Loading...
2018 Faces of Diversity ReportMETROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 1 FACES OF DIVERSITY METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT Annual Diversity Report FY2018 2 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 15 16 18 MESSAGE FROM MSD LEADERSHIP BRIAN HOELSCHER AUTHENTIC DIVERSITY SHONNAH PAREDES COMMITTED TO INCLUSION INCLUSION BY DESIGN PATRICIA PRIDE DIVERSITY IN CONSTRUCTION GERALD PICKETT, VANADA JOHNSON SMALL CONTRACTOR PROGRAM MIKE BUECHTER NEW CONCEPTS FOR DIVERSITY KATLYNN WOODRUFF MEASURING BENCHMARKS PROGRAMS THAT BUILD ON-THE-JOB TRAINING DAVIDA CRAYTON IN THIS REPORT TABLE OF CONTENTS Please note data in the report is valid as of August 2018. As project documen-tation is finalized, precise numbers may fluctuate. METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 3 Thank you for your interest in the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) and our diversity programs. Welcome to the inaugural Annual Diversity Report! In this inaugural Annual Diversity Report, we will share the history of the Diversity Division and the successes achieved in Fiscal Year 2018 (July 1, 2017–June 30, 2018). This report demonstrates how MSD implements and tracks diversity-related initiatives in order to create a more equitable organization and project spending that reflects the diversity of the community we serve. We have included statistical data for diversity CIRP construction utilization (FY18), diversity CIRP design utilization (FY18), small contractor infrastructure utilization (FY18), the Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) program status, and diversity annual updates and highlights. More than numbers, we want to high- light the faces of real people who make up our diversity initiatives, including staff and participants of our diversity programs. MSD’s deep-rooted and authentic commitment to diversity is the foundation for all that we do. It is exhib- ited within the culture of MDS as well as the wastewater and stormwater work we provide to more than 1.3 million customers. Diversity allows MSD to be more cost-effective and comprehensive by bringing to light ideas and solutions from many perspectives. It is our shared understanding of the motivations and benefits derived from this commitment to diversity that will have the greatest, long-term impact on the communities we serve. We hope you find this report useful. We also welcome your comments and suggestions on how MSD might improve future reports to keep you better informed of our progress. BRIAN HOELSCHER Executive Director & CEO 4 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT AUTHENTIC DIVERSITY SHONNAH PAREDES Manager of Diversity Programs MSD recognizes that small and diverse businesses are the foundation for building stronger communities. That is why we are committed to diversifying workforce participation and developing under-utilized mi- nority- and women-owned businesses in our region. The year 2012 was pivotal in MSD’s commitment to diversity. While not the inception of all diversity efforts, it was the year MSD initiated its first disparity study. The disparity study identified areas within MSD where there were no disparities and areas that could be enhanced to improve minority and women participation. The same year, I began managing many of MSD’s diversity initiatives. Since then, and based on the recom- mendations identified in the disparity study, we have introduced an array of programs and strategies with measurable results. Each ensures opportunities for minority and women business enterprises across MSD’s capital and non-capital projects. For example, training programs provide opportunities for women and mi- norities to gain on-the-job training and experience within the tunneling industry; scholarships encourage SIUE students to consider careers as Treatment Plant Operators; and paid summer internships introduce disadvantaged high school students to MSD job opportunities. Policies are accompanied by practical programs with rigorous compliance standards for tracking to im- prove inclusion and ensure validity of data. Our team developed a one-of-a-kind compliance reporting software that allows our contractors to track workforce participation and vendor utilization with greater efficiency, accuracy, and transparency. In this first Annual Diversity Report, you will find that MSD has made great strides in the area of diversity since 2012. Utilization of minorities and women on MSD projects continues to rise as does the use of mi- nority- and women-owned businesses. However, we recognize our work is not yet done. In FY2019, we plan