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McCoy FamilyDescendants of James F. McCoy 1 James F. McCoy 1815 - 1884 +Sylvia Elizabeth "Eliza" Johns 1837 - 1910 2 James H. McCoy 2 Janetta McCoy 2 Varena McCoy 2 Mary Ann McCoy 2 John B. McCoy 1862 - 2 Archie Agustus "Bert" ,McCoy 1872 - +Jennie Avery 1885 - 3 Eva Agusta McCoy 1904 - 3 Archie Gilbert "Gill" McCoy 1905 - 1964 +Blanche Willey 1905 - 1995 4 Betty McCoy 1927 - 4 Bob McCoy 1929 - 4 colleen "Babe" McCoy 1931 - 4 Joe McCoy 1939 - 3 Leslie James McCoy 1907 - 1960 +Thelma Collins 4 Thelma Patricia McCoy *2nd Wife of Leslie James McCoy: +Mary Willey 4 Eugene Leslie McCoy 1933 - 3 Ina Evelyn McCoy 1909 - 1911 3 Verna Luella McCoy 1911 - 1995 +Jim Scovel *2nd Husband of Vema Luella McCoy: +Ivan Lee Evans 4 Gerald Lee Evans Evans 1931 - 4 Verna Jean Evans 1933 - 3 George Henry McCoy 1913 - 1964 +Doris McFarland 4 John Walter McCoy 1938 - 4 Judith Lynn McCoy 1948 - 3 Myson.Burdett McCoy 1915 - 1991 +Aloha Beck 1920 - 4 James Burdett McCoy 1947 - 3 William Morris McCoy 1923-1931 2 Walter S. McCoy 1878 - 2 Katherine Elmira Elizabeth McCoy 1880 - 1956 +Beck 3 Elizabeth Beck 3 William Beck THE McCOY FAMILY OF YELLOW PINE, IDAHO The McCoy Family Beginnings The McCoy family, of Yellow Pine fame, was started by one James F. McCoy, born in Tennessee in 1815. He went to California during the gold rush days with his young wife Eliza and there started his family. From the California gold fields he worked in various localities in the desert triangle of northeast California, Neva- da, and southern Oregon as a horseman -cowboy until his death in Drews Valley, Oregon, in 1884. Four of his eight children had married and gone in different directions at the time of his death: James H. McCoy, and his sisters Janetta, Verena, and Mary Ann. The senior unmarried son, John B. McCoy, apparently became the leader of the remnant family which consisted of: John B. McCoy, born 1862, Millville CA Archie Augustus McCoy, born Jan 11, 1872, Susanville CA Walter S. McCoy, born April 3, 1878, Clover Valley (Elko County) NV Katherine Elmira Elizabeth McCoy, born Sep 23, 1880, Clover Valley NV Sylvia Elizabeth "Eliza" Johns McCoy, born 1837, their widowed mother In 1888, John was working in Bruneau, Idaho, in the Owyhee County desert. He worked for the Wilkins Horse Company, the largest horse company in Idaho, with over 4000 head of horses. Owner Kitty Wilkins (1879-1936), was known as the "Horse Queen of Idaho." (Owyhee Cattlemen, 1979:33) In the 1900 census, Elizabeth, John, Archie, and Katherine were recorded in the Meeteetse, Wyoming census. Katherine was listed as Katie Beck, living with her mother and brothers, and had a newborn daughter that was not named. They lived in the household adjacent to Verena McCoy Baldwin. Archie (Bert) McCoy, the family leader Archie McCoy hated his name so was called Bert by his family and friends. He left the family group at an early age to work in the mines at Butte, Montana. He then returned to range work at the ranch of his older sister, Verena McCoy Bald- win (1862-1935), on the Greybull River north of Meeteetse, Wyoming. It was there that Bert met and married Jennie Avery in July 1903. Jennie was born in Ulysses, Pennsylvania, on January 31, 1885, and had come by covered wagon to Wyoming as a young girl. The newly married couple went to California where their first child, Eva Augusta, was born at Cedarville on July 7, 1904. They moved again a short time later to Paradise Valley, near Elko, Nevada, where their first son, Archie Gilbert McCoy, who became known as Gill McCoy, was born on October 25, 1905. Bert and family continued to move frequently, and the rest of his children were born at various localities in Idaho: son Leslie James McCoy, who became known as "Whitey," was born on May 11, 1907, at Avery; and two daughters born at Bruneau, Ina Evelyn McCoy, born June 25, 1909, and Verna Luella McCoy, born January 21, 1911. (Aloha McCoy, letter Nov 7, 1995) 1 The Bert McCoy family rejoined the other McCoy family members in Bruneau, Idaho, in the spring of 1909. In the 1910 census they were shown living in two adjacent households. The elder brother, John McCoy was noted as head of one household, still unmarried, and living with him was his youngest sister, Kate, and her two children. Katie's children were named in the census as Elizabeth Beck, age 7, and William Beck, age 5. Bert McCoy's household included, in addition to his wife and children noted above, his older brother Walter, and their aging mother Eliza (her name was listed as Sarah on the census). Eliza Johns McCoy died later that same year in Bruneau, at age 73, on November 27, 1910. Early the following year Bert and Jennie's daughter, Verna Luella McCoy, was born in Bruneau on January 11, 1911; but their daughter Ina Evelyn died on August 19, 19'11, of a congenital heart problem and was buried in the Owyhee desert. Their youngest sons were born north of Bruneau at Mountain Home: George Henry McCoy on March 1, 1913, and Myron Burdett McCoy on April 19, 1915; Myron became known as `Buster" to his family. The McCoy Brothers, Owyhee Desert Horse Wranglers The McCoy brothers were working as horse wranglers in the Bruneau-Mountain Home area at the close of World War I in 1918. Around that time the horse busi- ness began a very rapid decline, due to the increasing use of automotive power, noted by the Owyhee County historian Mildretta Adams (Owyhee Cattlemen, 1979:13). The decline in the horse business probably led the McCoys to begin searching for other venues of work. In 1918 E3ert McCoy left his family in Mountain Home and went north to Valley County to seek work. He worked as a logger in the vicinity of Cascade, Idaho, and drove a freight wagon carrying supplies to the small community of Yellow Pine, 62 miles east of Cascade. Bert also worked at the mines around Yellow Pine, wherever there was a job. Bert was settled in Yellow Pine when he sent for his family in the spring of 1919. His wife Jennie loaded all oftheir belongings into their wagon and headed north with the younger children, leaving Gill and Whitey behind with other McCoys. Jennie drove the four -horse team as far as Horseshoe Bend where Bert met her and drove the wagon the remaining distance to Yellow Pine. Bert and his family were met and befriended by store -keeper Albert Behne, who helped them establish their home in Yellow Pine. (Aloha McCoy, Jan 1980) In the late spring of 1919, a short time after Bert and Jennie arrived in Yellow Pine, the rest of the McCoy clan, led by brothers John and Walter, rounded up about 100 head of horses, not belonging to them, from the Owyhee Desert and drove them to Yellow Pine. Horse thievery was not new to the McCoys, as noted in the Owyhee Avalanche, November 23, 1917: "Sheriff Charlie Rogers returned Tuesday from a four day trip to the Bull Basin Country in the southwestern part of the county where he went to 2 arrest Walt McCoy, charged with altering brands. Despite the wild stories afloat over the county as the ability and willingness of McCoy to use a gun if necessary, Charlie experienced no trouble in landing his man here, but admits he kept his weather eye open during the homeward trip." Also, Ambros Maher, a rancher on the Owyhee River, noted in his diary on April 18, 1918: "Charlie Rogers is here tonight on his way back from across the river after Archie McCoy, didn't get him." (Maher diary). Historian Mildretta Adams notes, "Horse stealing continued for years in Owyhee County." (Owyhee Cattle- men, 1979:13) The McCoy clan, including Archie's sons Gill and Whitey, drove the stolen horses to Yellow Pine. Gill's son Bob provided this story of the event: "When my dad was thirteen and his brother Whitey was eleven, they trailed 100 head of horses off the Owyhee Desert in Nevada into Yellow Pine. Dad told me that they [the McCoy children] had never seen a town of any size and most of the horses were wild that they had caught off the desert. He said when they got into Boise they had horses scattered all over town, and the police department helped them gather the horses and get them through town just to get rid of them. They saw their first pine tree above Horseshoe Bend on the Payette River. They were amazed at their size... A lot of the horses died the first winter because of deep snow and the lack of food, something they never encountered on the desert." (Bob McCoy correspondence, Oct 27, 1995) The stolen horses were apparently kept in the upper Big Creek valley soon after their arrival in the Yellow Pine area, as Gill McCoy was noted in a newspaper article as having been to Warren to get supplies and was returning to Big Creek where he was running a large herd of horses (Payette Lakes Star, June 27, 1919). At that time the only habitation of consequence in the upper Big Creek area was the Edwards family store -post office at "Edwardsburg," as the Big Creek Ranger Station complex was not established until 1924. The Big Creek Ranger Station "Headquarters" was established in the large meadow where Gill probably ran his horses. The McCoy clan spent the winter of 1919 in Yellow Pine basin. They apparently seemed secure in the Yellow Pine community but their horse thievery may have been discovered by outsiders as they assumed an alias family name "Hollan," duly noted by census taker -storekeeper Albert Behne who knew their true names (US Census 1920, Idaho, Valley County, Yellow Pine Precinct). Possibly fearing apprehension, in the late spring of 1920 John, Walter, Katie, and Katie's two children took off with the remaining 70 stolen horses that survived the winter, heading cross-country to the Salmon River. Their route of travel would have been 3 over Profile Gap to Edwardsburg, then down Big Creek probably to the end of the wagon road at the Snowshoe Mine. They crossed Chamberlain Basin, picking up an old Nez Perce Indian trail that crossed the Salmon River at Disappointment Bar, then went up -river about a mile to what is now known as Lantz Bar, on the north side of the river, where they settled in the early summer of 1920. The McCoys probably