Loading...
Yellow Pine, IdahoMail Carrier's Bard Trip Cascade News �._ January 49 1918 volume III Number 41 D.G. Drake, who carries the mail between Cascade and Yellow Pine will not soon forget where he was and what he was doing while other folks were celebrating the Christmas holidays of 1917- On the in-- ward trip from Cascade, he was swamped in the poftenow just beyend, the 'Situmit g where he had to leave his horse and muck his wary through the snow about seven miles to the 41ohnson Creek station. From there he carried hay back to the animal to keep it alive while he could make the trip to Yellow Pine and back. On Christmas moaning Mr. Drake left Yellow Pine on the return trip, reaching the abandoned horse again after it had been marooned in the snow four days and nights. After getting his horse out the intrepid carrier again shouldered his burden of some forty pounds of mail and started again on his snowshoed for Ca4soade, reaching this place after a hard trip Sunday evening a little after dark. Mr. Drake says he is suro the boys who are fighting in the trenches have nothing on some of the fellows who are carrying Uncle Sam's bags over the mountain -tops of Idaho. Becoming alarmed at Mr. Drake's failure to reach Cascadep Frank Taylor and Bob Vernon had started out to search for him. Upon reaching Knox they found that he had arrived at that station with the mail. 198 0 197 will be followed by games and races, and one of the main features of • this year will be the frog race shared by all® Another high light will be the exhibit of the wood work (50 some odd pieces) done by the pupils during the school term. The articles shown this year are mostly birds and various colorful lawn decorations. 84 Yellow pine Coming Into .Prominence Cascade News MY 30, 1919 Volumn V Number 10 (From Daily Statesman.) Cinnabar deposits in the Yellow Pine basin bid fair to bring Idaho into the limelight as a quicksilver producing state. For the last several. ,years there has been more or less develop- ment of cirmabear cleAts and recent reports show some apparc:.tly valuable deposits. Specimens assayed in Boise during the last month from one of the properties showed values double the leading California properties and three times greater than the Oregon mines, according the United States metal lur,gical, survey. Several properties are being developed in the Yellow Pine. Several outfits have recently gone into the basin to do develop- ment work, although there is said to be three feet of snow on the level there at the preeent time. One company, had a crew of men working all winter in tunnel work. Extracting the quicksilver from the ore is an interesting problem. The cinnabar ore is placed in an air -tight compartment and a fire built underneath. Pipes similar to those us:d in a, whiskey' still run from the furnace, and when the prcipex temperature has bean- attained, the are gives off a smoke -like substance which condenses into quicksilver. The quicksilver is then placed in flasks which, when filled, weigh about 74 pounds each. They market value of a flask of quicksilver is now about $80, allthoueh during the war it reached $120. Yellow Pine Activity Cascade News June 27, 1919 Volumn V Number 13 Iassrs. Frank Nowak of Chicago and J. J. Robbins of Poise, arrived in Cascade Tuesday evening on their way to Yellow Pine, where they will look over the Alexander and Williams Antimon— mine and other properties owned by the Nowak Company, Incorporated, with a view to ascertaining what additional tools and supplies are needed, for the additional men to be employed f:-r the ceason's work. Extensive orperations will begin about July 15th. Mr. Robbins expects to have several large freighting outfits operating between Cascade and Yellow Pine during the present season. The Nowak Company is row ehi.ppi,r.L; to Cascade a cynn:.de plant and other machinery which is expect-A to arrive within a few days and will at once be taken in to the mines. 1199 Yellow Pine to Have Better Mail Service Cascade News November 21, 1919 Volunn V Number 25 Mr. Frank Kerby is in receipt of a letter from Senator John F. NWr,cntv saying: 'With further regard to the postal route from Cascade to Yellow Pine, I am advised this morning by the Fourth Assistant Postmaster General, Mr. Blakalee, that an accept,,ble proposal was received in response to advertisement, and orders have been issued establishing star route Na. 70317, once a week services during the entire year, effective December 1, 1919` and discontinuing the present service from the 30th instant. In addition to performing once a week service during the entire year, the contractor will be required to tra-wport not more than six hundred pounds of mail each trip during the period from July 1 to October 31, and not more than fifty pounds of mail each trip during the period from November 1 to June 30th of each yeas.:." Luc: ...new contract awarded to Mr. .abatei.n... Cascade News Volumn V December S, 1919 The first mail. From Yellow Pins L dex the new contract, awarded to Mr. Abstcin And effective Dec. 1, Came in on time 'WedneDdV, - evts�ng. The mail was brought in by Albert aennessey, who had to break: the trail through five feet of avow over the Cabin. creek xuvIt. Under the schedulo the nail will leave fellow Fine every Monday morning, arriving at Ca.scads WednesW evening; leaving this dace Thursday morn- ing, arrives at Yellow Pine Saturday everLing. 6()� Behne Still Boosting Cascade News June 18, 1920 Volumn Vi Number 30 A. C. Behne of Fellow Fine arrived tuesday on his way to Boise where he will meet. a party of eactern men who ere interested. in mining properties in the Yellow Pine distxict. Rr. Behne says the people of his section are much eluted over the prc3pects of being linked up closer witlx tba outside world as a result of road work planrad for the present season. He says the apecple who ' ve clung to that section and pinned their faith to its wonderful possibilities are now begining to realize that the waiting has not been in gain, as rapid development is sure to follow the building of a read that will make the transportation of machinery and supplies comparatively easy. Steps are being taken to build a school house at 'fellow Pine for the accommodation of a number of children who are now isolated from educational advantages. t 122 Yellow Pine Rancher Slain Cascade News September 19, 1930 Volumn XVI Number 27 Alleged Killer in Valley County Jail; is Silent Jim O'Neil, a man of about 50, of whom there is little known here, is in the County jail at Cascade and will face a charge of murder, as result of the killing of Charles Maples, well known rancher and miner of the Yellow Pine section, at the Jim Carpenter ranch four miles below Yellow Pine, on East Fork, Wednesday. Maples was shot through the heart with a 35 calibre rifle and was killed instantly. Coroner A. D. Robb brought tha body to Cascade Thursday and has prepared it for shipment. It is expected to be sent to Wisconsin for burial, where Maples has relatives. According to F. A. Hamilton, an eye witness and companion with Maples and O'Neil then at the point of the gun forced Hamilton, O'Neil cold- bloodedly shot Maples while he was sitting on an oil can in the door -yard talking to him. O'Neil then at the point of the gun forced Hamilton to drag the body into a ditch a short distance from the cabin and then started him for Yellow Pine, telling him to report that Maples had accidentally killed himself, and told Ham- ilton not to return. Hamilton reached Yellow Pine at about noon and Sheriff Wilson at Cascade was notified and as soon as possible, with Pxmseauting Attorney .Fred Taylor, Coroner A. D. Robb; and Village Marshall Enos Smith, left for the scene of the crime. They arrived at Yellow Pine to late in the day to make the trail trip down the river to the ranch, but went on the scene early next morning. They found O'Neil at the ranch where he surrendered upon being called upon to do so by Sheriff Wilson. O'Neil admitted having started to get out of the country and went into the mountains but said he lost his gun after placing it on 121 i I.gWER OF CHARLES MAPLE BY.JIM 0aNEIL Cascade News - - -- Yellow Pine Rancher Slain Vol, XVI September 190 1930 #27 Tried XVI December 17t 1930 #31 I* i i 124 O'Neil Received Preliminary Z.`--.ring Tuesday; Will Be Tried for Murder Cascade News December 17, 1930 Volumn XVI i Number 31 . Jim O'Neil, alleged killer of Charles Maples at`Yellow Pine a short time ago was given a preliminary hearing in the Probate Court Tuesday. He was represented by F M. Kirby as counsel. The hearing tools up .almost the entire day and numerous witnesses were examined before a large crowd of spectators. The hearing resulted in O'Neil being remanded to the District Court on a charge of first degree murder. 123 D the saddle of his horse and said he returned to the ranch because ` there was no use trying to make a get -a -way in that country. The Sheriff's party arrived in Cascade with the prisoner Thursday evening. Hamilton, Maples and O'Neil had been staying together on the ranch, O'Neil having come there within the past ten days after working in the mines at Meadow Creek and Deadwood Basin. O'Neil may possibly be brought to trial at the District Court session in Cascade in October. Vol" Z III N V yIEER 4r --- I A lb a e rt Pion C�,erg pas, es M® � Valley County of st one of its I oldest pioneer` this week w =th Albert C. Behnel Alw passing 0i He died j of. Yellow Pine, hosPita- i at the St. :I'te hospital. e into e Was 91 yars of age �•. Behne, who the Yeilo'w I ,. cam ears Pine country sr ore thaxx 5�sit of ago and homesteaded the of yellow what is now thereat faith . the Pine. He had section, and old - futur.e of that to refer to timers xecall he !i�d g en- Yellow Pine . as the comin ver of Idaho. He a well educated mar Iw2s and is largely responsible for Ye low Pine's . school system. Fo many years he served on the ei low Pine school board, and fact, was a member of th%Ie aL at the 'time of his dea . Yeah served as postmaster pine for 35 years. Wilbert C gehne ,was :born by Tennessee and .t P in that sts broth et who resist s by a ; He is "also survived unkno ,chose address is wn I Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History * I History Project "Step back in time in Yellow Pine" This page will be a collection from many sources. While you wait for the photos to load, scroll down to read the stories. More to come... NEW 03 -25 -04 Thanks go to all the authors whose works are presented here for the sake of history. "If you steal from one author, it's plagiarism; if you steal from many, it's research." Wilson Mizner (1876 -1933) Photo from "The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War" by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley - copyright 1977 Vq in I �111 Page 1 of 6 Yethm Pine as it lmkpd during t lee mine began optratian in 1936 and mining boom.. Scheelite and stibnite evert tungsten was discovered in 1941. There to necuaer the strategic minerair were 700 people employed in the area & /tungsten and antimony. An open pit 1942. "Yellow Pine is a 247 -acre community on the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, surrounded by national forest and 70 miles from the nearest town. This community, which just received telephone service in November of 1996, is truly one of the last remnants of the western wilderness. Its history is as rich as the nearby Stibnite and Thunder Mountain mining districts. "Yellow Pine began as a settlement on the Johnson Creek flat, about 1/4 mile upstream from the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River. In 1906, Albert Behne established the first Yellow Pine post office and mail service. Behne had a dream A grower of roses who loved classical music and opera, he envisioned a thriving city complete with street cars. In 1924, he received the patent on the 47 1/2 acres where the village presently exists, joining the Absteins and the Calls as property owners. In 1930, at the age of 76, he platted the present day Yellow Pine town site. Henry Abstein received the patent on the 160 acres north and east of the original town site in 1922. Although http://www,ruralnetwork.net/—yptimes/pagelO.html 4/4/2009 ' Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History Page 2 of 6 Abstein's primary interest was mining, he was also an active horticulturist and may of the apple trees that he planted are still living today. His original ranch has since been subdivided. Several members of his family remain in the area to this day." [From "Yellow Pine Cooks!" Community cook book organized by Y.E.S. [Yellow Pine Enhancement Society] These postcards are from the early 1980's ? ?? - the back of the top one says... Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677 Located 63 Miles North & West of Cascade The bottom one says.... Park's Yellow Pine Merc. Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677 Owned and operated by Gene & Bernice Parks. Everything for the Sportsman & Vacationer, including, Groceries, Gas & Oil, Hunting and Fishing License, Post Office & State Liquor Store. Open Winter & Summer to serve those who enjoy Idaho's Beautiful back country. Accessible in Winter by Snowmobile and Air only. Pub. By Robert Fries, 1312 Brooklawn, Boise, Idaho 83706 Made by Dexter Press, West Nyack, New York http: / /www.ruralnetwork.net/— yptimes /Pagel 0.html 4/4/2009 Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History Page 3 of 6 Yellow Pine [driving in from McCall c. 1982 - disclaimer - I would not try this route in a Cadillac!] "This is one of our favorite trips - breathtaking mountains, tumbling streams, idyllic campsites, yet on the fringe of civilization where you can still buy a roast beef dinner with cherry pie and get there in a Cadillac. "From McCall take the Lick Creek road and follow the signs at Yellow Pine Junction 3 miles from City center. Leave the pavement here for a good gravel road. (The road to Yellow Pine is usually open in June but don't count on driving to Big Creek until after July 4. Check locally.) ... "The drive along this creek [Lake Fork Creek] takes you through forested country, past small meadows, beaver damns and usually a few deer. Climb the summit (elev. 6,910) and you drop down on a canyon where the scenery is carved of granite peaks that rival Yosemite. Across the canyon, ribbons of waterfall cascade down the hillsides in silvery streamlets, and at Hum Creek a crash of water pours off the mountain generating enough energy to power the county. "Heading out for Yellow Pine you pass the Zena Creek Ranch (meals and lodgings) on a road that winds along the Secesh and later the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River. Here you're in a rock garden world where trees and shrubs and flowers vie for growth on slabs of gray rock that form the canyon wall. We watched kayakers here, ecstatic with this stretch of white water. "First time Idaho," they yelled, "But not the last." "At Yellow Pine you find a bit of the old west in the dusty street and frame buildings, board sidewalks or none at all. You get the local news off the bulleting board in front of the general store and cowboys have the right of way. We met an obliging one named Don, riding down the dusty main street, left leg in a cast and crutches slung across the horse's neck. He said it was a dependable kid's horse not likely to throw him. However, we still felt relieved when only one of them went into the bar that morning. "We liked Buck and Faye's too, a bar and grill where they serve giant hamburgers and where the mustached bartender sports a cowboy hat and smokes cigars. Live music on Saturday nights and you can bet the place http: / /www.ruralnetwork.net/— yptimes /page 1 O.html 4/4/2009 Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History Page 4 of 6 reels with boots and skirts, whiskey and tall tales. They make their own entertainment here. Big community barbecues are featured annually on July 4 and Labor Day. When someone suggested a TV installation on one of the mountaintops, the town spoke as one voice, "No, we don't want the damn thing." They don't want phones either. They like Yellow Pine the way it is and so do we. "The town has just about come full circle in the last 90 years. It began as a stop -over for miners on their way to Thunder Mountain and today it has a small boom on because of new mining activity in the area. Today the business of recreation also is important, both summer and winter. Larry Marks, owner of the Yellow Pine Lodge says, "I've seen 150 or 200 snowmobiles sitting on Main Street on a Saturday night. "All Services available here. Meals, lodging, gas and groceries. "There are three campground below Yellow Pine. The first one, Yellow Pine is 1 mile from town, Golden Gate is 2 miles beyond that and another 4 miles brings you to Ice Hole. All are attractive, wooded sites along Johnson Creek. Tables, grills, firepits, toilets. Excerpted from "The Idaho Rambler" Copyright March, 1982 by Betty Derig and Flo Sharp ISBN 0- 9609754 Printed in the USA by Lithocraft Inc. Boise, Idaho Above: present day Yellow Pine School Below: 1st dog team for Cox's in 1928. Lafe drove this team to school. Photos from "Idaho Mountains Our Home" by Lafe and Emma Cox - Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books "That fall Lafe stayed with Mr. Behne (pronounced Bee -nee), the founder of Yellow Pine, so he could attend school. Lafe developed great respect for this gentleman. Mr. Behne was a well educated man who had been a telegraph operator. He said he came from the East, but otherwise rarely talked of his past. He did a great deal of reading, especially the New York Times, to which he subscribed. He looked forward to the papers coming each week on the dog team mail deliveries." "At night, Mr. Behne would go down to Homer and Sadie Levandei s place to listen to the "Amos and Andy" show on the only radio in Yellow Pine. He always asked Lafe to go with him to guide him back to his shack, as his eyesight was poor. He wore really thick glasses." "Lafe's first teacher was Mrs. Dixie Hopkins. The student body was made up of Lafe and the Reed children from the South Fork of the Salmon. The Reed children and their mother stayed at the Abstein place east of town that winter. Each day the children walked over a mile and a half to school. Lafe says he can still see those girls walking through the snow, their long dresses dragging with the buildup of ice and snow on the hems of their skirts. "The teacher's cottage was next to the store and the school house south of that. All the buildings were of logs http://www.ruralnetwork.net/—yptimes/PagelO.html 4/4/2009 Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History Page 5 of 6 until later years. "The Yellow Pine School has a colorful history. When Lafe began attending in 1928, there had been a school in the community for eight years. The first Yellow Pine school was in a tent in 1920. Eight students were in attendance. In 1922 a log school house and a teacherage were built in the town proper. This was the school Lafe attended. It has since been torn down, but the teacherage remains as a private residence. "In 1936 a new one -room school was built with a woodshed adjoining. In a later year when the wood stove heater was abolished and oil heat installed, the woodshed was improved and became a recreation room. Our daughters both attended this school." Ibid. Pgs 31 -33 "Idaho Mountains Our Home" by Lafe and Emma Cox - Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books "We had a good time that winter [1943], meeting all the folks from Yellow Pine and Stibnite. There were more people in this community, with more women and a school. Yellow Pine had 3 bars, a store, post office and liquor store, and a hotel." "Most settlers in Yellow Pine were associated with the mines, or had a business there. The folks played an important role in establishing Yellow Pine, and people remained in the area for many years. "People have asked us why so many lived a long life (up into the 90's) in Yellow Pine. The best answer we could give was the clean fresh air. Surely not the home brew! "Some of the earliest settlers were: - Albert C. Behne (1854- 1945), who homesteaded in the basin in 1902. Established the village. - Henry T. Abstein, a well-known prospector and mining engineer -- also homesteaded there. "Mr. Behne and Mrs. Abstein were instrumental in getting a post office by writing letters -- to prove the need for a post office. Mr. Behne established the post office in 1905. - Theordore Van Meter, who built the first store, which is still standing today. - Homer and Sadie Levander, who purchased the store from Van Meter in 1926. - The Bert McCoy family, who built the first cafe. - Fay and Iva Kissinger, who built the first large hotel in Yellow Pine. Fay also established the water system for the village, or basin as it was called. - Ray Call and Bill Lotspitch, who built the first sawmill, which was eventually sold to Bill Newell and Fay Kissinger. - Al Hennessy, who was a prospector and the locator of the mine at Stibnite. He built several houses in the village and on Johnson Creek. - The John Oberbillig family, who located claims on Johnson Creek and later bought the Stibnite Mine from Al Hennessy. - H. H. Bryant, who came from Boise in the early 1920's and bought one of the homesteads on Johnson Creek that Al Hennessy had proved up on. The Bryants built a fox farm on their land. - Clem and Ida Hanson, who homesteaded the 260 acres 8-1/2 miles south of Yellow Pine. This is our retirement place now. - Alec Forstrum, who homesteaded the 160 acres in the early 1900's just a little over a mile from the Hanson ranch. In 1927 Alec sold this place to Clark and Beulah [Cox]. They built up the ranch as a recreational paradise. - Harry Withers, an early resident of Yellow Pine, who was a jack of all trades. Harry delivered mail by dog team, had a pack string, owned and operated a diamond drill at the mines, was a cook, a storekeeper and played music for dances. Harry died November 16th, 1994 at the age of 96. "Along with the ones mentioned, many others followed, who also helped to make Yellow Pine and the ranches so famous today. Much could be written of each settler, for they all contributed hard work and encouragement to this back country village. Mr. Behne envisioned Yellow Pine to be a large city come day, in its own beautiful mountain setting, but his dreams were never completely realized." Ibid. pg . 117 -121 "In 1945 Mr. Behne, the founder of Yellow Pine..., passed away at the age of 91. The funeral was held in the http: / /www.ruralnetwork.net/— yptimes /page 1 O.html 4/4/2009 Yellow Pine Times - Yellow Pine History Page 6 of 6 school, on a day in August. "A lady evangelist named Edna Abstein Lister, who formerly lived in the basin, returned to deliver the service to the crowded room. "It was a very warm day and her service was quite lengthy. It was not the type of sermon the miners, bar operators, pioneers and other natives were accustomed to hearing. "During the service one individual, with perspiration flowing from his forehead, became very perturbed. The evangelist had just told the mourners to look out the window as she waved her silk scarf in the air. She said, 'Watch Mr. Behne's spirit drifting in the air!' "At this point the disturbed fellow jumped up and shouted, 'I can't see a _ thing!' he stormed out of the room. "The evangelist cut the sermon short, finishing with sweet words of praise and respect for our dear friend. "Mr. Behne's body was laid to rest near his home, which was against his wishes. Lafe and many others collected money, a task that took about three years, and got permission to move his body to the proper Yellow Pine Cemetery, next to his friends." Ibid pg. 132 (right) Albert C. Behne the founder of Yellow Pine in the late 1800's. Mr. Behne lived 91 years. (above) Harry J. Withers, an early resident of Yellow Pine, who lived to see 96 years. Photos from "Idaho Mountains Our Home" by Lafe and Emma Cox - Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books Stories from Harry Withers coming next winter!!! History Project Home Page http://www.ruralnetwork.net/—yptimes/PagelO.html 4/4/2009 M lo-a fil,.5for(, cat Protect /0� / OS 9 YELLOW PINE � Sixty -seven miles from Zascade, the town of Yellow Pine is located on a flat Vnere Johnson Creek enters the East Fork of the South Fork of the main Salmon River. Yellow tine was first settled during the Thunder Moun- tain gold rush in 1902. The first log cabin belon, —.zd to a family by the name of Bair. Some of the other early settlers were A.C. Be,hne, Theo. Van - Meter, Charles Werdenhoff, Albert Henressy, and Henry Aostein. 1ne Past Office was established Many years before the wain road .-.as completeOl in 1919. Before the road was com- pleted -she old settlers would take turns carrying the mail on clog sleds. Homer Levander and Charley Ellison established the first store In 1924. The first sawmill was erected on the west edge of the town in .1922 and was destroyed by fire several years later. Two years after the sak-mill was bust, Pay Ki.ce-enger joined Ray Call and Bill Newell in it's operation. A larger Jaill was in the process of being moved to Stibnite. The oper- ation of t.e mill produced most of the timbers for the Sti- bnite mine and mill operation, also for the Yellow Pig district. Ili a report made by Professor D.C. Livingston, in.1919 stated that he believed that tme yellow mine area would be a large quick silver producer. This brougit sever-I mining outfits to the area to do development work. With all the mining outfits coming into the Yellow PL-10 area, a school dietrict uras formed in 1922 and a log school house was built -at that time. A year later a log cotta✓O ,was built to ho =a'the. school teacher. Mark Lawton Teas the first teacher in the new school house. - The citizens of Yellow Pine moved the school away from the business district in 1934 to the Golth west portion -of the town.. The school boasted of a piano that was taken from the flooded town ®f'.Hoosevclt. In 19x19 the teacher at the Yellow Pine school, lexa. Bertha White, reported that the piano "preserved it ° e tone quality in spite of the ' dunking' n,. The piano is still in use at tho school. Yellow Pine boasted -a population of 3; residents in the 1950 census. It has become a haven 'for big game hunters, fishermen, and in general peop -ALe who want- to get WWV, f ^oaa it all and enjoy nature in We rarest forms. : Lafe and &M Cox . have operated a dude ranch fo �,. the past 40 years at the original homestead. The ranch is loc- ated ten mile: from the townsite. Also some of the businesses st��7 open in•the "winter months and provide over night and food accodations for snow mobilers: Yoll�,w Pixie - refuses to the as most mining toan3 have; done, and still lives on. �7� m c ca'a 4t,5 �onlca,� (0(-(D j'e cE payt z -§ 3 r YELLOW PINE) IDAHO Ca. lclj 17'cwsy T a ^ 24t 1, 919• �o2 �n Teu bL� ;c • car c aB News, May 13, 1951 19, by 3)o�. 4 Povey, Page 20. II?71�? � x � }�C� � 9 '� HI. � . ^"#ne,a �•� r �., "��,.a .ar'r' ,�. n y� '.t�'�*�'E t.:an*:� f i �• .. -A K � 7.. .. Y � � � a max` ��• ! 3 �kT �Z«"[- i�'` �-yp� - �`����.:F � x �R � x � }�C� � 9 '� HI. � . ^"#ne,a �•� r �., "��,.a .ar'r' ,�. n y� '.t�'�*�'E t.:an*:� f i �• .. -A K � 7.. .. Y � � � a max` ��• ! 3 �kT �Z«"[- i�'` �-yp� - �`����.:F � x X1990 Page 6 PINE-i LOIo MT �G IBBONSVILLE 1 H FORK ;nLM II Coenlr• 93 28 • LEADORE CHALLIS MAY 75 28 ��.• 93 FANLEY CLAYTON 22 (OBSIDIAN 28 MACKAY • - AY�HOWE HUD iTA SN 33 N VALLEY 22 LAKE ILLE 6KETCHUM ARCO 20 bHAILEY 29 FAIRFIELD 93 .0 26 26 •CAREY IS � 15 t93 rO 26'SHOSMNE FALL 15 N 84 IEROME AMERICAN FALL • F BURLEY TWIN • 30 37 • ALBION ON • OAKLEY 71 • _A4 _ n SPENCER / ISLAt PARK n NTH. NY,•ASHTO' 33. REXBURG Dawes fF`, 2n VICTOPI •� PALISADES ; ALPINE TELLD r.ENRY BANC 0.0F• 30 `WLAVA INGS SPRING &DOWNEY ' MONTPELIER r OVID• •'L 91 PARISt 30 P ESTON dh GA I NT �N�HOLBROOK i RNnn > the retired life in Cascade. He is have one son, Don, who also lives in ellow Pine as a boy, Don has worked most of his life. He is interested in Aory and has taken information from and notes made by his mother, Emma, Don Campbell: a link to Central Idaho's historical past By Jean Vance as told by Don Campbell "I recall in the early summer of 1921 when I was not yet five, my Dad took me to a carnival that was set up in Emmett, Idaho and after I had ridden the horse on the merry- go-round we returned to the house to find a group of ladies calling on my Mother and wishing all 'good bye' for the following day we were to board the train for Cascade," said 73- year -old Don Campbell of Cascade. "After arriving in Cascade our belongings were loaded into a freight wagon pulled by two teams of horses and we headed for Yellow Pine." The Campbell family, consisting of Mark and Emma Campbell and son, Don, first stopped at Dan Drake's Lodge in Knox, Idaho. Established in 1898 by Charles C. Randall, Knox had become a major stop for miners taking the Thunder Mountain Road into Roosevelt. In 1917 Daniel G. Drake took up residence and built other structures which included a lodge. Campbell's history records show that the lodge was furnished with 17 beds and mattresses, 20 dining chairs and two tables, 15 dressers, 40 place- settings of dishes and three stoves - -one for cooking and two for heating. to tell his story. "After an overnight stay, ... ........ said. When fall came, Campbell and his mother left Yellow Pine with the mail carrier Henry Abstein, who with his buggy and one horse, made the trip in and out of Yellow Pine with postal deliveries. "Of course we stopped at the half -way house our first night out and in the morning we encountered a snow storm which made the traveling very slow. After a long day we arrived at Knox Lodge to spend the night. Campbell recalls riding from the Knox Lodge to Cascade in a truck driven by a man whose right arm was partially missing. He was intrigued at how the driver was able to shift gears by putting the partial arm into a ring that had been constructed atop the gear shift. Emma Campbell rode in the cab of the truck, her son and another man traveled in the back with a tarp pulled over them. They brought only their trunk and bed roll and boarded the New Plymouth -bound train at the Cascade depot. Mark Campbell joined his family two weeks later after completing the building projects in Yellow Pine. They stayed with Emma's parents the winter and summer of 1922- -only to return to the remote mining town in October of 1922 with a new baby son, Charles M. "Scotty" who had been born in Fruitland, Idaho on September 25. "We went back to Yellow Pine by the same means and route we had used in the fall of 1921. On the way from the halfway station to Yellow Pine, the tire came off the wagon and the driver made an exchange for another wagon with a road crew that was working nearby - -all this with my mother riding on the seat by the driver and holding my three - week -old baby Service building on what was known as the "Hansen crib" -- a structure that was about 3/8 of a mile along the bank of Johnson Creek. It was made of interlocking logs - -log cabin style - -yet laid up against the stream bank to stabilize the soil and accomodate vehicle travel on the new road. Campbell tells of an experience when he and another boy were trying their skill at using a cross cut saw: "I had my finger along the teeth when he pulled the saw cutting off the fingernail and into the finger. Of course, there were no medical facilities and infection prevention was a great concern. "My mother mixed up a remedy called "white linament" which consisted of eggs, turpentine and vinegar. After the first application you would have to run a mile to catch the person to apply it again. but it sure did prevent any infection!" Campbell says he still has the recipe if anyone would like to try it. Most of the time the children played with imaginary stick horses or trucks. In the wintertime they "did lots of skiing!" In 1923, $36.000 was allotted for the completion of the road which would be open in August to truck traffic. All during the summer months Mark Campbell worked on that road. In the fall, the school house completed, school began on October 15 with Miss Ida Woosley as teacher; and, with nine students. The school house was described as "nicely finished with beaver board (a type of compressed cardboard that was used in place of modern- day sheet rock- -about 1/4 inch thick), good windows and a fine floor." we went on to the halfway ctation which only had a " bunk house - -of sorts, a stable for the horses and another outbuilding. We stayed there the second night," he said. The next day the Campbell family arrived in Yellow Pine where they found a one room shack with two amenities - -a cookstove in the corner and a bunk on which they could throw out their bed rolls. said. When fall came, Campbell and his mother left Yellow Pine with the mail carrier Henry Abstein, who with his buggy and one horse, made the trip in and out of Yellow Pine with postal deliveries. "Of course we stopped at the half -way house our first night out and in the morning we encountered a snow storm which made the traveling very slow. After a long day we arrived at Knox Lodge to spend the night. Campbell recalls riding from the Knox Lodge to Cascade in a truck driven by a man whose right arm was partially missing. He was intrigued at how the driver was able to shift gears by putting the partial arm into a ring that had been constructed atop the gear shift. Emma Campbell rode in the cab of the truck, her son and another man traveled in the back with a tarp pulled over them. They brought only their trunk and bed roll and boarded the New Plymouth -bound train at the Cascade depot. Mark Campbell joined his family two weeks later after completing the building projects in Yellow Pine. They stayed with Emma's parents the winter and summer of 1922- -only to return to the remote mining town in October of 1922 with a new baby son, Charles M. "Scotty" who had been born in Fruitland, Idaho on September 25. "We went back to Yellow Pine by the same means and route we had used in the fall of 1921. On the way from the halfway station to Yellow Pine, the tire came off the wagon and the driver made an exchange for another wagon with a road crew that was working nearby - -all this with my mother riding on the seat by the driver and holding my three - week -old baby Service building on what was known as the "Hansen crib" -- a structure that was about 3/8 of a mile along the bank of Johnson Creek. It was made of interlocking logs - -log cabin style - -yet laid up against the stream bank to stabilize the soil and accomodate vehicle travel on the new road. Campbell tells of an experience when he and another boy were trying their skill at using a cross cut saw: "I had my finger along the teeth when he pulled the saw cutting off the fingernail and into the finger. Of course, there were no medical facilities and infection prevention was a great concern. "My mother mixed up a remedy called "white linament" which consisted of eggs, turpentine and vinegar. After the first application you would have to run a mile to catch the person to apply it again. but it sure did prevent any infection!" Campbell says he still has the recipe if anyone would like to try it. Most of the time the children played with imaginary stick horses or trucks. In the wintertime they "did lots of skiing!" In 1923, $36.000 was allotted for the completion of the road which would be open in August to truck traffic. All during the summer months Mark Campbell worked on that road. In the fall, the school house completed, school began on October 15 with Miss Ida Woosley as teacher; and, with nine students. The school house was described as "nicely finished with beaver board (a type of compressed cardboard that was used in place of modern- day sheet rock- -about 1/4 inch thick), good windows and a fine floor." Don Campbell now enjoys the retired life in Cascade. He is married to Rachel and they have one son, Don, who also lives in Cascade. Having lived at Yellow Pine as a boy, Don has worked in banking and accounting most of his life. He is interested in preserving Yellow Pine history and has taken information from public record, from pictures and notes made by his mother, Emma, and from his own experience to tell his story. "After an overnight stay, we went on to the halfway station which only had a °moo ' „ bunk house - -of sorts, a i stable for the horses and oo -. - oa - - -t a link to Idaho's hi! By Jean Vance as told by Don Campbell "I recall in the early summer of 1921 when I was not yet five, my Dad took me to a carnival that was set up in Emmett, Idaho and after I had ridden the horse on the merry- go-round we returned to the house to find a group of ladies calling on my Mother and wishing all 'good bye' for the following day we were to board the train for Cascade," said 73- year -old Don Campbell of Cascade. "After arriving in Cascade our belongings were loaded into a freight wagon pulled by two teams of horses and we headed for Yellow Pine." The Campbell family, consisting of Mark and Emma Campbell and son, Don, first stopped at Dan Drake's Lodge in Knox, Idaho. Established in 1898 by a Charles C. Randall, Knox had become a major stop for miners taking the Thunder Mountain Road into Roosevelt. In 1917 Daniel G. Drake took up residence and built other structures which included a lodge. Campbell's history records show that the lodge was S furnished with 17 beds and mattresses, 20 dining chairs and two tables, 15 dressers, 40 place - settings of dishes and three stoves - -one for cooking and two for heating. another outbuilding. We stayed there the second night," he said. The next day the Campbell family arrived in Yellow Pine where they found a one room shack with two amenities - -a cookstove in the corner and a bunk on which they could throw out their bed rolls. They moved in and spent the summer living in the shack along Johnson Creek. "The rest of the summer my father walked into students: Song - "America" by the audience; recitation - "Christmas Greeting" by Leona Wellman; recitation - "The Sugar Plum" by Donald Campbell; recitation - "The Only Kid" by George Hollan; play - "A Visit to Santa" by the school; solo- "Silent Night" by Louise Valberg; recitation - "That's Christmas" by Myron Hollan; recitation - "The Mortgage on the Farm" by Verna Hollan; recitation - "A Southern Christmas" by Donald Kennedy; play - "Celebrating Christmas in Mother Goose Land by the school; recitation - "The Pride of Battery B" by Leslie Hollan; recitation - "A Woman's Question" by Louise Valberg; recitation - "Always Christmas" by George Kennedy; song - "Don't Bite the Hand That's Feeding You" by the school quartet; play - "His Christmas Tree" by the school; recitation - "Preparation of Christmas Sights" by Donald Kennedy; readings - "The Other Boy" and "If I Should Die Tonight" by Ida Woosley;play- "Santa Living Toys" by the school. Christmas day was spent at the Johnson Creek Ranger Station with the Lorin Wellman family who traveled the four miles between Yellow Pine and the Ranger Station by horse drawn sleigh. (Mr. Wellman was in charge of the previously mentioned "Hansen Crib.)" During the winter of 1924 several people became ill and were taken out of Yellow Pine to see the doctor in Cascade by John Croco, the mail carrier. He was assisted by Ray Call, Mark Campbell or Lorin Wellman. Alex Forstom, 65, and James Edwards, 82, were both transported via dog sled. Even the teacher Miss Ida Woosley became and ill and left. Campbell does not recall if those who left ever returned; however, a new teacher, Miss Murphy was brought in on the return mail trip to oversee the one room school. With Campbell now in the 4th grade at age eight, his class boasted seven students. School was dismissed that May of 1925 with a community dinner and, of course, a school program given by the teacher and students. emerged as one of the pioneers of the Yellow Pine and Stibnite mining era," Campbell said. In November of 1924 Mark Campbell would start work in Cascade on the Moore building which later was known as the Mercantile or Coast to Coast building. Except for occasional visits he remained there until February 1925. The summer of 1925 brought visitors to the Campbell's Yellow Pine home. Mark Campbell's mother and sister came to see the family and Mark remained in Yellow Pine packing supplies by pack string to the various Forest Service lookouts. He also spent some of his time working on a barn at the Fred Holcomb ranch located down the East Fork River- - four miles from Yellow Pine. "We moved from Yellow Pine to Cascade in September of 1925," Campbell said, "where I started to school in the fifth grade with more kids around me than I had ever seen. The teacher was Margaret Patterson." The family moved because they had received acceptance for Scotty, the youngest son, to enter the Shriners hospital in December 16, 1925. Scotty and Emma Campbell remained in Portland until February 10, 1926. "I don't know the medical term, but basically, his left shoulder and arm did not develop," he said. The old, two -room, Campbell log cabin still exists as the back part of the Mahogony Bar in modern- day Yellow Pine. "As I look back, I am . sure my Dad was lured to the area by a prospector's dream of the 'gold mine in the sky' as there were any number of mining camps and lots of activities in the Yellow Pine area. "My Dad worked at building the sawmill in Emmett during 1916 and 1917 and I am sure he could have continued to live in Emmett and do his carpentry work but he wanted to do some prospecting. "My story is a very small part of the happenings that took place in the early days of the area. I am sure that a large number of folks endured hardships more severe than those encountered by my family. But looking back, I feel that my folks, Mark and Emma Campbell, were a vital part of what took place during those times." Campbell concluded ED U LEU The Catalina 25 National ampionship races are heduled for June 25 -27 at e Cascade, Idaho. The es are being hosted by the uthern Idaho Sailing sociation, Rostock -Boise arine (Catalina dealer), and it local Catalina 25 fleet, �4. The tentative schedule of rents calls for a southern aho Sailing Association gatta and Catalina 22 gional regatta on Saturday id Sunday, June 23 -24. The atalina 25 national iampionships will follow on [onday through Wednesday, ine 25 -27. Winds typically e light to moderate, with ine temperatures normally in e 70 -80 degree range. Contact Bob Entwistle at 08) 345 -6141 for more formaton. I` i K �is is not a fishing der- : nity to learn or relearn rvolr; 5 miles east of ist Highway 22 (Warm then south on the voir turnoff. Follow ar- 1990 (Idaho Free Fish - I not need a fishing Ii- 3h this day!) PM (There will be plenty :linic just to fish.) rpen fishing skills! To quire no competition or .tax, be with your family, iildren, your grandpar- Ichildren, your spouse, :quipment (some if you don't have any), nts, mosquito repellant, nscreen! Ice cream will 31 Share The _ Take A FREE (No 1( p 1 1 I$ to WHI 11 *Ftno♦ Trinc PLUMMER �nv[Mr 91 CALDER 95 By Jean Vance as n 3 told by Don Campbell •) 'SCLARKIA "I recall in the early HARVARD MOSCO,VJ • summer of 1921 when I was H, DEARY 0 ELK RIVER LOLO. MT. I not yet five, my Dad took 3 0DOWOIRNHAK RES 12 me to a carnival that was set IEWISTON• 12—"• •PIERCE up in Emmett, Idaho and wl\HFSTER• 11 after I had ridden the horse KAMIAH• 12 •LOWELL on the merry- go-round we 95 KOOSKIA • COTTONWOOD *` J returned to the house to find GRANGEVILLE• •ELK a group of ladies calling on r i ,L rd CITY my Mother and wishing all WHITE BIRD good bye' for the following •GI,BONSVILLE day we were to board the R IGG INS H FORK train for Cascade," said 73- `` : M „ year -old Don Campbell of NIW MEADOW COBALT � Cascade. YELLOW "After arriving in Cascade I,CALL ", PINE 28 93 our belongings were loaded 101INC II DONNFII.Y w • PoNDS into a freight wagon pulled WARM LEADORE • LAKE 20 by two teams of horses and CAMBRIDGE SF,ADE CHALLIS MAY MACK$INN e 95 75 20 •SPENCER II SLRA(IIC we headed for Yellow Pine." JP Ey •'.F ISER n• CP0.OEN 21 •STA_ ~,•AYTON3 22 15 SAINT The Campbell family, �FRUITLAND NK OWMAN •AND \\ ANTHON.,0ASHTON consisting of Mark and 1 .�P.K 1EAN:OBSIDIAN 84 52 i� HORSE • 28 33 Emma Campbell and son, FMME�SHOE •� 75 MAC KAY HOwE MUD REXBURG 33 55 BEND 0 33 DRIGGS_ Don, first stopped at Dan CALCWFLL IOAHO tl •ATLANTA LAKE (15- 20 PPe 21 CITY fore SHN VALLEY 22 2 26 RIRIET3IR Drake's Lodge In Knox, 11.G FEaTHERVIILE 6KETCHUM ARCO • Idaho. o iHAIIEY 20 IDAHO SWAN �' FAIRFIELD 93 26 FA_ LLSVALL Ey •,, ly Established m 1898 by 84 zo �- 26 PALISADES qc•6 Charles C. Randall, Knox 95 MURPHY �CAREY ALP 1:11 had become a major stop for MOUNTAIN HOME 75 15 miners taking the Thunder SILVER HAMMETT c CITY ,• (93 POCATELLO 34 Mountain Road into BRUNEALJ0GL ENNS 2F •HOSMNE 15N HEN0.Y FE 0.R' N ' BAIJCROFT Roosevelt. In 1917 Daniel aPC,iQ'rP `0 84 JEROME AMFRLL CAN • �• 30 SODA G. Drake took up residence BURLEY •LAVA SPRINGS �1 51 BUHL• TWIN HOTSPRINGS and built other structures • FALL Sy 30 37 •DOWNEV • ALBION MONTPEL IER o which included a lodge. ROGERSON• N 15 OVID*.�/ It li 77! ea 91 PARIS 3D Campbell's history records OAKLEY . 31 PCSTONtSAINT show that the lodge was 21 NOL BROOK � HARLES furnished with 17 beds and Don Campbell now enjoys the retired life in Cascade. He is married to Rachel and they have one son, Don, who also lives in Cascade. Having lived at Yellow Pine as a boy, Don has worked in banking and accounting most of his life. He is interested in preserving Yellow Pine history and has taken information from public record, from pictures and notes made by his mother, Emma, and from his own experience to tell his story. mattresses, 20 dining chairs and two tables, 15 dressers, 40 place- settings of dishes and three stoves - -one for cooking and two for heating. "After an overnight stay, t t the halfwa Total enrollment of the Yellow Pine one -room school in April of 1925. (L -R) Donald Campbell, Myron Hollan, George Hollan, Donald Kennedy, Elizabeth Smythe, Verna Hollan, Blanche Willey, George Kennedy. with two amenities - -a cookstove in the corner and a bunk on which they could throw out their bed rolls. They moved in and spent the summer living in the shack along Johnson Creek. "The rest of the summer my father walked into Yellow Pine to work on a log cabin which would become our home. He also spent time working on the new school house and teacher's cottage," Campbell W%;; wen on o y station which only had a 91 "Y ", bunk house - -of sorts, a stable for the horses and another outbuilding. We stayed there the second - : night," he said. �. The next day the ' Campbell family arrived in Yellow Pine where they found a one room shack Total enrollment of the Yellow Pine one -room school in April of 1925. (L -R) Donald Campbell, Myron Hollan, George Hollan, Donald Kennedy, Elizabeth Smythe, Verna Hollan, Blanche Willey, George Kennedy. with two amenities - -a cookstove in the corner and a bunk on which they could throw out their bed rolls. They moved in and spent the summer living in the shack along Johnson Creek. "The rest of the summer my father walked into Yellow Pine to work on a log cabin which would become our home. He also spent time working on the new school house and teacher's cottage," Campbell Christmas" by Myron Hollan; recitation - "The Mortgage on the Farm" by Verna Hollan; recitation - "A Southern Christmas" by Donald Kennedy; play - "Celebrating Christmas in Mother Goose Land by the school; recitation - "The Pride of Battery B" by Leslie Hollan; recitation - "A Woman's Question" by Louise Valberg; recitation - "Always Christmas" by George Kennedy; song - "Don't Bite the Hand That's Feeding You" by the school quartet; play - "His Christmas Tree" by the school; recitation - "Preparation of Christmas Sights" by Donald Kennedy; readings - "The Other Boy" and "If I Should Die Tonight" by Ida Woosley;play- "Santa Living Toys" by the school. Christmas day was spent at the Johnson Creek Ranger Station with the Lorin Wellman family who traveled the four miles between Yellow Pine and the Ranger Station by horse drawn sleigh. (Mr. Wellman was in charge of the previously mentioned "Hansen Crib.)" During the winter of 1924 several people became ill and were taken out of Yellow Pine to see the doctor in Cascade by John Croco, the mail carrier. He was assisted by Ray Call, Mark Campbell or Lorin Wellman. Alex Forstom, 65, and James Edwards, 82, were both transported via dog sled. Even the teacher Miss Ida Woosley became and ill and left. Campbell does not recall if those who left ever returned; however, a new teacher, Miss Murphy was brought in on the return mail trip to oversee the one room school. With Campbell now in the 4th grade at age eight, his class boasted seven students. School was dismissed that May of 1925 with a community dinner and, of course, a school program given by the teacher and students. "It was during the summer of 1924 that my Dad worked on the buildings at the Golden Gate mining camp near the Johnson Creek Ranger Station. The camp was the undertaking of remained there until February 1925. The summer of 1925 brought visitors to the Campbell's Yellow Pine home. Mark Campbell's mother and sister came to see the family and Mark remained in Yellow Pine packing supplies by pack string to the various Forest Service lookouts. He also spent some of his time working on a barn at the Fred Holcomb ranch located down the East Fork River- - four miles from Yellow Pine. "We moved from Yellow Pine to Cascade in September of 1925," Campbell said, "where I started to school in the fifth grade with more kids around me than I had ever seen. The teacher was Margaret Patterson." The family moved because they had received acceptance for Scotty, the youngest son, to enter the Shriners hospital in day Yellow Pine. As I look back, I am sure my Dad was lured to the area by a prospector's dream of the 'gold mine in the sky' as there were any number of mining camps and lots of activities in the Yellow Pine area. "My Dad worked at building the sawmill in Emmett during 1916 and 1917 and I am sure he could have continued to live in Emmett and do his carpentry work but he wanted to do some prospecting. "My story is a very small part of the happenings that took place in the early days of the area. I am sure that a large number of folks endured hardships more severe than those encountered by my family. But looking back, I feel that my folks, Mark and Emma Campbell, were a vital part of what took place during those times." Campbell concluded. "Anything you can do..." Donald and his brother Charles (Scotty) Campbell in August 1925 at their Yellow Pine home. i4. The tentative schedule of ,ents calls for a southern .aho Sailing Association gatta and Catalina 22 gional regatta on Saturday A Sunday, June 23 -24. The atalina 25 national lampionships will follow on [onday through Wednesday, lne 25 -27. Winds typically e light to moderate, with [ne temperatures normally in e 70 -80 degree range. Contact Bob Entwistle at 08) 345 -6141 for more formaton. LA his is not a fishing der - mity to learn or rele2 rvoir; 5 miles east ist Highway 22 (Wa then south on t voir turnoff. Follow 1990 (Idaho Free Fi not need a fishinc sh this day!) PM (There will be pie ,linic just to fish.) ,rpen fishing skills! :quire no competitior :lax, be with your fan. , Share The Good Take A Frie FREE FIS (No License 1990: 1991:, iildren, your grandpar- lchildren, your spouse, equipment (some if you don't have any), nts, mosquito repellant, nscreen! Ice cream will e! 37 r 71 p7 COUP A�M00 F ' WHITE WI ' 112 Day, *Float Trips '*Prices start at $30.00 *Group Rates LICFNSED 6 ' Phone 621 home down !1 L - - - -- 193 YELLOW PINE Cascade News - - - - -- Henry Abstein Tells Colorful History of Yellow Pine Area Vol. XXXVI May 18, 1951 Tr '142 Mail Carrier's Hard Trio Vol III January 14, 1918 #1 41 Yellow Pine to Have Better Mail S_.^vice Vol. V November 21, 1919 #25 "new contract awarded to Mr. Abstein.... Vol. V December 5, 1919 #37 HENRY ABSTE IN TELLS COLORFUL. HIS'T'ORY OF Y`,ELL04 PINE NMNING ,AREA. Taken from; "Cascade News " May 18, 1951 Volumn XXXVI Number 42 The foll -) ing historical account of the Yellow Pine dining area was submitted.tb the NEWS by 'Mrs. Bertha White, teacher of the Yellow Pine school, who in tilrn obtained mach of her information from Henry Abstein, one of the earliest living settlers of that area. Mrs. White says that as a teacher, she thinks the Yellow Pine folks are unusually cooperative with the school and that they 'back the teacher 100 per cent, which she says has made it a pleasant three years for her there. The Yellow Pine school has one of the smallest enrollments of any school in the nation. The three pupils enrolled this year are Janet and Roxie Cox, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. La£e Cox, and Dennis Peterson. This is Mrs. White's third year as instructor there. Her home is near Donnelly where she and her husband own and operate a ranch. Mrs. White said that the piano in use at the school is definetely an instrument with a !'past." It was taken from the submerged mining town of Roosevelt shortly after the turn of the century, and has pre- served its tone quality in °spite of the "dunking." Mrs. White's story follows: On the Stibnite road about 67 miles from Cascade, Yellow Pine, Idaho, located on the beautiful flat where Johnson creek enters the East Fork of the South Fork of the main Salmon, was first settled dur- ing the Thunder Mountain gold rush of 1902. The attraction at the time was placer gold. Some of tha old timers who bucked elements to help 195 put Yellow Pine on the map were A.C. Behne. Theo. wan Meter, Charles Wer'1enhoff, Albert Hennessy, -and Henry Abstein. The principal supply point in those days was Thunder City, about four miles southeast from the present county seat town, of Cascade, which at that time had a large general store (Logue Bros.) feed barn, hotel, and saloon. In 1903 a road was constructed to Knox (at that time called "Transfer" because the wagon loads were transferred to pack mules and horses). The Thunder Mt. wagon road was completed about 1905 via "Twin Bridges" on Johnson Creek, 12 miles south from Yellow Pine.. The post office of Yellow Pine was established many years before the road was finally completed to Yellow Pine in 1919. It was about this date when the Cox ranch, Abstein's, Holcomb place, Behne, and Ray Call homesteads were filed on. For the first several years, before Star Route service was granted the old settlers in Yellow Pine took turn about making trips out to bring in the mail. This at times was quite a chore in the winter as was the case in later years, even with dog sleds. The Profile Trail was not cut thru until 1912. The Profile Mining District was started about the same time in 1902. The trail travel at that time going around from Profile via Quartz Creek over "Jacob's Ladder" (back of the present Abstein Ranch where this trail forded the East Fork of the South Fork) continuing on then through Yellow Pine to Knox (Transfer) for supplies. The first Yellow Pine store was started in 1924 by Homer Levander and Charley Ellison. From this the surrounding camps were supplied by pack train. The road to Profile and Big Creek was carried on through finally in 1931. 196 Stibnite camp was started by the Bradleys about 1926, JolLn Oberillig and his associates having carried the prelimin.ari prospecting and ex- plorations for mazy years prior. In .fact PrinCle Smithte discoveries antedated the Thunder Mountain rush of 1902. The first sawmill in Yellow Pine was erected in 1922 by Racy Call and Bill Newell« Two years .later Fay Kissinger joined with them in a slightly larger mill on the west edge of the townsite. This was destroyed by fire several years later. The present larger sawmill (which at this writing is being moved to Stibnite) is situated down the river 3 miles and was erected by Fay Kissinger, and Frank Francis. Most of the large demand for timbers and lumber for the Stibnite mine and mill operations, and locally at Yellow Fine, was produced at this sawmill. .&bout 1922 Yellow Pine School District was formed and the settlers and prospectors around built a log school house. The following; year a log teacherage or cottage was built. Turk Lawton was the first teacher. Both of these log structures still remain in the town of Yellow Pine. About 1934 the Yellow Pine citizens decided to move the school away from the surrounding business district and A.C. Behne deeded to the school two lots in the uouthwest corner or Yellow Pine townsite. Here the present roomy school house and comfortalble teacherac-i was built. School has been conducted here ever since. Sometimes the at- tendance has reached over 16 and at other times dropped to almost one,. During the recent school term 15 pupils were enrolled, however only three attended the full year. School -i11. be out Friday. May 18, with the traditional picnic on that day honoring the pupils. All the town folks will share with them in a big covered dish lunch at noon. This 197 will be followed by games and races, and one of the main features of this year will be the frog race shared by all. Another high light will be the exhibit of the wood work (50 some odd pieces) done by th; pupils during the school term. The articles shown this year are mostly birds and various colorful lawn decorations. with the late Jake Jensen on the left, and, to the right, the late Joe Davis, the late Eric Jensen and a friend who is tentatively Identified as John Routson. Rack From Retreat Early Yellow Pine District Settlers Battled Hardships in Mountains By EARL WILLSON YELLOW PINE —This writer, who has frequently been refer- red to both sarcastically and humorously as: "Long Line" Willson, or preferably just as "Gabby" Willson, has returned to his retreat atop Profile Sum- mit and the adjacent areas af- ter nearly a months seige in the Boise Veterans Hospital. There successful efforts were made to arrest a badly hemor raging stomach ulcer that held him in that wonderful institu- tion completely cut off from his regular line of research into the lives of those early day pioneers and their primitive way of life. In this area, a road of sorts now winds its way up to this cabin's steps where a salt lick belongs exclusively to our ant- lered friends, and occasionally even a mother ventures near with her two last season's "two - heads" — albeit a little alert but nevertheless content to get her share of the mineral that even the brightly colored birds seem to have a monopoly on during the midday hours. Shadows Descend And now, the deepening shad- ows descend on this domain from which we have such a magnificent view of Coin Moun- tain being tipped by the setting sun, even as this promontory is the first pinnacle over which that celestial body rises to again bathe us and our surroundings with the blessed light of long sweetly scented days and short nights. As we reminisce further in retrospect, back to the turn of this century, we can see where the western slope of Coin Moun- tain is covered with the stark remains of dead and charred lodge pole pines that tower grotesquely above a new stand JOHN ROUTSON, now living in Weiser, was an early day pioneer of the Big Creek area of the Thunder Mountain dis- trict. He carried mail into edwardsburg over the Elk Creek Summit and rained and prospected, as well. He is now in his 90's. THE LATE Albert Hennecy was the original locator of the now defunct Bradley Stibnite mine near Yellow Pine. He owned other prospects in the Thunder Mountain region and packed mail into Roosevelt in the early days. He died in 1956 at age 80. 1i G ` of young seedlings and increas- ed highland grazing made pos- sible by increased light. Even the eastern slope below where our original cabin stood, presented the same picture (where now a thick stand of balsam, pinon pine and an oc- casional black pine towers into the heavens and obscures our former view down below where Profile Creek meanders in a southerly direction toward the east fork of the Salmon River and Yellow Pine Basin. Early Traveler This is remindful too, of the late Pringle Smith — that ec- Centric character, and native born southerner, who each sea- son made his regular pilgrim- age into the back country with his pack string. He refused to cross any mountain stream over any newly constructed pack bridge, because, as he said, he believed in traveling the bridge that had carried him safe - ly across during all the past years. Few pack bridges there were though, in those early days, and ,the fording of swollen mountain streams was often difficult and hazardous in the rugged ter- rain adjacent to the Copper Camp on lower Big Creek, and up toward Fern Creek and the quick silver mining prospects then owned by Pringle and his associates, then later taken over by the late John Ober - billig and successfully operated by that pioneer under difficult conditions for many years. Those were the days too, when the late Albert C. Hen - necy owned what later became the Yellow Pine Mine and the thriving inland town of Stib- nite, owned and operated by the i Bradleys. Trip Recalled Reminiscing further into the past, this correspondent can re- call a stormy ski trip across this then "no mans land," and an overnight stop with Hennecy before continuing the trip into the upper reaches of Profile. That, incidentally, was the rug- ged Irishm*n who, among other exploits, had the grueling task that many times forced old Hennecy to take shelter in the lee of a certain huge rock and, an improvised lean-to. Here he would subsist entirely on his usual ration. of chocolate and raisins until the storm Permit- ted him to continue the trip on his long skis. In later years, "Old Al," was equally proficient so they say, in the manufactur- ing of a special brand of "moun- tain dew," often referred to as "squirrel whiskey." T h o s e were troublesome times in the wilderness areas, when such characters as those depicted in the accompanying photographs lived that way and loved it. Those were the days too, when the mountaineer might be overtaken by "cabin fever," to the point where he and his partner had violent quarrels or even came to blows i before spring. However, there was that element of closely knit! ties that immediately took over when an associate or any far flung neighbor needed assist- ance. In this hour of need, all differences were forgotten and the only concern was to render succor to a stricken partner. v No Communication Often this assistance was dif- ficult in those early days be- cause of the primitive areas vast extent, and the settlers of- ten lived isolated in these far-1 flung areas where no line of communication was available and contact with a fellow man sometimes extended into weeks or even months. Then when death overtook', any unfortunate mountaineer,' no undertaker nor minister of the gospel presided over the', remains. Usually a rough lum- , ber casket was the individual's last resting place, but very of- ten not even a wooden box was available but the remains. were I swathed in a blanket before be- ing lowered into a hastily dug grave. Today many of these graves dot the terrain all over the back country, most of them un- marked, but mute evidence of the high cost of pioneering in any isolated areas. Some of thej more fortunate, however, are! resting in a pioneer cemetery; like the one in Yellow Pine I where community civic pride and mutual interest provides an inclosure and the facilities nec- essary to beautify the perman- ent pioneer shrine. THE RED METAL MINE in the early 1900's was the site of active diggings. Left to right are "Profile" Sam Wilson, George Blivens, Charles Ellison, the original locator of the mine, and Henry Abstein. vl( Cascau e- /�(,-Ws - KISSINGER HOTEL AND SERVICE STATION YELLOW PINE ..The Kissinger Hotel, operated by Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Kissinger, is a new establishment in Yellow Pine, having been in operation since early last spring. The rooms are furn- ished with new beds, mattresses, and chairs which are the most up- to -date and comfortable furnishings that could be obtained. Short orders and regular meals served at all hours are cooked by Mrs. Kissinger, who is a very capable and exper- ienced cook. The upstairs of the building is a nice sized dance hall where pleasant and enjoyable dances are held. Mr. Kissinger intends to build an up -to -date and fully equip- ped garage next to the hotel. He handles Shell products and has ice, for sale. Stop at the Kissinger Hotel and Service Station when you are in Yellow Pine. HOUSEHOLDER HOTEL' YELLOW PINE Mrs. Lee Householder invites you to stop at this cozy, home -like place, which ehe has managed ,since June 1, 1936. Mrs. Householder serves short order and regular meals at all hours and her excellent cooking and fair prices have won her an enviable reputation. This hotel has eight nicely furnished rooms which are rented at reasonable prices. When you are in Yellow fine, whether for just a few minutes, a day, or longer, stop at the Householder Hotel and enjoy the conveniences and cordial- ity that are extended by Mrs. House- holder. ALBERT C. BEHNE YELLOW PINE Mr. Behne has made his home at Yellow Pine for 33 years. He Is an authority on the Yelow Pine Mining district and knows all the early day history of the west and especially the Yellow Pine and Thunder Moun- tain country. When you go through Yellow Pine be sure to stop and get acquainted with this interesting old - timer. Mr. Behne has been post- master at Yellow Pine for 30 years. This is the oldest postoffice in Val- ley County. He also has charge of the only telephone exchange in. that section with a line to Cascade and one to McCall. Mr. Behne has great faith in the future of the Yellow Pine district and, as he is _a very in- teresting and convincing talker, the people to whom he states his views are also firm believers in the future of this beautiful and rich section of country. WHITE'S FILLING STATION AND LUNCH ROOM YELLOW PINE This attractive service station and lunch room was built by Mr. and Mrs. Ray White, and opened for bus - iness on July 1, 1936. They expect G -/93.:�- to build several new, modern tourist cabins to be ready for early spring use. Bottled and canned beer, can- dies, smokers' supplies, and novel- ties are carried in stock at present and Mr. White expects to have draught beer by next spring. They carry a complete line of fishing tackle in stock and next spring will put in a full line of sporting equip- ment— ammunition, cameras, lunch goods, etc. Short orders and regular meals are served at very reasonable prices. Mr. and Mrs. White, have lived in the Yellow Pine district for five years and are well liked by ev- eryone who is acquainted with them. Stop at White's Filling Station and Lunch Room when you are in Yellow Pine, WM. NEWELL YELLOW PINE Mr. Newell has operated the saw- mill at Yellow Pine for several years. He makes-,mine timbers, planed sid- ing and flooring, and any lumber that is used in construction work. He efficiently serves his patrons and his sawmil is an asset and a great convenience to the people of that section. Mr. Newell is a long -time resident of Valley County, having lived in the vicinity of Cascade for several years before moving his fam- ily to Yellow Pine. He is an ener- getic citizen and has great faith in the future of the Yellow Pine Min- ing Distrief. YELLOW )PINE MERCANTILE YELLOW PINE The former H. S. Levander Co., store in Yellow Pine hhs been owned by Callender's Mercantile since July 7, 1936, and capably managed by Mr. Howard Evans for the past year. This is the only store in Yellow Pine and has a stock of general merchan- dise— groceries, dry goods, drugs, fishing tackle,' ammunition, and mining equipment included. Mr.' Evans is also special liquor distri- butor for the state. The Yellow Pine Mercantile is the oldest store in the Yellow Pine district and it has a good reputation for dependability and service. Mr. Evans is very ac- comodating and will appreciate your patronage. Trade at the Yellow Pine' Mercantile when you are in Yellow' Pine. 7-7m Casca&,­ A�wi - 1 ,73s-- V O DUDE RANCH JOHNSON CRWEK The V O Dude Ranch was estab- �lfshed'in 1925 by Mr. and Mrs. Clark Cox, who have built a nine room lodge that is the last word in hunt- ing lodges.. There is a dining room where meals are served by Mrs. Cox, and a large living room that is furn- ished in true hunting lodge style stuffed birds, deer heads, bear skin rugs, coyote skins, and a large stone fire place, is fact, this lodge is per- fectly furnished for such a place. Mr. Cox is the perfect host and, as he knows the country, he can tell you where to hunt or fish. The V O Dude Ranch is 55 miles from Cas- cade by auto, in the heart of the big game country and Mr. Cox has about 60 head of pack stock and equipment to take out several parties at one ,time, at reasonable prices, and has guides that are good packers and are'I thoroughly familiar with the coun -' j try. If you want to hunt bear, elk, deer, mountain sheep, mountain goats, cougar, go fishing, or just go 'but in the wilds ", go to the V O Dude Ranch on Johnson Creek. bey i �e t � � ( r P ' P i y :µ. w I/ + 1� 11 -.,. S L .. ` ry `,� � - ."y�- .