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02 February 22, 2010 Budget & Implementation88674 RECORDS RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA TIME: 9:30 a.m. DATE: Monday, February 22, 2010 LOCATION: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside • NP. COMMITTEE MEMBERS .d Mary Craton, Chair / Jordan Ehrenkranz, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis, Vice Chair / Kathleen DeRosa, City of Cathedral City Roger Berg / Jeff Fox, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / To Be Appointed, City of Blythe Ray Quinto / Jim Hyatt, City of Calimesa Eduardo Garcia / Steven Hernandez, City of Coachella Scott Mates / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Bob Magee / Melissa Melendez, City of Lake Elsinore Terry Henderson / Don Adolph, City of La Quinta Wallace Edgerton / Darcy Kuenzi, City of Menifee Rick Gibbs / Kelly Bennett, City of Murrieta Steve Adams / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Ron Roberts / Jeff Comerchero, City of Temecula John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside, District II Jeff Stone, County of Riverside, District III 9- STAFF -Rd Anne Mayer, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Vo- AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY -V Annual Budget Development and Oversight Competitive Federal and State Grant Programs Countywide Communications and Outreach Programs Countywide Strategic Plan Legislation Measure A Implementation Public Communications and Outreach Programs Short Range Transit Plans Comments are welcomed by the Committee. if you wish to provide comments to the Committee, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. 11.36.06 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE www.rctc.org AGENDA * *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Monday, February 22, 2010 BOARD ROOM County Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First F/oor Riverside, California In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission's website, www.rctc.orq. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. ROLL CALL 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS - Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Committee may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Committee, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. Also, the Committee may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Committee shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Budget and Implementation Committee February 22, 2010 Page 2 Under the Brown Act, the Board should not take action on or discuss matters • raised during public comment portion of the agenda which are not listed on the agenda. Board members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration.. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES - SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 6. ELECTION OF OFFICERS Overview Page 1 This item is for the Budget and Implementation Committee to conduct an election of officers .for 2010 - Chair and Vice Chair. 7. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda. requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) 8. CONSENT CALENDAR - All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 8A. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Overview This item is for the Committee to: Page 2 1) Receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report for the second quarter ended December 31, 2009; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. • • Budget and Implementation Committee February 22, 2010 Page 3 8B. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Overview This item is for the Committee to: Page 4 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended December 31, 2009; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 9. PROPOSED POLICY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 BUDGET Overview This item is for the Committee to: Page 17 1) Approve the proposed Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the FY 2010/11 Budget; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. • 10. AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT UPDATE Overview This item is for the Committee to: • Page 40 1) Receive and file a report onthe status of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) projects; 2) Approve allocating potential stimulus funding from the federal "Jobs Bill" to projects that are currently federalized and can meet deadline requirements for the first 50% of the funds, with first priority to State Transportation Improvement Program projects (STIP), second priority to state highway projects, and third priority to local road projects; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 11. 2010 CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the 2010 Congestion Management Program (CMP); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. Page 42 Budget and Implementation Committee February 22, 2010 Page 4 12. FISCAL YEAR 2010 APPROPRIATIONS - ALAMEDA CORRIDOR EAST - AUTO • CENTER DRIVE AND STREETER AVENUE GRADE SEPARATIONS Page 131 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Allocate $674,500 to the city of Corona (Corona) for the Auto Center Drive grade separation project; 2) Allocate $674,500 to the city of Riverside (Riverside) in support of the Streeter Avenue grade separation project; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 13. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 14. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and staff to report on attended and upcoming meeting/conferences and issues related to . • Commission activities.. 15. ADJOURNMENT AND NEXT MEETING The next Budget and Implementation Committee meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Monday, March 22, 2010, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE ROLL CALL FEBRUARY 22, 2010 Present Absent County of -Riverside, District 11 County of Riverside, District III City of Beaumont, City of Blythe City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral City City of Coachella City of Desert.Hot Springs City of Lake Elsinore City of La Quirita: City of Menifee City of Murrieta City of Riverside City of Temecula RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET FEBRUARY 22, 2010 4 AME z �, ,!,tom \ -V- G AGENCY 9a-J 146 Q24i. Cr C� it E MAIL ADDRESS AGENDA ITEM 5 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE Monday, September 28, 2009 MINUTES 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Budget and Implementation Committee was called to order by Chair Mary Craton at 9:32 a.m., in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE At this time, Vice Chair Greg Pettis led the Budget and Implementation Committee in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Members/Alternates Present Members Absent Roger Berg Mary Craton Eduardo Garcia Rick Gibbs Terry Henderson Darcy Kuenzi Scott Matas Greg Pettis Ray Quinto Steve Adams Joseph DeConinck Ron Meepos Ron Roberts Jeff Stone John Tavaglione 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES - AUGUST 24, 2009 M/S/C (Henderson/Kuenzi) to approve the minutes of August 24, 2009, as submitted. Abstain: Berg Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 2 6. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There was additional information for Agenda Item 7, "Quarterly Sales Tax Analysis". 7. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, provided an update for the Quarter 1, 2009 sales tax analysis. Commissioner Terry Henderson expressed her gratitude to Theresia Trevino for the time and effort put into this process. M/S/C (Henderson/Kuenzi) to: 1) Receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 1, 2009; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REGIONAL ARTERIAL PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2009/10 BUDGET ADJUSTMENTS Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager, provided a brief overview of the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional Arterial program FY 2009/10 budget adjustments. In response to Commissioner Roger Berg, Shirley Medina confirmed that these projects are for regional arterials and the agreements were approved by the Commission. She stated that since revenues have significantly decreased, staff wanted to ensure that reimbursements consistent with approved agreements will be met. M/S/C (Henderson/Matas) to: 1) Approve FY 2009/10 budget adjustments resulting in a net increase to expenditures of $5.746 million related to the following TUMF Regional Arterial arojects; and Agency Project Name Project No. Net Increase/ (Decrease) Corona El Cerrito Road (Bedford Canyon Road to I-15) 5101 $ 233,000 Corona Green River Road (Dominguez Ranch Road to SR-91) 5103 ($1,898,000) • • • • • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 3 County of Riverside Reche Canyon Road/Reche Vista Drive (Heacock Boulevard to San Bernardino County Line) 5107 $ 18,000 Riverside Van Buren Boulevard IC at SR-91 5108 $3,559,000 County of Riverside Schleisman Road IC at 1-15 5113 $ 115,000 County of Riverside Van Buren Boulevard (Washington Avenue to Wood Road) 5116 $ 95,000 San Jacinto Ramona Expressway 17th Street to Cedar Avenue) 5118 ($ 8,000) Temecula French Valley Parkway IC at 1-15 5119 $3,532,000 Temecula I-15/SR-79 South IC 5120 $ 100,000 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 9. TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REGIONAL ARTERIAL PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROGRAMMING FUNDS Shirley Medina provided an overview of the TUMF Regional Arterial program recommendations for programming funds. Commissioner Berg requested staff provide an update on the TUMF Regional Arterial program approved projects and needs of the local jurisdictions. He expressed concern regarding suspending future TUMF programming requests as recommended. Shirley Medina stated the TUMF Regional Arterials program and expenditures schedule will be presented at the October Commission meeting. A TUMF update is provided on a quarterly basis to the Commission. Additionally, due to the decline in TUMF revenues, the Commission will, with few exceptions, only be able to continue reimbursing project sponsors with approved agreements consistent with the September 2004 Commission approval of programming for 23 projects. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, expressed the current challenge is an insufficient amount of TUMF funds to keep all of these projects moving forward. It was agreed upon with the public works directors to suspend any further action due to the decline in TUMF revenues and there is no programming capacity left. In response to Commissioner Greg Pettis' request for clarification that the city of Lake Elsinore and the county of Riverside's requests are to reprogram funds that have already been allocated, Shirley Medina confirmed it is identified in the project application and is an advancement adjustment within the project schedule. Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 4 In response to Commissioner Pettis' question regarding the city of Moreno Valley's requests, Shirley Medina confirmed its requests are consistent with its project applications. Commissioner Darcy Kuenzi stated the importance of continuing to complete phases of TUMF projects to be shovel -ready and eligible for additional federal funds as available. Shirley Medina concurred and noted most of the cities are looking into this. She stated staff will need to analyze the ability for these projects to receive federal funds in a timely manner. Anne Mayer stated several jurisdictions are prioritizing their TUMF projects and moving funds from one project to another with the goal to get these TUMF projects to the construction phase. She explained the city of Lake Elsinore's reprogram request was a shift from the right of way phase to the environmental phase in order to complete the environmental document. Commissioner Henderson suggested that the concern may be use of the word "suspending" in Recommendation No. 6. Shirley Medina clarified none of these TUMF projects are being suspended. It is a matter of putting a cap on future new programming requests due to a decline in TUMF funding. Anne Mayer provided an overview of the discussions with the public works directors concerning the prioritization of TUMF projects and next steps. She clarified the Commission will not be accepting programming changes until there are additional TUMF revenues. She suggested replacing the word "suspending" in Recommendation No. 6 to "deferring". Mike Myers, city of Moreno Valley Project Manager, expressed support for the Perris Boulevard improvement projects for the city of Moreno Valley. Prem Kumar, representing the city of Moreno Valley, expressed support for the Perris Boulevard improvement projects for the city of Moreno Valley. Chair Craton stated the city of Canyon Lake has applied for federal funds in order to complete its TUMF projects. • • • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 5 M/S/C (Henderson/Kuenzi) to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 06-72-040-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 06-72-040-00, with the city of Moreno Valley to program funds for right of way for the Perris Boulevard improvement project, Cactus Avenue to the Perris Valley Storm Drain Lateral B, in the amount of $1.521 million; 2) Approve Agreement No. 06-72-041-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement 06-72-041-00, with the city of Moreno Valley to program funds for right of way for the Perris Boulevard improvement project, Ironwood Avenue to Manzanita Avenue, in the amount of $631,000; 3) Approve Agreement No. 10-72-016-00 with the city of Lake Elsinore to reprogram $1 million of the $6 million previously requested for the right of way phase to the environmental phase on the Interstate 15 Railroad Canyon Road interchange improvement project; 4) Approve Agreement No. 06-72-521-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 06-72-521-00, with the county of Riverside to reprogram an estimated $4.326 million from its Eastern Bypass projects to the State Route 79 widening project, Thompson Road to Domenigoni Parkway, for right of way purposes; 5) Approve the net increases to the FY 2009/10 budget as follows: • $6.478 million for right of way expenditures; • $379,000 for design expenditures; • $550,000 for preliminary engineering expenditures; • $392,000 for construction expenditures; 6) Approve deferring future TUMF programming requests until such time that TUMF revenues increase; 7) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 8) Forward to the Commission for final action. 10. SB 821 BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES PROGRAM EXTENSION FOR THE CITY OF SAN JACINTO Jillian Edmiston, Staff Analyst, presented the request from the city of San Jacinto for an extension of SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities program funds. Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 6 M/S/C (Kuenzi/Henderson) to: 1) Grant the city of San Jacinto (San Jacinto) an extension to February 2010, for approved SB 821 program funds for the installation of concrete sidewalk and handicap ramps along the south side of Commonwealth Avenue from Hewitt Street to Girard Avenue; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 11. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Aaron Hake, Government Relations Manager, presented an overview of federal and state legislative activities. He recognized Tanya Love, Goods Movement Manager, who played a key role in developing the Commission's application in cooperation with cities of Corona, Riverside, and all of the major transportation agencies in Southern California for the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program grants. Anne Mayer discussed the high-speed rail component for stimulus funding, noting applications are due on Friday, October 2. She stated the California High -Speed Rail Authority included the preliminary engineering for the San Diego to Los Angeles route via the Inland Empire section. She announced the public scoping meetings and a press conference. At Anne Mayer's request, Aaron Hake confirmed positive train control (PTC) was included in the TIGER submittal. Anne Mayer stated the Commission is trying to push PTC funding and discussed its importance. She also updated the Commission on the Mobility 21 Summit. M/S/C to: 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation; and 21 Forward to the Commission for final action. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 13. COMMENTS BY COMMISSIONERS/STAFF 13A. Anne Mayer announced: • • • Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes September 28, 2009 Page 7 • She and Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, will be traveling to San Francisco to sign the closing documents for the Commission's bond sale. • The Commission received an AA+ rating from Standard and Poor and congratulated Theresia Trevino and the financial team for an outstanding job. Commissioner Kuenzi expressed her gratitude to staff for its hard work to maintain the current ratings. Chair Craton concurred with Commissioner Kuenzi's comments. 14. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Budget and Implementation Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 10:05 a.m. The next meeting of the Budget and Implementation Committee is scheduled for October 26, 2009 at 9:30 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board .Haam.o.-- AGENDA ITEM 6 • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Office and Board Services Manager THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Election of Officers STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Budget and Implementation Committee to conduct an election of officers for 2010 - Chair and Vice Chair. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The election of officers for the full Commission and its Committees are held on an annual basis. Commissioners Mary Craton and Greg Pettis were elected as the Budget and Implementation Committee's officers in February 2009. Once the election has been conducted, the new Chair and Vice Chair will immediately assume the positions. Past Chairs of the Budget and Implementation Committee are as follows: 2009 - Mary Craton, City of Canyon Lake 2008 - Steve Adams, City of Riverside 2007 - Rick Gibbs, City of Murrieta 2006 - Jeff Stone, County of Riverside, District 3 2005 - Bob Magee, City of Lake Elsinore 2004 - Terry Henderson, City of La Quinta 2003 - Robert Schiffner, City of Lake Elsinore 2002 - Chris Carlson, City of San Jacinto 2001 - John Hunt, City of Banning 2000 - Ron Roberts, City of Temecula Agenda Item 6 1 AGENDA ITEM 8A • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Matt Wallace, Procurement and Assets Administrator Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report for the second quarter ended December 31, 2009; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The attached report details all professional services and administrative contracts that have been executed for the second quarter ended December 31, 2009, under the Single Signature Authority granted to the Executive Director by the Commission. The unused capacity at December 31, 2009 is $422,088. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of December 31, 2009. Agenda Item 8A 2 00'880'iL94 00'Zt6'LL 00248LL 00'0 00'005'L 00.00S'2 00'90C s onot'Lt onereZ ooro0o'ooss E a J. e. iayl wea6md �alanuy 6gdm3 Puelul LLs elwo}Ile3 to BIM suolleolvads peed gsuul 61E600 }o uollu edud eJelleMr^4411M11 600Z 'tE }60uma0 46nu41 DNINIVN3LI INOONtl 03Sn LNnOWV D35n 1NnON'o ', noel}en( t A0000N rest, 14dlsul Wen; BOOZY 61n6 3levinintl 1NOONtl LNnONV 1NnONtl Oltld 1Nnowe S301/143S dO N011d1210330 1Ntl1lnSN0 1042111N00 Lan:UNDO MINIUM° OMNIVW3M 600Z'It 21391/3030 d0 SV A1RlOHlfld 321n1VNOIS MONIS • • • AGENDA ITEM 8B RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Anne Hallberg, Accounting Supervisor THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended December 31, 2009; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Attached are the quarterly investment and cash flow reports as required by state law and Commission policy. The county of Riverside's Investment Report for the month ended December 31, 2009, is also attached for review. Attachments: 11 Quarterly Investment Report for the Quarter ended December 31, 2009 2) County of Riverside Investment Report for the Month ended December 31, 2009 Agenda Item 8B 4 • • Nature of investments Bond ProJacts 4.41 % Oparating Funds H1.39 pant Reserve 3.31 Trust Funds 10.89 Statement of Compliance All of the above investments and any investment decisions made for the quarter ended December 31, 2009 were in full compliance with the Commission's investment policy as adopted on May 13, 2009. The Commission has adequate cash flows for six months of operations. Signed by Chief Financial Officer 5 • Riverside County Transpodaticn Commission Investment Portfolio Report Period Ended: December 31, 2009 OPERATING FUNDS RATING COUPON PAR PURCHASE MATURITY YIELD TO PURCHASE MARKET UNREALIZED GAIN FAIR VALUE MOODYSIFITCH S&P RATE VALUE DATE DATE MATURITY COST VALUE (LOSS) City National Bank Deposits 1,924,573 A3aBB+ NIA NIA County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund 398,956,249 Aaa/MRIIAAAN+1 NIA - 1.11% Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 3,583.380 Not Rated NIA N/A Subtotal Operating Funds 402,444.202 FUNDS HELD IN TRUST County Treasurers Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund Subtotal Funds Held in Trust COMMISSION BOND PROJECT FUNDS/DEBT RESERVE US Bank Money Market Investment Agreements County of Riverside Pool investment First American Government Obligation Fund Subtotal Bond Project Funds/Debt Reserve TOTAL All Cash and Investments 53.851.419 Aaa-MRIIAAAN+1 NIA 53.851,419 14,220,328 Aaa/AAAm N/A 23.955,544 Aaa/AAAm 39,175,872 494,471,493 N/A Investment Transactions for the Quarter Ended December 31, 2009 Purchases'. Maturities' Par Value at Maturity Maturity Date Coupon Rate 6 SUMMARIZED INVESTMENT TYPE Banks 1.924,573 County Pool 450,807,668 County Pool Investment LAIF 3,563,380 Mutual Funds: US Bank Money Markel 14,220,323 First Amercan Govemment Obligation Fund 23,955,544 Sub- Total Mutual Funds 38,175,872 Investment Agreements TOTAL $ 494,471,d93 • r� ! i'reastiter .Tax'Collectorr 7If Jon: Christensen Asses%sit Tt tirvrer-,7ax " Collectar `s µ ovan s rivatmet t Unemployment Rate(10%acdralvs. 10.2%survey ) Payroll change(411< actual vs-125K survey) • "The Tough Ten" December 2009 has come and gone and with its passing it ranks as the most challenging decade for the U.S. in recent memory. Let's recap for the sake of history and its effects on the financial mar- kets in which the Treasurers Pooled Investment Fund invests. It all started with the power debacle and the collapse of Enron and other energy giants. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was born and addressed the issues of corporate and accounting scandals which shook public confidence in the nation's securities markets. Then, along came September 11' 2001 which resulted in the worst terrorist attacks on American soil. The response was the U.S. military's Operation Enduring Freedom designed to annihilate AI- Qaeda in Afghanistan and to root out the coward Bin Laden and his Taliban cronies. Scion thereafter, the U.S. launched shock and awe, invaded Iraq and toppled Saddam Hussein in its search for weapons of mass destruction; they were never found, but the citizens of Iraq no longer live under a ruthless dictator. We thank our troops for their bravery and honor those who have last their lives fighting in the name of freedom. Aided by the 9/11 terrorist attacks and other contributing factors that began earlier in the decade, our economy succumbed to recession. With that, the Federal Reserve, led by then Chairman Greenspan, began its rate cutting campaign. Several years of rising home prices, record setting global stock and commodity markets, and, easy credit all became the fuel for the perfect storm. • Concerns about housing market slowdowns, which were the primary engine of growth this decade as well potential geopolitical crisis in oil exporting countries, and, perpetual budget and trade deficits all help to create a climate of ambiguity about the overall direction of the U.S. economy. In mid-2007 concerns of ongoing pressures in the sub -prime mortgage market and weakness In the housing sector of the economy came to pass. The Subprime Melt- down was born. During the recent housing boom, lenders doled out mortgages like candy to borrowers with poor credit histories, asking for little or no money down and requiring limited or no documentation of income. At the same time, rising home values and low interest rates spurred consumers to take out home equity loans to purchase con- sumer products. They also encouraged borrowers to choose riskier adjustable rate and interest only loans to afford more expensive real estate. As interest rates Increased, this house of cards began to fall. According to Bloomberg News, First American Corporation esti- mated in March of 2D07 that $326 billion of adjustable -rate mortgages extended between 2004 and 2006 would lead to 1.1 million foreclo- sures over the next six to seven years. The problem is, 25% of our GDP is attributable to housing and related industries. Uh, Houston, we have a problem. IYlonth End Market Value(1) h End Book V aiun Paper Gain or Lost ($) Paper Gam or Book WArel ivioditied Lass (%) Yield(2) (Yrs.) Duration The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is composed of County, Schools, Special Districts and other Discretionary Depositors 040 November 5,155,915,736.52 5,128,291,035.95 27,624,700.57 September 5,222,064,383.99 5,197,744,083.50 24,320,300.49 0.54% 1.16 1.06 0.47D/o 1.26 1.04 1.03 1.01 The final nail in the coffin was crude oil prices; they reached a high of over $145 per barrel In July 2008. In the same year, we saw three of the largest corporate bankruptcies in history; WaMu, Bear Stearns and Lehman Bros. They were followed by G.M. in 2009. Thankfully, we navigated the storm well and I'm proud to say we didn't lose a penny: other municipal treas- urys weren't as fortunate with over $350 million in losses right here in Califor- nia alone. The banking and credit crisis followed quickly with many of the big storied commercial and investment banks teetering on collapse. Without federal government intervention, a complete meltdown of our banking system was imminent; some experts argue it was within days had Washingtonnot stepped in. Along with our domestic economic situation, world trade was Collapsing with the result being the first global recession since WW II. To slave off further chaos, the FED, Treasury and FDIC rolled out many plans to shore up the financial system. In Oct 2008 Congress passed a sweeping and controversial fnandal bailout package. At the core of the bill was the govern- ment's plan to buy troubled assets from financial institutions. The major aim of the plan was to free up banks to start lending again once their balance sheets are cleared of toxic holdings. It may have been too little to late as the economy continued to slide. By February 2009 the national unemployment rate reached 8.1% and over 12% in Riverside County. Over 1.2 million jobs were lost during the first two months of 2009, the worst showing in a quarter century. This magni- tude of job losses has not been seen since the government began keeping records in the 1930's. The President signed into law in February, along with other stimulus plans, a $787 billion program to create or save over 3.5 million jobs. As unemployment continued to increase, so too did the number of fore- closures; over 8 million Americans owed more money on their houses than what they were worth. This number continued to increase, resuking in a mas- sive write down of property values, ultimately impacting everything from local governments and the services they provide to school districts and the children they teach. Housing continued.its slide in Riverside County as measured by the median home price. After reaching a high of over $425,000 in June of 2006, March median home prices are back down to less than $190,000, ac- cording to Data Quick. This represents a staggering drop of over 50%. New home Inventory continues to be historically high and the number of foreclo- sures continued to rise, all of which compound the problems of an already distressed market. Far 2009, the assessed valuation of the County dedined by 10.5%, or, $25 billion. The prolonged erosion of values will continue to drive up the num- ber of foreclosures and bankruptcies, both at record levels. All of these face tors have a devastating effect on our private sector, County and local govern- ment, with no signs of help on the horizon from the state or the federal govern- ment. There is more evidence of the economic slowdown; as expected, the coffers of the federal government are showing signs of distress as individual income tax collections are being reported down almost 15%, with corporate income taxes down well over 50% from the same period last year. All the while, Washington continues to pour money out at a rate never seen. before in history. This has pushed the budget deficit to well over $1 trillion from$450 billion last year. As we all know by now, some of our worst fears were realized with a lack at confidence in our financial system, free markets and capitalism. Through all this turmoil the Pool has maintained its coveted AAA ratings. We will continue to maintain our conservative posture and adhere to our invest- ment objectives that have served us so well through "The Tough Ten." Den Keel Trwmror•Tee Collector • Market Shia; a; The Fed maintained the target rate at a range of 0 to 25 bps. The 2 year T-Note was yielding 1.14% (up 47bps). while the 10 year T-Note was yielding 3.85% (up 64bps.) For December, the Pool had a decrease of 21bps. in the average monthly yield. 