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05 May 22, 2006 Budget & Implementation77015 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA TIME: 9:30 a.m. DATE: Monday, May 22, 2006 LOCATION: Board Chambers County Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, 1st Floor Riverside, CA 92501 ***COMMITTEE MEMBERS*** Jeff Stone, Chair / District Three / County of Riverside Barbara Hanna, Vice Chair / Art Welch, City of Banning Roger Berg / Jeff Fox, City of Beaumont Robert Crain / Joseph DeConinck, City of Blythe Gregory S. Pettis / Charles 'Bud" England, City of Cathedral City Juan M. DeLara / Richard Macknicki, City of Coachella Alex Bias / Yvonne Parks, City of Desert Hot Springs Bob Magee / Robert L. Schiffner, City of Lake Elsinore Terry Henderson / Don Adolph, City of La Quinta Rick Gibbs / Douglas McAllister, City of Murrieta Ron Meepos / Alan Seman, City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams, City of Riverside Jim Ayres / Chris Buydos, City of San Jacinto John F. Tavaglione, District Two / County of Riverside ***STAFF*** Eric Haley, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer ***AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY*** Annual Budget Development and Oversight Countywide Strategic Plan Legislation Measure A Implementation and Capital Programs Public Communications and Outreach Programs Competitive Grant Programs: TEA 21-CMAO & STP, Transportation Enhancement and SB 821-Bicycle & Pedestrian Property Management SAFE/Freeway Service Patrol TUMF Program and other areas as may be prescribed by the Commission Comments are welcomed by the Committee. If you wish to provide comments to the Committee, please complete and submit a Testimony Card to the Clerk of the Commission. 11.36.3 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may taken on -any item listed •on the agenda. 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 22, 2006 BOARD CHAMBERS County Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street,P= Floor Riverside, California In compliance with the Americans, with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Commission at (951) 7871141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS .(The Committee may add an. item to the .Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item `to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If. there are. less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) Budget and Implementation Committee May.'22, 2006 Page CONSENT CALENDAR `- All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 6A. INTERFUND LOAN ACTIVITY REPORT Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the lnterfund Loan Activity Report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2006; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 6B. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS:, This item' is for the Committee to: 1) - Receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statement's' for the -third quarter. ended March 31, 2006; and 2) Forward to the Commissionfor final action, FUNDING' ADJUSTMENT FOR THE STATE ROUTE 74 WIDENING PROJECT BETWEEN I-1.5 IN LAKE ELSINORE AND 7T" STREET IN PERRIS Overview This item is for the Committee to: 'Approve an increase , of $1,807,233 to the project budget for, the State Route (SR)74 widening project between)-15 inthe city of. Lake Elsinore (Lake Elsinore) and 7t' Street in the city of Perris (Perris) from $76,446,874 to'$78,254,107; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. • Budget and Implementation Committee May 22, 2006 Page 3 8. REVISIONS TO THE 1989 MEASURE . A .LOCAL CIRCULATION INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FOR THE CITY OF RIVERSIDE Pg. 74 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the city of Riverside's (City) request to split the Commission's 1989 Measure A Local Circulation Interchange (IC) project commitment of $1 1.758 million for the Adams Street interchange with $3.968 million going to the Van Buren interchange and $7.790 million to the La Sierra interchange projects; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to redistribute the Measure A funds between the La Sierra and Van Buren interchange projects based on the value of construction bids received. This requires the City to provide written documentation on the bid value to the Commission and this authorization cannot exceed the total amount of Measure A funds approved for these projects in the Strategic Plan; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 9- CORONA DEPOT PROPERTY SALE Pg.21 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-067-00 for the sale of the Corona Depot, (.97 acres) located at 150 Depot Drive in Corona as shown on the. attached .map, to the city of Corona in the amount of $753,000; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. Budget and Implementation Committee May 22, 2006 Page 4 10. LAMB CANYON PROPERTY CONVEYANCE. TO CALTRANS Overview This item is for the Committee to: Approve the conveyance of property acquired for the Lamb 'Canyon projecttoCaltrans; Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the conveyance documents; and 3) Forward to the 'Commission for final action. MADISON STATION GROUNDS SALE TO THE CITY OF RIVERSIDE Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) 2) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-065-00'for 'the sale`. of. the .former Madison : Station Grounds, (4.15 acres) located on Railroad Avenue between Madison Street and Jefferson Avenue in Riverside as shown on the attached map, to the city of Riverside in the amount of $.1,070,000; Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and Forward to'the,Commission for final action.': 12. APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT NO. 06-51-063-00 WITH CALTRANS FOR THE EXCHANGE OF PROPERTY RELATED TO THE SAN JACINTO BRANCH LINE Overview This item is for the Committee to: 30 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-063-00 with Caltrans for:, the exchange of property relatedto the San Jacinto Branch Line (Parcels 7723-1, 7731-1-A, and 7731-2 and Parcel 7724-01-05); 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review,to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and. 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. • Budget and Implementation Committee May 22, 2006 Page 5 13. PROPOSED BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 Pg. 50 Overview 1) Receive input on the Proposed Fiscal Year (FY) 2006/07 budget; 2). Close the public hearing to receive input on the Proposed Budget for FY 2006/07 on June 14, 2006; 3) Adopt the proposed budget for FY2006/07; and • 4) Forward to the Commission for final action. 14. .RESOLUTION NO. 06-007 'RESOLUTION OF THE . RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ESTABLISHING THE COMMISSION'S APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006/07" . Pg. 248 Overview 1) Approve Resolution No. 06-007. establishing . the Commission's appropriations limit for Fiscal Year 2006/07; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 15. ADVANCE OF FY 2006/07 CITY OF HEMET MEASURE A LOCAL STREET AND ROAD FUNDS Pg. 255 Overview 1) Approve an advance of $2,126,000, including accrued interest; to the city of Hemet (City) for its estimated Measure A Local Streets and Roads (LSR) funding for FY 2006/07; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute Agreement No. 06-31-068-00, Measure A. Local Streets and Roads Advancement Agreement, between the Commission and the City; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. Budget and Implementation Committee May 22, 2006 Page 6 16 AGREEMENTS FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL. TOW TRUCK SERVICE, Pg. 258 :I • Overview 1) Approve Agreement No. 02-45-070-03, Amendment No.. 3 to. Freeway Service Patrol Tow Truck Agreement No. 02-45-070..with : Tri-City Towing, Inc., to extend the term of the agreement and increase the hourly rate from $45.00 to $47:00 for Beat #4; 2) Approve Agreement No. 02-45-071-04, Amendment. :No. 4 to Freeway Service Patrol Tow Truck Agreement No. 02-45-071 ,with Pepe's Towing Services, Inc. to extend the term of the agreement and increase the hourly rate from $43.75 to $45 75 for, Beat #18; 3) 'Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to 'execute the, agreements on behalf of the Commission; and Forward to the Commission for final action. 17: APPROVAL OF,; • CITY OF MORENO • VALLEY'S (CITY) BICYCLE TRANSPORTATION PLAN 1► Approve the city`of Moreno Valley's (City) Bicycle Transportation, Plan as submitted, and Forward to the, Commission for final action. 18. STATE.AND FEDERALLEGISLATIVE UPDATE 1) Approve the following bill positions: HR 5329 (Miller, R-Diamond Bar) SUPPORT AB 201.5 (Lieu, D-Redondo Beach) - OPPOSE; and Forward to the Commission for final action.. 19. ITEMS PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA • Budget and Implementation Committee May 22, 2006 Page 7 20. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT Overview 1) This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and staff to report on attended and upcoming meeting/conferences and issues related to Commission activities. . 21. ADJOURNMENT AND NEXT MEETING The next Budget and Implementation Committee meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 A.M., Monday, June 26, 2006, Board Chambers, 1st Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. - ATTENDANCE ROSTER BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE MEETING MONDAY, MAY 22, 2006 9:30 A.M. NAME l� %e n //5 ‘77-,6 REPRESENTING e-W/v/n i / w 6? .,Jto TELEPHONE OR E-MAIL # bar to -4.f hahIn a®LQ1,0a•Cotv\ v • AGENDA ITEM 4 Minutes • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE Monday, April 24, 2006 MINUTES 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Budget and Implementation Committee was called to order by Chair Jeff Stone at 9:33 a.m.; in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members/Alternates Present Members Absent Roger Berg Juan DeLara Rick Gibbs Barbara Hanna Terry Henderson Bob Magee John Tavaglione Jeff Stone Steve Adams Jim Ayers Alex Bias Robert Crain Ron Meepos Gregory Pettis 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 4. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES -February 27, 2006 M/S/C (Henderson/Hanna) to approve the minutes of February 27, 2006 as submitted. • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes April 24, 2006 Page 2 CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Henderson/Tavaglione) to approve the following Consent 'Calendar items: 6A. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT' 1) Receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report .for the third quarter ended March 31, 2006; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 6B. ;QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended March 31, 2006; and Forward to the Commission for final action. 7. AMENDMENT TO JHE CONTRACT WITH WESTERN AREA SECURITY GUARDSERVICES(WASS) FOR A TWO -MONTH EXTENSION M/S/C (Henderson/Tavaglione) to: 1) Authorize a two -month extension of the current, agreement with WASS; 2) Authorize a contract amendment amount of $130,673; 3) Authorize :staff 'to bring the contract recommendation directly to the Commission for action in June; and 4► Forward to the Commission for final action. RELEASE REQUEST SERVICES PROPOSALS FOR "ON -CALL RIGHT-OF=WAY Min Saysay, Program Manager, provided an overview: of thel components of the .Right -of -Way Program that will be necessary to respond in a timely and cost efficient mannento the demands of acquisitions for the future projects. r • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes April 24, 2006 Page 3 M/S/C (Tavaglione/DeLara) to: 1) Authorize the, release of Requests for Proposal for On -Call Right of Way Services in the field of: (1) Title ;and Escrow Services; (2) Right of Way Engineering and Surveying Services; (3) Residential, Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural Property Appraisal Services; (4) Goodwill Appraisal Services; (5) 'Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Appraisal Services; (6) Review Appraisal Services; and 17► Right of Way Acquisition and Relocation, Real Property Searches, Identification and Feasibility Studies for Replacement and Mitigation Sites, Cost Estimates, and Utilities Relocation; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. AMENDMENT TO MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING NO. 23-001. FOR THE PERRIS MULTIMODAL TRANSIT CENTER Sheldon Peterson, Program 'Manager, provided on brief overview of the Perris Multimodal Transit Center and the need to amend. the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to include Riverside Transit Agency's (RTA) authorization of $1,050,000 in TUMF funds and $1,352,472 from a Transportation Enhancement (TE) grant received by RTA. M/S/C (Henderson/Berg) to: 1) Authorize staff to amend the Perris Multimodal Transit Center MOU No. 23-001 with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to incorporate additional funding of $1,050,000 of Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) and $1,352,472 of Transportation Enhancement (TE) funds for a total MOU of $4,719,605; and 2) ' Forward to the Commission for final action. 10. RECURRING CONTRACTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager, provided a brief overview of the schedule of recurring contracts for the FY 2006/07. M/S/C (Magee/Hanna) to: 1) Approve the Recurring Contracts for FY 2006/07; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. ''Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes April 24, 2006 • Page 4 11. PROPOSED BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 Michele Cisneros presented the proposed Budget for FY 2005-06 highlighting _ the following areas: Budget Process Guiding Policies Total Estimated Sources and Uses Revenues, Revenue Trends and Breakdown Expenditures, Expenditures by Department and function Personnel Cost Trends Measure A Administration At Commissioner ,Bob :Magee's request, Michele Cisneros, clarified the two types of fund balances. In response to Commissioner Roger Berg's inquiry on expenditures relatedto transit, Michele Cisneros indicated that staff is projecting $7.8 million for"' specialized transit and $7.1 million for transit and gave a brief explanation of the uses for; specialized transit. At Commissioner Terry Henderson's request for clarification on the excess, of expenditures over revenue,Michele Cisneros stated expenditures are exceeding the current yearrevenues and therefore carryovers from prior fiscal years will be utilized,, which is primarily related to capital projects. Chair Stone . recommended " staff change,the statement, to :prior budgeted amounts expended in the :present fiscal year to more accurately reflect the expenditure. Commissioner` Terry Henderson also, recommended utilizing _ an alternate color to red on the Measure A Administration chart. Commissioner Berg suggested re-evaluating the transit systems on a.: regional basis due to the growth rate and changes in Riverside County to ensure the most efficient and effective system, noting the Transit • Policy. Committee is charged with this issue. Eric Haley, Executive Director, stated that the process over thenext two years is going to lead directly to what Commissioner Berg was stating. There needs to be a :deliberation over the proper balance between inter -community transit, specialized transit,; and rail. There are efficiencies that will be discussed by the Transit Policy Committee. • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes April 24, 2006 Page 5 M/SIC (Henderson/Hanna) to: 1) Discuss, review and provide guidance on the proposed Budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2006/07; 2) Open :the public, hearing, to receive input and comments on the proposed FY 2006/07 budget on .May 10, 2006 and on ,May 22, 2006 and close the public hearing on June 14, 2006; and 3) Forward -to the Commission for final action. 12. AGREEMENT NO. 06-45-046-00 FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL 'TOW TRUCK SERVICE Brian Cunanan, Staff Analyst, updated the Committee on the status of the Freeway. Service Patrol (FSP) agreement for towing service on Beat No. 2, indicating that Hamner Towing has, expressed; an inability to carry out tow service commitments for this beat. In response to Commissioner Terry Henderson's concern regarding sufficient flexibility in the agreement to address fuel cost issues, Brian. Cunanan responded that the agreement allows contractors to request . a price adjustment as warranted. M/S/C (DeLara/Hanna) to: 1) Award Agreement No. 06-45-046-00 to Tri-City Towing for tow truck service on Beat No. 2 of the Freeway Service Patrol program at a cost of $50.00 per hour per truck; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, ,to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 13. AGREEMENT NO. 06-45-050-00 WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL FOR OPERATION OF THE FREEWAY CALL BOX SYSTEM FROM JULY 1; 2006 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2009 Jerry Rivera, Program Manager, provided an overview regarding the agreement with the Department of California Highway Patrol for supervision and oversight of the call box program. Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes April 24, 2006 Page 6 2) 3) M/S/C (Henderson/Berg) to approve the projections for the: 1) Approve Agreement No. `06-45-050=00 with the State of California, Department of California Highway Patrol, for the operation of the call box system from July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2009; Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel.'review, to, execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and Forward to the Commission for final action. ITEMS PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR No items were pulled from the consent calendar ;;for 'discussion. COMMENTS BY COMMISSIONERS/STAFF At Commissioner Magee's request, Eric Haley updated the Committee on the Riverside Orange County.Authority document. 16: ADJOURNMENT There '.being no further business for •consideration by the Budget and Implementation Committee, ;the meeting was adjourned at. 10:09 a.m. The next meeting .of the Budget and Implementation Committee is scheduled for May 22,'2006 at 9:'30`a m.' .Jennifer Harmon'' . Clerk of the Board • AGENDA ITEM 6A • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Interfund Loan Activity Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Interfund Loan Activity Report for the third quarter. ended' March 31, 2006; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: On April 14, 2004 the Commission approved the Interfund Loan Policy and adopted Resolution No. 04-009 "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission to Authorize Interfund Loans". Subsequently, the Commission requested that the interfund loan activity be reported on a quarterly basis. The attached details list all interfund loan activity through March 31, 2006. The total outstanding interfund loan amounts as of March 31, 2006 are $575,000. Attachment: Interfund Loan Activity Report 1 • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Interfund Loan Activity Report For 3rd quarter ended March 31, 2006 Amount Maturity Date of Loan of Loan Date Lending Fund Borrowing Fund April 2, 2003 $ 300,000 July 1, 2006 Measure A - WC Highway (222) Measure A - WC LSR (227) March 4, 2004 275,000 July 1, 2009 Measure A - WC Commuter Assistance (226) Total $ 575,000 Purpose of Loan Advance to make repairs and improvements to Railroad Canyon Road Measure A - WC Highway (222) Additional local match for the SR71 Widening/Animal Crossing Project Date Commission Approved March 12, 2003 December 10, 2003 V:12006106 June \Budget & Implementation1MC.Attachment.lnterfund Loan Act Report AGENDA ITEM 6B • • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTAT/ON.COMMISS/ON. DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee. FROM: Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial. Officer SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the third quarter ended March 31, 2006; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the first nine months of the fiscal year, staff has monitored the revenues' and expenditures of the Commission: -The attached financial statements present the revenues and expenditures for the nine months of the fiscal year (FY). Period closing accrual adjustments are not included for revenues earned but not billed and expenditures incurred for goods and services received but not yet invoiced, as such adjustments are normally made during the year end closing activities. The operating statement shows the sales tax revenues through the third quarter at 61 % of the budget. This is a result of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board' (GASB) Statement No. 33.. GASB 33 requires sales tax revenue to be accrued in the period in which it is collected at the point of sale. The State Board of . Equalization collects the Measure A funds and remits them to 'the Commission after the reporting period for the businesses. This creates a two -month lag in the receipt of revenues by the Commission and related 'disbursements of local `streets and roads allocations. Accordingly, these financial statements reflect the Measure A sales tax revenues and related local streets and roads expenditures related to collections through January 2006. On a cash basis, the Measure. and Local Transportation Fund `(LTF) sales tax revenues are 16% and 15% higher respectively, than the same nine -month period last fiscal year: Federal, state and localgovernment reimbursements and other revenues are on a ;reimbursement basis, and the Commission will receive these revenues as the projects are completed and invoiced to the respective agencies. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues : are remitted to the Commission by the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) the 10`" of 'each month. During the third quarter, WRCOG .remitted approximately ;.. $11,310,500. 'Other revenues are significantly higher than budgeted "due -to the sale of Commission property in; February 2006. The Commission sold .the Pierce Street property for "$10,250,000. The proceeds from the sale were deposited into the Western` County, Measure A Rail program. � Investment income is slightly ;higher due to higher cash .and investment balances and their related yields. „ The Administrative and: Programs/Projects expenditure' categories are below budget overall. These categories ,,are expected to be in line by the end of the fourth quarter. Listed ;below are: the capital related .projects that have significant variances and their. status: Highway' Engineering/Right of Way/Land State Route (SR) 91 ` Van „Buren - Interchange;»7,600,000)-The city_ of Riverside, is the ,lead' 1 agency and . has experienced delays related to environmental issues. 1 The environmental process : is complete: and ,right of way, , acquisition will ;commence in FY: 2005/06. Construction will not commence for;. 18' "months and the city requested, and the Commission approved, amending the Measure A Strategic Plan to allow, the Van Buren !' • funds: to be used for the construction phase of ;the La Sierra interchange scheduled for .spring 2006.' SR-91 ,HOV Lanes between. Adams. Street and 7th Street (518,300,000)—The' Commission : is awaiting final approval of the environmental document and geometric "approval drawings in order to commence the final design phase currently forecasted forJune 2006. SR-79 Realignment (5;7,010,000).=Engineering; delays : were; caused by requests from resource ,agencies to study new; avoidance alternative alignments. „An amendment` to the contract was required which resulted in the < • • need for a preaward audit prior to the issuance of a notice to proceed. Additionally, the consultant is currently behind in submittal of invoices through March 2006. • SR-74 G Street to Interstate (1) 215 ($1,450,000)—The Commission is awaiting completion of the traffic studies in order to commence the preliminary and environmental. phase of work. Acquisition of right of way will not start until FY 2006/07. • SR-74 from 1-15 to 7`h Street ($4,250,000) —The County of :Riverside (County) continues to negotiate with parcel owners to acquire the property needed to complete the mitigation requirements of the project: In addition, funding has been allocated to cover settlements through state condemnation for those properties acquired through eminent domain. • SR-60 East Junction to 1-215 HOV ($2,887,700)—Caltrans has approved the project to proceed with the final. design. Funding authorization from the Federal Highway Administration is pending. • 1-215 Project Study Report ($500,000) - Project is currently on hold pending completion of the traffic model analysis. • Commercial Paper Projects ($43,700,000)—Commercial paper proceeds remain available for right of way and land acquisition related to projects and mitigation as opportunities arise; however, the . second traunche of $55,000,000 included in the. budget as bond proceeds has not been issued due to the balance of unexpended proceeds as of March 31, 2006. Highway Construction • 1-15 Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road Interchange ($2,700,000)—The County recently awarded the construction contract. Construction began on February 21, 2006 with an estimated 18 month construction period. • SR-74 from 1-15 to 7t Street ($14,300,000)-The prior year's winter rainfalls caused delays in construction and utility relocation. Delivery of oil base material for asphalt has caused additional delays, and construction completion is currently forecasted for the end of the second quarter in FY 2006/07. • SR-60 ($1,558,200)—Project is complete; however, punch list items are still being reviewed, and final payment will be released upon settlement of claims. Additionally, the plant establishment was delayed due to the prior year's rainfalls and is expected to be complete by the fourth quarter of FY 2005/06. SR-111 ($1,311,6001--The widening project in the city of La Quinta- was awarded, and construction started June 2005. The Commission 'recently received a progress payment invoice from the city. The •city of Indio will commence its project May 2006. The city of Rancho Mirage is expected to submit an invoice for the completed Magnesia Falls project in June 2006 for $1,00,0,000 as part of the terms of an agreement, with the Commission. • • Commercial Paper Projects ($17,648,400)—Commercial paper proceeds remain• "available for construction related to projects as opportunities ;arise; however, the second traunche of $55,000,000 included in the budget as bond proceeds has not been issued due to the balance of unexpended proceeds as of'March '31, 2006. Rail Engineering/Right of Way/Land North Main Corona Station Parking Structure ($1,100,000)-The CEQA environmental document was: 'approved, and the NEPA'. environmental document. vvas`" prepared and submitted for approval to the ;Federal Transit Administration. funding to proceed with'. the .start of final design .has been ' appropriated, and a consultant agreement was awarded in March 2006. •Perris Valley Line ($10;791",000)—Preliminary engineering contract award was rescheduled for the fourth' quarter in FY- 2005/06 Additionally, property acquisition :has been ,postponed as a result of the delay;' in the ; NEPA environmental"document due to public comments on the noise and vibration study, which is now complete. The new start application will be complete .once concurrence is rec eived the final ridership analysis._ • Riverside Downtown Eastside Parking Lot ($375,000) Delays in final design occurred• due to requirements' for preparing and submittingengineering and planning applications to, the, city to obtain permits. Engineering drawings are being finalized in order to prepare an'RFP""for construction. Rail : Stations ($60,000) Estimates for potential, rehabilitation; projects were included in the budget. • Staff is developing a station rehabilitation plan to monitor costs going forward.' Rail. Construction Riverside .Downtown Eestside Parking Lot '($1,735,000)-Delays in the final design have occurred due to •the requirements for preparation and submittal of the engineering/planning '"application' to the city :to obtain permits. • • Accordingly, the start of construction has been delayed until the fourth quarter of FY 2005/06. • Rail Stations ($354,000)—Estimates for potential rehabilitation projects were included in the budget. Staff is developing a station rehabilitation plan to monitor costs going forward. TUMF Engineering/Right of Way/Land • Mid County Parkway ($19,100,000)—Approval of the preaward audit for the consultant was recently received, and Amendment #2 for Phase II preliminary engineering was approved and a notice to proceed was issued December 2005. Staff continues to have ongoing discussions with developers to try to reserve corridor right of way. • Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects ($33,145,400)— Agreements for more than half of the projects have been signed with the cities and County. These agencies are now in the process of preparing requests for proposal to award contracts. Commission staff will continue to actively work with the agencies to have agreements signed for the remaining projects. TUMF Construction • SR-91 Green River Interchange ($3,114,600) - Funding for the project has been committed by the Commission and Caltrans. The project will be awarded and begin construction in FY 2006/07. • Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects ($13,097,500)—No construction activities on approved regional arterial projects will occur until the final design phases are completed and environmental documents are approved. Intergovernmental distributions are primarily expended as one-time LTF payments made at the beginning of the fiscal year based on claims submitted by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments and WRCOG. Unused funds in this category are used for Planning and Programming departmental expenditures. Capital Outlay expenditures are under budget due to unexpended authority for potential property improvements at various rail station sites. Additionally, the redesign and reconfiguration of existing office space to accommodate six new staff positions is nearly complete. Staff expects this category to be in line by the end of the fourth quarter. Debt Service interest expenditures are made in December and June, while principal payments are made in June. 7 Staff will continue to monitor the revenues and expenditures and notify the Commission of any unusual events. Attachment:. Quarterly Financial Statements — March 2006 DESCRIPTION RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET VS ACTUAL 3RD QUARTER FOR THREE MONTHS ENDED 3/31/2006 Revenues - Sales tax Federal, state & local govemment reimbursements Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Other revenues .Interest Total revenues Expenditures Administration Salaries & benefits • General legal services Professional services Office lease & utiNies General administrative expenditures Total administration Programs/projects Salaries & benefits General legal services Professional services General projects Highway engineering Highway construction Highway right of way/land Rail engineering Rail construction Rail right of way • - TUMF engineering TUMF construction - TUMF right of way Local streets & roads Regional arterial Special studies • FSP towing Commuter assistance - Property management •, Motorist assistance Rail operations & maintenance STA distributions Specialized transit - Planning & programming services Total programs/projects Intergovernmental distribution Capital outlay Debt service Principal Interest Arbitrage rebate tax . Cost of issuance ' Total debt service Total expenditures - Excess of revenues over (under) expenditures Other financing sources/uses Operating transfer in Operating transfer out Bond proceeds Payment to escrow agent Total financing sources/uses Net change in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2005 Fund balance March 31, 2006 v,se,spepi,M.�p,wcmlewm a,unenr BUDGET $ 159,753,428 • $ 43,608,200 45,825,000 • 8,045,952 5,453,600 262,686,180 1,608,000 103,500 1,064,200 375,000 1,142,200 4,312.900 2,284,500 1,537,300 2,237,785 3,210,200 30,871,000 37,619,200 55,572,700 7,276,000 2,089,000 . 5,050,000 26,125,385 16,212,100 26,120,000 55,106,500 9,993,900 2,186,600 1,430,980 2,765,000 110,300 2,265,344 6,677,900 5,967,000 5,104,345 45,300 307,858,339 1,909,128 909,000 28,669,500 8,345,200 400,000 37,414,700 352,404,067 (89,717,887) 46,561,500 46,561,500 55,000,000 55,000,000 (34,717,887) 230,537,100 ACTUAL : 97,150,116 2,923,503 37,109,013 14,634,808 4,929,017 156,746,457 1,157,582 39,122 660,794 271,777 748,142 2,877,416 1,427,158 663,776 875,054 1,349,569 3,572,671 4,956,702 5,087,837 160,456 221,992 31,811 3,559,996 2,298,146 33,679,103 6,131,745 703,838 911,788 1,507,993 60,026 334,591 . 4,564,610 3,428,098 3,595,905 • 18,950 79,141,816 1,055,521 155,517 .REMAINING PERCENT BALANCE UTILIZATION' $ (62,603,312) . (40,684,697) • (8,715,9871' 6,588,856 . . (524,583) (105,939,723) - 450,418 '- 64,378 423,406 103,223 394,058 1,435,484 .857,342. 873,5234 1,362,731" 1,860,631 27,298,329• -32,662,498 50,484,863 7,115,544 1,867,008 , 5,018,169 . 22,565,389 16,212,100 23,821,854 21,427,397 3,862,155 1,482,762 519,192 1,257,007 " 50,274 1,930,753 2,113,290 2,538,902 -1,508,440 26,350 228,716,522' 853,607 753,483 - 28,669,500 4,021,209 " 4,323,991. 400,000 4,021,209 87,251,479 33,393,491 _ 265,152,588 69,494,976 159,212,865 25,778,473 •25,778,473 69,494,978 279,262,635 (20,783,027) 20,783,027 (55,000,000) (55,000,000) 104,212,865 48,725,535 60% 72%' 38% 61% 72%' " 66% 67% 62% 43% 39% 42% 12% 13% 9% 2% 11% 1 14% 0% 9% 61% 61% 32% 64% 55% 54% 15% 68% 57% 70% 42% 26% 55% 17% . 25% 77% 55% 55% 0% 0% 0% -200% 121% $_ 195,819,213 . $ 348,757,613 $ 152,938,400 178% EL94SL'94E $ 90E'99Z'ES $ 9LS'LPO'BL $ LOVSOL -- $-L1.9999'96 SE9Z926LZ -[ ZL4'.le6 BZ. :6£9'E9teSZ 8ZL'LLS=$ BLB'L $.- OTOS - $ „T E££4 B£YSOE'4 $ £9S'491'01 $ L9SOOL. _ ,6S1 4L9'C9. 8L6'496'89 _ 9E8'£BS£Z - (1.90'9L49) -9S9'S ELD'eLL'SZ CLVOLL'SZ 46E'6O9'SZ' - 4L04609'9Z. ,-BSSYS64E ` 'SZE'9Z6'£ - .'060'LSE'LL :'OL£64 • 6429464EL 00C'CDC 17----' 099 OZ9'9 '(LBS'9014 - (ZLZ'600'1.) 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' 3AVS /dSi 0NOA 1VHSN30 ' gnumew.,�.xV.PIlP.a:aiu.i� 900Z' LE 400e19 epueleq puns SOOZ'L Nnf 9aug9q Puna' -" seaueleq pun/ ul aBuego Lew. seen/seems 6000905 9110j. . 10969 moose al tuauLAed: . spaa:nld P009 'no lelsue4 Busensdp of Jelsueq Bu9eled0 sesn/seeLno8 6upueu9 LeL110 991099094xe (lapun).14n0 sanuanal sseoK3 391n1P090Xe16101- e01Na91SeP 10101 eduenesl L0 VwO xel 9190.1 9691901y, - 199Lelul' • ledimed. (WINOS map - • ABOn019110e0 _r 0000LIMIsIP 191ueWuleno61ep1 spelold/su09l60Ld lelol ---saopNae Bulwwel6ad96un aid' -- ➢sued pOzllepa08:. " suOPn9P1sIP tl1S 000999449w'$. 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DATE: , May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Bill Hughes, Bechtel Project Manager Karl Sauer, Bechtel Construction Manager THROUGH: Hideo Sugita, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Funding Adjustment for the State Route 74 Widening Project Between 1-15 in Lake. Elsinore and 7`n Street in Perris STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve an increase of $1,807,233 to the project budget for the State Route (SR) 74 widening project between 1-15 in the city of Lake Elsinore (Lake 'Elsinore) and 7' Street in the city of Perris (Perris) from $76,446,874 to $78,254,107; and - 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The 1989 Measure A includes improvements to SR-74, 'between 1-15 in Lake Elsinore and 7' Street in Perris, , a length of .approximately 8.5 miles. The improvements realign curves and widen the existing two lance roadway to four lanes with 8 foot shoulders and a continuous 14 foot paved median. The project was split into two segments. Segment 1 is from 1-15 to Wasson Canyon Road. Segment 11 is from Wasson Canyon Road to Th Street in Perris. The project's estimated cost in the January 2000 RCTC Strategic Plan was $40.5 million. At the July 12, 2000 meeting, the Commission approved a revised budget of $51.3 million for the SR 74 1989 Measure A project. At that time the budget -was increased due to the additional cost to accelerate delivery and right-of-way costs related to environmental mitigation for the California gnatcatcher. 'Additionally, the cost to acquire required temporary construction easements was included in the overall project budget: At the May 8, 2002 meeting, the Commission approved a second budget revision which raised the estimated cost to complete the project to $69.8 million. That project cost increase was $18,515,666. The project increases were: primarily due to escalating right-of-way costs of $10,310,000; additional cost of design, construction management and roadway construction to meet Caltrans design standards of $7,050,609; and the inclusion of construction for the ` new Greenwald/Meadowbrook connection with SR-74for $1,155,057. At the September 14, 2005 meeting, the Commission approved a third budget revision which raised the estimated cost to complete the project to $76.45 million. That project cost increase was $6,599,219. Approximately one-half of the project increases' was again primarily due to escalating right of way costs, which included $273,000.,.for additional right-of-way acquisition administrative costs, $237;585 for Greenwald right-of-way acquisition costs, $1,800,000 to support settlement. of land acquisitions for the project, and an additional $1,500,000 for 'mitigation lands'..: . The remaining project increases were due to the increased 'material; labor and j equipment costs; due to;.various weather and utility relocation schedule delays. ; The SR-74 Segment II construction project is currently, scheduled to be completely open to; traffic and operational within ;the next couple of months. 'Staff Has continued to monitor the construction expenditures in comparison to the approved ._ project budget and at this time is, projecting that the construction expenditures to completion are projected to be in excess of ;the approved budget by approximately $1000,000. The projected' cost- increase is solely due to the continued escalation of the price. of materials, mainly the price per tonne for asphalt.: concrete.'' Since Hurricane Katrina,the price of asphalt has escalated from the, bid price of $40 per tonne to :a current negotiated' price of approximately $70 per tonne. The price of asphalt was a negotiated' price due to schedule impacts from., delayed utility relocations, and the rainy season during winter and spring of 2004to early 2005. , At this.,time, staff is recommending 'that. the :Commission approve,an increase to the total project, budget of $1,807,233, with $1,000,000, allocated for Segment II - construction and'.$807.,233 for' project contingency. This will increase the project budget from $76,446,874 to $.7.8,254,,107. The _Commission .previously has, entered into Agreement No. 03-31-045 with the Eastern Municipal,: Water'; District (ENIVVD) for the relocation of the EMWD,.water line as part of the construction of the. SR-74 Segment II highway widening project. Per the terms of the agreement, 'EMWD is to reimburse —the. Commission for the relocation of the EMWD water. line. Currently, the,,EMWD reimbursements are credited to the project in' the, WesternCounty Measure,A'Highway Fund. The total reimbursed -relocation costs are projected to be $1;'807,233.: • The combination of the EMWD reimbursements and the total project budget cost increase results in a net project budget of $76,446,874, representing a SO increase in the overall project. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2005/06 Amount: $1,807,233 Source of Funds: Reimbursements Budget Ad ustment: No GLA No.: 222-31-41203 P3001 222-31-81301 P3001 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \`P`tto. Date: 5/22/06 13 AGENDA ITEM 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2005 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Hideo Sugita, Deputy Executive Director THROUGH: Eric Haley, Executive Director SUBJECT: Revisions to the 1989 Measure A Local Circulation interchange Improvement Projects for the City of Riverside STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1)Approve the city of Riverside's (City) request to split the, Commission's 1989 Measure A Local Circulation Interchange (IC) project commitment of $11.758 million for the Adams Street interchange with $3.968 million going to the Van Buren interchange and $7.790 million to the La Sierra interchange projects; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to redistribute the Measure A funds betweentheLa Sierra and Van Buren interchange projects based on. the value of construction bids received. This requires the City to provide written documentation on the 'bid value to the 'Commission and this authorization cannot exceed the total amount of Measure A funds approved for these projects in the Strategic Plan; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: There are three local circulation interchange improvement projects included in the 1989 Measure A program for the city of Riverside. The interchange projects are on State Route (SR) 91 and are located at La Sierra Avenue, Van Buren•'Boulevard, and Adams Street. The only Measure A funds expended to date related to the- east bound SR-91 off ramp and auxiliary lane at Van Buren Boulevard in the amount of $2.954 million. This results in a remaining commitment of $7.616 M of Measure A funds available to the Van Buren interchange improvement project. 14 The :Measure A funds approved for the projects are: Van Buren IC Expended to Date = Balance Available = La Sierra 1C Adams IC Total Remaining Available = $10.570 M ($ 2.954 M) . $ 7.616 M $15.460 M $1 1.758 M $34.834 M,.' Attached is a letter from the City requesting that the Commission consider defunding the ,Measure A commitment for the. SR-91 Adams Street interchange project ;to assist the deliveryof the,SR-9.1 La .Sierra Avenue and the SR-91, Van Buren Boulevard interchange improvement projects. For ;your. information,' the status of,:the interchange projects is as follows: Van Buren: Wrapping up environmental (July 2006) and entering final design. Construction is anticipated in fall/winter 2007. La. Sierra:. Completed environmental and final design' anticipated to be completed ',• (August 2006). ,Construction is anticipated to begin January 2007.. Adams: No work ,undertaken;to,date. Given thedramatic increases ,in: land valuation and material costs (concrete, "steel, . asphalt, aggregate base, etc.) that impact project delivery costs,' staff' recommends that the Commission , approve the City's request.. The City requests the Commission to split ,the Adams 'Street interchange ,Measure" A commitment of $1 1.758 million 'with, $3.968, million going to the Van Buren Boulevard IC project and $7.790 million to the La Sierra Avenue IC project. If approved, the, Commission's >revised funding commitment• to •-1989 Measure A Local Circulation`Interchange: improvement projects in the City will be: ; Van Buren IC Expended to Date Balance "Available, , = From Adams IC = Revised Total for. Van Buren = $10.570 M ($ 2.954"M) $ 7.616 M $ 3.968 M $11.584 M. 15 La Sierra IC $15.460 M From Adams IC = $ 7.790 M Revised Total for La Sierra= $23.250 M Adams IC To Van Buren 1C To La Sierra IC= Revised Total for Adams $1 1.758 M ($ 3.968 M) ($ 7.790 M) $ 0.0 M Staff also recommends that the Commission authorize the Executive Director to redistribute the Measure A funds between the La Sierra and Van Buren interchange projects based on the value of construction bids received. This will require the City to provide written documentation on the bid value to the Commission, and this authorization cannot exceed the total amount of Measure A funds approved for these projects in the Strategic Plan. If approved, and given the anticipated delivery timeframes for the projects, staff expects this action to be reflected in the FY 2007-08 Commission budget. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2007/08 Amount: $11,758,000 Source of Funds: Measure A Budget Ad ustment: No GLA No.: 222-31-81301 P 3008 $3,968,000 222-31-81301 P 3014 $7,790,000 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \pii_tiiii.;01 Date: 5/22/06 Attachment: Letter from the City of Riverside 16 • A Office of the City Manager • February 9, 2006 UltffCEMVIEF) J F ..b 2 4 2006L Mr. Eric Haley, Executive Director RIVERSIDE COUNTY Riverside County Transportation Commission . TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Dear Mr. Haley: La Sierra and Van Buren Interchanges with State Route 91 As you may know, the City of Riverside is nearing completion of the construction plans for the La Sierra/State Route 91 interchange and the Environmental Assessment for the Van Buren/State Route 91 interchange will be released for public comment by March 2006. Due to the significant escalation in construction costs, both projects are now significantly underfimded and it is necessary for the City to develop a new funding strategy. I believe it is possible to fund both projects using the resources available in the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Program (TUMF) and the funds- outlined in the 1988 Strategic Plan for local interchanges within the City of Riverside. La Sierra/SR 91 Interchange In regards to the La Sierra/SR 91 interchange, the estimated construction cost, including. right of way and construction management, is now approximately $40 million. The City has secured $ .0.15 million in TUMF for the project and expects to increase the total TUMF funding to $16.675 million. The Commission hasalso previously budgeted approximately $7.6 million of the $15.26 million earmarked for the La Sierra interchange in the 1988. Strategic Plan forlocal interchanges. Assuming the Commission will be budgeting the remaining $7.66 million in the Strategic Plan, the project will have a funding shortfall of approximately $7.8 million. I anticipate that the La Sierra interchange project should be ready to advertise for construction bids no later than June 2006. All the necessary right of way will be in the City's possession by March and the 100 percent construction plans were submitted to Caltrans in early February. In September 2005, the City Council took action to confirm that the La Siena and Van Buren interchanges with SR/91 are the City's highest priorities and approved a recommendation to ask the Commission to utilize the entire $37.778 million earmarked in the 1988 Strategic Plan to fund these projects, if necessary. In my September 30, 2005 letter, I outlined the City Council action. 3900 Main Street • Riverside, CA 92522 • 951.826.5553 • www.riversideca.gerr7 75918 A.1.15.1 Consequently, the City is requesting that the Commission approve utilizing approximately $7.8 million of the $11.854 million reserved for the Adams Street interchange to complete the funding for the La Sierra/SR 91 interchange. Reconstruction of the State Route 91 interchange will complement a $14 million joint. effort by the City and County of Riverside to widen and fully improve La Sierra Avenue from SR 91 to El Sobrante Road. These projects are currently under construction and once completed, along with the freeway interchange,La Sierra Avenue will be fully improved between El Sobrante Road and Arlington Avenue., Van Buren/SR 91 Interchange The City anticipates the cost of the Van Buren interchange to be approximatelyt$35, . million- including right,'. of way and construction` Management. The Commission: has' awarded the project $10 million through the Regional TUMF call for projects_ and. . approximately $7.6 million remain in the 1988 Strategic Plan for. this interchange. Taking into consideration the $3.5 million in STIP funds that we 'anticipate willbe' approved by the California Transportation Commission, the $500,000 of remaining` CMAQ and $116'STP funds, [anticipate an approxitnate $11.8 million funding shortfall. The City is requesting the Comniission increase the Regional TUMF funding for the Van Buren' 'inm terchange. to the :.aximum• amount included in the TUMF 'Nexus Study, approximately $16.675 million after adoption of the 2005.TUMF Nexus- Study Update. In addition; we are requesting the `Commission apply the remaining $3.9 million from the Adams Street interchange to ,the Van Buren project and that the City and Commission' .continue to work together to complete the funding for Van Buren between now and Mid.. 2007 when it should be ready to advertise for construction bids.` Completion of•the Van Buren/SR 91 interchange'is critigal to'the City's plan to address. congestion on Van Buren ,=The City will.begin construction on a $16million project to widen Van Buren from SR 91''to Garfield this summer. I. anticipate Van Buren south of SR 91 will be widened to six -lanes in the near futt re.by privatedeveloprnent and/or City ; contracts .within, the next couple'of'years. In addition, the City just began designen . • $10 million• project to widen r Van Buren from the Santa 'Ana River to Jackson and' the missing segnierit between Jackson and Garfield is in the proposed" Capital lmprovement ' Program. These `city -funded improvements will be a significant addition to this .regional'• arterial roadway. By applying the funding earmarked for 'the Adams Streetinterchange to'La Sierra and. Van Buren, :the City`' understands :that no funds will be, available through the ;1988 Strategic Plan; for third ,interchange 'in Riverside' and we' wish to• work 'With the Commission toidentify 'and'secure:funding for additional interchange' improvements'in the future. • • • For your convenience, attached is a summary of the proposed funding plan for both interchanges. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me at 826-5761 or Tom Boyd at 826-5575. Sincerely, Bradley J. Hudson City Manager attachment cc: Mayor City Council Siobhan Foster Rick Bishop George Johnson 19 Interchange Funding Summary. La Sierra/SR 91 Estimated Cost Approved TUMF Regional Measure A budgeted* Ftmding shortfall Additional TUMF Available Unbudgeted Regional Measure A Development Fees Regional Measure A`(Adams St.)** Total Funding Available Van Buren/SR ,91 Estimated Cost Approved Regional TUMF Regional Measure A i STIP CMAQ STP Funding shortfall Additional TUMPAvailable Regional Measure A (Adams St.)** Funding 'shortfall; • $40 million $10.15 million $7.6 million $22.25 million $6.525 million $7.66 million $0.275 million $7..79 $40 million $35 million: $10 million $7.6 million $3.546 $0.5 $1.6 $11.854 "million $6.675 million $3.968 million $1.111 million *RCTC budget Transfer frotn ;Van Buren/SR 91'interchange. **The 1988 Strategic Plan: includes $11758 million for Adams Street/SR 91 20 I AGENDA ITEM 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Claudia Chase, Property Administrator THROUGH: • Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager SUBJECT: Corona Depot Property Sale STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-067-00 for the sale of the. Corona Depot, (.97 acres) located at 150 Depot Drive in Corona as shown on the attached map, to the city of Corona in the amount of $753,000; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3► Forward to .the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In March 1993, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, currently known as the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF); sold various parcels of land along the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Subdivision corridors to the Commission. Various contracts, leases and licenses with individuals, corporations, political bodies, companies and public utilities authorizing their use or occupancy of Santa Fe property were assigned to the Commission as a result of this transaction. Included in the assignment is the property known as the Corona Depot. In March 2005, the Commission declared the property known as the Corona Depot as surplus and authorized staff to initiate the sixty (60) day public agency notification period. During the notification period the city of Corona Redevelopment & Economic Department submitted a letter of interest in purchasing the subject property pending the appraisal. The appraisal was completed in July 2005, and the appraised value is $753,000. In September 2005, RCTC provided the executive summary of the appraisal report to, the city of Corona. The city of Corona expressed interest in doing whatever was necessary to facilitate the preservation of the Corona Depot. 21 In April, 2006, the Corona: City Council decided to pursue the acquisition of the Corona Depot including the building and property from the Commission. Attached !. is the city Of Corona's letter of acceptance. Pending Commission approval,' staff ' will work with legal counsel and the city of Corona to draft and execute.a Purchase and Sales Agreement transferring title of the Corona Depot to the City of Corona. Attachments: 1)' Assessor parcel map 2) Letter `of acceptance from the city of .Corona O cn *al A CM1 /-86S8Z VA/ 1!1 S/•H/£szEn • OCZ£Z - Y r - v9/ YYd- 6S6/d „ , H-F//£ir ?YN 9ie9/ „ • „ 6£-1£/£01lY rorr/ vile OP Ma* 0,9•81/J01 wd . spunk xuo/A2 cp,(slw/d•GS 658-9680V ! »A 1177/EY;JO NICIUM iIN MUMMD/ Mil [S°JICA1ld ®ma Moin _�� GM NITIONIA ���t m WNW?* v roI • 1 "FFiY-alt 7�` C //.. IYI•�00'Y'tlY G it 4 / a, el, -.It . dN0Y0,7. d0 .t.L/0 b+Od SONV 7 '700 3015W1A1b/.OS 'h'Od a1160170a 30/51/34l6, :vow viz!? dr, y^NOSS3SSY_ wimp MI( All IY MO w WO. IN n/(a lY N/Of VI •IIIO AWO SJ Odtleed /N7NTS7SSY VW S/ dr. Snll • 05/15/2006 16:04 95173624138 951/736-2260 951/736-2488(FAX) May 15, 2006 _Eric Haley Executive. Director Riverside County Transportation Commission Post Office Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Re: Corona Depot (APN 119-320-039): Dear Mr. Haley: At the April19, 2006, City Council meeting, staff was authorized to proceed .with the purchase; of the Corona Depot located at 150 Depot Drive, in the amount of;$753,000. The Redevelopment Agency will be acquiring the property and will work with you on the preparation of a Purchase and Sale' Agreement. I look forward to working':with you. OFFICE OF: REDEVELOPMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT REDEVELOPMENT PAGE 02/02 File No: 400 SOUTH VICENTIA AVENUE, P.O. BOX 940,- CORONA, CALIFORNIA 92878-0940 OFFICE HOURS M-F, 8:00 AM • 5:00 PM htbliwovw.discovercarene.corn cerely, 'Darla Charbonnet Redevelopment Manager 24 • AGENDA ITEM 10 RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Claudia Chase, Property Administrator THROUGH: Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager SUBJECT: Lamb Canyon Property Conveyance to Caltrans STAFF RECOMMENDATION - This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the conveyance of property acquired for the Lamb Canyon project to Caltrans; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the conveyance documents; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION In November of 1992, the Commission approved a contract with Riverside County Real Property Services for right of way acquisition services for the State Route (SR) 79 Lamb Canyon Measure A highway improvement project. The project limits were from 1' Street in the city of: Beaumont to the San Jacinto River Crossing at Sanderson. The project was completed in February 1997. During a review of all properties owned by the Commission, it was noted that properties related to this project were not conveyed to Caltrans upon completion of the project.' A cooperative agreement between the Commission and Caltrans was lacking the details of the property transfer. The purchases were made in -the Commission's name and never transferred to Caltrans. The length of time since the original transactions has added complexities for all parties involved. Epic Land Solutions was asked to review the acquisition files for securing right of way for Lamb Canyon (SR-79), and convey the right of way to Caltrans: After auditing the files and working with Caltrans to determine the parameters for the transfer, both Caltrans and the Commission are ready to complete the transaction. . The final step is to convey the SR-79 properties to Caltrans. 25 AGENDA ITEM 1 1 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and implementation Committee FROM: Claudia .Chase, Property Administrator THROUGH: Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager SUBJECT: Madison Station Grounds Sale to the City of Riverside STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-065-00 for the sale of the former Madison Station Grounds, (4.15 acres) located on Railroad Avenue between Madison Street and Jefferson Avenue in Riverside as shown on the attached map, to the city of Riverside in the amount of $1,070,000; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel . review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In March 1993, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, currently known as the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF), sold various parcels of land along the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Subdivision corridors to the Commission. Included in this sale is the property known as the former Madison Station Grounds. In October 2005, the Commission declared the property known as the former Madison Station Grounds as surplus and authorized staff to initiate the sixty (60) day public agency notification period. During the notification period, on November 15, 2005, the city of Riverside provided the Commission a letter indicating its intention to purchase the property, pending the appraisal. The appraisal was completed in December 2005, and the appraised value is $1,070,000. In February 2006, the Commission provided the executive summary of the appraisal report to the city of Riverside. Following its review of the appraisal report, the city of Riverside submitted to the Commission a letter accepting the terms of the appraisal and sale of the property. 26 230--.z5 NAOISON - w� ..wr.n,w .. POR C177 OF RIVERSIDE (AL. 9 /. LANDS — T.© RSRI •. 9• -STREET y0EPD► ST4 si�N/Ee sz ,,. • - • SI O l• « ' ., « 0 0 CART STREET NJISIOt• deril ARON* reavn� cL sr�e.w rerr RM..WI� estivn wal Ny IPM; RR9//31 . . . /1/7l RY_ I . a.17%.asra m� mal^�cs o =..cs Claudia Chase`` Property Administrator. RiversideCounty Transportation Commission P.O.120081 Riverside, CA 92502=2208 Re` Madison Station Surplus Properties APNs 230-233-013, 230-245-013, 230-245-015,`and 230-253-01,0; We have received acopy of the Executive Summary Report for the above referenced parcels. Please be advised that the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Riverside is definitely interested in purchasing the properties and,accept this letter as our writtenTesponse Please call me to discuss proceeding to the next step in getting this purchase underway. I look forward, to working with you on this transaction. . Sincerely, au zet: ' Amelia M. Vailu'uE, SRNVA Real Property Manager Cc: John' Curts, Redevelopment Area AMV 2/24/06 G:1Rea1 Property1DOCSTard4106-4-004.1bdac 3900 Moen Street • Riverside, CA 92522 •'951.826.5649 • Fox 951.826.5744 • www:rwersideco.gov AGENDA ITEM 12 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION - DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Claudia Chase, Property Administrator THROUGH:. Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager SUBJECT: Approval of Agreement No. 06-5.1-063-00 with Caltrans for the Exchange of Property Related to the San Jacinto Branch Line . STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-51-063-00 with Caltrans for the exchange of property related to the San Jacinto Branch Line (Parcels 7723-1, 7731-1-A, and 7731-2 and Parcel 7724-01-05); 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute.the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In March 1993, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company (ATSF), currently known as the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF), sold the 38: mile San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) to the Commission. Between 1992 and 1994, Caltrans relocated less than a mile of the SJBL rail right of way for the construction of 1-215; the rail line was moved from the east side of 1-215 to the west side in an area near Alessandro Blvd. The relocation of the SJBL resulted in remnant parcels both north and south of Alessandro along the "Old I-215" rail right of way. The Commission's property management consultant, Epic Land Solutions, recommended that the remnant . parcels be disposed of in three phases. In September 2004, the Commission authorized the disposal of Phase 1 (map is attached), which resulted in the surplus of approximately 13 acres north of Alessandro Blvd. in the unincorporated area of the county of Riverside. This property is currently in escrow. In March 2005, the Commission authorized the exchange of the properties in Phase 2 (map is attached), which will result in the transfer of parcels south of Alessandro and east of the 1-215 from the Commission to the March Joint Powers Authority (JPA). In return, March JPA will convey to the Commission the :new rail right of 30 way, located on the west side: of the I-215 on which the rail line is currently operating. The exchange of, these parcels is currently in escrow. The disposition of the balance of the "Old 1-215" rail right of way, or Phase 3 of the .property exchange, is the subject of this .agenda item. , In phase 3, the Commission will convey to Caltrans the parcels No. 7723-1, 7731-1-A, 7731=2 for future highway projects (i.e., the widening of the Cactus Avenue interchange):- In { return Caltrans will convey parcel 7724-01-05 to the Commission, .which is 'the new right• of .way north :of Alessandro, west of the 1-215, and the. SJBL currently occupies. .The legal description and plat map will, serve as documentation for the right of way. Attached:are the.I-215 Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3 transaction maps and a.draft of Agreement No. 06-51-063-00 which includes legal descriptions and plat maps '. • for Phase '3. Attachments: 1) 1=215 Phase 1 map . 