Loading...
05 May 15, 2000 Citizens advisory committee / Social services transportation advisory council87876 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICE TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL MEETING AGENDA* TIME: 1:30 P.M. DATE: Monday, May 15, 2000 LOCATION: RCTC OFFICE - Conference Room 'A' 3560 University Avenue Riverside, California 92502 (909) 787-7141 *By request, agenda and minutes may be available in alternative format; i.e., large print, tape. Ace Atkinson Peter Benavidez - Jim Collins Beverly Copeland John Davenport ,.// Bill Densmore Richard Galope COMMITTEE MEMBERS Judylynn Gries - Lucia Moran -- Lori Nickel Fortunato Penilla - Michelle Rainer Tanya Love, Program Manager 11.36.10 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL • • kGENDA* ''Action may be taken on any item listed on the agenda. RCTC Office 3560 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92501 Monday, May 15, 2000 - 1:30 P.M. "1. CALL TO ORDER SELF -INTRODUCTION APPROVAL OF MINUTES - April 17, 2000 (Attachment) 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS - (For comments on items not listed on the agenda. Comments relating to an item on the agenda will be taken whenithe item is before the Committee) 5. SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS/ 6. UNMET NEEDS HEARING TRANSCRIPT SUMMARIES AND RESPONSES 7. CHARGE FOR PARKING PLACARDS 8. RTA UPDATE - MultiSystems Evaluation 9. SUNLINE UPDATE 10. SUB -COMMITTEE REPORT - Bus Stop Accessibility / Municipal Responsibility, RTA Evaluation by Multi Systems & Capacity Constraints 11. COMMITTEE REPORT - (This item provides an opportunity for Committee members to report on items related to transportation. No action can be taken on any issues raised or presented) 12. OTHER BUSINESS (for discussion only - no action) 13. ADJOURNMENT • • • • • CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE SOCIAL SERVICE TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL April 17, 2000 1. Call to Order Vice -Chairperson Ace Atkinson called the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Council (CAC) to order at 1:35 p.m. at the offices of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, 3560 University Avenue, Conference Room "A", in Riverside, Califomia. 2. Self Introductions Members Present: Ace Atkinson Peter Benavidez Beverly Copeland Bill Densmore Fortunato Penilla Staff Voundy Others Present: Ray Greenidge Tanya Love Helen Wariner Members Absent: Jim Collins Richard Galope Judylynn Gries Lucia Moran Lori Nickel Michelle Rainer Tammy Lessa Jerry Rivera Ron Williams 3. Approval of Minutes — February 28, 2000 M/S/C (Benavidez/Penilla) approve the minutes of 2/28/00. 4. Public Comments There were no comments from the public at this time. 5. Presentation On Issues Related To Wheelchair Tie -Downs Staff Voundy from Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) presented a wheelchair tie down video on the "QRT Systems from Q-straint". Mr. Voundy advised the members that this is the tie -down system RTA will use on their new vehicles. Peter Benavidez asked if RTA had plans to retrofit their existing buses with the new system or if this system would only be offered on new 2 vehicles. Mr. Voundy stated that information was not available, however he felt confident RTA would take this under consideration. Bill Densmore asked for information concerning the cost per vehicle for installation of these QRT tie -downs on RTA's existing "large" buses. Mr. Voundy stated that information was not available, however he will provide this information to the committee at a future date. Mr. Voundy further stated that all of the new vehicles RTA purchases will be fitted with the QRT System. 6. Charge for Parking Placards It was decided, by the Committee, to reschedule this item to the next meeting since Jim Collins and Lucia Moran were not in attendance. 7. Selection of Representatives for SB821 Evaluation Committee Vice Chairperson Ace Atkinson appointed Beverly Copeland, Lucia Moran and Fortunato Penilla as representatives. 8. RTA Update Staff Voundy presented an update for the month of February 2000. Ridership was 554,742, up 3.1 % system wide YTD compared to last year. Fixed route services were up 4.31 % YTD compared to last year. Contract fixed routes were down 9.7% YTD compared to last year. Routes 31, 32, 100 & 149 were down from last year due to route realignment and lower ridership volume. Paratransit services were up 6.49% YTD compared to last year. The complaints received for January 2000 were 0.013% of total ridership. Fixed route complaints were 0.013%, while paratransit complaints were 0.006% of total ridership. The RTA Transportation Center handled 51,038 calls in February 2000; this was the second month in a row that the RTA Transportation Center handled over 50,000 calls. The average calls per hour for the month of February 2000 was 110 versus 49 calls per hour last year. Mr. Voundy advised the committee that a presentation from Multi -Systems was made on February 23, 2000 at 1:00 p.m. An invitation was sent to the Citizens Advisory Committee. Multi -Systems' final report is expected to be available in about one month. Vice -Chairperson Ace Atkinson asked if any members of the sub- committee on Bus Stop Accessibility/Municipal Responsibility, RTA's evaluation by Multi -Systems and Capacity Constraints were present. In • • • 3 • • • their absence Vice -Chairperson requested that next months agenda packet contain whatever information is available from Multi -Systems for review by the Sub -Committee. Vice -Chairperson Atkinson further requested that this be listed under the RTA Update. 9. SunLine Update Ron Williams requested time to discuss SunLines' current wheelchair tie - down systems. Ray Greenidge, field supervisor for SunLine gave a presentation on SunLine's current tie -down systems. Mr. Greenidge reported the majority of the problems SunLine is having with wheelchair tie -downs are occurring with scooters as opposed to wheelchairs. Vice -Chairperson Ace Atkinson requested an agenda item be put on next months meeting regarding scooters, wheelchair tie -downs and retrofit of existing vehicles in response to Mr. Greenidge's report. Vice -Chairperson Ace Atkinson proposed this item include input from RTA, SunLine and all other interested parties, in order to bring forth a position statement from the Citizens Advisory Committee which could then be taken forward to the Transportation Commission. Ron Williams gave an update on SunLine advising the members that the information on fixed routes was not available today, however information on SunLine's Paratransit Service was available. Mr. Williams reported that during the month of March 2000, SunLine provided Para -Transit transportation for a total of 9,460 riders, with 59 denials for a total of 1 %. In March 1999 a total of 7,364 rides were provided. In March of 1999 SunLine provided 730 wheelchair transports. In March 2000 1,383 wheelchair transports were provided. On -time performance had actually gone down: last year's on -time performance was 94%, this year it is 92.6%. Mr. Williams attributed this slight decrease to wheelchair transports. Complaints YTD last year were eight complaints, with 17 complaints YTD for this year. Eight of the complaints were for on -time performance and tardy cards were issued. Mr. Williams reported SunLine has been very pleased that service has increased and that complaints have not risen in proportion. Mr. Williams reported SunLine would acquire seven new vehicles in June 2000. Four or five of these will be to replace vehicles scheduled for retirement. In March 1999 Vets Express transported 262.veterans to Loma Linda VA Medical Center and in March 2000 the Vets Express transported 406 4 veterans. Mr. Williams reported that talks are under way at SunLine on expanding the Vets Express. Mr. Williams advised he would keep the committee updated. Mr. Williams reported that Same Day Service is not getting the public response that was expected. The service is scheduled to expand to Palm Springs in approximately four weeks then to Desert Hot Springs in 6-8 weeks. This will complete the Same Day Service Expansion. 