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Design Guidelines for Planned Unit DevelopmentsDESIGN GUIDELINES FOR PLANNEDUNITDEVELOPMENTS Prepared for September 30, 2002 1 INTRODUCTION DESIGNIMPLEMENTATION I. INTRODUCTION A. Plainfield design philosophy:B. Residential, commercial, and industrial:It is the policy of the Village of Plainfield that single-family detached housing will remain the predominant land use within the Village. Because single-family detached housing will be the primary land use, and by extension Plainfield will be a community of families, the quality of life is very important. Therefore, it is very important that all new developments (single family, commercial, and industrial developments) reflect the quality of life through design.The Village of Plainfield is one of the fastest growing suburbs in the Chicago Metropolitan region. It is the Village of Plainfield’s desire to channel this growth to insure that new developments provide quality housing, shopping, and places of employment for its citizens. Therefore, the quality of the developments and their design is crucial to the continued well being of the Village of Plainfield. The design guidelines set forth here are intended to provide direction to insure that all new development is of highest possible quality.II. DESIGN IMPLEMENT A TION Consistent with the Village’s philosophy, Planned Unit Developments will be required of the following:All developments over twenty (20) acres or in excess of fifty (50) dwelling units should be submitted and processed under the Planned Unit Development provisions.Aprocess for density bonuses will be considered which equates a percentage of the value of extra dwelling units with monies spent on additional amenities such as extra landscaping, wider landscaped boulevards, streetscaping, or similar upgrades.At the discretion of the Village, architectural excellence may also be a basis for the density bonus.A. Residential density:Two of the most commonly held misconceptions regarding residential development are that the lower the density the better the development and that density is solely a function of lot size. In fact, neither of these perceptions is universally true. Density and lot size do not control the design, the development, the architectural design, or the landscape design. 2 B. Density and site analysis:In order to properly determine the density for the tract under consideration, a "density plan"should be submitted to the Village. Each such plan shall include the following information in either graphic or written form:1.The total gross area of the tract 2.Topographic data at not greater than two foot contour intervals 3.Existing floodplain limits 4.Existing wetlands The key to this process is to assign a reasonable and rational density to the remaining developable tracts within Plainfield’s planning jurisdiction. This step should be accompanied by an environmental constraints inventory. Although much of Plainfield’s remaining developable land appears to be primarily agricultural such an inventory would be useful. This inventory data is available from various sources, including the Will County Land Resource Management Plan, the National Wetlands, Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood maps, and aerial photographs.5.The location of the nearest elementary, junior high, and high school 6.Proposed bedroom mix 7.The maximum number of home sites based on a minimum lot size as per zoning category, or in the case of townhome development a density in accordance with the Village Comprehensive Plan shall be applied;said plan shall not utilize any portion of the wetlands, floodplain, or areas devoted to stormwater detention 8.Existing park sites within a one mile radius, including size and facilities 9.Existing vegetation Proposed park site(s) within the project site 10.In order to begin to control for quality design it is recommended that density be regulated as the maximum number of dwellings permitted for the buildable acreage involved. The rationale for this recommendation is that where minimum lot size is the controlling variable; the ability to conserve usable open space is minimized.Furthermore, the likelihood of being presented with "cookie cutter"subdivision design is greatly enhanced. In this scenario, it is very important to make adjustments for lands that are either inherently unbuildable, such as wetlands or floodplain, or areas where development should be minimized for design reasons such as areas with preservable hard wood vegetation. 3 C. Concept plan:D. Reviewing the bonus system (additional lot s):E. Protective covenant s:Within fifteen (15) working days, the Village shall review and return to the petitioner the plan indicating the maximum number of lots permitted on the tract, the amount of school and park land required or the cash in lieu required. Within forty-five (45) days,the Village shall provide the petitioner with general comments on the overall design as well as the design s consistency with these guidelines.1. The density plan and site analysis will be the basis for preparing a concept plan which shall incorporate the planned unit design guidelines. 