2);': ` 1-215 Phase 2 map ., 3► ` ,1-215"Phase 3 map 4) Draft Agreement`'No. 06-51-063-00 31 • I-215 Pending Transactions San Jacinto Branch Line (today) ■ CALTRANS m March JPA • March JPA m RCTC . ■ RCTC m Marc6 7PA ▪ RCTC m CALTRANS . CALTRANS m RCTC Potential RCTC Surplus Property = Phase 1 Proposed ROW Boundary - m .mow M nm• Epic Land Solutions, Inc. O Oa Al am cal 96. O no Cn IMO 020 A "en 1�1 m.rwrr�w-w 32 1-215 Pending Transactions Legend . CALTRAM to MardtJPA MarchJPA to RCTC ® RCTC to Mach 7PA ▪ ROTC to CALTRANS ANS ® , CALTRANS to RCTC • Potential RCTC Surplus Property Proposed ROW Boundary' MEE =pi s 1 rill' ,r;Isii4 4 ®_ ,�111_$I1j18 1 B II 1d1 YtSivLossul rw 2-1t, 440 bet. xis TI � �9At rill IY r i � D� r AI/tt tYlt r+7i�i,.� ai am. A OHO tl1 w AAI➢i Pti YYY s r'/94er�, lii1 � .��y�ig1aie�1 Yq CE1AYY�I�YY® in . 310 C0° tltiA SMIR M 6 usa'IHoat to 111111It_ = HIM 1 Nil Alessandro Blvd 1 `Epic Land Solutions, Inc.-, o AM to ya -2,030 33 a�atta[1 Ms IM aq�te - ,74 & TI �0o 1 t®mEsa PHASE'3 swap w/ Ca!trans San Jacinto Branch Line (today) Legend 111 CALTRANS to March JPA . March JPA to RCTC ®- RCTC to Much NA ▪ RCre to cALTRANs ® cALTRANs to Rcrc • Pateuhzd RCTC Stuplus Property — ProposedROW_Bonodary I-215 Pending Transactions 5 `i110 �fiktus Leilli1111111 Old 1-215 Frontage r,nn„ �.rC�jl#IIAA� 91111 -r - r I� �l�1ni�-�� Epic Land Solutions, Inc., o m m t,n au ems.. P9 "° aq 1Me .'"r.:7 'wr.S.w'Cw°""...�"9.r.. 34 AGREEMENT FOR EXCHANGE OF PROPERTIES THIS AGREEMENT FOR EXCHANGE OF PROPERTIES ("Agreement") is dated for convenience and reference as of , and is entered by and between RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION,.a public agency of the State of California,:- ("RCTC'), and THE STATE .OF CALIFORNIA ACTING BY AND • THROUGH ITS :-,DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ("STATE"), `. (collectively, "Parties"). • RECITALS RCTC desires to convey, to State all of RCTC's right, title and interest in certain properties and State desires to convey. to 'RCTC .all of State's right, title and interest .in: a. certain property: € . (collectively, Properties) as; follows:" 1..RCTC desires to convey to ,State three real properties in the County of Riverside,. State of '= California, described and shown on California. Department of Transportation Exhibit "A", :; attached hereto, and identified as Parcel Numbers 7723-1, 7731=1-A, and:7731-2. 2. State` desires • to coney to RCTC :a certain property in the ,County of Riverside, State of r California, described and shown'on California Department of Transportation's Exhibit "A", attached hereto; and identified as Parcel Number 7724-01-05. 3. The Parties desire to exchange the Properties upon terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement. ' 4. The Parties intend for this, agreement' to fulfill the requirements of each, of them under Agreement No. 484280,'.: dated November 15 1990 between.,State and the Atchison Topeka Santa • Fe Railway Company.("Santa Fe", RCTC'spredecessor in interest), without in any way affecting Caltrans'I independent, ongoing and perpetual' obligations: under Agreement No. 184280. • NOW; THEREFORE,. in consideration of the above facts and' of the covenants and. agreements • contained herein, the Partiesjhereto agree that: 1. Terms of exchange The properties shall be exchanged without payment to either party. RVPUBIELB\679104.1 • 2. Title and Escrow. Immediately after execution and delivery of this Agreement by State and RCTC, the Parties shall proceed as follows regarding title matters and escrow holding: 2.1. An executed copy of this Agreement shall be delivered to First American Title Company, ("First American") for escrow opening. First American shall provide title and escrow services to both Parties. Fees for escrow and title services shall be shared equally by the Parties. Epic Land Solutions, Inc., ("Epic") shall coordinate the escrow services for both Parties. 2.2. First American shall issue preliminary title reports for each of the Parties' respective property conveyances. The reports shall include legible copies of all documents, whether recorded or unrecorded, referred to in the Report and a color coded map plotting all easements disclosed by the Report. Within twenty days following receipt of the last of the copies of the exceptions described in the Report, the Parties shall notify each other of their satisfaction of the title condition. If there are any objections to the title condition, the Parties will use best efforts to cause such matters to be removed or, to obtain such endorsements from the Title Company as may insure the Parties' intended use for the Properties. 2.3. To transfer the property from RCTC to Caltrans, First American shall prepare a quit claim. deed for execution and delivery by RCTC to First American; to transfer the property from Caltrans to RCTC, Caltrans shall prepare, execute, and deliver to First American, subject to the approval of the Califomia Transportation Commission, a good and sufficient Director's Deed. First American shall record the executed deeds in the Official Records of the County Recorder of Riverside County, California and, if elected by either party, issue title insurance polices. The party that elects to insure the title of the property conveyed to them shall bear the expense of said title insurance. 2.4. The parties will utilize their best efforts to ensure that Escrow closes on or before 120 days after escrow has been opened, but in no event later December 31, 2006. If Escrow is not in a condition to close by such date, then it will close as soon thereafter as all of the conditions described herein have been satisfied or waived. RVPUB1ELB1679104.1 Page 2 of 3 36 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have executed this Agreement as of the date above. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION: APPROVED AS TO FORM:.. RVPUBIELB1679104;1 37 APPROVAL RECOMMENDED: APPROVED AS TO FORM: • EXHIBIT "A-3" Parcel No. 7731-1-A, together with Parcel No.7731-2 Parcel No. 7731-1-A: That portion of that certain parcel of land as conveyed to Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (formerly California Southern Railroad Company) by deed recorded January 23, 1888, in Book 69, page 91 of Deeds, in the office of the County Recorder :of San Bernardino County, California, acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, described as Parcel No. 14 in instrument No. 191848, recorded May 10, 1994 in the Office of the County Recorder of Riverside County, California, located in Sections 14, 15 and 23 all of Township 3 South, Range 4 West, SAN BERNARDINO '..:rfw.X..t.`;, :n the County .of Riverside, State of California, according to the Official Plat thereof, described as follows: COMMENCING at the Northeast corner of said Section 15, marked by a 1-112 inch. brass disc, stamped "R1VCO SUR-1985-SEC COR"; thence along the North fine of said Section 15, North 89° 52' 19" West, 1,461.68 feet to the Easterly Railway "right of way line of above said deed; thence along said Easterly Railway right of way line, South 19° 23' 12" East, 2678.25 feet to the intersection of the westerly prolongation of the North line of that certain parcel of land acquired by the United States of America by Decree of Taking, a -certified copy of which was recorded March 2, 1942, in Book 532, page 311, Official Records of Riverside County, and by Decree on Amended Declaration of Taking, a certified copy of which was recorded February 2.4, 1943, in Book 571, page 236, Official Records of Riverside County, with the Westerly right of way line of that certain parcel of land acquired by the State of California (State Route 215), as Parcel No. 35 in Decree of Condemnation, a certified copy of which was recorded May 18, 1943, in Book 580, page 327, Official Records of Riverside County; thence continuing along said Easterly Railway right of way line and said Westerly right of way line (State Route 215), South 19° 23' 12 East, 82.79 feet to the POINT Old' BEGIMING; thence, Course "A", continuing along said Easterly Railway right of way line, South 19° 23' 12" East, 3383.10 feet to the beginning of a non -tangent curve eoneave southwesterly, having a radius of 1,960.00 feet; thence northwesterly along said curve from a tangent bearing of North 22° 31' 48" West, through a central angle of 3 54' 34", an arc length of 133.74 feet; thence North 19° 23' 02" West, 597.79 feet; thence North 20° 44' 22" West, 956.60 "feet to the beginning of a curve, concave southwesterly, having a radius of 797.00 feet; thence northwesterly along said curve through a central angle of 22° 05' 24", an are length of 307.28 feet to the Westerly Railway right of way (continued) F�ibit "A-3" Pace I of 6 Pared No. 7731-1-A: (cont.) line of above said deed, said line being parallel with and 100.00 feet southwesterly measured at ,:oht 9neea in the above mentioned Course "A"; thence along said Westerly Railway right of way line, North 19° 23' 12" West, 1508.35 feet to the beginning of a inn -tangent curve,. , concave northeasterly, having a radius of 875.00 feet; thence southeasterly -along said carve, from a -tangent bearing of South 56°33'30" East, through a central angle of 9°47'09", an arc length of 149.44 feet to the said Easterly Railway right of way line ,and the POINT OF. BEGINNING. This'. conveyance: is made for the purpose of a freeway and the grantor liereby, releases and relinquishesto the grantee any and .all abutter's rights, including " access rights, appurtenant ro grantor 's'"remaining property, in and to said freeway. AND ALSO the grantor' hereby releases and relinquishes to the ,grantee any and ail abutter's' rights of access„appurtenant to grantor's remaining property in and to said freeway over and across,`.the follo►ving described line: Parcel No. 7731-'t.: BEGINNING at the Southerly terminus of said Course "A" of hereinabove described parcel; thence South 19° 23' 12": East, 2,119.03 feet to the Northerly te.r hints of Line 2 as. described in Document recorded October 1,1982, as Instrument No.170248, Official Records of Riverside County. The bearings ao d distances' used in the above description are, on the California Coordinate System of 1927; Zone VI.: Multiply ditstanees 'shown by 110000702 to obtain ground level :distances. Rio-215-(34.7-35.90731(7731,1-A, 7731-2) This real property descriprurn has been prepared by tare, or under rriy direction, in conformance with,the Professional Land Surveyors Aci._ I - p� ty DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE POST NUMBER. 08 HIV 215 34.7-35.9 Parcel No.7731-1-A' Porcel No.7731-2 �\ �4 •-FD.1-1/2" BRASS DISK. \� NORTH LINE SECTION 15 1. STAMPED "RIV CO SUR • LAL€SSANDRO 1 � `.�_�_ BOULEVARDIQ, 11 1985 - SEC COR" N89 52 19 W 1461.68 ""T5/ 14 I I I 1 ' I1_ 1 E---t-'i 1 `---FdINT OF \\\ ALEsSANORO TRACT " t 8E0'0 IN OK.bj P6.13 OF NAPS i 1 REO's OF SAN BORNAROINO COUNTY \` v I COMMENCEMENT .,, �, \\ �\. 04 �l 47' 1, �� Rai' `1a� t-' �' \\ r '� oa 4, '3 > lt cfle C, c�, a . C.'2 1 .0 1. � i --,4i19 lP \� pW'�---- f m N ', N�e • m '" �\\ �� mf nto co f' q p' P 9 • S`` ` • 1`ry n , �, - REF.INFO.: DIST. *08, R/W MAP 451200-2,-3,-5 O _P A = 0911.41 R = 875.001 L = 119.44' Allognor 14 S19°23112HE 82.79' a SEE SHEET 3 OF 4 Ate, cc - t 0g 0 - }_ - ✓ 1 N O. D �• e• WV• O 4-. Y � m D C_ C O Y rr-• U^O O N O 02 L • o -coV u � ov c> c•- C �� �O tV O L O L NGn t O N O 4 0 Ol O�OO. N O - cuo.- LV•In L =CL 4 Y- C z0O o— POINT OF BEGINNING EXHIBIT "B" STATE OF CALIFORNIA BUSINESS AND TRANSPORTATION AGENCY' DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION; EXHIBIT "A" PLAT PARCEL No's. 7731-1-A & 7731-2 SCALE: 1 "=400' DATE: MAY 2006 SHEET 2 OF 4 )obit "A-3" Page 4 of 6 I% SEE SHEET 2 OF 4 r 33�17` '(il O CFI ` nO N. • ...I.p f cD :2 mO 9 o1 y -. o so O ,a l A y u' California, os Parcel No. 35 In Decree of Condemnation, a certified copy of which recorded May 18,1943 in Dk.580,pg.327 0 O.R. OF Riv, Co., also being the Easterly u+ RFD of A.T. 33.F. Railway, as recorded Jan.'23,1888,1n Bk.69,pg.91 �+ , 15 14 POINT OF DISTRICT 1 COUNTY ROUTE POST NUMBER 08 RIV BEGINNING CACTUS Westerly Right of Way line of that certain AVENUE; parcel of land ocquired by the State of - R i vers'kie, County 215 34.7-35.9 Parcel No.7731-1-A Parcel No.7731-2 Transportation Commission': Railway ,Right of Way Tranfer to The: State of California PARCEL No. NO R Q T L r ( 1960.00' 3°54'34" 66.89' 133,74' 0 797.00' 22°05'24" 155.57' 307.28'. O 875.00' 9°47'09" ,74.90' 149.44' SZW ��1 /4 SR.4 C, 1 �4' T JJ .S .1 ♦ . 4. s.a,M. COURSE • ''A" EXHIBIT STATE OF'CALIFORNIA , BUSINESS AND TRANSPORTATION -AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF%TRANSPORTATION EXHIBIT "A" PLAT ?. PARCEL 'Nos. 7731.-1-k&.773t-�' Maim Phibit "A-3" age 5 of 6 SCALE: f "=400'' DATE: MA 2006 SHEET 3. OF '''4 SEE SHEET 3 OF 4 Southerly Terminus COURSE "A°1 MSTMCT 08 COUNTY RIV ROUTE 215 POST 34.7-35.9 NUMBER Parcel No.7731-1-A` Parcel No7731-2 Riverside Caunty • Trarnsportat i on 7.COrnrp i ss i on •Ra i Tway R'i ght of Way • Relinguish,Access Rights to the State- of Cali fora i a Northerly terminus of. Line,2 of Parcel<'No.6894-1 per deed rec.. Oct..1 1982,As Inst. No.170248. O.R. Of Riverside' County. gW 3 ": LOT 3 W [4'1J RESUBD1YISIDN DF^ALESSANDRO RECORDED:IN BOOK '1S; PAGES 16-1/ OF MAPS RECORDS OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY . N'LY LINE OF PARCEL'1N,6898=1 PER DEED RECORDED SEPT.2,1983 AS INST.N0.180614, O.R. OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY STATE OF CAL IFORNIA BUSINESS AND TRANSPORTATION 'AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION!' EXHIBIT "A" PLAT. PARCEL NOs. 77,31-1_-A &`7731-1. DATE: AMY" 2006 AFticbibit "A-3" age 6 of 6 EXHIBIT "A" PARCEL No. 7724-01-05 That portion of the West Half of Section 10, Township 3 South, Range 4 West, SAN BERNARDINO BASE AND MERIDIAN, in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, according to the Official Plat thereof, described as follows: COMMENCING at a' 2" iron pipe with brass disk stamped "1/4 COR 10/15 T3S R4W SBM" marking the South Quarter corner of said Section 10, thence along the South line of said Section 10, South 89° 53' 09" West, 762.11 feet; thence North Cr 06' 51" West, 40.00 feet to the North line of Alessandro Boulevard (142.00 feet in width) and the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence Course ."A from a • tangent which bears North 3° 36' ' 54" West, northeasterly along a non -tangent. curve, concave easterly, having a radius of 1960.00 feet, through a central angle of . 18° 14' 09", an arc length of 623.82 feet; thence Course "B", North 14° 37' 15" East, 492.34 feet to the beginning of a curve, concave westerly, having a radius of 1860.00 feet; thence Course "C", northeasterly along last said curve, through a central angle of 15° 13' 52", an arc length of 494.45 feet; .thence Course "D", North 0° 36' 37" West, 2076.96 feet to the beginning of a curve, concave westerly,having a radius of 5950.00 feet; thence Course "E", northerly along last said curve, through a central' angle of 9° 56' 57", an arc length of 1033.19 feet; thence North 10°- 33' 34" West; 185.80 feet to the Westerly line of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway right of way (100.00 feet in width), as acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission described as Parcel No. 11 by Instrument No.. 191848, recorded May 10, 1994 in the Office of the Recorder of said County, said Westerly line being the Easterly line of Parcel 4 of Parcel Map No. 17607, as shown on map recorded in Book 99 page 13 of Parcel Maps, in the Office of the Recorder of said County, distant southerly along said Easterly line, a distance of 20.02 feet from the Northeasterly corner of said Parcel 4; thence along said Railway right of way and southerly along a non - tangent curve, concave northeasterly, having a radius .of 2961.60 feet, from a tangent which bears South 12° 22' 53" East, through a central angle of 7° 00' 47", an arc length of 362.50 feet; thence South 19° 23' 39" East,-308.17 feet to the Northwest corner of Parcel No. 12 of above said Instrument and the -beginning of a non -tangent (continued) 44 PARCEL No. 7724-01-05 cont. curve, 'concentric with Course "E" as described above, having la radius of 6050.00 feet; thence southerly along last said concentric curve, from a tangent which bears South 6° 00' 52" East, through a central angle of 5° 24' 15", an arc length;of 570.64 feet to a dine parallel with and distant easterly 100.00 feet ;•from Course "13" -as described above; thence along said parallel line, South 0 36' 37" East,.2076.96 feet:to the beginning of a•curve, concentric with Course "C" as described„above, having .a -radius of 1960.00 feet; thence, southwesterly along last said concentric curve through a central angle of 15°,.13' 52", an arc length of 521.03 feet .to a line parallel withand distant southeasterly 100.00 feet from Course "B" as described above; 'thence along last said parallel line, South 14° 37' :15" -West, 492.34.feet to the beginning of a curve, concentric with Course "A" as described above, having a radius of 1860.00 feet; thence southwesterly along last saidi concentric curve through a central angle of 18° 25' 28", • an arc length of S98.11 feeeto the North line .of said .Alessandro Boulevard;, thence along . said North line, South 89 53' 09" i'Vest, 100.20 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. There shall_ be no abutter's. rights .of access appurtenant to 'the, above -described real. property in and to the, adjacent State .freeway .and said property is 'subject to special assessrueats,,if,any,,restrictions, reservations and.easements of:record „ = , The bearings and. distances used in the above description. are on. the California Coordinate System of 1927, 7,one VI. Multiple distances shown by 1.0000702 to obtain ground level distances. 08-Riv-215-36 07 6-7724;01=05 (7724-2,, 7725-2, 8047-1,`8052-2) This real property description has been. prepared by me, or gander my. direction, In conformmice with 01 Professional Land Surveyors Act. Signature Date . #A AND G. Es * EXP.124i-07 No. 7517 j of CA1-�� 17 .45 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE POST MILE PARCEL NUMBERS 08 RIV 215 36.5-37.6. DD007724-01-05 I ��,• �-p O� �2 �.�s EA_ST_RI_DGE 1I 1 SEE SHEET No. 4 SEE SHEET No. 3 • i r— \ 1 •i1 I i SEE SHEET No: 2 1 ALESSANDRO• 1 ©\o'S � REF.INFO. : DIST. #08 RAI MAP 451200-9,10,11 EXHIBIT 113" VICINITY MAP FOR DEPICTION OF EXHIBIT `�A" — EUCAL YPTUS AVE. 1 1 1 1 DRACAEA AVE. COTTONWOOD y AVENUE DIRECTOR'S DEED PAR. 007724-01-05 SEE DETAILS ON Ay SHEETS 2, 3 AND 4 AVE• s STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION VICINITY MAP FOR DIRECTOR'S DEED DD007724-01-05 SCALE: N.T.S. DATE: JAN. 20061 OF 4 EET No. 4ti DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE POST MILE PARCEL NUMBERS 'f \0 eO o` \\' iA ' 5. ,h MATCH LINE DIRECTOR'S DEED PAR. 007724-01-05 POINT OF BEGINNING ; NORTH JANE ALESSANDRO BLVD N 08 RIV 215 36.5737.6 DD007724-01-05 SEE_ SHEET No. S 100'.4 Q SOUTH LINE / SECTION 10 HIBIT ALESSANDRO REF:IRF DEED PLAT FOR DEPICTION OF EXHIBIT "A ' 1 I 0 \,1-- \-0 /1 pC� . ... • z i 1 i N • , " =300' 2 I.P. W/BRASS DISK STAMPED "1/4 COR 10Y15 T3S, R4W SBM";;MARK) NG THE S.I/4. COR. SEC: "10 POINT OF COMMENCEMENT 40.00et� �� y1 �Op936 'D' a3 0 1 40 5\�jfi SS , DIST. #OB R/W MAP 451200-9,10,11 SCALE: 1" -=300' S89°53'09"W. .<762.11' STATE DEPARTMENT. OF TRANSPORTATION. D=IR'ECTOR`'S. D.E�ED` = PLAT � ` ppoo7724=01-45 • DATE: J AN,. 2006;; SHEET No. 2 , OF s 5" :, fT No. 4 dEE SHEET. No. 2 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE POST MILE' " PARCEL NUMBERS 08 I RIV LINES—� COTTONWOOD ... _...._.._.._... _ - AVENUE 215 36.5-37.6IDD007724-01-05 EXHIBIT "B" DEED PLAT FOR DEPICTION OF EXHIBIT "A" DIRECTOR'S DEED PAR. 007724-01-05 STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION DIRECTOR'S DEED PLAT DD007724-`01-05- SCALE: REF.INFO: toe RAY MAP .451200-9,10,11 1 "=300' DATE: JAN. 2006 SHEET No. 3 OF 4 DISTRICT. COUNTY ROUTE POST MILE .PARCEL NUMBERS DEED PLAT FOR DEPICTION OFF -EXHIBIT A" AVENUE .&\s W._ �o DIRECTOR'S DEED o'.0, PAR. 007724-01-05 REF,INFO. : DIST. u08 08 RIV; 215 36.5-37.6 DD007724-01-05, XHIBIT f 0 CORNER . \I„:[� SECTIONS 10/3 secTloN LINE_ EUCALYPTUS AVENUE; K 011 It'LY RAY-RIV.CO.TRANS.CONN. AR. 11 PER INST. 4 191848 REC. NAY 10, 1994, O.R. 1 n !w y� Ch i•n 1 F O`c� ' 1 1m LIn 1 ? n 1 �A�G�v 1 \ c pN '� 1 N.E. COR.� °1r QA�G�D�'' 1 -PARCEL 4 1 L ;1P � qq i 1. . ,0. 1 /0 I. :4'' N10°33' 34"IY j` 1 185.80' 1 1 1 1 p / 11 . \1 QA 14\- 1 1 1 /.- ; 4a ,-,519°23'39"E G.-- , • 308.17' In re) `� • �o �,�56 0552E m J Ait .4 • I e+„4 .. 1• A = 7°00' 47" R 2961.60'' L = 362.50' "NATCWILINE100' RAY MAP 451• 20049,10,11 1 •rs_ SEE 'SHEET No. 5 P 1 l a ! ! Trati6-6- _ ILt�-EN.4tg ,1 STATE :DEPARTMENT .OF:TRANSPORTATION DIREP OR'S :DEED, PL .DD 007 7'24 SCALE: . 1 =300' DATE: :1AN. 2006; ` AGENDA ITEM 13 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE:. May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief. Financial Officer SUBJECT: Proposed Budget Fiscal Year 2006/07 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive input on the Proposed Fiscal Year (FY) 2006/07 budget; 2) Close the public hearing to receive input on the Proposed Budget for FY 2006/07 on June 14, 2006; 3). Adopt the proposed budget for FY2006/07; and 4) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The annual fiscal budget is the result of Commission staff determining the operating and capital needs for FY 2006/07 and identifying the resources to fund those needs. The budget process began in January 2006. The goals and objectives approved by the Commission on March 8, 2006 were the basis of this budget. The goals and objectives considered during the preparation of the budget relate to mobility initiatives, goods movement, improved system efficiency, environmental stewardship, economic development, intermodalism and accessibility, and public and agency communications. On May 10, 2006, staff presented the proposed budget to the Commission. Subsequent to that presentation, staff updated the document as a result of the following changes: • An increase of $21,100 in the Commission's contribution for dental and vision insurance, which replaces the dental/vision reimbursement plan. • A decrease in interest income of $500 is a result of the increase in fringe benefit expenditures. A public hearing to allow for public comment on the proposed budget, as revised, is required prior to the adoption of the proposed budget. The public hearing was opened at the May. 10, 2006 Commission meeting and will continue to the June 14, 2006 Commission meeting. After the public hearing is closed on June 14, 2006, adoption of the Proposed Budget for FY 2006/07 will follow. In accordance 50 with the Commission's' fiscal policies, the budget must be adopted no dater than !; June 15 of each year. Attached is the 'Proposed Budget for FY 2006/07.. This .document contains the executive summary; as revised, that was presented at the May 10, 2006 Commission meeting; the Gann Appropriation Limit; the guiding policies related to the preparation of the budget; a summary of the budget process; fund budgets; details : of program revenues and other sources, personnel costs, and {debt;. department budgets; a community profile; and appendices including a ;glossary of acronyms, funding definitions, and program/general terms. A summary of the Proposed Budget for FY 2006/07 is as follows; FY 2006/07 Budget Revenues and other financing sources: Sales taxes -Measure A and LTF Reimbursements (federal, state, and other) TUMF State Transit Assistance Other revenues Interest on investments Commercial paper proceeds Transfers in Total revenues and other financing sources Expenditures and other financing uses: Personnel salary and fringe benefits Professional services Support services Projects and operation's Capital outlay Debt service (principal; interest and costs of issuance) Transfers out Total expenditures and other financing uses Excess (deficiency)_ of revenues and .other financing. sources over (under) expenditures and other financing uses Beginning fund balance Ending, fund balance'' Attachment:. FY 2006/07 Proposed Budget 51 167,122,400 19,707,800 42,000,000 6,924,300 3,648,600 12,499,000 80,000,000 83,053,100 '414,955,200 4,636,300 7,781,806 2,397,000 ;348,655,100 695,000 .- 39578,000 ; 83053,100 486,796,300 " 1(71,841,100) 310406,800 ,;238,565,700 • • Fr 2006►071 BUDGET 52 Honorable Commissioners Riverside: County Transportation Commission Riverside, California FY 2006/07 Budget Introduction Riverside County (County) is certainly on the move in more ways than one. Its > population is booming, doubling in size in the last 15 years and recently surpassing two million. The County's economy is seeing unprecedented levels of housing growth and value appreciation. Employers are also taking notice, and the area is becoming a leader in California in terms of recent job creation. It's an exciting and dynamic environment that combines a boom town economy in an area with significant natural appeal with mountains, deserts, unique: habitat areas, and natural beauty. Not surprisingly, this can lead to "a number of challenges. The impact of growth on transportation is =enormous,, and the 'Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) is workingto respond to the County's transportation needs while also protecting and safeguarding; the ,environment andquality of life for. area families. In doing so; the Commission is working to keep people moving at a similar pace ;of the :: . County's economy., Currently, highwayconstruction; is taking . place at a 'variety of locations throughout Riverside' County. '''• This includes the widening of State Route (SR) 74:near Perris and - Lake Elsinore, the reconstruction of the SR-60/SR-91/Interstate (I) 215 in downtown Riverside, the widening of 'SR-60 in Mira Loma, the widening of Highway 111 in Indio, and the construction of anew interchange at 1-15 and Cantu-Galleano. Rancho Road 'in the: northwestern,. portion' of the County. The upshot of these projects is better mobility for the County's residents and 'businesses as well as the creation of thousands of jobs " and economic opportunities All of this is taking place due to previous decisions by the: Commission and by every local jurisdiction in the County that includes the Riverside County Board of Supervisors and 24 separate. city .councils. The actions of the government bodies in the western Riverside: County (Western County) and Coachella Valley areas of the County have led to the establishment of transportation development fees to mitigate the; congestion impacts of new development in each of these areas. The establishment of 'successful, partnerships with other levels of; government: is especially important to the success of the Commission's mission. While the relationship with local jurisdictions has been effective, the need for having; the state of Califomia (State) as a funding partner continues to be an elusive goal. Fiscal Year (FY) 2005/06 marked one of the only times • that Proposition 42 was fully funded andimplemented; r. and the good news is that it will likely be implemented and funded:. in FY 2006/07. °. However, the State must continue to make; additional investments in transportation in a predictable manner, and 'a focus on goods movement -related "infrastructure would be. most helpful to 'Riverside County. During 2006 the Legislature and the Governor will ; • • • consider the approval of a comprehensive infrastructure bond; depending on the details of the proposal, the additional funding will be most welcome. Since the original approval in 1988 of Measure A which became effective July 1, 1989 (1989 Measure A), the local half -cent sales .tax has become the primary source of funding for new transportation projects in Riverside County. As funding from the federal and state governments remains uncertain and is even likely to decline, the local sales tax program becomes increasingly important. Voter action in November 2002 ensures the replacement of the 1989 Measure A program when it expires in 2009 with a new 30 year program (2009 Measure A). that will continue funding improvements until June 2039. Current Responsibilities During FY 2006/07, the Commission will spend $403,743,200 on a wide variety of projects and services. This funding level includes several high -profile projects, including the final design of the SR-60/I-215 East Junction high occupancy vehicle lanes connector, the Mid County Parkway .environmental study and right of way acquisition, SR-79 realignment study and right of way acquisition, transportation improvements .in the Coachella Valley, Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension project engineering and right of way . acquisition, strategic . partnership efforts, and parking improvements at commuter rail stations in Riverside and Corona. Additionally, the Commission will continue to fund Measure A efforts and programs that are constructed and offered by cities and local transit providers. The Commission's status is somewhat unique in Southem California. As many transportation agencies have consolidated functions and grown in size, the Commission remains true to the original intent of the state legislation that created it. We serve as the County's primary transportation planning and funding agency and have not taken on additional : responsibilities such as .operating transit services. As - a . result, the Commission maintains productive relationships with other agencies as part of its planning and funding role. For example„ Measure A pays for a. score of lesser -known projects that are extremely important to local residents. More than $58,318,300 will be returned to local cities and the County for local streets and roads needs. In addition to local tumback :funding, Measure A provides funding for many regional street and road projects, and funds the improvement of major arterial streets in the Coachella Valley_ The Commission also receives and programs funding from state and federal sources. This includes the state's Transportation Development Act programs that are allocated primarily to the County's major publictransit providers. Measure A also contributes to the public transit cause by funding transit fare discounts and transit programs for senior citizens and persons with disabilities:. Another Measure A effort is a .Commuter Assistance program that provides ridesharing assistance to employers and commuters. Looking Toward the Future; The focus of FY,2006/07 and for many years thereafter will be project delivery. While'` Riverside Countyis already the site of a number of large transportation projects; many; more are on -the' near -term horizon. A number of current planning efforts. will soon become construction "projects. This is especially true of the many Western County ` Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee funded projects that are currently in 'various '. phases of environmental clearance, planning; and right-of-way acquisition. This will also be true of goods movement projects such as the construction of railroad grade separations. that are necessary in a variety of locations in Riverside County. The;: passage of the federal transportation bill known as SAFETEA-LU'provides the County,` with $31 million in federal funding for grade separations. The Commission; has already, allocated the vast majority of these dollars, and projects will be ready to construct most specifically in Coachella, 'Riverside, and Banning. With continued participation from the state and federal government, even more projects like these can be delivered. Even more will be delivered with local funding as Measure A revenues 'continue to grow with', the ,,County's.booming economy.'-- During this fiscal year, the 'Commission will approve a: Measure A delivery plan that will outline Measure'A priorities for the next decade. The plan will include project priorities, and timelines that, will likely focus on several key freeway projects. ,`Ideally, the efficiency of this effort will be enhanced with changes in state law that will allow design build contracting and partnerships with the.', private "sector. GFOA Distinguished Budget 'Award The Goverriment Finance. Officers Association of the United States and ; Canada ''(GFOA),presented; an award, of,Distinguished Budget Presentation toAhe Riverside County. Transportation Commission , for its: annual budget -for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2005: ; Inordento receive: this award; a governmental unit must publish a document that meets program criteria es:;a policy document, as anoperations`guide,;as a financial plan; and as a • communications device i The ;award is, valid for a period of one; year only. ' The Commission believes; that this I budget document conforms to program requirements, ,; and it will be:submitted to the.GFOA'to determine its eligibility for another award The'preparation of this budget. has been a collaborative effort involvingevery` member of the Commission's . staff. -The budget` reflects the. Commission's recent reorganization and desire and effort,to communicate the components of the budget in terms: that are easily understandable and supportable for the general public. Staff:.' acknowledges and appreciates the guidance and leadership of the Commission's 30-member Board of ' Commissioners and the sense of renewal and commitment they have inspired. „ 55 Eric A. Haley, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief. Financial Officer 56 TABLE OF CONTENTS COMMISSION INTRODUCTION EXECUTIVESUMMARY Introduction Budget Overview Personnel Department Initiatives Fund Balances , Budget Comparative Budget Expenditures and Other Uses Highway, TUMF, and Rail Programs Governmental Fund Type Budgets GANN APPROPRIATION: LIMIT , ' GUIDING POLICIES Commission Policy Goals and Objectives Financial and Administration Policies BUDGET PROCESS SUMMARY Budget Process ' Functional Organization Chart ' Staff Organization Chart FUND BUDGETS Budget Summary by Fund' Authorization, Amendment, and Fund Structure General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Projects Funds Debt Service Fund REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Funding Sources Sales Tax Revenues Investment Income Program Revenues PERSONNEL Salary and Fringe Benefits Personnel Summary COMMISSION DEBT Debt Capacity Analysis Debt Service Schedule Program and Geographic Debt Legal Debt Margin Debt Service Requirements DEPARTMENT BUDGETS Budget Comparison by Department, MANAGEMENT SERVICES Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance' REGIONAL PROGRAMS: Regional Issues Planning and Programming Rail Operations Property Management Specialized Transit Narrative discussion of the history of the Commission andilist of principal` officers' ' ,i Narrative overview of the operational and financial factors'considered „ Summarized narrative overview, charts, and tables of revenues and expenditures Personnel expenditures and full-time equivalents Major initiatives and summarized expenditures by department Fund balances by program and geographic area Schedule of budget by summarized line item Expenditures and other uses summarized by fund type Listing of budgeted capital project expenditures Summary of estimated financial sources and uses by governmental fund types Narrative discussion of the appropriation limit Narrative description of policy goals and objectives Description of financial policies Narrative description of various budget stages Organization chart Organization chart Table summarizing fund and department revenues and expenditures Narrative description of authorization level, amendment process and fund structure Overview; narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures Overview; narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures by Measure A and non- Measure A special revenue funds Overview, narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures, Overview; narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures:. Schedule of funding sources Narrative description of Measure A and TDA sales taxes Narrative description of investment income'• Tables and accompanying narratives of program revenues , Chart and accompanying description of benefits and changes in salary and benefits' i Tables of personnel expenditures and full time equivalents qI Charts and accompanying narrative demonstrating debt capacity Schedule of debt maturities by year Charts of debt service by program and geographic area Schedule ofcalculation of legal debt margin ' Table summarizing debt service requirements by issue i;,Schedule of expenditures' by department Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives; key assumptions and budgeted expenditures q Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions, and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumption5 arid budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures ,'Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures •Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Project Development and Delivery Location of Capital Projects Capital Projects Summary COMMUNITY PROFILE Riverside County's History Demographics APPENDICES Glossary of Acronyms Funding Definitions Program Terms General Terms • Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Local map of major capital projects for current year Narrative description of each capital project Narrative discussion of the history of Riverside County Charts and tables of various demographic data Explanation of commonly used abbreviations Narrative description of various funding sources Description of Commission programs and, related terms Commonly used terms in governmental accounting • 58 Name, Bob Buster John F.-Tavaglione Jeff Stone '> Roy Wilson Marion Ashley Barbara Hanna Roger Berg , Robert Crain John Chlebnik -Mary Craton Gregory S. Pettis Juan M.DeLara JeffMiller Alex Bias" ` Robin Lowe Mary Roche Michael H. Wilson Terry Henderson Bob Magee Frank West Rick Gibbs Frank Hall Dick Kelly Ronald Oden ' Daryl Busch Ron'Meepos` Steve Adams Jim Ayres Ron Roberts. Michael Perovich r Riverside County Transportation Commission List of Principal Officials Board of Commissioners Title , Meniber Member 2nd Vice Chairman (Commission), Chairman (Budget and Implementation Committee • Member 'Chairman (Commission) Vice'Chair (Budget and Implementation Committee) Member Member Member Member ' Member Member Member Member Member Vice Chairman (Plans and Programs Committee) Member '.'.1st ; .Vice Chair (Commission), Chair (Transit Policy ,Committee).` ; Member Vice Chairman (Transit Policy Committee) Member - Member:: Member; Member Chairman (Plans and Programs Committee) ',Member'i' Member; Member. Member ..Governor's Appointee Manadement Staff Eric A. Haley; Executive Director Hideo.Sugita, Deputy Executive Director Anne Mayer, Deputy Executive Director Cathy Bechtel,: Director of Project Delivery Theresia Trevino, ChiefFinancial;Officer John Standiford, Director of Public Affairs Stephanie Wiggins, Director of: Regional Programs County of Rive istrict 4 Riverside County, of istrict 5 " City of Bannin City of Beaum City of Blythe' City of Calime City :of Canyon City of Cathedr City Coachella City of Corona City of Desert ings' City of Hemet r City of Indian City of Indio City of La Quin ont Lake , HotSpr to Agency County of Riverside, District.1 County of Riverside, District 2 County of Riverside, District 3 rside, D , D 9 sa al City ' Wells , City of Lake Elsinore City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Norco , City of Palm Desert City of Palm Springs City of Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Riverside City of San Jacinto City of Temecula Caltrans, District Executive Summary Introduction The budget for Fiscal Year "(FY) 2006/07, is presented to the Board of Commissioners (Board) . and the citizens of Riverside County. The budget outlines the projects the Commission plans to complete during the year and appropriates expenditures to accomplish these tasks. The budget also shows the funding sources and fund balances that will be used to complete these projects. "This document will. serve as the Commission's monetary guideline.. To provide the reader "a better understanding of the projects to be completed, staff has included descriptive information regarding each department and major projects. The discussion in each department includes a review of major initiatives and key 'assumptions. Staff used the goals and objectives approved at the Commission meeting on March 8, 2006, to prepare the budget. In addition to the Commission's long-term goals and strategic plan, the short-term factors listed below were used to guide the development of the budget: . Operational • Complete the prioritization of Measure A highway projects covering the two expenditure plans from 2006 through 2019. • Maximize the use of innovative financing strategies to support the 2009 Measure A 10-year delivery plan. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to implement the FY 2006-2009 Transportation. Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional Arterial Program and facilitate the delivery of arterial improvements in western Riverside County (Western County). • Continue work on the project level environmental document for the Mid County Parkway, a new Community Environmental Transportation 'Acceptability Process (CETAP) corridor. • Initiate the next steps on the Riverside County -Orange County CETAP corridor as outlined in the Major Investment Study's (MIS) Locally Preferred Strategy. • Continue to work with the Regional Conservation Authority (RCA) to implement the Mufti -Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) and provide funding for land mitigation. • Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving the County. • Support innovative programs which provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders with special transit needs. • " Promote program efficiency and harmony between transit operators. • Maintain effective partnerships among commuters, employers, and government to increase the efficiency of our, transportation system by encouraging and promoting transportation alternatives.. • Continue to provide a motorist aid system that ensures safety and "convenience to freeway motorists. • Maintain close communication.with Commissioners and educate policy makers on all issues of importance to the Commission. . 61 Financial • - Maintain administrative program delivery costs below the policy threshold of 4% of • Measure A revenues. The current Management °Services :budget is:; 2.29%. of Measure A revenues. • Maintain administrative salaries and benefits at less than 1 % of ;Measure A° revenues: • The current administrative salaries and benefits is .92% of Measure A revenues. Continue to maintain prudent cash reserves to provide some ,level of insulation for unplanned expenditures Maintain current positive bond ratings with rating agencies. Move forward on Measure A projects for highways and regional arterials using sales tax revenues, TUMF revenues, and state and federal funding as well'. as financing alternatives such as commercial paper and innovative financing strategies. • Look foropportunities, funding sources, and innovative approaches, toaddress transportation needs that extend beyond Measure A. • Leverage and protect past Measure A investments in rail to obtain state and, federal funding 'for additional rail improvements, including the Perris Valley Line Metrolink . extension project (,Perris Valley Line).. Budget (overview Chart - Revenues: Major Categories Other Revenue 1%, TUMF Revenue% 17% Investment Income 5% 1 `Measure A Sales' Tax 62%, 'Total- revenues are budgeted at"U51,902,100 _which is an increase of 13.2% over FY 2005/06 projected revenues -and ,a 4.1 % decrease over the FY 2005/06 budget. The projected fund balance at June 30, 2006 available for expenditures (excluding; reserves; for debt service of $31,631,800 , and loans receivable of $36,349,600) is $242,425,400. Total funding sources available for the FY 2006/07 budget, including commercial` paper proceeds a of $80,000,000, amount to $574,327,500. • Chart 2 - Commission Revenue Trend $300,000,000 $250,000,000 5200.000,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/00 FISCAL YEARS FY 05/07 ®Investment Income IMOther Revenue OTUMF Revenue 0Intergovernmental ■LTF Sales Tax ®Measure A Sales Tax The State Board of Equalization has provided cities and other agencies its projections for statewide taxable sales over the next fiscal year to increase 5%. Riverside County continues to experience significant growth due to population increase, available and affordable housing, and a wider base in its economic engine. After taking these economic factors and the state 'of the local economy into consideration, staff has projected a 6% increase in Measure A sales tax revenues compared to the prior year budget. On behalf of the County, the Commission administers the LTF and receives allocations for administration, planning, and programming in addition to funding for rail operations included in the Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). This LTF sales tax revenue is budgeted to decrease by 11.9% based on the initial LTF sales tax revenue projections, which are adjusted at mid -year based on actual receipts. The budgeted LTF sales tax revenue is sufficient for Commission administration, planning and programming, and rail operations. The majority of LTF funding received by the County and available for allocation is distributed to all transit operators in the County; however, it is not included in this budget as it is an unbudgeted special revenue fund. Intergovernmental revenues are expected to decrease 43.3% compared to the prior year budget; however, only 16.1 % of the prior year budget amount is projected to be realized as revenue in FY 2005/06 as a result of specific capital project activities. The decrease is primarily related to federal reimbursements for the final design of the State Route (SR) 91 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes in Riverside, as this project did not reach the final design stage in FY 2005/06. For FY 2006/07, federal sources will partially fund rail capital projects including the Perris Valley Line, Perris multimodal facility, and North Main Corona station parking structure and highway capital projects including the SR-79 realignment study, SR-60 East Junction to Interstate (I) 215 HOV lane connector, and Corona/I-15 Cajalco interchange TUMF regional arterial project. State funds will reimburse a portion of the costs on the North Main Corona station parking structure. As a result of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)-with the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), the Commission will receive 48.1% of TUMF through June 30, 2009, and, in accordance with the 2009 Measure A, thereafter at 100%, after deduction of an administrative fee, up to an aggregate of $400 million. TUMF represents fees assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western County. FY 2006/07 TUMF 63 fees are expected to decrease 8.3% compared to the FY 2005/06 budgeted revenue based on a softening of the housing market. Other revenue consists of miscellaneous revenues and is projected to increase 4.3% from the prior year's budget. Investment income is anticipated to increase 129.2% in FY 2006/07 as a, result of higher cash and investment balances due to. increased sales tax revenues, the issuance of commercial paper, and continued higher yields on investments'. Staff continues to actively manage its resources and make appropriate investments to maximize the return to the Commission without sacrificing security and affecting short-term cash requirements. Tablet Revenues FY 2004-2007 FY 03/04 - FY 04/05 FY 05/06 Actual Actual Revised Budget Measure A Sales, Tax LTF Sales Tax • Intergovernmental TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues $ 120,564,800 $ 138,921,300 $ 147,300,000 7,812,500 7,693,400 12.453,400 27,610,800 30,131,000 49,521,800 35,615,200 • 46,325,300 - 45,825,000 :. 3,976,760' , 3,118,000 - 2,132,400 2.934,500, 4.540.600 5,453.600 $ - 198.514 50Q' $ 230.729 60Q $ 262 686.200 Chart = Expenditures: Major Categories Regional Issues 0% Management Services 1% Debt Service 10% Regional, Arterials Coachella Valley ,3/0 ;' zt—�- Motorist Assistance 1%' Planning and Programming 2% FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Projected -Budget $ 147,300,000 $-156,150,000 $ 12,453,400 - 10,972.400 (7,958,800 28,057,100 45,266,900 42,000,000 3,866,200 2,22,3,600 5.610.100 ,.12.499.000 Dollar Change • Percent Change 8,850.000 - 6.0% (1,481,000), -11.9% (21,464,700) -43.3% (3,825,000) . -8.3% . 91,200 4.3% - 7,045.400 129.2% $ 222 455.4QQ $ 251 90; "'" /10784 1001 Ala' Rail Operations 2% Property Management; Local Streets and s: Roads 14% Specialized Transit 2% Li Transit` 2% i Commuter Assistance Capital Highway, Rail and TUMF ,62% Total expenditures are budgeted at $403,743,200, an increase of 14.6% from the :prior year budget amount of .$352,404;000. Program expenditures totaling $359,639,100 represent 89.1 % of total budgeted expenditures in FY 2006/07. Program costs have increased 15.8%. from $310,487,400 in FY 2005/06. ` This increase isprimarily due to a 1:6.8%`increase in the Capital Highway, Rail, and TUMF: programs. Significant highway projects include SR-79 realignment, Mid County Parkway right of way acquisition 'and engineering,' and construction on the SR-91` Van Buren, 'La` Sierra, and Green 'River 'interchange improvements. Additionally,- as a result of the, ;commercial paper program, advance funding for projects •, • • included in the 2009 Measure A may begin. Significant projects include land acquisition for the MSHCP in Western County and Coachella Valley as well as Mid County Parkway right of way acquisition. Approved TUMF regional arterial projects will be in various phases of engineering, construction, and right of way. Right of way acquisition and preliminary engineering for the Perris Valley Line will be a significant rail capital project in FY 2006/07. Debt Service of $39,578,000 has increased slightly as a result of the issuance of additional commercial paper. Management Services expenditures of $4,526,100 are comparable to the FY 2005/06 budget. Table 2 - Program Expenditures FY 2004-2007 FY 03104 FY 04105 Actual Actual Management Services Regional Issues Planning and Programming .Rail Operations , Property Management . Specialized Transit Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance - Capital Highway, Rail and TUMF' Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials - Coachella Valley .Debt Service .. TOTAL FY 05106 FY 05106 FY 06107 Revised Budget Projected _.Budget Dollar Percent Change Change $ $, 4,501,900 $ 4,006,600 $ 4,526,100 $ 24,200 0.5% 70,700 - 161200 353,400 282,700 399.9% -4,444,700 ` 2,660,800 • 6,412,100 1,967,400 44.3% 7,559,200 7,341,100. 8,055,000 495,800 6.6% 628,800. 535,900 1,061,800 433,000 68.9% 5,172,000 ,4,757,500- 7,825,100 2,653,100 513% 6,201,500 4,164,700 7,119,500 918,000 14.8% 3,782,900 3,342,800 3,842,100 59,200 1.6% 4,006,100-2,477,700 3,629,400 (376,700) -9.4% 213,521,100 6'1575,500 249,303,00035,781,900 16.8% 55,106,500 55,106,500 58,318,300 r 3211,800 5.8% -9,993,900 8,563,700 13,719,400 .3,725,500 37.3% 37.414.700 36A14.100 39.578000- 2,163.300 5.8% • A 154 fi21 90n S M 456 AM $ _352 404 00.8 $ M Minn $ 4(q.743 20Q $ 5_1339.2011 ]4.651 Note: Management Services include Executive Management, Administration, Legislative Affairs and Communications, and Finance. Commission Personnel 2,903,100 $ 3,260,200 69,100. 67,900 2,563,000 2,331,000 4,900,400 5,330,400 338,400 580,200 4,294,400 4,875,300 2,164,300 2,268,800 2,943,900 2,643,700 1,978,400 2,191,000 42,513,800 59,314,600 46,206,300 53,330,700 8,244,200 10,053,700 35,508,600 38208.700 The Commission's salary and fringe benefits total $4,636,300 for FY 2006/07. This represents an increase of 19.1% or $743,800 over the FY 2005/06 budget of $3,892,500. The Commission has set aside a pool of 4% for salary increases in FY 2006/07. Additional personnel costs are related to the recently filled staff positions for three program managers and three staff analysts as well as a new staff position for an administrative assistant. The Full, Time Equivalent (FTE) has increased by 3.5 FTE positions from the prior year, for a total of 31 FTE positions. Fringe benefit increases continue to relate primarily to Public Employees' Retirement System (PERS) and workers' compensation costs. Table 3 - Staff Summary by Department FY2004-2007 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05106 FY 06/07 FTE FTE FTE FTE Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance Regional Issues Planning and Programming Rail Operations Property Management Specialized Transit Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Capital Project Development and Delivery TOTAL 1.6 1.3 1.4 1.4 4.1 4.1 3.9 4.7 1.4 1.3 2.5 2.6 5.1 5.5 5.5 5.5 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.5 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.2 2.0 2.4' 1.9 1.9 1.1 0.8 0.8 2.0 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.6 1.1 1.2 1.6 ' 1.5 2.5 2.4 2.0 1.4 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.9 1_1 1_8 2_7 3_8 25.0 26.0 27.5 31.0 65 Department Initiatives The preparation of each department's budget was :'based on key assumptions, accomplishments in FY 2005/06, major initiatives for FY 2006/07, and department goals and related objectives. Following are the key initiatives and summary of: expenditures for each department. Executive Management • Continue project development and delivery as the key Measure A priority. • Explore creative financing opportunities due to the impact of the.State's general fund and budgetary issues on transportation funding. Maintain regional cooperation and collaboration as a significant effort consistent with the philosophy and mission of the Commission. Continue to expand communications with media, business, and civic,groups. Maintain public education efforts regarding the growing transportation financing needs of . the Commission's projects and programs. Maintain andimprove administrative efficiency and fiscally sound practices. Strengthen, the "depth of staff resources. Table,4 - Executive Management Program FY 03/04 FY 04/05 Costs Actual Actual Personnel r Professional Support' TOTAL Administration • Provide high quality support to the Commission and to internal and external customers. • Continue to 'update :the electronic document management system to improve the Commission'srecordkeeping capabilities. • Continue efforts to expand the .Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) mailing ;list and to provide support to staff regarding the DBE program for federally funded capital construction projects. • Continue to provide tirnely communications to Commissioners with greater utilization: of electronic mail. . • Utilize' `available technology to streamline processes and provide easier, access' to Commission records. „ • Support and develop a motivated workforce with a framework of activities and practices that are in compliance withemployment laws and regulations. $ 174,400 84,200 . 63,300 $ 321,900 $ 204,300 114,300 60,800 $ 379,400 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 Revised Budget , Projected $ 250,000 $ 251,200 86,000 60,100 65,000 (21000) 59,100 74,700 55,100. (4,000) $ 395,100 $386,000 $ 396,000 $ , 900 $ 275,900$ 25,900 FY 06/07. Dollar Percent Budget Change Change 1 10.4° 24.4.% -6.8% Da% 66 Table 5 - Administration Program FY 03/04 FY 04/05 Costs Actual Actual . Personnel Professional Support Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL $ 359,000 84,800 667,100 8,000 31 400 $1.150.300 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 Revised Budget Projected $ 362,400 . $ 85,500 925,300 119,800 31.400 $1.524_40Q $ 445,300 177,700 1,242,600 189,000 31,500 2.086.100 FY 06/07 Budget Dollar Percent Change Change $ 448,300 $ 462,400 $ 17,100 74,800 64,400 (113,300) 1,114,600 1,191,800 (50,809) 90,000 100,000 (89,000) 31,500 26:200 (5,300) $1 759.2119 $i,$44.800 $ (241300) 3.8% -63.8% - 4.1 % - 47.1 % -16.8% - 11.6Y, Legislative Affairs and Communications • Participate in efforts to seek greater state and federal investment to transportation infrastructure. • Promote and maintain interregional cooperation with consideration of the Commission's interests and ongoing commitments. • Play a.key role in the administration of the Regional Transportation Agencies' Coalition (RTAC). • Advocate positions in the State Legislature and Congress that advance the County's transportation interests. • Continue to develop a broad public- information .program regarding the Commission's responsibilities and accomplishments through a variety of media formats. • Continue to place an emphasis on providing communications support related to major project development efforts. • Create a new branding for all of the Commission's services. Provide new Commissioner orientation meetings and other continuing education opportunities for Commissioners. Table 6 - Legislative Affairs and Communications Program . FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 Costs Actual Actual Revised Budget Personnel Professional Support TOTAL Finance $ 202,500 $ 191,900 $ 342,400 163,400 139,700 365,000 107.000 111.500 178,300 $ 472 900 $ 4431QQ $ 885.70f1 FY 05106 FY 06/07 Projected Budget Dollar Percent Change Change $ 204,300 $ 357,500 $ 15,100; 293,300 428,000 63,000 218 500 153 000 /25.3001 $ 716.100 $ _9313,5005280g 4.4% 17.3% - 14.2% Continue appropriate uses of commercial paper to advance 2009 Measure A projects of `the Commission, Coachella Valley Association of Govemments (CVAG), and local jurisdictions. • Apply the sales tax revenue forecast update to the 10-year delivery plan, the analysis related to a recommended increase in the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap, and planning considerations for a long-term debt issue in 2008 or 2009. •' Initiate an internal audit risk assessment program. • Continue to _keep abreast of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities. 67 Table 7- Finance Program Costs Personnel Professional Support TOTAL FY 03/04 Actual $ 408,400 557,200 23,800 $ : 989.400 Regional Issues Focus on interregional concerns and maintain effective working relationships involving various bi-county transportation issues. Continue .to work closely with member agencies on the: development transportation management, center (TMC). • Continue to address airport issues with emphasis on ;(March ARB) plansto develop air freight services. Support transitoriented development initiatives. FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY05106. FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget .Projected Budget Change Change $ 570,300 $ 615,100' $ 681,900. $ 111,600 19.6% 559,000 510,700 628,500 69,500 12.4% 37,200 51,000 62,600 25,400 68.3% $ 1.166.500 5 1.176.800 11.373.000 $ 206.500 $ 494,100 428,800 21,800 $ 944 70Q t7.7% Table 8- Regional Issues Program FY.03/04 Costs' ; ,'Actual . Personnel:, Professional Support TOTAL $ 42,300 25,900 900 $ 69.14.0 of _a new the March Air Reserve Base FY 04/05 FY.05/06 FY 65/06 'FY 66/07 Actual -; 'Revised Budget Projected Budget $ 41,500 $ 25,500 900 $37.900 $ Planning and Programming • Monitor increased:funding authority and respon 57,500 11,000 2,200 70.70_0 $ 29,800 127,500 3,900 $161.200 $ 353.400 Dollar ; Change;' $ 96,300 $ 38,800 252,500 241,500 4.600 2,400 II Percent Chang• e % 67.5 2195.5%' 409:1% • sibilityto the;State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and impacts .on the STIP caused .by the. state budget issues. Ensure STIP 'funded! projects , are administered and `'implemented consistent . with• California ;Transportation Commission : (CTC) and ,: 'California Department ,,of Transportation'(Caltrans) policies., ! Continue to strategically programprojects and obligate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding. Monitor and track the TUMF regional arterial projects: • ` Identify and evaluate innovative. financing strategies through strategic Partnership efforts. Work with member agencies by coordinating project submittals for inclusion ,in the 2008 . Regional: Transportation' Plan (RTP) update. Work ,cooperatively with •member agencies tD continue the work.; efforts- oti 'the .new CETAP corridors. Continue the Congestion, Management Program (CMP) update and traffic. monitoring along urban and rural highway; systems. Administer the,SB 821 ,«Bicycle and Pedestrian Program. Develop a web -based project . management database. for the schedules and funding as well as access by local agencies: Table 9- Planning and Programming Program FY 03/04 FY 04/05 Costs Actual Actual Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations TOTAL FY 05/06 Revised Budget FY 05/06 FY 06107 Dollar Percent Projected Budget Change Change $ 424,100 $ 388,400 $ 515,200 $ 438,500 $ 683,600 $ 168,400 32.7% 102,000 140,800 341,200 166,800 2.943,000 2,601,800 762.5% 15,000 8,600 17,200 17,800 57,000 39,800 231.4% 2,021,900 1793,200 3,571.100 2,037,700 2.728,500 (842,6001 -23.6% $2,563;00Q $ 2 331 000 $ 4,444209 $ 2,660$00 $ 6.412100 $ 1.967.400 Rail Operations • Continue capital improvements at the commuter rail stations in Riverside County. • Seek preliminary engineering for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) New Starts Perris Valley Line. • Work with the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) and the San. Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) to transform the summer weekend service into a year-round service and to advance additional IEOC and 91 Line train service by 2010. • Seek capital and operating funds for intercity passenger rail. • Continue to play a proactive role in the development of a statewide, high-speed passenger rail system. • Oversee commuter rail station operation and maintenance. Table 10 - Rail Operations Program FY 03/04 Costs Actual Personnel Professional Support Rail Station Operations Special Studies Transfers Out TOTAL $ 236,200 224,000 93,600 4,346,600 192 200 $ 5.092.600 Property Management FY 04105 Actual FY 05/06 FY 05/06. FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change $ 281,000 $ , 216,300 220,200 415.000 100,300 . 181,100 4,642,400 6,496,800 86,500 250.000 400 $ 5.330.800 $ 7.559.200 $ 254,200 $ . 320,700 $ , 104,400 270,000 285,500 (129,500) 145,400 206,400 25,300 6,262,700 7,142,400 645,600 408,800 100,000 (150,000) $ 7 341 100 $ 8.055.002 - $ 495.800 48.3% -31.2% 14.0% 9.9% -60.0% 0.0% • Develop a commuter rail station rehabilitation and strategic planfor the long-term maintenance of the Metrolink stations. • Maintain the order, safety, and security of Commission -owned properties. • Generate a revenue stream to support the costs of maintaining Commission -owned real property. • Provide support for property acquisitions and conveyance of capital project rights of way. Table 11- Property Management Program. FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Costs Actual Actual Revised Budget "Projected Budget Change Change Personnel $ 71,600 $ 73,000 $.. 87,900 $ 85,300 $ 285,500 $ 197.600 224.8% Professional 226,100 413,700 430.600 354,400 - 450,000 19,400 4.5% Support 13,800 41,000 - . 8,700 3,500 10,700 2,000 23.0% Projects and Operations 26,900 52.500 ', ` 101 600 ` 92,700 315,600 214.000 " 210.6% TOTAL : $ 338 4Q9 $. 58021.1 628 : t 5 51%9 19 Q 1.061.800 $ 433.000 68.9% 69 Specialized Transit • Support innovative programs which provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areasor for riders 'having very' special transit needs and monitor funding of these programs. • Provide availability. for local matching funds to Western County applicants seeking. FTA Section 5310 •federal capital grants. Table 12- Specialized Transit Program FY 03/04 Costs , Actual Personnel • Professional Support Projects and Operations TOTAL $ 23,400 1,800 900 4,268.300 Q 4 2Q4 4W FY 04/05 Actual $ 21,800 3,300 4,100 4,846.100 $ 4R75 300 FY 05/06 Revised Budget FY 05/06 FYi 06/07 - Dollar - Percent Projected Budget Change (Clrange $ 43,700 $ .17,800 $:. '81,800: $���,38,100 87.2% 24,000 42,700 62,500 38,500 160.4% 9,300 2,900 14,100 4,800 51.6% 5.095.000 4.694.100 '7.666700 2.571.700 ''50.5% $ 8 177 ()nil S • 4-757 50Q $ 7 525 100 ' 5 2 653 100 'am Continue implementing the:recommendationsresulting from the FY 2000/01':through FY 2002./03 triennial performance audit and review transit operator performance and annual _progress; reports through TransTrack and the SRTPs, respectively.:; • Engage an audit firm to''conduct the state triennial performance audit for. FY 2003/04 . . through FY 2065/06. • Discuss, develop,'andl submit policy directions relating to transit matters through the .Transit Policy,Committee (TPC). Begin: the development of conceptual programs for the 2009 Measure A transit funds. Table 13= Transit ; Program .r Costs Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations TOTAL ! 03/04 Isj Actual FY 04/05 Actual FCC 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar '' Percent Revised Budget Projected, Budget;` Change Change $ 126,400 .-$- 138,100- '$ 190,600 '$ 147,600 $ 189,800 $ (800) -0.4% 72,700 ' "76,300 30,400 163,200 190,400 160,000 ' 526.3% 7,000' ' •' : 4,200 13,500 16,000 20,600 7,100 52.6% 1.958200'="i2:050,200 5,967,000', 3.837,900 6,718.790 751,700. 12.6% $ 2164,300 ; $2.268 800 $ 6 201500 $ 4,184 700 $ 7 119 5912 ,'j: 91.1i 0119 14.8% Commuter Assistance 6; • Continue .rideshare incentives, and support services in: partnership with commuters, employers, and other governments. Perform a programmatic analysis of the Commuter assistance program and develop the Program Tracking and Performance Measurement Tool (Program Measurement Tool) to . foster: improved service delivery and 'greater constituent participation as well as to more - efficiently implement the Commuter Assistance program.' • Seek increased opportunities for cross marketing of transit and rail services.. • ' Maintain and operate a five-county,ridematching database system with partner agencies. • Assess, • develop; and; irriplement a;Guaranteed Ride Home (GRH).'Program to serve Inland Empire employers.' 70 • Participate in regional decisions relating to the implementation of . 511 and the dissemination of traffic and traveler information services. Table 14- Commuter Assistance Program FY 03/04 Costs Actual Personnel Professional Support. Projects and Operations Capital Outlay TOTAL FY 04/05 FY 05106 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Actual - Revised Budget Projected Budget: Change Change $ 187,500 $ 289,600 $. 258,700 $ 267,900. $ 200,300 $ (58,400) 591,600 351,600 519,200 '.488,100. 895,000 375,800 486,000 .316,000 .644,300 641,000 572,700 (71,600) 1,678,800 1,626,500 2,120,700 1.558:800 2,079,100 (41,600) - 60,000 240,000 387 000 • 95.000 (145 000) $2 943 900 $ 2.64a,Z0Q . $ - 3.782.900 $ 3 342.800 $ 3.842.1 QQ - $ 59 20Q -22.6% 72.4% -11.1 % -2.0% -60.4% ja4 Motorist Assistance • Continue implementation of the recommendations included in the 5-Year Strategic and Financial Plan (5-Year Plan) for the call box program, including the modification of approximately 670 call box sites. •. Complete the implementation of an Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) system for the FSP tow trucks as well as the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) :to collect the data. • Keep abreast of and evaluate all technology to improve call box service to hearing and speech impaired motorists. Table 15- Motorist Assistance Program FY 03/04 Costs Actual Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL $ 92,900 45,300 31,700 1,808,500 248 300 2B.70Q FY 04/05 Actual $ 101,800 61,700 18,100 2,009,400 254 100 $ 2A45.10Q FY 05/06 Revised Budget $ 88,100 216,700 26,700 3,674,600 262.800 $ 4,266,90Q FY 05106 Projected FY 06/07 Dollar . Percent Budget Change Change $ 91,700 $ 125,100 $ 37,000 42.0% 156,800 54,300 (162,400) -74.9% 25,500 27,100 400 1.5% 2,203,700 3,422,900 (251,700) -6.8% 253.000 375,700 112,900 43.0% $ 2.7311700 $„1,00510Q $ (263.8001 St.2° Capital Project Development and Delivery • Expand the Eastside parking lot at the Riverside Downtown commuter rail station. • Complete preliminary engineering and begin final design of the Perris multimodal facility. • Complete final design of a parking structure at the North Main Corona commuter rail station. • Complete alternative studies and environmental clearance and initiate right .of way acquisition for the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line. • Continue environmental and preliminary design for the Bi-County 1-215 project. • Complete the realignment and widening of SR-74 from Wasson Canyon Road to 71h Street in the city of Perris (Segment II). • Continue the environmental and preliminary engineering services for the SR-79 realignment project as well as acquire right of way. • Continue development of a project report and environmental document for the Mid County Parkway project as well as acquire right of way. • Complete final design of the SR-60/I-215 East Junction HOV lanes connector. 71 Personnel a Professional Support Projects and Operation Capital t)utiay Debt Service-Cor nmrcial Paper Transfers Out TOTAL Acquire land as mitigation for the cumulative andAirect impacts associated with construction. of future highway and regional arterial projects_' Provide Measure A funding and support to Westem County local jurisdictions for interchange construction at 1-15 Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road and SR=91 interchange improvements. at Van Buren, La Sierra, and Green River. Provide - Measure . A funding and support to Coachella Valleylocal jurisdictions for construction of operational improvements along SR-86 and SR-111: Provide TUMF funding for regional arterial project engineering, construction, and right of way acquisition. • Provide advance' funding of 2009 Measure A projects in Hemet, Indio,, and Blythe. Table.16- Capital Project Development and Delivery A'O9@rn FY 03104 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar : Percent Costs Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected 'Budget . Change Change 232,300 $ 378,000 $ 826,500 $ 476,100 $` ' 875,500 $ 49,000 5.9% , 982,200 1,271,600 1,787,000 1,241,10D ': 1,462,700 (324,300) .-18.1% 50,800 83,800 108,300 ". 7,000 21,300 j; (87,000) ;;-80.3% K699,000 120,965,600 275,419,700 123,521.500 318,481,200 43,061,500 . '; 15.6% - 480,000 `500,000 20,000 42% i, ' 1 - 1,900,000 899,400 4,076,900 2,176,900 114.6%. 41,0E2600 36.795.630 46.298,700 35,483.200 82,677,400 36378,700 J, 78.6% 5138.046,900 $ 159.494600 $_._326.820200 $161628.300. IC8.095.000 $ 812748nn 24 9% 72 • Table 17— Projected Fund Balances by Program and Geographic Area at June 30, 2007 Measure A Western County Coachella Valley Palo Verde Other Total Reserved: Commuter Assistance $ 12,698,500 $ - $ - $ $ 12,698,500 Debt Service - 31,436,600 31,436,600 Highway 47,494,900 6,779,500 1,265,600 55,540,000 Loans Receivable 32,514200 1,460,400 33,974,600 Local Streets and Roads 109,400 . 74,300 52,700 - 236,400 Planning and Programming Services _ 450,600 450,600 Property Management - 1,480,200 1,480,200 Rail 44,331,400 5,135,500 49,466,900 Regional Arterials - 1,540,500 1,540,500 Specialized Transit 7,691,900 13,300 . 7,705,200 Transit ' - 4,410,500 4,410,500 TUMF 33,375,800 33,375,800 Unreserved, designated: Motorist Assistance 3,696.600 3,696,600 Unreserved, undesignated 2,553.300 2.553,300 TOTAL Fund Balance 144 840 30Q $ 8 40.7_ 600 $ 52/D1) $ _85,265,100 $ 238.565.700 73 000'099'3f 310ee1saay sum,' spuoy+opn0 009'9E6'T£t aalnlag 3090 000'469'2£3' pund soin 3330:: �- as 004'033'43 3we331331/ 313u331 NG5 009'969'E3 3we3sItsv as4 WON 00LISS OPeoY Pue pewit 1320733I13A:TIM oled 00E1;3 31*Lku1 Pa3111 03ds 004'ossIS elepeutl 1tYalOay OOEb[S speoe Pus wars mai — 005'6LL'93 3em46131 009'LO6'eS AaIRA glayaeo0 �. o0e'stt'££S Aw01 00OWL* 313u3+1 Pa31131aedE 006'3£093 PEW — 006'60TS 3P3011 Pue 31304S 133n1 — 002'DTgts$a19en13aavweal — OO6bet'a4 MmY61N T031369'2 T33=313133Y+33nwwe0 — 009'992'Tf 31,31A1 oa fwd 1341d03. 00T9R'SLTS Alunop w31 M .Oo6$eeso£f ^- . ipuni3130ana813133ds DO4'SET'S3 wo0e+31011371 — ...00Y039'TS 30awa033361 AL3dwd —. 009b34S 3331AnS oulwun+00+3 poe 6uluuald 00£'£ist$ ss0131353uawoiNnaw — 009'6Tots 00L'59S18£Z$ .. uolssiumoo uopepodsueij Aunoo appan,b LOUZ'0£ eunr;e wea6oad pue adAl pund iewawuaanom Aq sapuelea pund papa[oid - tr Pe4D • • • TABLE 18- BUDGET COMPARATIVE BY SUMMARIZED LINE /TEN FY 2004 - 2007 FY 03104 FY 04/05 FY 05106 FY 05/06 FY 06107 DOW Percent Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change REVENUES Measure A Sales Tax 5 120.564.800 S 138,921,300 $ 147.300.000. 5 147,300.000 5156.150.000 $ 8.850.000 6.0% LTF Sales Tax- Planning and Administration 2,307,000 2,497,300 3,343,400 3.343A00 2995.500 (397;900) -10.4% LTF Sales Tax - Transit Allocation 5505.500 5.195,600 9,110,000 9,110,000 7,976,900 (1,133,100) -12.4% STA Transit Albcedon 2.8.99,700 3,348,700 5,813,600 3.891.700 6.924,300 1,010,700 17.1% Vehicle Registration Fees 1,435.100 1,541,200 1,425,000 1,425,000 1,425,000 - 0.0% Reimbursements 23,276.600 25241,100 42,183.20D 2,642,100 19.707,800. (22475,400) -532% Omer Revenue 3.978.700 3.118.000 2,132,400 3,868,200 2.223,600 91,200 4.3% TUMF Revenue - 35,615200 46.325.300 95.825,000 45266,900 42.000.000 ' (3,8221)00) -8.3% Investment Income 2.934500 d54060Q 5.453.800 5,810100-12499000 7.045.400 129.2% TOTAL Revenues 198,514.500 230.729.600 262.686.200 222,455,400 25/,802,100 (10,784,100) -4.1% EXPENDITURES Personnel Salary and Benefits 2.581,000 • 2,965200 3.892,500 3.327.800 4.636,300 743,800 19.1% Professional and Support _ General Legal Services 1,010,700 1.313,500 1,640.800 1261,100 1.309,800 (331,000) -202% Financial Services 48.900 52,300 550,000 75,600 100,00D (450.000) -81.8% AudB Services 520,600 358.500 378.000 345.900 520,000 142,1)00 37.6% Professional Services -Omer 1.582000 1 608,700 2,394,000 2 166.900 5.652.000 3,458.000 144.4% TOTAL Professional Costs 3.161,200 3,333,000 4,962,800 3.949.500 7,781,800 2,819,000 58.8% Support Costs - 1.560.900 1698,400 2,523,500 2.321.80Q 2397.000 (131.5001 TOTAL Professional and Support Costs - 4,722,100 5.029,400 7,491,300 6,271,300 10,178,800 2.687,500 '35.9% Projects and OperaOons' Projects-GGeneral 2,403,000 1.892,300 - 3,013,600 1,765,000 3.500.500 486.900 18.2% Rae Operations 1.178,800 1.427.800 1.546,300 1,346,600 1,590,600 • 44,300 2.9% SAFE Operations • 5715500 565200 2.173,700 767,200 1.715.500 (458,200) -21.1% Towing 1222,000 ' 1,439.000 1,431,000 1,429,800 1,573,000 142,000 9.9% Commuter Assistance 1,638,800 1,568.500 2.020.700 1.517.800 2,004,100 (18,600) -0.8% Highway Engineering 1,670,900 0,234,800 30,871,000 6,452,100 6,327.01)0 (24.504.000) -79.5% Rail Engineering 538,600 249,500 7276.000 257,700 7,450,000 174,000 2A% TUMF Engineering 1,145,500 5,898,100 26.125,400 12.736,600 33.016.000 7,290.600 27.9% Highway Construction 28.032.200 22053,400 37,619200 15.622,600 45,1311,400 8,222,200 21.9% Rao Construction 3.295,700 856.400 2,069.000 443.500 1.738,500 (350200) -16.8% TUMF Construction - 3.600 18212.100 3.145.000 4,648,000 (11,364.100) -70.1% Highway Right ofWay/Land 1.354700 1.877,700 55.572.700 8,735,000 745,11)0 (54.327,600) -98.7% Rae R19M of WayAand 3.025,500 - 5,050,000 63.600 5,075.000 25,000 0.5% TUMF Right of Way/Land - - - 13,357,700 26,120.000 9,616,300 137,422,000 111,302.000 426.1% SCRRA Contribution 3,167,800 3.214,600 5.317,700 5.530.000 6.051,800 734,100 13.B% Special Studies 1,129,000 2428,800 2,186,600 1.075,630 1.890700 (295.900) -13.5% . Special Transportation/Transit �- 4266.300 4,846,100 - 5,095.000 4.694.100 7,686.700 2,571,700 50.5% Local Streets and Roads 46,208.3110 52330.70D 55,106,500 55,106.500 58.318.300 3211,800 5.8% Regional Arterials -Coachella Valley - 8,244200 10.053,700 9,993,900 8,563.700 13.719,400 3,725,500 37.3% LTF Disbursements 750,200 706200 1,909.100 1,911.300 1.042800 (866,300) -45.4% STA Disbursements 1 958 200 2,050200 5.687.000 3.837.900 6.718.700 751.700 12.8% TOTAL Project and Operating Costs 111.808200 138.072.400 302.696.500 144,617.900 348.655.100 42958400 15.2% Debt Service Principal Payments 25,318,800 27,228,200 28,669,500 28.662500 30.364A00 1.694.900 6.9% Interest Payments 9.191.800 8,400.300 8245,200 7,744.600 9,063,600 718,40! 80.6% Arbitrage Rebate Tax 2,141,600 - - 0.0% COst of Issuance - 438 600 400.000 150.000 (250.0001 -62.5% TOTAL Debt Service 35.508.600 38208.700 37A14,700 36,414,100 39,578,000 2,163,300 5.6% Capital Outlay - 6.000 - 178 800 909.000 477.000 695.000 (214.0001-23.5%° TOTAL Expenditures 154.627.90Q 184 456 200 362 404 000 191.108.100 403 743 200 51,339,200 14.6% Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over (Under) Expendeures 43,886.600 46273.400 (89.717.800) 31.347.300 (151,841,100) (62,123,300) 892% Olher Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 41.523.100 37,050200 46.561,500 35,736,200 63.053,100 36,491,600 78.4% Transfers Out (41,523,100) (37.050,200) (46.561.500) (35.736200) (83.053,100) (36,491,600) -78.4% Debt Proceeds 30.002000 55.000.000 - 80.000 000 25.000,000 45_5% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Omer Financing Sources(Dees) 43,886.600 76,276,400 (34,717.800) 31.347.300 (71,841,100) (37.123,300) 106.9% Beginning Fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE 158.894.500 202,781.100 279.059.500 279,059.500 310.406.600 31.347.30D 11.2% § 202 781 106 4 7791159.50Q B 944 341 70Q C 310 406 800 5 258 585 7Q4 $ f5 776 000) -2.4% - 75 • 95,200 - 599,800 348;655,100 695,°4 Table 19- Budget Expenditures and Other Uses Summarized by, Governmental Fund Type FY 2006/07 General Fund Special Revenue 'Capital Projects Debt Service, Total Personnel Salary and Benefits $ 3,267,700 $ 1,368,600 $ $ $ 4,636,300 Professional and Support Expenditures General Legal Services 369,400 940,400 1,309,800 Financial Services 95,200 4,800 - 100,000: Audit Services 495,000 25,000 520,000 Professional Services - Other 4,290100 1.134,500 427,400 5,852,000 TOTAL Professional Services 5,249,700 2,104,700 427,400 7,781,800 Support Costs1,691.200 705,800 - • 2,397.000 TOTAL Professional and Support Services 6,940,900 2,810,500 427,400 10178,800 Project and Operations Expenditures Program': Management - 2,575,500 Projects - General 315,600 209.400 Rail Operations 1,590,600 SAFE Operations 1,715,500 Towing 1,573,000 Commuter Assistance 2,004,100 Highway, Rail, and TUMF Engineering ''. 47,193,000 Highway, Rail, and TUMF Construction . 43,927,900 Highway. Rail, and TUMF Right of Way/Land - 103,217,100 SCRRA Contribution 5,551,800 500,000 Special Studies 1,785,700 105,000 Special Transportation/Transit 7,666,700 Local Streets and Roads 58,318,300 Regional Arterials - Coachella Valley 13,719,400 LTF Disbursements 1,042.800 - STA Disbursements 6,718,700 TOTAL Project and Operations Expenditures 10,286,500 ' 289,443,600 48,925,000 Capital Outlay Debt Service • Principal and Interest 25,000 1,200 • 3,926.900 35,474,900 ' 39,428,000, Cost of Issuance 15(1,000 150,000 TOTAL Debt Service 25,000 1,200 4,076,900 35,474,900 39,578,000. Other Financing Uses: Transfers Out 39.180.500 43.872,600 83,053.100 ` TOTAL Expenditures and Other Financing Uses $ 20 ti A,309 $ 3339.404.221 $ ' 97 301.900 $ 35 4Z4 340 $ 486 Zffiat.) 8,500,000 40,025,000 2,975,500 525,000 1;590,600 1,715,500 1,573,000 2,004,100 47,193,000 '52,427,900 143,242,100 , 6.051,800 • 1,890,700 7,666,700 , 58,318,300 13,719,400 1,042,800 6;718,700 Table 20 - Highway, TUMF, and Rail Programs FY 2006/07 Description Projects General Program Management and Contract Administration (Bechtel Corp ) TOTAL PROJECTS GENERAL Highway Engineering SR-60 East Junction to 1.215 HOV SR-74 Wasson Road to 7th Street Highway Widening SR-74 Curve Realignment SR-74 G Street to 1-215 SR-111 City Projects (La Ouinta, Indio, and Cathedral City) 1-215 Bi-County Project General SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY ENGINEERING TUMF Engineering - SR-79 ReakgnmeM Preliminary Engineering and Environmental Mid -County Parkway Corridor Phase 0 Various Westem County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects SUBTOTAL TUMF ENGINEERING $ 2,975,500 2,975,500 2,500,000 85,000 482,000 1,450,000 1,000,000 10,000 6,327,000 8,030,000 10,000,000 15,386,000 33,416,000 Rail Engineering Perris Valley Line Preliminary Engineering 5,000,00D Perris Muhimodal Facility Survey and Material Testing 125,000 Penis Mukimodal Facility Engineering 1,000,000 Riverside Downtown Station Parking Lot Expansion - Easlside 50,000 Riverside Downtown Station Parking Lot Expansion.- Eastside Survey and Material Testing 175,000 North Main Corona Station Parking Structure 1,100,000 SUBTOTAL RAIL ENGINEERING 7,450,000 TOTAL HIGHWAY, TUMF, AND RAIL ENGINEERING 47,193,000 Highway Construction 1-15 Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road Interchange 2,734,000 SR-74 Wasson to 7th Street Widening_ Project 2,300,000 SR-86 County of Riverside Project .. 271,000 SR-91 Green River Interchange 7,006,500 SR-91 La Sierra Interchange 15,700,000 SR-91 Van Buren Interchange 7,600,000 SR-111 Magnesia Falls to Fairway 1,000,000 SR-111 City Projects (La ouinta, Indio, and Cathedral City) 699,900 Hemet/Sanderson Bridge (Commercial Paper) 3,000,000 IndioNarious Local Street and Road Rehabilitation Projects (Commercial Paper) 4,000,000 BlythelLovekin Boulevard Pavement Rehabilitation and Chanslorway Pavement Overlay (Commercial Paper) .1,500,000 General 30,000 SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION 45,841,400 TUMF Construction Various Westem County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects 4,848,000 SUBTOTAL TUMF CONSTRUCTION - 4,848,000 Rail Construction Riverside Downtown Station Parking - Easlside 1,738,500 SUBTOTAL RAIL CONSTRUCTION - - 1,738,500 TOTAL HIGHWAY, TUMF, AND RAIL CONSTRUCTION 52,427,900 Highway Right of Way and Lend SR-60 HOV Lanes behveen 1-215 and Redlands Boulevard 25,000 SR-60 HOV Lanes Right of Way Support Services 100 SR-74Wasson Carryon Road to 7th Street Right of Way Acquisition 700,000 SR-74 Wasson Canyon Road to 7th Street Right of Way Support Services 20,000 SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 745,100 TUMF Right of Way and Land SR-79, Realignment Right of Way Acquiskion 17,500,000 SR-79 Realignment Right of Way Support Services - 30,000 Mid County Parkway Right of Way Acquisition 72,500,000 MSHCP Land Acquisition - Westem County (Commercial Paper) - 25,000,000 MSHCP Land Acquisition - Coachella Valley (Commensal Paper) 15,025,000 Various Westem County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects 7,367,000 SUBTOTAL TUMF RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND - 137,422,000 Rail RigM of Way and Land Perris Valley Line Right of Way Support Services 75,000 Penis Valley Line Right of Way Acquis'k-on - 5,000,000 SUBTOTAL RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 5,075,000 TOTAL' HIG HWAY, TUMF, AND RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 193,242,100 GRAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, TUMF, AND RAIL PROGRAMS $ 245,833,500 77 ooe see'8C2 s 008'(900 Ole S Das agoeLL; 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A0119A+119489a0. 910u9Ly 19u0108a 1p9021Pug +loans reO aeurysiny 6691511 a 119ua11/Wpa11041Le11le1a 9.11.91E PPu9d9 00110910u90 VS12108 Wo1/R.MI^ 14ga 0a19101a9900 . `Ou09149us 95119B1g9ey /...11911.a') 19.1.901 -s0e10101k) gAt., -- - euajV3HaD Ilea - . 1g19ua9 • aloofad +1900 yeddn8 6901.9.1dg 119ua19191ad al8aue8 a00194 pug dales lav4199l+d 838n 1910NYNld 19ada$ lelau9uld P919ug1931y101 14 9m.uul 91999091d 1990 "onuanaa iwnl .Wail l/Muitanul Bead ue m1.16.a 919148A MuaAea ON* u01N0011Y Ygue11 y19 fluawaaln9Wpa n410 aluea9em9ullea lelep9d ' +MaweWn9WNa alms 9e1 SOPS 11- ael uleg y 0.1110Bilh s30a00s]yIONVNId seen pue seolnos )eloueuli peiewps3 Jo laewwns LOOZ • Nor Ad LZ B14e1 Gann Appropriation Limit In November 1979, the voters of the State approved Proposition 4, commonly known as the Gann Initiative. The Proposition created Article XIIIB of the State Constitution, placing limits on the amount of revenue that can be spent by public agencies from the "proceeds of taxes." In 1980, the State Legislature added Section 7910 to the Government. Code, providing that the governing body of each local jurisdiction must establish, by resolution, an appropriations limit for the following year., The appropriation limit for any fiscal year is equal to the previous year's limit adjusted for population . changes and changes in the California per capita income. The Commission is subject to the requirements' 'of Article XIIIB: Gann` appropriation limits are calculated for and applied to the Commission. In accordance with the requirements of Article XIIIB implementing legislation, the Board of Commissioners approved Resolution No. 06-007 on June 14, 2006, establishing appropriations limits for the Commission at $265,455,468. The FY 2006/07 budget appropriated $163,699,900 in taxes for the Commission, falling well within the limits set by the Gann Initiative. Based on historic trends and future projections, it appears the Commission's use of the proceeds of taxes, as defined by Article XIIIB, will continue to fall well below the appropriations limit. .The projected gap between the Commission's projected "use of proceeds" and appropriation limit remains significant over the next decade. The resolution and calculation for the FY 2006/07 appropriation limit are on the following pages. 79 2006-2007 APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT 2005-2006 Appropriations Limit $244,036,843 2006-2007 adjustment: Change in California per capita income Change in Population, Riverside County. 5.16 `+. 100 :...:...... ..... 100 5.16 percent 3.44 percent 1.052 .3,44 + 100 = 1.034 100 ` 1' 052' x 1.034 = 1.087768 .$244,036,843, x 1.087768 = $265,455,468 2006-2007 Appropriations Limit .:...... $265455,468 Source: ' California per capita income - California Department of finance Population, Riverside;Co California Research. Unit 80 SECTION 1 GUIDING POLICIES 81 Commission Policy Goals and Objectives The following material outlines the Commission's adopted policy goals, ;objectives and financial policies that serve as the framework for the work plan presented in the. FY' 2006/07 Budget. Mobility Initiatives The Commission, in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies, will strive to,create -a transportation system that promotes efficient mobility both within the County and regionally. This effort will increase in its intensity in the upcoming "fiscal year with the completion in 2006 of a 10-year delivery plan program and updated., Measure A.revenue projections: With the new :federal transportation act,, Safe, Accountable,, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A; Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), in place and the state , fundingpicture improving', witht:the .addition of Proposition 42 funding, the Commission faces a year of selective strategic opportunities as well as continuing challenges. Complete ;the prioritization of Measure A highway projects covering the two ' expenditure plans from 2006 through 2019. Maximize the use of innovative financing, including public/private partnerships, to support the 2009 Measure A 10-year delivery plan. Continue to work with state and federal agencies to program and construct projects in the STIP, the Measure A, program, and other high; priority projects. Maximize' the effective application and use of.TUMF funds to deliver eligible Commission priority projects. • Continue work ,on ',the project level environmental document for the Mid County Parkway, one of the CETAP corridors. Initiate the next steps on the Riverside County -Orange County CETAP corridor as outlined in the MIS's Locally Preferred Strategy. Actively participate in `the ,SR-91 Advisory Committee to facilitate near and long- i term improvements to,SR-91; enhance intercountypublic transit options and foster the development of a new corridor between the two counties. Workclosely with local, jurisdictions to implement, the FY 2006-2009 TUMF Regional Arterial Program and :facilitate the delivery of arterial improvements in Western County. ► Advocate 'streamlining efforts at the state and federal levels to facilitate timely project reviews, and approvals. Coordinate and provide public access to commuter information to foster the use of alternate modes of transportation such as ridematching for car/vanpooling, transit through the provision of'a regional trip planner, and real-time traffic information for congestion avoidance': Play an active role: in shaping state infrastructure bond proposals that will likely be placed on the November 2006 ballot. Goods Movement. The Commission will work with federal,' state, and local. governments to facilitate the movement of goods and services to, within, and through the County, recognizing the vital role mobility plays in the economic health of the County, the State, and the nation. • Seek funding and implement the Commission's approved, high -priority railroad grade separation priority list to: mitigate the impact of increased goods movement demands on the transportation system. • Promote the use of rail corridors (including the Perris Valley Line within funding constraints) as an alternative to trucks for the movement of freight within the County and the region. Work with county transportation commissions, local jurisdictions, Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA or Metrolink), the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), and the private railroad companies,toward the implementation of a coordinated regional approach to increase rail and highway . capacity for goods movement that includes environmental and communityimpact mitigation. Improved System Efficiency The Commission will select projects and allocate funds in a manner that will improve safety and reduce congested traffic corridors. • • Advocate the development and use of advanced technologies for transportation applications that are affordable and .practical • Work with public and private interests to apply real-time technology to disseminate commuter information that will support the use of altemate modes and improve efficiency of the regional transportation system. • Assure the effectiveness of transit planning through the annual SRTP process with a goal toward promoting program efficiency and effectiveness. • Provide innovative commuter rideshare programs to reduce single occupant vehicle trips and coordinate with other regional rideshare service providers to- address intercounty commute trips. • Through the use of technology, make real-time traffic information available to commuters for the purpose of trip planning and congestion avoidance. • Work with Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to continue providing a motorist aid system which includes a call box program and. an FSP program including temporary services in freeway construction zones. • Continue development, in partnership with Caltrans and SANBAG, of the Inland Empire TMC. 83 Environmental Stewardship;' The Commission will achieve its mobility goals while promoting environmental stewardship I1 and protecting the area's natural resources and quality of life. Continue working with the RCA to implement the MSHCP and ,provide funding to assist in the assembly of the reserve system. Work with SCAG, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), sub -regional. agencies, and .local jurisdictions to develop an&implement an RTP that meets regional air quality goals and conformity guidelines. ' Support outreach and educational programs that promote the benefits .of ridesharing-and availability of help through www.CommuteSmarlinfo and 1=800- COMMUTE. Facilitate private/public use of clean fuels technology. _ <Economic Development Transportation' "decisions will .consider the economic benefits derived from any '. improvement: andwhere feasible and practical, will pursue transportation alternatives that enhance or complement economic development. Support local agencies in the design and construction of interchanges that are in Proximity to regional economic centers and developments. Support local- projects, consistent with countywide transportation goals, ,which enhance business development, local employment, and area tourism. Foster the development of transportation technology research; education, and training efforts of public institutions. within the County. Intermodalism and Accessibility • County residents will be served, where economically feasible; through the development of transportation alternatives' that' consider the needs of a wide range of citizens. Work with transit providers and local social service agencies to provide specialized transit service to meet a broad spectrum of socio-economic transit needs. Integrate commuter assistance. programs and marketing. with transit in order to foster the use of al ternative commuting, modes: a . Implements the Commission's commuter rail,SRTP and the SCRRA long-range strategic plan for 'expansion of the commuter rail system benefiting Riverside County constituents with an emphasis on the Perris Valley Line, an extension from Riverside to Perris' via Moreno Valley. - Participate in the, study of high-speed rail options and support efforts for eventual implementation of a statewide high-speed rail system with emphasis. on the pilot project being in Southern California and including the integration of existing rail passenger? services. 84 • Public and Agency Communications The Commission will provide timely, informative, and accurate information to encourage informed public and agency participation in the Commission's decision -making processes. • Promote a close working relationship with news and civic entities to increase interest in and understanding of transportation and related issues. Enhance the provision of public information through various forms of communication (e.g., website, television, Speakers Bureau, print media, radio, etc). • Maintain an ongoing effort of informing Riverside County's Congressional and State Legislative delegations regarding County transportation issues. 85 Financial and Administration Policies Operating BudgetPolicies The Commission shall budget no more than one percent (1 %) of Measure A sales tax revenue for administrative salaries and benefits: Administrative program delivery costs will be budgeted at whatever is reasonable and necessary, but not to exceed four percent'(4%) of Measure'A sales tax • revenues (inclusive of the one -percent salary limitation). • Amounts will be budgeted by fiscal year for multi -year projects based on best available estimates with the understanding that, to the extent actuals vary from those estimates and the i ongoing basis. + The fiscal capital budget should be consistent with the strategic plan and deviations appropriately noted; explained, and justified. Revenue Policies Sales tax revenue projections will be revised semi-annually to ensure use of current and relevant data. -Staff may adjust annual amounts to reflect the most current economic trends. Federal' and state: matching funds will be used where possible and available to supplement the use of local funding sources. Fiduciary responsibility regarding TUMF revenues .shall be exercised,' and revenues will be. allocated pursuant to Commission direction and the approved 2009 Measure A. Debt Management' Policies" The Commission will maintain 2.0x debt ratio coverage on all senior debt. Debt issuance will be for major capital projects including engineering, construction, ; and right of way. Operating requirements must be from current ongoing revenues. Costs of issuance including the standard underwriter's discount will not exceed two percent (2%). While.it is the intent of the Commission to establish a cash debt reserve for long term bond issuance, ;surety ,bonds can be obtained when, beneficial to the Commission. The commercial paper program will provide advance funding for projects included r, in the expenditure 'plan of the approved 2009 Measure: A. The Commission will consider actions to lessen the restriction of, the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap, which. could include the possibility of a .'ballot measure in 2008 to increase the cap. • • • Auditing, Accounting, and Financial Reporting Policies • The Commission will issue.a Comprehensive Annual. Financial. Report (CAFR) in accordance with the GASB.Statement 34 financial reporting model. • An audit is to be conducted annually, on the Commission's accounting books and records. As long as the Commission has outstanding bonds, an independent accounting firm must conduct the audit. • The Commission is responsible for ensuring that audits of Measure A and TDA funding recipients are completed and reviewed for compliance and other matters in a timely manner. • An internal audit risk assessment program will be implemented to identify improvements in controls and procedures as well as best practices. Capital Planning and Programming Policies • Established priorities will be reviewed annually via a series of workshops and/or policy maker workshop. Reserve Policies • The Commission will maintain a cash reserve at least equal to five percent (5%) of annual revenues (exclusive of reimbursements and matching funds). • The Commission will establish and maintain a transit operator's reserve of ten percent (10%) for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley. Additionally, a ten percent (10%) reserve will be established and maintained for each of the Western County transit operators (public bus and commuter rail). Cash Management/Investment Policies • Where possible, the Commission will encourage receipt of funds by wire transfer to its accounts. • Balances in the bank operating account will be maintained at the amount necessary to meet monthly expenditures. • Idle funds will be invested per the Commission's established investment policy emphasizing in order of priority: 1) safety, 2) liquidity, and 3) yield. • Cash disbursements to local jurisdictions and vendors/consultants will be completed in an expeditious and timely manner. Human Resources Management Policies • Commission staffing levels will be consistent with the intent of its enabling legislation, which envisioned a small, but effective staff. • ' Consultants will be used to augment staff efforts as much as possible to support programs or work loads, which do not appear to be of a permanent nature. 87 Information Technology Policies Significant effort will be made to maintain efficient and cost-effective technology' infrastructure by continuously upgrading network equipment 'and software to ensure performance, productivity, and connectivity among staff, other agencies, and the public. Network security will continue to be a top priority to'maintain the. integrity of the Commission's network and information. • • SECTION 2� BUDGET PROCESS SUMMARY 89 Budget Process Summary The budget is the primary performance tool used to measure and control accountability, of public agencies for taxpayer dollars. Thebudgetcommunicates to all stakeholders (i.e., elected officials, regional agencies, and citizens) how the investment they, made will be put to', use by providing detailed information on thespecifics of resource allocation and expenditures. Progress is monitored on a monthly basis, and revisions' and updates are made as deemed necessary to reflect changing dynamics and accommodating unplanned requests. This results in a budget document that is useful and meaningfulas a benchmark against which to evaluate government accomplishments and/or challenges and to assess compliance ' with fiscal accountability. Chart 5 - Budget Process ID Task Name Duration 2005.: 2006 JIJ AISIOIN i D," J F M 'A MIJIJIA; 1 Short Term Strategic Direction' Phase 105 days 2 Resource Identification and Allocation Phase ' 80 days Needs Assessment Phase 90 days 3 Development and Review Phase 110 days 4 5 Adoption and Implementation Phase 40 days 6 Budget Roles and Responsibilities 225 days Short -Term Strategic Direction Phase The first phase�of the budgetprocess' is to determine the direction of the Commission in the short-term ` and to integrate this with the Commission's long-term goals and objectives. Annually ,a workshop is held for the policy makers to evaluate and determine where the Commission plans to be and what it desires to accomplish over the next -five to ten years. , Annual.: reviews allow for timely responsiveness to any significant g political;: legislative; ' oreconomic developments that may occur locally, statewide, or nationally. Staff then adjusts: its course based on the long-term strategic direction of the policy makers_ Staff convenes in early January to both assess actual results, compared; to: the current year budget, and map changes' in strategy for the ensuing fiscal year by reviewing; and, if necessary; redefining departmental mission statements ,and setting ;goals: Those goals, upon review by the Board, become the Commission's short-term .strategic: direction: 90 Resource Identification and Allocation Phase Simultaneous with the short-term strategic direction .phase, staff focuses on what funding sources are available and what monies areestimated as carryover from the current year. ' In actuality, resource identification occurs throughout the year, but it is finalized in the upcoming fiscal year budget. Amounts to be borrowed are. determined .as part of the 'long-term strategic planning process; but such amounts are adjusted in the annual budget to reflect more current information. Needs Assessment Phase Staff and consultants evaluate what projects and studies need to be ,accomplished. Project priority and sequencing set in the long-term strategic plan are the .top candidates for budget submission. However, priorities may have changed due to economic necessities or political realities, resulting in projects being rescheduled by acceleration or postponement. New projects may be added or existing priorities deleted 'based on Commission direction. Development and Review Phase Using all the data and information gathered from the previously mentioned stages, department heads submit their desired budgets to the finance Department. The information, along with staff and overhead allocations, is compiled into a preliminary or draft budget. After review by the Executive Director and inclusion of the desired changes, the draft budget is presented to the Board for input. Adoption and Implementation Phase The proposed budget is submitted to the Commission at its May meeting. A hearing is scheduled to allow for public comment on the proposed budget. The Commission may choose, after public hearing, to adopt the budget or to request additional information and/or changes to the budget. The budget must be adopted no later than June 15 of each year. if the need arises during the year, staff may transfer part or all of any budgeted balance within financial responsibility units by function. Control of the budget is maintained by distributing monthly status reports to department heads. Corrective action must be documented and submitted to the Finance Department for any significant budget variations. Commission approval is sought for any expenditure that will exceed those amounts allocated to each financial responsibility unit (e.g., Measure A) by broad classification (i.e., administration, programs, debt service, capital outlay, and other financing uses). 91 Budget Roles and Responsibilities Involvement in the: budget permeates all staffing levels at the Commissionfroni clerical suppoit staff to policy makers. Each program manager develops a detailed line item operating and ,capital budget. Those budgets by program are submitted ,to the department head for review and approval. The department heads submit their budgets to the Chief Financial Officer by mid -March. The Finance Department compiles the ' department budgets. Both the capital and operating budgets are combined- into the draft budget for the entire Commission. The Executive Director reviews the' entire budget for overall consistency with both the short and long-term strategic direction' of the : Commission, appropriateness of funding sources for the identified projects. and - .studies, and reasonableness of the operating budget expenditures, which. should also correspond to the capital: budget. 92 CHART 6 - FUNCTIONAL ORGANIZATION CHA• FY 2006/07 • Board of Commissioners Policy Committees Transit Plans & Programs Budget & Implementation Property • Advisory Committees Technical Advisory Citizens Advisory Legal Counsel Executive Management Executive Committee Regional Programs ? Goods Movement ?Commuter Assistance ?Call Box Program ?Freeway Service Patrol ?Rail Operations ?Transit Planning- - Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications ?Clerk of the Board and Board Relations ?Office and Records Management ?Disadvantaged Business Enterprise ?Claims and Insurance ' Administration ., ?Human Resources ?Legislative Advocacy ?Legislative Analysis ?Public Information • andCommunications ?Media Relations Capital Project Delivery ?Highway and Rail Capital Programs ?New Corridors ?Property Management Finance ?Financial Management ?Budget Development ?Contract Management and Procurement Transportation Planning & Programming ?State Transportation Improvement Program ?Regional Transportation Plan ?Congestion Management ?I'UMF Program epsuead ulpeyi LI3`OVNVVC S103ro1:1d 1V11dVO ese4Oelpne{O a01V231SINIINOV A1N3d01d 1 AesAeS ugg a30VNVW AVM d01HOi� IeMee A41e0 601032l10 J.2l3AI130 103rOUd 1 E e;l6ns OaplH �101032i10 anus 03X3 Alf -Ida] ss003 eysews 1NV1SISSV 'ONI1Nn000V-uOINSS Nigeeu emol - 6JecigeH euuV (Z) NVIOINH031 ONI1Nn000V .. saeuso slap 1i30VNVIN 630un033H NVWf1F . 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S3dfi11ON3d)(3 ' S3df1110N3dX31tl101 000'0S1 009'E90'6 000499'0E . 00L'ObE'LZE 00L'Ob£'lZE 001'ee L'S 009'9EE'OE 006'9Z6'£ 004SSE' eb 00b'ZSE 80 000'96Z'9£ • 001'512'9 000'8Z9'f _ .. 001.'209'E OOS'fil l'L 001'SZ9'L ._ 009'190'1 000'530'8 001"Z 10'9 000'ESE 006'1.8E'9E1 006'19f'9El 000'180'4 OOL'S59'Oe oneees'£OL OOP190 P• ". 002'559'0E 002 698'£01 OOL 009. 009 009 OWE - OOL'OZ 001'Z06'L92 OOE'seri 006'Z80't 000'060'2 000'199'LS 000'E90'L OOL'ZZZ'ot OOS'ase'821 O Vas'L - -DOZ'bZS'l o0L'094'El OOZ'lBS'E - .S30N3A3d1V101 006'Z80'L 002'991 000 65Z'Z . 000'000'Zb - 00E'1eZ6'9 000'nE'2 00£'S9Z'l 301Ad3S 1930 6103006d 1V11dV0 000 Z 000'29£ S 000' 180' 1 30NVISISSV 32d NO114'01101 lISNVdl WdOdlNll 31V1S NOIIVIbOd5NVNI 009'LteL'S 009'9E1 001,ZE ' 008'b0E '00Z LL ewooul lueuesenul • • OOE'OEVI 000'5ZZ '00 L'9 . 003'916 009'94Z COVE enuened Ate° .. enuened mill soz'oe's - 000'SZb'L ooe'sLl'L 001'991'L 009 ` Iewinuwenoeuelui- 00L'EZL'01- xsl eel6S dll D00'LOb.'e£ S 000791'.EL L $ S $ S. 000'0051 S eel sales V emseen SSON3A321 A311VA A3llVA ALN1100 3dV5 , dSd• 1Y6130139-. 1V113N30 NO114180630 30413A V-1131-10V00 Nd31SSM d11/01021 V 321l1SV3W - - OlVd - .yy ZAd luewALw yetla0 pup pund Aewng la0pn8 e19e1 V 3d115%044 • Fund Budgets Budgetary Basis The Commission accounts for its 23 budgeted governmental funds using the modified accrual basis of accounting. and the current financial resources measurement focus. Revenues are recognized as soon as they are both measurable and available to meet current year obligations. Revenues are considered to be available when they are guaranteed as to receipt, based on expenditure of funds (i.e., government matching funds), or certain to be received within 180 days of the end of the fiscal year. Expenditures are generally recorded when a liability isincurred; however, debt service expenditures are recorded when the payment is due: Chart 8 — Total Fund Expenditures and Transfers Out (Uses) Debt Service Fund 7% Capital Project Funds .20% . General Fund 4% Special Revenue Funds 69% Budget Authorization and Amendment Process The Commission authorizes expenditures according to administration, programs, capital outlay, and debt service as well as other financing uses. As long as management does not exceedbudgeted amounts in these broad classifications, it, may transfer amounts among individual line items according to function and between financial responsibility units defined as the General, Measure A, Motorist Assistance, STA, TUMF, Capital Projects, and Debt Service funds. Any other budget changes require the authorization of the Commission. The Commission may take action at any monthly meeting to amend the budget. Those amendments are incorporated into the budget as they occur and are reflected in the CAFR in the final budget amounts reported in the budgetary schedules. Fund Structure There are a total of 23 funds which account for the Commission's budgeted resources categorized into four governmental fund types: General fund, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, and Debt Service fund. There are six funds reported in the General fund and 14 in the special revenue funds. Two capital projects funds are used to account for capital project expenditures financed with short or long-term debt 97 proceeds. In addition, the „Commission has one Debt Service fund to account for debt related activity. Non -Budgeted Funds In addition .to the, 23 budgeted governmental funds, the. Commission has another. special, revenue fund and two fiduciary funds comprised of an agency fund 'and `a private -purpose trust fund. The Commission does not adopt budgets for these three funds. The monies in the special revenue fund are the Riverside County LTF administered by the 'Commission. These LTF monies are .monitored and controlledby means of an annual allocation process and by legal and statutory requirements. General Fund Overview' The General' fund of the Commission is used to account for all activities not legally ,. required or designated by Board action to be accounted for separately.'For many 'public agencies the General fund is .the largest fund. .The Commission's ,largest source is. Measure A, a locally ,levied sales tax which .legally, must be separately accounted for. The. General fund receives a portion of the Measure A, sales tax revenue for administration and operation of the Commission. The Commission's .commuter rail . operations, short-range transit, 'planning,`. fund programming, property management, clean fuel and air" and a portion administration are accounted :for in the General fund. The revenue sources for the 'General .fund are Measure A sales tax for administration, LTF sales tax, for administration and planning, LTF Article funds forr commuter rail transit operations and capital, user fees from licenses, state highway`ac'count (SB 45) funding for project planning, 'various ,other state and' federal reimbursements not accounted for in other funds, and investment income. ;i. ... Chart 9-'General ,Fund Sources • Table 23 - General Fund Sources FY 2004 - 2007 FY 03I04 FY 04105 FY 05I06 FY 05I06 FY 06107 % Change % Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Actual Revised MEASURE A SALES TAX $ 3.000,000 $ 3,000,000 $ 3,090,000 $ 3,090,000 $ 3,500,000 16.7% 13.3% LTF SALES TAX Article 3 Administration 756.700 675.000 700,600 700,000 750,000 11.1% 71% A rticM 3 Planning 1,550,300 1.822,800 2,643,400 2,643,400 2,245,500 23.2% -15.1% Article 4 Transit 5,000,000 .5,192.800 9,110,000 9,110,000-7,728,200 48.8% -15.2% STATE FUNDING STIP 85,600 231,400 563,300 53,900 1,947,000 741.4% 233.8% "Other 7,200 - - _ - 0.0% 0.0% FEDERAL FUNDING STIP _ 660,600 7,100 - - -100-0% 0.0% Other 676,000 404,000.709,500 407.300 50,000 -87.6% -93.0% OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS Local - 194,600 375,700 546,100 175,800 190,000 -49.4% -65.2% Miscellaneous - 11,000 26,100 1,000 29,300 1,700 -93.5% 70.0% USER FEES Licenses 395,300 547,100 180,000 225,000 200,000 -63.4% 11.1% OTHER 300,900 197,300 226,200 106,500 47,000 -76 2% -79.2% INTEREST . 43,500 163,000 237,100 . 117,500 382,000 134.4% 61.1% TRANSFER IN - 190,100 - 2,883,100 1416.5% NIA TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 12 671 70Q $ 12832.40Q $ 18 026 611Q $ 16.658.104 $ 19.924.50Q $5.3%. 105°A Measure A sales tax revenues are used for administration and have increased .13.3% compared to the prior year to offset increased expenditures. The administrative allocation is adjusted at mid -year based on required expenditures, but in no event will exceed four percent (4)/0) of total Measure A revenues (including administrative salaries and benefits). LTF sales tax revenues .fund administration, planning staff and studies, and transit , operations and capital for rail services. The changes compared to the prior year budget are for the following reasons: • Planning money is set by taw at three percent (3%) of estimated LTF sales tax revenues. .The FY 2005/06 revised budget includes the effect of. the mid -year projection adjustment. This adjustment usually includes the unapportioned carryover amount, which is not determined until after the fiscal year end. Transit funding is also tied to sales tax revenue growth. The allocation of funding to commuter rail and bus transit operators, however, is based on need. 99 Table 24 - General Fund Uses FY 2004 - 2007 'FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 %.Change (15 Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected. Budget Actual Revised Personnel Salary and fringe Benefits i$ 1,993,200 $ 2.116,800 $ 2,597,800 $." 2,400,900 $ 3,267,700 54.4%; 25.8% Professional and Support General Legal Services . Financial Services: Audit Sen4ces Professional Services -Other Lease/Utilities -General Communications ' Maintenance Insurance Staff Related - Information/Publicity - r SUBTOTAL" • Project and Operations . Projects - General Rail Oper'afions SCRRA Contribution - Special Studies SUBTOTAL' Other LTF Disbursements Capital Outlay . 265,000 287,700 338.500 285,500 _ 369,400 28,4% .9.1% 44,800 49,800 47,600 67,100 95,209 91.2% 4100.0% 488,100 342,100 355,000 326,700 495,000 ' . 44.7% 39.495 711,000 928,400 1,617.100 1,295,900 •4,299,100 362.1%--165.3% 283,600 300,600 356,900 352800 - 368,600 22.6% 3.3% 210,500 223,700 295,500 275,200 321,400 43.7% 8.8% 49,400 46,300 46,900 34,400 39,200 -15.3% -16.4% 50,400 63,800 137,500 • 52,100 '. �.58,100 - -8.996 57.7% 124,900 348,200 476,400 . 475,900 475,800 36.6% -0.1°% 108.300 95,800 154,400 114,500 177,900 85.7% , 15.2% 122.900 141.70Q 265.600 270100 250.200 76.6% ' '-5.8% 2,458,900 2,828,100 4,091.400 3,550,200 6,940,900 145.4% �361.900 70,600 47,400 92,700 315,6Q0: 347.0% 585.8% 1,178,800 1,427,800 1,546,300 1,346,600 1,590;600 - 11S4% 2.9% 3,167,800 3,214,600 4,950,500 4,916,100' '5,551,8004, 72.796 12.1% 936.800 1.155600 1.899.600-535.200 1.785.700. 5,868,800 8,443,800 6,890,600 9,243,70057.5% 750,200 706,200 1,909,100 1,911.300 1,042,800 114 00Q 179.900 - 85 700'95200 i 1 2,089,000 1,997,000 : 1,138,000 . 7.600 SUBTOTAL ,.. _ 757,800, . - 820,200 Debt Service - Principal Payments _ 25,500 28,100 28,100 .24,400 5.6% 13.295 Interest Payments 4A00 1.900 1.900 600 - SUBTOTAL 29,900 . 29.800 30,000 -. - 30,000 -16.1%-16.7%- TRANSFERS OUT 192:20Q'. 400 ,-100096 - 0.05i TOTAL GENERAL FUND' ' $ 11 077 30Q $ • 11"664 10Q 't 17 752 000 $ 14 855 70n " 4 20 615 300� 26,700 3.100 251100 76 7% 454 Personnel salary andfringe benefits have increased from the FY 2005/06 budget by 25.8%. This increase is dia'eto increased salaries related to nevi,staffand merit increases and PERS and; workers'.' compensation costs Professional and 'support expenditures' have increased by 69 6%- 'The increase is primarily related, to professional services for strategic partnership efforts. Project and operations expenditures have increased by 9.5% primarily due to costs related to maintenance of highway properties and to commuter rail operating and capital subsidies. Other expenditures have decreased by 45.5% due to reduced LTF disbursements for various planning and programming activities which are directly affected by LTF planning revenues available. • Special Revenue funds Overview The Commission's special revenue funds are legally restricted as to use. Measure A sales tax, Western County TUMF, state budgetary allocations, and vehicle registration fees are all accounted for in 14 special revenue funds. State and federal reimbursements and project matching funds are used to supplement. the Measure A sales tax revenues. The special revenue funds' resources are expended on County highway, rail, and regional arterial engineering, construction, and right of way acquisition; local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction; education and incentive programs to encourage ridesharing; special social service transportation programs; fixed _route transit operation and capital needs; and motorist towing and freeway call box assistance. REVENUES Chart 10 - Special Revenue Funds Sources Interest_ 3% Other 1% TUMF 15% Federal Revenues— , 5% State Revenues 3% Transfer In 17% LTF 0% Measure A 56% 101 Table 25 — Special Revenue Funds Sources FY 2004 — 2007 • FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 % Change . % Change Actuar Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Actual i 'Revised MEASURE A SALES TAX - Highways $ 38.074.900 $ 44,288,500 $ 46,694,000 $ 46,694,000 $ 49.328,000 11.4%' 5.6% . Rail 14.062,000 16,418,400 17,716,000 17,716,000 .18.672,000 :-13-7% 5.4%- Regional Arterials - 11,911.000 13,462,900 14,284,000 14,284,000 • 15,363,000 - .14,1% 7.6% Local Streets and Roads 45,205.500 53,325,900 56,577,000 56,577,000 59,788,000 12.1% 5.7% Specialized Transit 7,311.400 8,425.600 8,939,000 8,939.000 9.499.000 12.7% 6.3%.: TOTAL MEASURE A- 117,564,800 135,921300 144.210,000 144,210,000 152650,000 1:12.3% 5.9% LTF SALES TAX ' Aritale 4 Transit - 505,500 2,800 248,700 '8782.1% N/A STATE FUNDING FSP;Budgetary Allocation 807,50D 1,369200 1.009,200 .1,051,400 .:'1.175,900 -14.1% , 16.5% STIP - -• 7,700 194.200 86500 1,313,300 - 576.3%.:: N/A State Transit Assistance 2,899,100 3,348,700 5,913,600 ,3,891,700 "6,924,300 _ 106.8% -17.1% State Other, 2,926,400 3,365,500 2,425.000 - 161,000 97.0% ' -95:8% FEDERAL. FUNDING •- ' Federal Transit Administration-.. _ 274,900 143,100 9,025000 ..STIP . Surface Transportation Program 264,800 (500) - - Congestion Mitigation and Air QualBy 16,711,600 "'13,869.500 20.383,200 1Federal Other - - 4,221.800" 6,294,500 'OTHER REIMBURSEMENTS'"'.' Local - 573,900 1,014,000 498,400.. 59,700 (Miscellaneous - 84,8130 20,000 ' 725,000 1600 USER FEES Vehicle. Registration fees 1,435,100 1,541.200 1,425.000 1.425000 .:1,425,000 TUMF REVENUE - 35,615,200 46,325.300 45.825.000 •' 45,266,90D 42;000,000 -8.3% OTHER 3,319,500 2,373,600 1,726,200 3,534,700 1,976,600 _---16.7% -14.5% —INTEREST 957,600 2,668.900 4.144.800 3,182,500 8,768,800-228.6% .111.6% TRANSFERS IN 14,759.200 3 147.800 11 078,300 253.000 44.695,200 1319.9% " 303.4% TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS $ 1912DLEQ0 $ 219.526 40Q $ 254 666200 $ 203.739.600 $ -276 207 700 25diSk - Measure A Special Revenue Funds Of the special 'revenue funds, 10 are funded primarily with Measure A`'sales tax." revenue; the five Westem County operating funds, the four Coachella: Valley operating funds, and the Palo . Verde . Valley operating fund. These 10 funds accountfor all Measure A expenditures that are not paid from debt proceeds. Chart 11— Measure A Sales Tax, • Western County Measure A Operating Funds These special revenue funds account for Western County's 74% share of the Measure A sales tax. Since the sales tax leverages state and federal dollars, most of the Commission's reimbursements flow through this fund. Chart 12 — Western County Percentage of Total Special Revenue Fund Sources Remaining Commission Revenues 51% Table 26 — Western County Measure A Operating Funds Sources FY 2006 — 2007 . FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Measure A Sales Tax Highways Rail .. Local Streets and Roads Commuter Assistance Specialised Transit Total. Measure A Local Transportation Fund Sales Tax State Funding State Other STIP Federal Funding Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Federal Other Federal Transit Administration Other Miscellaneous Revenue Interest' Transfer In TOTAL Western County Measure A 41,337,000 17.716,060 42,946,000 2,684,000 2.684.000 107,367,000 2,425,000 $ 43,567,000 $ 18.672,000 45,265,000 2,829,000 2.829.000 20,363,200 6,294,500 . . 9,028,000 1,223,400 2,114,400 815.500 W eslern County Operating 49% Dollar % Change Variance 'Estimated 2,230,000 5.4% 956,000 2,319,000 5.4% 145,000 5.4% 145,000 5.4% 113,162,000 5,795,000 5.4% 248,700 248,700 N/A 101,000 (2,324,000) -95.8% 1,313,300 1,313,300 _ N/A 3,309.800 3,715,000 767,100 5,747.600 7.019.500 (17,053,400) (6,294,500) . (5,313,000) (456,300) 3,633.200 6,204.000 - 83.7% -100.0% - 58.9% - 37.3% 171.8% 760.8% $ 149.631.006 $ 135 384.000 $ (14.247.000) As Table 26 demonstrates, total revenues for the Western County operating funds are 9.5% below the prior year's budget, principally due to decreases in federal funding. All the programs funded by Measure A are projected to receive an increase of 5.4% in sales tax revenues compared to the prior year. Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds These special revenue funds account for Coachella Valley's 25% share of the Measure A sales tax. 103 , sales tax. Chart 13 - Coachella Valley Percentage of Total Special Revenue Fund Sources 1, Other Funds 85% Table 27.- Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds Sources FY 2006 -I2007 Measure A Sales Tax Highways Regional Arterials Local Streets and Roads Specialized Transit Total Measure A Other MiscellaneousRevenue. Interest TOTAL Coachella. Valley' Measure As' ' Coachella v Valley Operating FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar. % Change Revised Budget ' Budget Variance Estimated $ 5,357,000 $ 5,761,000 $ 404,000 7.5% 14,284,000 15,363,000 1,079,000' 7.5% 12,499,000. - 13,442,000„ 943,000 7.5% 3,571,000 3,841000 ' 270,000; 7.5% 35,711,000 38,407,000 2,696,000 7.5% 1,430;300 100 0.0% 385.400 ` 243,500+ 171.0% 1,430,200 141,900 $ 37283.100: $ > 40.222.700.. $ 2,939 600` LEA i All the programs funded by Measure A are projected to receive an increase' of 7.5% in . sales tax revenues compared to the prior year. Other revenues, represent. the. -Coachella Valley's TUMF programs share of the debt service on the 1993 Series A' sales tax revenue bonds used to fund regional arterial improvements. Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund This special revenue fund accounts for Palo Verde Valley's 1 % share of Measure A Chart 14 - Palo Verde Valley Percentages of Total Commission Revenues Remaining Commission ;Revenues 100% r, • • • Table 28 - Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund Sources FY 2006 - 2007 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Interest TOTAL Palo Verde Valley Measure A FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar % Change Revised Budget Budget Variance Estimated $ 1;132;000 $ 1,081,000 $ (51,000) -4.5% 1,300 2.000 700 53.8% $ 1.133.300 . $ 1.08.34QQ $ (50.300) -4.4% The Palo Verde Valley local streets and roads program funded by Measure A is projected to receive a decrease of 4.5% in sales tax revenues compared to the prior year. Non -Measure A Special Revenue Funds The TUMF fund accounts for the Commission's share of developer fee assessments on new residential and commercial developments in Western County. TUMF revenue is projected to decrease 8.3% based on a 2004 Taussig study as well as conservative estimates based on recent actual trends. Federal revenues are related to federal reimbursements on the SR-79 realignment project and the Corona 1-15 Cajalco interchange regional arterial project. The transfer in consists of reimbursements from commercial paper for the purchase of right of way related to the Mid County Parkway project. Table 29 - Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund Sources FY 2006 2007 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar % Change Revised Budget Budget Variance Estimated Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee $ 45.825,000 $ 42,000,000 $ (3,825,000) -8.3% Federal Other - 7,362,000 7,362,000 0.0% Interest 1,749,300 2,299,400 550,100 31.4%' Transfer In 10,000.000 37,300,000 27,300 000 273.0% TOTAL TUMF $ 57.574 300 $ 88.961,AQQ, $ 31.387.100 Chart 75 - FSP and SAFE Fund Sources FSP 55% 54.5% The FSP fund accounts for the state and local resources provided to cover the costs of servicing stranded motorists by means of towing, changing tires, and providing fuel 105 Table 30 - Freeway Service Patrol Fund Sources FY 2006 - 2007 State Budgetary Allocation - Other Miscellaneous Revenue Interest Transfer from SAFE TOTAL Freeway Service. Patrol The SAFE fund accounts for the $1 per vehicle registration fee levied on all registered vehicles within the County.. It funds emergency aid call boxes located strategically on !' the highways throughout the County. Table 31:-'Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies Fund Sources FY 05/06 Revised Budget $ 1,009,200 291,000 20,800 262.800 • FY 06/Or Budget Dollar Variance 1,175,900 $ 166,700 316,200 25,200 32,100 ° 11,300 375.700 112,900 16.5% - 8.7% 54.3%' ' 43.0% FY 2006 -12007 " .Vehicle Registration Fees Othe) Miscellaneous Revenue+ Interest,. TOTAL SAFE $ 1.5_83.800 $ 1.899.900- $ 316.100 FY D5/06 Revised Budget 1,425,000 5,000 69,100 Dollar Variance 1,425.000;` $ 5,100 136.600 , • % Change'. Estimated 0.0% 2.0% 67,500 97.7,% 1.499.190 $ 1,566 70f) $ 67.600 The .STA fund accounts for the state budgetary allocation for rail' and bus transit operations and capital requirements. The allocation is strictly based on estimates of gas tax revenues and is providedby the Controller of the State of California. It .is subject to annual state budget appropriation. Table<32 - State Transit'Assistance Fund Sources FY. 2006 - 2007 FY'05/06 , Revised Budget State Budgetary Aliocation' $ 5,913,600 $ Interest 48,900 . TOTAL State Transit. Assistance I' Chart 16 - Special Revenue Funds Uses'; FY 06/07 ,'.: , Dollar % Change Budget Variance ` Estimated 6,924300' $ 1,010,700 "17.1% 165,700, - . • 117.700 2452% 5.961600 $ 7.090.000 '$ 1.12/3.40Q 18.9.4 Transfer -Out 12% 106 Projects and Operations 70% I Table 33 - Special Revenue Funds Uses FY 2004 - 2007 Personnel Salary and Fringe Benefits FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06107 % Change 1° Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected - Budget • Actual Revised 587,800 5 849.100 $ 1,294,700 $ 926,906 $ 1368,600 •61.2% 5.7% Professional and Support - General Legal Services 745,700 1,024.900 1,302300 1,063300 ' 940,400 -8.2% -27.8% Financial Services 2,100 2.500 - 2,400 , 3,400 . 4,800 92.0%.', 100.0% Audit Services 32.500 16,400 23900 19200 25,000 52.4% 8.7% Professional Services -Other 572,000 680,300 748,900 615500 1,134,500 66.8% 51.5% Lease/Utilities 21,000 • 19800 23,000 - 22,700 23,900 20.1% 3.9% General ' 255,800 . 301.800 ; 302,200 221,500 270,900 -10.2% -10.4% Communications 40,200 42,800 50,500 42,400 44,600 4.7% -11.7% .Maintenance 31,400 22800 56,800 18.700 25,500 143°k -55.1% lrrsurance 6,600 17,600 24,200 24200 24,200 37.5% 0.0% Staff Related - 20,800 20.600 76,600 24.000 68,500 - 232.5% - , -10.6% Information/Publicity • 235.100 51,500 262 060 393.300 • 248.200 381.9% -5.3% TOTAL PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORT 2,263,200 2,200,400 2,871,900 2,452,200 2,810,500 27.7%„ -2.1% Projects and Operations Program Management 1,993,200 1,779900 2,034.706 1.607,100 2,575,500 - 44.8% 26.6% Park and Ride Lease Payments 40,000 38,000 100,000 41,000 75,000 97.4% -25.0% Projects -General 7900- 4,700 .'131.500 24,200 ,134,400 36400.0% 1204.6% .SAFE Operations 578,500 565,300 2,173,700 767,200 1,715,500 178.3% • -27.6% Towing 1,222,000 1,439,000 1,431,000 1,429,800 1,573,000• 39.3%.• 40.0% Commuter Assistance 1,638,800 1,588,500 2,020,700 1,517,800 2,004,160 26.2% . -0.8% • Engineering 3,355,000 10,382,400 59427,000 19,446,400 47,193,000 354.5%-20.8%� Construction 31.327900 28,913,400 38,271,900 19,211,100 43,927.900 ' 51.9% 14.8% Right of Way - 4,380,200 13,964260 43,042.700 9,883,700 103,217.100 r 639.2% 139.8% ' _ Special Studies 192,200 1,271.000 257,000 500,600 105,000 - -91.7% -63.4% Specialized Transit. 4,268,300 4,846.100 5995900 4,694,100 7,666,700 58.2% ,.50.5% . Stale Transit Assistance 1,958,200 -2,050,200 5,967,000 3937900 ' 6,718,700 227.7% 12.6% Regional Arterials - Coachella Valley 8,244,200 ' 10,053,700 9,993.900 . 8,563,700 13,719,400 36.5% 37.3% SCRRA Contdbution - - 367,200 613.900 - 500.000 0.0% 36,_2% TOTAL PROJECTS AND OPERATIONS 59,206,400 76,895,500 170.343.300 72,138900 231.125.300 200-6% 35.7% Other Local Streets and Roads 46,206,300 53,330,700 55,106,500 55.106,500 58,318,300 9.4% 5.8% Capdal Outlay 400 85800 729.100 391.300 599.800 811.6% -17.7% TOTAL OTHER 46,206,700 53.396,500 55,835.600 55,497,800 58,918,100 10.3% 5.5% Debt Service Principal Payments . 1,300 1,500 1,400 1,400 1,200 -20.0% • -14.3% Interest Payments 200 100 100 100 --100.0%-100.0% TOTAL DEBT SERVICE • 1,500 1.600 1,500 1,500 1200 -25.0% • -20.0% TRANSFERS OUT - - 27,058400 34.156.600 36.561.500 35.736.200 39,180,500 - 14.7% 7.2% TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS $ 135 324 QQ9 9 167 4$$ 700 $ 266 9011 5DQ $ 166.753.100 $ 333 404 200 99.0% 24.225 Measure A Special Revenue Funds The Measure A special revenue funds expend monies on capital construction and improvements to highways, commuter rail, regional arterials, and local streets and roads- Funding is also reserved for commuter assistance and specialized transit programs- The Commission is considered a self-help county, and, as such on major highway projects, the Commission supplements the State's spending. Upon completion of the projects, Caltrans takes over the projects. All revenues from the Measure A sales tax have been . pledged as securityfor the Commission's senior sales tax revenue bonds and commercial paper notes. Debt 107 service on the bonds is ,recorded in the Debt Service fund, and most of the resources for the cash payments are provided by the Measure A special revenue funds. "Debt`' service, consisting, principally of interest, for the commercial paper notes is recorded in a capital projects fund,' as the notes will be paid from 2009 Measure A sales tax'. revenues. Table'34 - Western County Measure A Operating Funds Uses FY 2006 2007 Personnel, Professional and Support - Measure A Program Management Park and Ride Lease Payments ` Projects -General Highway Engineering Highway Construction Highway Right of Way Rail:Engineering Rail Construction Rail Right of Way Commuter Assistance 'Specialized Transit Local Streets and Roads Special, Studies - " SCRRA Contribution Capital'Outlay Transfer Out for Debt,Service ,TOTAL Western County Measure A FY 05/06 Revised Budget FY 06/07 Budget $ 3,185,100 $ 3,273,200 $ 1,826,700 2,266,500 100,000 75,000 5,000 30,125,000 4,877,000 18,659,200 35,370,500 11,872,700 745,100 7,276,000 7,450,000 2,089,000 1,738,500 5,050,000 5,075,000 2,020,700 2,004,100 1,330,100 3,162,500 41,475,500 43,795,300 282,000 100,000 367.200 500,000 " 720,000'595,000 27,584,800 27,805.800 Dollar " Variance 88,100 439,800 (25,000) 5,000 (25,248,000) 16,711,300 (11,127,600) 174,000. (350,500). . 25,000 (16,600)" 1,832,400 2,319,800 (182,000) 132,800 (125,000) 221,000 $ 153.964.000 $ 138 838.500 $ " (15.125.500) Table 35 - Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds Uses FY, 2006 - 2007, Personnel, Professional and Support Measure A Program Management Highway Engineering Highway Construction% Regional Arterials Specialized Transit' Local Streets and Roads Transfer Out for Debt Service.., .,FY 05/06 , Revised Budget 18,700 $ 23,200 746,000 1,311,600 9,993,900 3,764,900 . 12,499,000 7,898,400 FY 06/07 Budget % Change, Estimated 2.8% 24:1% 25.0% 0.0% -83.8% 89.6% 93.7%q 2:4% -16.8% 0.5% -0.8% 137.8°% 5.6% -64.5% 36.2% -17.4% 0.8°% Dollar °%Change Variance Estimated 42,400 $ 23,700 126.7°% 31,000 7,800 33.6% 1,450,000 704,000 , 94.4% 1,970,900 659,300 ''50:3% 13,719,400. 3,725,500 0, 37.3% 4,504,200 '. '739,300 las% 13,442,000 943,000 7.5% 7.899.000: 600 . 0.0°% TOTAL Coachella' Valley Measure A ': $ "36.255.70Q $' 43.058.900° $ 6.803,200 Table 36 Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund Uses FY 2006 - 2007 FY 05/06 Revised Budget , Local Streets "and Roads TOTAL Pala Verde Valley Measure A'') $ = 1.132.000 $' 1 081.000 - $ (51.000) 4.5%Q' FY 06/07 Dollar,; Budget Variance- 18,8% % Change •_. Estimated 1,132,000 $ ` 1.081.000 $ (51.000} . -4:5% In, the Palo Verde Valley, 100% of the Measure A expenditures, is related to local streets and roads... - Non -Measure A Special Revenue Funds The non -Measure A special revenue funds account for TUMF Western County project costs, transit disbursements from STA, and motorist assistance expenditures including towing service and freeway call boxes. These activities are budgeted in the TUMF, STA, FSP, and SAFE funds, respectively. The TUMF fund accounts for the expenditures in the Western County on regional arterial projects, including the CETAP corridors. , Table 37 — Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund Uses FY 2006 — 2007 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar % Change Revised Budget Budget . Variance Estimated Personnel, Professional and Support $ 489,200 $ 442,900 $ (46,300) -9.5% Program Management 184,800 278,000 93,200 50A% TUMF Engineering 21,280,000 33,416,000 12,136,000 57.0% TUMF Construction 16,212,100 4,848,000 (11,364,100)-70.1°% TUMF Right of Way 26,120,000 97,397,000 71,277.000 272.9% Transfer Out 815,500 3,100,000 2.284.500 280.1% TOTAL TUMF • $ 65.101.600 $ 139.481,900 $ 74.3M300 114.3% The STA fund is used to account for the state budgetary allocation of gas tax revenues designated for transit purposes. The budget assumes that the entire state grant and carryover from the prior year is allocated to claimants. Theactual allocation will not occur until early summer. Table 38 — State Transit Assistance Fund Uses FY 2006 — 2007 Personnel, Professional and Support Claimant Allocations TOTAL State Transit Assistance FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar % Change Revised Budget Budget Variance Estimated $ 400 $ 400 $ 0.0% 5.967,000 6.718,700 751,700 12.6% $ 5.967.400 $ 6.719.10Q $ 751.70Q 12.6% The FSP fund accounts for the Commission's towing service, which is jointly funded by Caltrans and the Commission. The program also includes services to construction zones to help mitigate congestion. 109 Table 39 - Freeway Service Patrol Fund Uses FY:2006 - 2007 'FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Personnel; Professional and Support $ 128,800 $ 194,000 $ 65,209 50.6% Towing 1,431,000 1,573,000 142,000 •j' 9.9% Projects - General" 128,300 126,900 (1,400) Capital Outlay • 4,900 2,600 (2,300) -46.9% Debt Service' 800 600 (200) -25.0% TOTAL Freeway Service Patrol $ 1.693.800 $ 1.897.100 $ 203.300 12.0% The SAFE fund accounts for the installation and maintenance of a ;freeway call box system within the, County.; . Table 40 - Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies. Fund Uses FY 2006 - 2007 Personnel;. Professional. and Support Access Charges Preventive'Maintenance Corrective. Maintenance Knockdowns Operating Costs Vandalism ' Equipment Maintenance Call Boxes. Special Studies Projects - General Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfer to FSP TOTAL SAFE Capital' Projects Fundsi Overview FY 05/06 • Revised Budget 344,400 88,800 '4,300 4,300 10,000 62,500 • 1,500 2,002,300 5,000 3,200 4,200 700 262,800 FY 06/07 Budget $ 226,200 69,000 4,600 4,600 10,000 70,600 1,000 1,555,700 5,000 2,500 2,200 600 375,700 2.794.000 $ 2.327.74Q Dollar Variance $ ! •(118;200) • (19,800) 300 ' 300 % Chacige Estimated 34.3% 7.0%' 7.0% 0.0%_ 8,100, 13.0% (500)' " 33.3% (446,600) ; =22.3% 0.0% (700) -21.9% . (2,000) ••47.6% (100) -14.3% 112,900 , 43.0% $' ' Ile& 300]' The capital projects: funds ,,account for all debt proceeds from senior bonds and commercial paper notes. ; Major expenditures are primarily for. ;highways _ including interchanges. The last senior debt issuance by the Commission was in July 2000; in March •2005 a commercial paper program was established to advance project development and land and ;right of way acquisition related to the 2009 .Measure A • • Chart 17 - Capital Projects Funds Revenues Investment Income 3% Debt . Proceeds 97% Investment income includes interest payments from the cities of Temecula, Canyon Lake, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and Corona for outstanding loans made from bond proceeds. Table41 Capital Projects Funds Sources FY 2004 - 2007 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05106 FY 06/07 % Change % Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Actual Revised Interest - $ 551,900 $ 208,000 '$ '.377,600 $ 659,800 $ . 2,082,900 901.4% 451.6% Debt Proceeds - 30 005 000 55.000.000 - 80.000000 166.6% 45.5% TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS $ 551 90Q $ 30 213 00Q $ 55.377.60Q $ 659 800 $ - 82 082.90Q 171.7% 4822f As substantially all of the remaining debt proceeds from the 2000 bond issue have been expended on highway projects through FY 2003/04, project expenditures in FY 2005/06 and FY 2006/07 are primarily funded by commercial paper proceeds. Table 42 - Capital Projects Funds Uses FY 2004 - 2007 General Legal Services Financial Services Professional Services Program Management Engineering Construction ROW1Land Mitigation Special Studies Interest Payments Arbitrage rebate tax Cost of Issuance Transfers out FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05106 FY 06/07 % Change % Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected - Budget Actual Revised $ $ 900 $ - $ 12,300 $ --100.0% 0.0% 500,000 5,100 - 0.0%-100.0% 28,000 251,500 427A00 0.0% 1426.4% 700.000 - 400,000 0.0%-42.9% 4,845.400 - 0 0%-100.0% - 17,648,400 - 8,500,000 0.0% -51.8% 1,271,200 43.700.000 8,531,200 40,025,000 3048.6% -8.4% 39,800 - 0.0% 0.0% 111,600 1,500,000 899,400 3,926,900 3416..7% 161.8% - 2,141,600 - - --100.0% 0.0% - 438,600 400,000 - - 150,000 -65.8% - -62.5% 14,272,500 2.893.200 10.000000 43.872,600 1416A% 338.7% TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS $ 14 272 50Q S 6.857 1QQ $ 9.739.300 $ 97 301 90Q 1319 0% 2Z,n 111 Debt Service Fund Overview The Debt Service fund of the Commission is used to: account for all „activities related to the sales tax revenue bonds debt ;incurred by the Commission. The Commission's largest single expenditure is debt service. The Commission made a conscious decision to issue debt to complete projects in the earlier years of the 1989 Measure A. This . strategy brought quick relief to the transportation needs of Riverside County. • As a result, the Commission has four outstanding bond issues. Under the provisions of 1989 Measure A as amended by Ordinance No. 92-1 (Measure AA); the Commission has the authority to issue bonds subject to a bond debt limitation of $525,000,000. The bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of the sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate amounts. These monies are includedin the restricted investments held by trustee in capital projects fund and the Debt Service fund. "A portion of the debt reserve requirement has `been satisfied with surety policies purchased from a major insurance company and held .by the trustee. Under the agreements, the Commission may use sales tax revenues for any lawful purpose related to the Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) afterthe trustee has satisfied debt service requirements. Under the 2009 Measure A program, the Commission will have the authority to issue bonds subject to a debt limitation of $500,000,000. Chart 18 - Debt Service Fund Sources Investment Income l 3% Table 43 - Debt Service Fund Sources FY 2004 - 2007 FY 03/04 , ,;FY 04/05. FY 05f06 FY05/06 " Actual ' `-Actual Revised Budget Projected Interest $ 1,381,500 ; $ 1,500,700 $ 694,10D $ 1.650,300 $ 1,265.300 -15-7% ,' 82.3%. Other Revenue (39,000) _ .`- N/A N/A' Transfers In - , 26.763.900 - 33.712.300 35.483200 35 483.200 35.474.800 5.2%- TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND $ - 28.106 400 $ 35.213.000 $ 36 177 300 $ 37.133.500 . $ 36 740 10Q 112 • Table 44 - Debt Service Fund Uses FY 2004 - 2007 Principal Payments Interest Payments FY.03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 % Change % Change Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Actual Revised $ 26.290.000 $ 27.200.000 $ 28.640,000 $ 28,640,000 $ 30,338,600 11.5% 5.9% 9187.200 ' '8:265.500 6.843.200 6.843,200 5.136.100 -38.0% -24.9% TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND $ 35 477 20Q R 35 485 509 $ 35 483 200 $ 35 483 900 $ 35 474.909 - 0.0% 113 77- 00Z SS6 alb $ OO1 14£'9LL $ 004 C9 L D4 9 ODO SZb I $ 000 Z 1b L $ 000 SU 9 009 60ET S 006'9LZ 1 00E 096 E S 00£ 4Z6 9 00L'ES0E9 00L'ES0•E9 000'000'09 000'000'09 009'LZS'L 00L'94E 00$'49$'l 00$'6£L - 004'9E9'2 00L'E69 001'ZeS 00E'PE '9 00£'SOE 00$1:$9'E COE'SL 009'990'9 004'S0E 000'0L 00CE£E'4 00Z'LZ 000'03L 000'060'L 00L'S9L 009'649'6S O0S'1.9 009'20 L'L L, 00E1:LE 000'09'LS 004.66Z'2 004'64S'SZ 004'006'1. 006' 9V119 - O04'6 L4'9 0001Z4' L 000'03 009'0E4'L - 000'000'Z4 000'Z9E'L 000'SLL'E 009'996 006'9L1'1. 00Z'Len 000'101. 000'00E 000'L46'L 00E1:26'9 00aZLs 0t $ Ooo osl 9SL $ seeJnos 6ulpund 0y19.11, T UI 818JSU¢Jl T - - _ 49999013 pe0 330NI0S ONIONVN13 133H1O toiled eOINeS Aemetid sepueBJew3 AemaaJd J01 Aluoylny sepJes 000'6E91 e0111eLeNsy Jalnwtuop 000'6Z97• Alunop welseM- esueJj pez9epeds 000'L49'E ANNA elley0eop • IlsueJj pezHerzede OOreZeL suoneJedO INN 009'94Z'Z - BwwweJ60Jd pue Bupueld ' seuelslsey esueJl Nets 5301AN3S ONV SINVN00213.1V11340•4O4 OOE'ELO'L 001'911 • 000'99e69 000'999'91. 000`ZL9`9L 000'929'64 - 00E'90E 00E'90E 009'0S£'4 $ 009'00L $ - $ $ - $ - $ - $ $ - $ $ 000'0SL $ 000'00S'E $ lelol Jay10 sapuaBy�saO!0 1e0o1 seed u0ge4sI6eN JaylO V.1.d OVryO AL11O 3112 tl1S dll V ems¢ery weJBad pue lueuNedap aloiyaA tensed • e1616 %¢j s81e$ • c0 weJBmaugJ dpuedeO Aq Seel and-SP 9p Ngel ej . speoll pue N99.1181e201 ADM ellegoeop • sleueUV Ieuol698 eed u04e6plry ueopup uopeeodsueJl keN ARnI190:We Newel:Onep sieajEud lellde0 SWVN00Nd Wilde° N3H10 0NV V 3NPS 311 Luewe6euery Aeedeud seewe$ ee uJeBeuery Revenues and Other Sources • Total revenues ' and other sources are budgeted at $414,955,200 and consist of Measure A sales tax of $156,150,000 (or 37.6% of total sources); LTF sales tax of $10,972,400 (or 2.6% of total sources); federal revenues of $14,436,800 (or 3.5% of total sources); state revenues, including vehicle registration fees, of $12,886,500 (or 3.1% of , total sources); TUMF of $42,000,000 (or 10.1% of total sources); debt proceeds of $80,000,000 (or 19.3% of total sources); transfers in of $83,053,100 (or 20.0% of total sources) and other revenues of $15,456,400 (or 3.8% of total sources). Shown in Table 46 are the specific revenue funding sources. , Table,46 - Revenues and Other Sources. . ' ,: Federal State . -Local ' _ Other , Total Percent - Measure A Sales Tax : $ - $ - $ 156,150.000 $ , - $ 156,150.000 37 6% Local Transportation Fund'Sales Tax ' - 10,972,400 - 4 10,972,400 2.6% , State Transit Assistance . 6.924,300 - . 6,924,300 1.7% California Department of Transportation ; - 3,361,300 - 3,361,360 0.8%- Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality , : 3,309,800 . - , - 3,309„800 0.8%., Federal Transit Administration ' - 3,715,000 - 3,715,000 0.9%; .. . Federal Other , , • '• , 7,412,000 , - , - 7,412,000 • - TranspcUtation Uniform Mitigation Fee ' " 42,000,000 • ' - 42,000,000 10.1%' . Rail and Highway Licenses - . 308,300 r 308,300 0.1% , .Coachella Valley AssociatiOn of Governments - 1.430,300 - 1,430,300 0.3%' Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies 1,425,000 - .. , - 1,425,000 0.3%. . „ Freeway Service Patrol , 1,175,900 - - . 1.175,900 0.3%, • Investment and Other • , : '' - 120,000 - '13,597,800 13,717,800 ' 3.3%;, Debt Proceeds . - - -- - 80,000.000 80.000,000 19.3% ' • Transfers in , - - 83.053.100 ' 83.053.100 20.0% TOTAL . $ 14.436 EISIQ $ 12 886 500 .$ 210.672,700 $ 176.959 20Q $_414.9_55.201I 100.651 • , . , . ' . . , . ' • Ravenna SOUrCeS--Definitions and Baqkground • • , , . •, , • Measure A: Measure A was first approved by Riverside County voters in 1988. More , than 78% of the electorate voted to impose a one-half of one cent sales tax over a 20- year period to pay for transportation improvements. Measure A requires that all sales taxes collected may only be used for transportation purposes including administration;. and the construction, capitat'acquisition, maintenance, and operation of streets, roads, , highways, including state highvvays and pyblic transit systems and for related purposes. These purposesinClude 'expenditures for planning, environmental reviews, engineering and design costs; and related right of way acquisition. The amount raised by this levy growing as the County and its economic base grow. Overall, the 1989 Measure A is ; expected to generate over $1.7 billion during its lifespan. ' OnNoverriber 5, 2002, the , voters of: Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A thrOugh 2039. The 2009 MeasUre 'A is expectedito raise rnore than $4.6 billion during its lifespan. Local Transportation Fund: l_TF was established in state laW by ,the TDA and is funded through a one -quarter of one cent of the State's 7.25% sales tax.. The intent of the legislation was to provide' a dependable revenue stream for public transportation operations. - The vast majority of LTF revenue in the Corinty is allocated to the eight public transit operators, including the Commission for its share eMetrolink operations ' 0, costs. Much like Measure A revenue, LTF will grow with. the growth of the County and its economy. State .Transit Assistance: STA provides additional TDA state funding of transit operations for urban counties. The funding source is generated by sales taxes on gasoline and diesel fuels. These funds are allocated to the County's eight public transit operators. State Transportation Improvement Program: The STIP is funded through state and federal gas tax dollars and is Califomia's primary transportation fund. Dollars are allocated to each county based on a formula that takes into consideration population and highway centerline miles. Actual funding decisions for 75% of STIP dollars are made by local transportation agencies such as the Commission. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ): The CMAQ program is federally ,funded and is targeted for transportation improvements in areas with air quality problems. This program pays for improvements that reduce congestion while improving air quality. The Commission has also used CMAQ dollars to include fuel and 'commuter assistance programs, signal interconnects; HOV lanes, and transit projects. Federal Transit Administration: On a reimbursement basis, the federal government provides funding for qualified capital investments in rail facilities, track, and vehicles. FTA funding is generally allocated annually by the federal government and is based on. calculated miles of service. Transportation Uniform. Mitigation Fee: In connection with the 2009 Measure A, the TUMF program was established in the Western County to provide additional funding for regional arterial projects. TUMF is administered by WRCOG. Per the 2009 Measure A', the Commission is to receive up to the first $400 ,million .in TUMF generated on, new residential and commercial development. As a result of an MOU with WRCOG, the Commission will receive 48.1 % of the :TUMF through June 30, 2009, when the original Measure A expires. Thereafter, the Commission will receive. 100%, after an administrative deduction, up to the aggregate of $400 million. Rail and Highway Licenses: The Commission owns parcelsofland and rail right of way in selected areas throughout the County. The ownership provides licensing opportunities for fiber-optic cable, advertising signs, and business tenants. The amount of funding received from the licenses provides revenue to support the cost of owning and maintaining the Commission's land and facilities. Coachella Valley Association of Governments: A portion of the Commission's 1993 sales tax revenue bonds was issued for regional arterial projects in the Coachella Valley. Annually, CVAG reimburses_ the Commission for 25% of the regional arterial portion of debt service. 117 Service Authority for ' Freeway Emergencies: This motorist assistance program places freeway call boxes' throughout the freeways and state highwaysin the County." Additionally, the Commission allocates a portion of the SAFE revenue to support the FSP. the call 'boxes enable . motorists to summon help should they encounter' mechanical or emergency.. problems while on the road. This program is established through State .law that allows county SAFE agencies to impose a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations within the County to pay for call box purchases and operations. The Commission is working with other SAFE agencies throughout the State to seek" enhanced: funding commitments through legislative and budgetary actions to .ensure that motorist aid programs can adequately meet the growing demands., • Freeway iService''Patrol: Caltrans is the primary sponsor of the FSP and provides the majority of funding for the program. The Commission administers and implements .the program elong;with the CHP and Caltrans. Investment Income: .The Commission has established..a prudent investment policy for cash on hand that is: intended to maximize return while, providing ,absolute safeguards on principal and liquidity. A more detailed explanation of the Commission's investment policy is discussed in another- section of this document: Measure A'Sales Tax'Revenues Revenue Proje ctions =The Commission historically has -obtained and. updated Measure A revenue projections through a consultant:.. The last update completed in ` May,2001 has not been relevant in recent years due to the unanticipated growth in sales tax revenues in the County.Accordingly, the Commission has revised the earlier projections through` 2009 to reflect current historical trends. Chart,19 — Foretaste d Measure A Sales Tax Revenues'2007 — 2000 180,000,000 -- . �175,000,000 170,000,000 . •165,000,000 160,000,000 155,000,000, 150,000,000 145,000,000' 2007 2008 The following additional assu'rriptions were .also used in the development of the Commission's revenue forecast,forFY 2006/07: • The State does' not change .mix of items subject to the sales "tax from what ; 1,, • has been included historically. • The relative sales and property tax rates of Riverside and: surrounding counties do not change from historical levels. • Internet sales will have minimal impact on revenue. As the transition between the two sales tax measures approaches, these Measure A sales tax revenue projections are being updated by a consultant. The new projections will be utilized in the 2009 Measure A 10-year delivery plan, strategic partnership planning efforts, and an analysis of a potential increase to be sought in the $500,million. 2009 Measure A bonding cap. Geographic allocation - Riverside County is comprised of three geographic areas: Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. The percentage of Measure A revenues allocated to each of these areas based on retum to source is approximately 74% for Western County, 25% for Coachella Valley, and 1% for Palo Verde Valley. These percentages will experience some variations from year to year based on changes in levels of taxable sales. Chart 20 — Geographic Allocation of Measure A Revenues Palo Verde Valley 1% rm.-hello Valley_ - 25% Western County 74% Table 47 - Geographic Allocation of Measure A Revenues by Program Program Administration Western County Coachella Valley Palo Verde Valley Total Administration $ 3,500,000 $ - $ $ $ 3,500,000 - Highway 43,567,000 5,761,000 49,328,000 Rail 18,672,000 - - 18,672,000 Regional Arterials 15,363,000 - 15,363,000 Commuter Assistance 2,829,000 - 2,829,000. Specialized Transit - 2,829,000 ' 3,841,000 - 6,670,000 Local Streets and Roads 45 265.000 13,442.000 1,081,000 59,788,000 TOTAL . $ 3.509.000 $ __I13162,090 $ 3$,407.000 $ _08I 900 $ 156.150.000 Program allocation - The Measure A TIP defines the manner in which the sales tax revenues, are to be spent. 119 fund.; Table 48 -Program Allocation of 1989 Measure A Revenues Western County Highway 38.5% Rail 16.5% Local Streets and Roads 40.0% Commuter Assistance 2.5% Specialized Transit 2.5% Coachella Valley` Regional Arterials 40.0% Local Streets and Roads 35.0% Highway 15.0% Specialized Transit 10.0% Palo Verde Valley Local Streets and Roads: 100% Other Sales Tax Revenues.. Revenues received from LTF totaling°$10,972,400 are allocated for regional and local transportation planning, program administration, and rail transit in Western County . The Commission administers these funds on behalf of the County.,, The County is projected to receive $74,850,000 in LTF revenues in FY 2006/07. The majority of LTF revenues approximating $70,284,600 is reserved for and disbursed to the eight public transit providers, including the Commission for its share related to commuter rail operations, within the County through the Commission's: non -budgeted special revenue Interest eammgs,on the State'and County investment pools are estimated at an interest rate of 4.0%. The earnings 'On ;funds held by. the trustee for debt service in money market funds are assumed to.;be at 4.25%. Other Commission operating funds are held in 'various mutual funds and: U.S. Treasury and agency -notes. Interest rates for the - mutual funds are assumed to be 4.25%°, while the treasury and agency notes yield is estimated'at 4.50%. Measure ;A sales :tax, 'reimbursements, and LTF funding are allocated to Commission programs asfollows: Highway', Program Funding' for the highway program includes Measure A sales, tax revenues and interest from loans to cities to advance their local streets and roads programs.` Measure A sales ,tax will be used for the SR-74, widening and curve realignment, 1-215 Bi-County project, SR-74 from G Street. to 1-215, SR-60 East Junction to,1-215 HOV.lanes, SR-111,.and SR-86 as well as for pass -through funding to other jurisdictions for, interchange improvements at SR-91 Van Buren, SR-91 La Sierra, and 1-15 Cantu-Galieano Ranch Road. Included in revenues is $206,000 of interest earned from loan reimbursement agreements with the cities of Canyon Lake, Corona, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and Temecula. Those funds are used to pay debtservice on the 1997,Series B junior sales tax revenue bonds. Commercial .paper proceeds will be used for Mid County Parkway, 'MSHCP'land acquisition in Westem County and Coachella Valley, and other local projects in the cities of Hemet, Indio; and Blythe. The amounts related to the local projects represent advances of local streets and roads funding from the 2009 Measure A. CMAQ funding will be used for the SR-60 East Junction to 1-215 HOV lanes. Local revenues include investment income. Transfers in represent amounts required for debt service as well as TUMF .and commercial ,paper pass -through funding to Ca!trans for the SR-91 Green River interchange improvements. Table 49 — Highway Program Revenues Measure A Sales Tax Federal - CMAQ Federal - Other State - Other Other Local Debt Proceeds Transfers In TOTAL FY 05/06 Revised Budget 46,694,000 18,321,300 6,294,500 2,200,000 2,634,100 55,000,000 23,100,100 $ 154,244.000 FY06/07 Budget $ 49,328,000 $ 2,341,200 101,000 6,419,700 . 80,000,000 29,295,900 5 151.485 M Variance Percent 2,634,000 (15,980,100) (6,294,500) (2,099,000) 3,785,600 25,000,000 6,195,800 $ 13,241 $00 5.6% -100.0% -95.4% 143.7% 45.5% 26.8% Rail Program Measure A sales tax will be used for the Perris Valley Line and additional parking at•the Riverside Downtown station—Eastside. Rail operations, which include Metrolink operating and capital contributions, station maintenance, support, rail right of way purchases, and the Perris multimodal facility match will be funded with an allocation of LTF sales tax revenues. The LTF estimate for rail assumes the LTF apportionment formula (based on population estimates for the County's three, major geographic areas provided by the State Department of Finance), calculates 22% (established for planning purposes by Commission policy) of the amount available for Western County, and then compares that with budgeted expenditures. . 121 FTA Section 5307 transit capital, funding will be used to start preliminary engineering and right of:way acquisition for the Perris Valley Line and tOEcomplete final design of the" North Main Corona stationparking structure. Pass -through FTA funding will be used for the Perris"rnultiniodal facility. STIP ,allocations will be used for the design of the North Main Corolla station parkin 'structure: • Local revenues include investment income and a local grant for internships: Transfer in represents amounts required for debt service. Measure A Sales Tax LTF Federal - FTA Federal - CMAO Federal - Other State STIP State --Other Other Local Transfer In TOTAL ; FY 05/06 FY06/07 Revised Budget Budget $ 17,716,000 $ 18,672,000 9,110,000 - 7,976,900 9,028,000 3,715,000 973,800 50,000 1,013,300 989,500 2,175,800 6,007,800 6,007,600' $ 93 825 inn $ 39 610.600 Transportation Uniform' Mitigation Fees The TUMF program for Western County regional arterials will receive funds primarily from :TUMF assessed on,'new;residential and commercial development:. in.We"stem County. Other federal revenues include SAFETEA-LU and its predecessor legislation (TEA21) funding of the SR-79 realignment and pass -through funding to the city of Corona for its 1-15~ Cajalco interchange improvements included in the TUMF 'regional arterial projects. The transfers in represent commercial paper proceeds for: the Mid I; County Partway and : SR-79 "'realignment right of wayacquisition projects. Local revenues represent investment income. Variance $, 956,000 5.4% (1,133,190) -12.4% (5,313,000) -58:9% (973,800) 100.0% ' 50,000 N/A - 1,013,300 N/A 0.0%0. 1186,300 119.9% (200) 0.0% $ 11214'500) Table 51 -Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Revenues; FY 05/06 FY06/07 Revised Budget. Budget TUMF Federal - Other Other Local Transfers In TOTAL 45,825,000 $ 42,000,000 '$ '(3,825,000) -8.3% - 7,362,000 7,362,000 N/A 1,749,300. 2,299,400 550,100, 31.4% 57 574 0 $ 88,QQ.1,40l1 $ 31.387.190 54_5% 10.000,000 37 300.000 27,300,000 273.0% 122 Regional Arterials The Measure A regional arterial program revenues will be used to reduce debt service on the 1993 sales tax revenue bonds and to continue construction and improvements of the regional arterial system in the Coachella Valley. Revenues of $1,430,300 from CVAG will be used to cover the Coachella Valley's share of debt service for the 1993 Series A sales tax revenue bonds. TUMF collected and maintained by CVAG is the source for these funds. Local revenues represent investment income. Transfers in consist of amounts required for debt service. Table 52 - Regional Arterial Revenues FY 05/06 FY06/07 Revised Budget Budget - Variance Percent Measure A Sales Tax $ 14,2E14,000 $ 15,363,000 $ 1,079,000 7.6% Local Agencies 1,430,200 1,430,300 100 0.0"% Other Local 163,000 314,300 151,300 92.8% Transfers In 5,720,300 5,721,100 - - 800 0.0% TOTAL $ 21,597,500 $ 2282a.700 $ 1,231,200 Local Streets and Roads Measure A allocations for the local streets and roads program are distributed to the cities and the County to use for local street repairs, maintenance, and construction. Transfers in represent amounts required for debt service. Table 53 - Local Streets and Roads Revenues FY 05/06 FY06/07 Revised Budget Budget Variance Percent Measure A Sales Tax Other Local Transfers In TOTAL State Transit Assistance $ 56,577,000 $ 59,788,000 $ 3,211,000 5.7% 6,400 61,500 55,100 860.9% 1,470,500 1,469,700. (800) -0.1°% 58.053 900 $ 61.319.200 $ 3 2613.0 t The STA allocation is based on an estimate received from the State Controller's Office. For FY 2006/07, the State's estimated allocation to Riverside County is $6,924,300, an increase of 17.1 % from the prior year budget. Any changes by the State to the revenues will be incorporated during ongoing budget reviews for FY 2006/07. Local revenues represent investment income. 123 Table 54 — STA Revenues FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Variance Percent State Transit Assistance $ 5,913,600 $ 6,924,300 $ 1,010,700 Other Local 48,000 165,700 117,700 TOTAL $ 5,961,600 $ 7,090,000 $ 1,128,400 Planning and Programming Transportation planning studies are funded with an LTF off -the -top allocation. equal to three percent (3%) of estimated revenues. Additionally, STIP .will fund planning,' programming and monitoring activities of. the Commission, CVAG, and the fourth CETAP corridor betvveen Moreno Valley and San Bernardino County. , Local revenues consist of other agency reimbursements for joint studies as well as investment income. Transfers in represent commercial paper proceeds for the strategic partnership efforts. Table 55 — Planning and Programming Revenues FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget, 17.1% 245.29'0 18 9% , LTF Sales Tax $ 2,643,400 $ 2,245,500 $ (397,900) -15.1% State - STIP 583,300 1,947,000 1,363,700 233.8% Federal - Other 709,500 - (709,500)'-100.0% Other Local/Agencies 593,900 141,200 (452,700) -76.2% Transfers In 2,653,100 2.653,100 N/A TOTAL $. 4 530 100 $ 6 986,8Q4 $ 2.456.700 54 2% Specialized Transit Measure A also allocates funding to specialized transit programs that tare designed, to improve the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. The [funds are also intended to subsidize transportation costs of the economically disadvantaged. No local revenue sources other than investment income are anticipated: Table.56 — Specialized Transit Revenues Westem County Measure A Sales Tax .. Coachella Valley Measure A,Sales Tax'' Other Local TOTAL $ . 2,684,000 3,571,000 185,700 6 440.700 124 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Variance Percent $ 2,829,000 $ 145,000 5.4% 3,841,000 270,000 7.6% 318.600 132.900 71.6% $ 6.988�600 $ 547 909 • • Commuter Assistance The Commuter Assistance program will receive funding from Measure A, other agencies, andinvestment income to assist, in implementing services to commuters and employers in promoting ridesharing programs. Table 57 - Commuter Assistance Revenues ' Measure A Sales Tax Federal - CMAQ State - STIP State - Other Other Local/Agencies TOTAL FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Variance $ 2,684,000 $ 2,829,000 $ 145,000 1,068,100. 968,600. (99,500) 300,000 300,000 225,000 - (225,000) 782,000 1,235.800 453.800 $ 4.759.100 $ 5., 3"�4_00 $ 574.300 Percent 5.4% -9.3% N/A 100.0% 58.0% 121/s° Service Authority for freeway Emergencies SAFE is funded from revenues received by a $1 fee included with the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration fees. Since the growth in these fees historically has not been substantial, the. budget amount has remained relatively constant. No local revenue sources other than investment income are anticipated. Table 58 - SAFE Revenues FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Revised Budget Budget Variance Percent DMV Fees $ 1,425,000 $ 1,425,000 $ - _ 0.0% Other Local 74,100 139,500 65.400 88.3% TOTAL $ 1.499.100 $ 1564,500 $ 6$`40Q 445 Freeway Service Patrol Caltrans will allocate State Highway account funds to cover the FSP. The State provides nearly 80% of the funding for the FSP program. The allocation of funding throughout the state is based on population, freeway miles, and level of congestion. The State's contribution is matched with an operating transfer of $375,700 from SAFE. Table 59 - FSP Revenues State Budgetary Allocation Other Local Transfers In TOTAL FY 05/06 Revised Budget $ 1,009,200 309,200 262.800 $ 1 581.200 FY 06/07 Budget Variance Percent $ 1,175,900 $ 166,700 16.5% 345,700 36,500 11.8% 375,700 112.900 43.0% $ 1,897,300 $ 31E100 20 0% 125 Other Program Revenues A total of'$240,000 in revenues is expected from property management licenses related to the San: Jacinto and San Bernardino subdivision rail program Transfers in of $230,000 :are related to Measure A highway funding for' the maintenance' of the Commission's highway properties. Management services sales tax revenues consist of Measure A of $3,500,000 and LTF sales taxes of $750,000 for administration. Other local revenues consist of investment income for property managemen management services totaling $168,900. SECTION 51 PERSONNEL 127 Personnel Personnel salary and fringe benefits The Commission provides a comprehensive package of Benefits to all permanent, salaried employees. The package includes: •. Health, dental, vision, and life insurance Short and long-term disability Workers' compensation Tuition assistance Sick and vacation leave Retirement benefits in the form of participation: in PERS Deferred; com pensatio n Employee Assistance Program In 'November 1988 when `Measure A was originally approved, one of the - requirements of the measure was -for the Commission to not budget more than one percent (1%)..of "Measure 'A'sales , tax revenuefor administrative salaries and. benefits.. In this `budget, .the ,Commission is utilizing ..92%of this capacity, and other salaries and benefits • are being, funded by specific 'programs and other federal, state, and local funds." As a; result of this requirement .the Commission maintains a small staff to provide the transportation services to Riverside County' The Commission's salary and fringe benefits total $4636,300. - This represents_ an increase of'19.1%, over the FY 2005/06 budget of $3,892,500 and is due to the, following reasons: Increase in PERSrrate; Increase in workers'.: compensation rate; Increase in the. Commission's contribution for dental and vision insurance which replaces the dental/optical reimbursement plan; Provision for a.4%o employee merit increase, pool; and • New staff positions for the 3 program' managers'' and 1 administrative assistant. I Chart 22 - Personnel and Benefits Costs $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $- 2000 2001 2002 '2003 2004, 2005 2006 2007 The FTE has increased by 3.5 positions from previous years, for total of 31 FTE positions. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling legislation that called for a small staff. Staff will continue to be provided the tools needed, including state of the art technology, to ensure an efficient and productive work environment. However, it must be recognized that small is not viewed in an absolute context; it is relative to the required tasks to be performed and the demands to be met. Table 60 - Personnel Summary FY 03104 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FTE FTE FTE FTE , Executive Management 1.6 1.3 1.4 1.4 Administration 4.1 4.1 3.9 4.7 Legislative Affairs and Communications 1.4 1.3 2.5 2.6 Finance 5.1 5.5 5.5 5.5 Regional Issues 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.5 Planning and Programming 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.2 Rail Operations 2.0 2.4 1.9 1.9 Property Management 1.1 0.8 0.8 2.0 Specialized Transit 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.6 Transit 1.1 1.2 1.6 1.5 Commuter Assistance 2.5 2.4 2.0 1.4 Motorist Assistance 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.9 Capital Project Development and Delivery 1_1 1_8 2_7 3_8 TOTAL 25.0 26.0 27.5 31.0 129 Commission Debt At June 30, 2006, the Commission will have $95,833,900 outstanding in sales tax revenue bonds. During FY 2006/07, $30,338,800 in bond principal will be retired, and $5,136,100 in bond interest payments will be made. Additionally, the Commission will make $3,926,900 in commercial paper interest payments and $26,200 in capital lease payments. The Commission has maintained an excellent credit rating and is one of .the highest rated self-help counties in the State. The Commission has been able to maintain its rating because of the high level of voter approval on Measure A, the higher standard of two times on debt service, and good financial management. The Commission currently maintains an Aa2/AA rating from Standard and Poor's and Moody's rating agencies. In FY 2006/07, staff will continue to work on a transition plan for the completion of the 1989 Measure A and the incorporation of the projects that are included in the 2009 Measure A TIP. The Commission established a commercial paper program in March 2005 for project development and land and right of way acquisition. Maturities of commercial paper will: be rolled over to new issuances of commercial paper, as the 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues will not be available until the 1989 Measure.A terminates in June 2009. Interest payments will be paid from available commercial paper proceeds or new issuances of commercial paper, The Commission expects to issue bonds to refinance .all or a portion of the outstanding commercial paper and to finance the projects included in the 2009 Measure A TIP. The Commission does not expect to issue any more debt from the 1989 Measure A. Debt Capacity Analysis The Commission is legally prohibited from issuing additional debt if its debt coverage ratio is less than 1.5 to 1 on all senior debt. The Commission has adopted a higher standard of 2 to 1 as part of its debt management policy. As Chart 23 and Table 61 indicate, the Commission has successfully met its policy standard. Any coverage less than 2 to 1 would necessitate using other program funding to cover all debt service expenditures. 131 Chart 23 —1989 Measure.A Debt Capacity Analysis $160,000,000' $140,000,000 $126,000,000_� $100,000,000 s -$80,00Q000 ,$60,000,000 r` $40,0,00,000 a b ? '$20,000,000 ti ,z. v FY02/03 FY03/04 Table 61 — Measure A Debt Sales Tax Revenues Senior Debt Service "' Coverage Ratio - Senior Debt Subordinate Debt Coverage ,Ratio - All Debt -Debt Rating Commercial Paper Debt Service Commercial Paper Rating • FY04/05 FY05/66 Capacity Analysis FY02/03 FY03/04 FY04/05 $' 105,782,600 $ 120,564,800 $ 138,921.300 $ $ 34,076,600 $ 34,004,900; $ 34,012,500 $ 3.10 3.55- 4.08 1,472,900 $ 1,472,300 $`. 1,473,000 $ 2.98 3.40 3.91 Aa2/AA.. Aa2/AA Aa2/AA $ - $ $ 111,600 N/A WA P-1/A-1+ Chart 24 — Available Measure' A Revenue/Debt Service 100% • 80% . 60%' 40% 20% 132 FY05/06 FY06/07 147.300,000 $ 156,150,000 34,012,700 $ 34,005,200 4:33 4.59 1,470,500 $ 1,469,700. - 4.15 4:40 Aa2/AA Aa2/AA 899,400 $ 3,926,900 P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ ®Available Revenues M Debt Service • Debt Service Schedule Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Table 62 - Commission Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 2007 $ 30,338,800 $ 5,136,100 ,$ 35,474,900 2008 31,865,100 3,608,000 35,473,100 2009 33,630500 1,843400 35,473,400 Total $ 95.$33 6c $ 10.587 500 $ 106.421.400 Under the provisions of the 1989 Measure A, as amended by Measure AA, the Commission has the authority to issue bonds subject to a bond debt limitation of $525,000,000. The following is a summary of bonds issued and secured by 1989 Measure A revenues: 2000 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A: In July 2000, the Commission issued $35,825,000 principal amount of serial bonds to finance the widening and construction improvements to enhance the accessibility and safety of SR-74 and other Western County projects. 1997 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A: The Commission issued $47,910,000 principal amount of serial bonds to refund $41,000,000 of the outstanding commercial paper notes along with $6,910,000 in•new debt proceeds to fund various major highway projects. 1997. Sales Tax Revenue Junior Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series B:" The Commission issued $13,245,000 principal amount of subordinated (junior) serial bonds to refund $3,000,000 of the outstanding commercial paper notes along with $10,245,000 in new debt proceeds to fund various streets and roads projects for local cities. 1996 Sales Tax Refunding Revenue Bonds, (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A: In January 1996, the Commission issued $61,765,000 principal amount of serial bonds to refund a portion of the 1991 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A. The bonds refunded were the serial maturities due in 2002 and 2003 for $6,945,000 and $7,405,000, respectively, and the term bonds due in 2009 for $44,975,000, for a total refunded debt of $59,325,000. 1993 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A: In February 1993, the Commission issued $136,610,000 principal amount of serial bonds to finance the purchase of the Santa Fe use rights and other rail properties, improvements to SR-86 and SR-111, as well as major regional arterials in the Coachella Valley. The bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts including 133 project proceeds, sales tax revenues, interest and principal payments; -and a reserve fund equal .to the maximum.annual debt service of $35,474,900. The allocation of the sales _'_ - easure A programs is presented in Chart 25. - Chart 25 - Program Long -Term Debt Regional Arterials 16% Local Streets and Roads 4% Highway 63% The allocation, of the sales tax revenue bonds by the benefiting 'geographic area is "presented in, Chart 26: Western County 74% The allocation. -.or the sales : tax revenue bonds debt service for ,the highway program by geographic area Is presented: in Chart 27. " Chart 27"-:1-lighway Program Debt'Service for Fy 2006/67: $24276,500 • • Commercial Paper Program Under the 2009 Measure A. program, the Commission will have the authority to issue bonds subject to a bond debt limitation of $500,000,000. In February 2005, the Commission authorized a $200,000,000 commercial paper program. On March 31, 2005, the Commission established the program for $185,000,000 Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds),Series A and B. The repayment of principal and interest on the commercial paper notes is secured by an irrevocable direct draw letter of credit issued by the Bank of America, N.A., as the Measure A sales tax revenues securing such repayment will commence on July 1, 2009. -Maturities of the commercial paper notes may range from one to 270 days, and interest rates are variable and dependent on current market conditions. The initial issuance of commercial paper in April 2005 was $30,005,000. Additional commercial paper of $80,000,000 is anticipated to be issued in''FY 2006/07. Costs of issuance related to these issuances are paid from the proceeds of the commercial paper and are included in debt service expenditures. Capital Lease The Commission has a capital lease for office equipment. Capital lease debt service is funded through the General fund and the Motorist Assistance special revenue funds. Outstanding Debt and Legal Debt Margin at June 30, 2006 A summary of the Commission's outstanding debt secured by Measure A sales tax revenues and related legal debt margin at June 30, 2006 is presented below: 1989 Measure A 2009 Measure A Authorized Debt $ 525,000,000 $ 500,000,000 1993 Series A 34,949,700 1996 Series A Refunding Bonds 28,459,700 1997 Series A 14,684,700 1997 Series B 4,025,000 2000 Series A 13,714,800 Commercial Paper Notes 30.005.000. Total Outstanding Debt 95.833.900 30,005,000 Legal Debt Margin $ 429.166 100 $ 469.995.000 135 • Listed below are the principal and interest payments by bond issue for FY 2006/07: Table'63 -'Bond Debt Service Requirements by Issue Bonds Issued Principal Interest 1993`$eniorBonds 1996`Senior Bonds 1997Senior Bonds 1997. Junior Bonds 2000 Senior Bonds $ 11,047,500 8,974,600 4,665,400 1,285,000 4,366,300 $ 1,954,900 1.660,800 692,700 184,700 643,000 Total $ 13,002,400 10,635,400 5,358,100 1,469,700 5,009,300 Total FY 2006/0T Debt Service $ 30.338.800 $ 5.136.100 $ 35.474.900 136 • SECTION i DEPARTMENT- BUDGETS e Cowl Tronsp ion 137 TABLE 64 - BUDGET COMPARISION BY DEPARTMENT FY 2004 - 2007 REVENUES: FY 03/04 FY 04105 FY 05/06 FY 05106 FY 06107 Dollar Perce Actual,;" Actual Revised Budget ", Projected Budget Change Cha Operating Revenues Measure A Sales Tax - $ 120,564,800 $ 138,921,300 $ - 147300,000 $ 147.300.000 $ 156,150,000 $ 8,850,000 6 LTF Sales Tax - Planning and Administration 2,307,000 2497,800 3,343.400 3.343400 , - 2,995,500 `: (347.900) -10.4% LTF Sales Tax -Transit Allocation 5,505.500 5,195,600 9,110,000 - 9.110.000 2976,900 (1.133,100) -12.4% STA Transit Allocation - 2,899,100 3,348,700 5,913.600 3891,700. 6.924,300 1,010,700 17.1% Vehicle Registration Fees. 1.435,100 1,541.200 1,425,000 1,425,000 1,425:000 0.0% -533% Other Revenue Reimbursements 23,276,600 25,241.10f/ 42,183,200 2,642.100 19,707,800 I (22,475,460) _ 3,976,700 3.118,000 2,132.400 3,866.200 2,223,600 ' 91,200 43% TUMF Fees - 35,615 200 46.325,300 ' - 45,825,000 45,266,900 ' 42,000,000-. (3825.000) -8.3% Investment Income _ 2.934,500 4540.600 5453,600 5,610,100 - 12.499,000,r'` 7.045,400 129.2°% - Total Revenues: - 198,514,500 230,729,600 262,686,200 . . EXPENDITURES: Management Sen4ces Executive Management-- - - 321,900 379,400 395,100 - 386.600 4 396,000 900 0.2% Administration 1,118,900 1,493.000 2,054.600 1,727,700 ' 1619600 (236000) 11.5% Legislative Affairs and Communications 472,900 443,100 885,700 ' 716.100 .. 939500 52600 ' 6.0% Finance - 989400 944,70D 1 166.500 1,176,800 : 1,373.000 � • 208.500 . 17.7% Total Management Services 2.903,100 3,260,200 - 4,501,900 4.006.600 _ i, 4,526,100• . 24200 DS%. Regionalograms Regional Issues - 69,100 67,900 . 70,700 161,200 353.400 - ' 282,700 399.9% Planning and Programming - 2,563000 2,331,000 4,444,700 2.660.800 6,412,100 1.967,400'443%'; Rail Operations • 4.900,400 5,330,400 7,559.200/ .7,341,100 `, 8.055.000. 495,80o e.6% Property Management" 338,400 .'580,200 628,800 - 535.900' ''.1,061,860 433.000 68:941, Specialized Transit 4,2941400 ' 4,875,300 5,172,000 . 4,757,500 7625,100 2,653,100 51.3% Transit 3,161,300 2,268,800 6,201,500• 4.161.700 - 7,119,500 ` 918,000 14.8% Commuter Assistance - _ -: 2943,900. 2643.700 3,782,900 - 3,342,800 3,842100 59,200 1.6%. Motorist Assistance 1.978.400 2,191,000 - 4.006100. 2,477700 3.629,400 (376,700) -9A%•. Total Regional Programs 19251,900 20,288,300 31,865,900 '25,441,700 38,298,400 6.432,500- 202% - Capital Project Development and Delivery, 96.964,300 122,699000 278,621,500 125,245,700 321,340,700 42,719,200 15.3% 26,316.800 , 27,228.200 28,669.500 28,669,500 i' . 30,364.400 1.694,900 5.9% 9.191.800 8,400,300 '. 8,345,200 2744.600 : 9,063,600 718.400 - - 8.6% 2,141.600 - 438600 400.000 - � 150.000 (250.000)-, 35.508,600 36208.700 37414,700 '36,414,100 39.578,000 154.627.900 184.456,200 352.404.000 191.108.100 403,743.200 51.339200 14.6%. Excess(deficiency)of Revenues over (under) EFpend4urees 43,886.600 - 46,273,400 (89,717,800) - `31347,300 ,, (151,841,100) (62,123.300) 69.2% Other Finariang Sources (Uses) i- _ Transfers In - - 41.523.100 37,050,200 46,561.500 - 35,736.200 83,053,100 36,491,600 78.4% Transfers Out (41.523,100) (37.050.200) (46,561.500)(35,736,200).;.'(83,053.100) 36,491,600 78.4% Debt Proceeds - 30.005 0D0 - 55.000,000 - 80,000.000 25.000.000 45.5% Net Financing Sources (Uses) - - 30.005000 55.000,000 • 80.000,000. , 25.009000 45.5% Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Arbitrage Rebate Tax Cost of Issuance - Total Debt Service Total Expenditures. Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance .Ending Fund Balance `43,886.600` -• 76,278.400 (34,717,800)' - 31,347.300 i (71641,100). 158,894,50Q 202,781 100 279,059.500 1, 279.059.500 . 310.406.800 31.347.300 $ - 202 781.10Q $. 279.059 500 $ 244 341700 i�$ - - 310.40B.800 $ ' 238'565 700 $ < f5 776.000) • 138 (37,123,300) SECTION 7.1 MANAGEMENT SERVICES 139 Executive Management Mission Statement: "To manage the activities of the Commission with a small staff; complemented with consultants, to effectuate sound transportation policies and legislation compatible with environmental standards and accomplish the expeditious delivery of cost-effective transportation programs and projects consistent with Commission. direction'." Chart 28 - Executive Management Support 14% Expenditures Personnel 70% Executive Managementhas a budget of $396,000, an increase of 0.2% from last year's budget, for oversight. of all Commission functions. Salaries and benefits. increased $25,900, or 10.4%, from the prior year's budget. Professional( costs include legal fees of $55,000, representing a 31.3% decrease' from last, year's budget.' Support costs reflect various membership dues aggregating $35,000_ Table _ Expenditure petail .. FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06N7 Dollar 'Percent "' :Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change `- ,Change Salaries and Benefits ' Professional Costs - General Legal Services Professional Services -Other Total Professional Costs Support. Costs - • TOTAL ExecutiveManagement $174,400' $ 204,300 $ 250,000 $ _ 251200 $ 275,900 $ 25,900 69,200 77,800 80,000 60,100. 55.000' (25,000) -31.3% 15.000, 36.500 6.000 - - 10000 4.000 . ` 66.7% 84200, ?114,300 86,000 ,60,100 65,000i (21,000)` 63.3001 60.800' 59,100 74,700 55,10014.000) $_a21,90Q' $379.400 $ 395100 $ 386.000 $ 396:000 $; '.900 140 Executive Management Staffing Summary Position _ FlOW64 FY04105' FY,05106 s r, rAual. Actual . ae=puty"Fxecut ve:Director.; Executive FFssrstant Exet;u4ve Director �, Department Budget Overview Department Description The Executive Director is responsible for and provides strong leadership in developing and implementing new strategies at the local, regional, and statewide' levels to assure project delivery of transportation improvements throughout the County. Furthermore,` Executive Management is committed to fostering a positive and supportive work environment for staff that emphasizes quality work and encourages teamwork and open communication, while recognizing individual achievement. Key Assumptions • Executive compensation package included within the Executive Director contract extends through December 31, 2008. The contract is subject to review and revision in. July 2006. Accomplishments FY 2005/06 saw extraordinary, accomplishments at the Commission, placing it in the top tier of California transportation organizations. In severatareas, the Commission stood by itself in successful advocacy, innovation, and leadership. • Advanced environmental studies and project development work on the Mid County Parkway project. New alignment options were added to the Commission's suite of alternatives under study, and public meetings were held to receive comments from interested parties. • Completed the Riverside County -Orange County CETAP Corridor MIS, including adoption of project and study recomrnendations by the Commission and OCTA in December 2005. Multiagency implementation. efforts will. be' ongoing in FY 2006/07. • After successfully initiating a $185 million commercial paper program to support 2009 Measure A projects, completed initial land acquisitions in support of the MSHCP. The commercial paper program also supported continuing work on the Mid County Parkway. • Initiated and/or completed major construction projects in FY2005/06, including: 141 SR-74 from Wasson Canyon Road to 7'h Street; which is scheduled to be completed in Fall 2006; o SR-60 (Valley Way to '1-15) beginning in Summer 2006 as a result of local commitmentsto'fund increased cost estimates; o Ongoing STIP-funded Caltrans project development efforts to deliver "a new Bob Hope Drive/Ramon Road interchange on 1-10; o" Ongoing STIP-funded CVAG project development efforts for additional interchange improvements on 1-10 (Indian Avenue, Palm Drive, Date Palm Drive, Jefferson Street, and Monterey Avenue); o ` SR-91 Green River interchange construction beginning in Summer, 2006 as a 'result of state and federal funding buttressed by the Commission's commercial paper; and o Master Agreement between Caltrans and the Commission to assure repayment of local funding through state commitments to the SR-60/I-215 East Junction project., . Major .Initiatives Project development and delivery will continue as the key Measure A priority. Work efforts are ongoing for the SR-60, SR-74, SR-79, SR-91 Green River interchange, and Coachella Valley. Measure ,A:.commitments in partnership with CVAG. Continuing,. expansion- of commuter rail', parkingas well asproject development and planning for the Perris Valley,; Line and active involvement in the ongoing SR-60/SR-91/1-215freeway interchange project will be major continuing efforts in FY 2006/07. Due to the continuing impact of the State's General Fund and 'budgetary issues ''on transportation funding, staff will continue to explore creative financing opportunities. One potential area to explore is private financing of design build or design bid build project(s) including •projects within the 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plan:' the SR-91/1'1.5 interchange, SR 91 widening, g, and SR-71 onramps andinterchange at'SR-91. The Commission will 'continue prudent :right of way protection and rpreservation activities ,for Measure A projects to control bng;range project costs and project feasibility.' Regional cooperation ,and collaboration will continue to. be given significant emphasis consistent with the philosophy and mission of this Commission. Working closely with the Executive Director in ,this :endeavor.will :be the Deputy Executive ;Director responsible for regional programs and the Publicanfonmation Director. Enhanced external communications will remain a top Commission priority. Media relations will continue to be formally cultivated, and _press releases will'remain a major effort eking with the Commission Connection `'newsletter. An expanding 'and systematic outreach to business and civic groups, "focusing on the integration of the 1989.Measure A' program with the 2009 Measure A will bee .central feature of the Program. - The Executive' Director will expend considerable effort educating the public on the growing transportation needs of the ,County and the Commission's efforts to meet` these needs. 