10. Sub -Committee Report There was no business on this item. 11. Committee Report Beverly Copeland reported on the Grand Opening of the combination Senior Center/Work Force Center in Hemet. Ms. Copeland advised the committee Care -A -Van is now operating out of this center. 12. Monitor List a. Welfare to Work There is no business on this item today. 13. Other Business Jerry Rivera of RCTC gave a preview on the Unmet Needs Hearing held in March 2000 in Blythe, California. This item is scheduled for the May 2000 meeting. Mr. Rivera supplied the committee with a copy of the summary of the testimony taken on that day. Mr. Rivera gave a brief summary of the requests which are listed below. 1. Chuck Grotke submitted a request for the City of Blythe to return to a fixed route system. Mr. Rivera stated that the City Manager and the Mayor of Blythe had advised him that an Origin and Destination study is currently in progress. 2. Four of the next five requests were for service for the veterans to the Palm Desert Clinic and the VA Hospital in Loma Linda. 3. Bud Schaff requested service north of the City of Blythe. Bill Densmore added that the VA transportation issue is a work in progress. As it stands now Blythe has been asked to quantify the nature • • • 5 • • • of the needs. Mr. Densmore stated that his personal effort is to join Blythe's efforts with the Vets Express. Mr.- Densmore advised the committee that the VA Hospital has obtained funding for pilot projects to look at alternatives to bringing medical care to these rural areas. 14. Adjournment There being no further business for consideration by the Citizens Advisory Committee Social Service Transportation Advisory Committee, a motion to adjourn was made at 2:47 p.m. Respectfully Submitted, Tanya Love, Program Manager ATTENDANCE ROSTER CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SVC TRANPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL MONDAY, MAY 15, 2000 NAME �e_,,.-y fZ i ?1-71 t4[JI 041v,e--_ 6AAA, " IAA 6 gik;',Vs®n Cg(2.1� • REPRESENTING -QCTC CTS4 C /ct. V BA/IGiA�i iReti► X/j ° nill(t� 1 V_NN5i I N-EsRif ,k &V X C� ov" Z,ly sui,u_ . TELEPHONE 7 8 7 - 71 V/ 901- a4- case Ego.) e 7- 7-I YI 70 3 q7-q SAS yet -7J-2"3_Z2-L e:LD - 3� Vvi.) 3"7-1V/a oq/74'7-7/4/ 74-0 - ?91— 34k �icbcty S-3 0 (gag c9,17,G1 ATTENDANCE ROSTER CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SVC TRANPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL MONDAY, MAY 15, 2000 �NAME :t��a� ► t G • REPRESENTING A \ �%\ SN IQ ewer erx cd-ri �t`i---)e+11 \)4Vk---\Nr* Svi\(I IBC `i Oct 543- 3\--SCP (7 GO 3uk-2-3----)J-I CAI ;-;) Gl 22 -32 2� 101- - O s() side �'ransportattiion County • 3560 University Avenue Suite 100 • Riverside, California 92501 phone: (909)787-7141 • fax: (909)787-7910 • www.rctc.arg TO: Citizens' Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council FROM: Jerry Rivera, Program Manager DATE: May 15, 2000 SUBJECT: FY 2000-01 Unmet Needs Hearing Transcript Summaries and Responses State law requires that a public hearing be held annually to receive comments from the public concerning public transit needs. Approximately $393million dollars in local transportation funds (LTF) will be available in the county for transit purposes in FY00/01. These funds are derived from 1 /4 of one cent of sales tax. As a priority, these funds must be used for public transit. If there are funds remaining after meeting all reasonable transit needs, these funds may then be used for construction and maintenance of streets and roads. In the Western County and Coachella Valley, all available local transit funds are being used for transit services. In the Palo Verde Valley, however, there have been sufficient "funds left over after funding transit services to make street and road improvements. The Commission requests the assistance of the CAC/SSTAC in reviewing the testimony and responses collected during the unmet needs hearing process to determine what improvements should be made to the Palo Verde Valley Transit system. Attached is a summary of the testimony from the Palo Verde Valley hearing. Also included are the proposed staff/operator responses. We worked with staff from the City of Blythe to determine what improvements were reasonable to meet based on projected productivity. The requests relating to connecting service to the VA clinic in Palm Desert and the hospital in Loma Linda appear to be primary concern at this time. The City of Blythe and RCTC staff will work with the County Veterans Service and the Veterans Advisory Committee to develop a program to transport clients to their appointments. Also, a concerted effort will be made by PVVTA and the contractor staff to better inform the public of the TRIP program and its policies. Staff recommends that the CAC/SSTAC request that the Commission adopt the unmet transit needs hearing testimony and responses and find that based on review of the existing services, that there are no unmet transit needs that are reasonable to meet in the Palo Verde Valley. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: That the Citizens' Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council recommend adoption of the FY 2000-01 Unmet Transit Needs responses for Riverside County and that based upon review of the existing services, find that there are no unmet transit needs which can be reasonably met in the Palo Verde Valley. 411 • BLYTHE CITY HALL March 2, 2000 Name/Organization FY 2000-01 UNIKT TRANSIT NEEDS Summary of TestinWy and Staff Responses Summar -------- -- - -- VICG1, .acl1Jw100 Chuck Grotke 8401 E. Hobson Way Blythe, CA 92225 Consider going back to a fixed route system within the next 3 to 5 years. ' RCTC approved a sum of money to conduct an Origin/ Destination Study to determine the feasibility of a fixed -route service. PVVTA is going to request the Commission to allow the carryover of these funds to do the study in 2001 /02. Jim Carney Blythe Veterans Committee 260 N. Spring Street Blythe, CA 92225 Requesting transportation for veterans from the Blythe area to Palm Desert and back. The TRIP program which provides reimbursement to volunteer drivers is currently available. The PVVTA is continuing to work with Richard Smith in identifying a driver pool to better utilize the TRIP program. P. H. Bud Schaaf Colorado River Senior Center HCR 20 Box 2725M Blythe, CA 92225??? Requested bus service North of Blythe up to the County line or at least up to Lost Lake. Also requested RCTC's assistance to have Caltrans move up the schedule of widening and repair of Highway 95. Unfortunately, population density in the area will not support the cost effective operation of a van service. The TRIP service is available and its usage is encouraged. „_peoQI)2-- BLYTHE TRANSIT NEEDS HEARING March 2, 2000 Page 2 Name/Organization Summary of Comments Staff Response Col. Tom Henry Palm Springs, CA 92262 Trying to set up a new transportation system to get Veterans from Blythe