2. The plan shall pay particular attention to the placement of open space, streetscaping, and landscaping. All lots that back up to streets (through lots) shall provide a minimum 20’ wide area to allow for an undulating landscape berm. The landscape berm should not exceed a 4:1 slope, and should occur in an outlot exclusive of the lots.3. Lot sizes may be decreased to 11,000 square feet with a minimum of 80’ frontage in order to provide more open areas and boulevards.Extra landscaping, planting, streetscaping, street lighting, and irrigation of public spaces will be among the elements considered by the Village as part of the bonus program. Protective covenants for the maintenance, continuing control and design of all the common areas shall be prepared by the developer and approved by the Village of Plainfield. These covenants shall include the following:1. Architectural design (architectural committee approval)2. Key building design and other requirements 3. Planned Unit Development landscaping to be installed by individual land purchaser 4. Key through lots 5. Common area maintenance program payment and standards (including rights of way on exterior)6. Fence control 7. Exterior additions to buildings fronting on a street 8. Vehicular storage 9. Masonry standards Garage location Decks and porches (architectural review committee)10.11. 4 TOPOGRAPHY& EXISTING CONDITION EXISTING VEGETATION LOW POINT HIGH POINT DENSITYPLAN 5 LANDSCAPE PLAN STREET CONCEPTPLAN PARK SITE A. S treet design:6 The following are a number of technical recommendations regarding street design considerations:RESIDENTIAL PLANNINGGUIDELINES III. RESIDENTIAL PLANNING GUIDELINES New developments must place considerable emphasis on the relationship between buildings, streets, and dedicated open space. Neighborhoods developed under these guidelines should place significant importance on the designation of public open space and on the provision of sidewalks, footpaths, and trails in an effort to foster a pedestrian friendly community atmosphere: this is one of the key elements of good residential design that distinguishes a good neighborhood from "just another subdivision."1. Avoid Long, Straight, Uninterrupted Segments: From an aesthetic, safety, and speed control perspective, it is important to avoid long straight street segments. This situation can be avoided through the use of a couple simple techniques as follows:a) Curving roads in an informal rural cluster layout b) Aseries of shorter, straight street segments, connected by 90-degree turns, creating a formal, traditional townlike neighborhood Variations that combine elements of both of these approaches are also possible, such as short curvilinear segments terminating in frequent intersections where the choices are to turn left or right (see T-intersections),thereby slowing traffic and making the streets and sidewalks safer and more pedestrian friendly.2. Provide Terminal Vistas: Whenever possible, street systems should be designed so that their curvature or alignment produces terminal vistas of open space elements, such as village greens, water features, or other public open space elements. This plan feature will maximize the visual impact of such areas so that residents and visitors will correctly perceive the open space emphasis. The created views are best or at least often found in the direct line of sight at "T" intersections , but can also be provided on land along the outside edge of street curves. (See #4 "T" Intersections) 7 3.Introduce Reverse Curves: The use of S shaped or reverse curves is often prohibited by subdivision ordinances; the rationale for this prohibition is usually safety. These curves are suggested for PUD’s because of their graceful beauty and because they serve to significantly slow traffic on local streets. It is important that these curves be employed only with relatively long horizontal curve radii of at least 250 feet and on local streets where the speed limit is between 25 and 30 miles per hour. Driveway access must be closely monitored on these curves. Where these limitations are implemented on reverse curves, the streets are actually safer because the traffic is slowed significantly.4.Incorporate "T" Intersections: In order to keep traffic speeds within the neighborhood as low as possible, residential streets that interconnect with other streets should do so through T-shaped intersections where cars cannot proceed forward in a straight line but instead must come to a full stop and turn left or right, thus slowing traffic and significantly increasing safety.5. Provide Street and Trail Connections: Interconnection of subdivisions creates a greater sense of neighborhood rather than isolated developments. Some developers may resist such connections, preferring to market their housing as isolated neighborhoods. This program of interconnections should be considered because it tends to create neighborhoods rather than a series of isolated subdivisions. Astreet passing through open space corridors prior to approaching new housing creates both terminal vistas and identifies the new neighborhoods.6. Introduce Wide Usable Boulevards:Wide usable boulevards are strongly encouraged to augment the pedestrian system and to further soften the streetscape. Boulevards are especially effective at major entrances and collector streets. (See landscape recommendations.)VIEW VISTA 8 BOULEVARD VIEW VISTA 9 BIKE PATH B. Building neighborhoods:Plainfield has evolved into an extensive collection of diverse subdivisions. Housing densities within the Village’s planning jurisdiction range from one acre lots to moderate