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04 April 9, 2008 CommissionRECORDS RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING AGENDA TIME: 9:30 a.m. DATE: Wednesday, April 9, 2008 LOCATION: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside Commissioners Chair: Jeff Stone 1' Vice Chair: Bob Magee 2nd Vice Chair: Bob Buster Bob Buster, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside Jeff Stone, County of Riverside Roy Wilson, County of Riverside Marion Ashley, County of Riverside Bob Botts / Brenda Sales, City of Banning Roger Berg / Jeff Fox, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Robert Crain, City of Blythe John Chlebnik / Ray Quinto, City of Calimesa Mary Craton / John Zaitz, City of Canyon Lake Gregory S. Pettis / Kathleen DeRosa, City of Cathedral City Eduardo Garcia / Steven Hernandez, City of Coachella Jeff Miller / Eugene Montanez, City of Corona Yvonne Parks / Scott Matas, City of Desert Hot Springs Robin Lowe / Eric McBride, City of Hemet Patrick J. Mullany / Larry Spicer, City of Indian Wells Michael H. Wilson / Melanie Fesmire, City of Indio Terry Henderson / Don Adolph, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Robert L. Schiffner, City of Lake Elsinore Frank West / Charles White, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs / Kelly Bennett, City of Murrieta Frank Hall / Malcolm Miller, City of Norco Dick Kelly / Cindy Finerty, City of Palm Desert Ginny Foat / Steve Pougnet, City of Palm Springs Daryl Busch / Mark Yarbrough, City of Perris Gordon Moller / Alan Seman, City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Chris Carlson / Jim Ayres, City of San Jacinto Ron Roberts / Jeff Comerchero, City of Temecula Mike Perovich, Governor's Appointee 83536 Anne Mayer, Executive Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director Comments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. 11.36.00 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 9, 2008 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. ROLL CALL 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS - Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to. the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the. Brown Act, the Board should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda which are not listed on the agenda. Board members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES - MARCH 12, 2008 Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 2 6. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS - The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 7. CONSENT CALENDAR - All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda_ 7A. ANNUAL INVESTMENT POLICY REVIEW Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to adopt the annual Investment Policy. 7B. POLICY REGARDING INDIRECT COST REIMBURSEMENTS Overview This item is for the Commission to: • Page 13 411 1) Approve the policy regarding the disposition of indirect cost reimbursements; and 2) Adopt Resolution No. 08-01 1, 'Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Authorizing the Disposition of Indirect Cost Reimbursements". 7C. FISCAL YEAR 2007/08 MEASURE A CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN, AMENDMENT FOR LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS FOR THE CITY OF PALM SPRINGS Page 18 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the amendment to the FY 2007/08 Measure A Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for local streets and roads for the city of Palm Springs (Palm Springs) as submitted. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 3 7D. FISCAL YEAR 2008-12 MEASURE A FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS FOR THE CITY OF DESERT HOT SPRINGS Page 22 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the FY 2008-12 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIP) for local streets and roads for the city of Desert Hot Springs (Desert Hot Springs) as submitted. 7E. INTERSTATE 15 INTERREGIONAL PARTNERSHIP — PHASE III Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 28 1) Approve Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 08-67-096-00 with the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) for the 1-15 Interregional Partnership — Phase III activities; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 7F. EXCLUSIVE NEGOTIATING AGREEMENT WITH THE ALAN MRUVKA COMPANY DBA BLUE SQUARE DEVELOPMENT GROUP FOR JOINT DEVELOPMENT AT THE RIVERSIDE -DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION Page 31 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 07-67-154-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-67-154-00, with The Alan Mruvka Company (TAMC) for a six-month extension for joint development at the Riverside -Downtown Metrolink station; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 4 7G. "GREEN" RCTC COMMUTER RAIL STATION REHABILITATION AND MAINTENANCE PLAN Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 32 1) Approve the "Green" RCTC Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan (Plan) and direct staff to implement the recommendations needed to make improvements that increase energy efficiency, while increasing the life of the assets at the five Riverside County commuter rail stations; 2) Allocate Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds in the amount of $2,477,714 to the Commission's Commuter Rail Program; and 3) Approve amendments to the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) and provide a budget adjustment to reflect an increase in capital expenditures in the amount of $2,477,714 for the Plan. • 7H. NORTH MAIN CORONA SHUTTLE AGREEMENT WITH RIVERSIDE. TRANSIT AGENCY Page 85 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 08-25-095-00 with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to provide for additional shuttle services to the leased satellite parking lot during construction of the North Main Corona Metrolink parking structure; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 71. COMMUTER RAIL PROGRAM UPDATE Page 87 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on the Commuter Rail Program. • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 5 7J. COORDINATED PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION PLAN Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the Coordinated Public Transit- Human Services Transportation Plan. Page 96 7K. FISCAL YEAR 2007/08 MID -YEAR STATUS OF PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Page 310 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the second quarter report indicating that all eight transit operators either met or exceeded productivity targets in the FY 2007/08 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP). 7L. AGREEMENTS RELATED TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE STATE ROUTE 74 WIDENING AND REALIGNMENT PROJECT BETWEEN DEXTER AVENUE IN THE CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE AND 7TH STREET IN THE CITY OF PERRIS Page 321 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 99-31-302-07, Amendment No. 7 to Agreement No. RO-9954, with SC Engineering for additional engineering design and survey services for State Route 74 widening project between Dexter Avenue in the city of Lake Elsinore (Lake Elsinore) and 7th Street in the city of Perris (Perris), for a base amount of $354,636 and a contingency amount of $45,364 for a total amendment not to exceed amount of $400,000; 2) Approve Agreement No. 08-31-092-00 to Southern California Edison (SCE) with a revised not to exceed Commission cost of $701,260 and a revised cost share, for the cost to relocate the SCE facilities, between the Commission (51%) and SCE (49%), which was required to allow for construction of the SR-74 widening and realignment project; Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 6 3) Approve Agreement No. 04-51-030-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 04-51-030, with Epic Land Solutions (Epic) for property management support services for Commission -owned parcels for a not to exceed amount of $70,000 and contingency amount of $10,000 for a total amendment not to exceed amount of $80,000; and 4) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission_ 7M. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 330 1) Receive and file an update on the State and Federal Legislation Update; and 2) Adopt a SUPPORT position on AB 2650 (Carter). 8. PRESENTATION — SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS ip Overview This item is for the Commission to receive a presentation by Gary Ovitt, President of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), on the State of the Region and a briefing on the new changes at SCAG. 9. PROPOSED DEBT ISSUANCE Page 334 Overview This item is for the Commission to continue efforts to develop a plan to refinance the outstanding commercial paper. 10. REVISED LOCALLY PREFERRED TRANSIT ALTERNATIVE FOR THE PERRIS VALLEY LINE SMALL STARTS PROJECT Page 546 Overview This item is for the Commission to revise the Locally Preferred Alternative (LPA) for the Perris Valley Line Small Starts project from Alternative E: Commuter Rail® with New Connection to Union Pacific (UP) at Rustin Avenue to Alternative D: Commuter Rail with New Connection to Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) at Citrus Avenue. • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda April 9, 2008 Page 7 11. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 12. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. 13. ADJOURNMENT The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 14, 2008, Board Room, County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL APRIL 9, 2008 Present Absent County of Riverside, District`I County of Riverside, District II County of Riverside, District III County of Riverside, District IV County of Riverside, District V City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Blythe City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral City City of Coachella City of Corona. City of Desert Hot Springs City of Hemet City of Indian Wells City of Indio City of La Quinta City of Lake Elsinore City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Norco City of. Palm Desert City of Palm Springs City of- Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Riverside City of San Jacinto City of Temecula Governor's Appointee, Caltrans District 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEETING COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET APRIL 9, 2008 ME AG NCY E M IL ADDRESS a �, � 4/„Aic l b bo-ts Pdc.ro (0� O b ss D`• 6 rift. 6, f i. 1.2 L- / 14-"iz'/ &4.9-r kj 0.1611-1.6 of /---4/G(y' ,-771/V n-A-1-4 - 4 Is � c � -�.. FRA"4//� Gt ee-r T ///a/Kcife,/`e-� 4�/?- �a o c •-•Q7 Sha(( ZB aal c.a/r0_�4-e-eip A/ Ls44. t-vl...- c��" J ‘ 'B/17751-/- TT L�".(i(TG70e:17 rnat',a � AFL SA c F H C'A L Ato 2z moi tli . (1a►ie(_e ii%r iledsst.,-I°‘, il1, pi ge..- l r l-c.„- Jvik-,0 GC.._to Kv car/ oD, SHAJ M, Ciji_e eNix CAI_ f Mi-S1 %I'll olo E=2, {Y jA)l z-s-o» �N / v % �a k-,i e, v Qie=, i'i' ..< -</<.. /"/-P4,<z.4u, /.v ai4_..ti G(..44_,lj-<s. by/a �dk)Ar- 0 6ez r4��- Ge,,e_e-4,--a--, NG fbr-75 (2»,--T nt-ipeAL C?, -ry /atiNg- P4-eI5 ��s. I� ra • • AGENDA ITEM 5 MINUTES • • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON MINUTES Wednesday, March 12, 2008 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Jeff Stone at 9:35 a.m., in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE At this time, Commissioner Dick Kelly led the Commission in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Marion Ashley Roger Berg Bob Botts Daryl Busch Bob Buster Chris Carlson Joseph DeConinck Ginny Foat Eduardo Garcia Rick Gibbs Frank Hall Terry Henderson Dick Kelly Robin Lowe 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS Jeff Miller Bob Magee Gordon Moller Basem Muallem Patrick J. Mullany Yvonne Parks Jeff Stone John F. Tavaglione Roy Wilson John Zaitz Commissioners Absent Steve Adams John Chlebnik Gregory Pettis Ron Roberts Frank West Michael H. Wilson Chair Stone and John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, presented Claudia Chase, Property Administrator, with an employee service award commemorating 20 years of service with the Commission. Claudia Chase expressed her appreciation for the opportunity to work at the Commission for the past 20 years. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES - JANUARY 9 AND FEBRUARY 13, 2008 M/S/C (Berg/Carlson) to approve the minutes of January 9 and February 13, 2008, as submitted. 6. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 7. CONSENT CALENDAR John Standiford announced for Agenda Item 7J, "Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account Funds and State Transit Assistance Funds to Public Transit Operators", as it relates to Recommendation Number 2, the Corona City Council approved the Short Range Transit Plan amendment to reflect an increase in capital expenditures. Due to a request to speak from the public on Agenda Item 7G, "City of Corona Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Programming Request for Additional Funding for the Foothill Parkway Extension Project from Paseo Grande to Lincoln Avenue", John Standiford provided an overview of the city of Corona (Corona) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) programming request for additional funding for the Foothill Parkway extension project from Paseo Grande to Lincoln Avenue. Garry Grant, Meadowbrook area resident, expressed concern for the oversight of the project and the effects of future developments in other areas due to the cost increase of this project. John Standiford explained the total amount of funds that this project will receive has not changed. The funds that Corona will receive for construction will be reduced and reallocated to right-of-way. Corona will need to make up for the difference on the construction portion for this project. M/S/C (R. Wilson/Foat) to approve the following Consent Calendar items: Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 3 7A. AGREEMENTS WITH MCGLADREY AND PULLEN, LLP AND MAYER HOFFMAN MCCANN P.C. FOR AUDIT SERVICES FOR THE COMMISSION AND FOR THE MEASURE A RECIPIENTS/TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT CLAIMANTS 1) Award Agreement No. 08-19-075-00 to McGladrey and Pullen, LLP to perform audit services related to the Commission in the amount of $363,950, plus a contingency amount of $36,050 for additional services that may be required in connection with debt offerings and other transactions, for a total contract award of $400,000; 2) Award Agreement No. 08-19-074-00 to Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C. to perform audit services related to the Commission's Measure A recipients/Transportation Development Act (TDA) claimants in the amount of $589,218, plus a contingency amount of $50,782 for additional services that may be required due to additional recipients or claimants to be audited, for a total contract award of $640,000; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. 7B. MID -YEAR BUDGET ADJUSTMENTS Approve an increase of $122,000 in Fiscal Year 2007/08 expenditures for mid -year budget adjustments. 7C. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the quarter ended December 31, 2007. 7D. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended December 31, 2007. 7E. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report for the quarter ended December 31, 2007. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 4 7F. MEASURE A WESTERN COUNTY REGIONAL ARTERIAL CALL FOR PROJECTS Receive and file the status of Measure A Western County regional arterial call for projects. 7G. CITY OF CORONA TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE PROGRAMMING REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR THE FOOTHILL PARKWAY EXTENSION PROJECT FROM PASEO GRANDE TO LINCOLN AVENUE 1) Approve the city of Corona's request to increase the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) regional arterial funds for the right-of-way phase on the Foothill Parkway extension project from $2 million to $12 million; 2} Approve an increase for expenditures of $10 million in the FY 2007/08 budget; and 3) Amend the TUMF agreement. 71-1. EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR PERRIS VALLEY LINE STATION DEVELOPMENT PRIORITY LIST Approve the evaluation criteria for the Perris Valley Line (PVL) Station Development Priority List. 71. COMMUTER RAIL PROGRAM UPDATE Receive and file an update on the Commuter Rail Program as an information item. 7J. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MODERNIZATION, IMPROVEMENT, AND SERVICE ENHANCEMENT ACCOUNT FUNDS AND STATE TRANSIT ASSISTANCE FUNDS TO PUBLIC TRANSIT OPERATORS 1) Allocate Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds in the amount of $210,000 to the city of Corona, $990,000 to the city of Riverside, $1 million to the Commission's Commuter Rail Program, and $4,020,564 to SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and allocate $8,877,273 in PTMISEA funding and $3,622,727 in State Transit Assistance (STA) funds to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to enable these transit operators to procure vehicles and equipment and fund facility improvements; • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 5 2) Approve amendments to the city of Corona (pending City Council approval March 5, 2008), city of Riverside, and the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) to reflect an increase in capital expenditures in the amount of $210,000, $990,000, and $1 million respectively; 3) Approve amendment No. 3 to the RTA and SunLine FY 2007/08 SRTPs to reflect an increase in capital expenditures in the amounts of $12.5 million and $4,020,564, respectively; and 4) Approve a budget amendment for a $3,622,727 increase to STA expenditures in FY 2007/08. 7K. PROPOSED AUGMENTATION TO THE FARE BOX RECOVERY POLICY 1) Review and approve the addition of the definition of Operating Costs to Calculate Farebox Ratios to the Fare Box Recovery Policy; 2) Review and approve the addition of the definition of Capital - Related Expenses Below Capitalization Thresholds to the Fare Box Recovery Policy; and 3) Review and approve the addition of the definition of Operating Cost Exclusions and Exemptions to the Fare Box Recovery Policy. 7L. COLLECTION AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND USDA FOREST SERVICE, CLEVELAND NATIONAL FOREST FOR THE PROPOSED IRVINE- CORONA EXPRESSWAY PROJECT 1) Approve Agreement 07-65-157-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-65-157-00, with the USDA Forest Service, Cleveland National Forest for the proposed Irvine -Corona Expressway project in an amount of $150,000 for a total contract amount not to exceed $313,568; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 7M. STATE LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Receive and file the State Legislative Update. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 6 8. PROPOSED POLICY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008/09 BUDGET Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, reviewed the budget process and presented the budget goals and objectives for FY 2008/09 and highlighted the following areas: • Goals and objectives; • Changes — mobility, goods movement, environmental stewardship, economic development, transportation choices, communications and other; and • Next steps of the budget approval process. Commissioner Chris Carlson expressed concern for the removal of the economic development goals as Measure A designates $40 million in funding for economic development to help with the economic development objectives related to transportation. She asked what will guide the use of those funds if the goals are removed from the budget. She asked that staff develop goals and guidelines in order to deal with the $40 million in economic development funding and that staff to bring those goals and guidelines to the Budget and Implementation Committee for review. She stated that she believes there are key objective projects that could be seeding to future economic development initiatives. Theresia Trevino explained the specific programs in Measure A are woven into the other goals that can be expanded. Commissioner Dick Kelly expressed concern that there are no economic development goals included in the Commission's budget goals and objectives as he believes the Commission has the greatest impact on economic development for Riverside County. He pleaded that there needs to be economic development goals. Commissioner Robin Lowe clarified that the economic development program was included Measure A that was passed by the voters. She compared this to the commitment made to the voters on the State Route 74 curve into the San Jacinto Valley that has not been met. The Commission needs to ensure - its commitments are met to ensure continued support from its constituents. Theresia Trevino clarified that the economic development program is not being eliminated. As for the goals for the FY 2008/09 budget, economic development is not called out as a specific goal. • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 7 Chair Stone replied that the removal of the economic development goals has diluted the importance of economic development as a forefront of the goals of this Commission and would like it returned to the goals and objectives. Commissioner Lowe concurred with Chair Stone's comments and stated the importance of emphasizing the economic development goals. John Standiford replied staff will reinsert the economic development goals into the FY 20O13/O9 budget goals and objectives. He stated that no action has been taken on the $40 million for economic development. He explained that staff's thought was economic development in many ways guides transportation in that most transportation investments have an economic development benefit. M/S/C to approve the proposed Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the FY 2008/09 Budget. 9. UPDATE ON THE TRANSPORTATION CORRIDOR INFRASTRUCTURE FUND John Standiford updated the Commission on the Transportation Corridor Infrastructure Fund (TCIF) and highlighted the following areas: • TCIF overview; • Southern California Consensus Group; • CTC staff recommendation; • Riverside County projects; • CTC funding recommendation by project; and • Next steps. In response to Commissioner Bob Buster's question regarding the additional time that was given to agencies in order to work with the railroads negotiating improvements in commuter rail access through Colton Crossing, John Standiford replied that CTC staff has acknowledged the limitation that there has not been any sort of negotiated agreement between the railroads, the state, and commuter rail operations. He stated that the Commission needs to be involved in the negotiations because the Commission has a contractual obligation to help fund the Colton Crossing so that .this public investment results in some sort of public benefit. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 8 Additionally, Commissioner Buster asked if the Perris Valley Line would be included in those discussions. John Standiford confirmed that the discussions will include the Perris Valley Line because the area of concern as it relates to the Commission's contract that impacts Colton Crossing essentially runs from Downtown Riverside into San Bernardino. Commissioner Buster asked for a status report concerning the municipal bonds and the potential impact on the Commission. John Standiford replied staff will bring an update to the Budget and Implementation Committee and forward to the Commission. M/S/C (Henderson/Miller) to receive an update on the Transportation Corridor Infrastructure Fund. 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION 11. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 11A. Commissioner Terry Henderson thanked staff for a successful 2008 Commission Workshop. 11B. Commissioner Kelly announced opening of a new road connecting Portola Avenue to Dinah Shore Drive in Palm Desert. 11C. Commissioner Jeff Miller announced that in the city of Corona, Caltrans completed a lane drop fix on SR-91 using existing pavement and restriping. This is the first project to use excess toll revenues to fund a project outside Orange County. 11 D. Chair Stone: • Provided an update on the trip to Sacramento to communicate the importance of keeping 850 million in the President's budget for the Perris Valley Line extension, which was met with unanimous support from the U.S. Senators and Representatives; and • Provided an update on the meeting with Senator Barbara Boxer regarding a town hall meeting on goods movement. • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes March 12, 2008 Page 9 11E_ John Standiford announced an event being held on Friday, March 14, 2008, sponsored by the Commission honoring the Big Horn County Club for its participation in the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program in the Coachella Valley. 12. CLOSED SESSION A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATOR Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Negotiating Parties: RCTC — Executive Director or Designee Property: APN 305-060-019 Property Owner/Negotiator: John Patterson Commissioners Busch, Buster, Magee, Stone, and Tavaglione recused themselves from the Closed Session. There were no announcements for the Closed Session item. 13. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, the meeting adjourned at 10:40 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, April 9, 2008, in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. Respectfully submitted, Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board • AGENDA ITEM 7A • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Annual Investment Policy Review BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to adopt the annual Investment Policy. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Section XIV of the Investment Policy requires an annual investment policy review and specifically states that the "Chief Financial Officer shall annually render to the Board a statement of investment policy, which the Board must consider at a public meeting. Any changes to the policy shall also be considered by the Board at a public meeting." Based on a review of the Investment Policy approved by the Commission on April 11, 2007, and consideration of changes to the California Government Code as of January 1, 2008, staff in consultation with the county of Riverside Treasury staff has determined that no technical changes are required. Staff is recommending adoption of the attached Investment Policy. Attachment: Investment Policy Agenda Item 7A 1 • • • it emir& Caazatp nsprtrtrtlion Commis:don INVESTMENT POLICY I. Introduction The purpose of this document is to identify policies and procedures that enhance opportunities for a prudent and systematic investment program and to organize and formalize investment -related activities. 11. Scope It is intended that this Policy cover all funds (except retirement funds) and investment activities under the direction of the Commission. III. Delegation of Authority Pursuant to the Commission's Administrative Code, the Board's management responsibility for the investment program is hereby delegated for a one-year period to the Executive Director who shall monitor and review all investments for consistency with this investment policy. Subject to review, the Board may renew the delegation of authority pursuant to this section each year. The Executive Director may delegate these duties to his designee ("Chief Financial Officer"). The Commission may delegate its investment decision making and execution authority to an investment advisor. The advisor shall follow this Policy and such other written instructions as are provided. IV. Prudence All persons authorized to make investment decisions on behalf of the Commission are subject to the prudent investor standard. Investments shall be made with care, skill, prudence and diligence under circumstances then prevailing, including, but not limited to, the general economic conditions and the anticipated needs of the Commission that a prudent person acting in a like capacity and familiarity with those matters would use in the conduct of funds of a like character and with like aims, to safeguard the principal and maintain the liquidity needs of the Commission. Authorized individuals acting in accordance with this Policy and written procedures and exercising due diligence shall be relieved of personal responsibility for an individual security's credit risk or market price changes, provided deviations from expectations are reported in a timely fashion. V. Objective The Commission's primary investment objectives, in priority order, shall be: 1. Safety. Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the investment program. Investments of the Commission shall be undertaken in a manner that seeks to ensure preservation of capital in the portfolio. 2. Liquidity. The investment portfolio of the Commission will remain sufficiently liquid to enable the Commission to meet its cash flow requirements. 3. Return on Investment. The investment portfolio of the Commission shall be designed with the objective of maximizing return on its investments, but only after ensuring safety and liquidity. In order to maximize return on its investments, the Commission seeks an active rather than passive management of portfolio assets. The Commission may from time to time sell securities that it owns in order to better reposition its portfolio assets in accordance with updated cash flow schedules, yield curve optimizations, yield opportunities existing between market sectors, or simply market timing. V I . Investments California Government Code Section 53601 governs the investments permitted for purchase by the Commission. Within the investments permitted by Code, the Commission seeks to further restrict eligible investments to the investments listed in Section V1.1 below. Percentage limitations, where indicated, apply at the time of purchase. Percentage holdings with any one non -governmental issuer are further restricted to a maximum of 10%. Rating requirements where indicated, apply at the time of purchase. In the event a security held by the Commission is subject to a rating change that brings it below the minimum specified rating requirement, the Chief Financial Officer shall notify the Board of the change. The course of action to be followed will then be decided on a case -by -case basis, 3 • • • considering such factors as the reason for the rate drop, prognosis for recovery or further rate drops, and the market price of the security. 1. Eligible Investments A. U.S. Government Issues. United States Treasury notes, bonds, bills, or certificates of indebtedness, or those for which the faith and credit of the United States are pledged for the payment of principal and interest. B. Federal Agency Securities. Federal agency or United States government -sponsored enterprise obligations, participations, or other instruments, including those issued by or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest by federal agencies or United States government -sponsored enterprises. C. Repurchase Agreements. Repurchase agreements are to be used solely as short-term investments not to exceed 30 days. The Commission may enter into repurchase agreements with primary government securities dealers rated "A" or better by two nationally recognized rating services. Counterparties should also have (i) a short-term credit rating of at least A-1/P- 1; (ii) minimum assets and capital size of $25 billion in assets and $350 million in capital; (iii) five years of acceptable audited financial results; and (iv) a strong reputation among market participants. The following collateral restrictions will be observed: Only U.S. Treasury securities or Federal Agency securities, as described in V.1 A and B, will be acceptable collateral. All securities underlying repurchase agreements must be delivered to the Commission's custodian bank versus payment or be handled under a properly executed tri-party repurchase agreement. The total market value of all collateral for each repurchase agreement must equal or exceed 102 percent of the total dollar value of the money invested by the Commission for the term of the investment. For any repurchase agreement with a term of more than one day, the value of the underlying securities must be reviewed on an on -going basis according to market conditions. Market value must be calculated each time there is a substitution of collateral. The Commission or its trustee shall have a perfected first security interest under the Uniform Commercial Code in all securities subject to repurchase agreement. The Commission shall have properly executed a PSA agreement with each counterparty with which it enters into repurchase agreements. D. U.S. Corporate Debt. Medium -term notes, defined as all corporate and depository institution securities with a maximum remaining maturity of five years or less, issued by corporations organized and operating within the United States or depository institutions licensed by the United States or any state and operating within the United States. Eligible investment shall be rated "AA" or better by one or more nationally recognized rating service. Investments in U.S. Corporate Debt are further limited to 30% of surplus funds. E. Commercial Paper. Commercial paper rated in the highest category by one or more nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO). The entity that issues the commercial paper shall meet all of the following conditions in either paragraph (1) or paragraph (2): (1) The entity meets the following criteria: (A) Is organized and operating in the United States as a general corporation. (B) Has total assets in excess of five hundred million dollars ($500,000,000). (C) Has debt other than commercial paper, if any, that is rated "A" or higher by a NRSRO. (2) The entity meets the following criteria: (A) Is organized within the United States as a special purpose corporation, trust, or limited liability company. (B) Has program -wide credit enhancements, including, but not limited to, over collateralization, letters of credit, or surety bond. (C) Has commercial paper that is rated "A-1" or higher, or the equivalent, by a NRSRO. Purchases of eligible commercial paper may not exceed 270 days maturity nor represent more than 10 percent of the outstanding paper of an issuing corporation. Investments in commercial paper are limited to a maximum of 25% of surplus funds. F. Banker's Acceptances. Banker's acceptances issued by domestic or foreign banks, which are eligible for purchase by • • • • the Federal Reserve System. Purchases of banker's acceptances may not exceed 180 days maturity. Eligible banker's acceptances are restricted to issuing financial institutions with short-term paper rated in the highest category by one or more nationally recognized rating service. Investments in banker's acceptances are further limited to 40% of surplus funds with no more than 30% of surplus invested in the banker's acceptances of any one commercial bank. G. Money Market Mutual Funds. Shares of beneficial interest issued by diversified management companies that are money market funds registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Sec. 80a-1, et seq.) and that invest solely in U.S. treasuries, obligations of the U.S. Treasury, and repurchase agreements relating to such treasury obligations. The Commission may invest in shares of beneficial interest issued by accompany shall have met either of the following criteria: (1) Attained the highest ranking or the highest letter and numerical rating provided by not less than two nationally recognized rating services. (2) Retained an investment adviser registered or exempt from registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission with not less than five years' experience managing money market mutual funds with assets under management in excess of five hundred million dollars (S 500,000,000). The purchase price of shares of beneficial interest purchased pursuant to this subdivision shall not include any commission that the companies may charge. Investments in Money Market Mutual Funds are further limited to 20% of surplus funds. H. Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund ("RCPIF"). The Commission may invest in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund. As on -going due diligence, the Chief Financial Officer shall obtain the information listed below: • A description of eligible investment securities and a written statement of investment policy. • A description of the interest calculation, the frequency of interest distributions, and the treatment of gains and losses in the portfolio. • A description of how often the securities are priced, how the securities are safeguarded, and the audit arrangements. • A description of who may invest in the program, how often they may invest, and what size deposits and withdrawals are allowed. • A schedule for receiving statements and portfolio listings. • A fee schedule, and when and how fees are assessed. • The composition of the investment fund for each reporting period. I. State of California Local Agency Investment Fund 1"LAIF"►. The Commission may invest in LAIF. As on -going due diligence, the Chief Financial Officer shall obtain the information listed below: • A description of eligible investment securities and a written statement of investment policy. • A description of the interest calculation, the frequency of interest distributions, and the treatment of gains and losses in the portfolio. • A description of how often the securities are priced, how the. securities are safeguarded, and the audit arrangements. • A description of who may invest in the program, how often they may invest, and what size deposits and withdrawals are allowed. • A schedule for receiving statements and portfolio listings. • A fee schedule, and when and how fees are assessed. • The composition of the investment fund for each reporting period. J. Certificates of Deposit. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) insured or fully collateralized time certificates of deposit in financial institutions located in California. Eligible investments are restricted to those issuing institutions that have been in business at least five years and whose senior debt obligations are rated "AA" or better by one or more nationally recognized rating service. The maximum term for deposits shall be one year. Investments in certificates of deposit are further limited to 20% of surplus funds. All time deposits must be collateralized in accordance with California Government Code section 53561. The Commission, at its discretion, may waive • the collateralization requirements for any portion of the deposit that is covered by federal insurance. 2. Eligible Investments for Bond Proceeds Bond proceeds shall be invested in securities permitted by the applicable bond documents. If the bond documents are silent as to permitted investments, bond proceeds will be invested in securities permitted by this Policy. With respect to maximum maturities, the Policy authorizes investing bond reserve fund proceeds beyond the five years if prudent in the opinion of the Chief Financial Officer. 3. Ineligible Investments As provided in California Government Code Section 53601.6, the Commission shall not invest any funds in inverse floaters, range notes, mortgage derived interest -only strips or in any security that could result in zero interest accrual if held to maturity. The purchase of any security not listed in Section VI.1 above, but permitted by the California Government Code, is prohibited unless the Board approves the investment either specifically or as a part of an investment program approved by the Board. VII. Maximum Maturities Maturities of investments will be selected to provide necessary liquidity, minimize interest rate risk, and maximize earnings. Current and expected yield curve analysis will be monitored and the portfolio will be invested accordingly. Because of inherent difficulties in accurately forecasting cash flow requirements, a portion of the portfolio should be continuously invested in readily available funds. Where this Policy does not specify a maximum remaining maturity at the time of the investment, no investment shall be made in any security, other than a security underlying a repurchase or reverse repurchase agreement authorized by this section, that at the time of the investment has a term remaining to maturity in excess of five years, unless the Board has granted express authority to make that investment either specifically or as a part of an investment program approved by the Board no less than three months prior to the investment. VIII. Performance Standards The Chief Financial Officer shall continually monitor and evaluate the portfolio's performance. A comparison of the portfolio's performance against a performance benchmark shall be included in the Chief Financial Officer's quarterly report. The Chief Financial Officer shall select an appropriate, readily available market index to use as a performance benchmark. IX. Reporting The Chief Financial Officer shall prepare and provide to the Board and the Executive Director, within 30 days following the end of the quarter, a portfolio report, which includes the following information: • Type of investment • Name of issuer • Date of maturity • Date of purchase • Par value • Original purchase cost • Call date (if applicable) • Current market value of securities • Unrealized market value gain/loss • Coupon rate, if applicable • Yield to maturity • Credit quality, as determined by one or more nationally recognized credit rating services, of each investment • Average duration of portfolio • Listing of all investment transactions during the quarter • A statement that the portfolio complies with the investment policy, or the manner in which the portfolio is not in compliance • A statement denoting the ability of the Commission to meet its liquidity requirements for the next six months, or provide an explanation as to why sufficient money shall, or may not be, available. X. Investment Procedures The Chief Financial Officer, as the Board's designee, is responsible for ensuring compliance with the Commission's investment policies and establishing written procedures and internal controls for the operation of the investment program. 9 • No person may engage in investment transactions except as provided under the terms of this Policy and the written procedures established by the Chief Financial Officer. The written procedures should address: delegation of authority to subordinate staff members, control of collusion, separation of transaction authority from accounting and record keeping, written confirmations of transactions, reconciliation of custody statements, and wire transfer procedures and agreements. An independent analysis by an external auditor shall be conducted annually to review internal control, account activity, and compliance with policies and procedures. XI. Authorized Broker Dealers and Financial Institutions The Chief Financial Officer shall maintain a list of authorized broker/dealers and financial institutions which are approved for investment purposes. It shall be the Commission's policy to purchase securities only from those authorized institutions and firms. Separate lists shall be maintained for broker/dealers and financial institutions approved for repurchase agreements and those approved for the purchase of other securities. If an investment advisor is used, they may use their own list of approved broker/dealers and financial institutions for investment purposes. To be eligible, a firm must meet the following minimum criteria: (i) an institution licensed by the state as a broker -dealer, or from a member of a federally regulated securities exchange, from a national or state -chartered bank, from a federal or state association or from a brokerage firm designated as a primary government dealer by the Federal Reserve bank; and (ii) all broker/dealer firms and individuals must be properly registered with the NASD and/or SEC to transact business in the relevant geographic locations and product sectors. In addition, counterparties for Repurchase Agreements shall be limited to primary government securities dealers rated "A" or better by two nationally recognized rating services.--Counterparties shall also have (i) a short-term credit rating of at least A-1 /P-1; (ii) minimum assets and capital size of $25 billion in assets and $350 million in capital; (iii) five years of acceptable audited financial results; and (iv) a strong reputation among market participants. The Chief Financial Officer shalt select broker/dealers and other financial institutions on the basis of the firm's expertise and credit worthiness. The Commission shall annually send a copy of the current investment policy to all dealers approved to do business with the Commission. Each broker dealer or financial institution that has been authorized by the Commission shall be required to submit and annually update a Broker/Dealer Questionnaire which includes the firm's most recent financial statements. The Chief Financial 10 Officer shall maintain a file for each firm approved for investment purposes, which includes the most recent Broker/Dealer Questionnaire. XII. Safekeeping and Custody To protect the Commission's assets, all securities owned by the Commission shall be held in safekeeping in the Commission's name by a third party bank trust department, acting as agent for the Commission under the terms of a custody agreement executed by the bank and the Commission. All securities will be received and delivered using standard delivery versus payment (DVP) procedures; the Commission's safekeeping agent will only release payment for a security after the security has been properly delivered. Physical delivery securities shall be avoided whenever possible, as book entry securities are much easier to transfer and account for since actual delivery of a document never takes place. In addition, delivered securities must be properly safeguarded against loss or destruction. The potential for fraud and loss increases with physically delivered securities. XIII. Ethics and Conflicts of Interest The Commission adopts the following policy concerning conflicts of interest: 1. Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall refrain from personal business activity that could conflict with proper execution of the investment program or which could impair their ability to make impartial investment decisions. 2. Officers and employees involved in the investment process shall disclose any material financial interest in any financial institution that conducts business with the Commission, and they shall further disclose any large personal financial/investment positions that could be related to the performance of the Commission's portfolio. 3. Officers shall refrain from undertaking personal investment transactions with the same individual with whom business is conducted on behalf of the Commission. 11 • • • XIV. Investment Policy Review The Chief Financial Officer shall annually render to the Board a statement of investment policy, which the Board must consider at a public meeting. Any changes to the policy shall also be considered by the Board at a public meeting. 12 • AGENDA ITEM 7B • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Policy Regarding Indirect Cost Reimbursements BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the policy regarding the disposition of indirect cost reimbursements; and 2) Adopt Resolution No. 08-01 1, `Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Authorizing the Disposition of indirect Cost Reimbursements". BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Since FY 2003/04, the Commission has prepared an annual Indirect Cost Allocation Plan (ICAP) and submitted it to Ca[trans for approval. Indirect costs include administrative salaries, fringe benefits, and other administrative costs; the indirect costs are recorded in the Commission's general fund. The approved ICAP enables the Commission to seek reimbursements for these indirect costs in connection with billings to federal and state agencies for capital project and other program direct costs. Revenues related to the indirect cost reimbursements have been accounted for with the other direct cost reimbursements in the project subaccount of the special revenue fund in which the direct expenditures were incurred. As a result, the capital project or program has received some additional revenues to be used for additional project costs, and the general fund has not received reimbursements for some of its costs. However, since most indirect cost reimbursements are related to Measure A projects or programs, these reimbursements are maintained in the Measure A program, which consists of several accounting funds. Agenda Item 7B 13 In recent months, the overall decline in sales tax revenues has resulted in a review of practices affecting administrative salaries and benefits due to the Measure A limitation that administrative salaries and benefits may not exceed 1 % of the sales taxes revenues. Accordingly, staff has determined that any recovery of indirect costs related to administrative salaries and benefits should be credited as revenue to the general fund rather than the special revenue fund project/program subaccount. In connection with the latest ICAP submitted to Ca!trans for approval, the state auditors have requested that the Commission adopt a formal policy related to the disposition of the indirect cost reimbursement revenues. Accordingly, staff requests the Commission's approval of the fiscal policy related to the disposition of indirect cost reimbursements and adoption of the related resolution. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 08-011 2) Indirect Cost Reimbursement Policy Agenda Item 7B 14 • • • • RESOLUTION NO. 08-011 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AUTHORIZING THE DISPOSITION OF INDIRECT COST REIMBURSEMENTS WHEREAS, a Fiscal Procedures Manual has been created and approved by the Riverside County Transportation Commission on April 11, 2001; WHEREAS, the Commission has developed an annual indirect cost allocation plan related to the recovery of indirect costs related to certain capital projects and other Commission programs subject to federal and state reimbursements. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Commissioners hereby resolves a policy regarding the Disposition of Indirect Cost Reimbursements as follows: Section 1: The Commission prepares an annual indirect cost allocation plan in order to recover indirect costs as part of federal and state reimbursement claims for certain capital project and other Commission program costs. Such plan must be submitted to and approved by Caltrans prior to seeking reimbursements of indirect costs. Section 2: In connection with reimbursements of indirect costs included in invoices to federal and state agencies related to certain capital projects and other Commission programs, revenues related to indirect cost reimbursements may be maintained by the applicable project or program fund, except for the portion related to indirect salaries and fringe benefits which shall be credited to the applicable general administration funds. 15. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Riverside County Transportation Commission at its meeting on Wednesday, April 9, 2008. BY: ATTEST: BY: Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Jeff Stone, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission 16 • • • • revside[ rrtrxl�• rumporlriliorr COMM virM INDIRECT COST REIMBURSEMENTS On April 9, 2008, the Commission approved Resolution 08-011, Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission authorizing the disposition of indirect cost reimbursements. Indirect cost reimbursements are the recovery of administrative costs including salaries and fringe benefits and other costs. Policy: • Reimbursements of indirect costs included in invoices to federal and state agencies related to certain capital projects and other Commission programs shall be based on an indirect cost allocation plan (ICAP) approved by state of California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). • Revenues related to indirect cost reimbursements may be maintained by the applicable project or program fund, except for the portion related to indirect salaries and fringe benefits which shall be credited to the applicable general administration funds. Procedures: • Upon approval of the annual ICAP to be used in connection with billings for capital project or other program costs, a determination shall be made by the Accounting and Human Resources Manager as to the portion of the indirect cost rate which is related to the administrative salaries and benefits. • After the preparation of an invoice which includes reimbursement for indirect costs, the Senior Accounting Assistant shall calculate the amount of the portion of the indirect costs related to the administrative salaries and benefits based on the amount determined by the Accounting and Human Resources Manager. • In the accounting entry related to the total revenues included in the reimbursement invoice, the Senior Accounting Assistant shall record the portion of the indirect costs related to administrative salaries and benefits as reimbursement revenue in the General Fund. V:/USERS/FINANCE/FISC. PROC/INDIRECT COST REIMBURSEMENTS.DOC - 04.09.08 17 AGENDA ITEM 7C • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Jerry Rivera, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2007/08 Measure A Capital Improvement Plan Amendment for Local Streets and Roads for the City of Palm Springs BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve the amendment to the FY 2007/08 Measure A Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for local streets and roads for the city of Palm Springs (Palm Springs) as submitted. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Measure A requires each recipient of local streets and roads monies to annually provide to the Commission a five-year plan on how those funds are to be expended in order to receive its Measure A disbursements. In addition, the Coachella Valley and Western County cities and the county must be participating in either the Coachella Valley Association of Governments or Western Riverside Council of Governments Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee program. The agencies are also required to submit an annual certification of maintenance of effort along with documentation supporting the calculation. The CIP for Palm Springs was approved by the Commission at its July 11, 2007 meeting. Any revisions to the adopted plan must be returned to the Commission for approval. Palm Springs has unexpended Measure A funds remaining from several other prior projects and is requesting to apply $300,000 in excess funds to the annual street slurry seal project that was originally budgeted at $500,000. Attachment: Letter from the City of Palm Springs with Revised CIP Schedule Agenda Item 7C 18 83257 J R City of Palm Springs Department of Public Works and Engineering 3200 E. Tahquirz Canyon Way • Palm Springs, California 92262 Tel: (760) 323-8253 • Fax: (760) 322-8360 • Web: www.ci.palm-springs.ca.us March 11, 2008 Ms. Anne Mayer Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3`d Floor Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Via Facsimile: (951) 787-7920 Re: Fiscal Year 2008-2012, 5-Year Measure "A" Local Street & Road Program Proposed City of Palm Springs Annual 5-Year Measure "A" Plan (Fiscal Year 2007/2008) — REVISED Dear Ms. Mayer: I am enclosing the second revision to the Measure A lists for funds that are listed on the '2007/2008" Table for Fiscal Year 2008-2012 5-Year Plan. The City has unexpended Measure A funds that are left -over remaining funds from prior projects that have been swept into a separate unallocated expenditure account by our Finance Department. The unallocated expenditure account currently has a balance of $361,356. It is anticipated. that this year's slurry -seal project will exceed the originally budgeted amount of $500,000." Therefore,'we are requesting concurrence on using $300,000 of these unexpended Measure A funds for the "Annual Street Slurry Seals (Construction)", which was originally shown with a project cost of $500,000. The increased project cost is $800,000. Please review the information and let me know if you have any further questions. I can be reached at (760) 323-8253, ext..8744. Marcus L. Fuller;_P_E.; P:L':S. Assistant Director of Public Woks/Assistant City Engineer enc cc: Thomas IMIson, Assistant city Manager . David Barakian,'Director.6f'P6blic Works/Cilk Engineer - Tom Kanarr, Interim Director of Finance/Treasurer r©MVED MAR 1 3 ?008 • iiry :i s:13E COUNTY fR4NSPORTATIONCOMMISS N Post Office Box:2743 • Palm Wings, California 92263-2743 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE "A" LOCAL FUNDS PROGRAM Agency: City of Palm Springs Prepared by: David J. Barakian, Director of Public Works/City Engineer (by Marcus L. Fuller, Assistant Director of Public Works/Assistant City Engineer) Date: June 1, 2007 September 7, 2007 (Revision 1) 'March 11, 2008 (Revision 2) t Fiscal Year 2008-2012, 5-Year Measure "A" Local Street,& Roads Program Fiscal Year 2007/2008 • ITEM NO. . PROJECT NAME/LIMITS PROJECT TYPE TOTAL COST MEASURE "A" FUNDS 1. ARHM Overlays (Construction) Street Maintenance $500,000 $500,000 2, Annual Street Slurry Seals (Construction) Street Maintenance $800,000 $800,000 3 Gene Autry Trail / Interstate 10 Interchange (funding to be added to required City match) Expanded Freeway Interchange 'Included on previous sheet $400,000 4 Belardo Road Bridge (funding to be added to required City match) New Road Extension and Bridge Construction `Included on previous sheet $400,000 5. Sunrise Way at Mesquite Avenue. Traffic Signal Upgrade Traffic Signal Modification $150,000 $150,000 6. Traffic Signal Interconnect Communication Upgrade Traffic Signal Modification $50,000 $50,000 7. Traffic Striping Improvements (City wide) Traffic Striping $50,000 $50,000 8. Traffic Signal Street Name Sign Replacement Program Traffic Signal Modification $50,000 $50,000 9. Camino Real Street Improvements Street Improvements $50,000 $50,000 10. ADA Curb Ramp Retrofit/Repair Program Street Improvements $50,000 $50,000 11. Traffic Safety Projects Traffic Signal Modification $40,000 $40,000 12. SB 821 Sidewalk Project (FY 07/08) Sidewalk Construction $70,000 $30,000 Page 1 of 2 • Z io Z a6ed •spefoad pm/dated if/snornaad alai; Buru!mai spun; v aanseaw papuadxaun Buren 000`00£$ if9 (uononajsuo0) glees itaanls;aaa;s lenuub aseaaoul:e uors►nea ;oafoad reu6rs enau ao; (spun; „b„ aanseam! LOOZ/900Z Penunuoo woa; aanotiaeo) 000`1'114 PM' t uorslnea ZZCbLL'Z$ ZZL` 710'Z$ 800Z/LOOZ aeaA leosld 1V1O1 0001'214 0001114 uopeompow leuSis ordeal uoneompon reuPs pw rl peoy ofewieM espuns 'et 00£`9$ 00£'9$ uopowpow 1eAs owerl ApnlS uogezporyouAs 1eAs ot}erl eppiAlo '41• ZZt7'03 ZZVO3 sluawanoidwi ;awls (OVA0) luawasnquip8 Aenoped /WIN\ PM '01. 000'S3 000'S 3 uowitelsul 1eu61S ou}eil (Apo 4sad)1eu61g meal ueulsaped tooLin ONOupds Limed le peozl ()Ism 6 SaNfld .,d, alnS`d3W 1SOO �V1.01 3dA11O3/.02rd S11WIl/3Wt/N 1O3fb2id ON W311 800Z/LOOZ neA leosld weaBoad speo2! '8 leeAs leool „b„ eanseaw neA-9 'Z60Z-800Z aeaA leosld AGENDA ITEM 7D • 0 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jerry Rivera, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2008-12 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plan for Local Streets and Roads for the City of Desert Hot Springs STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve the FY 2008-12 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIP) for. local streets and roads for the city of Desert Hot Springs (Desert Hot Springs) as submitted. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Measure A requires each recipient of local streets and roads monies to annually provide to the Commission a five-year plan on how those funds are to be expended in order to receive its Measure A disbursements. In addition, the Coachella Valley and Western County cities and the county must be participating in either the Coachella Valley Association of Governments or Western Riverside Council of Governments Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee program. The agencies are required to submit the annual certification of maintenance of effort (MOE) along with documentation supporting the calculation. On April 20, 2007, Commission staff provided the local agencies with Measure A revenue projections for local streets and roads to assist them in preparation of the required CIP. The agencies were asked to submit their CIPs by June 11, 2007 for submission to the Budget and Implementation Committee at its June 25, 2007 meeting and to the Commission on July 11, 2007. Staff has received the required CIP, MOE certification and supporting documentation from Desert Hot Springs and is requesting Commission approval of its CIP. Attachment: Measure A CIP for Desert Hot Springs Agenda Item 7D 22 Agency: Prepared By: Phone #: Date: • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE "A" LOCAL FUNDS PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2007-2008 City of Desert Hot Springs Jonathan Hoy, Director of Public Works 760-329-6411, extension 247 March 6, 2008 • Item No. Project Name/Limits Project Type Total Cost Measure "A" $ 5003 Hacienda Avenue Rehab West to Palm Pavement Reconstruction $547,100.00 $257,000.00 5011 City Wide Slurry Seal Improvements Slurry Seat and Crack Seal Misc. Streets $250,000.00 $261,650.00 5014 City Wide Striping Improvements New striping and reflective paint imprv. $35,000.00 $38,000,00 5008 Streets with MSWD Street and Sewer Improvements $500,000.00 $63,000.00 Totals $1,332,100.00 S619,650.00 Note includes unspent funds from FY06-07 budget 23 Agency: Prepared By: Phone #: Date: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE "A" LOCAL FUNDS PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2008.2009 City of Desert Hot Springs Jonathan Hoy, Director of Public Works 760-329.6411, extension 247 March 6, 2008 Item No. Project Name/Limits Project Type Total Cost Measure "A" $ 1 Western Ave -Scenic Dr OesignlEnviron Pavement Construction $355,060.00 $5,136.00 2 Slurry Seal Various City Streets Slurry Seal and Crack Seal Misc. Streets $261,650.00 $261,650.00 3 Streets with MSWD Street and Sewer Improvements $500,000.00 $141,214.00 4 Sidewalk Construction - Two Bunch Palms Trail & Pierson Blvd Construct Sidewalks on existing Streets $260,000.00 $65,000.00 Totals $1,378,730.00 $473,000.00 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE "A" LOCAL FUNDS PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010 Agency: City of Desert Hot Springs Prepared By: Jonathan Hoy, Director of Public Works Phone#: 760-329-6411, extension 247 Date: March 6, 20,08 Item No. Project Name/Limits Project Type Total Cost Measure "A" $ 1 Western Ave - Scenic Dr Construction Pavement Construction $314,353.00 $35,564.00 2 Street Rehabilitation - 2yr Project Pavement Construction $610,000.00 $300,000.00 3 City Wide Slurry Seal Improvements Slurry Seal and Crack Seal Misc. Streets $168,436.00 $168,436.00 Totals $1,092,789,00 $564,000.00 25 • Agency: Prepared By: Phone #: Date: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MEASURE "A" LOCAL FUNDS PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2010.2011 City of Desert Hot Springs Jonathan Hoy, Director of Public Works 760-329-6411, extension 247 March 6, 2008 Item No. Project Name/Limits Project Type Total Cost Measure "A" $ 1 Street Rehabilitation - 2nd year Pavement Reconstruction $610,000.00 $310,000.00 2 City Wide Slurry Seal Improvements Slurry Seal and Crack Seal Misc. Streets $230,000.00 $230,000.00 Totals $840,000.00 $540,000.00 r LZ 00'000'089$ 00'000'0E19S s1%01 00'000'090 00'000'099S spai1S •os11ry leas Noei0 pue leas /uanlS sluawanoadwi peg fuJnis ap1M A113 Z-9L $ „y„ aanseen • )so0 /e)ol edifl pefwd 81114117/eweN )oe%d 'OM +ue)I 800Z `9 4�JeW LbZ uolsua)xe '14179-6Z8-091 svoM o//gnd{oJapa40 `Aopi ueweuor sBu/idS )oH uesea jo ZLOZ-CLOZ dV2A 7VOSId WV2/00ild SONnj 711007 , t1„ 32117Sb3141 NOISS/WWOO NOIIVIdOdSNVIll A1N1700 30IS113APJ • :Ma :# euo9d poJedaad :ifoua8y J • • • AGENDA ITEM 7E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Interstate 15 Interregional Partnership - Phase III STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 08-67-096-00 with the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) for the 1-15 Interregional Partnership - Phase III activities; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In 2001, WRCOG received a grant from the state of California Housing and Community Development Department to enter into a partnership with the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) to address the job/housing imbalance between the two regions. This partnership became known as the 1-15 Interregional Partnership (1-15 IRP). Recently, WRCOG secured a $450,000 grant for Phase III activities to continue its work on the three primary components of the project that include transportation, housing and economic development. WRCOG has already received the fund transfer agreement from Ca!trans and it is anticipated that funding for Phase III activities should be available toward the end of March/beginning of April 2008. Overview of the 1-15 IRP Project - Phase III For Phase III activities, there will be an increase in collaboration between WRCOG, SANDAG, the Commission, and the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) as well as local economic development agencies from the counties of Riverside and San Diego. Work will continue on the three primary components of the project to continue to improve the quality of life for residents of the two regions. To ensure that the project continues to adequately address the issues of transportation, housing, and economic development, Phase III will maintain the interregional planning structure of existing committees. WRCOG, acting as the lead agency, and SANDAG will Agenda Item 7E 28 coordinate and administer all necessary functions to ensure successful completion of this 18-month project. Meetings will include semi-annual 1-15 IRP Joint Policy Committee meetings that consist of elected officials from local jurisdictions from the two counties. The project also incorporates into its timeline quarterly executive staff meetings consisting of the agencies' executives; staff level meetings will also occur as the project demands. Contractual Arrangements To assist with the study effort, and to avoid duplication of effort, it is anticipated that WRCOG will enter into MOU with SANDAG, the Commission, and possibly RTA for specific project tasks and project assistance. Over the next couple of weeks, the scope of work will be finalized as to further define agency responsibilities, and as a result, Commission staff is requesting approval to enter into an MOU with WRCOG to receive up to $165,000 of the $450,000 in grant funds as a "pass through" to conduct the work identified under the heading of Transportation Strategic Implementation Plan on the attached project budget and time line. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2008/09+ Amount: $165,000 Caltrans: State Planning & Research Source of Funds: and Public Transportation Account Budget Adjustment: N/A Grant (Pass through from WRCOG) GLA No.: 106 67 41509 $145,000 226 41 41509 P 2106 $ 20,000 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \ 4;41,y.4017 Date: 03/26/2007 Attachment: WRCOG and SANDAG Project Budget and Time Line Agenda Item 7E 29 • • • WRCOG / SANDAG 1-15 Interregional Partnership Grant awarded/Contract executed a. Joint Policy Committee meetings b .Executive Coordination c. Staff coordination ILt1 Responsible Party Caltrans/WRCGG WRCOG/SANDAG WRCOG/SANDAG WRCOG/SANDAG a. Convene Workshop Series b. Develop Strategic Action Plan c. Develop Business Database for Web -base Connectory Portal. d. Econ. Dev.Oulreach Materials a. Document existing SIP w/ short term strategies b. Cost-effective analysis c. Overall Funding Strategy d. Strategic Implementation Document e. Analysis of Transit Treatments and Infrastructure development f. Analys's:ParknRide Facilities/Management g. Goods Movement Documentation h. Interregional Vanpool/Carpool Program Coordination Strategy a. Pilot workforce housing study b. Smart Growth Concept analysis for selected cities in SW Riverside Co. c. Smart Growth Workshops WRCOG/SANDAG WRCOG/SANDAG WRCOG/SANDAG WRCOG/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG/RTA WRCOG/RCTC/ Caltrans RCTC/SANDAG RCTC/SANDAG SANDAG/WRCOG SANDAG/WRCOG SANDAG/WRCOG a. Draft Report b. Final Report TOTALS SANDAG/WRCOG SANDAG/WRCOG Total Cost 0 20,000 5,000 30,000 60,000 15,000 10,000 15,000 15,00D 45,000 45,000 15,000 15,000 20,000 10,000 Note: Fundng for this tas 'II be through a separate Galtrans Grant 70,000 22,000 8,000 20,000 10,000 450,000 Fiscal Year 2008 13121© O D Fiscal Year 2009 Fiscal Year 2010 EI0©0©EIEICI© © El©©121©0E10© © D 0ng ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 1 O D O ■\\A\■■■■■\\uu■■■■■A\\\\\■■MUM. .„, \\\ \\ ■ \\\ II�o111111\\\\1�\\�1�\��111a��p11 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■�\�\\�`�\\\�\m � NEN 44 \AS 1111111 \\ \:�� 4. .n;■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■�\ Deliverable Meeting Agendas/Minutes Meeting notes/follow up actions Meeting notes/follow up actions (Meetings as needed) Workshop Proceedings Strategic Action Plan Report Database of Businesses for Business Web Portal Outreach Materials Strategic Implementation Plan Report Feasibility Report Analysis Report and Maps. Report on Heavy Truck traffic Pilot Workforce Housing Report Preliminary Smart Growth Concept Map Workshop Proceedings Draft Final Report Final Report 1/2008104 Apnn7E.TL.A1.Budget Timeline final_rev3.xls 30 2/4t2008 a\• ��\ \�� !!!!!!!„1„1,,11,.11,11 NNE■■■■�■■■■■■■■■■■■■\\■■ • AGENDA ITEM 7F • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Exclusive Negotiating Agreement with The Alan Mruvka Company dba Blue Square Development Group for Joint Development at the Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 07-67-154-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-67-154-00, with The Alan Mruvka Company (TAMC) for a six-month extension for joint development at the Riverside -Downtown Metrolink station; and 2► Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its June 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded an exclusive negotiating agreement (ENA), Agreement No. 07-67-154-00, for joint development at the Riverside -Downtown Metrolink station to TAMC for a 180-day period. The ENA allows for the Commission to negotiate exclusively with TAMC. Upon execution of the ENA, TAMC provided the required $25,000 good faith deposit. The ENA expired March 2008. Representatives from the Commission, TAMC, Best Best & Krieger, the city of Riverside Planning and Redevelopment, and Keyser Marston Associates (real estate financial advisor) have had several meetings to discuss various matters regarding the proposed project; however; critical issues related to the structure of the deal to allow development of both the public parking and private development components of the project remain unresolved due to the complexity and the changing residential market. Commission staff and TAMC are requesting a six-month extension of the ENA to provide additional time to resolve these issues. Agenda Item 7F 31 • AGENDA ITEM 7G • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Sheldon Peterson, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: "Green" RCTC Commuter Rail Station Maintenance Plan Rehabilitation and STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the "Green" RCTC Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan (Plan) and direct staff to implement the recommendations needed to make improvements that increase energy efficiency, while increasing the life of the assets at the five Riverside County commuter rail stations; 2) Allocate Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds in the amount of $2,477,714 to the Commission's Commuter Rail Program; and 3) Approve amendments to the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) and provide a budget adjustment to reflect an increase in capital expenditures in the amount of $2,477,714 for the Plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission fully funds and maintains all of the commuter rail stations in Riverside County, which is unique among the Metrolink member agencies. Since Metrolink service began along the Riverside Line in 1993, the Commission has been maintaining the Riverside Downtown and Pedley stations. When the Inland Empire Orange County Line began in 1995, the La Sierra and West Corona stations were added. Then due to increasing demand, the North Main Corona station was added in 2002. Over the years the stations have begun to show their age and require a comprehensive preventative maintenance and rehabilitation plan. Today, the Commission also operates in an environment where there is an emphasis to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through greater energy efficiency. The development of the Plan provides an opportunity to incorporate these rehabilitation needs. Agenda Item 7G 32 The Commission has always taken pride in the commuter rail stations and now is the time to reinvest in them and preserve the Commission's assets. This Plan was developed through cooperation with Bechtel and Commission staff. The Plan addresses upgrades to improve environmental sustainability; safety, ease of access, and overall appearance. The Commission has been a leader in its commitment to the environment and was the first Metrolink station to provide for a 133-kilowatt photovoltaic generating station in partnership with Riverside Public Utilities at the La Sierra station. In pursuing the Commission's goal of environmental stewardship, the rail stations provide a unique opportunity to make immediate environmental improvements. The use of "green technologies" will be evaluated and implemented in the rehabilitation program. Water damage due to overspray from above -ground spray landscape irrigation systems is the cause of a large portion of the renovation work. Landscape renovations will be designed to minimize the use of water through plant selection and automated drip irrigation technology. A number of electrical power and lighting issues have been identified. Prior to replacing electrical components, consideration will be given to components that will reduce energy consumption. In addition, staff intends to use greenlenvironmentally friendly building products during the rehabilitation projects. Some examples include biodegradable cleaning products, recycled building products, and environmental friendly paint products. One of the other key sustainability elements is to encourage Metrolink and transit use by providing pedestrian friendly stations with clean and open walkways. In addition to "greening" the stations, there will also be extensive cleaning. Most of the stations will require painting to prevent corrosion as well as improve the overall appearance. There are plans for repairs and reconditioning of the station fencing and passenger platforms. These upgrades will also enhance safety. A comprehensive review and replacement of station signs will create clear and easy directions for both regular and new riders. Many of the parking lots will be resurfaced to prevent further deterioration and extend the useful fife of the existing asphalt. The Plan will be an ongoing effort that will be updated on a regular basis. For the initial two-year time period, a list of projects has been identified to resolve the many outstanding issues. The cost estimate for the first two years ranges from $2.38 million to $2.75 million. Since it is such an extensive project, the implementation strategy is to group related projects and have the work bid as one collective package between all five stations. This will provide a cost savings by achieving an economy of scale. The categories identified include irrigation and system landscaping, electrical and lighting, signage, painting, and asphalt. Due to the complexity of overseeing the number of concurrent projects, staff will utilize the assistance of Bechtel to provide program management and oversight. Agenda Item 7G 33 • • • • The estimated management costs for this program are projected at $379,000 for the first year and $398,000 for the second year. The project start date will begin with the FY 2008/09 budget year on July 1, 2008. Project Funding As part of the FY 2007/08 Proposition 18 PTMISEA program, Riverside County is slated to receive $17.8 million. In this process, commuter rail is eligible for a total of $2,637,710 of discretionary funding and $840,004 of non -discretionary funding, for a total of $3,477,714. At the March Commission meeting, $1 million of these funds was approved for the Perris Multimodal Facility. The remaining $2,477,714 of commuter rail funds will be used to fund the Plan. This project is eligible to use these funds under the category of rehabilitation, safety, or modernization improvements. The project management expenditures will be paid out of commuter rail local transportation funds, which are included in the budget development for FY 2008/09. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2008/09+ Amount: $3,254,714 Source of Funds: State Transit Assistance Funds — Prop 1 B Local Transportation Fund (LTF) Budget Adjustment: N/A 221 33 42301 P4XXX $2,477,714 STA Discretionary Revenue GLA No.: 221 33 40101 P4XXX 777,000 LTF Revenues 221 33 90701 P4XXX 3,254,714 Property Improvements Expenditures Fiscal Procedures Approved: \ .d;:, Date: 03/17/2008 Attachment: RCTC Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan Agenda Item 7G 34 Riverside County Transportation Commission RCTC Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan Station Costs Summary I. SHORT TERM REHABILITATION COST SUMMARY The RCTC Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan performed an in depth review of the five (5) existing Commuter Rail Stations. The results of this review identified a number of items at the stations that are recommended for rehabilitation and repair. Table A summarizes the draft total costs for the Short Term rehabilitation items recommended to be performed in Fiscal Year (2008-2009) for each station. Table 13 summarizes the draft total costs for the Short Term rehabilitation items recommended to be performed in Fiscal Year (2009-2010) for each station. Table C summarizes the field and office management costs to implement and manage the Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan for Fiscal Year (2008-2009) and Fiscal Year (2009-2010). The tables include a low and high cost range for each station due to certain rehabilitation items having various repair options with different costs, for example slurry seal the parking lot in lieu of the higher cost repair method of saw cutting/removing/replacing the asphalt pavement, due to a potential joint development occurring at the site at the end of the slurry seals useful life. These options are discussed in more detail in the individual reports. TABLE A COST TO COMPLETE ALLTHE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) REHABILITATION ITEMS Station Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Low Cost $390,500 High Cost $594,600 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station $619,600 $632,900 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station $143,200 $143,200 West Corona Commuter Rail Station $376,900 $422,700 Pedley Commuter Rail Station $253,600 $259,900 GRAND TOTAL $1,783,800 $2,053,300 ROUNDED GRAND TOTAL $1,800,000 $2,100,000 07_0064 Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I —1 36 Station Costs Summary TABLE B COST TO COMPLETE ALLTHE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) REHABILITATION ITEMS Station Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Low Cost $173,500 High Cost $173,500 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station $218,000 $218,000 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station $32,200 $32,200 West Corona Commuter Rail Station $121,000 $189,000 Pedley Commuter Rail Station $34,500 $34,500 GRAND TOTAL $579,200 $647,200 ROUNDED GRAND TOTAL $580,000 $650,000 07 0064 Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 37 I — 2 Station Costs Summary TABLE C MANAGEMENT COSTS TO IMPLEMENT THE STATION REHABILITATION AND MAINTENANCE PLAN Number of Stations in Service Fiscal Year 2008-2009 6" Fiscal Year 2009-2010 7B FIELD:: RCTC - Field Inspection - Assume 10% of Yearly time Spent Claudia Chase Hours per Year 208 208 Cost per Year $19,552 $20,530 Bechtel / Consultant - Field Inspection George Sales Hours per Year 500 500 Cost per Year $60,500 $63,525 Bechtel / Consultant - Rail Construction Coordinator Person TBD RCTC - Oversight Management - 10% of the Field Inspection Time Procurement Manager - Person TBD Hours per Year 924 924 Cost per Year OFFICE' Hours per Year $124,740 21 $130,977 21 Cost per Year $2,457 $2,580 Bechtel / Consultant - Oversight Management of the Rehabilitation Office and Field Work Dick Bryan Hours per year 100 100 Cost per Year $21,000 $22,050 Bechtel / Consultant - Oversight Management and Implementation of Rehab Plan Erik Galloway Hours per Year 216 216 Cost per Year $25,920 $27,216 Bechtel / Consultant - Rail Construction Coordinator Person TBD Hours per Year 924 924 Cost per Year $124,740 $130,977 Total RCTC Staff Hours Required (per year) 229 229 Total Bechtel Staff Hours Required (per year 2664 2664 Total Staff Hours Required (per year) 2893 2893 Total RCTC Management Cost (per year) $22,009 $23,109 Total Bechtel Management Cost (per year) $356,900 $374,745 Total Rounded Management Costs (per year) $379,000 $398,000 07_W8t Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 38 I — 3 Station Costs Summary NOTES FOR TABLE C: A: NORTH MAIN PARKING GARAGE OPEN FOR SERVICE MIDDLE OF 2009. NORTH MAIN PARKING GARAGE WILL ADD 1,100 NEW SPACES WITH TWO ELEVATORS, WHICH IS THE EQUIVALENT OF THE DOWNTOWN METROLINK STATION. THEREFORE, IT IS ASSUMED IT WILL REQUIRE THE SAME LEVEL OF FIELD AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT AS THE DOWNTOWN STATION. B: PERRIS MULTI -MODAL WILL ENTER SERVICE WITH THREE NEW STATIONS IN 2012. C: THE HOURLY COST WAS INCREASED 5% FOR ANTICIPATED COST LIVINGINCREASE AND/OR ANNUAL SALARY ACTIONS. 07_oaw Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 39 I - 4 Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside' ®owntown Core muter Rail: Station Rehabilitation and -Maintenance•. -Plan Station Background Information is Address: 4066 Vine St. Riverside CA 92502 ■ Station Opened: June 14, 1993 ■ Rail Lines Served: Metrolink — Riverside Line, Inland Empire Orange County Line, 91 Line; Amtrak — Southwest Chief ■ Acres: 12.4 Original, 1.5 Triangle Lot, 2.5 Eastside Lot. Prepared by: Bechtel Civil Inc. November 20, 2007 Section I: Executive Summary The Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station was constructed over eight separate construction projects, starting prior to 1993 and finishing with the East Side Parking Lot expansion project in 2006. The station has been operational for nearly 15 years and as the age increases the amount of rehabilitation and maintenance has correspondingly increased. This Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan was developed to identify the items requiring short and long term (over the next 12 years) rehabilitation and the subsequent maintenance which will be required to keep the station in .an operational state. The Plan has been broken up into six sections and two appendices, as outlined in the table of contents. Sections IV, V, and VI represent the body of this report and identify the items to be rehabilitated, the scope and cost to rehabilitate them, and the long term maintenance which will be required. The tables presented in Sections IV and V attempt to identify and encompass' all the items that exist at the Station, which would are recommended to be rehabilitated and will require ongoing maintenance. The tables were developed based on the construction and As -built plans for the eight construction projects and the twenty maintenance projects that have occurred at the station. Section IV identifies the items which are recommended for rehabilitation within the following time periods: ■ Short Term within the Next 2 years (2008-2010) ■ Mid-term - 2 to 5 years (2010-2013) ■ Long Term - 5 to 12 years (2013-2020) The items listed in the Short Term within the next 2 years category, were further sub -divided into items which are recommended to be rehabilitated within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009), and those that are recommended to be rehabilitated within the following fiscal year (2009-2010). The process to determine if the item should be recommended for rehabilitation within the upcoming fiscal year (2008- 2009) was by determining if one or more of the conditions listed below existed. ■ Potential Hazard. ■ Will result loss of functionality in the near future. ■ Issue which may reduce the stations operation capabilities. ■ Items which if not addressed may result in additional or accelerated deterioration or damage to the station. These Short Term items are listed in the attached table. Section VI presents the recommend scope of work, cost estimate and schedule to address the items recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2009), see summary table on the following pages. The costs used in the estimates were gathered from many sources including, BNI Building News General Construction 2006 Cost book and previous construction and maintenance projects. These costs are only 'estimates to be used for RCTC's budgeting process. The actual cost of the work will vary depending on a detailed scope, costs for labor, equipment, and materials and should be determined by reviewing the scope of work with RCTC's on call contractor or by a competitive bidding process. During the development of this plan, some of the items identified in Section IV, as recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2010), began the rehabilitation process. These items are either in the scope of work development phase, out for bid, or waiting for issuance of a purchase order or construction agreement. These items are included in this plan and in the attached table, since the work has not yet been completed. These items are identified at the end of the summary tables and are not included in the priority list or in the final cost. 07_0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan • • 41 Section 1: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item _ .. , 1: Asphalt Pavement Location . Main Parking Area Description of Rehabiftation Deteriorating areas (alligator cracking) - identify, Saw Cut, Remove, Replace AC, remove any wet materials and replace with new aggregate base. , Reason for. Rehabilitation* . If the repairs are not made water will infiltrate to the sub -soils and result in the failure of the pavement. Once the pavement fails, a large pothole will develop and may become a potential hazard to the public driving and walking through the parking lot. In addition, the water infiltration it will result in an expansion of the damage and additional costs to remove and replace additional sub -soils. Estimated cost,. $143,000 (Repair) To $26,000 (Slurry Seal Only) 2: Asphalt Pavement Temporary Parking Area Place crack sealant in the cracks occurring at the saw cut joints between the original and new asphalt pavement placed as part of the temporary lot improvement project 05-33- 523. if the repairs are not made water will infiltrate to the sub -soils and result in the failure of the pavement. Once the pavement fails, a large pothole will develop and may become a potential hazard to the public driving and walking through the parking lot. In addition, the water infiltration will result in an expansion of the damage and additional costs to remove and replace additional sub -soils. $7,700 3: Signage Station Wide 1) Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. (Currently in the rehabilitation process and signs are being placed.) 2) Complete the development of the Station Signage Standards and implement at all Stations. 1) Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and may result in a potential hazard. 2) The signs at all stations should be consistent and conform to set standard. This will reduce the cost for station specific signage and allow for the stockpiling of signs to be used when the need arises. $10,000 07 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 42 I — 2 Section I: Executive Summary Item 4: Wrought Iron Fence and Guard Railing Location Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Repair Rusted Sections and repaint all fencing. Reason for Rehabilitation. Portions of the fence have rusted through and are on the verge of breaking off and falling into the public walk ways creating a potential hazard. In areas not accessible to the public the rusting and corrosion if not treated will expand and will result in additional costs to make the necessary repairs. Estimated cost $41,000 5: ADA Ramp and Drainage Pipe Main Parking Area Remove and replace asphalt ADA ramp with Concrete ADA ramp. The existing ramp includes a PVC drain, which has become blocked with debris and will back up during a rain event. The backed up water will flow around the ramp resulting in a potential hazard for the public using the ramp. $1,830 6: Clear / Translucent Light Fixture Covers (Injection Molded Polycarbonate Prismatic Reflector Globe with intemal Alzak reflector to achieve Type V distribution) Station Wide Remove, Clean, and/or Replace with New Fixture Covers. These polycarbonate globes have been exposed to the elements over the past 15 years and the translucency of the polycarbonate has slowly deteriorated to the point where many of the globes are gray in color. The deterioration of the globes is not leading to a structural failure of the globe itself, but is reducing the light flowing through the globe and is reducing the aesthetic appearance of the light fixtures. $35,500 7: Precast Concrete Planters - Irrigation System North and South Platforms Remove/replace Pop up Spray Heads with Drip or Bubbler System. (The existing landscape maintenance contractor is replacing the heads as needed with a bubbler system.) The pop spray heads are resulting in overspray onto the platform and canopies which over the long term will result in damage to the canopies and staining on the platform. This overspray is also resulting in over watering, water waste, and a public inconvenience. $8,130 (replace heads) to $24,500 remove planters) m 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 43 I — 3 Section I: Executive Summary Item 8: Tactile Warning Surface Location North Platform and at Ticket Vending Area Description of - Rehabilitation Repaint the non -yellow tactile tiles or remove and replace all black tiles on North Platform and replace with new yellow screw and glue down tiles. Reason for Rehabilitation The existing black tactile warning tile has started to fade and deteriorate; also the color used is no longer the standard for the City of Riverside. The City of Riverside Building and Safety Division Disabled Access Standards Plan RDA-6.0 call for Yellow tile. Estimated cost $5,730 (paint) to $76,400 (remove and replace all) 9: Landscape Irrigation System Station Wide Employ a Licensed Landscape Architect to design an update to the irrigation system to reduce water usage by converting to a drip irrigation system. The existing irrigation system is resulting in overspray onto areas outside the landscaping, which is or will result in damage to the adjacent items, asphalt paving, wrought iron fence, light poles, etc., increasing the maintenance cost for the stations. $109,600 10: Trash Receptacles North and South Platforms Replace the existing steel trash receptacles with precast concrete ones similar to North Main Corona. The existing trash receptacles are rusting and are recommended to be replaced with precast concrete ones with lower maintenance requirements. $10,100 11. Handrail 1 Guard Rail Towers, Pedestrian Bridge, North and South Platform The existing paint has faded, peeled, and eroded. The entire handrail and guard rail should be repainted per the three step process used at the other stations. The faded, peeling, and eroded paint is a potential a hazard and could result in an increase in damage to the exposed metal. Resulting in higher maintenance costs. $3,800 12. Stair Nosing North and South Towers The existing stair nosing have started to come lose and the screws backing out. The nosing needs to be reattached to the stair case. The lose stair nosing's may result in a potential hazard. $1,200 13. Electrical Enclosures North and South Platforms The paint on the 4 existing electrical enclosures on the platform has started to fade and need to be repainted. The faded, peeling, and eroded paint is resulting in an increase in damage to the exposed metal. Resulting in higher maintenance costs. $8,000 14. Electrical and Communication Pull Box Covers South Platform The bolts holding the steel pull box covers for electrical and communicational have become lose and have backed out The empty bolt holes may result in a potential hazard. $1,900 a 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 44 I-4 Section I: Executive Summary Item 15. At -grade Pedestrian Crossing (Asphalt) Location Description of Rehabikation North Platform — Remove and replace with Middle Main Concrete Precast At -Grade Entrance Crossing Panels. Reason for Rehabilitation The asphalt has deteriorated; cracks and gaps have appeared and may presents hazard. Estimated cost $50,000 16. At -grade Pedestrian Crossing (Asphalt) North Platform - West End Remove and replace with Concrete Precast At -Grade Crossing Panels. Also remove and replace the asphalt adjacent to the at - grade crossing with concrete. The asphalt has deteriorated; cracks and gaps have appeared and may present a hazard. $70,000 GRAND TOTAL: $390,490 to $594,530 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07_0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I - 5 45 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1. Canopies — Structural Steel Location North and South Platforms Description of Rehabilitation The paint on the canopies supports columns and frame has faded and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. Reason for Rehabilitation The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal Estimated cost $5,500 2. Canopies — Metal Roof North and South Platforms The paint on the canopies roof has faded and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. $30,000 3. Platform Striping North and South Platforms The yellow line and waming text along the edge of the platforms has faded and in some locations is completely wom away. The striping and text needs to be repainted and maintained. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic and station use issue. $4,500 4. Bridge Lexan Windows Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Remove and Replace windows with either: 1) Same Window System, 2) Wire Mesh, 3) Safety Glass System if acceptable to BNSF. The glass is pitted and clouded due to dirt, dust, and train emissions. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the windows and is an aesthetic issue. $70,000 5. Bridge Windows Historical Displays Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge lithe Bridge Lexan windows are replaced the Historical Display will also need to be reapplied. The historical displays are attached to the windows and once the windows are removed the displays will gone. The City Planning Department required the placement of these historical photo displays on the windows. $18,000 6. Clear / Translucent Light Fixture Covers on Bridge Roof —White Globes Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Remove, Clean, andlor Replace with New Fixture Covers. The globes are pitted and clouded due to dirt, dust, and train emissions. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the globes and is an aesthetic issue. $12,000 07 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 46 1-6 Section I: Executive Summary Item 7. Aluminum Ceiling Light Fixtures Location Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Description of . , Rehabiitation Replace Light Fixture diffusers (louvered covers) - Reason for Rehabilitation " - The covers are dirty/ missing and need to be cleaned or replaced. The comfition does not affect the structural integrity of the fight fixture but is an aesthetic issue. Estimated cost $9,500 8. Neon Bridge Signs Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Replace Ballasts and bring signs back into full operation. Some of the Neon letters are non -operational. An inspection was performed and it appears the ballasts require replacement This will require access through the aluminum ceiling panels. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the light fixture but is an aesthetic issue. $9,000 9. Elevator - Interior Walls North and South Tower Elevators Repair the interior walls which have vandalized. The walls should sanded to create a bumished finish or replaced. The interior walls have been scratched and defaced. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the fight fixture but is an aesthetic issue. $2,000 10. Elevator - Doors North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Door Operators. It was noted that the door operators are not working at 100% efficiency and should be replaced. This is not an immediate issue since the doors still are functioning. $1,000 11. Bike Rack Station Purchase and Install RCTC approved Bike Rack. Station patrons have been locking their bicycles all around the station and it is resulting in a disorganized placement of the bikes. A bike rack is necessary to have the bikes located in one central area. $2,000 12. Mulch Station Landscape Areas Replace in all areas designated for Mulch. Many of the landscape areas do not have mulch placed which would reduce weed growth and provide a better aesthetic condition. $10,000 GRAND TOTAL: I $173,500* `: The cost provided is a rough Estimate to perform the work and a detailed scope of work has not yet been developed. The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. of 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I —7 47 Section 1: Executive Summary Item 1: Signage ITEMS CURRENTLY IN THE REHABILIATION PROCESS Location Description of Rehabilitation Station Wide Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. Reason for Rehabilitation Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and are resulting in a potential hazard. Estimated cost $1,500 (small signs) to $3,000 (larger signs) 2: Drinking Water Main Line (1-inch Copper) South Platform Leaking Water Line needs to be repaired or replaced. The main water line to the drinking fountain and planters on the south platform is leaking. At this time the valve feeding the area has been tumed off to minimize the damage from the leaking water. The leak needs to be repaired to reduce any potential damage to the platform and its steel reinforcement and to reestablish water service to the drinking fountain and the planters. $16,500 GRAND TOTAL: $18,000 to $19,500 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 48 I - 8 Section 1: Executive Summary SUMMARY Item of Work Items To Be Completed In The First Year (2008-2009) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Items To Be Completed In The Second Year (2009-2010) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Estimated Low Range Cost $390,500 $173,500 GRAND TOTAL: Estimated High Range Cost $594,600 $173,500 $564,000 to $768,100 07 0064 Riverside Downtown Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 49 1-9 Riverside County Transportation Commission La Sierra :`Comirrnuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance -Plan Station Background Information ■ Address: 10901 Indiana. Riverside CA 92502 ■ Station Opened: October 2, 1995 ■ Rail Line Served: Metrolink —Inland Empire Orange County Line, 91 Line ■ Acres: 3.5 original , 2.7 Phase I Parking Lot Expansion, 5.4 Phase II Parking Lot Expansion Prepared by: Bechtel Civil Inc. November 20, 2007 Section is Executive Summary The La Sierra Commuter Rail Station was constructed over five separate construction projects, starting priorto 1995 and finishing with the Phase II Parking Lot expansion project in 2003. The station has been operational for nearly 12 years and as the age increases the amount of rehabilitation and maintenance has correspondingly increased. This Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan was developed to identify the items requiring short and longterm (over the next 12 years) rehabilitation and the subsequent maintenance which will be required to keep the station in an operational state. The Plan has been broken up into six sections and two, appendices, as outlined in the table of contents. Sections IV, V„and VI represent the body of this report and identify the items to be rehabilitated, the scope and cost m rehabilitate them, and the long term maintenance which will be required. The tables presented in Sections IV and V attempt to identify and encompass all the items that exist at the Station, which would are recommended to be rehabilitated and will require ongoing maintenance. The tables were developed based on the construction and As -built plans for the five construction projects and the thirteen maintenance' projects that have occurred at the station. Section IV identifies the items which are recommended for rehabilitation within the following time periods: ■ Short Term within the Next 2 years (2008-2010) ■ Mid-term 2 to 5 years (2010-2013) is Long Term - 5 to 12 years (2013-2020) The items listed in the Short Term within the next 2 years category, were further sub -divided into items which are recommended to be rehabilitated within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009), and those that are recommended to be rehabilitated within the following fiscal year (2009-2010). The process to determine if the item should be recommended for rehabilitation within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009) was by determining if one or more of the conditions listed below existed. ■ Potential Hazard ■ Will result loss of functionality in the near future. ■ Issue which may reduce the stations operation capabilities. ■ Items which if not addressed may result in additional or accelerated deterioration or damage to the station. These Short Term items are listed in the attached table. Section VI presents the recommend scope of work, cost estimate and schedule to address the items recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2009), see summary table on the following pages. The costs used in the estimates were gathered from many sources including, BNI Building News General Construction 2006 Cost book and previous construction and maintenance projects. These costs are only estimates to be used for RCTC's budgeting process. The actual cost of the work will vary depending on a detailed scope, costs for labor, equipment, and materials and should be determined by reviewing the scope of work with RCTC's on call contractor or by a competitive bidding process. During the development of this plan, some of the items identified in Section IV, as recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2010), began the rehabilitation process. These items are either in the scope of work development phase, out for bid, or waiting for issuance of a purchase order or construction agreement. These items are included in this plan and in the attached table, since the work has not yet been completed. These items are identified at the end of the summary tables and are not included in the priority list or in the final cost. 07_0064 La Sera Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 51 Section 1; Executive Summary One of the issues that is unique to the La Sierra Station is the abundance of pigeons roosting on the Pedestrian Overcrossing. The pigeon problem (PP) has resulted in damage to the paint on the structure and an unhealthy condition resulting from the bird droppings. This issue will be addressed as an Short Term item during the repainting of the Pedestrian Overcrossings. 07_oaa La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabitation and Maintenance Plan I - 2 52 Section 1: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1. Asphalt Pavement . Location Main Parking Area '.. Description of Rehabiitation .. Deteriorating areas (alligator cracking) - identify, Saw Cut, Remove, Replace AC, remove any wet materials and replace with new aggregate base. Reasori for Rehabilitation If the repairs are not made water will infiltrate to the sub -soils and result in the failure of the pavement: Once the pavement fails, a large pothole will develop and may become a potential hazard to the public driving and walking through the parking lot. In addition, the water infiltration it will result in an expansion of the damage and additional costs to remove and replace additional sub -soils. Estimated cost $21,500 2. Light Poles Main Parking Repaint Light Poles and The paint on the light poles paint $25,500 Lot / Phase I Place Bird Spikes has faded and in some locations (paint only Parking Area / is flaking off. It appears some of faded and Phase II Parking the damage maybe due to bird flaking poles Area / Platforms droppings, which should be addressed at the same time the poles are re -painted. The deterioration of the paint will lead to the base metal being exposed to the elements and subsequent rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it could lead the pole having to be replaced, which woukl increase the stations maintenance costs. and place bird spikes) To $38,800 (paint all faded and flaking poles and place bird spikes) 3. Signage Station Wide 1) Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. (Currently in the rehabilitation process and signs are being placed.) 2) Complete the development of the Station Signage Standards and implement at all Stations. 1) Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and may result in a potential hazard. 2) The signs at all stations should be consistent and conform to set standard. This will reduce the cost for station specific signage and allow for the stockpiling of signs to be used when the need arises. $10,000 07_0064 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 53 I — 3 Section t: Executive Summary Item 4. Wrought Iron Fence and Guard Railing Location Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Repair Rusted Sections and repaint all fencing. Reason for Rehabilitation Portions of the fence have rusted through and are on the verge of breaking off and falling into the public walk ways creating a potential hazard. In areas not accessible to the public the rusting and corrosion if not treated will expand and will result in additional costs to make the necessary repairs. Estimated cost $23,200 (paint all fence and repair estimated 10% of total length) 5. Saw Cut Joints and North and South Clean out and place Joint The gaps in the concrete $1,200 Construction Joints Platforms Filler. platform need to be filled with a joint sealant to eliminate water infiltration to the sub soils. If the gaps are not filled, water will infiltrate and saturate the soils, resulting in an increase in the settlement of the platform and damage to concrete. 6. Clear / Translucent Station Wide Remove, Clean, and/or These polycarbonate globes $35,000 Light Fixture Covers Replace with New Fixture have been exposed to the (Clean and (Injection Molded Covers. elements over the past 15 years replace 10% of Polycarbonate Prismatic Reflector Globe with internal Alzak reflector to achieve Type V distribution) and the translucency of the polycarbonate has slowly deteriorated to the point where many of the globes are gray in color. The deterioration of the globes is not leading to a structural failure of the globe itself, but is reducing the light flowing through the globe and is reducing the aesthetic appearance of the light fixtures. the total covers) 07_0064 La Siena Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 54 I — 4 Section I: Executive Summary Item Location , Description of . Rehabilitation Reason for Rehabilitation Estimated cost 7. Structural Steel and North Tower / Repaint the exposed Steel It has been noted during the past $111,200 Other Steel Surface South Tower I and place bird retardant 2 years that the south tower and Exposed / Stair Cases I Pedestrian devices. pedestrian bridge steel has Tower Roof Bridge started to fade, peel, and erode. Some of the damage to the structure's paint is due to bird droppings, which should be addressed at the same time the structure is re -painted. The deterioration of the paint will lead to the base metal being exposed to the elements and subsequent rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it could lead the additional structural repairs which will greatly increase the stations maintenance costs. 8. Handrail and Guard North Tower ! Repaint the handrail and lt has been noted during the past $1,800 Rail South Tower! guard rail. 2 years that the south tower and (paint all Pedestrian Bridge pedestrian bridge steel has started to fade, peel, and erode. handrail) Most of the damage to the structure's paint is due to bird droppings, which will be addressed at the same time the structure is re -painted. The handrail and guard mil have suffered a significant amount of this damage since the birds roost on the railing. The handrail and guard rail need to be repainted to reduce the potential for the base metal to be exposed to the elements which would result in the development of rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it could lead the additional structural repairs which will greatly increase the stations maintenance costs. 07_ W64 La Sierra Commuter Rad Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 55 I — 5 Section 1: Executive Summary 9. Aluminimum Ceiling Panels Pedestrian Bridge Description of Rehabilitation Clean and Replace rusted or damaged sections as necessary. Reason for Rehabilitation The panel system is dirty and has not been cleaned during the life of the station, due to the system having to be hand cleaned. If the dirt is allowed to remain, it could lead to break down of the paint and corrosion, eventual requiring the ceiling panels to be replaced. Estimated cost $4,000 10. Landscape Irrigation System Station Wide Employ a Licensed Landscape Architect to design an update to the irrigation system to reduce water usage by converting to a drip irrigation system. The existing irrigation system is resulting in overspray onto areas outside the landscaping, which is or will result in damage to the adjacent items, asphalt paving, wrought iron fence, light poles, etc., increasing the maintenance cost for the stations. $386,200 GRAND TOTAL: $619,600 to $632,900 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07 0064 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I — 6 56 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED 1N THE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item .. 1. Carport - Structural Steel Location Phase l Parking Lot Description of Rehabiitation .- The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life and protect it from the elements and mitigate the development of rust . Reason for Rehabilitation. The paint is fading resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. Estimated cost $55,000 2. Light Poles - 35 foot tall square shape - Phase I and Phase II Parking Lots The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life and protect it from the elements and mitigate the development of rust. The paint is fading resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal $12,000 3. Platform Concrete Planter Block Outs North Plafform Remove and replace Pop up Spray Heads with Drip or Bubbler System. The pop up spray heads over irrigate the planters and should be replaced to reduce water consumption. $4,000 4. Canopies - Standing Seam Metal Roof North and South Platforms The paint on the steel has faded and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. The faded paint is rosuiting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. $30,000 5. Platform Stripping North and South Platforms The yellow line and warning text along the edge of the platforms has faded and in some locations is completely wom away. The stripping and text needs to be repainted and maintained. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic and station use issue. $4,500 6. Handrail - Mini Platforms North and South Platformsfaded The existing paint has and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. $4,000 07_0064 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 57 I-7 • Section t: Executive Summary Item 7. Bridge Lexan Windows Location Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Description of Rehabiliation Remove and Replace windows with either: 1}Same Window System, 2) Wire Mesh, 3) Safety Glass System if acceptable to BNSF. Reason for Rehabilitation The glass is pitted and clouded due to dirt, dust, and train emissions. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the windows and is an aesthetic issue. Estimated cost $70,000 8. Handrail — Pedestrian Bridge Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge The existing paint has faded and in some cases can 6e wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. $4,000 9. Standing Seam Metal Roof — Pedestrian Bridge Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge The existing paint has faded and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be repainted to extend its useful life. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the tong term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal $20,000 10. Elevator - Interior Walls North and South Tower Elevators Repair the interior walls which have vandalized. The walls should sanded to create a bumished finish or replaced: The interior walls have been scratched and defaced. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the light fixture but is an aesthetic issue. $2,000 11. Elevator- Doors North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Door Operators. It was noted that the door operators are not working at 100% efficiency and should be replaced. This is not an immediate issue since the doors still are functioning. $1,000 12. Elevator - Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier) North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier). The Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (fight diffuzier) are dirty and do not provide good light transmission and should be replaced. This process has occurred at Downtown Station and increases the brightness inside the elevator cab and improves the aesthetic appearance. $1,500 07 0064 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 58 I — 8 Section 1= Executive Summary 13. Mulch Location. Station Landscape Areas Description of Rehabilitation Replace in all areas designated for Mulch. Reason for Rehabilitation Many of the landscape areas do not have mulch placed which would reduce weed growth and provide a better aesthetic condition. GRAND TOTAL: Estimated cost $10,000 $218,000* ': The cost provided is a rough Estimate to perform the work and a detailed scope of work has not yet been developed. The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. ITEMS CURRENTLY IN THE REHABILIATION PROCESS 1: Signage Location Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. Reason for Rehabilitation Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and are resulting in a potential hazard. GRAND TOTAL: Estimated cost $1,500 (small signs) to $3,000 (larger signs) $1,500 to $3,000 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07 Wfi4 La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 59 l-9 • Section I: Executive Summary SUMMARY Item of Work . !terns To Be Completed In The First Year (2007-20089) Of The Short Tenn (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Items To Be Completed In The Second Year (2007-20089) Of The Short Term (Within 2Years) Rehabilitation Period Estimated Low Range Cost $619,600 $218,000 GRAND TOTAL: Estimated High Range Cost $632,900 $218,000 $837,600 to $850,900 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. of aee La Sierra Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 60 I-10 Riverside County Transportation Commission :lsiorth' llnain C®rona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Ildlaintenance`Phn Station Background Information ■ Address: 250 E Blaine St. Corona CA 92879 ■ Station Opened: November 2002 ■ Rail Line Served: Metrolink —Inland Empire Orange County Line, 99 Line ■ Acres: 6.72 original, 3.5 Parking Garage Prepared by: Bechtel Civil Inc. November 20, 2007 Section I: Executive Summary The North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station was constructed in 2002 and finishing in 2003. The station has been operational for nearly 4 years and as the age increases the amount of rehabilitation and maintenance has correspondingly increased. This Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan was developed to identify the items requiring short and long term (over the next 12 years) rehabilitation and the subsequent maintenance which will be required to keep the station in an operational state. This station is young when compared to the others in the system and due to this fact there are no major items requiring rehabilitation. The Plan has been broken up into six sections and two appendices, as outlined in the table of contents. Sections IV, V, and VI represent the body of this report and identify the items to be rehabilitated, the scope and cost to rehabilitate them, and the long term maintenance which will be required. The tables presented in Sections IV and V comprises detailed scope and attempt to encompass all the items that exist at the Station which would require rehabilitation and/or maintenance. The tables were developed base on the construction and As -built plans for the three construction projects and the two maintenance projects that have occurred at the station. Section IV identifies the items which are recommended for rehabilitation within the following time periods: ■ Short Term within the Next 2 years (2008-2010) ■ Mid-term - 2 to 5 years (2010-2013) ■ Long Term - 5 to 12 years (2013-2020) The items listed in the Short Term within the next 2 years category, were further sub -divided into items which are recommended to be rehabilitated within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009), and those that are recommended to be rehabilitated within the following fiscal year (2009-2010). The process to determine if the item should be recommended for rehabilitation within the upcoming fiscal year (2008- 2009) was by determining if one or more of the conditions listed below existed. ■ Potential Hazard. ■ Will result loss of functionality in the near future. ■ Issue which may reduce the stations operation capabilities. ■ Items which if not addressed may result in additional or accelerated deterioration or damage to the station. These Short Term items are listed in the attached table. Section VI presents the recommend scope of work, cost estimate and schedule to address the items recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2009), see summary table on the following pages. The costs used in the estimates were gathered from many sources including, BNI Building News General Construction 2006 Cost book and previous construction and maintenance projects. These costs are only estimates to be used for RCTC's budgeting process. The actual cost of the work will vary depending on a detailed scope, costs for labor, equipment, and materials and should be determined by reviewing the scope of work with RCTC's on call contractor or by a competitive bidding process. During the development of this plan, some of the items identified in Section IV, as recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2010), began the rehabilitation process. These items are either in the scope of work development phase, out for bid, or waiting for issuance of a purchase order or construction agreement. These items are included in this plan and in the attached table, since the work has not yet been completed. These items are identified at the end of the summary tables and are not included in the priority list or in the final cost. o 0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I —1 62 Section I: Executive Summary In early 2008 the construction of the North Main Corona Parking Garage is to commence. This project will construct a 6 level concrete parking garage in the western parking lot. It is anticipated it will take 17 months to complete this project. 