Loading...
09 September 24, 2020 CSTACRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council TIME: 10:00 a.m. DATE: Thursday, September 24 LOCATION: Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. COUNCIL MEMBERS Lisa Castilone, GRID Alternatives, Western and Southwest Riverside County John Chavez, Retired, the Pass George Colangeli, Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency, Palo Verde Valley Betty Day, Hemet Public Library Trustee, Hemet -San Jacinto Alejandra Gonzalez, Norco Seniors on the Move, Western Riverside County John Krick, T-Now Member, Western Riverside County Jack Marty, Retired Citizen, Banning Priscilla Ochoa, Blindness Support Services, Western Riverside County Mary Jo Ramirez, Workforce Development Member, Southwest Riverside County Catherine Rips, Angel View, Coachella Valley Gloria J. Sanchez, Menifee Senior Advisory, Southwest Riverside County 'vet Woolridge, Independent Living Partnership, Riverside County Kenneth Woytek, Menifee Senior Advisory Committee, Southwest Riverside County Riverside Transit Agency, Western Riverside County SunLine Transit Agency, Coachella Valley RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSIT OPERATORS City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Corona City of Riverside Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Riverside County Transportation Commission — Commuter Rail & Coachella Valley Rail Program Riverside Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency kPoSTAFF� Lorelle Moe -Luna, Multimodal Services Director Eric DeHate, Transit Manager Monica Morales, Senior Management Analyst Ariel Alcon Tapia, Management Analyst RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS AND SPECIALIZED TRANSIT ADVISORY COUNCIL www. rctc. orq AGENDA * *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 10:00 a.m. Thursday, September 24, 2020 Pursuant to Governor Newsom's Executive Order N-29-20, (March 18, 2020), the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council meeting will only be conducted via video conferencing and by telephone. Please follow the instructions below to join the meeting remotely. INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION Join Zoom Meeting https:firctc.zoom.us/i/87270319311 Meeting ID: 872 7031 9311 One tap mobile +16699006833„87270319311# US +1 669 900 6833 US Meeting ID: 872 7031 9311 For members of the public wishing to submit comment in connection with the Committee Meeting please email written comments to the Clerk of the Board at Imobley@rctc.orq prior to September 23, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. and your comments will be made part of the official record of the proceedings. Members of the public may also make public comments through their telephone or Zoom connection when recognized by the Chair. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS 1 Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council September 24, 2020 Page 2 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — July 9, 2019 and December 3, 2019 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) 6. ELECTION OF OFFICERS Overview This item is for the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council to conduct an election of officers for 2020 — Chair, Vice Chair and Second Vice Chair. 7. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN UPDATES AND TRANSIT FUNDING ALLOCATIONS Overview This item is for the Committee to receive and file Fiscal years 2020/21 — 2024/25 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning (Banning), Beaumont (Beaumont), Corona (Corona), and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission's FY 2020/21 — 2024/25 SRTP for the Rail and Vanpool Programs. S. COMMITTEE MEMBER / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Committee Members, transit operators, and staff to report on attended and upcoming meetings/conferences and issues related to Committee activities. 9. ADJOURNMENT The next Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council meeting is to be determined. 2 AGENDA ITEM 4 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL Minutes July 9, 2019 1. CALL TO ORDER Ariel Alcon Tapia, Management Analyst, called the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council to order at 11:02 a.m. in the March Field Conference Room at Riverside County Transportation Commission, 4080 Lemon St, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members Present Victor Duran Joe Forgiarini Jack Marty Priscilla Ochoa Linda Samulski Richard Smith Mary Venerable 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS Members Absent Laura Hernandez Linda Samulski Richard Smith Arnold San Miguel with Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) announced SCAG is preparing their draft regional transportation plan. The draft is scheduled to be released in September/October 2019. He encouraged everyone to give his or her input for the transportation plan. 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES The minutes for the June 21, 2018 meeting will be approved at the next CAC Meeting. 5. PUBLIC HEARING —TRANSIT NEEDS IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY See attached transcript. 6. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There were no additions/revisions to the agenda. 7. FISCAL YEARS 2019/20 — 2021/22 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS 4 Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council July 9, 2019 Page 2 Dale Reynolds from Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. He reported the LCTOP Program has been implemented in the valley to provide free rides for K-12 students to help educate them on how to use the transit system. Art Vela from the City of Banning presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. He reported the Transit Division has moved to the city's Public Works Department effective July 1, 2019. He also reported the City of Beaumont and the City of Banning have entered into an Interagency Services Agreement, and as a result, there will be 2 transfer stations within their cities- one at the Wal-Mart Shopping Center and one at the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital. Celina Cabrera from City of Beaumont presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. Service changes include re-routing and eliminating one bus on Route 2, adding a second bus route on CommuterLink 120. They have also added a stop to Casino Morongo. They will be completing a Comprehensive Operations Analysis to help better understand their demographic in the Pass Area. Sudesh Paul from City of Corona presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. She reported the city awarded a new contract for transit service on September 1, 2018. They are focusing on contract monitoring and service improvements. Ron Profeta from City of Riverside presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. The city plans to change the image of special transportation. They are branding their service as Riverside Connect. They are also launching electronic fare collection systemx, that will include a mobile app and the ability to set up an online account. Joe Forgiarini from Riverside Transit Agency presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. RTA will be increasing frequencies on routes in Perris and Hemet/San Jacinto areas. They are also testing mid -day CommuterLink service for a couple of existing routes and adding more weekend service. Victor Duran from SunLine Transit Agency presented the 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. He reported their agency has experienced a 2.3% ridership increase. They attribute the increase to several new programs: the Hall Pass Program, which provides free bus rides to college students; Palm Springs bus service; and their rideshare program. They have also recently launched a mobile app. He also announced Sunline's redesign which reduced the number of fixed routes for more frequent service along the most heavily used corridors. Service changes for the redesign begin in January 2020. Ariel Alcon Tapia presented Riverside County Transportation Commission's 2019/20 — 2021/22 SRTP. He reported MetroLink is planning to launch marketing campaigns and a ridership loyalty plan in the upcoming year. RCTC also plans to partner with other transit agencies to market special trains, e.g. Angels Express, Festival of Lights. 8. REBOOT MY COMMUTE PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM SUMMARY 5 Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council July 9, 2019 Page 3 Per RCTC staff's direction, this item was removed from the agenda. 9. COMMITTEE MEMBER/STAFF REPORT Ariel Alcon Tapia reported that CAC Member Pamela Brown passed away on May 27, 2019. 10. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council, the meeting adjourned at 12:46 p.m. in remembrance of Pamela Brown. Respectfully submitted, Lbfelle Moe -Luna Multimodal Services Director 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSIT NEEDS HEARING 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, July 9, 2019 Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, March Field Conference Room Riverside, CA 92501 Public Hearings Transcription Hearing Board: Joe Forgiarini, CAC Member, RTA CTSA Jack Marty, CAC Member Linda Samulski, CAC Member John Standiford, RCTC Deputy Executive Director Mary Venerable, CAC Member Michael Williams, CAC Member, SunLine CTSA RCTC Staff Members: Lorelle Moe -Luna, Multimodal Services Director Ariel Alcon Tapia, Management Analyst Monica Morales, Management Analyst Jennifer Anderson, Senior Administrative Assistant Public Hearing was called to order at 11:06 a.m. by Lorelle Moe -Luna. Lorelle Moe: Luna: I'm going to go ahead and open the public hearing. My name is Lorelle Moe - Luna, I'm the Multimodal Services Director for RCTC. RCTC is holding a public hearing today to receive comments from the public on transit needs in Riverside County. The services and needs raised through the public hearing will be used to assist in the evaluation of current transit services. If you have a comment or complaint regarding specific drivers, missed trips, or specific routes, we would ask that you contact the service provider directly. We are here today to receive comments about public transit service needs and how we can improve services in terms of coverage, expansion, gaps in service, etc. Those of you who wish to address the hearing board which is comprised of our Citizens Advisory Committee may fill out a speaker card, a yellow one, located in the back or we can pass one out to you. Please make sure you include a mailing address, email address, or some way we can contact you so we can provide you with a response to your comments. It would also be helpful if you would provide a phone number in case we have to clarify any parts of your statement. If you would prefer to just listen today and give us some Unmet Transit Needs Hearing Tuesday, July 9, 2019 Page 2 written comments instead, you are welcome to that. You can also send your comments to our RCTC address at 4080 Lemon St., Riverside, CA 92501 or you can email me at Imoe- luna@RCTC.org. I am going to go ahead and open the public hearing, what I'll do is call on those that have a comment card, I'll do that in the order that I receive them. We are here to receive your input and we can't necessarily respond to your comments today, but I can assure that any sort of input you provide us with today will be reviewed and shared with the appropriate transit provider. Our role here today is to listen, and we appreciated your effort to be here for this particular hearing. I know we are limiting comments to three minutes. We also have this being recorded and minutes being taken by our RCTC staff, so we will have a record of what you provide. CAC members may also provide a comment, but you would also need to fill out a comment card. So, our first commenter is Mr. Keith White. Mr. Keith White: I am a resident of Eastvale, I am Keith White, in Eastvale, the way Eastvale was divided some areas are harder to design bus routes. We have stops on Hamner, by Shayner to access busses. You cannot access busses that way, for kids who how take busses, that's one way Eastvale needs to improve. Can you figure out how to fund this? Eastvale has long walks or long ways to shopping centers. Eastvale is mostly housing tracts so we need to figure out how to get more busses on Main St. by housing tracts. Another issue is, do I have more time? Another issue is in Corona, Compton Avenue. I have doctors over there and no bus service that gets to those doctors. The nearest are a block away I believe, uphill or downhill, so you can't get to those back houses for senior citizens now have to take the bus for some people that's another issue. We got to have have more busses at night time for people who want to get to activities the problem is the carriers don't have this service, carriers have more traffic in other areas so that's another issue we need to look at. Then with this new law coming out by 2040, all busses must be electric we need to figure how to get more wheel chairs on these busses on 2012, cause we knows it's' more expensive, we need to get three wheel chairs on the buses. We need to maybe put two in the front and one in the back. We need to look at those issues. The wheel chairs are being passed up. We had an incident just the other night on 29 line that we had to pass up a wheel chair because there were already two wheel chairs on the bus. The wheel chairs are being left behind. That's the biggest major issue we have. A lot of senior can't get to their appointments so they have to use dial a ride, which is more money. A lot of senior citizens are low income, I'm low income and I do rely on the busses. We have to build more busses later at night. We need to get more cars off the road and more need get more citizens to ride the busses cause you got more cars on the road than busses. Yet SB 1 money that we are using I know in Eastvale. We need to look at those issues, especially the wheel chairs. Before you guys get brand new busses we need to figure out those issues. Lorelle Moe- Luna: Thank you Keith, we have another CAC member that just joined us. Will you introduce yourself. 8 Unmet Transit Needs Hearing Tuesday, July 9, 2019 Page 3 Mary Venable: My question to you is, you have an excellent presentation about what the needs are, have you ever you put this in writing? Keith White: I have contacted RTA a long time ago about it Mary Venable: My recommendation to you is to put this in writing because there are a lot of suggestion or comments, or complaint made, but we cannot do anything if they are not in writing. Keith White: This is my first time here, I'll put in writing Mary Venable: Understood, understood, this is a learning experience for both of us. Lorelle Moe -Luna: Thank you Keith. Does anyone have a speaker card that they would like to comment, no. Thank you so much Keith. All of you that are here are welcome to stay for the duration of the meeting we are going to be receiving some presentation from each of the transit operators, which we will go into next. Oh, I'm sorry, I'll go ahead and officially close the public hearings at this time if there are no other comments. 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL Minutes December 3, 2019 1. CALL TO ORDER Lorelle Moe -Luna, Multi -Modal Services Director, called the meeting to order at 10:31 a.m. in the March Field Conference Room at Riverside County Transportation Commission, 4080 Lemon St, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members Present Brittney Sowell Joe Forgiarini Jack Marty Priscilla Ochoa Linda Samulski Richard Smith 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS None 4. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS None 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES Members Absent Laura Hernandez Mary Venerable Motion was made by Smith, seconded by Marty to approve the minutes for the June 21, 2018 and the July 9, 2019 meetings were approved as submitted. The motion carried. 6. BYLAWS OF THE CITIZENS AND SPECIALIZED TRANSIT ADVISORY COUNCIL Eric DeHate, Transit Manager, provided an overview of the proposed bylaws and name change. John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, provided additional clarifying comments. Discussion ensued regarding the renaming of the Committee, membership of the Committee, training, mission statements, alternates, and outreach. Motion was made by Sowell, seconded by Smith, to approve the revised bylaws of the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Council (CAC/SSTAC); Rename the CAC/SSTAC to the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council (CSTAC); and 10 Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council December 3, 2019 Page 2 forward to the Commission for final action. The committee added to the original motion to have staff add language to the staff report presented to the Commission that recounts discussion and suggestions from the meeting. The motion carried. 7. NEXT GENERATION RAIL CORRIDORS ANALYSIS REPORT Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager, provided an overview of the Next Generation Rail Corridors Analysis. 8. COMMITTEE MEMBER/STAFF REPORT Joe Forgiarini announced he has accepted a position with another agency, LA Metro. Brittany Sowell provided an update regarding Sunline's Fill the Bus event. Ariel Alcon-Tapia, RCTC Management Analyst, provided an update on the Festival of Lights train service. Lorelle Moe -Luna announced the Coordinated Plan will be coming to the next meeting. John Standiford announced the Commission is considering a Traffic Relief Plan that may include a half cent sales tax be included on the November 2020 ballot. In response to questions from Mr. Marty, Monica Morales, Management Analyst, provided a brief overview of the TDA audit process which includes looking at services being provided and unmet transit needs. In response to comments and questions from Mr. Marty, Ms. Sowell suggested comments be brought up during the service change period for each transit operator. 9. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council, the meeting adjourned at 11:35 a.m. Respectfully submitted, CIL Lorelle Moe -Luna Multimodal Services Director 11 AGENDA ITEM 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 24, 2020 TO: Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council FROM: Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Election of Officers STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council to conduct an election of officers for 2020 — Chair, Vice Chair and Second Vice Chair. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its December meeting, the Commission approved the revised bylaws of the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Council (CAC/SSTAC) and the renaming of the CAC/SSTAC to the Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council (CSTAC). Sections 5.2 and 5.3 of the bylaws state nominees for the positions of Chair, Vice Chair, and Second (2nd) Vice Chair shall be submitted and voted on by the Council during the first (1st) meeting of the calendar year. All nominees shall be members of the Council. The term of all officers shall be for one (1) year or up to two (2) years, upon approval of the Council. Once the election has been conducted, the new Chair, Vice Chair and Second Vice Chair will immediately be seated in their new positions. Agenda Item 6 13 AGENDA ITEM 7 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 24, 2020 TO: Citizens and Specialized Transit Advisory Council FROM: Eric DeHate, Transit Manager THROUGH: Lorelle Moe -Luna, Multimodal Services Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Updates and Transit Funding Allocations STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Council to: 1) Receive and file Fiscal years 2020/21— 2024/25 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning (Banning), Beaumont (Beaumont), Corona (Corona), and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission's FY 2020/21 — 2024/25 SRTP for the Rail and Vanpool Programs. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The SRTPs serve as the county's primary justification for federal and state grants for transit operations and capital and provides a short-term vision of public transportation for the county including strategies that will help guide transportation decisions over the next three to five years. In Riverside County, there are seven public bus transit operators (Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; RTA; SunLine; and PVVTA), and the Commission as a commuter rail and vanpool operator — a total of eight transit operators. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze, and recommend potential productivity improvements to ensure federal, state, and local funds are allocated to transit operators to provide needed transit services for county residents. An annual SRTP update is a mechanism to meet this obligation and coordinate transit services throughout the county. The core components of each agency's SRTP includes the operating and capital plans and project justifications that are utilized as the basis for receiving transit funding. The SRTPs also document each operator's system and route performance data, which provide the basis for the Commission's oversight activities to ensure compliance with the Transportation Development Act (TDA), federal regulations, state law, and Commission -adopted policies and guidelines. COVID-19 Impacts on Transit Since mid -March 2020 when the Governor issued a stay at home order due to COVID-19, transit ridership plummeted 80 to 90 percent in just a few weeks, causing many transit operators to Agenda Item 7 15 reduce their scheduled services. Transit operators continue to monitor ridership closely and have implemented enhanced safety and sanitization measures for their vehicles, bus stops, and transit centers. While there is still much uncertainty to when schools will reopen and the stay at home order will be lifted, the FY 2020/21 service plans address how scheduled services might return to pre-COVID levels under fiscally conservative economic conditions. For FY 2020/21, it is estimated that countywide ridership (excluding Metrolink data which is unavailable at this time) will reach almost 8.1 million, a decrease of about 42 percent from planned ridership for FY 2019/20 due to COVID-19. The proposed service plans also provide flexibility to ensure that when local and state health provisions are lifted, they can adapt quickly to market changes. SRTP HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2020/21 At the June 10, 2020 Commission meeting, the Commission approved the operators' final SRTPs. Due to COVID-19, the operators and the Commission may have amendments to the SRTPs as funding obligations and needs may evolve. The following are service and capital program highlights for FY 2020/21 by operator. Banning (Attachment 1) Banning provides both Dial -A -Ride and three fixed route services and primarily covers the areas of Banning and Cabazon and provides connections to the Morongo Indian Reservation and Walmart in Beaumont. Banning estimates a total of $1.9 million in operating and $0.6 million in capital assistance needs, a combined increase about 4 percent from FY 2019/20 primarily due to the addition of a Transit Manager position. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Continued reduction of operating hours for Routes 1 and 6 as long as the stay at home orders remain in place; • Rebranding of its transit system (Banning Connect) with marketing to increase ridership and update all stops, materials, and fleet with the new logos; • Deployment of a new data platform in improving system performance, service reliability and real-time passenger information; • Upgrading the existing compressed natural gas (CNG) station; and • Replacement of one fixed route bus. Beaumont (Attachment 2) Beaumont provides both Dial -A -Ride and seven fixed route services. It primarily operates in Beaumont with stops in Banning and Calimesa. Beaumont estimates a total of $3.0 million in operating and $1.3 million in capital assistance needs, a combined decrease of about 27 percent from FY 2019/20 due to a reduction in capital assistance needs. Agenda Item 7 16 Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Continued reduction of services for Commuter Link Route 120/125 and Route 3/4 as long as the stay at home orders remain in place; • Implementation of a free fare promotion for seniors, veterans, and disabled passengers for one year; • Completion of a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA), including a fare elasticity analysis; • Redevelopment of the Walmart Transportation Hub for added capacity of buses and passenger amenities; • Construction of a new CNG fueling station; • Design and engineering of the fleet maintenance and operations building; and • Procurement of two electric vehicles for paratransit services. Corona (Attachment 3) Corona operates two fixed routes known as the Corona Cruiser and a Dial -A -Ride program for seniors and persons with disabilities within the city limits and neighboring communities of Coronita, El Cerrito, Home Gardens, and Norco. Corona estimates a total of $2.9 million in operating and $0.5 million in capital assistance needs, a combined increase of about 15 percent from FY 2019/20 primarily due to an increase in materials, marketing and utilities for translation services of various transit documents to comply with Title VI, contracted services expenses for updating the Triennial Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program, and the implementation of a COA. Planned services and projects in FY 2020/21 include: • Fixed route service schedule adjustments for better connections, particularly for morning peak service; • Implementation of a free fare program for special events and programs such as Bike to Work Day, Dump the Pump Day, Fixed Route Training Program, and Summer Student Program; • Improving Dial -A -Ride services by reviewing the feasibility of establishing an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) subscription services policy; • Working with the City's contract transportation operator to improve on -time performance, bus maintenance and cleanliness, and maintenance of bus stops; • Procuring services to conduct a COA to identify strengths as well as opportunities for service improvements; • Procuring services for quarterly inspection of buses to ensure state of good repair; • Procuring services to update the Triennial DBE Program for FY 2022/23; and • Implementation of many needed capital projects such as the Intelligent Transportation System, Bus Stop Improvement Project, purchase of an ADA accessible van, Agenda Item 7 17 implementation of a Digital Mobile Land Communication System, installation of a canopy/roof structure for the bus parking area, and route development buses. City of Riverside — Special Services (Attachment 4) Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation Dial -A -Ride for seniors and persons with disabilities within the Riverside city limits. RSS serves as the primary paratransit provider for those eligible within the city of Riverside. RSS differs from RTA's Dial -A -Ride by providing service only within Riverside city limits and serves seniors 60 years and older, as compared to RTA's Dial -A -Ride which serves seniors 65 years and older. RSS estimates a total of $5.4 million in operating and $0.6 million in capital assistance needs, a combined increase of about 17 percent from FY 2019/20 primarily due to capital projects such as vehicle replacements and equipment upgrades to improve operational efficiencies. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Implementation of electronic fare collection and online reservations; • Procurement of a consultant to assist in a strategic planning process; • Replacement of three CNG mini -buses that have met their useful life; • Upgrading computer software; and • Renovation of the dispatch office area. PVVTA (Attachment 5) PVVTA provides six fixed route/deviated fixed routes services known as "Desert Roadrunner," ADA paratransit service, and a transportation reimbursement program for individuals who are unable to access fixed route services. The fixed route service can deviate up to three-quarters of a mile away from the actual fixed route. Service is provided within the city of Blythe and surrounding unincorporated areas in the Palo Verde Valley. PVVTA estimates a total of $1.7 million in operating and $0.4 million in capital assistance needs, a combined increase of about 10 percent from FY 2019/20. This is due to expanding the Blythe Wellness Express to a three-day a week service and the replacement of a fixed route bus. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Continued reduction of operating hours for Routes 1 and 2 in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic; • Increasing service on the Blythe Wellness Express to three days a week; • Upgrading of computer software; • Replacement of a fixed route bus; and • Encouraging new ridership through targeted marketing campaigns. RTA (Attachment 6) Agenda Item 7 18 RTA operates 36 local, intercity, and regional fixed routes; nine CommuterLink express routes; and Dial -A -Ride services. RTA is also the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) for Western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the service area and providing driver training and grant application assistance to operators in Western County. RTA estimates a total of $82.4 million in operating and $2.6 million in capital assistance needs, a combined decrease of about 37 percent from FY 2019/20. This is attributable to significant reductions in service and expected Dial -A -Ride demand and not programming capital funding for the partial replacements of the heavy-duty CNG fleet, the contracted fixed route fleet, and the Dial -A -Ride fleet. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Continued Sunday -level and modified CommuterLink services as needed during the COVID-19 pandemic; • Discontinuation of Routes 26 and 210 in September 2020; • Elimination of various unproductive trips and schedule modifications to create a stronger, more efficient system; • Completion of the Zero Emission Bus (ZEB) Analysis; • Conducting a Route Reconstruction Study that aligns with post-COVID landscape, ZEB requirements, and new funding environment; and • Reprogramming of funding from the cancelled UCR Mobility Hub to the Canyon Crest Turnout project, Associated Transit Improvements, and replacement of non -revenue vehicles resulting in a net zero change. SunLine (Attachment 7) SunLine operates 15 local and regional fixed routes; one express route known as "Commuter Link"; demand response service branded as "SunDial"; and a vanpool program branded as "SolVan". SunLine is also the CTSA for the Coachella Valley and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the Coachella Valley. SunLine estimates a total of $40.1 million in operating and $6.3 million in capital assistance needs, for a combined decrease of about 12 percent from FY 2019/20 due to a reduction in capital programming. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • Continued Sunday -level service as needed during the COVID-19 pandemic; • Implementation of initial phases of the transit redesign service system that focuses on consolidating fixed routes to provide more productive routes with higher frequencies; • Introduction of microtransit services; • Facility and infrastructure projects such as replacement of operations facility, hydrogen fueling station, CNG fueling station, and Center of Excellence facility; • Purchase of 9 replacement CNG fixed route buses; • Expansion of SunLine property to include a solar farm; and • Increased revenue through the advertising program. Agenda Item 7 19 RCTC Rail and Vanpool Programs (Attachment 8) Western County Commuter Rail The Commission is a member agency of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) that operates the Metrolink commuter rail system. Of the 57 stations on the Metrolink system, the Commission owns and maintains nine stations that are located in Western Riverside County. The Western County Commuter Rail program reflects the Commission's share of Metrolink operating and capital subsidies, station operations and maintenance, right-of-way maintenance, and program administration and support. As of June 2020, total operating costs were estimated at $48.9 million and capital of $8.8 million, a combined decrease of about 1 percent from the prior year. Planned services and projects for FY 2020/21 include: • SCRRA will continue operating with a 30 percent reduction level of service through the first quarter due to COVID-19 and will focus its efforts on maintaining and regaining riders; • Completion of station rehabilitation projects such as elevator replacements, pavement rehabilitation, station painting, bike and pedestrian improvements, and upgraded lighting and electrical; • Increasing safety and sanitization measures at Metrolink stations such as social distancing platform placards for waiting areas, signage, hand sanitization stations, and enhanced daily and monthly deep cleaning routines for high traffic surfaces such as handrails, ticket vending machines, and elevators; and • Construction of the Riverside -Downtown Layover Facility North Expansion project. Coachella Valley — San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service The proposed 200-mile long rail corridor service in Coachella Valley will run from Los Angeles to Indio through the four Southern California counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino to provide a convenient scheduled link to the communities in the fast-growing Coachella Valley and Banning Pass areas. Financial support for project development will come primarily from federal and state grant funds received and maintained in the Coachella Valley Rail Fund. Major planning highlights for FY 2020/21 include the public release of a Tier 1 Program -level Environmental Documentation and Service Development Plan. The total capital programming request for FY 2021/21 is $0.7 million for the completion of this planning effort. VanClub The Commission's vanpool program known as VanClub is the newest transit program in the county and was launched in May 2018. VanClub is a valuable transportation alternative option in areas that are hard to serve by transit and supports long-distance commuters by offering a subsidy which reduces the cost of the vanpool lease. The total operating request for FY 2020/21 Agenda Item 7 20 is $1.9 million, an increase of about 19 percent from FY 2019/20. This is attributable to the transition of a new application and database system, subsidies and incentives to help promote growth post -pandemic which will result in an overall increase in program performance and participation. Planned service enhancements for FY 2020/21 will include: • Transition from a locally provisioned Inland Empire -based rideshare and vanpool system to a regional platform solution which will expand the commuter database and improve ridematching capabilities; • Procurement for a contract with additional leasing vendors to expand VanClub participant vehicle options; • Expanding employer partnerships and new market development with a direct business - to -consumer strategy; and • Continuing efforts to increase the number of leased park and ride spaces. SRTP FINANCIAL OVERVIEW In June 2020, the Commission approved about $210.7 million in total funding to support the FY 2020/21 operating and capital requests for the provision of transit services in Riverside County. To implement the SRTPs for FY 2020/21, the programming plan is to utilize available funding of approximately $189.0 million for operating and $21.7 million for capital purposes. Table 1 below provides a comparative overview of the total operating and capital costs from the prior year. Systemwide, this represents a 24 percent decrease compared to FY 2019/20 funding levels. Table 1: FY 2020/21 and FY 2019/20 Operating and Capital Costs* Fiscal Year Operating Capital Total 2019/20 $190,473,191 $84,849,413 $275,322,604 2020/21 $189,001,056 $21,725,536 $210,726,592 % Change -0.8% -74.4% -23.5% *Excludes FY2019/20 and FY2020/21 amendments approved since June 2020. Table 2 below provides an overview of the operating and capital costs by funding source required to support the County's transit operations. Typically, state funds, primarily Local Transportation Funds (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA), make up the largest share of operating and capital funds. However, this year with the passage of the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds will make up the majority share of funding. Federal funds will account for about $138.4 million (66 percent) of revenues, followed by state funds totaling about $52.2 million (25 percent), and local revenues representing about $20.1 million (9 percent). Agenda Item 7 21 Table 2: FY 2020/21 Funding Source Breakdown* Fund Type Fund Name Amount Percent of Total Funding Federal FTA CARES $ 95,930,168 45.5% FTA 5307 $ 30, 895, 510 14.7% FTA 5310 $ 418,947 0.2% FTA 5311 $ 1,172, 396 0.6% FTA 5312 $ 37,320 0.0% FTA 5337 $ 4,000,000 1.9% FTA 5339 $ 384,700 0.2% CMAQ $ 5,279,357 2.5% Other Federal Funds $ 255,000 0.1% Federal Subtotal $ 138,373,398 65.7% State LCTOP $ 5,994,635 2.8% LTF $ 36, 000, 783 17.1% SGR $ 4,140,341 2.0% STA $ 6,057,070 2.9% State Subtotal $ 52,192, 829 24.8% Local AB 2766 $ 20,000 0.0% Interest $ 471,000 0.2% Measure A $ 11,515,583 5.5% Other Local Revenues $ 4,237,507 2.0% Passenger Fares $ 3,916,275 1.9% Local Subtotal $ 20,160,365 9.6% Total for Federal, State and Local Funding $ 210,726,592 100% *Excludes FY 2020/21 SRTP amendments Transit operators may experience potential delays in receiving federal reimbursements. Staff will work with larger operators such as RTA and SunLine to advance as much LTF and Measure A in the first quarter up to the approved amount in this item to address potential cash flow issues. Funding allocations by operator for FY 2020/21 are based on Table 4.0: Summary of Funds Requested in each SRTP. This table is used as the primary basis for allocating operating and capital revenues under the Commission's authority. Future funding needs described in the SRTP beyond FY 2020/21 are solely for projection and planning purposes. Staff reviewed the transit operators' funding requests for farebox ratio compliance and other eligibility requirements. The Commission approved the FY 2020/21 SRTP updates (Attachments 1 — 8), funding allocations as summarized in Attachment 9, and subsequent programming of federally -funded and regionally significant projects into the FTIP in June 2020. Fiscal Impact LTF, STA, State of Good Repair (SGR), and Measure A fund allocations, as well as Rail and Vanpool FTA, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ), and Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Agenda Item 7 22 (LCTOP) funds are included in the Commission's approved FY 2020/21 budget. The various other FTA, CMAQ, LCTOP, and AB 2766 funds, as well as passenger fares and other revenues, received directly by the transit operators are not included in the Commission's budget. Should any funding revenue projections change, or transit operators require additional funds, staff will return to the Commission with amendments as necessary. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2020/21 Amount: $36,000,783 (LTF) $6,057,070 (STA) $11,515,583 (Measure A) $4,140,341 (SGR) Source of Funds: TDA (LTF and STA); Measure A; and SGR Budget Adjustment: No GLA No • LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND Western County Bus STATE TRANSIT ASSISTANCE Western County Bus 002210 86101 601 62 86101 $16,594,828 Western County Rail 002201 86102 241 62 86102 $2,180,172 Coachella Valley Bus 002213 97001 601 62 97001 $7,320,766 Coachella Valley Bus 002202 86102 241 62 86102 $2,968,598 Coachella Valley Rail 002211 86101 601 62 86101 $11,000,000 Palo Verde Valley 002202 97001 241 62 97001 $672,000 Palo Verde Valley 002212 86101 601 62 86101 $1,085,189 002203 86102 241 62 86102 $236,300 MEASURE A Western Commuter Rail Operating STATE OF GOOD REPAIR Western Riverside Bus 265-33-XXXXX $4,160,400 265-24-XXXXX $1,399,300 Coachella Valley Specialized Transit 002221 86102 242 62 86102 $2,486,553 Western Riverside Rail 002224 86102 242 62 86102 $837,037 Coachella Valley Bus 258-26-86101 $5,955,883 002222 86102 242 62 86102 $779,796 Palo Verde Valley 002223 86102 242 62 86102 $36,955 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \J,ov Date: 05/22/2020 Attachments: 1) City of Banning, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 2) City of Beaumont, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 3) City of Corona, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 4) City of Riverside, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 5) PVVTA, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 6) RTA, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 7) SunLine, FY 2020/21— FY 2022/23 SRTP 8) RCTC, FY 2020/21— FY 2024/25 SRTP 9) FY 2020/21 Transit Operator Funding Allocations Agenda Item 7 23 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021 - 2022/2023 �'� BANN/NGCONNfCT TRANSIT SYSTEM City of Banning 99 E. Ramsey Street Banning, CA 92220 951.922.3130 24 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 System Overview 1.1 Description of Service Area and System Map 3 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections 5 1.3 Description of Services by Mode/Route 6 1.4 Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles/Hours 7 1.5 Current Fare Structure 8 1.6 Revenue Fleet 9 1.7 Existing Facility 11 1.8 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies 11 1.9 Reference List of Prior Studies and Plans 11 2 Existing Services and Route Performance 2.1 Description of Key Performance Indicators 12 2.2 SRTP Performance Report 13 2.3 SRTP Service Summary 15 2.4 Service Performance 23 2.5 Productivity Improvement Efforts 29 2.6 Major Trip Generators 29 2.7 Recent Service Changes 29 3 Future Service Plans, Fare Changes, Capital Planning and Marketing 3.1 Planned Service Changes for FY 21-23 30 3.2 Future Marketing Plans, Studies and Promotion 30 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth 31 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes 32 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning 32 4 Financial Planning 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget Narrative 34 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Operating and Capital Program 39 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 41 • ADA, DBE, EEO, Title VI • TDA Triennial Audit, FTA Triennial Audit, NTD • Alternative Fueled Vehicles 4.4 Open Projects 43 5 Attachments Attachment No. 1: Interagency Services Agreement 45 25 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Chapter 1: System Overview 1.1 — Description of Service Area The City of Banning ("Banning") is strategically located astride Interstate 10 between the Inland Empire and the Coachella Valley in the San Gorgonio Pass. The City, incorporated in 1913, has a rich and colorful history. Initially Banning served as a stagecoach and railroad stop between the Arizona territories and Los Angeles. This history has contributed to the present-day spirit of pioneer resourcefulness and "can do" attitude that is so prevalent in the community. Banning has provided public transportation service since April 1973, which expanded to two routes in September 1985. The current transit system comprises three fixed -route services and a Dial -a -Ride system that is limited to seniors (60 + years of age) and persons with disabilities, including riders certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The newest of the three fixed routes, the Cabazon service, which began in July 1995, extends from Banning east to the unincorporated area of Cabazon. This route was extended in January 2000 to provide a route deviation to serve a remote residential area in eastern Cabazon. The Banning transit system serves several areas, including the commercial and residential areas of Banning and Cabazon, as well as the commercial areas of the Morongo Indian Reservation and limited commercial areas in the City of Beaumont ("Beaumont"). Banning transit services cover approximately 35 square miles in the pass area with routes connecting to regional services. Within the service area, population is mixed with areas of both high and low densities. The current routes have been planned by taking advantage of this knowledge, allowing the system to operate more efficiently. 26 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Service Area Map Bogart =aunty Park HIghkand Springs CITY OF BANNING TRANSIT SYSTEM MAP 2i BNG LEGEND Route 1 Route 5 Route 6 Route 5/6 Combo (Wknd Route Only) 23 Morongo Re:,ervnt ion onira ,7d� Raikroad Ave City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1.2 — Population Profile and Area Demographics Riverside County covers 7,208 square miles with a population of over 2.4 million people in 2010, per the U.S. Census. The population density for Riverside County is 303.8 people per square mile, largely due to the vast desert areas that are not populated. The City of Banning ("Banning") covers 23 square miles with a population of 31,044 people in 2019, per the Department of Finance El: City/ County Population Estimates, a growth rate of .3% compared to the population in 2018. The population density for Banning is 1,300 per square mile. The racial makeup of the City is as follows: POPULATION ETHNICITY ■ White alone ■ Black or African American alone ■ American Indian & Alaska Native alone ■ Asian alone ■ Two or More Races 41.9 % 3.2 % ■ Hispanic or Latino The six percentages add to more than 100 percent because individuals may report more than one race The average age of the population is the following: • 55+ Years • 40-54 Years • 20-39 Years • Under 19 Years 36.6 % 15.5 % 22.1 % 25.8 % The average age of the population is 45.1 years old. 28 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1.3 Description of Services by Mode/Route Table 1 Fixed Route Description ervice Route 1 Service from Beaumont to Cabazon via the Banning commercial corridor along Ramsey Street. Walmart Shopping Center, Sun Lakes Village, Banning Police Department, Casino Morongo, Cabazon Outlets, Cabazon Community Center, Mid -County Courthouse, Mt San Jacinto College Pass Campus and the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital. Route 5 Residential areas of Northern Banning, Indian School, Alessandro, Nicolet and Wilson Street to Walmart Shopping Center in Beaumont via downtown Banning Banning Library, Banning High School, Hemmerling Elementary School, Beaver Medical, Walmart, Sun Lakes Village, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, DMV and Banning Police Department. Route 6 Residential areas of Southern Banning, Hathaway and Williams Street to Walmart Shopping Center in Beaumont via downtown Banning Mt San Jacinto College Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, DMV, Banning Health Care, Sun Lakes Village, Rio Ranch Dial -A -Ride D Service Site City -Wide Demand Response and Origin -to -Destination shared ride transportation service for seniors age 60 and older and persons who are, due to their functional limitation(s), unable to use accessible fixed route bus service All areas of Banning and limited areas in Beaumont 29 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1.4 — Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles, Revenue Hours Ridership In 2013, a survey was conducted showing the demographics of the Pass Transit riders. The information gathered helped create a visual indication of the use of the system. The racial makeup of the ridership is as follows: RIDER ETHNICITY ■ White/Caucasian • Hispanic , African American • Other • Native American • Asian 4% 2% 1% 47% Furthermore, 86% of respondents stated that they used the system's fixed routes at least three times a week. 59% of the ridership used the bus service for local trips within the Banning/Beaumont/Cabazon area, and 49% use transit to travel outside of the City's service area. For 91 % of ridership, the bus system is their only means of transportation. An unspecified amount of respondents stated that the transit service is readily available in their area, with a majority of riders living within a two -block radius of a bus stop. A substantial amount of users of the system share the commonality of being either underemployed or unemployed, with 88% of riders reporting an annual household income of $20,000 or less and 81 % of respondents reporting a family of two or more. 87% of those completing the survey report English as their primary language while 13% speak Spanish. 30 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Revenue Miles/Hours In FY 2019/2020, the City of Banning budgeted 28,471 revenue hours for the operation of 344,005 revenue miles system -wide: • 26,086 revenue hours and 309,615 revenue miles projected for fixed route operations of three fixed routes. A majority of revenue miles/hours (approximately 70%) expected from Route 1. • 2,385 revenue hours and 34,390 revenue miles projected for DAR services. 1.5 - Current Fare Structure The City of Banning transit system fare structure, which have remained unchanged for several years, is as follows: Fare Categories General Youth (grades K-12) Senior (60+) Disabled Military Veterans Child (46" tall or under. Must be accompanied by full fare paying passenger.) Zone Fare (Cabazon Residential Area) Deviations (Routes 3 & 4) Active Military GoPass (During school session only) Fixed Route Base Day 10-Trip 10-Ticket Monthly Fare Pass Punch Book Pass Pass $1.15 $3.00 N/A $10.35 $36.00 $1.00 $3.00 $10.00 N/A $25.00 $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 $.25 N/A N/A N/A N/A $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 N/A $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 FREE N/A N/A N/A N/A FREE N/A N/A N/A N/A Dial -A -Ride Fares Fare Categories Base Fare 10-Ride Punch Card One -Way Companion PCA (w/ I.D.)* No Show $2.00 $18.00 $3.00 N/A FREE FREE $2.00 N/A *Personal Care Attendant must show proper ID each time they board. 31 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Riders have a few ways of paying for fares including purchasing passes at the Community Center and paying for fares on the buses. In FY 2019/2020 the City has began offering fare purchases through Token Transit, which offers fares via the web and a mobile application. 1.6 — Revenue Fleet The City of Banning transit system operates six fixed route vehicles all of which are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). The vehicles are equipped with racks for two bicycles and are in compliance with the ADA with mobility device lifts and two tie -down stations per bus. Fixed route vehicles range from 3 years to 10 years in age (6.2 years average age). The transit system has five vehicles that are classified as Dial -A -Ride (two in revenue service and two as spares). The one remaining is utilized as an alternate for the fixed -route, when needed. Dial -A -Ride vehicles range from 2 years to 17 years in age (approximately 10 years average age). The City also has four support vehicles which are used for driver relief or administrative errands. Table 1.1 shows the list of the City Fleet inventory. 32 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Banning Lift and Fuel Year Mfg. Model Seating Ramp Vehicle Type Built Code Code Capacity Equipped Length Code Average Lifetime # of Life to Date Miles Per Active Active # of Life to Date Vehicle Miles Vehicle As Of Vehicles Contingency Vehicle Miles through Year -To -Date FY 2019/ Vehicles Prior Year End March (e.g., March) 20 FY 2019/20 FY 2018/19 FY 2019/ 20 FY 2019/20 2015 EBC EDN 30 1 32 CN 1 0 143,606 143,606 2015 EDN AeroElite 30 1 32 CN 1 0 213,073 128,408 128,408 2016 EDN Easy Rider 25 1 32 CN 1 0 154,706 154,706 2017 EDN Easy Rider 25 1 32 CN 1 0 89,424 117,089 117,089 2010 EDN XHF 31 1 34 CN 1 0 344,077 344,077 2010 EDN XHF 31 1 34 CN 1 0 642,431 335,810 335,810 Tota Is: 172 6 6 0 Demand Response / Directly Operated 944,928 1,223,696 203,949 Average Lifetime # of Life to Date Miles Per Active Active # of Life to Date Vehicle Miles Vehicle As Of Lift and Fuel Vehicles Contingency Vehicle Miles through Year -To -Date Year Mfg. Model Seating Ramp Vehicle Type FY 2019/ Vehicles Prior Year End March (e.g., March) Built Code Code Capacity Equipped Length Code 20 FY 2019/20 FY 2018/19 FY 2019120 FY 2019/20 2010 EBC Aerotech 16 1 25 GA 1 0 124,148 144,212 144,212 2003 EDN Aerotech 12 1 25 GA 1 0 339,579 340,169 340,169 2013 GLV Universal 18 1 26 CN 1 0 77,463 96,703 96,703 2018 STR Allstar 16 1 25 GA 1 0 16,262 32,608 32,608 2008 ZZZ Ford 14 1 26 GA 1 0 250,252 259,533 259,533 Totals: 76 5 5 0 807,704 873,225 174,645 33 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1.7 — Existing Facilities The Banning transit system functions as a division within the Department of Public Works of the City and utilizes existing facilities. Customer service aspects of the transit division are available at the City's Community Center located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue, where bus passes are sold, schedules are available and ADA applications can be picked up and returned. Phone calls for general information and questions regarding scheduling are received Monday — Friday from 8:00am to 6:00pm at the Community Center. Administrative offices for the transit division, as well as the maintenance, parking, fueling of the buses, and storage of bus stop amenities, are located at the City's Corporation Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. The facility is equipped with five service bays, an outside vehicle wash bay, and a CNG station with both fast and slow fill pumps Maintenance of transit's fleet is performed by the Public Works Department, Fleet Maintenance Division. All dispatch and scheduling for paratransit services are handled at the Corporation Yard location as well. 1.8 — Existing Coordination between Transit Agencies In 2019, the cities of Banning and Beaumont executed a new interagency service agreement, outlined the relationship between each agency's operations and the manner in which the transit systems would operate within each City's service areas including, but not limited to route planning, scheduling, stops, transfers and the dissemination of information. In addition, a Memorandum of Understanding is held with the Morongo Band of Mission Indians allowing stops on their property. The ability to provide a stop at Casino Morongo allowed passengers to make connections with Sunline Commuter Link 220 (which ended on May 1, 2020), providing service to and from Palm Desert and Riverside. Also, services are also coordinated with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) by providing timed stops that meet with routes that provide travel to and from the areas of Hemet and Moreno Valley (i.e. Route 31 at either Sun Lakes Boulevard just east of Highland Springs or the Walmart stop along 2nd Street). Riders also have the opportunity to connect with the Amtrak Thruway Bus Service at Casino Morongo. 1.9 — Reference List of Prior or Existing Studies and Plans Although there are no existing studies to list (e.g. COAs, BRT studies, Safety Plans, etc.) in the FY 2020/2021 SRTP, the City plans to develop a Comprehensive Operations Analysis in the upcoming fiscal year. 34 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Chapter 2: Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 — Key Performance Indicators Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) as required by Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) are shown in Table 2 below. In addition to RCTC's KPIs, the City is implementing data collection procedures to more accurately collect data related to on - time performance, ridership growth, road calls, complaints, preventable accidents and rider injuries. A future goal of the City transit system is to have City Council approved operating standards and performance metrics. 35 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Banning Data Elements FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 196,730 Passenger Miles 630,252 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 28,471.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 344,005.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 374,006.0 Total Operating Expenses $1,688,836 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $178,553 Net Operating Expenses $1,510,283 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 10.570/0 I >= 10.00% I 14.49% I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $59.32 <= $57.03 $41.43 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $7.68 >= $7.18 and <= $9.72 $5.34 Fails to Meet Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $2.40 >= $1.35 and <= $1.83 $2.10 Better Than Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $53.05 >= $41.78 and <= $56.52 $35.42 Fails to Meet Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $4.39 >= $0.95 and <= $1.29 $1.53 Better Than Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.91 >= 4.93 and <= 6.67 6.63 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.57 >= 0.11 and <= 0.15 0.29 Better Than Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators 36 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 2.2 — SRTP Performance Report The Banning transit system has not seen noteworthy growth in ridership from FY 2017/2018 to FY 2018/2019. An increase in ridership was realized in part of FY 2019/2020 related to the new Interagency Services Agreement with City of Beaumont, but drastically dropped due to COVID-19. Final numbers are projected to be lower, by about 20% as compared in FY2018/2019 due to the pandemic. Operating costs increased from FY 2017/2018 to FY 2018/2019 and are expected to be lower in FY 2019/2020 mostly related to staff changes and reorganization with the City (e.g. salary savings). In the FY2019/2020 plan most primary targets range from "meets target" to "better than target" with the exception of one "fails to meet target" for "operating costs per revenue hour". See Table 2.1 for more information. 37 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMissioN FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: City of Banning All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 4th Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 116,748 96,526 199,010 None Passenger Miles 622,962 245,793 788,899 None Revenue Hours 14,189.8 14,563.7 27,394.0 None Total Hours 16,289.1 15,788.1 29,474.0 None Revenue Miles 393,142.6 337,411.9 779,037.0 None Total Miles 401,789.6 343,119.5 782,418.0 None Operating Costs $1,518,728 $603,303 $1,948,627 None Passenger Revenue $100,047 $87,415 $216,470 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue None Operating Subsidy $1,418,681 $515,888 $1,732,157 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $107.03 $41.43 $71.13 <= $42.80 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $3.86 $1.79 $2.50 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $13.01 $6.25 $9.79 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 6.59% 14.49% 11.10% >= 0.1 Meets Target Subsidy Per Passenger $12.15 $5.34 $8.70 >= $4.54 and <= $6.14 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $2.28 $2.10 $2.20 >= $7.79 and <= $2.42 Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $99.98 $35.42 $63.23 >= $30.11 and <= $40.73 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $3.61 $1.53 $2.22 >= $1.30 and <= $1.76 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 8.23 6.63 7.26 >= 5.64 and <= 7.62 Meets Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.30 0.29 0.26 >= 0.25 and <= 0.33 Meets Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. 38 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 2.3 — SRTP Service Summary All Routes System wide, the Banning Transit System was expected to improve it's service performance due to a reduction in operating expenses related to a reduction in administrative costs (e.g. salaries, etc.) and a projected slight increase in farebox revenue. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically reduced ridership and farebox recovery to much lower than original projections. It is anticipated that the reduction in ridership activity will carry into the beginning of FY 2020/2021, but at this time the overall impact is difficult to predict. Table 2.2 below identifies the 3rd quarter totals for FY 2019/2020 and projections for FY 2020/2021. It should be noted that the City does not have any excluded routes to report in this SRTP. 39 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2,2 -- City of Banning -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 5 3 8 4 6 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $1,537,859 $1,518,728 $1,688,836 $603,303 $1,948,627 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $112,866 $100,047 $178,553 $87,415 $216,470 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,424,993 $1,418,681 $1,510,283 $515,888 $1,732,157 Operating Characteristics - Unlinked Passenger Trips 126,793 116,748 196,730 96,526 199,010 Passenger Miles 326,390 622,962 630,252 245,793 788,899 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 22,018.4 14,189.8 28,471.0 14,563.7 27,394.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 798,183.0 393,142.6 344,005.0 337,411.9 779,037.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 808,419.9 401,789.6 374,006.0 343,119.5 782,418.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $69.84 $107.03 $59.32 $41.43 $71.13 Farebox Recovery Ratio 7.34% 6.59% 10.57% 14.49% 11.10% Subsidy per Passenger $11.24 $12.15 $7.68 $5.34 $8.70 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $4.37 $2.28 $2.40 $2.10 $2.20 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $64.72 $99.98 $53.05 $35.42 $63.23 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $1.79 $3.61 $4.39 $1.53 $2.22 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 5.8 8.2 6.9 6.6 7.3 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.16 0.30 0.57 0.29 0 26 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 40 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Fixed Route Service The Banning Transit System currently has three fixed route services (Route 1, Route 5 and Route 6) which serve downtown and neighborhood areas of Banning, both the residential and business areas of Cabazon, and the main commercial area of Beaumont (Walmart). Fixed route operations run from 4:30am to 10:OOpm (Route 1), 5:30am to 7pm (Route 5) and 6:30am to 6:00pm (Route 6) during the week and are adjusted to 8:00am and 6:00pm on the weekends. Previously, ridership and fare revenues were split along Ramsey Street by Beaumont's Route 2 and Banning's Route 1, but that is no longer the case. The cities of Banning and Beaumont have entered into a new Interagency Services Agreement (ISA; see Attachment No. 1), which prohibits either agency from operating a fixed route within each other's City limits. Transfers between the Banning and Beaumont transit systems occur at the Beaumont Walmart and San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital stops only. Current route maps are provided at the end of this section. Banning's fixed route service is expected to have a lower operating expenditure in FY 2019/2020 than in FY 2018/2019 related to savings in administrative costs associated with a reorganization within the City, which in turn reduced salary expenditures. In addition, farebox revenue are project to be higher than in FY 2018/2019, which will assist the City in meeting its farebox recovery ratio of 10% for its fixed route operations. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically impacted ridership numbers and farebox revenue in the end of 2019/2020 fiscal year and may impact the first quarter ridership numbers in FY 2020/2021. 41 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet Financial Data Table 2.2 -- Banning -BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 I FY 2019/20 Audited Plan 3rd QtrActual FY 2020/21 Plan L 4 2 6 3 5 Total Operating Expenses $1,333,081 $1,472,383 $1,498,732 $559,097 $1,728,770 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $89,985 $80,421 $156,553 $77,444 $191,470 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,243,096 $1,391,963 $1,342,179 $481,654 $1,537,300 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips Passenger Miles Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) Total Actual Vehicle Miles Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy per Passenger Subsidy per Passenger Mile Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 116,129 288,000 20,590.7 771,908.0 778,898.9 $64.74 6.75% $10.70 $4.32 $60.37 $1.61 5.6 0.15 106,668 586,674 12,749.5 364,945.6 370,130.6 $115.49 5.46% $13.05 $2.37 $109.18 $3.81 8.4 0.29 184,180 567,502 26,086.0 309,615.0 322,754.0 90,804 225,194 13,467.4 317,583.9 321,055.5 $57.45 $41.51 10.44% 13.85% $7.29 $5.30 $2.37 $2.14 $51.45 $35.76 $4.33 $1.52 7.1 6.7 0.59 0.29 186,460 740,155 25,494.0 746,537.0 747,418.0 $67.81 11.07% $8.24 $2.08 $60.30 $2.06 7.3 0.25 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 42 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Dial -A -Ride (DAR) The Banning transit system Dial -A -Ride is a service offered to seniors, aged 60 and older, persons with disabilities and passengers eligible under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). DAR operates from 6:00am to 6:45pm on weekdays and 8:00am to 4:45pm on the weekends. Limited service hours are available for non-ADA passengers. This category of passenger is also required to fill out a certification application to determine eligibility. If terms are met, the applicant receives a card certifying their eligibility to ride. The primary uses for the Dial -A -Ride system are transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment. Dial -a -Ride services also provide connections to the RTA and Banning and Beaumont fixed routes. Additionally, demand for paratransit is expected to grow. This is a universal transit/paratransit theme nationwide and Banning is anticipated to continue to see growth in the paratransit program. The savings in administrative costs mentioned above in the fixed route section also applies to DAR and like fixed route the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically impacted ridership numbers and farebox revenue in the end of 2019/2020 fiscal year and may impact the first quarter ridership numbers in FY 2020/2021. 43 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 1.2 -- Banning-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 1 1 2 1 1 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $204,778 $46,345 $190,104 $44,205 $219,857 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $22,881 $19,626 522,000 $9,971 $25,000 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $181,897 $26,719 $168,104 $34,234 $194,857 Operating Characteristics L - Unlinked Passenger Trips 10,664 10,080 12,550 5,722 12,550 Passenger Miles 38,390 36,288 62,750 20,599 48,744 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 1,427.7 1,440.4 2,385.0 1,096.3 1,900.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 26,275.0 28,197.0 34,390.0 19,828.0 32,500.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 29,521.0 31,659.0 51,252.0 22,064.0 35,000.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $143.43 $32.18 $79.71 $40.32 $115.71 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.17% 42.350/0 11.57% 22.560/0 11.37% Subsidy per Passenger $17.06 $2.65 $13.39 $5.98 $15.53 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $4.74 $0.74 $2.68 $1.66 $4.00 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $127.41 $18.55 $70.48 $31.23 $102.56 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $6.92 $0.95 $4.89 $1.73 $6.00 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 7.5 7.0 5.3 5.2 6.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.41 0.36 0.36 0.29 0.39 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 44 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 2.4 — Service Performance Route 1 — Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Route 1 is among the most used route in the system, operating along Ramsey Street and serving the commercial area Beaumont (Walmart), residential areas of Cabazon and Casino Morongo the outlet malls in Cabazon. Ridership on Route 1 accounts for approximately 72% of the total use of the system. While the longest in distance, this route operates on an one -hour headway from Beaumont to Casino Morongo. The major stops on this line include Albertsons, Wal-Mart, Banning City Hall, Mid -County Justice Center, Social Services offices in Banning, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Casino Morongo and the Desert Hills Outlets in Cabazon. The second loop of Route 1 also runs on an hour headway departing from Casino Morongo and servicing the Cabazon Community Center and the residential areas of Cabazon. Two buses are operated on this route which allows for hourly service to the two respective areas. Route 5 — Northern Banning Route 5 accounts for 17 percent of Banning's Transit System use, providing service to the areas that lie north of the 1-10 Freeway in the City of Banning. Major stops on this route are the Mid -County Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Banning Community Center, Library, Medical Facilities, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital and the commercial area of Beaumont (Walmart). Route 6 — Southern Banning Accounting for 11 % of Banning's transit system's use, Route 6 provides service to the southern area of Banning. Major stops on this route are the Mid -County Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, Medical Facilities, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital and the commercial area of Beaumont (Walmart). Route 5/6 Combo — Northern/Southern Banning This route which generally combines both Route 5 and Route 6 operates only on the weekends, with the exceptions that it does not travel into Cabazon. 45 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Banning -- 1 FY 2020/21 All Routes Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue BAN-1 All Days BAN-5 All Days BAN-5/6 Weekday BAN-6 Weekday BAN-DAR Weekday 2 127,500 707,850 16,550 16,740 616,737 605,568 $1,034,833 $128,700 30,600 11,700 3,972 4,017 62,500 68,500 $329,000 $31,000 8,560 13,000 1,000 1,100 11,050 12,100 $56,950 $5,270 19,800 7,605 3,972 4,017 56,250 61,250 $307,987 $26,500 12,550 48,744 1,900 3,600 32,500 35,000 $219,857 $25,000 199,010 788,899 27,394 29,474 779,037 782,418 $1,948,627 $216,470 Performance Indicators Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Net Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile BAN-1 All Days $906,133 $62.53 81.68 $8.12 12.43% $7.11 $1.28 $54.75 $1.47 7.70 0.21 BAN-5 All Days $298,000 $82.83 $5.26 $10.75 9.42% $9.74 $25.47 $75.03 $4.77 7.70 0.49 BAN-5/6 Weekday $51,680 $56.95 $5.15 $6.65 9.25% $6.04 $3.98 $51.68 $4.68 8.56 0.77 BAN-6 Weekday $281,487 $77.54 $5.48 $15.55 8.60% $14.22 $37.01 $70.87 $5.00 4.98 0.35 BAN-DAR Weekday $194,857 $115.71 $6.76 $17.52 11.379b $15.53 $4.00 $102.56 $6.00 6.61 0.39 $1,732,157 $71.13 $2.50 $9.79 11.10% $8.70 $2.20 $63.23 $2.22 7.26 0.26 46 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 ROUTE 1 BEAUMONT San Gorgonio Hospital Connection to Routes 2 3 EFFECTIVE 06/10/2019 (951) 922-3243 www.banningca.gov 6 COMBO wILSON ST RAMSEY ST BANNING 0 0 BANNING CONNECT CABAZON Desert Hills Casino Outlet Mai/ , Aforongo 11 /1 _7 0 9 0 SEMINOLE TRANSIT S Y S T E M Legend (Map not to scale) • Time and/or Transfer Point 13 Connection Point Casino Morongo Connection to Routes 1 120 220 Wal-M Connection to Routes FEl 2ND 1ST ST 2 3 4 5 6 Z 9 COMBO 120 125 220 31 O 2 MS✓CPass Campus Z O O 0 O a Sun Lakes Village Connection to Routes HARGRAVE S 47 MAGNOLIA MAIN CARMEN y Catazon Q Z Communityf Center Q Q >18 m DOLORES BONITA cc y MAXINE ESPERANZA Z 0 J City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 ROUTE 5 BEAUMOr w N© � T 0 1ST ST EFFECTIVE 07/31/2019 (951) 922-3243 www.banningconnect.com San Gorgonio Hospital Connection to Routes 2 3 6 COMBO w O WILSON ST 1121 Sun Lakes Village ElConnection to Routes SUNSET AVE BANNING 0"1._ BINNING CONNECT TRANSIT SYSTEM` 0 INDIAN SCHOOL LANE WILSON ST NICOLET ST COMBO Wal-Mart Connection to Routes 1 COMBO 120 125 ©©1:1©1111 • 220 31 ESSANDRO 0, w a 0 ce RAMSEY ST WESTWARD AVE. 48 ©0 NICOLET ST HATHAWAY S Legend (Map not to scale) • Time and/or Transfer Point EiConnection Point City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan ROUTE 6 Wal-Mart Connection to Routes BEAUMONT EFFECTIVE 06/10/2079 (951) 922-3243 www.banningconnect.com San Gorgonio Hospital Connection to Routes Connection to Routes BANNING CONNECT T R A H S I T S Y S T E H WESTWARD AVE MSJC Pass Banning Campus High Legend (Map not to scale) Time and/or Transfer Point Connection Point 49 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 1 ROUTE 5/6 Wal-M Connection to Routes 1 2 r 3 4 5 �� WILSON ST 1 EFFECTIVE 06/10/2019 (951) 922-3243 www.banningconnect.com HIGHLAND 6 9 COMBO 120 T25 220 31 w 7 Q in z z BANNING CONN[CT TRANSIT S Y S Legend (Map not to scale) Time and/or Transfer Point ElConnection Point NICOLET ST RAMSEY ST LINCOLN ST WESTWARD AVE Sun Lakes Village Connection to Routes 1 5 6 COMBO 31 50 • WESTWARD AVE INDIAN SCHOOL LN SANDRO S WILSON ST a 4 4 x Summit Ridge Apt. GEORGE ST © NICOLET ST 4 WILLIAMS ST o � r WESLEY AVE BANNING HARGRAVE ST tn a x 28 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 2.5 — Productivity Improvements Efforts City staff will continue to monitor key performance metrics throughout the year in order to identify underperforming routes and trips and make adjustments as necessary. Additionally staff plans to have developed a Comprehensive Operational Analysis in FY 2020/2021 with the goal of a detailed look at the city's existing bus services and provided recommendations for improving service to meet the needs of the City's riders. In order to enhance the customer experience by improving the City's fare program through the use of technology, the City has launched mobile ticketing through Token Transit and is available to all fixed route riders. The City is also working to further leverage technology and to deploy a data platform that will assist in improving system performance, service reliability and real-time passenger information. The City hopes to have the new platform available to City staff and the public in FY 2020/2021. 2.6 — Major Trip Generators Major passenger trip destinations that the Banning transit system services are the Sun Lakes Plaza Shopping Center, the Walmart Supercenter in Beaumont, the Banning Justice Center, San Gorgonio Pass Hospital, Beaver and Loma Linda Medical Plazas, the Cabazon Outlet Stores, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Casino Morongo and the Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus. There is a high demand for service to these destinations whether for employment, necessities or pleasure. 2.7 — Recent Service Changes All of the City's recent service changes have been related to the COVID-19 pandemic which has resulted in a drastic decrease in ridership. Changes include slightly reducing operating hours and minor revision to Route 6 (see below), which includes the elimination of the furthest east stop in Cabazon during the later hours. Additionally, the City has limited the amount of passengers on buses in order to adhere to social distancing guidelines Route Operating Hours Revised Operating Hours Route 1 4:30am — 10:11 pm 5:00am — 10:11 pm Route 5 5:30am — 6:49pm 5:30am — 6:49pm Route 6 6:OOam — 6:32pm 7:40am — 5:44pm 51 29 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Chapter 3: Future Service Plans, Fare Changes, Capital Planning and Marketing 3.1 — Planned Service Changes FY 2020/2021 — FY 2022/2023 The City currently does not have any formalized service changes planned for the immediate future. The City will continue to monitor ridership levels as they are projected to increase due to implemented changes related to the Banning/Beaumont agreement as well as planned commercial and residential development within the City. The City hopes to learn more about possibilities for improving it's services through the development of a Comprehensive Operational Analysis planned for FY 2020/2021. One such possibility that the City plans to research is the opportunity, if any, for a desert link route. 3.2 — Marketing Plans and Promotions Efforts have been made to market the Banning transit system over the past year and will continue in the coming years. These efforts include purchasing advertising on a map of the San Gorgonio Pass Area, distribution of route maps by delivery to the library, Chamber of Commerce, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, local hotels, businesses and social media outlets. Additionally, the City has developed a new brand for the transit system called "Banning Connect": '�"\ BANNINII CIINNEI'T As part of these rebranding efforts the City is currently redesigning route maps, bus stop signs, fliers and exterior/interior bus graphics. The City's efforts to promote ridership will include the following in this upcoming fiscal year: 1. Outreach programs to schools and at community events. 2. Attend senior community meetings to provide information. 52 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 3. Continue participation in the MSJC GO -PASS Program to encourage ridership of college students. 4. Articles in local papers highlighting new transportation routes. 5. Incorporate and coordinate travel training opportunities for Pass Passengers with regional providers including SunLine, RTA and Beaumont. 6. Offer "Rider Appreciation Day" to raise awareness of benefits of public transportation. 7. Continue to participate with Transportation Now, Senior Transportation Assistance Group, Pass Area Senior Connections, Pass Area Veterans Assistance, Cabazon Community Resources and other efforts. 8. Develop an advertising campaign that will promote Banning Pass Transit by increasing visibility and awareness of the services provided. The Banning transit system strives to operate service in a manner that will maximize system productivity, efficiency, as well as the use of subsidies. General goals include: • Develop an ongoing planning process with key agencies and organizations within the region. • Ensure that services are operated in a manner to maximize safety, to the riders, the public and the operators. • Develop a core group of services that connect key activity points and commit to providing service along those corridors. • Continually review all services to evaluate the efficiency and needs of the transit system. 3.3 — Project Ridership Growth For the past decade the City of Banning has observed very little private development projects that would have a noticeable impact to ridership. Over the past several months the City has seen much more development activity including entitlements of various commercial developments that could potentially act as ridership generators. There are also two large specific plan developments that amount to approximately 7,700 residential units, multiple schools, commercial/retail phases and parks. Additionally, and as previously mentioned in the report, the new agreement with the City of Beaumont resulted in a noticeable increase in ridership. This increase was short lived due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which drastically impacted ridership because of the 'shelter in 53 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan place" orders and the closure of many business. It is unknown how long the recovery period will last. 3.4 — Proposed Fare Structure Changes There are no fare structure changes at this time. 3.5 — Capital Planning Rolling stock In an effort to accomplish our SRTP goals, the City will continue to keep an efficient and reliabile rolling stock. As part of this task, the replacement of buses is essential. The City currently plans to replace one bus in FY 2020/2021 further described in Chapter 4. Fixed route vehicles range from 3 years to 10 years in age (6.2 years average age) and Dial -A -Ride vehicles range from 2 years to 17 years in age (approximately 10 years average age). The City plans to replace vehicles at or near the 12 year age. Fueling Station The City currently owns and operates a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling facility used to fuel the City's CNG fleet. The facility is well beyond it's useful life and is currently planned and fully funded for replacement. The City has tentatively slowed the progression of this project to consider the feasibility of electrifying the City's transit fleet; see table 4.4. for more information. Garage Improvements The City's transit fleet is currently maintained in the City's fleet garage located at the City's corporate yard. The garage is shared by all City departments (e.g. police, water, wastewater, streets, etc.) and nearing full capacity. The City will soon enter the planning stage of expanding the City's fleet operations including the expansion of the garage. This improvement would be funded by all City departments as it moves forward. Bus Shelters The City plans to provide for a good experience when utilizing the transit system by providing for attractive, comfortable and safe bus shelters while waiting for their bus. The City maintains it's bus shelters weekly (e.g. emptying trash, washing, etc.). There is a current need for the addition/replacement of bus shelters throughout the City. The City currently has nine bus shelters. The City plans to replace it's existing bus shelters beginning in fiscal year 21/22. At an estimated improvement cost of $13,500, the replacement of bus shelters would occur over a 5 year period. 54 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Table 3 FY 2020/2021 SRTP Highlights Highlights planned for the upcoming fiscal year include: o Process annual renewal of Interagency Services Agreement with the City of Beaumont o Complete rebranding of the City's transit system including posting new bus stop signs and placing new logos on the exterior/interior of transit fleet o Continue with marketing the City's transit system to improve ridership o Fill the newly funded Transit Manager position o Deploy a new data platform that will assist in improving system performance, service reliability and real-time passenger information o CNG Station Improvements o Purchase of new fixed route bus Table 3 - Operating and Capital Data Banning Transit System FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 (Est. Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) FY 20/21 Planned System Wide Ridership 133,185 126,793 116,748 96,526 199,010 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hours $71.11 $73.08 $74.27 $41.43 $71.13 55 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Chapter 4: Financial Planning 4.1 — Operating and Capital Budget For FY 2020/2021, operating funds needed to operate the Banning Transit System are $1,537,300 for the Fixed Route. The operating funds consist of $1,375,754 in local transportation funds (LTF), projected farebox revenue of $160,446, and additional miscellaneous funding in the amount of $1,100. Operating expenses also includes $135,000 for the preparation of a Comprehensive Operational Analysis. See Table 4 at the end of this section. The replacement of one bus is also included in this SRTP along with a request for funding in the amount of $550,000 of STA PUC 99313 funds, as shown in Table 4A below. The City's farebox revenue actuals were less that originally projected in FY2018/2019 resulting in a below ten percent farebox recovery ratio (9.61 %). As of the third quarter in FY 2019/2020 the City's transit operations seem to be doing well with an estimated farebox recovery ratio of 13.39%. At this time the City does not fully understand the resulting impacts of COVID-19 and related operational changes which have severely affected farebox revenue leading into the fourth quarter and expected to run through the beginning of FY 2020/2021. As identified in Table 4B, the City projects a farebox recovery ratio of 11.11 % in FY 2020/2021. 56 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPOR1ATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020121 City of Banning Operating Project Total Amount of Floes FARE LTV OTHR LCL SGR PUC00313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-0B STA PUC99313 STA RUC Sad14 Comprehensive Operation Analysis 5135000 $135,000 Operating Assistance (BUS) $1537300 $100,446 $1375,754 $1,100 Operating Assistance(DAR) 5194,857 522,550 $172,307 Sub-M.I apemen, $1067,157 $102,995 51683,061 $1,100 50 50 SO 50 $0 Capital Project Total Amount M Funds FARE CIF OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-OB STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Bus Replacement - 21-01 Capitalized Fleet Preventative Maintenance-21-02 0550000 539,878 538,436 52,286 $39,676 $494,987 514291 51111-10141Capital $589,878 50 00 $0 536436 52,286 039,676 $494,987 514291 Total Operating A Capital $2,457,035 $182,996 011693,061 $1,100 538,436 $2,286 T3913713 $494,987 014291 FY 2020121 Projected Funding Details FARE LTF OTHR LCL Total Estimated Operating Funding Request SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-0B STAPUC99313 5102996 51,603,061 $1,100 $1,067,157 538,436 $7,288 539,878 1494,987 STAPUC99314 514291 Total Estimated Capital Funding Request $589,878 Total Funding Request 52457,035 57 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan RIRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Banning Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-01 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Bus Replacement Category: Bus Sub-Cateciorv: Replacement Fuel Type: [:NG Project Description: Bus Replacement Proiect Justification: Funding for a new bus is needed to replace an older bus that is beyond its useful life. The new bus will increase reliability of our fleet and enhance the riding experience for our passengers_ Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date October 2020 March 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES {REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $550,000 Total $550,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 58 36 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020121 SRTP City of Banning Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Protect Number: 21-02 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Capitalized Fleet Preventative Maintenance Cateaorv: Bus Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: CNG Project Description: Preventative maintenance of existing fleet. Proiect Justification: PM activities in order to keep the transit Fleet operating in an effective and reliable manner. Proiect Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR-OB FY 2020/21 $39,878 Total $39,878 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 59 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Table 4B - Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Revenue Source Included in Farebox Calculation FY 18/19 FY 19/20 (Est. Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) FY 20/21 Planned 1. Passenger Fares 111,068 84,363 182,996 2. Interest 1,089 -2,377 1,100 3. General Fund Supplement 78,000 23,000 32,374 4. Measure A 5. Advertising Revenue 6. Gain on Sale of Capital Assets 7. CNG Revenue 8. Lease/Other Revenue 9. Federal Excise Tax Refund 10. Investment Income 11. Calpers CERBT 12. Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes 13. Other Revenues $1,026 $512 TOTAL REVENUES for Farebox Calculation $191,183 $105,498 $216,470 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSE for Farebox Calculation $1,989,651 $787,996 $1,948,627 FAREBOX RECOVERY RATIO 9.61% 13.39% 11.11% 60 38 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 4.2 — Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program Capital projects are funded through STA funds, Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account Program and Proposition 1B Security grants for Banning transit. Operating costs will be fully funded through LTF funds, farebox revenue and interest. The City plans to begin an advertising program to generate additional revenue as well as to pursue available grant opportunities. TABLE 4.1: SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 21/22 Project Description Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair LCTOP Fare Box Other Fixed Route Operating Expenses $1,575,705 $1,410,148 $164,457 $1,100 DAR Operating Expenses $199,729 $176,615 $23,114 Sub -Total: Operating $1,775,434 $1,586,763 $0 $0 $0 $187,571 $1,100 Project Description Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair LCTOP Fare Box Other Fleet Maintenance Garage Upgrades 22-02 $250,000 $250,000 Replace Paratransit Bus 22-03 $70,000 $70,000 Bus Shelters 22-04 $27,000 $27,000 Sub -Total: Capital $347,000 $0 $347,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 Total: Operating and Capital $2,122,434 $1,586,763 $347,000 $0 $0 $187,571 $1,100 61 39 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 4.2: SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 22/23 Project Description Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair LCTOP Fare Box Other Fixed Route Operating Expenses $1,647,755 $1,480,655 $166,000 $1,100 DAR Operating Expenses $208,945 $185,445 $23,500 Sub -Total: Operating $1,856,700 $1,666,100 $0 $0 $0 $189,500 $1,100 Project Description Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair LCTOP Fare Box Other Bus Replacement 23-01 $550,000 $550,000 Bus Shelters 23-01 $30,000 $30,000 Sub -Total: Capital $580,000 $0 $580,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 Total: Operating and Capital $2,436,700 $1,666,100 $580,000 $0 $0 $189,500 $1,100 62 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 4.3 — Regulatory and Compliance Requirements ADA The City of Banning submitted an Americans with Disabilities Act Paratransit Plan to the FTA on January 26, 1992. Fixed route buses are equipped with ADA compliant mobility device lifts and are accessible to persons with disabilities. A procedure is in place to provide service to a customer in a mobility device should a fixed route bus lift fail. Dial -A -Ride services provide ADA complementary paratransit service for the fixed route services operated by Banning transit system. The system uses a self -certification process with professional verification. Title VI Banning transit system does not utilize federal funds for operating expenses. As such, Title VI requirements do not currently apply to the transit system. Alternatively Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) Fixed -route buses are CNG powered and currently fueled at a City owned and operated CNG fueling station. Dial -A -Ride vehicles (which are less than 33,000 lbs. GVW and 15- passenger capacity), administrative and driver relief vehicles are gasoline -powered. Future vehicle purchases will be in compliance with the RCTC and South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) policies regarding alternative fuel transit vehicles. The City is commencing the assessment of moving towards an electrified fleet as well. TDA Triennial Audit California's Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The most recent TDA was completed in FY 2019/2020 (Y2016 — 2018). 63 41 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan Audit Recommendations (FY 2016-2018) Action(s) and Result Ensure timely completion and submittal of external TDA financial reports. The City's Financial Department will reach out to the TDA fiscal auditor and RCTC to coordinate the timing of financial close-out by the City and completion of the external TDA financial reports Continue to pursue a reimbursement agreement from RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College (MSJC) for Go -Pass riders The City will continue to reach out to MSJC and RTA to work on a reimbursement agreement. Include a link to Beaumont Transit on the Banning Transit Web Page This item has been completed. The City has added a list of regional agencies (Beaumont, RTA, SunLine and OmniTrans, Metrolink) 64 42 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan 4.4 — Open Projects Project Name SRTP Capital Project No's Project Element Funding Cate or Project Timeline (Months)* Total Project Cost Unfunded Balance ADA Accessible Van 09-6 2 1 18 $37,997 Schedule Holders for Bus Stops 09-8 6 1 12 $5,000 GPS System for Dial -A -Ride 09-9 6 1 12 $25,000 Paratransit Scheduling Software 09-10 6 2 24 $25,000 $10,000 Computer Equipment 09-11 6 1 12 $53,247 Security Cameras on Buses 09-13 5 2 18 $44,255 $15,000 Automated Enunciator & Display Equipment 09-16 5 6 $966 Replacement Coach - Prop 1B FY 14/15 15-01 1 - Wireless Communication Download System Prop 1 B - Security FY 14/15 15-02 6 2 24 $19,189 $15,000 Heavy Duty Hydraulic Lift 17-01 4 1 24 $50,000 Transit Office Building Security Project 17-02 4 1 12 $19,199 ADA Accessible Van 18-01 1 1 18 $47,997 Schedule Holders for Bus Stops 18-02 4 1 12 $50,000 GPS System for Dial -A -Ride 18-03 7 2 12 $15,362 $10,000 CNG Facility 19-01 4 1 24 $400,000 ADA Paratransit Mini -Bus Replacement 19-02 1 1 12 $75,000 State of Good Repair FY17/18 19-03 7 1 12 $38,307 Heavy Duty Hydraulic Lift 20-01 4 1 24 $75,000 CNG Facility 20-02 4 1 24 $325,000 SGR FY18/19 7 1 18 37,740 $1,344,259 $50,000 Project Elements: Funding Category: 1 Revenue Vehicle Purchase 1 Fully Funded 2 Non -Revenue Vehicle Purchase 2 Partially Funded 3 Vehicle Systems Equipment 4 Building, Land and Facilities Project baseline is 7/1/2020 5 FY 6 Debt Service 7 Maintenance 65 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan TABLES 1. Table 1 Individual Route Description (Chapter 1, 1.3) 2. Table 1.1 Fleet Inventory (Chapter 1, 1.6) 3. Table 2 Service Provider Performance Target Report (Chapter 2, 2.1) 4. Table 2.1 FY 2020/21 SRTP Performance Report (Chapter 2, 2.2) 5. Table 2.2 SRTP Service Summary (Chapter 2, 2.3) 6. Table 2.2A Summary of Routes (Chapter 2, 2.3) 7. Table 2.3 SRTP Route Statistics (Chapter 2, 2.4) 8. Table 3 Highlights of the FY 20/21 Short Range Transit Plan (Chapter 3) 9. Table 4 Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2020/21 (Chapter 4, 4.1) 10. Table 4A - Capital Project Justification (Chapter 4, 4.1) 11. Table 4B Fare Revenue Calculation (Chapter 4, 4.1) 12. Table 4.1 (Chapter 4, 4.2) 13. Table 4.2 ( Chapter 4, 4.2) 14. Table 4.3 Recommendations/Updates of FY 2016-2018 (NEW) TDA Triennial Performance Audit Report (Chapter 4, 4.3) 66 44 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan ATTACHMENT NO. 1 INTERAGENCY SERVICES AGREEMENT INTERAGENCY SERVICE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF BANNING AND THE CITY OF BEAUMONT THIS AGREEMENT is made and entered into the latter of the 1st day of July, 2019 or the date upon execution by both parties by and between the City of Banning, a municipal corporation, 99 E Ramsey Street, Banning, California 92220 (hereinafter referred to as 'BANNING"); and the City of Beaumont, a municipal corporation, 550 East 6th Street, Beaumont, California 92223 (hereinafter referred to as "BEAUMONT"). The annual term of this agreement shall coincide with the fiscal year of July 1st to June 30th. RECITALS: WHEREAS, BANNING and BEAUMONT are empowered by law to provide the public with convenient, safe, and accessible transportation within their respective jurisdictions; and WHEREAS, BANNING and BEAUMONT each operate a public bus transit system; and WHEREAS, BANNING and BEAUMONT desire to cooperate and coordinate in bus route planning, scheduling, stops, transfers, fares and information dissemination; and WHEREAS, both parties agree that this Agreement shall be non -financial in nature; and WHEREAS, this Agreement shall supersede any and all previous service agreements concerning public transit between BANNING and BEAUMONT. NOW, THEREFORE, it is mutually understood and agreed by BANNING and BEAUMONT as follows: ARTICLE 1. GENERAL AUTHORITY The City Managers ("City Manager"), or their designees, of BANNING and BEAUMONT, are hereby made the authorized representative, respectively, of BANNING and BEAUMONT to grant such authorizations and take such further actions as may be necessary to effectuate this Agreement 68 ARTICLE 2. PUBLIC INFORMATION BANNING and BEAUMONT agree to cooperate in providing the public with specific bus transit information, advertising the operations of both agencies and promoting the general use of public transit. ARTICLE 3. STOPS A. BANNING and BEAUMONT agree to cooperate in the location, installation and maintenance of the following jointly used bus stops, including the use of the other's posts: (1) Walmart Transfer Station -1540 East 2nd Street, Beaumont, CA 92223; and (2) San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital - 600 North Highland Springs Avenue, Banning, CA 92220 B. Each party shall be solely responsible for claims for damages arising out of its installation of its bus stop signs or passenger amenities and its transportation and related services. C. Each party shall implement the following boarding restrictions within its respective service area where duplication of service or potential revenue loss may occur, including: BEAUMONT will limit BANNING to no more than three buses per hour at the Walmart Transfer Station; and BANNING will limit BEAUMONT to no more than three buses per hour at the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital bus stop. Neither party will board passengers at any other bus stop within the other party's jurisdiction. D. Each party shall be responsible for obtaining any required licenses or permits and paying any necessary fees in order to establish bus stops, install amenities or operate service in either service area. ARTICLE 4. FARES Fares may vary in accordance with adopted policies of each party. Each party shall retain all fares collected in the operation of their service. ARTICLE 5. TRANSFER CONNECTIONS BANNING and BEAUMONT agree to facilitate minimization of passenger waiting time, and both parties shall coordinate schedules whenever practical. 69 ARTICLE 6. TRANSFER A. BANNING shall accept BEAUMONT'S transfer tickets or media valued at BANNING's base fare for that service toward BANNING's regular fixed route service at the Walmart Transfer Station and San Gorgonio Hospital bus stop. In the event that BEAUMONT'S base fare is valued at more than BANNING'S base fare, no change or credit will be due to the passenger. Passengers are not required to top -up their fare to cover any shortfall between the BEAUMONT'S and BANNING'S base fares. Transfer media includes a one- time transfer ticket issued by BEAUMONT. B. BEAUMONT shall accept BANNING'S transfer tickets or media valued at BEAUMONT'S base fare for that service toward BEAUMONT'S regular fixed route service at the Walmart Transfer Station and San Gorgonio Hospital bus stop. In the event that BANNING'S base fare is valued at more than BEAUMONT'S base fare, no change or credit will be due to the passenger. Passengers are not required to top -up their fare to cover any shortfall between the BANNING'S and BEAUMONT'S base fares. Transfer media includes a one- time transfer ticket issued by BANNING. C. BANNING shall accept BEAUMONT'S Commuter plus Local Day or Monthly Passes as transfer media for a one -dollar ($1) discount on BANNING'S Commuterlink buses with their applicable premium fare. D. BEAUMONT shall accept BANNING'S Commuter plus Local Day or Monthly Passes as transfer media for a one -dollar ($1) discount on BEAUMONT'S Commuterlink buses with their applicable premium fare. E. The transfer ticket or media shall not be issued on or valid on Dial -A -Ride or other curb -to -curb service. F. Until such time as both agencies use electronic fare media (e.g. phone applications), such as Token Transit, electronic fare media is excluded from this agreement. G. Each party shall accept the other party's valid employee identification, on all fixed route and commuter services in lieu of payment of fare. H. BANNING shall accept BEAUMONT'S Military Veteran Identification for purchase of BANNING'S reduced Veterans Fares. I. BEAUMONT shall accept BANNING'S Military Veteran Identification for purchase of BEAUMONT'S reduced Veterans fares. ARTICLE 7. OPERATIONAL INFORMATION Each party shall formally inform the designated representative of each City of 70 future plans for route and schedule changes, exclusive of temporary demand and emergency situations, no later than 30 days before the changes are scheduled to be implemented. ARTICLE 8. CONTROL AND RESPONSIBILITY A. Each party to this Agreement, in its operations pursuant hereto, is acting as an independent contractor and agrees to defend, indemnify and hold the other party, including its officers, directors, employees, agents, subcontractors and suppliers, harmless from and against all claims, losses, damages and expenses, including attorney's fees, on account of any loss, damage or claim, including bodily injury to or death of any person, or for property damage arising out of such party's performance of services described in this Agreement, unless, and to the extent, caused by the negligence, gross negligence or intentional conduct of the other party. B. Each party to this agreement shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the other party, including its officers, directors, employees, agents, subcontractors and suppliers, from and against any and all liability or expense including any claim of liability and any and all losses or costs, including legal expenses and costs of expert witnesses and consultants, that may be imposed by the other party solely by virtue of the provisions of Section 895.2 of the California Government Code. ARTICLE 9. SERVICE TO BE OPERATED Neither party may operate duplicating services in the other's jurisdiction without the written approval of the other party's elected city council. Every attempt shall be made to coordinate alignments, schedules, stops, fare policies, and route planning for the safety and convenience of the public and in accordance with Article 5 - Relationships Between Operators - of the Transportation Development Act. ARTICLE 10. COMPLIANCE WITH AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) Each party shall be solely responsible for complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1991 (ADA) as amended, including the provision of parallel ADA demand response service along each party's fixed routes operated in the other party's service area. ARTICLE 11. NO MONETARY CLAIMS Neither party shall have any claims against or liabilities to the other party on account of expenses incurred or revenues received or lost as a result of this Agreement except as otherwise provided to the contrary herein. ARTICLE 12. TERMS OF THE AGREEMENT 71 This Agreement shall be effective on July 1, 2019, or the date of full execution by both parties, whichever date is later, and will remain in effect for a term of one year. Prior to December 15th of the existing year, both parties will meet at least once to discuss coordination of services for the following fiscal year, as well as to discuss an extension of this agreement by an additional subsequent term for one year. Notwithstanding the forgoing sentence, either party may terminate this agreement by giving 60 days written notice to the other party. ARTICLE 13. GOVERNING LAW; SEVERABILITY. This Agreement is in all respects governed by California law and venue for any dispute shall be in Riverside County. If any article, section, part or sentence of this Agreement or the application thereof is declared invalid for any reason, such invalidity shall not affect the other provisions of this Agreement which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this Agreement are declared to be severable. ARTICLE 14. INSURANCE. The parties each verify that they are a self -insured entity or maintain insurance coverage through a Joint Powers Authority in reasonable and customary amounts for their respective operations. ARTICLE 15. COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS. Each party shall observe and comply with the Transportation Development Act of 1971, all other applicable laws, ordinances, codes and regulations of governmental agencies, including federal, state, municipal and local governing bodies having jurisdiction over any or all of the services, including all provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1979 as amended, all California Occupational Safety and Health Regulations, and all other applicable federal, state, municipal and local safety regulations. All services performed by either party must be in accordance with these laws, ordinances, codes and regulations. ARTICLE 16. NOTIFICATION AND MAILING ADDRESSES Any requests and demands made between the parties pursuant to this Agreement are to be directed as follows: CITY OF BEAUMONT: 550 East 6th Street Beaumont, CA 92223 Attn: Todd Parton City Manager (951) 769-8520 CITY OF BANNING: 99 East Ramsey Street Banning, CA 92220 Attn: Doug Schulze City Manager (951) 922-3104 72 Any notices of service and schedule changes are to be directed as follows: CITY OF BEAUMONT: 550 East 6th Street Beaumont, CA 92223 Attn: Elizabeth Gibbs Community Services Director (951) 769-8521 ARTICLE 17. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. CITY OF BANNING: 99 East Ramsey Street Banning, CA 92220 Attn: Art Vela Public Works Director (951)922-3130 The terms and conditions of this Agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties with respect to its subject matter. This Agreement shall supersede any and all prior contracts between the parties, regarding the subject matter of this Agreement. The terms and conditions of this Agreement shall not be altered or otherwise modified except by a written amendment executed by both parties. ARTICLE 18. NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES. This Agreement is not intended to, and shall not be interpreted to, create any rights or establish any standard of care with regards to any third party who is not a signatory and party to this Agreement. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first above written. CITY OF BEAUMONT CITY OF BANNING By By Julio Martinez, Mayor Art Welch, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: APPROVED AS TO FORM: By By John 0. Pinkney, City Attorney Kevin G. Ennis, City Attorney 73 Any notices of service and schedule changes are to be directed as follows: CITY OF BEAUMONT: 550 East 6th Street Beaumont, CA 92223 Attn: Elizabeth Gibbs Community Services Director (951) 769-8521 ARTICLE 17. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. CITY OF BANNING: 99 East Ramsey Street Banning, CA 92220 Attn: Art Vela Public Works Director (951)922-3130 The terms and conditions of this Agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties with respect to its subject matter. This Agreement shall supersede any and all prior contracts between the parties, regarding the subject matter of this Agreement. The terms and conditions of this Agreement shall not be altered or otherwise modified except by a written amendment executed by both parties. ARTICLE 18. NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES. This Agreement is not intended to, and shall not be interpreted to, create any rights or establish any standard of care with regards to any third party who is not a signatory and party to this Agreement. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first above written. CITY OF B s., 7 CITY OF BANNING J lio ."tinez, Mayor , APPROVED AS TO FORM: By By Art Welch, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: By n 0. ' inkn: f ity Attorney Kevin G. Ennis, City Attorney 74 Any notices of service and schedule CITY OF BEAUMONT: 550 East 6th Street Beaumont, CA 92223 Attn: Elizabeth Gibbs Community Services Director (951) 769-8521 ARTICLE 17. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. changes are to be directed as follows: CITY OF BANNING: 99 East Ramsey Street Banning, CA 92220 Attn: Art Vela Public Works Director (951)922-3130 The terms and conditions of this Agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties with respect to its subject matter. This Agreement shall supersede any and all prior contracts between the parties, regarding the subject matter of this Agreement The terms and conditions of this Agreement shall not be altered or otherwise modified except by a written amendment executed by both parties. ARTICLE 18. NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES. This Agreement is not intended to, and shall not be interpreted to, create any rights or establish any standard of care with regards to any third party who is not a signatory and party to this Agreement. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first above written. CITY OF BEAUMONT CITY OF BAN By Julio Martinez, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: By John 0. Pinkney, City Attorney By Art Welch ayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: By%�- Kevin G. Ennis, CityAttorney � RL ryt I aw.14 Assr. Ci N ATTost..0140 75 RESOLUTION 2019-81 RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF BANNING, CALIFORNIA, APPROVING AN INTERAGENCY SERVICES AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE CITY OF BANNING AND THE CITY OF BEAUMONT FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING COORDINATED TRANSIT SERVICES WHEREAS, on October 22, 2002 the City Council of the City of Banning approved Resolution 2002-76, "Resolution of the City Council of the City of Banning Authorizing the Execution of an Agreement with the City of Beaumont to Provide Coordinated Transit Services"; and WHEREAS, the City of Beaumont recently approved their Short Range Transit Plan for fiscal year 2019-2020, which included a plan to remove the City of Beaumont's Route 2, which is the route that currentlyoperates along the Ramsey Street corridor; and WHEREAS, with the removal of Route 2 from the City of Beaumont's transit operation, there remains a need to coordinate services for Beaumont and Banning transit dependent citizens during transfers from one agency's transit system to the other; and WHEREAS, City of Banning and City of Beaumont met to discuss terms and condition contained in the Interagency Services Agreement for each respective transit operation. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Banning as follows: SECTION 1. The Banning City Council adopts Resolution 2019-81, approving the Interagency Services Agreement between the City of Banning and the City of Beaumont for the purpose of providing coordinated transit services. SECTION 2. The City Clerk shall certify to the adoption of this Resolution and shall cause a certified resolution to be filed in the book of original resolutions. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 25th day of June 2019. Arthur L. e ch, Mayor City of Banning 1 76 ATTEST: Daryl Betancur, Deputy City Clerk City of Banning APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGAL CONTENT: Kevin G. Ennis, City Attorney Richards, Watson & Gershon [THIS SPACE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK] CERTIFICATION: I, Daryl Betancur, Deputy City Clerk of the City of Banning, California, do hereby certify that the foregoing Resolution 2019-81, was duly adopted by the City Council of the City of Banning, California, at a regular meeting thereof held on the 25th day of June, 2019, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Happe, Wallace, & Welch NOES: None ABSTAIN: None ABSENT: Peterson & Andrade CERTIFIED TO BE A TRUE AND CORRECT COPY OF THE ORIGINAL DOCUMENT ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK. BY la TIILE AcMV' C1€ I DATE 1 Y '24ISMOi 3 aryl Betancur, Deputy City Clerk City of Banning, Califomia 78 City of Beaumont SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY 2020/21 - 2022/23 BEAUMONT CALIFORNIA 79 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1— SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND SERVICE PROFILE 4 1.1 Description of Service Area 4 1.2 Population Profile and Demographics 5 Ridership Demographics 6 1.3 Services - Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service, Regional Express Bus Service 7 Table 1 8 Fixed Route 9 Paratransit Services 9 Regional Express Bus Service 9 10 10 10 11 12 12 13 13 14 15 16 1.7 Existing Facilities and Bus Stop Amenities 17 1.8 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies 18 1.9 Prior or Existing Studies and Plans 18 CHAPTER 2 - EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 18 2.1 Key Performance Indicators 19 Table 2.0 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 29 30 31 2.4 Service Performance 32 Route 2 32 Route 3 33 Route 4 33 Route 7 33 Route 9 34 Route 3/4 34 Commuter Link 120 34 Commuter Link 125 35 Dial A Ride (Paratransit) 35 Table 2.3 36 2.5 Productivity Improvement Efforts 38 1.4 Ridership, Revenue Miles, Revenue Hours Fixed Route Paratransit Services Regional Express Bus Service 1.5 Current Fare Structure Fare Collection Systems Incentive Programs and Ridership Promotion 1.6 Revenue Fleet Table 1.1 BUS Table 1.1 COM Table 1.1 DAR 2.2 SRTP Performance Report Table 2.1 2.3 SRTP Service Summary Table 2.2 Service Summary All Routes Table 2.2 Service Summary Excluded Routes Table 2.2 Service Summary Non -Excluded Routes Table 2.2 Service Summary BUS Table 2.2 Service Summary DAR Table 2.2A Beaumont SRTP 20/21 2 I Page 80 2.6 Major Trip Generators 39 2.7 Recent Service Changes 39 39 39 39 PLANNING, AND MARKETING 39 39 Ridership 40 40 40 Route 2 Route 3/4 Commuter 120 CHAPTER 3 — FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL 3.1 Planned Service Changes 3.2 Future Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotions to Promote Comprehensive Operations Analysis Travel Training Free Fare Promotion 41 Annual Promotions 41 Redevelopment of Walmart Regional Transportation Hub 42 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth 43 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes 43 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning 43 Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Station (Projects 19-01 and 20-01) 43 Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility (Project 20-02) 44 Replacement Vehicles (Project 20-06) 44 Electric Vehicle Charging Station (Project 20-07) 44 Table 3A 45 CHAPTER 4 — FINANCIAL PLANNING 46 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 46 Operating Budget 46 Table4 47 Table 48 FareboxCalculations 48 Capital Budget 49 Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Station (Project 21-01) 49 Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility (Project 21-02) 51 Bus Stop Signage and Amenities (Project 21-03) 53 Electric Vehicle Shuttle (Project 21-04) 55 Vehicle Communications for New Vehicles (Project 21-05) 57 Table 4.1 60 Table 4.2 62 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 63 Table 4.3 64 4.4 Open Capital Projects 65 Table 4.4 67 Beaumont SRTP 20/21 3 I Page 81 CHAPTER 1- SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND SERVICE PROFILE 1.1 Description of Service Area The City of Beaumont's public transit system services approximately 50 square miles and includes the city of Beaumont and parts of unincorporated Riverside County area known as Cherry Valley. Additionally, Beaumont transports passengers to the commercial areas of Cabazon, including Casino Morongo and the Desert Hills Premium Outlet Malls. At the center of three major thoroughfares, including Interstate 10, Highway 60 and Highway 79, Beaumont offers fixed route, commuter link, and paratransit service. Passengers can connect easily with other Beaumont routes, as well as with regional transit providers such as Banning, Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Sunline Transit Agency at one central location, the Beaumont Walmart transit center. Beaumont operates two commuter link routes that connect San Gorgonio Pass area residents with San Bernardino County. This express service from Beaumont stops in Calimesa, the San Bernardino Transit Center (SBTC), Kaiser Permanente Redlands medical offices, and the Jerry L. Pettis Memorial Veterans Administration Medical Center (VA). The SBTC is centrally located within downtown San Bernardino and offers extensive connection possibilities for passengers, including the Metrolink train system, OmniTrans, Victor Valley Transit Agency (VVTA), RTA and Mountain Transit. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 Agrd mm 4 I Page 82 1.2 Population Profile and Demographics According to the most recent report published by California Department of Finance in May 2019, Beaumont is the fastest growing city in Riverside County. Beaumont has experienced a 3.99% population increase from January 2018 to January 2019, with a total population of 48,401. Since the 1980s, Beaumont population has increased exponentially, with the largest increase in the late 2000s. 60000 50000 40000 30000 20000 10000 0 Population Growth 1980 1990 2000 2010 2013 2014 2015 2020 Year Beaumont has twelve (12) schools located within Beaumont Unified School District consisting of seven (7) elementary schools, two (2) middle schools, two (2) senior high schools, and one (1) charter school. Transportation provided by Beaumont Unified School District was eliminated in 2008 and many families rely on Beaumont's public transportation system to transport youth passengers to and from school. Beaumont's youth population (age 18 and under) equals 36%1; however, ridership reports taken throughout the year show youth passengers make up 56% of the total passenger base in Beaumont. Beaumont has three large active adult communities, with another two located in Cherry Valley. Although the median age of residents in Beaumont is 35 years, persons over the age of 65 make up 13.6% of the population, not including those living in Cherry Valley2. The growing active adult communities and the corresponding increase in population for this age group may impact paratransit and fixed route needs. The mean household income in Beaumont is $88,701, slightly below California's statewide mean household income of $101,4933. However, the percentage of families in Beaumont whose income is below poverty level is 7.6%, while across the state the poverty level is higher at 10.4%. 12014-2018 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates U.S. Census Bureau 2 lbid 3 lbid Beaumont SRTP 20/21 5 I Page 83 iMc For California residents over the age of 16 years, 63.5% participate in the labor force, where Beaumont shows almost equal to the state at 61.1%. Beaumont residents make up two predominant races with Hispanic or Latino at 43.2%, while another 38.5% are White (not Hispanic or Latino). Asian, Native American, and Pacific Islander make most of the other races, as shown below4: 50.00% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00% 43.20% 38.50% Race 7.30% 8.00% 2 0.30% 0.10% Race Hispanic White d Black Asian • Other u Native American mi Pacific Islander Almost 89% of residents over 25 years have at least a high school diploma (or equivalent) with 16.6% earning a bachelor's degree and 8.7% a graduate or professional degrees. Finally, of the total population in Beaumont, civilian veterans equal 7.7%, while another 10% report being disabled'. Ridership Demographics Ridership surveys were conducted in December and January of this fiscal year as part of the Comprehensive Operations Analysis currently underway. There were 427 responses. General passengers surveyed indicate that almost 68% live in a household with an annual income of less than $30,000. Approximately half of the passengers ride the service five or more days per week, with 70.5% indicating that they lack access to a personal vehicle. Additionally, almost 54% state that they use the service to travel either to work or school. Of the passengers surveyed, 36.4% state that they are Hispanic or Latino and 70.3% are 25 years or age and over. 4 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates U.S. Census Bureau 5 Ibid 6lbid Beaumont SRTP 20/21 6 I Page 84 1.3 Services - Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service, Regional Express Bus Service As shown in Table 1, Beaumont operates seven days a week, as follows: Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Route 2 Route 2 Route 2 Route 2 Route 2 Route 3 Route 3 Route 3 Route 3 Route 3 Route 4 Route 4 Route 4 Route 4 Route 4 Route 3/4 * Peak Service Route 3/4 Route 7* Route 7* Route 7* Route 7* Route 7* Route 9* Route 9* Route 9* Route 9* Route 9* Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter 120 120 120 120 120 120 Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter Commuter 125 125 125 125 125 Beaumont SRTP 20/21 7 I Page 85 Table 1 Description of Routes Route Description 2 3 4 7 Weekday Weekday Weekday Downtown to Walmart with Express Service to Cabazon Major Destinations Second Street Marketplace and restaurants, Walmart Regional Connection Stop, San Gorgonio Hospital, 6th Street Downtown area, Civic Center, Chamber of Commerce, Library, Oak Valley Parkway Plaza, Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle School and Beaumont High School Walmart to Cherry Valley via Sundance Second Street Marketplace and restaurants, Walmart Regional Connection Stop, San Gorgonio Hospital, Sundance Community, Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle School, Albert Chatigny Community Recreation Center, Sports Park, Cherry Valley commercial, Cherry Valley Deviations and Beaumont High School Walmart to Downtown via 3 Rings Ranch Weekday (Peak Service) 9 Second Street Marketplace and restaurants, Walmart Regional Connection Stop, San Gorgonio Hospital, downtown residential areas, Glen View High School, library, 3 Rings Ranch Community, Palm Ave, Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle School, Sports Park, Beaumont High School, north residential area, Albert Chatlgny Community Recreation Center, Pennsylvania Ave Tournament Hills and Fairway Canyon to Middle Schools and Beaumont High School I Following the Beaumont School District calendar: Western masterplan communities of Tournament Hills, Fairway Canyon to Beaumont High School, Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle School, Oak Valley Shopping Center Weekday (Peak Seneca Springs to Middle Schools and Following the Beaumont School District calendar: Southern masterplan communitiy Service) Beaumont High School of Seneca Springs, Beaumont High School, Mountain View Middle School, and San Gorgonio Middle School 3/4 CL 120 City Wide DAR Weekend Walmart to Cherry Valley via Downtown Second Street Marketplace and restaurants, Walmart Regional Connection Stop, San Gorgonio Hospital, downtown residential areas, Glen View High School, library, 3 Rings Ranch Community, Palm Ave, Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle School, Sports Park, Beaumont High School, Cherry Valley Commercial, north residential area, Albert Chatigny Community Recreation Center, Pennsylvania Ave Weekday and Walmart to San Bernardino Transit Saturday Center Weekday Walmart, Beaumont Civic Center, Calimesa downtown shopping centers, Calimesa Library, San Bernardino Transit Center Walmart to Loma Linda Veterans Hospital Walmart, Beaumont Civic Center, Calimesa downtown shopping centers, Calimesa Library, Redlands Commercial area including Mountain Grove Plaza, Redlands Amazon Distribution Centers, Kaiser Redlands Medical Office, Pharoh's Kingdom, Loma Linda Veteran's Affairs Hospital and Loma Linda Medical Center Weekday Demand Response/Reservation Based Service for Seniors 65+, and persons certified under American Disability Act (ADA) that live in the City of Beaumont and parts of Cherry Valley who are going to places in Beaumont or certain areas within Cherry Valley. Additionally, service is provided to persons who livewithing 3/4 of a mile from a FR stop and goingto a destination also within an area of 3/4 of a mile from a FR stop 86 Fixed Route Beaumont operates five weekday fixed routes, two in peak service only, and one weekend fixed route. Fixed Route service hours are: Monday through Friday Saturday and Sunday 6:30 a.m. to 7:26 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. During the holidays of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, and Day after Thanksgiving, Beaumont operates limited service and follows a Saturday schedule. Beaumont does not operate on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, or Christmas Day. Paratransit Services Paratransit service, otherwise known as Dial -A -Ride (DAR), is a reservation -based curb to curb service for residents of Beaumont and parts of unincorporated Cherry Valley. Qualified passengers include those who reside 3/4 of a mile from a fixed bus route and are either certified under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) or 65 years of age or over, living in the Beaumont area. DAR service hours are: Persons with ADA certification Monday through Friday Saturday and Sunday 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Seniors without ADA certification Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. DAR observes the same holiday schedule as the fixed route system. Limited Service is provided on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, and Day after Thanksgiving. No service is provided on New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, or Christmas Day. Regional Express Bus Service Beaumont operates two regional express routes, including Commuter Link 120 and Commuter Link 125. The CL 120 originates at Beaumont's Walmart transit center and provides service to and from the Beaumont Civic Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Outlet Mall, Calimesa and SBTC. The CL 125 also originates at Beaumont's Walmart transit center and provides service to and from Calimesa, Kaiser Redlands, Redlands Citrus Grove shopping center, and the VA Hospital in Loma Linda. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 9 I Page 87 Commuter Link service hours are: Monday through Friday Saturday 1.4 Ridership, Revenue Miles, Revenue Hours 4:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m. 7:50 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Fixed Route Since 2016, passenger boarding's across most fixed routes have steadily declined. In FY19, the overall fixed route system had 176,794 passenger boarding's, operated 219,639 revenue miles and 15,256 revenue hours of service. Passenger boarding's are projected to be less in FY 20, at 108,448 which is a 38.65% decrease from FY19. Local FR Annual Fixed Route Passenger Boardings 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 Proj 2020 Q 2019 u 2018 ii 2017 2016 Beaumont is in the process of a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) wherein each route is individually assessed and analyzed as a part of the overall system. Based on route data, surveys, and passenger data collection, the consultant conducting the COA is required to propose performance standards for adoption by Beaumont City Council. These standards will be used as an ongoing monitoring and management tool used to increase service in the coming years. Paratransit Services DAR has experienced a decrease in passenger trips in FY 20 compared to FY 19. In FY 19, there were 8,874 passenger trips, operated for 2,670 revenue hours and 33,680 revenue miles. Passenger trip projections for FY 20 are approximately 7,383 and equates to a 16.8% decrease. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 10 I Page 88 DAR Annual Paratransit Passenger Boardings 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Proj 2020 U 2019 v 2018 0 2017 ■ 2016 Regional Express Bus Service Commuter Link service has experienced increases in passenger boarding's partially attributed to added service and increased frequency. Combined commuter service saw 18,280 passenger boarding's in FY 19, operated 213,928 revenue miles and 7539.48 revenue hours of service. Together, commuter service has a projected increase of passenger boarding's of 20,565 which is a 12.5% increase over FY19. Commuter Annual Commuter Passenger Boardings lasimmel Beaumont SRTP 20/21 i 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 ® Proj 2020 0 2019 u 2018 id 2017 0 2016 11 1 Page 89 1.5 Current Fare Structure Fixed Route On fixed route service, passengers pay general fare unless they qualify for a discounted fare. Discounted fares are available to seniors, persons with disabilities, veterans, or active military. Children 46" tall or under ride for $0.25 with a paying adult. At the beginning of FY 20 Beaumont increased fares for all services except paratransit. The following is the current fare structure: Fare Category General Base Fare $1.25 Day Pass $3.10 10 Ticket Book $12.50 Monthly Pass $39.13 Child (46" tall or under) Accompanied by a paying adult. Limit 2 $0.25 N/A N/A N/A Senior/Disabled (60+) $0.75 _$1.90 $7.50 $24.80 Military Veterans $0.75 $1.90 $7.50 $24.80 Deviations (Route 3 and 4) $0.50 N/A N/A N/A Go Pass: MSJC Students (During valid session only) Free N/A N/A N/A Active Military Free N/A N/A N/A Paratransit Services Fare Categories Base Fare 10-Ride Punch Card One -Way $2.00 $18.00 Companion & Child $3.00 N/A PCA (with ID) Free Free No Show $2.00 N/A _ J Regional Express Bus Service Fare Categories Base Fare 10 Ride Punch Day Pass Monthly ikCard Pass General $3.50 $31.50 $8.00 $75.00 Child (46" tall or under) Accompanied by $2.50 $22.50 a paying adult. Limit 2 $6.00 $50.00 Senior/Disabled (60+) $2.50 $22.50 $6.00 $50.00 Military Veterans _ $2.50 $22.50 $6.00 $50.00 Active Military Free N/A N/A N/A Fare Collection Systems There are a variety of options available to passengers to pay fares. Passengers can purchase monthly passes at the Beaumont Civic Center where cash, check or credit cards are acceptable Beaumont SRTP 20/21 12 I Page 90 forms of payment. Onboard the bus, passengers can purchase ticket books, punch cards, and day passes from the driver using cash or check. New in FY 20 was the introduction of an electronic fare media called Token Transit as an additional fare option to our passengers. Available to all passengers on all modes of service, except Dial A Ride, Beaumont Transit passengers can purchase any fare category on their mobile phones. Beaumont Transit joined the dozens of agencies currently using the platform for seamless use of the application for connecting passengers. Token Transit is used primarily on the peak routes; Routes 7 and 9. 28% of the passengers on Route 7 use Token Transit. 30% of the Route 9 passengers use Token Transit. Predominately, passengers use cash or prepaid tickets as their preferred fare media for transportation. Incentive Programs and Ridership Promotion Beaumont Transit actively participates in many community events throughout the calendar year, including the annual Cherry Festival parade, holiday light parade, Touch -A -Bus, Trunk -or - Treat, Veteran's Expo, Stuff -the -Bus, and Free Fare Friday. The summer Travel Training program continues to be successful. Launched in 2017, Travel Training began in partnership with Metrolink to teach choice riders in the Pass area how to use public transportation to and from Los Angeles via the commuter bus and train. Once in Los Angeles, a tour of Union Station is offered to highlight the important connecting features of the regional connection hub. The endeavor continues to be a welcomed addition to the promotional efforts Beaumont Transit offers to the community. Beaumont offers a real-time bus tracking system called Double Map for our passengers to use. This program, initially purchased in 2016, promotes the reliability of the local transit system for passengers. This real-time bus tracking is accessible on a free smart phone app or through any connection with the Internet. This program gives passengers the ability to find and track their buses to eliminate unnecessary waiting. 1.6 Revenue Fleet Beaumont Transit's fleet consists of nineteen vehicles, ten of which are CNG fueled and the other nine by gasoline, as shown in Table 1.1. Three additional CNG vehicles are scheduled to be delivered in the next month. The CNG fueled vehicles meet the emission mitigation standards mandated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Beaumont maximizes the life of vehicles in our fleet. Most of the vehicles are considered Medium Duty vehicles under Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and have a 7-year, 200,000- mile life expectancy7. Beaumont maintenance keeps vehicles in service longer than FTA guidelines. https://www.transitwiki.org/TransitWiki/images/6/64/Useful_Life_of_Buses.pdf Beaumont SRTP 20/21 13 I Page 91 OrRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Directly Operated Table 1.1- Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Beaumont Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Vehicle Equipped Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2010 2015 2011 2011 2015 2015 2009 2009 CM D EBC EDN EDN EDN EDN GMC SIR C 5500 XHF 40 EDN EDN XHF 40 XHF 40 C-5500 C-5500 28 43 30 30 43 43 28 28 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 32 40 33 33 40 40 32 32 CN CN GA CN CN CN CN CN 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 216,657 51,696 246,841 146,972 37,811 33,408 181,558 202,528 230,600 54,189 278,190 165,591 43,294 39,676 187,418 219,620 230,600 54,189 278,190 165,591 43,294 39,676 187,418 219,620 Totals: TransTrack Manager"" 4/28/Z020 273 8 8 1,117,471 1,218,578 152,322 Page 1 of 1 92 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Commuter Bus / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Beaumont Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Vehicle Equipped Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2009 2018 2011 2011 2016 2010 2010 2010 2010 EBC EDN EDN EDN EDN FRD FRD FRD STR FORD E450 EZRider II FORD 550 FORD F550 FORD F550 Ford E450 Ford E-450 Ford E-450 C-5500 16 30 30 30 30 16 16 16 30 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 32 33 33 33 24 24 24 32 GA CN GA GA CN GA GA GA GA 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 256,606 13,209 286,184 308,818 47,334 339,121 351,833 342,813 311,313 257,310 52,652 318,361 338,738 94,643 344,930 396,713 377,929 340,881 257,310 52,652 318,361 338,738 94,643 344,930 396,713 377,929 340,881 Totals: TransTrack Manager"" 4/28/2020 214 9 9 2,257,231 2,522,157 280,240 Page 1 of 1 93 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Demand Response / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Beaumont Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Vehicle Equipped Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2008 EBC FORD E450 2016 EDN FORD E-450 16 20 1 1 24 24 GA CN 1 1 264,564 35,238 264,564 51,351 264,564 51,351 Totals: 36 2 2 299,802 315,915 157,958 TransTrack Manager"" Page 1 of 1 4/28/2020 94 All vehicles meet the ADA accessibility requirements and are equipped with bike racks. Vehicle capacity ranges in size from 16 passengers to 43 passengers. The vehicle shown below is the newest member of the Beaumont Transit fleet and primarily used on the CL 120 to SBTC. 1.7 Existing Facilities and Bus Stop Amenities Existing Transit Facilities Administrative services for Beaumont Transit are temporarily located in the heart of downtown Beaumont at the Beaumont Civic Center, 550 E 6th Street, Building D. It is at this location where dispatch, administrative assistance, and the operations yard are located. Customer service calls for general information, route planning, and Dial -A -Ride appointments are serviced at this location, while walk in customers, including the purchase of fare media, are serviced within the main civic center building. The Fleet maintenance operations is located at 550 California Ave, approximately 1 mile from the administrative building. Bus Stop Amenities Beaumont has 23 bus shelters, 157 bus stops, and a dozen stops with benches. A request for proposal has been issued to improve the Walmart Regional Bus Stop which connects passengers with four agencies. This improvement is funded by the Low Carbon Transportation Operations Program (LCTOP) FY 18 award. Additionally, LCTOP will install bus shelters at two other locations located in the disadvantaged community of Beaumont, including the Beaumont Library. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 17 1 Page 95 1.8 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies Because the San Gorgonio Pass area is geographically isolated from the desert, western Riverside County and the urban area of San Bernardino county, public transit coordination is vital for the movement of passengers. Passengers traverse cities to accomplish needs such as social services, employment opportunities in the urban areas, and more diverse commercial businesses. Beaumont has entered into multiple agreements with surrounding transit operators, including Banning, OmniTrans, RTA, and Victor Valley Transit Authority (VVTA). The 2019 interagency agreement with Banning has an added feature of a paper transfer system, reminiscent of the early 2000s. This has proven to be problematic to Beaumont's transit -dependent residents needing to access social services, the courthouse, and DMV services, all located in Banning, as they are now faced with a "two -seat" ride each way. Conversely, agreements with OmniTrans, RTA and VVTA have added value for connecting passengers. Passengers presenting a Beaumont multi use (day or month) pass can connect to OmniTrans, RTA or VVTA for free wherever the two agencies connect. - Passengers presenting a multi -use (day, week, or month) pass from OmniTrans or VVTA receive a $1.00 discount on commuter service or free connection with our fixed route wherever we connect. Passengers presenting RTA multi use pass (day, week, or month) connect for free to Beaumont's commuter and fixed route service wherever the two agencies connect. 1.9 Prior or Existing Studies and Plans Beaumont completed a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) in 2014 in conjunction with the City of Banning. The results of the study were partially implemented until the new agreement with the City of Banning in July 2019, which largely eliminated crossing of city boundaries. In early 2020, Beaumont retained the services of a consultant to complete an independent COA. Suggested in three phases, Beaumont has completed phase 1 of the project and the consultant is preparing to present to City Council. Phase 2 will consist of identifying service alternatives. Phase 3 will be preparing and implementing an action plan. The final phases of the COA are scheduled to be completed by end of FY 20 and implementation expected FY 21, pending the outcome of the COVID-19 pandemic. CHAPTER 2 - EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE Overall, Beaumont Transit systemwide passenger trips for FY 20 is projected to end lower than the passenger trips delivered in FY 19. In FY 19, systemwide passenger trips, including paratransit, totaled 203,948. FY 20 is projected to end at 136,396, resulting in a 33.12% decline from the previous year. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 18 I Page 96 Systemwide Annual Systemwide Passenger Boardings link MIL r-war-1 50,000 100,000 150,000 Proj 2020 h 2019 61 2018 El 2017 II 2016 200,000 250,000 There are three primary reasons to explain why Beaumont is experiencing a decline in passenger boarding's. First, public transit operators nationwide have seen a reduction in passengers across all modes of transportation. Second, Beaumont reduced service on the Route 2 by 75% in FY 20. The Route 2 previously connected Beaumont passengers in the low income and downtown area to social services in Banning; however, this service was eliminated with the entering of an Interagency Agreement with City of Banning which took effect July 1, 2019. Third, Covid-19 and the mandated social distancing and effective close of the economy has led to a reduction in service because of the reduction of passengers. 2.1 Key Performance Indicators Beaumont Transit monitors performance indicators throughout the year to ensure the system is performing productively. Customer complaints and suggestions are received, noted and implemented where appropriate. Route schedules and timepoints are reviewed for connectivity with other routes and regional connection opportunities. Department expenses are monitored for farebox recovery ratio. RCTC also provides an ability to demonstrate performance indicators in Table 2.0. Key performance indicators include seven discretionary and one mandatory, with transit operators required to meet four of the seven discretionary indicators. Beaumont currently fails to meet the mandatory performance indicator of 10% farebox recovery ratio and meets three of the seven discretionary. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 19 I Page 97 pliRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Beaumont Data Elements 1 FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target ____ FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 165,316 Passenger Miles 1,436,725 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 23,653.0 I Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles I 481,289.0 I I Total Actual Vehicle Miles 1 504,023.0 I Total Operating Expenses $2,610,230 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $281,000 Net Operating Expenses $2,329,230 I Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 10.76%I >= 10.00% 1 9.13%1 Fails to Meet Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $110.36 <= $100.60 $80.58 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $14.09 >= $9.36 and <= $12.66 $11.82 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $1.62 >= $1.96 and <= $2.65 $2.47 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $98.48 >= $74.32 and <= $100.56 $73.22 Fails to Meet Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $4.84 >= $4.04 and <= $5.46 $3.44 Fails to Meet Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.99 >= 6.72 and <= 9.09 6.20 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.34 >= 0.37 and <= 0.49 0.29 Fails to Meet Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager'"' 4/28/2020 Page 1 of 1 98 2.2 SRTP Performance Report In FY 20, when the SRTP was prepared for FY 21, Beaumont set a plan for performance. RCTC in turn set targets for Beaumont to keep in mind as the year of operation. The following Table 2.1 outlines the planned performance indicators for FY 21 and compares the FY 21 plan to the FY 21 targets. This report indicates that all seven discretionary performance indicators were planned to be met when the targets were set. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 21 I Page 99 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: City of Beaumont All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 4th Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 204,274 104,093 169,846 None Passenger Miles 976,877 497,341 1,477,908 None Revenue Hours 24,456.7 16,961.8 26,560.0 None Total Hours 25,484.4 18,305.6 28,686.0 None Revenue Miles 457,808.9 359,461.0 567,924.0 None Total Miles 483,043.8 374,832.0 590,904.0 None Operating Costs $2,796,318 $1,344,999 $2,775,646 None Passenger Revenue $240,041 $122,839 $307,338 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue $93,346 None Operating Subsidy $2,556,276 $1,222,159 $2,468,308 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $114.34 $79.30 $104.50 <= $72.21 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $6.11 $3.74 $4.89 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $13.69 $12.92 $16.34 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 8.58% 9.13% 14.43% >= 0.1 Meets Target Subsidy Per Passenger $12.51 $11.74 $14.53 >= $15.80 and <= $21.38 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $2.62 $2.46 $1.67 >= $3.32 and <= $4.50 Better than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $104.52 $72.05 $92.93 >= $57.43 and <= $77.71 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $5.58 $3.40 $4.35 >= $2.92 and <= $3.94 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 8.35 6.14 6.39 >= 3.09 and <= 4.19 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.45 0.29 0.30 >= 0.15 and <= 0.21 Better Than Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager"' 5/18/2020 100 Page 1 of 1 2.3 SRTP Service Summary In the following pages are reports that give an insight on how the Beaumont Transit service is performing in various areas compared to years past, as well as the plan for the coming fiscal year. Table 2.2 Service Summary for City of Beaumont All Routes: Like Table 2.1 above, this table compares 3rd Quarter actual of FY 20 to the plan of FY 20. In addition, the table also shows actual audited figures for FY 18 and 19 as well as showing FY 20 compared to FY 21 plan. This table shows all routes Beaumont operates including Dial -A -Ride and excluded routes. Some key takeaways from this report are: • Passenger trips are significantly lower than what was reported for previous FY's. • Beaumont Transit has lowered operating cost per revenue mile; however • Farebox recovery ratio remains below plan because of the low passenger trips. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 23 I Page 101 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- City of Beaumont -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes • FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 9 9 12 9 13 , Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $2,221,265 . $2,796,318 $2,610,230 $1,344,999 $2,775,646 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $235,430 $240,041 $281,000 $122,839 $307,338 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,985,836 $2,556,276 $2,329,230 $1,222,159 $2,468,308 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 197,775 204,274 165,316 103,433 169,846 Passenger Miles 945,103 976,877 1,436,725 494,205 1,477,908 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 24,771.8 24,456.7 23,653,0 16,691.8 26,560.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 420,009.0 457,808.9 481,289.0 355,656.0 567,924.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 447,136.0 483,043.8 504,023,0 370,667.0 590,904.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $89.67 $114.34 $110.36 $80.58 $104.50 Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.60% 8.58% 10.76% 9.13% 14.43% Subsidy per Passenger $10.04 $12.51 $14.09 $11.82 $14.53 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.10 $2.62 $1.62 $2.47 $1.67 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $80.17 $104.52 $98.48 $73.22 $92.93 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.73 $5.58 $4.84 $3.44 $4.35 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 8.0 8.4 7.0 6.2 6.4 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.47 0.45 0.34 0.29 0.30 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Managerm 4/29/2020 Page 1 of 1 102 Table 2.2 is further broken down into Excluded and Non -Excluded Routes. The following two tables reflect these two categories. In FY 20, Beaumont had 4 excluded routes from the farebox recovery ratio reporting. These routes were Route 2, Route 3/4, Commuter Link 120 and Commuter Link 125. Excluded Routes are new routes or routes that have had 25% change in route. Being excluded gives a grace period for the route to perform and gain passenger ridership for three years. More detail on excluded routes are located in Table 2.2A Table 2.2 Excluded Routes has the following points of interest: • Excluded Routes have not gained passenger base necessary in order to reach farebox recovery plan. • The new routes are gaining passengers, and operating service to gain the passengers, however the low passenger counts create higher operating cost per revenue hour. Table 2.2 Non -Excluded Routes consists of the remaining routes and services Beaumont offers. These non -excluded routes are services that have been established and unaltered for at least 3 years. Non -excluded routes include the Route 3, Route 4, Route 7, and Route 9. Non -excluded reports has the following points of interest: • Non -excluded routes are doing very well and have a farebox recovery of 17.74% through the 3rd Quarter FY 20. • Operating Costs per revenue hour and subsidies are low compared to plan and previous years. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 25 I Page 103 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- City of Beaumont -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan 1 FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 3 2 4 4 5 Financial Data r Total Operating Expenses Total Passenger Fare Revenue Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $829,935 $44,807 $785,129 - $460,249 $14,420 $445,829 $1,364,146 $123,109 $1,241,037 $892,388 $42,561 $849,827 $1,359,487 $117,500 $1,241,987 J Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips Passenger Miles Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) Total Actual Vehicle Miles 18,923 90,830 6,912.1 165,555.0 173,479.0 7,344 35,251 2,849.2 76,021.0 77,316.0 63,111 848,500 12,751.0 343,950.0 352,253.0 30,730 147,504 9,703.2 253,639.0 259,410.0 52,476 801,695 16,116.0 425,086.0 434,330.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy per Passenger Subsidy per Passenger Mile Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) $120.07 5.40% $41,49 $8.64 $113.59 $4.74 2.7 0.11 $161.54 3.13% $60.71 $12.65 $156.48 $5.86 2.6 0.10 $106.98 9.02% $19.66 $1.46 $97.33 $3.61 5.0 0.18 $91.97 4.77% $27.65 $5.76 $87.58 $3.35 3.2 0.12 $84.36 12.05% $23.67 $1.55 $77.07 $2.92 3.3 0.12 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager"" 4/29/2020 Page 1 of 1 104 INFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- City of Beaumont' -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Non -Excluded Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 6 8 8 7 8 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses Total Passenger Fare Revenue Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,391,330 $190,623 $1,200,707 $2,336,069 $225,621 $2,110,448 $1,246,084 $157,891 $1,088,193 $452,610 $80,278 $372,332 $1,416,159 $189,838 $1,226,321 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips Passenger Miles Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) Total Actual Vehicle Miles 178,852 854,272 17,859.8 254,454.0 273,657.0 196,930 941,626 21,607.6 381,787.9 405,727.8 102,205 588,225 10,902.0 137,339.0 151,770.0 72,703 346,701 6,988.7 102,017.0 111,257.0 117,370 676,213 10,444.0 142,838.0 156,574.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy per Passenger Subsidy per Passenger Mile Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) $77.90 13.70% $6.71 $1.41 $67.23 $4.72 10.0 0.70 $108.11 9.66% $10.72 $2.24 $97.67 $5.53 9.1 0.52 $114.30 12.670/0 $10.65 $1.85 $99.82 $7.92 9.4 0.74 $64.76 17.74% $5.12 $1.07 $53.28 $3.65 10.4 0.71 $135.60 16.71% $10.45 $1.81 $117.42 $8.59 11.2 0.82 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager"" 9/29/2020 Page 1 of 1 105 The City of Beaumont service is further broken down in Tables 2.2 by dividing up the service into programs. Beaumont Transit has two programs. One program is the BUS program which is all fixed route and commuter link services. The second program is the DAR program which is our Dial -A -Ride or paratransit program. Table 2.2 BUS shows all routes within this program. Key notes of interest: • Passenger Trips on the fixed and commuter links are significantly lower than previous years. • Low passenger trips directly affect the amounts listed in the subsidies • Operating cost per revenue hour is low compared to plan and audited actuals of years past which means Beaumont consciously attempts to lower operating costs to a level to balance farebox ratio where possible. Table 2.2 DAR shows the Dial A Ride or paratransit program. Key notes of interest: • Paratransit service is a very expensive service to offer; however, it is a required service. • Passenger trips are lower but the cost to operate the service is significantly higher than previous years. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 28 I Page 106 d- RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Beaumont -BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 8 8 11 8 11 wFinancial Data 1 Total Operating Expenses $1,912,928 $2,528,180 $2,380,230 $1,169,016 $2,471,923 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $215,369 $236,763 $258,000 $112,698 $283,338 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,697,560 $2,291,416 $2,122,230 $1,056,318 $2,188,585 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 187,489 195,400 156,187 97,887 160,782 Passenger Miles 899,947 937,920 1,388,341 469,858 1,429,869 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 21,606.1 21,785.4 20,866.0 15,015.9 23,844.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 380,714.0 424,129.0 446,602.0 333,928.0 532,748.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 404,305.0 445,928.3 465,746.0 346,932.0 552,664.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $88.54 $116.05 $114.07 $77.85 $103.67 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.26% 9.36% 10.83% 9.64% 15.23% Subsidy per Passenger $9.05 $11.73 $13.59 $10.79 $13.61 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.89 $2.44 $1.53 $2.25 $1.53 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $78.57 $105.18 $101.71 $70.35 $91.79 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.46 $5.40 $4.75 $3.16 $4.11 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 8.7 9.0 7.5 6.5 6.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.49 0.46 0.35 0.29 0.30 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager"" 4/29/2020 Page 1 of 1 107 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Beaumont-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd QtrActual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 1 1.1 1 1 2 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $308,337 $268,138 $230,000 $175,982 $303,723 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $20,061 $3,278 $23,000 $10,141 $24,000 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $288,276 $264,860 $207,000 $165,841 $279,723 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 10,286 8,874 9,129 5,546 9,064 Passenger Miles 45,156 38,957 48,384 24,347 48,039 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 3,165.7 2,671.3 2,787.0 1,676.0 2,716.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 39,295.0 33,679.9 34,687.0 21,728.0 35,176.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 42,831.0 37,115.5 38,277.0 23,735.0 38,240.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $97.40 $100.38 $82.53 $105.00 $111.83 Farebox Recovery Ratio 6.51% 1.22% 10.00% 5.76% 7.90% Subsidy per Passenger $28.03 $29.85 $22.67 $29.90 $30.86 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $6.38 $6.80 $4.28 $6.81 $5.82 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $91.06 $99.15 $74.27 $98.95 $102.99 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $7.34 $7.86 $5.97 $7.63 $7.95 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.26 0.26 0.26 , 0.26 0.26 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager"" 4/29/2020 Page 1 of I 108 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021 - 2022/2023 Table 2.2A Excluded Routes BEAUMONT -CALIFORNIA- Excluded routes are new routes or new service extensions that are eligible for exemptions from the farebox recovery requirements J j Servi I Mode Type Date of Exemption Route # (FR/DARL (DDJCDldi scription Jtxan e►xlatation End Date Route 2 FR DO Route 3/4 FR DO Route 120 FR DO Route 125 FR DO Monday - Friday: Downtown to Walmart with Express Service to Cabazon August 2019 August 2022 Saturday & Sunday Service: Walmart to Cherry Valley via Downtown Monday - Saturday Service: Walmart to San Bernardino Transit Center Monday - Friday Service: Walmart to Loma Linda Veterans Hospital August 2019 August 2019 September 2018 August 2022 August 2022 September 2021 109 2.4 Service Performance Beaumont Transit operates six local fix routes, two of which are peak routes, and two commuter links. In this section, each route will be analyzed and discussed. Fixed Route Service The following chart compares the total passenger trips by the route and by year for the local fixed route. Route 9 Route 7 Route 3/4 Route 4 Route 3 Annual Fixed Route Passenger Boardings by Route 1 ..A Route 2 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 ■ Proj 2020 IA 2019 V 2018 612017 St 2016 In the statistics and analysis discussed for each route, route performance is projected based on the passenger boarding trends for the first three-quarters of FY 20. Although this is a projection to end FY 20, the last quarter of FY 20 will have an anomaly in boarding's because of Covid-19; however, this anomaly is not reflected in the projections. Route 2 Route 2 is Beaumont's trunk route and operates weekdays only. It was dramatically reduced in FY 20 as a result of an Interagency Agreement with Banning Transit. This route previously served passengers with two buses and had a 1-hour headway Monday through Friday and served with a 2-hour headway on weekends. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 32 I Page 110 The current design of this route is one bus operating on a 1.5-hour headway, Monday through Friday only. The route was restructured to by-pass Banning city streets and connect passengers to major employment and recreational opportunities in Cabazon via the 1-10 freeway. In FY 20, Route 2 is projected to finish the fiscal year with a significant decrease in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips for FY 20 are projected at 16,501, a 79.37% decrease from FY 19 end of year at 79,995. This route represents 12.79% of the systemwide passenger trips, excluding paratransit. Route 3 Route 3 operates weekdays with a one -hour headway and services the north area of Beaumont, a portion of Cherry Valley via deviations, residential community of Sundance and Walmart. This route also connects Sundance with both middle schools, the high schools, and three elementary schools. Passengers traveling to outer portions of Cherry Valley can request deviations while on board the bus or by calling customer service. In FY 20, Route 3 is projected to finish the fiscal year with 25,668 passenger trips, a slight increase of 1.35% in passenger trips compared to FY19, which ended at 25,326. Route 3 makes up 19.90% of systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Route 4 Route 4 operates weekdays with a one -hour headway and primarily services the SB535 identified disadvantaged community located in the heart of Beaumont's original 9-square miles of city limits. This route connects passengers with the local library, two elementary schools, the community center, both middle schools, the main high school, and the commercial shopping area of Walmart. In FY 20, Route 4 is projected to finish the fiscal year at 24,133, a 5.68% decrease in passenger trips compared to FY19. This route services 18.71% of the systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Route 7 Route 7 is a weekday peak hour service and follows the Beaumont Unified School District academic calendar. This route is designed to service the passengers during the peak hours of the morning and afternoon to connect the westernmost portion of Beaumont residential areas with schools and connecting routes. The route services the masterplan communities commonly known in Beaumont as Fairway Canyon and Tournament Hills, providing transportation to both middle schools, as well as the main high school. Connection opportunities include Route 2, Route 3, and Route 4. In FY 20, Route 7 is projected to finish the fiscal year with a decrease in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 are 25,880, a decrease of 17.23% Beaumont SRTP 20/21 33 I Page 111 from FY 19 which had 31,269 passenger trips. Route 7 makes up 20.06% of systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Route 9 Like Route 7, Route 9 is a weekday peak hour service and follows the Beaumont Unified School District academic calendar. This route is designed to connect passengers during the morning and afternoon with the southernmost masterplan residential community commonly known as Seneca Springs with both middle schools, the high school, and connecting routes. In FY 20, Route 9 is projected to finish the fiscal year with a decrease in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 are 10,810, a decrease of 6.87% from FY 19, which had 11,609 passenger trips. Route 9 makes up 8.38% of all systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Route 3/4 Route 3/4 is a one -hour headway weekend -only service. This route is a combination of the weekday service areas of Route 3 and Route 4 and connects the downtown residential areas with places of interest such as the local library, a recreation center, several churches, and the commercial area of Walmart. Route 3/4 service was increased in FY 20 to include Sunday service. This route is primarily routed in residential areas to commercial areas. This route services many churches and religious buildings and accommodates transit dependent passengers needing to access religious services on Sundays. This route also operates on recognized limited -service holidays. In FY 20, Route 3/4 is projected to finish the fiscal year with a significant increase in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 were 5,454, an increase of 93.9% from FY 19 which had 2,813 passenger trips. Route 3/4 makes up 4.23% of systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Commuter Link 120 The Commuter Link (CL) 120 operates two buses Monday through Friday, one bus with a 2-hour and 20-minute headway, and one with a 1-hour and 20-minute headway. The CL 120 also operates on Saturday and recognized limited -service holidays. On Saturdays, CL 120 is serviced by one bus and has a 2-hour and 20-minute headway. This express commuter service connects passengers at the Beaumont Walmart to Calimesa and the San Bernardino Transit Center. In FY 20, the CL120's schedule was adjusted to also connect commuting passengers from San Bernardino to Casino Morongo. In FY 20, CL 120 is projected to finish the fiscal year with an increase in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 are 15,996, an increase of 16.35% Beaumont SRTP 20/21 34 I Page 112 from FY 19, which had 13,748 passenger trips. The CL 120 makes up 12.4% of systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Commuter Link 125 The Commuter Link (CL) 125 operates weekday service from Beaumont Walmart to San Bernardino County medical facilities, as well as recreational and employment opportunities. Originating from Beaumont Walmart, the CL 125 connects with stops in Calimesa, Redlands Citrus Plaza (Alabama St and Lugonia Ave), Kaiser Redlands Medical Offices, and Loma Linda Veterans Affairs Hospital. In FY 20, the CL 125 is projected to finish the fiscal year relatively equal in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 are 4,569, a slight increase of .82% from FY 19, which had 4,532 passenger trips. The CL 125 makes up 3.54% of systemwide passengers, excluding paratransit. Dial A Ride (Paratransit) Beaumont Dial A Ride (DAR) is a curb to curb service for qualified passengers residing in Beaumont and parts of Cherry Valley. Qualified passengers include persons over the age of 65 as well as those passengers certified under the Americans with Disability Act. Beaumont Transit honors and recognizes those passengers carrying ADA compliant identification cards from RTA and Omnitrans. DAR operates as a complimentary service to the fixed routes in Beaumont and mirrors that schedule. Reservations are required at least 24 hours in advance and priority is given to ADA passengers. On the weekends, DAR is available to ADA passengers only. In FY 20, DAR is projected to finish the fiscal year with a decrease in passenger trips compared to FY19. Passenger trips projected to end FY 20 are 7,382, a decrease of 16.8% from FY 19 which had 8,874 passenger trips. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 35 I Page 113 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Beaumont -- 2 FY 2020/21 All Routes Data Elements Peak Route * Day Type Vehicles Passengers Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Miles Hours Hours Miles TotaI Operating Passenger Net Miles Cost Revenue Subsidy BEA-120 All Days 2 19,358 522,666 8,014.0 8,456.0 244,234.0 250,344.0 $639,503 $58,342 $581,161 BEA-125 Weekday 1 5,720 120,120 3,403.0 3,557.0 96,558.0 97,788.0 $272,455 $12,450 $260,005 BEA-2 Weekday 1 20,618 119,585 3,535.0 3,638.0 66,614.0 67,836.0 $355,145 $32,501 $322,644 BEA-3 Weekday 1 32,194 186,725 3,118.0 3,294.0 42,562.0 44,462.0 $379,424 $47,232 $332,192 BEA-3/4 All Days 1 6,780 39,324 1,164.0 1,260.0 17,680.0 18,362.0 $92,384 $14,207 $78,177 BEA-4 Weekday 1 30,280 175,624 3,391.0 3,497.0 44,804.0 45,828.0 $333,582 $36,016 $297,566 . BEA-7 Weekday 3 32,568 188,894 805.0 1,280.0 14,744.0 20,408.0 $253,945 $54,011 $199,934 BEA-9 Weekday 1 13,264 76,931 414.0 659.0 5,552.0 7,636.0 $145,485 $28,579 $116,906 BEA-DAR All Days 2 9,064 48,039 2,716.0 3,050.0 35,176.0 38,240.0 $303,723 $24,000 $279,723 Service Provider Totals 13 169,846 1,477,908 26,560.0 28,686.0 567,924.0 590,909.0 $2,775,646 $307,338 $2,468,308 Trans7Yart Manager"" 4/14/2020 Page 1 of 2 114 OFRIVERSIDE couHTr TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Beaumont -- 2 FY 2020/21 All Routes Performance Indicators Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route R Day Type Revenue Hour Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mlle BEA-120 AN Days ;79.80 ;2.62 ;33.04 9.12% $30.02 $1.11 ;72.52 $2.38 2.4 0.08 BEA-125 Weekday ;80.06 ;2.82 647.63 4.56% ;45.46 ;2.16 ;76.40 $2.69 1.7 0.06 BEA-2 Weekday ;100.47 ;5.33 $17.22 9.15% ;15.65 ;2,70 ;91.27 $4.84 5.8 0.31 BEA-3 Weekday ;121.69 ;8.91 ;11.79 12.44% $10.32 ;1.78 ;106.54 ;7.80 10,3 0.76 BEA-3/4 AN Days ;79.37 ;5.23 $13.63 15.37% $11.53 ;1.99 $67.16 $4.42 5.8 0.38 BEA-4 Weekday $98.37 ;7.45 $11,02 10.79% ;9.83 $1.69 $87.75 ;6.64 8.9 0.68 BEA-7 Weekday ;315.46 ;17.22 ;7.80 21.26% ;6.14 ;1.06 ;248.37 ;13.56 40.5 2,21 BEA-9 Weekday $351.41 $26.20 $10,97 19.64% $8.81 ;1.52 ;282.38 ;21.06 32.0 2.39 BEA-DAR All Days $111.83 ;8.63 ;33.51 7.90% ;30.86 ;5.82 ;102.99 ;7.95 3.3 0.26 Service Provider Totals ;104.50 $4.89 $16.34 11.07% ;14.53 ;1.67 $92,93 ;4.35 6.4 0.30 7YansTIadc Manager"" Page 2 of 2 4/14/2020 115 2.5 Productivity Improvement Efforts Beaumont encourages participation and insights from our customers and the public. Customer satisfaction is our number one priority and we engage feedback. All customer comments and complaints are considered and generally resolved immediately. As a small agency, requests for new stops or an adjustment in timepoints are easily resolved. Beaumont monitors the schedules in correspondence with other agencies. Metrolink, RTA, Omni, and Banning schedules are all reviewed, and changes are made usually in response to a change in the larger agencies' schedules. Our goal is to ensure that transit passengers can connect with other agencies to complete their trip. Currently, Beaumont uses several products to keep passengers connected with system information and announcements. These products are Facebook, Instagram, Double Map (a web based real time GPS bus locating system), Google Transit, and Everbridge (a mass communication system operated in conjunction with Beaumont Police Department). FIND YOUR BUS 9 DOWNLOAD THE APP TODAY O... .4_1 I clay App Store .D oubl@MAP Additionally, Pass area residents are invited to attend monthly travel training trips led by Beaumont staff members to such key destinations as Los Angeles Union Station, Downtown Disney, and Oceanside. The purpose of travel training is to empower the public with strategy and knowledge of local transit system, as well as other regional connecting systems such as Metrolink, RTA and Metro. Education of public transit, by means of travel training informational meetings and outings, will assist in the alleviation of common fears surrounding public transit and get passengers comfortable with moving around and using public transportation. Beaumont recently secured a consultant to perform a comprehensive operations analysis (COA) and are currently completing phase 1 of a 3-phase project. The primary purpose of the COA will be to determine demographics and needs of the residents of Beaumont, as well as connecting passengers traveling into and out of the city via our commuter links. An analysis of our growing city and our increased residential, commercial, and industrial areas will require the implementation of new routes and route design. COA professionals will be crucial to the connectivity of routes and determining service needs to better service passengers in the area. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 38 I Page 116 2.6 Major Trip Generators Over one-third of Beaumont's passengers attend Beaumont schools, with primary travel patterns between residential neighborhoods and middle and senior high schools during peak hours -morning and afternoon. However, this type of service is not sustainable, but more importantly is more costly to the overall operations. For this reason, additional service will not be added to the two peak routes, Routes 7 and 9. Beaumont will continue to focus on regional transportation as a means of sustainability. Commuter Link 120 has been in service since 2013 and Commuter Link 125 was introduced in September 2018. Both commuters have grown in passenger trips month over month and are widely popular with inquiries from traveling passengers on Metrolink and other regional providers connecting to Beaumont and Casino Morongo. 2.7 Recent Service Changes Recent service changes were introduced on Route 2, Route 3/4, and Commuter Link 120. Route 2 Route 2 had several significant changes at the onset of FY 20. All changes were a direct result of the July 2019 Interagency Agreement entered into with the city of Banning. At the request of Banning, Route 2 bypasses the Ramsey St. corridor and travels along Interstate 10 to Casino Morongo and the Desert Hills Outlet mall. Additionally, the route decreased service from two buses to one bus, as well as decreased days of operation from seven days to weekday only. Route 3/4 Because of the significant decreases in operational service on Route 2, it was determined that Route 3/4 would be better designed to add service, from Saturday only to Saturday and Sunday. This allows transit -dependent passengers to travel on Sundays accessing religious services and patronize commercial shopping areas of Beaumont. Commuter 120 The Commuter Link 120 also experienced changes in FY 20. A second bus was added to the route which increased the route frequency. This change was made based on passenger surveys requesting more service to and from SBTC. With the additional bus, CL 120 is now able to service Casino Morongo, allowing passengers to connect from the Metrolink train or other bus operators at SBTC a one -seat ride to the casino and outlet malls. CHAPTER 3 - FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING, AND MARKETING 3.1 Planned Service Changes The current COA project will determine the future of Beaumont's service changes in the coming years. The City of Beaumont continues to grow with an average of 750 additional new homes Beaumont SRTP 20/21 39 I Page 117 built every year. There are currently 3,500 homes approved for construction. The COA will tell us where service will best be served and should be completed by early FY 21. Industrial and employment opportunities are also growing. Amazon is preparing to open a million square foot distribution center in Beaumont. Amazon reports that they intend to hire several hundred full-time employees and will begin doing so at the end of May or June 2020, with an anticipated opening date in July or August 2020. Beaumont Transit has been approached by Amazon to provide public transportation to the facility and is considering a micro -transit system as a pilot program to address transportation needs of the Amazon employees. A rideshare voucher program for senior and ADA passengers to offset the rising operational expenses incurred by paratransit service is also being explored. This voucher program will mirror a similar program offered by other public transit operators and consists of a 50-50 share in fare directly redeemable with the rideshare provider when the service is used. 3.2 Future Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotions to Promote Ridership Comprehensive Operations Analysis As discussed in previous sections of this plan, Beaumont is currently underway with a Comprehensive Operations Analysis. As part of the COA, a fare elasticity study will be completed to ensure that the schedule reflects a good business model, is fair to all passengers, and equitable in the industry. This COA will be central to the development of the department and is expected to be completed by June 2020. Travel Training Travel Training continues to be a successful program to teach Pass area residents how to ride public transportation from the Pass area to places of interest. Travel Training season begins in the early Spring and runs through the Fall, with trips to Union Station, Downtown Disney, and Oceanside. A common consensus with passengers is that public transportation is intimidating. Travel training offers guidance to individuals, eases concerns, and empowers passengers to make similar trips on their own in the future. Since its inception, over 300 choice riders have experienced travel training with Beaumont staff. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 40 I Page 118 Free Fare Promotion In FY 18, Beaumont successfully implemented a systemwide Free Fare Promotion that was funded by a grant from the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP). This 3-month promotion was extended to the city of Banning Transit, with both agencies reporting an increase in passenger trips and were a welcomed program to all passengers. Because of the overall success of the program, a new LCTOP grant funding application has been completed and will be used for a Free Fare Promotion in FY 21. The new Free Fare Promotion will consist of systemwide free fare for seniors, veterans, and disabled passengers for one year. Additionally, free fares will be extended to general passengers for three months. This program will be introduced in conjunction with any new route changes or added service as part of the COA study. Finally, with the potential aftereffects of Covid-19 on the overall economy, this promotion will assist passengers economically traveling to work and recreation. Annual Promotions Throughout the year our service is marketed with not only free fares, but visible appearances, as well. The opportunity to present the service and fleet to a captive audience has had positive effects with the community that would have normally not considered public transit. In the month of July, $0.25 (twenty-five cent) fare for youth passengers is offered on weekday Route 3, Route 4, and Saturday Route 3/4. Youth passengers, under the age of 18, can enjoy Beaumont SRTP 20/21 41 I Page 119 points of interest that these routes service, including destinations such as the community center, library, parks, city pool, and shopping. In conjunction with October's Breast Cancer Awareness month, passengers wearing pink on Wednesdays are given a raffle ticket as they board the bus. A drawing of a winning raffle ticket was drawn each week for a November monthly pass. The winning ticket number and winner were posted on Pass Transit's Facebook. Multiple marketing and promotional appearances are attended throughout the year. Informational booths at back -to -school nights and orientations are attended by staff. Additionally, entries in local parades, free rides to all Veterans during the annual Veteran's Expo, the holiday 'Stuff the Bus' food drive, rider appreciation events, and multiple community presentations and events, are all included in promotions to promote ridership and expose choice riders to public transportation. Beaumont offers free shuttle service to the annual signature event, the Cherry Festival, located in the downtown area of Beaumont. This annual festival, arts/crafts, food, and live entertainment gathering is a four -day event with attendance of over 50,000 throughout the four days. In 2019, the shuttle service provided 1,619 passenger trips to festival patrons. Redevelopment of Walmart Regional Transportation Hub Beaumont Transit has secured LCTOP and SGR funding for the purpose of redeveloping the Walmart Regional Transportation Hub and promoting ridership. This location is serviced by Beaumont, Banning, RTA and Sunline agencies. Hundreds of passengers connect at this location and the facility is undersized for the connecting passenger traffic. The Walmart stop is a central and visible location to the commercial center of Beaumont. With improvement, it will encourage additional use by existing passengers, but also entice new passengers to try transit. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 120 42 I Page 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth Projected ridership growth will be problematic; however, Beaumont is taking the necessary steps to analyze and create a profitable business model in the coming fiscal years. The economy resulting from Covid-19 will have a significant hardship for many people. As residents shift employment as a result of the virus, it is an opportunity to encourage transit as a cost -saving measure. The development of routes as a result of the comprehensive operations analysis is anticipated to encourage ridership growth. Additionally, Beaumont Transit will continue to focus on regional transportation and will consider an express commuter link route to the desert communities in FY 22. 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes Beaumont recently updated the fare schedule for FY 20. As part of the Comprehensive Operations Analysis, a fare elasticity study will be completed to ensure that the schedule reflects a good business model, is fair to all passengers, and equitable in the industry. The Go Pass program was voted into effect by the Associated Student Body (ASB) at MSJC as an additional fee for students during registration. That fee is entirely allocated to RTA to subsidize free fare to all MSJC students on RTA's routes. Beaumont has traditionally honored Mt. San Jacinto's (MSJC) Go Pass program without receiving subsidies, providing free fare to all MSJC students. As part of the most recent Triennial Performance Audit, a recommendation was made to either cease accepting the Go Pass and charge students as general passengers, or coordinate efforts with MSJC to present to the ASB to vote on an additional fee during registration for Beaumont Transit. Should the student body vote against the proposed fee for Beaumont, the fare schedule would reflect the elimination of the Go Pass program on Beaumont routes. 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Station (Projects 19-01 and 20-01) In FY 20, Beaumont purchased a 6.14-acre parcel in the city's southwest industrial area, in partnership with the Wastewater Fund. This property will include a 28,000 square foot public fueling station for compressed natural gas vehicles and serve as a critical revenue source for Beaumont Transit's farebox recovery. More importantly, it will eliminate Beaumont Transit's reliance and dependence on the limited fueling available at the only station in Beaumont, owned and operated by Beaumont Unified School District (BUSD). Fueling the CNG buses has been problematic and more frequently than not, BUSD station is unavailable, forcing the fleet to fuel at stations located as far away as Hemet and Moreno Valley. Additionally, the parcel will include slow -fill stations for each CNG bus in the fleet, with room for expansion, giving Beaumont Transit the ability to fuel CNG vehicles during non -operational hours. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 43 I Page 121 A conceptual master plan has been completed for Transit's portion of the land. The next phase will include adopting a compression services tariff agreement with Southern California Gas to design build the CNG station, with construction anticipated to be completed by end of FY 21. Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility (Project 20-02) As part of Projects 19-01 and 20-01, a fleet maintenance and operations facility will be constructed on the purchased parcel. Included is a 4,100 square foot, one-story building to house fleet and operations personnel, serve as a customer service point of sale location, and completely remove Beaumont Transit from the downtown area. All transit operations will be housed at one location, increasing effectiveness and efficiencies of the department. Design and engineering will begin in FY 21, with construction scheduled for FY 22. Part of the funding for this project is a State of Good Repair grant awarded in FY 19, as well as reprogramming of several previously obligated State Transit Assistance projects with fund balances. Replacement Vehicles (Project 20-06) Beaumont Transit's fleet includes three 16-passenger vehicles with over 300,000 miles each and have been in service for the past decade. Three new Ford Entourage Type E buses were purchased last summer and expected delivery is May 2020. Electric Vehicle Charging Station (Project 20-07) In FY 20, Beaumont designed and constructed an electric vehicle charging station, located strategically in the downtown area as a revenue source for Beaumont Transit's farebox. The project was funded by the Southern California Incentive Project (SCIP) in the form of a rebate of $240,000. The remaining project costs of $31,870 will come from the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Committee (MSRC), and the station is set to open in June 2020. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 44 I Page 122 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 3 Highlights - Implementation of a Free Fare promotion. - Redevelopment of the Walmart Transportation hub. - Completion of the Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA). - Fare elasticity analysis as part of the COA. - Construction of a compressed natural gas fueling station. - Construction of a fleet maintenance and operations building. - Procurement of two electric vehicle shuttles. Tvoe FY2016/2017 Audited BEAUMONT -C A L 1 F O R N 1 A- FY2019/20 Estimated FY2017/2018 (Based on 3rd Qtr actuals Audited FY2018/2019 Estimated and annualized) FY2020/21 Planned System -Wide Ridership 194,7201 197,7751 202,6981 131,571 169,846 Operating cost per revenue hours 117.721 129.111 117.141 113.461 104.531 Expenses 2,990,217 3,198,2141 2,796,3181 2,525,161 2,776,096 1 Revenue Hours 25,4021 24,7721 23,8711 22,2551 26,558 123 CHAPTER 4 — FINANCIAL PLANNING 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget Operating Budget As shown in Table 4 of this plan, Beaumont Transit projects a total amount of $3,084,384 needed in operational funding to fully operate a public transit program for the residents of Beaumont. Included in that amount is $2,776,096 from Local Transit Funds, farebox revenues collected of $213,942, LCTOP operational grant funding in the amount of $93,346, and interest earned in the amount of $1,000. This equals a modest 1.48% increase over funding in FY 20. Operational funding is allocated to 83% in personnel, 15% in maintenance and operations, and 2% in contractual services. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 46 I Page 124 OrRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRISSPOR1ARON COMMIfel6N Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020121 City of Beaumont Operating LCTOP PUC99313 III Project Total Amount of Funds FARE INT LCTOP PUC99314 LTF SGRPUCO9313 SURPUC99314 SGRda STA -OB STAPUC99313 STAPUC88314 1) Operating Assistance 2) Commuter Link 120 Operating Assistance 3) Commuter Link 129 Operating Assistance 4) Dial A Ride Operating Assistance 5) Interest and Other Income 81,756.361 $708,845 5294,455 $323,723 11,000 $133,600 $48,342 $12,000 520,000 $1,000 $60,000 $20,000 510,000 53,346 S1,559.415 $640,503 1272,455 $303,723 Sub4otel 00.68869 53,004,384 5213,942 11,000 190,000 $3,346 S2,776,095 50 30 SO SD SO SO Capital Protect Total Amount FARE INT LCTOP LCTOP LTF KM PUC99313 8GR PUC99314 8GR-013 STA - OB STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 of Funds PUC9931311j PUC99314 _ 12-01 GPS System on Buses ' 4 1 --,. - 13.01 Building Improvements 5-10,087 S-10,087 14-03 Bowing ()Improvements 5-11,274 -11274 15.01 2 Type 7 Buses for Repl0cement/Ezpo5oio 5-29,728 = 29,728 15-02 2 Security Camara Systeme for the above 5.5,237 5-5,237 Project 17-01 Bus Yard Parking Lot with Security Gates 1-100,000 5-100,000 19-02 Type H EZ Rider II Vehide 5-18.418 •'°"° 21-01 CNG Station-21.01 3500,000 1500,000 21.02 Fleet Maintenance and Operations Fadlity - 5671,248 $51,000 52,537 149.885 $121,381 1430,803 515,860 21-02 21-03 Bue Stop Signege & Amenities-21-03 851,999 851,999 21-04 2- Electric Shuttle EV Star -21.04 1220,000 5220,000 21-05 New Vehide Communications . 21-05 557,498 557,498 Subtotal Capital $1,321,894 50 SO $01 50 S0 S51,000 $2,537 $101,860 SO 51,150.803 $15,880 Total Operating a Ceplal 54.406,288 3213,942 81,000 $90.000 $3,348 $2,776,096 $51,000 $2,537 $101,884 SO 51,150,603 $15,860 FY 2020/21 Projected Funding Details FARE INT LCTOP PUC99313 LCTOP PUC99314 LTF Total Estimated Ottoman Funding Request SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-OB STA-OB $213,942 $1,000 190000 [1] Teat Comment by TranoTrack - Please Ignore. Overwrite If needed. 13,348 $2,778,098 $3,084,364 $51,000 $2,537 $101,884 50 STA PUC99313 31,150,803 STAPUC99314 515,800 Total Estimated Capital Fundng Request 11,321,884 Total Funding Request 0 I06,2ee Trans Track Meneger" r <R9012017:33:50 ET Pagel of 1 125 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 4B Fare Revenue Calculations (Consistent with RCTC Commission Farebox Recovery Policy 3/12/2008) Fareboir Galru>it)on �rir•ffta• 1 Charge for Service 229.112 223,761 213,942 2 Bus Outlet Sales 3 Sale of Property 4 Interest 5 Other Income/Transfers In 6 LCTOP 740 460 500 4,169 30 2,784 1,931 500 466 83,368 0 93,346 Total Revenue (1-6) $320,638 $226,182 $308,288 Total Operating Expense $2,796,317 $2,525,161 $2,776,096 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.47% 8.96% 11.11% 126 Capital Budget Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Station (Project 21-01) As mentioned in Section 3.5, Beaumont will continue funding for this critical project until construction is completed, and the station is open to the public. The continuation of funding for this project is critical to the sustainability of the public transit program in Beaumont. The revenue generated from the public fueling station will adequately support a significant increase to Beaumont Transit's farebox recovery. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 49 I Page 127 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Beaumont Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-01 Project Name: 21-01 CNG Station Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Installation of CNG Station at 4th and Viele property. FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: More than half of Beaumont's bus fleet is CNG fueled. All vehicles purchased must be CNG or other altemative fuel to comply with RCTC policy. However, there is not a reliable CNG Station in the Pass Area. Staff often must fuel buses out of town and is costly to operations funding and resources. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED]: Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $500,000 Total $500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack Manager'*' Page 1 of 1 4/29/2020 18:05:48 ET 128 Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility (Project 21-02) This project is a continuation of funding for the fleet maintenance and operations facility, to be constructed the purchased parcel. Included is a 4,100 square foot, one-story building to house fleet and operations personnel, serve as a customer service point of sale location, and completely remove Beaumont Transit from the downtown area. All transit operations will be housed at one location, increasing effectiveness and efficiencies of the department. Design and engineering will begin in FY 21, with construction scheduled for FY 22. Part of the funding for this project is a State of Good Repair grant awarded in FY 19, as well as reprogramming of several previously obligated State Transit Assistance projects with fund balances. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 129 51 I Page OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Beaumont Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-02 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: 21-02 Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Construction of administration, fleet maintenance, and operations facilities at the recently purchased property located at 4th and Viele in the industrial area of Beaumont Project Justification: Operations and maintenance are in two different locations and have outgrown their facilities. Buses are parked in both locations because all buses do not fit entirely at one location. The separation of the department is creating increased operational expenses. A parcel has been purchased at a new location in FY 20 and this project will help to develop it. A portion of the requested funding is a previously awarded grant project from State of Good Repair (SGR) in FY 18/19. Since RCTC disperses funds, it is required the project be listed on the capital projects list. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY2020/21 $51,000 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $2,537 SGR-OB FY 2020/21 $49,885 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $121,361 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $430,603 STA PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $15,860 Total $671,246 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Trans Track Manager 4/29/2020 18:06:14 ET 130 Page 1 of 1 Bus Stop Signage and Amenities (Project 21-03) New bus stop signage and amenities will be funded by the State of Good Repair grant awarded in FY 20. New bus benches and lighting will be added at bus stops to improve passenger comfort and safety, along with new signage throughout the service area. This project is funded by a State of Good Repair grant from FY 20. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 53 I Page 131 dmm —a.. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Beaumont Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-03 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: 21-03 Bus Stop Signage & Amenities Category: Bus Stop Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Replace bus stop signage and schedule holders throughout the service area. Project Justification: This is a previously awarded grant project from State of Good Repair (SGR) in FY 19/20. Since RCTC disperses funds, it is required the project be listed on the capital projects list. Bus stop signage is over 10 years old. Most are faded and unreadable. This project will help to design, purchase and install new bus stop signs. In addition, where stops are without adequate lighting or seating for passengers, this project will help to install amenities. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES IREQUESTEDJ: Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR-OB FY 2020/21 $51,999 Total $51,999 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack Manager TM Page 1 of 1 4/29/2020 18:07:06 ET 132 Electric Vehicle Shuttle (Project 21-04) Beaumont Transit has applied for and has subsequently been approved for the Volkswagen Mitigation Rebate earmarked for the purchase of two electric vehicle shuttles, allowing for a rebate of $160,000 per vehicle. Additional funding is needed in order to procure the two vehicles. Project 21-04 reflects the difference in the price of the shuttle and the rebate from Volkswagen. These shuttles are ADA compliant with a wheelchair ramp and will be used on Dial -A -Ride. Charging will be available with an electric vehicle charging station currently in construction at the Beaumont Civic Center public parking lot, near a primary bus stop. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 55 I Page 133 IIIRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Beaumont Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-04 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: 21-04 2- Electric Shuttle EV Star Category: Paratransit Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Electric Project Descrietion: Purchase of two electric shuttles to be used on Dial A Ride Service. Project Justification: Beaumont has secured a grant through Volkswagen Mitigation Trust Fund in the amount of $160,000 per vehicle. This requested amount will cover the difference in the cost of the shuttle. These vehicles will replace unleaded gas buses, as required by the grant, and will be used on local paratransit service. Beaumont will have a completed electric vehicle charging station by June 2020. Project Schedule: Start Date I Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES iREQUESTEDI: Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $220,000 Total $220,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack Manager", Page 1 of 1 4/29/2020 18:07:37 ET 134 Vehicle Communications for New Vehicles (Project 21-05) All Beaumont Transit vehicles are outfitted with two-way radios that serve as the sole communication between drivers and dispatch. An added benefit to this communication system is the ability of the driver to immediately contact Beaumont Police dispatch through direct connection in an emergency. Funding for this project will be reprogrammed from prior obligated State Transit Assistance fund balances. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 57 I Page 135 PFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Beaumont Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-05 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: 21-05 New Vehicle Communications Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Improve stop signage, schedule holders, and amenities at bus stops. Project Justification: This is a reprogramming request of prior year STA obligated balances (STA-OB) to this new project. Three new vehicles were purchased in FY 19 and will be delivered before end of FY 21. In addition, 2 electric shuttles are proposed for FY 21. These five new vehicles will need to have security and communications purchased and installed. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES jREQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA - OB FY 2020/21 $57,498 Total $57,498 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerT"' Page 1 of 1 4/29/2020 18:09:06 ET 136 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program Beaumont Transit continues to explore all available funding options to support transit operating and capital costs. Current secured funding includes STA, LCTOP, MSRC, and SGR grants but is void of any Federal funds. In FY 22, Beaumont Transit intends to submit a proposed funding plan request in the amount of $4,983,675, of which $2,859,379 is LTF, $1,800,000 is STA, $41,796 in LCTOP, $16,000 Measure A, $265,500 farebox revenue, and $1,000 in interest or other income. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 59 I Page 137 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 4.1 Fiscal Year 2021/2022 BEAUco RN,MONT cn�� Operations and Fixed Route Operations and Commuter Link 120 Operations and Commuter Link 125 Dial A Ride Interest and other income Total Operating Reouest 1,803,143 728,068 318,629 332,835 1,000 fidlemUre A Operating Other Other LTF LCTOP STA SGR Assistance Fund kip Farebox Revenue 1,606,197 17,946 179,000 659,718 13,350 55,000 280,629 10,500 16,000 11,500 312,835 20,000 1,000 $ 3,183, 675 $ 2.859, 379 $ 41,796 $ $ - $ 16.000 $ - $ 265.500 $ 1.000 'leasura A Operating Other Other LTF LCTOP STA SGR Assistance Funding Farebox Revenue CNG Station Fleet Maintenance and Operations Facility Bus Wraps 3- Ford Entourage -Type E Replacement Vehicles Total Capital Request Grand Total Operating & Capital 500,000 500,000 100,000 700,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 500,000 500,000 100,000 700,000 $1,800,000 $0 $0 $1,800,000 50 50 50 50 50 $4,983,675 $2,859,379 541,796 $1,800,000 50 $16,000 $0 5265,500 $1,000 138 In FY 23, Beaumont Transit intends to submit a proposed funding plan request in the amount of $4,594,936, of which $2,945,160 is LTF, $1,300,000 is STA, $41,840 in Measure A, $307,296 in farebox revenue, and $1,000 in interest or other income. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 61 I Page 139 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 4.2 Fiscal Year 2022/2023 BEAUMONT -CALIFORNIA- Measure A Operating Other Other LTF LCTOP STA SGR Assistance Funding Farebox Revenue Operations and Fixed Route Operations and Commuter Link 120 Operations and Commuter Link 125 Dial A Ride Interest and other income Total Operating Request 1,851,329 772,860 327,528 342,220 1,000 1,654,383 679,510 289,048 322,220 25,000 16,480 196,946 68,350 22,000 20,000 1,000 $ 3,294,936 $ 2,945,160 $ - $ $ - $ 41,480 $ - $ 307,296 $ 1,000 Measure — - operating Other Other LTF LCTOP STA SGR Assistance Funding Farebox Revenue CNG Station Passenger Amenities 3- Replacement Vehicles Total Capital Request Grand Total Operating & Capital 500,000 100,000 700,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 500,000 100,000 700,000 $1,300,000 $0 $0 $1,300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,594,936 $2,945,160 $0 $1,300,000 $0 $41,480 $0 $307,296 $1,000 140 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements The American with Disabilities Act of 1990 The Dial -A -Ride service provides complimentary paratransit services as a required element of ADA. Although Beaumont Transit does not have an internal application process due to staffing constraints, all other public transit operators' identification cards are accepted as verification on all routes. DBE, EEO, and Title VI Beaumont Transit System does not utilize federal funds for operating expenses. As such, DBE, EEO, and Title VI requirements do not currently apply to this public transit operator. Triennial Performance Audit RCTC retained the services of Michael Baker International to conduct the TDA triennial performance audit of the public transit operators under its jurisdiction in Riverside County, including Beaumont Transit, for Fiscal Years 2015-2016 through 2017-2018. Beaumont Transit fully complied with five of the eight applicable requirements and partially complied with the remaining three. The audit also summarized the major findings and provided a set of recommendations from the auditing firm. For this reporting period, four recommendations were given and as required by RCTC, are included in this plan as shown in Table 4.3. Two of the four recommendations have since been implemented or completed. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 63 I Page 141 City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 4.3 TDA Triennial BEAUMONT C A L I F O R N I A - Action Taken and Results Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reportsfor general public transit and specialized service. Beaumont continues to strive for timely completion of SCO reports. Additional staff in the finance department has been added to help prevent delays. Continue to work with RTA and Mt. San Jacinto College on fare revenue reimbursement from the College GO -PASS Revenue Agreement. Beaumont will explore the Go -Pass program and reach out to San Jacinto College to engage students for a student body vote to implement fare program for Beaumont Transit, independent from RTA. Include a link to BanningTransit on the BeaumontTransit web page. Completed Report mechanical road calls and other vehicle operation metrics in TransTrack Manager. Completed 142 Alternative Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) Beaumont Transit System operates nine CNG buses and six gasoline powered. Future vehicle purchases, like all current purchases, will follow the RCTC and SCAQMD policies regarding alternative fuel for transit vehicles. The State of California and California Air Resources Board has established a goal of transitioning all public fleet to electric buses by 2040. Beaumont is preparing for transition as our gas vehicles retire and intend to replace with electric buses in the coming FY's. 4.4 Open Capital Projects This final section includes a summary of open capital projects, balances outstanding for each project, and plan to reprogram old projects to future critical projects as outlined in Table 4.4. Beaumont SRTP 20/21 65 I Page 143 Project # Beaumont Open Projects STA Capita' Estimated balance 6r3320 Origii1 Amoure Items Approved in SRTP Awarded ArrrcsiK CNG re/ated 200.000.00 MSRC Grant 203.000.00 10-01 300.003.00 CNG Station lnpwemt+a 241,795.10 20-01 1.500.000.00 CNG Station 1,503,000.00 Total amount available for CMG Raject 1,941,795.10 17-02 85.000.00 Salable Bus Lift. Jade Stands E Tools 338.17 17-04 75.000.00 Slop Braking Ma: M mma 70,880.79 19.04 68,478.00 SGR Grant- Modernization of Vehicle &Mir/evace 15.478.00 20-05 40,000.00 Shop Tools 40.000.00 49.885.00 SGR Grant- Modernization of Vehicle ►lairttevaoe 49.885.00 Taal/mount addable for shop n/aerd projects 227,1la11.li6 jklidihot War/win/Ms 14 03 75.000.00 Bulling D trrpvrerncva 11,274.00 Resxog to 21-02 Feet Ma erarance & Operatims Faciirty 13-01 13,939.24 R_..kieva improverner, 10.083.83 17-01 100.000.00 Bus Yard Parkrig Lot with Security Gates 100.000.00 Total amount available for baking improvements f 21, 360 d3 20 02 481,700.00 500.000.00 Fleet Maireerance and Openttiors Facie), 20-03 100.003.00 Brand and LA00 Updae 100.000.00 20-04 122.943.00 Passenger Amenities (LCTOP 18/19) 127,444.00 20-07 100.000.00 EV Charprg Station 100.000.00 SGR 51.999.00 Bus Sbp Reliableation (SGR) 51.929.00 29.725.82 1,000,000.00 2 Type 7 Buses for Rept-mm/0/ Exason 15-01 f1>R 21-05: New Vetsicle Can*rvicaticr s Installation 12-01 5.181.52 GPS System on Buses 4,117.75 19-02 175.000.00 Type H EZ Rider II Venda i8.417.50 15-02 38,000.00 2 Security Camera Systems for the abode project 5.236.67 20-06 7130.000.00 3- Ford Entourage Type E 700.000.00 18,899.00 Rase 125 (LCTOP 181' 7) 16,899.00 Beaumont SRTP 20/21 144 66 I Page City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020/2021- 2022/2023 Table 4.4 Open Projects Prior to FY2020/2021 t• a 1,O• M I ^— SRTP Capital Project No's Beg to End - Project Timeline Total Project Cost Unfunded Balance., CNG Station Improvements 19-01 4 2 Current - 2023 CNG Station Improvements 20-01 4 2 Mobile Bus Lift, Jack Stands, and Tools 17-2 3 1 4,500,000 85,000 1,500,000 0 Shop Building Maintenance 17-4 7 1 75,000 0 SGR Modernization of Vehicle Maintenance 19-04 7 1 66,478 0 Fleet & Operations Facility 20-02 4 2 1,671,246 1,171, 246 Brand & Logo Update Passenger Amenities (LCTOP) EV Charging Station 20-03 7 2 20-04 6 1 20-07 4 1 200,000 129,943 310,000 100,000 0 0 3- Ford Entourage Type E Buses 20-06 700,000 0 Legend Project Elements: Funding Category: 1 Revenue Vehicle Purchase - FY 2 Non -Revenue Vehicle Purchase - FY 3 4 5 Vehicle Systems and Equipment - FY Building, Land and Facilities - FY Communication and Information Technology Systems - FY 6 Debt Service - FY 7 Maintenance - FY 1 Fully Funded 2 Partially Funded 145 City of Corona Transit Service Short Range Transit Plan FY 2020-21 through FY 2022-23 City of Corona 146 Table of Contents CHAPTER 1— SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND SERVICE PROFILE 3 1.0 INTRODUCTION 3 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREA 3 TABLE 1 — INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AND AREA SERVICED 3 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC 6 1.3 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES 7 1.4 OPERATING DATA FOR CORONA TRANSIT SERVICES 9 1.5 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE 9 1.6 REVENUE FLEET 11 TABLE 1.1 — FLEET INVENTORY 12 1.7 EXISTING FACILITIES AND BUS STOP AMENITIES 14 1.8 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES 14 1.9 REFERENCE OF PRIOR AND/OR EXISTING STUDIES AND PLANS 14 CHAPTER 2 — EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 14 2.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 14 TABLE 2 — SERVICE PROVIDER PERFORMANCE TARGET REPORT 16 2.2 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT 17 TABLE 2.1— FY2020/21 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT 18 2.3 SERVICE SUMMARY 19 TABLE 2.2 — SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY 22 2.4 SERVICE PERFORMANCE 23 TABLE 2.3 — SRTP ROUTE STATISTICS: DATA ELEMENTS & PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 24 2.5 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS 26 2.6 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS 26 2.7 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES 26 CHAPTER 3 — FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING AND MARKETING 27 3.1 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES 27 3.2 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION 27 3.3 PROJECTED RIDERSHIPGROWTH 28 3.4 PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE CHANGES 28 3.5 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING 29 TABLE 3 — CCTS FY 2020/21 HIGHLIGHTS 31 City of Corona Transit Service Page 1 of 48 FY 2020/21 FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 147 CHAPTER 4 — FINANCIAL PLANNING 32 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET FOR FY 20/21 32 TABLE 4 — SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2020/21 34 TABLE 4A — CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION 35 TABLE 48 — FAREBOX REVENUE CALCULATION 38 4.2 FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PLANNED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM (FY22-FY23) 39 TABLE 4.2 — SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 202/23 41 4.3 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 42 TABLE 4.3 — PROGRESS IMPLEMENTING TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT (TDA) TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RECOMMENDATIONS* 45 4.4 OPEN PROJECTS 47 City of Corona Transit Service Page 2 of 48 FY 2020/21 FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 148 Chapter 1— System Overview and Service Profile 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) sets the objectives and strategies for Fiscal Year (FY) 2020/21 for the City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS) by evaluating current transit system performance, projected demographic changes, operating and capital funding needs, anticipated funding from federal, state and local sources, and other factors to create a reasonable projection of conditions over the next three years (FY 2020/21 — 2022/23). 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREA CCTS operates demand response Dial -A -Ride (DAR) and fixed route service dubbed the Corona Cruiser. DAR service commenced in 1977 and available to the general public throughout Corona service area until January 2, 2018. The service is now available only to the following rider groups: Seniors 60 and older; Persons with Disabilities; and Persons certified under Americans with Disability Act (ADA). DAR provides curb -to -curb service throughout the City of Corona and neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services, and Norco College). The complementary paratransit Dial -A -Ride service area extends beyond city limits to ensure compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act %-mile corridor from a Corona Cruiser fixed route. Door-to-door service is available upon request for Dial -A -Ride patrons certified under the ADA. Corona Cruiser fixed route began operating in 2001 and serves the city -center as well as commercial, retail, and residential areas on the eastern and southern portion of the city. See Table 1 and Section 1.3 for detailed description of service by mode. Service maps on the following pages. City of Corona Transit Service Page 3 of 48 FY 2019-20 Short Range Transit Plan 149 TABLE 1- INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AND AREA SERVICED Mode Route Service Area/Sites Description Corona Cruiser Blue Line WalMart at McKinley Street West to River Run Apartments via Mountain Gate Park and downtown/Civic Center McKinley Street shopping areas, Magnolia Avenue, Centennial High, Medical Facilities, Senior Center, Corona Library, Corona Transit Center/North Main Corona Metrolink Station, Circle City Center (Community Center), North Main Street shopping area and restaurants Red Line The Crossings shopping area at Cajalco Road and Temescal Canyon Road to the Walmart at Neighborhood Market at West Sixth Street via downtown/Civic Center The Crossings shopping area, Walmart, California Avenue Post Office, Centennial High, Corona Transit Center/North Main Corona Metrolink Station (selected AM & PM trip), Corona Library, Senior Center, Civic Center, Corona High and Walmart Neighborhood Market on West Sixth Street near Smith Avenue. Service is extended to The Shops at Dos Lagos on Saturdays. Dial -A -Ride City Wide Demand Response / Reservation based service City-wide, neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito and Home Gardens as well as the following statellite locations in the City of Norco: Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services, Brunswick Classic Lanes, Target and Norco College City of Corona Transit Service Page 3 of 48 FY 2019-20 Short Range Transit Plan 150 City of Corona RONA CRUISER SERVICE AREA MAP NY LEGEND CORONA DIAL -A -RIDE DIAL-AatIOIE TO NORCO COLLEGE & NORCO SATELLITE LOCATIONS CITY OF CORONA ROUNDARY COUNTY AREAS OF SFRVICF if SATURDAY SERVICE TO DOS LAGOS CORONA CRUISER RED LINE ellCORONA CRUISER REO LINE mp! CORONA CRUISER SLUE LINE POPULAR DESTINATIONS: CIITIOLL PGarTgIFlt! ETTCIINK PARK PARK B RICE 1111 r_71� P NTlRY NNATE Ht.! SVIOCL BCIQJL t RWPRAL H oToye RECICRAL REHABILRATIOR SC LEI PI!Y L PCRON4 rniyElt NER'EK ]f# MILE CORRIDOR OUTSIDE ■ /+ CORONA DIALAORIDE SERVICE AREA = „:" _IN RTA's Fixed Routes'\ R.RIALlnk Gold Llnu jjjjjj - Roud 1 Rout. S 444 - rnr CenuterL1nk 235 ♦! T}91RInuE.r0n1, ](M$ TPRNIERMIL 151 City of Corona THE C[RCLE CTT'f c RONA pDIAL A -RIDE SERVICE AREA MAP LEGEND CORONA DIAL -A -RIDE POPULAR DESTINATIONS: DIAL-AatORL TON I1 O COLLEGE & �m'rEul NORCO SATELLITE LOCATIONS CITY Di- CORONA BOUNDARY COUNTY AREAS OF SFR:VICF —if SATURDAY SERVICE TO DOS LOGOS CORDRA. CRUISER REV LINE CORONA CRUISER RED LINE CORONA CRUISER BLUE LINE 514 MILE CORRIDOR OUTSIDE CORONA DIALS .RIDE SERVICE AREA 1111 NTERY 0I4TE ECaQQ ■ POST OFFICE PARK B RICE P HICn SLHaQL ETTICCINK 1141 HOSPITAL H oRo9a RECICRAL NEHAEILITAT ION MIMS maw SC L ERAAY L W RaNi C▪ ENTER l RTA's Flyer! Routes 1 RapldLIa Gold LIna Route 1 RNute S 1 1.ComrnutBrLrnk 2O5 GommutSrLrnk 20e SATELLITE POINTS Norm Satente Pot•11s:PLmos sateltes en Norco • Department of Public 8 Social Sarv1Cee • Norca College (RCC) • Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) • Brunswick Classic Lanes • Target 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC Based on the 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-year Estimate, CCTS serves a diverse population of 165,355 city residents. The city encompasses 39 square miles. That diversity is reflected in the table below. City Population and Diversity Population Estimate Percent Race Hispanic Total population 165,355 100.0% One race 156,414 94.6% Two or more races 7,171 4.3% One race 157,658 95.3% White 106,121 64.2% Black or African American 9,794 5.9% American Indian and Alaska Native 573 0.3% Asian 18,283 11.1% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 863 0.5% Some other race 22,024 13.3% Two or more races 7,697 4.7% White and Black or African American 1,061 0.6% White and American Indian and Alaska Native 1,044 0.6% White and Asian 2,095 1.3% Black or African American and American Indian and Alaska Native 35 0.0% or Latino and Race Total population 165,355 100.0% Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 72,658 43.9% Mexican 63,044 38.1% Puerto Rican 1,217 0.7% Cuban 846 0.5% Other Hispanic or Latino 7,551 4.6% Not Hispanic or Latino 92,697 56.1% White alone 59,484 36.0% Black or African American along 9,421 5.7% American Indian and Alaska Native alone 223 0.1% Asian alone 18,074 10.9% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone 809 0.5% Some other race alone 366 0.2% Two or more races 4,320 2.6% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014-2018 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate City of Corona Transit Service FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan Page 6 of 48 153 The table below lists passenger characteristics for Dial -A -Ride and Cruiser service. Passenger characteristic estimates are based on derived data compiled over the first nine months of FY 2019/20. Passenger Characteristic' Dial -A -Ride Corona Cruiser Seniors 18.0% General Public 34.5% Persons with Disabiities 53.8% Students 18.7% ADA Certified 26.0% Seniors/Persons with Disabilities 33.4% Personal Care Attendants 1.3% RTA Transfers 8.9% Metrolink Transfers 0.7% Metrolink Transfers 1.3% Children 0.1% Children 3.2% ' DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES The City contracts with the private sector to provide a turn -key transit operation. City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS) provides both fixed route (Corona Cruiser) and Dial -A -Ride (DAR) services. DAR service began in 1977, while the Corona Cruiser commenced in 2001. CCTS serves local business, retail stores, parks, school and entertainment venues. See Table 1 for overview of the service provided by CCTS. Fixed Route Service — Corona Cruiser: Blue and Red Lines The Blue Line serves the McKinley Street retail area, then travels on to Magnolia Avenue and Main Street to the River Road area. This route passes by many trip generators such as hospitals, medical facilities, schools, public service agencies, library, civic center, and commercial/retail areas. This route also serves the unincorporated area of Home Gardens. The Blue Line operates every 60-67 minutes. The Red Line connects the residential areas of central Corona with commercial areas along Sixth Street and the Ontario Avenue/California Avenue retail area. The Red Line also covers South Corona along Ontario Avenue/Temescal Canyon Road to serve the county area of El Cerrito, The Crossings shopping complex at Cajalco Road/Temescal Canyon Road, and The Shops at Dos Lagos on Saturdays. The Red Line operates every 50-66 minutes. The Cruiser schedule is as follows: Blue Line Red Line Monday — Friday 6:30 a.m. — 7:09 p.m. 6:30 a.m. — 7:05 p.m. Saturday 8:52 a.m. — 3:50 p.m. 9:00 a.m. — 5:09 p.m. Sunday no service no service The Cruiser does not operate on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. The Cruiser also serves the Corona Transit Center, owned and operated by the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). The Corona Transit Center provides a safe and efficient transfer point between City of Corona Transit Service Page 7 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 154 local and regional bus lines as well as regional commuter trains serving Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties. Trains are accessible via a pedestrian bridge to the adjacent North Main Corona Metrolink commuter rail station. To incentivize multimodal transportation, valid Metrolink pass -holders ride at no charge on Cruiser Blue and Red Lines to and from the Corona Transit Center/North Main Metrolink Station. CCTS and RTA have a reciprocal agreement that allows valid pass -holders a no cost, one-way transfer between the Cruiser and RTA buses at bus stops served by both Cruiser and RTA buses. Transfers between bus systems are an effective way to promote public transit as a low cost, eco- friendly, and stress -free alternative to automobile trips. Corona Dial-A-Ride/Paratransit Service Dial -A -Ride provided service to seniors (60 and older), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complementary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Reservations for DAR service can be made from one to fourteen days in advance; however, same day service may be accommodated if space is available. Dial -A -Ride provides curb -to - curb service throughout the City of Corona and neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services and Norco College). Door-to-door assistance for ADA certified passengers is available upon request. Door-to-door service is available when: • Drivers can see the bus at all times; • The outermost door is within 150 feet from the bus; • Driver safety and security is maintained; and • Where a safe parking area is available. The ADA certification process in western Riverside County is administered by the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). Additional information and application is available online at www.riversidetransit.com or by calling RTA at (951) 795-7887. For individuals certified for ADA complementary service, service hours are expanded to match Cruiser hours. Passengers certified under the ADA receive priority service. Voicemail message reservations are accepted for ADA clients on Sundays and Holidays for next day service. The Dial -A -Ride schedule is as follows: Non-ADA Complementary ADA Complementary Paratransit Paratransit Monday — Friday 6:42 a.m. — 6:00 p.m. 6:30 a.m. — 7:09 p.m. Saturday 8:52 a.m. — 5:09 p.m. 8:52 a.m. — 5:09 p.m. Sunday no service no service Dial -A -Ride service does not operate on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. City of Corona Transit Service Page 8 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 155 OPERATING DATA FOR CORONA TRANSIT SERVICES Following table reflects operating data estimates for FY 2019/20 using data from July 2019 through March 2020: Performance Indicator DAR Cruiser Total Operating Expense $ 1,069,074 $ 1,311,701 $ 2,380,775 Fare Revenue* $ 136,385 $ 262,340 $ 398,725 Passenger Trips 40,316 98,526 138,842 Vehicle Revenue Hours (VRH) 11,809 14,579 26,388 Vehicle Revenue Miles (VRM) 146,809 172,978 319,787 Operating Cost per VRH $ 90.53 $ 89.97 $ 90.22 *Includes CARES funding for farebox revenue loss Using passenger trips from the first nine months of FY 2019/20 as a basis for estimating fiscal year-end totals, system wide passenger trips are expected to decrease by 19 percent to 138,842 total passenger trips compared to 170,946 passenger trips in FY 2018/19. CCTS had anticipated an increase in ridership during FY 2019/20, however the pandemic effect of COVID-19 negatively impacted passenger trips for both the Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride. Even with reduced riders as a result of COVID-19, Corona Cruiser continues to operate at its' normal service levels. However, DAR service is dependent upon number of riders using the service and as such, has an impact on number of vehicle revenue hours and related revenue miles operated. CCTS' fare revenues estimates includes revenues generated by fares and other revenues including advertising, AB2766 pass subsidy, CARES funding for revenues lost as a result of COVID-19, and general fund to bridge gap for farebox ratio calculation. As a result of COVID- 19, CCTS has implemented no fares for both DAR and Corona Cruiser effective April 27, 2020. CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE Effective April 27, 2020, CCTS has implemented a no fare policy on both Corona DAR and Corona Cruiser due to the impact of COVID-19 on public transit system and the need to maintain social distancing. Once the pandemic situation with COVID-19 improves, CCTS will reinstate the fare structure as show on the following page. City of Corona Transit Service Page 9 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 156 Fare Type Fare Price Corona Cruiser Cash - General Public $1.50 Cash - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $0.70 Cash - Children (46" tall or under) $0.25 Day Pass - General Public $4.00 Day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $2.00 15-day Pass - General Public $17.50 15-day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $8.05 15-day Pass - Students $12.25 31-day Pass - General Public $35.00 31-day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $16.10 31-day Pass - Students $24.50 Dial -A -Ride Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $2.50 Buddy Fare $1.25 Children $0.50 Note: Fixed Route fare structure effective July 5, 2010; Dial -A -Ride fare structure effective January 2, 2018. To incentivize the use of public transit as a viable alternative to automobile trips, CCTS is using Air Quality Management District (AQMD) funds to subsidize multi -day passes (15-day and 31- day passes) on the Cruiser. The use of these funds allows CCTS to reduce the cost of multi - day passes by 30 percent for Cruiser riders but enables CCTS to recover an adequate fare. CCTS Fare Collection System CCTS currently offers its passengers two basic ways to pay for their trips on CCTS buses, one is cash, and the other, is through paper fare -media, that encompasses one-way tickets for the Corona Dial -A -Ride (paratransit), and Day Passes which can be purchased from bus operator and multi -day passes which must be purchased in advance. Cash and ticket fares are dropped into the "farebox" that possesses a top compartment that facilitates for the bus operator to verify with a glance the fare deposited by passenger boarding the bus, after bus operator verifies the correct fare, the operator activates a lever that allows the fares to drop into the secure bottom compartment of the farebox. Multi -day Passes of the Corona Cruiser, after purchase and on the first day of use, the pass must be validated by the bus operator, the operator is tasked with writing the initial date and date of expiration of the pass, along with her/his initials —such process activates a pass for either a fifteen (15) or a thirty-one (31) day period. Verification of a valid multi -day pass is done by the bus operator, operator verifies that the pass is current and the passenger possess the City of Corona Transit Service Page 10 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 157 corresponding pass (such verification can include verifying an ID, for proof of age, condition of disability, or student status). Z. 6 REVENUE FLEET The CCTS active fleet consists of 20 transit buses; See Tables 1.1. All CCTS buses are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement for accessibility and wheelchair securement. The Fixed Route fleet consists of seven (7) 2015 ElDorado National EZ Rider II heavy-duty/low- floor buses. EZ Rider II buses are powered with Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and were placed into Corona Cruiser service in February 2016. The Dial -A -Ride fleet consists of eleven (11) 2017 Glaval Universal E450 and two (2) 2012 El Dorado Aerotech 240 cutaway vehicles. These buses are also powered with Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). The 2017 buses were placed in service July 2018. City of Corona Transit Service Page 11 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 158 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Purchased Transportation Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Year Built Mfg. Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active # of Vehicles Contingency FY 2019/ Vehicles 20 FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2015 EDN EZ Riderll 30 7 32 CN 7 0 601,359 738,678 105,525 Totals: 30 7 7 0 601,359 738,678 105,525 TransTrack Manager'"' 4/27/2020 159 Page 1 of 2 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Table 1,1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Year Built Mfg. Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active # of Vehicles Contingency FY 2019/ Vehicles 20 FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2017 E-450 2012 EDN AEROTECH 18 20 11 2 25 26 CN CN 11 2 0 0 206,401 306,520 377,873 308,595 34,352 154,297 Totals: 38 13 13 0 512,921 686,468 52,805 TransTrack Manager'"' 4/27/2020 160 Page 2 of 2 1.7 EXISTING FACILITIES AND BUS STOP AMENITIES CCTS operates from City -owned facility located at 735 Public Safety Way. MV Transportation, the vendor retained to operate transit service, provides administrative and dispatching service from this location, as well as fueling and vehicle parking. Maintenance is performed by the vendor at an off -site garage. The Corona Cruiser fixed route service includes 185 bus stops and 27 bus stop passenger shelters along its' two routes. The contractor, MV Transportation, is responsible for maintaining all of the stops. CCTS provides all required equipment (I -stop signs, kiosks, benches, trash receptacles, etc.) to maintain the stops and its's associated equipment. 1.8 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES CCTS staff and Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) planning and operations staff work together to coordinate bus stop location/re-location, bus routing, layover areas/facilities, and transfer points where Cruiser and RTA passengers possessing valid day or multi -day passes can ride for free with a one-way transfer between systems. CCTS also coordinates marketing efforts with Metrolink to promote use of the both services. Funding, efficacy, and efficiency issues are jointly considered. 1.9 REFERENCE OF PRIOR AND/OR EXISTING STUDIES AND PLANS CCCTS has not had any prior studies performed, however plans are in the way for a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA). The COA is an in-depth study of the current operation of the Fixed Route System to identify strengths as well as opportunities for improvements. The COA will address CCTS' current and potential customers, how the overall system is performing and the areas of improvement. It will also address how CCTS can best serve its' market within its' operational and financial constraints. The goals of the COA are to improve customer travel experience by reducing travel time, improve service frequencies and connections where possible, and to introduce new and innovative transit options. The solicitation for the COA was released in March 16, 2020; however prior to proposal submittal date, the solicitation was canceled due to the impact of COVID-19 on transit system ridership. In addition, the consultant would not have been able to perform the onboard customer survey nor hold any public meetings. Therefore, the solicitation has been delayed till such time the situation with COVID-19 improves and ridership returns to normal as the data collected (or lack of data) consequently will not be conducive for an appropriate analysis. Chapter 2 — Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is the designated Regional Transportation Planning Agency (RTPA) with fiduciary and administrative oversight of transit operators in Riverside County. Each year, RCTC reviews and approves the Short -Range Transit City of Corona Transit Service Page 14 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 161 Plan (SRTP) and allocates local, state and federal funding. RCTC developed and monitors eight performance indicators that measure productivity — these indicators and year-to-date performance are listed in the table on the next page. By statute, transit operators serving urban areas must recover a minimum of 20 percent of operating cost through fare revenue for fixed route and 10 percent for Dial -A -Ride Specialized Service with combined system -wide blended farebox recovery of 15 percent. Fare revenue includes passenger fares, interest on investments, advertising revenue, local contributions, and the proceeds from the sale of surplus vehicles. A farebox recovery ratio below the system -wide 15 percent endangers the receipt of state funding. The farebox recovery ratio is a mandatory performance indicator. Table 2, Service Provider Performance Targets Report, appearing on the following page shows in detail on FY 2019/20 performance targets and actual performance by indicator. Through the third quarter of this fiscal year (July 2019-March 2020), CCTS lags behind the mandatory farebox recovery ratio but has met six of the seven discretionary performance indicators. CCTS has recorded a farebox recovery of 14.27 percent for July 2019-March 2020. A farebox recovery ratio in this range is anticipated at this point in the fiscal year. At the close of each fiscal year, the City contributes a sufficient amount of funding to bridge the gap between fare revenue received throughout the year and the amount required to meet the 15 percent farebox recover ratio. The contribution of funds is made only after all revenues and expenses are finalized following the close of the fiscal year. The size of the contribution varies each year depending on the final amount of revenues and expenses; however, the City's year-end contribution has always ensured CCTS meets the mandatory farebox recovery ratio. In addition, besides general funds, CCTS will utilize CARES funding for any fare revenues lost due to the impact of COVID-19 on ridership. City of Corona Transit Service Page 15 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 162 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Corona Data Elements FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 180,018 Passenger Miles 778,228 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 29,445.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 346,342.