Loading...
2015 Recruitment Brochure THE METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT The mission of MSD is to protect the public’s health, safety, and water environment by responsibly providing wastewater and stormwater management MSD offers career opportunities with one of the nation’s top sewer utilities as it continues a major capital improvement program to the region’s infrastructure. IMPROVE THE ENVIRONMENT— JOIN OUR TEAM THE ST. LOUIS REGION St. Louis has long been a destination for many: immigrants in search of a new life and economic prosperity; and explorers charting the unknown wilds of the frontier. These and the countless others who have journeyed through St. Louis have all added to the area’s rich diversity and made it one of the most dynamic regions in the nation. Modern metropolitan St. Louis, now home to 2.8 million people, encompasses 6,400 square miles and is one of the 20 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The St. Louis region’s economy is well diversified, with the agriculture, financial services, food and beverage, healthcare, military, biotechnology, plant sciences and telecommunications industries all having a significant presence in the area. Another integral part of the region’s economic vitality is the number of highly respected colleges and universities, including St. Louis University, the University of Missouri at St. Louis, and Washington University. These and other area educational institutions offer world renowned undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral programs . The arts, sports, and outdoor activities are all popular methods of recreation for both St. Louis area residents and visitors. Popular attractions include Forest Park, home of world class museums and the St. Louis Zoo. Fans pack Busch Stadium, the Edward Jones Dome, and the Scottrade Center to watch the St. Louis Cardinals, St. Louis Rams, and St. Louis Blues play. In addition, the St. Louis area is home to dozens of trails that provide plenty of opportunities for those who like to ride bikes, run, or walk . THE METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) functions as a special district, created under a provision of the Missouri State Constitution. MSD was formed to manage the sanitary sewers, storm sewers, combined sewers, and wastewater treatment plants that existed in St. Louis City and parts of St. Louis County prior to MSD’s creation in 1954. Before then, a menagerie of municipal and private sewer entities administered these functions. Lacking the legal authority and financial resources to properly manage these responsibilities, area residents realized that a more comprehensive framework was needed to address their public health and water pollution concerns. Thus in 1954, a vote authorized a charter for an agency that would manage needed capital construction programs, protect the areas sensitive watershed, and ensure high quality services to residents and businesses. That agency was MSD. MSD was formed on February 9, 1954, when voters approved the Plan of MSD. MSD began operation and maintenance activities in January 1956, in an area roughly composed of the City of St. Louis and the portion of St. Louis County east of Highway I-270. In 1977, residents in most of the remainder of St. Louis County voted in favor of annexation to MSD. Serving a population of approximately 1.3 million, MSD has more than 425,000 single-family residential, multi-family residential and commercial/industrial accounts. Currently, MSD’s boundaries cover 524 square miles and encompass all of the City of St. Louis and roughly 80% of St. Louis County, including 90 municipalities. MSD operates seven treatment plants, that combined treat an average of 370 million gallons of waste water per day. MSD is responsible for operating and maintaining 9649 miles of sewers. These include: 2,980 miles of storm water sewers; 4,741 miles of sanitary sewers; and 1,928 miles of combined sewers. The age of the sewers maintained by MSD range from over 150 years old to less than one year old. MSD’s fiscal year 2015 proposed expenditures include: an operating budget of $204.1 million; debt service of $66.7 million; and a capital improvement and replacement program of $284.2 million. For fiscal year 2015 starting July 1, 2014, MSD’s authorized work force numbered 987. The Mayor of St. Louis City and the St. Louis County Executive each appoint three trustees to a six-person Board of Trustees that governs MSD. The appointing process and powers of the trustees are laid out in MSD’s Charter (or Plan of the District ). All Trustees govern for a term of four years. No more than two of the three trustees from the city and the county each may be of the same political party, The Board of Trustees meets at least once per month and may meet more often by agreement. The Board has the power to appoint the Executive Director, the Secretary- Treasurer, the Internal Auditor, a