142 e • • Through meetings with community leaders, elected officials, and various citizen interest groups, the goal will be to communicate the Commission's achievements, plans, and aspirations, as it completes Measure A programs (1989-2009) and initiates its new 30-year program of projects (2009-2039). While actively .participating in all of these major endeavors, the. Executive Director will maintain and improve administrative efficiency and fiscally sound practices characteristic of the Commission. New staff were added in 2006 and integrated into the organization consistent with Commission direction. Special attention is, and will be, given to strengthening the depth of staff resources in anticipation of additional staff retirementsover the next three years. With the _FY 2005/06 retirement of two senior management staff members, the Commission added three program managers aimed at accelerated project delivery, new public/private sector initiatives, and property management and disposition. The Commission will continue to be competitive in the employment market and will retain capable staff as well as attract high quality applicants. Staff training and development, will continue to be, intensified enabling our small and dedicated staff to enhance skills, productivity, and value. Department Goals Maximize funding for transportation improvements in Riverside County through legislative advocacy and locally controlled funding options such as sales taxes. Objectives: • Implement the Commission's early development project priorities outlined in the recent Commission workshops, focusing on the first 10 years of the 2009Measure A and the remaining period of the 1989 Measure A expenditure plan., . • Advocate federal appropriations for the CETAP corridors, the FTA New Starts rail funding, and the regional efforts to reduce, the community impacts of rail goods movement. • Place an emphasis on initiating federally authorized and funded projects included within the new federal transportation bill and the Commission's ongoing .project priorities. Executive staff will respond to the State's transportation funding shortfall by continuing project work on named Measure A projects. • Support the completion of the CETAP new corridor adoption process. Support regional . transportation solutions in cooperation with surrounding counties that are of benefit to Riverside County. Objectives: • Support the redistribution of passenger and cargo growth demands from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) to existing underutilized airports in the region. • Continue work on grade separation and rail capacity projects funded through SAFETEA-LU. 143 Maintain effective working relationships with Commissioners to strengthen and expand the Commission's leadership in, transportation policy`'decision-making at all levels of government. Objectives: • FacilitateCommissioner participation at the regional, state, and federal 'levels' to raise the interests of the Commission and seek favorable action. • Continue theregular one-on-one meetings between the Executive Director, senior. staff, and the Commissioners. While. , maintaining a . relatively small staff, promote, the ' Commission's effectiveness by improving 'and developing staff skills, using state -of -the -,art working 'tools, and fostering an environment that encourages and rewards individual and team effort.' Objectives: . • Continue to maintain a well -documented employee appraisal process!that provides clear, understandable, and measurable performance` criteria for all employees: • Continue to refine the Commission's performance -based compensation system.. Develop the framework for a Commission culture that. enhances productivity, encourages regular and open communication among staff, -and' promotes the ' mutual achievement of individual and organizational goals and objectives. Objectives: Conduct- a semi-annual review of organization accomplishments as measured;' against planned }objectives to determine progress in meeting those objectives a'nd. action: steps needed. Facilitate open comrriurncations' ;and coordination' between management, professional staff, and support staff through regular meetings: Executive Management ' Performance/Workload Indicators FY03/04 Actual '. _ FY04105 Actual ` FY05106 ;[ Estimated ' 'FY06/07 " ;' Projected+, Budgeted Expenditures 4154,627,900 $184,456,200 $191,108,100 $403,743,200 Public Speeches 23 _ 28 24 25 Staffing Levels 25.0 26.0 .' 27.5 `' 31`_0 Administration E costs as percentage of expenditures 1.88%° 1.77% 2.10% 1.12% 0 Administration Mission Statement: "To provide quality and efficient services to the Board of Commissioners, its staff, and external customers and to comply with applicable federal and state requirements." Chart 29 - Administration Debt Service Expenditures Professional The Administration Department's total budget is $1,844,800 for office operations including management of office space, lease, and equipment; records; DBE compliance; Commission and committee meetings; and special events as well as for the clerk of the board and human resources functions. Professional costs of . $64,400 cover various services including, but not limited to, Commissioners' per diem, legal fees, consultant and other professional services,, and temporary office support services. Support costs of $1,191,800 cover administrative overhead including office maintenance; Commission insurance coverage; and information technology updates, support, and maintenance. 145 1f FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06' Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Dollar Percent Change Change "$ .359,000 $ 362,400 $ 445,300 $ 448,300 .$ 462,400 $, 17,100 ' 3..8% 59,500 58,800. 70,200 ' 50,800 . 60,000. ' ', " (10,200): - <-14.5% ` - 6,000 2,500 - - - 2,500 - `0.0% 25.300 20 700 105 000 24,000 - 1 900 (103.100) 98:2% 84,800 85,500 177,700 74,800. 64,400 • (113,3003' 667,100 925,300 1,242,600 1,114,600 1.191,800 (50,800)• Capital Outlay" 8,000 119,800 189,000 90,000 100,000 o -Debt Service 31400 31400 37500. 31.500 - 26.200 (5.300) TOTAL Administration $.1 15n 30Q $ 1.524 400 $ 2086 Inn Table':66 —Administration Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits ' Professional Costs Commissioner Per Diem.,' - .General Legal Services r Professional Services -Other Total. Professional"Costs Support Costs Department •Budget Overview Office Operations Department Description' Office Operations'oversees: the daily maintenance needs of the Commission's office facility arid its staff; annually ,updates the DBE program; goal, and vendor lists for ' federally funded projects; `reviews and updatesinsurance coverage for the, Commission and :its. properties; oversees the office lease; furnishes office supplies and equipment; ;maintains a.»safe working environment for Commission board - members .staff; and, consultants; manages information technology and records management systems; and provides support services. Office Operations',,continues to operate .with a small staff of four consisting of the Clerk of the Board, "Administrative Assistant, Administrative Support Specialist; and Senior Office `Assistant. The "Clerk of the Board also serves :as the Commission's DBE Liaison Officer: -63.8Y0 - -4.1% 0 0 Key Assumptions • Support is provided to 31 full-time. Commission staff and 11 in-house consultants. • Requests for project proposals and project notices of completion are posted and printed in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. • Information technology systems are updated to ensure efficiency. • Transitions to automated processing systems and document access are cost effective measures to promote administrative efficiencies. Accomplishments • Updated the web page in a timely manner for the postings of agendas, legal notices, requests for proposals, and employment opportunities. • Maintained efficient information technology infrastructure. • Continued to update the electronic document management system to improve processing of incoming and outgoing correspondence and.documents. • Posted requests for proposals for capital projects and legal notices for various Commission items. • Established a DBE goal of 6.46% for FY 2005/06. • Achieved 8.94% DBE goal for FY 2004/05. Major Initiatives The installation and implementation of the Commission's electronic document management system has provided a vast improvement in efficiencies as it relates to the management, storage, .and accessibility of the Commission's actions and documents and the retention capability for incoming and intemally created records. . Improvements will continue to be made to. strengthen the Commission's records processes and procedures and to increase efficiency. . The Commission is a member of the California Unified Certification Program. The Clerk of. the Board serves as its DBE liaison officer. The Commission's DBE program will be regularly reviewed to comply with federal guidelines. As projects are advertised, efforts will continue to be made to . expand the DBE mailing list to advertise for federally funded projects. Office Operations will continue to support staff members on capital construction projects as it relates to the Commission's DBE program, post legal notices for project requests for proposals and notices of completion, and set up special events to commemorate the start and completion of the projects. Office Operations will continue to provide high quality support services to the Board of Commissioners and to internal and external customers by providing. a working environment that enhances the overall mission of the Commission. 147 Department Goals Ensure quality service that demonstrates responsiveness and flexibility and provides services at the most reasonable cost. Objectives: • Support 31 full-time staff and 11 in-house consultants. • Provide accessibility to meeting agendas, legal notices; requests for proposal, and employment opportunities through the Commission's web page. Continue to improve administrative efficiency through'. automation of records processing. • Provide:a safe working environment with the maintenance of an injuryand illness prevention program: • Post legal notices and requests for proposal on the Commission's web page,and' in thenewspaperson a timely. basis. • "Continually. :update 'the DBE program and mailing list and provide informationron DBE certification on the Commission's web page. • Provide office ;supplies, equipment, and services consistent with intended quality and capabilities at the most advantageous price afforded in the market. •, Enhance and manage the Commission's information technology systems. . Department Budget Overview -Clerk of the Board Department Description The Clerk of the Board staff provide support services to -the: 30-member Board of Commissioners and its altemates and for Commission and .committee meetings. It serves as an important resource for the Commission -and hasthe responsibility for recording, publishing, preserving, and filing -meeting proceedings of documents acted upon by the. Commission and its committees; posting legal notices, capital' project requests for -proposals, and notices of project' completion; processing claims against, the Commission; fulfilling requirements,- of the Commission and the committees as it' relates to the Conflict of. Interest Code; coordinating' Commission special" events` and meetings;',and;performing all dutieS- required by ,law, rules,. or -, order of the Board of Commissioners. Key Assumptions • Staff support and meeting services' are provided to 30 Commissioners and their alternates, the. Commission; five established committees, and ad hoc committees. Monthly agenda packets and supporting documents and legal notices,are published ,and distributed in accordance with the Brown Act. Officers and members of the Commission are kept informed by providing them with the most current a , .e data to assist them and ... _ . their decision responsibilities: • • Frequent communication with Commissioners continues to provide news and updates on Commission items and transportation -related meetings. • Available technology is used to provide simplified access of agenda items and Commission actions by the public, local agencies, and staff. • Compliance with state and federal updates is achieved as it relates to the Brown Act. Accomplishments • Updated the web page and the bulletin board for the agenda, minutes, and supporting documents. • Posted legal notices in local newspapers and on the Commission's web page. . • Regularly advised officers and members of the Commission and their staff on changes to Commission meetings and other transportation -related meetings. • Arranged Commission and committee meetings and special events. ,of, the Commission. • Scheduled and noticed unmet transit needs hearing for the Palo Verde Valley in Blythe. • Processed and transmitted Commission -approved resolutions and ordinances to appropriate agencies in a timely manner. Major Initiatives Each year, local agencies make changes to their appointments regarding their representation on the Commission. Staff has made and will continue to make every effort to ensure that the newly appointed representatives, as well as their respective staff, are aware of operational policies of the Commission and other transportation - related meetings. There will be greater utilization of electronic mail with Commissioners for more efficient communications. Staff will continue to update technology to streamline processes and procedures to provide easier access to Commission actions, minutes, resolutions, and ordinances. Department Goals Ensure coordination and documentation of Commission and committee meetings and provide public accessibility to agenda items as required by state regulations. Objectives: • . Provide accurate, high quality agenda . packets for Commission and committee meetings. • Continue to provide support to Commission members, staff, and attendees of Commission and committee meetings. • Post meeting agendas and supporting documents timely in compliance with Brown Act requirements. 149 • Regularly update changes to the list of Commissioners and alternates and submit membership roster changes to the Secretary of State. • Maintain and file all Commission and committee meetings and official records of the Commission. • . Perform all duties within mandated deadlines. • Maintain and promote good Commission and staff relations. Facilitate access of information to Commission records. Objectives: • Continue to respond to requests for records and information on a timely basis and in accordance with state law. • Continue to improve theCommission's recordkeeping practices by updating the electronic document management system. • Maintain .and index Commission resolutions, ordinances, agreerrients, ,and contracts. • Maintain a .centralized ;database for Commissioners; agencies, and consultant. contact information. • Coordinate special activities, meetings, events, and conferences as', requested 'by the Executive Director and, the Commission. Department Budget Overview — Human Resources Department. Description Human Resources responsibilities include administering the recruitment, selection,` and appraisal process; updating and conducting a biennial survey of comparable salaries and benefits; maintaining personnel policies: and procedures; 'and' scheduling periodic sessions for staff to review benefits_:and personnel' rules and for supervisors to review the; performance evaluation process. Key Assumptions • The use of consultant maximized. • The assessment of Human; Resources practices and procedures will`continue.. • Continuous improvement in 'communication with employees regarding' Human Resources information will be an ongoing process. Accomplishments Revised the Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual.' services for Human Resources- administration is Developed and provided ,the Benefits Summary to all employees. Implemented the Human' Resources Newsletter to all employees. Amended life,: short-term disability, and long-termdisability insurance policies to ensure adequate and, complete coverage. 150 • Regularly provided information, to employees on changes to health insurance, 401(a) defined contribution, and 457 deferred compensation plans. • Updated the 401(a) defined contribution plan loan policy. • Developed and implemented a 457 deferred compensation loan policy. • Updated Equal Employment Opportunity Program, Harassment -Free Workplace, Violence in the Workplace, Drug -Free Workplace, and Electronic Communications policies. • Developed and implemented the recruitment and selection process. • Recruited and filled seven staff positions. • Held training and information -sessions on Personnel Policies and Procedures. • Improved the timeline for the completion of performance appraisals by staff and supervisors. • Completed the Biennial Compensation Study. - • Conducted employee survey related to benefits. Major Initiatives Human Resources focuses on managing employees and consists of a framework of activities and practices that support and develop a motivated workforce while at the same time complying withlegislation and regulations thatgovern the employer/employee relationship. Staff will use written position descriptions and performance expectations in order that each employee has a clear and consistent understanding of what is expected. Additionally, staff will utilize qualified human resources consultants to assist in establishing good human resources management practices, based on policies to establish parameters for fair and consistent decision - making, and to institute good workplace practices. A compensation program review will be conducted every two years to ensure fair compensation is established to attract and retain the most qualified employees. Department Goals — Human Resources Administer human resources policies, procedures, and programs in order to align personnel laws and the Commission's policies with continuous improvement principles. Objectives: • Review and; update personnel policies and procedures to comply with federal and state requirements. • Provide information to enhance the employee's knowledge of current personnel policies and procedures in various forms including electronic. access; workshops, and printed information. • Ensure that employee personnel records are updated timely for various personnel actions. 151 Continue to employ and recruit a dynamic and talented workforce. Objective: • Maintain a compensation program which ensures internal equity and external competitiveness within the pay structure for Commission employees. Develop people to be their best in order to meet the needs of the organization. Objectives: Build', . and maintain an effective performance system to . include timely performance- evaluations, personal development, and a supportive ,work environment. • Provide appropriate and timely training to meet the demands of the organization. Understand and consistently deliver excellent customer service to all employees. Objective Focus on "employee as customer" and consistently strive to exceed expectations by supporting and maintaining individualrespect, appreciation,; management accessibility, and communication. Improve .the 'quality :;of the work culture. Objectives: , Develop >and maintain a safe working environment. •''Maintain a proactive employeerelations process. Promote a work/family balance. Recognize and reward individual. contributions. Administration.; Performance/Workload Indicators FY 03/04 Actual FY_04/05 Actual FY 05106 Estimated ! FY 06/07 Projected. Employee Rules/Benefits Review Sessions Held 4 4 .' 8 1 Recruitments 3 3 9 , ; 0 Positions Filled '. 15 3 7 1 Documents Processed 4,788 8,184 8,440 8,600 ` AgreementsProrpesed 116 157 , 170 180,' Legal Notices , 11 , 19 10 10 Commission/Committee/Ad Hoc Meetings 45 63. 60 . 60 Commissioners (including Alternates) `:.. 'Supported 5 ; 59 54 ; . 54 ': 54 Staff and In -House Consultant Supported: Regular Full-time ' „ . Temporary/Seasonal 36 14 36 0 41 0 1 42 0 RCTC Sponsored Events 2 2 1 1 Legislative Affairs and Communications Mission Statement: "To strive to improve the lives of Riverside County residents by working through the legislative process and by maintaining effective interagency relationships. This is supported by _facilitating interactive communications with the public and transportation stakeholders through various outreach and media efforts." Chart 30 - Legislative Affairs and Communications Professional 46% Expenditures Support 16% Personnel 38% The Legislative Affairs and Communications Department has a total budget of $938,500, an increase of 6% from last year's budget. Staffing costs makeup 38.1% of the total department expenditures. Professional costs include legislative advocacy for $300,000 and graphic design and website updates- aggregating $71,000. Support costs include media ads for $100,000, which have decreased' 37.5% from last year's budget. Table 67 - Legislative Affairs and Communications Expenditure Detail FY 03104 FY 04105 FY 05106 FY 05/06 FY:06J07 Dollar - Percent Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change . Change Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs General Legal Services Professional Services -Other $202,500 $191,900 $ . 342,400 $204,300 $357,500 $ 15,100 4.4% 1,200 - .1,000 162200-138.700 6,000 1,000 2,000 - (4,000) -66.7% 359,000 292300 426,000 67000 18.7% Total Professional Costs 163,400 139,700 365,0030 293,300 428,000 63,000 17.3% Support Costs 107.000 111.500 178.300 218 500 153 000 (25,300) -14.2% TOTAL Legislative Affairs' and Communications S41j�9 ,Q $443.1QQ $ 865.70Q 57 Q,MQ $998 50Q $ 52 800 ¢,Qa 153 Legislative Affairs and Communications Staffing Summary 4 •z._ Position Fl" Q3)Q4 FY D05 =FY QSft�Q6 F,Y Q5/A7; Actual ; BQ t# l d901 AdmiitstrOy6 Support S etal� U 6Q ( k 0 0 � � D tdctar Falzlid Aff��rs 81 btre'obeRe9 � 10 Ex vbA iitant Executive' Direcfor kr ,C StaffAnatycst I 'a 1 29 Department Budget Overview Department Description Transportation issues and `'system enhancements - typically affect a number of jurisdictions and stakeholders. Through increased participation, the 'Commission is able to play,,a stronger leadership role at all levels of govemment to advance its. interests and policy goals. The Commission's Public Affairs efforts focus on taking full' advantage, of opportunities at both the 'federal and state levels when there is a -potential impact to Commission. programs. In doing so, the Commission maintains its role as a major legislative force and a statewide leader on a .broad range of issues affecting transportation policy such as project delivery and enhanced funding. Recognizing that the Inland 'Empire area of Riverside and, San Bernardino_ counties has, a number of commonly., shared transportation concerns and a significant combined, legislative . delegation in. ,Sacramento and „Washington, D.C., the Commission works cooperatively with SANBAG to leverage the interests of the ` region. The Commission: is committed to communicating with and educating a broad arena of interested parties on the; roles and responsibilities of the agency. Emphasis is placed on informing Riverside County residents and businesses about;;transportation projects g P i ;transportation ro ects and services and maintainin open communication with other stakeholders.., Various forms of media and communication tools are used .in these . outreach .efforts- with the overall objectives to provide < accurate, informative, and easily accessibleinformation; facilitate public participation in the Commission processes; and increase interagency coordination and cooperation The Public Affairs Director Is responsible for communicationswith the news media and, prepares text for Commission materials, presentations, and speeches. Along with the Executive Director, the Public Affairs Director actively participates in public 154 • • presentations at the local, regional, and state levels to represent the Commission's interests. The need for proactive public communication and outreach remains important as the Commission continues to move forward with the delivery of the 1989 Measure A work program and begins to meld that ongoing effort with a new focus toward advancing project commitments under the 2009 Measure A work program. Strong relationships with the news media are very important to ensuring that the public is . well informed regarding the Commission's progress in determining funding priorities, designing infrastructure improvements, and constructing projects. There are many points throughout these processes in which the public can and should play a role in shaping the future of the County's transportation network. Key Assumptions • The Executive Director will oversee the legislative affairs work effort with support from the Public Affairs Director and legislative consultants., • An effective communication and education program will be developed with the media and the local legislative delegation regarding the importance of Proposition 42 and other sources of state funding in funding transportation projects. • The annual newspaper report to the public .will be published . in the major. newspapers throughout the County. • The Commission Connection newsletter will be published monthly.. • The Speakers Bureau effort will continue to seek local community, opportunities to expand outreach regarding the Commission's activities. • The Commission's website will be updated and refreshed on a regular basis. • Additional communications tools and opportunities .will be explored for. incorporation into the ongoing program to help build public awareness of Commission activities. Accomplishments • Participated in the statewide Proposition 42 Coalition which led to the full funding in the State budget in FY 2005/06. •. Worked with the local Congressional delegation to receive federal- funding earmarks for high -priority projects including the I-15/Cajalco interchange, the of SR-79 realignment, a new corridor to Orange County, and interchanges in the Coachella Valley. • Published a four page annual report supplement in three major newspapers - The Press Enterprise, Desert Sun, and The Californian. The supplement's centerfold featured various planning efforts to address major transportation needs including the Riverside County to Orange County MIS, the Mid County Parkway Project Study Report, and the SR-79 Realignment Study. 155 • Continued effective 'relationships with the news media 'resulting in informative coverage regarding local and regional transportation issues and Measure A project delivery. • Enhanced the Commission's stock of photos for use in various outreach . materials.. • : Provided extensive public outreach support as part of the project development process for the Mid County Parkway, SR-79 realignment, Perris Valley .Line Metrolink extension, and Riverside County to Orange County MIS projects. • Issued a new Commissioner Resource Notebook to maintain the reference materials as:a useful resource tool for Board members. Supported the Rail Department in the development of various, :marketing materials and advertisements including the SummerLink and. Holiday Train services. Increased the Commission's presence on television with interviews on Comc_ast Cable, KOCE, and KVCR. Major Initiatives Legislative Affairs . Legislatively, the continued quest for additional state and federal 'investment 'in transportation infrastructure :will be an ongoing concern.At the state -level,there is considerable momentum to seek an aggressive bond'. package to fund' infrastructure projects. Commission staff will work with Commissioners to ensure that the legal language behindthe bond measure is favorable and also ensure that Riverside County receives a significant share of funding. Another legislative area of emphasis is the protection ofr;Proposition '42 This measure was approved' by 70.percent of the State's:voters in, 2002 and allocates the revenue from the sales and .use tax on the sale of gasoline for transportation projects. Unfortunately, Proposition 42 provides a mechanism for the Governor and the Legislature to suspend it in the case of a fiscal emergency. The 'rsuspension has been triggered in the past during ,state budget crises. The Commission has',joined a statewide coalition to advocate an amendment. to Proposition ,42'to eliminate the loophole and will play a major role in this effort .in the upcoming fiscal year. Also of particular importance are the promotion and maintenance of interregional cooperation to. ensure that theinterests of the Commission are disseminated in a proactive;, informative manner. i Within that context, partnership development, public and private, isviewed as critical to the Commission's continued success in affecting positive transportation decisions to meet future demands. - The Commission's intergovernmental work effort will remain focused on facilitating ongoing commitments as .well as being responsive to various emerging issues... FY . 2006/07 interregional concerns :will -prove- to be a more, important taskfor the Commission on a number of issues.' • • One effort that has proved to be quite._ successful in recent years is cooperative . relations with Orange County. RCTC and OCTA have developed an effective working relationship involving the 91 Express Lanes, Metrolink, and other bi-county transportation issues. Finally, the Commission is making strides in working with San Diego County on. mutually important transportation issues. Our commissioners and members of the San Diego Association of Govemments are meeting on a periodic, basis to consider transportation issues. The areas involving cooperation include widening of 1-15, commuter assistance programs such as vanpooling, and potential rail services. Communications The Commission provides information to the public through various channels including. 1) participation at public meetings and service clubs; 2) production and provision of resource materials and fact sheets; 3) maintenance and enhancement. of the Commission's website; and 4) development of newspaper press releases, radio public service announcements, and cable television spots.. The Commission's largest publication effort to provide widespread understanding of its projects and expenditures is its four -page annual report which is published in three area newspapers throughout the County. Broad distribution of the Commission Connection, a monthly one -page, two-sided newsletter highlighting actions of the Commission and emerging topics, will continue as part of the Commission's communications efforts. Efforts will continue to update and expand the Commission's contact database including e-mail addresses in order to support distribution of the Commission's public information materials. Effortswill be .made to increase the Commission's public information program targeted to citizens and businesses within the County as well as a broad array of public and private entities involved in the world of transportation.. A focus will be placed on the development and placement of periodic informational" ads in the County s major newspapers. The ads will be targeted to geographic areas and will communicate relevant information to the reader audience. A continuing emphasis will be placed on providing communications support to major project development efforts including the Penis Valley Line, Mid County Parkway as part of the CETAP program, Riverside County to Orange County MIS implementation, ' and ongoing highway construction projects. The Commission's outreach will include a proactive effort to work closely with various media formats such as print, radio, and television to increase their understanding of and interest in transportation issues and generate a higher level of media coverage. Toward that end, opportunities will be identified for live or taped interviews and presentations that speak to local citizens and their questions concerning transportation issues which could include forums such as city council meetings .and local cable television. A general information video about the 157 state, and federal government settings. Objectives: , Commission and its overall 'rolewill be completed as la 'tool for dissemination of information to the general public. Another new initiative for the coming fiscal year will be an effort to 'create new branding for all of the Commission's services. This effort will be done in, conjunction with the ` Commission's regional programs' staff and is intended to raise public awareness regarding' services such as specialized transit, commuter' assistance; motorist services, and -Metrolink commuter rail. All too often these' Services are considered' separately rather than as a "suite" of travel options forthe community. Given the investment of Measure A and public ` dollars in these 'services, the Commission seeks to increase public awareness of all of its services:and,programs. New', Commissioner orientation meetings will be provided by the 'Public Affairs Director in one-to-one settings. To supplement individual Commissioner meetings with the 'ExecutiVe Director, continuing education opportunities at the small group level will also be provided to Commissioners which focus on,.timely issues.. Department• Goals Foster the :Commission's full involvement in abroad range of local,. regional, • Participate in the Self -Help Counties Coalition,. the California Transit Association, Southern, Califomia Legislative Roundtable, state and federal transportation agencies, and community/business organizations including the Monday Morning' Group, Inland` Empire Economic Partnership, the Coachella Valley Economic Partnership, ;Temecula/Murrieta Group, Hemet/San Jacinto = Group, ;and. the Valley Group. • Work:with the CTC and the Regional Transportation Planning Agencies to protect and enhance' project funding for the County through influencing policy decisions. • 'Maintain a leadership;. role in local and regional transportation venues related to project development efforts ,and current and emerging issues including ; coordination , with ; other , county transportation commissions, - councils ,of' governments;local jurisdictions, etc: • Participate and ;influence intercounty discussions between Riverside' and Orange counties regarding the operation- of the 91 Express Lanes as well, as overall transportation: policy between both counties. This includes supporting efforts to develop .a new transportation corridor .between .the counties and to support additional transit service. ,:• • .Provide 'leadership .to the Technical Advisory Committee of the RTAC. Of particular concern is RTAC's role: in development and :overall approval of the RTP. ;Participate ;on the SCAQMD 'Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review: Committee (MSRC)'at both the policy and staff levels to provide leadership in the • • development of its work program disbursing $12 million annually to reduce mobile source emissions. Implement the Commission's state and federal legislative program to maximize flexibility in the use of existing transportation revenues by supporting legislation to protect and increase current funding levels, ensuring an equitable distribution _of available resources, streamlining administrative procedures to reduce costs and time of project development, and accelerating the allocation and use of existing resources. Objectives: • Coordinate legislative activities of federal and state legislative consultants in light of the passage of SAFETEA-LU and the potential for a statewide bond measure On infrastructure. Obtain monthly reports on activities performed. • Work with board members to establish policy positions, draft legislation, and take positions on pending legislation. • Review and analyze legislation and recommend positions for the Commission to adopt on specific legislative proposals. • Effectively represent the Commission before the state and federal legislative bodies, the CTC, and other agencies in funding, programming, and policy matters. • Maintain contact and good working relationships with state and federal lawmakers and their staffs. Regularly meet and inform them of County transportation issues, policy positions, and project priorities. • Convene meetings with state, federal, and legislative staff members, including hosting federal staff for an annual full -day briefing and tour of projects. Support the continuing education of Commissioners to increase their understanding of transportation -related issues at local, state,, and federal levels to maximize the effectiveness of the Commission in affecting policy and funding actions. Objectives: • Provide individual orientation training for new Commissioners. • Produce and distribute a monthly one -page fact sheet, Commission Connection, highlighting actions and activities of the Commission. • Provide periodic educational workshops or study sessions for Commissioners. • Maintain and distribute updates to the Commissioner Resource Notebook. Develop and maintain an information program which educates the public and other stakeholders on the roles and responsibilities of the Commission as it relates to accomplishments achieved through Measure A or other funding sources controlled or administered by the Commission. Objectives: • Expand, maintain, and update information on the Commission's website. 159 • Annually produce. an insert. in all major County newspapers that informs the public regarding Measure A progress and other Commission programs. • Issue news releases to the local media announcing significant achievements and providing information on Commission actions and activities. • Develop and : maintain open lines of communication with news reporters to facilitate adequate and accurate news coverage. • Schedule periodic media information briefings or news conferences when a particular issue warrants it. • Expand the stock of video footage for use in production of cable television spots that feature . transportation projects funded and or implemented by the, Commission. Periodically use cable television and other forms of media such as billboards, if appropriate, to communicate information to the public regarding the. Commission's activities and services. • Coordinate' and oversee message content of all. Commission publications and communications to provide uniformity of message and direction. . • Support the development and planning of projects in regard t0 public outreach " and communication efforts. Require the use of Measure A project/program signage by funding recipients ,to increase public awareness of Measure A accomplishments. • Continue to administer, and expand the use of the Speakers Bureau to reach community members in service and other organizations. • Monitor and distribute media coverage from various outlets in the County and throughout the region to Commissioners and :staff to enable them to closely follow transportation policy trends. • Provide oversight and coordination to Commission departments in the development of. communications' materials. Foster and maintain effective communications with other agencies to heighten their understanding of the rides and responsibilities of the Commission and increase interagencyy coordination and cooperation. Objective: • Assign designated staff members to attend other agency meetings and require staff to provide written/verbal communication on topics of discussion during regular staff meetings: Legislative Affairs and Communications PerformanceNllorkload;Indicators FY 03104 Actual FY'04/05 Actual' FY 05/06 Estimated FY 06/07 Projected Speakers` Bureau Presentations 25 28 30 30 Legislative matrix submittals to Commission .. 8 ' 10 10 10. Commissionenand state and federal; legislator in -person meetings 15 20 - .20 _ _ 20 Inland Empire Delegation staff briefings 3 3 2 2 Southern California Legislative Staff roundtables, .: 7 9 9 9 •,l { • Finance • Mission Statement: "To safeguard the Commission's assets and maintain strong and prudent fiscal controls in investing, accounting, budgeting, procurements, and financial reporting including ongoing disclosure to all interested parties. Seek financing altematives that complement the Commission's. strategic direction." Chart 31 — Finance Professional 46% Expenditures Support 5% Personnel 49% Finance's total budget is $1,373,000 and reflects a 17.7% increase over the prior year's budget. Department staffing costs will total $681,900, an increase of $111,600 or 19.6%. Professional costs of $628,500 include various services related to general legal, investment and financial advisory, external and intemal audits, debt management, and CAFR and annual budget graphic design. Support costs of $62,600 include CAFR and annual budget production costs of $25,000. 161 Table 68 — Finance Expenditure Detail FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 408,400 $ 494,100 $ 570,300 $ 615,100 $ 681;900. _ $ 111,60019.6% Professional Costs Legal Services 12,200 11,900 15,000 13,000 15,000 0.0°% Financial Services . 46,900 52,300 50,000 70,500 100,000 50,00.0 100.0%- Audit Services 438,000 285,000 373,000 335,000 415,000 '' 42,000,' 11.3% Professional Services -Other 60,100 79,600 121 000 92,200 98.500 -(22,5001 --18.6°% Total Professional Costs 557,200 428,800 559,000 510,700 628,506 69,500 12.4% Support Costs 23,800 21.800 37 200 51 000 62.600 25.400 68.3% $ 989.400 $ 944 701 $ 1 166.500 $ 1 176 80Q $ 1_ 7_3 200 $ �206.50Q 1;.7°%' TOTAL Finance Finance Staffing;Summary Positlor� _ . ":60 .0:4129 Attourrti Atitnjiust a G�110' Department Budget Overview Department Description. Commission resources _ are;'; allocated to assure financial stability and fiscal accountability. Finance activities include investing the Commission's cash resources,. planning and :directing financial transactions,',managing the procurements and contracts process, and subsequent monitoring of legal and regulatory requirements. Adequate cash flow must be; maintained while at the same time prudently investing idle funds. Borrowing needsare carefully planned using ;both short and, long-term, debt. Once debt is issued, there are ongoing :responsibilities including" interaction with financial advisors, bankers, dealers and .underwriters, bond counsel, bond insurers, trustees; : issuing and paying agents, arbitrage consultants, and rating: agenciesas well as ,providing' regular and consistent information`=disclosure .to investors. 162 Fiscal accountability involves receiving all funds due the Commission, paying all Commission obligations, maintaining,. the general ledger, regular reporting of the Commission's fiscal results, and preparing and monitoring the budget. Fiscal accountability requires the coordination of budget planning and monitoring and the accurate and timely accounting for all funding sources, including compliance with all applicable laws and regulations governing those funds. Accounting encompasses cash receipt and disbursement functions, maintenance of the general. ledger including project cost accounting, payroll processing, quarterly and annual financial reporting, and retention of and coordination with independent auditors. The Commission also. recognizes the importance of accountability for the organization. As a'result, the Commission is highly regarded by individuals, peers, other organizations, and government officials at .a local, regional, state, and national basis. A formal organizational accountability program was approved in January 2006 to address fraud risk, ethical conduct, financial and operational disclosure, and maintaining the public's confidence in' the Commission. Accordingly, measures are in the process of development based on a conceptual framework related to oversight, reporting, fraud, intemal control, and ethics. Key Assumptions • : The commercial paper program will continue to provide short-term advance funding for projects included in the 2009 Measure A in anticipation of the future issuance of long-term sales tax revenue bonds. • . Process improvements will continue regarding the procurement and contracts process to ensure that procurements occur with appropriate authorization and that related contracts are prepared and processed in a timely manner. • Directors and program managers will continue to have adequate project budget and accounting information to make informed decisions. • The indirect. cost .allocation plan submitted to Caltrans will continue to be approved and used in determining state and federal reimbursements of project costs. • Investments will be maintained primarily in, state and local agency investment pools for short-term liquidity purposes; however, investments in mid-term treasury and federal agency securities will be made as available funds are identified. The overall interest rate is projected to be 4%. Accomplishments • Executed four agreements with CVAG and local jurisdictions- aggregating $51,800,000 for advancement of 2009 Measure A funds using commercial paper program. • Obtained approval from Caftans for the indirect cost allocation, plan, thereby enabling the Commission to claim state and federal reimbursements for indirect costs related primarily to highway projects for FY 2005/06. 163 environment.' • Updated -arbitrage rebate calculations for all outstanding sales tax revenue .bond issues.. • Completed Six Sigma process improvement project related to :the 'contracts process and commenced implementation of operational efficiencies.:; Obtained financial reporting excellence awards from the Govemment Finance: Officers Association (GFOA) (13th year) and the California Society of 'Municipal Finance Officers (CSMFO)(2 year) related to the CAFR for the fiscal year ended. June 30. 2005.. . ::Commenced update'of Measure A sales tax revenue forecast through 2039 using . the UCLA Anderson Forecast of the UCLA Anderson School of Management. ; • Engaged. the services' of an actuarial consultant to perform an actuarial valuation` of the. Commission's postemployment medical benefits under GASB' Statement' No. 45. Invested, additional , $22,000,000 in primarily medium -term . federal agency securities based on renewed investment strategy, in a rising ' interest rate • Obtained GFOA distinguished 'budget award ('10th year) for annual. budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1,; 2005. • 'Received affirmation of AA rating from Standard & Poor's following' December 2005: presentation to credit analysts. Major Initiatives The commercial paper program has been in place for over one year, and provides advance funding for projects included in the 2009 Measure A. Commission management will continue to consider appropriate uses of commercial paper to. advance 2009-Measure A projects of the Commission, CVAG, and the local jurisdictions. Agreements will be prepared for advanres to local jurisdictions as requests for advances are approved. ' The sales tax revenue forecast update will be utilized for several purposes, over, the next year. Initially, it will be analyzed with the results of the 10=year delivery plan to identify potential project,funding shortfalls. This will then lead to innovative financing strategies. Secondly,, the revenue update ,will be used by the financial advisory team to recommend actions to lessen the restriction'of the;$500 million 2009 Measure A bon. ding cap, which could include the possibility of a ballot measure in 2008 to increase the cap. Finally, the revenue update and 10-year delivery plan results will be the basis of initial planning efforts for a long-term debt issue in 2008 or 2009. The long-term debt issue will include a refinancing of all or a .portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes: Additionally, these efforts may include consideration of an interest rate hedge or swap transaction to take advantage of low interest rates in a currently rising interest rate environment. During FY'2006/07, an internal audit risk assessment program will be initiated as a major effort related,` to the organizational accountability . program! The initial phase of the assessment wills include" a business risk analysisthatwill lead to an audit plan. An outcome of the projects included in the audit` plan will be operational solutions such 'as process improvements. • • • The Finance Department will continue to keep abreast of GASB technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities. Efforts to improve the statistical section of the CAFR in accordance with GASB ,Statement 44, Economic Condition Reporting: The Statistical Section (an amendment of .NCGA Statement I), will be completed.. However, the most significant accounting issue to be, addressed is GASB Statement 45, Accounting for Other Postemployment ,Benefits (OPEB). Effective with the fiscal year ending June 30, 2008, the Commission will be required to recognize _post -retirement health care costs on an accrual basis over a period approximating the employees' years of service and to provide information about actuarial accrued liabilities (AAL) associated with these benefits and whether and to what extent progress is being made in funding the plan. Accordingly, the Commission has hired an actuary to perform the actuarial valuation to calculate the AAL and make funding recommendations. Department Goals Protect the Commission's cash resources by regular monitoring of investment practices toensure consistency with established investment. policy. . Objective: • Achieve a rate of return at least equal to the County of Riverside Treasury Pool rate._ Manage . the Commission's outstanding debt ensuring compliance with applicable laws and regulations and continued investor awareness and receptivity to the Commission's program. Objectives: • Provide an annual update and review of the debt programs with rating agencies no later than December 2006. • • Meet continuing disclosure requirements of the debt programs. • Prepare arbitrage calculations as required. Ensure the Commission and funding recipients comply with Measure A and TDA laws and regulations as they relate to the annual financial and compliance audits as well as close cooperation and coordination with independent auditors. Objectives: , • Minimize the number of substantive management letter comments and compliance findings requiring corrective action by the Commission. • Establish appropriate fiduciary review and monitoring procedures for Measure A recipient and TDA claimant audits. Maintain fiscal and budgetary control through monitoring of periodic results and ensuring consistency with the Commission's strategic direction. 165 Objectives: • Obtain the GFOA DistinguishedBudget Award for the FY 2006/07 budget. • Provide monthly notification to managers on budget performance and assist ` managers' regarding explanations and resolution of unfavorable budgetvariances. • Facilitate a comprehensive budgeting approach that effectively involves management staff, -requiring full accountability for all department expenditures. • Assure :#iscalaccountability for Commission funds with general ledger' accounting ' and financial reporting consistent with generally . accepted " accounting principles.' Objectives: • Provide monthly activity reports to all managers ensuring proactive communication and timely responses to'any noted errors and corrections. • Obtain an unqualified opinion on the basic financial statements • Receive financial reporting excellence awards from the GFOA and CSMFO. • Stay abreast of accounting and financial reporting developments by attending training and conferences in accounting, financial reporting; or specialized areas: applicable to job duties. • Update and maintain the fiscal policies and procedures manual. • Update and maintain. complete • accounting desk procedures manual • to.facilitate cross training: • Assist local governments with Measure A funding by providing timely,' allocation of funds for eligible projects ,and financing opportunities to the extent funding 'does not impact other programs and is financially feasible and prudent. ' • Maintain' financial software to reflect technical updates and current technology. Develop and maintain an organizational accountability program encompassing financial, and operational .functions. Objectives: • Establish and implement measures ethics. • Issue annual disclosure F: responsibilities. related to oversight,;: fraud, internal control, .and nts related to .financial and, operational. Procure goods and services from qualified consultants, contractors, ,and other vendors. in`accordance with laws and regulations at a competitive price.' Objectives: • Assist departments and programs to procure and obtain goods and seances in a -cost effective and efficient manner. • Implement the results of the Si)( Sigma process: improvement project for contracts. Ensure that contracts are entered into with appropriate legal considerations: , Finance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 03/04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY 05/06 Estimated FY 06107 , Projected Sales Tax Revenue Bond Rating Aa2/AA Aa2/AA Aa2/AA Aa2/AA Commercial Paper Rating N/A P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ CSMFO Outstanding Financial Reporting _ Awarded Awarded Awarded Awarded GFOA Certificate of Achievement - Awarded Awarded Awarded Awarded GFOA Distinguished Budget Award Proficient Proficient' Proficient Proficient Invoices Processed 4,986 4,941 4,988 4,970 Checks Processed 3,623 3,372 3,647 3,550 Audit Adjustments 0 0 0 0 Average Yield on Investments 1.49% 1.71 % 3.44% 4.00% Payroll Hours Processed 52,861 53,635 58,294 57,000 Accounts Receivable Invoices Processed 159 189 130 160 167 REGIONAL PROGRAMS Regional Issues Mission Statement: . "To strive to improve the lives of Riverside County residents "through the facilitation of interagency and interjurisdictional relationships in support of a coordinated regional approach to transportation funding and solutions. Chart 32 - Regional Issues Professional 72% Support 1% Personnel 27% Expenditures Total budgeted expenditures for Regional Issues are $353,400. Staffing costs make up 27.2% of the total department expenditures. Professional services include on -call goods movement and transit -oriented development consultants for $250,000. Table 69-Regional Issues FY 03104. FY 04105 Actual .Actual Salaries and Benefits $ 42,300$-41,500 Professional Costs "Legal Services 900 500 Professional Services -Other 25,000 25.000 Total Professional Costs 25,900 25,500 Support Costs 900 • 900 FY 05106 FY 05106 FY 06107 Dollar Percent Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change $ 57,500 $ 29,800 $ 96,300 $. 38,800 67.5% 1,000, 2,500 2,500. 1,500 150.0% 10 000 125.000" 250,000 240,000 2400.0% 11,000 127,500 252,500 241,500 _ 2195.5% 2.200 3,900 4,600 2 400 109.1 % TOTAL Regional Issues $ 69.100 $ 67.900 $ 70 M $ 161.200 $ 353 400 $ 282.70Q 39 Mt 169 stir;♦ . Regional Issues StaffiriMS,Ummary Po's�6on• FY corm F7 04105 ; FY05/0 r�ro�ro'r "•Aa t:61 Actuat :t Budget Budget ; afintY .,,. p'u **(Plinkkl -W616iiP ejliSa 1Sta t An lY ._- Depertment:Budget Overview Department,Description Of ' particular :importance are the ;promotionand maintenance :♦ of interregional r, cooperation to ensure 'that the interests of the "Commission are disseininated in`a proactive,informative manner. Within that context,, partnership development, public':., and private, is viewed as criticalto the Commission's` continued success in "affecting positive°:transportation: decisions to meet future demands. As a, result, Regional ' Issues incorporates goods movement and transit oriented development. Key Assumptions The Southem California Multi -County . Goods Movement Action Plan is 41 completed by June2007. The Commission's Alameda Corridor East (ACE) Funding Plan is completed. Accomplishments. 'Completed ,the Rail. Grossing Priority Update of, needed grade separations throughout the County.':;. • Secured: $31 ,.million SAFETEA-LU earmark for grade separation projects in Riverside; County. Of the $31 million, $21 million was allocated' to support six , grade separation projects:. Awarded; $500000 "te .the city of Riverside for the Jurupa' Avenue Grade Separation project. i' • Completed the "Bottom Line Report outlining critical goods movement issues for eastern and western. Riverside Courity_ Initiated joint development requests for proposal for the La Sierra and Riverside Downtown Metrolink stations. Major Initiatives The Commission's work effort -will remain focused on facilitating ongoing commitments as well asbeingresponsive, to various emerging issues.. These include bi-county issues with San Bernardino County, Orange County, and San Diego County. A The development of a new TMC to serve Riverside and San Bernardino counties continues to be a priority. As part of the project development team, the Commission has been working closely with SANBAG and Caltrans to speed development of the proposed TMC to be constructed at.the 1-15/1-210 interchange. LAX expansion issues will be monitored with focus placed .on supporting and facilitating processes most likely to result in the redistribution of passengers and cargo from LAX to existing underutilized airports in the region. The Commission continues to support the March ARB plans to develop airfreight services and resulting ground access improvement needs. The Commission will continue to be an activeparticipant in the development of the Southern California and State Goods Movement Action Plans. ,As it relates to transit oriented development, the Commission will continue participating on the WRCOG Transit Oriented Development Study and seek to award exclusive negotiating agreements with development teams for the. La Sierra and Riverside Downtown stations. Department Goals Facilitate development of regional transportation solutions that benefit Riverside County. Objectives: • Participate and influence intercounty discussions between Riverside, Orange, and San Diego regarding the enhancement of . intermodal options. This includes additional transit services (rail and express bus) and rideshare services. Participate and influence the regional discussions on meeting air passenger and freight growth demands for the future, thereby encouraging the use of other regional airport facilities such as March ARB over LAX. Determine where future. efforts on addressing Riverside. County goods movement issues would prove most effective. Objectives: • Identify drivers of demand for goods movement services, performance of modal systems and services as well as public benefits, specific areas of inefficiency, and the impacts of goods movement on communities. • Implement the Commission's ACE Funding Plan through coordination of advocacy efforts with Legislative Affairs and Communications. Facilitate public and private investments in clean air technology in support of the broader air quality programs for SCAG, SCAQMD, and Riverside County local entities. - 171 Objective: Influence implementation of the Interstate Clean- Transportation Corridor plan to facilitate :the location of clean fuel infrastructure and deployment of clean fuel equipment along designated corridors in the County and the greater region through financial support and. participation. Facilitate improving accessibility, supporting regional goals of enhancing the quality of life, and supporting transit investmentthrough joint 'developments at the Commission -owned rail stations. Objective: • Support joint development that promotes and enhances rail transit ridership and protectsthecommuter rail stations and corridor. Regional Issues Performance/Workload Indicators FY 03/04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY 05/06 Estimated FY 06/07 , Projected Exclusive Negotiating Agreement N/A N/A N/A 1 • Planning and Programming Mission Statement: "To .exert leadership in planning and programming transportation improvements resulting in improved mobility and environmental stewardship while leveraging maximum return of federal, state, and private funding on local investment." Chart 33 —Planning and Programming Special Studies 26% LTF Disbursements 16% Expenditures Personnel 11% Professional and Support • 47% Planning and Programming expenditures of $6,412,100 have increased 44.3% from last year's budget due primarily to strategic partnership efforts. Salaries and benefits increased 32.7% as a result of the addition of an innovative financing program manager and increases in benefit costs. Professional services totaling $2,943,000 include consultant contractsto assist the Commission with public outreach efforts for the MIS,.CMP implementation efforts, air quality analysis, local and regional planning activities, strategic partnership advisors, and `legal services. Professional costs have increased 762.5% as a result of the strategic partnership/innovative finance efforts and the next phase of work on the. Riverside County -Orange County CETAP corridor that will be initiated in FY 2006/07. Planning and Programming will also be contracting with a consultant to develop a project management database to improve the management and monitoring of projects and funding. LTF disbursementsare directly affected by LTF planning revenues available, which have been adjusted in recent years at mid -year based on revised revenue projections. 173 Table.70 Planning and Programming Expenditure Detail FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 - 'FY 05/06 Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Salaries and Benefits::, - $ 424,100 $ 388,400 $ Professional Costs Legal Services 23,100 5,300 Professional Services -Other 78.900 135,500 Total Professional Costs 102,000 140,800 Support Costs.. - .. - Projects and'Operations Projects - General - Spectat Studies -LTF Disbursements Total Projects and Operations . 