to the clinic iri Palm Desert and to the hospital in Loma Linda. Staff is working with the local Veterans Advisory Committee, County Veterans Services, and RCTC to identify possible options. Bill Densmore, Director Riverside County Veterans Services 1 153A Spruce Riverside, CA 9250 Wants support to help link -up the veterans of the Palo Verde Valley with the VA Hospital in Loma Linda. See above response. Annie Tuttle Veterans Affairs Medical Center 11201 Benton Street Loma Linda, CA Followed up on requests made by Bill Densmore. See above response. • • • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION UNMET TRANSIT NEEDS PUBLIC HEARING March 2, 2000 Call to Order Vice -Chairman William G. Kleindienst called the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Unmet Needs Hearing to order at 2:30 p.m. at the Blythe City Hall Council Chambers, 235 N. Broadway Street, Blythe, California. RCTC Members Present: Robert Crain, City of Blythe Richard Kelly, City of Palm Desert William Kleindienst, Mayor of Palm Springs/RCTC Vice -Chairman Roy Wilson, Riverside County/Riverside County Transportation Commission Others Present: Jim Carney, Blythe Veterans Committee Tom Clifford, City of Blythe Bill Densmore, Riverside County Veterans Services Leticia DeLara, Supervisor Roy Wilson's Office George Eaperson, Riverside County Veterans Affairs Committee Tom Freeman, Supervisor Roy Wilson's Office Chuck Grotke, City of Blyth and Businessman Loraine Hunter, City of Blythe Mary Johnson, Valley Resource Center Lew Millet, Riverside County Veterans Affairs Committee Teresa Sato, Valley Resource Center P.H. Bud Schaaf, Colorado River Senior Center Jack E. Smith, Riverside County Veterans Affairs Committee Jack La Roche, Riverside County Veterans Affairs Committee Mary Theiry, Desert Comm. EZ Annie Tuttle, Veterans Affairs Medical Center Eric Haley, RCTC Executive Director Jerry Rivera, RCTC Staff Traci McGinley, RCTC Staff Commissioner William Kleindienst: I have a text that I am to read into the record and then we'll begin the actual opening of the hearing after these comments. State law requires that a public hearing be held annually to receive comments from the public concerning public transit needs. Approximately $707,000 are available in the Palo Verde Valley for transportation purposes pursuant to State Transportation Development Act. As a priority these funds must be used for public transit. If there are funds remaining after meeting all reasonable public transit needs these funds may be used for the construction and maintenance of streets and roads. In previous years there have been sufficient funds left over after funding transit service to assist in construction and maintenance of streets and roads. The purpose of this hearing is to receive comments from the public on whether there are reasonable transit needs that are not being met in the Palo Verde Valley. Please note that the key word here is reasonable, reasonable transit needs. This means that there must be evidence that there will be sufficient ridership to justify any expansion of existing service or addition of any new services. The service needs raised through this public hearing will also be used to assist in the evaluation of current services. If you have comments or complaints about drivers or a missed trip on a Dial -A -Ride, these comments should be made directly to the Palo Verde Transit Agency, since they are the operator of that service. We are here to receive comments about transit services that are not currently being met. If you would prefer to just listen today, the Commission will accept letters on unmet transit needs until March 3rd, or early next week if extra time is needed. Please send them to the Commission Office at 3560 University Avenue, Suite 100, Riverside, California, 92501. Those of you who wish to address the Hearing Board should fill out a card, it can be obtained from Commission Staff. Please make sure that you include your mailing address so that we can send you a response to your comments, also include phone numbers in case staff needs to clarify any parts of your testimony. I would ask that you limit your presentations to five minutes. At this point we would like to open the public hearing and allow any of you to give comments to this Board. Please come forward. Chuck Grotke, 8401 E. Hobson Way, Blythe, California: I don't have a card. Commissioner William Kleindienst: That is fine. Chuck Grotke: Thank you very much. Members of the Board my name is Chuck Grotke, I am a businessman in the community, I am also a member of the Blythe City • Council. • Commissioner William Kleindienst: Welcome. Chuck Grotke: I speak to you primarily as a businessperson at this point, although my council duties overlap. I would like you to consider, not necessarily for right now but in the next 3 to 5 years, the possibility of going back to a fixed transportation line in Blythe. I see a need coming forth to run a line as we did several years ago, from the river to Mesa Verde, which covers the entire length of Hobsonway Lane which is our shopping area. But more so with the new College going out in the location that it is, which is a bit out of town and off the beaten path. I see the need for public transportation to the College. Dial -A -Ride is doing fine. Dial -A -Ride is really getting inundated. This perhaps could work with Dial -A -Ride, perhaps take some of the burden off Dial -A -Ride for the "go to town to do shopping and come home", as opposed to the specialty needs to get to the Doctor's office or to some area. That is my submission. It is not for immediate need but it is something that we should start thinking about now, because I do envision a real need for it in the next 3-5 years. Thank you very much, I will fill out my card. • • Commissioner William Kleindienst: Thank you we appreciate your comments sir. Is there anyone else here to address these needs today at this hearing? Good afternoon. Jim Carney, Blythe Veterans Committee, 260 N. Spring Street, Blythe, California: Good afternoon, I also don't have a card. I did make a copy of what I want to present if you folks would like a copy of that while I do this. My name is Jim Carney and as you can see I work for the Sheriff's Department but I am not representing the Sheriff's Department today. I am representing a local Blythe Veterans Committee. We are requesting some type of transportation be provided for the veterans in this area. As you know this area is a little isolated from the mainstream of public transportation, other than personal auto or the greyhound bus lines. We are asking for, or making a request for a bus and a driver that could be utilized through out the month for the city, but asking for a day or two per month to transport veterans from the Blythe area to the Palm Desert area and back. I know Loma Linda has worked very hard trying to provide some type of bus service to the veterans. Our problem is that we have to get the veterans from here to Indio by 7:00 in the morning to get them to Loma Linda and then sometimes they don't meet all their appointments times. If the Transportation Commission could consider a request to have a bus available for the veterans one to two days a month to travel from Blythe to the Palm Desert area and then back to Blythe the veterans could be seen on a regular basis. I think the letter that I have there explains it a little better but, that's our request. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Can you address the number of individuals that need this service? Jim Carney: Per the 1990 census there is 103 veterans in this area that are currently using the VA Services. In the past 10 years that amount has gone up. But probably right in the vicinity of 200 to 225 veterans need to go out. Some of them don't go because they have no ransportation. At times they try to buddy up to go and we're working on getting them to all go to one area and signing up the ones that really need to go now. The Palm Desert Clinic we've been in contact with and they're willing to try to set up 1 to 2 days a month for just the Blythe Veterans and can see up to 10 new veterans at a time. Once that gets established and we go through the ones that need the medical services, it would me more of a monthly type trip to go back to see the doctor. Commissioner: Can you address the frequency of this need? Is it weekly, monthly? Jim Carney: Most :of them go on month to three-month deal. Once they get established and they can be maintained with just medication, they can get up to a year at a time, of medication. Most of them go no longer than six months. Commissioner: Thank you. Anyone else wising to address this Commission? Please come forward sir we welcome your comments. We'll give you a card to fill out and you can just take it off to the side. We'd appreciated it. P.H. Bud Schaaf, Colorado River Senior Center, HCR 20 Box 2725M, . _, s I'm here I guess on two different items. One is we have tried to get some bus service North of Blythe up to the County line, . The last attempt was through the Empowerment Zone '_�_, :°`� �- �. and I believe that Mr. Nelson has some information on that. We are trying to establish what we have to do from here to go further along in getting some transportation. The second Item is Highway 95. We have put in reports, petitions, pictures and through the good offices of our County Supervisor we have gotten some action. However the long-term gain on this is yet to be obtained. We are getting band -aids on a Highway that has a lot of traffic. I'd like to see if there is any way that RCTC can put any kind of pressure on Ca!trans to up the schedule of the widening and repair of that Highway. That, according to Mr. Carr from the District Maintenance office, is in engineering and it will be sometime in the year 2003 before we see any action on that. I'm not sure that road is going to last that long even with the upkeep that they are trying to do on it, which is a piecemeal project. So anything collectively that you can do and the Commission can do would be appreciated. Commission Robert Crain: Mr. Chairman I would like to add to that, this particular road, Highway 95 is very much in need of safety improvements. There is no shoulder. Major trucks go back and forth and sometimes just passing the trucks is so bad that you have no place to go. If you're off the side of the road you're rolling because it is dirt and there is a drop-off. And I would like to see the Commission address that. But there is also a related problem I know Hideo has been working on and it's dealing with • • • • call boxes in that area. Now there is a lack of cellular service but I understand they are attempting to get a relay tower established there soon. And I would hope that RCTC would extend the call boxes in that area immediately after they get the service. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Very good, thank you Robert. Is there anyone else wishing to address today's issues on Unmet Transit Needs? Tom I'm looking at you. Col. Tom Henry: Well the rest of my week we've had three meetings. We've just had a meeting with the Veterans over at the VFW. The point we were going to bring up today was about transportation for the, trying to set up a new transportation system to get our Veterans from here to the Clinic in Palm Desert and to the hospital in Loma Linda. Now we just had two good meetings this morning, and what we set up is a game plan. What we are going to try to do is to approach three different problems, registration because we have to get the people here registered, get them in the system. So we are going to on, in May, we're going to have a Veterans Fair out here for one whole day and bring people from the different parts of the Veterans Community and give an educational program and then take pictures and sign people up and get them enrolled in the hospital. What we've, what the hospital has finally decided, instead of us having to go over there to get our pictures taken, we are going to get the pictures taken here. So we're going to bring the treatment to the people instead of taking the people to them. Once that is accomplished I've found a piece of legislation that ties in to this transportation system where we can try to get a pilot program for Blythe. What happens is there is a new piece of legislation that has just been passed and what we are going to do, with Supervisor Wilson's permission, we're going to provide a letter to Congresswoman Bono to see if we could make a pilot program out of this community. This is something new in the VA system and we will see if we can qualify. And it will include other things. See, what we we're talking about is a community based outpatient clinic. We are still going to need a transportation system to get those people who require further care than just outpatient care. So what we want to address is like what we have in Coachella Valley, the Veterans Express. We want to get a system here that would help the people out here, because we are talking about an elderly group and we are getting up into our 80's, our World War II Veterans. We can't make that long drive, the heat, it is 110 degrees, the winds. The whole thing is, we are going to bring in all these problems so we can see if we can attack it from two levels. One level is to bring more outpatient clinic treatment here and the other level is to transport our people for further care. But as an interim, we can do the transportation thing first if we can work that out and then proceed down the line to get the other aspects of the program. And Bill do you want to add anything to this? Bill Densmore, Riverside County Veterans Services, 1153A Spruce, Riverside, California: I probably wouldn't be able to add to it. • Col. Tom Henry: Bill why don't you come down and read your name into the record book. Bill Densmore: Sure. Bill Densmore Riverside County Veterans Services. This is similar to what we discussed last year. I came up and testified and I wasn't sure if I was going to do that today but I'm certainly glad to. The Vets Express Line is well known by RCTC, hopefully it is a 5-day a week free transportation for veterans basically in the Coachella Valley. It leaves its first stop in Indio at 6:00 a.m., which is very, very difficult for veterans for Blythe to hook-up with simply because that is about a 4:00 a.m., probably even earlier than that, time to get up in the morning and to get into that service. So, we are, we've had the veterans of Blythe on our minds for quite some time and we want to get something done. I'm simply going to remind RCTC that I got a lovely letter of support as a result of our testimony last year. It said that they would work with us in putting something together and we're now going to pick up that marker, we're ready to go and we need your support. Whether or not it is going to be simply monetary or just your expertise in transportation remains to be seen, but we want someone dedicated to helping up link -up the veterans of the Palo Verde Valley with the VA Hospital in Loma Linda. And so if RCTC would give us that support we will be happy. And by