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 397,910.0 Total Operating Expenses $2,769,156 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $415,750 Net Operating Expenses $2,353,406 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 15.01% I >= 15.00% I 14.27% I Fails to Meet Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $94.05 <= $79.16 $86.22 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $13.07 >= $9.40 and <= $12.72 $12.61 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $3.02 >= $2.19 and <= $2.97 $2.95 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $79.93 >= $55.37 and <= $74.91 $73.91 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $6.80 >= $4.65 and <= $6.29 $6.09 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.11 >= 5.02 and <= 6.79 5.86 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.52 >= 0.42 and <= 0.56 0.48 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: A farebox recovery ratio in this range is anticipated at this point in the fiscal year. At the close of each fiscal year, the City contributes a sufficient amount of funding to bridge the gap required to meet the farebox recovery ratio. In addition, CARES Funding will also be used to close the gap in Fare Revenues lost due to COVID-19 resulting `in reduced ridership. TransTrack Manager'"' 4/29/2020 163 Page 1 of 1 2.2 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT Table 2.1, SRTP Performance Report, appearing on the following page lists performance targets set by RCTC for FY 2020/21. Table 2.1 indicates CCTS meets the mandatory farebox recovery ratio and four of the seven discretionary targets. The target for farebox recovery ratio is set for 15 percent systemwide (10 percent for Specialized DAR and 20 percent for fixed route). The target for operating costs per revenue hour for FY 2020/21 is calculated using operating costs accumulated during the first nine months of the current fiscal year (July 2019-March 2020 in this case), increase in revenue hour cost for transit operating contract and adjustment by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Currently, CPI is 3.31 percent. CCTS has failed to meet its' operating cost per revenue hours the past few years as the cost of contracting transit services has increased by over 20%; contracting cost accounts for -70 percent of the total budget. In addition, total operating costs for FY 20/21 includes additional costs related to the following consulting services: COA study (added additional funds) and Triennial DBE Goal/Program update. Use the actual contracted transit operations cost pursuant to the contract between MV and the City; this will allow the flexibility to use the higher variable rate due to operating less revenues hours for DAR and/or if needed, amend the contract. CCTS's failure to meet passengers per revenue hour & miles target is the direct result of the reduced rider estimated as a result of COVID-19. In particular for Corona Cruiser, while COVID- 19 impacted the ridership, CCTS continues operate normal service at this time which results in lower passenger per revenue hour/mile. City of Corona Transit Service Page 17 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 164 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: City of Corona All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 3rd Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 170,946 127,086 131,900 None Passenger Miles 732,023 543,177 562,368 None Revenue Hours 29,118.8 21,690.2 26,849.0 None Total Hours 33,637.3 25,416.0 31,167.0 None Revenue Miles 347,239.0 263,457.0 319,878.0 None Total Miles 399,249.0 302,294.0 364,962.0 None Operating Costs $2,489,197 $1,870,126 $2,941,298 None Passenger Revenue $437,174 $266,952 $443,967 None Measure -A Revenue $0 None LCTOP Revenue $0 None Operating Subsidy $2,052,023 $1,603,174 $2,497,331 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $85.48 $86.22 $109.55 <= $78.67 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $7.17 $7.10 $9.20 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $14.56 $14.72 $22.30 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 17.56% 14.27% 15.09% >= 0.2 Fails to Meet Target Subsidy Per Passenger $12.00 $12.61 $18.93 >= $10.46 and <= $14.15 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $2.80 $2.95 $4.44 >= $2.41 and <= $3.27 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $70.47 $73.91 $93.01 >= $54.88 and <= $74.24 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $5.91 $6.09 $7.81 >= $4.56 and <= $6.18 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 5.87 5.86 4.91 >= 4.46 and <= 6.04 Meets Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.49 0.48 0.41 >= 0.37 and <= 0.51 Meets Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. Service Provider Comments: Effective 4/27/20, due to the impact of COVID-19 on public transit, CCTS is not charging fares CARES funds will be used to cover farebox funding gaps. TransTrack Manager"' 5/5/2020 165 Page 1 of 1 2.3 SERVICE SUMMARY CCTS had anticipated an increase in ridership during FY 2019/20, however the pandemic effect of COVID-19 negatively impacted passenger trips for both the Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride. Ridership in FY 19/20 is expected to decrease an estimate 19% (or -32k riders) compared to FY 2018-19. See Table 2.2 for year to year performance data. Corona Cruiser CCTS operates the Cruiser along two fixed routes - the Blue Line and Red Line. Passenger trips on the Cruiser totaled 118,366 in FY 2018/19. Using the number of passenger trips recorded during the first nine months of FY 2019/20 as a basis for estimating year-end totals, passenger trips on the Corona Cruiser are projected to decline by 17 percent, or 19,840 trips, compared to the previous fiscal year for a total of approximately 98,526. Ridership during fiscal 2019/20 was expected to increase however, impacts of COVID-19 has caused a significant decline in transit ridership. See graphs on the following page of passenger trends by route. Passenger Trips 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 Corona Cruiser Passenger Trips FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20* FY 20/21** * FY 2019/20 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2019-March 2020. ** FY 20/21 projections are based on a 5 percent decrease over estimated FY 2019/20 year-end totals. Passenger trips on both the Blue Line and the Red Line are expected to decrease by 5 percent or 4,900 rips in FY 2020/21 when compared to the previous year. As mentioned above the decrease in ridership is due to the impact of COVID-19 on public transit. City of Corona Transit Service Page 19 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 166 Passenger Trips 90,000 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 Corona Cruiser Passenger Trips by Route FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Blue Line Red Line FY 19/20* FY 20/21** * FY 2019/20 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2019-March 2020. ** FY 20/21 projections are based on a 5 percent decrease over estimated FY 2019/20 year-end totals. Dial -A -Ride Dial -A -Ride provided 52,580 passenger trips in FY 2018/19. Using data collected from the first nine months of FY 2019/20 as a basis for estimating year-end totals, passenger trips may decrease by 23 percent, or 12.264 trips, as compared to FY 2018/19. The decrease in FY 2019/20 passenger trips may be attributed to the following: elimination of general -public DAR and impact of COVID-19. DAR was still recovering from the loss of general public riders which had accounted for about 10 percent of the riders. Ridership for DAR was expected to level off for FY 19/20 with a slight (2 percent) increase in ridership. COVID-19 greatly impacted DAR ridership as majority of the riders vulnerable to COVID-19 are seniors & persons with disabilities. Passenger Trips 90,000 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 DAR Passenger Trips FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20* FY 20/21** * FY 2019/20 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2019-March 2020. ** FY 20/21 projections are based on a five percent decrease over estimated FY 2019/20 year-end totals. City of Corona Transit Service FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan Page 20 of 48 167 Productivity Measures Productivity has been declining since FY 2014/15 on the Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride as measured by the number of passengers per revenue hour and revenue miles showed year -over - year in the below table. Ridership was expected level off and see a gradual, 2% increase in FY 2019/20. Unfortunately, productivity continue to drop through the current year due to the impact of COVID-19 on public transit ridership. Besides the impact of COVID-19, increased traffic congestion resulting from construction work throughout City of Corona continue to impact Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride buses. Freeway lane reductions and ramp closures, local street and lane closures, detours, and the movement of heavy equipment all increase congestion and impact traffic flow, which slows buses. Slower speeds result in longer duration trips, thereby impacting productivity. Mode Productivity Measure FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20* FY 20/21** Corona Cruiser Passengers per revenue hour 9.06 8.93 8.18 6.76 6.42 Passengers per revenue mile 0.77 0.75 0.69 0.57 0.54 Dial -A -Ride Passengers per revenue hour 3.92 3.79 3.59 3.41 3.12 Passengers per revenue mile 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.27 0.26 *FY 2019/20 performance is measured based on estimates covering the period July 2019 through March 2020. **FY 20/21 performance is measured based on FY 2019/20 estimates with a five percent decrease in ridership. Performance Measure FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual* FY 2020/21 Planned System -wide Passenger Trips 198,049 188,061 170,946 138,842 131,900 Cost per Service Hour $70.07 $77.24 $85.48 $86.22 $109.55 *AII expenses (including operations contract cost and fuel) upto quarter ending March 2020 have been posted City of Corona Transit Service Page 21 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 168 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- City of Corona -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 3 3 14 3 14 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $2,918,210 $2,489,197 $2,769,156 $1,870,126 $2,941,298 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $474,246 $437,174 $415,750 $266,952 $443,967 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $2,443,963 $2,052,023 $2,353,406 $1,603,174 $2,497,331 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 188,061 170,946 180,018 127,086 131,900 Passenger Miles 805,577 732,023 778,228 543,177 562,368 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 29,898.0 29,118.8 29,445.0 21,690.2 26,849.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 368,853.0 347,239.0 346,342.0 263,457.0 319,878.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 412,713.0 399,249.0 397,910.0 302,294.0 364,962.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $97.61 $85.48 $94.05 $86.22 $109.55 Farebox Recovery Ratio 16.25% 17.56% 15.01% 14.27% 15.09% Subsidy per Passenger $13.00 $12.00 $13.07 $12.61 $18.93 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.03 $2.80 $3.02 $2.95 $4.44 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $81.74 $70.47 $79.93 $73.91 $93.01 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $6.63 $5.91 $6.80 $6.09 $7.81 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 6.3 5.9 6.1 5.9 4.9 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.51 0.49 0.52 0.48 0.41 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/5/2020 169 Page 1 of 1 2.4 SERVICE PERFORMANCE Table 2.3 on the following two pages lists various detailed performance metrics by service and route for planned FY 2020/21. See above sections regarding route by route breakdown of these services. City of Corona Transit Service Page 23 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 170 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Corona -- 3 FY 2020/21 All Routes Peak Route # Day Type Vehicles Passengers Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue COR-BLUE All Days 3 48,408 191,212 7,124 7,831 81,318 85,712 $731,780 $146,356 $0 $0 COR-DAR All Days 9 38,300 192,650 12,262 14,712 146,937 176,315 $1,442,928 $144,293 COR-RED All Days 2 45,192 178,506 7,463 8,624 91,623 102,935 $766,590 $153,318 $0 $0 14 131,900 562,368 26,849 31,167 319,878 364,962 $2,941,298 $443,967 $0 $0 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/5/2020 171 Page 1 of 2 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Performance Indicators Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Corona -- 3 FY 2020/21 All Routes Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Net Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile COR-BLUE All Days $585,424 $102.72 $9.00 $15.12 20.00% $12.09 $3.06 $82.18 $7.20 6.80 0.60 COR-DAR All Days $1,298,635 $117.67 $9.82 $37.67 10.00% $33.91 $6.74 $105.91 $8.84 3.12 0.26 COR-RED All Days $613,272 $102.72 $8.37 $16.96 20.00% $13.57 $3.44 $82.17 $6.69 6.06 0.49 $2,497,331 $109.55 $9.20 $22.30 15.09% $18.93 $4.44 $93.01 $7.81 4.91 0.41 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/5/2020 172 Page 2 of 2 2.5 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS CCTS staff will continue to focus on improving the overall service monitoring key performance metrics such as passengers per revenue hour and farebox recovery, improving performance metrics include reviewing the operation to ensure established standards are being met. Staff holds contractor responsible for various performance standards pursuant to the contract. Some of these standards include but not limited to the following: • Improve On -time performance • Enhance Customer service experience • Meet ADA compliance standards • Maintain revenue vehicle and bus stop equipment In addition, as mentioned in section 1.9, CCTS will perform a study of the fixed route system to determine underperforming stops and potential for expansion service. The study will also help determine if bus stop improvements are necessary based on number of riders at the stops. Based on the study, CCTS may adopt a tiered bus stop improvement policy. Furthermore, CCTS realizes the need to update the current route schedule and provide increased connections to the Corona Transit Center. In addition, to be an effective and useful transportation option, buses need to consistently operate according to the published schedule. Bus passengers need to be able to rely on the bus to pick them up on schedule and deliver them to their destination on schedule. An unreliable transit system will lose riders. CCTS staff had performed an internal review, however the altered schedule was not able to meet the schedule for the student riders in getting to/from the schools. As such the schedule remains as is and will be updated once the COA is complete. The abovementioned approach to reviewing standards, performing a study and revising the schedule is intended to improve ridership, productivity and farebox recovery. 2.6 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS Major trip destinations within the city are the commercial/retail areas along McKinley Street and Sixth Street, The Crossings shopping area on Cajalco Road and Temescal Canyon, medical facilities along Magnolia Avenue, regional transit facilities off Main Street, the Corona Public Library, the Senior Center, and the Civic Center. El Cerrito Middle School and Centennial High are also major trip generators. Cruiser patrons use the service for work, shopping trips, making stops at pharmacies and grocery stores, and accessing restaurants and movie theaters. Over the past three years, students have made up an increasing share of Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride passengers. Many Dial -A -Ride passengers use the service to get to work and care centers, doctor visits, and Corona's two Metrolink Stations. 2.7 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES There have been no service changes during FY 2019-20. Much of the effort has been towards improving the current service. City of Corona Transit Service Page 26 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 173 Chapter 3 — Future Service Plans, Fare Changes, Capital Planning and Marketing 3.1 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES While CCTS has plans for services changes, these changes and/or improvements will be dependent upon the recommendations from the COA. As mentioned in section 1.9, the COA study is being temporarily delayed. The COA will be used to formulate recommendations for service improvements that maximize ridership and service performance effectiveness in meeting the needs of the patrons. The study will be used to determine following service enhancements in the next three to five years: • Increase weekday bus frequency during morning peak hours by adding an additional bus on the Blue Line and the Red Line. This will reduce headway by 30 minutes, thereby improving transit service and opportunity to increase ridership. This will provide patrons with options to utilize Corona Cruiser with additional time intervals. • Service to/from the Green River Road vicinity (northwest area of the City) • Reinstate service to/from the Vintage Terrace Senior Apartments • Extend weekday service to/from Dos Lagos shopping center • Service to/from City of Corona to John F. Kennedy High and Norco College in City of Norco • Frequent service to/from the Corona Transit Center to increase connections with Metrolink and RTA • Service to the West Corona Metrolink Station • Service to/from neighboring cities • Adding Sunday service Recommendations will include route alignments, schedules, headways, hours of service, areas served, interlines, time points, traffic considerations, estimates of cost and schedules for implementation and bus stop locations. Moreover, recommendations shall include chronological order as to plan revisions to the service with a ranking of short-term to end -of -plan ranking. 3.2 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION The CCTS staff is continuously looking for strategies to increase ridership and increase awareness of Corona Transit services. These marketing strategies include: • Bus Shelter Program — CCTS plans to replace existing advertising shelters at 20-25 bus stops. Shelters provide bus patrons with relief from the sun during hot days, and protection from rain during inclement weather. These shelters will feature two -panels for advertising, a bench, an area for a person with a mobility device/wheelchair, and solar - powered security lighting. These new shelters will act as a destination for bus passengers, and as an ambassador as to how public transit can beautify a neighborhood and itself function as marketing tool inviting motorist to try public transit. City of Corona Transit Service Page 27 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 174 • Poetry and Art on the Bus Program — in cooperation with Centennial High and Corona High, CCTS continues to conduct poetry and art contest inviting students to submit original poetry and artwork to be displayed on the interior of Cruiser buses. Selected poems and artwork are rotated each month. The program works as an outreach effort and marketing campaign at high schools while providing a creative outlet for students. Cruiser patrons are rewarded with expressive, introspective, and entertaining poems to read and artwork to ponder during their time on the bus. The program is in its twelfth year. • Free Fare Program — Implement a free fare program which will include the following programs: special free fare days, such as Bike to Work Day, Dump the Pump Day, days for targeted passengers; Fixed Route Training Program; and Summer Student Program. Offering various free fare programs allows the riders to experience the service with little to no cost to them with the intent the rider will continue to use the service. Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Funds will be utilized to offset the costs for this project. • Transit User Training — Present introduction on how to use public transit to promote use of the Corona Cruiser and its connection to regional bus and rail service. • Community Service Events — CCTS and contractor staff will participate in community events to inform attendees of those events about available transportation services and how they can take advantage of these services. • Updated Schedule — A new, reliable schedule, combined the completion of constructions projects, and upgrades in passenger amenities should go a long way in gaining back passengers that may have left the system for more reliable transportation alternatives. • Social Media — Use of social media such as Facebook, Twitter etc. to market transit services available and to update the public with ongoing changes. 3.3 PROJECTED RIDERSHIP GROWTH FY 19-20 was expected to have an increase in ridership compared to the prior years. Unfortunately, ridership has suffered greatly due to the impact of COVID-19. As such, CCTS does not project an increase in ridership in fiscal year 2021 however, is cautiously optimistic that as the situation with COVID-19 improves, the decrease in passenger trips experienced in Fiscal Years 19-20 thorough 20-21 will start to bottom -out, and slowly improve going into the following fiscal years. CCTS staff will utilize marketing efforts outlined in section 3.2 as an effort to increase ridership. In addition, CCTS will utilize the study mentioned in section 1.9 and ongoing surveys to assess the need for service improvements including service frequency, connectivity, span of service and on -time performance. CCTS will continue to explore options that address service attributes to attract new ridership while retaining the existing riders. 3.4 PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE CHANGES CCTS, currently does not have any plans for any fare structure changes. In the past, the CCTS has always followed RTA's example and kept in line with their fare structure. Once the Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) is completed, staff will use recommendations from the study for any fare changes. COA is on hold due to the impact of COVID-19 on public transit services. City of Corona Transit Service Page 28 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 175 3.5 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING CCTS capital program includes the following projects: Bus Stop Improvements CCTS plans to continue on -going improvements to bus stops which includes upgrading bus stop accessibility and passenger amenities; planned improvements are as follows: • Replace existing passenger shelters that display advertising with new shelters. The design of the new shelters will be based on the existing design, but re -worked to include two panels for advertising; and, • Replace older blue fiberglass bus benches with metal benches. • Add, expand, and/or replace damaged concrete at bus stops to improve accessibility. Currently, bus stop improvements are on an as needed basis due to increased customer requests, replacement of damaged equipment or assessment based on a complaint. Staff will need to do an assessment of each location to determine the need for replacement equipment. In addition, the COA will be used as a guide to determine which stops require tiered improvements. A component of the COA, requires the consultant to perform a physical inventory of each stop within the CCCTS fixed -route system and perform an analysis of the physical condition (does it meet ADA accessibility requirements) and illustrate whether ridership for each stop warrants a tier upgrade. Bus stops within the City of Corona are of the following Tier System: Description Amenities Tier 1 Sign, trash receptacle Tier 2 Tier 1 with bench seating Tier 3 Tier 2 with shelter and shelter lighting Landmark Tier 3 with landscaping Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) This system is for the purpose of ensuring customers are receiving the highest quality information on time as well as ensuring that CCTS is operating at optimal efficiency. ITS will includes components such as: Computer Aided Dispatching (CAD); Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL); Automated Annunciators to meet ADA Requirement; Relay real-time transit information; Automated Passenger Counter (APC); and an advance fare payment system. Customers are demanding enhanced information on a more immediate basis. Additionally, reporting requirements add increased pressure to provide more accurate and detailed information in order to monitor the systems performance. Upgrading our existing systems and installation of new technologies will ensure that customers are receiving the highest quality information on time, as well as ensuring that CCTS is operating at optimal efficiency. The use of ITS technologies contributes to enhanced customer service, improved productivity and to the overall fiscal responsibility of the transit system. CCTS plans to release the solicitation for an ITS during late FY 2021. CCTS is currently in the investigation phase to explore the various technologies available based on CCTS' needs. CCTS staff has participated in numerous vendor demonstrations and has City of Corona Transit Service Page 29 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 176 attend the ITS seminar to assist staff with potential scope of work for the Request for Proposal. Based on CCTS's need, staff is estimating cost of one million dollars for this project and expect to release solicitation during fiscal year 20-21. CCTS does not expect completion of this project till 2022/23. Purchase ADA Accessible Van Purchase an ADA accessible van to support the current DAR program to transport fewer passengers (or one wheelchair). This will allow the usage of a smaller vehicle for situations when a larger vehicle is not warranted. Use of a smaller vehicle when transporting few passengers may be much more efficient. Canopy/Roof Structure for Bus Parking Area Build a canopy over the bus parking stalls at the City's Corp. Yard to protect and prolong the life of the buses and the associated equipment from the sun's rays and the elements. Digital Land Mobile Radio System Purchase and install a new digital land mobile radio communications system to replace the current system in place as the current system is starting to show deterioration. Route Development Bus Purchase Purchase additional buses for Corona Cruiser. This project will be dependent upon the recommendations from the COA as there can be a potential to expand service. Route development buses are needed to operate more frequent services and/or additional bus route(s). CCTS ill purchase any needed buses through California Association for Coordinated Transportation/Morongo Basin Transit Authority (CaIACT/MBTA) Cooperative Purchasing Schedule (Cooperative). The Cooperative was developed in accordance with the Local Government Purchasing Schedule, as defined by 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §18.36, wherein the FTA extends to states and local governments the authority to make arrangements with multiple vendors to provide options for goods or services at established prices. The estimated cost for this project will be dependent upon the number of buses needed for potential service expansion. CCTS will be better able to estimate once the COA is complete. As mentioned earlier, the COA is on hold due to the impact of COVID-19. New Bus Stop with Amenities Add new stops with amenities needed to service any additional service recommendations. This project will be dependent upon the recommendations from the COA as there can be a potential to expand service. City of Corona Transit Service Page 30 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 177 TABLE 3 — CCTS FY 2020/21 HIGHLIGHTS Operations • Improve Fixed Route Service o Adjust Corona Cruiser bus schedule to reflect actual trip times. o Introduce additional morning peak service o Implement a Free Fare Program o Increase Ridership • Improve Dial -A -Ride Services o Review feasibility of establishing an ADA Subscription Services Policy • Work with the City's contract transportation operator to improve: o Operations of Corona Cruiser and Dial -A -Ride service; o Bus maintenance and cleanliness/maintenance of bus stops; and o Monitoring and verifying contractor performance. o Improve On -Time Performance • Conduct a Comprehensive Operational Analysis to identify strengths as well as opportunities for improvements • Seek services for quarterly inspection of the buses to ensure state of good repair Capital Projects • Intelligent Transportation System • Bus Stop Improvement Project • Purchase of ADA Accessible Van • Digital Mobile Land Communication System • Canopy/roof structure for Bus Parking Area • Route Development Buses City of Corona Transit Service Page 31 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 178 Chapter 4 — Financial Planning 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET FOR FY2O/21 Operating Budget To continue to provide Corona Cruiser fixed route and Dial -A -Ride service, CCTS is proposing an operating budget of $2.94 million for FY 2020/21, representing a 6.2 percent increase ($172,142) over the current year FY 19-20 budget. The operating budget as depicted in the table on the following page is distributed among the following four categories: • Salaries and Benefits expenses includes wages, fringe benefits (pension, medical, worker's compensation) and OPEB expenses for post -employment benefits. This expense accounts for 18 percent of the budget. • Materials, Marketing and Utilities expenses includes printing and publications, advertising, Routematch Dispatching software, utilities, office supplies, minor office equipment, translation services and administrative/ITS support services. The 7.2 percent increase in this category is due to adding a line item to translate various documents to comply with Title VI. • Fuel expenses to account for six percent of the total expense. Due to all vehicles utilizing CNG fuel, the overall year-to-year fuel costs have decreased. • Contracted Services constitutes the largest component of the budget at 73 percent. These expenses represent purchased transportation services for Dial -A -Ride and Corona Cruiser. In addition, this line item also reflects costs for a Vehicle Maintenance Oversight, a Comprehensive Operations Analysis and Consulting services for a Triennial DBE Goal/Program update. While year -over -year in operating costs for DAR services are expected to decrease due to operating less revenue hours for the 1st quarter of FY 2020/21 as a result of COVID-19; the City is responsible for compensating the contractor using the variable rate (higher per revenue hour cost) to recompense for the decrease in revenue hours pursuant to the contract with MV Transportation. Operating less revenue hours for DAR reflects in the reduces expenses for fuel expense. City of Corona Transit Service Page 32 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 179 Budget by Category and Mode Category Mode FY 2019/20 SRTP FY 2020/21 Plan Variance Salaries & Benefits Dial -A -Ride $ 238,420 $ 224,010 $ (14,410) -6.0% Fixed Route $ 293,166 $ 298,866 $ 5,700 1.9% Subtotal $ 531,586 $ 522,876 $ (8,710) -1.6% Materials, Marketing and Utilities Dial -A -Ride $ 40,795 $ 43,286 $ 2,491 6.1% Fixed Route $ 29,775 $ 32,391 $ 2,616 8.8% Subtotal $ 70,570 $ 75,677 $ 5,107 7.2% Fuel Dial -A -Ride $ 90,000 $ 75,000 $ (15,000) -16.7% Fixed Route $ 110,000 $ 110,000 $ - 0.0% Subtotal $ 200,000 $ 185,000 $ (15,000) -7.5% Contracted Services Dial -A -Ride $ 979,000 $ 1,100,632 $ 121,632 12.4% Fixed Route $ 988,000 $ 1,057,113 $ 69,113 7.0% Subtotal $ 1,967,000 $ 2,157,745 $ 190,745 9.7% Total Dial -A -Ride $ 1,348,215 $ 1,442,928 $ 94,713 7.0% Fixed Route $ 1,420,941 $ 1,498,370 $ 77,429 5.4% Total $ 2,769,156 $ 2,941,298 $ 172,142 6.2% For FY 2020/21, CCTS is proposing a funding plan that includes Federal Transit Administration (FTA) CARES and Section 5307 funds, State of Good Repair (SGR prior year funds) and revenues generated by passenger fares, bus shelter advertising, and local funds. Capital Budge CCTS is proposing a capital budget of $523,146 for FY 2020/21. Funding will be used to purchase items necessary to maintain the existing operations as well as future endeavors to improve service levels. Of the proposed capital budget, $27,500 was approved in prior SRTP. CCTS will use FTA section 5339, State Transit Assistance (STA) and SGR FY 19/20 & FY 20/21 funding to cover proposed capital program in FY 2020/21. City of Corona Transit Service Page 33 of 48 FY 2020/21 - FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 180 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 City of Corona Operating Project Total Amount of Funds 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5307 RS OB 5339 RS AB 2766 FARE GF REV LTF OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-OB STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Comprehensive Operations Analysis $100,000 $52,000 $48,000 Corona Cruiser Operating Assistance $1,365,870 $0 $1,365,870 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Corona Dial -A -Ride Operating Assistance $1,410,428 $1,410,428 $0 Triennial DBE Goal -Program Update $15,000 $15,000 Vehicle Maintenance Oversight Project $50,000 $50,000 Sub -total Operating $2,941,298 $0 $2,843,298 $48,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $50,000 $0 $0 Capital Project Total Amount of Funds 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5307 RS OB 5339 RS AB 2766 FARE GF REV LTF OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 SGR-OB STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Bus Parking Stall Canopy - 21-1 $100,000 $96,052 $3,948 Bus Stop Improvements - 21-2 $50,646 $47,296 $3,350 Intellegent Transportation System - 21-3 $345,000 $64,700 $255,624 $24,676 Sub -total Capital $495,646 $0 $0 $0 $64,700 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $143,348 $7,298 $0 $255,624 $24,676 Total Operating & Capital $3,436,944 $0 $2,843,298 $48,000 $64,700 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $143,348 $7,298 $50,000 $255,624 $24,676 FY 2020/21 Projected Funding Details 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5307 RS OB AB 2766 FARE GF REV LTF OTHR LCL SGR-OB Total Estimated Operating Funding Request 5339 RS SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Total Estimated Capital Funding Request $0 $2,843,298 $48,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $50,000 $2,941,298 $64,700 $143,348 $7,298 $255,624 $24,676 $495,646 Total Funding Request $3,436,944 Trans Track ManagerTM 5/5/2020 17:45:58 ET 181 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Corona Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-1 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Bus Parking Stall Canopy Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Modification Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: This project will entail installing a canopy over the bus parking stalls located in the City's Corp . Yard. Project Justification: Project funding will enable the purchase and installation of the canopy over the bus parking area in the City's Corp Yard. This project will protect buses and associated equipment from the sun's rays and the elements to prolong the life of buses and equipment Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date June 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $96,052 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $3,948 Total $100,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 1 of 3 4/29/2020 21:00:59 ET 182 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Corona Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-2 Project Name: Bus Stop Improvements Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: The Corona Cruiser serves 185 bus stops along two routes — the Red and Blue Lines. This project will provide funding to improve ADA accessibility, maintain bus stop furniture and equipment in a proper and safe manner and provide funding to place additional stops as demand warrants. This project is a multi-year/on-going activity. Project Justification: This transit enhancement project will entail the purchase and installation of new and/or replacement bus stop amenities to improve accessibility and/or removing barriers to accessibility. Project funding will enable the purchase of bus stop shelters, benches, solar lighting, bus stop signage, trash receptacles and bus stop post mounted lights. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $47,296 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $3,350 Total $50,646 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 2 of 3 4/29/2020 21:00:59 ET 183 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Corona Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 21-3 Project Name: Intellegent Transportation System Category: ITS Sub -Category: Systems Fuel Type: N/A FTIP No: RIV190603 Project Description: Purchase and install an Intelligent Transportation System that will support the following GPS based components: 1) Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL); 2) Automated Vehicle Annunciator System (AVAS); 3) Computer Aided Dispatching (CAD) and; 4) Automated Passenger Count (APC). The system will improve performance monitoring, and reporting capabilities, and improve service quality and bus efficiency. Project Justification: The ITS is necessary as an effort to ensure customers are receiving the highest quality information on time as well as ensuring that CCTS is operating at optimal efficiency. This project will entail additional funding for prior approved ITS projects. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 RS FY 2020/21 $64,700 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $255,624 STA PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $24,676 Total $345,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 3 of 3 4/29/2020 21:00:59 ET 184 TABLE 48 — FAREBOX REVENUE CALCULATION (Consistent with Riverside County Transportation Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Farebox Recovery Ratio Revenues FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 Est FY 2020/21 Plan Passenger Fares $323,593 $295,338 $273,458 $189,093 $0 Interest Income $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 General Fund Contribution $78,000 $45,600 $62,000 $0 $0 Measure A $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Passenger Shelter Advertising Revenue $7,421 $9,929 $9,150 $6,161 $0 Gain on Sale of Capital Assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 CNG Revenues $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Lease / Other Revenue $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Federal Excise Tax Refund $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Investment Income $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 CalPers CERBT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Other Revenues* $35,534 $17,167.12 $92,568 $203,471 $443,967 Total Farebox Revenues $444,548 $368,034 $437,175 $398,725 $443,967 Total Operating Expense $2,196,759 $2,309,337 $2,489,197 $2,380,775 $2,941,298 Farebox Recovery Ratio** 20% 16% 18% 17% 15% *For fiscal years 2019/20 & 2020/21, "Other Revenues" include funding from Federal Transit Administration CARES act to offset fare revenue loss impacted by COVID-19. Effective April 27, 2020, CCTS implemented a no fare policy as a result of COVID-19 impact on public transit to maintain social distancing. **Farebox recover ratio is based on a system wide blended rate of 15% (10% for DAR Specialized Service and 20% for Corona Cruiser fixed route service. City of Corona Transit Service FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan Page 38 of 48 185 4.2 FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PLANNED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM (FY22- FY23) Operating Program CCTS is proposing the following funding plan to support fiscal years 2022 and 2023: FY 2021/22 funding plan includes Local Transportation Funds (LTF), FTA Section 5307 funds, State of Good Repair and revenues generated by passenger fares, AB2766 funds, bus shelter advertising, general funds to close farebox funding gap and other local funds. FY 2022/23 funding plan includes Local Transportation Funds (LTF), FTA Section 5307 funds, State of Good Repair and revenues generated by passenger fares, AB2766 funds, bus shelter advertising, general funds to close farebox funding gap and other local funds. The above planned budget is assuming the improved situation with COVID-19 pandemic and operation resumes with reinstatement of passenger fares. Capital Program Capital program funds supporting fiscal years 2022 and 2023 will include FTA sections 5307 & 5339, State Transit Assistance (STA) and State of Good Repair for prior SRTP approved projects. City of Corona Transit Service Page 39 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 186 City of Corona Transit System FY 2021/22 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED Short Range Transit Plan Table 4.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2021/22 Project Description Total Amount of Funds dui LTF Aim STA 4116. Federal Section 5307 Federal Section 5339 Cares Act Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP AQMD AB 2766 Subvention Funds* Fare Box 4111. Other ** Operating Assistance - DAR Operating Assistance -Cruiser $ 1,510,497 $ 1,412,538 $ $ 709,438 $ 554,515 $ 591,199 $ 558,015 $ - $ - $ 32,500 $ 17,500 $ - $ 12,000 $ 149,100 $ 136,300 $ 28,260 $ 134,208 !--- Subtotal: Operating $ 2,923,035 $ 1,263,954 $ - $ 1,149,214 $ - $ - $ - $ 50,000 $ - $ 12,000 $ 285,400 $ 162,467 Project Description Capital Projectl o. Total Amount of Funds LTF STA Federal Section 5307 Federal Section 5339 Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP AQMD AB 2766 SubventionFunds * Fare Box Other ** Subtotal: Capital $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Total: Operating & Capital $ 2,923,035 $1,263,954 $ - $ 1,149,214 $ - $ - $ 50,000 $ - $ 12,000 $ 285,400 $ 162,467 5307 for 50% operating assistance @ 80% federal share minus CARES funding *AB 2766 congestion and emission reduction funds to incentivize Cruiser multi -day passes $12,000. **Other revenues include City contribution $84,500; Bus Shelter Advertising $8,000; and local contribution $10,000. DAR Cruiser $ 149,100 $ 136,300 Pax Fares Fare Box $ - $ 12,000 AB 2766 Subsidy $ 149,100 $ 148,300 $ Other $ - $ 8,000 Shelter advertising 8,260 $ 86,208 Gen'I Fund - $ 10,000 Local contribution 20,000 $ 30,000 Penalties 28,260 $ 134,208 Total $ 177,360 $ 282,508 $ 459,867 187 City of Corona Transit System FY 2022/23 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED Short Range Transit Plan Table 4.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2022/23 Project Description Total Amount of Funds 4111 LTF Allah STA Federal Section 5307 Federal Section 5339 Cares Act Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP alb AQMD AB 2766 Subvention Funds* Fare Box Mr Other ** Operating Assistance - DAR Operating Assistance -Cruiser $ 1,595,943 $ 1,443,689 $ $ 750,453 $ 566,975 $ 625,377 $ 570,476 $ 32,500 $ 17,500 $ - $ 12,000 $ 152,060 $ 139,000 $ 35,553 $ 137,738 !--- Subtotal: Operating $ 3,039,632 $ 1,317,428 $ - $ 1,195,853 $ - $ - $ 50,000 $ - $ 12,000 $ 291,060 $ 173,291 Project Description Capital Projectl o. Total Amount of Funds lir LTF STA Federal Section 5307 Federal Section 5339 Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP AQMD AB 2766 SubventionFunds * Fare Box Other ** Subtotal: Capital $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Total: Operating & Capital $ ,317,428 $ - $ 1,195,853 $ - $ - $ 50,000 $ - $ 12,000 $ 291,060 $ 173,291 5307 for 50% operating assistance @ 80% federal share *AB 2766 congestion and emission reduction funds to incentivize Cruiser multi -day passes $12,000. **Other revenues include City contribution $88,483; Bus Shelter Advertising $8,000; and local contribution $10,000. DAR Cruiser $ 152,060 $ 139,000 Pax Fares Fare Box $ - $ 12,000 AB 2766 Subsidy Other $ 152,060 $ 151,000 $ - $ 8,000 Shelter advertising $ 15,553 $ 89,738 Gen'I Fund $ - $ 10,000 Local contribution $ 20,000 $ 30,000 Penalties $ 35,553 $ 137,738 Total $ 187,613 $ 288,738 $ 476,351 188 4.3 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS Half Fare During Non -Peak Hours According to federal statute, transit operators must allow 1) elderly persons, 2) persons with disabilities, and 3) Medicare card holders to ride fixed route service during off-peak hours for a fare that is not more than one-half the base fare charged to other persons during peak hours. The base fare for Cruiser service is $1.50 during peak and non -peak hours. The fare for an elderly person (60+), a person with disabilities, and Medicare cardholders is $0.70 throughout the service day. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) The ADA requires that complementary paratransit service be available to ADA certified persons during the same hours and days of operation available to Cruiser (fixed route) passengers. Complementary paratransit service must be provided within 3/4 of a mile corridor from each side of a fixed route. CCTS operates Dial -A -Ride service that extends beyond the 3/4 mile corridor to the city limits, into the county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens, as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services and Norco College). When demand exceeds capacity, requests for service from ADA certified passengers receive priority. As such, CCTS maintains zero denials for ADA certified passengers. Provision of Service - ADA complementary paratransit must be provided to an ADA eligible individual, including those with temporary eligibility, a personal care attendant (PCA) if necessary, and one other individual accompanying the ADA-eligible individual, if requested. Additional companions may be provided service, if space is available. Service also must be provided to visitors. Any visitor who presents ADA eligibility documentation from another jurisdiction must be provided service. Type of Service — The ADA specifies "origin to destination" service. In certain instances, this might require service beyond strict curb -to -curb. Door-to-door assistance for ADA certified passengers is available upon request. Door-to-door service is available when: • Drivers can see the bus at all times; • The outermost door is within 150 feet from the bus; • Driver safety and security is maintained; and • Where a safe parking area is available. Fares — The ADA complementary paratransit fare cannot exceed twice the fare for a trip of similar length, at a similar time of day, on the Cruiser (fixed route system). No fares may be charged for Personal Care Attendants (PCAs). ADA certified individuals are charged $2.50 per trip which is less than twice the fare for a trip on the Cruiser ($1.50 x 2 = $3.00). A companion is charged $2.50 per trip as well. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Pursuant to Federal Regulation 49 CFR Part 26 - Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE); all public agencies receiving U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) funds, that anticipate awarding $250,000 or more in USDOT-assisted contracts, must establish a three-year (3) overall DBE goal for potential contracting opportunities for certified Suppliers. City of Corona Transit Service Page 42 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 189 CCTS will continue using federal section FTA 5307 funds for future projects including the use of these funds for operating and capital projects. The City submitted its' first DBE program and DBE triennial goal and methodology on December 12, 2017. The DBE goal & methodology is for federal Fiscal Years 2018-2020 (October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2020) and has received FTA concurrence on January 10, 2018. Title VI In compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, no person on the basis of race, color, or national origin, is excluded from participation in, or is denied the benefits of, or is subjected to discrimination within the scope of services offered by CCTS. The following notification to passengers of their right to file a complaint is included on the City of Corona website, service brochures, and posted on -board CCTS buses. No person shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity of the City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS). The Public Works Director is the CCTS Title VI Compliance Officer. For more information, or to file a Title VI Civil Rights complaint, contact the Corona Public Works Department by telephone at (951) 736-2266, by email at publwks@ci.corona.ca. us, or by visiting the Public Works Department at 400 S. Vicentia Avenue, Suite 210, Corona, CA 92882. The current CCTS 2018-2020 Title VI program received FTA concurrence on September 21, 2017. The next program is due on June 1, 2020, however, due to COVID-19, this date has been extended to October 1, 2020. Transit Asset Management (TAM) Plan Federal regulations 49 CFR 625 requires agencies to develop a transit asset management (TAM) plan if it owns, operates, or manages capital assets used to provide public transportation and receives federal financial assistance under 49 U.S.S. Chapter 53 as a recipient or subrecipient. As a recipient of federal funds and operating a public transit system, CCTS is required to comply with this regulation. Under this regulation, CCTS is defined as a Tier II provider. Tier II transit provider are that own, operate less than 100 vehicles in revenue service during peak regular service across all fixed route modes or in any one one non -fixed route mode. CCTS' TAM plan includes the following four required elements: 1) An inventory of assets; 2) Condition assessment of inventoried assets; 3) Description of decision support tool; and 4) A prioritized list of investments. As required, the completed TAM Plan was submitted to Southern California Association of Government (SCAG), the metropolitan planning organization (MPO) for the region on October 29, 2018. In addition, CCTS reports annually to FTA's National Transit Database (NTD) which includes asset inventory data; condition assessments and performance results and projected targets for the following fiscal year along with a narrative report on any changes. Per regulations, the TAM plan is required to be updated every four (4) years; the next update is in 2022. Public Transit Agency Safety Plan (PTASP) Federal Transit Administration (FTA) published the PTASP Final Rule (49 C.F.R. Part 673), which requires public transportation systems that receive federal funds under FTA's Urbanized City of Corona Transit Service Page 43 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 190 Area Formula Grants to develop safety plans which includes processes and procedures for implementing the Safety Management Systems (SMS). The documented SMS ensures the Agency is performing the necessary risk management activities, monitoring its results and making the necessary adjustments in maintaining a safe system. This plan outlines how CCTS, in partnership with its transit operations contractor (currently MV Transportation), will continually identify, monitor and mitigate various safety risks and hazards present in its transit operating environment. In addition, under the PTASP rule, the transit operator is required to set safety performance targets based on the safety performance measures established by the National Public Transportation Safety Plan (NSP). The NSP safety performance measures are for the following categories: Fatalities; Injuries; Safety Events; and System Reliability (State of Good Repair). The first set of performance targets are under development; these targets will be shared with Corona's Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the State of California. The plan was approved and adopted by City Council on April 15, 2020 and has been sent to Caltrans for review and approval. While FTA had set July 20, 2020 as the original date for compliance, due to impact of COVID-19, this date has been extended to December 2020. CCTS fully expect to meet the defined deadline. Transportation Development Act Triennial Audit CCTS underwent a Transportation Development Act (TDA) Triennial Performance Audit document review in January 2019 and site visit in March 2019 covering Fiscal Years 2015/16 through 2017/18. The triennial performance audits are administered and coordinated by RCTC. While the audit results reveal CCTS operations meeting the major goals and objectives of the TDA program, room for improvement is always paramount with the audit which suggests improvements in three areas as summarized in Table 4.3 Progress Implementing Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations. City of Corona Transit Service Page 44 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 191 TABLE 4.3 — PROGRESS IMPLEMENTING TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT (TDA) TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE A UDIT RECOMMENDA T/ONS aF TDA Triennial Performance Audit Period Covering FY 2014 through FY 2016 Audit Action / Remedy Recommendations Prepare and submit separate State Controller Transit Operators Financial Transactions Reports for general public transit and specialized service. Continue process of implementing ADA subscription services on Dial -A -Ride Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. • Corona's annual Transit Operators Financial Transactions Report to the State Controller has historically combined fixed route and dial -a -ride as each provided general public service. With the transition to specialized dial -a -ride, written instructions by the state to prepare this particular report require separate reporting of fixed route and specialized service. In the General Instruction Form completed by the City, a selection must be made as to which mode of transit is represented in the report. The options are general public use or elderly/disabled. Transit operators providing two types of service, (general public use and transit service exclusively for the elderly/handicapped) must complete a separate report for each type of service. The submission of separate reports to the State Controller will demonstrate Corona's proactive approach to compliance with state reporting instructions. Contacted the Office of State Controller on December 4, 2019 to file a separate report for Dial -A -Ride and Fixed Route. Was advised to submit a combined report for FY 2018-19 as a separate report for Dial -A -Ride will need to be created to add the specialized service to the SCO transit database. This report will be available starting with FY 2019-20. This recommendation is being carried forward from the prior audit. Subscription service is a convenience offered to ADA paratransit passengers who take the same trip on a regular basis, as it reduces the need to make repeated calls for each ride. Many agencies have subscription service trips (i.e., having a standing reservation scheduled) that make up a portion of their trip requests. Subscription service trips generally are trips that a patron makes multiple times per month, often multiple times per week, and have a specific origin and destination that do not change. Most often, these types of trips are for employment, medical, and/or educational purposes. These trips can be prescheduled, thus reducing the burden on the scheduler/dispatcher and call in -take system. ADA subscription service is generally on a space -available basis, and scheduled on a first -come, first -served basis for a given time period (e.g., 14 or 30 days of subscription service). Federal ADA law permits the use of subscription service as long as it does not absorb more than 50 percent of the available trips at a given time of day, and does not result in next -day ADA trip denials. Subscription service is discretionary and not mandated under ADA, which allows the City to investigate its feasibility through a demonstration period to determine whether additional scheduling efficiencies through the new scheduling software can be made, as well as whether there is some reduced staff and cost burden from the number of calls for reservations. The City is still in the process of implementing an ADA subscription service. Dial -a -Ride's transition from general public to a specialized service for ADA-certified and senior passengers makes the subscription service option more feasible. Subscription trips to many adult day care centers have been ongoing. In addition, the CCTS staff in conjunction with the contracted transit operator already monitor ADA trips to ensure that there are no capacity constraints. Nevertheless, staff will continue to work with the contract operator and review the feasibility of establishing a formal ADA Subscription Services Policy. A call-back function to remind riders of their upcoming trips will also improve operating efficiency and effectiveness. The City will be incorporating call-back function in the next ITS project. During the audit period, Corona adopted a blended farebox recovery standard of 15 percent. The revenues in the farebox ratio are composed primarily of passenger fares, City supplemental support revenues, and air district subsidies. New state legislation (SB 508) reinforces current RCTC practice of allowing other locally generated revenues in the farebox ratio. These other revenues could include advertising generated by the transit system, bus wraps on the vehicles, and other local contributions from the City to the transit program. Corona allows advertising space on its bus shelters and has expressed interest in allowing advertising on board its vehicles. The City currently does not have an advertising policy but has expressed interest in developing one. However, staffing and budgetary constraints make it difficult to pursue. Nevertheless, given the farebox recovery trends, the City should pursue this measure to incorporate other locally generated revenue in its farebox recovery. CCTS staff will continue to look for additional revenue sources to meet farebox recovery ratio of 10% for specialized Dial - A -Ride service and 20% for fixed route. City of Corona Transit Service Page 45 of 48 FY 2020/21 — FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 192 Federal Transit Administration Triennial Review A Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Triennial Review field review for the period of 2014-2016 was completed in March 2017. The table on the following page describes the deficiencies and FTA's recommended corrective action. CCTS staff has responded to and corrected all deficiencies mentioned on the following page. City received closeout letter dated April 9, 2018. The following table reflects the deficiency and correction action for this review. Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Triennial Review FY 2014-2016 Review Area Deficiency Corrective Action Technical Capacity Late MPRs/FFRs Submit to the FTA Region IX Office procedures for submitting Milestone Progress Reports (MPRs) and Federal Financial Reports (FFRs) on time Title VI Title VI program not submitted or expired Upload the required Title VI program to the TrAMS and notify the FTA Region IX RCRO Satisfactory Continuing Control Real property use issues Submit to FTA Region IX Office the following items: • Excess Real Property Inventory and Utilization Plan for the FTA-funded contribution to the facility that is no longer needed for transit purposes, as stated in the City's Grant Agreement, and that states how the recipient plans to use or dispose of the excess real property. • Identify which disposition method the City will pursue, along with a timeline, in compliance with FTA Circular 5010.1E, Chapter IV: Real Property, Section 2.j, "Real Estate Disposition" and Section 2.j. (2), "Disposition". CCTS' next Triennial Review was scheduled for site visit March 2020, however due to COVID-19, the site visit has been delayed and is tentatively scheduled for late FY 2021. National Transit Database The National Transit Database (NTD) approved CCTS' request to submit transit financial and performance data through a Small Systems Waiver starting in report year 2011; the waiver is available to transit providers operating 30 or fewer buses. The submission date for Report Year 2019 was October 30, 2019. CCTS staff provided responses and clarification to NTD reviewers following the initial review. The 2019 annual NTD report was closed out and accepted on January 23, 2020. Alternative Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) encourages all Riverside County transit operators to transition from diesel -powered transit buses to alternative fuel buses. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) are recognized as preferred options. CCTS operates using CNG-powered buses. City of Corona Transit Service Page 46 of 48 FY 2020/21 FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 193 4.4 OPEN PROJECTS CCTS has nine (9) prior SRTP approved projects open. The following reflects these open projects. Project Name SRTP Project Project # Element Funding Category 2 Project Timeline Dec-23 Total Project Unfunded Cost Balance Route Development Buses 15-03 1 $ 300,0001 $ 70,281 Passenger Shelters 17-2 4 1 on going $ 600,000 $ 573,696 Intellegent Transportation System 19-01 3 2 Dec-23 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 Route Development Buses 19-02 1 2 Dec-23 $ 950,000 $ 950,000 ADAAccesibleVan 19-03 1 1 Dec-21 $ 48,039 $ 48,039 Support Equipment & Software 19-4 3 1 Jun-21 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 ITS - add Fare Payment System 20-1 3 2 Dec-23 $ 50,000 $ 40,000 Digital Land Mobile Radio �0-2 20-3 3 1 Dec-21 $ 135,000 $ 135,000 ADA Accesible Van 1 1 Dec-21 $ 48,198 $ 48,198 TOTAL $ 2,641,237 $ 2,375,214 Project 17-2 balance includes interest earned for Prop 1B funding. City of Corona Transit Service Page 47 of 48 FY 2020/21 FY 2022/23 Short Range Transit Plan 194 FY 2020/21-FY 2022/23 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN City of Riverside, PRCSD - Special Transportation Division CITY OF V RJEIZSIDE FINAL 195 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1- SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND SERVICE PROFILE 3 SECTION 1.1 -SERVICE AREA 3 SECTION 1.2 - POPULATION PROFILE 4 SECTION 1.3 - PARATRANSIT SERVICE 4 SECTION 1.4 - DESCRIPTION OF RIDERSHIP 5 SECTION 1.5 - FARE STRUCTURE 5 SECTION 1.6 - REVENUE FLEET 6 SECTION 1.7 - EXISTING TRANSIT FACILITY 8 CHAPTER 2 -EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 9 SECTION 2.1 - KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 9 SECTION 2.2 - PERFORMANCE REPORT 11 SECTION 2.3 - SERVICE SUMMARY 13 SECTION 2.4 - SERVICE PERFORMANCE 15 SECTION 2.5 - PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS 17 SECTION 2.6 - MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS 17 SECTION 2.7 - RECENT SERVICE CHANGES 18 CHAPTER 3 - FUTURE SERVICE PLANS 19 SECTION 3.1 - PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES 19 SECTION 3.2 - FUTURE MARKETING PLANS 19 SECTION 3.3 - PROJECTED RIDERSHIP GROWTH 19 SECTION 3.4 - PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE CHANGES 20 SECTION 3.5 - CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING 20 CHAPTER 4 - FINANCIAL PLANNING 22 SECTION 4.1 - OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET NARRATIVE 22 SECTION 4.2 - FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PLANNED OPERATING & CAPITAL PROGRAM 27 SECTION 4.3 - REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 27 2IPage 196 I. SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 Service Area Special Transportation (ST) is a division within the City of Riverside's Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department that has been offering transportation services to seniors and disabled residents in the Riverside community since 1975. This paratransit transportation service is provided within the 81.54 square mile incorporated city limits of the City of Riverside, shown below in Figure 1. Figure 1 SWx La Sierra Acres' ? La Bierr Hills Arlanza La Siena ,South Aveata W..M W4 raN.q Arlington Arlington 'South - Magnolia Center Casa BlancaSHawarden Hills Presidential 'Park San 13.nardun tau y NW7KTR Sphcre Or mike re I Hunter Industrial Park' • Canyon Crest Alessandra Heights Sycamore Canyon Sycamore Canyon Park Business Park i Canyon 9Pr;rigs h. I 11.1 i ed-,_orangecrest S.M.,' Sphere ad Whence March 1aM wwe�+al�aws+� 3IPage 197 1.2 Population Profile The American Community Survey (ACS) data is a source of demographic information which is part of the 2010 Decennial Census Program. The ACS is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities with reliable and timely demographic, social, economic and housing data every year. Because the ACS is conducted annually, it serves as an interim source of up-to-date demographic data through the decade, until the next Census is conducted. According to the US Census Bureau, as of 2017, the population of the City of Riverside is 324,727 residents. The senior population within the City of Riverside (those 60 years of age and over) accounts for approximately 14.2% of the population. Riverside is below the national average of seniors age 60 and over which is 21.8%, however, due to the Baby Boomer generation aging into their sixties, the senior population will continue to rise. Ridership has slowly declined due to the rise in popularity of rideshare services such as Lyft and Uber. 1.3 Paratransit Services Owned and operated by the City of Riverside, Special Transportation is an origin -to- destination rideshare transportation service. The service is limited to senior citizens (60 years of age and older) and persons with disabilities (disabilities require a physician documentation). Special Transportation operates 362 days per year, only suspending service on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. Operating hours for ST are Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. and on weekends and holidays from 9:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m. In order to reserve a ride, passengers must call ST's reservation telephone number, during the business hours of 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. on weekends and holidays. An answering machine is available before and after business hours for cancellations. Table 1 Mode Description Area /Site Service Paratransit Services City Wide Origin to Destination / reservation -based service for Seniors over the age of 60 and Disabled Community Within the City limits of Riverside 4IPage 198 1.4 Description of Ridership Ridership data is listed in the tables below. FY 2019/20 data reflects ridership through April 2020. In both fiscal years, the average passenger age was 65. FY 2018/19 Total Passengers 139,878 Revenue Hours 42,557 Revenue Miles 576,393 1.5 Fare Structure and New Fare Type FY 2019/20 Total Passengers 94,477 Revenue Hours 30,058 Revenue Miles 404,645 On August 8, 2017, Special Transportation received approval by the City Council to increase its fare increase from $2.00 per trip to $3.00 for General Fares. A new fare type, Medical Fares, was created for individuals using our service for "medical related trips" such as doctor appointments, physical therapy, pharmacy visits, etc. Medical Fares would remain at $2.00 per trip so that the general fare increase would not be a barrier to wellness for our customers on a fixed income. Passengers using our service may pay their fare in cash at boarding time or pay with a pre -purchased ticket. General and Medical Fare Ticket booklets can be purchased in advance at the Special Transportation Offices located at 8095 Lincoln Ave, Riverside. The table below illustrates a breakdown of the fare types and associated costs. Fare Type Cost One-way (General) $3 One-way (Medical) $2 10-ticket Booklet (General) $30 10-ticket Booklet (Medical) $20 51Page 199 1.6 Revenue Fleet In FY 2019/20, Special Transportation operated a fleet of thirty-three 16-passenger paratransit minibuses which run on compressed natural gas (CNG). I n 2019 Special Transportation purchase two 9-passenger Ford Transit Vans equipped with wheelchair lifts to test the feasibility of operating a smaller profile vehicle to navigate in and around the more compact areas within the City. These vans will be put into service in FY 2020/21. Special Transportation also owns a Braun paratransit van equipped to hold six passengers and one wheelchair and a hybrid Honda Civic that is used by administrative staff in supervising routes and responding to accidents. These vehicles are not assigned to routes but are used as backups for special services. Subject to funding availability, vehicles are replaced after meeting the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) useful life of 5-years or 150,000 miles. See Table 1.1 — Fleet Inventory Wage 200 INIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Demand Response / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan City of Riverside Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Vehicle Equipped Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2010 FRD BU 2011 FRD BU 2013 GLV BU 2014 GLV BU 2017 GLV BU 16 6 25 CN 16 3 25 CN 16 7 25 CN 16 9 25 CN 16 8 25 CN 6 3 7 9 8 1,302,049 610,636 1,013,334 1,241,780 451,116 1,315,963 649,759 1,098,627 1,373,543 366,025 219,327 216,586 156,946 152,615 45,753 Totals: 80 33 33 4,618,915 4,803,917 145,573 7IPage 201 1.7 Existing Facility Special Transportation Offices are located at 8095 Lincoln Avenue within the City of Riverside Corporation Yard. Included in the facilities are an administration building consisting of administrative offices, a dispatch center, restrooms and a break room. Special Transportation's facility also includes a parking lot for the transit buses with each space equipped with a CNG slow fill station, and a CNG Maintenance Bay for maintenance and repair of the fleet. This CNG Maintenance Bay facility includes five maintenance bays, an administrative office, and multiple storage compartments for vehicle parts and equipment. The facility is outfitted with state-of-the-art safety equipment and machinery to maintain the CNG fueled vehicles. Wage 202 II. EXISTING SERVICES AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 2.1 Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) In order to ensure that Special Transit is providing superior customer service, staff considers several performance indicators. Targets are evaluated and reported on a monthly basis. In FY 2020/21, Special Transit will upgrade the current TransTrack system which will provide staff with data that will be useful in setting additional performance measures such as staff attendance and vehicle maintenance. Data for FY 2019/20 KPI's through April 2020 is listed in the tables below. Internal KPI's Target Actual On -time performance 100% 96.75% Call abandonment rate 0% 4.76% Average phone hold time 1:00 1:16 Special Transit is also required to meet other performance targets such as the 10% Farebox Recovery Ratio as mandated in the Transportation Development Act (TDA). The ratio will not be met in FY 2019/20; however, special exceptions will apply as a result of COVID-19. See Table 2.0 Service Provider Performance Targets Report 9IPage 203 INIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Riverside Data Elements FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 160,000 Passenger Miles 645,000 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 61,500.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 645,000.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 700,500.0 Total Operating Expenses $4,307,700 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $475,500 Net Operating Expenses $3,832,200 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 11.03% I >= 10.00% I 8.68% I Fails to Meet Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $70.04 <= $88.26 $101.69 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $23.95 >= $19.72 and <= $26.68 $29.28 Better Than Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $5.94 >= $3.79 and <= $5.13 4. Subsidy Per Hour $62.31 >= $64.67 and <= $87.49 $92.86 Better Than Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $5.94 >= $4.78 and <= $6.46 $6.93 Better Than Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 2.60 >= 2.81 and <= 3.80 3.17 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.25 >= 0.20 and <= 0.28 0.24 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators 10IPage 204 2.2 SRTP Performance Report Regarding how the service is running against our SRTP, Special Transit met or exceeded half of the FY 2020/21 targets. The four targets not met were — Operating costs per hour revenue, farebox recovery ratio, passengers per revenue hour, and passengers per revenue mile. The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. See Table 2.1 — SRTP Performance Report 11IPage 205 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: Riverside Transit Agency All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 3rd Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 8,697,652 6,244,521 3,413,076 None Passenger Miles 60,974,297 53,795,212 23,753,074 None Revenue Hours 880,029.4 664,041.2 537,914.0 None Total Hours 1,005,385.6 753,264.7 620,363.0 None Revenue Miles 13,376,948.5 10,023,015.7 8,211,940.0 None Total Miles 16,559,181.1 12,344,505.7 10,345,926.0 None Operating Costs $73,902,008 $65,396,958 $82,392,199 None Passenger Revenue $18,302,160 $13,952,115 $2,570,042 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue $3,365,455 None Operating Subsidy $55,599,848 $51,444,843 $79,822,157 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $83.98 $98.48 $153.17 <= $98.01 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $5.52 $6.52 $10.03 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $8.50 $10.47 $24.14 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 24.77% 21.33% 7.20% >= 0.2 Fails to Meet Target Subsidy Per Passenger $6.39 $8.24 $23.39 >= $7.23 and <= $9.79 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.91 $0.96 $3.36 >= $0.82 and <= $1.12 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $63.18 $77.47 $148.39 >= $63.04 and <= $85.28 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $4.16 $5.13 $9.72 >= $4.14 and <= $5.60 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 9.88 9.40 6.35 >= 7.41 and <= 10.03 Fails to Meet Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.65 0.62 0.42 >= 0.48 and <= 0.66 Fails to Meet Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager"' 5/13/2020 206 Page 1 of 1 2.3 SRTP Service Summary Special Transit collects and evaluates the historical data of several metrics in order to evaluate the overall service performance. Since FY 2017/18, there has been a decline each of the operating characteristics which include unlinked passenger trips, passenger miles, total actual vehicle revenue hours, total actual vehicle revenue miles, and total actual vehicle miles. In contrast, expenses seen in the Financial Data section of Table 2.2 have steadily increased. As a result, the total operating cost per hour has increased while the farebox ratio has increased. See Table 2.2 — SRTP Service Summary 131 Page 207 INIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- City of Riverside -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 1 1 27 1 27 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $3,180,857 $3,860,427 $4,307,700 $2,972,783 $5,360,000 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $443,181 $390,568 $475,500 $257,982 $240,000 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $2,737,676 $3,469,859 $3,832,200 $2,714,801 $5,120,000 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 153,559 139,911 160,000 92,707 70,000 Passenger Miles 798,507 727,537 645,000 444,994 322,500 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 45,475.0 42,559.0 61,500.0 29,234.0 30,750.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 615,121.0 576,321.0 645,000.0 391,948.0 322,500.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 697,449.0 647,380.0 700,500.0 439,676.0 350,250.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $69.95 $90.71 $70.04 $101.69 $174.31 Farebox Recovery Ratio 13.93% 10.12% 11.03% 8.68% 4.47% Subsidy per Passenger $17.83 $24.80 $23.95 $29.28 $73.14 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.43 $4.77 $5.94 $6.10 $15.88 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $60.20 $81.53 $62.31 $92.86 $166.50 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.45 $6.02 $5.94 $6.93 $15.88 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 3.4 3.3 2.6 3.2 2.3 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.25 0.24 0.25 0.24 0.22 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 14 208 2.4 Service Performance Special Transit provided 119,740 one-way trips for a total of 647,418 miles in FY 2018/19. Ty pica I I y, daily rides scheduled averages between 400-500. Special Transit will embark in a rebranding campaign in the next fiscal year in the hopes of informing the residents of Riverside of the service and increasing the number of riders. We will continue to advertise in places such as Riverside's senior centers and through the City of Riverside's Activity Guide publication. We will also continue to market the programs at various Senior Fairs and events throughout the city. See Table 2.3 — SRTP Route Statistics 151 Page 209 OrRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements All Routes Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside -- 4 FY 2020/21 Peak Route # Day Type Vehicles Passengers Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue RSS-DAR All Days 27 70,000 322,500 27 70,000 322,500 30,750 31,600 30,750 31,600 322,500 350,250 322,500 350,250 $5,360,000 $240,000 $5,360,000 $240,000 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION All Routes Performance Indicators TransTrack ManagerT's' 4/27/2020 Page 1 of 2 Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside -- 4 FY 2020/21 Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Passenger Revenue Revenue Net Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Cost Per Ratio Subsidy Per Mile Hour Mile Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Passenger Passenger Per Hour Per Mile RSS-DAR All Days $5,120,000 $5,120,000 $174.31 $16.62 $174.31 $16.62 $76.57 4.47% $76.57 4.47% $73.14 $15.88 $73.14 $15.88 $166.50 $15.88 $166.50 $15.88 2.28 0.22 2.28 0.22 TransTrack Manager' Page 2 of 2 4/27/2020 16 210 2.5 Productivity Improvement Efforts ST strives to operate an efficient service and continues to look for new ways to decrease costs while maintaining high productivity. ST Staff has been working on different staffing scenarios to maximize route efficiency will meeting customer demands. The Operation Supervisor is constantly examining the route efficiencies of each driver and meeting with them to provide constructive feedback to improve how each driver conducts his/her assigned reservations for that day. ST was successful in recruiting a second Operations Supervisor, a Management Analyst, and a Lead Senior Dispatcher/Scheduler. ST also converted three vacant full-time drivers' positions to split shift positions allowing ST to meet the service demands early in the morning and in the afternoon. For FY 2020/21, ST will evaluate the need to fill current vacancies for full time and part time drivers to help meet the current service demands. Implementation of an electronic fare collection system and mobile application will allow riders to pay for fares using a smart card and reserve rides via a web portal or mobile application. 2.6 Major Trip Generators Several factors will lead to growth of ST operations over the next several years. The Baby Boomer generation, the largest generation in the last century, is aging and becoming eligible to use our services as senior citizens. This element alone makes growth virtually unavoidable. The seniors, age 60+ makes up approximately 14% of the total population of the City of Riverside. Currently, 85% of the residents of Riverside are 59 years old or younger as shown in Figure 3, leading staff to anticipate a higher demand for Special Transportation services in the near future. Special Transportation falls under the auspices of the City of Riverside Parks, Recreation, and Community Service Department (PRCSD). PRCSD is responsible for senior programs, three senior centers, as well as the Friendly Stars program for developmentally disabled adults. This relationship and connection amongst department staff in these three areas make it possible to connect resources and advertise by word of mouth to senior resident participants. 17IPage 211 Figure 3 CITY OF RIVERSIDE AGE DEMOGRAPHICS US Census Bureau, ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2017 Aside from the regularly scheduled daily paratransit rides, Special Transportation transports over 170 passengers per day to various workshops within the City of Riverside. This subscription service for the Inland Regional Center (IRC) provides daily transportation for IRC clients to and from their workshops. ST also provides transportation services for Easter Seals, the Friendly Stars Program, and various other workshops for mentally and physically disabled passengers. These passengers look forward to attending their workshops (work/school) to attain a sense of independence. 2.7 Recent Service Changes Special Transit's recent response to COVID-19 resulted in one service change which gave senior riders the opportunity to schedule rides as early as 7 a.m. which is one hour earlier than the normal service hours. This decision was made by staff to ensure that the most vulnerable residents could take advantage of special shopping hours for seniors offered by many local grocers. 181 Page 212 III. FUTURE SERVICE PANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING AND MARKETING 3.1 Planned Service Changes There are currently no planned service changes. 3.2 Future Marketing Plans For FY 2020/21, ST will continue to market Special Transportation services. Working with the City of Riverside's Marketing team ST has developed a new brand identity that will give a new and updated look to the fleet of minibuses. More importantly, this effort will also include a change in the name of our service that will better capture what we do for the senior and disabled residents of Riverside. "Riverside Connect" will launch in the summer of 2020 with all the transit buses receiving a new vinyl wrap with the new name and logo. This new branding campaign will be used in all the advertisements the service. New full -color brochures and flyers will be produced and distributed at the City's Community and Senior Centers as well as advertisements in other City publications such as the Activity and Senior Guides. The Activity Guide is published three times per year and is mailed to over 55,000 residents. It is also available online at the City's main website. For FY 2020/21 Special Transportation will continue to be present at special events such as the Senior Day, wellness fairs, grand openings, and other events geared towards the senior and disabled community. We will also increase our presence at senior living facilities resident meetings and various ADA workshops in and around Riverside. ST has also launched a new website for Riverside Connect which will give the residents of Riverside all the information needed to sign up and use our services. 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth Prior to COVID-19, Special Transit projected a 10% increase in ridership for FY 2020/21 as a direct result of the increased marketing and rebranding of the service. However, due to the dramatic decline in ridership as a result of the pandemic, ridership projections are difficult to project. The expectation industrywide is that ridership will steadily increase to normal service levels as states and local governments lift stay-at-home orders. 19IPage 213 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes Special Transit staff plans to explore the possibility of increasing the fare to match the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) fare structure which would be a $0.50 increase. There are currently no plans to change the current medical fare of $2.00. 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning In terms of capital improvement, Special Transit has three capital projects planned for FY 2020/21. The first is a replacement of three (3) existing vehicles that have exceeded the useful life of 5-years and 150,000. The second project is the renovation of the dispatch office area which will provide space for the newly filled Lead Dispatch position. Lastly, Special Transit will upgrade the existing TransTrack data management system. The upgrade will provide staff with additional tools and analytics which will be beneficial for reporting purposes as well as improving the efficiency of the operation. See Table 3 — Highlights of 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan 20IPage 214 Table 3 - HIGHLIGHTS OF 2020/21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN • Electronic Fare Collection/Online Reservations — In an effort to provide better service to our senior and ADA riders, Special Transportation has procured and begun implantation of and electronic payment method that would allow riders and caregivers the ability to preload rider accounts with funds so that riders may electronically pay for transit fares. Along with an electronic fare collection, a mobile application will be made available to all riders that will allow them to manage their account, view scheduled trips and the status of their scheduled pickup. The application once fully implemented will also allow riders to self -schedule future rides. • Consultant — Per the recommendation in the FY 2016-2018 Triennial Performance Audit, Special Transit will hire a consultant to assist in the strategic planning process. • Bus Replacement — Special Transportation will replace 3 CNG Mini -Buses that have met the useful life threshold. • TransTrack Upgrade — Special Transit will upgrade the current TransTrack system which will assist staff with annual NTD reporting, provide valuable analytics and integration with the financial system and dispatch/scheduling software. • Dispatch Renovation — The City of Riverside will renovate the dispatch office area to accommodate the addition of new staff to fill the Lead Dispatch position. 21IPage 215 IV. FINANCIAL PLANNING 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget Narrative Special Transportation's operating budget is typically funded through Local Transportation Funds (LTF) which includes a 20% match requirement for preventative maintenance expenses. The remaining 80% is funded through Federal section 5307 funds. However, with the United States Senate's passage of the Coronavirus Relief, Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, the entire FY 2020/21 operating budget will be funded through this bill. Capital projects will be funded through a combination of Federal section 5339 and State Transit Assistance (STA) funds. See Table 4.0 — Summary of Funding Requests — FY 2020/21 22IPage 216 HISEHSISE COUNTY ER 3I15P0IRATIONJ COR1NI95ICO Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 0 0/ 1 City of Riverside Opera'lig moot mAiAmount of Funds. SE1I7R#CAREE SiF7FMOR OM RI 1ORPLICNdis &DRPLidi1 *TA PLIE 1E #T.APUC1ES1d Opensling FY202C-21 #5.31iO,000 j9,O/-0,000 E33O,000 E5.3641,1:14:14:1 E5,1U-11,13013 $32431909 #] Ea EE S] 1>] tlRIlutd cps Capital Prided -row Analnt of Funds. SEYF FM CAREE Ett7 RI OR 633E RE *GA PRE:M-15 SOR PLICNd11 VA PLICE11E 11A PUCBE11.1 Bus Rephoetn 1I- 21-1 134sgolch. F*ttn..,etbn -21-2 it-00,611E EBO,600 R0,3JJ0 13_],]]] 1J5,957 E50A00 11,595 #30J000 580,380 T129,9 Ttat[Ttbtlt Uppm* -21-3 Ea46etal c E550,3E0 EO E0 ;32],]]] E95,957 #I,595 i.11 9,392 93,3=9 'IOW Operating 1 CapEb1 E5.9211,390 55,O2-0,00O 53_'0,600 532],]]] 595,957 EH,595 511 ],39] 529,329 FY 31126Q 1 Proloobd Rnd l nd DDI 53a7 R9 CARES 53117 RE O1E TbmI Esdneted Operating rundrp Re pest 5339 RE EI R PUG99313 EIGR F#1G99311 BM PLI099313 #5AL-0,60] #320,05] #5.3BDACC E030JO1:1 EIS WEE BTt4P A29B31.1 E9y18 RIM IEstlna9d Gaplta =u91n0 Reg1e:l E550,3E0 Total Fundlttq Rtpuet:k $5Ed14319 217 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Riverside Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number. 21-1 Project Name: Bus Replacement Category: Paratransit Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: CNG Project Description: Replacement of 3 paratransit vehicles FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: The City of Riverside will procure three (3) 16-passenger 25ft. CNG buses that have an expected useful life of 5 years or 150,000 miles. The vehicles being replaced have met their useful life of 150,000 miles. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 RS FY 2020/21 $320,000 SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $45,957 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $4,695 STA PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $29,348 Total $400,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 24'Page 218 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Riverside Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number. 21-2 Project Name: Dispatch Renovation Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Modification Project Description: Renovation of dispatch office area Project Justification: The City of Riverside will renovate the dispatch office area to accommodate the addition of new staff to fill the Lead Dispatch position. Pro'ect Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Fund Type Fiscal Year SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 Total Amount $50,000 $30,000 $80,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 251 Page 219 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP City of Riverside Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number. 21-3 Project Name: TransTrack Upgrade Category: ITS Sub -Category: Upgrade Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Upgrade existing TransTrack tool. FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: The City of Riverside would like to upgrade the TransTrack system which will assist staff with annual NTD reporting, provide valuable analytics and integration with the financial system and dispatch/scheduling software. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $80,380 Total $80,380 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 261 Page 220 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program ST will take advantage of grant opportunities as they come available through the State of California and Federal Government in order to support its capital programs. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements Special Transportation strives to remain compliant with all local, state and federal regulations. ST stays abreast of legislative information and regulatory developments by attending workshops, trainings, and conferences which are frequently offered free of charge to transit operators. ST complies with FTA reporting requirements such as the submission of monthly and annual National Transit Database (NTD) reports. In March of 2018, ST underwent its most recent FTA Triennial Review. The Final report had two findings which staff is in the process of addressing. See Table 4.3 — Progress to Implement TDA Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations There were no violations noted during the most recent California Highway Patrol (CHP) Safety Compliance Terminal Inspection conducted on April 3-5, 2019. In the areas of maintenance, driver records and driver hours of services, ST received a "satisfactory" rating in all areas. 27IPage 221 TABLE 4.3 — PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TDA TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RECCOMMENDATIONS Recent Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2016 — 2018) Action (s) Taken and Results to Date 1. Pursue targeted marketing efforts and rebranding of the service. Efforts to launch rebranding of the service are underway with a bid and contract award STS has been tasked with serving the mobility needs of seniors, ADA-certified for repainting of the minibuses scheduled for persons, and persons with disabilities in the City Council approval on June 2, 2020. Additionally, new brochures and marketing City of Riverside. The senior population in the city (those 60 years of age and over) accounts for approximately 15.1 percent of the population based on the 2018 American materials with the new "Riverside Connect" name are ready for print and distribution which will coincide with the launch of the Community Survey estimates. Riverside remains below the national average of seniors age 60 and over, which is 21.8 percent; however, due to the Baby Boomer generation aging into their sixties, it is anticipated that the senior population will continue to increase. repainted buses. In Progress With the slow erosion in ridership in recent years, STS has been contemplating strategies to improve its messaging and outreach to the community. The transportation supervisor has been encouraged to conduct outreach and brainstorm ways to better engage the customer base. There is a perception in the community that the name "Special Transportation" is not particularly appealing 28IPage 222 and conveys a stodgy image. In the spirit of the City's innovative philosophy, STS should work with the City's marketing team to develop a brand identity for the transit service. This could be done in concert with the implementation of STS's fleet of nine - passenger minibuses and mobile fare collection. With the adoption of the $2.00 medical fare, STS could collaborate with local medical providers and services (such as dialysis centers and adult day-care facilities) that would market trips to their patients. Veterans are also another market that STS could target. Staff has programmed funds in the FY 2. Conduct a strategic planning process. 2020/21 SRTP to seek the services of a The annual Short -Range Transit Plan (SRTP) consultant to assist with the strategic process has been a useful tool in monitoring operational trends but it does not provide a strategic vision over a 5-, 10-, or 20-year time frame. STS is self-sustaining in that it does not rely on City General Fund revenues for support. planning process. In Progress However, given changes in the transit funding landscape and the challenges in recruitment and marketing that pose potential impediments to growth and sustainability, STS needs a process that can provide guidance and momentum. A 5- or 10-year strategic plan would establish guiding principles of how STS can build upon its 45-year legacy as a demand- 291 Page 223 response transit operator by setting goals, objectives, and strategies for attaining its vision. A strategic plan would also build on the recent efforts of STS to be more technically innovative and offer direction on potential funding opportunities and partnerships. As part of this effort, STS should assess its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges for providing service in a dynamic transit market and capitalize on its position as a regional mobility provider. Furthermore, STS should consider emerging trends and innovative strategies being implemented or considered within the industry. 301 Page 224 PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSIT AGENCY PVVTA SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY 2020/21- FY 2022/23 FINAL DRAFT #2 5/8/2020 Table of Contents CHAPTER 1- SYSTEM OVERVIEW AND SERVICE PROFILE 1.1 System Description 1.2 Area Profile 1.3 Service Description Table 1 1.4 Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles, Revenue hours 1.5 Fare Structure 1.6 Fleet Schedule Table 1.1 1.7 System Amenities 1.8 Network Cooperation 1.9 Reference Listing CHAPTER 2 - EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 2.1 Key Performance Indicators Table 2 2.2 Performance Reporting Table 2.1 2.3 Service Summary. Table 2.2 & 2.2A 2.4 Service Performance Table 2.3 2.5 Productivity Improvement 2.6 Trip Generators 2.7 Service Changes Page 2 Page 3 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 6 Page 7 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 16 CHAPTER 3 - FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING AND MARKETING 3.1 Planned Service Changes FY21-23 3.2 Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotion 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure 3.5 Capital Improvement Plan 3.6 Long Term Plans CHAPTER 4 - FINANCIAL PLANNING 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget FY 21 Table 4, 4A & 4B 4.2 Funding Plan Table 4.1 & 4.2 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements. Table 4.3 • ADA, DBE, EEO, Title VI • TDA Triennial Audit, FTA Triennial Audit, NTD • Alternative Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) 4.4 Open Projects Listing Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 20 Page 20 Page 21 Page 29 Page 31 Page 32 Page 32 Page 32 Page 33 226 11Page 1.1 System Description The Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) provides many transit options to serve senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and the general public. PVVTA services are known to the general public under the marketing name "Desert Roadrunner". PVVTA provides five deviated fixed routes in the Palo Verde Valley, which serve Blythe, Ripley, Mesa Verde, Palo Verde College, California Department of Corrections facilities, and limited service to Ehrenberg, Arizona. ADA Para -transit is also provided after hours on the Fixed Routes through route deviation requests. The routes can deviate up to 3/ of a mile away from the actual mapped routes. Hours of operation for the Fixed Route system are Monday through Friday from 5:00 am to 6:45 pm, and 8:00 am to 12 noon on Saturdays and limited holidays. PVVTA operates a non -emergency medical service to Coachella Valley called the Blythe Wellness Express (BWE). PALO VERDE COLLEGE 67" AVENUE Desert Roadrunner System Map Zoe COACHELLA c�i[i,v cxRM) VALLEY4- IINTERSTATE 10 } GI J_ LT1,1 • CA PRISONS 1.2 Area Profile 1 MESAVERDE Co-, r, CErt RIPLEY X6eserr Rose ^� DPSS 10T" AVENUE r L 2 NOT TO SCALE CHANSLORWAY BARNARD rf ti pvvta.com 1- W CC 1— V7 7th Street XF L OB ONWAY X arks. ENCINAS Geographically, the Palo Verde Valley is located approximately 170 miles east of Riverside along Interstate 10 at the Colorado River. The service area is primarily based within the City of Blythe, and the unincorporated Riverside County areas of Mesa Verde and Ripley. Also, part of the greater area is the California State prison facilities of Ironwood and Chuckawalla, approximately 20 miles west of the valley along Interstate 10. Also, PVVTA provides premier service to and from Coachella Valley. The Valley boasts a modest 16,000 residents, with 23% of the population within the K-12 age range. The makeup of the population is 56% Hispanic, 53% White, 7%African 227 2 I Page American and 4% Asian and native American. based on U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey at provided by the City of Blythe, Ethnicity is >100% as Bureau counts some individuals more than one ethnicity. 1.3 Service Description Presented below are the individual description of the deviated fixed routes provided by PVVTA. TABLE 1 - INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS LINE ROUTE DESCRIPTION AREAS/SITES SERVICED FIXED ROUTE: Blue Route 1 Provides riders access to many civic locations within the City of Blythe. Blue Route 1 operates deviated service in a clockwise loop type of route providing a 60 minute frequency with one bus five days a week. Blue Route 1 operates from 6:25 am to 5:40 pm Monday through Friday. Destinations on Blue Route 1 include: City Hall, Big K-Mart, Palo Verde Hospital, Employment Development Department, Palo Verde Unified School District, California Highway Patrol, DMV, Albertsons, Rite -Aid, Senior Nutrition Program, etc. Gold Route 2 Provides riders access between the City of Blythe & Palo Verde College. Gold Route 2 operates on a two way route providing a 60 minute frequency with one bus, five days a week. Gold Route 2 operates from 6:45 am to 4:30 pm and up to 6:40 pm upon request, Monday through Friday Destinations on Gold Route 2 include: Blythe City Hall, Big K-Mart, Albertsons, Colorado River Fair, Blythe Recreation Center, Palo Verde Hospital, Palo Verde Valley District Library, Employment Development Department, etc. Red Route 3 Provides premium commuter service between City of Blythe and the California Stale Prisons. Red Route 3 serves four Park-N-Ride lots, travels down Hobsonway to Mesa Drive then travels via 1-10 to the prisons. This route operates Monday through Friday from 5:15 am to 5:00 pm. This route serves four Park-N-Ride lots, travels down Hobsonway to Mesa Drive, then travels to the Stale Prisons, via Interstate 10. Connections to all other deviated fixed routes can be made al various locations within Blythe at two major transfer points. Green Route 4 Green Route 4 provides deviated fixed route service between Blythe, Ripley, and Mesa Verde. Ehrenberg Arizona, upon request only via Xtend-A-Ride. This route operates six (6) round trips from 6:30 am to 6:55 pm, Monday through Friday. This route will service four Park-N-Ride lots, travels down Hobsonway to SR78 then South to Ripley and West to Mesa Verde vial-10. Connections to all other deviated fixed routes can be made al various locations within Blythe at two major transfer points. Silver Route 5 The Silver Route 5 provides system -wide deviated fixed route service within the City of Blythe, Ripley, Mesa Verde and selected trips to Ehrenberg, Arizona. This route serves all major trip generating areas within the system on 90-minute headways. Operates from 8:00 am to 12:10 pm. This route will service the City of Blythe, Ripley, Mesa Verde and selected trips to Ehrenberg, Arizona and will operate on Saturdays and on service holidays only. Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) The Blythe Wellness Express fixed route will provide service fixed-route/point deviation service between the City of Blythe and medical facilities in the Coachella Valley. This service includes one morning trip leaving the Main Street Park -and -Ride in Blythe, with a return trip in the afternoon. This fixed route service will run three days a week, leaving the Park-n-Ride on Main Street at 6:30 am and returning to Blythe at 4:00 pm. This route will provide services to Desert Center, for pick up and drop off of passengers, with a rest stop al Chiriaco Summit. Continue to Sunline Division 2, Indio, John F Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Indio, Westfield Palm Desert, Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage and Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs. The service will run 3 days a week. 228 3IPage 1.4 Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles, Revenue hours Blue Route 1 City of Blythe Circulator; deviated fixed route, approximately 2500 revenue miles / 240 revenue hours monthly, 1600 in ridership respectfully. Gold Route 2 Palo Verde College Crosstown; deviated fixed route, approximately 4000 revenue miles / 190 revenue hours monthly, 1200 in ridership respectfully. Red Route 3 CA State Prison Commuter Express; deviated fixed route, approximately 2100 revenue miles / 60 revenue hours monthly, 650 in ridership respectfully. Green Route 4 Regional Rural service; deviated fixed route, approximately 3000 revenue miles / 155 revenue hours monthly, 700 in ridership respectfully. Silver Route 5 Saturday and limited holiday service; deviated fixed route, approximately 500 revenue miles / 24 revenue hours monthly, 120 in ridership respectfully. Blythe Wellness Express 6 Intercity service to the Coachella Valley; deviated fixed route, approximately 2800 revenue miles / 95 revenue hours monthly, 100 in ridership respectfully. PVVTA XTend-A-Ride micro transit service; demand responsive, approximately 400 revenue miles / 80 revenue hours monthly, 50 in ridership respectfully. 229 4IPage 1.5 Fare Structure PVVTA's fare structure is sensitive to the local economy while attempting to maintain the mandated 10 percent Farebox Recovery Ratio. The schedule includes full fare and discounted ride tickets. PVVTA's fare schedule increased by six percent (6%), effective FY19. In the upcoming fiscal year, staff will analyze the farebox recovery ratio and fare structure to determine if any further fare change is necessary. PVVTA Fare & Pass Schedule Fixed Route Cash Fare — Routes 1, 2, 4, 5 General Public Seniors Persons with Disabilities Children ages 5 and under* Children ages 5 and under* (ages 5-59 years old) (ages 60 years or older) (with ADA Card) (first boarding with full fare adult) (second & third boarding with full fare adult) $ 1.75 $ 0.85 $ 0.85 Free $ 0.85 * First (1) child Free, $0.85 for child 2 & 3 boarding with a fare paying adult; Full Fare for all other accompanying children. Arizona Zone Fare for travel to and from Ehrenberg, Arizona General Public, Seniors, & Persons with Disabilities $ 5.00 Fixed Route Cash Fare — Route 3 Express General Public, Seniors, & Persons with Disabilities Route Deviations (one way to or from route) Route Deviations — All Fixed Routes Route Deviations (one way to or from route) DV8 Card (8 one way deviation fares)*** ***Not valid for initial passenger fare, only for payment of route deviation fee. Fixed Route Go Passes 10-Ride Punch Pass S/D 10-Ride Punch Pass General Public 31-Day Pass Seniors 31-Day Pass Persons with Disabilities Summer Youth Pass 10-Ride Punch Pass 10-Ride Punch Pass 20-Ride Punch Pass General Public 31-Day Pass (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Routes 1, 2, 3 Local, 4 & 5) (Ehrenberg, Arizona) (Route 3 Express) (Route 3 Express) (Route 3 Express) Other Cash Fare — X-Tend-A-Ride & Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) X-Tend-A-Ride General Public, Seniors, & Persons with Disabilities BWE General Public, Seniors, & Persons with Disabilities One -Way BWE General Public, Seniors, & Persons with Disabilities Roundtrip $ 3.50 $ 0.85 $ 0.85 $ 6.80 $ 17.50 $ 8.50 $ 45.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 40.00 $ 50.00 $ 35.00 $ 70.00 $125.00 $ 5.00 $ 10.00 $ 15.00 230 5 1.6 Fleet Schedule PVVTA has an average fleet age of 4.3 years old, where revenue vehicles have a life span between 5 up to 7 years. Presented is the fleet inventory with specific characteristics. RIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Purchased Transportation Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Average Lifetime # of Life to Date Miles Per Active Active # of Life to Date Vehicle Miles Vehicle As Of Lift and Fuel Vehicles Contingency Vehicle Miles through Year -To -Date Year Mfg. Model Seating Ramp Vehicle Type FY 2019/ Vehicles Prior Year End March (e.g., March) Built Code Code Capacity Equipped Length Code 20 FY 2019/20 FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 FY 2019/20 2014 CMD 18 1 GA 1 2012 FRD 18 1 CN 2013 FRD 26 1 CN 1 2013 FRD 26 1 CN 1 2013 FRD 26 1 CN 1 2016 FRD 18 1 GA 1 2016 FRD 18 1 GA 1 2018 FRD 18 1 GA 1 2019 FRD 18 1 GA 1 2019 FRD 14 1 CN 1 2019 FRD 16 1 CN 1 1 70,214 82,733 82,733 170,484 170,484 120,454 126,048 126,048 121,433 125,102 125,102 151,381 154,725 154,725 123,425 134,688 134,688 119,487 141,693 141,693 44,227 83,075 83,075 1,135 33,082 33,082 17,991 17,991 291 291 Totals: 1.7 System Amenities 216 11 10 1 922,240 1,069,912 106,991 PVVTA continues to improve the Operations Center and the Main Street Park N Ride (PNR). This facility allows users the comfort of a "one stop" shop for all their transportation needs. Over the last few years, Low Carbon Transit Operations Program funds are being used to improve the PNR lot to improve passenger safety and comfort. Most recently, PVVTA continues to use State of Good Repair (SGR) grant funds to improve the facility's maintenance areas and bus storage. The Blythe CNG Station has proven to be a great resource to local and regional fuel needs for Compressed Natural Gas. Since the station opened in 2014, a steady increase in the number of vehicles especially commercial fleets has been seen monthly. Currently, PVVTA staff is working with the Palo Verde Unified School District (PVUSD) on expanding the station to accommodate the ever-growing demand for CNG locally and along the Interstate 10 corridor. PVVTA has seen vehicles use the station from travelers as far away as Canada who use this strategic route due to the reliability in CNG fuel availability. Expansion of the station is planned by early 2020 with an investment of $500,000 committed by the CA Energy Commission to PVUSD for this project. The expansion provides for maximum capacity of the station and further reliability through better redundancy in equipment. 231 6IPage 1.8 Network Cooperation PVVTA actively coordinates service with Quartzsite Transit (QTS) who operates the Camel Express providing one fixed route in the PVVTA Service Area. QTS provides service from Quartzsite Arizona three times a week and connects with the PVVTA system at the DPSS Transfer Center. QTS and PVVTA meet on occasion to address any operational issues and to provide joint training exercises to staff. These exercises include emergency training, operations and administration support development. Active coordination with Sunline was achieved for the success with the Blythe Wellness Express (BWE). Sunline provides operational emergency support for the BWE when the bus operates in the Sunline services area. During a potential incident, Sunline seamlessly assisted with bringing the BWE service back to normal and safe. With the 100+ mile one-way trip, the BWE requires extra support to ensure the most safe, comfortable and reliable service for the riders from the Palo Verde Valley. PVVTA is a member of CaIACT a statewide, non-profit organization that has represented the interests of small, rural, and specialized transportation providers since 1984. Membership is comprised of individuals and agencies from diverse facets of transportation, including operators of small and large systems, planning and government agencies, social service agencies, suppliers and consultants. PVVTA participates actively with CaIACT members and has been part of conference panels promoting concerns of extremely rural transit operators. Other member agencies frequently interact with PVVTA on regional and State issues facing public transit. 1.9 Reference Listing PVVTA has not conducted a formal operational study since the early 2000's. Currently budgeted is a plan for an updated Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) which would be completed in time for the next competitive bid for and operations contractor in FY2022. All planning referencing is taken from the Agency quarterly operational reporting, yearly and triennial audits as well as industry trends. Detailed documents can by accessed at pvvta.com/agencyfiles. 232 7IPage 2.1 Key Performance Indicators PVVTA uses key performance indicators set by RCTC to plan and monitor services. PVVTA does not have any specific measures beyond the presented targets. OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2019/ 20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 50,161 Passenger Miles 894,477 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 7,996.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 189,808.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 219,008.0 Total Operating Expenses $1,526,160 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $391,553 Net Operating Expenses $1,134,607 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio 25.65% >= 10.00% I 11.76%I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $190.87 <- $169.97 $168.57 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $22.62 >_ $19.07 and .= $25.79 $24.89 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $1.27 >_ $1.36 and <= $1.84 $1.78 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $141.90 >_ $126.24 and <= $170.80 $148.75 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $5.98 >= $5.21 and <= $7.05 $6.48 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.27 >= 5.61 and <= 7.59 5.98 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 026 >= 0.23 and <- 0.31 0.26 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: • 7 - 711ifiill! ;ii' - T'NJ,'li�Jllfz:r' L_ 233 81Page 2.2 Performance Reporting As to performance from FY2018/19 to the current FY2019/20, trends show a consistent flat trend over the last two fiscal years. Although costs have risen, the actual operating performance and ridership stays approximately flat based on all contributing factors. OFRIVERSIDE CDI1NTV TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/14 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 3rd Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 45,511 3,113 46,051 None Passenger Miles 637,154 43,582 807,393 None Revenue Hours 7,222.0 543.4 7,972.0 None Total Hours 8,804.0 655.5 9,325.0 None Revenue Miles 174,456.0 11,623.0 179,929.0 None Total Miles 202,292.0 13,654.0 206,244.0 None Operating Costs $922,582 $124,493 $1,651,527 None Passenger Revenue $96,203 $8,750 $356,446 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue $79,431 None Operating Subsidy $826,379 $115,744 $1,295,081 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $127.75 $229.12 $207.17 <= $169,97 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $5.29 $10.71 $9.18 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $20.27 $39.99 $35.86 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.43 % 7.03% 26.39% >= 0.1 Meets Target Subsidy Per Passenger $18.16 $37.18 $28.12 >_ $19.07 and <= $25.79 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $1.30 $2.66 $1.60 ›= $1.36 and <= $1.84 Meets Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $114.43 $213.02 $162.45 >= $126.24 and <= $170.80 Meets Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $4.74 $9.96 $7.20 >= $5.21 and <= $7.05 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.30 5.73 5.78 >= 5.61 and <= 7.59 Meets Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.26 0.27 0.26 >= 0.23 and <= 0.31 Meets Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. 234 9IPage 2.3 Service Summary. Table 2.2 & 2.2A In analysis of the data and planning costs for operating service has gone up consistently over the last few years. Last fiscal year PVVTA started on a track to use Federal 5311 funds to offset these growing costs. The service area demographics show a steady reduction in population which directly affects ridership. Miles and hours have been reduced to fine tune operations where such costs have increased. PVVTA must work to maximize services with the challenges such as population decrease, cost increase such as wages and operating costs. IMFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rdQtrActual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 5 5 6 5 6 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $865,873 $922,582 $1,526,160 $910,451 $1,651,527 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $90,161 $96,203 $391,553 $107,033 $356,446 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $775,712 $826,379 $1,134,607 $803,418 $1,295,081 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 14,047 45,511 50,161 32,284 46,051 Passenger Miles 616,658 637,159 894,977 451,976 807,393 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 7,955.0 7,222.0 7,996.0 5,401.1 7,972.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 182,286.0 174,456.0 189,898.0 124,013.0 179,929.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 216,411.0 202,292.0 219,098.0 142,459.0 206,249.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $108.83 $127.75 $190.87 $168.57 $207.17 Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.41% 10.43% 25.65% 11.76°% 21.58% Subsidy per Passenger $17.61 $18.16 $22.62 $24.89 $28.12 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.26 $1.30 $1.27 $1.78 $1.60 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $97.50 $114.43 $141.90 $148.75 $162.45 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.26 $4.74 $5.98 $6.48 $7.20 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 5.5 6.3 6.3 6.0 5.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.24 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.26 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 235 101 Page IIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- PVVTA-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rdQtrActual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 5 5 5 5 5 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $728,235 $780,826 $1,428,160 $825,657 $1,504,669 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $84,166 ($13,337) $357,468 $80,329 $322,331 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $644,070 $794,163 $1,070,692 $745,329 $1,182,338 Operating Characteristics x. Unlinked Passenger Trips 43,569 44,811 49,380 31,899 45,390 Passenger Miles 609,966 627,359 691,327 946,586 635,952 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 7,181.0 6,457.0 7,136.0 4,876.0 6,886.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 198,617.0 142,336.0 153,219.0 103,956.0 144,721.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 178,935.0 167,785.0 179,750.0 120,987.0 168,427.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $101.41 $120.93 $200.13 $169.33 $218.51 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.56% (1.71%) 25.02% 9.73% 21.42% Subsidy per Passenger $14.78 $17.72 $21.68 $23.37 $26.05 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.06 $1.27 $1.55 $1.67 $1.86 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $89.69 $122.99 $150.04 $152.86 $171.70 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.33 $5.58 $6.99 $7.17 $8.17 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 6.1 6.9 6.9 6.5 6.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.29 0.31 0.32 0.31 0.31 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- PVVTA-BWE -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/ 20 3rd QtrActuaf FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 1 1 1 1 1 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $133,442 $135,962 $89,000 $80,164 $137,958 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $5,195 $108,731 $31,285 $26,164 $31,615 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $128,247 $27,232 $57,715 $54,000 $106,343 Operating Characteristics ill. 111 Unlinked Passenger Trips 478 700 781 385 661 Passenger Miles 6,692 9,800 203,150 5,390 171,941 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 775.0 765.0 860.0 525.1 1,086.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 33,669.0 32,120.0 36,589.0 20,057.0 35,208.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 37,976.0 34,507.0 39,258.0 21,472.0 37,817.0 Performance Characteristics 1 r Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $172.18 $177.73 $103.49 $152.68 $127.03 Farebox Recovery Ratio 3.89% 79.97% 35.15% 32.64% 22.91% Subsidy per Passenger $268.30 $38.90 $73.90 $140.26 $160.88 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $19.16 $2.78 $0.28 $10.02 $0.62 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $165.48 $35.60 $67.11 $102.85 $97.92 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.81 $0.85 $1.58 $2.69 $3.02 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.7 0.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.01 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 236 111 Page OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Non -Excluded Routes FY 2017j18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 5 3 5 5 5 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $732,431 $673,375 $1,437,160 $830,287 $1,060,185 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $84,966 $435 $360,268 $80,869 $229,770 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $647,465 $672,940 $1,076,892 $749,418 $830,415 Operating Characteristics t Unlinked Passenger Trips 43,569 36,968 49,380 31,899 25,154 Passenger Miles 609,966 517,552 691,327 446,586 514,836 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 7,181.0 5,389.0 7,136.0 4,876.0 5,197.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 148,617.0 109,219.0 153,219.0 103,956.0 140,464.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 178,935.0 113,695.0 179,750.0 120,987.0 166,290.