to commission an update to the 2012 disparity study. We look forward to bridging any gaps identified by the new study while continuing our pursuit of authentic diversity and inclusion. METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 5 INITIATED FIRST MSD DISPARITY STUDY ESTABLISHED NEW M/WBE GOALS ESTABLISHED WORKFORCE GOALS FOR PROJECTS OVER $500,000 2012 SIGNED COMMUNITY BENEFITS AGREEMENT INTRODUCED FIRST SOURCE HIRING WITH SLATE 2013 2014 ADDED BUD TRAINING PROGRAM WITH SLATE LAUNCHED CONTRACTOR LOAN FUND WITH MSD AS AN INITIAL INVESTOR 2015 INTRODUCED SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM WITH SIUE PARTNERED WITH ST. LOUIS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 2018 UPDATE DISPARITY STUDY Vanada Johnson and Gerald Pickett join the diversity team Brian Ward, Larry Woods, and Katlynn Woodruff join the diversity team Mikal Hicks joins the diversity team Amanda Cooper joins the diversity team ROLLED OUT THE MSD DIVERSITY REPORTING SYSTEM 2016 Shonnah Paredes and Marnita Spight join the diversity team 6 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT SHONNAH PAREDES Manager of Diversity Programs AMANDA COOPER M/WBE Compliance Inspector MIKAL HICKS M/WBE Compliance Inspector VANADA JOHNSON M/WBE Compliance Inspector GERALD PICKETT M/WBE Compliance Inspector MARNITA SPIGHT M/WBE Compliance Specialist BRIAN WARD M/WBE Compliance Inspector KATLYNN WOODRUFF M/WBE Compliance Specialist LARRY WOODS M/WBE Compliance Inspector DIVERSITY TEAM COMMITTED TO INCLUSION MSD's diversity team encourages a culture that celebrates the ex- pertise and perspective of diverse people. With strategic goals and a steadfast vision, the team is dedicated to cultivating a workforce and environment reflective of the community it serves. VISION Support an environment that promotes diversity and equality for all. MISSION Aid in efforts to continuously improve the health, safety, and water environment of our residents and ratepayers through business prac- tices that represent a commitment to inclusivity and equality. CORE VALUES INTEGRITY Promote ethical behavior at all times. Treat others fairly and with respect. COMMUNITY Invest and reaffirm commitment to be involved with efforts that promote strategies that address challenges unmet. TEAMWORK Believe in working together to accomplish our mission through open communications, trust, respect, and diversity. INNOVATION Strive to continuously improve and embrace innovative ideas that help achieve excellence. EMPLOYEES Help everyone to reach their highest potential and value each per- son's contributions toward achieving inclusive success. CUSTOMERS Build resilient relationships by providing services and programs that are representative of the communities we serve. A TEAM COMMITTED TO CULTIVATING A CULTURE METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 7 8 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT INCLUSION BY DESIGN FROM STUDY TO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The Metropolitan St. Louis Sew- er District's (MSD) commitment to galvanizing and developing under-utilized minority- and women-owned businesses is evident in both its efforts and results. The 2012 disparity study served as a call to action and set in motion an ever-growing set of tools and intitiatives, such as more inclusive contractor di- versity goals, regular worksite inspectors, on-the-job training, internships, scholarships, and other programs. As a result, MSD has successfully maintained momentum where minority and women participation was prov- en to thrive and reduced areas where disparities existed. Since FY2016, MSD has increased minority workforce participation by five percent and has nearly doubled its women participation (construction). These and the rest of the numbers within this report confirm the significant impact that meaningful pro- grams and initia- tives can bring.    Whether celebrating successes or addressing disparities, MSD’s pursuit of a genuinely diverse work- force remains concrete. In FY2019, MSD will update the 2012 disparity study to analyze its diversity programs, practices, and results. Like the initial study, the update will act as a call to action for greater di- versity and inclusivity.  METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 9 PATRICIA PRIDE Project Engineer For more than a decade, Patricia Pride has been instrumental in many of MSD's Design Projects. As an Engineering Project Manager, she manag- es the design of multiple projects, ensuring that each design meets MSD’s standards. Most days include reviewing plans and specifications for design projects as well as interacting with de- sign consultants and other groups within MSD. “I enjoy the variety of the design projects," Pride said. "In the beginning of my career with MSD, I worked on sanitary relief projects. Now, I lead teams in designing deep rock tunnels and pump stations. This position allows me to continually expand my knowledge base and adapt to new challenges.” Among a long list of accomplishments and con- tributions, Pride's work with Maline Creek CSO Local Storage Tunnel and Jefferson Barracks Tunnel are two of the many design projects that are currently under construction. FY2018 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT & REPLACEMENT PROGRAM DESIGN UTILIZATION M/WBECOMMITMENTS MBE$855,475WBE$403,108TOTAL$1,258,583M/WBE ACTIVECONTRACT PAYMENTS MBE$12,696,857WBE$4,755,817TOTAL$17,452,674TOTAL PAID TO PRIMES$43,142,869 DESIGN CONTRACTS AWARDED TOTALING $3,813,446 17 PRIME CONSULTING TEAMS WITH WORKFORCE GOALS 18 *Watershed contracts were amended to current workforce goals 16.0% MINORITY (goal: 18%) 35.5% WOMEN(goal: 32%) 16% 2018 15% 2017 18% 2016 36% 2018 33% 2017 33% 2016 FY2018 DESIGN WORKFORCE UTILIZATION 22.4%10.6% 11.0%40.4%29.4% 33.0% 10 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT DIVERSITY IN CONSTRUCTION With transparency and consistency as their canon, MSD’s M/WBE Compliance Inspectors spend 90 percent of each workday on job sites. They interview workers, substantiate participation, confirm workforce utiliza- tion, monitor quality of work, and verify sub-contractor compensation. Gerald Pickett and Vanada Johnson are MSD’s first M/ WBE Compliance Inspectors. “ Vanada and I started to- gether; visited sites together; and learned together,” Pickett said. “The two of us taught each other,” Johnson added. “I know the sewers and traced the lines. He thor- oughly understands the construction side.” Now, Pickett and Johnson are part of a team of five in- spectors who start each day with a huddle and a laugh before heading out as a pack. The tight-knit group is a driving force for diversity in construction. “Our diversity program works because of our dedication to holding every contractor to their obligation,” Pickett said. “Many contractors have embraced MSD’s diversity goals and are being more consistent as a result,” John- son concluded. PRESENCE MATTERS M/WBE Compliance Inspectors M/WBE COMMITMENTS 19.5%14.8%MBE$48,342,360WBE$36,682,870TOTAL$85,025,230FY2018 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT & REPLACEMENT PROGRAM CONSTRUCTION UTILIZATION CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED TOTALING $248,022,930 82 SIXTY-NINENON-BUILDING(17% african american mbe) ONEDESIGN-BUILD(17% african american mbe) TWOBUILDING CONSTRUCTION(30% hispanic/african american mbe) FOURSTATE FUNDED(10% mbe/10% wbe) SIXUNDER $50K(no goals) ACTIVE CONTRACT PAYMENTS 20.9%3.4%MBE$35,555,976WBE$5,758,593TOTAL$41,314,569TOTAL PAID TO PRIMES - $170,197,254 24.3% 34.3% METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 11 FY2018 CONSTRUCTION WORKFORCE UTILIZATION 29.6% MINORITY 609,511HOURS 77,661OVER GOAL 79.3% APPRENTICE 67,343HOURS 33,362OVER GOAL 6.0% WOMEN 124,115HOURS 19,379UNDER GOAL 93,476 HOURSBUILDING CONSTRUCTIONgoal: 30% MINORITY 7% WOMEN 40% APPRENTICE (if used) 1,405,457 HOURSNON-BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONgoal: 30% MINORITY 7% WOMEN 40% APPRENTICE (if used) 558,977 HOURSSTATE FUNDEDgoal: 14.7% MINORITY 6.9% WOMEN 2,057,910 HOURSTOTAL WORKED 23.7% 28.9%29.6%2016201720183.1%4.1%6.0%201620172018*Workforce applies to construction contracts exceeding $500,000**Workforce applies to State Funded Construction contracts exceeding $10,000 12 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT SMALL CONTRACTOR PROGRAM IMPROVING DIVERSITY CAN START SMALL The Small Contractor Program is a stepping stone for small firms that want to expand their capacity and gain experience in the sewer construction industry. With hundreds of projects every year, there is a consistent flow of bid opportunities under $25,000. These relatively small projects have fewer bonding and insur- ance requirements, fewer up- front capital demands, and a bid- ding process that restricts the competition to like-sized firms. By reducing some of the stipulations associat- ed with larger projects, the Small Contractor Program is developing a strong pipeline of ex- perienced contractors for MSD’s larger Capital Improvement and Replacement Program (CIRP) work. The inclusion element of the Small Contractor Program has proven successful, resulting in small M/WBE firms growing to win larger roles. For every small contract, at least half of the bidders must be M/WBE