the way Cathy Bechtel at RCTC was a major player in helping us get Vets Express. It's not so much that there was any money flowing its just that there is so much knowledge and expertise and we used them as a resource and that's what I'm referring to. We have with us today Annie Tuttle from the VA Medical Center and she is one of the partners for the Vets Express and obviously a key player to anything that has it's destination to the VA Medical Center. I'm wondering if Annie would care to say anything or if it would be appropriate? Commissioner William Kleindienst: I think so, but I want to ask you a question. Maybe it is for you or for Tom. There were discussions being added regarding the idea of joining Arizona from two congressional standpoints to build some sort of a clinic here. What is going on in those efforts at this point? Bill Densmore: Well if I may. Commissioner William Kleindienst: We know that if the transportation is moving them from here to there if we can get the center here. Bill Densmore: The mountain to Mohammed. If we looked in terms of short term/long term that I'm afraid or realistically is probably going to be more long term. There is some legislative things that we're going to have to accomplish. There is a pilot project that we're going to hope to tap into. Its not so much that it is jurisdictionally going to be impossible, I think that is going to be the easiest of the things to surmount. But the problem is going to be in funding and the stream of funding that the VA Hospitals, who are going to be responsible for providing the care, how their funding is going to be increased to serve all the veterans. So we do hope that, ultimately, we can place something in this area more fixed than just rubber tires: But the rubber tires are going to get the patients to the treatment for the time being. We don't want to sit back and • • • • • • wait for the other. So we're hoping that, very optimistically, we were thinking this morning of 6 to 12 months for that and I think the pilot is going to take longer than that and that's why we want to get the transportation. • Commissioner William Kleindienst: I'd like to pursue this a little more, if in fact you are talking of having a departure of about 4:00 a.m., from here to meet the Vets Express at 6:00 a.m. in Indio. Are you asking for a system that then does that for you and leaves here at 4:00 or an independent system? Bill Densmore: Well everything is on the table. I personally, I think more realistically depending upon the funding, because we're also looking at the continuation or sustainability of the Vets Express Line and how it's going to be configured after August, the first two years of its start up grant. I think realistically there is going to be a breakdown in two types of transportation. One will be from Blythe to the outpatient clinic in Palm Desert for Primary Care, which would be outside of the realm of the Vets Express. Two, whether or not we can link up with Vets Express because they have to get up so early remains to be seen. So, I would think that we might want to look at volunteer drivers and a start up GSA vehicle for a service that runs independently of the Vets Express, possibly even picking up some passengers in the desert for almost a run -and -a -half out of the Coachella Valley to link up and go straight from the Palo Verde Valley to the Loma Linda VA facility. What we are looking at so that its not a 4:00 a.m. departure time is the use of a service the VA Hospital calls HOPTEL, which is for clients who cannot, patients who cannot get there early enough in the morning to start their trips, or they have to have some medical procedure done where they have to take some medication the night before and driving is out of the question, exactly. So, they will go in the evening before, stay at the VA Hospital or the Aegis of the VA Hospital, and then go to their clinics and then come back the next day. In which case it would be a lot easier. Now we're talking two days but not that get up time of 4:00 a.m. So we are looking at all those options to know what is the best option or what combination of options. We're going to have to get to know the client needs of the veterans in this area. So we need to start talking not numbers, but specific needs within those numbers. I hope I answered your question. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Yes and very well thank you. Col. Tom Henry: We basically know we have around 1,185 people we can identify from the 1990 survey. I'm sure we'll increase with the new census. But how many of these people need that care that's what we've got to find. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Great, thank you. Did you want to have someone else come forward to speak on this issue? Bill Densmore: Annie Tuttle is the Public Affairs officer at VA Medical Center at Loma Linda. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Very good, you filled out your card and everything. Annie Tuttle, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 11201 Benton Street, Loma Linda, California: Hey. Thank you. I just want to tell you we had a wonderful meeting this morning to kind of discuss these issues. You have a great group meeting here. I'm worked with Jim Carney, I know Les we've worked together a little bit and a lot of veterans so we're real anxious to look at what we can do. We appreciate your support. Vets Express has exceeded what Bill and I would ever of thought could have been done. And I think that there definitely is a need here. So let's start with transportation, we will not forget the goal of trying to get medical care here locally. We will not forget that goal but this is the first way to go. So any help you can give us is, as Bill said either financially or just with your knowledge, it would be greatly appreciated. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Very good, thank you. Is there anyone else wishing to address any issues in this area of transportation? Supervisor Wilson: Mr. Chairman I wonder if we should call on the Manager of the Palo Verde Transit Agency to give an update, a report since the Commission doesn't get out here that often? Commissioner William Kleindienst: I'd appreciate that. Les Nelson:: Yes Supervisor Wilson. Just in front of you on the desk today is a very brief overview of the agency as indicated. I know you can all read it. It is created by the joint powers authority between the County of Riverside and the City of Blythe back in 1978. It is a General Purpose Dial -A -Ride, although prior to 1981 the agency did operate a fixed route service. But again don't place to much emphasis on that because Blythe was certainly a much different community pre-1981. We currently are operating the Dial -A -Ride on a contract basis with the Valley Resource Center and have since September 1981. Service level is Monday through Friday, the times are indicated. Basically about 6:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and it is again Monday through Friday no weekend service. We have tried, based on past Unmet Needs Hearing, implementing some weekend services but the numbers did not substantiate continuing that and that was discontinued. Service area, I know somebody brought it up, is dictated by the JPA joint powers agreement. And it specifies in there, I suppose that could be amended, that it would be the City of Blythe and the adjacent unincorporated area, which is 18 miles and the request for services is certainly outside that 18 miles radius. The fare structure, $1.50 for less than five miles, $2.00 