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $102.00 $124.95 $201.40 $170.28 $204.00 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.60% 0.06% 25.06% 9.74% 21.67% Subsidy per Passenger $14.86 $18.20 $21.81 $23.49 $33.01 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.06 $1.30 $1.56 $1.68 $1.61 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $90.16 $124.87 $150.91 $153.70 $159.79 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.36 $6.16 $7.03 $7.21 $5.91 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 6.1 6.9 6.9 6.5 4.8 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.29 0.34 0.32 0.31 0.18 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 011 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 1 2 1 1 1 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $133,442 $249,207 $89,000 $80,164 $591,342 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $5,195 $95,768 $31,285 $26,164 $126,676 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $128,247 $153,439 $57,715 $54,000 $464,666 Operating Characteristics .1111 Unlinked Passenger Trips 478 8,543 781 385 20,897 Passenger Miles 6,692 119,602 203,150 5,390 292,557 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 775.0 1,833.0 860.0 525.1 2,775.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 33,669.0 65,237.0 36,589.0 20,057.0 39,465.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 37,476.0 88,597.0 39,258.0 21,472.0 39,954.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $172.18 $135.96 $103.49 $152.68 $213.10 Farebox Recovery Ratio 3.89% 38.43% 35.15% 32.64% 21.42% Subsidy per Passenger $268.30 $17.96 $73.90 $140.26 $22.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $19.16 $1.28 $0.28 $10.02 $1.59 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $165.48 $83.71 $67.11 $102.85 $167.45 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.81 $2.35 $1.58 $2.69 $11.77 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 0.6 4.7 0.9 0.7 7.5 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.01 0.13 0.02 0.02 0.53 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 237 121Page Table 2.2A - Excluded Routes Route # Mode (FR/DR) Service Type (DO/CO) Route Description Date of Implementation Exemption End Date Blue Route 1 FR CO Provides riders access to many civic locations within the City of Blythe. Blue Route 1 operates a deviated service in a clockwise loop type of route providing a 60 minute frequency with one bus five days a week. 7/1/2020 6/30/2023 Note: Excluded routes are new routes or new service extensions that are eligible for exemption from the farebox recovery requirements. 238 13IPage 2.4 Service Performance Based on the statistics below, route 1 is the primary line within the system carrying the most passengers with the best performance based on revenue hours and miles. This route is the universal lifeline service that circulates riders around the area and onto other routes. Route 3 utilizes a large amount of non -revenue miles to perform service as an express. Based on the data both route 5 and the BWE have the most challenges. Consequently, both routes are much needed to those riders in low-income, disabled and elder in age. 1111 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency -- 5 FY 202D/21 All Routes Data Elernents Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Miles Hours Hours Miles Total Operating Passenger Het Miles Cost Revenue Subsidy PVVTA-1 Weekday PVVTA-2 Weekday PVVTA-3 Weekday PVVTA-4 Weekday PVVTA-5 Saturday PVVTA-BWE Weekday PVVTA-DAD Weekday 20,897 9,391 7,143 6,640 1,319 661 292,557 131,474 99,998 92,956 18,467 171,941 2.775.0 1,848.0 804 0 1,164.0 295.0 1,086.0 2,822.0 1,945.0 1,287.0 1,975.0 309.0 1,487.0 39,965.0 41,961,0 23,515 0 32,919.0 6,836.0 35,208.0 39,954.0 44,396.0 41,9139 34,831.0 7,333.0 37,817.0 5541,392 5126,676 $590,303 5107,174 $146,692 $3E,428 $50,832 $6,221 $31,615 $2,500 $237,286 529,091 $137,958 $8,900 $464,666 $393,134 $115 264 $186,454 $22,820 $106,343 $6,400 Service Provider Totals 6 46,051 807,393 7.972.0 9,325.0 179,929,0 206,244.0 $1,651,527 5356,446 $1.295,081 Looking at the indicators below, the route 3 performs well as steps were taken in previous years to come in line with costs and negative trends. The BWE is the biggest potential burden to the Agency as a whole but as mentioned throughout this plan, is the most needed service with the changing needs of the community of the Palo Verde Valley. RIVERsIOf COUNTY 1RANSPORIArION COMMISSION Table 1.3 - SRTP Route Statistics Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency -- 5 FY 2020j 2 All Routes Performance Indicators Operating Operating Parebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Revenue Hour Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mlle Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile PVVTA-1 Weekday $213.10 514.98 $28.30 21.42% $22.24 $1.59 $167.45 $11.77 7.5 0.63 PVVTA-2 Weekday $270.73 $11.92 $53.26- 21.42% 941.06 $2.99 $212.73 99.37 5,1 0.22 PVVTA-3 Weekday $182.45 $6.23 $20.54 21.42% $16.14 $1.15 $143.36 94.90 8,9 0.30 PVVTA-4 Weekday $203.85 $7.21 $35.74 21.42% $20.08 $2.01 $160.16 55.66 5,7 0.20 PVVTA-5 Saturday $98.44 $4.25 $22.02 21.42% $17.30 $1.24 $77.36 53.34 9.5 0.19 PVVTA-BWE Weekday $127.03 $3.92 $208.71 22.91% $160.88 $0.62 $97.92 53.02 0.6 0.02 PVVTA-DAD Weekday 28.08% Service Provider Totals $20717 $9.18 735.86 215896 728-12 71.60 916245 5729 5.0 0.26 Currently, the Agency is understanding the affect of COVID-19 a world pandemic on all aspects of the transit and the community especially financially. This document was created during such pandemic so it is anticipated that this plans and things all together will be dramatically different in the weeks, months and years to come. 239 14 2.5 Productivity Improvement Over the last few years, PVVTA has seen a decrease in ridership system -wide. Service performance is flat at best with increases seen in cost due to the State increase in minimum wage, changes in labor law and the cost of fuel. PVVTA has seen a steady growth in ridership from the Unincorporated Riverside County area of Ripley. This is specifically attributed to the utilization of subsidized housing for families relocating from western county. Trip generators such as the Palo Verde College have more vacation periods which directly impacts transit performance. When such designations are not operating service is reduced to maintain cost control but a baseline number of employees must be maintained. Efforts have been made to have College directly contribute to transit service due to such impact. Red Route 3 has continued to show a decline in service due to the expanded vanpool options and reduction in staff at the Prison facilities. PVVTA continues to engage Prison staff to promote and market services to employees. Over the last few year, PVVTA has been working with both city and county planning departments to include conditions for transit usage on all major projects in the area. With those conditions PVVTA is also carefully planning the implementation or addition of services in the affected project areas. PVVTA continues to see improvement on performance goals with the BWE. The Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) utilizes a shuttle bus to the Coachella Valley for medical trips, the TRIP program for medical trips further into Western Riverside County. Taking aspects of local medical needs, community partnerships and the overwhelming need to link Eastern Riverside County; the BWE continues to be a vital program for residents of the Palo Verde Valley. Planning for the BWE includes expanding the scope of rides and marketing towards a larger population for civic and social service trips. For Blue Route 1 local service for the City of Blythe, plans are to expand service by five hours daily bringing 30-minute headways for riders during the peak periods of the day for this route. These efforts would allow riders to make trips to multiple trip generators for shopping and medical purposes fast throughout the day. 240 15IPage 2.6 Trip Generators This is a listing of the major trip generators throughout the PVVTA system: Albertsons Market Rite Aid Pharmacy Riverside County DPSS Casa Encinas Dollar Tree Blythe City Hall 2.7 Service Changes Smart & Final Market Burtons Trailer Park Blythe Post Acute EZ-Mart West Villa Monterey Roy Wilson Community Center Palo Verde College Desert Rose Apartments Palo Verde Hospital Blythe Post Office Union Bank PVVTA Blue Route 1 - will increase frequency to 30 minutes in core areas between the hours 9am and 3pm daily. PVVTA Gold Route 2 - will continue line service to 4:30pm Monday -Thursday, with an on -request service from 4:30pm to 6:45pm daily. PVVTA Red Route 3 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA Green Route 4 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA Silver Route 5 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA will increase the Blythe Wellness Express; to three day a week to the Coachella Valley. PVVTA will continue to operate XTend-A-Ride service which is a demand responsive micro transit service that addresses special areas in time where community require general public transit service that may not be available on the fixed route system. PVVTA will continue to offer the Desert RoadTRIP program as well as promote use of services such as the BWE and Xtend-A-Ride. 241 16IPage 3.1 Planned Service Changes FY21-23 PVVTA Blue Route 1 - will continue to run existing route between the hours 9am and 3pm daily. PVVTA Gold Route 2 - will continue line service to 4:30pm Monday -Thursday, with an on -request service from 4:30pm to 6:45pm daily. PVVTA Red Route 3 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA Green Route 4 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA Silver Route 5 - will continue to run the existing route and schedule with no changes in routing. PVVTA will continue to run the Blythe Wellness Express three days a week to the Coachella Valley. PVVTA will continue to operate XTend-A-Ride service which is a demand responsive micro transit service that addresses special areas in time where community require general public transit service that may not be available on the fixed route system. PVVTA will continue to offer the Desert RoadTRIP program as well as promote use of services such as the BWE and Xtend-A-Ride. 242 171Page 3.2 Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotion The following community engagement activities as well as marketing efforts will be utilized to promote ridership growth in FY 2020/21. 1. Continuation of the marketing program, which includes brochures, flyers, advertisements in local newspapers, community transit fairs, participation in community events, and promotional materials. 2. Continuation of public outreach program, which includes meetings with schools, employers, senior service programs, persons with disabilities programs, social service agencies, the general public, city departments, and other organizations that benefit from public transportation in the Palo Verde Valley. 3. Continuing the Mobility Training program to teach the public about mass transit including those with disabilities. 4. Continue to offer information on Rideshare programs available to residents and visitors of the Palo Verde Valley. 5. Continue to foster new partnerships with Palo Verde College Association of Student Governments, and new businesses coming to the city through the Shop, Save and Get Home Free Program. 6. Continue to work with marketing consultants to improve the Blythe Wellness Express and the Agency website pvvta.com. 7. Continue to co-sponsor and stay involved in community events such as Run for the Wall, Summer Safety Event, Cleanup Day and local community events. 8. Initiate a Comprehensive Operation Analysis in hopes of find better ways and strategizes to delivery service and plan for the future. 243 18IPage 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth Over the last few years, PVVTA has seen a cooling in increased ridership system -wide. Service performance is flat at best with dramatic increases seen in cost due to the State increase in minimum wage and fuel tax. PVVTA has seen a nominal growth in ridership from the Unincorporated Riverside County area of Ripley. This is specifically attributed to the utilization of subsidized housing for families from western county. Trip generators such as the Palo Verde College have more vacation time which directly impacts transit performance. When such designations are not operating service is reduced to maintain cost control. Efforts have been made to have College directly contribute to transit service due to such impact. Red Route 3 had a decline in service due to the expanded vanpool options and reduction in staff at the Prison facilities but due to recent changes those trend have turned around to positive and hopeful increases in ridership.. PVVTA continues to engage Prison staff to promote and market services to employees. Over the last two years, PVVTA has been working with both city and county planning departments to include conditions for transit usage on all major projects in the area. With those conditions PVVTA is also carefully planning the implementation or addition of services in the affected project areas. PVVTA continues to see improvement on performance goals with the BWE. The Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) utilizes a shuttle bus to the Coachella Valley for medical trips, the TRIP program for medical trips further into Western Riverside County. Taking aspects of local medical needs, community partnerships and the overwhelming need to link Eastern Riverside County the BWE has shaped out to be a much needed program for residents of the Palo Verde Valley. Planning for the BWE includes expanding the scope of rides back to 3-days a week and marketing towards a larger population for civic and social service trips. With the local services, PVVTA plans to add targeted increases in schedule frequency on the main line Blue Route 1. For the Green Route 4 service, local riders continue to asked for more service to Ripley. Using Xtend-A-Ride, Ripley is provided more access to transit for the growing community. Silver Route 5 varies in ridership throughout the different months mainly due to the climate and times when shopping is needed. Staff continues to factor in these specific operational characteristics when planning service. 244 19IPage 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Currently there are no proposed fare rate increases until passenger fares are analyzed in FY 2021. Upon analysis, the proposed fare structure will be presented to the board for adoption. 3.5 Capital Improvement Plan PVVTA plans to continue to replace rolling stock as buses reach their useful life of five years. The plan is to replace one bus in FY 2021, FY 2022, FY 2023, and two in 2024. The average cost of the buses PVVTA runs is about $120,000 and as long as funds are available, we will continue to replace once they have reached their useful life. This will allow PVVTA to continue to provide a reliable transit service with minimal to no down time at all. PVVTA will continue to purchase and install bus stops throughout the Palo Verde Valley at strategic locations that promote new ridership through target marketing and partnerships. In Fiscal Years 2022 and 2023, PVVTA plans to replace an administrative vehicle and a support truck as they will have reached their useful life. 3.6 Long Term Plans PVVTA is in need of a modern and all -encompassing maintenance facility which includes infrastructure for electric and alternative fueled vehicles. In a management goal to complete such a project by 2024; PVVTA is working with our funding partners to identify the best financial stream to pool funds together to bring such project to fruition. This facility would include state of the art work stations, LEED compliancy and an interactive public space to hold meeting and training. In 2024, PVVTA start down the path of having electric drive revenue vehicles. The plan is to start with a demo model then once a clear path emerges then ramp up procurements to bring in more EV buses online. Currently, PVVTA has applied for the VW Mitigation funds and has requested a E450 converted electric unit. Agency staff believes that factory supported equipment and standardized chassis is the best way to enter this technology. 245 20IPage 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget FY 21 Table 4, 4A & 4B Presented is the operating and capital budget based on the best estimates provided by RCTC, Caltrans and FTA. PVVTA utilizes Transit Development Act funding in both the; Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA). Other State funding includes Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) funds and Caltrans State of Good Repair (SGR) funds. Rounding out the funds is FTA 5311 rural funds administered by Caltrans as well. The funding requests and planning are typical and normal as past fiscal years. 1111515111510ECOUNTY 111665NI9TATION COM 91 M Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020121 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Operating P1o16F1 Total AnNX1d 61 F4360 65160R 6111 AB2766 FARE LCTOP 72099117 LCTOP P0799314 LTF OTNR LCL 60R PUC66217 SGR PUC99314 STAPSC99313 STA PUC99314 1 OPERATING ASSISTANCE 2 OPERATING ASSISTANCEi5311 FUNDS} 1 OPERATING ASSISTANCE (ME) 4 LCTOP FREE R IDE VOUCHERS 5 COMPREHENSIVE OPERATIONAL STUDY 51.166002 5202,146 5127.956 559,431 575.000 5202.146 520.000 573.020 511.515 $20,000 $57,756 51,975 $1,059007 ST6.345 575.000 643535 Subtotal Oparauq 51,651527 50 5202,146 520000 599635 677,756 51,975 51,215,650 543,665: SO 50 50 50 Capital PmNFt Tdal Anloud 6919 GR 6115 AR 2766 fARE LCTOP LCTOP LTF GTNR LCL SGR PIlC99119 SGR PVC99314 STA PUC94119 STA PUC56714 o1 Funds 11UC99313 PUC99314 SULK TRANSIT SUS TIRES, FILTERS, ETC. -FY 21. 610.000 52.353 57,937 5 COMPUTER SOFTWARE UPGRADE-FY 214 $35300 516.300 MINIVAN- 011E EXPANSION VEHICLE- FY 214 $55 000 555520 REPLACE SUPPORT VEHICLE- FY21.2 545 000 545000 REPLACEMENT OF FIXED ROUTE SUS(CN131 - FY 5145 000 5143.300 21.1 SGR MAINTENANCE SHOP EQUIPMENT (FY191201• 630955 535555 51,11. FY 21-5 506401e1 Capital 5329255 S56,000 50 50 .7 00 SO 50 SD 535,555 51,330 522 337 57,937 Td4100era6066 Ca put 51950702 555.000 5202.146 $20.000 ... '.15 577,756 51.675 $1215.650 $43,655 535,565 51.390 5226.353 57.937 FY205041 Projected Funding Detail. 5211 A8 2768 FARE LCTOPPUC99313 LCTOPPUC99514 LTF OTNR LCL Total Eslorate6 Operatel9 Fur0ln6 Request 5310 GS 6GR PUC9931S 60R PUC90314 STAPUC99313 STAPUC99314 Total 5-donated Caplal Funorq Requoal Tom Funding R6qu9t 5202 145 $20 000 b00.635 577.756 61675 51215,650 $43.565 51 A61 53T 556.000 535.565 61.360 0225.353 57.637 5025 255 51 900702 11 INN MI 11��991 P R RODIRBNHFR ID1 R" IMP prAa.cn ® ;i:2�SIIER ,s 246 21IPage WRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-1 Project Name: REPLACEMENT OF FIXED ROUTE BUS (CNG) Category: Bus Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: CNG FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: PVVTA is looking to purchase and replace one (1) CNG bus with seating capacity of 16 passengers/2 wheelchairs. Project Justification: PVVTA has several buses that have either met their useful life or are very close and need to be replaced in order to continue to provide reliable fixed route service to the community. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $145,000 Total $145,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 247 22 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY 21-2 Project Name: REPLACE SUPPORT VEHICLE Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Gas Project Description: 2021 5 passenger Ford Explorer FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Proiect Justification: PVVTA is currently operating a support vehicle that will meet its useful life and will need to be replaced in FY2021. Proiect Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $45,000 Total $45,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 248 23 I Page RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY 21-3 Project Name: BULK TRANSIT BUS TIRES, FILTERS, ETC. Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Parts Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Purchase in bulk transit bus tires, filters, coolants, etc. FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: Bus tires, filters, oil, coolants, brake kits, etc. will be purchased in bulk for the year. This will allow quicker repair of the buses with the supplies already on hand. In addition, it will allow the buses to be put back in service much quicker. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $2,063 STA PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $7,937 Total $10,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 249 24 I P a g e PFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY 21-4 Project Name: COMPUTER SOFTWARE UPGRADE Category: ITS Sub -Category: Systems Fuel Type: NIA Project Description: TransTrack Manager Upgrade FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: PVVTA would like to upgrade TransTrack so that operational data can be entered daily and reports can be generated monthly. This will allow single data entry and updated operational reports on a daily and or monthly basis. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $36,300 Total $36,300 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 250 25 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY 21-5 Project Name: SGR MAINTENANCE SHOP EQUIPMENT (FY19/20) Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Upgrade Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Upgrade/update heavy duty maintenance equipment. FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Justification: The maintenance equipment in the maintenance shop is old and needs to be upgraded/updated. This purchase will provide more efficient and safe equipment for the maintenance mechanic to use for repairs of the transit buses . With more efficient maintenance equipment, the buses will be in service much quicker. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $35,565 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $1,390 Total $36,955 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 251 26 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY 21-6 Project Name: MINIVAN - BWE EXPANSION VEHICLE Category: Support Vehicles Sub-Cateaorv: Expansion Fuel Type: Gas Project Description: Minivan - 5 ambulatory passengers with ramp Project Justification: Expansion vehicle for the BWE service. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5310 OB FY 2020/21 $56,000 Total $56,000 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description 252 27'Page Table 4B - Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Revenue Sources included in Farebox Calculation Actual Amount from FY2018/19 Audit FY2019/20 (Estimate) FY 2020/21 (Plan) 1. Passenger Fares 82,448 79,000 90,635 2. Interest 50 70 65 3. General Fund Supplement - 4. Measure A - 5. Advertising Revenue - 6. Gain on Sale of Capital Assets - 7. CNG Revenue 26,981 27,000 30,635 8. Lease/ Other Revenue - 9. Federal Excise Tax Refund - 10. Investment Income - 11. CalPers CERBT - 12. Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes (79,609) 11,285 13. Other Revenues 66,333 274,200 314,542 TOTAL REVENUE 96,203 391,555 435,877 for Farebox Calculation (1-13) TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 922,582 1,526,160 1,651,527 for Farebox Calculation FAREBOX RECOVERY RATIO 10.43% 25.66%I 26.39% Other Revenues Include: T.R.I.P. Revenue RTAP Grant Special Services Misc. Revenues MDAQMD Operating Funds LCTOP 5311 Funds $ 1,000 $ 1,500 $ 10,000 $ 465 $ 20,000 $ 79,431 $ 202,146 $ 314,542 253 28 I P a g e 4.2 Funding Plan Table 4.1 & 4.2 The FY 2022 operating and capital budget is presented below. A modest increase of five percent is reflected in the operating budget for this fiscal year. PVVTA will look to purchase a fixed route bus and a support vehicle to replace those which have met their useful life. Table 4.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2021 22 Project Description Capital Project Number in Total Amount of Funds LTF STA 5311 funds Stale 01 Good Repair Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Fare Box Other Funds Operating Assistance $ 1,247,342 $ 1,117,522 $ 82,971 $ 46.848 Operating Assistance {5311 Funds) $ 292,146 $ 202,146 Blythe wellness Express Operating $ 127.864 $ 96.225 $ 11.639 $ 20.000 $ Subtotal: Operating $ 1,577,352 $ 1.213 748 1: 202.146 $ $ • 94.610A $ 66.848 Replacement of Fixed Route Bus (CNG) FY22-1 $ 145,000 $ 145,000 `$ Replace Support Vehicle FY22-2 45,000 $ 45.000 Bulk Transit Bus Tires. Fillers. etc. FY22-3 10.000 $ 10.000 Bus Stop Amenities Y22•4 10,000 $ 10.000 SCR! Maintenance Infrastructure FY20,21 Y22-5 $ 38.630 $ 38.630 Subtotal: Capital $ 248 ,1,• :110.07::• • 28.630 $ $ Total: Operating & Capital $ 1.025.s82 S i 213 743 S 216 000 5 202.1 i5 S 202,146 $ - $ 94.610 $ 66,848 (1) Number should he to Table 4A - Capital Project Jusliiicalion Other funds Include; CNG Fuel Sales T.R.I.P. Revenue RTAP Grant Special Services Misc Revenuesilnterest MDAOMD Operating Funds $ 30,635 $ 1.000 $ 1.500 $ 10.000 $ 530 $ 20,000 $ 66,848 254 291Page The FY 2023 operating and capital budget is presented below. A modest increase of five percent is reflected in the operating budget for this fiscal year. PVVTA will look to purchase a fixed route bus and a support vehicle to replace those which have met their useful life. Table 4.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2022/23 Project Description Capital Project Number ip Total Amount of Funds LTF STA 5311 Funds Stale Of Good Repair Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Fare Box Other Funds Operating Assistance $ 1.307,591 $ 1.170.738 $ 86,922 $ 50,032 Operating Assistance (5311 Funds) $ 202.146 202.146 Blythe Wellness Express Operating $ 133.001 $ 100.807 $ 12.194 $ 20.000 Subtotal: Operating $ 1.642,83B $ 1.271.545 $ $ 202.146 $ $ $ 99.116 $ 70.032 Replacement of Fixed Route Bus (CNG) FY23-1 $ 145.000 $ 145.000 Replace Support Vehicle FY23-2 45,000 $ 45.000 Bulk Transit Bus Tires. Filters. etc. FY23-3 10.000 $ 10000 Bus Stop Amenities FY23-4 10,000 $ 10,000 Subtotal: Capital $ 210.000 $ - $ 210.000 $ - $ - $ $ - $ Total: Operating & Capital $ 1,852,638 $ 1,271.545 $ 210,000 $ 202,146 $ 202,146 $ - $ 99,116 $ 70.032 (1) Number should tie to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification Other Funds Include: CNG Fuel Sales T.R.I.P. Revenue RTAP Grant Special Services Misc. Revenues/Interest MDAQMO Operating Funds $ 30.635 $ 1,000 $ 1,500 $ 10.000 $ 530 $ 20,000 $ 74,632 255 301Page 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements. Table 4.3 PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY 2022/2023 TABLE 4.3—TDA TRIENNIAL Audit Recommendation (Covering FY2015/2016 — FY2017/2018) Action(s) Taken And Results Work with local elected officials and stakeholders to expand upon the Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) to serve veterans. PVVTA continues to work with key political stakeholders as well as local and regional Veteran advocates to strategically link services to identified needing segments of our community. Ensure that Board meeting agendas and minutes are posted on the PVVTA website. PVVTA fixed the link system in posting identified items. These can be found at pvvta.com/agencyfiles. Pursue further discussions with the City of Blythe about defining roles and responsibilities. PVVTA continues to engage in talks with the City of Blythe to define their roles in relation to the Agency. The hope is to have a living MOU by the end of FY 2020/21. 256 31IPage FY 2016-2018 , TDA Triennial Audit link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/2miuyjmtb4hw6go/AAA-I-F6ZZ- nK31MJ6_aRxRea/PVVTA%20FY2016-18%20TDA%20Triennial%20Audit.pdf?d1=0 PVVTA link https://www.dropbox.com/sh/2miuyjmtb4hw6go/AAA- rP3a2fFBuaJezMx397nsa/PVVTA%20ADA%20PIan%20021617.pdf?d1=0 PVVTA link PVVTA link FY 2016-2018 , TDA Triennial Audit link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/2miuyjmtb4hw6go/AAA-I-F6ZZ- nK31MJ6_aRxRea/PVVTA%20FY2016-18%20TDA%20Triennial%20Audit.pdf?d1=0 PVVTA Title VI link: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/2miuyjmtb4hw6go/AABD9skbHDzWF54Hchj1uw0fa/PVVTA%2 OTitle%20V1%20Program%202017.pdf?d1=0 Alternative Fueled Vehicles Utilization: PVVTA follows the RCTC policy in utilizing alternative fueled vehicles. The makeup of the fleet is at a 55% compliant gasoline utilization and a 45% Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) utilization. Such utilization is compliant also with the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) policy and alternative fuel. 257 32IPage 4.4 Open Projects Listing Transit SuBSA Table 4.4 Open Projects Prior to FY2020/2021 ego nd - Project Timeline Bulk Transit Tires, Filters, Etc. 19-02 7 1 7/2018 - 6/2020 CNG Equipment Rehabilitation 19-03 4 1 7/2018 - 6/2020 Fixed Route Replacement Bus 20-01 1 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Purchase Shop/Maint. Truck 20-03 2 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Bulk Transit Tires, Filters, Etc. 20-04 7 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Bus Stop Amenities 20-05 3 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Solar Parking Light 20-06 4 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Maintenance Shop Equip. (SGR) 20-07 3 1 7/2019 -6/2020 Total Project Cost 6,* 15,000 0 54,000 0 120,000 0 45,000 0 15,000 0 10,000 0 10,000 0 35,758 0 8 304,758 0 258 33 I Page Riverside Transit Agency V j 4111 SH RT TRANSITAPLAN FY2I-FY23 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW 7 1.1 JURISDICTION 7 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS 8 Population Profile — Rider Characteristics 8 Population Profile 8 1.3 FIXED -ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICES 10 Fixed -route Services 10 Paratransit Services 10 1.4 EXISTING FIXED -ROUTE AND DIAL -A -RIDE SERVICE 10 1.5 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE 11 Cooperative Fare and Subsidy Programs 12 1.6 REVENUE FLEET 13 1.7 EXISTING FACILITIES 13 Existing Facilities 13 Existing Passenger Transit Facilities 14 1.8 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES 17 Regional Coordination 17 Interregional Coordination and Transfer Agreements 18 1.9 RECENT STUDIES AND PLANS 19 CHAPTER 2: ROUTE PERFORMANCE AND EXISTING SERVICE 21 2.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 21 Service Standards and Warrants 21 Productivity vs. Coverage Target 22 2.2 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT 22 2.3 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY 22 2.4 SERVICE PERFORMANCE 23 2.5 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS 23 2.6 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS 24 2.7 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES 25 CHAPTER 3: FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING AND MARKETING 27 3.1 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES 27 3.2 MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE 29 3.3 FUTURE MARKETING PLANS, STUDIES AND PROMOTION 30 3.4 PROJECTED RIDERSHIP GROWTH (FY21-23) 32 3.5 PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE CHANGES 32 3.6 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING 33 Revenue Vehicles 34 Non -Revenue Vehicles 34 Equipment and Passenger Amenities 34 3.7 CAPITAL PROJECTS BEYOND FY23 34 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL PLANNING 36 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET FOR FY21 36 4.2 FUNDING SOURCES FOR OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAMS 39 260 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency 4.3 TUMF PROGRAM 41 4.4 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 42 4.5 OPEN PROJECTS 44 Planned Passenger Transit Facilities 44 Equipment and Passenger Amenities 46 261 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside hansit Agency Comparative Statistics Table 1 Table 1.1 Table 2 Table 2.1 Table 2.2 Table 2.2A Table 2.3 Table 3 Table 4 Table 4A Table 4B Table 4.1 Table 4.2 Table 4.3 Table 4.4 Table 5 Appendix A Tables FY20/21 Individual Route Descriptions Fleet Inventory 1) Motor Bus / Directly Operated 2) Motor Bus / Purchased Transportation 3) Commuter Bus / Directly Operated 4) Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY20/21 SRTP Performance Report SRTP Service Summary 1) Routes: All Routes (System -wide Totals) 2) Routes: Excluded Routes 3) Routes: Non -Excluded Routes 4) Program: Directly Operated Fixed -Routes 5) Program: Contracted Operated Fixed -Routes 6) Program: Dial -A -Ride 7) Program: Taxi Excluded Routes SRTP Route Statistics Highlights of SRTP / Operating and Financial Data Summary of Funds Requested for FY20/21 Capital Project Justification for FY20/21 Farebox Recovery Ratio Summary of Funds Requested for FY21/22 Summary of Funds Requested for FY22/23 FY16-18 FTA and TDA Triennial Review — Summary of Findings Open Projects RTA FY21 — FY25 TUMF Transportation Improvement Program RTA System Map and Fixed -Route Maps iii 262 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Glossary of Acronyms 5304 Discretionary grants for statewide and non -metropolitan transportation planning 5307 Formula grants for urbanized areas 5309 Discretionary grants for fixed guideway capital investments 5310 Discretionary grants for enhanced mobility of seniors and individuals with disabilities 5311 Formula grants for rural areas 5337 State of Good Repair 5339 Formula grants for bus and bus facilities ADA Americans with Disabilities Act A&E Architectural and Engineering AHSC Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program ATIS Advanced Traveler Information System BRT Bus Rapid Transit CARB California Air Resources Board CMAQ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program CNG Compressed Natural Gas COA Comprehensive Operational Analysis COVID-19 Coronavirus CPUC California Public Utilities Code CTAF-CTSGP California Transit Assistance Fund — California Transit Security Grant Program CTSA Consolidated Transportation Services Agency DAR Dial -A -Ride paratransit services DBE Disadvantaged Business Enterprise EEO Equal Employment Opportunity EV Electric Vehicle FTA Federal Transit Administration FTIP Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY Fiscal Year GASB Government Accounting Standards Board GGRF Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund GIS Geographic Information System Go -Pass Community College Pass HSR California High -Speed Rail ICT Innovative Clean Transit ITS Intelligent Transportation System LCFS Low -Carbon Fuel Standard LCTOP Low Carbon Transit Operations Program LEP Limited English Proficiency LTF Local Transportation Fund MJPA March Joint Powers Authority MPO Metropolitan Planning Organization MSJC Mount San Jacinto College OCTA Orange County Transportation Authority OPEB Other Post -Employment Benefits PEPRA Public Employees' Pension Reform Act of 2012 iv 263 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency PPP Public Private Partnership PTMISEA Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account PVL Perris Valley Line RCC Riverside City College RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission RINs Renewable Identification Numbers RTA Riverside Transit Agency RTPA Regional Transportation Planning Agency RPU Riverside Public Utilities § Section SB1 Senate Bill 1 SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SGR State of Good Repair SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance TCM Transportation Control Measure TDA Transportation Development Act TIRCP Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program TMC Travel Management Company TNC Transportation Network Company T-NOW Transportation NOW TSP Transit Signal Priority TTS Timed Transfer System TUMF Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee UCR University of California, Riverside U-Pass University Pass U.S.C. United States Code UZA Urbanized Area as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau WRCOG Western Riverside Council of Governments ZEB Zero -Emission Bus ZEV Zero -Emission Vehicle v 264 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The adoption of the 10-Year Network Plan (10-Year Plan) in January 2015 that resulted from the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) charted an ambitious and strategic path forward for Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). The findings from the market and service assessments, survey results, analysis of data, passenger comments and policy guidance from the RTA Board of Directors contributed to the development of service and capital improvement recommendations in the 10-Year Plan. The key focuses of the plan were to improve service frequencies, improve connectivity and reduce travel times with the introduction of timed transfer connections, more late -night services and improved passenger amenities. The annual Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) covers a three-year span and serves as the actual implementation and financial plan for year one only. The FY21 — FY23 SRTP marks the sixth implementation year of the 10-Year Plan. During the five years, not counting the FY21 implementation year, RTA managed to implement service frequency improvements --- the most requested form of improvement from our customers --- on 10 routes. This included an increase from one to three routes offering 15-minute service seven days a week during peak times, serving the highest travel demand areas of Corona, Riverside, Moreno Valley and Perris. Seven new routes were added, including RTA's first arterial limited -stop RapidLink (Gold Line) service between Corona and UC Riverside (UCR), a new CommuterLink freeway express route linking Riverside to San Bernardino and Orange County/Disneyland utilizing the new toll lanes on State Route 91 (SR-91), plus three new routes feeding the newly implemented Perris Valley Metrolink rail service. Local service now runs 365 days a year on all routes (except special shuttles). The recent COVID-19 pandemic has greatly affected RTA's revenue stream and it is estimated that this revenue loss will worsen in FY21. After experiencing ridership increases in January and February 2020, the Agency saw a huge ridership decline. By the beginning of April, the Agency's ridership had dropped approximately 75 percent, further depleting revenues and making required farebox recovery percentages impossible to reach. To better manage the uncertain future, RTA plans to run seven-day Sunday service, plus additional peak CommuterLink service for all of FY21. Dial -a -Ride (DAR) service will remain consistent with last year as the Agency strives to serve the most vulnerable population. Chapter 3 of the SRTP details the Agency's FY21 service plan. It is important to note that there are current California transportation bills being reviewed that will make public transportation free for certain rider groups. Assembly Bill 1350 (AB 1350) is a California transportation bill that aims to make public transportation free for youth ages 18 and under. The bill passed through the Assembly on January 27, 2020 but has not been assigned to a Senate committee at this time. Additionally, Assembly Bill 2176 (AB 2176) is a transportation bill that aims to make public transportation free for all California Community Colleges, California State University and University of California students. Lastly, Assembly Bill 2012 (AB 2012) aims 1 265 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency to provide free transit passes to all seniors ages 65 and older in California. Both AB 2176 and AB 2012 have not yet passed through the Assembly. As of this writing, the California State Legislature has suspended legislative sessions due to the COVID-19 pandemic; however, these bills are expected to move forward once pandemic relief legislation is heard. When combined with already declining revenues due to the health pandemic, the Agency will struggle further without a revenue source to make up for lost farebox from these three groups, that together make up approximately 75 percent of the current ridership. RTA is making investments in key capital improvements and will continue to focus on key long- term investments during FY21. The following is a high-level summary of the most significant capital projects progressing in response to the recommendations of the 10-Year Plan: • Hemet Mobility Hub. The Hemet City Council approved the conceptual plan in January 2019 and the project will be delivered through a Public Private Partnership (PPP) with provisions made to accommodate possible future rail service. Additionally, the city will contribute five acres of city -owned land toward this project. • Preparation and Implementation of Bus Stop Improvement Plan. Over 85 bus shelters with benches and trash receptacles have been installed at bus stops throughout the RTA service area since this plan was adopted in 2015. The plan calls for improving 25 bus stops in FY21. • The Vine Street Mobility Hub. RTA is currently completing a conceptual plan and community outreach for this project. Upon completion, architectural, engineering and design work will commence. According to RTA's 2018 Market Assessment and Strategic Direction Study (Market Assessment Study), RTA currently has a 96 percent overall satisfaction rating, as shown in the graph below. Due to rounding of numbers, the total will exceed 100 percent on the graph. 2 266 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside hansit Agency 20% NEUTRAL 3% DISSATISFIED 2% VERY DISSATISFIED 96% OVERALL SATISFACTION 45% VERY SATISFIED 31% SATISFIED Since the current fiscal year (FY20) ends in June 2020, data from calendar years 2018 and 2019 are used to look at the most recent regional fixed route ridership trends among RTA's regional peers: Omnitrans from San Bernardino County, North County Transit District (NCTD) from San Diego County and Foothill Transit from San Gabriel Valley. In reference to the table below, RTA showed a ridership loss of less than one percent (.78 percent) from calendar year 2018 to 2019, which is less of a drop than most other transit agencies have experienced, especially considering RTA increased fares in July 2019. Calendar Year (CY) to Calendar Year (CY) Fixed Route ComparEoo CY 2018 CY 2019 Net Agency Ridership Ridership Difference Percent Change Riverside Transit Agency (Rrveride County.::•• 8,287,164 8,222,689 -64.475 -0.785•6 North County Transit District (San Diego County, C4: 6,495,343 6,319,663 -175,680 -2.70G Omnitrans (s=n Bernardino County, Ca; 10,605,688 10,541,433 -64,255 -0.6B6 Fo othill Transit (Ban Gabriel Valley, Co* 12,452,677 11,751,793 -700,SS4 -5.635•G Source FIA Natiaial iranslt Database (Un ll nked Motor Bus & Can muter Bus Passenger Trips Similarly, long-term comparisons also suggest that RTA has consistently bucked the regional fixed -route ridership trends. While the fixed -route ridership of the four regional peers fell below 3 267 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21- FY23 .111 Riverside Transit Agency -•a the calendar year 2010 baseline, RTA shows a 9.31 percent ridership gain over the same period as noted in the graph and the supporting data tables below. 30% 20% 10% 0% -10% -20% -30% 2010 Percent Change in Fixed Route Ridership Relative to Calendar Year 2010 RTA fNCTD Omnitrans -XFFoothill -SunLine ♦National Total 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Source: FTA National Transit Database (Unlinked Motor Bus & Commuter Bus Passenger Trips) 2016 2017 2018 2019 I L Calendar ?agency 2010 2011 Year (CY) 2012 to Calendar 2013 Year (CY) Fixed 2014 Route Udmlred 2015 Passenger Trips 2016 2017 2018 2019 314 7,522,296 8,088,468 8,717,711 8,959,299 9,286,584 9,149,610 8,512,760 8,149,731 8,287,164 8,222,689 NCTD 7,626,585 7,814,669 8,060,890 8,363,039 8,147,895 7,821,113 7,144,265 6,557,310 6,495,343 6,319,663 Omnitrans 14,231,408 15,190,922 15,795,184 15,413,985 14,733,581 13,105,501 11.,620,694 11,043,721 10,605,688 10,541,433 SunLine 3,775,678 4,287,978 4,524,834 4,56,1,667 4,777,304 4,526,442 4,242,481 4,047,368 3,959,472 4,048,831 Foothill 12,861,767 14,052,742 13,902,047 14,257,099 14,766,378 14,170,727 13,584,934 12,887,639 12,452,677 11, 751,793 Nation al Total 5,084,112,443 5,143,733,046 5,149,256,736 5,121,951,463 5,070,142,995 4,933,214,156 4,733,125,066 4,525,563,097 4,434,010,149 4,417,456,351 Percentage ?agency 2010 2011 Change 2012 in Fixed Route 2013 Ridership Relative 2014 to Calendar 2015 Year (CY) 2010 2016 2017 2018 2019 RTA 0% 7.53% 15.89% 19.10% 23.45% 21.63% 13.17% 8.34% 10.17% 9.31% NCTD 0% 2.47% 5.69% 9.66% 6.84% 2.55% -6.32% -14.02% -14.83% -17.14% Omnitrans 0% 6.74% 10.99% 8.31% 3.53% -7.91% -18.34% -22.40% -25.48% -25.93% SunLine 0% 13.57% 19.84% 20.90% 26.53% 19.88% 12.36% 7.20% 4.87% 7.23% Foothill 0% 9.26% 8.09% 10.85% 14.81% 10.18% 5.62% 0.20% -3.18% -8.63% Nation al Total 0% 1.17% 1.28% 0.74% -0.27% -2.97% -6.90% -10.99% -12.79% -13.11% Source, FTA National Transit Data base {II nllnk,d Motor Bus & Commuter Bus pmsenger Trips' With the aggressive implementation of the recommendations of the 10-Year Plan and the pending completion of the Vine Street and Hemet mobility hubs, RTA is poised to fully implement a systemwide Timed Transfer System (TTS) and streamline the route network that would further 4 268 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency reduce travel times and improve service reliability and efficiency. However, RTA, along with all transit agencies in California, is challenged with a new mandate from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) of incorporating zero -emission, 40-foot buses. This was not anticipated at the time of preparing the 10-Year Plan in 2015. Hence, moving forward beyond the FY21 — FY23 SRTP, there is a necessity for RTA to pause further implementation of recommendations in the 10-Year Plan. This is because of the financial and operational constraints that will result from CARB's adoption of the Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) regulations in December 2018. The ICT initiative mandates public transit agencies transition entirely to a zero -emission bus (ZEB) fleet by 2040. This results in significant associated operating and capital cost impacts and calls for a complete evaluation of how RTA delivers service. Considering this regulation and the already uncertain economic future due to the COVID-19 pandemic, RTA will face budget cuts and contraction through at least FY21. To meet the ICT mandate, each transit agency is required to submit a rollout plan (implementation plan) by July 1, 2020. The plan will demonstrate how the agency intends to comply with the mandate and when it plans to purchase 40-foot ZEBs and build the necessary support infrastructure to reach the 2040 ZEB target. On April 23, 2020, RTA received notification from CARB that extensions would be approved if agencies were experiencing delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. RTA has submitted an extension request, asking to submit the plan by December 31, 2020. This extension will allow RTA staff to get key contract personnel here for the in -person Board meeting, something that is currently not an option due to travel bans between the United States and Canada. This extension will also allow the executive team the time to thoroughly review the documents, something that cannot be done right now as staff is busy keeping operations running while protecting employees and riders. Combining RTA's large service area with ZEB technology's current range issues will present an operational challenge to RTA. RTA will have to change the way it operates and make adjustments to afford the increased capital and operating costs. These adjustments will be reflected in future SRTPs as RTA begins programming funding for ZEB implementation. As a first step towards ZEB implementation, the Agency will conduct a route profile/Geographic Information System (GIS) update including some restructuring for ZEB implementation. The ZEB rollout plan will include a comprehensive operational and financial analysis of the impacts on RTA's delivery model for transit services that would result from the cost of zero emission fuel. The plan will also identify potential limits on operating range for ZEBs between recharging/refueling, cost of elimination of current financial incentives to utilize compressed natural gas (CNG) and the capital cost of constructing support facilities and infrastructure. The purchase of more expensive ZEBs and the training needs for staff operating and maintaining a ZEB fleet will also be studied. Potential new financial resources and incentives that may become available to implement the ICT mandate will be identified. 5 269 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 The FY21 — FY23 SRTP is organized as follows: Chapter 1 provides an overview of the system. Chapter 2 describes route performance and existing service. Chapter 3 details planned service changes during FY21. Chapter 4 covers the financial and capital plans. 6 270 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside hanstt Agency CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 JURISDICTION RTA's jurisdiction is among the largest in the nation for a transit system, encompassing approximately 2,500 square miles of western Riverside County. Included in the boundaries are 18 incorporated cities, including Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula and Wildomar, as well as the unincorporated areas of Riverside County supervisorial districts 1, 2, 3 and 5. RTA provides service in both urban and rural areas. Urbanized and rural areas are defined by the United States Census Bureau (US Census) based on population size and revised every 10 years with each new census. The urbanized zone areas (UZA) in the jurisdiction are Riverside -San Bernardino, Hemet and Murrieta-Temecula-Menifee. Portions of RTA routes also connect to Los Angeles -Long Beach -Anaheim and San Diego UZAs, providing interregional mobility options for RTA customers. The map below illustrates RTA's jurisdictional boundaries and highlights the portions of the region considered urbanized. na alley Pomona Ontario Inut ,G !unti Bar Chino Hills Ills Fark 1ge North Tustin na Tustin Chino Glru A,�,R1.4:11CCUk Eastvale Jurupa Valley Riverside 71.1 Norco Corona 133 "u.tiiill Ranch Rancho Santa Lake Forest Marganta Mission Viejo Laguna Hills 24, Laguna Niguel Laguna Beach San Juan Capistrano Dana Point San Clemente Home Gardens Wooduest lake El Cerrito A9othews Santana Peak Reuaands . Linda Moreno Valley take Perris . State Recreation Area Lakeview Morongo LR BESumont,..._ ,Banning Cabam., Nuevo Perris San Jacinto Soboba LR HomelandHemet Valle Vista East Hemet Sun City Lake Elsinore Canyon Lake ,_:land N al Forest W4duirar Murrieta 7 Temecula i9 I Winchester Diunrond Valley Lek, idyll, 271 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency First < 6 Months Time Median Age 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS Due to changing demographics in various communities RTA continues to be proactive by planning routes that are customer -oriented and financially sustainable. By studying the characteristics of riders, a better understanding is gained to more appropriately plan for and meet the needs of the transit market. Rider characteristics, along with demographic and population changes, are used to shape and strategize how resources will be allocated in future years. Population Profile — Rider Characteristics RTA passenger characteristics were collected from on -board surveys in spring 2018 as part of the RTA Market Assessment Study. A demographic summary of RTA riders offered the following characteristics: WHO RIDES RTA? 71k r� Students Length of Time Using RTA Bus Service 47% Female Gender 53% Male Employed I 149E 5 Years or More 6 Months to 2 Years Source: RTA Market Assessment Study (2018). Population Profile 3 to 4 Years Have a Vehicle Available for Trip Jib. 0 0 8 Median Household Income 272 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21- FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Deployment of future transit service will directly correspond to demographic and land use changes within the RTA service area, driven by population growth and buffered by the aforementioned ICT impacts. The table below shows population changes between 2010 and 2019 based on California Department of Finance data as of May 2019. Between 2012 (once Eastvale and Jurupa Valley were incorporated as cities) and 2019, population for the service area has grown by eight percent with growth experienced in most cities across this period. This growth provides potential future ridership possibilities for RTA. RIVERSIDE COUNTY Historical Populations, with 2010Census Counts City 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Change 2012- 2019 Change Banning 29,603 29,903 30,283 30,300 30,346 30,456 30,497 30,914 30,950 31,044 761 2.51% Beaumont 36,877 38,317 39,423 40,715 41,492 42,937 44,746 45,167 46,545 48,401 8,978 22.77% Calimesa 7,879 7,935 8,007 8,050 8,261 8,421 8,487 8,805 9,080 9,159 1,152 14.39% Canyon Lake 10,561 10,661 10,771 10,807 10,873 10,953 11,021 11,138 11,213 11,285 514 4.77% Corona 152,374 153,987 156,151 158,659 160,505 161,299 162,819 165,427 167,013 168,101 11,950 7.65% Eastvale * 54,354 55,963 57,260 59,327 60,833 62,912 64,683 65,725 66,078 10,115 18.07% Hemet 78,657 79,597 80,296 80,556 81,406 82,161 82,503 83,802 84,423 84,754 4,458 5.55% Jurupa Valley * * 97,004 97,907 98,143 99,067 100,683 102,392 104,661 106,318 9,314 9.60% Lake Elsinore 51,821 52,544 53,529 56,072 57,165 58,768 60,760 61,433 62,241 62,949 9,420 17.60% Menifee 77,519 79,639 81,513 83,494 84,562 86,018 87,943 89,113 90,775 93,452 11,939 14.65% Moreno Valley 193,365 195,137 198,019 199,803 200,394 201,346 203,216 203,934 206,046 208,297 10,278 5.19% Murrieta 103,466 104,722 106,522 108,570 109,450 111,029 113,087 116,527 116,970 118,125 11,603 10.89% Norco 27,063 27,106 27,287 26,868 26,768 26,049 26,560 26,527 26,464 26,386 (901) -3.30% Perris 68,386 69,775 70,892 72,119 72,799 73,360 75,113 75,659 76,260 76,971 6,079 8.58% Riverside 303,871 308,124 311,622 314,701 316,400 318,914 321,723 323,934 326,270 328,101 16,479 5.29% San Jacinto 44,199 44,688 45,261 45,708 45,934 46,199 46,778 47,053 47,607 48,878 3,617 7.99% Temecula 100,097 101,835 103,920 105,251 106,764 109,393 110,474 112,170 113,248 113,826 9,906 9.53% Wildomar 32,176 32,609 33,096 33,689 34,069 34,416 34,948 35,261 35,635 36,066 2,970 8.97% Unincorporated** 378,294 340,551 269,340 269,243 273,497 276,910 279,214 285,765 290,320 295,650 26,310 9.77% Incorporated (City Total) 1,317,914 1,390,933 1,509,559 1,530,529 1,544,658 1,561,619 1,584,270 1,603,939 1,621,126 1,638,191 128,632 8.52% County Total 1,696,208 1,731,484 1,778,899 1,799,772 1,818,155 1,838,529 1,863,484 1,889,704 1,911,446 1,933,841 154,942 8.71% *Previously unincorporated area **Unincorporated estima e is based on 75% of all the County unincorporated, not just western Riverside County (as per WRCOG guidance . Source: Californa Department of Finance Riverside County Total Population 2010 2015 2020 2025 2,198,503 2,332,491 2,468,145 2,597,656 Change 6.09% 5.82% 5.25% Across the RTA service area, the highest population and employment densities continue to be found in the corridor linking Corona, Riverside and Moreno Valley, encompassing more than one- third of the estimated 1.9 million residents in western Riverside Countyi' and the highest concentration of jobs are in, around and between the cities of Riverside and Corona and in the Murrieta/Temecula area in western Riverside Countyi21. The population and employment densities of these cities make public transit a more viable option for travel. Most of the other cities and unincorporated areas consist of lower density suburban single-family homes or rural living. This condition often results in lower transit usage. Ill California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit (May 2019). 121 RCTC Long Range Transportation Study (December 2019). 9 273 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency 1.3 FIXED -ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICES On April 5, 2020, RTA reduced service to a seven-day Sunday schedule with additional CommuterLink peak service on weekdays due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For FY21, RTA plans to continue operating at this service level. Fixed -route Services RTA fixed -route services fall within two categories: • 33 local routes • Five CommuterLink express routes See Table 1 for a complete listing of routes and the areas they serve. Paratransit Services RTA offers complementary demand -response paratransit Dial -A -Ride (DAR) service to persons with disabilities and seniors (age 65 and older). DAR is an advanced -reservation service: • DAR trips must begin/end within 0.75 miles of an active RTA fixed -route (excluding express buses) • DAR service operates at times equivalent to the local fixed -route bus services RTA Has Three Types of DAR Services: • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Priority DAR Service: RTA gives priority service to individuals who are certified under ADA law for trips throughout the RTA service area based on the above two criteria. • Senior and Disabled DAR Service: Seniors age 65 and older and persons with disabilities are eligible for local DAR service for trips that begin/end within a single city based on the above two criteria. • DAR Plus Service: To provide service to those who live in rural areas that do not have access to public transportation, RTA began the DAR Plus Lifeline Service program in July 2015. This program extends the DAR service boundary around local fixed routes by an additional two miles (2.75-mile radius) to qualified applicants needing life -sustaining services. The program provides wheelchair accessible service to seniors aged 65 and older and to persons with disabilities for lifeline services such as doctor's appointments, dialysis and chemotherapy treatments, trips to the pharmacy, trips to the grocery store for food and trips to the senior center to access hot meal service. 1.4 EXISTING FIXED -ROUTE AND DIAL -A -RIDE SERVICE 10 274 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency In FY20, RTA budgeted 916,704 revenue hours for the operation of 13,902,698 revenue miles system -wide: • 713,672 revenue hours and 10,484,779 revenue miles budgeted for operation of 47 fixed - routes • 203,032 revenue hours and 3,417,919 revenue miles budgeted for operation of complementary DAR service In FY14, passenger growth exceeded projections due to factors such as significant increases in pass programs, customer satisfaction, high gasoline prices and a high unemployment rate. In FY15 through FY18, ridership declined due to continued improvements in the economy coupled with continued low gas prices and record automobile purchases. In FY19, RTA had an increase in ridership, thus reversing the trend of the past four years. Contributing factors are the increased service RTA has deployed in FY18 and FY19 together with increasing gas prices. From July 2019 thru February 2020, ridership has kept pace with FY19 despite a projected decrease in ridership due to the fare increase that was implemented in July 2019. In March 2020, ridership across all forms of public transportation, including RTA, dropped dramatically due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 1.5 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE In October 2018, the Board authorized a contract award to conduct a fare study. In April 2019, the Board approved a fare increase that was implemented in July 2019. In addition, the Board authorized a subsequent increase in fares effective July 2021. The table below shows the current fare structure. Prior to this increase, RTA had not increased fares for 10 years. 11 275 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21- FY23 Riverside Transit Agency FIXED -ROUTE FARES Fare Categories General Youth (grades 1-12)** Senior / Disabled** Medicare Card Holder Veteran* * Child (46" tall or under) Base Fares $1.75 $1.75 $0.75 $0.75 $0.75 $0.50 Day Pass* $5.00 $5.00 $2.50 $2.50 $2.50 N/A 7-Day Pass* $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 $20.00 N/A 30-Day Pass* $60.00 $45.00 $30.00 $30.00 $30.00 N/A COMMUTERLINK FARES COMMUTERLINK + LOCAL Fare Categories General Youth (grades 1-12)** Senior / Disabled** Medicare Card Holder Veteran* * Child (46" tall or under) Base Fares $3.50 $3.50 $2.75 $2.75 $2.75 $2.75 Day Pass $10.00 $10.00 $7.00 $7.00 $7.00 N/A 30-Day Pass $95.00 $95.00 $70.00 $70.00 $70.00 N/A DAR FARES I Not accepted on fixed -route buses Fare Categories Senior / Disabled Medicare Card Holder Child (46" tall or under) Base Fares $3.50 $3.50 $0.75 10-Ticket Books $35.00 $35.00 N/A *Accepted as base fare. CommuterLink trips require an additional $2.00 (Senior, Disabled, Medicare, and Veteran) or $1.75 (General / Youth) per trip. **Proper identification is required at time of boarding. In addition to these fare categories, RTA also currently has U-Pass, Go -Pass and City Pass programs. Cardholders of these programs get unlimited rides on any fixed -route, including CommuterLink, in the RTA network by showing valid identification. It is important to note that the State of California is proposing to make public transit free for youth 18 and under and students of state funded colleges and universities. The Agency anticipates that college pass programs would be terminated should that legislation pass. Active duty military, police and fire personnel in uniform with valid identification are also eligible for complimentary rides on RTA fixed -routes. Cooperative Fare and Subsidy Programs RTA makes every effort to create partnerships that will improve service for customers by developing fare programs that promote the use of public transit. In FY21, the following cooperative fare and subsidy programs are expected to continue: • City of Riverside - City Pass for Employees • County of Riverside - Route 50 Jury Trolley Additionally, the college pass programs will be placed on hold as RTA is receiving LCTOP funding to run a fare -free program for youth and college students. The program will be in effect for the FY21 school year. RTA staff is working with colleges to extend current agreements for another 12 276 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency year, considering this year will be free for those students whose schools have an active agreement with RTA. The regular college pass program, whereby students ride with an active school ID and fares are paid for by the school, would resume in Summer 2021. The City of Riverside subsidizes the City Pass fare program for its employees to ride the bus for free and serves as a pass outlet (Riverside Go Transit) for its residents by discounting 20 to 30 percent off 7-day and 30-day passes, respectively. Other subsidized transit services include the trolley and circulator routes which are funded by UCR or local jurisdictions. These subsidized routes could be placed into service in FY21, should the ridership warrant their implementation. 1.6 REVENUE FLEET As of March 31, 2020, the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) has a total active fleet of 333 buses: • One hundred forty-five 40-foot buses, which run on compressed natural gas (CNG), for high ridership fixed -route services directly operated by RTA drivers. These buses are, on average, six years old and have 322,029 miles. They are replaced when they reach their useful life of 12 years or 500,000 miles. On average, the Agency will purchase 35 of these vehicles every two years. • Seventy-eight 32-foot buses, which run on either gasoline or CNG, for lower ridership fixed -route services operated by contracted drivers. These buses are, on average, two years old and have 150,000 miles. They are replaced when they reach their useful of seven years or 200,000 miles. On average, the Agency will purchase 30 vehicles every year. • One hundred ten Dial -A -Ride buses, which run on gasoline, for paratransit services operated by contracted drivers. These buses are, on average, three years old and have 110,915 miles on them. They are replaced when they reach their useful life of five years or 150,000 miles. On average, the Agency will purchase 25 vehicles every other year. See Table 1.1 for a complete inventory of the RTA fleet. 1.7 EXISTING FACILITIES Existing Facilities RTA's primary facility is Division I in the City of Riverside. RTA's secondary facility is Division II in the City of Hemet. RTA's Riverside facility is utilized for directly operated routes in the northern portion of the system's network while RTA's Hemet facility is utilized for directly operated routes in the southern portion of the system's network. As an effort to better utilize the available office space at Riverside and Hemet, Contract Operations, Information Technology and Travel Training staff were relocated to the Hemet facility in summer 2018. After this move, the Riverside facility has 413 active employees on site and the Hemet facility has 107 active employees on site. 13 277 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency In FY21, RTA's contracted fixed -route service will continue to be provided by Empire Transportation, operating from a facility they lease in the City of Perris. DAR service is currently provided by Southland Transit, Inc. and operates from a facility they lease in the City of Perris. Both contractors are responsible for housing, operating and maintaining RTA vehicles. The DAR facility in Perris also houses the DAR reservation call center. DAR Plus will also be provided by Southland. For FY21, DAR overflow is not anticipated, as ridership has seen a drastic decline due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Southland is prepared to handle all DAR needs for the coming fiscal year. Existing Passenger Transit Facilities In addition to improvements to service frequency and expanding service, the 10-Year Plan recommends the creation of a TTS and improving support infrastructure such as transit hubs to meet the growing demand for transit service in the most efficient manner. It is neither feasible nor cost effective to run direct service from every trip origin to destination. Therefore, the only system that can meet the growing demand efficiently is one that enables timed transfer connections from one service or mode to another. Strategically placed transit hubs are essential to making a TTS work at its optimum. Furthermore, transit hubs are more than just a place to make bus connections. They can be community -centered, multi -modal facilities where bus and rail customers share a selection of mobility choices. These modes of travel can include single -occupancy vehicles, carpools, vanpools, bicycles, pedestrian walkways, local and commuter express buses, light rail and regional rail networks. Transit hubs are generally owned by various public agencies and are well - situated for the advancement of public -private investment partnerships leading to transit - oriented commercial and residential development. The following is a summary of the existing transit facilities in the RTA service area: Perris Station Transit Center: This transit center is in the City of Perris at C Street and 4th Street (SR-74) and has eight bus bays served by nine RTA routes. The facility handles multi -modal transfers between Metrolink; RTA local, regional and express routes; RTA's Dial -A -Ride and park -and -ride patrons in the southwest region. 14 278 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency MIMS !OM standards. Reinforced concrete bus • Corona Transit Center: This transit center is ▪ in the City of Corona off Grand Boulevard and North Main Street and includes eight bus bays and a pedestrian bridge to trains at the North Main Corona Metrolink Station. Galleria at Tyler Bus Stop Improvements: The demand for enhanced connections and improved bus stop amenities prompted RTA to improve the stops at the Galleria at Tyler Mall, which is served by 10 routes. The upgrade was completed in October 2014 and nearly doubled the size of the facility, which now includes six bus bays with new passenger shelters equipped with solar lighting. The facility also includes arrival and departure information and customer amenities that comply with ADA design pads were installed to protect the roadway and increase the useful life of this facility. Further improvements were made in 2017 to add two additional stops on Magnolia Avenue to accommodate new RapidLink Gold Line service. In March of 2020, RTA completed construction of a new turnout for the westbound routes on Magnolia Avenue to avoid blocking the travel lanes. bus pads were Moreno Valley Mall Transfer Station: Similar to the Galleria at Tyler, the transit facility at Moreno Valley Mall is an integral part of establishing transfers within RTA's network. Completed in March 2015, the upgraded facility, which is utilized by eight RTA bus routes, has tripled in size to include six upgraded bus bays with pedestrian amenities that comply with ADA design standards. New bus shelters with solar lighting, information kiosks, benches and trash receptacles were installed. Concrete also installed to preserve the roadway and increase the useful life of the stop. On 15 279 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency average, more than 1,500 boardings and alightings occur at this station every day. In January 2020, space for two bus bays were added to help ease bus congestion that resulted from RTA's frequency improvements on routes 16 and 19. Downtown Riverside Stop Improvements: This operating plan, which modernized the service in downtown Riverside by creating an on -street grid system, was a key recommendation in the 10- Year Plan and was necessary due to the closure of the Riverside Downtown Transit Terminal. The operating plan improved passenger transfers, consolidated routes to enhance service delivery and boost productivity and reduced the number of buses traveling to downtown thereby improving traffic circulation. This project was completed in December 2016. RapidLink Gold Line (Corona to UCR Corridor): RTA identified the corridor between UCR and Corona primarily along University and Market/Magnolia Avenues as a candidate for limited -stop service. More than 9,000 customers use bus services along this corridor on weekdays. Fifteen bus stops were upgraded to include bus shelters with solar lighting, benches and trash cans as well as new RapidLink signage on the shelter roof. RapidLink Gold Line service launched in August 2017. Promenade Mall Mobility Hub: RTA and the City of Temecula worked together to identify a project site located at Promenade Mall in Temecula, which is owned and operated by Temecula Towne Center Associates (TTCA). Promenade Mall had a single bus stop that was served by seven RTA bus routes. RTA had outgrown this facility and passengers were often left in the elements waiting for their bus due to the lack of an adequate shade structure and waiting area. RTA staff worked with TTCA on delivering this project as a PPP, with RTA providing construction funds and TTCA agreeing to own and maintain the hub. The project was completed on January 13, 2019 and placed into service. The new hub features five shelter areas/shade structures, nine benches, improved lighting, sidewalk upgrades, real-time passenger information and expanded room for up to five full-sized buses. 16 280 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency and intermodal connectivity between connections La Sierra Metrolink Station Expansion: This project was completed in January 2019 and was delivered through a public -public partnership with RCTC. The La Sierra Metrolink Station is emerging as a major intermodal mobility hub that brings together rail, two RTA routes, one OCTA route, plus last -mile -first -mile solutions including bikeways and pedestrian walkways and market -rate housing. This station expansion project supports RTA's goal of implementing timed transfer rail and bus and includes six bus bays with passenger amenities as well as a coach operator restroom facility. Transit Enhancements: During FY20, 10 stops were enhanced which included adding or replacing shelters, benches and trash cans and improving the accessibility of the stops. These enhancements were made in accordance with the Board - adopted Bus Stop Strategic Policy. 1.8 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES RTA is one of two designated Consolidated Transportation Services Agencies (CTSA) in Riverside County, the other being SunLine Transit Agency in the Coachella Valley. RTA's role as a CTSA is to assist RCTC in coordinating public transit throughout RTA's approximate 2,500-square-mile jurisdiction, support driver training and technical workshops and assist with preparing grant applications. Regional Coordination RTA coordinates regional services with the Corona Cruiser and Pass Transit systems in the cities of Corona, Beaumont and Banning. During FY20, RTA coordinated with the city staff for construction of bus stops for the new RTA Route 4 between Eastvale, Norco and Corona. The Route 4 schedule was also created in coordination with Metrolink and Corona Cruiser schedules. In the City of Riverside, RTA coordinates with Riverside Special Services, which provides 17 281 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency complementary ADA-compliant service to RTA's fixed -routes. Additionally, RTA staff periodically meets with social service providers, bus riders and other advocates through forums such as RCTC's Citizens Advisory Committee, RTA's ADA meetings, Transportation NOW (T-NOW) chapters and surrounding regional transit operators. As a CTSA, RTA continues to assist other agencies throughout western Riverside County by helping them to apply for federal and state funds such as the FTA § 5310 program. The projects funded through the 5310 program improve mobility for seniors and individuals with disabilities by removing barriers to transportation services and expanding the available transportation options. In FY20, RTA also assisted the City of Corona with their Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan (PTASP), a new federal requirement. Interregional Coordination and Transfer Agreements While most trips are completed within RTA's jurisdiction, there is a demand to provide connectivity to areas outside of this area. As such, RTA has collaborated with other transit agencies on agreements for funding splits and/or jurisdictional overlap, to further interregional connectivity via public transportation. As a result of these collaborations, RTA has transfer agreements with the following agencies: Metrolink, Omnitrans, OCTA, Corona Cruiser, SunLine and Pass Transit. Metrolink tickets and passes are accepted on RTA fixed routes that serve Metrolink stations during the period from one hour before to one hour after Metrolink service hours and are valid on the day of travel. Fare media from Omnitrans and Pass Transit are accepted at transfer locations at the equivalent base fare rate, excluding CommuterLink service, on the day of travel. Corona Cruiser fare media is accepted at transfer locations and adjacent stops. OCTA fare media is accepted for base fare on CommuterLink routes 200 and 205 at transfer locations in Orange County as well as La Sierra Metrolink between RTA routes 15 and 200 and OCTA Route 794. Current and retired employees as well as dependents of Omnitrans and OCTA are eligible to ride at no cost on any local fixed - route or CommuterLink in the RTA service area. In FY18, as part of the introduction of new CommuterLink Route 200, RTA and Omnitrans reached an agreement to allow Route 200 to include a stop at the Downtown San Bernardino Transit Center. RTA also reached agreement with OCTA and the City of Anaheim to allow Route 200 to serve stops in Anaheim including Harbor Boulevard at Disneyland. Omnitrans and RTA also coordinated on developing a new transfer point in South Fontana for RTA routes 21 and 49, and Omnitrans Route 82, as well as identified space for future Omnitrans service at the new Amazon Eastvale transit hub. In FY21, RTA will continue to collaborate with these agencies to continue to provide options for enhanced interregional connectivity via transfer and funding agreements and jurisdictional overlap. 18 282 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency 1.9 RECENT STUDIES AND PLANS RTA regularly conducts various studies in order to provide efficient, reliable, safe and accessible transportation that meets the needs of the community. These studies also lay out plans for RTA's future service, replacement and maintenance of capital equipment, financial projections and transition to ZEBs. Studies and plans are also completed in order to meet federal and local requirements to apply for grant funding. Listed below are the recent studies that have been completed and/or updated. Title Summary Calendar Year of Completion/ Update Location Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) A two-year study that reviewed RTA's network structure, route performance, market conditions and service performance. Findings from the study led to the development of phased recommendations that will help maximize ridership and improve the overall passenger experience while improving the system's financial sustainability. The COA is meant to guide RTA's service planning decisions over the next decade. 2015 RTA Website Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study This study surveyed both riders and non- riders in RTA's service area to gain a better understanding of the factors that contribute to ridership and identify strategies that can be implemented immediately to encourage additional ridership. 2018 RTA Website Transit Asset Management (TAM) Plan The TAM Plan, which is reviewed every two years, includes an inventory and condition assessment of RTA's assets as well as a plan to maintain the assets in a state of good repair. The plan forecasts when assets will need to be repaired or replaced and outlines future financial capital needs. 2018 RTA Board of Directors Meeting Agenda September 2018 Zero Emission Bus Analysis and Rollout Plan This study analyzed RTA's current route profiles, service area, energy consumption needs and ridership to determine which 2020 Will be available on RTA's website 19 283 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency type(s) of ZEB technology would be operationally feasible and cost effective for the Agency. The Rollout Plan will provide a detailed timeline and estimated cost for a phased transition to ZEBs that meets CARB requirements. The study and Rollout Plan is a fluid document and requires Board of Director approval. once completed and approved by RTA Board of Directors Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan (PTASP) The PTASP is reviewed annually and summarizes RTA's safety plans and includes the process and procedures to implement Safety Management Systems (SMS). This ensures RTA is performing the necessary risk management activities, monitoring the results and making the necessary adjustments in order to maintain a safe system. 2020 RTA Board of Directors Meeting Agenda March 2020 Contagious Virus Response Plan This plan was developed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This plan details RTA's contingency plan if service reductions are needed due to increased staff absenteeism or as mandated by the Board of Directors or other governmental authority. The reduction of service is presented in increasing tiers with the final third tier being a complete suspension of service. 2020 RTA Board of Directors Meeting Agenda March 2020 20 284 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency CHAPTER 2: ROUTE PERFORMANCE AND EXISTING SERVICE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS RTA evaluates and plans for its services using the RTA Board -adopted Service Standards and Warrants metrics, which are updated as needed. Service Standards and Warrants The Service Standards and Warrants guidelines are design standards that set the requirements for a minimum level of service that respects service quality characteristics such as route structure, service area coverage, operating hours and on -time performance. There are several factors that are typically considered when objectively measuring service performance. These factors, used in conjunction with the Annual State of Public Transit Report, help determine whether service is cost effective. SUMMARY OF SERVICE STANDARDS AND WARRANTS Population Density Density is determined by the number of people housed per square mile or the number of employees per square mile. RTA aims to provide at least 85 percent of all residences, places of work, high schools, colleges and shopping centers with access to bus service. Route Classifications RTA service can be classified into three fixed -route service types: local, RapidLink limited stops and CommuterLink express. Complementary to the fixed -route service is DAR. See Table 1 for the route classification of each route. Span of Service The span of service or the hours of operation refers to the start and end time of a route. The span of service will vary based on the demand in the community and the classification of the route. Bus Stop Spacing and I Amenities Depending on the population density, bus stop spacing in urban areas usually averages about 1,500 ft. (.28 miles) to 2,500 ft. (.47 miles). As service approaches more suburban and rural areas, bus stop spacing may be limited to locations with accessible curb and gutters and sidewalks suitable for ADA compliance. The new bus stop spacing standards allows spacing of 0.25 to 0.33 miles to support local, regional and community feeder routes; 0.25 to 0.5 miles for frequent key corridor local service; and 0.5 mile stop spacing for RapidLink service. Bus stops with 10 or more average weekday boardings may qualify for a shelter and stops with five or more boardings may qualify for a bench, subject to funding availability that is determined in the annual budget process. These standards were adopted in the Bus Stop Strategic Policy (2015). On -Time Performance RTA requires that no bus shall leave a time point early and should arrive at a time point no later than six minutes after the scheduled arrival time. This limit is appropriate for RTA's service area due to the average distance traveled by each route and the combined rural and urban areas. Headways (Frequency) Headways are the timed intervals between each scheduled trip within a fixed -route bus (e.g., the bus runs every 30 minutes). Headways range anywhere from every 15 minutes to every 120 minutes depending on the density and are aimed at operating in 15-minute increments for frequent key corridors supporting local and regional connector tiers. Community feeders and CommuterLink routes may vary depending on demand. 21 285 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Transfer Wait Time Transfer Wait Time refers to the amount of time a passenger has to wait when transferring from one mode of transportation to the next, whether it is bus or rail. In denser UZAs such as downtown Riverside, average transfer wait times should not be longer than approximately 20 minutes. In smaller urbanized and even in rural areas, the average transfer wait time can reach up to 30 to 45 minutes depending on the frequencies of the routes in the area. Load Factor (Maximum Depending on the bus, the maximum number of passengers should not exceed 150 Vehicle Loads) percent of the seating capacity or the legal weight limit of the bus. DAR vehicles should not exceed 100 percent of the seated capacity. Source: RTA's Service Standards and Warrants (2012), Bus Stop Strategic Policy (2015) Productivity vs. Coverage Target The Transportation Development Act (TDA) of 1971 established fiscal performance requirements of 20 percent farebox recovery in urbanized areas and 10 percent in rural areas. To help remain in compliance with this state mandate, and to improve effectiveness and efficiency, RTA has adopted the following policy for service deployment: • Sixty percent of fixed -route service should be deployed in areas with higher population and employment densities where transit is able to meet productivity standards, and • Forty percent of fixed -route service should be to maintain coverage in areas where lower population and employment densities limit transit service productivity. The 60/40 split establishes a benchmark for RTA to meet mandatory farebox recovery. By state mandate, new or significantly modified service is exempt from meeting the required criteria for up to two years plus the year of commencement. The objective is to give these routes time to perform up to standards. Other key metrics monitored are operating cost per revenue hour, passenger per revenue hour and mile, and key subsidy measurements. These key metrics are noted in Table 2.0. 2.2 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertain future, RTA plans to run seven-day Sunday service, plus additional peak CommuterLink service for all of FY21. DAR service will remain consistent with last year as the Agency strives to serve the most vulnerable population. For FY2020/21, RTA projects 537,914 revenue hours for the operation of 8,211,940 revenue miles systemwide. Ridership is projected to be 3,413,076, a significant decrease from FY20 ridership due to the pandemic. Table 2.1 shows detailed information on the FY21 Performance Report. 2.3 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY For FY21, the projected systemwide revenue miles and hours are distributed as follows: • 325,781 revenue hours and 4,861,106 revenue miles budgeted for directly operated routes. 22 286 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency • 133,455 revenue hours and 2,125,585 revenue miles budgeted for contract operated routes. • 78,678 revenue hours and 1,225,249 revenue miles budgeted for operation of DAR and DAR Plus service. For FY21, of the projected systemwide revenue miles and hours, 94,049 revenue hours and 1,689,423 revenue miles are for excluded routes. Table 2.1 provides detailed information on RTA's FY21 projected service and Table 2.2 lists the excluded routes and dates they will expire. As noted previously, The FY21 projections consider the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on ridership, service levels, operational capacity and revenue. 2.4 SERVICE PERFORMANCE On April 5, 2020 RTA reduced service to a seven-day Sunday schedule with additional CommuterLink peak service on weekdays. For FY21, RTA will continue to run this service which consists of 38 fixed routes and complementary DAR service. The total projected revenue miles and hours are provided in route level detail in Table 2.3. Estimated number of passengers, passenger miles, revenue hours and miles, operating costs and passenger revenue information are provided for each route including DAR which is summarized by UZAs. The FY21 projections take into account the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on ridership, service levels, operational capacity and revenue. 2.5 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS RTA continually monitors key service performance metrics such as farebox recovery and passengers per hour or trip. These metrics are key factors in evaluating the performance of individual routes and trips. In FY20, RTA completed a performance review of all fixed route trips. In order to identify underperforming trips and routes, the following metrics were used: • Trips (or sequence of trips) with less than or equal to six boardings were subject to discontinuation. • Peak trips (above base daytime frequency) with less than 20 boardings were subject to discontinuation. • Route service days with less than six passengers per revenue service hour were subject to reduction in frequency. This review resulted in the discontinuation of many under -performing trips across the RTA network. This process of review allows RTA to make the RTA network more financially sustainable. 23 287 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency In the last year, RTA invested in higher productivity local routes 1 (Corona — UCR), 16 (Moreno Valley Mall — UCR) and 19 (Perris — Moreno Valley) and CommuterLink routes 204, 206, 208 and 217. Under -performing trips were discontinued and LCTOP funding was used to minimize the increase in operational costs. This approach to service investment is intended to improve both ridership and productivity. Due to declining ridership triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the service improvements made in FY20 are currently suspended. Per the Board adopted Contagious Virus Response Plan, RTA is running Sunday service levels seven days a week as of April 5, 2020. 2.6 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS The education -related, work -related and retail and recreational trips are RTA's largest trip purposes. Customer surveys conducted in 2018 for the Market Assessment Study indicated that: • 48 percent of riders are students • 31 percent of all trips were to/from college or school • 29 percent of trips were for work purposes • 26 percent of trips were for retail or recreational purposes These market segments will remain critical to ridership expansion. RTA's student pass programs with local colleges and universities have been a great source of ridership growth over the last decade and continue to be marketed heavily to the college populations. RTA continues to make every effort to coordinate transit service with K-12 school bell schedules and boundaries. Ridership on our CommuterLink Express buses has seen in general decline due to low gas prices. This service type will continue to be monitored and service levels adjusted in line with demand. As service levels are adjusted, RTA will develop plans to effectively communicate these changes to customers. The 10-Year Plan and the Market Assessment Study point to the ongoing need for service improvements concentrated on four core themes: 1. Service Frequency: Key improvement required for RTA services to attract new ridership. 2. Connectivity: Better coordination between RTA services at key connection points. 3. Streamlining: Focus routes on major streets/corridors, reduce circuitous and overlapping routing of service, improve travel times and ease of understanding of network. 4. Span of Service: Add late -night service for major employment centers, colleges and universities. 24 288 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency RTA will continue to explore service changes that address these key service attributes to retain existing and attract new ridership. 2.7 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES Key service expansions implemented in FY20 are listed below: • Route 1 weekend frequency increased from every 30 to every 15 minutes during peak periods. • Route 12 was extended to Corona Hills (McKinley St.) retail area and weekday frequency was improved to every 55 minutes instead of every 70 minutes. • Route 13 daytime weekday service frequency was improved from every 65 minutes to every 50 minutes. • Route 14 daytime weekday service frequency was improved from every 70 minutes to every 50 minutes. • Added early morning and late evening trips to routes 19 and 28 weekdays, Saturday, and/or Sundays to better match warehouse shift times at Perris and Moreno Valley. • Route 22 daytime weekday service frequency was improved from every 60 minutes to every 45 minutes. • Routes 23, 24 and 61 were rerouted to terminate at the recently upgraded Promenade Mall bus stop. • Route 28 Saturday and Sunday frequencies were improved from 65-75 minutes to 45 minutes and implemented a weekend schedule. • Route 30 east loop was extended to travel along portions of Dunlap Drive, Nuevo and Evans Roads. Due to high ridership, a weekday trip was also added departing Orange Vista High School during school days only. • Route 31 weekday frequencies increased to every 60 minutes and weekend frequency increased to every 70 minutes between Moreno Valley, Beaumont/Banning, San Jacinto and Hemet. • Route 79 was extended from Hemet Valley Mall to MSJC San Jacinto providing a coordinated schedule with Route 74 thus maximizing frequency between Winchester, Hemet and San Jacinto. • Increased weekend frequency on routes 16 and 19 from every 30 to every 15 minutes. • Additional weekday trips were added through the midday period on CommuterLink routes 204, 206, 208 and 217 due to increasing demand for regional and intercounty trips, variable working hours of many riders and to connect with all weekday Metrolink trains. The FY20 service expansions listed above were implemented as scheduled but some of them are not currently in service due to the COVID-19 pandemic service reduction. The new Route 4 was scheduled to begin in May of 2020. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Route 4 implementation has been postponed. In FY20, RTA also reviewed ridership on all fixed -route 25 289 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 trips. A small number of trips with low ridership were discontinued. This approach minimized the impact on existing riders while making the service more efficient and financially sustainable. 26 290 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency CHAPTER 3: FUTURE SERVICE PLANS, FARE CHANGES, CAPITAL PLANNING AND MARKETING 3.1 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES The preparation of the FY21 service plan began with a performance review of all fixed -route bus service and the resulting findings influenced adjustments to service levels on selected RTA routes to improve service reliability, increase ridership and improve efficiency. Moreover, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a Sunday schedule seven days a week is planned for FY21. It is unknown when COVID-19 pandemic related mandates to stay at home will be lifted and how long the social, economic and financial impacts will last. RTA is also currently completing a ZEB Analysis that will produce a rollout plan for the Agency's ZEB fleet transition as mandated by CARB. No new service is projected for FY21 until the financial and operational impacts of transitioning to ZEBs are finalized. To prepare for the ZEB transition, provide more efficient service and use taxpayer dollars wisely, trips with low ridership will be discontinued on several routes. Elimination of unproductive trips helps create a stronger, more efficient system and optimizes routes for future use of ZEB technology. See Table 3 for highlights on RTA's FY21 service changes, operating budget and capital budget. The following service changes listed below are planned for FY21. Implementation of these service changes may change depending on COVID-19 pandemic developments. • September 2020 service changes: o Route 20: The 7:50 p.m. (Saturday only) weekend westbound trip departing Iris and Lasselle will be discontinued. o Route 24: The 7:04 p.m. weekday northbound trip departing Temecula Valley Hospital and the 6:49 a.m. weekday southbound trip departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. Also, proposed to be discontinued is the alternate routing that serves the Temecula Library. o Route 26: Due to low ridership, Route 26, which serves portions of Moreno Valley and Riverside, will be discontinued. o Route 27: The 9:02 p.m. weekday southbound and the 5:30 a.m. southbound weekend trips departing Galleria at Tyler will be discontinued. o Route 28: The 5:05 a.m. weekend westbound trip departing Hemet Valley Mall will be discontinued. o Route 30: The west loop will be discontinued while the east loop will remain. o Route 40: The 8:56 a.m., 11:26 a.m., 1:56 p.m. and 4:23 p.m. weekend eastbound trips departing Lake Elsinore Walmart, and the 7:36 a.m., 10:14 a.m., 12:41 p.m., 3:08 p.m. and 6:02 p.m. weekend westbound trips departing Cherry Hills and Bradley will be discontinued. 27 291 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency o Route 49: The 5:52 a.m. weekday westbound trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station will be discontinued. o Route 61: The 4:35 a.m. weekday northbound trip departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. o Route 210: The route will be discontinued due to low ridership. • January 2021 service changes: o Route 9: The 5:02 a.m. weekday northbound trip departing the Lake Elsinore Outlet Center and the 6:50 a.m. weekend southbound trip departing Perris Station Transit Center will be discontinued. o Route 11: The 6:04 a.m. weekday clockwise trip departing Moreno Valley Mall will be discontinued. o Route 12: The 7:13 p.m. weekday westbound trip departing La Cadena and Stephens will be discontinued. o Route 13: The 4:30 a.m. weekday eastbound trip departing Galleria at Tyler will be discontinued. o Route 23: The 7:24 p.m. weekday northbound trip and the 10:06 a.m. and 6:10 p.m. weekend northbound trips departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. o Route 32: The 5:50 a.m. weekday southbound trip departing Mt. San Jacinto College and the alternate routing along Commonwealth and Villines Avenues, Las Rosas Road and 7th Street will be discontinued. In April 2020, RTA issued a booklet summarizing the above proposed changes (English and Spanish). The booklet was available to the public on all fixed -route buses as well as online at RTA's website. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Newsom issued an executive order on March 19, 2020 for all individuals living in the State of California to stay home or at their place of residence except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of the federal critical infrastructure sectors. As a result, in -person community outreach for the FY21 proposed service changes was suspended. RTA's outreach was predominantly done online through the website, RTA Reader, Rider News, press releases and social media. Customers were invited to comment on the proposals by phone, email, traditional mail or by attending the May 2020 Board of Directors meeting. RTA will partner with the County of Riverside to provide the subsidized jury trolley (Route 50) through December 2020, at which time a new contract will be necessary to continue service. In partnership with Metrolink rail service, RTA usually operates the Route 54f shuttle service for Riverside's Mission Inn Festival of Lights on four Friday and Saturday evenings in November and December. This shuttle is well utilized and helps reduce traffic congestion at this popular event. If the event occurs this winter, RTA will work with Metrolink on an agreement to fund the 54 shuttle and update RCTC staff. There are two routes that are normally subsidized by agency partners that are not currently in the budget for FY21. Route 51, funded by UCR, and Route 55, funded by the City of Temecula, both need new funding agreements before services will be provided. RTA staff will keep RCTC 28 292 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency informed regarding the status of these subsidized routes and update the budget accordingly should the need to provide service arise in the coming fiscal year. 3.2 MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE The provision of ADA services remains a challenge. It is costly both to RTA and to the passengers who use it. Efforts to mitigate the increasing expenses in DAR service included the launch of a senior, disabled and Veteran Travel Training Program. The Travel Training Program commenced in fall 2011 and covers all aspects of public transit from training on how to ride the bus, how to use a bus schedule and map, as well as help in overcoming physical and social barriers that may prevent passengers from using a fixed -route bus. Participants benefit by developing a greater level of independence and increased mobility, ultimately bringing significant financial savings to both customers and RTA. In FY19, more than 450 trainees actively participated in travel training. Program participants took more than 98,500 trips on fixed -route buses. From July 1, 2019 to February 2020, more than 400 trainees actively participated in the program and have taken over 64,000 trips on fixed -route buses. Since the program's inception, travel training has served more than 2,400 seniors and persons with disabilities, resulting in more than 636,000 trips on fixed -route buses through February 2020. Based on FY19 actual performance, RTA can save an estimated $12,200 a year for every five -day - a -week rider who makes the switch from DAR to fixed -route service. During FY19, the program saved RTA over $900,000, and since the program's inception it has saved over $3.1 million. The recent COVID-19 pandemic and resulting social distancing standards have greatly reduced ridership demand on both fixed route and demand response service. In addition, these standards and lack of demand have rendered RTA's traditional Travel Training program delivery impractical and inefficient. For FY21, RTA will continue its mobility management assistance for seniors, disabled persons and veterans using our customer information center located in Hemet. Passengers will still be given step-by-step training on how to travel using RTA's fixed route system and will benefit from receiving instructions through phone calls and emails, limiting in -person contact. RTA staff confirmed with Caltrans, who administers the 5310 grant, that the funds awarded for the Travel Training program delivery can be used for this form of mobility management. The Medi-Cal Reimbursement Program was implemented in early 2012 and was developed in cooperation with the State Medi-Cal Program for paratransit trips taken to and from qualifying medical facilities. This program provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the net expenses associated with these trips and provides access to alternative sources of state and federal funding for DAR services. With the passage of Assembly Bill 2394 (AB2394), providers of State Medi-Cal insurance plans must now begin to provide their members with transportation services for 29 293 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency qualified medical, dental, mental health or substance use disorder appointments, and, to pick-up prescriptions and other medical supplies. Prior to the passing of this bill, these transportation services were provided by the Agency and reimbursed through the State's Medi-Cal program. AB2394 will have a negative impact on the Agency as it will limit the amount the Agency will be able to bill for medically purposed trips taken on DAR. While the guidance received from the County of Riverside (LGA) is still evolving, it is estimated the reimbursement rate will be approximately 34.58 percent of 50 percent of total eligible trips which will lead to a reduction in Medi-Cal revenue. 3.3 FUTURE MARKETING PLANS, STUDIES AND PROMOTION The Marketing Department executes marketing and communication campaigns targeted at existing and potential riders, commuters, students, elected officials, members of the business community, the media and non-profit groups. With the Agency's vision, mission and core values in mind, the department's efforts address community, media and public relations; allocates resources to increase the awareness of RTA's services; promotes the increased use of those services as well as to develop a positive relationship between the Agency and the people we serve. More specifically, the Marketing Department seeks to address the following areas: • Increasing fixed -route ridership and awareness of RTA services • Encouraging trial and repeat use among residents who currently do not ride the bus • Enhancing a positive image among riders, potential riders, community leaders and elected officials • Ensuring public awareness and education for new and expanded bus service • Educating the public on the benefits of public transportation • Coordinating timely updates to RTA's website: RiversideTransit.com • Promoting our services on social media and presence at community events • Providing excellent customer service • Coordinating media and public relations • Enhancing government relations • Assisting with employee communication The department has identified objectives, target markets and strategies that can result in maximum impact both now and for years to come. The coming year provides a variety of opportunities for the department, including the promotion of new mobility hubs, and continued efforts to push mobile ticketing as well as popular free -ride programs for area college students. The department will also examine new ways to promote our service to our youngest and oldest riders, especially given the possibility of new legislation that would grant free rides to youth, college students and seniors. 30 294 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Service Adjustments: Marketing promotes information regarding service adjustments through a variety of advertising methods to reach customers including rider alerts, press releases, website information, brochures, newspaper ads, on -bus information and social media. Customer Information Materials: RTA aims to make the transit system easier to understand and use through enhanced passenger information and signage. Materials are developed for both novice riders and experienced users to read and understand. Informational documents are readily available and designed to attractively promote RTA services to new users, while maintaining interest and engagement from existing riders. Public Speaking Opportunities: Presentations are customized for a variety of market segments. Outreach to business and community leaders is used to educate these groups about the economic benefits that transit provides to the RTA community, while presentations for social service agencies or other gatekeeper organizations are tailored to educate these groups on how transit can enhance personal mobility and how they can help to promote its usage. Presentations also occur at senior centers, colleges and school orientation programs that focus on how those populations can use the bus to accomplish their various tasks. Community Relations: Many of RTA's strategies rely on working through local organizations and businesses to direct specific promotional messages to constituencies with realistic potential for using RTA's transit services. Community -based marketing and partnerships with local businesses and public agencies of this kind are cost-effective. A way RTA builds upon these relationships is by participating in community events such as expos and parades, which provides the opportunity to attract potential new users and promote RTA as an active community partner. Website and Social Media: RTA's website is used to publish up-to-date information about Agency services, policies and publications. RTA also utilizes social media, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and iAlerts. Social media is a relatively inexpensive advertising format that allows RTA to provide information quickly and easily to users while raising RTA's profile and brand. Customer Information Center: The Customer Information Center provides phone information to customers seven days a week. As call volumes fluctuate, RTA maintains staffing levels to adequately meet its customers' needs. Various resources such as Google Transit trip planners and BusWatch real-time bus tracking allow customer representatives to quickly and accurately answer customer inquiries. English and Spanish speaking clerks are always available to assist callers. For other language requirements, both written and verbal, RTA uses the service of LanguageLine Solutions which provides interpretation and translation in more than 200 languages. Transportation NOW: T-NOW was formed in 1992 as a grassroots advocacy group comprised of public transit advocates. Members of T-NOW range from elected officials to community activists to everyday transit users who are committed not only to addressing regional transportation 31 295 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency issues but meeting the needs of individual communities. There are six T-NOW chapters throughout the service area that include Greater Riverside, Hemet / San Jacinto Area, Northwest, Moreno Valley / Perris, San Gorgonio Pass Area and Southwest. Each chapter meets monthly and sets goals and objectives relevant to their communities. Media and Public Relations: Media relations allow RTA to generate awareness and recognition as well as to reinforce marketing messages and activities, influence community or industry members and positively position the Agency in the public's eye. Press releases are sent throughout the year to alert the media and the general public of developments, route or schedule changes, holiday schedules or Agency events. The Agency also produces an annual report which is distributed by mail and on the Agency website. Free Fares for Youth and College Students Program: From August 17, 2020 — June 30, 2021, RTA will implement the Free Fares for Youth and College Students Program across all RTA fixed routes for youth ages 18 and under and college students. During this time, students will be able to ride any RTA fixed route for free by showing appropriate ID. Transportation is often a barrier for many students. Providing students with access to free, reliable transportation can help increase school attendance and improve grades. This program will provide RTA with a realistic estimate on the actual number of students that will ride and the potential cost of the program if it were to be implemented year-round, as is suggested in AB1350. The program will also increase awareness of RTA routes and help promote farebox recovery during the transition back to normalcy from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Free Fares for Youth and College Students Program is funded through the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP). 3.4 PROJECTED RIDERSHIP GROWTH (FY21-23) Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the projected ridership for FY21 will be significantly lower than the previous year at 3,413,076, a decrease of 60 percent from FY20. The projected ridership is reflective of RTA's reduced operations to seven-day Sunday service, plus additional peak CommuterLink service for FY21. It is unknown when pandemic related mandates to stay at home will be lifted and what the social, economic and financial situations will be post the COVID-19 pandemic. As society begins to adapt to a new normal, it is anticipated that RTA will see an increase in ridership however the timing of that is unknown. 3.5 PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE CHANGES In April 2019, the Board approved a two-phase fare increase, the first of which was implemented in July 2019. The second fare increase will be implemented in July 2021. The table below shows the current fare structure and the fare increase that will take place in July 2021. 32 296 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency FARE TYPE CURRENTFARE JULY2021 LOCAL FIXED ROUTE CASH General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran Child (46" tall or under) DAY PASS General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran 7-DAY PASS General 30-DAY PASS General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran Youth (grades 1-12) $1.75 $2 75( $1 75( $1 50( 75( $5 $6 $2.50 $3 $2.50 $3 $20 $25 $60 565 $30 $35 530 535 $45 $50 COMMUTERLINN CASH General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran Child (46" tall or under) DAY PASS General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran 30-DAY PASS General Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Card Holder Veteran $3.50 $4 $2.75 $3 $2.75 $3 $2.75 $3 $10 $12 $7 $8 $7 $8 $95 $110 $70 $85 570 $85 DIAL -A -RIDE AND DIAL -A -RIDE PLUS SENIOR/DISABLED Cash 10-Ticket Book CHILD(46"TALL OR UNDER) Cash 3.6 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING $3.50 - $10.50 $4- $12 $35 $40 75t $1 Capital improvements to the transit system are necessary in order to maintain facilities and equipment in a state of good repair, reduce costly repairs and ensure the safety and security of the public. Moreover, capital projects such as improvements to stops and installation of passenger amenities can lead to an increase in ridership. Listed below are RTA's upcoming 33 297 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency projects pending available funding. These projects are estimated to begin within the next fiscal years. Revenue Vehicles RTA purchases revenue vehicles to replace older vehicles that have reached their minimum useful life in years or mileage as defined by the FTA. Projections on when vehicles will need to be replaced are based on service levels and are outlined in the Agency's TAM Plan. Future purchases of replacement revenue vehicles will follow the ZEB Rollout Plan and meet CARB's ICT mandate. Revenue vehicles projected to be purchased in FY21-23 are funded. Non -Revenue Vehicles Non -revenue vehicles are used for coach operator shift change, operations supervisors and administrative staff. Trucks are used for the stops and zones crew that service all of RTA's bus stop amenities. RTA purchases non -revenue vehicles to replace older vehicles that have reached their minimum useful life in years or mileage as defined by the FTA. RTA will be purchasing electric support cars to minimize greenhouse gas emissions. Non -revenue vehicles purchased in FY21-23 are funded. Equipment and Passenger Amenities Transit Signal Priority (TSP): TSP is a tool that allows transit vehicles to travel through controlled intersections faster and more conveniently. Unlike signal pre-emption which is used on emergency vehicles, TSP technology on a bus utilizes a transmitter that allows the traffic signals along major streets to remain in "green" mode for several seconds longer, therefore allowing a late -running bus to advance more quickly along its route to maintain on -time performance. TSP is currently being used on Route 1 along the University Avenue and Magnolia Avenue corridors. Electric Vehicle Charging Stations: RTA will be installing electric chargers at the administrative offices to charge the support vehicles. The proposed plan is to install six electric chargers in 2020 and another 10 will be installed in 2021. This project is fully funded and is estimated to cost $573,000. Moreno Valley Mall Bus Stop Improvements: In January 2020, space for two additional bus stops were added at the Moreno Valley Mall Transit Center to ease bus congestion. RTA staff is drafting a plan to add passenger amenities and bus pads to protect the roadway. This project is currently unfunded. RTA staff is currently working on design plans. The project will go out to bid in the winter of 2020 and completion is tentatively scheduled for May 2021. 3.7 CAPITAL PROJECTS BEYOND FY23 34 298 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside hansI Agency In December 2018, CARB's ICT regulation was passed which requires RTA to transition to a ZEB fleet by the year 2040. RTA is currently in the middle of its ZEB Analysis and Rollout Plan. As previously mentioned, due to the COVID-19 pandemic RTA has requested an extension to December 31, 2020. This analysis will recommend — subject to board approval — the type(s) of ZEB technology RTA will use given RTA's service area, routes and ridership. The Rollout Plan will provide a detailed timeline and estimate the financial costs of transitioning to ZEB technology. Future capital purchases may include ZEBs, related recharging/refueling equipment, new facilities and on route charging. 35 299 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL PLANNING The FY21 Operating and Capital budgets reflect the Agency's plan to address the current and projected impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The proposed budgets are developed to support overall Agency goals of providing as much safe and reliable public bus transportation in western Riverside County during this pandemic as practical, providing excellent customer service and preserving as much ridership as possible — all within estimated fiscal constraints. It should be noted that significant adjustments — positive or negative — to the requested budgets are likely after the commencement of FY21. 