�........, -. .' ;"";. :. ,, � x .. i _. ,. ,,..r.. „ /�,�.. �l` FT ft\ / � �/d .�Y f ri � gyp. �� r� i t � �, � "."�' EA .4do'. r y 9' �s i fr 4W 4, 7� 1 V z � s t: IJV P � I � � M 4 )AA El �� � .. y� �1 * ...4.� � � ' �� �x r , iV � �"� w�'4 � �°y� f .. � nP' fR'`� n �` ,' �' ! r � A., �.A S 1'2P` f y� r '"A r' � 1 O.. ;'? r,°.' /� �-, r .0 . , /'� �� > -. � �n_ c ra .� ':' t „ � ._ _- t _ �.a. .-�„a� r �� m. � �' -�` .��� � `; . /''i �� � ,F _. m + f ,A f OV o op �F " 1 k� T. ,1 F I l � c 7...r 11 Ell 4 ^7.rHNw . lL� f e it of E 44 y". VAL"'. ei I 1 111, ton_ 0 -vA S' liv VN ti o� Vk t1V� 1 ` .14 j ej tv s ....� mss,.•,,,,, �, , . 1,.� ..- r�,,,. M••�...�_,.� "' �..°�"' -�r'� �.. • - °'.. � �.°•..,.� ,:.tea �, vA, a 1 0 0 v n / ^/) ••VV11 �l� v Fpe*l e man Cr 0. 1 4b, AL ti +-" r. 4 IVY - S t ! 3 R C.yF„!�.: : It �r 1 b,r u r 0 77" 4 (f:p 14, n }r Y�„ �' I m r9 'Lt, � /12tL l Inc!/ � �•- . f 'eve '1 � t Q rn O-y � � �� PdIP k e i%i r, r1,r UP' m u C-&,02 b {�Z oLl Q l S Ian q-e i To NuA s t Yt %e-r' 4 (-0177 ra 14- 0 au -Z ell, 0 cw OA We %i^ `� �`'-� -cam... 7'C� -�. CIL-, a N 1�2 f eu� 'Su"oz, vyyu 4L-(, '4 AI/A U 160 U l 62, L� i 02 � pill. 1 { 1 cZ �rrc 77'1 a,tia rL _ ✓ �r�Z� D 3 I �1 P lot �- Q a. 103 ! ca 6 pi 0 �j 101 I PIT 15:kj� It 3 j A L94-,"�2A CALAL YY') wt�,� J c4ot- PtUVIJ- e . r , l 3 ►� � LIc�J �- 1 3 joy ,.t.3 Igo --ra�t- 41jz�-- �l cs32 r i( et i, r� 103 iuv1 r Le I l � (tom � r13�cUr✓ t� -�.2D2 3 t p - - • ,n1 C'. V.8. o\�k bokl �iZ! � e�►i•cE N- e�,cfrulssan t t87 • tVCA RJ 41:r to lqi 1"571 I v K nA, Cabe fg, -QOW� �y9.3 C.i.G ,Zp �' 0 �v � acc21� T � 0 0 eal�i 7,/ra AWE oaf 0 PC i k'�kc_ C14 c..- , JMI PG r 14,E ( _ dv� �Y-3 b3q- Al l� 836 ti l��tt� cak i°0, 3. b l'c t-�L O a " 63 a-x F7 P-t4� 6�� 0 4x, • THE FIRST SCHOOLHOUSE in Yellow Pine is shown, along wizn tine w2wiier a au—sa. They were constructed in 1922. fold Stampede at Thunder Mountain Brought New Life to Yellow Pine Area By EARL WMLSON YELLOW PINE —This story is about Yellow Pine and its site that took root among giant ponderooa trees in a meadow' filled with quaking aspens and clumps of willows. A remote settlement, it actual- ly came into existence just after' the well known Thunder Moun- tain gold excitement, but was of little importance even as a tiny village, until the advent of the Bradley Mining Company operations, and subsequent es- tablishing of Stibnite at the Yellow Pine mine near the head- waters of the east fork of the south fork of the Salmon River. At the time of the Thunder Mountain gold stampede into the Monumental Creek area, Yellow Pine was practically an uninhabited "basin" only a very few miles above 'Dead Man's" Bar and the Regan cabins on the east fork where isolated placer mining operations were carried on by the sluice box and the gold pan. Today, these cabins are a tumbled down de- cayed pile of logs, among which a crude sign was found a few years ago and is now on display over the door at the Yellow Pine mercantile store. The very skillfully cut lettering showed that the cabins were built in 1876, and occupied the winter of 1885 and 1886. Later the struc- ture known as the Buckb.orn cabin on Regan Flat, was ap- parently occupied by a pros- pector known as Fox. • • « « • • ALBERT C. BERNE, first postmaster, district mining recorder and justice of the peace at Yellow Pine, is shown. The picture wa,4 taken inside the post office just prior to the turn of the century. 'Three Cabins Built When this correspondent first Ientered Yellow Pine in 1907, ac- jcom anied b his father, the (late "Profile by there were only three cabins —the first to be built in the area was un- occupied, and the other two were inhabited by the late Theo - dove Van -Meter and the late Al- bert C. Behne who finally be- came the postmaster, mining recorder, justice of the peace and the founder of Yellow Pine. Contrary to some people who connect Yellow Pine and its lat- er business and social activities with the Thunder Mountain era, may we set the record straight by saying that it was many years later before a few scat- tered log cabin homes were erected, or any places of busi- ness opened up in Yellow Pine —in fact not until the Bradley mining operations at the Yellow Pine Mine seem permanent, that the hamlet even reached the proportion of a village. Then its fatherly founder, Mr. Behne, who had applied for a post office in 1905, carried his own mail from the Johnson Creek bridge (now known as Twin Bridges) for at least once a week until finally the Roose- velt- Thunder Mountain r o u t e was abandoned and in turn re- routed to Yellow Pine about the year 1909. The site of Yellow Pine, more commonly referred to in the old days as Yellow Pine Basin by the few scattered patrons of the post office just preceeding the turn of the century, was only considered a very beautiful meadow nestling among the sur- rounding ponderosa forests, and inhabited by denizens of the ad- jacent areas —a place too, where the few scattered sourdoughs might drop into from the high, snow blanketed areas during the early spring months and somewhat relieve themselves of bad cases of "cabin fever" con- tracted by all too much isola- tion. Homemade Brew "Cabin fever" could be arrest- ed, at least temporarily, by drowning it in the contents of Mr. Van- Meters open barrel of home brew he called "old hen." Actually a mixture of raisins and other assorted fruits and juices that made up a concoc- tion so highly impregnated with sugar that one tin cup full of the alcoholic beverage would either take one blissfully out of this world or loosen the tongue at both ends. Incident- ally too, perhaps "Old Van" had the only tomcat in Idaho that could catch enough mink dur- ing the winter months to keep him in tobacco from the pro- ceeds derived from the mink pelts —at least that's the way the story goes. The Yellow Pine of today is not just an attraction for the surrounding "hillbillies" and the outside tourist, hunter or fish- erman. Denizens of the sur- rounding yellow pine forests, after which the settlement was named, still wander through and around the town even as their predecessors did in the ancient meadow, perhaps even in pre - historic times. Even the bear, whose ancestors came down out of hibernation from the high elevations early in the spring to feed on Mr. Behne's garbage dump, seemingly are just as curious as to man's re- cent endeavors in the village. And no doubt attracted by the scent of food lingering around the homes, these clownish ani- mals have actually disturbed ladies' privacy by looking in windows — unusual "peeping toms" that after being driven off, we are wondering whether perhaps bruin did not return for another look, so undeniably hu- man are their many antics. The first school to be held in Yellow Pine was conducted in a tent in the year 1920 by a teacher identified as Miss Smith, and who taught a total of eight children. They were identified as George McCoy, Doris Edwards, Leslie McCoy, Eva McCoy, Ted Abstein, Helen Trinler' Myron McCoy and Gil McCoy. A photograph in this group submitted by this writer, also shows the first log school house and th teacher's cottage (now owned by William Schier- ding of Yellow Pine). These structures were built in 1922, and the village showed little growth up to that time. Somehow the Yellow Pine of today seems headed in the direc- tion of making a modern hamlet that could well be likened unto the fictitious Shang -ri -la of the far away Tibetan mountains, so vividly portrayed in the book "Lost Horizon," the similarity being in the isolation of both places. The real and the ficti- tious, the entrance covered over and then through the blizzard swept mountain routes, until the final entrance into snow -free areas entirely surrounded by mountain pinnacles that tower above a basin where compara- tively long summer seasons, and the greenery of a typical farm- ing community, the likes of which are comparable to the Cox Dude Ranch on the ad- joining Johnson Creek, and the Fred Holcomb place on the East Fork. Comparable to Cascade and Long Valley in elevation, but much more protected from the rigorous winter blasts, Yellow Pine's present population of "Johnny Come Latelys" are profiting by the small number of early pioneers who blazed the trails and constructed the first pack bridges to span the streams. Packed in Supplies These first few settlers from the high surrounding areas were kept busy packing in the supplies needed to last through the eight months of closed trails and the constantly drifting snow. Then the silence broken only by the snow -laden wind and the cry of an occasional tal- low hawk. This was pioneering that those now interred in Yellow Pines pioneer cemetery are but a part of the small group who scattered to the far flung areas of what is now known as the primitive wilderness. Where in those days such pio- neer ventures as the old Werd- enhof and the Sunday Mine at Edwardsburg were in operation, and only a winding trail down Big Creek reached the Copper Camp and the Jensen brothers Snow Shoe Mine. These and many other small operations from Profile, Quartz Creek and clear to the Ramey Ridge, were the reason that held those men snow -bound and isolated in re. gions where only the melting snows of spring could free the trails and again make trans- portation by pack or saddle animal possible. This was indeed pioneering the hard way. area. He is shown with Theodore Van Meter at the Van Meter cabin in Yellow Pine. The cabin is still intact. -- — -- — YELLOW PINE'S SCHOOL in 1920 was in a tent. And this photograph, provided by Gill McCoy, now living hr Emmett, Route 1, and then a student at Yellow Pine, shows the-stu- dent body. Identified are, from left, George McCoy, Verna McCoy, the school teacher, a Miss Smith, Doris Edwards, Leslie McCoy, Eva McCoy, Ted Abstein, Helen Trinler, Myron McCoy, and Gill McCoy. Statesman photo by Paul Brinkley- Rogers Larry Marks on the steps of his newly reopened Yellow Piiieto ge `es y ew Pine �s boomlnffolo but keep the TVs in Bo "me" By PAUL BRINKLEY- ROGERS The Idaho Statesman ELLOW PINE — When a small town starts dying, the church shuts its doors, the school closes down, and the saloons put away the barstools and the whisky bottles and hope for better days again. That's the way it was in Yellow Pine, an old logging community deep in the Payette Na- tional Forest east of McCall. A town whose population fluctuated with the seasons, it had seen the number of its year -round residents dwindle to only 22 last winter. With the first snow only a few weeks away, however, indications are that at least 50 to 60 of the 100 people who have lived in Yellow Pine this summer intend to winter over. A combina- tion of the possibility of a mining boom and the popularity of snowmobiling and outfitter serlow Pine is being called a "boom." The boom has meant the reopening of Yellow Pine's one -room school —closed since one pupil graduated in 1974; the dusting off of the Mahog- any and Corner bars; the opening again of Yel- low Pine's two hotels; regular Sunday calls by an out -of -town minister to the tiny Yellow Pine church; the rejuvination of the town's white - frame Recreation Hall; and a significant rise in property values. A new demand for public servi_-Gii nas also brought road crews from Valley County to in- spect and repair the often hazardous dirt roads linking Yellow Pine to Cascade and McCall, and has started a drive to renovate Yellow Pine's fire truck, a 1946 Chevrolet, and perhaps to buy another water pumper. But the town is still in 'no mood to acquire tele- phones or television. As Larry Marks, owner of the Yellow Pine Lodge, said: "Two years ago someone said they would sit an antenna on one of the mountains here. The town said `No. We don't want the damn thing.' That's the way it was and that's the way it's going to be. The general consensus of the town is we don't want phones or TV. We like Yellow Pine the way it is." Yellow Pine nestles among groves of pine trees in a cloud - swathed, narrow valley, 4,750 feet high, formed by the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River. Mountains as high as 7,000 to 9,000 feet poke their peaks through the clouds and in September the weather is so un- predictable that one moment Yellow Pine folks may squinting in bright sunshine and the next, sprinting across muddy Main Street to escape a downpour. At the heart of the rebirth of Yellow Pine, per- haps, has been the presence all year long of about 30 to 35 men and women working for the Canadian Superior gold mining project at the ghost town of Stibnite, 14 miles east of Yellow Pine on a dirt road also recently inspected by county road crews. "Superior Mining has had a big influence on what has happened to this town," said Marks. "But it may be just one of those years, People realized that visitors who made the trip here left disappointed that only Murphy's Bar and the Yellow Pine Merc (Mercantile Store) were open and that everything else was closed down. "So, some people decided to do something about it. "I've seen 150 or 200 snowmobiles sitting on Main Street on a Saturday night," Marks said, "looking for some place to go. That's why I bought the Lodge. We can put up about 30 peo- ple here. Two other places in town can put up about 35. I've seen it so crowded in winter that 15 people were sharing sleeping space in one empty cabin. "This has been the biggest boom this town has seen for five or six years," he said. "Even the roads are improving. They were in a pretty sad state. People were losing mufflers and blowing out tires. No wonder they didn't want to stay on here. "But when 89 people — people who lived here and local ranchers — sent a petition to the county this year it had some effect. The road crews came right after Labor Day. They are still fixing the McCall road and next spring, they say, they may resurface part of it with- a neo- prene coating." Marks paid $85,000 for the Yellow Pine Lodge, a large, rambling structure which once housed a dance floor on the second floor. He bought it in partnership with local outfitter Don Waller and with Dave Howard, who is reopening the Fern- croft Lodge at Smith's Ferry. The Lodge reopened again June 28. "It has al- ways proved to be a good business," said the big, burly Marks. "There's a lot of good fishing and hunting here. People come from all over the world to Yellow Pine because it is in the wilderness — on the edge of the Primitive Area. We had a visitor last week all the way from England." Yellow Pine functions as a community with a town council of five, led by Don Millen, chair- man, a retired high school principal from Con- cord, Calif. Three of the seats will be open next year and, as Marks said, "There's a lot of inter- est in politics again." The influx of people this year, many of them retired persons, has meant that land prices, al- ways high because Yellow Pine is a tiny pocket of privately owned properties in the middle of federal land, are up. There is not, in fact, too much land for sale — a small, tin - roofed cabin without electricity next to the Lodge is on the market for $20,000, and across the road, a larger house is available for $40,000. "They're not worth that," said a Ca- nadian Superior worker, "but the demand is there." Much of the town council's efforts this year have been directed toward refurbishing the Recreation Hall and improving Yellow Pine's all - volunteer fire department. Two barbeques — one on Labor Day and the_ other on July 4 — raised $1,100 toward purchas- ing new fire fighting equipment. During snow - free months, the town's old '46 fire engine is maintained by Tom Nichols but when he leaves may w Will C' i �I GRADUATION BELL DEDICATION �"` HOMECOMiNG � IV V.,., r, I IT T J.W, " Rik 'i M*,,. R.-chard Miller TOU TC THEM R k L 17; AT --'G- N' Dl,;D-lrC,,qTlroN PCIVIXOMiNcl 5 PNIA671, GUESTS nall"or Frank Ohiirch ---,rtse:-Ata-tive 3*leve Spwrin UISNR E-,,erett Loughridgo, Bill, Pcrrisffi Chairman., -Dorsnelly- Try tess Sorve Wilsor, High, School Band LTon'. Direct r r- Nt A L—_ U f-4o O a� 0 V Oi Q F a S 0 V a t-•1 0� � C O C? r f"1 r4 Jai t cc Y Q C. a r 0 +mod r•1 Gip m� id 43 I Q O t� P 43 C O r. v c � � b a V a -ri co 0 ► v at n M'i U R. r� ae w a o 6 �n a i Y 1 to a Q w C -t CY. r� a d qqO .O O to x� 4 .d a4 m 'k O r-1 r4 W a ti O �m N v� t fi Q a U r. O O U 0 .0 r- A e aC Qy W a c a n in v � vt t-i t-i STUT,,:-.'N PIIIW CTS Art 'i!;xhibit Decorations Guest and Alumni books Hostessp Seating - Alumni and Teachers Music Rrogram Backrcom Floor Painting Patch desIgn Program Makeup Rocm Cleanur, Yard Fullenwid,x. Michelle Miller All students Tami Vyborg Lanni. Nyborg, and Amy Nontgomery Camille Nyborg Awq Montgomenry Clark Good-win. fit .St.i2�t3nt.9 "vudwin, Joe Ali&olson The 0 say. can you see by the sawn It early What so proudly we hailed at the twiti't:t'" fast gleaminF•,, i hose broad strip —s and bright stars. throjjr, jj t�,�5 pAr:.lous fi.0 -.t, O'er the ramparts we uatct,ed were sa r all aRrly utreami.ns, And the rockets reel glare, the boirls bursting it air Gave proof thrcu7h the: night that our fla,;, was still there. 0 say, does that star sppngl.ed harner yet wave, O'er the land of the free and the home cf the brave, ':qty Hy-T.r. Eternal Father, strong; to aavGa Who suffers from our rr_stles= way, Who bids the m., ht3 ocean deeds, Ire some appointer; li rats keep, 0 gear us when rre cry to thee F,.:- .t ^s: ar, peril on the sta, Cod Bless Ameri --a !lad tss° America Land *.�:z;t I love} ,.Lana bide her And rijid- -- her l'l ra: *r the nie:ht a 1iPhI t from above., s ^,uuntain5 7 c. crairie oc -ans while r:ith fc a?,. —%s America SPECIAL THANKS Emma COX Ruth flascn His Ycrq of School Connie Fai'mzarurn Iva Kissiager Conn--'- BdrkelZ Art Wrrk Decorations 4 iii Adkins B81. A, s ta"Ati on Frank Schumak 1Afe Cox Pole and nat,allatin r Farr X13singer Ground Work Da'v'e McClinur�ck Duane Fry Laura 3codwi.r. T,:i':aw Ping Niwt Pa tQ ries Farley Goodwin Use of Truck for Cleanup Germ. 14ve joy F:^oNram NO W-W STANDING in front of a vacation A -frame he and his wife built by themselves, Mery Bowman and little Shane Fee look down hill on the town of Yellow Pine. a baby bear alive. Photographs of na- ture, alternately murderous and mel- low. The mines, alternately booming and busting. And, through it all, the presence of the wilderness working it- self into their lives. The dogsled has been replaced by the snowmobile; the pack train by plane; the tenderfoot treds there now where once he dared not enter. But, the spirit of men like Lafe Cox still pervades the area and the wilderness instills its timeless lessons in those who choose to stay. People come and go in Yellow Pine, some staying only a year, some staying several. But just overnight one begins to feel at home. Livii:: closely and somewhat dependently o one another, the people seem part of large loose - knit family in which the predominant feeling is one of acceptance. Accept- ance is "well, because you're one of us." Your faults, your weaknesses, your strengths and peculiarities are all known. In fact, they are taken with a good shot of humor. For, is many townspeople point out, in sup a close community, personal conflict., are in- evitable. And who knows whether it is an instinctive sense of creating harmo- ny or a conscious application of back- woods wisdom, but the rich vein of hu- mor which runs through the gossip, al- ways seems to say — "Well, old Joe's pretty funny, but then, so is life." Gossip is mellowed with a wink of the eye and a shake of the head. Eyes sparkle with the first nuance of a joke. The ancient humor is sparked, shared and understood with but a crinkle of an eyelid. If you are new, they will laugh at your jokes, no matter how poor, and if you are an old timer, your stories are always good for a laugh, though you've told them a hundred ways a hundred times. In all, there is a spirit of a camara- derie — not forced — just human. Even today for some residents, the hard times come, with days of wondering "Why Yellow Pine ?" To some, the question eventually leads to moving on. But for all, Yellow Pine is, if not a Shangri -La, at least a stop on the road — a home along the way, where you can replenish your humanity and take stock of yourself, before moving back to the vaster wilderness "outside." AIRPORT: 4 miles from ranch to Bryant ranch (Aeronautics) Airport RESERVATIONS: For reservations or more information write to — Lafe and Emma Cox Cascade, Idaho Phone Boise 344 -0497 JUNE 1 to NOVEMBER 30 Lafe and Emma Cox Emmett, Idaho Phone 365 -4565 DECEMBER 1 to MAY 30 ROUTE and MILEAGE: � Horseslf .34W. B end • Emmei'1: � c,15': 1 9 6 3 CaEN Idaho Centennial Celebration ` August 2 -3 -4 Square Dances Featured Horseback Rides Hiking Tours to Thunder Mountain Areas This Ranch began operating in 1927 and has continued under the same family name. The elevation is 5,068 feet. Truly, this is a Paradise of the Idaho wilderness. 1' COX DUDE 0 NCH Lafe and Emma Cox "A Sportsman's Paradise — in the Wilderness" YELLOW PINE, IDAHO Licensed and Bonded Members of Idaho Outfitters and .p Guides Association �. Over 32 Years Experience FISHING HUNTING PHOTOGRAPHY HORSEBACK RIDING TRAIL TRIPS SQUARE DANCES Fun and relaxation for all the family 1963 -- N, N ' McCall UUM RANC9 Landmar 4 Lak • Cascade ;t5! � Horseslf .34W. B end • Emmei'1: � c,15': 1 9 6 3 CaEN Idaho Centennial Celebration ` August 2 -3 -4 Square Dances Featured Horseback Rides Hiking Tours to Thunder Mountain Areas This Ranch began operating in 1927 and has continued under the same family name. The elevation is 5,068 feet. Truly, this is a Paradise of the Idaho wilderness. 1' COX DUDE 0 NCH Lafe and Emma Cox "A Sportsman's Paradise — in the Wilderness" YELLOW PINE, IDAHO Licensed and Bonded Members of Idaho Outfitters and .p Guides Association �. Over 32 Years Experience FISHING HUNTING PHOTOGRAPHY HORSEBACK RIDING TRAIL TRIPS SQUARE DANCES Fun and relaxation for all the family 1963 -- N, N FISHIN�: TROUT: Rainbows Eastern Brook Cutth roats Native Dolly Vardens June 4 to October 31 White Fish June 4 to February 28 Steelhead January 1 to October 31 SALMON: July 15 to !august 20 Fishing seasons in this pamphlet are taken from Idaho Fish & Game regulations for 1963; Big Game seasons are taken from Idaho Fish and Game regulations for 1963. These seasons are subject to change. Please check current Idaho regulations. BY DAY LAKE TRIPS — Guide per day Horse per day LAKES AVAILABLE — Rainbow Rock . . . . . Caton . . . . . Marion Coxie Riordan . . • - Horseheaven Black Buck . . . . . I o 0 HyUNTING: �OUNTAIN SHEEP OR GOAT September 1 to September 15 Guide, packer, horses and equip- ment and food furnished on one week deluxe hunt. Price per man per week — $300.00 Hunter furnishes personals, sleep- ing gear, guns and game sacks. Deposit of $100 each required. ELK DEER BEAR September 15 to November 30 Deluxe Trip: Same furnishings as for mountain sheep hunt for one week per man — $225.00 Deposit of $50 each required. $18 Special Hunt: Hunter furnishes 4 groceries. For one week hunt per man — 7 miles 81/2 miles 9 miles 11 miles 7 miles 7 miles 6 miles 9 miles 15 miles Some of the Most Beautiful scenery Idaho has to offer. $200.00 Deposit of $50 each required. Preferably four to five in party. Drop Camp Rates Only: Licensed Packer per day, $20 Horse per day 5 Pack out elk . . . . 30 Pack out deer . . . . 15 Pack out bear . . . . 10 Pack out horns . . . . 5 Packer and horses furnished only to be packed in and out at this rate. i A CCOMMODATIONS: Families and Organizations Welcome j Horseback Rides-per hour ... $1.50 Breakfast ..............$1.25 Lodging and Meals: { Dinner :......:""'.:::: 2.00 Special Dinner 3.00 Per person per day L °Mai °c 9.50 Per person per week 55.00 Per couple per day 16.00 Per couple per week 100.00 Children 3 to 12 years — Per child per day . . . 5.00 U, Per child per week . . . 25.00 Children under 3 no charge Housekeeping Cabins: Per day $ 6.00 to $10.00 Per week $35.00 to $50.00 Lodge with ranch cooked meals Modern and Square Dances Featured Camp Grounds Available License Fees: Resident fish & game $ 6.00 Resident fish or game 4.00 Deer tag - 2.00 Elk tag - 3.00 Non - resident fish (season) 15.00 Non - resident fish (5 -day) 5.00 Additional day - 1.00 Non - resident fish & game 100.00 Non - resident deer only 25.00 Deer tag - 2.00 Elk tag - 3.00 Non - resident upland bird . 25.00 Please check current Idaho Fish & Game department regulations for specific areas and complete information. b ti Family Moves, Takes Half of Students, ,Leaves Yellow Pine School `Quartet' Little School Is Plenty Big for Student Body T H E ENTIRE STUDENT body of what must be the smallest school in Idaho poses for a "class picture," j o i n e d by three - year -old Johnny Quast, left, son of the teacher. Others, from left, are Steve, Sandra and Tim Heater, and Jeanne Adkins. T h e traditional one -room schoolhouse is the Yellow Pine School, District 423. Story and Photos By MARY JANE WILLIAMS Statesman Correspondent YELLOW PINE — "I woke up one morning and dis- covered half the kids in school were gone." What had happened, first - year teacher Jack Quast goes on to explain, is that one family with five children had moved away, leaving the Yellow Pine school with just enough enrollment for a bridge game — exactly four pupils, If there is a school district anywhere in Idaho smaller than District 423 (Yellow Pine), it hasn't been heard from yet. The Yellow Pine school actually embarked on the 1969 -70 school year with 10 pupils — minimum re- quired by the State Board of Education for maintaining a school — but when the one family's five students moved away and another girl of jun- ior high school age decided to finish the school year in Boise, only the four were left. =Tlie. academic atmosphere rPeZ1,Xe -"A 1- , f4 day . is somewhat informal. Teacher and students — Jeanne Adkins (fifth grade), S a n d r a Heater (seventh grade), Steve Heater (sixth) and Tim Heater (third) — often take field trips on horseback. Even Quast's three - year -old son, Johnny, may tag along. Jack and all four students play the guitar which leans in the corner, and Sandra and Jeanne are teaching each other to play the an- cient Singer piano in the schoolroom. (The piano is a story in it- self. Lafe Cox, local dude rancher, says the upright was laboriously carted into the area during the Thunder Mountain gold rush just after the turn of the century. The piano reportedly has endured a flood and two fires, but still produces beautiful music.) "Stuffed ballot boxes" are supposed to be a thing of the past, with the advent of elec- tronic voting systems — but there is such a box in the Yellow Pine school. It was about to make their debut as b a i t this Memorial Day weekend. It seems there was no elec- tion at Yellow Pine last fall, so it was decided to put the empty ballot box to good use. Half the classroom houses a ping -pong table, a game enjoyed by all four students, Quast says. He explains that when a teacher is faced with the unenviable task of keeping even four to 10 children oc- cupied inside, day after day after day during the winter, recreation can be something of a problem. Indoor roller - skating also has proven to be a winner, he says. What brought Jack Quast — a native of Ontario and an Oregon State graduate — to Yellow Pine in the first place? Both he and his wife Sue say they love the out -of- doors, and decided that a couple of years living in a small cabin next to the one - room schoolhouse in the Quast says the biggest teaching problem in such a small school "is the diver- gency in grades." He must be prepared in all subjects for all grades — and at Yellow Pine, that means grades 3, 5, 6 and 7. (High- school students usually f i n i s h their education in other schools.) Yellow Pine is located about 80 miles east of McCall. It is accessible by road during the summer months, but the 45 residents are sealed off from the out- side world by a wall of white once winter hits. A f t e r snow blocks the roads, Yellow Pine citizens must depend on planes — most often equipped with skis — or snowmobiles for getting in and out. School Supt. John C. Rid - dlemoser, McCall, who says the McCall - Donnelly district "inherited the Yellow Pine district because geogra- phically it is closest to us," makes his visits to the tiny FOUR CLASSES — and four students — are hard at work in Adkins; and thirdgrader Tim Heater. The school started the the tiny Yellow Pine school, under supervision of teacher 1969.70 year with 10 students, but one girl decided to finish Jack Quast (standing). From left are sixth- grader Steve the year in Boise and five others — all in one family — Heater; seventh - grader Sandra Heater; fifth- grader Jeanne moved out of the district. DUSTY AND SCARRED, this venerable Singer piano still is playable, as Yellow Pine stu- dent Sandra Heater demon- strates. Legend has it that the piano was brought into the area near the turn of the century during the Thunder Mountain gold rush. Two fires, one flood, and many years later, it still provides music in the tiny school. AN ONTARIO NATIVE, first- year teacher Jack Quast is an Oregon State University graduate. He and his wife Sue took the post in remote Yellow Pine because they thought it "would be great" to spend a couple of years living in a small cabin next to the one -room schoolhouse. THE IDAHO STATES I.AN, Boise, Sunda. , August 2, 1970 Yellow Pine Picked As Trailer Court Site YELLOW PINE — Ranch- er's Exploration and Devel- opment Co., Albuquerque, N.M., has announced the planned construction of a 50- unit trailer court at Yellow Pine. James