density townhomes.The scale and diversity of the older neighborhoods in Plainfield exhibit many desirable features. In order to incorporate these features the following neighborhood design guidelines are suggested:1. Each residential neighborhood will consist of a local street system; connections to adjoining neighborhoods through pedestrian and vehicular systems are encouraged.2. Multiple street entrances in and out of each neighborhood are strongly encouraged.3. Neighborhoods are encouraged to be composed of small rather than large residential blocks to further encourage pedestrian friendly environments.4. Each neighborhood will incorporate neighborhood scale open space, preferably at its center, as well as a transition to the adjoining neighborhood.5. To the extent possible, detention areas shall be placed to further enhance open areas.C. S treet front age and building massing:1. For single family detached homes:In an effort to reduce the perception of overbuilding, as viewed from the street,and enhance the appearance of open space, a maximum house facade is recommended consistent with the Village’s zoning ordinance and minimum side yards. Streetside facade width should create an expression of a main body of the house. Side wings should be setback from the property line to reduce the apparent building mass. 10 TOWNHOME GARAGE DOORS - BEFORE Greater front yard setbacks and widths may be considered at the primary entrance to the development. This tends to enhance the appearance of open space. This can also be achieved with broader landscaped parkways at the entrance.Amaximum height limitation of thirty-five (35) feet, consistent with the Village Zoning Ordinance is recommended. Front porches are encouraged, with an allowable encroachment into the front yard of five (5) feet. This minor encroachment helps accentuate the articulation of the home.2. For townhomes:In townhome developments, garages, especially two car garages, can dominate the street frontage. In order to avoid the monotony and barren appearance of an endless line of garage doors, the grouping of townhomes should not exceed five units per building or one hundred and forty-four feet, whichever is less. The grouping and appearance of garage doors for the townhomes is critical.Therefore, garage doors should not be placed side-by-side and the inclusion of side-loaded garages is encouraged. Where garages are accessed at the rear of the unit through a mid-block service drive, other options may be considered.However, no townhome development will be considered which does not vary the number of units in a building. Amaximum height limitation of thirty-five (35) feet, consistent with the Village Zoning Ordinance is recommended. Front porches are encouraged, with an allowable encroachment into the front yard of five (5) feet. Long uninterrupted rear porches will not be permitted. Rear porches and raised desks should be articulated to avoid the appearance of one continuous deck or porch. The materials for decks and porches must be harmonious with the materials used for the principal residences.Within 1 year, all wood decks and porches must be painted or stained in a manner consistent with the principal residences. 11 TOWNHOME GARAGE DOORS - AFTER 3. Street orientation:Front doors and windows to major rooms within the house are strongly encouraged to address the street. Walkways that lead to the front door,separated from any driveway are also encouraged. The front door should be a prominent and welcoming feature. Open front porches that face the street are also advocated.Garages at the rear of the site, accessible through mid-block streets should be considered. Rear garages may be attached or detached, although it is recognized that the Midwest climate makes attached garages more attractive to home buyers. Rear access garages have the advantage of allowing the streetscape to be unencumbered by garage doors, continuous curb cuts, and an endless stream of driveways. On-street parking can accommodate visitors;on-street guest parking has the additional advantage of further separating sidewalks from street traffic. If garages facing the street are necessary, garage doors are encouraged to be in one-car increments. Garage doors that are well designed and include features such as windows may be an acceptable alternative. Side loaded garages are also an acceptable alternative, especially where a window treatment is included in the side of the garage oriented to the street.4. Rear and side elevations:Rear elevations of all residential dwellings shall be subject to the provisions of these guidelines. Articulation of the rear elevation is very important, especially where the rear elevation is visible by the public. Side elevations without windows are strongly discouraged. Side elevations facing a street (corner lots) must have windows and shall continue the same materials treatment as the front elevation and in the same proportion. 