Civil Service Commission, and a Rate Commission. The Board of Trustees has the authority to annex territory within St. Louis County and may annex additional territory by ordinance if a majority of the landowners in that territory petition the Board. The structure of the Board includes four committees: Audit, Finance, Program Management, and Stakeholders. CURRENT ISSUES The following issues are representative of the types of programs and projects currently being managed by MSD. To successfully address these issues, the District employs a variety of positions. Career paths exist in areas such as engineering, finance, maintenance, plant operations, and environmental compliance . INFRASTRUCTURE RENEWAL AND ENHANCEMENT During dry weather, MSD treats 100% of all wastewater at its treatment plants. However, throughout MSD’s service area, there are hundreds of points where a combination of rainwater and wastewater discharges into local waterways from the sewer system during moderate to heavy rainstorms. These sewer over- flow points act as relief valves when too much rainwater enters the sewer system, and without them, our community could experience thousands of basement backups and/or extensive street flooding. (Even with these overflow points, basement backups can number in the hundreds during particularly heavy rains.) Depending on where sewer overflows are located within MSD’s system, they are classified as combined sewer overflows, or constructed separate sewer overflows. Many of these overflows are a legacy of the way our wastewater systems were first built starting in the 1850s. In June 2007, the State of Missouri and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) filed a lawsuit against MSD over the status of these overflows. The State of Missouri and EPA were later joined by the Missouri Coalition for the Environment. Though most overflows predate MSD’s creation in 1954, they are still MSD’s responsibility and efforts to address the issue must be completed. The issue of overflows has been a significant focus of MSD’s work for many years. As an example, from 1992 to 2011, MSD spent approximately $2.5 billion to eliminate over 350 overflows. Today, MSD’s work to address the 350-plus sewer over-flows that remain continues in the form of a multi- decade, multi-billion dollar capital construction program that was begun in 2003. Different from past capital programs, our current effort is addressing our community’s wastewater collection and treatment capabilities on a system wide basis, rather than carrying out system improvements one section at a time. This program is a mammoth undertaking that will benefit St. Louis, and our environment, for generations to come. Beyond the issue of overflows, our wastewater system is also just old, with the oldest sections dating to the 1850s. For example, we still have sewers in downtown St. Louis that are partially made of wood. In St. Louis County, we have sewers that were installed decades ago using outdated practices. On average, sewer pipe is expected to last 100 years. That means every year MSD should be replacing at least 1% of its total sewer pipes. An agreement between MSD and EPA was finalized by the United States Court for the Eastern District of Missouri (Eastern Division) on April 27, 2012. The agreement, called a Consent Decree, stipulates that MSD spend $4.7 billion over 23 years to address sewer over- flows and other related issues that were the basis for the lawsuit that the State of Missouri and EPA filed against MSD in 2007. While the vast majority of this work will be out of sight, and, thus, out of the day-to- day thoughts of most St. Louisans, this agreement will be felt in our region for decades to come; from the creation of jobs, to the protection of our region’s waterways, to preventing basement backups, this agreement, and the resulting spending, will be unparalleled in terms of its scope and reach. STRATEGIC PLANNING MSD needs to anticipate the long range challenges that will result from population changes, economic expansion, petitions for annexation, and the introduction of new environmental protection laws and regulations. In order to do so, MSD has established performance standards to use as benchmarks in measuring efficiency. MSD constantly compares its cost of operations and maintenance with other municipalities and with private organizations. Such cost comparisons can be very useful in determining which functions can be performed more efficiently in-house and which operations should be contracted to external organizations. Strategic business planning efforts should also incorporate a broad cross section of opinions and information from a variety of stakeholders, including but not limited to; unions; business and governmental interests; environmental groups; ratepayers; and regulatory groups having an interest in MSD’s operations. DIVERSITY The stakeholders of MSD expect that qualified minorities, women, and