature of the area. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 13 percent carpool. The share of commuters who carpool is higher in the sub - corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). Non -motorized trips account for just two percent of commute trips. 327 7 Figure 5.40 I Journey to Work Mode Share Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Walk, 2%,Work At Home, 6% Transit, 1 Carpool, 13% Drive Alone, 77% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 94 percent of the workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the Study Area. Nearly half of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 28 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 24 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, and VMT: The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs on 1-215 in the southern portion of the sub -corridor, between Menifee and 1-15. Much of this segment of 1-215 is congested with level of service F conditions and high delay during AM peak hour in the southbound direction and during PM peak hour in the northbound direction. The segments of SR-79 between 1-215 and Scott Road in the south of the sub -corridor and between SR-74 and Ramona Expressway experience poor operating conditions. Figure 5.41 and Figure 5.42 show a snapshot of Google traffic conditions during a typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. 5_54 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.41 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Menifee Murrieta O ch Vltfeg4 Temecula Beaumont G iman Hai ngs San Jacinto San Alto H Ei,Iemet Typical traffic - Ramona Bowl Faut im m m m sr;. • {, S M TOT F S I ednaglay. P-!i 1 AM BAM 12PM 31zhl E P.1 Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 2.75 5.5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 11 Miles F-55 Figure 5.42 I Existing PM Peak hour Freeway Congestion Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 I 1 1 l 0 2.75 ,ac0Dc .uni 4 @I 5.5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 11 Miles 330 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan DaiIyVMT), including local trips and through traffic in the Study Area are mostly carried on major arterial roadways and a relatively smaller part on the freeways. This is a reflection of the previously mentioned lack of major freeway facilities in the sub -corridor. Table 5.10 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 59 percent of the daily VMT. However, daily VHT is nearly split 30/70 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials and further underscoring the lack of freeways in the sub -corridor. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively less VMT per service population and it ranks seven out of the ten sub -corridors. Table 5.10 I VMT by Facility Type Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles Traveled Vehicle Hours Traveled Freeway 3,509,000 41% 57,263 30% HOV - - - - Arterials 5,095,231 59% 131,740 70% Total 8,604,231 100% 189,003 100% Source: SCAG Model 2016. Transit Usage: Due to its mostly rural nature, this sub -corridor has very little transit services. There is limited RTA bus service but no rail service. Safety: Figure 5.43 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. Collisions involving bicyclists and pedestrians are spread throughout the Study Area, however, some of the highest density of collisions in the Study Area occur in certain neighborhoods of Hemet and San Jacinto. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-33 percent increase. • Employment-42 percent increase. The relatively comparable rate of employment to population growth suggests that the jobs/housing ratio of this sub - corridor is expected to remain similar to the current conditions, reflecting the mostly rural nature of the sub -corridor. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 421,000 daily trips, representing a 34 percent increase, commensurate with the expected increase in population. VMT is projected to increase by 34 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 54 percent. The higher increase in VHT over VMT indicates increasing delay and congestion and likely and increase in congestion on arterials and conventional State routes (SR-79 and SR-74) due to the lack of major freeways through this sub -corridor. 5_57 The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.44 and Figure 5.45 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.43 I Collisions Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Collisions 2018 Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision Truck Collision • All Collisions Sub corridor Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5-69 Figure 5.44 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Auf Me ifee San 0 Beaumont •Jacinto • ■■ it 1■ �■■ i•iiw Hemet Hemet Unincorporated Riverside County Mufrieta Volume by Capacity - a 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 - 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor O 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.45 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor Menifee San Beaumont Jaci o Unincorpor+ated_ Riverside cbunty� 0 SMu ietfr a 15 ar \Temela Hemet -- Volume by Capacity - 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 - 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor Beaumont to Temecula Sub -Corridor 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 335 5.6.2 Strategic Approach for Beaumont to Temecula Sub -corridor: Strategic Approach for Beaumont to Temecula Sub -corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Overall lack of north/south mobility, particularly in the Hemet/San Jacinto Area. Local traffic gets mixed with regional traffic. • Major bottlenecks at the I-10/SR-79 interchange and the northbound I-15/SR-79 interchange. • Lack of north/south transit service. • Major tourism destinations result in travel at all times and on all days. Strategies 1. Fund and implement the SR-79 realignment project. 2. Make operational improvements on existing north/south arterials from San Jacinto to Temecula. 3. Grow vanpool and carpool formation to reduce vehicle flows connecting Beaumont, San Jacinto, Hemet, and Temecula. 4. Examine ways to improve north/south transit connectivity. 5. Deploy new technologies to proactively manage traffic and improve roadway conditions. 6. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on the I-10/Highland Springs, I-215/Keller Road, and Garbani Road interchanges. 7. Investment in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency. 8. Work with Tribal governments to facilitate employee commute options and explore funding opportunities for regional improvements. 9. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line, and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements at existing Metrolink stations. Additionally, support rapid bus services between Hemet to San Jacinto and Perris to Moreno Valley/Riverside. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5_72 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.7 Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor The Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line sub -corridor is one of five east/west oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.46 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.7.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is located entirely within the High Desert subregion of San Bernardino County, but provides intercounty connection to Los Angeles County. There are no east -west freeways in the sub -corridor; however, the High Desert Corridor (located at the northern edge of the sub -corridor) through its Draft EIR, is considering alternatives for the construction of a high capacity multimodal facility between SR-14 in Los Angeles County and 1-15 in San Bernardino County. This sub -corridor addresses east/west flows of people and freight within and through portions of unincorporated San Bernardino County and the cities of Adelanto, Apple Valley, Victorville, and Hesperia. This sub -corridor encompasses portions of San Bernardino County and includes parts of RSAs 32 and 30. The sub -corridor is generally 30 miles wide east to west and 20 miles long north to south. Key Transportation Facilities Key east/west oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: There are no freeways. Arterials: Key east -west arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the sub -corridor include: Bear Valley Road, Palmdale Road, Main Street, Eucalyptus Street, Ranchero Road, and Mesquite Street. Freight: 1-15 is a major goods movement corridor. UP Railroad and BNSF Railway pass through the sub -corridor. Transit: There are some bus routes in this sub -corridor operated by Victor Valley Transit Authority. There is no Metrolink service in this sub -corridor. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. Figure 5.46 l Sub -Corridor Study Area Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San Bernardino County Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 338 00 0 1 1 2.5 5 l 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.47 illustrates the land use by type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.48 shows the land use pattern. As illustrated in these figures, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor is residential at 59 percent of the total, comprised of single family residential at 19 percent and rural residential at 40 percent. Other significant land uses include open space and recreational at 19 percent. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has three percent industrial, five percent commercial and services, and over three percent agricultural. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor include high scores in portions of Adelanto, Victorville, and Hesperia. The southern portion of Hesperia, Apple Valley, and most unincorporated areas have lower scores. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the city of Adelanto. Figure 5.47 I Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Agriculture Specific Plan 3% 1 \4% Open Space and Recreation 19% Industrial) 3% Commercial and Services 5% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Single Family Residential 19% Rural Residential 40% 5-75 Figure 5.48 I Land Use Map Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor i illy —.I 1 1 T I i 1 � �T Lpi Tr r 'I ,PE-_ Ilninrnrnc�ra4Pd �I� I, I1 L:JJ cto:t ille yZ,; Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential ▪ Industrial Transportation, Communications & Utilities Mobile Homes & Trailer Parks N. Mixed Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential Mixed Residential and Commercial ▪ Rural Residential ▪ Commercial and Services General Office Use ▪ Public Facilities Educational Institutions — Open Space and Recreation Agriculture Water Specific Plan Undevelapable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 340 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan V Employment density is relatively low in much of the sub -corridor especially in the Cajon Pass and in unincorporated parts of the county. Employment density is highest in cities south of the Cajon Pass and on parcels directly adjacent to 1-15, U.S.-395, SR-18, Main Street, and Bear Valley Road. There is little employment density outside of these areas. Population is spread across single-family residential and rural residential lands that are primarily in the cities of San Bernardino, Victorville, Hesperia, Adelanto, and Apple Valley, and unincorporated San Bernardino County. Given the predominance of residential land uses„ the population -to -employment statistical ratio of the sub -corridor is 4.8, which is high compared compared to some of the other areas of the overall Inland Empire CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute very long distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.11 displays the magnitude and average size of trips within and external to the sub -corridor area. There are nearly 800,000 daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the sub -corridor. As illustrated, in the table below, 75 percent of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub - corridor. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the sub -corridor, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. The relatively high number of internal trip -making is a reflection of the relative remoteness and separation of the sub -corridor area from more urbanized parts of the Inland Empire. Around 12 percent of the trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end either inside or outside the IE CMCP area and 14 percent are to or from outside the IE CMCP area. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are 6.2 and 8.2 times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.11 I Internal and External Trips Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from Trips CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) 594,000 93,000 108,000 75% 12% 14% Source: SCAG Model 2016. 5.4 33.5 44.4 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.49 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 92 percent of commute trips in the sub -corridor are made by automobile. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 12 percent of workers carpooled. The share of carpoolers is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent), but less than other areas in the IE CMCP area, perhaps reflective of a lack of HOV facilities. Transit accounts for just one percent of commute trips, while six percent of residents work at home. Non -motorized trips account for just one percent of commute trips. 5-77 Figure 5.49 I Journey to Work Mode Share Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Other, 1% Carpool, 12% Drove Alone, 80% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 94 percent of the workers in the sub -corridor must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the sub -corridor. Nearly 51 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 27 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 22 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, VMT: The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs on 1-15 in the Cajon Pass, U.S.-395 between 1-15 and SR-18, and SR-14 east of 1-15. 1-15 in the Cajon Pass is congested during the PM peak is both directions. U.S.-395 is congested during the PM peak. SR-18 at the I-15/SR- 18 interchange is congested during both the AM and PM peaks. Figure 5.50 and Figure 5.51 show a snapshot of Google traffic conditions during a typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. Figure 5.50 l Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Unincorporated San.Bernardino County Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020 343 0 Typical traffic- Fa:r���� 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2.75 5.5 I 11 Miles Figure 5.51 I Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor m pinon H Unincorporated San Bernardino County pnelan a Adelanto At Baler Mesa Victorville Mount sin View Act tl nv ApP Valh Valley Lake Apple Valley t 81Wicna Typical traffic • Farta�a���sfow S M TO T F S Wedneeoay, 5.00 PM I I 8AM 12 PM 4 PTV PM Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020 0 0 2.75 5.5 1 l 11 Miles V Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the sub -corridor, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.12 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 51 percent of the daily VMT. Daily VHT is nearly split 45/55 between freeways and the arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively less VMT per service population compared to other sub -corridors and ranks sixth out of the ten sub -corridors for highest VMT per service population. Table 5.12 I VMT by Facility Type Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Freeway Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel 4,363,000 49% 90,000 45% HOV Arterials Total Source: SCAG Model 2016 4,468,000 51% 109,000 8,831,000 100% 199,000 55% 100% Transit Usage: In this sub -corridor, one percent of commute trips use transit. This sub -corridor does not have high quality transit corridor or stops. Safety: Figure 5.52 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, the collision rates for 1-15 are higher than the County average and Caltrans District 8 averages. Bicycle and pedestrian collisions are sparsely spread out in the sub -corridor, possibly reflecting low rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along 1-15. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-50 percent increase. • Employment-33 percent increase. The higher rate of population to employment growth suggests that the jobs/housing ratio of this sub -corridor is expected to worsen, resulting in longer commute trips in the future. Commensurate with these projected relatively high rates of growth for the area's demographics, total trip -making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 309,000 daily trips, representing a 39 percent increase. VMT is expected to increase by 23 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 72 percent. The disproportionate increase in VHT over VMT indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected relatively high growth rates. The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.53 and Figure 5.54 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-81 5.7.2 Strategic Approach for Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -corridor: Strategic Approach for Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Lack of east/west connectivity between the High Desert and Antelope Valley. • Lack of east/west connectivity within the High Desert, constrained by limited crossings of the Mojave River and the BNSF Railway rights -of -way. • Congestion at arterial junctions with 1-15 interchanges. Strategies 1. Enhance east/west access by completing improvements in the Greentree Corridor, linking Apple Valley, Victorville, and 1-15. 2. Work with Brightline West and the State to facilitate future High Speed Rail connection to the Antelope Valley Metrolink line. 3. Conduct necessary studies to improve the operations and safety of SR-18 from U.S.-395 to SR-138 and potentially program its widening. 4. Look for opportunities to fund the High Desert Corridor but recognize SR-18 widening as a partial solution to improve east/west mobility between the Antelope Valley and High Desert. 5. Fund and implement strategic 1-15 interchange improvements as identified in the Measure 1 Strategic Plan. 6. Fund and implement other improvements identified in the Victor Valley portion of the SBCTA 10-Year Delivery Plan. 7. Continue growth of vanpool and carpool formation from the High Desert to employment centers in the San Bernardino Valley and Antelope Valley. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-?82 Figure 5.52 l Collisions Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor • • 0 • • • •• u Adelanto • • • • • .. • III • • •• • s • • • • • •• •• • • •1• • ,.