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GAC Minutes 1993 11/03GOLF COURSE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MINUTES November 3, 1993 Attending: Ted Whiteman Frank Brown Julie Deacon Rick VanNoy Carl Hoss Mary Clemmer Charlie Denham CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL: Vice Chairman Whiteman called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. Jeff Goodman was absent while all other committee members were present. MINUTES: Frank Brown moved that the minutes from the October 6 meeting be approved, stating also that staff pursue the parcel of land in question for a practice chipping area. VanNoy seconded and the motion carried. OLD BUSINESS: 1) 1994 Fee Structure: Whiteman brought the new Committee members up to where the discussion ended at the last meeting. Hoss discussed an idea he says other municipal golf courses are using, called a discount card. The idea is to sell a card to a player and every time that player plays a round of golf he pays a small fee ($3 - $5). The daily greens fee would be raised in conjunction. Committee reaction was quite favorable to this particular plan. This subject will be discussed further at the next meeting. 2) Timberlost VI Roads and Berms Brown reported on the Council action on a letter addressed to them from the Committee. There were three areas of concern in that letter regarding two roads accessing the clubhouse drive and a berm on the south side of the parking lot. The Council voted to have city staff address solving the problems and that the plat not be signed without Committee approval of the three problem areas. NEW BUSINESS: 1) Confirmation and Welcome of New Members: Whiteman extended the Committee's welcome of Rick VanNoy and Julie Deacon as the new Committee members replacing DeEtte McCarty and Kay Larson. 2) $5 Tournament Green Fee: Brown moved to recommend to City Council to charge a $5 green fee for each tournament entry in all "exempt" tournaments except the McCall Pro -Am. VanNoy seconded and the motion carried unanimously. 3) Carl's Donation to the Hospital: Every year the Holiday Happening at the hospital raffles off several items including a season pass for the golf course. The question arises every year as to who actually donates the pass, the City or a private party. Deacon moved that it be memorialized in these minutes that Carl Hoss voluntarily donates this pass from personal funds. VanNoy seconded and the motion carried. 4) Winter Operation of Facilities: First topic of discussion was grooming a cross-country ski trail around the golf course. After several of the negative aspects far out weighed the positive it was determined that there is absolutely no support for this activity. ********* Mary Clemmer is in negotiation with the City to operate the clubhouse for parties and other functions throughout the winter. Mary produced a memorandum from City Attorney Burton. She stated that if the 1 - 25 group size category were dropped, she would do the rest. VanNoy moved to recommend to the City Council to approve the memorandum, with the correction, for Mary to operate the clubhouse facility. Deacon seconded and the motion carried. OTHER BUSINESS: Denham showed the results from the Turf Advisory Service visit from the U.S.G.A. The report covers several topics from the irrigation system to the maintenance shop (attached). Whiteman mentioned a conversation he had with Denham about the irrigation system on the new 9 holes. Denham had mentioned that he was concerned with the head spacing being a single row in the fairways. After viewing the plan a memo was sent to Bud Schmidt addressing the concerns. Some verbal agreements have been made with Dave Peugh and Larry Teufel stating that some of the holes will have double row coverage. There is no plan or anything in writing to this effect. VanNoy moved to make an entry in these minutes, on the subject of the new 9 irrigation, voicing the concern of the Committee of the inadequate coverage. Brown seconded and the motion carried. Whiteman asked the Committee to consider nomination of officers for the next meeting. With no further business, the meeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m. Respectfully Submitted, 7_)7Ae Ted Whiteman, Vice -Chairman C�04�7 0Ct E@tadd OFFICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY Edward G. Burton, Esq. MEMORANDUM Date: October 27, 1993 To: Bud Schmidt File No: From: Ted Burton Re: Winter Operation of Golf Clubhouse Revised Standard Edition (This is not a contract; it is intent for a contract.) I was asked by you to assist in figuring out a way to permit Mary Clemmer to continue to operate in the golf Clubhouse this winter, when we have the IRS rules to consider, and have very little relevant data on winter operations. The following arrangement seems acceptable to Mary and in my view would not violate the 50:50 rule. Mary would: Handle all booking and coordinate all sevices furnished to the building. Pay for all utilities, telephone, and other services furnished to the building. Collect for the City building use fees for each event in the amount of Group Size Per -Person Charge 1t 2-5 26 to 75 76 to whatever $2,89 { inirrtaar$25 08)- 1.50 1.25 Have non-exclusive use of the building for catering; any caterer may be used by a party wishing to use the building. Have exclusive use