07 0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 63 I - 2 Section 1: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item - 1. Saw Cut Joints and Construction Joints Location North and South Platforms Description of Rehabilitation Determine Root Cause for displacement. Clean out and place Joint Filler. If vertical displacement is present grind down the concrete to make it smooth and level with the adjacent surfaces. ' . Reason for Rehabilitation . ' The gaps in the concrete platform need to be filled with a joint sealant to eliminate water infiltration to the sub soils. If the gaps are not filled, water will infiltrate and saturate the soils, resulting in an increase in the settlement of the platform and damage to concrete. The vertical displacement of the concrete panels may result in a potential hazard_ Estimated cost $21,000 2. Lights! Ballasts Canopy & Platform Lights Replace burned out bulbs and potentially non- functioning ballasts. The lights require replacement due to station use issues. $18,000 3. Landscape Irrigation System Station Wide Employ a Licensed Landscape Architect to design an update to the irrigation system to reduce water usage by converting to a drip irrigation system. The existing irrigation system is resulting in overspray onto areas outside the landscaping, which is or will result in damage to the adjacent items, asphalt paving, wrought iron fence, light poles, etc., increasing the maintenance cost for the stations. S94,200 4: Signage Station Wide 1) Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. (Currently in the rehabilitation process and signs are being placed.) 2) Complete the development of the Station Signage Standards and implement at all Stations. 1) Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and may result in a potential hazard. 2) The signs at all stations should be consistent and conform to set standard. This will reduce the cost for station specific signage and allow for the stockpiling of signs to be used when the need arises. $10,000 GRAND TOTAL: $143,200 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 0 0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 64 I - 3 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1. Precast Concrete Planters - Irrigation System Location . . North and South Platforms Description of. Rehabilitation - Remove/replace Pop up Spray Heads with Drip or Bubbler System . Reason for Rehabilitation The pop spray heads are resulting in overspray onto the platform and canopies which over the long term will result in damage to the canopies and staining on the plafform. This overspray is also resulting in over watering, water waste, and a public inconvenience. Estimated cost $8,500 2: Clear ! Translucent Light Fixture Covers (Injection Molded Polycarbonate Prismatic Reflector Globe with intemal Alzak reflector to achieve Type V distribution) Station Wide Remove and Clean. These polycarbonate globes have been exposed to the elements over the past 15 years and the translucency of the polycarbonate has slowly deteriorated to the point where many of the globes are gray in color. The deterioration of the globes is not leading to a structural failure of the globe itself, but is reducing the light flowing through the globe and is reducing the aesthetic appearance of the light fixtures. $13,000 3. Bridge Lexan Windows Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Professionally Clean the windows with a contractor experienced with Lexan. The cost provided assumes Railroad insurance required. The glass is clouded due to dirt, dust, and train emissions. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the windows and is an aesthetic issue. $9,200 4. Elevator - Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier) North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier). The Polycarbonate Ceding panels (fight diffuzier) are dirty and do not provide good light transmission and should be replaced. This process has occurred at Downtown Station and increases the brightness inside the elevator cab and impmves the aesthetic appearance. $1,500 GRAND TOTAL: $32,200* *: The cost provided is a rough Estimate to perform the work and a detailed scope of work has not yet been developed. The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07 0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I - 4 65 Section 1: Executive Summary ITEMS CURRENTLY IN THE REHABILIATION PROCESS Item,' 1. Signage Location " Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. Reason for Rehabilitation Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and are resulting in a potential hazard. GRAND TOTAL: Estimated cost $600 (replace small signs) to- $1,200 (replace large sins $600 to $1,200 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07_0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 66 I - 5 Section 1: Executive Summary SUMMARY Item of Work Items To Be Completed In The FirstYear(2008-2009) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Items To Be Completed In The Second Year (2009-2010) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Estimated Low Range Cost $143,200 $32,200 GRAND TOTAL: Estimated High Range Cost $143,200 $32,200 $175,400 07 0064 North Main Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I — 6 67 Riverside County Transportation Commission Pedley "Commuter (tail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan Station Background Information ■ Address: 6001 Pedley Rd. Riverside CA 92509 ■ Station Opened: June 14, 1993 s Rail Line Served: Metrolink —Riverside Line ■ Acres: 4.5 original Prepared by: Bechtel Civil Inc. November 20, 2007 • Section I: Executive Summary The Pedley Commuter Rail Station was constructed over three separate construction projects, starting in 1993. The station has been operational for nearly 14 years and as the age increases the amount of rehabilitation and maintenance has correspondingly increased. This Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan was developed to identify the items requiring short and long term (over the next 14 years) rehabilitation and the subsequent maintenance which will be required to keep the station inan operational state. The Plan has been broken up into six sections and two appendices, as outlined in the table of contents. Sections IV, V, and VI representthebody of this report and identify the items to be rehabilitated the scope and cost to rehabilitate them, and the long term maintenance which will be required. The tables presented in Sections IV and V comprises detailed scope and attempt to encompass all the items that east at the Station which would require rehabilitation and/or maintenance. The tables were developed base on the construction and As -built plans for the three construction projects and the two maintenance projects that have occurred at the station. Section IV identifies the items which are recommended for rehabilitation within the following time periods: is Short Term within the Next 2 years (2008-2010) is Mid-term - 2 to 5 years (2010-2013) ■ Long Term - 5 to 12 years (2013-2020) The items listed in the Short Term within the next 2 years category, were further sub -divided into items which are recommended to be rehabilitated within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009), and those that are recommended to be rehabilitated within the following fiscal year (2009-2010). The process to determine if the item should be recommended for rehabilitation within the upcoming fiscal year (2008- 2009) was by determining if one or more of the conditions listed below existed. ■ Potential Hazard. ■ Will result loss of functionality in the near future. ■ Issue which may reduce the stations operation capabilities. ■ Items which if not addressed may result in additional or accelerated deterioration or damage to the station. These Short Term items are listed in the attached table. Section VI presents the recommend scope of work, cost estimate and schedule to address the items recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2009), see summary table on the following pages. The costs used in the estimates were gathered from many sources including, BNI Building News General Construction 2006 Cost book and previous construction and maintenance projects. These costs are only estimates to be used for RCTC's budgeting process. The actual cost of the work will vary depending on a detailed scope, costs for labor, equipment, and materials and should be determined by reviewing the scope of work with RCTC's on call contractor or by a competitive bidding process. During the development of this plan, some of the items identified in Section IV, as recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2010), began the rehabilitation process. These items are either in the scope of work development phase, out for bid, or waiting for issuance of a purchase order or construction agreement. These items are included in this plan and in the attached table, since the work has not yet been completed. These items are identified at the end of the summary tables and are not included in the priority list or in the final cost. 07 0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I —1 69 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1.Asphalt Pavement Location Main Parking Area Description of Rehabilitation . Deteriorating areas (minor surface unraveling and cracking) — perform crack sealing and spot slurry seal. ,. Reason for Rehabilitation If the repairs are not made water will infiltrate to the sub -soils and result in the failure of the pavement Once the pavement fails, a large pothole will develop and may become a potential hazard to the public driving and walking through the parking lot. In addition, the water infiltration it will result in an expansion of the damage and additional costs to remove and replace additional sub -sods. Estimated cost $2,200 2. Light Poles Parking Lot and Bus Loop I Platform Repaint Light Poles The paint on the light poles paint has faded and in some locations is flaking off. The deterioration of the paint will lead to the base metal being exposed to the elements and subsequent rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it could lead the pole having to be replaced, which would increase the stations maintenance costs. $12,200 3. Clear / Translucent Station Wide Remove, Clean, and/or These polycarbonate globes $32,700 Light Fixture Covers (Injection Molded Replace with New Fixture Covers. have been exposed to the elements over the past 15 years to Polycarbonate Prismatic Reflector Globe with intemal Alzak reflector to achieve Type V distribution) and the translucency of the polycarbonate has slowly deteriorated to the point where many of the globes are gray in color. The deterioration of the globes is not leading to a structural failure of the globe itself, but is reducing the light flowing through the globe and is reducing the aesthetic appearance of the Gght fixtures. $36,700 01 0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 70 I-2 Section I: Executive Summary Item 4. Tactile Waming Surface location . North Platform and South Platform Description of Rehabittation Repaint all Red and Faded Yellow Detectable Warning System Tile Reason for Rehabilitation• The existing red the is no bnger used as a standard and the yellow tactile warning file has started to fade and deteriorate. Estimated cost $2,500 (paint only) to $4,800 (Paint and replace 5%) 5. Station Platform Canopies Main Loading Platform Repaint the exposed Steel. It has been noted that the paint on the canopies has started to fade, peel, and erode. The deterioration of the paint will lead to the base metal being exposed to the elements and subsequent rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it could lead the additional structural repairs which will greatly increase the stations maintenance costs. $98,800 6. Landscape Irrigation System Station Wide Employ a Licensed Landscape Architect to design an update to the irrigation system to reduce water usage by converting to a drip irrigation system. The existing irrigation system is resulting in overspray onto areas outside the landscaping, which is or will result in damage to the adjacent items, asphalt paving, wrought iron fence, light poles, etc., increasing the maintenance cost for the stations. $95,200 7: Signage Station Wide 1) Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. (Currently in the rehabilitation process and signs are being placed.) 2) Complete the development of the Station Signage Standards and implement at all Stations. 1) Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and may result in a potential hazard. 2) The signs at all stations should be consistent and conform to set standard. This will reduce the cost for station specific signage and allow for the stockpiling of signs to be used when the need arises. $10,000 GRAND TOTAL: $253,600 to $259,900 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 0 0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 71 I-3 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1. Station Platforms - Concrete Joints Location North and South Platforms Description of - Rehabiltation Remove, Clean, and Replace Joint Filler Reason for Rehabilitation The joint filler material has dried out and cracked and needs to be replaced. The joint filler prevents water infiltration and potential settlement of the concrete. Estimated cost $5,000 2. Station Platforms - Painted Striping on platform North and South Platforms The yellow line and waming text along the edge of the platforms has faded and in some locations is completely wom away. The striping and text needs to be repainted and maintained. The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic and station use issue. $4,500 3. Station Site - 3'-6"-foot High Galvanized Guard Rail Parking Lot Repair Rusted Sections and repaint all fencing. Portions of the fence have rusted through and are on the verge of breaking off and falling into the public walk ways creating a potential hazard. In areas not accessible to the public the rusting and corrosion if not treated will expand and will result in additional costs to make the necessary repairs. $15,000 4. Mulch Station Landscape Areas Replace in all areas designated for Mulch. Many of the landscape areas do not have mulch placed which would reduce weed growth and provide a better aesthetic condition. $10,000 GRAND TOTAL: $34 500* *: The cost provided is a rough Estimate to perform the work and a detailed scope of work has not yet been developed. The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07_0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I - 4 72 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS CURRENTLY IN THE REHABILIATION PROCESS Item 1. Signage Location Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. Reason for Rehabilitation Some signs, at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and are resulting in a potential hazard. GRAND TOTAL: Estimated cost $600 . (replace small signs) to $1,200 (replace large sip ns $600 to $1,200 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07 0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 73 I — 5 Section 1: Executive Summary SUMMARY Item of Work Items To Be Completed In The First Year (2008-2009) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period. Items To Be Completed In The Second Year (2009-2010) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Estimated Low Range Cost $253,600 $34,500 GRAND TOTAL: Estimated High Range Cost $259,900 $34,500 $288,100 to $294,400 07 0064 Pedley Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 74 I - 6 Riverside County Transportation Commission West`Corona Commuter: Rail Station Rehabilitati®n and' Plana Station Background Information ■ Address: 155 S. Auto Center Dr. Corona CA 92880 ■ Station Opened: October 2, 1995 ■ Rail Line Served: Metrolink —Inland Empire Orange County Line, 91 Line ■ Acres: 10.7 original Prepared by: Bechtel Civil Inc. November 20, 2007 Section I: Executive Summary The West Corona Commuter Rail Station was constructed over two separate construction projects, starting in 1995 and finishing with the Pedestrian Ctvercrossing project in 2001. The station has been operational for nearly 12 years and as the age increases the amount of rehabilitation and maintenance has correspondingly increased. This Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan was developed to identify the items requiring short and long; term (over the next 12 years)rehabilitation and the subsequent maintenance which will be required to keep the station in an operational state. The Plan has been broken up into six sections and two appendices, as outlined in the table of contents. Sections IV, V and VI represent the body of this report and identify the items to be rehabilitated, the scope and cost to rehabilitate them, and the long term maintenance which will be required. The tables presented in Sections IV and V attempt to identify and encompass all the items that exist at the Station, which would are recommended to be rehabilitated and will require ongoing maintenance. The tables were developed based on the construction and As -built plans for the two construction projects and the six maintenance projects that have occurred at the station. Section IV identifies the items which are recommended for rehabilitation within the following time periods: e Short Term within the Next 2 years (2008-2010) ■ Mid-term - 2 to 5 years (2010-2013) ■ Long Term - 5 to 12 years (2013-2020) The items listed in the Short Term within the next 2 years category, were further sub -divided into items which are recommended to be rehabilitated within the upcoming fiscal year (2008-2009), and those that are recommended to be rehabilitated within the following fiscal year (2009-2010). The process to determine if the item should be recommended for rehabilitation within the upcoming fiscal year (2008- 2009) was by determining if one or more of the conditions listed below existed. ■ Potential Hazard. e Will result loss of functionality in the near future. ■ Issue which may reduce the stations operation capabilities. ■ Items which if not addressed may result in additional or accelerated deterioration or damage to the station. These Short Term items are listed in the attached table. Section VI presents the recommend scope of work, cost estimate and schedule to address the items recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2009), see summary table on the following pages. The costs used in the estimates were gathered from many sources including, BNI Building News General Construction 2006 Cost book and previous construction and maintenance projects. These costs are only estimates to be used for RCTC's budgeting process. The actual cost of the work will vary depending on a detailed scope, costs for labor, equipment, and materials and should be determined by reviewing the scope of work with RCM's on call contractor or by a competitive bidding process. During the development of this plan, some of the items identified in Section IV, as recommended for Short Term rehabilitation (2008-2010), began the rehabilitation process. These items are either in the scope of work development phase, out for bid, or waiting for issuance of a purchase order or construction agreement. These items are included in this plan and in the attached table, since the work has not yet been completed These items are identified at the end of the summary tables and are not included in the priority list or in the final cost. 07 0064 _ West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I -1 76 Section I: Executive Summary One of the issues that are unique to the West Corona Station is the high winds that flow through the canyon. These winds result in damage to the station and pedestrian crossing and an increase in dirt and dust during the summer months. 07_aria West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 77 I — 2 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE FIRST YEAR (2008-2009) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item • 1. Wrought Iron Fence and Guard Railing Location Station Wide Description of Rehabilitation Repair Rusted Sections and repaint all fencing. Reason for Rehabilitation Portions of the fence have rusted through and are on the verge of breaking oft and falling into the public walk ways creating a potential hazard. In areas not accessible to the public the rusting and corrosion if not treated will expand and will result in additional costs to make the necessary repairs. Estimated cost $15,400 2. Signage Station Wide 1) Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, Of faded. (Currently in the rehabilitation process and signs are being placed.) 2) Complete the development of the Station Signage Standards and implement at all Stations. 1) Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and may result in a potential hazard. 2) The signs at all stations should be consistent and conform to set standard. This will reduce the cost for station specific signage and allow for the stockpiling of signs to be used when the need arises. $10,000 3. Clear / Translucent Injection Molded Polycarbonate Prismatic Reflector Globes / Tempered Glass Main Parking Area / Station Wide Remove, Clean, and/or Replace with New Fixture Covers. These polycarbonate globes have been exposed to the elements over the past 15 years and the translucency of the polycarbonate has slowly deteriorated to the point where many of the globes are gray in color. The deterioration of the globes is not leading to a structural failure of the globe itself, but is reducing the light flowing through the globe and is reducing the aesthetic appearance of the light fixtures. $5,800 (clean only) To $10,600 (clean and replace some) 4. Tactile Wanting Surface North Platform and South Platform Repaint all Red and Faded Yellow Detectable Waming System Tile. The existing red tile is no longer used as a standard and the yellow tactile warning file has started to fade and deteriorate. $2,500 (repaint all) to $4,600 (repaint and replace some) 07_0064 West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 78 I — 3 Section 1: Executive Summary Item 5. Pedestrian Bridge Interior Wall Location Towers and Pedestrian Bridge Description of . Rehabilitation Existing drywall is damaged and deteriorating. The drywall was cracked and damaged near the floor and as time progressed the damage increased. Currentiy portions of the drywall have caved in or have deteriorated to the point where the cover paper and some of the drywall have fallen off. Most of the damage is located around the windows and along the bottom near the floor, see pictures on the following page. Reason for Rehabilitation _ The existing condition allows the bridge wall interior to be open to the elements and rodents. If the damaged is not repaired it could. results in corrosion to the bridge's structural steel and rodent infestation. Estimated cost $3,500 6. Bridge Rain Gutters Towers and Pedestrian Bridge The gutters function is to direct the water from the roof to not fall onto the pedestrian platform below. The gutters were placed for the public convenience and are not a structural necessity. Therefore, RCTC can elect to reattach the gutters or to leave them off the structure. The Rain Gutters tore away from the Bridge under Santa Ana Wind Conditions. $0 (Do nothing) to $14,900 (Reattach an Modify Connection) 7. Landscape Irrigation System Station Wide Employ a Licensed Landscape Architect to design an update to the irrigation system to reduce water usage by converting to a drip irrigation system. The existing irrigation system is resulting in overspray onto areas outside the landscaping, which is or will result in damage to the adjacent items, asphalt paving, wrought iron fence, light poles, etc., increasing the maintenance cost for the stations. $298,200 8. Light Poles Main Parking Lot! Platforms Repaint Light Poles The paint on the light poles paint has faded and in some locations is flaking off. The deterioration of the paint will lead to the base metal being exposed to the elements and subsequent rust and corrosion. If this is not mitigated at this time it coukt lead the pole having to be replaced, which would increase the stations maintenance costs. $16,800 07_0664 West Corona Commuter Rat Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 79 I-4 Section I: Executive Summary Item 9. Saw Cut Joints and Construction Joints North and South Platforms Description of Rehabilitation Determine Root Cause for displacement. Clean out and place Joint Filler. If vertical displacement is present grind down the concrete to make it smooth and level with the adjacent surfaces. Reason for Rehabilitation Estimated cost The gaps in the concrete platform need to be filled with a joint sealant to eliminate water infiltration to the sub soils: if the gaps are not Bled, water will infiltrate and saturate the soils, resulting in an increase in the settlement of the platform and damage to concrete. The vertical displacement of the concrete panels may result in a potential hazard. $6,300 10. Colored Concrete South Platform / Sidewalk Determine Root Cause for displacement. Clean out and place Joint Filler. If vertical displacement is present grind down the concrete to make it smooth and level with the adjacent surfaces. The gaps/cracks in the concrete platform need to be filled with a joint sealant or remove and replace the concrete sidewalk to eliminate water infiltration to the sub soils. If the gaps are not filled or sections replaced, water will infiltrate and saturate the soils, resulting in an increase in the settlement of the platform and damage to concrete. The vertical displacement of the concrete panels may result in a potential hazard, by grinding them down or removing and replacing the concrete panels it would address this issue. $11,400 (Caulk Joints and grind concrete) to $35,400 (Remove and replace al colored concrete) 11. Pedestrian Bridge Roof Leak Pedestrian Bridge Locate the leak in the roof and make the necessary repair. The water is leaking through the roof and damaging the ceiling, walls, and Floor of the bridge. $7,000.00 GRAND TOTAL: $376,900 to $422,700 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 070004 West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 80 I-5 Section I: Executive Summary ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED IN THE SECOND YEAR (2009-2010) OF THE SHORT TERM (WITHIN 2 YEARS) REHABILITATION PERIOD Item 1. Platform Stripping Location North and South Platforms Description of Rehabilitation ' ` The yellow line and waming text abng the edge of the platforms has faded and in some locations is completely wom away. The stripping and text needs to be repainted and maintained. Reason for Rehabilitation The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic and station use issue. Estimated cost $4,500 2. Structural Steel encased in metal stud framing and covered with Acrylic stucco finish. Bridge is Dryvit system. North and South Towers and Pedestrian Overcrossing Pressure wash and hand wash towers and bridge to remove built up dirt and train exhaust OPTION: Repaint the total Structure. The paint tower and bridge have become dirty due to the highs winds, dirty, and train exhaust. $14,500 (wash only) To $82,500 3. Handrail I Guard Rail Towers, Pedestrian Bridge, North and South Platform The existing paint has faded and in some cases can be wiped off by hand. The steel should be The faded paint is resulting in an aesthetic issue and in the long term may result in development of rust of the underlying metal. $3,000 repainted to extend its useful life. Per schedule of values 600 feet. 4. Bridge Lexan Windows Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Remove and Replace windows with either: 1) Same Window System, 2) Wire Mesh, 3) Safety Glass System if acceptable to BNSF. The glass is pitted and clouded due to dirt, dust, and train emissions. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the windows and is an aesthetic issue. $70,000 5. Aluminum Ceiling Panels Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Clean the ceiling in the bridge. The metal ceiling is dirty and need to be cleaned. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the light facture but is an aesthetic issue. $9,500 6. Aluminum Ceiling Light Fixtures Pedestrian Overcrossing Bridge Clean and/or Replace Light Fixture diffusers (louvered covers) The covers are dirty or missing and need to be cleaned and replaced. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the light fixture but is an aesthetic issue. $5,000 07 0064 West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 81 I - 6 Section 1: Executive Summary • • Item 7. Elevator - Interior Walls Location North and South Tower Elevators Description of Rehabilitation Repair the interior walls which have vandalized. The walls should sanded to create a bumished finish or replaced. Reason for Rehabilitation The interior walls have been scratched and defaced. The condition does not affect the structural integrity of the light fixture but is an aesthetic issue. Estimated cost $2,000 8. Elevator - Doors North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Door Operators. It was noted that the door operators are not working at 100% efficiency and should be replaced. This is not an immediate issue since the doors still are functioning. $1,000 9. Elevator - Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier) North and South Tower Elevators Replace the Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier). The Polycarbonate Ceiling panels (light diffuzier) are dirty and do not provide good light transmission and should be replaced. This process has occurred at Downtown Station and increases the brightness inside the elevator cab and improves the aesthetic appearance. $1,500 10. Mulch Station Landscape Areas Replace in all areas designated for Mulch. Many of the landscape areas do not have mulch placed which would reduce weed growth and provide a better aesthetic condition. $10,000 GRAND TOTAL: $121,000 to $189,000* *: The cost provided is a rough Estimate to perform the work and a detailed scope of work has not yet been developed. The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. 07_0064 West Corona Commuter Rai Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan I — 7 82 Section I: Executive Summary 1. Asphalt Pavement ITEMS CURRENTLY IN THE REHABILIATION PROCESS Location Main Parking Area Description of Rehabilitation Deteriorating areas (alligator cracking) — slurry seal. Reason for Rehabilitation If the pavement is slurry sealed as soon as possible it will provide an extension to the life span of the parking lot and provide at least 3additional years before another slurry seal process is required. If the parking lot is not sealed at this time the damage will continue to occur and eventually will require removal and replacement of portions of the pavement and sub soils. Estimated cost $37,000 2: Signage Station Wide Replace all emergency and station critical signs that are damaged, missing, or faded. Some signs at the station have faded, been stolen, or damaged and are resulting in a potential hazard. $1,500 (small signs) to $3,000 (larger signs) GRAND TOTAL: $38,500 to $40,000 The Numbers used prior to each item do not represent the priority of the items, but is merely a way to track the items. at 0064 West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 83 I-8 Section 1: Executive Summary SUMMARY Item of Work Items To Be Completed In The First Year (2008-2009) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Items To Be Completed In The Second Year (2009-2010) Of The Short Term (Within 2 Years) Rehabilitation Period Estimated Low Range - Cost $376,900 $121,000 GRAND TOTAL: Estimated High Range. Cost' $422,700 $189,000 $497,900 to $611,700 oz 0064 West Corona Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation and Maintenance Plan 84 I — 9 • AGENDA ITEM 7H • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Sheldon Peterson, Program Manager Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: North Main Corona Shuttle Agreement with Agency Riverside Transit STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 11 Approve Agreement No. 08-25-095-00 with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to provide for additional shuttle services to the leased satellite parking lot during construction of the North Main Corona Metrolink parking structure; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At the September 2007 Commission meeting, staff was authorized to advertise for construction bids for the North Main Corona Metrolink parking structure. This S25 million structure will provide for 1,000 parking spaces and is anticipated to take 18 months to complete. During construction, half of the existing parking lot or approximately 239 spaces will not be accessible. To address this need, staff developed a parking strategy with significant outreach to the riders. At the October 2007 Commission meeting, staff was authorized to establish a lease for a satellite parking location and provide for a shuttle agreement with the city of Corona. As the planning progressed, it was identified that there could be a greater demand for shuttle service than the single shuttle available with the city of Corona. Staff approached the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to provide for additional vehicles and frequency as a demonstration project. This added RTA service includes two 40-foot buses that can provide for five minute frequencies during the peak service. Agenda Item 7H 85 In January 2008, the Commission began construction of the North Main Corona Metrolink parking structure. With the implementation of the parking strategy program, there has been an increase in transit connections to the stations on both RTA and Corona Cruiser. Also the alternative Metrolink stations at West Corona and La Sierra have seen an increase in ridership. The main component of the strategy is the satellite parking program at 351 W. Rincon Street in Corona, which has proven to be a success. Since January, over 200 vehicles daily are using this site to park for the North Main Corona Metrolink station. The greater frequencies of the RTA service help morning commuters by providing quick and reliable connections in order to not miss their trains. The larger buses are especially helpful in the afternoons when the trains arrive and there is the need to move a large number of passengers quickly. Passengers are extremely happy with the level of shuttle service and there have been no complaints received for the shuttles or the satellite parking lot. The term would be for the agreement is 18 months and could be terminated within 30 days of the parking structure opening. The cost for the RTA service is $22,705.56 a month, or $408,700 for the duration of the project. For this budget year, the funds will be available through a budget transfer from the rail capital property improvements expenditures to rail operations transit operating expenditures. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2007/08 Amount: $135;000 N/A FY 2008/09 $273,000 Yes, Source of Funds: Local Transportation Fund Budget Adjustment: transfer only GLA No.: 103 25 86101 P4006 $135,000 FY 2007/08 103 25 90701 P4006 ($135,000) FY 2007/08 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \14114,,aA j, Date: 03/25/2008 Agenda Item 7H 86 • AGENDA ITEM 71 • r • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Henry Nickel, Staff Analyst Sheldon Peterson, Program Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Commuter Rail Program Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for. the Committee to receive and file an update on the Commuter Rail Program. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Inland Empire -Orange County Weekend Service Performance Q3 FY 07/08 Passenger Trips IEOC Weekend Service FY 06/07 —0-FY 07/08 o o o o ke' a� 40 9 of pro y^S Daily passenger trips on the year-round Inland Empire -Orange County (IEOC) Metrolink weekend service have continued to grow through the third quarter, providing 6,484 passenger trips quarter to date. This is an increase of nearly 28% over the 5,065 trips provided at this point last year. The success of this service is due in large part to the coordinated marketing efforts among the Commission, Orange County Transportation Authority, and San Bernardino Associated Governments. Most all responsibilities for marketing of the service have transitioned to Metrolink, this has included revised seat drops, branding, and consolidation of the various weekend services under a single promotional umbrella. Agenda Item 71 87 Parking Structure Construction Proceeds as Anticipated at North Main Corona Construction of a new -six story parking structure at the North Main Corona Metrolink station is continuing as anticipated. On January 4, the affected portion of the parking lot was closed. To compensate for this decrease 239 spaces, the Commission has leased 300 spaces as an auxiliary parking lot at the former Edwards movie theater. Corona Cruiser initiated shuttle service on February 26. Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) began providing additional shuttle service on January 7, transporting morning and evening Metrolink commuters riders to and from the station and auxiliary lot. This shuttle designated by RTA as the Route 206 "Hopper" transported 3,881 North Main Corona Metrolink station patrons during the month of February. This equates to 185 passengers daily. Additionally, RTA augmented Route 3 to now serve as a shuttle for mid -day passengers. Rendering of the completed North Main Corona Parking Structure. Track Work Along Orange Subdivision to Impact Weekend IEOC Line Service in April Metrolink will conduct necessary bridge and track repairs on the Orange subdivision between San Juan Capistrano and Oceanside during the last three weekends in April and likely the first weekend in May. To accommodate IEOC weekend passengers, Metrolink will be providing bus bridges between Oceanside and San Juan Capistrano, serving all station locations on a modified schedule. Upon finalization of the bus bridge schedule, the Commission staff will be working with Metrolink marketing and communications staff to assure information is conveyed to passengers prior to construction. West Corona Parking Lot to be Resealed in March As part of the Commission's commitment to owning and maintaining Riverside County's Metrolink rail stations, the West Corona station parking lot is undergoing an extensive resealing of the entire parking lot. This project will extend the useful life of the station. This is one of many maintenance, rehabilitation, and enhancement projects planned over the next few years at all Riverside Metrolink stations. As stations continue to age and exhibit the effects of continued use, such projects will be increasingly necessary to maintain station safety, function, and appeal. Agenda Item 71 88 • Riverside Line Passenger Trips Riverside Line 6,000 5,600 H 5,200 n � 4,800 F 0 4'400 ac 4,000 3,600 UP Track Work 3,200 O� 01 O� 01 O‘ 01 01 01 01 01 0 � 00 Few ��� PQ� �a� ��� �J� PJ� peg _°ti°, 'Q. �a�OeCe`o Month Daily passenger trips on Metrolink's Riverside Line for the month of February averaged 5,008, a decrease of 175, 3% less than the month of January. Compared to one year prior, the line averaged an overall daily increase of 182 passenger trips. This is nearly 4% more than a year ago. On Time Performance (95% Goal) Riverside Line 100 95 rn 90 m U 61 a 85 80 75 70 e �� a��� �4• a� a �� •V A� ��� o'`�� o�A� oA� �A� d�� F �` P �S J -Qs> coe O Oe �a Qe Month February on -time performance averaged 95% inbound (-1 % from January) and 96% outbound (-2% from January). There were seven delays greater than five minutes during the month of February. The following are primary causes: Agenda Item 71 Signals/Track/MOW Dispatching Mechanical Operations 89 Inland Empire -Orange County Line Passenger Trips Inland Empire Orange County Line 5,000 4,800 4,600 o. F 4,400 `0 4,200 * 4,000 3,800 3,600 Ok 0\ 01 pk ok ok o� Ok 01 0\ p1 0`b o� �e•Fr fat PQ� �a� ��c �J� PJ� coot{ cf. dos .00U lac •�md Month Daily passenger trips on Metrolink's IEOC Line for the month of February averaged 4,821, an decrease of 46 trips, 1 % less than the month of January. The line has increased by 114 daily trips or 2% from a year ago February 2007. On Time Performance (95% Goal) Inland Empire Orange County Line F eO\�0�O� A�A A 1O�1 7 00p0A00 �Q°g°� O°G)a ,40 Q\.%• Month February on -time performance averaged 98% southbound (+1% from January) and 95% northbound (no change from January). There were 12 delays greater than five minutes during the month of February. The following are primary causes: Signals/Track/MOW Dispatching Mechanical Operations Agenda Item 71 90 41) 91 Line • ~ `2,000 o xc 1,800 1,600 1,400 2,800 2,600 2,400 0 - 2,200 Passenger Trips 91 Line 0 0 01 0 0 0 0 0 01 01 0'l 0 00 Month Daily passenger trips on Metrolink's 91 Line for the month of February averaged 2,395 an increase of 95 trips, 4% more than the month of January. The line has increased by 97 daily trips or +4% from a year ago February 2007. 100 m 95 to • 90 a)85 • 80 a. 75 70 On Time Performance (95% Goal) 91 Line 01 01 0A ooA oA 0A 01 0- o� p- 00 00 Feo far PQr a1 �Jc �; QJ° Sep£ O°ti �°, O°u lac <<�`o Month February on -time performance averaged 96% inbound (+2% from January) and 95% outbound (-2% from January). There were eight delays greater than five minutes during the month of February. The following are primary causes: Agenda Item 71 Signals/Track/MOW Dispatching Mechanical Operations 91 Connecting Transit Service Performance The Commission's role facilitating interconnectivity between Metrolink and connecting transit services is essential to ongoing viability of system. Such services address the needs of transit dependent riders as well as help mitigate congestion ,and the necessity for expensive parking capacity at the Commission stations. The Commission is working to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of transit connections. In order to meet these requirements, the Commission has worked with Metrolink and local transit operators to offer connecting services to and from Riverside County Metrolink stations at no cost for those with valid Metrolink tickets. Within Riverside County, services include free transfers to routes operated by RTA, RTA's Commuter Link service and Corona Cruiser. The following graphs show total monthly Metrolink transfer passenger trips on each of the three services. 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 Passenger Trips RTA Fixed Route k Trans 1,000 -- ��� at��� �O‘ �c� ci �,01 0 0 Fe N N9 N JJ )J PJ« c, O° �� O6' Month Monthly Metrolink transfer trips on RTA's connecting fixed routes (1, 3, 15, 16, 21, 29, and 38) totaled 2,352 for the month of February, a decrease of 81 trips, -3.33% less than the month of January. Monthly trips increased by 310 or 15.18% over last year. Agenda Item 71 92 • • 7,000 6,400 a .L 5,600 c 5,200 4,600 4,000 01 01 01 01 01 QQx 4a� 3Jf4 Passenger Trips RTA Commuter Link O� 0 01 01 00 PJ" cep oc' .\o'" <56° Month 0 •§ ((o'00 Monthly Metrolink transfer trips on RTA's Commuter Link routes (202, 204, 206, 208, and 210) totaled 6,061 for the month of February, a decrease of 489 trips, - 7.47% from the month of January. This is primarily attributed to the expiration of the free fare period for the new Route 210, connecting the Pass Area to Riverside Downtown station. Monthly trips have increased by 1,189 or 24.40% over the last year. Passenger Trips Corona Cruiser 700 600 "' 500 c r- 400 w ° 300 200 100 01 01 01 01 0 0 0 001 O\ O� �0e `a�" N-S? 4•s� �Jd �J� PJ� wed oo� mod'' Qoa Month Monthly Metrolink transfer trips on the Corona Cruiser totaled 410 for the month of February, a decrease of 265,-39.26% from the month of January. Monthly trips have increased by 44 or + 12.02% over the past fiscal year. 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BACKGROUND INFORMATION: With the passage of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU), the following two new funding sources for transit service are available: 1) Jobs Access Reverse Commute (JARC) (Section 5316) program provides funding for the development and maintenance of job access projects to transport welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from work during non -peak hours as well as supply reverse commute options for workers in suburban areas; and 2) New Freedom (Section 5317) program provides funding for new public transportation services and alternatives for people with disabilities beyond what is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In accordance with the provisions of SAFETEA-LU, recipients under these programs must comply with all federal coordinated planning requirements to be eligible for funds. The reauthorization stipulates that projects selected for funding under these programs must be derived from a locally coordinated, public transit -human services transportation plan (Coordinated Plan). Moreover, the Coordinated Plan must be developed through a process that includes representatives of public, private, and nonprofit transportation and human service providers and participation by the public. The Coordinated Plan must include the following elements: • An assessment of available services that identifies current transportation providers (public, private, and nonprofit); Agenda Item 7J 96 • An assessment of transportation needs for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and people with low incomes. This assessment can be based on the experiences and perceptions of the planning partners or on more sophisticated data collection efforts; • Strategies, activities, and/or projects to address the identified gaps between current services and needs as well as opportunities to improve efficiencies in service delivery; and • Priorities for implementation based on resources, time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or activities. At the November 15, 2007 and February 21, 2008 Transit Policy Committee meetings, Commission staff and a consultant outlined outreach activities and preliminary findings from the Coordinated Plan development process. Since this time, a draft plan has been completed and is available for public review and comment on the Commission's website. The comment period began March 12, 2008 and will run through April 6, 2008. The federal government has viewed the Coordinated Plan as an evolving document with opportunities for the public and policy -makers to review and revise on an on -going basis. Presented below is a summary of the Coordinated Plan goals as suggested through the input and guidance of stakeholders - public, private, and nonprofit transportation and human service providers - and participation by the public. Coordinated Plan goals are as follows: 1) Establish leadership and infrastructure to promote coordination within and between public transit agencies and human service organizations; 2) Build capacity to meet the demand for specialized transportation needs of a growing population; 3) Promote information portals to enable many points of access to transportation information responsive to varying client/consumer needs; and 4) Promote coordination policy at regional, state, and federal levels. These goals are designed to guide public transit and human service organizations in the creation of a coordinated framework to deploy initiatives that address the transportation needs of seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons of low income. These goals are supported by 19 objectives that facilitate coordination throughout Riverside County and 63 strategies that further define coordination objectives as outlined in Attachment 1. The Coordinated Plan in its entirety is included as Attachment 2. Commission staff recommends the approval of the Coordinated Plan. Agenda Item 7J 97 • • • Following approval, the Commission will move forward with a competitive process to fund projects that address transportation needs as identified in the Coordinated Plan through a two-year call for projects using federal fiscal year (FFY) 2007 and 2008 program funds as shown in Table 1.1 Measure A funds designated for specialized transit; and federal Section 5310 Elderly and Disabled Specialized Transit Program, will be included in this two-year call for projects. To streamline the application process, staff is creating a universal application for the JARC, New Freedom and Measure A program (Section 5310 has a stand alone, state administered, application). It is staff's intent to make the application process as straight forward and uncomplicated as possible by asking applicants to identify the clientele and area served; it will be staff's responsibility to mix and match funding. In this way, applicants should be able to devote more time to project development than the application process. Table 1 - Program Funding by Urbanized Area a FFY 2007 and 2008 call for projects Urbanized Area Indio -Cathedral City -Palm Springs Riverside -San Bernardino a Temecula-Murrieta JARC New Total Freedom 357,169 180,350 537,519 1,130,415 428,106 1,558,520 185,594 119,487 305,081 Total $1,673,177 $ 727,943 $ 2,401,120 a exclusive of SCAGs 3% adrrin fee b Riverside portion of Urbanized Area funding The next steps in the Coordination Plan process are: • Review and approval by the Board of Commissioners - April 9, 2008; • Technical workshops for applicants - April/May 2008; • Call for projects - May 2008; • Application evaluation - June 2008; and • Application approval - July 9, 2008. Funding under the JARC and New Freedom programs are available in the Hemet -San Jacinto and Palo Verde Valley areas through a state-wide competitive process conducted by Caltrans. Agenda Item 7J 98 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2007/08 FY 2008/09 Amount: $1,131,307 Source of Funds: SAFETEA-LU transit funding Budget Ad ustment: N/A GLA No.: N/A - Funds are not passed through the Commission Fiscal Procedures Approved: \ifit4",0, -) Dater 03/17/2008 Attachments: 1) Coordinated Plan Goals, Objectives, and Strategies 2) Coordinated Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Plan Agenda Item 7J 99 • • • ATTACHMENT 1 1.1 Establish a Regional Mobility Manager capability to provide leadership on coordination around specialized transportation needs in Riverside County 1.1.1 Identify lead agency for the Regional Mobility Manager. 1.1.2 Define roles and responsibilities of the Regional Mobility Manager, 1.1,3 Establish a strategic oversight committee, inviting highest level membership that includes but is not limited to: the public transit operators, County Dept. of Public Social Services, Aging, Public Health, Behavioral Health, State Dept. of Rehabilitation, Inland Regional Center and selected County and municipal leadership. Establish a quarterly meeting schedule to oversee implementation, monitoring and promoting coordination activity. 1.1.4 Program mechanisms to promote coordination, including subarea coordination working groups, annual resource inventory updating, regularly scheduled workshops with expanded training opportunities, and projects to be implemented by partner agencies. 1.1.5 Continue expanding participating stakeholders/planning partners and establish ongoing mechanisms for communication via email, surface mail and other strategies, utilizing these as one method of updating the inventory. 1.1.6 Promote visibility for the Regional Mobility Manager role through e- newsletters and other tools, promoting understanding of this as a portal of access into coordinated specialized transportation solutions for the target populations across Riverside County. 1.2 Establish the Regional Mobility Manager's role in developing, "growing" and strengthening projects responsive to coordination goals and objectives. 1.2.1 Work at the agency and project levels to promote and identify potential coordination projects, working with participants and grant applicants to design effective projects. 1.2.2 Establish a technical assistance capability for the Regional Mobility Manager to consistently provide technical support to human service agency transportation programs related to service efficiency, effectiveness and safety, 1.3 Promote sub -regional mobility managers in Western Riverside, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde 1,3,1 Identify, promote and develop sub -regional mobility managers for geographic areas, within and between service systems to promote coordination. 100 Valley through the Call for Projects and through outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.3.2 Establish formalized relationships between the Regional Mobility Manager and sub -regional mobility managers to ensure collaboration. 1.3.3 Identify specific action areas and activities by which the Regional Mobility Manager and the sub -regional mobility manager(s) will work together to promote the Coordination Plan vision and goals. 1.4 Promote human services agencvlevel mobility managers through the Call for Projects and through outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.4.1 Identify, promote and develop agency -level mobility managers within service systems to promote coordination. 1.4.2 Develop and promote joint training opportunities bringing together human service and public transit personnel, including drivers, maintenance, information specialists and including all levels of mobility managers. 1.5 Develop visibility around specialized transportation issues and needs, encouraging high level political and agency leadership. 1.5.1 Conduct an annual summit of highest leadership levels among stakeholder partners to promote coordination successes, collaborative activities and to address outstanding policy issues in specialized transportation. 1.5.2 Develop the inventory database into an agency -level "partnership" tool, encouraging participation at all levels, using web -based and paper tools, 1.6 Establish RCTC's Call for Projects to be sufficiently flexible for applicants to design and implement projects responsive to identified needs. 1.6.1 Utilize the section 5310 technical assistance approach of providing adequate technical assistance to prospective applicants to help Improve proposal quality and ensure compliance with Federal grantee requirements. 1.6.2 Ensure applicant agencies establish measurable goals or service standards and evaluate performance against these goals and standards. 1.6.3 Require successful applicants to collect and provide ongoing data on coordination projects implemented and assess projects against agency goals, 1.6.4 Require that project applicants identify specific coordination strategies between or within public transit and human services systems to promote the Plan's goals and objectives. 2,1 Promote the QUANTITY of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation provided in 2.1.1 Review pass policies and pass distribution to get more trips to low income persons and Public Social Services' consumers; include in the review • • each of the three apportionment areas, such affected stakeholder partners as The Volunteer Center, the public operators and the Dept. of Public Social Services. 2.1.2 Promote public transit policies to expand availability of transportation options into late night, earlier in the mornings, on Saturdays and on Sundays, through piloted Immediate Needs programs. 2.1.3 Strengthen the service provision capabilities of small operators, through the Call for Projects by promoting technology solutions, including brokered specialized transportation, creating tools that enable agencies to pool resources or utilize centralized and increase quantity of trips available through increased efficiency. 2.1.4 Identify and encourage private sector responses to address specialized transportation needs, including taxi, jitney and commercial operator options. 2.2 Promote the QUALITY, of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation through strategies to improve services with attention to meeting individualized needs. 2.2.1 Promote transit fare reciprocity discussions between and among Riverside County's public transit operators and identify strategies to improve the seamlessness of the ride between transit providers. 2.2.2 Promote successful technology applications to Improve on -time performance for both public paratransit providers and human services transportation providers, also addressing customer communication, trip scheduling and same -day reservation capabilities of paratransit. 2.2.3 Establish driver training programs, tools, modules or resources that emphasize effectively meeting individualized needs of the target populations. 2.2.4 Promote coordination with rail and aviation modes of transport, with attention to specialized transportation needs and issues. 2.2.5 Promote coordinated systems solutions to special needs groups: e.g. Dialysis patients, grandparents raising grandchildren, incarcerated homeless.. 2.2.6 Promote specialized transportation applications to address door-to-door, door -through -door and escorted transportation needs. 2.3 Develop strategies for improving transportation solutions between county subareas and between 2.3.1 Promote pilot solutions to address the following corridors/ areas: 102 counties. - Blythe to Indio and return - Blythe to Riverside and return - outside of Palo Verde Valley Transit's existing service area - to rural areas in the southeastern Coachella Valley, including Mecca, Salton City, Thermal and Indian Hills; to the northeast including Windy Point and Sky Valley, and to ldyllwild. - between Banning and Beaumont, east to Cabazon, Morongo Casino and Palm Springs; west to Riverside Regional Medical Center. - in Western Riverside county unserved pockets that may include Homeland, beyond the Corona and Norco city limits, areas adjacent to Quail Valley, Perris and Lake Elsinore, and Anza and the Ortega Highway. - between various parts of Riverside County and regional medical facilities in San Bernardino County. 2.3.2 Collect data to document needs and identify potential strategies to address mobility needs of hidden populations, including agricultural workers. 2.3.3. Promote use of volunteers through Call for Projects opportunities that extend innovative solutions to specialized transportation connectivity needs. 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies. 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies, cont'd. 2.4.1 Strengthen the service provision capabilities of small operators, through the Call for Projects by promoting coordination around support functions such as centralized maintenance, joint vehicle procurement, parts or supplies procurement or purchase of insurance, collaborative vehicle washing and joint fueling. 2.4.2 Promote maintenance -related projects including vehicle maintenance programs for human services agencies and small operators. 2.4.3 Identify and distribute liablUty insurance options for human service organizations, including general liability for vehicle operations and for volunteer - based programs. 2.4.4 For transit support functions (e.g, maintenance, rider information, travel trainingl develop, encourage and promote cooperative relationships between 4,3 • public transit providers and human services organizations through workshop settings, special projects and any other means devised. 2.4.5 Establish basic reporting tools, including driver logs, dispatch logs and standardized definitions of terms that can be easily adopted by human services agencies to report on transportation provided and monitor trends. 2.4.6 Encourage the use of basic reporting tools by human services agencies through all possible means, including the Call for Projects and liaison with other human services funding sources (e.g. Inland Counties Regional Center, Dept. of Public Social Services, Headstart, Dept, of Behavioral Health , Public Health and others). 2.5 Promote capital improvements to support safe, comfortable, efficient rides for the target populations. 2.5.1 Promote the broadest range of capital projects to improve the users' riding experience, Including support for bus shelters, benches, lighting at stops, information technology at stops and on vehicles and safe boarding strategies.. 2.5.2 Promote capital expense for vehicles, vehicle maintenance, vehicle loaner and vehicle back-up projects that ensure safe and accessible services to the target populations. 2.6 Measure the quantities of trips provided in Riverside County, through new and existing procedures. 2.6.1. Promote full participation in the annual inventory process and develop other means of achieving more comprehensive and more accurate counts of publicly -supported specialized transportation programs. 2.6,2 Require completed inventory forms by all applicants to the Call for Projects In order to include them in the specialized transportation database. 2.6.3 Require successful Call for Projects' applicants to report on actual trips/services provided against service goals they may have established. 2.6.4 Establish other mechanisms to improve the accuracy of counting trips provided by human services organizations to the target populations. 3.1 Integrate and promote existing information strategies, including 211/ 511, web -based tools and 3.1.1 Integrate the multiplicity of transportation information resources available, with attention to 211/ 511 opportunities in relation to the information 104 paper products to get transit and specialized transportation information to consumers. needs of the target populations and their caseworkers, working through existing, regionally -oriented information systems. 3.1.2 Test Information applications through regional, systems -level and agency level pilot projects to promote existing transit for the target populations. 3.2 Develop information portal tools for wide distribution. 3.2.1. Create information tools oriented to direct human service agency staff, aiding them in accessing specialized transportation services on behalf of their consumers. 3.2.2 Improve methods of information distribution by working through existing RCTC and transit operators' consumer advisory groups as well as human services agency advisory bodies. 3.2.3 Ensure that the Regional Mobility Manager's information tools are maintained and kept current with service changes, establishing standardized mechanisms by which public operators and Measure A providers advise the Mobility Manager(s) of anticipated service changes. 3.2.4 Invite through the Calls for Projects strategies that establish, promote, enhance and extend transit and specialized transit information portals, 3.3 Promote information opportunities for human services staff and direct service workers and expand travel training options for consumers. 3.4 Report on project successes and impacts at direct service levels, at subregional level and at county wide levels; pursue opportunities to promote project 3.3.1 Develop and promote transit introduction modules and materials, to provide periodic training to agency level staff on transportation options across Riverside County, addressing also connections to neighboring counties. 3.3.2 Hold periodic transit workshops, distributed geographically across the county and to keep human services personnel current with available transportation resources and information tools. 3.3.3 Invite through the Call for Projects expanded travel training and mobility training projects geared to any consumer subgroup among the target populations to promote transit and build consumers skills in transit use. 3.4.1 Document performance on a range of measures that include cost- effectiveness, responsiveness to consumer needs, consumer satisfaction • • • • successes at state and federal levels levels and responsiveness to agency requirements. 3.4.2 Identify successes, as well as poor performance, and report on specialized transportation projects and solutions that are effective. 3,4.3 Monitor and report on implementation over the "project life" of individual projects, providing technical assistance as appropriate. 4.1 Work to establish non -emergency medical 4.1.1 Participate in activities that promote NEMT policy changes to transportation policies and more cost-effectively meet California's MediCal reimbursement to support need -based and not simply medically -related trip needs. functionality -based tests, including inviting in public transit providers as MediCal providers. 4.2 Establish a Universal Call for Projects process sufficiently flexible for applicants to construct and implement projects responsive to identified needs in a broad range of ways. 4.2.1 Ensure that the Call for Project design has sufficiently flexibility to incorporate all available funding sources and to encourage projects innovatively responding to needs In the broadest possible ways. 4.2.2 Promote technical assistance, building upon the Section 5310 approach of providing significant echnical assistance to prospective applicants, during the build up to the Call for Projects and after its announcement to improve the quality of the project proposals and to ensure Federal compliance. 4.3 Establish processes by which implemented projects are evaluated with successes and failures reported. 4.3.1 Ensure that measurable goals are established for all projects, potentially inviting applicants to set forth the measurable goals against which they wish their projects to be assessed. 4.3.2 Collect ongoing data on coordination projects implemented, assessing projects against goals which agencies themselves may establish. 4.3.2 Identify and report on success, as well as poor performance for projects and solutions against such measures as cost-effectiveness, responsiveness to consumer needs, consumer satisfaction levels and responsiveness to agency personnel requirements. 106 ATTACHMENT 2 PUBLIC TRANSIT- HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY - FINAL REPORT Prepared by: A-M-M-A Claremont, CA. In Association with JUDITH NORMAN -TRANSPORTATION CONSULTANT AND TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND PLANNING JANUARY 2008 107 • TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY — FINAL REPORT January 2008 Table of Contents Page Executive Summary Introduction 1 1.0 Federal Context for the Locally Developed Coordination Plan 2 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Coordination at the Federal Level 1.3 Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Program Guidance 2.0 Assessment of Available Services — Public Transit and Measure A Providers 4 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Public Transit and Measure A Providers' Operating Data 2.3 Operating Characteristics of Transportation Providers 2.4 Opportunities for Coordination: Public Transit and Measure A Operators 3.0 Assessment of Needs — Demand Estimation 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Target Populations 3.3 Future Population Projections 3.4 Demand Estimation 3.5 Trips Currently Provided 3.6 Demand Estimation Summary Comments 4.0 Assessment of Needs — Stakeholder Survey Findings 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Stakeholder Survey Approach 4.3 Stakeholder Survey Findings 4.4 Stakeholder Survey Summary Comments 5.0 Assessment of Needs — Stakeholder Outreach Process and Findings 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Stakeholder Involvement Objectives and Methodology 5.3 Stakeholder Involvement Process and Findings 5.4 Stakeholder Outreach Summary Comments 6.0 Selected Coordination Examples for Riverside County 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Four Working Examples of Coordination in Service Delivery 6.3 CTSAs as One Structure for Selected Coordination Activities 108 22 34 62 80 7.0 Overview of Needs, Gaps and Duplication of Service 90 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Federal Transit Administration Program Guidance 7.3 Summary of Needs by Target Group 7.4 Summary of Needs by Riverside County Areas and Subareas 7.5 Summary of Institutional and Vehicle Related Needs 7.6 Gaps and Duplication in Services Provided 7.7 Need, Gap and Duplication Assessment Summary Comments 8.0 Recommendations 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Leading Towards Recommendations 8.3 Framework for Coordination 8.4 Plan Vision and Goals 8.5 Plan Recommendations 8.6 Sequencing and Prioritization of Plan Recommendations 8.7 Prioritization for Project Selection 8.8 Coordination Planning: Overview of Next Steps 8.9 Plan Approval and Adoption Process 114 Appendices Appendix A — Stakeholder Survey Cover Letter Appendix B — Stakeholder Survey Appendix C — Project Fact Sheet for Riverside County Appendix D — Stakeholder Survey Database Reports D-1 Stakeholder Survey Responding Agencies (n=71) D-2 Stakeholder Survey by Legal Type (n=71) D-3 Stakeholder Survey by Region (n=71) D-4 General Public Transportation Agencies and Human Services Agencies (n=66) D-5 Transportation Providers, Service by General Public Agencies and Human Services Agencies (n=43) Appendix E -- Interim Summary Matrix of Stakeholder Involvement Interviews/Workshops (10/15/07) Appendix F — Summary of Outreach Opportunities Appendix G -- Consumer Telephone Survey Appendix H — TRIP Program Interview Summaries Appendix I — Stakeholder Interview Guide January 2008 page Hi 109 • List of Exhibits OX-1 Coordination Plan Process vii EX-2 Geographically -Related Priority Transportation Needs of the Target Populations xi EX-3 Translating Target Population Transportation Needs into Projects xiv List of Tables 1-1 Summary of Goals of SAFETEA-LU Planning Process 3 2-1 Financial and Operating Data for Public Transit Operators: Fixed -route Services 9 2-2 Financial and Operating Data for Public Transit Operators: Paratransit Services 10 2-3 Financial and Operating Data for Measure A Operators... 11 2-4 Summary of System Operating Characteristics — Public Transit Operators 12 2-5 System Maintenance Characteristics Public Transit Operators 14 2-6 Summary of System Operating Characteristics — Measure A Operators 16 2-7 System Maintenance Characteristics — Measure A Operators 19 3-1 Target Populations for JARC, New Freedoms, and Section 5310 Programs 23 2 Population Projections for JARC, New Freedoms, and Section 5310 Programs 26 -3 Specialized Transit Trip Demand Estimation for SAFETEA-LU Target Populations 28 3-4 FY 05-06 Public Transit and Other Specialized Transit Trips Provided 30 4-1 Stakeholder Survey Respondents by Legal and Service Types 37 4-2 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Reported Caseload and Daily Ridership 38 4-3 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Reported Caseload and Daily Ridership by Area of County 39 4-4 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Responding Agencies With Largest Caseloads ......... 39 4-5 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Primary Client Groups Served by Agency Type 41 4-6 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Response to Primary Barriers — Transit Access 46 4-7 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Other Unmet Needs in Riverside County 48 4-8 Ranking of Areas of Interest in Coordinated Transportation by Responding Agencies 51 4-9 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Transportation Services Reported , Provided by Agency Type 53 4-10 Coordinated Arrangements List 54 4-11 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Vehicle Characteristics Reported by Survey Respondents 54 4-12 2007 Stakeholder Survey - Vehicle Utilization Reported by Survey Respondents 55 44-13 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Hours and Days of Operation Reported by Responding Agencies56 110 List of Tables Cont'd 4-14 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Transportation Budgets Reported by Survey Respondents 57 4111 4-15 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Funding Sources Reported by Survey Respondents 58 5-1 Inland Regional Center Vendor Roundtable Summary of Issues 66 5-2 CaIWORK's/GAIN Roundtable Summary of Issues 67 6-1 Coordinated Experiences for Riverside County 86 7-1 Target Population Transportation Needs, Resources, and Possible Responses 97 8-1 Improved Mobility for Riverside County 120 List of Figures 4-1 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Responding Agencies by Legal type ..............:... 36 4-2 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Responding Agencies by Region 36 4-3 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Primary Population Served 40 4-4 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Percent of Total Caseload Reported by Consumer 42 4-5 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Client Trip Needs Poorly Served — All Reporting 43 4-6 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Client trip Needs Poorly Served — by Agency Type 44 Ai 4-7 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Areas of Interest to Lower Costs or Improve Transport 50 4-8 2007 Stakeholder Survey — Transportation Services Provided... 52 1MMA 111 January 2008 page v� A COORDINATED PLAN: WHY THIS PLAN? This plan is prepared in response to the coordinated planning requirements of SAFETEA-LU (Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Act — A Legacy for Users, P.L. 190-059), set forth in three sections of the Act: Section 5316-Job Access and Reverse Commute, Section 5317-New Freedom Program and Section 5310-Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities Program. The coordinated plan establishes the construct for a unified comprehensive strategy for transportation service delivery in Riverside County that is focused on unmet transportation needs of elderly individuals, persons with disabilities and individuals of low income. The coordinated plan must contain the following four (4) required elements, as identified in the implementing circulars FTA C. 9070.1F, FTA C. 9050.1 and FTA C. 9045.1: 1: An assessment of available services identifying current providers (public and private); 2. An assessment of transportation needs for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and people with low incomes — this assessment can be based on the experiences and perceptions of the planning partners or on data collection efforts and gaps in service; 3. Strategies and/or activities and/or projects to address the identified gaps between current services and needs, as well as opportunities to improve efficiencies in service delivery; 4. Priorities for implementation based on resources (from multiple program sources), time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or activities identified. The Riverside County Transportation Commission is responsible for preparing this locally developed plan and for providing oversight to its implementation. How WAS THIS PLAN DEVELOPED? Various goals were articulated with the plan approach depicted on Exhibit 1 following. The plan must • Serve as a comprehensive, unified plan that promotes community mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities and persons of low income. • Establish priorities to incrementally improve mobility for the target populations; • Develop a process to identify partners interested, willing and able to promote community mobility for the target populations through a subsequent Call for Projects. To achieve these, the planning process involved: • quantitative analyses, including a demand estimation to estimate need and a stakeholder survey to 477 countywide stakeholders to identify resources, needs and potential partners. Responses from 75 agencies represented a 16 percent retum. • qualitative activities included public meetings and interviews with major agencies and organizations funding human services, with a representative group of direct service providers, and with representatives of the target group constituencies. In total almost 200 individuals directly contributed to this plan. • assessment of existing public transit services including Metrolink, the 7 public transit operators and 14 Measure A providers, undertaken to identify coordination opportunities. 112 IIA A$ed • S0, 6upds s}oafoad .iod Ilex j uogeuipaoo3 800Z AGenuep / ssaoflJd . �uiaeaH �i�gnd seppinov palussessd eamosad pue peeN s8upein eaumwoo kosinpy leoiugoal swea6oad /eaaped g o; part ueid pawun `angsuayaadwoo padoianea Alleool d — LOOZ `Alunoo aplsaanN aoj ue!d uoReu!paoo0 uogepodsueal seo!naas uewnHlisueal ongnd wilipc3 • • WHAT RIVERSIDE COUNTY RESIDENTS NEED TRANSPORTATION? A census -based estimate of demand identifies Riverside County's coordinated plan target populations and projects potentially needed trips. Using the 2000 census to provide detail on the specific subgroups, a range of 164,000 to 307,000 persons was estimated as the countywide target population. These individuals are adults between ages 16 to 64 who are low income or disabled and seniors age 65 and older. Because there can be overlap among these groups, they are represented as a range, estimated at between 91 percent and 20 percent of Riverside County's 2000 population of 1.5 million residents. These proportions were projected forward, using general population estimates developed by the California Dept. of Finance with other assumptions about changes in the senior population and the base adult population. The projections suggest that significantly increasing numbers of residents, from the 2000 census base, will be within the target populations: By 2010, up to 439,000 persons, a 43 percent increase and 20 percent of the population; By 2020, up to 581,000 persons, almost a 90 percent increase and 21 percent of the population; and By 2030, up to 719,000 persons, a 134 percent increase and 21 percent of the population. Within the County's three Federal apportionment areas, there are important differences in the distribution of these population groups. The target population ranges for each subregion are: ➢ For Western Riverside, between 10 percent and 18 percent of the subregion's 1.2 million persons in the 2000 census base population; ➢ For the Coachella Valley, between 13 percent and 25 percent of the subregion's 318,000 persons in the 2000 census; ➢ For the Palo Verde Valley, between 5 percent and 13 percent of the subregion's 26,000 persons in the 2000 census. Average trips per day were estimated for these target groups, and the proportion of those trips that might present for public transit. These public transit trips represented potentially 7 to 10 million trips needed annually by these adults who are low income or disabled and senior, again using the 2000 census population base. From among these, those trips requiring special assistance were hypothesized at 25 percent, or one in four trips, between 1.7 million to 2.5 million annual trips for the 2000 census population. Projected to 2006, this range is estimated at 2.2 to 3.2 million trips requiring specialized assistance. Trips needed contrast favorably with the almost 11 million documented overall trips provided by the public transit providers, plus another 2.7 million provided by Metrolink (FY 06). This exceeds the projected range of 7 to 10 million total needed trips. However specialized transit trips were below well below the range. Public demand response trips provided were almost 550,000 trips annually, plus Measure A providers in Westem Riverside added 62,000 trips to that in FY 06. Combined with survey -documented trips of almost 70,000 human service agency trips, total specialized trips reported are 682,000 trips, significantly below the low -end estimate of 3-2 million trips needed for the 2006. The plan examines the characteristics and nature trips that are presently unmet, not provided or not available. WHAT EMERGED FROM THE AGENCY SURVEY OF NEEDS? A survey of potential planning partners develops a picture of specialized transportation resources and issues for the Riverside County. The survey generated a sixteen percent survey response rate with 75 agencies and organizations responding, from throughout the county. These organizations A M A January 2008 114 page viii reflected the breadth and diversity of organizations concerned with the transportation of persons of limited means, of seniors and of individuals with disabilities. This emerging picture of the state of coordination appears grounded in a broad -base of perspectives represented by survey respondents.A good mix of public and non-profit, as well as for -profit social service agencies and commercial transportation providers responded with several faith -based and one tribal organization. Fifty-eight agencies, 75 percent, have some type of transportation function, including directly providing it, contracting for it or as a contractor, subsidizing bus passes and tokens, or arranging it on behalf of their consumers. Public agencies were most likely to subsidize bus passes and tokens, then followed by directly operating or contracting for services. Non-profit social service agencies were more likely to arrange by assisting with information and then by directly providing. Vehicles reported were almost 1,300. Excluding vehicles operated by commercial providers and the one responding school district, of the balance, 413 vehicles were operated by pubic transit providers and 193 human service vehicles were reported. Human service agency vehicles were more likely to be smaller and only 27 percent were lift -equipped. Trips reported by responding agencies annualized to over 11 million passenger trips provided, with 99 percent of these provided by 7 public transit operators, and just one percent or 97,000 annual trips provided by the 38 responding human service providers. Applying just the operations costs reported, the public transit cost of a one-way trip is $8.30 while the human services agencies are providing trips for $3.65 in reported costs. Reported client trip needs that are poorly served differed somewhat between public transit operators and human services agencies but with overlap. Both public transit operators and human services agencies saw medical trips as the highest priority, by 86 percent and 77 percent respectively. ➢ Public operators' second ranked needs were: kids to daycare and school (86 percent), followed by a group of four tied trip -types: training and education, work between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., shopping and multiple errands, and recreational trips (71 % each). ➢ Human service agencies second tier trip needs — but reported with much less frequency — were training and education (38 percent), work between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., and shopping and multiple errands (34 percent each). Barriers to coordination were frequently noted as related to funding for directly operated or contracted transportation, difficulties in working with public transit in relation to reliability, and its rules and requirements that can conflict with individualized client needs; availability of public transit, the geography and long trip distances of Riverside County; MediCal reimbursement rates for transportation and insurance liability concerns. Importantly, significant numbers of both the public operators and human service agencies indicated interest in coordination opportunities. This 16 percent sample of agencies and organizations reported over $93 million in funding for transit, paratransit and specialized transportation — of this $91 million were reported by public transit and $2.1 million in transportation funding by human services agencies. Differences in the funding base included as public transit reports a stable, continuing funding stream that they largely expected to increase. Human services agencies report more diverse funding types, with significant reliance upon donations and fees with far less expected likelihood of future increases. WHAT NEEDS EMERGED FROM STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS? An extensive outreach effort in Riverside County was conducted with more than 200 agency and consumer representatives to address the FTA plan development guidance and achieve the following: • Lay the ground work for the stakeholders' survey and encourage response; A,M.M.A January 2008 115 page ix • • Obtain views and perspectives of stakeholder agencies/ organization and clients/ consumers on coordination of transportation services; • Inform and educate stakeholders about capacity building strategies to achieve coordination in the human and social services sectors of transportation; • Build goodwill and cooperative relationships with key stakeholders and communities -at -large; • Invite agencies to anticipate a continuing process by building a strengthened relationship between public transportation providers and human service providers and with RCTC. Outreach efforts included 43 on -site agency interviews, three roundtables with groups of agencies, a series of three project development workshops and focused discussion with consumers of three representative groups. Identified needs drawn from this array of contacts across the county's three apportionment areas were considered on three dimensions: 1) consumers, 2) the geography of the county and 3) institutional and vehicle -related issues. An analysis of gaps in service identified key areas towards which to target projects and strategies: ➢ Addressing institutional communication gaps ➢ Meeting individualized consumer needs ➢ Expanding public transit ➢ Creating inter -jurisdictional transportation alternatives ➢ Increasing service capacity ➢ Improving service quantities ➢ Improving communication and information at all levels ➢ Addressing liability concerns and promoting insurance altematives Service duplication was not seen to be an issue given the diversity of needs identified, the range of responses these require and the considerable geographic expanses of Riverside County. Essentially, more transportation of a variety of targeted types and characteristics is needed. Exhibit 2 following summarizes geographically -related needs identified within each of the three apportionment area of the county. Meeting Coordination Requirements and Translating Needs into Projects Federal guidance suggests that coordination "friendly" policies must be developed by regional public transit agencies and organizations to ensure that projects seeking funding can be incorporated into the regional Program of Projects (POP), the tool by which Federal funding is assured. Implementation of the recommendations outlined in this report will assist RCTC and others in establishing a "culture of coordination" throughout the county to promote projects addressing the needs this plan identifies. The myriad of individualized needs emerging through discussions with agency/organization staff representatives and with consumers begin to suggest project responses. Projects are considered in this plan in relation to: ➢ types of consumer whose needs present, as with senior transportation, or ➢ types of trips needed, as with non -emergency medical transportation, or ➢ types of improvements to transportation necessary to serve members of the target populations. Exhibit 3 following suggests the potential projects heard from stakeholders and illustrates the connection between consumer needs and potential project responses. January 2008 page x 116 EXHIBIT 2, Geographically -Related Priority Transportation Needs of the Target Populations Riverside County Apportionment Area Population Characteristics Exiting Transportation - Resources High Priority Identified Needs and Challenges Potential Coordination Partners PALO VERDE VALLEY - BLYTHE 26,000 persons A younger population, median age 33. -just 7% age 65+ - of adults 18-64— 6% are at poverty level 3.3% have go -outside- the -home disability issues. - 1,400 to 3,500 persons in target populations (2000 census) Palo Verde Transit 8 vehicles providing --- 900 trips weekly on fixed- route; 100 trips weekly on demand response - Public school district. - TRIP program supports 50 one-way trips weekly - Long distance trips between Blythe and Indio for medical, and social service appointments; limited medical services in Blythe. - Greyhound service only twice daily and it no longer stops in Palm Springs. - Trips needed into Blythe from surrounding communities of Ripley, Mesa Verde, others. - Need for continuity of communication with public human services where turnover of agency staff limits institutional knowledge and understanding of public transit. - Palo Verde Transit - First Five of Riverside - County Behavioral Health Dept. - GAIN program/ DPSS - Headstart program - County agencies - Greyhound COACHELLA VALLEY 318,000 persons (2000) Median age 36 with high proportion of seniors. 17% age 85+ 9 - of adults under 65--- 8% at poverty level 10 /° have go -outside the- home disability issues 50,000 to 100,000 persons in target populations (2000 census) SunLine with 84 vehicles and 58 operating daily provides: - 65,000 trips weekly on SunBus fixed -route 1,600 trips weekly on SunDial's paratransit. -TRIP program supports 300 trips per week -Limited human service providers Private taxi operators - Insufficient information readily available about existing resources and desire for coordinated information about transportation resources - More transit alternatives needed Including privately operated and taxi, special shuttles, van pool and rideshare options. - Increased Sun Line frequency and service area coverage although limited by resources and state efficiency requirements related to farebox recovery. - SunLine - Roundtable of service providers led by Desert Samaritans - GAIN program / DPSS - taxi operators - Greyhound • • January 2008 page xl • • • EXHIBIT 2, Geographically -Related Needs, continued Riverside County Apportionment Area Population Characteristics Exiting Transportation • Resources High Priority Identified Needs and Challenges Potential Coordination Partners COACHELLA VALLEY, continued - Improved SunDial service quality re reliability. - Special shuttles targeted to special needs groups or trips or geographic areas - More transit amenities of bus shelters with protection from the sun and wind. WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY 1.2 million (2000 census) 11.5 % seniors 65+ Adults under age 65 7/0 low income adults 4.% go -outside -the -home disability issues 122,000 to 223,000 target population (2000 census) - Metrolink 52,000 trips/week - Riverside Transit Agency providing weekly -- 110,000 fixed route trips 4,000 demand response RTA taxi trips350 weekly Other public operators: - Riverside Special Transit 2,800 weekly trips - Corona Cruiser 1,400 wkly. - Pass Area -6,000 weekly - 14 Measure A providers serving 1,200 trips weekly - TRIP program 1,200 one- way trips weekly - Volunteer Center over 900 trip tickets/ vouchers weekly - Private Taxi Operators PASS AREA - All public transit operators, including Metrolink. - All Measure A providers - County human services agencies, including depts. of Public Health, Behavioral Health, GAIN/ DPSS and others, -VA Medical Center - Riverside Regional Medical Center First Five Riverside - Private taxi operators - Private dialysis companies, e.g. DaVita - Extended operating hours beyond 6 p.m. - Increased capacity of dial- a -ride service. - Expanded service to area's larger employers, e.g. casinos and Cabazon. RIVERSIDE CITY AREA - Door -through -door service - Improved scheduling for dialysis patients - Improved information capabilities about existing services - Need for information to reflect "quality" of service, particularly in relation to taxis NORCO/CORONA AREA - Bus pass reciprocity between RTA and Corona. - Service quality concerns for the Corona Cruiser. - Pockets of need in South Corona, Mira Loma and adjacent unincorporated areas with no bus service. 118 January 2008 page xi! - Connections to Ontario. EXHIBIT 2, Geographically -Related Needs, continued Riverside County Apportionment Area Population Characteristics Exiting Transportation - Resources High Priority Identified Needs and Challenges Potential Coordination Partners WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, continued - Metrolink 52,000 trips/week Riverside Transit Agency providing weekly -- 110,000 fixed route trips 4,000 demand response RTA taxi trips350 weekly Other public operators: - Riverside Special Transit 2,800 weekly trips - Corona Cruiser 1,400 weekly trips Pass Area -6,000 weekly - 14 Measure A providers serving 1,200 trips weekly - TRIP program 1,200 one- way trips weekly - Volunteer Center over 900 trip tickets/ vouchers weekly - Private Taxi Operators CENTRAL WESTERN -All public transit operators, including Metrolink. - All Measure A providers - County human services agencies, including depts. of Public Health, Behavioral Health, GAIN/ DPSS and others; headquarters staff and sub -area district/clinic staff. -VA Medical Center - Riverside Regional Medical Center - First Five Riverside private tax( operators Private dialysis companies, e.g. DaVita. RIVERSIDE - Long travel times on existing fixed -route; connections difficult for target population; need improved travel times. - Service quality concerns: demand response reliability. pockets of Need: Homeland, Nuevo, Galivalin Hills, south of Lake Matthews, northern Perris, Quail Valley, Ortega Hwy. - Improved connections fixed -route selected public facilities, such as DPSS/ GAIN office in Lake Elsinore. - Extended RTA fixed -route operating hours. - Improved timing of RTA connections in Lake Elsinore to south county. - Alternatives options for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren. SOUTH WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY - Heaithf medical trips into central Riverside and San Bernardino County locations. - Youth oriented trip options for latch -key youth i9 January 2008 page xiif • nix abed 900Z itienuer oar p�lV•l�V! •sdul spaau lepads Jo{ yla oa sengewaaie moJ6 of paaN - • • • Exhibit 3, Riverside County Translating Target Population Transportation Needs Into Projects Target Population Special Transportation Needs and Concerns Transportation Modes Potential Transit or Transportation Projects/ Solutions Seniors, Able- Bodied - Lack of knowledge about resources. -Concem about safety and s kzurity - Awareness that time when driving might be limited. - Fined -route transit - Point deviation and deviated FR - Senior DAR - Special purpose shuttles: recreation, nutrition, shopping - Single point of information - Educational initiatives, including experience with bus ridmg before it is needed. - Buddy programs; assistance in "trying' transit - Transit fairs, transit seniors -ride -free days or corrnrxanpass - Seniors, Frail and Persons Chronically 111 - Assistance to and through the door. - Assistance with making trip arrangements - On -time performance and reliability critical to frail users. - Assistance in trip planning needed. - Need for shelters - - Need for "hand-off" for terribly frail - ADA Paratranslt - TRIP program - Emergency and non -emergency medical transportation - Escort/Comp'nion Volunteer drivers - Special purpose shuttles Escorted transportation options - Door -through -door assistance; outside -the - vehicle assistance. - Increased role for volunteers. - Technology that provides feedback both to consumer and to dispatch; procedures to identify frailest users when traveling. - Individualized trip planning and trip scheduling assistance. - Expanded mileage reimbursement program. - Driver sensitivrdy training. - Appropriately placed bus shelters. Persons with Disabilities - Service quality and reliability - Driver sensitivity and appropriate passenger handling procedure - Concems about wheelchair capacity on vehicles/ pass-bys - Need for shelters - Sometimes door through door or issues of "hand-off' - Fixed -route transit - ADA Paratransit - TRIP program - Emergency and non -emergency medical transportation - Special purpose shuttles - Escort/Companion - Single point of information; Information as universal design solution. - Continuing attention to service performance; importance of time sensitive service applications. - Driver education and attention to procedures about stranded or pass -by passengers with disabilities. - Aggressive program of bus shelters. - Vehicles, capital replacement. Persons of Low Income and Homeless Persons - Easy access to trip planning - Fixed -route transit - Point deviation and deviated FR - Special purpose shuttles (work, training, special education, Headstart, recreation) - Van pools, ridesharing, car sharing - Creative fare options available to human services agencies. - Increased quantity of bus tokens available. - Universal pass for services across county. - Bus passes available to those searching for jobs or in job training programs; cost-effective. - Special shuttles oriented to this population's predictable travel patterns. - Education about transit to case managers, workers with this population. - Feedback to transit planners on demand; continued work to improve. transit service levels (coverage, frequency, span of hours) - Training of staff to train consumers - Vanpool assistance, ridesharing connections information - Fare subsides (bus tokens or passes) that can be provided in a medium that is not cash - Breaking down the culture of poverty that uses transportation as the difficulty for not moving about the community. - Difficulties of mothers with multiple children - Need to bring along slopping carts - Difficulties with transfers within and between systems; long trips. Persons with Sensory Impairments - Difficulty in accessing visual or auditory information. - Possible door-todoor for visually impaired - Driver sensitivity - Fixed route transit - ADA Paratranvsit - Demand response - TRIP program - Single point of information; information in accessible formats - Guides (personal assistance) through information - Driver training critical to respond to needs. Persons with Behavioral Disabilities - Medications make individuals sun -sensitive and waiting in the sun is not an option. - Medications cause thirstiness; long hour waits in the heat can lead to dehydration. - Mental illnesses can make it - Fixed route transit - ADA Paratranslt - Special purpose shuttles - Escorl/Companion - Possibly 910,-ial shuttles oriented to this known predictable travel needs. - Driver training projects to provide skills at managing/ recognizing behaviors of clients. - Aggressive program of bus shelters - "Hand-off' can be critical for confused riders, passing them off to a responsible party. - Important that driver understand riders' conditions. frightening to be in public spaces. - Impaired judgment and memory 121 • t PRIORITIES FOR PROJECT SELECTION Meeting the specialized transportation needs of three diverse and often overlapping segments of the population, seniors, persons with disabilities and low-income individuals is challenging. Actions and strategies developed will be incrementally effective in improving services, by providing a wider array of travel options to the target populations based upon their individual needs, and informing them about those options. This can be accomplished by gradually building the capacity of public transit and human service agencies/organizations to develop and implement coordinated projects, plans and programs. Both public transit and human service agencies/organizations must be active partners in this capacity building process. The actions necessary to increase the capacity of public transit to offer improved access and availability to transportation options for the target populations will differ from those actions and strategies needed to build capacity for human services. Moreover, the need to build the capacity and reliability of human service transportation providers to complement public transportation services is critical, since the overall mission of these agencies/organizations is to serve individualized need, including operating services that public transportation cannot readily provide (e.g., non -emergency medical transport, door -through -door and escorted trips). For these reasons, project opportunities designed to strengthen the ability of human service agencies to continue to provide the hard -to -serve trip needs of seniors, persons with disabilities and low-income individuals should be encouraged. Priorities relative to the development and funding of coordinated transportation projects identified through the locally developed comprehensive unified plan should: 1. Adequately address the unmet/underserved and individualizes transportation needs of the targeted populations; 2. Demonstrate coordination efforts between public transit and human services agencies; 3. Maintain consistency with current Federal and State funding regulations and requirements; 4. Be financially sustainable; 5. Include measurable goals and objectives to be largely developed by the applicants; 6. Build and/or increase overall system capacity and service quality; and 7. Leverage and maximize existing transportation funding and capital resources. PLAN VISION, GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS A vision is proposed for Riverside County's locally developed coordination plan: IMPROVED MOBILITY FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY SENIORS, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AND PERSONS OF LOW INCOME To this end, the project team has developed four (4) goals, supported by eighteen (18) implementing objectives to accomplish coordination in the region. In addition, a total of sixty-two (62) implementing actions, strategies or projects are identified. The goals and objectives to guide project development are presented below and detailed in Chapter 8 of the full plan document. These goals are responsive to the Federal guidance for the locally developed plan and establish the roadmap by which mobility needs of target populations throughout Riverside County can be addressed. The implementing strategies are the methods by which gaps in services and opportunities for improved efficiencies may be achieved, through coordinated strategies and initiatives. The four goals are described as follows: AMil January 2008 page xvi 122 Goal 1- Coordination Infrastructure Given the level and diversity of needs in the county, ensuring leadership to facilitate coordination is needed, as no one agency or organization has the resources to facilitate the necessary cultural, institutional and operational changes needed to accomplish coordination goals. Coordination in Riverside County cannot be accomplished without dedicated staff and financial resources. Projects funded under this goal should establish and/or further the development of the Regional Mobility Manager concept. The specific objectives proposed under this goal include: 1.1 Establish a Regional Mobility Manager capability to provide leadership on coordination of specialized transportation within Riverside County and adjacent counties. 1.2 Establish the Regional Mobility Manager's role in developing and "growing" projects responsive to regional coordination goals and objectives. 1.3 Promote sub -regional Mobility Managers in Westem Riverside, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley through the Call for Projects and through outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.4 Promote human services agency -level mobility mangers through the Call for Projects and outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.5 Develop visibility around specialized transportation issues and needs, encouraging high level political and agency leadership. Goal 2 — Building Capacity to Meet Individualized Mobility Needs Acknowledging that more transportation capacity is needed to serve the growing population expectations of Riverside County, this goal addresses the idea of providing more trip options for the target populations. In addition, this goal inherently includes the concept of strengthening: the ability of human agencies and organizations to provide those trips that public transit cannot, thereby increasing not only capacity but access to services. The notions of reliability, quality of service and service monitoring are reflected under this goal. The objectives proposed include: 2.1 Promote policies that increase the quantity of public transit and specialized transportation provided in each of the three apportionment areas. 2.2 Promote the quality of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation through strategies to improve services with attention to meeting individualized needs. 2.3 Develop strategies for improving transportation solutions across county sub -regions and between counties. 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies. 2.5 Promote capital improvements to support safe, comfortable, efficient rides for target populations. 2.6 Measure the quantities of trips provided in Riverside County through new and existing procedures. Goal 3 — Information Portals The need exists to broaden the reach of information related to transit and specialized transportation services for clients/consumers, as well as stakeholder agencies and organizations. Riverside County has a wealth of transportation services. Points of access to transportation information must be expanded to allow everyone the opportunity to understand and to use the transportation network. The objectives proposed under this goal include: 3.1 Integrate and promote existing information strategies, including 211, 511, web -based tools and paper media to get public transit and specialized transportation information to consumers. 3.2 Develop information portal tools for wide distribution. 3.3 Promote information opportunities for human services agency line staff and direct service staff and expand training options for consumers. AMIll January 2008 page xvii 123 3.4 Report on project successes and impacts at direct service levels, and at regional and subregional levels; pursue opportunities to promote project successes at. State and Federal levels. Goal — Coordination Policy As the issues presented through this planning process are not new, but longstanding, there needs to be continuing policy attention brought to some of the underlying issues and dilemma. These include reimbursement policies of non -emergency medical transportation, establishing a coordinated grant application process and reporting on what works and what doesn't work in relation to coordinated transportation responses. 4.1 Work to establish non -emergency medical transportation policies and more cost-effectively meet medically -related trip needs. 4.2 Establish a Universal Call for Projects sufficiently flexibly for applicants to construct and implement projects responsive to identified needs in a broad range of ways. 4.3 Establish processes by which implemented projects are evaluated with successes and failures reported. SEQUENCING AND PRIORITIZATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS Phase 1 of implementing these recommendations is to establish a leadership capability for coordination policies through a Regional Mobility Manager (RMM), including determining the best location for that function. An advisory body to guide both the RMM and the activities of this plan is recommended, with broad representation from among the agencies and constituencies best representative of the target populations. Subsequent sub -regional and agency -level mobility managers are also envisioned to start-up and promote coordinated service responses. Phase 2 involves development of coordinated responses to promote capacity building, information portals and coordination policy. These may involve: ➢ Develop a mobility -focused transportation coordination agenda for the RMM. ➢ Conduct an annual inventory/ survey process to nurture the coordination environment. Establish a regional transportation website. ➢ Implement countywide travel training programs, building upon existing travel training resources. ➢ Develop a data collection process to assist human services agencies and organizations. ➢ Expand volunteer model opportunities within the county, addressing insurance issues for these and other specialized transportation services. ➢ Promote and build upon the existing centralized system, through the Volunteer Center, to facilitate bus pass/ token purchase for human services agencies. A competitive selection process will be developed by RCTC for Section 5316 (JARC) and Section 5317 (New Freedom), consistent with state guidelines around the Section 5310 program and building upon past RCTC Measure A Call for Projects. Recommendations for a flexible application process are proposed with projects to be invited under one or more of the four general project categories: Coordination Infrastructure; Building Capacity; Information Portals; Coordination Policy. The RCTC Board of. Directors' approval and adoption of the coordinated plan is anticipated for February 2008. January 2008 page xviii 124 PUBLIC TRANSIT- HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY — Final Report January 2008 This document presents the results a process to prepare a locally developed plan, entitled the Public Transit - Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County. This plan is required by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administration in order to access funding available under: Section 5316 — Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program, Section 5317 — New Freedom program, and Section 5310 — Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities program. Funds are available through the JARC program for capital and for operation of services targeting unmet transportation needs of low-income individuals for work -related trips. Funds available through the New Freedom program are for capital or operation of services supporting mobility of persons with disabilities, particularly with regard to trip needs that go beyond that provided by Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) complementary paratransit. The Section 5310 program is an existing program providing capital equipment to transportation services to seniors and/or persons with disabilities. The development of the plan involved a range of activities, including: • Stakeholder survey widely distributed to a mix of public transit and human services organizations across the county; • Data collection effort compiling key information from the public transit operators and from Measure A -funded specialized transit programs in Western Riverside County; • An estimate of trip demand for the target groups of seniors, persons with disabilities and individuals of low income; • An extensive public outreach effort across the County; • Provision of examples of coordinated service delivery to provide modest detail about coordinated service projects. From this broad array of stakeholder outreach strategies and other data collection and analysis, this report provides an assessment of the needs, gaps and duplication of services for the three target populations — persons of low income, persons with disabilities and elderly individuals. This assessment leads to a series of recommendations that include a mobility vision on behalf of the target groups and four coordination goals with nineteen objectives and sixty-three (63) implementing strategies, project and activities. Finally, the report proposes a framework for coordination, including development of a Regional Mobility Manager for Riverside County and establishing a universal Call for Projects. Discussion is included of sequencing of the plan's recommendations and prioritization strategies for project selection. 125 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 1.1 INTRODUCTION This plan is prepared in response to the coordinated planning requirements set forth in three sections of SAFETEA-LU [Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Act — A Legacy for Users, P.L. 190-059] Section 5316-Job Access and Reverse Commute program (JARC), Section 5317-New Freedom Program and Section 5310-8derly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities Program. The Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan (plan), prepared on behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), will establish the construct for a unified comprehensive strategy for transportation service delivery focused on unmet transportation needs of Riverside County. This plan meets the requirement for coordinated planning efforts as described in SAFETEA-LU, and enables federal funding under the Section 5310, JARC, and New Freedom programs. 1.1 COORDINATION AT THE FEDERAL LEVEL SAFETEA-LU With the passage of SAFETEA-LU in 2005, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted a series of "listening sessions" around the country to obtain input on how to implement facets of this complex transportation funding authorization. Guidance was sought from public transit operators, regional transportation planning agencies and metropolitan transportation organizations. Comments on the New Freedom program, JARC, and the 5310 capital program recommended consolidating the coordination planning requirements for these programs. To that end, the proposed FTA circulars issued in March 2006 and the final circulars issued on May 1, 2007 all included a common Chapter V: Section 5310 - FTA C. 9070.1F; Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities Program Guidance Section 5316 — FTA C.9050.1: The Job Access & Reverse Commute Program Guidance Section 5317- FTA C. 9045.1: New Freedom Program Guidance. The circulars' common Chapter V, "Coordinated Planning," requires that any projects funded through these sections be "derived from a locally developed, coordinated public transit — human services transportation plan" which is "developed through a process that includes representatives of public, private, and non-profit transportation and human services providers and participation by members of the public."' The findings reported here contribute to this locally developed, coordinated public transit -human services transportation plan to ensure that eligible projects developed for Riverside County constituents can be funded. Specifically, the plan's goals should address the general purposes and requirements outlined in Table 1-1 on page 3. ' Page V-1 of each of the respective proposed circulars, Section 5310, Section 5316 and Section 5317 , issued by the Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Dept. of Transportation, May 1, 2007_ January 2008 page 2 126 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 1-1 Summary of Goals of SAFETEA-LU's Coordinated Locally -Developed Planning Process The Coordinated Locally -Developed Plan shall identify transportation needs of individuals with disabilities, older adults and people with low incomes; provide strategies for meeting those local needs and prioritized transportation services for funding and implementation. [From the Overview in Chapter 5, Coordinated Planning of each of the Circulars related to Sections 5310, 5316 and 5317 released May 1 2007.] Program Goals that the Plan shall address: Section 5310 — Elderly Individuals and Individuals with Disabilities Program: Provision of discretionary capital assistance in cases where public transit was inadequate or inappropriate to serve the transportation needs of elderly persons and persons with disabilities [FTA Circular 9070.1 F, p. 1-3]. Section 5316 —Jobs Access and Reverse Commute Program: Improve access to transportation services to employment and employment -related activities for welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals" [FTA Circular 9050.1, p. II-1]. In addition, the House of Representatives conference report indicated that the FTA should "continue its practices [with this program] of providing maximum flexibility to job access projects designed to meet the needs of individuals not effectively served by public transportation" [HRC Report 109-203, Section 3018]. Section 5317 — New Freedom Program: Provide additional tools to overcome existing barriers facing Americans with disabilities seeking integration into the work force and full participation in society" [FTA Circular 9045.1, p. II-2]. 1.2 FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION (FTA) PROGRAM GUIDANCE FTA guidelines require that the coordinated plan must contain the following four (4) required elements consistent with the available resources of each individual agency/organization: 1. An assessment of available services that identifies current providers (public, private and non-profit); 2. An assessment of transportation needs for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and people with low incomes — an assessment which can be based on the experiences and perceptions of the planning partners or on data collection efforts and gaps in service; 3. Strategies and/or activities and/or projects to address the identified gaps between current services and needs as well as opportunities to improve efficiencies in service delivery; and 4. Priorities for implementation based on resources (from multiple program sources), time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or activities identified. AIII M A January 2008 page 3 127 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 2.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides an assessment of the transit providers in Riverside County, both public operators and the specialized transportation providers funded with Measure A in Western Riverside County. It provides operating characteristics and performance indicators for these transit providers. 