• • • • ▪ Unincorporated San Bernardino County • • tt • • 15 • • • Victorvi ll e •4■,,.R im1I / Pa Ili Hesperia • • • • • • •p Collisions 2018 • Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision • Truck Collision • All Collisions Sub corridor Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 347 O 0 2.5 5 I 10 Miles Figure 5.53 l Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 1 Adelento ■ ■ —: Unincorporated San Bernardino County 441111411110. Mk m u 41 .mod Apple Valley ■ ictorville ire � iIN Nt a �r 1au ■i!i�■Ulm ■ ■!,p.aaavm— =PA AIMMIEFOrif ■■ _■■■_ � Hesperia ar rr awn akiry Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 > 1 QSub corridor Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor O 0 2.5 5 10 Miles i 348 Figure 5.54 l Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Apple Valley to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor 1 Adelento �•� �1 A4vaiiey MEM VicesMEI Orville �' 1• t� avaime Unincorporated San Bernardino County zummel Imroaresiii I`n■ I. �11�aA" ww. opov 1iiwa Hesperia Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9-1 > 1 © Sub corridor Apple Valley to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 349 0 0 2.5 I I I 5 10 Miles 5.8 Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor The Banning to Rialto sub -corridor is one of five east/west oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.55 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.8.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is located in both San Bernardino and Riverside counties and generally connects the eastern and central parts of the urbanized areas of the Inland Empire, acting essentially as the eastern extension of the Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line sub -corridor (#6), with a small overlap. It is worth noting that this sub -corridor has three major generally parallel freeway corridors (SR-60, 1-10 and SR-210) that frequently serve as effective alternate routes for east/west travel within the Inland Empire and to and from Los Angeles County. This sub -corridor addresses east/west flows of people and freight within and through portions of the cities of Riverside, Fontana, Rialto, San Bernardino, Loma Linda, Colton, Moreno Valley, Beaumont, Jurupa Valley, Rancho Cucamonga, Calimesa, Yucaipa, Banning and Beaumont. The sub -corridor includes parts of RSAs 29, 45, 46, 47 and 50. The sub -corridor is generally 30-40 miles in length east to west and 20 miles wide north to south in San Bernardino County, narrowing to about 5 miles wide in Riverside County. Key Transportation Facilities Key east/west-oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: SR-60, 1-10, and SR-210 Arterials: Key east/west arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the Study Area include: Highland Avenue, Foothill Boulevard, Baseline Street, Rialto Avenue, San Bernardino Avenue, Mill Street, Barton Road, Colton Avenue, Redlands Boulevard, Wildwood Canyon Road, Wilson Street, Ramsey Street, 1st Street, Oak Valley Parkway, and San Timoteo Canyon Road. Freight: 1-10, SR-60, and SR-210 are major goods movement corridors. UP Railroad, BNSF Railway, and SCRRA pass through the sub -corridor. Transit: This sub -corridor includes portions of several Metrolink commuter rail routes. The 91/Perris Valley route runs through a portion of the area and it transitions from an east/west route to a north/south route. The sbX Green Line, a bus rapid transit route, runs within the area but primarily serves north/south movements. A Sunline transit line has commuter lines connecting Coachela Valley to Beaumont to Riverside/ San Bernardino. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, within the Riverside County portion of the sub -corridor there are several proposed east/west Regional Routes. These routes would cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. Figure 5.55 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor F-1 Study Area Freeways 0 Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor I 0 i 1 5 1 I 10 Miles Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.56 illustrates the land use by type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.57 shows the land use pattern. As illustrated in these figures, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor is residential at a total of 36 percent which includes single family residential at 24 percent, multifamily residential at three percent, and rural residential at nine percent of the total. Agriculture is still a major land use at 24 percent, and open space and recreational land uses are at eight percent. The area also has nine percent of the land use designated as Specific Plans. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has six percent industrial, four percent commercial and services, and some mixed -use designated zones. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor include higher scores in the western portion of the area in Colton and San Bernardino, with moderate scores in the Moreno Valley/Grand Terrace, Redlands, and Yucaipa areas and lower scores in the Calimesa area and throughout the western portion of the sub -corridor. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the cities of San Bernardino and Colton in the western portion of the Study Area. Figure 5.56 I Land Use Types Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 9% Agriculture 24% Open Space and Recreation 8% Mixed Residential and Commerical 3% Mixed Commercial and J Industrail 3% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Industrial 6% Single Family Residential 24% Multi Family Residential 3% Mixed Residential 2% Rural Residential 9% Commercial and Services LFacilities 4% 5% 5_gg Figure 5.57 I Land Use Map Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential ▪ Commercial and Services ▪ General Office Use r Public Facilities Educational Institutions ▪ Industrial ▪ Transportation, Communications, and Utilities Mined Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential and Commercial - Open Space and Recreation Agriculture Water Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 353 Employment density is relatively low in much of the Study Area, especially in Moreno Valley and the areas to the east. Generally in the central portion of the sub -corridor, including San Bernardino, Loma Linda, and Redlands, the employment density is the highest. Population density follows a similar pattern to employment density, with relatively lower densities in the southern and eastern portions of the sub -corridor and higher densities along central, more urbanized portions of the sub -corridor. The population -to -employment statistical ratio of the sub -corridor is 3.1, which is relatively high compared to some of the other areas of the overall Inland Empire CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute longer distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.13 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. There are over 4.3 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the Study Area. As illustrated in the table below, slightly over half of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor Study Area. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the Study Area, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. The remaining trips are evenly split between having one end in the Study Area and the other end either inside or outside the IE CMCP area. This relatively good balance is an indication of the central location of this sub -corridor and its importance in serving both internal and external trips, as well as commute trips, and all trip purposes in the Inland Empire. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are, intuitively, more than twice and four times the length of the internal - internal trips, respectively; however, due to the size and location of the sub -corridor, it shows a better balance than most other sub -corridors. Table 5.13 I Internal and External Trips Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips Internal Trips CMCP Study Area to/from Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016 2,611,000 55% 9.0 1,042,000 22% 21.2 1,083,000 23% 37.6 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.58 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 90 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are made by automobile. Transit accounts for just two percent of commute trips, while four percent of residents work at home. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 14 percent carpooled. The share of commuters who carpool is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This could be an indicator of the existence of HOV lanes on major portions of all east/west freeways. Non -motorized trips account for just two percent of commute trips. 5-90 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.58 I Journey to Work Mode Share Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Transit 1 % Walk, 2%,W ork At Home, 6% Carpool, 13% Drive Alone, 77% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 94 percent of the workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the Study Area. Nearly 60 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 28 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 12 percent commute over one hour. The larger percentage of short trips is an indication of a relatively better balance between jobs and housing in this sub -region. Congestion, Delay, VMT: The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs on SR-60 in the western portion of the sub -corridor, from east of 1-215 to the SR-60/I-215 junction. Much of this segment of SR-60 is highly congested with level of service F conditions and high delay during both AM and PM peak hours. SR-60 east of the 1-215 junction operates well except for the segment approaching the 1-10 junction near Banning, which experiences congestion. Along 1-10 there are smaller segments of congestion, but much of 1-10 within this sub -corridor operates at acceptable levels of service. Most of the east/west arterial system in this sub -corridor operates acceptably with limited segments or intersections experiencing poor operating conditions. Figure 5.59 and Figure 5.60 show the snapshot of Google traffic conditions during typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. 5-91 Figure 5.59 1 Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Typical traffic - • S M TOT F s Wednesday, 8:00 AM Brae 12 PM 4PM a PP.1 Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 356 0 0 2.5 5 1 T 1 10 Miles Figure 5.60 1 Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 357 0 I l I 1 1 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the Study Area, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.14 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 37 percent of the daily VMT. However, daily VHT is nearly split 50/50 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively less VMT per service population and it ranks ten out of the ten sub -corridors. Table 5.14 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway 26,511,000 58% 499,000 48% HOV Arterials Total 2,547,000 6% 16,823,000 Source: SCAG Model 2016. 45,881,000 37% 101% 46,000 4% 487,000 1,032,000 47% 99% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor has some high -quality transit services, including the Metrolink Commuter Rail services, as well as other services in cities of San Bernardino, Fontana, Rialto, Colton, and Loma Linda. High - quality transit services include bus rapid transit (BRT) sbX between CSUSB and Loma Linda University & Medical Center; and Omnitrans bus services in downtown San Bernardino and along Foothill Boulevard. This sub -corridor also has some high -quality transit stops at Metrolink stations in Fontana, Rialto, San Bernardino, San Bernardino downtown, Riverside -Hunter Park/UCR, and Moreno Valley. It also has some of the highest ridership bus stops in the overall IE CMCP Atudy Area, which are located at San Bernardino Transit center, Moreno Valley Mall, and University Market (UCR). Safety: Figure 5.61 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, 1-10 experiences some of the highest collision rates for the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. Conversely, SR-210 has the lowest collision rate of all the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. The collision rates for SR-60 are higher than the Riverside County average and Caltrans District 8 averages, but fall between the rates for SR-210 and 1-10. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in the western portion of the sub -corridor in San Bernardino and Rialto, as well as the area around the SR-60/I-215 junction, possibly reflecting higher rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along freeways with the largest concentrations along portions of 1-10 and SR-60. 5-94 Figure 5.61 I Collisions Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor • • • C• • 10 $ • Rialto • • • • 4040 •• • •% • • • • • San Bernardino • • • a • . ?r • •• •• - s,. a r• (Colton • • • • •••®•• Loma Linda •� ERiverside • • • ♦ • • 0• • • Redlands Highland •• a • •• • • 10 w Yucaipa w • • •• • •• • •• Cali esa •• • • 1 • • • • • M� renosValley, • • _oc •• • • • • 0w) • •• •• o • • • • evem •• • • ,• Collsions 2018 Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision • Truck Collision • Other Vehicle Collision QSub corridor • • Banning 4 • • • �. • • • Collisions 2018 Source: SWITRS, TIMS 2018 359 0 I l l i l 0 2.5 5 � I 10 Miles Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-22 percent increase. • Employment-39 percent increase. The higher rate of employment to population growth suggests that the jobs/housing ratio of this sub -corridor is expected to improve, resulting in possibly shorter commute trips in the future. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by 730,000 daily trips, representing a 23 percent increase. VMT is projected to increase by 20 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 43 percent. The disproportionate increase in hours of travel over miles of travel indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the relatively high growth rates and the strategic location of this corridor which serves internal traffic and a significant amount of through traffic. The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.62 and Figure 5.63 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. As shown, the SCAG traffic projections indicate that during the AM peak hour significant portions of 1-10 and SR-60 in the eastern portion of the sub -corridor area will become highly congested. Some additional points of congestion will occur along SR-210 as well during the AM peak. During the PM peak, similar patterns are projected to occur with increased congestion on 1-10 and SR-60. In addition, segments that already are congested will experience greater delay and longer peak periods. 5-96 Figure 5.62 l Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor are .�■\�II�II�i 7■��i� Rialto ,•�Ir I ��N� AMINElU:i 1,0 i 1w Ems — lumm ammo Colton _, R dlan Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 361 0 Volume by Capacity < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9-1 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Figure 5.63 1 Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 011PII•ilk —``La I in :Uhm:!ilil3UUi! Ei ji '11C!It UM \�� ems■ � _ � L mnir—.-Li . 41111% Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor 362 0 I 1 1 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.8.2 Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Several significant bottlenecks on 1-10: eastbound and westbound merge/diverge with 1-215, eastbound merge with SR-210, eastbound upgrade in Yucaipa, and I-10/SR-60 junction. • Significant and growing congestion in both directions at the I-215/SR-60 junction in Riverside and I-10/SR-60 junction in Beaumont due to population and housing increases. • Multiple congested interchanges: I-10/SR-79 interchange in Beaumont and interchanges on 1-10 at Mountain View Avenue, California Street, Alabama Street, and University Avenue. • Ongoing congestion on SR-210 westbound north of 1-10 and eastbound at Highland Avenue. • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Metrolink San Bernardino line and Riverside line are well -used, but capacity limitations limit substantial additional growth. • Cities with Metrolink stations would like to take advantage of those locations for transit -oriented development (TOD), but parcel assembly/development costs are high and train frequencies are not always conducive to the mid -day and bi-directional mobility needed to support TOD type uses. Strategies 1. Construct Redlands Passenger Rail Project from University of Redlands to downtown San Bernardino, including use of zero -emission multiple unit (ZEMU) trainsets. 2. Implement managed lane systems on SR-60 from downtown Riverside to Moreno Valley and on 1-10 from Redlands westerly. 3. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on SR-60/Potrero Blvd, SR- 60/Gilman Springs Road, and 1-10 interchanges at SR-79, County Line Road, University Avenue, Alabama Street, and California Street. 4. Implement 1-10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane in Yuciapa, addressing one of the most serious freight bottlenecks in the Inland Empire. 5. Invest in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency and passenger rail movement. 6. Accelerate truck fleet turnover for air quality improvement. 5-99 7. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution development). 8. Extend Sun Lakes Boulevard from Highland Home Road to Westward Avenue and Sunset avenue. 9. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the IE/OC, San Bernardino, and Riverside lines as described in the SCRRA SCORE Program; construct accessibility improvements and station improvements to existing Metrolink stations. 10. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-1 00 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.9 Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor The Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line sub -corridor is one of five east/west oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.64 illustrates the boundaries of the sub - corridor Study Area. 5.9.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This sub -corridor is located mostly in San Bernardino County with a small portion in Riverside County and generally connects the western and central parts of the urbanized areas of the Inland Empire, acting essentially as the western extension of the Banning to Rialto sub -corridor (#5), with a small overlap. It is worth noting that this sub -corridor has three major parallel freeway corridors (SR-60, 1-10, and SR-210) that frequently serve as effective alternate routes for east/west travel within the Inland Empire and to and from Los Angeles County. This sub -corridor addresses east/west flows of people and freight within and through portions of the cities of Riverside, Fontana, Rialto, San Bernardino, Colton, Jurupa Valley, Rancho Cucamonga, Ontario, Chino, Montclair, and Upland. The sub -corridor encompasses portions of both Riverside and San Bernardino counties and includes parts of RSAs 28, 45, 29 and 46. The sub -corridor is generally 25-30 miles in length east to west and 12 miles wide north to south in both Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Key Transportation Facilities Key east/west oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: SR-60, 1-10, and SR-210. Arterials: Key east/west arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the Study Area include: Foothill Boulevard, Holt Avenue, Mission Boulevard, Riverside Drive, and Baseline Road. Freight: 1-10 and SR-60, are major goods movement corridors. UP Railroad, BNSF Railway, and SCRRA pass through the sub -corridor. There are several warehouses in this sub -corridor, with the majority of them located between SR-60 and 1-10. Transit: This sub -corridor includes portions of several Metrolink commuter rail routes. The 91/Perris Valley route runs through a portion of the area and it transitions from an east/west route to a north/south route. The Inland Empire/Orange County and San Bernardino lines both run within the sub -corridor and terminate in Downtown San Bernardino. The Riverside line is an east/west route with three stops in the sub -corridor. The sbX Green Line, a bus rapid transit route, runs within the area but primarily serves north/south movements. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, within the Riverside County portion of the sub -corridor there are several proposed east/west Regional Routes. These routes would cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. 5-101 Figure 5.64 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Study Area Freeways 8 Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 366 4:11 1 1 1 1 0 2.5 5 1 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.65 illustrates the land use by type in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.66 shows the land use pattern. As illustrated in these figures, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor is residential at a total of over 37 percent, including single family residential at the highest 26 percent of the area. Specific plans at 20 percent still have a major share of the land uses, and agriculture at eight percent is a noticeable part of the land use development patterns in this sub -corridor. In terms of employment generating land uses, the area has 11 percent industrial, four percent commercial and services, and some mixed -use designated zones. The subarea has a relatively low percentage of open space at only five percent of the total. This is generally due to this sub -corridor being in the most urbanized area of the Inland Empire. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are generally high, with a low score in the Rancho Cucamonga - area. Moderate -to -high score areas include neighborhoods of Ontario, Fontana, Colton, and San Bernardino. Low scores indicate less exposure indicators, less environmental effects indicators, less sensitive population indicators, less socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the cities of San Bernardino and Colton in the eastern portion of the Study Area. Figure 5.65 I Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Specific Plan 20% Agriculture 8% Open Space and Recreation 5% Mixed Residential and Commerical 4% Industrial 11% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Single Family Residential 26% NW Mixed Residential 4% 1 Facilities 4% Rural Residential 4% Commercial and Services 4% 5-1 03 Figure 5.66 I Land Use Map Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential Commercial and Services General Office Use - Public Facilities Educational Institutions ▪ Industrial ▪ Transportation, Communications, and Utilities NEMixed Commercial and Industrial - Mixed Residential and Commercial Open Space and Recreation Agriculture Water ▪ Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 368 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Employment density is relatively high in this sub -corridor compared to the IE CMCP Study Area due to its higher urbanization. In general, north of SR-60 has high employment density especially in Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, San Bernardino, and Riverside. Population density follows a similar pattern to employment density, with relatively lower densities south of SR-60 in the sub -corridor and higher densities along the northern portion of the sub -corridor. The population/employment ratio is mixed with a high ratio south of SR-60 in Jurupa Valley area and low ratio in the rest of the sub -corridor. Overall, this sub -corridor has low population -to -employment statistical ratio of 2.5 compared to some of the other areas of the overall Inland Empire CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute shorter distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.15 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. Daily auto trips are relatively high with over 5.1 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the Study Area. As illustrated in the table below, over half of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor Study Area. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the Study Area, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. The remaining trips are evenly split between having one end in the Study Area and the other end either inside or outside the IE CMCP area. This relatively good balance is an indication of the central location of this sub -corridor, its higher level of urbanization, and its importance in serving both internal and external trips, as well as commute trips, and all trip purposes in the Inland Empire. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are, intuitively, more than twice and four times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively; however, due to the size and location of the sub - corridor, it shows a better balance than most other sub -corridors. Table 5.15 I Internal and External Trips Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from Trips CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips 2,896,000 56% 1,168,000 23% Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. 5.9 15.9 1,104,000 21% 27.0 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.67 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 90 percent of commute trips in the Study Area are made by automobile. Transit accounts for just two percent of commute trips, while five percent of residents work at home. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 12 percent carpooled. The share of commuters who carpool is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This could be an indicator of the existence of HOV lanes on all east/west freeways in this sub -corridor. Non -motorized trips account for just two percent of commute trips. 5-105 Figure 5.67 I Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Work At Home, 5% Walk, 2%� Transit, 2% \ Carpool, 12% Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates. Drive Alone, 78% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the Study Area must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the Study Area. About 55 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work. 29 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, 15 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, VMT: The most significant recurring congestion and delay on the freeway system occurs on SR-60, 1-10, and SR-210 in the eastern portion of the sub -corridor, east of 1-15. Figure 5.68 and Figure 5.69 show the snapshot of Google traffic conditions during typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. This subarea has the majority of top bottlenecks of the entire IE CMCP Study Area. The majority of the top bottlenecks in the sub -corridor occur along the SR-60, 1-10, and SR-210 in the western portion of the sub -corridor, east of 1-15 and on SR-60/I-215 in the eastern portion of the sub -corridor. 5-106 Figure 5.68 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Ma�cMll Ca�y°� A Gale°arse `I Clew.nenl=. Wfldarmcc Pa.k Claremont Claremont MOM Montclair Pomona vel Banda Fells heed Charley c logy 9 Rancho 5°n cMo��o Hei9Ma Upland LSa.O Typical traffic • m!r S M T O T F s ] Wednesday, 8: 0 AM 6AM 12PM 4G''. ucamonga is ^ o Rialto San Bern Mv9Blol,�,. *�I e Fontana no Mills Jirupa.Valley qm° Colton u..Wsll,w as rdino Riverside / Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. OI 1 2 1 1 1 0 2.25 4,5 9 Miles Figure 5.69 l Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Pomona cie=amum Montclair Marva Upland PI wa a FaII,rra,Ih.ad Chaff, Cdieve RancholCucamonga ,1one Garde..,'n1 IJ'itiY$FiS""' rwnap•aia Typical traffic - ra_r t S M TOT F S - 1 Wednesday, B:E}Q AM 9AM 12PM 4FM 8 PM Fontana Fontana Ji3ruparValley Rialto San Bern.rdin prostrnora Park giver Colton Riverside1eer„Y, Riverside / Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 372 l l 0 2.25 4.5 9 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the Study Area are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.16 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 35 percent of the daily VMT. However, daily VHT is nearly split 55/45 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and the arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively less VMT per service population and it ranks nine out of the ten sub -corridors. Table 5.16 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway HOV Arterials Total 28,605,615 60% 580,301 52% 2,560,121 5% 46,553 4% Source: SCAG Model 2016. 16,988,325 35% 495,679 48,154, 061 100% 1,122,533 44% 100% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor has some high -quality transit services including Metrolink Commuter Rail services as well as other services in the cities of San Bernardino, Fontana, Rialto, Colton, and Loma Linda. High -quality transit services include bus rapid transit (BRT) sbX between CSUSB and Loma Linda University & Medical Center; and Omnitrans bus services in downtown San Bernardino and along Foothill Boulevard. This sub -corridor also has some high -quality transit stops at Metrolink stations in Fontana, Rialto, San Bernardino, San Bernardino downtown, Riverside -Hunter Park/UCR, and Moreno Valley. It also has some of the highest ridership bus stops in the overall IE CMCP Study Area, which are located at San Bernardino Transit center, UCR campus, and University Market (UCR). Safety: Figure 5.70 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. Collisions involving bicyclists and pedestrians are spread throughout the Study Area, however, some of the highest density of collisions in the Study Area occur in certain neighborhoods of Hemet and San Jacinto. In terms of safety, 1-10 experiences some of the highest collision rates for the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. Conversely, SR-210 has the lowest collision rate of all the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. The collision rates for SR-60 are higher than the county average and Caltrans District 8 averages, but fall between the rates for SR-210 and 1-10. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in the eastern portion of the sub -corridor in San Bernardino and Rialto, as well as the area around the SR-60/I-215 junction, possibly reflecting higher rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along freeways with the largest concentrations along portions of 1-10 and SR-60 near 1-15 and 1-215. 5-109 Figure 5.70 I Collisions Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Collisions 2018 Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision Truck Collision • All Collisions QSub corridor Rancho Cuca'fnonga Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 374 0 2.5 5 1 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth by 2040: • Population-19 percent increase. • Employment-31 percent increase. The higher rate of employment to population growth suggests that the jobs/housing ratio of this sub -corridor is expected to improve, resulting in possibly shorter commute trips in the future. Total trip making in the sub -corridor is projected to increase by one million daily trips, representing a 20 percent increase. VMT is projected to increase by 10 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 22 percent. The disproportionate increase in hours of travel over miles of travel indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the relatively high growth rates. Also, the strategic location of this corridor which serves internal as well as a significant amount of through traffic and connections to Los Angeles County. The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.71 and Figure 5.72 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-111 Figure 5.71 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor Ale 400! A..mung ri imrol 7.===M1W.:=1,1W7Arsimpin11 glaremont 111111MI,L • I 110. IEEE ---mmimmammoirrld, arNti I • W.- !III I I I I • pardp illIMI011111111 ME11111 1 um"*A'aionwrA- om tokrim -- NEN •am- „Olio tar., LioAMM rAllipliriati= Mon U15ir sjak-w, 11r, • 1011 4..-1,1M1 Chino VIP ,41.1.011. !1 Volume by Capacity - < 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 - 0.9 - 1 > 1 I=1 Sub corridor ft MO Iry mIWE S. -Ber a din. 1111111 .e.111.1111111 111111 =MIIIMI• 1171' ir"--40MMIN . . MIMI - • ll'am ME/ 1111111NAMairdirldi LPAt' Mall. •..-Annummosailimin.--iri, iiiIME1111111 -.. 111111111=1•1.1 Nimmi An ..1 ir II IMP lik lei!, 11117 5.'.- L.. AgrAs' _ simmo:=Emm maiurgara, 1111 m• ...rssiMME "11111 1 INNIIININ Wilma ..41104011 -411Are Riversid Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 376 0 0 2 .5 III! 5 1 0 Miles Figure 5.72 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Riverside/Rialto to Los Angeles County Line Sub -Corridor ■���i m1111 ►a: 1■11u1■1� � ■ ■lflnm, isma= -moor. ` �irl1s� r 1 11■I�■11�t -miiminsmin - 'W�=--- ■rr■..1rrr11■r blIPITIMpalmu IlIT ,a��■■ram vas • Erna;■■�i111111 5 Ber a dir Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor 377 (31 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5.9.2 Strategic Approach for Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Sub -Corridor Problems to be Addressed • 1-10 and SR-60 are nationally significant freight corridors, with heavy congestion on 1-10 between the LA County Line and Sierra Interchange and throughout SR-60. • 1-10/1-15 interchange is 12th on ATRI's national list of the top 100 truck bottlenecks. • Metrolink stations represent some of the Inland Empire's best opportunities for TOD, but need to increase train frequency over time and make it easier for jurisdictions/developers to build on infill sites (limited capabilities since loss of redevelopment funding). • Lack of good transit connection to Ontario International Airport. • Major housing and population increases, especially in parts of the corridor south of SR-60 and north of SR-210. Strategies 1. Build on substantial existing transit assets (e.g., move forward with SCORE program on the multiple Metrolink lines —increasing frequency and improving service on Riverside, San Bernardino, 91/Perris, and IE/OC lines). 2. Build West Valley Connector BRT connecting Pomona, Montclair, Ontario, and Rancho Cucamonga, with significant destinations in each jurisdiction, including Ontario International Airport. Integrate with potential new zero -emission tunnel connection from Metrolink San Bernardino Line to ONT. 3. Implement first/last mile transit connections (particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations). 4. Enhance freight access at freeway interchanges to improve first/last mile efficiency (list key interchanges for freight access). 5. Implement managed lane system on 1-10 from LA County line to Ford Street; and SR-60 from 1-15 to Moreno Valley. 6. Accelerate truck fleet turnover for air quality improvement. 7. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution development). 8. Encourage TOD and affordable housing at transit stations. 9. Implement "next -generation" shared -ride and virtual travel systems. 10. Build out regional active transportation network. 11. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-114 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.10 Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor The Riverside to Orange County Line sub -corridor is one of five east/west oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.73 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.10.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This very important east/west sub -corridor is almost entirely within Riverside County but provides the primary and critical inter -county connections between Riverside/San Bernardino counties and Orange County. This sub -corridor has historically been one of the most highly traveled and congested corridors in Southern California and subject of many studies and improvements. The sub -corridor addresses flows of people and freight within and through portions of unincorporated Riverside County and the cities of Chino Hills, Corona, Norco, Riverside, Eastvale, and Jurupa Valley. Across the Orange County line, it also immediately serves the cities of Anaheim Hills and Yorba Linda. This sub -corridor encompasses portions of San Bernardino and Riverside counties and includes parts of RSAs 45, 46, and 29. The sub -corridor is generally 30 miles in length east to west and 7 miles north to south. Key Transportation Facilities Key east/west oriented transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: SR-91 and SR-60. SR-91 has a major multilane express lane facility in the freeway median interoperable with other FasTrak facilities in the state. Arterials: Key east/west arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the sub -corridor include: 6th Street/Magnolia Avenue, Ontario Avenue, Foothill Parkway, Victoria Avenue, Indiana Avenue, Arlington Avenue, Jurupa Avenue, Central Avenue, and Hidden Valley Parkway. Freight: SR-91 is a major goods movement corridor. BNSF Railway and Union Pacific Railroad pass through the sub -corridor. There are numerous warehousing facilities in the sub -corridor near interchanges of SR-91/I-15 and SR-91 /SR-60/I-215. Transit: This sub -corridor includes portions of several Metrolink commuter rail routes. The 91/Perris Valley and Inland Empire/Orange County line route runs through this corridor with multiple stops in Corona and Riverside. There are several bus routes in this sub -corridor operated by RTA, including the Commuter Route Express 200. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, there are several proposed Regional Routes, including east/west route SR-91 corridor via Magnolia Avenue. These routes cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. 5-1.15 Figure 5.73 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Q Study Area Freeways © Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line Lc Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 0 i 2.75 5.5 11 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and land use: Figure 5.74 illustrates the land use patterns in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.75 shows the land use by type. As illustrated in these figures, the predominant land use type in the sub -corridor is residential, including single family residential at 28 percent of the area and rural residential at 12 percent. Other key land uses include agriculture at 18 percent and open space and recreational at nine percent. In terms of employment - generating land uses, the area has nine percent industrial, four percent commercial and services, and over four percent mixed -use designated zones. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are high throughout the sub -corridor. Areas with higher scores include areas near the SR-91/I-15 interchange in Corona and near the SR-91/SR-60 interchange in Riverside. Areas with low scores are in Chino Hills, Norco, and portions of Riverside where there is open space. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the community of Home Gardens near the city of Corona in the sub -corridor. Figure 5.74 1 Land Use Types Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Agriculture 18% \ Open Space and Recreation 9% Industrial Y 9% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Facilities 6% Single Family Residential 28% Rural Residential 12% 5-1 1 7 Figure 5.75 I Land Use Map Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Land Use (SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential - Commercial and Services General Office Use Public Facilities Educational Institutions _ Industrial Transportation, Communications, and Utilities Mixed Commercial and Industrial - Mixed Residential and Commercial Open Space and Recreation - Agriculture Water - Specific Plan Undevelopable or Protected Land Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. 