of the bar, in recognition that her name is on file at ABC in connection with the license and she has paid the liquor liability insurance ($2,400). Furnish complete reports that permit City and Mary to learn what the winter experience really is. City would: Pay a management fee of $1,200 per month, representing utilities of about $500 to $600 and the balance as a charge for handling booking and other management, to include managing heat, daily checking of building to prevent freeze-up, etc. City and Mary would: In the event experience shows that the management fee is apparently going to be exceeded by the net profit of the bar, which would of course also mean that the management burden is greater than anticipated, renegotiate the arrangement to the end that the management fee would inctrease, and the City would receive a compensatory percentage of the profit. Post Office Box 1065, McCall, Idaho 83638-1065 Telephone: (208) 634-7142 Fax: (208) 634-3038 National Director JAMES T SNOW Rec crai Director LARRY W. G!LHULY Agrcnomist PAUL H. ✓ERMEULcN PATRICK J. GROSS Turf Advisory Service Western Region August 4, 1993 GREEN SECTION TURF ADVISORY SERVICE VISIT McCALL GOLF COURSE, McCALL, IDAHO. i icocii �: Mr. Charlie Denham, Superintendent Mr. Rob Wilson, Assistant Superintendent Mr. Ted Whiteman, Vice Chairman Advisory Committee 1lr. Carl Hoss, Professional (short visit) I1r. Larry Gilhuly, USGA Green Section It was a pleasure to again visit the McCall Golf Course on August 4, 1993, on behalf of the USGA Green Section. In the five years since the last visit, improvement was noted on all playing areas with noticeably improved putting surfaces due to deep tine aeration. Several tees have been reconstructed, a driving range added and labor increased. In addition, a beautiful clubhouse facility has been added. The main topics of discussion during this visit included the irrigation system, greens, greens surrounds, tees, fairways, cart paths, the maintenance facility and miscellaneous topics. Should you have any questions concerning this visit or report, please do not hesitate to contact our office. THE IRRIGATION SYSTEM The USGA Green Section agronomists have the opportunity to visit over 350 golf courses every year in the Western United States. Without a doubt, the irrigation system at McCa11 Golf Course is one of the worst systems we have viewed in the past ten years! There is not another golf course we are aware of that has the problem with pressure associated with irrigation linked to the public water lines. As a result, pressure problems are enormous and the entire golf course cannot be irrigated during a single evening. When this is combined with 4" mainlines that provide inadequate gallonage, poor spacing and general system fatigue, turf loss will occur along with areas of excess moisture You are to be commended for the outstanding job with the new clubhouse. Now it is time to address an even more important topic - the irrigation system! 22792 Centre Drive. Suite 290 • Lake Forest. CA 9263• (714) .:7-9464 AX a 57-93 1 - �� 1 4,,; :64 Recyc,eo Paper GA McCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 2 Combining the system with the new nine - During the course of this visit, it was mentioned that a pond and pumping plant will be installed on the new nine holes. Due to the physical proximity of this nine, it makes logical sense to provide adequate pumping and storage capacity for all 27 holes. Then, mainlines can be directed from the pumping plant to the eisting 18 when funding becomes available. Completing a pumping plant for the new nine that'would be separate from the existing 18 does not make fiscal or logical sense. It may be possible to install a pumping plant, lake and mainlines for the existing 18 for the same cost as installing separate pumps and lakes for both golf courses. The need for a qualified irrigation engineer - As you proceed with the irrigation system, it becomes imperative to use a qualified irrigation engineer for updating the existing 18 holes. To assure proper spacing, control and quality results, we have enclosed a list of qualified irrigation engineers with proven track records. Once the irrigation designer has been selected, carefully choose a qualified installation company. Also enclosed with this report is a list of installers. GREENS The putting surfaces have responded from the deep tine aeration programs by , Superintendent Denham. This aerator has reduced ice dam,ge by improving internal drainage and developed much deeper root systems. Continuation of spring aeration was suggested along with an additional deep aeration during the month of October._ This would be especially beneficial on those greens that display black layer or growth problems. Other topics discussed concerning the greens included: 1. Green No.6. While many of the greens display a poor soil, No.6 green has the added problem of safety. The proximity of this green to No.7 tee should be addressed by moving the green to the left approximately 10-15 yards. Care should be taken to not endanger players from the new tee on No.15.' In this regard, mounding and trees should be added behind this green while the grove of trees immediately to the left of the existing green GA McCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 3 must be removed. This green should be designed by the same architectural firm used for the new nine holes and could be constructed in-house or by an outside contractor. The use of USGA Putting Green Specifications was also recommended. Putting green rolling. This concept was tried during the McCall Amateur with very positive results. Rollin° can be done twice weekly however, a minimum of two additional aerations will be needed yearly to relieve surface compaction. If rolling is started in 1994, an increase in mowing height was recommended. 