12 CORNER ELEVATION D. Key lot s:Key lots are defined as those lots within a residential development that are located at highly visible intersections as well as other strategic points within the development.Where through lots are unavoidable and back up to high volume streets, the rear of these buildings shall also be treated as "key lots." (See Section E on through lots.)Key lots shall be noted on all plans submitted under these guidelines to the Village.The Village may add, delete, or amend the location of the key lots within the subdivision.1. Architectural treatment of key lots:a) As noted in Section E, front doors and windows to major rooms shall be oriented to the street. Walkways that lead to the front door, separated from any driveway are also encouraged. The front door should be a prominent and welcoming feature. Open front porches that face the street are also advocated. b) Any elevation, which has exposure to a street, shall feature the use of brick or other natural materials on these elevations. c) Simple roof forms, such as gable or hip are encouraged. Dormers are also encouraged. Multiple gables and overly-pronounced roof forms should be avoided. d) All elevations shall have windows.2. Landscape architectural treatment of key lots:a) Front yards, parkways, and sidewalks shall be designed as a cohesive whole. Anaturalistic treatment is preferred, utilizing a combination of overstory trees, understory trees, shrubs, and flowers.b) Landscape treatment approaching key lots shall serve to frame and emphasize these lots, especially the entrance. 13 a) All through lots shall be effectively screened at the rear of the property through fencing or berming and landscaping or a combination of the two.THROUGH -LOTSINGLE FAMILY E. Through lot s:1. Architectural treatment of through lots:a) Particular attention shall be paid to the architectural details of the rear elevations on all through lots including materials and window treatment.b) Window treatments shall be included in order to add a sense of articulation to the rear elevation (i.e. shutters and window details).c) The lots that are designated as key lots, and are also through lots, shall have additional design features on the rear elevations that face a street,as follows: (1) Balanced window fenestrations (2) Provide for at least one 2 foot minimum plane change (3) Provide for gable or hip roof change on rear elevation (4) Provide wood trim and shutters as rear design elements (5) Use exterior materials as associated with front elevation (1) Where fencing is used such fencing shall be consistently applied throughout the development. This shall be enforced through protective covenants. Fencing shall be placed on the use side of the berm, outside the landscape outlot or easement.(2) Where landscape screening is employed, the berm shall be at least three feet high and at no greater than a 4:1 slope. The berm shall undulate and curve.2.Landscape architectural treatment of through lots: 14 (3) Where landscape screening is employed, the berm shall be planted with 30-40% evergreen trees at least eight (8) feet in height and evergreen shrubs at least five (5) feet in height, at the time of installation. Deciduous plants shall be interspersed to add seasonal color and balance. b) Not all through lots are key lots.CONCEPTPLAN CONCEPTPLAN - KEYLOTS STREET STREET 15 CONCEPTPLAN - THROUGH LOTS CONCEPTPLAN - SHOWING VISTAAND VIEWS VIEW VIEW VIEW VIEW VIEW CORRIDOR VIEW VIEW STREET STREET 16 STREETSCAPE F. S treet scaping:1. Incorporated in the plan shall be boulevards, brick paving, monuments, bike paths, special effect fencing, and seating areas.2. Ahigher quality of landscaping shall be required in these areas.3. Irrigation of common areas should be considered.4. Boulevards using a terminus can direct visual attention from monotonous streets.5. Landscaping in boulevards should be structured not to block safety.6. All boulevards shall be maintained by the homeowner’s association.7. The land planner should be encouraged to design passive sitting areas in the boulevard.8. Where boulevards are incorporated into the development plan it is strongly recommended that such boulevards be not less than thirty (30) feet in width, although they may taper at either or both ends. Boulevards should be landscaped appropriately. This would include, but not be limited to the following: a) Boulevards should be landscaped with 75% live plant materials.b) The balance of the boulevard islands should include hardscape elements such as; benches, unit pavers, decorative fencing, natural rock outcroppings, art sculpture, or other elements deemed appropriate by the village. 17 WATER RETENTION POND WATER RETENTION POND G. Retention ponds and detention areas:1. Retention ponds and detention areas should be created as focal features of the development. Care should be taken to design these areas in as natural a manner as possible.2. Native deciduous plant materials, which are indigenous to wet environments,shall be the predominant vegetation. 18 H. Illustrative residential site plan:Review the illustrative site plan on the following page as a reference guide for submittal of a concept plan.I. Residential landscape design:Alandscape plan shall be required for all developments under these guidelines. Said plan shall be prepared by an Illinois registered landscape architect. Except where screening is required, plants shall be arranged in a naturalistic pattern. All plants shall be locally grown; roots of all plants shall be balled and burlapped. The Village Board shall codify minimum sizes and acceptable species. (Arecommended plant list is appended to this report.) Native wildflowers and other perennials are encouraged to add seasonal color.The scale and nature of landscape material should be appropriate to the site and structures. Larger scale buildings