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HomeMy Public PortalAbout14. School Resource Officer Framework and MOU with Claremont Unified School DistrictClaremont City Council Agenda Report File #: 4934 Item No: 14. TO: CLAREMONT CITY COUNCIL FROM: ADAM PIRRIE, CITY MANAGER DATE: NOVEMBER 28, 2023 Reviewed by: City Manager: AP SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION OF A SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER PROGRAM FRAMEWORK AND PROPOSED MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT AND THE CLAREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR A SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER POSITION (FUNDING SOURCE: GENERAL FUND) SUMMARY In September 2020, the City of Claremont Police Commission established an ad hoc committee to evaluate the School Resource Officer (SRO) position. The ad hoc committee facilitated the presentation of information regarding the SRO position to the Police Commission during seven public meetings over a nine -month period. Ultimately, the Commission voted to provide seven recommendations to the City Council. One of the Commission's recommendations, which City Council approved, was to "Establish and impanel a representative working group (e.g. City and school officials; Police Department representatives; El Roble Intermediate School, San Antonio and Claremont High School students; parents; and community leaders) tasked with reimagining school safety and mental health in Claremont schools, and designing a new program that reflects the needs of students, staff, and the community." After extensive discussion and mindful deliberation, members of the SRO Working Group created a framework for the SRO position and presented their recommendations to the City Council on September 27, 2022. The framework that was recommended by the SRO Working Group was approved by the City Council and was presented to the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education (BOE) on November 17, 2022 for its consideration; however, the BOE proposed several modifications to avoid redundancies and to clarify Claremont Unified School District's (CUSD) expectations of the SRO position. The proposed modifications can be found in Attachment B. CLAREMONT Page 1 of 5 Printed on 11/22/2023 Throughout the 2022-23 and 2023-24 school years, CUSD staff conducted additional outreach to their students regarding the SRO position, and presented a summary memo to the City, which can be found in Attachment A. Additionally, members of the City Council, the BOE, and City/CUSD staff met on October 30, 2023 to discuss the framework that was approved by the BOE (Attachment C) in November 2022, and agreed that the framework was reflective of the feedback that was provided by CUSD students. As such, staff recommends that the City Council consider the School Resource Officer Program Framework that has been approved by the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education, and that the City Council approve a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District for a School Resource Officer position. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends the City Council: A. Approve the School Resource Officer Program Framework that has been considered and approved by the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education; and B. Authorize the City Manager to execute a Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District for a School Resource Officer position and authorize the City Manager to make non -substantive changes as necessary. ALTERNATIVES TO RECOMMENDATION In addition to the recommendation, there are the following alternatives: A. Make modifications to the School Resource Officer Program Framework that has been approved by the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education for the BOE's consideration. B. Do not approve a Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School district for a School Resource Officer position. C. Request additional information. FINANCIAL REVIEW The School Resource Officer position is funded jointly by the City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District. The cost of the position for 2023-24 is $220,000, with the City and CUSD each contributing $110,000 to fund the position for the fiscal year. The staff cost to prepare this report is estimated at $628 and is included in the operating budgets of the Administrative Services and Police Departments. ANALYSIS Background In September 2020, the City of Claremont Police Commission established an ad hoc committee to evaluate the School Resource Officer position. The ad hoc committee facilitated the presentation of information regarding the SRO position to the Police Commission during seven public meetings over a nine -month period. Ultimately, the Commission voted to provide seven recommendations to the City Council. CLAREMONT Page 2 of 5 Printed on 11/22/2023 powered by LegistarT"^ One of the Commission's recommendations, which the City Council approved, was to "Establish and impanel a representative working group (e.g. City and school officials; Police Department representatives; El Roble Middle School, San Antonio and Claremont High School students; parents; and community leaders) tasked with reimagining school safety and mental health in Claremont schools, and designing a new program that reflects the needs of students, staff, and the community." Councilmember Jennifer Stark selected the SRO Working Group members, as the group formed during her term as Mayor. The SRO Working Group