persons with disabilities be given an opportunity to compete for MSD contracts and other work. Long-term efforts of development, funding educational and work skill programs, recruitment, and training are needed to sustain a qualified cadre of diverse personnel at all levels of the workforce. The Board and MSD leadership has agreed MSD must reflect the communities it serves. FINANCE Since 2003, MSD has utilized a combination of rate increases and bond issuances to finance its work to address overflows and rehabilitate our wastewater collection and treatment system. In July 2003, the average monthly single-family wastewater bill was $13.97. That same bill will gradually increase to $43.67 by July 1, 2015. Further rate increases are anticipated beyond 2015. As stated previously, the issuance or planned issuance of $1.72 billion in bonds have been used to minimize rate increases. Much like a home mortgage allows a large investment to be paid for over many years, the bonds have kept rates lower than they would have been had MSD used a “pay-as-you-go” approach. To issue bonds, MSD must receive approval from voters residing within its service area. In February 2004, 70% of voters approved the issuance of $500 million in bonds. In August 2008, 75% of voters approved the issuance of $275 million in bonds. In June 2012, 85% of voters approved the issuance of $945 million in bonds. As set through a public Rate Commission process, MSD expenditures from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2016, are scheduled to be capital projects valued at $972 million, $658 million for operational costs, and debt service of $312 million. The Rate Commission is an independent body within the MSD organization that reviews proposed rate increases. Composed of 15 member organizations representing a broad cross section of MSD customers and our St. Louis community, the Rate Commission utilizes a system based on many of the same procedures employed by the Missouri Public Service Commission and is meant to give the public a voice in setting MSD’s rates. The Rate Commission process includes multiple technical and public hearings where customers have an opportunity to provide feedback on rate proposals. The impact of the work associated with the Consent Decree with the EPA has increased the need for unprecedented levels of financial resources. MSD’s financial operation is responsible for the development of financial strategies and corresponding budgets, analyses and financial statements to support this effort. These strategic initiatives have increased the need for more aggressive collection of delinquent customer bills, the management of an increasingly sophisticated investment portfolio, increased scrutiny of MSD’s financial condition and greater financial statement of transparency for bond investors. Maintaining MSD’s current strong bond ratings has also become a greater importance as a means to minimize future rate increases necessary to meet MSD’s Consent Decree obligations. MSD SERVICE AREA MAP COMPENSATION & BENEFITS As a member of the MSD team, you will receive an attractive compensation and benefits package. Salary will be based on education, experience and overall qualifications. Below are some of the benefit programs MSD offers:  Medical & Dental Insurance – MSD pays 85% of employee only medical coverage and 75% toward the tier selection of dependent coverage. The District contributes $10 monthly towards dental insurance.  District paid Long-Term Disability plan.  District paid Life Insurance and Accidental Death & Dismemberment coverage of one times salary, with option to purchase additional coverage.  Spending Account for pre-tax payment for non-reimbursed medical, dental and child care expenses.  Vision Program – reimbursement up to $100 per fiscal year for the cost of employee or spouse prescription eyewear with a rollover to a maximum of $300.  Twelve Holidays.  Sick Leave accrual of 10 - 12 days per year, depending upon length of service, and there is no maximum accrual.  Paid Vacation accrual equivalent to two weeks after one year; three weeks at five years, four weeks at 10 years, and five weeks at 20 years.  Deferred Compensation Plan – a savings plan by which employees may begin a long-term savings plan on a tax-deferred basis.  A Defined Contribution Retirement Plan with vesting over 5 years at 20% each year.  Educational Assistance – A set amount is given per fiscal year for approved courses.  Flexible work schedules for certain job classifications. APPLICATION PROCESS For more information on positions and to apply on-line go to WWW.STLMSD.COM/ CAREERS Human Resources Department Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District 2350 Market Street St. Louis, MO 63103-2555 The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and values diversity at all levels of its workforce. For further information about MSD visit WWW.STLMSD.COM Quality Service Always