382 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Employment and population is dense in the sub -corridor compared to the IE CMCP Study Area as a whole. Higher employment densities are primarily adjacent to the SR-91 and 1-15 corridors in the cities of Corona and Riverside. Population is concentrated in single-family residential neighborhoods in the cities of Corona and Riverside. Given the predominance of residential land uses, the population -to -employment statistical ratio of the sub -corridor is 2.4, which is is relatively low compared to some of the other areas of the overall Inland Empire CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute longer distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.17 displays the magnitude and average length of trips within and external to the subarea. There are nearly 1.9 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the sub -corridor. As illustrated in the table below, 39 percent of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the sub -corridor, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation and other, which are often proximate to home. Forty- one percent of trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end inside the IE CMCP area and 20 percent of trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end outside the IE CMCP area. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the study and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are 3.8 and 7.1 times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.17 I Internal and External Trips Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. Sub -corridor Internal Trips 757,000 Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from CMCP Study Area Rest of Region 784,000 377,000 39% 41% 20% 3.9 14.7 27.6 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.76 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 89 percent of commute trips in the sub -corridor are made by automobile. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 13 percent of workers carpooled. The share of carpoolers is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This is reflective of the relatively longer commute trips using the sub -corridor to other job locations in Orange County and the existence of express lanes. Transit accounts for two percent of commute trips, which could be reflective of the existence of two Metrolink lines. Five percent of residents work at home and non -motorized trips account for just three percent of commute trips. 5_119 Figure 5.76 I Journey to Work Mode Share Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Work at Home, 5% Non -Motorized, 3% Transit, 2% Carpool, 13%1 Source: ACS 2017, 5-year estimates Other, 1% Drove Alone, 76% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the sub -corridor must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. The generally lower (compared to other sub -corridors) drive alone percentage is likely due to the robust express lane and Metrolink services in this sub -corridor. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the sub -corridor. Nearly 51 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 32 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 17 percent commute over one hour. Congestion, Delay, VMT: As stated before, this is one of the highest traveled and congested regional corridors in Southern California. Nearly all freeways in the sub -corridor experience reoccurring congestion during the AM and PM peak periods. Figure 5.77and Figure 5.78 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions on the freeway system for 2018 from Google traffic data, respectively. During the AM peak, high levels of congestion occurs on southbound SR-71, westbound SR-91 from 1-15 to 241, eastbound SR-91 in Riverside, 1-215, eastbound SR-60 before 1-215 interchange, and westbound SR-60 before 1-215 interchange. During the PM peak, congestion occurs on eastbound SR-60 before SR-71, southbound SR-71, NB 241, southbound 1-15 after SR-91 interchange, northbound 1-15 after SR-91 interchange, SR-91 between Corona and Riverside, 1-215, and eastbound SR-60. 5-1 20 Figure 5.77 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 01 . . t 0 2.5 5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 385 1 10 Miles Figure 5.78 I Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Ifniversity of C,Ipfornoo. Hry rsIde v Typical traffic - Fast1===Slos. SMTOT F S Wednesday. 5:0-0 PM -111 I I I ! BAM 12PM 4PM BP! Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 0 + I I I I 0 2.5 5 Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 386 10 Miles Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the sub -corridor, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.18 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the freeway carries 67 percent of the daily VMT. Daily VHT is split almost 70/30 between freeways (including HOV and express lanes) and arterial network, reflecting lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively more VMT per service population and it ranks third out of the ten sub -corridors for highest VMT per service population. Table 5.18 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle Hours of Travel Freeway HOV/Express lanes Arterials Total 11,441,000 67% 315,000 66% 560,000 3% 10,000 2% 5,081,000 30% 152,000 17,083,000 100% 478,000 Source: SCAG Model 2016. 32% 100% Transit Usage: With two Metrolink lines and connecting bus services, this sub -corridor is relatively well served in the Inland Empire. This sub -corridor has some high -quality transit stops at Metrolink stations in Corona and Riverside. It also has some of the highest ridership bus stops in the overall IE CMCP Study Area, which are located at Corona Transit Center, Galleria at Tyler, University Market (UCR), and UCR campus. In this sub -corridor two percent of commute trips use transit. Safety: Figure 5.79 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, the collision rates for 1-15 are higher than the County average and Caltrans District 8 averages. Bicycle and pedestrian collisions are sparsely spread in the sub -corridor, possibly reflecting low rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along 1-15. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-13 percent increase. • Employment-51 percent increase. It is notable that employment growth is expected to be far greater than population growth, potentially suggesting better jobs/housing balance and shorter average commuter trip lengths in the future. Total trip making in the sub - corridor is projected to increase by 522,000 daily trips, representing a 27 percent increase. VMT is projected to increase by 15 percent and VHT is expected to increase by 36 percent. The disproportionate increase in hours of travel over miles of travel indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected relatively high growth rates for this sub -corridor. 5-123 The congestion levels are expected to increase on the freeway and arterial systems by 2040. Figure 5.80 and Figure 5.81 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-124 Figure 5.79 I Collisions Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Collisions 2018 Bicycle Collision o Pedestrian Collision • Truck Collision • All Collisions Q Sub corridor Chino Hills Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 389 O� 2.5 5 10 Miles Figure 5.80 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 390 0 0 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 >1 Sub corridor 2.5 5 10 Miles Figure 5.81 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor Riverside to Orange County Line Sub -Corridor 391 0.8 0.8 - 0.9 0.9 - 1 >1 Q Sub corridor 0 1 1 1 1 I 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 5.10.2 Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Banning to Rialto Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Several significant bottlenecks on 1-10: eastbound and westbound merge/diverge with 1-215, eastbound merge with SR-210, eastbound upgrade in Yucaipa, and I-10/SR-60 junction. • Significant and growing congestion in both directions at the I-215/SR-60 junction in Riverside and I-10/SR-60 junction in Beaumont due to population and housing increases. • Multiple congested interchanges: I-10/SR-79 interchange in Beaumont and interchanges on 1-10 at Mountain View Avenue, California Street, Alabama Street, and University Avenue. • Ongoing congestion on SR-210 westbound north of 1-10 and eastbound at Highland Avenue. • Nationally significant freight corridor and large concentration of warehousing and logistics centers. • Metrolink San Bernardino line and Riverside line are well -used, but capacity limitations limit substantial additional growth. • Cities with Metrolink stations would like to take advantage of those locations for transit -oriented development (TOD), but parcel assembly/development costs are high and train frequencies are not always conducive to the mid -day and bi-directional mobility needed to support TOD type uses. Strategies 1. Construct Redlands Passenger Rail Project from University of Redlands to downtown San Bernardino, including use of zero -emission multiple unit (ZEMU) trainsets. 2. Implement managed lane systems on SR-60 from downtown Riverside to Moreno Valley and on 1-10 from Redlands westerly. 3. Make strategic operational improvements to and/or reconstruct interchanges on SR-60/Potrero Blvd, SR- 60/Gilman Springs Road, and 1-10 interchanges at SR-79, County Line Road, University Avenue, Alabama Street, and California Street. 4. Implement 1-10 Eastbound Truck Climbing Lane in Yuciapa, addressing one of the most serious freight bottlenecks in the Inland Empire. 5. Invest in grade separation projects to improve goods movement efficiency and passenger rail movement. 6. Accelerate truck fleet turnover for air quality improvement. 5-1 28 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 7. Implement "Healthy Communities and Healthy Economies Toolkit for Goods Movement" (given continued warehouse/distribution development). 8. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the IE/OC, San Bernardino, and Riverside lines as described in the SCRRA SCORE Program; construct accessibility improvements and station improvements to existing Metrolink stations. 9. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-1 29 5.11 Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor The Hemet to Corona sub -corridor is one of five east/west oriented sub -corridors within the Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan. Figure 5.82 illustrates the boundaries of the sub -corridor Study Area. 5.11.1 Sub -Corridor Definition This east/west sub -corridor is entirely within Riverside County and currently does not have a major freeway facility traversing its entire length; however, due to its orientation and abundance of housing on the east and jobs on the west, there are major east/west flows of traffic on the key arterial system such as Ramona Expressway, Cajalco Road, El Sobrante Road, and others. In addition, future new and improved facilities such as the Mid County Parkway and improvements on Cajalco Road are planned in this sub -corridor. This sub -corridor addresses east/west flows of people and freight within and through portions of unincorporated Riverside County and the cities of Corona, Norco, Riverside, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Perris, Menifee, San Jacinto, Hemet, and Beaumont. This sub - corridor includes parts of RSAs 46, 47, 50, 48, and 49 all within Riverside County. The sub -corridor is generally 45 miles in length east to west and about 15 miles wide north to south. Key Transportation Facilities Key transportation facilities within the sub -corridor include: Freeways: SR-74 and SR-91. Arterials: Key east/west arterial facilities that run through significant portions of the sub -corridor include: Foothill Parkway, Ontario Avenue, Sixth Street, Magnolia Avenue, Cajalco Road, Indiana Avenue, Victoria Avenue, Van Buren Boulevard, El Sobrante Road, Domenigoni Parkway, Simpson Road, Nuevo Road, Ramona Expressway, Esplanade Avenue, and Stenson Avenue. Freight: SR-91 is a major goods movement corridor. BNSF Railway passes through the sub -corridor. Transit: Metrolink commuter rail routes passes through this sub -corridor connecting passengers to Los Angeles and Orange County. The 91/Perris Valley route runs through a portion of the area as it transitions from an east/west route to a north/south route in Riverside with three stops in Moreno Valley and Perris, terminating in South Perris. The Inland Empire/Orange County ine runs within the sub -corridor with stops in Corona and Riverside. There are several bus routes operated by RTA in the sub -corridor. Active Transportation: There are many municipal bicycle routes within the sub -corridor, including Class I, II, III, and IV facilities. In addition, within the Riverside County portion of the sub -corridor there are several proposed east/west regional routes. These routes would cross multiple jurisdictions and consist of different types of facilities and classes. 5-1 39 Figure 5.82 I Sub -Corridor Study Area Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor 011 40 m V O Study Area Freeways ® Metrolink Stations Metrolink Train Routes 91/ Perris Valley Line Inland Empire -Orange County Line Riverside Line San Bernardino Line IMME Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 395 0 I I 1 I I I 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Existing Characteristics of the Sub -Corridor Socioeconomic and Land Use: Figure 5.83 illustrates the land use patterns in the sub -corridor and Figure 5.84 shows the land use by type. As shown, the predominant land use in the sub -corridor is rural residential, at 34 percent of the entire area, single family residential at 12 percent, agriculture at 17 percent, and open space and recreational at eight percent. In terms of employment -generating land uses, the area has six percent industrial and two percent commercial and services. March Air Reserve Base, a major employment area, is in the central part of this sub - corridor and there are very large warehousing and distribution centers located in the general vicinity. The area includes Lake Mathews and Lake Perris (Reservoir), two large bodies of water that are major water recreation areas and large portions of open space with habitats for sensitive species. The CalEnviroScreen scores for this sub -corridor are high throughout most of the area. Areas with higher scores are in Corona, Moreno Valley, Perris, and north/east portions of Lake Elsinore. Areas with low scores are around Sun City. Higher scores indicate greater exposure indicators, greater environmental effects indicators, higher sensitive population indicators, higher socioeconomic factor indicators, or a combination of these. Areas with a high score generally experience a much higher pollution burden than areas with lower scores. SCAG "Communities of Concern" also occur in the communities of Home Gardens, Mead Valley, Perris, and Good Hope in the sub -corridor. Figure 5.83 I Land Use Types in Sub -Corridor Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Single Family Specific Plan Residential 13% __ 12°A. Agriculture 17% Open Space and Recreation 8% Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. >114i Industrial 6% Rural Residential 34% 5-132 Figure 5.84 I Land Use Map Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Source: SCAG 2012 Land Use. Land Use {SCAG) Single Family Residential Multi -Family Residential Mobile Homes and Trailer Parks Mixed Residential Rural Residential Commercial and Services ▪ General Office Use ▪ Public Facilities Educational Institutions 0 Industriel ▪ Transportation, Ccmmunications, and Utilities ▪ Mixed Commercial and Industrial Mixed Residential and Commercial _ Open Space and Recreation Agriculture V4£a ter - Specific Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 25 5 I � 10 Miles Employment density is relatively low in much of the sub -corridor, especially in unincorporated areas. Employment density is highest in Corona and Riverside at SR-91. There also are minor employment concentrations in Moreno Valley, Perris, Menifee, and Hemet. Population concentrations are in single-family residential land that is primarily in Corona and Riverside. Population also is concentrated in single-family neighborhoods in Perris, Menifee, San Jacinto, and Hemet. Given the predominance of residential land uses, the population -to -employment statistical ratio of the sub -corridor is 3.6, which is relatively high compared to some of the other areas of the overall Inland Empire CMCP Study Area, indicating a need for residents to commute longer distances to work. Travel Patterns: Daily auto trips were examined to gain insight into the daily activity patterns of travelers in the region. Table 5.19 displays the magnitude and average sizes of trips within and external to the subarea. There are nearly 2.15 million daily auto trips made by residents and employees in the sub -corridor. As illustrated in the table below, 45 percent of those trips are internal -internal trips, meaning they start and end within the sub -corridor. These sub -corridor internal trips include commute travel for workers who live and work in the sub -corridor, as well as local trips for daily activities such as shopping, school, recreation, and other, which are often proximate to home. Forty- two percent of trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end inside the IE CMCP area and 12 percent of trips have one end in the sub -corridor and the other end outside the sub -corridor. The average trip lengths for trips with one end in the Study Area and the other either inside or outside of IE CMCP area are 2.9 and 7.9 times the length of the internal -internal trips, respectively. Table 5.19 1 Internal and External Trips Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Sub -corridor Internal Trips Sub -corridor Trips to/from Sub -corridor Trips to/from CMCP Study Area Rest of Region Daily Auto Trips Average Trip Length (Miles) Source: SCAG Model 2016. 976,000 911,000 263,000 45% 42% 12% 5.0 14.8 40.0 Commute trips were examined to better understand the peak period travel patterns. Figure 5.85 illustrates the journey to work mode share for the sub -corridor. Overall, 91 percent of commute trips in the sub -corridor are made by automobile. Notably, when examining the group that commutes by car, 14 percent of workers carpooled. The share of carpoolers is higher in the sub -corridor compared to California as a whole (10 percent). This is reflective of the relatively longer commute trips from the sub -corridor either to other job locations in Riverside County or Southern California and low levels of transit use, despite the presence of Metrolink services in this sub -corridor. Transit accounts for just one percent of commute trips, while five percent of residents work at home. Non -motorized trips account for just two percent of commute trips. 5-1 ?.4 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Figure 5.85 I Journey to Work Mode Share Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Non -Motorized, 2% Transit, 1 %* Carpool, 14% Source: ACS 2015, 5-year estimates. r Work at Home, 5% I_ Other, 1% Drove Alone, 77% Except for individuals who work at home, nearly 95 percent of the workers in the sub -corridor must find a way to travel to their jobs each workday. Their choice of transportation mode, departure time, trip origin, and destination all play key roles in determining door-to-door travel time. The collective result of these daily decisions are reflected in the commute times for the sub -corridor. Nearly 44 percent of all workers commute less than 30 minutes to work, 33 percent commute 30 to 60 minutes, and 23 percent commute over one hour, which is a reflection of a lack of major employment centers in the area. Congestion, Delay, VMT: Figure 5.86 and Figure 5.87 show a snapshot of Google map traffic conditions during typical Wednesday AM and PM peak hour, respectively. As shown, the traffic data indicates that there is congestion on SR-74 between SR-79 and 1-215 during both AM and PM peak hours. 