thought they were at the ultimate hideout, deep in the Salmon River wilderness. However, soon after settling in at Lantz Bar, the McCoy clan was enumerated by a census taker who was very conscientious to have found them in such a remote location. The census taker noted John McCoy, his sister Katie Beck, and Katie's two children who were then noted as, "Nellie Beck, age 20" and "Joseph Beck, age 19," both born in Wyoming, which does not corres- pond with the 19110 census data. Katie later ended up in Pendleton, Oregon, where she died October 25, 1956. Nellie Elizabeth Beck married Daniel Strong on June 13, 1921 in Boise. Daniel Strong was a lodger at Curley Brewer's ranch on the South Fork of the Salmon in 1920. They moved to Canada and had three chiildren. Katie's children's father„ named Beck, has not been identified in any records. John McCoys hideout at Lantz Bar was the early squatter's claim of John Mit- chell "Mitt' Haynie. McCoy bought Haynie's improvements at Lantz Bar in 1921 and stayed there until the autumn of 1923, according to the late Salmon River historian John Carrey. In 1925 Frank B. Lantz established a homestead on the bar and thus the name (Carrey and Conley, 1978:116). John McCoys where- abouts is unknown after 1923. Bob McCoy said his great uncle died in Montana at age 71 [about 1933] when he fell off a hay wagon, breaking his neck (Bob McCoy letter, 1995, undated). A search of death records and census records in Montana and adjacent Idaho for that era failed to find anything about John McCoy (Bill Salmon correspondence, 2006). Walter McCoy Walter McCoy (aka Walter Hollan) was not enumerated on the 1920 census. If he had gone to Lantz Bar with his siblings, he only stayed there a very short time, as in 1920 he took up residence on McCalla Creek in Chamberlain Basin. It may have been that en route to Lantz Bar he discovered the abandoned homestead claim that had been established in 1915 by R. A. Wallingford and vacated in 19119. (Preston, 2001:29) The homestead site on McCalla Creek is about three miles downstream from Moose Meadows and about 15 miles by trail to the loca- tion of John McCoy's camp on the Salmon River at Lantz Bar. Soon after of Walter McCoys settlement on McCalla Creek, the place became known as "McCoy Cabin," arid was so noted on Forest Service maps until recent years. His neighbors were few. Jesse Root (1883-1935), who McCoy came to dislike intently, lived part-time at his homestead -ranch on Whimstick Creek, about eight miles away by trail to the southeast. Further to the southeast was Cold Meadows, where a ranger station was built in 1923 and occupied during 4 the summer. To the west, in the Chamberlain Meadows area, lived William Allen "Al" Stonebraker and August Hotzel, and the Chamberlain ranger station was occupied from June to early October (see Preston, 2001:25-33 for detailed historical descriptions of the habitations in the Chamberlain complex). An oral history made by an early Yellow Pine resident, the late Lafe Cox (1914- 2002) adds information about Walter McCoys place on McCalla Creek: In mid - May, 1927, the family of Clark and Beulah Cox, including their 13-year old son Lafe, left their home near Emmett, Idaho, to look for a new ranch in the Salmon River backcountry. They had 14 head of horses; Bud Joy and his son Rex had been engaged to guide the Cox family. Their destination was Mallard Creek, on the north side of the Salmon. After an abortive attempt to reach Mallard Creek by way of the South Fork, they turned around and went across Elk Summit to Big Creek and then on through Chamberlain Basin to Campbell's Ferry on the Sal- mon River. Campbell's Ferry was then owned by Robert A. "Bob" Hilands (see history of Campbell's Ferry: Preston 2002). They could not get across the river because the water was too high, so Bob Hilands sent them back through Cham- berlain to Walter McCoy's place to get McCoy to take them down the Salmon on a "goat trail" to a point opposite Mallard Creek where they could get across by rowboat. Lafe Cox described Walter McCoy: "McCoy was his name but at that time he was going by the name of Holland. They had come out of Oregon [really Owyhee County, Idaho] and they had got too many horses of the wrong fellows and they had to leave and he end- ed up over here in Chamberlain. And if he didn't know you, you couldn't see him. He worked rawhides to make a living. He made rawhide bridle reins and hackamores and he'd often sell them to the Forest Service fellows. He'd get enough money to buy groceries on. And his brother [Bert/Archie] lived here at Yellow Pine and he'd take groceries over part way and take them over to him." Lafe Cox goes on to describe Walter McCoy's place on McCalla Creek: "You had to know where it was, had to be told because he didn't have many trails in there. They never traveled the same way twice. He was hiding out from the law. He talked to us and he had a campground. We went down and camped and he ate with us. It started to rain so we moved over to his house. Dad and mother stayed in his guest room. Bud Joy, Rex, and I stayed in an- other building. There were several buildings, but they're all gone [burned by Forest Service]. His house had a porch on it, and a step to get on the porch. He had a picket fence around his garden, probably seven feet high on ac- count of the elk and deer eating up his garden. And he had his yard fenced 5 the plan had to do with McCoy's long time hatred for Jesse Root who had a ranch in the backcountry a few miles from McCoys place. It was quickly determined that for Sheriff Rothwell to come from Grangeville (the county seat of Idaho County) to the scene would require an auto trip of at least two to three days, through McCall and Warren, thence by horseback a day's ride to Chamberlain Ranger Station, or the adjacent Stonebraker Ranch, and another day or more to locate McCoy. Given that there was already snow on the ground and more to come, it was not reasonable for Sheriff Rothwell to come to the scene by that means. It was also known that two weeks prior to the McCoy inci- dent, a few pilots from Nick Mamer Flying Service of Spokane, had begun flying big game hunting parties from Grangeville to the Stonebraker Ranch in Cham- berlain Basin. (Lewiston Tribune, Oct 13, 1928) So Sheriff Rothwell called Nick Mamer to arrange for pilot Jack Rose to pick up Rothwell and "a deputized forest ranger" in one of Mamer's airplanes and fly them to the Stonebraker Ranch on Friday, October 26, to begin the hunt for Walter McCoy. The Stonebraker Ranch was about 12 miles from where McCoy lived on McCalla Creek. (Idaho States- man, Nov 1, 1928; Idaho County Free Press, Nov. 1, 1928) The Cook brothers' story indicates that their grandfather, Warren Cook, worked with Sheriff Rothwell to apprehend McCoy; so, it was Warren Cook who was the "deputized forest ranger" in the newspaper account. The Cooks' story is a bizarre tale, reminiscent of an Old West dime novel. The story notes that upon their arri-val at the Stonebraker Ranch on Friday afternoon, Rothwell and Cook were met by Jesse Root. Root would have come by horseback, probably from the road's end at Hays Station, a full day's ride. The plan was to dupe McCoy into believing that he was playing a good citizen's part in assisting in the arrest of his enemy, Jesse Root, and thereby Rothwell could avoid McCoy being a belligerent captive. The sheriff's posse no doubt stayed overnight at Stonebraker's, then started their hunt for McCoy on Saturday morning, with Cook and Rothwell borrowing horses from Al Stonebraker. As was their plan, Jess Root went to his ranch on Whim - stick Creek and waited while Cook and Rothwell went searching for McCoy. They first went to McCoy's cabin on McCalla Creek but McCoy was not there so they tracked him in the snow for two days, eventually returning to McCoy's cabin on Sunday where they found him standing behind his corral fence. Cook apparently introduced Sheriff Rothwell and McCoy asked, "What do you want?" Rothwell replied, 'We need your help to catch Jesse Root, go saddle a horse." Since he had a great dislike for Jesse Root, McCoy readily agreed to help "capture" Root. While McCoy was diverted, saddling his horse, Rothwell secretly unloaded McCoy's shotgun, which was leaning against the fence. The three men then mounted their horses and rode off to Jesse Root's place, a few miles away on Whimstick Creek. As they approached Jesse Root's cabin, McCoy was instructed 7 with jack pine poles all standing on end. A deer or an elk will not jump a pick- et fence. You can take a picket fence and put it up four feet high and they won't jump it." After staying at McCoy's place four or five days, the Cox family went down the Salmon River to a point opposite Mallard Creek. Clark Cox did not like what he saw, turned around, came back through Chamberlain, went down Crooked Creek to the Snowshoe Mine where they camped. They went the next day to Big Creek, over Profile Gap to Yellow Pine, and started up Johnson Creek, stopping to camp at Alec Forstrum's place. Clark Cox bought the Forstrum place; they moved there in early August 1927 and started Cox's Dude Ranch (Cox 1973: 14-23). Lafe Cox and his wife Ernrnalater took over the dude ranch from his parents and operated it until their retirement in 1992 when it was sold. The former Cox Dude Ranch is currently operated as Wapiti Meadows Ranch. Walter McCoy was sometimes labeled the "wildman of Chamberlain Basin." For a few years prior to 1928, Walter McCoy was reported to have threatened some of the area's few ranchers and trappers with his shotgun, and had been peeking into windows, robbing cabins, and otherwise acting strangely. McCoy was also known to have been taking provisions from the Forest Service commissary (sup- ply building) at the Chamberlain Ranger Station, when it was vacated for the winter. However, at the close of the 1928 season, when no supplies were left, McCoy left an angry note, demanding "his" supplies. Forest Ranger Dan LeVan, who had known McCoy since LeVan had been appointed the area's Forest Ranger in 1924, said McCoy had been