members she selected are as follows: Medina Collie Lynn King -Tolliver Rafik Mohamed Tyrone Newman Sophie Rivasplata The SRO Working Group members held several meetings between February and August 2022 to develop the recommendations before the City Council tonight. Katie Wand, Assistant to the City Manager for the City of Claremont, served as the Staff Liaison to the SRO Working Group, and Brittany Sornborger, Claremont Police School Resource Officer, participated in meetings to answer questions/provide information to the group members. At the request of the SRO Working Group members, during two of their meetings, CUSD staff members attended to answer questions from group members regarding CUSD's school safety/mental health resources, as well as to provide feedback on the Working Group's recommendations. After extensive discussion and mindful deliberation, members of the SRO Working Group created a framework for the SRO position and presented their recommendations to the City Council on September 27, 2022. The framework that was recommended by the SRO Working Group was approved by the City Council and was presented to the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education on November 17, 2022 for its consideration; however, the BOE proposed several modifications to avoid redundancies and to clarify Claremont Unified School District's expectations of the SRO position. The proposed modifications can be found in Attachment B. Current CUSD/SRO Student Outreach Efforts In light of the feedback and suggestions that the SRO Working Group provided in their proposed framework, during the 2022-23 and 2023-24 school years, CUSD staff conducted additional outreach to their students regarding the SRO position, and presented a summary memo to the City, which can be found in Attachment A. Highlights of their outreach efforts are as follows: • CUSD administration invited a diverse group of underrepresented students to attend a meeting to discuss the topic of the SRO data from a recent student survey, which found that 32 percent of the CHS students do not feel safer with an armed SRO on campus and 53 percent of Black/African American students do not feel safer with an armed SRO on campus. Approximately 14 students attended this meeting and represented student groups such as students from the Black Student Union, Hispanic Honor Society Club, and other students who are active in social justice groups. Participants provided feedback that was then reviewed with CUSD administration. The following is a summary of that meeting: o Students felt that if we want to help all students feel safe with the SRO on campus, it should start with getting the SRO more positively involved with activities and the school CLAREMONT Page 3 of 5 Printed on 11122/2023 powered by LegistarT"^ community. o Students stated they wanted to know more about who the SRO is on a personal level. They want to know about the training she has had to become an SRO and what her job duties include. o One student shared that back in December an article was published in the Wolfpacket about one of her friends that had a negative interaction with the SRO. The SRO allegedly made a derogatory comment to a CHS student. o Some students shared that the SRO is very officer oriented and not student oriented. o CUSD staff reported that the feeling in the room was clear - students would like an appropriate person to provide feedback to the SRO telling her to be more visible on campus, not just in front of the office or in the patrol car in the parking lot; have more positive interactions with students; and look less intimidating and closed off while on the Claremont High School (CHS) campus. • After the student meeting was held, CUSD administration shared the feedback with the SRO and then reconvened the same student group to meet with the SRO so that the SRO had an opportunity to answer students' questions and address the concerns they provided in the first meeting. CUSD staff then asked the student group for recommendations on how they could take this information and share it with the larger student body in an effort to try to make more students feel comfortable with the SRO. • When SRO Brittany Sornborger met with the student group, she introduced herself and talked about her family, hobbies, education, why she became a police officer, and why she wanted to be an SRO. Students asked her several questions about her role as an SRO. The students felt it was important that all students understand the SRO's role if they were attempting to make students feel more comfortable with her being on campus. The group came up with the following suggestions, which are being implemented: o Introduce the SRO and talk about her role during Freshman Link Crew Orientation. o Film two minute segments about her role as the SRO, her background, etc. that can be shown on Wolfcast. o At the end of each video segment, Officer Sornborger should let students know that she will be walking around campus with CUSD staff at lunch that day and encourage them to come up and introduce themselves to her. o Every trimester have her hold drop -in sessions during lunch where students can come talk to her, ask her questions, etc. • The February 2024 Student LCAP Survey will include another question about how students feel with the presence of the SRO on campus to determine whether these strategies have been effective in increasing the percentage of students who feel comfortable with an SRO on campus. Next Steps Members of the City Council (Mayor Ed Reece and Mayor Pro Tern Sal Medina), the BOE (President Kathy Archer and Vice President Bob Fass), and City/CUSD staff met on October 30, 2023 to discuss the framework that was approved by the BOE in November 2022. In this meeting, all parties agreed that the proposed framework (Attachment C) was reflective of the feedback that was provided by CUSD students as detailed in Attachment A. An important outcome of the work performed by the City's SRO Working Group is the development of a Memorandum of Understanding to guide the operation of the SRO program. Many of the Working Group's recommendations for the operation of the SRO program have been incorporated into the CLAREMONT Page 4 of 5 Printed on 11/22/2023 powered by LegistarT"^ proposed MOU. Previous to the formation of the Working Group, Claremont's SRO program was not governed by a guiding document or agreement that operationalized the SRO program or set parameters and expectations for the School Resource Officer's work on CUSD campuses. Further, the Education Code requires that a Memorandum of Understanding exist between a school district and a city for SRO services. Staff recommends that the City Council approve the framework presented with changes reflecting input received during CUSD's outreach to students and authorize the City Manager to enter into an MOU between the City and CUSD (Attachment D) for the SRO position to operate within the approved framework. The MOU would also be subject to approval by the CUSD Board of Education. As such, it is recommended that the City Council also authorize the City Manager to make non - substantive changes as needed. LEGAL REVIEW The proposed MOU for SRO services has been reviewed and approved as to form by the City Attorney. RELATIONSHIP TO CITY PLANNING DOCUMENTS Staff has evaluated the agenda item in relationship to the City's strategic and visioning documents and finds that it applies to the following City Planning Documents: Council Priorities, General Plan, 2022-24 Budget, and the Youth and Family Master Plan. CEQA REVIEW This item is not subject to environmental review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). PUBLIC NOTICE PROCESS The agenda and staff report for this item have been posted on the City website and distributed to interested parties. If you desire a copy, please contact the City Clerk's Office. Submitted by: Adam Pirrie City Manager Attachments: A - Memo from CUSD B - Track Changes Framework C - Clean Framework D - Draft SRO MOU Prepared by: Katie Wand Assistant to the City Manager CLAREMONT Page 5 of 5 Printed on 11/22/2023 powered by LegistarT"^ ATTACHMENT A CLARENOONT Claremont Unified School District 170 W. San Jose Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 Date: October 30, 2023 To: Adam Pirrie, City Manager From: Dr. James Elsasser, Superintendent of Schools RE: School Resource Officer (SRO) The purpose of this memorandum is to share with you what has been done to address the concern that some CHS students have shared regarding the presence of an SRO on campus. The following are updates that I have shared with the Board of Trustees regarding steps we have taken to address these concerns. Update written by Dr. Elsasser to the Board of Trustees - April 14, 2023 1 convened a diverse group of administrators to meet and brainstorm possible actions to address those students who feel less safe/unsafe, or threatened by the routine presence of the officer. That brainstorming session took place on March 23, 2023 and included Brad Cuff, Assistant Superintendent, Student Services; Dinah Felix, Assistant Superintendent, Business Services; Dr. Brett O'Connor, CHS Principal; Dr. James Mitchell, CHS Principal Elect; and me. By the end of that meeting, we had decided that D. O'Connor would convene a diverse group of underrepresented students to attend a meeting to discuss the topic of the SRO and the data from the recent student survey. During the meeting, the survey data would be used as the starting point of a conversation that would eventually include a brainstorming session on why certain students do not feel safer with an armed SRO on campus and what we could do to change that perception. We also decided it would be best if the meeting was facilitated by trusted CHS staff members rather than administrators. That meeting was scheduled for March 30 and was facilitated by Nikki Mitchell, CHS Counselor; Joseph Galindo, CHS teacher; and Ryan Easton, CHS teacher (and 2023 CUSD Teacher of the Year). Approximately 14 students attended this meeting and represented student groups such as students from the Black Student Union, Hispanic Honor Society Club, and other students who are active in social justice groups. The meeting began by staff sharing the purpose for the meeting followed by sharing the student survey results (administered in EXCELLENCE EQUITY INNOVATION INTEGRITY ATTACHMENT A February 2023) related to the SRO. After staff reviewed the survey data, students were asked the following three questions: 1. Share with the group why you think that 32% of the CHS students do NOT feel safer with an armed SRO on campus? 2. Why do you think 53% of Black/African American students do NOT feel safer with an armed SRO on campus? 