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2019 Annual Diversity ReportMETROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 1 DIVERSITYANNUAL REPORT FY2019 2 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 3 MSD’s AUTHENTIC COMMITMENT MSD’s Manager of Diversity Programs shares how a deep-rooted and authentic commitment to diversity is the foundation for MSD programs. 4| 5| 7| 8| 11| 12| 14| 16| 19| Please note data in the report is valid as of August 2019. As project documentation is finalized, precise numbers may fluctuate. Thank you for your interest in the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD). We are proud to provide you with the second Annual Diversity Report. After a banner year of successes, we have even more exciting diversity news to share for Fiscal Year 2019 (FY2019). In addition to tracking our diversity compliance statistics and program milestones, we launched our 2012 Disparity Study Update for the Capital Improvement and Replacement Program (CIRP). The Disparity Study looks at the statistics of ready, willing, and able minority- and women- owned business enterprises (M/WBEs) in our region as it relates to the awarding of contracts with MSD. The 2012 Disparity Study provided a baseline assessment of where we stood as a district. Now, we have implemented programs such as the Small Contractor Program with minimum requirements for small, minority, and women contractors ready to expand their capabilities for performing CIRP work. This year, our scholarship partnership with Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville (SIUE) was expanded to cover the full tuition cost, making the program even more appealing. Our commitment to diversity remains strong and we continue to reevaluate our progress. MSD is excited to highlight the strides made in FY2019, working to increase equity in the contracting and workforce community in the St. Louis region. We hope you find this report useful and informative. We welcome your comments and suggestions on how we might improve future reports to better inform you and meet your needs. BRIAN HOELSCHER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & CEO TABLE OF CONTENTS CULTIVATING A CULTURE 2019 DISPARITY STUDY UPDATE LEVELING THE PLAYING FIELD SMALL CONTRACTORS WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS THAT BUILD EDUCATION & INTERNSHIPS PARTNERING WITH MSD Maline Creek Storage FacilitySAK Construction 4 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 5 MSD Business Diversity Programs is a foundational imperative at MSD with an intent to fully optimize all efforts for continuous involvement with community-based partners to promote equity and equality in our region. In keeping with our mission to reflect diverse strategies in sup- port of a safe environment, it is no coincidence that transparency of in- formation is reflected in our commitment to deliver measurable results. MSD’s comprehensive workforce programs support the inclusion of minority and women workers on MSD projects to drive economic growth within the metropolitan St. Louis region. To further enhance concerted efforts, our workforce initiatives drive opportunities for career choices through diverse participation across all professions in the sewer utility industry. I am extremely pleased with the annual results from our fiscal year 2019 for the Capital Improvement and Replacement Program and other diversity programs. While inclusion exceeds policies and diversity reaches beyond metrics, the two are fundamental to building a genuinely diverse and inclusive workforce and supply chain. For this reason, measurable benchmarking of diversity programs helps MSD leaders to manage and develop meaningful efforts to improve our programs. To ensure consistent and meaningful oversight of program performance, this fiscal year is identified as a point when MSD will examine areas of prime and subcontractor performance by conducting an update disparity study for the next five-year period. We look forward to continuing our pursuit of authentic diversity and inclusion through community input and involvement as we address results of the disparity study in the coming year. SHONNAH PAREDES MANAGER OF DIVERSITY PROGRAMS SHONNAH PAREDES Manager of Diversity Programs LARRY WOODS Diversity Construction Supervisor SHEILA THOMAS Diversity Office Associate YULANDA BRADY M/WBE Compliance Specialist MIKAL HICKS M/WBE Compliance Specialist MARNITA