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Residential Design & Planning Guidelines for Planned Unit Developments and AnnexationsKON-FER INC. and THE COMMUNITYDEVELOPMENTDEPARTMENT Residential Design & Planning Guidelines for Planned Unit Developments and Annexations C OCTOBER20, 2005 1 INDEX DEFINITIONS I.INTRODUCTION II.VILLAGE OF PLAINFIELD'S HISTORY& EXISTING CHARACTER III.GOALS & OBJECTIVES IV .PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURALSUBMISSIONS 1)Exhibits required for planning and architectural review V .RESIDENTIAL DESIGN ST ANDARDS 1)Materials 2)Quality of Materials 3)Integrity of Materials 4)Massing of Building Components 5)Window Placement 6)Eave Det ails 7)Door and Door Placement 8)Garage Placement 9)The Use of the Front Porches 10)The Use of the Dormers 11) Lighting and Address Identification VI.NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN ANDHOUSEPLACEMENT 1) Coving 2) Conservation Design 3) Traditional Neighborhood Design VII.LANDSCAPE, STREETSCAPE AND NATURALDETENTION PONDS VIII.DENSITY BONUS SYSTEM 2 DEFINITIONS:1. Pattern Book:Abook prepared by the developer/builders design consultants that illustrates the proposed architectural theme, land planning, landscape, and any other provisions of the proposed development. It shall include, but not be limited to, the following: a. It explains how the development compliments the physical form of the site and the land plan.b. It clearly shows all open spaces and their integrated use in the development, to enhance both the function and aesthetic beauty of the development.c. It indicates how the architectural design is consistent with the Village's promotion for 360 degree architecture and clearly depict the architectural styles. d. Landscape plans indicating shrubs species that will be part of the development and numbers. e. All submittals will be graphically complete in order to eliminate the need for plan interpretation.f. It shall be an "instrument of service" shall be binding on all future land owners.g. It shall est ablish design standards for approval for all elements of the development.2.Through Lot:Alot having frontage on a public or private right of way abutting both its front and rear yards. The design of the rear elevations shall include building articulation. They shall also include the use of one of the following design items, bay-windows, shutters, and rear porches . All through lots shall be graphically indicated on the site plan for Village review accept ance. Through lot example.THROUGHLOTS 3 3. Key Lot:Alot designated on the site plan as occupying a significant location as determined by the Village, which will therefore be treated in an architecturally significant manner. 50% use of brick will be part of the architectural design. Examples of key lots are at the "T" intersections of streets, corner lots, or every 7th lot on long uninterrupted block. All key lots shall be indicated on the site plan for correlation purposes for the Village's acceptance. 4. Key -Through Lot:Alot having frontage on a public or private right- of- way with the rear of the building facing a public, private right- of- way, or open area, viewable from an adjacent right of way. This lot shall be designed with the key , and thru lot st andards.5. Common area . Common area shall include:a. Detention ponds, Private lakes.b. Parkways, medians, Greens, Pocket p arks, Landscape strip s, and any open land not dedicated for specific public use.6. Brick Wainscot:Aconstant horizontal brick line around the building, beginning at the first floor window sill, and continuing down to the foundation.7.Architectural Committee:The Architectural Committee shall be composed of a total of three (3) members. One shall be from the Developer/ Builder Group and two shall be from the Village of Plainfield.Brick wainscot example.Key-Through lot example.Key lot example.KEYLOTS KEY -THROUGH LOTS 4 I. INTRODUCTION The fundamental purpose of these proposed Residential Design Guidelines is to promote good residential design throughout the Village of Plainfield. It has often been said that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" and that dictating certain architectural styles is futile due to the fact that architectural t aste is inherently subjective. While architectural t aste and styles clearly change with the times, cert ain architectural standards are timeless and transcend the ages.Architectural concepts like proportion, balance, symmetry and harmony are as relevant today as they were in time of Andrea Palladio and the "Four Books on Architecture".The hope of the authors of this document is that these guidelines encourage the development community to give more thought to their design of single-family homes. These guidelines are intended to guide the development community through the various design element s that the Village is looking for in the development of new single-family product throughout the Village. Good design transcends the ages and one generally knows good design when one sees it. A well designed home will have the proper proportions, the angle of the roof and the placement of the windows all work. Each well designed individual home eventually adds up to an interesting and unique neighborhood. The future character of the Village of Plainfield will be defined by the character of each new subdivision that comes through the process. These guidelines will encourage and reward the developer who chooses to return to the traditional methods of place making through the rediscovery of classic design lessons of proportion,balance and harmony .An example of good residential design. 5 II.VILLAGE OF PLAINFIELD'S HISTORY& EXISTING CHARACTER The purpose of these Residential Design Guidelines is to ensure that new residential development in the Village of Plainfield is consistent with the Village's current sense of place and present quality of life. The Village of Plainfield is in a unique situation of being one of the oldest communities in Will County and one of the fastest growing communities in the Chicago metropolitan area. In order to preserve the historical character of the Village and unique sense of place, new residential development should incorporate the following residential design guidelines into their developments.The Village of Plainfield has a rich architectural heritage that has created a collection of unique neighborhoods which contain a diversity of architectural styles. The architecture varies from neighborhood to neighborhood, especially in the Village's historical core. The Village takes great pride in this diversity of architecture. However, in recent years, the distinct character of the V illage has been threatened by a new trend in residential development. As the Village continues to grow, more and more nationally recognized production builders have entered the Plainfield market. In many cases, these national builders have brought their standard home designs to the Village. The proliferation of large scale production of a limited number of home designs has resulted in development of homogeneous neighborhoods with little or no connection to Plainfield's historic architectural vernacular and sense of place.The following guidelines should be used by the development community to ensure that all new residential development in the Village is compatible with the existing character of the Village. The history and historical pattern of development must be taken into consideration by the development community when considering new product for the V illage. One of the central goals