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Residential Infill DesignResidential In fi ll Design Guidelines Village of Plain fi eld - Planning Department April 2009 Table of Contents Introduction/Purpose 4 Background 5 Existing Conditions 6 Site & Form 9 Roofs 11 Materials 12 Porches 13 Windows 14 Doors & Entries 15 Additions 16 Garages 17 Multiple-Family Residences 18 Business Transition Zoning 19 Landscaping & Tree Preservation 20 Appendix A: Plain fi eld Architecture 21 Appendix B: Resources 24 Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 4 These guidelines are to encourage redevelopment that is compatible with the existing character of the village core as well as continue to preserve the character of the existing neighborhoods. Continued regional growth has increased developmental pressures in the village core. These guidelines are targeted towards the village core, but can also apply to new development outside of the area. The design guidelines serve as a reference for property owners, developers, residents, and public of fi cials responsible for reviewing development plans within the area. The criteria are meant to address the exterior appearance of buildings. The guidelines are not intended to prohibit creative approaches to individual building designs, or to promote architectural uniformity. It is the intent of this document to foster collaboration between the Village and the developer/builder early in the design process of a redevelopment project. In Plain fi eld, the goal of redevelopment projects is for them to re fl ect an understanding of the immediate site surroundings and village character. The projects should consider existing features including massing, height, setbacks, proportions, scale, roof forms, materials, articulation, lighting, signs and awnings while creating appropriate architectural design.The intent of the guidelines is not to recreate traditional architectural styles that do not allow for contemporary architectural designs or materials, but to provide a framework within which good design can fl ourish in context and enhance the existing Village character. Additionally, the guidelines attempt to de fi ne characteristic architectural elements to assist in the development of both neo-traditional and contemporary design solutions. These re fl ect the Midwestern architecture associated with Plain fi eld.These guidelines are to be used in conjunction with the Design Manual for the Lockport Street Corridor (2000). The Design Manual concentrates on business structures typically found on Lockport Street and addresses the surrounding areas. These in fi ll guidelines are applicable to residential development, while the Design Manual is focused on the commercial areas of the historic core.Introduction/ Purpose Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 5 Settlement & Original Town Plain fi eld is known as the oldest community in Will County, predating the formation of the county itself. Members of the Potawatomie tribe lived in the area when French fur traders arrived in the 1820s. Permanent settlers arrived shortly thereafter, but the fi rst land sale in the area did not occur until 1833. “Plane fi eld” was laid out in thirteen blocks, now the area surrounding the Village Green, by Chester Ingersoll in 1834. In 1835, Will County separated from Cook County. The same year, James Matthews platted the eastern section of the Village. The northeast section of the Village was laid out by Squire Arnold in 1835-36. Major Corridors Along Main Street , in the northern part of the Village, a stagecoach line ran from Chicago to Ottawa. The fi rst business in town, the Plain fi eld (Halfway) House, was located on this route and is now listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The name comes from its location at the midpoint of the stage line. It served primarily as an inn and tavern, but was also used as Will County’s fi rst franchised post of fi ce and the headquarters of the local militia. By the 1860s, most commerce shifted to Lockport Street , the main route from the west to the Illinois & Michigan Canal to the east. Lockport Street remains the commercial center for the historic core. Many original buildings remain; however, several fi res occurred between 1881 and 1898. The earliest buildings are wood frame commercial and religious buildings. Additional commercial and residential buildings date from the late 19th century and early 20th century.In 1913, Lockport Street was chosen as a segment of the Lincoln Highway , the fi rst paved, transcontinental highway. Plain fi eld’s section was paved in 1921. In 1939, Plain fi eld was designated on an alternate route of U.S. Route 66 . Portions of this route, which was decommissioned in 1985, are now a scenic byway. Plain fi eld became one of only two places in the U.S. where two of the longest paved highways at the time intersected. It was the only place where the two roads shared the same alignment Joliet Road is also another road important in the early history of Plain fi eld. The road served as a connection between Plain fi eld and Joliet as early as the 1840s and became a major commercial corridor for Plain fi eld in the 1960s. Illinois Route 59 , formerly known as Division Street, become a major thoroughfare and commercial corridor in the 1990s. Recent Changes Since 1990, when an F5 tornado struck parts of the Village on August 28th, the Village has grown rapidly. The population of the Village was 4,557 in 1990 and grew to 13,038 in 2000. Growth occurred at an even faster pace over the next few years, with the population doubling in a few years and reaching 37,334 in 2007. Background Original Town portion of an 1862 plat of the Village.Plain fi eld or Halfway House constructed in 1834 and along the Chicago-Ottawa Road.Newer development in the Village. Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 6 Existing Conditions Village Core The core of Plain fi eld extends southward from approximately the intersection of Illinois Route 59 and the Canadian National/EJ & E railroad tracks to just north of Fort Beggs Drive. Its western boundary is the Du Page River. The eastern boundary is the Lake Renwick Heron Rookery Nature Preserve, the Canadian National/EJ & E railroad tracks, as well as a portion of the area to the north and east of the railroad tracks. The village core consists of a wide variety of lot size ranging from less than 5,000 square feet to more than 30,000 square feet. The diversity in lot size re fl ects a diverse building stock as well. Typically, residential construction prior to 1900 is wood while brick, stone and other materials were incorporated in later construction.Comprehensive Plan There are two goals for the historic downtown core in the Comprehensive Plan: protect the character and integrity of the downtown area, and focus on expanding the traditional downtown district through historic preservation and new investment. The Comprehensive Plan designates the land within the historic downtown core under several land use categories, The residential land uses are from highest intensity to lowest intensity: Multiple Family Residential, Village Residential, and Medium Density Residential. Village Residential is the most prevalent classi fi cation with a density of 4.0-6.0 dwelling units per acre. Village Residential allows for single family detached residences and attached residences with up to four units. It can also be a transition between lower and higher intensity uses. This is appropriate for much of core given its size and location to corridors that are transitioning to commercial uses. For commercial uses, the Transitional and Mixed Use classi fi cations are the most relevant to these guidelines. Properties on IL 59/Division Street and U.S. 30/Joliet Road are designated Transitional Commercial. The purpose of this designation is to encourage the conversion of residential structures to professional and commercial uses while maintaining the historic and residential character of the structures. Mixed Use comprises a small area of the village core and provides a variety of uses including retail, of fi ce, institutional, and residential. Village Core Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 7 Neighborhoods within the Village Core The village core is a relatively small area, but within it are several areas that function as neighborhoods. These are the Village Green, Arnold’s Addition, the Lockport Street Business Corridor, the northeast quadrant comprised primarily of Bartlett, Center and Eastern, the Joliet Road area, and the Highview Subdivision. Village Green The Village Green was platted in 1835 and the area around it developed over the next 100 years. The earliest house is a Greek Revival cottage from c. 1835, while the most recent change is a bungalow that was altered to a two-story residence in 2005. The lots around the Green are relatively small for the village; approximately 10,000 square feet. Over half of the blocks surrounding the Green have alleys. These blocks typically have detached garages to the rear of the residences with the garage facing the alley, while the remaining blocks commonly have detached garages that are set to the rear of the property with an entrance from the front. The area includes some mid-20th century ranch residences with attached garages. The area to the west of the Green suffered extensive damage from the tornado. Several residences were reconstructed following the tornado, while others were extensively remodeled. This area is also near the Electric Park site, a resort in the early 20th century along the Du Page River.The area surrounding the Village Green is predominantly Low Density Residential, with some Multiple Family residences. The areas on and adjacent to Lockport Street are part of the B-5 Traditional Business overlay district. Arnold’s Addition The northeast portion of the historic urban core was not of fi cially platted until Squire Arnold’s death in 1845. Main Street coincided with the Chicago - Ottawa Trail and is the site of one of the village’s earliest buildings, the Plain fi eld/Halfway House. As with the Village Green area, this part of Plain fi