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET FOR FY21 In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Agency's FY21 budget reflects a plan to dramatically decrease the level of safe, reliable and effective fixed route public bus transportation service. This reduction is in line with the Agency's core values balanced with economic circumstances and fiscal reality. Compared to the current Board -approved FY20 budgeted service plan, fixed route revenue service is planned to decrease by 36 percent. With that in mind, the Agency is planning for a service level that balances forecasted fiscal constraints, safety of the public and our employees and the varied profile of the service area. Further, we are planning to deliver service aimed at preserving as much ridership as possible throughout the region while we await changes in conditions on many fronts. Staff remains fully committed to exploring all service and financial alternatives necessary to meeting the public transit needs of the citizens who live and work in western Riverside County. With that in mind, the total proposed FY21 Budget for the Agency is $85,013,449. This includes $82,392,199 for operating expenses and $2,621,250 for capital projects. The $82,392,199 FY21 Operating budget reflects a decrease of $10,042,833, or 11 percent, from the FY20 budget. The operating budget covers planned revenue service provided on both directly operated and contracted fixed routes, as well as DAR trips including DAR Plus. The budget also covers administrative costs to support operations and maintenance. The $2,621,250 FY21 Capital budget is decreased by $39,462,780, or 94 percent, from the current FY20 Capital budget. Staff has prioritized the Agency's capital improvement needs with strong consideration toward maintenance of critical operations and vehicle procurements to maintain existing services while preparing for a post-COVID-19 pandemic future. The biggest driver in the decrease is not programming funding for the partial replacements of the heavy-duty CNG fleet, the contracted fixed route fleet and the DAR fleet. The capital budget includes the reprogramming of funds from the UCR Mobility Hub and the programming of additional SB 1 State of Good Repair funding. 36 300 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Operating Budget Profile: Administration 22% Planning 1% Maintenance 15% Operations 62% The proposed operating budget totals $82,392,199. Operations, at 62 percent, constitutes the largest component of the proposed operating budget. Maintenance represents another 15 percent of the total. Together, Operations and Maintenance equate to 77 percent of the Agency Operating budget. Planning and Administration functions combine for the remaining 23 percent of the operating budget. The operating budget contains five major cost elements. The elements are: • Salaries and Benefits (55 percent), comprises employee wages/salaries and fringe benefits including, but not limited to, medical, pension, Worker's Compensation and OPEB • Purchased Transportation (27 percent), represents the resources required for contracted transportation services for certain fixed routes and DAR demand • Materials and Supplies (five percent), consists primarily of fuel, parts and lubricants for the operation, repair and maintenance of Agency vehicles • Services (four percent), includes external auditing, legal counsel, legislative support, marketing, outside maintenance, custodial, armored transport, actuarial services, insurance brokerage and towing • Other Expenses (nine percent), consists of insurance, utilities, printing and publications, advertising and promotion, dues and subscriptions and other miscellaneous expenses 37 301 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency 9% 4% 5% 27% Capital Budget Profile: ❑ Salaries & Benefits • Contracted Routes o Services ❑ Materials & Supplies ■ Other Expenses The proposed FY21 Capital budget totals $2,621,250. Capital funding will be used for the purchase of critical items to maintain existing operations and service levels. FY21 capital budget profile by project element is shown below: ❑Tire Lease • Non -revenue Vehicles ■ SB1SGR ❑ ICT /Post-COVID-19 Plan • Shelters & Stops Notable capital projects included in the proposed FY21 budget are: • Additional funds programming for 25 support vehicles to upgrade them from unleaded fuel to electric • Replacement of 12 non -revenue vehicles (two trucks, 10 cars) • Expansion of two non -revenue vehicles (two cars) • Tire lease • Associated Transit Improvements • SB 1 State of Good Repair funding • Programming of funds toward planning the impacts of the CARB ICT mandate to utilize ZEB vehicles in the future • Reprogramming UCR Mobility Hub funds to Bus Turnouts on Canyon Crest and vehicle procurements listed above 38 302 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency 1- 7 FUNDING SOURCES FOR OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAMS Funding for the operating and capital budgets are generated from federal, state, and local revenue sources. The table shown below summarizes the allocation of each revenue source for FY21. 39 303 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Total Operating & Capital Revenues $85,013,449 Operating Revenues $82,392,199 Passenger Fares $1,052,078 LTF Operating Assistance $12,135,671 Federal Operating Assistance $64,524,031 FTA Section 5307 $62,763,937 FTA Section 5310 $150,000 FTA Section 5311 $1,407,094 FTA CMAQ $0 Low Carbon Transit Operations (LCTOP) $3,365,455 Measure A $0 SB 1 STA $0 Other Local Revenue $1,517,964 40 Capital Revenues $2,621,250 Federal $337,613 FTA Section 5307 $337,613 TUMF $250,000 STA $84,403 SB1 SGR $1,949,234 304 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Funding for the FY22 and FY23 operating and capital budgets are also expected to be from federal, state and local revenue sources. Since we don't know what the circumstances will be when we get to those two fiscal years, Tables 4.1 and 4.2 are based on a few simple assumptions. With respect to the operating budgets, these amounts are based on delivering the same level of service with the same staffing levels and contract providers. For planning sake, a year -over -year inflation factor of three percent was used starting with FY21. Once the estimated budget was established under these assumptions, we reviewed the funding sources for viability and expectation. As necessary, revenue sources were adjusted. With respect to the capital budgets, these amounts are based on estimated needs over a longer time horizon based on today's expectation of the future. When the succeeding fiscal year's budgets are prepared in the future, the capital needs and plans will be re -addressed for current and expected circumstances. 4.3 TUMF PROGRAM The WRCOG TUMF Program ensures that a new development pays its fair share for the increased traffic that it creates. As identified in the WRCOG TUMF Administrative Plan, RTA is currently allocated three percent of every TUMF dollar collected for use on projects of regional significance located in the TUMF network. Below is the comprehensive list of RTA's projects included in the 2016 TUMF Nexus Study: PROJECT NAME CATEGORY UNIT COST U S COST TUMF SHARE Riverside Mobility Hub at Vine Street Transit Center 1 $6,000,000 1 $6,000,000 $3,630,000 Moreno Valley Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Jurupa Valley Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Banning Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Lake Elsinore / Canyon Lake Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Transit Enhancements in Temecula / Murrieta Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Hemet Mobility Hub Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 San Jacinto Mobility Hub Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 MSJC Mobility Hub Transfer Facility $1,000,000 1 $1,000,000 $605,000 Regional Operations and Maintenance Facility 0 and M Facility $50,000,000 1 $50,000,000 $30,251,000 Annual Transit Enhancements Program Bus Stop $40,000 290 $11,600,000 $7,018,000 Central Corridor Rapid Link Implementation BRT Service Capital $60,000 42 $2,520,000 $1,525,000 41 305 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21 — FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Medium Buses Vehicle Fleet 1 $155,000 7 $1,085,000 $656,000 Vehicle Fleet Large Buses Vehicle Fleet 2 $585,000 29 $16,965,000 $10, 264,000 COA Study COA Study $950,000 1 TOTALS: Source: TUMF Nexus Study — 2016 Program Update, Page 51. $950,000 $575,000 $153,120,000 $92,639,000 The Nexus Study is a planning document, and programming of TUMF funds is subject to funding availability and done through the TUMF Project Expenditure Plan. Table 5 contains RTA's FY21 — FY25 TUMF Expenditure Plan effective July 1, 2020. 4.4 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS As a recipient of state and federal funding, RTA is required to comply with regulatory policies and procedures that are reviewed and audited regularly. SUMMARY OF REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS TDA Triennial Audit: Under the State of California, TDA provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: LTF and STA funds. These funds are for the development and support of public transportation needs that exist in California and are allocated to areas of each county based on population, taxable sales and transit performance. See Table 4.3 for a summary of the recommendations and actions taken from the last Triennial in 2019. FTA Triennial Review: The triennial review is a comprehensive review of compliance with FTA requirements that is conducted of § 5307 grantees at least every three years. Even though the review is conducted of § 5307 grantees, it addresses all FTA programs for which the grantee is the direct recipient of funds, including § 5304, 5307, 5310, 5311 and 5339. It addresses the grantee's implementation of Federal requirements in 21 areas and its oversight of sub -recipients, operations contractors or lessees funded by these programs. The last FTA Triennial Review was completed in November 2019 with no deficiencies found in any of the areas of review. ADA: The federal ADA Act of 1990 prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity and access for persons with disabilities. Under the ADA Act, public transit operators are required to provide complementary paratransit service to persons who are ADA certified and are within three-quarters of a mile of a local fixed -route bus during the hours of bus service operation. RTA remains fully compliant with all Federal ADA regulations and has had no ADA customers denied service on DAR. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program: The federal DBE Program seeks to ensure nondiscrimination in the award and administration of FTA's Department of Transportation -assisted contracts in the Department's highway, transit and airport financial assistance programs and to create a level playing field on which DBEs can compete fairly for Department of Transportation -assisted contracts. 42 306 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency In accordance with U.S. Department of Transportation regulations found at 49 C.F.R. § 26.45, a new 3- year DBE goal was submitted for review to the FTA and became effective on October 1, 2018. RTA's DBE program will remain in effect through September 30, 2021. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO): The Federal Transit Laws, 49 U.S.C. § 5332 (b), provide that "no person in the United States shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, or age be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any project, program or activity funded in whole or in part through financial assistance under this Act." This applies to employment and business opportunities and is considered to be in addition to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEO Program is submitted to FTA every four years and RTA is in compliance. The last submission was on March 2, 2018. Drug and Alcohol Testing: Per the Code of Federal Regulations (Title 49, Part 40 and 655), RTA established a Drug and Alcohol testing policy in an effort to deter drug and alcohol use in the workplace. The policy establishes the circumstances in which applicants and employees are tested for drugs and alcohol in the workplace and the consequences when they test positive. The purpose of the policy is to prevent accidents, injuries, and fatalities resulting from the misuse of alcohol and prohibited drugs by employees who perform safety -sensitive functions. The Drug and Alcohol Report is in compliance with FTA and was last updated on January 1, 2018. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides that "no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." (42 U.S.C. § 2000d). RTA submits Title VI Program to FTA every three years. The last report was submitted in October 2019. Limited English Proficiency (LEP): FTA issued regulations based on the Executive Order 13166 to all transit operators to establish LEP policies and procedures that ensures that RTA publications are issued in English and any other languages used by a significant number of the general population in the service area as determined by periodic demographic assessments. RTA's updated LEP policy and plan was submitted with the Title VI Program in October 2019. Public Hearing Policy: U.S. Code Title 49 § 5307 under the Urbanized Area Formula Grant Program requires that transit systems maintain a process to solicit and consider public comments before raising fares or implementing major reductions in service. RTA's Public Hearing Policy for Major Service and Fare Changes was last revised in October 2012. Alternative Fueled Vehicles: RCTC Resolution No. 00-018 established an emissions standards requirement for the acquisition of urban transit buses with federal, state, or local funds. All full-sized urban public transit buses purchased or leased with federal, state or local funds granted or programmed by RCTC shall meet the urban bus optional, reduced -emissions standards set by the California Air Resources Board for oxides of nitrogen and non -methane hydrocarbons. RTA remains fully compliant with RCTC Resolution No. 00-0018 for vehicles purchased using federal, state or local funds. 43 307 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Southern California Air Quality Management District — Rule 1192: This rule requires public transit fleets of 15 or more revenue vehicles and operating in SCAQMD's jurisdiction to acquire alternative fuel heavy duty vehicles when procuring revenue vehicles. The rule applies whether revenue vehicles are operated by government agencies or by private entities under contract to government agencies that provide passenger transportation services including intra- and inter -city shuttle services. National Transit Database (NTD): The NTD is the primary source for information and statistics on U.S. transit systems. Congress requires agencies to report NTD data on an annual basis if they receive or benefit from §5307 or §5311 formula grants. NTD also requires monthly operating and safety statistics reports from agencies that file as a "Full Reporter". FTA submits annual NTD reports that summarize transit service and safety data to Congress for review and use. RTA submits monthly and annual NTD reports. The last annual report was submitted in October 2019. 4.5 OPEN PROJECTS Listed below are a few of RTA's current projects. Capital projects help to increase the safety, efficiency and reliability of the transit system and can lead to a growth in ridership. Detailed information on all open capital projects can be found in Table 4.4. Planned Passenger Transit Facilities Canyon Crest Bus Stops: Currently, 31 percent of UCR's population use RTA's services. UCR is one of the busiest transit destinations in the Agency's transit network, with over 1,700 boardings and alightings reported on an average weekday. Planned service improvements, the popular U-Pass Program, parking price increases, increased congestion and resulting environmental and sustainability challenges are projected to contribute toward positive ridership gains in the future. The current on -street bus stops at UCR located on Canyon Crest Drive are utilized by routes 1, 16, 51, 52, 204 and RapidLink Gold Line. This stop currently does not have the space, bus shelters or other amenities essential to effectively accommodate the current and planned service levels. The proposed upgrades to the Canyon Crest Bus Stops will include approximately five bus bays with shelters, benches, trash cans and bus pads. Also included in the plan is a bidirectional bicycle track across the street, further enhancing safety by moving bicyclists out of bus traffic. The track is funded by the City of Riverside. The upgrades to the Canyon Crest Bus Stops were originally envisioned as a state of the art UCR Mobility Hub. However, due to funding constraints related to construction bids, the UCR Mobility Hub is no longer moving forward. The Canyon Crest upgrades will be completed in partnership with the City of Riverside and are scheduled to begin in June 2021 and is estimated to be completed by September 2021. Hemet Mobility Hub: Today, about 150,000 people reside in the Hemet -San Jacinto Valley, a rapidly growing area in western Riverside County. The City of Hemet has a projected population 44 308 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency of 126,500 in 20401, a 58 percent increase from 80,070 in 20162. Population growth will result in an increased demand for transit service in the area. The City of Hemet developed a Downtown Specific Plan in April 2017. The City's Downtown Specific Plan has identified a need for an intermodal mobility hub to meet the projected demand for local and regional transit services such as bus, rail, car, bike sharing and transportation network companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft. The intermodal mobility hub will also serve as a park -and -ride facility and include solar power and electric vehicle (EV) charging stations to support emerging EV technologies. Furthermore, the potential extension of commuter rail service from the City of Perris to Hemet and San Jacinto (currently being studied by RCTC in their rail feasibility study) could also benefit from the intermodal mobility hub. The plan identifies a city owned 14.5-acre site as the Transit Oriented District (TOD) and includes plans for a multi -modal mobility hub. The hub will be central to the Hemet Civic Center to the south, the County Administrative Center to the north and the Hemet Valley Hospital complex to the east. A substantial portion of this site will be available to transit supportive land uses that could be developed through PPP. The plan envisions a transit -oriented development that will include housing, retail, office, public spaces and entertainment venues that will include energy - efficient sustainable design features to fully activate the mobility hub to be a thriving community activity center. The vision for the project creates an opportunity to use cap -and -trade funding. The proposed Hemet Mobility Hub will address current and future mobility, sustainability and efficiency needs of the City of Hemet and RTA. It will have the capacity to anchor RTA routes 28, 31, 32, 33, 42, 74, 79 and 217 that currently serve the Hemet -San Jacinto Valley. RTA plans to construct a mobility hub in partnership with the City of Hemet. On October 27, 2016, the RTA Board of Directors approved staff's recommendation to enter into a MOU with the City of Hemet to prepare a conceptual plan. A contract was awarded for A&E in April 2017 to PSOMAS. Site selection, conceptual planning and initial design were completed in April 2018. In FY19, RTA had the project modeled by SCAG during the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) update, programmed additional 5339 small urban funds for construction and submitted a grant for those funds. In January 2019, RTA received approval of the final conceptual report and direction to explore PPP options to deliver the project. In May 2019, the Hemet City Council approved moving forward with an RFP to develop all 14.5 acres of city -owned property. The City of Hemet received funding for an SB2 grant which includes funding for a Market Assessment and a Project Manager for the TOD portion. An MOU between RTA and the City of Hemet will be completed once a Project Manager is hired in spring of 2020. Vine Street Mobility Hub: The City of Riverside's General Plan 2025 identified Vine Street as one of the preferred locations within downtown Riverside for a new mobility hub due to its proximity 1 SCAG 2016-2040 RTP / SCS, Demographics and Growth Forecast 2 California Department of Finance, Report E-1 45 309 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency to major employment centers, county and city government centers, UCR, Riverside Community College, the Convention Center, multiple entertainment venues and urban housing complexes. Thus, the Vine Street Mobility Hub will function as a regional multi -modal transportation hub that supports connectivity between multiple transit agencies such as RTA and SunLine Transit Agency in Riverside County; Omnitrans, the public transit provider in San Bernardino County; and Metrolink, the commuter rail service provider for Southern California. The Vine Street Mobility Hub is to be located on land across from the Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station on Vine Street. The Mobility Hub would be designed and developed with emerging technologies, renewable energy sources and mobility solutions in mind. RTA has constructed an interim on -street layover facility at Vine Street to accommodate the buses operating throughout downtown Riverside. RTA currently owns 4.5 acres on Vine Street and is currently working to acquire one additional parcel from Riverside Public Utilities (RPU), which currently has a vacated underground well. The well site, which is located in the center of RTA's land, was originally not available. In partnership with RPU, RTA will relocate the well site and obtain ownership of the center parcel. With the additional parcel, RTA will be able to construct a larger, more contiguous Mobility Hub. The Vine Street Mobility Hub is currently in the conceptual design phase. Extensive community outreach and feedback was completed in early 2020 and is being incorporated into the design. The design will be shared with the community in June 2020 for additional feedback and approval. Once the conceptual design is completed, RTA will go out to bid for the Architectural and Engineering and construction of the Vine Street Mobility Hub. RTA has secured additional funding for construction of the Vine Street Mobility Hub through the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Grant (AHSC). In partnership with the Wakeland Housing and Development Corporation, RTA was awarded $1.79 million towards the construction of the Vine Street Mobility Hub. Operations and Maintenance Facility RTA's main facility, located in Riverside, was built in 1986 and a secondary facility, located in Hemet, was purchased in 1999. The Riverside facility is at max capacity and cannot accommodate any more vehicles. Similarly, the Hemet facility is nearing capacity and has limited space for expansion. With the CARB mandate to switch to ZEBs by 2040, additional space will be needed to house all the necessary recharging/refueling equipment needed to run service. With the limited amount of space available, RTA will need to examine alternative solutions. Moreover, with the switch to zero emission technology, an additional facility located in a key location may be necessary to minimize deadhead and/or provide options to recharge/refuel. Further movement on the Operations and Maintenance Facility is pending results from the ZEB Analysis and Rollout Plan. Equipment and Passenger Amenities 46 310 Short Range Transit Plan • FY21— FY23 Riverside Transit Agency Scheduling and Operations Software Project: RTA began procurement of the Transit Scheduling and Operations software in May 2019. On February 27, 2020, the RTA Board of Directors approved the purchase of the Giro scheduling software. Once implemented, this software will allow RTA to create its own efficient schedules, vehicle blocking, run -cuts and rosters without relying on a vendor to provide such services. The procurement included a new customer comment database and the option of a new customer trip planner. It will also allow for improved operations management by integrating the daily crew and vehicle rostering and other operational functions into one system to improve the efficiency and administration of these processes. Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS): RTA has also introduced the ATIS technology with LED signage, known as BusWatch, which relay real-time arrival information on display at major transfer points. As part of the ITS upgrade program, new BusWatch real-time displays were installed at mobility hubs in the cities of Perris, Corona and Temecula. Additional BusWatch real- time displays will be installed at the Hemet Mobility Hub and Vine Street Mobility Hub when these projects are constructed. Passengers may also lookup real-time arrival information via RTA's BusWatch website, mobile application and SMS. The ATIS project included querying and alerting of bus arrivals via text messaging, which was recently completed with the upgraded ITS program. Mobile application development is also part of this project, which allows passengers to lookup real-time arrival information for all RTA fixed routes. Additional open projects can be found in Table in 4.4. 47 311 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Comparative Statistics: FY2020 Budget vs. Proposed FY2021 SRTP Unlinked Passengers Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Fare Revenue (1) Operating Expenses FY2020 I FY2021 FY2020 I FY2021 FY2020 I FY2021 FY2020 I FY2021 FY2020 I FY2021 Direct Operated Routes 1 1,841,432 864,077 81,287 58,404 877,320 675,189 $ 2,073,821 $ - $ 8,926,770 $ 9,947,938 1 RL 148,311 - 17,737 - 242,278 - $ 119,078 $ - $ 1,947,798 $ - 3 133,111 - 11,667 - 142,326 - $ 126,083 $ - $ 1,281,303 $ - 10 156,905 38,398 13,350 8,635 147,432 98,141 $ 180,300 $ - $ 1,466,039 $ 1,470,731 11 107,232 34,770 10,067 6,759 115,956 79,674 $ 125,322 $ - $ 1,105,531 $ 1,151,194 12 204,309 97,005 19,244 14,174 226,948 170,010 $ 230,563 $ - $ 2,113,328 $ 2,414,295 13 219,056 122,133 18,934 11,510 215,412 142,897 $ 242,933 $ - $ 2,079,291 $ 1,960,500 14 201,011 77,625 17,092 10,330 211,782 144,590 $ 228,168 $ - $ 1,877,019 $ 1,759,553 15 456,003 157,899 31,737 18,139 362,517 231,554 $ 520,345 $ - $ 3,485,339 $ 3,089,597 16 484,422 264,044 27,871 22,636 312,071 263,917 $ 517,605 $ - $ 3,060,744 $ 3,855,525 18 120,676 28,787 10,328 8,707 131,766 118,481 $ 134,832 $ - $ 1,134,166 $ 1,483,066 19 720,557 359,143 50,171 38,748 623,393 522,671 $ 860,057 $ - $ 5,509,648 $ 6,599,938 20 286,639 88,571 23,469 13,809 327,278 213,733 $ 332,931 $ - $ 2,577,380 $ 2,352,125 21 111,690 53,240 9,805 7,930 141,128 118,167 $ 139,925 $ - $ 1,076,744 $ 1,350,665 22 294,543 121,740 21,541 15,278 326,523 249,299 $ 362,465 $ - $ 2,365,612 $ 2,602,391 27 193,268 69,574 19,831 11,730 385,040 236,827 $ 246,397 $ - $ 2,177,835 $ 1,998,043 28 396,395 204,967 30,441 21,795 521,820 379,100 $ 472,542 $ - $ 3,342,939 $ 3,712,287 29 136,953 80,791 15,422 10,498 217,403 155,479 $ 167,371 $ - $ 1,693,605 $ 1,788,120 41D 32,899 - 2,133 - 33,947 - $ 36,557 $ - $ 234,227 $ - 49 224,426 92,404 14,930 9,506 182,447 123,231 $ 269,670 $ - $ 1,639,541 $ 1,619,223 54F 8,197 - 455 - 2,275 - $ 78,053 $ - $ 49,967 $ - 200 172,740 63,073 25,932 14,588 608,025 374,162 $ 453,288 $ 181,807 $ 2,847,833 $ 2,484,755 202D 3,063 - 615 - 19,830 - $ 5,833 $ - $ 67,494 $ - 204 61,883 19,321 8,429 6,208 177,755 134,640 $ 132,553 $ 37,608 $ 925,623 $ 1,057,413 205 21,737 8,822 4,471 4,352 111,659 111,812 $ 66,721 $ 21,311 $ 491,049 $ 741,279 206 47,313 5,571 6,368 5,107 130,876 139,002 $ 161,201 $ 16,701 $ 699,356 $ 869,913 208D 21,518 12,861 3,912 6,938 84,247 178,530 $ 37,393 $ 17,878 $ 429,602 $ 1,181,686 210D 1,886 - 367 - 4,824 - $ 7,667 $ - $ 40,296 $ - 217D 6,039 - 1,165 - 30,080 - $ 16,024 $ - $ 127,917 $ - Total Directly Operated Routes 6,814,214 2,864,817 498,771 325,780 6,914,358 4,861,106 $ 8,345,698 $ 275,304 $ 54,773,996 $ 55,490,238 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -57.96% -34.68% -29.70% -96.7% 1.3% Contracted Fixed Routes 3 8,838 30,172 1,502 4,976 19,131 64,023 $ 11,600 $ - $ 138,273 $ 594,728 4 32,863 - 3,388 - 56,568 - $ 43,137 $ - $ 312,000 8 180,705 51,209 17,042 12,885 245,214 203,676 $ 233,308 $ - $ 1,569,375 $ 1,539,895 9 61,534 20,146 6,643 4,904 118,530 96,306 $ 79,858 $ - $ 611,750 $ 586,103 19 2,559 265 257 392 3,457 3,580 $ 2,494 $ - $ 23,712 $ 46,872 23 91,996 22,361 14,403 11,510 207,785 160,717 $ 114,121 $ - $ 1,326,330 $ 1,375,651 24 60,788 18,643 12,085 8,949 144,876 116,012 $ 75,487 $ - $ 1,112,890 $ 1,069,493 26 8,798 - 4,331 - 57,318 - $ 9,528 $ - $ 398,835 $ - 30 61,057 8,102 7,610 4,009 92,371 56,143 $ 69,904 $ - $ 700,763 $ 479,127 31 148,146 49,638 22,913 17,228 548,582 340,240 $ 197,552 $ - $ 2,110,078 $ 2,059,010 32 108,510 30,806 9,721 8,419 105,630 96,492 $ 137,276 $ - $ 895,222 $ 1,006,239 33 38,177 9,302 6,986 3,906 86,963 49,566 $ 45,552 $ - $ 643,324 $ 466,767 40 31,335 10,053 9,017 7,308 154,733 128,872 $ 46,022 $ - $ 830,376 $ 873,369 41C 39,565 10,914 5,193 4,392 85,319 82,769 $ 43,510 $ - $ 478,265 $ 524,931 42 45,811 5,357 5,775 3,766 85,501 51,857 $ 52,944 $ - $ 531,831 $ 450,045 50 2,213 1,773 2,352 2,231 15,794 14,734 $ 208,239 $ 110,000 $ 216,551 $ 266,641 51 28,260 - 1,898 - 19,367 - $ 158,101 $ - $ 174,823 $ - 52 49,107 - 3,210 - 22,420 - $ 48,763 $ - $ 295,576 $ - 54 1,384 - 1,741 - 6,918 - $ 449 $ - $ 160,310 $ - 55 9,011 - 794 - 9,339 - $ 13,812 $ - $ 73,099 $ - 61 103,910 35,450 19,400 12,343 327,452 214,620 $ 150,140 $ - $ 1,786,583 $ 1,475,187 74 183,478 57,019 21,443 13,316 369,588 233,333 $ 252,099 $ - $ 1,974,702 $ 1,591,515 79 103,797 39,792 18,644 12,921 281,298 212,645 $ 132,767 $ - $ 1,716,955 $ 1,544,257 202 11,286 - 3,698 - 88,071 - $ 28,960 $ - $ 340,573 $ - 208 31,074 - 6,123 - 170,100 - $ 82,638 $ - $ 563,848 $ - 210 2,155 - 550 - 16,248 - $ 6,946 $ - $ 50,647 $ - 212 - - - - - $ - $ - $ - $ - 217 45,439 - 8,182 - 231,848 - $ 126,717 $ - $ 753,512 $ - Total Contracted Fixed Routes 1,491,796 401,001 214,901 133,454 3,570,421 2,125,585 $ 2,371,924 $ 110,000 $ 19,790,203 $ 15,949,830 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -73.12% -37.90% -40.47% -95.4% -19.4% TOTAL FIXED ROUTES 8,306,010 3,265,819 713,672 459,234 10,484,779 6,986,691 $ 10,717,622 $ 385,304 $ 74,564,199 $ 71,440,069 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -60.68% -35.65% -33.36% -96.4% -4.2% 312 4:55 PM 5/12/2020 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Comparative Statistics: FY2020 Budget vs. Proposed FY2021 SRTP Unlinked Passengers Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Fare Revenue (1) Operating Expenses FY2020 FY2021 FY2020 FY2021 FY2020 FY2021 FY2020 FY2021 FY2020 FY2021 Dial -A -Ride Routes Riv-San UZA 250,957 93,422 123,744 49,914 2,037,861 776,886 $ 1,041,846 $ 422,477 $ 10,855,166 $ 6,927,904 Murr-Tem-Men UZA 82,994 30,235 40,923 16,154 673,938 244,575 $ 344,548 $ 137,521 $ 3,589,898 $ 2,322,027 Hemet UZA 58,293 21,114 28,744 11,281 473,361 179,283 $ 242,004 $ 95,448 $ 2,521,475 $ 1,515,301 Non-UZA 2,964 2,487 1,462 1,329 24,069 24,505 $ 12,305 $ 11,327 $ 128,211 $ 186,899 Total Dial -A -Ride Routes 395,208 147,258 194,873 78,679 3,209,229 1,225,249 $ 1,640,703 666,774 $ 17,094,750 10,952,130 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -62.74% -59.63% -61.82% -59.4% -35.9% Taxi Service Riv-San UZA 8,633 - 5,024 - 128,979 - $ 40,303 $ - $ 479,435 $ - Murr-Tem-Men UZA 3,046 - 1,551 - 38,662 - $ 14,034 $ - $ 144,231 $ - Hemet UZA 2,246 - 1,509 - 39,838 - $ 10,657 $ - $ 147,594 $ - Non-UZA 159 - 75 - 1,211 - $ 728 $ - $ 4,823 $ - Total Taxi Routes 14,084 - 8,159 - 208,690 - $ 65,722 - $ 776,083 - % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -100.00% -100.00% -100.00% -100.0% -100.0% TOTAL DAR and TAXI SERVICE 409,292 147,258 203,032 78,679 3,417,919 1,225,249 $ 1,706,425 $ 666,774 $ 17,870,833 $ 10,952,130 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -64.02% -61.25% -64.15% -60.9% -38.7% GRAND TOTAL 8,715,302 3,413,077 916,704 537,913 13,902,698 8,211,940 $ 12,424,047 $ 1,052,078 $ 92,435,032 $ 82,392,199 % Change - FY21 vs. FY20 -60.84% -41.32% -40.93% -91.5% -10.9% (1) Total Passenger Fare Revenue consists of cash fares, tickets, passes and subsidy agreements. It does not include othe local revenues. 313 4:55 PM 5/12/2020 Route # Route Class Directly Operated Fixed Routes Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 1: FY2020/21 Individual Route Descriptions as of July 1, 2020 'This route has selected trips that are/will be both directly operated and contract operated. Route Description Cities/Communities Served Connections ' 1 ■i Regional From UCR and downtown Riverside to Galleria at Tyler and Corona primarily via University Ave. and Magnolia Ave. Riverside, Home Gardens, Corona Metrolink, Corona Cruiser, Omnitrans, SunLine 31 Local loth St. and Belle Ave. in Corona via Main St. and Grand Ave. to the Corona Transit Center, Norco College, Jurupa Valley and Eastvale via Hamner Ave. and Limonite Ave. to Amazon Eastvale Corona, Riverside, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley Metrolink, Corona Cruiser ' 10 Local 11 Local From Big Springs St. on Riverside's Northside to Galleria at Tyler primarily via Blaine St., Third St., Victoria Ave. and Lincoln Ave. Circulator between Moreno Valley Mall and March Air Reserve Base primarily via Frederick St., Ironwood Ave., Heacock St. and JFK Dr. Riverside Moreno Valley, March Joint Powers Authority Omnitrans SunLine 12 Local From Stephens Ave. and Center St. on Riverside's Northside, through downtown, then to Merced Dr. at Magnolia Ave. via Magnolia Ave., California Ave. and Jurupa Ave. Riverside Omnitrans 13 Local From Hunter Park Metrolink Station to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Chicago Ave., MLK Blvd., Magnolia Ave., Central Ave., Arlington Ave., Colorado Ave. and Tyler St. Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans 14 Regional From Galleria at Tyler to downtown Riverside via Indiana Ave. and Brockton Ave., then University Ave. and Iowa Ave. and Center St then to Loma Linda VA Hospital via Mount Vernon Ave. and Barton Rd. Riverside, Highgrove, Loma Linda Omnitrans 15 Local From downtown Riverside to Galleria at Tyler to Magnolia Ave. and Merced Dr. via Magnolia Ave., Arlington Ave., La Sierra Ave., Tyler St. and Indiana Ave. Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine, OCTA 16 Local From Moreno Valley Mall to UCR via Day St., Box Springs Rd., Sycamore Canyon Blvd., Central Ave., Canyon Crest Dr., Campus Dr., University Ave., Iowa Ave. and Blaine St. Moreno Valley, Riverside SunLine 18 Local From Moreno Valley College to Moreno Valley Mall via Kitching St., Perris Blvd., Cottonwood St. and Frederick St., then Pigeon Pass Rd. to Sunnymead Ranch Moreno Valley SunLine 19 Regional From Moreno Valley Mall to Perris Station Transit Center via Sunnymead Blvd. and Perris Blvd. and Moreno Valley College with service to distribution centers at Indian St. and Morgan St. Moreno Valley, Perris Metrolink, SunLine 20 Regional From Magnolia Ave. and Elizabeth Ln. in Riverside to Moreno Valley College via Central Ave., Alessandro Blvd., Moreno Beach Dr. and Iris St. with selected trips serving Moreno Valley March Field Metrolink Station weekdays Riverside, Moreno Valley 21 Local From Galleria at Tyler in Riverside to Fontana via Van Buren Blvd., Mission Blvd. and Country Village Jurupa Valley, Fontana, Riverside Omnitrans 22 Regional 27 Regional From Perris Station Transit Center to downtown Riverside via Old Elsinore Rd., Clarke St., Wood Rd., Alessandro Blvd., Chicago Ave. and University Ave. From Perris Station Transit Center to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via 1-215 Fwy and Van Buren Blvd. Riverside, Woodcrest, Mead Valley, Perris Riverside, Woodcrest, March Joint Powers Authority, Perris Metrolink, Omnitrans Metrolink 28 Regional From Florida Ave. and Lincoln Ave. in East Hemet to Perris Station Transit Center Perris, Romoland, Homeland, Hemet, East Hemet, Valle Vista Metrolink 29 Regional From downtown Riverside to Amazon Eastvale via Rubidoux Blvd. and Limonite Ave. Selected trips deviate via Jurupa Valley/Pedley station weekdays. Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 41 Regional From the Mead Valley Community Center to Moreno Valley with stops at Moreno Valley College and Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley, Perris, Mead Valley 49 Regional From downtown Riverside to Country Village and Fontana via Mission Blvd. Jurupa Valley, Riverside, Fontana Omnitrans, SunLine 200 Express 204 Express From San Bernardino Transit Center to Anaheim via SR-91 and SR -SS Freeways with stops at downtown Riverside and La Sierra Metrolink Stations, Village at Orange and Anaheim Resort district From UCR to Montclair TransCenter via downtown Riverside, Country Village and Ontario Mills Mall Riverside, Corona, Orange, Anaheim Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Ontario, Montclair Omnitrans, Metrolink, OCTA, SunLine Metrolink, Omnitrans, Foothill Transit 205 Express From the Promenade Mall in Temecula to Village at Orange vial-15 and SR-91 Fwys with stops in Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Dos Lagos and Corona Transit Center Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Corona, Orange Metrolink, Corona Cruiser, OCTA 206 Express From Promenade Mall Temecula to Corona Transit Center via I-15 Freeway with stops in Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley and Dos Lagos Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Corona Metrolink, Corona Cruiser 2081 Express From Promenade Mall Temecula to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station via I- 215 with stops in Murrieta, Perris, Moreno Valley and downtown Riverside Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, Riverside, Moreno Valley Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 314 Route 9 Route Class Contracted Fixed Routes 3 Local Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 1: FY2020/21 Individual Route Descriptions as of July 1, 2020 'This route has selected trips that are/will be both directly operated and contract operated. Route Description loth St. and Belle Ave. in Corona via Main St. and Grand Ave. to the Corona Transit Center, Norco College, Jurupa Valley and Eastvale via Hamner Ave. and Limonite Ave. to Amazon Eastvale Cities/Communities Served Corona, Riverside, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley Connections Metrolink, Corona Cruiser TrI Local Serving Lake Elsinore Outlet Center, Walmart on Railroad Canyon Rd. and Lakeland Village via Lakeshore Dr., Mission Trail, Grand Ave. and Riverside Dr. Lake Elsinore, Lakeland Village, Wildomar 9 Local From Lake Elsinore OutLet Center to Perris Station Transit Center via Hwy 74, Theda St., Ellis Ave. 19 Regional From Perris Station Transit Center to Exceed Facility on Trumble Rd. Perris, Good Hope, Meadowbrook, Lake Elsinore Perris Metrolink Metrolink 23 Local From Central & Palomar St. in Wildomar through Murrieta to County Center Dr. in Temecula Wildomar, Murrieta, Temecula 24 Local Temecula service with stops at County Center Dr., Old Town, Pechanga Resort and Temecula Valley Hospital Temecula 30 Local Perris local circulator serving the Perris Transit Center, Walmart, May Ranch and Weston Rd. & Carter Dr. Perris Metrolink 31 Regional Service from Hemet Valley Mall to Moreno Valley Mall via Banning and Beaumont with stops at Mt. San Jacinto Community College, Sun Lakes Village, Walmart on Moreno Valley, Banning, Beaumont, San Jacinto, Moreno Beach Dr., Moreno Valley Senior Center and Riverside University Medical Hemet Center Pass Transit, SunLine 32 Local 33 Local From Hemet Valley Mall to Mt. San Jacinto College via downtown San Jacinto and San Jacinto Ave. From Super-Walmart on Sanderson Ave. and the Hemet Valley Mall in west Hemet to Stanford St. and Thornton Ave. in east Hemet San Jacinto, Hemet Hemet, East Hemet, Valle Vista 40 Regional From Walmart in Lake Elsinore to Cherry Hills Blvd. in Menifee with stops in Canyon Lake, Quail Valley, MSJC Menifee Campus and Heritage Lake Menifee, Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore 41 Regional From the Mead Valley Community Center to Moreno Valley with stops at Moreno Valley College and Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley, Perris, Mead Valley 42 Local From the Hemet Valley Mall to Soboba Casino in San Jacinto via Kirby St., Cottonwood Ave., Santa Fe Ave. and East Main St. 50 Trolley Riverside downtown Jury Trolley service 61 Regional Hemet, San Jacinto Riverside From the Perris Station Transit Center to Cherry Hills Blvd. and Bradley Rd. in Menifee and Temecula with stops at MSJC Menifee campus, Loma Linda University Medical Center - Murrieta and County Center Dr. Perris, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula Metrolink From San Jacinto and Hemet to Menifee and Perris, serving MSJC San Jacinto 74 Regional campus, Hemet Valley Mall, Winchester, MSJC Menifee campus and Perris Station San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Perris Transit Center Metrolink 79 Regional From the Hemet Valley Mall to Old Town Temecula via Winchester Rd. (State Hwy 79). Also serves County Center Dr., Promenade Mall, Temecula City Hall, French Valley and Southwest Justice Center Hemet, Winchester, French Valley, Murrieta, Temecula From Promenade Mall Temecula to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station via I- Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, Riverside, 208 Express 215 with stops in Murrieta, Perris, Moreno Valley and downtown Riverside Moreno Valley Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 315 Route 1 Route Class Contracted Paratransit Routes Riverside -San Bernadino UZA Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 1: FY2020/21 Individual Route Descriptions as of July 1, 2020 'This route has selected trips that are/will be both directly operated and contract operated. Route Description Origin -to -Destination Cities/Communities Served Banning, Beaumont, Corona, Eastvale, Good Hope, Highgrove, Jurupa Valley, Loma Linda, Mead Valley, Meadowbrook, Moreno Valley, Norco, Perris, Quail Valley, Riverside, Woodcrest Connections Hemet UZA Origin -to -Destination East Hemet, Gillman Springs, Green Acres, Hemet, Homeland, San Jacinto, Valle Vista, Winchester Murrieta-Temecula-Menifee UZA Origin -to -Destination Canyon Lake, French Valley, Lake Elsinore, Lakeland Village, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar, Romoland Non-UZA Origin -to -Destination March Joint Powers Authority 316 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Directly Operated Table 1,1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2013 2014 2016 GIL GIL GIL G27D102N4 G27D102N4 G27D102N4 38 38 38 82 9 30 42 42 42 CN CN CN 82 9 30 27,023,330 2,307,614 3,300,986 30,985,356 2,707,899 4,208,698 377,870 300,877 140,289 Totals: 114 121 121 32,631,930 37,901,953 313,239 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 317 Page 1 of 5 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Purchased Transportation Table 1,1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2016 2016 2018 2019 2018 2018 EDN EDN GLV GLV SPC ZZZ AerElit320 AerElit320 Entourage Entourage Senator II Villager 26 26 28 28 12 28 9 23 3 27 4 5 33 33 33 33 32 32 GA GA CN CN CN CN 9 23 3 27 4 5 2,112, 577 5,705,275 185,183 397,339 238,717 111,281 2,308,908 6,342,620 211,655 1,710,167 431,231 181,859 256,545 275,766 70,551 63,339 107,807 36,371 Totals: 148 71 71 8,750,372 11,186,440 157,555 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 318 Page 2 of 5 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Commuter Bus / Directly Operated Table 1,1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2013 2014 2016 GIL GIL GIL G27D102N4 G27D102N4 G27D102N4 38 38 38 15 2 7 42 42 42 CN CN CN 15 2 7 4,527,464 402,517 759,749 4,959,186 466,900 1,105,936 330,612 233,450 157,990 Totals: 114 24 24 5,689,730 6,532,022 272,168 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 319 Page 3 of 5 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Commuter Rail / Purchased Transportation Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Year Built Mfg. Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active # of Vehicles Contingency FY 2019/ Vehicles 20 FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2018 GLV Entourage 28 7 33 CN 7 463,459 66,208 Totals: 28 7 7 463,459 66,208 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 320 Page 4 of 5 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Table 1,1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seating Capacity Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2018/19 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2019/20 2016 2013 2017 2018 EDN GCC GLV SPC AeroTch220 GCII Universal Senator II 12 12 12 12 36 5 30 39 23 22 24 22 GA GA GA GA 36 5 30 39 4,687,910 9,182,095 2,650,196 1,145,953 5,814,354 1,171,889 3,105,231 2,108,454 161,509 234,377 103,507 54,062 Totals: 48 110 110 17,666,154 12,199,928 110,908 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 321 Page 5 of 5 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review Riverside Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 8,715,302 Passenger Miles 74,865,016 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 916,704.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 13,902,698.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 17,233,789.0 Total Operating Expenses $92,435,032 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $14,645,321 Net Operating Expenses $77,789,711 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 21.16% I >= 16.81% I 21.33% I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $100.83 <= $99.45 $98.48 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $8.93 >= $6.23 and <= $8.43 $8.24 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $1.04 >= $0.88 and <= $1.20 $0.96 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $84.86 >= $61.57 and <= $83.29 $77.47 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $5.60 >= $4.05 and <= $5.47 $5.13 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 9.51 >= 8.42 and <= 11.39 9.40 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.63 >= 0.55 and <= 0.75 0.62 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 322 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: Riverside Transit Agency All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 3rd Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 8,697,652 6,244,521 3,413,076 None Passenger Miles 60,974,297 53,795,212 23,753,074 None Revenue Hours 880,029.4 664,041.2 537,914.0 None Total Hours 1,005,385.6 753,264.7 620,363.0 None Revenue Miles 13,376,948.5 10,023,015.7 8,211,940.0 None Total Miles 16,559,181.1 12,344,505.7 10,345,926.0 None Operating Costs $73,902,008 $65,396,958 $82,392,199 None Passenger Revenue $18,302,160 $13,952,115 $2,570,042 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue $3,365,455 None Operating Subsidy $55,599,848 $51,444,843 $79,822,157 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $83.98 $98.48 $153.17 <= $98.01 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $5.52 $6.52 $10.03 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $8.50 $10.47 $24.14 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 24.77% 21.33% 7.20% >= 0.2 Fails to Meet Target Subsidy Per Passenger $6.39 $8.24 $23.39 >= $7.23 and <= $9.79 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.91 $0.96 $3.36 >= $0.82 and <= $1.12 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $63.18 $77.47 $148.39 >= $63.04 and <= $85.28 Better Than Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $4.16 $5.13 $9.72 >= $4.14 and <= $5.60 Better Than Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 9.88 9.40 6.35 >= 7.41 and <= 10.03 Fails to Meet Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.65 0.62 0.42 >= 0.48 and <= 0.66 Fails to Meet Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager"' 5/13/2020 323 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 61 63 184 63 142 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $76,320,585 $73,902,008 $92,435,032 $65,396,958 $82,392,199 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $16,551,836 $18,302,160 $14,645,321 $13,952,115 $2,570,042 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $59,768,749 $55,599,848 $77,789,711 $51,444,843 $79,822,157 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 8,583,410 8,697,652 8,715,302 6,244,521 3,413,076 Passenger Miles 61,095,376 60,974,297 74,865,016 53,795,212 23,753,074 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 871,285.7 880,029.4 916,704.0 664,041.2 537,914.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 13,314,621.9 13,376,948.5 13,902,698.0 10,023,015.7 8,211,940.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 16,636,856.2 16,559,181.1 17,233,789.0 12,344,505.7 10,345,926.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $87.60 $83.98 $100.83 $98.48 $153.17 Farebox Recovery Ratio 21.69% 24.77% 21.16% 21.33% 7.20% Subsidy per Passenger $6.96 $6.39 $8.93 $8.24 $23.39 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.98 $0.91 $1.04 $0.96 $3.36 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $68.60 $63.18 $84.86 $77.47 $148.39 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.49 $4.16 $5.60 $5.13 $9.72 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 9.9 9.9 9.5 9.4 6.4 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.64 0.65 0.63 0.62 0.42 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 324 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 9 21 73 12 31 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $14,458,642 $17,341,511 $25,224,674 $13,124,210 $15,368,025 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $1,505,152 $2,919,347 $3,490,631 $1,819,518 $72,187 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $12,953,490 $14,422,164 $21,734,043 $11,304,692 $15,295,838 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 535,732 2,411,134 2,459,523 1,340,234 568,589 Passenger Miles 5,764,439 19,261,465 34,144,615 13,694,362 6,069,244 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 226,289.6 251,382.6 233,578.0 123,924.0 94,049.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,667,202.1 4,179,317.8 4,045,690.0 2,051,501.9 1,689,423.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,635,167.2 5,211,672.7 4,970,649.0 2,481,928.9 2,232,587.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $63.89 $68.98 $107.99 $105.91 $163.40 Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.41% 16.83% 28.76% 13.86% 5.28% Subsidy per Passenger $24.18 $5.98 $8.84 $8.43 $26.90 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.25 $0.75 $0.64 $0.83 $2.52 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $57.24 $57.37 $93.05 $91.22 $162.64 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.53 $3.45 $5.37 $5.51 $9.05 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.4 9.6 10.5 10.8 6.1 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.15 0.58 0.61 0.65 0.34 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 325 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Non -Excluded Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 52 52 111 57 111 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $61,861,943 $56,560,497 $67,210,358 $52,272,748 $67,024,174 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $15,046,684 $15,382,813 $11,154,690 $12,132,597 $2,497,855 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $46,815,259 $41,177,684 $56,055,668 $40,140,151 $64,526,319 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 8,047,678 6,286,518 6,255,779 4,904,287 2,844,487 Passenger Miles 55,330,937 41,712,832 40,720,401 40,100,850 17,683,830 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 644,996.1 628,646.7 683,126.0 540,117.2 443,865.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 9,647,419.8 9,197,630.7 9,857,008.0 7,971,513.7 6,522,517.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,001,689.0 11,347,508.3 12,263,140.0 9,862,576.8 8,113,339.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $95.91 $89.97 $98.39 $96.78 $151.00 Farebox Recovery Ratio 24.32% 27.20% 18.31% 23.21% 7.64% Subsidy per Passenger $5.82 $6.55 $8.96 $8.18 $22.68 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.85 $0.99 $1.38 $1.00 $3.65 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $72.58 $65.50 $82.06 $74.32 $145.37 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $4.85 $4.48 $5.69 $5.04 $9.89 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 12.5 10.0 9.2 9.1 6.4 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.83 0.68 0.63 0.62 0.44 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 326 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- RTA-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 27 29 121 29 104 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $45,344,067 $43,633,672 $54,790,401 $39,790,737 $55,490,238 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $12,196,667 $14,126,671 $10,566,973 $11,172,911 $1,793,268 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $33,147,400 $29,507,001 $44,223,428 $28,617,826 $53,696,970 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 6,733,159 6,825,680 6,814,214 4,894,513 2,864,816 Passenger Miles 45,420,633 45,497,976 55,325,782 38,725,794 19,588,964 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 454,083.8 477,158.4 498,771.0 370,325.3 325,781.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 6,414,366.3 6,634,855.0 6,914,358.0 5,141,865.9 4,861,106.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 7,439,877.6 7,755,931.7 8,022,582.0 5,968,920.4 6,116,386.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $99.86 $91.44 $109.85 $107.45 $170.33 Farebox Recovery Ratio 26.90% 32.38% 24.92% 28.08% 9.29% Subsidy per Passenger $4.92 $4.32 $6.49 $5.85 $18.74 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.73 $0.65 $0.80 $0.74 $2.74 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $73.00 $61.84 $88.66 $77.28 $164.83 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $5.17 $4.45 $6.40 $5.57 $11.05 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 14.8 14.3 13.7 13.2 8.8 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.05 1.03 0.99 0.95 0.59 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 327 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- RTA Bus (Contract) -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 26 27 63 26 38 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $16,517,876 $15,278,960 $19,773,798 $13,937,072 $15,949,830 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $2,850,017 $2,696,440 $2,371,923 $1,587,148 $110,000 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $13,667,859 $12,582,520 $17,401,875 $12,349,924 $15,839,830 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,434,349 1,465,889 1,491,796 1,083,105 401,002 Passenger Miles 10,554,990 10,477,439 16,089,468 11,783,841 2,351,365 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 206,028.0 209,163.3 214,901.0 159,378.0 133,455.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,437,415.0 3,424,493.8 3,570,421.0 2,578,701.1 2,125,585.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,844,391.0 4,725,227.7 4,918,739.0 3,528,573.3 2,707,607.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $80.17 $73.05 $92.01 $87.45 $119.51 Farebox Recovery Ratio 17.25% 17.65% 16.93% 11.39% 0.68% Subsidy per Passenger $9.53 $8.58 $11.67 $11.40 $39.50 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.29 $1.20 $1.08 $1.05 $6.74 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $66.34 $60.16 $80.98 $77.49 $118.69 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.98 $3.67 $4.87 $4.79 $7.45 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 7.0 7.0 6.9 6.8 3.0 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.42 0.43 0.42 0.42 0.19 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 328 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- RTA-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 4 4 4 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $13,847,982 $14,365,383 $17,094,750 $11,326,234 $10,952,130 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $1,451,606 $1,428,510 $1,640,703 $1,151,631 $666,774 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $12,396,376 $12,936,873 $15,454,047 $10,174,603 $10,285,357 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 403,099 393,713 395,208 259,100 147,258 Passenger Miles 4,962,149 4,846,607 3,230,031 3,189,521 1,812,745 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 204,026.7 186,938.4 194,873.0 130,477.6 78,678.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,265,002.9 3,140,400.5 3,209,229.0 2,207,920.8 1,225,249.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,154,750.0 3,900,822.5 4,083,778.0 2,752,484.3 1,521,933.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $67.87 $76.85 $87.72 $86.81 $139.20 Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.48% 9.94% 14.60% 10.17% 6.08% Subsidy per Passenger $30.75 $32.86 $39.10 $39.27 $69.85 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.50 $2.67 $4.78 $3.19 $5.67 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $60.76 $69.20 $79.30 $77.98 $130.73 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.80 $4.12 $4.82 $4.61 $8.39 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.0 2.1 2.0 2.0 1.9 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.12 0.13 0.12 0.12 0.12 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 329 Page 1 of 1 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- RTA Taxi -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics . Peak -Hour Fleet 4 4 4 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $610,660 $623,993 $776,083 $342,915 $0 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $53,546 $50,539 $65,722 $40,425 $0 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $557,114 $573,454 $710,361 $302,490 $0 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 12,803 12,370 14,084 7,803 0 Passenger Miles 157,605 152,275 219,735 96,055 0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 7,147.3 6,769.4 8,159.0 3,860.2 0.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 197,837.7 177,199.3 208,690.0 94,527.8 0.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 197,837.7 177,199.3 208,690.0 94,527.8 0.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $85.44 $92.18 $95.12 $88.83 Farebox Recovery Ratio 8.77% 8.10% 8.46% 11.79% Subsidy per Passenger $43.51 $46.36 $50.44 $38.77 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.53 $3.77 $3.23 $3.15 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $77.95 $84.71 $87.06 $78.36 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $2.82 $3.24 $3.40 $3.20 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 1.8 1.8 1.7 2.0 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.08 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 330 Page 1 of 1 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 2.2A Excluded Routes Excluded routes are new routes or new service extentions that are eligible for exemption from the farebox recovery requirements. Route # 41 Mode (FR/DAR) FR Service Type (DO/CO) CO 9 FR CO 12 FR DO Route Description New route from Amazon Eastvale to Corona Transit Center via Archibald Ave. and River Rd. through Eastvale, Norco and Corona From the Lake Elsinore Outlet Mall to Perris Station Transit Center via Hwy 74 Riverside (La Cadena & Stephens) to downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler Mall and Corona Hills Plaza Date of Implementation Exemption End Date 9/9/2018 6/30/2021 9/8/2019 6/30/2022 From Perris Station Transit Center to downtown 22 FR DO Riverside via Hwy 74, Old Elsinore Rd. and 9/9/2018 6/30/2021 Alessandro Blvd. 27 FR DO 28 FR DO 30 FR CO From Perris Station Transit Center to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Florida Ave., 215 Fwy and Van Buren Blvd. New route from Florida Ave. and Lincoln Ave. in east Hemet to Perris Station Transit Center Perris local circulator serving the Perris Transit Center, Walmart, May Ranch and Weston Rd. & Carter Dr. 1/13/2019 6/30/2021 1/13/2019 6/30/2021 4/5/2020 6/30/2022 From Super-Walmart on Sanderson Ave. and the Hemet 33 FR CO Valley Mall in west Hemet to Stanford St. and Thornton 4/5/2020 6/30/2022 Ave. in east Hemet 204 2 FR DO From UCR, downtown Riverside and Jurupa Valley to Ontario Mills Mall and Montclair Transit Center 1/12/2020 6/30/2022 From the Promenade Mall in Temecula to Corona 206 2 FR DO Transit Center via 15 Fwy with stops at Murrieta, 1/12/2020 6/30/2022 Lake Elsinore Outlet Center and Temescal Valley 208 2 FR CO/DO Serves the Promenade Mall in Temecula to the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station and downtown area via 1-215 with stops in Murrieta, Menifee, Perris and Moreno Valley 1/12/2020 6/30/2022 Serves Hemet and San Jacinto to Temecula and 2173 FR CO/DO Escondido 1/12/2020 6/30/2022 1 Route 4 implementation has been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 2 Additional mid -day service was suspended as of 4/5/20 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 3 As of 4/5/20, Route 217 is no longer running due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 331 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements Table 2,3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 FY 2020/21 All Routes Peak Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Route # Day Type Vehicles Passengers Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue RTA-0 All Days $1,517,964 RTA-1 All Days 18 864,077 4,650,598 58,404 63,755 675,189 824,475 $9,947,938 $0 $1,536,000 RTA-10 All Days 3 38,398 206,608 8,635 9,171 98,141 111,836 $1,470,731 $0 RTA-101 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-11 All Days 3 34,770 187,300 6,759 7,440 79,674 100,163 $1,151,194 $0 RTA-12 All Days 4 97,005 521,803 14,174 15,449 170,010 201,719 $2,414,295 $0 RTA-13 All Days 3 122,133 657,187 11,510 12,782 142,897 171,371 $1,960,500 $0 RTA-14 All Days 4 77,625 418,012 10,330 11,687 144,590 181,260 $1,759,553 $0 RTA-15 All Days 5 157,899 849,828 18,139 19,895 231,554 273,876 $3,089,597 $0 RTA-16/16E All Days 7 264,044 1,422,004 22,636 24,439 263,917 300,509 $3,855,525 $0 $500,000 RTA-18 All Days 3 28,787 154,863 8,707 9,495 118,481 142,907 $1,483,066 $0 RTA-19 All Days 8 359,143 1,932,565 38,748 43,392 522,671 678,731 $6,599,938 $0 $589,270 RTA-19C All Days 0 265 1,805 392 587 3,580 10,208 $46,872 $0 RTA-20 All Days 6 88,571 476,836 13,809 15,050 213,733 243,435 $2,352,125 $0 RTA-200 All Days 6 63,073 1,307,664 14,588 16,778 374,162 442,161 $2,484,755 $181,807 RTA-202 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-202D All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-204D All Days 2 19,321 363,807 6,208 6,810 134,640 145,487 $1,057,413 $37,608 $289,900 RTA-205 All Days 3 8,822 166,121 4,352 6,810 111,812 192,613 $741,279 $21,311 RTA-206D All Days 3 5,571 104,901 5,107 8,474 139,002 239,546 $869,913 $16,701 $185,727 RTA-208 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-208D All Days 2 12,861 242,178 6,938 10,679 178,530 300,425 $1,181,686 $17,878 $264,558 RTA-21 All Days 2 53,240 286,333 7,930 9,086 118,167 150,394 $1,350,665 $0 RTA-210 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-210D All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-217 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-217D All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-22 All Days 6 121,740 1,443,842 15,278 17,962 249,299 330,874 $2,602,391 $0 RTA-23 All Days 3 22,361 153,306 11,510 13,255 160,717 213,548 $1,375,651 $0 RTA-24 All Days 3 18,643 127,328 8,949 10,396 116,012 161,308 $1,069,493 $0 RTA-26 All Days 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 RTA-27 All Days 4 69,574 825,870 11,730 13,137 236,827 283,703 $1,998,043 $0 RTA-28 All Days 6 204,967 2,438,927 21,795 25,455 379,100 476,947 $3,712,287 $0 RTA-29 All Days 3 80,791 434,793 10,498 11,495 155,479 174,865 $1,788,120 $0 RTA-3 All Days 1 30,172 188,795 4,976 6,619 64,023 110,415 $594,728 $0 RTA-30 All Days 1 8,102 56,119 4,009 4,374 56,143 59,282 $479,127 $0 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 332 Page 1 of 4 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements Table 2,3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 FY 2020/21 All Routes Peak Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Route # Day Type Vehicles Passengers Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue RTA-31 RTA-32 RTA-33 RTA-3D RTA-40 RTA-41C RTA-41D RTA-42 RTA-49 RTA-50 RTA-51 RTA-52 RTA-54 RTA-55 RTA-61 RTA-74 RTA-79 RTA-8 RTA-9 RTA-HEMDAR RTA-HemTax RTA-MTMDAR RTA-MTMTax RTA-NonDAR RTA-NonTax RTA-RSBDAR RTA-RSBTax All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days 5 49,638 341,980 17,228 21,243 340,240 436,491 $2,059,010 $0 2 30,806 211,240 8,419 9,733 96,492 128,649 $1,006,239 $0 2 9,302 64,381 3,906 4,514 49,566 64,860 $466,767 $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 1 10,053 69,716 7,308 8,530 128,872 158,392 $873,369 $0 1 10,914 75,193 4,392 5,122 82,769 95,909 $524,931 $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 1 5,357 36,781 3,766 4,337 51,857 64,304 $450,045 $0 3 92,404 496,924 9,506 10,535 123,231 149,089 $1,619,223 $0 2 1,773 3,245 2,231 3,055 14,734 34,733 $266,641 $110,000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 4 35,450 245,016 12,343 13,621 214,620 247,068 $1,475,187 $0 4 57,019 394,186 13,316 15,732 233,333 292,937 $1,591,516 $0 4 39,792 274,692 12,921 14,983 212,645 268,891 $1,544,257 $0 3 51,209 100,166 12,885 13,827 203,676 230,868 $1,539,895 $0 1 20,146 7,416 4,904 6,295 96,306 129,744 $586,103 $0 21,114 259,916 11,281 13,231 179,283 217,222 $1,515,301 $95,448 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 30,235 372,191 16,154 19,919 244,575 317,729 $2,322,027 $137,521 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 2,487 30,619 1,329 1,362 24,505 24,888 $186,899 $11,327 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 93,422 1,150,019 49,914 59,852 776,886 962,094 $6,927,904 $422,477 0 0 0 0 0 0 $0 $0 142 3,413,076 23,753,074 537,914 620,363 8,211,940 10,345,926 $82,392,199 $2,570,042 $3,365,455 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 333 Page 2 of 4 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Performance Indicators Table 2,3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 FY 2020/21 All Routes Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Net Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile RTA-0 RTA-1 RTA-10 RTA-101 RTA-11 RTA-12 RTA-13 RTA-14 RTA-15 RTA-16/16E RTA-18 RTA-19 RTA-19C RTA-20 RTA-200 RTA-202 RTA-202D RTA-204D RTA-205 RTA-206D RTA-208 RTA-208D RTA-21 RTA-210 RTA-210D RTA-217 RTA-217D RTA-22 RTA-23 RTA-24 RTA-26 RTA-27 RTA-28 RTA-29 RTA-3 RTA-30 All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days ($1,517,964) $9,947,938 $170.33 $14.73 $11.51 15.44% $11.51 $2.14 $170.33 $14.73 14.79 $1,470,731 $170.32 $14.99 $38.30 0.00% $38.30 $7.12 $170.32 $14.99 4.45 $0 $1,151,194 $170.32 $14.45 $33.11 0.00% $33.11 $6.15 $170.32 $14.45 5.14 $2,414,295 $170.33 $14.20 $24.89 0.00% $24.89 $4.63 $170.33 $14.20 6.84 $1,960,500 $170.33 $13.72 $16.05 0.00% $16.05 $2.98 $170.33 $13.72 10.61 $1,759,553 $170.33 $12.17 $22.67 0.00% $22.67 $4.21 $170.33 $12.17 7.51 $3,089,597 $170.33 $13.34 $19.57 0.00% $19.57 $3.64 $170.33 $13.34 8.70 $3,855,525 $170.33 $14.61 $14.60 12.96% $14.60 $2.71 $170.33 $14.61 11.66 $1,483,066 $170.33 $12.52 $51.52 0.00% $51.52 $9.58 $170.33 $12.52 3.31 $6,599,938 $170.33 $12.63 $18.38 8.92% $18.38 $3.42 $170.33 $12.63 9.27 $46,872 $119.57 $13.09 $176.88 0.00% $176.88 $25.97 $119.57 $13.09 0.68 $2,352,125 $170.33 $11.00 $26.56 0.00% $26.56 $4.93 $170.33 $11.00 6.41 $2,302,949 $170.33 $6.64 $39.39 7.31% $36.51 $1.76 $157.87 $6.15 4.32 $0 $0 $1,019,805 $170.33 $7.85 $54.73 30.97% $52.78 $2.80 $164.27 $7.57 3.11 $719,968 $170.33 $6.63 $84.03 2.87% $81.61 $4.33 $165.43 $6.44 2.03 $853,212 $170.34 $6.26 $156.15 23.26% $153.15 $8.13 $167.07 $6.14 1.09 $0 $1,163,808 $170.32 $6.62 $91.88 23.90% $90.49 $4.81 $167.74 $6.52 1.85 $1,350,665 $170.32 $11.43 $25.37 0.00% $25.37 $4.72 $170.32 $11.43 6.71 $0 $0 $0 so $2,602,391 $170.34 $10.44 $21.38 0.00% $21.38 $1.80 $170.34 $10.44 7.97 $1,375,651 $119.52 $8.56 $61.52 0.00% $61.52 $8.97 $119.52 $8.56 1.94 $1,069,493 $119.51 $9.22 $57.37 0.00% $57.37 $8.40 $119.51 $9.22 2.08 $0 $1,998,043 $170.34 $8.44 $28.72 0.00% $28.72 $2.42 $170.34 $8.44 5.93 $3,712,287 $170.33 $9.79 $18.11 0.00% $18.11 $1.52 $170.33 $9.79 9.40 $1,788,120 $170.33 $11.50 $22.13 0.00% $22.13 $4.11 $170.33 $11.50 7.70 $594,728 $119.52 $9.29 $19.71 0.00% $19.71 $3.15 $119.52 $9.29 6.06 $479,127 $119.51 $8.53 $59.14 0.00% $59.14 $8.54 $119.51 $8.53 2.02 1.28 0.39 0.44 0.57 0.85 0.54 0.68 1.00 0.24 0.69 0.07 0.41 0.17 0.14 0.08 0.04 0.07 0.45 0.49 0.14 0.16 0.29 0.54 0.52 0.47 0.14 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 334 Page 3 of 4 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Performance Indicators Table 2,3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 FY 2020/21 All Routes Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Net Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile RTA-31 RTA-32 RTA-33 RTA-3D RTA-40 RTA-41C RTA-41D RTA-42 RTA-49 RTA-50 RTA-51 RTA-52 RTA-54 RTA-55 RTA-61 RTA-74 RTA-79 RTA-8 RTA-9 RTA-HEMDAR RTA-HemTax RTA-MTMDAR RTA-MTMTax RTA-NonDAR RTA-NonTax RTA-RSBDAR RTA-RSBTax All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days All Days $2,059,010 $119.52 $6.05 $41.48 0.00% $41.48 $6.02 $119.52 $6.05 2.88 0.15 $1,006,239 $119.52 $10.43 $32.66 0.00% $32.66 $4.76 $119.52 $10.43 3.66 0.32 $466,767 $119.50 $9.42 $50.18 0.00% $50.18 $7.25 $119.50 $9.42 2.38 0.19 $0 $873,369 $119.51 $6.78 $86.88 0.00% $86.88 $12.53 $119.51 $6.78 1.38 0.08 $524,931 $119.52 $6.34 $48.10 0.00% $48.10 $6.98 $119.52 $6.34 2.48 0.13 $0 $450,045 $119.50 $8.68 $84.01 0.00% $84.01 $12.24 $119.50 $8.68 1.42 0.10 $1,619,223 $170.34 $13.14 $17.52 0.00% $17.52 $3.26 $170.34 $13.14 9.72 0.75 $156,641 $119.52 $18.10 $150.39 41.25% $88.35 $48.27 $70.21 $10.63 0.79 0.12 so $0 $0 $0 $1,475,187 $119.52 $6.87 $41.61 0.00% $41.61 $6.02 $119.52 $6.87 2.87 0.17 $1,591,516 $119.52 $6.82 $27.91 0.00% $27.91 $4.04 $119.52 $6.82 4.28 0.24 $1,544,257 $119.52 $7.26 $38.81 0.00% $38.81 $5.62 $119.52 $7.26 3.08 0.19 $1,539,895 $119.51 $7.56 $30.07 0.00% $30.07 $15.37 $119.51 $7.56 3.97 0.25 $586,103 $119.52 $6.09 $29.09 0.00% $29.09 $79.03 $119.52 $6.09 4.11 0.21 $1,419,853 $134.32 $8.45 $71.77 6.29% $67.25 $5.46 $125.86 $7.92 1.87 0.12 $0 $2,184,506 $143.74 $9.49 $76.80 5.92% $72.25 $5.87 $135.23 $8.93 1.87 0.12 $0 $175,572 $140.63 $7.63 $75.15 6.06% $70.60 $5.73 $132.11 $7.16 1.87 0.10 $0 $6,505,426 $138.80 $8.92 $74.16 6.09% $69.63 $5.66 $130.33 $8.37 1.87 0.12 so $79,822,157 $153.17 $10.03 $24.14 7.20% $23.39 $3.36 $148.39 $9.72 6.35 0.42 TransTrack Manager'"' 5/12/2020 335 Page 4 of 4 R Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 3 Highlights 11111 FY2016/2017 Audited FY2017/2018 Audited FY2018/2019 Audited FY2019/20 Estimated (Based on 3rd Qtr actuals and annualized) FY2020/21 Planned System -Wide Ridership Operating cost per revenue hours 8,741,975 $88.98 8,583,410 $90.94 8,702,284 $97.25 6,845,252 $115.45 3,413,077 $153.17 Recent Trends: The trend in 2016-2018 has been downward for ridership as gas prices and car ownership costs have remained relatively low and the economy continues to create more jobs leading to more people opting to purchase cars and lesser use of transit. In FY2019, RTA began to see an upward trend in ridership largely due to new service as well as increased gas prices. From July 2019 thru February 2020, ridership has kept pace with FY19 despite a projected decrease in ridership due to the fare increase that was implemented in July 2019. In March 2020, ridership across all forms of public transportation, including RTA, dropped dramatically due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The new Route 4 was scheduled to begin in May of 2020; however, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Route 4 implementation has been postponed. Routes 51 and 55 are also suspended until schools re -open and funding is secured. FY20 saw the following service improvements: • Route 1 weekend frequency increased from every 30 to every 15 minutes during peak periods. • Route 12 was extended to Corona Hills (McKinley St.) retail area and weekday frequency was improved to every 55 minutes instead of every 70-minutes. • Route 79 was extended from Hemet Valley Mall to MSJC San Jacinto providing a coordinated schedule with Route 74 thus maximizing frequency between Winchester, Hemet and San Jacinto. • Increased weekend frequency on routes 16 and 19 from every 30 to every 15 minutes. • CommuterLink Expansion: Additional weekday trips were added through the midday period on CommuterLink routes 204, 206, 208 and 217 due to increasing demand for regional and intercounty trips, variable working hours of many riders and to connect with all weekday Metrolink trains: Proposed Service Changes for FY 2021: RTA is currently completing a Zero Emission Bus Analysis that will produce a rollout plan for the Agency's ZEB fleet transition as mandated by CARB. No new service is projected for FY21 until the financial and operational impacts of transitioning to ZEBs is finalized. In an effort to prepare for the ZEB transition, provide more efficient service and use taxpayer dollars wisely, trips with low ridership will be discontinued on several routes. Elimination of unproductive trips helps create a stronger, more efficient system. The following service changes listed below are planned for FY21. Implementation of these service changes may change depending on COVID- 19 pandemic developments. September 2020 service changes: o Route 20: The 7:50 p.m. (Saturday only) weekend westbound trip departing Iris and Lasselle will be discontinued. o Route 24: The 7:04 p.m. weekday northbound trip departing Temecula Valley Hospital and the 6:49 a.m. weekday southbound trip departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. Also, proposed to be discontinued is the alternate routing that serves the Temecula Library. o Route 26: Due to low ridership, Route 26, which serves portions of Moreno Valley and Riverside, will be discontinued. o Route 27: The 9:02 p.m. weekday southbound and the 5:30 a.m. southbound weekend trips departing Galleria at Tyler will be discontinued. o Route 28: The 5:05 a.m. weekend westbound trip departing Hemet Valley Mall will be discontinued. o Route 30: The west loop will be discontinued while the east loop will remain. o Route 40: The 8:56 a.m., 11:26 a.m., 1:56 p.m. and 4:23 p.m. weekend eastbound trips departing Lake Elsinore Walmart, and the 7:36 a.m., 10:14 a.m., 12:41 p.m., 3:08 p.m. and 6:02 p.m. weekend westbound trips departing Cherry Hills and Bradley will be discontinued. o Route 49: The 5:52 a.m. weekday westbound trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station will be discontinued. o Route 61: The 4:35 a.m. weekday northbound trip departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. o Route 210: The route will be discontinued due to low ridership. 336 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 3 Highlights • January 2021 service changes: o Route 9: The 5:02 a.m. weekday northbound trip departing the Lake Elsinore Outlet Center and the 6:50 a.m. weekend southbound trip departing Perris Station Transit Center will be discontinued. o Route 11: The 6:04 a.m. weekday clockwise trip departing Moreno Valley Mall will be discontinued. o Route 12: The 7:13 p.m. weekday westbound trip departing La Cadena and Stephens will be discontinued. o Route 13: The 4:30 a.m. weekday eastbound trip departing Galleria at Tyler will be discontinued. o Route 23: The 7:24 p.m. weekday northbound trip and the 10:06 a.m. and 6:10 p.m. weekend northbound trips departing Promenade Mall will be discontinued. o Route 32: The 5:50 a.m. weekday southbound trip departing Mt. San Jacinto College and the alternate routing along Commonwealth and Villines Avenues, Las Rosas Road and 7th Street will be discontinued. Operating Budget ($82,392,199): • Decrease of 11% over FY20 budget. Variance analysis by cost element is provided below: o Salaries — 5% decrease due to elimination of 17 administrative positions and an administrative employee wage freeze. o Benefits — 4% increase due to increased health benefits and OPEB. o Purchased Transportation —33%decrease due to reductions in service and expected DAR demand. o Services — 9% increase due to increased security and insurance related services. o Materials & Supplies — esentially flat; fuel and parts reduction offset by COVID-19 supplies. Capital Budget ($2,621,250): • RTA's 3-Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is updated to reflect the current economic outlook and service needs with a focus on items which are mandatory to support our current service offering while positioning the Agency future operations. Decrease of 94% over FY20 budget. FY21 CIP projects are funded with Federal Sections 5307 and 5339, State Transit Assistance (STA), SB1 SGR funds and TUMF. A summary by project element for FY21 is shown below: o UCR Mobility Hub and Bus & Bus Facilities re -programming to Canyon Crest Turnout Project, Associated Transit Improvements and Non -Revenue Vehicles - $0.0 million o Tire Lease - $0.4 million o Facility Maintenance - $1.9 million for operations and facilities maintenance projects o Route Reconstruction Study - $0.3 million 337 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 Riverside Transit Agency Operating Project Total Amount of Funds 5307 HS 5307 HS CARES 5307 LALB CARES 5307 MTM 5307 MTM CARES 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5307 RS OB 5310 OB 5311 5311 CARES 5339 LALB OB 5339 MTM OB 5339 RS OB FARE ADA Complementary Paratransit Service Advertising Revenue Capital Cost of Contracting Capitalized Preventive Maintenance CNG Sales CommuterLink General Farebox Revenue Investment Income LCFS Credits Mobile Ticketing Operating Assistance RINs Credits Wentworth Lease Youth Fare Promotion $2,250,000 $10,000 $19,727,569 $13,242,194 $100,000 $4,871,401 $776,774 $470,000 $500,000 $36,000 $37,200,297 $380,000 $57,964 $2,770,000 $1,738,821 $247,471 $1,925,484 $7,916,389 $312,970 $1,889,417 $4,320,000 $1,617,458 $3,486,039 $1,800,000 $2,006,277 $8,932,004 $2,077,190 $24,494,417 $150,000 $505,365 $901,729 $275,304 $776,774 Sub -total Operating $82,392,199 $1,986,292 $9,841,873 $312,970 $1,889,417 $9,423,497 $12,738,281 $26,571,607 $0 $150,000 $505,365 $901,729 $0 $0 $0 $1,052,078 Capital Project Total Amount 5307 HS 5307 HS CARES 5307 LALB 5307 MTM 5307 MTM 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5307 RS OB 5310 OB 5311 5311 CARES 5339 LALB OB 5339 MTM OB 5339 RS OB FARE of Funds CARES CARES FY16-10 Bus and Bus Facilities - 16-10 $-1,898,499 $-348,070 $-1,144,462 FY19-3 (8) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY19-3 $80,500 $3,870 $60,530 FY20-4 (15) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY20-4 $187,575 $150,060 FY20-4 (2) Expansion Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY20-4 $18,525 $14,820 FY20-7 UCR Mobility Hub - FY20-7 $-1,920,006 $-3,870 $-455,896 $-1,076,239 FY21-1 (2) Replacement S&Z Trucks - FY21-1 $161,864 $129,491 FY21-2 (10) Replacement Support Vehicles (electri c) - FY21-2 $406,915 $100,995 $224,537 FY21-3 (2) Expansion Support Vehicles (electric) $95,976 $76,781 FY21-4 Associated Transit Improvements - FY21-4 $968,651 $774,921 FY21-5 Capitalized Tire Lease - FY21-5 $422,016 $337,613 FY21-7 Canyon Crest Bus Turnouts - FY21-7 $1,898,499 $348,070 $1,144,462 Fy21-8 Facility, Fuel Stn, Vehicle Enhance/Upgrade s - FY21-8 $1,949,234 FY21-9 Route Reconstruction Study - FY21-9 $250,000 Sub -total Capital $2,621,250 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $337,613 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Total Operating & Capital $85,013,449 $1,986,292 $9,841,873 $312,970 $1,889,417 $9,423,497 $13,075,894 $26,571,607 $0 $150,000 $505,365 $901,729 $0 $0 $0 $1,052,078 Trans Track Manager TM 5/12/2020 20:06:02 ET 338 Page 1 of 3 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 Riverside Transit Agency Operating Project Total Amount of Funds INT LCTOP OB LCTOP PUC99313 LCTOP PUC99314 LTF MA CTSA OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA - OB STA PUC99313 ADA Complementary Paratransit Service Advertising Revenue Capital Cost of Contracting Capitalized Preventive Maintenance CNG Sales CommuterLink General Farebox Revenue Investment Income LCFS Credits Mobile Ticketing Operating Assistance RINs Credits Wentworth Lease Youth Fare Promotion $2,250,000 $10,000 $19,727,569 $13,242,194 $100,000 $4,871,401 $776,774 $470,000 $500,000 $36,000 $37,200,297 $380,000 $57,964 $2,770,000 $470,000 $740,185 $36,000 $2,349,969 $239,301 $450,000 $9,267,689 $2,233,000 $4,252 $180,730 $10,000 $100,000 $500,000 $380,000 $57,964 Sub -total Operating $82,392,199 $470,000 $776,185 $2,349,969 $239,301 $12,135,671 $0 $1,047,964 $0 $0 $0 $0 Capital Project Total Amount INT LCTOP OB LCTOP LCTOP LTF MA CTSA OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA - OB STA PUC99313 of Funds PUC99313 PUC99314 FY16-10 Bus and Bus Facilities - 16-10 $-1,898,499 $-405,967 FY19-3 (8) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY19-3 $80,500 $16,100 FY20-4 (15) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY20-4 $187,575 $37,515 FY20-4 (2) Expansion Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) - FY20-4 $18,525 $3,705 FY20-7 UCR Mobility Hub - FY20-7 $-1,920,006 $-384,001 FY21-1 (2) Replacement S&Z Trucks - FY21-1 $161,864 $32,373 FY21-2 (10) Replacement Support Vehicles (electri c) - FY21-2 $406,915 $81,383 FY21-3 (2) Expansion Support Vehicles (electric) $95,976 $19,195 FY21-4 Associated Transit Improvements - FY21-4 $968,651 $193,730 FY21-5 Capitalized Tire Lease - FY21-5 $422,016 $84,403 FY21-7 Canyon Crest Bus Turnouts - FY21-7 $1,898,499 $405,967 Fy21-8 Facility, Fuel Stn, Vehicle Enhance/Upgrade s - FY21-8 $1,949,234 $1,778,722 $170,512 FY21-9 Route Reconstruction Study - FY21-9 $250,000 $250,000 Sub -total Capital $2,621,250 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $250,000 $1,778,722 $170,512 $0 $84,403 Total Operating & Capital $85,013,449 $470,000 $776,185 $2,349,969 $239,301 $12,135,671 $0 $1,297,964 $1,778,722 $170,512 $0 $84,403 Trans Track Manager."' 5/12/2020 20:06:02 ET 339 Page 2 of 3 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 Riverside Transit Agency FY 2020/21 Projected Funding Details 5307 HS 5307 HS CARES 5307 LALB CARES 5307 MTM 5307 MTM CARES 5307 RS 5307 RS CARES 5310 OB 5311 5311 CARES FARE INT LCTOP OB LCTOP PUC99313 LCTOP PUC99314 LTF OTHR LCL Total Estimated Operating Funding Request 5307 RS 5339 LALB OB 5339 MTM OB 5339 RS OB OTHR LCL SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA- OB STA PUC99313 Total Estimated Capital Funding Request $1,986,292 $9,841,873 $312,970 $1,889,417 $9,423,497 $12,738,281 $26,571,607 $150,000 $505,365 $901,729 $1,052,078 $470,000 $776,185 $2,349,969 $239,301 $12,135,671 $1,047,964 $82,392,199 $337,613 $0 $0 $0 $250,000 $1,778,722 $170,512 $0 $84,403 $2,621,250 Total Funding Request $85,013,449 Trans Track ManagerTM 5/12/2020 20:06:02 ET 340 Page 3 of 3 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: 16-10 FTIP No: RIV140838 Project Name: FY16-10 Bus and Bus Facilities Category: Bus Stop Sub -Category: Modification Project Description: This is to reprogram funding associated with project FY16-10. Project Justification: Funding is being reprogrammed to specifically identified projects needed by RTA. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2015 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 -$348,070 5339 RS OB FY 2020/21 -$1,144,462 STA - OB FY 2020/21 -$405,967 Total -$1,898,499 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 1 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 341 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY19-3 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY19-3 (8) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Electric Project Description: To add funding to project FY19-3 for the replacement of 8 support vehicles. The additional funding is necessary as the fuel type for these vehicles was changed from unleaded gasoline to electric. Project Justification: Funding is necessary to replace support vehicles that have exceeded their useful life. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 LALB OB FY 2020/21 $3,870 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $60,530 STA- OB FY 2020/21 $16,100 Total $80,500 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 2 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 342 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY20-4 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY20-4 (15) Replace. Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Electric Project Description: To add funding to project FY20-4 for the replacement of 15 support vehicles. The additional funding is necessary as the fuel type for these vehicles was changed from unleaded gasoline to electric. Project Justification: Funding is necessary to replace support vehicles that have exceeded their useful life. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $150,060 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $37,515 Total $187,575 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 3 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 343 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY20-4 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY20-4 (2) Expansion Support Vehicles (electric plus -up) Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: Electric Project Description: To add funding to project FY20-4 for the expansion of 2 support vehicles. The additional funding is necessary as the fuel type for these vehicles was changed from unleaded gasoline to electric. Project Justification: Additional support vehicles have become necessary due to both the lower mileage range of electric vehicles as well as the new COVID service plan, which is less efficient for safety purposes (1 driver=1 bus). Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $14,820 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $3,705 Total $18,525 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 4 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 344 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY20-7 FTIP No: RIV140835 Project Name: FY20-7 UCR Mobility Hub Category: Bus Stop Sub -Category: Modification Project Description: This is to reprogram funding associated with the UCR Mobility Hub. Project Justification: Funding is no longer needed for this project, as the UCR Mobility Hub is not moving forward. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 LALB OB FY 2020/21 -$3,870 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 -$455,896 5339 RS OB FY 2020/21 -$1,076,239 STA - OB FY 2020/21 -$384,001 Total -$1, 920, 006 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 5 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 345 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-1 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY21-1 (2) Replacement S&Z Trucks Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Gas Project Description: Replacement of 2 Stops and Zones Trucks. Project Justification: Funding is necessary to replace support vehicles that have exceeded their useful life. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $129,491 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $32,373 Total $161,864 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 6 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 346 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-2 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY21-2 (10) Replacement Support Vehicles (electric) Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Electric Project Description: Replacement of current support vehicles that use unleaded fuel to new electric vehicles. Project Justification: Funding is necessary to replace support vehicles that have exceeded their useful life. Project Schedule: Start Date July 2020 Completion Date June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $100,995 5339 RS OB FY 2020/21 $224,537 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $81,383 Total $406,915 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 7 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 347 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-4 FTIP No: 19-01 Project Name: FY21-4 Associated Transit Improvements Category: Bus Stop Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Project Description: Funding is to primarily fund bus stop improvements, such as concrete pads, benches, trash cans, etc Project Justification: Funding is necessary to ensure RTA bus stops are maintained and equipped with appropriate amenities to ensure a high-level of customer service. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2024 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 RS OB FY 2020/21 $774,921 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $193,730 Total $968,651 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 8 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 348 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-5 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: FY21-5 Capitalized Tire Lease Category: Bus Sub -Category: Parts Fuel Type: CNG Project Description: Funds for bus tire lease. Project Justification: Funding of the tire lease is necessary to ensure buses are equipped with safe working tires. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5307 RS FY 2020/21 $337,613 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $84,403 Total $422,016 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 9 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 349 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-7 FTIP No: RIV140838 Project Name: FY21-7 Canyon Crest Bus Turnouts Category: Bus Stop Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Project Description: Funding is to improve bus turnouts in the Canyon Crest near UCR. Project Justification: Improved bus turnouts near UCR will assist in making transportation to and from the University more efficient for both RTA and students. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5339 MTM OB FY 2020/21 $348,070 5339 RS OB FY 2020/21 $1,144,462 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $405,967 Total $1,898,499 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 10 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 350 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-8 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Fy21-8 Facility, Fuel Stn, Vehicle Enhance/Upgrades Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Project Description: Funds to be used for replacement/enhancements of facilities and/or equipment. Project Justification: Funds are necessary to ensure RTA facilities and equipment are kept in good working order. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $1,778,722 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $170,512 Total $1, 949, 234 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 11 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 351 OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP Riverside Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: FY21-9 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: FY21-9 Route Reconstruction Study Category: Bus Sub -Category: Study Fuel Type: Other Project Description: RTA will undergo a study to reconfigure its service in a way that aligns the post-COVID landscape, ZEB requirements, and the new funding environment. Project Justification: RTA's service model must change to react to the post-COVID landscape, ZEB requirements, and the new funding environment. A study is needed to determine what specific steps should be taken. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount OTHR LCL FY 2020/21 $250,000 Total $250,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description TransTrack ManagerTM Page 12 of 12 5/12/2020 13:46:34 ET 352 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 4B Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with RCTC Commission Farebox Recovery Policy 03/12/2008) 1 Revenue Sources included in Farebox Calculation Actuals from FY2018/19 Audit FY2019/20 Estimated FY2020/21 Plan 1 Passenger Fares Mks, 2 Measure A 11,003,883 4,033,457 8,800,000 3,263,300 1,052,078 3 LCTOP milM 4 Sale of CNG 5 RINs/LCFS Revenue 6 Shelter Advertising Rev 1,263,392 100,357 1,669,068 14,608 1,500,000 100,000 1,135,000 15,000 3,365,455 100,000 880,000 10,000 7 Gain/(Loss) on Assets 8 Investment Income 9 Lease Revenue 10 Bridge Service, Other 981,148 65,892 147,969 3,000 675,000 65,000 25,000 470,000 57,964 11 Exempt Routes 12 13 14 (972,177) 15 Total Revenue (1-15) $18,302,160 $15,581,300 $5,935,497 Total Operating Expense $73,902,008 $92,000,000 $82,392,199 Farebox Recovery Ratio 24.77% 16.94% 7.20% 353 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 4.1 Fiscal Year 2021/2022 Operating Purpose Operating Assistance -General Total Amount 35,298,424 4,823,556 150,000 Bus & Bus 5311 & Facilities 5311(f) 27,324,868 STA • easure Operating SGR Assistance Other Funding Farebox Other Revenue 3,000,000 Capitalized Preventive Maintenance Capital Cost of Contracting ADA Complementary Paratransit Service 13,639,460 21,263,778 2,313,866 10,229,595 4,717,841 1,854,000 520,526 3,409,865 10,025,411 459,866 6,000,000 CommuterLink Routes 5,000,000 4,362,437 354,000 283,563 Mobile Ticketing 36,000 36,000 LCTOP Project 1,382,700 1,382,700 Farebox (Cash, Coin, Tickets, Passes) 4,716,437 4,716,437 Interest Income 400,000 400,000 Advertising Revenue 10,300 10,300 CNG Sales 103,000 103,000 LCFS Credits 400,000 400,000 RINs Credits 300,000 300,000 Wentworth Lease 0 Total Operating Request $ 84,863,965 $ 21,624,992 $ 150,000 $ - $ 520,526 $ 45,582,447 $ 1,772,700 $ 6,000,000 $ - $ 3,000,000 $ - $ 5,000,000 $ 1,213,300 •ital Purpose 5307 5310 5339 Bus & Bus 5311 & Facilities 5311(f) LTF LCTOP STA measure A Operating SGR Assistance Other Funding Farebox Other Revenue Replace (35) DO Vehicles - CNG ($818.8k ea) Replace (2) Stops & Zones Truck 15,000,000 171,660 137,328 15,000,000 34,332 Replace (1) Transport Vehicle 33,287 26,630 6,657 Replace (1) Tvl Train/Admin Pool Vehicle 49,600 39,680 9,920 Fareboxes for both DO & CO fleet 3,265,000 3,265,000 Associated Transit Improvements 513,438 410,750 102,688 Capitalized Tire Lease 500,348 400,278 100,070 Maintenance Equipment 50,000 40,000 10,000 IT Equipment 100,000 80,000 20,000 Facility, Fuel Stn, Vehicle Enhance/Upgrades 1,950,000 1,950,000 Total Capital Request $21,633,333 $1,134,666 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $18,548,667 $1,950,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 Grand Total Operating & Capital $106,497,298 $22,759,658 $150,000 $0 $520,526 $45,582,447 $1,772,700 $24,548,667 $1,950,000 $3,000,000 $0 $5,000,000 $1,213,300 354 RRRRRRR� Riverside 'Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 4.2 Fiscal Year 2022/2023 O.eratinPur.ose Total Amount S3 9 Bus & Bus 5311 & 5307 i 5310 Facilities 5311(f) LTF Measure A Operating Other SGR Assistance Funding Farebox Other Revenue Operating Assistance - General Capitalized Preventive Maintenance Capital Cost of Contracting ADA Complementary Paratransit Service CommuterLink Routes Mobile Ticketing LCTOP Project Farebox (Cash, Coin, Tickets, Passes) Interest Income Advertising Revenue CNG Sales LCFS Credits 43,276,977 13,170,604 16,239,278 2,387,025 5,150,000 36,000 1,000,000 4,700,000 486,700 10,300 103,000 450,000 RINs Credits 400,000 2,695,909 10,536,483 4,859,376 1,909,620 150,000 37,431,068 2,634,121 520,526 4,859,376 477,405 4,850,000 36,000 1,000,000 6,000,000 3,000,000 300,000 4,700,000 486,700 10,300 103,000 450,000 400,000 Total Operating Request $ 87,409,883 $ 20,001,388 $ 150,000 $ $ 520,526 $ 50,251,970 $ 1,036,000 $ 6,000,000 $ 5307 5339 Bus & Bus 5310 Facilities $ 3,000,000 $ $ 5,000,000 Measure A 5311 & Operating Other 5311(f) LTF LCTOP STA SGR Assistance Funding Farebox 0 1,450,000 her Revenue Replace (40) COFR vehicles Replace (50) DAR Vehicles Associated Transit Improvements Capitalized Tire Lease Maintenance Equipment IT Equipment Facility, Fuel Stn, Vehicle Enhance/Upgrades 6,000,000 3,000,000 775,000 556,887 50,000 250,000 1,950,000 620,000 445,510 40,000 200,000 6,000,000 3,000,000 155,000 111,377 10,000 50,000 1,950,000 Total Capital Request $12,581,887 Grand Total Operating & Capital $99,991,770 $1,305,510 $0 $0 $0 $3,000,000 $0 $326,377 $1,950,000 $0 $0 $0 $21,306,897 $150,000 $0 $520,526 $59,251,970 $1,036,000 $6,326,377 $1,950,000 $3,000,000 $0 $5,000,000 $0 $1,450,000 355 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 4.3 FY16-18 FTA Triennial Review and TDA Triennial Audit A_enc '111!TIMITMTWIRI, Action Taken and Results FTA TDA RTA was found compliant across the 21 sections of review. No deficiencies were found in any of the areas of review. Focus efforts on evaluating the commuter ridership market. N/A -In October 2018, the Agency completed a Market Assessment and Strategic Directions Study that evaluated ridership and identified strategies that can be implemented to encourage additional ridership, including an evaluation of CommuterLink service. -In January 2020, the Agency secured grant funding to add off peak CommuterLink service in response to new residential developments, increasing nontraditional work hours and high travel demand on the main corridors linking south and north of western Riverside County. -The Agency will continue to market the additional service on billboards, Rider Alerts, Rider News, RTA Reader, Ride Guide, RTA website and via social media. TDA Evaluate plans for RTA facility growth that align with -Facility and service growth will be evaluated pending results from increased transit services in the southern section of the the Zero Emission Bus (ZEB) Analysis and Rollout Plan which is service area. estimated to be completed by July 2020. -The ZEB Analysis and Rollout Plan will alter the way RTA delivers service. -All service increases will be dependent on the financial implications of the ZEB implementation plan. 356 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 4.4 Open Projects Prior to FY2020/2021 Project Name SRTP Capital Project No's it c V y E E d - uu b0 c o cu Y u U Beg to End - Project Timeline Total Project Cost Unfunded Balance Vine St. Mobility Hub Hemet Mobility Hub Ops&Maint Facility 12-9, 15-11, 16-12 4 16-11, 18-9, 19-8 4 1 01/2017-12/2030 7,774,612 16-15, 17-9, 19-9 4 2 05/2019 - 09/2025 25,947,696 0 1 08/2019 - 05/2023 6,825,327 0 0 Maint Spare Components 12-7, 13-4, 17-4 7 2 06/2012- 06/2022 1,971,075 0 Scheduling Software 13-4, 19-7 5 1 05/2020 - 12/2021 1,800,000 0 14-5, 16-11, 17-3, 18- Associated Transit Improvements 4,19-5, 20-5, 20-7 8 2 09/2018 - 09/2021 3,683,981 2,834,316 ITS Enhancement/Expansion 14-7 5 1 10/2014 - 06/2020 25,914 0 Fareboxes 15-5, 19-10, 20-8 3 2 03/2019 - 07/2022 5,809,422 3,265,000 Facility Improvements 16-8, 17-7, 18-7, 19-6 4 2 04/2019 - 06/2022 3,126,954 0 Information System 16-9, 17-8, 18-8, 19-7 5 2 02/2019 - 06/2021 1,432,233 0 Misc Support Equipment 16-7, 17-6, 18-6 7 2 07/2019 - 06/2021 77,500 0 Tire Lease 19-4, 20-6 7 2 07/2019 - 06/2023 1,006,588 422,016 DAR Vehicles 17-2, 18-2, 19-2, 20-3 1 2 08/2019 - 12/2023 4,870,908 0 COFR Vehicles 16-1, 18-1, 19-1, 20-2 1 2 08/2019 - 12/2023 9,156,608 0 DO Revenue Vehicles 40ft Bus 19-11, 20-1 1 2 10/2019 - 06/2022 37,192,680 0 Support Vehicles 18-3, 19-3, 20-4 2 2 01/2020 - 12/2021 1,866,127 951,355 SGR 19-10, 20-8 4 2 Unknown 5,660,824 1,949,234 ICT Impacts 1, 4 2 01/2020 - 06/2021 250,000 250,000 18 118,478,450 9,671,921 Legend Project Elements: 1 Revenue Vehicle Purchase - FY 2 Non -Revenue Vehicle Purchase - FY 3 Vehicle Systems and Equipment - FY 4 Building, Land and Facilities - FY 5 Communication and Information Technology Systems - FY 6 Debt Service - FY 7 Maintenance - FY 8 Associated Transit Improvements - FY Funding Category: 1 Fully Funded 2 Partially Funded 357 Riverside Transit Agency RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY2020/2021 - FY2022/2023 Table 5 Riverside Transit Agency FY 2021- 2025 TUMF Expenditure Plan Fiscal Year FY 19-20 Prior Years Expenditures Expenditures through 6/30 (estimate) FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FY 23-24 FY24-25 Current Programmed Total Programmed Payments/Exp Phase Balance Original Programmed Phase Cost Forecast Revenuesi Estimated Carryover (as of 6/30) $ 2,070,629 $ 16,852,147 $ 975,000 $ 1,500,000 $ 19,219,195 $ 17,112,727 $ 1,500,000 $ 9,937,727 $ 1,500,000 $ 4,684,274 $ 1,500,000 $ 184,274 $ 25,897,777 $ 3,373,796 $ 59,799,222 Available Revenues Phase $ 18,922,776 $ 20,194,195 $ 18,612,727 $ 11,437,727 $ 6,184,274 1 $ 1,684,274 • Funded Expenditures Project RTA-0001 Hemet Mobility Hub ALL $4,275,988 $184,955 $ - $ 1,500,000 $ 1,500,000 $ 591,033 $ 500,000 $ - $ 4,091,033 $ (184,955) $ 4,275,988 RTA-0002 UCR Mobility Hubs'' ALL $5,445,000 $442,226 $ (442,226) $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - RTA-0003 Promenade Mobility Hub ALL $1,692,797 $1,392,494 $ 145,807 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ (1,538,302) $ 1,538,302 RTA-0004 Associated Transit Enhancements Program ENH $1,940,437 $172,654 $ - $ 150,000 $ 175,000 $ 200,000 $ 300,000 $ 384,586 $ 1,209,586 $ (172,654) $ 1,382,240 RTA-0005 Long Range Planning ENH $600,000 $468,532 $ - $ 31,468 $ - $ - $ - $ 100,000 $ 131,468 $ (468,532) $ 600,000 RTA-0007 Vine Street Mobility Hub' ALL $3,630,000 $0 $ - $ 500,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 1,130,000 $ - $ - $ 3,630,000 $ - $ 3,630,000 RTA-0009 HQTC Improvements (former RapidLink Blue Line) ENH $1,500,000 $0 $ - $ - $ - $ 500,000 $ 1,000,000 $ - $ 1,500,000 $ - $ 1,500,000 RTA-0010 Regional Operations & Maintenance Facility ALL $30,251,000 $0 $ - $ 500,000 $ 5,000,000 $ 4,332,420 $ 1,200,000 $ - $ 11,032,420 $ - $ 11,032,420 RTA-0011 San Jacinto Mobility Hub ALL $200,000 $0 $ - $ 200,000 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 200,000 $ - $ 200,000 RTA-0012 Revenue Vehicle Purchase - ZEBss ALL $10,264,000 $0 $ - $ 200,000 $ - $ - $ 3,000,000 $ 1,199,688 $ 4,399,688 $ - $ 4,399,688 Total Programmed Capital Improvements $ 26,194,195 $ (3,373,796) $ 29,567,991 Annual Capital Funded Expenditure $59,799,222 $3,670,215 $ (296,418) $ 3,081,468 $ 8,675,000 $ 6,753,453 $ 6,000,000 $ 1,684,274 Projected Funded Balance carryover $ 19,219,195 $ 17,112,727 $ 9,937,727 $ 4,684,274 $ 184,274 $ (0) FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Summary Table FY 22-23 FY 23-24 FY 24-25 Available Revenue $ 18,922,776 $ 20,194,195 $ 18,612,727 $ 11,437,727 $ 6,184,274 $ 1,684,274 5-Year Avail Forecast/Cash 5-Year Programmed 5-Year Balance Programmed Phrases $ (296,418) $ 3,081,468 $ 8,675,000 $ 6,753,453 $ 6,000,000 $ 1,684,274 $25,897,776 $25,897,777 $0 Carryover Balance $ 19,219,195 $ 17,112,727 $ 9,937,727 $ 4,684,274 $ 184,274 $ (0) Notes: 1) Revenue increase to 3% for RTA due to Nexus Study, assumes 35% decrease in FY21 revenues due to the COVID-19 pandemic and flat revenues for FV22 through FY25. 2) Project is not moving forward. Removing from TUMF TIP and deprogramming funds. 3) $442,226 refunded by UCR for TUMF funds spent on A&E. 4) TUMF amount adjusted to reflect max allowed amount. 5) Project added from approved 2016 TUMF Nexus Study. 358 Appendix A: RTA SYSTEM MAP AND FIXED -ROUTE MAPS ONTARIO L Route 204 continues to Montclair Transit Center. JURUPA ®" m MARLAY CHERRY Route 200 to San Bernardino Transit Center 14 200 Loma Linda University Medical Center + t PROSPECT O Loma Linda VA 4BARTON m Hospital LOMA LINDA SYSTEM MAP MAP NOT TO SCALE «Route 200 to Anaheim «R. ute205to Village at Orange RISW 1794 to South Coast Metro 0 0 METROUNK cc z CO POMONA 3 a /aNgl`o Country '49 • cc o > GRANITE HILLS 21 000 111 MISSION BLVD CANTO-GALLEANORANCH Amazon csEastvale �n MIRA LOMA GOODMAN ` LIMONITE 68TH ST EASTVACE CITRUS 15 3 Norco City Hall MARKET Norco Senior Center LAMPTON Norco College 3RD • •1 90 « COMMERCE Corona ' City Hall GRAND —_=91 111 6TH ST CORONA LOTH Corona Regional Medical Center 79y 3 6th 9 0 21 LIMONITE 49 204 JURUPA VALLEY The Pedley Metrolink Station O METROLINK \000 ARLINGTON NORCn CORONA TRANSIT CENTER GOLD LINE•1.3.205.206 CORONA CRUISER BLUE, RED METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 27 HIDDEN VALLEY Corona Transit Center . 200 205 6 1 6TH ST MDR Vintage Terrace Senior Community Y�O Canyon Community Church Park and Ride DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE DETAIL 3265 THIRD ST FOURTH ST FIFTH ST I SIXTH ST 0 z 0 -1499 3824 1606 MARKET ST 3504- Fox Performing Arts Center 3258 CHESTNUT S 3506 1830 1190 1791 1 Q z 0 0 V in NINTH ST I TENTH ST 1- uJ cc 2 White Park ELEVENTH ST I- 0 z J TWELFTH ST THIRTEENTH ST 10 FOURTEENTH ST Riverside Community Hospital { 1141= 4609 Convention Center -1448 -3515 349111 Main St Mall SantognoRiver 15 F 9 9G La Sierra ? •Q\EQC• University 112 12 CA \tS��O, O.\ " CoronaHill�F� 0P 794' Mission Inn 205 206 91 1. y � GG ARLINGTON GOULD» F t.„ 15 21 15 Ea 13 13 County COUNTY Mental FARM ealth Galleria at Tyler HOLE FF9 ley 2 Kaiser Hospi HOME GARDENS CAJALCO T Fyjl, -*Dos Lagos DOS LAGOS 205 206 TEMESCAL CANYON 205 206 Tom's Farms ORANGE ST Main Library MISSION INN AV Omnitrans 215 — -3503 " 3502 GOLD LINE ury Hall 1148 = =1082 I119 I _ 4608 ®I 1081= + 2 uJ 2 731109 3501 . H1002, ki ___( 29 , i 1II11I1 Iwo ■m1� 00 \�°\PAP La Sierra Metrolink Station METROLINK 137 ®41) galCourt- house Detention ® Center 1— z 2 GIDLD LINE ®in Hall of Justice 1150 1446 11) MULBERRY ST 29 /`D 44, 1il T/(T O�y 49 60 QJ� 29 so" P�O���e\ eo CENTRAL 12 15 91 14 GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE• 1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 18 Lake Mathews 12 13 JURUPA $J} 24TH 204 49 oo ARLINGTON WINE 200 10 14 2 SEE DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE DETAIL Fj 30� 13 15 20 10 Broc 12 2 12 c0/D'JrR/4 Sse 2 STi SPRU RD ¢' ? : RTA 0 4 c uuEE 14 BOROUG MAS 3RD 204 fill UNIVERSITY MLK 13 Q 0 C TRAL 0 10 20 nArcade ARLINGTON RIVERSIDE TEMESCAL CANYON 205 206 Omnitrans 215 Omnitrans 215 County Administration Center CD =1445 1498 CD V) LLJ z 3494 B 3493 C 3511 D 3498 OMNI 3496 CD CD Omnitrans 215 1 CD 1 --1 91 CENTER E GRAND TERRACE HIGHGROVE Hunter Park Metrolink Station METROLINK HUNTERPARK/UCR METROLINK STATION 13.52•METPOLINK .0 2 BLAINE 16 'T .L <a UCR z, z m6, BIG SPRINGS ML KING 52 208 210 22 x 22 20 >- ® 60 16 208 CENTRAL � �09 CANYON CREST 27 MLK High VAN BUREN School WOODCREST CAJALCO gcr LAKE ELSINORE OUTLET . CENTER PARK & RIDE 8.9.205.206 210/SunLine 2 GO' 0 UNIVERSITY AV CEO 1 1085 I —1085 II —1085 IIKED 210/SunLine 220 u i SunLine 220 in Outlet Center BUS STOP NUMBER ® Brockton & 14th 0 z �22 210 LOCHM00 26 UCR & BANNOCKBURN GOLD LINE•1 •16.51 52.204 MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 30 0 w MANZANITA OLD LAKE RD a\P\R\SCE BOX SPRINGS 16 208 0 m z ALESSANDRO «MISSION METROUNK GROVE Moreno Valley March Field Social Metrolink Station Security Office 210 0 ostIol 16 • 0 • Moreno : Valle • Mall' 26 LYPTUS TOWNGATE 208 T MARCH JPA ORANGETERRACE MARIPOSA 21 ti/g9� Citrus Hills yq'y High School MEAD VALLEY 26 20 11 MORENO IRONWOOD m VALLEY HEMLOCK 1 o CENTERPOINT SUNNYMEAD TOWNGATE o "' FIR 18 City . Hall 6 VPN$\9‘c6k27 OLEANDER 41 RIDER — Mead Varey Community Center MEADOWBROOK Ike CACTUS MEYE March MORENO VALLEY/ MARCH FIELD METROLINK STATION COTTONWOOD 11 JFK 208 27 41 CAJALCO LAKE ELSINORE ROUTES SERVED & DIRECTION 14EB 1791 14WB 49EB 1790 3506 Brockton & University 1830 University & Brockton 3250 3265 Mission Inn & Brockton Mission Inn & Brockton 1081 1080 1149 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 1002 1EB, 13EB, 15EB 4600 Gold Line EB 4609 Gold Line WB gm Market & 10th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 3503 13EB, 15EB 3504 1440 1606 1449 Market & 6th 12WB, 29EB Market & 3rd 12EB, 29WB PE University & Market Mead Valley Library SAN JACINTO Canyon Lake RAILROAD Imart ELLIS CC CO 210 3 • EUCALYPTUS Welcome aboard the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), your community transportation provider. The RTA operates 47 bus routes to provide you with safe, cost-effective and reliable service in western Riverside County. We hope that this System Map is useful to you in planning your trip. Should you need additional information, please call the Customer Information Center at (951) 565-5002. • Route Number Route Path 3:13:13 Commuter Routing =cc Alternate Routing 0 Point of Interest 0 Medical Facility Transfer Point Metrolink Station Interstate e State Highway Main Road Water 0 2020 Riverside Transit Agency. Effective Date: January 12, 2020 210 ALESSANDRO 19 CZ vn cC 19 CC 18 Riverside Med JFK GENTIAN IRIS -2 niversity 41 4 CACTUS 20 Moreno Colleg • 31 <, EUCALYPTUS Walmart RIVERSIDE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 20.31.41 Kaiser Permanente Medical Center IRIS MORENO VALLEY COLLEGE PERRIS FAIRGROUND Star- CreSt MORGAN 208 SAN JACINT 41 RIDER ST O. CC CC 111 ORANGE CC MAY RANCH 30 WALNUT 19 Eki NUEVO 19 208 4TH ST o 74 00 PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER • • 9.19.22.27.28.30.61 Boarding diagram pg 31 74 BONNIE DR 208 • South Perris Metrolink Station METROLINK SOUTH PERRIS METROLINK STATION CHERRY HILLS & BRADLEY 40.61.74 QUAIL VALLEY Fire Station 40 LAKE 40 74 CHAMBERS AV MCCALL 61 111 210 31 60 ROUTE 51 Crest Cruiser Trolley 51 • • UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 1.14.16.51.52 51 IOWA AT UNIVERSITY. 52.204 Post Office RIVERSIDE CHICAGO 22.51 Legend I Map not to scale (31 Transfer Point and Information 0 Trolley Stops • • • • • • Ce • 1.10.14.51.52 University Village Blaine UCR AT BANNOCKBURN GOLD LINE•1•16.51 52.204 411(.8411 • • 51 • • • UCR • CANYON CREST TOWNE CENTRE UCR EXCEED 4 208 10104 NEWPORT RD NEWPORT RD 40 RAILROAD CYN RD Canyon Lake City Hall <97 qfr Wildomar g Inland Valley = Medical Center 205 206 WILDOMAR MATTHEWS SUN CITY Menifee Valley Medical Center 28 74 LA PIEDRA RD 208 Menifee City Hall ROHRABACHER MURRIETA CLINTON KEITH 23 City Hall - & Senior FUN CENTER 23.202.205.206 3501 University & Lemon Gold Line WB, 1WB 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay G 1085 3491 University & Market 1WB, 13WB, 14WB, 15WB, Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay H 3490 1150 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay D 29EB/WB, 49EB/WB 1140 3490 3207 1446 Orange & University 14th & Orange Grove In Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay C 3496 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay F 200EB/WB OMNI Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay E Omnitrans 215 3494 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay A 3493 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay B 1EB/WB 205 20 SIMPSON 40 Mt. Co 61 208 Vis MURRIETh OTSPRING Walmart EQUITY &YNEZ 55.79.217 CO HEMET VALLEY MALL 74 n Jacinto ge-Menifee Loma Linda University Medical Center LINNEL 20 206 COUNTY CENTER 55.79.217 Temecula City Hall ers OLD TOWN 74 WINCHESTER 79 23 217 79 74 THOMPSON 79 SIMPSON DOMENIGONIPKWT 217 79 BENTON 217 79 79 MAGDAS COLORADOS CO French Valley Airport TECHNOLOGY 217 79 Promenade Mall PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 31 28 Z' STAGECOACH City Hall PLAZA 210 Walmar 2ND CC 54,0 31 COMMERCE WAY» SAN JACINTO 42 EATON • COTTONWOOD FRUITVALE 33 42 MENLO OAKLAND 217 T 1 74 Hemet 31 Valley c, 79 Mall LA 33 217 THORNTO MUSTANG 217 FRENCH VP' SKY VIEW ALGRAVE AULD Southwest Justice Center TEMECULA Roo ovs 24 Community Center 24 Temecula Valley Hospital 32 HIGHLAND SPRINGS» 21 ENTEVR • —41 4414 3 42 33 217 79 AM STETSON ESP MM 32 CENTRAL ‘7. 32 ANADE WEALT MENLO OAKLAND THORNTON HEMET MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE 31.32.74.79.217 Mt. San Jacinto College,p City all MAIN 74 LATHO 32 32 42 EVANS 32 Walmart FLORIDA 33 cC CC 33 0,9 Soboba Casino 28 VALLE VISTA THORNTON EAST HEMET Avp PALM 74 Sunline 220 continues to Palm Desert ROUTE 55 Temecula Trolley • • • Ysabel • • HARVESTON • • EQUITY &YNEZ EQUITY DR 55.79.217 cc CctO COUNTY CENTER 55.79.217 55 • The Promenade at Temecula Palm Plaza Shopping Center Extended Stay America Best Abbott Western Legend I Map not to scale 0 Transfer Point and Information 0 Trolley Stops 41 Chaparral 55 041/ PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205-206.208.217 Temecula Walmart 0401. 24 24 REDHAWK FIFTEENTH ST LEGEND Stop Location Number (0 Route Numbers CW=Clockwise 10 01 University & Lemon Omnitrans 215 3824 Market & 4th 29EB 1002 University & Lemon 22NB, 29WB, 49WB, 204NB 3502 3409 Lemon & University 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay I SunLine 220EB/W6 Mel 14th & Lime IA/ NJ,GIall Pechanga Resort • PEPPERCORN >> -Great Oak HS \E)Rt 217 continues to Escondido Transit Center RIDE GUIDE EFFECTIVE APRIL 5, 2020 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE I EFECTIVO A PARTIR ABRIL 5, 2020 HASTA NUEVO AVISO SPECIAL EDITION i Riverside Transit Agency EFFECTIVE APRI 5, 2020 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE EFECTIVOA PARTIR ABRIL 5, 2020 HASTA NUEVO AVISO (951) 565-5002 I RiversideTransit.com All buses are accessible to persons with disabilities. Todos los autobuses son accesibles a las personas incapacitadas. WELCOME ABOARD! BIENVENIDOS ABORDO! NEW SERVICE LEVELS HAVE BEGUN Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Riverside Transit Agency has adjusted all routes and schedules until further notice. The service change scheduled for May 10 has been cancelled. We currently offer reduced service on 35 local fixed routes, five CommuterLink express routes and Dial -A -Ride service. Get details at RiversideTransit.com. • SUNDAY-LEVEL SERVICE 7 DAYS A WEEK: 1,3, 8, 9,10, 11,12, 13,14, 15,16, 18,19,20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 40, 41, 42, 49, 52, 61, 74, 79, 200. • TEMPORARILY DISCONTINUED ROUTES: GOLD LINE, 19A, 26, 50, 51, 55, 202, 210, 217. • REDUCED -SCHEDULE ROUTES: 204, 205, 206, 208. STAY INFORMED RiversideTransit.com - We recommend checking our website daily for service updates as your travel plans could be affected by temporary route and trip suspensions. iAlerts - Get email rider alerts and news delivered directly to your mobile device or computer. Signup free under the Newsroom section on our website. BusWatch & Transit App -Track your bus and get real- time bus information by downloading the BusWatch or Transit apps or by visiting RTABus.com. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram -Join us on social media. Customer Information Center - (951) 565-5002. The information center is open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, and 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekends and holidays. NUEVOS NIVELES DE SERVICIO HAN COMENZADO Debido a la pandemia de coronavirus, la Agencia de Transito de Riverside ha ajustado todas las rutas y horarios hasta nuevo aviso. El cambio de servicio programado para el 10 de mayo ha sido cancelado. Actualmente ofrecemos un servicio reducido en 35 rutas fijas locales, cinco rutas express CommuterLink y el servicio Dial -A -Ride. Obtenga detalles en RiversideTransit.com. • SERVICIO DE NIVEL DOMINGO 7 DIAS A LA SEMANA:1, 3, 8, 9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,18,19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 40, 41, 42,49,52,61,74,79,200. • RUTAS TEMPORALMENTE DISCONTINUADAS: GOLD LINE, 19A, 26, 50, 51, 55, 202, 210, 217. • RUTAS DE HORARIO REDUCIDO: 204, 205, 206, 208. MANTENTE INFORMADO RiversideTransit.com - Recomendamos que visite nuestro sitio web diariamente para obtener actualizaciones del servicio, ya que sus planes de viaje podrian verse afectados por la suspension temporal de rutas y viajes. iAlerts - Reciba alertas y noticias por correo electronico directamente en su dispositivo movil o computadora. Registrese gratis en la seccion de Noticias en nuestro sitio web. Aplicacion BusWatch & Transit - Rastrea to autobds y obten informacion en tiempo real descargando las aplicaciones BusWatch o Transit o visitando RTABus.com. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram - Unete a nosotros en las redes sociales. Centro de informacion al cliente - (951) 565-5002. El centro de informacion esta abierto de 6 a.m. a 10 p.m. de lunes a viernes y de 8 a.m. a 10 p.m. fines de semana y festivos. 