of these residential guidelines is to preserve the Village's sense of place by continuing the Village's historical pattern of creating unique neighborhoods.As highlighted above, Plainfield is the oldest village in Will County and the Village takes great pride in its historical downtown core. One will find unique neighborhoods throughout the V illage of Plainfield that cont ain numerous examples of dif ferent vernacular architectural styles. It is this variety of architectural styles that helps create the Village of Plainfield's special character. The rich diversity of architecture in the Village's downtown core include many fine examples of Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, Queen Anne,Craftsman, Tudor Revival, and Colonial Revival vernaculars. In addition to the rich heritage of unique architecture, the original settlement of Plainfield reflect s a traditional p attern of development. The original pattern of development in Plainfield reflected a traditional grid plan that remains largely intact today. Generally, the Village's historical core as we know it today was settled between 1835 and the beginning of the twentieth century. Many of the homes located along streets such as Bartlett, Division, Center, Illinois, Oak, and Ottawa were constructed during this period. The early settlement of Plainfield represents a traditional pattern of development and it wasn't until the 1970's that conventional residential subdivisions began to spring up around the Village's historical core. By the beginning of the 21st Century, Plainfield has become one of the fastest growing communities in the State of Illinois. Abrief summary of architectural styles of single-family homes has been provided as a resource for the development community. Prior to using these guidelines, it is important that developers become familiar with the variety of architectural vernaculars that can be found throughout the Village of Plainfield. Each of these styles reflects a particular era and time in the Village's history. Below is a brief summary of some of the different architectural vernaculars as outlined in the "Reconnaissance Survey Report" prepared by the Urbana Group:GREEK REVIVAL Generally, Greek Revival homes were constructed between 1825 and 1860. Generally, Greek Revival incorporates a gabled or hipped roof or low pitch. This type of residential architecture usually incorporated a prominent cornice line; façade corners sometimes identified by a corner board; and front doors typically were surrounded by narrow sidelight s and a rect angular line of transom lights above. Greek Revival homes often had a porch or a prominent entry area.GOTHIC REVIVAL The Gothic Revival homes were generally constructed between 1840 and 1880 and usually incorporate a steep roof, usually with steep cross gables; gables commonly have decorated verge boards; windows commonly extend into gables, frequently have pointed arch (Gothic) shape, one story porches were usually present on these Gothic Revival homes.6 Greek Revival example.Gothic Revival example. 7 ITALIANATE Italianate homes were generally constructed between 1840 and 1880 and usually are two or three stories tall. These homes usually incorporate low pitch roofs, usually hipped, with widely overhanging eaves,which incorporate decorative brackets beneath tall,narrow windows. The windows in these homes are generally curved above and the windows require incorporated elaborate hood molds. Often these homes were topped off with a square cupola or tower.QUEEN ANNE The Queen Anne style was generally constructed between 1880 and 1910. Generally, Queen Anne homes have a steeply pitched roof or irregular shape, usually with a dominant facing gable,patterned shingles, cutaway bay windows, and wall materials of differing textures. Usually, smooth walled appearances were avoided. In addition,these homes usually incorporated an asymmetrical façade with partial or full-width porches that extend along one or two sidewalls.COLONIAL REVIV AL Colonial Revival homes were generally constructed between 1880 and 1955. These homes generally incorporated an accentuated front door which often has a decorative pediment supported by pilasters or which extended forward and supported by slender columns to form an entry porch. These prominent entrances often have overhead fanlights or sidelights.The façade of Colonial Revival homes is symmetrical and the windows are placed in a balanced manner with a centrally located door. Windows are usually double-hung sashes, with multi-pane glazing in one or both sashes. Windows are frequently in adjacent pairs.Italianate example.Queen Anne example.Colonial Revival example. 8 The Colonial Revival movement reintroduced the American colonial home (Federal Adams and Georgian vernacular form) throughout the United States from approximately 1880 to 1950. The 1920's experienced a peak in the interest in the Colonial Revival. In their purest form, the Colonial Revival can be very simple box, with a hip roof, gracious windows, and prominent doors that incorporate porticos or columns. One of the key aspects to the Colonial Revival, like any Colonial, is the importance of balance and symmetry.NEO-CLASSICAL The Neo-Classical movement generally lasted between 1895 to 1940 and is usually reflected by single family homes with a façade with a full-height porch with roof supporting classical columns; columns often have Ionic or Corinthian capitals. The facades show symmetrically balanced windows and a centrally located door. A variation of the Neo-Classical home is the Charleston Style.TUDOR REVIVAL The Tudor Revival movement lasted from approximately 1890 to 1940 and the T udor Revival is usually indicated by a single-family home that has a steeply pitched roof, usually side-gabled, and a façade dominated by one or more prominent cross gables, usually steeply pitched. This style generally incorporates decorative half-timbers and tall narrow windows, usually found in multi-pane glazing. Often these homes have massive chimneys, commonly crowned by decorative chimney pots. FRENCH COUNTR Y Atraditional vernacular form that derives from the outer provinces of France and began to be introduced to America during the early part of the 20th century.Common element s include tall windows with slat-board shutters, steep roofs, multiple gables, and assorted arches, stone and stucco are frequently used along with wood trim with p ainted timbers.Neo-Classical example.Tudor Revival example.French Country example. 9 SHINGLE STYLE The Shingle Style was introduced to the Northeastern part of the country between the years of 1874 and 1910. These structures were generally constructed out of balloon frame and were influenced by many styles, including Tudor, Gothic and Queen Anne. Generally, Shingle style homes have wood shingles, irregular roof lines and cross gables.MIDWESTERNVERNACULAR The Midwestern vernacular farmhouse was developed in the Midwest during the mid-nineteenth century. This vernacular form is generally characterized by the steeply pitched gable roof and a cross or el configuration. The window details generally involves vertical single or double-hung windows with very limited accents around the windows.PRAIRIE STYLE The Prairie Style generally lasted from 1900 to 1920 and reflect s single-family homes with low-pitched roofs, usually hipped, with wide overhanging eaves;two stories with one-story wings or porches; eaves,cornices, and façade det ailing emphasizing horizontal lines; often with massive, square porch supports.Shingle Style example.Midwestern Vernacular example.Prairie S tyle example. 