SPIGHT M/WBE Compliance Specialist GARY FORD M/WBE Compliance Inspector JEREMY GRISBY M/WBE Compliance Inspector VANADA JOHNSON M/WBE Compliance Inspector DENISE JONES M/WBE Compliance Inspector TREINNEA RUSSELL-HARRIS M/WBE Compliance Inspector BRIAN WARD M/WBE Compliance Inspector DIVERSITY TEAM VISION Support an environment that promotes diversity and equality for all. MISSION Aid in efforts to continuously improve the health, safety, and water environment of our residents and ratepayers through business practices that represent a commitment to inclusivity and equality. CULTIVATING A CULTURE INTEGRITY Promote ethical behavior at all times. Treat others fairly and with respect. COMMUNITY Invest and reaffirm commitment to be involved with efforts that promote strategies that address challenges unmet. TEAMWORK Believe in working together to accomplish our mission through open communications, trust, respect, and diversity. INNOVATION Strive to continuously improve and embrace innovative ideas that help achieve excellence. EMPLOYEES Help everyone to reach their highest potential and value each person's contributions toward achieving inclusive success. CUSTOMERS Build resilient relationships by providing services and programs that are representative of the communities we serve. MSD’s diversity team encourages a culture that celebrates the expertise and perspective of diverse people. With a steadfast vision and a commitment to its core values, the diversity team diligently cultivates a workforce and environment reflective of the community it serves. 6 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 7 MSD CONDUCTSDISPARITY STUDY 2012 2013 STUDY RESULTS LEAD TO NEW GOALS FOR DIVERSITY PROGRAMS DISPARITYSTUDYFROM STUDY TO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT 2019 The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) is committed to cultivating a diverse workforce and developing programs to assist under-utilized minority- and women-owned firms. MSD continues to implement innovative programs and create capacity-building opportunities to help fulfill this commitment. In early 2019, MSD announced it would conduct an update to its 2012 Disparity Study. The initial study, which was completed a little over five years ago, became the catalyst for the expansive offering of initiatives now in place. The innovative programs and current policies include more inclusive contractor goals, worksite inspectors, on-the-job training, internships, community partnerships, and other programs. “These types of strategies remain a high priority, for us” said Shonnah Paredes, MSD’s manager for diversity programs. “We are revisiting and updating the original 2012 report in order to identify more opportunities to improve our programs.” The 2019 update will analyze MSD’s current diversity programs, practices, and results. The update will measure inclusion and availability as well as determine what advancements MSD has accomplished on projects in terms of workforce. Mason Tillman and Associates, a minority- and woman-owned firm, is conducting the update. The firm specializes in disparity studies and has conducted 30 percent of all disparity studies commissioned in the United States. “I commend MSD on conducting the initial study and now the update,” said Dr. Eleanor Ramsey, president of Mason Tillman. “MSD is committed to the community and is a good example of how analyzing the impact of a diversity program is important for economic growth in the community.” DISPARITY STUDY THEN & NOW 6 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT 2014 NEW GOALS LEAD TO STAFF GROWTH 2018 RECORD $85M WAS COMMITTED TO M/WBE’S IN CONSTRUCTION 2015/2016 LAUNCHED AUTOMATED REPORTING SYSTEM; ADDED WORKFORCE COMPLIANCE TRACKING 445 Active Contracts 264 Prime + Sub Vendors 24.3% M/WBE Particpation(Construction) 35.7% Workforce Participation(Construction) 40.4% M/WBE Participation(Pro-Services) 51.6% Workforce Particpation (Pro-Services) MSD CONDUCTS UPDATE TO 2012 DISPARITY STUDY 2019 150 contractors were trained to use MSD’s new diversity reporting system in 2015 as a way to self-report diversity participation. SEVEN M/WBE Construction Inspectors conduct real-time, on- site compliance monitoring reporting on all of MSD’s CIRP projects. FEBRUARY of 2019, MSD launched an update to its 2012 Disparity Study for its Capital Improvement and Replacement Program (CIRP). 