A. Mitchell, com- pany spokesman said the court will be located adja- cent to the Yellow Pine School, on Boise National Forest land. Mitchell also said an archi- tect is drawing up plans for the court, which will. house workers at the proposed min- . ing site at the former Stib- nite Mine. Twenty -five units are planned for most imme- diate use, with the additional twenty -five as needed, he said. There was no immediate announcement of the size of the proposed mining oper- ation, or the beginning date of -work at the Stibnite Mine. Mitchell said company offi- cials are awaiting assay re- ports from the cores which have been drilled at the an- timony mine. The mine site is the for- mer Bradley Mining Co. mine, which operated in the 1940's and recently has been leased by Rancher's Explor- ation and Development Co., Albuquerque, N.M. Yellow Pine One never ceases to learn in this country. A person can come here, smug in the faith of his ability, only to find if you can do it the "hard way" you'll just have to learn. This was brought home to me in a cross -punch to my ego when I had occasion to keep the kitchen open at Murph Earl's this last week. I did real fine until some hunters came in for steaks. - I've cooked steaks in many places of con- venience, but never a frozen steak for the public. - And in Yellow Pine, it is only frozen steak. I was in despair at the results for I couldn't seem to reach the exact point of frying to please them. I tried, but each attempt led to more em- barrassment and more impatience on the customers' part. Later I realized I should have prepared myself for this by asking. The story soon spread, but no one ridiculed me. They offered help and advice; This is Yellow Pine! Death of a hunter near Beaver Creek, a Richard Nelson of Eureka, California. Seems he rose early, built a fire, made coffee and in conversation with his partner, fell over with a sudden heart at- tack. I caught this infomation on our last trip in to Big Creek, Sheriff Merton Logue and Coroner Burton Walker were eating at the Lodge on our arrival. At this time, we found Frank putting a relic of a stove together, for the purpose of heating the store. When assem- bled, it turned out to be a very unusual type of stove with many fancy gadgets and decorations. It could be classed as a real antique. Day before hunting season in their area saw many vehicles lining the sides of the road to Copper Camp with barely enough room for anyone to drive through. Packer (Jack) Gillahan, driving a herd of pack animals to his base camp at Crooked Creek found the road barred by horses of a group of hunters tied right across the road. Some very disgruntled men found the rope cut and animals loose when they were awakened by the noise of Jack's animals, finally free to move on down the road. Their irate comments cooled down when they learned it was a road they blocked. -- Not a trail!. Our drive back to Yellow Pine gave us many sources of amusement. Real faith in luck showed in the sight of two young men in a very old car, pulling a very old two -wheel trailer in the advent they had their kill. As we passed Profile Sam's cabin; we noted a camper there, using the cabin. Old sheets enveloped the old structure to ward off the cold. Every curve brought us to almost a complete stop as an eager hunter barelled around the bend and traffic was heavy!! On a single track road with turn- outs, every curve presents danger. The tales we hear are not always humerous. One very upset hunter, with a suspicion of tears in his eyes, told of his hunting trip. -- Camped below Look Out Mountain - he returned to his campsite after a short hike, thinking to catch up his horse for a ride up on the ridge. Finding the animal missing, he trailed him down the canyon and found him lying on his side dead from a rifle bullet. All he could say was "This was my buddy, my pal. I raised him- loved him. - A beautiful horse, and he's dead. "Whoever shot the animal knew it, for the tracks pointed to his quick retreat. Looking to the mountains around us in Yellow Pine, we see the touch of Old Man Winter's cold hand. We hear of snow, sleet, and hail from the cold men returning from the chase of the Elk and deer. The end of fall is in sight, at least in the high country. As Spring moved slowly up to us, day by day, so winter will move down to us, day by day. e. ;j. 1I3o)71 J By MEREDITH MOTSON Statesman Correspondent YELLOW PINE — From the air, Yel- low Pine is only a cluster of roofs, en- circled by forest, surrounded by moun- tains, and buttressed by wilderness for as far as the eye can see. But, seen from the streets, that tiny cluster of roofs is a world in itself — an outpost of civilization — a civilization in microcosm comprised of a few people, a few buildings, and a wealth of local atmosphere. Neither a hippy commune nor a liv- ing ghost town, Yellow Pine is simply a town of 35 assorted people, young and old, worldly or otherwise, who, for a, host of different reasons, have decided that this is where they want to live. And living in Yellow Pine means being content that the nearest town (McCall) lies more than 60 miles away, accessible only by rugged road in sum- mer and snowmobile or plane in win- ter. It means stocking six months worth of food and fuel every fall, living snowbound and fairly self- sufficient ev- ery winter, getting "cabin fever" every spring, and sharing your town with "outsiders" every summer. To live in Yellow Pine is to live intimately inter- twined with the ways of nature and the ways of your neighbors, but to main- tain your distance and respect for both. There, in the very heart of the wilds, the comforts of modern technology are accessible if needed, and the curses — as good as a million miles away. So, who lives there? As in every town, there are the shopkeepers, the restaurant owners, the laborers, the bartenders. Only in Yellow Pine, there are only one or two of each. Then there is the school teacher, a few miners, several odd -jobs men, and a few re- tired couples. Many first came as min- ers or packers and simply decided to stay on. Fred Bachich, now retired, once served as superintendent of both the Bonanza and Bradley mines in Stibnite, (about 10 miles from Yellow Pine) and has long since returned with his wife Milly, "because it seemed like home." Residents for 12 years now, Milly smiles and says, "We have no reason to go out, so we just stay here. Oh, once we spent a couple winters out But, generally they enjoy their quiet life, reading, gardening, visiting their neighbors. A life quite different, in fact, from their experience back in the 40's when gold, silver, and antimony mines were booming and Stibnite sup- ported a bustling community of more than 1,000. With its movies, dance hall, bowling alley, recreation hall and hometown newspaper, Stibnite sud- denly put little Yellow Pine to shame. Once the end of the road, the supply station where pack trains and miners bid farewell to the last comforts of civilization before heading for the wil- derness, Yellow Pine was not even that anymore. With the coming of Stibnite, the road was extended on to the larger community and Yellow Pine became a mere stop along the way. Stibnite, Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt City boomed all around, but Yellow Pine never did become a min- ing town. Yet, today, the old mining towns are all wind- whittled skeletons of the past, while, strangely enough, Yellow Pine lives on. The adventurous continually return to her fold. Mery Bowman, who came to the area at 16 to work on the Stibnite to Yellow Pine road, is among the re- turnees. Though he and his wife trav- eled world -wide while he worked as a mechanic for Morrison Knudson, "each time we came back, we'd head for Yel- low Pine," he says. Now, at retirement age, they are starting a small resort of vacation A- frames there, "for people like us, who reach the point where it gets pretty hard sleeping on the ground." Perhaps it was the mountain air in his 16 -year- old lungs that first bewitched him, but he seems confident that the old Yellow Pine magic is still potent enough to support his growing resort. And Yellow Pine is growing, if not in year -round residents, in summer cabin owners, whom the community regards, if not with jubilation, at least with a certain wistful acceptance, perhaps un- derstanding that the days are gone when their private wilderness could be theirs alone. Though as akin to the wilderness as any man could be, Lafe Cox, seems to have understood this all along. As the owner of the Cox Dude Ranch (roughly 10 miles from Yellow Pine), he and his wife Emma have been opening their doors to newcomers and old timers alike for more than 40 years. There in the solitude of the old Cox homestead on Johnson Creek, Lafe grew up, went to school, raised his own family, and still runs the family style dude ranch with fatherly pride. He is warmly respected as a fine horseman and authority on the wilder- ness, and, from his lifetime experience with the comings and goings of Yellow Pine folk, he has absorbed a wealth of history and character of the area. One has but to sit by the fire in the ranch's big front room to understand the real spirit of the indomitable little town ... tales of his 10 -mile treks by dog sled as a boy to attend the Yel- low Pine school; tales of the old school marm — "a tiny little woman who only weighed about 70 pounds soaking wet, was tougher than iron, but the best teacher I ever had," and tales of the trappers, the miners, and the little lady who brought a herd of milk cows in when Thunder Mountain was booming, milked them all winter, butchered them for beef in the fall, "and came out with more money than any min- er!" Both the toughness and tenderness of the settlers is no more apparent than in Lafe's old collection of photographs: his mother bearing a coyote hide aloft, wearing homemade skis, heavy boots and overcoat, and yes, a skirt; the men, a gritty weatherbeaten crew, with the harsh climate imprinted in their look, struggling one year to keep Backcountry schools survive space age by Jan McMahan MCCALL —In this era of "modern" education and sleek classroom facilities, there are still two not -so -sleek or modern schoolhouses in our own area that function as "remote necessary attendance units" for resident children. Back at Warren, the old un- painted school door opened of- ficially for the 1973 -74 year for a reported 12 elementary students on August 30th. The teacher there this year is Mrs. John Thompson, a 1973 graduate of Montana State University, who, according to Idaho County Superintendent Earl Vopat, will be assisted by her husband, a wildlife biologist, with the upper grades, as well as with the accompanying chores of stoking the wood fire and shoveling snow. The "outback" plumbing facilities are still very much as they were through bygone years, and electric lighting depends on neighboring storekeeper Jack Pickell's hydraulic generator. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have moved into one of Warren's more luxurious available homes, where they have running water, a flush toilet and their own small generator, and, according to Mr. Vopat, are looking for- ward to the year's experience with a lot of enthusiasm. Last year's teacher, Dave Hudson, elected to return to the Riggins school this year. Operation of the Yellow Pine school, an unsettled question until last week, began September 17th under the tutelage of Mr. Richard Miller, a certified teacher who has just returned from four years in American Samoa. Mr. Miller, his pretty wife, also a qualified teacher, and their three small children are "hanging their hats ", at least temporarily, at Cox Dude Ranch, nine miles south of the school facility. Two of the Miller children incr0ased the initial enrollment to- eight on Monday, according to Supt. Serve Wilson. The M -D district trustees had tenatively elected not to re -open the school this year but were over- ruled by the State Department of Education following protests from parents planning to stay in Yellow Pine through the winter. Two problems, in addition to lack of pupils, were lack of a certified teacher and the very poor con- dition of available housing for a teacher. Both are apparently solved at this time and classroom education once again a reality for the Backcountry kids. Dubbed the "University of Yellow Pine" by residents, that school boasts commercial, modern plumbing and an oil furnace. It's really not so different from other small educational facilities, ex- cepting for its remote location and relative isolation from the `out- side" during long winters. Those kids at Warren and Yellow Pine don't have the luxuries of after - school TV or a quick trip to local "hangouts ". What they do have is a unique late 20th century educational experience and, hopefully, instructional guidance to prepare them for the wider world in future years. Superintendent Vopat noted recently that his Idaho County district also has a similar remote unit at Locksaw Lodge on Lolo Pass, where seven or eight students were expected this year. S Yellow Pine school bell 40 peels again Transplanted Minnesotan Bill Erickson and his By PAUL BRINKLEY - ROGERS The Idaho Statesman ELLOW PINE — The big brass bell is ringing once again at the old one -room school in Yellow Pine be- cause this remote central Idaho community has a teacher again for the first time since 1974. The teacher is Bill Erickson, 36, who just 13 months ago had a comfortable job at an affluent school in the Minneapo- lis suburbs. He finds himself today teaching eight children in grades 1 through 8 in a town with no telephones, no television but a good deal of fresh mountain air. Coming to Yellow Pine, summer population 100, was actu- Statesman photo by Paul Brinkley- Rogers eight charges at "University of Yellow Pine.' ally a step upward for the small, stocky Erickson. Last year he taught in Big Creek, population 16, an even more isolated backcountry hamlet 15 miles north of Yellow Pine. It was not until late summer that Yellow Pine, 100 miles northeast of Boise on the edge of the Idaho Primitive Area, realized it might have enough children on hand to open its schoolhouse again. Part of the McCall - Donnelly School District, even though McCall is 69 miles distant over a rough mountain road, Yel- low Pine had to guarantee that at least seven children would be ready to go to school in August to meet the district's requi- rements. Said Larry Marks, owner of the Yellow Pine Lodge and father of Russell, 13, and Rodney, 11, both students at the School (Continued from Page 1F) school, "We found out in late July we would have half a dozen kids here. "Carol Sullivan wrote a letter to Serve Wil- son, superintendent of schools in McCall, telling him we wanted to open up the school again. He radioed back and said he'd be here in mid -Aug- ust to look at the situation and he carne, met with the parents, and got them to sign forms guaranteeing that their children would be M school." Erickson, meanwhile, had been working dur- ing the summer for the Forest Service at Stib- nite — the old mining town 14 miles from Yellow Pine — leading a group of youngsters salvaging timber from ruined buildings. "I came out to Idaho without a job," Erickson said, "because I wanted to be in the mountains and get away from all the driving in the city." He took a leave of absence from his job in Min- nesota at the Rosemont Middle School where he taught life sciences to the sixth and seventh grades. After the first teacher became ill, Erickson over teaching duties at Big Creek. Instead of driving to work, he said, he found himself cross - country skiing to the one -room schoolhouse there. It was very different from Rosemont with its 1,500 pupils. "At Big Creek, I did all the janatorial work myself," he said. "I kept the wood - burning stove in the school going too." Erickson Liked the solitary life, he decided. When he heard about the possibility that Yellow Pine's school might open up again, he applied for the position. In his favor was the fact that he has a child of school age, David, 7, which brought the number of kids of school -age to eight. His other child is Joshua, 2. More children are onhand this year because Yellow Pine is experiencing a modest popula- tion boom. About 50 to 60 of the people who lived in the picturesque community phis summer are expected to winter over, tied to the town by log- ging, and by the outfitting and snowmobiling services it provides. Last winter, the only child to spend the winter in Yellow Pine was Michelle Sullivan, the daughter of an outfitter family, who took corre- spondence courses at the fifth -grade level. "Idaho is one of the few states I ever heard of where this kind of thing can be done," said Erickson. This year, Yeuow rine rwasas one curia eacn in first, second, seventh and eighth grades, and two children each in third and fifth grades. When McCall approved the reopening of -the Yellow Pine School (a wooden sign on the fence outside the red and white frame structure im- modestly proclaims it "The University of Yel- low Pine "), the local community got together to renovate the building and the tiny house next door provided rent -free to the teacher by the school district. As Marks described it, "I donated the stove. My wife (Judy) helped paint the house. The town scraped the furniture together." Other ci- tizens laid new linoleum floors in the school- house and in Erickson's home. By the time Erickson arrived the school, built in 1920, fairly sparkled. Its 250 -pound brass bell on the porch, which once pealed out aboard the USS Carson City, was polished again. It opened still short of the $450 worth of text- books Erickson ordered and in the first week of school he was using outdated teaching mate- rials. But there was heat. Wrapped in the cold mist and rain that smothers Yellow Pine in Sep- tember, the school was being warmed by a 1,500 gallon delivery of oil which must last all winter. Erickson and his wife Peggy, 34, a registered nurse, are waiting for the snow to fall. There is usually about six feet of it on the ground in win- ter. "We are both enthusiastic skiiers," said Erickson. "That's one of the reasons we choose to live up here." He said he is being paid $13,700 to stay in Yel- low Pine this winter. Once winter sets in there is no way out of the town, deep in the Payette National Forest, other than by snowmobile — three hours to McCall — or by light aircraft equipped with skis. "The lack of television doesn't bother me," he said. "It makes backcountry kids more resour- ceful. They like the area where they are. They don't run home to sit in front of the tube. I still have the problems of discipline I faced in city schools, but I like these kids here. "Parents in Yellow Pine are interested in a good, basic education. Back here you have to be a firm believer in the basics of education. Par- ents here told me they want their children to read and to do arithmetic. "I spend much more time teaching the basics than I do science or social studies. If I had my druthers I would rather do science. But there really isn't too much use for science out here." The one -room schoolhouse, Erickson said, "is pretty much individualized instruction. You have time to spend time with each child. But there are problems. With the number of grades here you probably don't have enough time to help each child." _..r' GV,'1 Back- country outfitter promises to haul hay in horse -drawn sleigh By PAUL BRINKLEY- ROGERS The Idaho Statesman CASCADE — A man with two children tered in the Feb. 2 cross- country ski race en- at Yellow Pine wants to do something to show his kids that he supports them all the way. Don Wailer, a 29 -year -old outfitter from Yellow Pine, was in Cascade on Monday making arrangements to buy a ton of hay he intends to haul back to the isolated hamlet Jan. 30. The hay will travel the 755-mile route to Yellow Pine through deep snow on the back of Waller's horse -drawn :sleigh. "1 want to support the race," Waller said, and this seemed like a great way to do it. I can mix business — I need the hay for my horses — with some fun." Waller said he hopes to leave Yellow Pine in the sleigh Friday and arrive in Cascade late Sunday afternoon. He will leave Cas- cade on Tuesday for Yellow Pine, arriving there just before the ski race. Waller's children, Donny, 8, and Rene, 6, are among all eight children from Yellow Pine's one -room schoolhouse who will race all two children from neighboring Big Creek 10 miles to the top of a 7,605 -foot -high moun- tain pass called Profile Gap. Roads to the two tiny communities on either side of the pass are impassable during; the winter by snow. Only ski- equipped planes and snowmobiles can make the trip over twisting mountain roads. Yellow Pine schoolteacher Bill Erickson is organizing the ski race to offset "the bore- dom" of the long winter, he said. There are no telephones. or television in the two vil- lages. Waller said the old, 10 -foot -long sleigh, which recently was restored in Boise, will be drawn by a team of two horses with two more horses accompanying them to help out. Along for the ride will be Howard Buettgen- bach, 40, a Yellow Pine guide who works with Waller. "I expect the horses will sink a little into the snow at times," Waller said, "but snow - inubilers have been using the route and the Snow should be packed enough so the sleigh rides along on top of it. "We won't have any radio or CB equip- ment with us. We'll just take our bedrolls, a frying pan, a coffee pot and a gun." Waller said the 30 bales of hay will be enough to feed the 10 horses ne keeps year -round in the Yellow Pine area for about eight days. "It doesn't sound like much," he said, but that hay will come in handy toward spring when we run low on feed." There is nothing special about the horses pulling the sleigh, he said. "They're just ordinary saddle horses that I broke last year to pack." He uses the horses mostly to transport hunting and camping gear and the hunters he takes into the back country around Yellow Pine: An ordinary seven -day hunt- ing trip during elk season costs about $1,000, Waller said. Waller said he has never made the Yellow Pine- Cascade trip by sleigh before. He will take the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River i out of Yellow Pine and follow the South Fork Road to Landmark. After camping out in the snow, he will then go over the top of Big Creek Summit, elevation 6,614 feet, down Warm Lake road to Cascade. Waller said he hopes to offer rides on the sleigh to children in j Cascade while he is in town. The I sleigh also will be in available the day of the ski race to pick up any children who drop out. Hay was not the only item Wal- ler was shopping for in Cascade. He is divorced, he explained, and .would also.like to hire someone to go back with him for the winter to cook for him and his two children. "Cooks are hard to find, nowa- days," he said. "But a man has to eat." Yellow Pine: by Jerri Montgomery There has been a bit more stirring in this village in the last week beginning with the weekend arrival of former Yellow Piners Al and Lois Chapman. They brought Vince and Beverly Shutt of Boise in with them. The four stayed at the Sno -Inn and snowmobiled around the area, taking the Shutts to see their property across the East Fork and making a swing on up to Quartz Creek. One by one this group sank into the snow and spent some time digging out before they could make the return trip. Al promised to dance on Saturday night and this he did at the B and F. Yellow Piners were joined by Jerry and Eade Walters from Aberdeen, and the Jim Nisulas, who came into the bar in time to see the second performance of Dale Johnson and his dummy (? ) Jasper. With each performance, Jasper becomes a bit wise. Sitting on Dale's lap he will move his head from one side to the other, taking in those present, deciding who he will send a verbal jab. Finally, with his eyes on his victim, he will converse with Dale until the punch line is delivered. Our time with Jasper is short for he needs a little oiling between acts. Our Saturday nights seem to be shorter this year, many leaving the bar for bed and rest. The evening ends with a few villagers sitting around discussing the weather and resulting problems or whatever comes to mind. Cougar hunter bagged his prey Don Waller will make this trek via horse -drawn sleigh to Cascade and back, starting Friday. Don plans two days going and two days in return. He will bring back a ton of hay for his horses. I had the thought, for a very short time, of riding along on this trip that was until I was told Don and Howard Buettgenbach will sleep along the trail. In this weather I just do not believe I want to be that ad- venturesome. Then too. I might dampen the fun the fellers would have. Tom Nicholas and his group left on Monday morning. Many of the Yellow Piners rode out to attend the This dummy in the bar keepsjabbing us snowmobile and com- missioner's meeting in Cascade. The com- missioner's meeting to find a solution for the four -wheel drive vehicles that have torn up the groomed trail from the Cascade side. The cougar hunter, Ted Christianson, shot his cat the day before he left, but not without some trouble. He started out the morning of his big day by slipping into the icy cold water. He fell through the ice as he was filling his thermos with water for the hike. Later, hearing the dogs voicing the message "cougar treed," he moved up a steep incline on hands and knees. His nose was almost in the snow and he saw nothing but rocks and the snow. Then he felt a dog licking his face. He realized the cougar was near and that he should be alert. Ted shot the cougar, knocking him out of the tree. The cat, trying to regain the tree to climb to safety, whacked the two dogs and injured them. The cougar, finally killed and brought to Yellow Pine to be shown off by the happy hunter from Minnesotta, was a hard - earned trophy. Ted and guide, Ray Ralls had spent many days tramping up and down mountains in the very cold weather trailing the cat Ted left early • Wn IS DeclI allence By PAUL BRINKLEY - ROGERS The Idaho Statesman YELLOW PINE — Friday, Feb. 2, will be remembered as the day 13- year -old Rodney Marks raced out of the bitter cold and skied to victory in one of the toughest endurance tests children from this remote back - country hamlet have ever faced. It was a race not so, much against his fellow students but against the subzero temperatures and the steep gradient of the 10 -mile course, which took him through the spectacular scenery from Yel- low Pine to the top of 7,607 -foot Profile Gap. The gap separates Yellow Pine from the even more isolated hamlet of Big Creek. The race saw all six children from the one - room schoolhouse in Yellow Pine racing against all two children from the Big Creek schoolhouse in the first ever cross - country ski contest between the two schools. It was so cold Friday morning that the race, scheduled to start at 9:30 a.m., was delayed for half an hour. Even so, it was 20 below zero in Big Creek and 7 below in Yellow Pine when 10 a.m. arrived and a radio call started the race simultaneously outside both com- munities. Yellow Pine, which celebrated the safe arrival Thursday night of outfitter Don Waller and guide Howard Buettgenbach after a 2!/2- day, 71 -mile horse -drawn sleigh ride from Cascade, was geared up for the excitement of the ski race. Many of the 45 people wintering over in the village, which has nei- ther telephone nor television, had stayed up most of the night in the B &F Bar, toasting the two men with round after- round of beer and dancing to the music of a honk ,+ -tonk piano and an accordion. But by 9 a.m. most of the revelers, including Waller, whose chit- dren Rene, 6, and Donnie, 8, were in the race, were gathered in the warmth of the Yellow Pine Lodge for a verdict on whether the race would be staged at all_ Some of the race organizers thought the cold might be too severe. The sun, which burned brightly in a blue sky, changed their minds, however, and the decision was made to go ahead. The villagers loaded the children on the backs of their snowmo- biles and took off in a cloud of snow to a point on the East Fork of the Salmon River where the Yellow Pine entries were to begin. At For them, it was important to the same time, Lisa Minter, 11, and her brother Robbie, 6, stood show they could do it and to finish outside the Big Creek Lodge to begin their leg of the race. without giving up." The Yellow Pine students included Rodney Marks; his brother Bill Erickson, who once taught Russell, 15; Rene and Donnie Waller; David Erickson, 7, son,of Bill school in Minneapolis, said he re- Erickson, Yellow Pine's schoolteacher; and Michelle Sullivan, 6, gretted that "a lot of kids from the daughter of Yellow Pine resident Carol Sullivan. Two other Yellow city missed out on an event like Pine children who had been in training for the race transferred to this. It's too bad that they probably another school and did not take part, don't realize how well they could Joining the Yellow Pine children on skis were their teacher and do if they had a chance to do this tSpe RACE_ 1 munities huddled in the cold at the kind of thing." „ Margo Conitz, a Yellow Pine resi- summit. _ Maggie Butterfield, who went as dent, who works for the U.S. For- Five minutes later, his brother a fire lookout for the U.S. Forest est Service in the summer. With Russell came across the finish Service in Big Creek, would not the Big Creek children on skis line. Only a minute behind him was say how her village came up with were their mother, Roxy Minter, Lisa Minter who struggled up the the name "Big Creek Bullets," and their teacher, Jeannette Clark strenuous last half -mile switch- stenciled on pennants sewn on the Erickson (not a relative of Yellow back on the Big Creek side and jackets of the Big Creek support - Pine's Erickson), 25. skied to a finish and some warm ers. Almost the entire population of hugs from her mother and her "It's just one of those mys- the two villages turned out on their father Bruce Minter, who runs the teries," she said, "that we keep to snowmobiles to patrol the race and Big Creek Lodge and flies light air - ourselves. The important thing is to take a boxload of wieners, craft for the tiny community. that we raced and raced well." marshmallows and hot chocolate Finishing fourth was Donnie Minter he supported the to Profile Gap for a victory feast Waller, about one hour later. said cooked over a pine log bonfire built David Erickson was fifth, and idea of the race, because "compe- in the deep show. Michelle Sullivan was sixth. The tition is good for the children. too many people Gene Parks, owner of Yellow other children dropped out earlier There are not in our town for that kind of Pine's Sno-Inn, helped monitor in the race because of the bitter l radio coordination of the race cold, Robbie Minter after one mile, around thing." There are only seven peo- from his snowmobile, and Dorothy and Rene Waller after 31/2 miles, pie in Big Creek, which serves as a Millen, wife of the chairman of the Rodney Marks sat by the fire, center for hunting and ranger sta- Yellow Pine village council, took a shaking his head. "Boy," he said, flask of orange juice on her snow- "I tion, this winter. . Jeanette Erickson, who arrived wish I had finished the race in mobile to refresh the children on 2t /2 hours. That's what my teacher at the top before rival teacher Bill their struggle to the top. wanted. I stayed behind my Erickson, said that she had never Two hours and 35 minutes after brother, but after a while, I stressed the idea of competing. the race began, Rodney Marks thought why stay behind? So I swept into sight and flashed past a "The important thing was to have a lot of fun," she said. "I went ahead of him and found I t crowd of villagers from both coin- could stay there." didn't care if they finished first. The original log school house in Yellow Pine. School integral part Part of the Heritage Happening of the people who grew up in the back - country village of Yellow Pine is their one -room school. The first classes in Yellow Pine were held in a tent, eight students being taught by a Miss Smith. Those first pupils were Doris Edwards, now living in Tacoma, Wash.; Ted Abstein, Woodland Hills, Calif.; Helen Trinler, and the McCoy children, George, Leslie, Myron, Gil and Eva. In 1922 -'23, the villagers constructed a log schoolhouse and 'teacherage, which served the community until 1934. The teacherage still stands near where the school was and is now the property of Horace and Evelyn Anderson of Mc- Call. Former students still 9!91F remember the horse sculpted from ice that decorated the school yard during the winter of 1928. The ice sculpture was made by the teacher, Fannie Forcher, and the five boys who were her pupils that year. Mrs. Forcher, now almost 90 years of age, is living with her daughter, Dorothy, in Princeton, W. Va., and still corresponds with her former pupil Lafe Cox. Cox