10 CRAFTSMAN STYLE The Craftsman Style generally lasted from 1905 to 1930 and generally incorporates low pitched gable roofs, with wide, unenclosed eave overhang, roof rafters usually exposed; decorative beams or braces commonly added under gables; porches, either full or partial width, with roof supported by tapered square columns, columns or pedestals frequently extended to ground level without a break for the porch floor.As outlined above, the historical character of the Village of Plainfield has largely been maintained and reflects a compact grid of streets that radiates from Lockport Street and Division Street. In addition to the traditional grid pattern, the Village maintains a commercial Main S treet that continues to be the center of the V illage. While no longer being the commercial nucleus of the Village, the Village's historical main street continues to provide the Village with a unique sense of place and distinguishes the Village from many of the surrounding communities. It was this main street, along with the surrounding historical neighborhoods and vast tract s of farmland that largely defined the character of Plainfield from the mid-nineteenth century until the later part of the twentieth century. As the Village of Plainfield continues to grow and attract new residential development, a new focus on good residential design has become a priority. The following guidelines focus on good design element s. Many of these design element s are intended to reintroduce many of the traditional architectural patterns that once were commonly used and have been largely forgotten by today's builders.The new residential design guidelines are not intended to be overly prescriptive or require builders to recreate certain architectural vernaculars. Instead, the purpose of these guidelines is to reintroduce traditional concepts on architectural integrity, balance, and symmetry.Craftsman Style example. 11 III. GOALS & OBJECTIVES The goal of these Residential Design Guidelines is to promote good residential planning and architectural design and to ensure that new residential development is consistent with the Village's current sense of place and character. As drafted, these design guidelines will work hand in hand in hand with the Village's existing "PUD Design Guidelines". One of the central objectives of both sets of these guidelines is to create unique and innovative residential developments. To ensure that the Village only attracts developments that are unique and innovative, great attention must be given to the overall land plan, streetscapes and architectural design..In addition to the necessity of having a good land plan the goals and objectives of these Residential Design Guidelines include the reintroduction of the tradition of designing homes with 360 degree architecture. To ensure that the development community gives new added attention to the design of homes, the Village will require the submittal of a "Pattern Book" as part of the planning process. Specifically, all residential developments that are more than twenty (20) acres or in excess of fifty (50) homes will have to be developed as a Planned Unit Development. All new planned unit developments and annexations will be required to submit a "Pattern Book" for st af f review . The purpose of the "Pattern Book" is to require the developer provide graphic architectural detail on the homes that are being proposed for their developments. Land Plan example.Good single family elevation design example.Good open space example. 12 IV.PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE SUBMISSIONS 1.Exhibits requires for planning and architecture review.A.Existing Conditions Plan (depicting:)1.Existing trees 2.Wetlands, floodplains, and lakes 3.Easements 4.Topography 5.Adjacent street connections B.Land Plan - Over all site plan (depicting:)1. Lot sizes 2. Proposed detention(and how developed)3.Proposed parks 4.Proposed schools (if required)5.S treet scape, boulevard and roundabout s 6.Vistas 7.Entrance Monuments 8.Legend individual density, net and open area 9.Key-lot s and through lot s C.Proposed Landscape Plan 1.All public planting areas 2.Perimiter landscaping 3.Proposed detention pond landscaping D.Proposed architectural elevations of all the proposed models within the development. These proposed elevations will form the elevation standards that will be subsequently reviewed and approved by each development’s architectural review committee.E.Protective Covenants Shall be submitted as part of the “Pattern Book.”Land Plan example - detail.Example of boulevard and streetscape.Detail of landscape plan. 13 V. RESIDENTIALDESIGN STANDARDS 1. Materials New residential developments in the Village of Plainfield must place considerable emphasis on the types of materials that are used on all four elevations of single-family homes and attached product. The fundamental purpose of these Residential Design Guidelines is to avoid the creation of monotonous housing product that incorporate "painted front elevations."Painted front elevations are those elevations that usually place a number of cosmetic architectural elements ranging from a veneer of brick or stone, a series of gables or particular window fenestration to a house to create some architectural variety to the product. Invariably,the front elevation will have some architectural articulation and visual interest, leaving endless numbers of side and rear elevations that are made up of vinyl boxes with no windows or improperly balanced windows.The goals of the following standards are to restore certain design integrity on how materials are used on single family homes and attached product and to reintroduce common methods that were traditionally used in pre-war communities and reflected in the Village's historical core.The following are a number of technical recommendations regarding design and the usage of materials on single-family and attached residential homes:1. Import ance of 360 degree Architecture: Similar to the V illage's policy with respect to commercial development, all residential architecture should incorporate some of the same materials and designs that are used on the front elevation on the side and rear elevations. The form of the design shall be continuous around the building, including the exterior materials. Architectural interest can be added to elevations by using a couple of simple techniques, for example:Example of 360 degree architecture.Front Side Rear 14 a. If brick or stone is used on the front elevation, use brick or stone on any chimney that may be located on the side or rear elevation.b. If brick or stone is used on the front elevation, incorporate a three (3) foot wainscot of brick or stone around the sides and rear or alternatively, in a mass at key points.c. Any brick or stone that is used on a front elevation shall minimally incorporate a return around the corners of any homes. This will avoid the impression of having merely a veneer of brick or stone on the front elevations. Areturn should have a minimum width of two (2) feet and terminate as a change in plane.d. Use brick or stone on all four elevations of the first floor of any single home.2. Quality of Materials Single-family homes should incorporate brick or stone when it is consistent with the vernacular design of the house. When not appropriate, in lieu of using standard vinyl siding on any elevation, the following materials should be used whenever possible:Front elevation with brick.Rear elevation with brick chimney.Front elevation with stone.Front elevation with brick and stone. 