8 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 9 FY2019: CIRP DESIGN UTILIZATION DESIGN CONTRACTS AWARDED: 11 TOTAL: $6,761,432TOTAL PAID TO PRIMES: $38,944,015 FY2019: DESIGN WORKFORCE UTILIZATION *Watershed contracts were amended to current workforce goals 37% WOMEN (goal: 32%) 36% 2018 33% 2017 33% 2016 16.5% 2019 MINORITY (goal: 18%) 16% 2018 15% 2017 18% 2016 M/WBE ACTIVECONTRACT PAYMENTS MBE$11,777,262WBE$3,846,540TOTAL$15,623,8029.8%40.1%30.2% M/WBECOMMITMENTS MBE$2,658,394WBE$698,987TOTAL$3,357,38139.3%10.3%49.6% WHAT MSD REPORTS ON Leveling the playing field for minority and women contractors and workers is an essential component of MSD’s Diversity Program. As the diversity construction supervisor, Larry Woods manages a staff of compliance inspectors who are responsible for monitoring construction inspectors for the Capital Improvement and Replacement LEVELING THE PLAYING FIELD LARRY WOODS DIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR Program (CIRP). His team also visits CIRP construction project sites to ensure MSD’s diversity requirements are being met by all prime and subcontractors. Woods enjoys helping develop MSD’s diversity training programs and initiatives. As a result, these programs cultivate an open and inclusive environment on CIRP projects. They also help level the playing field by providing opportunities for the community MSD serves. IMPACTFUL DIVERSITY “It is rewarding to hear the success sto- ries of minority and women contractors and workers who have elevated their businesses and careers by utilizing the re- sources MSD has available with its CIRP projects,” said Woods. Inclusion of peo- ple with various experiences, ethnicities, and orientations not only provides unique per- spectives and approaches to problem solving, it also fosters innovation in ways that can only be achieved through diverse collaboration. Woods said he has witness the direct impact of diversity on supply chains, employee retention, and the talent pool while working with MSD contractors. With so much development underway in the St. Louis area, diversity is the key to each project’s success as well as the re- gion’s success. Woods suggests all hands are needed on deck, including the prepa- ration and education of future hands. “By introducing youth to the many opportuni- ties in the construction industry, we hope to ensure there will always be a reliable source of ready talent,” he concluded. By introducing youth to the many opportunities in the construction industry, we hope to ensure there will always be a reliable source of ready talent. Larry Woods FY2019: DESIGN WORKFORCE UTILIZATION TOTAL DESIGN PROFESSIONALS WORKFORCE: 53.7% MSD reports on utilization for its various projects and types of work, most of which fall into the Capital Improvement and Replacement Program (CIRP). CIRP is a plan to fund capital expenditures to meet MSD’s capital needs each year. Maintaining, replacing, and/or expanding sewer infrastructure to meet regulatory requirements fall within MSD’s CIRP work. DESIGN This group encompass professionals who are responsible for a project’s planning and design. MSD tracks their utilization separately from other contractors. CONSTRUCTION These companies are responsible for the physical construction of projects. MSD puts a lot of effort into establishing and enforcing utilization goals with this group. SMALL CONTRACTOR PROGRAM This program is a pathway for smaller contractors and M/WBE firms to gain additional experience to bid as a prime contractor on CIRP work. 10 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 11 FY2019: SMALL CONTRACTORS PROGRAM 10 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT GREENSPACE FROM SOD TO SUB TO SMALL CONTRACTOR SMALL CONTRACTORS MSD’s Small Contractor Program helps small firms expand their capacity and gain experience in the sewer construction industry. These small projects (less than $25,000) have no bonding requirements, fewer up-front capital demands, and a bidding process that restricts the competition to like-sized firms. GREENSPACE Steve and his wife Diane Kelley started Greenspace 24 years ago. “I was an iron worker,” said Steve. “When I got laid off, I started cutting grass with a push lawn mower. I went back to work six months later and saved some money to buy a commercial mower during the next layoff. I never returned.” While working on a landscape and sod project for an MSD contractor, Steve took the initiative to ask about other opportunities to work