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Route 30 Corridor Enhancement U.S. ROUTE 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines U .S . R o u t e 3 0 Prepared August 2008 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines TABLE OF CONTENTS History of Lincoln Highway 1 Study Area & Existing Conditions 7 • Overview & Purpose of Plan 9 • Designated Enhancement Area 10 • Existing Zoning & Land Use Regulations 11 • Existing Infrastructure 14 • Existing Transportation Featur es 15 • Architectural Features/Visual Am enities 16 • Guiding Redevelopment & Development Projects in the Corridor 18 • Summary of Existing Conditions Analysis 23 • Conclusions 25 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines 27 • Plan Summary as Depicted in the Co mprehensive Plan 29 • Enhancement Guidelines 31 • Site Design 33 • Architecture 41 • Transportation 49 • Signage 63 • Streetscape 73 • Conclusion 83 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Reconnecting to the Roadway’s Past History of Lincoln Way Barber Shop Photo Courtesy of: A History of Plainfield Then & Now 1 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines HISTORY OF LINCOLN HIGHWAY Lincoln Highway, also known as “The Main Street Across America,” was formed in 1913. It is one of America’s best known historical roads, expanding nearly 3,400 miles from the east coast to west coast. Carl Fisher, the famous highways’ founder, developed the idea in 1912 after recognizing the poor quality of the United States street system. Before Lincoln Highway was created, there were almost no good roads. Towns were lucky if they had a road that was graded, much less if they had one that was gravel or brick. The roads essentially led to nowhere, and were impassable in poor weather conditions. Lincoln Highway was named in honor of President Lincoln. Like President Lincoln, the Highway united the country from coast to coast. When the road was constructed in 1913, it sparked imagination and fostered the rapid growth of automobile tourism in the early 20th century. People’s mindset was that the journey is just as important as the destination and so great prosperity was brought to towns that the Highway passed through. The name “Lincoln” embraces the patriotic spirit of the Highway, and in no time numerous hotels, Bed & Breakfasts and tourist attractions popped up along the route. Today, Lincoln Highway has yet to be surpassed. The roadway was slowly forgotten after its initial boom, but once the Lincoln Highway Association reactivated in 1992 there have been strong efforts dedicated to preserving the Highway. The above picture illustrates the original Lincoln Highwa y Route, and the main lateral branches created to tie into it. Lincoln Highway in Plainfield, Illinois At one time, Lincoln Highway and U.S. Route 66, the two longest paved highways in the world, crossed over one another in Plainfield. Today, Lincoln Highway, or U.S. Route 30, extends as a major east-west arterial roadway throughout the Village. This roadway is an important part of the regional transportation system and carries a substantial volume of traffic through the Village. By 1960, after the Lincoln Highway had been opened for nearly 50 years, Plainfield had grown - attracting many new residents, businesses, and industries. Although it maintained its small town image, Plainfield was slowly transforming from a small, rural community to a modern suburb in the Chicago metropolitan area. 3 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines LINCOLN HIGHWAY THROUGH THE AGES Though the Lincoln Highway was formed in 1913, many towns did not proceed with the actual paving until decades later. Despite portions of roadway varying between patches of concrete, dirt and gravel, many tourists were already traveling the highway and passing through Plainfield by 1914. The Lincoln Highway Association designated the Village’s principal street, Lockport Street, as a part of the transcontinental highway’s route, so passersby would travel through the heart of the Village’s downtown. Downtown businesses boomed when a good portion of the motorists stopped for refreshments and nearby lodging. C. L. Corke’s ice cream parlor and confectionary store even erected an electric “Lincoln Highway Headquarters” sign in the store window to promote the new road and attract attention. The Village of Plainfield paved its portion of Lincoln Highway in 1921, and to this day, Lockport Street remains home to the Village’s historic downtown. Lincoln Highway was one of the first roads that could be used year-round and in all weather conditions. In this picture, residents enjoy clearing the snow in front of the Village’s downtown store fronts. Photo Courtesy of Plainfield Historical Society Historical Facts - R econnecting to the Lincoln Highway’s History A bubbler water fountain was given by Carl Parker to various cities along Lincoln Highway in Illinois. The fountains were given in memory of his mother, who was an Illinois woman. The gift of the fountain was received if a town named the road the LincolnWay. Plainfield named the street as requested and placed the fountain at the corner of the Lincoln Highway and Illinois Street (in the Village’s downtown). The location then became the site of the original Plainfield State Bank. Today, the site is used as the Heritage Business Center. The original bank is still intact under the façade of the newer business center. (Story & Photo Courtesy of Norman and Ione Mueller) THEN NOW 4 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The Lincoln Highway has a rich history and place in the Village of Plainfield. Throughout the Village, there are portions of Lincoln Highway that have maintained a distinctive character and provide people with a historical connection to the Village’s past. On the other hand, there are several areas that have become unattractive and blighted with the passing of time. Two of the most distinguishable locations along Lincoln Highway that are still intact with their historical past and continue to draw visitors into the town include the Village’s historic downtown and the Lake Renwick Heron Rookery Nature Preserve. The two photos at the top right signify two important corners from the Village’s history - the northeast and northwest corner of Lincoln Highway and Renwick Road. These two corners were part of what was known as Powell’s Mill. There was a distinguishable restaurant with a windmill on top of it to welcome visitors and residents to the Village on one corner, and an open, quarry lake where people could enjoy swimming and the outdoors on the opposite corner. The two photos at the bottom represent present day in the Village. The Village has proudly maintained the historic, small town character of the downtown, and what used to be the local swimming hole is now a beautiful forest preserve where residents can enjoy seeing a variety of wild bird species. Photos courtesy of Plainfield Historical Society Photo Courtesy Steven Pinker Photo Cour tesy of the Enterprise - Linda Ozbolt 5 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Study Area & Lincoln Highway : 7 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Overview & Purpose of Plan The Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines have been designed for the benefit of Plainfield, its residents and business community, and the region as a whole. They will enhance the character and sense of place of the Lincoln Highway Corridor while reconnecting it to its historical past. In order to maintain this section of town as an important gateway and commercial destination point, the Village has identified the need for improvement. The primary goal of the Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines is to maintain an increased success for Lincoln Highway. This will be done by providing a plan for the redevelopment of property and infrastructure along Lincoln Highway. The area of focus for the Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines shall be the portion east of Illinois Route 59, stretching southeast to Interstate 55. This portion of roadway is chosen because it has endless opportunities for improvement. The Corridor Enhancement Area is highlighted with the red circle. The boundaries are everything east of IL Route 59 and west of Interstate 55. This area is the area cluttered with too many curb cuts, poor quality architecture, little landscaping and overall inadequate conditions for an important corridor on both a local and national level. To reconnect residents and visitors to the roadway’s historic past, while providing a dynamic, modern day destination point, ex tensive enhancement and revitalization will need to occur here. West of Illinois Route 59, much of the development along the Lincoln Highway is newer. Modern commercial businesses, industrial sites, and undeveloped parcels scatter this portion of the famous roadway. Development on this segment complies with the Village’s Zoning Code and Comprehensive Plan, which regulates transportation, architecture, landscaping and other elements that are lacking on the southern portion. 9 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines DESIGNATED ENHANCEMENT AREA The designated enhancement area along the Route 30 Corridor is located in a prime position for success due to the number of people in the area, and the number of average daily trips traveled on Lincoln Highway. The Village of Plainfield, along with Will County as a whole, is a rapidly growing area in the region, so these numbers can be expected to continually increase in size. The following data is from the Census 2000, prepared by ESRI. Demographics Within a 1 Mile Radius Of Designated Enhancement Area TOTAL POPULATION 3,482 AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME $79,437.00 Demographics Within a 3 Mile Radius Of Designated Enhancement Area TOTAL POPULATION 35,852 AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME $74,523.00 Demographics Within a 5 Mile Radius Of Designated Enhancement Area TOTAL POPULATION 91,105 AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME $70,157.00 The Village’s Comprehensive Plan identifies I-55 as a Freeway/Expressway and US Route 30 as a Major Arterial. Based on these classifications, the average daily trips traveled by passing vehicles is: AVE. DAILY TRIPS TRAVELED ON US ROUTE 30 ~10,000 to 50,000 AVE. DAILY TRIPS TRAVELED ON I-55 ~30,000 to 150,000 10 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Existing Zoning & Land Use Regulations The Village of Plainfield’s Zoning Ordinance and the existing land uses on Lincoln Highway have influenced the current conditions of the Corridor. On the map at the right, each of the parcels are colored and coded with a corresponding zoning district. The Corridor consists mainly of Low Density Single Family Residential, Highway Busi ness District, Agricultural District (in this case the Heron Rookery), with several parcels zoned Business Convenience District, Business Transition District and Townhouse Residential District sprinkled throughout. The main Zoning classifications prevalent in the Corridor can be described as follows: Low Density Single Family Residential District: Provides for areas of low density, single family detached housing on lot sizes with a minimum of 12,000 square feet. Highway Business District: Accommodates a broad range of retail, service, and commercial uses, and allow for the highest intensity of such uses. Virtually all patrons arrive by automobile to these sites. Agricultural District: Provides an environment suitable for and limited to agriculture. In this situ ation, the district serves more of a green space/open space area because the area is protected by the Forest Preserve District of Will County. CURRENT CONDITIONS 11 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The Village’s Comprehensive Plan establishes a land use policy direction for the Village and surrounding planning area. The Plan provides a framework for public and private decisions about how particular sites should develop. The purpose of the Future Land Use Plan is to provide guidelines for controlling the character of the community, ensure that municipal services and facilities will not be overburdened, and establish a sound tax base. The Plan will maintain the traditional form, natural environmental characteristics and quality of life found in Plainfield, while promoting balance by encouraging new commercial and employment opportunities. Illustrated at the left is the Future Land Use Map for the south Lincoln Highway Corridor. South of Renwick