3 Bentgrass overseeding. If mowing heights are raised, creeping bentgrass overseeding should be instituted. For best results, overseeding should occur during the summer months when soil temperatures are optimum. For this reason, purchase of a spiker for a Toro bunker rake was suggested. With the new golf course having 12 bunkers, the purchase of this unit is justified. As the greens are spiked during the summer months, overseed with i lb.;1,000 sq. ft. of SR 1020, Pennlinks or Providence creeping bentgrass. 4. A method to minimize spike problems - During the last 35 years, the USGA has conducted three comprehensive studies on the damage caused by conventional golf spikes. Conclusive evidence in all three tests showed the conventional golf spike causes far more damage than other shoe types. Unfortunately, the playing public has found spikeless golf shoes unacceptable from a traction standpoint. However, during the past year a small company in Boise, Idaho has developed a replaceable golf spike that does little damage to turf and no damage to carpets, carts, cart paths and bridges. They offer exceptional traction and completely eliminate spike marks! For additional information concerning this product contact: Ur. Ernie Deacon Soft Spike Company Warm Springs Golf Club PO Box 7845 Boise, Idaho 83707 (208) 343-5661 McCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 4 �%��� 5. GA Improving the nursery. To assure a quality nursery, it must be treated exactly as a regular putting surface. All fertilizer, topdressing, mowing and aeration should be completed in conjunction with normal green programs. Also, make sure to provide adequate irrigation in the center of the nursery. For the future, do not exceed 2 lbs./1,000 sq. ft. when seeding and always mix offsite to avoid the variation in growth habit noted during this visit. o Experiment with organic fertilizers. During the summer months you may wish to experiment with natural organics, such as i-iilorganite. Also, positive results have been seen with a microbial product at Hayden Lake. For additional information, you may wish to contact Mr. Dick Gilfoil at (208) 772-3211 GREENS SURROUNDS The areas around the greens would benefit from an ongoing program of aeration and overseeding with perennial ryegrass. If possible, aerate in the spring or fall using 5/8" tines followed by complete core removal. This is especially important on traffic areas where noticeable compaction and weakness was evident. In regard to perennial ryegrass overseeding, overseed in the springy and fall at rates as high as 7-8 lbs./1,000 sq. ft. This can be done in conjunction with aeration or with a slicer/seeder. The other requirement for the areas in front of and around the greens is improved drainage. Many greens were noted (Nos. 1, 5, 10, 11, and 12) where extensive work is needed to remove excess moisture in front of and to the sides of the greens. Many of these locations are suspected drainage points from the greens and should be easy to eliminate. Other areas will require extensive aeration and topdressing however, the fronts of the greens are critically important to retain firmness from a playing standpoint. TEES While the teeing surfaces have been improved through reconstruction efforts, the decision to utilize Kentucky bluegrass sod grown on clay has resulted in layering problems. McCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 5 For this reason, all of the tees, tee surrounds and green surrounds where this sod has been used should be aerified this fall using 5/8" tines in two directions. To assist in the completion of this operation and for normal greens aeration, the purchase of a Cushman CoreHarvestor is necessary. This unit will rapidly clean the cores four times as fast as is currently practiced. For the future, sodding of tees or greens surrounds with similar material is not recommended. It would be best to seed these areas or establish a nursery grown on sand to eliminate these aeration requirements. Future reconstruction needs - It was agreed that the next tees that should be reconstructed are Nos.1 and 12. This will complete the beautification for the clubhouse area. When these are completed, try to provide more entrys than was viewed on No.10. Once these two tees have been completed, the teeing surface for No.14 should be upgraded. To achieve maximum growth, the elimination of two firs to the back left of the tee will increase sunlight. Regardless of construction efforts, these trees should be removed. Comments concerning the practice tee - Enclosed with this report is a reprint thoroughly describing a method to improve turf on the practice tee. Superintendent Denham should be responsible for the sand/seed mixture, fertilization, mowing, irrigation and aeration. Pro Shop personal would be responsible for rope movement and daily overseeding. This program.has worked