with MSD. “I asked Vanada Johnson (MSD) about the Small Contractor Program and she gave me all the information I needed to move forward.” By 2018, Greenspace met the pre- qualification requirements and began working on small MSD contracts like replacing pipes and laying drain pipe for storm sewers. Now, Greenspace subcontracts on larger MSD projects, proving to be a dependable sub for MSD prime contractors. “The program’s given me the ability to purchase equipment and look for other opportunities to use the machinery I’ve acquired,” said Steve. He’s also hired an operator, and a licensed drain layer since last year. The Small Contractor Program is about strengthening small firms, including M/WBE contractors, that may not have the capacity to complete large-scale projects yet. The program opens doors for companies like Greenspace to gain experience and afford the equipment needed for larger projects. 392 MSD projects qualified for the small contractor program this year. 50% opportunity for M/WBEs on each small business bid. $25,000 maximum dollar amount is considered a small contract with MSD. FY2019 WORK ORDERS TOTAL PROGRAM WORK ORDERS: 392 TOTAL M/WBE WORK ORDERS: 145 FY2019 PROGRAM SPEND SANITARY IR - $2,629,536OMCI STORM - $912,511TOTAL - $4,638,380 M/WBE$907,356M/WBE$443,272TOTAL$1,605,20034.6%49%35% FY2019 M/WBE PARTICIPATION M/WBE DOLLARS M/WBE PERCENTAGE OF PROGRAM DOLLARS 30.8% 34.6%201720182019$1,605,200 $2,099,189 34.6% $1,605,200 12 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 13 Women account for only nine percent of construction industry-related jobs in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Because the significant deficit in overall female representation still exists in 2019, MSD continues its commitment to programming, policies and procedures that develop a diverse workforce. WOMEN INCONSTRUCTION DEBRA JARVIS & TRACY RODGERS MSD DIVISION INSPECTORS MSD employees Debra Jarvis and Tracy Rodgers are not only examples of women in construction at MSD, but also what the power of representation can achieve. DIVERSE THINKING As a division inspector for MSD’s Capital Construction Group, Debra Jarvis’ daily routine is anything but routine. The role’s spectrum of responsibilities include engaging with customers, contractors, and elected officials; and resolving construction issues with team members and homeowners. “I believe a diverse workforce is a stronger workforce,” Jarvis said. “Promoting diversity in thinking allows us to serve our customers better.” This value is one she’s experienced first-hand in her 19 years in the construction industry, and one she’s modeled in her four years at MSD. FIRST FEMALE INSPECTOR Tracy Rodgers’ career does not resemble a typical career path. When she joined MSD’s engineering department as an account associate 22 years ago, she did not envision a career in construction. As her interests evolved, her colleagues encouraged her to apply for a job as a construction inspector. In getting the job, she became the first female construction inspector at MSD. “Twenty years ago, only one other woman was applying for these types jobs,” Rodgers said. “Now, the numbers are higher, but we still have some work to do.” Today, Rodgers is an advocate for women in the trades, encouraging them to give the industry a try and mentoring them once they do. As a result of the mentorship she herself received, MSD programs, and her own skills, Rodgers has succeeded in a male-dominated industry. “It is important to be innovative and think outside the box to con- tinue to cultivate a diverse trades workforce,” she said. Representation matters. It is important for women to understand that work in the trades is an excellent opportunity for economic freedom. Tracy Rodgers FY2019: CIRP UTILIZATION FY2019: CIRP CONSTRUCTION UTILIZATION NINETY-THREENON-BUILDING(17% African American MBE) EIGHTSTATE FUNDED(10% mbe/10% wbe) FOURUNDER $50K(no goals) $121,545,171 TOTAL PAID TO PRIMES 101CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED M/WBE COMMITMENTS FY2019: CONSTRUCTION WORKFORCE UTILIZATION 39,179 HOURSBUILDING CONSTRUCTION goal: 30% MINORITY | 7% WOMEN 40% APPRENTICE (if used) 1,668,033 HOURSNON-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION goal: 30% MINORITY | 7% WOMEN 40% APPRENTICE (if used) 523,696 HOURSSTATE FUNDED goal: 14.7% MINORITY | 6.9% WOMEN 2,230,908 HOURSTOTAL WORKED *Workforce applies to construction contracts exceeding $500,000 **Workforce applies to State Funded Construction contracts exceeding $10,000 29.7%28.9%29.6%201720182019MINORITY - 29.7% HOURS - 663,448UNDER GOAL - 5,824 7.0% 4.1%6.0%201720182019WOMEN - 7.0% HOURS - 158,056OVER GOAL - 1,893 APPRENTICE - 71.1% HOURS - 103,766OVER GOAL - 25,837 M/WBE ACTIVE CONTRACTS TOTAL PAID TO PRIMES: $171,784,199MBE$19,038,821WBE$5,277,136TOTAL$24,315,95715.6%4.3%20%MBE$36,653,112WBE$14,183,523TOTAL$50,836,6358.2%29.6%21.3% 14 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 15 IT’S A DIRTY JOB BUD graduate Keesha Baldwin is a laborer apprentice at SAK Construction and is training to be a journeyman. As an apprentice, Baldwin ensures her crew is safe, supplies them with needed equipment and directs crane operators as they install sub-pumps in tunnels. “I am dirty all the time from my job, but people are amazed at what I do,” Baldwin said. She even considers the job her calling. “This job has been a life-altering experience for me. It is rewarding.” TUTOR TO TUNNELS As a graduate of BUD cohort 11, Saroya Fortune found herself on a new career path. Coming from the education field, she had no work- ing knowledge of tunneling or the requisite jargon the industry used, but her eager- ness and efforts catapulted her in a new direction. Today, Fortune works for Wil- liams Tunneling, a MBE subcon- tractor for SAK Construction on MSD’s Maline Creek Tunneling Project. From above ground, she ensures a safe environment for those working in the tunnels. She also works with concrete. “I never imagined I would be doing this type of work,” Fortune said. “But I am extremely thankful for the opportunity to provide for myself and my family.” Fortune is pursuing an American Concrete Institute certification. BUD LITE MSD’s new BUD Lite program is an expansion of the long established BUD program. BUD Lite targets high school juniors and seniors with an interest in the construction with the hope that they will someday lead the industry. PROGRAMS THAT BUILD The Contractor Loan Fund (CLF) is a coalition of partners investing in expanding the capacity of cer- tified minority- and women-owned businesses within the construction industry. MSD joined local govern- ment organizations, non-profits, and private sector businesses to develop a low-interest, revolving loan program to help M/WBE con- struction companies fund their operations before they may be eli- gible for traditional bank financing. Recently, one of the CLF borrowers won their first MSD bid as a prime contractor and plans to use their funds to complete their project. One way MSD keeps its capital program inclusive and representative of the St. Louis population is via the Community Benefits Agreement (CBA), a formal agreement with community organizations addressing diverse workforce participation, business development, and obstacles related to developing a diverse labor pool and contracting community. The CBA supports the development of initiatives that address these issues. The Workforce Development Grant Program, formerly the Building Union Diversity (BUD) program, targets and trains unemployed, underemployed, and interested job applicants for MSD contractors in need of qualified minority and women workers. CONTRACTOR LOAN FUND COMMUNITY BENEFITS AGREEMENTI am dirty all the time from my job, but people are amazed at what I do. This job has been a life-altering experience for me. It is rewarding. Keesha Baldwin 14 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 15 WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT GRANT PROGRAM BUD PARTNERS Associated General Contractors CWIT Employment Connections Epworth Father’s Support Center St. Vincent DePaul St. Louis Community Credit Union St. Louis County Workforce Development SLATE United Way CLF LOANS WORTH $10M GRANTED SINCE 2014 FIFTY CLF LOANS WORTH $3.5M OUTSTANDING IN 2019 TWENTY-FIVE CLF LOAN APPLICATIONS IN THE REVIEW PIPELINE TWELVE CBA SIGNATORIES Coalition of Black Trade Unionist CORE MCC Metropolitan Congregations United MOKAN M-SLICE NAACP City Branch NAACP County Branch National Society of Black Engineers Universal African Peoples Organization CLF COMMUNITY PARTNERS Associated General Contractors City of St. Louis Hispanic Chamber of Commerce justine PETERSEN Minority Business Council MOKAN NAACP National Society of Black Engineers Regional Union Construction Center St. Louis County St. Louis Development Corp St. Louis Economic Development Partnership Small