2.2 PUBLIC TRANSIT AND MEASURE A PROVIDER OPERATING DATA One aspect of the demand for specialized transportation services is the demonstrated demand from the trips already provided by the county's public transit and Measure A providers funded in Western Riverside County. The standardized operating and financial data submitted to RCTC by these operators represents the basic source for this analysis, augmented by data obtained through telephone and email contacts. Due to the number and size of tables presented in this section, all tables appear in numerical order beginning on page 9 and following the narrative text. Basic operating and financial data is summarized in tables: Table 2-1 Table 2-2 Table 2-3 Public Transit Operators: Fixed Route Services (page 9) Public Transit Operators: Paratransit Services (page 10) Measure A Operators (page 11) Service operating characteristics are summarized in tables: Table 2-4 Public Transit Operators Summary System Operating Characteristics (pages 12-13) Table 2-5 Public Transit Operations System Maintenance Characteristics (pages 14-15) Table 2-6 System Operating Characteristics - Measure A (pages 16-18) Table 2-7 System Maintenance Characteristics - Measure A (pages 19-21) 2.3 OPERATING CHARACTERISTICS OF TRANSPORTATION PROVIDERS Operating Characteristics: Public Transit Operators Riverside County presently has a total of 8 operators of public transit including fixed route and paratransit services and Metrolink commuter rail_ Listed in alphabetical order, these are: • City of Banning • City of Beaumont • City of Corona • Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency January 2008 page 4 128 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • RCTC's Metrolink Commuter Rail Program • Riverside Special Transportation Services • Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) • SunLine Transit Agency RCTC's Metrolink Commuter Rail program provides only fixed route service. The City of Riverside's Special Transportation Services program operates only demand -responsive transportation and serves as the umbrella for ADA complementary paratransit service for RTA's fixed -route system within the City of Riverside. Each of the other operators provides both public fixed route and paratransit services. Collectively, the county's seven transit operations providing bus service provided 11.2 million passenger trips (fixed route-10.6 million, paratransit-0.6 million) at a cost of $69 million (Tables 2-1 and 2-2) while RCTC's Commuter Rail program provided 2.7 million trips at a cost of $24.9 million (Table 2-1) in a fiscal year (FY) 2007-08. Tables 2-4 and 2-5 provide a summary of the fixed route and paratransit transit services operated by the Riverside County public transit operators. Table 2-4 summarizes the services operated by each agency and basic service policies while Table 2-5 shows basic information on how these agencies maintain and service their vehicles. Operating Characteristics: Measure A Transportation Programs During FY 2006/07, Measure A provided funding in Western Riverside County to 14 organizations. The recipients are a diverse group, ranging from a large public medical center to a nonprofit organization primarily using volunteers to operate a mileage reimbursement program. The nature of these agencies and the transportation services they provide significantly impacts their level of interest in different types of assistance and coordination. The transportation services provided by these 14 organizations can be characterized as follows: Providing travel training only Reimbursing volunteer drivers Provides public transit tickets Transportation for residential facility clients only Transportation for specific clientele Transportation to/from speck facility(ies) only Number of Organizations Organizations 1 2 Blindness Support Services TRIP — Partnership to Preserve Independent Living CASA — Court Appointed Special Advocates 1 Volunteer Center 2 2 3 Operation Safehouse Whiteside Manor Inland AIDS Project Boys & Girls Clubs Beaumont Adult School Care Connexxus January 2008 page 5 129 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Riverside Regional Medical Center General Purpose Transportation 3 Care -A -Van Friends of Moreno Valley City of Norco Tables 2-6 and 2-7 provide a summary of the transportation programs provided by the Measure A recipients. The data shown here clearly depicts a collection of tailored transportation services that meet very specific trip needs that generally cannot be met using public transit services. Most of the programs are directed at particular client groups such as school children, children in shelters or foster homes, adults participating in day care programs and residential care. In general, the transportation needs of these groups would not be met by trip -sharing or consolidated delivery programs. The vehicle operating and maintenance summary shows that only 1 of the 9 programs that operate vehicles, Beaumont School District, performs vehicle maintenance in-house. Beaumont School District no longer operates vehicles, providing free bus passes on Pass Transit fixed Route service. Most of the programs use a variety of commercial garages and auto dealerships. Similarly, fueling and vehicle washing is done at a variety of locations, consistent with the wide geographical dispersion of these services across the county. 2.4 OPPORTUNITIES FOR COORDINATION: PUBLIC TRANSIT AND MEASURE A OPERATORS The coordination of transportation services and support functions is generally described in terms of a continuum from simple support and training at one end to the consolidation of services and administration at the other. For Measure A providers, there appear to be few opportunities for the coordination of services due to the targeted nature of the services being provided and the manner in which those services are being operated and administered by their sponsoring organizations. This finding is supported by a number of characteristics of Measure A providers: • 4 of the 14 agencies do not directly provide transportation, but enable individuals to use public transit services through travel training or free bus passes or mileage reimbursement for volunteers for driving others in their private autos; • 7 of the 10 organizations that directly operate transportation services do so for client groups that cannot be safely or conveniently mixed with other client groups or the general public — for example, adult day care clients, at -risk youth and AIDS positive individuals; and • 7 of the 14 organizations serve only their registered clients or program participants within very narrow geographic areas the county. Conversely, an analysis of the information shown in tables 2-1 through 2-7 highlight some practical opportunities for a coordination of activities that may result in modest cost savings, increased efficiency in vehicle operations, and improved vehicle reliability and safety. Opportunities for coordination of support functions between public operations and Measure A providers could include: January 2008 page 6 130 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report / Driver Training. Only one or two of these programs are large enough to have their own driver training programs and several operate vehicles of a size not to require anything above a Class C license? Regardless of the size of the vehicle, however, any employee who is driving in the course of their employment could benefit from specific training in safe driving, transporting special needs clients, and wheelchair securement. Scheduling and Dispatch Assistance. Assistance ranging from theprovision of more efficient scheduling techniques using computers or simple proven manual forms to record trip reservations and arrange vehicle tours to assessment and improvement of current procedures to improve vehicle use and collection of useful operating data. Vehicle Maintenance Services. As noted, a majority of providers use commercial vendors to service and repair their vehicles. At least a couple options exist for improving the quality and/or the cost of these maintenance services. First, maintenance services could be arranged through the public transit providers, the County or local city fleet service departments. These public agencies may be more familiar with the transit -type vehicles being used and be able to provide "loaner" vehicles in the event of lengthy repairs. Such collaborative maintenance activity may be able to reduce the cost of normal vehicle maintenance due to the public transit providers' expertise and dedicated facilities. A second option is that the maintenance requirements of these organizations could be combined, either as a single group or regional groupings, to obtain a combined service package with a single vendor to obtain a better cost based on volume services. II' Coordinated Fueling. Similar to vehicle maintenance, fueling could be coordinated through the existing public transit systems, County or city facilities, or combined to obtain a lower commercial fleet discount. With the continuing high costs of vehicle fuel, coordinated fueling has the possibility of producing sizable cost savings, however, the fueling locations must be convenient to access. As RCTC requires the public operators to purchase CNG- fueled vehicles, it may not be practicable to coordinate fueling through the transit providers. However, county facilities or school districts are alternative systems with whom some type of joint fuel programs may be feasible. O' Coordinated Vehicle Washing. Washing of commercial and transit vehicles has been targeted by water agencies as a major area of Clean Water Act enforcement; thus the continued washing of vehicles in parking lots or other open locations risks citations. Considering that most public transit agencies have wash systems or enclosed wash areas with wastewater treatment systems, this is an area of coordination that should be pursued. Vehicle Inspections. Discussions with the Measure A providers found several that did not believe their vehicles were subject to CHP inspection given the small size of their vehicles 3 z Class C license is the general Department of Motor Vehicles' license required for operating private automobiles_ Class B licenses are typically required of coach operators, drivers operating 40 foot transit buses and other commercial vehicles where the gross vehicle weight is more than 10,000 pounds. 3 The Biennial Inspection of Terminals requirement, commonly referred to as the BIT program, was established by the California Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1988, a program continuing since 1965. The intent of these inspections is to ensure that every truck terminal throughout the state is inspected by the Califomia Highway Patrol on a regular basis, thereby creating a level field for all motor carriers statewide. Motor carriers subject to inspection, whether or not for hire, include the following vehicles: motor truck with three or more axles having a gross vehicle weight of more than 10,000 pounds; truck tractors; trailer or semi -trailers; trucks transporting hazardous materials; motor trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds or more than 40 feet in length. January 2008 page 7 131 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report In the interest of general passenger safety, particularly considering the public funding involved in their operations, a program of annual inspections may be developed through the public transit providers as a double-check of daily operator inspections and periodic preventive maintenance. Such inspections could provide a mechanism for maintenance oversight and vehicle -related technical assistance to these small, specialized transportation providers, in lieu of'a coordinated maintenance program. January 2008 page 8 132 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan Financial and Operating Data for Public Transit Operators: Fixed Route Services Operator City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Corona Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Riverside Transit Agency [2] Sunline Transit Agency Fixed Route Bus Totals RCTC Commuter Rail [1] Notes Fiscal Yr Operating Cost Fare Revenues Total Passengers Vehicle Rev Hours Vehicle Rev Miles 03/04 $745,008 $91,447 212,634 10,574 152,711 04/05 $839,300 $89,998 192,326 11,979 182,359 05/06 $932,894 $115,165 183,265 12,647 197,722 06/07 $718,672 $78,136 113,981 9,343 146,104 03/04 $431,997 $28,509 81,520 10,396 136,198 04/05 $590,000 $34,929 87,870 11,536 166,667 05/06 $614,588 $46,240 89,962 11,615 173,034 06/07 $522,992 $41,024 85,652 11,321 75,611. 03/04 $681,357 $99,484 142,062 16,177 197,050 04/05 $799,461 $105,732 162,423 17,693 208,168 05/06 $862,412 $131,509 146,983 18,214 206,974 06/07 $741,344 $148,212 150,815 18,053 - 206,367 03/04 $393,200 $32,404 28,415 9,192 161,093 04/05. $562,988 $41,282 37,275 9,284 173,688 05/06 $573,168 $57,881 46,274 8,934 162,901 06/07 $375,068 $37,267 39,719 8,836 167,390 03/04 $30,722,972 $5,364,352 7,362,203 471,324 7,325,942 04/05 $30,577,670 $5,727,231 7,139,831 469,879 7,432,179 05/06 $34,788,082 $6,618,662 6,634,600 472,437 7,267,698 06/07 $37,613,733 $7,132,766 6,818,613 477,980 7,176,807 03/04 $13,683,279 $2,547,630 3,455,798 149,540 2,189,697 04/05 $13,227,654 $2,475,524 3,334,540 144,627 1,964,449 05/06 $15,272,214 $2,630,307 3,474,361 134,628 1,817,704 06/07 $14,852,176 $2,935,091 3,419,492 146,999 1,895,284 03/04 $46,657,813 $8,163,826 11,282,632 667,203 10,162,691 04/05 $46,597,073 $8,474,696 10,954,265 664,998 10,127,510 05/06 $53,043,358 $9,599,764 10,575,445 658,475 9,826,033 06/07 $54,823,985 $10,372,496 10,628,272 672,532 9,667,563 03/04 $0 $0 0 0 0 04/05 $23,261,100 $12,483,409 2,541,574 54,679 2,253,944 05/06 $28,276,500 $14,049,615 2,700,117 61,642 2,558,231 06/07 $24,893,703 $12,179,323 2,728,895 64,605 2,713,325 1. Commuter Rail data combines the three services: CR-91, CR-IEOC and CR-RIV_ 2. Data shown for RTA Fixed Route Services combines RTA-BUS and RTA Bus(Contract) services. January 2008 133 page 9 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-2 Riverside County Transportation Coordination Plan Financial and Operating Data for Public Transit Operators: Paratransit Services Operator Fiscal Yr Operating Cost Fare Revenues Total Passengers Vehicle Rev Hours Vehicle Rev Miles City of Banning City of Beaumont [Note 1] City of Corona Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency City of Riverside Specialized Transportation Riverside Transit Agency [2] Sunline Transit Agency Totals 03/04 $86,343 $6,483 10,130 2,347 43,290 04/05 $104,785 $8,254 9,636 2,566 41,031 05/06 $111,423 $11,367 9,463 2,327 45,758 06/07 $88,056 $9,242 10,336 2,038 42,548 03/04 $336,514 $30,666 32,163 7,473 92,202 04/05 - 30,342 7,065 92,241 05/06 $412,526 $24,748 28,656 6,731 93,113 06/07 $280,135- $17,498 20,419 4,716 66,698 03/04 $631,830 $85,599 68,138 14,730 224,455 04/05 $651,174 $84,716 66,481 14,141 215,861 05/06 $653,927 $105,807 - 58,892 13,172 190,205 06/07 $606,118 $122,175 57,577 13,166 182,488 03/04 $321,133 $24,248 11,170 3,904 48,193 04/05 $168,026 $17,169 5,897 2,368 30,706 05/06 $175,809 $17,973 4,797 2,164 26,810 06/07 $112,277 $13,736 4,842 2,207 32,328 03/04 $1,810,464 $185,332 157,828 38,788 642,845 04/05. $2,071,936 $204,976 152,752 36,503 598,951 05/06 $2,414,555 $240,846 145,223 36,738 578,196 06/07 $2,180,190 $250,224 133,064 31,544 438,544 03/04 $6,264,023 $593,422 226,661 127,176 2,333,851 04/05 $6,186,007 $901,955 217,750 133,546 2,362,804 05/06 $6,310,946 $527,220 217,858 130,431 2,355,490 66/07 $7,495,789 $650,686 249,023 153,739 2,890,133 03/04 $2,837,974 $221,067 105,967 48,111 845,391 04/05 $2,940,042 $202,783 88,356 42,977 707,294 05106 $3,215,660 $217,853 83,956 41,424 556,957 06/07 $3,343,668 $229,147 83,419 40,879 532,278 03/04 $12,288,281 $1,146,817 612,057 242,529 4,230,227 04/05 $12,121,970 $1,419,853 571,214 239,166 4,048,888 05/06 $13,294,846 $1,145,814 548,845 232,987 3,846,529 06/07 $14,106,233 $1,292,708 558,680 248,289 4,185,017 Notes 1 _ Beaumont Dial -A -Ride Operating Cost and Revenue figures not listed for 04/05. 2. RTA data is combined for RTA DAR and RTA Taxi. AMMA January 2008 134 page 10 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-3 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan Measure A Operators Operator Fiscal Yr Operating Cost Fare Revenues Total Passengers Vehicle Rev Hours Vehicle Rev Miles Beaumont Adult School [1) Blindness Support Services [2] Boys 8 Girls Clubs of Southwest County Care -A -Van Care Connexxus [3] 05/06. $50,277 $0 4,994 524 12,922 06/07 $49,403 $0 2,589 1,162 10,860 04/05 $62,468 60 05/06 39 06/07 06/07 $113,373 $O 26,599 4,035 14,068 03/04 $204,738 $8.825 7,498 5,736 71,657 04/05 $253,284 $9,280 8,257 5,663 64,734 05/06 $281,370 $12,207 9,295 6,351 69,649 06/07 $234,643 $12,933 10,965 6,038 61,585 Friends of Moreno Valley Inland Aids Project Operation Safehouse [4) The TRIP Program [6] 04/05 $69,750 $1,230 5,488 1,282 15,440 05/06 $230,291 64042 13,755 3,879 45,320 06/07 $254,014 $3,876 11,500 3,179 . 39,385 Riverside County regional Medical Center Court Appointed Special Advocates City of Norco The Volunteer Center Whiteside Manor [B] Totals Notes 03/04 $17595 $661 3,585 651 9,039 04/05 $67,148 $2,620 3,594 1,749 29,608 05/06 $69,770 $2,647 4,842 1,746 29,365 06/07 $76226 $1,889 2,691 1,756 22,260. 03/04 $197,758 $0 1,641 647 31,006 04/05 $175,352 $0 1,574 599 29,917 05/06 $10,015 $0 1,974 866 38,126 06/07 6127,872 $0 2,089 '1,122 51,672 06/07 03/04 $224,190 $0 15,920 349.893 04/05 $305,344 $0 24,393 495,198 05/06 $0 06/07 $214 300 $0 80,400 1,152,000 06/07 $439,559 $7,997 24,212 232,977 04/05 $34,224 $18.109 2,736 379 8,353 05/06 $35,686 $18,684 2,606 432 8,499 06/07 $144,971 $19.883 2,789 1,593 9,706 03/04 651,447 $0 55,740 04/05 $61,949 $0 72,740 05/06 49,983 06/07 06/07 $28,624 $O 4,026 5,645 43,044 03/04 $695,728 $9,486 84,384 7.034 461,595 04/05 $7 029,519 $31,239 118,842 9,672 643,250 05/06 $677,409 $37,580 87,488 13,798 203,881 06/07 $1,682,985 $46,578 167,860 257,507 1,404,580 [1] Beaumont Adult School mewed hireling orgy beginning rY 05/013 [2] Mindeness Support is a travel training program and does not provide direct transportation [3] Care Coemam transportation services Cagan January 2005. [4] Operation Safehouse was oiY funded $5,000 m 06/02 to cover veNcle maintenance end assurance; not used for transportation [5] The TRIP program Is a mileage reimbursement program- [6] Whiteside Manor: All case workers and direct client staff ere required to be licensed to drive, so "Stetting" shows 20 FTS_ The Boys and Girls Club of Southwest County, Operation Safehouse, Regional Medical Center, Creed Appointed Advocates, and Whiteside Manor only began funding in FY 06/07 AMMA January 2008 135 page 11 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-4 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan Public Transit Operators Summary of System Operating Characteristics Operator City of Banning City of Corona Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Description of Transportation Service 1. PASS Transit operates 3 fixed routes 2. Dial -A -Ride Services 1. Corona Cruiser operating 2 fixed routes 2. Dial -a -Ride 1. Deviated fixed route transit service on prescribed timetables_ 2. Curb -to -curb Dial -A -Ride service. Operating Organization Operated by City of Banning Operated under contract by Transportation Concepts Operated under contract by Transportation Concepts Geographic Area Served Services operate within the City of Banning and to Cabazon Services operate within the City of Corona, area of 39.21 square miles Boundaries: N: 2"" Avenue, S: 289' Avenue, E: Colorado River, W: Ironwood State Prison Hours/Days of Service FR: M-Fx 6 am — 7 pm Sal: 8 am — 5 pm Sun: 9 am — 5 pm DAR: ADA : same as FR Non-ADA: M-F 8am-4:30pm DAR: M-F: 6 am — 6 pm Sat: 8am — 5pm Fixed Route (approx): M-F: 5am — 9pm Sal: 8am — 7pm M-F: 5:00 am — 8:30pm Sat: 8:00am — 5:30pm Sun: 8:25am — 5:30pm Eligibility Fixed Route: GP DAR: ADA certified Non-ADA = Seniors [60+] and disabled Anyone is eligible to use these services Fixed Route: GP City DAR: Srs +Disabled County DAR: GP+Srs+Disabled Trip Restrictions No trip restrictions for ADA paratransit Non-ADA DAR is limited to space available Dial -A -Ride will go only 'A mile outside city limits County General Public riders must use fixed routes for "in town" trips Reservation Policies Trips must be requested no less than 24 ahead; trips for appls can be made up to 21 days ahead; priority is given to ADA trips Dial -A -Ride trips may be reserved at least 1 day and up . to 14 days in advance Fixed Route Deviation: From 1 day to 30 min by phone or 30 min before deviation if on bus DAR: From 7 days to 2 hours ahead of pfu time Cancellation/ No- Show Policies Trips are to canceled at least 1 hour ahead or fare is charged. [N/S are not a problem] 3 no shows on Dial -A -Ride results in suspension for 30 days. Cancel up to 1 hr before phi; No show if rider does not take trip; 3 No shows result in suspension for 30 days. January 2008 136 page 12 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-4 Continued Operator Riverside Special Transportation Services Riverside Transit A gency Sunline Transit Agency Descriptiodbf Transportation Service Advance reservation Curb -to -Curb Dial -A -Ride services Fixed Route, Dial -A -Ride, Commuter -Link and rural foxed -route services Fixed Route and Demand Responsive transit services Operating Organization City of Riverside Fixed route service in urbanized areas operate by RTA; DAR, Commuter -Link and Waal FR operated by contractors Sunline Transit Agency Geographic Area Served City limits of the City of Riverside Westem Riverside County Coachella Valley, including 9 cities and unincorporated county areas Hours/Days of Service M-F: 8:00am — 6:00pm S + S: 9:00 am — 4:30pm No service on Thanks -giving & Christmas Day M-F: 3:00am — 10:00pm S + S: 5:30am—10:00pm No service on Thanks -giving & Christmas Day 4:30 am—12:00am 7 days/wk Eligibility Seniors 60+ Individuals with Disabilities [doctor's note or ADA certified] Fixed Route: General Public DAR: ADA certified, RTA disabled ID card holders and Seniors 60+ Fixed Route: General Public Demand -Responsive: ADA paratransil eligible only Trip Restrictions Only restriction is travel within city limits Fixed Route: none DAR: service is first come, first served with priority to ADA paratransit eligible_ Fixed Route: no trip restrictions DAR: ADA certified only Reservation Policies Trips may be reserved up to 7 days in advance; same day is space available; subscription trips provided Trips may be reserved from one to seven days in advance Trips may be reserved up to 14 days ahead and at least 24 hours ahead Cancellation/ No -Show Policies points tem for ro Service has system shows; can suspend trips for repeal offenders RTA has pant system for late cancellations and no-shows- repeat violations result in service suspension Sunline reserves the right to suspend service for customers with repealed no-shows AMNIA 137 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-5 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan Public Transit Operator System Maintenance Characteristics Operator City of Banning City of Corona Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Maintenance Provider City of Banning Commercial Vendor: Corona Fleet Services City of Blythe Central Garage Maintenance/ Vehicle Storage Location Addresses Maintenance & storage at City Yard, t76 E. Lincoln, Banning Storage: 760 Corp Yard Way Corona, CA 92882 440 S. Main Street Blythe CA 92225 Facility Description: Facility has gatekey entry Facility is fenced and lighted Facility is fenced and lighted Security Shared with other operations? - Shared with other City fleets Shared with other City fleets Shared with other City fleets, inc. police and fire Fueli arran ements 9 City Yard has CNG and gas fuel capabilities Corp Yard has CNG and gas fuel capabilities CFN Stations On -site wash facility w/water capture Wash rack Wash rack w/o water capture Capacity for added vehicles? n/a Possibly — City also planning new facility Date Last CHP Terminal Inspection/Results June 2007 Satisfactory 08/06/06 Satisfactory January 2008 page 14 138 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-5 Continued Operator Riverside Special Transportation Services Riverside Transit Agency Sunline Transit Agency Maintenance Provider City of Riverside Fleet Services RTA maintains primary fleet; Contractors maintain DAR, Commuter -link and rural fixed route fleets Sunline Maintenance/ Vehicle Storage Location Addresses 8095 Lincoln Avenue, Riverside RTA has two operating bases; contractors operate from other facilities [t] 32-505 Harry Oliver Trail Thousand Palms, CA 92276 Facility Description: Facility is fenced and lighted Facility is fenced and lighted Security Shared with other operations? No, DAR fleet has separate parking area Facility maintains all Sunline vehicles Fueling arrangementsDAR has own CNG fueling station All vehicles other than DAR are CNG and fueled at RTA facilities; commercial vendors used for other fueling Fueling is done on -site On -site wash facility wlwater capture Vendor does washing in on- site wash area RTA and contractor fleets are washed in on -site wash areas at respective bases. Capacity for added vehicles? Up to City Fleet Services RTA would need to review Agency not interested in this opportunity Date last CHP Terminal Inspection/Results June 2006 Excellent Notes: [1] RTA operates from two bases in Riverside and Hemet; the three contractors operate from bases in Hemet, Perris and Temecula. A M MA January 2008 page 15 139 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-6 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan summary or sysrem uperaun s L:naracrerisucs - measure Pi vperaLors Operator Beaumont Adult School Blindness Support Services Boys &Girls Clubs of Southwest County Care -A -Van Care Connexxus, Inc. Description of Transportation Service Transportation for students in teen mother program and ESL students with preschoolers in childcare Travel Training Program to enable independent use of public fixed route transit services Before- and after -school transportation between schools and Bays &Girls Clubs Door-to-door transportation services Curb -to -Curb transportation for clients to/from adult day care and adult day healthcare Operating Organization Beaumont School District Training done by agency staff Operated by agency staff Operated by agency staff Operated by agency staff Geographic Area Served San Gorgonio Pass area, including cities of Beaumont, Banning and Cherry Valley Western Riverside County Elementary and middle schools in vicinity of Albert Hill Ranch Clubhouse in Lake Elsinore and Pechanga Great Oak Club In Temecula Hemet and San Jacinto Two Facilities: 1. City of Riverside & surrounding areas 2. Sun City & surrounding areas Hours/Days of Service Mon thru Thur for BAS students Mon thru Fri for teen mother program Class is held once a week. Average student participates in weekly class for several months Weekdays 6:30 am to 6:00pm Monday thru Friday Mon thru Friday for program hours 8:30 am of— 2:00pm Eligibility Adults attending BAS and teen mothers attending Milo P. Johnson High School Blind and visually Impaired Individuals Service is open to any club member, but priority is given to scholarship students Seniors 55+ Individuals with disabilities Truly needy Program clients who are disabled functionally or mentally -impaired Trip Restrictions Program only provides transportation to and from classes. n/a Except for fieldtrips, transportation is only provided between clubs and schools No restrictions as to trip purpose so long as within service area Provides transportation to and from facilities. Cannot serve persons who are safety risk. Reservation Policies Students arrange transportation thru school office. n/a Students are signed up for transportation for entire school year Trip requests are accepted at least one day prior up to one week ahead. No same day trip bookings. Services are set up as subscription trips at same times each day or same days each week. Cancellation/ No -Show Policies Students call to cancel service if sick/absent; 3 consecutive days absent w/o notice and service is cancelled. n/a Transportation is seen as privilege and parents generally call to cancel, 3 no-shows without calling to cancel and person will be denied a ride for$0 days. Service can be terminated with 2 week notice for safety reasons. 140 January 2008 page 16 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-6 continued Operator Friends of Moreno Valley Inland Aids Project Operation Safehouse, Inc. The TRIP Program Riverside County Regional Medical Center [1] Description of Transportation Service Curb -to -curb demand responsive service Demand response transportation services Client transportation for (1) Emergency Runaway & Youth Shelter and (2) Transitional Living Program 1. Provide information on transportation alternatives and referral services; 2. Provides volunteer -assisted transportation 1. Established routes to 10 communities in Western R. County 2. Door -to -Door service in same area Operating Organization Operated under contract by Diversified Paratransit Operated by agency staff Operated by agency staff The Partnership RC Regional Medical Center Geographic Area Served Moreno Valley origins to destinations within 35 miles of MV Riverside and San Bernardino Counties Programs serve all of Riverside County Services cover all of Riverside County yyestem Riverside County Hours/Days of Service M-F service only. Hours are flexible but limited M-F (approx): 6:00 am — 9:00 pm No Sat or Sun services currently 24x7 depending on trip need 24 hours a day, 7 days per week Routes: M-F 7:00 am — 5:00 pm Door: 6:00am M-F :00am — 8:00 pm Sat 6:00 am — 5:00pm Both on -call 24/7 Eligibility Seniors 60+ and adults 21+ with disabilities Service Is available to anyone in counties who tests AIDS positive Transportation only provided to clients of agency's two residential programs Seniors 60+, persons with disabilities and the truly needy who are unable to travel in any other way Routes: Anyone requiring RCRMC services D-to-D: seniors [65+], disabled & truly needy Trip Restrictions No restrictions on trip purpose, however priority Is to out-of-town medical trips . Trip purposes are limited to medical appts, support group meetings, counseling and legal appts Shelter: recreation, counseling, few medical trips. TLC: job Interviews, school, counseling, medical appts. TRIP assistance is not given when trips are possible through public transit or normal family care giving - Non -emergent transport only; no minors w/o parent/guardian; no gurneys, limited ride alongs Reservation Policies At least 1 day ahead up to 7 days. First come, first served except priority to wheelchair medical Requests must be made 48 hours In advance. Emergency same -day services on space- available basis. Trips arranged by staff and case managers Once the volunteer relafionshlp is established, travel is arranged between the client and volunteer Routes: Request 5 days in advance, first come, first served D-to-D: Once eligible, 24 hour advance Cancellation/ No -Show Policies No policy, not a big problem No-show clients are contacted by staff; service can be suspended for chronic no-shows. Not applicable Not applicable Both: 24 hour advance notice of cancellation is requested Notes: 1. Of the two services provided by the Regional Medical Center, only he Door -to -Door service is funded by Measure A. iAMAA • January 2008 page 17 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-6 Continued Operator Court Appointed Special Advocates The Volunteer Center Whiteside Manor Description of Transportation Service Program provides mileage reimbursement for volunteers Program provides public transit tickets to nonprofit agencies, churches and government agencies Transportation for clients in residential care facility Operating Organization Volunteers are administered by agency staff Administered by agency staff Operated by agency staff Geographic Area Served Riverside County Tickets are provided for RTA regular and ADA service and for Riverside Special Transportation Service only provided to residents of facility at 5935 Janet Street, Riverside Hours/Days of Service 7 days a week, hours as coordinated with volunteer Per schedules of RTA and Riverside Special Transportation 24 hours a day, 7 days per week Eligibility Service is available to children VlS yrs] placed in foster care by the courts Generally seniors, disabled and truly needy as defined by participating agency Transportation is available only to clients of residential facility Trip Restrictions Trips provided to court hearings, medical appts, counseling, school and some outings Generally medical appts, job interviews, counseling, training and essential trips, per agency missions Trips provided to medical appts, court hearings, counseling, group meetings and some outings Reservation Policies Transportation is arranged between the foster homes and the volunteers n/a Calendar is maintained of trip needs; efforts are made to group similar trips/destinations Cancellation/ No -Show Policies n/a n/a n/a mei 142 January 2008 page 18 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-7 Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordination Plan System Maintenance Characteristics Operator Beaumont Adult School Blindness Support Services Boys 8 Girls Clubs of Southwest County Care -A -Van Care Connexxus, Inc. Maintenance Provider Beaumont School District n/a program operates no vehicles Commercial maintenance vendor Commercial vendor: Grant Auto Commercial vendor: Corona Fleet Maintenance/ Vehicle Storage Location Addresses School District Yard -- Vehicles stored at club locations 4 vehicles stored at drivers' homes, 2 at safe agency location Vehicles stored at facilities facility Description: Yes Lake Elsinore: parked at club, unsecured Pechanga: at Casino, secured n/a Fenced and gated Security Shared with other operations? Yes n/a n/a No Fueling arrangements Fueled at School District Yard Commercial fuel vendor Fueled at County yard in Hemet Fueling done at Poma Automated Fueling On -site wash facility w/water capture Washed at School District Yard Washed at off -site car washes Washed at off -site car wash Washed at facilities In parking lots Capacity for added vehicles? - n/a n/a n/a Date Last CHP Terminal Inspection/Results 01l09/2007 Satisfactory May 2007 Satisfactory 4643 January 2008 page 19 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Operator Friends of Moreno Valley Inland Aids Project Operation Safehouse, Inc The TRIP Program Riverside County Regional Medical Center Maintenance Provider Diversified Paratransit Commercial vendor; Sparkman Garage Commercial vendors: auto dealerships n/a program operates no vehicles Riverside County Fleet Services Maintenance/ Vehicle Storage Location Addresses parked -out in MV; maintained at DPI Pomona facility Vehicles are stored at agency offices, 3756 Elizabeth St. Vehicles are stored at residential facilities Maintenance: 4293 Orange St. Riverside Storage: Hospital Facility Description: Residential area, not secured Parking area is fenced and lighted Parked in secured areas -- Lot is patrolled, not secured Security Shared with other operations? No No May be parked with staff or residents' vehicles Fleet Services maintains County light duty vehicles Fueling arrangements Fueled at commercial gas station Fueling done at Poma Automated Fueling Commercial gas stations except for natural gas at City Vehicles are fueled at Fleet Services On-sitewawa es capful a Washed in street or driveway eneraly washed on-off- Gsite inlpa king area Washewashessite car Yes Capacity for added vehicles? n/a n/a n/a Possible, Fleet Services presently does some non -Co maintenance Date Last CHP Terminal Inspection/Results Current vehicle not yet inspected May 2007 Satisfactory Not inspected by CHP — Unknown 144 January 2008 page 20 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 2-7 Continued Operator Court Appointed Special Advocates The Volunteer Center Whiteside Manor Maintenance Provider program operates no vehicles program operates no vehicles Commercial vendor: Magnuson's Maintenance! Vehicle Storage Location Addresses -- _ Maintenance: University Av, Riverside Storage: At facility Facility Description: -- Parking area is fenced and lighted Security Shared with other operations? -- -- n/a Fueling arrangements •- -- Commercial gas stations using gas cards On -site wash facility w/water capture Vehicles are washed on -site in parking area Capacity for added vehicles? -- -- n/a Date Last CHP Terminal Inspection/Results "" -- Not inspected by CHP A:N�b1:d • January 2008 page 21 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 3.1 INTRODUCTION Planning for increased coordination among public and human services transportation providers in Riverside County is informed by understanding and measuring the specific populations that use general public dial -a -ride programs. These individuals are best characterized by the target populations of three SAFETEA-LU programs: Section 5310 (Capital Assistance for Seniors and Disabled Individuals), 5316 (Job Access and Reverse Commute), and 5317 (New Freedom). The populations served by these programs are seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons of low income including persons on welfare. This chapter quantifies Riverside County residents within these population groups and considers these in relation to defined sub -areas of the county. And a rationale is presented for quantifying the specialized trips these individuals may need. Although children are among those using public transportation services, for purposes of developing this demand estimate, only adult population data is considered given the summarized census data characteristics available for persons age 16 and above. 3.2 TARGET POPULATIONS The Federal Transit Administration has identified three target populations under the SAFETEA- LU programs, Sections 5316, 5317 and 5310. These are persons of low income, persons with disabilities and seniors. Quantifying the Target Population Table 3-1 identifies the numbers of these individuals in Riverside County from among the 1.5 million residents, drawn from the 2000 Census population figures. The California Department of Finance estimates the 2010 county population to be 2.2 million, a 45 percent increase over the 2000 census base used in this analysis. The county as a whole is considered as well as the three apportionment areas of Western Riverside County, the Coachella Valley and the Palo Verde Valley. Approximately three-quarters of the County's population live in Western Riverside (77 percent), twenty percent are residents of the Coachella Valley and less than two percent in the Palo Verde Valley (1.7 percent). Although there are more recent countywide data, the 2000 Census provides the baseline for looking at detailed statistics for all of the sub -areas and population groups. Table 3-1 considers the adult population only, defined as persons age 16 and older except for identification of persons below the poverty line (ages 18 — 64). This table utilizes the 2000 Census figures as the population base for subsequent projections of these target groups. Population growth in Riverside County is substantial and the anticipated rates of growth are documented later in this chapter_ By 2030, the county's projected population of 3.5 million will be 127 percent above its 2000 census population of 1.5 million persons.. January 2008 page 22 146 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 3-1 TARGET PoPULATioNS for JAR�C, New Freedoms and Section 5310;Programs 2000 Census Attribute, Summary Flle 3 Riverside County • People by Category [2000] %Of Total Riverside County Population Western Riverside - People by Category [2000] [5] % of Sub Area Population Coachella Valley • People by Category [2000] [6] % of sub Area Population Palo Verde - People by Category [2000] 17] % of sub Area Population Total Population in Percentage of Total County ADU4T,5 16.64 I21; Low-income (ages 18-64) (Below poverty level as defined by the Census Bureau) [3] Disability (non -institutionalized) Ages 16-64 [4] with a "go outside home" disability SENIORS [2] Seniors, ages 65-74, with %of all seniors Seniors, ages 75-84, with % of all seniors Seniors, ages 85+, with %of all seniors Low Income Seniors (Below poverty level as defined by the Census Bureau) [3] Percentage of Seniors 65+ below poverty level Disability (non -institutionalized) Ages 65+ [4] with a "go outside home disability" Percentage of Seniors 65+ with a "go outside home" disability TOTAL TARGET POPULATION RANGES: Low end; Adutta�with disabilities (16 64)'and Dotty seniors 75+ Mid Range: Adults with disabilities (16.64) and ail seniors 65+ High land: Low Income adults (16-64) and all senior 65+= ` 1,545,387 100.0% 929 974 112,564 72,519 194,770 103,117 71,129 20,524 14,437 35,593 164,172 267,289 307,334 100.0% 60,2%. 7,3% 4.7% 0.9% 2.3% 7.4% 18.3% 1,201,307 77.7% 746,397 85,402 55,421 137,706 72,640 51,637 15,060 10,165 27,197 122,118 19,3,127 223,108 62,1%a 7,1% 4.6°/u 18.e% 318,125 20,6% 64'701 25,530 16,245 55,237 29,361 18,969 5,276 2,929 8,067 40,490 71,482 80,767 51.8°1a 3 8.0% 5.1 % 17.40/o f 0.2% 2.5% 5.3% 14.6% 22.6% 25,955 1,7% 1,632 6,3% 853 3.3% 1,627 ;7:0% 1,116 523 188 tit 1,343 5,2% 329 1.3% 73.5% 16.0% 4/.6 9.3% 3;459 g3a% [t] Census 2000 Summary File 3, Total Population. [2] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Sex by Age. [3] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Poverty Status in 1999 by age. [4] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Age by types of disability for the civilian non -Institutionalized population 5 years & over with disabilities. Sub -Area data extrapolated from Census 2000 Geographic County Subdivisions, [5] Western Riverside - Corona CCD, Elsinore Valley CCD, Hemet -San Jacinto CCD, Idyllwild CCD. Jurupa CCD, Lake Matthews COD, Murrietta CCD, Norco CCD, Perris Valley CCO, Riverside CCD, San Gorgonio Pass CCD [6] Coachella Valley - Cathedral City -Palm Desert CCD, Coachella Valley CCD, Desert Hot Springs CCD, Palm Springs CCD [7] Palo Verde - Chuckwalla CCD, Palo Verde CCD January 2008 page 23 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Poverty Levels For the 2000 Census, the. Riverside County total population was established at over 1.5 million persons. Of this total, 7 percent, or 112,564 adults, were identified as at or below the poverty levels as defined by the U.S. Census. Definitions of poverty by the U.S. Census are made based on a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. When a family's income is less than the threshold for a family of that size and type, then that family and every individual in it is considered to be in poverty. These thresholds do not vary geographically.4 The Riverside County proportion of 7 percent of persons at poverty levels is below both the statewide mean and the national mean of 13 percent.5 Among the sub -areas, Western Riverside is right at the county mean with 7.1 percent low- income adults. The Coachella Valley is slightly higher than the county mean, with 8.0 percent low-income adults. And Palo Verde Valley is below the county mean with 6.3 percent of its residents identified as low income. Disability Characteristics The second population group of interest is persons with disabilities. A disability is characterized by 2000 Census as persons with difficulty performing selective activities of daily living. While the 2000 Census has a number of variables related to disability status, this analysis uses the "go outside the home" disability, with individuals self -reporting that they have a disability that impacts mobility outside the home. The U.S. Census Bureau classification of this disability includes those who because of a physical, mental or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, have difficulty going outside the home alone to shop or to medical appointments. For Riverside County: ➢ 4.7 percent of the total population, or 72,519 persons, were adults age 16 - 64 with disabilities. ➢ 2.3 percent of the total population were persons 65 and older with disabilities, a total of 35,593 senior residents with disabilities, comprising 18 percent of the senior population. Among the sub -areas, generally comparable proportions were reported with the Coachella Valley showing only somewhat higher proportions of self -reported disability and the Palo Verde Valley with slightly lower proportions of adults with self -reported disability. Persons with disabilities and persons of low income represent overlap to some extent. The Census Bureau documents that the presence of a disability is associated with lower levels of income. In national studies, the Census Bureau has reported that 13.3 percent of persons with no disability had incomes less than half the median income, 30.4 percent of those with any disability had low incomes, and 42.2 percent of those with a severe disability had low incomes.s Senior Characteristics The senior population has a variety of characteristics of interest to this discussion. The individuals over age 65 in the 2000 census numbered just under 200,000 or 12.6 percent of the Riverside County total population. This is comparable to the state as a whole, with 12 percent of California's population age 65 and older in 2000. Low-income seniors, defined by income in relation to household size, are almost 1 percent of the total county 4 U.S. Bureau of the Census, Income, Eamings and Poverty Data from the 2005 American Community Survey. B.H Webster, A. Bishaw. Washington, DC, August 2006, p. 20. 5 Income, Earnings and Poverty Data from the 2005 American Community Survey, p. 22_ 6 Current Population Reports, Series P23-194, Population Profile of the United States, 1997. p. 32. AMMA January 2008 page 24 148 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report population (0.9 percent) and represent 7.4 percent of the senior population, age 65 and older. Seniors with disabilities were also identified in the 2000 census, a self -reported category as noted above. Eighteen percent of seniors, or 35,593, characterized themselves as disabled. In the sub -areas, the Coachella Valley is significantly above the County and State means with 17.4 percent of the population ages 65 and older. Western Riverside is very similar to the County as a whole, with 11.5% of its population 65 and older. The Palo Verde population is a younger group, with just 7 percent of the sub -area population ages 65 and older. A third group of potentially vulnerable seniors are the older senior populations, those 75 and older and those 85 and older. Advanced age is associated with increased rates of disability.' Over 71,000 seniors are between the ages of 75 and 84, representing 53 percent of the total county senior population, and another 20,500 are 85 and older, representing 10.5 percent of the county senior population. More than 11 percent of the senior population in Califomia as a whole are 85 and older, a percentage only slightly larger than that for Riverside County seniors. The physiology of aging identifies age 75 as the age point at which the natural effects of the aging processes are increasingly likely to impinge upon lifestyle, health status and general well- being. This is not to say that every 75 year -old is going to have difficulty getting around. However, it does indicate that statistically, there is increased incidence of disease and risk of falling that result in mobility impairments. The consequences of stroke and heart disease, as well as various chronic conditions or degenerative processes can also limit mobility.$ For persons age 85 and older, these rates of higher incidence of chronic disease and impairment increase more dramatically. Although not true of every individual 85 or older, this population is highly likely to have increased special needs and requirements when it comes to moving about their local community. This group is also the subset of the senior population that is expected to grow at the fastest rate with the aging of the baby boomers. Target Population Ranges As presented in Table 3-1, and supported by the discussion above, it is useful to look at ranges of persons in the defined and overlapping target population, a group ranging between 164,000 and 307,000 persons. As noted previously, ranges are used because some overlap exists among these demographic categories. For example an individual may be both disabled and of low income, or a senior may also be disabled. Three ranges of target populations are proposed for the County's total population, again using the 2000 census data as a base: ➢ Low End: Adults with disabilities (ages 16 -64) and only seniors 75+ = 164,172 persons ➢ Mid Range: Adults with disabilities (ages 16-64) and all seniors 65+ = 267,289 persons ➢ High End: Low income adults (ages 16-64) and all seniors 65+ = 307,334 persons For the three sub -areas of interest within the county, the comparable target population ranges are: ➢ for Western Riverside County: 122,000 to 223,000 persons, ➢ for Coachella Valley: 40,500 to 81,000 persons, and ➢ for the Palo Verde area: 1,400 to 3,500 persons. ' U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, Series P23-194, Population Profile of the United States, 1997_ Washington DC, 1998, p_ 50-51. a Spirduso, W. Physical Dimensions of Aging, Human Kinetics, 1995, p. 28. AMMA January 2008 page 25 149 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 3.3 FUTURE POPULATION PROJECTIONS Anticipating future population impacts, population projections for Riverside County are presented in Table 3-2 with estimates for the years 2010, 2020, and 2030. The California Department of Finance estimates that by 2010 the county's population will be 2.2 million, and 2.9 million by 2020. By 2030 the population is estimated to be 3.5 million persons, a staggering increase of 127 percent over the 2000 population. Table 3-2 TARGET POPULATIONS for JARC, NewlFreedoms, 5310 Programs =POPULATION:PROJECTIONS .O.saotnis` ' e x r k.�-.�"r.. °hSM�iFYf r +ttGva de. , 2000 Census �` kIEtI .3=1 = 2 .0 1' '203€)'* ' Total Rhfetside`County±P.opUlation C 1,545,387 - -,7,239,053y,- '2-904,848 - 3,507,498 _ % Change over 2000 Population 45% 88% 127% Adults with disabilities andlor low income adults, ages 72,519 „, 7%dtaal 111,953 s% 145,242 5% 175,375 5% 18 to 64 112,564 p>pd4>an 156,734 7% 203,339 7% 245,525 7% Seniors age 65 and older, including oldest seniors, B5* 194,770'2.6%. W t°a1 282,121 12.ex 377,630 13% 473,512 13511, (1% of total population), seniors with disabilities (2% of popolaton total population) and low-income seniors (1%total _ population(.\t TOTAL3'ARGET POPULATION12414GE8;: _ Low End Ranger Adults w/ disabilities and only seniors 75. 164,172 10.6% Na nha n7a Mid Range: Adults w/ disabilities and all seniors 65. 267,289 17.3% 394,073 18% 522,873 18% 648,887 19% %Charge Over 2000 Pow/a/ton Na 47% 96% 143% High End Range: Low income adults (t6-84)• all seniors 65+ 307,33419.9% 438,85420% 580,97020% 719,03721% % Charge Over 2000 Poplabon Nor 43% 6a% 134% Notes: 11 State of California Dept. of Finance Race/ Ethnic Population Projections with Age and Sex Detail, 2000 - 2005, Sacramento, CA., July 2007. Riverside County estimates stow slightly lower numbers and of. seniors population for 2010 (230,558 persons) and for 2020 (322,248 persons), with a sligMtly higher number of seniors for 2030 (487,707 persons). Table 3-2 presents projections of the target populations, based upon California Department of Finance total county population estimates. These are combined with straight projections of the adult low-income population and the disability adult populations, in combination with a steadily increasing senior population. Adults with disabilities (ages 16-64) plus seniors ages 75 and older represent the low end of the ranges. Low-income adults (ages 16-64) plus all seniors represent the high end of the range and, combined, suggest target population ranges of: • between 394,073 to 438,854 persons by 2010, • between 522,873 to 580,970 persons by 2020, • between 648,887 to 719,036 persons by 2030. The percentages of the target population increase modestly, at the mid range from 17 to 19 percent of the total population and up to 21 percent by 2030 for the range's high end. The sobering change however is in the raw numbers of individuals involved, reflecting the county's overall population growth. These rates of change, over the 2000 population, increase as follows with the high end of the range increasing at somewhat slower rates than the lower end: • by 2010, increasing range of 43 percent to 47 percent from the 2000 population • by 2020, increasing range of 89 percent to 96 percent from the 2000 population • by 2030, increasing range of 134 percent to 143 percent from the 2000 population. January 2008 page 26 150 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report In terms of developing these target population projections, the low-income population is held at a steady rate, anticipating that change is unlikely for this group. The disability population may be an increasing proportion, as increases in the number of adults with disabilities are suggested by evidence in the public health literature. Predicted increases in disabilities among younger cohorts may due to rising obesity rates.9 For purposes of this analysis, such possible growth is represented within the range of adults age 16 to 64 inclusive of those of limited means.: There is some demographic evidence, at the national level, that the proportion of seniors in poverty is decreasing as the baby -boomers age. This suggests that while tomorrow's seniors will be increasing significantly in quantity, they may also be more able to offset the costs of the services they require.79 3.4 DEMAND ESTIMATION Anticipating what level of trips these persons need and what proportion of these trips are unmet or undermet are other areas of inquiry. Table 3-3 presents an estimate of the potential trip demand for specialized transit trips hypothesized for these target populations, drawing upon trip making rates in various national research efforts. Utilizing the population estimates presented in Tables 3-1 and 3-2, Table 3-3 uses average daily trip rates, defined as the number of one-way trips per day made by an individual, developed through national research to establish a total level of trips these groups may be making on a typical weekday. These trip rates are annualized to establish annual trips made. Assumptions are then applied as to the proportion of trips made on transit or specialized transportation. In Table 3-3, the target population data discussed above return to the 2000 Census adult population estimates developed in Table 3-1. This revealed that for adults below age 65, proportions of 5 to 7 percent were persons of low-income, disabled, or may fall into both categories, somewhere between 72,500 and 112,500 persons. Seniors in various sub groups are considered, including those who are low income (7 percent of seniors), those with disabilities (18 percent of seniors) and those over age 75 where general health conditions are more prevalent (47 percent of seniors). Table 3-3 proposes mean trip rates for these persons, estimates the number of total trips taken by these individuals annually, estimates the number of these trips potentially taken on public transit and, of these, the proportion that may require specialized transportation or additional assistance. 9 www.pubmed.gov, website of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, as cited in SACOG Region Senior and Mobility Study, 2007, p. 10. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, Series P23-194, Population Profile of the United States, 1997. Washington DC, 1998, p. 4. January 2008 page 27 151 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 3-3 Specialized Transit Trip Demand Estimation for SAFETEA-LU Target Populations (2000 Census Riversfde;Counly T,arget!PopuTatto Aduhs (age 16 — 641 Disabled population al 4.7 % of adult population, ages 16-64[112,564 necssmal —15%to 7% of adult population (16 - 64) Low income population at 7.3% of adult population ages 16-64 [72,519 persons) Seniors (ages 65+) Seniors low-income at 7.4% of age 65+ -----17% to 18% of senior population Seniors with disabilities at 18.3%of age 65+ 135.593 oersonsl Seniors age 75+ when mobility issues become increasingly critical, at 47% of age 65+ [91,653 persons) Target Population Trip Ranges for Riverside County 47 % of senior population Low end trlp range: Adults with disabilities (16 4) and seniors low income or disabled (up in X% of seniors) Hi end trip range: Low Income adults (16- 64) and seniors 75+ (up to 47%of seniors) Votumnit 3 3.7 u 3.411 21 12 Tnp Making:,. Estimate.e r- Ranges. Trips Per Capita, At High End of Ranges [2000 Census Population Base of 1545,387] Tdpa,A11.7Hp'*T ' Rat:'Ter9.e �; Papubboii^255 68,421 677 106,204,134 12,516,879 g 8.5% is 30,859,131 49,080,182 100.5 3% u 3% is 2% n Icot column Aneeal Tnps,:i ° PotonWNy on• PutiltcT®iut[ «(Annual Tdps� PUEbp Tmnsit 6.5 nnuarrops,) agold 0 spee`Ipl,� ._ SsslsTanw g. 25%ofl?ubHc _ Tn ATnpn'i Notes: [1] Bureau of Transportation Slatistids, 2001 National Household Travel Survey- Trip rates for 65+, Not Employed; Medical Conditions Limiting Travel [2) National Cooperative Highway Research Program 'Estimating Impacts of Me Apng Population on Transit Ridership', p.17 (2006) [3) Sacramento Area Council of Governments Household Travel Survey of 1099; In Senior 8 Disabled Nearly Study, p, 9 (2006) NI Freedom to Travel, N.S- DOT Bureau of Transportation Statistics (2002) [51 Transportation Research Report, TCRP Report 82: Improving Pubic Transit Options for Older Persons (2002) and 2001 National Hemefiota Travel Survey (6%) Mean trip rates (Column A in Table 3-3) are the average number of one-way trips per day made by an individual. Mean trip rates are drawn from several published sources. ➢ The longstanding source is the 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which is routinely used as a basic data set by which to understand travel patterns of various subsets of the population. This disaggregated study is built up from a relatively small "n" but distributed around the country so that it is not geographically limited to a single region. Because extensive work has been done with this data set, and a similar 1999 study, it is the most common source for daily trip rate activity. ➢ U.S. DOT Bureau of Transportation Statistics publishes mean trip rates for persons age 65, for those not employed, and for those with medical conditions limiting travel. ➢ Also used is work published by the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRD) in a study entitled Estimating Impacts of the Aging Population on Transit Ridership (2006). Considerable research has been done by the highway industry to understand the effects of the aging process and its implications for road and highway design. This particular study disaggregated the travel pattems of seniors of different ages and mobility levels and their published mean trip rate for the oldest old, defined as age 85 and older is used here. ➢ Several sources were used in attributing mode share to these subgroups. The U.S. DOT Bureau of Transportation Statistics published a study Freedom to Travel (2002) that examined the trip making behavior of various groups. It included an analysis of January 2008 page 28 152 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report persons with disabilities and did identify them as high users of public transit, at rates of 25 percent and more of trips made, unlike the mode share for the general population of 4 percent or less. ➢ By contrast, the Sacramento Council of Governments conducted a 1999 disaggregated travel survey of seniors and the disabled populations and established a mode share of 8.5 percent use of transit by persons with disabilities,. This is a region that is transit - friendly to persons with disabilities and conducive to using transit. This lower rate of use is used here. ➢ Finally a Transit Cooperative Research Report (TCRP), Report 82: Improving Public Transit Options for Older Persons" (2002) identified a 3 percent public transit utilization rate by seniors in urbanized areas. This was half the mode share suggested by the 2001 National Household Travel Survey but this lower rate of use is used in Table 3-3 to help ensure a conservative, low -end estimate. Table 3-3 uses these sources to establish the daily "mean' trip rate per person in each subgroup (Column A). This rate is multiplied by target population group number, times 255 days, to establish a mean weekday travel figure for the year (Column B). For the subgroups identified this represents a range of 99.3 million to 155.2 million trips a year, weekdays only trips by all modes, all methods by which these individuals might travel. Then the various rates of public transit use, drawn from the literature and discussed above, are applied to establish the proportions of these trips potentially using public transit (Column C). Multiplying these public transit rates times the annual trips taken establishes the range of public transit trips, between 6.7 million and 10 million trips are needed by members of the target populations (Column D). A further calculation is made to identify the proportion of these trips — hypothesized for this calculation as one in four trips (25 percent) — where some kind of special intervention, additional information or assistance, or particular requirement may be needed (Column E). For the Riverside County as a whole, this is estimated at almost 1.7 million and up to 2.5 passenger trips, given the 2000 census population base. A per capita indicator for these numbers is calculated, suggesting that 1.6 trips per capita will reflect the high end of the range, at 2.5 million passenger trips. As the proportion of persons requiring these specialized trips grows, the relative need for increased numbers of these trips will grow also. 3.4 TRIPS CURRENTLY PROVIDED To assess the impact of any demand estimation for the target populations within Riverside County, it is necessary to understand how this compares with the level of trips currently provided. Table 3-4 presents these trips, both public transit and specialized transit trips provided for FY 2005/06, the year for which the most complete data is available. ➢ RCTC's commuter rail trips total 2.7 million, 19 percent of all the trips reported in Table 3-4. ➢ Public fixed -route transit are just under 10.6 million trips, 76 percent of aN trips reported on Table 3-4. These trips were provided by Riverside Transit Agency, including RTA contract services, SunLine Transit, Banning and Beaumont services, City of Corona and Palo Verde Valley Transit. January 2008 page 29 153 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 3-4 FY 05-06 Public Transit and Other Specialized Transit Trips Provided FY 05-06 Public Transit and Other Specialized TransitTrips !Provided Caitfomla State_Dept a Finance 2006 Pop- ulatlon,for Riverside- County VI 2 005,477 % of ail RCTC Commuter Rail - Riverside RCTC Commuter Rail - Inland Empire Orange County RCTC Commuter Rail - 91 1,101.646 1,066,541 531,930 �1'�` 1�t,K, fi`=F#TiL'fi�RtR'I RTA FR SunLine FR .RTA Contract FR Banning FR Corona FR Beaumont FR Palo Verde Valley FR 5,718,234 3,474,361 916,366 183,265 146,983 89,962 46,274 RTA DAR Riverside Special Transportation Services DAR Sunline DAR Corona DAR Beaumont DAR RTA Taxi Banning DAR Palo Verde Valley DAR 199,322 145,223 83,956 58,892 28,656 18,536 9,463 4,797 The TRIP Program / Parnership to Preserve Independent Living Care Connexxus Care -A -Van Beaumont Adult School Friends of Moreno Valley City of Norco Inland AIDS Project The Volunteer Center [41 [49983) 24,393 13,755 9,295 4,994 4,842 2,606 1,974 Tops per Capita for 2006a Total Population ALL TRANSIT TRIPS Public Transit, Measure A Specialized Transportation and stakeholder survey human services agency trips reported 11,186,149 80% k r r, �!.' Tnps per Capita for 2006-Total Population ` -� S.8 ALL DEMAND RESPONSE/ SPECIALIZED TRANSIT TRIPS: Public demand response, Measure A providers, stakeholder survey human services trips reported . _ Trips per Capita for-2006-Total;Poputatron, ONLY TRANSIT FUNDED DEMAND RESPONSE/SPECIALIZED TRANSIT TRIPS: Public :Trips per Capita for 20U67atal Population 681,528 5% 0:3 610,704 4% STAKEHOLDER SURVEY: Human Service Agency Trips Reported [31 (Teter n=tt agencies) 70,824 1% _ .., .- .. Trips per Capita,for 200iS Total Population 0 (Y Notes: [1) State of Califomia, Department of Finance, Race/Ethnic Population with Age and Sex Detail, 2000-2050_ Sacramento, CA_ July'07 121 RCTC Transtrack SRTP Service Summary - FY 05/06 Audited 1312007 Riverside County Public Transit -Human Services Coordination Plan by A-M-M-A ' Survey trip total excludes public transi operators and Measure A providers that reported trips but are already counted above. Excludes the commercial providers who reported a total of 398,700 trips. [41 Trips subsidized by The Volunteer Center are already reported in RTA trip data. Atli January 2008 154 page 30 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report ➢ Public demand response programs provided are almost 550,000 or 4 percent of total trips reported. Providers include the Riverside City Special Transportation Service, as well as RTA taxi and dial -a -ride programs operated by or contracted on behalf of each of the fixed -route operators. ➢ The Westem Riverside Measure A program has 7 programs providing trips, totaling almost 62,000 trips or 0.4 percent of total trips reported. The providers of these trips include the TRIP mileage -reimbursement program, Care Connexxus, Care -A -Van, Beaumont Adult School, Friends of Moreno Valley, the City of Norco, and Inland Aids. Additionally, almost 50,000 bus tokens and passes distributed by The Volunteer Center. Not included in this count are trips provided by new FY 2007 participants in the Measure A program, including Riverside Regional Medical Center, the Boys and Girls Club of Southwest County Operation Safehouse, and CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates). ➢ The stakeholder survey returned responses of trips provided that are not otherwise accounted for in the above numbers. Considering just human service agency trips, reported trips provided by 11 agencies annualized to almost 71,000 trips. The public transit agencies and commercial providers are excluded from this number so as not to double count. These trips are modest in number, one half of one percent of the total trips reported, and slightly more than the 62,000 trips provided by Measure A providers for this period. Clearly the human service agencies are providing significant numbers of trips, even with this modest sample of just 11 agencies reporting trip information. Presented at the bottom of Table 3-4 are a series of totals for these various types of transportation services, considering: all trips, just transit trips, only demand response and specialized transit trips, only transit -funded specialized transit trips and only stakeholder trips. These reflect the varying levels of resources currently available within Riverside County as a whole. Contrasting the Demand Estimate with Trips Provided Trips by the different service provision modes were noted on Table 3-4, accounting for almost 14 million trips provided during FY 2006/07. The demand estimate presentedpreviously in Table 3-3 suggests demand levels of 1.7 million to 2.5 million trips are needed by the target populations, using the 2000 Census population as a base from which to estimate this demand. With Riverside County, as a whole, the provision of just under 14 million trips represents 7.0 trips per County resident per year, calculated with 2006 Califomia Deptartment of Finance population estimate for the County's total population. This 7.0 trips per capita measure is well above that 1.6 trips per capita estimate of need developed in Table 3-4 suggesting that certain levels of demand are in fact being met. However, looking only at the demand response and specialized transit trips provided, that level of 681,528 trips or 0.3 trips per capita is well below a demand level of 1.6 trips per capita that was calculated against a population base that has been growing for 7 years. Relating trip demand to trips provided is complicated by the fact that members of the low-income . population can use public fixed -route services. Any demand estimate is not looking solely at the demand responsive trip needs of a senior population or persons with disabilities as they have January 2008 page 31 155 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report been in the past when the JARC target population was not considered. Nonetheless, clearly there is a need to grow trips on two dimensions: 1. growing the volume of total trips, across all modes, given this county's anticipated population growth and 2. growing the type of trips provided which is suggested by the descriptions of need presented in subsequent sections of this document. While there is certainly need for increased quantity and types of trips to be made available for these target populations, the demand estimate is sufficiently close to the current range of trips provided to suggest that this task is achievable. 3.5 DEMAND ESTIMATION SUMMARY COMMENTS This subsection presents a rationale by which to quantify the target populations, utilizing census variables and establishing a range of 143,700 persons up to 307,000 persons based upon the 2000 Census. These individuals represented between 9 percent and almost 20 percent of Riverside County's total 2000 population of 1.5 million residents. They are comprised of adults between the ages of 16 and 64 who are low income and/or are disabled and seniors ages 65 and older. Just over three -fourths of these persons live in Western Riverside County, one in five in the Coachella Valley and less than 2 percent (26,000 persons) live in the Palo Verde Valley. There are some differences in the basic characteristics of the target populations among the three identified areas. Western Riverside residents are just at the statewide means of proportion of low income (7 percent) and proportion of seniors (12 percent). The Coachella Valley residents are significantly older, with 17 percent ages 65 and older, and have a higher proportion of adults with disabilities, reflecting that retirement -oriented region. The Palo Verde area is a younger population, just 7 percent are seniors and this area is below the mean proportions of adults ages 16 to 64 who are low income (6 percent) or disabled (3 percent). The base target population proportions are projected forward, using general population estimates developed by the Califomia Department of Finance and other assumptions about changes in the senior population and the base adult population. The projections suggest significantly increasing numbers of Riverside County residents will be within the target populations: • By 2010, up to almost 440,000 persons • By 2020, up to almost 581,970 persons • By 2030, up to almost 720,000 persons. At the high end of the ranges presented, the population grows from 19 percent to 21 percent over the thirty-year period. In terms of the rates of growth represented, these are substantial and reflect Riverside County's overall continuing growth, increasing by 47 percent between 2000 and 2010 and by as much as 143 percent by 2030, over the 2000 census -based estimates. Trip demand is also considered in relation to the target population. Using a rationale for mean trips per day and estimating the proportion of those trips that might present for public transit, an estimate was developed for public transit demand. This represented a range of 6.7 million trips to over 10 million trips. This is a conservative trip demand estimate for weekday trips only, exclusive of holidays. Of these, it is hypothesized that one in four trips (25 percent) will require some level of specialized assistance, reflecting the trip demand appropriate to this plan. This is represented as a range of 1.7 million to 2.5 million annual trips for Riverside County's 2000 January 2008 page 32 156 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report census population. This level of demand is further characterized as 1.6 trips per capita of trips either unmet or undermet need on behalf of the target populations. Relating these demand indicators to trips provided is encouraging in that the current volume of all trips provided is well above these demand levels. The County's FY 2005/06 trips totaled` almost 14 million across all service provision modes, including rail, public fixed route and demand responsive service, Measure A providers and a small survey response from human service agency trips provided. A breakdown of the 14 million trips, which can be represented as 7.0 trips per capita, shows the demand response trips totaled over 681,000 trips and account for just 0.3 trips per capita. The demand response level of currently available trips is well below the 1.6 trips per capita indicator of needed trips. This planning process documents unmet transit needs of a variety of types and characteristics suggesting the demand estimate will reflect latent demand, trips not currently served. Further as the years forward from the 2000 census -based population grow, the demand for specialized transit trips will also grow with the County's dramatically increasing population. The goal suggested then is to provide high quality transit and specialized service that can meet growing demand and meet for some portion of the individualized trips needed by members of the target populations. Subsequent sections of this document reveal need in a variety of ways, by trip type, by geographic area and time of day and by levels of service required, suggesting that there does exist latent demand that is not yet addressed by the trips currently provided. Additionally, riders potentially eligible for ADA services will increase as population grows and the baby boomer generation increasingly reaches senior status above 65 years of age where disabilities increase and additional specialized transportation trips will needed. 111 January 2008 page 33 157 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 4.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter presents the stakeholder survey which was conducted as one strategy by which to bring new players into the transportation -planning environment and to begin to quantify needs and resources that might suggest coordination opportunities. The discussion focuses primarily on survey responses from, public transit and human service agencies. 4.2 STAKEHOLDER SURVEY APPROACH The stakeholder survey was designed to bring quantitative descriptions to the assessment process, both about existing public transportation services and about human service resources and needs expressed by both groups. The mail -back survey processes and findings are described here. Constructing a Mailing List Considerable effort was made to construct a master database that would reflect the breadth of human services and public transit organizations in Riverside County. Listings were compiled from a variety of sources, including RCTC's Measure A mailing lists and Riverside County participants at a 2005 non -emergency medical transportation conference. Additionally from the Califomia Motor Vehicle Department, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) terminal yard listings were obtained. This list reflects those transportation operators that the CHP inspects annually for safety and compliance with Califomia code. There were 117 current records for the 2006 year in the CHP terminal yard inspection listing. Finally, some Internet searching was done to check lists of senior centers, adult day health care centers, and major social service agencies among others. An initial database of over 500 records was constructed through these processes. Deletions of duplicate records and consolidation of other records where two contacts existed were necessary before a mailing could be conducted. The list was further reduced by bad address and returned mail, and revised by new address information for a final database count of 477 agencies Designing the Survey The survey tool itself was modified to reflect Riverside County; it was derived from earlier versions used in three Southem Califomia counties: San Diego, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. The survey was designed around two primary objectives. First, it was intended to be easy -to -answer, short with no more than two -pages, and with as many check -box and closed -ended responses as possible. Secondly, it was applicable both to agencies which did not provide transportation and to those which did provide transportation. The rationale for this is that both groups have some understanding of unmet transportation needs, albeit from different perspectives." One survey page asked questions about agency characteristics and transportation needs; the second page asked about the agency's transportation function. Z� The final version of the survey included 23 questions, which in addition to contact information asked four agency characteristic questions, four questions on needs and coordination issues, and 15 questions about the transportation services provided. Among these there were three open-ended questions, with most questions providing check -box options for response. AM MA January 2008 page 34 158 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Constructing the Database A relational database was built to serve the inventory, constructed in Microsoft Access from the original mailing list data set. The database consists of three primary tables and several supporting tables. - Table Agencies - agency name and address, source(s) of agency record - Table Survey - inventory data - Table Contacts - contact information on the individuals participating in this locally developed planning process Supporting tables include look -up tables for coded inventory questions and other tables, such as zip codes used with the sector table for assigning surveys to sub -areas within the county. The "contacts" table has been maintained through the project, to identify individuals within agencies who have transportation concern. Finding the "right" people within agencies remains a priority to promoting coordination and therefore remains a critical part of this plan. These databases will be provided to RCTC at the end of the project for ongoing use and maintenance. 4.2 STAKEHOLDER SURVEY FINDINGS The finalized survey, included as Appendix A, was mailed out to stakeholder agencies in early summer 2007. A cover letter from the Riverside County Transportation Commission explained the survey's intent towards preparation of the locally -developed coordinated plan for all of Riverside County. A return envelope was included, to facilitate return mail of the survey although the survey could also be returned by fax or email. As of this writing, 75 surveys were received, representing a 16 percent return rate on the current database of 477 agency records. Included as Appendix B are the summary data reports for the survey questions, presented and discussed in this subsection. 4.2.1 Characteristics of Responding Agencies This section describes legal characteristics, caseload sizes and client populations served for the responding agencies. Figure 4-1 shows that the largest group of responding agencies were public agencies (29 agencies - 39 percent), followed closely by private, non-profit agencies (27 agencies - 36 percent). Private, for -profit agencies were third most frequent (16 agencies - 21 percent). Faith -based and tribal organizations were the least frequent with a combined total of just three agencies. Agency locations by subarea of the County are presented in Figure 4-2 and an alphabetical listing by legal type is presented in Table 4-1 following Figures 4-1 and 4-2.. • The largest group of respondents, not surprisingly, is from the Riverside city area, including Moreno Valley (32 agencies - 43 percent). • Coachella Valley was also well represented with about one -fifth of all respondents (15 agencies - 20 percent). • Norco/Corona and the Central areas of Western Riverside County had comparable numbers of respondents (Norco/Corona: 7 agencies - 9 percent; (Central area: 9 agencies - 12 percent). • The fewest responses were received from southern Wester Riverside County and from the Palo Verde area with three agencies each (5 percent). • Four agencies located outside Riverside County were among the respondents. January 2008 page 35 159 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Figure 4-1 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Responding Agencies by Legal Type, n=75 Public Agency Private, non-profit Private, for profit Faith based org Tribal org 0% 10% 20 30% 40% Figure 4-2 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Responding Agencies by Region, n=71 W R-Riverside Coachella Valley W R-Central W R-Corona-Norco Palo Verde W R-South WR-Pass 0% 10% 20% 30% Note: The percentages in this chart are based on the 71 responding agencies within the County; the percentages shown in the narrative (page 35) reflect all 75 responiding agencies. 40% 50% January 2008 160 page 36 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 4-1, Stakeholder Survey Respondents by Legal and Service Types (as of 12/19/07) Corona United Methodist Church Church affiliated Human Sery - Non-hlth K Human Sery -Non-hlth Catholic Charities Church affiliated Celebrity Tours LLC Private, for profit I Prov - Prov Express Transportation Systems Private, -for profit Mainstream Tours Private, for profit ``Prov Coachella Valley Taxi Owners Association ___ ....__ ......_._ __.... __... _. -_. -__- Private, non-profit 9Prov _ __.___ ...--__._._..... ._........ -i- DaVita - Corona Dialysis Private, for profit ry Human Se - Health DaVita Magnolia West Dialysis (20'12) DaVta Montclair Dialysis Private, for prof Private, for profit HumanSent- Health Human Sery Health DaVita Riverside Dialysis Canter Private, for profit Human Sery - Health Desert Hills Alzheimers Special Cara Center Inland Faculty Medical Group Private for profit Private, for profit Human Sery Health Human _Sery Health Human Sery - Health~- Magnolia Rehabilitation 8 Nursing Center T Private, for profit PPMC - Primary Provider Management Company Private, for profit ! Human Sery - Health -9 Stroke Recovery Center - n Pvata, for profit Human Sery Health 'Axiom Counseling Team Private, for profit ~ Human Sery Non-hlth Home Instead Senior Care - Private, for profit Human Sery - Non-hlth Human Sery - Non -Filth Inland Empire Adult Day Health Care Private, for profit _ Seniors Helping Seniors .. Private, for profit - Human Sery -Non-hlth j Eisenhower Five Star Club Private, non-profit Human Sery - Health .Inlancl AIDS Project Private, non-profit Human Serv- Health }MFI Recovery Center Private, non-profit -Human Sery - Health I Human Sery - Non -filth Basic Cocc,upational Training Canter - Private, non-profit 'Boys a Girls Club Of Desert Hot Springs Private, non-profit ! Human Sery - Non-hlth Care A Van Transit Prime of Life, Inc. Care Connexxus Inc Adult Day Services Private, non-profit i Human Sery Non -filth Private, non-profit _ E Human Sery Non-hlth Private, non-profit Human Sery -Non-tdtFi Private, non-profit iHuman Sery Non-hlth _-�._.r__......_.__...._._...._..-tilt._ Private, non-profitHuman Sery -Non-h1tFi Private, non-profit /Human Serv- Non-hlth eCoachella Valley Resue Mission _ ICommunity Access Center Community Assistance Program _ Corona - Norco Settlement House DaybrDaybreak Adult Daycare Services eak ._.___...__.._..__... ._.___...s .. Lion_,.. _._. ._.... till._...._..__._ Desert Blind and -Handicapped Association, Inc_ Private, non-profit Human Sery - Non-hlth 1._.�.._ ....__ecs, ._ ._.te,non- Pnvata, non-proFt 3 Human Sery -Non-filth Desert Samaritans For The Elderly Private, non-profit i Human Sery Non-hlth Hospice of the, Valleys Private, non-profit Private, non- ofit `:Human Private, non-profit Private, non-profit Hu_man_Sent Non-hlth_ Sery -Non-Filth Indio Senior Center _ _ _ Inland Regional Center Human Sery - Non-hlth Human Sery - Non-hlth Jewish Family Service of the Inland Communities Martha's Village and Kitchen Private, non-profit I Human Sery - Non-hlth Parsons with Disabilities Private, non-profit Human Sery - Non-hlth Senior Shuttle, Inc. Private, non -_profit :Human Sery - Non-hlth Southern California Indian Center, Inc. Private, non- rofit !Human Sery - Non-hlth eSun City Concern, Inc. Private non-profit Human Sery Non-hlth The Carolyn E. Wylie Center fo_r_C_ Children t3 Youth _til.__ -. Wildomar Community Council Pnvata non-profit non:profit Private, non-profit Human Sery Non hlth .._._.�..___..... tilt. 'Human Sery Non hlth . wldomar Senior Community Prvate, non-profit Human Sery Non-hlth jGenerai Public _ City of Banningg Public Works - Public _ City of Corona _w_�� Public Public "General Public 'General Public General Public Clty.of Riverside Specialized Transit Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency - Public - RiversideTransitAgency Public ;General Public 'Southern California Regional Rail Authority,- Metrolink _ _ Public General Public (Surrline Transit Agency Public General Public Sunline Transit Agency - Access Committee - Public General Public Riverside County Department of Mental Health Public Human Sery -Health Riverside County Department of Mental Health Adult Services - Public Human Sery - Health Riverside County Department of Mental Health -Blythe Public _ _ Public Human Sen. - Health .._._..._. ........___....._.. Human Sery -Health ...... Riverside County Department of Public Health CalWorks GAIN Program ._.. _...._. _ Y Ci of Moreno Valle City Public 'Human Sery Non-hlth .._ _...._._ _ _ _. Public - Human Sery - Non-hlth Corona Senior Center Public Human Sery - Non-hlth Dept. of Veterans Services ........_ _ _... ... _. _._.... ._.. _..____ ...__..._.__. DPSS Administration - County Wide Emplyment Service Public i Human Sery Non-hlth _.. _... .. .__..._..._-. _._ ...._..._.. _... Public / Human Sary Non-hlth Eddie Dee Smith Senior Center Pubtic 'Human Sery - Norrhlth First 5 Riverside _ _ _ _ ._..._.._..._.. . Hemet GAIN Public Human Sary Non-hlth .. r._ ".... .. ._. _. ... Public ;Human Sery -Non-hlth Lake Elsinore Family Care Center Public a'Human Sery -Non-hlth Lake Elsinore Senior Center CARE Program _ .._.-.. _. ..._..._ ...._._____. Riverside County Community Action Fr ram Public 'Human Sery Non-hlth _.__....n._ _ _... .... Public Human Sery Non-hlth Riverside County Office of Education - Children's Services Unit Public Human Sery - Non-hlth Riverside County Office on Aging_- RSVP _ _--- .tilt_ _ _. __. Riverside County Office on Ali -Transportation Riverside County Substance Abuso Public Human Sery Non-hlth. . _ _ . Public Human Sery Non-hlth Public !Human Sery - Non-hlth Supervisor JOFin Tava_selione Second Dist Riverside Co Public f I Other .I General Public _ Palo Verde Unified School District _ _ ifi Public -� _ _-._ ._ .... ... _....__. .. Riverside/San Bernardino County Indian Health _ .till ._ 5 .. Tribal seances / Human Sery Health __ 3 January 2008 page 37 161 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agency Reported Caseloads Agencies and organizations estimated the number of persons on their caseloads, the average daily attendance, and those who required specialized transportation assistance and/ or were traveling in a wheelchair (Table 4-2). Table 4-2 2007 Stakeholder Surve , Re • orted Caseload and Dail Ridershi Enrolled clients/ consumers Daily attendance/ ridership Percent of caseload attending/ riding daily Clients requesting transportation assistance door to curb % of enrolled caseload Clients in wheelchair/ mobility devices % of enrolled caseload 439,549 5,568 1% 2,976 1% 236, 694 745 0% 680 0% 49,133 1,408 3% 981 2% 151,247 3,211 2% 1.277 1% • 520 157 10% 2 0% 581 0% 271 0% 38 0% 267 0% 0 0% 955 47 5% 36 4% 5 1% Caseload information drawn from respondents, suggests that 439,549 persons are clients of the agencies represented. If these were unduplicated individuals, this could be 29 percent of the county's approximately 1.5 million residents. It is highly likely, though, that these data reflect some level of duplication, as individuals who present to the social service system or may be using public transit may also be utilizing other public services represented among survey respondents. Of the individuals reported, respondents reported average daily attendance of almost 5,600 persons or 1 percent of the total caseloads reported. This average daily attendance number is less likely to be duplicative and is reflective of the volume of traffic these organizations generate. Responding private, for -profit agencies are seeing the greatest number of these persons, at 236,694 of the total caseload reported. However, only a very small proportion are traveling daily, representing less than one percent of their reported caseload. Public agencies followed closely behind with 151,000 persons representing more than half of the total number of clients traveling daily, at 3,200 persons. For the non-profit agencies, reporting about 10 percent of the total caseload at 49,OOO persons, a somewhat higher proportion are traveling daily, at 3 percent and just over 1,400 clients. This is consistent with the likelihood that non-profit agencies are seeing their clientele more frequently than is often required by typically larger public organizations. Consumers needing transportation assistance were estimated at half of the total daily caseload reported. Responding for -profit organizations report that nine out of ten consumers they serve daily need transportation. The private, non-profit agencies and the single responding tribal organization indicate that three-quarters of individuals on their caseloads need transportation. Persons in mobility devices, predominately wheelchairs, observed arriving daily at sites were 10 percent of the average daily attendance or 581 individuals traveling daily among this group. The highest incidence of mobility device use was reported by the private for -profit agencies, 271 individuals from among these. January 2008 page 38 162 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 4-3 examines reported caseload information by area of the county and some interesting differences emerge. The Riverside city area has the largest number of those traveling daily (1963 persons). Palo Verde has the second largest number (1,220), and the Coachella Valley has slightly fewer (1,015). The Norco/Corona area, with fewer daily riders, shows almost half of its reported consumers to be traveling daily. Table 4-3 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Reported Caseload and Daily Ridership by Area of County Enrolled clients/ consumers Daily attendancel ridership Percent of caseload attending) ddng daily Clients requesting transportation assistance door to curb % of enrolled caseload Clients in wheelchair/ mobility devices % of enrolled caseload 439.549 5.568 lob 2.976 1% 1,043 511 49% 213 20% 2,062 1% 251 1% 200 46% 1,596 69 6% 43 3% 460 4% 25 0% 5 50% 2 20% 581 0% 45 4% 476 0% 26 0% D 0% 9 1% 10 0% 10 0% 5 50% Total caseload information by the top reporting agencies is presented in Table 4-4, reflecting the range of consumer groups, public and private agencies represented among respondents. Table 4-4 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Responding Agencies With Largest Caseloads PPMC - Primary Provider Management Company Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Community Assistance Program _Riverside County Department of Mental Health Lake Elsinore Family Care Center Medical Group Inland Faculty DPSS - Administration - County Wide Emplyment Service Dept. of Veteran's Services Riverside County Office of Education - Children's Services Unit Persons with Disabilities Indio Senior Center 215000 60000 36000 32756 20000 20000 12656 7700 Primary Clients Served While there is some overlap among populations served by the responding agencies, there are also differences and Figure 4-3 and Table 4-5 shows agencies' primary populations. Agencies or organizations may serve more than one population group so groups can be overlapping. Low-income persons are served by six out of ten responding agencies, followed closely by persons with physical disabilities and frail seniors, served by 48 and 47 percent of responding agencies respectively. In addition, one-third of the agencies serve able-bodied seniors. A slightly smaller number of agencies, including many public transit agencies, serve the general public. 1.11.M.A January 2008 page 39 163 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report The next two largest groups of responding agencies are serving persons with behavioral disabilities, including mental illness and Alzheimer's (29%) and persons with sensory impairments (25 percent). Youthare served by just 13 agencies (17 percent). Clearly responding agencies are serving the target populations of the SAFETEA-LU programs that are the focus of this plan. Figure 4-3 2007 Stakeholder Survey Primary Population Served, n=75 Persons of low income Persons wl physical disabliities Seniors, frail �� A.:,: „. 47% Seniors, able-bodied33% General Public" 31 % Persons w/ behavioral disabilities =4 =' 29% �i Persons w/ sensory impairments '' 25% Youth 17% A1MA 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% January 2008 page 40 164 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 4-5, 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Primary Client Groups Served By Agency Type of Responding Agencies Seniors, able-bodied Seniors, frail Personswl physical disabilities Persons wlbehavioral disabilities Persons wlsensory impairments Persons of low income Youth General Public Other 25 337 35 47% 36 48% 21 29% 19 25' 45 69Y 13 17' 23 31% 12 WI 5 31% 10 63% 10 63% 4 25% 5 31% 10 63% 2 13% 4 25% 2 13% 8 30% 14 52% 13 48% 10 37% 8 30°h 19 10% 4 15% 4 15% 5 19% 12 41% 10 34% 12 41% 8 28% 6 21% 14 48% 7 24% 14 48% 5 17% 1 50% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0°% 1 50% 0 0% 0 0% 1 10o% 1 100% 0 0% 0 0% 1 100% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% Among agency types, the private for -profit agencies were most likely serving frail seniors, persons with physical disabilities or persons of low income. Each group is served by more than 60 percent of the for -profit agencies (recognizing that many of these clients fall into all three categories). The private non-profit respondents report the largest numbers of agencies serving persons of low income. And approximately of the private non-profit agencies serve frail seniors or persons with physical disabilities. Public agencies are most likely to serve members of the general public and persons of low income (48 percent of responding agencies), and able- bodied seniors (41 percent). The responding tribal organization serves frail seniors, persons with physical disabilities, and ,persons of low income. The faith -based organizations serve the general public and able-bodied seniors. Another way to understand the consumer base represented by these agencies is to contrast caseloads reported against the primary service agencies provide. Figure 4-4 shows that the predominate caseload was medical and health -related patients (54 percent). At some distance, public transit agencies reported 15 percent of the total consumer caseload, presumably ADA registrants and consumers on dial -a -ride registries. Low-income consumers were reported at 12 percent of the total, followed closely by consumers of senior and disabled services (10 percent) and of general public social services (6 percent). Youth -related services are provided for just 2 percent of the total caseload reported. January 2008 page 41 165 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Figure 4-4 2007 Stakeholder Survey Percent of Total Caseload Reported by Consumer Group Served (Caseload = 439,549) Medical/Health Public Transit Agencies Low Income Senior/ Disabled, Social Services General Public, Social Services Youth/ Child Tribal =,! 0% Church Affiliated Education 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Percent of Enrolled Clients Reported by Client Group (excludes commercial operators) 4.2.2 Transportation Needs and Issues Presented Responding agencies were asked to characterize the needs of consumers they believe to be poorly served. Specifically, they were asked "please specify the transportation needs most often communicated to you by your client base." Figure 4-5 shows the ranking of transportation needs reported by all responding agencies. Clearly top -ranked was medical trip need, with 56 agencies (75 percent) identifying this as a need communicated to them by consumers. Second ranked as needs were: Training and education classes — 30 agencies (40 percent) Shopping and multiple errand trips — 29 agencies (39 percent) Work trips between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. — 29 agencies (39 percent) January 2008 page 42 166 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Third ranked as needed trip -types were: Recreational activities or events — 21 agencies (28 percent) Late night and early moming work trips — 18 agencies (24 percent) Long distance trips — 17 agencies (23 percent) Figure 4-5 2007 Stakeholder Survey Client Trip Needs Poorly Served - All Reporting (n=75) Doctor/medical trips Training/ education classes Work between 8am-5pm Shopping and multiple errands Recreational activities or events Night/ early morning work shifts Long distance trips Weekend and holiday trips Visiting family or friends Kids to daycare or school 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Other trip types that were identified as needs, but not as frequently as the top ranked groupings, included trips to get kids to day care, visiting family and friends, and weekend and holiday trips. Figure 4-6 shows breakdowns of the trip needs for the responding public transit agencies and for human service agencies. Different perceptions of need emerge. There was agreement among the groups on two high -ranked needs: medical trips and trips for training and education. For the public operators, top ranked needs were: Medical trips (86 percent of the 7 public transit operators) Transporting kids to daycare or school (86 percent) Training and education classes (71 percent) Work between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (71 percent) Shopping and multiple errands (71 percent) Recreational activities (71 percent) A�1MA January 2008 page 43 167 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report For human services organizations, top ranked needs were: Medical trips (77 percent, 47 agencies) Training and education (38 percent, 23 agencies) Shopping and multiple errands (34 percent, 21 agencies) Work between 8 am and 5`pm (34 percent, 21 agencies) Figure 4-6 2007 Stakeholder Survey Client Trip Needs Poorly Served - by Agency Type Doctor/medical trips Training/ education classes Work between 8am-5pm Shopping and multiple errands Recreational activities or events Night/ early moming work shifts Long distance trips Weekend and holiday trips Visiting family or fiends Kids to daycare or school M Human Service ® Public Transit 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Percent Responding Agencies by Type Human Services =61 General Public Transit = 7, n=68 Other needs noted in the open-ended response to this question included the following. Work related: • Volunteering • Services and job interviews Socialization or services related: • Getting to appointments at our office (Riverside County Office on Education) • Seniors to daycare, day program or program sites January 2008 page 44 168 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • ADL's, shopping for daily staples • Gambling (Celebrity Tours, LLC) Medically related: • Dialysis trips (7 days a week) • Dial -A Ride/Medi-van transportation with gurney and wheelchair. • Frequent and repetitive medical therapies - dialysis, chemo, radiation Other: • Before and after [public transit] hours • All of the above and more. Barriers Responding agencies were asked about the barriers to accessing transportation or to coordinating transportation. Table 4-6 reports these responses, showing their breadth but also revealing some key themes. Among common themes are: ➢ Funding challenges for directly operating or contracting for transportation. ➢ Difficulty in working with public transit, its reliability, and its rules and requirements that are sometimes in conflict with the individualized needs of consumers. ➢ Public transit's availability, when it operates and when it does not can represent a mismatch with transit dependent consumers' needs. ➢ Geography of Riverside County and the long distances required by some trips and for some clients. ➢ Medi-Cal reimbursement rules, particularly for dialysis patients, is problematic. January 2008 page 45 169 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 4-6, 2007 Stakeholder Survey - Response to Primary Barriers!Transit Access Proper timing for doctors and other appointments to residents who are dependent on public transportation Agency issues Legal issues to expand services. Zoning for us to expand to the Rancho Mirage and'Palm Desert areas Agency issues Patients are low-income generally and most have Medi-Cal, which pays for transportation (non -emergency transport). However, those who do not have Medi-Cal due to being just barely over the limit must use Dial -A -Ride. This tends to be a problem for us. Agency issues Lack of Transportation Availability May not be aware of all human service agencies in the valleys Availability Late night - till 10:00 pm to Mira Loma, Glen Avon, Rubidoux, Corona; including connections Availability Do not cross county lines. Not time accurate, expensive, no one to help passengers on and off. Availability Not enough service available Availability Our patients must come three times per week to a set appointment time. Availability Observation - referrals to services not enough - hands on scheduling and assistance scheduling services is necessary Availability Great challenge with providing service to various consumers attending various programs to stay at the same time. Consumers Patients don't meet the required criteria of being wheelchair confined or in utilizing assistive devices, but as dialysis patients are disabled. Consumers The only barriers we experience is when we need to transport a heavy client Consumers recruitment of voluntary drivers Drivers/ staffing The need to send a caregiver with each client. Drivers/ staffing Recruiting volunteer drivers. Short notice from clients. Limited other services. Drivers/staffing Lack of funds Funding Grants and subsidies provided by SAFETEA-LU legislation. Funding Availability of funds to cover transportation costs Funding Very Costly Funding Limited resources, limited staff, limited number of vehicles Funding Funding and vehicles Funding Lack of flexibility of available funding sources. Funding Financial Funding Not enough funding to meet demand county wide Funding Clients with no income to purchase bus pass. Limited bus routes. Funding Required matching funds Funding Limited funding and excessive overhead costs Funding Medical status & financial situation Funding Vast geographic boundaries of County in relation to clinic sites Geography Minimally populated and large geographic area Geography Transportation from Coachella Valley to Metro Riverside Geography Geography Limited door -to door for frail seniors and difficulty in long distance trips to LAX. Not enough money for transportation staff and vans. Distance is an issue Anza, Coachella Valley. Geography Geographic Locations. Cost effective transportation to local communities 10 and 22 miles away. Meeting FBR ratio Geography January 2006 170 page 46 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Cost at $2.50 per ride (Dial -A -Ride) with reliability of service. Public route: bus stop access requires crossing uncontrolled busy street which is very dangerous. Public transit The locations of bus stops are inadequate. Only two busses run at the time and do not meet the needs of our clients. Public transit Timeliness of the service from Sun Dial Public transit We have multiple patients coming at similar times and staying for various periods (3 - 5 hours), which makes it difficult to obtain transportation (public) to meet needs all of the time. Public transit Willingness to call ahead so we can escort out for pickup or [into agency] when arrive as clients are unable to wait for "window period" outside or with required supervision as they have cognitive and/or physical disabilities Public transit Unreliability of current organization. Long bus rides, too long of "windows" for pick up times. Public transit Timeliness is occasionally an issue, but not severe or serious Public transit Different hours of operation than the City of Beaumont Public transit No buses stop at Wardman Park for pick up and drop off for the youth by Sunline. Public transit Getting participants to center and home again with 1 hour maximum transit time Public transit Unmet Transportation Needs Agencies were also asked about areas of the county where unmet transportation needs exist. Table 4-7, on the following page, reports these responses. Again certain themes emerge, some echoed in the barriers' responses but others new. ➢ Consumers' individualized needs make it difficult to use available public transit. These needs include assistance in booking trips, gurney transportation, and special help for dialysis patients and behavioral health consumers. ➢ Public transit bus fares can be prohibitive to those of lowest income. ➢ Public transit service areas and service hours are not adequate. More service is needed. ➢ Public transit services are needed intra-county between Riverside County communities and particularly between the Coachella Valley and Riverside cities. ➢ Public transit services are needed inter -county between Riverside and Los Angeles, San Bemardino, Imperial and Orange Counties. ➢ Geography of Riverside County and the long distances required for some trips is difficult for the consumers requiring these. ➢ Medi-Cal reimbursement rules, particularly for dialysis patients, is problematic. ➢ information assistance is needed, both to help frail consumers navigate services and to assist those new to public transit in finding their way. ➢ Expanded Metrolink services will help these consumers, as well as commuters. Respondents in a few particular geographic areas of the county identified additional services needed in those areas, including: - Eastvale community not served by Norco or Riverside - Military personnel traveling from Palm Springs to 29 Palms - Interstate service between Blythe and Arizona cities January 2008 page 47 171 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 4-7, 2007 Stakeholder Survey - Other Unmet Transit Needs in Riverside County We have not had any comments or complaints regarding transportation. Compliment Perhaps more transportation in addition to what you have. All in all, I think you are doing a great job. Rarely do we have issues or concerns with your service. Compliment Unique needs associated with transporting consumers who may be symptomatic and youth who have behavioral disturbances Consumers Seniors - disabled unable to navigate the system. They need transportation case managers. Consumers Need of transportation for elderly especially wheelchair and gurney. Consumers Need for assisted transportation arrangements - ongoing phone care management service to ensure successful transportation outcomes. Consumers Inability to get to bus stops, routes are not convenient and not adequate to get clients to their particular destinations. Consumers Can't get easily to Doctors, cross city lines (medical), Dial -A -Ride service is very poor and unreliable. ADA certification process is very unfair and difficult; barrier block services; limited service areas. Consumers Handicap [access]- with wheelchair, regular low-cost for elderly to and from markets, hospitals and doctors appointments Consumers/ Costs Seniors living in multi -family neighborhoods who may themselves qualify for ADA transportation or need a dial -a -ride. Eastvale community not served by Norco or Riverside Consumers/ Service area Riverside County needs to duplicate many programs given to the public by the county and city of Los Angeles Funding Patients are low-income generally and most have Medi-Cal, which pays for transportation (non -emergency transport). However, those who do not have medi-cal due to being just barely over the limit must use Dial - A -Ride. Funding Meeting Title 17 requirements. Funding Dialysis - If client doesn't have insurance. Funding/ Costs Bus vouchers for homeless families Funding/ Costs Wildomar is a rural area. Seniors have hard time getting around, and persons of low-income can not get to work. Geography We have patients that need to go to LA County or Orange County for transplant evaluation and have no transportation services to take them due to distance Geography Transportation to remote locations Geography Transportation for military personnel going from Palm Springs to 29 Palms. Geography A better coordination of communication for customers needing services. Information Lack of coordinated efforts. Cost of fares. Lack of knowledge of providers. Too many numbers to call. Information/ Costs There is no reliable on -call transportation available. Public transit Public transportation is unavailable in many areas we serve. The hours of operations for public transportation do not accommodate early morning or late night shifts. Public transit January 2008 172 page 48 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Dialysis transportation can be difficult as our units are open from Sam to 7pm Mon -Sat. they must come to all their treatments. Public transit / service hours We are looking forward to the commencement of Metrolink services on the 215 corridor and possibly BRT along Alessandro. Public transit/ rail Need more inter connectivity between major cities in Riverside County. Need Metro -link to go to east county (Coachella Valley) Public transit/ rail Commuter rail service is needed between Riverside County and Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties. Public transit/ rail Our service gets a lot of calls for service in the Rancho Mirage and Palm Desert areas. Love to see it expand further [out] in the Valley. Wheelchair access for wheelchair bound clients. Service area No buses for children to get to school in unincorporated areas. Service area Intracounty Blythe to Coachella Valley; Intercounty Imperial to Riverside; Interstate Blythe to Arizona cities Service area Gap of areas Service area Easy commute from Riverside to other cities such as Banning. Service area Cross jurisdictional destination. Example: south county to VAMC - Loma Linda Service area No transportation from the El Cerrito area, "The Crossings" (Cajalco Road areas) and Dos Logos area to the center. Dial -A -Ride and Corona Cruiser have poor pickup - times and schedules are not satisfactory or conducive to transporting clients. Service areas January 2008 page 49 173 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Coordination Interest Survey respondents were asked about coordination interest with the question "Please, indicate your areas of interest to coordinate transportation." Respondents could check as many options among the twelve choices as might apply, or indicate no interest. Figure 4-7 shows the responses of agencies with any interest in coordination. Nine agencies (12 percent) indicated they were not interested in any sort of coordination activities at this time. Figure 4-7 2007 Stakeholder Survey Areas of Interest to Lower Costs or Improve Transport, Agencies by Type Coordinated trip scheduling/ dispatch Coordinated service operations Joint usefsharinglpooling vehicles Contract out for service ratiter than direct Coordinated driver training:retraining Coordinated vehicle and capital purchases Contract to provide trans to other agencies Shared fueling facilities Pooling S resources to better coordinate service Shared maintenace facilities Joint purchase of supplies or equipment Joint purchase of insurance 0 2 4 6 10 12 Count of Responding Agencies =75 14 16 18 174 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Two areas generated the greatest interest: • coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch (17 agencies — 22 percent) • coordinated service operations (14 agencies — 18 percent) This may indicate a desire to purchase trips or in obtaining additional vehicle capacity through a coordinated system, without having to operate the vehicles by one's own. agency. Agencies' intent or specific needs will have to be further explored to understand their requirements and expectations. There are similar levels of interest in the next three areas, with 11 or 12 agencies reporting some interest in: joint use or sharing of vehicles, contracting out for service, and joint driver training (Figure 4-7). The next group of potential coordination categories, receiving interest by 7-9 agencies, includes: coordinated vehicle and capital equipment purchases, contracting to provide transportation to other agencies, shared fueling facilities, and pooling funding resources to coordinate services. Only a'few agencies indicated in the areas of: shared maintenance facilities, joint purchase of equipment, and joint purchase of insurance. To understand differences and similarities in coordination interest, Table 4-8 contrasts the responses of the public transit agencies and the human services agencies. Although the highest -ranked coordination responses are different for the two groups of agencies, there is significant overlap in the second -ranked categories. The top -ranked area of coordination interest for public transit providers involved coordinated service operations. Human service providers identified joint use of vehicles as their top priority for coordination. Both types of agencies identified a second -ranked interest in coordinated trip scheduling, an important overlapping coordination interest. In addition, there is probably some similarity of purpose in transit's interest in coordinated service operations and human services' interest in coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch. Although focusing on different approaches, transit may be interested in providing the coordinated service operations while the human services organizations may desire someone to undertake the coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch functions. Table 4-8, Ranking of Areas of Interest In Coordinated Transportation by Responding Public Transit and Human Services Agencies Sorted b Public Transit Interest Potential areas of coordination interest Shared fueling facilities (Transit #2) Coordinated trip scheduling/ dispatch (Hum. Serv. #2; Transit #2) Contract out for service rather than direct (Transit #2) Coordinated driver training/retraining Coordinated vehicle and capital purchases Joint purchase of supplies or equipment Pooling $ resources to better coordinate service Contract to provide trans to other agencies Shared maintenace facilities Joint purchase of insurance 175 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 4.2.3 Transportation Services Provided Agencies were asked to describe the transportation they provide and offered a number of ways in which to characterize that service. Responses included: • Arranging for transportation by assisting with information while clients remain responsible for follow-up • Subsidizing transportation through agency purchase of coupons, scrip, passes, fares or mileage reimbursement • Agency directly operates transportation with full responsibility for the transportation by this agency • Arranging for volunteer drivers • Public transit provision to general public • Contracting with another entity or agencies to provide transportation services • No transportation operated, contracted or subsidized Figure 4-8 presents the results for the data set as a whole, identifying separately those entities that provide public transportation services. Multiple responses to this question are possible, when an agency may purchase bus passes as well as directly provide or contract for transportation:2 One-third of responding agencies directly operate transportation (22 agencies — 29 percent), in addition to the 7 agencies (9 percent) providing public transit. Figure 4-8 2007 Stakeholder Survey Transportation Services Provided, n=75 Arranges by assisting wfinfo Agency operates Subsidizes Contract with another entity Public transit to general public 0°% 5°% 10% 15% 20°% 25°% 30% 35% 52 Ten agencies marked "other" to this question but their responses were coded into the above, as appropriate. January 2008 176 page 52 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agencies arranging for transportation, providing an informational assistance with the consumer responsible for follow-up numbered just under a third (22 agencies, 29 percent). One-fourth subsidize transportation with bus passes or tokens or taxi fare (18 agencies, 24 percent) with a smaller number contracting with another entity to provide services (12 agencies, 16 percent). Just under one-fourth provide no types of transportation services. Considering transportation service methods reported geographically; in addition to public transit providers there is some directly operated service is reported in each of the subareas: • Coachella Valley — 6 directly operated providers; 3 contracting with other entities; 2 volunteer driver programs • Riverside city area — 5 directly operated providers; 5 contracting with other entities; 2 volunteer driver programs • Corona/ Norco area — 3 directly operated providers; 1 contracting with other entities; 1 volunteer driver program • Pass communities —2 directly operated providers • Western Riverside central area — 2 directly operated providers • Western Riverside south area — 1 directly operated provider, 1 volunteer driver program Examining transportation services provided by agencies' legal status shows some interesting differences (Table 4-9). Private for -profit operators were most likely to directly operate with full responsibility for operations (6 agencies- 38 percent), followed by assisting with information (4 agencies — 25 percent). Private non-profit providers were most likely to arrange by assisting with information (11 agencies — 41 percent), followed by directly operating (9 agencies — 33 percent). Public agencies, which includes both the public transit providers but also other public human services organizations, were most likely to subsidize bus passes, tokens and/or mileage (10 agencies — 34 percent), followed by assisting with information (7 agencies — 24 percent) and directly operating (6 agencies — 22 percent). The two faith -based organizations were subsidizing bus passes or tokens or arranging for volunteer drivers. The one tribal organization responding is directly operating with full responsibility for operations. Table 4-9, 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Transportation Services Reported, Provided by Agency Type No transportation provided, contracted, arranged Agency operates [full responsibility Arranges by assisting wfinformation Subsidizes passes, tokens, mileage Contract for service with other entity Arranges for volunteer drivers or car Public transit provided to general public 17 23% 22 29% 22 29% 18 24% 12 16% 6 8% 7 9% 5 31% 6 38% 4 25% 2 13% 3 19°% 1 6% 0 0% 6 22% 9 33% 11 41% 5 19% 4 15°% 3 11% 0 0% 6 21°% 6 21% 7 24°% 10 34°% 5 17°% 1 3% 7 24°% 0 0°% 0 0% 0 0°% 1 50% 0 0°% 1 50°% 0 0% 0 0% 1 100% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% AMNIA January 2008 177 page 53 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Cooperative Agreements or Arrangements Agreements between agencies were identified by 21 survey respondents. Table 4-10, lists the agencies with whom coordinated arrangements were most frequently noted. Table 4-10 a ®� RTA SCAN 2 Inland Regional Center Community Action Program 2 2 Access Services, Inc. 1 Arizona Transit Agencies City of Beaumont City of Riverside - Specialized Transportation Desert Center School District Desert Health Care Friends of Moreno Valley Greyhound 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Metrolink 1 North County Transit District (NCTD - San Diego) Orange County Transit Authority (OCTA) Om nitra ns 1 1 1 Primary Care Medical Transportation Riverside County Regional Medical Center TRIP Program 1 1 1 4.2.4 Transportation Providing Agencies A total of 47 of the responding agencies are providing transportation services in some form, either directly operating, contracting for service, subsidizing bus passes or taxis, or arranging for volunteer drivers. Separately 18 agencies are assisting consumers with transit information. Vehicles Available Vehicles reported by tor -profit, non-profit and public agencies through this survey number 1,275. Excluding school district vehicles and commercial vehicles, which have the potential to be double -counted with agency vehicles, 606 public transit or human service agency vehicles were identified. These vehicles are categorized in Table 4-11. Table 4-11, 2007 Stakeholder Survey, Vehicle Characteristics Res orted b Surve Res • ondents Total Vehicles Vehicles Used Daily % of total vehicles Passenger Capacity Up to 9 pax 10-14 pax 15-24 pax 25+ pax n=75 1,275 603 47% 822 158 46 218 n=45 606 272 45% 185 158 41 198 n=7 413 219 53% 30 144 14 198 Wheelchair/Lift Equipped 398 }` 389 378 % of total category vehicles 31% 64% 92% Note: Vehicles reported by commercial operators and school districts are included In the total count (All Agencies) butnot detailed in the breakdown by General Public providers and Human Services providers. This avoids double counting by agencies with whom they are contracting and excludes the school bus vehicles. - n=38 193 53 27% 155 14 27 O January 2008 178 11 6% page 54 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Public transit agencies report that more than half of their vehicles (53 percent) are used daily while just 27 percent of the human services vehicles are used daily. This suggests that human service entities are using their vehicles with less regularity, more often sitting unused. Based upon anecdotal comments coming through the outreach process, this can relate to difficulties in finding drivers among agency personnel, most of whom have responsibilities other than driving vehicles. By contrast, public transit vehicles are driven by dedicated staff who do not have these competing responsibilities. Human services vehicles tend to be smaller, seating fewer passengers, are often sedans and fewer are reported as lift -equipped. Public transit vehicles are more likely to be Larger and lift - equipped. Just 6 percent of reported human services vehicles are lift -equipped, contrasting sharply with the 92 percent of public transit vehicles reported as lift equipped. Notably, when asked about vehicle replacement, public transit operators were able to indicate the replacement schedules for about 50 percent of their reported vehicles. By contrast, human services agencies indicated replacement needs for less than 19 percent of the 193 vehicles they reported. Although the TRIP program is considered a human services agency, its vehicle counts were moved to a classification of "other" due to their reporting of having 400 volunteer vehicles, of which its administrator estimates that only 50 to 75 of these are used daily. These figures would greatly skew the accuracy of vehicle counts when contrasting with other agencies. Vehicle Use The utilization of vehicles is of paramount interest to this inquiry as it suggests a baseline of services now provided and a means by which to measure increases in the quantities of services provided, over time. Reported data is presented below in Table 4-12. Table 4-12, 2007 Stakeholder Survey Vehicle Utilization Re • orted b Surve Res . ondents Total Monthly One -Way Trips Reported Annualized One -Way Trips X 12 months Total Monthly Service Miles Reported Annualized Service Miles X 12 months N=45 923,211 11,078,532 100% 1,274,887 15,298,644 100% N=7 915,114 10,981,368 99% 1,224,826 14,697,912 96% N=38 8,097 97,164 1% 50,061 600,732 4% Table 4-12 presents the volume of trips reported by this sample of agencies. Looking back to Chapter 3, where countywide audited public transit trips were documented at almost 14 million trips provided in FY 2005/06, this sample appears to be fairly representative with its total of almost 11 million trips. In Table 4-12, clearly the 7 public transit operators are providing the bulk of the reported trips, 99 percent of trips reported. The human services agencies, numbering 38 including both Measure A providers and other human service agency transportation programs, are providing just 1 percent additional trips. MA January 2008 page 55 179 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report This reported trip total in Table 4-12,does not include commercial operators whose reported trips totaled almost 400,000 trips, some of which may be contracted on behalf of selected public operators or specialized transit providers_ For this reason, the commercial operators' trips were excluded. Also excluded are RCTC's Metrolink commuter rail program, 2.8 million trips documented in the Chapter 3 presentation of almost 14 million trips provided countywide during FY 2005/06. Because human service agencies typically count consumers, rather than trips, there is some concem about the reliability of the numbers represented in Table 4-10, as reported by the human services organizations. Human service agency reporting of transportation tends to count a round-trip as one trip. One consumer travels out and back, equaling one trip. Public transit standardized reporting requires that a one-way trip iscounted as one and a round trip is counted as two, potentially doubling the way in which human service agencies often report trips provided. Experience in other counties has shown that the human service agencies are using different methodologies to report standard transit indicators. These numbers therefore, for the human services programs, simply provide a point of reference and general comparison but probably are not as reliable as those reported by the public transit agencies for which standardized reporting definitions exist Hours and Days of Operation There are differences in the days of service and hours of operation between public transit agencies and human service transportation providers. Essentially, the vast majority of human service providers are operating on weekdays only during standard business hours. Responding public transit operators have somewhat expanded hours during weekdays. On the weekend days, with the exception of Corona, all of the operators provide some Sunday service but hours are more limited, less service available before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. Table 4-13 presents service hours and service day information for the two groups. Table 4-13, 2007 Stakeholder Inventory Hours and Days of Operation Reported by Responding Public Transit and Human Services Agencies Weekdays General (8am-6pm) Early (before 8am) Late (6pm-10pm) 24R Saturday General (8am-6pm) Early (before Sam) Late (6pm-10pm) 2477 Sunday General (8am-6pm) Early (before 8am) Late (6pm-10pm) 24/7 24 10 6 7 3 3 6 3 3 53% 22% 13% 0% 16% 7% 7% 0% 13% 7% 7% 0% 7 6 4 7 3 3 6 3 3 100% 86% 57% 0% 100% 43% 43% 0% 86% 43% 43% 0% 17 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 45°/u 11% 5% 0% 0% 0% 180 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 4.2.5 Funding Reported for Agencies Providing Transportation A final area of inquiry is that of funding. What level of funding supports the programs reported and what are the sources of those funds is of considerable interest to considering and developing coordinated initiatives. Reported Budgets Over $93 million in transportation funding is reported by this survey sample, with 98 percent of that reported by the public transit operators (Table 4-12). The sample's reported dollars for public transit of $91 million are about half of RCTC's documented FY 2007l08 funding total of $165 million. This is in part because RCTC's Metrolink commuter rail funds are not included here, as well as two transit operators, Beaumont and Riverside Special Transportation that did not complete survey information. Similarly, it is expected that the $2.4 million reported by the human services agencies is undercounting actual transportation budgets, given the common difficulties of disaggregating transportation costs in the allocations per client per capita that are common to many human service agencies. Commercial transit providers reported only negligible dollars and as there is the potential for double counting where their funding comes from a contracted operation with a public transit or human services agency, these numbers are not included in Table 4-14. Table 4-14, 2007 Stakeholder Survey Trans . ortation Bud • ets Reported b Survey Res ondents Vehicle operations (drivers & supervisors, maintenance, fuel) Mileage reimbursement New vehicles and equipment Administrative expense Insurance Taxi vouchers Bus passes and bus tokens Total Reported Budgeted Dollars Note 11:Total budget for Sunline Transit n=45 total $47,403,996 $262,738 $5,068,026 $9,679,371 $2,637,632 $115,887 $80,922 51% 0% 5% 10% 3% 0% 0% $93,234,849 100% %o if %. %of n=7 total n=38 total $46,062,418 $300 $4,885,026 $9,582,655 $2,521,604 $0 $6,000 $27,986,277 51% 0% 5% 3% 0% 0% $1,341,578 $262,438 $183,000 $96,716 $116,028 $115,887 $74,922 61% 12% 8% 4% 5% 5% 3% $91,044,280 100% $2,190,569 100% 98% 2% Direct vehicle operations account for fifty percent of the dollars expended, largely by the public transit operators. For the 38 human services agencies providing some level of budget information, a total of $2.2 was reported or 2 percent of all transportation funding identified by these respondents. Direct operations accounted for 61 percent of human service transportation dollars, at $1.3 million. Mileage reimbursement was the next largest category for human services at $262,000. Capital equipment, while 8 percent of human services dollars reported, was a modest $183,000. Other expenditures reported included insurance ($116,000), taxi vouchers ($115,000), bus passes and tokens ($75,000) and administrative expense ($97,000). January 2008 page 57 181 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report When asked whether anticipated future budgets were increasing or decreasing, overall, 24 percent of agencies anticipated their budget would increase and 16 percent expected it to stay the same. Just one agency anticipated some decrease. The public transit agencies were more likely to report a possible increase (85 percent said yes) while fewer human services agencies expected increases (24 percent of agencies). Another 28 percent of human service agencies anticipated their budget would not change next year while no responding public transit agencies had a similar perspective. All of the public transit operators responding expected to be in the transportation business in five years time. Eighteen (47 percent) of the responding human service agencies answered similarly while four (10 percent) were unsure. None said they did not expect to be providing transportation in five years time. Reported Funding Sources Funding sources utilized by responding agencies are reported below (Table 4-15). The funding picture that emerges for the responding agencies provides insight into the challenges and difficulties of promoting coordination. Public transit operators have predictable and stable funding sources. Human services organizations report greater dependency on donations and fees, with continuing funding reported by only small numbers. Table 4-15, 2007 Stakeholder Survey Fundin. Sources Reported b Surve Res.ondents 45 General Funds Measure A Other Transportation Development Act Education Department Department of Developmental Services Department of Aging Department of Rehabilitation Department of Health Services FTA Section 5307/5309 FTA Section 5310 vehicles/ capital FTA Section 5311 Community Development Block Grants Health and Hunan Services Client/ parent/ rider fees and fares Private donations/ fees United Way Farebox Fundraising 7 4 9% 2 4% 3 7% 5 11% 0 2 29% 2 29% 2 0 0 29% 5 11% 1 14% 6R 0 2 4% q 0 6 13% 0 38 4 11% 3 8% 1 1 1 1 2 0 3% 3% 3% 3% 5% 2 5% 0 3 8% 4 11% 2 5% 1 3% 6 16% The public transit agencies are predominately reporting ongoing funding through state Transportation Development Act funding (86 percent) and through Federal Transit Operating AIM January 2008 182 page 58 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report funds, Section 5307/ 5309 (57 percent), rural Section 5311 service (29 percent) and capital Section 5310 (29 percent). Some general fund receipts (29 percent) were reported and farebox revenues are noted by the public operators as a required, continuing source. By contrast, the funding picture for responding human service organizations is more diverse. The largest single funding source reported is local general funds (10 agencies - 26 percent) followed by private donations and fees (7 agencies — 18 percent). Added to these are fundraising, client and parent fees and United Way, clearly important to social services agencies with a total of 9 agencies reporting one or more of these sources. Human service agency funding through the Federal Health and Human Services programs was next (5 agencies - 13 percent), including the Ryan White Act and Older Americans Act funding. Other Federal funding to human services agencies includes Community Development Block Grants (3 agencies) and Section 5310 funding (2 agencies). State funding reported includes the Department of Developmental Services, Mental Health Services Act and the State Department of Education. Local funding includes Measure A which was reported here by 4 human services providers (11 percent). 