15,000 8,600 334,900 17,700 936,800 1,069,300 750,200 706,200 1 793 200 TOTAL Planning and Programming $2.563.00Q $2.331.ROA Planning and; Programming. Staffing Summary ��tian �r" Department Budget Overview Department Description • .FY 06/07. Dollar .:Budget Change 515,200 $ 438,500 S. 883,600 $ 198,400 Percent Change 32.7% _ 17,000 30,100 . _. 56,000' '_ .:i39,000 ,229.4% 324.200 136.700 '` 2,1387,000 _. 2,562,800 i790.5% . 341,200 166,800 2,943,900 - 2,601,800 .-,762.5% - ' 17,200 - 12,400 1,649,600 1,909.100 17,800 • ' 57,000 <39,800 126,400 1.911.300 :231 A% - '(12,400).. 100.0% 1,685,700,,. :36,100. 2.2% ':1.042.800 (866.300) I'2.728.500 (842,600) $ 6 412 100 B 1 �n67400 The Commission is responsible for 'short- and long-range transportation planning and • programming. Short-range planning and ` programminginvolves the development of the five-year STIP and six -year Federal ;•Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) for Riverside County. 'Projects are required to be included in these programming documents in order to receive state and federal funding and approvals. The Commission's involvement with .long-range planning efforts includes :the coordination and input into, long, -range transportation planning efforts throughout the County and southem''California region. 'These efforts include participation in local and regional corridor studies, including CETAP for which the Commission is taking the lead, and the RTP developed by SCAG in conjunction with county transportation commissions, local agencies, transit operators, and other interested parties. Programming specifically involves the development, review, andapproval of projects for various funding programs. Projects approved for funding ,must be included in the appropriate transportation programming documents (FTIP and/or STIP), which require the identification .of all fund sources, project delivery schedules, and other pertinent information. All projects that are funded with federal and state dollars or local projects that are regionally significant must be included in the FTIP.. SCAG is responsible for incorporating ;all six -county (Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura) transportation improvement programs into one regional document and conducting a conformity analysis with the adopted air. plans. Projects that are funded, with Regional Improvement Program (RIP) and Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds are part of the STIP approved by the CTC. RIP and IIP funded projects are also included in the FTIP. The Commission is responsible for allocating the following local, state, and federal funding sources:. Local Sources: • Measure A programs/projects that are identified in the 1989 and 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plans • TUMF regional arterial program projects State Sources: • SB 821 bicycle and pedestrian projects • Regional Improvement Program Federal Sources: • Transportation Enhancements (TE)' • Surface Transportation Program (STP) • Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality The Commission also serves as the.CMA for the County and is responsible for developing and updating the CMP. The CMP was developed to meet state legislation and federal Congestion Management System (CMS) requirements, which includes an enhanced traffic monitoring system_ The CMP's highways and regional arterials are regularly monitored to ensure that they are not operating at deficient levels [Level of Service (LOS) "Fl. If a deficiency occurs along the CMP system, a deficiency plan must be prepared that identifies mitigation measures and/or projects that will improve the LOS to "E" or higher. 175 •` The Commission will continue its efforts in working with transportation partners to: streamline and improve project delivery. The Commission will continue its leadership role on CETAP and' work with our partner "agencies `'(SANBAG and OCTA) to .continue progress on these . corridors The CETAP effort will be funded with a combination of local, state, and federal funds. The consultant contract for CMP services is maintained to provide assistance with ongoing monitoring; efforts, update the CMP-on a`biennial basis, manage 'the traffic count data, and support other related planning activities. The Commission' will continue the progress of transportation projects identified in 19891Measure A and the'2009 Measure Aas well as other high priority projects, including TOME projects. • `; The Commission .will participate in local, bi-county,' and regional planning. efforts representing the interests of the County. The. Commission will work with the CTC to implement as many projects as possible given the current funding constraints. and continue to seek alternative funding for previously committed projects that have been delayed, in previous STIP cycles The Commission will „develop strategies to implement innovative financing including public/private partnerships. The Commission will develop a project management database . that 'will consolidate all projects into one database to improve efficiencies in monitoring projects_ and:; funding. Accomplishments Completed the 2006STIP submittal to the CTC. • Completed the 2006 FTIP submittal to SCAG. • Coordinated a call for projects and approved projects for STIP TE funds: • :Approved the Locally Preferred Strategy for: the Riverside County -Orange County MIS in cooperation with OCTA.' • Continued, progress on the east -west CETAP internal corridor with the project level Environmental ImpacfStudy (EIS)/En`vironmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Mid County Parkway: project. Minimized project delays in light of state funding shortfalls. " Received CTC ,approvalmf,an:AB 3090 Replacement Agreement .to proceed with the SR-60 Valley Way, to 1-15 HOV/Mixed Flow Lanes project by replacing STIP"fundswith a:TUMF 'loan and CTC approval: of a Letter of No Prejudice (LONP).' The AB 3090'agreement allows the reprogramming. of RIP funds to the SR-60/I-215 East Junction connector, and the LONP allows the payback of $21 million of CMAQ funding. • Received CTC approval of an AB :3090 Replacement Agreement to advance the SR-91 Green River interchange project by replacing STIP funds with a TUMF loan and commercial paper. The AB 3090 Replacement Agreement allows the reprogramming. of RIP funds to the SR-60/I-215 East Junction connector. • Initiated the strategic . partnerships effort by establishing contracts with consultants. Major Initiatives With the passage of SB 45 in 1998, increased funding authority and responsibility was placed on the Commission as it relates to the STIP.. SB 45 provides .for distribution of federal and state 'highway funds into :the following categories: RIP, IIP, and Intercity Rail. Each county transportation commission throughout the State is responsible for programming RIP funds, which represents 75% of the total STIP funding available statewide for capital enhancement projects. The 75% funding level is then further distributed with 60% of the funds allocated to Southern California and 40% to Northern California. A population formula is then applied to determine county levels called "county shares." • As a result of SB 45, . the Commission is responsible for ensuring that projects funded with STIP funding are administered and implemented consistent with CTC and Caltrans policies. Two percent of RIP funding available to Riverside County was allocated for staff support to carry out STIP planning, programming, and monitoring activities. Included in the 2009 Measure A is a provision that identifies $400 million of TUMF revenues collected on the Western County TUMF network to be allocated to TUMF regional arterial projects. Of the $400 million, $200 million is slated specifically for the CETAP corridors and the other $200 million for regional arterial projects. In late 2004 the Commission established a 5-year program and approved $71.7 million for 24 regional arterial projects. The Commission has initiated strategic partnership efforts to identify and evaluate innovative financing strategies. Innovative: financing will likely be necessary to fund the significant gap between funding readily available through conventional govemmental funding/financing techniques and project needs. Innovative financing including the use of public/private partnerships will be necessary to fully fund the 10-year delivery plan. Transportation Planning The Commission's role in planning throughout the year will involve working with SCAG, sub -regional agencies, local agencies, and the other county transportation 177 commissions in the region on various planning efforts relative to the 2008 RTP including, but not limited to, corridor studies, goods movement studies, and. -efforts to update transportation computer modeling upgrades and project databases'. The " Commission will take the lead in coordinating County project > submittals for inclusion in the 2008 RTP update. The Commission will also prepare comments on the draft 2008 RTP to ensure the Commission's policies ,and goals are reflected. In. FY 2006/07 the Commission will continue its work efforts on the new CETAP corridors. The :required technical reports for the Mid County Parkway should be completed this year, and..a draft environmental document should; be in its final.. stages of readiness for: public circulation. Additionally, initiation of the technical studies and preliminary engineering work outlinedas part of the Locally Preferred Strategy for. the Riverside' County-Orange'County MIS will begin this year. Work on the .MIS was conducted in a cooperative effort with OCTA and ; the Transportatiorr Corridor Agencies. We will also work in cooperation with SANBAG and affected Riverside County and San Bernardino County cities: to continue progress on the Moreno Valley -San Bernardino County corridor improvements. The FY 2006/07 CMP effort will focus on the 2006 , CMP update and traffic 'monitoring along the urban and rural highway systems. This effort: will provide an improved method of reporting traffic count data ,to meet federal and state monitoring requirements as well as local data needs. The traffic count information is planned to be posted on the Commission's website and willbe; updated on a quarterly: basis; . Transportation Programming - FTIP The 2006 FT1P update is'enticipatedto be federally approved in October 2006 `and will ;continue le be ,amended (approximately quarterly) to incorporate minor changes to projects that do not require transportation conformity modeling. The 2006 '' FTIP, update incorporates, projects that require' air quality modelingor changes to. existing projects that cermet.,be done through quarterly amendments. Projects identified in SAFETEA=LU must be, included' in. the FTIP. :Some projects have been included, in 'the 2006 FTIP update where project information- was available. Staff is working:with lead agencies to incorporate ;the .remaining SAFETEA-Lli earmark projects through'the amendment process. STIP' The 2066 STIP was; adopted bythe'CTC in April 2006. Amendments to the STIP are 'sub'mittedto Caltrans,on a semimonthly basis, asA'e. CTC meets every five to six weeks. STIP amendments are required when adding or deleting projects and to reflect changes in project scope "and/or funding. Time extensions .may be granted, but are not guaranteed, by the CTC for projects that cannot meet delivery schedules due to circumstances beyond the lead agency's control.' TE In 2004 the CTC restructured the administration of the TE program by incorporating it in the STIP. Since TE funds are federal, they are not impacted by the state budget. The Commission identified SAFETEA-LU reauthorization TE funds as a reserve in the 2006 STIP. As each TE project is ready for allocation, the project will be programmed on an individual basis. TUMF Project monitoring and tracking of TUMF regional arterial projects will occur according to the agreements between local agencies and the Commission. During FY 2006/07, Commission staff will continue to work with WRCOG in updating the project costs per the Nexus study update. In addition, Commission staff will work with local agencies to complete funding agreements and any issues regarding project delivery. SB 821 Annually, the Commission releases a call for bicycle and pedestrian projects in April. The Commission establishes an evaluation committee to rank eligible projects that meetthe established criteria_. Project recommendations are approved by the Commission in June. Project Monitoring Staff has awarded a contract with:a consultant firm to develop a web -based project management database. With the high demand .on reporting and monitoring the progress of projects to prevent funds from 'lapsing, a consolidated database will allow for efficient monitoring of project schedules and funding and for local agencies to access project information as well as update their respective _ project data. Department Goals - Planning Build upon relationships with local, state,. and federal agencies to coordinate short- and long-range planning to ensure that transportation projects receive funding and approvals. 179 Objectives: • Work'with CVAG, WRCOG, Caltrans, transit operators, and local_ agencies, to coordinate project submittals and comments on the 2008 RTP. • Provide the: Commissioners information to assist in advocating Commission . projects. Continue<CETAP inter- and intracounty corridor work. Continue working with the RCA to implement the MSHCP and provide funding to assist in .the assembly; of the reserve system. Continue. to seek•a strongerrole for county transportation commissions in state and regional transportation and air quality programs in order to direct. funding for, programsand projects that will improve air quality and mobility in Riverside County. , Objectives::. • Participate in statewide efforts to maintain the SB 45 STIP RIP share at 75% of the total STIP amount. • Support efforts advocatingthe continuation and "protection of Proposition"42 funding and the payback of loans: taken from the State Highway Account. Advocate that RIP' county share reserves receive priority programming over counties that advanced their shares. • Support efforts to seek additional funding for projects that improve air quality.' • .. Support ongoing efforts to regulate federal emission sources. Continue implementation' 'of the CMP in cooperation with SLAG, WRCOG, CVAG, Caltrans, and local agencies and maintain federal certification for the CMP: Objectives: Implement the CMP Ito meet federal CMS requirements cited under the metropolitan planning organization (i.e., SCAG) planning regulations. r Provide data collected on the CMP system to SLAG' for reporting on the Highway Performance Monitoring System. Provide data collected on the CMP system to local agencies, sub -regions, and other interested parties. Continue monitoring the CMP system to ensure the minimum adopted level of service threshold is' met'. Work with 'Caltrans and locale governments including transit 'operators to seek opportunities to develop and' implement Intelligent. Transportation System (ITS) • applications that improve the accessibility of .highway: and transit information to the public as well as achieve, operational efficiencies. Objective: • Seek federal and state funding sources to support implementation of ITS strategies and projects consistent with the Inland Empire ITS Strategic Plan. Continue to advocate for jobs/housing balance and attracting high income jobs to Riverside County in addition to addressing intercounty congestion. Objectives: • Participate in ongoing studies and activities regarding the jobs/housing imbalance between Orange and Riverside counties and San Diego and Riverside counties. • . Support the County interests pertaining to transportation planning as population, job, and housing forecasts are developed by SCAG and the State. Department Goals — Programming Identify innovative financing strategies in order to fully fund projects identified in the 10-year delivery plan. Objectives: • Complete the assessment and evaluation of available strategies. • Develop a financial plan for the Mid County Parkway project. • Support efforts to develop' public/private partnership legislation. Consolidate project databases toallow for efficient monitoring of"projects and funding with the ability to share project information with local jurisdictions. Objectives: •' Work with the consultant to develop a web -based , project management database that will enhance and promote information sharing. • Work with SCAG and other county transportation commissions to refine .and maintain the SCAG regional database, including the coordination of the Commission's database with SCAG's FTIP database. • Coordinate with Caltrans to assure database compatibility among the regional and state databases. Ensure maximum funding and flexibility for projects programmed in the STIP and under SAFETEA-LU. 181 Objectives: Continue to strategically program projects and obligate and/or allocate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding. Continue monitoring project implementation through the use of milestone reporting on a quarterly basis to maintain maximum funding levels for projects and prevent loss of funds to Riverside County. Provide,; assistance to local agencies to facilitate and streamline project delivery. Objectives: •3° Provideinformationregarding project programming data, °'including funding status; to project sponsors on a.quarterly basis. • Participatein local, regional, and state forums to resolve issues =regarding project delays or other'' problems with project. delivery. Provide local agencies with recommendations on project programming` to minimize unnecessary requirements and delays: Continue to work with state and federal agencies to streamiineprocesses-for funding and 'project approvals. Objectives: Establish relationships' with key staff at state and federal agencies: Identify problematic areas ;with project delivery and/or programming :and develop solutions for streamlining and clarifying processes • Participate in regional, state, and federal forums addressing issues related to project programming; implementation, and air quality;; conformity:; Planning and Programming j, , Performance/Workload Indicators 'FY 03/04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual ;' FY 05/06 - Estimated " FY 06107 , Projected Number of Projects Monitored. _ • 49 269 ' 269 339' Number of Traffic Counters at Call Boxes _ 20 36 ;36 36 Number of Traffic Counters at TMC Sites ,.: 0 27 ,27. 27 Number of TUMF Regional Arierial,Projects N/A . _ 24 '' +24_ ' 26 • • Rail Operations Development, Operations, and Support Mission Statement: "To develop and support rail transportation options for increased mobility within Riverside County and the region." Chart 34 — Rail Operations Special Studies 1% SCRRA Contribution 69 % Expenditures Personnel 4% Rail Station Operations -Other 2°% Professional and - Support 6% Rail Operations expenditures of $8,055,000 include Metrolink support and the five Commission -owned and operated commuter rail stations. The SCRRA contribution for Metrolink support consists of an operating contribution of $5,551,800. The Commission's subsidy to SCRRA's operating budget has increased by 12.1 % from last year due to fuel and insurance cost increases, a full year of costs for the two additional round trips on the Inland Empire -Orange County (IEOC) line for weekday service, and expanded year-round IEOC weekend service. Even with this increase, the Commission's commuter rail program will be able to meet the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) targets. for FY 2006/07. Station maintenance includes utilities, grounds maintenance, repairs, and cleaning of the Commission's rail stations. Station security costs have increased 9.5% from the prior year as 'a result of additional service hour requirements, contractor wage increases, and a new contract. Professional and support costs include legal services, consultant services, and general supplies. 183 Table 71 - Rail Operations Expenditure Detail FY 03/D4 FY 04105 FY 05106 - FY 05f06 FY 06/07 Dollar -Percent Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Salaries and Benefits Budget ' Change' _. Change $ 236,200 $ 281,000 $ 216,300 $ 254,200 `.$ 320,700 $ 104,400... 48.3% Professional Costs Legal Services..' - 100,700 57,600 110,000 91,600 100,000. (10,000) Professional Services -Other 123 300 162.600 305,000 178 400 165,500 .(119.5001 -39.2% Total Professional Costs 224,000 220,200 415,000 270,000 285,500 (129,500) -31.2% Support Costs • • Rail Station Operations Station Maintenance Station Security SCRRA Operating Subsidy Total Rail Station Operations Special Studies- . Transfers Out TOTAL Rail Operations 93,600 100,300 181,100 145,400 206,400 25,300:. ,. 14.0% 395,800 592,400 687,900 508,200 650,600-.-.,(37,300) -5.4% - 783,000 835.400 858,400 838,400 940,000-81,600 9.5% 3.167,800 3.214.600 4.950.500. 4.916.100 5,551.800 601.300 12.1% 4,346,600'-- 4,642,400 6,496,800 . 6,262.700 7,142,400 645,600 9.9% - 86,500 - 250,000 408,800 100,000 (150,000). ;-60.0% 192.200 400 - - - - - - - 0.0% F 0 .600 $ 5 330 80Q $ 7 559.200 $ 7 341 10Q 't 805.5.W0 $ - 495 800 Rail, Operations Staffing Summary Department Budget Overview Department Description The Commission has directed efforts in the areas of regional commuter rail; intercity passenger rail, high. -speed .rail, and capital improvements, to support enhanced passenger and freight rail service. The entire program includes elements of planning,, programming, commuter rail development and support, station and corridor management, mitigation of community and environmental impacts, legislative and regulatory advocacy, and construction of capital. projects. Many elements are: managed or supported by other Commission_ departments, Bechtel Infrastructure (Bechtel) project 184 • management, legal counsel, and consultants. Departmental efforts contributing to the rail program are found throughout the budget document. Coordination and consultation also occur with a variety of public and private entities including the CTC, Caltrans, Califomia Public Utilities Commission, Califomia High Speed Rail Authority, Federal Railroad Administration, FTA, Amtrak, environmental agencies, the University of California (UC), transit providers, SCAG, WRCOG, CVAG, local governments, private freight railroads, businesses, and property owners. The Commission participates in .the ongoing funding and governance of Metrolink by SCRRA, a joint powers authority consisting of thecounty transportation commissions of Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties. The Commission holds two voting positions on SCRRA's eleven member board. Commission staff serves on the five -county Technical Advisory Committee which negotiates service and funding levels, based upon the county's established priorities, and provides technical assistance, coordination between various- SCRRA and commission departments, and linkages to local communities. Of the seven commuter rail, lines operated by Metrolink, three routes consisting of the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 Lines directly serve Western County. Key Assumptions • Metrolink's preliminary FY 2006/07 budget is adopted by the Commission and SCRRA. • Ridership and fare revenues continue to grow on the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 Lines. • The Commission manages the station security guard contract. Estimated costs are based on the actual contract terms with a portion to be reimbursed by SCRRA. • Preliminary engineering of the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line project is completed during FY 2006/07. . Accomplishments • Completed the SCRRA 30-Year Strategic Assessment. • Completed 2005 Riverside County Commuter Rail Feasibility Study. The study recommended future study of commuter rail extensions to Hemet/San Jacinto and Temecula/Murrieta. • Increased ridership on the IEOC Line by 9% over the FY 2004/05 actual ridership. Successfully transitioned the Beach Train into the SummerLink service with OCTA and SANBAG. The service grew from one round trip to three a day, .and the ticketing was streamlined into regular Metrolink operations. The 2005 SummerLink operated over 24 dates and provided 18,932 passenger trips. • Supported the Holiday Toy -Train events at Riverside County stations. Community participation grew substantially with 2,850 people in attendance between the four station events, and the Spark of Love Toy Drive generated a record number of toys 185 for local charities. The Commission -sponsored school contest generated additional attendance by encouraging classes to .participate in the toy drive. • Continued .to support additional Inland Empire/Orange County marketing :efforts :to encourage ridership growth of 9% over previous year's actual ridership. Major Initiatives Over the last 14 years, significant capital improvements have been made on the private freight corridors over which the Commission's commuter rail services operate. Current major initiatives include construction of Phase 2 parking expansion at the Riverside, Downtown station and preliminary engineering of the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line. Additionally, the .Commission is working with OCTA and SANBAG to expand the summer 1E0C weekend service into a year-round service with two daily round trips and to advance additional 1E0C and 91 Line train service by2010. Chart 35 = Metrolink Ridership '12000 ,10000 8000 6000 In recent yearsRailOperations has also focused attention on the; creation of intercity passenger rail service between the Coachella Valley, Riverside, and the Los Angeles' basin (with future extension to the Mexican border at Calexico) through advocacy effo'ts with state, federal„and+ local government entities , and .negotiation with the freight railroads. `The Commission's current efforts include seeking capital and operating funds and'coordinating with Amtrak West "and Caltrans. The Commission continues to ;play a proactive role in the development of astatewide, high-speed" passenger "rail system, including routing of the backbone corridor through the Inland. Empire with possible stations in Downtown Riverside,: UC Riverside, March ARB, Murrieta;_and Temecula. The California High Speed Rail Authority has completed a draft program'EIR and. program' EIS for a 700=mile high' speed train: system serving Sacramento, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, Los: Angeles, the .Inland. Empire, Orange County, end San Diego. " Unlike the other SCRRA member agencies, the Commission owns and operates the commuter rail stations serving Riverside County: Riverside Downtown, Pedley, La Sierra, West Corona, and North Main Corona. Station operation and maintenance costs are included in the Rail Operations budget with services coordinated by the Commission's Property. Management Department. New and ongoing construction projects at these stations are described in the capital budget. Chart 36 - Station Operations and Maintenance - $1,59.0,600 Program Management 8% Security 59% Chart 37 - Station Locations Utilities 11 °% Riverside County Metrolink Stations UP MAIN LINE BNSF MAIN LINE ilmmit San Jacinto Branch Line General Maintenance 15% Grounds Maintenance 7% RI The Commission holds title to and manages the 38-mile San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) and several adjacent properties, preserved for future passenger rail service. Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad (BNSF) holds the freight rights in the corridor, providing service to local shippers, and performs maintenance on the line. In June 2000, the Commission allocated $20 million of Measure A funds for capital and operating expenditures related to the implementation of passenger rail service on the Initial Operating Segment of the SJBL, known as the Perris Valley Line. Latest project . 187 cost estimates total $1851million: Staff is seeking a :full funding grant agreement from the FTA`New Starts Program -to fund 50% of. the project 'cost with the balance to be funded by°other federal,, state, and private funding sources. The FY 2006/07:budget? in the Capital Project Development and Delivery' section includes $10,075,000 for the project. Facilitating efficient freight service on the line continues to be.a priority: In June 2003, the Commission readopted the Locally Preferred Alternative: 'Metrolink Extension from Riverside to Perris along the SJBL with" the Union Pacific: Riverside Industrial Lead. chart 38 — Perris Valley Line Map SOSAMELES Improve` utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving Riverside County. Objectives: • Meet or exceed PIP. goals through increased peak period, patronage on the Riverside Line by 2.0°! , 1E0C Line by 5.0%, and 91 Line by 6.5% . • Increase off-peak and reverse -peak patronage by,5% in FY 2006/07 by aggressively marketing: unused capacity for business, recreational, and school trips.:. • Reduce'the public subsidy .per passenger mile traveled on lines currently serving the County through economies of_scale, efficient. use of train sets and crew hours,, and increased' passenger. fares. Maximize opportunities for public use of rail -related investment. Objectives:. ` • Support transit operator; efforts to expand availability -and use of connecting transit in order to improve access and reduce demand on parking capacity. Expand opportunities for interline travel through' coordination of schedules with Amtrak -intercity an& long _distance trains and other Metrolink lines, including encouraging joint ticketing options. . Identify and plan for capital improvements necessary to increase the scope, appeal, and reliability of commuter rail operations. Objectives: • Continue work to fully fund Segment 1 of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley) on the SJBL. . • Seek funding for parking lot expansion at Commission -owned Metrolink stations. Maintain efforts with local agencies, other Southern California counties, and the state and federal governments to expand intercity passenger rail service into Riverside County and the Coachella Valley. Continue to support and influence state efforts in the creation of a high-speed passenger rail system along an Inland Empire alignment through sponsorship of the Inland Empire High Speed Rail Task Force. Rail Operations Performance/Workload Indicators . FY03/04 Actual FY04/05 Actual FY 05/06 Estimate d FY 06/07 Projected Growth of Average Daily Ridership on existing commuter lines • Riverside Line • . IEOC Line •' 91 Line 4,462 - 3,641 1,700 4,566 3,634 1,876 4,653 3,974 2,004 4,723 4,155 2,124 Farebox Recovery Ratio s • Riverside Line • IEOC Line • 91 Line 51.1 % 56.6% 101.4% 46.9% 48.7% 107% 48.7% 52.9% 103.3% 47.5% . 39.0% 61.7% Rail PIP Targets: Passenger Trips (annual growth) 9% 3% 7% 2% Farebox Recovery Ratio 58% 53.7% 55.9% 34%-46% Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.10 $0.13 $0.11 $0.17-$0.23 Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile 41.35 37.44 42.7 25-35 189 Property Management Mission Statement: "To protect the real property assets of the Commission in a cost effective manner with awareness of potential economic benefits to be derived from the .sale, lease, or development of said property." Chart 39 —'Property Management Projects and Operations 30% Expenditures Personnel.: - 27%e Property; Management expenditures are budgeted at $1,061,800 to `.maintain' Commission -owned highway and rail property. Staffing costs have increased significantly as a result of the addition of a right of way program manager. Epic, Land Solutions, Inc. (Epic) will continue to assist the Commission with the :property management and ''right of way, support services to resolve unauthorized use of:: Commission -owned property, ,;while maximizing revenues derived from :licenses, and the sale of excess • property. Maintenance costs include $260,0001orweed abatement services on Commission -owned. highway and rail: properties and $50,000 for rail program management. Table 72 — Property Management Expenditure Detail FY 03/04 FY 04105 FY.05106 FY 05106 • FY 06/07 Dollar - Actual' +1 Actual Revised Budget Projected ' Budget Change Salaries and Benefits $ ' 71.600'- $ 73,000 $ 87,900 $ 85,300 , $ 285,500 <$ 197,600 Professional' Costs Legal Services - Professional Services -Other. Total Professional Costs Support Costs •Projects and Operations Maintenance . - TOTAL Property Management 49,700 176 400 128,700 102,000 88,700- 130,000.+!=28,000 285000 328 600 265.700 320,000:i .(8,600) 226100 413,700_ 430,600 _ 354,400 450,000 19,400. -'13,800 41,000 ' 8,700 3,500 10,700 2,000 26 900`-. 52,500 101.600 92,700 325.600 214.000 210.6% $ 43R,�QQ � $ 580.20Q • `$' 628 80Q- $ 535 90Q $ 1.061 ROO . $ 43.a.0nn . r]9�a. . r,.:. _ 190 • o Property Management Staffing Summary �fix; ^},: -s i�� �: FY03f04'yw; mmjstrative SuppoA Spec�ali t putt' Etiveireefcr rc,jeirPO rety I�G?tt�g �tgi�nt r rn' _artager Department Budget Overview Department Description Since 1990, the Commission has acquired property assets in the course of rail and highway, project implementation. To date, the rail properties number over 225 parcels, including five Metrolink commuter rail stations. Operation of these, stations is overseen by this department; however, expenditures are identified in the. Rail Operations budget. The Commission has acquired approximately 500 parcels for the SR-74 highway project. In addition 32 properties have been acquired for the Mid County Parkway project, SR-79 realignment and the SR-60 HOV lanes. These properties consist of both fee and temporary construction easements which will be transferred to Caltrans upon completion of the projects. . The Property Department develops license and right of entry agreements related to the SJBL which require the coordination of a variety of public and private entities (i.e., Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Caltrans, and BNSF). Numerous agreements are negotiated and executed as directed by- the Property Committee and the Commission. Upon project completion, properties are reassessed and are deemed surplus when it has been determined that the continued retention of the property no longer supports the Commission's policy goalsand objectives. Key Assumptions • The exchange with Caltrans and March JPA related to property along the 1-215 will be completed. • The demonstration of the closed circuit- television (CCTV) surveillance cameras at the La Sierra station will be completed. • The street vacations in the vicinity of the Riverside Downtown station will . be completed. 191 Accomplishments Completed the appraisals of the Corona Depot, Madisonproperty, and future Alessandro station. Completed the development of a detailed property inventory log to include the recently acquired properties for SR-79 and the Mid County Parkway. Generated over;$80,000 in new revenue from increasing fees for existing billboard licenses: With the assistance of Epic, generated over $50,000 in out lease revenue from the BNSF. Completed the sale of the Old Highway 215 and the Pierce Street properties generating in excess of`$13 million: Implemented the use of the property inventory database. Resolved property -related issues related to the future Perris station: Oversaw the removal of hazardous materials at three of the Metrolink':stations., Major Initiatives During FY 2006/07, . a' commuter rail station rehabilitation. and strategic plan _ will be developed to prepare for the long-term maintenance of the Metrolink stations. Department Goals Maintain order, security, and safety at the Commission's operating and . non- - operating properties.. Objectives: • Ensure undeveloped land is abated and secured with fencing. • :Work with local law enforcement and Epic to prevent trespassing ,or use of Commission -owned property. • Monitor: use of CCTV systems and related installation of security gates at the five:: Commission -owned Metrolink:stations • Eliminate liability exposure by meeting with local law enforcement agencies to discuss emergency procedures: " Generate 'revenue to offset maintenance costs of rail and'highway properties. Objectives: • Surplus excess Commission -owned property. • Increase license, valuation and assessments on existing and future licensees. • Facilitateeconomic development aiong the railroad right of way. " Provide support for .property acquisitions and conveyance of capital' project rights of way. • Objectives: • Conduct a review of the SR-74 excess property and convey to Ca!trans. • Complete the conveyance of surplus property in iambs Canyon. • Review and update policy guidelines for all property management issues. Property Management Performance/Workload'Indicators FY 03l04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY 05106 Estimated FY06107 Projected License Agreements 17 20 22 30 Appraisals 2 5 3 3 193 Specialized Transit;: Mission Statement: "To maintain and enhance, as resources allow, transportation options for seniors, persons ;vvith ' disabilities; and the truly needy through innovation and .:community - interaction " Chart40 - Specialized Transit Personnel 1% Regional Transportation 98% Expenditures Western County specialized transit expenditures are allocated based on a -.competitive process among qualified social service providers within Westem County.. The last call for projects was released in March 2004 and was for a two-year period covering FY 2004/05 and FY.2005/06. A call for projects covering FY 2006/07 and ,FY 2007/08 was released in February, 2006 and included a non -emergency medical transportation component. The Coachella Valley allocation is disbursed monthly to ISunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), the -major •transit provider in the Coachella Valley. The FY2006/07 budget for projects andoperations has increased 50.5% over the FY 2005/06 budget, as a result of two-year call. for ;projects which 'included, a non -emergency medical ;, transportation component. Table 73 Specialized Transit Expenditure Detail �. FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 05106 FY 06/07 Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected .Budget.' Salaries and Benefits - $23,400• $21,800 $43.700 $. 17,800 $ 81,800 Professional and Support 1% Professional Costs Legal Services Professional Services -Other Total Professional_ Costs . Support Costs Projects and Operations Regional Transportation . Dollar Change $38,100 3,300 2,000 2,700 10,000 8,000 400:0% 22,000 40.001) 52.500 ,-30,500 138.6% 3,300 24,000 - . - 42,700. 62,500 38,500 160.4% 4,100 9,300. 2,900 14,100 4,800 51.6% 5,096.000 4,694.100 7.666,700 .2,571.700 50.5% TOTAL • Specialized Transit $ 4.294.400 ','$ 4.875 30Q .$ 5 172 OM $ 4 757 500 .Z =0 .$ 2.653 10Q 194 • • Specialized Transit Staffing Summary Posit nts oavoa FY o4lijs:. r,os os FY:106 . Actual Itctua[ Budget • Budgett �Ct ims1ra6ve,Support 5pectalis. ilk. E�cecutiU$. Qir2CtOi „poppo Pr to Harmer Stafl�Snslysi Department Budget Overview Department Description • 0.16 6.16 s The Measure A specialized transit program provides a valuable service to _ the community. Substantial support is fumished to social service and public transit agencies, which serve special and unique needs of seniors and persons with disabilities. Annually, the Commission facilitates a competitive call for projects to allocate FTA Section 5310 funds available to non-profit transportation and social service agencies and public operators under special circumstances for the purchase of capital equipment. Key Assumptions • Western County disbursements are based on the preliminary results of the call for projects released in February 2006. • CVAG allocates its discretionary five -percent of Measure 'A funding to SunLine for specialized transit. Accomplishments • Provided approximately $2,041,000 to 10 non-profit organizations in Western County as a result of the Commission's two-year competitive call for projects. The funding was used to provide transportation assistance to seniors, the disabled, and economically disadvantaged residents of Western County. • Transitioned the Westem County taxi demonstration program that was developed and implemented in October 2003 to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). The RTA program was funded with TDA funds. • Conducted a study to determine the non -emergency medical transportation needs in Western County to assist in providing program direction for the FY 2006/07 and FY 2007/08 call for projects. 195 ;Major Initiatives The Commission has longdemonstrated a strong commitment to assist: in themobility of those with specialized transit needs. Through its =Specialized Transit Program, the Commission has provided millions of dollars to public and non-profit transit operators: for the provision of special transit services .to improve the mobility 'of:'seniors and persons with, disabilities. Along with support of traditional dial -a -ride services the Commission supportsinnovative programs which provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs. For 17 years, the Commission has provided operating grants to a number of non-profit agencies in Westem County to assist in the provision of very specialized transit services. The riders, many frail and elderly, have come to depend on these services which provide a, higher levelofassistance than can be provided by the public transit providers and/or operate in areas not served by public transit. In February 2006, a call for projects covering FY 2006/07 and !FY 2007/08 was released for Western County Specialized Transit programs, including the non -emergency medical transportation component. 'Based on a preliminary review of proposals received, funding exceeding: $3 million was requested through . the call for projects by local agencies throughout Western County to support ongoing and new programs: In ,order to 'assure' the availability of funds to support matching of FTA Section 5310 capital grants, $150,000 on an annual basis is budgeted for Western County applicants to meet the 11.47% local matching requirements for such grants. Department Goals Provide timely information to, the public regarding Commission implemented projects and support public relations activities of Measure A funded programs by grant recipients. Objective- • .:Produce and distribute public, information .materials asneeded including ;press releases, flyers, brochures, marketing materials, and newspaper ads. Allocate Measure A Specialized ,Transit: funds to support services which will maintain and/or enhance mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities,and the truly needy: Objectives: • Monitor performance of Specialized "Transit grant recipients through`( analysis of their quarterly performance reports. • Continue discussions ,with the Office on Aging and ,the United Way to encourage funding of transportation projects by these agencies. Assistance to screen eligible transportation programs and monitoring the cost effectiveness of these proposals will continue to be offered to both agencies. 196 • Support the FTA Section 5310 grant process for the purchase of capital projects to improve mobility for seniors and persons with disabilities by working with Caltrans, public operators, and social service agencies to ensure a competitive process statewide for the allocation of federal transportation . dollars for social service programs_ • Provide technical assistance and program support to agencies offering specialized transit programs to ensure the maximum benefit of funding for improved mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities, and the economically disadvantaged. Continue to provide staff resources to assist and support the coordination of transit services within the County and throughout the State. Objectives: • Regularly participate in meetings that focus on the coordination of transit services, such as the California Association for Coordinated Transportation,'SunLine's Access Committee, RTA's Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Committee, and the Riverside County Foundation on Aging Board of Directors. • Develop a marketing and distribution network for communicating specialized transit mobility options to seniors, the disabled, and persons of limited means. Specialized Transit Performance/ Workload Indicators FY 03/04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY 05/06 Estimated FY O6/07 Projected Number of Specialized Transit grants awarded 8 10 10 15 Number of one-way trips provided by Measure A funded non-profit operators 12,724 21,649 25,000 25,000 Number of one-way trips reimbursed through the Western County Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project 15,920 24,393. 27,000 27,000 Number of transit tickets.provided through the Transportation Access Program 55,740 72,740 75,000. 75,000 Number of clients served through Blindness • Support Services 49 42 40 40 197 Transit Mission Statement: "To coordinate the operation of all public transportation services within the County with a goal 'toward promotingprogram efficiency and ` effectiveness 'between transit operators." Chart 41 Transit Personnel 3% Projects and Operations 94% Expenditures' Professional 3% Support 0% Transit expenditures are budgeted at $7,119,500 for FY 2006/07, an increase of 14.8%a compared to the prior year. Professional costs .of $190,400 include triennial performance audit services as well as TransTrack and other consultant services_ STA - expenditures of $6,718,700 have, increased by 12.6% from last year's budget' due to increased STA revenues as' well as the scheduled disbursement of funds -for capital. projects allocated in previous years. Table 74 - Transit Expenditure Detail FY'03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05106 FY 05/06 Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected. $ " 126,400 $ 138,100 $. '190,600 $ 147,600 Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services . 11,900 3,500 Audit Services60,500 70,900 Professional Services -Other 300 1,900 20,400 10,000 . 2,100 , 7,900 153,200 Total Professional Costs 72,700 76,300 30,400 163,200 Support Costs Projects and Operations STA Disbursements L1.958.200 2.050,200 5 967 000 3 837 900 6 718 706 751 700 TOTAL Transit $ 2 164.=" $ 2263,800 $ 6.207500 $ 4 `164 700 $ 7_119 500 j'$ "918.000 14 8% FY 06107 t Dollar. Percent BudgetChange .; Change $ 189,800-$ (800) -0.4% 7,000 -4,200 - 198 13,500 16,000 10,000 - 0.0% 100,000 ' 100.600 0.0% 80,400 :'' 60,000 .294.1%. 190,400 160,000 526.3% 20,600 7,100 52.6% 12.6% • Transit Staffing Summary Position tSiimfi[iistraWe Support Sj i eputy Executive'Direi •.Director Pr000 DelOi Director' Regional; 'Program Thansy �tafii Rnat9g, Department Budget Overview Department Description Q The Commission is responsible for short-range transportation planning and. programming. Planning includes the development of the countywide SRTPs for eight public transit operators consisting of the cities of Banning, Beaumont; Corona, and Riverside; SCRRA's Metrolink commuter rail; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency; RTA; and.SunLine: The Commission assists in coordinating the development, review, and approval of the annual countywide SRTPs and allocates transit funding resources. The Commission has responsibilityfor funding transit programs using Measure A, LTF, STA, and FTA Section 5307, 5309, and 5311 funds.. In addition, based on available funding, the, Commission may conduct an unmet transit needs hearing in the Palo Verde Valley. The Commission has operator oversight and fiduciary responsibilities to ensure .that annual fiscal audits and a triennial performance audit are conducted. The Commission is also charged with annually reviewing transit operator activities and recommending potential productivity improvements to lower operating costs. Key Assumption • LTF, STA, and Measure A disbursements are based on projected budgetary allocations but will be adjusted after the Commission has approved actual allocations. • Accomplishments Continued conducting regular meetings of the TPC, which was established in May 2004 as a result of a recommendation from the Commission's state triennial performance audit. Since its inception the TPC reviewed issues related to route productivity, reserves, funds allocated and unclaimed, state -mandated farebox recovery ratio, timeliness of spending allocated capital funds, and the allocation .of 2009 Measure A funding available in Western County and Coachella Valley. 199 Addressed the eight • recommendations made in the Commission's last state triennial performance audit. Addressed 46 recommendations made in the state triennial; performance audits for: the ;public transit operators in the FY 2005/06..SRTPs. In FY 2006/07, a triennial performance audit will be conducted covering the prior three'. years of ;transit' . activities., That audit will include a review of the 46 recommendations, made to determine whether .recommendations were implemented in -compliance with the TDA. Reaffirmed the implementation of the PIP which establishesperformance targets for the transit operators to meet in an effort to contain escalating operating costs. Evaluated available software tools to assist with transit operator data collection and analysis and selected TransTrack, the Transit Performance Manager :'software' application,and training package. Major Initiatives - ;r California's TDA. requires that a triennial performance audit beconducted of public'' transit entities receiving TDA ; (LTF and STA) revenues. The;; purpose of the; ..performance audit, is to evaluate, the system's effectiveness and efficiency in its use of,: TDA funds to ,provide :public transit. Results of the performance audits covering. FY`' 2000/01, .FY 2001/02,..and FY 2002/03 were presented to the Commission An fY'.• 2003/04. Progress • has : been ,made : in implementing the performanceaudit' recommendations; . annual- progress reports will continue to be provided through the:• 'operators' SRTPs'for FY 2006/07. In July 2006, staff will release a request for proposals seeking a qualified audit firm to conduct the state triennial performance . audit covering FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06. • In order to "strengthen analytical capabilities to oversee transit operator performance,' TransTrack, a web -based software package, will be implemented.; This will result in the , availability of real-time data to analyze operator routes- based on ithe performance> criteria outlined in the: Commission's PIP. The TPC will continue to discuss, develop; and submit policy direction, relating .to= transit " matters for Commission:: action. This committee will guide the preparation of a., transit, vision, monitor transit implementation, review the performance of operators, and bring a regional; perspective to transit. Workingwith the``TPC and transit operators, staff will begin developing the conceptual'• - programs for the '2009 Measure A funds available in Western County, and Coachella Valley. • Department Goal Coordinate' the operation of all public transportation services within. the County with a goal toward promoting program efficiency and harmony betweentransit. operators as outlined in state law. Objectives: • Review transit planning, resource allocation, and service implementation policy requirements including appropriate coordination of commuter rail, intercounty and intercity bus, local bus and paratransit, and social service transportation services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Assure the ongoing effectiveness of the SRTP process and work with the County's eight transit operators through the Commission's TPC to assure efficiency and effectiveness as well as compliance with the PIP. • Coordinate regional transit connections among commuter rail, buses, and paratransit services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Monitor transit operators' quarterly capital grants reports. • Monitor transit operators' perfomiance through analysis of their quarterly performance reports using the TransTrack computer -based tracking program. 201 Commuter Assistance MissionStatement: "To encourage and promote transportation altematives for commuters through information delivery, technological' innovation, education, and community interaction." Chart 42 =.Commuter Assistance Capital Outlay 2% Personnel 5% Projects and ;Operations '. 55% `. Support 1'5% Expenditures Commuter Assistance expenditures total $3,842,100, which represents a slight increase;'' from last year's budget. Professional costs of $895,000 have increased 72.4% over the prior year due to an increase in computer programming costs required to support the integration of transit schedule ;information into the RideGuides as well as Commuter' Assistance special+projects. These special projects areintended to fund the strategic;; planning effort for the Commuter Assistance program as it moves toward implementation of the 2009 Measure A. Support costs totaling $572,700 include mail and printing . services, ;computer and ' vehicle maintenance, communications, and other `, office expenditures. The FY 2006/07 support costs reflect an 11.1%decrease resulting from more efficient implerrientation,of the various rideshare programs. Commuter Assistance projects and operations' expenditures consist of consultant'services totaling $1,386100 to', manage and implement the program, merchant vouchers valued at $418,000 a;transit' operating contribution of $200,000,.and park and ride lease payments, of $75,000. • • Table 75 - Commuter Assistance Expenditure Detail - FY 03/04 FY 04105 FY 05/06 FY 05106 FY 06/07 Dollar Percent Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits - $ 187,500 $ 289,600_ $ 258,700 $ 267,900 $ 200.300 $ (58,400) -22.6% Professional Costs Legal Services . 33,000 16,400. 20,000 " 9,900. 20,000 - 0.0% Professional Services -Other 558,600 335,200 499.200 478.200 875.000 375,1300 -.75 3% Total Professional Costs 591,600 351,600 519,200 488,100 895,000 375,800 72.4% Support Costs 486,000 316,000 644,300 641,000 572,700 (71,600) -11.1% Projects and Operations Park and Ride _ 40,000 38,000 100,000 41,000 75,000 (25,00.0) -25.0% Regional Transportation 1,638.800 1,588.500 2 020,700 1,517.800 2.004.100 (16.600) "-0.8% Total Projects and Operations 1,678,800 1,626,500 2,120,700 1,558,800 2,079,100 (41,600) -2.0%. Capital Outlay - 60,000 TOTAL Commuter Assistance 240.000 387.000 95,000 (145 000) -60.4% $ 2 943 99Q $ 2 643 70Q 't 9 782 900 $ 3 342 B00 $ 3 84210Q $ 59 20Q 1_6% Commuter Assistance Staffin Posr or , �- Department Budget Overview Department Description While much of the Commission's work is focused on increasing transportation' infrastructure and capacity, there is significant value in ensuring that the transportation systems are used efficiently. To help foster more efficient use of these systems, the 'Commission's Commuter Assistance Program seeks to encourage Riverside County constituents/commuters to make a mode -shift decision away from solo vehicle commuting and into a shared 'commuting arrangement. Through the use of incentives both for beginning and then maintaining a mode- shift/rideshare arrangement, the provision of employer services to foster the implementation of employer -based mode -shift and rideshare programs, and public information services including the dissemination of traveler information through the use of . 203 , for its residents and employers in San Bernardino County. Accomplishments;'` technology, the Commuter Assistance Program seeks to influence driver behavior by incentivizing a mode shifting decision: at both the employer and commuter levels. The Commission's Commuter Assistance Program was implemented as a. specific requirement. under Measure A to address congestion mitigation. While ridesharing has a beneficial impact on air quality, first and foremost, it is a strategy to ease traffic I' congestion through increased use of altemative forms of., transportation ;'including carpools, vanpools, buspools, public bus, Metrolink, congestion avoidance; walking', bicycling, and:telecommuting. Key Assumptions The. Commission;: will continue to contract with a consulting firm .to implement the Commuter Assistance Program., The Commission willrealize a 5% cut in the cost for the consultant to 'implement the Commuter Assistance Program through' the use of more efficient work plans and increased consultant staff 1productivity. At the regional level, four county transportation commissions (Los Angeles, Orange, San;. Bernardino, and Ventura) will contract with the Commission for Ale provision of regional ridematching database and network operations, the provision of ridesl anng information services; and operation of the regional website www.CommuteSmart.info. The Commission will continue to operate in a leadership rolefor the development of regional traveler information systems and nexus to the national 511 implementation effort being studied for the SCAG region. Maintaining its long-term partnership with the Commission,;SANBAG will contract with the; Commission; to manage ;and implement a "sister" Commuter Assistance Program Operated, maintained, and, `enhanced the .regional rid,ematching database and ridesharing information system for the five -county region.. is Operated, maintained, and enhanced the regional rideshare website, www.CommuteSmart.info, on:behalf of the five -county region. Taking direction from the Commission,' the traffic map portion of the website underwent,a major expansion in.orderto reflect, the,entirelnland.Empire region stretching; from the Nevada/Arizona border to the Mexican border,at,San Diego. Working closely withits regional partners; the Commission,; has. been able to improve '(through the use of 'technology and enhanced site graphics) the user experience for employers and commuters visiting the; website who are, or will be, making:a mode-shift/rideshare decision. • Worked cooperatively with the` MSRC and other regional partners in order to utilize the MSRC "Pick'A Day, Any ,Day" media campaign to promote, the new CommuteSmart website.. This effort resulted in .a' 30% increase in the daily number of hits to the website during eachmedia sweep. . Implemented four, out of eight findings from "Consumer Research Focus 'Group Effort This resulted in,,:the,Commission's. revision of;: its; marketing and employer outreach materials as well as onsite presentations undertaken by representatives working can behalf of the Commission. Revised, enhanced, and continued to' provide to interested employers an electronic commuter survey. In making technological improvements to the e-survey, employers'. now have the 'option to survey, their employees electronically in total or by combining both paperand electronic formats, thus making Ahe "user experience "much 'rnore efficient for the employer: The number of employers using the `e-survey increased by; 12% over the previous' fiscal year. Planned, ;developed, and'irrrplemented "a new Program Measurement Tool. The tool is designed to enable consultant" staff to :uniformly enter project results, thereby:making,` the data consistent and in, a format that will allow for real-time trending of program perforMance by the Commission: Identified and recruited new park`and ride locationsin Menifee and Corona.: Continued with a revitalization of the Rideshare Plus incentive program by holding number of merchant participanteto 500 while increasing .the value of the merchant discount offers: Major Initiatives A cornerstone of the Commuter Assistance Program is its continued partnership among . commuters, employers, and:, government. The partnership, based on voluntary efforts, makes ,a"collective difference in increasing the efficiencyof our "transportation system — local roads, freeways, commuter rail, and public bus. The: combined, effort results in less congestion, decreased vehicle miles traveled, and improved air quality. For FY 2006/07, the Comhnlssiori will undertake a series of pnagrammaiic,analysistask for the Commuter Assistance Program including the following_ investigation and analysis regarding the provision of the modeshifttrideshare: incentive, the potential kr: iricreased outreach to students and seniors; the potential for fostering increased participation with small employer partners vie the provision of secure on-line transactions; and the potential for more direct communication with end user ,commuters via the provision of secure on- line transactions. It isintended that the results derived from this analysis, used in concert with the Program Measurement Tool, will allow -the Commission to fester: improved service delivery and greater constituent participation in the program. orking with our modal partners {transit and railj; .the Commuter Assistance Program PY 2006r/07 is also looking to increased opportunity for cross marketing, in particular the -erid useitcommuter. Consistent with the development of the Program Measurement Tool, the Commission will seek to more efficiently implement "the Commuter Assistance program. By focusing resources on those programs that 'result in increased participation by commuters, the Commission expects the. program to yield a '5% savings in the consultant cost to implement; 205 To further augment the Cornrnuter Assistance Program shopping cart of services, an effort to assess, develop,, and implement a GRH Program to serve Inland Empire employers (initiated in FY 2005/06) will be delivered in FY 2006/07 for both Riverside and San Bernardino counties. li The Commission is also highly involved in the regional decision for the implementation of 511 and the dissemination of Advanced Traveler Information services. 