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Borden, Sheepherder Billgi7 by Roxanna Allen What's in a name? Well, when you have a name like "Three -Finger" Smith, "Sheepherder" Bill Borden or "Hard Rock" Elliot there's got to be an interesting story somewhere in your life. Especially if your life was spent in the early unsettled days of this country. "three -Finger" Smith's life was filled with adventures that you would never see on the late show. The story of how he lost his fingers was told by his son Henry and taken from Rafe Gibbs book, "Beckoning the Bold". "It seems that the father's muzzle -loading ' shotgun accidentally fired while he was talking to a friend" the book reads. "He happened to have both hands cupped over the barrel, and the shot blew off the middle two fingers of each hand. `Three -Fingered' Smith always shied away from admitting the facts because he believed that no man should be careless with a gun." Smith was the lone survivor of the,Indian battle that took place at the Cascade Falls on the Payette River near the present town of Cascade. Will Munday, Tom Healy, and Jake Groselose were not as lucky. They are buried at the site. Smith was wounded and traveled 30 miles, finally reaching Cal White's mail station at Little Salmon Meadows (old Meadows now). There he recover- ed, but remained badly crippled from his wounds. Smith made a rich strike at Florence and a story is told that after the strike he took off to Warren, where he proceeded to buy a sal+eon and declare that "drinks were on the house". And, of course, being that the "drinks were on the house" he'd have a few himself. How many saloons he bought is not known, but it was said that in a hundred nights he went through a $100,000 and ended up broke. He finally made his home at his ranch at the mouth of Elk Creek and spent the remainder of his life there. William "Sheepherder Bill" Borden claimed he was a descendent of the famous Borden milk Spawning grounds Their strange names fit their lives t products family. He lived in a cabin at the mouth of Porphyry Creek, where he always raised a fine garden. A well-educated man that had a weakness for drink, "Sheepherder" Bill bade several stakes and would proceed to drink up, all of his profits. Whiskey would prove to be the ruin of, ".'Sheepherder" Bill. He was burned in his cabin when his whiskey still blew up, or so it was supposed when the burned cabin was discovered. Ernest "Hard Rock" Elliot,, a packer for the mines, would go to Warren to celebrate Labor Day. He would arrive with a long string of horses, some loaded with whiskey, and a horse or two to ride. He would unload at Missouri George's cabin and put his horses out to pasture on Warren Meadows. And then he would proceed to celebrate. There would be about a week-long spree of drinking with his buddies, which they would call "hanging one on". After that it would be out of the system and back to packing. "Cougar" Dave Lewis was a government packer and scout during the Sheepeater Cam- paign. He was at the battle of Soldiers Bar and was instrumental in having the monument placed at Private Harry Engen's grave site there in about 1925. After the Indian wars, "Cougar" Dave stayed in the Big Creek country with his guns and dogs, hunting cougar for a living. At the age of 93 he arose at his usual early hour and had a bit of breakfast. He didn't feel quite up to par, so he hiked out of the canyon and had a friend take him to Boise. He died the next day. Sylvan "Buckskin Billy" Hart is a nationally known inhabitant of the Salmon River country. He is a master craftsman of many arts, including hand -hammered copper cooking utensils, hand- made knives and guns, the tanning and sewing of his buckskin garments, and the preserving of his own food stuff.