eld developed over time, with early Greek Revival residences, Queen Anne style residences, bungalows, and later, several multiple family apartment buildings. Unlike the relatively rigid structure around the Village Green, the lots in Arnold’s Addition are irregularly shaped with variations in the parcel size. Some of the larger parcels are deep lots that are adjacent to the DuPage River. Much of this area is zoned Low Density Residential or Multpile Family Residential.Lockport Street Business Corridor The Lockport Street Business corridor developed after the initial settlement in Plain fi eld when Lockport Street became a main route to Lockport and the I & M Canal. This area has a variety of buildings and types from commercial to residential. Guidelines for this area are covered extensively in the Design Manual. The zoning is the B-5 overlay district.The Village Green (center) and surrounding neighborhood.Arnold’s Addition encompasses a vari-ety of uses and building types. Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 8 East Side This side of town developed fi rst along the major road corridors in the mid-1850s and fi lled in through the mid-20th century. There are a variety of residential styles, particularly Greek Revival cottages to the south, and Queen Anne residences to the north. Detached garages dominate and few of the blocks have alleys. This area of town has several neo-traditional detached garages that re fl ect the architecture of the main residence. Several of these are located on Bartlett Avenue, but others are scattered throughout the village core. This part of town is predominantly zoned Low Density Residential with some commercially zoned properties along the major corridors. U.S. 30/Joliet Road The area surrounding Joliet Road, now U.S. Route 30, has a variety of architectural styles, types, and uses. There are several residences from the mid to late 19th century along with residences and commercial development from the 20th century. This is a heavily traveled corridor with commercial development at the periphery. Some of the residences are transitioning to commercial uses. Those that do not front U.S. Route 30 retain more of their residential character. Mid-Century Subdivisions To the south of the Village Green, but accessed from IL 59/Division Street, is Highview. It is predominantly a subdivision of mid-century residences. There are several earlier residences, but ranch homes with attached garages dominate. Typically these residences are brick, or wood and may have synthetic siding. This area is zoned Low Density Residential and the southern portion of it abuts a retail center. The East Side of Plain fi eld fi rst developed along the Naperville Road, Main Street, Lockport Street, and Joliet Road corridors.Highview, developed mid-century, is on the left, and the Joliet Road area is to the right. Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 9 Guidelines The orientation of the building should be compatible with the orientation of the existing adjacent buildings.The massing should use forms and relate to that of the surrounding buildings. The scale of the building should be proportional to existing buildings.The setbacks should be comparable to neighboring buildings. The height, volume, and bulk should be compatible with that of neighboring buildings. The height of the foundation should be comparable to the height of the foundation on neighboring buildings. Site & Form The exterior of this home is predominantly siding and shingles. Stone is used on the porch columns and the stairs. The simplicity of materials helps the residence blend with the adjacent properties. The garage is detached and to the rear, as with the neighboring property.Craftsman style windows Paired columns with stone supports First-story siding Second story sh ing les This group of properties respected the front setback of predominantly mid-century ranch neighborhood. However, the architectural styles and massing are not in keeping with the existing homes.This in fi ll residence is recently constructed, but its roo fl ine, bay window, and entry porch relate to neighboring in fi ll houses and older residences. These neo-traditional residences sit relatively close to the street and have detached garages to the rear. These residences would be appropriate in areas with older and newer homes.Bay window Eave return Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 10 The house to the left dwarfs its much smaller neighbor, a Cape Cod style home. In this case, the difference is partially due to changes in elevation. However, in fi ll development can better blend in by considering its neighbors.Smaller Cape Cod proportions with one and one half stories and dormer windows This in fi ll home has Tudor style in fl uences, but with a greater number of materials than traditional Tudor style residences. This can complicate the exterior and detract from its appearance, rather than add to it.This teardown residence is not compatible with the surrounding early and mid-twentieth century residences. Its scale, fenestration pattern, two-story