should generally be complimented by larger plant material. Detention/retention ponds should be designed to reflect a natural shape rather than an engineered geometric shape. All detention/retention ponds shall be landscaped utilizing native plant materials suitable to such an environment, such as River Birch, Black Alder, Redtwig or Yellowtwig Dogwood, and Red Maple. (See additional notes on retention areas.)Apermanent means of watering plant materials in the common areas shall be provided. Installation of an underground irrigation system is encouraged.Parkways shall be not less than eight (8) feet wide as measured from the back of the curb. Plantings within the parkway shall employ shade trees not less than three (3)inches in caliper as measured at twelve (12) inches above the established grade.The perimeter of all single family detached developments, under these provisions, shall have not less than 30-40% of the perimeter landscaped with a mix of coniferous trees and plant material, except where the provisions for through lots shall take precedence.Where fences are proposed for the perimeter of a development, such fences shall, by covenant, be uniform in design and color throughout the development. The height of such fences shall be consistent with Village ordinances.Where a townhome or multi-family development abuts property planned or zoned for single-family detached development, a continuous landscape screen of at least fifty (50) percent of evergreen plant material shall be installed within the townhome or multi-family site. All screening material and berms shall be designed to create horizontal and vertical movement. 19 AGOOD EXAMPLE OF ACOMMERCIALFACADE NON -RESIDENTIAL GUIDLINES IV. NON-RESIDENTIAL GUIDELINES These guidelines are intended to provide a framework for future retail developments. This framework requires a basic level of architectural variety, compatibility of scale with surrounding uses, pedestrian and bicycle access, and recognition of the historical context of the Village of Plainfield. This framework is not to be interpreted as limiting architectural or planning creativity. Rather it is the Village of Plainfield’s desire that these guidelines will serve to promote commercial development that is both aesthetically and commercially successful. However, in the case of "big box" centers, a clean, simple design, which minimizes the sense of bulk, is preferred.A. Large commercial uses:In order to promote a desirable land plan for a large commercial site, the planner should be aware of the Village’s posture as to how buildings should be viewed from the access roads leading to the proposed development. The Village’s vision of a large commercial site is as follows:1.Access road traffic shall be clear and unencumbered by parking stalls. Such access shall provide for all necessary traffic lanes.2.Access points shall be minimized.3.The perimeter of the property shall provide for a 30’ minimum landscape strip.4.The perimeter of the site adjacent to a street shall provide for commercial outlots, if possible.5.Parking for all outlots shall be placed away from the access roads.6.Parking for all outlots shall be screened from the adjoining street system by the building and shall be provided on the exterior ring road or between buildings, but not on access road frontage.7.All entrances to the development shall be allowed to provide for a large monument sign. (One per entrance and sign can be up to 20 square feet in size, per village ordinance). 20 AGOOD EXAMPLE OF ACOMMERCIALFACADE WITH GOOD FOUNDATION PLANTING B. S treet orient ation:1.Facades should be articulated to reduce long unbroken lines and provide interest. Facades greater than one hundred feet (100’) in length should incorporate wall plan projections or recesses. 2.Ground floor facades that front on public streets shall have arcades,display windows, entry areas, awnings, or similar features.3.Buildings shall incorporate architectural features and patterns that provide visual interest, at the scale of the pedestrian.4.The elements noted in these guidelines shall be an integral part of the building rather than superficially applied trim, graphics, or paint. 5.Building facades must include a repeating pattern that shall include no less than two of the elements noted in these guidelines. At least one of the elements shall repeat horizontally. These elements shall include:a)Color change b)Texture change c)Material module change C. Roofs:1.Variations in roof lines shall be used to add interest to and reduce the massive scale of large buildings. 2.Roof features shall complement the character of adjoining neighborhoods.3.Roofs shall have no less than two of the following features:a)Parapets concealing flat roofs and rooftop equipment (i.e. HVAC) units from public view. Such parapets shall feature three dimensional cornice treatments.b)Overhanging eaves on sloping roofs are accept able .c)Low sloping roofs are not encouraged . 