continues to live on his ranch 10 miles out of Yellow Pine. In his school days, Cox traveled the distance to school in the winter by dogsled. The present wood - frame school was built in 1936 -'37. A large wood heater kept the classroom warm. The teacher, who was also the janitor, built the fire each day at 5 a.m. In recent years an oii neater has been added. Yellow Pine became part of the McCall -Don- nelly School District in the 1961 -'62 school year. That year started with seven students, but only three were left by February. The following year, school opened with 21 students. In the 1967 -'68 year, residents of the village banned together to ex- pand the school's woodshed into a recreation room. Labor and materials were mostly furnished by the residents. This year began with eight students, and present enrollment stands at six. The students are being taught this year by Patty Schindeldecker, and the villagers join in on many of tl,,� chool's projects. Dorothy Forcher gallops away on ice horse sculpted by students in 1925. G ellow Pine: Here's howower p came to our village by Jerri Montgomery Jan. 18 -- Today, riday, the mail came in ithout a worry about ow or low clouds and night the temperature overs just below 20 as e 11 p.m. hour draws ear. The slide on the 'arm Lake summit has en cleared and the owmobilers have been rriving. Some have anceled, hearing rumors e trail was either slush r rough ice. There were a few times is past week that the ghts flickered causing s to wonder if another cower failure was going o hit us. There was a day when he electrical power was i village project with the ielp of two generators. Phis was a community power system conceived )y three of the village )usinessmen -- Tom Nicholas, owner of what s now the B and F; "-larence Pond, part )wner of the store, and Don Browning, who had purchased the hotel and pack outfit from Kissingers. Their venerating plants were expensive to operate and •equired a lot of TLC. They contacted Burton Nalker, head of civil lefense for Valley County, and found that by becoming a declared civil defense area in case of national emerggncy, the village was eligible to apply for generating equipment. Through Walker, they located two diesel electric generators, one a 40 KVA and the other a 50 KVA, which could be procured for a nominal cash consideration. After much leg work, the tow units were finally trucked into Yellow Pine, and dumped off on the vacant lot between the hotel and the Behne house. There they lay all winter. In the spring the village had organized the Yellow Pine National Defense Community Unit, as advised by Mr. Walker. It was all very proper, with by -laws and rules and regs. Fred Bachich was elected chairman. Then came the problem of raising the necessary funds to install the distribution system. By this time civil defense was threatening to repossess the units unless they were paid for some $600 plus. As there was no money in the treasury, the chairman advanced this amount on a note. The note was to be paid in full when the community sold the system to Idaho Power later. As chairman, Fred Bachich was sent to Intermountain State Bank under the im- pression $3,000 was available upon the signatures of three businessmen. But Frank Callender said this was not a sound approach and suggested an alternative. The bank would honor any Yellow Pine property owner's individual note up to $100 to be repaid in 12 months. There were 32 potential subscribers which would secure the financing and make the project a community effort. Some took advantage of this offer and others dug into their own pockets. It was then the village went to work digging post holes, scrounging poles and hardware from Stibnite and Cinnebar. Ernie Oberbilling donated electrical hard- ware from Antimony Camp and the use of a truck, and Jack Walker worked with his truck hauling poles. With the money coming in from the property owner, we were able to buy wire and recon- ditioned meters from Idaho Power. All monies advanced by property owners were to be paid back in the form of power. With permission from the forest service, two generating units were installed in the warehouse, our Ree Hall toady, along with the panel boards and main switches. One plant was to be operated, the other kept as stand -by. Bud Leatherman contributed his efforts and knowledge to hook up much of the electrical system. Murph Earl put in his share of digging post holes. For $100 American Oil sold us a 6,400 - gallon storage tank, still at Cin- nebar,which Jack Walker trucked down for us. About the middle of June the village was ready to "turn on," but had one difficulty. Like old Mother Hubberd, the cupboard was bare, with no money to buy fuel. Once more they went scrounging and gathered up enought diesel oil from the townspeople to run the plant until the meters were read for the first time. After collecting the first power bills, we were financially stable. In order to conserve fuel, the plant was started at 7 a.m. and ran until 10 p.m. except for special occasions at one of the bars or on weekends. The the power was left on until the party broke up. This operation con- tinued successfully until Idaho Power became interested and took over the system, around 1967. As a by the way, in the early'50s while the mines were still running, after a fashion, J.J. Oberbilling approached Idaho Power in regards to extending the power line from Riorden Creek to An- timony Camp, where he proposed to build his new mill. The power company was agreeable providing it could extend the line on into Yellow Pine and if the residents were agreeable to accept this service. But when the Idaho Power representative met with the town- speople, two of the principal businessmen turned thumbs down. Consequently, Idaho Power backed off. Ten years later, the Yellow Piners did it the hard way, on their own. It is remarkable what a small group of people can accomplish when they are all of accord. Yellowpine. by Jerri Montgomery MARCH 8 -- We haven't been up on the hill this winter, but tonight while riding to Carl Kitchen's house, we discovered this could be an adventure. By our shack the road is almost smooth, yet a few yards up the hill, the first of the ruts show up. To avoid them one must angle a truck to one side of the road and near the edge of the ditch. At the Kitchen residence we were allowed to peek at the baby rabbits Muriel is trying to mother and feed. Muriel is not en- joying much sleep at night, for these five wee babies must be fed every three hours. Carl wakes, warms the milk and then wakes Muriel who is beginning to feel like "Mother Rabbit." Fay Stark could not join me for a cup of coffee at the hotel today. She had to go home to feed her husband. I asked her why she did not send a lunch with him. Came her answer, "I did once and he brought the lunch home to eat." So now she cooks. The quiet of the af- ternoon was broken suddenly by Kia's sharp bark and I knew by her tone that there were horses near. Most of the Van Hoover horse herd was galloping across the field below our property. The horses ran up the road then turned to retrace their route. Kelly, seeing this, hid behind a tree until the last horse passed. Then he jumped out and spooked the animals so they would turn into the alley leading to the pasture. They were once more penned in. I believe the pony, Pretty Boy, was the leader in this attempt for freedom. The ski team from Yellow Pine University made a good showing in McCall. Donnie and Rene Waller did us proud and the entire team came home successful. During their time out, the young students stayed at the McCall Hotel, went to a movie at Alpine Playhouse, had pizza, snowmobiled and, in general, had a whale of a time. Friday night was quiet in this village. Nary a bar was open. Fred Strand and his group rode to Big Creek. Carl Whitmore and Marion ( Smitty) Smith rode into Yellow Pine from Lowman. Carl and Smitty usually come in with Tom Nicholas and Dean Herman at least once during the snowmobile season. Yet, for one reason or the other, Tom and Dean could not make this trip. Saturday groups of snowmobilers came in but there was no music in the village. We heard the snowmobiles coming down off the hill, heading They danced so hard the floor fell in for the bar, and later they roared by this shack on their return to bed and rest. Jim and Louise Daniels were in a couple of weeks ago on snowmobile. Louise flew out for the return trip. Jim came in alone a week later. Jim Daniels has teen coming into this area for a good many years. fie can recall when the hotel was first built, when Iva Kissenger worked at the hotel on the hill, which i.s now Murph's house, and he remembers Fay and Iva's daughters when they were little tots going to school in the first school house. He spoke of the many Yellow Pine trees that were in the middle of the village and the many pack strings that lined up along the main street, the miners who came to the village for a Saturday night and the wild times they had. I have been told of the horse races that once churned the dust of the main street and the fights that started at one end of the street to end up at the other end. The story I like to tell is of the night Paul was at Murph's and two women launched into a rolling, hair pulling, scratching, clawing encounter. Paul was standing by Murph watching the spectacle. He finally turned to Murph and asked "Aren't you going to do something to stop this fight ?" Murph puffed on a cigarette and drawled "Nope, they are cleaning UP my floor." The fight went on until one gave up and left. There was the night Mary Earl and Ray Thrall were dancing so vigorously the floor under their feet gave way. The next few days were given to repairing the floor. Should anyone come in for a drink, he was put to work to lay the new floor. In this fashion the new dance floor was soon ready for some more stomping. Jim Cox has written to ask when the road will be open so we expect him when he has the word. We wonder when Harry Withers will come in. There was the day he was the first one to drive into Yellow Pine, almost following the county equipment. Road opening used to be a big event. Someone would shoot off a gun and yell "the road is open," and the doors of the houses would slam as the residents ran to the middle of the village to see who was the first to drive in. There would be a short celebration. When the vehicles were lined up for the drive out, there would be an exodus for the outside and the freedom of the road. This would usually occur in the evening and we drove down the East Fork and on to the South Fork. We would take our time, stopping now and then to gather to talk or at the Reed ranch stop to see how many deer we could see on the flat. We would leave a deserted village. Today there is no such feeling. Most of the residents now have vehicles outside. So the drive out is usually done by one vehicle with many passengers. Or one vehicle will make the trip alone. Progress and changes. A school bell for Yellow Pine By JEAN EBBERT YELLOW PINE — This town of 35 permanent residents is about 500 miles from the nearest ocean. It lies deep in the Salmon River mountains, about 150 miles northeast of Boise and about 60 miles from the nearesC.highway. Not exactly what you would call a naval environment. But in Yellow Pine, since six years ago this Memorial Day, the spirit of the U.S. Navy is alive and well, for the bell of Yellow Pine's one -room school house is the former ship's bell of USS Car- son City, a Navy patrol frigate that served in the Pacific in 1944. The 259 -pound brass bell has been serving the school since May 25, 1974, when it was presented to the school by a representative of the 13th Naval District. Also present were Senator Church, Con- gressman Symms, school district Superintendent Wilson, and a crowd of nearly 200 people. Admiral Zumwalt, naval chief of opera- tions, and Vice Admiral Hooper, naval curator and director of naval history, and Governor Andrus of Idaho were also invited, but could not attend. Their bad luck, for it was a fine day. Amy Montgomery, the school's sole eighth grade student, gradu- ated that day. The McCall- Donnelly High School Band played. The women of Yellow Pine provided lunch. Church and Symms pre- sented flags that had flown over the U.S. Capitol. Lafe Cox led the flag- raising ceremonies and was named the bell's custodian. His wife Emma unveiled the bell. Lafe and Emma received a carved wooden plaque from Superintendent Wilson for their many services to the school. Lafe snowplowed on winter days so the school could open, or he "bused" students to school on his skimobile. He and Emma had housed Richard Miller, the school's teacher, and his family at their ranch. Yes, a fine day. The bell would be in good hands. This was only proper, for the bell had served honorably on Car- son City during her wartime cruises. When Carson City was decom- missioned in 1949, the bell was put in storage in Seattle. In the fall of 1973, Richard Miller came to teach the "Yellow Pine Nine" — nine pupils in eight grades. Miller later wrote, "the little red school house was all that it should be, except that it lacked a bell." A Navy veteran, he knew that many ships were in mothballs, and possibly a bell could be secured through the Navy. On Dec. 3, 1973, he wrote to Zumwalt, asking that a ship's bell be sent to this, one of the few remaining one -room schools in the country. Hooper replied for Zumwalt on Dec. 19, saying that a bell was available and would be shipped if the school would pay the shipping costs, and if a custodian would be designated who could receive the bell and report annually to the Navy on its location and condition. The cost of shipping the bell would be $37. The Yellow Pine Nine raised $15 and the school district agreed to pay the balance. On Jan. 15, 1974, Miller wrote Hooper that the conditions would be met, and that the school was planning to dedicate the bell on the upcoming Memorial Day. He added, "While we are small in number here in Yellow Pine, we are not lacking in dedication to our country ... a simple yet poignant ceremony might be a reminder to other Ameri- cans that pride in our country still flourishes." Now the Navy took over. The bell was crated and sent overland across the Cascades and the plains of eastern Washington, leaving behind the Pacific, but carrying deep in its brass the sounds and spirits of long days and nights at sea, of arduous and unglamorous patrols, of hundreds of sailors who had marked their days at sea by its clang. The bell arrived in Cascade in March. Yellow Pine was still snowed in, so Ray Arnold of Cascade flew the bell the last 40 miles in his ski - equipped airplane. Lafe Cox and Miller then hauled the bell by truck to Cox's garage, where Miller spent the next two months polishing it. And that's how on Memorial Day 1974, after a quarter century of silence„ Carson City's bell came to ring again, to mark for Yellow Pine's citizens the rhythm of school days, to be honored and cherished. Amy Montgomery has married and moved away from Yellow Pine. Richard Miller is now principal of the American High School in Seoul, Korea. Lafe and Emma have retired from running their ranch, and now live just a mile- and -a -half from the school. "That day in 1974 was one of the most honored and memorable days in the 52 years Lafe and I have lived in Yellow Pine," she says. I believe it. (Jean Ebbert, a former naval officer and a Navy wife for 25 years, is a regular columnist for Navy Times.) by Jerri Montgomery Jan. 27 -- I learned through a phone call from Boise and a note from Cascade of the passing of Murphy Earl. Once the shock and deep sense of loss eased, I sat and relived the years I knew this man. I first knew Murph some years ago casually in his suit and tie in Boise, meeting him now and then at the Western Cafe and Bar. I came to have a friendship with him in our first trips to Yellow Pine, and it was through Murph that Paul and I bought the house we were to move in- to and dub "our shack." I smile as I recall how in the first year, I act- ed with the greatest respect when near Murph. That was until the evening he pushed me to anger and I argued with him. It was then I realized Murph Earl enjoyed an argument. From then on he and I would argue with gusto and enjoy every minute of it. I am seeing Murph at the drums, playing with Don Caward, Harlow Struble and Tommy Richardson, or whoever played the music for a Saturday night dance. Murph loved to be in Yellow Pine, holding court in the big Log Bar, telling hunting and fishing stories, talking about the hey day of Stibnite or cooking for a group on the rotisserie. I remember fall evenings sitting in the back room with Murph on one of the couches in front of the huge fireplace, or cooking steaks on the grill in the fireplace. One night Murph dropped a steak in the ashes. Velda Cahill told Murph he had to eat that steak. I have pictures of Murph behind the bar with his old buddies sitting across from him -- Ray Thrall, Frank Hansberry, Paul Montgomery, Harry Withers, Pat Nobles. Now, Ray, Paul and Murph have gone. At times I feel I have lived a thousand years, watching so many friends pass on. Each year now, my friends and loved ones leave me. Yet the memories linger on and on. Murph was an integral part of Yellow Pine. We waited for Murph to drive in, come spring, and in the first hour after he opened his door, the bar would fill. The winter cold of the bar would ease once the barrel stove was fired up, and amidst the confusion of boxes on the floor, conversation would flow. The voice of Jim Reeves would be heard from Murph's stereo or the juke box would play. Murph made no big waves in Yellow Pine. He is a legend. I was told by an old -timer Murph had done much for this village, quietly, anonymously. The most treaured gift he left was the memories. I wonder now if the log bar will be opened come spring. What changes will take place? I am sad to even contemplate changes. When I return to Yellow Pine, I will look to see Murph sitting on the porch seat of his bar and in my mind's eye perhaps I will see him and feel his presence for men of Murph's caliber are not forgotten. I received four phone calls and a note to tell me the news of Murph's death. I am grateful for this thoughtfulness. Today I sit in the dining area, watching the boats come and go by the bay. Ramey San ven- tured out into the yard to bask in the sunshine. A lovely day, sweater weather. Rain fell for three days, on and off, and to the north, we hear of mud slides covering main highways and destroying homes. But in Newport, this seems to miss us. I see on TV the news of snow in Boise and Valley County. I know what this winter will br- ing to Yellow Pine. The snowmobiles will be out in full force. There will be a wait for mail or a flight out, and the wood stoves will be burning day and night. Come a thaw, the rivers will run high, the boulders will crash through the night. Here, the daffodils are coming up, a hummingbird flew into the yard three days ago, and the robins can be seen hopping in yards where ever one drives. Across the bay, east- ward, snow caps a distant mountain. Bus Westcott and Irene Baker called us two nights ago, a welcome surprise. This couple had barely returned from fishing in Mexico. They caught only two pelicans, which they released, but they had warm weather. Murphy Earl, tendinAi bar at his bar and cafe in Yellow Pine. Saturday night there will be a crab feed at the American Legion Hall. We will be there to eat our fill and dance. This is fresh crab, which tn,- diner has to crack. I am closing now. My deepest sympathy to Murph's family, to all who knew the big man and cared. Murph Earl will linger in the fond memories. -�r r • w 1a, —;ho rl� -tee -F,q,r Al 01, .2 P4 as CAN A TOWN EXIST W ithoutATi l ephone? Meet some of the people of Yellow Pine, Idaho, who get along very well without it i ICA A IS A LABYRINTH of wires. With more than 160 million tele- phones in the country today, virtually every home in the nation is connected by wires and space satellites that permit one to talk to anywhere in the world. Can you imagine, then, a world without them'? if the telephone in your home sud- denly goes out of order, you can always use a neighbor's or find a pay phone nearby. But what would it be like without even those? Could you live without phones completely? Could you live in Yellow Pine, Idaho, for example'? Yellow Pine is truly an American anach- ronism. It is one of the last towns in the U.S. without a single phone. Situated deep in the mountainous 2.9 million -acre Boise National Forest, Yellow Pine is 52 miles from the nearest town (and telephone). From January to late April, the only way into this snowbound wilderness is by ski plane. Most people journey to this tiny hamlet (pop. 100; 60 in winter) to hunt, fish and pan for gold. But I came to Yellow Pine to find out firsthand how, in this day and age. people live without telephones. The main street of the town is just a block long. There are two bars, two inns. a single -room schoolhouse, a nondenomi- national church and Parks' Merc, an old- BY M I C H A E L S. L A S K Y tasmoned combination general store- ly relishing the story. "After a while, he gas station- Laundromat -post office that decided he'd better call his wife to say is usually the first place a visitor stops he was staying a few days more. They upon arrival, started arguing, and she told him in no I'm no different, and when I go inside, uncertain terms to get home. I'm greeted by Debbie Rekow, an em- ployee. "Now I know why you folks to h ndle tthe radio didn't microphone, which don't have telephones," I comment as I has this button you press in to talk and enter. "The phone installers probably release to listen. So I stood by him and got lost trying to find this place." pushed it in and out at the right moments. "Yellow Pine isn't the easiest place to When he finally couldn't stop her scream - travel to, that's for sure," says Debbie. "A ing, he yelled, `Well, listen, honey, right burly truck driver came in here recently now I have a lady here, and she's push - and said, 'This sure is God's country!' ing my button!' `Oh, you find it pretty ?' l asked. He said, "She hung up. It must have been a What 1 mean is that God's the only conversation with very high ratings, be- one who could find it! "' She laughs. cause all the radios were on monitor. "So how do you get along without a "People here are pretty self - sufficient." telephone nearby? Aren't there times notes Darlene. "One man knows auto - when you wish you had one ?" motive mechanics, and there's another "The only time when a telephone who's a carpenter and plumber. Some - seems to be really important around one else can handle electronics, and so here is when there's an emergency of on. Neighbors help neighbors. We can't some sort," says Debbie. "We do have just pick up a phone and call a service a two -way radio to receive and send man to come way out here!" messages. But there are only certain Although the townsfolk enjoy the isola- hours that the radio is monitored. I tion that life in Yellow Pine provides, "Now that I'm a mother, a ,. the snowbound I phone seems winters test the like more of a '' fortitude and necessity. One resolution of night my baby, everyone. Amber, was "Some peo- running a very pie have gone high fever. But stir -crazy here. it was 3 a.m., and I've had to I and the radio � �X escort them to monitor was Boise for a lit - off. If I'd had a tle R and R," phone, 1 could Sheriff Dave have called a At the local bar: Young and old alike gather 'round McClintock doctor to help a two -way radio for word from the outside world. tells me. "Booze her and quiet and boredom my nerves." The towns folk are the biggest Across the problems 1 get dusty dirt street from the lo- that is the town's are like pioneers— cals. Frankly, main drag is the my job would nine -room, 19- }Jut some have be easier if 1 bed Yellow Pine had a tele- Lodge, run by a phone. Radio Bob and Dar-gone Stir -crazy airwaves are l e n e Rosen- not always de- baum. As soon as I enter, Darlene pours Sometimes atmospheric conditions lions make me a cup of coffee. it impossible to transmit or receive mes- sages can you live way out here in the . But, personally, I don't need a middle of nowhere without a telephone ?" phone. I've lived so long without one As Bob sticks a wad of tobacco into that I've learned to live without." s cheek, he says, "You know, we real- Part of the Yellow Piners' reluctance can communicate with the outside to install phones is that they are, sym- orld. We just have to do it over the bolically at least, the last link with civi- radio. We call down to Cascade, and lization. The absence of phones has kept they have some gizmo that patches us the townsfolk independent. pioneers and. into a phone, which they dial." well, different from the rest of us. "The bad part about these calls is that "Like everything else, there is good j they aren't private," says Darlene. and bad about having no phones in town," "Anyone who's tuned in can hear. In says Bob Rosenbaum. "The constant winter, some people monitor the radio ringing doesn't interrupt your life, espe- all day as entertainment. cially during meals. "Some visitors come purposely to get "Of course, potential customers of away from telephones. We had a man the inn can't call us for reservations. staying here who was playing hooky But," he adds, "we don't get bill collec- from his wife," Darlene tells me, clear- I tors bothering us either." Zak Z Pa�v4 Yellow Pine asks county to open road By Bradley Blum The Star -News Sixteen residents of Yellow Pine told the Valley County Board of Commissioners Monday that they want the Warm Lake Highway kept open over Big Creek Summit this winter if federal authorities will allow the South Fork "Road to be open- ed. At a meeting earlier this month in Yellow Pine, Payette National Forest Ranger Earl Kimball told residents that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to a proposal that would allow wheeled traffic on the road along the South Fork of the Salmon River during two weekdays each week this winter. The Fish and Wildlife Ser- vice has the authority over whether the road can remain open in the winter under the Threatened and Endangered Species Act of 1969. - Some wildlife biologists think the elk herds that winter along the South Fork are an important part of the habitat of the gray wolf, which is considered an en- dangered species. The Fish and Wildlife Service is charged with deciding what activities on the road pose a threat to the wolf. At the Sept. 3 meeting in Yellow Pine, it was agreed that any plans to keep the South Fork Road open hinged on whether the county would keep Big Creek Summit open. 6T le-r" /i -e 2- 12 S At the commissioners' Sept. 9 meeting, Commissioner Howard Koskella said that the county road department would remove snow on the Warm Lake Highway until Jan. 1, 1986, but after that would allow the road to snow shut. At the time, Koskella said that the county did not have the money to keep the road open all winter, and would reopen it in early spring using a new rotary snowblower purchased this sum- mer. On Monday, Koskella told th, Yellow Pine residents that tht county planned to cease snow removal efforts over Big Creek Summit after Jan. 1 unless the commissioners received indica- tion from the residents that they want the highway kept open. "We know you're not all in agreement yet, because we have been approached by some residents who say they don't want it open and others who say that they do," Koskella said. However, none of those ap- pearing at the commission meeting said they were opposed to keepsrr� the roads open. One t#ember of the audience suggested that a vote should be taken since a large percentage of Yellow Pine's residents were in attendance at' Monday's meeting. Commission Chairman Adolf Heinrich asked which residents supported having the county keep Big Creek Summit open, provid- ed that the South Fork Road could be kept open, and all 16 Yellow Pine residents said yes. Another meeting between the U.S. Forest Service and residents has been scheduled for 10 a.m. Oct. 8 at the Krassel Ranger District office in McCall. Yellow Piners as BY ERIC BECHTEL for aid over The Star -News Five Yellow Pine residents ap- Fork of the Salmon River Road, peared before Valley County the forest service has more than commissioners Monday to re- 600 sediment- generating roads in quest county help in preserving the area of the South Fork. the South Fork of the Salmon "They're closing 15 miles of River Road as an access between d , +1, h h Cascade and Yellow Pine. roa e winter, w en t ere are few sediments, and leaving open Beginning this year, the road 600 miles on their inventory," he will be closed by the Payette Na- said. "The logic of that just tional Forest even more than the doesn't make sense." closures over the past winter. The long -term forest service H e also said it doesn't make plan is to permanently close 15 sense to use the Warm Lake - miles of the road within three to Landmark route as an alternate five years. access. Closure is necessary to reduce "I can't see Landmark as a man- caused sediment into the reasonable access. I worry about South Fork of the Salmon river, a my brakes going out going down sensitive salmon spawning area, there in the summer," he said. forest officials have said. Howard Koskella, county com -. The Forest Service has propos- mission chairman, agreed that ed the Warm Lake - Landmark -- the Warm Lake- Landmark route Johnson Creek route as an alter- would be a poor alternative to the native to the South Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Salmon River Road and has pro- Road. posed that those using the alter- "I still don't think it would be nate road pay for its mainten- a safe road for winter use," ance. Koskella said. To keep it usable According to Yellow Piners, the South Fork of the Salmon River Road is the only reasonable access to Yellow Pine, and the Forest Service's rationale for closing it does not make sense. "Everyone in our community was damaged by the decision last year," Yellow Pine resident Howard Buettgenbach told com- missioners. "We had a number of medical emergencies, but there was no access. The planned closure for this year would be much more extensive than last year's." Buettgenbach said he: had found that, besides the South during the winter, he said, it would require sanding or gravel- ing every day, and the county could not afford that cost. He said it is possible Hecla Mining Company would assume responsibility for the road if the mining firm goes into year -round operation in the Stibnite area. Koskella said the county has asked the forest service to turn operation of the South Fork Road over to the county. "We asked if they would turn that road over to us, and they just grinned." he said. Yellow Pine resident Mike S7d i- Ne-W5 /gut 1;, t4F7 k Valley road Screiber asked the commission to repeat its request to the forest ser- vice. If nothing else, he said, it would provide more ammunition for planned legal action against the forest service. Valley County Engineer Les Ankenman was asked by the commission to draft a letter to the forest service renewing the county's request. Besides legal action against the Forest Service, Yellow Pine resi- dent John Sumner told the com- mission there is an element in Yellow Pine advocating the removal of any gate the Forest Service constructs to block the road. Sumner said that a 1986 case involving a Yellow Piner who violated a winter closure of the road was decided in the Yellow Piner's favor by a federal judge. The federal judge, Sumner said, stated it was unconstitu- tional for the forest service to prevent a landowner from having reasonable access to his property. John Hanson said he believes the forest service is not being honest in its reasons for closing 15 miles of the road. "The first eight miles (of the road) are the single highest con- tributor to sediment, "' Hanson said. "If they were truly in- terested in preventing sediment, they'd close it all from the blacktop." The reason only a 15 -mile stretch of the road is being clos- ed, Buettgenbach believes, is that the forest service wants to keep logging areas open on each end of the road. >x k /Z/ %.3 Harmonica festival pays tribute to frontier musical instrument YELLOW PINE — Contes- tants will be coming from all over the world, literally, for this year's Yellow Pine Harmonica Festival, which gets underway Friday and runs through Sunday. Well, a few of them, any- way, will make some very long trips to take part in this back - country community's fourth an- nual celebration of the impor- tance of the harmonica in the mu- sical history of the old west. Hands down, the winner of the farthest traveler award, pro- vided that he makes it, of course, will be Hea Bong Lee, who is traveling from Seoul, South Ko- rea, for the contest. In addition, Vi and Ken El- liston, from Lakefield, Ontario, Canada, are