entry, materials, and roof pitch do not fi t with the adjacent properties. The size of the gabled dormer on the roof is not proportionate to the size of the hipped roof. Windows are not compatible with each other Entry not proportionate and does not blend with others in the neighborhood Residential lots in the historic core of the village range in size from less than 5,000 square feet to over 30,000 square feet. The area surrounding the Village Green has some of the smaller lots in the core, while lots that were at one point on the edge of the village boundaries are often larger. In fi ll development should keep in mind the size of adjacent parcels and setbacks when planning for new construction. In fi ll projects do not need to replicate the look of nearby properties, but should be compatible with and relate to the properties that are around it. Many of the earliest buildings in the village had very simple forms, typically rectangular masses. Those built around the turn of the century were often much more complex with many variations to the basic form including projecting bays, an asymmetrical facade, and irregular window placement.Residential Trends in the Village Core Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 11 Guidelines The type and pitch of the roof should be compatible with adjacent properties.Simple gabled or hipped roofs with a pitch similar to the neighboring structures are typically appropriate. Changes in the plane in the roof can add articulation and visual interest, but should be added to serve a purpose.Roof materials should be similar to those on neighboring buildings or should be appropriate for the style. Roofs This neo-traditional residence is an example of a variety of roof types that work well together. It has a simple gabled roof with gabled roof wall dormers. The porch has a hipped roof, classical columns and folk victorian touches. A small shed roof porch with an entry is located on the side. This neo-traditional residence has a number of elements that make it suitable for inclusion in neo-traditional neighborhoods and as an in fi ll residence. It has a simple roo fl ine with intersecting gables, which similar to the gabled ell plan popular around the turn of the century. It has trimwork and details that differentiate it from similar properties, but it is not overly embellished.Regionally appropriate trimwork as architectural detail Fiber cement board siding Architectural detailing with turret Full facade porch This in fi ll residence has Queen Anne style in fl uences. The columns and railings on the porch are compatible with the architecture of the residence as a whole. The majority of the houses nearby have front porches, although this is the only full facade porch. Simple roo fl ine with intersecting gables Wall Dormers Shed roof Simple balustrade Hipped roof Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 12 Guidelines Veneers of materials should be used in a way that implies that the materials serve a structural purpose.The materials used on the front should be used on all sides.Articulation can be used to break up a facade, but the breaks in the façade should serve a purpose.Materials This residence appropriately uses brick and fi ber cement board siding. Additional detailing is provided with the white trim, classical columns, and a bay window. There is brick on all elevations of the fi rst fl oor. Trim separates the fi rst story from the second. The second fl oor and eave are fi ber cement board siding. The angling of the fi ber cement board siding in the eave adds additional visual interest.Classical columns Fiber cement board siding Angled siding First-story brick on all elevations This residence’s simple form and use of materials creates an aesthetically pleasing appearance. The Colonial Revival in fl uences are compatible with the adjacent mix of new and old structures. Hipped dormer window Fiber cement board siding Classical columns Limestone Brick Clapboard Vinyl Wood Shingle Fiber Cement Board Clapboard is the most common material used for siding on residences in the core of the village. It was supplemented by wood shingles on Queen Anne in fl uenced homes. Brick residences are not as common, but several American Foursquare residences are brick. Limestone was commonly used for the foundation on residences built prior to the 20th century. A few farmhouses in outlying areas are constructed of limestone. Fiber cement board is an alternative to wood or vinyl siding and works well for in fi ll development. The exterior wall material and trim details are critical elements on an in fi ll project. The wall material does not necessarily need to be the same as adjacent or nearby properties, but it should be compatible with nearby properties. The colors used for in fi ll development and additions should be compatible in hue and tone with the remainder of the property and with adjacent properties. Wall Materials Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 13 Guidelines Porches should be proportional in size to those on surrounding properties.Porches should be in