Road, the map is consistent with the Village’s Zoning Ordinance. This portion of the road is envisioned to be for general commercial purposes. There are some significant changes north of Renwick Road, as the majority of the parcels are designated as Municipal/Institutional, Mixed Use and General Commercial. In the Village’s Zoning Ordinance, the majority of these parcels are developed as Low Density Single Family Residential. As redevelopment occurs, there will be a shift in use as well as enhancement. Future Land Use details are as follows for the larger parcels in the corridor: General Commercial: Provides for retail establishments which offer a wide range of goods and services in locations which abut or front major arterial roadways. This includes commercial complexes and roadside commercial establishments. Municipal/Institutional: Encompasses those lands owned and operated by federal, stat e, or local governments as well as public and private educational facilities, cemeteries, churches, hospitals, nursing homes, or other non-profit facilities. Mixed Use: Provides opportunities for a variety of potential uses, including mixtures of retail, offi ce, institutional and limited residential development. This includes retail clusters. Comprehensive Plan Map 12 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Goals Outlined in the Comprehensive Plan The Village of Plainfield’s Comprehensive Plan identifies general goals and issues for the Route 30 Corridor. As a major entrance into the Village, the corridor’s appearance and functionality becomes an increasingly important issue. Route 30 provides access to the Village from Interstate 55 and the Village’s southern boundary with Joliet, extending northwest to the Village’s northern boundary. The goals outlined in the Comprehensive Plan include the following: Enhanced Roadway Capacity – Traffic is already congested and will likely continue to increase. Congestion is particularly bad at the intersection with Route 59. Improve Corridor Appearance – This corridor should be viewed as an important front door to Plainfield. Both public and private improvements are needed to enhance the appearance of the corridor. Develop Remaining Vacant Property for Business Use – A number of sites within the corridor are vacant and would provide good opportunities for infill development. Focus should be on attracting a small business park near Interstate 55. The Comprehensive Plan goes on to outline the corridor’s existing infrastructure and transportation features. 13 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Existing Infrastructure Much of the development in the Route 30 corridor is older, and was developed prior to modern development procedures such as site plan review. Consequently, although the corridor is home to so me important businesses and community resources, the overa ll character of the corridor is in need of enhancement. The southern boundary of the corridor intersects with Interstate 55, thus is a main entrance point into the Village. Physica l Improvements in this section of the corridor will help welcome residents and visitors to the community and create a positive impression of the Village. Potential improvements suggested in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan regarding the existing infrastructure include the followin g: • Install an attractive entry sign in an attractive setting to welcome people into the Village. • Enforce more restrictive sign regulations to help reduce the numbers of billboards and temporary signs within the corridor as these signs are distracting and clutter the area. • The installation of shrubs and ot her landscape features in the parkways will beautify the str eet and screen parking areas. • Bridge enhancements should accommodate additional traffic lanes, bike/pedestrian access and attractive design features. • Façade renovation would improve the appearance of many existing businesses. • Streetscape enhancements such as lighting, relocation of overhead lines, installation of street furniture and other pedestrian amenities should be incorporated along the corridor. As illustrated by these comments, the existing infrastructure for the southern portion of the Route 30 corridor is generally unwelcoming and unattractive for people visiting the area. The existing corridor offers a blighted appearance that hurts both the economic vitality of the area, as well as the Village’s characte r. Additionally, the existing infrastructure is inadequate for the traffic that utilizes the area and unattractive for people visiting or passing through the corridor. The above photo is taken looking north on Lincoln Highway from a position near the I-55 Interchange. There is nothing that announces one’s arrival into Plainfield, IL, nor anything that makes the area distinguishable. An attractive gateway entrance feature is one step that will advance the area’s appearance and sense of place. 14 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Existing Transportation Features U.S. Route 30, or Lincoln Highway, is currently a two lane road (as of 2008) that must be widened to accommodate the high traffic volumes the corridor receives. The widening of the Route 30 corridor would improve traffic flow, reduce congestion and minimize the likelihood of traffic diversions through nearby residential areas. The Village’s Comprehensive Plan identifies that the road should be widened to a four-lane section with either a striped median or mountable/barrier median to accommodate left-turn lanes. Both Will County and the Village of Plainfield identify that U.S. Route 30 will remain a major arterial roadway. In the Village’s Comprehensive Plan, suggested transportation improvements include the following: • Effort should be made to reduce the number of curb cuts on the road and provide cross-access between adjacent properties. • Improve the capacity at the intersection of Route 30 and Lily Cache Road through the addition of turn lanes and enhanced roadway geometrics. • Improve the Lily Cache Bridge to provide capacity for at least four lanes of traffic and a bike path. • Widen the entire roadway between Renwick Road and I-55 to four lanes with an urban cross section and appro-priate turn lanes. • Improve the intersection of Route 30 and Route 59 by restricting Commercial Street to right turn in and right turn out only, and widening Route 59 south of its intersection with Route 30. • Roadway improvements should incorporate drainage enhancements. Improving the existing transportation features will increase the safety and accessibility of the area, as well as attract more businesses. Traffic improvements will make the corridor easier to navigate and more of a destination than it is currently. Today, the corridor has significant amounts of traffic, but the majority is just passing through. The numerous curb cuts force vehicles to stop and wait while drivers make right and left turns into different commercial lots, and there are few safe options for people exiting the commercial businesses to get back onto the roadway. Additionally, widening the street will alleviate congestion and provide more space for drivers. This photo is taken prior to the days of the Lincoln Highway . Note the road is nearly impassable with the wet weather conditions. The road is inadequate for travelers. The adjacent photo is the intersection of Lincoln Highway and Interstate 55 as of Spring of 2008. As the Village continues to grow, it will be necessary to increase the capacity of the roadway to accommodate the added traffic. Though for much different reasons, this road is inadequate for travelers just as the road in the photo above. 15 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Architectural Featur es/Visual Amenities The Lincoln Highway corridor has no architectural or visual consistency. What was once a charming stretch of the route with a windmill, a motel and open land is now cluttered with buildings of poor architectural quality, gravel parking lots and dilapidated structures. As redevelopment occurs on Lincoln Highway, there will need to be much attention to architecture to turn the corridor around in a sense. A strength of the Lincoln Highway Corridor is the strong presence that auto dealerships have in anchoring the commercial areas. The auto dealerships have helped maintained the commercial success of the corridor, because this area is the only section of the Village that provides home to this unique business. The dealerships continually draw people off Interstate 55 and attract people from the northern part of the Village for car sales. These three auto dealerships add to the economic vibrancy of this corridor, yet there is still room for improvement. As shown in the pictures to the right, the signage displayed for each of them is no longer allowed by Village Ordinance. The height and integrity of the signs is noncompliant, and the banners used as attention getting devices in the two smaller photographs are prohibited in the Village. Effort should be made on these properties to bring the cars back from the street and install landscaping to visually enhance the area. Generally, the auto dealerships exceed at keeping the site well lit for pedestrians, upholding a better quality of lighting fixtures, and maintaining their property grounds. 16 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines As suburbanization boomed, quality design was often overlooked. People’s dependency on automobiles began to negatively influence communities by encouraging the development of sterile subdivisions, strip malls and displeasing roadways. Communities today are left with unattractive landscapes consisting of paved highway strips, endless parking lots, monotonous housing tracts and lacking commercial character. This phenomenon is known as the “Geography of Nowhere,” as explained by James Howard Kunstler. Lincoln Highway, once a destination roadway uniting the country, is now cluttered with unattractive utilities, inadequate buildings and excess signage. The pictures at the left illustrate the corridor in its current state as of Spring 2007. Note the many opportunities for improvement: • Above ground utilities clutter the side of the roadway. • There are large numbers of unattractive, metal buildings. • There is unscreened outdoor storage. • There is an overabundance of curb cuts. • There is excess signage. • The signage present is of low quality. • Gravel parking lots. • Minimal landscaping. • Inconsistent infrastructure (i.e. some areas have curbs while others do not). • Buildings do not front the street, rather they are angled to face northwest. • The corridor is cluttered and in general disarray. The above items mentioned are not characteristic of a historically significant roadway, thus should be improved as appropriate. The US Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines shall address each of these issues and propose a plan for eliminating them while reconnecting the Lincoln Highway to its historic importance and making it a destination for all to enjoy. 17 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines As of 2008, there are two si gnificant projects planned for the Lincoln Highway Corridor that will prove themselves as guiding examples for future development. Each project anchors the north or south end of the corridor, and sets an example of better architecture and enhanced visual appeal, more landscaping and pedestrian amenities, and fewer access points to declutter the roadway for automobile traffic. Each project will attract a different type of business, so there will be a variety for consumers to enjoy. One project will focus on Big Box retail, while one will focus on smaller vendors. The graphic at the left depicts the two projects in color. The solid orange parcel at the southeast corner of Renwick Road and US Route 30 is Heron Point of Plainfield, while the colored site plan near Interstate 55 is The Boulevard. Each was approved by the Village and anchors an important loca tion of the corridor. Guiding Redevelopment & Development Projects In The Corridor 18 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The Boulevard The Boulevard is a large commercial project that replaces the Clark Truck Stop on Route 30, adjacent to Interstate 55. The project consists of a hybrid life-style shopping center that will include a variety of Big Box retailers, restaurants and commercial shops to create a shopping destination point. It will have distinctive architectural style with streetscaped, walkable streets for a pleasant pedestrian environment. Though the site is about 85 acres in size, access will only be provided via one full access intersection on the existing Frontage Road, and a right-in right-out access point on Route 30. The Boulevard is one of the most significant redevelopment projects that the Lincoln Highway corridor will see because it is removes an undesirable use and replaces it with a high quality destination point. This development will provide a quality standard for all future development through its examples of architecture, landscaping, pedestrian amenities, access points and general land uses. The Boulevard will attract new businesses to the corridor, and increase the economic vitality. The above illustration depicts the conceptual site plan for The Boulevard. Illustrated are the conceptual building footprints, site circulation, landscaping and green space. The development is bound by green space and water elements to the north and east, and highly traveled roadways to the south and west. There is an attractive landscaped boulevard incorporated as the ma in drive through the site, and the site layout exceeds traditional Big Box form. A ll of these unique elements combined shall make The Boulevard a successful destination point. 