3 M o US Treasury Bill 6Mo US Treas ury Bill 0.06 0,20 0.05 2 Yr US Treasury Note '114 0.47 5 Yr US Treasury Note 2.69 U.68 tJ Yr US Treasury Note 3.85 0.64 FED Fund Rate 0.25 Crude Oil (barrel) Gold (Ounce) 79.36 1.94 1,096.95 (82.80) ) DJIA 10,428.00 S&P 500 1,115.10 NASDAQ 2,269.15 715.72 58,02 146.73 Page 1 Sector breakdown Cash Equivalent &MMF Nepoliable CDs M unicipal Bends e o nd • U.S. Treasury TOTAL ket Value WAte1 507,054,000 0.05 020 104,846,102 0,66 2.03 1,024,894290 0.80 0.43 6,155,962,0 0.97 0.96 • Credit Quality AAA ,741%A. r Fodoral A9cncy and U.S. Tierau ry, 86 B6 Z, A-1/ P-1 or better, 097% R.5 r3 Maturity Distribution 40% 35 % 30% 25..4 20 % 15% 1 O% 5% 0% • 30 days or 30- 90 Days 90 Days - 1 1- 2 Years 2- 3 Years Year Less Over 3 Years 12 Month Gross Yield Trends1 4 3.8 3 2.5 2 1,5 1 0.5 0 De0-08 Jan-09 Feb-09 Mar -OS Apr-09 May -Of Jun•09 Jul-09 Aug-09 bsp-09 OM-09 Nov-09 Deo-09 Cash Flows2 Ma. nib Virru Necei lz4.0)1illi ,,Wank. 03/2010 807.62 vtlr n5i2010 59253 Mond 2a pis£nmts 390.97 995.86 a 1. 1347. 041.7 1107.85 799 59 itr Rya ired ,t.cluaI In1. IEinre +ewrr4 o3:a9. BoxF'x:.f FSai:ris e. i9:ri Rr ri ke 4r., (762, 09) (188.24) (749.17) (372.56) (233.20) ( .z23.8) 650 99 188,24 371.40 372.36 233.20 3,112 7 $969.51 15 00 615 92 346.63 227.73 11,354 5 54 +8 3»33.3 9 t Treasurer's Institutional Money Market Index (TIMMI) is compiled and reported by the Riverside County Treas- urer's Capital Markets division. It is a composite index derived from the average of three multi -billion dollar AAA rated Prime Umds that invest in a diversified portfo- lio of U.S. dollar denominated money market instruments including 11S. Treasuries, government agencies, bankers' acceptances, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, repurchase agreements, etc) portfolios that the Treasurer tracks. Further details available upon request. Current funds are ASTITGA, WF✓ OC (I2/09), and MPFXX 'The Pooled Investment Fund cash flaw requirements are based upon a 11 month historical cash flow model. Based upon projected cash receipts and maturing invest- ments, there are sufficient funds to meet future cash flow disbursements over the next 11 months. LIAM SO L6'L 0'x 69 9L'L ELI 111 YG'L LL'L V2'1 021 CS' ILL 011 13'1 LP1 C31. 001 Cl't ei'l K'L 99' ol'L (00'0sE'S) (,0�0100059) Ol O'OSC11 moot (00'0011 100'001'Cl 100'00510 too'ose (002tL'S1 00a39'0681 0010V'te6'6 00ros9066`P 0D00e'CBSb 00'000'966Y OD 006 SOB'9 00'005'L13e't DO00019C9 00SLC•DLit '5 1.e16 D01009001 Pe6e oodonolVot HMO 00'0090005 wee 00.000.055a ro'e5 000000001 000000009 SL'66 00'0009001 k. .: C0'009'POE 'ft 00 11991'S o5rot SL t0L L2 LL02MLLt Lt0L916 10L0011. uOzlErOt LlOZL9ZL6 1 LOZNL9 LLOZML/0 OOL9Z 0052'L 009Z'1 0000'L 0921'4 DOR' 00K't °SLOT W90NU52 Z NNVS 110330 113V3033 000D0900'S Nve 110330 WaVi 032 00 0000005 PIS0N+A92'LNNVS 1103tlO WaVi 03i 00'000'000' 0v 10NUL NV8100380133V2 033 0900010011. 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VVbleeV doll dbO 3a330 NHOf 00'000000'5 aszl e OOSL Z OSLE'L 00S2 i 9 E c WV/99V doll VOIOSINV AO NyeN00'000 000'SE �LVJO>CVK -44402 " 6Vv905090 .44**0.01191 W P9V doll >AV9 N01383AOS 00'000000'01 GbV2DD9D9 A011 d00g01110 00000000'G [NVfPIfGt tl911 ON1ONnd dnO 000.13 00000000'S SOVACL ELL 4:0/00*#,EI11ii!!:il4MM! 111M'i_uttLpi1 VV9'/m..180 d ef030 00000000O4 Emmen . r'*7iIIC ZIKkikk`S7 g1,44:ggg*1`i:Z 1;iit-W411,111 W€00 .' . M1109eV 1103a] 801001V.LOA01 00 00000002 L9ndEEZee VVV/99V AVMtM1tlH 3a IHSNtl39 00000000S ZdV099090 ! r,.47R'ft"°d{.,' ,. 04:ObOOMG,'lial`<" OUSgiil ii� :-..,:i,F' Y9'd0 VVVPgo AVMVH1VH 3a1H5Na3e 00000000'L i8V09ea90 l(l!{'`!`k°�'i(O:W"E�.s KOWCW'bd3 .�-1d.Q!Hirgl.1;f1'II I.'.94 MON 91a3103W - ON1W alEl onV 111n(1 Lv 11 VIv (IlA tit111INIV'1 nmvn is I lnlVA NIJO11 ALItIi11.V1v N(l.ln(13 NOILIMS]0 a15n.) The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund was in FULL COMPLIANCE with the Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy. The County's Investment Policy is more restrictive than the California Government Code. This policy is reviewed annually by the County's Investment Oversight Committee and approved by the County Board of Supervisors. Investment Category AGENCY BONDS LOCAL AGENCY OBLIGATIONS (u, N -:. 5 BILLS OF EXCHANGE CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS REVERSE REPOS Maximum Maturity Authorizer! °% Limit Quality S&P/ Moody's 5 YEARS NO LIMIT A/A2/A 5 YEARS NO LIMIT 270DAYS 40%(1) k r:5 5 YEARS 30% 92 DAYS 20% CaITRUST SHORT TERM FUND N/A N/A N/A SECURED BANK DEPOSITS 5 YEARS NO LIMIT Maximum Maturity 3 YEARS 3 YEARS 180 DAYS 1 YEAR Authorized t emit Quality S&P/ Moody's Actual Riverside Porttolio % 15%/ $150MM A/A2/A 1.70% 2.50% INVESTMENT GRADE 0.25% 30% A1/P1/F1 25% MAX A1/P1/F1 60 DAYS 10% MAX N/A DAILY LIQUIDITY 1% 1 YEAR 2% BOARD APPROVED 0.88% LOCAL AGENCY INVESTMENT FUNDS N/A NO LIMIT 3 YEARS 0% MAX + No more than 30% of this category may be invested with any one commercial bank • > Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as weighted average maturity not exceeding 90 days 3 Or must have an investment advisor with not less than 5 years experience and with assets under management of$500,000,000. • THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREIVS OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE 53646 • Pages AGENDA ITEM 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposed Policy Goals and Objectives for Fiscal Year Budget 2010/11 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the proposed Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the FY 2010/11 Budget; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The initial step in the budget process is to develop policy goals and objectives for the next fiscal year that are consistent with the Commission's overall strategic direction. The goals and objectives for FY 2010/11 reflect the continuation of the transition related to the completion of the 1989 Measure A and commencement of the 2009 Measure A projects and programs. Most importantly, the adoption of the Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the annual fiscal budget provides an opportunity to match the Commission's spending priorities in a manner that implements the promises made to the citizens of the county of Riverside in both Measure A Expenditure Plans and that fulfills other Commission responsibilities. The Commission's seven long-term policy goals are: • Promote mobility; • Mitigate and address the impact of goods movement; • Ensure improved system efficiencies; • Foster environmental stewardship; • Encourage economic development; • Support transportation choices through intermodalism and accessibility; and • Prioritize public and agency communications. The Commission's Financial and Administration Policies are also included in the Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the FY 2010/11 Budget. Attachments: 1) Proposed Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for FY 2010/11 Budget 2) Overview of Policy Goals and Objectives for FY 2010/11 Agenda Item 9 17 Commission Policy Goals and Objectives In addition to financial and administration policies, the Commission has seven long-term policy goals: promote mobility, mitigate and address the impact of goods movement, ensure improved system efficiencies, foster environmental stewardship, encourage economic development, support transportation choices through intermodalism and accessibility, and prioritize public and agency communications. For each of these policy goals, the objectives and initiatives that were considered in the framework of the work plan for the FY 2010/11 budget are identified below. While Riverside County grapples with the challenges of a declining real estate market, high unemployment, and an uncertain economy, the need for better transportation remains a top public priority that the Commission is poised to address via the seven policy goals. In moving forward with an aggressive program of projects and services, the Commission will face the challenge of lower Measure A and TDA revenues and uncertainty regarding the availability of federal and state transportation revenues. Due to the long-term nature of many of the Commission's programs, many of the policy goals' objectives and initiatives are ongoing from year to year. Promote Mobility The Commission, in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies, will strive to create a transportation system that promotes efficient mobility both within the County and region. • Complete projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A and determine use(s) for any unexpended revenues. • Continue to aggressively pursue completion of the environmental and design processes on key components of the Western County Highway Delivery Plan, which includes the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects. • Continue to develop the toll program consistent with the Western County Highway Delivery Plan including executing toll program agreements with key regional and state partners namely Caltrans, OCTA, toll operator, California Highway Patrol (CHP), and others. • Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental clearance for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. • Continue to work with state and federal agencies to fund and construct projects programmed in the STIP, Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP), Proposition 1 B bond programs, and Measure A program as well as other high priority regional projects. • Maximize obtaining all available transportation funds and strategically program funds to meet funding deadlines and to prevent the lapse and loss of funds. • Maximize the effective application and use of Western County TUMF funds to deliver eligible Commission priority projects. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to implement the TUMF Regional Arterial Program and facilitate the delivery of arterial improvements in Western County. 18 • Actively participate in the SR-91 Advisory Committee and Riverside Orange Corridor Authority to facilitate near and long-term improvements to SR-91; enhance intercounty public transit options and foster the development of a new corridor between the two counties. • Advocate streamlining efforts at the state and federal levels that will reduce costs, time and delays currently associated with project delivery including, but not limited to, timely project reviews and approvals. • Continue to coordinate and provide public access to commuter information via the newly launched Inland Empire 511 system. • Continue cooperation with the FTA regarding the Small Starts process to support the initiation of the Perris Valley Line commuter rail service in 2012. • Continue to work with the public transit operators to reduce costs and increase system efficiencies in order to accommodate lower revenues from state and federal sources. • Continue to develop a vision of transit service to further promote seamless intracity, intercity, and regional transit connectivity for County residents. Mitigate and Address the Impact of Goods Movement The Commission will work with federal, state, and local governments to facilitate the movement of goods and services to, within, and through the County, recognizing the vital role goods movement mobility plays in the economic health of the County, the State, and the nation. • Seek funding and local agency concurrence to implement the Commission's approved, high -priority railroad grade separation priority list to mitigate the impact of increased goods movement demands on the transportation system. • Remain committed to a regional approach regarding goods movement issues in order to maximize funding from state and federal sources to goods movement needs in Southern Califomia. • Continue working with the Ports and regional transportation commissions to develop an infrastructure cargo fee. • Continue working with the Southem California Association of Governments (SCAG), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), OCTA, SANBAG, San Diego Association of Govemments (SANDAG), Ventura County Transportation Commission (VCTC), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), Mobility 21, and the Coalition for America's Gateway and Trade Corridors to encourage Congress to create a national goods movement program to treat the nation's multimodal national goods movement network as a system rather than individual projects. Ensure Improved System Efficiencies The Commission will select projects and allocate funds in a manner that will improve safety and reduce congested traffic corridors. 19 • • • Advocate the development and use of advanced technologies for transportation applications that are affordable and practical. • In partnership with SANBAG, refine and enhance the recently launched Inland Empire 511 system, which will make real-time traffic information, real-time bus and rail transit trip planning information, and rideshare information available to commuters for the purpose of trip planning and congestion avoidance. • Assure the effectiveness of transit planning through coordination with the Transit Operators Working Group, Citizens' Advisory Committee, and annual SRTP process with a goal toward promoting program productivity, efficiency and effectiveness. • Provide innovative commuter rideshare programs to reduce single occupant vehicle trips and coordinate with other regional rideshare service providers to address intercounty commute trips. • Work with local jurisdictions, Caltrans and the CHP to continue providing a motorist aid system which includes a call box program and an FSP program, including temporary services in freeway construction zones. • Continue development, in partnership with Caltrans and SANBAG, of the Inland Empire Transportation Management Center. . • Leverage resources to incorporate park and ride facilities and additional connecting bus service at Metrolink stations that may have available capacity, Foster Environmental Stewardship The Commission will achieve its mobility goals while promoting environmental stewardship and protecting the area's natural resources and quality of life. • Continue working with the RCA to implement the MSHCP. • Work with the SCAG, SCAQMD, sub -regional agencies, and local jurisdictions to implement an RTP that meets regional air quality goals and conformity guidelines. • Support a variety of outreach channels and educational programs that promote the benefits of ridesharing, public and specialized transit, rail, and availability of commuter resources for the purposes of reducing vehicle trips and vehicle miles traveled. • Facilitate private/public use of clean fuels technology. • Address new state and federal mandates regarding greenhouse gas emissions, including coordination with local and regional agencies and participation in various forums to develop implementation guidelines. • Continue to develop sustainable and green commuter rail stations and provide upgrades and rehabilitation projects to reduce the environmental impact of the existing stations. Encourage Economic Development Transportation decisions will consider the economic benefits derived from any improvement, and, where feasible and practical, will pursue transportation altematives that enhance or complement economic development. 20 • Identify opportunities to develop local stimulus programs related to transportation projects that will create jobs and improve the economic base in the County. • Support local agencies in the design and construction of interchanges that are in proximity to regional economic centers and developments. • Support local projects, consistent with countywide transportation goals, which enhance business development, local employment, and area tourism. Support Transportation Choices through Intermodalism and Accessibility County residents will be served, where economically feasible, through the development of transportation alternatives and travel options that consider the needs of a wide range of citizens. • Work with transit providers and local social service agencies to provide specialized transit service to meet a broad spectrum of socio-economic transit needs of seniors and persons with disabilities. • Leverage commuter assistance and freeway service patrol outreach channels in order to increase the awareness of and foster the use of alternative commuting modes. • Implement the Commission's commuter rail SRTP and SCRRA's long-range strategic plan for expansion of the commuter rail system benefiting Riverside County constituents with an emphasis on the Perris Valley Line, an extension from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley. • Pursue the goals and objectives as outlined in the Coordinated Public Transit - Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan) for Riverside County related to a unified, comprehensive but flexible strategy for transportation service delivery to address transportation gaps and/or barriers focusing on unmet transportation needs of elderly individuals, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited income. • Enhance security, surveillance, and emergency response capabilities of County transit facilities and infrastructure through proactive planning, interagency coordination, and investment. Prioritize Public and Agency Communications The Commission will provide timely, informative, and accurate information to encourage informed public and agency participation in the Commission's decision -making processes. • Promote a close working relationship with news and civic entities to increase interest and understanding of transportation and related issues. • Enhance the provision of public information through various forms of communication (e.g., website, television, Speakers Bureau, print media, radio, etc). • Maintain an ongoing effort of informing Riverside County's Congressional and State Legislative delegations regarding County transportation issues. • Develop an effective long-range legislative strategy regarding the reauthorization of 21 • • • • the federal transportation bill to ensure that the federal government participates as a full partner in funding Riverside County projects that are of national and regional significance. • Advocate for sufficient funding for Riverside County transit and transportation projects from various federal and state revenue sources including, but not limited to, annual federal appropriations, economic recovery programs, STIP, and Proposition 1 B bond programs. • Seek legislative flexibility for innovative financing and delivery methods. • Maintain ongoing efforts to educate commuters, businesses, and the public regarding the Commission's toll planning efforts and specific project development efforts currently underway. 22 • • Financial and Administration Policies Financial Planning Policies • The Commission shall budget no more than one percent (1 %) of Measure A sales tax revenues for administrative salaries and benefits. • Administrative program delivery costs will be budgeted at whatever is reasonable and necessary, but not to exceed four percent (4%) of Measure A sales tax revenues (inclusive of the one -percent salary limitation). • The Commission shall budget 100% of the annual required contribution related to the postretirement health care benefits. • The Commission shall utilize unexpended 1989 Measure A funds only for projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A. Sales tax revenues from the 2009 Measure A shall be expended only for projects and programs included in the 2009 Measure A. • Amounts will be budgeted by fiscal year for multi -year projects based on best available estimates with the understanding that, to the extent actuals vary from those estimates and the project is ongoing, adjustments will be made on an continual basis. • The fiscal capital budget should be consistent with the strategic plan and deviations appropriately noted, explained, and justified. • A balanced budget shall be adopted annually with operating and capital expenditures and other financing uses funded by identified revenues and other financing sources as well as available fund balances. Revenue Policies • Sales tax revenue projections will be revised semi-annually to ensure use of current and relevant data. Staff may adjust annual amounts to reflect the most current economic trends. • A strategic application of local funding sources will be used to maximize federal and state funding of projects. • Fiduciary responsibility regarding Western County TUMF revenues shall be exercised, and revenues will be allocated pursuant to Commission direction and the approved 2009 Measure A. Debt Management Policies • The Commission will maintain 2.0x debt ratio coverage on all senior debt. • Debt issuance will be for major capital projects including engineering, right of way, and construction. Debt secured by Measure A revenues may be used to advance projects included in the 2009 Measure A expenditure plan. • Operating requirements, if any, must be paid from current ongoing revenues and may not be financed. • Costs of issuance, including the standard underwriter's discount, will not exceed 23 two percent (2%). • The Commission may enter into interest rate swaps to better manage assets and liabilities and take advantage of market conditions to lower overall costs and reduce interest rate risk. • While it is the intent of the Commission to establish a cash debt reserve for long term bond issuance, surety bonds can be obtained when beneficial to the Commission. • All sales tax revenue debt must mature prior to the termination of 2009 Measure A on June 30, 2039. • The Commission will consider actions to lessen the restriction of the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap, which could include the possibility of a future ballot measure to increase the cap. Expenditure Accountability Policies • Established priorities for planning and programming of capital projects will be reviewed annually with the Commission. • Actual expenditures will be compared to the budget on at least a quarterly basis, and significant deviations will be appropriately noted, explained, and justified. Reserve Policies • The Commission will maintain program reserves in accordance with Measure A and TDA policies and guidelines. • The Commission will establish and maintain a transit operator's reserve of ten percent (10%) for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley. Additionally, a ten percent (10%) reserve will be established and maintained for each of the Western County transit operators (public bus and commuter rail). • The Commission shall prioritize the use LTF reserves for the purpose of transit operations. • The Commission shall require that transit operators draw down their current capital projects list prior to requesting the use of reserves to match capital grants and have no more than a three year backlog of capital projects. Cash Management and Investment Policies • Where possible, the Commission will encourage receipt of funds by wire transfer to its accounts. • Balances in the bank operating account will be maintained at the amount necessary to meet monthly expenditures. • Idle funds will be invested per the Commission's established investment policy emphasizing in order of priority: 1) safety, 2) liquidity, and 3) yield. • Cash disbursements to local jurisdictions and vendors/consultants will be completed in an expeditious and timely manner. 