living alone for seven years, his appearance was neat and clean, and his cabin was a model of cleanliness; but "too much isolation, too much brooding over real or fancied wrongs and other causes have injured the memory and brought on visions." Fearing that McCoy "was not in his right mind and might become violent, Ranger LeVan contacted Idaho County Sheriff Herve Rothwell in late October, 1928, to apprehend McCoy. (Idaho County Free Press, Nov 1, 1928) The task of apprehending McCoy was not an easy one, considering that there were no roads in the mountain wilderness and there was a foot of snow on the ground. From his winter ranger's office in McCall, Dan LeVan must have had several telephone discussions with Sheriff Rothwell in Grangeville, and others, to develop the apprehension plan. A family story, related by Dan and Dave Cook, grandsons of Warren Cook, indicates that Warren Cook and Jesse Root, both of whom were good friends of Dan LeVan, and also knew Walter McCoy, were in- volved in the plan. Warren Cook, a former Forest Ranger, lived in McCall; Jesse Root was postmaster -storekeeper in Warren. The involvement of Jesse Root in 6 by Rothwell, "If I holler for help, you come!" Sheriff Rothwell and Cook entered the cabin and returned with Jesse Root in handcuffs. The four men rode off with McCoy guarding Root from behind, with his unloaded shotgun. (Dan and Dave Cook, interview Oct 12, 1999) The newspaper account indicates that the sheriff's posse came out of the back - country "by way of Warren and McCall by stage and auto." (Idaho County Free Press, Nov 1, 1928) By deduction, the sheriff's posse must have gone by horse- back to Stonebraker's for overnight Sunday, then a days ride to road's end at Hays Station where they were picked up by auto and taken to Warren. From Warren they took the stage to McCall (the "stage" is a term left over from the days of the horse-drawn stage coach which at that time denoted the automotive transport that (hauled freight, mail, and people between Warren and McCall). On arrival in McCall, according to the Cooks' story, the sheriffs posse marched into the jail cell, then exited, leaving a befuddled McCoy behind bars with his empty shotgun. The next day, Tuesday, October 30, Walter McCoy was taken to Grangeville by Sheriff Rothwell, accompanied by Forest Ranger Dan LeVan. On Wednesday there was a sanity examination of McCoy in the court of Judge Wilbur L. Campbell. Present at the examination were Sheriff Rothwell, Ranger LeVan, Doctor John Shinnick, and Attorney E3erchman (Bert) Auger. When ques- tioned, McCoy said that during July and August the sun got too fast and he tried to stop it; he said he spent several days and nights worrying over that and also claimed that he was being pursued by the "pitchfork gang, little red devils, the `Flirt', and a `Riddle'." Walter McCoy was declared insane and was committed to the Idaho State Mental Hospital at Orofino the next day, October 31, 1928. (Idaho County Free Press, Nov 1, 1928) Walter S. McCoy died at the hospital a few months later on April 17, 1929, and was buried at the Riverside Cemetery in Orofino. Bert/Archie McCoy Settles in at Yellow Pine When Bert McCoy arrived in Yellow Pine with his family in the spring of 1919, he was befriended by storekeeper Albert Behne, as noted above. Behne had arrived in Yellow Pine basin in 1902 from Spokane, pushing a wheelbarrow during the Thunder mountain gold rush. Albert Behne (1854-1945) was not a prospector arid did not have many outdoorsman skills, but he saw a business potential in Yellow Pine basin. He established a store, and subsequently the Yellow Pine post office. Behne filed a homestead claim for 47.5 acres for what is now the Yellow Pine townsite, patented January 31, 1925 (BLM homestead records). Long-term Yellow Pine resident Harry Withers (1898-1994) remembered: "The McCoy family (Holland then) had moved into the basin and had a team of horses, which was used to plow up the meadow back of the hotel and Murph's joint [Murph Earl's Yellow Pine Tavern] and planted and harvested a crop of wheat that helped to prove up on the homestead. McCoy claimed Behne promised him the whole block in the northwest corner in payment for 8 his help in proving up. McCoy did get two lots, the two I [Harry Withers] now have." (Sumner 1986:13) Long time Yellow Pine resident Pete Hillman and Bert McCoy bought the cafe - bar from Dan Drake. They needed $1000 down payment and between them they came up with $500, borrowing the remainder from Charlie Maples (Sumner 1986: 23). Bert's daughter-in-law, Aloha McCoy, writes that Bert added a lean-to on each side of the building and one in back. One side was a restaurant, in the mid- dle was a pool hall, and a barber shop on the other side which he leased out. The lean-to in back was a woodshed. The lean-tos have been removed. Bert lost the cafe -pool hall in a card game (Aloha McCoy 1980). The old building, now re- novated, is the Yellow Pine chapel and community center. Harry Withers wrote, "The McCoys owned the restaurant and pool hall. I spent the winter with them and was chief cook by common consent, as I liked to cook and the senior McCoy [Bert] was inclined to become slightly incapacitated occa- sionally. Also, the boys' [Gill and Whitey] talents didn't seem to run toward the culinary arts." Withers added that the restaurant was often the scene of raucous feasts with jugs of locally -produced moonshine whiskey (Sumner 1986:57) Lafe Cox described Yellow Pine as a center for illegal whiskey production during the Prohibition Era of the late 1920s and early 1930s. From Cox's description it appears that the entire community of Yellow Pine was involved in bootlegging, including Bert McCoy. Bert was arrested in 1931, along with other Yellow Pine residents Roy Elliot, Charles Carwater, Mike Smith, Morris Corbett, Wayne and Mrs. Shapply, Rose Pigg, and LeRoy Parker (Idaho Daily Statesman, August 11, 1931). All were jailed in Cascade and Bert's son Gill had to pay his fine. The "revenuers" were constantly after them, drawn to Yellow Pine by the large quan- tities of sugar and grain being sent to storekeeper Albert Behne. Lafe Cox indi- cated that the whiskey production occurred during the winter and hundreds of barrels would be hidden in the snow. Lafe and his friends would randomly ski throughout the area so that there was a confusion of ski trails so the federal agents would not find the places where the whiskey barrels were buried (Cox 1972:32-35). Whiskey was an essential ingredient for most social activities in early Yellow Pine; Ted Abstein noted, "Bert McCoy was a great fiddler at the dances when we had live music, which wasn't very often. That was my downfall. I just loved his fiddling and wanted to be a fiddler when I grew up." (Sumner 1986:87) 9 Carl Kitchen Jr. wrote: "During prohibition days; the fellows in the village would get real serious about going out and cleaning up the cemetery, building fences, etc. Men such as Jim Leahy, Paddy Breen, Bert McCoy, Jack Hanby, and others would pass the hat to collect money for cemetery renovation. Then the fellows would buy a jug or two of bootleg whiskey and go out to the cemetery to work. Some- how, between whiskey and swapping yarns about departed friends, the work never did get done" (Sumner 1986:35). Harry Withers wrote this story: "Pat Leahy, Cinnabar [Mine] foreman, and his brother Jim Leahy, Fiddle Creek foreman, and I hiked to Yellow Pine on May 24 [1928]. They started looking for a jug. Bert McCoy, who lived where I now live, had moon - shine, but was away. One of his sons, who was working at Ray Call's sawmill told the Leahys where to find an empty jug and where to dig by a certain garden fence post to find a 10- gallon keg of moonshine. We filled a gallon jug, re- buried the keg, paid for the jug, and left for Bryant's Ranch to spend the night." (Sumner 1986:52) In addition to being a restaurateur and moonshiner, Bert was a part-time pros- pector and had a little dig near the mouth of Monumental Creek where he built a cabin in 1931. Bert's daughter, Verna, said, "He was always going to get rich nE'xt year," (from Fuller interview, 1984). Berl: was working at the claim in the winter of 1933 when he developed pneumonia and had to be rescued by his son Gill with his dog sled. Bert never recovered from the pneumonia and died on June 12, 1933, in a Boise hospital. Bert's mining claim was later relocated by Big Creek summer resident Wilbur Wiles and patented in 1983; the cabin built by McCoy burned in a wildfire iin 2002. McCoy Children in Yellow Pine School The presence of Bert's children prompted thE� establishment of a school in Yellow Pine in 1920, first held in a tent. The following year a log school house was built in the flat at the southwest corner of the village which served until 1936, when the present wood frame school house was built. The first children to attend the Yel- low Pine school in 1920 were Doris Edwards, Helen Trinler, Ted Abstein, and the McCoy children, Eva, Gill, Leslie ( "Whitey "), George, and Myron ( "Buster"). How- ever, the 1920 school year lasted only a few days. Gill and Whitey wrapped a bear hide around Buster and pushed what appeared to be a bear into the tent, frightening the young school teacher, Letha Smith, such that she quit, leaving the YE)IIow Pine school without a teacher until thE; following year. The teacher for the two years following was Mark Lawton. His students in 1922, in addition to the McCoys, included the four oldest children of 'William "Deadshot" Reed: Sam, Mabel, Pat, and young Bill. Deadshot had moved his family to Yellow Pine from 10 his ranch on the South Fork for the winter for schooling, but the family returned to the South Fork in the early spring before the school term ended. (Lawton, in Sumner 1986: 110; Deinhardt -Hill, 2003:86) For summer recreation the McCoy children went on fishing expeditions with their mother, Jennie. Youngest daughter, Verna, recalls, "My mother was a fisherwo- man. She would drag all of us kids up someplace so she could fish. [My brothers] George and Buster and me would ride one horse with her. I was about eight years old then. We used to go up to Profile [Summit] to Crater and Fish Lakes. We'd camp up there until we all got so full of. fish she'd get mad at us because we couldn't eat 'em all (McCoy interview attached to Fuller letter, April 27, 1984). Bert and Jennie McCoy had their last child, William ( "Billie ") Morris McCoy, on October 31, 1923, in Cascade. Billie drowned on Easter Sunday 1931, in the mill pond in Emmett (Aloha McCoy letter, Nov 7, 1995). The Willey Ranch Connection On the South Fork of the Salmon River, northwest of Yellow Pine, was the ranch of Simeon "Sim" Willey The Willey Ranch was reached from Yellow Pine by a 12 -mile steep trail, known as the "Willey Trail," over Rainbow Saddle and down the South Fork of Sheep Creek. As the Willey Ranch was lower in elevation than Yellow Pine, gardens crops could be grown there much earlier in the spring and later in the autumn. Sim Willey would periodically make the trip to Yellow Pine to sell or barter his vegetables. Sim also raised cattle on his ranch which were trailed to Yellow Pine for slaughter. It was by this agricultural commerce that the McCoy children became well acquainted with the several children of Sim and Mary ( "Minnie ") Willey, resulting in two marriages, as noted below. 