over five. As Councilman Grotke indicated, ridership characteristic for a Dial -A -Ride operating on a Monday through Friday, in 1999 we carried 20,446. Five years ago we were carrying about 7,500 people a year. We're now over 20,000 and the passengers per mile the 0.35 is somewhat of a concern but really reflects more the geography of the area, the fact that things are a far distance apart. Passengers"per hour of almost 3. Subsidy per passenger; my recollection is that's a pretty reasonable number for a Dial -A -Ride • • • i • • • operation and the farebox recovery ratio 18.7%. Again we are a rural area and I believe our requirement is 10, but we're up closer to the 20 that you might see in an urbanized area. Fleet inventory; 3 Diplomats Intermediate size, all diesel operated, 16 passengers plus 2 wheelchairs. All of the vehicles are lift equipped. And basically Monday through Friday during peak periods we are having to use all three of those vehicles. We have two back-ups, a Chevy intermediate size and a Chevy van. We also did implement the special TRIP services, primarily to get to and from the Coachella Valley. The particulars are there which I continue to work with Richard Smith, we are trying identify a driver pool, so people can actually make better utilization of that service. But the 23 participates we have do use it actively, and it has been beneficial, and it has taken some of the people to and from the Coachella Valley. Hopefully that is somewhat of an overview. I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have. Supervisor Roy Wilson: I think one of the other things too for the Commission members that it would be nice if you would touch on, is the fact that the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency and the budget that has been approved by RCTC will be doing a fare, or not a fare but an origin/destination study, and we hope to have that completed within this next, well within this year. Basically looking or moving towards the ultimate of some type of a fixed route with a Dial -A -Ride supplement. Les Nelson:: Right, we had in the current fiscal year requested and RCTC did approve a sum of money to do an origin/destination study to determine the feasibility of the fixed route service. We know that , ..sting at the seams with the Dial -A -Ride. We really we're going to try and s =Y# - the O&D study with the new college opening on the Mesa. That new college is being built, but the funding was delayed about a year so that whole process of getting the O&D study has slipped. What we will probably do is request the Commission to allow us to carry those funds over into next year recognizing that the college will be a huge trip generator. Certainly, something that would be best served by a fixed route, and the college will take up occupancy in September 2000. So those time frames should dovetail pretty well. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Very good. Is there anyone else wising to address the hearing today? I would like to acknowledge that in the audience is Colonel Lew Millet, a Medal of Honor recipient, warrior, patriot, great American. Lew always good to see you, sir. Always good to see you, sir. He is a good man. Did you know that Tom? Colonel Tom Henry: Yes, indeed. Commissioner William Kleindienst: Again is there anyone else wishing to address the hearing today? If not, we appreciate your comments. Member's do you believe it is appropriate at this time? We'll take your input back to RCTC and use it in trying to deal with your issues. Thank you all very much for coming down today. Stand adjourned. •+SECUREMENT OF WHEELCHAIRS AND OTHER MOBILITY AIDS ON TRANSIT VEHICLES • • APRIL 9, 1990 Prepared for: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board 1331 F Street, NW; Suite 1000 Washington, D.C. 20004-1111 (202)272-5434 Prepared by: Dale E. Daucher, P.E. Falls Church, VA NOTICE - This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) in the interest of information exchange. Neither the Access Board nor the United States Government assumes liability for its contents or use thereof. The contents of this report do not necessarily reflect the official policy of the Board. The United States Government does not endorse products, manufacturers, or private corporations. Trade or manufacturers' names appear herein solely because they were considered by the authors as essential to the object of the report. PROJECT ACTION - Project ACTION (Accessible Community Transportation in our Nation) seeks to create and demonstrate a cooperative model for accessible public transportation involving national and local disability and transit interests. It was designed to improve the relations between the transit and disability communities as well as augment the tools and techniques that can be used to improve transportation services to people with disabilities. The project includes the development and demonstration of a cooperative model of techniques to: Identify people with disabilities in the community and their transit needs; develop outreach and marketing strategies; develop training programs for transit providers; develop training prgrams for persons with disabilities; apply technology to solve critical barriers to transportation and accessibility Project ACTION is managed by the National Easter Seal Society and is funded through a cooperative agreement with the Urban Mass Transportation Administration. The National Easter Seal society is a nonprofit, community - based health agency dedicated to increasing the independence of people with disabilities. Easter Seals makes a difference in the lives of disabled adults, children and their families by offering a wide range of quality services, research and programs. Easter Seals is in the forefront of advocacy efforts on behalf of people with disabilities. Through a nationwide network of 170 affiliates, more than a million people receive Easter Seal services each year. It is Easter Seals' hope that programs funded through Project ACTION will foster the cooperative atmosphere that is necessary to move us into the 1990's and beyond as well as to develop the tools and techniques that will help implement new federal mass transit policies for people with disabilities as required in the new Americans with Disabilities Act. In increasing numbers, disabled and older Americans are overcoming physical limitations by using a wide variety of mobility aids to extend their range of travel. The golf carts of the sunbelt neighborhoods are being augmented by personal 2-, 3-, and 4- wheeled vehicles that can be seen daily on our city sidewalks and public transit systems. As a public or private transit authority, the responsibility of safe, efficient service now is enlarged to affording ridership to people using a wide variety of mobility aids. In considering not only the many types of mobility aid devices, but the variety and sizes of lifts, and the numerous makes of • • • buses and vans, it can be easily seen that there is no single, definitive solution to accessibility on mass transit vehicles. But, since the need is real and the solutions, although not all- encompassing, are a good beginning, the experience of two transit accessibility leaders can be tapped for guidance. Both Southern California Rapid Transit District (SCRTD) and Seattle Metro have taken the initiative to involve the ridership in needs assessment and have established policies, educated operators and informed the public to achieve greater accessibility in their bus transit systems. NEEDS ASSESSMENT - In August 1987, SCRTD, using