on the list of contes- tants for this year's festival. That international contin- gent will be joined by harmonica players from around the western United States. From California, Nevada, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and from most corners of Idaho, they'll be converging to take part in a festival that began in 1990 when Bill Roberts had an idea. Roberts, a Yellow Pine property owner and member of the Yellow Pine Village Council, wanted to organize a celebration that would honor the contribu- tion the harmonica made to the many miners' camps in the pio- neer west. It also happened to co- incide with Idaho's Centennial Celebration. He contacted the various harmonica manufacturing com- panies and the Society for the Preservation and Advancement of the Harmonica (SPAR). An audience of about 300 attended the first year's event, a number that swelled to about 1,500 over the two- and -a -half day event last year. Returning this year to judge the contest are Eddie Gordon, of Fresno, Calif., and Don Allen, of Minneapolis, Minn. Gordon, 51, has played pro- fessionally since he was 9, an age when he was discovered by the "Harmonica Rascals." He be- came a member of the "Harmon - icats," and has appeared on about 30 Texaco Star Theatre produc- tions with Milton Berle, and roughly 50 Ed Sullivan Shows with acts like Elvis Presley, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, and Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Gordon has also played on various other television shows such as "Your Show of Shows," "Kraft Music Hall," and "F Troop." He also did the theme songs for "Petticoat Junction," "My Three Sons," "The Rockford Files," "Sanford and Son," and for the films "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," "Midnight Cowboy," "Goodbye Mr. Chips," and "Pop - eye." He also worked on the composition for the Sesame Street theme. Allen is now retired and plays "to have fun," but he also tries to play a couple of shows each year. He has played with professional groups on televi- sion, radio, commercials, and recorded since the 1950s. In the early 1980s he began teaching at harmonica seminars in Detroit and Akron, Ohio. Boisean Lin Vanskike, a regular at the contest, will ac- company the judges when they do their ever - popular judges' concert. Danny Wilson, who works for the Lee Oskar Har- monica Company has judged in past years, but is unable to attend this year. SPAH has members from all over the world, and that group's 1991 convention in De- troit drew contestants from all over, including hundreds from the United States and Canada. The harmonica has a particularly strong following Japan and Eu- rope. The youngest and oldest competitors are coming to the event from Washington state. Randy Rutherford, 16, will make the trip from Spokane, and Eu- gene Born, 85, is from Sequim. Patrick Harren, of McCall, is a three -time winner of the dia- tonic division of the contest, but won't be able to return this year. However, McCall resident-Kei- th Darling will show up to repre- sent Valley County. Also scheduled to return this year are past crowd favorites Arthur and Luella Babbitt, of Amagosa Valley, Calif. The Mountain States Legal Foundation will receive all net proceeds from the event, which is being privately funded this year after a vote by community members last fall determined that the community would not be the official host. The non -profit foundation represented Yellow Pine in court last fall in a battle with the U.S. Forest Service over whether the South Fork Road would be plowed in the winter to provide access. Those attending should be prepared for hot days and cool evenings, for cooking some of their own meals, and for camp- ing out, as the few hotel rooms and houses available have long since been rented. /i the Ad vocd'�e ug day 1493 Harmonica festival draws 1,500 to Yellow Pine YELLOW PINE — Despite some inclement weather, a crowd estimated at 1,500 traveled here last weekend to take in the Fourth Annual Yellow Pine Har- monica Festival. And winners of the various parts of the competition came from all over North America. Fred Crabtree, who finished second in the diatonic harmonica division in 1992, took advantage of the absence of Patrick Harren of McCall. Harren, who has had a lock on that division since the event's inception, couldn't attend this year's event and Crabtree took first place in that division. Finishing second in that di- vision was Leland Smith, of Reno, Nev., and in third place was Boisean Mike Corbett. In the chromatic division, an unexpected entrant traveled from the midwest to waltz away with first place. Darrell Williams. of Wichita, Kan., was not listed among the entrants prior to the event. The second -place finisher in that division was a returning player from Shelton, Wash., Vern Morgus. He organizes the Harmonica Jamboree in Tacoma, Wash., each year, and sells har- monicas and gives lessons. Ed Sigmier, of Poncha Springs, Colo., is another first - time entrant who made the trip into Idaho's backcountry a worthwhile ordeal, as he finished third in the chromatic division. And, winning the group di- vision was a couple who also traveled a long way to give the event an international flavor. Vi and Ken Elliston, from Lake - field, Ontario, Canada, heard about the event from some friends of theirs who had attend- ed previously, and decided to make the festival this year. 7-ne .Sfa►- NeW5 5�2r 16,1917 3 Photo courtesy Heda Mining Co. Eric Jones examines a seedling at Hecla's reclamation project. e cla awarded for recla ation at Yellow Pine Hecla Mining Company has re- ceived Idaho's top environmental award for Excellence in Annual Op- erations of Large Hard Rock Mines. The award is for reclamation work completed during 1992 at the company's Yellow Pine gold mine near McCall, which was closed last year after producing nearly 100,000 ounces of gold. Gov. Cecil Andrus and the state board of land commissioners pre- sented the award to Eric Jones, Yel- low Pine project superintendent, at an awards ceremony held recently in Boise. Hecla has consistently exceeded its reclamation plan requirements, and has taken reclamation responsibility for 40 acres of historic mine impacts at the Yellow Pine mine, according to the award. Hecla has implemented special- ized grading, water management, and planting and seeding on application acres of the mine, according to the award. Hecla has consistently used Best Management Practices throughout the mine and process sites, according to the award. These practices have led to water quality standards being main- tained or exceeded throughout the life of the mine. Hecla pioneered the use of native bacteria in the process of bio- neutral- ization to decommission and neutral- ize cyanide in the mine's processed ore pile. Cyanide - eating bacteria were grown on -site and applied to the pile in 1992. This method has been successful and will help establish a more natural, biologically balanced ecosystem when final reclamation is completed, com- pany officials said. This is the third environmental award earned by the Yellow Pine unit. In October 1992 the Pacific North- west Pollution Control Association awarded Yellow Pine the 1991 Indus- trial Pollution Control Award for Idaho. This award was in recognition of Hecla's initiative and ingenuity asso- ciated with the final reclamation and bio -neutralization process. Yellow Pine also received Idaho's Top Reclamation Award for Excel - lenceAnnualOperations during 1990. s yYV1GL7 Harmonica felt starts Friday in Yellow Pine By Karen Bossick The Idaho Statesman YELLOW PINE — Most times it plays second fiddle to the sax- ophone. Even the tuba. But the usually overlooked harmonica will_ be the star at- traction at the 6th Annual Yel- low Pine Harmonica Contest Friday through Sunday. The event, one of the North- west's most unique, attracts con- testants and spectators from throughout the nation to this tiny hamlet east of McCall. Three of the country's finest harmonica players. — Don Al- len, Eddie Gordon and Danny Wilson — will judge the contest from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. They will also perform at 7 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. Ad- /mission to the contest costs $2; admission to the judges' con- cert, $5. Jam sessions will be begin at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday; a gos- pel music fest starts at 11 a.m. Sunday. Contestants will teach free harmonica lessons from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday in the shop across from the town's recrea- tion hall. A potluck dinner at 5 p.m. Friday, barbecue dinner from 5 to 7 p.m. Satur- day and break- fast from 7 to 9 a.m. Sunday will round out the weekend. The barbecue costs $5; break- fast, $3. There are no Red Lion Hotels or Ramada Inns in this tiny town, popula- tion 35. But you can park your tent or trailer in one of the nearby national forest campgrounds. To get to Yellow Pine, turn east on the Warm Lake High- way at Cascade. Turn north on the newly paved South Fork of the Salmon River road at Warm Lake. If you prefer, you can stay on the Warm Lake Highway a few miles farther, turning off in- stead on the dirt - and - gravel Johnson Creek Road. This route offers a nice view of Warm Lake. Or, you can go through Mc- Call to the Lick Creek Road, which starts on the east side of Payette Lake. Though a rough dirt- and - gravel road, it's consid- ered the prettiest by the locals. ZIT'S A 31 -MILE SKATING RINK' Troy Maben /The Idaho Statesman A group of women from Yellow Pine rides down the main street of the small mountain town after an impromptu horse race through the center of town. No one likes road to Yellow Pine Story by Art Lawler * Photos by Troy Maben The Idaho Statesman % �i lG�Gl�rG vf�tT�s'n ?avr - Paving the span hasn't improved safety or helped the environment John Heggen was going 25 miles per hour when he left the roadway. His red pickup hit the black ice on an outsloping curve that night, and his right wheel skid- ded over the edge of the soft shoulder. The truck rolled over and hit a tree. Fortunately for Heggen, the truck bed caught on the tree, perhaps saving his life. Heggen, a Yellow Pine resi- dent and senior conservation of- South Fork Yellow Pine Road ficer for Idaho Fish and Game, kicked the door open, fell 5 feet to the ground, then rolled an- other 20 feet. "When I looked up, my pickup was. hanging precariously above me," he said. "I guess it wasn't my time to go." It was, instead, his introduc- tion to South Fork Salmon Riv- er road, a winding route that the Forest Service almost closed twice — once to protect wolves from traffic and once to protect salmon from sediment flowing down from the soft moun- tainside. But the road wasn't closed. It was paved, with money from an $8 million congressional appro- priation that turned a 31 -mile stretch into the "two -way" as- phalt adventure that Heggen survived. That amounts to about $160,000 for each of the 50 or so people it serves -- the winter population of Yellow Pine. A 250 -acre patch of private land surrounded by two national for- ests, the community of red- goofed rustic buildings with horses tied in front of the local tavern has the feel of 19th cen- tury Idaho. The locals are less than thrilled by their new link with the outside world, even though it's the only way in and out luring winter. Many would gather see it torn up and re- glaced with gravel, to slow mo- torists and give them better tD7action than the ice -slick asphalt. "It's a 31 -mile skating rink," said Dave Imel, a retired school Coacher who escaped Boise six years ago. "Deputy Dave, as they call Dave McClintock of the Valley County Sheriff's Department, puts the road's 14 -foot width into quick perspective: "My pickup up over there, with the mirrors, is eight feet wide." A compromise The Forest Service attempted to close off 19 miles of the old 1-irt road in the mid -80s be- cause the sediment was de- 3troying spawning grounds of , almon in the South Fork of the Salmon River. But Yellow Pine got help of then U.S. Senator Jim Mc- Clure, who pushed through the 'Rppropriation bill in 1988 in opes the paved road would 4hore up the mountain, answer - Crig the concerns of both envi- onmentalists and the people of Yellow Pine. It didn't work. But the Forest gervice is still trying. "The soil material out there is real sandy and highly eroda- ble," said Dennis Gordon, hy- arologist with the Payette Na- Oonal Forest. . The solution, he said, is to r'evegetate the mountains -- a time consuming process that Often doesn't take. .+ Then there's the problem of road maintenance. , "They plow the road and end tip getting a snow floor built up on the road," Gordon said. ` "Then with the traffic and the thawing, it turns into ice, Ind there's a period of time when the road is pretty icy." In the short term, construc- tion added to the problem — gome 1,300 cubic yards of sed- iMent. To offset the problem, the forest Service is dredging the river. 'Three years after the road has opened, the service still Paq,. A4 Z of 5 Paq�r Howard Buettgenbach walks along a portion of the 31 -mile paved road to Yellow Pine. has 200 cubic yards to remove this summer. Life of freedom Yellow Pine is leaving the tough answers to the Forest Service for now. But as they've shown in the past, they're not afraid to chal- lenge the government. In 1988, citing safety and en- vironmental reasons, Payette National Forest Supervisor Sonny LaSalle ordered the road padlocked for the winter — with Yellow Pine residents trapped inside. "It still bothers me that in the same year the Berlin Wall came down our Forest Service saw fit to lock up a town," said part -time Yellow Pine resident Lois Vanhoover. "They lost a lot of locks dur- ing that time," said Imel, who admits to using a hacksaw on one himself. Still, local citizens seem will- ing to put up with all kinds of hardships for the scenic beauty of the surrounding mountains. Imel, who recently retired as the teacher at Yellow Pine's one -room schoolhouse, first drove through on a hunting trip. He had the driver stop and let him out. "I told him `This is where I'm going to be buried,' " he said. A happier man would be hard to find. Howard Buettgenbac6 stands on the road along the banks of the South Fork of the ' Salmon River where a washout of the cut bank above the road pitched sediment and trees, covering the road. Buettgenbach worries that sediment problems from numer- ous causes, including the Salmon River Road, are destroying = the habitat in the river for the few remaining � chinook salmon that return from the ocean to spawn each year. Photos by sk :.'�. Troy Maben S It The Idaho statesman WIN ` ", �t V,�, Pager Not even Howard Buettgen- bach, a part -time resident and environmentalist, can hurt his disposition for long. Buettgenbach — pronounced Bit -zen -bach, except by some weary locals who call him "Bit - chin -bach" — also taught at the school for a year. Both men love the freedom of life in Yellow Pine. There are apparently no smoking ordinances. At least none anybody worries about. It's a village where residents feel free to to stay inside and smoke, or go to go outside and drink. Small town life Four horses were parked in front of the Yellow Pine Tav- ern on Thursday morning. The four young riders — Tra- cy Jo Boyd, Virginia Barthob- new, Rhonda McLenna, and Connie Cox — stood alongside, smoking and drinking a beer. Then they hopped on their horses and raced them down main street. The sign on the door at the Yellow Pine Tavern says dogs and horses are prohibited, but Imel said the rule is only spo- radically enforced. "Where else could you walk down the street like this with- out being harassed," said E.W. "Catfish" White, a beer in one hand as he strides down main. The waitress inside, Kay Hammons announces to new- comers they can pour them- selves a cup of coffee over by the wall. A large, woodburning stove warms the room. The waitress, just to spice things up, adds, "We serve fat lips at no extra charge." Gladys Smith and Dave's wife, Lynn Imel, arrive later to spread out a new quilt across the pool table for everyone to see. And in the evening, the youn- ger women gather in a booth for a lingerie party while the men drift into evening conver- sation, praising Rush Lim - baugh and ripping the presi- dent for what they see as his big government addiction. Everybody seems to be in town except Buettgenbach, who is two miles away, clean- ing out his one -room shack, drinking water from a spring, and stoking his wood - burning room schoolhouse, rides his four - wheeler through Yellow Pine. Most ebsidents have snowmobiles or four - wheelers to pet around in winter. stove. a Matlock enjoys a cold beer on the steps of the town tavern on _ horse. The sign on the door at the Yellow Pine Tavern says dogs and horses are prohibited; the rule is only sporadically enforced. )ennis Gordon National Forest hydrologist wn environmentalist uettgenbach worries that iment problems from numer. causes, including the Salm- River Road, are destroying habitat in the river for the remaining chinook salmon L return from the ocean to wn each year. e knows most of the citi- i of Yellow Pine consider an environmental extrem- even though he says he has problem with responsible -%llEr /cLrc6ro ��smar -� ;Paj'P AS G7- s' Pages wnicn nas nm) GICtU —i.y "He's wrong," he said. "Those fish are smart enough to know where to spawn." Even if they're not, he doesn't worry about the extinc- tion of one salmon species. "Did you know they had a record salmon harvest in Alas- ka last yearT he asked. "I'm not going to put a fish ahead of people." Eroding away outislopes and tender cutbanks. I% the worst sections, part of the asphalt paving has cracked, sunken and small chunks have even disappeared. Landslides are daily occur - re ces. Motorists have to dodge falling rocks and trees th t sometimes cover the le �Ihey're gth of the road. getting used to it. Arid the problem is melting away as winter gives way to ften described as one long ii "I know we have to have wood, and we have to have minerals. But there's a right way and a wrong way to go about it. .93F Howard Buettgenbach part-time Yellow Pine resident But both men are vocal crit- spring. ics of the South Fork Salmon But they wonder, before the River road. snow falls again, whether As late as last Frida 19 dif- they'll see results from the For- ferent sections of the road est Service's efforts to make its "Someone's going to have to could be counted with erosion $8 million road a safe one. die out there before anything cerani .. Imel is skeptical. gets done." Lcq Vl //e y Road trip to Yellow Pine - valley county's infamous back country town offers glimpse of the past Visitors to central Idaho won't want to miss a drive to the backcountry community of Yellow Pine, which lies in the midst of millions of acres of backcountry. The community has gained fame in the past as a town without telephones. But that could be changing soon as a local telephone utility has received permission to bring phone service to Yellow Pine, which boasts a year -round population of 50. One of the major highlights on Yellow Pine's schedule of community events is the annual Harmonica Festival, held each year, the first week- end in August. For three days, some of the best har- monica players in the nation gather for competi- tion, jam sessions and concerts. The event is billed as a tribute to a musical instrument that helped build the west. And, as you sit on Yellow Pine's graveled main street on an August evening, listening to wail of a harmonica, you feel very much as if you are in the old west. There are several ways to drive to Yellow Pine, all of them scenic. Perhaps the easiest is to drive east from Cascade on the Warm Lake Highway to the South Fork Salmon River Road. That recently paved road fol- lows the famous South Fork down to its confluence with the East Fork of the South Fork. Then, turn right and follow the the East Fork upstream to Yellow Pine. That stretch along the East Fork is graveled and can be washboarded at times, but drive slow and enjoy the scenery. Another route in involves staying on the Warm Lake Highway and continuing past Warm Lake, and up over Warm Lake Summit to Landmark, a Forest Service outpost. At Landmark, turn north on the Johnson Creek Road, and follow that route all the way in to Yellow Pine. Yet a third route, and possibly the most scenic, is also probably the toughest on a vehicle. A pickup or sport utility vehicle is adviseable, however, some- one driving slowly can also take an automobile in via the Lick Creek Road. That route is accessible from downtown McCall by heading east toward the McCall Golf Course and Ponderosa State Park. Turn east off of Davis Ave. and prepare for a view from the top of Lick Creek Summit — it actu- ally gets better as you descend the other side into the Secesh River drainage — that rivals that of Yosemite National Park. Once down the Secesh drainage, you'll pick up the South Fork, and turn upstream again where you'll find the intersection with the East Fork. Follow it on in to Yellow Pine. Three ways in, three ways out. A round -trip making a loop will take the better part of a day, including a few hours' worth of stops for picture taking, picnicking and rest breaks. But it makes for a terrific automobile tour of some of Idaho's most scenic country. T/ Z • // Photo for The Star -News by Shari Hambleton Harmonicas ring out in Y.P. A competitor in the Yellow Pine Smith, Reno, Nev. Chromatic - 1. Harmonica Contest entertains the Ken Couch, Cheney, Wash. 2. audience that gathered in the back- Conrad Hystrom, Portland, Ore. 3. country hamlet east of McCall for a Charlie Henderson, South Caro - weekend of music, food and fun. lina. Group -1. Harmonicans, West - Top finishers in the contest were: ern Washington. 2. The Boys From Diatonic -1. Adam Smith, Elk City. Boise, Boise. 3. Couch Duo, Cheney, 2. Mark Gonyier, Alaska. 3. Leland Wash. I Yellow Pine plays host to Harmonica Contest Thirty -five residents welcome thousands of music - appreciating folks at annual event By Karen Bossick The Idaho Statesman ellow Pine may be a dot representing 35 people on the map. But the town's seventh annual Harmonica Contest and Music Festival goes international this year. Tay Keng Seng, of Malaysia, will join a lineup of about 30 tin - blowing contestants that hail from Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Utah and Arizona. The contest will be held Aug. 1 through 3 in the tiny burg of Yellow Pine, a former gold - mining town in the mountains east of McCall. The town, which just got telephone service, has spon- sored the harmonica festival since 1990. About 300 people turned out for the first festival; 2,500 turned out for last year's three -day run. This contest is unique in that contestants are allowed to play any type of music they wish rather than just one song or one type of music.. The judges, who include a former member of the Harmon- icats that appeared on the "Ed Sullivan Show," hail from Elk River, Minn., Schererville, Ind., and Santa Clarita, Calif. Free lessons will be offered to amateur harmonica players. Musicians of any ilk are also' invited to take part in free jam sessions and compete for the Crowd Pleaser Award. Last year's "Crowd Pleaser" was not a harmonica player but a genuine guitar - playing duo. If you plan to attend, don't bother making reservations with the Ramada Inn or saving your lunch money for a Big Mac. You'll find neither in Yellow Pine, where the main dirt street is lined by two bars, a hotel and a grocery store with a sign that said, "Closed due to retirement." Plan on bringing your own trailer, motor home or tent. The Yellow Pine Enhancement Society, Inc. (YES), a non - profit corporation made up of Yellow Pine residents, is sponsoring a Friday night potluck, which costs $3. Saturday night's barbe- cue costs $5 and Sunday's pan- cake breakfast costs $3. You should bring your own food for other meals. Proceeds from the harmonica contest go toward graveling and repairing the streets, assisting the fire department, maintain ing the community hall and hi- ing legal representation to keep. the South Fork of the Salmon Road open. It takes about 41 /z hours to ga from Boise to Yellow Pine. Tape Idaho 55 north from Boise tko- Cascade. Turn right on the Warm Lake Highway. At the top of Landmark hill, turn left off the paved road onto a winding, gravel -dirt Johnson Creek Road. It's 25 miles from here to Yellow Pine. Questions: Call 382 -4336 anid. ask for Dave or Lynn Imel at BSC -32. 71P L�nq 1/a ll <�Y �%vo P i/�11, 7 Blowin' up a storm Don Allen, left, one of the regularly returning judges at the annual Yellow Pine Harmonica Contest and Music Festival, gets with it, along with "Harmonica Bob," who hails from the Puget Sound area of Washington. Their impromptu performance came while the three contest judges were doing a little teaser concert for the crowd of more than 500 gathered on the main drag in the remote mountain hamlet Saturday evening. r� &aho cS 1 LAST J ELIVERY Fa 9 P,�, IAt- z /`Wfos At the Yellow Pine General Store, former owner Bernice Parks, left, won't let departing mail stage carrier Elaine Battles leave without a goodbye hug. Katherine Jones / The Idaho Statesman Elaine Battles has been delivering mail on the Yellow Pine mail stage route for 21 years. Today is her last day. Residents and colleagues called her departure the end of an era. Yellow Pine says goodbye to Elaine Battles as she leaves her mail stage route By Tim Woodward The Idaho Statesman ELLOW PINE — Lafe Cox isn't one for public displays of emotion, but even he couldn't keep from hugging the woman who has delivered his mail for 21 years. "You're gonna have to go a long way before you can beat this one," he said to her replacement. Turning to Elaine Battles, he said "I appreciate what you do." For Cox, who toiled from sunup to sundown for half a century run- ning a backcountry ranch, this was high praise. Battles, 53, is trading her mail stage route to carry the mail on a highway, Idaho 55 from Cascade to Smiths Ferry. Her last day serv- ing Yellow Pine is today. The stage route — over roads that would make a mountain goat nervous — is one of the last in the country to include freight service. The years of rough roads and heavy lifting have taken a physical toll. A backcountry institution, Bat- tles has delivered mail and freight longer than most on her route can remember. Isolated ranchers and residents of Yellow Pine, Big Creek, Krassel and other remote communities have relied on her for mail, groceries, medicine, news and conversation. She has been their link to the world beyond the mountains. In Yellow Pine, population 50, two men and a dalmatian waited for her outside the post office Wednesday. "lf I'm late, people are waiting," she said. "There's not a lot to do in Yellow Pine." A pink flier on a wall of the post office, in Dave and Paula McClin- tock's garage, invited the town to Battles' going -away brunch at the Shady Nook Cafe. At the Yellow Pine General Store, where you can buy anything from pie filling to butane to Old Crow bourbon, former owner Bernice Parks greeted her longtime mail carrier and friend with a going -away hug. "You remember what Dave said to me my first day ?" Battles asked her, laughing. "He said I'd never last." Dave McClintock, in addition to laving the post office in his garage and ►eing married to the postmaster, is the leputy sheriff. Yellow Pine is the place vhere workers wear two or more hats, verybody knows everybody and peo- ►le count on one another in ways city olks have trouble understanding. i reliable friend Over lunch at the Stumble Inn, cross the dirt Main Street from the 3ack.Country Saloon, Battles recalled he time a Yellow Pine businessman landed her a sackful of bills and ►sked her to deposit them in Cascade. "It was nearly $8,000. And that was ny first year," she said. "He'd never aid eyes on me before." People rely on Battles because they snow they can. Nancy Richter, co- ►wner of the general store since April, laid that without the postal carrier, he wouldn't have made it the first ime she drove over 7,300 -foot Land - nark Pass in the winter. "It was snowing like mad, and I was errified. Elaine let me follow her, and he baby -sat me the whole way.... "She helps people in medical emer- ,encies, goes out of her way to pick up )irthday cards and prescriptions, she given shops for people's groceries. It's iot part of her job, but she's always here for us. At this point, she's a piece )f Idaho history." Postal patron Robert Dendy said limply that "her shoes aren't Tillable." For Mike Ozmer, her re- )lacement, Battles' dedi- The red ai Dodge pic Elaine Ba drives is a iar sight tc residents low Pine, she delive more than groceries, cine, new., conversat Katheri The Idaho �/y19� Fagg �L Z of Battles worked three days a week in winter, six in summer. On good days, the route could take eight hours, in- cluding lunch. If the weather was bad or she ran into trouble, it could be 12 or 13. Her pay has been a percentage of the freight. This year, she figures she'll make $15,000. Her workday has begun at 8 a.m., when she arrived at the Cascade Post Office to load mail and freight into Ray Arnold,s red -and -gray Dodge pickup, the Thunder Mountain Express. Bat- tles works for Arnold, an institution as a backcountry pilot and the one who ration and popularity ire intimidating. "You wonder New Meadows low long it will Rayette :ake before people sae 'eel that way about_' Mccau you," he said. "If giver." Doi People trust her Resenroer with cash, checks, 5s ,harge accounts. o N io "I buy things in c "ascade for Wapiti Meadow (a dude ranch) and charge it on their account," Battles said. "If people don't have accounts, I pay for it my- self. I've never had anybody not pay me back. People give me blank, signed checks and ask me to buy things for them. We don't have that kind of trust many places anymore." Endangered species ascade There aren't many mail carriers like Battles, either. Cascade Postmaster Dan Tanner estimated that the num- ber of backcountry mail routes in Ida- ho is less than a dozen. "In Elaine's case, it's the end of an era," he said. "If something's wrong, she's the first one people call. They call her before the Forest Service... or any- body. She knows the country better than anyone because she's there every ay. Yellow Lake It takes an hour and half to go from Warm Lake to Yellow Pine, on a road`. punctuated with washouts and dizzy -' ing dropoffs. "Isn't this beautiful!" she said as" workers cleared a rockslide on a tow -' ering switchback. "I've taken pictures, but they don't show the depth or ho*, spectacular it is. 1. -1 "This isn't plowed in the winter, ". she continued for Ozmer's benefit. Ozmer, 38, takes over the route on_. Tuesday. He was along for training. "It's up to your judgment how long you want to try to go over it before it.' closes. Going up isn't bad, but going' down can be terrifying. You just slide,, until you hit the snow berm." She laughed, briefly, about the time' she stopped with her back wheels dan'-" gling over a cliff. Another time, a tree;; fell on the truck, smashing its hood and windshield. She drove it that way for three weeks. She's had a$„ many as five flat tires in a day. She was carry- ing two spares has the contract with the U.S. Postal and had others, Service to run the mail route. stashed on the The route is 135 tortuous miles, 185 with trips to Big Creek on Tuesdays and Fridays. The Thunder Mountain Express is 6 years old, with more than 200,000 bone - jarring miles on it. It took an hour to load the mail, beer,, 150 bags of ice and other freight. Bat- tles has delivered dogs, cats, a dead cougar. "I did refuge to haul three goats once," she said "I was worried about the residue." Making mail drops The first of 11 mail drops is at Warm Lake, where lodge co -owner June Lopez Cadenhead waited for 800_, pounds of ice, a week's supply. "Elaine has delivered most of our' supplies for as long as we've been' here," she said. "I feel terrible. Every-' one on the route feels terrible." route. ".'