3. The CUSD Board of Education and District Leadership have committed to continue having an armed SRO on campus. Per Claremont Police Department, SROs are required to be armed while on duty. Therefore, what can CUSD and CHS do to help all students feel safe with an armed SRO on campus? All participants were very interested in the subject and engaged in dialog with staff. They provided a lot of feedback that was then reviewed with CHS administrators and me. The following is a summary of some of the common themes that were expressed in the student feedback: • Students felt that if we want to help all students feel safe with the SRO on campus, it should start with getting the SRO more positively involved with activities and the school community. • Students stated they wanted to know more about who the SRO is on a personal level. They want to know about the training she has had to become an SRO and what her job duties include. • One student shared that back in December an article was published in the Wolfpacket about one of her friends that had a negative interaction with the SRO. The SRO allegedly made a derogatory comment to a CHS student. • Some students shared that the SRO is very officer oriented and not student oriented. Staff reported that the feeling in the room was clear - students would like an appropriate person to provide feedback to the SRO telling her to be more visible on campus, not just in front of the office or in the patrol car in the parking lot; have more positive interactions with students; and look less intimidating and closed off while on the CHS campus. As a next step, Dr. O'Connor is going to share this feedback with the SRO and then reconvene this same student group to meet with the same three trusted staff members and the SRO so that the SRO has an opportunity to answer students' questions and address the concerns they provided in the first meeting. Staff will then ask this group for recommendations on how we take this information and share it with the larger student body in an effort to try to make more students feel comfortable with the SRO. EXCELLENCE EQUITY INNOVATION INTEGRITY ATTACHMENT A Update written by Dr. Elsasser to the Board of Trustees - June 15, 2023 Dr. O'Connor called in the students who attended the March 30 meeting and informed them that he would like the same group of students along with the previous facilitators and Officer Sornborger so that Officer Sornborger could address the questions this group of students asked in their previous meeting. He also wanted to continue discussions with them on how they could share this news with all students across the campus with the goal of making all students feel more comfortable with the presence of an SRO on campus. That follow-up meeting took place on May 18. During that meeting, Officer Sornborger introduced herself and talked about her family, hobbies, education, why she became a police officer, and why she wanted to be an SRO. Students asked her several questions such as: • What are your job responsibilities and duties as the CHS SRO? • What training have you had to be an SRO? • Do you carry Narcan? • What tools do you have if you ever need to use force? • When would you use a gun on campus? • If you were out in front of the office, is there any reason you would contact a student without first contacting an administrator? • What training have you received on equity and inclusion? • Why do you stand in front of the office on some days? • Why don't you walk around campus? • What are you doing when you're sitting in your car in the parking lot? • If a student is involved in a conflict, when is that student allowed to use force to protect themselves? • When do you cite a student for drug possession? Both Officer Sornborger and Dr. O'Connor responded to all of those questions. The students felt it was important that all students understand the SRO's role if they were attempting to make students feel more comfortable with her being on campus. The group came up with the following suggestions: • Introduce the SRO and talk about her role during Freshman Link Crew Orientation • Film two minute segments about her role as the SRO, her background, etc. that can be shown on Wolfcast • At the end of each video segment Officer Sornborger should let students know that she will be walking around campus with Dr. Mitchell or one of the Assistant Principals at lunch that day and encourage them to come up and introduce themselves to her • Every trimester have her hold drop -in sessions during lunch where students can come talk to her, ask her questions, etc. Dr. Mitchell will work with Officer Sornborger and the CHS Assistant Principals to implement the suggestions above. The February 2024 Student LCAP Survey will EXCELLENCE EQUITY INNOVATION INTEGRITY ATTACHMENT A include another question about how students feel with the presence of the SRO on campus to determine whether these strategies have been effective in increasing the percentage of students who feel comfortable with an SRO on campus. Update written by Dr. Elsasser as of October 18, 2023 Per the suggestions above, the SRO did attend the Freshman Link Crew Orientation where she was introduced and given the opportunity to speak about herself and her role as SRO. She was also interviewed by the Wolfcast and that interview was shown on campus during September. CHS staff is working to implement the additional suggestions above throughout the remainder of this school year. EXCELLENCE EQUITY INNOVATION INTEGRITY ATTACHMENT B City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District School Resource Officer Program Framework The reimagining of the School Resource Officer (SRO) in Claremont Unified School District (CUSD) stresses the "resource" component rather than the "officer" component, l4itiRg thr` rr\19 ,-4 th., S.PQ in Gl@�' to Gl@�' G@R� PiSeGH rit i r v r r stir v The primary goal of school safety is to ensure structural, physical, and emotional safety on school