24 • • Auditing, Accounting, and Financial Reporting Policies • The Commission will replace its financial software system in order to better integrate project accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. • The Commission will issue a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) in accordance with the GASB Statement 34 financial reporting model. • An audit is to be conducted annually on the Commission's accounting books and records. As long as the Commission has outstanding bonds, an independent accounting firm must conduct the audit. • The Commission is responsible for ensuring that audits of Measure A and TDA funding recipients are completed and reviewed for compliance and other matters in a timely manner. • An internal audit program will be maintained to identify improvements in controls and procedures as well as best practices. Human Resources Management Policies • Commission staffing levels will be consistent with the intent of its enabling legislation, which envisioned a small, but effective staff. • Contract staff and consultants will be used to augment staff efforts as much as possible to support programs or workloads, which do not appear to be of a permanent nature. Information Technology Management Policies • Significant effort will be made to maintain efficient and cost-effective technology infrastructure by continuously upgrading network equipment and software to ensure quality performance, productivity, and connectivity among staff, other agencies, and the public. Network security will continue to be a top priority to maintain the integrity of the Commission's network and information. The following matrix illustrates the linkage of the Commission's overall policy goals described in this section to the individual departmental goals and objectives included in Section 7. ,Department Management Services Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs 8 Communications Finance _. Regional Programs Regional Issues Planning and Programming Rail Right of Way Management Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistarice Motorist Assistance Capital Project Development 8 Delivery Commission Policy Goals Goods System Enuronmental Economic Intennodalism Mobility Movement Efficiencies 25 Stewardship Detelopment 8 Accessibility Financial 8 Communications Administration I, I./040Z meA le3sid sanipafg0 Pue woo Aollod ;e6pne LZ la6pnq panoadda ui palaaodaooui . sanpefgo pua siao6 iquewpedap ui sail . spa 6u!woodn salainowv . uogoa qp sausinals2 . aunt pue Aen ui uoissnosrp la6pnq aoj. a6ais sias . sangoafg0 woo `sapiiod p6pne luawdoienea • 8Z. suoRequnwwoo Aouaba pue ongnd azpopd Amgissa000e pua wsHepouaaai.ui Onono saoiouo uogepodsua.q poddns . luawdoianap opouooa abaanooup dNspaannais iawauauoainua aalso.d saiouaiowe uaai.sAs panoadw! aansuD . wewenow spoo6 jo pedw! aul ssaappa pua ele6 iW . 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AGENDA ITEM 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager Aaron Hake, Government Relations Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file a report on the status of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) projects; 2) Approve allocating potential stimulus funding from the federal "Jobs Bill" to projects that are currently federalized and can meet deadline requirements for the first 50% of the funds, with first priority to State Transportation Improvement Program projects (STIP), second priority to state highway projects, and third priority to local road projects; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: ARRA Project Status The ARRA provided Riverside County with approximately $73 million in funding. To date, all of the five interchange projects and two Transportation Enhancement (TE) projects have been obligated. Of these seven projects, five have been awarded and the remaining two projects will be noticed for advertisement this month. The ARRA highway and TE projects are listed below: Project Original ARRA $(000's) Revised ARRA $ (000's) Status I-10/Bob Hope Drive/Ramon Road IC $ 34,912 $ 23,509 Awarded 11/2009 1-10/Palm Drive/Gene Autry Trail IC $ 5,080 $ 10,965 Awarded 1/2010 1-10/Indian Canyon Drive IC $ 0 $ 5,518 Advertised 3/2010 I-215/Clinton Keith Road IC $ 10,000 No change Awarded 11 /2009 SR-60/Valley Way IC $ 4,982 $ 3,868 Awarded 12/2009 74/215 IC $ 16,101 No change Advertised 2/2010 Palm Springs (TE), Gene Autry Trail landscaping $ 1,800 No change Awarded 9/2009 Riverside (TE), Alessandro Boulevard landscaping $ 400 $ 348 Awarded 10/2009 Note: The ARRA funds will continue to be revised as projects are awarded and closed out. Agenda Item 10 40 The first ARRA project awarded was the I-10/Bob Hope Drive/Ramon Road interchange. This project experienced a cost savings at time of award due to the low bid environment. Therefore, approximately $11 million was reprogrammed to the other 1-10 interchanges that were ready for construction, which were the 1-10/Palm Drive/Gene Autry Trail and 1-10/Indian Canyon Drive interchanges. ARRA savings that may result from low bids on 1-10/Indian Canyon Drive and 74/215 interchanges will be reprogrammed to other federalized projects that are ready for construction in their respective subregion. Proposed "Jobs Bilr/Stimulus_II As previously reported, the proposed "Jobs Bill" may contain funding for transportation similar to ARRA. At the state level, the Legislature may consider bills that would address a "Stimulus II" and determine the funding distribution within the state. Detailed language on such legislation is not yet available, but Commission staff is working with the Commission's lobbyist and through the Self -Help Counties Coalition in responding to the various proposals that will be put on the table. Caltrans headquarters surveyed the regions for potential projects that could meet a deadline of having a fully executed contract within 90 days of the funds being apportioned. This requirement could be applied to at least the first 50% of the funding allocated to the states. The discussion among Caltrans and the regions has led to a general concurrence that 90 days is overly optimistic, as the process for obligating funds (submitting the request for authorization to Caltrans and Federal Highway Administration) is about a 90-day process in itself. Caltrans and other regional agencies are recommending reconsideration of this 90-day deadline; however, Congress appears to be insistent on such a rapid deadline without any regulatory or administrative relief. If the deadline remains as proposed, Commission staff will review projects that could potentially meet this deadline. Potential projects include two projects that are programmed in the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and are scheduled to request an allocation at the February and April 2010 California Transportation Commission (CTC) meetings. These STIP allocation requests will likely be deferred due to lack of STIP allocation capacity for the remainder of the fiscal year. If a "Stimulus II" bill is passed, Commission staff will recommend approving funds for federal projects that can meet the 90-day contract deadline and establishing priority in the following order: approved ARRA projects, STIP projects, state highway projects, and local arterial projects. If the state as a whole meets the 90- day contract deadline, other projects may be considered for the remaining half of the stimulus funding and brought to the Commission for approval. At the time this staff report was written, the passage of a "Stimulus II" bill was very much in doubt. Agenda Item 10 41 • AGENDA ITEM 11 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager THROUGH: Cathy Bechtel, Project Development Director SUBJECT: 2010 Congestion Management Program TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve the 2010 Congestion Management Program (CMP); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The CMP was initially mandated under Proposition 111 in 1990. The intent of the CMP was to more directly link land use, transportation, and air quality decisions and programs. In 1996, legislation was passed to change the CMP from a state mandate to a voluntary program. However, federal planning rules require Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) to demonstrate consistency of county CMPs with the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). State statute also requires CMPs to be updated on a biennial basis. The federal Construction Management System (CMS) program has historically focused on traffic monitoring efforts to identify deficiencies and projects that could mitigate the deficiencies including Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)/Transportation System Management (TSM) projects, capital, and operational improvements for state highway and regional facilities. The state CMP looks at a broader approach in mitigating system deficiencies from capacity enhancement projects to Transportation Demand Management strategies to enhancing transit operations. Each Congestion Management Agency (CMA) throughout the state has tailored the CMPs to incorporate a combination of these program requirements to meet the respective needs for mitigating congestion and improving air quality. In Riverside County, the CMP effort primarily involves monitoring the CMP network on an annual basis to determine if there are deficient segments. A Level of Service (LOS) analysis is conducted and CMP segments operating at LOS "F" are reported as deficient. A deficiency plan is then required to be prepared that identifies mitigation measures including, but not limited to, capacity projects, Transportation Agenda Item 11 42 Demand Management (TDM)/Transportation System Management (TSM), and transit enhancements. If an improvement project is scheduled to be implemented on the deficient segment within approximately five to seven years, the project itself will serve as the deficiency plan. Other components of the CMP update involve reviewing and incorporating legislation and regulations at the state and federal levels, if any, that may pertain to the CMP. CMP LOS Analysis Results The CMP LOS analysis identified two CMP segments operating at LOS "F". The first segment is on Interstate 215 from the 15/215 interchange to Scott Road. The Commission is implementing a widening project along this segment, which is expected to fully mitigate the deficiency. Upon completion of the widening project the LOS will be re -analyzed to determine if a deficiency still exists. The second deficient segment is along 1-15 from Weirick Road (south of Corona) to the Riverside/San Bernardino County line. This segment could potentially be mitigated by the implementation of the State Route 91 Corridor improvement Project (CIP) and/or 1-15 CIP. The SR-91 CIP project scope includes improvements along 1-15 north and south of the 91 /15 interchange to improve the connections and overall circulation of the interchange. The SR-91 CIP is scheduled to be implemented in 2012, and the 1-15 CIP is currently scheduled to begin after the completion of the SR-91 CIP. Chapter 7, TDM/Air Quality Chapter 7 was updated to reflect current TDM efforts undertaken by the Commission and other local agencies. This chapter was expanded to include a discussion regarding TDM strategies and the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Compass Blueprint effort that several local agencies in Western and Eastern County participated in. Lastly, this chapter was updated to mention SB 375 requirements and its relationship to TDM efforts currently underway in Riverside County: Staff has presented the draft 2010 CMP to the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and at its February 2010 meeting, the TAC recommended approval of the 2010 CMP. Deficiency plans are not being recommended at this time due to the fact that the projects scheduled to be constructed along the deficient segments are likely to mitigate the deficiencies; however, staff will continue to monitor these segments. Upon the Commission's approval of the 2010 CMP, staff will submit the document to SCAG. Attachment: 2010 CMP Agenda Item 11 • 43 • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program March 10, 2010 Prepared For: *deCounly ransportalion Commission Riverside County Transportation Commission County Regional Complex 4080 Lemon Street, 3ro Floor Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Ph: (951) 787-7141 Fax: (951) 787-7920 Prepared By: (yRPA r Teehnoiugicn, �r _ VRPA Technologies, Inc. 4630 W. Jennifer, Suite 105 Fresno, CA 93722 Ph: (559) 271-1200 Fax: (559) 271-1269 44 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER DESCRIPTION PAGE Executive Summary ES-1 1 Designation of the Congestion Management Agency 1-1 2 Designation of the CMP System of Highways and 2-1 Roadways 3 Transportation Modeling 3-1 4 Multimodal System Performance Standards 4-1 5 Enhanced Transportation System Management 5-1 Program 6 LOS Deficiency Plans 6-1 7 Transportation Demand Management/ 7-1 Air Quality 8 Capital Improvement Program 8-1 9 CMP Conformance and Monitoring 9-1 10 CMP Development and Implementation/ 10-1 Update Process Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 46 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program LIST OF EXHIBITS EXHIBIT DESCRIPTION PAGE 2-1 Riverside CMP System 2-2 4-1 Level of Service on CMP System 4-3 5-1 Smart Call Box (SCB) Implementation Sites 5-2 5-2 Transportation Management Center 5-5 (TMC) Implementation Sites LIST OF TABLES TABLE DESCRIPTION PAGE 2-1 System of Highways & Roadways 2-5 4-1 Exempt Facilities in 2007 4-6 4-2 Highway Capacity Manual -Based LOS Methodology 4-7 Applications 4-3 Transit System Performance Indicators 4-10 5-1 Floating Car Run Deficiency Analysis 5-7 9-1 CMP Updates Since Inception 9-4 Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. ii 47 MO Riverside County Congestion Management Program EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Congestion Management Program (CMP) was first established in 1990 under Proposition 111. Proposition 111 established a process for each metropolitan county in California to designate a Congestion Management Agency (CMA) that would be responsible for development and implementation of the CMP within county boundaries. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) was designated as the CMA in 1990, and therefore, prepares the CMP updates in consultation with the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), which consists of local agencies, the County of Riverside, transit agencies, and subregional agencies. CMP legislation is provided in Appendix 1. The intent of the CMP is to more directly link land use, transportation, and air quality, thereby prompting reasonable growth management programs that will effectively utilize new transportation funds, alleviate traffic congestion and related impacts, and improve air quality. A number of counties within California have developed a CMP with varying methods and strategies to meet the intent of the CMP legislation. The Riverside County CMP was significantly modified in 1997 to focus on federal Congestion Management System (CMS) requirements as well as incorporate elements of the State CMP requirements. The 1997 CMP also focused on development of an Enhanced Traffic Monitoring System in which real-time traffic count data can be accessed by RCTC to evaluate the condition of the CMS, as well as meet other monitoring requirements at the state and federal levels. This monitoring effort was completed in 2004, which consisted of installing Smart Call Boxes (traffic counters in Call Box equipment) and traffic counters at Caltrans' Traffic Management Center (TMC) sites along the state highway system. Monitoring of the CMP system on local arterials will continue to occur through the Coachella Valley Association of Governments' (CVAG) monitoring program and through local agency monitoring efforts in Western Riverside County. RCTC's adopted minimum Level of Service (LOS) threshold is LOS "E". Therefore, when a CMP street or highway segment falls to "F", a deficiency plan must be required. Preparation of a deficiency plan will be the responsibility of the local agency where the deficiency is located. Other agencies identified as contributors to the deficiency will also be required to coordinate with the development of the plan. The plan must contain mitigation measures, including consideration of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and transit alternatives, and a schedule for mitigating the deficiency. To insure that the CMP is appropriately monitored to reduce the occurrence of LOS deficiencies, it is the responsibility of local agencies, when reviewing and approving development proposals, to consider the traffic impacts on the CMP System. When a deficiency is identified as part of the CMP Update LOS evaluation process, further Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. ES-1 49 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program detailed analysis of LOS must be conducted to determine whether an actual deficiency has occurred. The LOS analysis conducted as part of the CMP Update process is only considered to be a "screening" level analysis, therefore additional, more detailed assessment of a potential deficiency would be required before a deficiency is formally identified. Coordination with the affected local jurisdiction(s) will be made to insure that appropriate data, geometrics, counts and other related information is applied to calculate LOS. During preparation of the 2009 CMP, deficiencies were found on the CMP System based upon this year's monitoring effort. These segments will continue to be monitored to determine if the deficiencies reflect temporary or permanent conditions. If it is determined that deficiencies are permanent and not related to construction activities on the segment or anywhere else that could impact the segment or any other special circumstances a deficiency plan will be required to address the deficiency. OTHER PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS This document is prepared to address each elements the State CMP legislation and federal CMS requirements. Below is a summary of each chapter highlighting the Riverside County CMP's approach in meeting the state CMP and federal CMS requirements. Chapter 1 - Designation of the CMP Lead Agency: • The County Board of Supervisors, and a majority of cities representing a majority of population in the incorporated area, must designate by resolution, a public agency to prepare and adopt the Congestion Management Program. The Riverside County Transportation Commission was designated as the CMA for Riverside County on June 11, 1990. The County Board of Supervisors and a majority of the cities representing a majority of the population supported the designation. Chapter 2 - Designation of the System of Highways and Roadways: • The CMA must designate a system of highways and roadways to include, at a minimum, all state highways and principal arterials. RCTC has designated, based upon a set of optional criteria referenced in Chapter 2, a system of Highways and Principal Arterials. All State highways within Riverside County have been included in accordance with CMP statutes, and a set of Principal Arterials has been identified (reference Exhibit 2-1 and Table 2-1). Prepared for Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. ES-2 50 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Chapter 3 - Transportation Modeling: ♦ The CMA is to provide a uniform database of traffic impacts `for use in a countywide transportation computer model." For purposes of this Program, the Commission has recognized use of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) transportation model, the Coachella Valley Area Transportation System (CVATS) sub -regional transportation model, the Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RIVTAM) Final Report (May 2009), and local agency models to analyze traffic impacts associated with development proposals or land use plans. Chapter 4 - Multimodal System Performance Standards: ♦ AB 1963 identifies requirements in CMP legislation including development of multimodal system performance standards focusing on street and highway level of service and transit standards. This Chapter therefore incorporates minimum standards for both these important forms of transportation. CMP Street and Highway Standards The methodology for measuring LOS must be that contained in Circular 212 or the most recent version of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM); and traffic standards must be set no lower than LOS "E" for any segment or intersection on the CMP system, unless the current LOS is lower (i.e., "F"). For purposes of this CMP, LOS analysis for intersections and segments along the CMP System of Highways and Roadways, under current or existing conditions, is required to be developed using HCM-based methods. Considering the transportation financing program in Riverside County established through Measure A, there are no advantages to set a higher minimum LOS standard than required by CMP legislation, LOS "E". As a result, the minimum LOS standard for intersections and segments along the CMP System of Highways and Roadways shall be "E" unless the intersection or segment had a lower LOS (LOS "F") in 1991 (reference Table 4-1 and Exhibit 4-1). Such facilities are exempt from CMP deficiency plan requirements. Public Transit/Altematiye Mass Transit System Standards Transit standards must be established for service frequency (i.e., headways), routing, and coordination among multiple transit agencies operating within the CMP jurisdiction. To meet the requirements of the Statutes, the performance measures outlined in the Short Range Transit Plans prepared by transit agencies in Riverside County are included in this chapter. in 2005, RCTC approved a Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the county's eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. The PIP identifies Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. ES-3 51 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program performance targets in which transit operators will strive to meet in developing its SRTP service and financial plan. Chapter 5 — Enhanced Transportation System Management Program: • The CMP must include a program to analyze the impact of land use decisions by jurisdictions on the regional transportation system, including an estimate of costs to mitigate those impacts. This element describes the traffic data collection process to assess land use decision impacts on the Congestion Management System. Under the program, RCTC, CVAG and Caltrans would be the agencies in Riverside Couhty responsible for the traffic count data collection process. The count data can also be applied to comply with State and federal Congestion Management Plan/Congestion Management System/Transportation Management System (CMP/CMS/TMS) data collection requirements. CVAG currently has a Traffic Monitoring Program in place that addresses CMP System Monitoring requirements in the Coachella Valley. RCTC has implemented the Enhanced Traffic Monitoring Program using Smart Call Box (SCB) and Caltrans' Traffic Management Center (TMC) equipment at selected sites along the State Highway system in Riverside County. This system has resulted in significant increases in the number and location of traffic counts along the CMP System. Chapter 6 - LOS Deficiency Plans: • AB 471 and AB 1791 provide for the development of deficiency plans. The bills state that "a city or county may designate individual segments or intersections as deficient when they do not meet the established level of service standards, if prior to the designation at a noticed public hearing, the city or county has adopted a deficiency plan". Deficient segments or intersections will be identified through the biennial traffic monitoring process. When a deficiency is identified as part of the CMP Update LOS evaluation process, further detailed analysis of LOS shall be conducted to determine whether an actual deficiency has occurred. The LOS analysis conducted as part of the CMP Update process is only considered to be a "screening" level analysis, therefore additional, more detailed assessment of a potential deficiency would be required before a deficiency is formally identified. Coordination with the affected local jurisdiction(s) will be made to insure that appropriate data, geometrics, counts and other related information is applied to calculate LOS. The local agency where the deficiency is located will be responsible for the preparation of the deficiency plan. RCTC will prepare deficiency plans on the State Highway System when deficiencies are identified and will coordinate the development of the deficiency plan with affected local jurisdictions. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. ES-4 52 201 D Riverside County Congestion Management Program Chapter 7 - Transportation Demand Management (TDM)/Air Quality: • The CMP must include alternatives to single occupant auto use, such as transit, and van and carpooling; and must promote strategies to manage overall travel demand, such as a jobs/housing balance, flextime, telecommuting and parking strategies. Local agencies must also adopt a transportation demand management (TDM) ordinance to comply with CMP statutes. In 1991, all local agencies adopted TDM ordinances. In 1996, the State changed the CMP from a mandatory program to a voluntary program; therefore, RCTC has not required agencies to update their respective TDM ordinances. RCTC has facilitated the implementation of a number of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) projects independently through the Measure "A" Commuter Assistance Programs. RCTC has also facilitated implementation of a number of TDM projects in cooperation with Caftans and local agencies in Riverside County and in adjoining counties to achieve TDM objectives such as rideshare services, commuter rail services and development of rail stations, park-n-ride lots, rail and feeder services, motorist aid services, and bus and specialized transit services. Taken together, the individual programs, projects, and TDM ordinances that continue to be implemented by local agencies constitute a broad base effort to reduce reliance on the single occupant vehicle and address CMP objectives. Chapter 8 - Capital improvement Program (C1P): • The CIP is a 7-year program; projects in the CIP may be incorporated into the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) for the programming of Flexible Congestion Relief (FCR) and Urban and Commuter Rail funds; CIP Projects must maintain or improve performance of the multi -modal system; and projects must conform to transportation -related emission air quality mitigation measures. To comply with the statutes, the 2009 CIP incorporates all CMP System projects listed in the most recent TIP including STIP, Measure "A", Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF), and other federally funded projects. To streamline this process, CIP requirements shall be the same as, and accomplished through the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) development. Chapter 9 - CMP Conformance and Monitoring Process: • RCTC must make a determination that its member cities and the county are conforming to the CMP, including consistency with traffic LOS and transit performance standards and implementation of a program to monitor and evaluate the performance of the transportation system.. SCAG must also find the CMP consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan and certify that the CMP meets federal CMS requirements. The specific requirements of Conformance and Monitoring Process are described in Chapter 9. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. ES-5 53 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Chapter 10 - CMP Development and implementation Update Process: • This chapter focuses on the procedural, administrative, and coordination activities related to CMP development, adoption, and update in accordance with CMP legislation. The CMP includes a process that addresses each of the activities identified above including CMP development, adoption, and update. Environmental Assessment — The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) identifies the CMP as an exempt project. As a result, compliance with CEQA requirements is no longer necessary. r Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. ES-6 54 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 1 DESIGNATION OF THE CONGESTION MANAGEMENT AGENCY STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS According to CMP legislation (AB 471, AB 1791, AB 1963, and AB 2419), the Riverside County Board of Supervisors and a majority of cities representing a majority of the population in the incorporated area, must designate by resolution, a public agency to prepare and adopt a Congestion Management Program (CMP). The Congestion Management Agency (CMA) has the authority to monitor compliance with the adopted program. An amendment to the Government Code requires the CMA to update and adopt the CMP every two years (biennially) consistent with development of the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP). A copy of AB 2419 is provided as Appendix 1. A key feature of AB 471 is the requirement that every urbanized county with a population of 50,000 or more must prepare and adopt a comprehensive CMP. The CMP represents a directive for local governments to measure and mitigate the impact of land use decisions on streets, highways, and regional transportation systems. In 1996, the State of California amended the CMP legislation to change the requirement from mandatory to voluntary. However, federal Metropolitan Planning provisions require Metropolitan Planning Organization's (MPO) serving a transportation management area (TMA) (i.e. area with a population over 200,000) to include a Congestion Management System (CMS) component as part of their transportation planning process. Each of the six counties in the Southern California Association of Governments (SLAG) region has adopted and implemented a CMP. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) jointly determine if the MPO's planning process meets the requirements of 23 U.S.C. 134 among other provisions. In the event that the FHWA/FTA determines that the planning process in a TMA does not substantially meet the requirements and do not certify the process, they may withhold federal project and funding approvals. RCTC DESIGNATED AS THE CMA On June 11, 1990, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) was designated as the CMA for Riverside County by resolution from member agencies. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) and the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) also supported the designation. It is the Commission's intent to continue working closely with WRCOG, CVAG, the cities and the County, toward development and implementation of an effective CMP. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program The Commission will continue to develop and biennially update the CMP to coincide with the development of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP) in cooperation with local governments, Air Quality Management Districts, and subregional planning agencies (WRCOG and CVAG). The CMP must also be submitted to the MPO, which for Riverside County is the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). SCAG is responsible for determining consistency of each CMP within the SCAG region with the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and air quality management plans. The Riverside County Congestion Management Program combines the requirements of the State's CMP and the federal CMS with a greater emphasis on the CMS, resulting in an enhanced transportation monitoring system. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies g/ • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 2 DESIGNATION OF THE CMP SYSTEM OF HIGHWAYS AND ROADWAYS STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(a), referenced in AB 1963, requires development of a Congestion Management Program (CMP) to establish traffic level of service (LOS) standards for a system of highways and roadways designated by RCTC as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA). This system must include, at a minimum, all state highways and principal arterials, both new and existing facilities. Once designated, components of the system cannot be removed. Designated System of Highways and Principal Arterials: ♦ All State Highway facilities in Riverside County. Consideration may be given to the following conditions when designating Principal Arterials: ✓ Routes identified on Calimns' "Functional Classification System" maps as "Principal Arterials"; ✓ Designated expressways; and ✓ Facilities linking cities/communities (interregional facilities), and major activity centers (shopping malls, activity centers, major industrial/business parks, stadiums, etc). 2010 CMP SYSTEM UPDATE PROCESS An update to the CMP System considers the criteria identified above, including arterial facilities added to the Federal Functional Classification System. Local agencies may nominate arterials for inclusion on the CMP System at any time. Nominated arterials will be reviewed by the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) for approval and forwarded to the RCTC Board for final approval. Exhibit 2-1 provides a graphic display of the CMP System of Highways and Roadways in Riverside County. Based upon review of the revised Functional Classification System and the considerations listed above, no additional facilities were designated as principal arterials during the 2010 CMP update process. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies gg 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program a_ U .2 Rincipal Arterials on OAP Site m Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program 6chibit 2-1 (cont). w z Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies �r3 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Exhibit 2-1 (cont). z Fivefold CMP9/dem (Coachella Malley) RincOW Arterials on CMPS3em Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE 2-1 CMP SYSTEM OF HIGHWAYS AND ROADWAYS ♦ State Highways: Facility Name 1. 1-10 2. 1-15 3. 1-215 4. US 95 5. SR 60 6. SR 62 7. SR 71 8. SR 74 9. SR 78 10. SR 79 11. SR 86 12. SR 91 13. SR 111 / Highway 111 14_ SR 177 15. SR 195 16. SR 243 17. SR 371 Limits San Bernardino Co. Line to the Arizona State Line San Bemardino Co. Line to the San Diego Co. Line San Bernardino Co. Line to 1-15 San Bernardino Co. Line to 1-10 San Bemardino Co. Line to I-10 San Bernardino Co. Line to 1-10 San Bernardino Co. Line to SR 91 Orange Co. Line to SR 111 Imperial Co. Line to 1-10 I-10 to San Diego Co. Line SR 111 to Imperial Co. Line Orange Co. Line to 1-215 1-10 to Imperial Co. Line SR 62 to 1-10 SR 86 to SR 111 1-10 to SR 74 SR79toSR74 ♦ Principal Arterials - Western Riverside County: Facility Name 1. Alessandro Blvd. 2. Agua Mansa Rd. 3. Arlington Blvd. 4. Armstrong Rd.Nalley Way 5. Country Village Rd. 6. La Sierra Ave. 7. Limonite Ave. 8. Magnolia Ave. 9. Main St./First St. 10. Market St/Rubidoux Blvd. 11. Seventh and University 12. Sierra Ave. 13. Etiwanda Ave. 14. Van Buren Blvd. Limits Intersection of Central, Arlington & Chicago to 1-215 San Bernardino County Line to Market St. California to Intersection of Central, Alessandro & Chicago Sierra Ave. to SR 60 San Bernardino County Line to SR 60 Arlington Blvd. to SR 91 San Bemardino County Line to Mission Blvd. SR 91 to Market St. San Bernardino County Line to Market St. San Bernardino County Line to Magnolia Ave. Market to SR 91 San Bernardino County Line to Valley Way/Armstrong Rd. Limonite Ave. - San Bernardino County Line San Bernardino County Line to 1-215 ♦ Principal Arterials - Coachella Valley: Facility Name 1. Monterey Ave. 2. Ramon Rd. Limits SR 111 to 1-10 SR 111 to 1-10 " SR 111 in Riverside County is a designated State Route (SR) between 1-10 and Golf Club Drive and between SR 74 and the Imperial County Line. That section between Golf Club Drive and SR 74 was relinquished to adjacent jurisdictions. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies gra 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 3 TRANSPORTATION MODELING STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089.3 (c) of the Government Code requires that RCTC, as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA), in consultation with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), cities and the County, develop a uniform database on traffic impacts for use in a countywide transportation model. Further, RCTC, in consultation with SCAG, must approve transportation computer models that will be used by local jurisdictions and the county to determine the quantitative impacts of development on the circulation system. Local transportation models shall be consistent with the databases used by SCAG RCTC TRANSPORTATION MODELING Transportation computer models applied in Riverside County include the Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RIVTAM) and the SCAG Regional Transportation Model. The newly developed RIVTAM model was a multi -agency effort to develop a more detailed roadway network than the SCAG Regional Model. RIVTAM added 570 centerline miles of roadways to the network and incorporates all facilities in the Riverside County General Plan classified as Secondary and above. In addition, some Collectors were included, as necessary, to insure that all Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs) are connected to the network of General Plan roadways. A Memorandum of Understanding has been approved by the Riverside County Transportation Department (RCTD), CVAG, WRCOG, and RCTC to establish roles and responsibilities for updating and maintaining the model including use of the model by the local agencies. The RCTD serves as the lead agency for RIVTAM. During 2008, SCAG prepared an update to the SCAG models based upon new growth forecasts developed for the Year 2035. The RIVTAM model is based on the SCAG 2008 model with refinements to reflect local conditions within Riverside County. Local transportation models are also developed by local agencies to determine impacts on their transportation system. TRANSPORTATION MODEL IMPROVEMENTS The SCAG model was last revised/updated (calibrated/validated) in 2008 and has been available for use by local agencies in reviewing regionally significant development projects, or projects that generate greater than 500 peak hour trips through the Intergovernmental Review (IGR) process. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 3-1 65 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program In addition, SCAG developed a regionwide demographic database system to collect accurate data for development of the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). The RTP is the region's long range transportation plan that considers land use development patterns, transportation systems, population and housing needs to develop policies and strategies that will accommodate future growth and demand. Locally, WRCOG, CVAG, and the County of Riverside have taken lead roles in the development of a Geographic Information System (GIS) to monitor growth in the County so that socioeconomic and land use databases can be easily developed and maintained. SCAG has developed model consistency guidelines to assist public agencies and traffic engineering professionals with the development of local models that are consistent with the SCAG regional transportation model. The objective of these guidelines is to comply with CMP consistency requirements, improve communications between affected agencies to simplify the exchange of data, and improve databases and modeling results at both the local and regional level. A copy of the current Consistency Guidelines for Transportation Modeling - Riverside and San Bernardino Counties is available at RCTC or at the SCAG Inland Empire Office in Riverside. MODELING FOR CMP PURPOSES During implementation of the Riverside County CMP, transportation computer models are used for several purposes, including: ♦ Determining and monitoring traffic levels of service (LOS) for the current and future years; • Analyzing the impacts of land use decisions resulting from the IGR or CEQA processes and when an LOS deficiency occurs along the CMP System; and ♦ Evaluating and prioritizing transportation improvement projects, such as capital projects, transit projects, Transportation Systems Management (TSM) projects, Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies, and other programs that improve the transportation system and air quality. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPR Technologies 3-2 66 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 4 MULTIMODAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(b)(2) of the Govemment Code states that the Congestion Management Program (CMP) must contain a performance element that includes performance measures to evaluate current and future multimodal system performance for the movement of people and goods. At a minimum, the performance measures must incorporate highway and roadway system performance and measures established for the frequency and routing of public transit, and for the coordination of transit service provided by separate operators. The performance measures must also support mobility, air quality, land use, and economic objectives, and must be used in the development of the Riverside County Capital Improvement Program (CIP) required pursuant to paragraph (5), deficiency plans required pursuant to Section 65089.4, and the land use analysis program required pursuant to paragraph (4) of the Government Code. According to AB 471 and AB 1791, traffic level of service (LOS) must be measured by: a) Circular 212; b) the most recent version of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM); or c) by an alternative uniform methodology adopted by RCTC as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA), which the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) determines is consistent with the HCM. In no case can the standards established be below LOS "E" or the current level, whichever is farthest from LOS "A". RCTC PERFORMANCE STANDARDS This Chapter describes the multimodal system performance standards for Riverside County in accordance with CMP legislation. Therefore, standards are presented in this Chapter for the CMP System and for the Public Transit/Alternative Mass Transit System. CMP System of Streets and Highways ♦ Established Minimum Level of Service With the intent of the legislation in mind, the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) CMP Subcommittee approved a "two -tiered" approach to establish the minimum LOS standard. Tier 1 involves the 'locally established minimum traffic LOS - or- ceiling,"while Tier 2 involves the CMP minimum LOS standard - or - "floor." Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies ea 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Most local agencies in Riverside County and Caltrans have adopted LOS standards of "C" or "D" (representing the "ceiling" in Tier 2) in an effort to maintain a desired LOS for the local circulation system. To address CMP legislative requirements, and establish a minimum LOS along the regional system of roadways and highways within the County (representing the "floor" in Tier 2), RCTC approved a minimum traffic LOS standard of "E." ♦ Exempt Facilities Table 4-1 and Exhibit 4-1 identify facilities (roadway segments or intersections) along the CMP System of Highways and Roadways that had a LOS of "F" in 1991. As a result, these facilities continue to be "exempt" from CMP requirements in accordance with CMP Statutes. ♦ Methodology to Determine Level of Service RCTC determined that the traffic LOS method that incorporated a "delay" analysis was the most applicable for CMP purposes. Consideration of delay through HCM-based software programs provided a closer approximation of LOS than under the Circular 212 or similar methodologies. For purposes of this Program, LOS analysis for intersections and segments along the CMP System of Highways and Roadways (under current or existing conditions), should be developed or established using the following HCM-based methods in the order presented: 1. Segment (freeway and principal arterial) floating car runs or stopped delay LOS analysis at intersections; 2. Segment and intersection LOS analysis using HCM; and 3. Segment analysis using the Modified HCM LOS Tables (or revised Florida LOS Tables). Staff continues to recommend the use of HCM methods through applicable software packages applied to various types of facilities (reference Table 4-2 -- LOS Methodology Applications). Appropriate defaults to be applied by local agencies in their analysis of LOS are referenced in Appendix 2. HCM-based methodologies applied to calculate LOS for CMP purposes will be the responsibility of local agencies as new development or land use plan revisions/updates (reflective of specific development proposals) are considered. This process shall be consistent with the Enhanced Transportation System Management Program described in Chapter 5. Prepared for. 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Q. • • • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE 4-1 EXEMPT FACILITIES IN 2009 STATE HIGHWAYS ON STATE ROUTE 60: RIVERSIDE COUNTY LINE TO JCT 1-15 VALLEY WAY TO JCT SR 60/SR 91/1-215 JCT SR 60 EAST TO PERRIS BOULEVARD ON STATE ROUTE 71' SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LINE TO JCT SR 91 ON STATE ROUTE 74: GRAND AVENUE TO LAKESHORE DRIVE LAKESHORE TO 1-15 SANDERSON AVENUE TO CORNELL STREET CORNELL STREET TO HEMET AVENUE ON STATE ROUTE 91: RIVERSIDE COUNTY LINE TO JCT SR 71 JCT SR 71 TO MAPLE STREET MAPLE STREET TO JCT 1-15 JCT 1-15 TO 0.6 MILE WEST OF MCKINLEY 0.6 MILE WEST OF MCKINLEY TO MAGNOLIA AVENUE MAGNOLIA AVENUE TO 14TH STREET 14TH STREET TO JCT SR 60/SR 91/1-215 ON 1-215: EAST JCT SR 60 TO JCT SR 60/SR 91/1-215 JCT SR 60/SR 91/1-215 TO SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY LINE ON STATE ROUTE 111: DISTRICT 11 BOUNDARY TO JCT SR 74 JCT SR 74 TO GENE AUTRY TRAIL 'RINCIPAL ARTERIALS - WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON LA SIERRA AVENUE: ARLINGTON TO GRAMERCY ON VAN BUREN BOULEVARD: NORTHERLY CITY LIMIT TO JURUPA JURUPA TO CENTRAL CENTRAL TO ARLINGTON Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE 4-2 HIGHWAY CAPACITY MANUAL BASED - LEVEL OF SERVICE METHODOLOGY APPLICATIONS p+q 4 V = to 2 V fto, W F Q O 2 W cO D y � 1'¢ Z ce 0 p 2 .J 00 2rzi 2 BASE YEAR *1 URBAN Signalized Intersections x x x Unsignalized Intersections - 4-Way Stop Controls *4 Unsignalized Intersections - 2-Way Stop Controls *4 x Links, Expressways, & Arterials x x x Freewa Links, Ram* , & Weavin* Sections RURAL Signalized Intersections x x x x x x Unsignalized Intersections - 4-Way Stop Controls *4 Unsignalized Intersections - 2-Way Stop Controls *4 x Links, Expressways, & Arterials x x x Freewa Links, Rams, & Weaving Sections FUTURE YEAR *2 URBAN x x x Signalized Intersections x x x - Unsignalized Intersections - 4-Way Stop Controls *4 Unsignalized Intersections - 2-Way Stop Controls *4 x Links, Expressways, & Arterials x x Freewa Links, Rams, & Weavin* Sections 'URAL Signalized Intersections x x x x x Unsignalized Intersections - 4-Way Stop Controls *4 Unsignalized Intersections - 2-Way Stop Controls *4 x Links, Expressways, & Arterials x x Freeway Links, Ramps, & Weaving Sections x x *1 - Current year traffic conditions '2 - Future year (2030) traffic conditions *3 - Used as an example only, other HCM compatible software will also be accepted. *4 - Results of analysis should be evaluated considering actual intersection conditions or 4-or 2-way stop or signal warrants. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies d4 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program The initial LOS analysis conducted as part of the CMP Update process is considered to be a "screening" level analysis. A more detailed assessment is conducted on key critical segments. If the analysis results in LOS deficiencies, the LOS analysis would continue on a quarterly basis to determine the average peak hour LOS and determine if the LOS deficiencies are due to temporary or permanent conditions. Coordination with the affected local agency(s) also will be made to insure that appropriate data, geometries, counts and other related information is applied to calculate LOS. 2009 Level of Service (LOS) Results ✓ Coachella Valley The Coachella Valley Associated Governments (CVAG) has implemented a valleywide traffic monitoring program over the past eight (8) years. Information provided by CVAG indicated that there are no deficiencies in the Coachella Valley for 2009. ✓ Western Riverside County Based on level of service calculations along the CMP system in Western Riverside County using Caltrans and local agency counts, there were no deficiencies along local arterials included on CMP System in Western Riverside County for 2009. The 2007 CMP identified a deficiency along Alessandro between SR 91 and 1-215. It was noted that the deficiency was likely the result of the 1-215 corridor improvement project from the 60/91/215 interchange to the 60/215 East Junction. Given that the deficiency along Alessandro is no longer occurring, it has been concluded that the prior deficiency was indeed a result of traffic avoiding the construction activity along the 1-215 corridor. ✓ State Highways Traffic count information was collected from the Caltrans 2008 Traffic Monitoring Report and from existing Smart Call Boxes located along the State Highway system. In addition, peak hour traffic counts were taken by VRPA Technologies in late summer and early fail 2009, the data was evaluated by VRPA Technologies using HCM-based LOS tables. Following review of the initial screening results by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), floating car runs were performed along six major State Highway segments. Results of this process are provided in Chapter 5 and indicate that there are two deficient segments operating at "LOS" F. The first segment is on 1-215 (from 1-15 to Scott Rd). RCTC is the lead agency of a widening project along this segment, which will begin construction next year. It is likely that the LOS will be improved to LOS "E" or better once construction of the 1-215 is completed. Upon completion of the widening project the LOS will be re- analyzed to verify that the project mitigated the deficiency. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies a� 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program The second segment operating at LOS "F" is on 1-15 (from Weirick Road to East Jurupa St). This deficiency will likely be improved to LOS "E" or better once construction of the 1-15 Corridor Improvement Project (CIP) is initiated and completed. Additionally, the SR 91 Corridor Improvement Project (CIP) will also have a significant impact on the 1-15 as the project extends north and south of the I-15/SR-91 interchange along 1-15 to improve the interchange connections and overall circulation in the vicinity of the SR-91/I-15 interchange. The SR-91 CIP is scheduled to be implemented in 2014. In addition to those segments operating at LOS "F", it will be important to also closely monitor LOS "E" segments on a quarterly basis. Once a LOS "E" segment falls to LOS "F" during the quarterly monitoring process, the segment will be further analyzed as to what the cause may be. If the LOS is at "F" for more than one (1) year with no extenuating circumstances causing the deficiency (e.g., construction, special event, etc), the local agency and/or ROTC will be required to prepare a deficiency plan in accordance to Chapter 6. Public Transit/Altemative Mass Transit Standards ♦ Statutory Requirements Section 65089.(b)(2) of the Government Code specifically requires development of standards established for the frequency and routing of public transit, and for the coordination of transit service provided by separate operators. Public Transit and Alternative Mass Transit Facility Standards RCTC, as the Regional Transportation Planning Agency, is responsible for planning and coordinating all public mass transit services within the jurisdiction of the Commission and between the jurisdiction of other county commissions or transit operators. On an annual basis, transit operators prepare a Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), which is a three-year document detailing the operating and capital costs that are planned for transit services. Each operator adopts such a plan and then provides quarterly data to RCTC regarding performance. Once the SRTPs are approved by RCTC, transit operators are charged with the responsibility for providing the service levels and purchasing the capital equipment identified in year -one of the SRTP. Once approved by RCTC, the SRTPs must be amended if an operator wants to deviate from the original plan. The Commission encourages all operators to coordinate public transportation services including routes, fare structure and transfer agreements as the overall goal is the improvement of public transportation services to the general public. To assist with the coordination efforts, quarterly meetings are held with the public transit operators to ensure that efficient, effective transportation services are provided. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Public Utilities Code Section 99244 requires the Commission to annually identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators through the SRTP process. This process requires the transit operators to address recommendations made through the triennial performance audit. In 2005, the Commission reaffirmed its commitment to a Productivity Improvement Program (PIP), which was originally adopted in 1998 as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the county's eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. Table 4-3 details the performance targets as identified in the PIP that transit operators will strive to meet in developing its SRTP service and financial plan: TABLE 4-3 TRANSIT SYSTEM PERF Performance Indicator Method for Establishing Performance Targets 1) Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Increases no more than CPI 2) Fare Box Recovery Ratio Per PUC requirements and RCTC policy 3) Subsidy per Passenger +/- 15% variance 4) Subsidy per Passenger Mile +/- 15% variance 5) Subsidy per Revenue Hour +/- 15%variance 6) Subsidy per Revenue Mile +/- 15% variance 7) Passengers per Revenue Hour +/- 15% variance 8) Passengers per Revenue Mile +/- 15% variance 9) Ridership growth 2% minimum growth annually (Applies to Commuter Rail) As an alternative mode to the single -occupant vehicle, mass transit services (commuter rail services) should be considered during the assessment of local development proposals that impact the Congestion Management System and during the development of deficiency plans by local agencies. Further, future rail passenger services should be considered as appropriate mitigation measures to offset potential deficiencies. If feasible, future transit and passenger rail facility systems should be described as potential services that could reduce vehicle trips and relieve congestion at or above the minimum LOS standard. RCTC CONFORMANCE AND MONITORING PROCESS It is the local agency's responsibility to ensure implementation of development project mitigation measures identified by the project proponent. RCTC and local agencies will monitor the implementation of deficiency plans that include transit and roadway improvements intended to improve traffic LOS. If through the biennial traffic monitoring process, the LOS along a deficient arterial or highway facility improves to LOS "E" or better, mitigation measures that have not been implemented as specified in the deficiency plan, would no longer be required for CMP compliance purposes. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 5 ENHANCED TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT PROGRAM STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089 (b)(4) of the Government Code requires that RCTC develop a program to analyze the impacts of land use decisions made by local jurisdictions on regional transportation systems, including an estimate of the costs associated with mitigating those impacts. In no case must the program outlined in this Chapter include an estimate of the costs of mitigating the impacts of interregional travel, but it must provide credit for local public and private contributions to improvements on regional transportation systems. In the case of toll road facilities, credit must only be allowed for local public and private contributions, which are unreimbursed from toll revenues or other state or federal sources. RCTC must calculate the amount of the credit to be provided. RCTC ENHANCED TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT PROGRAM The RCTC CMP Enhanced Transportation System Management Program was designed to meet the federal Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) and Congestion Management System/Traffic Management System (CMSfTMS) requirements, as well as to monitor the CMP System of Highways and Roadways. A review of Federal CMS/TMS requirements is provided in Appendix 3. The intent of the Enhanced Transportation System Management Program is to effectively identify those facilities that have congestion problems, track the degree of congestion, and apply evaluation criteria to the system so that federal and State funds are targeted or programmed to relieve the congestion. The Enhanced Transportation System Management Program utilizes 'loop or pavement sensors" currently installed along the State Highway system at call boxes and TMC sites. Traffic counters were installed at these sites allowing RCTC and Caltrans to retrieve_ count data. Future plans are to retrieve speed, vehicle classification, and turning movement data. The Enhanced Transportation System Management Program will improve traffic monitoring for the CMP and other planning or technical purposes. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 5-1 79 VMS GI LW 5 3- Pik ..0 (Pogolsul) sells .xo9 u Jim iunop maN i 6 (Pallelsul) seen xo8 lleo vein maN 0 SIM 0,d :o6d 6664 4 L661 wog; seAB xog Be0 pews Bullslxg AlgellelSul 10N) sell§ ..xo9 uoPeis mm0 meN ®(PelPRsul 10N) MIS xo8 imp Yews meN ID 4N3031 V L-S 11131HX3 3aISN3A121 N213183M NI S311S NOIIVIN31A131d0,1I XO8 Tlt/012lb'WS T o c .y y E O] U 0 o o chi otr as co i wa �ot O 1b Uv b a .` O • N O a LO °' 63 O. 4 • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program x,msoi,aa S N- F�J (Pallr;0e0 sa31s ,.xo9 mama,. 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N b c0 �i ro Q. a • ,,TICSOI S 3 \'iiPJ N JA Nopuno9.11unoo gown*, =OAS dr* uo setoWelUl t31 WGISiS dVd7 u0 SFDIMINH —✓�— (13uotle,edo NIOI IOU P311%30 331133W1313N (P89g13u110N1331/3 7W1,neN ON3e31 Z-4 1181HX3 3CIISN3A121 N213183M NI S311S NOIld1N3W3IdWl WW1 Izt CV 17 J M .M1 1 PAta swag JAY Itta1uaOt �O1W7J 13 Nny 0.13. lun i S .UIuptNyS K.] mum IS Put y vot o.1 V Nny Nquow11 Q,xa R ._of.• •••�=eue__ s........ _.• \ op Amp any ,p<MID tS utow mown scyoS ■II■in ill■ ■ • • PAIS puwp oldeyQ op outptawae ues 1 ■ • O U V. N e U0 e 0 0 t~ 04 a ect ro -^ ▪ 42 C e • A O cl as ,V • in OQ d ro 0. 4 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TRAFFIC MONITORING State Highways Monitoring the state highways for CMP purposes involves the downloading of traffic count data from Caltrans' Traffic Management Center (TMC) sites and Smart Call Box (SCB) sites on a monthly basis. A level of service analysis will be performed to determine the condition of the CMP System. When a deficiency or LOS "F" is identified as part of the CMP Update LOS evaluation process, further detailed analysis of LOS shall be conducted to determine whether an actual deficiency has occurred. The best approach to determine LOS along freeway segments is through the use of floating car runs on a quarterly basis. In 2009, floating car runs were conducted under the direction of RCTC's CMP consultant VRPA Technologies. Resufts of these runs are provided in Chapter 4. Local Arterials Local arterial monitoring involves the continuation of the CVAG Traffic Monitoring Program in the Coachella Valley and the local traffic counting efforts on behalf of the local agencies in Western Riverside County. To further insure that the CMP System is appropriately monitored to reduce the occurrence of CMP deficiencies, proposed development projects are evaluated by each affected agency to determine potential impacts along the regional and sub -regional Systems. As a result, these evaluations will likely reduce the incidence of LOS deficiencies along the CMP System given that each local agency has established LOS thresholds at higher levels. To insure that major development projects and plans are evaluated and reflected in the Southern California Association of Governments (SLAG) Transportation Model and local models, local agencies are encouraged to work with affected agencies to mitigate the impacts considering the California Environment Quality Act (CEQA). Monitoring of Potential Deficiencies As a result of the 2009 LOS screening analysis, two (2) LOS "F" segments along 1-15 and 1-215 were identified using floating car runs. Floating car runs provide the accurate measure of LOS (reference Table 5-1). The segment along 1-215 (1-15 to Scott Rd) is operating at LOS "F". It is expected however, that the segment will be improved to LOS "E" or better once the 1-215 widening project, from 1-15 to Scott Road, is completed. The segment along 1-15 (VVeirick Road to Jurupa Street) is also operating at LOS "F". This segment is expected to be improved to LOS "E" or better once the 1-15 Corridor Improvement Project (CIP) and/or SR-91 CIP are completed. Each of these deficient segments will continue to be monitored using floating car runs over the next 9 months on a quarterly basis to determine the LOS. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 5-6 84 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE 5-1 FLOATING CAR RUN DEFICIENCY ANALYSIS Ceficient Per Pleating Car '� Overriding Runs (YIN) Considerations (YIN) Reason for Overriding Considerations If the LOS is at "F" for more than one (1) year with no extenuating circumstances causing the deficiency (e.g., construction, special event, etc), the affected local agency will be noted that a deficiency plan must be prepared in accordance with requirements set forth in Chapter 6. As a result, it will be important to continue to monitor the LOS along these segments on 1-15 and 1-215 to identify the LOS through the use of traffic counts or floating car runs on a quarterly basis in 2010 and 2011. It will, also be important to. also closely monitor critical LOS "E" segments. Once a LOS "E" segment falls to LOS "F", the segment will be further analyzed as to what the cause may be. If the LOS is at "F" for more than one (1) year and is the average annual peak hour condition with no extenuating circumstances causing the deficiency (e.g., construction, special event, etc), the local agency will be notified that a deficiency plan must be prepared in accordance with requirements set forth in Chapter 6. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. 5-7 85 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 6 LOS DEFICIENCY PLANS STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(b)(1)(B) of the Government Code specifically states that the Level of Service (LOS) standards established by RCTC, as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA) in Riverside County, not be below LOS "E" or the current level, whichever is farthest from LOS "A". When the LOS on a segment or at an intersection fails to attain the established level of service standard, a deficiency plan must be adopted pursuant to Section 65089.4. In addition, Section 65089.4 requires a local jurisdiction to prepare a deficiency plan when highway or roadway LOS standards are not maintained on segments or intersections of the designated system. The deficiency plan must be adopted by the city or the County at a noticed public hearing. RCTC DEFICIENCY PLAN PROCESS RCTC will prepare deficiency plans or identify mitigation strategies for deficient segments along the State Highway System on behalf of local agencies. RCTC will coordinate development of such plans with affected local agencies, WRCOG or CVAG, Caltrans, and the AQMD. These agencies will have an opportunity to work with RCTC during the development of a deficiency plan, provide comments, and meet with other affected agencies to discuss issues prior to completion of a plan. To comply with the intent of the CMP legislation, a deficiency plan prepared by a city, the County or RCTC must include the principal elements specified in the CMP Legislation (reference Appendix 1). To date, the CMP minimum Levels of Service threshold has been met, therefore deficiency plans have not been required. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 6-1 87 2010 Riverside County Congestion (Management Program PROCEDURE TO IDENTIFY DEFICIENT SEGMENTS The procedure for identifying deficient segments or intersections along the CMP System of Highways and Roadways is documented in Chapter 5, Enhanced Transportation System Management Program. Deficient segments would be identified through traffic monitoring. When a deficiency is identified as part of the CMP Update LOS evaluation process, further detailed analysis of LOS shall be conducted to determine whether an actual deficiency has occurred or if the initial analysis identified a deficiency due to extenuating circumstances or faulty data. Therefore additional, more detailed assessment of a potential deficiency would be required before a deficiency is formally identified. Coordination with the affected local jurisdiction(s) will be made to insure that appropriate data, geometries, counts and other related information is applied to calculate LOS. If a deficiency is identified, affected agencies will be notified. A review of mitigation measures, including capital improvement, transit, and TDM projects, will be conducted to determine how the deficiency can be mitigated. The recommended mitigation measure(s) will be reviewed by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). CRITERIA TO DETERMINE APPROPRIATE MITIGATION MEASURES Mitigation strategies that measurably improve the CMP System must be identified in the deficiency plan. Such strategies would include capital improvement projects or other measures that shift trips to alternative modes that may be included in or consistent with local Transportation Demand Management (TDM) ordinances. Further, mitigation measures should be developed considering both the existing and planned circulation system and the highest peak hour trip estimates or forecasts. Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County TUMF Programs Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County local agencies and the County of Riverside have adopted Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) programs. In general, the programs impose fees on development specifically to address transportation impacts on local arterials. The fees are then used for selected transportation improvement projects along the adopted TUMF arterial network. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) implements the TUMF program in the Coachella Valley and the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) implements the program in Western Riverside County. If, during the annual LOS monitoring process, an intersection or segment along the CMP system within the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) areas fall below LOS "E," an evaluation of planned improvements necessary to mitigate the deficiency must be undertaken. The adopted arterial programs would then be reviewed to determine if the deficiency would be mitigated through the TUMF program and within a reasonable timeframe. If an improvement project(s) is programmed that will mitigate the Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. 6-2 88 • • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program deficiency, the arterial program would be considered as a deficiency plan for CMP purposes. If projects in the arterial program do not meet the required mitigation for the deficiency, then RCTC will work with the appropriate agency(s) to identify mitigation measures. Agencies that do not participate in the TUMF programs would be required to prepare a deficiency plan in accordance with this chapter. REVIEW OF DEFICIENCY PLANS Deficiency Plans will be reviewed by the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). A recommendation of approval or nonapproval of deficiency plans will be forwarded to the RCTC Board for action. In accordance with Chapter 5 - Enhanced Transportation System Management Program, mitigation measures must be identified to offset deficiencies. If the Board approves the deficiency plan, that plan will immediately become effective. In accordance with Section 65089.4(d), upon receipt of a deficiency plan from a local agency, RCTC shall hold a noticed public hearing within sixty (60) days. Following the hearing, the RCTC may either accept or reject the plan in its entirety. Further, the Commission may not take action to amend the deficiency plan if it finds that it is not acceptable. If RCTC rejects the plan, the plan must be forwarded to the affected local agency indicating the reasons for rejection. RCTC would then meet and confer with the affected local agency to identify revisions that would provide for an adequate plan. The affected local agency may resubmit a corrected deficiency plan and obtain approval by RCTC prior to the next annual allocation of tax increment funds. If the local agency does not correct and resubmit the plan, or receive approval prior to the next distribution of funds, RCTC must notify the State Controller to withhold such funds. If through the biennial traffic monitoring process, the LOS along a deficient arterial or highway facility improves to LOS "E" or better, mitigation measures that have not been implemented as specified in the deficiency plan, would no longer be required for CMP compliance purposes. In the Coachella Valley and in Western Riverside County, any funds withheld from a jurisdiction due to noncompliance, will be returned to the subregion that it was taken from (CVAG or WRCOG) to implement the respective TUMF Regional Arterial Program. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 6-3 89 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER l TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT/ AIR QUALITY STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(b)(3)(A) of the State code requires that RCTC prepare a CMP trip reduction and travel demand element that promotes altemative transportation methods. Such methods must include, but are not limited to, carpools, vanpools, transit, bicycles, and park -and -ride lots; improvements in the balance between jobs and housing; and other strategies, including, but not limited to, flexible work hours, telecommuting, and parking management programs. CMP Legislation also requires consideration of parking cash -out programs. INTRODUCTION There are effective ways of achieving trip reduction in Riverside County other than through the adoption of local agency TDM Ordinances, which was the focus of TDM efforts in the past. RCTC believes that there are other approaches that can be more effective and has facilitated the implementation of TDM projects through the Measure "A" Commuter Assistance Programs, and the implementation of a number of TDM projects (in cooperation with Caltrans and local agencies in Riverside County and in adjoining counties) to achieve TDM objectives. Such TDM strategies include the development of Park-N-Ride lots, commuter rail stations, and public transit feeder services. Taken together, the individual programs and projects constitute abroad base effort to reduce reliance on the single occupant vehicle in Riverside County. In addition to TDM, Transportation Systems Management (TSM) strategies also provide for smoother traffic flow, especially along congested streets and highways in the County. Types of TSM strategies already implemented in Riverside County include bus bays, signal coordination systems, signal preemption for transit vehicles, improved signal timing projects, ramp metering, and focused intersection improvements. A project underway in the Coachella Valley that integrates both TDM and TSM solutions is the Washington Street and Highway 111 Commercial Corridors TDM/TSM Study affecting the cities of La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indio, Indian Wells, and the County of Riverside. TSM and TDM altematives are being analyzed to determine if there are other cost effective ways of easing future congestion along the Washington/Highway 111 corridors. These altematives may reduce travel delays either through a more effective use of existing capacity, adding capacity (if feasible), through traffic synchronization, encouraging motorists to use transit, car/van pooling, use of other alternative modes and TDM measures, encouraging motorists to travel at less congested times, and/or encouraging pedestrian and bicycle usage. The Study will explore a number of transportation solutions and strategies for getting people where they need to go by auto, foot, bicycle, or bus, and it will provide a baseline of data and analysis for helping to make those decisions in the future. RCTC's approach to trip reduction and congestion relief through TDM and TSM can be particularly effective in a rapidly growing county such as Riverside. This chapter identifies the types of strategies that local agencies can also implement to achieve further reductions in trips and enhance traffic flow, especially along already congested CMP facilities and other major streets and highways. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 9-i 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TRAVEL DEMAND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES The intent of this section is to identify ways that local agencies can seek to maximize the efficient use and capacity of a roadway and/or transit facility, often with limited transportation resources. Devebping a viable transportation system not only includes building new roadways and adding transit, but also involves managing the demand for travel on these systems. TDM is a term applied to a broad range of strategies that are primarily intended to reduce and reshape demand (use) of the transportation systems. TDM strategies are designed to make best use of existing transportation facilities and maximize future transportation investments. Using strategies that promote alternative modes, increase vehicle occupancy, maximize the efficient use of parking, reduce travel distances, and ease peak -hour congestion, TDM increases the efficiency and effectiveness of the transportation system. TDM includes programs and strategies to promote altematives to driving alone or single occupancy vehicle (SOV) travel. These include such activities as carpools, vanpools, transit, bicycles, park -and -rife lots, freeway service patrols, and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). These programs will improve air quality in the region and help meet the goals of the Air Quality Attainment Plans, as well as address climate change goals. It is important that RCTC, Caltrans, and local govemments throughout the County consider the application of TDM strategies during preparation of transportation plans, circulation elements, and transportation corridor studies. Planning and preliminary engineering of major corridor investment projects in Riverside County present significant opportunities for the coordinated integration of TDM strategies. TDM is recognized as the quickest and least expensive component of transportation solutions, resulting in reduced construction impacts, increased use of new and existing transit services, and extension of the life of a roadway through reduced congestion. In addition, a basic tenet of TDM programs is developing partnerships between multiple organizations that have influence on commuting and travel habits, necessary to develop programs and policies that will reduce congestion and increase accessibility and mobility. The solutions to contemporary transportation problems can no longer be found solely in the construction of new or even wider roadways. The TDM strategy recommendations presented below have been drafted with an understanding that any viable solution must include the participation of all available players in the County. RCTC, local agencies, land developers, local employers and their employees, the transit agencies, as well as the general public all need to work together cooperatively to resolve the transportation related issues that are currently affecting, and will continue to affect, Riverside County's economic viability and environmental health. TDM strategies that can be effective in the region have been organized under the following five categories: + Enhance Vehicle Occupancy (carpools/vanpools/park-n-ride) + Shift auto travel to Transit (bus and rail system improvements) + Shift auto travel to Non -Motorized Transportation modes (bicycling and walking) + Shift travel demand to "nonpeak" periods or eliminate trips through Alternative Work -Hour Programs and Telecommuting + Maximize the efficient use of parking resources through Parking Management Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Recommended strategies within any of these categories should be used as individual TDM methods where appropriate, but will have the most significant impact when they are used in combination with other strategies from the same and other categories. As in architectural design, an effective TDM program appears like an information network, in that each element can be effective for some level of benefit, but when the elements are connected and combined, the result is powerful beyond the sum of its parts. One example of this reality is when a company offers a flex time work schedule to its employees who live within moderate distances. They may feel able to change their commute travel mode from a single. occupant vehicle to walking or bicycling due the increased flexibility of starting times. The research suggests that for shorter commute distances, the vehicle trips for an employment site may be reduced by 1% to 9%. However, when that same employer also provides lockers and shower facilities, employees that begin their work commute from an even further distance may also feel comfortable with a walking or bicycling commute. The °TDM web or net" becomes much wider in terms of capturing more mode shifting employees based on a wider geographic scope. The actual trip reduction under the right conditions may be increased to as high as 30%. Following are some potential strategies: ♦ Complete Streets Analysis or Multimodal Level of Service (LOS): The modes analyzed in the multimodal LOS analysis should be dependent on the place type. For example, in most cases, rural inter -city travel need not look at pedestrian capacity. The plan should provide mitigation and a monitoring program to offset impacts to all modes through incident and demand management strategies. ♦ Corridor Analysis: Corridor impacts to a mode may be mitigated by providing capacity on a parallel facility. For example, an impacted facility may lack pedestrian and bike facilities; however, a parallel bike/pedestrian path within the corridor could offset this deficiency. In addition, impacts to transit buses stuck in the same traffic congestion as single occupancy vehicles could be mitigated by the provision of a transit/High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane in the congested travel direction during peak periods. Additional mitigation for congestion could be through the provision of a freeway service patrol to rapidly clear traffic accidents and disabled vehicles during peak periods. ♦ Multimodal Circulation Plans: At their next regularly scheduled update, local circulation elements should consider multimodal LOS standards. In addition to the road network, circulation plans should include bike, pedestrian, and transit networks. The bike/pedestrian/transit networks should provide for transit oriented development centers that could serve as transfer points and nodes for future express and/or regional service. The centers also should provide a connected network linking to the future High Speed Trains and passenger rail stations. These centers should be reflected in the Land Use Elements of local agency General Plans with higher densities and a mix of land uses that make for a vibrant pedestrian oriented destination. The centers should use multi -modal LOS standards within their boundaries to ensure capacity for bike, walk, and transit. Enhancing Vehicle Occupancy TDM strategies designed to increase vehicle occupancy including casual and organized ridesharing, have been categorized under the concept of Enhancing Vehicle Occupancy. It is interesting that when non- rideshare participants are questioned about why they do not consider ridesharing, they often indicate that they think it would be inconvenient. However, when ridesharers are asked about their experience, they indicate that it is more convenient than driving alone. In any case, the issue of ridesharing requires a match of people that reside in the same general area and work at the same location or in close proximity. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program The region can promote the activity through marketing the services of ridematching firms and encouraging local companies to make the rideshare services a part of their TDM program. If a group of employees are interested in forming a formal riclesharearrangement, local agencies should assist them in applying for funding or in connecting them to another appropriate agency. Perhaps the most significant deterrent to participating in a carpool of vanpool is the fear of not having a personal vehicle to use in case an emergency arises while at work. Local agencies in the region should develop a guaranteed ride home program for employees that participate in any alternative transportation mode, including walking or bicycling. ROTC, through Inland Empire Commuter Services (IECS), offers these services and more to local employers. By partnering with IECS, employers have access to rideshare marketing materials and services to extend to their employees at no cost such. as region -wide ridematching, a guaranteed ride home program, and RCTC's Rideshare Incentive and Rideshare Pius Rewards programs. Transit System Improvements The region and its communities share a common goal of insuring transit services are available to provide greater mobility for its residents. The presence of viable and sustainable transit services is critical to ensure the economic viability and the region's general. well being. Transit system improvements that should continue to be implemented or researched include: ♦ Expansion of transit services, including additional regular or express service, Metrolink. service, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems, and other similar transit services. ♦ Multi -modal transit centers linking alternative modes of transportation including transit, non -motorized transportation, rail, etc., allowing intercity and regional connections ♦ Provision of alternative methods of transportation for paratransit riders ♦ Provision of current schedules, rates (including procedures for obtaining transit passes), and routes of mass transit service to employment sites or service areas. ♦ On -site waiting andfloading facilities for transit. ♦ Provision of a convenient and safe shuttle service to transport workers/patrons to and from their residences, a park -and -ride lot, or other staging area to a workplace/service area. ♦ A monthly transit or rail pass subsidy of 50% or the maximum taxable benefit limit, whichever is greater. ♦ Transit shelters along a designated bus route or posting a bond for future construction when the transit route is extended to an employment/service site. Credit is given when the transit shelter is constructed in conformance with city/county regulations and when the employment/service site is on, or adjacent to, an existing or planned bus route. Each of the local agencies in the County should work with affected transit providers to study transit enhancements and systems that will effectively reduce auto trips, especially along congested corridors. Non -Motorized Transportation Improvements Over the past several decades, walking and bicycling as a means of transportation and recreation have increased in popularity. This has led to a surge in the construction of trails and on -road accommodations for these modes of travel. While finishing the off -road trail system remains important, priorities in the region Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 94 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program area are shifting to maintenance of the existing system and the provision of on -road accommodations. RCTC fully supports safe and comfortable facilities that fit the needs of the County. The system of bicycle and pedestrian facilities, including off -road trails and on -road accommodations, must continue to be designed for all users. The skill level and preferences of bicycle riders can vary greatly. Riders who use bicycles to commute to work are likely comfortable on the majority of roads, including those without designated bicycle facilities. However, the casual user may be uncomfortable on routes that do not include separate bicycle designations, and children are likely best suited by facilities that are separate from the road. There are several types of bicycle facilities that can acoommodate the various types of bicyclists. While the system currently features predominately off -road trails, other type of accommodations will likely become more common in the future. All type of accommodations should be considered in the effort to provide the area with the best system of bicycle and pedestrian accommodations. The most common type of bicycle facilities are: ♦ Shared Use Path (Trail): These are generally referred to as trails or off -road accommodations. Shared use paths often serve corridors not served by roads, or where wide right of way exists next to the roadway, permitting their construction parallel to the road. Shared use paths generally do not allow motorized vehicles and can be utilized by bicyclists and pedestrians. ♦ Bicycle Lanes: Bicycle lanes are established by pavement markings and signage along streets where there is significant bicycle demand and the necessary street conditions to accommodate bike lanes. Bike lanes delineate the right of way by assigning separate lanes to motorists and bicyclists and lead to more predictable movements by each. ♦ Paved Shoulders: These are primarily implemented in rural areas, often on state and local highways. Paved shoulders provide a separated space for bicyclists, similar to bicycle lanes. ♦ Signed Shared Roadway: These roads are designated by bike route signs, generally either to provide continuity with other bicycle facilities (such as bike lanes) or to designate preferred routes through high - demand corridors. The purpose of signing the shared roadway is to indicate to bicyclists that there are advantages to using that particular route over others. Signage also alerts vehicle drivers that bicyclists are likely to be present. ♦ Shared Roadway (No Separate Bicycle Facility or Signage): Most minor residential streets would qualify as shared roadways as they have minimal and low -speed traffic and, therefore, do not need any bicycle designations or accommodations. There are many factors to consider when determining the best type of bicycle accommodation for a particular road, including traffic volume, speed limit, lane widths, parking, and so on. It should be kept in mind that many streets, especially low -volume residential ones, are safe for bicycling without any modifications. Arterials and collectors may be best suited by signage, wide outside lanes, or designated bike lanes. Shared use paths are best utilized along very busy roads or to serve recreation interests in areas away from roads. When planning for new facilities, the following issues should be considered: ♦ Sidewalk Connections: Many areas in the metropolitan area have gaps in the sidewalk system. This is especially problematic along bus routes as pedestrians can have difficulty reaching the transit stops. There are many benches along bus routes for people who are waiting to catch a bus, but there are many locations where these benches are in the middle of grass with no sidewalk connection. These locations need to be improved. In addition, sidewalks are lacking in some of the metro area's commercial developments. While many of these improvements fall upon the local jurisdiction, RCTC has an interest in all areas of the region being properly linked by sidewalks. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 9% 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ New Development and Redevelopment Connections: It is vital to connect new developments and redevelopment to the existing trail system. RCTC supports and strongly encourages local agencies to incorporate connections to the trail system from future residential, commercial, and industrial subdivisions and redevelopments. To ensure connectivity, this process should begin at the planning phase of new development or redevelopment and continue through its full implementation. This approach will provide for enhanced non -motorized access throughout the system. ♦ Traffic Signal Design: Traffic signals are not always capable of responding to the presence of a cyclist. In areas where signals change due to the presence of vehicles, a bicyclist may have to wait an excessive amount of time for a green light or may cross on a red light. Where appropriate, new traffic signal detectors should be implemented to recognize the presence of cyclists and cyclists should be educated on how to utilize detectors so the signal will change for them. Also, crossing lights for bicyclists/pedestrians and motorists should be examined, particularly on busy roadways, to ensure minimal points of conflict between road users. ♦ System Maintenance: While there are still trails to be built and on -road facilities to be designated or added, much of the existing system has been in place for many years. Maintenance of the existing system is becoming a critical issue as many trails will require significant resurfacing or reconstruction efforts in the coming years. Local jurisdictions will need to ensure that the existing system is adequately maintained. ♦ Bicycle Parking: Bike racks, lockers, or some other form of bicycle parking must be provided throughout the metropolitan area. While providing the route to get to a destination is often the primary consideration, bicyclists must have a place to secure their bikes once there. Areas that should provide bicycle parking include all public buildings, parks, transit stops, and places near businesses and multi- unit residential dwellings. ♦ Bicycle Racks on Transit Buses: Bicycling and transit are two transportation modes that are often used on the same trip. Bicycle racks on buses increases the mobility of bicyclists as it enables them to travel across the metropolitan area. Transit agencies should have bike racks installed on all new bus purchases. ♦ Showers/Locker Rooms: Bicycling to work would likely be more attractive to people if they were able to shower or freshen up and change in comfortable facilities. Local agencies can work on providing shower and changing areas in public buildings and work with private employers to provide these facilities to encourage bicycling to work. Recently, there has been a movement to plan for and implement "Complete Streets". According to the Complete the Streets organization (www.completestreets.org), complete streets are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities must be able to safely move along and across a complete street. There are many benefits to complete streets, the most prominent being improved safety for all users. In addition, complete streets encourage other modes of travel besides personal automobile, thereby improving health, decreasing air pollution from emissions, and decreasing congestion. The design of a complete street can vary greatly, depending on the characteristics of the roadway. Local, residential streets that are low -speed and have low traffic volumes are likely already complete streets as they do not require separate accommodations for other modes of travel. Busier streets may require more infrastructure to make them complete. Items that could be part of a complete street include: ♦ Sidewalks ♦ Bike lanes Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 9-% 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program • Wide shoulders ♦ Separate trails ♦ Crosswalk striping/raised crosswalks ♦ Median refugesrslands ♦ Bus pullouts/bus only lanes ♦ Audible pedestrian signals/countdown pedestrian signals The optimal design for a particular street will depend upon many factors, including, its traffic volume, speed limit, lane widths, parking, and so on. Creating a complete and user-friendly system of bicycle and pedestrian accommodations involves more than trails, sidewalks, and on -road accommodations. To fully incorporate these modes into the region's transportation system, there are several important elements to consider. ♦ Education: Teach all road users about the rights and responsibilities of cyclists; create educational publications; promote bicycling to target populations; work with schools to establish bicycling skills curricula; establish adult bicycle education programs. ♦ Engineering: Accommodate bicyclists on all roadways; provide convenient and secure bicycle parking; ensure bike lanes and pathways form an integrated and contiguous network; fund on -road bicycle facility improvements in conjunction with roadway projects; coordinate with surrounding jurisdictions. ♦ Encouragement: Establish a centralized program for interaction with and education of the public; increase local coverage of bicycle events. • Enforcement: Update city codes and zoning to ensure that the interests of bicyclists are incorporated into existing and future developments; enhance enforcement measures of traffic rules and regulations to both cyclists and motorists. ♦ Evaluation: Track bicycle ridership; track the number of roads that have on -road bicycle accommodations added. RCTC encourages each local agency to consider the elements noted above when designing new or improved transportation corridors, preparing transportation plans and circulation elements, developing a non -motorized transportation plan, or when reviewing new development proposals. Article 3 of the California Transportation Development Act establishes 2% of Local Transportation Funds to be made available to cities and the county to build facilities for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicyclists. Every April, the Commission releases a call for projects for pedestrian and bicycle facilities in which all Riverside County jurisdictions are eligible to apply for funding. Alternative Work Schedulesfrelecommuting Alternative work schedules (also known as variable work hours) are comprised of three different strategies: flextime, compressed work weeks, and staggered shifts. The definition of each follows: ♦ Flextime —Employees work specified hours each week, but are given flexibility on when they arrive to work, take lunch, and leave work ♦ Compressed work weeks —Employees work more hours than typical, but work fewer days per week or pay period Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ Staggered shifts —Employees arrive and depart work at different times in shifts. Shifts may be staggered anywhere from 15 minutes to two hours In general, altemative work schedule strategies provide the following benefits: ♦ Reduce peak period congestion directly ♦ Make ridesharing and transit use more feasible ♦ Reduce parking lot and entrance/exit congestion ♦ Less employee stress/better productivity ♦ Facilitate better employee morale/retention ♦ Reduce tardiness ♦ Are economical to provide ♦ Can offer flexibility needed for other commute solutions ♦ Staggered hours allow for more coverage because of extended workday ♦ More flexibility for personal and work time ♦ Can offer flexibility needed for other commute solutions ♦ Often reduces commute time by avoiding rush hour traffic ♦ Less traffic congestion during peak hours ♦ Better air quality from reduced congestion Studies have found that employees with flexible work schedules save an average of 7 minutes per day in commute time. Also, variable start times can reduce peak -period trips, particularly around large employment centers, and when combined, flextime and telecemmuting can reduce peak -hour vehicle commute trips by 20-50%. While these programs are employer -based, local agencies can encourage or even require employers to participate. Local agencies should also develop a program to organize the enforcement of these programs as they are submitted by new developments. Telecommuting involves a situation where an employee is working anywhere but in his/her traditional office. A typical scenario involves employees working at home either full or part time, but they could also be working on travel assignments, at remote work centers, or on the road day-by-day. Telecommuting benefits include: ♦ Reduced parking needs ♦ Reduced office space needs and overhead costs ♦ Less employee stress/better productivity ♦ Better employee morale/retention ♦ Decreased absenteeism and sick leave ♦ More flexibility for personal and work time ♦ Higher productivity ♦ Less traffic congestion ♦ Better air quality ♦ Reduced fuel use ♦ Eligibility in the IECS Rideshare Incentive/Rideshare Plus Rewards programs Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Altemative work schedules and telecommuting should continue to be highlighted as TDM plans and programs are required by local agencies during review of development and redevelopment proposals. Both of these TDM strategies have the greatest potential for significant trip reduction in the region. Parking Management Parking management is arguably, the most effective method of encouraging people to shift to alternative modes of travel. A study of the effectiveness of parking management programs in Los Angeles found that charging for parking can decrease the number of individuals driving alone to work by as much as eighty percent (80%). Programs reaching that level of success may be rare, but a more typical reduction is assumed at closer to thirty percent (30%). Another study of parking costs in the Portland, Oregon area found that parking charges of just $40 per month could increase transit use by twenty percent (20%) in both the suburban and central business districts. When parking costs were increased to $80 per month, the increase in transit use rose by 35 to 40 percent (35-40%) (Peng, Zhongren, Kenneth J. Dueker, and James G. Strathman. 1996). It is clear however, that Riverside County is unique in its characteristics that appear to demonstrate an unlimited amount of space to place parking and that space is available at a relatively low cost. Even though parking charges are not likely to produce changes in travel behavior at the same level in Los Angeles or Portland, Oregon, the management of parking can alter behavior and result in the reduction of vehicle trips. Parking management techniques include a range of practices, such as preferred parking spaces for high occupancy vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles, reduced parking charges for carpools and vanpools, shared parking facilities, daily rather than monthly parking charges, establishing parking maximums for new developments, and the taxing of parking facilities. As is the case with most other TDM strategies, parking management can be even more effective when combined with other TDM techniques such as free transit passes, cash -incentive programs, and the availability of high -quality transit service. Local agencies should consider these management strategies as new developments and redevelopment projects are proposed and reviewed. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT Transportation Systems Management (TSM) is defined as a program to reduce demand on, and increase the capacity of, the existing transportation system. Specifically, TSM is an integrated program that will optimize the performance of existing infrastructure through the implementation of systems, services, and projects designed to preserve capacity and improve security, safety, and reliability. TSM strategies include the following: ♦ 511 Traveler Information Service which provides Riverside County with real-time traffic information and commute alternatives by calling 511 or visiting ie511.org ♦ Ramp metering ♦ Congestion pricing ♦ Changeable message signs ♦ Signal coordination ♦ Roadway improvements ♦ Improved signal timing ♦ Other Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) improvements, such as detection and video surveillance ♦ Re-routing of traffic to less congested routes Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 9g 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ Pedestrian facilities including restricted pedestrian crossings and consideration of pedestrian overcrossings ♦ Placement of transit stops and bus bays ♦ Corridor access improvements ♦ Advanced traffic signal timing programs, such as SCOOT (Split Cycle Offset Optimization Technique) or SCAT (Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic) systems RCTC, Caltrans, and each of the local agencies within the County should consider the design and implementation of TSM improvements as they plan for and design street and highway improvement projects; especially along heavily congested streets and highways. The Inland Empire ITS Strategic Plan, approved by RCTC in 1998 provides a thorough discussion and assessment of the types of ITS and TSM strategies that can improve traffic flow and relieve congestion. SCAG COMPASS BLUEPRINT The SCAG Compass Blueprint was enacted to encourage creative and sustainable development strategies that fit local needs and support shared regional values. The SCAG Compass Blueprint is regional in scope and supports the integration of land use, transportation, and resource planning. The planning process considers the "Three Es" of sustainable communities: prosperous economy, quality environment, and social equity. Blueprint planning is a comprehensive undertaking that requires innovation, collaborative planning, thinking on a macro scale, and a willingness to follow through to implementation. Through partnerships with local governments, the SCAG Compass Blueprint serves communities by applying the best available tools to create successful examples to accommodate regional growth. A principal objective of the Compass Blueprint is to balance job growth with housing growth in order to reduce trips and vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Local agencies in Riverside County that have completed or are currently working with SCAG on Compass planning include Cathedral City, Coachella, Corona, Desert Hot Springs, Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Norco, Perris, Riverside, Murrieta, and Temecula. Some of the various Compass -related projects in Riverside County that these and other agencies are currently implementing or will initiate shortly include the following: ♦ City of Corona Redevelopment Agency (RDA) - Land Use Will Analysis, Market Feasibility ♦ Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) - Non -Motorized Transportation Plan Update ♦ Lake Elsinore - Design Standards and Visualization Products for the Planned Civic Center Development ♦ WRCOG - Conceptual Transportation Network and Scalable Implementation Strategy for Deployment of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) in the Cities of Riverside, Corona, Norco, and Moreno Valley ♦ WRCOG — Study to examine Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) opportunities along major transportation corridors including the Mid County Parkway,1-15, and 1-215 ♦ WRCOG - 1-15 Interregional Partnership (IRP) with the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG). The Southern Califomia Association of Govemments (SCAG) to provide assistance to expand the study area and conduct smart growth analysis and prepare a transportation strategy implementation plan for 1-15 and 1-215 ♦ City of Cathedral City — To develop a corridor strategy that considers land use, infill scenarios, Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies 3c�® 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program transportation, and economic development while connecting various areas and linking existing plans within the City ♦ City of Moreno Valley — To explore Transit Oriented Development (TOD) opportunities around an emerging rapid transit line along Alessandro Boulevard, connecting a planned Metrolink station to Riverside County Hospital ♦ City of Desert Hot Springs — To develop a land use vision for the area adjacent to a conservation corridor area (the Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan) that balances resource conservation and development SENATE BILL (SB) 375 SB 375 (Steinberg) is California state law that became effective January 1, 2009. This new law requires' California's Air Resources Board (CARB) to develop regional reduction targets for greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Future growth and development in California and within the Riverside County region will be planned consistent with Senate Bill (SB) 375, which calls for the integration of transportation and land use and housing planning through the development of "Sustainable Community Strategies" (SCS). California's 18 Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) have been tasked with creating SCSs and demonstrating actions necessary to attain the. proposed reduction targets by 2020 and 2035. SB 375 also establishes the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as one of the overarching goals of regional planning consistent with Assembly Bill (AB) 32. The transportation sector is the single largest source of GHG in California. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) estimates that approximately 40% of the GHG statewide is transportation related. The efforts presented in this Chapter are consistent with the objectives of SB 375 by supporting sustainable community strategies for the purpose of reducing GHG emissions, improving air quality, aligning planning for transportation and housing, and creating opportunities for the implementation of TDM and TSM strategies that reduce trips and vehicle miles traveled. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies �7QI�1 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 8 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(b)(5) of the CMP Statutes requires that RCTC prepare a seven-year capital improvement program, developed using the performance measures described in paragraph (2) to determine effective projects that maintain or improve the performance of the multimodal system for the movement of people and goods, and to mitigate regional transportation impacts identified pursuant to paragraph (4). RCTC CIP PROGRAM For purposes of this CMP Update, the 2010 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) consists of the STIP, Measure "A", TUMF programs, and other federally funded projects programmed on the CMP system. RCTC submits state, local and federally funded projects to the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) for inclusion in the FTIP. Locally funded non -regionally significant projects are not required to be included in the FTIP. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 181 03 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 9 CMP CONFORMANCE AND MONITORING STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089.3 of the Government Code requires RCTC to monitor the implementation of all elements of the Congestion Management Program (CMP). Caltrans is responsible for data collection and analysis on State highways, unless the agency designates that responsibility to another entity. RCTC may also assign responsibility of data collection and analysis to other owners and operators of facilities or services if the responsibilities are specified in its adopted program. RCTC must also consult with Caltrans and other affected owners and operators in developing data collection and analysis procedures and schedules prior to program adoption. RCTC CONFORMANCE AND MONITORING At least biennially, RCTC will determine if the County and cities are conforming to the CMP, including, but not limited, to all of the following: (a) Consistency with levels of service standards, except as provided in Section 65089.4. (b) Implementation of a program to monitor and evaluate the performance of the transportation system. (c) Adoption and implementation of a deficiency plan pursuant to Section 65089.4 when highway and roadway level of service standards are not maintained on portions of the designated system. In addition to conformity requirements referenced in specific sections of the Government Code, the County and cities must work with the Congestion Management Agency (CMA) to provide Level of Service (LOS) monitoring information along the CMP System. This process is detailed in Chapter 5, Enhanced Transportation System Management Program. RCTC will continue to work with its Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to introduce new or revised requirements. Additional CMP workshops, to be held at the request of individual jurisdictions, offer the opportunity for planning and engineering staff to gain a better understanding of the CMP in an informal environment. 