5-135 Figure 5.86 I Existing AM Peak Hour Freeway Conditions Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor OPIIIIIIPPIP" • GMtlne Cwl,[a V,I Ai 15 Riverside nkn Mmne.Unincorporated Nro ,ma °`eue+, Riverside County Npeervn •I iw,e Celle Lake Elsincir Meld V4Iry fga Bass eo Mre Valley Terris 15 Hurtling Area Nowa AM. MM SPMq• San Jacinto Iwo, •,o �M Meniiee em«. Hemet �II San IMa tint ..- .my ewnort• ode, Typical traffic - Fast mmmmSaw , S M TOT F S IWednesday, 8:00 AM 1- 1 ▪ I I I GAM 121)14 £PM (I PM Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 400 O I I I 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Figure 5.87 I Existing PM Peak Hour Freeway Congestion Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor ,„„„Unincorporated Esro,. Riverside County ROSI,V0 Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Source: Google Maps (Typical Wednesday Traffic) —accessed on March 6, 2020. 401 0 0 2.5 5 1 10 Miles Daily VMT, including local trips and through traffic in the sub -corridor, are mainly carried on freeways and major arterial roadways. Table 5.20 shows the VMT in the sub -corridor by facility type. As shown, the arterial network carries 47 percent of the daily VMT. Daily VHT is nearly split 45/55 between freeways (including HOV lanes) and arterial network, reflecting slightly lower speeds on the arterials. As compared to the other sub -corridors, this area has relatively more VMT per service population and it ranks two out of the ten sub -corridors for highest VMT per service population. Table 5.20 I Vehicle Miles of Travel by Facility Type Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Freeway HOV Arterials Total 8,657,000 168,000 7,981,000 16,806,000 Source: SCAG Model 2016. 52% 170,000 44% 1% 3,000 1% 47% 216,000 100% 389,000 55% 100% Transit Usage: This sub -corridor also has some high -quality transit stops at Metrolink stations in Corona, Riverside, and Perris. It also has some of the highest ridership bus stops in the overall IE CMCP Study Area, which are located at Corona Transit Center, Perris Transit Center, and Galleria at Tyler. Despite these transit facilities, in this sub - corridor only one percent of commute trips use transit. Safety: Figure 5.88 illustrates the reported crashes by type for 2018. In terms of safety, SR-91 experiences the highest collision rates for the IE CMCP Study Area freeways. There is a relatively high concentration of bicycle and pedestrian collisions in this sub -corridor compared to other sub -corridors. High concentrations are along SR-91 between La Sierra Avenue and I-215/SR-60 interchange, possibly reflecting higher rates of walking and bicycling in these areas. Truck collisions occur throughout the Study Area but mostly along SR-91 with the largest concentrations near I-215/SR-91/SR-60 interchange. Future Conditions The sub -corridor is expected to experience the following growth rates by 2040: • Population-34 percent increase. • Employment-52 percent increase. Commensurate with these projected relatively high rates of growth for the area's demographics, total trip making in the sub -corridor is expected to increase by 676,000 daily trips, representing a 31 percent increase. VMT is expected to increase by 25 percent and VHT is projected to increase by 58 percent. The disproportionate increase in hours of travel over miles of travel indicate increasing delay and congestion in the future due to the projected relatively high growth rates for this sub -corridor. Figure 5.89 and Figure 5.90 illustrate the AM and PM peak hour conditions, respectively, on the freeway system projected for 2040 from the SCAG model. 5-138 Figure 5.88 I Collisions Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Collisions 2018 • Bicycle Collision Pedestrian Collision • Truck Collision • All Collisions O Sub corridor t :': E• • . 4Y ;• • • • l ilAreno •� _' • Valley • . . •• • Ito;; ` b o • r • • •• •• M • • •• :otc N. .� • qi 'lit • . Unincorporated • • ® • c • Riverside County ° • Pews • • • • • s . • • • ��••' ••• • :se ! • San Jacinto M •' • -o ... • •• • • •• $■ • • • • %a s • • • ••• 881 ••• ••••.__• II Menife• : �•veum_e jY... • s••�� • • • •s . • M. • ••• •. g• • a ••Lake Elsin000rreje • Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 403 0 0 2.5 5 10 Miles Figure 5.89 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —AM Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Unincorporated Riverside County Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 404 0 0 2,5 5 � I 10 Miles Figure 5.90 I Future 2040 Traffic Conditions —PM Helmet to Corona Sub -Corridor Unincorporated Riverside County Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor 405 0 i l l 1 1 1 0 2.5 5 10 Miles 406 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 5.11.2 Strategic Approach for Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Strategic Approach for Hemet to Corona Sub -Corridor Problems to Be Addressed • Lack of good east/west routes. No adequate east/west routes to connect communities. • Need to preserve environmentally sensitive areas and habitats. • SR-74 is an east -west principal arterial that transects the cities of Perris and Hemet. It functions as the cities' main street with a large concentration of local businesses and retailers but lacks adequate driveway access control, safe sidewalks and bike lanes, and traffic signals. • High number of traffic incidents on east/west roadways. Strategies 1. Complete regional Salt Creek Trail 2. Complete Mid -County Parkway to provide an additional regional east/west corridor, minimize use of local roads, and shift traffic away from SR-74. 3. Build on substantial transit assets. Invest in Metrolink rail expansion for the 91/Perris Valley Line and construct accessibility improvements and station improvements at existing Metrolink stations. 4. Implement first/last mile transit connections, particularly from major destinations to Metrolink stations. 5. Complete SR-79 realignment; improve access to SR-74. 6. Extend 1-15 Express Lanes to SR-74 with new express lanes to improve trip relaibility for commuters and transit riders and provide additional incentives for carpool and vanpoolers. 7. Explore policies and methods to increase work at home to decrease commute trips. 5-143 408 6.0 Multimodal Transportation Projects The Inland Empire CMCP effort included significant outreach to key corridor stakeholders, as described previously in this report. The stakeholders each have their own transportation plans and programming initiatives which are aimed at bringing forth and implementing multimodal transportation improvements in their respective jurisdictions. These include transportation plans of Caltrans, ROTC, WRCOG, SBCTA and the corridor's local agencies including counties and cities. For the CMCP, all of the currently available plans were reviewed in detail by the stakeholder agencies and a master list of potential projects was developed for the CMCP which would address the expected transportation challenges described in this plan. Each stakeholder agency also assisted with identifying the projects from their respective plans in the ten sub -corridors. Due to two key reasons, the project team determined that it was not feasible to measure the benefits of each of the projects using quantitative methods, such as the results of travel demand models or simulation models for the IE CMCP. This is because: 1) the area of the CMCP is extremely large (almost two entire counties and ten sub - corridors); and 2) each stakeholder agency has completed their own detailed analysis of the potential improvements and benefits of the improvement projects, and thus the projects have already been screened for various performance metrics at the local, county and subregional levels. However, to supplement the agency's own evaluations, a second level of qualitative performance metric evaluation was completed for the IE CMCP for each project, utilizing the performance measures described in this section. Furthermore, data and findings from all quantitative sources such as the regional travel models, the Census American Community Survey and other sources were used to inform the evaluations. As discussed in Section 2.3, a series of performance measures are used to assess the list of projects based on a combination of state, regional and local plans, goals and objectives. The following key performance measures were discussed and chosen by the Inland Empire CMCP Project Management Team to assess the sub -corridor improvements: • VMT Reduction. • Improving Accessibility. • Person Delay Reduction. • Reducing GHG and Improving Air Quality. • Safety Improvement. • Improving System Reliability. • Mode Shift. • Congestion Relief. • Person Throughput. These performance metrics are used to assess the potential transportation system improvements in each sub - corridor. The intent is not to rank the improvements or measure them against each other, but rather to inform the CMCP and SCCP process regarding how the projects address the overall goals and objectives related to state, regional and local plans, and how they help move people and goods in congested corridors. It is also recognized 5-1 i _awl that the county -level plans and Caltrans plans have carefully developed short range, ten year and long range improvement plans with sets of projects that have been reviewed by residents, system users and elected officials. Those plans are used as a backbone for the sub -corridor recommendations, with additional analysis related specifically to the CMCP. A set of rules were applied by project type for each performance metric to determine if that project type has a greater or lesser benefit. For example, some types of transportation improvements may significantly improve safety but not necessarily reduce congestion, while others may reduce VMT but not significantly affect system reliability. Additionally, for each performance metric category, a set of rules were established to identify if the improvement would result in a Low, Medium, or High score for each metric based on known characteristics and attributes of each type of improvement. The list of performance measures, project types and how each project type scores for each metric is included in Appendix A. Many of the projects are located entirely within one sub -corridor, while others, such as freeway projects, longer distance arterial improvement projects and longer distance active transportation projects are located in more than one sub -corridor. The number of recommended projects in each sub -corridor is shown in Table 6.1. Table 6.1 1 Recommended Projects By Sub -Corridor Sub -Corridor Number of Recommended Projects Victorville to San Bernardino San Bernardino to Riverside Cajon Pass to Eastvale Riverside to Temecula Beaumont to Temecula Apple Valley to LA County Line Banning to Rialto 42 33 40 76 23 Riverside/Rialto to LA County Line Riverside to Orange County Line Hemet to Corona 23 69 79 29 35 Appendix A includes the entire list of recommended projects for the entire IE CMCP study area as well as for each of the ten sub -corridors. The Low, Medium, and High (L/M/H) scores for each project are shown for each of the performance metrics. As noted above, the intent is not to rank or compare the projects, but rather to identify how each project will provide benefit to the transportation system based on the key metrics. These qualitative scores were assigned based on a classification of project types against the performance measures listed above. In other words, each project of the same classification received the same score. The scores may represent a starting point for further evaluation at an individual project level within the environmental process or other more detailed project -focused modeling or analytical exercise. Therefore, it is critical to understand that individual projects may have greater or lesser benefit than represented by their generic classification used for the scoring in Appendix A, depending on a number of factors, for example: 1) 5-2 y the scope and scale of the specific project; 2) the context within which the project is being proposed (e.g. a more congested or less congested setting; and 3) the cost of the project (e.g. a smaller scale lower scoring project could have high cost-effectiveness where the cost is also low).. These caveats are important because it is impossible to conduct a project -level evaluation for each project, or even each major project, within the framework of the CMCP. When each project goes through environmental review or is submitted for state or federal funding consideration, each project will go through a rigorous analysis of the quantitative benefits associated with that project, in the specific context within which it will be implemented. This includes an assessment of the benefits against project costs, resulting in a cost-effectiveness assessment. This process has become more well established with the advent of the SB 1 competitive programs. Therefore, any project given a low score in Appendix A could prove to have greater benefits and greater cost-effectiveness in an actual project -level evaluation in a site -specific context. Some projects may also have substantial freight benefit in one context but not in another. Therefore, it is important not to pre -judge any individual project based on a score in Appendix A but view it in its unique application in the real -world environment. That said, the performance measure classification process and scores in Appendix A may be useful in highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of projects in each class. A total of 386 highway, arterial, transit and goods movement projects are included, plus an additional 986 bikeway projects, in the following modal categories: • Highway: - HOV/HOT/Express Lanes-42 projects - ITS/Operational Improvements-13 projects - Auxiliary Lane-5 projects - Capacity Enhancement-21 projects - Interchange Enhancement-74 projects - New Interchange-17 projects - Rehabilitation and Safety Improvement-64 projects • Arterial: - Corridor Improvements-3 projects - Capacity Enhancement-8 projects - Intersection Improvement-1 project - Bridge and Grade Separation-36 projects • Goods Movement: 5-3 - Truck Climbing Lane-8 projects - Bridge and Grade Separation-2 projects • Transit: - New Bus-28 projects - Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)-11 projects - New Rail-7 projects - New Rapid Transit-4 projects - Bus Replacement/Transit Maintenance/Transit Operations-17 projects - Transit Centers/Park and Ride/Bus Stations/Bus Stops-12 projects • Active Transportation: - Bikeways Class I, II, II and IV-935 projects (note due to the lage number of active transportatoin projects, many of which are local bikeway iniatives, they are not listed in the master project list) 412 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 7.0 Implementation and Funding Plan Funding for transportation improvements is available through a series of Federal, state, and local sources. Depending on the source of funding, eligible projects vary by mode, scope, and project phase. Some funding programs allocate resources through competitive grant processes or other discretionary means, while other funds are distributed by formula to state, regional, or local governments. This chapter summarizes some of the relevant funding sources available for projects in the IE CMCP Study Area. 7.1 Federal Funding Sources Federal transportation funding is administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) and authorized by Federal transportation bills. The most recent transportation funding bill, Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), was signed into law in 2015. Much of the funding available through the U.S. DOT's Highway Trust Fund is allocated to California based on the state's population. The State of California, in turn, distributes those funds to local agencies by formula or through competitive grant programs. For instance, the majority of the federally funded Surface Transportation Program funding in California is programmed through the STIP (Statewide Transportation Improvement Program). Additionally, California's Active Transportation Program consolidated most of the Federal and state funding sources for bicycle and pedestrian projects. There are two Federal discretionary grant programs available for local agencies to apply for funding. These include the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development program (BUILD —formerly TIGER) and the Infrastructure for Rebuilding America program (INFRA —formerly FASTLANE). Highlighted below in Table 7.1, these programs provide opportunities for the Inland Empire CMCP cities and regional entities to apply for substantial funding amounts for regionally significant projects. 7-1 Table 7.1 I Relevant Federal Funding Sources Name Funding Type Eligible Modes/Description INFRA Discretionary A Federal discretionary grant program reviewed by U.S. DOT. Emphasis on highway and goods movement projects. BUILD Discretionary A Federal discretionary grant program reviewed by U.S. DOT. Emphasis on multimodal projects. New Starts and Small Starts (FTA Section 5309) Discretionary Funds light rail, heavy rail, commuter rail, streetcar, and bus rapid transit projects. Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) Discretionary Federally allocated to the State by formula, the HSIP program is available for roadway safety projects through a competitive program administered by Caltrans. Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) Formula Federally designated air quality containment areas receive funding by formula to program local and regional projects. Rail -Highway Crossings (Section 130) Program Discretionary Safety improvements to reduce the number of fatalities, injuries and crashes at public railway -highway crossings. Grade Separation (Section 190) Program Discretionary This competitive grant program provides $15 million each year to local agencies for the construction grade separation projects.