a style appropriate to the structure.Porches should be compatible with those on adjacent properties.Porches should be incorporated if they are common in the neighborhood. Porches This small in fi ll residence has an appropriate entry porch. It provides some articulation to the front facade and is also functional. The porch also relates to the adjacent late 19th and early 20th century residences that are nearby.Identical roof pitches Well detailed Appropriately sized This single story neo-traditional residence has a full facade recessed front porch. It is intermixed among one and two story residences. It shows in fl uence of the Craftsman style with brackets, shingles, and porch columns. This locally landmarked American Foursquare residence has a full facade front porch that follows the guidelines. It also has a rear addition that blends with the original exterior. In many cases, offsets between the original and newer and additions are encouraged. The owners of the residence utilized the rehabilitation grant program to assist with the restoration of the original clapboard siding. Appropriately sized windows Smooth transition between original residence and addition Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 14 Windows This window, on an 1830s Greek Revival building, has operable shutters, and six light over six light double hung windows. The vertical proportions and balanced placement of windows on this in fi ll residence help it blend with its neighbors. The gable front roof and front porch assist with this.This in fi ll residence is in fl uenced by the Colonial Revival style. The dormer windows are well placed, centered above the four second-story windows. The shutters are non-functional, but are sized and placed as if operable. The garage is detached and to the rear with a gabled dormer similar to those on the main structure. Operable shutters that are appropriate for window size Six light, divided light windows Appropriately sized and spaced gabled dormer windows Appropriately sized shutters Entry with sidelights and transom Balanced placement Simple entry All windows are vertically proportioned Guidelines The window and door styles should complement the existing styles on surrounding properties. The fenestration pattern should respect that of surrounding properties. Particularly the shape, proportions, arrangement, and detail exhibited on historic homes that provide inspiration for in fi ll projects.The placement of windows should make reasonable attempts to consider the privacy of adjacent properties.Shutters should be sized to fi t the window openings.Shutters placed at edge of window opening, not at edge of trim Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 15 This late 19th century residence has a small entry porch that utilizes elements present elsewhere on the exterior. There are turned porch columns that fi t with the Victorian era architecture of the residence. The front door and storm door are also appropriate for the residence. Doors & Entries Guidelines The entry and door should be proportionate with the remainder of the structure.The entry should be a single story unless a two story entry is appropriate for the structure or the area. The entry should be compatible with the entries on adjacent properties.This early 20th century residence has added Craftsman features to its front elevation. The alterations to the residence are appropriately sized and are in keeping with the era of the residence’s construction.A neo-traditional residence, this house incorporates several 19th and early 20th century elements. These includes the full facade front porch, the pitch of the roof, and the balanced placement of the windows. Continuation of roof pitch Incorporation of Craftsman elements Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 16 Guidelines Additions on homes should be compatible, but distinguishable from the original structure.Additions should consider the bulk and volume of adjacent properties. The materials used on the addition should be compatible with those of the original structure.Openings on the addition should be in keeping with those of the original structure.Additions Now an of fi ce, this building was originally a residence. It is located along the Route 59 corridor and is now used as a business. The rear addition is distinguishable from the original portion by the lattice along the foundation, but it generally blends with the original building. Change in foundation material Appropriate windows Addition Original residence Vergeboard Cut away bay window The original residence was a small one and one half story I-House. An addition was added to the left and the rear due to the shape of the lot and its location adjacent to fl oodplain. The addition is distinguishable from the original residence. However, it is compatible with the original residence. Several elements borrow directly from the original type and architectural in fl uences: the original residence and the addition have vergeboard, there is a cut away bay window on the fi rst story, and the windows have vertical proportions similar to the original.This American Foursquare has several alterations. It has an addition to the rear and side (not visible) and the two-car garage. The addition is distinguishable from the original residence, but includes architectural elements from the original building and is sensitive to the original structure. Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 17 Guidelines The size, design, and location of the garage should be compatible with the principal structure and nearby properties.The garage should use the same or similar materials as the principal structure.The openings on the garage should be similar in size to those of adjacent properties.Corner lots should consider taking advantage of the opportunity to place the garage on the side of the structure. Attached garages may be added in areas with predominantly detached garages if the garage is sized and placed appropriately.Long lots should consider taking advantage of the opportunity to place the garage detached to the rear or attached to the side or rear of the structure. If the garage is located on the front of the building, the percentage of street façade occupied by the garage should be comparable to the percentage of street façade occupied by a garage on nearby properties. This detached carriage house incorporates several elements present in the house - the gambrel roof, shed dormer, casement windows, and wood siding - and also appears modern in construction. The location on the side and rear of the property takes advantage of the home’s corner lot location.Shed dormer Gambrel roof Casement windows This compatible garage is attached to an existing home. It is set back from the front facade and is distinguishable from the original house. The eyebrow window adds architectural detailing that relates to details on the existing home. Eyebrow window Colors and materials match existing house Roof slope compatible with exsting roof line Garages This attached garage on a newer residence takes advantage of the corner lot to place the garage on the side of the house. The garage uses the same materials as the principal structure. It has cornice returns and separate garage doors that help it blend with the existing neighboring houses.Same roof pitch Cornice returns Single car garage doors Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 18 Multiple-Family Residences Guidelines Buildings with fewer than four units should incorporate elements of traditional residential architecture in Plain fi eld.As appropriate, larger buildings should incorporate elements of traditional architecture in Plain fi eld.The form, massing, and type of the buildings should respect adjacent properties. While the majority of development in the core of the Village is single-family residential, there are opportunities for multi-family housing. There is the potential for condo or apartment buildings with an urban feel. This development would best near the DuPage River and areas addressed by the Riverfront Master Plan. Townhouses and rowhouses would also be appropriate redevelopment for limited areas of the Village core. These would be appropriate for limited areas of the urban core as designated in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan. This townhome development has elements of traditional and contemporary architecture.Three or four story multi-family buildings would be appropriate for limited areas in the Village core. This example has retail on the fi rst fl oor, residential units above, street parking in the front and resident parking to the rear. It is constructed of brick, well articulated, and well proportioned. Townhouse development is appropriate for limited areas of the Village’s urban core and expanded urban core. This development should relate to adjacent properties and include elements of traditional architecture. This example is located outside of the expanded urban core. However, its scale and architecture would be compatible with that of the urban core. Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 19 This former residence is located less than one block from the main commercial corridor. It retains its historic form while operating as a business. Buildings of this type and scale provide a transition from the denser, urban forms along the main strreet and similar buildings that remain residences nearby. The same guidelines apply for properties that are zoned or could be zoned business transition. Additional details on the purpose and intent of the zoning classi fi cation are in the Zoning Ordinance and the Comprehensive Plan. Generally, the following is recommended for these properties: The rehabilitation or restoration of buildings is encouraged.Preservation of existing structures is encouraged to retain the character of the area. The original style or type should be retained. Business Transition Zoning Detailing with the vergeboard in gable Synthetically sided, but with white trimboards that provide some differentiation Historic entry porch A large addition was added onto this former residence located along the Route 59 corridor. The addition allowed for additional of fi ce space while retaining the setbacks and character of the area. Original residence Balanced window placement as on original residence Unchanged setback, with offset for architectural effect Setback consistent with adjacent properties Fiber cement board siding Architectural detailing with multi-gabled dormer New professional of fi ce construction located between commercial and residential properties. Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 20 Residential Architectural Styles Many residences in Plain fi eld have in fl uences of one or more architectural styles, but are not truly representative of a speci fi c style. Few homes are architect designed. Greek Revival (c. 1830-1860)Greek Revival structures occurred much later in Illinois than other parts of the country. Typically the structures had a gable or hipped roof, a cornice emphasized with a wide band of trim, and often small rectangular frieze windows below the trim. Other windows were typically double hung with six panes in each sash. The front door was often surrounded by sidelights with a transom above it. Wings were common as were porches. Greek Revival structures are some of the earliest in Plain fi eld and there are a number of smaller buildings with an in fl uence of the style. Neo-Classical/Classical Revival (c. 1895-1950)Full-height porch dominates front facade, roof supported by classical columns with Ionic or Corinthian capitals. Balanced window and door placement. The foundation is typically limestone and above grade.Italianate (c. 1840-1885)The Italianate style began in England and was inspired by Italian farmhouses. The Italianate style is present in commercial and residential buildings. Residential buildings often had a low pitched roof with overhanging eaves, and decorative brackets. The windows were tall and often rounded, frequently with an arch. There was often a small porch. The foundation was typically limestone and several feet above grade.Shingle (c. 1880-1900)The Shingle style is less common. Roofs are steeply pitched with an irregular roof line. The sides are often clad with shingles, which are uninterrupted at the corners. Asymmetrical facades and porches are typical. Queen Anne (c. 1880-1910)Queen Anne style buildings, and those with an in fl uence of the style are one of the more common types in Plain fi eld. The style typically has a steeply pitched and irregularly shaped roof with a front facing gable. Appendix A: Plain fi eld Architecture Top: A National Register listed Greek Revival structure on Main Street that dates from the 1830s.Above: An Italianate residence located on Bartlett Avenue.Right: A Shingle style home located on Center Street with the characteristic shingle siding, asymmetrical roof, and two story bay window. Far Right: This Queen Anne residence is on Illinois Street and serves as an example of the style. Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 21 Top: A Colonial Revival on Center Street with a bay window, dormer window, symmetrical facade and Doric porch columns.Above: Cape Cod style residence with a gabled roof, gabled dormers, and paired windows.Above right: Tudor Revival residence on Lockport Street with an asymmetrical roof line, stucco and half-timbering on the second story, and grouped casement windows.Right: A Bungalow style residence with Craftsman style in fl uences. The residence has a hipped roof, gabled dormer, bay window, and an enclosed porch. There are often decorative details such as wood shingles or half-timbers, frequently in the gable ends. Porches - partial, full facade, and asymmetrical - are common and often extend along at least one side wall. Colonial Revival & Cape Cod (c. 1895-1960, c. 1925-1950)Colonial Revival buildings, typically built from c. 1880-1955 are common in the Village. They typically have a gabled or hipped roof and the facade is symmetrical. The windows are double hung with multi-pane sashes. The entryway is often surrounded by pilasters or sidelights. A small entry porch with slender columns is also common. Dutch Colonial Revival style buildings have a gambrel roof. Also common are Cape Cod buildings, which were built from c. 1925-1950. These buildings are usually one and one half stories with a gabled roof and gabled dormer windows. The facade is symmetrical, with the door often having a pediment and surrounded by pilasters. Tudor Revival (c. 1890-1940)Tudor Revival buildings are less common in the Village. There are several with an in fl uence of the style. The buildings normally have steeply pitched gabled roofs. Half-timbering is often present in the eaves. Frequently, the windows are casement with multiple panes of glass. The front door is often rounded. Craftsman/Bungalow (c. 1910-1935)The Craftsman style was in fl uenced by the Arts & Crafts movement and these residences typically had low sloping roofs, exposed rafter tails, triangular knee braces, and multi-paned sash windows over a single sash. Bungalow homes have elements of the style. Typically they are square or rectangular in shape and are one to one and one half stories. They often have gabled roofs, and often a gabled dormer. Some have exposed beams and rafter tails. The windows may be paired and are double hung with a multi-paned sash over a single pane sash.Modern (c. 1920-1980)Modern styles are not common in the Village, but there are several examples. There are residences that have Moderne as well as Modern elements. Moderne structures often have a fl at roof, stucco walls, curved edges, and an asymmetrical facade. Modern structures, typically later, commonly have fl at or low-pitched roofs, walls with a smooth fi nish, an asymmetrical facade, and an emphasis on the horizontal. Village of Plain fi eld - Residential In fi ll Design Guidelines 22 Top: I-House close to the expanded downtown with a side gabled roof, three bays, and gabled front entry with paired columns.Above: Side Hall Plan residence with Italianate in fl uences, including a gabled roof, corner boards with pilaster caps, and fl at roof door hood with brackets. Top Left: Gabled Ell type residence with a gabled roof, bay window, and hipped roof entry porch. Left: Locally landmarked American Foursqaure with a hipped roof, hipped dormer window, paired windows, and a full facade porch.Residential Vernacular Types I-House (c. 1830-1890)There are few I-Houses in the Village, but there are several variants on the form, Pre-Classic I-Houses. Most I-Houses have a side gabled roof. They are typically two stories, one room deep, and at least two rooms wide. A chimney may be in the center or at the gable ends. Pre-Classic I-Houses commonly have a small entry porch with a hipped roof.Upright & Wing (c. 1830-1890)Upright and Wing homes have a two or one and one half story “upright” section and a single story “wing”. Both sections have a gabled roof. The door is often in the wing portion and there is a partial porch. The form was often common during the Greek Revival period and often has elements of the style. Side Hall Plan (c. 1830-1880)The side hall plan is named for the hall and stairwell on the side of the house. This type has a gabled roof and is two rooms deep. Most side hall plans in Plan fi eld have a front gabled roof, but there are side gabled roofs as well. The type is also known as a “Two-Thirds Georgian” since it was missing the side wings present on Georgian residences. Some examples in Plain fi eld have Greek Revival or Italianate in fl uences. Italianate in fl uenced buildings often have small entry porches with brackets. Gabled Ell (c. 1865-1885)Gabled Ell buildings, often with variations resulting in a T-Plan or a Cross Plan, are common in Plain fi eld. They are two stories with a gabled roof. The door is typically on the “ell” section of the house and there is often a partial porch. Many of these buildings have in fl uences of a style, typically Italianate or Queen Anne. American Four Square (c. 1900-1925)This type was popular early in the 20th century. The buildings had a hipped roof, often with a gabled or hipped dormer window in the front and often on the sides. There was typically a full facade front porch. The foundation was raised and usually concrete block. Village of Plain fi eld - Residentail In fi ll Design Guidelines 23 City of Lake Forest Residential Design Guidelines: A Resource Guide for Building in Established Neighborhoods, 2003. City of Orange: In fi ll Residential Design Guidelines. City of Orange, Community Planning Department, Advance Planning Division, 2004.Cusato, Marianne and Ben Pentreath. Get Your House Right: Architectural Elements to Use and Avoid. New York: Sterling, 2007.Cusato, Marianne. The Value of Design. JamesHardie, 2008.Final Draft Design Guidelines for Residential Buildings in Adopted Historic Districts. Prepared for the City of Glendale, CA by Architectural Resource Group and Architects, Planners, and Conservators, Inc.Heart of Knoxville: In fi ll Housing Design Guidelines,.Knoxville, Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission, and The East Tennessee Community Design Center.McAlester, Virginia and Lee. A Field Guide to American Houses. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.Plain fi eld’s Historic Urbanized Core: An Intensive-Level Survey and Report, ArchiSearch Historic Preservation Consultants, 2006. Residential Design Guidelines for Rock Island Historic Districts and Landmarks, Rock Island Preservation Commission, 2005. Susanka, Sarah. The Not So Big House. Newtown, CT: The Taunton Press, 2001. Workbook for Successful Redevelopment: An Idea and Resource Guide for Building in Established Neighborhoods. Community First, 2002.Village of Arlington Heights, Single-Family Design Guidelines. Planning & Community Development Department, 2004.Village of Plain fi eld Comprehensive Plan Update, October 17, 2005. Village of Plain fi eld Residential Design and Planning Guidelines fro Planned Unit Developments and Annexations. Kon-fer Inc. and the Community Development Department, 2005.Village of Plain fi eld, Illinois Design Manual for the Lockport Street Business Corridor. Arris Architects + Planners, P.C., 2000. Appendix B: Resources