511 is an unfunded federal mandate arising out of TEA21 and SAFETEA-LU and it requires that real-time or near, real-time traffic and traveler information be provided to the public. Given the lack of funding from the federal government for this initiative, the Commission has taken a leadership rolein organizing a regional discussion to deal with the mandate. Department Goals Operate a cost,effective Commuter Assistance Program within Riverside County that results in a demonstral3le reduction in single occupant vehicle trips thus assisting with congestion mitigation and improving air quality. Objectivei: , • Ensure, the effectiveness of the Commuter Assistance Program through program analysis and recurring assessments of participation and retention of riclesharers. Through the implementation of the Program Measuremertt Tool, the Commission will continue to look for. ways to pare program costs without impacting `service delivery or 4111 participation. • Continue the new employer recruitment effort first implemented in the previouS fiscal year for FY 2006/07. This is intended to increase pregrarn visibility with Inland Empire employers and small businesses (100-250 employees each) not currently subject to SCAQMD rules. • , , • Complementing the " new employer recruitment effort, construct ai methodoldgy to reach Out t6 employerS and speak directly to their employees ;through- the Use of technologY.' The Commission intends to study the effectiveness of providing secure on-line transactions and electronic signature and verification services:: • Leverage the use of technology to provide ridematchingi,inforrnation and services to Riverside County ernployerS! and end user commuters by taking advantage of the - services and 'prodUcte hosted On the regional ridematchingdatabase and website. • Continue to offer Short-terrat incentives for commuters to try a transportation >mode other ffian driving alone. • Continue to provide a revvanis program for long-term ridesharers to encourage their continued use of alternative modes of transportation. Ensure the coordination Of ridesharing programs throughout the inland Empire and the southern California region. 206 i • Objectives: • On behalf of the region, continue to provide leadership with regard to the ongoing operation, maintenance, and enhancement of both the regional ridematching database and network and the regional rideshare website, www.CommuteSmart:info. These resources allow the region to be in a position to put forth a collective effort and provide a single regional resource for employers and commuters who are seeking the information and resources necessary to make a modeshift and ridesharing decision. • Using www.CommuteSmart.info along with 1-800-Commute, continue to take the lead in merging the development of real-time and accessible traveler information. The Commission will continue to work with its regional partners on technology development, implementation, and the cost-effective delivery of such information. • Contract for the enhancement of the RideGuides through a grant funded by the MSRC. Working in partnership with the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, this grant will enable transit information to be displayed on individualized RideGuides produced for employees who have been surveyed. • Continue to administer a "sister" Commuter Assistance Program in San Bernardino County on a contract basis, thus expanding the reach and effectiveness of commuter programs throughout the Inland Empire area. • Fund and participate in regional rideshare marketing programs to enhance awareness of and encourage participation in commute modes that provide an alternative to driving alone. Enhance and pursue educational activities that encourage alternatives to driving alone and that encourage employers to assist employees in seeking commute methods other than driving alone. Objectives: • Enter the new Commuter Exchange vehicle into service. The Commuter Assistance Program budget intends for the vehicle to be completed and on the road for the FY 2006/07 fiscal year. Sixty site visits are intended. • In partnership with the four county transportation commissions and others, utilize the regional ridesharing database and website, www.CominuteSmart.info, to host and distribute the monthly electronic rideshare newsletter, CommuteSmartNews. • Maintain, update, enhance, and refresh the Club and Team Ride members' only website, www.Rideshareolus.info. • Distribute regular broadcast fax information bulletins to local employers regarding commuter issues. • Investigate the implementation of a "paperless" (on-line transactions) program in order to increase small employer participation and reach out to end user commuters. • Advocate through the Commission's legislative program for commuter -friendly tax deductions for employers, who assist residents by paying for transit passe_ s and vanpool costs. • Publicize theparticipation of local employers in the Commission's. Commuter Assistance Program through various media options. 207 Chart 43 - Commuter Assistance Program Budget Project Type Advantage Rideshare In County, Buspool Subsidies Club Ride • Commuter Exchange Inland Empire Commuter Services -Riverside Local Ridematcning Services " Regional Rideshare Marketing Special Project Development/Contingencies Information Services Park and Ride SANBAG Regional Rideniatching Services General - - Commuter. Incentive Commuter Incentive Commuter Incentive PubOc Education Employer Services Employer Services Marketing Program Enchancemenl Commuter Services Commuter Services Commuter Incentives and Services; Employer Services Commuter and Employer Services Measure A Other ' 'FY 06107 Budget.. $ 316,900 $ 99,000 ` 175,600' 163,500 377,700 80,500 . 20,000 179,000:: 50,400 75,000 $ 316,900 99,000 175,600 163,500 377,700 80,500 20,000 179,000 50,400 75,000 • 1,100,700.. .1,100,700 • 254,100 410,000. ;664,100 539,700 539,700 $ 2,331,400 ' $ 1,510,700 $ 3,842,100 Commuter Assistance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 03/04 . Actual FY.04/05 Actual FY 05/06. Estimated FY 06/07 Projected Number of one-way single occupant vehicle trips', reduced as a result of Advantage Rideshare incentives 56,683 78,968 85,000 90,000 Number of Club Ride Members - 1,994 2,837 3,073 ' 3,200` Number of. incoming 1-866-RIDESHARE telephone calls (1) 829 801 2,250 : 2,375 Number of services provided by Inland Empire Commuter '. Services to support employer_ trip reduction efforts at worksites: ' • Employers Requesting Survey Services 85 100 101 110 • Employer Worksites Surveyed 147 581 162 170 • RideGuidesProduced 1,1,374. 8,992 8,800. 9,000 • RideSmartTips Produced `., 9,335 32,379 27,400 :. . 29,000 • Technical Assistance Services . 272 289 115 120 Number of events participated in by the Commuter Exchange in total, and as identified individually below: ,' 58 _ 37 54.' ;. 60 • Public Events 9 ,. 5 7 7. • Employer Work Sites 11 5. ;8 g" • -' Elementary Schools , 38 27 39 45 (1) A total of 2,250 incoming telephone', calls are projected to be received for "FY2005/06 and .a total of 2,375 calls are projected to be recelyed for FY 2006/07. These projections include not •ust calls received on the 1-866-RIDESHARE line) but also include telephone calls received on 1-BOO-COMMUTE line. The combination of calls "received from these two lines represents the total calls received by the Rideshare Call Center: The actual' performance documented above for FY 2003/04 and FY 2004/05 represents, only those calls received on the 1-866-RIDESHARE line and does not include calls received on the l-800-COMMUTE line. °Total calls received for FY 2003/04 were 1,136 and 1,944 for FY 2004/05. 208 Motorist_ Assistance Mission Statement: "To improve safety and convenience to motorists who experience mechanical difficulty on the roadway." Chart 44 — Motorist Assistance Personnel 3% Professional Transfers Out 1% 9% - � Support 1% Projects and Operations 86% Expenditures Motorist Assistance expenditures are budgeted at $4,005,100 for FY 2006/07, ,or a decrease of 6.2% compared to the prior year budget. Budgeted expenditures for project operations include $1,573,000 in towing contract costs for the FSP program and $287,100 for the SAFE to cover cellular access charges, knockdowns, vandalism, miscellaneous repairs and maintenance, and call answering services. Towing costs have increased 9.9% as a result of the implementation of FSP service on an additional beat on 1-15 south of the SR-91/I-15 interchange. Professional costs of $54,300 include legal services and contracted consultants to monitor the Commission's call, box program and provide monthly operating and statistical reports for the program. Equipment maintenance expenditures included in project operations of $1,557,800 are related to technology upgrades, ADA and site accessibility improvements, and site improvements to be completed in FY 2006/07. 209 Table 77 - Motorist Assistance Expenditure Detail FY 03/04 FY 04105 FY 05106 FY 05/06. FY 06107 Dollar Actual Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget 'Change Salaries and Benefits S .92,900 $ 101,800 $ 88,100 $ 91,700 $ 125,100 '$ Professional Costs Legal. Services - 5,200 32,500 152,000 118,400 27,000 (125,000) 82.2% Professional Services -Other 40.100 29.200 64.700 38.400 27 300 Total Professional Costs Support Costs Projects and Operations Projects General 8,000 5,100 11,500 6,700 6,300- (5,200). -45.2% Towing 1,222,000 1,439,000 1,431,000 1,429,800 1,573.000. 142,000 9.9%` ' Access Charges 108,100 106,700 88,800 112,000 69,000.. (19,800)- 122.3% Preventive Maintenance."11,100 1,700 4,300 4,100 4,600 I. ' 300 ' 7.0°% Corrective Maintenance. ; - - 11,100 1,700 4,300 4,100 4,600 300. '" 7.0% Equipment Maintenance:' 333,700 336,200 2,001,600 540,000. 1,557,800 ! (443,800). -22.2% Knockdowns' . - ,500 , 900 - '10,000 4,000 '10,000 " - : ';0.0% , Vandalism - - - . 1,500 1,000 1,000 (500) ' -.33.3% - Operating Costs; 114,000 118,100 116,600 102,000 191,600 - 75,000 -64.3% Special Studies - - - - 5,000 - - - - .5.000 - - 0.0% Total Projects and Operations- 1.808.500 2,009.400 3.674.600 2.203.70Q 3,422,900 (251.700) -6.6 .. Percent " Change . Transfers Out - - -.TOTAL Motorist AssistanCe,� (37,400) •-57.8% 45,300 61,700 216,700 156,800 54,300 - (162,400) - -74.9% ' 31,700 18,100 26,700 25,500 27,100 37,000 '42.0% „1.5% 248 300 254 100 - 262 800 253 000 375 700 112 900 - S 7 276 700 $ 7.445-100 $ 4.268_90Q $ 2 730 700 A 4.r11t5 tilQ �5 1263 800) Motorist Assistance Staffing Summary Posftiori t - -w t s y 0� "FY04rOs AcwY': Department Description' SAFE is the call box system that allows motorists to call for assistance in the event of a mechanical breakdown or accident on the freeway.Additionally, the FSP assists stranded "motorists on certain segments of the freeway by towing, changing :flat tires, providing a :gallon of fuel, etc., at no charge to the motorists. FSP service is also provided in construction zones through separate funding agreements with Caltrans to { help mitigate congestion. 210 • • Key Assumptions • 'Existing percentage levels of vandalism, knockdowns, and miscellaneous repairs will remain consistent with the past year; however, the actual number of incidents will decline due to the reduction in the number of call boxes throughout the system. • Since maintenance costs are based on a flat -fee maintenance contract with Comarco. Wireless Technologies, annual maintenance costs will decline by an estimated 39% due to the reduction in call boxes. • Call box operating costs are based on estimates from the CHP and the call answering center contract through SANBAG. • • Cellular service charges are based on the existing five-year agreement with AT&T Wireless Servicesfor digital cellular service. • Costs for conversion to digital technology and ADA and site accessibility retrofits are based on estimates of work to be completed in FY 2006/07. • Tow track contractor costs for the six existing beats are based on Commission - approved contracts. • Data collection for the six FSP beats will be automated through the use of P. DAs. Accomplishments • . Continued the implementation of recommendations identified in the Riverside County SAFE Call Box Program 5-Year Plan by awarding a contract to Comarco Wireless Technologiesto enhance accessibility and retrofit- selected sites as recommended in the 5-Year Plan. • Worked with the call box consultant to analyze the decline in call volume along with the need to maintain a "safety net" system for motorists in Riverside County and to develop a call box reduction plan to responsibly meet those needs. . • Worked with the CHP and Caltrans to identify and justify the need for an additional FSP beat on 1-15 south of SR-91, issued an RFP, and awarded a contract for service on the new beat. • Continued midday FSP service (8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.) on portions of SR-91 and SR-60/I-215 to mitigate. congestion during the construction on the SR-60/SR-91/1- 215 interchange. One additional vehicle on SR-91 and three vehicles on SR-60/I- 215 are available during the three-year construction period of the project. • Conducted a pilot program to evaluate the effectiveness of using PDAs to collect data and -an AVL system to track the tow trucks in order to assist the CHP in supervising the increasing number of vehicles. Major Initiatives Once the call box system reduction is complete, the implementation of the recommendations in the SAFE 5-Year Plan will continue. Projects to enhance accessibility and retrofit sites will affect approximately 670 call boxes. The modifications will involve reconfiguring sites to meet new site standards, relocating boxes behind guard rails, replacing pedestrian pads, lowering call boxes on the poles, or replacing the sites with the new "L" or "M" site design. 211 Staff will complete the implementation of the AVL system for the tow trucks as well as the use of PDAs to collect the data. All of the vehicles and drivers will be fully equipped' by the end of the fiscal year, representing the first SAFE in the•State. to' implement the ; use of this technology. In conjunction with our call box consultant and other SAFEs'throughout the State;'staff .` will continue. to keep abreast of and evaluate all technology to improve service to hearing andspeech, impaired motorists. Department Goals . Maintain the integrity: of the call box system and service levels., Objectives; •- Along with San Bernardino' County SAFE; continue to monitor the operation ;of the call answering center contractor, Professional Communications Network: . • Implement .the balance of the Commission's recommendations from the, SAFE 5- Year Plan: Continue. the. Freeway Service Patrol as long as state funding support is available. Objectives: • Consult with Caltrans and the CHP to evaluate existing beats and determine if changes in service hours, number of vehicles assigned to .each beat, or expanded service hours are justified should additional funding become available: • _ Review proposed construction projects with Caltrans' and coordinate the lase of . temporary tow service to mitigate congestion: • Work cooperatively with •Caltrans, the CHP, and other FSP program managers to gain increased funding for the programand review the funding allocation formula to attain a moreequitable distribution of program funds. Complete the' implementation of the AVL and PDA systems.' - Motorist Assistance 'FY 03104 FY 04/05. - FY 6 FY 06/07 -Performance/Workload Indicators : , Actual ' 'Actual Estimated Projected ;Number of Call Boxes • 1,083' _ 1,058. 678 ! 678 Numbenof Call Box Callsr-- 23,713 19,945 . 18,000;. 1.7 000 Number of Vehicle Assists 32,564 32,542 • 33,900; 36;700 SECTION 7.31 CAPITAL PROJECTS 213 Capital Project Development and Delivery Mission Statement: "To keep the Commission's contract with the voters of Riverside County by accelerating the planning, programming, and implementation of projects and programs in the Measure A Transportation Improvement Plan to the extent that funds are available. To ensure that capital projects are environmentally acceptable, technically sound, and designed in a manner that is cost effective." Chart 45 -Capital Project. Development and Delivery Debt Service - Commercial Paper 1% Expenditures The budgeted; expenditures; and transfers out total $408,095,000 to cover all ,of the Commission's major Capital projects., General, project costs' include $2,975,500 related to program management provided by Bechtel and $5,000 related to' permits for "rail capital` projects.. Rail capital expenditures' amount to $14,863,500 primarily for preliminary engineering and initiation of right of way acquisitions for the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line upon:; FTA approval, Riverside Downtown station-Eastside parking lot expansion, final design. of a parking.: structure at 'the North' Main Corona station, and final design and construction of the Perris muitimodal facility. Additionally, rail capital expenditures include a commuter rail feasibility study for the 1-15 corridor as well as the local match for an SCRRA capital contribution for the development of an electronic passenger information system. Highway capital expenditures of $52,913,500 are for. engineering, construction, and right of way on SR-60, SR-74, SR-86, SR-91, SR-111, 1-15, 1-215, and SR-60/I-215. Additional capital expenditures°to be funded with commercial paper proceeds include' s • • construction of the Sanderson Bridge in the city of Hemet and rehabilitation projects in the cities of Blythe and Indio. TUMF capital expenditures amount to $175,686,000 for various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects approved for TUMF funding in 2004, preliminary engineering and right of way acquisition on the Mid County Parkway and the SR-79 Realignment projects, and MSHCP land acquisition in Western County and Coachella.. Valley. Disbursements to CVAG for the regional arterial program are budgeted at $13,719,400. Payments to cities and the County for local streets and roads repair, maintenance, and construction amount to $58,318,300. Costs of issuance of $150,000 are related to the anticipated issuance of $80,000,000 in additional commercial paper for 2009 Measure A projects. Interest payments on outstanding commercial paper are estimated at $3,926,900. Repayment of sales tax revenue bonds debt principal and 'related interest is $35,474,900 and is included in transfers out. Transfers out of $47,202,500 relate primarily to funding for Mid County Parkway and SR-79 Realignment right of way acquisition,strategic partnership efforts, and SR-91 Green River interchange improvements. Other costs of $2,359,500 include salary and fringe benefits, legal fees and other professional services, and support. Capital outlay of $500,000 is related to on -call rehabilitation improvements at all commuter rail stations: Table 78 —Capital Project Development and DeliveryExpenditure Detail .. FY 03104 FY OL85 FTO5106 FY05106 FY 06107 Dollar Percent Actual - Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ` Chage Change Salaries and Benefits $ 232360 $ "378,000.-$ eaoo0 $ 476.100 $ - 875,500 $ - 49,000 5.9% Professional Costs Legal Services 701,800 969,000 . 1,123,300 ' 941,000 879,800 (243,500) - -21.7°/. Financial Services - - . 500,000 5,103 - (503,000) 100.0% Audit Serves 22.100 2600 5,000 3.000 5,000 - o.o% ' Professional ServicesOther - 256300 300.000 159 70Q 292000 577,903 419.200 269.1 Total Professional Casts 992210 1271,600 1.7137.000 1,241300 1,462,700 (324,330) -18.1% Sun' Pal Costs 50,800 83,800 106300 7,000 21.300 (87,000) -80.3% Projects and Operations Projects -General 1,993.200 1,779.033 2734.700 1,624,600 2980,500 245,600 90% Highway, Rail and TURF ProganEngeleering 3355,000 10322400 64,272,400 19.446400 47.196000 (17,079,400) 26.6% ,.Highway, Rail and TUMF PnogarnCorstrution - 31,322900 28,913,400 55.920.300 19211.100 52427.900 (3,492400) -62% Highway, Rail and11/MF Prw,rain ROW and Land 4.390203 15.235.400 86,742,700 - 18.414,960 .. 143,242100 56499,403 "65,1% Highway, Rail and TUMF Program Special Stull, 192220 1,271.030 282000 546400 . 100,800 (182,000) -64.5% Local Shoots and Roads 46,206.303 53330,700 55.106,500 55.1060:0 56316300 3,211,800 5.8% Regional Arterials - Coachella Valley - 8.244,200. 10,053700 . 9,996900 6563.700. 13,719403 3.725,500 373% SCRRA Cona6wtion - 367200 613,900 - 506900 - 13280$ 36 Total Projects and Operations 95,699,000 120,965.600. 275,419,703 173.571,500 318,481,200 43.061,503 15.696 Capital Outlay - - 490.090 500,000 20,000 42% Debt SmiceCmrrercial Pape - 1.900,000 899,400 4.076.900 Z176,900. 114.696 , Transfers Out - ' 41082600 26.M.01)0 46.298,700 ' 35483200 A2577.400 36,378.700 7� . TOTAL Capital Project Develcurerd and oefnay s 13A M69m $ Ko494600 L. 3^f'.A2n22Q $ 164f12 322 . $ 408 11954CQ $. A1274.80D'. ?4>P7. 215 Capital Project Development and Delive ppsitiot Department Budget Overview. Department Description .. Capital Projectsis responsible for the development and delivery of major ;highway, . regional arterial, and rail capital projects where the Commission is identified as the lead agency. The delivery of a capital project can include tasks such as feasibility studies, preliminary engineering, environmental clearance, final design, right of way acquisition, construction, and construction, management. Approximately 84% of the Commission's" budget,, originates in this department managed by the Deputy Executive Director responsible for the capital program and Project Delivery Director. The primary goal of Capital', Projects is to accelerate delivery of the Measure A, STIP, and federally funded .,highway,; regional arterial, and rail capital improvement projects,' throughout' the County. Highway : improvements currently in 'progress include ..the; addition of carpool' lanes,; widening and realignment projects, .;and interchange 'improvements. The Commission will continue its efforts to!protect and purchase right of way .for .the identified highway, improvements as. funding permits. i'Regional .arterial capital .improvements include planning for new CETAP corridors,:. and : funding, for: Western' County TUMF regional arterial projects approved by the Commission in 2004 as a result of a call for projects. • Commuter rail capital improvements include new or; expanded parking facilities„the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line, and 'a multimodal; facility in the city of Perris. In addition to the Measure A projects constructed directly by the ''Commission, this department provides the necessary coordination between the Commission and Caltrans for the development of scope,' cost, and project delivery schedules for Measure `A projects that are' 'funded 'by the STIP. For these projects, Caltrans has the responsibility, . for design and construction as the lead agency. r • Capital Projects also has lead agency status over certain demonstration projects identified in TEA21 and SAFETEA-LU. The FY 2006/07 cash flow .to support the highway construction program is directly impacted by thecondition of the . State's budget problems. In FY 2003/04 the Commission advanced $33,915,000 of Western County Measure A highway -funds to Caltrans to guarantee the delivery of the. SR-60/SR-91/1-215 J interchange project. Repayment from the State -of $31,324,000 of the amount advanced is due in FY 2006/07, and, until that time, cash to support new .construction projects has. been determined on a project by project basis. The 2009 Measure A program includes stipulations. for agencies in Western County to be eligible to receive the new, Measure A local streets and roads funds. beginning. in 2009. Each incorporated city in Western County and the County must participate in the TUMF program, which is administered by WRCOG. Additional requirements include participation in the Westem County. MSHCP and submittal of an' annual' capital improvement program. In FY 2003/04 the Commission and WRCOG entered into an MOU which identifies a distribution of the TUMF revenues prior to the 2009 Measure A which commences in July 2009. The distribution, after deduction of a WRCOG administrative fee, is 48.1 % to the Commission for regional arterials and CETAP corridors, 48.1% to WRCOG for the five TUMF improvement zones, and 3.8% to the RTA for regional transit facilities. Given the staff support required to oversee and participate in the preliminary project development work associated with the Mid County Parkway project and the SR-79 Realignment project as well as the various TUMF projects, costs for staff and related support have been included in this budget. As additional project development is assumed by the Commission to support TUMF project delivery, such expenditures may increase. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue its emphasis on completion of the.1989 Measure A program. • The January 2000 Strategic Plan Phase I serves as the basis for defining the 1989 Measure A project selection and prioritization. • TUMF regional arterial project costs are based on the list of projects; approved by the Commission in 2004. • Agreements for the advancement of 2009 Measure A funds have been obtained from CVAG and cities desiring to participate in thecommercial paper program. • Highway project costs are based on engineers' estimates and scope agreements with Caltrans. • Construction projects are competitively bid tominimizecosts. • All projects will be built to required standards. 217 Accomplishments •" Successfully negotiated with Ca!trans for AB 3090'Replacement Agreements to provide Commission funding for the SR-60 Valley -Way to I-15 NOV/Mixed Flow Lanes .and SR-91 'Green River Road interchange projects, thereby ensuring that these projects would -proceed to construction. • -Completed construction ;and commenced landscaping and plant establishment on the SR-60 HOV widening from SR-60/I-215 to Redlands Boulevard:' • Completed the parking lot improvements on Vine Street_ at the Riverside Downtown station. Completed preliminary engineering of Phase 1 for the Perris Multimodal Facility for . the RTA bus tr`ansitcenter. Achieved substantial construction ,progress on Segment II of the`; SR-74 widening project. Made substantial progress related to the environmental process for the Mid County .' Parkway and SR-79 Realignment projects. Initiated final design ?,on theparking structure project at the North Main Corona station: Major Initiatives' The Commission: updates the STIP, FTIP, and Measure A revenues projected through the year 2008 for each area of the County based . on formulas approved by the . Commission. - Those projections allow the Commission to identify "specific :,'projects, priorities, and funding sources for each year of the Strategic Plan period. The construction' projects .-identified in the FY 2006/07budget funded by Measure A, TUMF„ state, or;federal ',funds require the continued support of the 1Bechtel': program management team which.includes:program managers, project engineers,construction engineers, inspectors, and support staff. Since the passage of SB 45 in 1997, the Commission is responsible forSTIP-RIP fund programming and project ";,delivery.` in partnership with Caltrans' and " the., CTC. r Additionally, the, Commission ;may also be responsible for ,project "delivery of federal' demonstration' projects.;: Further, the; Commission has agreed to provide continuing',: assistance: through Bechtel, to Caltrans to support the completion; of the Riverside;. Measure A SR-60/SR-91/1-215 highway project through :the design „Sequencing process allowed by AB 405. A major effort is'currently underway related to an update of the delivery status of the 1989 Measure A as wellI-as an objective assessment of the scope, 'cost, issues, and challenges related to the 12009 'Measure A. This .information should assist the,. Commission in prioritizing, project delivery for the first 10 years of the 2009 Measure A. The expected outcome of this process is a 10-year delivery plan for the 2009 Measure: A. The Commission also disburses Measure A local streets and roads funds directly to the cities and County for their use. The budgeted amount is set by formula established in the Measure' .A .TIP. Local jurisdictions will receive $58,318,300 for local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction. Each jurisdiction's respective allocation is based on population (Westem_ County and Palo Verde Valley) or dwelling unit (Coachella Valley) and the amount of sales tax generated. A number of jurisdictions in the Western County have entered into loan agreements with the Commission for advance acceleration of 1989 Measure A local streets and roads revenues. The annual principal and interest payments for these loans are deducted by the Commission from each city's respective disbursements based on the terms of the loan agreements. The participating jurisdictions are the cities of Canyon Lake, Corona, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and Temecula. Additional agreements have been executed with CVAG and the cities of Blythe, Hemet, and Indio, to advance acceleration of 2009 Measure A regional arterial or local streets and roads revenues through participation in the commercial paper program. La Quinta is the only city in the Coachella Valley which does not participate in the Coachella Valley TUMF Program. Accordingly, La Quinta's Measure A allocation is remitted to CVAG in lieu of the TUMF. The Coachella Valley has a discretionary five percent of its Measure A sales tax revenues that may be allocated for either local streets and roads or transit as determined by CVAG. CVAG has usually elected to allocate such revenues to transit. A summary of the capital projects, including local streets and roads funding, included in the FY 2006/07 budget follows the Performance/VVorkload Indicators. Department Goals Continue prudent right of way protection and preservation activities for Measure A and TUMF. projects to control long-range project costs and project feasibility. Objectives: • Purchase property to protect right of way required for future projects, as funding is available. • Develop agreements with private property owners/developers, where practical, to coordinate the design of Measure A- and TUMF-funded highway improvements required for development. Build upon and strengthen the partnership with Caltrans toward timely delivery of identified Measure A and STIP projects. Objectives: • Develop agreements with Caltrans and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), as may be required, to finalize project scoping and cost issues for the STIP, 219 SAFETEA-LU federal demonstration projects, .and; Measure A -funded highway ;. projects in Riverside'. County. • • Provide quarterly contract status and cost schedule reports to the Commission and Caltrans: In coordination with SANBAG and Caltrans District 08, provide the FHWA Regional Administrator and his key staff members with a briefing on theoverall highway programs of Measures A (Riverside County) and I (San Bernardino County) and the status of various projects, as well as identify and discuss issues which need • resolution in order to keep current projects on schedule. To`the ,extent permitted; by law, pursue reasonable involvement of local 'DBE firms and minority and women.' business enterprises in contract work. Objective: Maintain goal for. a' "minimum DBE participation in all federally funded contracts. Continue to review quarterly report on DBE participation levels. Provide effective communication of project progress to the Commission board ' members, Caltrans, and FHWA. Objective. • Develop a.strategy with Caltrans District 08 that would allow the Commission to advance specific projects identified in the Strategic Plan to take advantage of any unexpected state or federal funding which may become available through increased state or federal budget authorizations or potential loan programs: to advance construction. Work with • Caltrans and '.other agencies toward completion ` of 'preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of all projects. Objective: • Work with Caltrans, the, County, and the cities in Riverside County to complete preliminary design sand' environmental clearance for Measure A projects that could be eligible to, receive additional or early funding from 'various sources that could become available if,a.project is sufficiently developed. Complete the construction of the highway projects .identified in !the FY .2006/07 :• budget. Objectives: ; Complete plant establishment for SR-60 HOV lanes' between'SR-60/1-215 and Redlands Boulevard. Complete right of way acquisition and continue to support construction of Segment II of the Measure A SR-74, widening project between Wasson Canyon Road and '7�' Street in the city of Perris:' Complete the SR-11 f project in the Coachella Valley. 220 In coordination with the Rail Program Manager, construct capital improvements at existing commuter rail stations as identified in the FY 2006/07 budget. Objectives: • Complete the integration of CCTV, system at all the rail stations with the control station at the Riverside Downtown station. • Wrap up construction of as-builts at the North Main Corona rail station. • Construct additional Eastside surface parking at the Riverside Downtown rail station. • . Complete final design and construction of the Perris multimodal facility. • Begin preliminary engineering, complete environmental clearance, and start, right of way acquisition for the FTA New Starts Perris Valley Line. Location of Projects within Riverside County Budgeted for the FY 2006/07 'WOW 'ERE 1) SR-60 (A) Completion of HOV lanes construction between the east junction of SR-60/1-215 and Redlands Boulevard, including on -going landscaping and plant establishment activities. (B) Final design of the SR-60 East Junction to 1-215 HOV lanes. 2) SR-74 3) SR-79. 4) SR-91 5) SR-111, 6) Mid County Parkway • (A) Negotiations for right of way acquisition and construction of Segment II from Wasson Canyon Road to 7°' Street in the city of Perris. (B) Preliminary engineering and environmental for G Street to 1-215 interchange. Realignment between Gilman Springs Road and Domenigoni Parkway includes project study report, project report, and environmental document. Construction of interchange improvements at: (A) Green River Drive (B) La Sierra Avenue (C) Van Buren Boulevard Design and construction of intersection improvements by the cities of Indio, Cathedral City, and La Quinta and the County. Preliminary engineering, preparation of the project report, and environmental documentation for Phase II of the project. 221 7) Perris Valley Line Preliminary engineering and right of way acquisition for the Perris Valley Line '(Riverside -Moreno Valley- Perris) along the SJBL. 8) North Main Corona Station Final design of the parking structure. 9) Riverside Downtown Station 10) Local Streets and Roads 11) SR-86 12) Perris Multimodat Facility' 13)1-215 Bi-County Project' Construction of Phase II Eastside parking ` lot expansion and design of station improvements for landscaping and lighting to meet city of Riverside requirements. Allocation of Measure A. revenues to each city and the County to improve, maintain, and repair high, priority local streets and roads. Traffic signal at Avenue 66. Final design and construction for a bus and rail multimodal facility in downtown Perris. Development of an EIR/EIS and ` preliminary engineering on the I-215 North from Riverside to the San Bernardino County line. Capital Project: Development & Delivery Performance/WorkloadIndicators FY 03104 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY 05/06 Estimated FY 06107 Projected Preliminary. Engineering (Project Reports and Environmental Documentation).;' Contracts Awarded. '�& _ r r n ,, )_ ' �_ 2 Plans, Schedules, and Estimates Contracts Awarded " f' , h1 , ... p K R 4 z Number of Projects,with Active Right of -Way Acquisition �� X � .,�, 2 Construction Awards' . ' - , ,. t 1 Highway and Rail Project Close-outs _ 10 '. Capital Projects Summary Western County Highway and TUMF Projects SR-60,HOV`Lanes Complete project close-out of construction and continue plant establishment of the SR- 60 Measure A HOV lane project between the East Junction of SR-60 between 1-215 and Redlands Boulevard. • FY 2006/07 Cost $ 25,000 Right of way acquisition and temporary construction easements $ 100 Right of way support services Measure A Budget Impact , Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A and CMAQ funds. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by the. Commission on June 14, 2000. SR-60 East Junction to 1-215 HOV Lanes Connector Complete final design: FY 2006/07 Cost $. 2,500,000 Final design Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using CMAQ with 1989 Measure A for local match. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by the Commission on June 14, 2000. SR-74 Widening Complete construction of Segment II for realigned four -lane roadway between Wasson Canyon Road in the city of Lake Elsinore and 7th Street in the city of Perris. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $ 85,000 Final design $ 2,300,000 Construction and landscape management $ 700,000 Right, of way acquisition $ 20,000 Right of way support services Costs for Segment II will be funded using 1989 Measure A. In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved, by the Commission on June 14, 2000. This 1989 Measure A project was advanced with $4.5 million made_ available by Caltrans to be used for several safety projects. Segment I from 1-15 to Dexter Road was completed in Summer 2004; Segment II is scheduled for completion in. Fall 2006. SR-74 Curve Realignment Perform preliminary engineering of curve realignment along SR-74 between Winchester Road and Warren Avenue. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $ 800,000 Preliminary engineering Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A. In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by the Commission on June 14, 2000. 223 SR=74 from G Street to 1-215 ` Perform preliminary engineering and environmental .related: to SR'=74" interchange improvements. FY'2006/07 Cost $ 482,000 Preliminary engineering and environmental Measure A Budget Impact Project costs will be funded using 1989,Measure A. 'Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved, by the Commission on June 14, 2000. SR-79 Realignment from Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway Perform'` realignment environmental and preliminary engineering services from •Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway. $8,030,000 Realignment, environmental, and;, engineeringservices $17,500,000 Right of way acquisition $ 30,000 Right of way support, services Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using `TUMF and ° TEA21 and SAFETEA-LU funds. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as .approved by the ` Commission on June 14, 2000. The realignment studies of'SR-79 between Hemet and San Jacinto will be performed,as a demonstration project and funded through TEA21/SAFETEA-LU program dollars. The local match for preliminary engineering will come from TUMF funds. 1-215.Bi-County Project (Riverside to San Bernardino County Line)` Continue to -fundithe. Phase I development of an EIR/EIS and preliminary engineering on the 1-215 "North?:througf an'agreement with SANBAG. ' FY 2006/07 Cost ,'•$ ..1,000,000 Preliminary engineering and environmental Measure ABudget Impact 1Current phase costs of this project will ,be funded ,using • 1989.Measure A. Strategic -Plan Impact 11011e The match up project on the; San Bernardino County side is on 1-215 from 1-10 to the Riverside County Line (1-21`5 South). • • Mid County Parkway Corridor Project Perform Phase II activities related to the development of a project report and environmental document. FY 2006/07 Cost $10,000,000 Preliminary engineering and environmental $72,500,000. Right of way acquisition Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded with TUMF and commercial_ paper proceeds. Strategic Plan Impact Phase II funding consists of a federal streamlining allocation and Western County TUMF regional arterial and. CETAP funds. Commercial paper proceeds will provide advance funding of 2009 Measure A funds. MSHCP Land Acquisition in Western County Acquire -land as mitigation for the cumulative and indirect impacts associated with construction of future highway and regional arterial projects as required by 2009 Measure A. FY 2006/07 Cost $25,000,000 Land acquisition Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as advance funding of 2009 Measure A. Strategic Plan Impact None SR791 Van Buren Interchange (Phase II) Provide funding and support for construction to widen and fully improve interchange improvements at Van Buren Boulevard. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $ 7,600,000 Construction Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A with the city of Riverside as lead agency. . In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by the Commission on June 14, 2000. One of the aspects of Measure A is construction of interchanges which improve local circulation or promote job development. Van Buren is one of the interchanges to relieve local congestion and promote job development. As Phase II of this project, it will improve the local circulation element; widen, raise, and lengthen that span of the bridge from six to ten lanes; and improve. ramp access. Phase I added a new eastbound off ramp that was completed in 1996. 225 SR-91 La Sierra Interchange ' Provide'funding and support to start construction to widen and fully improve La Sierra Avenue from SR-91 to El Sobrante Road. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $15,700,000 Construction Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A and TUMF funds with the city of Riverside as lead agency. In accordance with the Strategic Plan asapproved by the Commission on June 14, 2000. SR-91 :Green River Road' Interchange Provide funding and support to begin construction of highway improvements including the replacement of the overcrossing bridge at Green River Road. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure "A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $ 7,006,500 Construction Costs are funded with TUMF and commercial 'paper proceeds with Ca!trans as lead agency. ''None 1-15 Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road' Interchange Provide funding and support to construct new interchange at Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road. FY 2006/07 Cost $. 2,734,000 Construction Measure Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A with County as lead agency: Strategic Plan Impact This is a 1989 'Measure A project in the Strategic Plan as P 9improvement.P gram. art of the interchange program. The 1989 Measure A,commitment for this project is $5.0 million; however,' funding of $226 million was provided to the County for the Winchester Road project. The County agreed to replace that funding in the future with STP funds: Sanderson Bridge City of Hemet Provide funding and support for the construction of a bridge. FY 2006/07 + $'.'3,000,000 Construction " Measure A Budget Impact Cots will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as an . advance of 2009 Measure .A local' streets and :roads funds with the city of Hemet as lead agency. None the Strategic;Plan Impact • 226 Various Western, County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects Provide TUMF funding and support for the engineering, construction, and right of way activities related to various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects. FY 2006/07 Cost $15,386,000 Engineering $ 4,848,000 Construction $ 7,367,000 Right of way Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using TUMF, regional arterial funds with various local jurisdictions as lead agency for their respective projects. Strategic Plan Impact None; however, projects are included in .list of TUMF projects approved by the Commission in 2004. Coachella Valley Highway Projects SR-111 . Provide funding and support to complete signal and local intersection widening improvements along SR-111 as a result of the cooperatively programmed 1989 Measure A highway program funds by the Commission and CVAG. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact $ 1,000,000 Magnesia Falls to Fairway in Rancho Mirage $ 2,149,900 City projects in La Quinta, Cathedral City, and Indio Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A with each city as lead agency for its respective project. The projects will be completed as part of the identified Tier II projects in the,Strategic Plan. SR-86 Provide funding andsupport to complete signal "and local intersection widening improvements along SR-86 as a result of the cooperatively programmed 1989. Measure A highway program funds by the Commission and CVAG. FY 2006/07 Cost $ 271,000 Traffic signal at Avenue 66 Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A with the County as lead agency and Caltrans responsible for maintenance. Strategic Plan Impact Included in the Strategic Plan as improvements on three segments of SR-86. 227 Various Local Street and Road Rehabilitation Projects —`City of Indio' Provide funding and support for overlay and pulverize projects on local streets and roads in the city of Indio. ' FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Strategic Plan Impact' $ 4,000,000 Construction Costs will be funded using commercial paper, proceeds as an advance of 2009 Measure A local street and roads funds with the city of Indio as lead agency. None. The city. of Indio is the lead agency: MSHCP Land Acquisition, in Coachella Valley Provide funding and support for the acquisition of land as mitigation for the cumulative and indirect impacts associated: with construction of future highway 'and regional arterial , projects as required by 2009 ~Measure A. FY 2006/,07 Cost Measure AiBudget` Impact Strategic Plan Impact $15,025,000 . Land acquisition Costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as advance funding of 2009 Measure A. None Palo Verde Valley Highway Projects Lovekin/Chanslorway'Projects —.City of Blythe Provide funding and support -kw the-Lovekin Boulevard Pavement' Rehabilitation and Chanslorway.Pavement Overlay local streets and roads projects in the city of Blythe. FY 2006/07 Cost f $, 1,500,000 Construction Measure'A Budget Impact ,. Costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as an advance of 2009 'Measure A local street and" roads funds with the city of Blythe as lead agency. None. Strategic Plan Impact San Jacinto Branch Line Segment l (Perris Valley Line) Complete alternative "studies and environmental clearance and 'start preliminary engineering and right of way acquisition forextension of commuter rail services. FY 2006/07 Cost ;$ 5,000,000' Preliminary engineering;; $ 5,000,000 Right of way acquisition $ 75,000 Right of way support services Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using FTA and 1989 Measure A: funds. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approvedby the Commission on June 14, 2000 and consistent' with the Commission's long-term policy goals. The FTA New Starts Alternatives Analysis proposes $186,000,000 for ,improvements along Segment I of the SJBL, of which $10,075,000 of federal and local funds is for completion of the environmental :clearance and start of. preliminary engineering. The start of preliminary engineering is .necessary for future commuter rail service on the SJBL, and the initial operating segment of the Perris Valley Line is from Riverside to Perris. Professional services costs not included above total $312,000. Riverside Downtown Station Parking Lot Expansion—Eastside Construct the Eastside parking lot expansion at the Riverside Downtown station. FY 2006/07 Cost $ 50,000 Final design $ 175,000 Survey, and material testing $ 1,738,500 Construction, landscape management, and support services Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved .by the Commission on June 14, 2000. North Main Corona Station Parking Structure 'Complete final design of a parking structure at the North Main Corona station. FY 2006/07 Cost $ 1,000,000 Final design $ 100,000 Survey and material testing . Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using IIP funds and FTA Section 5307 funds. Strategic Plan Impact In accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by the Commission on June 14, 2000. City of Perris Multimodal Facility Complete final design and start construction of the Perris multimodal facility Phase 1. FY 2006/07 Cost Measure A Budget Impact $ 1,000,000 Engineering $ 125,000 Survey and material testing Costs will be funded using FTA Section 5309 bus funds to .be reimbursed by RTA and LTF. 229 Strategic :Plan Impact In 'accordance with the Strategic Plan as approved by :the Commission on June 14, 2000. Local Streets and Roads Western County'Area D'istribute"local return funding`for local streets and roads projects in Western County. FY 2006/)7 Cost MeasureA' Budget Impact Coachella Valley Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Coachella Valley., 797,000 535,000 202,000 267,000 5,297,000 2,126,000 1,214,000 4,614,000 2,586,000 967,000 Banning Beaumont Calimesa Canyon Lake Corona Hemet ` Lake Elsinore Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco $ 1,360000 Perris $ 9,775,000 Riverside $ 739,000 $ 3,739,000 $11,047,000 $45,265,000 1,469,700 $43,795,300 Total "Western County, net:. All :costs will be distributed in accordance Measure A. one. San Jacinto Temecula Riverside County Total Wester County Less: debt service payments with 1989 $ 1,758:000 $ 510,000. $ 400,000 •$ 241,000 ,$ 1,680,000 ,$ :.',. 0 ,_$ 1,968,000 2,773,000 944,000 . $ ' 1,884;000 230 Cathedral City Coachella Desert Hot Springs Indian Wells Indio La Quinta Palm Desert Palm Springs Rancho Mirage Riverside :County • • • $ 1,284,000 CVAG $13,442,000 Total Coachella Valley Measure A Budget Impact All costs will be distributed in accordance with 1989 Measure A. Strategic Plan Impact None. Palo Verde Valley Area Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Palo Verde Valley. FY 2006/07 Cost $ 836,000 $ 245,000 $ 1,081,000. Measure A Budget Impact All costs will Measure A. Strategic Plan Impact None. Blythe Riverside County Total Palo Verde Valley be distributed in accordance with 1989 231 COMMUNITY PROFILE Community. Profile Riverside County is the fourth largest county in California, stretching westward nearly 200 miles from the Colorado River and comprising more than 7200 square miles that include 24 incorporated cities. Riverside County can trace its beginning back to 1893 when voters approved the formation of a new county. The area was carved from parts of San Bemardino and San Diego counties. In its 110+ years of existence, the County's economy has diversified and prospered. Originally, Riverside County was a very agricultural area, known for a wide variety of crops grown on its fertile soils. The County remains a strong agricultural area, but it is increasingly becoming a leader in manufacturing, transportation, construction, and tourism. The success of the area has brought dramatic population growth to Riverside County. During the 1980's, the County was the fastest growing county in the state. The available and affordable housing in Riverside County has attracted many people to the County. While the County's population and housing growth continues, jobs are also increasing as many firms relocate to the area and move away from older communities. The economic outlook for Riverside County remains bright with more firms moving into the area, while existing employers expand. At the same time, the area is preparing for its future as well in supporting better education. The County is home to a number of colleges and universities including UC Riverside. Chart 46 - Population 2,000,000 1,800,000 1,600,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000 0 e°,41' 4h005°,,0" cp �� ry,Pryoo 400 goo ooh 233 Chart 47 - Age Composition (%) - 2000 Census 65 to 74 7% '. 80 to$4 '._. 3% 55 to 59 4% 45 to 54 75 to 84 5% • 35 to 44J 85 & over 1% \20 to 24 25 to 34 6% 13% Chart 48 - Gender Composition (%) - 2000 Census . MALE 50% • FEMALE Chart 49 - Racial; Composition (%) -.2000 Census -Black, .,`2ormore American 6% ' Races 4% Indian 1% Asian or Pack Islander 4% Hispanic 36% White 51% _Under 5 8% 5 to 9 9% 10 to 14 9% _15 to 19 8% • Chart 50 — New Home Sales 30,000- 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 1991 1993 1995 Chart 51 — Unemployment Rate 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 1995 1996" 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Chart 52 — Retail Sales (%) - $18.8 Billion — 2004 Data Automotive 32% Other 13% Apparel Store 5% Building Material 13% General Merchandise 16% Household 5% Food Stores 6% Eating & Drinking 10% 235 , Chart 53 - Household Income'(%) - 2000 Census $100,000 to $150,000 7% $75,000 to $100000 .- 11 °/u $150,000 to $200,000 2% $50,000 to; $75,000 21% 236 $25,000 to $35,000 • 14% $10,000 to $15,000 6% $15,000 to $25,000 14%.; .. • SECTION 9� IAPPENDICES1 237 Glossary of Acronyms 'AAL ACE ADA AVL Bechtel BNSF Board CAFR • Caloans Actuarial Accrued Liabilities — Alameda Corridor East Americans with Disabilities Act — Automatic Vehicle Location — Bechtel Infrastructure — Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad Board of Commissioners for the Riverside County Transportation Commission Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Califomia Department of Transportation CCTV — Closed Circuit Television CETAP — Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process CHP - California Highway Patrol CMA— Congestion Management Agency C14MAQ* — Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality CMP, — 1 Congestion Management Program CMS ' Congestioh Management System Commission — % 'Riverside County Transportation Commission County County' of Riverside CSMFO :' . California Society of Municipal Finance Officers CTC California Transportation Commission. CVAG ' Coachella' Valley Association of Governments DBE Disadvantaged Business Enterer ise DMV — Department of Motor Vehicles EIR — Environmental Impact Report ` EIS' ', Environmental lmpact Study Epic . — Epic Land Solutions, Inc. FHWA* — Federal Highway Administration FSP — Freeway Service Patrol FI'A* Federal Transit Administration FTE — Full-time Equivalent FTIP* ' " Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY - Fiscal Year GASB - Governmental Accounting Standards Board GFOA Government Finance Officers Association ORB is ^Guaranteed Ride Home HOY • High Occupancy Vehicle (Carpool Lane) I ' Interstate IEOC — • Inland Empire -Orange County Metrolink Service IIP*' - Interregional Improvement Program • ITS — +• Intelligent Transportation System LAX — Los Angeles International Airport LONP Letter of No Prejudice LOS — ; Level aService LTF* Local Transportation Fund March ARB — March Air Reserve Base Measure AA Ame:ndmentto 1989 Measure A to increase bond debt limitation'to $525,000,000 Metrolink . — Opeiating Name for SCRRA (see SCRRA) !'.. MIS Major Investment Study MOO — Memorandum of Understanding MSHCP ' Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan MSRC Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (AB 2766)- OCPA — Orange County Transportation Authority OPEB Other PostemploymentBenefits PDAs Personal Digital. Assistants . Perris Valley Line Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project Piiblic;Employees Retirement System '' PIP 'Productivity Improvement Program RCA ' Regional Conservation" Authority RIP* — Regional Improvement Program 238 RTA — Riverside Transit Agency RTAC — Regional Transportation Agencies Coalition RTP — Regional Transportation Plan SAFE — Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies . SAFETEA-LU* — Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users SANBAG — San Bernardino Associated Governments SB 45 — Senate Bill 45 Kopp 1997 Transportation Funding SB 821 LTF Bicycle and Pedestrian Funds SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SCAQMD - South Coast Air Quality Management District SCRRA — Southern California Regional Rail Authority SJBL — San Jacinto Branch Line SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA* — State Transit Assistance State — State of California STIP* — State Transportation Improvement Program STP* Surface Transportation Program SunLine SunLine Transit Agency . TDA* — Transportation Development Act TE* — Transportation Enhancements TEA21 * — Transportation Equity Act for the 21 st Century TIP — Transportation Improvement Plan TMC - Transportation Management Center TPC ' — Transit Policy Committee TUMF — Transportation/Traffic Uniform Mitigation Fee (Western County/Coachella Valley) UC — University of California Western County — Western area of Riverside County . WRCOG — Western Riverside Council of Governments 1989 Measure A — Original.'h cent transportation sales tax measure approved by voters in November 1988 2009 Measure A — Extension of sales tax measure approved by voters in November 2002 which is effective upon expiration of original sales tax measure in June 2009 5-Year Plan — 5-Year Strategic and Financial Plan for the Call Box Program * Additional information provided in Funding Definitions. Funding Defmitions Federal Fund Sources Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5309 discretionary funds generally provided to urbanized areas for funding new start rail projects, major bus fleet replacement, and transit facility construction. Matching ratios range from 50/50 to 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5307 formula funds made available to urbanized areas for operating subsidies, capital projects and planning. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital and planning match is 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5310 funds made available to states for the purpose of providing capital support to private non-profit and, in certain circumstances, public transit operators. This is a state administered discretionary program providing funds on .an 88.53% federal and 11.47% local basis. Section 5311 funds provided to support rural transit operating subsidies and capital projects. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital match is 80% federal and 20% local. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) In 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) was approved by Congress to replace the former Federal Aid Urban/Federal Aid System funding programs. 1STEA was established as a six -year funding program and was reauthorized for. another six years in 1997. This new transportation act was renamed as the Transportation Equity Act of the Twenty-first Century (TEA21) and was extended through August 10, 2005 when the President signed into law the Safe, Accountable, 239 Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity, Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). With guaranteed funding for highways, highway safety, and public transportation," totaling $244:1 billion;• SAFETEA-LU. represents the largest surface transportation '; investment in our nation's history. Under these programs the following fund sources are allocated to each county; and the ' Commission further allocates these funds based on federal provisions. Surface Transportation Prograin (STP) Funds allocated by the Commission and administered by Caltrans that provide funding for local`steet and road ,improvements. Current matching rate is 88.53%federal and 11.47% local. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Funds allocated by the Commission for transportation related air quality improvement projects in air quality non - attainment areas. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47%local. Safety projectscan, qualify for.100% of CMAQ funding. Transportation Enhancements (TE) The amount of funds made available under this program is'10% of the state apportionment ofSTP funds. Projects are • qualified and prioritized by, the Commission and submitted to the California Transportation Commission for Inclusion'iF in the State Transportation Improvement Program. The basic definition, of a. transportation enhancement Project is an improvement that is over and above' the base transportation project. Project categories are pedestrian '•and bicycle facilities, scenic or historic highways, scenic beautification, historic preservation, rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities, preservation of abandoned railway corridors, control/removal ;of .outdoor' advertising, .archaeological planning and research, and 'mitigation of water pollution due to highway runoff. Currenfmatching rate is 88.53%federal and 11.47%local. State and Local Fund Sources State Transportation Improvement Program The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) consists of Regional Improvement Program (RIP). and Interregional Improvement. Program (IIP) funds. The RIP and UP programs are mainly supported by Proposition 42 • funding. The RIP component, represents 75% of STIP funds available for capacity projects. Regional Transportation Planning Agencies are responsible for selection of projects proposed for RIP funds. The IIP component represents the remaining 25% of STIP funds available for capacity projects and Caltrans is responsible for the selection of IIP-funded projects. The Commission and Caltrans District 08 work closely in coordinating projects for these fund sources. Transportation Development Act (TDA) The TDA is comprised of two elements: Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA),funds. LTF funds are derived from 1/4 of one cent of the state sales tax•and are returned to source— There are three areas of apportionment within Riverside}.:County comprised of Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo' Verde Valley (Blythe). The Commission administers the LTF on behalf of the County of Riverside. Funds are provided for program administration, Souther California Association of Governments regional planning, local, transportation planning, and transit services in Westem:Gounty,and the Coachella Valley. In the Palo Verde Valley `funds support transit services and local street and road improvements. Funds are also provided to the County for local street and road improvements y ° made available for bicycle and pedestrian m unincorporated areas. Additionall ,under SB 821 2/° of LTF funds;are�' projects. STA funds are generated from the' statewide sales tax on gasoline and diesel fuel and are allocated.by the state to the Commission on the basis Of population and as a percentage of transit fare revenue. The Commission has generally • used these funds to support capital purchases and improvements as these funds have been subject to state budgetary: actions. • Measure A • Measure A is a half -cent local retail transaction and use tax that was -initially approved by the voters in Noveiber 1988 s , for 20 years (Ordinance 88-1) and extended in November 2002 for additional 30 years (Ordinance 02-001), through, , June 2039, to help fund key transportation improvements in Riverside County. It provides:ftinds to improve highways'' and local roadways, to initiate commuter rail services on existing tracks, to expand dial -a -ride services and commuter programs, and to guarantee half -'price bus fares for seniors and persons with disabilities. These types of improvements' are needed to contrOrtrafhc, increase safety, and maintain the quality of _life within the County. Since existing state, and federal sources provide only a limited amount of funding for a limited number of projects, Measure A'will cover the shortfall for key projects with, a funding source that is under local control. It will use the revenue generated in • Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley to meet the unique transportation needs of each of those areas. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee The Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program was adopted by all local jurisdictions in the western county area of Riverside County in July 2003. Under this program, which is administered by the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), fees are assessed on new residential and commercial development in westem Riverside County to ensure that new development pays its fairs share toward providing the needed infrastructure improvements on the regional system of highways and arterials. In accordance with the extension of Measure A in 2002, the Commission shall receive the first $400 million of TUMF revenues to fund equally the regional arterial system and the development of new corridors. As a result of a Memorandum of Understanding with WRCOG, the Commission will receive 48.1% of TUMF through June 30, 2009, and, in accordance with the extension of Measure A, thereafter at 100%, afler deduction of an administrative fee, up to an aggregate of $400 million. Program Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the various program terms used and discussed in the narrative and generally used in outlining the Commission's functions for auditing, governmental accounting, financial reporting and budgeting. Transportation Improvement Plan . This plan also acts as the County's expenditure plan and was prepared by the Commission for the proposed U2% local retail transaction and use tax for transportation purposes to be collected. This was proposed by the Commission as a means to fill the funding shortfall to implement needed highway and commuter rail projects, local street and road programs, and transit improvements for seniors and disabled persons Highways Measure A provides revenues to widen existing highways, expand interchanges, and improve remote freeways. These improvements are needed to control traffic congestion in Western County and improve access and safety in Coachella Valley. Costs of these improvements will be covered by funds from state and federal sources. Measure A revenue will be used to supplement —not replace —these other sources and to acceleratework on projects deferred for lack of funding. . Commuter Rail Measure'A provides capital revenne for commuter rail service to Orange and Los Angeles counties. LTF provides revenue for commuter tail operations in Riverside County. These trains operate on existing railroad tracks'parallel to • major freeways. Commuter mil service provides a safe and reliable transit alternative to driving alone during the peak period. Plans to expand commuter rail service in westem Riverside County from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley are currently underway. . Metrolink The Commission's commuter rail program is part of the regional network operated by the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operating under the name of Metrolink, a five -county joint powers agency composed of the transportation commissions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside, and Ventura. The puipose of this agency is to manage the operation and maintenance of commuter rail in the five -county metropolitan area. The service is operated under contract by Amtrak. Regional Arterials Fifty-five percent of the Measure A funds generated within the Coachella Valley is used for state highways and major regional. road projects. The Coachella Valley area is served by few state highways. The regional arterial system ' developed through the Coachella Valley Association of Governments functions much like state highways to address future needs for the area. The system is to be implemented •with a mix of funding required from new development under a Traffic Uniform Mitigation Fee to be paid by developers from new development and from Measure A funds retumed to the Coachella Valley area. The Traffic Uniform Mitigation Fee schedule shall beestablished in order to . generate at least the equivalent of Measure A funding toward the regional arterial system. Local Streets and Roads Measure A provides revenues to local jurisdictions for the construction, repair; and maintenance of local -streets and roads. The County and local cities are required to supplement those expenditures with other previously dedicated revenue sources to maintain road improvements at a level equal to or greater than the base year amount (fiscal year 241 87i88). LTF provides revenue for local street and road improvements in the Palo Verde Valley and unincorporated areas of the County. Specialized Transit Measure A provides revenues to improve transportation services for seniors, persons with disabilities and commuters. ;For seniors and 'persons "with disabilities, it provides dial -a -ride cab service at night for emergency reposes, guarantees half-price bus fares, and assists centers with their transit programs. For commuters, it improves express bus service and ., expands ridesharing programs In the Coachella Valley, revenues also are available for bus replacement and local bus . service: Commuter Assistance The purpose of this program is to provide short tens incentives to encourage single'occiipant vehicle drivers to use ,,, alternate modes' of transportation including carpools, vanpools, bus pools, public bus, commuter walking,"'' bicycling: Motorist Assistance The Motorist'Assistance program has two elements_ The Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) is a special team of tow trucks 'that travel on selected Riverside County freeways during peak commuter hours.to assist drivers_ when their cars break-, •down..`The other element is the call box system, which installation and operation is made possible with' revenue ', provided by the public. One dollarper year from every motor vehicle registration pays for, the call boxes:and their operation and maintenance_ Call boxes are being provided by the Commission, which serves as 'the County,s Service .Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE). Bicycle and Pedestrian LTF provides revenues for the construction of bicycle and pedestrian facilities and related right-of-way costs.. Transit ; The Commission is the agency responsible for short range transportation, planning and programming and coordinating the operation of all public transportation service within theCounty. The Commission allocates and disburses•TDA ; funds to the transit operators for operating and capital purposes. General. Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the narrative discussions and illustrations included in ' this budget document and the terininology generally used in governmental accounting, auditing,; financial reporting, and r budgeting. Accountability The state of being obliged to explatnl'one's actions, to justify what one does. Accountability requires a government to answer to its citizenry to justify the raising of public resources and the purposes for which they amused. Accounting System ,. The,methods'and records established to'identify, assemble, analyze classify, record, and report a government's transactions and to maintain accountability for the related assets and liabilities. ; i Accrual Basis of Accounting Tlie'accounting of the financial.effects of transactions, events, and interfundactivities when they:occur, regardless of, when cash is received or paid. • • ' Advance Refunding Bonds New bonds issued to refinance an outstanding bond issue before the date the outstanding bonds become due or callable, to'.obtain better interest rates' and/or bond conditions: `Proceeds of the advance refunding bonds are deposited in escrow with n fiduciary, invested in U.S.' Treasury Bonds or; other authorized "Securities; and use&to redeem the underlying bonds at their maturity'or call date: and to pay interest on the bonds being refunded. ' - Agency Fund A fiduciary fund type, used to report resources held by a govemment'for others in a purely' custodial capacity and;'. cannot be used to support the. government's own programs_ The Commission's agency fund is the "Local Projects Agency Fund' which accounts for the proceeds from a subordinate debt issue for various cities' local 'street and road projects. ` 242 • Audit A systematic collection of the sufficient, competent evidential matter needed to attest to the faimess of management's assertions in the financial statements or to evaluate whether management has efficiently and effectively carried out its responsibilities. The auditor obtains this evidential matter through inspection, observation, inquiries, and confirmations with third parties. Basis of Accounting A tern used to refer to when the effects of transactions or events are recognized for financial reporting purposes. For example, the timing of recognition can be when the transaction or event occurs (accrual basis) or when cash is received or paid (cash basis). Bond A written promise to pay a specified sum of money (face or principal amount) at a specified date or dates in the future (maturity date), together with periodic interest at a specified rate. Bonds are primarily used to finance capital projects. Budget A plan of financial activity for a specified period of time indicating all planned revenues and expenditures for the budget period. .Annual budgets are usually required bylaw and are essential to sound financial management. The Commission prepares an annual budget which is applicable to a single fiscal year. Budgetary Control The control or management of a government in accordance with an approved budget to keep expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and available revenues. Budget Document The instrument used by the budget -making authority to present a comprehensive financial program to the appropriating goveming body. Capital Outlay Expenditures resulting in the acquisition of or addition to the government's capital assets or assets to be transferred to Caltrans, such as highway projects. Capital Projects Fund A governmental fund type created to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital projects. The Commission has two capital projects funds for Measure "A" Western County and Measure "A" Coachella Valley to account for bond proceeds from sales tax revenue bonds and related highway and commuter mil projects. Commercial Paper An unsecured short-term promissory note issued primarily by corporations with maturities ranging from two to 270 days. The credit risk of almost all commercial paper is rated by a rating service. Comprehensive Annual Financial A financial report that encompasses all funds of the government. In the financial section of the CAFR are the basic financial statements and required supplementary information as well as combining and individual fund financial statements as necessary. The CAFR also contains introductory information and statistical data. - Current Financial Resources Measurement Focus A measurement focus that reports on the near -term or current inflows, outflows, and balances of spendable financial resources. This focus is unique to accounting and financial reporting for state and local governments and is used for reporting the financial position and results of operations of governmental funds. Debt An obligation resulting from the borrowing of money or from the purchase of goods and services. Debts of governments include bonds, time warrants, and notes. Debt Coverage Ratio The ratio of pledged revenues to related debt service for a given year. 243 Debt Limit The maximum amount of outstanding gross or net debt legally permitted. Debt Proceeds The difference between the face amount of debt and the issuance discount or- the sum of the face amount and the issuance premium_ Debt proceeds differ from cash receipts to the extent issuance costs, such'as underwriters'fees, are withheld by the underwriter. Debt Service Fund Agovernmental fund type created to account for the accumulation of resources for and payment of general long-term. debt principal and interest. The Commission has one debt service fund for its sales tax revenue bonds. Expenditures Represents decreases in net financial resources on the transfer of property or services for the'purpose o acquiring an asset, service, orsettling a loss. Fiduciary Funds ' Funds used to report assets held in adrustee or agency capacity for others and cannot therefore be used to support the government's own programs, .. Financial Advisor In the context of the issuance of debt, a consultant who advises the issuer on any of a varieyof matters related to the issuance. The financial advisor sometimes also is referred to as the fiscal consultant. Financial Audi[ An audit made, to, provide independent assurance whether the financial statements of a,govemment are presented fairly in conformity with GAAP. ' Financial Resources ' Resources that are or will become available for spending and include cash, resources ordinarily expected to be converted to cash such as receivables, inventory, and prepaid assets. Fiscal Year For the Commission, the 12-month period that begins July 1 and ends with June 30 of the designated fiscal or operating year for accounting and budgeting purposes. Fund A fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts in which cash and other financial resources, all . related liabilities, and residual equities or balances, and changes therein, are recorded and segregated to carry- on ` specific activities or attain certain` objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Fund Balance • 'The excess of a' governmental fund's assets over its liabilities. Fund Type Any one of eleven classifications into which' all funds are categorized in governmental accounting. Governmental fund types include general, special revenue, debt service, capital projects, and permanent funds:. Proprietary fund types include enterprise and internal service funds- 'Fiduciary fund types include pension trust, investment trust, and private - purpose trust funds and agency funds.. Statement No. 34 issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board that was implemented by the Commission in FY 2001/02. "GASB 34 established new financial reporting standards for state and local governments. Under the new financial reporting model, governmental financial statements include basic financial statements that present both government -wide and fund financial statements and required supplementary information,' including Management's '. . Discussion and Analysis. GASS 44 Statement No. 44, Economic Condition Reporting: 77re Statistical Section issued' by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board will be completed by the Commission in FY 2004/06. +GASB 44 improves the statistical section of the CAFR. .1' 244 GASB 45 Statement No. 45, Accounting for Other Postemployment Benefits (OPEB) issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board will be required to be implemented by the Commission by FY 2007/08. GASB 45 requires recognition of post -retirement health care costs on an accrual basis over a period approximating the employees' years of service and to provide information about actuarial accrued liabilities associated with these benefits and whether and to what extent progress is being made in funding the plan. General Fund The govemmental fund type used to account for all financial resources, except those required to be accounted for in another fund. General Ledger A record containing the accounts needed to reflect the financial position and the results of operations of a government. In double -entry bookkeeping, debit balances equal the credit balances in the general ledger. General Long-term Debt Long-term debt with a maturity of more than one year after the date of issuance which is expected to be repaid from governmental fund resources. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) Minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. GAAP encompass the conventions, rules, and procedures that serve as the norm. for the fair presentation of financial statements. The GASB; is the primary authoritative accounting and financial reporting standard -setting body on the application of GAAP to state and local governments. Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) Rules and procedures established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) for the conduct of a financial audit. There are ten basic GAAS, classed into three broad categories: general standards, standards of field work, and standards of reporting. The Auditing Standards Board of the AICPA publishes Statements on Auditing Standards (SAS) and related interpretations to comment and expand upon these basic standards. Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS) Standards established by the General Accounting Office (GAO) in its publication, Government. Auditing Standards, for the conduct and reporting of both financial and performance audits in the public sector. GAGAS set forth general standards applicable. to both types of audits and separate standards of field work and reporting for financial and performance audits. The GAGAS standards of field work and reporting for financial audits incorporate and build upon GAAS. Governmental Funds Funds generally used to account for tax -supported activities. The Commission's governmental funds are comprised of general, special revenue, debt service, and capital projects funds Grant A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function or program. Independent Auditor An auditor meeting the independence criteria set forth in GAAS and GAGAS. Indirect Cost Allocation Plan A cost allocation plan developed to identify and document the cost incurred to administer state and federal programs and is used to recover such indirect costs from program grants or reimbursement agrents. Internal Auditing . An independent appraisal of the diverse operations and controls within a government entity to determine whether acceptable policies and procedures are followed, established standards are met, resources are used efficiently and economically, and the organization's objectives are being achieved. The term covers all forms of appraisalofactivities undertaken by auditors working for and within an organization. 245 Internal Control Policies and procedures established to provide reasonable assurance that specific govemment, objectives' will be achieved. Joint Venture A legal entity or other organization resulting from a contractual agreement and that is owned, operated, or govemed by two or more participants as a separate and specific activity for the benefit of the public or service recipients and in which the government retains an ongoing financial interest or ongoing financial responsibility. The Commission is,a member agency ofMetrolink. Legal Level of Budgetary Control The level at which a government's management may not reallocate resources without 'special approval 'from legislativebody. "" Loans Receivable An asset account reflecting amounts loaned to individuals or organization's extemal to the Commission, including notes taken as security for such loans. Measurement Focus • The objective of a measurement; that is, what is being expressed in reporting a government's financial performance and `position. A particular measurement focus considers not only which resources aremeasuredl(financial or economic), ;;, but also when theeffects of transactions orevents involving those resources are recognized (basis of accounting). The',i measurement focus of the, Commission's._ government -wide and ;fiduciary` fund financial !statements is ;economic resources, whereas the measuto !lent focus of governmental fund financial statements is current financial resources. Modified Accrual Basis The accrual basis of accounting adapted to the governmental funds' measurement focus according to which,revenues, and other financial resource increments (e.g., bond issue proceeds) are recognized when they become susceptible to • accrual, that is when they become both "measurable" and "available to finance expenditures of the current period." Expenditures are recognized when the fund liability is incurred except for unmatured interest on general long-term debt and certain similar accrued obligations when due. The Commission's governmental funds are accounted' for using the - modified accrual basis of accounting. Other Financing Sources Amounts classified separately from' revenues to avoid distorting revenue trends that represent an increase in current, " financial resources.':Other financing sources generally include general long-term debt proceeds, amounts equal to the • ' present value of minimum lease payments arising from capital leases; proceeds from the sale of general fixed assets; and transfers in. Other Financing Uses •" Amounts. classified separately from expenditures to avoid distorting expenditure trends and t pawent a decrease my • current financial resources. Other financing uses generally include transfers out andthe amount of refunding: bond. proceeds deposited with the escrow agent. Overhead • Indirect costs that cannot be specifically associated with a given service, program, or department and thus; cannot be clearly associated with a particular functional category:. Principal in the context of bonds other than deep -discount debt, the face value or par value of a bond' or issue of bonds payable on stated dates of maturity: e. Program _ Group activities; operations, or organizational units directed to attaining, specific purposes or objectives. Program Budget ; .. A budget wherein expenditures are based primarily on the functions or activities, of a government rather than to specific items of cost or to specific departments: 246 • Purchase Order A document authorizing the delivery of specified merchandise or the rendering of certain services and the making of a charge for them. Refunding Bonds Bonds issued to retire bonds already outstanding. The proceeds of refunding bonds may be used to repay the previously issued debt (current refunding) or to be placed with an escrow agent and invested 'until used to pay principal and interest on old debt at a future date (advance refunding). Reimbursement Grant A grant for which a potential recipient must first incur qualifying expenditures to be eligible. Reserved Fund Balance Those,portions of fund balance which are not appropriable for expenditure or that are legally segregated for a,specific future use. Special Revenue Fund A governmental fund type used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources (other than major capital projects) that are legally restricted to expenditure for specified purposes. The Commission maintains special revenue funds for Measure A Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde; Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee; Freeway Service Patrol; Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies; State Transit Assistance; and Local Transportation Fund, which is an unbudgeted fund. Transfers All interfund transfers representing flows of assets between funds of the government without equivalent flows of assets in retum and without a requirement for repayments. Trust Fund A fiduciary fund type used to report pension, investment, or private -purpose trust arrangements, under which principal and income benefit individuals, private organizations, or other governments. Trustee A fiduciary holding property on behalf of another. 247 AGENDA ITEM 14 s RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Michele Cisneros,. Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Resolution No. 06-007 `Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2006/07" STAFF RECOMMENDATION.' This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Resolution " No. 06-007 establishing the Commission's appropriations limit for Fiscal Year 2006/07; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action.' • BACKGROUND INFORMATION. Section 7910 of the California Government Code implements Article XIIIB of the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction- to. establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make_ documentation used to determine the appropriations limit available to the public fifteen days prior to adoption of the resolution establishing the appropriations limit. Staff has performed, the calculations necessary to determine the limit. The resolution and documents supporting the calculation are attached.' The Commission chose to use the percentage change in the California per capita personal income and the populations change within Riverside County as the factors in determining the appropriations limit. As required, the. adoption of the . Commission's Gann Appropriations Limit was posted in the local newspaper. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 06-007 2) California per capita income — California Department of Finance 3) Population, Riverside County California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit 248 'RESOLUTION NO. 06-007`. "RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTYTRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ESTABLISHING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT WHEREAS, Article XIIIB of the California Constitution places an annual limitation upon appropriations from proceeds of. taxes by each local . government of the State of California; and WHEREAS, in 1988, pursuant to Article °XIIIB,' section 4 of the California Constitution, :the Riverside County Transportation Commission established .its appropriations limit at $75 million for .fiscal year' 1988-1989 under ordinance No. 88-1; and WHEREAS, Section 7910 of the California_ Government ,Code implements Article XIIIB of .the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction to,'establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make the documentation used in determiningthe appropriations limit available •to the public, fifteen days prior, to adoption of the resolution establishing theappropriations limit; and WHEREAS, in accordance with Senate Constitutional Amendment, No. 1 approved by the voters of the State effective June '6, 1990, beginning with, °'fiscal ' •:year 1990-1991 and for each fiscal year thereafter, the Commission's' Boardof Commissioners is .required to select either the Percentage change in California, per capita personal' income or the percentage -change; in the local', assessment roll due to the addition oflocal non- residential construction), and either the population change within 'the Commission or the population change within Riverside County,'' as the two factors to be applied in' calculating the appropriations limit for;each fiscal year; and.; WHEREAS, this Beard .wishes to select, as factors in determining the Commission's: appropriation 'limit ;for fiscal' year 2006-2007 the; percentage change in :California Per,. -capita ;personal income., and also ,the ..population change within•; Riverside County; and WHEREAS, this Commission has documented its calculations of the Commission's appropriations limit for fiscal year 2006-2007 and said calculations have been made available to the public ,at: least fifteen days prior • to the adoption of this resolution. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission as follows: 1. For fiscal year 2006-2007, the factors selected for calculating the appropriations limit are (a) the percentage change in California per capita personal income, and (b) the population change within the County of Riverside. 2. The appropriations limit applicable to this Agency pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution for fiscal year 2006-2007 are hereby established and determined to be $265,455,468 3. A copy of the documentation used in the determination of the appropriations limit for fiscal year 2006-2007 shall be affixed hereto and shall be available for public inspection. 4. Pursuant to Section 7910 of the California Government Code, any judicial action or proceeding to attack, review, set aside, void, or annul the establishment of the appropriations limit as set forth herein must be commenced within forty-five days of the adoption of this resolution. ADOPTED this 14th day of June, 2006. Marion Ashley, Chairman Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 250 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2006-2007 APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT 2005-2006 Appropriations Limit $244,036,843 2006-2007 adjustment: Change in California per capita income Change in Population, Riverside County 5.16 percent 3.44 percent 5.16 + 100 = 1.052 100• 3.44 + 100 = 1.034 100 1.052 x 1.034 = 1.08776 $244,036,843 x 1.08776 = $265,455,468 2006-2007 Appropriations Limit $265,455,468 Source: California per capita income — California Department of Finance Population, Riverside County — California Department of Finance Demographic Research Unit 251 s PER CAPITA PERSONAL INCOME United California California %Change States %Change %of U.S. 1950 r/ 1,874 - 1,504 - 124.6% 1955 r/ 2,383 1,907 - 125.0% 1958 r/ 2,599 2,109 - 123.2% 1959 r/ 2,743 5.5% 2,209 4.7% 124.2% 1960 r/ 2,826 3.0% 2,269 2.7% 124.5% 1961 r/ 2,881 1.9% 2,327 2.6% 123.8% 1962 r/ 3,005 4.3% 2,440 4.9% 123.2% 1963 r/ 3,102 3.2% 2,527 3.6% 122.8% 1964 r/ 3,275 5.6% 2,672 5.7% 122.6% 1965 r/ 3,413 4.2% 2,850 6.7% 119.8% 1966 r/ 3,656 7.1% 3,062 7.4% 119.4% 1967 r/ 3,874 6.0% 3,254 6.3% 119.1% 1968 r/ 4,201 8.4% 3,538 8.7% 118.7% 1969 4,529 7.8% 3,836 8.4% 118.1% 1970 4,810 6.2% 4,085 6.5% 117.7% 1971 5,034 4.7% 4,342 6.3% 115.9% 1972 5,454 8.3% 4,717 8.6% 115.6% 1973 5,944 9.0% 5,231 10.9% 113.6% 1974 6,552 10.2% . 5,707 9.1% 114.8% 1975 7,129 8.8% 6,172 8.1% 115.5% 1976 7,825 9.8% 6,754 . 9.4% 115.9% 1977 8,570 9.5% 7,405 9.6% 115.7% 1978 9,580 11.8% 8,245 . 11.3% 116.2% 1979 10,753 12.2% 9,146 10.9% 117.6% 1980 11,951 11.1% 10,114 10.6% 118.2% 1981 13,175 10.2% 11,246 11.2% 117.2% 1982 13,763 4.5% 11,935 6.1% 115.3% 1983 14,556 5.8% 12,618 5.7% 115.4% 1984 15,994 9.9% 13,891 10.1% 115.1% 1985 16,956 6.0% 14,758 6.2% 114.9% 1986 17,668 4.2% 15,442 4.6% 114.4% 1987 18,549 5.0% 16,240 5.2% 114.2% 1988 19,599 5.7% 17,331 6.7% 113.1% 1989 a/ 20,585 5.0% 18,520 6.9°% 111.2% 1990 21,638 5.1% 19,477 5.2% 111.1% 1991 21,750 0.5% 19,892 2.1% 109.3% 1992 22,492 3.4% 20,854 4.8% . 107.9% 1993 22,635 0.6% 21,346 2.4% 106.0% 1994 b/ 23,203 2.5% 22,172 3.9% 104.7% 1995 24,161 4.1 % 23,076 4.1 % 104.7% 1996 25,312 4.8% 24,175 4.8% 104.7% 1997 26,490 4.7% 25,334 4.8% 104.6% 1998 28,374 7.1% 26,883 6.1% 105.5% 1999 29,828 5.1% 27,939 3.9%. 106.8% 252 2000 rl 32,463 2934,15 0.8% 105.8% 2001 rl • 32,382 1.3% 50,574 2,4% 107.5% 2002 - rf 32,8:3 -0.2% 30,810 0.8`%< 106,5% 2003 rl. 33,400 1.8% 31,485 2.2% 106.1% 2004 rl. 35,219 5.4% 33,050 5.0% 106.6% 2005 E( .37,036 - 52% 34,586 4.6% 107.1% a/ Reflects LomaRrieta earthquake. bl Reflects Northridge earthquake. Note:Omits income for :govemment employees overseas. El Preliminary Estimaterby'BEA., March 28, 2008 Source: U.S: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, http://www.bea.doc.govt- ri Revisea from 2000 to 2004 Released March 28, 2000 Updated: April 5, 2006'. Filename: bbpercap, .. 253 • E-1: City/County Population Estimates with Annual Percent Change January 1, 2005 and 2006 City/County/State CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE BANNING BEAUMONT BLYTHE CALIMESA CANYON LAKE CATHEDRAL CITY COACHELLA CORONA DESERT HOT SPRINGS HEMET INDIAN WELLS INDIO LAKE ELSINORE LA QUINTA MORENO VALLEY MURRIETA NORCO PALM DESERT PALM SPRINGS PERRIS RANCHO MIRAGE RIVERSIDE SAN JACINTO TEMECULA BALANCE OF COUNTY Total Populatiori Percent 1/1/2005 1/1/2006 Change 36,728,196 37,172,015 1.2 1,888,311 1,953,330 3.4 28,130 28,128 0.0 19,105 23,145 21.1 22,089 22,179 0.4 7,482 7,415 -0.9 10,981 10,939 -OA 50,957 51,081 0.2 30,964 35,207 13.7 144,992 144,661 -0.2 19,507 22,011 12.8 66,873 69,544 •4.0 4,810 4,865 1.1 66,539 71,654 7.7 38,289 40,985 7.0 36,377 38,340 5.4 166,385 174,565 4.9 85,648 92,933 8.5 , 26,846 27,263 1.6 49,595 49,539 -0.1 46,000 46,437 1.0 44,880 47,139 5.0 16,520 16,672 0.9 287,321 287,820 0.2 28,618 '31,066 8.6 81,921 93,923 14.7 507,482 515,819 1.6 254 AGENDA ITEM 15 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Deputy Executive: Director SUBJECT: Advance of FY 2006/07 City of Hemet Measure A Local Street and Road Funds STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve an advance of $2,126,000, including accrued interest, to the city of Hemet (City) for its estimated Measure A Local Streets and Roads (LSR) funding for FY 2006/07; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute. Agreement No. 06-31-068-00, Measure A Local Streets and Roads Advancement Agreement, between the Commission and the City; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION_ In late March 2006, staff received an electronic mail request from the City for an advance of its FY 2006/07 Measure A LSR funding approximating $2,000,000. The advance is needed to supplement other City funds for a city-wide repaving project to commence this summer. Recently, staff received a formal request, which is included as Attachment 1. It is estimated that the City's share. of FY 2006/07 Measure A LSR funding is $2,126,000. The $126,000 difference between the estimated funding available and the project advance will be utilized to pay accrued interest costs, as the advance will be funded by the Measure A Western County Highway Fund. Staff has negotiated with the City an interest rate equal to the quarterly Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund plus a .25% administrative fee. The advance will be available to the City beginning July 1, 2006. Staff will withhold 100% of the City's monthly Measure A LSR allocations and make quarterly payments to the Measure A Western County Highway Fund. If there is a balance of Measure A LSR allocations to the City after full repayment of the advance, including interest, such balance will be remitted directly to the City. In the unlikely event that the FY 2006/07 Measure A LSR allocations to the City are less than the total advance of 255 $2,126,000, any balance due,vvould be deducted fronn,the FY 2007/08 Measure,A LSI9 allOcations. Staff ,is; in the process of preparing the advance agreement, :which -will be reviewed by legalcounsel. , Financial Information In ;Fiscal Year Budget:. No: Year: FY 2006/07 Amount: $2,126,000 Source of Funds:.: Measure A Budget Ad ustment: No GLA'No.: 222-31-12401 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \iltbudeiti Date`' '5/22/06 Attachment: Letter from'city,o:f Hemet 256 From the Office of PUBLIC WORKS May 3, 2006 i 76651 EH, TT, MC 510 E. FLORIDA AVENUE • HEMET, CALIFORNIA 92543 • (951)765-3879 Eric Haley Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3th Floor Riverside,. CA 92502-2208 -01-.E@IEOWE MAY 052006 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Re: Request for Advance of FY06/07 Measure A Allocations Dear Mr. Haley: Thank you for your time in considering the City's request. The City of Hemet is • designing a city-wide repaving project. The project will start construction in Summer 2006. The City's current balance of Measure A funds is only half of the amount needed to complete the project. To facilitate completion of the project, the City requests an advance of its FY06/07 Measure A allocation. We understand the advance will require approval of the Commission, require payment of interest (to be deducted from the FY06/07 allocation), and funds will not ready for disbursement until September 2006, if approved. The advance will allow Measure A funds to benefit the public earlier, result in savings from economies of scale, and expedite the rehabilitation of more streets in Hemet. Thank you for your cooperation and please contact me at (951) 765-3870 if you need more information. Sincerely, Mike Gow Public Works Director/City Engineer c: City Manager Finance Director 257 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Brian Cunanan, Staff Analyst Jerry Rivera, Program Manager THROUGH: Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Agreements for Freeway Service Patrol Tow Truck Service STAFF RECOMMENDATION This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 02-45-070-03, Amendment No. 3 to Freeway Service Patrol. Tow Truck Agreement No. 02-45-070 with Tri-City Towing, Inc., to extend the term of the agreement and increase_ the hourly rate from $45.00 to $47.00 for Beat #4; 2) Approve Agreement No. 02-45-071-04, Amendment No. 4 to Freeway Service Patrol Tow Truck Agreement No. 02-45-071 with Pepe's Towing Services, Inc, to extend the term of the agreement and increase .the hourly rate from $43.75 to $45.75 for Beat #18; 3) Authorize, the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Forward to Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission, acting in its capacity as the Riverside County Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE), provides Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) service on six segments or beats of SR 91, I-215/SR 60, and 1-15. Annually, the program provides approximately 32,500 assists to stranded motorists along Riverside County freeways. The FSP tow trucks remove disabled vehicles and those involved in minor accidents from the freeway to improve its flow and reduce pollution. Service patrol operators will change a flat tire, provide "jump" starts, provide a maximum of one gallon of fuel, temporarily tape cooling system hoses, and refill radiators. If the operator cannot get the vehicle moving, it is towed off the freeway to pre -designated drop locations where the motorist can make arrangements for further assistance. Currently, the program operates fifteen tow trucks patrolling over 50 miles of freeway, Monday through Friday. during the peak commute hours of 5:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Additionally, mid -day service is provided on Beat #4 (SR-91, . Magnolia Avenue to 258 60/9.1/215 interchange)' and Beat #18 i1-215, San Bernardino line to Alessandro) due to theirproximity to the 60/91 /215 interchange construction. Contracts fortwo of the beats, Beat #4 and Beat #18,' will expire on June 30;2006`,` and both beats have one final option year remaining.: Staff has contacted Pepe's .. Towing for Beat'' #18 and Tri-City Towing for Beat #4 to..assess "their interest in extending the term of their agreements for an additional year through June 30, 2007. In response, both providers have asked for rate adjustments, due to increased fuel and operational costs realized. Pepe's Towing has asked .for. a $2.00 rate adjustment to "bring the hourly rate per truck to $45.75, and Tri-City Towing has, also asked for a $2.00 rate adjustment to bring the hourly rate per truck to $47.00. Compared;to the other active FSP 'contract rates, these adjusted rates are ,the lowest of the six. Staff is recommending that the last and final option to extend the agreements for one additional: year through June 30, 2007 be exercised with both Tri-City`Towing and Pepe's Towing for Beat #4'and_Beat #18, respectively. All obligations incufred by the Commission under the terms of this award are funded 80%'from State funds and 20% from local SAFE fees apd are subject to continued funding from ;the State' for the Riverside. County Freeway Service Patrol program. Funding for these: beats!:is included in the FY 2006/07 Proposed Budget'. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget:. Y Year: FY 2006/07 Amount: : $827,000 Source of Funds: State of California — 80% o SAFE'DMV Fees `- 20 /o ' Budget Adjustment: N GLA No.: 201-45-81014 Fiscal Procedures; Approved: ` \....4.441;ov Date: 5/22/06 1) Letter from Pepe's Towing Services, Inc. 2)'` Letter from Tri-City Towing, Inc. April 26, 2006 Jerry Rivera Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon St, 3.1 Floor Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Ref Extension FSP Beat #18 0? rE: � '� � `U7• tIA MAY 01 711w5RIVERSIDE. COUNTv L .TRANSEinfiTATiON CO ;ip: J 76615 J R Dear Jerry: Thank you for extending the Freeway Service Contract for Beat #18. I appreciate the confidence you have shown me by extending the contract once again. I agree to accept the extension of the contract as you outlined in your later dated April 24, 2006. However, I am experiencing fuel expenses that are escalating daily. As we approach the. summer months, I expect prices to escalate even more. That is why I am asking for an , increase of $2.00 per hour on my contracts. 1 look forward to working with you and the Riverside County Transportation . Commission. Please feel free to cony, t me at an M Sec 1303 E. Victoria Avenue 2000 fi: %y Street 8828 Beech Avenue San Bernardino, CA 92408 • Colton, CA 92324 • Fontana, CA 92337 (909) 796-4004 (909) 682-5682 260 (909) 357-3452 _ 2775 N. Locust Avenue Rialto, CA 92377 (909) 877-8597 2006 10: 2: PEFES TOW ya�1y**IC*.`4 l.Ya1«atr ear yl�e�f :N N' li YA of \xPl of e: w+wee+ie #�iiii�11x11d' w �{yT�1 f13�yIy__}/ell Y3iY VY tY N xy rNY1#f}fA PM ��j��.-��i��YN}�4f rMYi Y# }ixf-a�e�+ ie}t• .. N.ssP}k}{Yv1. TNi1 x M}tFA€l1e; lYxx»Y+Pie RRy 1F}Y;}i}yyaNx i-r/#Yi}N • � - •���ReY tf }1J 1t 1#} APRIL 26, 2006 JERRY RIVERA, PROGRAM MANAGER RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION . COMMISSION. 3RD. FLOOR 4080 LEMON STREET P.O. BOX 12008 RIVERSIDE, CA 92502=2208 • k: .. .,1 E • MNi 01. 2006 L RIVERSTJEC1111N1Y ..... TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 76614 RE: REVISED PROPOSAL FOR BEAT 4 FOR 5ITT YEAR OF 5 YEAR CONTRACT DEAR JERRY; THANK YOU FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO RE -BID BEAT 4 TO BEGIN ON JULY 1, 2006 FOR ONE YEAR. WE NEED TO:BE'ABLE TO INCREASE OUR PER HOUR PRICE TO $47.00. AS I KNOW YOU ARE AWARE VARIABLE EXPENSES HAVE INCREASED SIGNIFICANTLY. WE HAVE ALSO EXPERIENCED A SEVERE SHORTAGE IN LABOR PERSONNEL AVAILABLE TO DO OUR WORK. I HAVE INCLUDED A REVISED FINANCIAL SHEET TO SHOW YOU OUR CURRENT EXPENSES. WE HAVE ADJUSTED FOR A POTENTIAL $5.00 PER GALLON FUEL PRICE. FOR YOUR INFORMATION I KNOW THAT NEXT YEARS EXPENSES WILL INCREASE IN TRUCK PURCHASE PRICE AND WE WILL NEED TO INCREASE OUR HOURLY PAY RATE TO BE ABLE TO ATTRACT AND RETAIN NEW AND OLD EMPLOYEES. THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION OF OUR COMPANY. SINCERELY, STEVEN L. JOON, PRESIDENT TRI-CITY TO G, INC. 262 $ 47.00 $ 357,764 MIDDAY ;,' $ 47.00 Labor: 20.70 Fuel: 15.21 W/C: 1.50 w/c Supplies: 2.34 ** Truck maintenance: Profit/Overhead 7.45 ROC 1) Lithe, oil filters 125.00 $ 39.75 2) Brake replacement 42.75 (1 per. year $ 500/job) 3) Tires (based on 9/mo 83.25 (Tire 4996 rniles/mo' 125.00 per tire) Incidentals 120.00 (Mirrors, uniforms, windshields,licenses, supplies, customer fuel) TOTAL 371.00 Detailed Itemized Beat Cost Schedule Must Be Submitted with Each Beat For Beat # 4 (Base thesecosts on the initial three year contract period only) a. Average Hourly Rate for 1 year period b. Total 1 year contract cost for the beat (Average hourly rate above x 4 trucks x 1903 hours of service) $ 47.00 x 4 x 1903 Provide an itemized cost schedule used to develop hourly rate by the following budgercategories: c. Labor $ 12.00/hr (500.00 wk = 5 days - 9 hrs x 1.15) d. Benefits (See r below) e. Equipment _(truck payment) $ 60,447 ($ 1100/mo x 12 1903) f. Fuel (operating as well as motorist) 1100 miles/wk x 52 ÷ 12mpg x 5.00 -1903 Identify average annual cost per gallon $ 5.00 g: Insurance (liability, workers' comp)'W/C $ 1.25 - Liability $ 2.94 W/C - $ 10/per'$ 100 Liability — $5553/per truck h. Material and supplies $ 371 x 12 1903 (See ** below) i. Other incidentals (list) Administration $500 x 12 -1903 j. Profit/Overhead 10% Total cost per hour per truck (sum of c. thru j.) (Must agree with cost per hour which is line a.) Note this hourly rate . must also coincide with the rate specified in the price summary sheet for the initial contract term 3 year period) AUTHORIZED SIGNATURE' * Dental Ins: 11.15/mo x 12 -1903 = 07 Life Ins. 12.35/mo x 12 -,1903 .08 Health Ins. 117/mo x 12 - 1903 = .74 TOTAL .89 AGENDA ITEM 17 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Jerry Rivera, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Approval of City of Moreno Valley's (City) Bicycle Transportation Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the city of Moreno Valley's (City) Bicycle Transportation Plan as submitted, and 21 Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The City's Bicycle Transportation Plan has been submitted to the Commission for certification that it complies with the requirements of the State Bicycle Lane Account (BLA) program as required by state law. The City has prepared the plan in order to be eligible for a State Bicycle Lane Account grant which may fund a maximum of 90% of the cost of an eligible project(s), and each jurisdiction is eligible to receive up to 25%' of the funds available for any given year. It is the City's intention to submit a proposal to fund the projects listed on page 10 of its 5- year Bicycle Transportation Plan. Commission staff has reviewed the City's Bicycle Transportation Plan and finds that the Plan satisfies the requirements of the BLA program as specified by state law. 264 • AGENDA ITEM 18 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 22, 2006 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: John Standiford, Public Affairs Director THROUGH: v Eric Haley, Executive Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update • STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the following bill positions: HR 5329 (Miller, R-Diamond Bar) SUPPORT AB 2015 (Lieu, D-Redondo Beach) — OPPOSE; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Federal Update: Congressman. Miller Seeks Funding for State Route (SR) 91 Congressman Gary Miller, who represents portions of San Bernardino, Orange and Los Angeles counties has introduced HR 5329 to 'provide $390 million 'in federal funding for a series of improvements on SR-91 in Orange and Riverside counties. He has sought and received the support of Congressman Calvert for this bill. The improvements include the following projects and funding amounts: • $221.3 million to add one lane in each direction between SR-55 and Riverside County. • $40.7 million to add an auxiliary lane in each direction from SR-241 to SR- 71. • $7.1 million to eliminate a chokepoint caused by CalTrans' truck weigh station. • $56 million to build a direct connector from the 91 Express Toll Lanes to SR- 241. • $65 million to divert truck traffic off the SR-91 freeway by building a freeway -to -freeway connector between Interstate 5 and SR-56, making it an alternative east -west corridor. 265 The: first four projects are ;consistent with publicly, adopted plans and additional federal funding would be welcomed to speed the implementation of these projects. The fifth; project involving SR-56 in "San Diego is somewhat new and unexpected and requires additional scrutiny and analysis. V ` Given the likely processin' Congress, the language .in this bill will be included in another legislative bill and probably, at best, would receive a minimal- amount of t funding.. ,However the benefit of the approach is to have the,projects•and the need for improvements on the SR-91 be enacted in a legislative vehicle to serve as the foundation for the`' future reauthorization for the federal transportation bill which is only a few years into the future. HR 5329 was introduced" in mid -May and has also • Committee Chairman Don Young. State Update: May,Budget'Revise and Air District Governing Board .Bill Amended On Friday, May r` 12, Governor Schwarzenegger unveiled his May revise of the proposed .state budget with additional good news for California: The continuing strength of the 'economy has led to a surge in state revenues that have exceeded • projections by more than $7 billion. What it means for the state will be a reduction in the state budget deficit. This includes the $920 million in early repayment of p g p dollars and the full previous, borrowing that was .done with state: transportation authorization and allocation',of:Proposition 42. With negotiations concluded -regarding the infrastructure bond package, it appears increasingly likely that the' state will approve and adopt,.. ;a budget; in time for the July 1 '.deadline. ,;., SCAQMD Board Bill`` AB 2015 by South Bay; Assemblyman Ted Lieu will add a seat to the South Coast Air Quality: Management District (SCAQMD) Governing Board that would represent primarily cities in the South .Bay region of Los Angeles County. Currently,";cities ..in San, Bernardino, Riverside and, Orange; counties each have one representative on the Governing Board.' Los Angeles County cities have two representatives that are split 4 between the western, and eastern halves of the county. This bill! would create a third Los Angeles County seat that would include ;the western ?.portion „:of Los ". Angeles ;iCounty •but would exclude the city of Los Angeles. s Originally the bill was drafted to add the seat for Los Angeles but to also add additional city seats for Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. The additional seats for the counties outside of Los Angeles have now been amended out of the bill resulting in one additional seat for Los Angeles County and no corresponding increase for the other counties. The air quality challenges faced by the eastern portion of the South Coast Air Basin are profound and will impact future policy decisions on land use, growth and transportation for decades into the future. The effect of this bill is to actually diminish the influence of the eastern, inland counties while increasing the level of representation for Los Angeles County. From a political ,perspective, Los Angeles County cities other than Los Angeles itself probably have a list of legitimate grievances in terms of regional representation and other territorial squabbles; however, changing the composition of the SCAQMD merely elevates a political dispute while trivializing the important policy issue of air quality. Ordinarily staff does not recommend a position on issues involving other agencies; however, there is a clear nexus between air quality and transportation. A number of other agencies including SCAQMD, the Riverside County Board of Supervisors and the city of Moreno Valley have all voted to oppose this bill. Commission staff recommends a similar position mainly because a case has yet to be made that there is anything wrong with the SCAQMD's governance structure and because the proposed change would dilute the influence of Riverside County on the governing board. Other Bills In April the Commission voted to support AB 2630 by local Assemblyman John Benoit which would ease a number of restrictions on cities to obtain Public Utilities Commission funding for railroad grade separations. One troubling aspect of that bill was that it would allow a lessening of the contribution that must be made by the private railroad companies for each project. That troubling aspect of the bill has been amended out and the bill received unanimous approval in the Assembly Transportation Committee. Another bill that was introduced and killed so quickly before the bill could come to the Commission for a position was AB 2621 by Ventura County Assemblywoman Audra Strickland. This bill would have eliminated a portion of the state sales gas tax on gasoline. The Assemblywoman's husband is a statewide candidate and has used the bill for campaign events in a number of areas in the state to capitalize on higher gas prices. It obviously conflicts with the statewide effort to protect Proposition . 42, and it did not -receive approval in the Assembly Revenue and Taxation Committee. 267 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION `POSITIONS ON STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION - UPDATED xoav12,J0U6 � AB- 426 (Bogh) ' This bill would require Cn|trans to convert. all HD\/ lanes on state on u 34'hour highways in Riverside County that currently 'as basis into part-time H()V lanes that operate um nnixad'f|ovv lanes except during peak periods, subject toany required approvals of the federal government. Bill iudead. - SUPPDRT|N CONCEPT ' 4/13/05 AB 453 (Benoit) This bill would extend the time limit that is currently in place under state law for state funding mfrailroad grade crossings. 9/22/05 - Signed by Governor. SUPPORT 4/13/05 AB 850 (Canoiami||n). This bill would authorize the Department of Transportation to enter into comprehensive development franchise agreements with public andprivate entities for specified types of transportation projects subject to certain r equirements and conditions. The bill -would require u franchise ogroarnont to allow the department to acquire by ,condemnation or negotiation the financial value of a competing tu|| facility ifitopens o competitive state facility in.thesame corridor. Bill is dead. SUPPORT WITH AMENDMENTS 4/13/05 ^ A0 1266 (Niw||o) This bill would generally authorize the Department of Transportation to award contracts. for projects using the design -sequencing contract method, ifcertain requirements are met. . Bill iudead. SUPPORT 4/13/05 ' AB 1`699 (Frnnnnned / This bill vvVu|d state the intent of the Legislature to authorize certain transportation authorities to use design -build process for bidding on one highway construction project within- the jurisdiction of. the applicable transportation authority. .� 7/5805 Hearing' postponed by Senate Trans Q/Housing Committee. SUPPORT IN CONCEPT. 5/11/05 AB 1714 (P|wmc|o) � ' This bill would require the construction ofthe more affordable skyway structure and would limit the use of -additional toll revenue to seismic retrofit projects such an the Bay Bridge repair. The mtate'o responsibility of$3OUmillion will befor the demolition ofthe old bridge. The rest of the money needed to uornp|ata the new bridge �xvou|dhave tobe. raised from acombination nfincreased tolls, local bond sales and existing state and federal highway appropriations. AB 1714reflects the Governor's position onthe Bridge issue. Pill iudead. . . SUPPORT 5/11/05 � ' AB 2025 (Ni*Up) ' Thiu.bi|| would authorize the department to contract using the design- build process, as, defined, for the design and construction- *of transportation prnj�o��. � � `� ' �� . ` . 4/17/06 Hearing postponed by �4onemb|y Transportation Cwnonobter SUPPORT ` � AB 2028 (Huff) ' This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to provide an appropriation inthe Budget/�utof 2OO7orinrelated legislation duhn0phnte'^ �h�3OO7^O8 fiscal ` t� o|| funds which »vVV|d have |year been �a tuthe, Transportation* ' nveotn�ant Fund in prevouu fiscal years. 2/15/06 From N»h*ari»Qdateeat. ` ^ SUPPORT ' . F s\ogoat.doc N co m .',�::" c � >��—', '� '`u, s." �.-. �v.tsr 'cs,m�; a � ` �: - - .< - • _ �, - � t � � • v �� "�° t m a - � � � "' Passed Assembly. Transportation Committee, referred to Appropriations on :4/27/06 -1. „-- SUPPORT :., - 4/12/06 `:.• - AB.2630 (Benoit) Originally, -this bill lifted a ten-year moratorium on cities utilizing PUC funds for grade separation projects • before they could"` again pull funding for another grade separation. The- bill also allowed a local 10%match to: _substitute for the required`-10% match by'_railroads for grade separation ''projects. The bill .was amended to eliminate the "local .match .option,:.keeping railroads responsible for 10% match,' -and the ten-year restriction = remains- unless .Caltrans deems that:there are extra funds .available ._to -fund another -grade separation1n the city. The bill is sponsored by the City of Riverside. ACA - - 4 (Plescia) .. -- . - -This measure would delete the. -provision- authorizing the Governor and the -Legislature to';5uspend -the-transfer"of revenues from the General Fund"to°the-Transportation Investment -Fund for --a: fiscal- year -during a "fiscal emergency, -specific to Proposition'42.- - . ` _ = _ _ _ .., _„• .. .:• _ :: , _ Approved by Assembly Transportation: Committee on 1/1'OZ06 and referred ' to Appropriations. SUPPORT 1 /12/05 ACA 9 (Bogh) - : ' ---- This measure would change the:. vote: requirement to 4/5 . of the membership of each house. of the Legislature in order to enact -a Statute suspending in whole or iri part the'transfer of motor. vehicle tax revenue from the General Fund to the Transportation Investment fund, specific to Proposition 42. :; - - - ;, Approved by Assembly - Transportation Committee on 1/10/06 and referred to Appropriations. SUPPORT 3/18/05 ACA 11 (Oropeza) This measure would delete the provisions authorizing the transfer of revenues from the'General-Fund to the Transportation investment Fund to be suspended., The. measure would .authorize the Legislature to loan funds in the Transportation Investment Fund to the General Fund or any other state fund :or account, -or to local agencies, under conditions than are' similar Tto ''conditions applicable to loans- of -revenues "under- Article XIX of, the, California .Constitution, and would require interest to be paid on :a loan that is not repaid. within the same fiscal year as it was made, specific to Proposition 42. • -Approved by 'Assembly Transportation Committee on 1/10/06 and referred to Appropriations. SUPPORT 3/18/05 ACA 22 . (LeMalfa) Proposed Constitutional Amendment weuld-severely restrict the use `of eminent domain. ". - ` :: -- • _ _ - Adoption refused by Committee on Housing_and_. _ .. Community Development. SEEK_ AMENDMENTS 9/14/05 ACA X 1 4 (Keene)_ This. measure would,: on and after July 1, 2006, prohibit :the transfer' of -funds from a special fund to the General Fund. as a. loan, with specified exceptions. Any- funds that -,were -transferred prior ,to .that date from a special fund for the purpose of_ making a loan to the General Fund' and that have not been repaid would be required to be repaid over,the next 15-years. In_exchan e, Pro osition 42 would be . e . g p� permanently protected in the future. Amended.. Re- ;referred to Committee on Budget Process .4/1.2/05. ` WATCH _ - 4/13/05 , F:lusers\preprint\js\ egmat.doc •. SB 371 This' bill would allow state, regional, and local transportation 1 /31 /06 In SUPPORT IN 5/1 1 /05 (Torlakson) authorities to try design -build contracting under specific criteria and for these projects to be audited to determine the success or failure of Assembly. Read first time. Held. CONCEPT use of design -build by these transportation entities. SB 427 Originally, this bill would exempt from CEQA requirements the 2/16/06 To SUPPORT 4/13/05 (Hollingsworth) construction of any overpass, onramp, or offramp that is built on an Committee on , existing State Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) right -of- Natural Resources. way. It has now been amended to make changes to the environmental scoping process and additional amendments are likely. SB 561 This bill would provide additional transportation options in allowing for 1/31/06 Returned"to SUPPORT 7/13/05 (Runner & toll facilities, but does so in a manner that eliminates the inherent Secretary of Senate. Torlakson) unfairness to the public from the imposition of non -compete clauses. SB 705 This bill would authorize the Department of Transportation to contract 2/1 /06 Returned to . SUPPORT 4/13/05 (Runner) using the design -build process for the design and construction of Secretary of Senate. • transportation projects. The bill would require the director of the department to establish a prequalification and selection process. SB 1024 This bill would enact the Safe Facilities, Improved Mobility, and Clean 1 /31 /06 In SUPPORT WITH 12/14/05 Torlakson & Air Bond Act of 2005 to authorize $7,688,000,000 in state general Assembly. Read first AMENDMENTS Perata) obligation bonds for specified purposes, including the seismic retrofit time. Held. of toll bridges, levee improvements, restoration of Proposition 42 transportation funds, port infrastructure and security projects, trade corridors of significance, emissions reduction projects, environmental - enhancement projects, and transportation needs in cities, counties, and cities and counties that meet certain requirements relative to provisions of housing needs in their communities, subject to voter approval. SB 1812 This bill allows the State of California to waive its 1 1 ' Amendment Passed Senate SUPPORT 4/12/06 • (Runner) protection against lawsuits brought in federal court and assume responsibility for enforcing NEPA regulations under a pilot. program Transportation & Housing Committee included` in SAF_ ETEA-LU. The bill streamlines the environmental process and is sponsored by Caltrans, who is . actively seeking to participate in the program. . and Judiciary,. referred to Appropriations on 5/2/06. SCA 15 ." Proposed :Constitutional Arriendment would severely restrict the use 8/30/05 Set first SEEK 9/14/05 (McClintock) of eminent domain." • ihearing.. Failed • passage in AMENDMENTS Committee 3-2 Reconsideration granted. 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