- National Highway Freight Program Discretionary _ The FAST Act established National Highway Freight Program (NHFP) to improve the efficient movement of freight on the National Highway Freight Network (NHFN). National Highway Performance Program Discretionary The NHPP provides support for the condition and performance of the National Highway System (NHS), for the construction of new facilities on the NHS. Nationally Significant Federal Lands and Tribal Projects Discretionary The Nationally Significant Federal Lands and Tribal Projects (NSFLTP) program provides funding for constructing, reconstructing, and rehabilitating nationally significant projects on Federal or Tribal lands. National Significant Freight and Highway Projects (NSFHP) Discretionary The Nationally Significant Freight and Highway Projects (NSFHP) provides financial assistance — competitive grants or credit assistance —to nationally and regionally significant freight and highway projects that align with the program goals to: improve safety, efficiency, and reliability of the movement of freight and people; generate national or regional economic benefits and an increase in U.S. global economic competitiveness; reduce highway congestion and bottlenecks; Improve connectivity between modes of freight transportation; enhance the resiliency of critical highway infrastructure and help protect the environment; improve roadways vital to national energy security; address the impact of population growth on the movement of people and freight, mitigate impacts of freight movements on communities. Surface Transportation Block Formula Grant Program STBG provides flexible funding that states and local governments may use for projects on any Federal - aid highway, including the National Highway System; bridge projects on any public road; transit capital projects and; public bus terminals and facilities. Federal Transit Discretionary Administration Sections 5303, 5304, 5305 Provides procedural and funding requirements for multimodal transportation planning in States and metropolitan areas. Planning must to be cooperative, continuous, and comprehensive leading to long - range plans and short-range programs that reflect transportation investment priorities. Funds are available to States and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) for planning activities. Federal Transit Formula Administration Section 5307 The Urbanized Area Formula Funding program provides Federal resources to urbanized areas and to governors for transit capital and operating assistance and for transportation related planning. Federal Transit Administration Section 5311 Formula This program provides formula -based funding for capital and/or operating assistance to rural areas with a population fewer than 50,000 where many residents rely on public transit to reach their destinations. Federal Transit Administration Section 5312 Discretionary This program supports research activities that improve the safety, reliability, efficiency, and sustainability of public transportation by investing in the development, testing, and deployment of innovative technologies, materials, and processes. 414 IT! Federal Transit I Formula Administration Section 5337 Fundin • T Eli • ible Modes/Descri tion Federal Transit Formula Administration Section 5339 Federal Transit Administration Transit - Oriented Development Planning Pilot Recreational Trails Program The State of Good Repair program is dedicated to repairing and upgrading the Nation's rail transit systems along with high -intensity motor bus systems that use high -occupancy vehicle lanes, including bus rapid transit. The Bus and Bus Facilities Infrastructure Investment Program (49 U.S.C. 5339) provides Federal resources to states and direct recipients to replace, rehabilitate and purchase buses and related equipment. This programs also allows for the construction of bus -related facilities, including technological changes or innovations to modify low or no emission vehicles or facilities. Discretionary Provides funding to advance planning efforts that support transit -oriented development (TOD) associated with new fixed -guideway and core capacity improvement projects. TOD focuses growth around transit stations to promote ridership, affordable housing near transit, revitalized downtown centers and neighborhoods, and encourage local economic development. Discretionary The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) provides funds annually for recreational trails and trails -related projects. The RTP is administered at the Federal level by the Federal Highway Administration. It is administered at the state level by the California Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR). Sources: United States Department of Transportation; California Department of Transportation; RCTC; SBCTA; Cambridge Systematics. 415 J In addition to these Federal funding sources, the FAST Act continues the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program, which provides Federal credit assistance to eligible surface transportation projects, including highway, transit, intercity passenger rail, some types of freight rail, intermodal freight transfer facilities, and some modifications inside a port terminal. The FAST Act continues the authority of the TIFIA program to provide to States, localities, or other public authorities, as well as private entities undertaking projects sponsored by public authorities, three distinct types of financial assistance: • Secured loans are direct Federal loans to project sponsors offering flexible repayment terms and providing combined construction and permanent financing of capital costs. • Loan guarantees provide full -faith -and -credit guarantees by the Federal Government to institutional investors, such as pension funds, that make loans for projects. • Lines of credit are contingent sources of funding in the form of Federal loans that may be drawn upon to supplement project revenues, if needed, during the first 10 years of project operations. [23 U.S.C. 603 and 604] 7.2 Project Type The FAST Act continues all prior TIFIA eligibilities and makes two new activities TIFIA-eligible: 1) transit -oriented development projects (as defined below); and 2) the capitalization of a rural projects fund within a State infrastructure bank. [23 U.S.C. 601(a)(12)] As a general rule, to receive TIFIA credit assistance under the FAST Act, a project must have costs that equal or exceed either: • $50 million. • 1/3 of the most recently -completed fiscal year's formula apportionments for the State in which the project is located. Specified project types have a lower cost threshold under TIFIA, including: • For an intelligent transportation system (ITS) project, $15 million. • For a transit -oriented development project (as defined below), $10 million. • For a rural infrastructure project (as defined below) or for capitalizing a rural project fund (as described below), $10 million (but not exceeding $100 million). • For a local infrastructure project (as defined below), $10 million. [23 U.S.C. 602(a)(5)] 7-4 lll.lhl Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 7.2.1 Transit -oriented Development Projects The FAST Act makes eligible for TIFIA credit assistance a project to improve or construct public infrastructure that is located within walking distance of, and accessible to, one of a specified list of transit facilities. [23 U.S.C. 601(a)(12)(E)] 7.2.2 Rural Infrastructure Projects The FAST Act modifies the definition of "Rural Infrastructure Project" for TIFIA purposes. The new definition is a surface transportation infrastructure project located in an area that is outside of an urbanized area with a population greater than 150,000 individuals, as determined by the Bureau of the Census. [23 U.S.C. 601(a)(15)] 7.2.3 Local Infrastructure Projects To qualify as a "local infrastructure project" for the lower ($10 million) minimum project cost threshold: • The applicant for the project (or program of projects) must be a local Government, public authority, or instrumentality of local Government. • The project (or program of projects) must be located on a facility owned by a local Government. • The Secretary must determine that a local Government is substantially involved in the development of the project (or program of projects). [23 U.S.C. 602(a)(5)(B)(iv)] 7.2.4 State Funding Sources With the passage of California Senate Bill 1 (SB1), the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, the State of California has additional transportation funding for local and regional projects. SB1 augmented existing sources of funding, such as the Active Transportation Program and State Highway Operation and Protection Program, and created entirely new funding programs, such as the Solutions for Congested Corridors and Trade Corridor Enhancement programs. Table 7.2 highlights the state funding sources that are most relevant to the IE CMCP projects. 7-5 Table 7.2 I Relevant State Funding Sources Name Funding Type Eligible Mode/Notes Local Streets and Roads Formula Cities and counties receive funds for road maintenance, safety projects, railroad grade separations, complete streets, and traffic control devices. Solutions for Congested Corridors (SCCP) Discretionary Regional transportation authorities and Caltrans may nominate projects for funding to achieve a balanced set of transportation, environmental, and community access improvements to reduce congestion. Trade Corridor Enhancement (TCEP) Discretionary Caltrans and regional entities can be project sponsors. Funding is available for infrastructure improvements in theBay Area, Central Valley, Central Coast, LA/Inland Empire, and San Diego/Border. Local Partnership Program (LPP) 60% Discretionary 40% Formula Eligible funding for "self-help" counties.' Most transportation improvements are eligible. Active Transportation Program (ATP) Discretionary Eligible projects include bicycle and pedestrian improvements and planning. SB1 augmented the ATP with an extra $100M annually to the program. State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP) Formula Projects are selected by Caltrans and adopted by the CTC. Projects included in the program are limited to capital improvements relative to the maintenance, safety, operation, and rehabilitation of the state highway system that do not add new capacity to the system. State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Formula Projects are proposed by regional transportation agencies and approved by the CTC on a bi-annual basis. The majority of the STIP funding comes from Federal sources. Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) Discretionary Discretionary program administered by Caltrans and the California State Transportation Agency (CaISTA). Funds transformative capital improvements that will modernize California's intercity, commuter, and urban rail systems, and bus and ferry transit systems, to significantly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, vehicle miles traveled, and congestion. SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program Discretionary Each year 2 percent of the LTF revenue is made available for use on bicycle and pedestrian facility projects. RCTC allocates SB 821 funds through a biennial Call for Projects. All of the cities and the County of Riverside are notified of available funding and are requested to submit project proposals. Eligible projects include sidewalks, access ramps, bicycle facilities, and bicycle plan development. 1 Counties that have passed local option sales tax measures to fund transportation improvements. Source: California Department of Transportation, California Transportation Commission. 418 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan 7.2.5 Local Funding Sources Riverside County Toll Revenue Congestion -pricing involves charging varying tolls or fees to transportation system users. Implementation of express lanes is a strategy of congestion pricing. Routinely, service demands exhibit a peaking characteristic related to the time of day or seasonal time of the year. The 91 Express Lanes currently applies a time of day pricing policy, which charges higher tolls in the peak period allowing for a more reliable trip in the express lanes during the most congested hours of the day. RCTC's venture into tolling expanded the agency's funding and financing options for the design and construction of the currently operational 91 Express Lanes and the future 15 Express Lanes, currently in construction. Toll revenue is a new funding source in addition to Measure A and traditional state and Federal funding sources. As a result of the financing successes from the 91 Express Lanes and 15 Express Lanes, RCTC will continue to use toll revenue in the following ways: 1. Borrow against future toll revenue to help fund capital costs of new express lane facilities (e.g., project financings for the 91 and 15 Express Lanes). 2. Pay annual Operation and Maintenance (O&M) expenses on express lanes facilities, debt service and financing reserves, and life -cycle repair and rehabilitation of the toll system and roadway. 3. Construct RCTC-approved transportation projects in the corridor from which the surplus toll revenue was generated (statutorily mandated). Local Transportation Revenue Funds Several transportation funding sources have their origins in city or county revenues. These include general fund revenues used for street purposes at the city level, development impact fees, gas tax shares, proceeds from bond sales for street purposes, street assessment levies, and traffic safety fund revenues. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees (TUMF) are an important part of the Measure A extension. The TUMF programs for the Western Riverside County subregion and the Coachella Valley subregion ensure that future development contributes its fair share toward infrastructure costs to mitigate new growth's cumulative, indirect, and regional transportation impacts consistent with the State's Mitigation Fee Act. The fees help fund improvements to maintain target levels of service in the face of higher traffic volumes that new developments bring. 7-7 Riverside County Local Sales Tax —Measure A Funds Measure A was first approved by Riverside County voters in 1988 and was in effect for 20 years from 1989 to 2009. It was extended for an additional 30 years in 2002. Measure A is administered by RCTC for the purpose of collecting a half -cent local transaction and use tax for transportation. Measure A was enacted to fill the funding shortfall to: implement necessary highway, commuter rail, and transit projects; secure new transportation corridors through environmental clearance and right-of-way purchases; provide adequate maintenance and improvements on the local street and road system; promote economic growth throughout the County; and provide specialized programs to meet the needs of commuters and the specialized needs of the growing senior and disabled population. Approximately $4.662 billion will be collected over the 30-year period between 2009 and 2039 for a variety of transportation mode improvements and programs in Riverside County. San Bernardino County Financial Strategy Revenue sources in San Bernardino County include Measure I (cash and bond), local contributions, and state and Federal funds as described in this chapter. Measure I is the half -cent sales tax collected throughout San Bernardino County for transportation improvements. San Bernardino County voters first approved the measure in 1989 and in 2004 approved the extension through 2040. SBCTA administers Measure I revenue and is responsible for ensuring that funds are used in accordance with various plans and policies. Measure I funds are allocated based on the Measure 1-2010-2040 Ordinance and Expenditure Plan and the Strategic Plan policies that define the framework for the programs and projects referenced in the measure. The 10-Year Delivery Plan outlines the near -term strategy. The administration of Measure I is different between the Valley and the Mountain/Desert areas. The County is divided into six "subareas" with distinct expenditure plans and policies. Additionally, Measure I has a return -to - source provision so that revenue collected within a subarea can only be used in that subarea. The financial strategy used in the development of the 10-Year Delivery Plan includes: • Apply ordinance and policy criteria. • Preserve existing grants. • Maximize available funds. The 10-Year Delivery Plan is built off of the Measure I Ordinance and Board Policies. Key Ordinance requirements are: • Measure I revenues shall be allocated by formula to subareas and programs. • State and Federal funds shall be allocated proportionally to subareas over time. 7-8 Inland Empire Comprehensive Multimodal Corridor Plan Key Board Policies are: • State and Federal funds shall be allocated to maintain geographic equity. • Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds for the San Bernardino Valley shall be allocated in the following priority: 1) regional programs; 2) transit capital projects; and 3) freeway HOV projects. There is no established policy for the Mountain/Desert Subareas. • Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds for the San Bernardino Valley shall be allocated to the Freeway Projects Program. There is no established policy for the Mountain/Desert Subareas. • A Measure I Program that benefits from bonding shall accommodate the debt service within the Program's revenue. Numerous existing grants have to be used by a certain date or the grant is rescinded. The 10-Year Delivery Plan is developed to ensure these funds are not lost. This strategy is critical in the development of each 10-Year Delivery Plan to allow SBCTA to meet the delivery deadlines and make full use of grant awards that have allocation and award deadlines, like many of the competitive SB1 programs. With SBCTA facing transportation funding challenges, maximizing all available funds is critical. State and Federal funds are subject to rescission if the funds are not used in a timely manner. The 10-Year Delivery Plan allows for better management of all funds across programs and subareas, minimizing the potential for funds to be rescinded. 