11 Gill McCoy, assistant ranger at Chamberlain, n. d. Photo courtesy of Dan Levan Jr. Archie Gilbert "Gill" McCoy Gill was the oldest of Bert's children, born in 1905. At an early age he ran a trap line in the winter for marten and fox. In the mid -1920s Gill assisted his father freighting mining equipment and supplies by pack string from Yellow Pine, which was the end of the road at that time, to mines; further in the wilderness. On the return trips ore would be transported to Yellow Pine to be loaded onto trucks. In 1927, several mines at Stibnite were consolidated under the ownership of F.W. Bradley who formed the Yellow Pine Company. A truck road was completed to the Stibnite mines in 1929 so that the complex ore, which contained gold and antimony, could be transported to the railhead at Cascade and thence to the smelter at Salt Lake City. The truck road terminated Gill McCoy's business of freighting to Stibnite by pack string. (Fuller 1987:227) Gill was an expert long distance dog sled driver. In the winter, when the road was closed by snow, Gill would transport the mail by dog sled between Yellow Pine and Cascade for the primary Post Office Department contractor, George Stone - braker, younger brother of Chamberlain rancher Al Stonebraker. Gill was the winter mailman from the mid -1920s until 1930, when Stonebraker began winter mail delivery by aircraft (Preston 2003:5) George Stonebraker had a dog sled race team of nine Irish setters that Gill drove in competition for Stonebraker. In one such event Gill won fourth place in the slush on Payette Lake in 1931 (Idaho County Free Press, March 5, 1931; Bob McCoy correspondence, Oct 17, 1995). 12 Gill McCoy, Bill "Slim" Clark, Bill Timm, and a man called "Frenchy," established a mining claim in the 1930s on Monumental Creek opposite the mouth of Camp Creek. A stamp mill was moved to the site by Slim Clark from an abandoned mine on the west slope of Routson Peak, which had been worked around 1908 and the early 1930s. A substantial cabin was built on the claim. Over the years, the ownership of the claim became confused. In 1963, the question of ownership, which included Jim Burris, resulted in the shooting of Slim Clark by Burris's son. Slim Clark bled to death before he could get medical attention (interview with George Dovel, Aug 15, 1977, in Hartung 1978:42). The cabin became known as the "murder cabin;" which was destroyed by wildfire in 2000 (Kingsbury, pers. comm. 2001). Gill McCoy marries Blanche Willey After an across - the - mountain courtship of several years, 22 -year old Gill McCoy married 21 -year old Blanche Willey on May 5, 1926. They had a little one -room house in Yellow Pine where they lived for four years. For entertainment they went to dances in the school house, where they "danced all night long," said Blanche McCoy. Gill's brothers, George and Buster (Myron) stayed with them, sleeping in a tent next to the house, even in the winter. When Buster was in the 8th grade, about 1923, he quit school and took off across the mountain to live with the Willey's. At that time Gill had a string of horses which he and Bud Joy and Sam Cook used for packing hunters and fishermen, as well as hauling freight to and from Stibnite. From 1931 to 1938, Gill and Blanche lived at Stibnite where Gill worked outside using teams to haul mine timbers and other roustabout work. (Blanche McCoy interview, August 3, 1978). Gill and Blanche's children were: Betty McCoy, born May 20, 1927, in Boise; died October 9, 1979. Bob McCoy, born November 11, 1929, at Emmett; died July 9, 1998 Colleen "Babe" McCoy, born July 7, 1931; at Cascade; died April 29, 1995. Joe McCoy, born April 1, 1939 at Emmett, currently living in Idaho. 13 Monumental Creek Ranch that Gill McCoy bought in 1933. This photograph was taken ca. 1955 when it belonged to the USFS. Photo courtesy of Bob and Joyce Dustman Gill buys Monumental Creek Ranch In 1933 Gill McCoy bought the Monumental Creek Ranch, at the mouth of Holy Terror Creek, four and half miles north, or downstream from the abandoned townsite of Roosevelt. The ranch had its beginnings as the 1913 homestead claim of R.A. Wallingford. In the early 1920s Rufus A. "Rufe" and Ora Hughes took over the place and received a patent on the 95 -acre property on June 14, 1928. Roy Elliot had become Hughes' partner and then bought him out. In the autumn of 1929 Jess and Vernie Vanderpool bought the ranch and ran it for two years. Jess was also known in the Yellow Pine area by the alias Jess Warner as he was wanted for horse stealing. Vernie's daughter by her first marriage, Aloha Beck (see biographical note on page 22), lived on the ranch as a child and later married Gill's younger brother Myron "Buster" McCoy. When the Vanderpool's could not pay for the ranch, Roy Elliot sold the place to Gill McCoy (see home- stead plat on page 14). Gill moved his family to the Monumental Creek Ranch in 1933 where he packed supplies for the Forest Service in the summer and did packing for hunters in the autumn. Gill also ran a few cattle on the ranch and the adjacent forest land. The family lived on -the ranch year around until 1939 when they moved to Emmett for better schooling for the children. 14 Gill McCoy began his full -time employment with the Forest Service in 1939, as alternate ranger on the Big Creek District, working for Ranger Dan LeVan. Ran- ger LeVan's children were the same age as those of Gill McCoy, resulting in a very close working relationship and family relationship. When Dan LeVan's wife Persis died at age 41 in 1945, Blanche McCoy became the surrogate mother to Dan's young children. Dan LeVan Jr. refers to Blanche McCoy as "my other Mom" (LeVan letter, Jan 1, 2007). The LeVan -McCoy relationship is further described in a following Dan LeVan biographic sketch and the included articles by Dan LeVan Jr. In 1946, the old Chamberlain District was organizationally reactivated and sep- arated from the Big Creek District. Gill McCoy was assigned as the Assistant Forest Ranger for the Chamberlain District, under the oversight of Ranger Dan LeVan at Big Creek. Upon LeVan's reassignment in 1950, Gill was appointed District Forest Ranger, believed to be the last appointment of a Forest Ranger by virtue of job knowledge, without formal education. Gill's primary assistant in Chamberlain was Buff Parke (Elbert C. Parke, 1894- 1981). Buff's wife, Adelia (Adelia Routson Parke, 1898 -1981) was daughter of IBig Creek pioneer John Routson (Adelia authored a fascinating history of her life in the back- country; see Adelia Routson Parke's, Memoirs of an Old Timer). Sally Preston, remembers how kindly she was treated by Gill and Blanche McCoy and Adelia and Buff Parke when she would fly to Chamberlain as a young child in the late 1940s with her father Don Park, the Idaho National Forest supply officer. Gill retired from the Forest Service in 1952 and was replaced by Ranger G. Val Simpson. Gill retired to a rancher's life in Long Valley and died at Cascade on December 31, 1964. Gill's wife, Blanche Willey McCoy lived many more years; she died at age 90, in Caldwell, on August 18, 1995 (Idaho Statesman, August 21, 1995). See more about Blanche Willey McCoy in the Willey family biographic sketch on page 26. 15 UNITED STATE-S 0; .-A . -BL ACKFOOT 20° 54` 95.26 'I C--COY,. GILL S_.4 4.9._ 33 -.15 & 20 IV E .............. Co. Wa. r. .T:) .............................. . . .... . ......... 5: .. . . . ................ ... .... . .......... ...... r .. ..... .. C> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Traced from ;r-Ownsh,(;, P/07t-/-. 