4.3 STAKEHOLDER SURVEY SUMMARY COMMENTS This survey has developed a picture of specialized transportation resources and issues in Riverside County: The survey generated a sixteen percent survey response rate with 75 agencies and organizations responding, coming from throughout the county: The subareas were reasonably represented. These organizations clearly reflect the breadth and diversity of organizations concemed with the transportation of persons of limited means, of seniors and of individuals with disabilities. Agencies responding represented a caseload of over 439,000 persons, spread across the breadth of consumer groups. There was a good mix of public and non-profit, as well as for - profit social service agencies and commercial transportation providers. Single faith based and tribal organizations were heard from. For the county as a whole, agencies estimates suggest` that less than one percent of these consumers are on -site, in agency programs daily, projected to be almost 5,600 persons. However, of these, half have some type of specialized transportation need or requirement. These proportions vary considerably among agencies, given the type of service and consumer base they serve. Fifty-seven agencies (76 percent of respondents) have some type of transportation function, including directly providing it, contracting for it or as a contractor, subsidizing bus passes and tokens, or arranging for it on behalf of their consumers. Direct service provision by human services providers is fairly well distributed across the county, as follows: • Coachella Valley— 6 directly operated providers; 3 contracting with other entities; 2 volunteer driver programs • Riverside city area — 5 directly operated providers; 5 contracting with other entities; 2 volunteer driver programs • Corona/ Norco area — 3 directly operated providers; 1 contracting with other entities; 1 volunteer driver program • Pass communities —2 directly operated providers • Western Riverside central area — 2 directly operated providers MA January 2008 page 59 183 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • Western Riverside south area —1 directly operated provider, 1 volunteer driver program Public operators were more likely to directly provide or contract for services while social service agencies were more likely have a mix of responses to their consumers' transportation needs. Vehicles reported were 1,275, with 413 operated by pubic transit providers and almost 200 reported by social service agencies, the balance by commercial operators. Upwards of 400 of the human services vehicles are privately owned by volunteers in the TRIP program and were excluded from the human services total. Owned or leased human service agency vehicles were more likely to be smaller and only 6 percent were reported as lift -equipped. Trips provided are estimated at 11.1 million annually with 96 percent of these provided by the public transit operators, and 4 percent provided by the responding human services agencies. Reported needs for client transportation differed somewhat, between public transit operators and human services agencies,. but with some overlap. There was agreement on the top need though, of non -emergency medical trips as the highest priority, by 75 percent. Public transit agencies ranked as top needs: medical, training and education, work between 8 and 5 p.m., shopping with multiple errands, and recreational activities. Human services agencies ranked as top needs medical trips, training and education, and shopping with multiple errands. Barriers to coordination were noted as: ➢ Funding challenges for directly operating or contracting for transportation. ➢ Difficulty in working with public transit, its reliability, and its rules and requirements are sometimes in conflict with individualized needs of consumers. ➢ Public transit's availability, when it operates and when it does not can represent a mismatch with transit dependent consumers' needs. ➢ Geography of Riverside County and the long distances required by some trips and for some clients. ➢ Medi-Cal reimbursement rules, particularly for dialysis patients, is problematic. Areas of unmet transportation need, reported by respondents, overlap with barriers and include: ➢ Consumers' individualized needs make it difficult to use available public transit; needs including assistance in booking trips, gurney transportation, and special help for dialysis patients and behavioral health consumers. ➢ Public transit bus fares can be prohibitive to those of lowest income. ➢ Public transit service areas and service hours are not adequate. More service is needed. ➢ Public transit services are needed intea-county between Riverside County communities and particularly between the Coachella Valley and Riverside cities. ➢ Public transit services are needed inter -county between Riverside and Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Imperial and Orange Counties. ➢ Geography of Riverside County and the long distances required for some trips is difficult for the consumers requiring these. ➢ Medi-Cal reimbursement rules, particularly for dialysis patients, is problematic. January 2008 page 60 184 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report ➢ Information assistance is needed, both to help frail consumers navigate services and to assist those new to public transit in finding their way. ➢ Expanded Metrolink services will help these consumers, as well as commuters. Top ranked coordination interest differed between public transit and human services. Both types of providers, however, expressed an interest in coordination, with some similar and overlapping interests. The public operators were most interested in coordinated service operations, with interest also expressed in coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch, shared fueling facilities, and contracting out for transportation service. The human services agencies were most interested in joint use or sharing of vehicles while also expressing an interest in coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch. The shared interest in coordinated trip scheduling and dispatch provides an important point of mutual interest. The initial mutual interest in this category of coordination may lead to other coordinated services involving the two types of transportation providers. This 16 percent sample of agencies and organizations reported over $93 million in funding for fixed -route services, paratransit and specialized transportation programs. Differences in the funding base were significant, with public transit reporting a stable, continuing funding stream that they largely expected to increase. Human services agencies reported much more diverse funding types, with significant reliance upon donations and fees and far less likelihood of future increases. January 2008 page 61 185 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report The stakeholder involvement process links the locally developed plan development process with stakeholder agencies and organizations, termed by FTA as "appropriate planning partners." This begins what must become a continuing process of relationship building, a process ultimately expected to address the mobility needs of the target populations. 5.1 INTRODUCTION The Transportation Coordination Plan will ultimately articulate a unified comprehensive strategy for public transportation delivery that speaks specifically to the mobility needs of the three target populations: 1) seniors, 2) persons with disabilities, and 3) low income persons. The development of a locally -developed plan must include outreach to and involvement of agencies and organizations that operate or contract for transportation and/or provide other services to the target populations, as well as the actual consumers of these services. The outreach activities associated with this report are currently in process and will be augmented over the next several months to include focused discussions with clients and consumers prior to finalizing the coordinated plan for Riverside County. This report reflects the status of the outreach activities to date. The findings and results of all outreach activities will be documented as elements of the draft and final plan reports. 5.2 STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY In addition to achieving consistency with FTA-funding related guidance and requirements, the project team designed a stakeholder outreach process to accomplish a number of other project - specific objectives and serve as the basis for outreach efforts: 1. Obtaining and assessing the views and perspectives of stakeholder agencies and organizations, and of clients/consumers on issues specific to needs of the target populations (seniors, persons with disabilities, and low income individuals) and available transportation resources in the county; 2. Soliciting ideas and assisting agencies and organizations in consideration of coordinated transportation plans, projects and strategies that could be recommended'as elements of the plan; 3. Informing and educating stakeholders about capacity building strategies designed to empower and motivate the human and social service sectors of transportation towards coordination; 4. Working with the county's public transit operators to further understand the intrinsic value and benefit of coordinating their transportation efforts amongst themselves, and with human and social service agencies and organizations; 5. Continuing RCTC's efforts to build goodwill and cooperative relationships with key stakeholders and the community -at -large; and 6. Validating and strengthening survey information to offer a more individualized understanding of consumer needs, and potentially increasing the survey response rate. January 2008 page 62 186 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Methodology Recognizing the need to reach and obtain participation from as many stakeholders as possible the project team worked with the RCTC Project Manager to focus outreach activities and efforts in the following seven (7)geographic subregions of Riverside County: • Westem Riverside - Corona/Norco • Western Riverside — Riverside • Western Riverside — Central • Westem Riverside — South • Westem Riverside — Pass • Coachella Valley • Palo Verde The target constituencies of the outreach effort include the following: 1. Management and staff representatives of agencies and organizations operating transportation and/or serving the day -to day need of clients and consumers; 2. Clients and consumers of specialized transportation services; 3. Staff representatives of regional, municipal and community -based public transit systems in Riverside County; 4. Citizens and vendor advisory group representatives; and 5. Local, regional, state and federal transit/transportation and human and social service agency/organization representatives. The stakeholder involvement effort was conducted concurrent to the survey inventory. It involved forty-three (43) separate outreach opportunities, including on -site face-to-face interviews, meetings, workshops and presentations to public transit and human service agencies, telephone interviews and meetings with clients and consumers in Riverside County. Highlights of the outreach effort are presented below. A summary of the individual stakeholder activities is shown in Appendix F. 5.3 STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT PROCESS AND FINDINGS 5.3.1 Stakeholder and Outreach Opportunities Technical Advisory Group The project team directed by RCTC established a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to ensure direct local agency and organization participation and community involvement in development of the comprehensive unified coordination plan for Riverside County. The TAC had a number of meetings during the plan development process and is comprised of public transit agencies and operators, human service agency staff and representatives, and other stakeholders. A.M.M A January 2008 page 63 187 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Public Workshops and Committee Presentations Members of the project team and RCTC staff focused some effort at the outset of the study on presenting and discussing the development of the Transportation Coordination Plan, and other relevant funding -related issues with other representatives of regional and local agencies/organizations. The proceedings from these activities will be documented and incorporated into the results of the stakeholder involvement effort, and appended to the draft and final reports. Stakeholder Roundtables The project team met with three separate "peer" groups that collectively represented a myriad of health and human service agencies and organizations. With the cooperation of stakeholder agencies, roundtable sessions were scheduled and conducted with their various constituencies and/or staff representatives. The sessions were conducted as follows: • Good Samaritans Coachella Valley Transportation Roundtable, Palm Desert - This regular meeting of an existing transportation group was coordinated by Michael Bamard of the Desert Samaritans. The project team was invited to attend this session to discuss coordinated project issues. • Inland Valley Regional Center, Vendor Roundtable, Riverside — Arranged by Tiki Thompson and project team members as a special coordinated study outreach activity. The session included transportation vendors (operators) under contract to the agency. • CalWorks/GAIN, County of Riverside, Department of Public Social Services, GAIN Coordinator Roundtable, Banning — The session was arranged Dave Terrell, and included himself and staff Coordinators and from each of the nine (9) GAIN offices. Key issues from each session are summarized starting on the following page. January 2008 page 64 188 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 5.3.2 Key Issues From Stakeholder Roundtables Good Samaritans Coachella Valley Transportation Roundtable The key issues impacting services providers and consumers that were cited during the session are as follows: • Duplication of service (multiple agencies serving the same geographic areas but often for different clientele with differing needs); • Lack of coordination and information exchange among service providers; • Lack of adequate funding and/or reimbursement, particularly for meeting specialized transportation needs; • No coordinated single point that consumers can contact for up-to-date information on all transportation services and schedules available in the Coachella Valley; • Difficulty in recruiting and retaining volunteers; • The expense involved in maintaining a fleet of vehicles and paying for drivers; and • The high cost of liability insurance. The group recommended some potential solutions for overcoming issues and barriers to coordinated transportation, which included: 1. Creation of a central website that would provide information on transportation services throughout the county, and could transit schedules, routes, eligibility requirements and other useful information. 2. Continue efforts to explore ways to achieve better coordination among transportation providers. January 2008 page 65 189 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Inland Regional Center, Vendor Roundtable The discussion was facilitated by members of the project team and was directly focused upon the study assessment issues: transportation needs and vendor transportation resources, barriers to coordination and potential project ideas. Highlights of the discussion are summarized in Table 5-1 following. Table 5-1, Inland Regional Center Vendor Roundtable Summary of Issues Transportation Needs • Regional Center clients are disabled individuals (both physical and cognitive) of all ages; vendors have fixed clientele (repeat users) • No automated scheduling and dispatching even among the larger operators • Increased commitment to serve the target populations is needed • Rural areas dirt roads and sidewalks; not feasible for buses to access • Late and odd working hours of clients must be met • Lack of space availability; need for coordination and/or additional vehicle and driver resources • Need better planning • Lack of communication and cooperation between operators; vendors pursue their own interest and do not always put customer needs first; • Regional Center needs to provide better information for operators • Need to maximize resources; use resources collectively. Vendor Resources • Majority of vendors operate fixed deviated route curb -to -curb services; • Most of the transportation vendors provide up to 15 trips per day • Largest provider operates 15 vehicles and carries 110 passengers per day barriers to Coordination • Cost of fuel; • Hiring and retaining driver personnel; • Insurance costs; • Vehicle maintenance; • Time and scheduling between operators • Behavioral issues of clients; • Driver training and customer service issues in handling difficult trips; • Customer service policies not compatible; Potential Projects • Develop comprehensive driver training programs • Implement coordinated dispatch and scheduling • Collection of passenger trip data for planning purposes A1�IA January 2008 190 page 66 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report CalWorks/GAIN, County of Riverside, Department of Public Social Services, GAIN Coordinator Roundtable The discussion was facilitated by members of the project team and was directly focusedupon the study assessment issues: client transportation needs, barriers to coordination and potential project ideas. The viewpoints represent all geographic areas of Riverside County and include the following nine (9) geographic areas: Norco, Perris, Indio, Blythe, Riverside, Desert Hot Springs, Cathedral City, Banning, and Lake Elsinore. Highlights of the discussion are summarized in Table 5-2 below. Table 5-2. CalWorks GAIN Roundtable Summary of Issues Transportation Needs • Bus pass reciprocity between all transit systems • Clients are unable to get to the GAIN office since they have no personal autos • Not enough service in unincorporated rural areas such as Green River. There are many rural areas where there is no transportation access. • Need better service to Mira Loma • Transportation to jobs is difficult and sometimes impossible • Need to identify clusters where service industry jobs are • Need service from Indio to Palm Springs • Bus service not available to Ripley, Mesa Verde, only within city limits • Cost of bus service is a key issue when clients need to pay weekly or every day • Frequency of service and amount of service available are pressing issues • No bus service on Dillon Road • Bus service non-existent in Thousand Palms • Palm Springs to La Quinta needs service • Need to expand service hours Resources • County uses their own vehicle fleet to do client pick-up and retum trips • Clients sometimes network to get rides to GAIN sites Barriers to Coordination • Liability insurance Potential Projects • Shuttle service that operates between home and GAIN sites (20 to 30 minute trip length). • Identify clients and create vanpool/rideshare services for clients working at large employment sites. Employment focused van pool program. Potential for grouping of trips going to same geographic area to work. • Trip data collection project for DPSS for planning and project development purposes • Bus shelter project for all desert bus stops • Creation of "Night Owl' or "Mega Pass" which allows rider to access all transit services • Mobility management • Central call center for transportation information IMMA January 2008 191 page 67 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 5.3.3 Key Issues from Project Development Workshops Approach The consultant team conducted three project development; workshops in three locations around the county (Riverside, Corona and Palm Desert) for purposes of developing coordinated responses to specific transportation needs. These project development workshops included a range of participants, with the first one being exclusively transportation providers, both public transit and Measure A providers. The second two workshops included a mix of human service agencies and public transit agencies. A total of 48 agency representatives participated. The format was to consider a handful of transportation needs that had surfaced through the outreach process and to then select and discuss one or two of these in detail. The transportation topics selected for discussion in these project development workshops included: 1. Dialysis trip needs 2. Mobility manager function 3. Coordinated vehicle maintenance and management 4. Immediate needs transportation 5. Information and trip brokering 1. SUBJECT: DIALYSIS (RCTC 9/18 meeting) Project Goals and Objectives: • Need for dialysis patients to obtain transportation on a regular reliable timeframe. • Second leg of dialysis trip needs to be flexible for pick up to retum. • Dialysis trip has same components of an immediate needs trip. • Safety of dialysis trip is a concem • Some patients may need door-to-door service, rather than curb -to -curb • Communication between medical staff, social worker, dispatcher, and driver is key to a better trip • Similar elements of any Non Emergency Medical Transport trip Addressing Needs and Strategies: • Transportation agency needs to know of appointment changes as soon as possible • Loss of a social worker prohibits progress and slows operations. • Training and retraining of individuals within the "trip circle" due to high tumover • We should take back ownership of training and education since the providing agency has a vested interest in the efficiency of the system • Consider mass transit approaches versus meeting individualized need • Seek knowledge from experiences of other agencies already providing to avoid piffalls. • Break down the line between public transit and specialized transportation agencies. Follow reliability structure of public transit and merge with the flexibility of specialized transportation • Public operators also need to coordinate amongst themselves • Fuse technology in to transportation structure to help create a more seamless system • Implement a protocol of procedures for specific situations ANIMA January 2008 page 68 192 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 2. SUBJECT: MOBILITY MANAGER Project Goal: Specialized transportation that accommodates all needs is almost impossible, therefore creating the need for a Mobility Manager to help integrate the needs and, resources potentially involved. • Think through the entity in which the Mobility Manager should be placed • May or may not reside in an existing agency • Avoid existing agency which would make the Mobility Manager take on the personality of the existing agency • Mobility Manager should be sub -regional to better understand the environment in which it operates • A non-profit agency may not have the resources to facilitate being the Mobility Manager • Explore a more cooperative effort • Consider creating a liaison or intermediary between agencies to help train and monitor participating agencies in their area of expertise • Create a council for development, encompassing agencies and liaisons • Consider the Rideshare model • Mobility Manager could also work as a dispatch system to agencies closest to desired ride • Consider having an on call provider • A non-profit organization may be able to facilitate the Mobility Manager with help from funding sources. A public entity or government agency is too bureaucratic and will slow progress • Do not make too many layers to the Mobility Manager. It will lead to a lack of understanding when too many people are involved • Design a system where meeting points can help facilitate long distance trips 3. SUBJECT: IMMEDIATE NEEDS/ SAME DAY TRANSPORT (Corona, 10/22) Program Characteristics and Issues • Qualify for eligibility (income or disability) • Card or voucher — card cuts down fraud — good for ninety days • Allow up to seven miles for trips •, Intercity travel • Identify expenses to figure out cost of trip • Manage over usage • Health and human services agency • Oversee operations by a larger agency • Cost of service - free vs. fare — is funding available? • Educate the user on prioritizing trips to help cut down over usage January 2008 page 69 193 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 4. SUBJECT: COORDINATED VEHICLE MAINTENTANCE (Corona, 10/22) Project Goals: Develop a program to assist smaller social service agencies with routine preventative maintenance and service spares. Objectives include towering costs, making services continuously available without downtime for vehicle maintenance and developing new transportation altematives when vehicles must be out -of -service for routine maintenance. Resources to Secure • Additional vehicles • Coordinated maintenance assistance • Funding for maintenance, incidental costs • Reserve and back-up vehicles • Overflow option(s) for transporting clients when vehicles are down • Class B drivers Vehicles Needs and Issues • Assist smaller agencies with a lack of vehicles (back ups) • Help with the costs associated with transportation by smaller agencies • Drivers need class B licenses • 5310 money — can it come with PM I costs incorporated into purchase price? • Cooperative pool of human service agencies — group together to relieve pressure on smaller agencies • Overflow or spare vehicle (from pool) • Liability; insurance is an obstacle • Push overflow of clients when vehicles are down to public transit • Could city or county municipalities provide maintenance? 5. SUBJECT: INFORMATION AND TRIP BROKERING Information Issues and Needs (Group #1 — Coachella Valley) • Need to hire a consultant to show: 1. Vehicles 2. Destinations 3. Demographics • Funding pots are different 1. Sharing of funds is prohibited in some cases 2. Matching issues • Continue conversations over time 1. Find a resolution 2. Oversight • Productivity 1. Reduce empty buses • Countywide office with subarea breakdown • Use of technology — languages • Scope of service • Eligibility (standardized vs. subregional) • Travel throughout the county IMMA January 2008 page 70 194 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Info and Trip Brokering Issues and Needs (Group #2 — Coachella Valley) • Challenge of where to call — different policies — mandates • Technology — 1 800 # or simple dispatch • Website with GPS utilization — one stop shop • Subregional mobility manager • Information person to answer calls • Create a technical advisory group • Create a link to 211 • CTSA vs. non profit • Monthly meetings of cooperating providers • Needs to be a one stop shop — people should know who to call • Funding Opportunities o CTSA activities o Grant applications o Dispatching fees o Brokering fees o Information referral grants and resources 5.3.4 Key Issues from On -Site Stakeholder Interview Process An integral element of our approach is our recognition of the need to conduct outreach to both the larger human service "peer/funder" agencies and organizations and to individual public transit and human service agencies and organizations. This approach was designed to help us to gather and interpret both the regional perspectives of the "peer/funder" agencies and organizations, and the localized viewpoints of individual agencies and organizations, for the purpose of creating a thorough depiction of client and consumer needs and agency, and organization transportation resources countywide. To facilitate and expedite the interview process, the project team elected to interview agencies and organizations in the designated geographic subregions in order to obtain more information. The project team developed a short interview guide (Appendix G) to assist us in collection of information from agencies and organizations about the current needs of clients/consumers, and to provide us with insight into culture of these entities relative to the provision and/or need for transportation, and the issues related to coordination (i.e. barriers and coordinated project ideas and suggestions). The project team collected information on the following issues: 1. The role of transportation relative to the overall responsibilities of the age ncy/organization; 2. Whether their organization or agency operated transportation and/or their level of awareness of other public or private transportation programs and options; 3. Direct or indirect experiences with individuals and/or families having difficulty making trips (work, school, medical) for lack of transportation, and perceived impacts to their organization; I114 January 2008 page 71 195 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 4. Their perspectives on the barriers to coordinating relative to services they operate for the benefit of their clients/consumers; 5. Their understanding of needs that remain unmet and/or areas underserved; and 6. Their suggestions on potential project ideas and their priorities. Using the interview guide team members completed a number of face-to-face interviews with public transit agencies and human and social service agencies. These face -to -face -interviews are useful in furthering the assessment of transportation needs, barriers to coordination and soliciting ideas for potential coordination projects. The key findings by geographic area are documented below. In addition, a matrix of the information obtained from agencies and organizations during the interview process is shown in Appendix F. Key Findings of On -Site Interviews Organized by Geographic Area 1. Western Riverside — Corona/Norco Transportation Needs Lack of availability of public transportation service in unincorporated areas. The City of Corona has limited service to highly traveled destinations in two unincorporated areas. Due to the limited resources, the city has selected areas that meet certain criteria. In contrast, there are seniors who live in other unincorporated areas where public transportation is not available. They need access to social activities that are generally located within the city's core area. An agency indicated that for these seniors, social activities are critical to their well-being. There is a challenge of balancing the constraints that public transportation agencies face in determining adequate ridership and the availability of funding needed for the city to justify service that conflicts with the needs of seniors who live in unincorporated areas. Lack of thru service to Ontario industrial areas. There are both jobs and training opportunities developing in the industrial and distribution areas that surround and are adjacent to the Ontario Mills Mall. Lower income residents of the Corona/ Norco areas must travel into Riverside and connect there to get public transportation to Ontario. Much more direct, and faster service is desirable to support training and employment opportunities. Better timed connections with Metrolink. For fixed -route users, the connections with Metrolink are very poor, often arriving just after the Metrolink trains leave or with buses not waiting until the Metrolink arrives before departing the stops near Corona. Barriers to Coordination Adequate funding for transportation projects that enable agencies to meet the needs of those who need specialized transportation. Funding sources are limited. Potential Projects January 2008 page 72 196 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Potential projects mentioned by the agencies in the Corona area included creating a single point of information and other educational outreach efforts. An agency expressed the value of making transportation information accessible and the need to conduct educational outreach programs to exchange information between riders and for the agencies to leam about their needs. Working with the visually impaired to understand the specialized transportation needs was helpful in improving services. In addition, increasing service from unincorporated areas was cited as both a challenge and an opportunity. Funding is a key issue to overcome. Providing fixed -route service and vans/shuttles were possibilities to consider. 2. Western Riverside — Riverside Transportation Needs Health care services are extremely difficult to reach for many residents of remote/rural areas. Migrant workers living in Mecca and residents of Blythe need to get to Indio where medical services are available. Due to lack of access to public or private transportation, getting to Indio is very challenging. Creating ways of educating and empowering clients to take proactive steps was critical to finding transportation options. With the limitations of public resources, clients need to be resourceful and seek out assistance with transportation from friends and neighbors. Barriers to Coordination One agency said that liability issues related to buses, the drivers, required equipment and managing the program was a barrier to coordination. However, another agency said that there were laws that protected "Good Samaritans" from liability issues related to transportation. Potential Projects Two agencies mentioned a single point of information to promote awareness of transportation options as potential projects. 3. Western Riverside — Central Transportation Needs Seniors/grandparents face additional responsibilities that have created transportation challenges. Grandparents in increasing numbers are assuming the responsibility of caring for their grandchildren. This is a phenomena" that is occurring in Riverside County as seniors who have limited income need to transport grandchildren to school and medical appointments. Some agencies are helping to address this need but this is growing issue. ABM MA January 2008 page 73 197 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Dialysis patients face significant transportation challenges that make public transportation difficult to meet their needs. Because of the nature of dialysis treatment, patients require transportation that is reliable, flexible and inexpensive. The necessity of on -going treatment, the time commitment and costs of travel creates a strong need for specialized transportation services. Applying for transportation funding poses challenges for non-profit agencies. A non-profit agency indicated that a match of 50 percent for transportation was difficult for it to provide. Also, the way thattheyneed to report value of matching is difficult because of the way that they raise funds or resources to operate their services. Many non -profits must be resourceful and may receive discounted gas to run their vehicles, have their office space rental costs waived and items donated. The myriad of goods and services that they receive is sometimes challenging to quantify for transportation funding grants. Challenges in reaching clients located in remote and rural areas. Some clients need to utilize dirt roads to access public transportation. For senior and/or persons with disabilities, this is a major impediment. In these cases, van service is the most efficient way to provide transportation, particularly in remote areas. Barriers to Coordination An agency said that including smaller non -profits in process so they could give input would enable them to provide the perspective of smaller agencies. Potential Proiects Two agencies mentioned a single point of information for transportation options as needed services. This project could include personal one-on-one services to help guide clients through the different transportation options and how to access them. 4. Western Riverside — South Funding for personal auto repair. Two agencies discussed the affordability of auto repair as a significant transportation challenge for their clients. Particularly for low- income individuals, if the repair work is needed, it is usually very difficult for them to pay. In remote areas where public transportation is unavailable or not easily accessible, travel by automobile is the only option. An agency also emphasized the limitations of the $43 per month gas subsidy which is based upon the bus pass. Limitations of public transportation for dialysis patients. The hours for transit service are limited and does not allow for flexibility to adhere to a set schedule. They utilize van service that is flexible to meet the needs of patients. The alternative for some patients is to be transported by family members or friends. However, this alternative has limitations as well because they are not always available during the treatment schedule. Barriers to Coordination January 2008 page 74 198 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Platt For Riverside County Final Report One agency mentioned liability issues as a potential barrier but would seek to address it by developing a memorandum of understanding and looking at related fiscal matters. Potential Projects Three agencies felt that access to transportation information was critical to helping clients become aware of transportation options. In addition, three agencies believed that public transportation had shortcomings including limited service; the travel time was too lengthy and not flexible enough to meet the needs of the majority of their clients. Two agencies mentioned funding for auto repair while one discussed some of the potential drawbacks in the payment process. Both felt that enabling clients to maintain and drive vehicles was critical because of the flexibility that it offered, because viable public transit was not available. 5. Western Riverside— Pass Transportation Needs Two agencies cited the lack of adequate public transportation service in the Banning area. There are not enough staff and resources to meet the needs of the area. One agency estimated that 40 to 50 percent of the families walk to the Health Center to receive services. In some circumstances, this creates hardships. Barriers to Coordination One agency suggested that funding is a key impediment to coordinating with other agencies. Potential Projects One agency mentioned developing a single point of information that would provide 24 hour service and direct assistance could help clients to team about their transportation options. Clients need guidance and advice 6. Coachella Valley Transportation Needs The key issue raised by agencies was the need for readily accessible transportation information through a single point of contact consisting of assistance, education and counseling. Three organizations discussed the importance of a single point of contact. Seniors, persons with disabilities and low- income individuals in many cases do not know who or where to contact for transportation services. One agency that provides caregiver services for their clients said that seniors usually ask them about transportation services. Agencies mentioned a central source of information such as one telephone number. Others mentioned the need for a "centralized website." Such a website could help provide information on transportation resources. 1[11111A January 2008 ,page 75 199 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Inadequate public transportation. Two agencies said there was inadequate service to reach worksites for jobs and in some cases interviews. This is partly because of the limitations of transit service and the nature of job hours and location. Barriers to coordination Four organizations raised the issue of liability when coordinating with other agencies or organizations. The key issue concerned sharing vehicles and liability as well as insurance coverage. Other agencies talked about the need to coordinate after grants/funding expired. Potential Protects Project ideas from 4 organizations focused on improving bus service and funding for buses. Three organizations said that transportation information and education projects would be very helpful for their clients. One organization discussed the need to possibly provide vanpool service for clients to get to jobs that would be focused on providing service for their particular needs. 5.3.5 Consumer Telephone Interviews The project team conducted telephone interviews with participants of the Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project (TRIP), a supplemental transportation program that encourages volunteer ride -sharing with people who would otherwise be homebound and isolated and provides administrative assistance to other organizations and agencies that operate, or would like to establish, similar user friendly and convenient transportation services for seniors and disabled individuals. The program is administered and managed by the Independent Living Partnership, an organization that works to improve or preserve the independence and dignity of the elderly and persons with disabilities, their families and caregivers through the provision of services, education and access to empowering services and resources. The Partnership provided the project team with the contact information for twelve TRIP project participants. The project team was able to complete only five (5) interviews as the remaining seven (7) individuals either declined to be interviewed or could not be contacted. The completed interviews were conducted with persons between the ages of 66 and 95 years of age and lived in various areas of the county. To encourage participation, the interview consisted of five questions (Appendix G). Participant responses to interviews are included as Appendix H. Telephone Interview Highlights The issues raised by those interviewed can be summarized as follows: • Physical disabilities and limitations prevent regular use of fixed -route public transit modes, as walking to bus stops is not an option • Use of family, private care providers and TRIP volunteers to make trips is cited as primary method of trip -making and limits when they can travel to the availability of their volunteer driver. • When public transit is used there is tremendous wait time and inconvenience, and travel must be made early in the day to avoid too long a day. AMMA January 2008 page 76 200 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • There are reliability concems about taking public transit and being uncertain about accessing retum trips. • Improvements recommended include providing service that is more direct to destinations such as medical facilities and shopping. • Improved transportation options can increase independence for these individuals. 5.3.6 Consumer Meetings Scheduling of various consumer focus groups was attempted and ultimately two groups were convened: a group of visually impaired consumers and a group of individuals of low income. Group size was limited to 10 to 12 persons in order to ensure sufficient time for individual to share their viewpoints. As a thank you for participating, those attending were given a Safeway gift card with a value of $30 redeemable at Safeway; Vons and Pavilions stores. 1. Blindness Support Services: The project team met with clients and staff of Blindness Support Service in Riverside. A total of twelve (12) participants attended the meeting. The project team focused the discussion on the issues of current travel behavior; trip needs, transportation challenges faced, as well as, solicited their suggestions and ideas to improve access to transportation services. Highlights of the discussion are detailed below. Current Travel Behavior • Participants indicated use of both fixed -route and demand -responsive modes of transportation. Some use RTA, SunLine, Omnitrans. Some use ADA services. And some use Greyhound for longer distances • Most individuals work and use public transportation 3-5 times per week (weekdays) • Families and friends provide transportation support on weekends Trip Needs • Need to make work, school, medical appointments, errands and recreational trips using public transportation during the week • Pre -trip planning is a must; transit information must be available (both online and in print) Transportation Challenges Faced • Problems using fixed -route as there is apprehension about safety issues in crossing streets, getting to and boarding buses • Transferring between services is an issue; lengthy wait times in transferring • Demand responsive service reliability; despite early scheduling of rides, they are frequently late to arrive to destination. Scheduling of trips by transit operators is a major issue • Driver training issues; they are oblivious to safety of sight -impaired persons Suggestions and Ideas to Improve Access to Transportation Services • More training is needed for drivers on issues such as geography, customer service and sensitivity issues. Driver knowledge needs improvement • Need additional late night services, as those working late shifts have been stranded January 2008 page 77 201 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • Need improved communication between buses when running late to ensure that transfers can be made • Implement universal pass which can be accepted by all • Need more opportunities for public input 2. Dept. of Public Social Services, CalWOrks/GAIN Program Consumer Meeting Senior staff or the Riverside County Dept. of Public Social services worked with the consultant team to develop a consumer focus group opportunity. Program staff at the Corona office promoted such a meeting an recruited a total of 12 individuals who agreed to participate. This meeting was held in December 2006 at the Corona Dept. of Public Social Services offices. The day of the meeting was lightly rainy; as a number of participants were coming by public transit, this may have dissuaded them and just four persons, all DPSS consumers, attended. This included one young woman under age 18, a young mother with a pre -school -aged child and two middle-aged women with grown children, Highlights of the discussion are detailed below. Current Travel Behavior • All participants were regular public transit users, including RTA, Omnitrans, Orange County bus lines and Metrolink. The youngest woman was driving the car owned by a large family group and had access to it only intermittently. • One woman used Metrolink to travel into Orange County to work, although she was now looking for work locally. • One woman uses the Corona Cruiser regularly. • Family and friends do provide transportation support at times. Suggestions to Improve Transit Services • Connections between RTA and Metrolink trains arriving at the Corona station need improvement. The #3 buses go up and down Hamner, and used to go into the N. Main Street Metrolink station but don't now, making it difficult to get to the trains. Also, the timing is off. The trains routinely leave just before the bus arrives, made more difficult now by the walk from the newly located bus stop. • Trains into Orange County need to run earlier as it is difficult to arrive by 8 a.m. and impossible to arrive by 6 or 7 a.m. This woman was a nursing technician and needed to be at hospital facilities for shifts starting well before 8 a.m. • More intercity service between Norco and Riverside needed — the #15 leaves Riverside and requires one transfer to get to their home in Norco but leaves too early for getting out of work after 5 p.m.. Needs to be a somewhat later bus departure (Riverside to Arlington/ La Sierra; transferring to #3, Arlington to Norco). • More intercounty bus service between Norco/ Corona and Ontario. There are work and training opportunities available in Ontario. Getting to these currently requires a long trip heading northeast into Riverside and then west to Ontario where traversing directly west from the Norco/Corona area would save much travel time. The DPSS staffer affirmed that there are numerous work and training opportunities in the general vicinity of Ontario Mills Mall and Ontario convention center. January 2008 page 78 202 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • improved vehicle shocks. The ride on the buses can be very painful for those with any kind of arthritis or joint problems. This is particularly the case with #3 route, smaller buses. Can feel like Mr. Toad's Wild Ride. • No room for strollers; buses are often too full and it is very difficult for mothers with young children to navigate the buses with a stroller. • Behavior of other passengers is of concern to a young mother, does not feel safe and the driver makes no attempt to control passenger behavior. Frightening for a mother traveling with a three year -old. • The Corona Cruiser needs to add services along Foothill for three to four miles where there is considerable new development; currently goes to Arterio and then reversing heads southwest. • Driver passed by a stop when this rider was on the RTA bus and the driver didn't hear or recognize the request to stop. Rider had to walk a considerable distance back to original stop. • Drivers (RTA) can be grouchy; more driver training needed. • Day pass for the Corona Cruiser is needed. • Universal pass between the Corona Cruiser and RTA is needed. Corona Cruiser are inconsistent in accepting RTA passes; some do and some will not. Information Availability • Transtar has been a tool that has been helpful to DPSS caseworkers in assisting consumers to find available public transit. It was not found to be working (or the intemet connection was having difficulty) at the time of this focus group discussion. DPSS workers can use assistance in learning the transit services and in being kept current about changes to public transit artery services. • DPSS workers do assist with transportation information, particularly when clients are new to the area or newly without private transportation resources. 5.4 STAKEHOLDER OUTREACH SUMMARY COMMENTS This chapter presented summary findings from an extensive public outreach effort across the county. These included a total of 43 agency interviews, three types of consumer discussions, three roundtable discussions with agency representatives and three project development workshops to consider projects that could conceivably be implemented. In addition, there were three technical advisory committee meetings through the course of the project. These various discussions and conversations involved close to 75 agencies and 200 persons, reflecting a comprehensive summary of the transportation concems, needs, barriers to meeting these needs and potential transportation projects of the three target population groups. Needs and barriers can be summarized in terms of; 1) individualized consumer requirements of rider assistance, trip types and purposes, making trip arrangements and travel times and distance; 2) institutional concerns related to drivers, vehicles, maintenance and insurance; 3) in relation to the county's vast distances and geography. An analysis of the issues and concems raised through these discussions, and in conjunction with other study findings, is presented in Chapter 7 following. Chapter 8 presents the plan recommendations that are derived from analysis of these findings. AMMi January 2008 page 79 203 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 77a 6.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter presents examples of transportation coordination activities. The first two agencies, the York County Community Action Corporation in Maine, and St. Johns County Council on Aging in Florida, participated in a conference hosted by the Riverside County Office on Aging on May 17, 2007, "Roadmap for Coordinated Transportation Innovations: Interviews with agency leaders provide a framework of coordinated service delivery within these two counties. Two further examples, Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission in Virginia, and King County Metro of Washington state, were extracted from the United We Ride website as examples of best practices that can be of potential value to Riverside County. A matrix of key characteristics of these four programs also presents "lessons learned" by these coordinated services. The chapter concludes with a description of consolidated transportation service agencies (CTSAs), a coordinated service structure established in California in 1979 through the Social Services Transportation Improvement Act. Paratransit inc. in Sacramento, reported on as one example of a CTSA, also participated in the May 2007 conference on coordinated transportation in Riverside County. 6.2 FOUR WORKING EXAMPLES OF COORDINATION IN SERVICE DELIVERY Continuing to Improve Service — York County Community Action Corporation, Maine A state statute in 1979 in the state of Maine allowed York County Community Action Corporation (YCCAC) to become a regional transportation agency. YCCAC receives both Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and human services funds to provide services for seniors, persons with disabilities, and low-income households. The transportation program covers an area of 1,000 square miles through fixed -route and demand response services and a volunteer driver program. However, there is always room for improvement as noted by Connie Garber, Director of Transportation. The need for transportation service is always growing with the increasing numbers of seniors, and maximizing service delivery with the amount of funds the agency receives will always be a challenge. Coordinating with community -based and faith -based organizations is one way that YCCAC is trying to maximize its service delivery. For example, YCCAC works directly with community senior centers that provide transportation for their seniors, getting seniors to and from these centers. Driver programs are available to these agencies for a nominal fee with materials that instruct drivers on how to properly load and unload passengers and other safety issues associated with transporting individuals. Another interesting program offered through YCCAC is the volunteer driver program. The program organizes members of the community to drive individuals to non -emergency medical appointments in the volunteer's private vehicle. Volunteers are reimbursed for mileage and tolls. Currently there are 115 volunteer drivers in the program. AM1 A January 2008 page 80 204 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report One of the key lessons teamed that Ms. Garber shared is that on -going communication among all stakeholders is valuable. , As a consequence, YCCAC understands what the needs are which allows them to be creative in service delivery. YCCAC is unique in that both transit and human services funds all go through the agency. It allows for open communication between these agencies and streamlines programs by eliminating the approval of different goveming bodies or boards or commissions. Instead, programs can be decided at staff level, presented to one board, and implemented quickly. Attention to Service Delivery — St. Johns County Council on Aging, Florida The story of public transportation service in St. Johns County is based on a "customer comes first attitude' towards service delivery. Cathy Brown, Executive Director of St. Johns County Council of Aging points out that the question which is always asked is: "what will it take to do...". By identifying customer benefits, the agency is free to develop solutions that improve overall mobility. The Sunshine Bus Company provides transit service within St. Johns County. Six routes travel throughout the County with connections to the Jacksonville Transportation Authority at the Avenues Mall. A bus will pick up and drop off passengers where it is safe for a driver to stop. However, the provision of adequate service is always a challenge_ Providing service to underserved markets, especially in rural areas, is becoming more of a possibility with the service delivery culture of partner agencies in this area. For example, east -west service through Florida is now lacking with the discontinuation of Greyhound service. Those wishing to travel from St Johns County to Putnam and Alachua Counties (located west of St. Johns) through public transit do not have many options, usually leaving them stranded. in order to provide this service, St. Johns, in partnership with Putnam County, has gone after FTA Sec. 5311 funds to begin operation of east -west corridor service beginning in 2008. Service delivery is not possible without strong leadership and an understanding that the mobility benefits outweigh the costs. The Sunshine Bus Company's executive director reports that leaders that understand this can help generate this understanding within the community, fostering an atmosphere of helping one another. Successful service delivery is principally defined in terms of how customers are treated. As Ms. Brown points out, if you are nice to the riders, time will not matter. Of course, she noted all attempts are made to be on time and an efficient service provided, but the needs of customers is a dominant theme in all aspects of service design and service delivery. A lli January 2008 page 81 205 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Serving Regional Trip Needs through Technology Application — Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission, Virginia Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission was faced with the challenge of improving mobility between communities within its nine -county, 1,700 square mile region with a population of about 205,000 persons. The problems of inter -county trip needs prompted a technology response that became known as the "public mobility program." The need for regional trips prompted this application, since many needed trips were across county lines and difficult to serve by programs or services operating within individual jurisdictions. The components of the "public mobility program" involve computer assisted scheduling, and further planned technology elements of a "contactless" fare card and AVL (automated vehicle locators) for social service agency vehicles. Coordination dialogue among a variety of organizations, primarily the public operators and social service agencies, began during the mid- 1990's. These conversations led to a grant of $100,000 for technology support in the development of software, funded with rural ITS [Intelligent Transportation Systems] funding. That in turn led to creation of an RFP for the writing the software that was won by RouteMatch. The goal of the software development was to utilize "empty" seats on social service vehicles where there was agreement as to the compatibility of riders. The program's vision was for "real time" ridesharing, through software that enabled the booking of trips across participating systems. A key player was the City of Winchester, which became the lead agency responsible for housing and implementation of the program. Other participating systems were the main regional human services programs including the Area Agency on Aging and the Northwestern Community Services, the; regional agency serving persons with developmental disabilities. Lessons learned included identifying the considerable difficulty of getting agencies to "offer up" their transportation dollars to a central coordinated program. Agencies' willingness to contribute their dollars into a central funding pot was very limited as they expressed concern about losing their dollars and not meeting their clients' transportation responsibilities. The approach that was successful was to utilize common resources, namely transit grant funding and maximize the resources of the participating agencies in meeting regional trip goals. That is evidenced by some modest trip booking on agency vehicles traveling between regional destinations. Other lessons included: - the need to understand at a fairly detailed level the nature and characteristics of regional trip -making patterns, The realization that "community" precedes cooperation as the networking around a neutral table proved to be fundamental to getting to implementation. The importance of establishing a lead agency and a "home" for the project. January 2008 page 82 206 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Community Partnerships — King County Metro, Washington King County, Washington includes 2,100 square miles on the southeastern sides of the Puget Sound with a population of 1.7 million. The area has considerable and extensive specialized transportation needs, in addition to extensive services met by its Metro public transportation systems. Metro desired to develop and extend partnerships that could expand transportation options for seniors and persons with disabilities. Specifically, Metro desired to: 1. fill service gaps; 2. provide for cost-effective services; and 3. provide more service options. In 2002 Metro instituted three programs towards these goals: Advantage, Advantage Plus, and the Special Use Van Pools. These programs utilize vehicles retired by Access, the ADA complementary paratransit program; the Access vehicles are removed from the fleet after a'two- year useful life. The program components involve these vehicles, vehicle maintenance, driver training and emergency roadside assistance. Agencies must providea minimum' of 50 passenger trips per month to Access -eligible passengers. Agencies are required to provide the trip scheduling, the drivers and liability insurance. The program has been funded modestly, with available FY 2005 information indicating that about' 127,000 trips were provided for a Metro trip cost of $5.11 _ This is in sharp contrast to the Metro Access trip cost of almost $30 per one-way trip. Funding is at a level of $6.5 million and new funding will add an additional $1 million per year for new vehicles. This became particularly important as the Metro Access program went from a two-year to a three-year useful life program, which reduced the available useful life in vehicles being made available to agencies. Key players included Metro's Executive Director, who was an early champion, and the King County Accessible Services Committee, which helped to define and promote the program. It is administered by the Metro's Accessible Services Department. Currently 21 agencies are participating with 40 vans, serving populations that are primarily seniors or persons with developmental disabilities. Lessons leamed include the fact that the development of partnerships has been effective and growing with various positive benefits for both the human services and the public transit. Some agencies chose to end their relationship with the program when they could not maintain the 50 Access eligible trips per month and no longer wished to participate. Other agencies were enabled to stay in the program, and in the transportation business, because of Metro's provision of vehicle maintenance, driver training and road calls. As a further element of and outgrowth of this program, a regional accessible transit guide was developed. Al MA January 2008 page 83 207 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 6.3 CTSAs AS ONE STRUCTUREFORSELECTED COORDINATION ACTIVITIES In Califomia, improvement of specialized transportation and mobility choices for consumers has long been encouraged through coordination and consolidation of human services and public specialized transportation services. Formalized in 1979 through the passage of AB120, the Social Service Transportation Improvement Act, county transportation commissions were required to develop action plans for the coordination and consolidation of social service transportation and to designate a Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) to implement these action plans. The benefits that are possible through coordination and, ultimately, consolidation of social service transportation are enumerated in California Government Code Sections 15951 and 15952: • Cost savings through combined purchasing of equipment; • Increased safety and lower insurance costs through more effective driver training; • More efficient use of vehicles through centralized dispatching; • Increased vehicle reliability and maintenance cost savings through centralized maintenance; • Cost savings, elimination of duplicative administrative processes and increased services from centralized administration; and • More effective and cost efficient use of scarce resource dollars through identification and consolidation of existing sources of funding. Experience in the more than 25 years since the passage of AB 120 has shown that the coordination and/or consolidation of social service transportation involves a lot of organizational and operation detail, can take significant time, work and resources to implement, and may not be readily embraced by some local agencies. Regardless of these caveats, improvement of local transportation through coordination and consolidation has the potential of bringing about real improvements in the quality of transportation provided to consumers who need these services, through increased efficiency and safety in operations, and increased cost- effectiveness in these services through the provision of more rides for the same cost. The key to developing coordinated or consolidated specialized transportation lies in the realization that different transportation provider agencies have different levels of interest in and need for the benefits of coordination or consolidation. To be successful, a plan for transportation coordination and consolidation must allow agencies to participate at different levels. CTSA Characteristics of Potential Interest to Riverside County A recent review of six CTSAs in California, conducted by Placer County, identified the following characteristics. • Consolidated Transportation Services Agencies (CTSA) vary widely in how they view their roles relative to what types and categories of services they provide and how these services are provided. • Not all of the CTSAs reviewed operate service. However, those agencies that do operate service do so through direct provision of contracted services on behalf of other agencies and organizations or through contract arrangements with other transportation providers. January 2008 page 84 208 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • One example was of a provisional CTSA which develops and distributes information on specialized transportation resources in the county and maintains a comprehensive database of public transit and human and social service agencies in the county that operate transportation and/or serve clients needing transportation. • CTSAs are funded from a variety of local, State and Federal funding sources, including donations and gifts. Most, but not all, operate with some level of human services funding. • One CTSA offers expanded services to all segments of the public serving a diversity of trip need, including serving the trip needs of ADA riders and the trip needs of commuters. However, recognizing that some transportation revenue sources can be targeted to spec categories of riders (e.g. funding for programs for seniors and the disabled) this expanded role can create challenges in the allocation of funding resources to the appropriate services, particularly in multi jurisdictional transportation environments. • CTSA role evolves over time based upon the needs of the individuals needing transportation. • Transit Districts can serve as the CTSA or a separate entity can be designated by the public agency(ies) within the county. • Mobility training for users of services (both paratransit and fixed -route) is a valuable program offered by a majority of CTSAs reviewed. Paratransit Inc. as an Example of a CTSA In order to consider how coordination and consolidation is experienced in other settings, Paratransit Inc. of Sacramento, Califomia is used as an example that has a number of successful programs. Paratransit Inc. provides demand response service throughout Sacramento County and surrounding jurisdictions. Paratransit Inc. partnered with Sacramento Regional Transit (RT) to provide complementary ADA paratransit service for the fixed -route network. In addition to providing paratransit service, Paratransit Inc. provides educational opportunities to help passengers utilize the fixed route system. Paratransit Inc. works with almost 40 other agencies. This includes coordinating with other agencies in providing maintenance of agencies' vehicles. Revenue generated from this system helps Paratransit Inc. provide additional service on the road. This form of coordination activity provides a mutual benefit for both partners. Smaller agencies that would not have the funds to maintain their own vehicles can outsource to Paratransit Inc. In return, Paratransit Inc. uses . earnings from maintenance to provide more service on the street. January 2008 page 85 209 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report TABLE 6-1, COORDINATION EXPERIENCES FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY Agency/ Project Name Organization Issue / Coordination Objective Description and Status Lead and Key Players Lessons Learned St. Johns County Non-profit, Discontinuation of . Partner with Putnam County to ➢ St. John's 1. Board made a Council on Aging organization east -west service receive 5311 funds for service Council on conscious effort to do dedicated to by Greyhound between these counties, which Aging what is best for the SERVICE DELIVERY serving the elders specifically for will provide east -west service. community instead of in the community. Operated by a people traveling to/from Putnam (a Service expected to begin January 2008. ➢ Putnam County worrying about cost. Coordination rural county to the )=. Greyhound 2. Coordination is Board with 18-22 members. Board approves policies, handles grievances. 44 vehicles, 7 for fixed route and rest are paratransit west) and Alachua counties. Choice Ride Program: this program is available for persons traveling to/from Jacksonville, which is located 30 miles from St. John's . Choice Ride Program provides seamless transportation between two counties, which is popular for workforce riders. good for morale. County. York County 1,000 Square mile Increased demand Volunteer Driver Program — ➢ Community- Ongoing Community Action service area. for service and a community service where volunteers based communication of Corporation need to maximize drive riders to non -emergency organizations. needs to staff between CONTINUING TO IMPROVE SERVICE Provides a mix of transportation service including fixed route, demand response, and a volunteer driver program. service delivery. medical appointments. and among community agencies is critical to developing coordinated responses that meet consumer needs. 210 January 2008 page 86 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agency! Project Name Geographic Area Served Issue ! Coordination Objective Description and Status Lead and Key Players Lessons Learned Northern Nine county Create more • Computer assisted scheduling A Regional 1. Difficult for agencies Shenandoah Valley region, in two mobility options in • Planned contactless fare card planning to "offer up" their Regional states [Virginia and between • Planned AVL in social service agency transportation Commission and Maryland], 1724 square communities agency vehicles ➢ Main regional dollars as transit $s are built into their PROVIDING miles, population • Coordination discussions begun human programs. REGIONAL TRIPS 205,000 in the mid-1990's services Contributing dollars THROUGH THE PUBLIC MOBILITY Considered • Obtained $100,000 ITS funding for development of software -- agencies, including the to a central pot and they "lose" their PROGRAM — suburban and rural ITS implementation Area Agency dollars, Greater TECHNOLOGY rural • Developed RFP and let contract on Aging and success in APPLICATION to RouteMatch for software development. Northwestern Community Services extending what they can do to meet regional goals. • Program recently established in Winchester City Transportation Dept, as the new -lead agency. (agency serving persons with developmental disabilities) 2. Important to look at regional trip -making needs and patterns. Ridesharing concept, in real time, to use empty seats on social service vehicles with compatible clients" A City of Winchester Transit Dept. 3. Community precedes cooperation — networking around a neutral table fundamental to getting to implementation, 4. Need for a "home" is critical, Results are slow to achieve but progress real. • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agency/ Project Geographic Area Issue / Description and Status Lead and Key Lessons Learned Name Served Coordination Players Objective King County Metro Accessible Services Dept. COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS All of King County Washington, _ length of eastern side of the Puget Sound, 2100 square miles Metro's desire to develop partnerships to expand transportation options for seniors and persons with disabilities 1. Fill service gaps Three programs initiated in 2002: Advantage, Advantage Plus, Special Use Van Pools. Metro provides retired lift- equipped Access vehicles (2 years useful life), vehicle maintenance, driver training and emergency roadside assistance to agencies providing AT LEAST 50 passenger trips month to Access passengers. Agencies promise trip ➢ King County Metro Executive Director ➢ King County Accessible Services Advisory Committee 1. Partnerships with agencies have been positive, effective and growing. 2. When Advantage partnerships ended, it was mutual; agencies couldn't maintain 50 Access eligible trips per month and no 2. Provide cost- scheduling, drivers and liability ➢ Accessible longer wished to be effective services insurance Services transport providers. Department 3. Provide more For several years, program 3. Participants are service options maxed out with available funding. ➢ FY 06 — 21 largely serving seniors Provided 127,000 trips in FY agencies and and persons with 05 at about $5.11 per trip vs. $30 40 vans, largely developmental pre trip on Access. Program funding has been seniors and developmental disabilities. about $6.5 million a year. disabilities services 4. Some agencies enabled to stay IN the June 2005 State Paratransit Grant of 1 % of new funding source — adding $1 million for new vehicles (Access went to 3 years useful life; little left for agencies). Able to add agencies. transport business because of maintenance, driver training and road calls, 5 new agencies in 2006 and 5 in 2007. 5. Developing a regional accessible transit guide for entire Puget Sound region. 212 January 2008 page 88 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agency/ Project Name Geographic Area Served Issue / Coordination Objective Description and Status Lead and Key Players Lessons Learned Paratransit Inc. Sacramento, Carmichael, Elk Provides demand- response services . A private non-profit corporation started in 1978 and designated ➢ Sacramento County Coordinating with other agencies can CTSA example Grove (also to individuals and as a CTSA on July 1, 1988 by ➢ Sacramento help improve service served by eVan), Fair Oaks, Folsom agencies serving people with the County of Sacramento, Sacramento Regional Transit Regional Transit by providing mutual benefits for both (to/from Light Rail disabilities and District (RT), and Sacramento District partners; in this case Stations only), Rancho Cordova, Citrus Heights, Rio Linda, Elverta, Orangevale, North Highlands, seniors within the County. In 1992, partnered with Sacramento Regional Transit (RT) to also operate complementary ADA paratransit services. Area Council of Governments (SACOG). . Coordination activities include providing maintenance services for 40 other agencies in the region. Earnings used to provide more rides. D Sacramento Area Council of Governments maintenance earnings allow for expansion of service. January 2008 page 89 • • 7.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter discusses the preceding chapters' findings, considering identified resources and needs on three dimensions: • in relation to the target populations of persons of low income, persons with disabilities and seniors; • in relation to the geography of Riverside County and specifically the three apportionment areas to which SAFETEA-LU funding flows; and • In relation to institutional, vehicle -related issues. The discussion then identifies gaps, as a consequence of this needs assessment, to lay the groundwork for recommendations to be subsequently presented. 7.2 FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION (FTA) PROGRAM GUIDANCE Under FTA guidelines, the coordinated plan must contain the following four (4) required elements consistent with the available resources of each individual agency/organization: 1. An assessment of available services that identifies current providers (public, private and non-profit); 2. An assessment of transportation needs for individuals with disabilities, older adults, and people with low incomes, an assessment which can be based on the experiences and perceptions of the planning partners or on data collection efforts and gaps in service; 3. Strategies and/or activities and/or projects to address the identified gaps between current services and needs as well as opportunities to improve efficiencies in service delivery; 4. Priorities for implementation based on resources (from multiple program sources), time, and feasibility for implementing specific strategies and/or activities identified. Meeting these required elements began with the extensive effort involved in the development of a master database listing of agencies used to invite key stakeholders or "planning partners" into the process. Stakeholders included both representatives of public transit organizations and of human service agencies throughout the Riverside County. As previously noted, extensive methods were undertaken to ensure broad levels of participation including administration of the countywide stakeholder survey, stakeholder agency/organization meetings and interviews, roundtable and workshop sessions and discussion with consumers. In addition, meetings with various RCTC committees and the plan's Technical Advisory Committee provided opportunity to review and comment upon plan development issues. The assessment of transit resources provided in Chapter 2, the trip demand estimation presented in Chapter 3, the stakeholder survey reported in Chapter 4, and findings drawn from outreach efforts reported in Chapter 5 are pulled together here for a broad assessment of the Riverside County needs and resources, consistent with required FTA elements. AMMA January 2008 page 90 214 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 7.3 SUMMARY OF NEEDS BY TARGET GROUPS Understanding the unique and individualized needs reported for the target populations, as expressed through the survey and outreach processes, ensures that projects, actions and strategies developed in response will address these needs over time. Recognizing that there is overlap in the characteristics of target populations (e.g. seniors who are low income and/or are disabled; persons with disabilities who are low income), the following section profiles the needs by consumer segment and recognized sub -segments as presented through the plan development process_ 7.3.1 Needs Summarized For Low Income Constituencies Low Income Persons -- Families Family groups who are enrolled in the public social service programs interviewed through this planning effort identified trip purposes that relate to education and training, work, child care and medical purposes. Family groups in need of transportation may be attending programs as court referrals where there has been an allegation of child abuse or child neglect. There may be a probation referral, where the family is in danger of losing their children to out -of - home. placement. Others are coming for services, particularly medical services, because their own resources are so very limited. Some families may be immigrant populations and non-English speaking, or speak English with limited proficiency, and find accessing services a complicated process. Children of low income families may be attending Headstart, programs of First Five, and for subsidized child care. Often these are family units with more than one pre-school child, usually single mothers with multiple children. These are among the low-income clientele of responding human service agencies. While there are a variety of trip purposes necessary for these families, medical trip purposes are reported frequently as the area of greatest need, often because these are longer distance trips and therefore more difficult for low income families. Unmet medical trip needs were reported by a number of sources, in both surveys and outreach interviews. This population is generally physically healthy, able to walk and move about the community, but may not own a car. Or the single working car in the family is used by the household wage earner and not available during the day for medical appointments. Some low income families have cars but not in working order, they are not insured or family members do not have a valid driver's license. Agency personnel believe that some solutions may lie in getting access to these vehicles and driver capabilities through car sharing, van pooling and ride sharing. Use of fixed -route service is possible, but information must be readilyaccessible, usually to the case worker, and services must not be so inconvenient as to discourage use. Agency personnel do speak to the problem that transportation is sometimes used as the 'excuse" for not participating in other programs. Where staff can remove transportation barriers, it makes it harder for consumers not to participate in programs. January 2008 • page 91 215 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Agency staff spoke of the difficulties mothers with young children have in using fixed - route transit to get from home to day-care to work. The day-care trips are particularly difficult where the mother must go in for a few minutes to sign in the child (or pick-up the child) but transit services, of course, cannot wait. Pricing of transportationservices is a significant issue for these lowest income families. The ability to pay for a trip, and for the trips of attending children over age five, was an issue frequently reported. This segment of the population is by definition low on financial resources, and therefore struggles with the expenditure of these scarce resources for transportation versus food and other basics. Bus passes are therefore of critical importance to these families and often the way in which agencies provide transportation support to families. In both rural areas and urban areas, bus stop amenities are important for families using available public transit. Staff spoke of the needs of young children for protection from the sun and wind, while families with young children are aided by benches while waiting for buses. Low Income Persons — Individuals Low income individuals include young people coming out of the foster care system, "aging out" and often participating in other state and county social services, such as the Transitional Assistance Programs of the Behavioral Health Department. These young people, between the ages of 18 and 23, are typically enrolled in community college courses and may be receiving supplemental security income, somewhat over $1,000 a month to cover all their living expenses. _ Such young people can be quite knowledgeable about public transit, with some ADA certified because of substantial leaming and other cognitive disabilities. At least two mobility issues were reported: 1. the pricing of transportation, even fixed route fares, is very difficult given their modest income; 2. using public transit to attend community college courses is difficult where evening classes end at or just after the time fixed route services cease operation. Low-income youth in after -school programs such as the Desert Hot Springs Boys and Girls Club participate in off -site programs that may be once a week and slightly more frequent during school holiday periods. Such agencies face difficulties in assisting the young people in getting to the sites, largely because they don't own vehicles that can transport groups of kids, perceive there to be significant liability issues if they do own vehicles, and generally have limited resources for handling episodic, infrequent youth trip needs. Low Income Persons — Homeless Consumers Individuals who are homeless or on the verge of homelessness have few to no resources; a single bus fare or token is usually beyond them. These consumers have very limited access to information and learning a bus route or particular routing to get to a desired destination is a complicated task, simply because so many life issues impinge upon them. Similarly, even where the individual might qualify for ADA paratransit, they have limited or no access to a telephone to schedule a trip pick-up. There can be children accompanying a homeless individual; usually a female, all of whom need bus fares. In some instances, as with children participating in after -school programs and shelter -oriented activities, very young children may be traveling alone. January 2008 page 92 216 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report For these persons many activities of daily living are difficult, and complicated. Caseworkers hope to make the transportation element easier, through information and fare availability, so that access to jobs and a better quality of life become more readily possible. However agency personnel also note that reported transportation problems are sometimes used as a reason for "not trying." Where these legitimate difficulties can be eased or smoothed, it encourages the individual to grapple with the "culture of poverty" and work to better their circumstances. For consumers using homeless shelters, these typically require sign -in between 5 and 6 p.m. and those using public transit services to get to interviews or training face particular challenges. They must carefully plan their time to ensure they are back to the shelters in time to make the sign -in window. This can be difficult where transit routes are hourly and more and when travel distances, such as to medical services, are long. 7.3.2 Needs Summarized for Persons with Disabilities Persons with Disabilities — Adult Working Ages Focus group conversations indicate that individuals with disabilities use the full gamut of public transit services available, including in one group of 12 persons alone, experience with Greyhound, RTA, SunLine, Omnitrans and ADA demand response services. Issues needing attention by these comparatively able-bodied, disabled persons included: • the operating hours and the need forearliest moming and late swing shift transportation in all areas of the county, and • increasing the availability of fixed route transit, or some altemative transportation, in areas where it is not operating, such as unincorporated county areas and rural communities, including areas with dirt roads. • continued training of drivers on how to work sensitively with persons with disabilities, including those with visual impairments or hearing impairments, as well as those using mobility devices; • continued improvement of the reliability of demand response services where individuals are frequently late, despite all consumer efforts to allow sufficient lead time for appointments and work trips to ensure being on time at their destinations. • information services that support pre -trip planning and help individuals understand available transportation and its requirements of the individual. • universal pass capability that can work across the various public transit services in Riverside County. Persons with Disabilities— Physically Disabled Using Mobility Devices Since the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990 considerable attention has been paid to the physical environment relative to persons in wheelchairs and using mobility devices. Accessibility of the physical environment is one outstanding issue AM MA January 2008 page 93 217 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report consistently raised by consumers. A second identified by both riders with disabilities and their social service agency representatives is on -time performance and the difficulties of knowing just when the vehicle will arrive. One problem is that of impediments to the path of travel. Implementation of the ADA has been successful in contributing to creation of "islands" of accessibility, resulting in a greater number of accessible bus stops and transfer points. Consumers, however, still have difficulty accessing these places because of difficulties in navigating and moving about in the physical environment. Consumers indicate they sometimes cannot access fixed -route services because of path -of -travel difficulties. On -time performance is a continuing challenge for demand response services and this surfaced as an issue in both Westem Riverside and in the Coachella Valley. Persons with physical disabilities who are not using scheduled fixed -route services struggle with the structural challenges of demand responsive service which make it hard to ensure the vehicle's arrival times. These riders, and their advocates, identify the long travel times that paratransit trips require, making it necessary to block out significant segments of the day for transportation. Reliable on -time paratransit performance makes getting to work on -time very difficult for those who are employed. Persons with Disabilities — Persons on Dialysis Individuals on dialysis have a range of needs that impact transportation and these were identified in almost every area of Riverside County and in every forum — interviews, surveys and project development workshops. Transportation difficulties reported were various. They included needs of the individual rider, Medi-Cal reimbursement problems and service performance issues with existing transportation delivery systems. Agency personnel indicate that individuals on dialysis may be reasonably able-bodied when arriving at dialysis appointments but they are weak upon leaving and may need varying degrees of assistance. On -time arrival is very important for dialysis patients where the individual has a time slot in a given "chair" that will soon be used by the next patient on the roster and can't be reserved for later use if the rider is delayed by transportation difficulties. By the same token, some very frail consumers are using dialysis and are in very poor health conditions. They are not easily able to tolerate the shared -ride experience, either coming to or going home from their dialysis appointment. Individuals' departure times require flexibility in leaving the dialysis center. The return trip home may have to be rescheduled if an individual has a medically difficult session (e.g. bleeding out, etc.) and has to stay longer at the dialysis center. In some instances, particularly for medical facilities around the Riverside County Regional Medical Center, individuals may actually have to be transported between facilities when their conditions warrant and as one provider indicated, the transportation services are the last to know about changes that will have transportation implications. An Indian Health Service agency, assisting numerous individuals with dialysis treatments, spoke of the need for seven -day -a -week dialysis transportation, with weekend dialysis appointments increasingly common as demand grows but facilities have difficulty keeping up. Similarly, some dialysis services run twenty-four hours a day, necessitating late night pick ups and drop offs for some consumers, long after the operating hours of most public transit services. January 2008 page 94 218 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Persons with Disabilities — Consumers with Behavioral Health Needs Consumers in this category fall into several subsets, including those with mental health problems, those who are developmentally disabled, those with cognitive disabilities, and those who may have Alzheimer's or brain injuries that translate into behavioral difficulties. Those clients associated with various mental health services may be physically more able- bodied and mobile than some other groups. They can frequently have same -day trip needs for medical appointments when their mental health situation changes rapidly. Trip purposes for these individuals can reflect the full gamut of life -sustaining, as well as life -enhancing purposes. Fixed -route services are feasible for individuals who are physically able, but may be difficult and frightening for some persons on those days when their mental illness is active. Some behavioral health staff spoke of buddy programs that help to minimize the anxiety of traveling independently. Medications commonly taken make it difficult for these individuals to be exposed to the sunlight for extended periods. Agency staff spoke of the need for bus shelters and benches, protection from wind and sun. The absence of these creates unhealthy situations when there are longer wait times for vehicle pick-ups and drop-offs. Consumers with developmental disabilities, Alzheimer's or those with severe brain injuries likely require some level of supervision or assistance, both in transit, and at the end destination. In these instances, the "hand-off" is very important as it ensures that an individual with impaired judgment or poor memory is not wandering off in the space between the vehicle and the front door of their destination, but instead "handed off' to a responsible, receiving adult. Individuals participating in adult day health care programs, often persons with Alzheimer's, have special needs. Interviewed staff characterized these as: shorter ride times, escorts to and from the vehicle, and training of drivers not to drop off the rider at locations other than their homes. One difficulty of Alzheimer's and dementia conditions is that the individual can appear to be normal and in full possession of their faculties. Drivers need to be clear that these riders can only be taken to and from their home addresses, despite what the rider may otherwise indicate. Short ride times, of one hour or less, are important as some of these individuals become quite agitated. Also, escort to and from the door ensures that such riders do not wander away. Some consumers with developmental disabilities or those with Alzheimer's can become agitated, or even combative, in transit where they become fearful or anxious, particularly where there is a departure from their daily routine. In addition, there is increased incidence of seizures among members of these groups. Staff indicates that drivers assigned to services for these populations should be adequately trained and prepared to handle these types of real situations. 7.3.3 Needs Summarized For Senior Groups Seniors - Able -Bodied Seniors Much has been written about the transportationneeds of seniors and the importance of encouraging them to consider the use of public transit before they actually need it. Seniors in January 2008 page 95 219 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Riverside County, like the non -senior adult population, are more likely to drive their own vehicle or travel as passengers in private automobiles. Encouraging seniors to consider alternative transportation is challenging, particularly as it represents a loss of personal independence and self-reliance that is difficult for individuals to contemplate. But seniors who do explore altemative mobility options demonstrate the importance of continuing to promote public transit. Both able-bodied seniors and their advocates expressed concern through this planning effort about how seniors find transportation information when they need it. This is critical inasmuch as seniors' health conditions can change quickly. Seniors' need for assistance in accessing transportation can also quickly become a higher priority. Knowledgeable seniors; comment that even where there is only a gradual decrease in physical capabilities, the need for ready information about transportation is important. Agency personnel desired a continual "flow" of information about transportation potentially available to seniors so that in that moment when the individual is ready to listen and learn and consider transportation alternatives, that information is readily available. Seniors — Frail Elderly and Oldest Old Consumers who are medically frail or among the oldest -old of 80 years old and more may be supported at home, sometimes in a debilitated health status that makes moving outside the home complicated. They may be attending day care programs or adult day health care programs outside of the home but are otherwise quite limited in their mobility around the community due to multiple health issues. Trips taken are reported as primarily for life - sustaining purposes of medical needs, pharmacy needs or nutrition. Seniors in rural as well as urban areas of Riverside County perceive only limited transportation choices to be available, despite the availability of transportation and even specialized transportation in their local communities. Some of this has to do with seniors' limited knowledge about resources, some with the activities involved in making the arrangements for transportation. Assistance with transportation begins with making the actual trip arrangements, which may include scheduling the appointment and the transportation pick-up. These consumers generally need door -through -door transportation support, which therefore must include help with trip scheduling as well as assistance at the destination end, such as help with grocery shopping or navigating a complex medical complex. Same day trip needs are indicated when health conditions change rapidly. When these consumers do travel about the community, they speak of their considerable anxiety about the transportation experience due to their overall poor health condition. This reflects their limited capacity to tolerate transportation -related difficulties, such as long waits, distances to walk between the drop-off and the destination, or no-show vehicles. The poor health conditions of the frailest seniors was reflected in the fact that fully one -quarter of seniors' identified by the TRIP program as candidates for telephone interviews were too physically limited to participate in the telephone interview process. Seniors who rely upon family members for transportation spoke during interviews about the complexities of that — often seniors do not want to ask busy, younger relatives to assist them with transportation needs. Sometimes the family member or friend is available only at times that don't fit well with the requirements of the senior, either in terms of appointment times or the senior's energy levels. For example, the senior who is able to do things in the morning may find difficult trips late in the day when a working -age relative can provide transportation. January 2008 220 page 96 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 7-1, Riverside County Target Population Transportation Needs, Resources and Possible Responses Target Population Special Transportation Needs and Concerns Transportation Modes Potential Transit or Transportation Projects/ Solutions Seniors, Able- Bodied - Lack of knowledge about resources. -Concern about safety and security - Awareness that time when driving might be limited. - Fixed -route transit - Point deviation and deviated FR - Senior DAR - Special purpose shuttles: recreation, nutrition, shopping - Single point of information - Educational initiatives, including experience with bus riding before it needed. - Buddy programs; assistance in "trying" transit - Transit fairs, transit seniors -ride -free days or common pass Seniors, Frail and Persons Chronically 111 - Assistance to and through the door. - Assistance with making trip arrangements - On -time performance and Tenability critical to frail users. - Assistance in trip planning needed- - Need for shelters - Need for "hand-ofr for terribly frail - ADA Paratransit - TRIP program - Emergency and non -emergency medical transportation - EscorUComp'nion Volunteer drivers - Special purpose shuttles - Escorted transportation options - Door -through -door assistance; outside -the - vehicle assistance. - Increased role for volunteers. - Technology that provides feedback both to consumer and to dispatch; procedures to identify frailest users when traveling: - Individualized trip planning and trip scheduling assistance. - Expanded mileage reimbursement program. - Driver sensitivity training. - Appropriately placed bus shelters. Persons with Disabilities - Service quality and reliability - Driver sensitivity and appropriate passenger handling procedure -Concernsaboutwheelchair capacity on vehicles/ pass-bys - Need for shelters - Sometimes door through door or issues of "handofr - Fixed -route transit - ADA Paratransit - TRIP program - Emergency and non -emergency medical transportation - Special purpose shuttles - Escort/Companion - Single point of information; Information as universal design solution. - Continuing attention to service performance; importance of time sensitive service applications. - Driver education and attention to procedures about stranded or pass -by passengers with disabilities. - Aggressive program of bus shelters. - Vehicles, capital replacement. Persons of Low Income and Homeless Persons - Easy access to trip planning information - Fare subsides (bus tokens or passes) that can be provided in a medium that is not cash - Breaking down the culture of poverty that uses transportation as the difficulty for not moving about the community. - Difficulties of mothers with multiple children - Need to bring along shopping carts - Difficulties with transfers within and between systems; long trips. - Fixed -route transit - Point deviation and deviated FR - Special purpose shuttles (work, training, special education, Headstart, recreation) - Van pools, ridesharing, car sharing - Creative fare options available to human services agencies. - Increased quantity of bus tokens available. - Universal pass for services across county. - Bus passes available to those searching for jobs or in job training programs; cost-effective. - Special shuttles oriented to this population's predictable travel pattems. - Education about transit to case managers, workers with this population. - Feedback to transit planners on demand; continued work to improve transit service levels (coverage, frequency, span of hours) - Training of staff to train consumers - Vanpool assistance, ridesharing connections Persons with Sensory Impairments - Difficulty in accessing visual or auditory information. - Possible door-to-door for visually impaired - Driver sensitivity - Fixed route transit - ADA Paratransit - Demand response -TRIP program - Single point of information; information in accessibly formats - Guides (personal assistance) through information - Driver training critical to respond to needs. Persons with Behavioral Disabilities - Medications make individuals sun -sensitive and waiting in the sun is riot an option. —Medications cause thirstiness; long hour waits in the heat can lead to dehydration- - Mental illnesses can make it frightening to be in public spaces. - Impaired judgment and memory - Fixed route transit - ADA Paratransit - Special purpose shuttles - Escort/Companion - Possibly special shuttles oriented to this known predictable travel needs. - Driver training projects to provide skills at managing/ recognizing behaviors, of clients. - Aggressive program of bus shelters - "Handofr can be critical for confused riders, passing them off to a responsible party. - Important that driver understand riders conditions. AMMH January 2008 221 page 97 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 7.4 SUMMARY OF NEEDS BY RIVERSIDE COUNTY AREAS AND SUB -AREAS 7.4.1 Palo Verde Valley Apportionment Area The Palo Verde Valley runs along the Colorado River from Imperial County to San Bernardino County and inland to the Joshua Tree National Park. It consists of one population center, Blythe, surrounded by a large unincorporated area and isolated communities. Its demographics show a young population, with an average age younger than the countywide median age of 33 years and fewer elderly persons, just 7 percent, compared with the countywide proportion of almost 13 percent. In an area with almost 26,000 persons in 2000, between 6% and 13% of the population (1,300- 3,500 persons) are part of the target groups. Only 1,800 persons are estimated to be age 65 and older, representing 7% of the area's population. Trip needs are likely to be oriented to younger populations, with senior trips needs somewhat more limited in quantities. Palo Verde Transit's fixed -route services are providing almost 900 trips a week and the dial -a - ride makes just under 100 trips a week with its 8-vehicle fleet. The school district operates vehicles for student transportation. Various human services agencies provide some transportation support, largely through bus pass purchase and sometimes caseworker transportation. The TRIP mileage reimbursement program is available to registered Palo Verde Valley residents and 3 percent of the trips provided through this program in 2007 were in the Blythe area, over 2,600 one-way trips, an average of 50 trips per week. Lonq Distance Trips Agency and consumer reports generally indicate that transit services within Blythe are adequate and that unmet trip needs of the target groups relate to the long-distance trips into services in Indio and in Riverside. Some trips are needed to the Loma Linda University Medical Center and to the Veterans Hospital in San Bernardino County. Reportedly, local transit funding is not readily available to support trips across the desert to locations that are 90 to 150 miles and farther distant. The public transit operator has attempted various strategies to provide limited transportation services, particularly to Indio where there is some demand, but local elected officials have found it difficult to support the use of local dollars in this way. Some human services agencies are funding very limited transportation between Blythe and Indio, often in the form of mileage reimbursement to staff who will go out and bring individuals in to appointments, such as expectant young mothers and Headstart-age children in need of special services. Indio is a significant destination for many such appointments, particularly as there is almost no dental care in Blythe, limited pre -natal care and limited psychiatric, medication -oriented services available. Several agencies — including First Five of Riverside, the County Behavioral Health Department, and the GAIN program — indicated an interest in finding ways to work together to meet these long-distance trip needs. County workers do have access to vehicles and could transport more than one individual. But concem was also expressed about the difficulties and even safety issues of mixing of consumers, such as Headstart children and psychiatric patients whose medications are not effectively controlling their illness. AIMt January 2008 222 page 98 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Some coordination around these long-distance trips is already in place — for example, the public operator has a relationship with the local Greyhound bus station and assists consumers in buying discounted Greyhound bus passes. But Greyhound trips run only twice each day between Blythe and Indio, in the early morning and after 7 p.m. Greyhound no longer stops in Palm Springs, and trips by Greyhound into Riverside can be hours in duration for a 75 mile trip. Trips Into Blythe from Surrounding Areas Several agencies discussed needs of individuals living outside of Blythe, including Ripley at 7 miles, Mesa Verde at 8 miles, and others 20 miles or more from Blythe who need to come in for services, groceries and socialization. When these individuals cannot drive themselves, they become extremely isolated but usually cannot afford to move into housing in more populated areas where services would be more readily available. Increased Coordination And Communication Among Agencies A related concem was the need expressed by the Blythe public operator for better communication between the transportation provider and responsible social service agencies around consumer needs. Particularly in relation to demand response services, the public transit operator needs better coordination around the dropping off of vulnerable riders at their destinations, being clear that there is someone there to receive them. Similarly, several human services agencies based in Riverside and providing services to consumers in Blythe, indicated that it is not clear with whom the social service agency personnel should be communicating. 