15 a.When appropriate from a design perspective, single-family homes that incorporate more than 50% masonry on the front elevation should incorporate a minimum of 25% masonry on the side and rear elevations. Brick treatments on the sides and rear should be in the form of a wainscot.b. In lieu of using standard vinyl siding, the use of cedar clapboard, cedar shingles, or hardier board should be considered. Any vinyl product that is used on a single-family home should be an architectural grade vinyl siding with foam backed trim and corners boards or equal.3. Integrity of Materials The usage of materials on single-family homes should be historically consistent with the vernacular design that is chosen by the developer. The Village of Plainfield promotes the reintroduction of original materials as they were commonly used in home construction throughout the region in the pre-war years.4. Massing of BuildingComponents New residential developments in the Village of Plainfield should take great care in the design as it relates to the massing and composition of single-family homes. Consistent with the Village's historical core and the existing rich diversity of architectural styles, new residential development should take extensive efforts in ensuring that there is a relationship between the composition and the massing of a single-family home.Façade compositions, especially the placement of windows are closely related to building massing.The placement of windows should not only be consistent with the massing of the house, but also should be consistent with the particular architectural vernacular that is chosen. The existing architecture of the V illage's historical core exhibit s the traditional methods of window placement.Whenever possible, traditional methods in window placement and treatments should be used in all future single-family residential development in the V illage.Balanced window placement.Illustration of massing component s. 16 In addition to the critical importance of window placement, another architectural element that will influence the design and overall appearance of a single-family home is the selection of roof style and proposed pitch of the roof. Extensive efforts should be made to ensure that there is a relationship between the massing of a building and the roof that is chosen for the structure.In order to incorporate the architectural goals, the following single-family guidelines are strongly encouraged to be used whenever possible:5. W indow Placement It is critical that home builders in the Village of Plainfield avoid the appearance of "punch out windows" on all four elevations of any single-family home. Windows should be placed whenever possible on all four elevations. Blank walls with no windows are strongly discouraged. W indows should be centered above each other . Additionally , great care should be given to the placement of windows and the window fenestration used. The style of the windows should be dictated by the architectural style of the house.Example of well balanced roof lines.Example of well balanced windows.Front elevation.Front elevation.Rear elevation. Below are a number of guidelines that should be followed with respect to window placement:a. Windows should be proportioned in a manner that creates a balanced elevation. Furthermore, window placement should be consistent with the overall vernacular design of the structure and windows should generally be vertically oriented.As stated above, windows should be centered one above the other. b. Windows should be placed on all four elevations. Blank walls with no windows are strongly discouraged.c. Traditional window fenestration consistent with the proposed vernacular architectural style of a structure should be used whenever possible. Any window fenestration used on the front elevation should be carried through on the side and rear elevations.d. All windows should incorporate some ornament al trim work. Simple aluminum window frames with no trim work are strongly discouraged.e. Where appropriate, shutters should be used. If shutters are appropriate, they should be sized and mounted if operable. Shutters should be avoided on double or triple hung windows. If shutters are used on the front elevation, they should be carried over to the side and rear elevations where appropriate.17 Example of balanced windows on rear elevation.Example of shutters on front elevation. 18 6. Eaves Details Traditionally, the massing of a house has been articulated with eaves and soffit details. Eave details may vary with the particular vernacular design of the house. However, eaves and soffits should incorporate a minimum width and should be carried around all four elevations of the house. Roof overhangs generally vary 12 inches for a Colonial to 20 inches or more on a Prairie Style Home.One of the benefits of the incorporation of a prominent eave is that it creates a shadow line around the top of the house and creates some articulation to the roof line of each individual house. Generally, the more detail there is to an eave, the better the appearance will be.Below are some guidelines that should be used with respect to the placement of eaves and soffits on all single-family homes:a. All single-family homes should incorporate eaves on all four elevations of the homes and the eaves should have a minimum width of 12 inches.b. Where architecturally appropriate, the incorporation of eave brackets should be used.c. Eaves should be as continuous as possible, both horizont ally and vertically .d. Afrieze board should be incorporated below every eave on all four elevations.7. Doors and Door Placement Door placement, door style, and color should all reflect the vernacular style of the house. Door styles should be used in a manner that emphasizes the front entry and de-emphasizes the garage and service door . Generally , door placement s should be centrally located and placed in balanced manner with respect to window placement. In addition to proper location, doors should serve as prominent architectural features. The placement and design of doors should follow the following guidelines:Centrally located door placement. 19 a.Doors should generally be constructed out of wood, fiberglass, or steel and should incorporate a style that is consistent with the architectural style of the house.b. Where architecturally appropriate, doors should incorporate sidelights or transoms which can be a rectangular form or segmented arch form.c. Where appropriate, doors should incorporate raised panels, glass panels, or panels of decorative glass.d. Where appropriate, doors should incorporate covered porches, vestibules, bracketed hoods, or decorative trim work around the doorways.8. Garage Location and Design Too often the placement of garages defines the character of a residential streetscape. To avoid the scenario of long street scapes dominated by endless number of projecting garages,great care and thought should be given to the placement and design of garages. Consistent with the Village's PUD Design Guidelines, a minimum percentage of the garages in any individual subdivision should be side loaded. Additionally, to avoid the creation of street scapes dominated by long lines of "snout houses," garages should be recessed or project no more than a cert ain dist ance from the main structure of the house. Based on the aforesaid design goals, the following design guidelines should be used in the placement and design of garages:a. Aminimum of twenty-five (25%) of the garages in any given subdivision should be side loaded or rear loaded. This calculation includes corner lots.b. W ith the exception of side- loaded garages, no garage should project more than five (5) feet from the front elevation of the house that is closest to the street.c.The intermix of side loaded garages into streetscapes can prevent the of domination of continuous garage doors Good use of door transom. 