7,o Table A.1 I IE CMCP Project List Project 91 CIP Completion Type Highway Sub -Type HOV/HOT/Express Lanes SCAG RTP x Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput Safety - Mode Share Person Delay Accessibility GHG and air Quality L System Reliability M H M H H 1-15 ELP Completion Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 15/91 Express Lanes Connector Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H SR-60 Truck Lanes Goods Movement Truck Lane x - M L - M - - M Mid -County Parkway: Placentia Interchange at 1-215 Construction Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 91 Pachappa UP Project: Railroad realignment Goods Movement Bridge and Grade Separation x - L H - M L - L Mid County Parkway: Sweeney Grading Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 71/91 Interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR-91 Corridor Operations Project (Westbound auxiliary lane: Green River to 241) Highway Auxiliary Lane x - M - - M M - M 1-15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension (Cajalco to 74): Advanced Operations Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H START 1-15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension (Cajalco to 74) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension (Cajalco to 74) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 91 Downtown Riverside Express Lanes - Environmental Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H Mid County Parkway: Right of Way and Environmental Mitigation Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H Mid -County Parkway: Package 2 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H Mid County Parkway: 1-215 Project, Nuevo to Alessandro Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 1-15 Express Lanes Project Southern Extension (Cajalco to 74) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 60/215 Riverside -Moreno Valley Express Lanes Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H 1-215 Gap Project (1-215 to French Valley Parkway) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H 91 Downtown Riverside Express Lanes - Design/Construction Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H Lake Elsinore: I-15/Railroad Canyon Interchange (fully funded) Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L RCTLMA: Cajalco Road Corridor Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Temecula: French Valley Parkway Phase 2 Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Mid County Parkway: Packages 3 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 79 Realignment Arterial Arterial Corridor Improvement x - L L - M L - L 1-15 Corridor (SR-74 to 215/15 interchange) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H SR-91 Corridor Ultimate Project Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-10 Truck Climbing Lane Goods Movement Truck Climbing Lane x - M L - M - L M 1-15 Corridor (215/15 interchange to San Diego County line) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H SR-71 Widening Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 10/60 Interchange Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M 215 Ultimate widening (60 to San Bernardino County line) Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) - M L - M M - H 60 Jurupa Valley -Riverside Express Lanes Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H SBCTA: 15 Express Lanes Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H RCTLMA: Ethanac Corridor Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 422 Project Temecula: French Valley Parkway Phase 3 Type Highway Sub -Type Interchange Enhancement SCAG RTP x Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput L Safety M Mode Share - Person Delay M Accessibility M GHG and air Quality L System Reliability L I-215/Barton Road IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR 210 Widening Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H 1-10 Corridor Contract 1 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-10 Contract 1 Measure I Investment Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-15 Corridor Contract 1 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-10 Corridor Contract 2A Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-10 Truck Climbing Lane* Goods Movement Truck Climbing Lane x - M L - M - L M I-215/Mount Vernon/Washington Bridge Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L US 395 Widening, Phase 1 from SR 18 to Chamberlaine Way Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H Apple Valley Road and SR 18 Realignment Arterial Arterial Corridor Improvement x - L L - M L - L Bear Valley Bridge over Mojave River Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Yucca Loma Road Widening Apple Valley Road to Rincon Road Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Ranchero Road Corridor Widenin Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Main Street Widening from US 395 to 11th Avenue Phase 1 Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Main Street Widening from US 395 to 11th Avenue Phase 2 Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M Yucca Loma Corridor - Green Tree Boulevard Extension Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) 1 x - M L - M M - M Rock Springs Road Bridge over Mojave River Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation x - L H - M L - L Phelan Road Widening SR 138 to Hesperia City Limits Arterial Capacity Enhancement (arterial) x - M L - M M - M I-10/Cedar Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR 210/Base Line IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR 60/Central Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-10/University Street IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-215/University Parkway IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-10/Alabama Street IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR 60/Archibald Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-10/Mount Vernon Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L 1-10/Riverside Avenue IC Phase 2 Highway Interchange Enhancement - L M - M M L L 1-15/Base Line Road IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR60/Euclid Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-15/Sierra Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-10/Euclid Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L 1-10/Monte Vista Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L I-10/Vineyard Avenue IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Monte Vista Avenue Grade Separation (UP) Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation x - L H - M L - L Mount Vernon Viaduct Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L I-10/Fourth Street Bridge Undercrossing Highway Bridge and Grade Separation x - L H - M L - L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 423 Project Type Sub -Type SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel Person Throughput Safety Mode Share GHG Person and air Delay Accessibility Quality System Reliability Redlands Passenger Rail Transit New Rail x H H - H M H M H San Bernardino Line Double Track Transit Bus Replacement / Transit Maintainance / Transit Operations x - L L L M L L L Gold Line to Montclair Transit New Rail x H H - H M H M H DMU (Diesel Multiple Unit) to ZEMU (Zero or Low Emission) Transit Bus Replacement / Transit Maintainance / Transit Operations - L L L M L L L West Valley Connector (BRT) Transit BRT x H H - H M H M H On 1-10 through San Bernardino and Riverside Counties Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M On 1-10, from LA/SBD County line to Cherry Avenue in Ontario Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 07_LA_60_15.93/19.49, 08_SBD_60_R1.37, 08_SBD/RIV_10_R9.31/R102.00 Goods Movement Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L LA/SBD County Line to Ford Street in Redlands Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-10 and 1-15 Junction Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On 1-10, Live Oak Canyon Road to Singleton Road Goods Movement Truck Climbing Lane x - M L - M - L M On 1-10, in Ontario, from 0.2 mile west of 4th Street Undercrossing to 0.2 miles east of 1-15/1-10 Junction Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L 1-10, in Colton, between Mt. Vernon Avenue and Junction of 10/215, at Santa Ana River (Bridge No. 54-0292L/R and 54-0292G) Highway Bridge and Grade Separation x - L H - M L - L I-10 at California Street Interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In/near Redlands, from 1-10 and SR-210 IC to SBD/RIV County Line Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M On 1-10, from east of Tennessee Street to SR-38/Orange Street Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-10, from SR-38/Orange Street to Ford Street Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-10, from Wabash Avenue to County Line Road Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-10, from Live Oak Canyon Road to County Line Road Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-10, from Cherry Valley Boulevard to 14th Street/ San Timoteo Canyon Road; also on Routes 60 and 86 at various locations Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In Beaumont, from SR-60 westbound off -ramp to Highland Springs Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Riverside County, on Routes 10, 15, 71 and 215 at various locations Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In and near Beaumont and Banning, from Pennsylvania Avenue to Route 111 Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L 1-15 Express Lanes Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-15 from Cajalco Road to SR-60 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On 1-15, from the San Diego County line to the SB On Ramp at Rancho California Overcrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-15, from Nichols Road to north of Glen Ivy Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-15, from south of Ontario Avenue to Route 60 Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-15, from 6th Street to 0.2 mile south of 68th Street Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-15, from 6th Street to 0.2 mile south of 68th Street Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-15 from Cajalco Rd to SR-74 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On 1-15, from 1-15/1-215 IC to RIV/SD County Line Highway Auxiliary Lane - M - - M M - M 1-15 Express Lanes Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 424 Project Near Fontana, from Sierra Avenue to Devore Road Type Highway Sub -Type Rehabilitation SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput Safety L Mode Share - Person Delay M Accessibility L GHG and air Quality - System Reliability L - Near San Bernardino, from Glen Helen Parkway to Route 15/395 Junction Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Hesperia and Victorville, from Route 395 to north of Mojave Drive Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Victorville, from 0.2 mile north of Bear Valley Overcrossing to 0.3 mile south of Palmdale Road Overcrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Victorville, from Mojave Drive Overcrossing to Victorville Separation and Overhead Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L At SR-60/Redlands Blvd Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L IN WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY IN THE CITY OF MORENO VALLEY ALONG SR- 60 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) - M L - M M - H from 2 miles east of SR-57 to 1-15 Goods Movement Truck Lane - M L - M - - M Near Ontario, from the San Bernardino County line to Valley Way Undercrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In the cities of Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Riverside and Moreno Valley, from Hamner Avenue to Gilman Spring Road; also on SR-91 from 1-15 to Madison Street Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Moreno Valley, from Day Street to WB Off Ramp at Theodore Street Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On SR-60 in unincorporated Riverside County Goods Movement Truck Climbing Lane x - M L - M - L M In Pomona, Chino and Ontario, from Los Angeles County line to Riverside County line Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Chino, at Pipeline Avenue OC No. 54-0744, Monte Vista Avenue OC No. 54-0746, and Benson Avenue OC No. 54-0748 Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L In Ontario, from Euclid Avenue to the Riverside County line; also in Riverside County, from the San Bernardino county line to Mission Boulevard (PM RO.0/R3.0) Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On State -Route 60, in the city of Ontario, in the County of San Bernardino, from PM R7.3 to PM R10.00 Highway Auxiliary Lane - M - - M M - M State Route 60 (SR-60) in the city of Ontario, between Euclid Avenue and 0.65 miles east of Vineyard Avenue in San Bernardino County. Highway Auxiliary Lane x - M - - M M - M From the SBD/RIV County Line to SR-91 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) - M L - M M - H Near Chino Hills, from LA/SBD County Line to SBD/RIV County Line; Near Corona, from SBD/RIV County Line to Junction of SR-71/SR-91 Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In Chino and Chino Hills, from 0.4 mile south of Euclid Avenue to 0.2 mile north of Pine Avenue Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L SR-79 FROM DOMENIGONI PKWY TO GILMAN SPRINGS ROAD Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H From SR-91 NB to SR-60 WB Highway Interchange Enhancement - L M - M M L L ON SR-91/I-15 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H In Corona and Riverside, from Route 15/91 separator to Adams Street overcrossing Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes - M - H M H L H SR-210 From LA/SBD County Line to 1-15 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H In Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana, from East Avenue to west of Beech Avenue; also on Route 15 at Route 210/15 Separation Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In San Bernardino County, on Routes 71, 210, 215 and 259 at various locations Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Redlands and Highland, from north of West Pioneer Avenue to Baseline Street Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L SR-210 at 5th St/Greensport Rd Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR-210 FROM LOS ANGELES/SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LINE TO 1-15 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 425 Project In Colton, from 0.3 mile south to 0.3 north of Washington Avenue Overcrossing No. 54- 0530 Highway Sub -Type SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput Safety H Mode Share - Person Delay M Accessibility L GHG and air Quality - System Reliability L L Bridge and Grade Separation In Murrieta and Menifee, from Route 215 to north of Scott Road Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Murrieta, from 0.2 mile north of Clinton Keith Road Overcrossing to 0.5 mile south of Scott Road Overcrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L Near Devore, at Little League Drive Overcrossing Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L US-395 Hesperia, Victorville and Adelanto from 0.16 mi n/o 1-15 JCT to SR-18 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H On US-395 from 1-15 to 0.5 miles SO Farmington Road Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H From 7.9 mi N/O SR-18 to 10.4 mi S/O Kramer Jct (Rte 58) Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Adelanto at the intersection of US-395 & Bartlett Road Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In Victorville at Seneca Road - LT Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M From Mills Ave Undercrossing to 1-10 and SR-38 Separation Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Upland, from San Antonio Avenue to Sultana Avenue Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Upland, from west of Route 83 (Euclid Avenue) to east of Sultana Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L 1-10 at Grove Avenue and 4th Street Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-10 at Grove Street and 4th Ave Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M In Ontario, from 0.2 mile west to 0.2 mile east of Vineyard Avenue Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Ontario, from 0.2 mile west to 0.3 mile east of Vineyard Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-10 HOV Lane Addition from Haven Avenue (Ontario) to Ford Street (Redlands) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H At I-10/Beech Ave Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M In Fontana at Alder Avenue Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M At I-10/Pepper Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On 1-10 at Mountain View Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Redlands, from west of University Avenue to west of Ford Street Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L At 1-10 Ford St on ramp to the freeway Arterial Intersection Improvement x - L M - M L - L I-10 from Ford St to Riverside County Line Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H In Yucaipa, from Live Oak Canyon Rd to County Line Rd Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-10 at Wildwood Canyon Interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In the City of Calimesa, at I-10/County Line IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Calimesa and Beaumont, from County Line Rd Undercrossing to 0.1 Miles W/O 1-10 and SR-60 Separation Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On I-10/Cherry Valley Blvd IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At I-10/Oak Valley Pkwy IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At SR-79/ Beaumont Ave between 6th St and 1st St Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Pennsylvania Av between 6th St and 3rd St Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Highland Springs Ave between 5th St and south ramps Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On 1-10 near Beaumont from San Bernardino County Line to junction I-10/SR-60 Goods Movement Truck Climbing Lane x - M L - M - L M In and near Temecula, from Rainbow Valley Boulevard to Front Street Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 426 Project Diego County Type Sub -Type SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel Person Throughput Safety Mode Share GHG Person and air Delay Accessibility Quality System Reliability At New Eastern Bypass IC south of Temecula Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M In Temecula, Murrieta, and Wildomar from Riverside/San south of Bundy Canyon Rd BR line to 0.3 miles Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In Temecula, from 1.1 miles north of Truck Inspection Station to Temecula River Bridge Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L Between SR-60 and 1-10 Goods Movement Truck Lane x - M L - M - - M At 1-15/ Rancho California between Ynez Rd and Jefferson Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Temecula, from 0.2 mile south of Rancho California Overcrossing to 0.1 mile south of Winchester Road overcrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Temecula, from SR-79/Winchester Road to SB On Ramp at 1-15/1-215 Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On the I-15/SR-79 IC from Front St to Bedfort Ct. Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Temecula and Murrieta, from 0.2 miles south of Winchester Road/Banana Avenue to 0.2 mile south of Warm Springs Creek Bridge; also from Temescal Wash Bridge to Parkridge Avenue Undercrossing (PM 40.8/41.8) Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L In/near Murrieta, from 0.5 Miles S/O 1-15 and 1-215 Separation to 0.3 Miles N/O Clinton Keith Rd Overcrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L At 1-15 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Bundy Canyon Rd between Orange St and Cherry St Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Wildomar from 0.84 miles N/O Baxter Rd to overcrossing Franklin St overcrossing in Lake Elsinore to 0.55mi1es Terrace and Grape 1,000 ft west of north of Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L At Olive St between Orchard St and Grape St On 1-15 at Malaga Rd between Casino Drive Lakeview At I-15/SR-74 (Central Ave) IC junction mod. Between Riverside St Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M St Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Collier Ave to Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In 1-15 at Main IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On 1-15 at Second St between Collier Ave and Camino Del Norte Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H On 1-15 at Riverside Dr between Collier Ave and Dexter Ave Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L At Nichols Rd between ramps Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Lake St between Walker Canyon Rd and Temescal Canyon Rd Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Horsethied Canyon Road just beyond and between ramps Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Temescal Canyon north of Glenn Ivy just beyond and between ramps Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At 1-15 /Cajalco Rd IC near Corona Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L 1-15 IN CORONA FROM CAJALCO RD TO STATE ROUTE In Western Riverside County on SR-91/I-15 60 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H At Hidden Valley Pkwy between Hamner Ave and beyond NB exit ramp Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Corona and Norco, from Corona Ave Undercrossing to Detroit St Overcrossing Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L At 2nd St between Hamner Ave and Valley View Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In and near Norco, from 3rd Street to northbound on -ramp at Limonite Avenue Interchange Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L At 6th St between Hamner Ave and Sierra Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At I-15/Limonite Ave IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 427 Project On 1-15 near the City of Norco on Schleisman Rd from Lindsey Ct to Wineville Ave Type Highway Sub -Type New Interchange SCAG RTP x Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput Safety L Mode Share - Person Delay M Accessibility L GHG and air Quality - System Reliability M M At Bellegrave Ave between Hamner Ave and Wineville Rd Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M Various Locations in/near Ontario, from 0.5 Miles N/O Cantu-Galleano Ranch Rd to Philadelphia Ave UC; from 0.3 Miles E/O Haven Ave OC g to 0.3 Miles W/O Milliken Ave UC; from RIV/SBD County Line to 0.3 Miles W/O Mira Loma OC Highway Interchange Enhancement - L M - M M L L In Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga and Fontana, from RIV/SBD County Line to 1-15 and SR-138 Separation Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L on 1-15 from Ontario to approx 1.3 miles north of the Junction of 1-15/SR-138 Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-15 from Riverside/San Bernardino County Line to north of Dale Evans Parkway IC Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L On 1-15 at Arrow Route to Foothill Boulevard Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-15 from I-15/SR-210 IC to 1-15/1-215 IC Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On 1-15, from 1-15/1-215 IC (SBD County) to I-15/US-395 (Hesperia) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H 1-15/1-215 IC Improvements - Devore IC south of Glen Helen Pkwy to north of Kendwood, and 1-215 from south of Devore Rd IC to 1-15 (PM 16.0-17.8) Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H Near San Bernardino, from Glen Helen Parkway to Junction of I-15/US-395 Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-15 in the Cajon Pass Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-15 from I-15/US-395 to High Desert Corridor Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H Various Locations in Hesperia, from Joshua St Overcrossing to NV/CA State Line Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On 1-15 at Muscatel Street Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-15 at Mojave Street Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-15 at Eucalyptus Street Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-15 at Bear Valley Road Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On 1-15, in Victorville, from Mojave Drive to Stoddard Wells Road, and in Barstow Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Victorville from 0.5 miles north of Mojave Dr to 1.5 miles north of Existing Stoddard Wells Rd OC Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L On 1-15 at Boulder Road/Dale Evans Parkway Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L 1-15 EXPRESS LANES - ADD 1 EXPRESS LANE IN EACH DIRECTION FROM US- 395 TO HIGH DESERT CORRIDOR (SEGMENT 5) Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H In and near the city of Riverside, on SR-60 from Milliken Avenue to Junction of 60/91/215; also on SR-91 from Spruce Street to Junction of 60/91/215 Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M On SR-60 from San Bernardino/Riverside County Line to Day Street IC in Moreno Valley Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L At Mission Blvd between Granite Hill Drive and Sevaine Way Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Near Riverside, from 0.2 Miles W/O Camino Real Undercrossing to 0.5 Miles E/O Valley Way Undercrossing Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In and near the city of Riverside, from west of Valley Way to Junction of 60/91/215 Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L At Rubidoux Blvd between 30th St and 34th St Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Milliken Blvd between Harrel Ave and Iberia Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Riverside and Moreno Valley, from west of Market Street to Day Street Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L At Main St between Russell St and Stoddard Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 428 Project In Moreno Valley on Graham St. Type Highway Sub -Type Bridge and Grade Separation SCAG RTP x Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel - Person Throughput Safety H Mode Share - Person Delay M Accessibility L GHG and air Quality - System Reliability L L At Heacock St between Hemclock Ave and Sunnymead Blvd Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Perris Blvd between Sunnymead Blvd and Ironwood Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On SR-60 in Moreno Valley Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M In the City of Moreno Valley Highway Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L In Moreno Valley at SR-60/Moreno Beach Dr IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At SR-60/Theodore St IC (World Logistics Center Parkway Interchange) Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M In Western Riverside County in the city of Moreno Valley along SR60 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) - M L - M M - H AT SR-60/Gilman Springs Rd IC Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On SR-60 in Riverside County, in and near Moreno Valley and Beaumont Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L Near Beaumont, from Gilman Springs Road to 1.4 miles west of Jack Rabbit Trail Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L Near Beaumont, from Gilman Springs Road to 1.4 miles west of Jack Rabbit Trail Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On SR-60 between Jack Rabbit Tr and SR-60/I-10 Junction Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Chino, from the Los Angeles County line to Monte Vista Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L SR-60 and Vineyard Avenue Interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L Central Avenue Bridge Crossing Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On SR-60 at Ramona Avenue Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Chino, from Monte Vista Avenue to Benson Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Chino, from 0.3 Miles E/O WB Off -Ramp to Central Ave Highway Auxiliary Lane - M - - M M - M In Chino, from Benson Avenue to San Antonio Avenue Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L On SR-60 at Mountain Avenue Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L SR-60 at Grove Ave interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In Corona, at Route 15/91 Interchange Highway Rehabilitation - - L - M L - L At Tyler St between Diana and Indiana Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Adams St between Diana Ave and Indiana Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L In the city of Riverside at Adams Street Interchange Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L At Madison St between Garden St and Indiana Ave Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L From Central Ave UC to 0.1 mi west of Third Street UC Highway Safety Improvement - - M - M - - L In Upland and Rancho Cucamonga, from Los Angeles County line to east of Etiwanda Avenue Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On SR-210 from 1-215 to 1-10 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H On SR-210 at Waterman Avenue Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On SR-210 at Del Rosa Avenue Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L On SR-210 at Victoria Avenue Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M 1-215 Segments 1-3 & 5: 1-215 landscaping in the city of San Bernardino Highway Landscaping x 0 0 0 0 M 0 0 0 In San Bernardino (city), from 4th St to Junction of 1-15 and 1-215 Highway ITS / Operational Improvements - M L - M M L M On 1-215 from SR-210 to 1-15 Highway HOV/HOT/Express Lanes x - M - H M H L H Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 429 Project Type Sub -Type SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel Person Throughput Safety Mode Share GHG Person and air Delay Accessibility Quality System Reliability On 1-215 at Campus Parkway IC Highway New Interchange x - M L - M L - M On 1-215 at Palm Avenue Highway Interchange Enhancement x - L M - M M L L FROM 0.16 MI N/O 1-15 JCT TO SR 18 Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H FROM CHAMBERLAINE WAY TO 1.8 MI S/O DESERT FLOWER ROAD Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H On US-395 from 1.8 miles SO Desert Flower Road to 0.5 miles SO Farmington Road Highway Capacity Enhancement (highway) x - M L - M M - H Route 15 - Improved weekday frequencies Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 16 - Improved weekday frequencies from MVC to Perris Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Rapid Link - Add midday service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 16 - Improved weekend frequencies Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 217 - Improved weekday frequency and all -day service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 216 - Improved weekday frequency and all -day service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 206 - Improved weekday frequency and all -day service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 208 - Improved weekday frequency and all -day service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 204 - Improved weekday frequency and all -day service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 40 - Add weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 217 - Add all -day weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 216 - Add all -day weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 206 - Add all -day weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 208 - Add all -day weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 204 - Add all -day weekend service Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M New Route - Menifee to Perris via Nuevo Rd Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M New Route - Moreno Valley to Loma Linda Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M New Route - Murrieta-Temecula West Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M New Route - Temecula East Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M New Route - Lake Elsinore to Corona Crossings Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Route 61 - Improved weekday frequencies Transit New Bus H H - H M H M M Railroad Grade Crossing - Olive Street in Colton on the San Bernardino Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Valley Boulevard in Colton on the San Bernardino Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Laurel Street in Colton (Replaces Valley) Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Fogg Street in Colton (Replaces Olive) Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Widen Mount Vernon Avenue grade separation in Colton on the Alhambra Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - In Fontana on Citrus Avenue At Santa Fe Railroad, Construct Undercrossing For Existing 4 Lanes Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Main Street in Grand Terrace on the San Bernardino Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - In Hesperia on Ranchero Road 7th Avenue To Danbury, Realign Road, Construct Railroad Undercrossing Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 430 Project Railroad Grade Crossing - Mauna Loa/Lemon feasibility study) and BNSF Grade Separation (costs from Type Arterial Bridge and Sub -Type SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel Person Throughput Safety Mode Share Person Delay Accessibility GHG and air Quality System Reliability Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Eucalyptus Road in Hesperia on the BNSF Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Beaumont Avenue in Loma Linda on the Yuma Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Monte Vista Avenue in Montclair at the UPRR Crossing Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Widen Central Avenue Alhambra and Los Angeles Lines Railroad Grade Crossing - Archibald Avenue in Railroad Grade Crossing - North Milliken Avenue grade separation in Montclair on the Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Ontario on the Los Angeles Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L in Ontario on the Alhambra Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - South Milliken Avenue in Ontario on the Los Angeles Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Vineyard Avenue in Ontario on the Alhambra Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Haven Avenue in Rancho Cucamonga at Metrolink Crossing Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Railroad crossing safety improvements at San Timoteo Road in Redlands on the Yuma Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Palm Avenue in San Bernardino on the Cajon Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Rialto Avenue in San Bernardino on the San Bernardino Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Hunts Lane in San Bernardino/Colton on the Yuma Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L Railroad Grade Crossing - Glen Helen Parkway in San Bernardino County on Cajon Line Arterial Bridge and Grade Separation - L H - M L - L E Street Corridor (to California) (18.3 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Foothill Boulevard East (16.6 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Foothill Boulevard West (16.2 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Euclid Avenue to Corona (17.9 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H San Bernardino Avenue (11.0 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Holt Avenue/4th Street (20.4 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Grand/Edison Avenues (17.4 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Sierra Avenue (7.6 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Riverside Avenue (16.4 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Haven Avenue (10.4 miles) Transit BRT H H - H M H M H Santa Ana River Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III, IV L M M H M M H L SR-91 Corridor Via Magnolia Ave Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L Cajalco — San Bernardino County Line Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L 1-15 Corridor via Temescal Canyon Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III, IV L M M H M M H L East Corona — Lake Perris via El Sobrante Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III L M M H M M H L East Corona — Lake Perris (Alternative) via Cajalco Rd Active Transportation Bikeway Class - II, III, IV L M M M M M H L Bautista Creek — Perris Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L San Timoteo Canyon Road — Ramona Expressway Active Transportation Bikeway Class - II, IV L L M M M M H L San Bernardino County — Interstate 10 Pass Area Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III, IV L M M H M M H L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 431 Project San Jacinto River Park — Diamond Valley Lake Type Active Transportation Sub -Type Bikeway Class - I, II SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel L Person Throughput M Safety M Mode Share H Person Delay M Accessibility M GHG and air Quality H System Reliability L Bautista Creek — Mission Trail Active Transportation Bikeway Class - II, III L L M M M M H L Lake Elsinore — Murrieta Creek Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III, IV L M M H M M H L Aberhill Ranch — Ramona Expressway Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II, III, IV L M M H M M H L Jefferson Avenue — Lake Skinner Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L 1-215 South Corridor Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L 1-215 Central Corridor Active Transportation Bikeway Class - 1, II, III L M M H M M H L Gilman Springs Road — Beaumont Active Transportation Bikeway Class - 1, II, IV L M M H M M H L Lake Skinner — San Diego County Active Transportation Bikeway Class - 1, IV L M M H M M H L Riverside Hunter Park — Downtown Menifee Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L East Riverside — Moreno Beach Drive Active Transportation Bikeway Class - 11, IV L L M M M M H L Lake Mathews Loop Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, 11 L M M H M M H L Lake Elsinore Loop Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, I1, III L M M H M M H L Diamond Valley Lake Lakeview Trail Active Transportation Bikeway Class - I, II L M M H M M H L Perris Reservoir Loop Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Murrieta Creek — Temecula Creek Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Adelanto Rd. - Air Expressway to 0.12mi. S Holly Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Mojave Dr. - Mesquite Rd. to Highway 395 Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Cactus Rd. - Aster Rd. to Highway 395 Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Alembic St. - Norco St. to Falchion Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Alembic St. - Stoddard Wells Rd. to Norco St. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Apple Valley Rd. - Bear Valley Rd. to Jess Ranch Pkwy. Active Transportation Bikeway Class II L L M M M M H L Apple Valley Rd. - Falchion Rd. to Ohna Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Bear Valley Rd. - Central Rd. to Joshua Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Bear Valley Rd. - W City Limit to Central Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Central Rd. - Bear Valley Rd. to Mojave St. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Central Rd. - Stoddard Wells Rd. to Waalew Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class II L L M M M M H L Central Rd.A - Waalew Rd. to Bear Valley Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Choco Rd. - Saugus Rd. to Norco St. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Choco Rd. - Seneca Rd. to Yucca Loma Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class III L L L L M M H L Choco Rd. - Waalew Rd. to Corwin Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Corwin Rd. - Choco Rd. to Dakota Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Dakota Rd. - Fresno Rd. to Corwin Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Dale Evans Pkwy. - Corwin Rd. to Waalew Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Dale Evans Pkwy. - Fresno Rd. to Corwin Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Dale Evans Pkwy. - Outer 1-15 S to Fresno Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 1 L M M H M M H L Deep Creek Rd. - Sitting Bull Rd. to Tussing Ranch Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class 11 L L M M M M H L Note: * Evaluation Criteria are consistent with CTC CMCP and SCCP guidelines evaluation criteria. L = Low, M = Medium, H = High 432 Project Del Oro Rd. - Apple Valley Rd. to Denison Rd. Type Active Transportation Sub -Type Bikeway Class II SCAG RTP Primary Evaluation Criteria* Secondary Evaluation Criteria* Vehicle Miles of Travel L Person Throughput Safety M Mode Share M Person Delay M Accessibility M GHG and air Quality H System Reliability L L Esaws Ave. - Central Rd. to Joshua Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Falchion Rd. - Outer 1-15 S to Norco St. Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Fresno Rd. - Dachshund Ave. to Navajo Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class II L L M M M M H L Fresno Rd. - Dale Evans Pkwy. to Dachshund Ave. Active Transportation Bikeway Class I L M M H M M H L Havasu Rd. - Seneca Rd. to Yucca Loma Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class III L L L L M M H L Highway 18. - W. Town Limit to Apple Valley Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class II L L M M M M H L Kiowa Rd. - Tussing Ranch Rd. to Ocotillo Way Active Transportation Bikeway Class II L L M M M M H L Lafayette St. - Dale Evans Pkwy. to Central Rd. Active Transportation Bikeway Class