7.4.2 Coachella Valley Apportionment Area The Coachella Valley communities, stretching from Palm Springs to Indio and beyond to Mecca, have very mixed demographics. Clearly some communities are well-to-do but are home to often isolated, elderly persons who have very limited social support systems beyond what their dollars will purchase. The region's average age is 36 and its 17 percent senior population is more than four points above the statewide average of 13 percent and five points above Riverside County as a whole with 12 percent seniors (2000 census). The percent of lower income populations is modest, 8 percent compared with a 7 percent total for the County; however, in selected Coachella Valley communities lower -income persons are a significant proportion of the total population. In rural areas where housing costs are lower; the per capita income is well below county and state averages. Between 40,000 and 81,000 persons are projected to be among the target populations that are the focus of this plan, between 13 percent and 25 percent of the region's more than 300,000 persons. SunLine is providing almost 67,000 fixed -route trips per week while SunDial provides 1,600 demand response trips weekly. These services have a combined available fleet of 84 vehicles while utilizing 58 of those vehicles on an average day. TRIP mileage reimbursement activities supported 14,600 one-way trips during FY 07 to Coachella Valley residents, almost 300 trips per week January 2008 page 99 223 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Insufficient Information_ Available The Coachella Valley Transportation Roundtable, convened by the Good Samaritans' organization, has identified information services as the number one need. This 20-member group understands information to be a complicated set of issues involving having updated printed and web -based information in the right hands. The right hands may include caseworkers, family, and church members who are involved with seniors, lower income individuals or persons with disabilities. There was concern that while public transit is a significant and important part of a total information package, there were other private — both for profit and non-profit— resources available about which people need to know. Need for More Transit Alternatives The request for more information is likely also code language for development of more resources, a way of stating that individuals want access to altematives to the public transit resources currently available. This is in part because there is need for more individualized services than SunLine and SunDial can provide. The stakeholder survey identified three commercial operators in the Coachella Valley, and a handful of human services agencies providing transportation, including Boys & Girls Club of Indio, Indio Senior Center, Coachella Valley Rescue Mission, Ca!works/ GAIN, and Desert Blind and Handicapped Association. These are representative and not a comprehensive list. It is clear, though, that the types of trip needs discussed by the Roundtable are greater than the resources currently in place to serve these needs. So the request for more information can also be understood to mean needing more providers available to serve the target populations' transportation needs. Within the urbanized areas of the Coachella Valley, there may be opportunity for taxi operators to help fill certain gaps, as with the Safe Ride Home and Nite Owl services that exist in other areas to meet after-hours trip needs. Where no commercial or non-profit entities exist, as in the very isolated, rural areas, GAIN and DPSS workers indicated interest in creating ridesharing and van pooling options to help bring consumers into interviews and then continuing into employment when they obtain jobs. Low-income families rely upon public transportation to get their children to school. Expanded fixed -route service needs were identified in relation to three schools: Palm Desert Community College, an elementary school on Country Club Drive and a middle school in Desert Hot Springs. While public transit cannot replace traditional school bus transport, continued attention to school bell times (or class dismissal times) will serve these constituents. Expanding the range of altematives for those of lowest income and in very rural, low density areas is a significant transportation challenge. Increased SunLine Frequency, Service Area Coverage and Operating Hours Individuals spoke to need for increased SunLine services, to improve the frequency of buses in areas where service runs only at 60- or even 90-minute intervals. And requests to improve the coverage include extending services beyond where SunLine currently travels, with more service to outlying areas. Sometimes this came as a request for a stop near an agency, as with Desert Hot Springs' Boys and Girls Club. Other requests were for regular service between Desert Hot Springs and Indio, increased service to Mecca, and life line levels of January 2008 page 100 224 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report service to Salton City, Thermal and Indio Hills. Additional services were indicated for areas beyond Thousand Palms, Windy Point off Highway 111, to Sky Valley and Idyllwild. In some instances, service may be available between two points within the Coachella Valley but requires transfers that elongate already long trips. If the first route rums late, the rider can miss the transfer and have another wait of anywhere from 45 to 90 minutes. The economy of the Coachella Valley was characterized by some interviewees as a service economy that had transportation needs around the clock. Particularly for the service workers at the lowest end of the employment spectrum, this can require trips very early in the morning, possibly before the SunLine's first runs at 4:30 a.m. or connecting from routes that start later. SunLine's evening service runs as late as midnight on selected routes but stops earlier on others, again making transfers difficult. It was noted that even Walmart jobs (currently on Monterey Ave. in Palm Desert and Ramon Road in Palm Springs) have shifts that end past 10 p.m. The same is true for SunDial, whose days and hours must complement the fixed route, expanded service hours could help some achieve employment in third shift positions that are not otherwise available to them. Improved SunDial Service Quality As has been noted, improving the reliability of demand response transportation is identified as a need by the frail senior who has limited energy and capacity to wait for a vehicle, the dialysis patient who needs a prompt and direct trip home at the end of a treatment session and the employed individual with disabilities who relies upon SunDial to get to work but needs a timely, reliable service to meet their employer's expectations. Continuing efforts to improve dial -a -ride service reliability will be a significant help to the target populations. Special Shuttles and Special Needs Related to creating more altematives, there were individual anecdotes that suggest episodic but intense special needs, as with the migrant family with children who walked from Indio to Mecca over two days and other individuals who made a similar walk to get to a child in the Indio hospital. Identifying and addressing such transportation needs around health care for migrant populations and agricultural workers represents special challenges. Transit Amenities While need for shelter from the elements has been documented elsewhere, Coachella Valley plan participants spoke about its critical importance in the high heat of the desert, including the need for cool decking on benches exposed to the sun. 7.4.3 Western Riverside Apportionment Area and Subareas Westem Riverside is home to almost eight out of ten Riverside County residents. It is overall a slightly younger population than the state as a whole, with an 11.5 percent senior population compared with the 13 percent statewide average. It has a lower proportion of low income residents than neighboring Los Angeles County — 7 percent versus 9 percent — but these individuals are widely dispersed, densely in some areas and less so in others. AMA January 2008 page 101 225 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Given the large number of:residents overall, those within the target population of this Plan are also significant in numbers, estimated at between 122,000 and 223,000 (2000 census) and growing with the region's significant documented growth. Riverside Transit Agency is, providing local and regional service to the communities of Western Riverside, delivering almost 110,000 fixed -route trips weekly and almost 4000 demand responsive one-way trips weekly. Western Riverside County residents utilize the TRIP program in the greatest proportion, almost 80 percent of all trips provided, amount to almost 63,000 in FY 2007 or over 1,200 trips per week. Various Measure A -supported providers also provide trips and these are identified in the discussion below of five Westem Riverside subareas. Additionally, The Volunteer Center has a substantial bus pass and trip ticket distribution program to agencies and organizations serving members of the target groups— the 50,000 trips distributed through The Volunteer Center represent a significant supplemental program as many of these tickets are provided free to member agencies' constituencies. Western Riverside — Banning/Beaumont Pass Subarea Public transit in the ,pass area has undergone considerable change in recent years, with the creation of the Pass Area Transit which enables both Banning and Beaumont to continue operating their own services but doing so with improved local connections and coordination. In FY 2006, Banning provided about 3,500 weekly trips and Beaumont about 1,700 weekly fixed -route trips. Demand response trips totaled over 500 weekly for Beaumont and almost 200 weekly for Banning. A long-standing Measure A provider, the Beaumont Adult School, is providing just under 100 one-way trips weekly to teen mothers and ESL students with preschoolers in child care, representing an important transportation -related collaboration with a 'school district. Additionally, because the County Department of Public Social Services has a major facility in Banning, its personnel have been participants in the dialog about improvements to pass area transit services, as members of a long-standing advisory group focused on identifying and addressing local transit needs. Local needs are met to some degree by the Pass Area Transit, but limited by the service operating hours of 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Those in the retail industry and working in Cabazon just east of Banning cannot use public transit to get home. Many of Cabazon's 100 retail outlets are open until 9 or 10 p.m. with employee responsibilities beyond that. Additionally, the new Morongo Casino is a 24-hour operation with a large employment base. These individuals, some of whom are at entry level service positions, are potential transit users. Local dial -a -ride services serve ADA trips and non-ADA on a space available basis for seniors (age 60) and persons with disabilities who are not ADA certified. Dial -a -ride demand has reportedly been increasing and there may be need to increase capacity, as well as to obtain additional fare box support from agencies and organizations whose consumers are making significant subscription trips. Western Riverside — Greater Riverside Subarea The greater Riverside area is served by Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), operating services between 3 a.m. and 10 p.m. on weekdays and between 5:30 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Saturdays AM MA January 2008 page 102 226 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report and Sundays. RTA is providing significant service to the greater Riverside area with a total of 28 fixed -routes operating. Specialized transportation resources are also significant within Riverside. Riverside Special Transportation Services provides advance reservation, curb -to -curb services to persons 60 and older and to persons with disabilities, providing about 2,800 one-way trips per week. RTA's ADA service also operates within greater Riverside but is supplemental to the Riverside Special Transportation Services within the Riverside city limits. Additionally several Measure A providers serve specialized trips that may originate or end within the greater Riverside area. These providers include: Inland AIDS, Friends of Moreno Valley, Care Connexxus, Whiteside Manor, Riverside County Medical Center and Operation Safehouse. - Collectively, these services provided around 260 trips weekly in FY 2006, not including Riverside County Medical Center and Operation Safehouse both of which began operations during the current fiscal year. Needs expressed during the plan development process were notable by what was NOT conveyed. There were few complaints about the existing fixed -route service. Demand response complaints focused almost exclusively on service reliability issues. Within the City of Riverside, despite extensive outreach dialog, needs emerging were those that typically go beyond traditional public transit services, even ADA complementary paratransit services, and echoed needs identified elsewhere. These included: • need for door -through -door transportation for seniors and the most frail • problems of trip scheduling around dialysis patients • need for improved information services that enable and assist individuals with trip planning and help caseworkers identify resources • need for information services that advise consumers on the "quality" of services, that is to say that can assure riders that services meet certain basic minimum standards related to vehicles and drivers. Western Riverside — Norco/ Corona Subarea In addition to some regional RTA services, the cities of Norco and Corona each have transportation services providing fairly defined services. The City of Corona has a traditional public transit program, providing just fewer than 3,000 fixed -route trips weekly on its Corona Cruiser and about 1,100 demand response trips. The City of Norco has a Measure A funded program that is much smaller in scale, providing about 50 trips per week. Services are provided within city boundaries and, in the case of the demand response services, with various eligibility requirements. Issues that surface through the Plan development processes relate largely to service area conflicts with the existing service. Specifically, • Bus passes that work across RTA and Corona transit services; although there is a policy of reciprocity, Corona drivers do not consistently accept RTA bus passes. • Service quality concerns regarding the service reliability of demand response services as well as Corona Cruiser. January 2008 page 103 227 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • Pockets of need in South Corona, beyond the incorporated city limits where development continues to expand. • Pockets of service need near Green River trailer park, near the Orange County line, in the Eastvale community, and some generated from Horse Thief Canyon. • Need for expansion of fixed route Corona Cruiser within Corona, south of Olive Street and west of Main Street. • Need for service to Mira Loma from Norco / Corona. Western Riverside — Central Subarea The central area of Western Riverside county has seen expansion of RTA services, particularly since establishing a second base of operations in Hemet. Measure A providers of some significance operate from this area, including the long-standing Care -A -Van in Hemet and Care Connexus in Sun City. Together these two programs are serving about 300 trips a week. Trip needs identified include: • The long travel times needed to get to Riverside Regional Medical Center by RTA fixed route services, and a need for alternatives. • Service quality concerns regarding the service reliability of demand response services as well as Corona Cruiser. • Pockets of need include Homeland with trip needs identified by staff from the Departments of Behavioral Health, Public Health, and Public Social Services/GAIN. • Pockets of need in the Perris area including Nuevo, Galvalin Hills, south of Lake Matthews and northern Perris. • Quail Valley has a large number of low income young families and very limited transportation. • No transportation available along Ortega Highway where there are some low income families. • There is a GAIN office in Lake Elsinore that is not easy for consumers in the surrounding communities to get to; improved transit connections would assist with interviewing and training. • Extended fixed -route operating hours are needed; much fixed route service ends by 8 p.m. while service and retail jobs require employees to travel after that. • RTA connections originating in Lake Elsinore from south areas of the county (Temecula and Murrieta) are not well timed and the buses to Riverside Regional Medical Center routinely leave before other buses arrive. Several central Westem Riverside communities are characterized by relatively higher proportions of seniors, including Lake Elsinore and Hemet. One unexpected consequence of this is a Grandparents Raising Grandchildren phenomenon for which a fairly large sized program has been established in the Hemet area. These seniors have particularly complex transportation issues: they may be facing some limitations in their own ability to drive, even as they have the increased transportation requirements that come along with young children. A�1MA January 2008 page 104 228 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Western Riverside — South Subarea The south westem Riverside County areas of Murneta and Temecula are characterized by increasing growth and often family members with long commutes to distant employment in San Diego County or in Downtown Riverside, Orange or Los Angeles Counties. The transportation implications: of these areas are often focused on youth, on the lowest income individuals, including migrant workers and the problems of distance to regional medical facilities in central Riverside and in San Bernardino Counties. Medical facility trips may in several directions, with San Diego veteran's hospital and facilities and other private facilities almost as close, or closer, in the direction of San Diego as they are to downtown Riverside. Areas such as Anza have no current services, although in the past there was a modest volunteer -based transportation program. Wildomar Senior Community Center operates some service, as does the Measure A provider Boys and Girls Club of Southwest County. Both groups are obviously focused on specific clientele. There are limited options for transportation providers, with few altematives to RTA, making this a challenging area for those in the target populations with unmet transportation needs. 7.5 SUMMARY OF INSTITUTIONAL, VEHICLE -RELATED AND INSURANCE NEEDS Institutional issues were presented during the plan development process and were not otherwise addressed in the preceding discussion of consumer needs. Most of these issues. surfaced for the small providers, non-profit and private organizations, whose primary mission is not transportation which is seen only as a support service to a different core business. Various support capabilities considered in Chapter 2, Transit Needs Assessment, as well as some other related items emerging through the outreach process are enumerated here Insurance liability issues, identified by numerous interviewees, are also considered. 7.5.1 Various Institutional Support Needs Provision of training resources for small providers -- All of the Measure A providers are small and not easily able to have their own driver training programs. Several operate vehicles of a size that does not require anything above a Class C license. Regardless of the driver licensing requirements, all drivers can benefit from regular, on -going driver training in areas such as safe driving, transporting special needs clients and wheelchair securement. One agency commented that program staffers are also drivers when necessary and these individuals don't always provide the maintenance director with clear and sufficient information about vehicle conditions. Periodic driver training meetings can help to sensitize staff to the breadth of issues involved in safe vehicle operations. Provision of training resources for public transit operators Numerous interviewees spoke of capabilities for providing training resources to the public operators, for example on behalf of Alzheimer's patients, behavioral health consumers, or persons who are blind or have limited vision. These agency personnel have a wealth of knowledge and skill toolboxes that could be helpful to drivers in creating a safe and comfortable ride experience for their riders. January 2008 page 105 229 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Provision of training for maintenance personnel — While most of the small programs contract out for maintenance, several provide it in-house. Several options exist for improving the quality and/or costs of these services. At a minimum, including agency maintenance personnel in selective training experiences with local public transit operator maintenance could lead to collaborative solutions for selective maintenance functions. Driver Recruitment -- Several small agencies spoke of the difficulties of recruiting drivers, in part because of the split -shift nature of the need. This may not be readily addressed by public transit operators but it is conceivable that collaboration between agencies could lead to filling existing personnel gaps, whether through shared -driver arrangements or possibly shared vehicles. Role of taxi operators — Commercial, for -profit taxi operators have participated in the plan development process and have indicated interest and willingness to be part of projects geared towards these needs. An appropriate role for taxis, as another overlay in the array of service options, does exist and they should be considered as a resource in the development of alternatives. 7.5.2 Vehicle and Vehicle -Related Needs Coordinated vehicle maintenance/ vehicle loaner programs -- County and local city fleet service departments, as well as the public transit operators, have extensive vehicle maintenance capabilities. Such public agencies might be more familiar with the transit -type vehicles being used and able to provide "loaner" vehicles in the event of lengthy repairs. These and other collaborative maintenance ventures could reduce the costs of services. Alternatively, there may be ways to combine the maintenance requirements of various small organizations, potentially reducing their costs by obtaining a combined service package at a better cost based upon volume of service. Coordinated fueling and other supplies -- As fuel prices continue to climb, all efforts to reduce fuel costs and identify coordinated opportunities through existing county or city fleets should be explored. While the public operators are all on compressed natural gas, other public entities in the county are not and collaborative relationships may be feasible. Similarly, purchase of lubricants and potentially other supplies could be facilitated, and lower costs achieved, through consolidated purchasing. Scheduling and dispatch assistance -- While some small providers are serving niche markets and captive groups through their own day program or residential facility, others are providing a more traditional demand response environment where individuals call into dispatch to make trip reservations. Assistance' cold be provided, ranging from provision of more efficient scheduling techniques using computers and commercial software, to assessment and improvement of current procedures to improve vehicle use and collection of useful operating data. Coordinated vehicle washing This as a potential coordinated service point is prompted by four agencies included in the transit assessment review who indicated that their vehicles are currently washed in their parking lots. The washing of commercial and transit vehicles has been targeted by water agencies as a major area of Clean Water Act enforcement, suggesting that developing alternatives to such vehicle washing practices could avoid citations. January 2008 page 106 230 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 7.53 Liability and Insurance Needs Liability and/or insurance requirements were identified as significant "barriers to coordination" by numerous agencies and organizations throughout Riverside County. Public transit and human service agency recognition of the issues of potential risk and liability associated with operating coordinated transportation services is logical, and is an issue that must inevitably be addressed if coordination of services between agencies is to occur. Stakeholder responses during interviews and meetings reflected an overall understanding that the liability and risk associated with operating services in coordination with other agencies/organization must be considered at the outset. Specific details about the individual agency/organization liability and/or risk did not surface during the outreach process. This can be attributed to stakeholder's limited knowledge of the specifics of their insurance policy. This level of fact-finding would be the subject of a risk assessment relative to the nature of any coordinated services to be operated. However, as a result of the development of coordination plans and programs, insurance and liability -related issues have surfaced in other settings related to operating coordinated transportation services between agencies. These issues generally involve vehicles, drivers and clients/customers, and include, but are not limited to: • Pooling and/or sharing of vehicles by multiple agencies • Mixing of "clientele" • Drivers employed by one agency/organization driving vehicles of another • Use of volunteer drivers • Gaps in existing insurance coverage between agencies/organizations (i.e. need for excess coverage) • Variance in driver training and certifications • Agency/organization control issues Although these issues appear difficult to resolve, agencies and organizations in Califomia have worked to develop and offer insurance solutions for those agencies and organizations operating transportation services under unique circumstances. For example, one method by which risk loss is financed is known as captive insurance. This is a form of group insurance owned by its members. Captives are generally a sound choice for agencies and organizations with a good loss record and risk management and an ability to finance some of its own exposure. Savings from a captive are realized through financial control and mitigating risk by having a professional team of insurance and management service providers. Savings in a range of 10%-20% are reported through improving the cost of financing risk and operating safely, The State -legislated public transit or non-profit agency insurance pools include California Non Profits United Vehicle Pool (NPU) and California Transit insurance Pool (CaITIP). In addition, the Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA) in association with Pacific Shore Insurance Services, Inc. has developed the Community Transportation Mutual insurance Company (CTMIC). The CTMIC operates as a captive insurance company and is available to all CTAA members, including public agencies, cities, private non-profit operators, private -for -profit operators and tribal organizations operating in all types of service areas. January 2008 page 107 231 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report The CTMIC was created in response to expressed concerns of its members over insurance costs, insurance availability and the need for increased understanding of community transportation and its exceptional needs, including meeting the individual, highly specialized trip needs of seniors and disabled individuals. 76 GAPS AND DUPLICATION IN SERVICES PROVIDED This section identifies gaps in transportation services in Riverside County which provide a starting point for strategies to reduce the gaps and improve the mobility of the target populations. The gaps include institutional, temporal, and geographic gaps indicated by the preceding needs assessment. The issue of service duplication is addressed in relation to the diversity of needs and county's geographic expanse. 7.6.1 Addressing Institutional Communication Gaps Coordination of the transportation services operated by public transit and human service agencies are impacted by the challenges of working between two very distinct service systems. For public transit, operating service is its core business, around which significant infrastructure has been built. For the human services agencies, transportation is a support service, and is often viewed as a distraction from the agencies' primary purpose. Although both serve the public, cultural differences in orientation exist. Human service organizations are closer to the client, have a better understanding of individual needs and requirements, and focus their day-to-day efforts on addressing and resolving issues on behalf of the individual, as characterized in Chapter 4's Stakeholder Outreach findings. Public transit is more attentive to "mass" needs only in relation to providing service, with considerably less awareness of the individual but instead an understanding of how to meet needs of large groups. Different Regulatory Requirements Public transit providers spoke in the Technical Advisory Committee meetings about their difficulties in communicating with human services personnel about the fare box and productivity requirements that public transit must meet. State statutes, as well as Federal requirements, establish rules that limit the public operators' ability to provide low -productivity services, charter -type services or the long-distance rural services that won't bring in sufficient rider fares to meet minimum standards. Human services organizations grapple with different, but equally binding, restrictions that may include the need to tie expenditures to individual consumers, the need to show progress towards an individualized program plan, and other client -focused requirements. Communication between these systems, given the potential labyrinth of rules on either side of this particular divide, argues for continued communication and mutual education. Differing Languages Between Public Transit and Human Services Since the day-to-day business objectives of these two service industries differ, it is logical to find that they speak different "languages," interpreting, processing and responding differently. AMIN January 2008 page 108 232 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report For example, public transit operators talk in terms of one-way passenger trips, and apply performance measures of cost per hour and passengers per hour. Human service agencies speak of client days, per diem rates and often understand trips as vehicle trips rather than one-way passenger boardings. One example of this is the recent change in reporting by the TRIP program to accommodate the National Transit Database definition of a trip. Switching to :the standard definition of a one-way trip as "each time that a person enters a vehicle for travel" made a significant difference in TRIP reporting, as indicated by the increased trip numbers between FY 06 and FY 07. The FY 06 total was 24,393 trips, while the FY 07 trip total was 79,989 trips. This increase was the result of counting trip chaining, the multiple trips that an individual may make on their single "outing" with a TRIP - reimbursed volunteer driver. Coordination Among Personnel It was noteworthy that several interviewees in human services did not know with whom to talk within pubic transit organizations. By the same token, the Blythe transit operator who has numerous working relationships with human services personnel spoke of the tack of institutional memory. He found it challenging that with turnover among human services workers, he finds himself starting all over again to educate new individuals about transit issues. Such starting points for communication, reflecting how foreign each "industry" is to the other, must be gradually addressed in order for these two systems to work effectively on coordination projects. While at a minimum, there may be value in establishing a "translator" to work with across the two systems, regular and routine meetings between key individuals in both groups are indicated. 7.6.2 Meeting Individualized Consumer Needs One of the main purposes of this Plan is to recommend ways that public transit and human service agencies can work together to develop plans and projects that will address unmet needs of low income individuals, persons with disabilities, and seniors. The enumeration and detailing of these needs indicates that providing service to some difficult -to -serve sub -segments of the target population (e.g. frail, chronically ill and disabled individuals) requires high levels of individualized service. This Plan identifies, through the outreach presented in Chapter 5 and in the needs assessment of this chapter, specific types of individualized need experienced by the target populations. Public transit and human service agencies and organizations must find ways in which to meet needs that consumers described and that agency/organization personnel enumerate on their behalf. Actions and strategies developed as elements of this plan must be designed to improve the ability of providers of specialized transportation to serve such highly individualized trip needs with greater efficiency. Such needs include information, communication, shortened ride times and increased service timeliness, as well as segregated services for particularly vulnerable populations such as Head start children, dialysis patients, the most frail elderly and so forth. tM MA January 2008 page 109 233 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 7.6.3 Expanding Public Transit Clearly increasing the quantity of existing public transit services is indicated in each of the subareas of the County, some of which may be addressed in the long range planning and visioning processes undertaken by the County's public transit operators. General areas of expansion include: ➢ increasing the frequency of buses on core routes, ➢ expanding the hours of the operating day to earlier in the morning and later at night ➢ improving transfer timing and frequency to make longer or cross -jurisdictional trips more convenient, with more direct connections between high travel areas. It was notable in the extensive outreach undertaken there were very limited complaints received about the existing public transit infrastructure. The focus was rather on how to improve what was in place or how to extend it farther. Members of these target groups do rely upon existing public transit and any improvements to these networks will serve their needs. That said, specific needs were indicated in the Coachella Valley for later evening service from the Community College campuses and possibly start -times earlier than the 4:30 a.m. starts that will better support this region's service industry economy. Pockets of rural needs were identified beyond SunLine's current service footprint, some of which may become feasible with time for life -line services. Riverside Transit Agency's span of service is considerable but late night services do not now exist past 10:30 p.m. and there may be indication for a Nite Owl type service for the period from midnight until 3:30 a.m. when core routes commence. Pockets of unserved areas exist, notably beyond the Norco and Corona city limits and in the Homeland area. There is some need for direct service between Norco/ Corona and Ontario employment centers. Some previously unserved areas, such as Jurupa, do not seem to represent the need they have in the past. The Pass Area Transit in Banning and Beaumont needs earlier moming and later evening service. Later service hours on the weekends to support the retail and casino employment opportunities to the east are also needed. Blythe services appear to be serving the immediate community reasonably well but need for trips beyond the city limits continue. 7.6.4 Creating Inter-iursidictional Transportation Alternatives Riverside County s considerable expanse results in a necessary clustering of selective regional facilities such as medical facilities, and means that many individuals have to make cross - jurisdictional trips. The problem then becomes who is going to pay for a trip that begins in one community, on one side of the county, and ends in another. This is a challenge that confronts Blythe and Coachella Valley communities. This was to some extent resolved in Western Riverside with the creation of a regional operator, Riverside Transit Agency, but remains an issue for residents of Banning and Beaumont who need to travel in both east and westerly directions and have more limited choices for making those trips. January 2008 page 110 234 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Mechanisms for addressing these long trips, for which there is not a clearly identified funder, are needed. Many persons within the target populations require such transportation assistance, largely to medical facilities, but also to court and human services agency appointments, and in some cases for employment. Creative solutions could include: ➢ exploring the potential for ridesharing and vanpooling for working -aged populations, ➢ establishing special shuttles, with human service agencies as funding participants, such as a Blythe to Indio shuttle; ➢ continuing and promoting the TRIP program's ability to provide mileage -subsidy for more frail, dependent populations who can find a driver. 7.6.5 Increasing Service Capacity Chapter 2's Transit Assessment and Chapter 3's demand estimation identified the rail, public transit and specialized transit trips currently being provided in the region: The 13.9 million total trips, including rail, represent 7 trips per person, based upon the 2000 census. Anticipating that the populationgrowth over the next 30 years may increase over 120 percent, growth in trips provided will be necessary just to maintain current levels of service. Human service transportation programs also exist. In the last year, the TRIP program's countywide reach added 80,000 very specialized one-way trips. The other Measure A service providers, operating just in Westem Riverside County, added almost 40,000 more. These small, non-profit providers are potentially an important strategy, albeit small in scale, for meeting` certain individualized needs of these populations. However, the assessment also shows that some of the needs of the target population are not now being met, such as door -through -door, long-distance shuttles, and service to and from more isolated areas. So while needs exceed the services now in place, there must also be some restructuring of the existing network of transportation services to handle identified and increasing needs. The potential to coordinate and leverage transportation resources with human services organizations who share responsibility for these populations is a logical next step. 7.6.6 Improving Service Quality Service reliability and predictable on -time performance are critical to groups of persons among the target populations. Usually these are demand response riders, using either-'SunLine or RTA's ADA complementary paratransit services, or on other community dial -a -rides such as those in Corona, Banning and Beaumont. Paratransit programs are notorious for their difficulty in providing predictable, on -time service but it is not impossible to assure riders of certain windows of on -time performance. For dialysis patients, frail individuals and those in the workforce on -time pick-up is critical. The availability of technology provides new opportunity to improve these services, even in a shared -ride environment. ` When services are running late, communication with riders can alleviate much concern and anxiety as to just when rides will arrive. Automatic call-backs can advise riders that their ride is within a mile or so. And automated routing and scheduling, when software parameters are finely honed, can help to January 2008 page 111 235 • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report improve scheduling effectiveness. Attention to the quality of service, and efforts to improve that quality, must be a key part of improving the mobility of the target groups. 7.6.7 Improving Communication and Information at All Levels There were numerous information, mis-information and communication issues arising through the needs assessment process that speak to gaps in understanding and the need for projects to improve that . These issues are multi -layered, with several dimensions identified here. With Prospective Riders There was a comment about the need for a steady flow of information about public transit so that when the transportationneed presents itself, information or access to information is readily available. Many comments were made about one -number solutions or integration of 211/ 511 information capabilities, keeping the most up-to-date transit information available at these sources or having the potential to refer directly through these sources. With Agency Personnel The need for ready access to information arose with many caseworkers, including those in the DPSS/GAIN programs, those working with frail seniors, and those working with teens in the behavioral health or systems. Some of these caseworkers readily find information, understanding that they must master it in order to help their consumers; these individuals become rich internal resources, the agency "transportation guru" who understands what the local transportation service does and doesn't do. For those staff who can't readily find their way around transit guides and timetables, it is difficult for them to assist consumers, to know when to counter consumer mis-information, or to advocate on behalf of their consumers for expanded transit services_ On Behalf of Frail, Chronically 111 or Dependent Individuals Some individuals need the highest levels of assistance in making their transportation connections, what the Office on Aging termed "transportation case management." These persons needing basic assistance in organizing their trip pick-up and drop off include those with acute or chronic illness, dialysis patients, those on chemotherapy treatment, and persons who are confused or frail. Between Drivers and Riders, Dispatch and Riders Improved communication applies during the ride as well as in the process of obtaining a ride. This suggests continuing and differently focused driver training to sensitize both public fixed - route and paratransit drivers to recognize and facilitate transportation for persons with special needs. In addition, technological tools may improve the capability of the system to improve communication between the rider, the vehicle and dispatch in a real-time situation. This will serve to minimize long waits given the uncertainty about a vehicle's arrival time. Dispatchers and call takers may require additional training to assist high -needs consumers more effectively and to be sensitized to their requirements. January 2008 page 112 236 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 7.6.8 Addressing Service Duplication Service duplication issues were not documented. The size of Riverside County and the diversity of transportation needs, particularly as identified through Chapter 2's assessment of Measure A providers, shows no particular levels of duplication. In fact, existing services are meeting a breadth of needs across a vast geographic expanse although unmet needs do exist. 7.6.9 Addressing Liability Concerns and Promoting Solutions This discussion of needs has considered the commonly repeated barrier of liability issues. Responses to similarly -expressed needs were developed both here in Califomia and at the national level. Two statewide pools and the national pool established through the Community Transportation Association of America have evolved in response to the 'concerns of smaller, often non-profit and sometimes volunteer -based transportation programs. Further information about these options and their availability promoted, as coordinated service options are developed that are responsive to Riverside County needs. 7.7 NEED, GAP AND SERVICE DUPLICATION ASSESSMENT SUMMARY COMMENTS This chapter has examined identified needs on three dimensions: 1) in relation to consumers sub -groups within the target populations, 2) in relation to the geography of the county and 3) in relation to institutional, vehicle -related issues. An analysis of gaps in service identified key areas to which to target projects and strategies: ➢ Addressing institutional communication gaps ➢ Meeting individualized consumer needs ➢ Expanding public transit ➢ Creating inter -jurisdictional transportation altematives ➢ Increasing service capacity ➢ Improving service quality ➢ Improving communication and information at all levels ➢ Addressing liability concerns and promoting insurance altematives Service duplication was not seen to be an issue given the diversity of needs, the range of responses this requires and the considerable geographic expanses of Riverside County. January 2008 page 113 237 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 8.1'IN7RODUCTION This concluding chapter presents the direction suggested by the planning process, by the stakeholders and participants, and by analysis of its findings. A vision is presented along with and four goals: The goals provide a basis for organizing the recommended responses to the needs and gaps identified through the planning effort. A sequencing of responses is suggested through a framework forcoordination. And the chapter suggests the next steps in implementing the plan. 8.2 LEADING TOWARDS RECOMMENDATIONS Meeting the specialized transportation needs of the three diverse and often overlapping segments of the target population — seniors, persons with disabilities and low-income individuals -- will continue to be challenging into the future. Actions and strategies developed should be effective in incrementally improving services, by providing as many travel options as possible to the target populations based upon their individual needs and informing them about those options. This can be accomplished by gradually building the capacity of public transit and human service agencies/organizations to develop and implement coordinated projects, plans and programs. Both public transit and human service agencies/organizations must be active partners in this capacity building process. The actions necessary to increase the capacity of public transit to offer improved access to transportation for the target populations will differ from those actions and strategies needed to build capacity for human and social services. For example, in Riverside County, public transit operators have already built considerable infrastructure, and are taking the initiative to increase service capacity by implementing technological solutions to improve service delivery and efficiency for most population segments. Public transit infrastructure includes bus maintenance and parking/storage facilities, bus stop, layover and transfer locations, automated fare collection and revenue counting equipment, scheduling/dispatching, vehicle location systems. Recognizing the wealth of public transit resources in use to operate mass transportation in Riverside County, it is critical to build the capacity and reliability of human service transportation providers to complement public transportation services. The overall mission of these agencies/organizations is to serve individualized need, including operating services that public transportation cannot (e.g., non -emergency medical, door -through -door, etc.). For this reason, project opportunities designed to strengthen the ability or human service agencies and organizations to continue to provide the hard -to -serve trip needs of seniors, persons with disabilities and low-income individuals should be encouraged. 8.3 FRAMEWORK FOR COORDINATION The project team approach to development of recommendations is designed to provide RCTC and stakeholder agencies and organizations in Riverside County with additional guidance to continue their efforts to expand and strengthen this framework for coordination. We believe that AMMA January 2008 238 page 114 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report there are a myriad of opportunities for transit to work with human service agencies/organizations to plan for and to ultimately deploy newly developed coordinated projects and programs to address the changing transportation needs in the county. In this and previous chapters we have developed a rationale for prioritizing projects selected for funding, and have identified potential solutions to address the needs of the target populations. Current FTA guidance suggests that specific project recommendations relative to a Program of Projects (POP) do not need to be included in coordinated plans at this juncture. Rather plans should provide the framework for decision -making around the subsequent POP process. In addition, we believe that viable coordination projects can only be developed by those with significant understanding of the details of the transportation environment. Therefore, our recommendations are focused on building the coordinated framework and strengthening ties between public transit and human service agencies and organizations. The wholiy inclusive stakeholder involvement process that was undertaken as an element of the coordination plan resulted in an array of actions, strategies and project recommendations that represent the next logical steps toward coordination and achievement of the proposed vision and goals. 8.3.1 Regional Mobility Manager— Federal Content The mobility manager, as articulated in the federal circulars delineating the requirements of JARC, New Freedom and Section 5310 programs, is viewed as central to the concept of coordination. As such, implementation of mobility management initiatives are eligible capital expenditures, funded at the larger Federal share of 80 percent. Specifically, the circular language states: "Mobility management techniques may enhance transportation access for populations beyond those served by one agency or organization within a community....Mobility management is intended to build coordination among existing public transportation providers and other transportation service providers with the result of expanding the availability of service. Mobility management activities may include: (a) The promotion, enhancement, and facilitation of access to transportation services, including the integration and coordination of services for individuals with disabilities, older adults and low-income individuals; (b) Support for short-term management activities to plan and implement coordinated services: (c) The support of State and local coordination policy bodies and councils; (d) The operation of transportation brokerages to coordinated providers, .funding agencies and customers; (e) The provision of coordination services, including employer -oriented Transportation Management Organizations' and Human Service Organizations' customer -oriented travel navigator systems and neighborhood travel coordination activities such as coordinating individualized travel training and trip planning activities for customers; AMMA January 2008 page 115 239 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report (t) The development and operation of one -stop transportation traveler call centers to coordinate transportation information on all travel modes and to manage eligibility requirements and arrangements for customers among supporting programs; and (g) Operational planning for the acquisition of intelligent transportation technologies to help plan and operate coordinated systems... "13 The Mobility Manager concepts as described in the circular, are not new to California as this guidance includes many of the elements of the original AB 120 and SB 826 Social Service Transportation Improvement Act. The difference is that the mobility manager roles and responsibilities now encourage coordination between public transit and human and social services transportation. 8.3.2 Other Coordination Issues -- Coordination Within Systems Coordination also means working together "within systems." This perspective on coordination is also important, especially for public transit providers whose sole business is to operate transportation that is seamless and transparent to the rider. Although public transit operators in Riverside County continue to build upon their ability to provide customers with a high level of transit service, operating revenues remain scarce. The coordination plan offers new opportunities to leverage existing funding for operators willing to coordinate with other providers to create transparency between systems. For example, establishing core service operating hours across a region would benefit the low income transit dependent rider who must use multiple operators to travel long distances from home to work and back again, and who must be certain that a return trip can be made. Other examples of potential areas of coordination on demand -responsive systems could include standardization of age eligibility requirements between systems and coordinated scheduling and dispatching. 8.3.3 Coordinated Approach to Funding Opportunities — Universal funding Application To promote the coordinated opportunities that this plan identifies, plan recommendations will also address combining into a single grant process the various potential funding opportunities that RCTC administers. These will vary somewhat by apportionment area: specifically, for Western Riverside County, a universal funding package can include funding available under Measure A while for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley, this source is not available. Additionally, the Section 5310 program is administered at the state level, by Caltrans, and that process stands as a statewide, competitive procurement. 13 FTA Circular 9045.1 New Freedom Program Guidance and Application Instructions, May 1, 2007, p. III-10 to III-11. January 2008 page 116 240 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 8.4 PLAN VISION AND GOALS The following overall vision is proposed for Riverside County's locally developed coordination action plan: 1 IMPROVED COMMUNITY MOBILITY FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY SENIORS, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AND PERSONS OF LOW INCOME 1. Establish leadership and infrastructure to promote coordination within and between public transit agencies and the human services organizations. 2. Build capacity to meet demand for specialized transportation needs of a growing population. 3. Promote information portals to enable many points of access to transportation information responsive to varying client/consumer needs. 4. Promote coordination policy at regional, state and federal levels. 8.5 PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS The project team approach to development of recommendations is designed to guide public transit and human service agencies/organizations in the creation of a coordinated framework to plan, program and allocate funding and ultimately deploy new transportation initiatives that will, address the transportation needs in Riverside County. To this end, the project team has developed four (4) goals, supported by nineteen (19) implementing objectives to accomplish coordination in the county. In addition, a total of fifty- nine (59) implementing actions, strategies and projects are recommended: The goals, objectives implementing actions, strategies and recommended projects are presented below and outlined in Table 8-1. These goals are responsive to the Federal guidance by ensuring that the locally developed plan provides the direction through which needs of the county's target populations can be met. The implementing strategies are the methods by which gaps in services and opportunities for improved efficiencies may be addressed through coordinated strategies and initiatives. The four goals are described as follows: Goal 1— Coordination Leadership and Infrastructure Given the level and diversity of needs in the county, a regional approach to facilitating coordination is needed, as no one agency or organization has the resources to effectuate the necessary cultural, institutional and operational changes needed to accomplish coordination goals. Coordination in Riverside County cannot be accomplished without dedicated staff and financial resources. Projects funded under this goal should establish and/or further the development of the Regional Mobility Management concept. The objectives proposed under this goal include: January 2008 page 117 241 Public Transit -Human. Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 1.1 Establish a Regional Mobility Manager capability to provide coordination leadership within Riverside and adjacent counties. 1.2 Establish the Regional Mobility Manager's role in developing, "growing" and strengthening projects responsive to coordination goals and objectives. 1.3 Promote sub -regional mobility managers in Westem Riverside, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley through the Call for Projects and through outreach by the Regional Mobility Manager. 1.4 Promote human services agency -level mobility managers through the Call for Projects and through outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.5 Develop visibility around specialized transportation issues and needs, encouraging high level political and agency leadership. Goal — Capacity Building Acknowledging that more transportation capacity is needed to meet the growing population expectations within Riverside County, this goal addresses the idea of providing more trip options for the target populations. In addition, this goal inherently includes the concept of strengthening the ability of human service agencies and organizations to provide trips that public transit cannot, thereby increasing not only capacity but access to services. The notions of reliability, quality of service and service monitoring are reflected under this goal. The objectives proposed include: 2.1 Promote the quantity of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation provided in each of the three apportionment areas. 2.2 Promote the quality of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation through strategies to improve services with attention to meeting individualized needs. 2.3 Develop strategies for improving transportation solutions between county sub -areas and between counties. 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies. 2.5 Promote capital improvements to support safe, comfortable, efficient rides for the target populations. 2.6 Measure the quantities of trips provided in Riverside County, through new and existing procedures. Goal 3 — information Portals The need to broaden the reach of information related to transit and specialized transportation services for clients/consumers, as well as stakeholder agencies and organizations is critical. Riverside County has a wealth of transportation service resources. Points of access to transportation information must be expanded to allow everyone the opportunity to understand and use the transportation network. The objectives proposed under this goal include: 3.1 Integrate and promote existing information strategies, including 211/511, web -based tools and paper media to get public transit and specialized transportation information to consumers. 3.2 Develop information portal tools for wide distribution of information. January 2008 page 118 242 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 3.3 Promote information opportunities for human services staff and direct service workers and expand training options for consumers. 3.4 Report on _project successes and impacts at direct service levels, subregional level and at county wide levels; pursue opportunities to promote project successes at State and Federal levels. Goal 4 — Coordination Policy As the issues presented through this planning process are not new, but longstanding, there needs to be continuing policy attention brought to some of the underlying issues and dilemma. These include reimbursement of non -emergency medical transportation, establishing a consolidated grant application process and reporting on what works and what doesn't work in relation to coordinated transportation responses. 4.1 Work to establish non -emergency medical transportation policies and more cost- effectively meet medically -related trip needs. 4.2 Establish a Universal Call for Projects process sufficiently flexible for applicants to construct and implement projects responsive to identified needs in.a broad range of ways. 4.3 Establish processes by which implemented projects are evaluated with successes and failures reported. A.M IL1 January 2008 page.119 243 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Table 8-1 VISION IMPROVED MOBILITY FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY SENIORS, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AND PERSONS OF LOW INCOME 1.1 Establish a Regional Mobility Manager capability to provide leadership on coordination around specialized transportation needs in Riverside County. 1.1.1 Identify lead agency for the Regional Mobility Manager. 1.1.2 Define roles and responsibilities of the Regional Mobility Manager. 1.1.3 Establish a strategic oversight committee, inviting highest level membership that includes but is not limited to: the public transit operators, County Departments of Public Social Services, Aging, Public Health, Behavioral Health, State Dept. of Rehabilitation, Inland Regional Center and selected County and municipal leadership. Establish a quarterly meeting schedule to oversee implementation, monitoring and promoting coordination activity. 1.1.4 Program mechanisms to promote coordination, including subarea coordination working groups, annual resource inventory updating, regularly scheduled workshops with expanded training opportunities, and projects to be implemented by partner agencies. 1.1.5 Continue expanding participating stakeholders/ planning partners and establish ongoing mechanisms for communication via email, surface mail and other strategies, utilizing these as one method of updating the inventory. 1.1.6 Promote visibility for the Regional Mobility Manager role through e- newsletters and other tools, promoting understanding of this as a portal of access into coordinated specialized transportation solutions for the target populations across Riverside County: 1.2 Establish the Regional Mobility Manager's role in developing, "growing" and strengthening projects responsive to coordination goals and objectives. 1,2.1 Work at the agency and project levels to promote and identify potential coordination projects, working with participants and grant applicants to design effective projects. 1.2.2 Establish a technical assistance capability for the Regional Mobility Manager to consistently provide technical support to human service agency transportation programs related to service efficiency, effectiveness and safety. 244 January 2008 page 122 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 1.3 Promote sub -regional mobility managers in Western Riverside, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley through the Call for Projects and through outreach by RegionalMobility Manager. 1.3.1' Identify, promote and develop sub -regional mobility managers for geographic areas, within and between service systems to promote coordination. 1.3.2 Establish formalized relationships between the. Regional Mobility Manager and sub -regional mobility managers to ensure collaboration. 1.3.3 Identify specific action areas and activities by which the Regional Mobility Manager and the sub -regional mobility manager(s) will work together to promote the Coordination Plan vision and goals. 1.4 Promote human services agency -level mobility managers through the Call for Projects and through outreach by Regional Mobility Manager. 1.4.1 Identify, promote and develop agency -level mobility managers within service systems to promote coordination. 1.4.2 Develop and promote joint training opportunities bringing together human service and public transit personnel, including drivers, maintenance, information specialists and including all levels of mobility managers. 1.5 Develop visibility around specialized transportation issues and needs, encouraging high level political and agency leadership. 1.5,1 Conduct an annual summit of highest leadership levels among stakeholder partners to promote coordination successes, collaborative activities and to address outstanding policy issues in specialized transportation. 1.5.2 Develop the inventory database into an agency -level "partnership" tool, encouraging participation at all levels, using web -based and paper tools. 'AMR 41045 January 2008 page 123 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 2.1 Promote the QUANTITY of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation provided in each of the three apportionment areas, 2.1.1 Review pass policies and pass distribution to get more trips to low income persons and Public Social Services' consumers; include in the review such affected stakeholder partners as The Volunteer Center, the public operators and the Dept. of Public Social Services. 2,1,2 Promote public transit policies to expand availability of transportation options into late night, earlier in the mornings, on Saturdays and on Sundays, through pilot Immediate Needs/Same Day transportation programs, 2.1.3 Strengthen the service provision capabilities of small operators, through the Call for Projects by promoting technology solutions, including brokered specialized transportation, creation of tools that enable agencies to pool resources or utilize centralized functions, and Increase quantity of trips available through increased efficiency. 2.1.4 Identify and encourage private sector responses to address specialized transportation needs, including taxi, jitney and commercial operator options. 2.2 Promote the QUALITY of public transit, paratransit and specialized transportation through strategies to Improve services with attention to meeting Individualized needs. 2.2.1 Promote transit fare reciprocity discussions between and among Riverside County's public transit operators and identify strategies to improve the seamlessness of the ride between transit providers, 2.2.2 Promote successful technology applications to improve on -time performance for both public paratranslt providers and human services transportation providers, also addressing customer communication; trip scheduling and same -day reservation capabilities of paratransit. 2.2.3 Establish driver training programs, tools, modules or resources that emphasize effectively meeting individualized needs of the target populations. 2.2.4 Promote coordination with rail and aviation modes of transport, with attention to specialized transportation needs and issues. 2.2.5 Promote coordinated systems solutions to special needs groups; e.g. Dialysis patients, grandparents raising grandchildren, incarcerated homeless. 2.2.6 Promote specialized transportation applications to address door-to-door, door -through -door and escorted transportation needs. 246 January 408 page 124 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report. 2.3 Develop strategies for improving transportation solutions between county subareas and between counties. 2.3.1 Promote pilot solutions to address the following corridors! areas: -Blythe to Indio and return - Blythe to Riverside and return - outside of Palo Verde Transit's existing service area -to rural areas in the southeastern Coachella Valley, including Mecca, Salton City, Thermal and Indian Hills; to the northeast including Windy; Point and Sky Valley, and to Idyllwild. - between Banning and Beaumont, east to Cabazon, Morongo Casino and Palm Springs; west to Riverside Regional Medical Center. - in Western Riverside county unserved pockets that may include Homeland, beyond the Corona and Norco city limits, areas adjacent to Quail Valley, Perris and Lake Elsinore, and Anza and the Ortega Highway. - between various parts of Riverside County and regional medical facilities in San Bernardino County. 2.3.2 Collect data to document needs and identify potential strategies to address mobility needs of hidden populations, including agricultural workers. 2.3.3. Promote use of volunteers through Call for Projects opportunities that extend innovative solutions to specialized transportation connectivity needs. 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies. 2.4.1 Strengthen the service provision capabilities of small operators, through the Call for Projects by promoting coordination around support functions such as centralized maintenance, joint vehicle procurement, parts or supplies procurement or purchase of insurance, collaborative vehicle washing and joint fueling. 2.4.2 Promote maintenance -related projects including vehicle maintenance programs for human services agencies and small operators. 2.4.3 Identify and distribute liability insurance options for human service organizations, including general liability for vehicle operations and for volunteer - based programs: • January 2008 page 125 • • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 2.4 Support transportation services provided by human services agencies, cont'd. 2.4.4 For transit support functions (e.g. maintenance, rider information, travel training) develop, encourage and promote cooperative relationships between public transit providers and human services organizations through workshop settings, special projects, and other strategies. 2.4.5 Establish basic reporting tools, including driver logs, dispatch logs and standardized definitions of terms that can be easily adopted by human services agencies to report on transportation provided and monitor trends. 2.4.6 Encourage the use of basic reporting tools by human services agencies through all possible means, including the Call for Projects and liaison with other human services funding sources (e.g. Inland Counties Regional Center, Dept. of Public Social Services, Headstart, Dept, of Behavioral Health , Public Health and others). 2.5 Promote capital improvements to support safe, comfortable, efficient rides for the target populations. 2.5.1 Promote the broadest range of capital projects to improve the users' riding experience, including support for bus shelters, benches, lighting at stops, information technology at stops and on vehicles, and safe boarding strategies. 2,5.2 Promote capital expense for vehicles, vehicle maintenance, vehicle loaner and vehicle back-up projects that ensure safe and accessible services to the target populations. 2,6 Measure the quantities of trips provided in Riverside County, through new and existing procedures. 2.6.1. Promote full participation in the annual inventory process and develop other means of achieving more comprehensive and more accurate counts of publicly -supported specialized transportation programs. 2.6.2 Require completed inventory forms by all applicants to the Call for Projects in order to include them in the specialized transportation database. 2.6.3 Require successful Call for Projects' applicants to report on actual trips/services provided against service goals they may have established. 2.6.4 Establish other mechanisms to improve the accuracy of counting trips provided by human services organizations to the target populations. 248 January 2008 page 126 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 3.1 Integrate and promote existing information strategies, including 211/ 511, web -based tools and paper products to get transit and specialized transportation information to consumers. 3.1.1 Integrate the multiplicity of transportation information resources available, with attention to 211 / 511 opportunities in relation to the information needs of the target populations and their caseworkers, working through existing, regionally -oriented information systems. 3.1.2 Test information applications through regional; systems -level and agency level pilot projects to promote existing transit for the target populations. 3.2 Develop information portal tools for wide distribution of information. 3.2.1. Create information tools oriented to direct human service agency staff, aiding them in accessing specialized transportation services on behalf of their consumers. 3.2.2 Improve methods of information distribution by working through existing RCTC and transit operators' consumer advisory groups as well as human services agency advisory bodies, 3.2.3 Ensure that the Regional Mobility Manager's information tools are maintained and kept current with service changes, establishing standardized mechanisms by which public operators and Measure A providers advise the Mobility Manager(s) of anticipated service changes. 3.2.4 Invite through the Calls for Projects strategies that establish, promote, enhance and extend transit and specialized transit Information portals. 3.3 Promote Information opportunities for human services staff and direct service workers and expand travel training options for consumers. 3.3.1 Develop and promote transit introduction modules and materials, to provide periodic training to agency level staff on transportation options across Riverside County, and addressing connections to neighboring counties. 3.3.2 Hold periodic transit workshops, distributed geographically across the county, to keep human services personnel current with available transportation resources and information tools. 3.3.3 Invite through the Cali for Projects expanded travel training and mobility training projects geared to any consumer subgroup among the target populations to promote transit and build consumers' skills in transit use. January 2008 page 127 4049 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 3.4 Report on project successes and impacts at direct service levels, at sub -regional level and at county wide levels; pursue opportunities to promote project successes at state and federal levels 3.4,1 Document performance on a range of measures to include cost- effectiveness, responsiveness to consumer needs, consumer satisfaction levels and responsiveness to agency requirements. 3.4.2 Identify successes; as well as poor performance, and report on specialized transportation projects and solutions that are effective. 3.4.3 Monitor and report on implementation over the "project life" of individual projects, providing technical assistance as appropriate. 4,1 Work to establish non -emergency medical transportation policies and more cost-effectively meet medically -related trip needs. 4,1.1 Participate in activities promoting NEMT policy changes to California's MediCal reimbursement to support need -based and not simply functionality - based tests, including inviting in public transit providers as MediCal providers. 4.2 Establish a Universal Cali for Projects process sufficiently flexible for applicants to construct and Implement projects responsive to identified needs in a broad range of ways. 4.2.1 Ensure that the Call for Project design has sufficiently flexibility to incorporate all available funding sources and to encourage projects innovatively responding to needs in the broadest possible ways. 4.2.2 Require that project applicants identify specific coordination strategies between or within public transit and human services systems to promote the Plan's goals and objectives. 4.2.3 Promote technical assistance, building upon the Section 5310 approach of providing significant technical assistance to prospective applicants, during and after the Call announcement to improve the quality of the project proposals and to ensure Federal compliance. 4.3 Establish processes by which implemented projects are evaluated with successes and failures reported. 4.3.1 Ensure that measurable goals are established for all projects, potentially inviting applicants to set forth the measurable goals against which they wish their projects to be assessed. 4.3.2 Collect ongoing data on coordination projects implemented, assessing projects against goals which agencies themselves may establish. 4.3.2 Identify and report on success, as well as poor performance for projects, e.g. cost-effectiveness and responsiveness to consumer needs. a•N•hi. 250 January 2008 page 128 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report 8.6 SEQUENCING AND PRIORITIZATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS Public. transit and human service agency/organization transportation resources in Riverside County, documented as an element of this plan, are extensive and substantially funded. Nevertheless, this plan proposes the enhancement and improvement of the existing network of services through coordination — specifically for seniors, persons with disabilities and low income individuals. A "vision" for coordination has been developed to facilitate improved mobility for these target populations. To accomplish this vision, several dozen implementing actions and strategies have been detailed in Table 8-1, with the expectation that there will be incremental implementation and refinement of actions and strategies over the next few years. The strategies outlined in the table should be viewed as guidance for public transit and human service agencies; actual projects developed by these agencies and organizations will be based upon their specificneeds. resources and ability and willingness to work to establish coordination relationships and projects with others: Phases of implementation activity are recommended, as follows. Phase 1— Coordination Leadership and Infrastructure (Goal 1) Riverside County Regional Mobility Manager (RMM) The establishment and implementation of the Regional Mobility Manager (RMM) function and gradual implementation of sub -regional mobility managers/activities in at least three subregions in the county are the fundamental recommendations of the coordinated plan. Given the size of Riverside County and the rate of projected growth in the targeted populations over the next few years, the regional mobility manager is envisioned to play a major role in furthering coordination efforts and has been proposed as an important element of RCTC Visioning process. It will be important that this entity remains flexible and innovative in its approaches to coordination, as its role will vary depending nature of the strategy, plan or activity to be accomplished. This role will include but is not limited to, serving in a number of capacities as partner, broker and/or coordinator of projects, plans and programs. The RMM with its multiplicity of roles can serve as the translator and liaison between the two systems toward the goal of mobility improvement for the target populations. The RMM supported by subregional mobility managers will form the central cooperative mechanism for implementation of regional and locally developed coordinated plans and programs. It is recommended that the RMM, including the governance or technical advisory body discussed in the detail following section, be created within one to two years following completion of the coordination plan. The mobility manager construct for Riverside County will to a large degree assume the persona of the responsible; lead agency or independent entity. Organizationally mobility management can be accomplished in any number of ways which include, but may not be limited to: 1.) Integration of a new functional unit, section or division within an existing agency/organization; or 2.) Creation of a new and separate organization/entity established. specifically for mobility management purposes. January 2008 page 129 251 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report The project team anticipates that decisions conceming the exact structural, govemance and legal framework of the RMM will be made by RCTC in consultation with the county's public transit operators and human service agencies and organizations. The RMM should serve to further the goals outlined in the coordination plan, implement or seek implementation of projects that have regional implications (e.g., countywide marketing and information, training and education programs, etc.) and expand efforts to encourage relationships between public transit and human service agencies throughout the county. RMM responsibilities should also include provision of technical, educational and information assistance to agencies and organizations involved in subregional mobility management activities at the local level to ensure consistency of coordinated plans, projects and programs. The RMM should initially serve as the clearinghouse for development of information and technical transportation resources that can increase the knowledge base of both public transit and human service agencies and organizations about transportation services operating and available within the county as a whole, through creation of county -wide information resources and reference materials (i.e. county -wide transportation services website, regional transportation services reference materials, etc.). As coordination efforts begin to evolve and as the needs of the target populations increase, the role of the RMM can conceivably be expanded to broker transportation services and/or to directly provide specialized trips for hard -to -serve segments of the target populations that are not currently being served. Overview of the RMM Advisory Group 46 In order to ensure that the RMM will remain committed to the development and implementation of a proactive transportation coordination agenda, it is recommended that the advisory body of. public transit and human service agencies and organizations be only those that are willing and interested in working together over the long term to accomplish coordination objectives aimed at addressing specialized transportation needs in Riverside County. Therefore, those agencies and organizations electing to participate in the RMM advisory group would conceivably: ❑ Be representatives of organizations, agencies and entities with an interest and commitment to address issues relative to the target populations' transportation needs; ❑ Be willing to contribute matching financial resources for plans, projects or programs that are beneficial to their clients and/or constituents; ❑ Have the consent and support of executive management within their own organization/agency to regularly and actively participate within the group; ❑ Be positioned to represent their agency/organizations' viewpoints, and have access to responsible decision -makers within their organization/agency; and ❑ Have some knowledge of specialized transportation issues and needs of the target populations represented by their organization/agency. January 2008 page 130 252 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report An initial outreach effort may need to be conducted to solicit and solidify stakeholder organization/agency interest in participation on an advisory body/committee. There was a dialogue initiated during plan development with the larger public transit and human service agencies and organizations in the county. These included: public transit operators such as Riverside Transit Agency and SunLine Transit Agency, the Department of Public Social Services (DPSS), Inland Valley Regional Center, Department of Behavioral Heafth, First Five Riverside, Department of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, etc. This dialogue was designed to ascertain their stake and potential interest in transportation issues and their willingness to work toward a coordinated "mix" of solutions with other agencies/organizations. In addition, it is also important to encourage the participation of smaller agencies and organizations within the RMM framework. The RMM advisory body is initially envisioned as a cooperative strategic working group that operates on a volunteer basis, and is collectively convened to provide guidance to the RMM on transportation coordination issues, plans, programs and projects. However, depending upon howthe RMM is initially structured, governance and legal responsibility of the RMM may or may not be delegated to this group. The advisory body as deemed appropriate may gradually progress toward a greater degree of legal oversight and responsibility in future years. It is recommended that the RMM working with the advisory body develop an "action- oriented" agenda that will guide their work activities for the first year. The agenda could focus initially on the coordinated plan goals, objectives and strategies outlined above. Meetings of the advisory body should be regularly scheduled to continue progress toward achievement of established goals and objectives, and to ,ensure that the group remains focused, organized and functional. The size of this advisory group will depend upon the interest and level of commitment demonstrated by stakeholder organizations - and agencies. Continuing the "After Plan" Stakeholder Dialogue Although working with others is definitely not a new concept, the ability to build cooperative relationships between agencies and organizations that ultimately leads to viable coordinated transportation projects can be daunting. Due in large part to institutional differences between the public transit and human service sectors, resistance to the concepts of coordination can limit the willingness of stakeholders to begin the "dialogue" that must take place for projects to be developed. As an element of the stakeholder involvement process, the project team facilitated three project development workshops designed to begin the conversations around coordinated transportation project ideas and assist in the development of project priorities. The workshops also were designed to "jump-start" the networking between the two systems. These sessions were successful in that they allowed public transit and human service agency/organization stakeholders to work together to identify issues inherent in developing the selected project scenarios, and helped them to understand the level of commitment necessary between partners to develop coordinated projects. Although the workshops were a good start to begin the coordination dialogue in the county, efforts must be continued to facilitate on -going constructive conversation between the two January 2008 page /3/ 253 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report systems. As stated previously, the responsibilities of the RMM will include a functional element of technical assistance designed to clear the path to coordination on many levels within the county. Subregional Mobility Manager Concept It has been demonstrated that although regional responses to planning can be effective in establishing the infrastructure needed to effectuate coordinated actions, knowledge of the transportation needs at the subregional level can serve to support the regional goals and more adequately address individualized needs. The continued growth of the target populations in Riverside County and their diverse needs warrants a comprehensive approach that employs a "bottoms -up" coordinated strategic framework. Even during the development of the coordination plan,; stakeholder agencies and organizations in various geographic areas of the county expressed interest in assuming active roles in improving mobility options, and some agencies and organizations have already initiated efforts to evaluate coordination opportunities. These early efforts are encouraging and should be commended. Conceivably, a subregional mobility manager could be a public transit agency or organization, a human service agency or organization or a representative non-profit or not -for -profit partnership of both agency/organization types within the same subregion or local area. To be effective in serving the needs of local populations, subregional mobility management activities should be undertaken in at least three geographic areas of Riverside County (i.e. Western Riverside, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley). There will likely be a gradual developmental process to build the "will" of these public transit and human service agencies and organizations to develop and maintain viable coordinated partnerships. At a minimum, the RMM should work to promote coordinated planning and project development activities, consistent with the plan in the geographic areas mentioned above. Although the RMM will work to encourage coordination activities throughout the county, the willingness of public transit and human service stakeholder agencies and organizations within each sub -area to develop and seek funding for coordinated plans and projects within their respective geographic areas, will ultimately dictate where subregional mobility managers will reside. As previously mentioned, these subregional agencies and organizations are envisioned to work cooperatively with and support the RMM in the development of plans and projects within their subregion or geographic area, as well as, participate as active members of the RMM advisory body to assist in formulation of coordinated countywide strategies. Phase I/II — Capacity Building/Information Portals Strategies (Goals 2, 3 and 4) Concurrent with and following the full "build out" of transportation coordination activities in Riverside County, including the implementation of the RMM and subregional counterparts, opportunities to develop coordinated projects that can begin to address the needs of the target populations should be pursued. The project team believes that there are a few "basic" strategies and project concepts that can be developed early, that will work to support and promote the framework of a coordinated transportation environment, and that can be funded in the near -term (i.e. 1-5 years). IMMA January 2008 page 132 254 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Therefore, the project team recommends that the RMM and/or other public transit and human services agencies/organizations explore the feasibility of instituting and/or implementing one or more of these strategies/project concepts at the regional and/or subregional level, as applicable. These strategies and project concepts include: AM MA ❑ Develop a results -oriented mobility -focused transportation coordination agenda for the RMM consistent with the coordination plan that will guide the organizations' work activities for the first year. The agenda should, at a minimum incorporate the following elements: o Planning and trip data collection strategies to ensure that plans, projects and programs implemented are successful in "bridging the gap" between target populations' needs and transportation resources; o Stakeholder and client/consumer transportation information and education o Investigation and gradual procurement of existingtransportation technologies necessary to effectively implement service -related coordination strategies; and o Leveraging financial support for coordinated mobility management activities. ❑ Conduct an annual inventory/survey process to continue to grow the coordinated transportation framework. This activity will serve to ensure that the data and information on transportation services, resources and needs is regularly updated. This in turn will provide a relatively sound basis for coordinated planning activities. The database can also be modified to serve as the nucleus for development of a regional website. ❑ Establish a regional transportation website that will serve the central portal for the dissemination of information on transportation services within the county. ❑ Implementation of a Travel Training program for agencies/organizations staff and their clients. Create and/or expand upon a'county-wide or subregional Travel Training program. There are existing travel training programs at the local level which could be expanded and/or used as a model for this type of program. This strategy will encourage greater utilization of services for those in the target populations who can and would use public transportation. Human service agencies/organizations' staff desiring to arrange transportation or refer their clients to transit, as well as new and prospective clients and customers needing to travel to their various destinations, would be candidates for training, participating in group training sessions. ❑ Develop a data collection process designed to assist human service agencies and organizations operating transportation and their contractors to establish trip counting procedures to ensure accuracy and consistency in accounting for senior, persons with disabilities and low-income trips provided throughout the county. At a minimum human service agencies should be collecting data in the following categories: • One-way passenger hoardings • Passenger pick-up and drop-off points by zip code January 2008 page 133 255 • • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • Passenger pick-up and drop-off points by street address • Passenger trip purpose • Time of day The design of data collection methodologies should reflect an understanding of the issues relative to collecting and reporting certain categories of client information relative to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Act (i.e. street address, etc.). Implementation of this type of project will provide information on the level of services operated in the county, and will help to identify patterns of travel. This will also encourage participation of human service agencies as partners with public transit in the planning and development of coordinated services. Effective transportation data collection can also be used as justification for RCTC in their efforts to increase financial support and resources from Federal and State agencies for transportation programs. ❑ Assess the potential to implement coordinated service delivery models in the future that employ the use of volunteer labor in a structured, close geographic setting within Riverside County. The use of volunteer drivers was reported by a small number of human service stakeholder agencies/organizations, and should be further explored for potential application in other areas of the county. This strategy effectively minimizes labor costs, thereby reducing overall service operating costs. ❑ Promote and build upon the existing centralized system to facilitate bus pass purchase programs for human service agencies. 8.7 PRIORITIES FOR PROJECT SELECTION The single most important consideration in the process to prioritize and select coordinated projects and programs for funding will lie in the project's potential to satisfactorily address and/or resolve identified transportation need(s) of the target populations. Priorities relative to the development and funding of coordinated transportation projects identified through the locally developed comprehensive unified plan should: • Adequately address the unmet/underserved and individualized transportation needs of the targeted populations; • Demonstrate coordination efforts between public transit and human service agencies and organizations; • Maintain consistency with current federal and State funding regulations and requirements; • Be financially sustainable; • Include measurable goals and objectives; January 2008 page 134 256 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report • Build and/or increase overall system capacity and service quality; and • Leverage and maximize existing transportation funding and capital resources. 8.8 COORDINATION PLANNING - OVERVIEW OF NEXT STEPS Federal guidance requires that the designated recipient of FTA Sections 5316 (Job Access and Reverse Commute) and 5317 (New Freedom) "is responsible for conducting a competitive selection process" to allocate funds from these sources. Therefore, immediately following the adoption of the final Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County, it is recommended that RCTC undertake a number of follow-on activities necessary to develop a competitive application selection process to solicit, receive, evaluate and funding applications for coordinated transportation projects county -wide for the upcoming 2008 funding cycle. Projects selected for funding must be derived from the project recommendations and guidance contained in the adopted locally developed, coordinated transportation plan. Projects approved for funding by RCTC will comprise a Program of Projects (POP) and will be incorporated into the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). It is anticipated that the JARC and New Freedom application process, although separate, will be coordinated with the Metropolitan and Statewide planning processes in Riverside County, and will be consistent with the Transit Visioning for Riverside County. As mentioned previously, since this will be the first funding cycle following the completion of the coordination plan, RCTC must first develop a comprehensive funding application package and subsequently undertake the process to solicit applications from eligible stakeholders in Riverside County. Development of JARC and New Freedom Funding Applications RCTC should develop a funding application that is understandable and "user friendly." The application should recognize the similarities of the two funding sources relative to coordination, and acknowledge the distinct elements of each funding source that are directed to a specific target population. The application should consist of two parts. Part one will have the applicant provide information about the project and the agency submitting the application. General information should be requested from applicants, such as: o Type and amount of funding requested o Applicant and/or co -applicant information (contact names, phone numbers, etc.) o An overview of the applicant agency/organization relative to the target population o A complete description of the project o Location of the project (as applicable) o Total amount of match and funding requested AM MA January 2008 257 page 135 • • Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report This general section of the application should be accompanied by part two, a funding -speck section requiring applicants to provide supplemental and descriptive narrative to describe and rationalize the proposed project or strategy, appropriate to the funding source for which they are applying. Conceivably, the funding -specific section of the application would encompass the four goals developed as elements of this plan. These goals could effectively represent general project funding categories. For example, applications would be solicited under one of the four general project categories; as follows: • Coordination Leadership and Infrastructure • $uilding Capacity • Information Portals • Coordination Policy The plan objectives and the strategies specified under each of the four goals (general funding categories) and presented in Table 8-1 will be used to instruct applicants about the types of projects that are eligible for funding under each category. The development of a funding application tied directly to the plan reflects a straightforward, logical approach toward ensuring that projects and programs submitted for funding will be wholly consistent with plan goals, objectives and strategies. Establishing Service Efficiency and Productivity Measures Coordination projects and/or programs can be categorized as either service operating projects or as other non -operating projects/strategies (e.g. vehicle and facility sharing, joint vehicle maintenance, coordinated customer information and/or marketing projects, etc.). Given the infancy of transportation coordination efforts in Riverside County, there remains some level of uncertainty about the how project efficiency, productivity and effectiveness should be measured. Since efficiency, productivity and effectiveness measures relative to specialized coordinated transportation operating projects are yet to be understood, care should be taken, at least initially, to avoid development of measures that are too stringent. Overly stringent measures may have the effect of limiting the participation of human service agencies in the coordination process. Therefore, it is recommended that any efficiency, productivity and effectiveness measures that may be included in the JARC and/or New Freedom first year funding application, be structured to allow reasonable time for achievement (e.g. reasonable increases in ridership at specified intervals throughout the duration of the project). Moreover, RCTC could conceivably require agencies and organizations to propose the means by which their projects should be evaluated for success through identification of measurable objectives that they anticipate achieving and against which they would be assessed. In the next few years, as coordinated transportation projects are funded and implemented, the appropriate responses to the issues of efficiency, productivity and effectiveness will be thoroughly explored and ultimately addressed in an equitable and appropriate fashion. IHi January 2008 page 136 258 Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan For Riverside County Final Report Technical Application Assistance for Riverside County Stakeholders The process to provide technical application assistance and information to stakeholders prior to the submittal of applications should be designed to educate and inform. This process can also be used as an opportunity to help applicants conceptualize eligible project ideas through discussion and feedback. This approach will encourage greater participation in the application process, and will likely result in the receipt of viable, fundable applications. Therefore, the project team recommends that outreach and technical application assistance to applicants applying for JARC and New Freedom funding become an integral part of the pre - application process. RCTC should conduct application workshops and/or working sessions for stakeholders in advance of the application due date, for the purposes of educating and informing these agencies and organizations about the JARC and New Freedom funding requirements and processes. 8.9 PLAN APPROVAL AND ADOPTION PROCESS The process for RCTC approval and adoption of this plan include the following activities: ❑ Presentation of the draft plan concepts to the Coordination Plan Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) ❑ Presentation of the draft plan concepts to the Riverside County Transportation Commission Executive Committee ❑ Presentation of the final plan to RCTC Board of Directors. ❑ Conduct of universal Call for Projects A111 M January 2008 page 137 259 • • • Appendices Appendix A — Stakeholder Survey Cover Letter Appendix B — Stakeholder Survey Appendix C — Project Fact Sheet for Riverside County Appendix D -- Stakeholder Survey Database Reports D-1 Stakeholder Survey Responding Agencies (n=71) D-2 Stakeholder Survey by Legal Type (n=71) D-3 Stakeholder Survey by Region (n=71) D-4 General Public Transportation Agencies and Human Services Agencies (n=66) D-5 Transportation Providers, Service by General Public Agencies and Human Services Agencies (n=43) Appendix E -- Interim Summary Matrix of Stakeholder Involvement Interviews/Workshops (10/15/07) Appendix F -- Summary of Outreach Opportunities Appendix G -- Consumer Telephone Survey Appendix H -- TRIP Program Interview Summaries Appendix I -- Stakeholder Interview Guide 260 • Riverside County Transportation Commission May 15, 2007 Appendix - A There are exciting opportunities on the horizon to improve mobility for those with special needs in Riverside County created through new Federal legislation known as the Safe, Affordable, Flexible and Efficient Transportation Equity Act — A Legacy for Users ((SAFETEA-LU). This legislation provides guidance and funding resources to public transportation and health and human service agencies and organizations over the next seven years, under the auspices of the New Freedom initiative. This initiative promotes transportation coordination efforts designed to improve the mobility of consumers whose transportation needs are not easily met. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is developing a Public Transit — Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County designed to address unmet specialized transportation needs throughout the county. Seniors, persons with disabilities and persons of low income are the focus of this plan. A stakeholder outreach process has been developed to ensure involvement of the myriad of public transit and human and social service agencies and organizations within the county, and includes administration of a survey to assess transportation needs and resources, as well as, meetings and working sessions with agency/organization representatives and consumers throughout the county to discuss and document their views and perspectives on coordination issues. Towards this end, we respectfully request that you take time to respond to the survey on behalf of your agency/organization. Please complete and return the survey to us by Friday, June 15, 2007. The completed survey can be returned by regular mail in the enclosed envelope or faxed to: A-M-M-A 306 Lee Avenue Claremont, California 91711 Fax: (909) 621-9387 The survey should be completed by agencies providing transportation and agencies serving clients needing transportation. Your input is valued and critical to the success of the project. Please respond promptly so that your agency/organization can participate in new Federal Funding opportunities through SAFETEA-LU (both new and existing programs) on behalf of your client/consumer base. Should you have questions related to the survey or the project, please contact Heather Menninger at (909) 621-3101, or Judith Norman at (310) 608-2005. Thank you for your cooperation. Sincerely, Eric Haley Executive Director 261 • J. PLEASE IDENTIFY THE PRIMARY CLIENT POPVT.ATION YOUR AGENCY SERVES: (chick ail that aFPb) ❑ Senior: able-bodied. 0 Persons with physical disabriiries- 0 Person with behavioral disabilities -D. Persons with sensory impairments Riverside County Tronsporloftatn Commission PUBLIC TRANSIT - HUMAN SE TRANSPORTATION COORDI FOR RIVERSITIF COUNTY - Summer 2007 Contact Name: Title_ Telephone_ Fax: E-Mail: resale a, brieff descsip 2_ YOUR AGENCY © Private far profit 3 Private. acnianfrt ❑ Chmch affiliated ".. Agency Name: Site Andress_ Mailing Address: may= Zip code_ Appendix — B NP ganizettion or program. (Yon may also attach a brochure or at tern k one only), Q Tnhal orgeniamon ©: Politic Agemy 3_ NUMBER OF ACTIVE CLIENTS ON YOUR AGENCY'S ROSIER LIVING WITHIN RIVYRRIDP.COUNTY # Tors[ client J consumers vomited or on caseload lists Average daily em>adanm #- Fiat_ on site daily who require transports wan assistance. # Est. cm site daily in wheelchairs Not applicable.(check mark avid') Ci Seniors,, bat Ci Penmen of low income n Youth `i Other a General public 5_. PLEASE SPECIFY temTRANS-PO RTATTOPiNEEDS THAT ARE MOST OFTEN CClMMUIOCATEU TO YOU BY YOUR CLIENT BASE: (thick nli that apAtj Getting to work between Sam - Spa '.©. Lace night or earlymorning Arco& shifts 0 Weekend and holiday trips G Recreational .R nal ae.rmerg rl or s 0 Visiting&Ma or ftismel5. ❑ Kids to day cam to st_hooF G Going to the doctor J medical trips C Shopping andrimI iple errand d trips Ct Attending training, ednrctiau classes or program sites G Long distance trips ins purposes of C. Odom 6. A N : PORTATIOY operated, contracted, or arranged 1] PU13LIC TR ANSYF provided vo the general public © OPERATE trimpactauoo trik full vemonsrl„7uy for dm transportation by this agency CI CONTRACTfor transportation. services provided by another entity undm contract to ibis trywnry SII SEDI T.F transportation through agency ptrchase of passes, fares -or_miles_ reimbursement ARRANGE FOR public or private transportation by assisting with iaivsnsation but clients responsible for follow-up Cl ARRANGE FOR volunteer drives or mime ear Other (02asc rpsci))j 7_ AeFLAT PRIMARY BARRIERS TO ACCESSING aadlar COORDIirATLNG TRANSPORTATION EXIST FOR YOUR AGENCY or ORGANFLriTION? j3 FaSR REMELT.' list SURVEY IN TEE ENCLOSED. ADDRESSED ENVELOPE TCt 1T4A(9E9)631-9311.ca rraaaxr- anaaa39641paariblisluars 262 Awvoy CSAsrrmnr, CA ill 11 TRANXPORTATICYN SURVEY. Pam 2 9. PLEASE LND1CATE YOUR AREAS OF ENTEREST 7'0 COORDINATE TRANSPORTATION' (check all that apply): 0 Scant use, pooling, ca sharing of vehicles among organizations 0 Coordinated service °pennons DI Coordinated vehicle sad capital purchases 0 Slurred fueling facilities 0 Shared maintenance facdities lonitt purclsase of supplies or equipment 0 Joint purchase of insurance 0 Coordinzted trip schedularg =Afar dispachmg Coordinated dciver training and ramining programs Contracting out for service rather than direct operations 0 Contracting So provide transportation to atter agencies Poo/in of Emends' resources to better coordinate service 0 Not imam -nett ia ceardination activities at this time 0 Other 10_ HOW MANY VEHICT FS 130 YOU HAVE FOR CUSTOMER TRANSPORTATION, 11 HOW MANY VEHICLES Amy USED TO PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION ON AN AVERAGE DAY? 12. NUMBER A.ND CAPACITY OF VEHIC1.ES: A_ 0 of vehicles serving 9 or fearer passengers B. of vehicles for 10 - 14 passengers C. f of vehicles for 15 — 24 passengers D. 0 of vehicles for 25 passengers as more E_ Toad 0 of vehicles Lift -equipped 13. HOW MANY OF YOUR VF-H1CLES NEED TO BE REPLACED? Now Within a year Within the next two years 14. PASSENGER LOAD AND VEHICLE UTILIZATION Please tell us about the lerkarre qrsaruice 'rut provide- Aversge # Diane -way passenger tips per MONTH Cosmties each atesed-tuperr pj oee-sraypsemensal tripe soar oce trip each time a palialalglat boards the vehicle A9a9-age # of vehicle miles per moprra &MEM coczehlyzemehec of ream esevoks1 by yeterested flag to ireaspest cities:. 15_ TRAnaaTORTATION SERVICE ARV - ElPieose describe service area, lining cities, if myopias' re E3 Throughout Ric erside Cranny 16_ DAYS AND HOURS OF OPERATION: °aerating Hams Illereadays First Ilick-op Lae Pick-up 17_ DO YOU LIMIT lilt TYPES OF TRIPS YOi7 PROVIDE TO PEOPLE? ON° ©Yes, please explain 121_ DRIVERS ANTI, MANAGEMENT FOR TRANSPORT: 0 Fad Time Drivers # Volunteer Drivers 0 Part Trine Drivers *SupermsersiMgre 19_ COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS/ARRANGEMENTS? Do you have any finamel or informal cooperative 98691C8 agreements/arrangements for wormwood:car? O No Cl Yes, cooperative egreements/arrangementsuvidf 20_ TRANSPORTATION BUDGET: (Curiteullizalyear) For vehicle operuticas Wren, mann., fuel) For whelp replamsurmst capital funds Fat hos passes, tickets or Miens Far tazi vouchers / other specataed tamp. services $ Adm33091T60031 (advertising. maketurg Insurance Mileage rennisarsesoeut Other (phase specter) 21_ FUNDDIG SOURCES FOR TRANSPORTATION BUDGET (Indicate source and him% other as oppromaig) County/Loral Funding Federal Fandine D General Funds Q FFA section 5307 D Other D Other State Fundiur Turesp_ Oet.,__atAct D Ranation Department Di Dept Developments/ Services Dept 0fAeel- 0 Dept. ofRefelidilstion D Dept_ offleahls Services D Other DOther D FFA sectar 5310 (vehicle4 D FTA maim 5311 LI Came D69. Rlork Grano 0 Health and 13001e13 Services. D Other Other Fending 0 Client Fees 0 Plisse Dreitions /Chants 0 United Way D Fan bon - 0 Other 22_ COMPARED '1'0 LAST YEAR, DID YOURAGENCli TRANSPORTATION BUDGET? D Increase 0 Deanne Stay the sage 23 WILL YOUR AGENCY CONTINUE ITS CLIENT TRANSPORTATION OVER THE NEXT 5 YEARS* 0Yes 0 No 0 Unsure PLEASERETURN-11M SIALVEY INTEE ENCLOSED. ADDRESSED ENVELOPE:Pa A-M-14-11306 Las Ave. Clasexcest, CA 9-1711 RAE: (909) 623-9387 or MAIL: acema306@earthlt 263 • Riverside County Transportation Commission 2007 PUBLIC -TRANSIT HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY Riverside County's Response to the Coordinated Transportation Planning Requirements of SAFETEA-LU [Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Act, A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Public Law 109-059] The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has responsibility for preparing the "locally developed plan" which will prioritize and plan for use of funds in Riverside County under: -- New Freedom Program (Section 5317) -- Job Access 8 Reverse Commute (Section 5316) -- Seniors and Persons with Disabilities capital program (Section 5310) This plan develops a "unified comprehensive strategy for public transportation service delivery through a coordinated planning process to address unmet needs of target populations. [SAFETEA-LU) TARGET POPULATIONS OF COORDINATION PLAN: ➢ Persons with disabilities ➢ Elderly individuals ➢ Individuals of low-income TECHNICAL ADVISORY GROUP: Representatives of agencies and organizations in Riverside County with responsibility for different members of the target populations will meet at key points during the project to review its progress and findings between May and October 2007. Persons interested in participating may contact Tanya Love at RCTC (951) 787-7141. Appendix C COORDINATION PLAN GOALS: 1. To create a locally developed coordination plan that identifies service gaps and duplication of services. 2. To involve stakeholders in a coordinated planning process. 3. With input from stakeholders, to develop competitive project selection from the coordinated plan 4. To establish criteria for sub -recipient solvency. 5. To ensure that projects comply with regional and state planning documents (TIP and STIP). 