an analytical approach to assess needs and establish policies, held a technical fair to determine what types of wheelchairs could be safely accommodated on their buses. Over 30 representatives from transit and governmental agencies met with representatives from wheelchair manufacturers. They tested 14 wheel- chair and mobility aid devices on 6 different lift/bus types. Four test criteria were evaluated: LENGTH - The length of the wheelchair was compared to the length of the lift. Wheelchair lengths varied from 28 to 47 1/2 inches. Lift platform lengths vaned from 43 to 55 1/2 inches. When a wheelchair was longer than the lift platform mechanism, the problem was noted. People using wheelchairs were observed entering and exiting the bus using the lift. Maneuverability - The use of wheelchairs was tested for ability to maneuver from the lift to the securement area. 64% of people using wheelchairs experienced problems maneuvering in aisles varying in width from 32 to 37 inches particularly when standees were present. Backing the wheelchair onto the lift seemed to afford better maneuverability and quicker securement. Securement on the Lift - This was examined primarily from the ability of the lift to provide a secure "ride" during operation. Solid lift platforms presented few problems, but collapsible stairs did not remain level while ascending or descending, causing the wheelchair to move forward or backward. Securement in the Travel Area - Securement devices preventing the wheelchair from moving were tested both with and without the wheel- chair occupied. Although the use of wheelchair brakes was encouraged, this alone was considered inadequate secure- ment. The wheel securement clamp was appropriate for manual wheelchairs but not for certain powered wheelchairs or 3-wheeled devices. Two floor mounted securement straps and an over -the -shoulder seat belt used in combination were found to accommodate all wheelchairs tested. Detailed information, including the dimensions of the lifts and buses used in the tests, as well as the dimensions and weights of the three-, and four -wheeled mobility aids tested can be found in the brochure, "RTD Accessibility Policy," printed in July, 1989 and distributed by SCRTD. Availability of the SCRTD brochure and other supplemental information is described at the end of this brochure. Seattle Metro, as early as 1978, was assessing needs and establishing policy using a subjective approach. They gathered information from the community by having regular meetings with the Elderly and Handicapped • • • Task Committee (EHTAC). Further information was obtained from the community -at -large through meetings with a citizens' task committee. And, in these formative years, they met regularly with a task group of bus drivers. ESTABLISHED POLICIES - Both SCRTD and Seattle Metro followed up their assessment of user needs by establishing policies in five significant areas: 1. Who can use the lift? SCRTD allows only riders using wheelchairs that fit on the platform without wheelchair overhang to ride the lift. Seattle allows wheelchair riders, people using walkers, crutches or canes, people who can walk unassisted but cannot climb steps and attendants who accompany persons in wheelchairs to ride the lift. 2. When can a disabled person use the bus? SCRTD allows a person in a wheelchair to board a bus that has an accessible decal, even if the bus is not on a designated accessible route. The person can board at the driver's discretion, at any location where the lift can be operated safely. Seattle Metro will board disabled persons on accessible buses only at designated stops on designated routes and will allow off-loading at designated stops only. 3. Maneuverability through the bus. SCRTD riders in wheelchairs generally have easy entry into the securement area because most of the lifts are at the rear door and the securement area is directly opposite the lift. SCRTD, as a policy, encourages backing onto the lift to allow for easier entry into the securement area and wheel clamp. Seattle Metro riders in wheelchairs are also encouraged to back onto the lift because all Seattle lifts are at the front door, thus requiring maneuvering past the fare box, past the facing seats, and backing into the securement area and wheel clamp. On buses with wheelwells under the facing seats, drivers may require other passengers to move from their seats while the rider in the wheelchair maneuvers to the securement area. 4. Securing the wheelchair. Both SCRTD and Seatle Metro ask riders in wheelchairs to lock the brakes while on the moving lift. Both SCRTD and Seattle Metro drivers are taught to ask if a rider needs assistance in securing the wheelchair in the securement area. However, since the drivers are also taught that the safety of their passengers is ultimately the driver's responsibility, a few go beyond the norm of asking if the rider is secured, and actually attach the straps without asking or being requested to do so. 5. Future procurements. SCRTD's policy is to make every effort to procure buses with lifts that are safe and have level platforms of adequate size. The procurement policy does not specify the location of the lift at the front or rear door. Consequently, GMC (now TMC), which provides a lift at the rear door only, has been successful low bidder in supplying most of SCRTD's buses. The securement devices for buses with rear door lifts, can be seen in Figures 1. and 2. as follows: Figure 1. • • • SCRTD securement area 1. Wheel clamp mounted to seat, 2. Loop -ended vehicle restraint belts (two), bracket mounted, 3. Automotive type 3-point passenger seat belt. All belts are furnished with inertia type retracters. Inertia type retracters provide for smooth movement and a constant tension, thus allowing for ease of extension and complete retraction. One disadvantage of these devices is that they allow movement of the secured vehicle during normal bus starts and stops. This movement can be disconcerting for the person riding in the wheelchair. Seattle Metro's procurement policy, as reflected by its January 1987 purchase documents for articulated buses, includes a lift and securement layout, complete with illustration, requiring a front door lift. The wheelchair securement area, located in the front of the bus, has provisions for two wheelchairs, accomplished by providing a folding double transverse seat and a single folding longitudinal seat located on each side of the aisle. The securement devices for buses with front door lifts can be seen in Figures 3. and 4. Figure 3. Seattle Metro securement area 1. Wheelclamp mounted to folding seat, 2. Loop -ended red vehicle restraint belts (two), bracket mounted, 3. Automotive type passenger lap belt. All belt retracters are ratchet type to provide positive locking when belts are in secured position. The ratchet type retracters allow no movement during normal bus starts and stops. This stability can be reassuring to the person riding in the wheelchair. One disadvantage of the ratchet type retracter is that the belt must be extended and retracted smoothly and slowly or else the ratchet will lock prematurely. In Seattle, wheelchair tiedown instructions, are printed black on white background on 18-gauge aluminum and are mounted on the seat backs as shown in Figures 1. and 3. Figures 5. and 6. illustrate the securement of two different types of mobility aids. Figure 5. shows a three -wheeled vehicle secured in SCRTD's rear door securement area using the two loop -ended securement straps. The automotive 3-point belt is