cer- tified. While the requirements for selection are the same for all bidders (low bid), the 50/50 mandate encourages the par- ticipation of small M/WBE con- tractors. Like the program as a whole, this builds the availabil- ity of a diverse labor pool and contracting community. The more accessible bidding process empowers small firms, including M/WBEs, to gain the experience needed for larg- er projects. In doing so, MSD is helping small contractors scale their operations and become more profitable. It is about strengthening small M/WBE contractors who may not have the capacity to complete large-scale projects yet. METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 13 MIKE BUECHTER Program Manager Mike Buechter joined MSD in 2003 and has man- aged the Small Contractor Program since 2013. In addition to managing work distribution and employee development, he is responsible for solving worksite, technical, and project issues. As a big thinker and astute problem solver, Buec- hter manages his team of 20, who are responsi- ble for approximately 500 contracts annually. With projects that span just a few days or weeks, the contracts that qualify for the Small Contrac- tor Program are considerably smaller than MSD’s CIRP work. But to Buechter and his team, all 500 small projects start with 500 selection teams and 2,000 bids, followed by the management of 500 contracts and projects. Buechter and his department have helped shape the community in meaningful ways. The quanti- ty of projects and number of small contractors who have built their capital and capacity as a result of the program are evidence of its impact. PROGRAM SPEND SANITARY IR - $2,656,823OMCI STORM - $1,981,557TOTAL - $4,638,380 M/WBE$838,875M/WBE$766,325TOTAL$1,605,200TOTAL PROGRAM WORK ORDERS 509 37.3% M/WBE (total: 190) M/WBE DOLLARS M/WBE PERCENTAGE OF DOLLARS M/WBE PARTICIPATION 29.4%30.7% 34.6%201620172018$1,605,200 $2,099,189 $1,244,901 34.6%38.7%31.6% FY2018 14 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT KATLYNN WOODRUFF M/WBE Compliance Specialist Katlynn Woodruff is an enthusiastic champion for diversity. As a M/WBE Compliance Specialist, she supports MSD’s diversity programs and en- sures compliance for every department, contrac- tor, and service provider is monitored, tracked, and meeting diversity program requirements. “We don’t simply dictate policies and tell our contractors ‘good luck,’” Woodruff said. “We are here to support them in this endeavor by pro- viding the tools to meet their diversity goals.” Joining MSD in 2014, Woodruff has supported many of these tools. She was instrumental in developing the MSD Diversity Reporting System for tracking and monitoring compliance; she coordinates MSD’s diversity trainings; and she scrutinizes hundreds of contracts and reports to verify their accuracy. “MSD’s diversity efforts make a real impact in the community. We believe our workforce and contractors should reflect the community they serve, and I am excited to see this materialize.” MSD is committed to stimulating economic growth and increasing the vitality of under-utilized minori- ties and women in the St. Louis area. This resolve is the driving force behind MSD’s comprehensive programming: BUILDING UNION DIVERSITY* Targets and trains unemployed, underemployed, and interested job applicants for MSD contractors in need of qualified minority and women workers. COMMUNITY BENEFITS AGREEMENT Ensures MSD’s capital program is representative and inclusive of the St. Louis population via an agreement with community organizations. CONTRACTOR INCENTIVE PROGRAM Incentivizes contractors to expand their workforce to include more diverse apprentices than required. CONTRACTOR LOAN FUNDA low-interest, revolving loan program for certified M/WBEs, providing providing opportunities to par- ticipate on MSD’s larger projects. ERTC SCHOLARSHIPS Provides minorities and women with opportunities for education, internships, and employment within the wastewater and stormwater treatment plant industry. FIRST SOURCE HIRING* Helps contractors achieve their workforce develop- ment and diversity goals by maintaining a list of eligible and available union construction workers. ON-THE-JOB TRAINING Prepares people to work with MSD on its tunnel- ing projects through multi-tiered learning within a classroom and on project worksites. ST. LOUIS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM Generates interest in the sewer construction indus- try by inviting diverse high school students to par- ticipate in MSD internships. PROGRAMS THAT BUILD NEW CONCEPTS FOR DIVERSITY * SLATE PROGRAMS METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 