6. To coordinate project evaluation methods and create a budget for long-term grants management. COORDINATION PLAN COMPONENTS: - OUTREACH MEETINGS AND SURVEY Various local outreach activities will seek to identify parties in Riverside County who are "interested, willing and able" to support coordination of specialized transportation. - EXISTING ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT Identifying demographics and transit resources that provide a context for coordination opportunities. - APPLICABLE COORDINATION MODELS Identifying national models that bring knowledge to Riverside County about coordination successes. - FOCUS GROUPS AND PUBLIC WORKSHOPS Extending outreach efforts to consumers and agency representatives. - NEEDS ASSESSMENT Barriers, duplication and gaps in service for the target populations are analyzed to suggest coordination responses - DRAFT AND FINAL PLAN TIMEFRAMES: Outreach Efforts Summer - Fall 2007 Draft and Final Plan - Fall/Winter 2007 264 Organization 1 Axiom Counseling Team Riverside County Transportation Commission Responding Agencies Name ADDRESS Steve Wells 6887 Magnolia Ave. Riverside Appendix D-1 PHONE 925C6 (951)369-526CHS 2 Basic Occupational Training Center Mitzi Yodites 1323 Jet Way Perris 92571 (951)657-80281E 3 Boys 8 Girls Club Of Desert Hot Springs ADAMJeanette Jaime 66150 8TH ST Desert Hot Springs92240 (760) 329-131218 4 CalWorks GAIN Program -Elizabeth Hawkins 44-199 Monroe Street, Ste. D Indio 92201 _ (760) 863-2928iS 5 Care A Van Transit - Prime of Life, Mary Jo Ramirez P.O. Box 1301 San Jacinto 92583 (951) 765-9671HS 6 Care Connexxus, Inc. Adult Day Services Jeanne Klingenberger 4130 Adams St., Ste. B Riverside 92501 (951) 509-2500-1S 7 Catholic Charities Belinda Marquez P.O. Box 119 Moreno Valley 925M (951) 784-5020-IS 8 Celebrity Tours LLC WILLIAM DAVIS 4751 E PALM CANYON DR, Palm Springs 922E4 (760) 770-2700CTO STE D 9 City of Banning - Public Owen Cardes P.O. Box 998 Banning 92221 (951)922-313CGP 10 City of Corona Maria Aranguiz 400 S. Vicentia Ave. Corona 928E2 (951)279-3763GP 11 City of Moreno Valley John Kerenyi P.O. Box 88005 Moreno Valley 925@ (951) 413-314CHS 12 City of Riverside - Special Transportation Vanessa Jezik 3900 Main St. Riverside 9252 (951) 351-6182GP 13 Coachella Valley Resue Mission Sue Meyers P.O. Box 10660 Indio 922@ (760) 347-351MS 14 Coachella Valley Taxi Owners Association Sergio Santo P.O. Box 5451 Palm Springs 92263 (760) 778-5156CTO 15 Community Access Center Paul Van Doren 6848 Magnolia Ave., Ste. 150Riverside 92516 (951) 274-0358iS 16 Community Assistance Program Jerry Casillas 24594 Sunnymead Blvd., Ste. W Moreno Valley ' 92553 (951) 485-779MS 17 Corona - Norco Settlement House Sally Carlson 507 South Vicentia Ave Corona 9281'2 (909) 737-35041S 18 Corona Senior Center Leona Sparks 921 S. Bell Ave Corona 928T (951)-736-2363iS 19 Corona United Methodist Church Diane Ereino 114 E 10TH ST Corona 92873 (951)7375225-1S 20 DaVita - Corona Dialysis Eveleen DiMaggio, 1820 Fullerton Ave., Ste. 180 Corona MSW 92881 (951)736-6660-15 21 DaVita Magnolia West Dialysis (2012) R Addo 11161 Magnolia Ave. Riverside 925C5 (951)351-809CHS 22 DaVita Montclair Dialysis Kris Podley 5050 Palo Verde, Ste. 100 Montclair 91763 (909)625-03391S 23 DaVita Riverside Dialysis Center Adrian Torres 4361 Latham St., Ste. 100 Riverside 92501 (951) 682-27001S 24 Daybreak Adult Daycare Services Kay Perryman 1075 North State St. Hemet 92543 (951)791-3556HS 25 Dept. of Veterans Services Bill Densmore 1153A Spruce Street Riverside 92507 (951)955-301CHS 26 Desert Blind and Handicapped Association, Indanny Tucker 800 Vella Road, Ste. B Palm Springs 92263 (760) 323-4414iS 27 Desert Hills Alzheimers Special Care Center Trudy Hendricks 25818 Columbia St. Hemet 92544 (951)652-1837HS 28 Desert Samaritans For The Elderly Michael Bamard P.O. Box 10967 Palm Desert 92259 (760) 837-9068-1S 29 DPSS - Administration - County Wide EmploymDeNid Terrell Service ' 4060 County Circle Drive Riverside 92503 (951)358-595CHS 30 Eddie Dee Smith Senior Center Lynne Craig 5188 Mission Blvd. Riverside 92503 (951) 275-9975-IS 31 Eisenhower Five Star Club Stacey Smith 42-201 Beacon Hill, Ste. A Palm Desert 92211 (760)836-02321S 32 Express Transportation Systems Mesfm Shawel P.O. Box 409 Covina 91723 (951)222-2291CTO 33 First 5 Riverside Michelle Burroughs 2002 Iowa Ave., Ste 100 Riverside 92507 (951)248-0014HS Agency Listing Alpha Respondents Page 1 of 3 1/28/2008 10:15:26 AM 265 Organization Name ADDRESS PHONE 34 Hemet GAIN Lisa Williams Hemet 92543 HS • 35 Home Instead Senior Care Sheryl Zitck 28364 Vicenl Morgan Dr, SteTemecula 92593 (951) 587-2121HS C • 36 Hospice of the Valleys Celeste Preble 28127 Bradley Road Sun City 925E6 (951) 672-1669iS 37 Independent Living Partnership for Seniors and Richard Smith Persons with Disabilities 6296 Rivercrest Drive, Ste. K Riverside 92507 (951) 867-38000th 38 Indio Senior Center Michael Moreland 45222 Towne St. Indio 92201 (760) 391-41761S - 39 Inland AIDS Project D. Joy Gould 3756 Elizabeth St. Riverside 92515 (951)346-19101S 40 Inland Empire Adult Day Health Care Barbara Portec 135 N. McKinley Ave Corona 928(951) 808-9600iS 41 Inland Faculty Medical Group Martha Knowlton 952 South Mt. Vemon Ave, Ste. Colton 92321 (909) 433-9111HS B 42 Inland Regional Center Tad Thompson P.O. Box 6127 San Bernardino 92403 (909) 890-3473iS 43 Jewish Family Service of the Inland CommunibBebbie Long 4133 10th Street Riverside 92501 (951)784-1212HS 44 Lake Elsinore Family Care Center Lillie Murvine 2499 E. Lakeshore Drive Lake Elsinore 92533 (951) 471-4201HS 45 Lake Elsinore Senior Center - CARE Program Arline Gulbransen 420 Lakeshore Dr. Lake Elsinore 92533 (951) 674-2520-1S 46 Magnolia Rehabilitation & Nursing Center Savila Eftekhari 8133 Magnolia Ave: Riverside 92501 (951) 688-4321HS 47 Mainstream Tours Lorraine Von Deauxplette 26246 Kalmia Ave Moreno Valley 92555 (951) 924-9744CTO 48 Martha's Village and Kitchen Claudia Castorena 83791 Date Ave. Indio 92201 ' (760) 347-4741HS 49 MFI Recovery Center Lisa Molina P.O. Box 4187 Riverside 92501 (951)683-65901S 50 Palo Verde Unified School District Patricia Bolton 295 N 1ST ST Blythe 922Z (760)922-13220th 51 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency K. George Colangeli 125 W. Murphy Street Blythe 922Z (760) 922-1140;P 52 PPMC - Primary Provider Management CompelEtiiena Curry 3880 Lemon SI, Ste. 300 Riverside 92501 (951) 778-6107HS 53 Riverside County Community Action Program Art Garcia 2038Iowa Ave., Suite B-102 Riverside 9256 (951) 955-4900iS 54 Riverside County Department of Mental HealthBill Brenneman 4095 County Circe Drive Riverside 92503 (951) 358-4563-IS 55 Riverside County Department of Mental Health Darwin Nedlinger 1827 Atlanta Ave., Ste. D-1 Riverside 9256 (951) 955-2109iS Adult Services 56 Riverside County Department of Mental Health John Hermanson 61297 Hobsonway Blythe Blythe 92225 (760)921-5019iS 57 Riverside County Department of Public Health Sarah Mack 4065 County Circle Riverside 92503 (951) 358-6181HS 58 Riverside County Office of Education - Children:lill Johnson Services Unit P.O. Box 868 Riverside 9253 (951)826-4881HS 59 Riverside County Office on Aging - RSVP Fran Ferguson 73750 Catalina Way Palm Desert 922E0 (760) 341-3401HS 60 Riverside County Office on Aging - TransporlarotWalsh 6296 River Cest Dr., Ste. K Riverside 9250' (951) 867-3800iS 61 Riverside County Substance Abuse Richard Martinez 1777 Atlanta Ave., Ste. G Riverside 92507 (951) 778-35001S 62 Riverside Transit Agency Mark Stanley 1825 Third Street, P.O. Box Riverside 92507 (951) 565-513MP 59968 63 Riverside/San Bernardino County Indian HealtWatty Garcia 11555 1/2 Poirero Road Banning 92220 (951) 676-6810iS 64 Senior Shuttle, Inc. Michael Finch 78208 Allegro Dr. Palm Desert 92211 (760) 837-2012HS 65 Seniors Helping Seniors Janet Meservy P.O. Box 707 Mira Loma 9173 (951) 681-57203S 66 Southern California Indian Center, Inc. Iris Snachez 1151 N. Spruce St. Riverside 9256' (951) 955-8029-IS 67 Southem California Regional Rail Authority - Joann Cadelle 700 S. Flower St., 26th Floor Los Angeles 90017 (213) 452-020MP Metrolink • Agency Listing Alpha Respondents Page 2 of 3 1/28/2008 10:15:27 AM 266 Organization Name ADDRESS PHONE 68 Stroke Recovery Center Beverly Greer 2800 E. Alejo Dr. Palm Springs 922(2 (760) 323-7676HS 69 Sun City Concem, Inc. 70 Sunline Transit Agency. Jennifer Raisch 29995 Evans Road Sun City 925E6 (951) 679-2374-IS • Eunice Lovi 32 505 HARRY OLIVER Thousand Palms 922 6 (760) 343-345EGP TRAIL 71 Sunline Transit Agency - Access Committee-Margorite Freeman 32-605 Harry Oliver Trail Thousand Palms 922(760) 798-138EHS 72 Supervisor John Tavaglione Second Dist. Donna Johnston P.O. Box 1646 Riverside Co. Riverside 9250E (951) 955-10240th 73 The Carolyn E. Wylie Center for Children & Cathy Crowther 4164 Brockton Ave. Riverside 92501 (951) 683-5193-IS Youth 74 Wildomar Community Council Sharon Heil P.O. Box 1476 - Wildomar 925(951) 245-2943-IS. 75 Wildomar Senior Community WILLIAM THRALLS P.O. Box 740 Wildomar 925(951) 678-1555-IS Agency Listing Alpha Respondents Page 3 of 3 267 1/28/2008 10:15:27 AM • Avg enrolled clients/consumers All Private, Private, Church Tribal for profit non-profit Public affiliated services 75 100% 5,861 16 21% 14,793 27 36% 1,820 29 39% 5,215 2 3% 1 1% 955 Total enrolled clients/consumers 439,549 236,694 49,133 151,247 955 Avg daily attendance 74 47 52 111 47 Total daily attendance 5,568 745 1,408 3,211 47 Avg daily needing tx assist 40 43 36 44 36 Total daily needing tx assist 2,976 680 981 1,277 36 Avg daily in wheelchairs 8 17 1 9 5 Total daily in wheelchairs 581 271 38 267 5 not applicable (n) 10 2 3 5 0 • Seniors, able-bodied Seniors, frail Persons of low income Youth Persons with physical disabilities Persons with behavioral disabilities Persons with sensory impairments . General public Other 25 35 45 5 10 10 8 14 19 12 10 14 0 1 1 13 36 22 19 23 12 2 10 4 5 4 2 4 13 10 8 4 5 7 12 8 6 14 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 Getting to work between Sam - 5pm 29 Late night or early moming work shifts 18 Weekend and holiday trips 15 Recreational activities or events 21 Visiting family or friends 13 Kids to daycare or school 13_ Going to the doctor/medical trips 56 Shopping and multiple errands 29 Training, ed classes or prog sites 30 Long distance trips 17 Other 16 3 4 4 5 2 1 14 3 2 6 6 11 7 4 7 5 5 21 15 11 3 5 14 7 7 9 6 7 19 11 17 8 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 No transportation Public transit provide to general public Operate transportation Contract; sery prov by another entity Subsidize transportation Arrange for trans by assisting w/info Arrange for vol drivers or private car Other 17 7 22 12 18 22 6 12 5 6 6 0 0 6 3 2 4 1 2 0 9 4 5 11 3 5 7 6 5 10 7 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 Summary by legal Type P1 1/28/2008 10:1529 AM 268 All Private, Private, Church Tribal for profit non-profit Public affiliated services 75 100% 16 21% 27 36% 29 39% 2 3% 1 1% Joint use/pooling/sharing. vehicles 12 Coordinated service operations 14 Coordinated veh and cap purchases 9 Shared fueling facilities 8 Shared maintenance facilities 4 Joint purchase of supplies or equipment 4 Joint purchase of insurance 3 1 8 3 - 0 0 5 9 0 0 4 5 0 0 3 5 0 0 4 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 0 0 Coordinated trip scheduling/dispatch Coordinated driver training/retraining Contract out for service (no dir op) Contract to prov trans to oth ags Pooling $ to better coord service Not interested at this time Other 17 11 11 8 7 11 10 4 7 6 0 1 5 5 0 2 4 5 0 2 3 3 0 1 1 4 1 2 5 4 _ 0 2 2 6 0. 1,275 up to 9 passengers 822 10-14 passengers 158 15-24 passengers 25+ passengers 46 218 73 619 576 61 611 143 1 6 151 0 2 3 41 0 2 0 216 0 wheelchair lift -equipped 398 6 10 382 0 Total number of vehicles classified: 1,244 66 620 551 7 Now 239 11 105 123 Within one year Within the next two years 79 69 8 7 64 14 14 41 0 0 Avg monthly one-way trips Total monthly one-way trips 12,842 844 1,111 31,559 963,136 13,510 29,986 915200 4,440 4,440 Avg monthly vehicle miles Total monthly vehicle miles 24,780 30,690 5,184 42290 1,858,509 491,041 139,971 1,226,397 Throughout Riverside County 10 Yes 21 2 2 5 3 12 5 1,100 1,100 Summary by Legal Type P2 269 1/28/2008 10:15:30 AM Private, Private, All for profit non-profit Public Church Tribal affiliated services Avg full-time drivers Total full-time drivers 75 100% 8 610 16 21% 3 54 27 36% 6 151 29 39% 14 398 2 3% 7 Avg part-time drivers Total part-time drivers 2 150 1 8 2 64 3 78 0 0- Avg volunteer drivers Total volunteer drivers 10 0 29 0 0 777 2 774 1 0 Avg supervisors/managers Total supervisors/managers 1 1 1 1 0 53 8 24 21 0 Yes 23 5 7 t1 0 Avg for vehicle op Total $656,787 $49.258,996 $20,750 $332,000 $45,688 $1,233,578 $1,644,601 $47,693,418 $a Avg for vehicle replcmnt cap funds Total $69,440 $5,208,026 $625 $10,000 $1,852 $50,000 $177,518 $5,148,026 $0 $0 Avg for bus passes, tickets/tokens Total $1,079 $2,375 $1,303 $80,922 $38,000 $5,141 $37,781 Avg for taxi vchersloth spectzd trans Total for taxi taxi vchrsloth sp trans $1,545 $115,887 $2,000 $32,000 $572 $15,457 $2,360 $68,430 $0 0 Avg for admin (advrtsng/marketing) Total for administration $130.432 $6250 $3,693 $330,436 941 $9,782,371 $100,000 $99,716 $9,582,655 $0 Avg for insurance Total for insurance $38,532 $2,8.99,932 $15,875 $254,000 $3,864 $104,328 $87,297 $2.531,604 $0 Avg for mileage reimbursement Total for mileage reimbursement $7,050 $528,738 $0 $o $10,296 $278,000 $8,646 $250,738 $0 $0 Avg for other Total for other $373,150 $0 $0 $965,044 so $27,986277 $0 $0 $27,986,277 $0 Summary by Legal Type P3 270 1/28/2008 10:15:32 AM General funds Other All Private, Private, for profit non-profit Church Public affiliated Tribal services 75 100% 13 11 16 21% 0 0 27 36°% 6 7 29 39% 7 4 2 3% 1 1% 0 0 Transportation Development Act Education Department Department of Dev. Services Department of Aging Department of Rehabilitation Department of Health Services Other 7 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 FTA section 5307 FTA section 5310 (vehicles) FTA section 5311 Community Dev. Block Grants Health and Human Services Other 4 4 2 3 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 2 0 4 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Client fees Private donations/grants United Way Fare box Fundraising Other 7 8 2 6 7 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 7 2 1 7 1 2 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Increased Decreased Stayed the same 18 1 12 3 0 1 8 0 7 7 1 3 0 0 1 Yes No Unsure 32 0 5 5 0 1 14 0 1 12 0 3 1 0 0 Summary by Legal Type P4 271 1/28/2008 10:15:33 AM Avg enrolled clients/consumers Total enrolled clients/consumers WR- Corona WR- WR- WR- WR- Coachella Palo All Norco Riverside Central South Pass Valley Verde 75 100% 7 9% 32 43% 9 12% 3 4% 2 3% 15 20% 3 4% 5,861 439,549 149 1,043 10,916 349,301 2,515 22,638 145 436 798 1,596 282 4,225 20,100 60,300 Avg daily attendance Total daily attendance 74 5,568 73 511 61 1,963 63 565 67 200 45 89 68 1,015 407 1,220 Avg daily needing tx assist Total daily needing tx assist Avg daily in wheelchairs Total daily in wheelchairs 40 2,976 8 581 30 213 6 45 64 2,062 15 476 28 251 3 26 67 200 0 0 22 43 5 9 12 180 1 10 8 25 3 10 not applicable (n) Seniors, able-bodied Seniors, frail Persons of low income Youth 10 25 35 45 13 1 3 4 5 0 4 10 13 23 7 1 4 6 5 2 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 3 5 6 8 2 0 1 1 1 2 Persons with physical disabilities Persons with behavioral disabilities Persons with sensory impairments General public Other 36 22 19 23 12 4 1 1 2 1 15 11 10 5 6 3 3 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 5 4 2 6 3 1 1 1 0 Getting to work between Sam - 5pm Late night or early moming work Weekend and holiday trips Recreational activities or events 29 18 15 21 1 0 1 1 13 8 5 7 3 1 1 3 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 1 7 5 2 4 1 0 1 2 Visiting family or friends Kids to daycare or school 13 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 13 0 7 2 0 0 2 1 Going to the doctor/medical trips Shopping and multiple errands Training, ed classes, program sites Long distance trips Other 56 29 30 17 16 4 1 2 2 2 24 9 16 9 5 8 5 5 0 2 3 3 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 10 8 4 2 4 2 1 1 3 0 Summary by Region P1 272 1/2812008 10:15:33 AM No. transportation Public transit provided to gen public Operate transportation Contract; sery prov by another entity Subsidize transportation Arrange for trans by assisting w/info Arrange for vol drivers or private car Other WR- Corona WR- WR- WR- WR- Coachella Palo All Norco Riverside Central South Pass Valley Verde 75 100% 7 9% 32 43% 9 12% 3 .4% 2 3% 15 20% 3 4% 17 7 22 12 18 22 6 12 0 1 3 1 1 2 1 1 10 2 5 5 9 10 2 6 3 0 2 0 1 6 0 1 1 0 T 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 6 3 4 4 2 1 0 i 2 1 2. 0 0 Joint use/pooling/sharing vehicles Coordinated service operations Coordinated veh and cap purchases Shared fueling facilities Shared maintenance facilities Joint purchase of supplies/equip Joint purchase of insurance Coord trip scheduling/dispatch Coord driver training/retraining Contract out for service (no dir op) Contract to prov trans to oth ags Pooling $ to better coord service 12 0 5 2 0 0 5 0 14 1 5 1 0 1 5 1 9 1 4 0 0 0 3 1 8 4 4 3 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 A 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 17 0 5 2 0 1 6 1 Not interested at this time 11 11 0 2 3 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 4 3 2 1 8 7 11 0 0 0 2 4 4 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 3 2 1 0 Other 10 2 4 0 1 1 2 0 Summary by Region P2 273 1/28/2008 10:15:35 AM WR Corona All Norco WR- Riverside WR- Central WR- South WR - Coachella Pass Valley Palo Verde 75 1005% 7 9% 32 43% 9 12% 3 4% 2 3% 15 20% 3 4% 1,275 21 845 10 1 15 294 29 603 7 241 10 1 12 259 21 up to 9 passengers 10-14 passengers 15-24 passengers 25+ passengers 822 158 6 1 540 147 4 1 0 0 7 3 210 4 1 2 46'. 218 9 5 27 136 1 0 1 0 0 5 1 53 7 19 wheelchair lift -equipped Total number of vehicles classed: 398 1,244 " 21 14 280 850 6 4 1 0 15 8 268 75 29 11 Now Within one year Within the next two years 239 0 71 3 0 1 151 3 79 0 32 1 1 0 33 4 69 2 30 0 0 1 19 5 Avg monthly one-way trips Total monthly one-way trips 12,842 963,136 1,810 12,668 19,112 611,578 96 865 4 11 2,220 4,440 21,172 317,574 1,333 4,000 Avg monthly vehicle miles Total monthly vehicle miles 24,780 1,858,509 3,553 24,872 35,683 1,141,870 535 4,811 667 2,000 2,200 4,400 11,965 179,475 7,027 21,081 Throughout Riverside County 10 4 0 0 1 2 0 Yes 21 1 8 0 2 1 6 1 Avg full-time drivers Total full-time drivers 8 610 4 25 8 266 0 4 0 1 6 12 16 239 7 20 Avg part-time drivers Total part-time drivers 2 150 0 2 2 49 0 0 0 0 3 5 5 77 3 9 Avg volunteer drivers Total volunteer drivers Avg supervisors/managers Total supervisors/managers 10 777 0 0 24 753 0 0 0 0 0 1 24 0 0 1 53 0 1 1 18 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 21 1 4 Yes 23 2 10 2 0 1 3 2 Summary by Region P3 274 1/28/2008 10:15:36 AM. Avg for vehicle op Total WR- Corona WR - WR - WR - WR - Coachella Palo All Norco Riverside Central South Pass Valley Verde 75 100% 7 9% 32 43% 9 12% 3 43(o 2 37o 15 20% 3 4% $656,787 $49,258,996. $1,714 $12.000 $1,438,049 46,017,552 $26,155 $235,396 $13,333 $40,000 $480,412 $960,823 $42,815 $642,225 $443,667 $1,331,000. Avg for vehicle replcmnt cap funds Total $69,440 $5,208,026 $a $151,699 $4,854,365 $5,556 $50,000 $0 $0 $81,831 $163,661 $o $43,333 $130,000 Avg for bus passes, tickets/tokens $1,079 $5,429 $1,144 $0 $0 $3,000 $0 $too Total $80.922 $38,000 $36,622 $o $o $6,000 $.o $300 Avg for taxi vchersloth speclzd trans $1,545 $4,571 $2,309 $o $0 $0 $667 0 Total for taxi taxi vchrs/oth sp trans Avg for admin (advrtsng/marketing) Total for administration $115,887 $130,432 $9,782,371 $32,000 $0 $0 $73,887 $295,695 $9,462,225 $0 $5,864 $52,779 $0 $0 $0 $68,434 $136,867 $10,000 $8,700 $130,500 $0 $0 $0 Avg for insurance $38,532 $1,143 $78,201 $4,731 $o $25,887 $3,010 $0 Total for insurance $2,889,932 $8,000 $2,502,439 $42,575 $o $51,773 $45,145 $0 Avg for mileage reimbursement $7,050 $o $16,139 $0 $0 $150 $800 $0 Total for mileage reimbursement $528,738 $0 $516,438 $o $0 $300 $12,000 $0 Avg for other Total for other $373,150 $27,986,277 $o $0 $o $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,865,752 - $27,986,277 $o Increased Decreased Stayed the same 18 1 12 2 0 0 6 0 5 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0' 1 5 0 4 1 1 1 Yes No Unsure 32 0 2 0 12 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 5 2 1 0 Summary by Region P4 275 1/28/2008 10:15:38 AM • • • • General funds Other All WR- Corona Norco WR- Riverside WR- WR- Central South WR- Coachella Palo Pass Valley Verde 75 100"h 13 7 9% 1 1 32 43% 3 5 9 12% 1 1 3 4% 0 0 2 3% 0 1 15 20% 5 3 3 4% 3 0 Transportation Development Act Education Department Department of Dev. Services Department of Aging Department of Rehabilitation Department of Health Services Other 7 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 2 2 0 0 0. 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 FTA section 5307 FTA section 5310 (vehicles FTA section 5311 Community Dev. Block Grants Health and Human Services Other 4 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 4 2 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 Client fees Private donations/grants United Way Fare Box Fundraising Other 7 1 3 0 0 0 2 1 8 2 8 7 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 1 4 0 D 0 0 0 Summary by Region P5 276 1 /28/2008 10:15:39 AM All General Public Human Services 68 100% 7 10% 61 90% Avg enrolled clients/consumers Total enrolled clients/consumers Avg daily attendance Total daily attendance Avg daily needing tx assist Total daily needing tx assist Avg daily in wheelchairs Total daily in wheelchairs not applicable (n) 6,361 432,524 64 9,563 66,941 105 5,993 365,583 59 4,344 38 2,561 732 90 627 3,612 32 1,934 9 36 5 581 254 327 8 7 Seniors, able-bodied Seniors, frail Persons of low income Youth Persons with physical disabilities Persons with behavioral disabilities 25 37% 34 50% 43 63% 12 18% 5 71% 4 57% 3 43% 2 29% 20 33% 30 49% 40 66% 10 16% 34 50% 20 29% 5 71% 3 43% 29 48% 17 28% Persons with senso General public ry impairments 17 25% 20 29% 3 43% 5 71% 14 23% 15 25% Getting to work between Bam - 5pm Late night or early moming work shifts Weekend and holiday trips Recreational activities or events Visiting family or friends Kids to daycare or school Going to the doctor/medical trips Shopping and multiple errands Training, ed classes orproq sites Long distance trips Other 26 38% 15 22% 10 15% 15 22% 5 71% 3 43% 6 80% 5 71% 21 '34% 12 207. 4 7% 10 16% 10 15% 10 15% 53 78% 26 38% 28 41% 13 19% 13 19% 4 57% 1 14% 6 86% 5 71% 5 71% 4 57% O 0% 6 10% 9 15% 47 77% 21 34% 23 38% 9 15%. 13 21% No transportation Public transit provide to general public Operate transportation Contract; service provided by another entity Subsidize transportation Arrange for trans by assisting w/iinfo Arrange for vol drivers or private car Other 17 25% 0 0% 17 28% 7 10% 18 26%u 9 13% 18 26% 20 29°% 5 7% 11 16% 7 100% 3 43% 3 43% 1 14% O 0% O 0% O 0% 0 0% 15 25% 6 10% 17 28% 20 33% 5 8% Summary by GP/HS Pt 277 1/28/2008 10:15:40 AM • • Joint use/pooling/sharing vehicles Coordinated service operations Coordinated veh and cap purchases Shared fueling facilities Shared maintenance facilities Joint purchase of supplies or equipment Joint purchase of insurance Coordinated trip scheduling/dispatch Coordinated driver training/retraining Contract out for service (no dir op) Contract to prov trans to oth agencies Pooling $ to better coord service Not interested at this time Other All 68 100% General Public 7 10% Human Services 61 90% 10 15% 11 16% 7 10% 0 0% 5 71% 3 43% 10 16% 6 10% 4 7% 7 10% 4 6% 4 6% 3 4% 13 19% 9 13% 9 13% 4 6% 7 10% 11 16°% 10 15% 4 57°% 0 0% 2 29% 0 0% 4 570% 3 43°% 4 5707o 1 14% 2 29°% 1 140% 2 29% 3 5% 4 7% 2 3% 3 5% 9 15% 6 10% 5 8% 3 5% 5 8% 10 16% 8 13% �.; up to 9 passengers 10-14 passengers 15-24 passengers 25+ passengers 606 9 272 4 185 3 158 2 413 59 219 31 30 4 144 21 193 3 53 1 155 3 14 0 41 1 198 3 14 2 198 28 27 0 0 0 wheelchair lift -equipp ed Total number of vehicles classified: 389 6 582 9 378 54 386 55 11 0 196 6 Now Within one year Within the next two years 127 2 69 1 54 1 115 16 60 9 38 5 12 0 9 D 16 0 Avg monthly one-way trips Total monthly one-way trips 13,577 923,211 130,731 915,114 133 8,097 Avg monthly vehicle miles 18,748 174,975 821 Total monthly vehicle miles 1,274,887 1,224,826 50,061 Throughout Riverside County 8 12% 1 14% 7 11% Yes 18 26% 1 14% 17 28% • Summary by GP/HS P2 278 1/28/2008 10:15A1 AM Avg full-time drivers Total full-time drivers All General Public Human Services 68 100% 7 1 0 % 61 90% 6 416 54 381 35 Avg part-time drivers Total part-time drivers Avg volunteer drivers Total volunteer drivers 1 5 1 84 35 25 0 0 0 25 0 25 Avg supervisors/managers Total supervisors/managers 0 29 3 20 0 ,. Yes 18 26% 6 86% 12 20% Avg for vehicle op (drivers, mnt, fuel) Total for vehicle op (drivers, mnt, fuel) $697,118 $47,403,996 $6,580,345 $46,062,418 $21,993 $1,341,578 Avg for vehicle replacement capital funds Total for vehicle replacement capital funds $74,530 $5,068,026 $697,861 $4,885,026 $3,000 $183,000 Avg for bus passes, tickets, tokens Total for bus passes, tickets, tokens $t,t90 $80,922 $857 $6,000 $1,228 $74,922 Avg for taxi vouchers/other spec trans Total for taxi taxi vouchers/other spec trans $1,704 $115,887 $0 $0 $1,900 $115,887 Avg for administration (advertising, mkt) Total for administration (advertising, mkt) $142,344 $9,679,371 $1,368,951 $9,582,655 $1,586 $96,716 Avg for insurance Total for insurance $38,789 $360229 $1,902 $2,637,632 $2,521,604 $116,028 Avg for mileage reimbursement Total for mileage reimbursement $3,864 $262,738 $43 $300 $4,302 $262,438 Avg for other Total for other $411,563 $3,998,040 $0 $27,986,277 $27,986277 $0 Summary by GP/HS P3 279 1/28/2008 10:15:43 AM • • General funds Other All 68 100% General Public 7 10% Human Services 61 90% 12 18% 9 13% 2 29% 3 43% 10 16% 6 10% Transportation Development Act Education Department Department of Dev. Services Department of Aging Department of Rehabilitation Department of Health Services Other 7 10% 6 86% 1 2% 1 1% 1 1% O 0% O 0% 1 2% 1 2% 1 1% 1 1% 2 3% 1 1% O 0% O 0% O 0% 0 0% 1 2% 1 2% 2 3% 1 2% FTA section 5307 FTA section 5310 (vehicles) FTA section 5311 Community Dev. Block Grants Heath and Human Services Other 4 6% 4 6% 2 3% 3 4% 4 57% 2 29% 2 29% 0 0% O 0% 2 3% O 0% 3 5% 6 9% 0 0% O 0% O 0% 6 10% 0 0% Client fees Private donations/grants United Way Fare box Fundraising Other 6 9% 7 10% 2 3% 6 9% 6 9% 2 3% 1 14% 0 0% 0 0% 5 71% 0 0% 1 14% 5 8% 7 11% 2 3% 1 2% 6 10% 1 2% Increased Decreased Stayed the same 15 22% 0 0% 11 22% 6 86% O 0% O 0% 9 15% 0 0% Yes No Unsure 26 38°A 0 0% 5 7% 6 86% O 0% 1 14% 20 33% 0 0% 4 7% • -Summary by GP/HS P4 280 1/28l2008 10.15:44 AM All General Public Human Services 45 100% 7 16% 38 84% Avg enrolled clients/consumers Total enrolled clients/consumers 3,215 144,692 9,563 66,941 2,046 77,751. Avg daily attendance Total daily attendance Avg daily needing tx assist Total daily needing tx assist Avg daily in wheelchairs Total daily in wheelchairs 80 105 75 3,597 42 1,876 7 732 90 627 36 2,865 33 1,249 2 not applicable (n) Seniors, able-bodied Seniors, frail Persons of low income Youth Persons with physical disabilities Persons with behavioral disabilities Persons with sensory impairments General public 336 5 17 38% 23 51 % 28 62% 9 20% 254 1 5 71% 4 57% 3 43% 2 29% 82 4 12 32% 19 50% 25 66% 7 18% Getting to work between 8am - 5pm Late night or early morning work shifts Weekend and holiday trips Recreational activities or events Visiting family or friends Kids to daycare or school Going to the doctor/medical trips Shopping and multiple errands Training, ed classes or program sites Long distance trips Other 22 49°/n 16 36% 12 27% 12 27% 18 40% 5 71% 3 43% 3 43% 5 71% 5 71% 17 45% 13 34% 9 24% 7 18% 13 34°/o 12 27% 3 43% 9 24% 8 18% 13 29% 6 86% 5 71% 2 5% 8 21% 7 16% 9 20% 35 78% 19 42% 19 42% 9 20% 6 13% 4 57% 1 14% 6 86% 5 71% 5 71% 4 57% O 0% 3 8% 8 21% 29 76% 14 37% 14 37% 5 13% 6 16% No transportation Public transit provide to general public Operate transportation Contract; sery prov by another entity Subsidize transportation Arrange for trans by assisting w/info Arrange for vol drivers or private car Other 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 7 16% 18 40% 9 20% 18 40% 7 100% 3 43% 3 43% 1 14% 0 0% 15 39% 6 16% 17 45% 14 31% 5 11% 10 22% O 0% O 0% O 0% 14 37% 5 13% 10 26°% Summary by GP/HS Providers P1 281 1/28/2008 10:15:45 AM • Joint use/pooling/sharing vehicles Coordinated service operations Coordinated veh and cap purchases Shared fueling facilities Shared maintenancefacilities Joint purchase of supplies or equipment Joint purchase of insurance Coordinated trip scheduling/dispatch Coordinated driver training/retraining Contract out for service (no dir op) Contract to prov trans tooth ags Pooling $ to better coord service Not interested at this time Other All 45 100% General Public 7 16% Human Services 38 84% 10 22% 0 0% 10 26% 11 24°% 7 16% 5 71 °% 3 43°% 6 16% 4 11% 7 16°% 3 7°% 4 9°% 3 7% 12 27% 9 20% 9 20% 4 9% 7 16°% 6 13% 9 20% 4 57°% 0 0°% 2 29% 0 0% 4 57% 3 43% 4 57% 1 14% 2 29% 1 14% 2 29% 3 8% 3 8% 2 5% 3 8% 8 21% 6 16°% 5 13% 3 8°% 5 13% 5 13% 7 18% up to 9"passengers 10-14 passengers 15-24 passengers 25 passengers 606 13 272 6 185 4 158 4 413 59 219 31 30 4 144 21 193 5 53 1 155 4 14 0 41 1 198 4 14 2 198 28 27 1 0 0 wheelchair lift -equipped Total number of vehicles classified: Now Within one year Within the next two years 389 9 582 13 127 3 69 2 54 1 378 54 386 55 115 16 60 9 38 5 11 D 196 10 12 0 9 0 16 0 Avg monthly one-way trips Total monthly one-way trips 20,516 923,211 130,731' 915,114 213 8,097 Avg monthly vehicle miles 28,331 174,975 1,317 Total monthly vehicle miles 1,274,887 1,224,826 50,061 Throughout Riverside County 8 18% 1 14% 7 18% Yes 18 40% 1 14% 17 45% • Summary by GP/HS Providers P2 282 1/28/2008 10:15:47 AM Avg full-time drivers Total full-time drivers. Avg part-time drivers Total part-time drivers All 45 100% General Public 7 16% Human Services 38 84% 9 416 54 381 1 35 2 84 5 35 25 Avg volunteer drivers Total volunteer drivers 1 25 0 0 1 25 Avg supervisors/managers Total supervisors/managers 1 29 3 20 0 9' Yes 16 36% 6 86% 10 26% Avg for vehicle op (drivers, mnt, fuel) Total for vehicle op (drivers, mnt, fuel) $1,053,422 $47,403,996 $6,580,345 $46,062,418 $35,305 $1,341,578 Avg for vehicle replacement capital funds Total for vehicle replacement capital funds $112,623 $5,068,026 $697,861 $4,885,026 $4,816 $183,000 Avg for bus passes, tickets, tokens Total for bus passes, tickets, tokens $1,798 $80,922 $857 $6,000 $1,972 $74 922 Avg for taxi vouchers/other spec trans Total for taxi taxi vouchers/other spec trans $2,575 $115,887 $0 $0 $3,050 $115,887 Avg for administration (advertising, mkt) Total for administration (advertising, mkt) $215,097 $9,679,371 $1,368,951 $9,582,655 $2,545 $96,710 Avg for insurance Total for insurance $58,614 $360,229 $3,053 $2,637,632 $2,521,604 $116,028 Avg for mileage reimbursement Total for mileage reimbursement $5,839 $43 $6,906 $262,738 $300 $262,438 Avg for other Total for other $621,917 $27,986,277 $3,998,040 $27,986,277 $0 $0 Summary by GP/HS Providers P3 283 1/28/2008 10:15:48 AM • • General funds 12 27% 2 29% 10 26% Other ' 9 20% 3 43°% 6 16% Transportation Development Act Education Department Department of Dev. Services 7 16% 6 86% 1 3% 1 2% 0 0°% 1 3% 1 2% 0 0% 1 3% Department of Aging 1 2°% 0 0°% 1 3°% Department of Rehabilitation 1 2°% 0 0°% 1 3% Department of Health Services 2 4% O 0% 2 5% Other - 1 2°% 0 0% 1 3% FTA section 5307 4 9°% 4 57% 0 0% FTA section 5310 (vehicles) 4 9°/0 2 29% 2 5% FTA section 5311 2 4% 2 29% 0 0% Community Dev. Block Grants 3 7% O 0% 3 8% Health and Human Services Other 5 11% 0 0°% O 0% 0 Mb 5 13% 8% 0 Client fees 5 11% 1 14% 4 11% Private donations/grants 7 16°% 0 0°% 7 18% United Way 2 4% 0 0% 2 5% Fare box 6 13°% 5 71% 1 3% Fundraising 6 13% 0 0% 6 16% Other 2 4% 1 14% 1 3% Increased 15 33°% 6 86% 9 24% Decreased 0 0°% 0 0% 0 0°% Stayed the same 11 33% 0 0% 11 29% Yes 26 58% 6 86°% 20 53°% No 0 0% 0 0% 0 0°% Unsure 5 11°% 1 14% 4 11°% Summary by GP/HS Providers P4 1/28/2008 10:15:49 AM 284 • • Appendix E • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER'INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Foundation for the Retarded of the Desert • Dependent on operating and providing bus Fleet to meet the transportation needs of clients. • Challenge is maintaining buses. Need to be replaced approximately every three years. . • Need a dedicated funding source. • Software to help coordinate route planning. • Transporting clients to facility for training or other sites. Provide "curb to curb" service. • Need reliable transportation because reimbursement of expenses is based upon attendance. Liability issues related to Insurance. Driver -training programs to keep drivers up to date on rules and requirements. Homestead Senior Care (Provides caregivers for in -home care services) • Seniors contact agency for caregivers to provide basic trips such as non -emergency medical appointments, grocery shopping and other errands. • More resources to provide a list of transportation providers for their clients. Need a referral system that provides background information on transportation providers. Concerns about liability issues related to insurance Develop a referral service for transportation services. Create a centralized website with agencies and transportation resources. City of Banning, provides dispatched transit service • Increase funding for drivers. Need more staff to operate the buses. Currently, drivers run 'combo' routes, One route was eliminated. This affects service for work and school trips. • Insufficient service for dial -a -ride service. Not available to meet demand. • A bus stop was moved and this impacted seniors, persons with disabilities. The stop helped provide access to shopping in the area including Wa!mart, Coordination with multiple agencies Is the key. Providing service from Banning to service to Cabazon and then to Palm Desert. There Is interest in providing increased service. 285 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO. COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS First 5 Riverside, (Funding agency for 60 agencies that service children zero to five years old population.) • Increase in fixed route service in desert areas because service is inadequate. Conduct a needs assessment routes, frequency in service and see where the gaps are. Blythe to Indio and Mecca Indio, • Agencies want to purchase vehicles to provide transportation for their clients. • Transportation services needed for medical appointments. • Blythe does not have a local dentist that can provide periodontal care and the closest doctor is located in Indio. Many parents do not have a car and the public transportation does not offer a direct service to Indio. • Expectant mothers in Blythe need direct service to Indio. Nurses have gone to Blythe to transport expectant mothers to Indic. • Service is needed to transport children to school. Parents unable to coordinate work schedules. One parent volunteered to drive children to school and had each family contribute $2.00 for gas. • Migrant farm workers are affected by the lack of access to transportation. Ambulances will not go out to Mecca. For emergencies, workers go to Indio. When they are discharged they are unable to call (do not have phones) for someone to pick them up. Consequently, they have to walk back to Mecca. In one situation, a parent with small children took two days to walk back. • Liability issues related to vehicles. These include drivers, required equipment for buses. Established policies but it is difficult to monitor. • Head Start faces challenges with ensuring required safety measures such as car seats and seat belts. As a result, they encourage parents find ways to transport their children, • Challenge to match needs of clients zero to five years old with the needs of other agencies with different age groups. Networking to promote education and awareness of transportation options. Coachella Valley Rescue Mission. (Provide Homeless Shelter and emergency meals.) • Providing transportation for clients to travel to non- emergency medical as well as hospital visits and Job interviews. • For persons with behavioral disabilities, riding transit can be "scary". Need ways of communication with drivers. • Parents with young children need transportation where there are gaps in the service. A mother with two children had to get them to a school located on Country Club Dr. The bus stopped one mile away and they had to walk the extra distance. • There is no bus service for clients to get to monthly meetings with parole officer. So, CVRM provides transportation. Liability issues related to shared vehicles. Determining who is responsible for insurance and maintenance. • Offer a daily bus pass so that clients can travel for various trips including job interviews and training and to see family members that is discounted or free. • Buddy programs; assistance in helping to be introduced to transit, (For example, a similar program has helped persons with autism ride the bus.) • Increase the availability of bus tokens and consider a universal pass for transportation services. ft • • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS • Continuing to provide transportation for clients with visits at DPSS to see their children. There is a 15 minute grace period or the visitation will be cancelled. • Need drivers for various staffing trips such as getting health cards (to meet requirements for kitchen workers) at the County. With staff and volunteer turnover, this requires frequent travel time. - • Clients need service to evening classes at Junior College. Classes finish at 9:30 pm and drivers are sent out to pick- up students to return to the Shelter. • Expand bus routes in the Central Valley and for new developments. • The Valley is a Hospitality -based economy and service from Desert Hot Springs is 1 14 hour one way route. Need to develop a larger municipal transit system. • Single point of information for transportation options. • Shuttles dedicated to clients' particular travel needs. • Educational programs for case workers to increase awareness of transportation options and the particular needs of clientele. • Projects that fund vehicles for agencies to transport clients. Partnership to Preserve Independent Living • Clients are persons with varying disabilities including physical limitations, visually impaired, diabetes, dialysis patients. In many cases, buses are unable to transport these clients because the schedule is difficult to match and may need "door -through -door" service. Physical stamina Is limited and on a daily basis may not be able to anticipate whether they can use public transportation. • Need to empower clients to take proactive approach to getting assistance with transportation from neighbors and/or friends. • Creating awareness of transportation resources and need to use promdtional marketing means to encourage use of alternative modes of transportation. • "Hands-on" counseling to assist people with the appropriate information about transportation options. • Need to integrate social services with transportation needs. • Designate a Human Service agency to be the CTSA because of their experience with the specialized transportation needs of their clientele. • According to the APTA, at some point In time 50 percent of those over 65 years old will be unable drive somewhere. Funding streams for transportation need to be part of coordinated system so that there are transportation resources allocated In a mutually beneficial approach. • Develop a public service campaign to facilitate awareness of mobility issues related to seniors, persons with disabilities and low income and encourage people to help each other. • A proposed TransCare program would provide transportation services that offer coordination, access and referral. Callers utilize the 211 and trained specialists provide transportation information, an outreach program that includes presentations to community groups, marketing materials is conducted and survey to Identify specialized needs. This proposed program may incorporate 211 telephone service and the internet and involves agencies to update data. For example, patients are discharged from hospitals; a document is printed based on their transportation needs with information on transportation resources, 287 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT COORDINATION PLAN INTERVIEWS(WORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Partnership to Preserve Independent Living, continued A counseling service based upon the Ride Connection which is based in Portland. Clients are given personal attention regarding transportation resources and options, Service is tailored to clients' specialized needs and information/education on those options is provided. There Is coordination between public transportation providers and Human Service agencies. Good Samaritan's Coachella Valley Transportation Round Table • Human Services Agencies from the Coachella Valley and Transportation Agencies Some of the potential barriers discussed included: • Where to call for information and the inability to make calls • Costs • Limited Schedules of service • Limited knowledge of appropriate services • Specialized needs of clients • Coordination between providers • Outdated information Some potential solutions to barriers discussed included: • Need an agency to take a leadership role • Seeking funding to do a survey on the most efficient approach to using resources • Coordinating services to improve utilization resources. • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWSIWORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Boys and Girls Club of Desert Hot Springs • Access to aftemoon recreational activities for children. • Transporting children to special trips and events and high school students to "Building Horizon" program which is part of the Regional Opportunity Program. Students help to build homes on empty lots. During the summer, these trips are once a week and when school is in session, twice a month. • In Desert Hot Springs, need bus service from middle school to the Club. The current route stops three blocks away and students have to walk to the Club. Estimate that 50 to 100 are missing out on opportunities to participate in recreational activities due to a lack of transportation to the site. Develop a strategic approach to make it easier for children to reach the site without having to `Falk. Conduct a needs analysis to better coordinate service to identify gaps in service and routes that are unmet. Locating a stop near or at the Boys and Girls Club would improve access, - Cal Works/GAIN - Indio • Employment services for clients that are able-bodied and approved for cash aid, welfare and/or food stamps. Clients must be able to work. The agency provides a supportive service that facilitates client progress. • Agency provides clients with Sunline bus passes or tickets, gas cards or authorize a check to address transportation needs. • Sunline does not serve all areas and transportation options for clients falls short. The agency tries to mitigate with issue by using county vehicles to provide trips • There is a need to travel as far away as Desert Center (45 miles) Salton City (close to Desert Center), Indio Hills and Sky Valley where there is no bus services • Lack of transportation to rural areas • Clients need to travel to employment sites to apply for jobs and have interviews, training sites for workshops and classes (both on -and -off site) also take clients for clothing purchases --clients needs run the gamut. • Banning Pass area challenging to serve (Beaumont, Banning, Cabezon) • Banning Pass Area is served by providers (RTA, Banning and Beaumont, but they have limited evening service which is needed by clients to get to and from employment. • Majority of clients are mothers —women with children. • Because of internal policy/ administrative issue relating to creating separate series of transit tickets for various aid codes (e.g. cash aid, food stamps, etc) This process doubles the work and makes distribution complex. Clients may be entitled to gas card, but it may not be given. Fraud is low but process needs simplification because it is too cumbersome. • Credibility of one of the public transit providers is an issue. Cal Works/GAIN is reluctant o work with the transit provider due to past improprieties. 289 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT COORDINATION PLAN INTERVIEWSlWORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Coachella Valley Taxi Owners Association (C.V.T.O,A.) • Company represents 300 cabs. Also a member of Taxi Limo Paratransit Association (TLPA), Has grown in last 4 years. Company represents 186 of 271 taxis in the Valley-17 of 22 cab companies. • Taxi companies were providing specialized DAR trips for customers in 1996-97. Public transit operator now providing all the DAR trips that the taxi industry used to provide. • Interested In working with agencies to provide specialized transit trips • Taxi industry willing to negotiate discounts and believe that the company can benefit by providing these rides. ADA compliant. • Has experienced numerous challenges in their efforts to establish cooperative working relationship with the public transit provider. • No lift equipped vehicles yet, just wheelchair ramps. Company is preparing to purchase new generation taxis that are lift equipped as new business Is secured. • New taxis are being manufactured outside of the U.S, —must explore Buy America Requirements relative to new funding sources. • Public operator implementing new taxi ordinances in the Coachella Valley which could severely impact the taxi Industry in the Valley. • Expansion of Safe Rlde Home Program Department of Mental Health - Blythe • Agency provides counseling and assistance to substance abuse and mental health cases —there is considerable overlap. Qualified ambulatory clients are provided with bus passes. • 90-95% Medl-Cal recipients, Other clients are indigent. • Local fixed -route and DAR services are limited. • Ideally local bus passes are provided since large percentage of the people are from local area. However, transportation may be needed for up to 20 miles away. Depending upon need. 10-trip pass may be provided, • The agency also contracts with Greyhound to offer vouchers for long-distance trips. • A need for medical care in the Coachella Valley is and issue for clients. Very difficult to get to the Coachella Valley —both access and financing these trips are a . challenge. • There are some clients who will not avail themselves of available transportation services; not always about transportation. Clients must have responsibility to be flexible. • No real barriers to coordinating efforts. The. agency already has partnerships with other agencies (CPS. DPSS, Probation, etc.) The only issues would be conceptualization and motivation. • Shuttle to Coachella Valley destinations. This would satisfy 80% of locals need, Service could have the potential to travel beyond to major medical facilities (Riverside Regional Medical Center and Loma Linda). • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Greater commitment needed from social service agencies as • Hard to coordinate with Implement a specialized transit identification. personnel changes agency memory Is lost. current ARB regulations for Special stickers could be used to identify clients Service Area: City of Blythe, unincorporated alternative fueled vehicles, Sustainability—hard to dedicate rides. by type. Full pass process which could be housed In Palo Verde Transit. Riverside County — Mesa Verde, Ripley, Colorado River areas, Ehrenberg. # of vehicles: 9 (6 FR/3DAR) • Special fares or free riders can only be given Expansion of existing travel training program Span of service: 5 am — 6:30 p,m. Contracts with human service agencies for occasionally. If demand Explore potential use of Greyhound to provide special services: GAIN/Calworks, Mental Health, ERU School, Palo Verde College (EPOS and Drug Court), School District. from social service agencies Increases, system could be intercity trips to needed destinations Inundated. • Previous attempts at establishing accounts with agencies have shown that accountability and abuse can be issues. • Biggest problem is coordination and communication related to case management of clients. Lack of coordination creates security issues for drivers and for individuals being dropped off at destinations. • Improper handling of mental health clients having mental Issues —this happens 90% of the time. Transit staff calls Adult Protective Services. Need more coordination on this. • Public and political issues and pressure will not allow PVT to offer intercity trips. This has been tried three times and locals do not want their services used to provide trips to other jurisdictions. 291 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS BARRIERS TO COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency, continued • Examine regulations relative to interstate coordination of specialized transportation services. This is an important issue specific to PVT and Imperial County (California) relative to travel to Arizona destinations. Stroke Recovery Center • Lack of resources to adequately fund transportation programs. • Accessible transportation for persons with disabilities Including those needing wheel chairs. • Length of time to travel creates a challenge for clients. A trip through the Coachella Valley on Sun Dial can take up to three to four hours. One client gets picked -up at 7:00 am and may not arrive at the Center till 9:00 am or 10:00 am. When they leave the Center at 1:00 pm, it may take two or three hours to return home. • According to the Department on Aging, women may face nine years without being able to drive and men six years. • Liability issues, do not have resources to develop needed insurance. • Coordinating with other agencies can help to pool resources; however, transportation services with many stops can be exhausting for clients. In addition, clients with spinal cord Injuries are affected by bumpy rides. An issue is how do you prioritize trips for clients with different needs and from various agencies., • Buses have many stops and not enough flexibility to meet the needs of clients. • Suggested a the potential to Implement a transportation project modeled after St. Johns County on Aging Transportation Program and The Sunshine Bus Company. Fixed routes are provided for serving ambulatory general public riders In the urban area. In addition, demand responsive trips for older adults, persons with disabilities and residents of rural areas are provided, There are developer "set -asides" to help fund transportation, There Is a customer first culture with a "hospitality focus". To address the low population density In rural areas, Sunshine bus uses "deviated fixed routes" which includes cellular phone communication. • Another program that could be modeled In Riverside Is the York County Community Action;Corp (YCCAC) Transportation Program. This multi -modal program Includes buses, vans, mini -vans and volunteer driven automobiles: It uses Its own software to schedule trips and clusters trips. The program coordinates with hospitals on funding and reimbursement. They promote a customer first approach. 02 • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS • Establish a specialized transit identification to identify clients and customers that require special assistance and/or handling to make trips. The full pass process could be housed in Palo Verde Transit, • Subsidize Greyhound to expand their current services to provide intercity, county and/or state trips. Need guidance from the state concerning funding for inter - county and state coordination efforts. California Family Life Center (CFLC) and Care- • Transportation is needed for clients that are fragile and It is • Including "smaller • Single point of information for clients to A"Van, provide services for seniors, persons a lifeline. organized systems" to contact regarding transportation with disabilities and low Income Individuals. • Increase service for seniors, low income individuals and provide input Into the resources: This could include a telephone persons with disabilities. Trips include dialysis treatment transportation funding number and counseling services to help and lab appointments, grocery shopping (Wal-Mart), hospitals (Loma Linda and Veterans) and beauty shop process. The objective Is allowing guide the caller. • Providing more escort services particularly appointments. Provide personal assistance such as the input on challenges for persons with disabilities who utilize a driver helping with grocery bags. A large percentage are related to smaller wheelchair for visits to the Doctor. women who are now either unable to drive or previously agencies and • Transportation service which could include never drove. • Travel to dialysis appointments presents certain challenges for patients. There are two Centers in town but transit service is blocks away.. Transportation must be reliable in order to be on time for appointments, Therefore, two vans provide transportation service for clients. However, some appointments can run over the time allotted and with a limited number of vans, they may leave to go pick-up another patient. Transportation schedules are coordinated with nurses at the Centers. There are medical transports service but these are more expensive. , • Providing 'curb to door service" is critical because of the extreme heat in the area. organizations. vans to help those under the Kin Care program (services that assist those who are raising children) and the Grandparents Raising Grandchildren program. • Transportation services for job training programs, • Provide service listed on "Transportation Needs" matrix. (already provide many on the list) • Provide transportation for center clients that attend training programs. • When applying for transportation grants, a major challenge is finding "matching dollars", In some cases, the match is 50 percent which is too high for non -profits. 10 percent to 20 percent would make if easier to provide the match to 293 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS meet grant requirements. California Family Life Center (CFLC) and Care- A -Van, continued • A related challenge regarding matching dollars for grants, is the manner in which non -profits finance their operations. They use a variety of means to raise funds, These include donations, "bartering" and receiving discounts on items such as leases for office space or gasoline. These items can be difficult to value for purposes of the grant requirements. The market price may be different from the actual costs of goods. • Providing transportation service for clients with Alzheimer or cancer to gel to senior centers for programs. This enables family or friends who are care givers to receive a much needed "break." • The costs of operating transportation. • Declining funding sources such as CMG programs are reducing resources for non -profits to provide services. Transportation can be a "hard sell" because other agencies (that are not transportation -related) may not understand the needs. • Need more bus service for Homeland area which has areas where there are dirt roads and seniors are unable to walk to the bus stop. Dial -a -ride service is limited when potential riders are "bumped" from pick-up service, • Medical transportation services require a fee. Need organizations to provide free or charge a nominal fee for service. (Care-A-Van's fee is $2.00 but this is not mandatory to receive service) • Drivers serve as "gatekeepers" to spot cases where contacting Adult Protective Services Is Important. • A "phenomena" Is occurring In Riverside County. Increasing numbers of grandparents within Riverside County are having the responsibility of caring for their grandchildren. Due to a number of reasons, parents are unable to care for their children. Some grandparents are in their 80's and face transportation Issues including having to transport their grandchildren to school and other activities. • • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS County of Riverside, Department of Mental • For case workers, transportation is an important issue to • Unsure how to • Create a dedicated shuttle route for clients Health access services. coordinate with other that would include agencies and • Provide transportation to the food bank, food stamps, doctors, post office. Riverside County agencies. Would like organizations that would provide needed services: The route could include • Because transportation is so critical for the clients, there is to coordinate more Riverside County Medical Center (Includes one full Lima staff member and one part time member closely with other Medically Indigent Program), Department devoted to assisting them with transportation agencies and of Public Social Services, Food Bank; and • The primary objective of the transportation staff is to get the clients to County office to visit the doctors and access medications that help stabilize their conditions. organizations. Shelter, These are special shuttles oriented to these client's "predictable travel patterns." • For clients located in rural areas such as Anza, Homeland, Idyl!wild, transportation is a challenge. Van access is the most efficient way to transport these clients. • Appropriate Project Ideas from AMMA • Vans are limited so need to fill vans to capacity and need to coordinate schedule with the doctors. Time increments may include for example, 11;30 am and then 12:00 pm. Clients are at times unable to wait too long because they suffer from anxiety and may become agitated, • Complaints about how long it takes to travel on public transportation to Riverside County Medical Center; it can take all day. • Providing special projects to get client to court but is rare. • Many clients cannot get on the bus because of their illnesses or lack of financial resources • 'Encouraging clients to visit the "Peer Drop -In -Center" in Transportation Needs Matrix; (Single point of information, .Educational initiatives, Buddy programs, Transit Fares, Promotion of Gold Pass, Door -through -Door assistance, Volunteer programs, Individualized trip planning, mileage reimbursement programs, appropriately placed bus shelters; driver education, creative fare options, more bus tokens, bus passes for job training trips, Transit education for case workers, understanding riders conditions). Perris for vocational training and interaction with peers. It is about 35 minutes by car and hours by bus. Clients will not go to the Center by bus because of the travel time. As result, they can become isolated and do not participate in programs. • Clients who need to seek Homeless Shelter for overnight stays face a transportation -related challenge in finding sleeping accommodations and trying to get to medical appointments. For example, everyday, they need to sign In by 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm and be out by the next day at 7:00 am. If they have a 3:00 pm appointment and have no access to a car or van service, it is very difficult to get back to Shelter in time to sign -in. 295 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT COORDINATION PLAN INTERVIEWSIWORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Home Instead Senior Care • Clients need to get to the doctor, emergency room and • Clients often do not • Education/training for caregivers regarding shopping but many are limited by low income and in some know who to call for transportation options that might be cases disabilities. Persons who need wheelchairs prefer not to travel by taxi because of the problems with access, • In certain areas, Dial•A•Ride is not available. transportation services. available for their dllents. At one office, there are 70 to 80 caregivers, Once trained these caregivers could provide • N.A. with respect to • Provide transportation as an "incidental' part of services. other agencies. information on transportation options. However, many clients need transportation and call just to ask to be driven to an appointment or to go shopping. They do not have access to transportation. Home Instead indicates to the client that this is not just for transportation but includes other services such as providing meals, assistance with dressing and during medical visits they write down the Doctor's comments. • Public Transportation is challenging because of the long travel time. One client travels from Sun City to the • Single point of information that is accessible and user-friendly for the client. Some clients have binders filled with Information regarding doctors, contacts and medications. Therefore, making the transportation information readily accessible would be very valuable, • Veterans Hospital in Loma Linda. Client rides scooter to the bus stop, takes the bus then transfers to another bus. This trip takes three hours. If a connection is missed, it could take four hours. Shuttle service from Sun City to Loma Linda would be helpful. • Some callers are "bed -bound" and they require extraordinary assistance to travel. In some cases, a Hoyer lift is needed to lift the client out of their bed and then they are assisted into a wheelchair. Next, they are helped Into a van with lift. • Many want to stay at home and not be placed in a care facility. Banning Family Health Center, County of • Vans to transport clients. Bus service does not begin early • Funding resources • Single point of information that Is 24 hour Riverside Health Department enough to,pick-up riders. If clients are travelling by bus to need to be available service. Provide advice on transportation Moreno Valley, they would be late to appointments. that would help to options, It might be similar to the medical • Approximately40 to 50 percent of the clients walk to the coordinate with other hotline and provide direct information on Center. This can be a challenge when It rains and some families are attempting to walk home with several children. agencies. the day the client plans to travel, • Transit vouchers would be beneficial. It can be difficult to watch children as they are walking home. It Is also a challenge for expectant mothers. • Bus service is needed for child care. • Need information on transportation options. 409 6 • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Riverside/San Bernardino Indian Health, Inc. • Transportation to the doctor and other non- Transit is not a viable option • Put out health and transportation emergency medical appointments. • because of the hours that Information through a County • Private transportation companies are expensive and dialysis Is offered and the campaign. can cost up to $100 per trip; frequency of service is not • Provide "door-to-door" assistance. • Transportation for other clients, for example those adequate, Most transit • Develop more bus shelters and needing to go a long distance is difficult. Some schedules and transportation benches so that riders, particularly clients travel to Los Angeles County including trips companies have limited hours older ones can sit down. to UCLA for chemotherapy. These are all day trips, • Weekend trips to the doctor are difficult to find that follow the work day schedule. However, patients • Driver education on the needs of III patients. service. sometimes have to start dialysis • Shuttles for Dialysis patients, Focus • Some private companies will drop-off a patient and treatments at 5:00 am or go on two Centers in Temecula. will leave them there to do other trips and not come later in the day ending at 9:00 • Single point of information for back for two hours. for the elderly, this can be tiring pm. For a 6:00 am patients to find varying transportation and challenging. • Some low income individuals or families need help appointment, they have to get up at 5:00 am, dress and eat to options, • Gas cards for friends and neighbors In learning how to use the transit system. It takes get to the Dialysis Center. to use their vehicle to provide skill to know what to say when calling for information Family members have to go to transportation. May be based upon or to cross the street. These are survival skills not work and it is difficult for them to distance travelled. taught in schools. • Auto maintence and repair is a majorissue. People cannot afford $600 to pay for. repairs. - take them to the Center. • Subsidies to help clients pay for auto repairs. • A draw -back with some mileage reimbursement programs is that some people do not want to wait to receive reimbursement for gas. Gas cards may be more effective. It is difficult for patients to maintain a regular schedule because of the after effects from treatment. Because Fluid is removed during treatment, patients are often weak and sleepy. To provide treatment, and "access blood", a central line is put into a vein or a "shunt" into the arm. After treatment is completed, the patient may bleed and pressure is placed on the arm or vein to stop the bleeding, Therefore, travelling immediately is not possible. They may need to stay 15 to 20 minutes longer. The patient's transportation must be flexible to meet their needs. In addition, the numbers 297 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Riverside/San Bernardino Indian Health, Inc„ continued within the target population who need dialysis treatment is increasing because some are diabetic, Native Americans or spouses are only eligible.for services. County of Riverside Department of Social • Transportation to job interviews/ training and child care. Potential liability • Projects that help fund gas cards and auto Services Employment Services • Provide gas cards or vouchers, if they have a vehicle, issues may require repair. CalWorks/GAIN but need more resources, • In the past, challenges in using gas vouchers, some looking Into fiscal matters, developing • Transit vouchers and vanpocls to service remote areas. stations would not accept them because it is a slow agreements and • Transportation Information that is made process to reimburse due tothegovernment process of memorandum of accessible to clients. payment. Using gas cards; hope to expand the program. • Staff uses County vehicles to provide transportation for clients due to lack of access. • Banning public transportation service is very limited. understanding. • Workers have jobs In Mira Loma where there are warehouses. These jobs are entry level and require workers to be there by 4:00 am but there is no bus service. • In remote areas of the County, public transportation is limited. Clients need to get to the district office or hospitals. They sometimes borrow a car for transportation. However, a major issue Is the costs of car repair. Frequently, they are unable to pay for maintenance and repair and no longer can use the car. Bus service does not start until 6:00 am and stops at 10:00 pm. Bus service that offers earlier and later hours is needed. DPSS used to provide assistance but a new funding source is needed. • Dial -a -Ride is not always available In remote areas. It is often full and riders must call in advance. • The $43 dollar a month gas subsidy that DPSS offers to those with cars is inadequate. It is based upon the cost of a bus pass. Typically, the subsidy will last for one week. Their clients are often unable to get to work and take their children to school or child care. This is a major challenge in getting to work and continuing in the program. Also, their salary is insufficient to pay for gas. Entry level positions begin at $7,50 per hour. Many work 20 hours per week and because of day care issues, they get to work late and leave early. Need more "advertising" in offices with information on where to call and access transportation services. • • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWS/WORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Corona Senior Center • Transportation service to access the Senior Center is needed. There is a residential community for those 55 years old plus called Trilogy. Because it is in an unincorporated area, the City of Corona does offer service for the residents. RTA does provide service to Metrolink and perhaps service could be extended to Trilogy along this route. There is a lodge nearby where seniors could ride golf carts and get picked up by the bus, There are amenities at • None. • Provide service to unincorporated areas of the county. • Extend service to the Trilogy community. . • Increase the service area of Dial -a -Ride. Triology but some residents look forward to the social interaction at the senior center. In addition, RTA's routes are sometimes limited and unable to go an extra block to make it convenient for the rider. • Seniors are unable to drive. There is a couple where the husband had a stroke and the wife cannot drive. They do not have access to transportation and are in a difficult situation, • The visually impaired range in age from 34 years old to 70. They need to socialize but transportation access is a challenge. When some buyers purchased homes, they saw the Corona mailing address and assumed that they had moved into the City. However, they live in unincorporated areas. Dial -a -ride will not go into these areas. However, there are unincorporated areas such as Home Gardens with transit service but not Clay Canyon. • Center provides van service but need more. Center takes seniors on field trips like the library and this provides them with social activities. City of Corona • In most of the unincorporated sections near the City • Sufficient funding to • Single point of Information, which begins of Corona and RTA, they do not provide service. coordinate and with one phone number to call. It would However, there are exceptions In certain areas develop joint projects. provide information on transportation where the City of Corona does provide service. Funding resources options. These include highly traveled destinations such as need to be increased • Educational outreach should be a "two-way" the Department of Motor Vehicles and Riverside City to offset the costs of approach to learn the needs of riders and College. If a proposed destination is outside of the providing service. the community. This should include City boundaries, the ridership must be high to be • Understanding the networking, which helps agencies to considered for service. Service ends at 900 pm and limitations of understand the particular needs of people. may need service until 10:00 pm. Service might be providers and each • Driver education programs that better considered as training. agency. enable them to help riders. 299 RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWSNVORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS City of Corona, continued • Dial -A -Ride service is open to everyone within the City boundaries. It is not restricted only to senior citizens and persons with disabilities. The visually impaired have special needs: • In the past, drivers were not educated as to the specific needs of the visually impaired. • If a person who is visually impaired is dropped off at location where they cannot read the sign, then they are lost. Drivers were provided training to help them understand that they needed to provide direction. • Public Transportation brochures needed to be printed in larger font to make it easier to read. The City then printed schedule times in larger font. • Certain colors are more readily viewed by the visually impaired. They used black and white to make it easier to read. • Challenges in identifying bus stops. The City uses ADA guidelines. Suggestions from working with the visually Impaired include: changing the heights on poles, using orange colors to be more visible during the evening. Funding these changes is a challenge. • Important to understand that each visually Impaired person has their own Individual needs. • Education is Important in getting people to understand different transportation options. Through education, some Dial -A -Ride riders became aware of fixed -route service. In some cases, they realized that fixed route service better served their needs and the cost was lower. • Education at senior centers was helpful in teaching seniors how to read a brochure and understand bus routes. • Subsidized fares for low-income individuals would be helpful but may not be feasible due to budget limitations. • Some seniors live in the suburb areas but want to participate in recreational activities. • • • • RCTC PUBLIC TRANSIT -HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN SUMMARY MATRIX OF STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT INTERVIEWSIWORKSHOPS BARRIERS TO AGENCY TRANSPORTATION NEEDS COORDINATION POTENTIAL PROJECTS Peppermint Ridge, a residential facility for • Trips purpose are typically for recreational activities, to • Must ensure that client • Collaborative opportunities around driver persons with developmental disabilities with doctor and medical appointments, to day programs and needs are met first, in any training and vehicle maintenance could outlying programs, including 11 homes work -related. sort of coordinated service help the agency. • Training of drivers, who are usually staff, is important and model — concerns about how • Joint purchasing of fuel Fleet of 28 vehicles with more than 20 in daily needed, Agency driver training programs exist and are to ensure own client trip operation. routinely updated but could be enriched by collaboration with public transit agencies. • Vehicle maintenance is a continuing issue although currently is well managed; vehicles are on a regular schedule of maintenance with new maintenance software recently obtained. Also, new van lift and tire changer equipment obtained (Section 5310 grant). needs will be met in any sort of collaborative trip -providing model. • Driver recruitment and availability of Class B license is a continuing challenge. Turnover is high making It difficult to retain good staff/ drivers. Riverside County Office on Aging • Produced a booklet of transportation needs and barriers for • Interjurisdictional — where • Projects that assist most frail in making their older adults in Riverside County. trips have to cross city transportation arrangements. • No centralized resources to assist consumers in finding boundaries or go between • Mobility manager/ case managers/ transit or getting information about it, • There are seniors who could use fixed route but special regions, e.g. Coachella Valley Into Riverside; Blythe transportation case managers for individuals to connect with available considerations around introducing them and getting them to utilize fixed route. into Riverside_ • Assistance levels not readily transportation, • Doorthough-door and high levels of • About 500 frail seniors and younger individuals with provided by the system for assisted transportation. disabilities are under case management care and have those who are most frail. • Free transportation for seniors on main line considerable difficulties navigating available transportation • Income an Issue for some services services; are in need of door-to-door and door -through- seniors which limits their • Driver training assistance could be offered door assistance. These individuals are often overwhelmed mobility. to the public operators to assist them In by losses — physical and otherwise — and cannot organize • Accessible pathways and being more sensitive to their frail elderly their own transportation services. • Need for "trip coaching" to assist these frail individuals in making their own arrangements. • Some in wheelchairs cannot do a car transfer making it difficult for volunteers or even care providers to assist_ • Some bed -bound individuals who need door -through -door assistance. physical barriers to accessibility continue to be issues in some public • spaces — need continued attention to "path of travel" issues. riders. • Need gurney transportation resources — do not really have such services that individuals (family members or care providers) can call in Riverside County. 301 • Appendix F Riverside County Transportation Commission Public Transit — Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan Summary of Public Outreach Efforts Public Workshops • "Roadmap for Coordinated Transportation Innovations" — Morongo Casino Resort, May 17, 2007 Committee Presentations • Social Services Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting, August 21, 2007 • Riverside County Transit Operators Meeting, August 22, 2007 • Technical Advisory Committee Meetings, September, October 30, 2007, November 29, 2007 Stakeholder Roundtables • Good Samaritans' Coachella Valley Transportation Round Table — Palm Desert, July 19, 2007 @8:30 AM • Inland Valley Regional Center, Vendor Roundtable, Monday, September 24, 2007 • CalWorks/GAIN, County of Riverside, Department of Public Social Services, GAIN Coordinator Roundtable, Banning, Thursday, October 4, 2007, @10:00 AM Project Development Meetings • City of Corona —City Hall, Public Works Department, Large Conference Room, Monday, October 22, 2007 9:30 AM • Coachella Valley Association of Govemments (CVAG), Room 115, Tuesday, October 23, 2007 9:30 AM Consumer Telephone Interviews and Meetings • Telephone Interviews with TRIP program participants • Blindness Support Services, Consumer Meeting, Friday, October 12, 2007, 10:00 AM " On -Site Interviews — By Region Western Riverside — Corona/Norco • Peppermint Ridge, Tracy Mauser, Friday, September 21, 2007 • Corona Senior Center, Leona Sparks, Corona, Monday, September 10, 2007 @ 11:00 AM • City of Corona, Public Works Department, Marie Sole Aranquiz, Corona, Monday, September 10, 2007 @1:00 PM 302 Western Riverside — Riverside • St Patrick's Church; Betty, Moreno Valley, Thursday, August 16 @ 10:00 AM • Inland Valley Regional Center, Tiki Thompson, San Bemardino, Friday, August 24 @ 10:00 AM • First 5 Riverside, Michelle Burroughs, Riverside, August 7, 2007 @ 9:00 AM • Partnership to Preserve Independent Living, Richard Smith, Riverside, August 7, 2007` @ 11:00 am. • Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), Riverside, Monday, October 1, 2007 @ 2:00 PM Western Riverside — Central • Department of Public Health, Sarah Mack, Riverside, Friday, August 24 @ 3:00 PM • Express Transportation Systems, Mesfin Shawel; Riverside, Friday, August 24 @ 12:00 PM • Inland Valley AIDS Project, D. Joy Gould, Riverside, Wednesday, August 29 @ 9:30 AM • California Family Life Center and (Care A Van), Mary Jo Ramirez, Hemet, Friday, August 31, 2007 @ 10:00 AM • County of Riverside, Department of Mental Health, Cynthia Read, Hemet, Friday, August 31 @ 1:00 PM Western Riverside — South • Department of Public Social Services, David Terrell, Riverside, Monday, September 10 @ 9:30 • Department of Behavioral Health, Jeff Pryor, Riverside, Friday, August 24 @ 1:30 PM • Riverside/San Bernardino County Indian Health, Patty Garcia, Temecula, Thursday, September 27, 2007 @ 9:00 AM (Telephone Interview) • Home Instead Senior Care, Sheryl Zitek, Temecula, Tuesday, September 25, 2007 @ 9:00 AM Western Riverside — Pass • Banning Senior Center, Heidi Meraz, Banning, Thursday, July 26, 2007 @ 1:00 PM • Banning Family Health Center, Gina Ortega, Wednesday, September 26, 2007 (Telephone Interview) Coachella Valley • Boys and Girls Club of Desert Hot Springs, Adam Sanchez, Thursday July 19, 2007 @ 11:30 AM • Foundation for the Retarded of the Desert, Richard Balocco, Palm Desert, Thursday July 26, 2007 @ 9:00 AM • Stroke Recovery Center, Beverly Greer, Palm Springs, Monday. August 6, 2007 @ 11:00 AM 303 • • Home Instead Senior Care, Renee Martinez, Palm Desert, Thursday, July 26, 2007 @ 11:00 AM • Coachella Valley Rescue Mission, Sue Meyers, Coachella Valley, Wednesday, August 8, 2007 @ 11:30 AM (Telephone Interview) • Cal Works/GAIN Program, Elizabeth Hawkins, Indio, Tuesday, July 31, 2007 @ 11:15 AM • Coachella Taxicab Owners Association, Sergio Santos, Palm Springs, Tuesday, July 31, 2007 @ 1:00 PM Palo Verde • Department of Mental Health, John Hermanson, Blythe, Wednesday, August 1, 2007 @ 11:00 AM • Palo Verde Transit , K. George Colangeli, Wednesday August 1 @ 1:00 PM 304 0 Appendix G Riverside County Transportation Commission Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan Consumer Telephone Survey 1. What type of trips do you currently make both in and outside of your community? (e.g., routine medical appointments, training or education, shopping, church, etc.) 2. What type of trip do you make most often? (e.g. medical, training, shopping, etc.) 3. What mode(s) of transportation (medical van, public Dial -a -Ride service, family private auto, etc.) do you use to make these trips? 4. What experiences have you had both good and bad, while making these trips? 5. What ideas do you have to improve transportation to better meet your current trip needs? 305 Appendix H Riverside County Transportation Commission Public Transit — Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan TRIP Program Interview Summaries 1. Enedina Caballero: September 27, 2007 at 12:30 Enedina Caballero is a 76-year-old woman, who currently resides in Blythe. Enedina Caballero stated that she did not use public transportation because she just had knee surgery and therefore is unable to walk around a lot. She usually gets rides from her daughter, but has to work around her daughter's busy schedule. This is an inconvenience to her at times because she has to wait to make her errands and it not able to get out of the house as much as she would like. When Mrs. Caballero was asked if there was anyway that transportation; could be improved to better meet her needs, .she stated that having a form of transportation that could pick her up from the house and maybe help her get around in the store and at doctors appointments would be much more convenient for her. 2. Angie Gibson: September 27, 2007 at 12:50 Angie Gibson is a 66-year old woman, who is lives in Blythe. Mrs. Gibson stated that she mostly receives rides from private care service providers and from family and friends. She said the problem with this method is that the care service providers only come to her house on certain days and the amount of hours that she has with them is limited. And her family and friends have jobs, so sometimes they are not able to take her on her daily errands. When Mrs. Gibson was asked about other forms of public transportation such as the bus and dial -a -ride, her response was that the dial -a -ride in her community requires her to fill out too much paperwork before using their services, which is a big inconvenience to her. She said that she is not able to walk very far by herself; therefore, walking to a bus stop is out of the question for her. She recommends that public transportation services be easier to access and could possibly help her to get around. 3. Patricia Donahue: September 27, 2007 at 1:05 Do not use public transportation declined to participate in interview process. 4. Susie Madison (Indio): September 27, 2007 CQ? 1:10 The telephone contact number provided for Susie Madison was no longer in service. 5. Margaret Mann: September 27, 2007 A1:12 Margaret Mann is an 84-year-old woman from Palm Desert, who is currently living alone. She suffers from osteoporosis and arthritis. She stated that most of her errands consist of going to the dentist, the hairdresser, grocery shopping, and the doctors office. She said she also liked to get out and go shopping but her transportation limitations do not allow her to do this as much as she would like to. Most of the errands that she runs are usually in the morning. She stated that she goes to the grocery store at least once a week. Mrs. Mann is currently using Sunline as a means of transportation. When asked how she felt about using the Sunline service overall, Mrs. Mann expressed mixed feelings. She stated that the last time she called them, she waited for the driver for 2 hours, but they never came, so she missed her doctors appointment. She also said that when she uses them to go to her doctor's appointments, she is usually dropped off at 306 7:30am and is not picked up until 5:30pm, because Sunline has other people to pick up. Not only is the tremendous wait time an inconvenience for her but she said that it is really scary to be somewhere all alone and not know for sure if your ride is going to come and pick you up or not. When Mrs. Mann does not use the Sunline service, she gets her daughter to take her places. But she said she feels bad asking her daughter for rides because she knows that she is busy with her own family and work, and feels like she is just an extra burden for her. Mrs. Mann stated that some of the improvements that could be made in her county are to provide paid rides to and from the doctors office, similar to the ones that she received when she lives in San Diego. She said that these rides should also be provided to and from the grocery store, although she cannot shop by herself. She felt that gains in the transportation system would help her to gain some of her independence back. 6. Simon Burton (Temecula): September 27, 2007 No response via telephone. 7. Louise Lewis: September 27, 2007 2:15 Louise Lewis is an 86-year-old woman, living in Riverside. Mrs. Lewis stated that she was not able to use any form of public transportation because she was recently diagnosed with congestive heart failure, and was not given that long to live. She stated that her nurses and caretakers come to her. 8. Barbara Marshall: September 27, 2007 A 2:20 Declined to participate in interview process. 9. Curtis Miller (Anna): September 27, 2007 0. 2:25 (no answer) 10. Elise Schoonmaker: September 27, 2007 A 2:30 Elise Schoonmaker is a 95-year-old woman currently residing in Sun City. She stated that she uses Dial -a -ride to make her errands such as: dentist appointments and the market. She said that she uses dial -a -ride to go to the grocery store once a week and twice a week just to get out of the house. Most of her errands are ran in the morning because she stated that dial -a -ride take a long time to pick her back up once they have dropped her off, and she doesn't like to be out late, therefore she is forced to make all her errands early in the moming. She said the long wait times are hard for her because she is very old. Mrs. Schoonmaker didn't state any specific ideas to improve the current transportation system, but did state that any improvement at this point would be good. 11. Betty Sprouse (Murrieta): September 27, 2007 p 3:00 (no answer) Declined participation in interview process. 12. Geneva Tice (Palm Springs): October 1, 2007 @12:15 Geneva Tice is a 79-year-old woman residing in Palm Springs. She currently lives alone. She uses transportation to make daily errands that consist of her routine doctor appointments and grocery store visits. These errands are mostly made in the morning. Mrs. Tice stated that she uses transportation service such as TRIP and a transportation program provided through her local church_ The TRIP program reimburses the volunteer driver according to the mileage. It is up to the person receiving the ride to keep a log of the miles driven, they must then submit that 307 to TRIP, who then reimburses the driver. Mrs. Tice said that she liked this program because people are much more willing to give her rides when they know that they will be getting paid to do so. When the Trip driver is unavailable to her, she then uses the transportation program through her church, which she has to pay for. She must purchase a book of tickets (each book contains 14 tickets) for ten dollars. Each ride is worth one ticket regardless of the distance traveled. Mrs. Tice seemed to be very pleased with her current forms of transportation and had no suggestions on how to improve it, besides the idea that the Trip program used me more largely utilized. 308 • • Appendix 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Public Transit — Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County Stakeholder Interview Guide 1. What is the role of transportation relative to the overall responsibilities of the agency/organization? 2. Whether the organization (or agency) operates transportation, and/or is aware of other public or private transportation programs and options; 3. What are the direct or indirect experiences with individuals and/or families in making trips (work, school, medical, other)? Is there a lack of transportation for them? What might be perceived impacts to the organization (Specifying individual or situational experiences with clients/consumers)? 4. What are the organization's opinions about possible barriers to the coordination of transportation services for clients and/or consumers?` 5. What types of transportation needs are unmet and/or which areas are underserved for your target population(s)? 6. Any recommendations on how to improve access to transportation services (and/or increase the availability of transportation services) in the community? 7. Any interest in participating in potential coordination projects? What are some of the potential project ideas and agency priorities or viewpoints? (exploratory discussion). 8. Other ideas or issues from the participants? 309 AGENDA ITEM 7K • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation. Commission FROM: Brian Champion, Program Manager Fina Clemente, Staff Analyst THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2007/08 Mid -Year Status of Productivity Improvement Program STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the second quarter report indicating that all eight transit operators either met or exceeded productivity targets in the FY 2007/08 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission oversees transit service in Riverside County primarily through the approval of Short Range Transit Plans. (SRTP), which details the operating and capital costs that are planned for transit services. Public Utilities Code (PUC) Section 99244 requires the Commission to annually identify, analyze, ,and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators (public bus and commuter rail) through the SRTP process. The PIP was designed to assist in the SRTP process and meet .state PUC requirements by establishing objective criteria for assessing productivity improvement opportunities. Moreover, the PIP is part of the Commission's comprehensive effort to work with the county's eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. The PIP establishes both mandatory and discretionary performance targets that are evaluated against the operator's actual performance. On September 12, 2007, the PIP policy was revised to reclassify operating cost per revenue hour from a mandatory target to a discretionary target. The revised policy now includes a single mandatory target and seven discretionary targets. Agenda Item 7K 310 The following performance indicators are evaluated through the PIP process: Mandatory Target • Fare box recovery ratio (between 10 percent for services provided in non - urbanized areas up to 20 percent for services in urbanized areas) Discretionary Targets • Operating cost per revenue hour (+/- 15% variance) • Subsidy per, passenger ( +/- 15% variance) • Subsidy per passenger mile (+/- 15% variance) • Subsidy per revenue hour (+/- 15% variance) • Subsidy per revenue mile (+/- 15% variance) • Passengers per revenue hour (+/- 15% variance) • Passengers per revenue mile (+/- 15% variance) Additional Discretionary Targets for Commuter. Rail Program • Ridership growth - goal of no • Passenger miles per revenue car - goal of 30 passengers per revenue car mile To be in compliance with the PIP, a bus operator needs to meet or exceed the required fare box recovery ratio and meet or exceed four of seven discretionary targets. The Commuter Rail Program must meet or exceed the required fare box recovery ratio as well as five out of nine discretionary targets. Commission staff is pleased to report that all eight transit operators have either met or exceeded their PIP targets through the second quarter of FY 2007/08. The cities of Beaumont and Corona, RTA, and SunLine have met the required fare box recovery target and all seven discretionary targets. The city of Riverside has 'met its mandatory fare box target as well as five out of seven discretionary targets, while the city of Banning and PVVTA have met four of seven discretionary targets in addition to the mandatory fare box target. RCTC's Commuter Rail Program has met its fare box requirement and seven out of nine discretionary targets. In cooperation with transit providers, Commission staff will monitor quarterly performance to ensure that transit services continue to be provided in an efficient manner. Attachments: 1) FY 2007/08 PIP Compliance Summary — Mid -Year Status 2) Service Provider Performance Target Report By Operator) Agenda Item 7K 311 • • • • PIP Indicators FY 2007/08 PIP COMPLIANCE SUMMARY - MID -YEAR STATUS July 2007 - December 2007 Banning Beaumont Corona Riverside RCTC Rail RTA SunLine PVVTA Mandatory:' 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio Discretionary: J J J J J 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour 2. Subsidy Per Passenger 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile 4. Subsidy Per Hour 5. Subsidy Per Mile J 0 N/A J J J J J J J J J J J J 0 J J 0 J 0 J J O J J J J J J J J J J J 0 0 0 J J 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 0 J J J J J J J 7, Passengers Per Revenue Mile Unlinked Passenger Trips (Rail) Passenger Miles •er Rev. Car Miles Rail Mandatory scorecard (Farebox Ratio) Discretionary scorecard J Met Farebox met 4 of 7 J J Met Farebox met 7 of 7 J Met Farebox met 7 of 7 J J Met Farebox meet 5 of 7 J J Met Farebox meet 7 of 9 J J Met Farebox meet 7 of 7 J J Met Farebox meet 7 of 7 J J Met Farebox met 4 of 7 J Legend: J = In Compliance 0 = Not in Compliance N/A = not available . PIP Program Policy Revision to reclassify Operating Cost per revenue Hour as a Discretionary Indicator approved by Commission on 9/12/07. To meet RCTC PIP Program, operators need to meet: a. Required farebox recovery ratio: (10%for municipal operators; 20% for Corona, 40% for Rail, 17.66% for RTA and 17.77% for SunLine) b. Bus Operators: Meet at least 4 of the 7 discretionary targets; Rail: Meet at least 5 of the 9 discretionary targets. Mid -Year FY 07/08 PIP Compliance (as of 2nd Quarter): • Operators that met Farebox: All Operators met Farebox ratio requirement. • Operators that met at least 4 of 7 Discretionary Targets: All Operators are in compliance with Discretionary Indicator requirement. 312 • • Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Banning Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 178,500 . Passenger Mlles Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 15,627.0 Total Actual Vehicle. Revenue Miles 254,158.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 264,302.0 Total Operating Expenses $1,189,294 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $130,800 Net Operating Expenses $1,058,494 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 10.99% I >= 10.00% I 10.04% Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $76.11 <= $76.82 $73.68 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $5.93 >_ $4.99 and <= $6.75 $7.05 Fails to Meet Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile None 4. Subsidy Per Hour $67.73 >= $55.45 and <= $75.03 $66.27 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mlle $4.16 >= $3.36 and <= $4.54 $4.07 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 11.4 >= 9.4 and <= 12.8 9.4 Falls to Meet Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.70 >= 0.57 and <= 0.77 0.58 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 4 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager" 3/14/2008 Page 1 of 8 Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Beaumont Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 124,626 Passenger Mlles 285,703 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 18,128.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 256,431.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 263,172.0 Total Operating Expenses $1,111,000 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $111,675 Net Operating Expenses $999,325 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 10.05% 1 >= 10.00% 11.09% IMeets Target Discredonary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $61.29 <= $71.26 $41.85 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $8.02 >= $8.02 and <= $10.86 $5.55 Better Than Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mlle $3.50 >= $3.79 and <= $5.13 $2.61 Better Than Target 4, Subsidy Per Hour $55.13 >_ $53.36 and <= $72.20 $37.21 Better Than Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $3.90 >= $3.49 and <= $4.72 $2.62 Better Than Target 6: Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.9 >m 5.6 and <= 7.6 6.7 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mlle 0.49 >= 0.37 and <= 0.49 0.47 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 7 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"' 30.441 Page 2 of • • • Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Corona Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2OO7/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 210,000 Passenger Miles 895,387 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 33,477.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 383,352.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 404,715.0 Total Operating Expenses $1,928,813 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $386,293 Net Operating Expenses $1,542,520 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio 20.020/0 I >= 20.000/0 I 20.00% 'Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $57.62 <_ $61.98 $54.95 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $7.35 >_ $6.58 and <_ $8.90 $6.21 Better Than Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $1.72 >_ $1.64 and <_ $2.22 $1.57 Better Than Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $46.08 >_ $44.00 and <_ $59.52 $43.96 Better Than Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $4.02 >_ $3.54 and <_ $4.80 $3.50 Better Than Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6.3 >= 5.7 and <= 7.7 7.1 Meets Target 7, Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.55 >= 0.46 and <= 0.62 0.56 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 DisaetIonary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 7 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"" 3/14/2008 Page 3 of 8 learalriwagr4seers atimassa Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Riverside Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 163,750 Passenger Mlles 673,873 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 43,834.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Mlles 755,485.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 784,323.0 Total Operating Expenses $3,016,719 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $312,000 Net Operating Expenses $2,704,719 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.340/0 i >= 10.00% I 10.91% 'Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $68.82 <_ $70.44 $77.14 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $16.52 >_ $11.97 and <_ $16.19 $14.87 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $4.01 >_ $2.99 and <_ $4.05 $3.72 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $61.70 >- $49.70 and <_ $67.24 $68.72 Fails to Meet Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $3.58 > _ $3.59 and <_ $4.85 $4.48 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 3.7 >= 3.6 and <= 4.8 4.6 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.22 >= 0.26 and <= 0.35 0.30 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement, Meets 5 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"" 3/14 Page 4 of 8 • • Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 52,772 Passenger Mlles 192,983 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 13,255.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 192,983.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 204,251.0 Total Operating Expenses $873,489 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $89,000 Net Operating Expenses $784,489 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1, Farebox Recovery Ratio I 10.180/0 >= 10.000/0 I 10.040/0 I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $65.90 <= $71.51 $73.80 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $14,87 >= $12.24 and <= $16.56 $16.83 Fails to Meet Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $4.07 >_ $2.42 and <= $3.28 $3.36 Falls to Meet Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $59.18 >= $52.52 and <= $71.06 $66.39 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $4.07 >= $2.92 and <= $3.96 $3.85 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 4.0 >= 3.7 and <= 5.0 3.9 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.27 >= 0.20 and <= 0.28 0.23 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 4 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCrC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"" 3/14/2008 Page S of 8 iaeratfaxryr:..rre++IwCasidnaa Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review RCTC Commuter Rail Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 2,996,389 Passenger Miles 102,399,288 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Train Hours 75,500.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Car Miles 3,006,960.0 Total Actual Vehicle Train Miles Total Operating Expenses $37,353,200 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $17,522,700 Net Operating Expenses $19,830,500 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 46.91% I >= 40.00% 46.34%'Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $494.74 <= $495.48 $519.15 Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $6,62 >= $4.92 and <= $6.66 $6.45 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mlle $0.19 >= $0.15 and <= $0.21 $0.18 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $262.66 >= $204.87 and <= $277.17 $278,53 Fails to Meet Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $6.59 >= $4,89 and <= $6.61 $6.54 Meets Target 6. passengers Per Revenue Hour 39.7 >= 35.4 and <= 47.8 43.2 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mlle 1.00 >= 0.84 and <= 1.14 1.01 Meets Target 8. Unlinked Passenger Trips 2,996,389 >= 2,987,138 1,531,525 I Meet Target 9. Passenger Miles per Rev. Car Miles 34.05 _ >= 28.95 and <= 39.16 35.38 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 5 out of 9 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 7 of 9 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"" 3/14 Page 6 at 8 • • • Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review Riverside Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,231,939 Passenger Miles 49,229,263 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 653,228.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Mlles 10,505,063.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,182,768.0 Total Operating Expenses $49,999,135 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $8,334,988 Net Operating Expenses $41,664,147 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 16.67% 1 >= 17.660/0 22.07%'Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $76.54 <= $76.54 $73.72 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $5.76 >= $4.54 and <= $6.14 $5.18 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.85 >= $0,67 and <= $0,91 $0,76 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $63.78 >= $50.98 and <= $68.98 $57.44 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mlle $3.97 >= $3.17 and <= $4.29 $3.50 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 11.1 >= 9.5 and <= 12.9 11.1 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.69 >= 0.60 and <= 0.81 0.68 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 7 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCrC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Managern" 3/14/2008 Page 7 of 8 (sir ioyMaliseComdata Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Review SunLIne Transit Agency Data Elements FY 2007/08 Plan FY 2007/08 Target FY 2007/08 Year to Date Through 2nd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 3,533,550 Passenger Miles 22,035,715 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 202,367.1 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Mlles 2,489,637.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 2,690,448.0 Total Operating Expenses $20,369,284 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,619,988 Net Operating Expenses $16,749,296 Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio I 17.77% I >= 17.770/0 I 18.45% I Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $100.66 <= $100.77 $95.00 Meets Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $4.74 >= $3.56 and <= $4.82 $4.53 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.76 >_ $0.58 and <= $0.78 $0.73 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $82.77 >= $67.39 and <= $91.17 $77.47 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $6.73 >= $5.20 and <= $7.04 $6.08 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 17.5 >= 16.1 and <= 21.7 17.1 Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile 1.42 >= 1.24 and <= 1.68 1.34 Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance summary: Meets FY 07/08 Farebox Ratio Requirement. Meets 7 of 7 Discretionary Indicators. Meets RCTC PIP Program. Service Provider Comments: TransTrack Manager"" 3/14 Page 8 of 8 • • AGENDA ITEM 7L • • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director Min Saysay; Right -of -Way Manager Karl Sauer, Bechtel Project Coordinator THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreements Related to the Construction of the State Route 74 Widening, and Realignment Project Between Dexter Avenue in the City of Lake Elsinore and 7' Street in the City of Perris BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 11 Approve Agreement No. 99-31-302-07, Amendment No. 7 to Agreement No. RO-9954, with SC Engineering for additional engineering design and survey services for State Route 74 widening project between Dexter Avenue in the city of Lake Elsinore (Lake Elsinore) and 7'" Street in the city of Perris (Perris); for a base amount of $354,636 and a contingency amount of $45,364 for a total amendment not to exceed amount of $400,000; 2) Approve Agreement No. 08-31-092-00 to Southern California Edison (SCE) with a revised not to exceed Commission cost of $701,260 and a revised cost share, for the cost to relocate the SCE facilities, between the Commission (51 %) and SCE (49%), which was required to allow for construction of the SR-74 widening and realignment project; 3) Approve Agreement No. 04-51-030-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 04-51-030, with Epic Land Solutions (Epic) for property management support services for Commission -owned parcels for a not to exceed amount of $70,000 and contingency amount of $10,000 for a total amendment not to exceed amount of $80,000; and 4) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Over the past several years the Measure A SR-74 widening and realignment project, between Dexter Avenue in Lake Elsinore and 7" Street in Perris, were completed and accepted by Caltrans. The improvements included realignment of Agenda Item 7L 321 curves and widening the existing two-lane roadway to four lanes with eight foot shoulders and a continuous 14-foot paved median. Even though construction has been completed and the project has have been accepted by Caltrans, there still remains close-out work associated with right-of-way acquisition and utility relocation services. This agenda item addresses three items that are required to support the close-out work. Item Number 1 — Additional Engineering Design And Survey Services At the January 13, 1999 meeting, the Commission awarded Agreement No. RO-9954 to SC Engineering to provide final PS&E design: services for the SR-74 improvement project. Over the years, there have been several amendments to the SC Engineering agreement to provide additional design services. Even though construction of the SR-74 project are completed, there still remain a number of engineering and surveying activities, mainly associated with the acquisition of right-of-way for the project that remains to be completed. Such scope was not included in the referenced SC Engineering agreement or amendments to date. Staff requested and SC Engineering responded, see attached letter dated March 13, 2008, with a scope of work and respective cost proposal to provide additional engineering and survey services to complete the remaining work associated with the SR-74 project. Staff has reviewed and concurs with the SC Engineering scope and cost. With this agenda item, staff is recommending that the Commission approve Agreement No. 99-31-302-07 with SC Engineering for additional engineering design and survey services for SR-74 widening project between Dexter Avenue in Lake Elsinore and 7'h Street in Perris, for a base amount of $354,636 and a contingency amount of $45,364 for a total amendment not to exceed amount of $400, 000. Item Number 2 — Utility Relocation Services At its January 8, 2003 meeting, the Commission approved Agreement No. 03-31- 048 with SCE, for an amount not to exceed $524,000, to relocate SCE facilities that interfered with construction of the SR-74 widening and realignment project from Dexter Avenue in Lake Elsinore to 7`h Street in Perris. Over the past several years, SCE has completed all its relocation services required, and the SR-74 project have been completed and accepted by Caltrans; however, Agreement No. 03-31-048 was never fully executed by SCE. Agenda Item 7L 322 • • The original SCE estimated total relocation costs of $1,310,000 and the original SCE assumed cost share between the Commission (40%) and SCE (60%) was the basis for the Commission's approved share of $524,000 and included in the original agreement. Subsequent to the completion of all the SCE relocation work, SCE has submitted a revised total cost to relocate its facilities of $1,375,019 and has provided back-up documentation to support a revised cost share between the Commission (51 %) and SCE (49%). Utility relocation cost sharing is based on prior rights encroachment permits and easement deeds. When the basis of utility installation is by encroachment permit, the utility company is responsible for relocation. When the facility was installed by virtue of an easement deed, the agency is responsible for relocation. A total of 127 SCE poles were relocated as a result of this project; 62 poles installed by virtue of encroachment permits and therefore the responsibility of SCE and 65 poles installed by easement deeds and therefore the responsibility of the Commission. Staff has reviewed the SCE revised total relocation cost and back-up documentation and is in concurrence with both. The Commission's share of the revised total relocation cost should be $701,260. This is an increase of $177,260 over the amount previously approved by the Commission. With this agenda item, staff recommends that the Commission approve Agreement No. 08-31-092-00 with SCE with a revised not to exceed Commission cost of $701,260 and a revised cost share, for the cost to relocate the SCE facilities, between the Commission (51 %) and SCE (49%) to allow for construction of the SR-74 widening and realignment project. Item Number 3 — Property Management Support Services At its November 12, 2003 meeting, the Commission awarded Agreement No. 04-51-030 to Epic for property management support services for Commission - owned properties for a not to exceed amount of $237,238. At its July 2004 meeting, the Commission approved Amendment No. 1 for a not to exceed amount of $374,589. At its December 2005 meeting, the Commission approved Amendment No. 2 in the amount of $301,850, and at its April 2007 meeting, Amendment No. 3 was approved by the Commission in the amount of $ 622,484. The main objective of Amendment No. 4 is to complete the transfer of title of right-of-way, purchased for the SR-74 widening and realignment project between Dexter Avenue in Lake Elsinore and 7' Street in Perris, from the Commission to Caltrans. This will involve the review of 366 acquisition and relocation assistance files to ensure compliance with Caltrans Right -of -Way Policies and Procedures. In Agenda Item 7L 323 some cases, acquisition documents are missing and have to be reproduced. Approval of this amendment in the amount of $80,000 will increase the total contract value to $1,616,161. A budget adjustment for FY 2007/08 in the amount of $80,000 is recommended. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: NO N/A Year. FY 2007/08 FY 2008l09 Amount:, $981 260 $200,000 Source of funds: Measure A Budget Ad ustment: Yes 222-31-81403 P3001 $ 80,000 FY 2007/08 GLA No.: 222-31-81102 P3001 $200,000 FY 2007/08 222-31-81102 P3001 $200,000 FY 2007/08 222-31-81301 P3001 $701,260 FY 2008/09 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \1414,4,01,,,,,, Date: 03/17/2008 Attachment: Letter from S.C. Engineering dated March 13, 2008 Agenda Item 7L 324 • TRANSPORTATION TRAFFIC CML ENGINEERING PROTECT/CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT December 20, 2007 (Updated March 13, 2008) Route 74 from Dexter Ave to Seventh Street Widen to 4-Lanes SC File: RCTC-99-01 Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3`d Floor Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Attention: Mr. Karl Sauer Project Coordinator Subject: Amendment No. 7 — Additional Right of Way Engineering and Design Services Dear Mr. Sauer: Per our conversation, itemized below are detailed descriptions of additional items that were performed or anticipated to be performed that were not covered in any previous scope of work, and are needed to complete the project: 1. Additional Right -of -Way (R/W) Engineering Services (Record of Survey) A. Increased County of Riverside Review Fees: The original estimated County of Riverside Review Fees was estimated at $3,200. As of today, $4,700 has been paid to Riverside County on Segment 1. Therefore, a fee increase of $8,800 is requested for Segment 2. B. Revise RAN Hard Copies Adjustments per Caltrans/Epic Land Solution Review: As you are aware, Caltrans has been reviewing the Route 74 deeds against the R/W Hard Copies and Maps. This work is anticipated to be completed in early 2008. Associated Engineers anticipates additional work associated with the review and updating the Record of Survey for Segment 2. Therefore a fee increase of $32,784 is requested. C. Reset R/W Monuments due to Record of Survey: As part of the Record of Survey Review, Riverside County requested additional monuments be field set. Therefore, a fee increase of $16,372 is requested. D. Modify Record of Surrey per County/Caltrans/Epic Land Solution Review: Revisions in the R/W hardcopy and additional RNV monuments required additional revisions to the Record of Survey. A Fee increase of $28,015 is requested. E. Prepare Legals and Plats (Segment 1) for Grant Deeds: Per Caltrans requirements, all legals and plats must be updated to current standard format prior to acceptance of Right of Way from RCTC: A Fee increase of $16,924 is requested. F. Prepare Legals and Plats (Segment 2) for Grant Deeds: Per Caltrans requirements, all legals and plats must be updated to current standard format prior to acceptance of Right of Way from RCTC. A Fee increase of $38,669 is requested. G. Compare As -Built to R/W Segment 2: Caltrans has requested that the contract as -built plans be compared against the original R/W Maps. A Fee increase of $27,658 is requested H. Revise/Update Legals and Plats per Various reviews Due to revisions in the R/W hardcopy, Record of Survey, and R/W requirement reviews, additional revisions to legals and plats are required. A Fee increase of $27,254 is requested A total increase of $196,476 is requested for R/W Engineering Services. SERVING THE TRANSPORTATION NEEDS OF IHE INLAND EMPIRE AND HIGH DESERT HEADQUARTERS 14890 SEVENTH STREET. UNIT B VICTORVILLE, CA 92395 780.955.77121243.955.6130 FAX Mr. Karl Sauer, Project Coordinator December 20, 2007 (Updated March 13, 2008) Riverside County Transportation Commission Page 2 2. Additional Design Efforts A. Contract As -Built Plans: a. Segment 2 - The original contract did not provide a budget to provide As -Built Plans. In order for Caltrans to "Close -Out" the design portion of the project, As -Built Plans were submitted to Caltrans. A Fee increase of $54,305 is requested. b. Greenwald Avenue - The original contract did not provide a budget to provide As -Built Plans. In order for Caltrans to "Close -Out" the design portion of the project, As -Built Plans were submitted to Caltrans. A Fee increase of $3,275 is requested B. Septic/Sewer System Design: During the construction of Segment 2, four septic systems failed due to existing high ground water. As a result, these septic systems required a special design. Listed below are the identified septic systems and the anticipated solution and anticipated design fee a. APN 326-240-021 — Connect to existing City of Perris sewer line on 7w Street- Design Fee $8,663. b. APN 342-120-013 — Construct a new "Mounded" Septic system on property Design Fee,$4,226. c. APN 342-130-009 — Construct a new "Mounded" Septic system on property -, Design Fee $4,226. d. APN 342-151-014 — Construct a new "Mounded" Septic system on property— Design Fee $5,071. e: Prepare Septic System Specifications and assist in the preparation of the construction contract document — Design Fee $2,536. C. Utility Joint Use Agreements (JUA): As part of the utility relocation coordination Caltrans requires JUA when utilities are relocated with State RNV. The following JUA will be prepared for each of the following utility company: a. The Gas Company — Design Fee $8,452. b. Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District (EVMWD) — Design Fee $8,452. c.. Southern California Edison — Design Fee $8,452. D. RNV Coordination/Review (Caltrans/Epic Land Solutions) — Segment 1: Caltrans has reviewed the Route 74, Segment 1 Grant Deeds against the RNV Requirement Plans, Hard Copies and: Maps. Caltrans requested that the Designer review and make recommendations on any discrepancies. This work was completed in completed in June 2007. A Fee increase of $8,241 is requested. E. R/W coordination/Review (Caltrans/Epic Land Solutions) — Segment 2: Caltrans has been reviewing the Route 74, Segment 2 Grant Deeds against the RAN Requirement Plans, Hard Copies and Maps. Caltrans will request that the Designer review and make recommendations on any discrepancies. This is anticipated to be completed in the spring 2008. A Fee increase of $16,904 is requested. F. Project Management/Coordination: Due to the length of the contract and the additional service items, additional project management and coordination is anticipated. A Fee increase of $25,356 is requested. A total increase of $158,160 is requested for additional Design Services. Therefore, a total of $354,636 is requested to complete and close-out the SR-74 widening project Once again, I appreciate the opportunity to serve RCTC and assist in the process of the approval of the necessary documents and provide a.safer transportation facility in Riverside County. Should you have any question, do not hesitate to call me at-760-955-7712. Sincerely, SC ENGINEERING c_ Sal Chavez, PE PrincipaVProject Manager cc: Project Files-55 326 STATE ROUTE 74, Segment 2 Additional Right of Way Engineering and Design Services - TASK - - - Estimated No. of Sheets .Estimated .: '.Hours/Sheet Estimated - Hours Firm Cost 1. ADDITIONAL RIGHT OF WAY. ENGINEERING A. increase County of Riverside Review Fee 1 - - AE $8,800 B. Revise RNV Hard Copies per Record of Survey/Caltrans/Epic Land 1 328 328 AE $32,784 C. Reset RN/ Monuments due to Record of Survey 1 61 61 AE $16,372 D. Modify Record of Survey per CailranslEpicLand Review 1 284 284 AE $28,0151;. E. Prepare Legals and Plats (Segment 1) for Deeds 1 182 182 AE $16,924 F. Prepare Legals and Plats (Segment 2)for Grant Deeds- 1 - 434 434 AE $38,669 G. Compare As -Built to RNV Segment 2.. 1 272 272 AE 827,658 H. Revise/Update Right of Way Maps per Caltrans/Epic Land Review. 1 264 264 AE $27,254. Subtotal 1,825 $196,476 2. ADDITIONAL DESIGN SERVICES - A. Contract As -Built Plans _ a. Segment 2 514 1.00 514.0 SC - $54,305 b. Greenwald Avenue 31 1.00 31.0 SC $3,275. B_ Septic/Sewer Systems Drawings/Plans - a. APN 326-240-021'(Connect to City of Perris Sewer System) 1 82 82 SC - $8,663 b. APN 342-120-013 (Mounted System) 1 40 40 SC $4,226 a APN 342-130-009 (Mounted System) 1 40 40 SC $4,226 d. APN 342-151-014 (Mounted System) 1 48. 48 SC $5,071 e. Septic. Specitications/Assist in the Construction Contract Preparatior 1 24 24 SC $2,536 C. Utility Joint Use Agreements a. The Gas Company 1 80 80 SC $8,452 b. Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District 1 80 80 SC $8,452 c. Southern Califomia Edison - 1 80 80 SC $8,452 D. RNV Coordination/Review with Caltrans and Epic Land - Segment 1 1 78 78 SC $8,241 E. RAN Coordination/Review with Caltrans and Epic Land - Segment 2 1 160 160 SC $16,904 F. Project Management/Coordination/Meetings 1 240 240 SC $25,356 _ Subtotal 556 1,497 SC $158,160 TOTAL 3,322 SC+SUBS $354,636 327 STATE ROUTE 74, Segment 2 Additional Right of Way Engineering and Design Services COST PROPOSAL WORKSHEET::a: COMPANY: SC ENGINEERING SCOPE OF WORK Additional R!W Engineering and Design Services DATE . December 21, 2007 (Updated 3-13-08 REVISION 1 PROJECT: State Route 74, Segment 1 and 2 MILESTONE/PHASE/PROJECT SUMMARY: SUMMARY DIRECT LABOR Sal Chavar _ Car) $osa/Sloff David Jenkins/Staff JohnDams/Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff MULTIPLIERS Project Manager 150.0 $ 55.00 $8.250 Senior Engineer 374.0 $ 47.00 $17,576 Civil Engineer 0.0 $ 42.00 $0 ChAl Engineer 524.0 $ - 40.00$20,960 Bridge Engineer 0.0 $ - $0 CADD Operator/Technician 449.9 $ 26.50 $11,899 Landscape Architect 0.0 $ - $0 Administrations/Project Controls 0.0 $ 26.00 $0 TOTAL HOURS' 1497.01 1497.0 ESCALATION (RATE) GENERAUADMINISTRATIVE @ 116.57% (of Total Direct Labor+ Escalation) PAYROLL ADDITIVES@ OTHER DIRECT COST 28 43% (of Total Direct Labor + Escalation) 145.00% $ 68,410.85 $ _ 16,684.57 TOTAL MULTIPLIERS Reproduction (Bond/Due Pdnts) (Actual Cost) 1 LS a $0 $58,687 ( $85,095. ' TOTAL OTHER DIRECT EXPENSES OUTSIDE SERVICES (wlo fee) ASSOCIATED ENGINEERS $196,476 so I TOTAL OTHER DIRECT EXPENSES FEES $196,476 I 'SC ENGINEERING 10% (of Total Direct Labor + Total Multipliers) $ 14,378.19 TOTAL MULTIPLIERS TOTAL COST $14,378 $354,636 328 • ASSOCIATED ENGINEERS, INC. Ref AE 99-138 • SR74 - Right of Way Engineering, Segments 1 & 2 Cost Proposal 01 /03/08 Revised 3/11/08 • TASKS Project Manager Chief Mapper Land Surveyor Survey Technician CADD Technician 3-Man Field Crew Chief of Surveys Clerical Proj Admin ODC Costs TOTAL HOURS TOTAL COST Rates: $217.95 $168.92 $120.21 $92.31 $87.18 $341.57 $120.56 $58.97 $65.38 Revise Hardcopy R/W Maps 4 16 72 96 120 12 8 328 $32,783.68 Reset R/W Monuments 1 4 8 40 6 2 61 $16,372.23 Modify Record of Survey 4 8 60 80 120 8 4 $8,800.00 284 $36,815.44 Prepare Legals and Deeds Seg. 1 (78) 4 16 40 40 80 2 182 $16,923,68 Prepare Legals and Deeds Seg. 2 (205) 6 24 100 100 200 4 434 $38,669.30 Compare As -built to R/W Seg. 2 4 16 48 120 80 4 272 $27,657.72 Revised.R/W Maps Seg.2 4 16 60 100 80 4 264 $27,254.04 Total Hours 27 100 388 536 400 40 6 300 28 $� `'s 1825 Total Costs $5,884.65 $16,892.00 $46,641.48 $49,478.16 $34,872.00 $13,662.80 $723.36 $17,691.00 $1,830.64 $8,800.00 -� $196,476.09 ODC Costs: County Checking Fees $8,800,00 SCOPE: Coordinate with Caltrans, RCTC and Riverside County to make adjustments to the hardcopy and R/W maps, reset previously set R!W monuments and modify the Record of Survey to show results. We have assumed that approximately 205 parcels in Segment 2 and 78parcels in Segment 1 will need revisions and new legals and deeds written. 0:199.1381AE COST-03.11-08 329 • AGENDA ITEM 7M • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Aaron Hake, Government Relations Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file an update on the State and Federal Legislation; and 2) Adopt a SUPPORT position on AB 2650 (Carter). BACKGROUND INFORMATION State Legislative Update Interstate 15 High Occupancy Toll Lane Project to Have Big Week in Sacramento Commission -sponsored AB 1954 (Jeffries) will receive its first hearing in the Assembly Transportation Committee on Monday, April 7. The purpose of the bill is to secure the Commission's 1-15 high occupancy toll (HOT) lane project as one of four available slots in an existing pilot program for HOT lanes. Legislative ratification is one of a two-step process required by Speaker Nunez's program. The other step is to receive an eligibility finding by the California Transportation Commission (CTC), which is expected to take place two days after AB 1954's hearing. The Commission is currently the only applicant under this program. The Commission has collaborated closely with the CTC and Caltrans in the development of its public partnership application for 1-15. CTC staff has conducted a thorough and exhaustive review of the project for its compliance with state laws and the Speaker's pilot program. By memorializing 1-15 as one of the four HOT lane projects statewide, the Legislature will enable the construction of more than 145 new lane miles of highway capacity at zero expense to the state. In such a severe fiscal environment and with congestion continuing to increase, the Commission's 1-15 project provides Agenda Item 7M 330 an opportunity for the Legislature to provide relief to the traveling public without placing additional burden on the state's budget. State Route 91 Legislation to be Heard in Senate Transportation and Housing Committee The Commission and Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) joint - sponsored SB 1316 (Correa) will be heard in Senator Alan Lowenthal's (D-Long Beach) committee on Tuesday, April 8. To review, the bill makes amendments to AB 1010 (passed in 2002), which will allow the Commission to develop its planned extension of the SR-91 Express Lanes while maintaining the public interest protections that were crucial in transferring the original express lane franchise out of private ownership. The bill authorizes the Commission to develop the express lanes extension under public ownership and operation, in compliance with all Caltrans and Federal Highway Administration standards for design, construction, inspection, and operation. Non -compete clauses in any agreement regarding the lanes are expressly prohibited in the bill. Toll revenues are required to be used to repay bonds issued by the Commission to finance the project; excess revenues generated by the toll facility will be required to be reinvested in improvements to the SR-91 corridor. In drafting the bill language, both agencies and the author have placed a premium on ensuring accountability and public benefit. Additionally, the bill allows OCTA to use excess toll revenues to construct a direct -connector from the existing SR-91 Express Lanes to the SR-241 toll road. Currently, commuters must chose between the SR-91 Express Lanes and SR-241, causing many commuters heading to and from south Orange County to endure heavy congestion in the mainline of SR-91. OCTA's proposed project would allow seamless transition between both toll facilities and further reduce congestion on the mainline of SR-91. Also, the bill extends the term of OCTA's franchise to match the 50-year length of the Commission's tolling authority. The purpose of this amendment is to allow both counties' toll roads to connect seamlessly without one half creating a bottleneck when the OCTA term reverts to general purpose lanes in 2030. The extended term also allows OCTA to finance the direct connector between the SR-91 and SR-241 and other major corridor improvements. Commission staff has been working with OCTA and Senator Correa to gather a broad coalition of support for the SR-91 project. SR-91 has one of the worst levels of congestion in California and one lane in each direction provided by Measure A by 2039 is simply not enough to address the challenges of that freeway. Agenda Item 7M 331 • • • • New capacity under public ownership financed by user fees is the only way to go above and beyond what is currently planned for this vital corridor. Inland Empire Legislator Introduces Bill to Extend Streamlining Program Rialto Assemblymember Wilmer Amina Carter has introduced AB 2650 on behalf of Caltrans to extend the pilot program that allows California (and other states) to streamline the environmental approval process for transportation projects. Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) created an experimental program whereby states could accept responsibility for clearing projects through the NEPA process. By participating in this program, states were required to waive their 11' Amendment sovereign immunity and accept the jurisdiction of the federal courts. Legislation is required to waive this right and participate in the program. The initial legislation passed several years ago contained a sunset date for the 11' Amendment waiver of January 1, 2009. However, the program took several years after the passage of SAFETEA-LU to take effect in California; to date it has only been in effect for six months. In order to allow for more time to conduct this streamlining program, AB 2650 extends the sunset date for the 1 1 `" Amendment waiver to August 10, 2011. Caltrans reports that draft environmental documents have been approved in 72% less time under this program, and final environmental documents have taken 67% less time. In Light of the Commission's program of projects to be delivered in the coming years, programs such as NEPA delegation will be important to expediting delivery. Thus, staff recommends the Commission adopt a SUPPORT position on AB 2650 (Carter). Federal Legislative Update The election -year environment in Washington, DC is reaching a fever pitch. A symptom of this fever includes the debate over a one-year moratorium on earmarks, which are special projects identified by members of Congress in bills for specific funding. Earmarks for important transportation projects are often the focus of lobbying efforts by public agencies such as the Commission and its member cities. Although the Senate defeated an attempt to ban earmarks in FY 2009, the President and Congressional Republicans continue to pressure the Democrat leadership to severely cut down on the level of earmarking this year. Fewer earmarks generally mean more discretionary funds available to the Administration for grant programs. Commission staff will monitor the movement of the federal budget and any opportunities to secure funding for Commission priorities. Agenda Item 7M 332 The Commission Seeks to Keep Perris Valley Line in the President's Budget President Bush's FY 2008/09 budget includes $50 million for the Commission's Perris Valley Line (PVL) Metrolink extension project. This line item in the Small Starts category of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) budget is only a proposal to Congress at this point in the process. 'Congress is currently in the process of passing' its own budget resolution and will move to appropriate funds according to that budget later this year. RCTC Commissioner and Metrolink Chair, Ron Roberts was in Washington, DC in February advocating to members of Congress to keep the President's request in the final federal budget. The PVL was also a major topic of discussion for Commission Chair Jeff Stone during his visits with Senator Barbara Boxer and Representatives Ken Calvert, Mary Bono Mack, Jerry Lewis, and James Oberstar ID -MN, Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee). Senator Diane Feinstein, a member of the subcommittee, which appropriates funds for transportation projects, has been a major proponent of the PVL. Commission advocate Cliff Madison and Executive Director Anne Mayer have met with Senator Feinstein's appropriations staff to discuss the project. The Commission's message to Congress is that the $50 million recommendation is appropriate and necessary to keep the PVL moving forward on schedule Now that the project has received a "medium -high" Small Starts rating from FTA, the project's development will begin to accelerate and funds will be expended at increasing levels. The President's recommended funding is based on the Administration's confidence in the Commission's ability to deliver the project. Senator Boxer Invited to Transportation Town Hall Meeting Pursuant to the Commission's action at its annual workshop at the end of February, Chair Stone has officially extended an invitation to Senator Boxer to attend a town hall meeting in Riverside County to discuss the county's transportation priorities and collaborative efforts. Senator Boxer's office was receptive to the idea; Commission staff and DC -based advocates will continue to follow-up to secure a date and location with the Senator. Commissioners visiting Washington, DC in the near future are encouraged to express their continued interest in hosting the Senator in Riverside County to discuss transportation issues. Agenda Item 7M 333 • • AGENDA ITEM 8 PRESENTATION • AGENDA ITEM 9 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 9, 2008 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposed Debt Issuance BUSGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to direct staff to continue efforts to develop a plan to refinance the outstanding commercial paper. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In March 2005, the Commission launched its $185 million commercial paper program to provide advance funding for projects included in the 2009 Measure A expenditure plan. The 2009 Measure A commences on July 1, 2009, and the first sales tax receipt is not anticipated until September 2009. As of March 14, 2008, the Commission has issued $1 10 million of commercial paper and has expended approximately $92 million of the commercial paper proceeds; however, the available balance of specific funding commitments made by the Commission is approximately $53 million. Additionally, the Commission is using commercial paper during FY 2007l08 to fund the significant engineering contracts related to the 10-Year Western County Highway Delivery Plan projects. Accordingly, there is little remaining capacity in the commercial paper program to commit to funding additional project efforts in FY 2008/09 and beyond, such as the Perris Valley Line (PVL) extension. Short-term financing will be required for the PVL project, now that it has received the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) rating that allows the Commission to commence preliminary engineering activities. Although the 'President's FY 2008/09 budget includes $50 million for the PVL project under the FTA Small Starts program and the remaining $25 million is expected in the following year, the Commission should plan to use available Commission funds until reimbursements can be requested at a later date. Staff has communicated this preliminary plan of financing to the FTA oversight team, as this is an aspect of its oversight of the project. Agenda Item 9 334 Plan of Finance Based on this need for additional financing capacity, staff has prepared a preliminary plan of finance with the assistance of its financing team to issue approximately $130 million of sales tax revenue bonds (2008 Bonds l to refinance the outstanding commercial paper; fund capitalized interest on the bonds through December 1, 2009, since sales tax receipts will not commence until September 2009; establish a reserve fund; and pay costs of issuance of the 2008 Bonds. The combination of the commercial paper program maximum debt capacity of $185 million and the proposed 2008 Bonds of $130 million, aggregating $315. million, will not exceed the $500 million debt limitation specified in the 2009 Measure A. The proposed 2008 Bonds are long-term bonds due in June 2029. The general terms include an initial interest rate period through December 1, 2009, at which time the 2008 Bonds would be remarketed and a new long-term rate period would be established. In the unlikely event that the Commission does not have access to the capital markets on December 1, 2009, the existing bond holders would continue to own the 2008 Bonds and those bonds will bear an interest rate of 1 1 % until such time as the bonds can be remarketed. Considering the Commission's strong underlying credit ratings, at present there are no plans to obtain a liquidity facility, e.g., letter of credit, or credit enhancement, e.g., bond insurance, to support the 2008 Bonds. It will be repaid solely from 2009 Measure A sales tax receipts. The initial interest rate period coincides with the October 1, 2009, effective date of the Commission's forward -starting interest rate swaps aggregating a notional amount of $185 million. The financing team that has participated in the development of this proposed plan of finance is similar to the team for the commercial paper program and includes the following key members: • Financial Advisor: Fieldman, Rolapp & Associates; • Bond Counsel: Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP; • Disclosure Counsel: Nossaman, Guthner, Knox & Elliott LLP; • General Counsel: Best, Best & Krieger LLP; and • Underwriters/Remarketing Agents: Lehman Brothers and Banc of America Securities LLC. Agenda Item 9 335 • w • Arrangements have been made to present this plan of finance to the rating agencies. Chair Jeff Stone, Executive Director Anne Mayer, Chief Financial Officer Theresia Trevino, and certain members of the finance team will participate in these presentations to confirm the strong credit ratings on the Commission's outstanding bonds and to seek ratings on the 2008 Bonds in light of the recent decline in sales tax revenues. Meetings with Standard & Poors as well as Fitch Ratings are scheduled on April 21, 2008 in New York and with Moody's Investors Service on April 30, 2008 in San Francisco. Credit ratings are expected to be received by May 8, 2008. The proposed documents for this transaction will continue to be revised for any matters that arise as a result of these rating meetings and any other matters. Final documents will be presented for approval at the May 14, 2008 Commission meeting. Drafts of the documents for the proposed 2008 Bonds are included as attachments to this staff report for preliminary consideration and consist of the following: • Preliminary official statement (draft); • Resolution No. 08-010 (draft) authorizing the issuance and sale of a not to exceed amount of sales tax revenue bonds; the execution and delivery of an indenture, supplemental indenture, purchase contract, and official statement; and the taking of all other actions necessary in connection with this transaction; • Indenture between the Commission and the trustee (draft) regarding the terms and conditions of the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds; • First supplemental indenture between the Commission and the trustee (draft) regarding the terms and conditions of the issuance of the 2008 Bonds; and • Bond purchase agreement (draft) between Lehman Brothers, as senior managing underwriter, and the Commission regarding the purchase of the 2008 Bonds. As part of the action that is expected to occur on May 14, 2008, to authorize the issuance of the 2008 Bonds, the Commission will be approving the form of the Preliminary Official Statement and authorizing its distribution in connection with the sale of the 2008 Bonds, as well as the preparation of a final Official Statement once the 2008 Bonds have been priced. These offering documents are required under state and federal securities laws prohibiting the offer and sale of securities such as the 2008 Bonds unless all matters that would be material to an investor in the 2008 Bonds have been adequately disclosed and that there is no omission of material facts: Furthermore, under rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the underwriters cannot purchase the 2008 Bonds unless they have received a "substantially final" offering document which discloses all material information that they reasonably believe to be true and correct. Agenda Item 9 336 The Commissioners serving on the Board as the governing body of the issuer of the 2008 Bonds are expected to read and be familiar with the information described in the draft Preliminary Official Statement included with this staff report. The Commissioners may employ the services of experts to take the lead in the drafting and review of the official statement, but the Commissioners have the duty . to review the information and bring to the attention of those responsible for the preparation of the offering document any misstatements or omissions in the draft and to ask questions if they are unclear about the information or their role. The financing team will be available at the Commission meeting to respond to the identification of any misstatements or omissions or to such questions. Anticipating Commission approval for this transaction on May 14, 2008, the pricing activities related to the 2008 Bonds are expected to occur through the end of May 2008 with a closing date of June 10, 2008 for the issuance of the 2008 Bonds. Current Credit Market Environment Recent events in the credit market and the related impacts on municipal bond insurers and large banking institutions cannot be overlooked as part of the proposed transaction. Accordingly, staff has obtained the attached memorandum from its financial advisor regarding the Commission's situation and risks as contemplated in the structure of the proposed transaction and recent challenges in the market In order to proceed with the proposed plan of finance for the 2008 Bonds, staff is requesting that the Commission provide conceptual approval and direct staff to continue its efforts with the development of the proposed financing for the 2008 Bonds, including the required documents. Financial Information $130,000,000 bond In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2007/08 Amount: Proceeds; $950,000 costs of issuance Source of Funds: Sales tax revenue bonds Budget Adjustment: Yes (pending) GLA No.: 303 31 59102 $130,000,000 Estimated Bond Proceeds 303 31 96103 $ 950,000 Estimated Costs of Issuance Fiscal Procedures Approved: \141,„taatevro Date: 03/17/2008 Agenda Item 9 337 • • • Attachments: 1) Financial Advisor Memorandum Dated March 14, 2008 2) Preliminary Official Statement (Draft) 3) Resolution No. 08-010 (Draft) 4) Indenture (Draft) 5) First Supplemental Indenture (Draft) 6) Bond Purchase Agreement (Draft) Agenda Item 9 338 FIELDMAN 1 ROLAPP & ASSOCIATES To: heresia Trevino Chief Financial Officer Riverside County Transportation Commission From: Daniel L. Wiles, Principal and General Counsel Anna V. Racheva, Vice President Heldman, Rolapp & Associates Re: Impact of Recent Market Events Date: March 14, 2008 ATTACHMENT MEMORANDUM The Commission's Situation As noted in Ms. Trevino's memorandum, the Commission is considering the issuance of debt (the "2008 Bonds') to refinance approximately $100 million of its outstanding Commercial Paper obligations. As currently envisioned, the new bonds will be sold with a fixed rate until October 1, 2009. On that date, the Commission will need to reinarket those bonds, that is, resell them to new investors. In addition, the Commission will also intend to market additional bonds on a similar basis to refinance the remaining $85 million of its original Commercial Paper program. In October 2009, when the Commission markets its bonds, the Commission will have a broad variety of options for the terms of the bonds, including the mode of interest rate (fixed or variable) and the type of security for the bonds (enhanced with a bank letter of credit/bond insurance or based solely on sales tax revenues). Like any issuer of bonds, the Commission will face the types of risks that come with access to the capital markets. Interest rates can change, markets have greater and lesser demand, and certain types of features have greater or lesser value in the eyes of bond owners. The ter -ma of the Commission's upcoming bond issue provide for a "penalty" rate —estimated to be 11 °%o. The penalty rate would be in effect for any period for which the Coimnission can not successfully remarket bonds, requiting the original holders to continue to retain them. The first possibility of that occurrence is October 1, 2009, the date on which the original 2008 Bonds must be remarketed. If those bonds were not successfully remarketed on that date, the Corurnission would pay the 11% penalty rate until the 2008 Bonds can be remarketed or refinanced successfully. Recent Challenges to the Municipal Credit Markets: Over the past 6-8 months, the markets for municipal bonds in the United States have been challenged on a number of fronts. The overall "credit crisis and the reliance on "sub -prime" mortgages for the US housing market have winnowed the ranks of the municipal bond insurers. The uncertainty as to credit quality of insuredpaper is reflected in the drastically weakened demand for auction rate securities —bonds with a variable interest rate for which the current holder bears the risk of the unavailability of liquidity in the market for resale. In rum; the stress on large banking institutions has reduced the availability of traditional bank liquidity to support public finance transactions, and significantly raised the cost of that liquidity. 8.AI.TT:Comm .Fieldman Memo.Debt Issuance.doc - 1 339 MEMORANDUM The Commission's Risks You have asked if the current transaction exposes the Commission to the risks highlighted by the market's recent troubles. We believe while the Commission will be exposed to some market risk by needing to remarket the 2008 Bonds and market additional bonds in 2009, we believe that the level of that risk is very low. Moreover, the Commission has such wide latitude in structuring its future financings that troubles in any specific market sector, like those seen in the past few months, generally can be avoided by the judicious selection of debt structure and the choice of the related market segment into which the bonds will be sold. Relating the Commission's Debt Structure to the Market The Commission's sales tax based debt is highly rated in the high AA category by both Moody's Investors Service and Standard & Poor's Rating Services. We anticipate a similar rating by FitchRatings. The most recent troubles in the municipal market stem from the impact of rating downgrades of the primary bond insurers. The exposure of the major AAA rated insurers to the risks from collateralized debt obligations and sub -prune mortgages has clouded the perceived financial strength of three of the four primary insurers. Only FSA has avoided significant credit impacts- Each other insurer has received at least one downgrade by one of the three major rating agencies_ Moreover, Assured Guaranty, formerly a minor and new bond insurer, has seen its value rise significantly. In Sian, the environment for municipal bond insurance, measured by the number of the participants, the cost of municipal bond insurance and the value of that insurance has changed dramatically. The effects of these changes in the bond insurance market tend to fall most heavily on issuers having underlying ratings in the A and BBB categories, the categories for which bond insurance has the most value. While well rated issuers, including the Commission, have issued insured debt, the primary rationale for the use of insurance has been to broaden market access, not specifically to enhance credit Well rated issuers of Erred rate debt have continued to have good market access to long term debt financing. Much of the market focus on troubles in municipal securities has centered on auction rate securities. Auction rate securities ("ARS") are variable rate securities used by a number of sophisticated issuers. The primary structural feature of ARS is that the holder of ARS takes the risk of remarketing at the time of each rate reset. When an interest rate period, generally 7 days, ends, the designated broker -dealer holds an auction to determine the next interest rate. Purchasers provide their proposed rates and the lowest rate at which all of the ARS are remarketed is the rate payable on the ARS for the succeeding period. If there is a failure to remarket, the penalty rate applies and the existing holders of the ARS must continue to hold (absent sales on the open market). Holders of auction rate securities have reacted strongly to the weakening of bond insurers and have chosen to release their debt for remarketing without providing an auction bid. Over the past 4 weeks, this resulted in "failed remarketings" at which the ARS were reset to the penalty rate. We note that each issue for which this occurred has subsequently had its interest rate come down from the penalty rate on subsequent remarketings. However, the rates have not equaled the rates prevailing prior to early February 2008. This has prompted a number of issuers of ARS to consider remarketing of their securities on a different interest rate basis. At the same time that ARS issues were experiencing liquidity troubles, the primary providers of liquidity and credit support for more traditional variable rate debt were experiencing their own changes A traditional variable rate bond program relies on external support for both liquidity and credit. Holders of traditional variable rate bonds do not take any risk of remarketing. The liquidity support allows the issuer to have sufficient fiords to provide payment for those bondholders wishing to relinquish their bonds at any interest rate change. 8.AI.TT.Comm.Fieldman Memo.Debt Issuance.doe - 2 - • 340 • MEMORANDUM The current troubles in the market have impacted a number of the large banking institutions that tend to provide the liquidity and credit support. _Moreover, those institutions that continue to provide letters of credit, are able to charge significantly higher -rates for their service. This can negatively impact the cost of future financings, including those of the Commission. When the Commission remarkets the 2008 Bonds and issues additional bonds relating to the remainder of its commercial paper program, it will face the requirement to successfully place its debt. However, the situation facing the Commission differs significantly from the situation of market participants during early 2008. There are two fundamental differences: 1. The Commission will be engaged in a lengthy effort to remarket-its bonds prior to the deadline. Unlike the issuers involved in failed ARS sales, the Commission will have months to plan and execute its remarketing plan. The Commission will not be locked into a specific requirement to remarket on a particular date; it can move forward at a date earlier than October 1, 2009, if circumstances warrant. 2. The Commission has a number of options as to the structure of its bonds on remarketing or refinancing. The current troubles in the market are focused on specific types of bonds, with specific security. The problem areas fight now concern ARS as described above and certain bonds with credit enhancement. As we noted above, many of the bond insurers are under credit stress; moreover, many of the providers of bank credit and liquidity support for variable rate debt are either under credit stress themselves or are in position to charge significantly higher fees. However, the -Commission has a significant amount of latitude to structure its 2009 offerings. To the extent that certain problem areas exist, the structure can be altered to avoid or minimize those -problems. 'there is no financial transaction free of all risk. However, given the Commission's alternatives, we believe that the negative impacts comparable to those currently experienced by issuers can be controlled by the Commission. We do not believe that the Commission faces significant risk of negative impact resulting from the structure of the 2008 Bonds. 8.A1.TT.Comm.Fieldman Memo.Debt Issuance.doc 341 ATTACHMENT 2 NGKE Draft dated April 1, 2008 PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL STATEMENT, DATED , 2008 NEW ISSUE —BOOK -ENTRY ONLY Ratings for the Series 2008 Bonds (as defined herein): • Moody's: "_" Fitch:" " S&P: " " See "RATINGS" herein [DACLogo] In the opinion of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP, Bond Counsel, based on an analysis of existing law, statutes, regulations, rulings and court decisions and assuming, among other matters, the accuracy of certain representations and compliance with certain covenants, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes under Section 103 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and is exempt from State of California personal income taxes. In the opireion of Bond Counsel, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is not a specific preference item for purposes of the federal individual or corporate alternative minimum taxes, although Bond Counsel observes that such interest is included in adjusted current earnings in calculating corporate alternative minimum taxable income. Bond Counsel expresses no opinion regarding any other federal or state tax consequences related to the ownership or disposition of, or the accrual or receipt of interest on, the Series 2008 Bonds. See "TAX EXEMPTION" herein. Dated: Date of Delivery Due June 1, 2029 The Sales Tax Revenue Bonds described above (the "Series 2008 Bonds") are being issued by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") to (i) refinance all of the outstanding principal amount of the Commission's Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and Series B, as more particularly described herein (collectively, the "Notes"), (ii) fund capitalized interest on the Series 2008 Bonds through December 1, 2009, (iii) fund a reserve fund for the Series 2008 Bonds, and (iv) pay costs of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. The initial Interest Rate Period for the Series 2008 Bonds will be a Long -Tenn Rate Period and the initial Long -Term Rate Period will be the period commencing on and including the date of delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds and ending on and excluding December 1, 2009. The Series 2008 Bonds shall initially bear interest at a rate of % per annum. During the initial Long -Term Rate Period, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is payable semi-annually on June 1 and December I of each year, commencing on December 1, 2008, except that the final interest payment with respect to the initial Long Term Interest Rate Period shall be paid on December 1, 2009. On December 1, 2009, there will be a mandatory tender for purchase of the Series 2008 Bonds (the "Initial Mandatory Tender Date"). The Commission has agreed prior to the Initial Mandatory Tender Date to hire remarketing agents to use their best efforts to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds on such date. If such remarketing agents are unable to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds on the Initial Mandatory Tender Date, such Series 2008 Bonds will continue to be owned by the then current Holdersand will commence to bear interest at the rate of % per annum until such time as the Commission elects to adjust the interest rate to be borne on the Series 2008 Bonds to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Long -Term Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or a Fixed Interest Rate and there is a successful remarketing of the Series 2008 Bonds. There is no liquidity facility supporting the purchase of the Series 2008 Bonds on the Initial Mandatory Tender Date, nor is there any plan to provide any. The interest rate on the Series 2008 Bonds may thereafter be adjusted to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, a Long -Term Rate, a Commercial Paper Rate or a Fixed Rate, as provided in the Indenture. The Series 2008 Bonds are initially being issued as fully registered bonds without coupons in the denominations of $5,000 or any integral multiple thereof. The Series 2008 Bonds will be registered in the name of Cede & Co., as holder of the Series 2008 Bonds and nominee for The Depository Trust Company ("DTC"), New York, New York. Purchasers will not receive certificates representing their interest in the Series 2008 Bonds purchased. The principal or redemption price of and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is payable by wire transfer to DTC which, in turn, will remit such principal, redemption price or interest to the DTC Participants for subsequent disbursement to the Beneficial Owners of the Series 2008 Bonds, as more fully discussed herein. The Series 2008 Bonds will mature on June I, 2029. This Official Statement is not intended to provide certain information with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds (including the terms of such Series 2008 Bonds) after conversion from the initial Long -Term Rate. Owners and prospective purchasers of the Series 2008 Bonds should not rely on this Official Statement for information concerning the Series 2008 Bonds in connection with any conversion of the Series 2008 Bonds to Series 2008 Bonds bearing interest at a rate other than a Long -Term Rate, but should look solely to the offering document to be used in connection with any such conversion. The Series 2008 Bonds are subject to redemption prior to maturity, as more fully described herein. During the initial Long -Term Rate Period, the Series 2008 Bonds are not subject to redemption. The Series 2008 Bonds are special obligations of the Commission payable from and secured solely by a pledge of the Revenues {which is defined herein and which principally includes the receipts from the imposition in the County of Riverside, California of a 'Lz- RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds) Series 2008 A .. Preliminary, subject to change. 342 cent sales tax scheduled to take effect July 1, 2009 (the "Sales Tax"), less certain administrative fees paid to the California State Board of Equalization), as described herein. The Sales Tax was approved by more than a 2/3 vote of the electorate of the County of Riverside on November 5, 2002 and is scheduled to expire on June 30, 2039. NEITHER THE FAITH AND CREDIT NOR THE TAXING POWER OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE, THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OR PUBLIC AGENCY THEREOF, OTHER THAN THE COMMISSION TO THE EXTENT OF THE PLEDGE OF THE REVENUES, IS PLEDGED TO THE PAYMENT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF, REDEMPTION PREMIUM, IF ANY, OR INTEREST ON THE SERIES 2008 BONDS. The Series 2008 Bonds are offered when, as and if issued and received by the Underwriters, subject to the approval of validity by Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Bond Counsel, and certain other conditions. Certain legal matters will be passed on for the Commission by Nossaman, Guthner, Knox & Elliott, LLP, Los Angeles, California, as disclosure counsel, and by Best Best & Krieger, LLP, Riverside, California, the Commission's General Counsel. Certain legal matters will be passed upon for the Underwriters by Stradling, Yocca, Carlson & Rauth, Newwport Beach, California. It is anticipated that the Series 2008 Bonds will be available for delivery to DTC on or about June 10 , 2008, Lehman Brothers Banc of America Securities LLC Dated: , 2008 9.A2.TT.Comm.Revised Preliminary Offering Stmt.D0C343 • • • $ Series 2008 Bonds Initial Principal Initial Long -Term Final Maturity Mandatory Amount to be Rate ending on (but Yield to Initial Date Tender Date Tendered excluding) December Mandatory 1, 2009 "Fender Date CUSIP No! December I, June 1, 2029 2009 t CUSIP numbers are provided for convenience of reference only. Neither the Commission nor the Underwriters take any responsibility for the accuracy of such numbers. 344 No dealer. salesman or any other person has been authorized by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") or the Underwriters to give any information or to make any statements or representations, other than those contained in this Official Statement, and, if given or made, such other information, statements or representations must not be relied upon as having been authorized. The information set forth herein has been obtained from the Commission and other sources which are believed to be reliable, but it is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness, and it is not to be construed as a representation by the Underwriters. The information in this Official Statement is subject to change, and neither the delivery of this Official Statement nor any sale made after any delivery shall, under any circumstances, create any implication that there has been no change since the date of this Official Statement. This Official Statement does not constitute an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy any of the Series 2008 Bonds in any jurisdiction in which such offer or solicitation as not authorized, or in which any person making such offer or solicitation is not qualified to do so, or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such offer or solicitation in such jurisdiction. This Official Statement is not to be construed as a contract with the Purchasers of the Series 2008 Bonds. Statements contained in this Official Statement which involve estimates, forecasts or matters of opinion whether or not expressly so described herein, are intended solely as such and are not to be construed as representations of fact. THE PRICES AT WHICH THE SERIES 2008 BONDS ARE OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC BY THE UNDERWRITERS (AND THE YIELDS RESULTING THEREFROM) MAY VARY FROM THE INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING PRICES OR YIELDS APPEARING ON THE COVER PAGE HEREOF. IN ADDITION, THE UNDERWRITERS MAY ALLOW CONCESSIONS OR DISCOUNTS FROM SUCH INITIAL PUBLIC OFFERING PRICES TO DEALERS AND OTHERS. IN CONNECTION WITH THE OFFERING OF THE SERIES 2008 BONDS, THE UNDERWRITERS MAY EFFECT TRANSACTIONS THAT STABILIZE OR MAINTAIN THE MARKET PRICE OF THE SERIES 2008 BONDS AT A LEVEL ABOVE THAT WHICH MIG1ff O fl-IERWISE PREVAIL IN THE OPEN MARKET. SUCH STABILIZING, IF COMMENCED, MAY BE DISCONTINUED AT ANY TIME. IN MAKING AN INVESTMENT DECISION INVESTORS MUST RELY ON THEIR OWN EXAMINATION CONCERNING THE COMMISSION AND THE TERMS OF THE OFFERING, INCLUDING THE MERITS AND RISKS INVOLVED. THESE SECURITIES HAVE NOT BEEN RECOMMENDED BY ANY FEDERAL OR STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION OR REGULATORY COMMISSION. FURTHERMORE, TFIE FOREGOING AUTHORITIES HAVE NOT CONFIRMED THE ACCURACY OR DETERMINED THE ADEQUACY OF THIS DOCUMENT. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE. The Underwriters have provided the following sentence for inclusion in this Official Statement. The Underwriters have reviewed the information in this Official Statement in accordance with, and as part of, their responsibility to investors under the federal securities law as applied to the facts and circumstances of this transaction, but the Underwriters do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. The information and expression of opinion herein are subject to change without notice and neither the delivery of this Official Statement nor any sale made hereunder shall, under any circumstances, create any implication that there has been no change in affairs of the Commission since the date hereof. This Official 345 • • • Statement, including any supplement or amendment hereto, is intended to be deposited with one or more repositories. FORWARD -LOOKING STATEMENTS Certain statements included or incorporated by reference in this Official Statement constitute forward -looking statements. Such statements are generally identifiable by the terminology used such as "plan," "expect," "estimate," "project," "budget" or other similar words. The achievement of certain results or other expectations contained in such forward - looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements described to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward -looking statements. No assurance is given that actual results will meet the forecasts of the Commission in any way, regardless of the level of optimism communicated in the information. The Commission is not obligated to issue any updates or revisions to the forward -looking statements if or when its expectations, or events, conditions or circumstances on which such statements are based occur. THE ACHIEVEMENT- OF CERTAIN RESULTS OR OTHER EXPECTATIONS CONTAINED IN SUCH FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS INVOLVE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN RISKS, UNCERTAINTIES AND OTHER FACTORS WHICH MAY CAUSE ACTUAL RESULTS, PERFORMANCE OR ACHIEVEMENTS DESCRIBED TO BE MATERIALLY DIFFERENT FROM ANY FUTURE RESULTS, PERFORMANCE OR ACHIEVEMENTS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED BY SUCH FORWARD -LOOKING STATEMENTS. THE COMMISSION DOES NOT PLAN TO ISSUE ANY UPDATES OR REVISIONS TO THOSE FORWARD -LOOKING STATEMENTS IF OR WHEN ANY OF ITS EXPECTATIONS, OR EVENTS, CONDITIONS OR CIRCUMSTANCES ON WHICH SUCH STATEMENTS ARE BASED OCCUR, OTHER THAN AS DESCRIBED UNDER "CONTINUING DISCLOSURE" HEREIN. 346 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BOARD MEMBERS Jeff Stone, Chair Bob Magee, 1st Vice Chair Bob Buster, 2nd Vice Chair John F. Tavaglione Roger Berg Ron Wilson John Chlebnik Marion Ashley Gregory S. Pettis Bob Botts Jeff Miller Joseph DeConinck Robin Lowe Mary Craton Patrick J. Mullany Eduardo Garcia Michael H. Wilson Yvonne Parks Rick Gibbs Terry Henderson Dick Kelly Frank West Daryl Busch Frank Hall Steve Adams Ginny Foat Ron Roberts Gordon Moller Mike Perovich Chris Carlson MANAGEMENT Executive Director Anne Mayer Deputy Executive Director John Standiford Chief Financial Officer Theresia Trevino SPECIAL SERVICES Financial Advisor Fieldman, Rolapp & Associates Irvine, California Bond Counsel Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP San Francisco, California Trustee U.S. Bank National Association Los Angeles, California 347 • • • TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION 350 General 350 Authority for Issuance 350 Purpose 350 Security 350 Continuing Disclosure 351 References 351 THE SERIES 2008 BONDS 352 General 352 Initial Interest Rate Period 352 Long -Term Rate Period 353 Notice of Adjustment; Consequences of a Failed Remarketing 355 Payment of Principal and Interest 357 Redemption Terms of the Series 2008 Bonds 357 General Redemption Provisions 359 Purchase of Series 2008 Bonds Upon Conversion 360 PLAN OF FINANCE 360 APPLICATION OF SERIES 2008 BOND PROCEEDS 362 SECURITY AND SOURCES OF PAYMENT FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS 362 Limited Obligation 362 Pledge of Revenues 362 Revenue Fund; Allocation of Revenues 363 Bond Reserve Fund 365 Additional Bonds and Parity Debt 365 Initial Swap Agreements 366 Subordinate_ Obligations 367 THE SALES TAX 368 General 368 Collection of Sales Tax Revenues 369 l 988 Sales Tax Revenues 369 The Series 2008 Bonds are not secured by 1988 Sales Tax Revenues. 370 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 370 General 370 Commissioners 371 Executive Staff 371 THE TRANSPORTATION EXPENDITURE PLAN 372 INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS 373 Economy of the County and the State 373 No Liquidity Facility 373 The Sales Tax 373 Proposition 218 374 Further Initiatives 374 Loss of Tax Exemption 374 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 374 348 LITIGATION 375 TAX EXEMPTION 375 CERTAIN LEGAL MATTERS 376 RATINGS 377 UNDERWRITING 377 FINANCIAL ADVISOR 377 CONTINUING DISCLOSURE 377 MISCELLANEOUS 378 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C APPENDIX D APPENDIX E APPENDIX F Commission Audited Financial Statements For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2007 A-1 County Demographic and Economic Information B-1 Summary of Certain Provisions of the Indenture C-1 Book -Entry System D-1 Proposed Form of Bond Counsel Opinion E-1 Proposed Form of Continuing Disclosure Certificate F-1 349 • • • OFFICIAL STATEMENT RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION SALES TAX REVENUE BONDS (Limited Tax Bonds) Series 2008 A INTRODUCTION General This Official Statement, which includes the cover page and the appendices hereto, sets forth certain information in connection with the offering by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") of $ * principal amount of Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales "Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series 2008 A (the "Series 2008 Bonds"). Authority for Issuance The Series 2008 Bonds are being issued by the Commission under and pursuant to the Riverside County Transportation Sales Tax Act, being Division 25 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California (Section 240000 of seq.) (the "Act"), the Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance, adopted by the Commission on May $, 2002, and approved by at least two-thirds of electors voting on such proposition in the November 5, 2002 electron and any amendments or extensions thereto (collectively, and together with the Act, the "Law"), an Indenture, dated as of June 1, 2008 (the "2008 Indenture"), between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association (the "Trustee") and the First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of June 1, 2008 (the "First Supplemental Indenture" and, collectively with the 2008 Indenture, the "Indenture"). All capitalized terms used and not otherwise defined herein shall have the meanings assigned to such terms in APPENDIX C - "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF TI IF.. INDENTURE," or, if not defined therein, in the Indenture. Purpose The Series 2008 Bonds are being issued in order to (i) refinance all of the outstanding principal amount of the Commission's Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and Series B, as more particularly described herein (collectively, the "Notes"), (ii)fund capitalized interest on the Series 2008 Bonds to December 1, 2009, (iii) fund a reserve fund for the Series 2008 Bonds, and (iv) pay costs of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. Security The Series 2-008 Bonds are limited obligations of the Commission payable from and secured by certain revenues (the "Revenues") pledged under the Indenture, including a pledge of revenues (the "Sales Tax Revenues") derived from a 1/2-cent sales tax scheduled to take effect Preliminary, subject to change. 350 July 1, 2009 (the "Sales Tax"), imposed in accordance with the Law and the California Transactions and Use Tax Law (Revenue and Taxation Code Section 7251 et seq.), net of an administrative fee paid to the Califomia State Board of Equalization (the "Board of Equalization") in connection with the collection and disbursement of the Sales Tax. The Sales Tax was approved by more than a two-thirds vote of the electorate of the County of Riverside on November 5, 2002 and is scheduled to expire on June 30, 2039. Additional Parity Debt may hereafter be issued and paid from the Revenues. See "SECURITY AND SOURCES OF PAYMENT FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS - Additional Bonds and Parity Debt" and "PLAN OF FINANCE" herein. A Bond Reserve Fund is established under the Indenture. The Bond Reserve Requirement under the Indenture with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds in the amount of $ will be funded from the proceeds of the sale of the Series 2008 Bonds. See "SECURITY AND SOURCES OF PAYMENT FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS Bond Reserve Fund," and APPENDIX C - "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE - Definitions" herein. NEITHER THE FAITH AND CREDIT NOR THE TAXING POWER OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE, THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OR PUBLIC AGENCY THEREOF, OTHER THAN THE COMMISSION TO THE EXTENT OF THE PLEDGE OF THE REVENUES, IS PLEDGED TO THE PAYMENT OF THE SERIES 2008 BONDS. Continuing Disclosure The Commission has covenanted for the benefit of the owners and beneficial owners of the Series 2008 Bonds to provide certain financial information and operating data relating to the Commission by not later than 210 days following the end of the Commission's Fiscal Year (presently June 30), commencing with the report for the 2008-09 Fiscal Year, and to provide notices of occurrence of certain enumerated events, if material. See "CONTINUING DISCLOSURE" herein and APPENDIX F - "PROPOSED FORM OF CONTINUING DISCLOSURE CERTIFICATE." References The descriptions and summaries of various documents hereinafter set forth do not purport to be comprehensive or definitive, and reference is made to each such document for the complete details of all terms and conditions. All statements herein are qualified in their entirety by reference to each such document, copies of which are available for inspection at the offices of the Commission. 351 • • • THE SERIES 2008 BONDS General The Series 2008 Bonds are being issued in the aggregate principal amount of $ to (i) refinance all of the outstanding principal amount of the Notes, (ii) fund capitalized interestonthe Series 2008 Bonds to December 1, 2009, (iii) fund a reserve fund for the Series 2009 Bonds, and (iv) pay costs of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. The following is a summary of certain provisions of the Series 2008 Bonds. Reference is made to the Series 2008 Bonds for the complete text thereof and to the Indenture for a more detailed description of these provisions. The discussion herein is qualified by such reference. See "APPENDIX C — SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE" herein. This Official Statement is not intended to provide certain information with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds (including the terms of such Series 2008 Bonds) after conversion from the Initial Long -Term Rate. Owners and prospective purchasers of the Series 2008 Bonds should not rely on this Official Statement for information concerning the Series 2008 Bonds in connection with any conversion of the Series 2008 Bonds to Series 2008 Bonds bearing interest at a rate other than a Long -Term Rate, but should look solely to the offering document to be used in connection with any such conversion. As used herein, the term "Bonds" means any Bonds, including the Series 2008 Bonds, issued pursuant to the Indenture. Further, "Series" means Bonds designated as being of the same Series and "Variable I-nterest Rate" means a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Commercial Paper Rate and a Long -Term Rater Initial Interest Rate Period The initial Interest Rate Period for the Series 2008 Bonds will be a Long -Term Rate Period and the initial Long -Term Rate Period will be the period commencing on and including the date of delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds and ending on and excluding December 1, 2009, the last day of the initial Long -Term Rate Period_ The Series 2008 Bonds shall initially bear interest at rates as set forth on the inside cover hereof. During the initial Term Interest Rate Period, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is payable semi-annually on June 1 and December 1 of each year commencing. on December 1, 2008, and the final interest payment with respect to the initial Long -Term Rate Period will be paid on December 1, 2009. On December 1, 2009, there will be a mandatory tender for purchase of the Series 2008 Bonds (the "Initial Mandatory Tender Date"). The Commission has agreed to hire remarketing agent(s) to use their best efforts to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds on such date. If such remarketing agents are unable to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds on the Initial Mandatory Tender Date, such Series 2008 Bonds will continue to be owned by the then current Holders and will commence to bear interest at the rate of f _%] per annum (the "Delayed Remarketing Period") until such time as the Commission elects to adjust the interest rate to be borne on the Series 2008 Bonds to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Long -Term Rate, Preliminary, subject to change. 352 Commercial Paper Rate, or a Fixed Interest Rate and there is a successful remarketing of the Series 2008 Bonds. See "Long -Term Rate Period" herein. There is no liquidity facility supporting the purchase of the Series 2008 Bonds on the Initial Mandatory Tender Date nor is there any plan to provide a liquidity facility. On the Initial Mandatory Tender Date, the Series 2008 Bonds are also subject to optional redemption pursuant to the Indenture. See "Redemption Terms of the Series 2008 Bonds below: The interest rate on the Series 2008 Bonds may thereafter be adjusted to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, another Long -Term Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or converted to a Fixed Rate as provided in the Indenture. The Series 2008 Bonds will be issued in the aggregate principal amount and will mature on the Maturity Date shown on the pages immediately succeeding the cover page of this Official Statement. The Series 2008 Bonds will be dated the date of original delivery. The Series 2008 Bonds shall bear interest on the unpaid principal amount thereof as described below. At no time shall any Series 2008 Bonds bear interest at a rate in excess of the Maximum Rate, which is defined as the lesser of: (i) 12% per annum or (ii) the maximum rate of interest that may legally be paid on the Bonds. The Depository Trust Company, or DTC, will act as the initial securities depository for each Series of the Series 2008 Bonds, which will be issued initially pursuant to a book -entry only system. See "APPENDIX D — BOOK -ENTRY SYSTEM" herein. Under the Indenture, the Commission may appoint a successor securities depository to DTC for the Series 2008 Bonds. The Holders of the Series 2008 Bonds have no right to a book -entry only system for the Series 2008 Bonds. The information under this caption, "THE SERIES 2008 BONDS" is subject in its entirety to the provisions described below under "APPENDIX D — BOOK -ENTRY SYSTEM" while the Series 2008 Bonds are in the book -entry only system. Long -Term Rate Period Determination of Long -Term Rate. During a Long -Term Rate Period after the initial Long -Term Rate Period, the Series 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at the Long -Term Rate. The Long -Term Rate shall be determined by the Remarketing Agent on a Business Day no later than the Long -Term Conversion Date. Subject to the certain provisions of the Indenture, the Long - Term Rate shall be the rate of interest per annum determined by the Remarketing Agent to be the minimum interest rate which, if borne by the Series 2008 Bonds, would enable the Remarketing Agent to sell such Series 2008 Bonds on such date at a price (without regarding accrued interest) equal to the principal amount thereof; provided that in the event of a failure of the Commission to elect a new interest period for the Series 2008 Bonds or a failure of the Remarketing. Agent to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds , the Series 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at the rate of [ %] per annum until such time as the Commission shall elect to adjust the interest rate to be borne on the Series 2008 Bonds to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Long -Term Rate, Commercial Paper Rate, or a Fixed Rate and there is a successful remarketing of the Series 2008 Bonds. Adjustment to or Continuation of Long -Term Rate. Subject to the Indenture, at any time, the Commission, by written direction to the Trustee, the Tender Agent (if any), the Liquidity Facility Provider (if any), and the Remarketing Agent (if any), may elect that the Series 353 • 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at a Long -Term Rate. Such direction of the Commission (i) shall specify the duration of the Long -Term Rate Period, (ii) shall specify the proposed effective date of the Long -Term Rate Period, which date shall be (1) a Business Day not earlier than the 30th day following receipt by the Trustee of such direction, (2) in the case of an adjustment from a Commercial Paper Rate Period to a Long -Term Rate Period, the day immediately following the last day of the Commercial Paper Interest Rate Period, (3) in the case of an adjustment from one Long -Term Rate Period to another Long -Term Rate Period, the day immediately following the last day of the then -current Long -Term Rate Period or a day on which the Series 2008 Bonds otherwise would be subject to optional redemption pursuant to the Indenture if such adjustment did not occur; and (iii) with respect to any such Long -Term Rate Period, may specify redemption prices and periods different than those set forth in the Indenture, if approved by Bond Counsel. The last day of the Long -Term Rate Period shall be determined by the Remarketing Agent on a Business Day not later than the Long "term Conversion Date (which last day shall be either the day immediately prior to the Maturity Date for such Series, or a day which both immediately precedes a Business Day and is at least 181 days after the effective date thereof). The direction of the Commission described above shall be accompanied by a letter of Bond Counsel that it expects to be able to give a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel on the Long -Term Conversion Date and by a form of the notice to be mailed by the Trustee to the Holders of the Bonds of such Series as provided in the Indenture. During the Long -Term Rate Period commencing and ending on the dates so determined and during each successive Long - Term Rate Period, if any, so determined, the interest rate borne by the Series 2008 Bonds shall be a Long -Term Rate. If, by the 45th day prior to the last day of any Long -Term Rate Period with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds which ends on a day other than the day immediately preceding the Maturity Date of such Bonds, the Trustee shall not have received notice of the Commission's election that, during the next succeeding Interest Rate Period, the Series 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or shall be converted to the Fixed Rate, the next succeeding Interest Rate Period for such Bonds shall be a [Weekly Rate Period] until such time as the interest rate on such Bonds shall be adjusted to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or converted to the Fixed Interest Rate as provided in the Indenture; provided that, except with respect to the Initial Long -Term Rate Period, if the Commission fails to make an election with respect to the interest rate to be borne by the Series 2008 Bonds prior to each successive Long -Term Rate Period or the Remarketing Agent fails to remarket on any such date, the 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at the rate of % per annum until the Commission makes an election with respect to the interest rate to be borne by the Series 2008 Bonds and the Remarketing Agent successfully remarkets the Series 2008 Bonds. See "Determination of Long - Term Rate" above_ After the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, the Series 2008 Bonds shall no longer be subject to or have the benefit of the tender provisions of the Indenture. Notice of Adjustment to or Continuation of Long -Term Rate. The Trustee shall give notice of an adjustment to a (or the establishment of another) Long -Term Rate Period for the Series 2008 Bonds to the Holders of such Bonds not less than 30 days prior to the proposed effective date of such Long -Term Rate Period: See "Determination of Long -Term Rate" above. . Such notice shall state: (i) that the interest rate on the Series 2008 Bonds shall be adjusted to, or 354 continue to be, a Long -Term Rate unless Bond Counsel fails to deliver a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel to the Trustee, the Commission and the Remarketing Agent as to such adjustment in the Interest Rate. Period on the effective date of such adjustment; (ii) the proposed effective date and duration of such Long -Term Rate Period; and (iii) that the Series 2008 Bonds are subject to mandatory tender for purchase on such proposed effective date and setting forth the applicable Purchase Price and the place of delivery for purchase of such Bonds. Sale at Premium or Discount. Notwithstanding the above provisions, the Long -Term Rate shall be the rate of interest per annum determined by the Remarketing Agent to be the interest rate which, if borne by the Series 2008 Bonds, would enable the Remarketing Agent to sell such Series 2008 Bonds at a price (without regard to accrued interest) which will result in the lowest net interest cost for the Series 2008 Bonds, after taking into account any premium or discount at which such Series 2008 Bonds are sold by the Remarketing Agent, provided that: (1) The Remarketing Agent certifies to the Trustee, the Tender Agent, the Commission that the sale of the Series 2008 Bonds at the interest rate and premium or discouht specified by the Remarketing Agent is expected to result in the lowest net interest cost for such Series 2008 Bonds on the Long -Term Conversion Date; (2) The Commission consents in writing to the sale of the Series 2008 Bonds by the Remarketing Agent at such premium or discount;. (3) In the case of Series 2008 Bonds to be sold at a discount, either (a) a Liquidity Facility is in effect with respect to such Series 2008 Bonds and provides for the purchase of such Series 2008 Bonds at such discount or (b) the Commission agrees to transfer to the Tender Agent on the Long -Term Conversion Date, in immediately available funds, for deposit in the Purchase Account, an amount equal to such discount; (4) In the case of Series 2008 Bonds to be sold at a premium, the Remarketing Agent shall transfer to the Trustee for deposit in the Revenue Fund an amount equal to such premium which amount may be used to pay amounts related to the costs of conversion; (5) On or before the date of the determination of the Long -Term Rate, the Commission delivers to the Trustee and the Remarketing Agent a letter of Bond Counsel to the effect that Bond Counsel expects to be able to give a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel on the Long -Term Conversion Date; and (6) On or before the Long -Term Conversion Date, a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel shall have been received by the Trustee and confirmed to the Commission and the Remarketing Agent. Notice of Adjustment; Consequences of a Failed Remarketing In the event that the Commission shall elect to adjust the interest rate on the Series 2008 Bonds to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, another Long -Term Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or converted to a Fixed Rate as provided in the Indenture, then the written direction furnished by the Commission as required by such sections shall be made by registered or certified mail, or by telecopy, confirmed by registered or certified mail. 355 • • • Notwithstanding anything in the Indenture, in connection with any Conversion of the Interest Rate Period, the Commission shall have the right to deliver to the Trustee, the Remarketing Agent (if any), the Tender Agent (if any), the Liquidity Facility Provider (if any), on or prior to 10:00 a.m., New York City time, on the second Business Day preceding the effective date of any such Conversion a notice to the effect that the Commission elects to rescind its election to make such Conversion_ If the Commission rescinds its election to make such Conversion, then the Interest Rate Period shall not be converted and the Series 2008 Bonds shall continue to bear interest at the Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Long -Term Rate or Commercial Paper Rate, as the case may be, as in effect immediately prior to such proposed Conversion. In any event, if notice of a Conversion has been mailed to the Holders as provided in the Indenture and the Commission rescinds its election to make such Conversion, then the Series 2008 Bonds shall continue to be subject to mandatory tender for purchase on the date which would have been the effective date of the Conversion as provided in the Indenture. No Conversion from one Interest Rate Period to another shall take effect under the Indenture unless each of the following conditions, to the extent applicable, shall have been satisfied: (i) The Trustee shall have received a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel with respect to such Conversion. In the case of any Conversion with respect to which there shall be no Liquidity Facility in effect to provide funds for the purchase of Series 2008 Bonds on the Conversion Date, the remarketing proceeds available on the Conversion Date shall not be less than the amount required to purchase all of the Series 2008 Bonds at the Purchase Price (unless the Commission, in its sole discretion, elects to transfer to the Tender Agent the amount of such deficiency on or before the Conversion Date). (ii) In the case of any Conversion of a Series 2008 Bonds from a Long -Term Rate Period to a Daily Rate Period or a Weekly Rate Period, not later than 60 days prior to the Conversion Date the Commission shall have appointed a Tender Agent and a Remarketing Agent and shall have delivered a Liquidity Facility in accordance with the Indenture and there shall have been executed and delivered a Tender Agent Agreement and a Remarketing Agreement. If any condition to the Conversion shall not have been satisfied, then the Interest Rate Period shall not be converted and the Series 2008 Bonds shall bear interest at the rate of % per annum during the period of time from and including the applicable Conversion Date to (but not - including) the date that all such eries 2008 Bonds are successfully remarketed (the "Delayed Remarketing Period"). On each Business Day following during the Delayed Remarketing Period, the Remarketing Agent shall continue to use its best efforts to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds into the Interest Rate Period designated by the Trustee at the direction of the Commission. Once the Remarketing Agent has advised the Trustee that it has a good faith belief that it is able to remarket all of the applicable Series 2008 Bonds into the designated Interest Rate Period, the Trustee will give notice to the holders of the Series 2008 Bonds not later than five Business Days prior to the purchase date, which notice will state (I) that the interest rate on the Series 2008 Bonds will continue to be a Long -Term Rate or will be adjusted to a Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, or Commercial Paper Rate on and after the purchase date; (2) that the Series 2008 Bonds will be 356 subject to mandatory tender for purchase on the purchase date; (3) the procedures for such mandatory tender; (4) the purchase price of the Series 2008 Bonds on the purchase date (expressed as a percentage of the principal amount thereof; and (5) the consequences of a failed remarketing. During the Delayed Remarketing Period, the Trustee may, upon direction of the Commission; apply amounts on deposit in the Redemption Fund to the redemption of the Series 2008 Bonds as a whole or in part on any Business Day during the Delayed Remarketing Period, at a redemption price equal to the principal amount thereof, together with interest accrued thereon to the date fixed for redemption without premium. During the Delayed Remarketing Period, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds shall be paid (i) on each June 1 and December I occurring during the Delayed Remarketing Period and (ii) on the last day of the Delayed Remarketing Period. Notwithstanding anything in the Indenture to the contrary, in connection with the adjustment from a Long -Term Rate Period that would require the mandatory tender for purchase of Series 2008 Bonds at a Purchase Price greater than the principal amount thereof as provided in the Indenture, the Commission, as a condition to exercising its option to cause an adjustment in the Interest Rate Period, shall deliver to the Trustee prior to the mailing of notice of such adjustment, immediately available funds for the purpose of paying such premium, unless the Liquidity Facility, if any, then in effect with respect to such Series 2008 Bonds provides for the payment of such premium. Payment of Principal and Interest The Series 2008 Bonds will be issued as fully registered bonds without coupons and, when issued, will be registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of DTC. Individual purchases of interests in the Series 2008 Bonds will be made in book -entry form only, in authorized denominations of $5,000 or any integral multiple thereof. Purchasers of interests will not receive certificates representing their interests in the Series 2008 Bonds. For a description of the method of payment of principal, premium, if' any, and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds and matterspertainingto transfers and exchanges while in the book -entry system, see "APPENDIX D — BOOK -ENTRY SYSTEM." So long as Cede & Co. is the registered owner of the Series 2008 Bonds, the Trustee will pay principal of and premium, if any, and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds to DTC, which will remit principal, premium, if any, and interest payments to the Beneficial Owners of the Series 2008 Bonds, as described under "APPENDIX D — BOOK -ENTRY SYSTEM." The principal, purchase price or redemption price of the Series 2008 Bonds and interest thereon Shall be payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the principal corporate trust office of the Trustee. Redemption Terms of the Series 2008 Bonds Optional Redemption of the Series 2008 Bonds — Long -Term Rate Period. During the initial Long -Term Period (from May 2008, the date of delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds through December 1, 2009), the Series 2008 Bonds are not subject to redemption. The 357 • • • Series 2008 Bonds are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturity, at the option of the Commission (which option shall be exercised upon request of the Commission given to the Trustee (unless waived by the Trustee) at least 45 days prior to the date fixed for redemption), in whole or in part, without premium, in such amounts as may be specified by the Commission, on December 1, 2009, and, during the Delayed Remarketing Period on any Business Day. After the Initial Long -Term Rate Period, while any Long -Term Rate is in effect the Series 2008 Bonds are subject to redemption prior to their stated maturity, at the option of the Commission (which option shall be exercised upon request of the Commission given to the Trustee (unless waived by the Trustee) at least 45 days prior to the date fixed for redemption), in whole or in part, in such amounts as may be specified by the Commission, on the day following the last day of any Long - Term Rate Period and on such other dates specified in the conversion notice with respect to such Long -Term Rate Period at a Redemption Price equal to the amount of Series 2008 Bonds called for redemption, plus accrued interest to the date fixed for redemption, without premium. Optional Redemption of the Series 2008 Bonds — Other Interest Rate Periods. While bearing interest at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate, the Series 2008 Bonds will be subject to redemption prior to their stated maturity, at the option of the Commission, in whole or in part, in authorized denominations of $100,000 and any integral multiple of $5,000 in excess thereof, on any date, at a Redemption Price equal to the amount of Series 2008 Bonds called for redemption, plus accrued interest, if any, without premium. While bearing interest at a Commercial Paper Rate, the Series 2008 Bonds will not be subject to optional redemption prior to their maturity date, but will be subject to redemption at the option of the Commission in whole or in part on their maturity date at a Redemption Price equal to the amount of Series 2008 Bonds called for redemption, plus accrued interest, if any, without premium. Unless the Commission obtains a Favorable Opinion of Bond Counsel, any Series 2008 Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate are subject to redemption in whole or in part (and if in part, in such order of maturity and Mandatory Sinking Account Payment dates as the Commission shall specify and within a maturity of Mandatory Sinking Account Payment date by lot or by such other method as the Trustee determines to be fair and reasonable and in authorized denominations of $5,000 and any integral multiple thereof), on any date, at such times and at such Redemption Prices as follows: (1) 1f, on the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, the remaining term of such Series 2008 Bonds is greater than eight (8) years, then such Series 2008 Bonds will not be subject to optional redemption until the first June 1 or December 1 (whichever is earlier) to follow the eighth (8th) anniversary of the conversion of such Series 2008 Bonds to a Fixed Rate. On such first June 1 or December 1, such Series 2008 Bonds will be subject to redemption at 102% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest, if any, to the date of redemption, which Redemption Price will decline by one percent (1%) per annum on each succeeding anniversary of such first June 1 or December I until reaching a Redemption Price of 100% of the, principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest, if any, to the date of redemption, and thereafter at a Redemption Price of 100% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest, if any, to the date of redemption. (2) If, on the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, the remaining term of such Series 2008 Bonds is less than eight (8) years, then such Series 2008 Bond will not be subject to optional redemption. 358 Mandatory Redemption of the Series 2008 Bonds from Sinking Fund Installments. The Series 2008 Bonds are subject to mandatory redemption from Mandatory Sinking Account Payments for such Series 2008 Bonds, on each date a Mandatory Sinking Account Payment for such Series 2008 Bonds is due, and in the principal amount equal to the Mandatory Sinking Account Payment due on such date at a redemption price equal to the principal amount thereof, plus accrued but unpaid interest to the redemption date, without premium, as set forth below. Redemption Redemption Date Sinking Fund' Date (June 1) Installment (June 1) j Final Maturity General Redemption Provisions Sinking Fund* Installment Selection of Series 2008 Bonds for Redemption. Whenever provision is made in the indenture for the redemption of less than all of the Series 2008 Bonds or any given portion thereof; the Trustee shall select the Series 2008 Bonds to be redeemed or such given portion thereof not previously called for redemption, by lot, in any manner which the Trustee in its sole discretion shall deem appropriate and fair. Notice of Redemption. Notice of redemption shall be mailed by the Trustee on behalf of the Commission, but failure by the Trustee to mail any notice to any one or more of the Holders or any one or more of the securities information services or depositories designated by the Commission shall not affect the sufficiency of the proceedings for the redemption of Series 2008 Bonds. Each notice of redemption shall state (i) the date of the notice, (ii) the Series designation and the date of issue of the Series 2008 Bonds, (iii) the redemption date, (iv) the Redemption Price, (v) the place or places of redemption, including the name and address of the Trustee, (vi) the maturity, (vii) the CUSIP numbers, if any, and (viii) in the case of Series 2008 Bonds to be redeemed in part only, the respective portions of the principal amount thereof to be redeemed. 3 Preliminary, subject to change. 359 • • • Notice of redemption shall be mailed by the Trustee, not less than thirty (30) days nor more than sixty (60) days to the Holder of Series 2008 Bonds called for redemption. Such notice shall be given to the Holders of Series 2008 Bonds designated for redemption at their addresses appearing on the bond registration books maintained by the Trustee as of the close of business on the day before notice is given. Notice shall also be given to the Remarketing Agent and the Securities Depository and/or securities information services designated in the Indenture. Rescission. The Commission may, at its option, prior to the date fixed for redemption in any notice of redemption rescind and cancel such notice of redemption by written notice of the Commission to the Trustee and the Trustee shall mail notice of such cancellation to the recipients of the notice of redemption being cancelled. Effect of Redemption. Notice of redemption having been duly given as aforesaid, and moneys for payment of the redemption price of, together with interest accrued to the redemption date on, the Series 2008 Bonds (or portions thereof) so called for redemption being held by the Trustee, on the redemption date designated in such notice, the Series 2008 Bonds (or portions thereof) so called for redemption shall become due and payable at the redemption price specified in such notice, together with interest accrued thereon to the date fixed for redemption, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds so called for redemption shall cease to accrue, said Series 2008 Bonds (or portions thereof) shall cease to be entitled to any benefit or security under the Indenture, and the Holders of said Series 2008 Bonds shall have no rights in respect thereof except to receive payment of said redemption price and accrued interest to the date fixed for redemption. Partial Redemption of Bonds. Upon surrender of any Bond to be redeemed in part only, the Commission shall execute, and the Trustee shall authenticate and deliver to the Holder of such Series 2008 Bond, at the expense of the Commission, a new Bond or Bonds of Minimum Authorized Denominations equal in aggregate principal amount to the unredeemed portion of the Bond surrendered, at the same maturity and terms as the surrendered Bond. Purchase of Series 2008 Bonds Upon Conversion Tenders of Series 2008 Bonds and Converted Series 2008 Bonds Are Subject to DTC Procedures. As long as the book -entry only system is in effect with respect to any Series 2008 Bonds, all tenders for purchase and deliveries of Series 2008 Bonds upon Conversion tendered for purchase or subject to mandatory tender under the provisions of the applicable Indenture shall be made pursuant to DTC's procedures as in effect from time to time, and neither the Commission, the Trustee, nor any Remarketing Agent shall have any responsibility for or liability with respect to the implementation of these procedures. For a description of the tender procedures through DTC, see "APPENDIX D BOOK -- ENTRY SYSTEM." Mandatory Tender for Purchase on First Day of Each. Interest Rate Period. Series 2008 Bonds to be converted shall be subject to mandatory tender for purchase on the first day of each Interest Rate Period, at a Purchase Price equal to the principal amount thereof. PLAN OF FINANCE The Series 2008 Bonds are being issued in order to-(i) refinance all of the outstanding principal amount of and a portion of the interest on the Notes, (ii) fund capitalized interest on the 360 Series 2008 Bonds to December 1, 2009, (iii) find a reserve fund for the Series 2008 Bonds, and (iv) pay costs of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. In March, 2005, the Commission authorized the issuance of its Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds) Series A in an aggregate principal amount up to $] 10,000,000 and Series B in an aggregate principal amount up to $75,000,000. As of [April 15, 20081 there is $ outstanding principal amount of Notes. The Notes are secured by a pledge of the Sales Tax subordinate to the pledge of the Sales Tax in favor of the holders of the Series 2008 Bonds. The principal of and interest on the Notes are payable from draws under an irrevocable, direct pay letter of credit issued by Bank of America, N.A. (the "Bank"), pursuant to a reimbursement agreement dated as of March 1, 2005 ("Reimbursement Agreement") by and between the Commission and the Bank. The stated amount of the letter of credit may not exceed $190,000,000. The letter of credit expires March 29, 2010, unless terminated earlier as provided in the Reimbursement Agreement. The Commission's obligation to reimburse the Bank for draws under the letter of credit to pay the principal of and interest on the Notes is secured by a pledge of Sales "fax on parity with the obligation to pay Note holders and subordinate to the pledge in favor of the holders of the Series 2008 Bonds. The Commission has entered into the following interest rate swap agreements (collectively, the "Initial Swap Agreements"). in a combined notional amount of $185,000,000, which Initial Swap Agreements have an effective date of October 1, 2009 and expire on June 1, 2029: a. An 1SDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between the Bank and the Commission, as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between the Bank and the Commission; and b. An 1SDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. ("Lehman") and the Commission, as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between Lehman and the Commission. Pursuant to the Initial Swap Agreements, the Commission has agreed to pay a fixed interest rate to the Bank and Lehman, and the Bank and Lehman have agreed to pay the Commission a floating rate of interest. To secure its obligation to make regularly scheduled payments to the Bank and Lehman, until the Commission issues floating rate debt payable from the Sales Tax on a senior lien basis to the Notes, the Commission has pledged the Sales Tax Revenues on a parity basis with the obligation to pay principal of and interest on the Notes and reimburse the Bank for draws under the letter of credit; after issuance of any floating rate debt payable from the Sales Tax on a senior lien basis to the Notes, the pledge of Sales Tax in favor of Lehman and the Bank will be on a parity basis with the lien of the Sales Tax in favor of the senior lien floating rate bond holders. The Commission's obligation to pay any early termination amounts to Lehman and the Bank pursuant to the Initial Swap Agreements is subordinate to the pledge in favor of the Notes and the Series 2008 Bonds. See "SECURITY AND SOURCES OF PAYMENT FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS — Initial Swap Agreements". 361 APPLICATION OF SERIES 2008 BOND PROCEEDS The proceeds from the sale of the Series 2008 Bonds will be applied as follows: Sources of Funds: Principal Amount of Bonds [Pius/Less}: Original Issue [Premium/Discount j Total Sources: $ Uses of Funds: Notes Escrow 2008 Capitalized Interest Fund(1) Costs oflssuance(2) Reserve Fund Total Uses: (1) Capitalized interest calculated from the date of the delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds to December 1, 2009. (2) Includes underwriters' discount, rating agency fees, trustee fees, printing costs, bond counsel, disclosure counsel and financial advisor fees and expenses and other miscellaneous expenses. SECURITY AND SOURCES OF PAYNIENT FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS Limited Obligation The Series 2008 Bonds are limited obligations of the Commission and are payable as to both principal and interest, and any premium upon redemption thereof, exclusively from the Revenues, which principally include Sales Tax Revenues, pledged under the Indenture. NEITHER THE FAITH AND CREDIT NOR THE TAXING POWER OF THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE, THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OR PUBLIC AGENCY THEREOF, OTHER THAN THE COMMISSION TO THE EX ENT OF THE PLEDGED REVENUES, IS PLEDGED TO THE PAYMENT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF, REDEMPTION PREMIUM, IF ANY, OR INTEREST ON, THE SERIES 2008 BONDS. Pledge of Revenues All Sales Tax Revenues are irrevocably pledged by the Commission to secure the punctual payment of the principal or purchase price of, premium, if any, and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds and any additional Series of Bonds issued under the Indenture (collectively, the "Bonds") and any additional Parity Debt in accordance with their terms. The Sales Tax Revenues shall not be used for any other purpose while any of the Bonds or Parity Debt remains Outstanding, except as permitted by the provisions of the Indenture permitting the application thereof for the purposes and on the terms and conditions set forth therein. Additionally, there are pledged to secure the payment of the principal of, redemption premium, if any, and interest on the Bonds in accordance with their terms, all amounts (including proceeds of the Bonds) held by the Trustee under the Indenture (except for amounts held in the Rebate Fund), subject only to the 362 provisions of the Indenture permitting the application thereof for the purposes and on the terms and conditions set forth therein. Pursuant to the Indenture, the pledge of Sales Tax Revenues constitutes a first lien to secure the Bonds and Parity Debt. The pledge of Sales Tax Revenues shall be irrevocable until all Bonds issued under the Indenture, including the Series 2008 Bonds, and all Parity Debt are no longer Outstanding. The Sales Tax Revenues pledged to the payment of the Bonds and Parity Debt shall be applied without priority or distinction of one over the other and the Sales Tax Revenues shall constitute a trust fund for the security and payment of the Bonds and Parity Debt; but nevertheless out of Sales Tax Revenues certain amounts may be applied for other purposes as provided in the Indenture. Out of Revenues there shall be applied all sums required for the payment of the principal of (including any premium thereon) and interest on the Bonds and all Parity Debt, including any Regular Swap Payments, together with any sinking fund payments relating to Bonds and Parity Debt and Reserve Fund requirements with respect thereto. All remaining Revenues, after making the foregoing allocations, shall be available to the Commission for all lawful Commission purposes. For a detailed description of the Sales Tax and projected receipts of Sales Tax Revenues, see "THE SALES TAX" herein. Revenue Fund; Allocation of Revenues As long as any Bonds are Outstanding or any Parity Debt remains unpaid, the Commission has assigned the Sales Tax Revenues to the Trustee and shall cause the Board of Equalization to transmit the same directly to the Trustee. The Sales Tax Revenues shall be received and held in trust by the Trustee for the benefit of the Owners of the Bonds and any Parity Debt. The Trustee shall forthwith deposit all Sales Tax Revenues in the Revenue Fund, maintained and held in trust by the Trustee. when and as such Sales "Tax Revenues are received by the Trustee. See APPENDIX C "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE — Allocation of Revenues." Investment income on amounts held by the Trustee (other than amounts held in the Rebate Fund or for which particular instructions are -provided) shall also be deposited in the Revenue Fund. In order to carry out and effectuate the pledge, charge and lien on Swap Revenues contained in the Indenture, the Commission agrees and covenants that all Swap Revenues shall be deposited when received with the Trustee for deposit in the Interest Fund. In each month while Bonds remain Outstanding, the Trustee is required to set aside receipts of Sales Tax Revenues in the following respective funds, amounts and order of priority (provided that deficiencies in any previously required deposit may be made up prior to the deposit to a fund subsequent in priority and further provided that set asides or transfers required with respect to other Parity Debt may be made on a parity basis, as provided in the Indenture): I. Interest Fund. The Indenture requires the Trustee to make monthly deposits intheInterest Fund in an amount equal to (a) one -sixth of the aggregate half - yearly amount of interest becoming due and payable on Outstanding Current Interest Bonds during the ensuing six-month period, plus (b) the aggregate amount of interest, calculated at the Maximum Rate to accrue during that month on the Outstanding Variable 363 • • • • Rate Bonds other than Variable Rate Bonds which are the subject of a Swap, plus (c) one -sixth of the aggregate half yearly amount of any Regular Swap Payments becoming due on Swaps. 2. Principal Fund; Sinking Accounts. The Indenture also requires the Trustee to make monthly deposits in the Principal Fund in an amount equal to at least (a) one -sixth of the aggregate semiannual amount of principal, accreted value, if applicable, and mandatory sinking account payments becoming due and payable within the next six months on Outstanding Bonds having semiannual maturity dates and mandatory sinking account redemption, plus (b) one -twelfth of the aggregate yearly amount of principal, accreted value, if applicable, and mandatory sinking account payments becoming due and payable within the next twelve months on Outstanding Bonds having annual maturity dates and mandatory sinking account redemption, plus (c) one -sixth of the aggregate of the Mandatory Sinking Account Payments to be paid during the next six-month period into the respective Sinking Accounts for the Term Bonds of all Series for which Sinking Accounts have been created and for which semiannual mandatory redemption is required from said Sinking Accounts, plus (d) one -twelfth of the aggregate of the Mandatory Sinking Account Payments to be paid during the next 12-month period into the respective Sinking Accounts for the Term Bonds of all Series for which Sinking Accounts have been created and for which annual mandatory redemption is required from such Sinking Accounts. 3. Bond Reserve Fund. The Indenture also requires the Trustee to make deposits to the Bond Reserve Fund as set forth below. See "—Bond Reserve Fund" below. 4. Subordinate Obligations Fund. The Indenture requires the Trustee to establish, maintain and hold in trust a separate fund designated as the "Subordinate Obligations Fund." As long as any Subordinate Obligations remain unpaid, any Revenues remaining in the Revenue Fund after the transfers described in (1), (2) and (3) above have been made shall be transferred the Notes Trustee. After the Notes Trustee has made the required deposit of Revenues under the Notes Indenture, the Notes Trustee shall transfer any remaining Revenues back to the Trustee. 5. Fees and Expenses Fund. The Indenture requires the Trustee to establish, maintain and hold in trust a separate fund designated as the "Fees and Expenses Fund." At the direction of the Commission, after the transfers described in (1), (2), (3) and (4) above have been made, the Trustee is required to deposit as soon as practicable in each month in the Fees and Expenses Fund (i) amounts necessary for payment of fees, expenses and similar charges (including fees, expenses and similar charges relating to any Liquidity Facility or Credit Enhancement for the Bonds or any Parity Obligations) owing in such month or the following month by the Commission in connection with the Bonds or any Parity Obligations and (ii) amounts necessary for payment of fees, expenses and similar charges owing in such month or the following month by the Commission in connection with Subordinate Obligations. The Commission shall inform the Trustee of such amounts, in writing, on or prior to the first Business Day of each month. Any Revenues remaining in the Revenue Fund after the foregoing transfers described in (I), (2), (3), (4) and (5) of above, except as the Commission shall otherwise direct in writing or as is 364 otherwise provided in a supplemental indenture, shall be transferred to the Commission on the same Business Day or as soon as practicable thereafter. The Commission may use and apply the Revenues when received by it for any lawful purpose of the Commission, including the redemption of Bonds upon the terms and conditions set forth in the supplemental indenture relating to such Bonds and the purchase of Bonds as and when and at such prices as it may determine. See APPENDIX C - "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE —Allocation of Revenues" and " — Definitions" for a more complete discussion. Bond Reserve Fund The initial Bond Reserve Requirement under the Indenture in the amount of $ will be funded from the proceeds of the sale of the Series 2008 Bonds. `Bond Reserve Requirement" is defined under the Indenture as follows: as of any date of calculation, the lesser of (i) 10% of the aggregate original principal amount of Series 2008 Bonds (less any original issue discount), or-(ii) 1251%0 of average Annual Debt Service for the Series 2008 Bonds or (iii) 100% of Maximum Annual Debt Service for the Series 2008 Bonds. A Bond Reserve Fund is established under the Indenture. Except as otherwise provided in the Indenture, on or after July 1, 2009, upon the occurrence of any deficiency in the Bond Reserve Fund, the Trustee shall deposit in the Bond Reserve Fund, as soon as possible in each month, until the Balance therein is at least equal to the Bond Reserve Requirement, (i) one -twelfth (1/12th) of the aggregate amount of each unreplenished prior withdrawal from the Bond Reserve Fund and (ii) the full amount of any deficiency due to any required valuation of the investments in the Bond - Reserve Fund. In lieu of a cash deposit, the Commission may fulfill all or a portion of its obligation to fund the Bond Reserve Fund by depositing a letter of credit, surety bond or insurance policy, as provided in the Indenture. See APPENDIX C - "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE - Funding and Application of Bond Reserve Fund" and "— Definitions" for a more complete discussion. Additional Bonds and Parity Debt Under the Indenture or other instrument authorizing Parity Debt, the Commission may issue other obligations payable in whole or in part from Sales Tax Revenues subject to the terms and conditions contained in such authorizing instrument. Issuance of Additional Series of Bonds. The Commission may by Supplemental Indenture establish one or more additional Series of Bonds payable from Revenues and secured by the pledge made under the Indenture equally and ratably with Bonds previously issued, but only upon compliance by the Commission with the provisions of the Indenture. Certain of the applicable provisions of the Indenture are described below: (a) No Event of Default shall have occurred and then be continuing. (b) The Supplemental Indenture providing for the issuance of such Series shall require that the balance in the Bond Reserve Fund, forthwith upon the receipt of the 365 • proceeds of the sale of Bonds of such Series, be increased, if necessary, to an amount at least equal to the Bond Reserve Requirement with respect to all Bonds to be considered Outstanding upon the issuance of Bonds of such Series. Said deposit may be made from the proceeds of the sale of Bonds of such Series or from other funds of the Commission or from both such sources or in the form of a letter of credit or surety bond or insurance policy as described under "SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE - Funding and Application of Bond Reserve Fund." (c) The Commission shall place on file with the Trustee a Certificate of the Commission certifying that the amount of Sales Tax Revenues and 1988 Sales Tax Revenues collected during the Fiscal Year for which audited financial statements are available preceding the date on which such additional Series of Bonds will become Outstanding shall have been at least equal to 1.5 times Maximum Annual Debt Service on all Series of Bonds and Parity Obligations then Outstanding and the additional Series of Bonds then proposed to be issued, which Certificate shall also set forth the computations upon which such Certificate is based. Nothing in the Indenture shall prevent or be construed to prevent the Supplemental Indenture providing for the issuance of an additional Series of Bonds from pledging or otherwise providing, in addition to the security given or intended to be given by the Indenture, additional security for the benefit of such additional Series of Bonds or any portion thereof. Issuance of Refunding Bonds. Refunding Bonds may be authorized and issued by the Commission without compliance with the provisions of the Indenture described above under "Issuance of Additional Series of Bonds" and other terms of the Indenture; provided that Maximum Annual Debt Service on all Bonds and Parity Debt Outstanding following the issuance of such Refunding Bonds is less than or equal to Maximum Annual Debt Service on all Bonds and Parity Debt Outstanding prior to the issuance of such Refunding Bonds. Issuance of Parity Debt. The Commission may also issue additional Parity Debt payable on a parity with the Bonds and which will have, when issued, an equal lien and charge upon the Sales Tax Revenues, provided that the conditions to the issuance of such Parity Debt set forth in the indenture and such other authorizing instruments are satisfied; including the coverage test described in subsection (c) above under the caption "Issuance of Additional Series of Bonds." The Commission has agreed pursuant to the Initial Swap Agreements to secure its obligation to make regularly scheduled payments with a pledge of Sales Tax on a parity basis with the Series 2008 Bonds on and after the date the Commission issues Bonds bearing interest at a variable rate of interest. Initial Swap Agreements The Commission has entered into the following interest . rate swap agreements (collectively, the "Initial Swap Agreements"), in a combined notional amount of $185,000,000, which Initial Swap Agreements have an effective date of October 1, 2009 and expire on June 1, 2029: a. An ISDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between the Bank and the Commission; as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between the Bank and the Commission (the "Bank Swap Agreement"); and 366 An ISDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. ("Lehman") and the Commission, as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between Lehman and the Commission (the "Lehman Swap Agreement"). Under the Initial Swap Agreements, the Commission's obligation to make regularly scheduled payments to the swap counterparties is secured by Sales Tax Revenues on a parity basis with the Series 2008 Bonds. The Commission's obligation to make any early termination payment is secured by Sales Tax Revenues subordinate to the pledge of Sales Tax Revenues to pay the principal of and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds. The Bank Swap Agreement is in the notional amount of $100,000,000. Pursuant to this agreement, the Commission has agreed to pay the Bank a floating rate equal to 671%0 of USD- LIBOR (One Month) and the Bank has agreed to pay the Commission a fixed rate equal to 3.6790%. The Bank Swap Agreement is subject to early termination in the event that the unenhanced ratings on the Series 2008 Bonds issued by Moody's and S&P fall below investment grade or are withdrawn or suspended; a reduction in the long-term unsubordinated ratings of the Bank below investment grade can also result in an early termination of the Bank Swap Agreement. The Commission has the option of terminating the Bank Swap Agreement upon 2 Business Days' notice provided it has sufficient funds to pay and early termination amount_ The Lehman Swap Agreement is in the notional amount of $85,000,000. Pursuant to this agreement, the Commission has agreed to pay Lehman a floating rate equal to 67% of USD- LIBOR (One Month) and Lehman has agreed to pay the Commission a fixed rate equal to 3.6790%. Under certain circumstances, Lehman's rights and obligations under the Lehman Swap Agreement can be assigned to Lehman Brothers Special Financing Inc. ("LBSF") in which event LBSF's obligations would be guaranteed by Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.. The Lehman Swap Agreement is subject to early termination in the event that the unenhanced ratings on the Series 2008 Bonds issued by Moody's and S&P fall below investment grade or are withdrawn or suspended; if LBSF has been substituted for Lehdman, a reduction in the long-term unsubordinated ratings of the Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. below investment grade can also result in an early termination of the Lehman Swap Agreement. The Commission has the option of terminating the Lehman Swap Agreement upon 2 Business Days' notice provided it has sufficient funds to pay and early termination amount. Subordinate Obligations The Commission may issue obligations which are subordinate to the payment of the principal, premium, interest and reserve fund requirements for the Bonds and all Parity Debt, and which subordinated obligations are payable as to principal, premium, interest and reserve fund requirements, Warty, only out of Sales Tax Revenues after the prior payment of all amounts then required to be paid front Revenues for principal, premium, interest and reserve fund requirements for the Bonds and all Parity Debt, as the same become due and payable. As of the date hereof, the only subordinate obligations that are authorized are the Notes and the Commission's obligation to make early termination payments pursuant to the Initial Swap Agreements. 367 • • THE SALES TAX General The Act, among other things, authorizes the Commission to develop a countywide consensus on a proposed transaction expenditure plan to be submitted to the voters as part of an ordinance imposing a retail transactions and use tax in the county in accordance with the provisions of the California Transactions and Use Tax Law (Revenue and Taxation Code Section 7251, et. seq.). In accordance with the Act, on November 5, 2002, more than two-thirds of the voters of the county voting on the measure approved Measure "A" which authorized the imposition of The Sales Tax in the county commencing in July 2009. The Sales Tax will be collected for a thirty year period. The Sales Tax consists of a one-half of one percent (I/2%) sales tax on the gross receipts of retailers from the sale of tangible personal property sold in the county and a use tax at the same rate upon the storage, use or other consumption in the county of such property purchased from any retailer for storage, use or other consumption in the county, subject to certain limited exceptions described below. The one-half of one percent sales tax imposed in the county for transportation purposes and administered by the Commission, is in addition to a seven and one -quarter percent sales tax levied statewide by the State of California. In general, the statewide sales tax applies to the gross receipts of retailers from the sale of tangible personal property. The statewideusetax is imposed on the storage, use or other consumption in the state of property purchased from a retailer for such storage, use or other consumption. Since the use tax does not apply to cases where the sale of the property is subject to The Sales Tax, the application of the use tax generally is to purchases made outside of the state for use within the state. The Sales Tax is generally imposed upon the same transactions and items subject to the sales and use tax levied statewide by the state (hereinafter collectively referred to as the "State Sales Tax"), with generally the same exceptions. Many categories of transactions are exempt from the State Sales Tax and The Sales Tax. The most important of these exemptions are: sales of food products for home consumption, prescription medicine, edible livestock and their feed, seed and fertilizer used in raising food for human consumption, and gas, electricity and water when delivering to consumers through mains, lines and pipes. In addition, "Occasional Sales" (i.e., sales of property not held or used by a seller in the course of activities for which he or she is required to hold a seller's permit) are generally exempt from The State Sales "Tax and from The Sales Tax; however, the "Occasional Sales" exemption does not apply to the sale of an entire business and other sales of machinery and equipment used in a business. Sales of property to be used outside the county which are shipped to a point outside the county, pursuant to the contract of sale, by delivery to such point by the retailer, or by delivery by the retailer to a carrier for shipment to a consignee, at such point, are exempt from The State Sales Tax and from The Sales Tax. Action by the State Legislature or by voter initiative could change the transactions and items upon which The State Sales Tax and The Sales Tax are imposed. The State Legislature could further change the transactions and items upon which The State Sales Tax and The Sales Tax are imposed. In addition, other voter initiative measures could be adopted; further affecting the receipt of sales tax revenues. Such changes or amendments could have either an adverse or beneficial effect on the sales tax revenues. The Commission is not currently aware of any 368 proposed legislative change which would have a material adverse effect on sales tax revenues. See also "Proposition 218" below. Collection of Sales Tax Revenues Collection of The Sales Tax is administered by the California State Board of Equalization (the "BOE" or the "State Board of Equalization"). The Commission and the State Board of Equalization have entered into an agreement for state administration of district transactions and use taxes to authorize payment of sales tax revenues directly to the trustee. The State Board of Equalization, after deducting amounts payable to itself, is required to remit the balance of amounts received from the sales tax directly to the trustee. The trustee is required to apply the Sales Tax Revenues to make deposits to the funds and accounts established under the indenture and to transfer the remaining amounts to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as issuing and paying agent for the notes (the "Issuing and Paying Agent"). The remaining unapplied Sales Tax Revenues, if any, are transferred to the Commission for use for any purpose contemplated by the ordinance. The fee charged by the BOE to the Commission for fiscal year 2006-07 for collection of the 1988 Sales Tax was $1,412,100. The fee that the BOE is authorized to charge for collection of The Sales Tax is determined by State Legislation; there can be no assurances that the amount of this fee or the method for determining the amount of the fee will be the same in July, 2009, when collection of The Sales Tax commences. 1988 Sales Tax Revenues This tax represents an additional source of revenue to the Commission, is a separate tax from the Sales Tax and does not secure the Series 2008 Bonds. On November 8, 1988, more than two-thirds of the voters approved the Riverside County Transportation Commission Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance (the "Prior Ordinance") which authorized the imposition of a retail transactions and use tax of one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the gross receipts of retailers from the sales of all tangible personal property sold at retail in the county and a use tax at the same rate upon the storage, use or other consumption in the county of such property purchased from any retailer for storage, use or other consumption in the county, subject to certain limited exceptions (the "1988 Sales Tax"). The 1988 Sales Tax ceases to be effective on June 30, 2009 with major collection of 1988 Sales Taxes to be received by the Commission no later than September 30, 2009. The Commission has issued indebtedness secured by the 1988 Sales Tax and expects all outstanding principal and interest on these obligations to be fully paid on or before June 1, 2009. The Sales Tax securing the notes does not serve as security for the repayment of the obligations secured by the 1988 Sales Tax. The following table shows the 1988 Sales Tax remitted to the Commission during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1997 through June 30, 2007. 369 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION HISTORICAL 1988 SALES TAX REVENUE RECEIPTS Fiscal Year Net Sales % Change Ended June 30 Tax Receipts(') From Prior Fiscal Year 1997 $57,888,147 4.46 1998 63,496,222 9.69 1999 70,396,828 10.87 2000 81,543,732 15.83 2001 89,464.634 9.71 2002 94,400.890 5.52 2003 102,817.407 8.92 2004 117,632,722 14.41 2005 134,516,986 14.35 2006 155,206,029 15.38 2007 157,092,807 1.22 (1) Net of State Board of Equalization administrative fee. Source: The Commission The Series 2008 Bonds are not secured by 1988 Sales Tax Revenues. Annual Sales Tax Revenues to be received as projected for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 2007, total [$145,000,000]. These Sales Tax Revenues are anticipated. to equal at least times Maximum Annual Debt Service on the Series 2008 Bonds assuming interest rates based on the fixed rates paid by the Commission pursuant to the Initial Swap Agreements and the amortization of the principal amount of the Series 2008 Bonds based on the mandatory sinking fund schedule. The projection of Sales Tax receipts for Fiscal Ycar ended June 30, 2008 represents a 8% decline from Fiscal Year ended June 30, 2007. This decline is higher than what is being experienced at the state and national level with regard to sales tax receipts for this period. There can be no assurances if and when Sales `fax receipts will begin to increase. For a summary of historical taxable retail sales within the County see the table entitled "County of Riverside, Taxable Sales Transactions" in APPENDIX B of this Official Statement. THE COMMISSION RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION General The Commission is charged with a number of important responsibilities in serving the. residents, of the county. Administering the prior sales tax program is by far the most prominent of these responsibilities since that program has raised more than $1 billion. The Commission, which has the responsibility of placing future transportation ballot measures before the public, was successful in November of 2002 in obtaining more than 2/3rds voter approval of the Sales fax. 370 In addition to the Commission's Measure A responsibilities, the Commission has also been designated as the congestion management agency (the"CMA") for the County. As the CMA, the Commission has developed a congestion management program that more effectively utilizes transportation funds by linking land use, transportation and air quality efforts. The Commission serves as the service authority for freeway emergencies and operates the freeway service patrol (the "FSP") for Riverside County. The results of these programs — 650 call boxes along the County roadways and 20 FSP tow trucks providing assistance to more than 55,000 motorists annually — are among the most visible of the Commission's programs. More recently, the State Legislature gave new authority to the Commission by changing the way funding is distributed from the State Transportation Improvement Program, which is funded through state and federal gas taxes. In simple terms, counties no longer apply to the State for funding their most urgent transportation needs. Instead, State transportation dollars are given directly as an entitlement, leaving the decision -making about transportation spending up to the designated county transportation commission like the Commission. While this gives the Commission greater control over how transportation dollars are spent, it also requires a much higher level of local communication and participation to determine how these dollars are spent throughout a county with so many transportation needs. In order to enhance county -wide participation and improve its decision -making, the Commission made a major change in its structure in 1999 by expanding the Board from eight members to thirty_ The expanded Commission ensures better representation throughout the County and provides the participatory framework for continued success among these responsibilities. Commissioners Section 130053 of the California Public Utilities Code specifies that the Commission consists of five members of the Riverside County Board of Supervisors, one member from each incorporated city in Riverside County (each of whom must be a mayor or member of the City Council) and one non -voting member appointed by the governor of the State of California. The role of the Commission is to act as the policy -making board for Riverside County Transportation activities. Executive Staff The Commission's key staff members, the position held by each and a brief statement of the background of each staff member is set forth below. ANNE MAYER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Anne Mayer was appointed in October 2007 as the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission. She is responsible for overall management of the Commission including execution of operational policies and procedures and all personnel decisions. Ms. Mayer joined the Commission in May 2005 as Deputy Executive Director.- Prior to joining the Commission, she was the District Y 8 Director for the California Department of Transportation (CALTRANS). As District Director, she was responsible for management of the state highway system in San Bernardino and Riverside counties. With over 371 • • • 24 years of experience in the public works field, Ms. Mayer was with CALTRANS for 14 of those years. Ms. Mayer holds a civil engineering degree from Michigan State University. JOHN STANDIFORD, DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. In January 2008, John Standiford was appointed as Deputy Executive Director for the Commission, he joined the Commission in 1999 and was the Public Affairs Director prior to his new appointment. He also served as the Manager of Government and Media Relations for the Orange County Transportation Authority, where he worked for more than seven years. Earlier in his career, Mr. Standiford worked for three state legislators from the Los Angeles area. He received his bachelor and masters degrees from the University of California, Irvine. THERESIA TREVINO, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER. Ms. Trevino joined the Commission as the Chief Financial Officer in January 2004. Ms. Trevino previously worked as Manager of Accounting and Financial Reporting for the Orange County Transportation Authority. She also served as an adjunct professor for governmental accounting and reporting at the University of Redlands. Ms. Trevino's 19-year public accounting career included 16 years with Ernst & Young LLP. As Senior Manager in its Assurance and Advisory Business Services Practice Serving Government Clients, she led the development of the Southern California practice and served as a national technical resource. She is a Certified Public Accountant in California and completed the. Executive Management Program at the University of California, Riverside. Ms. Trevino received a bachelor of science degree in accounting from Loyola Marymount University with Magna Cum I.,aude Honors. THE TRANSPORTATION EXPENDITURE PLAN On November 5, 2002, 69.2 percent of the voters of the County approved Measure "A" — The Riverside County Transportation Commission Transportation Expenditure Plan (the "Plan") and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance which expressed the following concerns in its preamble: The transportation system in Riverside County is rapidly deteriorating and our population and economy are growing rapidly. Maintenance and repairs of existing roadways and improvements to relieve congestion cannot be accomplished with available funds. Without additional funds, the system will bog down and pavement will crumble into permanent disrepair... Local governments must either generate revenues to expand our system and maintain our investments or watch the system collapse and endanger the health, welfare and safety of all. Riverside County residents. The goals of the Plan are as follows: (1) Maintain and improve the quality of life in Riverside County by supplementing existing funds for transportation; (2) provide for accountability in the expenditure of taxpayer funds; (3) provide for equity in the distribution of Measure "A Revenues; and (4) provide for local control of the Transportation Improvement Program. 