362 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 11 TABLE OF CONTENTS Route information available in large print upon request. Phone Number Index RTA Services 4 Other Fixed -Route Services 4 RTA Information Customer Information Center 5 RTA Business Office 5 Lost and Found 5 ROUTE MAPS AND SCHEDULES RapidLink Gold Line I NO SERVICE I UCR, Downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler, Corona Transit Center 29 Route 11 UCR, Downtown Riverside, Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station, Smith & 6th, W. Corona Metrolink 30 How to Use Your Ride Guide Route 31 Eastvale, Norco, Corona Transit Center, 10th & Getting Started 6 Belle 33 Service Animals and Pets 6 Safety and Travel Tips 6 Route 8 I Lake Elsinore, Wildomar 35 Wheelchairs 7 Transportation NOW 7 Route 9 I Perris Station Transit Center, Lake Elsinore Scooters and Bikes 7 Outlet Center 37 Surfboards/Boogie Boards 8 Jury Duty 8 Route 10 I Big Springs & Watkins, Downtown Metrolink Passes 8 Riverside, Galleria at Tyler 39 Wi-Fi Service 8 Reasonable Modification Policy 8 Route 11 'Moreno Valley Mall, March ARB, Alessandro Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964 8 & Frederick 41 Fares, Fare Categories, Passes, Tickets & ID Cards Definitions of Fare Categories 8 Types of Passes 9 Buying and Activating Your Pass 10 Mobile Ticketing: Bus Pass 0n Your Phone 10 Fixed -Route Fares 11 CommuterLink Fares 11 U-Pass, Go -Pass and City Pass Fares 11 Dial -A -Ride Fares 11 City Listing of Pass Outlets 12,13 Seccion en Espanol (Spanish Section) 14-20 Reduced Fare Identification 21 Boarding Diagrams Corona Transit Center 22 Galleria at Tyler Mall 23 La Sierra Metrolink Station 24 Moreno Valley Mall 25 Perris Station Transit Center 26 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station 27 Route 12 I La Cadena & Stephens, Downtown Riverside, Corona Hills Plaza 43 Route 13 I Hunter Park/UCR Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler 45 Route 14 1 Galleria at Tyler, Downtown Riverside, Loma Linda VA Hospital 47 Route 15 I Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Merced & Magnolia 49 Route 161 UCR, Moreno Valley Mall 51 Route 181 Sunnymead Ranch, Moreno Valley Mall, Moreno Valley College 54 Route 19 I Moreno Valley Mall, Perris Station Transit Center 56 Route 19A I NO SERVICE I Perris Station Transit Center, Trumble Rd 59 Route 20 'Magnolia & Elizabeth, Social Security Office, Service Guide 28 Moreno Valley/March Field Metrolink Station, RUMC, Kaiser Permanente, Moreno Valley College 60 363 2 I RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY Route 21 I Galleria at Tyler, Country Village via Jurupa Valley 62 Route 221 Downtown Riverside, Perris Station Transit Center 64 Route 23 I Temecula, Murrieta, Wildomar 66 Route 24 1 Temecula, Pechanga Resort 68 Route 261 NO SERVICE I Orangecrest, Moreno Valley/ March Field Metrolink Station, Moreno Valley Mall 70 Route 27 I Galleria at Tyler, Orangecrest, Perris Station Transit Center 71 Route 28 I Perris Station Transit Center, Hemet Valley Mall, Florida & Lincoln 73 Route 29 I Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Eastvale 75 Route 30 I Weston & Strohm, Perris Station Transit Center, May Ranch 77 Route 311 Moreno Valley Mall, Beaumont, Banning, San Jacinto, Hemet Valley Mall 79 Route 321 Hemet Valley Mall, Mt. San Jacinto College - San Jacinto 81 Route 33 I Hemet -Sanderson, East Hemet 83 Route 40 I Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake, Quail Valley, Menifee, Sun City 85 Route 41 I Mead Valley Comm. Center, RUMC 87 Route 421 Hemet Valley Mall, San Jacinto, Soboba Casino 89 Route 49 I Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside, Country Village, Fontana 91 Route 50 Jury Trolley I SUSPENDED UNTIL JURY TRIALS RESUME I Eden Lutheran Church, Riverside County Courthouse, Riverside 93 Route 51 Crest Cruiser I SUSPENDED UNTIL UCR CLASSES RESUME I UCR, Canyon Crest, Riverside 94 Route 52 I NO SERVICE I UCR, Hunter Park/UCR Metrolink Station. 95 Route 55 Temecula Trolley I SUSPENDED UNTIL TEMECULA SCHOOLS RESUME I Harveston, Promenade Mall, County Center Dr 96 Route 61 I Perris Station Transit Center, South Perris Metrolink Station, Sun City, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula 97 Route 74I San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Sun City, South Perris Metrolink Station, Perris 99 Route 79 I San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Temecula 101 Route 200 I San Bernardino Downtown Transit Center, Downtown Riverside, Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Galleria at Tyler, La Sierra Metrolink Station, Village at Orange, Anaheim, Disneyland 103 Route 202 I NO SERVICE I Murrieta, Temecula, Oceanside Transit Center 105 Route 204 1 REDUCED SERVICE I UCR, Downtown Riverside, Country Village, Ontario Mills, Montclair Transcenter 106 Route 205/2061 REDUCED SERVICE I Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Park and Ride, Tom's Farms, Dos Lagos, Corona Transit Center, Village at Orange 108 Route 208 1 REDUCED SERVICE I Temecula, Murrieta, South Perris Metrolink Station, Perris Station Transit Center, Moreno Valley Mall, UCR, Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station, Downtown Riverside 111 Route 210 / SunLine Route 2201 NO SERVICE I Palm Desert, Thousand Palms, Beaumont Walmart, Moreno Valley, UCR, Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station113 Route 2171 NO SERVICE I San Jacinto, Hemet, Temecula, Escondido 114 364 RTA RIDE GUIDE - Apri15, 2020 v04 13 PHONE NUMBER INDEX CUSTOMER INFORMATION CENTER (951) 565-5002 Information about bus routes, schedules, fares and to make a comment. Hours: weekdays 6 a.m. -10 p.m., weekends and holidays 8 a.m. -10 p.m. Deaf and Hard of Hearing TTY Bus Information 1-800-800-7825 California Relay 1-800-735-2929 LOST AND FOUND: RTA Lost and Found/Business Office, 1825 Third St., Riverside 92507 (951) 565-5000 RTA DIAL -A -RIDE SERVICES 1-800-795-7887 Type of Dial -A -Ride service varies by city. Please call or visit our website at RiversideTransit.com for availability of service in your city. Hours: weekdays 7 a.m. - 6 p.m., weekends 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Deaf and Hard of Hearing TTY Dial -A -Ride 1-800-369-3610 California Relay 1-800-735-2929 Travel Training (951) 565-5002 Trip Cancellations (866) 543-4782 After Hours ETA Hotline (Toll free) (866) 543-4782 Cancel by e-mail cancel@RiversideTransit.com OTHER DIAL -A -RIDE SERVICES Banning Dial -A -Ride (951) 922-3252 Beaumont Dial -A -Ride (951) 769-8532 Care -A -Van (Hemet, San Jacinto) (951) 791-3572 Corona Dial -A -Ride (Seniors & the disabled only) (951) 734-7220 MoVan (Seniors & the disabled only) (800) 351-6571 Norco Senior Bus (951) 270-5647 Riverside Special Transportation (Seniors & the disabled only) (951) 687-8080 OTHER FIXED -ROUTE SERVICES Amtrak (Nationwide Rail Passenger Service) 1-800-872-7245 Coaster (Rail service in San Diego County) 1-800-COASTER or (619) 233-3004 Corona Cruiser (City of Corona bus service) (951) 734-9418 Foothill Transit (Service throughout San Gabriel Valley) 1-800-743-3463 Greyhound (Nationwide service) 1-800-231-2222 Metrolink (Rail Passenger Service) 1-800-371-5465 Los Angeles Metro (Red Line, Blue Line, MTA, etc.) (323) GO METRO Moreno Valley free neighborhood shuttle (877) 665-4623 MTS (San Diego County bus service) (619) 557-4555 North County Transit District (Service in North San Diego County) (760) 966-6500 OCTA (Service throughout Orange County) 1-800-636-7433 Omnitrans (Service throughout western San Bernardino County) 1-800-966-6428 Palo Verde Valley Transit (Service in the city of Blythe) (760) 922-1140 Beaumont Pass Transit (Service in Beaumont, Cherry Valley, Calimesa and part of Banning) (951) 769-8530 Banning Pass Transit (Service in Banning, Cabazon and small portions of Beaumont) (951) 922-3243 SunLine Transit (Service throughout Palm Springs and Coachella Valley) (800) 347-8628 NOTE: RTA operators can only provide RTA information. Please call the appropriate services with questions regarding other transportation services. RTA cannot be responsible for changed phone numbers. 365 4 RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY RTA INFORMATION CUSTOMER INFORMATION CENTER RTA's Customer Information Center is staffed with friendly clerks ready to assist you with information about bus schedules, routes, fares and pass outlet locations. The center also takes reports of bus stops that need cleaning or repairs and they document customer complaints and commendations. Please note that some complaints may need to be submitted in writing by postal mail, e-mail or via RTA's website, RiversideTransit.com. The center is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekends and most holidays. Call the Customer Information Center at (951) 565-5002. If you need help planning a trip, please be prepared to provide the following information to the customer information clerk: 1. The nearest street and main cross street of your starting point and destination, or address, not business name. 2. The time of day (a.m. or p.m.) you need to arrive. 3. Specify weekday or weekend schedule. The RTA Customer Information Center can only assist you with RTA information. For information on other transportation services, please refer to the phone number index on Page 4. RTA BUSINESS OFFICE RTA's business office is located at 1825 Third Street in Riverside and is accessible by using routes 10 and 13. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and closed Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. Passes may be obtained from our Riverside office during business hours. You may pay using cash, check, MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or ATM card with a Visa or MasterCard logo. There is a $25 fee charged for all returned checks. You can also order passes securely on our website at RiversideTransit.com or through the Token Transit app. LOST AND FOUND RTA's Lost and Found is located at the RTA business office at 1825 Third Street, Riverside, or call (951) 565-5000 Monday to Friday between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lost and Found items wit be held for five business days. 366 RTA RIDE GUIDE - Apri15, 2020 v04 15 HOW TO USE YOUR RIDE GUIDE The RTA Ride Guide contains route maps and timetables for all its fixed routes. Understanding how to use the route maps and timetables will allow you to use the Ride Guide to plan your trip. GETTING STARTED The first steps in planning your trip is to decide the starting point, where you want to go, and what day and time you want to travel. The RTA system map will help you determine which route or routes you will take. Once you have determined the route(s) you need, follow these simple steps to plan your trip using the Ride Guide: 1.On the route map, locate the beginning and ending point of your bus trip. 2. Locate the time point closest to your beginning and ending bus trip location. Time points are indicated on the route maps by a number inside a circle. NOTE: Each time point on the route map has a corresponding column on the timetable. Not all bus stops are indicated on the map and there are many bus stops between each time point. 3. Find the column on the correct timetable that corresponds with your selected time point. Be sure you are using the timetable for the correct day of the week and direction of travel. Read down the column below the time point to find the time closest to your desired departure. Time for stops between time points can be estimated by adding the amount of time it will take the bus to get from the previous time point to your stop. SERVICE ANIMALS AND PETS Service Animals The ADA defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. Service animals perform some of the functions and tasks that the individual with a disability cannot perform for him or herself. Some examples include: • Service animals can be guide dogs for the blind or visually impaired, signal dogs for the hearing impaired, or other types of animals that can be individually trained to work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability. • Service animals perform some of the functions and tasks that the individual with a disability cannot perform in their day-to-day activities. • A service animal must always be under the control of the owner or handler. • Service animals require no special tag, identification, certification, papers, harness, vest, cape, or pass. What is not a service animal? • Pets are not service animals. • Emotional support, therapy, comfort, and companion animals are not service animals, as they have not been trained to perform a specific job or task. These animals would not be afforded access rights under the ADA. Pets Small pets and non -service or guide animals are allowed only if owners comply with the following rules: 1. Small animals such as birds and cats must be secured in a commercially made pet carrier or cage that can be safely placed on the passenger's lap and does not require a separate seat. 2. Glass, breakable or homemade carriers are not permitted. 3. The animal must be completely enclosed within the pet carrier or cage at all times. 4. The pet carrier or cage must completely prevent the animal from escaping or physically contacting another passenger or of escape. 5. The pet carrier or cage must be constructed so that no bedding material or pet waste can exit. The animal must not interfere with, disrupt or disturb any service or guide animals on the vehicle. SAFETY TIPS • For safety reasons, RTA buses cannot stop at locations under construction or non -designated bus stops. • When exiting the bus, use sidewalks and crosswalks whenever possible. Never cross the street directly in front of the bus. TRAVEL TIPS • Arrive to your bus stop at least 10 minutes early. • No eating, drinking, smoking (including e-cigarettes), loud music or changing of clothes or diapers. • If you use a paper pass that has been activated, swipe it in the farebox rather than dipping it to prevent it from jamming in the farebox. 367 6 RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY • Carry -on bags limited to three, must fit in lap not in aisle. • Please refrain from shouting, using profanity, offensive language or talking to the operator while the bus is in motion. • No graffiti, alcohol, drugs or weapons of any kind permitted on the bus. • Push the yellow strip between the windows or pull the cord to signal your stop prior to arrival. • All customers should remain seated until the bus comes to a complete stop. • Please exit through the rear doors, if possible, to speed boarding of customers. • Fold -up seats and seats directly behind the operator are intended for seniors and customers with disabilities. • Keep your buses and bus stops clean by using trash receptacles. • Please keep your feet off the seats. • Shirts and shoes must be worn at all times. • Shopping carts and strollers should be folded prior to boarding the bus. Walkers should be folded prior to taking your seat. Customers seated in the front of the bus who are unable to collapse their foldable shopping carts may be asked to move to another area of the bus to keep aisles, doors and steps dear to facilitate safe boardings and wheelchairtie-downs. WHEELCHAIRS To ensure proper fastening of the chair during travel, please limit the number of carry -on bags stowed in the back of the chair. To avoid injury to yourself and other customers, please remove any protruding objects such as flag poles and reflectors with sharp points. Be aware that RTA buses deploy a wheelchair ramp/lift for easy boarding and alighting. When the ramp/lift is deployed, the bus will emit a beeping sound. When exiting the rear doors, listen for the beeping sound and be observant of the ramp to avoid injuries. Wheelchairs and electric mobility scooters are allowed on the bus as long as they do not exceed 30 inches wide and 51 inches long and the combined weight does not exceed 800 pounds. For your safety, please turn off the power to your mobility device while the driver fastens the safety harness and during the entire trip. Refrain from removing wheelchair or scooter securement until you reach your destination and the bus comes to a complete stop. Please use the bus seats whenever possible. RTA is pleased to offer tether straps for wheelchairs and scooters. Call (951) 565-5002 to schedule an appointment. TRANSPORTATION NOW Since its inception in 1992, Transportation NOW has been a proud advocate and enthusiastic ally of public transportation in Riverside County. Members of the public are invited to attend any of the group's six chapters: Greater Riverside, Hemet/San Jacinto Area, Moreno Valley/Perris, Northwest, San Gorgonio Pass and Southwest. For more information or to join a chapter, call Eric Ustation at (951) 565-5250 or email at eustation@riversidetransit.com. BIKE AND RIDE Every RTA bus has a bicycle rack capable of handling at least two bikes with standard bike tires. Bikes are accepted on a first -come, first -served basis. Passengers wishing to transport bikes should first notify the coach operator that they are loading or unloading a bike before approaching the bike rack. When loading your bicycle in the bike rack: NOTE: For your safety, loading and unloading of bicycles should be done from the curbside of the bus. • Wait for the bus to come to a complete stop before loading your bicycle. • Bicycles must not exceed 551bs. • Loose articles must be removed from bicycle before being placed on the bike rack. • Bicycle handlebars or baskets must not obstruct driver's view. • Foldable bicycles (non -motorized) no larger than 28"X 20"X 11"are allowed on board (under the seat). • The coach operator has the discretion to deny foldable bicycles and items which cannot be reasonably and safely stored under the seat or safely on the exterior bike rack. • Tandem and tri-cycle bikes are not allowed. • Please remember, you are responsible for the loading and unloading of your bicycle. • When departing the bus, exit through the front door, and let the coach operator know you're removing your bicycle from the rack. • RTA is not responsible for Toss or damage to bicycles. Battery -powered bicycles and scooters are allowed on RTA buses: • Customers are allowed to place electric bicycles with sealed gel, lithium Ion or NiCad batteries in the bike rack as long as they fit safely in the bike rack and have standard tires. (Must also meet the bicycle requirements listed above.) 368 RTA RIDE GUIDE - Apri15, 2020 v04 17 • Customers are allowed to carry on the bus electric scooters with sealed gel, lithium Ion or NiCad batteries as long as they can be folded and fit under your seat or on your lap. The following items are not allowed on RTA buses: • Customers are not allowed to bring on board the bus items such as used gasoline cans, car batteries, hover boards, gas -powered vehicles, or objects too large to fit under passenger seats. • Electric bikes with liquid lead acid batteries are not permitted in the bike rack nor are gas -powered bikes. SURFBOARDS/BOOGIE BOARDS Surfboards and boogie boards no longer than six feet and with a maximum 4"skeg are permitted on buses, provided they are enclosed in a bag, can be positioned in front of the customer while the bus is in motion and do not take up an additional seat. JURY/GRAND JURORS DUTY All jurors summoned to serve in Riverside County courthouses are able to ride for free on all RTA buses while on active jury duty by showing their current and valid juror summons badge to the coach operator. METROLINK PASSES RTA will accept valid Metrolink passes or tickets for the full fare on routes that serve Metrolink stations during the period from one hour before to one hour after Metrolink's service hours. The Metrolink pass or tickets must be valid on the day of travel and pass -holders must disembark at the Metrolink Station. WI-FI SERVICE Free wireless Internet access (Wi—Fi) is available to RTA customers on all buses. The availability, reliability, uptime and speed of the services are not guaranteed by RTA. NO SMOKING OF ANY KIND ABOARD RTA BUSES All Riverside Transit Agency buses and stations are entirely non-smoking. This includes cigarettes, cigars and electronic smoking devices such as electronic cigarettes. The smoking of marijuana or ingestion of cannabis products for any purpose is also prohibited, and sealed containers are required for the transportation of any cannabis -related product. REASONABLE MODIFICATION POLICY The Riverside Transit Agency is committed to providing safe, reliable, courteous, accessible and user-friendly services to its customers. To ensure equality and fairness, RTA is committed to making reasonable modifications to its policies, practices and procedures to avoid discrimination and ensure programs and services are accessible to individuals with disabilities. Requests for modifications can be made by calling RTA at (951) 565-5002 or emailing comments@riversidetransit.com. NOTIFICATION OF PUBLIC RIGHTS UNDER TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 The Riverside Transit Agency operates its programs and services without regard to race, color and national origin in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Any person who believes she or he has been aggrieved by any unlawful discriminatory practice under the Title VI may file a complaint. For more information on the Riverside Transit Agency's civil rights program and the procedures to file a complaint, contact (951) 565-5002, email comments@riversidetransit.com, or visit our administrative office at 1825 Third Street, Riverside, CA 92507. If information is needed in another language, contact (951) 565-5002. FARES, FARE CATEGORIES, PASSES and TICKETS and ID CARDS DEFINITIONS OF FARE CATEGORIESAND IDENTIFICATION General All customers except those who meet the qualifications for youth, senior, disabled or child fare categories. No identification is required for General fares. Youth First grade through 12th grade only. College students pay General fare. Youth fares are in effect at all times. Appropriate ID must be shown each time you board a bus to receive the Youth fare. School -issued picture ID cards are appropriate identification. RTA also offers Youth identification cards to anyone in grades 1 369 8 RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY through 12. AYouth ID card costs $2. Call (951) 565-5002 for more information on how to obtain one. Senior / Disabled / Medicare Any person who meets RTA disability requirements, presents a valid Medicare card, Veteran ID or seniors age 60 or above are eligible for a discounted fare on all RTA fixed -route services. Medi-Cal cards will not be accepted. Customers must show appropriate ID each time they board a bus to receive the discounted fare. RTA issued photo ID cards are available for senior and disabled customers. To receive a Disabled ID card, individuals must present a disabled application form completed by a doctor or licensed health care professional or one of the following as proof of disability: Medicare Identification Card, Department of Motor Vehicles Disabled Person Placard Identification Card receipt, Braille Institute Identification Card, Disabled Veteran Service -Connected Identification Card, or a Social Security Disability Income Award Letter with proof of disability. Please bring the proper documentation and a photo ID to the Family Services Association, 8172 Magnolia Ave., on the second Tuesday of each month between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. to receive your identification card. There will be a cost of $2 for the card. If you have any questions, please call (951) 565-5002. Applications are available at the RTA business office, on ourwebsite at RiversideTransit.com or by calling our Customer Information Center at (951) 565-5002. Veteran Any person who meets RTA Veteran requirements, presents a valid U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs issued ID card or a U.S. Uniformed Services ID card indicating retired status. Customers must show appropriate ID each time they board a bus to receive the discounted fare. RTA-issued photo ID cards are available for veteran customers. Please call (951) 565-5002 for the location and time to obtain your ID card. There is a $2 fee for the ID card. To receive a Veteran ID card, individuals must present a Department of Defense Form 214 and a picture ID. RTA also recognizes the 0mnitrans Military Veteran Identification (issued by County of San Bernardino Department of Veteran Affairs). Active Duty Military, Police and Fire Personnel Any person who meets RTA active duty military, police or fire personnel requirements rides free on RTA fixed - route buses. Active duty military personnel must wear 370 the appropriate uniform at the time of boarding or present to the driver a valid U.S. Uniformed Services ID card indicating active service or a Common Access card indicating uniformed services or active duty. Police and fire personnel must be in full uniform at the time of boarding. Customers must wear the appropriate uniform or show appropriate ID each time they board a bus to receive the discounted fare. Child Height -based: 46"tall or under. Must be accompanied by a full -fare paying customer. ADA The RTA Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) ID card is for persons who have been specially certified through the RTA ADA Certification process. This ID may qualify you for priority service on any RTA Dial -A -Ride, Corona Dial -A -Ride, Riverside Special Transportation and Beaumont Dial -A -Ride. If your ADA card indicates that you require the assistance of a personal care attendant, the attendant may ride for free. To become ADA certified, you are required to complete an application and provide a Healthcare Professional Verification form. This ID must be renewed every four years. For more information, call (951) 565-5002. Commuter Routes Routes 200, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 210 and 217 are commuter routes with fares of $3.50 for general and youth and $2.75 for senior/disabled. Persons may also buy a Plus+Pass which may be used on both local fixed routes and CommuterLink express routes. TYPES OF PASSES RTA uses electronic fareboxes in all buses and standard fareboxes in Dial -A -Ride buses. The electronic fareboxes accept coins, cash and paper tickets and passes, as well as mobile tickets and passes. Passes are the size of a credit card, printed on sturdy paper with a magnetic stripe on the back. Rather than showing your pass to the driver, you will swipe your pass in thefarebox similar to using an ATM card. For cash fares, please use exact fare only. No change will be issued from either the fareboxes or the drivers. To avoid delays, use quarters instead of smaller coins. 1-Day, 7-Day and 30-Day passes are available through the mail, at RTA headquarters, at some pass outlets or at RiversideTransit.com. 1-Day passes may also be purchased on the bus. RTA RIDE GUIDE - Apri15, 2020 v04 19 1-Day Pass 1-Day passes are designed for the occasional rider who needs to transfer often. Customers may purchase a Local 1-Day Pass, valid on local fixed routes and RapidLink only, or a Local+CommuterLink 1-Day Pass valid on all local, RapidLink and commuter routes. The 1-Day Pass is good for unlimited travel on the day the pass is first used. Your 1-Day Pass will be validated by the farebox and the effective date will be printed on the back of the pass. Please verify that the correct date has been printed. 1-Day passes are not transferable to another day and there are no refunds or exchanges for lost or stolen passes. Use of a Senior/Disabled/Medicare or Veteran 1-Day Pass requires proper identification each time you board a bus. 1-Day Passes are not accepted on Dial -A -Ride. 7-Day Pass The 7-Day Pass is designed to provide an affordable alternative to RTA's monthly pass. Customers may purchase a Local 7-Day Pass, valid on local fixed routes and RapidLink only. The 7-Day Pass must be used over a consecutive seven-day period beginning after first use. The 7-Day Pass is not sold on the bus and is only available by presale. 7-Day passes are not valid on Dial - A -Ride or CommuterLink services. 30-Day Pass 30-Day passes are ideal for customers who travel often on the RTA bus system. Customers may purchase a Local 30-Day Pass, valid on local fixed routes and RapidLink, or a Local+CommuterLink 30-Day Pass valid on all local, RapidLink and commuter routes. The 30-Day Pass must be used overa consecutive 30-day period beginning after first use. The 30-Day Pass is not sold on the bus and is only available by presale. Dial -A -Ride Tickets Dial -A -Ride tickets are sold in books often. You will be required to present a ticket each time you board a Dial -A -Ride bus. Some trips may require more than one ticket. Dial -A -Ride tickets are only valid on RTA Dial -A -Ride buses and not valid on local fixed route, CommuterLink or other transit agency buses. BUYING AND ACTIVATING YOUR PASS 7-Day and 30-Day passes are not sold on the bus. They may be purchased at a number of outlets throughout the county, through the mail or securely on our website at RiversideTransit.com. For the location of a pass sales outlet near you call (951) 565-5002 or see pages 12 and 13. Remember, passes are not refundable and are not accepted on Dial -A -Ride. When you purchase your 1-Day, 7-Day or 30-Day Pass, it will not be activated. You must activate the pass on the bus the first time you use it. To activate, insert the pass (printed side facing you with the arrow pointing down) in the activation slot on the top left side of the farebox. The farebox will print the effective dates on the back of the pass. Then, all you have to do is swipe your pass on all other buses you board and ride. MOBILE TICKETING: BUS PASS ON YOUR PHONE Riding RTA just got easier. Now you can buy RTA passes on your smartphone. The Token Transit app makes paying your fare a breeze! There's no need to carry cash. No need to wait in line to buy a pass. And no need to search for your bus pass buried in your wallet. Simply board the bus, tap your phone and go! Customers can purchase RTA 1-Ride, 1-Day, 7-Day and 30-Day passes from anywhere! Passes can be purchased for immediate use, or if you're planning ahead, they can be stored on Token Transit app for future trips on all RTA fixed - route buses. Three simple steps to paying with your smartphone. 1. Get the Token Transit app at TokenTransit.com/app. 2. Buy your RTA bus pass. 3. When you board the bus, make sure the app is open and the pass is visible, place the phone over the validator and wait for the beep. 10 I RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY 371 LOCAL FIXED -ROUTE FARES Fare Categories (includes RapidLink) Base Fares Day Pass* 7-Day Pass* 30-Day Pass* General $1.75 $5 $20 $60 Youth (grades 1-12)** $1.75 $5 $20 $45 Senior/Disabled— 75( $2.50 $20 $30 Medicare Card Holder** 75( $2.50 $20 $30 Veteran** 75C $2.50 $20 $30 Child (46"tall or under) COMMUTERLINK FARES Fare Categories 50( Base Fares N/A COMMUTERLINK Day Passes + LOCAL N/A (includes N/A RapidLink) 30-Day Pass General $3.50 $10 $95 Youth (grades 1-12)** $3.50 $10 $95 Senior/Disabled— $2.75 $7 $70 Medicare Card Holder* $2.75 $7 $70 Veteran** $2.75 $7 $70 Child (46^tall or under) $2.75 U-Pass, Go -Pass, Active Jurors, Active Duty Military, N/A Police, Fire Personnel and N/A City Pass I RIDE FREE U-Pass: UC Riverside, Cal Baptist University, La Sierra University Go -Pass: Riverside City College, Moreno Valley College, Mt. San Jacinto College, Norco College City Pass: All City of Riverside employees DIAL -A -RIDE FARES I Not accepted on Fare Categories fixed -route buses Base Fares 10-Ticket Books Senior/Disabled $3.50 - $10.50 $35 Medicare Card Holder $3.50 - $10.50 $35 Child (46^tallorunder) 75C N/A * Accepted as base fare. CommuterLink trips require an additional $2 (senior/disabled) or $1.75 (general) per trip. ** If you plan to use a senior, disabled, Medicare, veteran or youth discounted fare, you must show proper ID each time you board the bus. You must also show proper ID to purchase discounted passes at retail outlets. For a list of accepted forms of identification, see Page 22. 372 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 I11 PASS OUTLETS RTA's passes are good for base fare on all fixed -route buses. Passes are not accepted on Dial -A -Ride. WE RECOMMEND THATYOU (ALL THE PASS OUTLET TO DETERMINE TYPES OF AVAILABLE PASSES. BEAUMONT Beaumont City Hall 550 E. 6th St. Beaumont, CA 92223 (951) 769-8520 CORONA Circle K 13120 Magnolia Ave. Corona, CA 91720 (951) 737-8476 Corona Public Library 650 S. Main St. Corona, CA 92882 (951) 736-2381 GLEN AVON Tony K Market 6104 Mission Blvd. Riverside, CA 92509 (951) 369-0108 HEMET Chip's Liquor 1207 W. Florida Ave. Hemet, CA 92543 (951) 658-5136 Hemet Public Library 300 E Latham Ave. Hemet, CA 92543 (951) 765-2440 X-Press Cash'til Payday 1799 E. Florida Ave. Hemet, CA 92544 (951) 925-6166 HOMELAND Highway 74 Market 31190 Hwy. 74 Homeland, CA 92548 (951) 926-4233 JURUPA VALLEY City Hall 8304 Limonite Ave. Ste. M. Jurupa Valley, CA 92509 (951) 332-6464 LAKE ELSINORE City of Lake Elsinore 130 S. Main Street Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 (951) 674-3124 Lake Elsinore Senior Activity Center 420 E. Lakeshore Dr. Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 (951) 674-2526 MENIFEE Menifee City Hall 29714 Haun Road Menifee, CA 92586 (951) 672-6777 MORENO VALLEY Fastrip Food Store 23991 Sunnymead Blvd. Moreno Valley, CA 92553 (951)243-5104 Liquor + Food Mart 23080 Alessandro Blvd., Ste. 208 Moreno Valley, CA 92553 (951) 697-4888 Mel's Liquor 14051 Indian St., Ste. 0 Moreno Valley, CA 92553 (951) 924-5534 Moneytree (Inside Food 4 Less) 24440 Alessandro Blvd. Moreno Valley, CA 92553 (951) 243-3876 Moreno Valley Chamber of Commerce 12625 Frederick St., Ste. E3 Moreno Valley, CA 92553 (951) 697-4404 MURRIETA City of Murrieta 1 Town Square Murrieta, CA 92562 (951) 304-2489 PERRIS La Favorita Supermarket 546 lndian Hills Circle, Ste. B Perris, CA 92570 (951)443-4379 One Stop Store 406 S. D St. Perris, CA 92570 (951) 940-5177 City of Perris 101 North D St. Perris, CA 92570 (951) 943-4610 RIVERSIDE AK Market 6411 Brockton Ave Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 276-8333 Angel Eyes Smoke Shop Plus 4024 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA, 92501 (951) 686-2159 City of Riverside Utilities Plaza 3901 Orange St. Riverside, CA 92501 (951)826-5311 Discounted passes for City of Riverside residents only. City of Riverside Customer Resource Center 3025 Madison St. Riverside, CA 92504 (951) 826-5311 Discounted passes for City of Riverside residents only. Community Access Cntr. 6848 Magnolia Ave., Ste. 150 Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 274-0358 TTY (951) 274-0834 Continental Currency Services Inc. 1788 University Ave., Ste. 116 Riverside, CA 92507 (951) 686-3223 12I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 373 Friendly Liquor 3962 University Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 787-9224 Jimenez Ranch Market 5600 Mission Blvd. Riverside, CA 92509 (951) 782-8037 Moneytree (Inside Food 4 Less) 4250Van Buren Blvd. Riverside, CA 92503 (951) 343-9680 Riverside Transit Agency 1825 Third St. Riverside, CA 92507 (951) 565-5000 RUBIDOUX Smart Buy Cigarette Shop 5675 Mission Blvd. Rubidoux, CA 92509 (951)369-1143 SAN BERNARDINO Omnitrans — San Bernardino Transit Center 599 W. Rialto Ave. San Bernardino, CA 92411 (800) 966-6428 SAN JACINTO Fastrip Food Store 692 S. San Jacinto Avenue San Jacinto, CA, 92583 (951) 654-4809 TEMECULA The Customer Service Experts The Promenade Mall 40820 Winchester Rd. Temecula, CA 92591 (951) 296-0975 Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce 26790 Ynez Ct. Temecula, CA 92591 (951) 676-5090 Temecula Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau 28690 Mercedes Street Temecula, CA 92590 (951) 491-6085 WILDOMAR City Hall 23873 Clinton Keith Rd., Suite 201 Wildomar, CA 92595 (951) 677-7751 SCHOOLS / COLLEGES Students may purchase bus passes at their school offices at the following schools. Citrus Hill High School ASB Office 18150 Wood Rd. Perris, CA 92570 (951) 490-0400 John North High School 1550 Third St. Riverside, CA 92507 (951) 788-7314 Orange Vista High School 1400 Orange Ave. Perris, CA 92571 (951) 490-4660 Ortega High School 520 Chaney St. Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 (951) 253-7065 Perris Union High School 1151 N. A Street Perris, CA 92570 (951) 943-6369 Ramona High School 7675 Magnolia Ave. Riverside, CA 92504 (951) 352-8429 San Jacinto Unified School District 2045 S. San Jacinto Avenue San Jacinto, CA 92583 (951) 929-7700 Val Verde High School 972W. Morgan St. Perris, CA 92571 (951) 940-6155 WE RECOMMEND THAT YOU CALL THE PASS OUTLET TO DETERMINE TYPES OF AVAILABLE PASSES. 374 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 113 INFORMACION SOBRE RTA CENTRO DE INFORMACION AL CLIENTE El Centro de Informacion al Cliente de RTA cuenta con personal amables y listos para ayudarle con informacion sobre los horarios, rutas, tarifas de autobuses y ubicaciones de centros de distribucion de pases. El centro tambien recibe reportes sobre las paradas de autobus que necesitan limpieza o reparaciones y documentan las quejas y elogios de los clientes. Tenga en cuenta que algunas quejas tienen que ser sometidas por escrito y mandadas por correo postal, correo electronico o por el sitio web de RTA, RiversideTransit.com. El Centro de Informacion esta abierto de 6 a.m. a 10 p.m. entre semana y de 8 a.m. a 10 p.m. los fines de semana y la mayorra de los dias de fiesta. Llame al Centro de Informacion al Cliente al (951) 565-5002 0 511. Si necesita asistencia para planear su viaje, por favor este listo para proveer la siguiente informacion al personal del Centro de Informacion al Cliente: 1. La calle mas cercana e interseccion principal de su punto de partida y destino o su domicilio. No necesitamos el nombre del negocio. 2. La hora del dra que usted necesita Ilegar a su destino. 3. Especifique si desea el horario de entre semana o fin de semana. El Centro de Informacion al Cliente le puede ayudar unicamente con informacion relacionada con RTA. Para obtener informacion sobre otros servicios de transportacion, por favor mire la lista telefonica que empieza en la pagina 4. OFICINAADMINISTRATIVA DE RTA La oficina administrativa de RTA esta ubicada en 1825 Third Street en Riverside y es accesible usando las rutas 10 y 13. Las horas de oficina son de 8 a.m. a 5 p.m., de lunes a viernes, cerrada los sabados, domingos, y dias festivos. Los pases se pueden obtener en nuestra oficina en Riverside durante las horas laborales. Usted puede pagar con dinero en efectivo, cheques, tarjetas de credito MasterCard, Visa, Discover o tarjeta de debito con logo de Visa o MasterCard. Habra un cargo de $25 por todos los cheques devuelto por el banco. Los pases tambien se pueden ordenar de forma segura en nuestro sitio web en RiversideTransit.com. OBJETOS PERDIDOS/ENCONTRADOS El Departamento de 0bjetos Perdidos/Encontrados esta ubicado en la oficina administrativa de RTA en 1825 Third Street, en Riverside, o Ilame al (951) 565-5000 de lunes a viernes de 8 a.m. a 5 p.m. Los objetos perdidos/ encontrados se guardaran por cinco dias laborales. COMO USAR SU GUTA DE VIAJE La Guia de Viajes de RTA contiene mapas y horarios de todas las rutas fijas. Entender cow usar los mapas de las rutas y los horarios le permitiro usar la Guia de Viajes para planar su viaje. COMO COMENZAR NOTA: Cada punto de horario en el mapa de ruta El primer paso en planear su viaje es decidir el punto tiene una columna correspondiente en la tabla de de partida, adonde quiere ir, y que dra y hora desea horarios. No todas las paradas de autobus estan viajar. El mapa del sistema de RTA le ayudara a indicadas en el mapa y hay varias paradas entre cada determinar que ruta o rutas necesitara tomar. punto de tiempo. Una vez que haya determinado la(s) ruta(s) que necesita, siga estos simples pasos para planear su viaje usando la Guia de Viajes: 1. En el mapa de rutas, localice el punto de partida y de Ilegada de su viaje en autobus. 2. Localice el punto de tiempo con horario mas cercano a su ubicacion de partida y Ilegada de su viaje en autobus. Los puntos de tiempo se indican en los mapas de rutas con un numero dentro de un crrculo. 3. En la tabla de horarios, encuentre la columna que corresponda con su punto de tiempo seleccionado. Asegurese de usar la tabla de horarios que corresponda al dra de la semana correcto y a la direccion de su viaje. Lea la columna debajo del punto de tiempo para encontrar la hora mas cercana que usted desea pa air. Las horas de las paradas entre los puntos de tiempo se pueden calcular sumando el tiempo que tardara el autobus en Ilegar desde el punto de tiempo anterior hasta su parada. 14I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 375 ANIMALES DE SERVICIOYMASCOTAS Animales de servicio ADA define un animal de servicio como cualquier perro gura, perro de senal u otro animal entrenado individualmente para brindar asistencia a una persona con discapacidad. Los animales de servicio realizan algunas de las funciones y tareas que el individuo con discapacidad no puede realizar por si mismo. Algunos ejemplos incluyen: • Los animales de servicio pueden ser perros gura para personas ciegas o con discapacidad visual, perros de senalizacion para personas con discapacidad auditiva u otros tipos de animales que pueden ser entrenados individualmente para trabajar o realizar tareas para una persona con discapacidad. • Los animales de servicio realizan algunas de las funciones y tareas que la persona con discapacidad no puede realizar en sus actividades cotidianas. • Un animal de servicio siempre debe estar bajo el control del dueno o del manejador. • Los animales de servicio no requieren una etiqueta especial, identificacion, certificacion, papeles, arnes, chaleco, capa o pase. iQue no es un animal de servicio? • Las mascotas no son animales de servicio. • El apoyo emocional, la terapia, la comodidad y los animales de compait a no son animales de servicio, ya que no han sido entrenados para realizar un trabajo o tarea especrfica. Estos animales no tendrian derechos de acceso bajo la ADA. Mascotas Se admiten mascotas pequenas y animales que no son de servicio o gura solo si los propietarios cumplen con las siguientes reglas: 1. Los animales pequenos, como Maros y gatos, deben estar asegurados en una jaula o jaula para mascotas fabricada comercialmente que pueda colocarse de manera Segura en el regazo del pasajero y que no requiera un asiento separado. 2. No se permiten portadores de vidrio, fragiles o caseros. 3. El animal debe estar completamente encerrado dentro del transportador de mascotas o la jaula en todo momento. 4. El portador o la jaula de la mascota debe evitar por completo que el animal escape o contacte frsicamente con otro pasajero o que escape. 5. El porta mascotas o la jaula deben estar construidos de manera que no pueda salir material de cama o desechos de mascotas. El animal no debe interferir, interrumpir o perturbar ningun servicio o gura de animales en el vehrculo. CONSEJOS DE SEGURIDAD • Al salir del autobus, utilice la banqueta y el paso de peatones cuando es posible. Nunca cruce la calle justo enfrente del autobus. • Gracias por mantener el pasillo despejado. Los carritos de compras y las carriolas deben plegarse antes de subir al autobus, y los andadores deben doblarse antes de tomar asiento. • Por razones de seguridad, los autobuses de RTA no pueden detenerse en paradas bajo construction o paradas de autobus que no estan designadas. DATOS PARA SU VIAJE • Llegue a su parada de autobus al menos 10 minutos antes. • No coma, beba, fume (incluyendo e-cigarrillos), ni escuche milsica con volumen alto o cambie su ropa o panales. • Lrmite el numero de bolsas con sus compras a tres y deben caber en sus piernas y no en el pasillo. • Por favor abstengase de gritar, usar lenguaje ofensivo o hablar con el operador mientras el autobus esta en movimiento. • No se permite grafiti, alcohol, drogas o armas de cualquier tipo en el autobus. • Empuje la tira amarilla entre las ventanas o estire el cordon para senalar su parada antes de Ilegar a su parada de autobds. • Todos los clientes deben permanecer sentados hasta que el autobds pare completamente. • Por favor salga por la puerta trasera, si es posible, para acelerar el abordaje de los clientes. • Los asientos-plegables y los asientos directamente detras del operador estan destinados para personas de la tercera edad y clientes con discapacidades. • Mantenga sus autobuses y paradas de autobus limpios usando el recipiente de basura. • Por favor no suba los pies en los asientos. • Camisas y zapatos deben ser usados en todo momento. • Los carritos de compras y las carriolas deben doblarse 376 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 115 antes de subir al autobus. Los andadores se deben doblar antes de tomar su asiento. Los clientes sentados en la parte de enfrente del autobus que no pueden doblar sus carritos plegables de compras se les puede pedir que se muevan a otra area del autobus para mantener los pasillos, puertas y los escalones despejados para facilitar los abordajes y los amarres de sillas de ruedas. • Si utiliza un pase de papel, que se ha activado, desl(celo en la caja de tarifas en lugar de sumergirlo para evitar que se atasque en la caja de tarifas. SILLAS DE RUEDAS Para garantizar la correcta fijaci6n de la silla de ruedas durante el viaje, por favor limite el numero de bolsas de equipaje detras de la silla. Para evitar lesiones a usted y a otros pasajeros, por favor quite cualquier objeto que sobresalga, tales como postes de banderas y reflectores con puntas afiladas. Tenga en cuenta que los autobuses de RTA despliegan una rampa/montacargas de silla de ruedas para facilitar el abordaje y apearse del autobus. Cuando se despliega la rampa/montacargas, el autobus emitira un sonido. Al salir de las puertas traseras, escuche el sonido y observe la rampa/montacargas para evitar lesiones. Las sillas de ruedas y scooters de movilidad electrica se permiten en el autobus siempre y cuando no excedan 30 pulgadas de ancho y 51 pulgadas de largo y el peso combinado no exceda 800 libras. Por su seguridad, apague el dispositivo movible mientras el operador abrocha el enganche de seguridad y durante todo el viaje. No quite la seguridad de la silla de ruedas o scooter hasta Ilegar a su destino y el autobus pare completamente. Use los asientos del autobus siempre que sea posible. RTA se complace en ofrecer correas de amarre para las sillas de ruedas y scooters. TABLAS DE"SURF"IBOOGIE" Tablas de surf y de boogie que no sean mas largas de seis pies y con un maximo de cuatro pulgadas son permitidas en los autobuses siempre y cuando se transporten adentro de una bolsa y que se pueda colocar en frente del cliente mientras el autobus este en movimiento y no puede ocupar un asiento adicional. SERVICIO DE JURADO Todos los miembros del jurado convocados para servir en los tribunales de Riverside pueden viajar gratis en todos los autobuses de RTA mientras estan en servicio del jurado activo, muestre su identificacien actual y valida del jurado al Operador del autobus. PASES DE METROLINK RTA acepta pases o boletos validos de Metrolink como pago de tarifa completa en las rutas que sirven las estaciones de Metrolink durante el periodo de una hora antes y una hora despues de las horas de operaci6n de Metrolink. Los pases o boletos de Metrolink tienen que estar vigentes con el dia del viaje y los pasajeros deben bajarse en la estaci6n de Metrolink. SERVICIO INALAMBRICO (WI-FI) Acceso gratuito a Internet Inalambrico(Wi-Fi) esta disponible para los clientes de RTA en los autobuses. La disponibilidad, confiabilidad, tiempo de funcionamiento y velocidad de los servicios no estan garantizados por RTA. BICICLETAY PASEO Cada autobus RTA tiene un rack de bicicletas capaz de manejar al menos dos motos con Ilantas de bicicleta estandar (maximo de 26"o 700 cm). Las bicis son aceptadas en una primera Ilegada, de primera. Los pasajeros que deseen transportar bicicletas deben notificar primero al operador del autocar que estan cargando o descargando una bicicleta antes de acercarse al bastidor de la bicicleta. Al cargar su bicicleta en el bastidor de la bici: • Espere a que el autobus Ilegue a una parada completa antes de cargar su bicicleta. • Las bicicletas no deben exceder 551bs. • Los articulos flojos deben ser removidos de la bicicleta antes de colocarlos en la rejilla de la bicicleta. • Los manillares o cestos de bicicletas no deben obstruir la vista del conductor. • Las bicicletas plegables (no motorizadas) no mayores de 28"x 20"x 11 "se permiten a bordo (debajo del asiento). • El operador tiene Ia discreci6n de negar bicicletas plegables y articulos que no pueden ser razonablemente y con seguridad almacenados bajo el asiento o con seguridad en el bastidor de bicicleta exterior. • No se permiten bicicletas tandem y bicicletas tricycle. • Por favor recuerde que usted es responsable de la carga y descarga de su bicicleta. • Al salir del autobus, salga por Ia puerta principal y deje que el operador del autocar sepa como guitar la bicicleta del rack. • Nota: RTA no es responsable de perdidas o Banos a las bicicletas. 16I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 377 Se permiten bicicletas y scooters con pilas en los autobuses RTA: • Se permite a los clientes colocar bicicletas electricas con gel sellado, ion de litio o baterras NiCad en el bastidor de la bicicleta, siempre y cuando quepan con seguridad en el bastidor de la bicicleta y tengan Ilantas estandar. (tambien debe cumplir con los requisitos de la bicicleta listados arriba.) • Se permite a los clientes Ilevar en las vespas electricas del autobus con el gel sellado, el ion del ltio, o las baterras de NiCad mientras que pueden ser dobladas y caben debajo de su asiento o en su regazo. NO FUMAR DE NINON TIPO A BORDO DE AUTOBUSES RTA Todos los autobuses y estaciones de RTA son totalmente para no fumadores. Esto incluye cigarrillos, cigarros y dispositivos electronicos para fumar, como cigarrillos electronicos. El tabaquismo de la marihuana o la ingestion de productos de cannabis para cualquier proposito tambien esta prohibido, y se requieren contenedores sellados para el transporte de cualquier producto relacionado con el cannabis. Tarifas, Categorias de Tarifas, Pases y Boletos y Tarjetas de Identificacion DEFINICION DE CATEGORIAS DE TARIFAS E IDENTIFICACIUN General Todos los clientes excepto aquellos que califican para las tarifas de jovenes, personas de la tercera edad, discapacitados o ninos. No se necesita identificacion para las tarifas Generales. Jdvenes Estudiantes del ler al 12avo grado solamente. Estudiantes de colegio pagan tarifa General. Las tarifas de jovenes estan vigentes todo el tiempo. Se requiere identificacion apropiada al abordar el autobus para recibir la tarifa de descuento. Identificaciones escolares con fotografia se consideran apropiadas. RTA tambien ofrece identificaciones a estudiantes del 1 er al 12avo grado. El costo de la identificacion es de $2. Llame al (951) 565-5002 para mas informacion de como obtener una identificacion. Personas de Tercera Edad/Discapacitadas/ Medicare Personas que cumplan con los requisitos de discapacidad de RTA, personas que presenten una tarjeta valida de Medicare, identificacion de Veteranos o personas mayores 60 anos, son elegibles para una tarifa con descuento en todos los servicios de rutas fijas de RTA. No se aceptan tarjetas de Medi-Cal. Para recibir la tarifa con descuentos, los clientes deben mostrar identificacion apropiada cada vez que aborden el autobus. RTA ofrece identificaciones con fotografia a personas de la tercera edad y discapacitadas. Para recibir una identificacion de discapacidad, los clientes deben presentar una aplicacion completada por su medico o profesional de salud autorizado o una de las siguientes pruebas de discapacidad: Tarjeta de Identificacion de Medicare, recibo del Departamento de Motores y Vehiculos comprobando la compra del cartel de discapacidad, tarjeta de identificacion del Institute Braille, identificacion de discapacidad de Veterano del ejercito, o carta de otorgacion de beneficios de la Oficina del Segura Social. Favor de traer la documentacion adecuada y una identificacion con fotografia a "Family Services Association; 8172 Magnolia Avenue, el segundo marten del mes entre las 9 a.m. y 11 a.m. para recibir su tarjeta de identificacion. Habra un costo de $2 por cada tarjeta. Si tiene alguna pregunta, por favor Ilame al (951) 565-5002. La tarjeta de Medical no se aceptara. Las aplicaciones estan disponibles en la oficina administrativas de RTA, en nuestro sitio web en RiversideTransit.com o Ilamando al Centro de Informacion al Cliente al (951) 565-5002. Veterano Cualquier persona que cumpla con los requisitos de RTA referente a los Veteranos Militares, presenta una tarjeta de identificacion valida del Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos de EE.UU. o una tarjeta de identificacion de Servicios Uniformados de EE.UU. que indica el estado retirado. Clientes deben mostrar la identificacion apropiada cada vez que suben a un autobus para recibir la tarifa con descuento. 378 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 117 Las tarjetas de identificacion con fotografra de RTA estan disponibles para clientes veteranos. Por favor Ilame al (951) 565-5002 para la ubicacion y el tiempo para obtener su tarjeta de identificacion. Hay un costo de $2 para la tarjeta de identificacion. Para recibir una tarjeta de identificacion de veterano, las personas deben presentar un Formulario 214 del Departamento de defensa y una identificacion con fotografra. RTA tambien reconoce la identificacion de Veterano Militar de 0mnitrans (emitido por el Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos del Condado de San Bernardino). Personal en Servicio Militar Activo, Policia y Bomberos Cualquier persona en servicio militar activo, policial o bomberos que cumpla con los requisitos de RTA viaja gratis en los autobuses de ruta fija de RTA. El personal militar en servicio activo debe Ilevar puesto el uniforme adecuado en el momento de subir al autobus o presentar al Operador una tarjeta de identificacion valida de Servicios Uniformados de EE.UU. que indique servicio activo o una tarjeta de Acceso Comun que indique servicios uniformados o servicio activo. El personal de policra y bomberos deben estar en uniforme completo en el momento de subir al autobus. Los clientes deben Ilevar el uniforme apropiado o mostrar la identificacion apropiada cada vez que suban a un autob6s para recibir la tarifa con descuento. Ninos Basada en estatura: 46 pulgadas o menos. Deben de ser acompanados por un adulto que pague la tarifa completa. ADA La tarjeta de identificacion de RTA de La Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades (ADA) es para personas que han sido especialmente certificadas por el proceso de Certificacion de ADA de RTA. Esta identificacion puede calificarlo para servicio de prioridad en cualquier servicio Dial -A -Ride de RTA, servicio Dial -A -Ride de Corona, Servicios Especiales de Transportacion de Riverside y servicio Dial -A -Ride de Beaumont. Si su tarjeta de ADA indica que necesita la asistencia de un asistente de cuidado personal, el asistente puede viajar gratis. Para ser certificado bajo ADA, tiene que Ilenar una aplicacion y proveer una forma de verificacion de un profesional de salud. Esta identificacion debe renovarse cada cuatro albs. Para mas informacion, Ilame al (951) 565-5002. COMMUTERS"RUTAS EXPRES" Las rutas 200, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 210 y 217 son rutas expres con tarifas de $3.50 para general yjovenes y $2.75 para personas de la tercera edad/ discapacitados. Las personas tambien pueden comprar un "Plus+Pass"que puede usarse tanto en rutas fijas como en las rutas CommuterLink expres. TIPOS DE PASES RTA utiliza cajas de tarifas electronicas en todos los autobuses y cajas de tarifas estandar en los autobuses Dial -A -Ride. Las cajas de tarifas electronicas aceptan monedas, efectivo y boletos y pases de papel, asi Como boletos y pases moviles. Los pases son del tamano de una tarjeta de credito, impresos en papel firme con una banda magnetica al reverso. En lugar de ensenar su pase al Operador, pasara el pase en la caja de igual manera como to hace con su tarjeta ATM. Por favor use cambio exacto cuando pague en efectivo. El Operador o la caja electronica no tienen la capacidad de darle cambio. Para evitar demoras, use monedas de 25 centavos en lugar de monedas de menos denominacion. Pases de 1-dra, 7-dras y 30-dras estan disponibles por correo, en la oficina administrativa de RTA, en nuestro sitio web en RiversideTransit.com o en algunos centros de distribucion de pases. Pases de 1-dia tambien se pueden comprar en el autobus. Pases de 1-dia Los pases de 1-dra estan disenados para el cliente ocasional que necesita hater varias conexiones en un dra. Los clientes pueden comprar el pase Local de 1-Dra, valido unicamente en las rutas fijas locales y RapidLink o el pase Local+CommuterLink de 1-Dia valido en todas las rutas locales, RapidLink y rutas Expres. El pase de 1-Dia es valido para viajes ilimitado el dra que el pase se use por primera vez. Su pase de 1-Dia sera validado por la caja electronicas de coleccion de tarifas con la fecha actual impresa al dorso. Por favor verifique que la fecha este correcta. Los pases de 1-Dia no son transferibles a otro dra y no hay devoluciones o cambios por pases extraviados o robados. El use del pase de 1-Dra para personas de la tercera edad/discapacitados/Veteranos requiere identificacion apropiada cada vez que aborde el autob6s. Los pases de 1-Dra no se aceptan en Dial - A -Ride. 18I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 379 Pases de 7-Dias El pase de 7-Dias esta disenado para proveer una alternativa asequible al pase mensual de RTA. Los clientes pueden comprar un pase Local de 7-Dias, valido en rutas fijas locales y RapidLink solamente. El pase de 7-Dias se debe usar durante un periodo consecutivo de siete dias comenzando con el primer dia de uso. El pase de 7-Dias no se vende en el autobus y solo esta disponible por adelantado. Los pases de 7-Dias no son validos en Dial -A -Ride. Pase de 30-Dias Los pases de 30-Dias son ideales para clientes que usan el sistema de autobus de RTA con frecuencia. Los clientes pueden comprar un pase Local de 30-Dias, valido en rutas fijas locales y RapidLink, o un pase Local+CommuterLink de 30-Dias valido en todas las rutas locales, RapidLink y rutas Expres. El pase de 30-Dias debe usarse durante un periodo consecutivo de 30-dias comenzando con el primer dia de uso. El pase de 30-Dias no se vende en el autobus y solo esta disponible por adelantado. Boletos de Dial -A -Ride Los boletos de Dial -A -Ride solo se venden en libros de diez boletos. Debera presentar un boleto cada vez que aborde un autobus de Dial -A -Ride. Algunos viajes requieren de mas de un boleto. Los boletos de Dial -A -Ride solo son validos en autobuses de Dial - A -Ride de RTA y no son validos en rutas fijas locales, CommuterLink u otros autobuses de agencia de transito. PASE DE AUTOBUS EN SU TELEFONO Montar RTA ahora es mas facil. Ahora puede comprar pases RTA en su telefono inteligente. La aplicacion Token Transit hace que pagar su tarifa sea muy facil. No hay necesidad de Ilevar efectivo. No es necesario esperar en la fila para comprar un pase. Y no es necesario buscar su pase de autobus enterrado en su billetera. Simplemente suba al autobus, toque su telefono y listo. Los clientes pueden comprar pases RTA de 1 viaje, 1 dia, 7 dias y 30 dias desde cualquier lugar Los pases se pueden comprar para uso inmediato, o si esta planeando con anticipacion, se pueden almacenar en la aplicacion Token Transit para futuros viajes en todos los autobuses de ruta fija de RTA. Tres pasos simples para pagar con su telefono inteligente. 1. Obtenga la aplicacion Token Transit en Token transit.com/app. 2. Compre su pase de autobus RTA. 3. Cuando aborde el autobus, asegurese de que la aplicacion este abierta y que el pase sea visible, coloque el telefono sobre el validador y espere el pitido. TRANSPORTE NOW Desde su creacion en 1992, Transporte NOW ha sido un representante orgulloso y entusiasta aliado del transporte publico en el Condado de Riverside. Los miembros del publico estan invitados a asistir a cualquiera de los grupos de los seis capitulos: Gran Riverside, Hemet/San Jacinto Area, Moreno Valley/ Perris, Noroeste, San Gorgonio Pass y Suroeste. Para obtener mas informacion o para unirse a un caprtulo, Ilame a Eric Ustation al (951) 565-5250 o al correo electronico eustation@riversidetransit.com. COMPRAYACTIVACION DE SU PASE Los pases de 7-Dias y 30-Dias no se venden en el autobus. Se pueden comprar en varios centros de distribucion de pases a traves del condado, por correo o de forma seguro en nuestro sitio Web en RiversideTransit.com. Para la ubicacion del centro de distribucion de pases mas cercano a usted Ilame al (951) 565-5002 o vea la pagina 12 y 13. Recuerde, los pases no son reembolsables y no se aceptan en Dial -A -Ride. Cuando compre su pase de 1-Dia, 7-Dias o 30-Dias, no estaran activados. El pase se debe de activar a bordo del autobus cuando se use por primera vez. Para activar abordo, meta el pase (el lado impreso mirando hacia usted con la flecha apuntando hacia abajo) en la ranura de activacion en el lado izquierdo de la caja electronica de coleccion de tarifas. La caja de coleccion de tarifas imprimira las fechas de vigencias al dorso del pase. Despues, todo to que tiene que hacer es deslizar el pase abordo de todos los autobuses en que viaje. P6LIZA DE MODIFICACION RAZONABLE Riverside Transit Agency se compromete a proporcionar servicios seguros, confiables, amables, accesibles y faciles de usar para sus clientes. Para garantizar la igualdad y la equidad, RTA se compromete a hacer modificaciones razonables a sus polizas, practicas y procedimientos para evitar la discriminacion y asegurar que los programas y servicios sean accesibles para las personas con discapacidades. Las solicitudes para modificaciones se pueden hacer Ilamando a RTA al (951) 565-5002 o enviando un correo electronico a comments@riversidetransit.com. 380 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 119 NOTIFICACION DE LOS DERECHOS PUBLICOS BAJO EL T(TULO VI DE LA LEY DE DERECHOS CIVILES DEL ACTO DE 1964 Riverside Transit Agency opera sus programas y servicios sin distincii n de raza, color, y origen nacional de acuerdo con el Titulo VI de la Ley de Derechos Civiles del Acto de 1964. Las personas que Green que han sido perjudicadas por una practica discriminatoria ilegal bajo el Titulo VI, pueden presentar una queja. Para mas informaci6n sobre el programa de derechos civiles de Riverside Transit Agency y los procedimientos para presentar una queja, (lame al (951) 565-5002, o mande un email a comments@riversidetransit.com o visite nuestra oficina administrativa en 1825 Third Street, Riverside, CA 92057. Si necesita la informaci6n en otro idioma, (lame al (951) 565-5002. TARIFAS DE RUTA FIJA y RapidLink Categorias de Tarifas Tarifa Basica Pase Diario* Pase de 7-dlias* Pase de 30-Dias* General $1.75 $5 $20 $60 Estudiante (grados del 1 al 12)** $1.75 $5 $20 $45 Personas de Tercera Edad** 75C $2.50 $20 $30 Personas Discapacitadas** 75( $2.50 $20 $30 Personas con Tarjeta de Medicare** 75( $2.50 $20 $30 Veterano** 75( $2.50 $20 $30 Nltos (46 pulgadas de altura o menos) 50( N/A N/A N/A TARIFAS DE COMMUTERLINK TARIFAS DE COMMUTERLINK + LOCAL y RapidLink Categorias de Tarifas Tarifa Basica Pase Diario Pase de 30-Dias General $3.50 $10 $95 Estudiante (grados del 1 al 12)** $3.50 $10 $95 Personas de Tercera Edad** $2.75 $7 $70 Personas Discapacitadas** $2.75 $7 $70 Personas con Tarjeta de Medicare** $2.75 $7 $70 Veterano** $2.75 $7 $70 NinoS (46 pulgadas de altura o menos) $2.75 N/A N/A Jurados activos, servicio militar activo, policia, bomberos y City Pass I VIAJEN GRATIS U-Pass: UC Riverside, Cal Baptist University, La Sierra University Go -Pass: Riverside City College, Moreno Valley College, Mt. San Jacinto College, Norco College City Pass:Todos los empleados de la Ciudad de Riverside TARIFAS DIAL -A -RIDE (DAR) I No se aceptan en los autobuses de ruta fija. Tarifa Basica Talonarios de Boletos se venden en libros de 10 boletos Categorias de Tarifas Personas de Tercera Edad $3.50 - $10.50 $35 Personas Discapacitadas $3.50 - $10.50 $35 Personas con Tarjeta de Medicare $3.50 - $10.50 $35 Niltas (46 pulgadas de altura o menos) 75( N/A *Se acepta como tarifa basica en servicio de rutasfijas. Para usar el servicio de CommuterLink, se requerire $2 adicional (Personas de Tercera Edad/ Discapacitadas) o $1.75 (general) porviaje. **Si planea usar lastarifas de descuento para personas de la tercera edad, discapacitadas, persona con tarjeta de Medicare, Veteranos ojdvenes, debe mostrar identificacidn adecuada cada vez que aborde el autobds. Tambien debe mostrar una identificacidn adecuada para comprar pases de descuentos en los centros de distribucidn de pases. Para obtener una lista de las (lases de identificacidn aceptables, vea la Pagina 22. 381 20 I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Reduced Fare Identification Identificacion para tarifas reducidas Do you qualify for a Senior, Disabled, Medicare, Veteran or Youth discounted fare? If so, you must show proper ID each time you board the bus. You must also show proper ID to purchase discounted passes at all retail outlets, at RTA office, on our website, or through the mail. If you do not have proper ID with you, you will be required to pay the full general fare even if you have a discounted pass. Below are forms of ID accepted on the bus for discounted fares: Disabled: RTA issued disabled ID card, RTA ADA card, Medicare card, Veteran's Service connected ID card or Braille Institute ID card. Senior: RTA issued Senior ID card, CA Driver License or ID card or Medicare card. Veteran: Any person who meets RTA Veteran requirements, presents a valid U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs issued ID card or a U.S. Uniformed Services ID card indicating retired status. RTA issued photo ID cards are available for veteran customers. Medicare Card: Any person who displays their valid Medicare Card is eligible for a discounted fare on all RTA fixed -route services. Customers must show their Medicare Card each time they board a bus to receive the discounted fare. Youth: RTA issued Youth ID card or school issued (grades 1-12) picture ID with current school year validation. �Es usted elegible para la tarifa de descuentos para personas de la tercera edad, discapacitadas, Medicare, Veteranos o Jovenes? De ser asi, debera mostrar identificaci6n adecuada cada vez que aborde el autobus. Tambien debera mostrar identificacion adecuada para comprar boletos o pases de descuento en todos los centros de distribucibn de pases, en nuestra oficina en Riverside, en nuestro sitio Web o por correo. Si no tiene la identificaci6n adecuada, tendra que pagar la tarifa total general, aunque tenga un boleto o pase de descuento. A continuacidn se muestran las formas de identificacion que se aceptan en el autobus para las tarifas de descuento: Personas Discapacitadas: Tarjeta de identificaci6n para personas discapacitadas expedida por RTA, tarjeta ADA de RTA, tarjeta Medicare, tarjeta de identificaci6n del Servicio de Veteranos o tarjeta de identificacion del instituto Braille. Personas de la Tercera Edad: Tarjeta de identificacion para personas de la tercera edad expedida por RTA, licencia de conducir o identificacion de California o la tarjeta Medicare. Veterano: Cualquier persona que cumpla con los requisitos de RTA referente a Veteranos Militares, presenta una tarjeta de identificacion valida del Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos de EE.UU. o una tarjeta de identificaci6n de Servicios Uniformados de EE.UU. que indica el estado retirado. Las tarjetas de identificaci6n con fotografia emitida por RTA estan disponibles para clientes veteranos. Personas con Tarjeta de Medicare: Cualquier persona que muestre tarjeta valida de Medicare es elegible para las tarifas de descuento en todas las rutas fijas de RTA. Para recibir las tarifas de descuento, los clientes deben mostrar su tarjeta de Medicare cada vez que aborden el autobus. Jdvenes: Tarjeta de identificaci6n de Jovenes con fotografia expedida por RTA o por las escuelas (grados 1 al 12) con validacion actual del afio escolar. SENIOR ID Rita Jones ID Number 100002 Expires: 5/21/21 MITA Rita Jones ID Number 100003 Expires: 5/21/26 DISABLED ID JOHN DOE ID Number 123456 Expires: 3/31/2020 ADA ID RITA JONES ID Number A00-12345 Expires: 9/30/2020 Mobility CANE Device: PCA: Yes (800)795-7887 VETERAN JOHN L SMITH ID Number 100256 Expires: 8/31/2022 MITA f MEDICARE HEALTH INSURANCE JOHN L SMITH k,,. 1 EG4-TE5-MK72 HOSPITAL (PART A) MEDICAL (PART B) 03-01-2016 u,••mpk�• 03.01-2016 Identification NOT accepted on the bus: Medi-Cal cards, Social Security Award letter, a note from a doctor, or other items not listed above will NOT be accepted as identification to purchase or use a reduced fare ticket or pass. Identificacidn NO aceptada en el autobus: La tarjeta Medi-Cal, carta de beneficios del Segura Social, una nota de su doctor, u otros documentos que no se hayan nombrado NO serail aceptados como medio de identificaci6n para comprar o usar un boleto o pase descontado. 382 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 121 Corona Transit Center BOARDING DIAGRAM LEGEND 0 Bays NB=Northbound I SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound I WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise E. GRAND BLVD. ROUTE 3 Corona Cruiser Blue Line Corona Cruiser Red Line ROUTES 205 & 206 N. MAIN ST. El B A III ROUTE 1 EB el ROUTE 1WB III RapidLink Gold Line Walkway to Metrolink station For route and schedule information call (951) 565-5002 or visit RiversideTransit.com 22 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 383 Galleria at Tyler Mall BOARDING DIAGRAM II 0 ROUTES 1 EB 12 EB RapidLink Gold Line EB ROUTES 1 WB,12WB RapidLink Gold Line WB MAGNOLIA AVE t D 1 LEGEND 0 Bays ►O N NB=North bound I SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound I WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise MALL ENTRANCE c B A ROUTE 27 ROUTE 15 ROUTES 200 EB 13 ROUTES ROUTE ROUTE 200 WB 21 10 14 For route and schedule information, call (951) 565-5002 or visit RiversideTransit.com GALLERIA AT TYLER 384 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 123 La Sierra Metrolink Station BOARDING DIAGRAM i D Hi iii in el il B rk- ROUTE 200EB ROUTE 200WB OCTA 794 ROUTE 15EB ROUTE 15WB DIAL -A -RIDE To Train Platforms .a BUS HOLDING AREA 11 A PARKING LOT 1 1 1 LEGEND CI Bays O N NB=Northbound I SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound I WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise For route and schedule information call (951) 565-5002 or visit RiversideTransit.com 24 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 385 Moreno Valley Mall Transit Center BOARDING DIAGRAM ROUTE ROUTE ROUTE ROUTE ROUTE ROUTES 19 19 18 11 31 26,208 210,220 NB=Northbound I SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound I WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise For route and schedule information call (951) 565-5002 or visit RiversideTransit.com 386 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 125 Perris Station Transit Center BOARDING DIAGRAM O FIRST STREET DIAL -A -RIDE ROUTE 19 ROUTES 19A, 27 ROUTE 28 PARKING ROUTES 61, 74 L1J LJJ t ROUTE 9 CC i- z V) 0 U V) ROUTE 22 m J ROUTE 208 Amtrak Thruway ROUTE 30 BUS ONLY ENTRANCE THIRD STREET 1 METROLINK For route and schedule information call (951) 565-5002 or visit RiversideTransit.com 26 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 387 Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station BOARDING DIAGRAM ROUTES 208NB/SB 210EB/WB ROUTE 1 EB/WB A B fr// C z m ROUTE Fa -_ 15EB/WB ROUTES 29EB/WB 49EB/WB D // ROUTE Omnitrans 215NB ROUTE ra 200EB/WB LEGEND 0 Bays rO NB=Northbound I SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound I WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise 4- PARKING AMTRAK MEGA BUS ROUTES 208 N B/S B 210/220EB/WB NE ROUTES 1EB/WB 15WB M ©ROUTES 29WB 49WB t�a DIAL -A -RIDE 388 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 Ili SERVICE GUIDE CITY/COMMUNITY RTA SERVICE & OTHER CONNECTING SERVICES Anaheim RTA 200, OCTA Banning RTA 31, Pass Transit, Greyhound Beaumont RTA 31, Pass Transit, AmtrakThruway Canyon Lake RTA 40 Corona RTA 1, 3,12, 205, 206, OCTA 794, Corona Cruiser, Metrolink Country Village RTA 21, 49, 204, Omnitrans Eastvale RTA 3, 29 French Valley RTA 79 Glen Avon RTA 21, 49 Hemet RTA 28, 31, 32, 33, 42, 74, 79, AmtrakThruway Highgrove RTA 12, 14, Omnitrans Homeland/Romoland RTA 28 Home Gardens RTA 1, Corona Cruiser Jurupa Valley RTA 3, 21, 29, 49, 204 Lake Elsinore RTA 8, 9, 40, 205, 206 Loma Linda RTA 14, Omnitrans Mead Valley RTA 22, 41 Menifee/Sun City RTA 40, 61, 74, AmtrakThruway Mira Loma RTA 21, 29 Moreno Valley RTA 11, 16, 18, 19, 20, 31, 41, 208, AmtrakThruway Montclair RTA 204, Metrolink, Omnitrans, Foothill Transit Murrieta RTA 23, 61, 202, 205, 206, 208 Norco RTA 3 Ontario RTA 204, Omnitrans, Metrolink Orange RTA 200, 205, OCTA Orange Crest RTA 27 Pedley RTA 21, 29, Metrolink MI Perris RTA 9, 19, 22, 27, 28, 30, 41, 61, 74, 208, AmtrakThruway, Greyhound Riverside RTA 1, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22, 27, 29, 49, 200, 204, 208, OCTA 794, Riverside Special Transportation, AmtrakThruway, Metrolink, Omnitrans, Amtrak Rubidoux RTA 29, 49 San Bernardino RTA 200, Omnitrans San Jacinto RTA 31, 32, 42, 74, 79 Temecula RTA 23, 24, 61, 79, 205, 206, 208, Greyhound Temescal Valley RTA 205, 206 Wildomar RTA 8, 23 Winchester RTA 74, 79 Woodcrest RTA 22, 27 389 28I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY RAPIDLINK GOLD LINE NO SERVICE 390 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 129 Routing and timetables subjecttodrange. Rotas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. UCR - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - CORONA UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE•1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 IOWA & UNIVERSITY GOLD LINE•1.14.16.51 52.204 MISSION INNAVE UNIVERSITY gVE MARKET & UNIVERSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point Long-term Detour Routing RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1.15.29.49.200.208 210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK•AMTRAK SUNLINE 220 Riverside Boarding diagram pg 27 Community Hospital RIVERSIDE BROCKTON ARCADE 1.10.14.15 MAGNOLIA & 15TH Central M.S. 1.13.15.50 CENTRAL AVE Marcy ARLINGTON AVE Library 14TH ST 3RDSr.. Ramona H.S. ADAMSST VAN "UREA' MO CoPmmum y Hospital R No\�PVE 4 GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE•1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 23 CORONA TRANSIT CENTER GOLD LINE• 1.3.205.206 CORONA CRUISER BLUE, RED METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 22 _ GRANDBIVD WEST CORONA zbronapark- METROLINK STATION And -Ride Corona 0.0 SoiliAVp City Hall Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com IOWA & BLAINE 1.10..14.51.52 ''.. W B(AINEST 11-1 -t o Q' 03¢ ,off University Qi Village THCesarChavez Community Center • UCR AT BANNOCKBURN GOLD LINE • 1 •16.51 52.204 • Riverside CHICAGO & City College UNIVERSITY Riverside GOLD LINE•1 •13 Plaza 14.22 91 MAD/SONST California Baptist University ChemawaM.S. Sherman Indian H.S. Arlington Library tyiERsr Kaiser Medical Center IA SIERRA AvE VllegasM.S. MCKINLEYST Home Gardens Library 6TH & MAIN GOLD LINE•1 •CORONA CRUISER 91 S BLUE, RED SMI▪ TH & 6TH 1 •CORONA CRUISER RED MAGNOLIA & LA SIERRA GOLD LINE• 1 •15 .. MAGNOLIA & MCKINLEY GOLD LINE•1 CORONA CRUISER BLUE CORONA UCR RTA and Corona Cruiser honor each other's Day and 30-Day passes at shared stops. 30I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 391 1 Eastbound to Downtown Riverside/UCR A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 'Times are approximate II West Corona Metrolink Station cn Smith & 6th • Corona Transit a Center P Magnolia & a McKinley Galleria at Tyler P.' Magnolia & A ' Adams oBrockton Arcade °' Riverside City cp College -IUniversity& Lemon Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station • B at Bannockburn ckburn — 6:14 6:26 6:36 6:46 6:55 7:01 7:06 7:12 7:16 7:29 — 6:51 7:06 7:17 7:28 7:37 7:43 7:48 7:54 — 8:07 — 7:25 7:40 7:51 8:02 8:11 8:17 8:23 8:29 8:33 8:47 7:52 7:58 8:13 8:24 8:35 8:44 8:50 8:56 9:02 9:06 9:20 8:22 8:28 8:43 8:54 9:05 9:14 9:20 9:27 9:34 — 9:50 — 8:49 9:07 9:20 9:32 9:44 9:50 9:57 10:04 — 10:20 9:08 9:15 9:33 9:46 9:58 10:10 10:17 10:24 10:32 — 10:50 9:38 9:45 10:03 10:16 10:28 10:40 10:47 10:54 11:02 — 11:20 — 10:00 10:18 10:31 10:43 10:55 11:02 11:09 11:17 — 11:35 — 10:15 10:33 10:46 10:58 11:10 11:17 11:24 11:32 — 11:50 — 10:27 10:45 10:58 11:13 11:25 11:32 11:39 11:47 — 12:05 — 10:42 11:00 11:13 11:28 11:40 11:47 11:54 12:02 — 12:20 — 10:57 11:15 11:28 11:43 11:55 12:02 12:09 12:17 — 12:35 — 11:12 11:30 11:43 11:58 12:10 12:17 12:24 12:32 — 12:50 — 11:27 11:45 11:58 12:13 12:25 12:32 12:39 12:47 — 1:05 — 11:42 12:00 12:13 12:28 12:40 12:47 12:54 1:02 — 1:20 — 11:57 12:15 12:28 12:43 12:55 1:02 1:09 1:17 — 1:35 — 12:12 12:30 12:43 12:58 1:10 1:17 1:24 1:32 — 1:50 — 12:28 12:46 12:59 1:14 1:26 1:33 1:40 1:48 — 2:06 — 12:43 1:01 1:14 1:29 1:41 1:48 1:55 2:03 — 2:21 — 12:58 1:16 1:29 1:44 1:56 2:03 2:10 2:18 — 2:38 — 1:13 1:31 1:44 1:59 2:11 2:18 2:25 2:33 — 2:53 — 1:30 1:48 2:01 2:16 2:28 2:35 2:42 2:50 — 3:10 — 1:45 2:03 2:16 2:31 2:43 2:50 2:57 3:05 — 3:25 — 2:00 2:18 2:31 2:46 2:58 3:05 3:12 3:20 — 3:40 — 2:15 2:33 2:46 3:01 3:13 3:20 3:27 3:35 — 3:55 — 2:33 2:51 3:04 3:19 3:31 3:38 3:45 3:53 — 4:13 — 2:48 3:06 3:19 3:34 3:46 3:53 4:00 4:08 — 4:28 — 3:05 3:23 3:36 3:51 4:03 4:10 4:17 4:25 — 4:45 — 3:18 3:36 3:49 4:03 4:15 4:22 4:29 4:37 — 4:57 — 3:32 3:50 4:03 4:17 4:29 4:36 4:43 4:51 4:56 5:14 — 3:47 4:05 4:18 4:32 4:44 4:51 4:58 5:06 5:11 5:29 — 4:03 4:21 4:34 4:48 5:00 5:07 5:14 5:22 — 5:40 — 4:19 4:37 4:50 5:04 5:16 5:23 5:30 5:38 — 5:56 — 4:39 4:57 5:09 5:22 5:33 5:39 5:46 5:54 — 6:12 4:52 4:59 5:17 5:29 5:42 5:53 5:59 6:06 6:14 — 6:32 5:23 5:30 5:48 6:00 6:13 6:24 6:30 6:37 6:45 6:50 7:08 — 5:58 6:16 6:28 6:41 6:52 6:58 7:05 7:13 7:31 6:27 6:34 6:50 7:02 7:14 7:25 7:31 7:38 7:45 — 8:03 6:49 6:56 7:12 7:24 7:36 7:47 7:53 8:00 8:07 — 8:25 — 7:23 7:39 7:51 8:03 8:14 8:20 8:27 8:34 — 8:52 — 7:46 8:02 8:14 8:26 8:37 8:43 8:49 8:55 9:00 9:15 8:43 8:49 9:04 9:16 9:28 9:39 9:45 9:51 9:57 — 10:10 392 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 131 1 Westbound to Corona A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 'Times are approximate • UCR at co Bannockburn Riverside - 1 _ Downtown Metrolink Station 1University& a Lemon °' Riverside City o College Brockton Arcade co • Magnolia & Adams wGalleria at Tyler °' Magnolia & ccn McKinley °' Corona Transit cAn Center • Smith & 6th 111 West Corona Metrolink Station 6:18 — 6:26 6:33 6:39 6:45 6:54 7:06 7:16 7:27 7:36 6:43 6:55 6:59 7:06 7:12 7:18 7:27 7:39 7:50 8:01 8:10 7:20 7:34 7:38 7:45 7:51 7:58 8:10 8:25 8:36 8:47 8:56 7:54 — 8:07 8:14 8:20 8:27 8:39 8:54 9:06 9:17 9:26 8:22 8:36 8:40 8:47 8:54 9:02 9:14 9:29 9:41 9:52 — 8:45 8:59 9:03 9:10 9:17 9:25 9:37 9:52 10:04 10:17 — 9:07 — 9:20 9:28 9:35 9:43 9:55 10:10 10:22 10:35 — 9:37 — 9:50 9:58 10:05 10:13 10:27 10:42 10:54 11:07 — 10:02 — 10:15 10:23 10:30 10:39 10:53 11:09 11:23 11:36 — 10:17 — 10:30 10:38 10:45 10:54 11:08 11:24 11:38 11:51 — 10:32 — 10:45 10:53 11:00 11:09 11:25 11:41 11:55 12:08 — 10:47 — 11:00 11:08 11:15 11:24 11:40 11:56 12:10 12:23 — 11:02 — 11:15 11:23 11:30 11:39 11:55 12:11 12:25 12:38 — 11:17 — 11:30 11:38 11:45 11:54 12:10 12:26 12:40 12:53 — 11:32 — 11:47 11:55 12:02 12:11 12:27 12:43 12:57 1:10 — 11:47 — 12:02 12:10 12:17 12:26 12:42 12:58 1:12 1:25 — 12:02 — 12:17 12:25 12:32 12:41 12:57 1:13 1:27 1:40 — 12:17 — 12:32 12:40 12:47 12:56 1:12 1:28 1:42 1:55 — 12:32 — 12:47 12:55 1:03 1:12 1:28 1:46 2:00 2:13 — 12:47 — 1:02 1:10 1:18 1:27 1:43 2:01 2:15 2:28 — 1:02 — 1:17 1:25 1:33 1:42 1:58 2:16 2:30 2:43 — 1:17 — 1:32 1:40 1:48 1:57 2:13 2:31 2:45 2:58 — 1:32 — 1:47 1:55 2:03 2:12 2:27 2:45 2:59 3:12 — 1:47 — 2:02 2:10 2:18 2:27 2:42 3:00 3:14 3:27 — 2:02 — 2:17 2:26 2:34 2:43 2:58 3:16 3:30 3:43 — 2:18 — 2:33 2:42 2:50 2:59 3:14 3:32 3:46 3:59 — 2:33 — 2:48 2:57 3:05 3:14 3:29 3:47 4:01 4:14 — 2:50 — 3:05 3:14 3:22 3:31 3:46 4:04 4:18 4:31 4:39 3:05 — 3:20 3:29 3:37 3:46 4:01 4:19 4:33 4:46 — 3:22 — 3:37 3:46 3:54 4:03 4:18 4:36 4:50 5:03 5:11 3:37 — 3:52 4:01 4:09 4:18 4:33 4:51 5:05 5:18 — 3:52 — 4:07 4:16 4:24 4:33 4:48 5:06 5:20 5:33 — 4:07 — 4:22 4:31 4:39 4:48 5:03 5:21 5:35 5:48 — 4:25 — 4:40 4:49 4:57 5:06 5:21 5:39 5:53 6:06 6:14 4:40 4:56 5:00 5:09 5:17 5:26 5:40 5:57 6:09 6:21 6:30 5:09 5:25 5:29 5:38 5:46 5:55 6:09 6:25 6:37 6:49 — 5:26 — 5:41 5:49 5:56 6:04 6:18 6:34 6:46 6:58 — 5:52 — 6:05 6:13 6:20 6:28 6:41 6:56 7:07 7:19 — 6:15 — 6:28 6:36 6:43 6:50 7:03 7:18 7:29 7:41 — 6:51 7:05 7:09 7:17 7:24 7:31 7:44 7:59 8:10 8:22 8:31 7:43 — 7:56 8:04 8:11 8:18 8:30 8:45 8:56 9:08 — 8:25 — 8:38 8:46 8:53 9:00 9:12 9:27 9:38 9:50 — 9:04 9:18 9:22 9:30 9:37 9:44 9:56 10:11 10:22 10:34 — 393 32I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. EASTVALE - NORCO - CORONA O CANTU-GALLEANO RANCH AMAZON ¢I A� .EASTVALE 1 5 3.29 Z JA OODMANWAY EASTVALE Eastvale Gateway LIMONITE & HAMNER• • • 3.29 Harada Heritage Park River Heightsl.S. Eleanor Roosevelt H.S. VernolaMarketplace 68TH ST CITRUS ST Norco Library 6TH ST 5TH ST DMV 'O 0 Post Office DPSS MARKET 4)" & CLARK NORCO 0 COLLEGE 3RDST W GRAND & 6TH 1.3 Corona Senior Center North Main Plaza .10TH ST MARKET ST «LIMONITE AVE NORCO «LAMPTON LN 3RD ST 2ND 5T MAIN & PARKRIDGE 3•CORONA CRUISER BLUE z CORONA TRANSIT CENTER GOLD LINE•1 •3.205.206 CORONA CRUISER BLUE, RED W. oGrand METROLINK Goa dark- Boarding diagram pg 12 And -Ride gT 15 Corona Mali 6TH ST MAIN & 6TH 1.3 Corona Regional Medical Center CORONA BELLE & 10TH 3•CORONA CRUISER BLUE, RED 394 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point RTA and Corona Cruiser honor each other's Day and 30-Day passes at shared stops. RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 133 3 Northbound to Eastvale A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 'Times are approximate Corona Transit Center Main & Parkridge Market & Clark Limonite & Hamner Amazon Eastvale 1 3 5 6 7 7:28 7:32 7:40 8:04 8:12 9:25 9:30 9:39 10:02 10:10 11:21 11:26 11:35 12:02 12:10 1:29 1:33 1:42 2:09 2:17 3:27 3:31 3:40 4:07 4:15 5:42 5:46 5:54 6:21 6:29 7:39 7:43 7:51 8:15 8:23 3 southeillil6 _MI6_ A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Amazon Eastvale Limonite & Hamner Market &Clark Main & Parkridge Corona Transit Center 7 6 5 3 1 6:35 6:44 7:06 7:12 7:20 8:20 8:30 8:55 9:03 9:11 10:20 10:30 10:55 11:03 11:11 12:27 12:37 1:03 1:11 1:19 2:27 2:37 3:03 3:11 3:19 4:25 4:35 4:57 5:05 5:13 6:44 6:53 7:13 7:21 7:29 395 34I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 8 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Lakesid H.S. 74 ORTEGA HWY LAKE ELSINORE - WILDOMAR LOOP Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 2r12 S\O�QQ, Lakeside Library cy 9,0, 9 BALDWIN BLVD LAKE ELSINORE - LAKE ELSINORE OUTLET CENTER 8.9 coo Lakeland Village M.S. 9y MP�P�P�o C�A'0O ' Mission Trail Library ec h 9l O� qpF `rT sf Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point Railroad Canyon Rd WALMART 8.40 Served first before Canyon Estate Dr loop Post Office WILDOMAR &CENTRAL 8.23 AQQ' DavidA (r Brown M.S. 396 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 135 8 Counterclockwise Loop via Grand Ave A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Lake Elsinore o Outlet Center — °' Lakeshore & • Viscaya °' Lakeside High School °' Grand & N Baldwin 01 Palomar & Central I Mission Trail & Malaga 1ALake Elsinore Walmart ✓ ll 1 Graham & c Langstaff ALake Elsinore �, Outlet Center 7:52 8:00 8:08 8:15 8:31 8:41 8:47 8:59 9:12 9:00 9:08 9:16 9:23 9:39 9:49 9:55 10:08 10:21 10:03 10:11 10:21 10:29 10:45 10:55 11:04 11:18 11:31 11:06 11:15 1 1: 25 1 1: 33 11:49 11:59 12:08 12:22 12:36 12:20 12:29 12:38 12:46 1:02 1:12 1:21 1:35 1:49 1:31 1:40 1:49 1:57 2:14 2:24 2:33 2:47 3:01 2:46 2:55 3:04 3:12 3:29 3:39 3:47 4:01 4:15 4:01 4:10 4:18 4:26 4:43 4:53 5:01 5:15 5:29 5:03 5:12 5:20 5:28 5:45 5:55 6:02 6:15 6:29 6:18 6:27 6:35 6:43 7:00 - - - - 8 Clockwise Loop via Mission Ira' A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate °' Lake Elsinore No Outlet Center °' Graham & N Langstaff ° Lake Elsinore N Walmart ° Mission Trail & Malaga ▪ Palomar & a Central " Grand & �, Baldwin Lakeside A High School ILaore& Viscaya Lake Elsinore Outlet Center 7:18 7:31 7:42 7:50 8:07 8:18 8:25 8:35 8:43 8:23 8:38 8:51 9:00 9:17 9:28 9:35 9:45 9:53 9:27 9:42 9:55 10:04 10:20 10:31 10:38 10:48 10:56 10: 3 7 10: 5 2 11:05 11:16 1 1: 3 2 1 1:4 3 11:51 12:02 12:10 11:48 12:03 12:16 12:27 12:43 12:54 1:02 1:13 1:21 1:03 1:18 1:31 1:42 1:58 2:09 2:17 2:28 2:36 2:18 2:33 2:46 2:57 3:13 3:24 3:32 3:43 3:51 3:21 3:37 3:50 4:00 4:16 4:27 4:35 4:45 4:53 4:37 4:53 5:05 5:15 5:31 5:42 5:50 6:00 6:08 5:37 5:52 6:04 6:14 6:30 6:41 6:49 6:59 7:07 397 36I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 9 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. ION PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER - LAKE ELSINORE OUTLET CENTER Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Perris Senior City Hall Center PERRIS PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61 •74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 26 CST THEDA ST O O CC LM O LAKE ELSINORE Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point GREENWALD AVE 7' 74. z L LAKE ELSINORE Target OUTLET CENTER 8.9 COLLIER AVE 398 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 137 9 Northbound to Perris Station Transit Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Hwy. 74 & Meadowbrook Perris Station Transit Center 1 2 3 6:38 6:48 7:03 7:50 8:00 8:15 9:26 9:37 9:52 10:36 10:47 11:02 11:45 11:56 12:13 12:46 12:59 1:16 1:59 2:12 2:29 3:11 3:24 3:41 4:21 4:34 4:51 5:36 5:48 6:05 6:37 6:49 7:04 9 Southbound to Lake Elsinore Outlet Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 1 Times are approximate Perris Station Transit Center Hwy. 74 & Meadowbrook Lake Elsinore Outlet Center 3 2 1 6:50 7:02 7:13 7:50 8:02 8:13 8:45 8:57 9:08 10:07 10:19 10:31 11:15 11:28 11:40 12:25 12:38 12:50 1:34 1:47 1:59 2:37 2:50 3:02 3:59 4:12 4:24 5:02 5:15 5:27 6:14 6:27 6:39 399 38I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. rcy h. BIG SPRINGS & WATKINS - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - GALLERIA AT TYLER UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE• 1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 IOWA & BLAINE 1.10.14.51.52 Fp ® `.. CO4. ) RT A. Pox Theater F ER,' UNIVER ITV PVE y 16(NST. -' 141N Am ORANGE �z & 10TH ,. 7verside 10.12.13 City 91 % College RIVERSIDE Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point 0 Jr, Rivernid�F. \•- Plaza Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com F�f GF9�o�'9G SQQ��S�O 9-Ike Riverside Sports OCR Complex John North tiqr H.S. d 09GF COUNTY ADMINISTRATION CENTER 10.12.13.200.208.210 c, yCN10GE01 BROCKTON ARCADE 1.10.14.15 Marcy Libypy fB p0 yCE Calif. Sch. for Deaf Notre Dame Casa H.S. Blanca Library MADISON ST Arlington H.S. JACKSONST Van Bure VqN Drive -In ▪ BORfNBlVD g GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE • 1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 28 Poly H.S. Po99 9y AB Only Gage M.S. 400 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 I39 1 0 Eastbound to Big Springs & Watkins A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate to a b °o & A Jackson `" Lincoln & Madison _ Arlington 65 at Target c O a)a 03Q >V a+ c N FilE -17 lnb I•�o Big Springs & Watkins 1 5 6 7E 8:03 8:34 8:44 8:52 9:34 9:47 9:54 10:02 10:08 10:20 10:28 10:38 10:51 10:56 1 1:1 1 11:18 11:26 11:32 11:44 11:52 12:02 12:15 12:29 12:44 12:51 12:59 1:05 1:17 1:25 1:35 1:48 1:55 2:10 2:17 2:24 2:30 2:42 2:50 3:00 3:13 3:26 3:41 3:48 3:55 4:01 4:13 4:21 4:31 4:44 4:51 5:06 5:13 5:20 5:26 5:38 5:46 5:56 6:09 6:26 6:39 6:46 6:53 6:59 7:11 7:19 7:28 7:41 1 0 Westbound to Galleria at Tyler A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Iao Big• b Springs & I Watkins a • RTA Offices w cD Orange & N 10th r0 «gyp >u` 6 8:32 00 caBrockt1on Arcade 00 Arlington o at Target °o Lincoln & qo Madison o ILincoln & o1 Jackson m ea a v �1- 1 9:19 9:28 9:37 9:46 9:56 10:08 10:15 10:24 10:31 10:46 11:01 11:10 11:19 11:29 11:41 11:48 11:57 12:04 12:19 12:25 12:34 12:43 12:53 1:05 1:12 1:21 1:28 1:43 1:58 2:07 2:16 2:26 2:38 2:45 2:54 3:01 3:16 3:23 3:32 3:41 3:51 4:03 4:10 4:19 4:26 4:41 4:54 5:03 5:12 5:22 5:34 5:41 5:50 5:56 6:11 6:24 6:33 6:42 6:52 7:02 7:08 7:16 7:22 7:36 DID YOU KNOW? Every $1 invested in public transportation generates approximately $4 in economic returns. 401 40I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY MORENO VALLEY MALL - MARCH ARB LOOP ROUTE Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 a-NERpoiN (c F IRONWOOD AVE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com «Counter -clockwise I Clockwise » TOWNGATE BLVD MORENO VALLEY FREDERICK & ALESSANDRO 11.20 City Hall March ARB Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point OTransfer Point 0 a Kaiser Medical Offices Sunnymead M.S. Moreno Valley H.S. COTTONWOOD AVE ALESSANDRO BLVD CACTUS AVE 0 0 HEMLOCK AVE Post Office OHEACOCK & SUNNYMEAD 11.19 O SUNNYMEAD BLVD EUCALYPTUS AVE 0 HEACOCK & COTTONWOOD 11.18 Riverside County Superior Court ALESSANDRO & HEACOCK 11.20 MEYER DR JFK DR 4 «Clockwise I Counter -clockwise » 0 y Badger Springs M.S. 2 JO JO CO 402 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 141 11 Clockwise Loop to March ARB via Ironwood A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate t = Saturdays only, trips do not operate on Sundays. Moreno Valley Mall Perris & Hemlock Alessandro & Heacock Meyer & 6th St Frederick & Alessandro Moreno Valley Mall 1 2 3 4 5 1 t 8:30 8:40 8:52 9:07 9:19 9:29 9:42 9:54 10:03 10:09 10:21 10:31 10:44 10:56 11:06 11:12 11:24 11:34 11:47 11:59 12:09 12:15 12:27 12:37 12:50 1:02 1:12 1:18 1:30 1:40 1:53 2:05 2:15 2:21 2:33 2:43 2:56 3:08 3:18 3:24 3:36 3:46 3:59 4:11 4:21 4:27 4:39 4:49 5:02 5:14 5:24 5:30 5:42 5:52 6:05 6:17 6:27 6:33 6:45 6:55 7:07 7:19 7:29 7:35 7:47 11 Counterdockwise Loop to March ARB via Frederick A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD !Times are approximate t = Saturdays only, trip does not operate on Sundays. Moreno Valley Mall Frederick & Alessandro Meyer & 6th St Alessandro & Heacock Perris & Hemlock Moreno Valley Mall 1 5 4 3 2 1 t 9:00 9:09 9:14 •: A 9:37 9:50 10:00 10:09 10:15 10:27 10:40 10:55 11:05 11:14 11:20 11:32 11:45 12:00 12:10 12:19 12:25 12:37 12:50 1:05 1:15 1:24 1:30 1:42 1:55 2:10 2:20 2:29 2:35 2:47 3:00 3:15 3:25 3:34 3:40 3:52 4:05 4:20 4:30 4:39 4:45 4:57 5:10 5:25 5:35 5:44 5:50 6:02 6:15 6:30 6:40 6:49 6:55 7:07 7:20 7:35 403 42I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Q*• LA CADENA & STEPHENS - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - CORONA HILLS PLAZA Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Legend 1 Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point RIVERSIDE County Mental Health La Sierra Js UniveZS� sicSQ HOLEAVE l9Ji - - 40 0<0%. "PROMENADE/COLLETT CORONA HILLS PLAZA rf 91 UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE•1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Ruth Lewis Community Center/Reid Park CENTER ST -GARNER RD INTERCHANGE 1 n r-� 9 a tan MARKET & UNIVERSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 1- Foxl Theater 10TH ST z COUNTY ADMINISTRATION CENTER - Riverside 10.12.13.200.208.210 Hall of Justice RUSSELLST 0 z ti Salvation Army Riverside County Administrativ Center 14TH ST ARLINGTON AVE VAN BUREN & CALIFORNIA CASA 12.21 Riverside COUNTY FARM RD 2 Z Fp f Kaiser Hospital Juvenile AN,(.) Hall ORANGE UNIV. AVE & 10TH x 10.12.13 JURUPA AVE 0 Io RIVERSIDE O� CITY OCOLLEGE J o O MAGNOLIA 96F< A. STREETER & & ELIZABETH ,. a\tt,P ARLINGTON 2•012.13.14.15 12.15 GALLERIA ATTYLER GOLD LINE• 1.10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 28 loner Goeske ar. 404 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 143 1 2 Eastbound to La Cadena & Stephens A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate *Trip will end service at Primer and Columbia bus stop. c' Promenade & McKinley aII Pierce & La A - Sierra • Streeter & - Arlington Jurupa & p Magnolia 1 Market & a University — La Cadena & • 0 Stephens m •�' N N WI— 3 6:48 0 3 > V Oea 7 7:14 7:24 7:38 7:45 7:58 8:07 8:11 8:21 8:36 8:22 8:36 8:43 8:57 9:07 9:11 9:21 9:36 9:21 9:35 9:42 9:56 10:06 10:10 10:20 10:35 10:20 10:35 10:43 10:57 11:07 11:11 11:21 11:38 11:20 11:35 11:43 11:57 12:07 12:11 12:21 12:38 12:22 12:37 12:46 1:02 1:13 1:17 1:27 1:44 1:25 1:40 1:49 2:05 2:16 2:20 2:30 2:47 2:25 2:40 2:49 3:05 3:16 3:20 3:30 3:47 3:29 3:44 3:53 4:09 4:20 4:24 4:34 4:51 4:32 4:47 4:56 5:12 5:23 5:27 5:37 5:54 5:33 5:48 5:56 6:12 6:23 6:27 6:37 6:54 6:37 6:52 7:00 7:16 7:25 7:29 7:39 7:56* 2 Westbound to Corona Hills Plaza A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate ILaCadena& j Stephens • Orange & 10th 00 vv oa3 4102 o °c 4i � 0 `w w a ,,,a' 10 2 Si- Pierce & La of Sierra °D Promenade N & McKinley 7 6 5 3 7:22 7:26 7:34 7:49 The 7:00 a.m. trip will start service at the first stop on Orange St north of Columbia Ave at approximately 6:55 a.m. 7:54 8:13 8:18 8:22 8:32 8:47 8:54 9:11 8:46 9:10 9:15 9:19 9:29 9:46 9:53 10:10 9:46 10:10 10:15 10:19 10:29 10:46 10:53 11:10 10:45 11:08 11:13 11:17 11:29 11:47 11:54 12:12 11:48 12:11 12:16 12:20 12:32 12:50 12:57 1:15 12:48 1:11 1:16 1:20 1:32 1:50 1:57 2:15 1:54 2:15 2:20 2:24 2:36 2:54 3:01 3:19 2:57 3:18 3:23 3:27 3:39 3:57 4:04 4:22 3:57 4:18 4:23 4:27 4:39 4:57 5:05 5:23 5:01 5:22 5:27 5:31 5:43 6:01 6:09 6:27 6:09 6:30 6:35 6:39 6:51 7:09 7:17 7:35 7:09 7:28 7:33 7:37 7:49 8:04 8:12 8:30 405 44I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY HUNTER PARK/UCR METROLINK STATION - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - GALLERIA AT TYLER Routing and timetables subject tochange. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. iO N Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing 0 Transfer Point Norte Vista H.S. P%\\ k t, ARLINGTON &TYLER 13.15 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com HUNTER PARK/UCR METROLINK STATION 13.52 • METROLINK (000 CHICAGO & ..:: ;,...._E�o�y •C ;•• Z, UNIVERSITY ?r'•_"'`.7ASS GOLD LINE•1 •13 99' �tl; v \_,A North H.S. ORANGE 3Q0 .,.,,. 6 Post & 10TH S.'..........vP re_y Office 10.12.13 .O�lF�O \�c�t�S�� Library 9C0 MARKET I& UNIVERSIT .. C• f 4� �����VO - 204 N w ,ZgS�1 Stratton Community Center RIVERSIDE MARKET 10TH ST 5w Riverside' Riverside & 10TH City Hall County 1 •13.15 11TH ST 5E Administrative MARKET ""Riverside Center & 11TH Community.: r RIVERSIDE 1 •13.15 Hospital d CITY COLLEGE Central M.S. MAGNOLIA y Riverside & 15TH Plaza 1.13.15.50 m ADO Riverside *GO" 3 9F Airport Ps' ARLINGTON & MONROE - 13.15 yFG nP FyG• `S)\ COLORADO &VAN BUREN 13.21 0 DPSS ';\ PJsc A90 GALLERIAATTYLER 'CV GOLD LINE• 1.10.12.13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram 223 Sierra M.S. COUNTY ADMINISTRATION CENTER 10.12.13.200 208.210 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04145 1 3 Eastbound to Hunter Park/UCR Metrolink Station A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate *If required, bus will take passengers to the bus stop on Market St far side University Ave. o• r GalleriaatTyler Colorado & • Van Buren Phoenix & Arlington Riverside City College o Market & 11th co N11Chicago & University IMassachusetts & Hulen • Chicago & Marlborough Hunter Park/UCR Metrolink Station 7:37 7:56 8:05 8:16 8:18 8:31 — 8:35 8:43 8:40 8:59 9:09 9:22 9:26 9:41 — 9:45 9:52 9:35 9:56 10:06 10:19 10:23 10:39 — 10:43 10:50 10:40 11:01 1 1:1 1 1 1: 25 1 1: 29 11:45 — 11:49 11:56 11:41 12:02 12:12 12:26 12:30 12:46 — 12:50 12:57 12:50 1:11 1:21 1:35 1:39 1:55 — 1:59 2:06 1:50 2:11 2:21 2:35 2:39 2:55 2:59 3:03 3:10 3:02 3:23 3:33 3:47 3:51 4:07 4:11 4:15 4:22 3:53 4:14 4:24 4:37 4:41 4:57 5:01 5:05 5:12 5:08 5:29 5:37 5:49 5:53 6:08 6:12 6:16 6:23 6:00 6:21 6:29 6:40 6:42* — — — — 1 3 Westbound to Galleria at Tyler A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Hunter Park/UCR o Metrolink Station - Spruce & Atlanta Massachusetts & o Hulen N Chicago & o University 5 Market & 10th A Riverside City O College Phoenix & o Arlington Colorado & co Van Buren w I. a to L w a w 1 8:18 7:58 8:04 8:11 8:18 8:30 8:33 8:43 8:52 9:13 9:02 9:08 — 9:15 9:30 9:33 9:47 9:56 10:18 10:02 10:08 — 10:15 10:30 10:34 10:48 10:57 11:21 11:03 11:09 — 11:16 11:31 11:35 11:49 11:58 12:22 12:06 12:12 — 12:19 12:34 12:38 12:52 1:01 1:25 1:07 1:13 — 1:20 1:35 1:38 1:52 2:01 2:25 2:16 2:22 — 2:29 2:44 2:47 3:01 3:11 3:35 3:20 3:25 — 3:32 3:47 3:50 4:03 4:13 4:37 4:32 4:37 — 4:44 4:59 5:02 5:15 5:24 5:47 5:22 5:27 — 5:34 5:48 5:51 6:04 6:13 6:36 407 46I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 14 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. O GALLERIA AT TYLER - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - LOMA LINDA VA HOSPITAL Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com RTA does not serve Mt Vernon Ave or Barton Rd except at Loma Linda hospitals. Omnitrans Route 325 serves Michigan Ave and Barton Rd. Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point OTransfer Point LOMA LINDA University�P�jpNQO LOMA LINDA VA HOSPITAL POCIA° 149•32SNSRX " ANS2 - PASS 125 t1GRAND 44 Loma Linda y(k09* 2 TERRACE ��NPRO N . CENjCRS 6 CENTER & MICHIGAN 14.OMNITRANS 325 CHICAGO & UNIVERSITY GOLDLINE•1.13 v� 14.22 MARKET & UNIVERSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 UNIV ERSITYAvE t4.1 3%• 0 HIGHGROVE University Village IOWA & BLAINE 1.10.14.51.52 IOWA & UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY .'4, Riverside Cesar Chavez GOLD LINE• 1.14.16.51 & BROCKTON Q' Community Community Center 52.204 14.22 Hospital UNIVERSITY & LEMON • DMV GOLD2 Riverside 14.15.22.29.49 LINE•1.10.1 1�R3?l" Piaza 200.204.208.210 a OMNITRANS 215 BROCKTON ARCADE 3 S� 1.10.14.15 California School Riverside '�O` for the Deaf Medical 'f2oy Center . MADISON ST GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE•1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 23 «TYLER ST RIVERSIDE 408 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 147 14 Eastbound to VA Hospital A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate t = Saturdays only, trips do not operate on Sundays. * If required, bus will take passengers to the bus stop on Market St far side University Ave. Galleria at Tyler Indiana & Madison Brockton Arcade University Brockton Iowa & Blaine Center & Michigan Linda Loma VA Hospital 1 2 3 4E 5 6 7 t 7:31 7:44 7:49 7:58 8:11 8:21 8:39 t 8:25 8:38 8:43 8:54 9:11 9:21 9:39 9:24 9:39 9:44 9:55 10:12 10:22 10:40 10:26 10:41 10:46 10:57 11:14 11:24 11:42 11:26 11:42 11:47 11:58 12:15 12:25 12:43 12:29 12:45 12:50 1:01 1:18 1:28 1:46 1:31 1:48 1:53 2:04 2:21 2:31 2:49 2:36 2:53 2:58 3:09 3:26 3:36 3:54 3:40 3:57 4:02 4:13 4:30 4:40 4:58 4:43 4:58 5:03 5:14 5:31 5:41 5:59 5:46 6:01 6:06 6:17* — — — 14 Westbound to Galleria at Tyler A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate t = Saturdays only, trip does not operate from VA Hospital to downtown Riverside on Sundays. Loma Linda VA Hospital Center & Michigan Iowa & Blaine University & Market Brockton Arcade Indiana & Madison Galleria at Tyler 7 6 5 4W 3 2 1 7:59 8:17 8:30 8:41 8:53 8:59 9:14 8:58 9:16 9:29 9:40 9:53 9:59 10:16 9:56 10:14 10:27 10:40 10:53 10:59 11:16 10:59 11:17 11:30 11:43 11:56 12:02 12:19 12:01 12:19 12:32 12:45 12:58 1:04 1:21 1:06 1:24 1:37 1:50 2:03 2:09 2:26 2:10 2:28 2:41 2:54 3:07 3:13 3:30 3:13 3:31 3:44 3:57 4:10 4:16 4:33 4:16 4:34 4:47 5:00 5:13 5:19 5:36 5:11 5:29 5:42 5:55 6:08 6:14 6:31 409 48I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 15 Routing and timetables subjectto change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. ►O DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - MERCED & MAGNOLIA Information Center (951)565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point Altemate Routing QTransfer Point 5 La Sierra University RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1.15.29.49.200.208.210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK.AMTRAK.SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram p927 ................ UNIVERSITY NIVER GOLD EITY• I&O LEMON 5.22.29.49 N1V 200.204.208.210.OMNITRANS 215 MARKET & UNIVEiRSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 MAGNOLIA & 15TH 1.13.15.50 Riverside City Hall 106 Riverside Community Hospital Central M.S. RIVERSIDE CITY COLLEGE i 9 9G F Riverside Marcy Plaza Library SUN�ySA°E RIVERSIDE sT BROCKTON % ARCADE 1.10.14.15 9G F '5' 0 & MO ROE Arlington o Spam y ARLINGTON Riverside 13.15 ARLINGTON Ji Airport A & STREETER 12-15 Norte Vista Iss�1N ARLINGTON H.S. & VAN BUREN 15.21 J� 4945 d4`0 OQ�\PP , @ Loma Vista — M.S. La Sierra Senior Center HOLE AVE LA SIERRA & HOLE/PIERCE 12.15 ly 've,jo, La Sierra MAGNOLIA & LA SIERRA GOLD LINE• 1.15 0 �Fg(-4,2?Q� O Kaiser Hospital Hillrrest Hs. 9JT 91 GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE• 1.10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg23 Arizona M.S. LA SIERRA METROLINK STATION 15.200.00TA 794•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 24 410 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April5, 2020 v04 I49 15 Eastbound to Downtown Riverside A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Merced & ccr, Magnolia La Sierra Metrolink Station La Sierra & • Hole/ Pierce Arlington & N La Sierra 1Arlin9ton & Van Buren Arlington & m Streeter 03 • Brockton Arcade w Riverside City College Riverside- °' Downtown 0.' Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay C) d I. I m .2 A t7 3 7:37 8:04 — 8:16 8:26 8:31 8:40 8:47 8:52 8:58 9:08 8:45 — 8:57 9:08 9:13 9:22 9:29 9:34 9:40 9:50 9:25 — 9:37 9:49 9:54 10:04 10:11 10:16 10:22 10:32 10:06 — 10:19 10:31 10:36 10:46 10:53 10:58 1 1 :04 1 1 :14 10:48 — 11:01 11:13 11:18 11:28 11:35 11:40 11:46 11:56 11:30 — 11:43 11:55 12:00 12:10 12:17 12:22 12:28 12:38 12:09 — 12:22 12:36 12:42 12:52 12:59 1:04 1:10 1:20 12:50 — 1:03 1:17 1:23 1:34 1:41 1:46 1:52 2:02 1:32 — 1:45 1:59 2:05 2:16 2:23 2:28 2:34 2:44 2:14 — 2:27 2:41 2:47 2:58 3:05 3:10 3:16 3:26 2:57 — 3:10 3:24 3:30 3:40 3:47 3:52 3:58 4:08 3:39 — 3:52 4:06 4:12 4:22 4:29 4:34 4:40 4:50 4:24 — 4:37 4:51 4:57 5:07 5:14 5:19 5:25 5:35 5:01 5:09 5:19 5:32 5:38 5:47 5:54 5:59 6:05 6:15 5:42 5:50 6:00 6:13 6:19 6:28 6:35 6:40 6:46 6:56 6:21 6:29 6:39 6:52 6:57 7:06 7:13 7:18 7:24 7:34 7:24 — 7:37 7:50 7:55 8:04 8:11 8:16 8:22 8:32 15 Westbound to Merced & Magnolia A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Riverside- °' Downtown o ' Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay C) 1_ Riverside City .moo College Brockton Arcade o' Arlington & .o Streeter 1°' Arlington & Van Buren Arlington & La Sierra La Sierra & 0 Hole/ Pierce Gal feria at Tyler 1La Sierra a Metrolink Station 1a1 Merced& Magnolia 7:12 7:22 7:28 7:32 7:41 7:48 7:55 8:04 — 8:16 7:54 8:04 8:10 8:14 8:23 8:31 8:38 8:49 8:58 9:08 8:36 8:46 8:52 8:56 9:05 9:13 9:20 9:31 — 9:46 9:18 9:29 9:35 9:39 9:48 9:56 10:03 10:15 — 10:30 10:00 10:11 10:17 10:21 10:30 10:38 10:46 10:58 — 11:13 10:42 10:53 10:59 11:04 11:13 11:21 11:29 11:41 — 11:56 1 1 : 24 11:35 11:42 1 1 :47 11:56 12:04 12:12 12:24 — 12:39 12:06 12:17 12:24 12:29 12:38 12:46 12:54 1:06 — 1:21 12:48 12:59 1:06 1:11 1:20 1:28 1:36 1:48 — 2:03 1:30 1:41 1:48 1:53 2:02 2:10 2:18 2:30 — 2:45 2:12 2:24 2:31 2:36 2:45 2:53 3:01 3:13 — 3:28 2:54 3:06 3:12 3:17 3:26 3:34 3:42 3:54 — 4:09 3:36 3:48 3:54 3:59 4:07 4:16 4:24 4:36 — 4:51 4:18 4:30 4:36 4:41 4:49 4:58 5:05 5:17 — 5:32 5:00 5:12 5:18 5:23 5:31 5:39 5:46 5:56 — 6:11 5:45 5:56 6:02 6:07 6:15 6:23 6:30 6:40 — 6:54 6:25 6:36 6:42 6:47 6:55 7:03 7:10 7:20 — 7:34 7:14 7:25 7:31 7:36 7:44 7:52 7:59 8:09 — 8:23 411 50I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY MORENO VALLEY MALL TO UCR Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. / NO Legend I Map not to scale 0 Timeand/orTransferPoint OT Transfer Point UCR AT BANNOCKBURN GOLD LINE • 1 •16.51 52.204 UCR CANYON S CREST DR `P.QO IOWA AV Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 MORENO VALLEY CANYON CREST DR UNIVERSITYAVE AT UNIVERSITY VILLAGE GOLD LINE• 1.16.52 IOWA AT UNIVERSITY GOLD LINE•1.14.16.51 52.204 RIVERSIDE Canyon Crest Towne Center ® DAY ST WHERE TO TRANSFER BETWEEN ROUTES 1 & 16 CANYON CREST DR UCR AT BANNOCKBURN lEB•16E6 Bannockburn —45 Village aeon UNIVERSITY VILLAGE IOWA AVE L UNIVERSITYAVE AT UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 1 WB• 16WB 412 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 151 1 6 Eastbound to Moreno Valley Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate UCR at Bannockburn Moreno Valley Mall 1 3 7:33 7:59 8:15 8:42 8:58 9:27 9:26 9:57 9:56 10:27 10:11 10:42 10:26 10:57 10:40 11:11 10:55 11:26 11:09 11:40 11:25 11:56 11:41 12:13 11:56 12:28 12:11 12:43 12:25 12:57 12:41 1:13 12:56 1:28 1:11 1:43 1:26 1:58 1:41 2:13 1:56 2:28 2:11 2:43 2:26 2:58 2:42 3:14 2:57 3:29 3:12 3:44 3:27 3:59 3:44 4:16 4:01 4:33 4:16 4:48 4:31 5:03 4:46 5:18 5:01 5:33 5:18 5:50 5:33 6:05 6:03 6:35 6:29 7:01 7:44 8:16 8:37 9:07 10:13 10:39 413 52I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 1 6 Westbound to UCR A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Moreno Valley Mall University Ave & University Village UCR at Bannockburn 3 2 1 7:11 7:36 7:44 7:55 8:20 8:28 8:38 9:06 9:14 9:07 9:35 9:43 9:36 10:04 10:12 10:04 10:32 10:40 10:19 10:47 10:55 10:34 11:02 11:10 10:49 11:17 11:25 11:04 11:32 11:40 11:19 11:47 11:55 11:34 12:02 12:10 11:48 12:17 12:25 12:02 12:32 12:40 12:17 12:47 12:55 12:32 1:02 1:10 12:47 1:17 1:25 1:02 1:32 1:40 1:17 1:47 1:55 1:32 2:02 2:10 1:47 2:17 2:25 2:02 2:32 2:40 2:17 2:47 2:55 2:32 3:02 3:10 2:50 3:20 3:28 3:05 3:35 3:43 3:20 3:50 3:58 3:35 4:05 4:13 3:52 4:22 4:30 4:07 4:37 4:45 4:22 4:52 5:00 4:37 5:07 5:15 4:52 5:22 5:30 5:07 5:37 5:45 5:22 5:52 6:00 5:37 6:07 6:15 5:53 6:22 6:30 6:09 6:37 6:45 6:39 7:07 7:15 7:11 7:39 7:47 7:39 8:07 8:15 8:25 8:53 9:01 9:19 9:47 9:55 414 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 153 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horados son sujetos a cambios. PIGEON PASS RD SUNNYMEAD RANCH - MORENO VALLEY MALL - MORENO VALLEY COLLEGE Vista Heights M.S. Canyon Springs H.S. SUNNYMEAD RANCH SUNNYMEAD RANCH PKWY NB ONLY z «NBONLY pp «CENTERPOINTDRMoreno a 1- yV" " Valley o COTTONWOOD �� TOWNGATE AVE H.S. w &HEACOCK v� 11.18 dC I COTTONWOOD AVE COTTONWOOD & FREDERICK 11.18 MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 MORENO VALLEY Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Badger PERRIS & Springs ALESSANDRO M.S. J 18.19.20 m Vista M JFK DR w Dellago '^ H.S. GENTIAN AVE IRIS AVE »� IO KRAMERIA» MORENO VALLEY Vista COLLEGE Verde 18.19.20.41 M.S. 415 54I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 1 8 Northbound to Sunnymead Ranch & Moreno Valley Mall # A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate o Iris & Lasselle Perris & rs) Alessandro \' Cottonwood & Frederick Moreno A Valley Mall Heacock & Manzanita co Moreno IS) Valley Mall ea a a VI my RI Li. J 1 2 7:14 8:08 8:15 8:23 8:31 8:42 9:04 9:21 9:12 9:19 9:27 9:35 9:46 10:08 10:26 10:14 10:22 10:31 10:39 10:50 11:12 11:30 11:19 11:27 11:36 11:44 11:55 12:17 12:35 12:25 12:33 12:42 12:50 1:01 1:23 1:41 1:30 1:38 1:47 1:56 2:07 2:29 2:47 2:36 2:44 2:53 3:02 3:13 3:35 3:53 3:43 3:51 4:00 4:09 4:20 4:42 5:00 4:49 4:56 5:05 5:14 5:25 5:47 6:05 5:56 6:03 6:11 6:19 6:30 6:52 7:10 7:00 7:07 7:15 7:23 7:34 7:56 8:13 1 8 Southbound to Moreno Valley College A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Moreno Valley Mall Cottonwood & Graham Perris & Alessandro Lasselle & JFK Iris & Lasselle 5 45 3 2 1A 8:30 8:38 8:45 8:51 9:02 9:31 9:39 9:46 9:53 10:04 10:36 10:44 10:51 10:58 11:09 11:40 11:49 11:57 12:04 12:15 12:45 12:54 1:02 1:09 1:20 1:51 2:00 2:08 2:15 2:26 2:57 3:06 3:14 3:21 3:33 4:03 4:12 4:20 4:27 4:39 5:10 5:19 5:27 5:34 5:46 6:15 6:23 6:31 6:38 6:50 416 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04155 1919A Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. MORENO VALLEY MALL TO PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER - TRUMBLE RD Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com TOwNCIR t, MORENO VALLEY MALLCENTERPOINT DR 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing OTransfer Point SUNNYMEAD ▪ & HEACOCK = 11.19 SUNNYMEAD BLVD MORENO VALLEY Val Verde H.S. MORGAN ST March Mountain H.S. PERRIS & ALESSANDRO0ALESSANDRO BLVD 18.19.20 ALESSANDRO0ALESSANDRO Badger Springs M.S. IRIS AVE ROSS/LOWE'S/ KRAMERIA AVE STARCREST 19.41 3 RAMONA EXPY G :fir PERRIS PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61.74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 26 Perris Valley Spectrum Walmart Perris 10 Theater NUEVO RD MORENO VALLEY OLLEGE 18.19.20.41 Perris Fairgrounds Service only during SoCal Fair PERRIS & RAMONA EXPY 19.41 ORANGE AVE Kindred Hospital Riverside PERRIS & NUEVO 19.27.30 O Perris H.S. z d JARVISST Perris City Hall E SAN JACINTO AVE W 4TH ST TRUMBLE RD AT EXCEED 56 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 417 1 9 Northbound to Moreno Valley Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Perris Station Transit Center Perris & Ramona Expy Moreno Valle• y College Perris & Alessandro Sunnymead & Heacock Moreno Valley Mall 2 4 5 6 7 8 5:11 5:29 5:39 5:51 6:00 6:09 6:00 6:18 6:28 6:40 6:49 6:59 6:44 7:02 7:12 7:24 7:35 7:45 7:27 7:45 7:55 8:07 8:18 8:28 7:55 8:13 8:23 8:36 8:47 8:57 8:22 8:40 8:50 9:04 9:16 9:26 8:50 9:08 9:18 9:32 9:44 9:54 9:20 9:38 9:48 10:02 10:14 10:24 9:35 9:53 10:03 10:17 10:29 10:39 9:50 10:08 10:18 10:32 10:44 10:54 10:04 10:22 10:32 10:47 10:59 11:09 10:19 10:37 10:47 11:02 11:14 11:24 10:32 10:50 11:00 11:15 11:28 11:38 10:46 11:04 11:14 11:29 11:42 11:52 11:00 11:18 11:28 11:43 11:56 12:07 11:15 11:33 11:43 11:58 12:11 12:22 11:30 11:48 11:58 12:13 12:26 12:37 11:45 12:03 12:13 12:28 12:41 12:52 12:00 12:18 12:28 12:43 12:56 1:07 12:15 12:33 12:43 12:58 1:11 1:22 12:30 12:48 12:58 1:13 1:26 1:37 12:45 1:03 1:13 1:28 1:41 1:52 1:00 1:18 1:28 1:43 1:56 2:07 1:16 1:34 1:44 1:59 2:11 2:22 1:34 1:52 2:02 2:17 2:29 2:40 1:50 2:08 2:18 2:32 2:44 2:55 2:05 2:23 2:33 2:47 2:59 3:10 2:20 2:38 2:48 3:02 3:14 3:25 2:37 2:55 3:05 3:19 3:31 3:42 2:53 3:11 3:21 3:35 3:47 3:57 3:08 3:26 3:36 3:50 4:02 4:12 3:23 3:41 3:51 4:05 4:17 4:27 3:38 3:56 4:06 4:20 4:32 4:42 3:53 4:11 4:21 4:35 4:47 4:57 4:08 4:26 4:36 4:50 5:02 5:12 4:23 4:41 4:51 5:05 5:17 5:27 4:39 4:57 5:07 5:21 5:33 5:43 4:54 5:12 5:22 5:36 5:48 5:58 5:25 5:42 5:52 6:06 6:17 6:27 5:59 6:16 6:26 6:40 6:51 7:01 6:27 6:44 6:54 7:08 7:19 7:29 7:13 7:30 7:40 7:54 8:05 8:15 8:10 8:27 8:37 8:50 9:00 9:09 9:34 9:51 10:01 10:13 10:22 10:31 418 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 157 1 9 Southbound to Perris Station Transit Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 'Times are approximate Moreno Valley Mall Sunnymead & Heacock Perris & Alessandro Moreno Valley College Perris & Ramona Expy Perris Station Transit Center 8 7 6 5 4 2 6:19 6:25 6:33 6:42 6:52 7:08 6:46 6:53 7:03 7:13 7:23 7:40 7:17 7:24 7:34 7:44 7:54 8:11 8:09 8:16 8:26 8:36 8:46 9:03 8:57 9:04 9:15 9:26 9:36 9:54 9:37 9:45 9:56 10:07 10:17 10:35 9:52 10:00 10:11 10:22 10:32 10:50 10:07 10:15 10:26 10:37 10:47 11:05 10:22 10:30 10:41 10:52 11:02 11:20 10:37 10:45 10:56 11:07 11:17 11:35 10:52 11:00 11:11 11:22 11:32 11:50 11:07 11:15 11:26 11:37 11:47 12:05 11:21 11:29 11:40 11:52 12:02 12:20 11:36 11:44 11:55 12:07 12:17 12:35 11:50 11:58 12:09 12:21 12:32 12:50 12:06 12:14 12:25 12:37 12:48 1:06 12:23 12:32 12:43 12:55 1:06 1:24 12:38 12:47 12:58 1:10 1:21 1:39 12:53 1:02 1:14 1:26 1:37 1:55 1:07 1:16 1:29 1:41 1:52 2:10 1:23 1:32 1:45 1:57 2:08 2:26 1:38 1:47 2:00 2:12 2:23 2:41 1:53 2:02 2:15 2:27 2:38 2:56 2:08 2:17 2:30 2:42 2:53 3:11 2:23 2:32 2:45 2:57 3:08 3:26 2:38 2:47 3:00 3:12 3:23 3:41 2:53 3:02 3:15 3:27 3:38 3:56 3:08 3:17 3:30 3:42 3:53 4:11 3:24 3:33 3:46 3:58 4:09 4:27 3:39 3:48 4:01 4:13 4:24 4:42 3:54 4:03 4:16 4:28 4:40 4:58 4:09 4:18 4:31 4:43 4:55 5:13 4:26 4:35 4:48 5:00 5:12 5:30 4:43 4:52 5:05 5:17 5:29 5:47 4:58 5:07 5:20 5:32 5:44 6:02 5:13 5:22 5:34 5:46 5:58 6:16 5:28 5:37 5:49 6:01 6:13 6:31 5:43 5:52 6:04 6:16 6:28 6:46 6:00 6:09 6:21 6:33 6:45 7:03 6:15 6:24 6:36 6:48 7:00 7:17 6:45 6:54 7:06 7:17 7:28 7:44 7:11 7:19 7:30 7:41 7:52 8:08 8:26 8:34 8:45 8:56 9:07 9:23 9:19 9:25 9:33 9:42 9:52 10:07 10:41 10:47 10:55 11:04 11:14 11:27 419 58I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY ROUTE 19A NO SERVICE 420 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04159 20 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. MAGNOLIA & ELIZABETH - METROLINK - RUMC - KAISER PERMANENTS - MOVAL COLLEGE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com RIVERSIDE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 20.31.41 Poly CENTRAL H.S. & VICTORIA 10.20 Riverside Plaza Moreno Valley School District Moreno Valley Library ALESSANDRO © PERRIS BLVD & PERRIS 18.19.20 Post Ofhre 0A19 OaONVSS3ltl INDIAN ST ALESSANDRO O FREDERICK ST & FREDERICK 11.20 Moreno Valley DAY ST city Hall MISSION GROVE PKWY SP MORENO BEACH DR KAISER PERMANENTE HOSPITAL LASSELLEST PENINSULA CT E. MORENO VALLEY COLLEGE 18.19.20.41 z KITCHING ST MORENO VALLEY MORENO VALLEY/MARCH FIELD METROLINK STATION 20.26 • METROLIN K Mission Grove Plaza TRAUTWEIN RD RIVERSIDE VICTORIA AVE n MAGNOLIA & ELIZABETH 1.12.13.14.15.20 a MAGNOLIA AVE ��DMV « BROCKTON AVE MISSION GROVE AT SOCIAL SECURITY 20.22.26 Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing TO Transfer Point 60 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 421 20 Eastbound to Moreno Valley College A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate t = Saturdays only. °' Magnolia & Elizabeth III Mission Grove at a Social Security Ill Moreno Valley March Field °' Metrolink Station N _ Alessandro & A Frederick Alessandro & N Perris IRiverside University Medical Center Iris at Kaiser Permanente 'O Hospital aballop .. AalleAouaaoW IIIris & Lasselle 7:40 7:57 8:07 8:15 8:23 8:31 8:41 8:46 8:55 8:28 8:45 - 8:57 9:07 9:15 9:25 9:30 9:39 9:31 9:48 - 10:01 10:11 10:19 10:29 10:34 10:43 10:31 10:50 - 11:03 11:13 11:21 11:31 11:36 11:45 11:31 11:50 - 12:03 12:13 12:21 12:31 12:36 12:45 12:31 12:50 - 1:03 1:13 1:21 1:31 1:36 1:45 1:34 1:53 - 2:06 2:16 2:24 2:34 2:39 2:48 2:36 2:55 - 3:08 3:18 3:26 3:36 3:41 3:50 3:36 3:55 - 4:08 4:18 4:26 4:36 4:41 4:50 4:31 4:50 - 5:03 5:13 5:21 5:31 5:36 5:45 5:22 5:41 5:51 5:59 6:09 6:17 6:27 6:32 6:41 6:28 6:47 6:59 7:07 7:15 7:25 7:30 7:39 t 7:26 7:44 - 7:56 8:04 8:11 8:21 8:26 8:35 8:26 8:43 - - 8:54 9:02 9:09 9:19 9:24 9:33 20 Westbound to Magnolia & Elizabeth A.M. times are in PLAIN, P M. times are in BOLD Times are approximate t = Saturdays only. b Iris & Lasselle o, Iris at Kaiser o Permanente 'O Hospital Riverside • University o Medical Center Alessandro & Perris w_ Alessandro & ▪ Frederick V111Moreno Valley March Field • Metrolink Station • Mission Grove in at Social Security °o Magnolia & O Elizabeth 8:16 8:20 8:30 8:41 8:48 - 9:00 9:21 9:05 9:09 9:20 9:32 9:40 - 9:54 10:17 9:49 9:53 10:04 10:16 10:24 - 10:38 11:01 10:53 10:57 11:08 11:20 11:28 - 11:42 12:05 11:55 11:59 12:10 12:22 12:30 - 12:44 1:07 12:55 12:59 1:10 1:22 1:30 - 1:44 2:07 1:55 1:59 2:10 2:22 2:30 - 2:44 3:07 2:58 3:02 3:13 3:25 3:33 - 3:47 4:10 4:00 4:04 4:15 4:27 4:35 - 4:49 5:12 5:00 5:04 5:15 5:27 5:35 5:45 5:55 6:18 6:05 6:09 6:20 6:32 6:39 - 6:53 7:16 7:00 7:04 7:15 7:27 7:34 - 7:45 8:06 t _ 7:50 7:54 8:05 8:15 8:2 8:33 8:51 422 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 161 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. GALLERIA AT TYLER TO COUNTRY VILLAGE/ FONTANA MARLAYAVE CC o j „ BANANA # m & CHERRY 21.49 CHERRY AVE ONIMTRANS82 FONTANA Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point pT Transfer Point SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY SAN SEVAINEW JURUPA VALLEY COUNTRY VILLAGE 21.49.204 BEN NEVIS BLVD ETIWANDA & LIMONITE 21.29 MISSION BLVD RIVERSIDE COUNTY GLEN AVON Glen Avon Library lurupa Valley R.S. Mira Loma LIMONITE & ARCHER/COLLINS JURUPA RD M.S. PEDLEY LIMONITE AVE 21.29 x CC Riverside County Animal Control ARLINGTON AVE Pedley Metrolink Station ARLINGTON & VAN BUREN z 15.21 RIVERSIDE Walmart GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE• 1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 13 CALIFORNIA & VAN BUREN 12.21 PVF Arlington Library 62 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 423 21 Northbound to Country Village/Fontana A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Galleria at Tyler Van Buren & Arlington Limonite & Collins Felspar & Jurupa Banana & Cherry 1 2 3N 4 5 7:41 7:53 8:01 8:19 8:32 8:46 9:00 9:10 9:28 9:42 9:55 10:10 10:20 10:38 10:53 11:03 11:21 11:31 11:49 12:04 12:14 12:33 12:43 1:01 1:16 1:27 1:46 1:56 2:14 2:29 2:39 2:58 3:08 3:26 3:41 3:53 4:12 4:22 4:40 4:55 5:05 5:22 5:32 5:50 6:05 6:16 6:32 6:42 6:58 7:13 21 Southhnund to Galleria at Tyler A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Banana & Cherry Felspar & Jurupa Limonite & Archer Van Buren & Arlington Galleria at Tyler 5 4 35 2 1 7:37 7:51 8:09 8:19 8:31 8:47 9:02 9:20 9:30 9:45 9:52 10:07 10:26 10:36 10:53 11:03 11:18 11:37 11:47 12:04 12:14 12:29 12:48 12:59 1:17 1:26 1:41 2:00 2:11 2:29 2:39 2:55 3:14 3:25 3:43 3:51 4:07 4:26 4:37 4:55 5:05 5:19 5:38 5:49 6:06 424 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 163 22 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. UNIVERSITY & BROCKTON 14.22 DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com MARKET & UNIVERSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE • 1 •10.12 MISSION INN 14.15.22.29.49 • r`, 200.204.208.210 UNIV. AVE • •> ^ 7 OMNITRANS 215 . o � 511 l7 a CHICAGO & CENTRAL 22.51 Post CHICAGO & Office UNIVERSITY GOLD LINE• 1 •13 14.22 lG Mission 13., Grove Plaza Social Security TRAUTWEIN RD rya Office & VAN BUREN AVE... 22.27 VAN BUREN» Martin g MARIPOSA Luther o N1 N K ng 1 1 H.S. or'9p /0 Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point OTransfer Point RIVERSIDE MISSION GROVE AT SOCIAL SECURITY 20.22.26 x OLEANDER AVE Citrus Hill H.S. Markham St RIDERST W O O D C R E S T CAJALCO & CLARK 22.41 MEAD VALLEY CAJALCO RD Mead Valley Library PERRIS PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61.74.208•METROLINK Perris Boarding diagram pg 26 City Hall SAN Senior JACINTO AVE (enter 4TH ST 425 641 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 22 Northbound to Downtown Riverside A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate °i Perris Station o. Transit Center San Jacinto & N "'INavajo °' Clark & Cajalco • Parsons & • Markham Trautwein & Van Buren oo Mission Grove o\ at Social Security A Chicago & • University °: University & 0,,, Brockton 6:50 6:56 7:07 7:19 7:25 7:31 7:45 7:57 7:31 7:37 7:48 8:00 8:06 8:12 8:28 8:40 8:38 8:44 8:55 9:07 9:13 9:19 9:35 9:47 9:42 9:48 9:59 10:11 10:17 10:23 10:39 10:51 10:12 10:18 10:29 10:41 10:47 10:53 11:09 11:21 10:42 10:48 10:59 11:11 11:17 1 1: 23 11:39 11:51 11:24 1 1: 30 11:41 11:53 11:59 12:05 12:21 12:34 12:32 12:38 12:49 1:01 1:07 1:13 1:29 1:42 1:34 1:40 1:51 2:03 2:09 2:15 2:31 2:44 2:48 2:54 3:05 3:17 3:23 3:29 3:45 3:58 3:58 4:04 4:15 4:27 4:33 4:39 4:55 5:08 5:07 5:13 5:24 5:36 5:42 5:48 6:03 6:16 6:11 6:17 6:28 6:40 6:46 6:52 7:06 7:19 7:11 7:17 7:28 7:40 7:46 7:52 8:06 8:18 22 Southbound to Perris Station Transit Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate o University& G, Brockton Chicago & University Mission Grove N at Social Security Trautwein & Van Buren Markham & o• 44. Parsons Clark & N Cajalco °D San Jacinto & Navajo Perris Station o.) Transit Center 8:12 8:22 8:36 8:42 8:49 9:01 9:12 9:22 8:50 9:00 9:15 9:21 9:28 9:40 9:51 10:01 9:57 10:07 10:22 10:29 10:36 10:48 10:59 11:09 11:03 11:13 11:28 11:35 11:42 11:54 12:05 12:15 12:12 12:22 12:37 12:44 12:51 1:03 1:14 1:24 1:11 1:21 1:36 1:43 1:50 2:02 2:13 2:23 2:01 2:11 2:27 2:34 2:41 2:53 3:04 3:14 2:29 2:39 2:55 3:02 3:09 3:21 3:32 3:42 2:56 3:06 3:22 3:29 3:36 3:48 3:59 4:09 3:31 3:41 3:57 4:04 4:11 4:23 4:34 4:44 4:16 4:26 4:42 4:49 4:56 5:08 5:18 5:28 4:49 4:59 5:15 5:22 5:29 5:41 5:51 6:01 5:37 5:47 6:02 6:08 6:15 6:27 6:37 6:47 6:40 6:50 7:05 7:11 7:18 7:30 7:40 7:50 426 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04165 23 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. GRUWELLPALOMAR & CENTRAL P. II 8.23 L 10 «CENTRAL WILDOMAR 15 p P' HIGH SCHOOL LEY VOIst sr 1. Murrieta ?