19 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The Boulevard achieves its attractive design through attention to details. The Design Philosophy behind the project is that the use of exciting and unique storefronts, merchandising designs and gathering spots creates a shopping environment that attracts customers and results in increased sales. Each building is envisioned to be an inviting establishment, and the streetscape will be colorful and well landscaped so visitors to the site will relax and linger. Key elements that were incorporated in The Boulevard plan include: • Stone base tower elements with brick patterns and tile insets • Entry feature elements • Projected canopies and awnings over entries to break up wall massing • Strong vertical elements to articulate walls • Use of projecting elements to create strong entry features • Articulated brick patterns and accent colors in walls • Use of accent lighting • Dramatic use of lighting, color, detailing and graphics The above mentioned elements are visible in the photos above and at the right. The three figures above illustrate interest ing elements that are taken directly from the attractive site plan of The Boul evard. It is the special consideration that has been given to these types of elements that make a commercial area truly unique. Figure 1. depicts that the site will be preserving the adjacent wetland. This will add green space and beauty to the commercial portion of the site, while also providing a best management practice to better the health of the environment. The adjacent wetland serves as both an aesthetic and environmental benefit for the site. Figure 2. maximizes the impact of the adjac ent greenway to provide for an ideal restaurant site. Diners will have t he opportunity to look through windows at a lush, natural area, or dine outdoors in the fresh air with views uninterrupted by other developments an d passing automobiles. This type of land setup will make this lot very desirable and valuable. Figure 3. is element incorporated in the Village’s Design Guidelines - an attractive landscaped boulevard that provides visual interest and environmental benefits. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Interesting Elements from The Boulevard Site Plan 20 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Heron Point of Plainfield Gas City The Gas City gas station & Family Pantry convenience store are key elements that are necessary to allow the adjacent multi-tenant building in the Heron Point development to be constructed. Gas City will guide the quality and design of future growth on Lincoln Highway. Heron Point of Plainfield is located on the southeast corner of US Route 30 and Renwick Road, and serves as an important gateway to the Village’s south Lincoln Highway corridor. Located adjacent to the Lake Renwick Heron Rookery Nature Preserve, this corner provides picturesque views and an ideal location for commercial businesses to thrive. Gas City will be the commercial business anchoring the hard corner of Lincoln Highway and Renwick Road. The outstanding architecture and creative site design provides an attractive welcome for residents and visitors to the area. In turn, this will drive further economic development. The two-sided landscaping and controlled light levels under the canopy promote environmental sensitivity to the adjacent wildlife refuge as well. Gas City will provide the momentum that the Lincoln Highway corridor needs for redevelopment. The business is known for attracting quality commercial developments, hospitals and schools due to the high traffic numbers the business generates. Gas City customers will be drawn to the site due to its highly visible location on the corner, and then on impulse go to the adjacent shops. The architecture for Gas City and the multi-tenant building is complimentary, thus defining the quality of the Heron Point development, which will encourage other new businesses to invest in the area. 21 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Heron Point of Plainfield—Commercial Center Heron Point will occupy the southeast corner of Route 30 and Renwick Road, thus being a northern gateway entrance to the south Lincoln Highway corridor. Currently a vacant parcel, this land will be developed into a unified commercial strip center built with quality materials and unifying architectural elements. Heron Point will have decorative lighting fixtures, landscaping, and stone accents to make the site aesthetically pleasing. Access onto the site will be provided via cross access drives, so there will be minimal access points on Route 30 and Renwick Road. The Heron Point commercial strip center is a much smaller scale project than the previous project (The Boulevard). It occupies a much smaller area of land and will be developed to accommodate less commercial business. The above illustration is a rendering of the approved commercial portions of Heron Point. The building is simple, but additional dimension is added through the roofline variations, wind ow placement, accent stone and brick work, and landscaping. The businesses loca ted in this commercial center will be served via minimal curb cuts along US Route 30, thus enhancing the traffic circulation and safety. 22 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Summary of Existing Conditions Analysis Currently, the designated enhancement area on Lincoln Highway has several strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS • The corridor is highly visible to traffic on Interstate 55, and already has high numbers of traffic flow. • The corridor is in a great regional location. • The auto dealerships pr esent on the road serve as excellent anchors for commercial business. • As the land becomes more valuable, undesirable, secondary uses will naturally start to disappear. • There are new, quality developments planned for each corridor entrance, which will guide redevelopment of the rest of the corridor. • The corridor has a historical past. • New development on the corridor is generally of higher quality. • The majority of the parcels are developed and are grandfathered in per Village Ordinance. They will need to be redev eloped, which will include demolishing the old structures, before new structures can be built and new regulations can be applied. • The infrastructure in the corridor is insufficient for the traffic the area handles. • Many of the buildings are in poor condition which may discourage landowners from improving conditions on their own property. • There are virtually no pedestrian amenities in the corridor. • There is minimal landscaping in the corridor. • As time goes on, land will increase in value and undesirable uses will naturally start to disappear, giving way for new businesses and improvements. • Many of the weaknesses of the corridor are non-compliant with Village Ordinance, so if they are discontinued for a year or anything is done to intensify them, the weaknesses will need to be brought into compliance and thus will be improved. • The Enhancement Guidelines offer a critique of the corridor’s existing conditions and guidelines for their future enhancement. • High traffic counts will attract new business and growth. • The current infrastructure of the corridor is insufficient for the traffic the area handles. • Many of the buildings are in poor condition which may discourage landowners from improving conditions on their own property. • There are virtually no pedestrian amenities in the corridor. • There is minimal landscaping in the corridor. • The majority of the corridor is already developed and so is in need of redevelopment. Redevelopment will complicate the process as it will be more costly and time consuming. 23 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Conclusions Improving the existing conditions of the Lincoln Highway corridor will create an attractive built environment, a vibrant natural environment, successful commercial districts and a healthy economy. Improving t he area will reconnect visitors to the history and importance of the road, by sparking people’s imagination and fostering new growth. As mentioned previously, Lincoln Highway was created with the mindset that the journey is just as important as the destination. By creating an attractive and dynamic corridor, the Village will have created a place people seek out for their shopping, dining and other consumer needs. The improvements will solidify the corridor’s reputation and welcome people into the Village of Plainfield. 25 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Lincoln Highway : 27 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Plan Summary as Depicted in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan 29 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines ENHANCEMENT GUIDELINES Lincoln Highway is nearly indistinguishable for Plainfield residents and visitors to the community. The three overriding goals for the Corridor Enhancement Guidelines shall be as follows: • Integrated and complementary land uses through site design, architecture, landscaping and unifying elements. • An efficient and attractive transportation system for both automobile traffic and pedestrian users. • An enhanced civic and historical identity. These goals shall be achieved through the following breakdown of categories: Site Design Redevelopment with a creative si te design will address many of the issues of the Lincoln Highway corridor in addition to benefiting the area’s aesthetic value. Through a creative site design, a developer/builder can create a desirable site for tenants and a high level of demand for that site. In these guidelines, “creativity” can be defined as one’s ability to transcend traditional ideas and create meaningful new ideas. Creative site designs will be an important part of redevelopment in the Corridor. Architecture To reconnect residents and visitors to the roadway’s historic past, while providing a dynamic, modern day destination point, extensive enhancement and revitalization will need to occur with the buildings and architecture along U.S. Route 30. Buildings can be demolished and rebuilt, renovated or improved to replace the old, outdated looks with modern day designs in accordance with the Village’s Site Plan Review Ordinance. Quality materials, 360 degree architecture, wall projections and recessions are just some of the elements that can enhance the character of businesses along the Lincoln Highway corridor. There will be an emphasis on the use of quality, natural materials, such as brick and stone, on all new construction in the corridor. Transportation Infrastructure and road improvements are two of the most important elements for enhancing the Lincoln Highway corridor. These improvements will improve traffic and business conditions, allow for easy vehicular and pedestrian circulation, improve stormwater management and more. Signage Signs influence the public’s perception, not just about individual businesses but also about commercial districts and even a community as a whole. Well-designed, well-sized, and well-sited signs contribute positively to community appearance, and most business owners would agree that an attractive community is a prosperous community. The signage available currently on US Route 30 is overwhelming and cluttered, making it difficult for businesses to adequately advertise their product to passersby and degrading the character of Village streets. Lincoln Highway is one of the few locations in the Village that continues to have an abundance of billboards and pylon signs. 