. In 21 years, she's" . had three accidents. One was her fault. She hugged the' mountainside on a" blind turn and coI - ;,' lided with a deputy sheriff. "People ask me if it gets bor- ing driving the same roads every day. I tell them I've had all the excitement i can stand. When you've had your wheels hanging over a cliff and three people run into you and another 300 try to run into you, you don't mind be•', mg bored at all.... "You have to like yourself to do this'- job because you're alone a lot. You have to be sociable, because even. though you're not with them very long, you see the same people every day. And you have to be self - reliant. If you` break down in a storm on a mountain pass, there's nobody around to help, YOU." She learned self - reliance growing up on in Alaska, where her father was' a trapper, outfitter and guide. She and her husband, Gene, moved to Idaho in-, 1972. He manages an oil company in • Cascade. Elaine was working as a waitress when Arnold offered her the mail route. " "For some reason, I was always spilling on him. He had to give me the mail job to keep from having coffee.' dumped on him. I was a terrible wait- ress." With more than 600,000 miles of backcountry driving, she's looking for ward to smooth roads and light loads. ' "But I won't have time to get bored. The new route has 320 boxes. And compared with Highway 55 traffic, the' backcountry's easy." It will be easy to miss as well, after two decades of daily encounters with, wildlife, mountain characters and heart- stopping scenery. "I've seen moose, mountain lions, mountain goats, osprey, bald eagles.... I love the country, and I love the peoL ple. For me, it's been like a working va- cation. I'm lucky. I've gotten to do ex- actly what I wanted to do and get paid for it." i17e • %lair d 5 aC M,s, -nq kI _ g�4/11/G/ M ike Mego of Nampa works out a spine - tingling rendi- tion of "Amazing Grace" on his harmonica Friday af- ternoon while sitting around camp, which took over what's known as the Yellow Pine golf course. 1�7e fd/ oi_ S pa,-7e- s `Oh, that play mountain music ...' Basil Cannada of Boise concentrates on his keyboard while jamming with friends Friday at his campsite at the 12th Annual Yellow Pine Harmonica Contest Fest. They said it couldn't be done, but Cannada figured out a way to plug in his Yamaha keyboard to a generator. The four -year veteran of the Fest says he en joys the playing and the people. "The congeniality of the folks is what makes it," Cannada said. Toe-tappin knee-slappin'fun at Yellow Pine's harmonica festival here's a sign when you head up the Warm Lake Road near Cascade: "Yellow Pine Harmonica Contest and Fest" with a big arrow so you don't miss the road. It was there so thousands of musicians and their fans could have a foot- stompin' good time this weekend in a town where normally just 80 people hang their hats in the summer. Whew, it was a crowd - pleasing Crowd Pleaser contest on the Yellow Pine stage Friday night. Entertainment included harmonicas, cowboy poetry and singing; one man even performed on a saw. Yep. The kind you use to cut down trees. Ken Sorrel Is and Laura Agana, both of Kuna, summed it up: " It'sthe mountains; it'sthe music; it'sthe people." Rollin' Joe Jordan of Spokane strolls up Yellow Pine Av enue before getting sidetracked by a yard sale. Jordan E formed later that evening by singing song about his fa teeth. "My teeth are like the stars in a Western sky," Jor said. "They always come out." A photo essay by Kim Hughes, Idaho Statesman photographer As the sun sinks lower, the crowd gets louder. Lea Yer- gler, left, and Alvin Albert, both from St. Maries, clap and holler as John Edwards of Ontario, Ore., performs. "I guarantee my audience pleasure when I play," Ed- wards said before starting. "They'll either have plea - sure while I'm playing or pleasure after I quit play- ing." On what maybe the world's biggest harmonica (or maybe not, we don't know), Marvin Monroe, from Ohio, jams with the Buckeye State Harmonica Band. The weather was hot, but Marvin and the guyswere hotter, drawing harmonica - loving people to the main stage. "A buckeye is a nut that grows on a tree," fellow band member Jack Ely said. "That's us." Doug Sonderstrom, a psychology instructor at a junior college in Wharton, Texas, practices playing outside the Yellow Pine Community Hall on Saturday morning While contests head inside. Sonderstrom has been playing the harmonica for 40 years, but this was his first trip to the Yellow Pine festival. "It's beautiful. If you play the harmonica, you never get a chance to be around other harmonica players, because, let's be realistic, to be a harmonica player is to be kind of an oddball," Sonderstrom said. "If you getup here and you're surrounded by hundreds of other harmonica players, you suddenly become normal." Logan Kerr belts out "You Are My Sunshine" during the Crowd Pleaser. The 82- year -old man's voice quivered as he sang "Hey, good lookin', whatcha got cookin' ...." With a grin and a flirt, he pointed atthe ladies and sang, "How'bout cookin' something up with me ?" Whoopin' and hollerin', theygave Kerra standing ovation. Wash -day power blues Housewives all over Idaho wel- comed the arrival of the magic of electric- ity when it came to their communities. But it wasn't always the last answer, as Nancy Sumner and Jane Keating learned inYellowPine, where the power lines were not in- stalled until the un- usually late date of July4,1963. Nancy had her washing machine going full tilt one morning when sud- denly everything electric in the whole house stopped. Jane Keating, who lived in the next cabin upriv- er, reported her power was off, too. They knew that an Idaho Power man was staying nearby, so they drove to his campsite and learned, oh happy day, that he was a power- company troubleshooter. He checked the trans- former pole at Nan- cy's cabin and noted the line also ran only to Jane's cabin. When he asked the two women what they'dbeendoing the moment the elec- tricity quit, they both said, "The washing." He shookhis head. "You blew the trans- former. You can't bothwashthe same ay. —,,Idaho Women in History" byBettyPenson- Ward Traffic woes won't stop this weekend's harmonica Pest By Susan Whaley The Idaho Statesman Organizers of the Yellow Pine Harmonica Contest hope fans won't let a jet -fuel spill on Ida- ho 55 keep them away from the music this weekend. Road crews re- opened a sin- gle lane on Idaho 55 to traffic late Thursday, but delays are ex- pected. Drivers who are planning to attend the festival, which be- gins today and runs through Sun- day, may want to take an alter- nate route north, such as U.S. 95 to McCall or Idaho 21 to Low- man. "People just need to be patient and get through the delays, and everything's going to be fine," said Vicki Martineau, owner of Yellow Pine's Corner Bar. "We're definitely ready." This is the 15th year that some of the nation's top amateur play- ers will compete in the teeny - tiny town east of McCall. Dawn Brown, owner of the Yellow Pine General Store, ex- pects the usual crowd of up to 3,000 musicians and fans. That's a lot of music. The dirt road running through town is the site of "Crowd Pleaser" concerts Friday and Sat- urday. Judges award cash prizes to New Yellow Meadows Pine i JMcCall Lake J Donnelly Cascade` Warm f"t Lake cascade A6 N top players at formal contests in the Community Hall. Competi- tors are coming from as far away as Tampa, Fla.; Albuquerque, N.M.; and Las Vegas, Martineau said. Day and night, jam sessions tend to spring up wherever at least two people with harmoni- cas, guitars or fiddles gather. To offer story ideas or comments, contact reporter Susan Whaley at swhaley @idahostatesman.com or 377 -6431. At IdahoStatesman.com Link to Yel low Pine Harmonica Festival R Your checklist Mike Mego of Nampa works out a spine -tin- gling rendition of "Amazing Grace" on his harmonica. Statesman file photo HOW TOGETTHERE: Take Idaho 55 north 75 milesto Cascade and fill up the gas tank. Expect delays on 55, which is reduced to one lane. Alternate routes include U.S. 95to New Meadowsand Idaho 55 to McCall, or Idaho 21 to Lowman and the Banks - Lowman High - wayto Idaho 55. From McCall take the Lick Creek Road (a windy, 50- mile dirt road). From Cascade, turn east on Warm Lake Road on the north end of town and continue tothe South Fork Salmon River Road (paved but curvy) or Johnson Creek Road (a good dirt- gravel road). Expect at least a four -hour drive, dependingon routes and delays. WHERE TO STAY: The limited lodging available is full, so bring your RV or tent and sleeping bag. There are unlimited free camp- sites close to town. FOOD: Bring your own but plan to eat there, too. Dinner on Fri- day and Saturday and breakfast on Saturday and Sunday is served at the Community Hall, $5 -$7. Proceeds benefit community im- provement projects. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are available at the Si Iver Dol lar Cafe and Yel low Pine Tavern and Cafe. The Cor- ner Bar serves pizza. Also, food from vendors and the Yel low Pine General Store. INFORMATION: (208) 633 -3300. -3) /es Historic �_ ... _ . Just in time for Valentine's Day, long gone." here are some offbeat Idaho love stories: • • • Boisean Emma Bryant wrote a column in the Yellow Pine Gazette called "Looking Back "She told quite a few stories about her female contemporaries. "One concerned a bachelor miner named Lem Hansen, who advertised for a wife in a lonely hearts magazine and corre- sponded with a Detroit woman. ... When he went to meet her at the train in Cascade, she didn't know him because he had sent her a picture of a handsome young man instead of himself. "They decided to go out to din- ner anyway, and then they de- cided to get married anyway.... He gave her a splendid diamond ring, which she carefully sewed into the lining of a coat. After she died "in poverty" in Boise, rela- tives who hunted for the gem found her things had been given to the Salvation Army and were ,Z / / 2OO 2 Yet another love story that did- n't end up quite so happily -ever- after concerns a nightclub enter- tainer who had a room in Boise's Idanha Hotel. She was a belly dancer, snake charmer and whatnot, and she de- veloped quite a crush of male ad- mirers. One particularly persis- tent fellow — whom she'd re- peatedly turned down — found out where she lived and came call- ing at her hotel room very late one night. She opened the door a few inches, but didn't ask him in. Not that she needed to. He was already halfway down the hall, squealing like a stuck pig. Behind him, in hot pursuit, wriggled her "bodyguard," an 8- foot -long python that was part of her act. Source: `Idaho Women in Big &Little Biographies and Other Gender Stories, "by BettyPenson Ward Photo by Dwight Utz BIG BRIDGE - A 90 -foot long "railcar" bridge is shown arriving at its new home along Johnson Creek Road about eight miles south of Yellow Pine. The bridge replaced the previous access bridge to Wapiti Meadows Ranch. The massive structure was made in Lebanon. Ore- and its installation was supervised by Boulder Creek Engineering of Donnelly. Yellow Pine Post Office on USPS list for closure Remote office only generates $5,000 per year The post office in the backcountry community of Yellow Pine east of McCall is being studied for possible closure under a plan issued last week by the U.S. Postal Service. The Yellow Pine post office is one of 3,700 retail officesof the USPS across the nation that are to be studied for possible closure over the next four months, a news release said. Residents of the town are still pondering the report as they prepare for Yellow Pine's annual harmonica contest this weekend. "We are still waiting to see if some of our questions will be answered," said Steve Holloway, who owns Yellow Pine General Store and Sil- ver Dollar Grill. One question is whether Yellow Pine will still get mail even if it is only through post office boxes, Holloway said. The Yellow Pine post of- fice has lost about 20 percent of its postage revenue in the past three years, Robert Vunder, the USPS district manager of marketing for Utah and Idaho, told msnbc. com. . Vunder said the office's revenue for 2010 was $5,000. "If you look at $5,000 rev- enue in a year, and we're open 303 days, you can see that's a losing proposition," Vunder told msnbc.com. The post office says the closures are needed nation- wide as more people choose to conduct their postal busi- ness inways otherthan going to the post office. "Today, more than 35 per- cent of the Postal Service's retail revenue comes from expanded access locations such as grocery stores, drug stores, office supply stores, retail chains, self - service kiosks; ATMs and usps.com, open 24/7," Postmaster Gen- eral Patrick Donahoe said in a news release. "Our customers' habits have made it clear that they no longer require a physical post office to conduct most of their postal business," Donahoe said. The postal service has introduced the Village Post Office as a potential replace- ment for post offices on the closure study list, the USPS news release said. A Village Post Office would be operated by local businesses, such as pharma- cies and grocery stores, and would offer popular postal products and services such as stamps and flat -rate pack- aging, the release said. 47305 Sri Y �4 g r��y��et,,ep��,, s ; ctober. 19'IP 96 CHARLIE cI BE 4.� IS DEAD x � m TRtM MST frantier Timed i OLD WEST, . TWO FUNERALS FOR tl HENN Y * KITTY LEROY r QUEIEN Of THE HOOFERS ^x.'�x• �.�w. i.. �a kM.� .. i; ... :.?.: -?t t� �wz' ': <: -: ;. � ,. :� :.. � .:.. s. .�ti;i • .. :�:. .. r ..:,j,.,_; �. Unless angels have a lot of patience they must have been very relieved when AI's first rites turned out to be a false alarm and they wouldn't have to cope with the man from Yellow Pine for another fifty years! BY ERNEST OBERBILLIG Photos Courtesy Author THE Weiser Idaho American news- paper of September 10, 1956 pub- 1` lished this obituary: Albert Hennessy, eighty, died last y{ y Monday, September 3, in Norton's * w I Convalescent home of natural causes.„_. f Hennessy was a long time resident of Yellow Pine Hotel and born in *�.r New York State, December 28, 1875. �� t Mrs. Guy Herbert, Pioche, Nevada, a niece is the only known relative. t t, Funeral services were held at North- ern-Jones chapel Saturday. Burial` t' was in Riverside Cemetery on the ' ' v * 't ` z � = t Oregon side. ,� { •�, • This obituary was not unusual; similar ones appeared in most of the larger news- a papers in Idaho a few years back. What then makes it significant? The remark- , v •� able thing about the death notice was .w" IN that it recorded the second funeral for j this man —the two occasions separated by more than half a century. The life and achievements for Albert Hennessy in the ,.. years between his two funeral services makes this story worth telling, and here are the circumstances of his first funeral. Al Hennessy came from a large family < ��`�','� P +'. ' r " of boys who moved from New York State to Butte, Montana in the early 1890s. An x enterprising older one of the He boys established a dray and ore haulage business, which was soon expanded, with � ,,✓ 11 all the Hennessy brothers occupied. All except Al, that is. Al was always heading ►.` I back into the hills with the rifle and a prospecting outfit. After starving out on a poor prospect, �,, «^^ .• �� '+ , { ° Al would dejectedly come back to Butte to work awhile until he could scrape to- gether another grubstake and head for the hills again. , One fall Al headed back to his usual �� ;r v diggings where he was drivin p p �'" g a ros ect ' r drift or tunnel on a vein of ore. Al had whooped it up on his last night in town {'" � � � :' ' „��t -� `�► ,`,, • 4 and had managed to get thrown in jail. ,�� . `„� 4 t�' o...,�r„• ,�`� �,st ' \ tom, . �. �t I 6 True West i A Left: Al Hennessy in 1921 at his ranch (now Bryant Ranch). Above: The mountain vil- lage of Yellow Pine in 1930. Below: Al standing beside Henry Bryant's Ford (one of the first cars on the Hennessy Ranch). ..p R ?� a His brothers bailed him out with the agreement to "get him out of town," and they added to his meager grubstake so it would last all winter. With a well- stocked larder and mining supplies it was not surprising S::at his brothers heard nothing from him, as he was not much of a letter writer, and no concern was felt until the following spring. When Al failed to return by early May, one of the Hennessy brothers was sent to look for him. This brother made in- quiries in the mining district where Al had been working. Several prospectors recalled seeing him at work on his tunnel late in the fall but hadn't seen him for most of the winter and spring. Fearing the worst, the brother arrived at Al's cabin and found it vacant. To add to the brother's alarm, he found the kitchen well- stocked with groceries, and a made -up bed in one corner of the cabin. A rifle was resting in a deer horn rack, and clothes were hanging from nails along one wall. Despite the clutter and shambles of small objects left by pack rats on the floor, tables and chairs, the cabin obviously had been occupied and neat several months earlier. Al's brother walked up the trail to the mine and found a short candle in the blacksmith shop at the mouth of the tun- nel. When he lit the candle and entered he was shocked to see human bones scattered about. Closer examination of the face of the tunnel indicated that a premature explosion had killed Al while he was loading dynamite in a drill hole. Several empty drill holes in the tunnel face had not yet been loaded but were all ready to be. He concluded that after the blast, coyotes, wolves or bobcats had entered the tunnel during the winter and, with their food scarce, had ripped Al's body to pieces. Sadly the brother gathered Al's bones in a sack and carried them back to Butte for burial. A doctor friend examined the remains and confirmed the family's fears —the skeleton bones were of a size ex- actly matching Al's dimensions. There was now no doubt that Al had met a violent death and that wild beasts had left only a few scattered bones along the drift to tell the story. With sadness in their hearts, the Hen- nessy brothers had a rousing Irish wake, followed by a proper Catholic funeral service in the church the next day. They then went back to work as usual, filling the busy days with haulage contracts, yet occasionally recalling with sorrowful thoughts the lonely demise of Brother Al. ONE EVENING about a year later, a Hennessy brother was relaxing over a drink in a Butte saloon when the bar- tender handed him a little newspaper called the Thunder Mountain News —a paper printed in a new mining camp in Central Ohio. One item caught his eye: "Al Hennessy, our relief mail carrier, came into Roosevelt on his skis with a forty -pound pack of mail and express." Could this be his brother or was it someone of the same name? George Hen- nessy rushed to show the newspaper to his brothers and they agreed he should immediately travel to Thunder Mountain to investigate. After a long, hard horseback trip of ten days, George finally arrived at the remote little settlement of Yellow Pine Basin. Response to his inquiry was im- mediate: "Yeah, Al Hennessy is on his ranch four miles up Johnson Creek at the mouth of Riordan Creek." George finished the last segment of his long journey scarcely noticing the beautiful timber and clear sparkling Johnson Creek —more a river than creek in size. His thoughts were still on his strange journey and the disappointment it might bring. Crossing Johnson Creek, though it was swollen by the spring run- off, was no problem because a good strong horse bridge had been built over it. When George rode up to the house, he found Al Hennessy —his brother — splitting stove wood. "Well, George, what brings you here — not bad news I hope ?" he asked calmly. "No. But, Al, we thought you were dead — killed in a blast in your tunnel! All I found was a few human bones that animals had left behind so we buried F A R AL H E N S September - October, 1.976 r- .d&A The start of the open pit on Hennessy's "Homestake" claims. This pit produced $50 million in gold. silver, antimony and tungsten between 1937 and 1952. them thinking they was yours!" George explained. "That had to be Alex Johnson's bones. I sold him my diggin's and asked John Blake to tell you I headed for Thunder Mountain. When you never wrote, I thought everybody was still mad at me for the fracas I caused on my last visit to Butte." "Hell, no, we weren't mad! And we sure gave you a nice funeral and wake, but I'm happy it was not you we buried!" George said with a grin. So it was that Al Hennessy had his first funeral in 1902 at Butte, Montana, and it wasn't until 1956 that he had his second. What happened between those years kept Al Hennessy mighty busy. IN HIS long and interesting life Al owned and developed nearly every val- uable mine, and one of the most valuable ranches, in the Yellow Pine area. While accomplishing these things, however, Al still drank more moonshine than any other two men in the district. He was the best skier for miles around and could even outshine his Scandinavian friends in this department —a fine feather in the hat of an Irishman. Al Hennessy started acquiring prop- erty in Central Idaho by filing for a homestead ranch of 160 acres in August 1903. He had lived on the place for a year or two earlier but the first record of his ranch (which is the present Bryant ranch) was his application for patent in 1903. (Part of this acreage in the last decade has become the best Idaho Aero- nautics Department Airstrip in Central Idaho. This grass field, nearly a mile long and called Johnson Creek Airstrip, adjoins the Bryant ranch.) Al's development of his property was noted in the Idaho City Idaho World newspaper on September 10, 1906: "Al Hennessy of Morrison had constructed this summer three miles of road between Morrison and the Johnson Creek bridge. He had also built a good bath house at the Hot Springs near Morrison." Al's ranching endeavors included a hay press at a spot called Hennessy Meadows on Riordan Creek about three miles east of his Morrison Ranch. Here Al harvested the wild hay or Timothy for winter feed for his horses, and packed it down to the ranch about 1,500 feet lower on Johnson Creek. Parts of Al's hay press can still be seen today in the meadows. From 1903 until about 1916 Al Hen- nessy led an agricultural life with only short forays into the mining area of nearby Thunder Mountain. However, he kept his eyes open and indexed and cata- logued all the likely prospects and mines. When World War I commenced, the mer- cury and antimony mines in the Yellow Pine district were reopened and prospect- ing for these metals developed into a mining boom. Many of the district's pros- pects of these metals had been found a decade or so earlier but were not devel- oped until the war created a need and a rise in price. Prospecting really reached a fever pitch after the United States be- came involved in 1917. During those war years Al Hennessy located several antimony and mercury prospects near the Pringle Smith mer- cury mine on Cinnebar Creek about fif- teen miles east of his Morrison ranch. Though most of these scattered claims were not very important and did not de- velop into producing mines —the Meadow Creek.prospect was a different story. It was located about three miles south of the junction of Sugar Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork on a small tribu- tary of the East Fork called Meadow Meadow Creek mine and mill in December 1931. iedx...: eix-;J 8 True West It ry �\ t o, An Ah r- .d&A The start of the open pit on Hennessy's "Homestake" claims. This pit produced $50 million in gold. silver, antimony and tungsten between 1937 and 1952. them thinking they was yours!" George explained. "That had to be Alex Johnson's bones. I sold him my diggin's and asked John Blake to tell you I headed for Thunder Mountain. When you never wrote, I thought everybody was still mad at me for the fracas I caused on my last visit to Butte." "Hell, no, we weren't mad! And we sure gave you a nice funeral and wake, but I'm happy it was not you we buried!" George said with a grin. So it was that Al Hennessy had his first funeral in 1902 at Butte, Montana, and it wasn't until 1956 that he had his second. What happened between those years kept Al Hennessy mighty busy. IN HIS long and interesting life Al owned and developed nearly every val- uable mine, and one of the most valuable ranches, in the Yellow Pine area. While accomplishing these things, however, Al still drank more moonshine than any other two men in the district. He was the best skier for miles around and could even outshine his Scandinavian friends in this department —a fine feather in the hat of an Irishman. Al Hennessy started acquiring prop- erty in Central Idaho by filing for a homestead ranch of 160 acres in August 1903. He had lived on the place for a year or two earlier but the first record of his ranch (which is the present Bryant ranch) was his application for patent in 1903. (Part of this acreage in the last decade has become the best Idaho Aero- nautics Department Airstrip in Central Idaho. This grass field, nearly a mile long and called Johnson Creek Airstrip, adjoins the Bryant ranch.) Al's development of his property was noted in the Idaho City Idaho World newspaper on September 10, 1906: "Al Hennessy of Morrison had constructed this summer three miles of road between Morrison and the Johnson Creek bridge. He had also built a good bath house at the Hot Springs near Morrison." Al's ranching endeavors included a hay press at a spot called Hennessy Meadows on Riordan Creek about three miles east of his Morrison Ranch. Here Al harvested the wild hay or Timothy for winter feed for his horses, and packed it down to the ranch about 1,500 feet lower on Johnson Creek. Parts of Al's hay press can still be seen today in the meadows. From 1903 until about 1916 Al Hen- nessy led an agricultural life with only short forays into the mining area of nearby Thunder Mountain. However, he kept his eyes open and indexed and cata- logued all the likely prospects and mines. When World War I commenced, the mer- cury and antimony mines in the Yellow Pine district were reopened and prospect- ing for these metals developed into a mining boom. Many of the district's pros- pects of these metals had been found a decade or so earlier but were not devel- oped until the war created a need and a rise in price. Prospecting really reached a fever pitch after the United States be- came involved in 1917. During those war years Al Hennessy located several antimony and mercury prospects near the Pringle Smith mer- cury mine on Cinnebar Creek about fif- teen miles east of his Morrison ranch. Though most of these scattered claims were not very important and did not de- velop into producing mines —the Meadow Creek.prospect was a different story. It was located about three miles south of the junction of Sugar Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork on a small tribu- tary of the East Fork called Meadow Meadow Creek mine and mill in December 1931. iedx...: eix-;J 8 True West :4 � �� �� �� k • 7,� .. � *'qY � �y.:. ;( + a� ..ti 1 s� • . r,.., _ ` �ar:wea. -. swiNb �.._ , .. _ .... ' "�. � � "! Meadow Creek camp in 1925. Creek and was an old Thunder Mountain gold prospect which Al had studied ten or twelve years earlier. The first work noted on the Meadow Creek prospect was in 1902 when J. C. McFarnahan filed for a water right on Meadow Creek for milling water for the Meadow Creek mine. This was much too early to work this mine because the stamp mills used then could not mill its complex gold and antimony ore mixture. In 1919 Al Hennessy formed Mead- ow Creek Silver Mines Company with J. L. Niday, a Boise lawyer, and J. J. Oberbillig, a Boise assayer and mining engineer. Other than annual as- sessment work on the five original min- ing claims and six new corporate claims located at Meadow Creek, nothing much was done on it until after it was sold �" 'a September- Oetober,19; 6 to United Mercury Mines Company formed by J. J. Oberbillig to purchase and explore both Pringle Smith's Hermes mercury mine and the Hennessy Meadow Creek mine as well. United Mercury was incorporated January 22, 1921 and funds were raised for the purchase and ex- ploration work of the two mines. In the years of 1921 -1925, Fred Franz, George Brewer, and George Kennedy worked at Meadow Creek and drove hun- dreds of feet of tunnel into the Meadow Creek ore body, opening up a half million tons of antimony- silver -gold ore. On November 4, 1922 the United Mer- cury balance sheet showed they purchased the Meadow Creek Silver Mining Com- pany for $100,000 worth of stock. For the Pringle Smith mercury claims, $251000 worth of Liberty Bonds were paid. In 1.925 the Homestake mine, the larg- est U. S. gold mine, sent its mining geologist, Lawrence Wright, to examine Meadow Creek mine. He liked the mine but IIomestake's metallurgists turned it down because they couldn't treat the com- plex gold - antimony ore. Then on May 17, 1927 the UMM Com- pany optioned the Meadow Creek and Cinnebar mines to F. W. Bradley for $1.5 million. F. W. Bradley -was a San Francisco mining engineer with a large interest in Alaska's Juneau gold mines and the Bunker Hill lead - silver mine in North Idaho. Bradley had also been . the managing engineer of the productive Alaska - Treadwell mine. From 1921 until the summer of 1923 Al Hennessy lived by selling United Mercury Mines Company stock he had received for his Meadow Creek Silver Mines Company, and he kept up his residence at his ranch on Johnson Creek and worked the mining claims he held on the west side of Johnson Creek just northwest of his ranch. Ile had received a patent to the ranch in 1919 from the U. S. Government and thus it became a proved -up homestead and real property in his own name. RANCHING was not really Al's cup of tea so in 1923 he located Hennessy 1, 2 and 3 lode claims on the Stibnite pit area and formed the Great Northern Mines Company with J. L. Niday, his former Meadow Creek Silver Mines Com- pany associate. Niday deposited $800 in the bank in the name of the corporation and gave Al the check book. Niday was allowed $200 more credit for expenses incorporating the company, and for this $1,000 he was to receive half the stock in the company. Thus, at this point the three most valuable claims in this part of Idaho (as they were to prove later) were acquired for a cash outlay of $1,000 plus labor. Apparently Al thought Niday was to help with more money and when he didn't contribute additional funds to the bank account, Al located several adjoining claims, some individually and some with his friend, Fred Franz. Because At did not deed these claims to the Great North- ern Mines Company, he and Niday got into an argument and were soon in court. Finally the Idaho Supreme Court affirmed the District Court and Al was ordered to turn in all adjoining claims to the Corporation and for this he was to re- ceive $50,001 in stock and Niday $49,999. After the court order to split the stock and include all the claims in the company there was no way Niday and Hennessy could work together and even do the minimal annual assessment work on the claims amicably. It was fortunate that at this time F. W. Bradley was already working the Meadow Creek and Cinnebar mines so in 1928 Niday and Hennessy gave Bradley an option on the Great Northern claims for $500,000 to be paid out of half the net proceeds, and Bradley did work on the claims each year. For several years Bradley's Yellow Pine Mining Company did some geolog- ical work on these claims; but in 1931 lie turned them back to Hennessy and Niday after his Superintendents White, Hamp- den, and Worthington and Geologist Her- shey reported no ore on them. Meanwhile, Hennessy. and Niday had received $5,000 cash for an easement over the Great Northern claims for a road, pipeline and transmission line with tun- nel sites so the early deal was not all a loss. In 1933, J. J. Oberbillig purchased the Great Northern claims — giving $7,500 each to Hennessy and Niday. Hennessy was paid out at $250 per month from November 1933 until May 1936. For $15,000 this group of eleven claims was bought, but with still no proven ore. In early 1937 a penstock pipeline walk- er, when examining a redwood pipeline leak, found.that water had washed the dirt off the hillside on the claims and the ore was now open on the east side of the pit. Bradley was soon milling 500 tons per day of gold ore from this mine. (In 1939 the U. S. Bureau of Mines start- ed drilling for startegic antimony there and in the winter of 1940 -1941 the drills cut high -grade tungsten ore associated with antimony. During World War II this pit was the largest U.S. producer of antimony and tungsten —about $25,000,- 000 worth in four years.) RETURNING to Hennessy's original Meadow Creek Silver Mines Company claims sold to UMM Co. in 1920, which Bradley had optioned from United Mer- cury Mines Company in 1927, we find that with the aggressive characteristic of any Bradley operation, they moved in FJ .sr l`pr- " u Jam "ong� :. ron Wr4 ! ( £{lralmn �rerk �ilurr amines (Lntnpany %AT L!i'e s � . PI- ftira01111 lurk #dkirr fl(uiru Qnmpmnl t7& * ` Stock Certificate for 25.000 shares of the Meadow Creek Silver Mine Company. and proved up the ore body and developed it for mining, and built a road ten miles to Profile Creek where it connected with the Yellow Pine road already built by the U. S. Forest Service. They built camps at Meadow Creek and at the North Tunnel and the lower Haulage Tunnel. They also started a mill in 1931 which was finished by Christmas, and milled ore from Mead- ow Creek from 1932 until 1937. During those early 1930 years the Meadow Creek mine produced about $200,000 