20 d. Aminimum of twenty-five (25%) of the garages in any given subdivision should be set back at least five (5) feet from the front elevation of the house.e. Aminimum of fifty (50%) of the garage doors that can be seen from the street shall incorporate either glass panel windows or individual bay doors.5’The use of intermittent side load garages help the look of the streetscape.Front Load Garage Designs Projected garage example.Recessed garage example.Flush garage example.Design changes of an existing floor plan can result in hidden garage doors and an attractive elevation.1.Base Plan - elevation 2.Base Plan - site 3.Rear-loaded Plan - site 4.Rear-loaded Plan - elevation 21 9. Useof Porches The use of porches on front elevations is strongly encouraged when architecturally appropriate. Generally, porches should have a minimum depth of between six (6) to eight (8)feet and should be constructed in a manner where they are fully useable. With respect to the construction of porches, the style of the porch should be architecturally consistent with the vernacular style of the house. Each porch element should be clearly expressed, including the deck platform, railings, columns, headers, porch ceiling, soffit, fascia, gutter, and roof. 1.Base Plan - elevation 2.Base Plan - site 3.Rear-loaded Plan - site 4.Rear-loaded Plan - elevation Front Porch Designs 22 10. Use ofDormers The use of dormers along the front elevations to provide additional architectural interest to rooflines is strongly encouraged where architecturally appropriate. Dormers should be habitable and have symmetrical gable, hip, shed,or curved roof forms. Dormers that have no functionality and are only used for cosmetic purposes are discouraged. The body of a dormer should be vertically proportioned, and the window within the dormer should be proportioned and balanced when comp ared to the windows in the floor below . 11. Lighting and Address Identification Another architectural element that helps provides additional interest and character to individual homes is creative use of exterior lighting and address marker placement s. Light fixtures should be consistent with the architectural style of the neighborhood and the house.All exterior lighting should be "down" or "area" lighting. All light sources should be white (no color lighting) and no overspill should occur on any abutting residential neighbor. All exterior lighting should be shielded to conceal any glare. Tree-up lighting should be concealed in shrubs.In addition to exterior lighting, each individual home should incorporate an address identification that is constructed out of quality materials. If brick is used on the front elevation,a stone address identification marker should be located adjacent to the front entrance or over the garage door.Single dormer example.Well proportioned dormer example.Symmetrical dormer example. 23 VI. NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN AND HOUSE PLACEMENT Another design aspect that will augment good residential design is good neighborhood design. The Village's Design Guidelines for Planned Unit Developments outline many of the key design elements that the Village is looking for in residential subdivision design. These include general guidelines on street design, street frontage and building massing, key lots and through lot design, and streetscaping. In addition to the Village's PUD Design Guidelines, serious consideration should be given to incorporating one of the following neighborhood designs into all future residential development in the Village of Plainfield. The following design forms reflect the Village's historical past and continued wish to preserve the current sense of place. The use of coving and conservation design reflects the Village's rural past and wish to preserve open space for future generations.The use of Traditional Neighborhood Design reflects the best design traditions of the Village's past.1 . Coving : One of the design elements that the following residential guidelines promote is using the concept of "coving" in creating residential land plans. The concept of "coving"provides a creative alternative to conventional subdivision planning. Consistent with the emphasis on good streetscape design, as outlined in the Village's PUD Design Guidelines,coving allows for the creation of park-like streetscapes. Borrowing from some of the early principles of the early "romantic" planned communities like Riverside, coving is an attempt to maximize the vistas of open space and de-emphasize the importance of street placement.Unlike the conventional method of subdivision design, coving requires the land planner to locate the house first and then plan the street location. By varying the house placements and through the use of meandering street networks, the planner is creating a network of extensive open space along the streets. This is accomplished by the fact that the deeper setbacks of homes allow the distances from homes to vary up to 300 feet. This larger distance allows for larger areas of open sp ace as the street meanders between the home sites.Example of land PUD using coving. 24 There are a number of benefits that coving will create with respect to better subdivision design. In addition to more open space vistas, the varying front yard depths allow for a de-emphasis on the garages. This is consistent with the Residential Design Guidelines. In addition, the incorporation of varying front yard depths along with meandering streets,means that houses rarely face one another directly. Aland plan that incorporates coving will encompass the following design elements:Instead of a fixed setback line, the homes are arranged along a varied and non-staggered setback. Setbacks can vary by up to 40% in a development that has used the principles of coving.Streets are designed in a way that they meander through the development, in lieu of a more conventional parallel street system.Large areas of front yard alternate from one side of the street to the other. This will provide additional vist as of open sp ace along the meandering roadway network.The placement of the homes becomes a critical component in the design of a subdivision using coving concepts. Homes should be placed in a manner that they avoid facing another home across the street.The use of coving principles provides an opportunity to create a very naturalistic subdivision with extensive landscaping. 