31 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Streetscape & Landscaping The Lincoln Highway corridor is visibly lacking in landscaping, green space and boulevard street design which is strongly encouraged throughout the Village. Through these design guidelines, much attention will be given to enhancing the streetscape of Lincoln Highway through landscaping, attractive lighting, specialty paving and other decorative elements. Streetscaping will give the corridor a strong sense of place. Downtown Streetscape Project In 2008, the Village conducted a comprehensive enhancement of the Village’s Historic Downtown, which is also home to the Lincoln Highway. The streetscape project encompassed upgrades to the public infrastructure, the installation of extensive landscaping & way finding signage, & the dramatic use of lighting, color, detailing & graphics to enhance the economic viability & vitality of the downtown. Each design element played an important role in dramatically enhancing the downtown district to make it more pedestrian friendly. The U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines implement a lot of the same ideas used in the downtown streetscape project. Each of these projects take place on an important stretch of the Lincoln Highway. BEFORE AFTER 32 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines SITE DESIGN This illustration focuses on the building footprints of the different commercial uses, entrance points to the shopping center and the landscaped boulevards that can be added for additional environmental and aesthetic benefits. This illustration is of a conventional shopping center. Note the outlots along the major thoroughfare, water detention areas in the rear, and linear connections. As previously mentioned, a creative site design has benefits that go beyond aesthetic value. Through original designs, a developer/builder will have created a more desirable site for tenants and more demand for that site. The Village of Plainfield encourages creative site designs to prevent scattered strip commercial development and to create a unique sense of place for the Lincoln Highway Corridor. Instead of typical strip commercial development, the Village is encouraging developments that are laid out in interesting patterns. Elements the Village will be looking for developers to employ include the following: • Differentiation in materials in vehicular and pedestrian areas (crosswalks, pedestrian plazas, etc.). • Varying site layouts to prevent monotony. • Well defined pedestrian areas accented by lighting & landscaping. • A variety in the shapes and sizes of buildings or building units. • Sustainability of the center as change occurs. • Quality architecture throughout. These elements are all visible in the photo below of the Wheaton Town Square Shopping Center. Photo: Courtesy of Peter Aaron 1992 - Wheaton Town Square Project 33 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Conventional strip malls, as illustrated above, are abundant throughout the Midwest region. Common characteristics of them include: • Expansive parking areas. • Linear design. • Disconnected site designs. • Small amounts of landscaping. • Excess or inadequate signage. • A Stop-And-Go attitude. While the site appears to be efficient for the uses located here, it generally functions as a Fixed Point, which attracts customers for impulse purchases. Fixed Point shopping centers must find opportunistic retail locations along the consumers’ pathway which is why the are often located on major streets, adjacent to Destination Points such as the hotel pictured in the background. This strip mall will appeal to the consumer who wants to get a bite to eat or stop in at their cell phone store spontaneously. The strip center does not invite guests to linger in the location to shop or relax once their one-stop-shop is complete. Note that there are few pedestrian amenities such as benches or attractive landscaping which would commonly be found at a Destination Point center. Characteristics of Destination Point Shopping Centers Shopping trip – when a consum er’s intended destination is the site itself. Big Box reta ilers and/or shopping centers, power centers and entertainment districts fall in this category. Popular characterist ics of destination points are as follows: Create an outdoor room. Quality & unified signage controls. Capitalize on building scale, design and architecture. Create visual experiences & vistas. Foster social interaction. Enhance the environment & natural features. Provide a sense of safety to people using the area. Destination Point commerci al centers accommodate a variety of users and uses. The site plan below illustrates a higher quality conventional design than the average Big Box commercial center because it provides a variety of store sizes and shapes, and is wrapped around the edges to embrace the commercial activity within it. It is also important to notice that ther e are two roads that go pass through this center. Rat her than separating the shopping areas for two disconnected comme rcial centers, this site plan unifies the opposite sides of the street into one major destination point. 34 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines It is not the intention of these Guidelines to promote only Destination Point shopping centers, seeing as Fixed Point businesses serve an important role in balancing the vitality and viability of a Corridor. Rather, these Guidelines intend to encourage developers and land owners to move away from nondescript, strip commercial development in exchange for consolidated centers and tasteful architecture and design. Creative site designs will be created through well thought-out architecture, infrastructure and streetscape elements. It is the vision of these guidelines to move away from the staggered, outdated buildings, towards buildings that are harmonious with one another and attractive and welcoming for those visiting or passing by. The photo at the left illustrates a conceptual, creative site layout that incorporates each of the elements desired in a commercial center. It creates a sense of enclosure for consumers visiting the site with the buildings forming a general envelope around the center. There are strong pedestrian connections throughout the site, as well as added green space to break up the “sea of pavement” that massive parking lots typically create. The site draws people into the center, but for those wishing to be in and out quickly there is still parking available along the bordering roadways. The smaller building has incorporated locations for outdoor seating for a café or coffee shop to encourage consumers to relax and enjoy the site for an extended period of time. This design is able to achieve all of this, while remaining practical. There is room for a larger retailer in the main building to be integrated into the rest of the center, and each business would have good street frontage and visibility. 35 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Concerns With Current Site Designs The current conditions on the U.S. Route 30 corridor are not ideal in terms of site design. The lots are very long and narrow, and the lots on the south side of the road do not adjoin the roadway at a 90 degree angle. Instead, the lots are angled, as are the buildings on them. Diagram 1. illustrates the current building footprints along Lincoln Highway. For people traveling southbound, towards I-55, there is adequate building frontage and the stores are positioned so that signs are visible. For those traveling northbound, however, potential customers are looking only at the sides and rears of buildings. By the time someone would be able to see what businesses are located in these buildings, it is likely he has already passed them. The existing building footprints do not maximize the visibility of stores for the businesses in them. N Variety of Uses The U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines encourage maintaining the current mix of commercial uses, businesses and services since they have proven successful and necessary for those in the market area. The Village’s Comprehensive Plan identifies the majority of the Corridor as general commercial, which will allow the diversity of uses to continue in the future. Retail shops, auto-oriented businesses, restaurants and specialty shops provide a well balanced base for the Corridor that these guidelines only aim at enhancing. Any redevelopment done will be sensitive to the surrounding residential areas, as well as the expansive nature reserves and wetlands. The U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines do not identify a future for the Lincoln Highway which would replicate the IL Route 59 Corridor with several Big Boxes and commercial outlots. The Lincoln Highway Corridor is envisioned to be a more intimate place, with smaller businesses, reduced traffic speeds and a more compact atmos-N Diagram 1. 36 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Outdoor Gathering Places Throughout the course of enhancement, it shall be important to incorporate public gathering places where appropriate. Appropriate locations would include small outdoor seating areas for eating and drinking establishments, as well as gazebos and/or benches in green space areas as illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 1. is an existing outdoor gathering place on the Lincoln Highway corridor, in the Lake Renwick Nature Preserve. It offers a place for people to relax outdoors in an attractive setting. Figure 2. illustrates how outdoor gathering spots can be incorporated within commercial development. An safe and attractive outdoor space will appeal to those that would like to enjoy the nice weather while dining or stopping for a refreshment. It is amenities like these that create a unique sense of place for an area and will keep people coming back. Pedestrian Amenities Pedestrian amenities are another component that shall be important in site design. Pedestrian amenities intend to encourage people to move around a commercial area on foot, rather than by automobile. This will encourage people to stay in the area longer, putting more money into the businesses located there and making the area more vibrant. Though many of the lots in the designated enhancement area are fairly small in size, cross access and consolidation provide opportunities for pedestrian connections. Figure 3. illustrates an attractive pedestrian walkway that travels through the center of a parking lot. It provides a safe route for pedestrians to cross through the middle of a commercial development to avoid having to stick to the perimeters. Note the differentiation in materials between the walkway and the drive aisles used to signify the pedestrian area both for the pedestrians as well as automobiles navigating the site. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. 37 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Landscaping & Buffering Landscaping and buffering is important with regards to site design as well as streetscaping on the Route 30 Corridor. Landscaping can strongly add to, or detract from, the aesthetic value of an area. Use of landscaping brings color and life to development’s parking lots and building facades, and provides a buffer from commercial activity and major transportation routes. Landscaping provides a fairly simple solution for businesses that are not in the financial position to redo a façade or construct a new building. Installing parkway trees and some landscaped parking lot islands can have a surprisingly dramatic effect in making an area appear more vibrant. There are also several important environmental benefits to the installation of landscaping. Cleaner air and reduced urban heat island effects are just a couple of examples. Lighting New and rehabilitated developments shall give special attention to the lighting fixtures used on a site. The design of lighting structures has a dramatic impact on an area. Traditional, elegant lighting fixtures are welcoming to the public, while utilitarian, steel structures are unattractive and uninviting. Lights that are mounted on black poles are encouraged throughout the Village because black minimizes their presence in the environment. It also reduces glare and gives higher visibility to traffic signals. It shall be a goal to implement lighting fixtures that are elegant and timeless throughout the Lincoln Highway Corridor. Light poles which are of other neutral colors such as a forest green or beige shall also be encouraged. The goal will be to move away from traditional box lights and grey cobra head lighting which detracts from the aesthetics of an area. The two shopping centers at the right offer attractive examples of how the style of lighting can be used to beautify a commercial development. 