0 loc. 1923 16 Bob McCoy, ca. 1950, at work on Big Creek Ranger District Photo courtesy of Bob and Joyce Dustman Life on the Monumental Creek Ranch The ranch buildings consisted of a two -story log house, blacksmith shop, barn, warehouse, and cellar. There was a bridge over Monumental Creek to the wagon road that went upstream to the Roosevelt townsite (Fuller 1987:232) The ranch was sold to the Forest Service for $1500 on August 29, 1941. All the ranch build- ings were burned by the Forest Service in the 1960s, except the blacksmith shop. When Gill's son Bob visited the site in 1966, the blacksmith shop was still standing. Bob found his toy truck where the woodshed used to stand. A layout of the ranch buildings, based upon a sketch by Bob McCoy, is on page 16 fBob McCoy correspondence, Oct 17, 1995) The blacksmith shop remained standing until it, too, was burned by the Forest Service in the mid- 1970s. Bob McCoy remembers his early years at the Monumental Creek Ranch: "Mother (Blanche Willey McCoy) planted a garden every spring. We had ra- dishes, onions, carrots, lettuce, and always turnips. I still don't like turnips. Someone before us planted some rhubarb. It was still growing wild when I was there in 1966. We had chickens and every spring Dad would pick out a range cow with the biggest bag and that was the milk cow for the summer. We let the calf have the milk in the mornings and Mother would milk [the cow] in the evenings. To milk the cow you had to get a rope on her and tie her head to the side of the corral then get another rope around her hind feet so she couldn't kick. Us kids helped with that part. One time the cow got out and 17 Monumental Ranches Hand drawn map was across the bridge over Monumental Creek. Mother had us kids wait at the trail across Holy Terror Creek so when she chased the cow back across the bridge we could head her up towards the corral. Mother was running through the trees to get around the cow when suddenly she screamed, then no more noise. My older sister Betty waded Monumental Creek but my younger sister Colleen ( "Babe ") and I weren't big enough at the time so we ran across the bridge. We found her [Blanche] laying flat on her back, trying to get her breath. She had run into a rope corral that Babe and I had built for our stick horses and knocked the breath out of her. Beside getting a good spanking we quit building corrals. "I don't remember learning to ride — it was something you just did. We all had our own horse. My first horse was a mare named Liz. Until I got bigger, to get on her I would have to get her close to the side of the corral then climb the corral and jump on her. Sometimes it would take more than on try. She would not always stand still." "We all had our chores to do. My sister Betty wasn't much of an outside per- son so she did household chores and Babe and I took care of the outside chores. We got the firewood in, took care of the chickens, tended the garden, and helped irrigate which we especially liked because every so often [spawn- ing Chinook] salmon would get in the ditch. It was great sport chasing the salmon down and wrestling it out of the ditch. Once in a while we would get one too big and Dad would help us. As I think back, I believe Dad got as much enjoyment watching us as we did chasing the salmon." [Spawning Chinook salmon were common in all the backcountry streams at least until the late 1950s, as observed by the author when living on the Secesh River, and observed by the late Val Simpson (1924 -2005) in Chamberlain Creek when he was Forest Ranger on the Chamberlain District on the Payette National Forest (G. Val Simpson, oral history 1984)]. Bob McCoy continues his story: "I can't ever remember wanting for anything while we were on the ranch. Wild game was plentiful, the best fishing anywhere, and lots of grouse. Wild ber- ries grew everywhere. Writing about ranch life brings back lots of memories. During haying season everyone helped. When I was seven I was old enough to drive the team pulling the hay rake. Dad wouldn't let me on the mowing machine because it was too dangerous. When we were putting the hay in the hay barn, Betty led the workhorse that pulled the Jackson fork up and along the trolley in the top of the hay barn. She hated it because she was scared of animals. One day she got scared about something and came running around the barn and the old workhorse, Rondo, followed her. He pulled the Jackson fork out through the end of the barn. [My other sister] Babe led the horse from then on. She wasn't scared of trying anything. My job was up in the barn throwing the hay to the sides as it was dumped from the Jackson fork. 19 'When school started in the fall, Mother and us kids moved to Yellow Pine where we had a home. My first two years of school [1935 -36] were in a log cabin. The school district finally built a school house on the flat below town. All the grades were in one room. There was never over nine kids in school at any one time. When Betty graduated from the eighth grade [1939], Dad bought a place at Emmett where there was a high school. We stayed there in the winters from then on. "I started working for the Forest Service in 1942. 1 was a flunky in fire camps. I was twelve ,years old. I worked every summer through 1945 in the Big Creek district on trail crews and on fires. When I was older and working for the For- est Service, the most enjoyable times were when I would be out alone with my pack siring for three or four days at a time. In 1946 1 was stationed at Chamberlain Basin as a packer. My main job was packing out smoke - jumpers. During World War 11, most of the smokejumpers were conscientious objectors. They were very dedicated firefighters. Someone from the McCall [Supervisor's] Office found out I was only sixteen years old and I was laid off (you had to be seventeen years old then to work for the Forest Service). I then joined the Marine Corps." (Bob McCoy correspondence, Oct 7, 1995) "Every fall the Forest Service [pack stock and riding] stock was trailed out to lower country for the winter; most of the time on the Salmon River below Big- gins. In the spring they were trailed back in [to Big Creek]. They would camp on Profile Creek above Yellow Pine and wait for snow conditions to get just right [with a hard crust] so they could take the stock over Profile Summit on top of the snow. On my first leave from the Marines, spring of 1947, they were camped, waiting on snow conditions. There was Dad, [Ranger] Dan LeVan, Skook [Myron] McCoy, Warner (Slim) Willey [Blanche McCoy's brother], and I think Ed James. I caught the mail stage into Yellow Pine and walked up to their camp. The next day the snow was right and I helped them take the stock over the summit. When you started over Profile Summit you had to make in one day because there was no place to hold the stock. When we went over there was still eight feet of snow on the summit. I stayed with them until my leave was about up, then radioed McCall and had a plane fly into Big Creek and get me. "When I was discharged from the Marines the summer of 1948, 1 went back to work for the Forest Service. I was stationed on a lookout in the Big Creek Dis- trict. In 1949 1 was [again] stationed on a lookout in the Big Creek District. In 1950 1 was foreman of a trail crew at Big Creek. That was my last year with the Forest Service" (Bob McCoy correspondence, 1995). W In his last year of packing for the Forest Service, Bob McCoy and Bob and Joyce Dustman, who had been Big Creek summer employees for several years, were workmates for most of the 1950 summer. The Dustman's and two other Forest Service summer workers had the project of clearing many miles of trails in the Lower Big Creek area. Bob McCoy was their packer. Bob and Joyce Dustman wrote of their experience working for the Forest Service in Fourteen Summers with the Payette National Forest, which includes several pages about their asso- ciation with Bob McCoy and their description and photographs of the McCoy Ranch on Monumental Creek as they found it in 1950, with the ranch buildings still standing. Bob McCoy was married to his first wife Harriet, in 1949, and together they had six children. In 1967 he married his second wife Reva and together they traveled to North Africa and the Western States on pipeline construction projects until his death at age 68, on July 9, 1998, while he was en route to the historic landmark dedication at the old Big Creek Ranger Station (Payette Lakes Star -News, July 16, 1998). 21 Skook McCoy, alternate ranger at Big Creek, before 1947 Photo courtesy of Dan LeVan Jr. Myron Burdefft "Skook" McCoy Myron McCoy was known only as Myron to his wife, Aloha. To his family he was known as Buster. To his workmates he was known as "Skook." Skook is short for the Chinook Indian jargon "skookumchuck," meaning "powerful," or close to that. In 1927, at the age of 12, Skook was essentially on his own and began working for Milt Hood, packing a string of mules to Sbbnite and Thunder Mountain. How- ever, with the completion of the truck road to Stibnite in 1929, the mule packing job dried up (Milt Hood, and his wife Mary, subsequently leased the Thomas Creek Ranch on the Middle Fork and established the successful Middle Fork Lodge). In those early winters, Skook also did some trapping. In 1931 Skook was employed by the Forest Service, as was everyone in the backcountry, on the great Chamberlain fire. He then did placer mining at Thunder Mountain and later went to work for the Jensen brothers at the Snowshoe Mine on Crooked Creek. In 1935 Skook: went to worth; for Blackie Wallace at the Flying "W" Ranch on Cabin Creek (see Preston 2001:39 -40). Skook fed Blackie's cattle and carried the mail on the Big Creek route (Wallace had the mail contract at that time). Aloha Beck's mother and step- father, Jess Vanderpool, had leased the former Bellingham place on Cabin Creek from Wallace. It was at Cabin Creek that Skook met 15- -year old Aloha Beck. The following spring, 1936, Skook began working for the Forest Service on Ranger Dan LeVan's trail crew on Big Creek, where he could keep his eye on Aloha. On September 16, 1936, Myron "Skook" McCoy and Aloha Beck were married in Cascade (see details of their courtship on page 27). 