campuses, so that students are able to thrive, benefit from their education, and reach their full potential. SRO and CUSD Roles — School S The SRO is responsible for: • Responding to discipline matters when police intervention is required by law due to suspected criminal activity. • Responding to calls for service on school campuses. • Serving as a law enforcement resource/consultant to school administrators, parents, teachers, and students. This includes regular engagement with CUSD administration for safety and emergency response matters. • If requested by CUSD, provide physical police presence on campus(es) if/when there is a threat to one of the school campuses • If requested by CUSD, providing relevant trainings and presentations for students, parents, CUSD School Board members, and CUSD staff members. Trainings may include: Active Shooter Training, Drug Awareness Updates, and other relevant trainings that CUSD deems fit. • If requested by CUSD, participating in campus drills to provide feedback school safety procedures (i.e. school lockdown). • Serving as a liaison between Claremont Police Department (CPD) and CUSD to ensure open communication/ information flow regarding community safety concerns. • Assisting CUSD staff with school -initiated special events where police security/assistance is requested by CUSD (i.e. football games, prom, graduation, Every 15 Minutes (exterior)). • Receiving relevant, on -going training , including: School Resource Officer; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI); Implicit Bias; Social Media; Child Abuse; ATTACHMENT B Sexual Abuse; etc. The SRO is asked to share some of these best practices with Claremont Police Officer colleagues. CUSD is responsible for: • Informing students, parents, and the SRO of health and safety resources and programs that are available to CUSD students, as defined by CUSD. • Enforcing school rules and associated discipline. Except in cases required by law, or involving a legitimate threat to school safety, the SRO is not at all involved in discipline matters. • Measuring SRO Program successes and failures, including tracking discipline cases where CUSD involves the SRO and how those cases are resolved. _a .. Staying abreast of best practices and current research regarding school safety. SRO Program Framework • The SRO Program Framework shall be reviewed on an annual basis by the City of Claremont and by CUSD. The review process will include the opportunity for students to provide anonymous feedback through the LCAP survey. The process will also include a review by the CUSD Equity Advisory Council, and a report made to the Board of Education. The review process may also include: an oral report from the SRO to the community during a City Council meeting, allowing public process, student involvement and community feedback; staff presentations to tl le C1 1S-Q C,-h. e-1 P-9- FG1 @RG11 r the Claremont Police Commission; fee`-h-A'''4 ('1 1S-Q S -hA I ('A-mmi++eLz; and/or other methods. • The SRO/CPD and CUSD collaborate to enhance preparation for and response to outside threats. ATTACHMENT B • To avoid disparate enforcement, all discipline matters involving students that rise to the level of criminal activity are referred to the SRO by CUSD. • The SRO in CUSD stresses the "resource" component rather than the "officer" component. A F, F,He" +"„ SQr, "-,r 14.FA0.+ � .r+ r-„-+iAR ,.,i+" r+,,, r+r �Se Rt- r_ri miviA1. Fe.e rr-�� T"e CD(1 r_r\e_r RA-t egg 1.�r��® pa t FA-1 t"e 4Pt P_ri r\r A- cr� C�T�� Cr0 C7T�� rrC fi OTQTI"��7'Cr'IT�TTT�CTITCCT��TOT ';PhAA' r�-�mv�i ir�r "i ii�rlirrrr• "r\�ei��i�r t"L-rP_ -Pr9 irirt-ivir_P_r, 'ei"P_rP r4991 R@�' riP_nr_ tA_ +"P_ SPQ_ iri A P-ri fr\ri-P_mP_Rt Fe F,P9RSe tr_ -A +"rP-�t to ri-"AA1 r�-�mv�__ T"ir R@�' Fe9Hir9 TI�FJ�TTSCT-QT�7mTCC • The SRO responds to calls for service at CUSD campuses, @RGI �r +" • Discipline matters that involve suspected criminal activity are referred to the SRO by school administration. 1P +" rr_-_Ases, ppiep to GA_.R4_AGt.Rg t"e SRQ +"P ri^"r\r\� firr+ i^r\vi rli ir^tr -PRrs-t ir-�ri @RGI t4eS apff9ffiate The SRO is a resource to CUSD administration in the following ways: • Reviews School Site Safety Plans for each CUSD campus, as well as any district wide policies/procedures pertaining to emergency preparedness, and provide feedback as needed. • Supports CUSD staff, including mental health professionals and campus proctors, when requested by CUSD. • Attends the Student Attendance Review Board (SARB) and other school district meetings, as required or requested by CUSD. • Serves as a law enforcement liaison to CUSD's District Wide Trauma/Crisis Response Team. The SRO is a resource to CUSD students and parents in the following ways: • In addition to responding to calls for service on school campuses, conducting regular patrol near campuses, and providing relevant training(s), the SRO is available to students and/or parents who wish to independently contact CPD to report criminal activity and/or seek advice from law enforcement. ATTACHMENT B DIV =.=: . W.1 . M.M.