38 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Fundamental Goals For Enhancement • Orient buildings to face Lincoln Highway at a 90 degree angle • Consolidate lots where appropriate • Provide cross access between lots when appropriate • Embrace the quaintness of the long and narrow lots • Implement appropriate building massing and rooflines • Create a visual experience for visitors and residents of the area • Enhance the natural features of the corridor • Provide a sense of safety to people using the area through lighting and pedestrian amenities • Quality and unified signage, lighting and architectural controls • Place buildings in a front loaded position when possible The illustration above depicts an example of how redevelopment on the Lincoln Highway Corridor could begin. Some lots may choose to consolidate with neighboring lots as is depicted in the larger lot with building A , while others may choose to maintain their current characteristics and simply make modifications to landscaping and pedestrian amenities. Note what a difference the landscaping and pedestrian connections could make throughout the corridor, and how curb cuts and lots can be consolidated to offer a larger building area. A 39 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines ARCHITECTURE "Originality consists of returning to the origin. Thus, originality means returning, through one's re-sources, to the simplicity of the early solutions." - Ant oni Gaudí The current visual conditions of the Lincoln Highway Corridor are cluttered, outdated and filled with buildings lacking architectural integrity. As an important front door to Plainfield, much effort will need to be put forth to improve the corridor’s overall appearance. Building new buildings and/or renovating existing facades will mold the corridor into a modern day commercial destination, while reconnecting residents and visitors to the roadway’s historic past. Attractive buildings, amongst other elements, will attract new businesses to the area and help existing businesses to expand their operations. Most people would agree that an attractive community is a successful community, thus special attention should be given to arch itecture and aesthetics as the Route 30 Corridor is redeveloped and enhanced. The above quote by Antoni Gaudí shall provide the underly ing framework for the architectural guidelines because it encourages people to reconnect to the simplicity of early solutions. As buildings are renovated or replaced with new structures, a fundamental characteristic shall be simplicity, or organic architecture. Organic architecture strives to integrate space into a unified whole with the justification that form follows function. Though an older concept, it is one that remains true today. Different types of businesses locate in different types of spaces. To maintain the wide variety of uses that currently exist on Lincoln Highway, a variety of different forms must be built and maintained. Having absolutely no architectural consistency amongst the buildings will give the corridor a chaotic appearance and will overwhelm consumers and businesses so that different businesses could become lost in the shuffle. These guidelines propose that rather than promote one specific style of architecture, such as encouraging all prairie style or all federal style architecture, an underlying simplistic theme will promote a unified corridor appearance, yet still give each business its own opportunity for originality. Appropriate building massing, proportions, material and lot orientation shall all be considered as redevelopment and enhancement occur on the Route 30 Corridor. 41 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines ARCHITECTURAL GOALS Lincoln Highway Corridor • Predominant use of quality materials • Appropriate building massing • Clean building lines • Methodical angles or curves, suggesting natural forms • Use of natural, earth tone colors • Emphasis on building function • Attempt to capitalize on available natural light The Village’s Site Plan Review Ordinance provides general regulations for which all new developments in Plainfield will have to comply with. These guidelines shall expand on those regulations to provide a clearer interpretation of what the Village is looking for in the enhancement of the U.S. Route 30 Corridor. The standards are intended to ensure that commercial, office and mixed use development is compatible with the surrounding area and contributes to the unique and historical character of the Village of Plainfield. For information and regulations on any architectural aspect not outlined through these guidelines, interested parties shall consult the Village’s Site Plan Review Ordinance. The following pages shall provide general architectural guidelines for the Lincoln Highway corridor. The successful design of new construction and rehabilitation requires creativity, but takes important design cues from the Village’s, along with the Lincoln Highway’s, historic past. This should not be interpreted to mean that new buildings should try to appear old or should assume a historic character they never had. Design cues shall be taken from the two new projects in the Corridor (The Boulevard and Heron Point). These guidelines will touch on building placement and orientation on lots, massing and building form, building height, materials, textures and colors, and roof lines. Certain key elements will be outlined as well. 43 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines As previously mentioned in Site Design, the current building placement and lot orientation of the Lincoln Highway Corridor is not ideal. Many of the buildings are built on an angle to the street due the long, narrow lot shapes. The figure to the left illustrates the current conditions of many building footprints. While these footprints may frame the road nicely for vehicles traveling southeast, they are barely visible for those traveling northwest. As redevelopment occurs, all buildings shall be oriented to face the street in a parallel manner. This will maximize each business’s visibility and provide passersby with increased opportunity to read business signage. Building Placement & Orientation on Lots These photos provide a perspective from roughly the same spot on Route 30 - the top is looking southeast and the bottom is looking northwest. One can see that it is easy to see the business names and building fronts when traveling southbound, but when traveling northbound the storefronts are completely hidden. The only way one would be able to tell what stores were which while heading northwest would be if the businesses placed illegal signage on the sides of their buildings, or if people braked while driving so they could look over their shoulders. As redevelopment occurs on this roadway, all buildings shall be oriented to face the street to maximize visibility, create a more linear streetscape and maintain good traffic flow. 44 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines To maintain the character of the Lincoln Highway corridor, new buildings shall have similar massing and building form to neighboring buildings. Massing is defined as three-dimensional composition of the building, or overall bulk. Having a consistency of massing will allow a new building to be compatible with the adjacent buildings and corridor as a whole. Massing & Building Form This is an example of appropriate massing and building form for various buildings in the Lincoln Highway Corridor. Each building has massing and form similar to that of its neighbor without being a direct replica. Note that each building is a different width, height and style, yet the horizontal lines are similar. Another attribute that makes the massing and form of these buildings complementary is the length of façade before being broken up by some type of vertical relief. Note how each segment is approximately 30 feet before being broken up by a wall projection or recession, change in materials or use of windows. The existing buildings on Route 30 range from approximately 65 feet wide to 100 feet wide, with the larger buildings having elements of vertical relief incorporated. The appropriate massing for new buildings in the corridor shall include facades that are approximately 65 feet wide. Those which have widths of greater than 65 feet shall incorporate elements of vertical relief every 65 feet, more or less. In regards to height, both Village Ordinance and these guidelines encourage buildings with a maximum height of 35 feet. New buildings shall complement the height of adjacent buildings by incorporating consistent horizontal features such as roof lines, signage placement, window height/placement and more. Each new building will have the opportunity for uniqueness as is illustrated in the above diagram, yet cohesion for the corridor shall be achieved through appropriate massing and form. Overriding Goals ♦ Use massing similar to adjacent buildings. ♦ Use elements such as roof forms, lines, openings and other characteristics which are similar to those found in the district. ♦ Building facades shall be designed to reduce mass and create an interesting visual rhythm and skyline. 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 45 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines All redevelopment on U.S. Route 30 will be strongly encouraged to take full advantage of quality architectural and design standards. To create a distinctive corridor in the Village of Plainfield, the following criteria have been identified for new development to comply with: Materials & Style • All material at pedestrian level will be of higher quality. • Elevations will use varying material color, texture and vertical and horizontal plane changes. • Walls will be masonry, stone veneer systems, or stucco. Larger buildings may include precast panels with stamped or inlaid brick textures and EIFS acrylic finishes. • Building facades shall provide greater detail and quality material where accessible to the public with covered entrees, awnings, towers and roof canopies. • Additional detail such as inlaid tile, soldier courses, building trim and wainscots are encouraged. • Tower elements and upper level windows are strongly encouraged. • Roofs shall provide a skyline to add interest to both height and plain changes using cornices, gables, hip roofs and dormered roofs. • Building entrances shall incorporate awnings, canopies, wall recesses, colonnades, cornices and other elements to distinguish their importance. Sample Materials Red Brick Buff Brick Brown Brick Caststone EIFS General Color Palette Stone Veneer Metal Roof Concrete Roof Tile Shingle System 46 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Colors, Textures & Rooflines Building colors, textures and rooflines shall be given consider ation throughout the Route 30 Enhancement Guidelines as they eac h have significant impact on the public realm. Color The approved materials list indicates that earth tone, neutral colors shall be the predominant color palette for any façade renovation or new construction. These colors blend into the environment better and act as less of a distraction. Neutral colors are timeless and offer a certain integrity to a building that bright colors often take away. That noted, bold colors may be used as accents on a building. These accents should be tasteful and account for no more than 10% of the building façade. Bold colors may be used on signs, awnings and trims. Each of the buildings above implements tasteful use of color on its facades. Texture Use of multiple materials on a façade shall be encouraged to add texture and depth to the building. Note that each building pictured above utilizes a predominance of brick, but incorporates additional materials in strategic locations to add character to the building. Different shades of brick, a mixture of brick and stone or other combinations may be used to add texture to a building. A building lacking texture often appears as only two dimensional and lacks character and presence. Rooflines There shall not be a standard, required roofline for the designated enhancement area; rather, the rooflines will be compatible with adjacent properties through use of horizontal lines and architectural features such as cornices. No one roofline shall be at a constant level. There should be changes in height, slope or entrance elements incorporated on all rooflines. 