Business & Technology Development Center Complete working group listed online: http://clfstl.org 16 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 17 MSD summer interns are a welcomed group of motivated, well-trained and talented high school and college students, who spend eight weeks learning and contributing to MSD’s many departments and programs. Local students are paired with companies like MSD through the St. Louis Internship Program (SLIP). DA’REZ YARBER As a sophomore at Illinois Wesleyan University, Da’Rez Yarber (pictured far right) is dedicated to his studies and to playing college football. He’s also a fourth-year summer intern at MSD. “SLIP came to our school, but at first I didn’t want to do it. I talked to my mom, grandma, and my football coaches about it because I didn’t want to miss practice. Since I was able to do it all, I thought, ‘why not explore my options?’” Once students graduate from high school, they must be invited to continue their internship with the employer during college. There was no hesitation inviting Yarber to return to the MSD internship program, where he has become a mentor to incoming interns. “I remember what it was like being in their shoes,” he said. “I know they’re learning a lot because I’ve learned a lot in the four years I’ve been here.” He also has changed his career path as a result. “I wanted to be a petroleum engineer,” Yarber said. “SLIP picked me to work at MSD, even though it didn’t have anything to do with engineering. Cyber security sounds fun now that I have been working here in Information Systems.” Yarber is now majoring in information technology and looks forward to returning next year and gaining more valuable experience that parallels his new career choice. DA’REZ YARBER FOURTH-YEAR INTERN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS SPONSORED FIVE Provides minorities and women with opportunities for education, internships, and employment within the wastewater and stormwater treatment plant industry. In 2019, MSD increased its allocation, awarding full-ride scholarships for the first time. EDUCATION & INTERNSHIPS ERTC SCHOLARSHIPS Generates interest in the sewer construction industry by inviting diverse high school students to participate in MSD internships. INTERNSHIP PROGRAM METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 17 PREVIOUS SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS NOW EMPLOYED AT MSD FULL-RIDE SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED FOR NEXT SCHOOL YEAR TWO TWO 18 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 19 PARTNERING WITH MSD CONTRACTOR RESOURCES ENGINEERING DESIGN Sharon Holt | (314) 768-6285 CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTING Lisa Treat | 314.768.6269 SMALL CONTRACTOR PROGRAM Michael Buechter | 314.768.2772 DIVERSITY PROGRAMS Shonnah Paredes | 314.768.6395 SUPPLIES & OTHER SERVICES Gina Jamison | 314.768.6314 ACCEPTABLE M/WBE CERTIFYING PARTNERS If your company is certified as a minority- or woman-owned business, or you wish to learn more about certification programs or how to become certified, visit stlmsd.com or contact Diversity Programs at 314.768.6395. Acceptable M/WBE certifying partners include: CITY OF ST. LOUIS flystl.diversitycompliance.com | 314.426.8111 MISSOURI STATE OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY oeo.mo.gov/oeo_certifications | 573.751.8130 As the clean water provider for the St. louis area, MSD is committed to doing its part to contribute to the continued economic growth of the communities in its service areas. The utility continuously seeks to identify certified minority- and women-owned businesses in the areas of engineering design, construction, and service and supplies contractors. MSD IN THE COMMUNITY The following events provide opportunity for people and companies to connect with MSD throughout the year. The dates are subject to change, so please check our website or call us for up-to- date times, dates, and places. JANUARY 2020 MSD Annual Design Industry Forecast Presentation FEBRUARY 2020 Site Improvement Association Infrastructure Expo APRIL 2020 MSD Annual Construction Capital Improvement and Replacement Program Presentation (2019 pictured lower left) ONGOING Diversity Fairs for Tunnel and Storage Facility Projects 20 | FY 2019 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT 2350 Market Street St. Louis, MO 63103-2555 314.768.6260 diversity@stlmsd.com stlmsd.com/diversity