- 6j. City Hall 90 ,w �j &Senior o RANCHO SPRINGS &enter F� c<& MEDICAL CENTER Fj F 5 Q urrieta \P 'r0 Town CenterP�'�P MULLIGAN FAMILY ti WALMART ��` FUN CENTER "el- WALMART �J 23.202.205.206 Wildomar o City Hall @ ¢ a Z Inland Valley -\ a ▪ MedicalCenter z JQ ��P4p �o 4oMURRIETA 9p EGSS NUSM CLINTON KEITH RD TEMECULA - MURRIETA - WILDOMAR Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing OT Transfer Point VISTA MURRIETA HIGH SCHOOL a� 9 iy 9p '] «NGENERAL KEARNYRD *Or" OVERLAND DR PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 LOS ALAMOS & WHITEWOOD 23.61.208 TEMECULA N A O Chaparral High School GraceMellman Comma ilyLibrary HES- WINCHESTER & NICOLAS 23.55.79 O Rancho Temecula Town Center 427 66I RIVERSIDETRANSIT AGENCY 23 Northbound to Wildomar A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate R G7 R w O £ O a N G!N i fa O V §Z N y C ate. M C �� Oro L V_ c'O y act Murrieta Walmart Kalmia & Jefferson °o Skyview Ridge c Amanda Apts • Inland Valley Medical Center • Palomar & • Central 1 2 4 7:56 8:05 8:27 8:56 9:05 9:27 9:33 9:43 9:50 10:00 10:15 10:06 10:17 10:39 10:45 10:55 11:02 11:12 11:27 11:11 11:23 11:49 11:55 12:05 12:12 12:22 12:37 12:25 12:37 1:05 1:11 1:21 1:28 1:38 1:55 1:39 1:51 2:19 2:25 2:35 2:42 2:51 3:08 2:44 2:56 3:24 3:30 3:40 3:47 3:56 4:13 3:56 4:08 4:36 4:42 4:52 4:59 5:09 5:26 5:06 5:18 5:46 5:52 6:02 6:09 6:19 6:34 6:10 6:22 6:50 6:56 7:04 7:11 7:26 — 23 Southbound to Temecula (Promenade Mall) A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate • Palomar & ,o ' Central IWInland Valley Medical Center 1Skyview Ridge Amanda Apts Kalmia & A Jefferson 4o Murrieta Walmart co Rancho o Springs ^� Medical Center fnchester& colas `I°D Promenade Mall 8:33 8:45 8:55 9:04 9:12 9:17 9:37 9:46 9:42 9:54 10:04 10:13 10:23 10:28 10:48 10:57 10:48 11:00 11:10 11:19 11:29 11:35 11:55 12:04 11:52 12:05 12:15 12:24 12:34 12:40 1:00 1:09 1:05 1:18 1:28 1:37 1:47 1:53 2:13 2:22 2:17 2:29 2:39 2:48 2:58 3:04 3:24 3:33 3:32 3:44 3:54 4:03 4:13 4:19 4:39 4:48 4:46 4:58 5:08 5:17 5:27 5:33 5:53 6:02 5:46 5:58 6:08 6:16 6:26 6:32 6:52 7:01 428 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 167 24 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. w\HCHESTERRD PROMENADE MALL - PECHANGA RESORT - TEMECULA VALLEY HOSPITAL Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing Or Transfer Point is SOLANA WY Temecula 1-7 E.S. Tower z Plaza TownCtr. Target a RANCHO CALIFORNIA RD TEMECULA STAGE STOP Post Office 24.79 ¢?iF Old Town � 6TH ST `:)FJ MAIN ST o .1) o h emewr rs Temecula o « LIBRARY Valley H.S. Gy 90Y 1 «NGENERAL KEARNY RD se ayg7F �9c� Pa 9p OVERLAND DR'. PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 Margarita M.S. Palomar Village TEMECULA Temecula j z City Hall " pgUg A Ro 1ST Temecula Valley Hospital DEPORTOLA y9 TEMECULA PKWY \. imart �9�� F'��otQ WaVAIL RANCH PKWY AF�y94/G 9 Aye` REDHAWKPKWY Birdsall PECHANGA 2 Sports Park <PEPPERCORNDR RESORT \\A\IAGreat oakH.s. 68 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 429 24 Northbound to Promenade Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Temecula Valley Hospital P Resort Pujol & Main Techangaemecula Stage Stop 6th & Front Margarita & Rancho California Promenade Mall 1 2 3 4 6 7 7:40 8:06 8:18 8:24 8:33 8:46 8:48 9:14 9:28 9:34 9:43 9:56 9:52 10:18 10:31 10:37 10:46 11:01 11:05 11:34 11:47 11:52 12:02 12:17 12:19 12:48 1:01 1:06 1:16 1:31 1:23 1:52 2:05 2:10 2:21 2:36 2:33 3:02 3:15 3:20 3:31 3:46 3:45 4:14 4:27 4:32 4:43 4:56 4:55 5:24 5:37 5:42 5:49 6:00 6:10 6:39 6:52 6:57 7:04 7:13 24 Southbound to Temecula Valley Hospital A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Promenade Mall Margarita & Rancho California Temecula Stage Stop 6th&Front Pujol & Main Pechanga Resort Temecula Valley Hospital 7 6 4 3 2 1 7:49 8:00 8:09 8:11 8:21 8:38 8:41 8:56 9:08 9:11 9:24 9:42 9:54 10:09 10:21 10:26 10:39 10:57 11:05 11:21 11:35 11:40 11:53 12:11 12:12 12:28 12:39 12:44 12:57 1:15 1:19 1:36 1:47 1:52 2:05 2:23 2:32 2:49 3:00 3:04 3:17 3:35 3:43 4:00 4:11 4:15 4:28 4:45 4:58 5:15 5:26 5:30 5:43 6:00 6:12 6:29 6:40 6:44 6:57 7:14 430 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04169 ROUTE 26 NO SERVICE 431 70I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY GALLERIA AT TYLER - PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing QTransfer Point PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61.74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 26 1,1 = C ST PERRIS & NUEVO PERRIS BLVDr.erris 19.27.30 High School Information Center (951) 565-5002 R iversideTra nsit.com RTABus.com GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE • 1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 a Boarding diagram pg 23 A\�o-5 Van Buren Drive -In Theater California Citrus State Historic Park MOCKINGBIRD CANYON RD WASHINGTON ST MLKHIGH SCHOOL• • WOOD RD x .... TRAUTWEIN RD 0 TRAUTWEIN RD & VAN BUREN AVE m Orange Terrace Community Center 22.27 ORANGE TERRACE & VAN BUREN AVE 26.27 Riverside National Cemetery 432 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 I71 27 Northbound to Galleria at Tyler A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Perris Station Transit Center Trautwein & Van Buren Van Buren & Washington Galleria at Tyler 1 2 4 5 5:45 6:11 6:15 6:30 6:40 7:06 7:12 7:27 7:41 8:07 8:13 8:30 8:35 9:01 9:07 9:25 9:34 10:02 10:08 10:26 10:35 11:05 11:12 11:31 11:42 12:12 12:19 12:40 12:41 1:11 1:17 1:38 1:55 2:25 2:31 2:52 2:46 3:16 3:22 3:43 4:01 4:31 4:37 4:58 4:56 5:26 5:32 5:50 6:09 6:39 6:44 7:02 7:08 7:34 7:39 7:56 7:51 8:17 8:22 8:39 27 Southbound to Perris Station Transit Center i_ A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Galleria at Tyler Van Buren & Washington Trautwein & Van Buren Perris Station Transit Center 5 4 2 1 5:30 5:43 5:47 6:15 6:43 6:58 7:03 7:31 7:34 7:50 7:55 8:25 8:28 8:46 8:51 9:21 9:23 9:45 9:51 10:23 10:28 10:50 10:56 11:28 11:31 11:53 11:59 12:31 12:36 12:58 1:04 1:36 1:36 1:58 2:04 2:36 2:45 3:07 3:13 3:45 3:45 4:07 4:14 4:46 4:57 5:19 5:26 5:58 5:57 6:17 6:22 6:54 6:46 7:06 7:11 7:41 8:06 8:24 8:29 8:57 433 72I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY is Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. OF PERRIS STATION - HEMET - LINCOLN & FLORIDA Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61 •74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg26 SHERMAN RD 4° .<9 «PALOMAR �Q MENIFEE RD Heritage High School BRIGGS RD LEON WINCHESTER RD EB To Hemet WE City Hall SAN JACINTO ST FLORIDA & SAN JACINTO 28.32.33 Valle Vista Library GRANT AVE» C ST PERRIS BLVD PERRIS ROMOLAND HOMELAND HEMET HEMET VALLEY MALL 28.31.32.33.42.74.79.217 KIRBY ST EBGILMORE ST «LYON AVE 0 0 FAIRVIEW AVE « LINCOLN AVE j< PALM AVE VALLE VISTA 434 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 I73 28 Eastbound to Hemet - Lincoln & Florida A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate *Trip will end at Florida Ave & State St bus stop at 12:13 a.m. Perris Station Transit Center 1 6:25 Hwy 74 & Leon 2 6:43 Kirby & Latham 3E 6:57 Lincoln & Florida 4 7:21 6:59 7:17 7:33 7:57 7:43 8:01 8:17 J 8:41 8:30 8:50 9:07 9:34 9:05 9:25 9:42 10:12 9:43 10:03 10:22 10:52 10:28 10:50 11:09 11:39 11:11 11:33 11:52 12:22 11:49 12:12 12:32 1:02 12:34 12:57 1:17 1:47 1:16 1:39 1:59 2:29 2:01 2:24 2:44 3:14 2:44 3:07 3:27 3:57 3:29 3:52 4:12 4:42 4:14 4:37 4:57 5:27 5:01 5:24 5:44 6:14 5:39 6:01 6:20 6:47 6:20 6:42 7:01 7:28 7:05 7:26 7:44 8:11 7:57 8:18 8:36 9:03 9:00 9:21 9:38 10:03 9:34 9:55 10:12 10:35 11:37 11:53 12:05* — 28 Westbound to Perris Station Transit Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD 'Times are approximate Lincoln & Florida 4 — Hemet Valley Mall 3W 4:30 Hwy 74 & Leon Perris Station Transit Center 1 5:01 2 4:44 — 5:05 5:19 5:36 5:26 5:55 6:11 6:28 6:11 6:41 6:57 7:14 7:00 7:32 7:50 8:07 7:43 8:15 8:33 8:51 8:18 8:50 9:08 9:27 8:56 9:31 9:49 10:08 9:44 10:19 10:38 10:57 10:22 10:57 11:18 11:38 11:05 11:41 12:02 12:22 11:49 12:25 12:46 1:06 12:32 1:08 1:29 1:49 1:15 1:51 2:12 2:32 1:57 2:31 2:52 3:12 2:39 3:13 3:34 3:54 3:29 4:02 4:23 4:43 4:09 4:42 5:02 5:22 4:52 5:25 5:45 6:05 5:45 6:17 6:36 6:54 6:25 6:55 7:14 7:31 7:38 8:08 8:27 8:44 8:21 8:50 9:07 9:24 435 74I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 29 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - JURUPA VALLEY - EASTVALE Information Center (951)565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com LIMONITE & HAMNER EastvaleGateway 3.29 EASTVALE HAMNER AVE Vernola © ETIWANDA Marketplace & LIMONITE 21.29 ETIWANDA AVE ARCHER Si LIMONITE & , 4 1 ST ARCHER/COLLINS 21•29 vPNgMRENgw� JURUPA PEDLEYRP PEDLEY METROLINK lurupa 14 STATION Cinemas 1— z 0 PEDLEY CAMINO REAL Legend 1 Map not to scale • Time and/orTransfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point DeAnzaPlaza 9G GOODMANWAY � AMAZON EASTVALE 3.29 JURUPA VALLEY P4Q .1.?G �'4/i Rubidoux `r��\F_ Il.s. RUBIDOUX ,10 19S�(�\"0" Post O Office OS\ '°g 1 RUBIDOUX 9MISSIION RIVERSIDE G UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE• 1.10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 Y VINE ST 60 Fairmount Fox Park Theater MARKET ST RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1.15.29.49.200.208 210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK•AMTRAK SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 27 436 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04175 29 Eastbound to Downtown Riverside A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Amazon Eastvale Limonite & Hamner Limonite & Archer Rubidoux & Mission Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay D) 1 2 3E 6 7 5:57 6:06 6:17 6:31 6:50 6:56 7:05 7:16 7:30 7:49 8:04 8:13 8:25 8:39 9:00 9:09 9:19 9:31 9:47 10:10 10:21 10:31 10:43 10:59 11:22 11:33 11:43 11:55 12:11 12:34 12:46 12:56 1:10 1:26 1:49 2:04 2:14 2:30 2:46 3:09 3:13 3:23 3:39 3:55 4:18 4:33 4:43 4:59 5:15 5:38 5:41 5:51 6:05 6:21 6:42 7:00 7:10 7:24 7:40 8:01 A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay D) Rubidoux & Mission Limonite & Collins Limonite & Hamner Amazon Eastvale 7 6 3W 2 1 5:55 6:16 6:28 6:38 6:46 7:00 7:21 7:35 7:46 7:54 7:59 8:24 8:40 8:51 8:59 9:10 9:35 9:51 10:03 10:11 10:20 10:45 11:01 11:15 11:23 11:32 11:58 12:14 12:28 12:36 12:44 1:10 1:26 1:40 1:48 1:59 2:25 2:41 2:55 3:03 3:19 3:45 4:01 4:15 4:23 4:28 4:54 5:10 5:23 5:31 5:48 6:13 6:29 6:42 6:50 6:52 7:17 7:30 7:43 7:51 8:11 8:36 8:49 9:01 9:09 437 761 RIVERSIDETRANSIT AGENCY 30 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. PERRIS STATION - WESTON & CARTER (WEST LOOP) - MAY RANCH (EAST LOOP) Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point OTransfer Point WEST LOOP RAMONA EXPY MAY RANCH MORGAN S EVANS & RIDER 30.41 MA Y .RANCH CC CC Walmart PERRIS & NUEVO 19.27.30 Perris Senior WESTON RD PERRIS STATION Center Perris City Hall `4) 0 TRANSIT CENTER 0 w z 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 ,n„ 61 •74.208•METROLINK ^ library »�2 Boarding diagram pg 26 SAN JACINTO *. 0 4TH ST Metrolink ORANGE AVE NUEVO RD Perris w ¢ H.S. uJ 0 CC 0 ¢ 42!)0. 4TH ST 7TH ST EB Post PERRIS Office 11THST rqf PERRIS BLVD & CASE RD / 11 TH ST 30.74 ELLIS AVE RIDER AN JACINTO AVE ro n 438 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 177 A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate 1.1APerris Station Transit Center V A .. 4th & Perris • Nuevo & Ruby 00 Orange Vista High School 100 , Sherman & o Walnut 1100 • Morgan & A Bradley 1WO0 Orange Vista High School a A• Nuevo & Ruby c 0 N V cal sr 413 Ico Perris Station U' Transit Center 5A 8:52 9:04 9:08 9:16 9:26 9:31 9:35 9:44 10:06 10:14 10:21 10:31 10:35 10:43 10:53 10:58 11:02 11:11 1 1: 33 1 1: 41 11:48 12:13 12:17 12:25 12:35 12:40 12:44 12:53 1:15 1:23 1:30 1:40 1:44 1:52 2:02 2:07 2:11 2:20 2:42 2:50 2:57 3:05 3:09 3:17 3:27 3:32 3:36 3:45 4:07 4:15 4:22 4:29 4:33 4:41 4:51 4:56 5:00 5:09 5:30 5:38 5:45 5:53 5:57 6:05 6:15 6:20 6:24 6:33 6:54 7:02 7:09 439 78I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY HEMET VALLEY MALL - SAN JACINTO - BEAUMONT - BANNING - MORENO VALLEY Routing and timetables subjecttodiange. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. SUN LAKES AT VILLAGE HIGHLAND b 31 •PASS TRANSIT SPRINGS AVE a�.r2 N Z Z —'« COMMERCE WAY O— Z BEAUMONT Z WALMART Q Q 31.210 in co SUNLINE 220 m m PASS TRANSIT 410 84 Re* AUTO MALL PKWY Super Walmart Stoneridge Towne Centre NASON ST g RIVERSIDE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER 20.31.41 MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE 31.32.74.79.217 d w ▪ w z ▪ z so o SAN �� JACINTO HEMETLYONAVE a Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com ION BUENA VISTA & DEVONSHIRE 31.33 KITCHING ST MORENO VALLEY SENIOR CENTER LL, 19.31 PERRIS ▪ BLVD MORENO VALLEY FREDERICK ST MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 GILMOREST» BUENA VISTA ST g a v City Hall _ R GILBERT o 0- . AVE K Hemet Unified School District HEMET VALLEY MALL 28.31.32.33.42.74 79.217 Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point 0 Transfer Point 440 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 179 31 Northbound to Moreno Valley Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Ic.,State & Acacia (Post Office) d Mt. San Jacinto W College San Jacinto u, Beaumont Walmart 1ASun Lakes at Village oo Super Walmart N at Moreno ^' Beach Dr -IIIRiverside A University Medical Center Moreno Valley Senior Center 'O —1 Moreno Valley 0 0 Mall a to L il LL ea N d 1> of 1 3 7:04 7:22 8:12 8:21 8:30 8:41 8:59 9:02 9:32 9:44 9:56 10:16 9:25 9:34 9:43 9:54 10:12 10:15 10:45 10:57 11:09 11:29 10:35 10:44 10:53 11:04 11:22 11:25 11:55 12:07 12:19 12:39 11:46 11:55 12:04 12:15 12:33 12:36 1:06 1:18 1:30 1:50 12:50 12:59 1:08 1:19 1:37 1:40 2:10 2:22 2:34 2:54 2:06 2:15 2:24 2:35 2:53 2:56 3:26 3:38 3:50 4:10 3:13 3:22 3:31 3:42 4:00 4:03 4:33 4:45 4:57 5:17 4:24 4:33 4:42 4:53 5:11 5:14 5:44 5:56 6:08 6:28 5:26 5:35 5:44 5:54 6:11 6:14 6:44 6:56 7:08 7:28 31 Southbound to Hemet Valley Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Moreno Valley Mall pldMoreno Valley Senior Center Riverside University Medical Center Super Walmart a at Moreno G' Beach Dr 00 Sun Lakes at a` Village 111 Beaumont o. Walmart co Mt. San Jacinto a College San Jacinto d m > LL Of GI Y fa M vo 1°'State & Acacia (Post Office) ° Hemet Valley Mall 3 8:48 8:15 8:27 8:39 8:48 9:16 9:21 9:41 9:53 10:03 10:13 9:29 9:41 9:53 10:02 10:31 10:36 10:56 11:09 11:19 11:29 10:33 10:45 10:57 11:06 11:35 11:40 12:00 12:13 12:23 12:33 11:46 11:58 12:10 12:19 12:48 12:53 1:13 1:26 1:36 1:46 12:56 1:08 1:20 1:29 1:58 2:03 2:23 2:36 2:46 2:56 2:07 2:19 2:31 2:40 3:09 3:14 3:34 3:47 3:57 4:07 3:11 3:23 3:35 3:44 4:13 4:18 4:38 4:50 4:59 5:09 4:24 4:36 4:48 4:57 5:26 5:31 5:51 6:02 6:10 6:20 5:34 5:46 5:58 6:07 6:35 6:39 6:58 7:09 7:17 7:27 6:52 7:04 7:16 7:25 7:53 7:57 8:16 8:27 8:35 8:45 441 80I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 32 Routing and timetables subjedto diange. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. HEMET VALLEY MALL - MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com SAGECREST DR Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing • Transfer Point SAN 044,g0 JACINTO 9Sanlacinta Senior Center ESPLANADE & SAN JACINTO 32.42.74 DEVONSHIRE AVE HEMET VALLEY MALL 28.31.32.33.42.74 79.217 74 MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE 31.32.74.79.217 RAMONA EXPY San Jacinto City Hall MAIN ST 0 ESPLANADE AVE MAIN ST North Mountain M.S. 7TH ST Regal San ,.,., Jacinto Metro 12 Hemet Q City Hall Acacia z Acacia Ave M.S. Hemet Unified School MAYBERRY AVE District STETSON THORNTON AVE Super Walmart SAN JACINTO & LATHAM 32.33 FLORIDA AVE SN EVANS ST COMMONWEALTH AVE HEMET 442 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 181 32 Northbound to Mt. San Jacinto College A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate 1 Hemet State & Valley Mall Stetson San Jacinto & Mayberry Esplanade & San Jacinto Main & Mistletoe Mt. San Jacinto College San Jacinto 1 2 3 5 7 9 7:15 7:28 7:34 7:47 7:52 8:04 8:22 8:36 8:42 8:55 9:00 9:13 9:19 9:33 9:39 9:53 9:58 10:11 10:27 10:41 10:47 11:01 11:06 11:19 11:28 11:42 11:48 12:02 12:08 12:21 12:37 12:51 12:57 1:11 1:17 1:29 1:38 1:52 1:58 2:14 2:20 2:32 2:49 3:03 3:09 3:25 3:31 3:43 3:44 3:58 4:04 4:20 4:26 4:38 5:02 5:14 5:19 5:33 5:38 5:50 5:56 6:08 6:13 6:27 6:32 6:44 32 Southbound to Hemet Valley Mall A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Mt. San Jacinto College San Jacinto Main & Mistletoe Esplanade & San Jacinto San Jacinto & Mayberry State & Stetson Hemet Valley Mall 9 7 5 3 2 1 7:17 7:30 7:34 7:46 7:53 8:07 8:16 8:29 8:34 8:47 8:55 9:09 9:21 9:34 9:39 9:54 10:02 10:16 10:25 10:38 10:43 10:58 11:06 11:20 11:27 11:40 11:45 12:00 12:08 12:22 12:33 12:46 12:51 1:06 1:14 1:28 1:37 1:49 1:54 2:08 2:16 2:30 2:42 2:54 2:58 3:12 3:20 3:34 3:48 4:00 4:04 4:18 4:26 4:40 4:54 5:06 5:10 5:24 5:32 5:46 6:00 6:12 6:16 6:28 6:36 6:50 443 82I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 33 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. HEMET VALLEY MALL - SANDERSON & THORNTON - STANFORD & STETSON Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com CD FLORIDA & STANFORD STANFORD ST 28.33 CC SAN JACINTO & OAKLAND 32.33.74.79 FLORIDA & SAN JACINTO 28.32.33 DPSS 1 w Hemet Valley Medica!Center WESTON O Simpson Senior ante LYON AVE STATE ST PALM AVE DEVONSHIRE AV « BUENA VISTA ST 0 v 0 DARTMOUTH ST HEMET • Gilmore St HEMET VALLEY MALL o 28.31.32.33.42 t74.79.217 CAWSTON AVE Tahquitz High School Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing Social = Security Office Target 74 SANDERSON AVE EAST HEMET SANDERSON &THORNTON 33.74.79 Super ^Watmart; a CAWSTON AVE ^'G 444 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 I83 33 Eastbound to Stanford & Stetson A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Hemet Valley Mall Devonshire & Carmalita Stanford & Stetson 1 4E 5 9:12 9:24 9:39 11:16 11:28 11:44 1:02 1:14 1:30 2:56 3:08 3:23 4:37 4:49 5:04 6:25 6:37 6:52 33 Westbound to Hemet Valley Mall and Sanderson & Thornton A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Stanford & Stetson Devonshire & Juanita Hemet Valley Mall Thornton & Sanderson Hemet Valley Mall 5 4W 1 2 1 8:10 8:26 8:39 8:51 9:05 9:44 10:02 10:15 10:29 10:46 11:50 12:08 12:21 12:35 12:52 1:48 2:06 2:19 2:33 2:48 3:28 3:46 3:59 4:12 4:27 5:09 5:26 5:39 5:52 6:07 445 84I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. i O Menifee Valley Medical Center LAKE ELSINORE - CANYON LAKE - QUAIL VALLEY - MENIFEE - SUN CITY HERITAGE LAKE DR LINDENBERGER RD SUN CITY BLVD. c 2 2 CHERRY HILLS & BRADLEY 40.61.74 Sun City Library BRADLEY RD CHERRY HILLS BLVD SUN CITY QUAIL VALLEY FIRE STATION Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ANTELOPE RD» d Menifee City Hall z Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com MENIFEE HAUN RD MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE MENIFEE 40.61.74 La Piedra Rd ER/Antelope Rd WB EVENS RD ¢_ KayCeniceros NEWPORT & Senior Center MURRIETA .40.61 MURRIETA RD QUAIL VALLEY GOETZ RD ION CANYON LAKE MAIN GATE Canyon Lake c 0 City Hall JOB *4? LAKE ELSINORE WALMART 8.40 446 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04 185 40 Eastbound to Menifee-Sun City A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD Times are approximate *La Piedra Rd at College Lake Elsinore Elsima WMenifee* Canyon Lake Main Gate Quail Valley Fire Station Newport & Murrieta Mt. San Jacinto College Cherry Hills & Bradley 1 2 3 4 5E 6 7:45 7:52 8:02 8:10 8:22 8:50 8:56 9:03 9:13 9:21 9:33 10:01 10:13 10:20 10:30 10:38 10:50 11:18 11:26 11:33 11:43 11:51 12:03 12:31 12:38 12:45 12:55 1:03 1:15 1:43 1:56 2:03 2:13 2:21 2:33 3:01 3:20 3:27 3:37 3:45 3:57 4:25 4:23 4:30 4:40 4:48 5:00 5:28 6:08 6:15 6:25 6:33 6:45 7:13 40 Wes d to Lake Elsin A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate **Antelope Rd at La Piedra Rd Cherry Hills & Bradley Mt. San Jacinto College Menifee** Newport & Murrieta Quail Valley Fire Station Canyon Lake Main Gate Lake Elsinore Walmart 6 5W 4 3 2 1 7:36 7:59 8:14 8:25 8:33 8:41 9:00 9:23 9:38 9:49 9:57 10:05 10:14 10:37 10:52 11:03 11:11 11:19 11:26 11:49 12:04 12:15 12:23 12:31 12:41 1:04 1:19 1:30 1:38 1:46 2:05 2:28 2:43 2:54 3:02 3:10 3:08 3:31 3:46 3:57 4:05 4:13 4:38 5:01 5:16 5:27 5:35 5:43 6:02 6:25 6:40 6:51 6:59 7:07 447 861 RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY MEAD VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER - MORENO VALLEY COLLEGE - RUMC Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point Os Transfer Point MEAD VALLEY CAJALCO & CLARK 22.41 CAJALCO RD RIDER ST MEAD VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com ALESSANDRO BLVD RIVERSIDE UNIVERSITY A O MEDICAL CENTER 20.31.41 „ J= MORENO VALLEY MORGAN ST ROSS/LOWE'S/ Ross STARCREST 19.41 JFK DR GENTIAN AVE IRIS AVE MORENO VALLEY COLLEGE 18.19.20.41 ti KRAMERIAAVE Q VIA DE ANZA PERRIS & RAMONA EXPY 19.41 RAMONA EXPY PERRIS RIDER ST Vista Del Lago H.S. Rancho Verde H.S. EVANS & RIDER 30.41 448 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 187 41 Eastbound to Riverside University Medical Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Mead vallCommuniy Center Ross / Lowe's / Starcrest Perris & Ramona Expy Lasselle & Via De Anza Moreno Valley College Riverside iversUniverdty Medical Center 1 2 3 4 5 6 6:55 7:08 7:13 7:23 7:27 7:38 8:41 8:54 8:59 9:09 9:13 9:24 10:27 10:40 10:45 10:55 10:59 11:10 12:13 12:26 12:31 12:41 12:45 12:56 1:59 2:12 2:17 2:27 2:31 2:42 3:45 3:58 4:03 4:13 4:17 4:28 5:31 5:44 5:49 5:59 6:03 6:14 41 Westbound to Mead Valley Community Cent. A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley College Lasselle &Via De Anza Perris & Ramona Expy Ross / Lowe's / Starcrest Mead Valley Community Center 6 5 4 3 2 1 7:48 7:57 8:02 8:15 8:18 8:31 9:34 9:43 9:48 10:01 10:04 10:17 11:20 11:29 11:34 11:47 11:50 12:03 1:06 1:15 1:20 1:33 1:36 1:49 2:52 3:01 3:06 3:19 3:22 3:35 4:38 4:47 4:52 5:05 5:08 5:21 6:24 6:33 6:38 6:51 6:54 7:07 449 88I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY HEMET VALLEY MALL - SAN JACINTO - SOBOBA CASINO Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. rO Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point SOBOBA RD SOBOBA CASINO P 1fjJeei, �� Jqy tip ✓9`/yrO9/e San Jacinto 410? %%J SAN JACINTO City\Hall A COMMUNITY FB 1.t�s' CENTER SAN JACINTO SAN �9j Itse <i- 0 & ESPLANADE fp 2°j 32.42.74 JACINTO `��� s9ti9FF° 0Q Z .1T9TFST 4' P • 5 Q K� Q,QO • EXCEED Riverside County 64� `A.1- O 4' ,o Child Support Services 4�`v 1,41, Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com SobobaSprings Mobile Home Estates R4M04/40), 49 sT f9 Super ✓,��y Walmart 140 HEMET +O , 0' r,• �o..4 QOP79.217 Q- 2H8ME3VA3L42MALL ya ��o 450 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 189 42 Eastbound to Soboba Casino A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Hemet Valley Mall Palm & Cottonwood San Jacinto & Esplanade San Jacinto Community Center Soboba Casino 1 2E 3 4 5 8:25 8:37 8:50 8:55 9:07 10:04 10:17 10:31 10:37 10:49 12:01 12:14 12:28 12:34 12:47 1:40 1:53 2:08 2:13 2:25 3:33 3:46 3:59 4:04 4:16 5:16 5:28 5:41 5:46 5:58 42 Westbound to Hemet Valley M A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD Times are approximate Soboba Casino San Jacinto Community Center San Jacinto & Esplanade Palm & Birch Hemet Valley Mall 5 4 3 2W 1 9:17 9:25 9:35 9:43 9:56 10:56 11:04 11:14 11:22 11:35 12:53 1:01 1:11 1:19 1:32 2:31 2:39 2:49 2:57 3:10 4:26 4:34 4:44 4:52 5:06 6:08 6:16 6:26 6:34 6:48 451 90I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutasy horarios son sujetos a cambios. rip BERNARDINO BANANA AVE Fai Lv MULBERRY AVE 0 DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - COUNTRY VILLAGE - FONTANA RUBIDOUX 11gllEY141Y Glen Avon Heritage Park BANANA & CHERRY 21.49 ONIMTRANS 82 L�J�p��O J a ti h COUNTRY VILLAGE 21.49.204 m z Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1 •15.29.49.200.208.210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK•AMTRAK•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 27 RIVERSIDE "PG, MISSION & GyOIG RUBIDOUX 29.49 J r4 The Cove 9'92 Waterpark CAMINO REAL Patriot H.S. PYRITES). PEDLEYRD 1E1549 sr GLEN AVON Eddie Smith Louis Senior Robidoux Center Library PJ� Fox 99� cc - Theater *P, F�J), UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE • 1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNTRANS 215 JURUPA VALLEY Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point s1 Transfer Point 452 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 191 49 Eastbound to Downtown Riverside A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Banana & Cherry Mission & Pedley Mission & Valley Mission & Rubidoux Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay D) 1 2 3 4 5 6:22 6:33 6:40 6:48 7:00 7:09 7:21 7:28 7:36 7:48 7:57 8:09 8:17 8:27 8:40 8:47 8:59 9:07 9:17 9:30 9:41 9:53 10:01 10:11 10:24 10:32 10:45 10:53 11:04 11:19 11:27 11:40 11:48 11:59 12:14 12:22 12:35 12:43 12:54 1:09 1:17 1:30 1:38 1:49 2:04 2:13 2:26 2:34 2:45 3:00 3:09 3:22 3:30 3:41 3:56 4:05 4:18 4:26 4:36 4:51 5:01 5:14 5:22 5:32 5:47 5:56 6:09 6:17 6:25 6:40 6:53 7:06 7:14 7:21 7:34 49 Westbound to Country Village/Fontana A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay D) Mission & Rubidoux Mission & Valley Mission & Pedley Banana & Cherry 5 4 3 2 1 7:10 7:23 7:30 7:35 7:47 7:58 8:13 8:20 8:25 8:37 8:50 9:05 9:13 9:18 9:31 9:40 9:55 10:03 10:09 10:22 10:34 10:50 10:58 11:04 11:17 11:29 11:45 11:54 11:59 12:12 12:24 12:40 12:49 12:54 1:07 1:19 1:35 1:44 1:49 2:03 2:14 2:32 2:40 2:45 2:59 3:10 3:28 3:36 3:41 3:55 4:06 4:24 4:32 4:37 4:51 5:01 5:19 5:27 5:32 5:46 5:57 6:15 6:23 6:29 6:42 6:50 7:07 7:15 7:21 7:34 7:44 8:00 8:07 8:13 8:26 453 92I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY ROUTE 50 SUSPENDED UNTIL JURY TRIALS RESUME 454 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 193 ROUTE 51 SUSPENDED UNTIL UCR CLASSES RESUME 455 94I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY ROUTE 52 NO SERVICE 456 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04195 ROUTE 55 SUSPENDED UNTIL TEMECULA SCHOOLS RESUME 457 96I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 61 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. PERRIS PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER - SUN CITY - MENIFEE - MURRIETA - TEMECULA Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com ELLIS > PERRIS STATION NB TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 61.74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 26 SAN JACINTO SOUTH PERRIS METROLINK STATION 61.74.208•METROLINK Fi ETHANAC Pa MCCALLBLVD SUN CITYo w .. CHERRY HILLS & BRADLEY aENCANTODR 40.61.74 Countryside LA PIEDRA RD Marketplace « N GENERAL KEARNY RD PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 i MAPLETON ST» KELLER RD» Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing O Transfer Point MENIFEE NEWPORT RD PIEDRA RD MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE MENIFEE 61.74 'OOP 9sT «GLADIOLUS AVE B41Loma Linda "417,9, University Target LINNELLN !MedicalCenter LINTON KEITH RD 8 W VistaMurrieta O H.S. Q 00 �05P� MURRIETA HANCOCK& • Rancho LOS ALAMOS Springs 23.61 • Medical Center MURRIETA HOT In SPRINGS RD 99a, 79 W H TEMECULA 458 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04197 61 Northbound to Perris Station Transit Center A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Promenade Mall Hancock & coLos Alamos IIMcElwain at Super Target riMt. San Jacinto College Menifee ill Cherry Hills o & Bradley co Encanto & co McCall I0Perris °' Station c) Transit Center 8:11 8:28 8:37 8:57 9:22 9:29 9:52 9:28 9:45 9:55 10:15 10:40 10:47 11:10 10:52 11:14 11:24 11:44 12:09 12:16 12:39 12:05 12:27 12:37 12:57 1:22 1:29 1:51 1:21 1:45 1:56 2:18 2:43 2:50 3:12 2:50 3:14 3:25 3:47 4:12 4:19 4:41 4:06 4:30 4:41 5:02 5:27 5:34 5:56 5:39 6:02 6:13 6:34 6:59 7:05 7:26 61 Southbound to Temecula (Promenade Mall) A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Perris • Station 4,, Transit A Center • Encanto & cri ro McCall 1°D Cherry Hills o & Bradley Mt. San • Jacinto cp College Menifee R 0-1;W RI2 oj 0 Y E v rt. R =J rio.Promenade Mall 3 2 8:47 8:58 8:52 9:11 9:19 9:45 10:07 10:19 10:40 10:07 10:26 10:34 11:00 11:22 11:34 11:55 1 1: 24 11:43 11:51 12:17 12:39 12:50 1:11 12:49 1:08 1:16 1:42 2:04 2:15 2:36 2:03 2:22 2:30 2:56 3:18 3:29 3:50 3:23 3:42 3:50 4:16 4:37 4:48 5:09 5:07 5:26 5:34 6:00 6:21 6:32 6:53 459 98I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE 31.32.74.79.217 San Jacinto H.S. STATE ST SAN JACINTO - HEMET - MENIFEE - SUN CITY- PERRIS Super Walman SAN JACINTO AVE.................. SAN JACINTO & ESPLANADE A San 32.42.74.79 ,re Jacinto ..,4^ Senior Center DPSS QQHEMET SAN JACINTO LYON AVE» a z �( 0 0 KIRBY ST Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com ION Legend 1 Map not to scale 0 Time and/orTransfer Point ® Alternate Routing Transfer Point « GILMORE ST HEMET VALLEY MALL 28.31.32.33.42.74 79.217 SANDERSON SANDERSONAVE & THORNTON ..33.74.79 West Valley H.S. WARREN RD WINCHESTER WINCHESTER RD PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 SOUTH PERRIS 61.74.208•METROLINK METROLINKSTATION Boarding diagram pg 26 61.74.208•METROLINK o <"zCST �PS`s.c'' «GOETZ SIMPSON & WINCHESTER Post Office 74.79 0 0 MENIFEE o, Try, MT. SAN a JACINTO cc fly COLLEGE MENIFEE 61-74 CHERRY HILLS & BRADLEY MENIFEE RD» 40.61.74 MenifeeCommunity Menifee Valley Center and Park Medical Center ANTELOPE RD » V ¢ V LID/DIy - m MURRIETARD SUN CITY BLVD = O PERRISBLVDv' PERRIS SUN CITY Menifee BRADLEY RD Countryside Marketplace z 460 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5,2020 v04199 74 Eastbound to Hemet Valley Mall and MSJC San Jadnt A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Perris Station Transit Center Cherry Hills & Bradley Mt. San Jacinto College Menifee Simpson & Winchester Hemet Valley Mall Mt. San Jacinto College San Jacinto 1 3 4 5 6 7 6:56 7:19 7:31 7:45 8:07 8:31 8:03 8:26 8:40 8:56 9:18 9:44 9:26 9:49 10:03 10:19 10:41 11:09 10:41 11:04 11:18 11:34 11:59 12:27 12:00 12:23 12:38 12:54 1:21 1:49 1:30 1:53 2:08 2:24 2:51 3:19 2:58 3:21 3:36 3:51 4:19 4:47 4:30 4:53 5:08 5:23 5:49 6:17 5:34 5:57 6:11 6:26 6:52 7:16 74 Westbound to Perris Station Transit Center f A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Mt. San Jacinto College San Jacinto Hemet Valley Mall Simpson & Winchester Mt. San Jacinto College Menifee Cherry Hills & Bradley Perris Station Transit Center 7 6 5 4 3 1 6:08 6:31 6:49 7:02 7:14 7:38 7:30 7:56 8:14 8:27 8:41 9:08 8:50 9:16 9:36 9:49 10:04 10:31 10:02 10:30 10:53 11:07 11:23 11:50 11:29 11:57 12:20 12:34 12:50 1:18 12:39 1:07 1:30 1:44 2:00 2:28 1:59 2:27 2:50 3:04 3:20 3:48 3:29 3:57 4:20 4:34 4:50 5:18 5:02 5:30 5:53 6:07 6:23 6:50 6:27 6:52 7:15 7:29 7:44 8:08 461 100 I RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY 79 SAN JACINTO - HEMET - WINCHESTER - TEMECULA Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point • TransferPoint HEMET SIMPSON & Tag WINCHESTER THORNTONST» 74.79 post0/hce MUSTANG WAY • West Valley • H▪ .S. WINCHESTER SIMPSON POURROY RD MT. SAN JACINTO COLLEGE 31.32.74.79.217 San Jacinto SAN 4)1' H.S. 9 a JACINTO 9 an HEMET VALLEY MALL 28.31.32.33.42.74 79.217 SANDERSON &THORNTON 33.74.79 ALGRAVE AVE a 913561`N • THOMPSON RD BENTON RD TEMEKU ST MAGDAS COLORADAS ST FLORIDA AVE 2, FRENCH VALLEY MURRI E T A r F/rRBRIGGSRDn AULDRD SOUTHWEST `0( Q JUSTICE �V49„ French Valley CENTER 'S'O�U'➢9y • Airport Sheriff SP9i k,. ,��� Station COUNTY CENTER R T$ 4. 55.79.217 C' NICOLAS RD Chaparral EQUITY&YNEZ H.S. oe 55.79.217 � COUNTY CENTER DR. GraceMellman • Community library °� T , T t$ WINCHESTER ▪ & NICOLAS 23.55.79 SEE INSET TEMECULA TEMECULA MORENO9O STOP STAGE STAGE STOP 3 24.79 6016TH &FRONT C 6ZH"•,� 5 0 `'IST jr‘ 0 a N GENERAL KEARNY RD PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 Jacinto SeniorCente oK Super Walma DPSS a DEVONSHIREaWBONLY OAKLAND AVE ge° alATHAM EB ONLY. & ESPLANADE 32.42.74.79 462 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 I'I 01 79 Northbound to Hemet Valley Mall and MSJC San Jacinto A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate 1G,w County Center Promenade ��, Mall Winchester o & Nicolas °o Southwest b Justice Center °D Winchester & Pourroy °D Simpson & N Winchester °D Hemet Valley Mall Mt. San • Jacinto • College San Jacinto 8:49 8:59 9:06 9:17 9:28 9:38 10:00 10:28 10:06 10:16 10:23 10:34 10:45 10:55 11:20 11:48 11:18 11:32 11:41 11:52 12:04 12:14 12:41 1:09 12:41 12:55 1:04 1:15 1:27 1:37 2:04 2:32 2:08 2:22 2:31 2:43 2:55 3:05 3:33 4:01 3:37 3:51 4:00 4:12 4:24 4:34 5:02 5:30 4:49 5:03 5:13 5:25 5:37 5:47 6:13 6:37 6:08 6:20 6:30 6:42 6:54 7:04 7:30 7:54 79 Southbound to Temecula (County Center) A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate a Mt. San Jacinto • College San Jacinto 11 Hemet c„, Valley Mall V Simpson & — Winchester A Pourroy & Winchester Southwest ii, Justice c'' Center °o Winchester a & Nicolas colPromenade Mall co County Center 8:14 8:40 9:00 9:10 9:23 9:36 9:43 9:51 9:22 9:50 10:13 10:25 10:38 10:51 11:00 11:08 10:45 11:13 11:36 11:46 11:59 12:14 12:23 12:31 12:07 12:35 12:58 1:08 1:21 1:36 1:45 1:53 1:19 1:47 2:10 2:20 2:33 2:48 2:57 3:05 2:42 3:10 3:33 3:43 3:56 4:11 4:20 4:28 4:11 4:39 5:02 5:13 5:27 5:41 5:50 5:58 5:40 6:08 6:31 6:42 6:56 7:10 7:19 7:27 463 102 I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 200 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. ION SAN BERNARDINO - RIVERSIDE - ANAHEIM Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com SAN BERNARDINO DOWNTOWN TRANSIT CENTER 200.OMNITRANS • WTA• PASS TRANSIT MOUNTAIN TRANSIT-METROLINK SAN BERNARDINO Downtown Riverside UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE •1.10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 c GALLERIA AT TYLER GOLD LINE • 1 •10.12 13.14.15.21.27.200 Boarding diagram pg 23 Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point 0 stop RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1.15.29.49.200.208 210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK•AMTRAK SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 27 (Across from Riverside -Downtown MetrolinkStation) VINE STREET (Bay F) RIVERSIDE 9y 9 F LA SIERRA METROLINK STATION 15.200.00TA 794•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 24 ORANGE (241) 6- Z z MEATS&TUSTIN VILLAGE AT ORANGE 200.205.00TA 24.42 46.50.71.167.213 0 - J ® ANAHEIM © Anaheim OCTA •ATN•LA METRO Center COMMUTERLINK m Angel Stadium cal LLI Q oa oa 464 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 I103 200 Westbound to Anaheim A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate. c San Bernardino b Downtown Transit p Center a Lemon & University iv (Downtown ^D Riverside) Riverside- ' Downtown cr,Metrolink Station (Vine St Bay F) 1WLa Sierra U' Metrolink Station V 11-1V Meats&Tustin V A Disneyland V 4 6:45 7:36 7:58 8:01 8:21 8:29 9:04 9:26 9:11 9:33 9:36 9:56 10:04 10:39 11:01 10:40 11:02 11:06 1 1: 26 11:34 12:12 12:36 12:20 12:42 12:46 1:06 1:14 1:52 2:16 2:15 2:37 2:41 3:01 3:09 3:47 4:11 3:30 3:52 3:55 4:15 4:23 4:59 5:23 5:30 5:52 5:55 6:15 6:23 6:57 7:21 7:30 7:52 7:55 8:13 8:21 8:53 9:15 200 Eastbound to San Bernardino A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate. co i\i Disneyland co Village at Orange La Sierra N Metrolink Station 1 ca Galleria at Tyler •o Lemon & University ii1 (Downtown Riverside) Riverside- Downtown Metrolink Station N (Vine St Bay F) San Bernardino N — Downtown Transit Center 10:07 10:35 11:11 11:19 11:39 11:42 12:00 11:42 12:10 12:46 12:55 1:15 1:18 1:36 1:12 1:40 2:18 2:27 2:47 2:50 3:08 2:53 3:21 3:59 4:08 4:28 4:31 4:49 4:48 5:16 5:54 6:02 6:22 6:25 6:43 6:04 6:29 7:07 7:15 7:35 7:38 7:56 8:15 8:40 9:14 9:21 9:41 9:44 10:02 10:15 10:40 11:13 11:19 11:35 11:38 11:56 465 104I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY ROUTE 202 NO SERVICE 466 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 1105 204 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. OE UCR - DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE - ONTARIO MILLS MALL - MONTCLAIR TRANSCENTER Information Center (951)565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. Legend 1 Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point O Stop • Transfer Point UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE• 1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 MARKET & UNIVERSITY 1.12.13.14.15.22.29.49 204 MISSION BLVD- PEDLEY RD» MARKET ST A c Country Village Park -And -Ride UCR RIVERSIDE CANYON CREST DR UCR AT BANNOCKBURN GOLD LINE•1.16.51.52.204 IOWA AT UNIVERSITY GOLD LINE• 1.14.16.51 52.204 RIVERSIDE COUNTY ONIONVNR38 NVS MONTCLAIR TRANSCENTER 204.OMNITRANS 66.85 88.209• FOOTHILL TRANSIT METROLINK MONTCLAIR MILLIKEN AVE NBONLYn : a MULBERRY AVE MONTEV61, 0 ONTARIO ONTARIO MILLS MALL 204.OMNITRANS 61.81 82.209 • r aSB ONLY COUNTRY VILLAGE 21.49.204 Route may be deviated due to traffic conditions. COMMUTEFLINK 106 I RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY 467 204 Weekdays I Northbound to Ontario Mills Mall & Montclair Transcenter A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate *Trip starts two minutes earlier from University & Lemon UCR at Bannockburn Market & University Country Village Ontario Mills Mall Montclair Transcenter 1 2N 3 4 5 — 4:20* 4:34 4:51 5:09 — 5:15* 5:29 5:46 6:08 — 5:55* — 6:12 6:29 6:51 6:45 6:58 7:12 7:29 7:51 2:00 2:17 2:31 2:50 3:12 2:55 3:12 3:26 3:45 4:07 3:45 4:02 4:16 4:35 4:57 5:08 5:25 5:42 6:01 6:23 6:13 6:28 6:42 6:59 7:17 204 Weekdays I Southbound to Downtown Riverside & UCR A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Montclair Transcenter Ontario Mills Country Village Mall University & Lemon UCR at Bannockburn 5 4 3 25 1 5:25 5:44 6:03 6:20 6:35 6:23 6:42 7:01 7:18 7:33 7:04 7:23 7:45 8:03 8:18 8:01 8:20 8:42 9:00 9:15 3:27 3:52 4:17 4:40 4:58 4:17 4:42 5:07 5:36 5:54 5:12 5:40 6:00 6:23 6:43 6:33 6:55 7:15 7:33 7:48 7:36 7:58 8:17 8:35 8:48 For Metrolink information, go to metrolinktrains.com or call 800-371-5465. 468 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 1107 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. TEMECULA - MURRIETA - LAKE ELSINORE - CORONA TRANSIT CENTER - ORANGE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 v 205.206.208.217 9cy 9 N GENERAL KEARNYRD OVERLAND DR LAKE ELSINORE OUTLET CENTER PARK & RIDE 8.9.205.206 CORONA TRANSIT CENTER GOLD LINE•1.3.205.206 CORONA CRUISER BLUE, RED METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 22 Dos Lagos TEMESCAL yt CANYON MAIN to GRAND SEE INSET 5. C 4.0 <TEMESCAL CANYON Tom's Farms ORANGE TEMECULA MURRIETA '' SEE INSET MULLIGAN FAMILY FUN CENTER 23.202.205.206 LAKE ELSINORE Legend I Map not to scale O Time and/or Transfer Point • Stop CANAL ST VILLAGE AT ORANGE 200.205.00TA 24.42 46.50.71.167.213 COMMUTERLINK 108I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 469 2051206 Weekdays I Northbound to Corona Transit Center and Village at Orange A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate 1jir jMuIIi9an s Murrieta AIILake Elsinore iv Outlet Center Park -And -Ride A i Tom's Farm a 1IIDos Lagos Corona Transit Center Canal & Meats 205 206 4:17 4:27 4:45 5:00 — 5:20 — 206 4:36 4:47 5:07 5:23 — 5:45 — 205 — — 5:35 5:47 6:00 6:23 7:18 206 5:09 5:20 5:40 — — 6:15 — 205 6:10 6:23 6:38 7:04 7:59 206 5:48 6:00 6:20 — — 7:02 — 205 — — — — — 3:10 3:48 205 — — — — — 4:27 5:05 206 3:17 3:32 3:57 4:11 4:20 4:40 — 206 4:41 4:56 5:21 5:35 5:44 6:04 — 205 — — — — — 6:14 6:49 206 6:30 6:45 7:07 7:20 7:28 7:46 — 470 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 1109 2051206 Weekdays I Southbound to Temecula A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD I Times are approximate Canal & Meats Village at Orange 1Corona Transit Center a Dos Lagos co 1o• A Tom's Farm w Lake Elsinore b Outlet Center (I' Park -And -Ride Mulliyans ca Murneta Promenade cA» Mall 206 The 6:25 a.m. trip wil wait for the 6:10 a.m. westbound train, but no later than 6:25 a.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 205 5:55 5:59 6:34 — — — — — 206 — — 7:12 7:25 7:35 7:50 8:05 a.m. westbouncl Station. 8:18 The 7:12 a.m. trip will wait for the 6:50 a.m. eastbound and 6:50 trains, but no later than 7:20 a.m. before departing the Metrolink 205 7:30 7:34 8:11 205 8:15 8:19 8:56 — 206 — — 4:31 — 5:03 5:18 5:38 5:55 The 4:31 p.m. trip wil wait for the 4:27 p.m. train, but no later than 4:41 p.m. before departin• the Metrolink Station. 205 4:00 4:04 5:08 5:33 5:43 5:58 — — The 5:08 p.m. trip will wait for the 4:41 p.m. and 4:58 p.m. trains, but no later than 5:15 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 206 — — 5:09 — — 5:51 6:11 6:26 The 5:09 p.m. trip will wait for the 4:41 p.m. and 4:58 p.m. trains, but no later than 5:15 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 206 — — 5:30 — 6:02 6:17 6:37 6:52 The 5:30 p.m. trip will wait for the 5:25 p.m. train, but no later than 5:40 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 206 — — 5:50 — 6:22 6:37 6:57 7:12 The 5:50 p.m. trip will wait for the 5:45 p.m. train, but no later than 6:05 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 205 5:17 5:21 6:25 6:50 7:00 7:15 7:30 7:48 The 6:25 p.m. trip will wait for the 6:05 p.m. and 6:17 p.m. trains, but no later than 6:35 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 206 — — 6:40 — 7:05 7:20 7:40 7:55 The 6:40 p.m. trip will wait for the 6:35 p.m. train, but no later than 6:50 p.m. before departing the Metrolink Station. 205 6:59 7:03 8:01 — 8:19 8:34 8:49 9:05 The 8:01 p.m. trip will hold for the 7:36 p.m. and 7:55 p.m. trains to arrive. If your train is delayed, please call RTA Customer Information Center at 951-565-5002 to ensure the bus waits. 471 110 RIVERSIDETRANSITAGENCY 208 RIVERSIDE UCR LOT 30 UNIVERSITY & LEMON GOLD LINE• 1 •10.12 14.15.22.29.49 200.204.208.210 OMNITRANS 215 z 0 MISSION INN AVE VineSt Layover 14TH ST MLK BLVD TEMECULA - MURRIETA - PERRIS - MORENO VALLEY- DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. O N Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. MORENO VALLEY COUNTY ADMINISTRATION CENTER 10.12.13.200.208.210 RIVERSIDE - DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION 1.15.29.49.200.208 210.OMNITRANS 215 METROLINK•AMTRAK SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 27 COMMUTERLINK 60 0 MORENO VALLEY MALL 11.16.18.19.26.31.208 210•SUNLINE 220 Boarding diagram pg 25 SAN JACINTO AVE PERRIS STATION TRANSIT CENTER 9.19.19A•22.27.28.30 0.61.74.208•METROLINK Boarding diagram pg 26 Legend I Map not to scale 0 Time and/or Transfer Point ® Alternate Routing O Stop OTransfer Point q SOUTH PERRIS METROLINK STATION O 61.74.208•METROLINK BpN//F PERRIS MURRIETA PROMENADE MALL 23.24.55.61.79.202 205.206.208.217 O N GENERAL KEARNY RD OVERLAND DR Route may be deviated due to traffic conditions. LOS ALAMOS & WHITEWOOD 40, 23.61.208 472 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v041111 208 Weekdays I Northbound to Downtown Riverside A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD Times are approximate IibPromenade Mall Icow Los i� Alamos & Whitewood A South Perris w Metrolink co Station A _ Perris 61173 Station o Transit 1Center IMoreno Valley Mall ASycamore I I Canyon & Eastridge IIUCR Lot 30 I0Riverside- Downtown o Metrolink Station Vine St ‘0 Layover (Bay A) 4:15 4:25 4:45 4:57 — — 5:27 5:39 4:55 5:05 5:25 5:40 6:08 6:20 6:32 5:32 5:44 6:04 6:19 6:56 7:08 7:20 6:14 6:26 6:46 7:02 7:46 7:58 8:13 2:51 3:06 3:31 3:49 4:14 4:23 — 4:45 4:57 3:38 3:53 4:18 4:36 5:01 5:10 — 5:30 5:42 208 Weekdays I Southbound to Temecula A.M. times are in PLAIN, P.M. times are in BOLD Times are approximate II Vine St Layover (Bay A) Riverside- Downtown11 Metrolink o Station UCR Lot 30 1cn Sycamore N Canyon & Sierra Ridge Moreno Valley Mall 1Stal Perris 6 _ Station A Transit Center o South Perris o Metrolink °i ation IAo1 Los N Alamos & Whitewood a' Promenade Mall 6:16 6:26 — 6:41 6:53 7:15 7:26 7:51 8:13 5:10 5:22 5:37 — — 6:07 6:19 6:41 6:56 The 5:22 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the 4:57 p.m., 5:03 p.m. and 5:17 p.m. trains to arrive, but no later than 5 27 p.m. before departing the station. 6:02 6:14 6:27 — — 6:55 7:07 7:27 7:42 The 6:14 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the 5:48 p.m. and 6:06 p.m. trains to arrive, but no later than 6:22 p.m. before departing the station. 6:33 6:45 6:58 — — 7:26 7:38 7:58 8:13 The 6:45 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the 6:27 p.m., 6:28 p.m. and the 6:37p.m. trains to arrive, but no later than 6:45 p.m. before departing the station. 6:53 7:05 7:18 — — 7:46 7:58 8:18 8:33 The 7:05 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the two 6:58 p.m. trains to arrive, but no later than 7:10 p.m. before departing the station. 7:30 7:42 7:54 — — 8:12 8:24 8:44 8:57 The 7:42 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the 7:25 p.m. train to arrive before departing the station. 8:31 8:41 8:51 — — 9:09 9:21 9:41 9:54 The 8:41 p.m. trip departing Riverside -Downtown Metrolink will wait for the 8:05 p.m. and 8:25 p.m. trains to arrive before departing the station. If your train is delayed, please call RTA Customer Information Center at 951-565-5002 to ensure the bus waits. 473 112 I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY ROUTE 210 NO SERVICE 474 RTA RIDE GUIDE - April 5, 2020 v04 1113 ROUTE 217 NO SERVICE 475 114I RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Board of Directors SunLine was established under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) on July 1, 1977, between Riverside County and the communities of the Coachella Valley, which at the time included the Cities of Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indio, Palm Desert, and Palm Springs. The JPA was later amended to include the Cities of Cathedral City, Indian Wells, La Quinta, and Rancho Mirage. The JPA's governing board consists of one elected official from each member entity and one county supervisor. SunLine is headquartered in Thousand Palms, California. Cathedral City: Coachella: Desert Hot Springs: Indian Wells: Indio: La Quinta: Palm Desert: Palm Springs: Rancho Mirage: Riverside County: Raymond Gregory Megan Beaman Jacinto Russell Betts Ty Peabody Glenn Miller Robert Radi, Vice Chair Kathleen Kelly, Chair Lisa Middleton G. Dana Hobart V. Manuel Perez SunLine Organizational Structure Lauren Skiver Luis Garcia Tommy Edwards Peter Gregor Tamara Miles Todd McDaniel Brittney B. Sowell Tony Cohen Chief Executive Officer/General Manager Chief Financial Officer Chief Performance Officer Chief Safety Officer Chief Human Relations Officer Chief Transportation Officer Chief of Public Affairs/Clerk of the Board Chief Maintenance Officer Skiver Garcia Edwards A Gregor Miles McDaniel Sowell Cohen Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan I I 477 Contents Executive Summary ES-1 Chapter 1 System Overview and Service Profile 1 1.1 Description of Service Area 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographics 3 1.3 Description of Fixed Route and Paratransit Services 6 1.4 Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles, and Revenue Hours by Mode/ Route Classification 11 1.5 Current Fare Structure 12 1.6 Revenue Fleet 14 1.7 Existing Transit Facilities and Bus Stop Amenities 15 1.8 Existing Coordination between Transit Agencies and Private Providers 15 1.9 Review of Previous Studies and Plans 18 Chapter 2 Existing Service and Route Performance 19 2.1 Description of Key Performance Indicators 19 2.2 Service Performance 24 2.3 Productivity Improvement Efforts Underway 31 2.4 Major Trip Generators 32 Chapter 3 Future Service Plans, Fare Changes, Capital Planning, and Marketing 35 3.1 Planned Service Changes FY2021-2023 37 3.2 Future Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotions 37 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth FY2021-2023 40 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes 40 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning 42 3.6 SunLine Refueled — Long-term Vision 46 Chapter 4 Financial Planning 49 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 49 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program 50 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 53 SRTP Tables Appendix A - SunLine Existing Route Profiles Appendix B - Refueled Route Profiles Appendix C - Zero -emission Bus Implementation Plan SunLine UUIYIMU /M! UM" U! IMMMSII o c c N N c • o U 478 Figures Figure ES.1 Figure ES.2 Figure ES.3 Figure ES.4 Figure 1.1 Figure 1.2 Figure 1.3 Figure 1.4 Figure 1.5 Figure 1.6 Figure 1.7 Figure 1.8 Figure 1.9 Figure 1.10 Figure 1.11 Figure 1.12 Figure 2.1 Figure 2.2 Figure 2.3 Figure 2.4 Figure 2.5 Figure 2.6 Figure 2.7 Figure 2.8 Figure 2.9 Figure 2.10 Figure 2.11 Figure 3.1 Figure 3.2 Figure 3.3 Figure 4.1 Figure 4.2 Figure 4.3 SunLine Fixed Route Average Weekday Ridership 2020 (January -April) ES-1 SunLine Fixed Route Average Weekday Ridership 2020 (January -April) Percent Change ES-2 Percent Change Fixed Route Ridership Relative to 2010 ES-3 Financially Unconstrained Transit Redesign ES-6 SunLine Service Area 2 Riverside County Population Growth Projections 5 Coachella Valley Population Growth Projections 5 Growth Projections for Jurisdictions in the SunLine Service Area 6 SB535 Disadvantaged Communities 7 SunLine System Map 9 College of the Desert Microtransit Pilot Service Area 10 Transit System Performance, FY2018-2019 12 Existing SunLine Fare Structure 13 SunLine Support Vehicle Summary 15 Weekday Service: Top 10 Stops Served 16 Weekend Service: Top 10 Stops Served 16 Load Standards 21 Bus Deployment 21 System Ridership Comparison - 5 years 25 SunBus Ridership Change 25 Fixed Route Ridership Comparison - 5 years 26 Fixed Route Performance, FY2020-2021 26 Paratransit System Performance, FY2018-2019 27 SunDial Ridership Comparison - 5 years 27 Taxi Businesses 28 Home -based Work Trip Attractions 33 Home -based Other Trip Attractions 34 SunLine Incremental Fare Increase Program 41 Status of SunLine's Capital Projects 43 Financially Unconstrained Transit Redesign 48 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2021 51 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2022 52 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2023 53 Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan iv 479 Abbreviations and Acronyms ADA Americans with Disabilities Act BEB battery electric bus CARB California Air Resources Board CMAQ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality CNG compressed natural gas CVAG Coachella Valley Association of Governments DBE Disadvantaged Business Enterprise FTA Federal Transit Administration FTIP Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY fiscal year ICT Innovative Clean Transit IT information technology IVT Imperial Valley Transit IVTC Imperial Valley Transportation Commission J PA Joint Power Agreement KPI Key Performance Indicator LCTOP Low Carbon Transit Operations Program LTF Local Transportation Fund MBTA Morongo Basin Transit Authority RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission RTA Riverside Transit Agency SBTC San Bernardino Transit Center SGR State of Good Repair SRA SunLine Regulatory Administration SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance Fund TAP Transit Ambassador Program v 480 SunLine - eii'p1ed UUIYIMU /M! UM" U! [Mall TIRCP Title VI TSP ZEB Definitions Financially Constrained Plan Financially Unconstrained Plan Microtransit Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program Title VI of the Civil Rights Act transit signal priority zero -emission bus Funded service improvements Unfunded service improvements A form of demand response transit that offers flexible routing and/or flexible scheduling of minibus vehicles Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan vi 481 Executive Summary This Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) describes near- and long-term initiatives for SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) to support the local economy, meet the mobility needs of Coachella Valley, expand transit market share, and gain new transit users. Because every transit trip begins and ends by having to walk or use a mobility device, motorized and nonmotorized mobility, accessibility, and interconnectivity are essential components of planning and developing transit services. In the midst of these planning efforts, the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 caused a major national and global disruption with the closures of businesses, schools, and entertainment venues and the enforcement of national and statewide public health policies. In March 2020, the adverse effects of COVID-19 on SunLine's ridership peaked. SunLine's weekday fixed route ridership dropped by 70 percent to 4,300 daily boardings. Paratransit ridership dropped by 80 percent to 100 daily boardings compared to the same month of the previous year. The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting secondary impacts on the Coachella Valley's economy, employment, and day-to-day life warranted SunLine to change course to immediately support the region's post COVID-19 pandemic recovery efforts. While Figure ES.1 and Figure ES.2 show a significant drop in ridership in mid -March, ridership leveled off around 5,000 riders per day through April, illustrating that SunLine continues to provide lifeline service to Figure ES.1 SunLine Fixed Route Average Weekday Ridership 2020 (January —April) Number of riders (1,000s) 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 M N N M M N N M M N 1� M M N Q W W O N N N W O N N W W ." M N N M r+ N M M N h M M N Q W W O N N tO W O N Q tG W O M N N N N N N N M N N N ..... NNNNNM N N N M January 1 February ES-1 March April simmw. e10p1ed 482 Figure ES.2 SunLine Fixed Route Average Weekday Ridership 2020 (January —April) Percent Change EL 40 30 20 10 -30 -40 - 50 - 60 -70 N Q to CO O N Q tG 00 O N Q t0 CO O .. M N n tT .. n tT M h n Ot N Q tG CO O N Q tG CO O N Q 0 00 O M M n tT M N n tT . M N n 01 O N ti N N ti N N N N N M N N ti N N N N N N N .y N N N N N M N ti ti N ei NNNNN January February � March the community. These efforts included taking those who do not own an automobile to work, doctors' offices, grocery shopping, and to other essential appointments. Recovering and rebuilding ridership from this major disruption is SunLine's highest priority. While continuing to respond to the day-to-day challenges, SunLine will begin implementing a COVID-19 toolbox with strategies and tools to support the recovery efforts of the region and then grow the transit market when it's safe to do so. Tools for the COVID-19 recovery include: Safety and sanitation > Rear -door boarding > Identify technology options for more efficient bus cleaning > Evaluate bus frequencies to minimize crowding Fare collection > Accelerate move toward Token Transit cashless fare system > Establish community partnerships with retail outlets for remote ticketing > Separate farebox from driver Contingency planning > Maintain essential services > Prioritize resources to most important routes Mass media campaigns Audience -specific messaging campaigns Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan ES-2 483 Looking forward, once a state of normalcy is reached, SunLine's bold Refueled: FY2021-2023 SRTP to recast its future, prepared with the guidance provided by the Board of Directors, input received from the residents who use transit, and a robust data analysis will be presented to the public for review and their input. The core guiding principles of Refueled include: » Make SunLine's system faster, more direct, and more efficient to attract new riders; » Streamline SunLine's route structure to focus more resources on the system's most productive bus corridors; » Develop microtransit solutions to serve low -density service areas and replace low -productivity bus corridors; » Simplify the fare structure and move to electronic media; » Update the service standards policy to support performance -driven transit and an emerging service delivery model; and » Develop the Route 111 High Quality Transit Corridor with transit signal priority, queue jumpers, and Super Stops to facilitate timed transfer connections and intermodal connectivity. Until the COVID-19 pandemic peaked in March 2020, SunLine was leading its peers with ridership gains since 2010, shown in Figure ES.3, bucking the national ridership trend. SunLine's 2019 onboard rider survey showed a remarkable 93 percent overall customer satisfaction rating. These accomplishments and current initiatives such as the Innovative Clean Transportation program, the College of the Desert microtransit pilot Figure ES.3 Percent Change Fixed Route Ridership Relative to 2010 40 30 20 a) c 10 0 -10 -20 -30 4p SunLine - National Total Riverside Transit Agency NCTD Omnitrans - Foothill Transit 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Source: National Transit Database Motor Bus and Commuter Bus Annual Unlinked Trips ES-3 SunLine UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII a)>, L 3E v E X w (1) 484 project, the student Haul Pass program, and the SolVan vanpool program reflect SunLine's ambitious plans to support the Coachella Valley's economy, educational objectives, and quality of life for residents of all ages and abilities. The Refueled FY2021-2023 SRTP lays out a financially constrained implementation plan based on the best available financial projections and anticipated grants. The service, rolling stock, and support infrastructure improvements that are not funded but are essential to meeting the future mobility needs of Coachella Valley are identified in the financially unconstrained section of the plan. The financially unconstrained section, or transit needs plan, will guide the development of new financial resources over time to bring these recommendations into reality. Additionally, the financially unconstrained plan is essential to effectively communicate SunLine's operating and capital needs to local, state, and federal funding agencies. Lastly, the plan enables SunLine to collaborate with local jurisdictions, Coachella Valley Association of Governments, Riverside County Transportation Commission, and other funding and planning agencies. The aim is to work together in long-term regional planning and implementation efforts to optimize scarce financial resources and develop and deliver projects jointly. The plan emphasizes coordination and collaboration with local governments to: Establish better multimodal connections to transit; Implement street improvements and pedestrian/non-motorized interconnectivity; Improve transit efficiency, speed, and reliability; Reduce transfers and travel times of the planned and redesigned local bus system; Realign routes to serve growing areas of the Coachella Valley; and Allocate a greater portion of new funding to implement and expand the transit market share or capture new riders. This SunLine Refueled: FY2021-2023 SRTP identifies financially feasible improvements that can provide faster and more convenient service to help attract riders. Implementation of these recommendations is contingent on transit demand and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic: » Microtransit can provide lifeline service on routes that may have to be discontinued because of low productivity. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan ES-4 485 » Originally slated to begin service in May 2020, the 10 Commuter Link between Indio and San Bernardino is delayed indefinitely. » Implementation of Route 111X Weekday Express service between Indio and Palm Springs may also be delayed past the anticipated January 2021 start date. Other improvement recommendations will be prioritized based on public and stakeholder input and the ability to fund them. Figure ES.4 shows the financially unconstrained SunLine transit redesign in concept. It would straighten, lengthen, and combine SunLine's existing 16 bus routes into 11 redesigned routes. Rural lifeline transit service to unincorporated areas of Riverside County, such as Mecca, North Shore, and One Hundred Palms, may be provided by on -demand microtransit service. Using microtransit in areas with lower transit demand would allow SunLine to use its existing bus fleet to improve service on its trunk routes. The staff recommendation is to adopt the financially unconstrained section of the plan in concept as a precursor to the public outreach efforts and preparation of the implementation plan and schedule. The financially unconstrained plan will then be subject to public review and input. Based on the input received from the public, local jurisdictions, and regional planning agencies, the plan will be revised and modeled with ridership and cost projections, and an implementation priority order will be set. This collaborative planning and review process is the cornerstone of the successful plan, and it cannot be a hasty process. The schedule for this critical step is contingent on the communities and the region reaching a level of post COVID-19 pandemic normalcy. Once the plan is refined, it will be presented to the Board of Directors for consideration. Through its Innovative Clean Transit Regulation, the California Air Resources Board has mandated that public transit agencies transition to zero -emission buses (ZEBs) by 2040. SunLine is ahead of many of its peers in meeting the ZEB targets. However, fleet planning for the Refueled service expansion must be included in the ZEB implementation plan. Shown in Appendix C, this implementation plan shows how SunLine intends to comply with the mandate and when it plans to purchase the buses and build the necessary support infrastructure. Potential funding for growing SunLine's fleet may be available through the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund. The Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) helps fund transformative capital improvements that will modernize California's bus transit systems. Refueled has the potential ES-5 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 486 Figure ES.4 Financially Unconstrained Transit Redesign 0 DESERT HOT S- PRIN L _ CATHEDRAL eiTY SPRINGS 4-1 0 INDIAN WELLS Riverside County San Diego County San Bernardino County Riverside County 1 _ IN O ULAQUINTA 0 L— _J I = Service area boundary C — C County boundary = City boundary Routes - Route 2 (14-30) Route 3 (15) ro Route 4(24-32) Route 5 (20-21) Route 6 (54, 80, 81, 90) Route 7 (70) 1P Route 8 (80, 81, 90, 91) 40 Route 9 (91-95) Route 111 Route 111X - PS BUZZ to transform how SunLine delivers service. Because the plan will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, vehicle miles traveled, and traffic congestion, the TIRCP is an important potential source for Refueled capital funding needs. As SunLine seeks grant funding from the TIRCP and other regional, state, and national sources, this Refueled SRTP has a powerful story to tell about SunLine's commitment to exceptional transit service, mobility, sustainability, and clean energy. This Refueled SRTP has four chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the system. Chapter 2 describes route performance and existing service. Chapter 3 describes Refueled initiatives and identifies potential service changes to implement the recommended route redesign. Chapter 4 covers the financial and capital plans. ES-7 Sliding - UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII L co 3E v E X w (1) 488 1 Page left blank intentionally. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan ES-8 489 CHAPTER 1 System Overview and Service Profile In 2019, SunLine Transit Agency completed a bold plan to recast its transit system. This plan to minimize transfers, reduce travel times, and realign routes to growing, more productive areas—SunLine Refueled —was prepared with guidance provided by the Board of Directors, input from transit riders, and a robust data analysis. SunLine conducted a microtransit pilot project to determine whether smaller vehicles used on demand could eventually replace rural lifeline service currently provided by a 40-foot city bus. It also launched the Haul Pass program to make transit more accessible and easier to use for college and university students. This first chapter of the Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) provides an introduction to SunLine. It outlines the baseline service conditions and includes a rider profile, a description of the service area, and a summary of current public transit service. 1.1 Description of Service Area The SunLine service area covers 1,120 square miles of the Coachella Valley (Figure 1.1). It extends from San Gorgonio Pass in the west to the Salton Sea in the southeast. Located 120 miles east of downtown Los Angeles and 60 miles east of Riverside and San Bernardino, most of SunLine's 1 490 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Figure 1.1 SunLine Service Area San Bernardino County Riverside County Los Angeles County San Bernardino County SunLine Service Area Riverside County San Diego County N N 0 = Service area boundary E — County boundary = City boundary m -, I I I I service area is located in the Riverside County Supervisorial District 4. SunLine provides service to the following cities: » Cathedral City » La Quinta » Coachella » Palm Desert » Desert Hot Springs » Palm Springs » Indian Wells » Rancho Mirage » Indio Service is also provided to the Riverside County unincorporated communities of Bermuda Dunes, Desert Edge, Mecca, North Shore, One Hundred Palms, Oasis, Thermal, and Thousand Palms. Within the Coachella Valley region, SunLine provides 150 square miles of fixed route service coverage and 200 square miles of paratransit service coverage. 1.2 Population Profile and Demographics The 2019 SunLine Transit Rider Survey was an important source of information for the Refueled plan. It gave SunLine staff a ridership profile and described how riders use the transit system. The infographic (next page) shows the demographic characteristics of SunLine's riders. Demographic Projections Despite the recent ridership downturn related to the COVID-19 pandemic, population growth in Riverside County and the Coachella Valley will continue to drive demand for public transit services. Refueled is aimed at supporting the local economy by providing better service to Coachella Valley's transit riders. With straighter, more direct routes, the redesigned system will provide more permanent transit corridors to transit -supportive land uses. These high -quality transit corridors, such as Route 111, are productivity -oriented to capture new riders. They are scalable to meet future demand as population grows. Projections prepared by the Southern California Association of Governments show that the Riverside County population is expected to grow at 1.1 percent rate from 2020 to 2040. This means an increase from 2.5 million people in 2020 to 3.17 million people in 2040. In contrast, Coachella Valley is projected to have a 2 percent higher annual growth rate than Riverside County over the same 20-year period. Population in Coachella Valley cities is projected to grow from 390,000 in 2020 to 600,000 in 2040. Figure 1.2 shows the Riverside County population growth projections through 2060. Figure 1.3 shows the Coachella Valley population growth projections. Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII POPULATION PROFILE and RIDER CHARACTERISTICS The SunLine Transit Rider Survey provided a snapshot of passenger characteristics, as summarized here. BOARDING FARE 60 BUS FARE CATEGORIES 50 40 30 20 10 0 NOT EMPLOYED 0 N o co v N PASS ONE-WAY OTHER CASH 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5- 0 CASH BOARDING SUMMARY BY FARE CATEGORY 31-DAY PASS DAY PASS 0 N TRANSFERS NON -FULL FARE 10-RIDE UNIVERSITY COMMUTER PASS LINK 220 DEMOGRAPHICS MALE EMPLOYED PART-TIME EMPLOYED FULL-TIME FEMALE NON -BINARY 1% $10K-$24K HISPANIC/ LATINO WHITE ETHNICITY AFRICAN/ iik AMERICAN MULTIRACIAL OTHER 1% I L ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER 2% ONLY ENGLISH SPANISH >$50K OTHER4% TRANSIT USE 1-2 YEARS TENURE 5+YEARS USING 3-4YEARS SUNLINE 4,6 MONTHS 6-11 MONTHS 6-7 D/WK WORK COLLEGE/SCHOOL oi, wt PERSONAL BUSINESS TRIP PURPOSE SOCIAL/ RECREATION OTHER2% —/ MEDICAL/DENTAL SHOPPING 2-3 D/MNTH 2% 4Ilk 2-3 D/WK 493 AS NEEDED 4% ONCE PER WEEK 4% 4 *LICENSE FOR TRANSIT DISABILITY ,LICENSE N CAN'T DRIVE NO CAR USE grLESS ENSIVE EXP CHOICE 3% OTHER2% Figure 1.2 Riverside County Population Growth Projections 4.0 3.5 c 3.0 0 2.5 c c 2.0 0 1.5 a a0 1.0 0.5 0 • COACHELLA VALLEY 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 Figure 1.3 Coachella Valley Population Growth Projections 800 700 12 600 0 500 .E 400 0 0 300 0 200 0_ 100 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 Within Coachella Valley, the cities of Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, and Indio are projected to gain the most population by 2040. These cities are projected to grow as follows. » Coachella —103,000 population increase (4.5 percent annual growth) » » Desert Hot Springs-31,000 population increase (2.7 percent annual growth) Indio — 45,000 population increase (1.6 percent annual growth) Figure 1.4 shows population growth projections for jurisdictions in the SunLine service area. Disadvantaged communities in California are specifically targeted for investment of proceeds from the State's cap -and -trade program. Senate sunline UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 44 Figure 1.4 Growth Projections for Jurisdictions in the SunLine Service Area City 2012 Population 2040 Population Difference Percent Difference (%) Cathedral City 51,476 68,100 16,624 32 Coachella City 42,400 146,300 103,900 245 Desert Hot Springs City 27,800 58,900 31,100 112 Indian Wells City 5,100 7,200 2,100 41 Indio City 78,800 123,300 44,500 56 La Quinta City 38,300 47,700 9,400 25 Palm Desert City 49,800 61,700 11,900 24 Palm Springs City 45,600 56,900 11,300 25 Rancho Mirage City 17,600 25,000 7,400 42 Unincorporated Riverside County 359,500 487,500 128,000 36 Total 716,376 1,082,600 366,224 51% Source: Southern California Association of Governments, 2016. http://scagrtpscs.net/Documents/2016/draft/d2016RTPSCS_DemographicsGrowthForecast.pdf Bill 535 mandates that 25 percent of the proceeds from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund go to projects that benefit disadvantaged communities. These investments are primarily aimed at improving public health, quality of life, and economic opportunity in the State's most burdened communities while also reducing pollution. Disadvantaged communities are defined as the top 25 percent scoring census tracts from the California Environmental Health Screening Tool (CalEnviroScreen). The Senate Bill 535 disadvantaged communities within the SunLine service area are illustrated in Figure 1.5. 1.3 Description of Fixed Route and Paratransit Services SunLine's existing transit service includes local bus, a circulator, a commuter/express bus, microtransit, and paratransit service. Additionally, SunLine's taxi voucher, vanpool, and rideshare programs provide additional Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 4$5 Figure 1.5 SB535 Disadvantaged Communities 41, DESERT HOT SPRINGS N CATHEDRAL CITYL j PALM SPRINGS li RANCHO MIRAGE PALM DESERT • -J 1 1-1 N\11 INI DIAN WEI;9, i3 INDIO 11 COACHELLA _ L 1 = Service area boundary C — C County boundary San Bernardino County = City boundary Riverside County SB535 Disadvantaged Communities Riverside County San Diego County LAQUINTA L— _J I • side County transportation options to residents throughout the Coachella Valley. Each of these service types is described briefly in the following sections. SRTP Table 1.0 (see SRTP Tables) shows a list of the routes and the areas they serve. Figure 1.6 shows the SunLine system map. Appendix A shows existing route profiles. Local Bus SunLine currently operates 15 local routes in its service area. The local bus network is broken down into trunk routes and connector or feeder routes. Trunk routes serve highly traveled corridors with more frequent headways and include Routes 14, 30, and 111. Connector/feeder routes operate in less dense areas and connect to trunk routes. These routes generally operate at less frequent headways and include Routes 15, 20, and 21. Palm Springs BUZZ The Palm Springs BUZZ is a free local circulator provided in partnership with the City of Palm Springs that operates in downtown Palm Springs on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 20-minute frequencies for a span of 10 hours from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. College of the Desert Microtransit Pilot Microtransit is an emerging transit mode that offers flexible and dynamic demand -driven transportation solutions to areas with limited transit access or where traditional fixed route service is simply not feasible. Microtransit services typically operate with a fleet of smaller vehicles (for example, cutaway vans or buses) in defined zones, with dynamic routing based on real-time demand. Similar to Transportation Network Companies such as Uber and Lyft, users in designated areas simply specify the details of their trips on a mobile application, and a vehicle is summoned to deliver them to their destination. Operating specifics such as service hours and coverage area can be tailored to meet the needs and/or resources of the agency (fleet availability, operating budget, etc.). In January 2020, SunLine began evaluating on -demand service provided by local taxi companies. This microtransit pilot program is intended to provide additional transportation options for College of the Desert students. The results of this pilot project will guide possible deployment across the Coachella Valley to provide access to the fixed route system and potentially expand the SunLine service area. Figure 1.7 shows the microtransit pilot service area. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan Figure 1.6 SunLine System Map Ocs MISSION LAKES Npr FRr r!' 4th Sp PIERSON NDA m y A m 3 TWO BUNCH PALMS ROSA STEVENS TAHQU SARIS Paim Springs BUZ ROUTE 14 O DILLON ROUTE 15 VISTA CHINO AVE 30 ROUTE fib CqT BST C/7Y RO1? 44 a R M R COO ROUTE 32 DINAH SHORE ERALD FORD FRANK SINATRA 1)44/0 o a � 1 Tyo GERALD FORD ROUTE 21 COUNTRY CLUB HARRI 4 HOVLEV FRED WARING WF��SH AVE47 TRANSIT ACINCY System Map May 2020 CUSTOMER SERVICE SERVICIO AL CLIENTE 760.343.3451 Sun Line.org TTY/TDD Service Available AVE38 AVE 1 1� �, 'k01O 4 _{AVE40 !--Cal Sate University San Bernardino Main Campus San Bernardino Transit Center/ MetroLink 10 COMMUTER LINK 2nd & Commerce BEAUMONT Indio to San Bernardino N A PALM DESERT Cal State University San Bernardino Palm Desert amp. INDIO SunLine Indio Facility L) 0 MADRID 9 498 ROUTE 70 4 4 TAMPICO 1 SINALOA ROUTE 81 CARREON AVE 48 /VE 70 A f o ryFR AVE 7 Mq p MF AVE 2 �� a •o WINDLASS , O z gee q �NORTH�6e AVE 66 Ag FgER, m pi ROUTE 80 AVE 50 AVE 52 Zao�CeCOAC yR<<4 ROUT 9( 1st 4th 5th SHORE AVE 54 ROUTE 91 AVE 70 In ROUTE 95 AVE 57 AVE 58 VE 62 NORTH SHORE SWIM ORIN. /Rt UM" O! IRANSIt Il'I1�1\ Figure 1.7 College of the Desert Microtransit Pilot Service Area RANCHO MIRAGE College of the 0 Desert DESERT INDIAN WELLS V//1I City boundary Microtransit Pilot Area vCollege of the Desert Indio I.I 1 L COACHELEA NORTH Commuter/Express Bus Commuter bus routes are those tailored to serve specific travel markets, typically during weekday peak travel periods. Implementation of the 10 Commuter Link with service between Indio and San Bernardino is contingent on transit demand and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. SunDial Paratransit SunLine operates federally mandated paratransit services. This service, called SunDial, is a shared -ride, origin to destination transportation option that is provided to people with disabilities who are unable, or who have limited ability because of their disability, to use fixed route buses. All public transit agencies that provide fixed route bus and rail service are required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide parallel paratransit service within 3/4 of a mile of local fixed routes, and days and hours of operation are based on that of the local fixed route network. Commuter and deviated services such as the 10 Commuter Link and Route 95 do not require complementary ADA service. SolVan Vanpool SunLine's Vanpool Program, SolVan, provides a subsidy for qualified vans that agree to report about daily riders, miles, hours, and expenses. A SolVan reporting system has been created to track each rider on each vanpool. The driver of the vanpool must be a participant in the vanpool program. Vanpool passengers will be responsible for paying the van monthly lease cost minus the subsidy. The lease cost includes insurance and maintenance. They will also share the cost of gas, toll fees, and parking fees (if applicable). Vehicles for this type of service will be leased by one of the pre -qualified vendors to one of the commuters in the group, a company, or a third -party representative. Taxi Administration The SunLine Regulatory Administration (SRA) is charged with licensing and regulating taxicab businesses and drivers in the Coachella Valley. 1.4 Description of Ridership, Revenue Miles, and Revenue Hours by Mode/Route Classification Figure 1.8 shows the SunLine transit system performance by mode for 2018 and 2019. 11 500 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Figure 1.8 Transit System Performance, FY2018-2019 Service Boardings 2018 2019 Revenue Miles 2018 2019 Revenue Hours 2018 2019 Boardings/ Revenue Mile 2018 2019 Boardings/ Revenue Hour 2018 2019 Fixed route 3,947,023 4,039,450 3,402,692 3,364,997 231,781 228,131 1.20 1.20 17.00 17.70 On - demand 156,292 155,332 989,084 971,701 66,851 65,911 0.16 0.16 2.34 2.36 Total 4,103,315 4,194,782 4,391,776 4,336,698 298,632 294,042 0.93 0.97 13.74 14.27 Source: National Transit Database, 2018-2019 1.5 Current Fare Structure In 2002, SunLine raised its base cash fare from $0.75 to $1.00. In 2011, a SunLine fare study recommended both eliminating the $0.25 transfer fare and incrementally raising the base cash fare to $1.50. These recommendations were not implemented. The SunLine Board of Directors has given direction to staff to explore fare -free operations. Figure 1.9 shows the existing SunLine fare structure. This fare structure differentiates fares for specific transit customers and trip types. The multiplier column shows the ratio of the base cash fare to the pass price and is the point where the pass fare per trip matches the per -trip cash payment. The multipliers show how SunLine is targeting specific market segments with discounts to increase the system's ridership and revenue. For example, SunLine provides a discounted 31-day youth pass for students using transit. 1.5.1 Cash Fares In addition to the $1.00 fare for adult riders, SunLine enforces a $0.25 fee for transfers. The transfer pass is good for unlimited rides within 2 hours of purchasing, and is valid only on the day issued. Transfers are issued only upon boarding. The base cash fare for seniors, which SunLine defines as individuals 60 years of age or older, is $0.50 on all fixed route services. Individuals that qualify for the ADA also pay a $0.50 base cash fare on all fixed route services. The fare complies with the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA's) Half Fare rule, which requires agencies receiving federal funds Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 12 Figure 1.9 Existing SunLine Fare Structure Fare Type Price ($) Multiplier Fare Type Price ($) Adult Other Cash 1.00 Transfers 0.25 Day pass 3.00 3.0 CV employer pass 24.00 10-ride 10.00 10.0 University pass 24.00 31-day pass 34.00 34.0 Youth Commuter Link 10 Cash Cash 0.85 General cash 6.00 Day pass 2.00 2.4 Senior cash 4.00 10-ride 8.50 10.0 31-day pass 24.00 28.2 Seniors/Disabled Commuter Link 10 Cash Cash 0.50 General day pass 14.00 Day pass 1.50 3.0 General 30-day pass 150.00 10-ride 5.00 10.0 Senior day pass 10.00 31-day pass 17.00 34.0 Senior 30-day pass 100.00 to offer fares to persons 65 or over and disabled travelers at a level no more than half the base cash fare. Medicare cards, Department of Motor Vehicles driver's license or senior ID cards, ADA certification cards, or SunLine Half Fare ID cards are accepted as proof of age or disability. A discounted youth fare of $0.85 is also available for children between the ages of 5 and 17. Children 4 years of age and younger ride free with a paid adult cash fare (maximum of two children). 1.5.2 Fare Passes SunLine currently issues two types of fare passes: the Day Pass and the 31-day Pass. Daily and monthly passes are available for the 10 Commuter Link service as well, but are priced and sold separately from the general fixed route passes. 13 502 Sliding iesoIIed OMIMU /M! UM" U! IMMMSII Day Pass The SunLine Day Pass is available for $3.00 and allows for unlimited rides on all fixed routes for the duration of 1 calendar day. In adherence to the FTA's Half Fare rule, the Day Pass for seniors and disabled riders is available for $1.50. The Day Pass for youth riders is $2.00. The Day Pass for the 10 Commuter Link is $14 for adults and $10 for seniors. 31-day Pass SunLine sells a pass valid for a rolling 31-day period from the date of first use. The 31-day Pass is available for $34 for general adult riders, $17 for seniors and disabled riders, and $24 for youths. The monthly pass for the 10 Commuter Link is a 30-day pass available for $150 (10 Commuter Link operates Monday through Friday only). Multiple Ride (10-ride) A 10-ride pass is available for $10.00 for general adult riders, $5.00 for seniors and disabled riders, and $8.50 for youths (ages 5 to 17). There is no discount from the base cash fare for this pass. Employer Passes SunLine offers a 31-day pass to businesses in the Coachella Valley that have 5 or more employees interested in using transit. The pass can be used for unlimited rides on any of SunLine's fixed route services and is priced at $24 a month. The pass is $10 less than the 31-day adult pass and is designed to encourage greater use of alternative modes of transportation. Haul Pass In August 2018, SunLine launched its Haul Pass Program to improve student access to Coachella Valley's colleges and university. Both the College of the Desert and the California State University, San Bernardino — Palm Desert Campus are partners. To ride SunLine, students of these schools can simply swipe their active student ID card through the SunBus card reader when they board. The program is currently funded through a 3-year grant from the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP). Token Transit SunLine riders download the Token Transit application to their smartphone and use it to pay SunLine fares. It requires a credit or debit card to set up an account and purchase bus passes. 1.6 Revenue Fleet SunLine's fleet includes fixed route buses, paratransit vehicles, and support vehicles. SRTP Table 1.1 (see SRTP Tables) shows the characteristics of Hau/Pass SRNIINf TRANSIT AGENCY Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 14 SunLine's fixed route and paratransit fleet. Figure 1.10 shows a summary of SunLine's fleet of support vehicles. Figure 1.10 SunLine Support Vehicle Summary Description Fuel Type Number of Vehicles Electric Light Vehicles Electric 14 CNG Light Vehicles CNG 18 CNG Light Duty Trucks CNG 14 Hybrid/Gasoline Light Duty Vehicles Hybrid 2 Total 48 Note: CNG = compressed natural gas 1.7 Existing Transit Facilities and Bus Stop Amenities SunLine operates administrative and bus operations facilities at two locations. Administrative headquarters and main bus operations are located at 32-505 Harry Oliver Trail in Thousand Palms. SunLine also operates a maintenance and fueling facility at 83-255 Highway 111 in Indio. Park -and -ride facilities are located at 78-420 Varner Road in Thousand Palms and at 83-255 Highway 111 in Indio. SunLine's bus system has 659 stops with 424 shelters. Planning is underway to relocate 12 inactive shelters. In addition, there are 60 stand-alone benches and waste containers at 14 major transfer locations. Figure 1.11 shows the top 10 stops served for weekday service. Figure 1.12 shows the top 10 weekend stops. 1.8 Existing Coordination between Transit Agencies and Private Providers As the designated Consolidated Transportation Services Agency, SunLine coordinates public transportation services throughout its service area. Staff participates in meetings with social and human service agencies, 15 504 SunLine UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Figure 1.11 Weekday Service: Top 10 Stops Served Stop City Average Riders Per Day Indian Canyon/Ramon Palm Springs 485 B St/Buddy Rogers Cathedral City 331 West/Pierson Desert Hot Springs 254 Baristo/Farrell South Side Palm Springs 235 Ramon/San Luis Rey North Side Palm Springs 198 Ramon/San Luis Rey South Side Palm Springs 194 5th/Vine Coachella 190 Hwy 111/Flower Indio 189 Ramon/Date Palm West Side Cathedral City 167 Baristo/Farrell North Side Palm Springs 126 Source: SunLine Transit Agency, March 2019—February 2020 Figure 1.12 Weekend Service: Top 10 Stops Served Stop City Average Riders Per Day 5th/Vine Coachella 358 Indian Canyon/Ramon La Quinta 299 B St/Buddy Rodgers Cathedral City 279 Palm Canyon/Stevens Palm Springs 191 Hwy 111/Flower Indio 171 Town Center/Hahn East Side Palm Desert 163 West/Pierson Desert Hot Springs 140 Palm Canyon/Baristo Palm Springs 107 Town Center/Hahn West Side Palm Desert 98 Ramon/San Luis Rey North Side Palm Springs 93 Source: SunLine Transit Agency, March 2019—February 2020 Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 506 I • consumers, and grassroots advocates through forums such as the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council, SunLine's ACCESS Advisory Committee, San Gorgonio Pass Area - Transportation Now Coalition, and neighboring transit operators. SunLine facilitates the ACCESS Advisory Committee. Staff hosts regular meetings at the Thousand Palms Administrative Office. SunLine applies input from the Committee to improve relationships with the community to address public transportation issues in the Valley. Additionally, staff members are actively involved in the regional transportation planning process through participation on RCTC and county committees. These committees include the RCTC Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council, the Technical Advisory Committee, Aging & Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) of Riverside Long Term Services and Supports Coalition, Desert Valley Builders Association, and related committees to enhance coordination efforts with SunLine. 1.8.1 Coordination With Other Public Transportation Providers In addition to providing transit service throughout the Coachella Valley, SunLine offers transit connections to a number of adjacent transit operators. SunLine, Omnitrans, and Metrolink collaborated to schedule the operation of 10 Commuter Link service, which connects Indio/Palm Desert to the California State University, San Bernardino campus and the San Bernardino Transit Center (SBTC)/Metrolink Station with a bus stop in Beaumont. In Beaumont, 10 Commuter Link provides connectivity to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), Beaumont Transit, and Banning Transit. Transfers are available to bus routes connecting to Cabazon, University of California, Riverside, Riverside University Health Center, Kaiser Hospital, VA Hospital, Loma Linda Medical Center, and numerous destinations served by RTA, Beaumont Transit, and Banning Transit. Negotiations are underway to establish agreements between SunLine and RTA, Beaumont Transit, and Banning Transit. SunLine also hosts Morongo Basin Transit Authority (MBTA) Routes 12 and 15 through a cooperative service agreement at its stops in downtown Palm Springs. The collaboration offers connections to Yucca Valley, Landers, Joshua Tree, and Twentynine Palms. SunLine is collaborating with Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency on its Rides to Wellness demonstration project known as the Blythe Wellness 17 506 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII • Express service. This service, launched in July 2017, operates 3 days per week and travels to the Coachella Valley's three hospitals (Desert Regional Medical Center, Eisenhower Medical Center, and John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital) within SunLine's service area. Amtrak California (operated by Amtrak bus contractors) transports rail passengers traveling between rail hubs at certain Amtrak stations and SunLine's bus stops in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, and La Quinta, under an additional cooperative service agreement. Amtrak's Sunset Limited inter- city train serves the Palm Springs Station on north Indian Canyon Drive. However, with rail service only serving Palm Springs three times a week in each direction, it is impractical for SunLine to offer transit service to the station at this time. SunLine collaborates with the Imperial Valley Transportation Commission (IVTC) in an effort to find a future connection with Imperial Valley Transit (IVT). IVTC oversees the regional transportation services and programs provided by IVT in the Southern California areas of Brawley, Calexico, Imperial, West Shores, and El Centro. In 2019, FlixBus initiated regional bus service at Palm Springs, Palm Desert, and Indio that connects to Los Angeles in the west and Phoenix, Arizona, in the east. SunLine maintains an interagency operating agreement with FlixBus. 1.9 Review of Previous Studies and Plans In 2019, SunLine completed its Transit Redesign and Network Analysis Study. Prepared by HDR, this study took a comprehensive look at fixed route transit operations to make recommendations to optimize SunLine's service. SunLine also completed an on -board transit rider survey in 2019. This survey provided insight into rider preferences and needs to help guide the transit redesign. Other reports reviewed for the preparation of this SRTP include: Bus Rider Survey Study (February 2015) SunLine Transit Feasibility Study Hydrogen Station Expansion (January 2016) SunLine Transit Facilities Master Plan (November 2016) SunLine Transit Agency Transit Asset Management (September 2018) Network Study Report SunLine Transit Redesign & Network Analysis (February 2019) Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) Plan to SunLine Board of Directors (May 2020) Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan soli CHAPTER 2 Existing Service and Route Performance SunLine developed its Refueled plan through a holistic process that reflected guidance from the Board of Directors, input received from riders, and a data -driven process that used existing transit market information such as stop- and route -level boarding data and origin -destination survey data. This SRTP includes updated key performance indicators (KPIs) that further support these quantitative, community -based planning methods. 2.1 Description of Key Performance Indicators As part of its Refueled commitment, SunLine regularly reviews routes' service performance to adjust service supply to meet demand within its capacities. A quartile -based performance threshold is used to compare and measure the relative performance of individual routes. This tool allows SunLine to identify the top 25 percent and bottom 25 percent performing routes. Passengers per revenue hour is the recommended KPI for evaluating SunLine's route -level service. It measures service effectiveness or productivity based on ridership (passenger boardings) generated for each revenue hour of service operated. SRTP Table 2 (see SRTP Tables) shows SunLine's system performance targets. 19 508 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII i 2.1.1 Service Quality Standards Service quality standards contribute to the reliability and consistency of service delivery. Riders may first be attracted to transit service based on headway and span. Choice riders may continue to use services because they can reliably get to their destinations on time. Unreliable service often results in decreased ridership. Service quality standards are proposed to be measured using the following operational and passenger experience metrics: » » » on -time performance (service reliability) percent service delivered (service reliability) miles between service interruption (service reliability) load standards (service comfort) average fleet age (service comfort) bus deployment policy Each suggested metric is discussed in more detail below. On -time Performance. This KPI measures service reliability as defined by adherence to the published service schedule. "On -time" is when a trip departs a time point within a range of 0 minutes early to 3 minutes late. To achieve targeted on -time performance, service running times must be calibrated regularly based on existing conditions. SunLine has a relatively uncongested operating environment, which helps support a high KPI for on -time performance. The on -time performance target is 90 percent for all services. This target helps show riders that 9 out of every 10 trips will arrive at the scheduled time. Runtime variants also affect service speed and reliability. Runtime is the time allotted in a transit schedule for a route to travel from one time point to another time point, or from beginning to end. Calibrating the runtime for the day of the week and hour of the day (for example, peak vs. non -peak) helps routes and the overall system adhere to or surpass the adopted on -time performance. It is important to review runtime variants regularly because roadway traffic conditions are ever -changing. Miles between Service Interruptions. This KPI measures service reliability as defined by revenue miles between service interruptions, regardless of cause. SunLine's standard is 5,000 miles. Load Standards. This service quality KPI establishes load standards for various vehicle types and is measured for each trip operated. While it may be acceptable for some riders to stand on the bus for short distances or Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 5090 time periods (for example, under 2 miles and/or 10 minutes) during peak periods, it is generally accepted that seating should be available for all riders during normal off-peak conditions. Figure 2.1 show load standards. Figure 2.1 Load Standards Service Period Maximum Consistent Load Factor Peak Average over 133% of seated load = 50 passengers Off-peak Average 100% of seated load = 38 passengers Average Fleet Age. The age of the vehicle fleet affects performance and reliability of transit services as well as system attractiveness to customers. SunLine's standard for average fleet age is no greater than 10 years. Adhering to the average fleet age standard will help ensure a reliable and comfortable passenger experience. Bus Deployment Policy. Bus deployment specifies the type of vehicle that should be used to operate individual routes. The type of vehicle deployed on a route depends primarily on ridership demand and trip loads. Using incorrectly sized vehicles on routes can unnecessarily add operating cost to a route or result in overcrowding. Figure 2.2 shows the bus deployment policy. Routes 111, 14, 30, and 15 should use 40-foot buses given the higher passenger volumes. Other routes should use either 40- or 32-foot buses based on ridership demand. Figure 2.2 Bus Deployment Service Type Vehicle Type Trunk routes 40-foot buses Local routes 32- or 40-foot buses depending on ridership demand On -demand service 15-passenger van or sedan 21 510 Sliding iel i.' 1 d oR,Y,Ms,d SunLine will review the bus deployment policy every 2 years beginning in 2020, and will make necessary adjustments as the fleet is updated to ensure compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requirements. SunLine is in full compliance with Title VI, which protects people from discrimination based on race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. SunLine ensures equitable distribution of its assets in delivery of transit services to the people of Coachella Valley. Buses are assigned according to successful completion of maintenance functions without regard to route assignment, or vehicle age, except in size considerations as outlined above. Additionally, fuel cell buses are assigned to routes with shorter distances and/or durations that are within the acceptable range capacity of those vehicles. Adequate numbers of buses are assigned to routes with high demand to avoid instances of overcrowding or standing passenger. All SunLine buses are fully air conditioned and are 100 percent accessible to persons with disabilities. 2.1.2 Warrants Standards Warrants standards provide a way to determine which areas within the large service area will have both the passenger demand and performance potential to produce cost-effective fixed route transit service. To ensure the agency's financial sustainability, SunLine will introduce only those new services that operate above the lower -performing route quartile or with productivity that is within 15 percent of the system average. Planning new services around these guidelines will help ensure successful performance of new routes. Providing a set of guidelines for which areas warrant all -day fixed route service will help SunLine respond to future community requests for new service. 2.1.3 Network Role New services should be evaluated for their place in the overall transit network. Each new route in the network will have a unique role, whether it is facilitating transfers with existing services, introducing service coverage to a recent development, or providing connections between current routes and major destinations. While successful new routes connect with existing services, they should not duplicate existing service or compete for passengers. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 22 511 2.1.4 Market Opportunities There is a strong correlation between service performance, surrounding population, and employment densities —the more people with access to a route, the higher the route's potential ridership. Population -dense areas tend to coincide with mixed -use neighborhoods, walkable environments, and higher populations of transit -friendly constituencies such as students, seniors, zero -vehicle households, and low-income populations. The minimum population and employment density for the introduction of new all -day fixed route transit service is an average of 10 people/jobs per acre within a half mile of the proposed route. A minimum threshold is considered supportive of fixed route service and should not be subjected to further analysis. Areas in this category that have unmet needs may be served by alternative options to fixed route service. 2.1.5 Unmet Mobility Needs SunLine will strongly consider the mobility needs of transit -dependent populations when evaluating where to operate service. In assessing the area's demand for transit service, it is important to examine the presence of these demographic groups and identify any present unmet needs. 2.1.6 Key Destinations Key destinations likely to generate higher demand for transit service include major area schools, colleges, universities, hospitals, retail/ commercial/entertainment centers with more than 10 people/jobs per acre, open residential communities (not gated), and those with relatively lower income and vehicle ownership levels. 2.1.7 Evaluating New Services New routes should be monitored to determine whether they are reaching the desired performance standards. The route should first be evaluated after 6 months to determine whether it meets more than two-thirds of its performance standards. New services not meeting the minimum standards at the end of an 18- to 24-month trial period are subject to corrective action or discontinuation. In some cases, trial periods for new services may vary based on the requirements of grant funding. For example, if a grant provided 3 years of funding for a route that did not meet standards, this route may still be operated for the full 3-year period. 23 512 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 2.1.8 Productivity vs. Coverage Target The SunLine Board of Directors' goal is to capture new riders and expand transit market share. The Board is committed to first investing in new operating plans that improve productivity, and second in operating plans that improve coverage. This is consistent with the Transportation Development Act of 1971 that established fiscal performance requirements of 20 percent of farebox recovery in urbanized areas and 10 percent in rural areas. To comply with this state mandate, and to improve effectiveness and efficiency, SunLine recommends the following policy for service deployment: » Seventy percent of fixed route service should be deployed in areas with higher population and employment densities where transit is able to meet productivity standards » Thirty percent of fixed route service should be deployed to maintain coverage in areas where lower population and employment densities limit transit service productivity. SunLine will not dismantle its existing service to pay for productivity. Rather, funds for new service will be split 70/30 to establish productivity - oriented routes to expand the transit market share and capture new riders. This focus on productivity will also help SunLine meet mandatory farebox recovery requirements. By state mandate, new or significantly modified service is exempt from meeting the required criteria for up to 2 years plus the year of commencement. The objective is to give these routes time to perform up to the standards. 2.2 Service Performance Beginning in August 2018, SunLine's Haul Pass program attracted new student riders to the system. Expanding the student travel market helped stabilize declines in transit ridership. At the same time, SunLine was able to reduce expenses and complete FY2020-2021 under budget. These savings put SunLine in a better financial position to weather the operational challenges and budget shortfalls resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, in the last quarter of the fiscal year, SunLine will see a significant decrease in passenger fare revenue as local fixed route and paratransit bus service are being provided free of charge. SRTP Table 2.1 (see SRTP Tables) shows the Fiscal Year (FY) 2020- 2021 SRTP performance report. It shows FY2018-2019 and FY2019- 2020 system performance indicators with FY2020-2021 anticipated performance. It projects a decrease in passengers and an increase in Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 24 513 operating costs for FY2020-2021. SRTP Table 2.2 (see SRTP Tables) shows the SRTP system service summary broken out by fixed route and dial -a - ride service types. SRTP Table 2.3 (see SRTP Tables) shows route -level performance indicators. Before the COVID-19 pandemic ridership drop, SunLine had been enjoying an increase in transit use. Figure 2.3 shows total SunLine system ridership, including both paratransit and fixed route bus service, for the 5 years from FY2014-2015 to FY2018-2019. Figure 2.4 shows that ridership increased in FY2018-2019 over the previous fiscal year. SunLine attributes this increase to the Haul Pass program attracting new student riders. Figure 2.5 shows increases in local bus ridership in the fall and spring months, which corresponds to student demand. Figure 2.6 shows the fixed bus route performance for FY2000-2021. Where fixed route service increased between FY2017-2018 and FY2018- 2019, paratransit service ridership levels remained steady. Figure 2.7 shows a small decrease in annual paratransit ridership between fiscal years. This small decline is good news as SunLine manages its paratransit service to Figure 2.3 System Ridership Comparison - 5 years 5.0 0 4.5 0 0 4.0 0 3.5 3.0 2.5 �FY14/15-FY17/18 FY15/16 FY18/19 FY 16/17 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN Figure 2.4 SunBus Ridership Change Service Type FY2017-2018 FY2018-2019 Percent Change Sun Bus (Fixed Route) 3,947,023 4,039,450 2.3% 25 514 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Figure 2.5 Fixed Route Ridership Comparison - 5 years 5.0 0 4.5 c 4.0 00 0 3.5 3.0 2.5 �FY14/15-FY17/18 FY15/16 FY18/19 FY 16/17 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN Figure 2.6 Fixed Route Performance, FY2020-2021 Route Peak Vehicles Annual Revenue Miles Annual Revenue Hours Gross Annual Operating Cost Annual Passengers 10 Commuter Link 2 191,556 5,915 N/A N/A 14 7 429,302 27,996 $4,195,171 580,984 15 1 87,484 5,448 $830,772 117,180 20 2 84,780 3,582 $851,447 31,587 21 1 18,391 1,334 $217,625 13,068 24 5 171,466 12,760 $1,489,422 176,322 30 5 267,281 25,674 $2,522,510 616,319 32 3 279,553 16,865 $2,562,878 250,298 54 2 113,483 6,733 $968,940 79,314 70 3 129,249 9,687 $1,240,395 163,252 80 5 105,020 9,061 $1,029,211 203,664 81 4 53,409 5,660 $585,221 88,736 Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 51 Figure 2.6 Fixed Route Performance, FY2020-2021 (continued) Route Peak Vehicles Annual Revenue Miles Annual Revenue Hours Gross Annual Operating Cost Annual Passengers 90 1 78,800 6,012 $669,911 72,872 91 3 315,323 17,279 $2,917,930 157,058 95 1 115,773 6,390 $1,076,640 28,840 111 14 1,006,510 67,814 $11,043,268 1,412,920 Total 59 3,447,380 228,210 $32,201,341 3,992,414 Figure 2.7 Paratransit System Performance, FY2018-2019 Service Type FY2017-2018 FY2018-2019 Percent Change SunDial 156,292 155,332 -0.6% Figure 2.8 SunDial Ridership Comparison - 5 years 16- 15 Number of riders (10,000s) 14 13 12 11 10 - FY 14/15 - FY 17718 - FY15/16 FY18/19 FY 16/17 JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN 27 516 Sliding e�;'p1ed UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! [Mall divert as many riders as possible to fixed route service as a way to control costs. Figure 2.8 (previous page) shows paratransit use for 5 recent fiscal years. 2.2.1 Taxi Voucher Program In addition to SunDial, SunLine offers a Taxi Voucher Program providing half-price taxi trips for seniors (60+ years) and the disabled through the use of an electronic payment card. This card is easily obtained by eligible patrons by submitting an application to SunLine. Once the application is reviewed and accepted, the patron is then mailed an activated payment card. When the patron receives their card they are able to call in and add a balance of up to $75 per month. SunLine provides matching funds in equal amount up to the $75. The total balance added for each month can be a maximum of $150. Remaining funds from previous months are carried over until utilized. To use the balance, the patrons simply order a cab and pay their fare with the Taxi Voucher payment card. This program is serviced by two taxi businesses permitted to operate in the Coachella Valley and provides some relief to the demands on the paratransit services. Both the riders and the taxi providers appreciate how this service keeps them competitive with other rideshare services in the area. It is anticipated that operational funding for the Taxi Voucher Program will be exhausted as of March 31, 2021. 2.2.2 Taxi Administration The SRA is charged with licensing and regulating taxicab businesses and drivers in the Coachella Valley. Figure 2.9 presents the current operating taxi businesses in the Coachella Valley along with the number of vehicles operated by each company. Figure 2.9 Taxi Businesses Business Number of Vehicles Coachella Valley Taxi 20 Desert City Cab 36 Yellow Cab of the Desert 52 Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 517 2.2.3 Vanpool A vanpool is a group of people who are commuting to the same workplace or post -secondary education facility (college, trade school, etc.) regularly from the same community, riding together in a van or SUV provided by a vendor to share expenses. Vanpools typically carry from 5 to 15 passengers and operate long distances, traveling between pick-up locations and a place of work/school. Vanpools provide small-scale commuter ridership in scenarios where operator costs would otherwise be prohibitively high. Operating costs are very low, because the passengers drive themselves. Ridership per platform hour is healthy. Vanpools are very demand -responsive; once ridership falls below a threshold, the service goes away and new routes can be added with a minimum of overhead. They can access office parking areas and other locations that scheduled SunLine service cannot reach, making for more convenient passenger drop-offs. Vanpool programs can be administered in a variety of ways, allowing the employer to be fully involved or simply promote the service. Employers can help employees form vanpools through rideshare matching. Rideshare matching helps potential vanpoolers locate others nearby with similar schedules. With technology advancements, on -demand vanpooling may help reduce coordination costs and increase ridership. Traditional vanpool programs often have average ridership per trip at above the minimum membership required for the vanpool. As the region develops unevenly, vanpools will be an increasingly effective means to serve trips from low -density places to employment and education centers. With vanpool programs, SunLine may be able to pull back bus service from low -volume coverage routes, and focus on more frequent trunk routes and core services. SunLine's Vanpool Program, SolVan, provides a subsidy for qualified vans that agree to report about daily riders, miles, hours, and expenses. A SolVan reporting system has been created to track each rider on each vanpool. The driver of the vanpool must be a participant in the vanpool program. Vanpool passengers will be responsible for paying the van monthly lease cost minus the subsidy. Lease includes insurance and maintenance. They will also share the cost of gas, toll fees, and parking fees (if applicable). Vehicles for this type of service will be leased by one of the pre -qualified vendors to one of the commuters in the group, a company, or a third -party representative. 29 518 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Vanpools GOALS ➢ Gain new vanpool riders whose route travels through or ends in eastern Riverside County. ➢ Educate the employer and employees of eastern Riverside County of the SolVan program and how the program works. ➢ Continue to support SunLine as a leader in alternative transportation options, recognizing the agency for bringing a new commute option to eastern Riverside County. ➢ Continue to support current vanpool participants to ensure their satisfaction with the program to promote long-term program participation. ➢ Work alongside the regional rideshare program, IE Commuter, to mine employee data of carpoolers and interested carpoolers and drivers commuting long distances with regular work shifts for potential vanpool groups; to add incentives and outreach efforts; and to leverage large and small employers to create a green -thinking workspace as an employee benefit (see tables below). EMPLOYEE COMMUTE DISTANCES 50 40 30 20 10 0 n i 10 TO 1 TO 3 TO 25 0R LESS LESS LESS LESS MORE THAN THAN THAN THAN MILES 1 MILE 25 MILES 3 MILES 10 MILES MODE SPLIT DRIVE ALONE CARPOOL REA SON FOR TR ANSIT USE 417 IjZERO EMISSION VEHICLE 1% MOTORCYCLE 1% PUBLIC BUS OTHER 4% WALK3% TELECOMMUTE 3% BICYCLE 2% MAJOR EMPLOYERS San Bernardino NallOnal Forest enpoeany c c tl Banning untie Vista IsIDIIONSO RESERVATION DwI Cabazon Bonnie Bell Whaeweter Snow Creek Palm Springs Aerial Tram W ay Q porergy closed ' Mt San Jacinto Pine INnod Dwelt View Saddle O Junction MI San Jacinto State Park. O Mountain Center Thomas Mountain Morango Valley North Palm Springs Palm $prings 9 Desert Hot Springs Sky Valley 9 alms 9 Muag Palm Desert Cahuilla H in 9 Coachella a Quints Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Thermal Mountains vista National_. Santa Rasa Pinyon Crest Taylor 9 Coachella Varrey Preserve idden Palms 9 9 9 Number of employees 250 — 500 500 — 999 1,000 or more Indio Hills elskra�s 9 eemuda 9 o nea �1. 9 Haul Pass n SYNIINI INANSII AN[NSY 2.3 Productivity Improvement Efforts Underway SunLine is constantly evaluating its routes to improve productivity. This includes key performance indicators such as farebox recovery and passengers per hour or trip. SunLine also continually evaluates its bus schedules and blocking to reduce deadhead miles and optimize layovers between trips. For example, the new 10 Commuter Link is aimed at improving regional service between the Coachella Valley and the Inland Empire. For students, 10 Commuter Link will provide a direct connection between the California State University, San Bernardino — Palm Desert Campus and the main campus in San Bernardino. It will also provide a connection to the San Bernardino Downtown Metrolink Station. The Route 111X weekday express service is intended to improve productivity on SunLine's highest ridership route. Stopping at five locations in the Highway 111 corridor, Route 111X will provide a 60-minute trip between Indio and Palm Springs. SunLine is conducting a microtransit pilot project to connect riders to main route service by bridging the first mile, last mile gap. This flexible, on -demand rideshare service is designed to connect riders to the fixed route system by providing point-to-point rides along identified fixed route corridors. The pilot project, which started in January 2020, is evaluating the feasibility of using local taxis to expand SunLine's service area and reach non-traditional markets. 2.3.1 Haul Pass The College of the Desert and the California State University, San Bernardino — Palm Desert Campus are important transit markets. Started in August 2018 with a grant from the LCTOP, the SunLine Haul Pass program gives students at these schools access to SunLine buses with their student ID. The LCTOP grant is funding an expansion of the program to other educational institutions, with the goal of all programs being self-sustaining. 