- M. . W- 1.1 • CUSD and the SRO should work together to identify ways that parents can effectively contribute to school safety, with the understanding that student needs and feedback should be prioritized. m�w�xw psi �wrwr�w�i�w uareurr� � ATTACHMENT C City of Claremont and the Claremont Unified School District School Resource Officer Program Framework (As approved by the CUSD Board of Education on November 17, 2022) The reimagining of the School Resource Officer (SRO) in Claremont Unified School District (CUSD) stresses the "resource" component rather than the "officer" component. The primary goal of school safety is to ensure structural, physical, and emotional safety on school campuses so that students are able to thrive, benefit from their education, and reach their full potential. SRO and CUSD Roles — School S The SRO is responsible for: • Responding to discipline matters when police intervention is required by law due to suspected criminal activity. • Responding to calls for service on school campuses. • Serving as a law enforcement resource/consultant to school administrators, parents, teachers, and students. This includes regular engagement with CUSD administration for safety and emergency response matters. • If requested by CUSD, provide physical police presence on campus(es) if/when there is a threat to one of the school campuses • If requested by CUSD, providing relevant trainings and presentations for students, parents, CUSD School Board members, and CUSD staff members. Trainings may include Active Shooter Training, Drug Awareness Updates, and other relevant trainings that CUSD deems fit. • If requested by CUSD, participating in campus drills to provide feedback on school safety procedures (i.e., school lockdown). • Serving as a liaison between Claremont Police Department (CPD) and CUSD to ensure open communication/information flow regarding community safety concerns. • Assisting CUSD staff with school -initiated special events where police security/assistance is requested by CUSD (i.e., football games, prom, graduation, Every 15 Minutes (exterior)). • Receiving relevant, ongoing training, including: School Resource Officer; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI); Implicit Bias; Social Media; Child Abuse; Page 1 1 ATTACHMENT C Sexual Abuse; etc. The SRO is asked to share some of these best practices with Claremont Police Officer colleagues. CUSD is responsible for: • Informing students, parents, and the SRO of health and safety resources and programs that are available to CUSD students, as defined by CUSD. • Enforcing school rules and associated discipline. Except in cases required by law, or involving a legitimate threat to school safety, the SRO is not at all involved in discipline matters. • Measuring SRO Program successes and failures, including tracking discipline cases where CUSD involves the SRO and how those cases are resolved. • Staying abreast of best practices and current research regarding school safety. SRO Program Framework • The SRO Program Framework shall be reviewed on an annual basis by the City of Claremont and by CUSD. The review process will include the opportunity for students to provide anonymous feedback through the LCAP survey. The process will also include a review by the CUSD Equity Advisory Council, and a report made to the Board of Education. The review process may also include: an oral report from the SRO to the community during a City Council meeting, allowing public process, student involvement, and community feedback; staff presentations to the Claremont Police Commission; and/or other methods. • The SRO/CPD and CUSD collaborate to enhance preparation for and response to outside threats. • To avoid disparate enforcement, all discipline matters involving students that rise to the level of criminal activity are referred to the SRO by CUSD. • The SRO in CUSD stresses the "resource" component rather than the "officer" component. • The SRO responds to calls for service and is present at CUSD campuses. • Discipline matters that involve suspected criminal activity are referred to the SRO by school administration. The SRO is a resource to CUSD administration in the following ways: Page 1 2 ATTACHMENT C • Reviews School Site Safety Plans for each CUSD campus, as well as any district -wide policies/procedures pertaining to emergency preparedness, and provide feedback as needed. • Supports CUSD staff, including mental health professionals and campus proctors, when requested by CUSD. • Attends the Student Attendance Review Board (SARB) and other school district meetings, as required or requested by CUSD. • Serves as a law enforcement liaison to CUSD's District Wide Trauma/Crisis Response Team. The SRO is a resource to CUSD students and parents in the following ways: • In addition to responding to calls for service on school campuses and providing relevant training(s), the SRO is available to students and/or parents who wish to independently contact CPD to report criminal activity and/or seek advice from law enforcement. • CUSD and the SRO should work together to identify ways that parents can effectively contribute to school safety, with the understanding that student needs and feedback should be prioritized. Board Adoption: 1111712022 Page 1 3 ATTACHMENT D MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT AND CLAREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR A SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER This Memorandum of Understanding entered into by the City of Claremont ("City") and the Claremont Unified School District ("District") or ("CUSD") is for the purpose of providing a School Resource Officer ("SRO"), for a term of July 1, 2023 through June 30, 2026. The City will provide one (1) sworn law enforcement officer (Claremont Police Officer) to act as the SRO. The officer will be selected by the Chief of Police and approved by the District Superintendent or his/her/their designee. The SRO will remain an employee of the City (Claremont Police Department). The Claremont Police Officers' Association (CPOA) has exclusive