1) Consistency with LOS Standards To simplify the process of collecting traffic counts from Caltrans and the local agencies, RCTC has implemented the Enhanced Transportation System Management Program. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 9-1 105 2090 Riverside County Congestion Management Program LOS calculations will primarily be based upon the newly installed traffic counting equipment along the state highway system. Counts along the local arterial system will be provided by the subregional agencies, affected local agencies, or from counts conducted by RCTC. Currently, thirty-six (36) Smart Call Boxes (SCB) sites and twenty-seven (27) Traffic Monitoring Center (TMC) sites have been installed to collect traffic counts along the state highway system. RCTC will consult with Caltrans for traffic count data along facilities where SCB or TMC counts are not available. The Enhanced Transportation System Management Program utilizes "loop or pavement sensors" currently .installed along the State Highway system at call boxes and TMC sites along the highway system. The program provides Ca!trans and RCTC the ability to retrieve real-time count information. Chapter 5 of this CMP contains a full explanation of the SCB and TMC implementation program. 2) Program to Manage and Analyze the System To insure that the CMP System is appropriately monitored to reduce the occurrence of CMP deficiencies, proposed development projects can be evaluated by each affected agency to determine potential regional and sub -regional impacts along the CMP Systems. As a result, such evaluation will reduce the incidence of LOS deficiencies along the CMP System. Local agencies are encouraged to work with other affected agencies to mitigate the impacts considering California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Intergovernmental Report (IGR) requirements to insure that major development projects and plans are evaluated and reflected in the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Transportation Model When a LOS deficiency is identified as part of the CMP Update, further detailed analysis of LOS shall be conducted to determine whether an actual deficiency has occurred. The LOS analysis conducted as part of the CMP Update process is only considered to be a "screening" level analysis, and a more detailed assessment of a potential deficiency would be required before a deficiency is formally identified. Coordination with the affected local jurisdiction(s) will be made to insure that appropriate data, geometrics, counts and other related information is applied to calculate LOS. 3) Transportation Model Consistency Requirements Transportation Modeling Guidelines have been developed by SCAG to assist local agencies in developing transportation models to analyze the circulation system within their jurisdiction or for special transportation studies. These guidelines are available at RCTC and at the SCAG Inland Empire office in Riverside. In addition, the Riverside County Transportation Department will be working with RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, and local agencies in developing transportation modeling guidelines for the RIVTAM model. RCTC will require that these guidelines be followed during development of traffic models for all projects of regional significance. The guidelines have several objectives; Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 9-2 106 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program however, the primary objective is to insure that the legislative requirements for transportation modeling and database consistency are achieved. In addition, the guidelines have been designed to ease the transfer of information from the regional and subregional models to local models and vice -versa. REQUIRED CMP UPDATES The CMPs were required to be updated annually between 1992 and 1995. An amendment to the CMP legislation changed the update to occur biennially. Table 9-1 outlines the updates approved since inception: The 2010 CMP update consists of monitoring the CMP System, and reporting the results of the analysis including deficiencies, and incorporating TDM and TSM efforts implemented by RCTC and local agencies. The CMP was originally planned for adoption in December 2009; however, the adoption was rescheduled to March 2010 to allow more time for review of federal congestion management system requirements and MPO CMP consistency requirements. SCAG CONSISTENCY REVIEW The 2010 CMP will be reviewed by SCAG for consistency with the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and with CMPs of adjoining counties (San Bernardino, Orange, and Los Angeles Counties). Under the MPO planning regulations, SCAG is required to certify that it meets federal CMS requirements, which includes a review and consistency determination of all CMPs within the SCAG region. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 1�� 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program TABLE 9-1 Year CMP UPDATES SINCE INCEPTION Major Effort/Revisions Adopted 1992 The Commission originally adopted the CMP December 1992 1993 The CMP was revised focusing on LOS evaluation December 1993 1994 The Commission updated Chapters 3 and 5 of the CMP December 1994 1995 The CMP was revised and updated, primarily focusing on Chapter 5, Land Use Coordination and the indusion of legislative amendments December 1995 1997 The CMP was thoroughly amended focusing on replacement of the Traffic impact Assessment (rIA) process contained in the Land Use Coordination Program (Chapter 5). The TIA process was replaced with the Enhanced Traffic Monitoring Program December 1997 1999 The CMP was revised focusing on LOS evaluation December 1999 2001 Minor revisions were included in the update and RCTC issued the RFP for the traffic counter installations at Smart Call Box and Traffic Management Center Sites. December 2001 2003 The 2003 CMP Update . was focused on continued implementation of the CMP to meet Federal Congestion Management System (CMS) requirements. The traffic counter installations project was nearing completion. Test runs were initiated. December 2003 2005 The 2005 CMP Update focused on a review of LOS and monitoring of various street and highway segments that were approaching deficient levels of service. Several segments were identified as deficient through the application of floating car runs. These segments fell deficient due to construction activity and road closures in adjacent areas. Continued monitoring of the segments has been undertaken and the segments continue to be deficient due to continued construction activity and road closures. May 2006 2007 The 2007 CMP Update also focused on a review of LOS and monitoring of various street and highway segments that were approaching deficient levels of service as referenced for 2005. Several segments were identified as deficient through the application of floating car runs. These segments fell deficient due to construction activity and road closures in adjacent areas. Continued monitoring of the segments was undertaken and two of the segments continued to be deficient due to capacity constraints. December 2007 Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 9-4 108 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program CHAPTER 10 CMP DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION! UPDATE PROCESS STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS Section 65089(a) of the Government Code requires that the Congestion Management Program (CMP) must be developed, adopted, and updated biennially, consistent with the schedule for the adoption and update of the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP), for every county that includes an urbanized area, and must include every city and the county. Development of the CMP must also be coordinated with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), regional transportation providers, local governments, Caltrans, and respective air districts. RCTC DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND UPDATE PROCESS As described above, CMP legislation requires that the Program be developed, adopted, implemented, monitored, and updated biennially. This chapter primarily focuses on procedural, administrative, and coordination activities related to CMP development, adoption, implementation and update. To meet the requirements of the legislation, the CMP shall be developed, adopted, implemented, and updated in accordance with procedures described in the following sections. CMP DEVELOPMENT The CMP is developed to meet federal CMS requirements and also includes elements of the State's CMP guidelines. State CMP statutes AB 471, 1791, AB 3093, AB 1963, and AB 2419 (reference Appendix 1). CMP ADOPTION PROCEDURE The following procedure has been developed to outline the process toward preparation and adoption of the CMP. RCTC staff shall coordinate the development of the CMP with the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). ♦ Local agencies should continue to monitor the CMP System. It is suggested that the local agency collect ground counts at least every four (4) months to provide for average annual traffic conditions. ♦ Beginning in April of each odd numbered year, RCTC will obtain counts or LOS analysis from Caltrans, CVAG, and local agencies. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. 10-1 110 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ In May of each odd numbered year, RCTC must initiate a CMP update. RCTC staff will review individual Chapters with the RCTC TAC, as necessary. ♦ In October of each odd numbered year, RCTC must submit a Preliminary Draft of the CMP to SCAG and the RCTC TAC CMP Subcommittee for review and comment. ♦ In November of each odd numbered year, RCTC staff will submit the Draft CMP to the TAC for formal review and approval. ♦ Between November and December of each odd numbered year, RCTC staff will submit the Final Draft to the Commission for review and approval CMP IMPLEMENTATION The CMP is to be implemented and monitored in accordance with procedures described in Chapter 9 - CMP Conformance and Monitoring. CMP UPDATE PROCEDURE The CMP update process should be initiated at least six months prior to adoption. _ Revision of the CMP may occur any time during the year to address speck issues. The update should include a thorough review of each Chapter or required element contained in the current CMP. A suggested review process follows: ♦ Legislative revisions or new enactments to CMP statutes should be thoroughly reviewed and incorporated into the CMP update. (Chapter 1, 2) ♦ Review agency requests for adding road segments to the CMP System. According to the CMP legislation, facilities may only be added to CMP system. All facilities included in the adopted CMP must be retained. (Chapter 1, 2) ♦ Review adjacent county CMP Systems to determine if facilities were added or are proposed for addition. Review and analyze any additions considering SCAG's Consistency Guidelines on file at RCTC. (Chapter 2) ♦ Review, in coordination with SCAG and local agencies, the existing and future year databases used for transportation modeling purposes to insure consistency in the development of socioeconomic estimates and projections. (Chapter 3) ♦ Review the adopted CMP Minimum level of service (LOS) standard. The CMP LOS standard can only be increased above the level identified in the adopted Program. (Chapter 4) Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 10-2 111 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ Review LOS estimates to determine if the LOS along CMP facilities has dropped below LOS "E". ♦ Document the purpose for, and status of, deficiency plans that may have been prepared by local agencies during the previous year including proposed mitigation measures. ♦ Document segments or intersections that are at LOS "E", close to falling below the adopted CMP threshold. ♦ Review the Productivity Improvement Program Transit System Performance Indicators for any changes/updates. ♦ Document whether public transit or passenger rail service was identified as a mitigation measure or potential mitigation measure in the development of deficiency plans. ♦ Review the CMP Conformance and Monitoring Process to determine whether the process is consistent with changes or revisions identified within other CMP elements. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. 10-3 112 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program APPENDIX 1 CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENTS STATUTES REFERENCING CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS (AB 2419) Assembly Bill No. 2419 CHAPTER 293 An act to amend Sections 65082, 65089, and 65089.3 of, and add Section 65088.3 to, the Government Code, relating to transportation. [Approved by Govemor July 25,1996. Filed with Secretary of State July 25, 1996.] LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST AB 2419, Bowler. Transportation: congestion management programs. (1) Existing law requires the development, adoption, and updating of a congestion management program for each county that includes an urbanized area. Existing law requires congestion management programs to be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program by December 15 of each odd -numbered year. This bill would provide that this incorporation requirement does not apply in those counties that do not prepare a congestion management program in accordance with existing law. (2) Under existing law, a congestion management program is required to contain specified elements. This bill would delete the trip reduction element and would make corresponding changes. (3) Under existing law, a congestion management program is required to be developed for specified counties and include every city and the county. The program is required to be developed and adopted by the county transportation commission or by another public agency designated by the county board of supervisors and the city councils of a majority of cities representing a majority of the population in the incorporated area of the county. This bill would make those requirements inapplicable in a county in which a majority of local governments, collectively comprised of the city councils and the county board of supervisors which, in total, represent a majority of the population of the county, adopt resolutions electing to be exempt from the congestion management program. The people of the State of California do enact as follows: SECTION 1. Section 65082 of the Government Code is amended to read: 65082. (a) A seven-year regional transportation improvement program shall be prepared, adopted, and submitted to the California Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. Al-1 114 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program Transportation Commission on or before December 15 of each odd -numbered year, updated every two years, pursuant to Sections 65080 and 65080.5 and the guidelines adopted pursuant to Section 14530.1, to inchide projects and programs proposed to be funded, in whole or in part, by funds which are any of the following: (1) For flexible congestion relief projects, as defined in Section 164.2 of the Streets and Highways Code. (2) For urban rail transit and commuter rail projects. Major projects shall include an escalated current cost updated to at least November 1 of the year of submittal, and be listed by relative priority, taking into account need, delivery milestone dates, as defined in Section 14525.5, and the availability of funding. (b) Congestion management programs adopted pursuant to Section 65089 shall be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program submitted to the commission by December 15 of each odd -numbered year. (c) The incorporation of the congestion management program into the regional transportation improvement program required to be submitted to the commission by December 1, 1991, may be delayed for a period not to exceed one year if an environmental impact report is required to be prepared for the congestion management program pursuant to Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) of the Public Resources Code, and the following conditions are met: (I) The agency, as defined by Section 65088.1, adopts written findings that the congestion management program cannot be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program by December 1, 1991, due to the time required to prepare an environmental impact report pursuant to Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) of the Public Resources Code. (2) The agency adopts a schedule for development of the congestion management program that will result in its adoption no later than December 1, 1992, and submits a report to the Legislature by July 1, 1992, on the progress of complying with this section. (3) The agency, county, and cities take every action necessary to assure the congestion management program will be adopted by December 1, 1992. (d) If the incorporation of the congestion management program into the regional transportation improvement program is delayed pursuant to subdivision (c), both of the following shall apply: (1) Any project included in the state transportation improvement program or'the traffic systems management program prior to December 1, 1992, which is otherwise required to be included in the congestion management program, pursuant to subdivision (e), but which is not included in the congestion management program to be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program pursuant to subdivision (b), shall be deleted from the state Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. Al-2 115 • 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program transportation improvement program or the traffic systems management program. (2) Local projects which are otherwise required to be included in the congestion management program, pursuant to subdivision (e), may be included in the regional transportation improvement program to be submitted to the California Transportation Commission by December 1, 1991. Any local project which is included in the regional transportation improvement program after December 1, 1991, but prior to December 1, 1992, which is otherwise required to be included in the congestion management program, but which is not included in the congestion management program to be incorporated into the regional transportation improvement program pursuant to subdivision (6), shall be deleted from the regional transportation improvement program. (e) Local projects not included in a congestion management program shall not be included in the regional transportation improvement program. Projects and programs adopted pursuant to subdivision (a) shall be consistent with the seven-year capital improvement program adopted pursuant to paragraph (5) of subdivision (b) of Section 65089, and the guidelines adopted pursuant to Section I4530.1. (f) Other projects may be included in the regional transportation improvement program if listed separately. (g) Unless a county not containing urbanized areas of over 50,000 population notifies the Department of Transportation by July 1 that it intends to prepare a regional transportation improvement program for that county, the department shall, in consultation with the affected local agencies, prepare the program for all counties for which it prepares a regional transportation plan. 00 The regional transportation improvement program may not change the project delivery milestone date of any state project as shown in the prior adopted state transportation program without the consent of the department or other agency responsible for the project delivery. (i) The requirements for incorporating a congestion management program into a regional transportation improvement program specified in this section do not apply in those counties that do not prepare a congestion management program in accordance with Section 65088.3. SEC. 2. Section 65089 of the Government Code is amended to read: 65089. (a) A congestion management program shall be developed, adopted, and updated biennially, consistent with the schedule for adopting and updating the regional transportation improvement program, for every county that includes an urbanized area, and shall include every city and the county. The program shall be adopted at a noticed public hearing of the agency. The program Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. Al-3 116 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program shall be developed in consultation with, and with the cooperation of, the transportation planning agency, regional transportation providers, local governments, the department, and the air pollution control district or the air quality management district, either by the county transportation commission, or by another public agency, as designated by resolutions adopted by the county board of supervisors and the city councils of a majority of the cities representing a majority of the population in the incorporated area of the county. (b) The program shall contain all of the following elements: (1) (A) Traffic level of service standards established for a system of highways and roadways designated by the agency. The highway and roadway system shall include at a minimum all state highways and principal arterials. No highway or roadway designated as a part of the system shall be removed from the system. All new state highways and principal arterials shall be designated as part of the system. Level of service (LOS) shall be measured by Circular 212, by the most recent version of the Highway Capacity Manual, or by a uniform methodology adopted by the agency that is consistent with the Highway Capacity Manual. The determination as to whether an alternative method is consistent with the Highway Capacity Manual shall be made by the regional agency, except that the department instead shall make this determination if either (i) the regional agency is also the agency, as those terms are defined in Section 65088.1, or (ii) the department is responsible for preparing the regional transportation improvement plan for the county. (B) In no case shall the LOS standards established be below the level of service E or the current level, whichever is farthest from level of service A. When the level of service on a segment or at an intersection fails to attain the established level of service standard, a deficiency plan shall be adopted pursuant to Section 65089.4. (2) A performance element that includes performance measures to evaluate current and future multimodal system performance for the movement of people and goods. At a minimum, these performance measures shall incorporate highway and roadway system performance, and measures established for the frequency and routing of public transit, and for the coordination of transit service provided by separate operators. These performance measures shall support mobility, air quality, land use, and economic objectives, and shall be used in the development of the capital improvement program required pursuant to paragraph (5), deficiency plans required pursuant to Section 65089.4, and the land use analysis program required pursuant to paragraph (4). (3) A travel demand element that promotes altemative transportation methods, including, but not limited to, carpools, vanpools, transit, bicycles, and park -and -ride lots; improvements in the balance between jobs and housing; and other strategies, including, but not limited to, flexible work hours, telecommuting, Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. A1-4 117 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program and parking management programs. The agency shall consider parking cash -out programs during the development and update of the travel demand element. (4) A program to analyze the impacts of land use decisions made by local jurisdictions on regional transportation systems, including an estimate of the costs associated with mitigating those impacts. This program shall measure, to the extent possible, the impact to the transportation system using the performance measures described in paragraph (2). In no case shall the program include an estimate of the costs of mitigating the impacts of interregional travel. The program shall provide credit for local public and private contributions to improvements to regional transportation systems. However, in the case of toll road facilities, credit shall only be allowed for local public and private contributions which are unreimbursed from toll revenues or other state or federal sources_ The agency shall calculate the amount of the credit to be provided. The program defined under this section may require implementation through the requirements and analysis of the California Environmental Quality Act, in order to avoid duplication. (5) A seven-year capital improvement program, developed using the performance measures described in paragraph (2) to determine effective projects that maintain or improve the performance of the multimodal system for the movement of people and goods, to mitigate regional transportation impacts identified pursuant to paragraph (4). The program shall conform to transportation -related vehicle emission air quality mitigation measures, and include any project that will increase the capacity of the multimodal system. It is the intent of the Legislature that, when roadway projects are identified in the program, consideration be given for maintaining bicycle access and safety at a level comparable to that which existed prior to the improvement or alternation. The capital improvement program may also include safety, maintenance, and rehabilitation projects that do not enhance the capacity of the system but are necessary to preserve the investment in existing facilities. (c) The agency, in consultation with the regional agency, cities, and the county, shall develop a uniform data base on traffic impacts for use in a countywide transportation computer model and shall approve transportation computer models of specific areas within the county that will be used by local jurisdictions to determine the quantitative impacts of development on the circulation system that are based on the countywide model and standardized modeling assumptions and conventions. The computer models shall be consistent with the modeling methodology adopted by the regional planning agency. The data bases used in the models shall be consistent with the data bases used by the regional planning agency. Where the regional agency has jurisdiction over two or more Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. Al-5 118 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program counties, the data bases used by the agency shall be consistent with the data bases used by the regional agency. (d) (I) The city or county in which a commercial development will implement a parking cash -out program that is included in a congestion management program pursuant to subdivision (b), or in a deficiency plan pursuant to Section 65089.4, shall grant to that development an appropriate reduction in the parking requirements otherwise in effect for new commercial development. (2) At the request of an existing commercial development that has implemented a parking cash -out program, the city or county shall grant an appropriate reduction in the parking requirements otherwise applicable based on the demonstrated reduced need for parking, and the space no longer needed for parking purposes may be used for other appropriate purposes. (e) Pursuant to the federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 and regulations adopted pursuant to the act, the department shall submit a request to the Federal Highway Administration Division Administrator to accept the congestion management program in lieu of development of a new congestion management system otherwise required by the act. SEC. 3. Section 65089.3 of the Government Code is amended to read: 65089.3. The agency shall monitor the implementation of all elements of the congestion management program. The department is responsible for data collection and analysis on state highways, unless the agency designates that responsibility to another entity. The agency may also assign data collection and analysis responsibilities to other owners and operators of facilities or services if the responsibilities are specified in its adopted program. The agency shall consult with the department and other affected owners and operators in developing data collection and analysis procedures and schedules prior to program adoption. At least biennially, the agency shall determine if the county and cities are conforming to the congestion management program, including, but not limited to, all of the following: (a) Consistency with levels of service standards, except as provided in Section 65089.4. (b) Adoption and implementation of a program to analyze the impacts of land use decisions, including the estimate of the costs associated with mitigating these impacts. (c) Adoption and implementation of a deficiency plan pursuant to Section 65089.4 when highway and roadway level of service standards are not maintained on portions of the designated system. SEC. 4. Section 65088.3 is added to the Government Code, to read: 65088.3. This chapter does not apply in a county in which a majority of local governments, collectively comprised of the city Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. A1-6 119 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program councils and the county board of supervisors, which in total also represent a majority of the population in the county, each adopt resolutions electing to be exempt from the congestion management program. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. Al-7 120 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program APPENDIX 2 RECOMMENDED HCM-BASED LEVEL OF SERVICE PROGRAM DEFAULTS FACILITYTYPE UROAN Freeways Group 70 CHARACTERISTICS TRAFFIC ROADWAY SIGNALIZATION e Si O P^ Y O .EC D .. s F C 0 at P9. a i 0 r- __ s =:1 ai- d& r':; 111:1'' ' _e I! g O ='O 49 •-j is i �LL 00 y' [a: -tea P O O T I- 8 6 04 3 w� w LL a`o a u`$mdr. =E111 .6. O s 1w '• i 1• o r. Ol 5 a J Er to e 1` m ,0 r6aE- C. E a =o .- ,~V'a2 e$ a , m5 Qts 0 =a&..4a m P EY ... g 3a =d,, 1r-,.,/�.?E•`�' 0 , 1: ' Al I€ aMm�y� i,7�pp�ay � IL,1,7 fa iy�m� �FELL yA. �� '®" �1En a.:17 A�LMmI +Y(4{Y�f9 ra.u. Q ) , ri. :1?`�p.4tlri< A ®' ,: ����t .,,•a mp R 15�� � Group 20rminza Slate Arterials Unintenupted© 0.000 m i,,,s;7-1® 'd'�..v.J E012=,'" 0 0.092 � i i cs.3..'.z.�� � a`:G .1 T k .�q'^ e =E-MI ssZIE EMI 0.092 nai' ' ' EWE ... =:3.111 isaar-sj�-'r''.y"�.'. e1i EEEDI''®1121=IMEN 0' 0© MEIL M i• EELIMIIIEEl®lE1110m0NE©00om Class 10 MIIIIMEMBM111=1112al MMINEE111171a1MMIIIIINEINEOMMENIKIIIIIREIIIMMEIIIIMMINIEECHEIZO williEEICEIIIMIIIKCINEUMENIIIENEMIU1111111571111011MEMMEMIIIIIECE1 0.925 EcasEamEwirminEwurmunmEnimilmEnati O 0.003 IMIIIMIKEIHERIIIIIIIENIZENNIMIVIIIIIMIENIMMIIIECICIZI 0.002 CEIIIMINIMINEMEEINIENEMENICOW1111111MMIEUNIEMMI MINNIMEMITI© -m 111111111•0215© 0.002 IDEEI'®NEI®NE1111©©000IIIM0©ECI 0 ' 1111111:Thl®0©©000©a©EU 0.002 CallIMIIIKEINEMEINEMEEZEMENMIC111111101111111111MIE11131 Non -State Roadresys o ' ' EE11111M11 ,.680 NEEMIKIMILINCIIMMICREINKIIIIIIIIMIESIEZEI ©CEINCETIMINEICEImo©mememe©11111112:11 m13:111111:19331MENEUooaIIEMe00Mo©mom IWEIMEMMTIIIIE1111:11131131111:MEIMMEMMENE=M=IIMMEMMEMMIEMMIER11211 -0 TRANSITIOMNG Freeways Slate Arterials Uninterrupted© Class)©n1310¢111 '' '®': CIMI 1800 mazom.:-:di-' ;0=E711511 0 0.097 WM 0.050 2000 [7-77,=sT"' i5 =7-7L, '-.�©©m '® E/ ELL,.'1:-0.3airMVM 0 "®' 0.so 0.950 C T-ia. i 1 1§/11= ..=. ���'N-::: us.T,.��..` �MI MEI 0.097 0.SO 0850 it ..;_...�vaw�_ =maiti�scr IIIIIIIIIII 0.010 tl 1E111='EM , A111©=._ T- =r-.;. ':'rc7-7.-''-- R:M . --ICITEFIAMMI 0010 ®' ®QOQQ©©Q©0EECI m11:1011201' ' 10MmeeoeeIae©om11:01 WM 0.004 12 i ' ERE' ®0©00m0©00♦1111'®" Class 0 IDEEIRECIIERIIIIMENCEIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIEMMIIIIIIELIMII 0ICIEM®® 0010 INCI®©©®OmQ©Q©gym oassmWM NonSlateRoadway MO, 61)403100y© m '�RIE110411®©©®00000©�' '�." i.• 0.668 '®13433m1110111©m0©0®QQ®i '®' mistral 0.568 '®NEUmO©m0©O®0©m 'O MIIIIIMI 0.568 '® r1 00 .-,M.M711111111111111=31111MMIN111011111111 Other &linefeed RURAL UNDEVELOPED Freeways -MIMI highways Level Terrain© ZEE 0.091 0.560 IMIIIIKCHECONINIU 0.560 EIEECI 0. 100 0.568 0.en 9t--la,-a." 1111211©l'•'n, id©11 '� 2 000 ia. i. ' ,ice911E1 '�©=3 m©0 ,r4 " t "e+ '.. ,i'd71 ® I Pr h;,,,"' 5:=4'S�w`,F'aillI © 0.100 ICEII 0.080 " ==J,c�`ay.30=©SINfg"�. �v •kzmAIME wig 0.100 Ega o.Ho inclu-YFrs'CEi0O aINIII== "r REM ounlelnous Terrain© 0.700 0.568 0.880 Ei = , IEllEEM00" ^-fifffin WEI © 0.100 0568 0080 7.000 '3Ei81r1®"L4'U' 00 s 4' .;�,yi 0,4+ x,.Ein es © 0.700 connu::' .tr-=a�m®nm©sizz 0 0.100 0.568 0.080 1,700 :MD 461a"tk WX 45 ^'aF'-,. - • ''Mil n41 ffirSAffaat 74,f ;r.'<'J:,+� Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologiesm Inc. A2-1 122 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program APPENDIX 3 FEDERAL CONGESTION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMITRAFFIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMSITMS) REQUIREMENTS Summation of FHWNFTA Final Rule: Management and Monitoring Systems FINAL RULE IN GENERAL The Final Rule is effective January 21, 1997, making Congestion Management Systems (CMS) in Transportation Management Areas (TMAs) and traffic monitoring systems (TMS) mandatory. The Final Rule requires the Secretary of Transportation (Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration) to issue regulations for state development, establishment, and implementation of: ♦ BMS (Bridge Management Systems); ♦ CMS (Congestion Management Systems); ♦ IMS (lntermodal Management Systems); ♦ PMS (Pavement Management Systems); ♦ PTMS (Public Transportation Management Systems); and ♦ SMS (Safety Management Systems). All above management systems are optional [as of the 1995 National Highway Designation Act (NHS)], except for CMS and TMAs. In addition to the CMS, the development, establishment, and implementation of a TMS is required under the Final Rule. TMAs are defined as: "an urbanized area with a population over 200,000 (as determined by the latest decennial census) or other area when TMA designation is requested by the Governor and the MPO (or affected local officials), and officially designated by the Administrators of the FHWA and the PTA. The TMA designation applies to the entire metropolitan planning area(s)." Issues mentioned in the Final Rule concerning Federal Funds include: ♦ Federal funds may not be programmed in a carbon monoxide and/or ozone non - attainment TMA for any project that will result in a significant increase in SOV (single -occupant -vehicle) capacity unless the project is based on an approved CMS. Interim CMS procedures may be used to meet these requirements, until September 30, 1997. After this date, such projects must be based on a fully operational CMS; and Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. A3-1 124 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ♦ Amendments in the 1995 NHS Act allow a state to elect not to implement,. in whole or in part, any one or more of the management systems (except for CMS in TMAs, and the TMS). In addition, the certification requirement was removed and the Secretary may not impose any sanction on or withhold any benefit from a state that elects to take this approach. Congestion management Systems (CMS) In all TMAs, the CMS shall be developed, established, and implemented as part of the metropolitan planning process in accordance with 23 CFR 450.3200 and shall include: ♦ Methods to: ➢ Monitor and evaluate the performance of the multimodal transportation system; ➢ Identify the causes of congestion; • Identify and evaluate alternative actions; ➢ Provide information supporting the implementation of actions; and ➢ Evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of implemented actions. ♦ Definition of parameters for measuring the extent of congestion and for supporting the evaluation of the effectiveness of congestion reduction and mobility enhancement strategies for the movement of people and goods. ♦ Establishment of a program for data collection and system performance monitoring to: ➢ Define the extent and duration of congestion; ➢ Help determine the causes of congestion; and ➢ Evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of implemented actions. ♦ To the extent possible, existing data sources should be used, as well as appropriate application of the real-time system performance monitoring capabilities available through Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technologies. ♦ Identification and evaluation of the anticipated performance and expected benefits of appropriate traditional and nontraditional congestion management strategies that will contribute to the more efficient use of existing and future transportation systems based on the established performance measures. The following categories of strategies, or combination of strategies, should be appropriately considered for each area: ➢ Transportation demand management (TDM) measures_ , including growth, management, and congestion pricing; ➢ Traffic operational improvements; ➢ Public transportation improvements; Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. A3-2 125 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program ➢ ITS technologies; and ➢ Additional system capacity (where necessary). ♦ Identification of an implementation schedule, implementation responsibilities, and possible funding sources for each strategy (or combination of strategies) proposed for implementation. "Section 500.102 — Policy (1 D Whether the systems are developing under the provisions of this part or under the State's own procedures, the following categories of FHWA administered funds may be used for development, establishment, and implementation of any of the management systems and the traffic monitoring system; National highway system; surface transportation program; state planning and research and metropolitan planning funds (including the optional use of minimum allocation funds authorized under 23 U.S.C. 157C and restoration funds authorized under Sec. 202 (f) of the National Highway System Designation Act of 1995 (Pub.L. 104-59) for carrying out the provisions of 23 U.S.C. 3070(1) and 23 USC 134(a)): congestion mitigation and air quality improvement program funds for those management systems that can be shown to contribute to the attainment of national ambient air quality standard; and apportioned bridge funds for development and establishment of the bridge management system. The following categories of FTA administered funds may be used for the development, establishment, and implementation of the CMS, PTMS, ]MS, and TMS: Metropolitan planning; state planning and research, and formula transit funds." ♦ Implementation of a process for periodic assessment of the efficiency and effectiveness of implemented strategies, in terms of the area's established performance measures. The results of this evaluation shall be provided to decision makers to provide guidance on selection of effective strategies for future implementation. ♦ In a TMA designated as non -attainment for carbon monoxide and/or ozone, the CMS shall provide an appropriate analysis of all reasonable (including multimodal) travel demand reduction and operational management strategies for the corridor in which a project that will result in a significant increase in capacity for SOVs (adding general purpose lanes to an existing highway or constructing a new highway) is proposed. If the analysis demonstrates that travel demand reduction and operational management strategies cannot fully satisfy the need for additional capacity in the corridor and additional SOV capacity is warranted, then the CMS shall identify all reasonable strategies to manage the SOV facility effectively (or to facilitate its management in the future). Other travel demand reduction and operational management strategies appropriate for the Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. A3-3 126 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program corridor, but not appropriate for incorporation into the SOV facility itself shall also be identified through the CMS. All identified reasonable travel demand reduction and operation management strategies shall be incorporated into the SOV project or committed to by the State and Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for implementation. ♦ Compliance with the requirement that the planning process in all TMAs include a CMS will be addressed during metropolitan planning process certification reviews for all TMAs specified in 23 CFR 450.334. If the metropolitan planning process in a TMA does not include a CMS that meets the requirements of this Section, deficiencies will be noted and corrections will need to be made in accordance with the schedule established in the certification review. ♦ Federal funds may not be programmed in a carbon monoxide and/or ozone non -attainment TMA for any project that will result in a significant increase of SOV (single occupant vehicle) capacity unless the project is based on an approved CMS. Interim CMS procedures may be used to meet this requirement, until September 30, 1997. After this date, such projects must be based on a fully operational CMS. Traffic Monitoring Systems (TMS) General Requirements ♦ Each state shall develop, establish, and implement, on a continuing basis, a TMS to be used for obtaining highway traffic data when the data are: ➢ Supplied to the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT); ➢ Used in support of transportation management systems; ➢ Used in support of studies or systems which are the responsibility of the U.S. DOT; ➢ Supported by the use of Federal funds provided from programs of the. U.S. DOT; ➢ Used in the apportionments or allocation of Federal funds by the U.S. DOT; ➢ Used in the design or construction of an FHWA funded project; or ➢ Required as part of a federally mandated program of the U.S. DOT. ♦ The TMS for highway traffic data should be based on the concepts described in the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guidelines for Traffic Data Programs" and FHWA "Traffic Monitoring Guide (TMG)," and shall be consistent with the FHWA Highway Performance Monitoring System Field Manual. ♦ The TMS shall cover all public roads except those functionally classified as local or rural minor collector or those that are federally owned. Coverage of Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, inc. A3-4 127 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program federally owned public roads shall be determined cooperatively by the state, the FHWA, and the agencies that own the roads. ♦ The state's TMS shall apply to the activities of local governments and other public or private non -state governments entities collecting highway traffic data within the state of the collected data are to be used for any of the purposes enumerated in Section A of this subpart. ♦ Procedures other than those referenced in this subpart may be used if the altemative procedures are documented by the state to furnish the precision levels as defined for the various purposes enumerated in Sec. A of this subpart and are found acceptable by the FHWA. ♦ Nothing in this subpart shall prohibit the collection of additional highway traffic data if such data are needed in the administration or management of a highway activity or are needed in the design of a highway project. • Transit traffic data shall be collected in cooperation with MPOs and transit operators. ♦ The TMS for highways and public transportation facilities and equipment shall be fully operational and in use by October 1, 1997. Components for Highway Traffic Data Each state's TMS, including those using altemative procedures, shall address the following components: • A state's TMS shall meet the statistical precisions established by FHWA for the HPMS. ♦ Continuous counter operations. Within each state, there shall be sufficient continuous counters of traffic volumes, vehicle classification, and vehicle weight to provide estimates of changes in highway travel patterns and to provide for the development of day -of -week, seasonal, axle correction, growth factors, or other comparable factors approved by the FHWA. As appropriate, sufficient continuous counts of vehicle classification and vehicle weight should be available to address traffic data program needs. ♦ Count data for traffic volumes collected in the field shall be adjusted to reflect annual average conditions. ♦ Vehicle classification activities on the National Highway System (NHS). On a cycle of no greater than three years, every major system segment (i.e_, segments between interchanges or intersections of principal arterials of the NHS with other principal arterials of the NHS) will be monitored to provide information on the Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. A3-5 128 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program numbers of single -trailer combination trucks, multiple -trailer combination trucks, two - axle four -tire vehicles, buses and the total number of vehicles operating on an average day. ♦ Vehicle occupancy monitoring. Such vehicle occupancy data shall be reviewed at least every three years and updated as necessary. Acceptable data .collection methods include roadside monitoring, traveler surveys, the use of administrative records (e.g., accident reports or reports developed in support of public transportation programs), or any other method mutually acceptable to the responsible organizations and the FHWA. ♦ Field operations. (1) Each state's TMS for highway traffic data shall include the testing of equipment used in the collection of the data. (2) Documentation of field operations shall include the number of counts, the period of monitoring, the cycle of monitoring, and the spatial and temporal distribution of count sites.. • Source data retention. For estimates of traffic or travel, the value or values collected during a monitoring session, as well as information on the date(s) and hour(s) of monitoring, will remain available until the traffic or travel estimates based on the count session are updated. ♦ Office factoring procedures. (1) Factors to adjust data from short-term monitoring sessions to estimates of average daily conditions shall be used to adjust for month, day of week, axle correction, and growth or other comparable factors approved by FHWA. These factors will be reviewed annually and updated at least every three years. (2) The procedures used by a state to edit and adjust highway traffic data collected from short-term counts at field locations to estimates of average traffic volume shall be documented. Prepared for: Riverside County Transportation Commission Prepared by: VRPA Technologies, Inc. A3-6 129 2010 Riverside County Congestion Management Program MONITORING REQUIREMENTS OF FEDERAL/STATE PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS PROGRAMS CMS TMS HPMS CMP Monitor/Evaluate the Multimodal Transportation System X X Identify Parameters for Evaluating the Extent of Congestion X Evaluate the Effectiveness of Implemented Actions X Identify/Implement a Program for Data Collection X X X X Cover all Public Roads X Collect Transit/Traffic Data X X X Meet AASHTO and FHWA Standards X X Continuous Counter Operations (volumes, vehicle class, weights, and highway travel patterns) X X Short-term Traffic Monitoring Every Two Years X Short-term Traffic Monitoring Every Three Years (sample data) X X Vehicle Classification (single/multi-trailer truck, 2-axle, 4- axle vehicles, buses, totals) — Every Three Years, Every Major System Segment X X Vehicle Occupancy (reviewed every three years) X Testing/Documentation of Field Operations X X Factoring Procedures (reviewed annually and updated every three years) X X Interstate and State Highway System (Ca[trans responsibility) X X X X Principal Arterials (CMA/local agency responsibility) X' X X X Minor Arterials (local agency responsibility) X' X X Collectors X' X X Recreational Routes X X All are eligible under CMS requirements depending on whether or not federal funds are to be allocated to the facilities. 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J`doS 01 dWO 01-0Z l!wqnS • lenoadde 0102i - 0 1-OZ aeW • lenoadde oyl - 0 1,OZ clad • AGENDA ITEM 12 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: February 22, 2010 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Goods Movement Manager THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2010 Appropriations - Alameda Corridor East — Auto Center Drive and Streeter Avenue Grade Separations STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Allocate $674,500 to the city of Corona (Corona) for the grade separation project; 2) Allocate $674,500 to the city of Riverside (Riverside) Streeter Avenue grade separation project; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Auto Center Drive in support of the The FY 2010 consolidated appropriations bill identified funding in the amount of $1.349 million for grade separation projects, located in Riverside County, on the Alameda Corridor East (ACE). At its February 10, 2010 meeting, the Commission approved allocating the congressionally -directed funding on a first -come, first - served basis - based on project deliverability - to support one of the 20 priority grade separation projects identified in the 2008 Grade Separation Funding Strategy: A Blueprint for Advancing Projects. Appendix B (attached) from the funding strategy provides a summary of the 20 priority projects including an overview of the funding and project status. City and county staff were subsequently notified of the availability of the funding. Corona and Riverside requested funding be allocated to partially support the right- of-way phase of the Auto Center Drive and Streeter Avenue grade separation projects, respectively. • Auto Center Drive project will construct a grade separation over Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway at an estimated cost of $32 million. The right of way phase of the project started in November 2009; construction is scheduled to start January 2011, with project completion scheduled for June 2012; Agenda Item 12 131 • Streeter Avenue project will grade separate the existing Streeter Avenue/Union Pacific Railroad by constructing an underpass at an estimated cost of $36.8 million. The project started the right of way phase of work earlier this month and is scheduled to begin construction January 2012, with project completion scheduled for July 2013. Both projects will improve traffic flow, reduce air pollution, and increase safety by eliminating vehicle delays at the at -grade crossings. Both projects previously received Proposition 1 B funding through the Trade Corridors Improvement Fund. As a result, both projects must commence construction by December 31, 2013. Allocating the federal funding to assist with the right of way phase of these projects will greatly support the delivery of these two projects. These federal funds will flow directly through to Corona and Riverside and do not affect the Commission's budget. Therefore, there is no financial impact to the Commission's budget. Attachment: Appendix B - RCTC Grade Separation Funding Strategy - Summary Agenda Item 12 132 • Appendix B RCTC Grade Separation Funding Strategy - Summary CPUC Voluntary Total Railroad Section Comainer Avail. Balance Local Contribution 190 Premiums Funds` Needed Funding Strategy Priority A 2 Auto Center Drivel BNSF $32.0 $8.30 $16.00 $2.70 $5.0 3 Avenue 52/UP $17.3 $1020 - $2.10 - $5.0 4 Avenue 56/ Airport Blvd/UP $60.0 $10.00 $50.00 3 Avenue 66/UP $33.5 - $10.00 $23.50 - 1 Columbia Avenue/ BNSF & UP $34.1 - $6.00 $20A5 $2.60 $5.0 1 Iowa Avenue/ BNSF &UP $32.0 $10.30 $13.00 $2.40 $1.30 $5.0 1 Magnolia Avenue/UP $51.2 - $20.00 $26.20 $5.0 1 Sunset Avenue/UP $36.5 $10.60 $10.00 $12.90 $3.00 - Funding Strategy Priority B $32.0 FD $17,3 CE PSR $60.0 - CE PSR (Eqv.) $33.5 - CE PSR (Eqv.) $34.1 C $32.0 PS&E $51.2 'Rt1tlP$[7 G $36.5 PE 1 3rd Street/ BNSF & UP $40.2 $7.66 $17.50 $0.50 $2.00 $5.0 $7.5 $40.2 PE 2 Clay Street/UP $37A $10.00 $12.50 $1.18 $1.87 $5.0 $6.9 $37.4 CE PSR (Eqv.) 1 Magnolia Avenue/ BNSF $81.8 $15.00 $13.70 $15.10 $4.09 MO $28.9 $81.8 CE PSR (Eqv.) 1 Riverside Avenue/UP $30.3 $5.00 $8.50 $2.50 $1.30 $5.0 $8.0 $30.3 E 2 Streeter Avenue/UP $36.8 $7.80 $15.50 $2.20 $1.30 $5.0 $5.0 $36.8 E Funding Strategy Priority C 3 Bel!grave Avenue/ UP $105.5 - $1.00 $- $1.0 $104-5 CE PSR (Egv.l 2 Center Street/ BNSF & UP $36.3 - $0.50 - - $- $0.5 $35.8 CPU 1 Jurupa Road/UP $108.4 - $12.00 $10.34 $5.0 $81.1 $108A - CE PSR (Eqv.) 2 Mary Street/BNSF $38.0 - $2.25 - $5.0 $30.8 $38.0 - PE 1 McKinley Street/ BNSF $109.2 $0.40 - $1.50 - - $- $1.9 $107.3 CE PSR (Eqv.) 3 Railroad Street/ BNSF $30.0 - $125 $- $0.3 $29.8 CE PSR (Eqv.) 2 Smith Avenue/ BNSF $30.0 - $0.25 - - $- $0.3 $29.8 CE PSR (Egv.l TOTALS: $960.5 $85.3 $152.7 S179.5 S27.8 $60.0 S168.1 $673.3 $307.1 • Total available funds include unsecured funding including railroad contributions, CPUC Section 190 and voluntary container fees. (All dollars in millions. Slight discrepancies may occur due to rounding.) LEGEND CPU Conceptual Planning Underway CE PSR Conceptual Engineering PSR CE PSR (Eqv.) Conceptual Engineering PSR (or Equivalent) PE Preliminary Engineering E Environmental ROW&D Right of Way and Design C Construction PS&E Plans, Specifications and Estimate FD Final Design RCTC Grade Separation Funding Strategy 2008 133