per year and kept an average of fifty men working year round. This mine was the only bright spot in the economy of Valley County during those dark De- pression years and the camp started look- ing even brighter after the Great North- ern claims were stripped for open pit mining in 1937. Then in 1939 the rum- blings of World War II promised the need for antimony as a war metal and, of course, the tungsten discovery in 1940- 1.941 followed. And we must credit Al Hennessy with being the original owner and promoter of the two biggest mines in that mining district. But let's backtrack and see what Al had been doing on his ranch on Johnson Creek in the early 1920s. Al got the idea that fox farming would suit him just fine and would make a paying propo- sition of his 160 -acre homestead. So he built some kennels, runs, and pens, brought in some foxes, and started on his way to building up a fox fur empire. He interested Henry Bryant, a Ford dealer in Boise who was Henry Ford's brother -in- law, and sold Bryant half his ranch in 1921. The fox business was not very great so in the winter of 1926 Bryant snowshoed in'from Cascade and pelted out the entire farm — breeding stock and all. The wags of Yellow Pine remarked that Bryant should have pelted Hennessy at the same time for getting him into the fox business in the first place. Al Hennessy left his mark permanently on Johnson Creek by dynamiting the deep holes near the Hanson Ranch and catch- ing the stunned white fish in nets on a riffle below. He blasted these holes to twice their original depth, but he (lid keep his foxes fed with white fish. Al sold the remaining half of his ranch to H. H. Bryant on November 17, 1924 but I found a confusing deed dated March 28, 1927 to T. L. Reedy from Al Hennessy for half the ranch, when he had already deeded it all to I3ryant. Perhaps Al was drinking and made out the deed to Reedy to give Bryant some trouble. IN September 193:3 Al sold his ten Ana- conda claims to Idaho Minerals Com- pany, another venture incorporated by his old friend, J. J. Oberbillig. These were located just northwest of Al's ranch along the steep slope of the canyon west of .Johnson Creek and contained some anti- mony, gold and silver prospects. Al had (Continued on page 38) La£e Cox and Al on the way to Al's ill -fated Buck Creek camp, This was the last of Al's mining endeavors, rt 10 True .West Two Funerals for Al Hennessy (Continued front page 10) been working these claims with Bob Beattie and they lived in some small cabins on the west side of the creek across from the Cascade - Yellow Pine Forest Highway. While Al and Bob were working the Anaconda Claims between 1929 and 1933 several incidents took place to contribute to the amusement of all their neighbors along the creek and in the village of Yellow Pine three miles downstream. Al was always out at night talking and singing to the stars and this habit was disturbing to anyone camping with him. One time Bob Beattie got an idea so he accosted Al as follows: "Al, your insomnia is caused by too much electricity in your body and if we can ground it out you will probably be able to sleep. To- night we will wire you up so you can sleep." They took four pieces of four -foot drill steel and pounded them through the floor and into the ground —two on each side of the head of Al's bed and two at each side of the foot of the bed. (Beattie, no doubt, got the idea for "grounding -out" Al be- cause in those days battery radios needed a ground to work well and, of course, the single wire phones required a ground connection.) When Al was ready for bed, Bob wired his wrists to the head steel posts and then wired his ankles to the two at the foot of the bed. The next morning when unwiring Al, Bob asked: "How did you sleep, AI ?" "Fine, never slept better. You sure did know what was wrong with me. Let's do this every time I have trouble sleeping." One of Al's favorite tricks was to pal up with some guy who had a winter's stake or had already bought his winter grub supply and get him to move in with him with the grub. After a few weeks Al would get drunk and get his gun and run I. J. Oberbillig. Al Hennessy's mining as- sociate who bought most of At's mining properties in the winter of 1924 -25. the "pal" off. Al would thus be left with the grub and supplies for winter with no effort. In fact, Al was always threatening to shoot someone with his old .30 -30 rifle and it was a wonder to all of us that someone didn't shoot back. Yellow Pine had several tough characters who would not hesitate to shoot back under these circumstances, and had been known to do it. It could be that Al was selective in making his threats and was careful to leave certain men alone. For one, Ray Call didn't respond to Al's bluff one time and for a while it looked like black cur- tains for Mr. Hennessy, and from then on At left Ray strictly alone. Idaho Minerals Bridge and Camp during the summer of '35. Al's old cabin is just off the large cookhouse - bunkhouse building. After selling his Anaconda claims to J. J. Oberbillig in 1933, Al moved across Johnson Creek and built two log cabins on the east side of the creek and along- side the road. This was his headquarters for the next ten to twelve years and it will be recalled that from 1933 until mid - 1936 Al was receiving $250 per month for his half of the Great Northern claims. At this same time Al also received about $3,000 cash from Idaho Minerals Company for his Anaconda claims. During this deepest part of the Depression, At thus took in over a period of four years more than $10,000 from his mining claim sales. With Al receiving about $300 per month during the days when a really good job paid only about $100, you can see that he was the prey for every boot- legger and card sharp in Yellow Pine. Every spring for several years Al would come out of the winter with a bad case of DTs and his lower eyelids would be turned inside out and look like two half - moons of raw beefsteak. Winter invari- ably left him, too, with an empty checking account. AL decided in the spring of 1935 that he needed to move up to a level befitting his station of life. He needed a car. He bought a used Dodge pick -up from J. J. Oberbillig, and several in Yellow Pine suggested that J. J. sold him the pick -up hoping he would run off the road and kill himself. One time Al and Jakie Stem were down in Yellow Pine whooping it up on a spree. When they decided to return to Al's camp, a couple of the town regulars cautioned At that he was too drunk to drive home. Al, of course, brushed the caution aside and took off. He and Jakie made it only a mile up the road when Al drove off over the steep grade. The pick- up came to rest with its radiator smashed into a tree which luckily kept the car from going on down into the river. Al crawled out of the wreck and up to the road and managed to get to his cabin a couple of miles away. The next morning Al woke up, partly sober but with a king -sized hangover, and began to recall the night before. He won- dered where Jakie was. Al ambled over to Bob Beattie's cabin just south of his and the two of them went back to the wreck and found Jakie still slumped in the seat of the pick -up. His neck was broken. Some of the Yellow Pine regulars, par- ticularly the two who wanted Al to stay in town until he sobered up, were upset over the wreck which killed poor old Jakie. Thus, Al found himself being avoided and treated like an outcast. Be- ing a friendly sort of Irishman At felt very sad to be ostracized from society, so he put his brain to work on a plan to get out of this predicament. After a time he had the solution. He circulated a story that the accident had really been bothering him so one night while he was talking to the stars he de- cided to talk to Jakie and see if Jakie was mad about the accident. By some means he was able to tune in Jakie and in the course of the conversation Jakie told Al to explain to his Yellow Pine friends that it was all right; his time was 38 True West Pastime or Profession .. . join the world's most enjoyable and most profitable activity!! TURN THOSE FANTASTIC DREAMS OF ADVENTURE INTO REALITY... UNCOVER TREASURES LOST FOR CENTURIES WITH A RELCO METAL/MINERAL DETECTOR • Detects gold, silver, iron, coins • Works through earth, vegetation, water, beach sand f • Powered by inexpensive battery • So powerful they detect even a single coin • Easy to operate. Weighs about 3 pounds >;;,, • Many top - quality models to choose from • Lowest prices. Buy factory- direct and save ' t • Instant financing available; small down payment 1 ' i FREE; Write or call day or might for big free catalog, L. P. phono record and unusual ■ I " souvenir coin. Phone (area 713) 682 -2728 i RELCO, Dept.DD96, Box 10839, Houston, Tex. a 77018 ■ 4 ADDRESS_ _— — CITY_ _STATE ' ZIP �.--^ I AN sai®®®.® NOUNS win BEEN son ■®P' up anyway. Jakie said to Al, according to the story, that they should ease up on Al because Jakie was not mad about it and besides he was having a ball up in heaven. It is immaterial if the town critics believed this or not; the facts still stood: the stars had told Al where to locate two good mines and this latest conversation with Jakie's spirit via the stars could very well be true! Al was also a kleptomaniac. He would steal items from his friends and lend them back to the rightful owners without a care about getting them back, If Al needed something, he took it without ask- ing; likewise, if you needed something from him, there was no hesitation, he was happy to help you out —even with your own tools. One night Al decided he wanted some fried chicken. The Idaho Minerals camp across the creek kept chickens and the cook Mattie Fuller had made pets of them. She would go out at feeding time and talk with them. She had names for each one of the old hens. Al cranked up the Dodge pick -up and headed over to the hen house. When Mat - tie heard the old hens squawking and calling to her, she thumped on the floor above her where the miners slept and called out, "Mike! Go out and check up on my babies. A skunk or weasel must be in the hen house!" Alike found a weasel by name of Al Hennessy with three of Mattie's pets in his hands with their necks already twisted. He got Al in the pick -up and headed back across the bridge and later told Mattie it was only Al —lost on his way home. He didn't dare tell Mattie that Al had killed some of her hens. The next morning she inquired of Mike about three missing white leghorns and he said maybe they got out when he opened the door to check on them and they would show up later. About this time Al took the chickens out in front of his cabin to pluck them, and with white feathers flying every- where around him, Mattie looked across the creek; now she knew the truth. She ran up the tunnel and found two of the men outside and demanded to know where they had hidden their guns. She insisted she was going over and shoot the old chicken thief. They calmed her down but from that day forward as long as Mrs. Fuller was at the camp, Al never crossed the bridge to the Idaho Minerals cookhouse. Mike warned him that he'd better not come near the place. OUR Irish prospector Al had been work- ing some claims up on Buck Creek in Trapper Flat when he decided in the fall of 1952 that he would take an outfit and spend the winter in there driving a tunnel alone. Since Al was then seventy - six years old, some concern was voiced about this, particularly since he was going to use only a tent on a wooden floor and frame. Pilots flying between Boise and the Stibnite (Meadow Creek) passed right over this camp on Buck Creek so they would check to see if smoke was coming from the tent stove pipe or if snow had been shoveled from the trail to the mine. They would even circle for Al to come out and wave to them that everything was all right. The next spring, early in March, Al's friends at Stibnite decided that Al's win- ter groceries must be getting pretty well picked over by then, so they decided to fix up a sack of groceries with some fresh meat and other tidbits and have one of the pilots drop the package by parachute. The pilot and "bombardier" did their job well; the chute floated gently down to the clearing beside Al's cabin. But when rushing out the tent -cabin door Al slipped on the icy steps and broke his ankle. He crawled back into the cabin and went to bed because he couldn't get out to split wood. A couple of days later a pilot reported the chute and package still in the clear- ing with no smoke coming from Al's stove. The alarm was sounded. Philip "Frenchy" Lequoia, and old friend of Al's, was living at the Beattie cabin with Fred Erickson close to Al's Johnson Creek camp. September - October, 1976 39 Frenchy hitched a ride up to Trapper Creek, put on snowshoes and in about four hours was at Al's camp. He found Al in bad shape with the broken ankle. Gangrene had developed. Al was also nearly famished for lack of water and food. Frenchy started a fire and made coffee and opened a can of soup. He pulled Al's bed over near the stove and left a big pile of wood so Al could feed the fire and keep warm. Frenchy left then to summon help to get Al out to the hospital. He found that Carl Whitmore, the mail carrier, had come into Yellow Pine with a "snow cat" so they went right back and brought A] out and loaded him into a pick -up for the trip to the hospital in Cascade. The doctor tried to get by with just cutting off Al's toes but gangrene had spread higher so they had to take off all the foot and part of the lower leg. Al came back to Yellow Pine with both crutches and a wooden foot but when he got thirsty he would crawl down to the bar without either of them and hoist him- self up on a stool. He would stay right there until Fomeone packed him home and dumped him in bed. This went on for about a year. Tadge Pickins, the storekeeper's wife, tried to keep Al cleaned up some and feel but the chore was too much for her so the county moved Al out to a nursing home in Weiser where he lived out his remaining years. Those last few years were dry ones for the most part except when an old pal would sneak in a bottle for him. There are no more old prospectors and mountain men left like Al Hennessy and since I am one of the few remaining who knew this whimsical character it seems fitting and proper to carve out one small notch on the history tree for him. After all, not many of them had two big mines to their credit —and also two funerals! A Cattle Tracker's Lost Gold (Continued from page SS) rolled out on the floor. A. piece he held close to the light had wide„ yellow seams running through it. Moving on, he came to an ore crusher and a forge. He pushed down on the forge handle and the cowhide bellows cracked and split apart. This mine could be a couple of hundred years old, he thought. He knew some- thing of the history of the area. It oc- curred to him that this mine and smelter could have been owned only by Spanish padres and worked by the Indians who were under their influence. Why had it been abandoned, with a vast fortune stacked under a covering of cowhides? Had the workers been slain? But he did know that with all this gold at his disposal, he was now an exceedingly rich man. His heart hammered when he thought of all the fine things that gold could buy: a large ranch stocked with the finest pure -bred cattle, possibly an ocean voyage for himself and his wife to old Spain, the land of their forefathers. And the gold was his and his alone. True, the vaqueros who were with him AO might justifiably have a claim to some of the gold. But hadn't he, the cattle tracker, through his own efforts discovered it? Yes. He would share the gold with no man. In a dreamy daze, Varela made his way from the cave to the tunnel and went out- side. His companions were standing by the fire, drinking coffee. "Why so long ?" exclaimed one of them. "We were beginning to think you had been killed by a bear!" "Oh," replied Varela, "there's an old cave back in there. I looked around it. But no bears! Nothing but a lot of old bat droppings on the floor." The following day the storm blew itself out. A brilliant sun broke out against a blue sky, and the snow- covered country- side glistened. Varela decided that with two days and a deep snowfall between him and the rustlers, it was best to give up on this particular tracking assign- ment. Besides, he was too concerned with his discovery and all its implications to bother much with cattle thieves. So he and the vaqueros headed back for their ranches. WHEN Varela got back home, his wife observed that he was not his usual pleasant self. lie seemed tense and pen- sive. She thought he was upset because he had failed to overtake the rustlers. With wifely solicitude, she tried to con- sole him: "Do not worry. Surely Don Ar- mijo knows you failed to recover his cattle only because of the terrible bliz- zard. Don Armijo is well aware that you are the greatest tracker in all of New Mexico." Varela smiled, but did not answer. He had problems. Like many a man who has suddenly been made rich, he was worried sick about how to handle his wealth and protect it from the greed of others. The big problem was to secretly get the heavy gold out of the cave and trans- ported to a large city, where he could sell it to banks. He wanted to confide in his wife, to tell her everything, but he dared not. She Nvas inclined to be talkative and gossipy. If he told her she would probably let it slip to her women friends, and within a creek, people as far away as Albuquer- Las Cruces. Now Mexico. que and El Paso would know all about the gold. A few days later a couple of Varela's friends came by and reminded him that the three of them were due to start work on a mining claim they had staked a month earlier in the Sierra Blanca. Pre- occupied with thoughts about his gold discovery, Varela had forgotten about the Sierra Blanca claim. He was, however, glad to go with them. They would be working the claim -for several weeks, and it would give him time to decide the best way for the removal and disposal of the gold in the cave. The day after they began work, fickle Lady Luck, who had smiled so benevolent- ly on Varela a week before, now turned the tables and delivered a bitter, cruel blow. He was preparing a powder charge to blast open a rock wall when the pow- der ignited prematurely. The explosion drove bits of rock deep into his eyes. His partners rushed him to a hospital in El Paso, but doctors could not save his sight. Varela was destined to be stone blind for the rest of his long life. After he was returned from the hospi- tal to his ranch, Varela was in a state of deep depression for many months. He grieved over the fact that his ranching, prospecting and cattle tracking days were over forever. He was doomed to poke around with a white cane and to be led around by his wife and friends. He was so gloomy that he rarely ever thought of the gold in the cave. Finally, his spirits revived and his out- look improved. He began to think about the gold, and decided that he would talk to his wife about it. He swore Dona Chonita to secrecy and told her the story from beginning to end. She did not believe him, although she pretended to. She considered that the terrible accident to his eyes had unbalanced him. More- over, the idea of that much gold stacked up in one pile was more than her mind could comprehend, But she humored her husband and listened dutifully to his every word about the gold. She spoke vaguely. of organizing a party of relatives to go and search for it. But she never did. The years passed, and eventually word Photo Courtesy Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe gw roi The Star News Public Lands Page Bridge at Johnson Creek airstrip to be replaced this fall The narrow, wooden -plank bridge built on a railroad car decades ago at Johnson Creek Airstrip in Valley County just south of Yellow Pine will be replaced this fall, the Idaho Transportation Department announced. "The bridge provides the only access to the Johnson Creek Airstrip, handling both recreational and commercial traffic year - round; said Dan Gorley of the ITO bridge section. "The airstrip is an important community asset providing arc access during firefighting season and is designated as a safe zone for Yellow Pine for evacuation purposes," Gorley said. The new concrete bridge will be one lane, like the current bridge, but wider. It will be located immediately downstream Maw sbo m bndge at Jotnson orea- Aurtnp of the current one, and span 72 feet and be 18 feet wide at ftwitenedb} spnugnnnffs Mebn%eis the bridge deck. scbeddedtobe replaced dusfall "The bridge will also sit several feet higher in elevation than the old bridge to safely accommodate high water or flood conditions," said Kyle Arnzen of the ITD regional design section. The water elevation can change by six or seven feet over the course of the year depending on spring run -off, and often runs over the top or reaches the deck of the old bridge, Amzen said. The project is expected to start by the and of August and finish in late October Work is not anticipated at nights or on the weekend, but is not prohibited if needed, a news release said. No local roads will be closed, but drivers may experience delays during construction. One lane will be maintained. Page 1 of 1 http: / /www.mccallstamews .com/pages /public_lands—Page.php 3/22/2012 Events and Arts The StarNews Page 1 of 1 The annual music festival in the backcountry hamlet of Yellow Pine has a new name and a new format. The 23rd Annual Yellow Pine Music & Harmonica Festival will be held Aug. 3-5, and the focus will be on music and fun, organizer Steve Holloway said. There will be no harmonica contest this year, but the festival will feature great harmonica players and other musicians in multiple concerts in the community hall, as well as in the ever-popular 'Crowd Pleaser' competition on the outdoor stage, Holloway said *For 22 years the community of Yellow Pine has flown in judges from all over the country to judge our contestants,' he said_ 'Unfortunately over the past 10 years we have seen the number of contestants drop dramatically, making the costs of judges cost prohibitive in comparison to the number of contestants,' he said. Mile the festival is still honoring prospecting pioneers who carried pocket harps into the wilderness with them, this yearly event has also evolved to include many types of music, Horoway said. For the latest details, go to c; ella:vrir ernuslcardharmcrir,nfe •ti ✓al.org, hap://www.mccallstamews.com/pages/events,_arts_page.php 6/28/2012 Events and Arts The StarNews Page 1 of 1 Harmonica festival drops contest, keeps the fun There won't be a harmonica contest anymore, but the newly named Yellow Pine Music & Harmonica Festival will still have plenty of music and fun to be worth the drive to the backcountry hamlet east of McCall. The 23rd edition of the festival will be held Friday through Sunday, Aug. 3-5. While the festival will still honor prospecting pioneers who carried pocket harps Into the wilderness with them, this yearly event has also evolved to include many types of music. The harmonica contest was cancelled due to lack of constestants, but well -known harmonica players as well as other musicians will be featured in concerts in the Community Hall, as well as in the ever - popular Crowd Pleaser competition on the outdoor stage. There will be food and craft vendors, raffles and auctions in between and during the music. For details, go to yellowpinemusicandharmonicafestival .org. http: / /www.mccallstamews .com/pages /events_arts_page.php 7/26/2012 The Star News Groups Page ps _page.php emm �.ae. s :n<a. br um uo� .'XCOUNMY'RtN&S - Denver l \lute and Joel S.m&val firom Base en"un the crowd dmmg the Yellow Rue Harmonica and Mime Feshv:al on Sahudar ereumg the weekeud event featured a ranett• of lore muse am mcludmg perfoimmcm by wmid- lass hanuomm placers Page 1 of 1 8/8/2013 This week's front page stories Massive slides close roads around Yellow Pine, Stibnite 13Y TOM GROTE The Star-News A dozen large slides of snow, rock and trees blocked roads near Yellow Pine and the Stibnite n'iining district of Valley County last Thursday, officials said. The slides blocked the East Fork of the South Fork River in several places, causing flooding until crews could clear the mess. One large slide swallowed the road and river near Deadman Campground about 10 miles west of Yellow Pine, Alan Mendive, a delivery driver for Ed Staub & Sons Propane, said he saw the massive slide come down the mountain just in front of him about 7:30 a.m. last Thursday. "I thought I was hallucinating," Mendive said. "I realized the whole mountain was coming down. The whole thing broke loose at once. Photo by Cwti. Bsmop He described the sound of the mass of snow, dirt and trees Dave Withawsoflihdas Cold 1w. creletimiiplxr as "a screeching thunder." left. stands ou a wassire slide that blocked the East Fak Road new' Yellow Ape last week MendivP sAiri hp. had %topped a. few miniitP8 P_.ArliP_.r to Clear rocks from the road. If he had not stopped, he believed he would have been buried by the slide. "I'd never been close to anything like that," he said. "It was something I will never forgot seeing." About 10 of the slides were on the Stibnite Road east of Yellow Pine, said Kyle Fend, environmental permitting and compliance coordinator with Midas Gold Inc., which is exploring the area for gold and other minerals. The slides happened between 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. last Thursday, blocking the road in two places and damming the East Fork in five places, Fend said. The largest slide was about 50 feet wide with the deepest slide rising about 60 feet above the river channel, he said. Midas Gold employees used the company's earth- moving equipment to clear the road. Enough of the slides were cleared by the end of the day that workers could be moved from Stibnte to Yellow Pine, Fend said. Midas Gold employees worked with Valley County and Payette National Forest officials to Gear the East Fork river of debris and get the water flowing back into its normal channel, a task that was finished on Sunday, he said. Page l of l htt p:!!-,N,NNr w. mccallstarnews .com/pages /fp_stories _page.php 3/13!2014 http: / /www.mccallstarnews .com/pages /groups _page.php [+ {rnrN :a Fehr, wam b. nKa r�ua MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS - An estimated r,5oo people hwveled to the back country of Valley County last weekend to attend the 25th Yellow pine Music and Harmonica Festival. At top, Harrison Thomsen of Nampa performs during Friday's Youth Crowd Pleaser performance. Above, dancers cut up the dirt while featured band Stellar Tide play on Friday. Page 1 of 1 8/7/2014 This week's front page stories Page 1 of 1 Johnson Creek resident protest snow plowing cutback Valley County pared back service to save money "Year -round access is very important to property such as ours. " —Diana Bryant BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star -News Residents along Johnson Creek Road on Monday told Valley County commissioners that halting snow plowing over five miles of their road would disrupt their lives and could reduce property values. Commissioners said they were looking for ways to cut back the cost of winter maintenance in the backcountry area of Valley County while still allowing residents to reach their homes during winter. Road and Bridge Superintendent Curtis Bennett recently sent a letter to the Johnson Creek residents, notifying them that plowing would be cut from Johnson Creek Airstrip to Wapiti Ranch. That section of road is located south of Yellow Pine and is a main access road to Yellow Pine and surrounding areas with homes. The county's road budget is operating at $1.4 million short of needed funding while the county waits to see if Congress approves federal payments to counties. Those funds would help counties which previously received millions of dollars from timber cutting on national forest lands within their boundaries. There are six families who will be affected if plowing stops, Diana Bryant of Wapiti Meadow Ranch told commissioners. "If we give up the right to have the road plowed to the end of property owned by private individuals, basically, it affects all of our property values," Bryant said. "Year -round access is very important to property such as ours." The road also serves the Forest Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game wolf management, Nez Perce tribal fishery biologists, emergency vehicles and propane delivery, she said. "How much more is five miles ?" she asked. "Why not stop at Warm Lake? Then you're talking about saving big bucks." The county started plowing the road in about 1983, but initially cleared it once a winter, after which it would be shut down by snow, commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank said. "It comes down to what are our options ?" Cruickshank said. "When there's no funding, there's no funding." Other county roads that could be left unplowed this winter include part of Crown Point near Cascade and a lane off West Mountain Road, the commissioners said. The county could save money if it does not plow the road immediately after a storm, but later, when it is more convenient for a county plow to visit, Cruickshank said. More money could be devoted to snowplowing in the winter if property owners agreed to less grading of the road in the summer, Bennett said. Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck encouraged the families to write the congressional delegation to support federal funding and to urge the Idaho Legislature to pass higher gasoline taxes to fund road maintenance. http: / /www.mccallstarnews .com/pages /fp_stories _page.php 11/26/2014 THE STAR -NEWS - THURSDAY, JULY 9, 2015 - _ — - - -- Photo by Deb Filler Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade Grand Marshall Donna Valdez greets well - wishers. . Photos for The Star -News by Gary Ertter Star -News News Main News Page Page 1 of 1 San Diego man charged with battery after scuffle with deputies In Yellow Pine BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star -News A San Diego man faces four felony charges after battling with Valley County sheriffs deputies early Sunday at the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival. r Taylor Smith, 26, was charged with aggravated battery, three counts of battery on a police officer and a misdemeanor count of resisting or obstructing. y ��, The deputies had responded to reports that a suspect was involved in a fight in a Yellow % Pine bar at about 11 a.m. on Saturday, Sheriffs Lt. Dan Smith said. TaAor Smith Witnesses told deputies that Smith grabbed a man he did not know and held a knife to his neck. The officers encountered him at about 1:30 a.m. Sunday, Smith said. A deputy ordered the suspect to get down on the ground, but as the officer was pulling out his stun gun, his hand was struck. Another deputy jumped in and the suspect was wrestled to the ground, but the suspect refused to move his arms to be handcuffed. He fought with the officers all the way into the patrol vehicle, Smith said. "He kicked both deputies and threatened to kill them and their families," Smith said. Earlier, the suspect had stabbed himself in the arm in front of children, Smith said. `He said he was going to kill someone," Smith said. Taylor Smith has an extensive criminal history and is wanted for parole violation. He was arraigned on Monday in Valley County Magistrate's Court in Cascade and bond was set at $200,000. Smith is due to return to court on Tuesday for a hearing on whether he should stand trial on the charges. http: / /www.mccallstamews .com/pages /fp_stories _page.php 8/6/2015 Star -News News Events Page Page 1 of 1 m— by Did Fills S1'REKr MUSIC-Participants in the Walking Music Parade and Jam Session stroll down Main Street in Yellow Pine during the village's Music and Harmonica Festival. An estimated 1,700 people attended the weekend of live music. h4://www.mccallstamews.com/pages/events—arts_page.php 8/6/2015 Star -News News Main News Page SLIDE BLOCKS YELLOW PINE ROAD wm br � Yellow Pine residents inspect a large rock slide o0 Monday that blocked the East Fork of the South Fork Road about three mites wear of Yellow Pine. The backeuuntry residents ate accustomed to such seasonal ineonveniences and patiently waited until Valley County caws cleated the mad at q p.m. Tuesday. Page 1 of 1 http:// www. mccallstamews .com/pages/fp_stories _page.php 3/17/2016 Star -News News Groups Page re.roM warms, MOUTH ORGAN musle -Those attending last weekend's Yellow fte Music and Harmonica Festiml were able to be part in the testia9tles, by taking hamronka lessons from instructor Ew�ki Grabber of Hater. From left ate Mike C.aatoni of Thailand, Grabber and Carol Carnahan of Boise. The weekend included performances by internationally kramv harmonica players as well as Ir"e music acts. Page 2 of 2 http : / /www.mccallstamews.com/pages /groups page.php 8/11/2016