in position to secure the rider. The dotted lines show the control mechanism tilted forward, when possible, as required by SCRTD, to avoid possible injury to the rider in the event of a sudden stop. Figure 6. shows a motorized wheelchair secured in Seattle Metro's front door securement area using the two loop -ended securement straps. If the "mag" wheel fits and locks in the wheel clamp, only the loop- ended strap on the right side of the wheelchair is required. The automotive lap belt is in position to secure the rider. EDUCATED DRIVERS - Both SCRTD and Seattle Metro recognize that the success of transit service ultimately depends on knowledge- able and courteous bus drivers. Both cities provide regular training for drivers, have frequent refresher courses on procedures, and have an award system to encourage better and more courteous service to handicapped riders. Seattle Metro has a 1 1/2 hour training session centered around a 15- minute video that demonstrates the approved use of the lift and securement equipment. The drivers learn not only how the equipment should be operated, but, equally important, are taught just how vital • • • this ser- vice is in fulfilling the needs of people with disabilities. For many of these people, Public Transportation is essential in the conduct of business, social and cultural activities. Both the video and the driver's manual underscore Seattle Metro's "people" approach to accessible service. The following issues are specifically addressed in the driver's training manual: Types of Wheelchairs Allowed Manual, standard chairs, large motorized chairs, custom and racing chairs, chairs with permanently reclined backs, 3- and 4-wheeled scooters. Seat Belt Use - The use of the automotive type seat belt is an option for the passenger. It is not a restraint device to use in securing a wheelchair. Restraint Device Use - Wheelchairs must be secured on both sides using either a loop -ended (red) restraint belt and wheel clamp or, if the wheel clamp is not used, two loop -ended restraint belts. PUBLIC RELATIONS - At both SCRTD and Seattle Metro, bus drivers are taught that their knowledge and awareness are equally essential in providing effective service. Knowledge of boarding and securement procedures along with the confidence attained by frequent use of these procedures will be required. However, equally necessary is the awareness and practice of courteous and thoughtful service extended to every person who enters the bus. The experiences of SCRTD and Seattle Metro over the years has found that successful accessible service results from: 1. Positive experiences for both passengers and drivers alike, including, but not limited to, a reward system for drivers who provide courteous service, 2. Overcoming fear of failure, rejection, or being injured, on the part of the rider with disabilities, 3. Understanding by passengers and drivers alike, that time will be needed to accept changes. One excellent piece of advice offered the driver is, "When you are in doubt as to whether a person needs help, ALWAYS ASK before giving help." (Quotation taken from the Seattle Metro drivers' manual.) INFORMED PUBLIC - The Southern California Rapid Transit District (SCRTD) distributes a brochure, "RTD Accessible Service for Passengers Using Wheelchairs." The brochure contains a complete map of the transit routes, iden- tifies accessible routes, and informs passengers with disabilities about service and equipment. The "how to" portion centers around commonly asked questions: Who can use bus lifts? Which buses are accessible? When can people with diabilities or wheelchair users ride? How do people with disabilities or wheelchair users board? Where and how to secure wheelchairs? How to exit the bus? What to do if problems are encountered? What to expect in the future? The brochure asks people to bring concerns and suggestions to the attention of the Public Relations De- partment and invites interested persons to attend orientation sessions on accessible service. SCRTD, in their brochure "RTD Accessible Policy' also follows the commonly asked questions approach: What types of wheelchairs are allowed on RTD buses? What features should consumers or riders look for when purchasing a wheel chair for use on • • • a bus? What measurements to look for when purchasing a wheelchair for use on a bus? What wheelchair measurements can be used on all RTD lift buses? Is the rider's wheelchair stable enough for use on a lift? Should boarding be made facing forwards or backwards onto the lift? How to secure my wheelchair? What to do to ensure a safe trip on the bus? CONCLUSION - The SCRTD and Seattle Metro have achieved success in developing accessible bus transportation through initiative and comprehensive planning, developing procedures, driver education and public awareness activities. This effort has gained national recognition from disabled consumers and concerned organizations such as the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) in Washington, DC. Recently, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), Boston, announced that it has developed a securement system which appears to be similar to those used by Seattle and SCRTD. Also, the Lane Transit District is distributing a memo describing its securement system. These are examples of the efforts transit agencies across the country are making to try to accommodate a broad range of current and potential passengers with disabilities. the details and specifications for the MBTA and Lane systems could not be included in this brochure but contacts are listed below for more information. This brochure has been prepared to assist local and regional transit authorities by providing information on the successful policies and equipment two transportation authorities have developed over a period of more than ten years. It is hoped that other transit authorities will build upon the experience of SCRTD and Seattle Metro in developing accessible bus systems in their own communities. RESOURCES - The following is a list of contacts and resources that are currently available: Points of Contact - SCRTD, Terry Moren Planning Department Southern California Rapid Transit District 425 South Main Street Los Angeles, California 90013 (213) 3724864; Seattle Metro Sue Stewart Safety Officer Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle 11911 East Marginal Way, South Bldg. A Seattle, Washington, 98168 (206) 6842828;MBTA Hebert Pence Manger of Project Administration Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Rail Equipment Department 80 Broadway Evertt, Massachusetts 02149; Lane Transit Micki Kaplan Lane Transit District P.O. BOX 2710 Eugene, Oregon 97402. Brochures- SCRTD "RTD Accessible Service for Passengers Using Wheelchairs"( Effective January, 1989); "RTD Accessible Policy" printed July, 1989; Procurement Specifications Seattle Metro "Manufacture and Delivery of Articulated Dual Power Buses with Wheelchair Lifts" Contract T/F 2685, dated January 1987, pp C30, C42, C43, C77, C78. Driver Education - Seattle Metro Wayne Huston (206) 6842825 Video "Easy Ridin" 15minutes "Riders and Disabilities" Operators Manual for, "Accessible Service", dated July 1981 Transit Operating Instructions, "The Book" September 2, 1989 Technical - Tony Chavira Equipment Maintenance Department SCRTD 900 Lyon Street Los Angeles, Cal. 90012 (213) 9725800 Retrofitting - The purchase of wheelclamps and restraint belts to retrofit buses should be accomplished with the assistance of the bus manufacturers' purchasing and engineering departments.