22 For a number of years, beginning in 1937, Skook and Aloha spent their summers on fire lookouts in the Big Creek District of the old Idaho National Forest, working for Dan LeVan. The summers of 1937 and 1938 were spent on Chicken Peak. The intervening winter was spent running the Big Creek Hotel, which they had leased from owner Dick Cowman (1905- 2004). The summers of 1939 and 1940 were spent on Horse Mountain; 1941 was spent on Rush Creek Point, and 1942 on Lookout Mountain. As a result of a manpower shortage during WW II, in 1943 the two were separated, with Aloha sitting alone on Lightning Peak and Skook on Lookout Mountain. At the close of the 1943 season, Skook joined the Navy Sea- bees, returning to the Forest Service at the close of WW II. They spent one more summer on Lookout Mountain, then Skook became the Assistant Ranger at Big Creek, working for Ranger Dan LeVan, while Skook's older brother, Gill, who had been LeVan's assistant, went to the Chamberlain Ranger Station. Meanwhile, their son, James Burdett McCoy, was born at Emmett on December 4, 1947. In August 1948, they established their permanent home in McCall. When Dan Le- Van was reassigned from Big Creek, Skook resigned from the Forest Service to work for Brown's Tie and Lumber Company in McCall. They later bought a small ranch at Emmett where Myron " Skook" McCoy died of cancer on August 31, 1991. Aloha still lives at the ranch. Their son James, is a mining engineer, a graduate of the University of Idaho. Skook is also fondly remembered in the Dustman story Fourteen Summers with the Payette National Forest. Leslie James "Whitey" McCoy Whitey was born at Avery, Idaho, on May 11, 1907. He first married Mary Willey in Oct 1931, but divorced in early 1937. They had one son, Eugene Leslie McCoy, born in Boise on Oct 18, 1933, who became an attorney. Whitey's second marriage was to Thelma Collins. They had daughter Thelma Patricia McCoy. As a young man Whitey worked in the Yellow Pine area in the mines of Henry Abstein. He later worked for Sumner Stonebraker (younger brother of Al Stone - Braker) packing supplies and machinery to Stibnite, then subsequently went to work at the Stibnite mine. After his divorce from Mary Willey in 1937, Whitey went to work for the mines in north Idaho and Butte, Montana. He met and married Thelma Collins in Washington, then returned to north Idaho to work in the mines. Whitey returned to Big Creek where he carried the mail for two years, then worked at the Stibnite mine during WWII. After WWII they bought a ranch in northern Washington, then sold the ranch and moved to Caldwell, Idaho, where he bought a stock truck, but he spent so much time away from home he sold the truck and returned to ranching. Whitey died of a heart attack Dec 31, 1960. 23 George Henry McCoy George was born March 1, '1913, at Mountain Home, Idaho. As a young man he worked at the Mile High Ranch of Ernest and Roy Elliot on Big Creek, where he put up hay and packed in supplies from Warren. In the autumn he helped the Elliots pack hunters and in the winter George hunted cougars and coyotes. During the great Chamberlain fire of 1931, George worked for the Forest Service with his pack string. He married Doris McFarland; they had a son John Walter McCoy born al. Emmett, Sep. 8, 1938; and daughter Judith Lynn McCoy, born at Ernmett Dec. 421, 1949, she died April, 1978. George died of a heart attack Jan. 25, 1964. In the early 1930s, George went to Pistol Creek, on the Middle Fork of the Sal- mon River, packing supplies, and then spent a short time working in the mines. He returned to Yellow Pine where he packed supplies to Thunder Mountain mines. In the Nate 1930s George leased the Flying W Ranch on Big Creek from Blackie Wallace. George formed a partnership with George "Blondie" McGill for cattle ranching. Around 1940 they purchased the former Stonebraker, Beale, and Hotzel ranches in Chamberlain Basin. There they ran cattle in the summer and hunting camps in the autumn, removing the cattle to winter range near Mountain Home before the hunters came. The Chamberlain Basin ranches were sold to the Idaho Fish and Game Department in 1949. The last cattle drive was in the autumn of 1949 in which 60 head of cattle were moved to the road's end at Big Creek by George and his 11 year -old son John, and 10 year -old Joe McCoy, youngest son of Gill McCoy. After selling the Chamberlain ranches, George bought a ranch near Pine, Idaho, in the Mountain Home area. George also had heavy construction equipment that he used building logging roads in the Mountain Home area. Verna Luella McCoy Verna was born at Bruneau, Idaho, on Jan 21, 1911. She married Ivan Lee Evans on Aug 31, 1929. They had son Jerald Lee Evans, born at Cascade on Sep 6, 1931; and Verna Jean Evans, born at Emmett on June 2, 1933. Verna and Ivan divorced and she married Jim Scovel. Verna died of cancer on April 29, 1995. Her son Jerald Evans became Idaho Superintendent of Public Instruction. 24 ALOHA BECK McCOY Aloha May Beck was born in 1920. Aloha is noted in the 1930 census in Lemhi County, Idaho. The following is Aloha's story, which was attached to her letter dated, April 27, 1995: "My life in the backcountry started in 1930. My mother [Vernie] and my father were divorced in 1929. Mother took up with a man called Jess Warner [an alias for Jess Vanderpool] in the backcountry. They saw an ad in the Salmon paper for a ranch for sale on Monumental Creek. They went to see about it, liked it and put a down payment on it. I had a brother, Isaac LaVere Beck (called LaVere), and a sister, Lila Lee Beck. The spring of 1930 we left the Lemhi River with everything we had on horses. We were on our way to Monumental Creek. I do not remem- ber how long it took us, but I do remember all the rain, snow, and wind. Lila wanted to be put in the grub box so she could stay warm. I remember staying over at Meyers Cove because it was snowing so hard. We also stayed over a day at the Crandall Ranch on the Middle Fork. It is now called the Flying "B" Air Strip. We went up Brush Creek over Two Point Peak. No trail there any more. We went past Lookout Mountain and up to the ranch. It was way after dark when we go to the ranch house. Everyone was so tired and cold. In a few days we wanted to go riding so Jess had us gather around the table and said, "I have something to give you and something to tell you. I do not want you to ever forget it." Then he gave us each a pocket knife and a little container of matches. He told us that if we ever got lost to put our reins over the [saddle] horn so our horses could not eat, then let them go where they wanted to go. He told us that they will always take you back to where you started. He said, "The matches are never to be used unless you are out someplace and your horse or you break a leg. In that case, build a fire and make good smoke and someone will see it and come. Your pocket knife may come in handy in lots of ways." My sister Lila and I would ride all over that [first] summer. We tried putting the reins up and kicking our horses in the ribs to see if they would go home. They always did. My brother LaVere liked to fish instead of riding with us. The salmon used to come there [to the ranch] in the irrigation ditches. The field out there would just be covered with salmon. We used to go out there and get them and put them under plants and everything else. Also, when they were irrigating the fields, you'd see does and fawns all over. "In the hay field was lots of badgers and [ground] squirrels. One day Jess told me if I would shoot them and bring him 200 tails he would give me an old single -shot .22 rifle. Well, I wanted that rifle so it did not take me long before it belonged to me. Jess gave all the shells I could use for the job and gave me instructions on the care of my gun. Then he told me I was on my own. I still have the .22. My son [James McCoy] learned to shoot with it, too, in later years." 25 "Mom took us kids up to Roosevelt Lake. We could see lots of houses in the lake and some in the [mud] slide. We went into one house in the slide that was like walking uphill. Lots of books and ledgers all over the floor. Mother said it had been an office. Later, fishermen set fire to everything so they could land a plane on the ice." "At times Lila and I would ride down the creek to visit with Claude and Elsie Tay- lor [see Preston: 2001:42]. In the fall we would go to Yellow Pine to school. In the spring Jess would bring the horses to get us. We would camp at the Fern Mine. The next morning, long before daylight, we were on our way over Monumental Summit while the snow was still frozen. It was always a mess because some places the snow was too soft to hold the horses. The summer of 1931 Jess packed to the 1931 fire out of Chamberlain Basin. Mother wanted to go with Jess so she left us kids alone for weeks at a time [see an account of this major wildfire in Briggs 1963:75 -104]. In the fall of '31 we all went to Leslie's and Mary Willey McCoy's shivaree [wedding party]. Everyone had a good time. In the fall of '32 We were camped on Johnson Creek, waiting for the people to move to Boise so we could rent the Van Meter house [in Yellow Pine]. Mother and I was getting supper over a campfire when Roy Elliot came running up. He told Mother that he wanted the rest of his money right then [for the Monumental Creek Ranch]. She told him she did not have it. He cussed her with language I'll not repeat. So Moth- er told him to get out and he could take over the place next spring. He told Moth- er he could sell the place for cash. Mother told him to do so." [Elliot sold the ranch to Gill McCoy]. "On March 21, 1933, my half brother [Jess Vanderpool Jr.] was born in the Van Meter house; first baby born in Yellow Pine. Mrs. Bill Newell, Mary [Willey] Mc- Coy, Jess, and myself was with Mother. Mother did not want any of us kids and let: us know it every day. When Jess Jr. came she did not want him either. I tried to shield him as much as possible. I learned -to do the family wash on the board. Jess taught me to make sour dough and bread made from it. He taught me to cook other things, too. The summer of 1933 Jess got a job cutting wood for Dan McRae at the Sunnyside Mine in Thunder Mountain. We moved into an old one - room shack. Mrs. McRae ask Mother if I could help her in the kitchen. She was cooking for the miners. Mother was pleased II brought home a silver dollar every day. Every night when I got home the family wash was soaking, waiting for me to do. When the work. for Jess was over we moved to the Mormon Ranch. Jess went to work for Mr. Crandall [who was running cattle on his ranch and the adjoining Mormon Ranch on the Middle Fork]. No school again. On my 14th birthday I took little Jess for a walk. When We; got back George McCoy was there. He had been up to visit Fred [Paulsen] and Daisy Tappen [up river at the Pistol Creek Ranch]. He was headed for the Mile Hi [Ranch on Big Creek] to hunt cougar with Ernest Elliot. In May [1934] we moved from the Mormon Ranch to the Garden Ranch on Big Creek. That summer Ernest Elliot died [of spotted fever]. He was buried on the Mile Hi. We went to his funeral. A lot of people