in virtually every situation when it is followed carefully. FAIRWAYS The fairways have been improved due to updated mowing equipment, increased aeration and a milder than normal spring and summer. Despite the wet weather, weaknesses with the irrigation system were seen throughout the fairways and roughs. Subjects to further improve the fairways included: 1. Increased aeration and equipment. If the irrigation system will not be addressed in the near future, then updating the aeration equipment becomes a high priority. i4cCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 6 Power aerifiers are now available that provide excellent depth along with improved spacing and cleaner results. A demonstration of one of these units was highly recommended to replace the current antique rolling aerifier. Once this has been updated, the fairways should receive a minimum of two aerations every year to begin thatch control efforts: These aerifiers can also slowly level fairways when combined with a core destroyer. Dethatch and overseed. In addition to aeration, another excellent method to address thatch is the use of the current overseeder without the seeding attachment. For demonstration purposes, dethatch in multiple directions, aerify and remove the organic debris from No.3 or 4 fairway. Overseed with improved perennial ryegrass in two directions at the maximum setting, broadcast an additional 200-250 lbs./acre of improved perennial ryegrass and topdress with 1/4" of clean sand. This can be completed this fall or next spring when adequate moisture is available. Based on the success of this program, funds can be allocated to expand this idea to as many fairways as possible on a yearly basis. The results of this program will be greatly enhanced if the irrigation system is updated. 3. Fairway topdressing. Heavy applications of sand were noted on Nos. 1, 9 and 18. While the amounts are proper and will assist in thatch decomposition and overall firmness, the use of sand containing less coarse material was suggested.' Also, a slightly higher rate may be necessary. 4. Increase lime applications. Another important method to increase thatch decomposition is the application of lime. Applications of 1,000 lbs./acre in the spring and fall were recommended to elevate the pH levels to the 6 range. If magnesium is also required, the use of dolomitic limestone would be appropriate. CART PATHS Several locations were noted where curbing has been installed around greens and tees. The results have been excellent with good definition between turf and traffic areas. With this in mind, an ongoing program to complete curbing around all greens and tees was suggested. When installing curbing, make sure to bring the soil to the top of the curb on the turf side. GA McCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 7 THE MAINTENANCE FACILITY The maintenance facility ranks with the irrigation system in overall function. In addition to inadequate storage for equipment, the mechanics work area, superintendents office, lunchroom, lockerroom, rest rooms, equipment wash area and maintenance yard are woefully lacking. In addition, current storage of pesticides and other chemicals may be in violation of State and Federal laws. In short, the maintenance facility should be updated beginning with a bulldozer! The problem with this facility becomes even more important as the new nine holes are added. Obviously, increased equipment and staff will be needed. This area deserves the second highest priority for capital improvement directly behind the irrigation system. MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS The New York Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program - At the end of 1992, over 600 golf courses had joined the New York Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program. This outstanding example of the positive value of golf courses is easily obtainable through a nominal fee and completion of an information sheet. Upon evaluation, New York Audubon will issue suggestions for the improvement of animal habitat and other environmental situations. It is then your option to fulfill seven steps to achieve the title of Certified Cooperative Sanctuary. With the negative publicity surrounding golf courses, this is a very positive method to counter these claims. Funding for improvements - Installing a new irrigation system, updating the maintenance facility, adding necessary equipment, improving cart paths and addressing other expenses as they occur will obviously require greater funding. It appears inevitable that the only source to address these requirements will have to come from fees. You may wish to incorporate a structured scale for local and out-of-town play. An overall increase in all areas is needed despite the inevitable complaints from local players. Players with privately owned carts will be asked to pay a much higher fee for cart storage than is currently required to -play the golf course. This has never been viewed in the Western United States and points out the need for an increased fee schedule. GA lcCALL GOLF COURSE August 4, 1993 Page 8 It is always a pleasure to visit McCa11 Golf Course to offer suggestions and recommendations for the maintenance of the golf course. Your hospitality is truly appreciated and we look forward to future visits on behalf of the USGA Green