2. Conservation Design : Conservation design provides an opportunity to preserve natural areas and additional open space. The purpose of conservation design, as outlined in the Village's proposed zoning ordinance, is for "the creation of residential areas that minimize the destruction of existing vegetation, maintain environmental corridors, create common open space, and preserve the rural character and natural topography." Unlike the conventionally designed subdivision, the conservation design process begins with identifying the natural areas that should be preserved. As outlined in Randall G . Arend t's "Conservation Design for Subdivisions," conservation design entails a four step process:Step One: Requires the developer to identify all of the potential conservation areas. One of the central goals of conservation design is to make every effort to preserve special areas of flora or fauna and vist as of open sp ace. 25 Step Two: Requires the developer to locate the house sites after the designation of open space areas that are worthy of preserving. One of the goals in laying out the house lots is to ensure to the highest possibility that each house will have a view of open space.Step Three: Requires the developer to design the street alignment and trail system. Contrary to the conventional method of subdivision design, the establishment of the street network is one of the last steps taken in the conservation design process.Step Four: The last step that is required by the developer in the conservation design process is laying out the lot lines. This process will often result in smaller lots then what would normally be found in a conventional subdivision design. However, the benefit would be more open space within the development.The amount of open space within a conservation design subdivision can vary between a minimum of forty-five (45%) and seventy (70%) percent. One of the real benefits that results from a higher percent age of open sp ace is the possibility of creating extensive buf fers along wetlands, watersheds, or other water bodies. In addition to preserving more open space,there are a number of other benefits that result from conservation design, including reduced infrastructure costs. As part of these proposed guidelines, the Village is promoting the use of conservation design in the low density residential districts. Acombination of conservation design developments and developments with large estate lots will help preserve the rural character of certain areas of the V illage as outlined in the Comprehensive Plan. Additionally , the use of conservation design provides an opportunity to link together the existing greenways and tracts of open space throughout the Village.Examples of Conservation Design site plan. 26 3. Traditional Neighborhood Developments : The purpose behind the Traditional Neighborhood Development is to reintroduce those traditional planning elements that can be found in the Village's historical core to new residential development. Traditional Neighborhood Design as outlined in the Village's proposed zoning ordinance update " is intended to regulate residential areas near the Village's center and provide opportunities for development that conforms to more traditional forms of neighborhood layout. It allows various housing types:single-family, duplex, and townhouse." As identified by Andres Duany and Elizabeth Plater Zyberk, a Traditional Neighborhood Development will incorporate the following characteristics:The neighborhood will have a discernable center. This may be a green, square, or some type of civic structure.Most of the dwellings are within a five minute walk of the center.Avariety of dwelling types are available including single-family homes, rowhouses, and apartments, so younger and older people, singles, the poor, and wealthy may find a place to live.Shop s and of fices can be at the edge of the neighborhood, in suf ficient variety to provide for the neighborhoods needs.An elementary school is close enough so that most of the children can walk from their homes.Small playgrounds that are convenient to every dwelling.S treet s within the neighborhood are a connected network which disperses traf fic by providing a variety of pedestrian and vehicular traffic routes to any destination.The street s are relatively narrow and shaded by rows of trees. These feature slow traffic, creating a pedestrian friendly neighborhood.Buildings in the neighborhood center are placed close to the street, creating a well-defined out door room.Certain prominent sites at the termination of the street vistas or in the neighborhood center are reserved for civic buildings. These provide sites for community buildings, educational, religious, or cultural activities.1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. 27 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. 28 One of the central features of a Traditional Neighborhood Development is the de-emphasis of the garage which is invariably located in the front of the house in a conventional subdivision. In place of the front loaded garage, homes in the traditional neighborhood incorporate rear-loaded alleys. The homes are usually placed much closer to the street and often incorporate a large,useable porch. Another important element of the Traditional Neighborhood Development is the diversity of housing stock that can often be found on the same block. Single-family homes are often intermixed with multi-family units. The benefit of this design approach is that it provides a mixture of housing stock for various income groups on the same block. The critical element in making this approach successful is good design. W ell designed rowhouses can intermix well with single-family homes.Because of the higher density in T raditional Neighborhood Developments, good architectural design is important. Many Traditional Neighborhood Development s choose a traditional architectural vernacular that has some connection to the history of the town that the development is located in. In addition to good architecture,traditional sidewalks, constructed out of brick, and traditional street lighting can add to the character of a neighborhood. Examples of a Traditional Neighborhood.Traditional Front Elevation Designs 29 VII. LANDSCAPE, STREETSCAPE AND NATURALDETENTION PONDS Landscape Guidelines The purpose of this section is to promote a higher standard of residential landscape for future residential neighborhoods in the Village of Plainfield. These guidelines are intended to benefit the individual homeowners and provide a long term benefit to the Village through the process of creating unique neighborhoods. In addition to the above architectural guidelines, these additional landscape guidelines should assist the development community in the creation of new types of residential subdivisions. The incorporation of these guidelines in addition to the Village's existing PUD Design Guidelines will provide an opportunity to reintroduce traditional concepts of the "Garden Suburb."In addition to good residential architecture, one additional way of introducing character to residential neighborhoods is by incorporating extensive landscaping above and beyond the standard parkway trees that are required by Village ordinance. As part of these guidelines, developers as part of any proposed Planned Unit Development (PUD) or Preliminary Plat should submit a landscape plan that shows the street scape landscape (parkway trees, landscaped medians, all common areas, and any subdivision entrance area), individual lot landscape plan, and detention landscape plan.Boulevard Plan - detail. 