came. George and Myron [McCoy] were there. That was the very first time I had ever seen Myron McCoy. He was later to become my husband of 54 years." "The fall of 1934 we went to Yellow Pine to school. The spring of 1935 we moved to the Bellingham Ranch on Cabin Creek. The folks had leased the ranch [from Blackie Wallace]. We moved into boarded -up tents. Jess went to work for a surveying crew with his pack string. Fall of 1935, no school. Fall of 1935 Myron McCoy went to work for Blackie Wallace [Merl R. Wallace, 1895 -1972] on Cabin Creek below us. He was packing the mail and feeding cattle. In the spring of 1936 Jess got a bunch of fellows together and built the cabin on Cabin Creek, later called a lodge. Myron McCoy went to work again for [Big Creek Ranger] Dan LeVan as soon as trail work began, spring 1936. When Myron got back up to the ranch, he ask me to marry him. I told him I would when I was eighteen [she was then 16]. Later that summer he brought me an engagement ring. Mother was furious, so Jess told her to calm down because in two years I would probably change my mind. From that time on things just kept getting worse. Jess went back to work for the surveying crew again. Mother started to go with them but the boss told her no women could go. He told her he was not going to take a chance of her getting hurt. So things at home really got bad." "In July, Mother went up to the store [at Big Creek]. While there, Dick Cowman [the owner] ask her if I could come work for him. He needed someone to help in the hotel. So I went to work with Mrs. [Lesta] Coonrod. I really enjoyed working there. My brother [LaVere, then about 14] had gone to live with Dad. Lila would not take care of little Jess. On September 14, Mother brought little Jess up for me to watch. I told her I just did not have time to watch him. She told me I would have to any way, so I told Mrs. Coonrod about it. She went to Dick and told him we were so busy I had no time to take care of both jobs. Dick told Mother if I was to baby sit, I could go home to do it. If she wanted me to work there, I could not baby sit. She gathered my wages, then called me to her room next to the store. She told me I knew who Jess was seeing and just would not tell her. I could not tell her because I did not know. Then she cussed me and threatened my life. By that time she was yelling. Lots of fellers from trail work and hunters coming in were on the store porch and could not help but hear her. I was so ashamed of her. The next day Jess brought the surveying crew in for mail and more grub. Later that same day, Myron came in off trail work. They both heard all about what had gone on. Everyone decided we should get married. Jess found us a ride to Cascade, also someone to stand up with us. So September 16, 1936, we were married." 27 In a later letter, April 27, 1996, Aloha McCoy wrote: "You ask about Bill Adamson. I had never seen or heard of him until he came in to Big Creek as [Ranger] Dan LeVan's government packer. For years, he was [the Forest Service fire] guard at Burgdorf. They let him go, so he ask Dan for a job. Mother and Jess [Vanderpool] split the blankets the spring of 1937. She came back to Big i Creek but Jess never did. Mother took up with Bill Adamson, then around Christmas got married. Bill worked two or three years for Dan. Dan had to let him go because of my trouble- making mother. They then moved to Cambridge where he worked in the sawmill. "They never went back to Big Creek." Aloha wrote on December 2, 1998: "I have five acres here [in Emmett] and rent the pasture in the summer to a neighbor for his cows. It helps pay the taxes and I don't have to work keeping it up. It gives me my yard to putter in. My [children] Jim and Kathy live in Boise so I drive over there or they come over here ... I can look out my front window and see the snow - capped mountains behind Horseshoe Bend ... It really is nice here." The Story of The McCoy Family of Yellow Pine, Idaho The first school in Yellow Pine was held in this tent in 1920. Back Row: Teacher Miss Smith, Eva EcCoy, Helen Trinler. Front Row: George McCoy, Verna McCoy, Doris Edwards, Myron McCoy, Ted Abstein, Leslie McCoy, and Gilbert McCoy Myron McCoy was only five years old. 1 ,�,"' �%•#* � ' � �.'�� � ,�• a rt,. ' ` `�� t � } � .1 i � _ 4$ l b � ? �. Yellow Pine, Idaho In 1931 Fred Franz home, School House, Teachers Cottage, Yellow Pine store, LaVanders home, Albert Hennesy come, Archie McCoy's poolhall, and the last house at the foot of the hill is the McCoy home. Ir Ak �- i � The first school in Yellow Pine was held in this tent in 1920. Back Row: Teacher Miss Smith, Eva EcCoy, Helen Trinler. Front Row: George McCoy, Verna McCoy, Doris Edwards, Myron McCoy, Ted Abstein, Leslie McCoy, and Gilbert McCoy Myron McCoy was only five years old. 1 ,�,"' �%•#* � ' � �.'�� � ,�• a rt,. ' ` `�� t � } � .1 i � _ 4$ l b � ? �. Yellow Pine, Idaho In 1931 Fred Franz home, School House, Teachers Cottage, Yellow Pine store, LaVanders home, Albert Hennesy come, Archie McCoy's poolhall, and the last house at the foot of the hill is the McCoy home. Paf:e 1 The McCoy Family of Yellow Pine, Idaho Mr. Archie McCoy (Bert) was born in Susanville, California. He ranched end worked in mines when he was a young man. He went to Butte, Montana and worked in the nines there. He left the mines and went to ranching; on the Greybull giver above Meeteetse, Wyoming. While there he met a young lady, Jennie Avery that had wrown -up on the Greybull River. As a very small girl she had moved from Ulysses, Pennsylvania (Where she was born), to Greybull, Wyoming in a covered wagon. They were married in July 1903 at the McCoy ranch above Meeteetse. They left Wyoming; and went back to California. One Yesr later their first child Eva McCoy was born at Cedarville, California. One year later their second child Archie Gilbert McCoy was born at Paradise Valley, Nevada. The rest of the children were born in Idaho. Some of the places are no longer on the map. The other children came every two years apart. They are :Leslie James McCoy was born at Avery, Idaho, Ina Evelyn McCoy was born at Lowrey, Idaho, Verna Luella McCoy was born_ at Bruneau, Idaho, George Henry McCoy was born at Mountain Home, Idaho, Myron Berdett McCoy was born at Mountain Home, Idaho, Eight years later Billy Morris McCoy was born In Cascade, Idaho. Ina died at age 2 years. Billy died at age 7 years. In 1918 Archie McCoy (Bert) left his family in Mountain Home, while he went to look for work. He went to work in the woods at Cascade. He also freighted supplies to Yellow Pine with team and wagon. He worked in some of the mines in the back country. In the springy; of 1919 Archie sent for his family. Jennie loaded all of their belongings into a wagon, put her children (except Gilbert and Leslie) into the wac-on, and took off for Yellow Pine, Idaho. She drove a four horse team as far as Horse Shoe Bend, where she met Archie. He drove the team on into Yellow Pine. Gilbert and Leslie stayed awhile with an uncle. A short time later Gilbert and Leslie drove a bunch of their fathers range horses into Yellow Pine for him. They drove them along the foothills around Boise. They all helped build a nice log cabin, which in later years burnt to the ground in the middle of the winter. In 1919 there was no school in Yellow Pine. In 1920 the first school was held in a tent. The picture with this sheet of paper shows the tent and the children of the first school. flack Row of Picture: Teacher Miss Smith, Eva McCoy, Helen Trinler, Front Row: George McCoy, Verna McCoy, Doris Edwards, Myron McCoy, Ted Abstein, Leslie McCoy, and Gilbert McCoy. Myron McCoy was not old enough to 1 o to school, but the teacher let him Archie built a poolhall in Yellow Pine. It is now the Yellow Pine church. He had a leanto on each side and one in the back. On one side he had a restaurant, the other side was a oarber shop. He ran the poolhall and restaurant. He leased out the barber shop. The leanto in the back is still there. It was a woodshed. The two leanto's have been removed. Archie later sold the poolhall. Verna McCnv Evans is now the Mother of Jerry Evans The Superintendent of Putlic Instruction at this time. We also have a Lawyer, A Mining Ens sneer, Heavy Equipment Operators and Diamond Drillers in the family. These are ;rF.ndchildren of Archie and Jennie McCoy. This has been v:ritten �y Mrs. Myron B. McCoy January 1980 McCall, Id,:jho Page 2 The McCoy Family of Yellow Pine, Idaho Eva McCoy married Earl Wilscn. They had one Son. They moved to Portland, Ore.pon. Gilcert (kno in fs Gill) helpe(l his father frieght supplies from Cascade to Yellow Pine in the summer months. In the winter he would run a trap line. He married Blanche Willey. She was born and grew up on the South Fork of the Salmon River. They had four children. In 1927 he went to work for �titnite Mining Company. He packed a Company packstring with supplies and Machinery. There was not any road beyond Yellow Pine at that time. It was just a wagon road from Cascade. In the winter months he packed mail, and supplies to Stibnite with a dog team. The road was finished to Stibnite in 1929 or 1930. When the road was finished Gill then went to work at the mine. Gill used to travel all over to compete in dog team races. He was very good at it too. He worked at Stibnite for ten years. Gill. bought the Hughs ranch on Monumental Creek. It is six miles below Roosevelt Lake. The forest service renamed it the McCoy ranch, later naming it Monumental ranch. It now goes by that name. He ranched and packed hunters for a few years. He went to work for the Forest Service and sold his ranch to them. He was assistant ranger at Big Creek, then acting ranger in Chamberlin Basin. He worked for the forest service for ten years. He quit to go back to ranching. Leslie McCoy when a young man went to work in the mines for Mr. Abstein. He later went to work for Sumner Stonebreaker packing supplies and machinery to Stibnite. In the winter months he r&n a trap line on Monumental Creek. He married Mary Willey. He then went to Stibnite to work. They had one