Section. We wish you the very best during the remainder of 1993 and please do not hesitate to contact our office as your use of the Green Section service does encompass the entire y ar. Respectfully submitted, 4,1!C Z/Le_z;_ Larry W. Gilhuly Western Director LiJG:pg '-r;y o+r: Iir. Charlie Denham, Superintendent cc: Mr. Ted Whiteman, Vice Chairman Advisory Committee cc: Mr. Carl Hoss, Professional Reprints/enclosures - Irrigation Designers List - Irrigation Installers List - Home On The Range IRRIGATION DESIGNERS: IRRIGATION INSTALLERS: Harry Yates, Irrigation Designer 27475 Ynes Road, #353 Rancho, CA 92390 714 676-7025 Roger Gordon, Irrigation Designer 23011 Moulton Pkwy, Suite D-11 Laguna Hills, CA 92653 714 770-2910 Russell D. Mitchell Association Irrigation Design Consultants 1666 Oakland Blvd. Walnut Creek, CA 94596 415 939-3985 Carl Kuhn, Irrigation Designer PO Box 493 Mercer Island, WA 98040 602 232-6220 Coates Irrigation Consultants Gaylon Coates 4300 N. Miller Road, #104 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 602 481-0682 Fred Yoshimura 77-605 delaware Place Palm Desert, CA 92260 619 345-1874 Foremost Irrigation PO Box 559 Temecula, CA 92593 714 698-7270 Christensen Irrigation 1820 E. Garry Ave. #116 Santa Ana, CA 92705-5804 714 261-6076 Gary Peterson Carlacio Landscape Inc. 76-690 Oklahoma Ave Palm Desert, CA 92260 714 279-5300 Leonard Bernhardt Inc. 7340 SW Miller Hill Road Beaverton, OR 97007-5459 503 649-3535 Bob McCallum & Associates 5321 E Indian School Road Phoenix, AZ 85018 602 840-6169 "Home on the Range" by LARRY W. GILHULY Director, Western Region, USGA Green Section Where seldom is heard A discouraging word, And the skies are not cloudy all day. THESE WORDS may have been true for the early settlers of the West, but they certainly don't apply to today's heavily used gnlf rnitrce prac- tice ranges. Fortunately, on visits to golf courses in the West over the past few years, several ideas have taken shape and are beginning to improve the turf quality on practice range tees. Combined into a working package, these ideas can pro- vide outstanding playing conditions, with only a moderate increase in ex- pense and little increase in labor. This simple program of improving turf quality begins with controlling where the golfers may practice. Ropes should be placed approximately seven feet apart across the width of the tee. After the ropes have been placed and anchored into the soil so they cannot be moved, individual practicing stations should be established approximately 10 feet apart. This can be done with various dividers, but placing bag holders and small buckets of topdressing for divot repair at regular intervals is especially effective. Once these boundaries have been established, the method of rope move- ment must be very precise. Players gen- erally tend to favor the right half of each practice station. With this in mind, mov- ing the individual stations in a sideways pattern following one day's use allows two days of use in each seven -foot -wide area. The ropes must be changed after each two-day period. Rather than con- suming seven feet with each move, the ropes can be moved to use approximately four feet at a time. This can be done since the players also tend to shy away from the ropes when they're practicing. By follow- ing this rope movement pattern, a prac- tice tee 40 yards deep can last as long as 60 days before the pattern is begun again. While this program will help to dis- tribute traffic evenly, the key to long-term success is the frequency of overseeding. At this point, the question of who will take care of the rope movement and over - seeding operations must be addressed. If your golf professional realizes income from the facility, it would seem proper that he participate in maintaining the practice tee. By improving turf quality, more players will use the facility and generate more income for the profes- sional. If this is the case at your club, worn areas on the tee should be top - dressed and overseeded at the end of each day by the person responsible for range cleanup. This operation is quite simple, with the person using the remaining top - dressing mixture in the buckets and other seed/soil material provided by the golf course superintendent. When this is done faithfully, the same 40-yard- deep tee will allow two months for perennial ryegrass regrowth before it is used again. If the golf professional is not involved with the practice tee at your club, the maintenance staff must complete the daily overseeding operation in early morning, before play begins, if labor is available. As a final note concerning this pro- gram, other cultural programs must be practiced to achieve long-term success. Include a complete fertilizer and or- ganic material in the topdressing mix- ture to help retain moisture and estab- lish seedlings. Also, aerify the teeing surface at least twice a year with a %- inch tine putting green aerifier, and a generous fertilization program should be maintained to sustain adequate turf vigor. Finally, best results occur with the use of triplex mowers, and remove clip- pings for further improvement in turf quality. The mowing operation can be completed early in the morning, and if rope movement is coordinated with the golf shop, the mower operator can be finished and on to the next job in no time. MARCH/APR1L 1989 3