30 New Residential developments in the Village of Plainfield should incorporate the following building blocks to create a unique and innovative developments:STREETSCAPE DESIGN Afundamental element of good residential design is the focus on good street design. Good street design should place considerable emphasis on the relationship between building,streets and dedicated open space. Long straight streets should be avoided.GREENWAYCONNECTIONS An element that is important is the creation of a network of greenways or good pedestrian connections throughout a residential subdivision. These greenways should incorporate extensive landscaping and of ten include benches and special lighting treatment s. These greenways should connect to neighborhood parks.BOULEVARD DESIGN The PUD Design Guidelines promote the incorporation of wide usable boulevards. The design guidelines further go on and encourage the placement of boulevards at major entrances or on collector street s. To create a more interesting design these boulevards often terminate at a terminal vista of open space or a key architectural structure. VISTAS OF OPEN SPACE The creation of terminal vist as of open space is another critical element to good subdivision design in the Village's PUD Design Guidelines. Open space should be located in an area that is centrally located if possible or in a location that maximizes the vista. Single-loaded streets facing the open space is encouraged.Streetscape example.Greenway example.Boulevard example.V ist a of open space example. 31 Below are some general guidelines for residential landscaping:1.Landscaping should be designed to be natural looking while having proportion, balance, unity, variety of species, and variety of color throughout the seasons.2.Landscaping materials that are native to the area should be selected wherever feasible.3.Each individual residential lot should incorporate a minimum of landscaping as outlined below which will soften the mass of the house and integrate with the common landscaping located within the parkways and any adjacent landscaped medians:a.Three (3) canopy trees with a 2 inch caliper per lot. Aleast one of these canopy trees should be located in the front yard.b.Aminimum of one (1) ornamental tree in the front yard.c.A minimum of ten (10) shrubs which will have a height of three (3) feet within three years. No more than four (4) of the shrubs can be of the same species.4.Residential landscaping should be innovative, creative, and ensure the proper long term maintenance and replacement of landscaping as needed; and 5.The best professional practices of the American Society of Landscape Architects regarding planting, installation, trimming, fertilizing, and other maintenance should be followed.6.All areas that adjoin public, arterial or collector street s shall provide for a minimum of 20' continuous land area separate from the lots and abutting the rear lot line. This area shall be mounded and landscaped, in an acceptable plan. Tree spacing min 40’-0”on center. Thirty (30) percent of all trees shall be evergreens and clustered. 7.The creation of detention ponds and lakes shall be designed, and landscaped to conform to the Village's subdivision standards. They shall reflect the following additional design standards.Detail of public area landscaping. 32 a. Detention ponds and lakes shall be designed to provide a natural shoreline, with adequate erosion control (mixture of wetland plants and viewing areas).b. Ponds and lakes shall be designed with at minimum 60% wetland plants, and grass sodded viewing areas. c.All ponds and lakes shall have access to adjacent streets, and provide space for the movement of maintenance equipment. d.Ponds and lakes shall provide for clear access around the pond suf ficient to allow access for maintenance equipment. This area shall be in addition to any required rear yards. e. Clustered trees, and or shrubs shall be placed around the pond or lake shoreline for soil stabilization, and beautification. 8. All cul-de-sacs shall provide for landscaped areas in the center of the cul-de-sac. It will be no smaller that 28’in diameter.9. Boulevards shall have a minimum of 2 1/2” caliper trees, 40’-0” on center located remote from the curb to avoid salt burn. An example of a pond with sodded viewing area.An example of a pond with naturalistic shoreline.Pond with tree clusters.An example of a landscaped cul-de-sac. 33 VII. DENSITYBONUSSYSTEM In order to promote and encourage the development community to incorporate the following residential design guidelines into all new Annexations and Planned Unit Developments (PUD),the following bonus system shall be available:Draft - August 1, 2005 Village of Plainfield Proposed Density Bonus System Development of new residential neighborhoods should follow the Village's Residential Design Guidelines. These guidelines are designed to promote quality development, providing for a varied community with a wide range of housing choices. Implementation of these guidelines must be a cooperative effort between the Village and the development community. The guidelines will be used by the V illage as a tool to aid in the evaluation of specific development proposals to determine appropriate residential densities. Administratively, this will be done through both the annexation agreement and planned development processes.The Future Land Use Plan outlines residential land use categories with varying densities (listed in dwelling units per acre) as follows:Existing Density Low Density Residential 1.4 - 2.0 Medium Density Residential2.1 - 3.0 V illage Residential 4.0 - 6.0 Multi-Family Residential10.0 - 15.0 A higher maximum density may be permitted in downtown Plainfield based on the merits of a particular project.Appropriate residential densities for each new subdivision in Plainfield will be determined on a case by case basis through the review and approval of annexation agreements and planned development s. Calculation of allowable density will be based on determination of a base dwelling unit count calculated by multiplying the buildable area of a property by the base density as outlined in the Comprehensive Plan. A series of density bonuses may then be permitted based on the following criteria.The maximum combined bonus that will be allowed under these proposed guidelines is 50%. 34 Draft Density Bonus System August 1, 2005 Neighborhood Design Approaches Amaximum 5% density bonus for projects containing one or more of the following design approaches. (See definition in Residential Design Guidelines)1. Coving 2. Traditional Neighborhood Design 3. Conservation Design 4. Urban Cluster 5. Transit Oriented Development Open space that results from a Conservation Design approach and transportation improvements that may be included in a TOD would be credited in addition to the maximum 5% as outlined above.Land Planning Design Amenities 1 . Open Space - Open space is a highly desired amenity within residential developments, providing multiple benefits including views and vistas, wildlife habitats, recreational opportunities, and storm water management. Areas such as p arks, forest preserves,retention or detention areas, greenways, landscape buf fers out side of a residential lot, and sports fields on a school campus can all be a part of the open space within a development. All developments will most likely have some open space to accommodate stormwater management requirement s and to provide required p ark and school sites. For project s containing over 30% open space, a density bonus of 1% will be provided for every 2% of additional open space up to a maximum density bonus of 15%. For example, a project providing 50% open sp ace would receive a density bonus of 10%. For the purpose of determining a project's open space percentage, areas for wetlands or floodway deducted in calculation of a sites buildable area will be added back in to the open space calculation.An example of open sp ace. 35 Draft Density Bonus System August 1, 2005 2.Dispersed Multi-Family Housing - Adensity bonus of 5% will be provided if the development disburses multiple-family housing throughout the project so that no than 33% of any multifamily product type is concentrated in any one area of the development.3.Dispersed Single - Family Housing - Adensity bonus of up to 5% will be provided for projects that mix lot sizes and home styles (ranch, 2-story,) within the development. The goal is to encourage neighborhood diversity through a variety of lot sizes and housing types within a block.4. Private Community Center - Clubhouse, pool and/or other recreational amenities such as a water p ark or tennis courts for residents of the subdivision. Abonus of up to 5% can be achieved for providing such amenities within a project as appropriate for the size of the development.5. Best Management Practices and Restoration of Natural Areas - A maximum 10% bonus can be achieved for the incorporation of Best Management Practices and/or restoration of natural areas to handle stormwater issues and to preserve water quality levels above ordinance requirements. This bonus category also includes the re-est ablishment of a functional eco-system including prairie, streams or wetlands to allow for aquifer recharge and wildlife habitat. Bonus for these features will be scaled based on a 1% bonus for each 1% of buildable area restored, up to the maximum 10% bonus.6. Landscape and Streetscape Design - Incorporation of boulevards, paving and bridge enhancements, decorative lighting and exceptional landscape design elements as outlined in the V illage's Residential Design Guidelines may qualify for a maximum 15% bonus.Detail of multi-family housing plan detail Community Center example.Landscape design example. 36 Draft Density Bonus System August 1, 2005 Architectural Design Amenities 1. Non-Dominant Garage Doors - Aminimum of 35% of garages in each subdivision are required to be non-dominant. Garages that are side or rear loaded or recessed from the front facade of the home as outlined in the Residential Design Guidelines shall be considered non-dominant. Garages that project no more than 5 feet from the front façade or that include decorative windows, carriage doors, curved tops, cross bucks or other elements of architectural interest shall also be considered non-dominant. If more than the minimum percentage of garages in a subdivision are non-dominant, a pro-rated density bonus shall be given for a maximum bonus of 10% given for 100% of the units having non-dominant garages. For example, a 5% bonus would be provided if 70% of the homes are non-dominant.2 . T raditional Architecture - Using a traditional architectural vernacular similar to that which currently exists in the Village's historical downtown as outlined in the Residential Design Guidelines shall be a core goal. Aminimum of 15% of homes in any subdivision shall incorporate traditional architecture. Amaximum bonus of 10% will be granted if 60%of the single family homes in a subdivision follow traditional architectural styles. Bonuses will be pro-rated to this maximum. For example, providing traditional architecture for 30% of the homes in a subdivision would yield a 5% density bonus.An example of a rear load garage street scape. 37 Draft Density Bonus System August 1, 2005 3.360 Degree Architecture - Aminimum of 25% of homes in any subdivision shall incorporate 360 degree architecture. This may be obtained by the use of any of the following: trim board around windows; wrapping of 18" of brick if used on the front; projection of windows or room elements from the side or rear façade; use of porches or decks; changes in the exterior materials used to provide architectural interest; incorporating gables in the roof or over windows; use of mullions on windows; shutters on the majority of windows; changes in roof elevations in the side or rear elevations; incorporation of traditional and balanced window placement on all four elevations; providing a landscape package for walls with small or no windows. Other elements of 360 degree architecture may be agreed to by staff and incorporated in the developer's pattern book.Abonus will be provided for homes on non-through lots or non-corner lots exhibiting 360 degree architecture as outline in the Residential Design Guidelines (Note: guidelines need to be clarified and expanded on page 10 based on discussions with developers). Amaximum bonus of 20% will be granted if 100% of the single family homes in a subdivision provide for 360 degree architecture. Bonuses will be pro-rated to this maximum. For example, providing 360 degree architecture for 50% of the lots in a subdivision would yield a 10% density bonus.Other Elements An additional bonus may be achieved for inclusion of the following elements as a part of the subdivision approval process. The maximum density bonus for all items listed in this Other Element s category is 15%.1. Land for Agency Use - Aland donation to an agency such as the Village, Library District, or Fire District shall be eligible for a density bonus. Park and school dedications, even if they exceed dedication requirements, are not included in this bonus category to avoid double counting with the open space bonus listed above.Bonus will be based on a percentage of land given (i.e. 5 acres on a 100 acre development is a 5% bonus).Example of 360 degree architecture.Front Side Rear 38 Draft Density Bonus System August 1, 2005 2. Historical Preservation - Preserving historical farmsteads or houses within the proposed development will earn up to a 5% bonus for each farmstead or home preserved. To qualify, homes or farmsteads receiving credit must receive Village Board approval. When necessary the Board may consult with the Historic Commission to determine the historic value of a structure.3. On-Site Major Transportation Improvements - Making a transportation improvement that will have a regional benefit in the Village's transportation network as identified on the Village Transportation plan. Abonus will only be considered for costs above normal subdivision requirements and any recapture and annexation fee allowances. One additional home will be permitted for every $25,000 in additional transportation improvement costs including but not limited to engineering, utility relocation, obtaining easements, right of way costs, legal fees, and landscape restoration.4. Off-Site Road Improvements - Constructing a roadway improvement not adjacent to the development to fill in a gap between improvement s. A bonus will only be considered for cost s above normal subdivision requirement s and any recapture and annexation fee allowances. One additional home will be permitted for every $50,000 in additional road improvement costs including but not limited to engineering, utility relocation, obt aining easement s, right of way cost s, legal fees, and landscape restoration.5. Correcting Off-Site Issues - These are existing issues identified by the Village Board that may include improved service of utilities, stormwater or access. One additional home will be permitted for every $50,000 in additional improvement cost s including but not limited to engineering, utility relocation, obtaining easements, right of way costs, legal fees, and landscape restoration .6. Affordable Housing - Adensity bonus of up to 10% can be achieved by providing housing affordable to residents with a median household income 80% of that of the metropolit an area. The Village shall establish a means by which prospective buyers shall be qualified and such information made available to home builders.Median household income means the median household income adjusted for family size for applicable income limit areas as determined annually by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development under Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937.