15 MEASURING BENCHMARKS FOR SUCCESS While inclusion exceeds policies and diversity reaches beyond metrics, the two are fundamen- tal to building a genuinely di- verse and inclusive workforce and supply chain. For this rea- son, MSD has built its diversity efforts upon verifiable proof. Each benchmark identifies suc- cesses and opportunities for im- provement so MSD can manage and develop meaningful efforts around its programs. MSD’s commitment to inclusion and diversity requires the same commitment from its contrac- tors. With a prime contractor’s obligation to M/WBE utilization required from the onset of a con- tract, MSD’s diversity team con- ducts an initial evaluation at the time of bid. This first step ensures efforts are taken to meet goals, when applicable. Monthly reporting and monitoring activities continue through- out the life of the project, requiring contractors to val- idate M/WBE participation on an ongoing basis. Addi- tionally, M/WBE Inspectors regularly visit MSD worksites to verify that minority and/or wom- en sub-contractors are success- fully performing the portion of work identified for the project as well as validate workforce data. In February 2017, MSD launched a robust vendor/workforce di- versity reporting system, simpli- fying contractor reporting and consolidating thousands of data- bases into a single, online portal. The new system allows MSD to streamline the collection and analysis of diversity compliance data. These combined efforts are fostering a workforce and supply chain that genuinely reflects the community they serve. The reporting system provides additional transparency and accessibility to contractors, sub-contractors, and ratepayers. 445 Active Contracts 264 Prime + Sub Vendors 24.3% M/WBE Particpation (Construction) 35.7% Workforce Particpation (Construction) 40.4% M/WBE Particpation (Pro-Services) 51.6% Workforce Particpation (Pro-Services) 16 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT BUD Building Union Diversity (BUD) is a pre-apprenticeship program that introduces minorities, wom- en, and St. Louis residents to construction trades. By target- ing these demographics, MSD is increasing diversity within the building trades by helping its contractors gain access to a growing workforce of qualified, minority and women workers.   The MSD-sponsored training program is operated by the Construction Trades Council of St. Louis and St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment (SLATE). Since its inception, BUD has graduated more than 100 individuals, some of whom have been hired by MSD contractors. It is also nationally recognized for its community impact. CBA PROGRAMS THAT BUILD EDUCATION & INTERNSHIPS MSD understands the impor- tance of identifying and en- gaging the next generation in wastewater, stormwater, con- struction, and design trades. It has teamed up with Southern Il- linois University at Edwardsville (SIUE) to offer scholarships at the university’s Environmental Resource Training Center. MSD sponsors $3,500 scholarships for minorities and women interest- ed in careers as treatment plant operators in the areas of waste- The BUD program continues to yield stories of success. Jonathan Long, for example, is a member of BUD-Cohort 4. Before BUD, he admits he was desperate for a second chance. “I truly hope the program survives for many years to come and people can benefit from SLATE resources,” said Long. “Many thanks to all the partners.” NINETEEN BUD GRADUATES SPONSORED FOUR EMPLOYED WITH MSD CONTRACTORS TWELVE EMPLOYED AND/OR APPRENTICES water and stormwater.  In addition to collegiate scholar- ships, MSD partners with the St. Louis Internship Program in its efforts to further develop educa- tional enhancement and intern- ship programs in conjunction with St. Louis City and County Public Schools. Through this program, diverse high school students are introduced to MSD’s work through tours and paid in- ternships at MSD facilities. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS SPONSORED INTERNSHIP PROGRAM SIUE ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE TRAINING SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS ONE EMPLOYED AT MSD ONE PENDING CERTIFICATION TESTING FIVE THREE METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 17 COMMUNITY BENEFITSAGREEMENT The CBA is a formal agreement between MSD and community organizations that estab- lishes a framework for addressing issues in diverse workforce participation, business development, and other areas that often act as obstacles in developing a diverse labor pool and contracting community. The CBA supports the development of initiatives that address these issues, both in terms of workforce participation and business ownership. The Contrac- tor Loan Fund (CLF) is a coa- lition of part- ners investing in expanding the capaci- ty of certified minority- and women-owned businesses within the construc- tion industry. MSD joined lo- cal government organizations, non-profits, and private sector businesses to develop a low-in- terest, revolving loan program specific to the capital needs of emerging M/WBE construction companies. MSD is proud to have been an initial investor in CLF. The $10+ million loan program helps M/WBE construction com- panies fund their operations and growth before they are eligible for traditional bank financing. Many MSD subcontractors are among those who have received CLF funding. Since its 2014 launch, the Con- tractor Loan Fund has approved 31 loans totaling more than $6 million. Four of these have been repaid, and several have been renewed. Currently, CLF has 20 outstanding loans totaling $3 million. The loan committee has approximately twelve applica- tions under review. HELPING BUILD ST. LOUIS FISCAL YEAR2018 20LOANSOUTSTANDING $3MILLION 31LOANSGRANTED $6MILLION SINCE2013 18 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT ON-THE-JOB TRAINING (OJT) BUILDING TUNNEL CAREERS DEEP UNDERGROUND On-The-Job (OJT) Tunnel Train- ing is an integrated program that introduces candidates to hands-on, expert-level, con- struction training. While the program is essential to devel- oping a diverse workforce for MSD’s tunneling projects, it is also educating a new genera- tion of laborers ready for a va- riety of career opportunities. Working alongside talented in- dustry professionals, OJT can- didates complete most of their training in the field. Trainees quickly become a safe and pro- ductive member of their team, learning the specialized oper- ations of tunneling work. After completing 1,040 hours of train- ing, they become eligible for certification, and many continue working for MSD contractors. MSD is committed to building a diverse, sustainable pipeline of laborers to work deep un- derground within the tunnel industry. Its four major tunnel- ing projects—Maline Creek, Up- per Maline Creek, Deer Creek, and Jefferson Barracks—have OJT programs with SAK Con- struction as the prime con- tractor. With each site funded by MSD having exceeded its minority and women partici- pation goals, the OJT Tunnel Training Program is ensuring a diverse and uniquely qualified workforce for years to come. METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT | 19 DAVIDA CRAYTON OJT Graduate/SAK Employee Davida Crayton is a laborer with SAK Construction, a tunneling company and MSD contractor. Her workplace is a 20,842 foot storage tunnel. Crayton is not the only commonali- ty between SAK and MSD. The two collaborate to fill a skills gap in the tunneling industry through a MSD sponsored program called OJT Tunnel Training Program. This program pro- vides classroom and job site training for women and minorities interested in the construction tunneling trade. Crayton is a recent graduate, having completed 1,040 hours of training. She is among many OJT graduates working on MSD projects. She is also among a growing number of women and minori- ties employed as tunneling laborers. TUNNELING PROJECTS WITH OJT PROGRAMS FOUR 2. MALINE CREEK 1. UPPER MALINE CREEK WORKFORCE 4 MINORITY MEN#1 52% complete (employed - 2017) #2 100% complete (employed - 2018) #3 15% complete (employed - 2017)#4 100% complete (employed - 2018) TRAINEE STATUS 1,040 hours required APPRENTICE(goal: 40%) 57.6% 74.5% WORKFORCE 4 MINORITY MEN #1 100% complete (employed - 2017)#2 100% complete (currently employed) #3 100% complete (employed - 2018) #4 100% complete (currently employed) TRAINEE STATUS 1,040 hours required APPRENTICE(goal: 40%) 26.8% 68.6% 2 MINORITY WOMEN #1 100% complete (currently employed)#2 100% complete (employed - 2018) 3. DEER CREEK WORKFORCE 4 MINORITY MEN#1 48% complete #2 7% complete (employed - 2018) #3 46% complete #4 30% complete (employed - 2018) TRAINEE STATUS 1,040 hours required APPRENTICE(goal: 40%) 38.7% 70.7% 1 MINORITY WOMAN#1 42% complete 50% Completion, 0% Retention 100% Completion, 50% Retention On target for 60% completion 4. JEFFERSON BARRACKS - Contractor Sponsored OJT Program 10.1% WOMEN(goal: 7%) 11.2% WOMEN(goal: 7%) 8.2% WOMEN(goal: 7%) 37.1% MINORITY(goal: 30%) 30.1% MINORITY(goal: 30%) 30.9% MINORITY(goal: 30%) credit: LLiUNA Local 110 20 | FY 2018 DIVERSITY REPORT METROPOLITAN ST. LOUIS SEWER DISTRICT 2350 Market Street St. Louis, MO 63103-2555 (314) 768-6260 diversity@stlmsd.com www.stlmsd.com/diversity