47 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines TRANSPORTATION Transportation Goals Completed Prior to the Adoption of These Guidelines • Improve the intersection of Route 30 and Route 59 by restricting Commercial Street to right turn in and right turn out only. • Improve the capacity at the intersection of Lily Cache Road & U.S. Route 30 through the addition of turn lanes and enhanced roadway geometrics. • Improve the capacity of the Lily Cache Bridge to provide capacity for at least four lanes of traffic & a bike path. TRANSPORTATION 49 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The intersection of U.S. Route 30 and IL Route 59 has been slightly improved through restricting Commercial Street to a right turn out only. The original plan for Commercial Street improvements called for a right turn in and right turn out movement, but due to traffic congestion and the complex turning movements that take place here this never happened. Commercial Street 51 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Lily Cache Road & Lincoln Highway Intersection As noted in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan, a desired improvement for the Lincoln Highway Corridor is to improve the capacity at the intersection of U.S. Route 30 and Lily Cache Road through the addition of turn lanes and enhanced roadway geometrics. Portions of this improvement have actually already been completed through the widening of the intersection, and the installation of appropriate turning lanes. A future goal to further improve the intersection will be to widen the roadway more, so that there are two through lanes traveling both southbound and northbound. As the intersection is currently, there is only one through lane for traffic traveling north and traffic traveling south. Lily Cache Bridge Through the redevelopment of the U.S. Route 30 Corridor, it was a priority to improve the Lily Cache Bridge to provide capacity for at least four traffic lanes and a bike path. This goal was completed by IDOT and therefore will not be addressed in these guidelines. In the future, these lanes will merely need to be re-striped to indicate four lanes. L i ly C a c h e U .S . R o u t e 3 0 The two photographs to the left depict the Lily Cache Road & U.S. Route 30 intersection in it’s current condition as of Summer 2008. Lily Cache Road is classified as a Minor Collector roadway which accommodates 2,000 to 5,000 average daily vehicle trips, an 80 foot right-of-way, and allows for parking on both sides. That noted, t here is not expected to be a very high traffic volume using this roadway and one left turn lane and one right turn lane should be sufficient for its intersection with U.S. Route 30. In 2002 the Village added a signal to this intersection for added safety. 52 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Transportation Goals That Will Be Addressed Through These Guidelines ♦ Reduce the number of curb cuts on the road and provide cross-access between adjacent properties. ♦ Pedestrian & Bicycle amenities should be incorporated wherever possible. ♦ Widen the entire roadway between Renwick Road and I-55 to four lanes with an urban cross section and appropriate turn lanes. ♦ Roadway improvements should incorporate drainage enhancements. TRANSPORTATION 53 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines TRANSPORTATION These framework guidelines shall have significant impact on the future functionality and desirability of the Lincoln Highway Corridor. As stated previously, infrastructure and road improvements are two of the most important elements for enhancing the Lincoln Highway corridor. These improvements w ill improve traffic and business conditions, and allow for easy vehicular and pedestrian circulation. U.S. Route 30 accommodates a high number of average daily trips, with the daily total being between 10,000 & 50,000. These high numbers, in conjunction with too many curb cuts, provides dangerous situations for vehicles and pedestrians. Cross Access & Access Consolidation Access is one of the most important elements for a business’s success. An overriding goal for the Lincoln Highway Corridor shall be to consolidate the access points on the roadway, as well as consolidate strategic cross access points amongst the business properties themselves. In the Corridor’s current condition, there are too many curb cuts for the high speeds and number of vehicles passing by. Access consolidation is a cost-effective way of reducing the number of vehicle conflicts in the Corridor, while making the shopping trip more enjoyable and safe for consumers. Consolidating cross accesses will further reduce the number of access points needed on U.S. Route 30, and provide efficient circulation for consumers circulating through the various businesses and centers of the corridor. The key goal shall be to eliminate the unnecessary access points so that turning movements from and onto Lincoln Highway are reduced. Note the abundant curb cuts and lack of pedestrian amenities that are typical on the U.S. Route 30 Corridor. 55 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Curb Cuts The U.S. Route 30 Corridor has an over abundance of curb cuts, whose removal is a vital part of the transportation plan. The photo above illustrates the northwest corner of Lincoln Highway and Lily Cache Road. There are three curb cuts off of Route 30 (pictured), plus an additional curb cut off of Lily Cache Road. The curb cuts are unnecessary, as one properly constructed access point from each roadway would suffice for the property. 1. 2. 3. Adjacent is the same property from an aerial view with the same three curb cuts shown. Being that Route 30 is such a highly traveled street, it is logical to have a right-in, right-out access point this close to the Lily Cache Road intersection, rather than a full access point as it would be difficult to make a left hand turn onto Lincoln Highway from this point. The right-in, right-out accounts for two of the curb cuts (1. & 2.). Curb cut 3. is redundant to the other two and should be removed. 1. 2. 3. Eliminating the third curb cut serves as both a traffic safety precaution, and an opportunity to create a larger, more attractive landscaping area. 56 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Cross Access As effort is made to reduce the curb cuts on Lincoln Highway, cross access will become increasingly important as well. Though the majority of parcels are somewhat narrow, most require their own access from Route 30 because there is either landscaping or another type of barricade between each individual parcel. Should someone have to stop at one store, and then another business that is two store fronts over, he/she would need to back onto Route 30. Providing more cross access across the commercial parcels will aid in reducing the number of turns made on and off of Lincoln Highway. It will provide for more efficient circulation off of the roadway as well. This aerial photo shows about eight curb cuts on the southern part of the roadway, spaced out over approximately 700 feet. Village engineers generally recommend full-access curb cuts be spaced out approximately 600 feet each. That would indicate that no more than two full-access curb cuts should be present on this stretch of the Lincoln Highway. 57 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Bike Amenities As noted in the Village’s Comprehensive Plan, bike and pedestrian amenities will be incorporated wherever possible. Currently, there is virtually no sidewalk or bike path system that would promote pedestrian use of the Corridor. As the corridor redevelops, incorporating pedestrian amenities shall be a major goal to encourage these additional users to take advantage of the wide variety of goods and services provided. The illustration to the right is an excerpt from the Village’s Comprehensive Plan, illustrating where the goals of bike lanes and different paths should be in the Corridor Enhancement area. According to this plan, a bike lane shall extend southeast from the Route 30 and Route 59 intersection, to Howard Street. Upon reaching Howard Street, the bike lane will turn off of Route 30 and extend directly south along Howard. The southern portion of the Corridor Enhancement area is not envisioned to accommodate any type of bike path. Bicycle Plan In 1999, the Plainfield Park Distri ct lead a cooperative effort to develop a Plainfield Area Bicycle Plan with the Village of Plainfield, the City of Joliet, the Forest Preserve District of Will County and Plainfield Township. The Trail plan contained in the Comprehensive Plan, and now in the U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines, generally reflects this prior planning effort, with minor modifications made to respond to changing conditions. The plan is designed to link residential areas of Plainfield with key co mmunity facilities such as parks, schools, and major centers of employment and shopping. 58 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Bike Amenities The bike lane expected to be installed shall be defined as follows: Dedicated lanes on a roadway pavement, striped and signed for bike use. Bike lanes typically are 5’ wide, and located on each side of a street so that bike traffic flows in the same direction as the motor vehicles. The illustration above depicts a sample cross section with a bike lane. Bike lanes average about five feet in width, and are immediately adjacent to the traffic. Bike lanes take up considerably less space than a shared use path, or a side path, which are set off the road, in the right of way or greenway. Pedestrian Amenities Regardless of what bike amenities are present throughout the Lincoln Highway Corridor, pedestrian amenities shall be incorporated on each side of the street as redevelopment occurs. A continuous sidewalk system will encourage people to get around more on foot while shopping, which is healthier and could potentially reduce vehicular traffic. All sidewalks should be clearly marked as they cross over access drives, whether that be through demarcation or a differentiation in materials. This will help communicate that pedestrians have the right-of-way, while providing a visual reminder to automobiles to look out for pedestrians. The sidewalks shall be of standard, five foot width, and where possible connect to the new businesses in the Corridor. Though there will likely not be heavy pedestrian traffic through this corridor, there should still be safe pedestrian routes. Currently, there is virtually no sidewalk or bike path system that would promote pedestrian use of the Corridor. As the corridor redevelops, incorporating these pedestrian amenities shall be a major goal to encourage these additional users to take advantage of the wide variety of goods and services provided. 59 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Urban Cross Section Another major transportation goal for the Route 30, or Lincoln Highway, Corridor, will be to widen the entire roadway between Renwick Road and Route 30 to four lanes with an urban cross section and appropriate turn lanes. The center shall be constructed as a mountable/barrier median, which is wide enough to accommodate left hand turn lanes. Where possible, a landscaped median shall be strongly encouraged in place of the barrier median, so as to add aesthetic value to the Corridor’s streetscape and reduce urban heat island effects. Each traffic lane for the road will need to be 12’ wide to accommodate large traffic counts as well as higher speeds. This also indicates that the center median will have to be at least 12’ wide in order to have the ability to accommodate left hand turn lanes as necessary. Also, it is important to keep in mind that much of the designated enhancement area remains identified as a Class II Truck Route, so traffic lanes will need to accommodate heavy truck traffic as well. Standard landscaped medians require a minimum 10’ width, so landscaping would in fact be permitted on the Route 30 Corridor. An agreement will need to be worked out with the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) should this landscaping be desired. +/- 94’ public right-of-way 12’ +/-12’ 5’ +/-12’ +/-12’ 5’ Option 1. Option 2. Please note : The cross section plans for the Li ncoln Highway Corridor are not consistent with other Major Arterial Road ways throughout the Village, as this is an older corridor with limited amounts of space. The public right of way does not permit for a wide boulevard and/or additional traffi c lanes etc. Safety and accessibility will override aesthetics on the road, thus the am ount of landscaping or sidewalk space may vary from property to property. The only constant shall be the lane widths and center median for turn lanes. 