21 COMMERCIALBUILDING WITH GOOD MATERIALS AND COLOR D. Materials and colors:Exterior building materials, geometrics, and colors comprise a significant part of the visual impact of a large building; therefore, they should be aesthetically pleasing and compatible with materials and colors used in adjoining neighborhoods. Elevations facing a street shall be either brick, sandstone, or other native stone or tinted, textured concrete masonry materials. The use of no more than two materials on the exterior elevation is encouraged.E. Entryways:1.Entryway design shall give orientation and aesthetically pleasing character to the building.2.Each principal building on a site shall have a clearly defined, highly visible customer entrance(s) featuring at least three of the following:a)Canopies or porticos b)Overhangs c)Recesses/projections d)Arcades e)Peaked roof forms f)Arches g)Outdoor patios h)Display windows i)Architectural details such as tile work and moldings that are integrated into the building structure and design j)Integral planters or wings that incorporate landscape 22 ILLUSTRATIVE BIG BOX DEVELOPMENT- PERIMETER PLANTING LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE LANDSCAPEDESIGN V. LANDSCAPE DESIGN A. Parking lot landscaping:1.All commercial parking lots that have twenty-five or more spaces shall submit a landscape plan for the parking lot consistent with these guidelines. Developments with fewer than twenty-five spaces shall provide interior landscaping equal to five percent (5%) of the vehicular use area.2.Parking lots consisting of twenty-five spaces or greater shall not have less than seven and one-half percent (7 1/2%) of the interior of the parking lot devoted to landscaping. Perimeter landscaping may be counted against the requirement where a greater than required setback has been incorporated into the plan. Required foundation landscaping may not be counted against this requirement.3.Landscape Areas:a)Interior parking lot landscaping shall be generally dispersed throughout the parking lot.b)Interior parking lot landscaping areas shall be a minimum of one hundred and twenty (120) square feet in area, with a minimum width of seven (7) feet. All landscape islands shall have a minimum depth of topsoil of three feet. 23 ILLUSTRATIVE BIG BOX DEVELOPMENT- FOUNDATION PLANTING ILLUSTRATIVE BIG BOX DEVELOPMENT- INTERIOR PLANTING LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE LARGEENTRYSIGNAGE 24 AGOOD EXAMPLE OF PERIMETER PLANTING c)Landscape material:(1)The landscape material used in the parking lot shall be canopy trees, which should be a minimum of 3" in diameter at the time of installation. Other plant material may be utilized to augment the shade trees, including flowers, shrubs, and groundcover.(2)One canopy tree shall be provided for every one hundred and twenty (120) square feet of landscape area.(3)Aminimum of fifty (50%) percent of every interior parking lot landscape area shall be comprised of live vegetation; the remaining area may include boulders or similar hardscape accoutrements as approved by the Village. d)Planned commercial covenants shall be required and submitted to the Village for approval. The covenants shall include but are not limited to:(1)How the common area maintenance will be administered and the remedies for delinquency.(2)Provide for the formation of an architectural committee to review and approve future changes and revision to then be submitted to the village for approval. 25 ACOMMERCIALBUILDING WITH POOR SIGNAGE, COLOR AND OUTSIDE DISPLAYS B. Perimeter landscaping:1.Where a parking lot is contiguous to a residentially planned or zoned district or is separated from such a district by a right of way, such yard shall effectively landscape to screen one hundred (100) percent of the parking lot from view. Wherever possible, berms shall be incorporated into the landscape plan.2.Evergreen trees and shrubs shall be incorporated into the landscaping plan to the greatest degree possible.3.Where a parking lot is contiguous to a non-residentially planned or zoned district or is separated from such a district by a right of way, such yard shall effectively landscape to screen fifty (50) percent of the parking lot from view. Wherever possible, berms shall be incorporated into the landscape plan.C. Foundation planting:1.Foundation planting shall be required abutting all commercial and industrial buildings and shall not be not less than ten (10) feet in width.2.Foundation landscaping shall be provided along the building foundation that is exposed to a public street. 3.Particular attention shall be paid to screening of dumpster pads, loading docks, and other visible ground level equipment. 4.Not less than eighty (80%) percent of the foundation landscaping shall be live vegetation. Hardscape such as benches, fountains and/or landscape boulders may be incorporated into the foundation planting plan. 26 ACOMMERCIALBUILDING WITH GOOD SIGNAGE, COLOR AND NO OUTSIDE DISPLAYS MISCELLANEOUS VI. MISCELLANEOUS It is important that any proposed signage be incorporated into the plans that are submitted,as listed below. All signs shall be designed in accordance with the current sign ordinance,and be consistent in character, color, and size:Building signs Directional signs Monument signs At no time will outside sales display be allowed without planned unit development approval.If requested, an accurate sales display plan shall be submitted for approval.VII. CONCLUSIONS CONCLUSIONS 1.These guidelines are meant to be a starting point for good architectural design, landscaping, and land planning.2.Better planning and design provides for stability of property value, which will preserve our grand community.3.The design guidelines set forth here are intended to provide direction to insure that all new development is of highest possible quality.