372 To address the concerns as expressed in the preamble, and to accomplish its goals and policies, the ordinance provided that sales tax revenues be distributed to the specific geographic areas of Riverside County (i.e., Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley) based on their proportionate share of revenues generated in the County, and that funds be allocated for highway and regional arterial projects, local streets and roads, transit and commuter rail, new corridors and economic development. In the Western County, $370 million is to be used for new corridor projects, $1.320 million for highway and regional arterial projects, $390 million for transit and commuter rail, $970 million for local street and road improvements, $270 million for bond financing costs, and the remaining $40 million for economic development projects. In the Coachella Valley, fifty percent is to be earmarked for its highway and regional arterial system, thirty-five percent for local streets and roads, and the remaining fifteen percent for transit. All Palo Verde Valley funds are designated for the maintenance of local streets and roads. INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS Economy of the County and the State The level of sales tax revenues collected at any time is dependent upon the level of retail sales within the County, which level of retail sales is, in turn, dependent upon the level of economic activity in the County and in the State generally. As a result, any substantial deterioration in the level of economic activity within the County or in the State could have a material adverse impact upon the level of sales tax revenues and therefore upon the ability of the Commission to issue sales tax revenue bonds in the future. For information relating to current economic conditions within the County and the State see APPENDIX B - "COUNTY DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC INFORMATION." No Liquidity Facility There is no initial or planned third -party liquidity facility supporting the purchase of the Series 2008 Bonds. if any remarketing agents appointed by the Commission are unable to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds on the Initial Mandatory Tender Date, such Series 2008 Bonds will continue to be owned by the then current Holders and will commence to bear interest at the rate of [ %] per annum until such time as the Commission elects to adjust the interest rate to be borne on the Series 2008 Bonds to a Weekly Interest Rate, Long -Term Rate, Commercial Paper Rate or a Fixed Interest Rate and there is a successful remarketing of the Series 2008 Bonds. In such circumstances the rate of interest to be borne on the Series 2008 Bonds will be equal to [ %]per annum. See "SERIES 2008 BONDS — Initial Interest Rate Period" herein. The Sales Tax With limited exceptions, the Sales Tax will be imposed upon the same transactions and items subject to the sales tax levied statewide by the State. The State Legislature or the voters within the State, through the initiative process, could change or limit the transactions and items upon which the statewide sales tax and the Sales Tax are imposed. Any such change or limitation could have an adverse impact on the sales tax revenues collected. For a further description of the Sales Tax, see "THE SALES TAX — The Sales "Tax." 373 • • • Proposition 218 On November S, 1996, voters in the State approved an initiative known as the Right to Vote on Taxes Act ("Proposition 218"). Proposition 218 added Articles XIIIC and XIIID to the California Constitution. Article XIIIC requires majority voter approval for the imposition, extension or increase of general taxes and two-thirds voter approval for the imposition, extension or increase of special taxes by a local government, which is defined to include local or regional governmental agencies such as the Commission. The Sales Tax was approved by more than two- thirds of the voters in Riverside County and is therefore in compliance with the requirements of Proposition 218. Article XIIIC also removes Limitations that may have applied to the voter initiative power with regard to reducing or repealing previously authorized local taxes, even previously voter -approved taxes like the Sales Tax. In the view of the Commission, however, any attempt by the voters to use the initiative provisions of Proposition 218 to rescind or reduce the levy and collection of the Sales Tax in a manner which would prevent the payment of debt service on the Notes, would violate the Impairment Clause of the United States Constitution and, accordingly, would be precluded. However, the interpretation and application of Proposition 218 will ultimately be determined by the courts. It is likely that the interpretation and application of Proposition 218 will ultimately be determined by the courts. Further Initiatives Proposition 218 and Proposition 42 were each adopted as measures that qualified for the ballot pursuant to California's initiative process. From time to time other initiative measures could be adopted, which may affect the Commission's ability to levy and collect the 1976 Sales Tax or the Sales Tax, or change the types of products or items subject to a sales tax. Loss of Tax Exemption As discussed under "TAX EXEMPTION," interest on the Series 2008 Bonds could become includable in federal gross income, possibly from the date of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds, as a result of acts or omissions of the Commission subsequent to the issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. Should interest become includable in federal gross income, the Series 2008 Bonds are not subject to redemption by reason thereof and will remain outstanding until maturity. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The financial statements of the Commission for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 2007, included in APPENDIX A of this Official Statement, have been audited by McGladrey & Pullen, LLP, certified public accountants, as stated in their report therein. McGladrey & Pullen, LLP was not requested to consent to the inclusion of its report in APPENDIX A, nor has it undertaken to update its report or to take any action intended or likely to elicit information _concerning the accuracy, completeness or fairness of the statements made in this Official Statement, and no opinion is expressed by McGladrey & Pullen, LLP with respect to any event subsequent to the date of its report. Except as described herein, the Commission represents that there has been no material adverse change in its financial position since June 30, 2007. 374 LITIGATION There is not now pending any litigation restraining or enjoining the issuance or delivery of the Bonds or questioning or affecting the validity of the Bonds or the proceedings and authority under which they are to be issued. Neither the creation, organization or existence of the Commission, nor the title of the present members of the Commission to their respective offices is being contested. TAX EXEMPTION In the opinion of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP, Bond Counsel, based on existing statutes, regulations, rulings and court decisions, interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes and is exempt from State of California personal income taxes. A complete copy of the proposed form of opinion of Bond Counsel is set forth in Appendix E. The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the "Code") imposes various restrictions, conditions and requirements relating to the exclusion from gross income for federal income tax purposes of interest on obligations such as the Series 2008 Bonds. The Commission has covenanted to comply with certain restrictions designed to assure that interest on the Series 2008 Bonds will not be included in federal gross income. Failure to comply with these covenants may result in interest on the Series 2008 Bonds being included in federal gross income, possibly from the date of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. The opinion of Bond Counsel assumes compliance with such covenants. Bond Counsel has not undertaken to determine (or to inform any person) whether any action taken (or not taken) or events occurring (or not occurring) .after the date of issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds may affect the value of, or the tax status of interest on the Series 2008 Bonds. Further, no assurance can be given that pending or future legislation or amendments to the Code, will not adversely affect the value of, or the tax status of interest on, the Series 2008 Bonds. Prospective owners are urged to consult their own tax advisors with respect to proposals to restructure the federal income tax. Bond Counsel is further of the opinion that interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is not a specific preference item for purposes of the federal individual or corporate alternative minimum taxes. Bond Counsel observes, however, that such interest is included in adjusted current earnings in calculating corporate alternative minimum taxable income. Prospective purchasers of the Series 2008 Bonds should be aware that: (i) with respect to insurance companies subject to the tax imposed by Section 831 of the Code, Section 832(b)(5)(B)(i) reduces the deduction for loss reserves by 15% of the sum of certain items, including interest with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds; (ii) interest with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds earned by certain foreign corporations doing business in the United States could be subject to a branch profits tax imposed by Section 884 of the Code; (iii) passive investment income, including interest with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds, may be subject to federal income taxation under Section 1375 of the Code for Subchapter S corporations having subchapter C earnings and profits at the close of the taxable year and gross receipts more than 25% of which constitute passive investment income; and (iv) Section 86 of the Code requires recipients of certain Social Security and certain Railroad Retirement benefits to take into account, in determining gross income, receipts or accruals of interest on the Series 2008 Bonds. 375 The Series 2008 Bonds may be purchased in the initial offering for an amount greater than their principal amount payable at maturity (hereinafter, the "Premium Series 2008 Bonds"). The excess of the tax basis of a purchaser of a Premium Series 2008 Bond (other than a purchaser who holds a Premium Series 2008 Bond as inventory, stock in trade or for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business) over the principal amount of such Premium Series 2008 Bond is "bond premium." Bond premium is amortized for federal income tax purposes over the term of a Premium Series 2008 Bond based on the purchaser's yield to maturity in the Premium Series 2008 Bonds, except that in the case of a Premium Series 2008 Bond callable prior to its stated maturity, the amortization period and the yield may be required to be determined on the basis of an earlier call date that results in the lowest yield on such Premium Series 2008 Bond. A purchaser of a Premium Series 2008 Bond is required to decrease his or her adjusted basis in such Premium Series 2008 Bond by the amount of bond premium attributable to each taxable year in which such purchaser holds such Premium Series 2008 Bond. The amount of bond premium attributable to a taxable year is not deductible for federal income tax purposes. Purchasers of Premium Series 2008 Bonds should consult their tax advisors with respect to the precise determination for federal income tax purposes of the amount of bond premium attributable to each taxable year and the effect of bond premium on the sale or other disposition of a Premium Series 2008 Bond, and with respect to the state and local tax consequences of owning and disposing of a Premium Series 2008 Bond. Certain agreements, requirements and procedures contained or referred to in the Indenture and other relevant documents may be changed and certain actions may be taken or omitted under the circumstances and subject to the terms and conditions set forth in such documents. Bond Counsel expresses no opinion as to any Series 2008 Bond or the interest thereon if any such change occurs or action is taken or omitted upon the advice or approval of counsel other than Bond Counsel. Although Bond Counsel has rendered an opinion that interest on the Series 2008 Bonds is excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes and is exempt from State of California personal income taxes, the accrual or receipt of interest, including original issue discount, on the Series 2008 Bonds may otherwise affect a -Holder's state or federal tax liability. The nature and extent of these other tax consequences will depend upon the Holder's particular tax status and the Holder's other items of income or deduction. Bond Counsel expresses no opinion regarding any such consequences. CERTAIN LEGAL MATTERS Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP, Bond Counsel, will render an opinion with respect to the validity of the Series 2008 Bonds. The proposed form of such approving opinion is attached hereto as APPENDIX E. Bond Counsel assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or fairness of this Official Statement. Compensation paid to Bond Counsel, Disclosure Counsel and Underwriters' Counsel is conditioned upon the successful issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. Certain legal matters will be passed upon for the Commission by Nossaman, Guthner, Knox & Elliott, LLP, Los Angeles, California, as disclosure counsel, and by Best Best & Krieger LLP, Riverside, California, the generalcounsel for the Commission. Certain legal matters will be passed upon for the Underwriters by Stradling, Yocca, Carlson & Rauth, Newport Beach, California. 376 RATINGS The Series 2008 Bonds have been assigned ratings of "__" by Moody's Investors Service, Inc., " " by Fitch Ratings and " " by Standard & Poor's Ratings Group, a division of the McGraw Hill Companies, Inc.. These ratings reflect only the views of the rating agencies, and do not constitute a recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities. The Commission has furnished to the rating agencies certain information respecting the Series 2008 Bonds and the Commission. Generally, rating agencies base their ratings on such information and materials and their own investigations, studies and assumptions. The ratings are subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the rating agencies, and there is no assurance that the ratings will continue for any period of time or that they will not be lowered or withdrawn. Any reduction or withdrawal of the ratings may have an adverse effect on the market price of the Bonds or the ability to remarket the Series 2008 Bonds. UNDERVVRITING Lehman Brothers Inc., as representative of the underwriters of the Series 2008 Bonds, has agreed, subject to certain conditions, to purchase the Series 2008 Bonds at a price of $ (representing $ aggregate principal amount of the Series 2008 Bonds, [plus/less] original issue [premium/discount] of $ and less $ Underwriters' discount). The Purchase Contract provides that the Underwriters will purchase all the Series 2008 Bonds if any are purchased. FINANCIAL ADVISOR The Commission has retained Fieldman. Rolapp & Associates, Irvine, California, as Financial Advisor in connection with the authorization and delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds. Compensation paid to the Financial Advisor is conditioned on the successful issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds. CONTINUING DISCLOSURE The Commission has covenanted for the benefit of the owners and beneficial owners of the Series 2008 Bonds to provide certain financial information and operating data relating to the Commission by not later than 210 days following the end of the Commission's Fiscal Year (presently June 30) (the "Annual Report"), commencing with the report for the 2008-2009 Fiscal Year, and to provide notices of the occurrence of certain enumerated events, if material. The Annual Report will be filed by the Dissemination Agent on behalf of the Commission with each Nationally Recognized Municipal Securities Information Repository (the "NRMSIRs"). The notices of material events will be filed by the Dissemination Agent on behalf of the Commission with the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board and with the NRMSIRs. The specific nature of the information to be contained in the Annual Report and the notices of material events is set forth under the caption "APPENDIX F — PROPOSED FORM OF CONTINUING DISCLOSURE CERTIFICATE" These covenants have been made in order to assist the Underwriters in complying with Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 15c2-12(b)(5). The Commission is in compliance with all continuing disclosure requirements applicable to its securities. 377 • • • MISCELLANEOUS The references herein to the Act and the Indenture are brief outlines of certain provisions thereof. Such outlines do not purport to be complete and for full and complete statements of such provisions reference is made to said documents or the Act, as the case may be. Copies of the documents mentioned under this heading are available for inspection at the Commission and following delivery of the Series 2008 Bonds will be on file at the offices of the Trustee in Los Angeles, California. References are made herein to certain documents and reports which are brief summaries thereof which do not purport go be complete or definitive. Reference is made to such documents and reports for full and complete statements of the content thereof. Any statement in this Official Statement involving matters of opinion, whether or not expressly so stated, are intended as such and not as representations of fact. This Official Statement is not to be construed as a contract or agreement between the Commission and the purchasers or Holders of any of the Series 2008 Bonds. 378 The execution and delivery of this Official Statement has been duly authorized by the Commission. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: Executive Director 379 • APPENDIX A COMMISSION AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2007 380 APPENDIX B COUNTY DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC INFORMATION 381 • • • APPENDIX C SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE INDENTURE 382 APPENDIX D BOOK ENTRY SYSTEM The information concerning DTC set forth herein has been supplied by DTC, and the Commission assumes no responsibility for the accuracy thereof. DTC is a limited -purpose trust company organized under the New York Banking Law, a "banking organization" within the meaning of the New York Banking Law, a member of the Federal Reserve System; a "clearing corporation" within the meaning of the New York Uniform Commercial Code, and a "clearing agency" registered pursuant to the provisions of Section I?A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. DTC holds securities that its participants ("DTC Participants") deposit with DTC. DTC also facilitates the settlement among DTC Participants of securities transactions, such as transfers and pledges, in deposited securities through electronic computerized book -entry changes in DTC Participants' accounts, thereby eliminating the need for physical movement of securities certificates. "DTC Direct Participants" include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations, and certain other organizations. DTC is owned by a number of its DTC Direct Participants and by the New York Stock Exchange, Inc., the American Stock Exchange, Inc., and the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. Access to the DTC system is also available to others such as securities brokers and dealers, banks, and trust companies that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Direct Participant, either directly or indirectly ("DTC Indirect Participants"). The Rules applicable to DTC and its DTC Participants are on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Purchases of Series 2008 Bonds under the DTC system must be made by or though DTC Direct Participants, which will receive credit for the Series 2008 Bonds on DTC's records. The ownership interest of each actual purchaser of each Series 2008 Bond (a "Beneficial Owner") is in turn to be recorded on the Direct and DTC Indirect Participants' records. Beneficial Owners will not receive written confirmation from DTC of their purchase, but Beneficial Owners are expected to receive written confirmations providing details of the transaction, as well as periodic statements of their holdings, from the Direct or DTC Indirect Participant through which the Beneficial Owner entered into the transaction. Transfers of ownership interests in the Series 2008 Bonds are to be accomplished by entries made on the books of DTC Participants acting on behalf of Beneficial Owners. Beneficial Owners will not receive certificates representing their ownership interests in Series 2008 Bonds, except in the event that use of the book -entry system for the Series 2008 Bonds is discontinued. To facilitate subsequent transfers, all Series 2008 Bonds deposited by DTC Participants with DTC are registered in the name of DTC's nominee, Cede & Co. The deposit of Series 2008 Bonds with DTC and their registration in the name of Cede & Co. effect no change in beneficial ownership. DTC has no knowledge of the actual Beneficial Owners of the Series 2008 Bonds; DTC's records reflect only the identity of the DTC Direct Participants to whose accounts such Series 2008 Bonds are credited, which may or may not be the Beneficial Owners. The DTC Participants will remain responsible for keeping account of their holdings on behalf of their customers. Conveyance of notices and other communications by DTC to DTC Direct Participants, by DTC Direct Participants to DTC indirect Participants, and by DTC Direct Participants and DTC 383 • • • Indirect Participants to Beneficial Owners will be governed by arrangements among them, subject to any statutory or regulatory requirements as may be in effect from time to time. Redemption notices will be sent to Cede & Co. If less than all of the Series 2008 Bonds within an issue are being redeemed, DTC's practice is to determine by lot the amount of the interest of each DTC Direct Participant in such issue to be redeemed. Neither DTC nor Cede & Co. will consent or vote with respect to Series 2008 Bonds. Under its usual procedures, DTC mails an Omnibus Proxy to the Commission as soon as possible after the record date. The Omnibus Proxy assigns Cede & Co.'s consenting or voting rights to those DTC Direct Participants to whose accounts the Series 2008 Bonds are credited on the rccord date (identified in a listing attached to the Omnibus Proxy). Principal and interest payments on the Series 2008 Bonds will be made to DTC. DTC's practice is to credit DTC Direct Participants' accounts on the payment date in accordance with their respective holdings shown on DTC's records unless DTC has reason to believe that it will not receive payment on a payment date. Payments by DTC Participants to Beneficial Owners will be governed by standing instructions and customary practices, as is the case with securities held for the accounts of customers in bearer form or registered in "street name," and will be the responsibility of such DTC Participant and not of DTC, the Trustee, or the Commission, subject to any statutory or regulatory requirements as may be in effect from time to time. Payment of principal and interest to DTC is the responsibility of the Trustee, disbursement of such payments to DTC Direct Participants will be the responsibility of DTC, and disbursement of such payments to the Beneficial Owners will be the responsibility of Direct and DTC Indirect Participants. The Commission and the Trustee cannot and do not give any assurances that DTC Direct Participants or DTC Indirect Participants will distribute to the Beneficial Owners (i) principal and interest on the Series 2008 Bonds, (ii) certificates representing an ownership interest in or other confirmation of ownership interests in the Series 2008 Bonds, or (iii) redemption or other notices sent to DTC or Cede & Co., its nominee, as registered owner of the Series 2008 Bonds, or that they will do so on a timely basis or that DTC, DTC Direct Participants or DTC Indirect Participants will service and act in the manner described in the Official Statement. The Commission and the Trustee will be entitled to treat the person in whose name any Series 2008 Bond is registered as the Bond Owner thereof for all purposes of the Indenture and any applicable laws, notwithstanding any notice to the contrary received by the Trustee or the Commission; and the Commission and the Trustee will have no responsibility for transmitting payments to, communication with notifying, or otherwise dealing with any Beneficial Owners of the Series 2008 Bonds. Neither the Commission nor the Trustee will have any responsibility or obligations, legal or otherwise, to the Beneficial Owners or to any other party including DTC or its successor (or substitute depository or its successor), except for the registered owner of any Series 2008 Bond. DTC may discontinue providing its services as securities depository with respect to the Series 2008 Bonds at any time by giving notice to the Commission or the Trustee. Under such circumstances, in the event that a successor securities depository is not obtained, Series 2008 Bonds are required to be printed and delivered. 384 THE TRUSTEE. AS LONG AS A BOOK -ENTRY ONLY SYSTEM IS USED FOR THE SERIES 2008 BONDS. WILL SEND ANY NOTICE OF REDEMPTION OR OTHER NOTICES TO OWNERS ONLY TO DTC. ANY FAILURE OF DTC TO ADVISE ANY DTC PARTICIPANT. OR OF ANY DTC PARTICIPANT 7'O NOTIFY ANY BENEFICIAL OWNER, OF ANY NOTICE AND ITS CONTENT OR EFFECT WILL NOT AFFECT THE VALIDITY OF SUFFICIENCY OF THE PROCEEDINGS RELATING TO THE REDEMPTION OF THE SERIES 2008 BONDS CALLED FOR REDEMPTION OR OF ANY OTHER ACTION PREMISED ON SUCH NOTICE. 385 • • APPENDIX E PROPOSED FORM OF BOND COUNSEL OPINION 386 APPENDIX F PROPOSED FORM OF CONTINUING DISCLOSURE CERTIFICATE This Continuing Disclosure Certificate (the "Disclosure Certificate"), dated as of , 2008, is executed and delivered by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission') in connection with the issuance of its $ Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, Series 2008 (the "Bonds"). The Bonds are being issued pursuant to an Indenture, dated as of June 1, 2008 (the "2008 Indenture"), by and between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association (the "Trustee") and the First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of June 1, 2008 (the "First Supplemental Indenture" and, together with the 2008 Indenture, the "Indenture"). Pursuant to the indenture, the Commission covenants and agrees as follows: SECTION 1. Purpose of the Disclosure Certificate. This Disclosure Certificate is being executed and delivered by the Commission for the benefit of the Holders and Beneficial Owners of the Bonds and in order to assist the Participating Underwriters in complying with Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 15c2-12(b)(5). SECTION 2. Definitions. In addition to the, definitions set forth in the Indenture, which apply to any capitalized term used in this Disclosure Certificate unless otherwise defined in this Section, the following capitalized terms shall have the following meanings: "Annual Report" shall mean any Annual Report provided by the Commission pursuant to, and as described in, Sections 3 and 4 of this Disclosure Certificate. "Beneficial Owner" shall mean any person which (a) has the power, directly or indirectly, to vote or consent with respect to, or to dispose of ownership of, any Bonds (including persons holding Bonds through nominees, depositories or other intermediaries), or (b) is treated as the owner of any Bonds for federal income tax purposes. "Disclosure Representative" shall mean the designee of the Commission to act as the Disclosure Representative. "Dissemination Agent" shall mean an entity selected and retained by the Commission, or any successor thereto selected by the Commission. The initial Dissemination Agent shall be Digital Assurance Certificate LLC. "Listed Events" shall mean any of the events listed in Section 5(a) of this Disclosure Certificate and any other event legally required to be reported pursuant to the Rule. "National Repository" shall mean any Nationally Recognized Municipal Securities Information Repository for purposes of the Rule. The National Repositories approved by the Securities and Exchange Commission as of the date of this Agreement are currently set forth at the following website: http://www.sec.gov/info/municipal/nrmsir.htm. "Participating Underwriters" shall mean any of the original underwriters of the Bonds required to comply with the Rule in connection with offering of the Bonds. "Repository" shall mean each National Repository and each State Repository. 387 • • • "Rule" shall mean Rule 15c2-12(13)(5) adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as the same may be amended from time to time. "State" shall mean the State of California. "State Repository" shall mean any public or private repository or entity designated by the State as a state repository for the purpose of the Rule and recognized as such by the Securities and Exchange Commission. As of the date of this Disclosure Certificate, there is no State Repository. SECTION 3_ Provision of Annual Reports. (a) The Commission shall provide to each Repository, or shall cause the Dissemination Agent to provide to each Repository, not later than 210 days after the end of the Commission's fiscal year, commencing with the fiscal year ending June 30, 2008, an Annual Report which is consistent with the requirements of Section 4 of this Disclosure Certificate. The Annual Report may be submitted as a single document or as separate documents comprising a package, and may include by reference other information as provided in Section 4 of this Disclosure Certificate. Not later than fifteen (15) Business Days prior to said date, the Commission shall provide the Annual Report to the Dissemination Agent. The Commission shall provide a written certification with each Annual Report furnished to the Dissemination Agent to the effect that such Annual Report constitutes the Annual Report required to be furnished by the Commission hereunder. The Dissemination Agent may conclusively rely upon such certification of the Commission. (b) If by fifteen (15) Business Days prior to the date specified in subsection (a) for providing the Annual Report to the Repositories, the Dissemination Agent has not received a copy of the Annual Report, the Dissemination Agent shall contact the Commission to determine if the Commission is in compliance with subsection (a). (c) If the Dissemination Agent is unable to verify that an Annual Report has been provided to the Repositories by the date required in subsection (a), the Dissemination Agent shall send a notice to the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board in substantially the form attached as Exhibit A. (d) The Dissemination Agent shall: (i) determine each year prior to the date for providing the Annual Report the name and address of each National Repository and the State Repository, if any; and (ii) (if the Dissemination Agent is other than the Commission), to the extent appropriate information is available to it, file a report with the Commission certifying that the Annual Report has been provided pursuant to this Disclosure Certificate, stating the date it was provided and listing all the Repositories to which it was provided. SECTION 4. Content of Annual Reports. The Commission's Annual Report shall contain or include by reference the following: (a) The audited financial statements of the Commission for the prior fiscal year, prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated to apply to governmental entities from time to time by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. If the Commission's audited financial statements are not available by the time the Annual Report is 388 required to be filed pursuant to Section 3(a), the Annual Report shall contain unaudited financial statements in a format similar to the financial statements contained in the final Official Statement relating to the Bonds (the "Official Statement'), and the audited financial statements shall be filed in the same manner as the Annual Report when they become available. (b) An update (as of the most recently ended fiscal year of the Commission) for the table entitled "Historical 1988 Sales Tax Revenues" set forth in the Official Statement under the caption "THE SALES TAX - 1988 Sales Tax Revenues'; provided that, commencing with the fiscal year ending June 30, 2010, the Commission shall provide such information with respect to Sales Tax Revenues in lieu of such information with respect to 1988 Sales Tax Revenues. Any or all of the items listed above may be included by specific reference to other documents, including official statements of debt issues with respect to which the Commission is an "obligated person" (as defined by the Rule), which have been filed with each of the Repositories or the Securities and Exchange Commission. If the document included by reference is a final official statement, it must be available from the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board. The Commission shalt clearly identify each such other document so included by reference. SECTION 5. Reporting of Significant Events. (a) Pursuant to the provisions of this Section 5, the Commission shall give, or cause to be given, notice of the occurrence of any of the following events with respect to the Bonds, if material: 1. principal and interest payment delinquencies; 2. non-payment related defaults; 3. modifications to rights of Bondholders; 4. optional, contingent or unscheduled Bond calls; 5. defeasances; 6. rating changes; 7. adverse tax opinions or events affecting the tax-exempt status of the Bonds; 8. unscheduled draws on the debt service reserves, if any, reflecting financial difficulties; 9. unscheduled draws on credit enhancements, if any, reflecting financial difficulties; 10. substitution of credit or liquidity providers, if any; or their failure to perform; and 11. release, substitution, or sale of property, if any, securing repayment of the Bonds. 389 • • (b) Whenever the Commission obtains knowledge of the occurrence of a Listed Event, the Commission shall as soon as possible determine if such event would constitute material information for Holders of Bonds. (e) If the Commission has determined that knowledge of the occurrence of a Listed Event would be material under applicable federal securities laws, the Commission shall promptly notify the Dissemination Agent in writing. Such notice shall instruct the Dissemination Agent to report the occurrence pursuant to subsection (d). (d) If the Dissemination Agent has been instructed by the Commission to report the occurrence of a Listed Event, the Dissemination Agent shall file a notice of such occurrence with the Repository_ Notwithstanding the foregoing: (i) notice of the occurrence of a Listed Event described in subsections (a)(I ), (4) or (5) shall be given by the Dissemination Agent unless the Commission gives the Dissemination Agent affirmative instructions not to disclose such occurrence; and (ii) notice of Listed Events described in subsections (a)(4) and (5) shall not be given under this subsection any earlier than the notice (if any) of the underlying event is given to the Holders of affected Bonds pursuant to the indenture. (e) Termination of Reporting Obligation_ The obligations of the Commission and the Dissemination Agent under this Disclosure Certificate shall terminate upon the legal defeasance, prior redemption or payment in full of all of the Bonds. If such termination occurs prior to the final maturity of the Bonds, the Commission shall give notice of such termination in the same manner as for a Listed Event under Section 5(f) hereof. SECTION 6. Dissemination Agent. The Commission may, from time to time, appoint or engage a Dissemination Agent to assist it in carrying out its obligations under this Disclosure Certificate, and may discharge any such Dissemination Agent, with or without appointing a successor Dissemination Agent. The Dissemination Agent may resign at any time by providing at least 30 days' notice in writing to the Commission. SECTION 7. Amendment; Waiver. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Disclosure Certificate, the Commission may amend this Disclosure Certificate, provided no amendment increasing or affecting the obligations or duties of the Dissemination Agent shall be made without the consent of such party, and any provision of this Disclosure Certificate may be waived if such amendment or waiver is supported by an opinion of counsel expert in federal securities laws acceptable to the Commission and the Dissemination Agent to the effect that such amendment or waiver would not, in and of itself, cause the undertakings herein to violate the Rule if such amendment or waiver had been effective on the date hereof but taking into account any subsequent change in or official interpretation of the Rule. SECTION 8. Additional Information. Nothing in this Disclosure Certificate shall be deemed to prevent the Commission from disseminating any other information, using the means of dissemination set forth in this Disclosure Certificate or any other means of communication, or including any other information in any Annual Report or notice of occurrence of a Listed Event, in addition to that which is required by this Disclosure Certificate. If the Commission chooses to include any information in any Annual Report or notice of occurrence of a Listed Event, in addition to that which is specifically required by this Disclosure Certificate, the Commission 390 shall have no obligation under this Certificate to update such information or include it in any future Annual Report or notice of occurrence of a Listed Event. SECTION 9. Default. In the event of a failure of the Commission to comply with any provision of this. Disclosure Certificate, any Holder or Beneficial Owner of the Bonds may take' such actions, as may be necessary and appropriate, including seeking mandate or specific performance by court order, to cause the Commission to comply with its obligations under this Disclosure Certificate. A default under this Disclosure Certificate shall not t be deemed an Event of Default under the Indenture, and the sole remedy under this Disclosure Certificate in the event of any failure of the Commission to comply with this Disclosure Certificate shall be an action to compel performance. The Commission hereby represents and warrants that it is currently not in default under any other continuing disclosure arrangement entered into in connection with the Rule. SECTION 10. Duties, Immunities and Liabilities of Dissemination Agent. The Dissemination Agent shall have only such duties as are specifically set forth in this Disclosure Certificate, and the Commission agrees to indemnify and save the Dissemination Agent, its officers, directors, employees and agents, harmless against any loss, expense and liabilities which they may incur arising out of or ire the exercise or performance of their respective powers and duties hereunder, including the costs and expenses (including attorneys' fees) of defending against any claim of liability, but excluding liabilities due to the Dissemination Agent's negligence or willful misconduct. The Dissemination Agent shall be paid compensation by the Commission for its services provided hereunder in accordance with its schedule of fees as amended from time to time, and all expenses, legal fees and advances made or incurred by the Dissemination Agent in the performance of its duties hereunder. The Dissemination Agentshall have no duty or obligation to review any information provided to it hereunder and shall not be deemed to be acting in any fiduciary capacity for the Distract, the Bondholders, or any other party. The obligations of the Commission under this Section shall survive resignation or removal of the Dissemination Agent and payment of the Bonds. SECTION 11. Beneficiaries. This Disclosure Certificate shall inure solely to the benefit of the Commission, the Dissemination Agent, the Participating Underwriters and Holders and Beneficial Owners from time to time of the Bonds, and shall create no rights in any other person or entity. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: 391 • • • EXHIBIT A NOTICE TO REPOSITORIES OF FAILURE TO FILE ANNUAL REPORT Name of Issuer: Riverside County Transportation Commission Name of Bond Issue: $ Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, Series 2008 Date of Issuance: , 2008 NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") has not provided an Annual Report with respect to the above -named Bonds as required by that certain Indenture, dated as of June 1, 2008, by and between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association (the "Trustee") and that certain First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of June I, 2008, by and between the Commission and the Trustee. The Commission anticipates that the Annual Report will be filed by Dated: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, on behalf of the Commission By: Its: cc: Riverside County Transportation Commission 392 • • • ATTACHMENT 3 OH&S Draft 3/27/08 NO.08-010 RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF NOT TO EXCEED S130,000,000 AGGREGATE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION SALES TAX REVENUE BONDS (LIMITED TAX BONDS), SERIES 2008, THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF AN INDENTURE, SUPPLEMENTAL INDENTURE, PURCHASE CONTRACT, OFFICIAL STATEMENT AND CONTINUING DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT AND THE TAKING OF ALL OTHER ACTIONS NECESSARY IN CONNECTION THEREWITH WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") is a county transportation commission duly organized and existing pursuant to the County Transportation Commissions Act, being Division 12 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California (Section 130000 etseq.); WHEREAS, the Commission is authorized pursuant to the Riverside County Transportation Sales Tax Act, being Division 25 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California (Section 240000 et seq.) (the "Act"), to, among other things, and with voter approval, levy a retail transactions and use tax in accordance with the provisions of Part 1.6 (commencing with Section 725I) of Division 2 of the Califomia Revenue and Taxation Code (the "Sales Tax Law") and to issue limited tax bonds payable from the proceeds of such tax; WHEREAS, the Commission adopted Ordinance No. 88-1, named the "Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance" ("Ordinance No. 88-1"), on July 6, 1988, pursuant to the provisions of the Act, which Ordinance provided for the imposition of a retail transactions and use tax (the "1988 Sales Tax") applicable in the incorporated and unincorporated territory of the County of Riverside (the "County") in accordance with the Sales Tax Law at the rate of one-half of one percent (1/2%) for a period not to exceed twenty (20) years; WHEREAS, by its terms, Ordinance No. 88-1 became effective at the close of the polls on November 8, 1988, the day of the election at which the proposition imposing the 1988 Sales Tax was approved by a majority vote of the electors voting on the measure, and the collection of the 1988 Sales Tax commenced on July 1, 1989; WHEREAS, the Commission adopted Ordinance No. 02-001, named the "Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail -Transaction and Use "Fax Ordinance" (the "Ordinance") on May 8, 2002, pursuant to the provisions of the Act, which Ordinance provides for the imposition of a retail transactions and use tax (the "Sales Tax") applicable in the incorporated and unincorporated territory of the County in accordance with the provisions of the Sales Tax Law at the rate of zero percent (0%) until the expiration of the 1988 Sales Tax on June 30, 2009, and thereafter at the rate of one-half of one percent (1/2%) for a period not to exceed thirty (30) years; OHS West:260379561.6 393 WHEREAS, by its terms, the Ordinance became effective at the close of the polls on November 5, 2002, the day of the election at which the proposition imposing the Sales Tax was approved by more than two-thirds of the electors voting on the measure; WHEREAS, the Ordinance empowers the Commission to sell or issue, from time to time, on or before the collection of the Sales Tax, bonds, or other evidences of indebtedness, in the aggregate principal amount at any one time outstanding not to exceed $500 million for capital expenditures for various purposes, including to carry out the transportation projects described in the Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan, adopted as part of the Ordinance, including any future amendments thereto (the "Expenditure Plan"); WHEREAS, the Commission is authorized by Section 240309 of the California Public Utilities Code to issue from time to time limited tax bonds (defined to include indebtedness and securities of any kind or class, including sales tax revenue bonds); secured and payable in whole or in part from revenues of the Sales Tax ("Sales Tax Revenues"); WHEREAS, the Commission has heretofore authorized the issuance of not to exceed $200,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of its Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and Series B (collectively, the "CP Notes"), pursuant to an Indenture dated as of March 1, 2005 (the "CP Indenture"), by and between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association, as successor trustee; WHEREAS, the Commission has heretofore executed and delivered interest rate swap agreements in an aggregate notional amount of $185 million (the "Initial Swaps"), which Initial Swaps have an effective date of October 1, 2009; WHEREAS, the Commission hereby determines that one or more new series or subseries of bonds in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed one hundred thirty million dollars ($130,000,000) is necessary in order to finance (i) the refunding of all or a portion of the outstanding CP Notes, (ii) capitalized interest on the bonds throughDecember1, 2009, (iii) the reserve fund for such bonds, if any, (iv) swap termination payments, if any, (v) funds for projects authorized in the Expenditure Plan, and (vi) the costs of issuance incurred in connection with such bonds, and the Commission has determined that such bonds in an amount not to exceed such principal amount shall be issued, secured by the Sales Tax Revenues and entitled, "Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), 2008 Series A" (the "Series 2008 Bonds"); WHEREAS, the Commission hereby further determines that the Series 2008 Bonds shall be issued pursuant town Indenture (the "Indenture"), as amended and supplemented, including as amended and supplemented by a Supplemental Indenture thereto (the "Supplemental Indenture"), which Indenture and Supplemental Indenture are proposed to be entered into by the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee (the "Trustee"); WHEREAS, there has been prepared and presented to the Board a proposed form of Indenture and proposed form of Supplemental Indenture; WHEREAS, in order to minimize debt service and maximize benefits to the Commission in connection with the issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds, it may be desirable to issue the Series 394 OHS West:260379561.6 • • 2008 Bonds as fixed rate bonds or as variable rate bonds in a term mode (the "Variable Rate Bonds"); WHEREAS, in order to set forth the terms of sale of the Series 2008 Bonds, the Commission proposes to enter into a bond purchase agreement (the "Purchase Contract') with Lehman Brothers Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC (collectively, the "Purchasers"); WHEREAS, the Purchasers have caused to be prepared and submitted to the Commission a proposed form of Purchase Contract; WHEREAS, in order to provide liquidity support, credit enhancement or both, for the Series 2008 Bonds, the Commission may purchase bond insurance or enter into one or more credit agreements, reimbursement agreements, standby bond purchase agreements or other liquidity or credit support agreements (each, a "Support Agreement'), containing such terms and conditions as the Executive Director of the Commission (the "Executive Director") or the Chief Financial Officer of the Commission (the "Chief Financial Officer") considers appropriate and with a bank or other financial institution or insurance company or association (each a "Support Provider," and collectively, the "Support Providers") to be selected by the Executive Director or Chief Financial Officer in the event a Support Agreement is determined to be beneficial to the marketing of the Series 2008 Bonds; WHEREAS, in order to provide information about the Series 2008 Bonds and related matters to purchasers and potential purchasers of the Series 2008 Bonds, the Commission proposes to execute and deliver an official statement (the "Official Statement"); WHEREAS, there has been prepared and presented to the Board a proposed form of Official Statement in preliminary form (the "Preliminary Official Statement') and a proposed form of Continuing Disclosure Agreement (the "Continuing Disclosure Agreement"); WHEREAS, the Commission has been presented with the forms of the Indenture, the Supplemental Indenture, the Purchase Contract, the Continuing Disclosure Agreement and the Official Statement relating to the financing described herein (the "Financing"), and the Commission has examined and approved each document and desires to authorize and direct the execution of such documents as are specified herein and such other documents as are necessary in connection with the Financing and to authorize and direct the consummation of the Financing; and WHEREAS, all acts, conditions and things required by the Law and the Constitution and laws of the State of California to exist, to have happened and to have been performed precedent to and in connection with the consummation of the Financing authorized hereby do exist; have happened and have been performed in regular and due time, form and manner as required by law, and the Commission is now duly authorized and empowered, pursuant to each and every requirement of law, to authorize such Financing and to authorize the execution of the Indenture, the Supplemental Indenture, the Purchase Contract, one or more Support Agreements, the Official Statement and the Continuing Disclosure Agreement for the purposes, in the manner and upon the terms provided; OHS West260379561.6 395 NOW THEREFORE, THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION RESOLVES: Section 1_ The Commission finds and determines that the foregoing recitals are true and correct. Section 2. The issuance by the Commission of not to exceed $ l 30,000,000 aggregate principal amount of Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), 2008 Series A, in accordance with the provisions set forth in the Indenture, in one or more series or subseries, is hereby authorized and approved. Section 3. The proposed form of Indenture and Supplemental Indenture presented to this meeting and the terms and conditions thereof are hereby approved. The structure, date, maturity date or dates (not to exceed June I, 2039), fixed or variable interest rate or rates (such rates not to exceed a maximum of 12% per annum) or methods of determining the same, interest payment dates, forms, registration privileges, place or places of payment, terms of redemption, tender, mandatory purchase, additional series designation and number thereof and other terms of the Series 2008 Bonds shall be (subject to the foregoing limitations) as provided in the Indenture and the Supplemental Indenture as finally executed and delivered. The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed, for and in the name and on behalf of the Commission, to execute and deliver the Indenture and the Supplemental Indenture, in substantially said form, with such changes therein as the officer executing the same may require or approve, such approval to be conclusively evidenced by the execution and delivery thereof. Section 4. The proposed form of Purchase Contract presented to this meeting and the terms and conditions thereof are hereby approved. The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed, for and in the name and on behalf of the Commission, to sell the Series 2008 Bonds to the Purchasers pursuant to the Purchase Contract with the Purchasers' compensation not to exceed 1% of the principal amount of the Series 2008 Bonds and to execute and deliver a Purchase Contract, in substantially said form, with such changes therein as the officer executing the same may require or approve, such approval to be conclusively evidenced by the execution and delivery thereof. Section 5_ The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed to negotiate with Support Providers, and, if the Executive Director, with the advice of Feldman, Rolapp & Associates (the "Financial Advisor"), determines that it is in the best interests of the Commission, to enter into a Support Agreement for the Series 2008 Bonds on such terms as the Executive Director, with the advice of the Financial Advisor, determines are appropriate. Section 6. The proposed form of Preliminary Official Statement presented to this meeting is hereby approved_ The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed to execute and deliver to the Purchasers a certificate deeming the Preliminary Official Statement, in substantially the fonn on file with the Clerk and presented to this meeting and with such changes as the Executive Director approves in the interest of the Commission, final within the meaning of Securities Exchange Commission Rule 15c2-12. The Purchasers are hereby authorized to 396 OHS West:260379561 6 • • • distribute the Preliminary Official Statement in the form so deemed final by the Executive Director. The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed, for and in the name and on behalf of the Commission; to execute and deliver a final Official Statement, in substantially said form, with such changes therein as the officer executing the same may require or approve, such approval to be conclusively evidenced by the execution and delivery thereof. Section 7. The proposed form of Continuing Disclosure Agreement presented to this meeting is hereby approved. The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed, for and in the name and on behalf of the Commission, to execute and deliver the Continuing Disclosure Agreement, in substantially said form, with such changes therein as such officer executing the same may require or approve, such approval to be conclusively evidenced by the execution and delivery thereof. Section 8. The Executive Director is hereby authorized and directed to negotiate with financial institutions and/or insurance companies, as applicable, and, if the Executive Director, with the advice of the Financial Advisor, determines that it is in the best interest of the Commission, to secure an irrevocable letter of credit, or a surety bond, or an insurance policy on such terms as the Executive Director determines are appropriate, in order to fund any bond reserve fund established pursuant to the Indenture or the Supplemental Indenture. Section 9. The Executive Director is hereby authorized to enter into or to instruct the Trustee to enter into, with the advice of the Financial Advisor, one or more investment agreements, float contracts, swaps or other hedging products or to terminate or revise the Initial Swaps (hereinafter collectively referred to as "Hedge Agreements") providing for the hedging of interest rate or the investment of moneys in any of the funds and accounts created under the Indenture or the Supplemental Indenture, on such terms as the Executive Director shall deem appropriate. Pursuant to Section 5922 of the California Government Code, the Commission hereby finds and determines that the Hedge Agreements will reduce the amount and duration of interest rate risk with respect to amounts invested pursuant to the Hedge Agreements and/or is designed to reduce the amountorduration of payment, rate, spread or similar risk or result in a lower cost of borrowing when used in combination with the Initial Swaps and the Series 2008 Bonds or enhance the relationship between risk and return with respect to investments. Section 10. All approvals, consents, directions, notices, orders, requests and other actions permitted or required by any of the documents authorized by this Resolution or the Initial Swaps, including, without limitation, any amendment of any of the documents authorized by this Resolution or the Initial Swaps or other agreement related thereto, and any of the foregoing that may be necessary or desirable in connection with any Support Agreement or the extension or replacement thereof, or any reserve facility, any investment of proceeds of the Series 2008 Bonds, or in connection with the addition, substitution or replacement of underwriters or remarketing agents, or any agreements with paying agents, escrow agents or verification agents, the removal or replacement of the Trustee or any similar action may be given or taken by an Authorized Representative (as such term is defined in the Indenture), without further authorization or direction by this Board, and each Authorized Representative is hereby authorized and directed to give any such approval, consent, direction, notice, order, request or other action and to take any such action which such Authorized Representative may deem necessary or desirable to further the purposes of this Resolution_ OHS Wese260379561.6 397 All consents, approvals, notices, orders, requests and other actions permitted or required by any of the documents authorized by this Resolution, whether before or after the issuance of the Series 2008 Bonds, which may be necessary or desirable in connection with any default under or amendment of such documents, settlements or revisions, may be taken or given by the Authorized Representative, without further authorization by this Board, and the Authorized Representative is hereby authorized and directed to give such consent, approval, notice, order or request and to take any such action which such officer may deem necessary or desirable to further the purposes of this Resolution and the transactions contemplated hereby. Section 11. All actions heretofore taken by the officers and agents of the Commission with respect to the Financing and the issuance and sale of the Series 2008 Bonds are hereby ratified, confirmed and approved. If at the time of execution of any of the documents authorized herein, the Executive Director is unavailable, such documents may be executed by the Deputy Executive Director of the Commission or the Chief Financial Officer in lieu of the Executive Director. The Chief Financial Officer of the Commission shall act as the Auditor -Controller of the Commission for execution of the Series 2008 Bonds. The Clerk of the Board of the Commission is hereby authorized to attest to the execution by the Executive Director or the Deputy Executive Director or the Chief Financial Officer of any of such documents as said officers deem appropriate. The proper officers and agents of the Commission are hereby authorized and .directed, jointly and severally, for and in the name and on behalf of the Commission, to do any and all things and to take any and all actions and to execute and deliver any and all agreements, certificates and documents, including, without limitation, any tax certificates or agreements, any agreements for depository or verification services, and any agreements for rebate compliance services, which they, or any of them, may deem necessary or advisable in order to consummate the Financing and the issuance and sale of the Series 2008 Bonds and otherwise to carry out, give effect to and comply with the terms and intent of the Ordinance, this Resolution, the Series 2008 Bonds and the documents approved hereby. 398 OHS West:260379561.6 • • Section 13. This Resolution shall take effect immediately upon its adoption and approval. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Riverside County Transportation Commission at its meeting on , 2008. ATTEST: By: Clerk of the Board of the Commission OHS West:260379561.6 By: Chairman, Board of Commissioners 399 CERTIFICATE OF THE CLERK OF THE BOARD OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION I, Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission"), hereby certify that the foregoing is a full, true and correct copy of a resolution duly adopted at a meeting of the governing board of said Commission duly and regularly held in Riverside, California, on , 2008, of which meeting all of the members of said Commission had due notice. I further certify that I have carefully compared the foregoing copy with the original minutes of said meeting on file and of record in my office; that said copy is a full, true and. correct copy of the original resolution adopted at said meeting and entered in said minutes; and that said resolution has not been amended, modified, rescinded or revoked in any manner since the date of its adoption, and the same is now in full force and effect_ I further certify that an agenda of said meeting was posted at least 72 hours before said meeting at a location in Riverside, California, freely accessible to the public and a brief general description of the resolution to be adopted at said meeting appeared on said agenda. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have executed this certificate hereto as of this date, , 2008. OHS West:260379561.6 By Clerk 400 • • • ATTACHMENT 4 OH&S Draft 3/ 17/08 INDENTURE between RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION and U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Trustee Dated as of June 1, 2008 Relating to RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION SALES TAX REVENUE BONDS (LIMITED TAX BONDS) OHS West260379475.5 401 SECTION 1.01 SECTION 1.02 SECTION 1.03 SECTION 2.01 SECTION 2.02 SECTION 2.03 SECTION 2.04 SECTION 2.05 SECTION 2.06 SECTION 2.07 SECTION 2.08 SECTION 2.09 SECTION 2.10 SECTION 3.01 SECTION 3.02 SECTION 3.03 SECTION 3.04 SECTION 3.05 SECTION 3.06 SECTION 3.07 SECTION 4.01 SECTION 4.02 SECTION 4.03 SECTION 4.04 SECTION 5.01 SECTION 5.02 OHS West:260379475.5 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ARTICLE I EQUALITY OF SECURITY; DEFINITIONS; CONTENT OF CERTIFICATES AND OPINIONS Equality of Security 3 Definitions 3 Content of Certificates 21 ARTICLE II THE BONDS Authorization of Bonds 21 Terms of the Bonds 22 Form of Bonds 22 Execution of Bonds 22 Transfer of Bonds 23 Exchange of Bonds 23 Bond Register 23 Temporary Bonds 23 Bonds Mutilated; Lost; Destroyed or Stolen 24 Use of Securities Depository 24 ARTICLE III ISSUANCE OF BONDS Issuance of Bonds 26 Issuance of Additional Bonds 26 Proceedings for Issuance of Additional Bonds 27 Issuance of Refunding Bonds 27 Limitations on the Issuance of Obligations Payable from Sales Tax Revenues; Parity Obligations; Subordinate Obligations 29 Calculation of Maximum Annual Debt Service with Respect to Bonds and Parity Obligations 31 Application of Proceeds 31 ARTICLE IV REDEMPTION, TENDER AND PURCHASE OF BONDS Terms of Redemption, Tender and Purchase 31 Notice of Redemption 31 Partial Redemption of Bonds 33 Effect of Redemption 33 ARTICLE V SALES TAX REVENUES Pledge of Revenues; Revenue Fund 33 Allocation of Sales Tax Revenues 34 402 TABLE OF CONTENT'S (continued) Page SECTION 5.03 Application of Interest Fund 38 SECTION 5.04 Application of Principal Fund 38 SECTION 5.05 Establishment, Funding and Application of Bond Reserve Funds 39 SECTION 5.06 Application of Subordinate Obligations Fund 42 SECTION 5.07 Application of Fees and Expenses Fund 42 SECTION 5.08 Application of Redemption Fund 42 SECTION 5.09 Rebate Fund 42 SECTION 5.10 Payment Provisions Applicable to Interest Rate Swap Agreements 43 SECTION 5.11 Investment in Funds and Accounts 44 ARTICLE VI COVENANTS OF THE COMMISSION SECTION 6.01 Punctual Payments 45 SECTION 6.02 Extension of Payment of Bonds 45 SECTION 6.03 Waiver of Laws 45 SECTION 6.04 Further Assurances 46 SECTION 6.05 Against Encumbrances 46 SECTION 6.06 Accounting Records and Financial Statements 46 SECTION 6.07 Collection of Sales Tax Revenues 46 SECTION 6.08 Tax Covenants 47 SECTION 6.09 Continuing Disclosure 48 ARTICLE VII EVENTS OF DEFAULT AND REMEDIES SECTION 7.01 Events of Default 48 SECTION 7.02 Application of the Revenues and Other Funds After Default; No Acceleration 49 SECTION 7.03 Trustee to Represent Bondholders 50 SECTION 7.04 Bondholders' Direction of Proceedings 51 SECTION 7.05 Limitation on Bondholders' Right to Sue 51 SECTION 7.06 Absolute Obligation of the Commission 52 SECTION 7.07 Termination of Proceedings 52 SECTION 7.08 Remedies Not Exclusive 52 SECTION 7.09 No Waiver of Default 52 SECTION 7.10 Credit Provider Directs Remedies Upon Event of Default 52 ARTICLE VIII THE TRUSTEE SECTION 8.01 Appointment, Duties Immunities and Liabilities of Trustee 53 SECTION 8.02 Accounting Records and Monthly Statements 54 SECTION 8.03 Merger or Consolidation 55 SECTION 8.04 Liability of Trustee 55 SECTION 8.05 Right of Trustee to Rely on Documents and Opinions 57 OHS West:260379475.5 403 TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) Page SECTION 8.06 Compensation and Indemnification of Trustee 58 ARTICLE IX MODIFICATION OR AMENDMENT OF THIS INDENTURE SECTION 9.01 Amendments Permitted 58 SECTION 9.02 Effect of Supplemental Indenture 60 SECTION 9.03 Endorsement of Bonds; Preparation of New Bonds 61 SECTION 9.04 Amendment of Particular Bonds 61 ARTICLE X DEFEASANCE SECTION 10.0I Discharge of Indenture 61 SECTION 10.02 Discharge of Liability on Bonds 62 SECTION 10.03 Deposit of Money or Securities 62 SECTION 10.04 Payment of Bonds After Discharge of Indenture 63 ARTICLE XI MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 11.01 Liability of Commission Limited to Sales Tax Revenues 63 SECTION 11.02 Successor Is Deemed Included in All References to Predecessor 64 SECTION 11.03 Limitation of Rights 64 SECIION 11.04 Waiver of Notice 64 SECTION 11.05 Destruction or Delivery of Canceled Bonds 64 SECTION 11.06 Severability of Invalid Provisions 64 SECTION 11.07 Notice to Commission and Trustee 64 SECTION 11.08 Evidence of Rights of Bondholders 65 SECTION 11.09 Disqualified Bonds 65 SECTION 11.10 Money Held for Particular Bonds 66 SECTION 11.11 Funds and Accounts 66 SECTION 11.12 Limitations on Rights of Credit Providers, Liquidity Providers, Reserve Facility Providers 66 SECTION 11.13 Article and Section Headings and References 67 SECTION 11.14 Waiver of Personal Liability 67 SECTION 11.15 Governing Law 67 SECTION 11.16 Business Day 67 SECTION 11.17 Effective Date of Indenture 67 SECTION 11.18 Execution in Counterparts 67 OHS West:260379475.5 404 • • • INDENTURE This INDENTURE, dated as of June 1, 2008 (as more fully defined in Section 1.02, the 'Indenture"), between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION, a public entity duly established and existing under the laws of the State of California (the "Commission"), and U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking association duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the United States of America, as trustee (the "Trustee"); WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, the Commission is a county transportation commission duly organized and existing pursuant to the County Transportation Commissions Act, being Division 12 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California (Section 130000 et seq.); WHEREAS, the Commission is authorized pursuant to the Riverside County Transportation Sales Tax Act, being Division 25 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California (Section 240000 et seq.) (the "Act"), to, among other things, and with voter approval, levy a retail transactions and use tax in accordance with the provisions of Part 1.6 (commencing with Section 7251) of Division 2 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code (the "Sales Tax Law") and to issue limited tax bonds payable from the proceeds of such tax; WHEREAS, the Commission adopted Ordinance No. 88-1, named the "Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance" ("1988 Ordinance"), on July 6, 1988, pursuant to the provisions of the Act, which Ordinance provided for the imposition of a retail transactions and use tax (the "1988 Sales Tax") applicable in the incorporated and unincorporated territory of the County of Riverside (the "County") in accordance with the Sales Tax Law at the rate of one-half of one percent (1/2%) for a period not to exceed twenty (20) years; WHEREAS, by its terms, 1988 Ordinance became effective at the close of the polls on November 8, 1988, the day of the election at which the proposition imposing the 1988 Sales Tax was approved by a majority vote of the electors voting on the measure, and the collection of the 1988 Sales Tax commenced on July 1, 1989; WHEREAS, the Commission adopted Ordinance No. 02-001, named the "Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance" (the "Ordinance") on May 8; 2002, pursuant to the provisions of the Act, which Ordinance provides for the imposition of a retail transactions and use tax (the "Sales Tax") applicable in the incorporated and unincorporated territory of the County in accordance with the provisions of the Sales Tax Law at the rate of zero percent (0%) until the expiration of the 1988 Sales Tax on June 30, 2009, and thereafter at the rate of one-half of one percent (1/2%) for a period not to exceed thirty (30) years; WHEREAS, by its terms, the Ordinance became effective at the close of the polls on November 5, 2002, the day of the election at which the proposition imposing the Sales Tax was approved by more than two-thirds of the electors voting on the measure; OHS V✓ese260379475.5 405 WHEREAS, the Ordinance empowers the Commission to sell or issue, from time to time, on or before the collection of the Sales Tax, bonds, or other evidences of indebtedness, in the aggregate principal amount at any one time outstanding not to exceed. any limit required by law for capital expenditures for various purposes, including to carry out the transportation projects described in the Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan, adopted as part of the Ordinance, including any future amendments thereto (the "Expenditure Plan"); WHEREAS; the Commission is authorized by Section 240309 of the California Public Utilities Code to issue from time to time Iimited tax bonds (defined to include indebtedness and securities of any kind or class, including sales tax revenue bonds), secured and payable in whole or in part from revenues of the Sales Tax (as more fully defined in Section 1.02, the "Sales Tax Revenues"); WHEREAS, the Commission has heretofore entered into an Indenture, dated as of March 1, 2005 (the "Notes Indenture"), between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association, successor by merger to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as trustee, pursuant to which the Commission has authorized the issuance of certain limited tax bonds (the "Notes") payable from and secured by the Sales Tax Revenues; WHEREAS, the Commission has heretofore executed and delivered interest rate swap agreements in an aggregate notional amount of $185 million (the "Initial Swaps"), which Initial Swaps have an effective date of October 1, 2009; WHEREAS, the Commission has determined to enter into this Indenture in order to provide for the authentication and delivery of certain limited tax bonds (the "Bonds"), to establish and declare the terms and conditions upon which the Bonds and other obligations secured by the retail transactions and use tax shall be issued and secured and to secure the payment of the principal thereof, premium (if any), and interest on the Bonds and obligations secured by the retail transactions and use tax on a parity with the Bonds (as more fully defined in Section 1.02, "Parity Obligations"); WHEREAS, the execution and delivery of this Indenture has in all respects been duly and validly authorized by resolution duly passed and approved by the Commission; and WHEREAS, all acts, conditions and things required by law to exist, to have happened and to have been performed precedent to and in connection with the execution and the entering into of this Indenture do exist, have happened and have been performed in regular and due time, form and manner as required by law, and the parties hereto are now duly authorized to execute and enter into this Indenture; NOW, THEREFORE, THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH, that in order to secure the payment of the principal of, premium, if any, and the interest on. all Bonds at any time issued, authenticated and delivered hereunder, to secure the payment of Parity Obligations in accordance with terms hereof and to provide the terms and conditions under which all property, rights and interests hereby assigned and pledged are to be dealt with and disposed of, and to secure performance and observance of the terms, conditions, stipulations; covenants, agreements, trusts, uses and purposes hereinafter expressed, and in consideration of the premises and of the material O}IS West:260379475.5 406 • • covenants herein contained and of the purchase and acceptance of the Bonds by the owners thereof, and for other valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the Commission does hereby agree and covenant with the Trustee for the benefit of the respective owners, from time to time, of the Bonds, or any part thereof, and for the benefit of the holders of Parity Obligations, in accordance with terms hereof, as follows: ARTICLE I EQUALITY OF SECURITY; DEFINITIONS; CONTENT OF CERTIFICATES AND OPINIONS SECTION 1.01 E t_qiinr of Security. In consideration of the acceptance of the Bonds by the owners thereof from time to time, this Indenture shall be deemed to be and shall constitute a contract among the Commission, the Trustee and the owners from time to time of the Bonds and the covenants and agreements herein set forth to be performed by or on behalf of the Commission or the Trustee shall be for the equal and proportionate benefit, security and protection of all owners of the Bonds, without preference, priority or distinction as to security or otherwise of any of the Bonds over any of the others by reasons of the Series, time of issue, sale or negotiation thereof or for any cause whatsoever, except as expressly provided therein or herein. Nothing herein shall prevent additional security being provided for the benefit of a particular Series of Bonds under any supplement to this Indenture. SECTION 1.02 Definitions. Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms defined in this Section shall, for all purposes of this Indenture and of any Supplemental Indenture and of any certificate, opinion or other document herein mentioned, have the meanings herein specified, to be equally applicable to both the singular and plural forms of any of the terms herein defined. "Accreted Value" means, with respect to any Capital Appreciation Bond, the principal amount thereof plus the interest accrued thereon, compounded at the approximate interest rate thereon on each date specified therein. The Accreted Value at any date shall be the amounts set forth in the Accreted Value Table as of such date, if such date is a compounding date, and if not, as of the immediately preceding compounding date. "Accreted Value Table" means the table denominated as such which appears as an exhibit to, and to which reference is made in, a Supplemental Indenture providing for a Series of Capital Appreciation Bonds issued pursuant to such Supplemental Indenture. "Act" means the Riverside County Transportation Sales Tax Act, Division 25 (Section 240000 et seq.) of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California, as now in effect and as it may from time to time hereafter be amended or supplemented. "Alternate Credit Enhancement" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, any Insurance, letter of credit, line of credit, surety bond or other instrument, if any, which secures or guarantees the payment of principal of and interest on a Series of Bonds, issued by an insurance company, commercial bank, pension fund or other financial institution, and delivered or made available to the Trustee, as a replacement or substitution for any Credit Enhancement then in effect_ ORS West:260379475.5 407 "Alternate Liquidity Facility" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, a line of credit, letter of credit, standby purchase agreement or similar liquidity facility, issued by a commercial bank, insurance company, pension fund or other financial institution, and delivered or made available to the Trustee, as a replacement or substitute for any Liquidity Facility then in effect. . "Annual Debt Service" means, for any Fiscal Year, the aggregate amount (without duplication) of principal and interest on all Bonds and Parity Obligations becoming due and payable during such Fiscal Year calculated using the principles and assumptions set forth under the definition of Debt Service. "Assumed Debt Service" means for any Fiscal Year the aggregate amount of principal and interest which would be payable on all Bonds if each Excluded Principal Payment were amortized on a substantially level debt service basis or other amortization schedule provided by the Commission for a period commencing on the date of calculation of -such. Assumed Debt Service and ending on the earlier of (i) the date specified by the Commission not exceeding thirty (30) years from the date of calculation, or (ii) the Tax Expiration Date, such Assumed Debt Service to be calculated on a level debt service basis or other amortization schedule provided by the Commission, based on a fixed interest rate equal to the rate at which the Commission could borrow for such period, as set forth in a certificate of a financial advisor or investment banker, delivered to the Trustee, who may rely conclusively on such certificate, such certificate to be delivered within thirty (30) days of the date of calculation. "Authorized Representative" means the Executive Director, the Deputy Executive Director, the Chief Financial Officer, the Accounting and Human Resources Manager, or any other person designated to act on behalf of the Commission by a written certificate furnished to the Trustee containing the specimen signature of such person and signed on behalf of the Commission by an Authorized Representative. 'Beneficial Owner" means any Person who has the power, directly or indirectly, to vote or consent with respect to, or to dispose of ownership of any Bond, including,_ without limitation, any Person holding Bonds through nominees or depositories, including the Securities Depository. "Board" means the Board of Commissioners of the Commission. "Bond Obligation" means, as of any given date of calculation, (1) with respect to any Outstanding Current Interest Bond, the principal amount of such Bond, and (2) with respect to any Outstanding Capital Appreciation Bond, the Accreted Value thereof. "Bond Reserve Fund" means any fund by that name established with respect to one or more Series of Bonds pursuant to the Supplemental Indenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds. "Bond Reserve Requirement" with respect to a Series of Bonds for which the Commission shall have established a Bond Reserve Fund shall have the meaning specified in the Supplemental Indenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds. "Bondholder" or "Holder", whenever used herein with respect to a Bond, means the person in whose name such Bond is registered. OHS West:260379475.5 408 • • • "Bonds" means the Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds) .authorized by, and at any time Outstanding pursuant to, this Indenture. "Business Day" means, except as is otherwise provided in the Supplemental Indenture pursuant to which a Series of Bonds are issued, any day other than (1) a Saturday, Sunday, or a day on which banking institutions in the State, the State of New York or the jurisdiction in which the Corporate Trust Office of the Trustee is located are authorized or obligated by law or executive order to be closed, (2) for purposes of payments and other actions relating to Bonds secured by a Credit Enhancement or supported by a Liquidity Facility, a day upon which commercial banks in the city in which is located the office of the issuing bank at which demands 1'or payment under the Credit Enhancement or Liquidity Facility, as applicable, are to be presented are authorized or obligated by law or executive order to be closed, and (3) a day on which the New York Stock Exchange is closed. "Capital Appreciation Bonds" means the Bonds of any Series designated as Capital Appreciation Bonds in the Supplemental Indenture providing for the issuance of such Series of Bonds and on which interest is compounded and paid at maturity or on prior redemption. "Certificate," "Statement," "Request," "Requisition" and "Order" of the Commission mean, respectively, a written certificate, statement, request, requisition or order signed in the name of the Commission by an Authorized Representative. If and to the extent required by Section 1.03, each such instrument shall include the statements provided for in Section 1.03. "Code" means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, and the regulations applicable thereto or issued thereunder, or any successor to the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. Reference to any particular Code section shall, in the event of such a successor Code, be deemed to be reference to the successor to such Code section. "Commission" means the Riverside County Transportation Commission, a public entity of the State, duly organized and existing under the Act. "Continuing Disclosure Agreement" means, with respect to each Series of Bonds requiring an undertaking regarding disclosure under Rule 15c2-12, the Continuing Disclosure Agreement, dated the date of issuance of such Series of Bonds, executed by the Commission and a Dissemination Agent, as the same may be supplemented, modified or amended in accordance with its terms. "Corporate Trust Office" or corporate trust office means the corporate trust office of the . Trustee at U.S. Bank National Association, 633 West Fifth Street, 24th Floor, Los Angeles CA 90071, Attention: Corporate Trust Services, or such other or additional offices as may be designated by the Trustee from time to time. "Costs of Issuance" means all items of expense directly or indirectly payable by or reimbursable to the Conunission and related to the authorization, execution, sale and delivery of a Series of Bonds, including but not limited to advertising and printing costs, costs of preparation and reproduction of documents, filing and recording fees, travel expenses and costs relating to rating agency meetings and other meetings concerning such Series of Bonds, initial fees and OHS West:260379475.5 409 charges of the Trustee, legal fees and charges, fees and disbursements of consultants and professionals, financial advisor fees and expenses, rating agency fees, fees and charges for preparation, execution, transportation and safekeeping of Bonds, surety, insurance, credit enhancement and liquidity costs, termination fees payable in connection with the termination of an Interest Rate Swap Agreement in connection with the delivery of such Series of Bonds, and any other cost, charge or fee in connection with the initial delivery of a Series of Bonds or any Parity Obligations delivered in connection with a Series of Bonds. "Costs of Issuance Fund" means a fund by that name established pursuant to the provisions of a Supplemental Indenture to pay Costs of Issuance with respect to a Series of Bonds being issued pursuant to such Supplemental Indenture. "Costs of the Project" means all items of expense related to the Project and directly or indirectly payable by or reimbursable to the Commission in accordance with the Act and the Ordinance. "Counterparty" means an entity which has entered into an Interest Rate Swap Agreement with the Commission. "County" means the County of Riverside, California. "Credit Enhancement" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, any Insurance, letter of credit; line of credit, surety bond or other instrument, if any, which secures or guarantees the payment of principal of and interest on a Series of Bonds, issued by an insurance company, commercial bank or other financial institution, and delivered or made available to the Trustee, as from time to time supplemented or amended pursuant to its terms, or, in the event of the delivery or availability of an Alternate Credit Enhancement, such Alternate Credit Enhancement. "Credit Provider" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, the Insurer, commercial bank or other financial institution issuing (or having primary obligation, or acting as agent for the financial institutions obligated, under) a Credit Enhancement then in effect with respect to such Series of Bonds. "Current Interest Bonds" means the Bonds of any Series designated as Current Interest Bonds in the Supplemental Indenture providing for the issuance of such Series of Bonds and that pay interest to the Holders thereof on a periodic basis prior to maturity. "Debt Service," when used with respect to any Bonds or Parity Obligations (for purposes of this definition of "Debt Service," herein collectively referred to as "Obligations"), means, as of any date of calculation and with respect to any Fiscal Year, the sum of (1) the interest falling due on such Obligations during such Fiscal Year and (2) the principal or Mandatory Sinking Account Payments required with respect to such Obligations during such Fiscal Year; computed on the assumption that no portion of such Obligations shall cease to be Outstanding during such Fiscal Year except by reason of the application of such scheduled payments; provided, however, that for purposes of such computation: OHS West:260379475.5 410 • • • (A) Excluded Principal Payments (and the interest related thereto provided such interest is being paid from the same source as the Excluded Principal Payments) shall be excluded from such calculation and Assumed Debt Service shall be included in such calculation; (B) in determining the principal amount due in each Fiscal Year, payment shall (unless a different subsection of this definition applies for purposes of determining principal maturities or amortization) be assumed to be made in accordance with any amortization schedule established for such Obligations, including any Mandatory Sinking Account Payments or any scheduled redemption or payment of Obligations on the basis of Accreted Value, and for such purpose, the redemption payment or payment of Accreted Value shall be deemed a principal payment and interest that is compounded and paid as Accreted Value shall be deemed due on the scheduled redemption or payment date of such Capital Appreciation Bond; (C) if any Obligations bear, or if any Obligations_ proposed to be issued will bear, interest at a variable interest rate for which an Interest Rate Swap Agreement is not in place and the interest on which is excluded or expected to be excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes, the interest rate on such Obligations for periods when the actual interest rate cannot yet be determined shall be assumed to be equal to the average. of the SIFMA Swap Index for the five (5) years preceding such date of calculation; (D) if any Obligations bear, or if any Obligations proposed to be issued will bear, interest at a variable interest rate for which an Interest Rate Swap Agreement is not in place and the interest on which is included or expected to be included in gross income for federal income tax purposes, the interest rate on such Obligations shall be calculated at an interest rate equal to 100% of the average One Month USD LIBOR Rate during the five (5) years preceding such date of calculation; (E) with respect to any Obligations bearing interest, or expected to bear interest, at a variable interest rate for which an Interest Rate Swap Agreement is in place providing for a fixed rate of interest to maturity or for a specific term with respect to such Obligations, the interest rate on such Obligations shall be assumed to be the synthetic fixed interest rate specified in such Interest Rate Swap Agreement for such term provided that if, pursuant to a Certificate of the Commission filed with the Trustee, the sum of (i) interest payable on such Obligations, plus (ii) amounts payable by the Commission under such Interest Rate Swap Agreement, less (iii) amounts receivable by the Commission under such Interest Rate Swap Agreement, is expected to be greater than the interest payable on the Obligations to which such Interest Rate Swap Agreement relates (i.e., if such Interest Rate Swap Agreement is an "off -market" Interest Rate Swap Agreement), then, in such instance, such excess amounts expected to be payable by the Commission under such Interest Rate Swap Agreement shall be included in the calculation of Debt Service; (F) with respect to any Obligations bearing interest, or expected to bear interest, at a fixed interest rate for which an Interest Rate Swap Agreement is in place providing for a net variable interest rate with respect to such Obligations for a specific term, the interest rate on such Obligations shall be assumed to be equal for such term to the sum of (i) the fixed interest rate or rates to be paid on the Obligations, minus (ii) the fixed interest rate receivable by the Commission under such Interest Rate Swap Agreement, plus (iii) the average interest rate of the OHS West:260379475.5 411 index on which the Interest Rate Swap Agreement is based, as identified in a Certificate of the Commission, or, if not based on an identifiable index, then the SIFMA Swap Index, in each case, over the five (5) years preceding the date of calculation; (G) if any Obligations feature an option, on the part of the owners or an obligation under the terms of such Obligations, to tender all or a portion of such Obligations to the Commission, the Trustee or other fiduciary or agent, and requires that such Obligations or portion thereof be purchased if properly presented, and such purchased Obligations are intended to be remarketed or refunded upon tender, then for purposes of determining the amounts of principal and interest due in any Fiscal Year on such Obligations, the options or obligations of the owners of such Obligations to tender the same for purchase or payment prior to the stated maturity or maturities shall be ignored and not treated as a principal maturity; and (H) principaI and interest payments on Obligations shall be excluded to the extent such payments are to be paid from Revenues then held on deposit by the Trustee or from other amounts on deposit with the Trustee or other fiduciary in escrow specifically therefor and interest payments shall be excluded to the extent that such interest payments are to be paid from the proceeds of Obligations held by the Trustee or other fiduciary as capitalized interest - specifically to pay such interest. "Defeasance Securities" means: (i) U.S. Treasury Certificates, Notes and Bonds, including State and Local Government Series securities; (ii) direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury which have been stripped by the U.S. Treasury itself; (iii) Resolution Funding Corp. securities ("REFCORP"), provided, however, only the interest component of REFCORP strips which have been stripped by request to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in book entry form are acceptable; (iv) pre -refunded municipal bonds rated "Aaa" by Moody's and "AAA" by Standard & Poor's, provided, however, that if such municipal bonds are rated only by Standard & Poor's, then such pre -refunded municipal bonds must have been pre -refunded with cash, direct United States or United States guaranteed obligations, or "AAA" rated pre -refunded municipal bonds; (v) obligations issued by the following agencies, which are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States: (a) Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) - certificates of beneficial ownership; (b) General Services Administration - participation certificates; (c) U.S. Maritime Administration - Guaranteed Title XI financing; (d) Small Business Administration guaranteed participation certificates and guaranteed pool certificates; (e) GNMA guaranteed MSB and participation certificates; and (f) U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Local Authority Bonds, or (vi) certain obligations of government -sponsored agencies that are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States limited to: (a) Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (FHLMC) debt obligations; (b) Farm Credit System (formerly Federal Land Banks, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, and Banks for Cooperatives) consolidated system- wide bonds and notes; (c) Federal Home Loan Banks (FHL Banks) consolidated debt obligations; (d) Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) debt obligations; (e) Student Loan Marketing Association (SLMA) debt obligations; and (f) Financing Corp. (FICO) debt obligations; and (g) other obligations approved by the Rating Agencies for defeasance escrows rated in the highest Rating Category. "Dissemination Agent" means, with respect to each Series of Bonds requiring an undertaking regarding disclosure under Rule 15c2-12(b)(5), the dissemination agent under the 0I{5 West:260379475.5 412 Continuing Disclosure Agreement delivered in connection with such Series of' Bonds, or any successor dissemination agent designated in writing by the Commission and which has entered into a Continuing Disclosure Agreement with the Commission. "DTC" means The Depository Trust Company, New York, New York, or any successor thereto. "Electronic Means" means facsimile transmission, email transmission or other similar electronic means of communication providing evidence of transmission, including a telephone communication confirmed by any other method set forth in this definition. "Event of Default" means any of the events specified in Section 7.01. "Excluded Principal Payments" means each payment of principal of Bonds or Parity Obligation which the Commission determines (in the Certificate of the Commission) that the Commission intends to pay with moneys that are not Sales Tax Revenues (such as commercial paper, balloon indebtedness or bond anticipation notes) but from future debt obligations of the Commission, grants from the State or federal government, or any agency or instrumentality thereof, or any other source of funds of the Commission, upon which determination of the Commission the Trustee may conclusively rely. No such determination shall affect the security for such Bonds or the obligation of the Commission to pay such payments from Sales Tax Revenues or amounts on deposit in the Bond Reserve Fund, if any. No payment of principal of Bonds may be determined to be an Excluded Principal Payment unless it is due on or prior to the Tax Expiration Date. "Fees and Expenses Fund" means the fund by that name established pursuant to Section 5.02. "Fiscal Year" means the period beginning on July 1 of each year and ending on the next succeeding June 30, or any other 12-month period hereafter selected and designated as the official fiscal year period of the Commission, which designation shall be provided to the Trustee in a Certificate delivered by the Commission. "Fitch" means Fitch Inc., and its successors and assigns, except that if such corporation shall be dissolved or liquidated or shall no longer perform the functions of a securities rating agency, then the term "Fitch" shall be deemed to refer to any other nationally recognized securities rating agency selected by the Commission. "Holder" or "Bondholder," whenever used herein with respect to a Bond, means the person in whose name such Bond is registered. "Indenture" means this Indenture, dated as of June I, 2008, between the Trustee and the Commission, as originally executed or as it may from time to time be supplemented or amended by any Supplemental Indenture delivered pursuant to the provisions hereof. "Initial Swaps" means the following Interest Rate Swap Agreements, in a combined notional amount of $185,000,000, which Initial Swaps have an effective date of October 1, 2009: OHS West260379475.5 413 a. ISDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between Bank of America, N.A. ('BofA") and the Commission, as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between BofA and the Commission; and b. ISDA Master Agreement, dated as of August 22, 2006, between Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. ("Lehman") and the Commission, as supplemented by the Schedule, dated as of August 22, 2006 and the confirmation of a transaction entered into on August 22, 2006 between Lehman and the Commission. "Insurance" means any financial guaranty insurance policy or municipal bond insurance policy issued by an Insurer insuring the payment when due of principal of and interest on a Series of Bonds as provided in such financial guaranty insurance policy or municipal bond insurance policy. "Insurer" means any provider of Insurance with respect to a Series of Bonds. "Interest Fund" means the fund by that name established pursuant to Section 5.02. "Interest Payment Date," with respect to each Series of Bonds, shall have the meaning specified in the Supplemental Indenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds. "Interest Kate Swap Agreement" means an interest rate swap, cap, collar, option, floor, forward, derivative, or other hedging agreement, arrangement or security, however denominated, entered into between the Commission and a Counterparty, in connection with or incidental to, the issuance or carrying of Bonds, including, without limitation, an interest rate swap, cap, collar, option, floor, forward, derivative, or other hedging agreement, arrangement or security entered into in advance of the issuance of Bonds. "Investment Securities" means the following: (1) any bonds or other obligations which as to principal and interest constitute direct obligations of, or are unconditionally guaranteed by, the United States of America, including obligations of any of the federal agencies and federally sponsored entities set forth in clause (3) below to the extent unconditionally guaranteed by the United States of America; (2) any certificates, receipts, securities or other obligations evidencing ownership of, or the right to receive, a specified portion of one or more interest payments or principal payments, or any combination thereof, to be made on any bond, note, or other obligation described above in clause (l ); (3) obligations of the Federal National Mortgage Association, the Government National Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Banks, Farmers Home Administration and Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; 01IS. West260379475.5 414 • • • (4) housing authority bonds issued by public agencies or municipalities and fully secured as to the payment of both principal and interest by a pledge of annual contributions under an annual contributions contract or contracts with the United States of America; or project notes issued by public agencies or municipalities and fully secured as to the payment of both principal and interest by a requisition or payment agreement with the United States of America; (5) obligations of any state, territory or commonwealth of the United States of America or any political subdivision thereof or any agency or depainnent of the foregoing; provided that at the time of their purchase such obligations are rated in either of the two highest long-term or highest short-term Rating Categories by Moody's and Standard & Poor's; (6) any bonds or other obligations of any state of the United States of America or any political subdivision thereof (a) which are not callable prior to maturity or as to which irrevocable instructions have been given to the trustee of such bonds or other obligations by the obligor to give due notice of redemption and to call such bonds for redemption on the date or dates specified in such instructions, (b) which are secured as to principal and interest and redemption premium, if any, by a fund consisting only of cash or bonds or other obligations of the character described above in clause (1) or (2) which fund may be applied only to the payment of such principal of and interest and redemption premium, if any, on such bonds or other obligations on the interest payment dates and the maturity date or dates thereof or the specified redemption date or dates pursuant to such irrevocable instructions, as appropriate, (c) as to which the principal of and interest on the bonds and obligations of the character described above in clause (1) or (2) which have been deposited in such fund along with any cash on deposit in such fund are sufficient to pay the principal of and interest and redemption premium, if any, on the bonds or other obligations described in this. clause (6) on the interest payment dates and the maturity date or dates thereof or on the redemption date or dates specified in the irrevocable instructions referred to in subclause (a) of this clause (6), as appropriate, and (d) which have been rated in one of the two highest long-term Rating Categories by Moody's and Standard & Poor's; (7) bonds, notes, debentures or other evidences of indebtedness issued or guaranteed by any corporation which are, at the time of purchase, rated by Moody's and Standard & Poor's in the highest short-term Rating Categories, or, if the term of such indebtedness is longer than three (3) years, rated by Moody's and Standard & Poor's in one of the two highest long-term Rating Categories, for comparable types of debt obligations; (8) demand or time deposits or certificates of deposit, whether negotiable or nonnegotiable, issued by any bank or trust company organized under the laws of any state of the United States of America or any national banking association (including the Trustee), provided that such certificates of deposit shall be purchased directly from such a bank, trust company or national banking association and shall be either (a) continuously and fully insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, (b) continuously and fully secured by such securities and obligations as are described above in clauses (1) OHS West:260379475.5 415 through (5), inclusive, which shall have a market value (exclusive of accrued interest) at all times at least equal to the principal amount of such certificates of deposit and shall be lodged with the Trustee, as custodian, by the bank, trust company or national banking association issuing such certificates of deposit, and the bank, trust company or national banking association issuing each such certificate of deposit required to be so secured shall furnish the Trustee with an undertaking satisfactory to it that the aggregate market value of all such obligations securing each such certificate of deposit will at all times be an amount equal to the principal amount of each such certificate of deposit and the Trustee shall be entitled to rely on each such undertaking, or (c) be issued by an institution the senior debt obligations of which are rated "AA" or higher by Standard & Poor's; (9) taxable commercial paper, other than that issued by bank holding companies, or tax-exempt commercial paper rated in the highest Rating Category by Moody's and Standard & Poor's; (10) variable rate obligations required to be redeemed or purchased by the obligor or its agent or designee upon demand of the holder thereof secured as to such redemption or purchase requirement by a liquidity agreement with a corporation and as to the payment of interest and principal either upon maturity or redemption (other than upon demand by the holder thereof) thereof by an unconditional credit facility of a corporation, provided that the variable rate obligations themselves are rated in the highest Rating Category for its short-term rating, if any, and in either of the two highest Rating Categories for its long-term rating, if any, by Moody's and Standard & Poor's, and that the corporations providing the liquidity agreement and credit facility have, at the date of acquisition of the variable rate obligation by the Trustee, an outstanding issue of unsecured, uninsured and unguaranteed debt obligations rated in either of the two highest long -tern Rating Categories by Moody's and Standard & Poor's; (11) any repurchase agreement with any bank or trust company organized under the laws of any state of the United States or any national banking association (including the Trustee) having a minimum permanent capital of one hundred million dollars ($100,000,000) or government bond dealer reporting to, trading with, and recognized as a primary dealer by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which agreement is secured by any one or more of the securities and obligations described in clauses (1), (2), (3) or (4) above, which shall have a market value (exclusive of accrued interest and valued at least monthly) at least equal to 103% of the principal amount of such investment and shall be lodged with the Trustee or other fiduciary, as custodian for the Trustee, by the bank, trust company, national banking association or bond dealer executing such repurchase agreement, and the entity executing each such repurchase agreement required to be so secured shall furnish the Trustee with an undertaking satisfactory to it that the aggregate market value of all such obligations securing each such repurchase agreement (as valued at least monthly) will be an amount equal to 103% of the principal amount of each such repurchase agreement and the Trustee shall be entitled to rely on each such undertaking; OHS WesL260379475.5 416 • • (12) any cash sweep or similar account arrangement of or available to the Trustee, the investments of which are limited to investments described in clauses (1), (2), (3), (4), (5) and (11) of this definition of Investment Securities and any money market fund, the entire investments of which are limited to investments described in clauses (I), (2), (3), (4), (5) and (1-1) of this definition of Investment Securities; provided that as used in this clause (12) and clause (13) investments will be deemed to satisfy the requirements of clause (11) if they meet the requirements set forth in clause (11) ending with the words "clauses (1), (2), (3) or (4) above" and without regard to the remainder of such clause (11); (13) any investment agreement with a financial institution or insurance company or whose obligations are guaranteed by a financial institution or insurance company which: (a) has at the date of execution thereof an outstanding issue of unsecured, uninsured and unguaranteed debt obligations or a claims paying ability rated in either of the two highest long-term Rating Categories by Moody's and Standard & Poor's; or (b) is fully secured by obligations described in items (1), (2), (3) or (4) of the definition of Investment Securities which are (A) valued not less frequently than monthly and have a fair market value, exclusive of accrued interest, at all times at least equal to the principal amount of the investment, (B) held by the Trustee or other custodian acceptable to the Trustee, (C) subject to a perfected first lien in the Trustee, and (D) free and clear from all third party liens; (14) shares of beneficial interest in diversified management companies investing exclusively in securities and obligations described in clauses (1) through (13) of this definition of Investment Securities and which companies have either the highest rating by Moody's and Standard & Poor's or have an investment advisor registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission with not less than five (5) years experience investing in such securities and obligations and with assets under management in excess of $500,000,000; (15) shares in a common law trust established pursuant to Title 1, Division 7, Chapter 5 of the Government Code of the State which invests exclusively in investments permitted by Section 53635 of Title 5, Division 2, Chapter 4 of the Government Code of the State, as it may be amended; (16) bankers' acceptances issued by domestic .or foreign banks, which are eligible for purchase by the Federal Reserve System, the short-term paper of which is rated in the highest category by Moody's and Standard & Poor's, which purchases may not exceed two hundred seventy (270) days maturity; (17) the pooled investment fund of the County of Riverside, California, which is administered in accordance with the investment policy of said County as established by the Treasurer/Tax Collector thereof, as permitted by Section 53601 of the Government Code of the State, copies ,of which policy are available upon written request to said Treasurer/Tax Collector; OHS West:260379475.5 417 (18) the Local Agency Investment Fund or similar pooled fund operated by or on behalf of the State of California and which is authorized to accept investments of moneys held in any of the funds or accounts established pursuant to this Indenture; (19) obligations of the Resolution Trust Corporation and interest obligations of the Resolution Funding Corporation; (20) financial futures or financial option contracts with an entitythe debt securities of which are rated in the highest short-term or one of the two highest long-term rating categories by Fitch, Moody's and Standard & Poor's; and (21) Any other forms of investments approved by the Board and consented to by each Credit Provider then providing Credit Enhancement for a Series of Bonds. "Letter of Credit Account" means an account by that name established to hold funds that are drawn on Credit Enhancement provided in the form of a letter of credit and that are to be applied to pay the principal of or interest on a Series of Bonds, which account shall be established pursuant to the Supplemental Indenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds. "Liquidity Facility" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, a line of credit, letter of credit, standby purchase agreement or similar liquidity facility securing or guaranteeing the payment of purchase price of such Series of Bonds and issued by a commercial bank, insurance company, pension fund or other financial institution, and delivered or made available to the Trustee, as from time to time supplemented or amended pursuant to its terms, or, in the event of the delivery or availability of an Alternate Liquidity Facility, such Alternate Liquidity Facility. "Liquidity Facility Bonds" means any Bonds purchased with moneys drawn under (or otherwise obtained pursuant to the terms of) a Liquidity Facility, but excluding any Bonds no longer considered to be Liquidity Facility Bonds in accordance with the terns of the applicable Liquidity Facility. "Liquidity Facility Rate" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, the interest rate per annum, if any, specified as applicable to Liquidity Facility Bonds in the Liquidity Facility delivered in connection with such Series of Bonds. "Liquidity Provider" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, the commercial bank, insurance company, pension fund or other financial institution issuing (or having primary obligation, or acting as agent for the financial institutions obligated, under) a Liquidity Facility then in effect with respect to such Series of Bonds. "Mandatory Sinking Account Payment" means, with respect to Bonds of any Series and maturity, the amount required by the Supplemental Indenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds to be deposited by the Commission in a Sinking Account for the payment of Term Bonds of such Series and maturity. OHS West:260379475.5 418 • "Maturity Date" means, with respect to a Series of Bonds, the date of maturity or maturities specified in the Supplemental lndenture establishing the terms and provisions of such Series of Bonds. "Maximum Annual Debt Service" means the maximum amount of Annual Debt Service becoming due and payable on all Bonds Outstanding and all Parity Obligations outstanding during the period from the date of such calculation through the final maturity date of the Bonds and Parity Obligations, calculated utilizing the assumptions set forth under the definition of Debt Service. "Maximum Interest Rate" means, with respect to all Bonds other than Liquidity Facility Bonds, the lesser of (i) twelve percent (12%) and (ii) the maximum rate of interest that may legally be paid on the Bonds from time to time, and means, with respect to Liquidity Facility Bonds, the lesser of (x) the Liquidity Facility Rate and (ii) the maximum rate of interest that may legally be paid on the Liquidity Facility Bonds from time to time. "Moody's" means Moody's Investors Service, a corporation duly organized and existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, and its successors and assigns, except that if such corporation shall be dissolved or liquidated or shall no longer perform the functions of a securities rating agency, then the term "Moody's" shall be deemed to refer to any other nationally recognized securities rating agency selected by the Commission. "1988 Ordinance" means the Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance, adopted by the Commission on July 6, 1988 and approved by a majority of the electors voting on such proposition on November 8, 1988, as supplemented and amended. "1988 Sales Tax" means the sales and use tax imposed by the Commission pursuant to the 1988 Ordinance from July 1, 1989 to June30, 2009. "1988 Sales Tax Revenues" means 100% of the amounts collected by the State Board of Equalization on behalf of the Commission pursuant to the Act from the 1988 Sales Tax. "Notes" means the Riverside County Transportation Commission Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and Series B, authorized by, and at any time Outstanding pursuant to, the Notes Indenture in an aggregate amount not to exceed two hundred million dollars ($200,000,000). "Notes Indenture" means the Indenture, dated as of March 1, 2005, between the Commission and U.S. Bank National Association, successor by merger to U.S. Bank Trust National Association; as trustee, as supplemented and amended from time to time pursuant to its terms. "Notes Trustee" means U.S. Bank National Association, successor by merger to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as trustee under the Notes Indenture, and its successors and assigns. "Notice Parties" means, as and to the extent applicable, the Commission, the Trustee, the Credit Provider, if any, for the Series of Bonds to which the notice being given relates, the OHS West:260379475.5 419 auction agent, if any, for the Series of Bonds to which the notice being given relates, the broker - dealer, if any, for the Series of Bonds to which the notice being given relates, the Liquidity Provider, if any, for the Series of Bonds to which the notice being given relates, and the remarketing agent, if any, for the Series of Bonds to which the notice being given relates. "Obligations" has the meaning given to such term in the definition of "Debt Service." "One Month USD LIBOR Rate" means the rate for deposits in U.S. dollars for a one - month maturity that appears on Reuters Screen LIBOR01 Page (or such other page as may replace that page on that service, or such other service as may be nominated by the British Bankers Association, for the purpose of displaying London interbank offered rates forU_S. dollar deposits) as of I I :00 a.m., London time, on the date of determination of such rate, except that, if such rate does not appear on such page on such date, the One Month USD LIBOR Rate means a rate determined on the basis of the rates at which deposits in U.S. dollars for a one -month maturity and in a principal amount of at least U.S. $1,000,000 are offered at approximately 11:00 a.m., London time, on such date, to prime banks in the London interbank market by three major banks in the London interbank market (herein referred to as the "Reference Banks") selected by the Trustee (provided, however, that the Trustee may appoint an agent to identify such Reference Banks). The Trustee or its agent is to request the principal London office of each of such Reference Banks to provide a quotation of its rate. If at least two such quotations are provided, the One Month LIBOR Rate will be the arithmetic mean of such quotations. If fewer than two quotations are provided, the One Month LIBOR Rate will be the arithmetic mean of the rates quoted by three (if three quotations are not provided, two or one, as applicable) major banks in New York City, selected by the Trustee or its agent, at approximately 11:00 a.m., New York City time, on such date for loans in U.S. dollars to leading European banks in a principal amount of at least U.S. $1,000,000 having a one -month maturity. If none of the banks in New York City selected by the Trustee or its agent is then quoting rates for such loans, then the One Month LIBOR Rate for the ensuing interest period will mean the One Month LIBOR Rate most recently in effect. "Opinion of Bond Counsel" means a written opinion of a law firm of national standing in the field of public finance selected by the Commission. "Ordinance" means the Transportation Expenditure Plan and Retail "Transaction and Use Tax Ordinance, adopted by the Commission on May 8, 2002, and approved by at least two-thirds of electors voting on such proposition in the November 5, 2002 election and any amendments or extensions thereto, and all future ordinances adopted, amended or extended pursuant to the Act from time to time. "Outstanding," when used as of any particular time with reference to Bonds, means (subject to the provisions of Section 11.09) all Bonds theretofore, or thereupon being, authenticated and delivered by the Trustee under this Indenture except: (1) Bonds theretofore canceled by the Trustee or surrendered to the Trustee for cancellation; (2) Bonds with respect to which all liability of the Commission shall have been discharged in accordance with Section 10.02, including Bonds (or portions of Bonds) referred to in Section 11.10; and (3) Bonds for the transfer or exchange of or in lieu of or in substitution for which other Bonds shall have been authenticated and delivered by the Trustee pursuant to this Indenture; provided, however, that in OHS West_260379475.5 420 • • • the event the principal of or interest due on any Bonds shall be paid by the Credit Provider pursuant to the Credit Enhancement issued in connection with such Bonds, such Bonds shall remain Outstanding for all purposes and shall not be considered defeased or otherwise satisfied or paid by the Commission and the pledge of Revenues and all covenants, agreements and other obligations of the Commission to the Holders shall continue to exist and shall run to the benefit of such Credit Provider and such Credit Provider shall be subrogated to the rights of such Holders. "Parity Obligations" means (i) any indebtedness, installment sale obligation, lease obligation or other obligation of the Commission for borrowed money, (ii) any obligation to pay the Rebate Requirement, (iii) the Initial Swaps, or (iv) any other Interest Rate Swap Agreement (excluding fees and expenses and termination payments on Interest Rate Swap Agreements, which fees and expenses and termination payments shall be secured by a lien and charge on the Sales Tax Revenues subordinate to the lien and charge upon Sales Tax Revenues that secures the Bonds, Parity Obligations and payment of principal of and interest on Subordinate Obligations) entered into in connection with a Series of Bonds, in each case (other than in the case of the Initial Swaps) incurred in accordance with Section 3.05(C), and in each case having an equal lien and charge upon the Sales Tax Revenues and therefore being payable on a parity with the Bonds (whether or not any Bonds are Outstanding). &