60 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Mid-Corridor Signal Location Currently, there is no signal at t he midway point between Renwick Road and Lily Cache Road. Though the Village’s Comprehensive Plan does not identify a mid-corridor signal location, but upon redevelopment it may become necessary. If enough lots are consolidated to create a fairly large commercial center, a signalized intersection would free up much congestion on the roadway. Should the various properties maintain their current boundaries, which are small and narrow, a signalized entrance point would not be a logical solution. Drainage Enhancements As redevelopment occurs on the Route 30 Corridor, and roadway improvements occur, necessary drainage enhancements shall be included. Currently, the designated enhancement area has inadequate storm drainage features. There is no consistent curb and gutter or storm sewer system; and during periods of heavy rain, water pools up on the sides of the road. As Lincoln Highway is widened to a four lane urban cross section, more impervious surface will be added to the site thus increasing runoff. Curbs with storm sewers and appropriate drainage pipes will need to be installed concurrently with any transportation improvements. Appropriate pipe sizes shall be determined by the Village’s Engineer. Potential Mid-Corridor Traffic Signal. Existing Signalized Intersections. 61 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Intersection Improvements to Improve Safety & Traffic Flow. Intersection Improvements to Improve Safety & Traffic Flow. Intersection Improvements to Improve Safety & Traffic Flow. Incorporate Landscape Boulevards Where Appropriate For Streetscape Enhancement Consolidate Curb Cuts & Provide Internal Cross Access as Properties Develop. Gateway Feature. Gateway Features. Gateway Feature. Potential Mid-Corridor Traffic Signal. Summary of Transportation Improvements Some of the improvements described in the U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines will be completed by the Village, while others will need property owner cooperation and will likely not be completed until redevelopment occurs and appropriate right-of-ways, easements, etcetera can be obtained. The goals outlined in these Guidelines shall be considered top priorities in any development c onsiderations made in the Corridor. Bike Lane. 62 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Signage plays an important role in determining the character of a commercial corridor. Signage can enhance or detract from a community depending on how it is implemented. Excess signage , as is currently present on Route 30, clutters and devalues commercial corridors, while controlled signage will promote a sense of order and pride in community character. Signs influence the public’s perception, not just about individual businesses, but also about commercial districts and even a community as a whole. Well-designed, well-sized and well-sited signs contribute positively to a community appearance, and most would agree that an attractive community is a prosperous community. Though a seemingly small aspect in enhancement, the removal of illegal signs and replacement with higher quality signage will have tremendous impact on the revitalization of the Route 30 Corridor. In conjunction with landscaping, addressing signage issues may be one of the least expensive and quickest options a property owner can take towards improving the appearance and viability of their property. Signage 63 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Signage is a way to improve or decline the quality of locations throughout a community because it is directly related to: • Enhancing pedestrian environments • Creating attractive gateways • Strengthening the economic vitality of a community • Strengthening the image of a community The signage available on Lincoln Highway is overwhelming and cluttered, making it difficult for businesses to adequately advertise their product to passersby and degrading the character of the historic Lincoln Highway Corridor. Additionally, many of the signs in the area are non-compliant with Village Ordinances. There are a number of attention-getting devices, pylon signs, billboards and other illegal signs scattered amongst the public right-of-way. The adjacent photos illustrates what is visible on the Lincoln Highway as one travels southbound. Note the over abundance of signs and cluttered appearance they emit. Several are illegal due to their poor quality, height and number. This photo displays the typical billboards which are still in existence in the Lincoln Highway corridor. Billboards are prohibited by Village Ordinance due to their obnoxiousness and the amount of distraction they cause from the road. As Rt.30 is enhanced, there will be a focus on the removal of illegal signs such as this one. Attention grabbing devices and oversized, over-abundant signs are illustrated in this photo. Though the automobile dealerships are a strong anchoring business for the Corridor, they often utilize excessive signage which offers a blighted appearance for residents and passersby. 65 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Sign Criteria As discussed previously, the designated enhancement area is a fairly tight corridor. The lots are generally narrow and the space for the public right-of-way is limited. Taking these factors into consideration, it will be important to have fairly restrictive sign regulations so that signage does not overwhelm the corridor as it currently does. All new signage in the Lincoln Highway Corridor shall be subject to obtaining the appropriate permit from the Village. General Parameters - Wall Signs • All signs must be made up of individual letters; conventional box signs will not be approved. • Lettering on all store signs shall be limited to business or trade name of the premises as it appears on the lease. • No exterior sign will be permitted to extend above any roofline. • No exposed lamps or neon tubing will be permitted. • No exposed raceways, crossovers or conduits will be permitted. • All signage returns shall either match face color of sign or blend with adjacent building color. • Illumination internally or externally shall be appropriate. General Parameters - Ground Signs • All signs shall have a minimum of 2 square feet of landscaping per 1 square foot of signage installed at the sign base. • All signs will be monumental, decorative iron or decorative wood in style, with a base consistent in materials with the main structure. • Freestanding tenant signs will be limited to 6 feet in height and 36 square feet in area. • Signs advertising multi-tenants shall be limited to 8 feet in height and 48 square feet in area. • External illumination shall be strongly encouraged on commercial and service properties. This may include backlighting through use of LEDs or a similar device. • Lettering on all signs shall be limited to the development name, business or trade name of the premises it is located on. 66 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Examples of Poor Signage The above sign is considered poor signage because it has exposed neon. This sign is considered poor signage because it would be categorized as a cabinet, or box, sign. This type of sign would be considered undesirable due to the amount of information it includes, and the cabinet sign at the top. As mentioned in the parameters, signs shall be limited to only the business and/or development name. The above signs are illegal and non-conforming with Village regulations. They are too close together, too close to the right of way, and confusing for passersby to read. Neither the height nor style of this sign will be permitted upon enhancement of the Route 30 67 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Examples of Good Signage A commercial development with quality wall and ground signs. Though the fonts and colors of the signs are different, the backlit illumination ties them all together nicely. This is an example of a good wall sign. It is not obnoxious and the business made an effort to tie the sign into the architecture of the building. Though not visible in this picture, the sign is illuminated ex ternally by lights in the roof. Here is an attractive ground sign which advertises for a development as a whole, rather than for individual tenants. This wall sign has attractive channel letters which reflect the business’s name and complement the façade. Note how the hunter green brings out the white of the letters and the letters have a dark green border on them to provide a finished look. Above is an example of a tasteful multi-tenant sign. This ground sign advertises for a development rather than a tenant and does a great job of incorporating landscaping and water elements to make this sign truly unique. 68 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Gateway Entrance Signs A goal in urban design is to incorporate a focal point monument at significant street corners and traffic ovals to announce one’s arrival into a community. Individual subdivisions may have these monuments, as well as cities and villages. As previously mentioned, the Linc oln Highway corridor is a significant entrance to the Village of Plainfield, as well as a major traffic route through the Village. To embrace this corridor and give it a strong identity, gateway signage shall be incorporated. These signs should be highlighted with attractive signage and landscaping. Where appropriate, the incorporation of artwork, arches and flags should be encouraged as well. Gateway signs serve as both informative and decorative signs. They increase the aesthetic values of streetscapes, while providing a sense of place for passersby. The sign pictured is an existing gateway sign the Village has, enhanced with additional landscaping to bring color and life to the street corner. This sign is at the southwest corner of IL Route 59 and Route 126 or Main Street. The seasonal mums, purple coneflower, and two trees help frame the sign. Attractive gateway signage will provide a unique entrance into the both the Village and the Lincoln Highway corridor. It is elements like this sign that can add character and charm to the public realm of the Village. Installing these signs will signify to Village residents and visitors that the Village takes pride in its appearance. 69 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Lincoln Highway Corridor Signage Along the entire historic Lincoln Highway, there are small signs with the Lincoln Highway logo present. This reconnects travelers to the historic past of the Lincoln Highway. As identified earlier, the Lincoln Highway has a rich history and place in the Village of Plainfield. It fostered the Village’s growth, went through the center of the Village’s downtown, and spans the entire length of the Village. To honor the highway, the Village has erected standard, metal signs along the roadway as displayed in Figure 1 . These signs are unattractive and nondescript. Along the famous route, there are many towns which have taken greater pride in their Lincoln Highway signs and have erected masonry columns instead of a metal post sign. This style represents more grandeur and importance, and is more aesthetically pleasing as is visible in Figure 2. Figure 1. In an effort to provide both a gateway entrance sign, as well as reconnect passersby to the historic importance of the Lincoln Highway, a hybrid sign for both can be created. Putting both features on one sign indicates that the Lincoln Highway is important in the Village. It can be a decorative coin inserted somewhere on the sign, or the Lincoln Highway’s general symbol as is pictured above. Figure 2. 