2.3.2 Mobile Ticketing The 2019 Transit Rider Survey showed that more than 80 percent of SunLine riders have access to a smartphone or tablet with an Internet connection. Access to a connected device is an important factor in the 5o Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII implementation of the Token Transit mobile ticketing pilot. The pilot program will allow riders to use a new method of acquiring passes, and will give SunLine valuable information that will be used for a permanent mobile ticketing solution. 2.4 Major Trip Generators The 2019 SunLine Transit Agency Rider Survey identified the main transit trip generators in the Coachella Valley. The top destinations for home - based work trips are Palm Springs, Palm Desert, and La Quinta. The College of the Desert and Palm Springs High School are top destinations for home -based other trips that include shopping, recreation, and education. Figure 2.10 and Figure 2.11 show the traffic analysis zones with the top home -based work and home -based other trip attractions. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 32 521 Figure 2.10 Home -based Work Trip Attractions 0 DESERT HOT SPRINGS San Bernardino County Riverside County EDRAL CITYL iii_Ri � � l N. MIRA PALM DESERT Illpit1/4,..._ 1 n"IJ s r3� .! iiIAN WELLS i INDIO �_- ~' r:_ IND- "J COACHELLA CO LAQUINTA I 0 u- l L _ CO J _i-1 i ill— SALTON SEA i Riverside County r Riverside County San Diego County a Service area boundary C C C County boundary = City boundary Number of trips <10 10-25 26-75 >75 Figure 2.11 Home -based Other Trip Attractions 0 DESERT HOT SPRINGS L L r = Service area boundary C — C County boundary San Bernardino County = City boundary Riverside County -1 OMIRAGE PMDESERT `� �-J 1 ft n 1_ 4, il M.I NDWEL 3 INDIO � d -- _ 14. COACHELLA l LA QUINTA I l Riverside County San Diego County 0 14. Number of trips <10 10-25 26-75 >75 CHAPTER 3 Future Service Plans, Fare Changes, Capital Planning, and Marketing The adoption of these Refueled recommendations in principle will open the door for an outreach effort. SunLine will coordinate closely with its member cities, the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG), and RCTC. SunLine will use the input of the public and its planning partners to jointly develop and deliver a redesigned transit network. Whether planning for long-term growth or addressing the immediate COVID-19 crisis, SunLine's Refueled system redesign is aimed at improving transit service to increase ridership. These recommendations include: » Make SunLine's system faster, more direct, and more efficient to attract new riders; » Streamline SunLine's route structure to focus resources on the system's most productive bus corridors; » Research and develop a microtransit service model that can replace traditional fixed route bus service in sparsely populated and/or low - transit -demand areas; » Simplify the fare structure and move to electronic media; » Update the service standards policy to support performance -driven transit and an emerging service delivery model; and 35 524 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII » Develop the Route 111 High Quality Transit Corridor with transit signal priority (TSP), queue jumpers, and Super Stops to facilitate timed transfer connections and intermodal connectivity. The Haul Pass program attracted new student riders to the SunLine system, helping to stabilize ridership. Long-term population projections show growth in Desert Hot Springs, Coachella, and Indio that will increase demand for transit. In the near term, however, SunLine's focus is on rebuilding ridership lost during the COVID-19 pandemic. Potential funding for expanding SunLine's fleet may be available through the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund. The Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) supports funding for transformative capital improvements that will modernize California's bus transit systems. Because elements of Refueled will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, vehicle miles traveled, and traffic congestion, the TIRCP is an important potential source for Refueled capital funding needs. Through its Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) regulation, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has mandated that public transit agencies transition to zero -emission buses (ZEBs) by 2040. SunLine is ahead of many of its peers in meeting the ZEB targets. However, fleet planning for the Refueled service expansion will be included in the ZEB implementation plan. The ZEB implementation plan (Appendix C) shows how SunLine intends to comply with the mandate and when it plans to purchase the buses and build the necessary support infrastructure. The ZEB rollout plan will include a comprehensive operational and financial analysis of the impacts on SunLine's delivery model for transit services. It will also identify potential limits on the operating range for ZEBs between recharging/refueling, analysis of financial incentives, and capital cost of support facilities. The rollout plan will also identify staff training needs for operations and maintenance. This SRTP, combined with the ZEB implementation plans, can tell the TIRCP and other funding partners a powerful story about SunLine's commitment to exceptional transit service and clean energy. This chapter outlines service changes planned in FY2021-2023 to begin implementing the Refueled program. It also presents steps toward the longer -term vision, including fare policy, marketing, and infrastructure needs. Haul Pass n ` —] SUNI INE TRANSIT AGENCY Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan �2� 3.1 Planned Service Changes FY2021-2023 The financially unconstrained Refueled plan is not funded. It recommends both restructuring SunLine's bus routes and improving frequency over the long term. The long-range improvements will require support infrastructure, additional fleet, and funding for operations. SunLine has three funded service changes planned for FY2021-2023. However, the implementation of these changes depends on the transit ridership and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. » SunRide Microtransit (January 2020) » 10 Commuter Link Service between Indio and San Bernardino » Route 111X weekday express service between Indio and Palm Springs 3.1.1 Route 111X Faster and more frequent service are top priorities for SunLine customers. Partially funded by a Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant, Route 111X would reduce travel time between Indio and Palm Springs by 24 minutes. Travel time would be reduced by skipping stops and using a more direct route on Fred Waring Drive. Route 111X will use the existing SunLine fleet branded for the express service. The route will have specially branded bus stops that may also include enhanced shelters and upgraded amenities. 3.1.2 SunRide Microtransit With SunLine's fixed route ridership down more than 70 percent from the COVID-19 pandemic, some bus routes may be discontinued because of low productivity. As part of its recovery plan, SunLine is evaluating microtransit as a stopgap measure to provide lifeline service. As transit demand and recovery allow, SunLine may consider deploying microtransit to improve access to fixed route bus service. As part of its recovery plan, SunLine may replace low productivity corridors and parallel paratransit service with a microtransit solution for cost efficiency. 3.2 Future Marketing Plans, Studies, and Promotions Response and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic will be an immediate focus of SunLine's plans. SunLine will develop plans and communication tools to reassure its riders and encourage them to use public transit again. SunLine will highlight how the Refueled improvements will provide faster, 526 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII i more frequent service to help restore ridership. Sunline's overall marketing and communication strategy will be focused on Refueled —Driving the Future of Transit. Refueled provides an exciting opportunity for SunLine to engage with passengers and reinvigorate our community. SunLine will highlight how the Refueled improvements will provide faster, more frequent service to help restore ridership. SunLine will welcome established riders back into a system that has maintained enhanced cleaning procedures and will proudly introduce the community to a more efficient transit network. Education is a fundamental component of the Refueled communication plan and will focus on ensuring riders understand the connection between the type of vehicles used and the service provided to them on the road. As such, informing the community on California's zero -emission fleet goals will play a part in the overall marketing strategy. SunLine's campaign will use a variety of media, as discussed in the following sections. Social Media and Website SunLine is active on social media, using it as part of a comprehensive marketing strategy. SunLine maintains Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and YouTube pages, and posts alerts and items of interest. During this COVID-19 pandemic, it is particularly important for SunLine to maximize its use of relatively low-cost and/or partnership -leveraged marketing tools. Digital media, both organic and paid, will be the hallmark of SunLine's marketing efforts. SunLine will use its website as an ongoing passenger information tool. The website is used to publish up-to-date information about SunLine services, policies, and publications. Passenger Transit Information/Rider's Guide Information on SunLine services and programs is easily obtainable and prominently displayed at transit centers, in buses, and at pass outlets. The SunLine Rider's Guide provides directions, maps, time point bus stop locations, schedules, fares, transfer information, and where to get assistance on how to use SunLine services and programs. SunLine's transit information is provided in both English and Spanish. SunLine has a deep commitment to sustainability, and in the past year started encouraging riders to seek route and service information digitally whenever possible. In a continued effort to support the mission set by the Board of Directors in Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan �2� the 1990s, SunLine has decreased printing by 33 percent and focused on improving digital access. Customer Service Center The Customer Service Center provides telephone information to customers Monday through Friday. Bilingual (English/Spanish) customer service agents use resources such as Google Transit trip planner and MyStop Bus Tracker to respond to customer inquiries. Community Outreach SunLine works with local organizations, businesses, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations to promote SunLine programs and services. Community outreach involves grassroots organizations to identify unmet transit needs and build community -based marketing partnerships. Historically, SunLine invests in these relationships by participating in community events such as mobility workshops, food drives, fundraisers, parades, and special event activities. During this COVID-19 pandemic, SunLine has developed a new plan to connect with members of the community via virtual outreach efforts to capture different audiences. Such efforts provide SunLine the opportunity to promote transportation services and programs to existing riders and attract potential future riders. Outreach for Refueled will be especially important to educate community stakeholders on the enhancements to their transit experience. Public Presentations Target audiences include seniors, students, social services, businesses, and community leaders. The main goal is public education related to the economic and environmental benefits of using public transportation. During presentations, SunLine highlights the key role that we hold as a public transit provider and leader in alternative fuel technology. SunLine's use of hydrogen electric fuel cell and battery electric fuel cell buses have made impacts to the environment on a global scale. Presentations emphasize why this is important and how it affects residents of the Coachella Valley. These presentations typically occur at senior centers, colleges, and school orientation programs. In response to COVID-19, many presentations will be virtual, in partnership with host organizations. Travel Training Transportation provides us with a sense of independence and opportunities to engage within our community. Sunline's Travel Training Program offers opportunities for riders to learn how to independently traverse a public transit system. To this end, SunLine offers group and b$ Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII one-on-one training aboard a fixed route bus to build confidence and allow people to travel with ease. Transit Ambassador Program The SunLine Transit Ambassador Program, known as TAP, empowers employees to expand SunLine's culture of customer service. TAP consists of a series of training sessions that address crucial topics and everyday scenarios in public transportation service. A Transit Ambassador has completed this program and can assist passengers with their trip planning. Transit Ambassadors will assist the rider until the rider feels confident in navigating the SunLine system independently. Access Advisory Committee The Access Advisory Committee, which meets bi-monthly, was formed in 1995 as an advocacy group consisting of various agencies in the Coachella Valley. Committee members range from community activists to everyday transit users who are committed to promoting successful implementation of the transportation provisions of the ADA and other related federal legislation or regulations. 3.3 Projected Ridership Growth FY2021-2023 Following a significant downturn in ridership in March 2020 related to the COVID-19 pandemic, SunLine expects it may take several years for ridership to rebound. SunLine and its planning partners are using the regional travel demand model to prepare long-term ridership forecasts for the unconstrained transit redesign. 3.4 Proposed Fare Structure Changes While the Board of Directors has directed SunLine staff to explore a fare -free system, the aim of this fare policy is to increase SunLine's revenues with a simplified structure that continues to provide support for low-income individuals. The key fare structure recommendations are summarized below. Increase base cash fare 75 percent in three increments. SunLine has the lowest base cash fare among its peers. While SunLine operates its service efficiently, SunLine has the lowest average fare, lowest fare revenue per passenger mile, and lowest farebox recovery rate of its peers. Improving its farebox recovery rate would give SunLine a dedicated funding source as it builds for the future, reducing the need for state and federal grants to grow its system. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 40 Charge adults and youth the same fare. Combining adult and youth fares would simplify SunLine's fare structure by reducing the number of fare types. Children age 6 years and younger may ride free. Eliminate the transfer fee. Research indicates that most transit agencies are eliminating transfer fees. With SunLine's redesigned network, many passengers would continue to require a transfer between routes to reach their destination. Rather than require a transfer fee, paper transfer tickets would be issued to allow riders the ability to use a second bus. The transfer ticket would be good for 2 hours. Develop a post -secondary school universal pass (U-Pass). Through an agreement negotiated with the schools, SunLine would prorate the price of the U-Pass over the entire student body based on an estimate of the total fare revenue that would be generated by individual users purchasing a monthly pass. This would allow SunLine to maintain expected revenues while allowing students to pay a lower fare price, thereby helping to attract students who might not choose transit otherwise. This negotiated U-Pass would eventually replace SunLine's current Haul Pass program, which is funded by a grant. Escalate SunDial paratransit fares. As SunLine incrementally increases its base cash fare, it would also increase its SunDial paratransit fare. The fare for an ADA paratransit user cannot be more than twice the fixed route base cash fare. Figure 3.1 shows the 5-year incremental fare increase program. Figure 3.1 SunLine Incremental Fare Increase Program Fare Category Current Fares Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Percent Change' (% General Cash $1.00 $1.25 $1.50 $1.75 75 Seniors/Disabled Cash $0.50 $0.60 $0.75 $0.85 70 Youth Cash Consolidate adult and youth $0.85 Eliminate employer pass Eliminate transfer fee 'Phase 3 compared to current fares. 41 530 SunLine oR,Y,Ms,d Review fares annually. Fares should be reviewed annually to assess the ridership impact. This should include an examination of revenue by fare category and fare media. The fare review should provide a peer comparison to help ensure fare policy decisions are well-informed. Make fare adjustments as frequently as possible. Fares should be adjusted annually to address inflation and to deliver a more gradual change to riders. Fares that are frozen for several years and then adjusted through a large disproportionate increase result in a "shock" to riders that may negatively affect the agency image and ridership. Calculate the SunLine internal rate of inflation to establish required fare adjustments. Fare increases should be based on SunLine's internal rate of inflation (goods, labor, and fuel), rather than the inflation of a general Consumer Price Index. The Consumer Price Index measures the inflation on a basket of goods and services unrelated to transit service and competing transportation modes To help low-income passengers access transit services and offset fare increases, SunLine may target fares for Coachella Valley residents who meet low-income guidelines. The U.S. Department of Labor's Lower Living Standard Income Level is often used by transit agencies to determine eligibility for reduced fares. It identifies income levels by family size that are adjusted annually based on changes in the Consumer Price Index. 3.5 Capital Improvement Planning Refueled implementation is closely tied to CARB's ICT regulation. The ICT regulation requires SunLine to gradually transition to a 100 percent ZEB fleet. As SunLine grows its fleet to provide additional service, it will need to evaluate daily mileage needs and the incremental capital or electricity costs of depot -charging electric buses that cannot be offset by available incentive and funding programs. SunLine is also planning for the new infrastructure needed to support hydrogen production and refueling for its fuel cell buses. It is also evaluating expansion of its satellite facility in Indio to support hydrogen and ZEB fueling and maintenance. SunLine is working with CVAG to plan and fund street improvements needed to preserve bus travel times and improve service reliability. These street improvements include TSP measures, queue jumpers, and dedicated bus lanes. Super stops are another capital improvement aimed Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 42 531 at enhancing the passenger experience. These stops include enlarged and near -level boarding areas, enhanced shelters, and upgraded amenities. SunLine is also working with its member cities to improve multimodal connections to its fixed route bus service. This includes connections to the Coachella Valley Link. This bicycling and walking pathway will link Coachella Valley cities and the lands of three federally recognized tribes with a path that generally parallels Highway 111. Figure 3.2 shows the status of SunLine's capital projects. Figure 3.2 Status of SunLine's Capital Projects Project Name Project Status Replacement and expansion of support vehicles Support vehicles have been delivered and are being prepped with make-ready equipment. Project is expected to be closed by end of May 2020, and remaining funds will be used for the next round of vehicle purchases. CNG fueling station and construction CNG station construction is in progress, which includes installing the fuel island canopy and CNG equipment, placing dispensers and vacuums, and constructing the station building. Construction is expected to be complete by end of June 2020. Solar carports (Administration Building Phase II) Solar carport installation has been completed. Project team is working with the utility provider and the general contractor on interconnection to the existing meter. Project is estimated to be complete by June 2020. Operations facility Construction mobilization and site ground work has been completed. The ground excavation and civil work is in progress. Five hydrogen electric hybrid fuel cell buses and hydrogen station (Air Quality Improvement Program Grant) Buses are in service and the temporary hydrogen dispenser is operational; commissioning of the hydrogen station and permanent dispensers is in progress. Center of Excellence Facility (ZEB In process of executing contract with the design firm to maintenance facility) complete the 100% design drawings. Service upgrade 3G to 4G On -site installation is complete. Project is expected to be closed out by end of May 2020. 43 532 Sliding oR,Y,Ms,d Figure 3.2 Status of SunLine's Capital Projects (continued) Project Name Project Status Information technology (IT) projects Project is in progress, replacing 20 percent of the IT equipment. Project expected to be closed by end of 2020. Five hydrogen fuel cell buses (LowNo Grant) Buses are in service and remaining funds will be used to procure additional fuel cell bus. Contract for the new bus is expected to go for Board approval in May 2020. Replacement of two commuter buses Buses are expected to be delivered by end of May 2020. Transportation demand management (Vanpool) Program is running; contract term with the service provider has been extended until September 2022. Indio facility improvements Contract with the general contractor has been executed. The contractor has begun the work, which includes a new training room, office space, and breakroom at the Indio location. Hydrogen station program improvements Project funds are in process of being reallocated to the public hydrogen station. Storage area network expansion for Tyler Enterprise Resource Planning, Host8 - Host12 Equipment has been received and project is expected to be closed by October 2020. Parts department and warehouse relocation Purchase orders have been issued to procure items for the parts warehouse. 2020 replacement and expansion of paratransit buses Purchase order has been issued and vehicles are in production and expected to be delivered in third quarter of 2020. Replacement of six fixed route buses Buses have been delivered and are being prepped for going into service. Asphalt slurry seal Bids were due on April 30; in process of contract execution. CNG project trailer demolition Finalizing the project scope and expected to go out for bids in mid -May 2020. Transmission Project has been completed. Working on the close-out documentation. Retention beautification Phase II Phase I has been completed, project in progress. Fall arrest system installation for maintenance bays Project is out for bids. Purchase of two expansion support vehicles Vehicles have been delivered; in process of closing out the project. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 44 Figure 3.2 Status of SunLine's Capital Projects (continued) Project Name Project Status Maintenance shop wall removal Project scope is being finalized and bids are expected to go out in May 2020. Floor resurfacing, Maintenance Building Div. 1 Project initiation and scope has been finalized; bids will go out in line with wall removal project. Asset management tool In process of procuring a consultant firm to assist with the project. Fixed route bus rehabilitation Project has not started. Replacement of non -revenue support vehicles Project has not started. Transit enhancements Project has not started. IT projects Project has not started. Radio system replacement Working on finalizing the project scope. Roof repair Div. I and Div. II Funds have been used. Two bus simulators In process of finalizing the scope. Proceeding with one simulator. Remaining funds to be programed toward IT needs for the operations facility. Replacement of six fixed route buses Project has not started. Boardroom equipment upgrade Finalizing the scope; project expected to begin by end of May 2020. SunLine property expansion/solar farm Phase In process of finalizing the purchase and sales agreement. Facility maintenance and improvements Capital purchase requests. H2 Ride Not proceeding with the project. New flier Air Quality Improvement Program Project has not started. Heavy-duty tow truck In the process of reallocating as match to public hydrogen station. 45 534 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 3.6 SunLine Refueled — Long-term Vision This financially unconstrained transit redesign plan provides a long- term vision for SunLine to enhance its transit service. The redesign plan consolidates SunLine's existing 16 routes into 11 routes and adds microtransit service. This plan is essential to effectively communicate SunLine's operating and capital needs to local, state, and federal funding agencies. The plan enables SunLine to collaborate with local jurisdictions, CVAG, RCTC, and other funding and planning agencies to include them in long-term regional planning and implementation efforts to optimize scarce financial resources and develop and deliver projects jointly. Appendix B shows the SunLine Refueled route profiles and implementation options. The following is a summary of proposed route modifications: Route 111X. Skip stop express service to reduce travel times between Indio and Palm Springs. Route 111. Improved service on the existing route. Route 2. Combine existing Routes 14 and 30 between Desert Hot Springs and Cathedral City. Route 3. Extend and rename existing Route 15 to connect 4th Street/ Cholla Drive in Desert Hot Springs to Langlois Road/Aurora Road. Route 4. Combine and rename existing Routes 24 and 32 to connect Palm Springs with Palm Desert Town Center Mall. Route 5. Combine existing Route 20 and Route 21, which would operate between Desert Hot Springs and Palm Desert Town Center Mall. Route 6. Extend existing Route 54 to 5th Street in Coachella to create the new Route 6 as part of a simplified service in Indio and Coachella. Route 7. Existing Route 70 would be maintained in the redesigned transit system as Route 7. Route 8. Combine portions of existing Routes 80, 81, 90, and 91 in Indio, Coachella, Thermal, and Mecca to improve operational efficiency and route directness and to make SunLine's system easier to navigate. Route 9. A new fixed route, Route 9, would provide bus service between North Shore, Mecca, and 100 Palms. 10 Commuter Link. Weekday express bus service between Indio and San Bernardino. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 535 Microtransit service. As part of its COVID-19 recovery plan, SunLine is evaluating microtransit as a stopgap measure to provide lifeline service. As transit demand and recovery allow, SunLine may consider deploying microtransit to improve access to fixed route bus service. SunLine may use lower -cost microtransit service to eventually replace fixed route bus service on the new Route 9. Operating as a circulator or as on -demand service, microtransit would connect riders to SunLine's fixed route bus service. Microtransit may also be used in Indio and in the southern end of Cathedral City and Palm Desert to expand the ridership catchment area. Figure 3.3 shows SunLine's redesigned fixed bus route system. 47 536 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Figure 3.3 Financially Unconstrained Transit Redesign 0 DESERT HOT S- PRIN San Bernardino County Riverside County CATHEDRAL eiTY SPRINGS 4-1 INDIAN WELLS ULAQUINTA I 0 0 Riverside County San Diego County = Service area boundary C — C County boundary = City boundary Routes - Route 2 (14-30) Route 3 (15) Route 4 (24-32) Route 5 (20-21) Route 6 (54, 80, 81, 90) Route 7 (70) 1P Route 8 (80, 81, 90, 91) 40 Route 9 (91-95) Route 111 Route 111X - PS BUZZ CHAPTER 4 Financial Planning The FY2021 financial planning process focused on prioritizing resources and aligning with the core strategic goals of the Refueled initiative. As mentioned before, in the midst of planning the FY2021-2023 SRTP, the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 caused a major national and global disruption. The executive team members at SunLine brought their diverse insights to effectively allocate resources to maintain essential services. The following SunLine financial plan is based on the best available financial projections and anticipated grants. 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget In FY2021, SunLine will have an operating budget of $40,840,150 and a capital budget of $6,298,206. The operating budget encompasses such costs as driver salaries, administrative salaries, fuel, insurance premiums, and other overhead costs required for day-to-day operations. The available funding will be used effectively and efficiently to accomplish organizational objectives. The operating budget will ensure that SunLine continues to offer safe and reliable transportation to Coachella Valley residents. The capital budget incorporates key projects to help further advance SunLine's Capital Improvement Program. The Capital Improvement Program for FY2021 focuses on continuing SunLine's investment in increasing its alternative fuel technology fleet and building energy -efficient 49 538 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII infrastructure similar to a first -of -its -kind solar microgrid. SunLine's Capital Improvement Program represents a unique opportunity to make long- term investments in SunLine's operational capabilities, energy strategies, and regulatory compliance by conforming to CARB's ICT mandate. Key components of the capital plan, beyond ongoing maintenance needs, include: light -duty public hydrogen station solar microgrid facility infrastructure improvements vehicle replacement and expansion The capital program depends on internal and external funding from federal, state, regional, and local sources. 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program For FY2021, funding plans for the proposed operating and capital programs are as follows: Funding sources for the proposed operating budget include FTA Section 5307 (Urban), FTA Section 5307 (CARES Act), FTA Section 5310 (Elderly and Disabled), FTA Section 5311 (Rural), FTA Section 5311 (f) (Intercity), FTA Section 5312 (Public Transportation Innovation), CMAQ, LCTOP funds apportioned by the California Department of Transportation, State Local Transportation Funds (LTF), Local Measure A funding, farebox revenue, and other revenue for operating assistance. Funding sources for capital projects include funds from FTA Section 5307, FTA Section 5310, FTA Section 5339, CMAQ, LCTOP, LTF, State Transit Assistance (STA), and State of Good Repair Funds (SGR). Figure 4.1 shows the estimated FY2021 operating and capital budget of $47,138,356. Figure 4.2 and Figure 4.3, respectively, show the FY2022-2023 operating and capital expenditure funding projections. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan �50 Figure 4.1 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2021 Fund Operating Amount ($) Capital CARES Act 5307 13,208,971 32.3 CARES Act 5311 300,000 0.7 CARES Act 5311(f) 53,889 0.1 Carryover CMAQ 662,366 1.6 Carryover LTF Carryover Section 5307 Carryover STA CMAQ 465,991 7.4 Farebox Revenue 1,399,824 3.4 LCTOP 1,038,101 16.5 LCTOP Carryover 337,000 0.8 LTF 11,000,000 26.9 Measure A 5,955,883 14.6 Other Revenue 2,421,878 5.9 Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City 4,968,507 12.2 Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City/Palm Springs 607,400 9.6 Section 5310 29,627 0.1 183,320 2.9 Section 5311 303,219 0.7 Section 5311 (f) 161,666 0.4 Section 5312 37,320 0.1 Section 5339 255,000 4.0 SGR 779,796 12.4 STA 2,968,598 47.1 Total $40,840,150 100% $6,298,206 100% 5o Sliding ie l ;:pled UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! [Mall Figure 4.2 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2022 Fund Operating Amount ($) Percent (%) Capital Amount ($) Percent (%) Cares Act 5307 2,160,147 5.1 Carryover 5307 4,962,864 11.7 3,048,769 10.2 CMAQ 958,000 2.2 Farebox Revenue 3,000,000 7.0 LTF 19,064,303 44.8 Measure A 9,037,987 21.2 Other Revenue 2,882,861 6.8 20,702,567 69.5 Section 5307 Section 5311 303,219 0.7 Section 5311 (f) 215,555 0.5 Section 5339 2,551,231 8.6 SGR 17,871 0.1 STA 3,479,129 11.7 Total $42,584,936 100% $29,799,567 100% In FY2022 SunLine estimates operating and capital budgets of $42,584,936 and $29,799,567, respectively. The operating budget will include grant funded services such as the Vanpool Program, SunRide, and Route 111X. The capital budget will continue to build on the FY2021 budget and increase alternative fuel technology and fleet and building energy efficient infrastructures. SunLine has applied for discretionary grants to help fund the capital program such as the Environmental Protection Agency's Targeted Airshed Grant Program. If successful, funding will be programmed in FY2022. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 1 Figure 4.3 Operating and Capital Costs - FY2023 Fund Operating Amount ($) Percent (%) Capital Amount ($) Percent (%) CMAQ 792,009 1.9 Farebox Revenue 3,000,000 7.1 LTF 21,181,250 49.9 Measure A 9,037,987 21.3 Other Revenue 2,962,861 7.0 Section 5311 303,219 0.7 Section 5307 4,962,864 11.7 1,600,000 37.6 Section 5311 (f) 215,555 0.5 Section 5339 1,600,000 37.6 STA 1,050,000 24.7 Total $42,455,745 100% $4,250,000 100% In FY2023, SunLine estimates operating and capital budgets of $42,455,745 and $4,250,000, respectively. The operating budget will include grant funded services such as the Vanpool Program, SunRide, and Route 111X. The capital budget will focus on facility infrastructures and facility improvement projects. SunLine will use formula funding and continue to actively seek discretionary grant funding. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements Americans with Disability Act SunLine complies with ADA guidelines by providing a 100 percent accessible revenue service fleet for fixed route transit services and ADA paratransit vehicles. As funding becomes available, SunLine continues to provide bus stop improvements to ensure accessibility. Staff also coordinates with developers and contractors regarding construction projects to include bus stop improvements when the opportunity arises. 542 Sliding UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII Disadvantaged Business Enterprise SunLine's most recent Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) program and goal were submitted to FTA in July 2018 and had an expiration date of September 2021. The next DBE report will be submitted in May 2020. Equal Employment Opportunity SunLine complies with federal regulations pertaining to employment and submits its Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)-1 report annually to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and its EEO/ Affirmative Action Program to FTA every 4 years, or as major changes occur in the workforce or employment conditions. The most recent EEO-1 report was submitted to the EEOC and certified in March 2019. The most recent EEO/Affirmative Action Program was revised and submitted to FTA in FY2015-2016. We will be sending the FY2016/FY2019 EEO/Affirmative Action Program to FTA in September 2020 Title VI Title VI protects people from discrimination based on race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. SunLine's Title VI report was submitted to FTA in November 2019 and has an expiration date of November 2022. Transportation Development Act The Transportation Development Act provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: the LTF and STA. RCTC commissioned Pacific Management Consulting to conduct the Triennial Performance Audit as required by the Transportation Development Act; SunLine's findings are referenced in Table 6 of that document. Federal Transit Administration Triennial Audit In accordance with regulations, SunLine completed an FTA Triennial Audit site visit in 2019. The Triennial Audit focused on SunLine's compliance in 21 areas. SunLine had no deficiencies with the FTA requirements. National Transit Database To keep track of the industry and provide public information and statistics as growth occurs, FTA's National Transit Database records the financial, operating, and asset conditions of transit systems. Staff are currently finalizing FY2016-2017 National Transit Database Section sampling. SunLine continues to perform parallel sampling using manual samples and Automatic Passenger Counter data to verify and gain approval to use Automatic Passenger Counter data in future reporting. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 53 i Alternative Fuel Vehicles In alignment with SunLine's Board -approved Alternative Fuel Policy, all vehicles in the fleet use CNG, electric, or hydrogen fuel. The current active fleet consists of 54 CNG buses, 15 hydrogen electric fuel cell buses, 4 battery electric buses, 1 diesel coach, 39 CNG paratransit vehicles, and 46 non -revenue CNG and electric vehicles, including general support cars, trucks, and facility -specific golf carts and forklifts. HVOMOGIEN barton c 'ZERO emunons BUS b44 FtEL Pouring AClem lommmw- Wig sunlme UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 1 Page left blank intentionally. Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan �4� SRTP Tables Sliding - OMIX6 ldt UM" Of [Mall 546 Table 1.0 Individual Route Descriptions Routes Route Classification Major Destinations Cities/Communities Served Connections 14 Trunk Shopping, Schools, DMV, Employment Center, Library, Senior Center Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs 15, 20, 24, 30, 32, 111, 111X & PS BUZZ 15 Local Shopping Centers, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, City Hall, Medical, and Schools Desert Hot Springs and Desert Edge 14 & 20 20 Local Shopping, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, Schools Desert Hot Springs and Palm Desert 14, 15, 21, 32, 54, 111, 111X, 10 Commuter & Amtrak 21 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, City Hall, School, College, and Mall Palm Desert 20, 32, 54, 111, 111X, 10 Commuter & Amtrak 24 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, Social Services, Theaters Palm Springs 14, 30, 32, 111, PS BUZZ & MBTA 30 Trunk Shopping, Schools, Medical, Library, Senior Center, Airport, Court House, Social Security, Theaters, and Public Social Services Palm Springs and Cathedral City 14, 24, 32, 111, 111X, PS BUZZ & MBTA 32 Local Shopping, School, College, Medical, Theaters, Mall and Hospital Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Thousand Palms 14, 20, 21, 24, 30, 54, 111, 111X & Amtrak PS BUZZ Local Hotels, Shopping and Entertainment Palm Springs 14, 24, 30, 111X & 111 54 Local Shopping, School, Tennis Gardens, Work Force Development, and College Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, Bermuda Dunes 20, 21, 32, 70, 80, 81, 91, 111, 111X, 10 Commuter & Amtrak 70 Local Shopping, Schools, Theaters, Tennis Gardens and Medical La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, Bermuda Dunes 54, 111 & 111X 80 Local Shopping, School, Workforce Development, Social Services, Senior Center, DMV, and Hospital Indio 54, 81, 91, 111, 10 Commuter & 111X 81 Local Shopping, Schools, Medical, Community Center, College, DMV, Hospital, Work Force Development, Social Services and Employment Center Indio 54, 80, 91, 111, 111X, 10 Commuter & Greyhound 90 Local Shopping, Library, City Hall, Senior Center, Community Center, Social Services and Medical Indio and Coachella 80, 91, 95, 111 & 111X 91 Local Shopping, College, Schools, Community Center, Center of Employment Training and Medical Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis 54, 80, 81, 90, 95, 111, 10 Commuter & 111X 95 Local Shopping, College, Community Center, Medical and Schools Coachella, Thermal, Mecca and North Shore 90, 91, 111 & 111X 111 Trunk Hospital, Medical, Shopping, College, Mall, Center of Employment Training and Schools Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio and Coachella 14, 20, 21, 24, 30, 32, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, 95, PS BUZZ, 111X, 10 Commuter, Amtrak & MBTA 111-X Express Hospital, Medical, Shopping, College, Mall, Center of Employment Training and Schools Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Palm Desert, La Quinta, Indio and Coachella 14, 20, 21, 30, 32, PS BUZZ, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, 95, 111, 10 Commuter, Amtrak & MBTA 10 Regional Shopping, Business, Entertainment and University Indio, Palm Desert, Beaumont, San Bernardino 20, 21, 54, 80, 81, 91, 111, 111X, OmniTrans, MARTA, VVTA, Beaumont Transit, RTA, SB Metrolink Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 547 PIRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Bus (Motorbus) / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan SunLine Transit Agency Lift and Fuel Year Mfg. Model Seating Ramp Vehicle Type Built Code Code Capacity Equipped Length Code Average Lifetime # of Life to Date Miles Per Active Active # of Life to Date Vehicle Miles Vehicle As Of Vehicles Contingency Vehicle Miles through Year -To -Date FY 2019/ Vehicles Prior Year End March (e.g., March) 20 FY 2019/20 FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 FY 2019/20 2014 TR3OFP 24 5 32 5 0 28,769 72,500 14,500 2018 BYD K9 35 4 40 4 0 39,618 102,001 25,500 2012 EDN AXCESS 37 1 40 OR 1 0 177,596 182,166 182,166 2014 EDN AXCESS 37 3 40 OR 3 0 361,743 392,493 130,831 2017 EDN AXCESS 37 1 40 1 0 20,126 38,331 38,331 2018 EDN AXCESS 37 5 40 OR 5 0 113,700 201,553 40,310 2009 EDN EZRider32' 29 10 32 CN 10 0 3,589,949 3,907,847 390,784 2008 NFA LF 40' 39 20 40 CN 16 4 11,912,917 12,823,011 801,438 2008 NFA LF 40' 39 21 40 CN 21 0 12,452,557 13,486,720 642,224 2016 NFA LF 40' 39 6 40 CN 6 0 941,795 1,198,535 199,755 2018 NFA XCELSIOR 39 5 40 5 0 28,769 117,466 23,493 2005 OBI ORION V40' 44 4 40 CN 1 3 3,073,972 2,048,479 2,048,479 Totals: 436 85 78 7 32,741,511 34,571,102 443,219 a.no j pexu i JO Uenui laau Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Demand Response / Directly Operated Table 1.1 - Fleet Inventory FY2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan SunLine Transit Agency Lift and Fuel Year Mfg. Model Seating Ramp Vehicle Type Built Code Code Capacity Equipped Length Code # of Active Vehicles FY 2019/ 20 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2019/20 Average Lifetime Life to Date Miles Per Active Life to Date Vehicle Miles Vehicle As Of Vehicle Miles through Year -To -Date Prior Year End March (e.g., March) FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 FY 2019/20 2013 EDN AEROTECH 12 2 22 CN 2 0 502,190 504,909 252,454 2015 EDN AEROTECH 12 8 22 CN 8 0 1,230,362 1,387,173 173,396 2016 EDN AEROTECH 12 15 22 CN 15 0 1,617,381 2,042,420 136,161 2018 SPC Senator 12 14 23 14 0 524,817 37,486 Totals: 48 39 39 0 3,349,933 4,459,319 114,342 Fleet Inventory— Demand Response IFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2,0 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Review SunLine Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 Target FY 2019/20 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 4,329,667 Passenger Miles 36,983,241 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 315,136.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 4,616,188.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 5,311,625.0 Total Operating Expenses $40,840,138 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $7,610,947 Net Operating Expenses $33,229,191 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 18.63% I >= 19.74% I 20.51% I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $129.60 <= $79.38 $121.03 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $7.67 >_ $4.98 and <= $6.74 $7.07 Better Than Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.90 >_ $0.56 and <= $0.76 $0.88 Better Than Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $105.44 >= $55.01 and <= $74.43 $96.21 Better Than Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $7.20 >= $4.50 and <= $6.08 $6.35 Better Than Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 13.74 >= 9.35 and <= 12.65 13.61 Better Than Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.94 >= 0.77 and <= 1.04 0.90 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: Service Provider Performance Targets Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan niRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 - Table 2.1 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider; SunLine Transit Agency All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 End of Year Actual FY 2019/20 3rd Quarter Year -to -Date FY 2020/21 Plan FY 2020/21 Target Plan Performance Scorecard (a) Passengers 4,217,807 3,049,243 3,908,259 None Passenger Miles 36,122,234 24,372,196 30,751,958 None Revenue Hours 299,653.2 224,032.2 304,858.0 None Total Hours 324,795.0 243,623.0 337,179.0 None Revenue Miles 4,647,046.6 3,391,780.3 4,540,208.0 None Total Miles 5,271,012.0 3,873,122.0 5,277,383.0 None Operating Costs $33,375,694 $27,114,692 $40,660,244 None Passenger Revenue $5,276,226 $5,560,653 $7,777,170 None Measure -A Revenue None LCTOP Revenue None Operating Subsidy $28,099,467 $21,554,039 $32,883,074 None Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $111.38 $121.03 $133.37 <= $123.43 Fails to Meet Target Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile $7.18 $7.99 $8.96 None Operating Costs Per Passenger $7.91 $8.89 $10.40 None Farebox Recovery Ratio 15.81% 20.51% 19.12% >= 0.2 Meets Target Subsidy Per Passenger $6.66 $7.07 $8.41 >= $7.73 and <= $10.45 Meets Target Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.78 $0.88 $1.07 >= $0.96 and <= $1.30 Meets Target Subsidy Per Revenue Hour $93.77 $96.21 $107.86 >= $90.81 and <= $122.85 Meets Target Subsidy Per Revenue Mile $6.05 $6.35 $7.24 >= $5.99 and <= $8.11 Meets Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour 14.08 13.61 12.82 >= 9.99 and <= 13.51 Meets Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.91 0.90 0.86 >= 0.66 and <= 0.90 Meets Target a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2020/21 Plan to the FY 2020/21 Primary Target. iaodad 9DU wJolJed d12iS OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 22 -- SunLine-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak -Hour Fleet 17 17 68 17 65 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $26,650,357 $27,505,466 $34,281,108 $22,485,257 $34,123,115 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $6,023,187 $4,729,613 $6,357,301 $4,994,576 $6,541,914 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $20,627,171 $22,775,853 $27,923,807 $17,490,681 $27,581,201 Operating Characteristics ■ ■ 1- - Unlinked Passenger Trips 3,947,023 4,039,450 4,174,079 2,927,100 3,761,953 Passenger Miles 38,247,959 32,850,476 35,145,747 22,480,631 29,230,376 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 231,780.4 228,131.2 249,076.0 173,204.1 238,372.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,402,691.1 3,364,996.5 3,647,585.0 2,534,502.8 3,543,495.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 3,808,756.1 3,778,101.0 4,131,848.0 2,856,047.5 4,017,717.0 Performance Characteristics ' Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $114.98 $120.57 $137.63 $129.82 $143.15 Farebox Recovery Ratio 22.600/0 17.200/0 18.54% 22.21% 19.170/0 Subsidy per Passenger $5.23 $5.64 $6.69 $5.98 $7.33 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.54 $0.69 $0.79 $0.78 $0.94 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $88.99 $99.84 $112.11 $100.98 $115.71 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $6.06 $6.77 $7.66 $6.90 $7.78 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 17.0 17.7 16.8 16.9 15.8 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.16 1.20 1.14 1.15 1.06 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. cr fD N SRTP Service Summary— Fixed Route Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- SunLine-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics I 3 3 Peak -Hour Fleet 1 1 30 1 30 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $5,827,953 $5,870,228 $6,559,030 $4,629,435 $6,537,129 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $690,467 $546,613 $1,253,646 $566,077 $1,235,256 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $5,137,485 $5,323,614 $5,305,384 $4,063,358 $5,301,873 Operating Characteristics I Unlinked Passenger Trips 156,292 155,332 155,588 110,010 146,306 Passenger Miles 1,801,489 1,691,066 1,837,494 1,201,768 1,521,582 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 66,850.9 65,911.0 66,060.0 48,235.1 66,486.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 989,084.1 971,701.1 968,603.0 720,156.0 996,713.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 1,183,816.9 1,182,562.0 1,179,777.0 879,953.0 1,259,666.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $87.18 $89.06 $99.29 $95.98 $98.32 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.85% 9.31% 19.11% 12.23% 18.89% Subsidy per Passenger $32.87 $34.27 $34.10 $36.94 $36.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.85 $3.15 $2.89 $3.38 $3.48 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $76.85 $80.77 $80.31 $84.24 $79.74 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $5.19 $5.48 $5.48 $5.64 $5.32 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.16 0.16 0.16 0.15 0.15 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. SRTP Service Summary — Demand Response OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 2.2 -- SunLine Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2017/18 Audited FY 2018/19 Audited FY 2019/20 Plan FY 2019/20 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2020/21 Plan Fleet Characteristics 1 IL 1 1 4 Peak -Hour Fleet 26 26 98 24 95 Financial Data 1 Total Operating Expenses $32,478,310 $33,375,694 $40,840,138 $27,114,692 $40,660,244 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $6,713,654 $5,276,226 $7,610,947 $5,560,653 $7,777,170 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $25,764,656 $28,099,467 $33,229,191 $21,554,039 $32,883,074 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 4,122,539 4,217,807 4,329,667 3,049,243 3,908,259 Passenger Miles 41,488,246 36,122,234 36,983,241 24,372,196 30,751,958 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 303,326.4 299,653.2 315,136.0 224,032.2 304,858.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 4,679,725.3 4,647,046.6 4,616,188.0 3,391,780.3 4,540,208.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 5,280,523.1 5,271,012.0 5,311,625.0 3,873,122.0 5,277,383.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $107.07 $111.38 $129.60 $121.03 $133.37 Farebox Recovery Ratio 20.67% 15.810/% 18.63% 20.51% 19.12% Subsidy per Passenger $6.25 $6.66 $7.67 $7.07 $8.41 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.62 $0.78 $0.90 $0.88 $1.07 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $84.94 $93.77 $105.44 $96.21 $107.86 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $5.51 $6.05 $7.20 $6.35 $7.24 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 13.6 14.1 13.7 13.6 12.8 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.88 0.91 0.94 0.90 0.86 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. 0 m N we4s/ s-ICaeuJwns eDinaaS d12iS Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan CT CT PIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Data Elements Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics SunLine Transit Agency -- 8 FY 2020/21 All Routes Peak Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Measure -A LCTOP Route# Day Type Vehicles Passengers Miles Hours Hours Miles Miles Cost Revenue Revenue Revenue SUN-10 CL All Days 2 35,678 277,218 5,567 6,222 187,626 210,092 $1,793,752 $307,449 SUN-111 All Days 14 1,298,136 10,086,517 68,895 73,943 1,001,443 1,145,465 $9,779,909 $1,955,982 SUN-S11X All Days 3 32,037 248,927 4,215 4,634 82,308 110,001 $939,181 $187,836 SUN-14 All Days 7 539,984 4,195,676 28,405 30,324 428,952 490,135 $4,184,742 $777,848 SUN-15 All Days 1 107,026 831,592 5,455 5,782 87,409 97,355 $831,211 $161,028 SUN-20 All Days 2 28,271 219,666 3,636 4,215 85,208 102,497 $875,115 $165,277 SUN-21 All Days 2 11,861 92,160 1,313 1,550 18,332 23,865 $23,857 $4,752 SUN-24 All Days 4 160,441 1,246,627 13,092 14,555 143,805 174,819 $1,492,596 $298,519 SUN-30 All Days 5 564,323 4,384,790 25,291 26,982 267,589 303,794 $2,593,770 $518,754 SUN-32 All Days 3 231,894 1,801,816 16,742 17,731 279,264 300,604 $2,566,537 $504,405 SUN-40 All Days 3 46,340 360,062 4,569 4,914 46,448 56,257 $480,323 $96,065 SUN-54 All Days 2 67,557 524,918 6,758 6,791 113,914 114,016 $973,458 $194,692 SUN-70 All Days 3 136,001 1,056,728 9,957 10,462 131,523 145,236 $1,240,017 $248,003 SUN-80 All Days 5 198,505 1,542,384 9,243 9,850 106,827 119,809 $1,022,924 $204,585 SUN-81 All Days 4 74,859 581,654 5,766 6,251 55,174 68,539 $585,179 $113,930 SUN-90 All Days 1 64,501 501,173 6,013 6,242 78,555 84,145 $718,427 $143,685 SUN-91 All Days 3 140,443 1,091,242 17,193 18,154 315,172 345,961 $2,953,792 $493,277 SUN-95 All Days 1 24,096 187,226 6,262 6,717 113,946 125,127 $1,068,325 $165,827 SUN-DAR All Days 30 146,306 1,521,582 66,486 81,860 996,713 1,259,666 $6,537,129 $1,235,256 95 3,908,259 30,751,958 304,858 337,179 4,540,208 5,277,383 $40,660,244 $7,777,170 SRTP Route Statistics — System (1 of 2) v cr fD W OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Performance Indicators Table 2.3 - SRTP Route Statistics SunLine Transit Agency -- 8 FY 2020/21 All Routes Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Net Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Route # Day Type Subsidy Revenue Mile Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile SUN -SO CL All Days $1,486,303 $322.21 $9.56 $50.28 17.13% $41.66 $5.36 $266.98 $7.92 6.41 0.19 535-111 All Days $7,823,927 $141.95 $9.77 $7.53 20.00% $6.03 $0.78 $113.56 $7.81 18.84 1.30 SUN-111X All Days $751,345 $222.82 $11.41 $29.32 19.99% $23.45 $3.02 $178.26 $9.13 7.60 0.39 SUN-14 All Days $3,406,894 $147.32 $9.76 $7.75 18.58% $6.31 $0.81 $119.94 $7.94 19.01 1.26 SUN-15 All Days $670,183 $152.38 $9.51 $7.77 19.37% $6.26 $0.81 $122.86 $7.67 19.62 1.22 SUN-20 All Days $709,838 $240.68 $10.27 $30.95 18.88% $25.11 $3.23 $195.22 $8.33 7.78 0.33 SUN-21 All Days $19,105 $18.17 $1.30 $2.01 19.91% $1.61 $0.21 $14.55 $1.04 9.03 0.65 SUN-24 All Days $1,194,077 $114.01 $10.38 $9.30 19.99% $7.44 $0.96 $91.21 $8.30 12.25 1.12 SUN-30 All Days $2,075,016 $102.56 $9.69 $4.60 20.00% $3.68 $0.47 $82.05 $7.75 22.31 2.11 535-32 All Days $2,062,132 $153.30 $9.19 $11.07 19.65% $8.89 $1.14 $123.17 $7.38 13.85 0.83 SUN-40 All Days $384,258 $105.13 $10.34 $10.37 20.00% $8.29 $1.07 $84.10 $8.27 10.14 1.00 SUN-54 All Days $778,766 $144.05 $8.55 $14.41 20.00% $11.53 $1.48 $115.24 $6.84 10.00 0.59 SUN-70 All Days $992,014 $124.54 $9.43 $9.12 19.99% $7.29 $0.94 $99.63 $7.54 13.66 1.03 SUN-80 All Days $818,339 $110.67 $9.58 $5.15 20.00% $4.12 $0.53 $88.54 $7.66 21.48 1.86 SUN-81 All Days $471,249 $101.49 $10.61 $7.82 19.46 % $6.30 $0.81 $81.73 $8.54 12.98 1.36 SUN-90 All Days $574,742 $119.48 $9.15 $11.14 19.99% $8.91 $1.15 $95.58 $7.32 10.73 0.82 535-91 All Days $2,460,515 $171.80 $9.37 $21.03 16.69% $17.52 $2.25 $143.11 $7.81 8.17 0.45 SUN-95 All Days $902,498 $170.60 $9.38 $44.34 15.52% $37.45 $4.82 $144.12 $7.92 3.85 0.21 SUN-DAR All Days $5,301,873 $98.32 $6.56 $44.68 18.89% $36.24 $3.48 $79.74 $5.32 2.20 0.15 $32,883,074 $133.37 $8.96 $10.40 19.12% $8.41 $1.07 $107.86 $7.29 12.82 0.86 Tables ■ Table3.0 FY2020-2021 Table Highlights 1. Implement Refueled recommendations. Streamline the transit network as proposed in the Refueled: FY2021-2023 SRTP to provide faster, easier -to -understand, and more convenient service to attract new riders. The implementation recommendations will be presented to the public for their review and input. Then the implementation plan will be presented to the Board of Directors for its consideration. 2. Use microtransit solutions to provide service on select corridors or segments of routes to optimize scarce financial resources and address first/last mile travel needs. Microtransit is a key component of the Refueled multimodal service strategy. 3. Implement 10 Commuter Link service between Indio and San Bernardino. Originally slated to begin service in May 2020, the opening is now delayed until California State University, San Bernardino and Palm Desert resume on -campus classes. 4. Implement Route 111X weekday express service, a pilot project funded with Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds. It will provide service between Indio and Palm Springs. The actual start date will be determined by the transit market's recovery. 5. Implement the California Air Resource Board's Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) rollout plan. The ICT regulation requires SunLine to gradually transition to a 100 percent zero -emission bus fleet. 6. Develop and implement the Solar Microgrid to Hydrogen project to support hydrogen production to refuel fuel cell buses. This program will benefit not only the Coachella Valley and its surrounding areas, but will also benefit the transit industry as a whole. 7. Implement transit enhancements. Plan and construct bus stop improvements to support the new Route 111X service. 8. Upgrade the existing 350 bar public hydrogen station located at SunLine's Thousand Palms facility to a modern public station capable of fueling current and future hydrogen vehicles. This includes refueling 350 and 700 bar light and heavy duty vehicles. SunLine Transit Agency SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FY 2020/2021 - FY 2022/2023 Operating & Financial Data FY 2016/17 2017/18 201 2019/20 FY 2020/21 dited di 'mated Planned System -Wide Ridership 4,316,269 4,122,539 4,217,807 4,050,157 3,908,259 rating Cost Per Revenue $107.26 $107.07 $111.38 $121.41 $133.37 Hour Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 557 OFCOUNTY iRAERSIDEiION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 SunLine Transit Agency Operating Project Total Amount of 5307 IC [1] 5307 IC CARES 5310 OB [3] 5311 [4] 5311 (f) CARES 5311 CARES [6] 5311 FOB [7] 5312 OB [8] 5339 IC [9] CHAO OB [10] FARE [11] LCTOP OB [12] LCTOP LCTOP LTF [15] Funds OB [2] [5] PUC99313 [13] PUC99314 [14] 111 Express $230,457 $184,366 $46,091 Anti -Human Trafficking Campaign $46,650 $37,320 $9,330 COD Haul Pass $110,000 Commuter 10 $391,918 $53,889 $161,666 $25,709 CSUSB Haul Pass $12,207 Haul Pass $337,000 $337,000 Operating Assistance $39,036.669 $4,968,507 $13,208,971 $303,219 $300,000 $1,399,824 $10,810,502 SunRide Ride Share $250,000 $200,000 $50,000 Taxi Voucher $118,508 $29.627 $29,627 TEST RECORD Vanpool Program $306,741 $278,000 $28,741 Sub -total Operating $40,840,150 $4,968,507 $13,208,971 $29.627 $303,219 $53,889 $300,000 $161,666 $37,320 $0 $662,366 $1,399,824 $337,000 $0 $0 $11,000,000 Capital Project Total Amount of 5307 IC [1] 5307 IC CARES 5310 OB [3] 5311 [4] 5311 (f) CARES 5311 CARES [6] 5311 FOB [7] 5312 OB [8] 5339 IC [9] CMAO OB [10] FARE [11] LCTOP OB [12] LCTOP LCTOP LTF [15] Funds OB [2] [5] PUC99313 [13] PUC99314 [14] Bus Simulator (2) - SL-19-10 $-298,800 Facility Improvements - SL-21-15 $80,000 Heavy Duty Tow Truck - SL-20-13 5-400,000 Hydrogen Station Improvements - SL-19-11 $L00,000 nfannation Technology Projects - SL-21-12 $570,800 Maintenance T Is and Equipment - SL-21-10 $89,500 Microgrid to Hydrogen-SL-21-01 $1.038,101 $864,077 S174,024 Operations, Division II, & Electrolyzer Access Control $250,000 $200,000 Sunk - SL-21-13 Perimeter Lighting Division I - SL-21-14 $80,000 Public Hydrogen Station - SL-21-07 $2,500,000 Purchase Computer Hardware - SL-21-05 $4,120 $4,120 Replacement Bus - SL-21-02 $768,000 $359,400 Replacement Support Vehicles - SL-21-11 $415,000 Safely Enhancement Projects - SL-21-08 $60,000 $48,000 SunLine Center of Excellence in Zero Emissions $679,796 Technology - SL-21-06 SunRide Vehicle Purchase (4)- SL-21-03 $582,489 $465,991 Upgrade Division I Fence - SL-21-09 $100,000 Vans for Service Expansion (3)- SL-21-04 $179,200 $179,200 Sub -total Capita $6,298,206 $607,400 $0 $183,320 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $465,991 $0 $0 $864,077 $174,024 $0 Total Operating B Capita $47.138,356 $5,575,907 $13,208,971 $212,947 $303,219 $53,889 $300,000 $161,666 $37,320 $0 $1,128,357 $1,399,824 $337,000 $864,077 $174,024 $11,000,000 6 m 0 Summary of Funding Requests (1 of 3) Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan RIFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 SunLine Transit Agency Operating Project Total Amount of LTF-OB [16] MA SPT [17] OTHR FED [18] OTHR LCL [19] SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA -OB [22] STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Funds [20] [21] [23] [24] 111 Express $230,457 Anti -Human Trafficking Campaign $46,650 COD Haul Pass $110,000 $110,000 Commuter 10 $391,918 $150,654 CSUSB Haul Pass $12,207 $12,207 Haul Pass $337,000 Operating Assistance $39,036,669 $5,955,883 $2,089,763 SunRide Ride Share $250,000 Taxi Voucher $118,508 $59,254 TEST RECORD Vanpool Program $306,741 Sub -total Operating $40,840,150 $0 $5,955,883 $0 $2,421,878 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Capital Project Total Amount of LTF-0B [16] MA SPT [17] OTHR FED [18] OTHR LCL [19] SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA -OB [22] STA PUC99313 STA PUC99314 Funds [20] [21] [23] [24] Bus Simulator (2) - SL-19-10 $-298,800 $-298,800 Facility Improvements - SL-21-15 $80,000 $80,000 Heavy Duty Tow Truck - SL-20-13 S-400,000 $-400,000 Hydrogen Station Improvements - SL-19-11 $-400,000 $-400,000 olormation Technology Projects - SL-21-12 $570,800 $298,800 $272,000 Maintenance Tools and Equipment - SL-21-10 $89,500 $89,500 Microgrid to Hydrogen - SL-21-01 $1,038,101 Operations, Division II, & Electrolyzer Access Control $250,000 $50,000 Surv. - SL-21-13 Perimeter Lighting Division I-SL-21-14 $80,000 $80,000 Public Hydrogen Station - SL-21-07 $2,500,000 $400,000 $400,000 $875,215 $824,785 Purchase Computer Hardware - SL-21-05 $4,120 Replacement Bus - SL-21-02 $768,000 $255,000 $153,600 Replacement Support Vehicles - SL-21-11 $415,000 $415,000 Safety Enhancement Projects - SL-21-08 $60.000 $12,000 SunLine Center of Excellence in Zero Emissions $679,796 $665,719 $14,077 Technology - SL-21-06 SunRide Vehicle Purchase (4) - SL-21-03 $582,489 $116,498 Upgrade Division l Fence - SL-21-09 $100,000 $100,000 Vans for Service Expansion (3) - SL-21-04 $179,200 Sub -total Capita $6,298,206 $0 $0 $255,000 $0 $665,719 $114,077 $0 $2,143,813 $824,785 Total Operating & Capita $47,138,356 $0 $5,955,883 $255,000 $2,421,878 $665,719 $114,077 $0 $2,143,813 $824,785 6 m 0 Summary of Funding Requests (2 of 3) FIERIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Table 4.0 - Summary of Funding Requests - FY 2020/21 SunLine Transit Agency FY 2020121 Projected Funding Details 53071C 53071C CARES OB 5310 OB 5311 5311 (f) CARES 5311 CARES 5311 FOB 5312 OB CMAO OB FARE _CTOP OB _TF MA SPT OTHR LCL $4,968,507 $13,208,971 $29,627 $303,219 $53,889 [1] FY21 Apportionment. [2] Obligated funds FY20. [3] Operating: Remaining Taxi Voucher funds. Capital: FY21 application to CalTrans. SL-21-04 will use $44,800 in toll credits as a match, and SL21-21-05 will use $1,030 in toll credits as a match. [4] 5311 application for regional and intercity apportionment. [5] 5311(f) CARES Act request through the Division of Rail and Mass Transportation. $300,000 [6] Phase 2 of distribution for FTA 5311 CARES Act. $161,666 [7j 5311(9 application for regional and intercity apportionment. $37,320 [8] 5312 Public Transportation Innovation project selection $662,366 [10] Obligated Funds. $1,399,824 [11] Estimated FY21 ridership projections. $337,000 [12] Obligated Funds. $11,000,000 [15] FY21 Apportionment $5,955,8831 [17] FY21 apportionment $2,421,878 [19] Advertising revenue ($100,000), Bus Shelter Maintenance ($122,482), Non Trans Revenue ($8,000), SRA Overhead Fee revenue ($27,381), Outside Fueling Sales ($800,000), CNG Rebate ($400,000), Emission Credit Revenue ($600,000), Other Revenue and Interest ($31,900), Taxi Voucher ($59,254), CSUSB Regional Service ($150,654), Haul Pass COD ($110,000), Haul Pass CSUSB ($12,207). Total Estimated Operating Funding Request $40.840,150 5307 IC 5310 OB CMAO OB _CTOP PUC99313 _CTOP PUC99314 _TF-OB OTHR FED SGR PUC99313 SGR PUC99314 STA-OB STAPUC99313 STAPUC99314 Total Estimated Capital Funding Request $607,400 $183,320 SA65,991 $864,077 $174,024 $0 $255,000 [1] FY21 Apportionment. [3] Operating: Remaining Taxi Voucher funds. Capital: FY21 application to CalTrans. SL-21-04 wtll use $44,800 in toll credits as a match, and SL 21-21-05 will use $1,030 in loll credits as a match. [10] Obligated Funds. [13] FY21 Apportionment. [14] FY21 Apportionment [18] SL-19-11 obligated refunds repurposed to SL-20-07. [18] 5339(a) Slate Discretionary Bus Replacement through Division of Rail and Mass Transportation. $665,719 [20] FY21 apportionment New Projects. $114,077 [21] FY21 apportionment. New Projects. $0 [22] Obligated funds moved from SL-20-13 $2,143,813 [23] FY21 Apportionment. $824,785 [24] FY21 Apportionment. $6,298,206 Total Funding Request $47,138,356 o cr fD O Summary of Funding Requests (3 of 3) Tables Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (1 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-19-10 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Bus Simulator (2) Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Systems Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: The project will purchase two (2) bus simulators to provide realistic scenario driver training. Project Justification: This equipment will provide realistic driving simulation in a controlled classroom environment. This allows the Agency to use minimal resources and provide a greater level of training and correct driving techniques to mitigate potential hazards. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date June 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA - OB FY 2020/21 -$298,800 Total -$298,800 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 561 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (2 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-19-11 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Hydrogen Station Improvements Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: Hydrogen Project Description: Hydrogen fueling station and hydrogen program improvements Project Justification: Project to make improvements in regards to the Agency's hydrogen station and assistance in the expansion of the hydrogen fueling capacities. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date June 2021 July 2018 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount LTF-OB FY 2020/21 -$400,000 Total -$400,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue - 8,1;p-q OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 562 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (3 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-20-13 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Heavy Duty Tow Truck Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: Other Project Description: Purchase of one (1) heavy-duty tow truck tractor and landoll trailer to pick up disabled buses and vehicles and to tow buses to bus conferences when driving is not efficient. Project Justification: The purchase of one (1) heavy-duty tow truck tractor and trailer will ensure SunLine's ability to tow our vehicles and maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA - OB FY 2020/21 -$400,000 Total -$400,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 563 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (4 of 18) COUNTRIVERSIDEINF COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-01 Project Name: Microgrid to Hydrogen Category: Land Acquisition Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: N/A FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: The solar microgrid will provide clean, renewable energy in a first -of -a -kind, self-sustaining onsite solar plus battery storage power -plant used specifically to deliver hydrogen power to SunLine's transit fleet. SunLine's Solar Microgrid to Hydrogen will deliver two (2) Megawatts of battery storage (Electric Storage System) and one (1) Megawatt of solar energy. The project location is at the SunLine facility in Thousand Palms, California. Project Justification: The solar microgrid to hydrogen project will assist in the sustainable production of renewable energy to help power the Agency's electrolyzer to deliver hydrogen fuel to SunLine's transit fleet. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date September 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount LCTOP PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $864,077 LCTOP PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $174,024 Total $1,038,101 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Sliding - UUIYIMU !M! UM" U! IMMMSII 564 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (5 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-02 Project Name: Replacement Bus Category: Bus Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: Fuel Cell FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: Purchase of one (1) fixed -route bus to replace existing CNG bus that will meet its useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. Project Justification: The purchase of one (1) fixed -route bus will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain services reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date August 2020 July 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5307 IC FY 2020/21 $359,400 OTHR FED FY 2020/21 $255,000 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $153,600 Total $768,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 565 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (6 of 18) RI/RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-03 Project Name: SunRide Vehicle Purchase (4) Category: Vanpool Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: CNG FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: Purchase of Four (4) vehicles for SunLine's rideshare program that would follow turn by turn instructions from a navigation system that connects live traffic conditions and real-time requests for pick-ups and drop-offs. Project Justification: SunRide is designed to bridge the first/last mile gap of travel. The service would be used for short trips under 3 miles defined in service zones. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 October 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount CMAQ OB FY 2020/21 $465,991 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $116,498 Total $582,489 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue 801014.kid OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 566 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (7 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-04 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Vans for Service Expansion (3) Category: Vanpool Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: CNG Project Description: Procurement of three (3) expansion vans that are ADA accessible in response to customer feedback. Project Justification: Meet the transportation needs of customers who are ADA eligible and depend on SunLine services as their means of transportation. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5310 OB FY 2020/21 $179,200 Total $179,200 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 567 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (8 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-05 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Purchase Computer Hardware Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Expansion Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Procurement of hardware for SunLine's expansion vans. Project Justification: Hardware for a service that will meet the transportation needs of customers who are ADA eligible and depend on SunLine services as their means of transportation. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5310 OB FY 2020/21 $4,120 Total $4,120 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue - e1014.ki OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 568 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (9 of 18) 155r RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-06 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: SunLine Center of Excellence in Zero Emissions Technology Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Maintenance facility for Zero Emission Vehicles Project Justification: The maintenance bay training facility will provide comprehensive workforce training programs to zero emission transportation technologies that support commercial operation of zero emission buses. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $665,719 SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $14,077 Total $679,796 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 569 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (10 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-07 Project Name: Public Hydrogen Station Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Upgrade Fuel Type: N/A FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: Upgrade the existing 350 bar, public hydrogen station located at SunLine's Thousand Palms facility, to a modern public station capable of fueling current and future hydrogen vehicles. This includes refueling 350 and 700 bar light and heavy duty vehicles. The station will be able to fuel 5kg capacity light duty vehicle fills back-to-back without having to wait to recharge, and two 60kg capacity Class 8 heavy duty trucks, in less than an hour. The upgrade includes installing a 700 bar refueling system that consists of main skid, SAE 2601-1 new standards dispenser and storage unit up to 130 kg of hydrogen. Project Justification: SunLine's current hydrogen station is being utilized to refuel SunLine's fleet of hydrogen powered electric fuel cell buses at 350 bar with no public access to the station. The upgraded 700 bar public station will be accessible to light and heavy duty vehicles. This project will provide additional source of revenue by selling hydrogen fuel and will support SunLine's future fleet. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date January 2021 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount LTF-OB FY 2020/21 $400,000 STA - OB FY 2020/21 $400,000 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $875,215 STA PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $824,785 Total $2,500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue 801014.kid OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 570 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (11 of 18) IIRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-08 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Safety Enhancement Projects Category: Equipment Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: To enhance the safety and security of the facility Project Justification: This project is needed to upgrade the current guard shack at SunLine's Division II facility. The upgrade will include security enhancements for occupant safety, proper securement of IT, and video equipment. In addition, the installation of a security film on the stairwell glass panels will assist in the event of the glass panels breaking the film and will keep the panels in place. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date October 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5307 IC FY 2020/21 $48,000 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $12,000 Total $60,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 571 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (12 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-09 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Upgrade Division I Fence Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: This project is to secure the base of the perimeter fencing at SunLine's Division I facility in Thousand Palms. Project Justification: This project is required to provide safe and secure transit facilities for staff and agency access Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date January 2021 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR PUC99314 FY 2020/21 $100,000 Total $100,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue 801014.kid OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 572 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (13 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-10 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Maintenance Tools and Equipment Category: Equipment Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Funds requested in this fiscal year will enable SunLine to improve maintenance tools and equipment in Thousand Palms, Indio, and Coachella. Project Justification: This project is necessary for upgrading aging equipment at the various SunLine locations, including equipment for oil storage, and a shop floor sweeper, and golf carts. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $89,500 Total $89,500 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 573 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (14 of 18) RFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-11 Project Name: Replacement Support Vehicles Category: Support Vehicles Sub -Category: Replacement Fuel Type: CNG FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Description: SunLine's support vehicles comply with FTA regulations and use alternative fueled vehicles (CNG). SunLine plans to purchase cars and/or pick-ups. Project Justification: The replacement support vehicles are needed for use by operations and maintenance staff as well as for use by administration staff. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date October 2020 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $415,000 Total $415,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue - e1014. i OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 574 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (15 of 18) OFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-12 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Information Technology Projects Category: Equipment Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: This project supports the purchase of the Agency's need for software, network infrastructure, computing resources, and business analytics. Project Justification: The use of IT equipment is critical to the daily function and efficiency in providing safety, reliable, and efficient transit services. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date January 2021 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA - OB FY 2020/21 $298,800 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $272,000 Total $570,800 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 575 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (16 of 18) piRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-13 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Operations, Division II, & Electrolyzer Access Control Surveillance Category: Equipment Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Access control and surveillance for the Agency's Operations, Division II facility, and Access Control Surveillance. Project Justification: Improve safety and surveillance at SunLine's Operations Facility, Division II Facility, and Electrolyzer. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 March 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount 5307 IC FY 2020/21 $200,000 STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $50,000 Total $250,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue - e1014.ki OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 576 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (17 of 18) INFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-14 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Perimeter Lighting Division I Category: Equipment Sub -Category: Upgrade Fuel Type: N/A Project Description: Install perimeter lighting to enhance the safety and security of the facility Project Justification: The enhancement of perimeter lighting is required to provide safe and secure transit facilities for staff and vehicles Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $80,000 Total $80,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 577 Table 4.0A Capital Project Justification (18 of 18) RFRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION FY 2020/21 SRTP SunLine Transit Agency Table 4.0 A - Capital Project Justification Project Number: SL-21-15 FTIP No: Not Assigned - New Project Project Name: Facility Improvements Category: Facilities Sub -Category: Rehabilitation/Improvement Fuel Type: N/A Proiect Description: Improve existing facilities in Thousand Palms, Indio, and Coachella Project Justification: This project is necessary for upgrading the aging facility and equipment at the various SunLine locations including HVAC, plumbing, electrical and others as needed. Project Schedule: Start Date Completion Date July 2020 December 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA PUC99313 FY 2020/21 $80,000 Total $80,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Su1L/ue 801014.kid OWING rill MO, 9r INOOSII 578 Table 4.0B Farebox Calculation I Table 4B (consistent with Commission Revenue Sources included in Farebox Calculation L - Farebox Calculation Farebox Recovery Policy) Actual Amount FY19/20 from FY18/19 (Estimate) Audit ii FY20/21 (Plan) 1 Passenger Fares 2,866,073.00 1,909,277.93 1,399,824.00 2 Interest 14,560.00 14,847.43 15,500.00 3 General Fund Supplement - - - 4 Measure A 580,000.00 426,988.41 3,986,934.68 5 Advertising Revenue 243,389.00 225,174.81 100,000.00 6 Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets - - - 7 CNG Revenue / Emission Credit 1,266,494.00 3,493,635.80 1,800,000.00 8 Lease / Other Revenue - - - 9 Federal Excise Tax Refund - - - 10 Investment Income - - - 11 CalPers CERBT - - - 12 Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes - - - 13 Other Revenues 885,709.00 652,032.47 506,378.00 . Total Revenue for Farebox 5,856,225.00 6,721,956.86 7,808,636.68 Calculation (1-13) . Total Operating Expenses 33,375,694.00 36,062,000.33 40,840,150.00 for Farebox Calculation - - Farebox Recovery Ratio 17.55% 18.64% 19.12% Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan 579 Project Desolpdon Total Amount of Funds Total Obligated Amount LTF STA Obligated STA Measure A Obligated SGR Section 5300 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Obligated Section 5307 IndiolCathedrel City Palm Springs CARES ACT Section 5307 Section 5309 Section 5310 Section 5311 Section 5311 (i) Section 5339 Obligated Section 5339 LCTOP LOOP Obligated Obligated CMAQ CMAQ Other Revenue OPERATING Operating Assistance $40,804,070 $4,982,884 $18,839,853 $9,037,987 $4,962,864 $2,160,147 $303,219 82,500,000 Commuter 10 Vanpool Program $391,918 $308,741 $0 $0 $25,709 $28,741 $215555 $278,000 $150,654 111 Express $600.000 $0 $120,000 $480,000 SunRide Ride Share $250,000 $0 $50,009 $200,000 $220,000 $0 $220,000 CSUSB Haul Pass $12,207 $0 $12,207 Sub -total Operating $42,584,936 $4,962,864 819,064,303 $0 $0 $9,037,967 $0 $4,962,864 $2,160,147 $0 $0 $303,219 $215,555 $0 $0 $0 $0 $958,000 $2,882,861 CAPITAL Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds With Obligated Total Obligated Amount LTF STA Obligated STA Measure A Obligated SGR Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Obligated Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs CARES ACT Section 5307 Section 5309 Section 5310 Section 5311 Section 5311 (i) Section 5339 Obligated Section 5339 LCTOP LCTOP Obligated Obligated CMAQ CMAQ Other Revenue Replacement Buses (Battery Electric 2) SL-22-01 $2,000.000 $0 $400,000 $1,600.000 Replacement Buses (Fuel Cell 15) SL-23-02 $15,000,000 $0 $15,000,000 Support Vehicles (5 cars. 1 Truck) SL-22-02 $285,000 $0 $265,000 Facility Improvements SL-23-03 $352.000 $0 $352,000 Hydrogen Station DMslon I SL-22433 $3,500,000 $1,600,000 $1,800,000 $1,900,000 Demolition al Existing Trailers SL-23-04 $80,000 $0 $80,000 Perimeter Fencing Electrolyxer SL-22-04 $300,000 $0 $300,000 Mobile Command Center SL-23-05 $500.000 $0 $100,000 $400,000 Microgrid to Hydrogen Phase III SL-22-05 $3,802,587 $0 $3,802,567 Bus Refurbishment SL-23-06 $2,500,000 $482,129 $17,871 $1,048,769 $951,231 Indio CNG Station Upgrade SL-22-06 $1,500,000 $1,500,000 Sub -total Capital $29,799567 $1,600,000 $0 $1,497,000 $1,982,129 $0 $17,871 $400,000 $2,648,769 $0 $0 $0 $0 10 $1,600,000 $951,231 $0 $0 $0 $0 $20,702567 Total Operating B Capital $72,384,503 $8,562,884 819,064,303 $1.497,000 $1,982,129 $9,037,987 $400,000 87,811,633 $0 $0 8303219 9215,555 81,600,000 80 $0 $0 $958.000 923,585,428 cr fD Summary of Funding Requests in FY2021-2022 Tables Refueled FY2021-2023 Short Range Transit Plan Project Description Total Amount of Funds Total Obligated Amount LTF STA State of Good Repair Measure A Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Obligated Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Section 5339 CMAQ Section 5311 Section 5311 (p Other Farebox OPERATING Operating Assistance $40,804,070 $0 $21,000,000 $9,037,987 $4,962,864 $303,219 $2,500,000 $3,000,000 Commuter 10 $391,918 $0 $25,709 $215,555 $150,654 Vanpool Program $306,741 $0 $28,741 $278,000 111 Express $600,000 $306,741 $120,000 $480,000 SunRide Ride Share $40,809 $0 $6,800 $34,009 COD Haul Pass $300,000 $0 $300,000 CSUSB Haul Pass $12,207 $200,000 $12,207 Sub -total Operating $42,455,745 $506,741 $21,181,250 $0 $0 $9,037,987 $4,962,864 $0 $0 $792,009 $303,219 $215,555 $2,962,861 $3,000,000 CAPITAL Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds With Obligated Total Obligated Amount LTF STA State of Good Repair Measure A Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Obligated Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm Springs Section 5339 CMAQ Section 5311 Section 5311 (f) Other Farebox Shop Equipment SL-23-01 $15,000 $0 $15,000 Support Vehicle (Truck) SL-23-02 $135,000 $0 $135,000 Driver Training Facility SL-23-03 $4,000,000 $0 $800,000 $1,600,000 $1,600,000 Guard Shack Upgrade SL-23-04 $100,000 $0 $100,000 Sub -total Capital $4,250,000 $0 $0 $1,050,000 $0 $0 $1,600,000 $0 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Total Operating & Capital $46,705,745 $506,741 $21,181,250 $1,050,000 $0 $9,037,987 $6,562,864 $0 $1,600,000 $792,009 $303,219 $215,555 $2,962,861 $3,000,000 6 m N Summary of Funding Requests in FY2021-2023 Appendix A: SunLine Existing Route Profiles Route 14 Desert Hot Springs — Palm Springs Route 14 is one of SunLine's most successful routes. This trunk route links the cities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs, connecting to Routes 15, 20, 24, 30, Palm Springs BUZZ, and 111, and linking riders with local shopping centers, schools, the Palm Springs Convention Center, Department of Motor Vehicles, the Employment Development Department, libraries, senior center, theaters, and other services within the communities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs. Route 14 operates with 20-minute frequency during weekday peak periods and 30-minute frequency during weekday evenings. Two Route 14 trips, including the last trip, serve Hacienda Avenue in Desert Hot Springs to meet passenger demand in this area. Additionally, one morning trip is provided to accommodate the volume of school students. DESERT N MISSION LAKES HOT SPRINGS Cs NA PALM SPRINGS z Z V Z aZ it. z•RAMON TWO BUNCH PALMS VISTA CHINO TAHQUITZ z 30 111 BARISTO . DMV J z Z Z PIERSON p HACIENDA DILLON O TIME POINT G TRANSFER '� CITY HALL O LIBRARY 0$ SENIOR CENTER SCHOOL ■ I I SELECTEDTRIP ONLY Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 4:53 AM 11:20 PM Weekdays 5:48 AM 10:41 PM Weekends Frequency 20/30 min 40 min Weekdays (peak/off-peak) Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $3,375,186 $680,986 Cost per Rider $5.81 Subsidy per Rider $4.64 Ridership 15 mph 7 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 1,844 On Time Performance Average Daily Passengers Weekends 1,034 90.4% Annual Passengers Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) 580,984 Passengers per Hour 20.8 29.42 Passengers per Mile 1.4 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 5,323 429,302 Annual Bicycle Boardings 18,798 Population within .5 mi of stop 32,276 27,996 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 10,711 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Revenue Hours 583 Route 15 Desert Hot Springs — Desert Edge Route 15 serves the community of Desert Hot Springs and Desert Edge, a Riverside County unincorporated community located southeast of Desert Hot Springs. Route 15 connects to Routes 14 and 20, and links riders with local shopping centers, a neighborhood community center, Desert Hot Springs Recreation, schools, and other services within Desert Hot Springs. The most recent Operational Analysis proposed a 30-minute frequency for this route. Frequency changes are under study and are subject to available funding and Board approval. Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 4:54 AM 8:49 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $656,493 6:49 AM 7:441 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $136,799 Frequency 60 min Weekdays Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider $5.60 $4.43 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles LRidership 16 mph 1 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 381 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 187 90.3% Annual Passengers 117,180 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 21.5 15,9 Passengers per Mile 1.3 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,048 87,484 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,011 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 18,004 5,448 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 1,649 4'" ST 'et t DESERT HOT SPRINGS PIERSON HACIENDA TWO BUNCH PALMS 14 20 N A O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER Ift CITY HALL • SENIOR CENTER • LIBRARY 1 SCHOOL DESERT z EDGE DILLON 9 to z z AURORA 584 Route 20 Desert Hot Springs —Thousand Palms — Palm Desert Route 20 provides limited stop service between Desert Hot Springs and Palm Desert. Route 20 provides residents of Desert Hot Springs and surrounding communities improved access to resources and employment opportunities concentrated toward the center of the Coachella Valley, including the College of the Desert. Route 20 connects with Routes 14, 15, 32, 54, 10 Commuter Link, and 111. O • w 4•r"ST DESERT HOT SPRINGS PIERSON TWO BUNCH PALMS DILLON O TIME POINT Qi TRANSFER �tL CITY HALL �$ SENIOR CENTER LIBRARY • MALL �C SCHOOL PALM DESERT a Z McCallum 2 z Theatre • i F g.O 21 32 54 111 UNIVERSITY HAHN FRED WARING INDIAN WELLS Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 6:32 AM 7:55 PM Weekdays No weekend service Frequency 60 min Weekdays Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $432,242 $37,038 Cost per Rider $13.68 Subsidy per Rider $12.51 No weekend service Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 24 mph 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 124 Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A 91.2% Annual Passengers 31,587 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 8.8 48.5 Passengers per Mile 0.37 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 63 84,780 Annual Bicycle Boardings 736 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 21,050 3,582 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 8,436 585 Route 21 Gerald Ford and Cook — Palm Desert Mall Route 21 provides service to Palm Desert, enabling riders to access the College of the Desert, the McCallum Theater, Palm Desert City Hall, Kaiser Permanente, California State University, San Bernardino — Palm Desert Campus, University of California, Riverside — Palm Desert Campus, Palm Desert High School, Palm Desert Library, major employment sites, medical facilities, and shopping centers. Route 21 connects with Routes 20, 32, 54, 111, and 10 Commuter Link. O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER I CITY HALL O SENIOR CENTER © LIBRARY ® POST OFFICE t SCHOOL © MALL PALM DESERT NA TOWN CENTER College of the Desert McCallum Theater \kAHN 20 32 54 111 DMV • GERALD FORD UNIVERSITY BERGER CSUSB ▪ UCR COUNTRY CLUB 0 0 V HOVLEY MERLE FRED WARING HWY 111 SAN PABLO Brandman Unviersity INDIAN WELLS Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 11:00 AM 3:50 PM Weekdays No weekend service Frequency 60 min Weekdays Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $161,073 $15,093 Cost per Rider $12.33 Subsidy per Rider $11.18 No weekend service Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 14 mph 1 On Time Performance Average Daily Passengers Weekday Average Daily Passengers Weekends 90.9% Annual Passengers Passengers per Hour Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) 51 N/A 13,068 9.8 13.8 Passengers per Mile Annual Revenue Miles 0.7 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 80 18,391 Annual Bicycle Boardings Annual Revenue Hours 284 Population within .5 mi of stop 16,593 1,334 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 10,768 x c a) a a 586 Route 24 Palm Springs Route 24 offers service in Palm Springs with connections to Routes 14, 30, 32, Palm Springs BUZZ, and 111. Route 24 links riders to destinations such as the Desert Regional Hospital, Desert Highland Community Center, Social Security Administration, schools, GP���Py medical facilities, theaters, and shopping centers. ROSA PARKS STEVENS O TIME POINT J TRANSFER m CITY HALL ®S SENIOR CENTER • LIBRARY al HOSPITAL yr SCHOOL SELECTED TRIP WEEKDAY ONLY SAN RAFAEL RACQUET CLUB • O• w� m v i � VISTA CHINO TACHEVAH BARISTO PALM SPRINGS N A Palm Springs International Airnor Riverside County Family Health Center RAMON INTERLINES WITH 32 SUNNY DUNES A Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 6:10 AM 8:25 PM 6:18 AM 7:38 PM Weekdays Weekends Frequency 40 min Weekdays Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $1,539,296 $206,797 Cost per Rider $8.73 Subsidy per Rider $7.56 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 11 mph 5 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 581 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 263 90.4% Annual Passengers 176,322 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 13.8 20.3 Passengers per Mile 1.03 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,428 171,466 Annual Bicycle Boardings 5,868 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 23,624 12,760 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 12,548 587 Route 30 Cathedral City— Palm Springs Route 30 is one of SunLine's most successful routes. Route 30 is a trunk route providing service between the cities of Cathedral City and Palm Springs. Riding Route 30 provides customers with access to the Palm Springs International Airport, Palm Springs City Hall, Social Security Administration, public libraries, city halls, senior centers, schools, shopping centers, and various industrial parks. It operates with 20-minute frequency during weekday peak periods, connecting to Routes 14, 24, 32, Palm Springs BUZZ, and 111. The most recent Operational Analysis proposed a 15-minute frequency for this trunk route. Frequency changes are under study and are subject to available funding and Board approval. BARISTO } INDIAN CYN 'O N a a RAMON PALM SPRINGS O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER W CITY HALL O$ SENIOR CENTER O LIBRARY ® POST OFFICE IX SCHOOL BARISTO u w TAHQUITZ RAMON Social Security Office Q W DINAH SHORE VICTORIA I� CATHEDRAL CITY Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:40 AM 10:440 PM 6:15 AM 9:41 PM Weekdays Weekends Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $3,095,564 $725,263 Frequency 20 min Weekdays Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider $5.02 $3.84 40 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 11 mph 5 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 1,941 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 1,131 89.0% Annual Passengers 616,319 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 24.0 19.3 Passengers per Mile Annual Revenue Miles 2.31 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 4,792 267,281 Annual Bicycle Boardings 20,864 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 35,632 25,674 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 12,274 588 Route 32 Palm Springs — Cathedral City —Thousand Palms —Rancho Mirage — Palm Desert Route 32 links Palm Springs, Cathedral City, the unincorporated community of Thousand Palms, Rancho Mirage, and Palm Desert. The route connects with Routes 14, 20, 21, 24, 30, 54, and 111. Riders can access schools and various retail centers along Ramon Road in Cathedral City. Routing through the 1-10 interchange provides access to Costco, Home Depot, and the Regal Cinemas 16 theater complex, as well as service to the Agua Caliente Casino on Ramon Road at Bob Hope Drive. This route also provides service to Eisenhower Medical Center, College of the Desert, and Westfield Palm Desert Mall. VISTA CHINO Palm Springs Air Museum Z PALM SPRINGS N A O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER ® MALL © HOSPITAL O LIBRARY I21 POST OFFICE • SCHOOL w 30 CATHEDRAL CITY w a RANCHO MIRAGE PALM DESERT 0 x m 0 m ROUTE 32 A THOUSAND PALMS Bus Stops it4161#426 Ramon i® Haskell SUNLINE: .� 2 OFFICE' 5 6 o Bus Stops tel l THOUSAND PALMS RAMON SunLine's Main Offices 32505 Harry Oliver Trail DINAH SHORE �J WLu COO MONTERE COUNTRY CLUB HAHN College of the Desert McCallum Theater 0 FRED WARING HWY 111 Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:05 AM 10:40 PM 6:54 AM 10:48 PM Weekdays Weekends Frequency 50 min 60min Weekdays Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $2,032,656 $292,978 Cost per Rider $8.12 Subsidy per Rider $6.95 Ridership 17 mph 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 791 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 452 88.9% Annual Passengers 250,298 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 14.8 40.4 Passengers per Mile 0.9 Annual Revenue Miles • Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,808 279,553 Annual Bicycle Boardings 11,081 Annual Revenue Hours 16,865 Population within .5 mi of stop 37,340 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 14,609 589 Route 54 Palm Springs — Indian Wells — La Quinta — Bermuda Dunes — Indio Route 54 operates between Palm Desert and Indio, serving the cities of Indian Wells and La Quinta as well as the unincorporated community of Bermuda Dunes, via Fred Waring Drive. This route was designed to provide direct service between Palm Desert and Indio, in addition to serving the length of Fred Waring Drive. Service is provided to the Indio Workforce Development, College of the Desert (Indio and Palm Desert), McCallum Theater, Civic Center, and the Indian Wells Tennis Gardens. Route 54 connects with Routes 20, 21 32, 70, 80, 81, 91, 111, and 10 Commuter Link at Westfield Palm Desert Mall, Fred Waring at Washington, and Highway 111 at Flower. Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:55 AM 7:55 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost No weekend service Annual Farebox Route Revenue Frequency $812,514 $91,889 Cost per Rider $10.24 45 min Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $9.08 No weekend service Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 17 mph 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 312 Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A 83.6% Annual Passengers 79,314 Passengers per Hour 11.8 24.8 Passengers per Mile 0.7 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 455 113,483 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,331 Population within .5 mi of stop 38,468 6,733 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 14,298 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Annual Revenue Miles Annual Revenue Hours TOWN CENTER MONTEREY College of the Desert McCallum Theater © O S.0 OO Y PALM INDIAN DESERT WELLS FRED WARING O TIME POINT © LIBRARY Q TRANSFER O SENIOR CENTER 1ft CITY HALL ® MALL SCHOOL SHINGTON Social Services Workforce Development Center QUINTA LL INDIO College of the Desert Indio Campus co VO REQUA HWY 111 Z^ 0 g 10 a 80 81 91 111 590 Route 70 La Quinta — Palm Desert— Indian Wells — Bermuda Dunes COUNTRY CLUB A HARRIS.; .r BERMUDA DUNES PALM Route 70 offers bus service to DESERT La Quinta and the edge of the cities of Palm Desert and Indian Wells and the unincorporated community of Bermuda Dunes. Riders are able to access the Indian Wells Tennis Gardens on Washington Street at Fred Waring Drive, city hall, the senior center, schools, and various shopping centers along Adams Street, Avenue 47, and Washington Street. Transfers from Route 70 to Route 111 can be made on Highway 111 at Adams Street and transfers from Route 70 to Route 54 can be made on Washington Street at Fred Waring Drive. FRED WARING INDIAN WELLS HWy 717 z 0 z O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER • CITY HALL ® POST OFFICE O LIBRARY QS SENIOR CENTER 4Por SCHOOL z O w cc co O SINALOA BERMUDAS MADRID z O l~7 z MILES BLACKHAWK ■ TAMPICO LA QUINTA COVE Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:15 AM 8:45 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,168,833 5:15 AM 9:28 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $189,151 Frequency 45 min Weekdays Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider $7.16 $6.00 90 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 13 mph 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 554 On Time Performance Average Daily Passengers Weekends 207 91.0% Annual Passengers 163,252 Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 16.9 19.5 Passengers per Mile Annual Revenue Miles Annual Revenue Hours 1.3 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 507 129,249 Annual Bicycle Boardings 7,550 Population within .5 mi of stop 29,299 9,687 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 5,958 591 Route 80 Indio Route 80 operates in a clockwise loop serving residents of Indio, providing access to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, Social Security Administration, Employment Development Department, Indio Senior Center, Boys and Girls Club, Riverside County Social Services Offices, Department of Motor Vehicles, Martha's Village & Kitchen, community centers, schools, and shopping centers. Three afternoon trips to Shadow Hills High School on Jefferson Street at Avenue 39 are provided. Route 80 connects to Routes 54, 81, 90, 91, 10 Commuter Link, and 111 at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street. AVE 38 °EmsAVE 39 *i v INDIO O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER © HOSPITAL O SENIOR CENTER SCHOOL 1 ■ I SELECTED TRIP ONLY • • • • Z. O Q. • AVE 40 • • • • • • • 0 N A AVE 41 cc z 0 AVE 42 Social Services Workforce Development Center 54 81>- Indio Teen z Center In Q • •< AVE 46 z z J L) © DR CARREON Riverside County Family Health Center ▪ 111111111 GOLF CNTR PKWY AVE 44 -4— ■ ■■■■■■■■■■■ DMV ■ SunLine's Indio Facility 9 AVE 48 0 2 Q 7 m Hours of Operation Service Span i Financial 6:00 AM 8:45 PM 6:00 AM 8:45 PM Weekdays Weekends Frequency 30 min Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,093,403 Annual Farebox Route Revenue $237,025 Cost per Rider $5.37 Subsidy per Rider $4.21 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 12 mph 5 Average Daily Passengers Weekday Average Daily Passengers Weekends 89.8% Annual Passengers On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) 11.02 Annual Revenue Miles 105,020 Annual Revenue Hours 684 275 203,664 Passengers per Hour 22.5 Passengers per Mile 1.9 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,819 Annual Bicycle Boardings 4,028 Population within .5 mi of stop 46,613 9,061 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 10,514 592 Route 81 Indio Route 81 is a loop route that operates counter -clockwise and provides transit service to residents of Indio, enabling passenger access to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, Employment Development Department, Social Security Administration, College of the Desert —Indio campus, Riverside County social services offices, Department of Motor Vehicles, Coachella Valley Cultural Museum, the Indio transportation center, community centers, library, schools, and shopping centers. Three morning trips to Shadow Hills High School on Jefferson Street at Avenue 39 are provided. Route 81 connects to Routes 54, 80, 91, 111, and 10 Commuter Link at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street. AVE 38 F O AVE 39 "o LL o INDIO o TIME POINT a TRANSFER Ift CITY HALL Q SENIOR CENTER ® MALL © HOSPITAL SCHOOL ■ I 1 SELECTEDTRIP ONLY AVE 40 f Sodal Services Workforce Development Ceps r• AVE 41 f GOLF CENTER P ....DMV Indio Transportation Center HWY 111 & FLOWER SonLine's Indio Facility Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:25 AM 8:15 PM 5:25 AM 8:15 PM Weekdays Weekends Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $682,616 $103,584 Frequency 60 min Weekdays 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider Ridership $7.69 $6.52 10 mph 4 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 298 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 119 90.6% Annual Passengers 88,736 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 15.7 8.71 Passengers per Mile 1.7 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 603 53,409 Annual Bicycle Boardings 974 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 30,954 5,660 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 8,085 593 Route 90 Indio —Coachella Route 90 serves the cities of Coachella and Indio, allowing passengers to access the Employment Development Department, Coachella City Hall, library, senior center, Boys & Girls Club, local schools, and shopping centers. Connections to Routes 80, 91, 95, and 111 occur at the transfer location on 5th Street at Vine Avenue in Coachella and on Doctor Carreon Boulevard at Van Buren Street in Indio. x c a) a a INDIO 80 z 0 u O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER it CITY HALL COA CHELLA Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:00 AM 9:52 PM 5:00 AM 8:52 PM Weekdays Weekends Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $724,425 $85,750 Frequency 60 min Weekdays Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider $9.94 $8.76 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 13 mph 1 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 214 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 170 92.3% Annual Passengers 72,872 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 12.1 12.96 Passengers per Mile 0.9 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 624 78,800 Annual Bicycle Boardings 1,339 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 40,099 6,012 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 5,865 594 Route 91 Indio — Coachella — Thermal — Mecca — Oasis Route 91 links Indio and Coachella with the unincorporated communities of Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis. Riders on Route 91 are able to connect to Routes 54, 80, 81, 90, 95, 10 Commuter Link, and 111 at the transfer location on 5th Street and Vine Avenue in Coachella and on Highway 111 and Flower Street in Indio. Passengers have access to employment sites, medical facilities, and shopping centers. Route 91 provides direct service to College of the Desert's East Valley Campus in Mecca. Route 91 also provides selected early, midday, and late night trips to Highway 111 and Flower to meet passenger demand in this area. INDIO HWY111& Q HWY111&FLOWER MARILYN ri I. • SunLine's Indio Facility z w i o 20 • z .C" *F AVE 54 OASIS 'Sy 9yk0. 2 Mountain yi Estates O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER ® POST OFFICE © MEDICAL • SCHOOL ■ I I SELECTEDTRIP ONLY COACHELLA AIRPORT BLVD Torres -Martinez Helath Center AVE 66 MARTINEZ 0 AVE 70 COD Mecca/Thermal r mnu, AVE 62 COD Mecca/Thermal AVE 58 AVE 62 MECCA 5th Riverside County: Library &; Family Health Center. HOME Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 4:48 AM 10:20 PM Weekdays 5:30 AM 10:40 PM Weekends Frequency Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $2,082,181 $182,625 Cost per Rider $13.26 60 min Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $12.10 60 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Ridership 19 mph 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 503 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 270 89.8% Annual Passengers 157,058 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 9.1 51.11 Passengers per Mile 0.5 Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings 384 315,323 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,618 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 31,866 17,279 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 5,662 595 Route 95 Coachella — Mecca — North Shore Route 95 serves Coachella and the unincorporated communities of Mecca and North Shore. Route 95 serves the College of the Desert's East Valley Campus in Mecca. Passengers on Route 95 are able to connect to Routes 90, 91, and 111 at the transfer location on 5th Street and Vine Avenue in Coachella. Service allows passengers to access employment sites, medical facilities, and shopping centers. AVE 70 cc / .. � .IL.71 AVE50 90 91 111 COACHELLA AVE 52 THERMAL AVE 72 VCZ& a Fk WINDLASS NORTH SHORE c O TIME POINT Q TRANSFER O MEDICAL 'e[ SCHOOL SELECTEDTRIP ONLY V w AVE 57 Riverside County Library and Family Health Center COD Mecca/Thermal Camous ■ AVE 62 Z J MECCA 5th HOME AVE66 6' 4y70 o, 4`F�o NORTH SHORE Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 4:15 AM 4:15 AM 10:00 PM 10:00 PM Weekdays Weekends Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $764,117 $34,036 Frequency 180 min Weekdays 180 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Cost per Rider Subsidy per Rider Ridership $26.50 $25.32 19 mph 1 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 85 Average Daily Passengers Weekends 65 87.4% Annual Passengers 28,840 On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour 4.5 52.49 Passengers per Mile 0.2 Annual Revenue Miles • Annual Wheelchair Boardings 130 115,773 Annual Bicycle Boardings 788 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 18,910 6,390 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 1,960 596 Route 111 Palm Springs —Cathedral City— Rancho Mirage — Palm Desert— Indian Wells — La Quinta —Indio—Coachella Route 111 is SunLine's highest ridership trunk route. Route 111 provides service along Highway 111 from Palm Springs to Coachella, linking with the cities of Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, and Indio. Route 111 enables riders to travel to destinations along the Highway 111 corridor. The route links passengers with major retail and commercial centers, recreational attractions, museums, and educational and medical institutions. Connecting routes include Routes 14, 20, 21, 24, 30, 32, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, 95, Palm Springs BUZZ, and 10 Commuter Link at transfer locations at Westfield Palm Desert Mall, 5th Street at Vine Avenue, Highway 111 at Flower Street, Highway 111 at Adams Street, B Street at Buddy Rogers Avenue, Indian Canyon Drive at Ramon Road, and Palm Canyon Drive at Stevens Road. The most recent Operational Analysis proposed a 15-minute frequency for this trunk route. Frequency changes are under study and are subject to available funding and Board approval. Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:00 AM 11:05 PM 5:30 AM 11:05 PM Weekdays Weekends Frequency 20/30 min Weekdays (peak/off-peak) 20/30 min Weekends Average Speed Peak Vehicles Annual Route Cost Annual Farebox Route Revenue $8,171,197 $1,656,347 Cost per Rider $5.78 Subsidy per Rider Ridership $4.61 15 mph 14 Average Daily Passengers Weekday Average Daily Passengers Weekends 81.2% Annual Passengers On Time Performance Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) 60.0 Annual Revenue Miles 1,006,510 Annual Revenue Hours 4,219 3,131 1,412,920 Passengers per Hour 20.8 Passengers per Mile 1.4 Annual Wheelchair Boardings 10,739 Annual Bicycle Boardings 58,828 Population within .5 mi of stop 80,134 67,814 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 36,698 VISTA CHINO STEVENS 24 PS BUZZ> BARISTO PALM SPRINGS yN CATHEDRAL CITY CATHEDRAL CITY fft RANCHO MIRAGE O TIME POINT O LIBRARY Q TRANSFER ® MALL i[ CITY HALL O SENIOR CENTER © HOSPITAL i SCHOOL PAL DESER College ofthe Desert McCallumTheater PALM DESERT INDIAN LA WELLS QUINT Bus stops s704 & #980 at Hwy 111 & La Quinta Ctr Dr are also served by AMTRAK FRED WARING ■ Larson Justiceanter O HWY 111 INDIO INDIO HWY 111 & FLOWER SunLine`s Indio Facility 20 0 A `LO 10 54 80 81 91 i COACHELLJ COACHELLA 597 10 Commuter Link Indio —Palm Desert —Beaumont —San Bernardino The 10 Commuter Link provides service between the Coachella Valley and San Bernardino. The route is 92 miles, with two stops in the Coachella Valley at the SunLine Indio facility and the California State University, San Bernardino — Palm Desert Campus. The route continues, stopping in Beaumont at 2nd Street and Commerce Way, California State University, San Bernardino main campus, and at the San Bernardino Transit Center and Metrolink station. Compared to the Riverside station, more than twice the number of trains serve the San Bernardino station. At the Beaumont bus stop, passengers will be able access buses connecting to Cabazon, University of California, Riverside, Riverside University Health Center, Kaiser Hospital, VA Hospital, Loma Linda Medical Center, and numerous destinations served by RTA, Beaumont Transit, and Banning Transit. The Beaumont bus stop is not a timed transfer point for SunLine's 10 Commuter Link because of unpredictable freeway travel time variability. However, with the use of real-time passenger information, passengers traveling between any of the above -mentioned destinations can transfer between SunLine, RTA, Beaumont Transit, and Banning Transit routes if the timing is right. Passengers can also use a transportation network service such as Lyft or Uber, taxi service, 0-Cal State University San Bernardino a bicycle, or some other mode for a faster trip to CBDBB) sl//IL�/le SBG TRANSIT AGENCY those respective destinations. Merrell"" The 10 Commuter Link bus stop in Beaumont also enables residents of the PASS area, San Jacinto, Hemet, and Moreno Valley to travel to California State University, San Bernardino and University of California, Riverside — Palm Desert Campuses, and other employment centers in Coachella Valley. 2nd & Commerce BEAUMONT A PALM DESERT Cal State University San Bernardino Palm Desert (CSUSB-PD) INDIO SunLine Indio Facility Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 5:20 AM 8:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost No weekend service Annual Farebox Route Revenue Frequency 8 trips N/A N/A Cost per Rider N/A Weekdays Subsidy per Rider N/A No weekend service Ridership Average Speed Peak Vehicles 46 mph 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday N/A On Time Performance Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A N/A Annual Passengers N/A Route Total Bidirectional Length (miles) Passengers per Hour N/A 183.9 Passengers per Mile N/A Annual Revenue Miles Annual Wheelchair Boardings N/A 191,556 Annual Bicycle Boardings N/A Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 5,759 5,915 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 2,177 598 Route Palm Springs BUZZ Palm Springs Palm Springs BUZZ offers free service in Palm Springs with connections to Routes 14, 24, 30, and 111 at transfer locations at Indian Canyon Drive at Ramon Road and Palm Canyon Drive at Stevens Road. The Palm Springs BUZZ links riders to hotels, shopping, entertainment, and restaurant destinations. The Palm Springs BUZZ route currently has service from Thursday through Saturday with hours of operation from midday to late evening. BUZZ service will be discontinued in January 2021 due to a funding shortfall stemming from the COVID-19 crisis. Hours of Operation Service Span Financial 12:00 PM 10:10 PM Thu