representation over the position of "Police Officer" and as such, all wages, hours, and working conditions are defined in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the City of Claremont and the CPOA. During the school year, the District will fund one-half of the salary and benefits of the SRO. The City will fund the remaining salary, benefits, overtime costs, and all equipment costs. The District will be billed by the City semi-annually for the SRO, for an amount not -to -exceed $200,000 for each school year. During periods when schools are on break, the SRO will be deployed back into police patrol operations for the City. BACKGROUND In September 2020, the City of Claremont Police Commission established an Ad -Hoc committee to evaluate the School Resource Officer (SRO) position. The Ad -Hoc committee facilitated the presentation of information regarding the SRO position to the Police Commission during seven public meetings over a nine -month period. Ultimately, the Commission voted to provide seven recommendations to the City Council. One of the Commission's recommendations, which City Council approved, was to: "Establish and impanel a representative working group (e.g. City and school officials; Police Department representatives; El Roble Intermediate School, San Antonio and Claremont High School students; parents; and community leaders) tasked with reimagining school safety and mental health in Claremont schools, and designing a new program that reflects the needs of students, staff, and the community." After extensive discussion and mindful deliberation, members of the SRO Working Group created a framework for the SRO position and presented their recommendations to the Claremont City Council. The framework that was recommended by the SRO Working Group and approved by the City Council on September 27, 2022 was presented to the CUSD Board of Education (BOE) on November 17, 2022; however, the BOE proposed several modifications. Throughout school years 2022-23 and 2023-24, CUSD staff conducted additional outreach to their students regarding the SRO position, and this information as well as the revised proposed framework was presented to the City Council on November 28, 2023. The framework that was ultimately approved is attached as Exhibit B. GOALS AND OBIECTIVE The primary goal of the School Resource Officer (SRO) is to collaborate with Claremont Unified School District (CUSD) staff and resources to ensure structural, physical, and emotional safety on school campuses, so that students are able to thrive, benefit from their education, and reach their full potential. The SRO position stresses the "resource" component rather than the "officer" component. The SRO will work with CUSD staff to reduce and prevent criminal activity; counsel and advise school staff on important safety issues; and be available as a law enforcement resource to parents and students. The SRO shall take law enforcement action as required. As soon as practical, and when legally permissible, the SRO shall make the superintendent/principal of the school aware of such action. At the superintendent's/principal's request, the SRO may take appropriate law enforcement action against intruders and unwanted visitors who may appear at the school related school functions, to the extent the SRO may do so under the authority of the law. The SRO will work four (4) days a week, ten (10) hours a day. The SRO will coordinate activities with CUSD administration, and will seek permission, guidance, and advice prior to enacting any program within the schools. The SRO will seek District and school input before any activity other than individualized police action is enabled. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Primary duties and responsibilities of the SRO include: • Responding to discipline matters when police intervention is required by law due to suspected criminal activity. • Responding to calls for service on school campuses. • Serving as a law enforcement resource/consultant to school administrators, parents, teachers, and students. This includes regular engagement with CUSD administration for safety and emergency response matters. • If requested by CUSD, provide physical police presence on campus(es) if/when there is a threat to one of the school campuses. • If requested by CUSD, providing relevant trainings and presentations for students, parents, CUSD School Board members, and CUSD staff members. • If requested by CUSD, participating in campus drills to provide feedback school safety procedures (i.e. school lockdown). • Serving as a liaison between Claremont Police Department (CPD) and CUSD to ensure open communication/ information flow regarding community safety concerns. This may include developing plans and strategies to prevent and/or minimize dangerous situations. • Assisting CUSD staff with school -initiated special events where police security/assistance is requested by CUSD (i.e. football games, prom, graduation, Every 15 Minutes). • Receiving relevant, on -going training, including: School Resource Officer; Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI); Implicit Bias; Social Media; Child Abuse; Sexual Abuse; etc. Primary duties and responsibilities of CUSD include: • Informing students, parents, and the SRO of health and safety resources and programs that are available to CUSD students, as defined by CUSD in Exhibit A. • Enforcing school rules and associated discipline. Except in cases required by law, or involving a legitimate threat to school safety, the SRO is not at all involved in discipline