70 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The locations identified on this map with a red circle are locations that the Village proposes as gateways and major entrances to the Lincoln Highway corridor. These will be the locations that the Village focuses on installing and enhancing gateway signage, landscaping and lighting fixtures. These locations are located near key intersections and will promote both the Village and the historic Lincoln Highway. Gateway Sign Location KEY Gateway Sign Location KEY 71 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The Lincoln Highway corridor is visibly lacking in terms of its streetscape. It shall be a focus of these guidelines to enhance the streetscape by means of landscaping and decorative lighting. Due to the high traffic volume of the corridor, streetscape furniture such as benches and trashcans will be omitted. As detailed in the transportation section, sidewalks shall be incorporated as well . 73 STREETSCAPE U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Streetscape Streetscaping contributes strongly to the sense of place of a corridor. LOW QUALITY STREETSCAPES Low quality streetscapes often are cluttered with unattractive features. This could include a disarray of poles, wires and signs, signs of all shapes and sizes, unlimited locations of signs and poles, and lacking or monotonous landscapes. All of these combined contribute to the urban heat island effect and take away from the beauty of the surrounding community. GOAL OF STREETSCAPES Ideally, streetscapes would add to the charm and character of a community by beautifying it and providing attractive visual, automotive, and pedestrian oriented corridors. To achieve a successful streetscape, the following goals are typically sought after: • Underground utilities. • Attractive landscape and open space plans. • Few signs. • New street lights with hardware for seasonal banners. • Gathering places. • Focal point monument in traffic ovals and at street corners. • Attractive lighting structures that move away from the common cobra head light. Characteristics of the current US Route 30 Streetscape: • No street lights for safety or aesthetic appeal. • Aboveground utilities. • No landscaping beyond sod. • No pedestrian amenities. • Inconsistent appearance & no visually unifying elements. The streetscape guidelines shall focus on lighting improvements, landscaping and pedestrian amenities, and the burying of utilities. Though it would be desirable to begin streetscaping right away, it is not logical to do so until the roadway is widened. Otherwise, any improvement completed may need to be removed (i.e. the sidewalk is in the wrong location, or the trees need to be uprooted and relocated). Streetscaping will likely be one of the final elements completed throughout the enhancement of the Lincoln Highway corridor. 75 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Lighting Lighting is an important aspect in the enhancement of the U.S. Route 30 corridor, as well as in the beautification of the Village’s public realm. The design of lighting structures has a dramatic impact on an area. Traditional, elegant lighting fixtures are welcoming to the public, while utilitarian, steel structures are unattractive and uninviting. Lights that are mounted on black poles are encouraged throughout the Village because black minimizes their presence in the environment. It also reduces glare and gives higher visibility to traffic signals. The Village’s Beautification Plan identifies that lighting fixtures which are elegant and timeless shall be implemented throughout parks and streets in the public realm. U.S. Route 30 is identified as a major arterial roadway through the Village as it provides a high level of mobility within and between major sub-areas of the Chicago metropolitan area. The adjacent chart depicts what type of lighting structures will be suitable for the Route 30 streetscape. If a standard cobra is opted for, it must be the color black. Additionally, it shall be desirable to incorporate both roadway and pedestrian level lighting. All lighting fixtures will need to meet IDOT photometric requirements. Please note: the recommended lighting fixtures apply to the roadway only. Any form of decorative light consistent with the nature of the surrounding development shall be permitted on the interior of commercial and business lots. 76 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Landscaping To dramatically enhance the Linc oln Highway corridor, more elaborate landscaping will need to be installed. The landscaping is important both for the beauty of the surrounding community as well as to reduc e urban heat island effects. An urban heat island is an area that is significantly warmer than its surroundings due to the modifications of land surface due to development. Planting street trees and other vegetation can greatly reduce the impacts of this while increasing the area’s beauty. Furthermore, landscaping will assist in buffering the vehicular uses and pedestrian uses, making the area more pedestrian friendly. People will be more likely to walk where they feel safe and separated from the traffic. The current landscaping conditions of the U.S. Route 30 Corridor consist of no more than a small, sodded area. There are no street trees or shrubs, and no perimeter plantings to screen parking lots from the roadway. In the adjacent photos, note the significant impact that the shrubs adjacent to the parking lot have. These shrubs, combined with the parkway trees, instantly transform the area. The area looks for appealing for pedestrians, and provides less distraction to drivers because it shields the commercial activities. LANDSCAPING : Before & After 77 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines The minimum requirements for streetscape landscaping are as follows: • Planting of parkway trees at no more than 40 ft. spacing. • Regrading of sodded parkway to provide attractive green space. • Planting of shrubs and/or trees to buffer parking areas from pedestrian amenities, as well as to screen parking from the roadway. • Where possible, a landscaped median shall be incorporated in the center of the roadway. For details regarding what species of trees are appropriate in these areas, interested parties should consult the Village’s Landscaping Ordinance. Pedestrian Amenities Pedestrian amenities shall be incorporated on each side of the street as redevelopment occurs. A continuous sidewalk system will encourage people to get around more on foot while shopping, which is healthier and could potentially reduce vehicular traffic. All sidewalks should be clearly marked as they cross over access drives, whether that be through demarcation or a differentiation in materials. This will help communicate that pedestrians have the right-of-way, while providing a visual reminder to automobiles to look out for pedestrians. The sidewalks shall be of standard, five foot width, and where possible connect to the new businesses in the Corridor. Though there will likely not be heavy pedestrian traffic through this corridor, there should still be safe pedestrian routes. 78 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Overhead Utilities The majority of utilities are located overhead on the Route 30 corridor, which detract from and clutter the streetscape. These lines should be buried if possible to enhance the aesthetic appeal of the Corridor and provide more flexibility for new streetscape designs. Overhead utilities, as illustrated in the adjacent picture, put restrictions on what size and type of trees can be planted, and diminish the impact of attractive lighting fixtures. Underground utilities allow the focus of a streetscape to be on the landscaping and lighting, which offers a more welcoming, attractive atmosphere. Collaboration with utility companies, as well as IDOT, shall be required prior to the burying of overhead utility lines. 79 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines KEY STREETSCAPE ELEMENT The Go Tane Gas Station The Go Tane Gas Station occupies a prominent corner in the Village of Plainfield, where IL Route 59 and U.S. Route 30 intersect. At this time, the old gas station is still intact, and consists of a convenience store and two gas pumping stations (shaded boxes in the diagram to the right). The Village of Plainfield has received approval for the demolition of the Go Tane Gas Station as well as the right to remove the underground gas tanks. Currently, traffic traveling north on Lincoln Highway does not have the option of turning left onto IL Route 59. The Village has identified the strong need to beautify this corner with attractive landscaping and entryway treatments once the Go Tane is removed. This will be done through use of water features, landscaping and a monument. Adjacent is an entryway monument in downtown Algonquin, Illinois. It contributes positively to the sense of place of Algonquin’s downtown, and has an enduring, timeless design. It is complemented by water features and attractive landscaping . Above is the approved IDOT draw ing for what improvements will be made at the IL Route 59 and U.S. Route 30 intersection. They will be creating a right turn lane for those traveling northbound in IL 59 so they are able to turn right onto Route 30. 80 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Go Tane Concept Plan A goal in urban design is to incorporate a focal point monument at significant street corners and traffic ovals to announce one’s arrival into a community. The intersection of IL Route 59 and U.S. Route 30 is a historically significant corner because both Lincoln HIghway and U.S. Route 66 passed through the area. Additionally, it is a corner with high visibility due to the large traffic volume this area of the Village accommodates. Both items combined provide a unique opportunity for an attractive gateway element to be employed. The adjacent, conceptual illustration outlines an option for enhancing the corner. The Village’s concept plan focuses on water features and a monument. It should also be noted that the Illinois Lincoln Highway Coalition, Illinois Route 66 Heritage Project and Historic Route 66 in Illinois - America’s Byway have conceptual plans for this corner as well. At this time, these groups’ plans focus more on signage and hardware elements versus anything monumental. The Concept Plan in these guidelines may be adjusted to incorporate various elements from the different Lincoln Highway and Route 66 groups’ plans, which is why no lighting, hardware or signage identifying these two historic routes is included. At the time of construction, details relating to the historic nature of the site shall be strongly encouraged. 81 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Attractive water feature to add a sense of movement/vibrancy to the street corner Clock tower backdrop to frame fountain and add character and sense of place to corner Landscaping added to enhance the natural features and add color to the site Brick pavers for aesthetic appeal and differentiation in material to promote the significant corner Concept Plan 82 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines CONCLUSIONS The U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines have been desi gned for the benefit of Plainfield, its residents and business community, and the region as a whole. They will enhance the character and sense of place of the Lincoln Highway Corridor while reconnec ting it to its historical past. As detailed throughout the document, the primary goal of these guidelines is to maintain an increased level of success for Lincoln Highway. Improving the existing co nditions of the Lincoln Highway corridor will create an attractive built environment, a vibrant natural environment, successful commercial districts and a healthy economy. Improving the area will reconnect visitors to the importance of the r oad, by sparking people’s imagination and fostering new growth. Lincoln Highway was originally created with the mindset that the journey is just as impo rtant as the destination. By creating an attractive and dynamic corridor, the Village will have created a place people seek out for their shopping, dining and other consumer needs. The improvements will solidify the Corridor’s reputation and welcome people into the Village of Plainfield. 83 U.S. Route 30 Corridor Enhancement Guidelines Thank You & References A History of Plainfield “Then and Now.” Reprinted by the Plainfield Hist orical Society by permission of the Plainfield Becentennial Commission, 1997. City of Tampa Florida : Hyde Park Guidelines, 71-78. Plainfield Historical Society. Plainfield: Postcard History Series . Timothy J. Smith and Michelle Y. Smith. Arcadia Publishing, 2007. Village of Orland Park. ‘New Construction in Old Orland Historic District.’ Village of Plainfield Comprehensive Plan : adopted May 2002, updated October 2005 Village of Plainfield Zoning Ordinance : adopted August 2006 85