Son. They separated after two ,years. He then went up North and worked in the mines. He also worked in the mines in Butte, Montana. He went to the Northern part of Washington where he met and married Thelma Collins. They have a daughter. They came back to North IdF +ho where he again worked in the mines. They returned to Big Creek Where Leslie carried the mail down the Creek for two years. He returned to Stibnite and worked during the war. When the war was over they bought a ranch in r ?nrf-Yin"VI % '_:•- t1 ;nc*'-r -.ri !TjV,n- r ^rir+haA frn-r r11if-.m- a ea vaarc rahcv finally sold the ranch and moved to Caldwell, Idaho. He nought a home, and a stocktruck. He spent a few years driving his truck. He spent so much time from home, so decided to sell his truck and go :;ack to ranching. His Son is a Lawyer. Verna McCoy married Ivan Evans when he worked at Stibnite. They met in Yellow Pine. They had one Son and one Dau_hter. They later separated. Their son at this.time is, The Superintendent of Public Instruction. Verna is now married to Jim Scovel. They are living in Caldwell, Id_iho. By Aloha fleck McCoy January 1980 McCall, Idaho The McCoy Family of Yellow Fine, Idaho PaF,:e 3 George McCoy vent to Bi T CreF-,k to work for Ern�:st and. Roy Elliot at their Mile His:h ranch. fie tlelried put up the hay and packed in supplies from Barren, Idaho. They packed out hunters in the fall. In the winter months he would hunt cou ar, (;o otes, etc. He pulled a pack string on the Chamberlin :asin fire in 1931. He married Doris McFarland. They had two chil,luen, one boy an.-J). a girl. He left Yellow Pine and vent to Pistol Greek, where he pecked in supplies. He also worked in the mines for a short time. He came back to Yellow Pine and pulled a packstring to the Thunder Mountain mines. He then went to work for himself. Fe leased the Flying W ranch on Cabin Creek, from Blackie Wallace. He ran the cattle on shares. At the end of the lease he took his cattle to Chamberlin Fasin. George and Blondie McGill became pardnerS at the ranch in Chamberlin Basin. He stayed there until they sold the ranch. He then bought a ranch-at Pine out of Mountain Home, Idaho. He worked in the woods building logging roads. He operated the heavy equipment on the road job. His Son is now building logging roads. He also operates the heavy equipment. Myron McCoy went to work for Milt Hood at the age of twelve. He was pullin:r; a pack string of mules to Stibnite and Thunder Mountain. He also packed out hunters. In the winter time tie did some trapping. At the aye of 16 he went to work on the big fire in 1931 at Chamberlin Basin. He placer mined at Thunder Mountain later going to work at the Snowshoe Mine on Crooked Creek. Crooked Creek runs into Big Creek of the Middle Fork. Myron married Aloha Beck. Her Mother and Stepfather had the Bellingham place on Cabin Creek leased. Her Stepfather with friends built the cabin which is now called Cabin Creek Lodge. Myron and Aloha spent m�:ny years on Lookouts. Myron worked for the forest service. Two years on Chicken Peak, two years on Horse Mountain, one year on Rush Creek Point, two years on Lookout Mountain. Myron then joined the Seabees and was sent to Saipan then on to Okinawa until the war was over in 1945• He came home and spent one more year on Lookout Mountain. The next 4 ,Jcars he was assiv_tant Ra.np.er at 1 i.r Crc,-k ficadouarters. He c_uit the forest service to go to work for .browns lie �.nd Lumber Co. Later changeing to Boi , Cascade when they bought the mill. Myron and Aloha had one Son. When he was six months old they moved to McCall, where they boun:ht their home in Aia ^ust 1948. James finished school in McCall then went on to the University of Idaho. He is riow a mining- Engineer. The Myron McCoys are still living in McCall. Aloha Beck McCoy 1980 �� � L1 •i v r rr-ti'- Myron "Skook" McCoy EMMETT — Myron "Skook" McCoy, 76, of Emmett, died Sat- urday, Aug. 31, 1991, in an Em- mett hospital. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4, at the Emmett Cemetery. American Legion Post ##49 and VFW Post ##4900 will officiate. Myron was born April 19, 1915, at Mountain Home, the seventh child of Augustus and Jennie Avery McCoy. They moved to Yellow Pine where he attended school. He married Aloha May Beck on Sept. 16, 1936, at Cas- cade. Myron served during World War II with the 130th Battalion of Seabees. His battalion prepared the United States base at Okina- wa, and arrived there in advance of the main Marine landing. He worked at Boise Cascade in McCall for 30 years, before retir- ing to Emmett in 1980. Myron was a gentle and quiet man, and will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Survivors include his wife of Emmett; a son and daughter -in- law, James and Kathleen McCoy of Salt Lake City; a sister and brother -in -law, Verna and Jim Scovel of Caldwell; four sisters - in -law, Doris McCoy of Mountain Home, Blanch McCoy of Anchor- age, Alaska, Thelma Pirnie of Caldwell and Lila Downey of Cambridge; a brother -in -law, Jess Vanderpool of American Falls; and four nieces and six nephews. He was particularly close to a niece, Pat McCoy of Boise, and a grandniece, Cindy McCoy of Mountain Home. He was preced- ed in death by his parents, four brothers and two sisters. Friends may call today until 8 p.m. at the Potter Funeral Chapel in Emmett. S; a1'- New5 MaY tg� y COLLEEN L. "BABE" McCOY Colleen L. "Babe" McCoy, 63, died April 29, 1995, in Clear Lake, Calif. A potluck in Babe's memory will be held Saturday, May 27, 1995, at AlohaMcCoy's in Emmett, from noon on. Friends and relatives are invited. She was born July 7, 1931 at Cas- cade to Archie G. and Blanche 1. McCoy. Babe's early life was spent on the family ranch on Monumental Creek, Big Creek Ranger Station and Chamberlain Basin. Winters were spent at Emmett, where she graduated from her high school class in 1949. After school, she joined the U.S. Marine Corps, which she loved, and rose to the rank of sergeant. When she left the Marines, she was employed by Duffy Reed Con- struction on projects in Idaho, Mon- tana and Nevada as a payroll clerk. Later she moved to the San Fran- cisco Bay area, where she was em- ployed as a courier for Technicolor and Purolator, which transferred her to Clear Lake, Calif., where she lived for the last 15 years. She is survived by her mother, Blanch 1. McCoy of Cascade, who resides in a care center in Caldwell; two brothers and sisters in -law, Rob- ert S. and Reva McCoy of Aztec, N.M., and Joseph F. and Patsy McCoy of Cascade, also several nephews and nieces. She was preceded in death by her father, Gil McCoy, and her sister, Betty McCoy. _�.+ ,j teS V-kidh i�95 Blanche I. McCoy Blanche I. McCoy, 90, of Cascade, and formerly of Emmett, died Friday, Aug. 18, 1995, in a Caldwell care center. Graveside services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 23, at the Emmett Cemetery, under direction of the Potter Funeral Chapel, Emmett. Father Leonard MacMillan of McCall will officiate. A pot- luck will be held following the services at the home of Aloa McCoy, 1817 Pioneer Ave., Emmett. Blanche was born Aug. 15, 1905, to Simeon and Minnie Willey at the family ranch on the South Fork of the Salmon River. She spent her early years on the ranch until at age 16 she went "over the hill to Warren." She later moved to Yel- low Pine to attend high school. It was there that she met and married Gil McCoy. They resided in Yellow Pine, Stibnite, and at the family ranch on Monumental Creek until 1940. They moved to Emmett where the family "wintered," returning to Big Creek and Chamberlain Basin for summers. In 1951 they moved to Cas- cade where they lived together until Gil's death in 1964. Blanche continued to live in Cascade until 1974 when she moved to Anchor- age, Alaska. While there she attended the university and achieved her dream of obtaining a "college education." She earned several associate of arts degrees and continued her studies there until the age of 85. In 1991 she returned to Idaho, living for a time with her son in Council before moving to the care center in Caldwell. Blanche was proud of the fact that she was the niece of Norman B. Willey, the first governor of the state of Idaho. She is survived by two sons and their wives, Bob and Reva McCoy of Aztec, N.M., and Joe and Patsy McCoy of Cas- cade; eight grandchildren; 13 great - grandchildren; and three great- great- grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gil; and their two daughters, Betty and Colleen McCoy. ey�d�t July I�"3 Robert S. McCoy Bob McCoy died Thursday, July 9, 1998, aftera long battle with heartdis- ease. Bob was born Nov. 25,1929, at Em- mett, Idaho, to Blanche and Gil McCoy. Bob grew up in the cattle, ranching areas of Valley and Gem: counties, and on the McCoy Ranch? (Monumental Ranch) in what is now the Frank Church Wilderness area , His early working years were spent ranching, mining, and in various posi- tions with the U.S. Forest Service. Bob married his first wife Harriet in 1949, and together they had six chit - dren.They moved to the back country then to Cascade in the 1950s. He worked inroad construction all around the West until 1968. In 1968 Bob began working on pipeline construction which he contin- ued until his death. He married his cur rent wife Reva in 1967, and they lived 11 primarily in Aztec, N. M. Bob and Reva traveled pipeline jobs from North Africa west to the California coast. Bob was a back country pilot at young age. He had an artist's skill with, pencil, charcoal, and pastels. He en- joyed drawing animals and wildlife scenes primarily. Bob was preceded in death by his father, Gil; his mother, Blanche; and his sisters, Betty and Babe. He is sur- vived by his wife, Reva; his brother, Joe; and his children, Tim, Roxanne, Mike, Shannon, Leslie, and Gil, and their spouses. He had 12 grandchil- dren, three great - grandchildren, two nephews and one niece. Bob's ashes were spread over New Mexico desert area pipeline. A wake will be held at a later dat9; For informa- tion regarding this c_ ;Joe McCoy at (208) 382 -3500; "'Mike McCoy of (208) 634 -8602.