matters. • Measuring SRO Program successes and failures, including tracking discipline cases where CUSD involves the SRO and how those cases are resolved. • Staying abreast of best practices and current research regarding school safety. PROGRAM EVALUATION • The SRO Program Framework shall be reviewed on an annual basis by the City of Claremont and by CUSD. The review process will include the opportunity for students to provide anonymous feedback through the LCAP survey. • CUSD, the SRO, and School Safety Committees or School Site Counsels will provide regular input on school safety. These groups will work together to identify ways that parents can effectively contribute to school safety, with the understanding that student needs and feedback should be prioritized. • The City and CUSD cannot guarantee any specific outcomes related to the presence of an SRO on District property, including the prevention of criminal activity on District property or at District events. CONTINUATION The DISTRICT and CITY may continue and renew this program by mutual written agreement. TERMINATION The DISTRICT or CITY may terminate this AGREEMENT without cause anytime after the Effective Date, by giving a forty five (45) day written notice to the other party. In the event of termination, DISTRICT shall compensate CITY for services performed to the date of termination. CITY shall continue to provide services after notice to terminate and during the forty five (45) day notice period unless DISTRICT, in the notice, requests CITY not perform services. The notice shall be deemed given when personally delivered to the DISTRICT or CITY representative. INDEMNIFICATION District Obligations - DISTRICT agrees to defend, indemnify and hold CITY, its elected and appointed officials, officers, and employees harmless against and from any and all losses, claims, actions, damages, expenses or liabilities, including reasonable attorney's fees, arising out of or in any way connected with the District's negligent performance of this Agreement. DISTRICT assumes workers' compensation liability for injury or death of its officers, agents, employees and volunteers, and assumes no workers' compensation responsibility for the elected and appointed officials, officers, and employees of the CITY. City's Obligations - CITY agrees to defend, indemnify and hold DISTRICT, its officers, agent, employees and volunteers harmless against and from any and all losses, claims, actions, damages, expenses or liabilities, including reasonable attorney's fees, arising out of or in any way connected with City's negligent performance of this Agreement. CITY assumes workers' compensation liability for injury or death of its elected and appointed officials, officers, and employees, and assumes no workers' compensation responsibility for the officers, agents, employees and volunteers of the DISTRICT. ASSIGNMENT This AGREEMENT may not be assigned or transferred by either Party without the express written consent of the other Party. NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARY This AGREEMENT, including, but not limited to the indemnification provisions, is for the benefit of the Parties only and does not create, nor is it intended to create, any benefit or liability to third parties. IN WITNESS THEREOF, the Parties have caused this Memorandum of Understanding to be executed: City of Claremont: G1»:ZI��/ City Manager Rutan & Tucker, LLP City Attorney Date Claremont Unified School District: Superintendent Date Date EXHIBIT A - HEALTH AND SAFETY RESOURCES AND PROGRAMS PROVIDED BY CUSD FOR CUSDSTUDENTS District and School site Safety Committees • Comprehensive School Safety Plans • Disaster Drills o Earthquake o Fire o Lockdown Anonymous Reporting with STOP -IT Raptor Visitor Volunteer Management System • Scans against the National Sex Offender Registry • Collects Name and Date of Birth • Prints a Visitor ID Badge Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) • Each school has a tiered behavioral framework for all students • 7 elementary schools - Platinum state recognition • 3 secondary schools - Gold state recognition Social Emotional Learning (SELL • Secondary schools utilize Homeroom for SEL lessons • Elementary Programs o RULER - 3 elementary schools o Second Step - 2 elementary schools Mental Health Team • 9 Secondary School Counselors • 4 Licensed Therapists that provide counseling to students and supervise counseling interns • 16 Masters -Level Student Interns that work under the direct supervision of a CUSD licensed therapist • Partnership with Tri-City Mental Health • Employee -Assistance Service and Education (EASE) • Care Solace Elementary School Program • A School Psychologist assigned to each school site to provide counseling to special education students, consultation with school staff, and psycho educational assessment when appropriate • A Licensed Therapist provides counseling to students and supervises elementary interns/trainees • An elementary school counseling intern/trainee provides group counseling and clinical care to students Secondary School Program • Counselors provide support to all students • Licensed therapists provide counseling to students and supervise secondary interns/trainees • Interns/trainees provide therapeutic support to general education students • School psychologists provide counseling to students in special education and complete psychoeducational assessments • Tri-City Mental Health supports SAHS students and are on campus one day a week EXHIBIT B - PENDING CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL