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06 June 9, 2010 Commission• • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org AGENDA * *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 9, 2010 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, CA In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission's website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. ROLL CALL 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS — Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Board should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda which are not listed on the agenda. Board members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — MAY 12, 2010 6. PUBLIC HEARING — RESOLUTIONS OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE, EASEMENT, AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of Resolutions of Necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected properties and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the Resolution of Necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer is just compensation has been made to the property owners. 3) Adopt Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 10-016, 10-017, 10-018, 10-019, 10-020, 10-021, 10-022, 10-023, and 10-024, "Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Certain Real Property, Located in Riverside County, California, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Numbers 215-332-023; 219-041-008; 219-043-025 and 219-043-026; 219-281-007; 219-301-006; 225-263-015; 225-350-050; 229-081-002; 229-110-035; 229-110-040, 229-110-04, 229-110-047, and 229-110-051 (Caltrans Parcel Nos. 20875-1 and 20875-2; 20874-1; 20423-1 and 20423-2; 20879-1 and 20879-2; 20867-1; 21109-1 and 21109-2; 20410-1 and 20410-3; 20686-1 and 20686-2; 20860-1; 20860-2; 20860-3; 20860-4, 20860-5, 20860-6, 20860-7, 20860-8, and 20860-9), for the Construction and Maintenance of Improvements Related to the State Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes, From Adams Street to the 60/91/215 Interchange, in Riverside County, California." • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 3 7. PUBLIC HEARING — PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 Page 107 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11; 2) Close the public hearing to receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11; and 3) Adopt the proposed Budget for FY 2010/1 1. 8. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS — The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. if there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 9. CONSENT CALENDAR — All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(sl. Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 9A. RESOLUTION NO. 10-015, RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ESTABLISHING THE COMMISSION'S APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 Page 346 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve Resolution No. 10-015, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2010/11". Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 4 9B. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD STATEMENT • NUMBER 54 FUND BALANCE REPORTING AND GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPE Page 354 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the Commission's new fund balance reporting policy; and 2) Approve the commitment of unexpended fund balance at June 30, 2010, in the Right of Way Management fund for right of way management services relating to rail and highway properties. 9C. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page 358 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the nine -month period ended March 31, 2010. • 9D. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended March 31, 2010. Page 364 9E. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Page 377 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2010. • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 5 9F. AGREEMENTS WITH LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. AND ICF INTERNATIONAL FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES Page 379 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call environmental consulting services for a three-year term in an aggregate amount of $1.2 million: a) Agreement No. 10-31-083-00 to LSA Associates, Inc; and b) Agreement No. 10-31-101-00 to ICF International; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to execute task orders awarded to these consultants under the terms of the agreements. 9G. AMENDMENT TO COMMISSION'S COMMUTER RAIL PROGRAM FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 AND FISCAL YEAR 2009/10 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS Page 443 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Amend the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2006/07 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect a reallocation of $4 million in Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 program funds originally approved for the North Main Corona parking structure to the Perris Valley Line (PVL) project; 2) Amend the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2009/10 SRTP to reflect allocation of $9.975 million in FTA Section 5309 program funds and deobligation of $8.8 million in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds and $1.175 million in State Transit Assistance (STA) funds for the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) rail car procurement project and reduction of LTF Capital Improvement Program expenditures by $480,000; and 3) Approve reductions to budgeted revenues and expenditures in the LTF, STA, Rail Operations, and Rail Capital funds. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 6 9H. AGREEMENT WITH ELITE ELECTRIC INC. TO PROVIDE LIGHTING MAINTENANCE SERVICES FOR THE FIVE COMMISSION -OWNED COMMUTER RAIL STATIONS AND THE PERRIS TRANSIT CENTER IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY Page 448 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 10-24-082-00 to Elite Electric, Inc. (Elite) for lighting maintenance services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations and the Perris Transit Center for a three-year period, and two one-year options, for a total contract amount of $550,000; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement, including option years, on behalf of the Commission. 91. PURCHASE OF RIGHT OF WAY FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Overview This item is for the Commission to: • Page 452 • 1) Authorize the Executive Director to purchase right of way for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), pursuant to consultation with an ad hoc committee appointed by the Chair; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute all agreements related to the purchase of right of way for the SR-91 CIP,. • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 7 9J. AMENDMENTS TO AGREEMENTS WITH DAVID EVANS & ASSOCIATES, PROJECT DESIGN CONSULTANTS, AND PSOMAS FOR ON -CALL RIGHT OF WAY ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING SERVICES Page 454 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the following agreements for on -call right of way engineering and surveying services in the aggregate amount of $450,000; a) Agreement No. 07-33-143-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-143-00, with David Evans & Associates; b) Agreement No. 07-33-145-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-145-00, with Project Design Consultants; and c) Agreement No. 07-33-144-02, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-144-00, with Psomas; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. 9K. FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 — FISCAL YEAR 2012/13 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS Page 456 Overview This item is for the Commission to review and approve, in concept, the FY 2010/11 — FY 2012/13 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, Riverside, Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA), Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the Commission's Commuter Rail Program. 9L. FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 MINIMUM FARE REVENUE RATIO FOR RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY AND SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY Page 461 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Reaffirm the methodology used to calculate the required fare box recovery ratio; and 2) Approve the FY 2010/11 minimum fare revenue to operating cost ratio of 17.09% for Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and 17.97% for SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine). Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 8 9M. AMENDMENT TO RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY'S FISCAL YEAR • 2009/10 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 465 1) Approve a modification to Riverside Transit Agency's (RTA) FY 2009/10 operating assistance funding by allocating $50,000 in Measure A funds designated for Specialized Transit/Consolidated Transportation Services Agency (CTSA) for Western Riverside County (Western County); 2) Approve a modification to RTA's FY 2009/10 capital improvement program to reflect an additional $4,007,425 in Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees (TUMF) and $3,508,333 in FY 2008/09 Proposition 1 B grant funding; and 3) Approve Amendment No. 1 to RTA's FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect these changes. 9N. AMENDMENT TO SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY'S FISCAL YEAR 2009/10 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 470 • 1) Approve a modification to SunLine Transit Agency's (SunLine) FY 2009/10 operating assistance funding by amending the original amount from $22,735,270 to $21,903,610 due to a combination of decreases in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds, Measure A funding, and federal Sections 5307, 5311, and 5317 allocations; 2) Approve a modification to SunLine's FY 2009/10 capital improvement program by using FY 2006/07 carryover funds of $502,865 in State Transit Assistance (STA), replacing previously approved LTF for local match to federally funded capital projects; and using an additional $594,000 in Section 5309 to replace Section 5307 funds for the bus rehabilitation project; 3) Approve a budget adjustment to the FY 2009/10 budget to reflect a reduction of $761,500 in LTF expenditures; and 4) Approve an amendment to SunLine's FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect these changes. • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 9 90. FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 SB 821 BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES PROGRAM FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS Page 474 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the FY 2010/11 SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities program recommended funding as shown in the attached schedule. 9P. SB 821 BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES PROGRAM REALLOCATION FOR THE CITY OF BEAUMONT Page 479 Overview This item is for the Commission to grant the city of Beaumont (Beaumont) a reallocation of unused SB 821 funds from its FY 2008/09 Citywide sidewalk and access ramps project to its FY 2009/10 Beaumont Avenue sidewalk and access ramps project. 9Q. SB 821 BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES PROGRAM EXTENSION FOR THE CITY OF TEMECULA Page 485 Overview This item is for the Commission to grant the city of Temecula (Temecula) an extension to June 30, 201 1, for approved SB 821 program funds for the Santa Gertrudis Creek pedestrian/bicycle bridge overcrossing project. 9R. FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 MEASURE A COMMUTER ASSISTANCE BUSPOOL SUBSIDY FUNDING CONTINUATION REQUESTS Page 492 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Authorize payment of $1,645/month maximum per buspool for the period July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 to the existing Corona, Mira Loma, and Riverside buspools; and 2) Require subsidy recipients to meet monthly buspool reporting requirements as supporting documentation to receive payments. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 10 9S. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 498 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 10. PROPOSED METROLINK BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 502 1) Adopt the preliminary FY 2010/1 1 Metrolink operating and capital budget; and 2) Allocate the Commission's funding commitment to the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) in an amount not to exceed of $8 million including contingency, in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for train operations and maintenance of way, and $1,224,700 for capital projects to be funded by Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 funds. 11. 2010 STATE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM ADOPTION Page 509 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file 2010 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) adoption. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 13. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 9, 2010 Page 11 • 14. CLOSED SESSION 14A. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL — INITIATION OF LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9(c) Potential Number of Case(s): Two 15. ADJOURNMENT The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 14, 2010, Board Room, County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California. • • Jeff Comerchero Mayor Ronald H. Roberts Mayor Pro-Tem Maryann Edwards Council Member Michael S. Naggar Council Member Chuck Washington Council Member 951-506-5100 FAX 951-694-6499 t: Printed on Recycled Paper City of Temecula 43200 Business Park Drive • Temecula, CA 92590 • Mailing Address: PO. Box 9033 • Temecula, CA 92589-9033 )951) 506-5100 • Fax i951) 694-6499 • www.cityoftemecula.org June 2, 2010 Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission P. O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Dear Clerk of the Board: I will be attending an APTA Rail Conference in Vancouver on June 9th so Council Member Jeff Comerchero will attend the Riverside County Transportation Commission meeting as my alternate. Sincerellyy, Ron Roberts Council Member cc: Council Member Comerchero RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET JUNE 9, 2010 E MAIL ADDRESS Ac_x_t7 ne,E.7?, ,,,GEN:a/ X. ,777z5 ., '' , %I%t-'s fri A R t /,+ I � J co -�\� �N{-- � (4\w. M;I►� IV(9-1-c-9 ��ccy,-, F�-,.w-A- (..)N\L-ZOMP.P--- (—c- C/ �i-s dl ✓4 e?7�--r 62 e,irce,ol j -ex-z4 e A6 Piliii2;11;V-e--- --1--~ /-fd c,e s o , 4).2\ 6ajle' ea7M(Vt_. W�wi-r G.4LT�4�5 v / 4y (PO /0t� tiC' ..if � 3 �)lit unae ---p 1 c° J' a �-rx- J G 04nA S 1111-re_5 N1.6._ i C2c/,u6 Eye. .'-'%02s'-✓ � �/9_G-G_,k• .O,v vi&-/-1 Rsi C�7es.e,173 ewe /lue�/ 1' k»-ear-rma 5.2A-1 7)400P- -4) s, e-- tom. ( lgs P '•�" 2«- Olt IrXT � 14 (//SC 6 rMtiJ PI t%\t r �� 5.� kJ° lJ e S- 0 (-- l /—✓vl .ti � --6c Z C. c- kc (! 1 CA/u2 � e_e...() f'2-1 .e --e(r�`'� y Sld /i mA-7--i� / 4i S- . c_.x2)LS�v7 1 . OD �. prj-Q.0 WA,Z-Z.r96-E FO6-F�Tozi MEh4.FZE., RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL JUNE 9, 2010 Present Absent County of Riverside- District County of Riverside, District II ,t 0 County of Riverside, District III County of Riverside, District IV ,� 0 County of R ve-mid& District D City of Banning ....................._...... City of Beat City of Blythe City of Catimas. City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral i City of Coachella City of C©rona City of Desert Hot Springs City of Hemet , City of Indian Wells City of Indio City of La Quinta .� 0 City of La EslOre City of Menifee City of Moreno Valley �' O City of Murrieta �' 0 City of Na o - 0 City of Palm Desert City of Palrti'5s City of Perris City of Ranc o City of Riverside City of Sari Jacintai` D. City of Temecula City of Wilac; --,' Governor's Appointee, Ca!trans District 8 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MINUTES Wednesday, May 12, 2010 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Bob Buster at 9:32 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE At this time, Commissioner Roger Berg led the Commission in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Steve Adams Darcy Kuenzi Marion Ashley Bob Magee John J. Benoit Scott Matas Roger Berg Ron Meepos Bob Botts Glenn Miller Daryl Busch Malcolm Miller Bob Buster Basem Muallem Mary Craton Patrick J. Mullany Scott Farnam Greg Pettis Bonnie Flickinger Steve Pougnet Eduardo Garcia Ray Quinto Rick Gibbs Ron Roberts Terry Henderson Karen Spiegel Richard Kelly Jeff Stone* *Arrived after the meeting was called to order 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests from the public to speak. Steve Di Memmo Joseph DeConinck Robin Lowe John F. Tavaglione Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — APRIL 14, 2010 M/S/C (Ashley/G. Miller) to approve the minutes of April 14, 2010, meeting as submitted. Abstain: Garcia and Meepos 6. PUBLIC HEARING — PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager, presented the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11, and discussed the following areas: • Budget process; • Commission policy goals; • FY 201 0/1 1Budget considerations; • Budget summary; • Sources by breakdown and comparison; • Expenditures by department; • Expenditures breakdown by department and comparison; • Capital department expenditure highlights; • Functional expenditures breakdown and comparison; and • Next steps. Chair Buster commended staff for the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11. Commissioner Marion Ashley concurred with Chair Buster and expressed it is a remarkable budget considering the current economic downturn, and stated the Commission continues to have ample reserves. Chair Buster opened the public hearing at this time. No comments were received for the public and the Chair announced the continuance of the public hearing to the Commission meeting on June 9, 2010. M/S/C (Henderson/Benoit) to continue the public hearing for the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11 to the Commission meeting on June 9, 2010. 7. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There was additional information to Agenda Item 11, "Colton Crossing Update." • • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 3 8. CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Adams/Henderson) to approve the following Consent Calendar items: Abstain: Ashley and Benoit on Agenda Item 9C 8A. ANNUAL INVESTMENT POLICY REVIEW 1) Adopt the Annual Investment Policy; and 2) Adopt Resolution No. 10-010, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Investment Policy" 8B. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 4 (Q4) 2009. 8C. RECURRING CONTRACTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 Approve the recurring contracts for FY 2010/11. 8D. TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE PROGRAM FUNDING AGREEMENT WITH WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS FOR STATE ROUTE 74/INTERSTATE 215 INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND RIGHT OF WAY 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-31-090-00 with Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) for $8.8 million in Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Central Zone funding for the construction phase of the 74/215 interchange improvement project; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Approve Agreement No. 05-31-566-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 05-31-566-00, with WRCOG to increase the right of way phase by $1.8 million to be funded with $900,000 of TUMF Central Zone funds and $900,000 of Measure A funds to address a cost increase; 4) Approve Agreement No. 10-31-092-00 with Southern California Edison (SCE) for the relocation and removal of utility poles and attached equipment; Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 4 5) Approve Agreement No. 10-31-093-00 with Time Warner Cable. (TWC) for the relocation and removal of utility poles and attached equipment; and 6) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. 8E. AGREEMENTS WITH QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO PROVIDE ON -CALL RIGHT OF WAY APPRAISAL SERVICES FOR RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, AND AGRICULTURAL PROPERTIES 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call right of way appraisal services for a three-year term, and two one-year options to extend the agreements, in an amount not to exceed an aggregate value of $950,000; a) Agreement No. 10-51-048-00 with Lidgard and Associates; b) Agreement No. 10-51-064-00 with Mason & Mason Real Estate Appraisers & Consultants; c) Agreement No. 10-51-065-00 with Donahue Hawran & Malm LLC; d) Agreement No. 10-51-066-00 with R.P. Laurain & Associates; e) Agreement No. 10-51-067-00 with Riggs & Riggs, Inc.; f) Agreement No. 10-51-068-00 with Hennessey & Hennessey LLC; and g) Agreement No. 10-51-069-00 with Robert Shea Perdue Real Estate Appraisal; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to execute task orders awarded to contractors under the terms of the agreements; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, including option years, on behalf of the Commission. 8F. AGREEMENTS WITH QUALIFIED CONTRACTORS TO PROVIDE ON -CALL RIGHT OF WAY APPRAISAL REVIEW SERVICES FOR RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, AND AGRICULTURAL PROPERTIES 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call right of way appraisal review services for a three-year term, and two one-year options to extend the agreements, in an amount not to exceed an aggregate value of $500,000; • • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 5 a) Agreement No. 10-51-051-00 with Donahue Hawran & Malm LLC; b) Agreement No. 10-51-070-00 with R.P. Laurain & Associates; c) Agreement No. 10-51-071-00 with Mason & Mason Real Estate Appraisers and Consultants; d) Agreement No. 10-51-072-00 with Hennessey & Hennessey LLC; and e) Agreement No. 10-51-073-00 with Overland Pacific & Cutler Inc.; 2) Authorize the Executive Director to execute task orders awarded to contractors under the terms of the agreements; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, including option years, on behalf of the Commission. 8G. AGREEMENT FOR UTILITY RELOCATION FOR THE STATE ROUTE 60/INTERSTATE 215 EAST JUNCTION HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES CONNECTOR 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-31-094-00 with AT&T for utility relocation for the 60/215 East Junction interchange project once the design and replacement location are finalized; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 8H. AGREEMENT WITH RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY TO REPAINT THE NORTH MAIN CORONA PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-25-091-00 for a right of entry and reimbursement agreement with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to allow for the painting of the North Main Corona pedestrian bridge for a total contract amount not to exceed $175,000; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 6 81. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS FOR THE RISING STARS IN TRANSIT INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 1) Approve Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 10-25-089-00 between the Commission and the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) for the Rising Stars in Transit — Internships for University Students program; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the MOU on behalf of the Commission. 8J. AGREEMENTS FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL TOW TRUCK SERVICE 1) Award Agreement No. 10-45-059-00 to Pepe's Towing Service for tow truck service on Beat No. 1 of the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program for a three-year term, and two one-year options to extend the agreement, for a total contract amount not to exceed $1,453,000; 2) Award Agreement No. 10-45-060-00 to Pepe's Towing Service for tow truck service on Beat No. 26 of the FSP program for a three- year term, and two one-year options to extend the agreement, for a total contract amount not to exceed $969,000; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, including options years, on behalf of the Commission. 8K. AGREEMENT WITH THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FOR THE REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL COSTS 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-45-085-00 with the State of California Department of Transportation (Ca!trans) for Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) in various construction areas in Riverside County; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 7 8L. FUNDING AGREEMENT WITH THE CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL SUPERVISION 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-45-084-00 with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to provide overtime supervision and operation of a Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program in Riverside County; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 8M. CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 1) Renew the memberships of Michelle Anglin, Peter Benavidez, Jim Collins, Fortunato Penilla, and Eunice Lovi; 2) Appoint LoreIle Moe -Luna as the new Consolidated Transportation. Service Agency representative from Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); and 3) Approve the memberships for the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Committee (CAC/SSTAC) effective January 1, 2010. 8N. CITY OF CORONA JUMP START FUNDING FOR GRADE CROSSINGS 1) Reallocate $500,000 in funding from the Smith Avenue and Railroad Street to the McKinley Avenue grade separation project; 2) Approve Agreement No. 08-33-014-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 08-33-014-00, with the city of Corona (Corona) deleting Smith Avenue and Railroad Street from the project list; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 80. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislative activities; 2) Approve the following bill positions: a) SB 1245 (Simitian) - OPPOSE; b) AB 1760 (Blumenfield) - WATCH; c) AB 2098 (Miller) - SPONSOR and SUPPORT; and d) AB 2620 (Eng) - OPPOSE. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 8 9. STATE ROUTE 60/INTERSTATE 215 EAST JUNCTION INTERCHANGE LOCAL MATCH REQUIREMENT Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager, provided an overview of the three qualified projects receiving State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funding. She displayed an aerial map depicting the existing 60/215 East Junction interchange and a project map. Commissioner Ashley commended staff and California Transportation Commission (CTC) member Joe Tavaglione for their efforts to obtain STIP funds for these projects. Commissioner Benoit concurred with Commissioner Ashley's comments and stated the 60/215 East Junction project will alleviate the severe traffic congestion at this interchange. M/SIC (Flickinger/Henderson) to: 1) Approve Measure A funds in an amount not to exceed $1,949,047, to match federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds programmed to the 60/215 East Junction interchange project; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director to execute the cooperative agreement amendment with Caltrans to include Measure A match funds. 10. AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE STATE ROUTE 74/INTERSTATE 215 INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT IN THE CITY OF PERRIS, AND CONSTRUCTION DESIGN SUPPORT Lisa DaSilva, Capital Projects Manager, provided an overview of the agreements for construction and additional design support for the 74/215 interchange improvement project. Commissioner Ashley expressed appreciation for this project moving forward. Commissioner Daryl Busch concurred. Anne Mayer announced the 74/215 interchange project groundbreaking ceremony will be held on June 14, in the city of Perris. • • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 9 MIS/C (Busch/Spiegel) to: 1) Award Agreement No. 10-31-030-00 for the construction of the 74/215 interchange improvement project in the city of Perris (Perris) to Skanska USA Civil West (Skanska) for the amount of 813,439,004 plus a contingency amount of $1,343,996 for potential change orders during construction, for a total not to exceed contract authorization of $14,783,000; 2) Approve Agreement No. 07-31-122-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 07-31-122-00, with David Evans and Associates, Inc. (DEA) to perform additional design support during the construction of the 74/215 interchange improvement project in the city of Perris for the additional amount of $204,087 resulting in a revised not to exceed amount of $3,303,749; and 3) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. 11. COLTON CROSSING UPDATE Anne Mayer provided an update on the Colton Crossing project, including positive train control (PTC), programming of Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF) funds for the project, the degree of public benefit, and the memorandum of understanding (MOU). At Chair Buster's request, Anne Mayer discussed the Coachella Valley analysis and additional train slots for passenger rail services. Commissioner Benoit commended staff on the successful negotiations and discussed the current status of the Colton Crossing and the regional benefits of its improvement. Commissioner Henderson also commended staff on the successful negotiations. She requested clarification on PTC and the effect of the MOU on potential passenger rail service to the Coachella Valley. Anne Mayer briefly discussed the origin of PTC, how it works, and the challenges of its implementation. She then stated with regard to the MOU, once it is approved, Union Pacific Railroad will commence an analysis of additional passenger rail service from the cities of Colton to Indio. She explained the Commission expects a thorough objective study, and will utilize the Commission's rail consultants and partners at Metrolink to ensure it is adequately addressed. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 10 In response to Commissioner Malcolm Miller's request for clarification on the PTC functions, Anne Mayer replied both trains are stopped, but she is uncertain for the other surrounding trains and recommended a PTC presentation at a future Commission meeting. Commissioner Benoit concurred with Anne Mayer's recommendation for a presentation on PTC. At Chair Buster's request, Anne Mayer provided an update on the 1-215 bi-county project with SANBAG. At this time, Commissioner Jeff Stone arrived at the meeting. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA There were no agenda items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 13. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT There were no comments from Commissioners or the Executive Director. At this time, Commissioners Eduardo Garcia, Rick Gibbs, Ron Meepos, Glenn Miller, • Steve Pougnet, and Ray Quinto left the meeting. 14. CLOSED SESSION 14A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Negotiating Parties: RCTC — Executive Director or Designee Property Owners — See List of Property Owners Item APN(s) Property Owner(s) 1 118-302-001 Li Li 2 118-160-058 Chris M. Bell and Joy L. Bell '3 118-160-057 Lynette Davis There were no announcements from the Closed Session items. • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 12, 2010 Page 11 15. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, the meeting was adjourned at 10:47 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, June 9, 2010, in the Board Room, at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California. Respectfully submitted, 011J"'‘'''-(L.-- Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Certain Real Property, Located in Riverside County, California, by Eminent Domain, for the Construction and Maintenance of Improvements Related to the State Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of Resolutions of Necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected properties and their • attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the Resolution of Necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. 3) Adopt Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 10-016, 10-017, 10-018, 10-019, 10-020, 10-021, 10-022, 10-023, and 10-024, "Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Certain Real Property, Located in Riverside County, California, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Numbers 215-332-023; 219-041-008; 219-043-025 and 219-043-026; 219-281-007; 219-301-006; 225-263-015; 225-350-050; 229-081-002; 229-110-035, 229-110-040, 229-110-045, 229-110-047, and 229-110-051 (Caltrans Parcel Nos. 20875-1 and 20875-2; 20874-1; 20423-1 and 20423-2; 20879-1 and 20879-2; 20867-1; 21109-1 and 21109-2; 20410-1 and 20410-3; 20686-1 and 20686-2; 20860-1, 20860-2, 20860-3, 20860-4, 20860-5, 20860-6, 20860-7, 20860-8, and 20860-9), for the Construction and Maintenance of Improvements Related to • the State Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes, From Adams Street to the 60/91/215 Interchange, in Riverside County, California." Agenda Item 6 1 BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is being asked to consider the adoption of Resolutions of Necessity declaring its intent to acquire fee, easement, and temporary construction easement interests in portions of certain real property through eminent domain proceedings for the construction and maintenance of the high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane project (Project) on the SR-91 in the city of Riverside. The immediate need for the property acquisitions is to proceed with the construction of the Project. The acquisitions are required for, and will benefit, the community by reducing congestion, improving existing operating conditions, and enhancing safety. The Project will complete the HOV lanes from the Orange County line to the 60/91 /215 interchange. Litigation guarantees were ordered from Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation and Stewart Title Guaranty Company to confirm and identify the record owners of the parcels affected by the Project. The Commission then served the affected property owners with a notice of the Commission's decision to appraise the property. The Commission had the properties appraised and made an offer to each of the record owners. Negotiations have been unsuccessful for the purchase of the properties; however, the adoption of a resolution of necessity for each property will not prevent negotiations from continuing. Since an agreement has not been reached with the owners of record, it may be necessary to acquire the parcels described in the attachments by eminent domain. The initiation of the eminent domain process is accomplished by the Commission's adoption of a resolution of necessity. Description of Property to be Acquired Ca!trans Parcel Numbers (CPN) 20875-1 and 20875-2 are owned by Imperial Stations, Inc., a California corporation, and is located at 3315 14t" Street, in the city of Riverside, California. The larger parcel is improved with a service station and a minimart. Only a temporary construction easement is necessary for the Project. The temporary construction easement area is improved with a sign and landscaping. CPN 20874-1 is owned by Grant Shockley, trustee of the Grant Shockley Trust under trust agreement dated October 23, 2003. The larger parcel is located at 3304 14t° Street, in the city of Riverside, California. On site improvements include a service station, a full service car wash, and minimart. The temporary construction easement acquisition is located along the west side of Agenda Item 6 • • • 2 • • Mulberry Street, and along the south side of 14`" Street, and is improved with landscaping, light fixtures, and a monument sign. Only a temporary construction easement is necessary for the Project. CPNs 20423-1 and 20423-2 are owned by West Riverside, LLC, a California limited liability company, and are located at 4470 Olivewood Avenue, in the city of Riverside, California. The larger parcel is improved with an office building. The larger parcel is located along the east side of Olivewood Avenue and the south side of Kane Street. Site improvements include fencing, paving, and landscaping. A fee portion and a temporary construction easement are necessary for the Project. CPNs 20879-1 and 20879-2 are owned by Stephanie Redmond and Erik R. Redmond. The larger parcel is improved with a single-family dwelling and is located at 2996 Rockhill Way, in the city of Riverside, California. Only temporary construction easements are necessary for the Project to regrade the entranceways to match the street profile. CPN 20867-1 is owned by Joe Hale. The parcel is improved with a single-family dwelling, and is located at 2984 Ivy Street, in the city of Riverside, California. Only a temporary construction easement is necessary for the Project to regrade the driveway to match the street profile. CPNs 21109-1 and 21109-2 are owned by Central Riverside Office, L.P. The larger parcel is located on the south side of Central Avenue, adjacent west to SR-91, in the city of Riverside, California, and is improved with a three-story office building. Other onsite improvements include an asphalt paved parking area, paving, curbing, and landscape. Various easement interests are necessary for the Project. CPNs 20410-1 and 20410-3 are owned by Westminster Arlington, LLC. The larger parcel is located north of Arlington Avenue, east of SR-91, in the city of Riverside, California. This property is currently being improved with an LA Fitness Center. A fee portion and a temporary construction easement are necessary for the Project, and affect the portion of the property between the building and the freeway. The LA Fitness Center was constructed in concert with the SR-91 project plans. CPNs 20686-1 and 20686-2 are owned by Mimi D. Monaco, trustee of the Mimi D. Monaco Separate Property Trust under declaration of trust dated September 21, 2001, as to an undivided 68.28% interest; Denise Monaco and Mimi D. Monaco, co -trustees of the Denise Monaco 2008 Trust under trust agreement dated June 6, 2008, as to an undivided 18.28% interest; Kenneth Cox and Mimi Monaco Donsbach, co -trustees of the Liana Elena Donsbach Trust under the Monaco 1989 Trust, as to an undivided 6.72% interest; and Kenneth Cox and Mimi Monaco Donsbach, co -trustees of the Christopher Boris Donsbach Trust under the Monaco 1989 Trust, as to an undivided 6.72% interest, all as tenants in common. The Agenda Item 6 larger parcel is located at 6751 Indiana Avenue, in the city of Riverside, California, and is improved with a fast-food restaurant, and with a drive -through. A fee portion and a temporary construction easement are necessary for the Project and affect a portion of the parking lot. CPNs 20860-1, 20860-2, 20860-3, 20860-4, 20860-5, 20860-6, 20860-7, 20860-8, and 20860-9 are owned by Douglas George Jacobs and Karen Lee Jacobs, trustees of the Jacobs Family Trust dated March 10, 2000, as to Parcel A; Indiana Business Center L.P., a California limited liability company, as to Parcel B; and, Douglas G. Jacobs and Karen L. Jacobs, co -trustees of the Jacobs Family Trust dated March 10, 2000, as to Parcel C. The larger parcel is located on the southwesterly corner of Indiana Avenue and Jane Street, in the city of Riverside, California, and is improved with five two-story office buildings. The partial fee acquisition is located on the southeasterly portion of the larger parcel, and is required for the reconfiguration of Jane Street and affect landscaping. There are also eight temporary construction easements necessary for the Project to reconfigure entranceways. Project Description The Project will provide two HOV lanes on the SR-91 between Adams Street and the 60/9.1 /215 interchange, and will improve ramps, bridges, and access and modify interchanges in Riverside County, California. Hearings and Required Findings The action requested of the Commission at the conclusion of this hearing concerning the acquisition of real property interests from the property owners listed below, and further identified in the legal description(s) and depicted on the map(s), which are attached. CPNs 20875-1 and 20875-2 are owned by Imperial Stations, Inc., a California corporation. CPN 20874-1 is owned by Grant Shockley, trustee of the Grant Shockley Trust under trust agreement dated October 23, 2003. CPNs 20423-1 and 20423-2 are owned by West Riverside, LLC, a California limited liability company. CPNs 20879-1 and 20879-2 are owned by Stephanie Redmond and Erik R. Redmond. CPN 20867-1 is owned by Joe Hale. Agenda Item 6 • • 4 • CPNs 21109-1 and 21 109-2 are owned by Central Riverside Office, L.P. CPNs 20410-1 and 20410-3 are owned by.Westminster Arlington, LLC. CPNs 20686-1 and 20686-2 are owned by Mimi D. Monaco, trustee of the Mimi D. Monaco Separate Property Trust under declaration of trust dated September 21, 2001, as to an undivided 68.28% interest; Denise Monaco and Mimi D. Monaco, co -trustees of The Denise Monaco 2008 Trust under trust agreement dated June 6, 2008, as to an undivided 18.28% interest; Kenneth Cox and Mimi Monaco Donsbach, co -trustees of the Liana Elena Donsbach Trust under the Monaco 1989 Trust, as to an undivided 6.72% interest; and Kenneth Cox and Mimi Monaco Donsbach, co -trustees of the Christopher Boris Donsbach Trust under the Monaco 1989 Trust, as to an undivided 6.72% interest, all as tenants in common. CPNs 20860-1, 20860-2, 20860-3, 20860-4, 20860-5, 20860-6, . 20860-7, 20860-8, and 20860-9 are owned by Douglas George Jacobs and Karen Lee Jacobs, trustees of the Jacobs Family Trust dated March 10, 2000 as to Parcel A; Indiana Business Center L.P., a California limited liability company, as to Parcel B; and, Douglas G. Jacobs and Karen L. Jacobs, co -trustees of the Jacobs Family Trust dated March 10, 2000, as to Parcel C. California eminent domain law provides that a public entity may not commence with eminent domain proceedings until its governing body has adopted a resolution of necessity, which a resolution may only be adopted after the governing body has given each party with an interest in the affected properties, or their representatives, a reasonable opportunity to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1. The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2. The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3. The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4. The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. Notices of the hearing were sent by first class mail to the property owners, and stated the Commission's intent to consider the adoption of the resolution, the right of each person to appear and be heard on these issues, and that failure to file a written request to appear would result in a waiver of the right to appear and be heard. The Commission has scheduled this hearing at which all persons who filed a written request within 15 days of the date of notice was mailed may appear and be heard. The Commission's legal counsel mailed the required notice to the property Agenda Item 6 owners on April 23, 2010; amended notices were mailed to the Shockley, Imperial Stations, Inc., and Redmond owners on April 29, 2010, in accordance with the California Code of Civil Procedure, section 1245.235 and Caltrans requirements. The property owners were also invited to meet with Commission and Caltrans staff to address any concerns the property owners may have with the design of the Project in the manner proposed and the necessity of. the acquisition. The four required findings are addressed as follows: 1. Public Interest and Necessity Require the Proposed Project The acquisition of the property is necessary to construct the Project, which will close the gap that exists on the HOV lanes at the SR-91 between the Orange County line and the 60/91 /215 interchange, and will improve ramps, bridges and access and modify interchanges in the city of Riverside, Riverside County, California. Construction of the Project will reduce traffic congestion and enhance safety. 2. The Project is Planned or Located in a Manner That Will be Most Compatible with the Greatest Public Good and the Least Private Injury A thorough analysis was conducted to find the single best location for this Project. Environmental analyses and findings indicate this site uniquely satisfies the engineering, public health, and environmental issues, and this location is the most compatible with the greatest public good. It is also the location with the least private injury. 3. The Real Property Sought to be Acquired is Necessary for the Proposed Protect As described above, a careful analysis was performed regarding location and what property and property rights were needed, and this parcel meets all the desired characteristics for the construction of the improvements for the Project. 4. The offer of Just Compensation Has Been Made Appraisals and appraisal reviews were prepared by the Commission's appraisers, Valentine Appraisal & Associates; R.P. Laurain Associates Incorporated; Lidgard and Associates Incorporated; Hennessey & Hennessey LLC; Paragon Partners, Ltd.; Mason & Mason; and Donahue Hawran & Malm LLC to establish fair market value of the real property the Commission is seeking to acquire from the property owned by the property owners Agenda Item 6 • 6 • identified herein. Offers of just compensation were made to the property owners to purchase the real property interests, based on the approved appraisal, as required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code. Although negotiated settlements may still be possible, it would be appropriate to commence the procedures to acquire the property through eminent domain, to ensure that the real property will be available to meet the time frames associated with the construction of the Project. Environmental Analysis Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) has been satisfied by the adoption of the State Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle Project Initial Study with Mitigated Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment with Finding of No Significant Impact in August, 2007. Fiscal Impact There is no fiscal impact from this action. Notice of Public Hearing Notices of Public Hearing were mailed on April 23, 2010, to the property owners of record. Amended Notice of Public Hearing were mailed to previously -noticed property owners on April 29, 2010. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 10-016 2) Resolution No. 10-017 3) Resolution No. 10-018 4) Resolution No. 10-019 5) Resolution No. 10-020 6) Resolution No. 10-021 7) Resolution No. 10-022 8) Resolution No. 10-023 9) Resolution No. 10-024 Agenda Item 6 7 • • • ATTACHMENT 1 RESOLUTION NO. 10-016 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 215-332-023 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20875-1 AND 20875-2), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire a temporary construction easement interest in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 215-332-023 (Ca[trans Parcel Nos. 20875-1 and 20875-2), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the temporary construction easement interest in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1 " are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interest to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission • • 9 • finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public uses► pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9'h day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 10 • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired "Temporary Construction Easement (TCE)" refers to the right of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC"), its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut or clew away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the ' prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin 48 hours after RCTC provides written notification to the Property Owner of its intent to commence construction. RCTC shall have the option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, at RCTC's sole discretion, until construction on the property is completed, upon written notice to the Property Owner. If the term of the TCE is extended. RCTC shall pay additional compensation to the Property Owner on a per diem basis, as set forth in the legal description of the property attached hereto. If the term of the TCE is extended, it shall not extend beyond August 1, 2016. EXHORT 1, PAGE 1 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 08-RIV-91-20.00(PM) #20875.1 & 20875-2 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, upon and across those portion of Block 13, Range 3, Map of the Town of Riverside, in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as per Map on file in Book 7, page 17 of Maps in the Office of the County Recorder of San Bernardino County, of that certain land described in a Corporation Grant Deed to Imperial Stations Inc., recorded November 26, 1997 as Instrument No. 436289, Official records of Riverside County, more particularly described as follows: PARCEL 20875-1 COMMENCING at the southerly corner of said Block 13; thence along the easterly line of said Block 13, North 29°42'48" East, 52.02 feet to the most easterly corner of that certain land described in a Grant Deed to the City of Riverside, recorded December 1, 1998 as Instrument No. 519706, Official records of Riverside County; thence along the northerly boundary -of said Instrument No. 519706, South 76°56'00" West, 36.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence (Course "A") continuing along said boundary, North 60°15'21" west, 43.29 feet; thence leaving said boundary, North 29°44'40" East, 3.00 feet to a line parallel with and 3.00 feet northeasterly measured at right angles from said Course "A"; thence along said parallel line, South 60°15'21" East, 46.53 feet to said northerly boundary; thence along said boundary South 76°56'00" West, 4.41 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 20875-2 The easterly 20.00 feet of said Instrument No. 436289 as measured at right angles to and parallel with the southeasterly line of (continued) 12 i 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 08-RIV-91-2O.0O(PM) #20875-1 & 20875-2 PARCEL 20875-2 (continued) said Block 13, Range 3 as shown on above said Map. EXCEPTING therefrom that portion conveyed to the City of Riverside, by Grant Deed recorded December 1, 1998 as Instrument No. 519706, Official records of Riverside County. It is understood that said temporary easements shall extend for a period of eighteen (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours after Grantee provides written notification to Grantor of its intent to commence construction. In the event said actual use by Grantee, its authorized agents or contractors extends beyond the prescribed period of time, the Grantee shall pay the Grantor at the same contract rate of $1,260.92 per month, prorated to the actual date said use is terminated. All rights acquired. herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or upon filing Notice of Completion. The bearings and distances used in the above descriptions are based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 19 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000273 to obtain ground level 20 distances. 21 / / / 22 / / / 23 These real properties have been described by me, or under my 24 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 25 26 27 28 Act. /j Slgnature L •/. Date Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 . i /X - .2 13 0 • CITY OF RIVERSIDIE CUNTY OF RIVERSIDE 08.4 BO%11000 PL. — BR001(S ST. v,013;etlsmvc.B.:0yy ` �� �Y7f+`d /F-1 PARCELS 20875-1 20875-2 54, �r 4, � F AYE a� Y NOTE: The State of Calffornfo or Ito Offi Coro or ogonfd oho71 not Do raaponoiDlo for the accuracy or complotdnosa Of dtgital imaged Of Nilo mop. Sr TO COLTON 7'^�t STATE OF CALIFORNIA RUMNESS, TRANSPORTATION ANTI EOUMG AGENCY DEPARTSE :NT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT OF WAY RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY VICINITY MAP EXHIBIT A NO SCALE DISTRICT =NTT ROUTE SHEET PR SHEET NOiTOTAL SHEETS 08 Riv 91 Q • CITY OF RIVE SIDE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE '1S H1N331llf103 'd u 60 i 576°56'00"W I1'.' 36.81'-- Z Z� zr- Wr— etVI z N29°44'40"E 3.00' NOTE: TM Store of Confornio or Ira officers or opens shall not oo roopenp'Dfo for fla ooeurooy or Comp foroeoas of &girer ?mopes of tnfa map. MAP !OF THE TOWN 0Ff RIVERSIDE M.B. 7/17 BLK 13 R 3 PARCEL 20875-1 �Cn (TCE) CN (i1 "Tv INSTRUMENT NO. .2 436289 576°56'00"W 4.41 ' e N29°42'4 8"E ..576°56'00"W / ' I \' '' - 27.52' ; �� 1 1 ..--. ' N29°42'48"E -- N29°42'48"E 124.09' 52.02' I PARCEL 20875-2 (TCE) 14 2.61' w w e„� 20 00' �- € MULBERRY STREET �II[Illllliillll!11111±III 560°15'43"E -' 20.00' STATE OF CALIFORNIA BUSINESS. TRANSPORTATION AND ZOO=AGENCY DEM MIENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT OF WAY RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY EXHIBIT B NO SCALE DISTRICT ONINTT ROUTE SHEET IN SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS 08 RIY 91 20.0 2 2 ATTACHMENT 2 RESOLUTION NO. 10-017 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY . FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTEREST IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 219-041-008 (CALTRANS PARCEL NO. 20874-1), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire a temporary construction easement interest in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 219-041-008 (Ca!trans Parcel No. 20874-1), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 16 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the temporary construction easement interest in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1 " are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interest to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it • • 17 • • • now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9tb day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 18 • • Definitions of Le al Riehts to be Acquired "Temporary Construction Easement (TCE)" refers to the right of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC-), its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin 48 hours after ROTC provides written notification to the Property Owner of its intent to commence construction. RCTC shall have the option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, at RCTC's sole discretion, until construction on the property is completed, upon written notice to the Property Owner. If the term of the TCE is extended, ROTC shall pay additional compensation to the Property Owner on a per diem basis, as set forth in the legal description of the property attached hereto. if the term of the TCE is extended, it shall not extend beyond August I. 2016. Exhibit ,Page_L_ 19 08-Riv-91-19.95(PM) #20874-1 1 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, 2 upon and across that portion of Lot 2, as shown by the Map of the Southern 3 California Colony Association, in the City of Riverside, California, filed 4 in Book 7 page 3, of Maps, in the Office of the County Recorder in San 5 Bernardino County, California also being shown as Lots 1, 2, and 21 on 6 Assessor's Map No. 19, filed in Book 1, page 23, of Assessor's Maps, 7 Records of Riverside County, California, described as follows: 8 mane= at the southwesterly terminus of that certain curse in the 9 northwesterly line of that real property granted to the City of Riverside by t0 Grant Deed, recorded Flory 6, 1973 as Instrument No. 16077, Official Records 11 of Riverside County, California, cited therein as "South 29°06'24" West 17.00 12 feet'; thence along the southeast line of Parcel 1, shown by a Record of 13 Survey filed in Book 33, page 44, of Records of Survey, Office of the 14 Riverside County Recorder, California, South 29°45'51" West 40.70 feet; 15 thence South 59°59'26" East 102.52 feet; thence South 29°43'29' West 162.89 16 feet to the southwest line of said Lot 2; thence along said southwest line 17 South 60°15'28" East 18.00 feet to the northwesterly line of certain 8 feet 18 strip of real property described in a Grant Deed to the City of Riverside, 19 California, recorded November 15, 1974 as Instrument No. 147462, Official 20 Records of Riverside County, California; thence along said northwesterly 21 line North 29°43'29" East 191.63 feet to a point on the southwesterly line 22 of that real property granted to the City of Riverside, described by said 23 Instrument No. 16077, said point being on a non -tangent curve concave 24 westerly having a radius of 25.00 feet a radial line to said point bears 25 North 72°34'00" Fast; thence, the following three courses are along said 26 southwesterly line, along said non -tangent curve 15.89 feet through a 27 central angle of 36°25'21" to a point on a compound curve concave 28 (continued) Exhibit _L_ Page _ -2 20 ( 1 southwesterly having 2 compound curve 106.12 3 thence North 60°15'21 4 / 5 It is understood that 08-Riv-91-19.95(PM) #20874-1 a radius of 950.00 feet; thence along said feet through a central angle of 06°24'00 " west 0.39 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said temporary easement shall extend for a 6 period of eighteen (18) months 7 after Grantee provides written 8 intent to commence construction. 9 In the event said actual use by 10 contractors extends beyond the 11 Grantee shall pay the Grantor 12 $1,607.28 per month, prorated 13 terminated. All rights acquired 14 1, 2016 or upon filing Notice of 15 / / commencing forty-eight (48) hours notification to Grantor of its Grantee, its authorized agents or prescribed period of time, the at the same contract rate of to the actual date said use is herein shall terminate on August Completion. 16 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 17 based on the California Coordinate System of 18 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000273 19 distances. 20 / 21 This real property has been described by 22 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 23 Act. 24 / 25 / 26 Signature�,,,�, 27 28 Date ALEXANDER S(611tIDOVAL PLS 7995 OVzoio Exhibit Page 3 1983, Zone 6. to obtain ground level me, or under my p6 LAW p¢R 844,Oo%. � O EXP. 12-31-10 * No. 7995 21 37YJ2 ON V y121IHX3 Anssapau ao xoiin?osaw AVM So ZHORI a> a cc 1 N �i N X LL3 m' au reeeor ur,p Is""w+•raw ..re lab -Mom ru„ffq� riCan +umbel o rawa.aio ra: Jo prypF� AO • 1V/0='01 135116 INIMINIIIMINIMMil I3DILSTO 3Ttl,Sph Er IfifIRX/ xirsS333u 3o xoiin7osax AVM,.3o Inonf 2s xIhriDY 014792° m i yssmsnir Ytvirosilva sO was ,££ '- m .E£ ' N N .- oulco ; - . ti f • o ONw 1 , e II ' Ct 1 Q NM tp. N N aCJ +N N N u1i OO r�N Ino' . c '�o 1 �y • ILLI---f-r) oCt O • i . 4,OL'06 � At„I,S,S176ZS Q ° OS e0d ££ •fir✓sa e, x be,.y° ,,,� �IVi so Imam! /e,tipo to S ZL£ M/LI lL£ 16 '318 'dWl 3 V 133H1 S A81:1387nW 33 Mar •°K •LEN! eon 3 ` --- 68 29I. I. M„6Z,£1,06ZS (30J.) L --bL 08 Z -1336Vcl f►% £ "AtliY ! 132IIYd • • Q3035traans 55300d • 7-•r 7-1"1-17-77 OL£ ti N Z Q V I I40,.;;;01- �CII52IaAI�I � � j �" aQISIMAIII J® LLID tl .005 °'�; FL�yO �O`�Oa • 3‘ Z X W ATTACHMENT 3 RESOLUTION NO. 10-018 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBERS 219-043-025 AND 219-043-026 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20423-1 AND 20423-2►, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire fee and temporary construction easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Numbers 219-043-025 and 219-043-026 (Caltrans Parcel Nos. 20423-1 and 20423-2), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 24 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the fee and temporary construction easement interests in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1" are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interests to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interests subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. • • 25 • Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 26 • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Drainage Easement" refers to a non-exclusive easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. Exhibit / Page / 27 • "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. Exhibit ,Page 2- 28 FEE 08-Riv-91-19.9(PM) #20423-1 1 For freeway purposes that portion of Mulberry Street as shown on 2 Assessor's Map No. 19 on file in Book 1 page 23, of Assessor's Maps, 3 Official Records of Riverside County, California and those portions 4 of said Mulberry Street and Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, shown by Map of 5 Harrington's Tract, filed in Book 11, page 19, of Maps, Records of 6 Riverside County, California, and that portion of that certain real 7 property, described in a Quit Claim Deed, to Western Devcon INC, 8 recorded March 21, 1997 as Instrument No. 95120, Official Records of 9 Riverside County, California, described as follows: 10 BEGINNING at a point on the southwesterly line of said Lot 1, of said 11 Harrington's Tract, distant South 60°15'01" East, 21.00 feet from the 12 southwest corner thereof, said point also being along the 13 northwesterly right of way of State Route 91; thence along said 14 southwesterly line North 60°15'01" West, 21.00 feet to said southwest 15 corner; thence North 24°04'40" East 177.93 feet; thence, course "A", 16 North 9°46'51" East 53.52 feet to the northerly line of that certain 17 real property of said Quit Claim Deed; thence, the following (4) 18 courses are along the northerly and easterly lines of said real 19 property, South 31°39'31" East 26.49 feet; thence South 3°13'56" West 20 39.29 feet to the westerly right of way line of State Route 91; 21 thence along said right of way, South 29°43'53" West 87.04 feet; 22 thence along said right of way, South 19°54'55" West 93.86 feet to 23 the POINT OF BEGINNING. 24 Together with the extinguishment of all easements of access 25 appurtenant to that portion of the owner's remaining property in 26 which the undersigned has some right, title or interest, in and to 27 said freeway and also over and across those courses along the 28 (continued) Exhibit _. _L-__ Page 3 29 08-Riv-91-19.9(PM) #20423-1 1 southerly side line of Kane Street, described as follows: 2 BEGINNING at the northerly terminus of said course "A"; thence along 3 said northerly line of said Quitclaim Deed, North 31°39'31" West 4 16.19 feet to the southerly terminus of that certain course, 5 described in a Grant Deed to the City of Riverside recorded April 09, 6 1990 as Instrument No. 1.2702.0, Of.fi.c.ial. Records of Riverside County, 7 State of California, cited therein as "South 17°25'01 East 25.66 8 feet"; thence along said certain course North 17°24'40" West 21.99 to 9 the southeasterly tenninus of that certain course, described in a 10 (( Grant need Riverside recorded December 20, 1996 as 11 Instrument No. 479580, Official Records of Riverside County, State of 12 California, cited therein as "North 65°16'46" West 120.99 feet"; 13 thence along said certain course North 64°31'43" West 60.76 feet. 14 / / 1 15 / / ! 16 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 17 based on the California Coordinate System of. 1983, 'hone 6. Multiply 1.8 distances shown by 1.0000273 to obtain ground level distances. to the City of 19 / / / 20 / / / 21 / / / 22 This real property has been described by me, Or under my direction, 23 con f_oxmance with 24 I I / 25 / / ! 26 Signature ' , // j 27 ALEXANDER SAWOVAL PLS 7995 / l.R q Date , ',l��i? f / f. , the Professional Land Surveyors Act. r / Exhibit / Page 'f 30 in TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT 08-Riv-91-19.9(PM) #20423-2 1 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, 2 over, upon and across that portion of Mulberry Street as shown on 3 Assessor's Map No. 19 on file in Book 1 page 23, of Assessor's Maps, 4 Official Records of Riverside County, California and that portion of 5 said Mulberry Street, shown by Map of Harrington's Tract, filed in 6 Book 11, page 19, of Maps, Records of Riverside County, California, 7 said portion of Mulberry Street is described in a Quit Claim Deed, to 8 Western Devcon INC, recorded March 21, 1997 as Instrument No. 95120, 9 Official Records of Riverside County, California, described as 10 follows: 11 COMMENCING} at a point on the southwesterly line of Lot 1, of said 12 Harrington's Tract, distant South 60°15'01" East, 21.00 feet from the 13 southwest corner thereof, said point also being along the 14 northwesterly right of way of State Route 91; thence along said 15 southwesterly line North 60°15'01" West, 21.00 feet to said southwest 16 corner also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 24°04'40" East 17 177.93 feet; thence North 9°46'51" East 53.52 feet to the northerly 18 line of that certain real property of said Quit Claim Deed; thence 19 South 19°55'21" West 92.68 feet; thence South 29°18'37" West 136.04 20 feet to the prolongation of the southwesterly line of said Lot 1; 21 thence South 60°15'01" East 19.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 22 i 23 It is understood that said temporary easements shall extend for a 24 period of eighteen (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours 25 26 27 28 after Grantee provides written notification to Grantor of its intent to commence construction. i (continued) Exhibit / Page 31 S i 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 t5 16 17 18 19 20 21 08-Riv-91-19.9(PM) #20423-2 All rights acquired herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or upon filing Notice of Completion. The bearings and distances used in the above description are based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 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Vs fasna vihnsaar YO 3O 2LNIS 9 107 0303Sa3dI1S SS300V _-+► 3„LS,9606N --- NO1703 01 01£ 892 CNOb00 Ol --------f - °0 '�t2` 6f/II 'B'W 10YW1 NLNIHYVH S 107 "S'rT 133tl1 S d g?:138717 V 3 - -------- SZ CCO�Oi01 tlC,00 Jp /C3DJNOO .00W 0144 10 006001 100.10 10 CiY160 .G CEO/ ow Jo.;C10!C4000CJ 00 IOY 1104C J/O Ci1 JO ON JOi1109 i0 411c+6 041 :310N ti 1n z a cal ✓,SZ 69£ l 6 -8S 6411 3 b .L01 F 10j 0303S83dr1S SS300d Z 10/ gg'26 - 60'9£t M„L£,9L,62S M LZ,9906LS OEI CI '0N ------------------------------ -------- 12f1SNf 1r 1081N00 S53o:v 0N3 • • (331) z-2z�oz -130:idd EZ/I'y• ^w,t, dew s,�nssass¢ Dod ,00'l2 `M✓8 '1SIX3 HOd i AO A.141\inc$3 RGISIMAIII A® .AIM a) a_ ATTACHMENT 4 RESOLUTION NO. 10-019 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTEREST IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 219-281-007 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20879-1 AND 20879-2), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire a temporary construction easement interest in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 219-281-007 (Ca!trans Parcel Nos. 20879-1 and 20879-2), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with Califomia Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 36 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the temporary construction easement interest in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1 " are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interest to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section / 240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described • • 37 • real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the .California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non- material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 38 • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired "Temporary Construction Easement (TCE)" refers to the right of the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC"), its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin 48 hours after RCTC provides written notification to the Property Owner of its intent to commence construction. RCTC shall have the option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, at RCTC's sole discretion, until construction on the property is completed, upon written notice to the Property Owner. If the term of the TCE is extended, RCTC shall pay additional compensation to the Property Owner on a per diem basis, as set forth in the legal description of the property attached hereto. If the term of the TCE is extended, it shall not extend beyond August I, 2016. Exhibit / Page / 39 • • • 08-RIV-91-18.98(PM) #20879-1 $ 20879-2 1 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 2 thereto, over, upon and across those portions of Lot 14, Rockledge 3 Park No. 2, Unit No. 1 in the City of Riverside, County of 4 Riverside, State of California, as per map recorded January 29, 1941 5 in Book 19, page 92 of Maps, in the Office of the County Recorder of 6 said County, more particularly described as follows: 7 PARCEL 20879-1 8 BEGINNING at the most southerly corner of said Lot 14; thence along 9 the westerly boundary of said Lot, North 35°51'06" West, 11.10 feet 10 to the beginning of a curve concave easterly having a radius of 11 50.63 feet; thence continuing along said westerly boundary and 12 northwesterly along said curve through a central angle of 27°45'49" 13 an arc distance of 24.53 feet; thence leaving said westerly boundary 14 North 81°54'44" East, 16.55 feet; thence South 01°20'46" West, 33.87 15 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING{ 16 PARCEL 20879-2 17 COMMENCE at the most southerly corner of said Lot 14; thence along 18 the westerly boundary of said Lot the following four (4) courses, ]9 (1) North 35°51'06" West, 11.10 feet to the beginning of a curve 20 concave easterly having a radius of 50.63 feet; thence (2) 21 northwesterly along said curve through a central angle of 51°10'49" 22 an arc distance of 45.23 feet; thence (3) North 15°19'44" East, 5.41 23 feet to the beginning of a curve concave southeasterly having a 24 radius of 180.00 feet; thence (4) northeasterly along last said 25 curve through a central angle of 08°41'00" an arc distance of 27.28 26 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continuing along said 27 westerly boundary and last said curve through a central angle of 28 (continued) Exhibit ___L �. Page .2, 40 i 08-RIV-91-18.98(PM) #20879-1 & 20879-2 1 PARCEL 20879-2 (continued) 2 06°11'59" an arc distance of 19.48 feet; thence leaving said boundary 3 South 59°47'18" East, 7.00 feet; thence South 27°05'51" West, 18.80 4 feet; thence North 65°16'36" West, 7.00 feet to the POINT OS 5 BEGINNING. 6 The bearings and distances used in the above descriptions 7 are based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 8 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000273 to obtain ground level 9 distances. 10 11 It is understood that said 12 period of eighteen 13 iiafter Grantee temporary easements shall extend for a (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours provides written notification to Grantor of its 14 intent to commence construction. 15 In the event said actual use by Grantee, its authorized 16 contractors extends beyond the prescribed period of 17 Grantee shall pay the Grantor at the same contract rate agents or time, the of $21.67 18 per month, prorated to the actual date said use is terminated. 19 All rights acquired herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or 20 upon filing Notice of Completion. 21 These real properties have been described by me, or under my 22 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 23 Act. 24 �I / 25 / 26 27 Signature 28 Date Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 r/ Z, A Exhibit / _Page Page 41 3 311,39 ON V zlgiax3 (MN AIINIi,IA AIISS33314 30 IdOiltrIOS32i A[VA1 dO IF101,1 rrounaaswu so zhinavraQ &NOM, ONiNOR ONY NOttrtaOBNYIt'SEW= rD001ff7Y3 30 WYJB 4 'm• ON{ AO 10f01•1 161./6/0 JOOO.uyOObsDalppMbp pOlO OIxi IWtliauOEOa•A•aJJC -00 �JlOp4,4oJS OVl :3(Ow z-6Lp8oz 6 1-6L80Z S-133�Idd i HalS)13nix LLNnoo aGISxffnzg 3O d.LIO • 11 ZIBzziX3 Aizss33ax 30 xOI.LQTOsZzz AVM 30 .1.1i9r4 vsaiataii ��ra JO tom° ,yin "a` iwely,te> se wwS .0 t3101 • • ATTACHMENT 5 RESOLUTION NO. 10-020 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTEREST IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 219-301-006 (CALTRANS PARCEL NO. 20867-11, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire a temporary construction easement interest in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 219-301-006 (Ca!trans Parcel No. 20867-1), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 44 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the temporary construction easement interest in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1" are. the legal description and plat maps of the interest to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the' interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it • • 45 • • now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9t day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 46 • • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Drainage Easement" refers to a non-exclusive easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. Exhibit / Page 47 • "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. Exhibit / Page 48 TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT 08-RIV 91-18.97(PM) #20867-1 1 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 2 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 11, of Monterey 3 Heights, in the City of Riverside, shown by a map filed in Book 18, 4 page 95, of Maps, in the Office of the County Recorder, County of 5 Riverside, California, also being a portion of Parcel 1, as shown 6 on Record of Survey, on file in Book 29, page 63, of Records of 7 Survey in the Office of the County Recorder, County of Riverside, 8 California, described as follows: 9 BEGINNING at the northwest corner of said Parcel 1; thence southerly 10 along the westerly line of said Parcel 1, South 15°20'44" West, 11 83.30 feet; thence South 76°14'29" East 15.66 feet; thence 12 North 45°51'37" East 24.96 feet; thence North 35°06'09" West 13 9.81 feet; thence North 50°08'56" East 10.01 feet; thence 14 North 35°28'00" West 2.77 feet; thence North 53°11'13" East 25.56 15 feet; thence North 53°26'39" East 20.48 feet to a point on the 16 northerly line of said Parcel 1, said point being on a non -tangent 17 curve concave southerly having a radius of 92.41 feet a radial line 18 to said point bears North 41°40'26" East; thence westerly along 19 said northerly line and said non -tangent curve 54.16 feet through a 20 central angle of 33°34'55" to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 21 / 22 / 23 It is understood that said temporary easement .shall extend for a 24 period of eighteen (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours 25 after Grantee provides written notification to Grantor of its 26 intent to commence construction. 27 in the event said actual use by Grantee, its authorized agents or 28 (continued) Exhibit / Page 3 49 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 08-RIV-91-18.97(PM) #20867-1 contractors extends beyond the prescribed period of time, the Grantee shall pay the Grantor at the same contract rate of $120.83 per month, prorated to the actual date said use is terminated. All rights acquired herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or upon filing Notice of Completion. The bearings and distances used in the above description are 8 based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, (1984.0) Zone 9 6. Multiply distances shown by 1.0000273 to obtain ground level 10 distances. 11 / / ! 12 / / ! 13 / / ! 14 / 15 / / ! 16 / / ! 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / ! ! 21 This real property has been described by me, or under my 22 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 23 24 25 26 27 28 Act. Signature Date ALE AL PLS 7995 Oi i0/1" XANDER DOV Exhibit / Page 4 50 Y. LB. Na eo S1.37a5 111.0/'a 13316I IY lXaas 131lIWtI,11.10 01101N1SQ awos ox V .I.ISIHX3 LIVIV 1L LTUIJIA Luss3J3x d0 140I11110S32I AVA1 30 . RODI .vN2Pv%toa as V aron IINOSI VILI ` SSKIS a vAtagdlxYJ do 31Y.L4 alJ17o� Ot a` i b g r (,;a7ep.., S / 1 V,'L 1 A( "_ i q�� _ �- 1ly�,�ry L-L980Z -133 Vd s{e� Vow etVF 10 Wow( 11410)P }co +Ke1QWoa Jo Aoraal000 ow Jo} owleWOeeJ op ♦ou now Jo we7Ne ow .•a otuJonm !. 0401S 0412 :31CY1 '1S SY0011e '7d 0:040f0e aaislaaAnt A® LLN1100 aaisuaniu A® 2..LIO • is of Lis en ao s13316 le2040a 133/251 Pa Lutes mume� tuimtautu at�� s Mt II£UHX7 ainsaoax ao NOLLn70saii AVM. 410 -ISOM emctvrxoasiuna so 1N3NCcarl3a xammovo,asaoaaKvetouvaxaufrever mahacsne vmnerman was '' ` �N ' Ob ° Co 2 y\"""\� 90d soot/1404 m Jo Ammo** sy} /oLsoiQlw�OttYu soatiolot I you now s.puOEo .G sa1o13/o sal JO kodOnio° io M is+r /rstrs a3O{$ sVi t310N „ „ . M„60,90°S£N / J 9 ass ` 1 ' ,// r �<"F 96 6 `1 ,12 ,LZ'z M„00,8Z°S£N s " L8'6 3099,8000SN gg'SL I-3„6Z,171°9LS ,0£'£8 M„bb,0Z0SLS (331) ..2:1 Z "10d 1 �� 6 1�0 �a1 y01 ` £9/6Z 'S'21 l 108 Ma HX21 'j'S'N'8 .� S N'9 l£-9Z/LOL sa `S6/81 8W S1H0I3N A3831NOW JO 3NI1 Al2:131S3M aGISIIHADI A® A.]L.Knoa acISuaAnI go AIM M ATTACHMENT 6 RESOLUTION NO. 10-021 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF EASEMENT AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 225-263-015 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 21109-1 AND 21109-2), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire easement and temporary construction easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 225-263-015 (Caltrans Parcel Nos. 21109-1 and 21109-2), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the easement and temporary construction easement interests in the property is to be acquired is for the 53 construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1 " are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interests to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interests subject to such existing public usels) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds • • • 54 • • • and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9' day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 55 • • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Drainage Easement" refers to a non-exclusive easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. Exhibit / Page 56 • "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. • Exhibit _ I , _ . Page -Z 57 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEivir"N1 08-RIV-91-18.40(pM) #21109-1 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, upon and across that portion of PARCEL 1, situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as described in document titled CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, for lot line adjustment, recorded March 8, 1990, as Document No. 085278, Official Records of said county, and described in QUITCLAIM DEED recorded November 26, 1997 as Document No. 436363, Official Records of said county, described as follows: COMMENCING at the intersection of the east line of Lot 12, as shown by map of SEID TRACT, on file in Book 24 of Maps, page 61, 12 records of 13 60.00 feet 14 map, said 15 Parcel 1; thence along said parallel line and along the northerly 16 line of said Parcel 1, North 89°56'22" West 19.73 feet to the 17 POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continuing along said parallel line 18 and said northerly line, North 89°56'22" West 6.00 feet; thence 19 leaving said northerly line South 0°03'38" West 5.31 feet; thence said county, and a line parallel and distant southerly from the centerline of Central Avenue as shown on said intersection being the northeasterly corner of said 20 South 38°06'02" East 31.28 feet; thence South 89°15'40" East, 21 feet to said east line of Lot 12, also being the east line of said 22 Parcel 1; thence along said east line North 0°44'20" East, 5.24 23 feet; thence North 38°06'02" West, 31.47 feet to the POINT OF 24 BEGINNING. 25 / / / 26 It is understood that said temporary easements shall extend for a 27 period of eighteen (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours 28 (continued) Exhibit _ L_ Page 3 6.05 58 08-RIV-91-18.40(PM) #21109-1 i after Grantee provides written notification to Grantor of its 2 intent to commence construction. 3 All rights acquired herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or 4 upon filing Notice of Completion. 5 / 6 The bearings and distances shown in the above description are on 7 the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. Multiply 8 distances in the above description by 1.0000285 to obtain ground 9 distances. 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 This real property has been described by me, or under' my 18 direction, .in conformance with the .Professional Land Surveyors 19 Act. 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / / 26 27 Signature 28 f I Date Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 Exhibit �__. ,Page 59 EASEMENT 08-RIV-91-18.40(PM) #21109-2 1 An EASEMENT for drainage purposes and incidents thereto, over, 2 Ripon and across that portion of PARCEL 1, situated in the City of 3 Riverside, County of Riverside, State of. California, as described 4 in document titled CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, for lot line 5 adjustment, recorded March 8, 1990, as Document: No. 085278, 6 Official Records of said county, and described in QUITCLAIM DEED 7 recorded November 26, 1997 as Document No. 436363, Official 8 Records of said county, described as follows: 9 BEGINNING at the intersection of the east line of Lot 12., as 10 shown by map of SEID TRACT, on file in Book 24 of Maps, page 61, 11 records of said county, and a line parallel and distant southerly 12 60.00 feet from the centerline of Central Avenue as shown on said 13 map, said intersection being the northeasterly corner of said 14 Parcel 1; thence along said parallel line and along the northerly 15 line of said Parcel 1, North 89°56'22" West 19.73 feet; thence 16 South 38°06'02" East, 31.47 feet to said east line of Lot 12, also 17 being the east line of said Parcel 1; thence along said east line 18 North 00°44'20" East, 24.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 19 The bearings and distances shown in the above description are on 20 the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. multiply 21 distances in the above description by 1.0000285 to obtain ground 22 distances. 23 This real property has been described by me, or under my 24 direction, 25 Act. 26 Signature 2$ Date in conformance win the Professional Land Surveyors Trent E. tenfestey Pt.S 8351 Exhibit. ! rage S 60 S13310 IS.101'0.1 1X015.1 Ild 133t0 1 1311041t000 I Aar SO 101211510 3Tvas og d xlgraxa AVIV AILKIDIA AxIssaa3 i 30 wour ' osau AVM, $d xHOI2I N0Iiv180a5lNKL 30 Y MAIINYa30 &UMW 020S0013 Q.1ly yoLzymoasNvaL Warms V0aiO3 TVD 30 91Y13 i N0110 16-8S dni 3 01 6SIUp1oltlLgo Jo .0/l000 dOW SIVi N WI:owl 1041aep 10 00J 9{ue6D JO ,Joo ow Jol elpfsuo 91J M iou llowy 1Jlo S11 +n oILLAD11107 i0. 1.014S 0411 *RA r J. s D c b m N 311N3A v vimenuon a yn Y.r 1+ A ��M0 n Ll..�E5 W1a��+� ire _"�---- 16-MSea3 kVN0M00 01 TwoonimiaimmommilgionsiummierneummaiumemenWillillinglia.l." .• �� :` - == am MeD ✓^:6 CR my y\ 62 z-600 l lz L -60 L z S-1306Vd • D SD b 2 Ca H ixsesper t-m ram- '1S '1S aaIsuaAnI d® ,uNnop HaISXHAIIi AO AID ATTACHMENT 7 RESOLUTION NO. 10-022 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE AND EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 225-350-050 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20410-1 AND 20410-3), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire fee and easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 225-350-050 (Ca[trans Parcel Nos. 20410-1 and 20410-3), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010, at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 63 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the fee and easement interests in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1" are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interests to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interests subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described • • • 64 • • • real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non- material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 91h day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 65 Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Drainage Easement" refers to a non-exclusive easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. 'exhibit l _ Page r 66 • "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. Exhibit / ,Page -2 67 • • FEE 08-RIV-91-18.02(PM) #20410.1 1 For freeway purposes, that portion of the Southeast Quarter of the 2 Southeast Quarter of Section 34, Township 2 South, Range 5 West, San 3 Bernardino Meridian, as shown by United States Government Survey, 4 situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of 5 California, of the land described in a Certificate of Compliance 6 recorded August 22, 1980 as Instrument No. 1980-152918, Official 7 Records of said County, described as follows: 8 COMMENCING at a point in the southeasterly right-of-way of State 9 Route 91, as described in deed to the State of California recorded 10 September 14, 1956 in Book 1971, page 303 Official Records of said 11 County, said point being the most westerly corner of land described 12 in a Quitclaim Deed recorded September 22, 1995 as Instrument NO. 13 316137, Official Records of said County; thence along said right- 14 of -way and along the northwesterly line of said land the following 15 three (3) courses, (1) North 30°39'51" East 128.22 feet; thence (2) 16 North 33°21'52" East 125.32 feet; thence (3) North 37°51'11" East 17 129.51 feet to the most westerly corner of said land described in 18 Certificate of Compliance, said westerly corner being the POINT OF 19 BEGINNING; thence continuing along said right-of-way and along the 20 northwesterly line of last said land the following three (3) courses, 21 (1) North 37°51'11" East 29.67 feet; thence (2) North 31°41'59" East 22 294.95 feet to the beginning of a curve, concave northwesterly, 23 having a radius of 2000.00 feet; thence (3) along said curve, 24 through a central angle of 2°56'32" an arc distance of 102.70 25 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way and said northwesterly 26 line, South 61°41'06" East, 0.81 feet to the beginning of a non- 27 tangent curve concave northwesterly having a radius of 2318.00 feet, 28 (continued) Exhibit ,Page 3 68 • 1 a radial line bears South 62°41'59" Last; thence southwesterly 2 along said non -tangent curve through a central angle of 5°37'14" 3 an arc distance of 227.39 feet; thence South 32°48'11" 'West, 4 131.1.3 feet to the beginning of a curve concave northwesterly 5 having a radius of 721.00 feet; thence southwesterly along last 6 said curve through a central angle of 3°08'11" an.arc distance of 7 39.47 feet; thence South 35°56'22" West- 29.46 feet to a point on the N southwesterly line of last said parcel, said point being distant 9 South 60°22'51" East, 1.12 feet from said most westerly corner; 10 thence along said southwesterly line, North 60°22'51." West, 1.12 11 feet_ to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 12 / 13 Lands abutting said freeway shall have no right or easement_ 14 of access thereto. 15 / 16 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 17 based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 18 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000285 to obtain ground level 19 distances. 20 / 21 This real property has been described by me, or under my 22 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 23 Act. 24 / 25 / 26 27 2N Signature Date Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 Exhibit Page 69 08-RIV-91-18.02(PM) #20410-1 • i EASEMENT 08-RIV-91.18.02(PM) #20410-3 1 An EASEMENT for maintenance purposes and incidents thereto, over, 2 upon and across that portion of the Southeast Quarter of the 3 Southeast Quarter of Section 34, Township 2 South, Range 5 West, San 4 Bernardino Meridian, as shown by United States Government Survey, 5 situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of 6 California, of the land described in a Certificate of Compliance 7 recorded August 22, 1980 as Instrument No. 1980_152918, Official 8 Records of said County, described as follows: 9 COMMENCING at a point in the southeasterly right-of-way of State 10 Route 91, as described in deed to the State of California recorded 11 September 14, 1956 in Book 1971, page 303 Official Records of said 12 County, said point being the most westerly corner of land described 13 in a Quitclaim Deed recorded September 22, 1995 as Instrument No. 14 316137, Official Records of said County; thence along said right-of- 15 way and along the northwesterly line of said land the following 16 three (3) courses, (1) North 30°39'51" East 128.22 feet; thence (2) 17 North 33°21'52" East 125.32 feet; thence (3) North 37°51'11" East 18 129.51 feet to the most northerly corner of said land, said corner 19 also being the most westerly corner of that certain land described in 20 a document titled "CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE", recorded August 22, 21 1980 as Instrument No. 1980-152918, Official Records of said 22 County; thence continuing along said right-of-way and along 23 the northwesterly line of last said land the following three 24 (3) courses, (1) North 37°51'11" East 29.67 feet; thence (2) 25 North 31°41'59" East 294.95 feet to the beginning of a curve, concave 26 northwesterly, having a radius of 2000.00 feet; thence (3) along said 27 curve, through a central angle of 9°56'55" an arc distance of 347.27 28 (continued) Pxhibit _ .Page S 70 i i i 08-RlV-91-18.02(PM) #20410-3 corner of last said land and to 2 the POINT OF BECiINNZNCi • thence along the northeasterly 3 boundary of last said land, South 56°17'29" East, 34.65 feet; 4 thence South 34°27'56" West, 61.25 feet to the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave northwesterly having a radius of 2338.00 feet, a radial • 1 �I feet to the most northerly line bears South (thence southwesterly along said non -tangent central angle of 4°24'49" an arc distance thence South 61°41'06" East, 34.79 feet; thence 401.77 feet; South West, 28.48 12 a point on the boundary of last 13'I said point being 60°22'51" East, 12.44 feet from said most 14 westerly corner of last said land; thence along said 15 southwesterly boundary, North 60°22'51" 16 thence North 35°56'22" West, 11.32 feet; East, 29.46 feet to the beginning of 17 a curve concave northwesterly having a radius of 18 feet; thence northeasterly along last said curve through a 19 central angle of 3°08'11" an arc distance of 39.47 feet; 20 thence North 32°48'11" East, West, 5 6 7 8 9' 10 11 North 58°05'48" thence 36°03'48" southwesterly distant South feet to said land, 66°05'54" East; curve through a of 180.10 feet; South 31°25'46" West, 44.34 feet; thence 131.13 feet to the beginning of a 21 non -tangent curve concave northwesterly having a radius of 22 2318.00 feet, a radial line bears South 57°04'45" East; thence 23 northeasterly along last said non -tangent curve through a 24 central angle of 5°37'14" an arc distance of 227.39 feet; 25 thence North 61°41'06" West, 0.81 feet to a point on said right- 26 of -way of State Route 91 and said northwesterly boundary 27 said land point being of last eing on a non -tangent curve having a 28 (continued) 721.00 Exhibit / Page_1c.__ 2 R 71 08-RIV-91-18.O2(PM) #20410-3 1 radius of 2000.00 feet, a_radial line through said point bears 2 South 61°14'33" East; thence northeasterly along said right-of- 3 'Nay and last said non -tangent curve through a central angle of 4 7°00'23" an arc distance of 244.57 feet to the POINT OF 5 BEGINNING. 6 / 7 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 8 based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 9 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000285 to obtain ground level 10 distances. 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 This real property has been described by me, or under my 20 direction, in conformance with the Professional. Land Surveyors 21 Ac t. 22 / 23 / / 24/ 25 II/ �' / i 26 Signature 27 • Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 28 Date f'L� l j^/i Exhibit / Page 72 1 VIYOS Ott .1I$IRX3 AZISS3D3N AO NOI11170S32i AVM 30 naprI AIOr.r.vi lOd1ZYnu_to,ioY3yYatQ ..)nave 9tasaos QNY NOrivaroasu azVSMatur 1901 .07VD JO aryls mm on. WM Imom _7 ...0 mWm o. .. mim mS .. • ' / 6nnfuu+�►=� r: 101IUMI 2! MUM YllterlDtPM l6-8S dlYI 3 '--laumitinumi immal WINO Mu�I�n11�uY�•. N01100 01 16-MS dR! 2-0 L S-130dVd ffWwlm+m Jp .LOylOp. '�W t04 /O MOM, 104141O JO aiw6O .9.s.O 044 •.Of .IalswAna p i.f! !!Ws fffO fil /O 8)I1.4.Of11O.� fO 411.44$ ftly *LOON • 21104100 O1 aQIsltaAI t 3® AINI103 �QIS�i�AI� 3® a --a _a i ?C LLI STY35 OS 20N a zlalHxa AlISs3aHx 10 MOII1170SHII AVM 30 IHOI2I NOLIVTIOJESAIVALL13N3'JY `OWSIIOH QNY3y��Lhnrtu t YVOIOnlvD 80 =NIS `55S�8S:18 SaISI ADI d® LLNn00 aarswannt J® ,1.1.I3 big 3s ` 17/ 35 dod NoLoaS Z1Z 112 ..doem Rita Jo reaosso; "Op .to sNpED JO vocJbie sql JO D!u.10spaa Jo aWaS 4141 '31011 a> c3:. co CL /t 3S ` b/i 3S ?:10d 'Sag Isrouoas (11S1laAz11 Jo LIN1103 r slia.A1)1 JO 2213 la 6/ t 3S ` b/ l 35 dpd An/ 3O A.I,Nno3 HART dO A.LI3 ATTACHMENT 8 RESOLUTION NO. 10-023 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER 229-081-002 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20686-1 AND 20686-2), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire fee and temporary construction easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Number 229-081-002 (Ca!trans Parcel Nos. 20686-1 and 20686-2), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010, at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. 77 Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the fee and temporary construction easement interests in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1" are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1 " is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interests to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interests subject to such existing public useis) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it • • 78 • • • now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 79 • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Drainage Easement" refers to a non-exclusive easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. Exhibit / Page 80 • "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. • Exhibit / Page a- 81 • • • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 FEE 08-Riv-91-17.60(PM) #20686-1 For freeway purposes, that portion of Lot 2, in Block 69 of ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as recorded in Book 11 of Maps, pages 20 and 21, records of San •Bernardino County, said portion described as follows: BEGINNING at the most northerly corner of that certain Parcel 2 as per plat recorded in Book 54, page 1, Record of Surveys, records of Riverside County, said corner being the intersection of the southeasterly line of State Route 91 as described in Directors Deed recorded November 16, 1960, in Book 2800, page 386, Official Records of Riverside County, with the southerly line of land as described in deed to James White Oil Company, recorded February 7, 1969 as Instrument No. 12356, Official Records of Riverside County; thence along said southerly line South 40°10'39" East 3.14 feet; thence South 53°34'58" West 125.29 feet to a point in the southwesterly line of land described in deed recorded January 15, 1999 as Instrument No. 1999-018123, Official Records of Riverside County, said southwesterly line also being the southwesterly line of said Parcel 2; thence North 40°11'28" West 7.55 feet to the most westerly corner of said Parcel 2, said corner being a point in the southeasterly line of said State Route 91; thence along said southeasterly line North 55°35'18" East 125.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 25 Lands abutting said freeway shall have no right or easement 26 of access thereto. 27 / 28 (continued) Exhibit I Page 3 82 08-Riv-91-17.60(PM) #20686-1 1 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 2 based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 3 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000285 to obtain ground level 4 distances. 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 This real property has been described by me, or under my 17 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors 18 Act. 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 Signature 27 28 Date Trent E. Lenfestey PLS 8351 /*(71 /e zL,/ Exhibit / Page 83 • • i 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT 08-Riv-91-17.60(PM) #20686-2 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 2, in Block 69 of ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as recorded in Book 11 of Maps, pages 20 and 21, records of San Bernardino County, said portion described as follows: COMMENCING at the most northerly corner of that certain Parcel 2 8 as per plat recorded in Book 54, page 1, Record of Surveys, 9 records of Riverside County, said corner being the intersection 10 of the southeasterly line of State Route 91 as described in 11 Directors Deed recorded November 16, 1960, in Book 2800, page 12 386, Official Records of Riverside County, with the southerly 13 line of land as described in deed to James White Oil Company, 14 recorded February 7, 1969 as Instrument No. 12356, Official 15 Records of Riverside County; thence along said southerly line 16 South 40°10'39" East 3.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence 17 continuing along said southerly line South 40°10'39" East 17.48 18 feet; thence South 51°28'17" West 18.85 feet; thence 19 North 40009'08° West 10.15 feet; thence South 53°34'58" West 20 106.41 feet to a point in the southwesterly line of land 21 described in deed recorded January 15, 1999 as Instrument No. 22 1999-018123, Official Records of Riverside County, said 23 southwesterly line also being the southwesterly line of said Parcel 24 2; thence along said southwesterly line North 40°11'28" west, 8.02 25 feet; thence North 53°34'58" East 125.29 feet to the POINT OF 26 BEGINNING. 27 It is understood that said temporary easement shall extend for a 28 (continued) Exhibit ,Page 5 84 • LIMNS ivies a 'ON yes 0'1l lu t333NS L6 MOON A{a WO= SO anodes alVDS ou g ZISIIHXZ LLISSaDaN do AIoxialosa-a XVM. ao LHJI2T Houruroasmvn ao alZIanrraa POMMY otesnon COM xou%raroaslavur.'seat asna vuaxorrrroao 3aroas 0 0 c c 3r7N3A d GNVI QNI • bet c UI l d ,b L'£ , 3„6£,0L00bS 80d l 6 31 V1 s PWPj1fPW00 .f0 .Cf. 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JO M045 OV1 2310N 3AN3Ad VNVIGNI I ( f fc(v r G (3,91) Z-9890Z 1306Vd ,S8'8l % M„L L, 8Z, LSS L0'90l M„8S,b£o£SS E P:Vd ,20'8 / M„8Z,LL00bN ,6Z'SZL - -� LLL [I I 3„89,0£0£5N — '00 "P8S 1Z-00/4 4 '8'A "Sl H NOl JNI fed 69 MO078 Z 10-1 amsuaAni J® A.s1\11103 aimsliam-a 3® X.LID • • ATTACHMENT 9 RESOLUTION NO. 10-024 A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, LOCATED IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBERS 229-110-035, 229-110-040, 229-110-045, 229-110-047 and 229-110-051 (CALTRANS PARCEL NOS. 20860-1; 20860-2; 20860-3; 20860-4; 20860-5; 20860-6; 20860-7; 20860-8 and 20860-9), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF IMPROVEMENTS RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES FROM ADAMS STREET TO THE 60/91/215 INTERCHANGE, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire fee and temporary construction easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Numbers 229-110-035, 229-110-040, 229-110-045, 229-110-047 and 229-110-051 (Ca!trans Parcel Nos. 20860-1; 20860-2; 20860-3; 20860-4; 20860-5; 20860-6; 20860-7; 20860-8 and 20860-9), for the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle project from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 9, 2010, at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and each affected property owner was afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: 89 Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for which the fee and temporary construction easement interests in the property is to be acquired is for the construction and maintenance of improvements related to the State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle lanes, from Adams Street to the 60/91 /215 interchange, in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes Commission to acquire by eminent domain property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "1" are the legal descriptions and plat maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission, which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property described in Exhibit "1" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interests to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights -of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interests subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. • • 90 • • • Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 91 • • • Definitions of Legal Rights to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by the Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Fee," also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, refers to complete or absolute ownership of the property. "Easement" grants to the Riverside County Transportation Commission ("RCTC") a permanent and perpetual easement together with the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to forever maintain, improve, alter, relocate, inspect, occupy and use for the access to the maintenance easement, as determined necessary. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The existing ground elevations of the easement shall not be increased or decreased, without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. "Temporary construction easement ("TCE")" refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in construction and related activities for the project, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Prior to termination of this easement, property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, stnueture or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, nor shall property owners plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time as plaintiff determines in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation to property owners. R V LITTBARN ES\757?10.1 Exhibit .Page 92 No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under, or over this easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not be for less than 18 months, and will begin on the date construction on the property commences. RCTC shall have an option to extend the temporary construction easement on a month -to -month basis, until construction on the property is completed. R V I.IT\PRA R N ES1757270.1 Exhibit / Page Z • • • 93 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 FEE 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-1 For public road and public utility purposes, those portions of Lots 19 and 20 of BARBARA JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of. Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on Mile in Book 27 of. Maps, page 73, records of said County, lying within that certain Parcel, of land described in a Certificate of Compliance recorded December 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 310070 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the northeasterly line of. said Lot 20 and the southwesterly right-of-way line of Jane Street (80.00 feet wide), said point being distant North 33°36'34" west, .30.53 feet from the most easterly corner of said Lot 20; thence along said southwesterly right-of-way, North 33°36'34" West 48.52 feet; thence South 18°13'18" East, 15.02 feet to the beginning of a curve concave northeasterly having a radius of 45.62 feet; thence 16 southeasterly along said curve through a central angle of 17 44°07'41." an arc distance of 35.14 feet to the POINT OF 18 BEGINNING. 19 The bearings and distances used in the above description are 20 based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6. 21 Multiply distances shown by 1.0000285 to obtain ground Level 22 distances. 23 This real property has been described by me, or ;ender my 24 direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors i 25 Act. 26 Signature ,r< 27 28 Date F Trent E. 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CL rn .: �f i 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT 08-Riv-91.17.56(PM) #20860-2,20860-3,20860-4,20860-5 20860-6, 20860-7,20860-8,20860-9 PARCEL 20860-2 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, upon and across those portions of Lots 19 and 20 of BARBARA JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, lying within that certain Parcel of land described .in a Certificate of Compliance recorded December 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 310070 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the northeasterly line of said Lot 20, said point being distant North 33°36'34" West, 20.07 feet from the most easterly corner of said Lot 20; thence South 56°23'26" West, 24.30 feet; thence North 40°44'59" West, 40.32 feet; thence North 56°23'26" East, 17.17 feet; thence North 33°36'34" West, 46.90 feet; thence North 56°23'26" East, 12.14 feet to the northeasterly line of said Lot 19; thence along the northeasterly line of said Lot 19 South 33°36'34" East, 27.92 feet; thence South 18°13'18" East, 15.02 feet to the beginning 19 of a curve concave northeasterly having a radius of 45.62 feet; 20 thence southeasterly along said curve through a central angle 21 of 44°07'41" an arc distance of 35.14 feet to said 22 northeasterly line of Lot 20; thence along said northeasterly 23 line South 33°36'34" East 10.46 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 24 PARCEL 20860-3 25 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 26 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 9 in Block 5, 27 of ORANGE ACRES, situated in the City of Riverside, County of 28 (continued) i Exhibit .! _ � .Page � 97 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-2, 20860-3,20860-4,20860-5 20860-6,20860-7, 20860-8,20860-9 t PARCEL 20860-3 (continued) 2 Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 3 13 of Maps, page 7, records of said County, lying within Parcel 1 4 as described in a Certificate;of Compliance recorded March 5, 5 1986 as Instrument No. 50506 of Official Records of said County, 6 described as follows: 7 BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel 1, 8 said point being distant North 49°50'45" East, 59.86 feet from 9 the most westerly corner of said Parcel 1; thence along said 10 northwesterly line, North 49°50'45" East, 11.00 feet; thence 11 South 40°09'15" East, 15.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 12 11.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15" west, 15.00 feet to the POINT 13 OF BEGINNING. 14 PARCEL 20860-4 15 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 16 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 1 of BARBARA 17 JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of 18 Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 19 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, lying within Parcel 20 1 as described in a Certificate of Compliance recorded March 5, 21 1986 as Instrument No. 50506 of Official Records of said County, 22 described as follows: 23 BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said 24 Parcel 1, said point being distant South 49°50'45" West, 25 11.92 feet from the most northerly corner of said Parcel 1; thence 26 South 40°09'15" East, 26.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 27 42.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15" West, 26.00 feet to said 28 (continued) Exhibit / Page . T 2 98 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-2,20860-3, 20860-4, 20860.5 20860-6,20860-7, 20860-8,20 860-9 t PARCEL 20860-4 (continued) 2 northwesterly line; thence along said northwesterly line 3 North 49°50'45" East, 42.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 4 PARCEL 20860-5 5 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 6 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot "A" (Barbara 7 Court) of BARBARA JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, 8 County of Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file 9 in Book 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, vacated by 10 Resolution No. 16507, recorded March 4, 1986 as Instrument No. 11 50178 of Official Records of said County, lying within Parcel 2 12 as described in a Certificate of Compliance recorded March 5, 13 1986 as Instrument No. 50506 of Official Records of said County, 14 described as follows: 15 BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel 2, 16 said point being distant North 49°50'45" East, 9.08 feet from the 17 most westerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence North 49°50'45" East, 18 48.00 feet; thence South 40°09'15" East, 12.00 feet; thence 19 South 49°50'45" West, 12.00 feet; thence South 40°09'15" East, 20 14.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45° West, 36.00 feet; thence 21 North 40°09'15" West, 26.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 22 PARCEL 20860-6 23 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 24 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 8 of BARBARA 25 JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of 26 Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 27 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, Lying within Parcel 2 28 (continued) Exhibit __L gage 3 99 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-2,20860-3, 20860-4,20860-5 20860-6, 20860-7,20860-8, 20860-9 PARCEL 20860-6 (continued) as described in a Certificate of Compliance recorded March 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 50506 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel 2, said point being distant South 49°50'45" West, 62.23 feet from the most northerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence South 40°09'15" East, 17.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 10.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15" West, 17.00 feet to said northwesterly line; thence along said northwesterly line North 49°50'45" East, 10.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 20860-7 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 9 of BARBARA JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, lying within that certain Parcel of land described in a Certificate of Compliance 19 recorded December 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 310070 of Official 20 Records of said County, described as follows: 21 BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel, said 22 point being distant North 49°50'45" East, 19.03 feet from the most 23 westerly corner of said Parcel; thence North 49°50'45" East, 24 25 26 27 35.00 feet; thence South 40°09'15" East, 21.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 35.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15" West, 21.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. 28 (continued) Exhibit_�! ' cue 9 .a 100 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-2,20860-3, 20860-4,20860-5 20860-6, 20860-7, 20860-8, 20860-9 1 PARCEL 20860-8 2 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 3 thereto, over, upon and across those portions of Lot 9 and Lot "B" 4 (Laguna Court) of BARBARA JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of 5 Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, as shown by 6 map on file in Book 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, 7 vacated by Resolution No. 16508, recorded December 1, 1986 as 8 Instrument No. 304315 of Official Records of said County, lying 9 within that certain Parcel of land described in a Certificate of 10 Compliance recorded December 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 310070 of 11 Official Records of said County, described as follows: 12 BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel, said 13 point being distant North 49°50'45" East, 84.77 feet from the most 14 westerly corner of said Parcel; thence North 49°50'45" East, 15 54.00 feet; thence South 40°09'15" East, 15.00 feet; thence 16 South 49°50'45" West, 14.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15° West, 17 4.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 7.00 feet; thence 18 South 40°09'15" East, 14.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 19 33.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15" West, 25.00 feet to the POINT 20 OF BEGINNING. 21 PARCEL 20860-9 22 A temporary easement for construction purposes and incidents 23 thereto, over, upon and across that portion of Lot 17 of BARBARA 24 JEAN TRACT, situated in the City of Riverside, County of 25 Riverside, State of California, as shown by map on file in Book 26 27 of Maps, page 73, records of said County, lying within that 27 certain Parcel of land described in a Certificate of Compliance 28 (continued) 5 101 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 08-Riv-91-17.56(PM) #20860-2,20860-3,20860-4,20860-5 , 20860-6,20860-7,20860-8,20860-9 PARCEL 20860-9 (continued) recorded December 5, 1986 as Instrument No. 310070 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the northwesterly line of said Parcel, said point being distant North 49°50'45" East, 313.91 feet from the most westerly corner of said Parcel; thence North 49°50'45" Fast, 15.00 feet; thence South 40°09'15° East, 15.00 feet; thence South 49°50'45" West, 15.00 feet; thence North 40°09'15° West, 15.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. It is understood that said temporary easements shall extend for a period of eighteen (18) months commencing forty-eight (48) hours after Grantee provides written notification to Grantor of its intent to commence construction. All rights acquired herein shall terminate on August 1, 2016 or upon filing Notice of Completion. The bearings and distances used in the above descriptions are based on the California Coordinate System of 1983, `Lone 6. Multiply distances shown by 1.0000285 to obtain ground level. distances. / / / / / / / / / / / / These real properties have been described by me, or under my direction, in conformance with the Professional Land Surveyors Act. Signature Rate .C� Trent E. 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M„S b,05 o6bS t,'t F i, 5 /,00'9L, 1 i O O° 00'Dl 1� O<0 1,00'LZ 1 ,1 ,o St,6000bS ` ii " 13„SL,6000bS / 3„S1,6000bS , v 1 I , i ,LL'b9- , l6'£ 1£ f f I / £L B /LZ ''W r3It1 / f / 3„Sb,OS06bN 8-0980Z -1308'dd •00w +IVt }O 4060w1 104Ap F0 99!„lyY,dw99 J° b9J11.a°0 044 J°J emiNi Od9YJ 9Q iu1 mkt* 9y11160 JO 9J=311i0 911 JG 0I14J641/04 /0 9.i.o.ps Rlj :3 0,y 8-09802 90d G-09902 80d 3nN3Ad VNVIONI 3J aGIS1IHAIII A® LL.N1100 amsuaAI2i AO A.LID 1— n s x w L,I w v� Commission is Requested to Make the Following Findings a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. 1 Location of Central Riverside Office Property Location of Imperial Stations Property Location of West Riverside LLC Property 'Canbai Location of Jacobs Property Rancho Location of Monaco Property wu r &marw Lusher King emi, Location of Redmond Property Cenral A Location of Westminster Arlington LLC Property 2 Ground View of Imperial Stations . Property 3 rr Imperial Stations Subject Property TCE Take - CPN 20875-1&2 Sq. Ft Required: 2,802 The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 4 Ground View of Shockley Property from 1 4h Street 5 Shockley Subject Property mom TCE Take - CPN 20874-1 Sq. Ft Required: 7,543 !. 1 !c .n 1. �., , s Riverside Freeway (SR-91) The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 6 Ground View of West Riverside LLC Property 7 tit 6 Riverside Freeway (SR-91) iry aIDfMtgot..u; Gtst,: k West Riverside LLC Subject Property Imo Fee Take (Retaining Wall) — CPN 20423-1 Sq. Ft Required: 4,091 MIN TCE Take - CPN 20423-2 Sq. Ft Required: 2,307 New Freeway Boundary 1 w .. I4 The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 9 Subject Property TCE Take - CPN 20879- 1&2 Sq. Ft Required: 470 New Freeway Boundary The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project Io Ground View of Hale Property 11 Riverside Freeway (SR-91) Subject Property TCE Take - CPN 20867-1 Sq. Ft Required: 2,638 New Freeway Boundary -t T F The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 12 Central Riverside LP Subject Property TCE Take - CPN 21109-1 Sq. Ft Required: 283 Permanent Drainage Easement Sq. Ft Required: 244 — CPN- 21109-2 The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 14 Ground View of Westminster Arlington, LLC Property 15 Westminster Arlington LLC Subject Property Fee Take — CPN 20410-1 Sq. Ft Required: 1,303 Maint. Easement - CPN 20410-3 Sq. Ft Required: 26,675 New Freeway Boundary The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 16 17 Indiana Ave. Monaco Subject Property Fee Take — CPN 20686-1 Sq. Ft Required: 669 TCE Take - CPN 20686-2 Sq. Ft Required: 1,187 New Freeway Boundary Riverside Freeway (SR-91) The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 18 19 Jacobs Family Trust Nom Subject Property 111•111 Fee Take (Cul-de-sac) —CPN20860-1 Sq. Ft Required: 174 TCE Take -CPN 20680-(2-9) Sq. Ft Required: 6,047 New Freeway Boundary Ss 1 "WO, rntnnp Indiana Ave. a" Riverside Freeway (SR-91) r The Real Property Interests to be Acquired are Necessary for the Project 20 Staff Recommends that the Commission Adopt a Resolution of Necessity Based on the Following Findings: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. 21 3000 dIZ A110 133111S -ssmiaav Ss3NISn8 d/101i9 / NOIIVZINV9110 / A3N39V JO 31NVN ON 3N0Hd a(211:J :9N11N3S313d311 3000 dIZ A110 133H1S p 1 $ \ :SS311OOV QooR - C�� - s b ='ON 3N0Hd 1W311 VON391d 3O 103rans �f I b :S1N3WW00 3118nd 30 103rans :31NVN (1/43N39V 3H1 NO 031SI1 SV1 :'ON N1311 VCIN39t! ❑ :S1N31A1W00 3118nd 31 )103H0 Q I Q,e i b"y1)Yr :31V13 ASIVlnSI =II I aA 111177•1 71.11 A I I IllUflnC n1UM WIW I an • • • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2010/11 BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11; 2) Close the public hearing to receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11; and 3) Adopt the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The annual fiscal budget is the result of Commission staff determining the operating and capital needs for FY 2010/11 and identifying the resources to fund those needs. The budget process began in December 2009. The goals and objectives approved by the Commission on March 10, 2010, were the basis of this budget. The goals and objectives considered during the preparation of the budget relate to mobility initiatives, goods movement, improved system efficiency, environmental stewardship, economic development, intermodalism and accessibility, and public and agency communications, and financial and administrative policies. On May 12, 2010, staff presented the proposed budget to the Commission. Subsequent to that presentation, staff updated the document as a result of the following changes, resulting in a net increase of $18,102,400 to ending fund balance: Agenda Item 7 107 Adjustments to Fiscal Year 2009/10 Projected Amounts • Increases of $3,010,800 in state and local reimbursement revenues less net increases of $1,721,300 in professional and support, project and operation, and capital outlay expenditures after further review and analysis of department budget worksheets. Adjustments to Fiscal Year 2010/11 Budgeted Amounts • A $18,854,400 increase in state reimbursements for various 2009 Measure A Western County highway projects following review of budget compilation; • A $90,000 increase in investment income as a result of a net increase in revenues and the correlating increase in the estimated cash balance; • A $50,000 increase in professional costs is related to quarterly sales tax audit services and the new Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 57, OPEB Measurements by Agent Employers and Agent Multiple -Employer Plans; • A $371,600 increase in support costs for Right of Way Management maintenance expenditures related to Commission -owned property; • A $193,300 increase in program management expenditures for Bechtel services based on a reconciliation to the Bechtel contract amount; • A $600,100 increase in general program operations following review of budget compilation; • A $1,316,000 decrease in highway construction following recent modifications in a cooperative agreement with CalTrans. • A $565,000 increase in right of way expenditures related to the Perris Valley Line project; • Increases of $1,201,000 and $457,000 in Local Transportation Fund Western County and Coachella Valley bicycle and pedestrian expenditures, respectively, after further analysis of funds available; and • A $9,500 increase in State Transit Assistance expenditures based on the subsequent review and analysis of the Short Range Transit Plan submissions. A public hearing to allow for public comment on the proposed budget, as revised, is required prior to the adoption of the proposed budget. The public hearing was opened at the May 12, 2010 Commission meeting. After the public hearing is closed on June 9, 2010, adoption of the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11 will follow. In accordance with the Commission's fiscal policies, the budget must be adopted no later than June 15 of each year. Attached is the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11. This document contains the executive summary, as revised, that was presented at the May 12, 2010 Commission meeting; the Gann Appropriations Limit; the guiding policies related to Agenda Item 7 108 • • • the preparation of the budget; a summary of the budget process; fund budgets; details of program revenues and other sources; debt; department budgets; a community profile; and appendices including a glossary of acronyms, funding definitions, and program/general terms. A summary of the proposed Budget for FY 2010/11 is as follows: Revenues and other financing sources: Sales taxes -Measure A, LTF, and STA Reimbursements (federal, state, and other) TUMF Other revenues Interest on investments Debt proceeds Transfers in Total revenues and other financing sources Expenditures and other financing uses: Personnel salary and fringe benefits Professional services Support services Projects and operations Capital outlay Debt service (principal, interest and costs of issuance) Transfers out Total expenditures and other financing uses Excess (deficiency) of revenues and other financing sources over (under) expenditures and other financing uses Beginning fund balance Ending fund balance Attachment: Proposed Budget for FY 2010/11 Agenda Item 7 FY 2010/11 Budget $ 174,809,900 61,911,500 10,000,000 178,000 1,830,000 185,000,000 212, 414, 700 646,144,100 6,225,000 18,618,400 4,837,100 429, 904, 300 587,600 106, 205,000 212,414,700 778,792,100 (132,648,000) 500,458,200 $ 367,810,200 109 • • • 110 • • • June 9, 2010 Honorable Commissioners Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside, California FY 2010111 Budget Introduction It has often been observed that adversity often inspires innovation. During the last few years, government agencies in Riverside County (County), California, have certainly faced economic adversity. However, in looking forward to Fiscal Year (FY) 2010/2011, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) is ready to enter a year that will be full of promise and activity, much of which will be funded through innovative thinking, careful management, and a commitment to effectively invest scarce resources in much needed and welcomed transportation projects and services. On the financial front, challenges remain. The Commission heavily depends on sales tax revenue which has seen year-to-year declines since the peak in FY 2005/06. Projected sales tax revenues for FY 2010/11 are expected to be comparable to FY 2009/10 revised projections, but the Commission is moving forward with an ambitious program of project development and funding leading to the eventual construction of billions of dollars in transportation projects over the next decade. Construction will begin on three major freeway projects funded by the Commission, and environmental work will wrap up on the Perris Valley Line, a 22 mile extension of the Metrolink commuter rail service. Preliminary project worts will also move forward for a dramatic expansion of State Route (SR) 91 in Corona which will feature new toll lanes, a general purpose lane in each direction, and a series of system improvements to include expanded interchange and improved access to and from what might be Southern California's most congested freeway. That's an important development for the County and the region. All too often, capital projects are delayed during tough times, leading to greater challenges in the future. A more thoughtful approach is to continue to invest in infrastructure during challenging times, often leading to welcome economic opportunities and a better future for everyone. Investing in better infrastructure will create jobs immediately as well as an economic base that attracts employers and jobs for the long-term. 112 Maior Projects on the Horizon By using a combination of funding from sources that include the voter -approved Measure A sales tax, Proposition 1 B, and other state and federal programs, the Commission will be active in construction, environmental, and engineering work for a number of projects: • SR-91 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange • Interstate (I) 215 corridor widening and improvements • 74/215 interchange • 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors • SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvements, including Express Lanes • Perris Valley Line Completed Projects Making a Difference The Commission has recently completed two important public transit projects that will enhance transit service for many Metrolink users and will be part of a much larger effort in the development of the Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension project. In July 2009, the Commission completed a six -story parking structure at the North Main Corona station. This facility serves two Metrolink rail lines and will be accessed by Perris Valley Line users. Ensuring ample parking at this station is extremely important given its proximity to SR-91 and 1-15. A new station location that has been completed is located in the city of Perris. This municipality has made significant improvements in its historic downtown area. The Commission has added to that progress with the development of a multimodal transportation center which opened in early 2010 and now serves Riverside Transit Agency bus riders. The facility includes rail platforms and will be a featured stop on the Perris Valley Line. Stimulus Dollars Making a Maior Impact With Congress's approval of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in 2009, Caltrans and local governments in the County have received welcome federal stimulus funding for transportation projects during FY 2009/10. These projects will remain in construction during FY 2010/11. While most of this funding did not come directly to the Commission, the investment in the area's transportation system freed up other dollars controlled by the Commission to build additional projects including the 74/215 interchange. All told, the ARRA program is funding six important freeway projects in various locations including: • I-10/Bob Hope/Ramon Road interchange (Coachella Valley) • 1-10/Palm Drive interchange (Coachella Valley) • 1-10/Date Palm interchange (Coachella Valley • • • 113 • I-215/Clinton Keith Road interchange (Murrieta) • SR-60Nalley Way interchange (Rubidoux area of Western Riverside County) • 74/215 interchange (Perris) Current Responsibilities During FY 2010/11, the Commission will invest $287 million in capital projects that include highway, regional arterial, and rail projects. The Commission's overall budget will exceed $566 million and includes additional investments for transit operations, payments to cities for street and road improvements, and a variety of smaller programs such as motorist and commuter assistance programs. The Commission's status has become somewhat unique in Southern California. As many transportation agencies have consolidated functions and grown in size, the Commission remains true to the original intent of the state of California (State) legislation that first created it, operating a staff of 40 budgeted positions. In doing so, the Commission remains effective in its role as a transportation planning and funding agency by maintaining productive relationships with other agencies. . For example, Measure A pays for a score of lesser -known projects that are extremely important to local residents. In FY 2010/11, the Commission will return $31 million in funding to local cities and the County for local streets and roads needs. The Commission also receives and programs funding from state and federal sources This includes the State's Transportation Development Act program dollars that are allocated primarily to the County's major public transit providers. Measure A also pays its share by funding transit fare discounts and programs for senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited means and by operating a commuter assistance program that provides traveler information and ridesharing assistance to employers and commuters. Looking Toward FY 2010/11 The focus of FY 2010/11 will be the construction of a number of freeway projects and delivery of two high -profile projects that are part of the Westem Riverside County Delivery Plan. The freeway projects include the widening of six miles of 1-215 in Murrieta, the construction of the 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors at the interchange in Moreno Valley, the widening of SR-91 in Riverside, and the expansion of the 74/215 interchange in Perris. All of these projects break ground during the 2010 or 2011 calendar years and are funded through a combination of state, federal, and Measure sales tax dollars. The two high -profile projects are the Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension project and the SR-91 corridor improvement project (CIP). The Perris Valley project has received a favorable rating from the Federal Transit Administration and a total of $75 million in federal Small Starts Program funding. In order to receive these dollars, the Commission 114 has participated in a competitive process which has resulted in favorable reviews for the cost effectiveness of the Perris Valley Line project. For the next fiscal year, environmental work will be completed, leading to construction in 2011. The total project budget for the Perris Valley Line is estimated at $233 million. A much larger project in terms of budget is the SR-91CIP which will require an investment of more than $1 billion to be funded through a combination of toll revenue bonds, Measure A funding, and federal Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) financing. The project has received legislative approvals and the go-ahead from the California Transportation Commission to be part of a special pilot program to allow the use of design -build procurement and contracting. During FY 2010/11, the Commission will continue environmental work, begin a design -build procurement, and acquire right of way for this project in anticipation of construction in 2012. Infrastructure & Transportation Serve as Economic Stimulus While Riverside County's economy has been negatively impacted by the recession and falling real estate values, the Commission will continue needed investments in transportation and will continue to explore creative and innovative approaches that include partnerships with other agencies, toll financing, the use of TIFIA, and design - build contracting whenever it allows the Commission to better serve the public and safeguard taxpayer dollars —especially Measure A funding. Transportation funding can help jumpstart the economy and create jobs and business opportunities for the entire region. GFOA Distinguished Budget Award The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an award of Distinguished Budget Presentation to the Riverside County Transportation Commission for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan and as a communications device. The award is valid for a period of one year only. The Commission believes that this budget document conforms to program requirements, and it will be submitted to the GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. Acknowledgements The preparation of this budget has been a collaborative effort of the Commission's staff. The budget reflects the Commission's desire to communicate the components of the budget in terms that are easily understandable and supportable for the general public. Staff acknowledges and appreciates the guidance and leadership of the Commission's • • • 115 • • 32-member Board of Commissioners and the sense of renewal and commitment they have and continue to inspire. Signature on file Signature on file Anne Mayer, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer 116 ABLE OF CONTENTS COMMISSION INTRODUCTION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction Budget Overview Commission Personnel Department Initiatives Fund Balances Budget Comparative Capital and Operating Budget Budget Expenditures and Uses Highway, Regional Arterial, and Rail Programs GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT Section 1: GUIDING POLICIES Commission Policy Goals and Objectives Financial and Administration Policies Policy Matrix Section 2: BUDGET PROCESS SUMMARY Budget Process Functional Organization Chart Staff Organization Chart Section 3: FUND BUDGETS Budgetary Basis and Fund Structure General Fund Special Revenue Funds •Capital Projects Funds Debt Service Fund Section 4: REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Funding Sources Revenues and Other Sources Program Revenues Section 5: COMMISSION DEBT Debt Capacity Analysis Debt Service Schedule Program and Geographic Debt Legal Debt Margin Debt Service Requirements Section 6: DEPARTMENT BUDGETS Budget Comparison by Department 6.1: MANAGEMENT SERVICES Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance 6.2: REGIONAL PROGRAMS Planning and Programming Rail Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance 6.3: CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Projed Development and Delivery Location of Capital Projects Capital Projects Summary • Narrative discussion of the history of the Commission and list of principal officers Narrative overview of the operational and financial factors considered Summarized narrative overview, charts, and tables of revenues and expenditures Personnel expenditures and full-time equivalents Major initiatives and summarized expenditures by department Projected fund balances by govemmental fund type and program Schedule of budget by summarized line item Schedule of budget classified by operating and capital purposes Schedule of budget by governmental fund type Listing of budgeted capital project expenditures by program Narrative discussion of the appropriations limit Narrative description of policy goals and objectives Description of financial policies Linkage of policy goals to departmental goals and objectives Narrative description of various budget stages Organization chart by Commission functions Organization chart of budgeted staff Narrative description of budgetary basis and fund structure Overview, narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures Overview, narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures by Measure A and non - Measure A special revenue funds Overview, narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures Overview; narrative and charts of revenues and expenditures Schedute of funding sources by department/program Narrative description of various revenues and other sources Tables and accompanying narratives of program revenues Charts and accompanying narrative demonstrating debt capacity Schedule of debt maturities by year Charts of debt service by program and geographic area Schedule of calculation of legal debt margin Table summarizing debt service requirements by issue Schedule of expenditures by department Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted expenditures Local map of major capital projects for current year Narrative description of each capital project 118 Section 7: COMMUNITY PROFILE Riverside County Demographics Statistical Information Commission Facts Section B: APPENDICES Glossary of Acronyms Funding Definitions Program Terms General Terms Narrative discussion of Riverside County's community profile Charts of various demographic data Charts of various statistical information Narrative overview of the Commission's programs and services Explanation of commonly used abbreviations Narrative description of various funding sources Description of Commission programs and related terms Commonly used terms in govemmental accounting 119 • • • Commission Introduction State of California (State) law created the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission or RCTC) in 1976 to oversee the funding and coordination of all public transportation services within Riverside County (County). The Commission's mission is to assume a leadership role in improving mobility in the County. The goveming body consists of all five members of the County Board of Supervisors, one elected official from each of the County's 26 cities, and one non -voting member appointed by the Governor of California. The Commission is responsible for setting policies, establishing priorities, and coordinating activities among the County's various transit operators and other agencies. The Commission also programs and/or reviews the allocation of federal, state, and local funds for highway, transit, rail, non - motorized travel (bicycle and pedestrian), and other transportation activities. The Commission serves as the tax authority and implementation agency for the voter approved Measure A Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Measure A was approved by the County's electorate in 1988 and imposes a one-half of one cent sales tax to fund specific programs that commenced in July 1989 (1989 Measure A). The 1989 Measure A was approved for 20 years and expired on June 30, 2009. On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A beginning in July 2009 through June 2039 (2009 Measure A). Additionally, the Commission provides motorist aid services designed to expedite traffic flow. These services include the Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE), a program that provides call box service for motorists, and the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), a roving tow truck service to assist motorists with disabled vehicles on the main highways of the County during peak rush hour traffic periods. These services are provided at no charge to motorists and are funded through a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations. The Commission is also legally responsible for allocating Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds, the major source of funds for transit in the County. The TDA provides two sources of funding: the Local Transportation Fund (LTF), which is derived from a one -quarter of one cent state sales tax, and State Transit Assistance (STA), which is derived from the statewide sales tax on gasoline and diesel fuel. Finally, the Commission has been designated as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA) for the County. As the CMA, the Commission coordinates with local jurisdictions in the establishment of congestion mitigation procedures for the County's roadway system. 120 • Name Bob Buster John F. Tavaglione Jeff Stone John J. Benoit Marion Ashley Bob Botts Roger Berg Joseph DeConinck Ray Quinto Mary Craton Greg Pettis Eduardo Garcia Karen Spiegel Scott Matas Robin Lowe Patrick J. Mullany Glenn Miller Terry Henderson Bob Magee Wallace Edgerton Bonnie Flickinger Rick Gibbs Malcolm Miller Richard Kelly Steve Pougnet Daryl Busch Ron Meepos Steve Adams Steve Di Memmo Ron Roberts Scott Famam Raymond Wolfe Riverside County Transportation Commission List of Principal Officials Board of Commissioners Title Chair (Commission) Member Member 2nd Vice Chair (Commission) Member Member Member Member Member Member 1st Vice Chair (Commission), Chair (Budget and Implementation Committee) Member Chair (Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Chair (Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee), Vice Chair (Budget and Implementation Committee) Member Member Member Member Member Member Vice Chair (Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Member Member Member Member Member Vice Chair (Eastern Riverside County Programs Projects Committee) Member Member Member Member Governor's Appointee Management Staff Anne Mayer, Executive Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director Cathy Bechtel, Project Development Director Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director Theresia Treviso, Chief Financial Officer Robert Yates, Multimodal Services Director and Agency County of Riverside, District 1 County of Riverside, District 2 County of Riverside, District 3 County of Riverside, District 4 County of Riverside, District 5 City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Blythe City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral City City of Coachella City of Corona City of Desert Hot Springs City of Hemet City of Indian Wells City of Indio City of La Quinta City of Lake Elsinore City of Menifee City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Norco City of Palm Desert City of Palm Springs City of Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Riverside City of San Jacinto City of Temecula City of Wildomar Ca!trans, District S 122 • • • Executive Summary Introduction The budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010/11 is presented to the Board of Commissioners (Board) and the citizens of Riverside County. The budget outlines the projects the Commission plans to undertake during the year and appropriates expenditures to accomplish these tasks. The budget also shows the funding sources and fund balances that will be used for these projects. This document will serve as the Commission's monetary guideline. To provide the reader a better understanding of the projects, staff has included descriptive information regarding each department and major projects. The discussion in each department includes a review of major initiatives and key assumptions. Staff used the goals and objectives approved at the Commission meeting on March 10, 2010, to prepare this budget. In addition to the Commission's long-term goals and strategic plan, the short-term factors listed below were used to guide the development of the budget: Operational • Complete projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A. • Aggressively pursue completion of the environmental and design processes on the State Route (SR) 91, Interstate (1) 15, and 1-215 projects included in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. • Continue development of the toll program including executing toll program agreements with key partners. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to implement the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional Arterial Program and. facilitate the delivery of arterial improvements in western Riverside County (Western County). • Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental clearance for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. • Continue cooperation with the Federal Transit Administration (PTA) regarding the Small Starts process to support activities for the Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension (Perris Valley Line) project. • Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving the County. • Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders with special transit needs. • Support cost reductions and promote operating efficiency for transit operators. • Maintain effective partnerships among commuters, employers, and government to increase the efficiency of our transportation system by encouraging and promoting transportation alternatives. • Continue to provide a motorist aid system that ensures safety and convenience to freeway motorists. • Maintain an active involvement in state and federal legislative matters to ensure that the Commission receives proper consideration for transportation projects and funding. • Maintain close communication with Commissioners and educate policy makers on all issues of importance to the Commission. 124 Financial • Fund administrative costs with allocations from Measure A, LTF, FSP, SAFE, and TUMF funds. • Maintain administrative program delivery costs below the policy threshold of 4% of Measure A revenues; the FY 2010/11 Management Services budget is 2.24% of Measure A revenues. • Maintain administrative salaries and benefits at less than 1 % of Measure A revenues; the FY 2010/11 administrative salaries and benefits is .70% of Measure A revenues. • Continue to maintain prudent cash reserves to provide some level of insulation for unplanned expenditures. • Maintain current positive bond ratings with rating agencies. • Move forward on Measure A projects for highways and regional arterials using sales tax revenues, TUMF revenues, and state and federal funding as well as financing alternatives such as commercial paper, sales tax revenue bonds, and toll revenue bonds. • Leverage and protect past Measure A investments in rail with state and federal funding for additional rail improvements, including the Perris Valley Line. • Prioritize the use of LTF reserves for transit operations and require transit operators to draw down their current capital projects list before requesting additional capital funds. • Consider actions to lessen the restriction of the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap. • Complete the replacement of the financial software system to better integrate project accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. Budget Overview Total sources (Table 1) are budgeted at $646,144,100, which is a decrease of 18% over FY 2009/10 projected sources and a 18% decrease over the FY 2009/10 budget. Total sources are comprised of revenues of $248,729,400, transfers in of $212,414,700, and debt proceeds of $185,000,000. The projected fund balance at June 30, 2010 available for expenditures (excluding reserves for debt service of $44,712,700 and advances receivable of $18,086,600) is $437,658,900. Accordingly, total funding available for the FY 2010/11 budget totals $1,083,803,000. Table 1 — Sources FY 2009-2011 Measure A Sales Tax $ 119,688,300 $ 106,000,000 $ 106,030,000 3i ¢sr $ 0% LTF Sales Tax 73,059,700 81,055,300 69,037400 "` (12,245,400) -15% STA Sales Tax 4,860,800 N/A Intergovernmental 104,666,400 78,833,600 44,915 300 ' (16,922,100) -21% TUMF Revenue 10,957,400 11,475,000 6,673,000 ('+Gs,, m (1,475,000) -13% Other Revenue 4,399,900 1,448,100 309,300' (1,270,100) -88% Investment Income 13,567,900 3,419,100 3,134800 (P a (1,589,100) -46% Operating Transiers In 46,541,200 244,211,600 265,310,100 ` s)$ (31,796,900) -13% Debt Proceeds 53,716,000 260,000,000 288,284 000 p; c,a k`v' (75,000,000) -29% TOTAL Sources $ 431,457,600 $ 786,442,700 $ 783,663,900 '�°7 k ,_, �! $ (140,298,600) -18% • • • 125 • • Through FY 2005/06, the County had experienced significant growth corresponding to the national economic expansion and amplified locally by competitive advantages of Riverside County over other coastal counties (Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego): (i) housing that was (and remains) more available and affordable; and (ii) plentiful commercial real estate and available development land at lower rates. Moreover, both transportation and communication access to employment centers in Los Angeles and Orange counties improved. Riverside County's economy thrived, reflecting the area's competitive advantages over its neighboring counties, largely as a result of the County's continuing ability to draw jobs, residents, and affordable housing away from the Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego county areas. As a result, the County enjoyed a more diversified employment and commercial base and an increasing share of the regional economy. Chart 1- Commission Sources Trend $350,000,000 $300,000,000 $250,000,000 $200,000,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 — 41-- Measure A Sales Tax —F LTF Sales Tax —11— STA Sales Tax ��f—TUMF Fede ral, State, Local Revenues tOperating Transfers In — �-- Debt Proceeds Today the local economy in Riverside County reflects the nationwide recession, as evidenced by increased unemployment; decreases in total personal income and taxable sales, residential building permits, and the rate of home sales and the median price of single-family residences; and high rates of notices of default on mortgage loans secured by single-family residences. The impact of the recession has been amplified in the Inland Empire due to its relatively greater recent growth and the relatively lower average income levels when compared to coastal areas. These factors have resulted in declines in Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues and TUMF fees as noted in Chart 1. While economic reports indicate that the nationwide recession has ended and economic growth has resumed, recovery in the local Inland Empire economy is expected to be protracted. The outlook for FY 2010/11 is guarded with some recent signs that the decrease in local economic activity has ended and an econoric recovery may have begun. Should Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues continue to decline and the availability of federal and state revenues continue to be uncertain, the timing and scope of the Commission's projects and programs may be impacted. 126 While the Commission's primary revenues are the Measure A and LTF sales taxes, other revenues and financing sources are required to fund the Commission's programs and projects as illustrated in Chart 2. Chart 2 — Sources: Major Categories De bt Proceeds 29% Operating Transfers In 33% Measure A Sates Tax 1696 .� LTF Sales Tax 11% Intergovernmental 10% TUMF Revenue 1% Investment Income O% The State Board of. Equalization recently provided to cities and other agencies its projections that statewide taxable sales over the next fiscal year will increase 6.3%; however, given the tenuous local economy, the Commission considers this estimate to be extremely optimistic. The Commission is not basing its estimate of revenues on the State Board of Equalization's projection. After taking the state of the local economy and recent revenue trends into consideration, staff has projected that Measure A sales tax revenues will be unchanged from the FY 2009/10 revised projection of $106,000,000. On behalf of the County, the Commission administers the LTF for public transportation needs, local streets and roads, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The majority of LTF funding received by the County and available for allocation is distributed to all public transit operators in the County, and the Commission receives allocations for administration, planning, and programming in addition to funding for rail operations included in the commuter rail Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). The LTF sales tax revenue received from the State is budgeted at $52,500,000, unchanged from the FY 2009/10 revised projection due to the economic concerns discussed earlier. Additional FY 2010/11 budgeted LTF revenues for allocations- to the Commission's general fund include $700,000 for administration; $1,575,000 for planning and programming; $3,841,700 for grade separation jump-start funding award allocations to the cities of Corona and Riverside and the County; and $10,193,200 for rail operations and station maintenance. STA funds generated from the statewide sales tax on motor vehicle fuel were allocated through FY 2008/09 by formula by the State Controller to the Commission for allocations to the County's public transit operators. The STA transit allocation for FY 2010/11 is $0 due to a continued suspension in the state's budget that began in FY 2009/10. • • 127 • • • Intergovernmental revenues include reimbursement revenues from federal sources of $28,870,700, state sources of $32,210,100, local agencies of $676,900, and others of $153,800 for highway and rail capital, rail operations and station maintenance, commuter assistance, and motorist assistance programs as well as planning and programming activities. Reimbursement revenues vary from year to year depending on project activities and funding levels. As a result of an amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Western Riverside Council of Govemments (WRCOG), the Commission will receive 48-7% of TUMF revenues (as updated by the most recent Nexus study), TUMF represents fees assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western County. FY 2010/11 TUMF fees are expected to remain flat at $5,000,000 based on the weakened housing market in the Inland Empire, and these revenues also include TUMF zone reimbursements of $5,000,000 for the 74/215 interchange project. Other revenue is projected to decrease 88% from the prior year's budget primarily because of the conclusion in FY 2008/09 of the annual debt service payments from Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) related to bonds issued for 1989 Measure A Coachella Valley regional arterial projects. Investment income is anticipated to decrease 46% in FY 2010/11 as a result of declining interest rates and declining cash balances. Staff continues to actively manage its resources and make appropriate investments to maximize the return to the Commission without sacrificing security and affecting short-term cash requirements. Transfers in relate primarily to the transfer of debt proceeds to Measure A highway and regional arterial projects and to retire outstanding commercial paper notes. Debt proceeds consist of the issuances of additional commercial paper notes and sales tax revenue bonds. Total uses (Table 2), including transfers out of $212,414,700, are budgeted at $778,792,100, a decrease of 15% from the prior year budget amount of $919,996,500. Program expenditures and transfers out totaling $667,737,900 represent 86% of total budgeted uses in FY 2010/11. Program costs have decreased by 7% from $715,872,700 in FY 2009/10. Table 2 —Uses FY 2009-2011 Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials Capital Local Streets and Roads Commuter Assistance Debt Service Management Services Motorist Assistance Planning and Programming Public and Specialized Transit Rail Maintenance and Operations $ 301,477,700 45,655,500 6,161,600 45,673,400 4,902,800 2,623,200 8,051,200 83,045,400 8,667,500 TOTAL Uses $ 506,258,300 Note: Management Services include Executive Management, $ 547,571,000 $ 405,750,700 31,215,900 31,491,700 7,795,200 9,225,500 198,2�5,000 193,050,200 5,868,800 3,840,700 11,122,300 90,048,500 24,279,100 4,888,700 3,819,800 5,448,100 72,183,700 13,590,800 $ 919,996,500 $ 739,449,200 Administration, Legislative Affairs (16,207,900) (229,500) (3,420,600) (92,050,000) (1,019,600) 1,873,300 (3,815,800) (13,589,100) (12,745,200) -3% -1% -44% -46% -17% 49% -34% -15% -52% $ (141,204,400) -15% and Communications, and Finance. 128 Commuter Assistance budgeted expenditures of $4,374,600 are 44% below FY 2009/10 due to the completion of the Inland Empire 511 system implementation. Ongoing operations of the Inland Empire 511 system are funded through SAFE, a motorist assistance service. Increased towing services in highway construction areas also result in an increase in another motorist assistance service —the FSP. Accordingly, Motorist Assistance budgeted expenditures of $5,714,000 reflect a 49% increase from the FY 2009/10 budget of $3,840,700. Debt Service of $106,205,000 has decreased 46% as a result of the FY 2009/10 refinancing of the 2008 bonds and retirement of a portion of the outstanding commercial paper program notes in connection with the commencement of forward starting interest rate swaps and issuance of variable rate sales tax revenue bonds. The 17% decrease in Management Services budgeted expenditures of $4,849,200 is primarily related to the reclassification of financing costs related to Measure A from Finance to Capital Project Development and Delivery as well as the implementation of the new financial software system. Planning and Programming budgeted expenditures of $7,306,500 reflect a 34% decrease from the FY 2009/10 budget of $11,122,300 as a result of the completion of geotechnical borings in the Cleveland National Forest related to feasibility analysis of a future Irvine - Corona Expressway (ICE) and a decrease in jump-start funding disbursements for grade separation projects. The $12,745,200 decrease in Rail Department budgeted expenditures of $11,533,900 is primarily due to capital funding disbursements to SCRRA for new rail cars in FY 2009/10. Total uses included in the FY 2010/11 budget by major categories are illustrated in Chart 3. Chart 3 — Uses: Major Categories Planning and Public and Specialized Transit Programming Rail Maintenance and 1% 10�' Operations 1% Motorist Assistance 1% Management Services 1% Debt Service 14% Commuter Assistance 0% Capital Local Streets I - V Capital Highway, Rail, and Roads - and Regional Arterials 4% 68% • • 129 • • • Commission Personnel The Commission's salary and fringe benefits total $6,225,000 for FY 2010/11. This represents a slight increase of 3% or $161,700 over the FY 2009/10 budget of $6,063,300 (Chart 4); however, as a cost savings measure, there will be no merit -based salary increases in FY 2010/11. Chart 4 - salary and Benefits Costs: Five Year Comparison mamma $7,000•,000 $6,000,000 ss o00,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 52,000,000 $1,000,000 s- FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 The Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of 40.0 FTE positions is below the FY 2008/09 level (Table 3) as a result of three retirements related to the implementation of an early retirement incentive, position reorganization, and maintaining a position as vacant. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling legislation that called for a small staff. Staff will continue to be provided the tools needed, including state of the art technology, to ensure an efficient and productive work environment. However, it must be recognized that small is not viewed in an absolute context; it is relative to the required tasks to be performed and the demands to be met. Table 3 - Staff Summary by Department FY 2009-2011 Executive Management 0.7 0.4 Administration 4.7 4.2 Legislative Affairs and Communications 2.6 1.9 Finance 6.6 6.5 Planning and Programming 5.8 5.4 Rail Maintenance and Operations 2.9 3.2 Public and Specialized Transit 2.6 2.6 Commuter Assistance 1.8 1.8 Motorist Assistance 1.8 1.2 Capital Project Development and Delivery 15.5 13.8 130 The Commission provides a comprehensive package of benefits to all permanent, salaried employees. The package includes_ health, dental, vision, and life insurance, short and long- term disability, workers' compensation, tuition assistance, sick and vacation leave, retirement benefits in the form of participation in California Public Employees Retirement System (CaIPERS), postretirement health care, deferred compensation, and employee assistance program. The compensation components are shown in Chart 5. Chart 5 — Personnel Salary and Benefits • Other Fringes r Health 2% 12% ■ Retirement011110, 22% • Salary 64% Department Initiatives The preparation of each department's budget was based on key assumptions, accomplishments in FY 2009/10, major initiatives for FY 2010/11, and department goals and related objectives. Following are the key initiatives and summary of expenditures for each department (Tables 4 through 13). Executive Management • Continue project development and delivery as the key Measure A priority. • Obtain approvals from the FTA, railroads, and community related to the development of the Perris Valley Line. • Advocate for state investments in transportation and approval of a federal transportation bill to fund needed transportation priorities in Riverside County and stimulate the local economy. • Maintain regional cooperation and collaboration as a significant effort consistent with the philosophy and mission of the Commission. • Enhance external communications with media, business and civic groups, and the community. • Maintain an effective mid -sized transportation agency with a small and dedicated staff. Table 4 — Executive Management Personnel $ 98,800 $ 93,709 $ 113,400 , r $ 5,700 6% Professional 46,100 70,000 50,600 Dllxar�i a pe 0% Support 49,000 51,600 47,800 I� T (1,400) -3% TOTAL $ 193,900 $ 215,300 $ 211,800 �. �� `';�;,,a � $ 4,300 2% • • • 131 • • Administration • Provide high quality support services to the Commission and to intemal and external customers. • Continue to strengthen the electronic records management system. • Continue to provide timely communications to Commissioners with continued emphasis on the utilization of electronic mail. • Continue to update technology to streamline processes and provide easier access to Commission records. • Support and develop a motivated workforce with a framework of activities and practices that comply with employment laws and regulations. Table 5 — Administration Personnel $ 349,800 $ 357,700 $ 341,700 $ 41,700 12% Professional 135,900 138,000 108,300 (3500) -3% Support 995,200 1,101,900 1,003,000 (454,500) -41% Capital Outlay 100,100 20,000 20,000 ,..1 (20,0001 -100% Debt Service 18,900 � i," R �+ - N/A TOTAL $ 1599,900 $ 1,617,600 $ 1,473,000 ry . ,m ti t: $ (436,3001 -27% Legislative Affairs and Communications • Continue efforts to protect and seek greater state and federal investment in transportation infrastructure and goods movement. • Advocate positions in the State Legislature and in Congress that advance the County's transportation interests, especially those related to the implementation of Express Lanes on SR-91 and of the Perris Valley Line. • Continue to develop a broad public information program regarding the Commission's responsibilities and accomplishments through a variety of media formats and presentation opportunities. • Continue to place an emphasis on providing communications support related to major project development efforts. • Provide new Commissioner orientation meetings and other continuing education opportunities for Commissioners. Table 6 — Legislative Affairs and Communications Personnel $ 358,900 $ 314,700 $ 353,100 Professional 364,900 666,000 495,000 Support 142,500 166,400 129,900 TOTAL $ 866,300 $ 1,147,100 $ 978,000 123,500) -7% 22,000 3% 4,600 3% 3,100 0% 132 Finance • Continue appropriate uses of long- and short-term financing to advance 2009 Measure A projects of the Commission and CVAG. • Apply the sales tax revenue forecast update to develop a financing plan to support the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan and CVAG highway and regional arterial projects, including consideration for a recommended increase in the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap. • Develop and approve internal audit projects related to the organizational accountability program. • Continue to keep abreast of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities and consider early implementation of new pronouncements. • Continue the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system to benefit all staff in the management of accounting and project information and automate a paperless workflow system. • Continue to implement a centralized procurements process in order to strengthen controls and ensure consistency in the application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations. • Maintain order, safety, and security at the Commission -owned operating properties, including the commuter rail stations. Table 7 — Finance Personnel $ 703,500 $ 694,600 $ 773,100 ` x ,a = $ (21,600) -3% Professional 1,331,300 1,779,600 757,500 4 Support 30,800 59,100 494,300�'�' ,+�'��+�m� 515,000 871% Capital Outlay 196,000 355,500 201,000 ""° t v (201,000) -57% DebtService 3,452,500 6,500,000 (6,500,000) -100% TOTAL $ 5,714,100 $ 9,388,800 $ 2,225,900 t„','���1"h� ��'t;°:iss � $ (7,090,700) -76% Planning and Programming • Monitor funding authority and responsibility related to the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and impacts on the STIP caused by the state budget issues. • Ensure STIP and Proposition 1B funded projects are administered and implemented consistent with California Transportation Commission (CTC) and California Department of Transportation (Ca!trans) policies. • Continue to strategically program projects and obligate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding, including monitoring the use of such funding to prevent funds from lapsing. • Focus on interregional concerns and maintain effective working relationships involving various bi-county transportation issues, including goods movement. • Coordinate planning efforts with regional and local agencies relating to the development of regional transportation plans (RTP) and green house gas reduction implementation guidelines. • Secure funding through the federal transportation bill for goods movement -related needs. • 133 • • • Monitor and track the TUMF regional arterial projects. • Work cooperatively with member agencies to continue the work efforts on the new Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process (CETAP) corridors. • Continue the Congestion Management Program (CMP) update and traffic monitoring along urban and rural highway systems. • Administer the SB 821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program. • Monitor the Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach's (Ports) projects for impacts on Riverside County. Table 8 - Planning and Programming Personnel $ 833,800 $ 854,300 $ 926,400 d� r'a g $ 65,400 8% Professional 513,100 704,300 313,800 f (354,300) -50% Support 28,200 38,400 11,400 (13,400) -35% Projects and Operations 6,676,100 9,525,300 4,196,500 + 13,513,500) -37% TOTAL $ 8,051,200 $ 11,122,300 $ 5,448,100 , i $ (3,815,800) -34% Rail Maintenance and Operations • Continue the planning and implementation of capital improvements at the commuter rail stations in Riverside County, including multimodal facilities, security and rehabilitation projects, and a layover facility. • Continue project development and right of way acquisition activities related to the Perris Valley Line project. • Establish best approach to build, maintain, and operate cost effective and environmentally sustainable facilities that meet the public's transportation needs. • Continue efforts with Iota( and state agencies to support intercity passenger rail service throughout Riverside County and a high-speed passenger rail system along an Inland Empire alignment. Table 9 - Rail Maintenance and Operations Personnel $ 384,200 $ 439,400 $ 399,400 Opt +m� $ 51,800 12% Professional 226,800 409,300 208,500 �2A4s�e ` (48,900) -12% Support 895,900 1,188,400 1,048,900 (195,000) -16% Projects and Operations 7,108,000 22,242,000 11,861,900 (12,569,2001 -57% Capital Outlay 52,600 • - 72,100 1yt+,R 16,100 N/A TOTAL $ 8,667,500 $ 24,279,100 $ 13,590,800 ,� r'1 $ (12,745,200) -52% Public and Specialized Transit • Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs and monitor funding of these programs. • Approve specialized transit funding allocations for FY 2011/12 and FY 2012/13 following the development of a second universal call for projects. • Continue long-range planning activities to ensure that anticipated revenues are in line with projected levels of service by transit operators. 134 • • • Table 12 — Motorist Assistance Personnel $ 110,500 -$ 141,0D0 $ 141,000 *: �^ $ 161,900) -44% Professional 34,700 404,400 405,900� (48,600) -12% Support 309,100 351,600 350,400 a, 595,000. 169% Projects and Operations 2,168,900 2,489,000 2,488,800 k° a_ 580,000 23% Transfers Out - 454,700 433,700 t 808,800 178% TOTAL $ 2,623,200 $ 3,840,700 $ 3,819,800� $x9 , $ 1,873,300 49% Capital Project Development and Delivery • Continue project development, right of way, and construction activities on remaining 1989 Measure A projects including SR-74 curve widening, 74/215 interchange, SR-91 high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange, and 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors and funding support for operational improvements at local interchanges on SR-60, SR-91, and SR-111. • Continue project activities on the 1-215 bi-county highway and Perris Valley Line rail projects, which were included in both the 1989 Measure A and 2009 Measure A programs. • Continue project work on the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan projects, including the 71/91 connectors, SR-91 corridor improvements, 1-15 corridor improvements, 1-215 corridor mobility improvement projects, SR-79 realignment, and Mid County Parkway. • Commence rail project activities for the Riverside Downtown station layover facility, La Sierra station parking expansion, and rehabilitation projects. • Provide Western County TUMF funding and support to local jurisdictions for regional arterial project engineering,- right of way acquisition, and construction. • Provide advance funding and support of 2009 Measure A highway and regional arterial projects and for the acquisition for land as mitigation in the Coachella Valley. • Maintain a right of way acquisition and management program in support of capital projects. • Manage right of way acquisition schedules and budget control measures. • Maintain and manage the access, use and security of Commission -owned properties, properties in acquisition process, and income generating properties. Table 13 — Capital Project Development and Delivery Persomel $ 2,149,700 $ 2,578,100 $ 2,406,000 Professional 2,388,900 10,948,500 6,593,600 Support 491,300 1,585,000 795,700 Projects and Operations 295,978,300 320,758,300 165,426,500 Capital Outlay 583,800 718,000 (18,900); Debt Service 42,202,000 191,755,0W 193,050,200 Transfers Out 45,541,200 242,199,000 262,039,500 TOTAL $ 389,335,200 $ 770,541,900 $ 630,292,600 127,800 5% 4,011,100 37% (715,700) -45% 11,705,200 4% (318,000) -44% (85,550,000) A5% (31,247,800) -13% $ (101,987,400) -13% 136 Fund Balances The total fund balance as of June 30, 2010 is projected at $500,458,200. The Commission's budgeted activities for FY 2010/11 are expected to result in a $132,648,000 decrease of total fund balance at June 30, 2011 to $367,810,200. A significant portion of the decrease is related to the use of available fund balance for the Measure A, TUMF, and LTF special revenue funds to complete the 1989 Measure projects and programs and to fund approved TUMF projects and transit operations in a declining revenue environment. Table 14 presents the components of fund balance by govemmental fund type and program at June 30, 2011. Table 14 — Projected Fund Balances by Governmental Fund Type and Pro ram at June 30, 2011 Management Services Planning and Pmgramrnlrg Rai Maintenance and Operations Right of Way Management 53.399,700 000,000 4,317,400 65,300 Measure A Western County: Bond Financing Commuter Assistance Economic Development Highways New Corridors Public and *darned Transi Rai Regional Arterials Measure A Coachella Valet/ Highways and Regional Arterial total Streets and Roads Specialized Transi Measure A PabVerde Valley Local Streets and Roads Motorist Assistance State Transit Assistance Local Transportation Fund TUMF CELAP Regional Arterials S758,500 9,586,800 10530,300 1E6,656,900 17,181,700 9,018,100 16,618,400 11,884,700 858,400 1,100 300 400 6,463,600 14,680,700 53,317,200 41,207,100 111.600 111,098,ma Budget Summary The overall budget for FY 2010/11 is presented in Table 15 by summarized line items, Table 16 by operating and capital classifications, and Table 17 by governmental fund type. Highway, rail, and regional arterial program expenditures by project are summarized in Table 18. • • 137 • • • Table 16 — Budget Comparative by Summarized Line Item FY 2009-2011 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of issuance TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Debt Proceeds Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (uses) Beginning fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 119,688,303 73,059,700 4,860,800 50,692,700 52,670,300 1,303,400 10,957,400 4,399,900 13,567,900 331,200,400 $ 106,000,000 $ 106,000,000 81,055,300 69,037,400 40,755,000 36,896,800 1,131,800 11,475,000 1,448,100 3,419,100 282,231,100 5,44,3,200 6,063,300 5,604,600 3,341,900 8,946,500 11,586,400 50,287,600 79,794,400 105,901,600 90,044,700 4,799,700 45,655,500 10,640,300 398,710,200 16,946,400 5,095,800 22,042,200 12,824,390 60,730,100 65,043,300 21,425,000 123,605,700 117,475,500 2,232,800 31,215,900 13,761,400 448,314,000 33,646500 182,395,000 12,026,900 12,610,000 3,250,000 17,408,050 25,131,800 2,375,450 6,673,000 309,300 3,134,800 230,069,800 6,158,400 10,588,300 4,438,60D 15,026,900 11,640,000 51,395,000 26,369,300 1,200,000 42,165,000 85,073,300 1,412,200 31,491,700 8,864,700 259,611,200 184,111,000 7,939,900 999,300 45,673,400 198,255,000 193,050,200 938,800 1,110,500 292,400 459,717,100 675,785,000 474,139,100 (128,516,700) 1393,553,960) (244,069,300)- 46,541,200 (46,541,200) 53,716,000 53,716,000 (74,800,700) 531,044,200 $ 456,243,500 244,211,600 (244,211,600) 260,000,000 260,000,000 265,310,100 (265,310,100) 298,284,000 288,284,000 (133,553,900) 44,214,700 456,243,590 456,243,500 $ 322,689,600 $ 500,458,200 $ 0% (12,245,400) -15% N/A (11,884,300) -29% (4,686,700) -13% (351,100) -30% (1,475,000) -13% (1,270,100) -88% (1,589,100) -46% (33,501,700) -12% 161,700 3% 1,672,000 10% (258,7001 -5% 1,413,300 6% 3,161,500 25% (8,287,500) -14% 10,280,300 16% 1,575,900 7% 4,103,690 3% {28,779,500) -24% (597,200) -27% (229,500) -1% 363,600 3% (18,40'3,700) -4% (90,095,000) -49% (205,000) -2% (1,750,000) -54% (92,050,000) -46% (522,900) -47% (109,407,600) -16% 75,905,900 -19% (31,796,900) -13% 31,796,900 -13% (75,000,000) -29% (75,000,000) -29% 905,900 -1% 44,214,700 10% $ 45,120,600 14% 138 Table 16 — Operating and Capital Budget FY 2010/11 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way and Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Debt Proceeds Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 10,758,600 68,809,900 2,018,400 5,504,500 790,700 502,000 88,384,100 3,519,100 3,658,800 3,967,800 7,626,600 7,179,200 88,696,000 1,565,600 97,440,800 187,600 108,774,100 (20,390,000) 2,725,700 (1,463,500) 1,262,200 (19,127,800) $ 95,241,400 26,852,300 26,705,600 40,000 10,000,000 178,000 1,328,000 120,021,600 100,893,800 $ 160,345,300 2,705,900 14,959,600 869,300 15,828,900 8,806,6® 52,442,600 75,323,600 23,000,000 127,709,300 70,000 30,986,400 14,125,000 332,463,500 92,300,000 12,405,000 1,500,000 106,205,000 400,000 457,603,300 (297,258,000) 209,689,000 (210,951,200) 185,000,000 183,737,800 (113,520,200) . 380,436,601 266,916,401 • • 139 • • • Table 17 — Budget by Governmental Fund T Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Debt Proceeds Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE 50,000 12,849,200 1,545,600 FY 2010/11 $ 2,700,000 $ 103,300,000 $ 16,309,900 52,500,000 397,700 28,473,000 1,100,100 31,110,000 178,000 652,700 10,000,000 178,000 39,200 1,493,600 20,902,900 227,529,300 3,088,700 3,136,300 3,269,400 15,349,000 3,085,700 1,751,400 6,355,100 17,100,400 1,340,300 14,645,500 52,442,600 68,823,600 23,000,000 121,389,300 75,846,800 90,000 30,986,400 14,125,000 15,785,100 401,349,200 170,600 25,399,500 417,000 422,002,900 (4,496,600) (194,473,600) 2,299,100 98,026,600 (26,344,700) (770,000) 1,529,100 71,681,900 (2,967,500) (122,791,700) 10,849,900 422,977,600 7,882,400 $ 300,185,900 55,200 55,200 6,500,000 6,270,000 12,770,000 83,300,000 9,000,000 1,305,000 11,100,000 1,500,000 86,105,000 20,100,000 98,875,000 20,100,000 (98,819,800) (19,858,000) 83,300,000 (180,300,000) 185,000,000 88,000,000 (10,819,800) 28,789,000 (5,000,000) 23,789,000 3,931,000 i 21,918,000 44,712,700 $ 11,098,200 $ 48,643,700 140 Table 18 - Hi hway, Re 1 lonal Arterial, and Rail Pro rams FY 2010/11 Projects and Operations Bechtel Program Management SCRRA Program Management General TOTAL PROJECTS -GENERAL - Highway Engineering 74/21S Interchange 60/21S East Junction NOV Lanes Connector 71/91 Connectors I-1S Corridor Improvements 1-21S BI-county HOV Interim Project 1-215 BI-county Project 1-215 Corridor Improvements (South Segment)//-1S to Scott Road 1-215 Corridor Improvement (Central Segment)/Scott Road to Nuevo Road I-21S Southbound to 1-1S Connector Widening Gap Closure Mid County Parkway SR-79 Realignment SR-91 Corridor Improvements SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/21S Interchange General SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY ENGINEERING Regional Arterial Engineering Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL ENGINEERING Rail Engineering La Sierra Station Parking Expansion Perris Valley Line and Other Related Projects Riverside Layover Facility Station Rehabilitation Projects SUBTOTAL RAIL ENGINEERING TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL ENGINEERING Highway Construction SR-60/Valley Way Interchange 60/21S East Junction HOV Lanes Connector 74/21S Interchange 1-21S Corridor Improvements (South Segment)/1-15 to Scott Road SR-111 City Project SR-74 Curve Widening 5R-91/Green River Interchange Bridge SR-91/La Sierra Interchange SR-91/Van Buren Interchange Coachella Valley Projects SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION Regional Arterial Construction Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL CONSTRUCTION Rail Construction La Sierra Statlon Parking Expansion North Main Corona Station Parking Structure Perris Valley Line and Other Related Projects Riverside Layover Facility Station Rehabilitation Projects SUBTOTAL RAIL CONSTRUCTION TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL CONSTRUCTION Highway Design Build SR-91 Corridor Improvements TOTAL HIGHWAY DESIGN BUILD Highway Right of Way and Land 74/215 Interchange 60/215 East Junction NOV Lanes Connector 1-215 Corridor Improvement (Central Segment)/Scott Road to Nuevo Road 1-21S Corridor Improvments (South Segment)/1-15 to Scott Road Mid County Parkway 5R-74 Curve Widening SR-74/1-15 to 7th Street SR-79 Realignment 5R-79/Thompson tb Oomenigoni SR-91 Corridor Improvements SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/21S Interchange Coachella Valley MSHCP SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND Regional Arterial Right of Way and Land Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND Rail Right of Way and Land Perris Valley Line and Other Related Projects General SUBTOTAL RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND GRAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL PROGRAMS 141 • • • Gann Appropriations Limit In November 1979, the voters of the State approved Proposition 4, commonly known as the Gann Initiative. The Proposition created Article XIIIB of the State Constitution, placing limits on the amount of revenue that can be spent by public agencies from the "proceeds of taxes." In 1980, the State Legislature added Section 7910 to the Govemment Code, providing that the goveming body of each local jurisdiction must establish, by resolution, an appropriations limit for the following year. The appropriations limit for any fiscal year is equal to the previous year's limit adjusted for population changes and changes in the Califomia per capita income. The Commission is subject to the requirements of Article XIIIB. Gann appropriations limits are calculated for and applied to the Commission. In accordance with the requirements of Article XIIIB implementing legislation, the Board approved Resolution No. 10-015 on June 9, 2010, establishing appropriations limits for the Commission at $318,967,208. The FY 2010/11 budget appropriated $226,617,800 in taxes for the Commission, falling well within the limits set by the Gann Initiative. Based on historic trends and future projections, it appears the Commission's use of the proceeds of taxes, as defined by Article XIIIB, will continue to fall below the appropriations limit. The calculation for the FY 2010/11 appropriations limit is as follows: 2009-2010 Appropriations Limit $ 322,761,463 2010-2011 adiustment: Change in California per capita income = -2.54 percent Change in Population, Riverside County = 1.40 percent -2.54 + 100 = 0.9746 100 1.40 + 100 = 1.014 100 0.9746 x 1.014 = 0.9882444 $ 322,761,463 X 0.9882444 = $ 318,967,208 2010-2011 Appropriations Limit $ 318,967,208 Source: California per capita income - California Department of Finance Population, Riverside County - Califomia Department of Finance 142 • • • qacatitairk Li2Cilaci4j titizta 144 • Commission Policy Goals and Objectives In addition to financial and administration policies, the Commission has seven long-term policy goals: promote mobility, mitigate and address the impact of goods movement, ensure improved system efficiencies, foster environmental stewardship, encourage economic development, support transportation choices through intermodalism and accessibility, and prioritize public and agency communications. For each of these policy goals, the objectives and initiatives that were considered in the framework of the work plan for the FY 2010/11 budget are identified below. While Riverside County grapples with the challenges of a declining real estate market, high unemployment, and an uncertain economy, the need for better transportation remains a top public priority that the Commission is poised to address via the seven policy goals. In moving forward with an aggressive program of projects and services, the Commission will face the challenge of lower Measure A and TDA revenues and uncertainty regarding the availability of federal and state transportation revenues. Due to the long-term nature of many of the Commission's programs, many of the policy goals' objectives and initiatives are ongoing from year to year. Promote Mobility The Commission, in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies, will strive to create a transportation system that promotes efficient mobility both within the County and region. • Complete projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A and determine use(s) for any unexpended revenues. • Continue to aggressively pursue completion of the environmental and design processes on key components of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan, which includes the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects. • Continue to develop the toll program consistent with the Westem Riverside County Delivery Plan including executing toll program agreements with key regional and state partners namely Ca!trans, Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), toll operator, Califomia Highway Patrol (CHP), and others. • Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental clearance for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. • Continue to work with state and federal agencies to fund and construct projects programmed in the STIP, Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP), Proposition 1 B bond programs, and Measure A program as well as other high priority regional projects. • Maximize obtaining all available transportation funds and strategically program funds to meet funding deadlines and to prevent the lapse and loss of funds. • Maximize the effective application and use of Western County TUMF funds to deliver eligible Commission priority projects. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to implement the TUMF Regional Arterial Program and facilitate the delivery of arterial improvements in Western County. 146 • Actively participate in the SR-91 Advisory Committee and Riverside Orange Corridor Authority to facilitate near and long-term improvements to SR-91; enhance intercounty public transit options and foster the development of a new corridor between the two counties. • Advocate streamlining efforts at the state and federal levels that will reduce costs, time and delays currently associated with project delivery including, but not limited to, timely project reviews and approvals. • Continue to coordinate and provide public access to commuter information via the newly launched Inland Empire 511 system. • Continue cooperation with the FTA regarding the Small Starts process to support the initiation of the Perris Valley Line commuter rail service in 2012. • Continue to work with the public transit operators to reduce costs and increase system efficiencies in order to accommodate lower revenues from state and federal sources. • Continue to develop a vision of transit service to further promote seamless intracity, intercity, and regional transit connectivity for County residents. Mitigate and Address the Impact of Goods Movement The Commission will work with federal, state, and local governments to facilitate the movement of goods and services to, within, and through the County, recognizing the vital role goods movement mobility plays in the economic health of the County, the State, and the nation. • Seek funding and local agency concurrence to implement the Commission's approved, high -priority railroad grade separation priority fist to mitigate the impact of increased goods movement demands on the transportation system. • Remain committed to a regional approach regarding goods movement issues in order to maximize funding from state and federal sources to goods movement needs in Southem Califomia. • Continue working with the Ports and regional transportation commissions to develop a funding mechanism for needed projects and mitigation on a regional basis, including Riverside County. • Continue working with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), OCTA, SANBAG, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), Ventura County Transportation Commission (VCTC), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), Mobility 21, and the Coalition for America's Gateway and Trade Corridors to encourage Congress to create a national goods movement program to treat the nation's multimodal national goods movement network as a system rather than individual projects. • 147 • Ensure improved System Efficiencies The Commission will select projects and allocate funds in a manner that will improve safety and reduce congested traffic corridors. • Advocate the development and use of advanced technologies for transportation applications that are affordable and practical. • In partnership with SANBAG, refine and enhance the recently launched Inland Empire 511 system, which will make real-time traffic information, real-time bus and rail transit trip planning information, and rideshare information available to commuters for the purpose of trip planning and congestion avoidance. • Assure the effectiveness of transit planning through coordination with the Transit Operators Working Group, Citizens' Advisory Committee, and annual SRTP process with a goal toward promoting program productivity, efficiency and effectiveness. • Provide innovative commuter rideshare programs to reduce single occupant vehicle trips and coordinate with other regional rideshare service providers to address intercounty commute trips. • Work with local jurisdictions, Caltrans and the CHP to continue providing a motorist aid system which includes a call box program and an FSP program, including temporary services in freeway construction zones. • Complete construction, in partnership with Caltrans and SANBAG, of the Inland Empire Transportation Management Center. • Leverage resources to incorporate park and ride facilities and additional connecting bus service at Metrolink stations that may have available capacity. Foster Environmental Stewardship The Commission will achieve its mobility goals while promoting environmental stewardship and protecting the area's natural resources and quality of life. • Continue working with the Riverside Conservation Authority (RCA) to implement the Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP). • Work with the SCAG, SCAQMD, sub -regional agencies, and local jurisdictions to implement an RTP that meets regional air quality goals and conformity guidelines. • Support a variety of outreach channels and educational programs that promote the benefits of ridesharing, public and specialized transit, rail, and availability of commuter resources for the purposes of reducing vehicle trips and vehicle miles traveled. • Facilitate private/public use of clean fuels technology. • Address new state and federal mandates regarding greenhouse gas emissions, including coordination with local and regional agencies and participation in various forums to develop implementation guidelines. • Continue to develop sustainable and green commuter rail stations and provide upgrades and rehabilitation projects to reduce the environmental impact of the existing stations. 148 Encourage Economic Development Transportation decisions will consider the economic benefits derived from any improvement, and, where feasible and practical, will pursue transportation altematives that enhance or complement economic development. • Commit to seek opportunities related to transportation projects that will create jobs and improve the economic base in the County. • Support local agencies in the design and construction of interchanges that are in proximity to regional economic centers and developments. • Support local projects, consistent with countywide transportation goals, which enhance business development, local employment, and area tourism. Support Transportation Choices through Intermodalism and Accessibility County residents will be served, where economically feasible, through the development of transportation alternatives and travel options that consider the needs of a wide range of citizens. • Work with transit providers and local social service agencies to provide specialized transit service to meet a broad spectrum of socio-economic transit needs of seniors and persons with disabilities. • Leverage commuter assistance and freeway service patrol outreach channels in order to increase the awareness of and foster the use of alternative commuting modes. • Implement the Commission's commuter rail SRTP and the Southern Califomia Regional Rail Authority's (SCRRA or Metrolink) plan for commuter rail services with an emphasis on the Perris Valley Line, an extension from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley. • Develop a long-range strategic plan for the provision of commuter and/ or passenger rail services in Western County or Coachella Valley. • Pursue the goals and objectives as outlined in the Coordinated Public Transit - Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan) for Riverside County related to a unified, comprehensive but flexible strategy for transportation service delivery to address transportation gaps and/or barriers focusing on unmet transportation needs of elderly individuals, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited income. • Enhance security, surveillance, and emergency response capabilities of County transit facilities and infrastructure through proactive planning, interagency coordination, and investment. Prioritize Public and Agency Communications The Commission will provide timely, informative, and accurate information to encourage informed public and agency participation in the Commission's decision -making processes. • 149 • • • Promote a close working relationship with news and civic entities to increase interest and understanding of transportation and related issues. • Enhance the provision of public information through various forms of communication (e.g., website, television, Speakers Bureau, print media, radio, etc). • Maintain an ongoing effort of informing Riverside County's Congressional and State Legislative delegations regarding County transportation issues. • Develop an effective long-range legislative strategy regarding the reauthorization of the federal transportation bill to ensure that the federal govemment participates as a full partner in funding Riverside County projects that are of national and regional significance. • Advocate for sufficient funding for Riverside County transit and transportation projects from various federal and state revenue sources including, but not limited to, annual federal appropriations, economic recovery programs, STIP, and Proposition 1 B bond programs. • Seek legislative flexibility for innovative financing and delivery methods. • Maintain ongoing efforts to educate commuters, businesses, and the public regarding the Commission's toll planning efforts and specific project development efforts currently underway. Financial and Administration Policies Financial Planning Policies • Administrative costs, including salaries and benefits, shall be funded by allocations from Measure A, LTF, FSP, SAFE, and TUMF funds. • The Commission shall budget no more than one percent (1 %) of Measure A sales tax revenues for administrative salaries and benefits. • Administrative program delivery costs will be budgeted at whatever is reasonable and necessary, but not to exceed four percent (4%) of Measure A sales tax revenues (inclusive of the one -percent salary limitation). The Commission shall budget 100% of the annual required contribution related to the postretirement health care benefits. • The Commission shall utilize unexpended 1989 Measure A funds only for projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A. Sales tax revenues from the 2009 Measure A shall be expended only for projects and programs included in the 2009 Measure A. • Amounts will be budgeted by fiscal year for multi -year projects based on best available estimates with the understanding that, to the extent actuals vary from those estimates and the project is ongoing, adjustments will be made on an continual basis. • The fiscal capital budget should be consistent with the strategic plan and deviations appropriately noted, explained, and justified. • A balanced budget shall be adopted annually with operating and capital expenditures and other financing uses funded by identified revenues and other 150 financing sources as well as available fund balances. Revenue Policies • Sales tax revenue projections will be revised semi-annually to ensure use of current and relevant data. Staff may adjust annual amounts to reflect the most current economic trends. • A strategic application of local funding sources will be used to maximize federal and state funding of projects. • Fiduciary responsibility regarding Western County TUMF revenues shall be exercised, and revenues will be allocated pursuant to Commission direction and the approved 2009 Measure A. Debt Management Policies • The Commission will maintain 2.0x debt ratio coverage on all senior debt. • Debt issuance will be for major capital projects including engineering, right of way, and construction. Debt secured by Measure A revenues may be used to advance projects included in the 2009 Measure A expenditure plan. • Operating requirements, if any, must be paid from current ongoing revenues and may not be financed. • Costs of issuance, including the standard underwriter's discount, will not exceed two percent (2%). • The Commission may enter into interest rate swaps to better manage assets and liabilities and take advantage of market conditions to lower overall costs and reduce interest rate risk. • While it is the intent of the Commission to establish a cash debt reserve for long term bond issuance, surety bonds can be obtained when beneficial to the Commission. • All sales tax revenue debt must mature prior to the termination of 2009 Measure A on June 30, 2039. • The Commission will consider actions to lessen the restriction of the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap, which could include the possibility of an administrative action or ballot measure to increase the cap. Expenditure Accountability Policies • Established priorities for planning and programming of capital projects will be reviewed annually with the Commission. • Actual expenditures will be compared to the budget on at least a quarterly basis, and significant deviations will be appropriately noted, explained, and justified. Reserve Policies • The Commission will maintain program reserves in accordance with Measure A • • 151 • • • and TDA policies and guidelines. • The Commission will establish and maintain a transit operator's reserve of ten percent (10%) for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley. Additionally, a ten percent (10%) reserve will be established and maintained for each of the Westem County transit operators (public bus and commuter rail). • The Commission shall prioritize the use LTF reserves for the purpose of transit operations. • The Commission shall require that transit operators draw down their current capital projects list prior to requesting the use of reserves to match capital grants and have no more than a three year backlog of capital projects. Cash Management and Investment Policies • Where possible, the Commission will encourage receipt of funds by wire transfer to its accounts. • Balances in the bank operating account will be maintained at the amount necessary to meet monthly expenditures. • Idle funds will be invested per the Commission's established investment policy emphasizing in order of priority: 1) safety, 2) liquidity, and 3) yield. • Cash disbursements to local jurisdictions and vendors/consultants will be completed in an expeditious and timely manner. Auditing, Accounting, and Financial Reporting Policies • The Commission will replace its financial software system in order to better integrate project accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. • The Commission will issue a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) in accordance with the GASB Statement 34 financial reporting model. • An audit is to be conducted annually on the Commission's accounting books and records. As long as the Commission has outstanding bonds, an independent accounting firm must conduct the audit. • The Commission is responsible for ensuring that audits of Measure A and TDA funding recipients are completed and reviewed for compliance and other matters in a timely manner. • An internal audit program will be maintained to identify improvements in controls and procedures as well as best practices. Human Resources Management Policies • Commission staffing levels will be consistent with the intent of its enabling legislation, which envisioned a small, but effective staff. • Contract staff and consultants will be used to augment staff efforts as much as possible to support programs or workloads, which do not appear to be of a permanent nature. Information Technology Management Policies 152 • Significant effort will be made to maintain efficient and cost-effective technology infrastructure by continuously upgrading network equipment and software to ensure quality performance, productivity, and connectivity among staff, other agencies, and the public. Network security will continue to be a top priority to maintain the integrity of the Commission's network and information. Linking Commission Policy Goals and Departmental Goals and Objectives The following matrix (Table 19) illustrates the linkage of the Commission's overall policy goals described in this section to the individual departmental goals and objectives included in Section'6. Table 19 — Relationship Between Commission and Departmental Goals • • 153 • • • Sootier& 2 ElQaclmsil [Puioilitatt Ilums[tv 154 • • Budget Process Summary The budget is the primary performance tool used to measure and control accountability of public agencies for taxpayer dollars. The budget communicates to all stakeholders (i.e., elected officials, regional agencies, and citizens) how the investment they made will be put to use by providing detailed information on the specifics of resource allocation and expenditures. Progress is monitored on a monthly basis, and revisions and updates are made as deemed necessary to reflect changing dynamics and accommodating unplanned requests. This results in a budget document that is useful and meaningful as a benchmark against which to evaluate government accomplishments and/or challenges and to assess compliance with fiscal accountability. The budget process consists of six primary tasks conducted in phases throughout the fiscal year. Chart 6 illustrates the budget process for the development of the FY 2010/11 budget and monitoring of the FY 2009/10 budget. A summary of each task is described below. Chart 6 — Bud et Process Short -Term Strategic Direction Phase The first phase of the budget process is to determine the direction of the Commission in the short-term and to integrate this with the Commission's long-term goals and objectives, including the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan as discussed in Section 6.3. Annually a workshop is held for the policy makers to evaluate and determine where the Commission plans to be and what it desires to accomplish over the next five to ten years. Annual reviews allow for timely responsiveness to any significant political, legislative, or economic developments that may occur locally, statewide, or nationally. Staff then adjusts its course based on the long-term strategic direction of the policy makers. Staff convenes in early January to both assess actual results, compared to the current year budget, and map changes in strategy for the ensuing fiscal year by reviewing and, 156 Needs Assessment Phase Staff and consultants evaluate what projects and studies need to be accomplished. Project priority and sequencing set in the long-term strategic plan are the top candidates for budget submission. However, priorities may have changed due to economic necessities or political realities, resulting in projects being rescheduled by acceleration or postponement. New projects may be added or existing priorities deleted based on Commission direction. Development and Review Phase Using all the data and information gathered from the previously mentioned stages, department heads submit their desired budgets to the Finance Department. The information, along with staff and overhead allocations, is compiled into a preliminary or draft budget. After review by the Executive Director and inclusion of the desired changes, the draft budget is presented to the Board for input. Adoption and Implementation Phase The proposed budget is submitted to the Commission at its May meeting. A hearing is scheduled to allow for public comment on the proposed budget. The Commission may choose, after public hearing, to adopt the budget or to request additional information and/or changes to the budget. The budget must be adopted no later than June 15 of each year. Upon adoption by the Commission, the budget is entered into the accounting system effective July 1 for the next fiscal year. Budget Roles and Responsibilities Involvement in the budget permeates all staffing levels, as presented in Chart 8, at the Commission from clerical support staff to policy makers. Each program manager develops a detailed line item operating and capital budget. Those budgets, by program, are submitted to the department head for review and approval. The department heads submit their budgets to the Chief Financial Officer by mid -March. The Finance Department compiles the department budgets. Both the capital and operating budgets are combined into the draft budget for the entire Commission. The Executive Director reviews the entire budget for overall consistency with both the short- and long-term strategic direction of the Commission, appropriateness of funding sources for the identified projects and studies, and reasonableness of the operating budget expenditures, which should also correspond to the capital budget. Expenditure activities of the funds are controlled at the budgetary unit, which is the financial responsibility level (General, Measure A, Motorist Assistance, LTF, STA, TUMF, Capital Projects, and Debt Service Funds) for each function (i.e., administration, programs, intergovernmental distributions, debt service, capital outlay, and other financing uses). These functions provide the legal level of budgetary control (i.e., the level at which expenditures cannot legally exceed the appropriated amount). 158 Budget -to -actual reports are distributed to program managers and directors on a monthly basis for informational purposes and quarterly for identification and evaluation of any significant budget variations. Management has the discretion to transfer budgeted amounts within the financial responsibility unit according to function or may provide support for supplemental budget appropriations requests. Supplemental requests require the authorization of the Commission. The Commission may take action at any monthly meeting to amend the budget. Those amendments are incorporated into the budget, as they occur, and are reflected in the CAFR in the final budget amounts reported in the budgetary schedules. The Finance Department compiles the data and submits a budget appropriations adjustment at mid -year to the Commission for approval. Chart S — Staff Organization Chart FY 2010/11 tegalLounael Chief Financial Officer Board of Cc mrnissloners Decutive Director Oao,ty Etecutirie Dire;tar Mullimodal5ereices Director Project Development Director Project Delivery Director • 7oli Programs Director • 159 • • • Fund Budgets Budgetary Basis The Commission accounts for its budgeted govemmental funds using the modified accrual basis of accounting and the current financial resources measurement focus. The basis of accounting is the same as the basis of budgeting. Revenues are recognized as soon as they are both measurable and available to meet current year obligations. Revenues are considered to be available when they are guaranteed as to receipt, based on expenditure of funds (i.e., govemment matching funds), or certain to be received within 180 days of the end of the fiscal year. Expenditures are generally recorded when a liability is incurred; however, debt service expenditures are recorded when the payment is due. Total sources and uses by governmental fund type for the FY 2010/11 budget are shown in Chart 9. Chart 9 — Total Sources and Uses by Governmental Fund Type FY 2010/11 ■ Total Sources4% ■ Total Uses 3% M Total Sources 42 6 Total Uses 36% Fund Structure ■ Total Sources4% ■ Total Uses 3% • Total Sources 50% ■ Total Uses 58% ■General Fund ■ Special Revenue Funds Y Capital Projects Funds ■ Debi Service Fund There are 31 funds (Chart 10) that account for the Commission's budgeted resources and are categorized into four governmental fund types: General fund, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, and Debt Service fund. All of the Commission's funds are budgeted. The number of funds has decreased from the 38 budgeted funds included in the FY 2010/11 budget primarily as a result of the expiration of the 1989 Measure A and the use of all available funds for its local streets and roads as well as Coachella Valley regional arterial, and specialized transit programs. There are four funds reported in the General fund and 24 in the special revenue funds. Two capital projects funds are used to account for capital project expenditures financed with short- or long-term debt proceeds. In addition, the Commission has one Debt Service fund to account for debt - related activity. 160 Chart 10 — Budgeted Funds Structure FY 2010/11 General Fund Overview The General fund of the Commission is used to account for all activities not legally required or designated by Board action to be accounted for separately. For many public agencies, the General fund is the largest fund; however, it is less significant for the Commission. The Commission's largest revenue source is Measure A, a locally levied sales tax that legally must be accounted for separately in special revenue funds. In addition to Commission administration and general operations, other General fund activities include commuter rail operations, planning and programming, and right of way management. The FY 2010/11 budget for the General Fund is presented in Table 20, followed by a discussion of significant components of the budget. • • 161 • • Table 20 — General Fund FY 2009 — 2011 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax $ 3,400,000 $ 2,700,000 $ 2,700,000 r ' a'e';., $ 0% LTF Saks Tax 13,082,000 28,338,700 16,537,400 t E 112,028,800) -42% Federal Reimbursements ' ' 3,769,800 1,100,000 943,700 � �;T � � 1! �. (702,300) {4% State Reimbursements 944,200 5,343,600 3525,000 ` - „p (4,243,500) -73% local Reimbursements 619,400 382,500 1,315,500 ' s, " (204500) -53% Other Revenue 448,500 686,100 309,300, ° (504100) -74% investment income 263,300 83,600 56,40D ; Ana'` 4.. (44,400) -53% TOTAL Revenues 22,527,200 38,634,500 25,387,300 '�.a ' a,,(17,731,600) 46% Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits 3.088,600 3,101,400 3,365,200 Professional and Support Professional Services 2,599,500 3,834,100 2,731,700 Support Cost 2,393,900 3,152,600 3,273,200 b` TOTAL Professional and Support Cost 4,993,400 6,986,700 6,004,900 Project and Operations Program Operations -General 1,420,900 1,511,100 1,266,300 Right of Way/Land 338,400 20,000 Operating and Capital Disbursement 7,742,000 28,193,400 13,434300 Special Studies 4,611,300 2,06I,800 1,362,200 TOTAL Projects and Operations 14,112,600 31,787,300 16,058,801) Debt Service Principal Payment 15,700 Interest Payment 2,300 TOTAL Debt Service 18,000 Capital Ouday 334,400 375,500 293,100 TOTAL Expenditures 22,347,000 42,250,900 25,722,000 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures 112,700) 0% 1564,700) -15% 166,900) .2% (631,600) -9% (170,800) 41% 30,000 150% (15,344,2001 -54% 1517,200) -25% 116,002,200) -50% N/A N/A N/A (204,9001 -55% (16,851,400) -40% 119,800) (3,616,4001 (334,701)),r,_,, '- ,y'a;, 1880,200) 24% Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers in 591,100 Transfers Out - 114,300) Net Financing Sources (Uses) - 576,800 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE (19,8001 1,079.200-7.,.r-,':. `�.� ., :;+'+;,. 1,708,000 289% 1755,700) 5285% 1,079,200 (3,039,600) 744,500 10,125,200 10,105,400 10,105,400 $ 10.105,400 $ 7,065,600 S 10,849,900 952,300 163% 72,100 -2% 744,500 7% 816,600 12% The sources for the General fund (Chart 11) consist of allocations from Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues and transfers from TUMF and motorist services for administration; LTF sales tax revenues for planning, programming, and monitoring (PPM) activities; LTF Article 4 allocations for commuter rail transit operations and capital; state highway account (SS 45) funding for project planning; various other federal, state and local reimbursements not accounted for in other funds for planning project activities; other revenue from licenses and leases related to right of way management; investment income; and other transfers for rail station maintenance of park and ride facilities and for right of way management related to rail and highway properties. General fund uses are depicted in Chart 12. 162 Chart 11 - General Fund Sources FY 2010/11 Transfers In Other Revenue ,. 10% 1% Local Reimbursements 1% State Reimbursements 5% Federal Reimbursements 2% Measure A Sales Tax 11% Measure A sales tax revenues allocated for administration are unchanged from the prior year due to the projected flat Measure A revenues. The administrative allocation may be adjusted at mid -year based on required expenditures, but in no event will exceed four percent (4%) of total Measure A revenues (including administrative salaries and benefits). LTF sales tax revenues from the Local Transportation Fund, a special revenue fund, are allocated to the General Fund for administration, planning staff and studies, and rail transit operations and capital. The changes compared to the prior year budget are for the following reasons: • Planning allocations are set by law at three percent (3%) of estimated LTF sales tax revenues. The FY 2009/10 revised budget includes the effect of the mid -year projection adjustment. This adjustment usually includes the unapportioned carryover amount, which is not determined until after the prior year's fiscal year end, and revised revenue projections. The FY 2010/11 budget reflects a $158,400 projected decrease in such planning allocations. • Transit funding for commuter rail and bus transit operators is tied to sales tax revenues; however, allocations are based on need to the extent that revenues and reserved fund balance are available. The FY 2009/10 budget included approximately $8,800,000 in LTF allocations primarily to fund capital contribution expenditures to SCRRA. There are no LTF allocations for such capital expenditures in the FY 2010/11 budget. • Allocations aggregating $6,750,000 for local jurisdictions' grade separation projects were included in the FY 2009/10 General fund budget. The FY 2010/11 budget includes LTF allocations of $3,841,700 for grade separation projects. • • • 163 • • • Federal reimbursements represent funding for geotechnical studies related to the proposed ICE. These studies were substantially completed in FY 2009/10; however, certain project activities may continue through FY 2010/11 with available federal funding. State reimbursements include STIP. revenues to fund PPM activities, which may vary annually. The FY 2009/10 budget included a $4,500,000 allocation from the State Transit Assistance special revenue fund to fund a portion of the increased capital contribution expenditures to SCRRA. Local reimbursements and other revenues represent reimbursements from other local agencies related to the geotechnical studies and a portion of the security costs at the commuter rail stations as well as property lease and license revenues. The FY 2009/10 budget also included a $170,000 grant from WRCOG related to an interregional partnership study. Property -related other revenues are anticipated to decrease almost 50% in FY 2010/11. Chart 12 — General Fund Uses FY 2010/11 Capital Outlay Transfers Out 13% % Personnel Salary and Benefits 12% Professional Services 12% Personnel salary and benefits expenditures are comparable to the prior year's budget. Professional and support costs decreased 9% as a result of decreased professional services required for administration, right of way management, rail legal and general matters, geotechnical studies, and regional issues as well as decreased support services for repairs and maintenance of properties and commuter rail stations. Project and operations expenditures decreased 50% primarily because the FY 2009/10 budget included $13,300,000 in rail capital contributions to SCRRA; $6,750,000 in allocations for local jurisdictions' grade separation projects; and special studies related to the ICE geotechnical studies, which were substantially completed during the current fiscal year. The FY 2010/11 budget includes no rail capital contributions to SCRRA and $3,841,700 in allocations for grade separation projects. These decreases were partially offset by a $1,000,000 increase in rail operating contributions to SCRRA for FY 2010/11. 164 Capital outlay expenditures decreased 55% due to fumiture, computer equipment, and ERP and other software purchases in FY 2009/10. The ERP implementation represents a significant portion of the capital outlay expenditures in FY 2010/11. The increase in transfers in is primarily due to updates to the administrative cost allocation methodology to ensure that all programs are supporting a fair share of administrative costs. The transfer out of $770,000 is from right of way management lease revenues to the 1989 Measure A Western County Highways special revenue fund related to the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector project. Special Revenue Funds Overview The Commission's special revenue funds are legally restricted as to use for Measure A projects and programs, TUMF projects, motorist assistance services, and funding of Riverside County transit operations and capital. The special revenue funds' budgets are summarized in Table 21, and individual budgets are presented in Tables 22 through 29 along with respective discussions. • • • 165 • • Table 21 — Special Revenue Funds FY 2009 — 2011 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax $ 116,288,300 $ I03,3C0,000 $ 103,300,000 ,s Kr + $ 0% LTFSales Tax 59,977,700 52,716,600 52500,000 ° r (216,60% 0% STASales Tax 4,860,800 - N/A Federal Reimbursements 46,922,900 39,655,000 16,464,350 , d (11,181,000) -16% State Reimbursements 51,726,100 31,553,203 21,606,800 (443,200) -1% Local Reimbursements 684,000 799,300 1,059,950 (146,600) .18% TUMF Revenue 10,957,400 11,475,000 6,673,000 (1A75,000) -13% Other Revenue 1951,400 762,000 0 (762,000) -10014 Investment Income 11,035,600 3,073,900 2)350,000 (1,580,300 .51% TOTAL Revenues 306,404,200 143,335,000 204,454,100 tic a (15,805,70% -5% Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits 2,359,600 2,961,900 2,793,200 Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations -General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out 174,400 6% 1,786,100 12,244,200 7,451,903 fi 3,104,800 25% 945,500 1,943,200 1,165,300 x o p=, 191,800) -10% 2,731,600 14,187,400 8,617,200 } r . 2,913,000 21% 10,165,500 11,313,200 10,373,700 3,332,300 29% 29,782,600 60,730,100 46,193,600 > s, (6187,5001 -14% 75,886,800 56,053,300 22,869,300 t�Cl' 12,770,300 23% - 21,425,000 1,200,000 at a r' ? 1,515,000 7% 47,165,400 115,586 00 35,165,000 e�� w 5,803,600 5% 82,301,700 89,282,100 71,643,030 � ! ;: (13,435,300) -15% 188,400 170,030 50,D00 ,, ,�'ahri; (80,000) 4714 45,655,500 31,215,900 31A91,700 ; "* 1229,500) -1% 10,640,300 13,761,400 8,864,700 -° 363,600 3% 301,787,200 399,536,700 227,851,000 800 100 6,Sog000 903 6,500,000 604,400 735,000 (700)'^" 307,483,700 423,921,000 239,260,700 `,_® 1,812,500 0% N/A (6,500,000) -100% (6,500,000) -100% 318,030 -4314 (1,918,100 0% (1,079,500) (180,586,O00) (34,806,600) < e h ` 113,887,600) 8% 15,238,100 60,798,900 41,735,600 "' + °+,;a 37,227,700 61% a.IcP (44,108,100) (11,106300) (17,621,300) caurn�"i �^,�� (15,138,400) 137% Net Financing Sources (Uses) (28,870,000) 49,692,600 24,114,300 ' .,� 21,989,300 44% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) (29,949,500) 430,893,400) (10,692,300)T '7 .vexg r 4� 8,101,700 -6% N/A Beginning Fund Balance 463,619,400 433,669,900 433,669,900 5 (10,692,300) -2% ENDING FUND BALANCE $433,669,900 $ 302,776,500 $ 422,977,600 ,( $ (2,590,600) -1% Measure A sales tax, LTF sales tax, Western County TUMF, state budgetary allocations, and vehicle registration fees are all accounted for in the 24 special revenue funds. Federal, state, and local reimbursements and transfers in of debt proceeds are used to supplement the Measure A sales tax revenues. Chart 13 illustrates the various special revenue fund sources. 166 Chart 13 — Special Revenue Funds Sources FY 2010/11 Investment Income 0% TUMF Revenue 3% Local Reimbursements 0% State Reimbursements 10% Federal Reimbursements 9% The special revenue funds' resources are expended on County highway, rail, regional arterial, and new corridors engineering, right of way acquisition, and construction; local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction; economic development incentives; bond financing; bicycle and pedestrian facilities; education and incentive programs to encourage use of alternate modes of transportation; special social service transportation programs; public transit operations and capital needs; and motorist towing and freeway call box assistance. As shown in Chart 14, projects and operations expenditures represent the primary use of special revenue fund resources. Chart 14 — Special Revenue Funds Uses FY2010/11 Personnel Salary and Transfers Out Benefits 6% 1% Capital Outlay _1 0% Professional Services 3% Support Costs 0% • 167 • • • Measure A Special Revenue Funds Of the special revenue funds, 19 are funded primarily with Measure A sales tax revenue which is allocated to the three geographic areas of the County (Chart 15). The Measure A funds are comprised of four 1989 Measure A and ten 2009 Measure A Western County operating funds, one 1989 Measure A and three 2009 Measure A Coachella Valley operating funds, and one 2009 Measure A Palo Verde Valley operating fund. Chart 15 — Measure A Sales Tax Revenues by Geographic Area Palo Verde Valley 1% Since the 1989 Measure A terminated on June 30, 2009, the remaining 1989 Measure A operating funds will be closed upon the completion of the specific projects and programs. With the commencement of the 2009 Measure A on July 1, 2009, the 14 operating funds will be in existence for the 30-year term. These funds account for all Measure A project and program expenditures and transfers of debt proceeds for capital projects. The Measure A special revenue funds expend monies on capital construction and improvements to highways, commuter rail, regional arterials, new corridors, and local streets and roads. Funding is also reserved for commuter assistance, public and specialized transit, and economic development incentives programs as well as bond financing costs. The Commission is a self-help county, and, as such on major highway projects, the Commission supplements the State's spending. Upon completion of the highway projects, Caltrans takes over the maintenance and operations of the projects. All revenues from the Measure A sales tax have been pledged as security for the Commission's senior sales tax revenue bonds and commercial paper notes. Debt service on the bonds is recorded in the Debt Service fund, and most of the resources for the cash payments are provided through transfers out by the Measure A special revenue funds for the 2009 Measure A bonds. Debt service for the commercial paper notes is recorded in a capital projects fund, as the notes will be paid from 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues or retired with proceeds from sales tax revenue bonds. 168 Western County Measure A Operating Funds The Western County Measure A Operating special revenue funds account for Western County's approximately 75% share of the Measure A sales tax. As demonstrated in Table 22, most of the Commission's reimbursements flow through these funds, since the sales tax leverages state and federal dollars. Table 22 — Western County Measure A Operating Funds FY 2010 — 2011 Sources Measure A Sales Tax Bond Financing Commuter Assistance Economic Development Incentives Highways Local Streets and Roads New Corridors Public Bus Transit Rail Regbna) Arterials Specialized Transit Total Measure A LTF Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income Transfers In TOTAL Sources Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Interest Payments Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL Uses Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 6,252,000 1,157,300 917,000 23,607,000 22,448,000 8,561,000 1,180,500 4,721,800 6,944,000 1,967,400 77,756,000 216,600 38,307,000 28,077,400 530,800 6,475,000 762,000 1,530,900 53,575,200 207,230,900 2,493,000 11,595,500 1,589,100 T„ 8,691,200 51,916,600 39,250,000 21,425,000 83,790,700 5,792,200 170,000 22,448,000 233,483,700 ( 6,500,000 735,000 1,882,900 258,279,200 i $ (51,048,300r 129,000) (5,300) (4,000) (109,000) (105,000) 139,000) (5,400) (21,400) (32,000) (8,900) (359,000) (216,600) (10,195,500) (936,800) (8,400) (1,475,000) (762,000) (617,700) 37,194,800 22,623,800 271,300 3,207,400 1787,700) 2,593,400 18,370,7001 15,801,000 1,575,000 3,623,400 (1,982,200) (80,000) (105,000) 13,054,900 (6,500,000) (318,000) 19,247,100 28,175,000 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% -27% -3% -2% -23% -100% -40% 69% 11% 11% 28% -50% 30% -16% 40% 7% 4% -34% -47% 0% 6% -100% -43% 1022% 11% (5,551,200) 11% The budgeted Measure A sales tax revenues are comparable to the prior year; however, taxable sales changes periodically impact the geographic allocation formula. FY 2009/10 LTF sales tax revenues were related to funding for a rail capital project. • • • 169 • The increase in federal reimbursements is primarily attributable to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding of $10,000,000 for the 74/215 interchange project construction. State reimbursements reflect increased STIP and Proposition 1 B Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) funding for various highway and rail projects. TUMF revenue represents reimbursements from TUMF zone funds administered by WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange construction and right of way acquisition. Prior year other revenue represented local contributions from the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) for the Perris Station Transit Center, which was completed in FY 2009/10. Investment income is expected to decrease as a result of the use of available 1989 Measure A Western County fund balance for remaining project and program expenditures as well as declining investment yields. As in prior years, a significant portion of transfers in consists of debt proceeds primarily from commercial paper notes as well as sales tax revenue bonds to fund 2009 Measure A Westem County highway projects. Other transfers in include funding from available 1989 Measure A debt service reserve funds for a rail capital project and from right of way management accumulated lease proceeds for the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector project. Measure A Western County professional services expenditures in FY 2010/11 consist of general legal services for the various programs and capital projects, specialized legal and financial advisory services related to the SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvement projects, other professional services for rail capital and commuter assistance projects, and liquidity facility and professional fees related to the Commission's debt programs. Support costs comprise operations and advertising for the commuter assistance program and maintenance and repairs for the commuter rail station rehabilitation and security projects. The 30% increase in general program operations is due to SCRRA program management related to the Perris Valley Line project. Many of the Commission's Western County rail and highway projects funded by Measure A have been in the project development phase for several years and are now at or near the construction phase. Such projects include the 74/215 interchange, 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector, 1-215 south segment corridor improvements, and Perris Valley Line. As a result, engineering expenditures in the FY 2010/11 budget will be 16% lower than the prior year, while construction expenditures will be 40% higher. For other projects such as the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 central segment corridor improvements and Riverside layover facility, engineering and environmental work will continue. Design -build activities related to the SR-91 corridor improvements will increase in FY 2010/11 with the design -build procurement. Right of way acquisition is another major project activity for which the process can be lengthy. Significant right of way acquisitions include the SR-91 corridor improvements, SR-91 HOV lanes, and Perris Valley Line. The 34% decrease in operating and capital disbursements is due to reduced allocations for Western County intercity bus service and specialized transit expenditures funded by the 2009 Measure A. 170 In FY 2009/10, interest payments were included in debt service expenditures, whereas $14,200,000 for debt service principal and interest is included in transfers out in FY 2010/11. Other transfers out include funding for right of way property management activities and maintenance of park and ride facilities at certain commuter rail stations and for SR-79 related projects aggregating $580,000 and $6,350,000, respectively. Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds These special revenue funds account for Coachella Valley's 24% share of the Measure A sales tax. Table 23 — Coachella Valley Measure A Operatin t Funds FY 2010 — 2011 Sources Measure A Sales Tax Highways & Regional Arterials $ 12,380,000 Local Streets and Roads 8,666,000 Specialized Transit 3,714,000 Total Measure A 24,760,000 Investment Income 46,300 TOTAL Sources 24,806,300 Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits 8,000 Professional Services 3,000 Support Costs 1,000 Projects and Operations Program Operations- General 16,300 Construction 6,719,300 Operating and Capital Disbursements 3,714,000 Local Streets and Roads 8,161,000 Regional Arterials 13,761,400 TOTAL Projects and Operations 32,372,000 Transfers Out 1,556,500 TOTAL Uses 33,940,500 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (9,134,200)E 197,000 2% 137,000 2% 59,000 2% 393,000 2% (42,000) -91% 351,000 1% (5,700) -71% (3,000) -100% (1,000) -100% 17,700 109% (6,093,900) -91% 59,000 2% (31,400) 0% 238,600 2% (5,810,000) -18% 796,300 51% (5,023,400) -15% 5,374,400 -59% As shown in Table 23, total sources for the Coachella Valley operating funds are comparable to the prior year's budget. While overall Measure A sales tax revenues are basically unchanged, taxable sales changes among the geographic areas do impact the geographic allocation formula. The Coachella Valley construction expenditures for FY 2009/10 reflect the carryover of project funding for the remaining 1989 Measure A Coachella Valley highway projects. Operating and capital disbursements represent specialized transit funds distributed to SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) for transit operations. Local streets and roads comprise turnback payments to local jurisdictions net of transfers out for debt service. Regional arterial projects are highway and regional arterial projects managed by CVAG. 171 • • • Transfers out are related to debt service for 2009 Measure A debt issued for CVAG highway and regional arterial projects and city of Indio local streets and roads projects under advance funding agreements. Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund This special revenue fund accounts for Palo Verde Valley's 1 % share of the Measure A sales tax. Table 24 — Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund FY 2010 — 2011 Sources Measure A Sales Tax Local streets and Roads $ 784,006 f i';If� $ (34,000) -4% Total Measure A 784,000 (34,000) -4% Investment Income 700 i ( 1700) -100% TOTAL Sources 784,700 (34,700) -4% Uses Projects and Operations Local Streets and Roads 606,900 ` l y e ; (93,100) -15% TOTAL Projects and Operations 606,900 F =` (93,100) -15% Transfers Out 177,100 _ 59,100 33% TOTAL Uses 784,000,.._,.I'. (34,000) -4% Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 700 �� �.1T; $ (700) -100% The Measure A sales tax revenues are affected by the impact of shifts in taxable sales changes on the geographic allocation formula as well as the overall changes in Measure A sales tax revenue levels. In the Palo Verde Valley, expenditures are for local streets and roads; however, transfers out relate to debt service for the city of Blythe local streets and roads projects under an advance funding agreement. Non -Measure A Special Revenue Funds The non -Measure A special revenue funds account for LTF disbursements, TUMF Western County project costs, motorist assistance expenditures for towing service as well as freeway call boxes and Inland Empire 511 system operations, and transit disbursements from STA. These activities are budgeted in the LTF, TUMF, FSP, SAFE, and STA special revenue funds, respectively. Local Transportation Fund The LTF special revenue fund derives its revenue from one quarter of one cent of the state sales tax that is returned to source and provides for funding of public transit operations in the County, bicycle and pedestrian facility projects, planning, and administration (Table 25). 172 Table 25 — Local Transportation Fund FY 2010 — 2011 Sources LTF Sales Tax $ 52,500,000 Investment Income 627,900 TOTAL Sources 53,127,900 Uses Projects and Operations Operating and Capital Disbursements 72,813,900 = (10,389,600) -14% TOTAL Projects and Operations 72,813,900 -� � (10,389,600) -14% TOTAL Uses 72,813,900 - : ' ," (10,389,600) -14% Excess (defidency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 119,686,000) ®` c :�; ` $ 10,027,000 -51% (362,600) (362,600) 0% -58% -1% The LTF sales tax revenue in FY 2010/11 is projected to be unchanged. Investment income is expected to decrease significantly due to declining yields on investments and cash balances resulting from the use of a portion of available fund balance for FY 2010/11 expenditure requirements. In FY 2010/11, approximately 92% and 8% of the LTF transit expenditures of $57,362,000 are for operating and capital purposes, respectively. The actual allocations will not be approved until July 2010. Planning and administration expenditures of $2,402,300 represent allocations to the General fund. The remaining expenditures of $2,660,000 relate to allocations to local jurisdictions for bicycle and pedestrian facility projects. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund The TUMF fund accounts for the Commission's share of developer fee assessments on new residential and commercial developments in Western County for regional arterials and CETAP corridors (Table 26). • • 173 • • Table 26 - Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund FY 2010 - 2011 Sources Federal Reimbursements $ 1,173,000 $ (1,173,000) -100% Loral Reimbursements 125,000 ii (125,000) -100% TUMF Revenue 5,000,000 a r 0% Investment Income 606,900 ,; b ; 4 r (401,300) -66% Transfers In 6,790,000 .. , t a r (440,000) -6% TOTAL Sources 13,694,900+r (2,139,300) -16% Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits 319,900 (29,300) -9% Professional Services 241,000 + ef' Support Costs 1,500 1, if'. 1,900 127% Projects and Operations Program Operations - General 116,700 +w 141,200 121% Engineering 8,813,500 83,200 1% Construction 10,084,000 M r 3,063,200 3096 Right of Way/Land 31,795,000 q 2,180,200 7% Regional Arterials i„Q '' 125,000 N/A TOTAL Projects and Operations 50809 200 m r r 5,592,800 11% Transfers Out 7,035,100 = � f +� s v ` ' :; (5,672,900) •81% TOTAL Uses ^rrF 58,406,100 1, s !�;!` (158,500) 0% Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (4,1,711,800) , �' r) $ (1,980,800) 4% TUMF revenue is projected to remain unchanged due to the weakened housing market. Prior year federal revenues relate to federal reimbursements on the SR-79 realignment project. The transfers in for FY 2010/11 relate to funding from the 2009 Measure A Westem County highways of $4,250,000 for SR-79 realignment right of way acquisition and from the 1989 Measure A Western County highways in the amount of $2,100,000 for an SR-79 regional arterial project. In the prior year, the transfer in was related to an intrafund borrowing that was not required. General program operations increased significantly because of more program management services required for the SR-79 realignment and Mid County Parkway projects. Approximately 86% of the projects and operations costs are attributable to programmed regional arterial projects, including the SR-79 realignment project. The remaining 14% relates to CETAP projects such as the Mid County Parkway preliminary engineering and right of way acquisitions. Transfers out in FY 2010/11 represent administrative allocations to the General fund and funding for right of way property management related to projects acquired for the Mid County Parkway. The prior year transfers out pertained to intrafund borrowings between the regional arterials and CETAP to fund regional arterial projects; however, the transfers were not required. Freeway Service Patrol Fund The FSP fund accounts for the state and local resources provided to cover the costs of servicing stranded motorists in covered service areas and construction zones by means of towing, changing tires, and providing fuel (Table 27). 174 Table 27 - Freeway Service Patrol Fund FY 2010 - 2011 Sources State Reimbursements $ 2,025,800 ', $ 493,600 24% Local Reimbursements 83,500 +9 0% Investment Income 5,700 q Y ` (2,700) -47% Transfers In 433,700 +{3 472,900 109% TOTAL Sources 2,548,700 963,800 38% Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits 109,200 sa (37,500) -34% Professional Services W' 13,200 ..y . 0% Support Costs 36,800 w 15,800 43% Projects and Operations Program Operations - General 2,383,800 rsW 566,200 24% TOTAL Projects and Operations 2,383,800� + 566,200 24% Transfers Out 14,000 ( 194,200 1387% TOTAL Uses ru; 2,557,000 _ 738,700 29% Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (8,300) r',"ice >+ $ 225,100 -2712% While the state's funding share of the covered service areas of $1,768,200 is comparable to the prior year, state reimbursements related to towing service in construction zones is expected to more than double as a result of an increase in Caltrans construction projects on County highways. Transfers in from the SAFE special revenue fund are expected to increase in FY 2010/11 primarily because of the Commission's construction projects on County highways. The increase in operating costs for the towing service in FY 2010/11 is related to the additional towing services required for the construction zones. Transfers out are administrative allocations to the General fund. Service Authoritv for Freeway Emergencies Fund The SAFE fund accounts for the $1 per vehicle registration fee levied on all registered vehicles within the County. It funds the installation and implementation of emergency aid call boxes located strategically on the highways throughout the County as well as the operations of the recently implemented Inland Empire 511 system (Table 28). 175 • • • Table 28 — Service Authors for Freeway Emergencies Fund FY 2010 — 2011 Sources Federal Reimbursements $ 175,000 S 186,500 107% State Reimbursements 1,450,000 tq ,'a, s4 - 0% Local Reimbursements 60,000 ra'v d 113,200) -22% Other Revenue N/A Investment Income 60,700 (31,500) -52% TOTAL Sources 1,745,700 141,800 8% Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits 31,800 (24,400) -77% Professional Servkes 391,200 (48,600) -12% Support Costs 314,800 !!? 579,200 184% Projects and Operations Program Operations - General 105,200 ti '' l ;o 13,800 13% TOTAL Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL Uses Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 462,000 =4_ :; $ (992,800) -215% Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) federal reimbursements represent the pass -through funds from SANBAG as its share of the Inland Empire 511 system operating costs. Other miscellaneous reimbursements include recoveries from call box knockdowns, which service is provided by a collection agency. Professional services related to the call boxes reflect a $232,200 decrease, which is offset by an $183,600 increase for the 1E511 system operations. Call box equipment maintenance reflected in support costs decreased $60,000 due to the completion of technology upgrades and other call box site -related improvements; however, support costs of $633,000 consisting primarily of communications and advertising related to the 1E511 system are included in the FY 2010/11 budget. The transfers out to the FSP special revenue fund reflect a matching contribution from SAFE funding to the State's contribution for towing services. State Transit Assistance Fund The STA fund accounts for the state budgetary allocation of gas tax revenues designated for rail and bus transit operations and capital requirements (Table 29). The allocation is based on estimates of gas tax revenues provided by the Controller of the State of California, subject to an annual state budget appropriation. Due to the State's budget issues, the STA allocations beginning in FY 2009/10 were suspended. 176 Table 29 — State Transit Assistance Fund FY 2010 — 2011 Sources Investment Income $ 194,800 Er $ (121,800) -63% TOTAL Sources 194,800 w E (121,800) •63% Uses Professional Services 300 ?3, �ls� 096 Projects and Operations Operating and Capital Disbursements 6,962,000 (1,122,500) -16% TOTAL Projects and Operations 6,962,000 i 4 { s, (1,122,500) •16% TOTAL Uses 6,962,300 (1,122,500) -16% Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (6,767,500) $ 1,000,700 -15% Investment income is expected to decrease significantly because of declining yields on investments and cash balances due to the use of available fund balance for expenditures and suspension of state allocations. The FY 2009/10 and FY 2010/11 consist of allocations primarily for Westem County bus and rail capital purposes, as available funds for Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley are minimal. Similar to the LTF allocations, the actual STA allocations will not be approved until July 2010. Capital Projects Funds Overview The capital projects funds account for all debt proceeds from commercial paper notes and sales tax revenue bonds (Table 30). 177 Table 30 - Capital Projects Funds FY 2009 — 2011 Revenues Investment Income $ 580,100 $ 10,500 $ 32,100 4 $ 44,700 426% TOTAL Revenues'` 580.100 10,500 32,100 ..,,I,.;. _J;s'; 44,)OQ 426% Expenditures Professional and Support Professional Services 1,219,000 868,100 404,700 am p (868,100) -100% Support Costs Z500 - 100 u NSA TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 1,221,500 668,100 404,800 .. _ `i ,;_. _ ..,. (868,100) -100% Projects and Operations Engineering 20,505,000 5,201,400 N/A Construction 3,907,600 8,990,000 3,500,000 ' ,a (2,490,000) -28% Right of Way/Land 58,397,800 8,000,000 7,0E0,000 , o - (1,730,0001 -22% TOTAL Projects and Operations 82,810,400 16,990,000 15,701,400 nr tT lulj �'.,;; (4,220,000) -25% Debt Service Principal Payments 50,000,000 180,111,000 ' �r a' �:-K a 33,300,000 67% interest -� Payments 4,331,400 3,110,000 3,439500 � 9 (1,805,000) 58X Cost of Issuance 3,250,000 999,300 +:' (1,750,000) -54% TOTAL Debt Service 4,331,400 56,360,000 184,550,200 .r.mpy 9e: *g),n i f.��r,,x aY 29,745,000 53% TOTAL Expenditures 88,363,300 74,218,100 200,656,400 t.,t,;...).}' 24,656,900 33% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures (87,783,200) (74,207,600) 1200,624,300) ` ^',.3' (24,612,200) 33% Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 50,000,000 196,408,300 r +n.+4, 33,300,000 67% Transfers Out (2,2913,200) (233,091,000) R32,246,000) 52,791,000 -23% Debt Proceeds 53,716,000 260,1100,000 288,284,000 uit v t y .r ' , o � (75,000,000) •29% Net Financing Sources (Uses) 51,417,800 76,909,000 252,446,300 „rz�^-s�.:11,091,000 14% Excess (deficiency( of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) (36,365,400) 2,701,400 51,822,000j, �`�„,ja; (13,521,200) - -501% Beginning Fund Balance 6,461,400 (29,904,000) (29,904,000) " f- -a 51,822,000 -173% ENDING FUND BALANCE ) # a 'e`;: $ 38,300,800 -141% $ (29,904,000) $ (27,202,600 $ 21,918,000 a - �� As illustrated in the following charts, capital projects funds sources primarily consist of debt proceeds and transfers in (Chart 16) and the significant uses of the capital projects funds are debt service and transfers out (Chart 17). In March 2005 a commercial paper program was established to advance project development and land and right of way acquisition related to the 2009 Measure A projects. During FY 2010/11, the Commission anticipates the issuance of $50,000,000 in additional commercial paper notes whereas the FY 2009/10 budget included $75,000,000. 1n October 2009, the Commission issued $185,000,000 in variable rate sales tax revenue bonds (2009 Bonds) in connection with the commencement of two interest rate swaps. This issuance retired a portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes and refunded the 2008 sales tax revenue bonds for $126,395,000. The Commission anticipates the issuance of approximately $135,000,000 in fixed rate sales tax revenue bonds in November 2010 (2010 Bonds) to retire a portion of the commercial paper notes and fund 2009 Measure A highway projects. 178 Transfers in represent bond proceeds used to retire commercial paper notes and, in FY 2009/10, to also refund the 2008 bonds. The transfers in related to the refunding were originally budgeted in the debt service fund. Chart 16 - Capital Projects Funds Sources FY 2010/11 Commercial paper proceeds will continue to fund Coachella Valley highway and regional arterial projects and land mitigation subject to an advance funding agreement as well as debt service interest on outstanding commercial paper notes. Proceeds from the 2010 Bonds will be used for debt service purposes to retire $83,300,000 in commercial paper notes and to pay the costs of issuance related to the 2010 Bonds. In FY 2009/10, the projected debt service included the refunding of the 2008 bonds, which transactions was originally budgeted in the debt service fund. A significant use of the commercial paper and bond proceeds is transfers out of $85,000,000 to the 2009 Measure A Westem County Highway Fund for projects. Additionally $12,000,000 of the 2010 Bonds proceeds will be transferred out to the Debt Service fund to establish a debt service reserve for the 2010 Bonds and to the Commercial Paper capital projects fund to retire $83,300,000 in commercial paper notes. • • • 179 • • • Chart 17 - Capital Projects Funds Uses FY2010/11 Projects and Operations 4% Debt Service Fund Overview Under the 2009 Measure A program, the Commission has the authority to issue bonds subject to a debt limitation of $500,000,000. The debt service fund of the Commission is used to account for all activities related to the sales tax revenue bonds debt incurred by the Commission (Table 31). The Commission's largest single expenditure is debt service. The debt agreements require the trustee to hold all debt proceeds and a portion of the sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate amounts. These monies are included in the restricted investments held by trustee in the capital projects funds and the Debt Service fund. Under the agreements, the Commission may use sales tax revenues for any lawful purpose related to the Riverside County TIP after the trustee has satisfied debt service requirements. In order to advance project development activities, the Commission established a $185,000,000 commercial paper program in 2005. A portion of the commercial papers issued since the program was established has been retired periodically with sales tax revenue bonds issued in FY 2007/08 and FY 2009/10. 180 Table 31 - Debt Service Fund FY 2009 - 2011 Revenues Investment Income $ 1,688,900 $ 251,100 $ 196,300 kNik++wi $ 19100) -4% TOTAL Revenues 1,688,900 251,100 196,300 - `` (9,100) -4% Expenditures Debt Service Principal Payments 33,630,000 132,395,000 4,000,000 x y (123,395,000) -93% Interest Payments 7,693,100 3,000,000 4,500,000 k' 8,100,000 270% TOTAL Debt Service 41,323,300 135,395,000 8,500,000 } r'.+.'rjii� (115,295,00D) -85% TOTAL Expenditures 41,323,100 135,395,000 8,500,000 ,,,.. F a sY;� (115,295,0001 -85% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures (39,634,200) (135,143,900) (8,303,700),,.yl„._ „,_,�k'} 115,285,900 -85% Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 31,303,100 132,821,600 26,087,000f,r (104,032,600) -78% Transfers Out (134,900) (15,442,800) r� i (5,000,000) NA Net Financing Sources (Uses) 31,168,200 132,821,600 10,644,200 I Fzi r{; (109,032,600) -82% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance (SA66,000) (2,312,300) 2,340500 0,253,300 -269% 50,838,200 42,372,200 42,372,200 ';_ tY,�^;.t:,"; a: s. 2,340500 6% ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 42,372,200 $ 40,049,900 $ 44,712,700 '� 47 °" $ 8,593,800 21% Transfers in represent the primary source of the Debt Service fund (Chart 18). Transfers in consist of bond proceeds to establish a debt service reserve for the 2010 bonds and Measure A funds from the 2009 Measure A Western County Highways, Coachella Valley Highways and Regional Arterials, and Palo Verde Valley Local Streets and Roads special revenue funds for debt service payments on the sales tax revenue bonds. The FY 2010/11 budget included transfers in related to the refunding of the 2008 bonds. Chart 18 - Debt Service Fund Sources FY 2010/11 Investment Income 1% 181 • • Debt Service fund uses (Chart 19) consist of debt service on the sales tax revenue bonds as well as a transfer out of $5,000,000 from excess 1989 Measure A debt reserves to the 1989 Measure A Western County Rail Capital special revenue fund for a rail project. Chart 19 — Debt Service Fund Uses FY 2010/11 182 • • • Section 4 184 Revenues and Other Sources Total revenues and other sources are budgeted at $646,144,100 and consist of Measure A sales tax of $106,000,000 (or 16% of total sources); LTF sales tax of $68,809,900 (or 11 % of total sources); federal revenues of $28,870,700 (or 4% of total sources); state revenues, including vehicle registration fees, of $32,210,100 (or 5% of total sources); TUMF of $10,000,000 (or 2% of total sources); debt proceeds of $185,000,000 (or 29% of total sources); transfers in of $212,414,700 (or 33% of total sources) and other revenues of $2,838,700. The specific revenue funding sources are shown in Table 32. Table 32 — Revenues and Other Sources FY 2010M 1 ManagemeM Services S 2.700.000 $ 700,000 $ - $ $ - $ 18,900 MEASURE AAND OTHER CAPITAL PROGRAMS Pend HnatMrg 6,223.000 3,800 CETAP - - 2,705000 Economic Development 913,000 _ _ 9,100 Highways 16,075,030 25,065,100 16,852,300 5,832,100 Local Streets and Roads 3E1196,600 New Corridors 8322.000 - • 85,500 Rail 4,700,400 - 1,640,500 10,000,000 172,500 Regional Arterials - 6,912,000 - 2,559,700 Right of Way Management - - - - - 178,300 REGIONAL PROGRAMS Public and Specialized -Transit 6006.600 52,.500,000 - 383,200 Planning and Programming 5416,700 1,100,100 367,700 71,500 Rad Station MaiMenance/Opentionu - 10,193,200 - 30,000 126,500 Commuter Assistance 1,1521200 435,000 1,259,203 530,100 Motorist Assistance 3,969,400 361,500 162,500 f` OTHER FINANCING SOURCES TUP Debt Pmceeds - - - 185.000,000 Stit Transfers in - 212,414,700 Imo. TOTAL Funding Sources 32,210,100 $ 28,870,70 $ 410.253,400 Revenues --Definitions and Background Measure A: Measure A is a one-half of one percent transactions and use tax that was first approved by Riverside County voters in 1988 and expired on June 30, 2009 after a 20-year term. On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A through 2039. The 2009 Measure A is expected to raise more than $6.7 billion (in nominal dollars) during its lifespan. The amount raised by the Measure A levy has increased as the County and its economic base have grown during the past two decades, peaking in FY 2005/06 at $157 million- As a result of the recent economic slowdown, Measure A revenues have decreased and are projected to approximate $106,000,000 in FY 2009/10 and FY 2010/11. 186 Measure A requires that all sales taxes collected may only be used for transportation purposes including administration and the construction, capital acquisition, maintenance, and operation of streets, roads, highways, including state highways and public transit systems and for related purposes. These purposes include expenditures for planning, environmental reviews, engineering and design costs, and related right of way acquisition. The Commission historically has obtained and updated Measure A revenue projections through a consultant for budget and strategic project planning purposes. The UCLA Anderson Forecast completed the last update in May 2006; however, this forecast has been updated frequently because of the weakened Inland Empire economy that began in 2007. Measure A revenue projections for the next five fiscal years are presented in Chart 20 below. Chart 20 - Forecasted Measure A Sales Tax Revenues 2011 - 2015 $125,000,000 $120,000,000 $115,000,000 S110,000,000 $105,000,000 S100,000,000 $95,00o,000 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 The following additional assumptions were used in the development of the Commission's revenue forecast for FY 2010/11: • The Inland Empire economy is not expected to improve significantly in FY 2010/11; however, a slow recovery is expected to begin in FY 2010/11. • The State does not change mix of items subject to the sales tax from what has been included historically. • The relative sales and property tax rates of Riverside and surrounding counties do not change from historical levels. • Internet sales will have minimal impact on revenue. The Measure A sales tax revenue projections have been considered in the Westem Riverside County Delivery Plan financing strategy and an analysis of a potential increase to be sought in the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap. Geographic Allocation - Riverside County is comprised of three geographic areas: Westem County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. The percentage of Measure A revenues allocated to each of these areas based on return to source is approximately • • 187 • • 75% for Westem County, 24% for Coachella Valley, and 1% for Palo Verde Valley (Chart 21). These percentages will experience some variations from year to year based on changes in levels of taxable sales among the geographic areas. Chart 21 - Geographic Allocation of Measure A Revenues Palo Verde Valley Program Allocation - The 2009 Measure A TIP defines the manner in which the sales tax revenues are to be spent, as presented in the Table 33. In Western County, public transit includes funding for specialized transit, commuter rail, intercity bus service, and commuter assistance. For the Coachella Valley, public transit includes specialized transit and public bus services. Table 33 - Program Allocation of 2009 Measure A Revenues • VVestern County ff'1i'lVe3r1-_. +�u6Uc-ran>it - 1c5 +3egir'r2IArteria!s -5'S Coachella Valley • Higlraa,,s aridQ.eglonal krterisls - •Loc2I:!'eery Hnj=(Ludt -»'> a cU 7'1_Ti cr:it? - YSi� Pal©Verde Valley •�oca1 Street. end goads • 100 Local streets and roads allocations to the local jurisdictions within each geographic area are based on population (in Western County and Palo Verde Valley) or dwelling units (in Coachella Valley) and taxable sales. 188 Based on the projected Measure A sales tax revenues of $106,000,000 for FY 2010/11, the geographic and program allocations are presented in Table 34. Table 34 - G • : raphic Allocation of Measure A Revenues by Program Administradon $ 2,700,000 $ _ $ Bond financing 6,223,000 Economic Development Incentives 913,000 Highways 23,498,000 Highways and Regional Arterials 12,577,000 Local Streets and Roads 22,343,000 8,803,000 750,000 New Corridors 8,522,000 Public Transit 8,986,000 3,773,000 Regional Arterials 6,912,000 TOTAL $ 2,700,000 $ 77,397,000 $ 25,153,000 $ 750,000 Local Transportation Fund: LTF, established in state law by the TDA, is funded through a one -quarter of one cent of the State's 8.25% sales tax. The intent of the legislation was to provide a dependable revenue stream for public transportation operations. Based upon an annual projection of LTF sales taxes that considers local economic factors and monthly receipt trends, the vast majority of LTF revenue in the County is allocated to the eight public transit operators, including the Commission for its share of Metrolink operations costs. Much like Measure A revenue, LTF had increased with the growth of the County and its economy until the recent economic recession. Revenues received from LTF are allocated for regional and local transportation planning, program administration, bicycle and pedestrian facilities projects, public bus transit, and rail transit, including the Commission for its share related to commuter rail operations in Western County. The Commission administers these funds on behalf of the County in a special revenue fund. State Transit Assistance: STA provides additional TDA state funding of transit operations and capital for urban counties, including the County's eight public transit operators. Due to the State's budgetary issues, it suspended the STA allocations for FY 2009/10 and FY 2010/11. Sales taxes on gasoline and diesel fuels generate the STA funding; however, recent legislation related to such funding has resulted in uncertainty in the level of continued funding, if any. State Transportation Improvement Program: Administered by Caltrans, the STIP is funded through state and federal gas tax dollars and is Califomia's primary transportation fund. Dollars are allocated to each county based on a formula that takes into consideration population and highway centerline miles. Actual programming decisions for 75% of STIP dollars are made by local transportation agencies such as the Commission. STIP reimbursement estimates are based on budgeted expenditures for specific projects with STIP allocations approved by the CTC. 189 i Proposition 1B: In November 2006, the voters in Califomia approved Proposition 1B, which funds various transportation programs from bonds issued by the State. Programs that are funded include CMIA, transit capital; STIP supplement, and Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TGIF). CMIA and transit capital revenues for certain highway and rail projects are included in state revenues. Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Registration Fees: State law that allows county SAFE agencies to impose a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations within the County to pay for call box purchases and operations; excess SAFE revenues may be used for 511 operations and as a match for FSP operations. The call boxes enable motorists to summon help should they encounter mechanical or emergency problems while on the road, while the Inland Empire 511 system provides real-time traffic and transit trip information available via the internet or telephone. Ca!trans Freeway Service Patrol Allocations: Ca!trans is the primary sponsor of the FSP and provides the majority of funding for the program, including towing services in construction zones. The State provides nearly 80% of the funding for the FSP program based on population, freeway miles, and level of congestion throughout the State. The Commission administers and implements the program along with the CHP and Caftans. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality: The CMAQ program is federally funded and is targeted for transportation improvements in areas with air quality problems. This program pays for improvements that reduce congestion while improving air quality. The Commission has also used CMAQ dollars to include fuel and commuter assistance programs, signal interconnects, HOV lanes, and transit projects. CMAQ reimbursement estimates are based on budgeted expenditures for specific projects with CMAQ allocations. Federal Transit Administration: FTA funding is generally allocated annually by the federal government to urbanized areas and is based on calculated miles of service. On a reimbursement basis, the federal government provides funding for qualified capital investments in rail facilities, track, and vehicles. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee: In connection with the 2009 Measure A, the TUMF program was established in the Western County to provide additional funding for regional arterial projects. TUMF is administered by WRCOG. As a result of an MOU with WRCOG, the Commission will receive 48.7% of the TUMF revenues, which are divided equally between the regional arterial and CETAP programs. TUMF revenues maintained by WRCOG are allocated for regional arterial zone improvements and regional transit facilities. TUMF revenue estimates are based on monthly receipt trends and consideration of local housing and commercial construction activity. Rail and Highway Licenses: The Commission owns parcels of land and right of way for highway, rail, and regional arterial projects in selected areas throughout the County. The ownership provides licensing opportunities for fiber-optic cable, advertising signs, and business tenants. The amount of funding received from the licenses provides revenue to partially support the cost of owning and maintaining the Commission's land and facilities. 190 Investment Income: The Commission has established a prudent investment policy for cash on hand that is intended to maximize return while providing absolute safeguards on principal and liquidity, as noted in Section 1. Interest eamings on the State and County investment pools are estimated at an interest rate of .50%. The earnings on funds held by the trustee for debt service and projects in money market funds and investment agreements are assumed to be at .50%. Program Revenues and Other Sources Revenues and other financing sources for FY 2010/11 are allocated to the various Commission programs as follows: Management services The primary funding sources for management services are Measure A and LTF allocations aggregating $3,400,000 as well as administration funding transfers in of $1,619,100 from TUMF, SAFE, and FSP. Interest and other miscellaneous reimbursement revenues in FY 2010/11 are $18,900. Bond Financing Measure A Western County revenues of $6,223,000 will be used to support .bond financing costs. Interest revenues are $3,800. CETAP The Western County CETAP program will also receive $2,500,000 from TUMF for development of new corridors. Additionally, other local revenues include $205,000 representing investment income. Economic Development In order to attract commercial and industrial development and jobs to locate in the Westem County area, Measure A Western County revenues of $913,000 will be used to create an infrastructure improvement bank to improve and construct interchanges, provide public transit linkages or stations, and make other improvements to the transportation system. Interest earnings are $9,100. Highways Funding for the highway program includes 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues of $36,075,000 for Western County highways and Coachella Valley highways and regional arterials programs. The 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues will be used primarily for the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvements. Unexpended 1989 Measure A revenues from prior years will be used on remaining projects such as SR-74 widening from 1-15 to 7th Street and curve realignment, 74/215 interchange, SR-91 HOV lanes, 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors, and SR-111 projects as well as for pass - through funding to the city of Riverside for interchange improvements for SR-91 at La Sierra Avenue and Van Buren Boulevard and to the County for SR-60 at Valley Way. • • 191 • • STIP funds totaling $20,058,100 will be used for the SR-91 HOV lanes, the 71/91 connectors, and 1-215 corridor improvements, including the 1-215 bi-county project. The 1-215 corridor improvements on the southern segment will receive $4,500,000 in Proposition 1B CMIA funds. Other state funds of $507,000 are related to the SR-91 HOV lanes. Federal funds for highways projects include $10,000,000 in ARRA and $200,000 in demonstration and Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds for the 74/215 interchange, $6,578,300 in CMAQ funds for the SR-91 HOV lanes, and $74,000 for the 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors. Additional local funding includes $5,000,000 in TUMF zone reimbursements from WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange and interest revenue of $832,100. The Commission will need to issue $50,000,000 in commercial paper notes and $135,000,000 to fund 2009 Measure A projects such as the SR-91 corridor improvements and MSHCP land acquisition and highway projects in Coachella Valley. Bond proceeds will also be used to retire a portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes and fund a debt service reserve. Transfers in represent $83,300,000 in 2009 Bonds proceeds to retire outstanding commercial paper notes, commercial paper project funding of $50,000,000 and bond proceeds of $35,000,000 to fund the 2009 Measure A projects, and $770,000 from Right of Way Management for the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector project. Other transfers in to the Debt Service fund includes $12,000,000 in 2009 Bonds proceeds to establish a debt service reserve fund as well as $14,200,000 and $1,679,400 for Measure A Western County and Coachella Valley highways debt service, respectively. Local Streets and Roads Measure A allocations of $31,896,000 and $909,600 for the local streets and roads program are distributed to the cities and the County for local street repairs, maintenance, and construction and transferred to the Debt Service fund for debt service related to advance funding agreements, respectively. Local revenues represent investment income. New Corridors To leverage local, state, and federal funding for four new transportation corridors identified through CETAP, Measure A Western County revenues of $8,522,000 will be available for environmental clearance, right of way acquisition, and construction of these new corridors. Interest revenues of $85,500 are included in local revenues. 192 Rail • Unexpended 1989 Measure A revenues will be used primarily for the Perris Valley Line and other related projects as well as the Riverside layover facility. The 2009 Measure A Western County's public transit program allocated $4,700,400 for rail. Proposition 1 B transit allocations of $1,640,500 will fund station rehabilitation and security projects. FTA transit capital funding will be used for the Perris Valley Line. Local revenues include investment income of $132,500 and reimbursements of $40,000 related to the Perris Station Transit Center. A $5,000,000 transfer in from available 1989 Measure A debt service reserves is to be used for a project related to the Perris Valley Line. Regional Arterials The Western County regional arterial program will receive funds from Measure A and TUMF in the amounts of $6,912,000 and $2,500,000, respectively. The new TUMF revenues along with unexpended TUMF revenues from prior years will fund be the primary source of funding TUMF regional arterial projects, including the SR-79 realignment. Other local revenues also consist of investment income of $59,700. Transfers in of $6,350,000 for regional arterials represent funding from 2009 Measure A Western County highways for the SR-79 realignment project and from 1989 Measure A Western County highways as a match for a TUMF regional arterial project. Right of Way Management Property management licenses and other miscellaneous revenues consist of $178,000 related to the San Jacinto and San Bernardino subdivision rail program and other highway properties. Transfers in of $480,000 are related to Measure A highway and rail funding for the maintenance of the Commission's highway and rail properties. Other local revenues for property management of $300 are related to investment income. Public and Specialized Transit LTF sales tax revenues of $52,500,000 are allocated primarily for public bus and rail transit operations and capital in the County. A small portion of these revenues is used for LTF planning and administration allocations as well as bicycle and pedestrian facilities grants. Prior to FY 2009/10, the STA allocation received from the State was used to fund transit capital; however, these allocations have since been suspended by the State. For the FY 2010/11 budget, unexpended LTF and STA revenues from prior years will be used to fund transit operations as well as bicycle and pedestrian facilities grants. Under the 2009 Measure A, public transit funding of $6,906,600 has been allocated for Western County specialized transit and intercity bus services and Coachella Valley specialized and public transit services. Local revenues represent investment income. 193 • Planning and Programming Transportation planning studies are funded with an LTF off -the -top allocation of $1,575,000, or three percent of estimated LTF revenues. An LTF allocation of $3,841,700 will fund grade separation projects for the cities of Riverside and Corona and the County. STIP in the amount of $1,100,100 will fund PPM activities of the Commission and CVAG. A federal earmark of $367,700 will be used to fund the completion of the geotechnical studies related to ICE. Local revenues consist of other agency reimbursements of $71,000 and investment income of $500. Rail Station Maintenance and Operations Rail operations, which include Metrolink operating and capital contributions, station maintenance, and support will be funded with an LTF allocation of $10,193,200. A $30,000 federal grant will also fund an intem. In addition to interest revenues of $21,500, local revenues include $105,000 in reimbursements primarily from SCRRA for security costs. Transfers in of $200,000 represent funding from the Measure A commuter assistance program for maintenance of park and ride facilities at the commuter rail stations. Commuter Assistance The Commuter Assistance program will receive funding of $1,152,000 from Measure A public transit to assist in implementing services to commuters and employers in promoting use of alternate modes of transportation in Western County. The Commission will also receive CMAQ pass -through funds of $1,220,400 to support the San Bernardino commuter assistance program, STP federal revenues of $26,000 for a ridesharing demonstration project in the Coachella Valley, and $12,800 of other federal revenues. State revenues include $435,000 in a grant from the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC). Local revenues consist of other agency reimbursements of $482,400 primarily for regional ridematching as well as investment income of $47,600. Motorist Assistance SAFE is funded from $1,450,000 in revenues received through DMV registration fees, while Ca!trans will allocate $1,768,200 in State highway account funds to cover the FSP and $751,200 for special FSP services required for construction. The Commission will also receive $361,500 of CMAQ pass -through funds to support SANBAG's share of the Inland Empire 511 system operations. Local revenues represent investment income of $32,200, cost recoveries of $46,800 from responsible parties related to call box knockdowns, and reimbursements of $83,500 from the city of Riverside for FSP services required on SR-91 for interchange construction projects. The State's FSP contribution is matched with an operating transfer in from SAFE of $906,600. 194 • estion (tot:tuci 1,0c.)[1,a 5c-ECt 196 • • • Commission Debt The Commission's debt under the 2009 Measure A has been incurred for highway, regional arterial, and local streets and roads projects for which title usually vests or, upon completion, will vest with Ca[trans or local jurisdictions. Future Measure A sales taxes are pledged to cover Measure A debt service payments. Since these projects are not assets of the Commission for which the Commission will have operating responsibilities, except for the intangible rights to operate a toll franchise on highways, future operating costs related to these projects cannot be determined and are not applicable. However, for toll and rail assets, operating budget impacts are considered in future project development. Commercial Paper In March 2005 the Commission established a $185,000,000 commercial paper program to advance project development and land and right of way acquisition under the 2009 Measure A TIP. Maturities of commercial paper notes are rolled over to new issuances of commercial paper. Regarding the commercial paper notes, the Commission currently maintains a P-1 and an A-1+ rating from Moody's Investors Service (Moody's) and Standard and Poor's Rating Service (S&P) rating agencies, respectively. Interest payments are made from available commercial paper proceeds or sales tax revenues. The current amount of outstanding commercial paper notes is $83,284,000 and an additional $20,000,000 in commercial paper notes is projected to be issued in June 2010. Approximately $83,300,000 of the outstanding commercial paper notes is expected to be retired in connection with the 2010 Bonds. In FY 2010/11 the Commission will issue $50,000,000 in new cormercial paper notes for capital project funding and interest payments for a projected outstanding amount of $69,984,000 at June 30, 2011. The Commission will make $1,305,000 in estimated commercial paper interest payments during the year. The Commission has an irrevocable direct draw letter of credit and reimbursement agreement with Bank of America, N.A. (Bank of America) as credit and liquidity support for the commercial paper notes. In February 2010 the letter of credit was reduced from $190,000,000 to $121,500,000 and renewed for an additional two-year period through March 2012. Due to the financial crisis in 2008, the cost for the liquidity support increased significantly from 21 basis points to 105 basis points. Such costs are reflected in the 2009 Measure A Western County Bond Financing special revenue fund. 198 Interest Rate Swap As a means to achieve a greater level of interest rate stability in connection with a refinancing of outstanding debt in late 2009, the Commission entered into two forward -starting interest rate swaps in August 2006 for a total notional amount of $185,000,000 at a fixed rate of 3.679% for 20 years effective October 2009; the counterparties will pay the Commission a floating rate equal to 67% of the one - month London Interbank Offer Rate (LIBOR). The counterparty for the first swap ($100,000,000 notional amount) is Bank of America, and the counterparty for the second swap ($85,000,000 notional amount) was Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. (Lehman DP). In September 2008, Lehman Brothers Holdings filed for bankruptcy, which was a trigger event under the swap agreement with Lehman DP. Accordingly, the swap agreement was terminated, and a termination payment of approximately $3,453,000 was paid to Lehman DP. The Commission entered into a replacement swap with Deutsche Bank AG (Deutsche Bank) for a notional amount of $85,000,000 at similar terms, except that the Commission will pay Deutsche Bank as the counterparty a fixed rate of 3.206%. Sales Tax Revenue Bonds In June 2008, the Commission issued $126,395,000 in sales tax revenue bonds to refinance $110,005,000 in outstanding commercial paper notes issued since the inception of the program, fund capitalized interest through December 2009 and a reserve fund, and pay accrued interest and costs of issuance. The 2008 bonds were necessary for the restoration of the commercial paper program to its maximum capacity in order to fulfill existing commitments for the use of commercial paper, pay costs related to 2009 Measure A projects during FY 2008/09, and provide short-term financing of FTA Small Starts reimbursable costs related to the Perris Valley Line project, as required. The Commission received ratings of Aa2, AA+, and AA from Moody's, S&P, and Fitch Ratings, respectively. In connection with the commencement of the interest rate swaps in October 2009, the Commission issued $185,000,000 in variable rate sales tax revenue bonds to retire $53,716,000 of outstanding commercial paper notes, refund the 2008 bonds, fund a portion of the debt service reserve, and pay costs of issuance for the 2009 bonds. The 2009 Bonds are secured by standby bond purchase agreements with JP Morgan Chase Bank at a fee of 125 basis points. The costs for this liquidity facility are accounted for in the 2009 Measure A Western County Bond Financing special revenue fund. The Commission maintained its debt ratings with this bond issuance; in April 2010, Fitch Ratings completed its recalibration of the Commission's bond and revised its rating from AA to AA+. For FY 2010/11, the Commission has budgeted debt service principal and interest payments of $6,300,000 and $7,700,000, respectively. • • 199 • • The Commission expects to issue $135,000,000 in bonds in November 2010 to retire approximately $83,300,000 of outstanding commercial paper notes, provide funds for 2009 Measure A Western County capital projects, fund a debt service reserve, and pay costs of issuance. Estimated debt service payments for the 2010 Bonds ,in FY 2010/11 are $2,700,000 for principal and $3,400,000 for net interest payments. Debt Capacity Analysis The Commission is legally prohibited from issuing additional debt if its debt coverage ratio is less than 1.5 to 1 on all senior debt. The Commission has adopted a higher standard of 2 to 1 as part of its debt management policy. As Chart 22 and Table 35 indicate, the Commission has successfully met its policy standard for debt issued under the 2009 Measure A, even in a declining sales tax revenue environment. The 1989 Measure A related debt consistently exceeded the Commission's standard, and coverage for the 2009 Measure A related debt of 5.27 is anticipated for FY 2010/11. Any coverage less than 2 to 1 would necessitate using other program funding to cover all debt service expenditures. Chart 22 — Measure A Debt Capacity Analysis S 120,000,000 $100,000,000 $80,000,000 $ 60,000,000 $40,000,000 $20,000,000 5- FY 2009/10 FY 2010/11 Table 35 - Measure A Debt Capacity Analysis Sales Tax Revenues Senior Debt Service Coverage Ratio - Senior Debt Senior Debt Ratio Commercial Paper Rating NS Senior Debt Service ■Available Revenues 200 Debt Service Schedule • Debt service requirements for the sales tax revenue bonds are based on actual and estimated amortization schedules for the 2009 Bonds and 2010 Bonds, respectively. Since commercial paper is expected to be refinanced with sales tax revenue bonds, debt service requirements for commercial paper are not included in Table 36; however, the debt service interest expenditures in FY 2010/11 are estimated at $1,305,000. Table 36 — Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Debt Service Requirements igl fe.'ki r 9i aptillll 2011 $ 9,000,000 $ 11,100,000 2012 11,895,000 14,600,000 2013 12,265,000 14,200,000 2014 12,655,000 13,750,000 2015 13,065,000 13,200,000 2016-2020 73,305,000 57,200,000 2021-2025 88,985,000 38,650,000 2026-2030 94,830,000 14,400,000 Total $ 316,000,000 $ 177,100,000 Outstanding Debt as of June 30, 2010 Under the provisions of the 2009 Measure A, the Commission has the authority to issue bonds subject to a bond debt limitation of $500,000,000. The following is a summary of debt issued and secured by 2009 Measure A revenues: 2005 Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds) Series A and Series B: In February 2005, the Commission authorized a $200,000,000 commercial paper program. On March 31, 2005, the Commission established the program for $185,000,000 Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and B. The repayment of principal and interest on the commercial paper notes is secured by an irrevocable direct draw letter of credit issued by the Bank of America, as the Measure A sales tax revenues securing such repayment commenced on July 1, 2009. Maturities of the commercial paper notes may range from one to 270 days, and interest rates are variable and dependent on current market conditions. The initial issuance of commercial paper in April 2005 was $30,005,000; additional amounts of $50,000,000 and $30,000,000 were issued during FY 2006/07 and FY 2007/08, respectively. The $110,005,000 in outstanding commercial paper notes was refinanced by the 2008 sales tax revenue bonds in June 2008. During FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10, the Commission issued $110,000,000 and $27,000,000, respectively, in commercial paper notes. Proceeds from the 2009 bonds were used in October 2009 to retire $53,716,000 201 of these outstanding notes. The Commission anticipates an issuance of $20,000,000 in additional commercial paper notes in June 2010. The note agreements require the trustee to hold all note proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indenture. Receipt of the 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues began in FY 2009/10. 2009 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds {Limited Tax Bonds}, Series A, B, and C: In October 2009, the Commission issued $185,000,000 principal amount of serial - bonds to refinance the 2008 bonds, retire a portion of the outstanding principal amount of the commercial paper notes and a portion of accrued interest on the notes, and fund a reserve fund. The bonds are mature in annual installments ranging from $4,000,000 to $13,700,000 on various dates through June 1, 2029 with variable interest rates set on a weekly basis. The 2009 Bonds are integrated with the interest rate swaps that are effective in October 2009, thereby creating synthetic fixed rate debt. The bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures, including a reserve fund equal to the maximum annual debt service of approximately $14,213,000. Receipt of the 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues commenced in FY 2009/10. The allocation of the sales tax revenue bonds to the 2009 Measure A programs is presented in Chart 23. Chart 23 — Program Long -Term Debt Local Streets and Roads 2% The allocation of the sales tax revenue bonds by the benefiting geographic area is presented in Chart 24. 202 Chart 24 — Long -Term Debt by Geographic Area Palo Verde Valley 1% Coachella Valley 9% Outstanding Debt and Legal Debt Margin at June 30, 2010 A summary of the Commission's outstanding debt secured by Measure A sales tax revenues and related legal debt margin at June 30, 2010 is presented in Table 37: Table 37 — Legal Debt Margin Authorized Debt 2005 Commercial Paper Notes 2009 Series A, B, C Bonds Total Outstanding Debt Legal Debt Margin Listed below in Table 38 are the principal and interest payments by bond issue for FY 2010/11: Table 38 —Debt Service Requirements by Issue 2009 Senior Bonds $ 6,300,000 $ 7,700,000 2010 Senior Bonds 2,700,000 3,400,000 Commercial Paper 83,300,000 1,305,000 TOTAL FY 2010/11 Debt Service 203 • • • Riverside County lionsportarion (mission oetion 54(ipt)LizIuui,)[lag Mullaz4gz 204 • • • Table 39 — Budget Comparison by Department FY 2009 - 2011 Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Saks Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue investment Income Total Revenues Expenditures Management Services: Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance Total Management Services Regional Programs - Planning and Programming Services Rail Maimenance and Operations Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Total Regional Programs Capital Project Development and Delivery Debt Service: Prindpal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance Total Debt Service Total Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers in Transfers Out Debt Proceeds Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance S 119,688,300 $ 73,059,700 4,860,800 5%692,700 52,670,300 1,3133,400 10,957,400 4,399,900 13,567,900 331,200,400 193,900 1,581,000 866,300 2,261,600 4,902,800 8,051,200 8,667,5130 83,045,400 5,161,600 2,623,200 107,54%900 301,592,000 33,646,500 12,026,900 45,673,400 459,717,100 106,000,000 S 106,000,000 81,055,300 69,037,400 40,755,000 17,408,050 36,896,800 25,131,800 1,181,800 2,375,450 11,475A00 6,673,000 1,448,100 309,300 3,419,100 3,134,800 282,231,100 230,069,800 215,300 1,617,600 1,147,100 2,888,800 5,868,800 11,122,300 24,279,100 90,048,500 6,237,300 3,386,000 135.073,200 211,800 1,473,030 978,000 Z225,9130 4,8849,700 5,448,100 13,590,800 72,183,700 6,388,600 3,386.100 100,997,300 336.587,900 175, 202, 900 182,395,000 12.61%000 3,250,000 184,111,000 7,939,900 999,300 198,255,000 193,050,200 675,784,900 474,139,100t 1128,516,70M 46,541,200 (46,541,200) 53,716,000 53,716,000 (74,800,700) 531,044,200 $ 456,243,500 $ (393,553,800) (244,069,300) 244,211,600 1244,211,600) 260,000,000 260,000,000 265,310,100 (265,310,100) 288,284,000 288,284,000 1133,553,800) 44,214,700 456,243,500 456,243,500 322,689,700 S 500,45%200 $ 0% 112,245,400) -15% N/A 111,884,3001 -29% 14,686,7001 -13% 1351,100) -30% 11,475,000) -13% (1,270,100) -88% (1,589,100) -46% 133,501,700) -12% 4,300 2% /436,300) -27% 3,100 0% 1590,700) -20% (1.019,6001 -17% (3,815,800) 34% 112,74%200) -52% 113,589,1001 -15% (2.062,700) -33% 1,064,500 31% 131,148,3001 -23% 14,810,400 4% 190,095,0001 -49% 1205.00D) -2% 11,750,0001 -54% (92,050,000) -46% (109.407,5001 -16% 75,905,800 -19% 131.796,900) -13% 31,796,900 -13% 175.000,000) -29% 175,000.000) -29% 905,800 -1% 44,214,700 10% $ 45,120,500 14% 206 eostiest mmmazorni:IIM SacevOcesz 208 • Executive Management • • Mission Statement: "To maintain the highest level of achievement and professionalism possible while managing the activities of the Commission with a small staff, complemented with consultants, to effectuate sound transportation policies and legislation compatible with environmental standards." Chart 25 — Executive Management Expenditures Executive Management has a budget of $219,600 (Table 40), an increase of 2% from last year's budget, for oversight of all Commission functions. Professional costs include legal fees and consulting services. Support costs include various membership dues of $50,200. Table 40 — Executive Management Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services 46,1OD 45,000 40,603 Professional Services - General 25,000 10,000' Total Professional Costs 46,100 70,000 50,600 Support Costs 49,003 51,600 47,8C0 TOTAL Executive Management $ 193,903 $ 215,300 $ 211,8C0'' 5,700 6% 0% 0% 0% 11,400) -3% 4,300 2% 210 Executive Management Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Deputy Executive Director Executive Director FTE Department Budget Overview Department Description The Executive Director is responsible for and provides strong leadership in developing and implementing new strategies at the local, regional, and statewide levels to assure project delivery of transportation improvements throughout the County. Furthermore, Executive Management is committed to fostering a positive and supportive work environment for staff that emphasizes quality work and encourages teamwork and open communication, while recognizing individual achievement. This is accomplished through a productive and collaborative effort with the members of the Commission and the oversight of the Commission's Executive Committee. Key Assumptions • The Executive Director will play a prominent role with external audiences with an emphasis on working with Congress, the California Legislature, Riverside County business organizations, and Southern Califomia transportation agencies and local governments regarding the reauthorization of the federal transportation act and on advancing transportation policy in California. • Project delivery will be a top priority in FY 2010/11 as construction will begin on the 74/215 interchange, 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector, SR-91 HOV lanes, 1-215 corridor improvement south segment, and Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension projects. • The advancement of construction on a number of projects will require a requisite increase in public outreach to the media and local governments as well as the need for watchful oversight to make the most of lower construction and right of way costs. • The development of the Perris Valley Line project will mark Riverside County's first major rail expansion in more than 12 years and will require significant effort from the Executive Director to obtain approvals from the FTA, local railroads, and community. • The Commission will have a high profile throughout the state due to its efforts to secure design -build authority for the construction of the SR-91 corridor improvement project in Corona. • As a cost savings measure, there will be no merit -based pay increases for employees during FY 2010/11. • 211 • • • • The Commission will play a leadership role in advocating for the approval of a federal transportation bill to fund needed transportation priorities in Riverside County with an emphasis on goods movement infrastructure and priority transportation corridors. Accomplishments FY 2009/10 saw extraordinary accomplishments at the Commission, placing it in the top tier of California transportation organizations. In several areas, the Commission stood by itself in successful advocacy, innovation, and leadership. • Advocated for and received ARRA stimulus funding for five freeway interchange projects throughout the County. Four of the interchanges are currently under construction. The fifth is the 74/215 interchange in Perris; the Commission will serve as the lead agency for this project. Construction on this project will commence in June 2010. • Continued to implement components of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. Federal tolling approval has been granted for corridor improvement projects on SR-91 and 1-15, and the CTC approved the SR-91 project for design -build contracting and procurement. • Continued progress on the Califomia Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process for the Perris Valley Line project, which included a number of public hearings and presentations to stakeholder groups, including the March Joint Powers Authority and the Riverside Unified School District. • Moved forward with the eventual implementation of the Perris Valley Line project by reaching agreement with Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad (BNSF) for access to its mainline. • Continued right of way acquisition for the SR-91 HOV lanes project in downtown Riverside. • Completed a draft environmental document for the Mid County Parkway and conducted a lengthy public comment period. As a result of the comments, a number of changes have been made to the proposed project. • Continued multiagency implementation efforts related to the proposed ICE and, as part of this effort, completed drilling for geological testing to determine the viability of a tunnel for this project. A report on the overall study and feasibility effort was presented at the Cormission's January workshop. • Partnered with OCTA on the addition of an eastbound lane on SR-91 located in both counties. Construction began in late 2009 and is funded primarily with ARRA dollars. • Opened the Perris Station Transit Center which is currently served by RTA buses, but will also be served by the Commission's Perris Valley Line project in 2012. • Guided the Commission through an uncertain economic environment with costs savings and successful adherence to limits on salaries and administrative expenditures. In spite of a struggling economy, the Commission's most recent debt issuance received excellent credit ratings, thereby reducing the Commission's borrowing costs. 212 • Obtained approval in the President's budget for the maximum level of federal Small Starts funding for the Perris Valley Line project. Federal involvement in the project will top $75 million. • Partnered with SANBAG to launch the Inland Empire 511 system to assist motorists, transit users, and carpoolers. Major Initiatives FY 2010/11 will be one of constant activity and will feature efforts to launch a number of projects while being challenged by a slow economy. The recent infusion of ARRA funding foreshadows a great deal of construction activity that the Commission will lead such as the 74/215 interchange in Perris, the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector project in Moreno Valley, the widening of SR-91 through downtown Riverside, and the widening of 1-215 in Murrieta. All of these projects will be funded through various Commission revenue sources, and the Commission has either played a major role in right of way acquisition and design or will do so during construction. At the same time, a number of other planned improvements will continue through project development work with an eye on construction in the near future. This includes completing environmental work and right of way acquisition on the Perris Valley Line project and continuing environmental work on the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. The largest project currently in development is the SR-91 corridor improvement project through Corona, a billion dollar effort that will add general purpose and express lanes to an 11-mile stretch of one of Southern California's most congested freeways. Environmental work on the project will continue along with advance right of way acquisition and the solicitation of a design -build team. The use of design -build procurement is a key element of the project, and the Commission will be active in ensuring that the project meets state requirements for eligibility as part of the state's design -build pilot program. Financing the project will also be a major concern, and the Commission will consider raising its Measure A debt limit and may consider private sector involvement. On a larger scale, a major concern in moving forward is the state of California's financial position and commitment to funding infrastructure and transportation. The Commission will take an aggressive and active role in advocating for state investments in transportation. The Commission is an active member of the Self -Help Counties Coalition and Mobility 21, and a major focus will be placed on advocacy for transportation in the state budget. Federal funding is also an important factor for the Commission's future, and the Commission will advocate strongly for the approval of a federal transportation bill. Congress's priorities will need to include funding for Positive Train Control (PTC) and for goods movement and freight -related projects in Southern California. In Riverside • • • 213 • • • County, goods movement investment must focus on the need to complete highway/rail grade separation projects. The success of many of these efforts will rely on enhanced external communications. Media relations will continue to be a priority, and press releases will remain a major effort along with social media and the Commission's On the Move monthly newsletter and annual report. An expanding and systematic outreach to business and civic groups, focusing on Commission efforts in terns of funding, construction, and services, will be the central feature of the communications program. While actively participating in all of these major endeavors, the Executive Director will maintain and improve administrative efficiency and fiscally sound practices characteristic of the Commission. With a total of 40 budgeted staff positions, the Commission organization remains consistent with Commission direction. The Commission will continue to be competitive in the employment market and will retain capable staff as well as attract high quality applicants. Staff training and development will continue, enabling our small and dedicated staff to enhance skills, productivity, and value. Our goal is to maintain the most effective mid -sized transportation agency in Califomia. Department Goals Maximize funding for transportation improvements in Riverside County through legislative advocacy. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Implement the Commission's early development project priorities outlined in the recent Commission workshops, focusing on the first ten years of the 2009 Measure A, which will include an emphasis on project development for the SR-91 corridor improvement project and the Perris Valley Line. • Advocate federal appropriations for current projects, FTA Small Starts rail funding, and the regional efforts to reduce the community impacts of rail goods movement. • Place an emphasis on initiating federally authorized and funded projects included within the new federal transportation bill and the Commission's ongoing project priorities. Executive staff will respond to the State's transportation funding issues by continuing project work on named Measure A projects, including the widening of SR-91 in downtown Riverside. • Work with the Ports and others on comprehensive efforts to develop a surcharge to pay for regional transportation improvements including railroad grade separations. • Continue implementation of Transit Vision while addressing short- and long-term funding constraints. 214 Focus on timely and effective completion of capital projects. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, lnfermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Serve as the lead agency for the construction of the 74/215 interchange in Perris. • Work closely with Ca!trans on construction of the 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connector project in Moreno Valley as well as the SR-91 HOV lanes project in downtown Riverside. • Address Metrolink rider concerns with ongoing rehabilitation work at the Commission's commuter rail stations. • Ensure effective communication with the public regarding construction and project details throughout the county. Support regional transportation solutions in cooperation with surrounding counties that are of benefit to Riverside County. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Continue work on grade separation and rail capacity projects funded through the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and TCIF as well as those called for in the Commission's $561 million Grade Separation Plan adopted in October 2006 and updated in 2009. • Work with neighboring counties regarding corridor improvements on SR-71 and SR-91 as well as on 1-15 and 1-215. • Maintain an effective working relationship with the agencies that comprise Metrolink to ensure that Riverside County commuter rail needs are served in an efficient, effective, and safe manner. • Partner with SANBAG to enhance and publicize the Inland Empire 511 system and work with agencies in San Diego, Orange, and Los Angeles counties to provide effective, regional 511 traveler information services. Maintain effective working relationships with Commissioners to strengthen and expand the Commission's leadership in transportation policy decision -making at all levels of government. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Facilitate Commissioner participation at the regional, state, and federal levels to raise the interests of the Commission and seek favorable action. • Continue regular one-on-one meetings between the Executive Director, senior staff, and the Commissioners. • Continue collaborative efforts with member agency staff regarding local priorities and funding challenges. • 215 • • • While maintaining a relatively small staff, promote the Commission's effectiveness by improving and developing staff skills, using state-of-the-art working tools, and fostering an environment that encourages and rewards individual and team effort. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Continue to maintain a well -documented employee appraisal process that provides clear, understandable, and measurable performance criteria for all employees. • Maintain and encourage staff morale and effectiveness. Develop the framework for a Commission culture that enhances productivity, encourages regular and open communication among staff, and promotes the mutual achievement of individual and organizational goals and objectives. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Conduct a semi-annual review of organization accomplishments as measured against planned objectives to determine progress in meeting those objectives and action steps needed. • Facilitate open communications and coordination between management, professional staff, and support staff through regular meetings. Executive Management Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09110 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected $566,377,400 Expenditures $459,717,100 $474,139,100 Staffing levels 45 41 40 Administration costs as percentage of expenditures 1.07% 1.03% 0.86% 216 Administration Mission Statement: "To provide quality and efficient services to the Board of Commissioners, its staff, and external customers and to comply with applicable federal and state requirements." Chart 26 -Administration Expenditures As noted in Table 41, the Administration Department's total budget is $1,181,300 for office operations including management of office space, lease, and equipment; records; Commission and committee meetings; and special events as well as for the clerk of the board and human resources functions. Salaries and benefits expenditures of $399,400 reflect an increase in FTEs from 4.22 to 4.32. Professional costs of $134,500 cover various services including, but not limited to, Commissioners' per diem, legal fees, and consultant and other professional services. Support costs of $647,400 cover administrative overhead including office maintenance; information technology updates, support, and maintenance; and recruitments. Beginning in FY 2010/11, general business insurance costs, which were previously included in the Administration Department, are included in the Finance Department budget. 218 Table 41 — Administration Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Commissioner Per Diem legal Services Professional Services -General Total Professional Costs Support Costs Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL Administration $ 349,800 $ 357,700 $ 341,70041,700 61,800 55,000 50,000 (5,000) 9% 30,500 33,000 16,800 r i a r 3,000 9% 43,603 50,000 41,500.', r= (1,500) -3% 135,900 138,000 108,300 'ary�' ' ' . (3,503) -3% 995,40 1,101,900 1,003,000 ; r'tts <. (454,503) 41% 100,100 20,090 20,000 t (20,033) -100% 18,SCO NiA $1,599,900 $ 1,617,603 $ 1,473,000 Atl $ (436,300) -27% Administration Staffing Summary Accounting and Human Resources Manager Administrative Assistant Executive Director Office and Board Services Manager Senior Administrative Assistant Senior Office Assistant Staff Analyst FTE 0.17 0.23 1.17 1.05 0.01 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.95 0.94 0.00 0.00 4.30 4.22 Department Budget Overview — Office Operations Department Description Office Operations oversees the daily maintenance needs of the Commission's office facility and its staff; manages information technology and records management systems; oversees the office lease; purchases office supplies and equipment; maintains a safe working environment for Commission board members, staff, and consultants; and provides support services. Office Operations continues to operate with a small staff of six consisting of the Office and Board Services Manager, Senior Administrative Assistant, three Administrative Assistants, and Senior Office Assistant. Key Assumptions • Support is provided to 40 full-time Commission staff. • Requests for project proposals and project notices of completion are posted and printed in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. • Information technology systems are updated to ensure efficiency. 219 • • • • An accurate and efficient records management system is maintained. Accomplishments • Updated the web page in a timely manner for the postings of agendas, legal notices, requests for proposals, and employment opportunities. • Maintained efficient information technology infrastructure. • Maintained the electronic records management system to ensure accurate and efficient processing of incoming and outgoing correspondence and documents. • Developed and implemented a Disaster Recovery Plan to ensure uninterrupted Commission operations. Major Initiatives The Commission will continue to maintain a robust electronic records management system. Achieving greater efficiencies and strengthening the Commission's records management processes and procedures, the system pertains to the management, storage, and accessibility of the Commission's actions and documents and the retention capability for incoming and intemally created records. Office Operations will continue to provide high quality support services to the Board of Commissioners and to internal and external customers by providing a working environment that enhances the overall mission of the Commission. Department Goal — Office Operations Ensure quality service that demonstrates responsiveness and flexibility and provides services at the most reasonable cost. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Support 40 full-time staff. • Provide accessibility to meeting agendas, legal notices, requests for proposal, and employment opportunities through the Commission's web page. • Continue to improve administrative efficiency through automation of records processing. • Provide a safe working environment with the maintenance of an injury and illness prevention program. • Post legal notices and requests for proposal on the Commission's web page and in the newspapers on a timely basis. • Provide office supplies, equipment, and services consistent with intended quality and capabilities at the most advantageous price afforded in the market. • Manage the Commission's information technology systems. 220 Department Budget Overview — Clerk of the Board Department Description The Clerk of the Board staff provides support services to the Board of Commissioners and its alternates and for Commission and committee meetings. It serves as an important resource for the Commission and has the responsibility for recording, publishing, preserving, and filing meeting proceedings of documents acted upon by the Commission and its committees; posting legal notices, capital project requests for proposals, and notices of project completion; processing claims against the Commission; fulfilling requirements of the Commission and the committees as it relates to the Conflict of Interest Code; serving as the Filing Officer for Economic Interest and Campaign Disclosure statements and legal claims against the Commission; coordinating Commission special events and meetings; and performing all duties required by law, rules, or order of the Board of Commissioners. Key Assumptions • Staff support and meeting services are provided to 32 Commissioners and their alternates, the Commission, four established committees, and a number of ad hoc committees. • Monthly agenda packets and supporting documents are published and distributed in accordance with the Brown Act. • Officers and members of the Commission are kept informed by providing them with the most current and accurate data to assist them and facilitate their decision making responsibilities. • Frequent communication with Commissioners continues to provide news and updates on Commission items and transportation -related meetings. • Available technology is used to provide simplified access of agenda items and Commission actions to the public, local agencies, and staff. Accomplishments • Updated the web page and the bulletin board for the agenda, minutes, and supporting documents. • Posted legal notices in local newspapers and on the Commission's web page. • Regularly advised officers and members of the Commission and their staff on changes to Commission meetings and other transportation -related meetings. • Arranged Commission and committee meetings and special events of the Commission. • Scheduled and advertised unmet transit needs hearing in Blythe for the Palo Verde Valley area. • Processed and transmitted Commission -approved resolutions to appropriate agencies in a timely manner. • 221 • Major Initiatives Each year, local agencies make changes to their appointments regarding their representation on the Commission. Staff has made and will continue to make every effort to ensure that the newly appointed representatives, as well as their respective staff, are aware of operational policies of the Commission and other transportation - related meetings. There will be continued emphasis on the utilization of electronic mail with Commissioners for more efficient communications. Staff will continue to update technology to streamline processes and procedures for easier access to Commission actions, minutes, resolutions, and ordinances. Department Goals — Clerk of the Board Ensure coordination and documentation of Commission and committee meetings and provide public accessibility to agenda items as required by state regulations. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Provide accurate, high quality agenda packets for Commission and committee meetings. • Continue to provide support to Commission members, staff, and attendees of Commission and committee meetings. • Post meeting agendas and supporting documents in compliance with Brown Act requirements. • Maintain an accurate list of Commissioners and alternates and submit membership roster changes to the Secretary of State. • Maintain and file all Commission and committee meetings and official records of the Commission. • Perform all duties within mandated deadlines. • Maintain and promote good Commission and staff relations. Facilitate access of information to Commission records. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Continue to respond to requests for records and information on a timely basis and in accordance with state law. • Continue to improve the Commission's recordkeeping practices by updating the electronic records management system. • Maintain Commission agreements, amendments, memoranda of understanding, resolutions, and ordinances. • Maintain a centralized database for Commissioners, agencies, and consultant contact information. • Coordinate special activities, meetings, events, and conferences as requested by the Executive Director and the Commission. 222 Department Budget Overview — Human Resources Department Description Human Resources responsibilities include administering the recruitment, selection, and appraisal process; updating and conducting a biennial survey of comparable salaries and benefits; maintaining personnel policies and procedures; and scheduling periodic sessions for staff to review benefits and personnel rules and for supervisors to review the performance evaluation process. Key Assumptions • The use of consultant services for Human Resources adrninistration is maximized. • The assessment of Human Resources practices and procedures will continue. • Continuous improvement in communication with employees regarding Human Resources information will be an ongoing process. • Compliance with state and federal labor law regulations is achieved. Accomplishments • Provided the annual Benefit Statement to all employees. • Regularly provided information to employees on changes to health insurance, 401(a) defined contribution, 457 deferred compensation plans, and the personnel policies and procedures manual through the Commission's intranet. • Recruited and filled one staff position. • Held training session on violence in the workplace. Major Initiatives Human Resources focuses on managing employees and consists of a framework of activities and practices that support and develop a motivated workforce while at the same time complying with legislation and regulations that govern the employer/employee relationship. Staff will use written position descriptions and performance expectations in order to give each employee a clear and consistent understanding of what is expected. Additionally, staff will utilize qualified human resources consultants to assist in establishing good human resources management practices, based on policies to establish parameters for fair and consistent decision - making, and to institute good workplace practices. The Commission's practice is to conduct a compensation program review every two years to ensure fair compensation is established to attract and retain the most qualified employees. During FY 2008/09, the Commission opted to postpone the compensation program review due to the slowdown in the economy and decline in sales tax revenues. The Commission will reintroduce the compensation program review when the economy and sales tax revenues improve. Additionally, there will be no annual merit increases for staff in FY 2010/11, as was the case in FY 2009/10. • 223 • • • Department Goals — Human Resources Administer human resources policies, procedures, and programs in order to align personnel laws and the Commission's policies with continuous improvement principles. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Review and update personnel policies and procedures to comply with federal and state requirements. • Provide information to enhance the employee's knowledge of current personnel policies and procedures in various forms including electronic access, workshops, and printed information. • Ensure that employee personnel records are updated timely for various personnel actions. Continue to employ and recruit a dynamic and talented workforce. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objective: • Maintain a compensation program that ensures internal equity and external competitiveness within the pay structure for Commission employees: Develop people to be their best in order to meet the needs of the organization. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Build and maintain an effective performance system to include timely performance evaluations, personal development, and a supportive work environment. • Provide appropriate and timely training to meet the demands of the organization. Understand and consistently deliver excellent customer service to all employees. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objective: • Focus on "employee as customer" and consistently strive to exceed expectations by supporting and maintaining individual respect, appreciation, management accessibility, and communication. Improve the quality of the work culture. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Develop and maintain a safe working environment. • Maintain a proactive employee relations process. • Promote a work/family balance. • Recognize and reward individual contributions. 224 Administration Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Employee rules/Benefits review sessions held 2 2 2 Recruitments 2 1 0 Positions filled 2 1 0 Documents processed 7,860 3,617 4,000 Legal notices 20 18 18 Commission/Committee/Ad Hoc meetings 62 52 56 Commissioners supported (including alternates) 57 57 57 Staff supported: Regular full-time Temporary/Seasonal 45 1 41 0 40 1 • 225 • • • Legislative Affairs and Communications Mission Statement: "To strive to improve the mobility of Riverside County residents by working through the legislative process and by maintaining effective interagency relationships. This is supported by facilitating interactive communications with the public and transportation stakeholders through various outreach and media efforts." Chart 27 - Legislative Affairs and Communications Expenditures The Legislative Affairs and Communications Department has a total budget of $1,150,200 (Table 42). Staffing costs make up 25% of the total department expenditures and reflect a decrease in FTEs from 1.89 to 1.72. Professional costs of $688,000 include legislative advocacy, graphic design, and website updates. Support costs of $171,000 have increased 3%, or $4,600, from last year's budget. Table 42 - Legislative Affairs and Communications Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits $ 358,900 $ 314,700 $ 353,100 $ (23,500) -7% Professional Costs Legal Services 8,000 96,000 ` a (6,000) •75% Professional Services -General 364,900 658,C00 399,000 -i, Y 28,000 4% Total Professional Costs 364,900 666,000 495,000 " 22,000 3% Support Costs 142,500 166,403 129900 ��z�"a 4,600 3% TOTAL Legislative Affairs and Communications $ 866,300 $ 1,147,100 $ 978,000.3,100 0% 226 Legislative Affairs and Communications Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant 0.17 0.15 Community Relations Manager 0.53 0.26 Deputy Executive Director 0.46 0.48, Government Relations Manager 1.00 1.00 FTE 2.16 1.89 Department Budget Overview Department Description Legislative Affairs Transportation issues and system enhancements typically affect a number of jurisdictions and stakeholders. Through increased participation, the Commission is able to play a stronger leadership role at all levels of government to advance its interests and policy goals. The importance of this is magnified when the Commission is seeking changes in law or needs legislative authorization to move forward with a specific project. The Commission's Legislative Affairs efforts focus on taking full advantage of opportunities at both the federal and state levels when there is a potential impact to Commission programs. In doing so, the Commission maintains its role as a major legislative force and a statewide leader on a broad range of issues affecting transportation policy such as project delivery and enhanced funding. This requires the establishment and maintenance of ongoing communication with Riverside County's legislative delegations in Washington and Sacramento. The Commission accomplishes this via a combined effort that includes Commissioners, staff, and legislative consultants in the two capitals. The effort also requires working with other transportation agencies throughout the State in order to collaborate on issues of mutual concern. This cooperation takes place in a number of forums including a monthly meeting of transportation commission chief executive officers, the legislative roundtable, Mobility 21, Self -Help Counties Coalition, and Coalition for America's Gateways and Trade Corridors (CAGTC). In FY 2010/11, the Commission will advocate to protect transportation funding sources at both the state and federal level. The keys to the effort will be in warding off attempts to divert state transportation funding to close California's budget gap and to push for a new authorization of the federal transportation bill. Communications The Commission is committed to communicating with and educating a broad arena of interested parties on the roles and responsibilities of the agency. An emphasis will continue to be placed on informing Riverside County residents and businesses 227 • • • about transportation projects and services and maintaining open communication with other transportation stakeholders. Various forms of media and communication tools are used in these outreach efforts with the overall objectives to provide accurate, informative, and easily accessible information; facilitate public participation in the Commission processes; and increase interagency coordination and cooperation. The Deputy Executive Director is responsible for communications with the news media and prepares text for Commission materials, presentations, and speeches. Along with the Executive Director, the Deputy Executive Director, Community Relations Manager, and individual project managers actively participate in public presentations at the local, regional, and state levels to represent the Commission's interests. Strong relationships with the news media are very important to ensure that the public is well informed regarding the Commission's progress in determining funding priorities, designing infrastructure improvements, and constructing projects. There are many points throughout these processes in which the public can and should play a role in shaping the future of the County's transportation network. Key Assumptions • The Government Relations Manager will oversee legislative affairs work efforts with guidance from the Executive Director and the Deputy Executive Director. • The annual newspaper report to the public will be distributed throughout the County. • The On the Move newsletter will be published monthly as well as distributed electronically and posted on the Commission website. • The Speakers Bureau effort will continue to seek local community opportunities to expand outreach regarding the Commission's activities. • The Commission's website will be updated and refreshed on a regular basis. • Additional communications tools and opportunities will be explored for incorporation into the ongoing program to help build public awareness of Commission activities including radio, television, social media outlets such as Twitter, and the internet. • The Commission will take a leadership role in formulating a countywide direction on federal transportation policy in order to influence the new authorization of the federal transportation act. • Public outreach will take a heightened role as project development activities accelerate on projects such as the SR-91 corridor improvement project, 1-215 corridor improvements, SR-91 HOV lanes, Perris Valley Line project, Mid County Parkway, and SR-79 realignment. • Goods movement will remain a key policy priority for the Commission, and there will be an emphasis to ensure that Riverside County receives significant funding for this need from state and federal governments. • Another governmental relations priority will be to secure design -build procurement authority for the SR-91 corridor improvement project through Corona. 228 • Another federal legislative priority will be seeking federal funding for the implementation of PTC technology for Metrolink trains. Accomplishments • Published a four -page annual report supplement in three major newspapers — The Press Enterprise, Desert Sun, and The Californian. • Continued effective relationships with the news media resulting in informative coverage regarding local and regional transportation issues and Measure A project delivery. • Provided extensive public outreach support as part of the project development process for the Mid County Parkway, Perris Valley Line, SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvement projects, and Riverside County to Orange County Major Investment Study projects. • Supported the Rail Department in the development of various marketing materials and advertisements including weekend and holiday train services. • Increased the Commission's presence on television and radio with interviews on Time Warner Cable, KVCR, KESQ, and KOCE. • Updated an informational video and held a workshop regarding goods movement issues and railroad grade separations. • Continue to take a leadership role and work together with the five -county consensus working group, Mobility 21, and CAGTC on goods movement issues through the federal legislative reauthorization process. • Developed new collateral materials for an overview of the Commission's programs and projects as well as construction projects planned for Western County, which are often distributed at public events. • Improved the functionality of the Commission's website and updated a number of specific project -related websites including those for the Mid County Parkway and the SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvement projects. • Developed a photo library that will assist in documenting the progress of the voter -approved sales tax program and can be accessed by staff. • Updated the appearance and effectiveness of the On the Move monthly e-mail newsletter by expanding its distribution. • Launched a new presence on the social networking site Twitter which can be accessed at http://twitter.com/RCTC. • Held widely attended grand opening events for the North Main Corona station parking structure and the Perris Station Transit Center. • Developed video presentations on the completion of the first Measure A program and the construction of the North Corona Main station parking structure, both of which were included on the Commission's website. • Actively participated in a region -wide effort to expand the reach of Mobility 21, a Southern California transportation advocacy group, to the Inland Empire. The emphasis resulted in co -hosting a major conference in Los Angeles in late 2009. • Upgraded a new Commissioner orientation program that bolsters Commissioner knowledge and participation regarding Commission projects and activities and was presented to every new Commissioner. • • 229 • • • Major Initiatives Legislative Affairs Legislatively, the continued quest for additional state and federal investment in transportation infrastructure will be an ongoing concem. At the state level, ongoing state funding problems will likely result in the diversion of state transportation funding. The uncertainty of state funding has led the Commission to embark upon new funding strategies such as toll financing to build new projects. Making these projects more efficient, such as allowing for design -build procurements, will continue to be a major priority in FY 2010/11. Additionally, in shaping state transportation policy, there is a need to be especially active in state legislative matters to ensure that Riverside County needs obtain proper consideration and funding. Another concern to monitor is state legislation that could impact transportation economic development in Riverside County through planning regulations as evidenced in SB 375. Another priority will be dealing with Congress on the new authorization of the federal transportation act. The federal transportation bill will be a critical opportunity to secure funding for goods movement -related needs such as the funding for four priority corridors: Alameda Corridor East grade separations in Riverside County, 1- 215, SR-91, and 1-10. Even after more than a year of delay, it appears that a new authorization of the federal transportation program will remain on hold; however, the next several months present an opportunity to propose favorable policy to major congressional committees. In anticipation of this priority, the Commission has already bolstered its lobbying presence in Washington, D.C. to play an influential role in shaping the reauthorization legislation. Developing effective partnerships with agencies such as RTA, SunLine, and CVAG will be an important component of the Commission's federal lobbying strategy pertaining to the federal transportation bill authorization process. Ideally, Riverside County will communicate a unified message to Congress regarding its mobility needs. During the coming year, the Commission will play a leadership role in bringing various agencies together in this effort that will include cities, the County, and transit operators. Another important effort in working with Washington is joining with other Southern California transportation agencies to maximize regional funding. This proved to be successful in California during the TGIF funding allocations and can be counted on in terms of the federal authorization as well. One organization that the Commission has membership is Mobility 21, which is comprised of transportation agencies, the Automobile Club of Southern California, and major business organizations such as the Greater Riverside Area Chambers of Commerce. Communications The Commission provides information to the public through various channels including: 1) participation at public meetings, chambers of commerce, industry 230 associations, and service clubs; 2) production and provision of resource materials and fact sheets; 3) maintenance and enhancement of the Commission's website; and 4) development of newspaper press releases, radio and television interviews, and cable television spots. The Commission's largest publication effort to provide widespread understanding of its projects and expenditures is its four -page annual report which is published in three area newspapers throughout the County. Broad distribution of the On the Move, an e-mail newsletter highlighting actions of the Commission and emerging topics, will continue as part of the Commission's communications efforts. Efforts will continue to update and expand the Commission's contact database including e-mail addresses in order to support distribution of the Commission's public information materials. A continuing emphasis will be placed on providing communications support to major project development efforts including the Perris Valley Line, the Mid County Parkway, and the SR-91 and 1-215 highway construction projects. The need for proactive public communication and outreach remains important, as the Commission continues to move forward with the delivery of the 2009 Measure A work program. This is an area of emphasis, as the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan places the Commission in a high -profile role to deliver large-scale highway projects. This will require additional contact with the public by the Community Relations Manager. The Commission's outreach will include a proactive effort to work closely with various media formats such as print, radio, internet, and television to increase their understanding of and interest in transportation issues and to generate a higher level of media coverage. Toward that end, opportunities will be identified for live or taped interviews and presentations that speak to local residents and employers and their questions concerning transportation issues. Appropriate forums may include city council meetings, local cable television, and radio. New Commissioner orientation meetings will be provided by the Executive Director, Deputy Executive Director, and Clerk of the Board in individualized settings. To supplement individual Commissioner meetings with the Executive Director, continuing education opportunities at the small group level will also be provided to Commissioners that focus on timely issues. Department Goals Foster the Commission's full involvement in a broad range of local, regional, state, and federal government settings. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Participate in the Self -Help Counties Coalition, the California Transit Association, Southern California Legislative Roundtable, League of Cities, Mobility 21, • 231 • • • CAGTC, state and federal transportation agencies, and community/business organizations. • Work with the CTC and the regional transportation planning agencies to protect and enhance project funding for the County through influencing policy decisions. • Maintain a leadership role in local and regional transportation venues related to project development efforts and current and emerging issues including coordination with other county transportation commissions, councils of govemments, and local jurisdictions. • Continue to foster the success of the Southern Califomia Working Group and Mobility 21 in advocating for additional funding for goods movement projects. • Participate and influence intercounty discussions between Riverside and Orange counties regarding the operation of the 91 Express Lanes as well as overall transportation policy between both counties. This includes supporting efforts to develop a new transportation corridor between the counties and to support additional transit service. • Participate and influence intercounty discussions with SANBAG on issues involving improvements to 1-215 and major arterials such as Pigeon Pass Road and Reche Canyon Road. • Participate and influence intercounty discussions with SANDAG on intercounty transportation issues including planning, vanpooling, transit connections, and the future improvement of 1-15. • Provide leadership to the Technical Advisory Committee of the MSRC to ensure that funding for air quality -related transportation improvements is fully distributed to Riverside County jurisdictions. • Work with SCAG, WRCOG, and CVAG to monitor and respond to transportation issues involving the implementation of SB 375 on smart growth planning. Implement the Commission's state and federal legislative program to maximize flexibility in the use of existing transportation revenues by supporting legislation to protect and increase current funding levels, ensuring an equitable distribution of available resources, streamlining administrative procedures to reduce costs and time of project development, and accelerating the allocation and use of existing resources. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Coordinate legislative activities of federal and state legislative consultants related to SAFETEA-LU, ARRA, STIP, and Proposition 1B. Obtain monthly reports on activities performed. • Work with board members to establish policy positions, visit with elected representatives in Sacramento and Washington, draft legislation, and take positions on pending legislation. • Review and analyze legislation and recommend positions for the Commission to adopt on specific legislative proposals. • Effectively represent the Commission before the state and federal legislative bodies, the CTC, and other agencies in funding, programming, and policy matters. 232 • Maintain contact and good working relationships with state and federal lawmakers and their staffs. Regularly meet and inform them of County transportation issues, policy positions, and project priorities. • Convene meetings with state, federal, and legislative staff members. Support the continuing education of Commissioners to increase their understanding of transportation -related issues at local, state, and federal levels to maximize the effectiveness of the Commission in affecting policy and funding actions. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Provide orientation training for new Commissioners. • Produce and distribute a monthly e-mail newsletter, On the Move, highlighting actions and activities of the Commission. • Provide periodic educational workshops or study sessions for Commissioners. Develop and maintain an information program which educates the public and other stakeholders on the roles and responsibilities of the Commission as it relates to accomplishments achieved through Measure A or other funding sources controlled or administered by the Commission. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Expand, maintain, and update information on the Commission's website including individual project websites and social media. • Annually produce a report that informs the public regarding Measure A progress and other Commission programs. • Issue news releases to the local media announcing significant achievements and providing information on Commission actions and activities. • Develop and maintain open lines of communication with news reporters to facilitate adequate and accurate news coverage. • Schedule periodic media information briefings or news conferences when a particular issue warrants it. • Expand the stock of video footage for use in production of cable television spots that feature transportation projects funded and or implemented by the Commission. • Periodically use cable television and other forms of media such as internet sites and blogs, if appropriate, to communicate information to the public regarding the Commission's activities and services. • Coordinate and oversee message content of all Commission publications and communications to provide uniformity of message and direction. • Support the development and planning of projects in regard to public outreach and communication efforts. • Require the use of Measure A project/program signage by funding recipients to increase public awareness of Measure A accomplishments. • Continue to administer and expand the use of the Speakers Bureau to reach community members in service and other organizations. 233 • • • Monitor and distribute media coverage from various outlets in the County and throughout the region to Commissioners and staff to enable them to closely follow transportation policy trends. • Provide oversight and coordination to Commission departments in the development of communications' materials. Foster and maintain effective communications with other agencies to heighten their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the Commission and increase interagency coordination and cooperation. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Assign designated staff members to attend other agency meetings and require staff to provide written/verbal communication on topics of discussion during regular staff meetings. Legislative Affairs and Communications Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Speakers bureau presentations 30 30 30 Legislative action submittals to Commission 9 9 9 Commissioner and state and federal legislator in -person meetings 50 55 50 Inland Empire delegation staff briefings 2 1 2 Southern Califomia legislative staff roundtables 9 9 9 234 Finance Mission Statement: "To safeguard the Commission's assets and maintain strong and prudent fiscal controls in investing, accounting, budgeting, procurements, and financial reporting including ongoing disclosure to all interested parties. Seek financing alternatives that complement the Commission's strategic direction." Chart 28 — Finance Expenditures The Finance Department's total budget is $2,298,100 (Table 43) and reflects a 76% decrease over the prior year's, budget, primarily related to a change in reporting certain debt administration professional services and debt service costs in the Capital Development and Delivery Department. Department staffing costs will total $673,000, reflecting a decrease of 3% due to Finance staff providing increased support to various programs and projects and one unbudgeted position vacancy. Professional costs of $896,500 include various services related to general legal, investment and financial advisory, external and internal audits, debt management, and CAFR and annual budget graphic design. Support costs of $574,100 reflect an 871% increase over the prior year's budget, because general business insurance costs previously included in the Administration Department are now included in the Finance Department budget beginning in FY 2010/11. Capital outlay is related to the carryover of budgeted costs for the ERP system software implementation. 236 Table 43 — Finance Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services Audit Services Financial Advisory Professional Services- General Total Professional Costs Support Costs Capital Outlay Debt Service TOTAL finance Finance Staffing Summary $ 703,500 $ 694,030 $ 773,100 ,,,_ oa, ;y'> $ (21,600) -3% 75,030 34000 30,000 .. " 0% 399,900 550,000 428,000 , (60,CM -11% 90,030 65,000 30,000 €, o (15,000) -23% 766,400 1,134,600 269,500 s (: c;,100) -71% 1,331,303 1,779,600 757,500 (;`'G,100j -50% 30,803 59,100 494,300 515,000 871% 196000 355,503 201,000 (201,0031 •57% 3,452,500 6,500,003 (6,500,000) -100% $5,714,103 $ 9,388,800 $ 2,225,900 i .. $(7,090,X4 -76% Accounting and Human Resources Manager 0.81 0.77 Accounting Assistant 1.00 1.00 Accounting Clerk 1.00 1.00 Accounting Supervisor 1.00 1.00 Accounting Technician 1.00 2.00 Administrative Assistant 0.01 0.01 Chief Financial Officer 0.58 0.55 Procurement and Assets Administrator 0.66 0.10 Procurement and Assets Manager 0.65 0.05 Senior Office Assistant 0.03 0.03 FTE 6.74 6.51 Department Budget Overview Department Description Finance and Accounting Commission resources are allocated to assure financial stability and fiscal accountability. Finance activities include investing the Commission's cash resources, planning and directing financial transactions, and subsequent monitoring of legal and regulatory requirements. Adequate cash flow must be maintained while at the same time prudently investing idle funds. Borrowing needs are carefully planned using both short- and long-term debt. Once debt is issued, there are ongoing responsibilities including interaction with financial advisors, bankers, dealers and remarketing agents, underwriters, bond counsel, bond insurers, trustees, issuing and paying agents, • • 237 • • • arbitrage consultants, and rating agencies as well as providing regular and consistent information disclosure to investors. Fiscal accountability involves receiving all funds due the Commission, paying all Commission obligations, maintaining the general ledger, reporting regularly on the Commission's fiscal results, and preparing and monitoring the budget. Fiscal accountability requires the coordination of budget planning and monitoring and the accurate and timely accounting for all funding sources, including compliance with all applicable laws and regulations governing those funds. Accounting encompasses cash receipt and disbursement functions, maintenance of the general ledger including project cost accounting, payroll processing, quarterly and annual financial reporting, and retention of and coordination with independent auditors. The Commission also recognizes the importance of accountability for the organization. As a result, the Commission is highly regarded by individuals, peers, other organizations, and government officials at a local, regional, state, and national basis. A formal organizational accountability program was approved in January 2006 to address fraud risk, ethical conduct, financial and operational disclosure, and maintaining the public's confidence in the Commission. Accordingly, measures have been implemented based on a conceptual framework related to oversight, reporting, fraud, internal control, and ethics. Procurements and Assets Management In the management of the procurements and contracts process, the responsibility of the procurement and assets management function is to ensure that the procurement policies approved by the Commission are followed and procurement procedures are updated as required. The function is responsible for the purchase of all goods and services, except for real property acquisition, in accordance with Commission policies and federal and state funding requirements to ensure the implementation of the Commission's projects and programs. This includes updates to the disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) program and anticipated DBE participation level (AADPL) goals for federally funded projects. Procuring goods and services for the Commission is a cooperative effort. All Commission staff involved in procurements for their projects and programs are responsible to employ sound judgment and appropriate standards of ethics and fairness to procure in a manner most advantageous to the Commission. This division also conducts a review and updates insurance coverage for the Commission and its properties. The Commission owns and maintains six Metrolink commuter rail stations, and stations along the Perris Valley Line extension will be added in the next few years. Assets management oversees the daily maintenance of these stations; however, expenditures are identified in the Rail Department budget. It is the responsibility of 238 assets management to ensure that the rail passengers have a safe and pleasant experience at the Commission -owned Metrolink commuter rail stations. Key Assumptions • The commercial paper program will continue as a short-term financing vehicle for the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan projects and as grant anticipation funding for the Perris Valley tine project. • Sales tax revenue bonds will be issued to retire a portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes and to provide funding for capital projects. • The Commission will pay 100% of the annual required contribution related to postretirement health care benefits. • Arbitrage calculations related to the outstanding debt issues will be performed by a consultant on an annual basis. • Directors and program managers will continue to have adequate project budget and accounting information to make informed decisions. • ERP system auxiliary modules related to human resources/payroll, fixed assets, budget preparation, position budgeting, accounts receivable, and GASB 34 financial reporting will be implemented by June 30, 2011. Implementation of web - based applications has not been determined. • Investments will be maintained primarily in state and local agency investment pools for short-term liquidity purposes; however, investments in mid-term treasury and federal agency securities may be made as available funds are identified and yields increase. The overall interest rate is conservatively projected to be .50%. • Procurements and contracts management processes will be reviewed and updated as a result of the ERP system implementation of the contracts and purchasing modules. • Existing procurement policies and procedures will be reviewed and updated as necessary. • A standardized procurement filing system will be developed and implemented and centralized procurement files will be implemented. • Rehabilitation of five Metrolink stations will continue. • A procurement to outsource the daily property management and maintenance of the commuter rail stations to a single vendor will be developed. Accomplishments • Implemented the core financial modules (general ledger, project accounting, accounts payable, purchasing, and contracts management) of EDEN, an ERP financial management system, to replace the existing financial management system in October 2009. • Instituted new business processes in the finance department as a result of the implementation of EDEN. • Conducted internal audit reviews of the EDEN implementation, transit provider services, and procurement and contracts management function. • Updated the internal audit risk assessment and related audit plan. • • • 239 • • • • Issued variable rate sales tax revenue bonds in connection with the commencement of the interest rate swap and to retire a portion of the commercial paper notes outstanding and refund the 2008 bonds. A liquidity facility with a bank was obtained as security for the bonds. • Extended the term for the commercial paper program's letter of credit for an additional two years. • Commenced the planning for a toll revenue bond issuance in 2011 by selecting an underwriting team to develop a financial model and provide financial input related to the design -build procurement. • Submitted CAFR for consideration of financial reporting excellence award from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) (17th year) related to the CAFR for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009. • Obtained GFOA distinguished budget award (14th year) for annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2009. • Provided assistance in revisions to the Measure A maintenance of effort (MOE) guidelines and determination of FY 2010-2019 base year MOE amounts. • Generated almost $700,000 in additional Measure A sales tax revenue since the engagement of a firm in January 2008 to provide sales tax audit services in order to detect and correct point of sale reporting errors. Major Initiatives Finance and Accounting The commercial paper program has been in place for over five years and has provided advance funding for projects included in the 2009 Measure A and related Westem Riverside County Delivery Plan. Commission management will continue to consider appropriate uses of commercial paper to advance 2009 Measure A projects of the Commission and CVAG and to provide FTA Small Starts grant anticipation funding for the Perris Valley Line project. In order to restore additional funding capacity to the commercial paper program, a portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes will be retired in connection with the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds in late 2010. A portion of the proceeds from the 2010 Bonds will provide funding for capital projects. Staff continues to develop a comprehensive financing plan to support the highway and rail capital projects to be delivered through 2019 and to assess future financing requirements. This financing plan incorporates revised sales tax revenue forecasts as well as other potential federal, state, and local revenue sources, including tolls. Based on the updated cost estimates for these projects and identified revenues, potential project funding shortfalls may result in project deferrals or require alternative financing strategies. Financing altematives to be considered include commercial paper, long-term bond issues to finance Measure A and toll projects, and federal loan programs. The financing plan also includes consideration of the restriction of the $500 million 2009 Measure A bonding cap, which could include the possibility of an administrative action or ballot measure to increase the cap. 240 Approximately three internal audit projects per year will be developed as part of the organizational accountability program. Projects may include a second phase for capital project management, station management, and accounts payable and disbursements. An outcome of the projects will be operational solutions such as process improvements. The internal audit risk assessment and audit plan will continue to be updated annually. To ensure that the Commission receives the proper of amount of Measure A sales taxes, the Commission will continue to engage a fimi to conduct sales tax audit services. The firm will also provide quarterly sales tax analysis and reporting services, of which a summary report is presented to the Commission on a quarterly basis. The Finance Department will continue to keep abreast of GASB technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities. New standards related to fund balance reporting and govemmental fund type definitions as well as the accounting and reporting for derivatives such the interest rate swaps will be implemented as part of the preparation of the CAFR for the year ended June 30, 2010. The Finance Department will continue the implementation of EDEN, an ERP financial management software system that will integrate data processing across the Commission, automate administrative processes, and embrace data integration. The ERP implementation efficiency gains include an automated paperless workflow system, advanced project accounting, multi -year budgeting, multi -year contract management, grant tracking, and readily available scanned images that can be retrieved by all users. Procurements and Assets Management A centralized procurements process will continue to be implemented to manage requests for proposals, qualifications, invitations for bid, small purchases, and related contract administration issues. Accordingly, this will strengthen controls to ensure consistency in the development and application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations, especially those related to federal and state grants. The procurement and assets management staff assist in the property management functions of the Commission's commuter rail stations. To prepare for the long-term maintenance of Commission -owned stations, a commuter rail station rehabilitation and strategic plan is being implemented (see Section 6.2, Rail). Part of the implementation of this plan will be the development of a procurement to outsource some or all of the property management responsibilities, including maintenance, of the stations during FY 2010/11. Staff also assists the Commission's insurance broker in procuring competitive quotes, on an annual basis, for various insurance coverages secured by the Commission in order to provide cost effective solutions to meet its diverse insurance needs. • • • 241 Staff will determine the annual DBE and AADPL goals for federal fiscal year (FFY) 2010/11, subject to Commission approval. The race conscious AADPL and the race - neutral AADPL relate to projects for which funding is received from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) through Caltrans, and the annual race -neutral DBE goal is related to FTA-funded projects. Department Goals Protect the Commission's cash resources by regular monitoring of investment practices to ensure consistency with established investment policy. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objective: • Achieve a rate of return at least equal to the County of Riverside Treasury Pool rate. Manage the Commission's outstanding debt ensuring compliance with applicable laws and regulations and continued investor awareness and receptivity to the Commission's program. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Provide an annual update and review of the debt programs with rating agencies no later than December 2010. • Meet continuing disclosure requirements of the debt program. • Prepare arbitrage calculations as required. Ensure the Commission and funding recipients comply with Measure A and TDA laws and regulations as they relate to the annual financial and compliance audits as well as close cooperation and coordination with independent auditors. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Minimize the number of substantive management letter comments and compliance findings requiring corrective action by the Commission. • Maintain appropriate fiduciary review and monitoring procedures for Measure A recipient and TDA claimant audits. Maintain fiscal and budgetary control through monitoring of periodic results and ensuring consistency with the Commission's strategic direction. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Obtain the GFOA Distinguished Budget Award for the FY 2010/11 budget. • Facilitate a comprehensive budgeting approach that effectively involves management staff, requiring full accountability for all department expenditures. 242 • Fund 100% of the annual required contribution related to the postretirement health care benefits. Assure fiscal accountability for Commission funds with general ledger accounting and financial reporting consistent with generally accepted accounting principles. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Ensure proactive communication and timely responses to any noted errors, corrections, and budget transfers related to program management reviews of accounting and budget information. • Obtain an unqualified opinion on the basic financial statements. • Receive financial reporting excellence awards from the GFOA. • Stay abreast of finance, accounting, and financial reporting developments by attending training and conferences in these general areas or in specialized areas applicable to job duties. • Update and maintain the fiscal policies and procedures manual. • Update and maintain complete accounting desk procedures manual for EDEN implementation to facilitate cross training. • Assist local govemments with Measure A funding by providing timely allocation of funds for eligible projects and financing opportunities to the extent funding does not impact other programs and is financially feasible and prudent. • Maintain financial software to reflect technical updates and current technology. Develop and maintain an organizational accountability program encompassing financial and operational functions. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Establish and implement measures related to oversight, fraud, internal control, and ethics. • Issue annual disclosure statements related to financial and operational responsibilities. • Develop an annual internal audit plan to include approximately three intemal audit projects and update business risk analysis at least on an annual basis. Procure goods and services from qualified consultants, contractors, and other vendors in accordance with laws and regulations at a competitive price. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Assist departments and programs to procure and obtain goods and services in a cost effective and efficient manner. • Ensure that procurements are conducted in accordance with a comprehensive Procurement Policies Manual. • Ensure that agreements, amendments, and MOUs are entered into with appropriate legal considerations. 243 • • • Process agreements, amendments, and MOUs in a timely and efficient manner. • Ensure that consistent procedures, processes, and tools are used for procurements. Review existing procurement policies and procedures. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Ensure that the procurement polices reflect Commission requirements and practices. • Segregate policies and procedures so that procedures can be easily updated without Commission approval. • Ensure that procurement policies and procedures reflect the requirements of the Commission's federal, state, and other funding sources. • Create an easy to read desktop quick procurement,policies reference guide for use by Commission staff. • Maximize the value received for the Commission's expenditure of public funds. • Provide all vendors an equal opportunity to provide needed goods and/or services. Maintain order, security, and safety at the Commission's commuter rail stations. (Policy Goal: lntennodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Monitor and improve closed circuit television systems at the Commission -owned Metro Iink stations. • Replace signage and repair facilities in an orderly and cost-efficient manner. Finance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Aa2/AA+/AA+ Sales tax revenue bond rating Aa2/AA+IAA Aa2/AA+/AA+ Commercial paper rating P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ GFOA Certificate of Achievement Awarded Awarded Awarded GFOA Distinguished Budget Award Proficient Proficient Proficient Invoices processed 5 285 5 500 5,600 Checks processed 3,516 3,600 3,700 Audit adjustments 1 0 0 Average yield on investments 1.32% 1.00% 1.00% Payroll hours processed 86,596 84,000 84,000 Accounts receivable invoices processed 280 290 300 Agreements processed 427 360 410 244 • Sootier§ (1)01::311n0 246 • • • Planning and Programming Mission Statement: "To exert leadership in transportation planning and the programming of funds to improve mobility, foster environmental stewardship, expedite project delivery, and form partnerships with regional, state, and federal agencies resulting in maximum return on local investment. Support a coordinated regional approach to solving transportation funding issues." Chart 29 - Planning and Programming pl,•Professional Costs 5% Support Costs 0% Expenditures Planning and Programming expenditures of $7,306,500 have decreased 34% from last year's budget (Table 44). Salaries and benefits represent 13% of total expenditures and increased slightly due to an increase in FTEs. Professional services totaling $350,000 have decreased 50% compared to the FY 2009/10 budget due to completion of the feasibility and water monitoring studies for the proposed ICE and a reduction in consulting services related to goods movement issues. Professional services include CMP implementation efforts, air quality analysis, project database management, local and regional planning activities, on - call goods movement consultants, and legal services. Projects and operations costs have decreased 37% due to a decrease in LTF disbursements of rail allocations for grade separation projects in the cities of Riverside and Corona and the County as well as in the costs for the ICE feasibility and water monitoring. 248 Table 44- Planning and Programming Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services 38,500 40,000 10,200 Professional Services -General 474,030 664,300 294,200 Total Professional Costs 513,100 704,300 313,800 Support Costs 28,200 38,400 11,400 Projects and Operations Program Operations 53,000 49,100 49,000 Right of Way 10,100 Spedal Studies 4,611,300 1,812,800 1,162,200 Operating and Capital Disbursements 2,031,700 7,613,400 2, «,300 Total Projects and Operations 6,676,100 9,525,300 4,196,500 TOTAL PIanningand Programming $ 8,061,200 $ 11,122,300 $ 5,448100 Planning and Programming Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Chief Financial Officer Community Relations Manager Deputy Executive Director Executive Director Goods Movement Manager Multimodal Services Director Planning and Programming Manager Procurement and Assets Administrator Procurement and Assets Manager Project Delivery Director Project Development Director Senior Staff Analyst Staff Analyst Toll Project Director FTE 833,800 $ 854,300 $ 926,400, ea :k= a' $ 65, (22,000) -55% (332,300) -50% L354,300) -50% (13,400) -35% (37,100) -76% N/A (492,200) -26% (21984200) -39% 13513,500i -37% $ (3,015,500) -34% 0.78 0.76 0.03 0.03 0.01 0.00 0.19 0.15 0.48 0.45 1.00 1.00 0.14 0.00 0.96 0.91 0.00 0.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.20 0.16 1.00 0.90 1.06 0.90 0.00 0.02 5.85 5.33 • • 249 • • • Department Budget Overview Department Description The Commission is responsible for short- and long-range transportation planning and programming. Short-range planning and programming involves the development of the five-year STIP and preparation of the five-year FTIP for Riverside County. These programming documents identify projects and their respective funding and schedules. The Commission's involvement with long-range planning efforts includes the coordination and input into planning efforts throughout the County and southern California region. These efforts involve participation in local, bi-county, and regional corridor studies, including the continued development of the CETAP corridors. Regional planning efforts are incorporated in the RTP (a 30-year transportation plan) developed by SCAG in conjunction with county transportation commissions, sub -regional agencies, local agencies, transit operators, and other interested parties. The Commission is responsible for approving projects for Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds and coordinating with Caltrans on the selection of Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds as part of the STIP approved by the CTC every two years. In November 2006, Proposition 1 B was approved by the voters of Califomia, which provided $20 billion in transportation infrastructure funding. Various program categories were established including a $2 billion infusion into the STIP. Other competitive program categories included CMIA and TCIF; Riverside County was successful in receiving funding for the SR-91 HOV and 1-215 widening projects, twelve grade separation projects, and a ground access improvement project at the I-215Nan Buren interchange. Given the current economic conditions, Proposition 1 B funds have been the most reliable state funding source for transportation projects this past year; however, continued funding is subject to the State's ability to issue Proposition 1B bonds. The Commission is a member of the Southern California Consensus Group that developed and submitted project proposals for the TCIF program. As with the RIP and IIP funds, CMIA and TCIF funds are administered and allocated by the CTC. Programming specifically involves the development, review, and approval of projects for various funding programs. In order to receive federal funds and approvals, all projects funded with federal and state dollars, or local projects that are regionally significant, must be included in the FTIP. SCAG is responsible for incorporating all six -county (Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura) transportation improvement programs into one regional programming document and conducting a conformity analysis with the adopted air plans to ensure compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. This 250 FTIP update effort is performed every 18 to 24 months. Multiple amendments occur within the 18 to 24 month FTIP update cycle for minor changes that do not affect the conformity analysis. The Commission is responsible for allocating the following local, state, and federal funding sources: Local Sources: • 1989 and 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plans • Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Program State Sources: • SB 821 bicycle and pedestrian projects • RIP • Proposition 1 B Federal Sources: • Transportation Enhancements (TE) • STP • CMAQ The Commission also serves as the CMA for the County and is responsible for developing and updating the CMP. The CMP was developed to meet state legislation and federal Congestion Management System (CMS) requirements, which includes an enhanced traffic monitoring system. The CMP's highways and regional arterials are regularly monitored to ensure that they are not operating at deficient levels [Level of Service (LOS) "F"j. If a deficiency occurs along the CMP system, a deficiency plan must be prepared that identifies mitigation measures and/or projects that will improve the LOS to "E" or higher. Partnership development, public and private, is critical to the Comrnission's continued success in affecting positive transportation decisions to meet future demands. Commission staff works in close coordination with its partners to advocate for federal, state, and local funding to improve mobility and mitigate the impacts of goods movement. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue its efforts in working with transportation partners to streamline and improve project delivery. • Project development work for CETAP corridors will be funded with a combination of local, state, and federal funds. • MSHCP funding contributions to the RCA through 2019 have been completed. • • 251 • • • • A consultant contract for CMP services is maintained to provide assistance with ongoing traffic monitoring efforts, biennial updates to the CMP, and support on other related planning activities. • The Commission will utilize all available funding sources on transportation projects identified in the 1989 Measure A and the 2009 Measure A as well as other regional high priority projects, including TUMF regional arterial projects. • The Commission will continue participation in local, bi-county, and regional planning efforts representing the interests of the County. • The Commission will work with the CTC, Caftans, and local project sponsors to implement projects funded with STIP-RIP, CMIA, and TCIF to ensure that the programming and timing of allocations are consistent with project schedules. • The Commission will continue to manage and host the project management database to improve efficiencies in monitoring projects and funding and in reporting to state and federal agencies. • The Commission will continue to assist local project sponsors with the processing of state and federal funding approvals and overall project delivery. Accomplishments • Developed 2010 STIP Update and submitted it to the CTC by established deadline. • Processed 18 STIP allocation and amendment requests to the CTC. • Completed the draft project level Environmental Impact Study (EIS)/Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Mid County Parkway project. • Completed the Feasibility Evaluation Report for the ICE tunnels. • Completed 22 local agency agreements and/or amendments for the implementation of TUMF regional arterial projects. • Completed 66 RTP project amendments. • Processed over 290 project amendments into the 2008 FTIP. • Developed the 2011 FTIP Update, consisting of a review and update of 402 projects totaling $9.2 billion, and submitted it to SCAG by established deadline. • Coordinated with Caltrans and project sponsors regarding the obligation of ARRA highway and TE projects, met obligation deadlines, and prevented loss of funding to Riverside County. • Completed Phase III activities for the 1-15 Interregional Partnership between the Commission, Caltrans, RTA, SANDAL, and WRCOG. • Developed and held a workshop regarding advancing the issue of goods movement in the Inland Empire. • Updated an informational video regarding goods movement issues and railroad grade separations. 252 • Submitted a $31.8 million grant application to the U.S. Department of Transportation for Auto Center Drive (Corona) and Iowa Avenue (Riverside) grade separation projects. • Monitored and provided written comments on port expansion projects for each of the Ports. • Monitored TCIF project development to ensure timely completion of the 12 grade separations and a ground access improvement project to improve the I- 215Nan Buren interchange as required for the $162.7 million Proposition 1B TCIF funds. One project (Columbia Avenue in Riverside) was completed in March 2010; an additional project (Magnolia Avenue in Riverside) is under construction. Two additional projects, Auto Center Drive and Iowa Avenue, are projected to complete the right of way phase so that construction can start in early 2011. • Continued to take a leadership role and work together with the five -county consensus working group and with Mobility 21 on goods movement issues. Major Initiatives Each county transportation commission throughout the State is responsible for programming RIP funds, which represents 75% of the total STIP funding available statewide for capital enhancement projects. The 75% funding level is then further distributed with 60% of the funds allocated to Southern California and 40% to Northern California. A population formula is then applied to determine county funding levels called "county shares." The Commission is responsible for ensuring that projects funded with STIP funding are administered and implemented consistent with CTC and Ca!trans policies. Two percent of RIP funding available to Riverside County was allocated for staff support to carry out STIP PPM activities. Federal TE funds are also administered through the STIP. TE funds are not subject to general fund diversions; however, TE funds are authorized each year by the passage of the state budget. CMIA and TCIF funds are monitored by Caltrans and the CTC. Baseline agreements are developed for each project under these programs. Any changes to project funding, scope, or schedule will require an amendment to the baseline agreement. The CTC allocates the CMIA and TCIF funds and the process for allocating the funds is similar to the process established for STIP funds. Included in the 2009 Measure A is a provision that identifies $400 million of TUMF revenues collected on the Western County TUMF network to be allocated to TUMF regional arterial projects. Of the $400 million, $200 million is slated specifically for the CETAP corridors and the other $200 million for regional arterial projects. The Commission and WRCOG entered into an amended MOU which identifies a distribution of the TUMF revenues prior to the commencement of the 2009 Measure A. The distribution, after deduction of a WRCOG administrative fee, • • 253 is 48.7% to the Commission for regional arterials and CETAP corridors. The remaining revenues are distributed to WRCOG for the five TUMF improvement zones and for regional transit facilities. An amendment to the $400 million cap provision was approved by WRCOG and the Commission in August and September 2008, respectively. As a result, the Commission will continue receiving 48.7% of TUMF funds for the CETAP and Regional Arterial Program projects above the original $400 million cap. In September 2004 the Commission established a 5-year program and approved $71.7 million to fund project development work for 24 regional arterial projects. Planning and Programming manages the Regional Arterial Program; however, the expenditures for these regional arterial capital projects are included in Capital Projects. In 2006 the Commission initiated strategic partnership efforts to identify and evaluate alternative financing strategies. Alternative financing will likely be necessary to fund the significant gap between funding readily available through conventional governmental fundingf financing techniques and project needs. Alternative financing structures including the use of public toll roads will be necessary to fully fund the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. The toll projects are discussed in the Capital Project Development and Delivery section. Transportation Planning The Commission's role in planning throughout the year will involve working with SCAG, sub -regional agencies, local agencies, and the other county transportation commissions in the region on various planning efforts relative to the development of the 2012 RTP and SB 375-mandated Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS), implementation of the 2008 RTP, corridor studies, goods movement studies, and efforts to update transportation computer models and project databases. Staff will also be an active participant in the development of green house gas reduction implementation guidelines and SB 375 legislative amendments. In FY 2010/11 the Commission will continue its work efforts on the CETAP corridors. The draft environmental document for the Mid County Parkway was circulated for public review and public comment received. An updated environmental document is being prepared to address changes made to the project limits and, once completed, will again be available for public review and comment. While the geotechnical feasibility report for the ICE has been completed, funding is included in the FY 2010/11 budget in the event that the Commission and the Riverside Orange Corridor Authority board decide to move forward with hosting a workshop to gauge interest from the private sector in its taking the lead on the tunnel concept. The Commission will also provide coordination and oversight, along with SANBAG, for the Moreno Valley -San Bernardino County corridor activities that are being led by the County, focusing on the Pigeon Pass and Reche Canyon road improvements. 254 The FY 2010/11 CMP effort will involve continued monitoring of traffic data and review of any new state and federal requirements pertaining to the CMP and CMS. Transportation Programming As mentioned above, the Commission is responsible for allocating various state and federal funds. The funds are monitored to ensure that regulations are adhered to in order to prevent funds from lapsing. The following summarizes the status of these funding programs: Local Funding TUMF Project monitoring and tracking of TUMF regional arterial projects by Planning and Programming will occur according to the agreements between local agencies and the Commission. In addition, Commission staff will work with local agencies regarding amendments to agreements and any issues regarding project delivery. To date, 22 project agreements have been executed totaling approximately $78 million. During FY 2010/11, a total of $40.7 million is anticipated to be reimbursed to local agencies using TUMF regional arterial funding. These project expenditures are included in Capital Projects. 2009 Measure A Westem County Regional Arterial Program A call for projects was initiated for the 2009 Measure A Western County Regional Arterial program. Due to the economic downturn, the selection of projects was postponed. It is anticipated that the call for projects will be revisited when revenues are at a level that can sustain reasonable cash flow to fund the projects selected for this program. 2009 Measure A Local Streets and Roads In order to receive Measure A local streets and roads funding, each year the cities and the County are required to submit their 5-year capital improvement plans (C1Ps) based on Measure A revenue projections. Additionally the local jurisdictions are required to submit an MOE certification consistent with adopted MOE guidelines. Amendments to CIPs are processed administratively for minor changes that do not affect the total programmed amount or are within budget levels. Significant changes require Commission approval. • • 255 • • • State Funding STIP- R/P/lIP The 2010 STIP cycle is scheduled for approval by the CTC in May 2010. The 2010 STIP is anticipated to be overprogrammed, requiring many projects to be delayed or deleted. Staff will identify other available fund sources and propose alternative funding options to fund projects that are not included as priority allocations by the CTC. This will involve amendments to the STIP and FTIP to reflect any changes made to funding sources and/or programming years. SB 821 Annually, the Commission releases a call for bicycle and pedestrian projects in April. These projects are funded by 2% of LTF revenues, as required by SB 821. The Commission establishes an evaluation committee to rank eligible projects that meet the established criteria. Project recommendations are approved by the Commission in June of each year. The Commission approved 13 projects in the amount of $1.2 million for FY 2009/10. The FY 2010/11 call for projects will have funding of $2.66 million available for award. These expenditures are included in the LTF special revenue fund, which is reflected in the Transit Department since this fund's activities relate primarily to transit funding. Federal Funding CMAQ, STP, and TE The Commission is responsible for allocating CMAQ, STP, and TE funds to transportation projects. In 2003, the Commission directed staff to program SAFETEA-LU funds (CMAQ and STP) to projects that were impacted by the state budget crisis and/or the rise in construction material costs with the exception of the CMAQ funding that is apportioned to the Salton Sea Air Basin (SSAB). In 2007, the Commission approved 25% of future CMAQ and STP funds (from the reauthorization of the federal transportation act) for grade separation projects approved in the Proposition 1B TCIF program. The Commission will be reviewing federal funding options for the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan projects once the federal transportation act is authorized and future funding levels are known. The Commission delegates the selection of projects for CMAQ funds apportioned to the SSAB to CVAG. In 2009 CVAG issued a call for projects for $2.1 million of CMAQ funding as a local stimulus to facilitate job creation. In December 2009, CVAG approved seven projects that are scheduled to be delivered within a year. 256 • In 2004 the CTC restructured the administration of the TE program by incorporating it in the STIP. Although TE funds are federal, they must be granted state budget authority in order for the funds to be allocated by the CTC. If the state budget approval is delayed, the TE funds cannot be allocated until the state budget is passed. In 2005, the Commission approved 18 projects totaling $17.6 million. To date, 14 projects have been delivered, and the remaining four projects will be allocated between FY 2010/11 and FY 2012/13. Project Monitoring The high demand for reporting and monitoring the progress of projects is essential to prevent funds from lapsing. The programming project database allows for efficient monitoring of project schedules and funding. Local agencies have been provided access to project information as well as the capability to update their respective project information in a timely manner. The Programming Department provides assistance to the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department with preparing and submitting requests for authorization of federal funding. In addition, Programming also monitors expenditures and project closeout of federally funded (CMAQ, STP, and TE) projects to prevent loss of funds. Regional Issues • The Commission's work effort will remain focused on facilitating ongoing commitments as well as being responsive to various emerging issues. These include bi-county issues with the counties of San Bernardino, Orange, and San Diego as well as goods movement. The Commission will continue working with partners from the Southern California Consensus Group (Ports, Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority, Alameda Corridor East Construction Authority, SANBAG, OCTA, Metro, Ventura County Transportation Commission, and SCRRA) to develop a regional infrastructure cargo fee. A priority will be to coordinate with legislative staff and advocacy groups such as Mobility 21 and the CAGTC to secure funding through the federal transportation bill for goods movement -related needs such as the funding of Alameda Corridor East grade separations in Riverside County. The Commission will continue to monitor the Ports' projects for possible impacts on Riverside County by reviewing agendas and requesting notices for projects under CEQA and the Brown Act. 257 Department Goals Build upon relationships with local, state, and federal agencies to coordinate short- and long-range planning to ensure that transportation projects receive funding and approvals. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Work with CVAG, WRCOG, Caltrans, transit operators, local agencies, and SCAG to coordinate project submittals and amendments to the 2012 RTP and SCS development, including the development of strategies to meet SB 375 greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. • Provide the Commissioners information to assist in advocating Commission projects. • Continue CETAP inter- and intracounty corridor work. • Continue working with the RCA to implement the MSHCP, although funding to assist in the assembly of the reserve system through 2019 has been completed. Continue to seek a stronger role for county transportation commissions in state and regional transportation and air quality programs in order to direct funding for programs and projects that will improve air quality and mobility in Riverside County. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Support efforts to seek additional funding at the local, state, and federal levels for projects that improve air quality. • Support ongoing efforts to regulate federal emission sources. • Support efforts that allow more flexibility in funding transit operating and capital costs. Continue implementation of the CMP in cooperation with SCAG, WRCOG, CVAG, Caltrans, and local agencies and maintain federal certification for the CMP. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objectives: • Implement the CMP to meet federal CMS requirements cited under the metropolitan planning organization (i.e., SCAG) planning regulations. • Provide data collected on the CMP system to SCAG and Caltrans for reporting on the Highway Performance Monitoring System. • Provide data collected on the CMP system to local agencies and other interested parties. 258 • • Continue monitoring the CMP system to ensure the minimum adopted level of service threshold is met. Continue to advocate for jobs/housing balance and attracting high income jobs to Riverside County in addition to addressing intercounty congestion. (Policy Goal: Economic Development) Objectives: • Participate in ongoing studies and activities regarding the jobs/housing imbalance between Orange and Riverside counties and San Diego and Riverside counties. • Support the County interests pertaining to transportation planning as population, job, and housing forecasts are developed by SCAG and the State. Consolidate project databases to allow for efficient monitoring of projects and funding with the ability to share project information with local jurisdictions. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Maintain consultant contract to manage and host the Commission's web -based project management database. • Work with SCAG and other county transportation commissions to refine and maintain the SCAG regional database, including the coordination of the Commission's database with SCAG's FTIP database. • Coordinate with Ca!trans to assure database compatibility and promote information sharing including timely reporting of fund obligation information. Ensure maximum funding and flexibility for projects funded with STIP-RIP, Proposition 1B, SAFETEA-LU, and future federal reauthorization funds. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Participate in statewide efforts to develop and implement guidelines and legislation for the various Proposition 1 B funding programs. • Work with Caltrans and the CTC to meet the intent of the CMIA and TCIF programs related to implementing projects within the timeframes specified in the baseline project agreements. • Advocate that local and federal funds used to replace state funding due to the state budget shortfall be given high priority for repayment when the state is in a position to repay such loans. • Participate in various forums regarding authorization of the federal transportation bill to increase funding levels, streamline programming processes, and provide flexibility in obligating funds. 259 • Support efforts advocating the continuation and protection of Proposition 42 funding and the payback of loans taken from state transportation accounts. • Advocate that RIP county share reserves receive priority programming over counties that advance shares. • Continue to strategically program and fund projects in an effort to obligate and/or allocate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding. • Continue to monitor project implementation through the use of milestone reporting on a quarterly basis to maintain maximum funding levels for projects and prevent loss of funds to Riverside County. Provide support to the Commission's Capital Project Development and Delivery and Finance departments to maintain project funding and schedules and minimize programming issues. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objectives: • Provide input to the budget development process. • Attend regular meetings with the Capital Projects Development and Delivery Department. • Serve in an oversight role regarding project invoicing and close-outs. • Prepare project agreement summaries. • Coordinate project request for authorization/obligation packages. • Monitor progress of project milestones and requests for authorization as they are processed through Caltrans Headquarters and FHWA. Provide assistance to local agencies to facilitate and streamline project delivery. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Communications) Objectives: • Continue coordination of monthly Technical Advisory Committee meetings and quarterly Project Delivery Subcommittee meetings. • Provide information regarding project programming data, including funding status, to project sponsors on a quarterly basis. • Provide local agencies with recommendations on project programming to minimize unnecessary requirements and delays. • Upon request, attend local agency project delivery team meetings to provide advice on programming issues. • Meet regularly with Caltrans local assistance staff to monitor project submittals and resolve project implementation and obligation issues. 260 Continue to work with state and federal agencies to streamline processes for funding and project approvals. (Policy Goal: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship, Communications) Objectives: • Maintain relationships with key staff at regional, state and federal agencies. • Participate in SCAG's National Freight Gateway Collaboration to define a system that meets the region's long term mobility, safety, environmental and energy needs including developing a brand specific to goods movement projects in Southem California. • Identify problematic areas with project delivery and/or programming and develop solutions for streamlining and clarifying processes. • Participate in regional, state, and federal forums addressing issues related to project programming, implementation, and air quality conformity. Facilitate development of regional transportation solutions that benefit Riverside County, including implementation of Proposition 1B TCIF projects and the Commission's Grade Separation Plan. (Policy Goal: Goods Movement, lntermodalism 8 Accessibility) Objectives: • Monitor progress made in constructing the TCIF-funded projects through discussions with staff from partner agencies including Caltrans; cities of Banning, Corona, and Riverside; and the County of Riverside. Timely completion of the TCIF projects is required to demonstrate the region's ability to deliver projects consistent with the CTC's direction when the Proposition 1 B funding was allocated. • Secure new sources of revenue supported by user fees and/or customs fees in support of the 2008 Grade Separation Funding Strategy that identified a funding shortfall of $565 million. Determine where future efforts regarding addressing Riverside County goods movement issues would prove most effective. (Policy Goal: Goods Movement) Objectives: • Identify drivers of demand for goods movement services and performance of modal systems and services as well as public benefits, specific areas of inefficiency, and the impacts of goods movement on communities. • Implement the Commission's 2008 Grade Separation Funding Strategy through coordination of advocacy efforts with Legislative Affairs and Communications. 261 • • • Facilitate public and private investments in clean air technology in support of the broader air quality programs for SCAG, SCAQMD, and Riverside County local entities. (Policy Goal: Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Monitor the impact of AB 32 (greenhouse gas emission reduction) application to Commission transportation projects. • Monitor the impact of SB 375 (greenhouse gas emission reduction) from light trucks and automobiles through land use and transportation efforts to reduce vehicle miles traveled. • Actively participate on the MSRC's Technical Advisory Committee to ensure equitable funding is available in support of capital projects within Riverside County. Planning and Programming Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09110 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Number of projects monitored (excluding TUMF Regional Arterial Projects) 125 402 150 Number of TUMF Regional Arterial projects monitored 24 24 24 Number of TUMF agreements/amendments 6 8 8 Number of FTIP amended projects 92 175 125 Number of STIP allocations, amendments, and extensions for Commission projects 7 17 13 Number of STIP allocations, amendments, and extensions for local agency projects 4 8 8 Number of written comments on expansion projects submitted to Ports 2 1 1 262 • • Rail Mission Statement: "To develop and support passenger rail transportation options for increased mobility within Riverside County and the region." Chart 30 — Rail Capital Outlay 0% Expenditures Salaries and Benefits 4% Professional Costs 3% Support Costs 9% Rail expenditures of $11,533,900 include Metrolink operations and capital support as well as maintenance and operations of the five Commission -owned and operated commuter rail stations (Table 45). Personnel costs increased 12% as a result of an increase in FTEs from 3.18 in FY 2009/10 to 3.31. Professional costs include legal and consultant services; legal costs have decreased 48% while professional services have increased 26%. Support costs, which reflect a decrease of 16%, include station maintenance, media ads, printing services, and marketing incentives. Station maintenance includes property management, utilities, grounds maintenance, repairs, cleaning, and security services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations, adjacent parking structures, and the new Perris Station Transit Center. The decrease in support costs is primarily related to lower station maintenance costs as a result of the implementation of the station rehabilitation plan. 264 Projects and operations include an operating contribution of $8,220,000 to SCRRA for Metrolink operations, whereas the prior year budget also included a $13,300,000 capital contribution to SCRRA for new rail cars. The Commission's commuter rail program intends to meet the number of required Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) targets for FY 2010/11. However if the serious economic circumstances impacting ridership in the current year continue, these targets may not be met. Table 45 — Rail Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services Professional Services -General Total Professional Costs Support costs Projects and operations $ 384,2M $ 439,403 $ 399,400 i` s_ $ 51,13C0 12% 122,700 210,O03 77,200 (100,000) -48% 104,100 199,303 100,4C0 ,, 51,100 26% 226,8C0 409,300 208,500 (48,900) -12% 895,9C0 1,1: 400 1,048,900 ', ? (195,0M) -16% Program Operations 1,367,7C0 1,462,000 1,216,900 Spedal Studies 2,4,000 200,000 Operating and Capital Disbursements 5,740,300 20,580,000 10,445,003 Total Projects and Operations 7,108,000 22,242,000 11,861,900 Capital Outlay 52,600 72,100 TOTAL Rail Maintenance and 0perations $ 8,667,500 $ 24,279,1M $ 13,590,803 Rail Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Chief Financial Officer Community Relations Manager Multimodal Services Director Procurement and Assets Administrator Procurement and Assets Manager Project Development Director Rail Manager Right of Way Manager Senior Office Assistant Staff Analyst FTE (184,2C0) -13% (25,000) -13% (12,360,003) -60% (12,569,200) -57% 16,100 N/A $(12,745,200) -52% 0.01 0.10 0.03 0.05 0.02 0.00 0.07 0.25 0.33 0.55; 0.25 0.20 0.00 0.00 0.96 1.00 0.01 0.00 0.02 0.03 g 1.00 1.00a 2.70 3.18 • • 265 • • • Department Budget Overview —Rail Operations Department Description The Commission has directed efforts in the areas of regional commuter rail, intercity passenger rail, high-speed rail, and capital improvements to support enhanced passenger and freight rail service. The entire program includes elements of planning, programming, commuter rail development and support, station and corridor management, mitigation of community and environmental impacts, legislative and regulatory advocacy, and construction of capital projects. Many elements are managed or supported by other . Commission departments, legal counsel, and consultants. Departmental efforts contributing to the rail program are found throughout the budget document. Coordination and consultation also occur with a variety of public and private entities including the CTC, Ca!trans, Califomia Public Utilities Commission, California High Speed Rail Authority (CHSRA), Federal Railroad Administration, FTA, Amtrak, environmental agencies, the University of California, transit providers, SCAG, WRCOG, CVAG, SANDAG, Los Angeles -San Diego -San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency, local govemments, private freight railroads, businesses, and property owners. The Commission participates in the ongoing funding and govemance of Metrolink by SCRRA, a joint powers authority consisting of the county transportation commissions of Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties. The Commission holds two voting positions on SCRRA's eleven member board. Commission staff serves on the five -county Technical Advisory Committee which negotiates service and funding levels, based upon the county's established priorities, and provides technical assistance, coordination between various SCRRA and commission departments, and linkages to local communities. Of the seven commuter rail lines operated by Metrolink, three routes consisting of the Riverside, Inland Empire -Orange County (IEOC), and 91 Lines directly serve Western County. Unlike the other SCRRA member agencies, the Commission owns and operates the commuter rail stations serving Riverside County: Riverside Downtown, Pedley, La Sierra, West Corona, North Main Corona (Chart 31). The Commission is also the owner of and the operating partner with RTA at the Perris Station Transit Center, a multimodal transportation facility. Station operation and maintenance costs are included in the Rail Department budget with services currently coordinated by the Finance Department's Procurements and Assets Management Division. New and ongoing construction projects at these stations are described in the capital budget managed by the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department. 266 Chart 31 — Riverside County Metrolink Station Locations Riverside County Metrolink Service EXISTING STATIONS CO PROPOSED STATIONS Key Assumptions • Metrolink's preliminary FY 2010/11 budget is adopted by the Commission and SCRRA. The Metrolink budget may include SCRRA approval of a fare increase, fare policy adjustments, and service reductions. The Commission's budgeted operating subsidy includes a contingency if only some of these actions are approved by the SCRRA board. • Ridership and fare revenues recover on the Riverside, IEOC, and 81 Lines (Chart 32). • The Commission manages the station security guard contract. Estimated costs are based on the actual contract terms with a portion to be reimbursed by SCRRA. 267 • • • • • • Chart 32 - Metrolink Average Daily Ridership 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Accomplishments III 91 Line ■ IEOC ■ Riverside/LA • Fully implemented parking service for customers at the 1,000 space North Main Corona station parking structure. • Completed construction of the Perris Station Transit Center with the immediate commencement of transit services. This facility also includes a park and ride area and will serve as a rail station for the Perris Valley Line. • Continued implementation of the Green Metrolink Station Rehabilitation Plan to upgrade the existing Metrolink stations for energy and resource efficiency and to rehabilitate station elements. • Completed a comprehensive safety and security assessment at the Metrolink stations that identified upgrades to the security camera system, monitoring activities, and security patrol monitoring. • Established joint station operations and multimodal coordination by developing a permit program to allow carpools and vanpools to use the North Main Corona and La Sierra stations' excess parking. • Established the La Sierra station as the primary origination point for the RTA/OCTA Route 794 Express Bus service to Orange County. • Supported the holiday toy train events at Riverside County commuter rail stations. The community continues to support these events with strong local participation. These events also generate needed donations for the Spark of Love Toy Drive for local charities. Major Initiatives Over the last 17 years, more than $110 million in capital improvements have been made in developing stations and securing access to support the Commission's commuter rail services operations. Recently completed initiatives include the completion of a 1,000 space parking structure at the North Main Corona station and the Perris Station Transit 268 Center. The station rehabilitation project continues at all stations. Detailed planning and environmental efforts are continuing at the La Sierra station with the addition of a multimodal park and ride facility and bus transit services. The development of the Perris Valley Line project and its operational impacts will continue to be pursued and evaluated, respectively. The Commission adopted the Commuter Rail and Multimodal Facility Design Criteria Manual to establish the design guidelines for future commuter rail stations, park and ride facilities, and multimodal transit centers developed by the Commission. The most immediate project to utilize this manual is the station development related to four Perris Valley Line stations which are currently at 65% design (see Chart 31 above). The goal of this effort is to provide the best approach to build, maintain, and operate cost effective and environmentally sustainable facilities that meet the public's transportation needs. Department Goals —Rail Operations Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving Riverside County. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Support improved Metrolink system safety initiatives. • Meet PIP goals through increased peak period patronage on the Riverside Line, IEOC Line, and 91 Line. • Maintain weekend, midday, and reverse -peak patronage in FY 2010/11. • Try to maintain the public subsidy per passenger mile traveled on lines currently serving the County through economies of scale, efficient use of train sets and crew hours, and increased passenger fares. Maximize opportunities for public use of rail -related investment. (Policy Goal: Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Support transit operator efforts to expand availability and use ,of connecting transit in order to improve access and reduce demand on parking capacity; costs associated with transfers are currently reimbursed to the transit operators by the Commission and are budgeted. • Expand opportunities with the Commuter Assistance Program's park and ride operations for the designation of speck car/vanpool parking at commuter rail stations with available capacity. • Expand opportunities for interline travel through coordination of schedules with Amtrak intercity and long distance trains, such as the Sunset Limited, and other Metrolink lines, including encouraging joint ticketing options. • • • 269 • • • Implement energy efficient systems and generate revenue to offset maintenance costs of rail properties. (Policy Goal: Environmental Stewardship) Objective: • Implement the concept of "green power" at the Metrolink stations by changing landscape materials to reduce water consumption and explore more energy efficient lighting. • Explore revenue potential of advertising at the rail stations and develop a Commission advertising policy. Department Budget Overview --Rail Development In order to expand passenger rail options throughout the County, the Commission conducts feasibility studies to assess the viability of commuter rail expansion. In 2005, the Commission completed the Commuter Rail Feasibility Study that examined the viability of extending Metrolink commuter rail service largely within existing rail rights of way. The Commission approved the study and recommended advanced study of extensions on the San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) to Hemet/San Jacinto and MurrietafTemecula. The next phase of Alternatives Analysis for these corridors will be pursued in future years as funding availability allows. San Jacinto Branch Line The Commission holds tide to and manages the 38-mile SJBL (Chart 33) and several adjacent properties, preserved for future passenger rail service. BNSF holds the freight rights in the corridor, providing service to local shippers, and performs maintenance on the line. 270 Chart 33 — San Jacinto Branch Line San Jacinto Branch Line Perris Valley Line Small Starts Project In June 2000, the Commission allocated $20 million of Measure A funds for capital and operating expenditures related to the implementation of passenger rail service on the initial operating segment of the SJBL, known as the Perris Valley Line (see Chart 31). Project cost estimates have been revised and are now approximately $232.7 million. Staff is seeking a project construction grant agreement from the FTA Small Starts Program to fund $75 million of the project cost with the balance to be funded by other federal, state, and local funding sources, as illustrated in Table 46 and Chart 34. The 271 • • • FFY 2008/09 appropriations bill included $45 million of the $75 million funding. The current draft FFY 2010/11 appropriations bill includes the remaining Small Start funding. Details on this capital project are included in the Capital Project Development and Delivery section. Chart 34 — Perris Valley Line Funding Chart Rail Property Sale Proceeds 7% Table 46 — Perris Valley Line Funding Plan Federal: STP FTA 5307 FTA 5309 Small Starts FTA 5309 Rail Modernization CMAQ State: STI P Total $ 500,000 26,157,000 75,000,000 9,516,000 5,907,000 57,672,000 Local: Measure A 42,666,000 Rail Property Sale Proceeds 15,276,000 Total Perris Valley Line Project Estimate $ 232,694,000 The project has received FTA approval to begin project development and advance preliminary engineering. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) draft environmental assessment was circulated for public review in 2004, and a new Supplemental Environmental Assessment will be released in fall 2010. A new CEQA document will be circulated for review and is expected to be finalized in fall 2010. The FY 2010/11 budget in the Capital Project Development and Delivery section includes total expenditures of $48.5 million for the Perris Valley Line and other related projects. The public outreach program for this project continues to be a priority with ongoing efforts to reach all the communities including residents, businesses, and schools along the corridor. 272 Passenger Rail to Coachella Valley In recent years the Commission has also focused attention on the creation of intercity passenger rail service between the Coachella Valley, Riverside, and the Los Angeles basin through advocacy efforts with state, federal, and local government entities and negotiation with the freight railroads. The Commission's current efforts include seeking capital and operating funds and coordinating with Amtrak and Caltrans. The Commission is also working closely with CVAG to update the feasibility studies to include current cost and travel time information. High Speed Rail The Commission continues to play a proactive role in the development of a statewide, high-speed passenger rail system, including routing of the backbone corridor through the Inland Empire with possible stations in the Riverside/Corona and Murrieta/ Temecula areas. With the passage of Proposition 1A in November 2008, there is now a proposed funding mechanism to move the state high speed rail project forward. The 2010 award of $2.3 billion in ARRA funds to the State will also advance other corridors in the state. The CHSRA has begun work on a project level environmental assessment and corridor alignment study for the section between Los Angeles and San Diego via the Inland Empire. The Commission has directed the review to include an alignment alternative along 1-15 for analysis. The Commission has entered into an MOU to be supportive in the development of this high speed rail project and is participating in the Southern California Inland Corridor Group meetings. The Commission is actively contributing to the current Altematives Analysis process and coordinating local participation at Technical Working Group meetings attended by local stakeholders. Key Assumption • Project development on the Perris Valley Line will continue in FY 2010/11. Accomplishments • Having received a medium -high rating from the FTA on the Perris Valley Line in December 2007, continued project development activities including progress on environmental documents and the related public reviews. • Began preliminary engineering to provide for additional layover track capacity at the Riverside Downtown station. • Continued the Green Metrolink Station Rehabilitation Plan to improve the existing Commission -owned stations. • • • 273 • • • Major Initiatives During FY 2010/11, the Commission will initiate engineering and design of a Riverside Downtown station layover facility. Additionally, as discussed above, project development and right of way acquisition related to the Perris Valley Line project is expected to continue. Department Goals —Rail Development Identify and plan for capital improvements necessary to increase the scope, appeal, and reliability of commuter rail operations. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Intermodallsm & Accessibility) Objectives: • Continue efforts to fully fund the Perris Valley Line (Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley) on the SJBL. • Finalize the station design elements for the Perris Valley Line. • Continue development of the Riverside Downtown station layover facility expansion. Maintain efforts with local agencies, other Southern California counties, and the state and federal governments to expand intercity passenger rail service into Riverside County and the Coachella Valley. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Intermodallsm & Accessibility) Continue to support and influence state efforts in the creation of a high-speed passenger rail system along an Inland Empire alignment through coordination' with state and local agencies. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Intermodallsm & Accessibility) Rail FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Performance/Workload Indicators Actual Estimated Projected Average daily ridership on existing commuter lines • Riverside Line 5,063 4,926 5,129 • IEOC Line 4,683 3,911 4,267 • 91 Line 2,256 2,089 2,177 Farebox recovery ratio • Riverside Line 56.19% 55.92% 59.0% • IEOC Line 33.03% 27.33% 29.1% • 91 Line 50.02% 48.44% 51.6% Rail PIP targets: • Passenger trips 3,120,423 3,279,966 2,939,639 • Farebox recovery ratio 44.50% 47.04% 44.02% • Subsidy per passenger mile $0.22 $0.20 $0.22 • Passenger miles per revenue car mile 35.54 38.76 40.02 274 • Public and Specialized Transit Mission Statement: "To coordinate the operation of all public transportation services within the County with a goal toward promoting compliance and improving mobility as well as program efficiency and effectiveness between transit operators. To maintain and enhance, as resources allow, mobility options for seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons of limited means through innovative solutions and community interaction." Chart 35 — Public and Specialized Transit Salaries and Benefits 1% Expenditures Professional Costs Q% Public and specialized transit expenditures are budgeted at $76,459,400 for FY 2010/11, as presented in Table 47, and consist primarily of projects and operations costs. Projects and operations costs have decreased because of declining LTF sales tax revenues and the State's suspension of STA funding. LTF disbursements consist of transit operating and capital allocations of $57,362,000, bicycle and pedestrian facilities allocations of $2,660,000, and planning and administration allocations of $2,402,300. The LTF transit allocations reflect the use of $9,659,000 in fund balances. STA disbursements of $5,839,500 are primarily for bus and rail capital purposes in Western County, as minimal fund balances for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley areas are projected to be available in FY 2010/11. Measure A disbursements include $2,920,000 for Western County specialized transit funding of the second year of the two-year call for projects from 1989 Measure A. The majority of Measure A disbursements relate to 2009 Measure A public transit programs: $490,000 for Western County Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) 276 allocations, $3,773,000 for Coachella Valley public and specialized transit, and $400,000 for Westem County intercity bus services. The Coachella Valley allocation is disbursed monthly to SunLine, the major transit provider in the Coachella Valley. Table 47 — Public and Specialized Transit Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits $ 297,800 $ 374,503 $ 336,100 $ (17,30D) -5"6 Professional Costs Legal services 20,700 35,000 25,003 ?" (5,000) -14% Audit Services 70,000 — (70,000) -100% Professional Services -General 155,300 237,803 167,800 Total Professional Costs 176,003 342,800 192,800 (135,000) -39% Support Costs 8,900 29,100 11,800. 3 (1,500) -5% Projects and Operations Spedal Studies 24003 Operating and Capital Disbursements 82,562,700 89,282,103 71,643,000 Total Projects and Operations 82,562,700 89,302,103 71,643,000 TOTAL Public and 5pedalizedTransit $ 23,045,400 $ 90,048,500 $ 72,183,J00 Public and Specialized Transit Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Chief Financial Officer Deputy Executive Director Multimodal Services Director Procurement and Assets Administrator Procurement and Assets Manager Staff Analyst Transit Manager FTE Department Budget Overview Department Description 0% (13,435,300) -15% (13,435,300) -15% $(13,589,100) -15% 0.29 0.20' 0.09 0.11 0.00 0.04 0.63 0.60 0.00 0.09r 0.00 0.21'.,' 0.62 0.407. 1.00 1.00 2.63 2.65 The Measure A specialized transit program provides a valuable service to the community by serving the needs of commuters, such as seniors and persons with disabilities, whose transportation needs are not met by traditional services. Specialized transit operations are typically managed by social service and nonprofit agencies. The Commission also allocates funding, following a competitive call for projects, through the FTA Section 5310 program that is administered by Caltrans. This program provides funding to nonprofit transportation and social service agencies and public operators under special circumstances for the purchase of capital equipment. • 277 • • • With the passage of SAFETEA-LU, the following are two relatively new federal funding sources for specialized transit services: • Jobs Access Reverse Commute (JARC) (Section 5316) program provides funding for the development and maintenance of jobs access projects to transport welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from work during non -peak hours as well as supply reverse commute options for workers in suburban areas. • New Freedom (Section 5317) program provides funding for new public transportation services and alternatives for people with disabilities beyond the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. In accordance with the provisions of SAFETEA-LU, recipients under these programs must comply with all federal coordinated planning requirements to be eligible for funds. Projects selected for funding under these programs must be originated from a locally derived Coordinated Plan and must be developed through a process that includes representatives of the public, private, and nonprofit transportation and human service providers. Development of the Coordinated Plan was completed in April 2008, and the first Universal Call for Projects was issued shortly thereafter. Approval of Measure A and JARC/New Freedom grant awards were completed in October 2008 for the Coachella Valley and Western County applicants, and projects began provision of services on July 1, 2009. The Commission is responsible for short-range transportation planning and programming. .Planning includes the development of the countywide SRTPs for eight public transit operators consisting of the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; SCRRA's Metrolink commuter rail; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency; RTA; and SunLine. The Comrission assists in coordinating the annual development, review, and approval of the operator SRTPs and allocates Measure A, LTF, STA, and FTA Section 5307, 5309, 5311, 5316, and 5317 transit funding resources to public transit programs. The Commission is responsible for the disbursement of Measure A, LTF, and STA funds, while federal transit funds are administered by the FTA. In partnership with the County's transit operators, the Commission coordinates the allocation of available Proposition 1 B transit funding and ensures proposed projects meet the mobility needs of the County. Proposition 1 B funds are annually appropriated by the legislature and used for transit related capital purchases or infrastructure/facility improvements. The Riverside County operators applied for Proposition 1 B funds; however, due to the state's ongoing financial crisis, the release of funds is contingent upon available proceeds from future bond sales. The Commission has public transit operator oversight and fiduciary responsibilities to ensure that annual fiscal audits and a state triennial performance audit are conducted in accordance with TDA regulations. The Commission is also charged with annually reviewing public transit operator activities and recommending potential productivity improvements to lower operating costs. To ensure that specialized transit allocations are expended and required service goals are met in accordance with funding 278 agreements, the Commission engages an audit firm to perform certain agreed -upon procedures for the Measure A specialized transit funding recipients. Key Assumptions • The Commission will approve specific funding allocations for specialized transit for FY 2011/12 and FY 2012/13 following the development and implementation of a second Universal Call for Projects. • LTF, STA, and Measure A disbursements are based on projected budgetary allocations but may be adjusted after the Commission has approved actual allocations in July 2010. • Declining LTF revenues will require streamlining operating expenses by all operators while maintaining efficiency and quality of service. • Transit Vision, adopted by the Commission in June 2008, established a 25% allocation of Measure A Western County Specialized Transit funds to the RTA as the CTSA for Westem County. Accomplishments • Completed the application evaluation, funding award, and contract agreement execution processes for successful recipients of Measure A, JARC, and New Freedom funding under the Universal Call for Projects. • Oversaw the successful implementation of the new specialized transit services resulting from the initial Universal Call for Projects funding allocation process. • Completed the local review and project ranking process for the FY 2008/09 FTA Section 5310 applications submitted to Caltrans for the statewide application. Projects are derived from a locally developed Coordinated Plan. • Incorporated FY 2008/09 Proposition 1B Public Transportation, Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds with transit capital funding sources following Caltrans' partial release of program funding. • Approved allocation of FY 2008/09 Proposition 1 B California Transit Security Grant Program—Califomia Transit Assistance Funds (CTSGP-CTAF) for eligible transit safety and security projects identified by transit operators following release of program funding and guidelines by the Governor's Office of Homeland Security. • Adopted the Transit Vision and related funding formulas for the TDA and Measure A funds through 2019. • Identified the development of a mobility management program through the transit visioning process. Major Initiatives For 20 years, the Commission has long demonstrated a strong commitment to assist in the mobility of those with specialized transit needs. Through its 1989 Measure A Specialized Transit Program, the Commission provided millions of dollars to public and nonprofit transit operators for the provision of special transit services to improve the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. Along with support of traditional dial -a - ride services, the Commission supports innovative programs that provide transit 279 • • • assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs. The riders, many frail and elderly, have come to depend on these services that provide a higher level of assistance than can be provided by the public transit providers and/or operate in areas not served by public transit. As a result of the 2009 Measure A, these specialized transit programs will continue through 2039. In July 2010, 17 programs in Western County and 5 programs in Coachella Valley will start their second year of specialized transit services under the Universal Call for Projects, including the non -emergency medical transportation component. Ten of these projects will be fully funded with Measure A funds, while the other 12 projects will be funded by a mix of Measure A, JARC, and New Freedom funds. As identified in the Coordinated Plan, the . specialized transit projects approved for funding will require implementation and yearlong performance monitoring. In order to assure the availability of funds to support matching of FTA Section 5310 capital grants, $150,000 on an annual basis is budgeted for Western County applicants to meet the 11.47% local match requirements for such grants. As a result of declining LTF and Measure A revenues, staff will be conducting long- range planning activities to ensure that anticipated revenues are in line with projected levels of service by the various public transit operators. Department Goals Provide timely information to the public regarding Commission -implemented projects and support public relations activities of Measure A, JARC, and New Freedom funded programs by grant recipients. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Produce and distribute public information materials as needed including press releases, flyers, brochures, marketing materials, and newspaper ads. Allocate Measure A Specialized Transit and federal funds to support services that will maintain and/or enhance mobility by alleviating transportation barriers for seniors, persons with disabilities, and the truly needy. (Policy Goals: Mobility, lntermodalism 8 Accessibility) Objectives: • Monitor performance of specialized transit grant recipients through analysis of their quarterly performance reports. • Support the FTA Section 5310, 5316 and 5317 grant processes to improve mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities and individuals of limited means by working with Ca!trans, public operators, and social service agencies to ensure a competitive process statewide for the allocation of federal transportation dollars for social service programs. • Provide technical assistance and program support to agencies offering specialized transit programs to ensure the maximum benefit of funding for improved mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited means. 280 • Seek Commission approval on a funding allocation for the second Universal Call for Projects and then initiate and develop process specific requirements for interested parties to submit applications. Coordinate the operation of all public transportation services within the County with a goal toward promoting program efficiency and harmony between transit operators as outlined in state law. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, lntennodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Review transit planning, resource allocation, and service implementation policy requirements including appropriate coordination of commuter rail, intercounty and intercity bus, local bus and paratransit, and social service transportation services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Assure the ongoing effectiveness of the SRTP process and work with the County's eight transit operators to assure efficiency and effectiveness as well as compliance with the PIP. • Coordinate regional transit connections among commuter rail, buses, and paratransit services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Monitor transit operators' quarterly capital grants reports. • Monitor transit operators' performance through analysis of their quarterly performance reports using the TransTrack computer -based tracking program. Continue to provide staff resources to assist and support the coordination of transit services within the County and throughout the State. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Intermodalism & Accessibility, Communications) Objectives: • Implement mobility management countywide. • Participate and influence intercounty discussions between Riverside, Orange, and San Diego regarding the enhancement of intermodal options. This includes additional transit services (rail and express bus) and rideshare services. • Regularly participate in meetings that focus on the coordination of transit services, such as the California Association for Coordinated Transportation, SunLine's Access Committee, RTA's ADA Committee, the Riverside County Foundation on Aging Board of Directors, the Older Californian Traffic Safety Task Force, and the Commission's Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council. • Continue the development of a marketing and distribution network for communicating specialized transit mobility options to seniors, the disabled, and persons of limited means. 281 • • • • • Public and Specialized Transit Performance/ Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09110 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected SRTPs submitted by operators and reviewed 8 8 8 Number of SRTP amendments 4 2 2 Number of Specialized Transit grants awarded 13 22 22 Number of one-way trips provided by Measure A funded projects 87,865 119,000 121,000 Number of one-way trips provided by JARC & New Freedom funded operators N/A 91,000 92,000 Number of one-way trips reimbursed through the Western County Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project 76,226 80,000 85,000 Number of transit tickets provided through the Transportation Access Program & Beaumont Adult School Transit Program 94,950 73,000 76,000 Number of clients served through Blindness Support Services 32 40 45 282 • • • Commuter Assistance Mission Statement: "To encourage and promote transportation alternatives for commuters through employer partnerships, information services, technological innovation, and community outreach." Chart 36 - Commuter Assistance Transfers Out 5% Capital Outlay 0% Expenditures Salaries and Benefits 5% Commuter Assistance expenditures and transfers out total $4,374,600, which represents a 44% decrease from last year's budget (fable 48). Professional costs of $595,800 have decreased 60% over the prior year due to the implementation of the Inland Empire 511 system during FY 2009/10. Operations for the Inland Empire 511 system will be supported through SAFE. Support costs totaling $532,500, which is comparable to the prior year, include mail and printing services, computer and vehicle maintenance, communications, and other office expenditures. Projects and operations expenditures of $2,820,400 consist of park and ride lease payments of $118,000 and regional transportation consultant services totaling $2,081,400 to manage and implement the program and merchant vouchers valued at $621,000. Reimbursements from local county transportation commissions for regional rideshare services provided by the Commission are included in revenues to offset these expenditures. The prior year budget included transfers out to other departments to fund new park and ride facilities and commencement of 2009 Measure A commuter assistance services. 284 Table 48 — Commuter Assistance Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services 30,600 30,033 68,700 a;J 1 0% Audit Services 4,6C0 • N/A Professional Services -General 351,503 1,453,500 1,393,603 (887,700) -61% Total Professional Costs 386,500 1,483,503 1,462,303 (887,7C0) -60% Support Costs 391,000 524,300 545,403 8,2C0 2% Projects and Operations Program Operations Construction Operating and Capital Disbursements Total Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL Commuter Assistance 161,200 $ 215,3C0 $ 368,200 `, : • ; `_ S (6,400) 2,373,200 2,897,200 2,894,500 1,701,000 1,100,000 1,100,000 142,000 4,216,200 3,997,200 3,951,500 6,300 17,000 18,200 1,030,000 1,557,900 2,836,900 6,161,600 $ 7,795,203 $ 9,225,500 Commuter Assistance Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Chief Financial Officer Deputy Executive Director Commuter Assistance Manager Multimodal Services Director Procurement and Assets Administrator Procurement and Assets Manager Staff Analyst FTE Department Budget Overview Department Description 0.08 0.02 0.01 0.02 0.00 0.05 0.86 0.53 0.14 0.10 0.00 0.03 0.00 0.02 1.16 1.00 2.25 1.77 (76,800) -3% (1,100,010) -100% N/A {1,176,800) -29% 0% (1,357,900) -87% S (3,420,600) -44% While much of the Commission's work is focused on increasing transportation infrastructure and capacity, there is significant value in ensuring that the transportation systems are used efficiently. To help foster more efficient use of these systems, the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program seeks to encourage Riverside County constituents and commuters to make a mode -shift decision away from single occupancy vehicle commuting and into alternative modes of transportation such as a carpool, vanpool, buspool, public bus, Metrolink, walking, bicycling, or telecommuting. The Commuter Assistance Program seeks to efficiently influence driver behavior by fostering a made -shifting decision at both the employer and commuter levels via the following methods: 285 • • • • The provision of employer services to foster the implementation of employer - based mode -shift and rideshare programs; • The use of incentives both for beginning and then maintaining a mode- shift/rideshare arrangement; and • Public information services including the dissemination of personalized commute options and traveler information through technology in order to educate commuters of all travel options available to them and to foster congestion avoidance behavior when traveling. The Commission's Commuter Assistance Program was implemented as a specific requirement under Measure A to address congestion mitigation. While ridesharing has a beneficial impact on air quality, first and foremost, it is a strategy to improve mobility through increased use of alternative travel modes of transportation. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue to contract with a consulting firm to administer the Commuter Assistance Program. • Maintaining its long-term partnership with the Commission, SANBAG will contract with the Commission to manage and implement a "sister' Commuter Assistance Program for its residents and employers in San Bernardino County. • At the regional level, four county transportation commissions (Los Angeles, Orange, San Bemardino, and Ventura) will contract with the Commission for the provision of regional ridematching database and network operations. Accomplishments • The Commission, in partnership with SANBAG, implemented an Inland Empire 511 system in accordance with national 511 implementation standards. This system includes a website and call center component that serves Riverside and San Bernardino County residents and commuters with traveler information, a transit planner, access to rideshare services, and more. While the Commuter Assistance Program funded the implementation costs of the Inland Empire 511 system, SAFE will fund the annual operating costs. • The Commission received the 2009 Association for Commuter Transportation (ACT) Creative Excellence Award for demonstrating creativity and originality that generated a significant response and results through the Amazing Rideshare Challenge Campaign. ACT is an internationally recognized transportation demand management association. • Enhanced the value of the RidesharePlus Rewards program benefits for commuters who maintain a rideshare arrangement. Members now have access to discounts at more restaurants, theaters, stores and hotels in the revamped program. Members receive an Entertainment -style book with coupons to local merchants and access to an online savings guide where members can print coupons at home for discounts at thousands of merchants nationwide. 286 • Implemented on-line tools to better serve employer partners and their employees and for more efficient processing of Rideshare incentives and RidesharePlus rewards applications and renewals. • Continued to operate the report card program for both program participants and employer partners which translates individual or worksite rideshare participation into money saved, congestion reduced, and emissions reduced. This outreach is intended to recognize rideshare efforts and to motivate participants to continue ridesharing and/or grow employer program participation. • Continued to operate, maintain, and enhance the regional ridematching database on behalf of the five -county region. In addition, www.CommuteSmart.info, the regional rideshare website, was refreshed with a new look and navigation to better integrate with the regional 511 websites. • Continued use of the Program Measurement Tool to evaluate program performance. • Continued to provide rideshare services to employers and commuters in the Coachella Valley, leveraging JARC funds which will sunset at the end of FY 2010/2011. • Continued work on a variety of MSRC grant projects such as the enhancement and integration of the dormant MSRC Bike Metro website, the enhancement of commuter RideGuides with the addition of custom transit itineraries, and support of the Rideshare to School project. • Renewed leases for park and ride facilities with the following locations: Canyon Community Church of the Nazarene (Corona), Living Truth Christian Fellowship (Corona), West Community Friends Church (Corona), Elsinore Naval Military School (Lake Elsinore), Revival Christian Fellowship (Menifee), La Sierra University (Riverside), San Jacinto Assembly of God (San Jacinto), Hope Lutheran Church (Temecula), Mountain View Community Church (Temecula), Orchard Christian Fellowship (Temecula), and the United Methodist Church (Temecula). • Worked in partnership with the Rail Department to develop a permitted section of park and ride spaces in the city of Corona at the North Main Corona Metrolink station as well as develop blueprints for potential parking security options to consider for future implementation. Major Initiatives A cornerstone of the Commuter Assistance Program is its continued partnership among commuters, employers, and government. The partnership, based on voluntary efforts, makes a collective difference in increasing the efficiency of our transportation system — local roads, freeways, commuter rail, and public bus. The combined effort results in less congestion, decreased vehicle miles traveled, and improved air quality. The major initiatives to continue these partnerships and efforts in FY 2010/11are described below. Grow Employer Partnerships: Given that the highest percentage of rideshare arrangements is formed at work sites, . voluntary employer participation is critical to addressing congestion and air quality goals; employers are the conduit to directly influencing their employees' personal transportation choices. The ongoing success of the core Western County rideshare program and the explosive success of the now three-year old Coachella Valley rideshare program demonstration is a testament to the significance • • • 287 • • • of employer partnerships in the program's success. However, the current economic downturn will pose challenges in terms of maintaining and/or growing these partnerships. Employer Transportation Coordinators (ETC) have to do more with less. Delivery of value-added services and tools to make the ETC jobs easier will be critical to their continued partnership. Enhance Program Tools and Outreach: The Commission is continuously looking for ways to improve the suite of services and outreach to both our program participants and employer partners to foster partnerships and participation. Through a grant -funded work effort, RideGuides distributed to commuters will be refreshed and reprogrammed to include personalized transit itineraries in addition to custom car/vanpoo) matches and park and ride information. An electronic RideGuide will also be available as part of this work effort. Potential alternatives to the current suite of services and outreach will be researched and assessed with program enhancement and garnering efficiencies as the objectives for areas including ridematching and leveraging social marketing. Support Multimoda► Travel: In addition to ridematching, information services, and incentives to facilitate ridesharing, the Commuter Assistance Program also implements park and ride facilities to support ridesharing efforts. The last Caltrans park and ride facility in Riverside County was built in 1999. The Commission leases park and ride spaces from property owners to supplement the network of park and ride spaces in Riverside County. A continued focus for FY 2010/11 will be to monitor and optimize the number of spaces leased and coordinate with ridesharers and transit and rail partners to identify areas where the lease program can help support car/vanpool arrangements as well as facilitate transit connections. Department Goals Operate a cost-effective Commuter Assistance Program within Riverside County that results in a demonstrable reduction in single occupant vehicle trips thus assisting with congestion mitigation and improving air quality. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Continue to offer short-term incentives for commuters to try a transportation mode other than driving alone. • Continue to provide a rewards program for long-term ridesharers to encourage their continued use of alternative modes of transportation. • Ensure the effectiveness of the Commuter Assistance Program through program analysis and recurring assessments of participation and retention of ridesharers. Through the implementation of the Program Measurement Tool, the Commission will continue to look for ways to pare program costs without impacting service delivery or participation. • Continue the mode-shift/rideshare incentive and services to the Coachella Valley and explore other grant opportunities to extend the program beyond the sunset of JARC funds at the end of FY 2010/11 and recommend a long term funding model. 288 • Continue on-line services to employer partners to make the administration of a trip reduction program an easier task. • Optimize the number of park and ride spaces leased and address park and ride gaps in the system. • Assess vanpool program funding opportunities. Ensure the coordination of ridesharing programs throughout the Inland Empire and the southern Califomia region. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, lntermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Continue to administer a "sister" Commuter Assistance Program in San Bernardino County on a contract basis, thus expanding the reach and effectiveness of commuter programs throughout the Inland Empire area. • Continue to contract for the enhancement of the RideGuides through a grant funded by the MSRC. Working in partnership with Metro, this grant will enable personalized transit information to be displayed on individualized RideGuides produced for employees who have been surveyed. • Continue to provide leadership with regard to the ongoing operation, maintenance, and enhancement of both the regional ridematching database and network. • Fund and participate in regional rideshare marketing programs to enhance awareness of and encourage participation in commute modes that provide an alternative to driving alone. Enhance and pursue educational activities that encourage alternatives to driving alone and that encourage employers to assist employees in seeking commute methods other than driving alone. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Communications) Objectives: • Continue the operation of the Commuter Exchange vehicle to include 35 site visits for the FY 2010/11. • Continue and enhance the dissemination of the report card program for both program participants and employer partners that translates individual or worksite rideshare participation into money saved, congestion reduced, and emissions reduced. • In partnership with the four county transportation commissions and others, utilize the regional ridesharing database and website, www.ridematch.info. • Maintain, update, and enhance the Rideshare Plus members' only website, www.Rideshareplus.info. • Distribute regular broadcast information bulletins via email to local employers regarding commuter issues. • Continue with the implementation of the on-line transactions program in order to increase ernployer participation and reach out to end user commuters. • Publicize the participation of local employers in the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program through various media options. • • • 289 • • • Work with Caltrans and local governments including transit operators to seek opportunities to develop and implement Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) applications that improve the accessibility of highway and transit information to the public as well as achieve operational efficiencies. (Policy Goal; System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Seek federal and state funding sources to support implementation of ITS strategies and projects consistent with the Inland Empire ITS Strategic Plan. • Program ITS projects in the FTIP to account for air quality benefits. Commuter Assistance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Number of one-way single occupant vehicle trips reduced as a result of Advantage Rideshare incentives 184,707 108,000 110,000 Number of Club Ride Members 7,378 6,229 6,450 Number of incoming 1-866-RIDESHARE telephone calls 2,423 1,980 2,100 Number of services provided by Inland Empire Commuter Services to support employer trip reduction efforts at worksites: • Employers requesting survey services 152 146 150 • RideGuides produced 34,940 25,000 26,000 • Technical assistance services 264 200 210 Number of events participated in by the Commuter Exchange in total, and as identified individually below: • Public events 7 6 6 • Employer work sites 8 4 4 • Elementary schools 58 39 41 290 • • • Motorist Assistance Mission Statement: "To improve safety, reduce congestion, and enhance access to traveler information for motorists through the provision of a comprehensive motorist aid system." Chart 37 — Motorist Assistance Salaries and Professional Benefits Costs 1% 6% Expenditures Motorist Assistance expenditures and uses are budgeted at $5,714,000 for FY 2010/11, or an increase of 49% compared to the prior year budget (Table 49). Salaries and benefits reflect a reduction in the motorist assistance manager and staff analyst FTEs for FY 2010/11. Professional costs of $355,800 include legal services and contracted consultants to monitor the Commission's call box program and provide monthly operating and statistical reports for the program. Support costs of $946,600 increased $595,000, or 169%, as a result of the operations and maintenance costs related to the newly implemented Inland Empire 511 system. Budgeted expenditures for project operations include $2,700,000 in towing contract costs for the FSP program. Projects and operations costs have increased 23% due to the provision of additional FSP service to help relieve congestion in construction zones. These incremental costs for construction FSP services are reimbursable from Caltrans and local jurisdictions. Transfers out of $1,263,500 represent SAFE's matching funds to state funding for FSP services and an allocation of administrative costs. 292 Table 49 — Motorist Assistance Expenditure Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs legal Services 6,700 10,000 11,500 , ����" 0% Professional Services - General 28,000 394400 394,400 i 3:, (48,600) -12% Total Professional Costs 34,700 v , 404,400 405,900 r� � , :: (48,600) -12% Support Costs 303100 351,600 350,400 P it r �.ni:,.:,.o", 595,000 169% Projects and Operations Program Operations Total Projects and Operations 2,168,900 2,489,000 Transfers Out TOTAL Motorist Assistance 2,168,903 454,700 Z489,000 2,488,800 433,700 $ 2,623,2W $ 3,840,700 $ 3,819,800 Motorist Assistance Staffing Summary Administrative Assistant Chief Financial Officer Commuter Assistance Manager Multimodal Services Director Procurement and Assets Administrator Procurement and Assets Manager Staff Analyst FTE Department Budget Overview Department Description $ (61,9001 -44% 580,000 23% 580,000 23% 800 178% $ 1,873,3C0 49% 0.02 0.05 0.01 0.02 0.14 0.47 0.02 . 0.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.16 0.60 0.35 1.19 As a SAFE, the Commission is responsible for providing a motorist aid system for Riverside County. This system is comprised of three components: 1) call boxes, 2) FSP, and 3) an Inland Empire 511 traveler information system. The call box system allows motorists to call for assistance in the event of a mechanical breakdown or accident on the freeway. The FSP clears small debris on freeways and assists stranded motorists on certain segments of the freeway by towing, changing flat tires, and providing a gallon of fuel at no charge to the motorists. FSP service is also provided in construction zones through separate funding agreements with Caltrans to help mitigate congestion. The Inland Empire 511 system is a telephone and web -based service that delivers real-time traffic information including incidents and travel times, bus and rail trip planning, and rideshare information. It was launched by the Commission in partnership with SANBAG. Key Assumptions • In partnership with SANBAG, the Commission will develop, maintain, and operate an Inland Empire 511 system in accordance with national 511 implementation standards. • • 293 • • • • Current percentage levels of vandalism, knockdowns, and miscellaneous repairs to call boxes will remain consistent with the past year. • Annual maintenance costs are based on a flat -fee contract based on the number of call boxes. • Call box operating costs are based on estimates from the CHP and the call answering center contract through SANBAG. • Cellular service charges are based on the existing agreement for digital cellular service. • Tow truck contractor costs for the nine existing FSP beats are based on Commission -approved contracts. • The Commission will maintain and operate an Inland Empire 511 system to be funded 50% by the Commission and 50% by SANBAG. The Commission's share of operating costs will be funded with SAFE revenues. Accomplishments • Maintained competitive rates across all tow operators as a result of exercising option years with no cost increases and obtaining competitive rates for new tow contracts awarded. • Continued research into potential radio options to address coverage gaps and pending FCC regulated radio narrowband conversion. • In partnership with SANBAG, developed the Inland Empire 511 system in accordance with national 511 implementation standards. • Continued the "cost recovery" program for call box knockdowns in an effort to collect reimbursement from motorists involved in accidents that damage Commission property. Major Initiatives Major Motorist Assistance initiatives will focus on system efficiencies and enhancing traveler information. Staff will complete the implementation of the AVL system for the FSP tow trucks. All of the vehicles and operators will be fully equipped by early FY 2010/11, thus providing CHP with a tool to more efficiently monitor the fleet and respond to incidents. Additionally staff will implement a cost-effective and expandable radio system that addresses coverage issues and pending FCC narrowband regulations. The Commission, along with its partner, SANBAG, will operate and maintain the Inland Empire 511 system. This system includes a website interface and an interactive voice recognition (IVR) telephone system that serves Riverside and San Bernardino county residents and commuters. 294 Department Goals Maintain the integrity of the call box system and service levels. (Policy Goal: System Efficiencies) Objective: • Along with San Bernardino County SAFE, continue to monitor the operation of the call answering center contractor. • Renegotiate rates with the existing call box maintenance contractor and prepare to put the call box maintenance contract out to bid. Enhance access to real-time traveler information. (Policy Goal: System Efficiencies) Objective: • Operate and maintain the Inland Empire 511 website and telephone systems supporting the Inland Empire 511 system on behalf of the Commission and SANBAG. • Continue to refine and enhance Inland Empire 511 web content, applications and outreach. • Continue to leverage existing resources such as traffic data provided by Caltrans District 8, existing IVR software, and Google Transit to minimize costs. Continue the Freeway Service Patrol as long as state funding support is available. (Policy Goal: System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Complete the implementation of the AVL system across the entire FSP fleet. • Implement a cost-effective and expandable radio system that addresses coverage issues and pending FCC narrowband regulations. • Continue to monitor program statistics and consult with the CHP and Caltrans to evaluate existing beats and determine if changes in service hours, number of vehicles assigned to each beat, or service hour adjustments should be considered in response to changes in funding. • Review proposed construction projects with Caltrans and local cities and coordinate the use of temporary tow service to mitigate congestion. • Implement the new statewide FSP logo across all program materials and collateral. Motorist Assistance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08/09 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Projected Number of call boxes 618 618 618 Number of call box calls 6,574 6,200 6,000 Number of vehicle assists 43,163 44,500 45,800 • • • 295 • • • betide Cooly T'mpartan Comatission cttnr: A etti4 n a Q 296 • • • Capital Project Development and Delivery Mission Statement: "To keep the Commission's contract with the voters of Riverside County by accelerating the planning, programming, and implementation of projects and programs in the Measure A Transportation Improvement Plan, as enhanced by the Toll Program, to the extent that funds are available. To ensure that capital projects are environmentally acceptable, expertly designed, and implemented in a cost effective manner. To acquire and manage required right of way in the most economical, efficient, and timely manner." Chart 38 - Capital Project Development and Delivery Salaries and Benefits 0% Expenditures Professional Costs Capital Outlay 0% Support Costs 0% The budgeted expenditures and transfers out total $668,554,500 to cover all of the Commission's major capital projects (Table 50). Personnel costs represent less than .5% of the budgeted uses. Professional costs of $14,959,600 are primarily related to general legal costs, specialized legal and financial advisory services related to the toll program, debt management services, and BNSF services related to a rail capital project. Support costs of $869,300 consist primarily of services needed to maintain the Commission's real properties in a condition that complies with all local codes and regulations governing property maintenance. 298 General project costs include $8,806,600 related to program management provided by Bechtel Infrastructure (Bechtel), SCRRA, and the project and construction manager and interagency support related to the SR-91 corridor improvements project design -build phase as well as permits for rail capital projects. Significant projects included in engineering expenditures of $52,442,600 are SR-91, I- 15, and 1-215 corridor improvements; Mid County Parkway; various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects; and the Perris Valley Line and other related projects. Construction expenditures of $75,323,600 are primarily related to the 74/215 interchange, I-215 corridor improvements south segment, various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects, and the Perris Valley Line and other related projects as well as funding to the city of Riverside for SR-91 interchange improvements at Van Buren. Design -build costs of $23,000,000 pertain to the SR-91 corridor improvements. Approximately 38% of the projects and operations costs represent right of way expenditures on significant projects including SR-91 corridor improvements, SR-91 HOV lanes, Mid County Parkway, various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects, and Perris Valley Line and other related projects. Funding will also be provided for CVAG's MSHCP land mitigation acquisitions. Local turnback payments to cities and the County for local streets and roads repair, maintenance, and construction amount to $30,986,400, net of debt service payments from the cities of Blythe and Indio. Disbursements to CVAG for the 2009 Measure A Coachella Valley highway and regional arterial program comprise 99% of the regional arterial expenditures. Rail capital equipment purchases for the SJBL represent 96% of the capital outlay expenditures. Interest payments on outstanding commercial paper, the 2009 Bonds, and proposed 2010 Bonds are approximately $12,405,000. Cost of issuance related to the proposed 2010 Bonds is estimated at $1,500,000. Principal payments include the retirement of $83,300,000 in outstanding commercial paper notes as well as $9,000,000 for the 2009 Bonds and proposed 2010 Bonds. Significant transfers out include $130,300,000 in 2010 Bonds proceeds for the retirement of a portion of the outstanding commercial paper notes, funding of 2009 Measure A Western County highway projects, and establishment of a debt service reserve; $50,000,000 in commercial paper proceeds to fund 2009 Measure A Western County and Coachella Valley highway projects such as the SR-91 corridor improvements project; and transfers to debt service aggregating $16,789,000. • • 299 • • Table 50 — Capital Project Development and Delivery Uses Detail Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services Audit Services Rnandal Advisory Professional Services- General Total Professional Costs Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way and land Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials Special Studies Operating and Capital Disbursements Total Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out 2,149,700 $ 2578,100 $ 2,406,000 1,3,18,700 14,300 15,160 1,010,803 3,904,500 1, ,1C0 55,060 55,060 653,100 6, ;1,060 4,199,400 2, 900 10,948,500 6,593,600 491,300 1,585,060 795,700 5,623,6C0 50,287,600 78,093,400 105,891,500 45,655,560 K640,300 400 (402,600) 5,927,600 60,730,050 63,943,300 21,425,000 123,605,650 31,215,900 13,761,400 150,003 4,990,800 51,395,060 25,269,300 1,200,C00 42,165,030 31,491,700 8,864,700 50,000 u 295,978,300 320,758,300 165,426,500 583,800 718,000 (18,900) 42,202,600 191,755,000 193,050A 45,541,200 242,199,O0D 262,039,500 127,800 5% (776,900) -2U46 (25,000) -45% 1,255,000 N/A 3,558,000 51% 4,011,100 37% (715,700) -45% 2,879,600 49% (8,287,450) -14% 11,380,300 18% 1,575,000 7% 4,103,650 3% (229,500) -1% 363,600 3% (80,060) -53% N/A 11,705,260 4% (318,000) -44% (85,550,000) •45% (31,247,800) -13% TOTAL Capital Project Development and Delivery $ 389,335,200 $770,541,900 $630,292,60D ++ ', ; $(101,087,400) -13% 300 Capital Project Development and Delivery Staffing Summa Accounting and Human Resources Manager 0.02 0.00 Administrative Assistant 0.46 0.55 Capital Projects Manager 3.00 3.00' Chief Financial Officer 0.25 0.22 Community Relations Manager 0.44 0.74 Deputy Executive Director 0.34 0.28 Executive Director 0.28 0.30 Muitimodal Services Director 0.00 0.00 Planning and Programming Manager 0.04 0.09 Procurement and Assets Administrator 0.00 0.18 Procurement and Assets Manager 0.10 0.52 Project Delivery Director 1.00 1.00 Project Development Director 0.80 0.84 Rail Manager 0.04 0.00 Right of Way Manager 0.99 1.00 Senior Staff Analyst 1.00 1.10 Staff Analyst 1.00 1.10 Toll Project Director 1.00 0.98 Toll Project Manager 2.00 2.00 FTE 12.76 13.90 Department Budget Overview Department Description Capital Projects is primarily responsible for the development and delivery of major highway and rail capital projects where the Commission is identified as the lead agency. The delivery of a capital project can include tasks such as feasibility studies, preliminary engineering, environmental clearance, final design, right of way acquisition, construction, and construction management. Funding is also provided through Capital Projects for local jurisdiction highway and regional arterial projects based on funding agreements with the Commission. Approximately 68% of the Commission's FY 2010/11 budget originates in this department managed by the Toll, Project Delivery, and Project Development Directors responsible for the capital program. The primary goal of Capital Projects is to accelerate delivery of the Measure A, toll, state, and federally funded highway, regional arterial, and rail capital improvement projects throughout the County. Highway improvements currently in progress include the addition of mixed flow and carpool lanes and tolled Express Lanes, widening and realignment projects, and interchange improvements as well as planning for new CETAP corridors. Regional arterial capital improvements include funding for Western County TUMF regional arterial projects. Commuter rail capital improvements include the expansion of commuter rail service in Riverside County, increased train storage • • 301 • • • facilities, parking improvements at the commuter rail stations, and station rehabilitation and security projects. This department also provides the necessary coordination between the Commission and Cattrans for the development of scope, cost, and project delivery schedules for Measure A projects that are funded by the STIP and Proposition 1B CMIA. Capital Projects also has lead agency status over certain demonstration projects identified in SAFETEA-LU. The 2009 Measure A program includes funding to the incorporated cities and the County for local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction. The budgeted amount is set by formula established in the Measure A TIP. To be eligible to receive these Measure A funds, each city in the Westem County and Coachella Valley areas and the County must participate in the TUMF program, which is administered by WRCOG in Westem County and by CVAG in Coachella Valley. Additionally, for Westem County jurisdictions, they must also participate in the MSHCP. Annually all cities and the County are required to submit a five-year capital improvement plan and meet an MOE requirement. Each jurisdiction's respective allocation is based on population (Western County and Palo Verde Valley) or dwelling unit (Coachella Valley) and the amount of sales tax generated. The city of La Quinta does not participate in the Coachella Valley TUMF Program, and the city of Beaumont was determined to be in noncompliance with the Western County TUMF program. Accordingly, La Quinta's Measure A allocation is remitted to CVAG in lieu of the TUMF, and Beaumont's Measure A allocation is transferred to the Commission's Measure A regional arterial program. Given the support required to oversee and participate in the project development work, costs for Commission staff and related support have been included in this department budget. The projects identified in the FY 2010i11 budget funded by Measure A, TUMF, state, or federal funds as well as future toll revenues require the continued support of the Bechtel program management team which includes program managers, project engineers, construction engineers, inspectors, contracts administration, and support staff. Right of Way Acquisition and Support Services The primary goal of the Right of Way Management Division is to deliver right of way in the most cost effective manner and within project schedules, while adhering to federal and state regulations. Commission staff required to supervise and manage right of way services and related support for individual projects are included in the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department budget. The Commission authorized the development of a Right of Way Acquisition Program in 2006. To implement the Commission's directive, staff procured the services of on -call right of way consultant services in the fields of title and escrow, right of way engineering and surveying, environmental assessment, appraisal and appraisal review, acquisition and relocation, feasibility studies and cost estimates, property management, and utilities 302 relocation. These consultants are managed and supervised by the Right of Way Management Division. Property Management The Commission strives to manage its real property with the objective of maximizing existing and future public transportation benefits, safety, and income by means of professional property management policies and procedures. This includes issuing licenses and rights of entry for authorized third -party uses, as well as investigating and resolving issues regarding uses that are not authorized by the Commission. On certain occasions, the Commission may also grant easements. General maintenance activities and security measures are also part of the property management scope of work on all Commission -owned properties. The demolition and clearance of structures and other improvements on acquired property, excluding commuter rail stations, is included in the property management function. Additionally, the Commission must manage real property acquired for a project until it is required for construction. Since 1990, the Commission has acquired property assets in the course of rail and highway project implementation. To date, the rail properties number over 225 parcels. The Commission acquired approximately 500 parcels for the SR-74 widening project (Segments 1 and 2), and most of these parcels, which were related to Segment 1, have been transferred to Caltrans. In addition approximately 40 properties have been acquired for the Mid County Parkway, SR-79 realignment, Perris Valley Line, and the SR-60 HOV lanes/I-215 to Redlands Boulevard projects. These properties were acquired in fee, and some will be transferred primarily to Caltrans upon completion of the projects. Upon project completion, all remaining properties within every project are reassessed and deemed surplus when it has been determined that the continued retention of the property no longer supports the Commission's policy goals and objectives. Long -Term Strategic Planning Several years ago, the strategic plan for the 1989 Measure A highway program was updated and provided the guidance for completion of the 1989 Measure A highway projects. A significant effort was completed in December 2006 to develop an implementation plan strategy for the 2009 Measure A state highway program, with a focus on the first 10 years of the program through 2019. An objective -based assessment of the Western County portion of the 2009 Measure A TIP was completed along with the prioritization of the program of projects. Four highway corridors, 1-215, I- 15, 1-10, and SR-91, were selected as the priority focus for the first 10 years of the 2009 Measure A program, and long-term development work was approved for large scale projects such as the development of the Mid County Parkway, realignment of SR-79, and the bicounty widening of 1-215 to San Bernardino County. Project development activities for these projects have been ongoing. • • • 303 • • • As a result of the recession and related decline in Measure A revenues, staff recently updated project costs and anticipated funding. After several months of review of funding issues with an ad hoc committee, an update and reprioritization of the Westem Riverside County Delivery Plan was presented to the Commission at its annual workshop in January 2010. Various actions were taken on the four priority highway projects (SR-91, 1-10, 1-15, and 1-215). Four of the 1-215 corridor projects were selected as a top priority (1-215 south and central segments, 1-215 Bi-county Gap Closure, and French Valley interchange), while the 1-215 north segment was deferred to a later year. Preliminary engineering and environmental clearance activities for the 1-15 corridor project will be completed; however, final design will be deferred for a few years. A scope reevaluation and related project reassessment is expected to be completed in July 2010. The 1-10 truck climbing lanes project was deferred several years. The SR-91 corridor projects will continue to move forward with a phased implementation plan, and alternative funding options will continue to be explored. For the strategic projects, preliminary engineering and environmental clearance will be completed for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment; right of way acquisition for Mid County will be considered for extraordinary acquisitions on a pay-as-you-go basis, while right of way acquisitions for SR-79 realignment will be suspended due to lack of available funding. Updated capital project implementation strategic plans are expected in 2019 and 2029, as required by the 2009 Measure A. CVAG has developed a strategic plan for Coachella Valley highway and regional arterial projects based upon a transportation project prioritization study that is updated periodically. The Perris Valley Line is the most significant rail capital project, and it was included in the 1989 and 2009 Measure A programs. Other rail capital projects are developed in coordination with SCRRA as well as the implementation of the Perris Valley Line. Four new transportation corridors were identified through CETAP and are eligible for 2009 Measure A new corridor and TUMF CETAP funding. TUMF regional arterial projects were approved in 2004 based on a call for projects, which is discussed in the Planning and Programming Department. These strategic planning activities play a significant part of the Commission's annual budget process, in particular the capital budget. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue its emphasis on the closeout of the 1989 Measure A program, • The Western Riverside County Delivery Plan serves as the basis for defining the 2009 Measure A project selection and prioritization. • Western County TUMF regional arterial project costs are based on the list of projects approved by the Commission in 2004. • Agreements for the advancement of 2009 Measure A funds have been obtained from CVAG and cities desiring to participate in the commercial paper program. The 304 annual principal and interest payments for these loans will be deducted by the Commission from each agency's respective disbursements based on the terms of the loan agreements. • Highway project costs are based on engineers' estimates and scope agreements with Caltrans. • Construction projects are competitively bid to minimize costs. • All projects will be built to required standards. • All highway projects, with the exception of tolled Express Lane facilities, are transferred upon completion to Caltrans; operation of these facilities is the responsibility of Caltrans. Tolled Express Lane facilities, when completed, will be operated and maintained by the Commission through the term of a future agreement between Caltrans and the Commission. • The Commission will develop strategies to implement alternative financing structures including public toll roads. • 2009 Measure A regional arterial projects will be selected and programmed when revenues are at a level that can sustain reasonable cash flow to fund the projects selected for this program. • Development of the SR-79 realignment and Mid County Parkway strategic projects through preliminary engineering and environmental clearance will continue. Accomplishments • Continued implementation of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. • Completed the project report and environmental process and substantially completed final design for 1-215 south segment widening from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Scott Road. • Obtained federal and state tolling authority for the SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvement projects. • Selected a project and construction manager and issued limited notice to proceed for the design -build phase of the SR-91 corridor improvements project. • Made substantial progress on the project report and environmental studies for the following projects: ■ SR-91 corridor improvement project (65% complete); ■ 1-15 corridor improvement project (65% complete); ■ SR-71/SR-91 interchange connectors project (70% complete); ■ 1-215 central segment widening project from Scott Road to Nuevo Road; and ■ 1-215 Bi-County HOV project. • Completed 95% of final design and continued right of way acquisitions and utility relocations for the SR-91 HOV lanes project through Riverside from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange. • Completed final design and right of way acquisition for the 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connector project. • Completed final design and right of way acquisition for the 74/215 interchange project and began construction phase. • Began design of SR-74 curve widening project. • • • 305 • • • • Modified the project limits for the proposed Mid County Parkway project in response to public comment on the draft environmental document. • Made substantial progress related to the environmental process for the SR-79 realignment project. • Continued successful negotiations with the FTA related to the Small Starts funding authorization for the Perris Valley Line. • Substantially completed preliminary engineering for Perris Valley Line project. • Completed construction on the parking structure project at the North Main Corona station. • Completed construction of the Perris Station Transit Center. • Completed the demolition and clearance of structures for the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector and SR-91 HOV lanes project. • Supported public outreach activities by providing graphics from the right of way project management database for Commission presentations to facilitate public understanding of project issues. • Declared property no longer needed for transportation purposes as surplus. Major Initiatives FY 2010/11 will mark the second year as the Commission closes out the 1989 Measure A programs and continues project activities related to the 2009 Measure A programs, of which the highway, rail, regional arterial, and local streets and roads programs represent the majority of the funding allocations. While most of the 1989 Measure A highway projects have been completed, a few projects will continue such as the SR-91 HOV lanes from Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange, SR-74 curve widening, 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors, and interchange improvements at SR-91/La Sierra Avenue, SR-91Nan Buren Boulevard, and SR-60Nalley Way. The 1-215 Bi-County HOV Gap Closure Project and Perris Valley Line rail projects will continue, as both are also included in the 2009 Measure A. Various stages of project development work for projects included in the Western County Highway Delivery Plan will continue in FY 2010/11. Implementation of tolling facilities within the SR-91 and 1-15 corridors, two major projects in the Western County Highway Delivery Plan, requires obtaining tolling authority from state and federal jurisdictions. Efforts to obtain this authority include successful passage of state legislation, approval of state and federal tolling authority applications, and administrative approval from Ca!trans and FHWA. In September 2008, SB 1316 and AB 1954 were successfully passed and signed into law by the Governor providing state tolling authority. Federal tolling authority was granted by FHWA via the Value Pricing Pilot Program in July 2009 for the 1-15 and via Section 129, Title 23 of the United States Code in August 2009 for the SR-91 corridor improvement projects. Detailed descriptions of the capital projects, including local streets and roads funding, that are included in the FY 2010/11 budget follows the Performance/Workload Indicators. 306 Department Goals Build upon and strengthen the partnership with Caltrans toward timely delivery of identified Measure A, CMIA, toll program, and STIP projects. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship, Economic Development) Objectives: • Develop agreements with Caltrans and FHWA, as may be required, to finalize project scoping and cost issues for the STIP, federal demonstration, toll, and Measure A funded highway projects in Riverside County. • Provide quarterly contract status and cost schedule reports to the Commission and Caltrans. • Meet the project milestones identified in the CMIA agreements between Commission, Caltrans, and the CTC. To the extent permitted by law, pursue reasonable involvement of local DBE firms and minority and women business enterprises in contract work. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Maintain goal for a minimum DBE participation in all federally funded contracts. Continue to review quarterly report on DBE participation levels. Provide effective communication of project progress to the Commission board members, city councils, the County Board of Supervisors, Caltrans, CTC, FTA. and FHWA. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Develop a strategy with Caltrans District 8 that would allow the Commission to advance specific projects identified in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan to take advantage of any unexpected state or federal funding which may become available through increased state or federal budget authorizations, federal stimulus or potential loan programs to advance construction. Work with Caltrans and other agencies toward completion of preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of all projects. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objective: • Work with Caltrans, the County, and the cities in Riverside County to complete preliminary design and environmental clearance for Measure A projects that could be eligible to receive additional or early funding from various sources that could become available if a project is sufficiently developed. • Release for public review and comment the updated NEPA and CEQA environmental documents for the Perris Valley Line. • Circulate for public review the draft project level environmental document related to the SR-79 realignment project. • • 307 • • • • Complete the Project Approval and Environmental Document for the 71/91 interchange connectors improvement project. Construct the highway projects identified in the budget. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Economic Development, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Continue to provide funding and support for interchange improvements along the SR-91. • Continue construction of the 74/215 interchange project. • Commence construction on the 1-215 south widening project, the first project in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan to reach construction, subject to availability and programming of State bond funds. • For the SR-91 corridor improvement project: a) secure authority to utilize the best - value design -build method of project delivery to advance the project schedule, b) start design -builder industry outreach and procurement of the design -build contractor, and c) adopt the locally preferred project alternative. In coordination with the Rail Program Manager, construct capital improvements at existing commuter rail stations as identified in the budget. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Environmental Stewardship, Intermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Continue advance preliminary engineering, complete environmental clearance and final design, and start right of way acquisition for the Perris Valley Line. • Continue various station rehabilitation and security projects. • Complete engineering and commence construction of Riverside Downtown station layover facility. • Complete engineering and construction of the La Sierra station parking expansion. Acquire right of way for rail and highway projects identified in the budget. (Policy Goal: Mobility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Acquire right of way for the following projects: Mid County Parkway, SR-91 HOV lanes project, and Perris Valley Line. • Protect and maintain properties acquired for future projects. Commence advance right of way acquisition for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. (Policy Goal: Mobility, Financial & Administration) • Ensure compliance with federal and state regulations goveming advanced acquisition. • Provide cost estimates and other right of way support services through the environmental phase of the project. 308 Identify alternative financing strategies in order to fully fund projects identified in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objectives: • Continue the assessment and evaluation of available strategies. • Support efforts to develop design -build legislation. Location of Major FY 2010/11 Projects within Riverside County INSERT MAP HERE 1) SR-74 Final design and right of way acquisition for the curve widening on SR-74 from Calvert Avenue to California Avenue. 2) 74/215 Construction of the interchange. 3) SR-79 Realignment between Gilman Springs Road and Domenigoni Parkway including project study report, project report, and environmental document. 4) SR-91 (A) Construction of interchange improvements at Van Buren Avenue. (B) Final design, right of way acquisition, utility relocation, and advertisement for construction for HOV lanes from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange. (C) Preliminary engineering and environmental studies for improvements to the 71/91 interchange. (D) Preliminary engineering, environmental studies, and design -build procurement. for toll and mixed flow lanes from SR-241 to Pierce Street in the city of Riverside. 5) SR-111 6) Mid County Parkway 7) Perris Valley Line Construction of intersection improvements by the city of Cathedral City. Preliminary engineering, project report, and environmental documentation for the project. Advanced preliminary engineering and right of way acquisition for the Perris Valley Line (Riverside - Moreno Valley -Perris) along the SJBL. • • 309 • • • 8) Local Streets and Roads Allocation of Measure A revenues to each city and the County to improve, maintain, and repair high priority local streets and roads. 9) 60/215 Construction of the East Junction HOV lane connectors. 10)1-215 Bi-County HOV Gap Closure Project 11) 1-215 12) 1-15 13) La Sierra Station Parking Expansion Preliminary engineering, environmental document, and at -risk design for the interim project to provide two HOV lanes on the 1-215 from the 60/91/215 interchange to Orange Show Road in San Bemardino County. (A) Complete final design and begin construction for the south segment from 1-15 to Scott Road, (B) Preliminary engineering and environmental document preparation for segments from Scott Road to Nuevo Road. Preparation of engineering and environmental document for the addition of mixed flow, HOV, and tolled Express Lanes from SR-60 to 1-215 in Temecula. Final design and construction for parking expansion to accommodate public bus connections and provide park and ride facilities for commuters. 14) Riverside Downtown Environmental, engineering and right of way activities for train layover facility. Layover Facility Capital Project Development & Delivery Performance/Workload Indicators FY 08109 Actual FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10111 Projected Preliminary Engineering (project reports and environmental documentation) Contracts awarded 5 1 0 Plans, specifications, and estimates contracts awarded 3 3 1 Number of projects with active right of way acquisition 3 2 5 Construction awards 2 3 4 Highway and Rail project close-outs 4 4 6 License agreements managed 42 55 50 Appraisals completed 146 120 121 Appraisal reviews completed _ 143 122 121 Right of Way on -call consultants: 3 2 2 Title and escrow services 3 3 3 Survey and right of way engineering 3 3 3 Appraisers 5 6 6 310 Appraisal reviewers 3 5 5 Acquisition/relocation 3 2 2 Environmental assessment 5- 5 5 Furniture, fixture, and equipment appraisers 2 2 2 Goodwill appraisers 2 2 2 Property management 3 2 2 Capital Projects Summary The following is a summary of the capital projects included in the FY 2010/11 budget. Costs are generally categorized by preliminary engineering, final design, right of way, construction, and design -build phases in addition to other project -related costs such as salaries and benefits, Bechtel project management, and legal fees. Western County Highway and Regional Arterial Projects SR-60Nalley Way (P003032) Provide funding and support to start construction to improve interchange at Valley Way. This project is expected to be completed in 2011. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 1,000,000 Construction Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds with the County as lead agency. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-74/1-15 to 7th Street (P003001) Complete right of way acquisition closeout for Segment II related to the realignment and widening of four -lane roadway between Wasson Canyon Road in the city of Lake Elsinore and 7th Street in the city of Perris. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 3,150,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 36,600 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. • 311 • • • 74/215 Interchange (P003015) Preliminary engineering began in 2006 and was completed in 2009. Final design was completed in 2009. Construction of the project is expected to begin in mid-2010 and be completed in 2012. The total project cost is estimated at $41 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 75,000 Engineering $11,170,000 Construction $ 1,285,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 366,300 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds, TUMF zone contributions, ARRA funds, and a federal earmark. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-74 Curve Widening (P003009) Complete preliminary design, final design, and right of way acquisition. Preliminary engineering began in 2009. Construction of the project should begin by the end of 2011. The total estimated project cost is $ 4.2 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 20,000 Construction $ 1,460,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 103,700 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-79 Realignment (P003003 & P005127) Perform realignment environmental and preliminary engineering services from Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway. The total estimated project cost is $1.2 billion. The project is expected to be completed with the environmental phase in 2012. Initiation of subsequent phases will be dependent upon the availability of funding. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 2,000,000 Preliminary engineering $ 4,250,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 228,200 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact None; costs have been funded using TUMF regional arterial, federal earmarks, and SAFETEA-LU federal funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 312 SR-91 Corridor Improvements (P003026 & P003028) Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental study phase and the design - build phase for the toll and mixed flow lanes project from SR-241 to Pierce Street, including tolled Express Lanes connectivity to 1-15 and improvements to the SR-91/I-15 interchange. The SR-91 corridor improvements project cost is estimated at $1.3 billion, and project development activities began in September 2007. The project is expected to be completed and open to traffic in December 2016. FY 2010/11 Cost $11,523,000 Preliminary engineering $27,000,000 Right of way acquisition $23,000,000 Design -build $ 4,020,300 Other project -related costs, including toll feasibility work Measure A Budget Impact Project development costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as advance funding of 2009 Measure A highway funds. Toll revenue bonds are expected to be issued in late 2011/early 2012 to provide project financing and reimburse the 2009 Measure A for toll -related project costs not covered by the 2009 Measure A. A federal Transportation Investment Finance Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan is also anticipated to be secured concurrent with the toll revenue bonds to complete the funding plan. Operating Budget Impact Operation and maintenance of future tolled Express Lanes facilities are the responsibility of the Commission, while all other state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Preliminary estimates of annual operating and maintenance costs are $7,800,000. Such costs will be paid from the collection of toll revenues. 71/91 Connectors (P003021) Complete preliminary engineering and environmental studies in December 2010, and potentially start final design for interchange improvements to the 71/91 interchange when funding becomes available. The total estimated project cost is $126 million. Preliminary engineering began in February 2008. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 676,200 Preliminary engineering $ 2,400,000 Final design $ 197,800 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using STIP-RIP funds and commercial paper proceeds as advance funding of 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. • • • 313 • SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 Interchange (PO03005) Continue final design and right of way acquisitions. Preliminary engineering began in 2001. Construction of the project should be completed in the summer of 2015. The estimated total project cost is $273 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 195,000 Final design $24,680,300 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 479,500 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Final design costs will be funded using LONP funds received and CMAQ with 1989 Measure A highway funds for local match. Right of way costs will be funded using STIP-RIP, Traffic Congestion Relief Program, CMAQ, and 1989 Measure A highway funds. CMAQ and CMIA funds generated by Proposition 1 B will be used for construction activities. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-91/La Sierra Avenue Interchange (PO03014) Provide funding and support to start construction to widen and fully improve La Sierra Avenue from SR-91 to El Sobrante Road. This project is expected to be completed in 2010. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 200,000 Construction Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds with the city of Riverside as lead agency. The Measure A funding commitment for this project was $27.2 million. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway and regional arterial operations are the responsibility of Caltrans and the local jurisdiction, respectively. SR-91Nan Buren Boulevard Interchange (PO03008) Provide funding and support for construction to widen and fully improve the interchange at Van Buren Boulevard. This project is expected to be completed in 2011. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 5,000,000 Construction Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds with the city of Riverside as lead agency. The Measure A funding commitment for this project was $7.6 million. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway and regional arterial operations are the responsibility of Caltrans and the local jurisdiction, respectively. 314 1-15 Corridor Improvements (PO03027) Continue preliminary engineering and environmental studies to add two tolled Express Lanes and one mixed flow lane in each direction from SR-60 to SR-74 and to add one HOV lane in each direction from SR-74 to 1-215. Preliminary engineering and environmental work started in April 2008 and is scheduled for completion in fall 2012. Project development beyond preliminary engineering for final design and construction is dependent upon the ongoing toll feasibility studies and are not currently budgeted. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 9,000,000 Preliminary engineering $ 1,360,300 Other project -related costs, including toll feasibility work Measure A Budget Impact Project development costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds, including commercial paper proceeds as advance funding. It is anticipated that toll revenue bonds will be issued in the future to provide project financing and reimburse the 2009 Measure A for toll -related project costs not covered by the 2009 Measure A. Operating Budget Impact Operation and maintenance of future tolled Express Lanes facilities are the responsibility of the Comrnission, while all other federal and state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Preliminary estimates of annual operating and maintenance costs are $15 million. Such costs will be paid from the collection of toll revenues. 60/215 East Junction HOV Lane Connectors (PO03017) Complete final design and right of way acquisition. Preliminary engineering began in 2006. Construction of the project is expected to be completed by 2012. The total project cost is estimated at $59 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 47,500 Final design $ 1,403,000 Construction $ 84,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 161,200 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using CMAQ and STP funds with 1989 Measure A highway funds for local match for final design. STP funds with 1989 Measure A highway funds for local match funds will be used for right of way. STP and CMAQ, with STIP-RIP and STIP-IIP for local match funds, as well as lease proceeds will be used for construction. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 315 • • • 1-215 Corridor Improvements (South Segment)/1-15 to Scott Road (P003022) Continue final design to add one mixed flow lane in each direction. Preliminary engineering began in 2007 and was completed in 2008. Final design began in 2008. Construction of the project is expected to begin in early 2011 and finish in 2013. The total project cost is estimated at $64 million. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 100,000 Preliminary engineering/environmental $ 1,250,000 Final design $12,275,000 Construction $ 10,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 347,000 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using STIP-RIP funds and 2009 Measure A highway funds; CMIA funds generated by Proposition 1 B bonds will be used for construction activities. N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 1-215 Corridor Improvements (Central Segment)/Scott Road to Nuevo Road (P003023) Continue preliminary engineering and environmental documentation to add one mixed flow lane in each direction. Preliminary engineering began in 2007. Final design is expected to begin in 2011, and construction will begin two years later. Construction of the project is expected to be completed by 2016. The total project cost is estimated at $188 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 1,800,000 Preliminary engineering $ 5,000,000 Final design $ 2,550,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 250,100 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using STIP-RIP funds and 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 316 1-215 Southbound to 1-15 Connector Widening Gap Closure (P003031) Commence preliminary engineering to widen southbound connector to I-15, which is expected to begin in 2010 with construction expected to be completed by 2012. The total project cost is estimated at $8.5 million. FY 2010/11. Cost $ 550,000 Preliminary engineering $ 58,200 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 1-215 Bi-county Project (PO03012) Continue to fund the Project Study Report and EIR/EIS on the 1-215 North from the city of Riverside to the San Bernardino County line through a cooperative agreement with SANBAG. Preliminary engineering began in 2003. Construction of the project should be completed by 2040. The total estimated project cost is $1.4 billion. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 500,000 Preliminary engineering/environmental $ 18,400 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Current phase costs of this project will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 1-215 Bi-county HOV Interim Project (P003030) Continue to fund preliminary engineering phase to add one HOV lane in each direction on the 1-215 North from the city of Riverside to the San Bernardino County line through a cooperative agreement with SANBAG, which has a match up project north from the San Bernardino County line to 1-10. Preliminary engineering began in 2009. Final design is expected in 2012. Construction is estimated to be completed by 2014. The total project cost is $167 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 741,200 Preliminary engineering/environmental $ 1,248,000 Final design $ 36,500 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 317 • • Mid County Parkway (P002302 & P005123) Perform activities related to the development of a recirculated project report and environmental document for a new corridor from 1-215 to SR-79. This phase is anticipated to be completed in 2012. Construction of this new facility will be completed over many years as funding becomes available and is estimated to cost $1.6 billion. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 1,050,000 Preliminary engineering/environmental $ 6,100,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 429,700 Other project -related costs and uses Costs will be funded with TUMF CETAP funds and 2009 Measure A new corridor funds. N/A; responsibility for highway operations has not been determined. Various Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Projects (P005101, P005102, P005103, P005104, P005105, P005106, P005107, P005108, P005113, P005114, P005115, P005116, P005118, P005119, P005120, P005121, P005125,& P005128) Provide TUMF funding and support for the engineering, right of way, and construction activities related to various Westem County TUMF regional arterial projects approved by the Commission in September 2004 following a call for projects. Total project costs approved for TUMF regional arterial projects approximate $73 million. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 5,846,700 Engineering and design $13,147,200 Construction $23,625,200 Right of way acquisition $ 162,000 Other project -related costs None; costs will be funded using TUMF regional arterial funds with various local jurisdictions as lead agency for their respective projects. N/A; regional arterial operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdictions. 318 • • • Coachella Valley Highway and Regional Arterial Projects SR-111 City Project (PO03413) Provide funding and support to complete signal and local intersection widening improvements along SR-111 and SR-86 as a result of the cooperatively programmed 1989 Measure A highway program funds by the Commission and CVAG. In 2003 nine projects were approved for 1989 Measure A highway funding. As amended in December 2007, total funding of these projects approximates $24.4 million. Substantially all of the projects have been completed, with the exception of one project which is expected to be completed in FY 2011/11 and a project for which sufficient funds are not available. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 625,5 Costs will funds with project. N/A; state Caltrans. 00 Construction project in the city of Cathedral City be funded using 1989 Measure A highway city of Cathedral City as lead agency for its highway operations are the responsibility of MSHCP Land Acquisition in Coachella Valley (PO08100) Provide funding and support for the acquisition of land as mitigation for the cumulative and indirect impacts associated with construction of future highway and regional arterial projects as required by 2009 Measure A under an advance funding agreement with CVAG. In September 2005 the Commission approved the advance funding of 2009 Measure A highway and regional arterial funds in the amount of $15.025 million for CVAG's land mitigation acquisitions. CVAG began expending these funds in FY 2008/09 following completion of federal permit and other matters. As of June 30, 2010, the projected remaining funding commitment for this project is approximately $7.7 million. FY 201011 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 6,270,000 Land acquisition Costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as advance funding of 2009 Measure A highway and regional arterial funds. N/A; land mitigation operations are the responsibility of CVAG. 320 Various Coachella Valley Highway and Regional Arterial Projects (P318100) Provide funding and support for the Monterey Avenue corridor in Rancho Mirage and Jackson Street, Avenue 42, and Jefferson Street in Indio under an advance funding agreement with CVAG. In September 2005 the Commission approved the advance funding of 2009 Measure A highway and regional arterial funds in the amount of $28.275 million for nine regional transportation projects in the cities of Coachella, Indio, Palm Desert, and Rancho Mirage and the County. As of June 30, 2010, the projected remaining funding commitments for these projects are approximately $13.5 million. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 6,500,000 Construction Costs will be funded using commercial paper proceeds as an advance of 2009 Measure A regional arterial funds with the cities of Indio and Rancho Mirage as lead agencies for their respective projects. N/A; regional arterial operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdictions. Rail Projects Perris Valley Line and Other Related Projects (P003800, P003823, P003824, P003825, and P003827) Continue advanced preliminary engineering and right of way acquisition and complete environmental clearance for extension of commuter rail services to Perris. Project commenced in December 2007 when the Commission received approval from FTA to move into project development. Other related projects include adding a fourth main track between the Riverside Downtown station to the connector to the SJBL branch line at Highgrove as well as right of way acquisition. Expected cornpletion date is December 2012 for a total project cost of $233 million. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 3,285,000 Engineering/support services $ 3,150,000 Final design $20,300,000 Construction/support services $21,835,600 Right of way acquisition/support services $10,628,200 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using FTA and 1989 Measure A rail funds as well as proceeds from sales of surplus properties. Subsequent year costs will also include STIP funding. Rail station operations related to this project, which will be the responsibility of the Commission upon completion of the project, will be funded with LTF and property management fees. Rail service and capital operations will be the responsibility of Metrolink and will be funded by the Commission with LTF and STA based on an allocation • • • 321 • • • determined by Metrolink. Annual station operations approximate $300,000 per station, or $1,500,000 annually in the aggregate for five proposed stations. North Main Corona Station Parking Structure (P003808) Complete construction of a 1,000 space parking structure at the North Main Corona station. Construction commenced in January 2008 with an expected completion date of June 2010 for a total construction cost of $21 million. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 33,000 Construction and support services $ 36,600 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact None; costs will be funded using STIP-IIP funds, CMAQ, STA, LTF, and FTA Section 5307 funds. Operating Budget Impact Operations of this parking structure will be the responsibility of the Commission. Annual operating costs are estimated at $300,000 to be funded with LTF. La Sierra Station Parking Expansion (PD03826) Commence final design and construction for the parking expansion at the La Sierra station to accommodate public bus transit connections and provide park and ride facilities for commuters. Construction is expected to be completed by December 2011. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 30,000 Engineering $ 2,000,000 Construction $ 59,200 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using Proposition 1 B PTMISEA and 1989 Measure A rail and commuter assistance funds. Operating Budget Impact Operations of this parking expansion will be the responsibility of the Commission. Annual operating costs are estimated at $100,000 to be funded with LTF. Riverside Downtown Layover Facility (P003822) Commence environmental, preliminary engineering, final design, and right of way activities for a Riverside Downtown station layover facility. Project development activities commenced in April 2010, and the project is expected to be completed by 2011. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 1,400,000 Preliminary engineering $ 400,000 Final design $ 50,000 Construction/support services $ 266,800 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A rail funds. Operating Budget Impact Operations of the layover facility will be assumed by Metrolink upon completion. 322 Station Rehabilitation and Security Projects (P004011 & PO04012) Continue various station rehabilitation and security projects. In April 2008, the Commission approved the Commuter Rail Station Rehabilitation Maintenance Plan with initial phase costs estimated at $2.5 million. The Commission approved a Comprehensive Station Security Upgrade Program in July 2008 at an estimated cost of $368,000. Several contracts have been awarded and are in progress. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 100,000 Final design (rehabilitation) $ 1,500,000 Construction (rehabilitation) $ 332,000 Other project -related costs (rehabilitation) $ 161,700 Other project -related costs (security) Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using LTF capital, Measure A rail, and Proposition 1 B PTMISEA and CTSGP-CTAF funds. Operating Budget Impact Operating costs at the stations, which are the responsibility of the Commission, are expected to decrease as a result of the rehabilitation projects; however, the savings have not yet been determined. Local Streets and Roads Annually monitor the MOE requirements to ensure local agencies are expending funds according to the 2009 Measure A ordinance. Review local agency 5-year capital improvement plans to ensure Measure A funds are expended on eligible local street and road projects. Western County Area Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Western County. FY 2010/11 Cost $ 351,000 Banning 0 Beaumont 93,000 Calimesa 117,000 Canyon Lake 2,468,000 Corona 1,022,000 Hemet 717,000 Lake Elsinore 746,000 Menifee 2,270,000 Moreno Valley 1,339,000 Murrieta 416,000 Norco 729,000 Perris 4,366,000 Riverside 434,000 San Jacinto 1,768,000 Temecula 349,000 Wildomar • • 323 • • • 4,742,000 Riverside County 416,000 Commission $22,343,000 Total Westem County Measure A Budget Impact All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. Coachella Valley Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Coachella Valley. FY 2010/11 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact Palo Verde Valley Area $ 936,000 422,000 282,000 167,000 1,098,000 0 1,800,000 1,288,000 635,000 1,166,000 1,009,000 8,803,000 (673,400) $ 8,129,600 Cathedral City Coachella Desert Hot Springs Indian Wells Indio La Quinta Palm Desert Palm Springs Rancho Mirage Riverside County CVAG Total Coachella Valley Less: debt service payments Total Coachella Valley, net All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Palo Verde Valley. FY 2009/10 Cost $ 606,000 Blythe 144,000 Riverside County 750,000 Total Palo Verde Valley (236,200) Less: debt service payments $ 513,800 Total Palo Verde Valley, net Measure A Budget Impact All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. 324 • • • See tion 7 0E1 rEn arav cpolEl 326 • Community Profile Riverside County is the fourth largest county in California, stretching westward nearly 200 miles from the Colorado River and comprising more than 7200 square miles that include 26 incorporated cities. This includes the newly -incorporated cities of Menifee and Wildomar. Riverside County can trace its beginning back to 1893 when voters approved the formation of a new county. The area was carved from parts of San Bemardino and San Diego counties. In its 115 years of existence, the County's economy has diversified and prospered. Originally, Riverside County was a very agricultural area, known for a wide variety of crops grown on its fertile soils. The County remains a strong agricultural area, but it is increasingly becoming a leader in manufacturing, transportation, construction, and tourism. Demographics The success of the area has brought dramatic population growth to Riverside County (Chart 39). Since the 1980's, the County has been one of the fastest growing counties in the state. The available and affordable housing in Riverside County has attracted many people to the County; however, a housing slowdown has occurred in recent years primarily as a result of the effect of the subprime mortgages, ensuing credit crisis, and recession (Chart 40). During the growth period, jobs also increased as many firms relocated to the area and moved away from older communities; however, the current economic slowdown has caused the County's unemployment rate to rise from its near alkime lows (Chart 41). The overall economic outlook for Riverside County is expected to improve in 2011 based on various economic forecasts. The area is preparing for its future as well in supporting better education. The County is home to a number of colleges and universities including University of California, Riverside. Chart 39 - Population — Last Ten Years 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 Source: California Department of Finance 328 Chart 40 — Home Price Advantage Home Value Advantage Riverside County and Southern California Markets (April, 2010i Riverside Les Angeles San Diego County Chart 41 — Unemployment Rate (%) — Last Ten Years SODrCe: California Employment Development Department Retail Sales Ventura Orange As a result of demographic changes and growth, retail sales in the County increased through 2006 (Chart 42 and Table 51); however, the effect of the recession on retail sales was noted in sales tax receipts beginning in 2007. 329 • Chart 42 — Retail Sates (%) - $26 Billion — 2008 Data Apparel Stores 4.31% Specially Stores 4.02% Food Stores 4.82% Household 3.14% Building Materials 5.52% Table 51—Riverside Coun Apparel Stores General Merchandise Specialty Stores Food Stores Eating& Drinking Household Building Materials Automotive Other Retail Sales Total all other services & outlets Source: State Board of Equalization Taxable Sales by Business Type (in 000's) — Last Five Years 1,171,013 $ 1,080,385 $ 990,129 $ 867,276 3,593,134 3,553,554 3,304,474 3,026,335 1,210,642 2,262,442 2,104,040 1,885,435 1,352,609 1,309,782 1,197,438 1,079,972 2,388,039 2,316,422 2,157,801 1,940,610 843,945 948,217 964,629 862,551 1,961,911 2,390,236 2,424,898 2,226,117 7,137,075 6,956,756 6,751,648 6,035,203 1,584,148 1,024,551 944,155 792,450 7,781,093 7,973,892 7,417,279 6,521,199 29,023,609 $ 29,816,237 $ 28,256,491 $ 25,237,148 The 2008 taxable sales generation by jurisdiction in the County, including ranking compared to 1999, is presented in Table 52. 330 Table 52 —Taxable Sales Generation by Jurisdiction in Riverside County for 20081 City of Riverside City of Corona City of Temecula City of Palm Desert City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Hemet City of Palm Springs City of La Qulnta City of Indio City of Cathedral City City of Lake Elsinore City of Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Norco City of Coachella City of Beaumont City of Banning City of San Jacinto City of Blythe City of Desert Hot Springs City of Indian Wells City of Calimesa City of Wiidomar City of Canyon Lake City of Menifee Incorporated Unincorporated county area Countywide California _ r $ r_ 4,093,218 15.7% 2,994,438 11.5% 2,307,072 8.9% 1,447,663 5.6% 1,154,650 4.4% 972,575 3.7% 840,655 3.2% 826,056 3.2% 731,831 2.8% 673,527 2.6% 649,612 2.5% 639,732 2.5% 562,025 2.2% 438,400 1.7% 436,753 1.7% 307,494 1.2% 270,480 1.0% 193,333 0.7% 192,541 0.7% 160,476 0.6% 91,671 0.4% 91,534 0.4% 54,285 0.2% 23,983 0.1% 12,300 0.0% 0.0% 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 3 5 4 6 13 8 9 16 10 7 11 14 15 12 19 20 17 21 18 23 22 24 N/A 25 N/A 20,166,304 5,837,291 22.4% 1 1 5 26,003,595 37800.0% $ 531,653,540 Source: California State Board of Equalization 1 Tex represents most recent data sea ileble Measure A Sales Taxes Measure A is a one-half of one cent transaction and use tax for transportation improvements in Riverside County. The County had a 7.75% sales tax rate including the Measure A rate through March 2009 and 8.75% thereafter (Table 53). Table 53 — Direct and Overlapping Sales Tax Rates — Last Five Years Source: Commission Finance Department and California State Board of Equalization • • 331 • During the recent economic slowdown, changes have occurred in the economic categories in which the Measure A sales tax was generated (Table 54). For several calendar years transportation represented the highest economic category, and construction, which was comprised of the building materials wholesale and building materials retail segments, was a significant contributor. In 2009 general retail was the largest economic category, and transportation and construction experienced significant declines due to the recession and housing slowdown. Table 54 — Sales Tax b Economic Cate o Source: MuniServices, LLC Each economic category consists of several economic segments, which provide additional information regarding economic activity in the County. In 2006 the top five economic segments consisted of auto sales -new, department stores, building materials wholesale, service stations, and restaurants. Over the next three calendar years, auto sales -new fell from the leading economic segment to fourth and building materials wholesale dropped to sixth, while department stores and restaurants rose to the top two economic segments. The top five economic segments in 2009 with comparisons to previous years are presented in Table 55. Table 55 — Sales Tax b Source: MuniServices, LLC 332 Commission Facts Programs and Services Measure A: The Commission administers Measure A, the local half -cent sales tax for new transportation projects in the County. Under Measure A, funding is used to improve highways, commuter rail, regional arterials, local streets and roads, transit and specialized transportation services including commuter assistance, economic development, new corridors, and Commission administration. Measure A expires in 2039. Transportation Development Act: The TDA is comprised of two elements: Local Transportation Fund and State Transit Assistance funding. The Commission administers the LTF one -quarter of one cent of the state sales tax on behalf of the County. STA is generated from the statewide sales tax on gasoline and diesel fuel and is allocated by the State to the Commission on the basis of population and as a percentage of transit fare revenues. TDA funding is allocated primarily to bus and rail transit operators for transit operating and capital needs. Additionally, LTF funding is available for bicycle and pedestrian facilities, planning, and administration and allocated to the Commission and local jurisdictions in the County. Highways: The Commission assists with the planning and funding for highway improvements. Major current projects include: SR-60 East Junction to 1-215 HOV lanes connector, SR-74/G Street to 1-215 interchange, SR-79 realignment, SR-91 corridor improvement project (HOT and mixed flow lanes), SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to the SR-60/SR-91/1-215 interchange, SR-91 interchange improvements at Van Buren Avenue, 1-15 corridor improvement project, 1-215 corridor mobility improvement projects, and Mid County Parkway. State highway maintenance is the responsibility of Caltrans. Local Streets and Roads: The Commission administers funding to local jurisdictions to improve streets, intersections, signal coordination, and pavement. Local streets and roads maintenance is the responsibility of the local jurisdictions. Commuter Rail: The Commission funds and oversees Metrolink rail services within the County. The Commission's three Metrolink lines are the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 lines. The Commission owns and maintains five Metrolink stations located at: 7 Riverside Downtown Station, 4066 Vine Street, Riverside 7 La Sierra Station, 10901 Indiana Avenue, Riverside 7 Pedley Station, 6001 Pedley Road, Riverside 7 North Main Corona Station, 250 E. Blaine Street, Corona 7 West Corona Station, 155 S. Auto Center Drive, Corona Motorist Assistance: The Commission provides emergency call boxes through the SAFE and offers emergency lowing services through the FSP. Commuter Assistance: The Commission provides a variety of rideshare services both to employers and commuters. Through voluntary participation, commuters and employers receive a direct benefit from their sales tax dollars, and the entire region benefits from reduced traffic congestion and improved air quality. Specialized Transit: The Commission maintains a strong commitment to assist in the mobility of those with specialized transit needs. Through its Specialized Transit Program, the Commission has provided millions of dollars to public and nonprofit transit operators to assist in the provisions of special transit services to improve the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. • • 333 • • • •eitlk6cb Lp rX•) i::= f:r.)Ci 0 334 • • • Glossary of Acronyms AADPL — Annual Anticipated DBE Participation Level ACT — Association for Commuter Transportation ADA — Atuaicans with Disabilities Act ARRA — American Recovery and Reinvestment Act AVL — Automatic Vehicle Locator Bank of America — Bank of America, N.A. Bechtel — Bechtel Infrastructure BNSF — Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad Board — Board of Commissioners for the Riverside County Transportation Commission CAFR — Comprehensive Annual Financial Report CalPERS — California Public Employees Retirement System Caltrans — California Department of Transportation CAGTC — Coalition for America's Gateways and Trade Condors CEQA — Caifomia Environmental Quality Act CETAP — Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process CHP — California Highway Patrol CHSRA — California High Speed Rail Authority CIP — Capital Improvement Plan CMA — Congestion Management Agency CMAQ* — Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality CM1A — Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (Proposition 1B funding category) CMP — Congestion. Management Program CMS — Congestion Management System Commission — Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordinated Plan — Coordinated Public Transit —Human Services Transportation Plan County — County of Riverside CTC — California Transportation Commission tj I — Consolidated Transportation Service Agency CTSGP-CTAF — California Transit Security Grant Program —California Transit Assistance Funds (Proposition I B funding category) CVAG — Coachella Valley Association ofGovemments Deutsche Bank — Deutsche Bank AG DBE — Disadvantaged Business Enterprise DMV — Department of Motor Vehicles EIR — Environmental Impact Report EIS — Environmental Impact Study ERP — Enterprise Resource Planning ETC — Employer Transportation Coordinators FCC — Federal Communications Commission FFY Federal Fiscal Year FHWA• — Federal Highway Administration FSP — Freeway Service Patrol FTA' — Federal Transit Administration FTE — Full-time Equivalent FTIP — Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY — Fiscal Year GASB — Governmental Accounting Standards Board GFOA — Government Finance Officers Association HOV — High Occupancy Vehicle (Carpool Lane) I — Interstate ICE — Irvine -Corona Expressway IEOC — Inland Empire —Orange County Metrolink Service EP• — Interregional Improvement Program ITS — Intelligent Transportation System IVR — Interactive Voice Recognition JARC — Jobs Access Reverse Commute (FTA Section 5316) Lehman DP — Lehman Brothers Derivative Products Inc. LIBOR — London Interbank Offer Rate LOS — Level of Service 336 LTF* — Local Transportation Fund Metro — Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Metrolink — Operating Name. for SCRRA (see SCRRA) Moody's — Mobdy's Investors Service MOE — Maintenance of Effort MOU — Memorandum of Understanding MSHCP — Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan MSRC — Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (AB 2766) NEPA — National Environmental Policy Act OCTA — Orange County Transportation Authority Perris Valley Line — Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project PIP — Productivity Improvement Program Ports . — Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach PPM — Planning, Programming, and Monitoring PTC — Positive Train Control PTMISEA Public Transportation, Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (Proposition IB funding category RCA — Regional Conservation Authority RCTC — Riverside County Transportation Commission RIP* — Regional Improvement Program RTA — Riverside Transit Agency RTP — Regional Transportation Plan S&P — Standard & Poor's Rating Service SAFE — Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies SAFETEA-LU* — Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users SANDAG — San Bemardino Associated Governments SANDAG — San Diego Association of Governments SB 45 — Senate Bill 45 Kopp 1997 Transportation Funding SB 821 — LTF Bicycle and Pedestrian Funds SCAG — Southern Califomia Association of Governments SCAQMD — South Coast Air Quality Management District SCRRA — Southern Califomia Regional Rail Authority SJBL — San Jacinto Branch Line SR — State Route SRTP — Short Range Transit Plan SSAB — Salton Sea Air Basin STA* — State Transit Assistance State — S tate of Cal ifornia STIP* — State Transportation Improvement Program STP* — Surface Transportation Program SunLine — SunLine Transit Agency TCIF — Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (Proposition 1B funding category) TDA* — Transportation Development Act TE* — Transportation Enhancements TIP — Transportation improvement Plan TUMF* — Transportation/Traffic Uniform Mitigation Fee (Western County/Coachella Valley) VCTC — Ventura County Transportation Commission Western County — Western area of Riverside County WRCOG — Western Riverside Council of Governments 1989 Measure A — Original 1/2 cent transportation sales tax measure approved by voters in November 1988 2009 Measure A — Extension of sales tax measure approved by voters in November 2002 which became effective upon expiration of original sales tax measure on July 1, 2009 2009 Bonds — Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, Series A, B and C issued in October 2009 2010 Bonds — Sales Tax Revenue Bonds anticipated to be issued in November 2010 * Additional information provided in Funding Definitions. • • 337 • • • Funding Definitions Federal Fund Sources Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5309 discretionary funds generally provided to urbanized areas for funding new start rail projects, major bus fleet replacement, and transit facility construction. Matching ratios range from 50/50 to 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5307 formula fimds made available to urbanized areas for operating subsidies, capital projects and planning. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital and planning match is 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5310 funds made available to states for providing capital support to private non-profit and, in certain circumstances, public transit operators. This is a state administered discretionary program providing funds on an 88.53% federal and 11.47%local basis. Section 5311 funds provided to support rural transit operating subsidies and capital projects. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital match is 8054 federal and 20% local. Section 5316 funds provided for the development and maintenance of jobs access projects to transport welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from work during non -peak hours as well as supply reverse commute options for workers in suburban areas. Section 5317 funds made available for new public transportation services and alternatives for people with disabilities beyond the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) In 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) was approved by Congress to replace the forrner Federal Aid Urban/Federal Aid System funding programs. ISTEA was established as a six -year funding program and was reauthorized for another six years in 1997. This new transportation act was renamed as the Transportation Equity Act of the Twenty-first Century (TEA21) and was extended through August 10, 2005 when the President signed into law the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). With guaranteed funding for highways, highway safety, and public transportation totaling S244.1 billion, SAFETEA-LU represents the largest surface transportation investment in our nation's history. Under these programs the following fund sources are allocated to each county, and the Commission further allocates these funds based on federal provisions. Surface Transportation Program (STP) Funds allocated by the Commission and administered by Caltrans that provide funding for local street and road improvements. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Funds allocated by the Commission for transportation related air quality improvement projects in air quality non - attainment areas. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. Safety projects can qualify for 100% of CMAQ funding. Transportation Enhancements (TE) The amount of funds made available under this program is 10°/a of the state apportionment of STP funds. Projects are qualified and prioritized by the Commission and submitted to the California Transportation Commission for inclusion in the State Transportation Improvement Program. The basic definition of a transportation enhancement project is an improvement that is over and above the base transportation project. Project categories are pedestrian and bicycle facilities, scenic or historic highways, scenic beautification, historic preservation, rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities, preservation of abandoned railway corridors, control/removal of outdoor advertising, archaeological planning and research, and mitigation of water pollution due to highway runoff. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. 338 State and Local Fund Sources State Transportation Improvement Program The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) consists of Regional Improvement Program (RIP) and Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds. The RIP and TIP programs are mainly supported by Proposition 42 funding. The RIP component represents 75% of STIP funds available for capacity projects. Regional Transportation Planning Agencies are responsible for selection of projects proposed for RIP funds. The IIP component represents the remaining 25% of STIP funds available for capacity projects and Ca!trans is responsible for the selection of IIP-funded projects. The Commission and Caltrans District 8 work closely in coordinating projects for these fund sources. Proposition 1B Program In November 2006, the voters in Caifomia approved Proposition 1B, which will fund various transportation programs from bonds issued by the state of California. Programs to be funded include corridor mobility improvements (CMIA), transit capital (PTMISEA), STIP supplement, goods movement (TCIF), state -local partnership funds, and cities and counties. Transportation Development Act (TDA) The TDA is comprised of two elements: Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA) funds. LTF funds are derived from 114 of one cent of the state sales tax and are retumed to source. There are three areas of apportionment within Riverside County comprised of Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley (Blythe). The Commission administers the LTF on behalf of the County of Riverside. Funds are provided for program administration, Southern California Association of Govetments regional planning, local transportation planning, and transit services in Western County and the Coachella Valley. In the Palo Verde Valley, funds support transit services and local street and road improvements. Funds are also provided to the County for local street and road improvements in unincorporated areas. Additionally, under SB 821, 2% of LTF funds are made available for bicycle and pedestrian projects STA funds are generated from the statewide sales tax on gasoline and diesel fuel and are allocated by the state to the Comrission based on population and as a percentage of transit fare revenue. The Commission has generally used these funds to support capital purchases and improvements as these funds have been subject to state budgetary actions. Measure A Measure A is a half -cent local retail transaction and use tax that was initially approved by the voters in November 1988 for 20 years (Ordinance 88-1) and extended in November 2002 for an additional 30 years (Ordinance 02-001), through June 2039, to help fiord key transportation improvements in Riverside County. It provides funds to improve highways and local roadways, to initiate commuter rail services on existing tracks, to expand dial -a -ride services and commuter programs, and to guarantee half-price bus fares for seniors and persons with disabilities. These types of improvements are needed to control traffic, increase safety, and maintain the quality of life within the County. Since existing state and federal sources provide only a limited amount of funding for a limited number of projects, Measure A will cover the shortfall for key projects with a funding source that is under local control. It will use the revenue generated in Westem County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley to meet the unique transportation needs of each of those areas. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee The Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program was adopted by all local jurisdictions in the Western County area of Riverside County in July 2003. Under this progranr, which is administered by the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), fees are assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western Riverside County to ensure that new development pays its fair share toward providing the needed infrastructure improvements on the regional system of highways and arterials. In accordance with the extension of Measure A in 2002, the Commission shall receive the first $400 million of TUMF revenues to fund equally the regional arterial system and the development of new corridors. As a result of an amended Memorandum of Understanding with WRCOG, the Commission will continue to receive TUMF above the original S400 million cap. Program Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the various program terms used and discussed in the narrative and generally used in outlining the Commission's functions for auditing, governmental accounting, fmancial reporting and budgeting. • • 339 • • Bicycle and Pedestrian LTF provides revenues for the construction of bicycle and pedestrian facilities and related right-of-way costs. Commuter Assistance The purpose of this program is to provide short-term incentives to encourage single occupant vehicle drivers to use alternate modes of transportation including carpools, vanpools, bus pools, public bus, commuter rail, walking, and bicycling. Commuter Rail Measure A provides operating and capital revenue for commuter rail service to Orange and Los Angeles counties. LTF provides revenue for commuter rail operations in Riverside County. These trains operate on existing railroad tracks parallel to major freeways. Commuter rail service provides a safe and reliable transit alternative to driving alone during the peak period. Plans to expand commuter rail service in Westem Riverside County from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley are currently underway. Highways Measure A provides revenues to widen existing highways, expand interchanges, and improve remote freeways. These improvements are needed to control traffic congestion in Westem County and improve access and safety in Coachella Valley. Costs of these improvements will be covered by funds from state and federal sources. Measure A revenue will be used to supplement —not replace —these other sources and to accelerate work on projects deferred for lack of funding. Local Streets and Roads Measure A provides revenues to local jurisdictions for the construction, repair, and maintenance of local streets and roads. The County and local cities are required to supplement those expenditures with other previously dedicated revenue sources to maintain road improvements at a level equal to or greater than the base year amount. LTF provides revenue for local street and road improvements in the Palo Verde Valley and unincorporated areas of the County. Metrolink The Commission's commuter rail program is part of the regional network operated by the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operating under the name of Metrolink, a five -county joint powers agency composed of the transportation commissions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside, and Ventura. The purpose of this agency is to manage the operation and maintenance of commuter rail in the five -county metropolitan area Motorist Assistance The Motorist Assistance program has two elements. The Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) is a special team of tow trucks that travel on selected Riverside County freeways during peak commuter hours to assist drivers when their cars break down. The other element is the call box system, which installation and operation is made possible with revenue provided by the public. One dollar per year from every motor vehicle registration pays for the call boxes and their operation and maintenance. Call boxes are being provided by the Commission, which serves as the County's Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE). Regional Arterials Measure A funds generated within the Western County and Coachella Valley areas are used for major regional road projects. The system is to be implemented with a mix of funding required from new development under a Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee to be paid by developers from new development and from Measure A funds retumed to the Westem County and Coachella Valley areas. The Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee schedule shall be established in order to generate at least the equivalent of Measure A funding toward the regional arterial system. Specialized Transit Measure A provides revenues to improve transportation services for seniors, persons with disabilities and commuters. For seniors and persons with disabilities, it provides dial -a -ride cab service at night for emergency purposes, guarantees half-price bus fares, and assists centers with their transit programs. For commuters, it improves express bus service and expands ridesharing programs. In the Coachella Valley, revenues also are available for bus replacement and local bus service. Transit The Commission is the agency responsible for short-range transportation planning and programming and coordinating the operation of all public transportation service within the County. The Commission allocates and disburses TDA funds to the transit operators for operating and capital purposes. 340 Transportation Improvement Plan This plan also ants as the County's expenditure plan and was prepared by the Commission for the proposed 1/2% local retail transaction and use tax for transportation purposes to be collected. This was proposed by the Commission as a means to fdl the funding shortfall to implement needed highway, regional arterial, and commuter rail projects; local street and road programs; and transit improvements for seniors and disabled persons. General Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the narrative discussions and illustrations included in this budget document and the terminology generally used in governmental accounting, auditing, financial reporting, and budgeting. Accountability The state of being obliged to explain one's actions, to justify what one does. Accountability requires a government to answer to its citizenry to justify the raising of public resources and the purposes for which they are used. Accounting System The methods and records established to identify, assemble, analyze, classify, record, and report a government's transactions and to maintain accountability for the related assets and liabilities. Accrual Basis of Accounting The accounting of the financial effects of transactions, events, and interfund activities when they occur, regardless of when cash is received or paid. Advance Refunding Bonds New bonds issued to refinance an outstanding bond issue before the date the outstanding bonds become due or callable to obtain better interest rates and/or bond conditions. Proceeds of the advance refunding bonds are deposited in escrow with a fiduciary, invested in U.S. Treasury Bonds or other authorized securities, and used to redeem the underlying bonds at their maturity or call date and to pay interest on the bonds being refunded. Agency Fund A fiduciary fund type used to report resources held by a government for others in a purely custodial capacity and cannot be used to support the government's own programs. Audit A systematic collection of the sufficient, competent evidential matter needed to attest to the fairness of management's assertions in the financial statements or to evaluate whether management has efficiently and effectively carried out its responsibilities. The auditor obtains this evidential matter through inspection, observation, inquiries, and confirmations with third parties. Balanced Budget The identification of revenues and other financing sources as well as available fund balances to fund operating and capital expenditures and other financing uses on an annual basis. Basis of Accounting A term used to refer to when the effects of transactions or events are recognized for financial reporting purposes. For example, the timing of recognition can be when the transaction or event occurs (accrual basis) or when cash is received or paid (cash basis). Bond A written promise to pay a specified sum of money (face or principal amount) at a specified date or dates in the future (maturity date), together with periodic interest at a specified rate. Bonds are primarily used to finance capital projects. Budget A plan of financial activity for a specified period indicating all planned revenues and expenditures for the budget period. Annual budgets are usually required by law and are essential to sound financial management. The Commission prepares an annual budget that is applicable to a single fiscal year. • • • 341 • • • Budgetary Control The control or management of a government in accordance with an approved budget to keep expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and available revenues. Budget Document The instrument used by the budget -making authority to present a comprehensive fmancial program to the appropriating governing body. Capital Outlay Expenditures resulting in the acquisition of or addition to the government's capital assets or assets to be transferred to Caltrans, such as highway projects. Capital Projects Fund A governmental fund type created to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital projects. The Commission has two capital projects funds for Commercial Paper and Sales Tax Bonds to account for debt proceeds from 2009 Measure A commercial paper notes and 2009 Measure A sales tax revenue bonds related to highway, commuter rail, regional arterial, and local streets and roads projects. Commercial Paper An unsecured short-term promissory note issued primarily by corporations with maturities ranging from two to 270 days. The credit risk of almost all commercial paper is rated by a rating service. Comprehensive Annual Financial Report A financial report that encompasses all funds of the government. In the financial section of the CAFR are the basic financial statements and required supplementary information as well as combining and individual fund financial statements, as necessary. The CAFR also contains introductory information and statistical data. Current Financial Resources Measurement Focus A measurement focus that reports on the near -tam or current inflows, outflows, and balances of spendable financial resources. This focus is unique to accounting and financial reporting for state and local govemments and is used for reporting the financial position and results of operations of governmental funds. Debt An obligation resulting fmm the borrowing of money or from the purchase of goods and services. Debts of governments include bonds, time warrants, and notes. Debt Coverage Ratio The ratio of pledged revenues to related debt service for a given year. Debt Limit The maximum amount of outstanding gross or net debt legally permitted. Debt Proceeds The difference between the face amount of debt and the issuance discount or the sum of the face amount and the issuance premium. Debt proceeds differ from cash receipts to the extent issuance costs, such as underwriters' fees, are withheld by the underwriter. Debt Service Fund A governmental fund type created to account for the accumulation of resources for and payment of general long-term debt principal and interest. The Commission has one debt service fund for its sales tax revenue bonds. Expenditures Represents decreases in net financial resources on the transfer of property or services for acquiring an asset, service, or settling a loss. Fiduciary Funds Funds used to report assets held in a trustee or agency capacity for others and cannot therefore be used to support the government's own programs. 342 Financial Advisor In the context of the issuance of debt, a consultant who advises the issuer on any of a variety of matters related to the issuance. The fmancial advisor sometimes also is referred to as the fiscal consultant. Financial Audit An audit made to provide independent assurance whether the financial statements of a government are presented fairly in conformity with GAAP. Financial Resources Resources that are or will become available for spending and include cash, resources ordinarily expected to be converted to cash such as receivables, inventory, and prepaid assets. Fiscal Year For the Commission, the 12-month period that begins July 1 and ends June 30 of the designated fiscal or operating year for accounting and budgeting purposes. Fund A fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts in which cash and other financial resources, all related liabilities, and residual equities or balances, and changes therein, are recorded and segregated to carry on specific activities or attain certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Fund Balance The excess of a governmental fund's assets over its liabilities. Fund Type Any one of eleven classifications into which all funds are categorized in governmental accounting. Governmental fund types include general, special revenue, debt service, capital projects, and permanent funds. Proprietary fund types include enterprise and internal service funds. Fiduciary fund types include pension trust, investment trust, and private - purpose trust funds and agency funds. GASB 34 Statement No. 34 issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board that was implemented by the Commission in FY 2001/02. GASB 34 established new financial reporting standards for state and local governments. Under the new financial reporting model, governmental financial statements include basic financial statements that present both govemment-wide and fund financial statements and required supplementary infonnation, including Management's Discussion and Analysis. GASB 45 Statement No. 45, Accounting for Other Poslemployment Benefits (OPLB), issued by the Govemmental Accounting Standards Board implemented by the Commission in FY 2007/08. GASB 45 requires recognition of postretirement health care costs on an accrual basis over a period approximating the employees' years of service and to provide information about actuarial accrued liabilities associated with these benefits and whether and to what extent progress is being made in funding the plan. General Fund The govemmemal fund type used to account for all financial resources, except those required to be accounted for in another fund. General Ledger A record containing the accounts needed to reflect the financial position and the results of operations of a govemment. In double -entry bookkeeping, debit balances equal the credit balances in the general ledger. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) Minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. GAAP encompasses the conventions, rules, and procedures that serve as the norm for the fair presentation of financial statements. The GASB is the primary authoritative accounting and financial reporting standard -setting body on the application of GAAP to state and local governments. Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) Rules and procedures established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) for the conduct of a tinancial audit. There are ten basic GAAS, classified into three broad categories: general standards, standards of • • • 343 • • • fieldwork, and standards of reporting. The Auditing Standards Board of the AICPA publishes Statements on Auditing Standards (SAS) and related interpretations to comment and expand upon these basic standards. Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS) Standards established by the General Accounting Office (GAO) in its publication, Government Auditing Standards, for the conduct and reporting of both financial and performance audits in the public sector. GAGAS set forth general standards applicable to both types of audits and separate standards of fieldwork and reporting for financial and performance audits. The GAGAS standards of fieldwork and reporting for financial audits incorporate and build upon GAAS. Governmental Funds Funds generally used to account for tax -supported activities. The Commission's governmental funds are comprised of general, special revenue, debt service, and capital projects funds. Grant A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function or program. Independent Auditor An auditor meeting the independence criteria set forth in GAAS and GAGAS. Internal Audit An independent appraisal of the diverse operations and controls within a government entity to determine whether acceptable policies and procedures are followed, established standards are met, resources are used efficiently and economically, and the organization's objectives are being achieved. The tern covers all forms of appraisal of activities undertaken by auditors working for and within an organization. Internal Control Policies and procedures established to provide reasonable assurance that specific government objectives will be achieved. Joint Venture A legal entity or other organization resulting from a contractual agreement and that is owned, operated, or govemed by two or more participants as a separate and specific activity for the benefit of the public or service recipients and in which the government retains an ongoing financial interest or ongoing financial responsibility. The Commission is a member agency of Metrolink. Legal Level of Budgetary Control The level at which a government's management may not reallocate resources without special approval from the legislative body. Loans Receivable An asset account reflecting amounts loaned to individuals or organizations extemal to the Commission, including notes taken as security for such loans. Measurement Focus The objective of a measurement, that is what is being expressed in reporting a government's financial performance and position. A particular measurement focus considers not only which resources are measured (financial or economic), but also when the effects of transactions or events involving those resources are recognized (basis of accounting). The measurement focus of the Commission's govemment-wide and fiduciary fund financial statements is economic resources, whereas the measurement focus of governmental fund financial statements is current financial resources. Modified Accrual Basis The accrual basis of accounting adapted to the govemmental funds' measurement focus according to which revenues and other financial resource increments (e.g., bond issue proceeds) are recognized when they become susceptible to accrual, that is when they become both "measurable" and "available to finance expenditures of the current period." Expenditures are recognized when the fund liability is incurred except for unmatured interest on general long-term debt and certain similar accrued obligations when due. The Commission's govemmental funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. 344 Other Financing Sources Amounts classified separately from revenues to avoid distorting revenue trends that represent an increase in current financial resources. Other financing sources generally include general long-term debt proceeds, amounts equal to the present value of minimum lease payments arising from capital leases, proceeds from the sale of general fixed assets, and transfers in. Other Financing Uses Amounts classified separately from expenditures to avoid distorting expenditure trends and represent a decrease in current financial resources. Other financing uses generally include transfers out and the amount of refunding bond proceeds deposited with the escrow agent. Overhead Indirect costs that cannot be specifically associated with a given service, program, or department and thus, cannot be clearly associated with a particular functional category. Principal In the context of bonds other than deep -discount debt, the face value or par value of a bond or issue of bonds payable on stated dates of maturity. Program Group activities, operations, or organizational units directed to attaining specific purposes or objectives. Program Budget A budget wherein expenditures are based primarily on the functions or activities of a govemment rather than to specific items of cost or to specific departments. Purchase Order A document authorizing the delivery of specified merchandise or the rendering of certain services and the making of a charge for them. Refunding Bonds Bonds issued to retire bonds already outstanding. The proceeds of refunding bonds may be used to repay the previously issued debt (current refunding) or to be placed with an escrow agent and invested until used to pay principal and interest on old debt at a future date (advance refunding). Reimbursement Grant A grant for which a potential recipient must first incur qualifying expenditures to be eligible. Reserved Fund Balance Those portions of fund balance which are not appropriable for expenditure or that are legally segregated for a specific future use. Special Revenue Fund A governmental fund type used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources (other than major capital projects) that are legally restricted to expenditure for specified purposes. The Commission maintains special revenue funds for Measure A Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde; Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee; Freeway Service Patrol; Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies; State Transit Assistance; and Local Transportation Fund. Transfers All interfund transfers representing flows of assets between funds of the government without equivalent flows of assets in return and without a requirement for repayments. Trust Fund A fiduciary fund type used to report pension, investment, or private -purpose trust arrangements, under which principal and income benefit individuals, private organizations, or other governments. Trustee A fiduciary holding property on behalf of another. • • • 345 Proposed Budget Fiscal Year 2010/11 Budget Adjustments (Draft to Final) FY 2009/10 Ending Fund Balance (as reported 5/12/7.0) Projected FY 2010 Adjustments: Increase in state and local reimbursements Increase in professional and support, project operation, and capital outlay expenditures Budget FY 2011 Adjustments: Increase in state reimbursements 18,854,400 ,! Increase in investment income 90,000 Increase in professional costs (50,000)� Increase in right of way support costs (371,600),, Increase in program management costs (193,300) Increase in program operations costs Increase in right of way acquisition costs Decrease in construction costs Increase in LTF bicycle and pedestrian distributions Increase in STA distributions FY 2010/11 Ending Fund Balance (per final budget 6/9/10) 10/11 Fund Balance '349,7g7, 010,800.' (1,721,300)' Budget Summary Beginning Fund Balance Revenues 248, 729,400 Debt Proceeds 185,000,000 Transfers In 212,414,700 Total Estimated Sources Expenditures Debt Service Transfers Out Total Estimated Uses (460,172, 400) (106,205,000) (212,414,700) 458,200 00 Uses Over Sources (132,648,000) (offset by beginning fund balance) Ending Fund Balance 367,810,200 Funding Sources Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal reimbursements State reimbursements Local reimbursements TUMF Other revenues Investment income Debt proceeds Transfers in Total Sources 32„219,100 830,700 10,000,000 178,000 ` 1,830,000 185,000,000 212,414,700 646,144,100 $ 250,000,000 $200,000,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 $- ti 4 H c•� � ch e c Ka��`a0�w e. `ro oe 4.y ecc�e�``tie mem me eCee ms ic �o ny yy4.taee`� Qyayayacyoeo �qc ¢p. AF qP ,oo�p `JG��eec\�e `e re�yO¢ \ay \�, e 4.a woNO ,m o6 h� Qe- Summary of Expenditures' FY 10 1.1 Expenditures Management Services Regional Programs Capital Project Development and Delivery 562,349,500 Debt Service 106,205,000 Total Expenditures Debt Service 14% Management Services Regional 1% Programs 13% 778,792,100 Management Services Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance Total Management Services Executive Management 5% FY 10/11 Expenditures �981100 .,849,200 Regional Programs Planning and Programming Services Rail Maintenance and Operations Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Total Regional Programs Commuter Assistance 4% Motorist Assistance 5% Planning and Programming Services 7% FY 10/11 Expenditures ,459,400 4,374,600 5,714,003 105,388,400 Rail Maintenance and Operations 11% Capital Program Expenditures Salaries and benefits Professional costs Support costs Projects and operations: Program operations Engineering Construction Design build Right of way and land Local streets and roads Regional arterials Capital outlay Debt service Transfers out Total Capital Project Development & Delivery 69,300 8,$76,600 52,442,600 75,323,600 ', 23,000,000 '. 7;709,300, 30,,986�400 Capital Program Ex enditures continued Capital outlay 0% Professional costs 2% Salaries and benefits 0% Program operations 1% Design build 4% Local streets and roads 5% Regional arterials 2% Capital Program Expenditure Highlights SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 Interchange 74/215 Interchange SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 Corridor Improvements Coachella Valley MSHCP Land Mitigation I-10 Interchanges at Indian and Date Palm SR-111 Widening Mid County Parkway Perris Valley Line Riverside Downtown Station Layover Facility Station Rehabilitation Projects Functional Uses Breakdown 11 Uses Personnel Professional , Support Projects and operations29,90d,300 Capital outlay �.587,600 Debt service and cost of issuance 106,205,000 Transfers out 212414,700 Total Uses $ 77Mk;100 Professional Personnel a% 1% Capital outlay 0% Support 1% Measure A Administration 0.00% 0.50% 1.00% 1.50% 2.00% ■Salaries and Benefits ®Administrative Casts 2.5,E'3/0 Adoption of budget on June 9, 2010 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Resolution No. 10-015, Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2010/11 BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve Resolution No. 10-015, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2010/11 ". BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Section 7910 of the California Government Code implements Article XIIIB of the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction to establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make documentation used to determine the appropriations limit available to the public 15 days prior to adoption of the resolution establishing the appropriations limit. Staff has performed the calculations necessary to determine the limit. The resolution and documents supporting the calculation are attached. The Commission chose to use the percentage change in the California per capita personal income and the populations change within Riverside County as the factors in determining the appropriations limit. As required, the adoption of the Commission's Gann Appropriations Limit was posted in the local newspaper. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 10-015 2) California per Capita Income and Population, Riverside County — California Department of Finance Agenda Item 9A 346 • • RESOLUTION NO. 10-015 "RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ESTABLISHING THE COMMISSION'S APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010/11 " WHEREAS, Article XIIIB of the California Constitution places an annual limitation upon appropriations from proceeds of taxes by each local government of the State of California; and WHEREAS, in 1988, pursuant to Article XIIIB, section 4 of the California Constitution, the Riverside County Transportation Commission established its appropriations limit at $75 million for fiscal year 1988-1989 under ordinance No. 88-1; and WHEREAS, Section 7910 of the California Government Code implements Article XIIIB of the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction to establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make the documentation used in determining the appropriations limit available to the public fifteen days prior to adoption of the resolution establishing the appropriations limit; and WHEREAS, in accordance with Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 1 approved by the voters of the State effective June 6, 1990, beginning with fiscal year 1990-1991 and for each fiscal year thereafter, the Commission's Board of Commissioners is required to select either the percentage change in California per capita personal income or the percentage change in the local assessment roll due to the addition of local non- residential construction, and either the population change within the Commission or the population change within Riverside County, as the two factors to be applied in calculating the appropriations limit for each fiscal year; and WHEREAS, this Board wishes to select, as factors in determining the Commission's appropriation limit for fiscal year 2010-2011 the percentage change in California per capita personal income and also the population change within Riverside County; and WHEREAS, this Commission has documented its calculations of the Commission's appropriations limit for fiscal year 2010-2011 and said calculations have been made available to the public at least fifteen days prior to the adoption of this resolution. 347 • NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission as follows: 1. For fiscal year 2010-2011, the factors selected for calculating the appropriations limit are (a) the percentage change in California per capita personal income, and (b) the population change within the County of Riverside. 2. The appropriations limit applicable to this Agency pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution for fiscal year 2010-2011 are hereby established and determined to be $ 318,967,208. 3. A copy of the documentation used in the determination of the appropriations limit for fiscal year 2010-2011 shall be affixed hereto and shall be available for public inspection. 4. Pursuant to Section 7910 of the California Government Code, any judicial action or proceeding to attack, review, set aside, void, or annul the establishment of the appropriations limit as set forth herein must be commenced within forty-five days of the adoption of this resolution. • ADOPTED this 9th day of June, 2010. Bob Buster, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 348 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2010-2011 APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT 2009-2010 Appropriations Limit $ 322,761,463 2010-2011 adjustment: Change in California per capita income = -2.54 percent Change in Population, Riverside County = 1.40 percent -2.54 + 100 = 0.9746 100 1.40 + 100 = 1.014 100 0.9746 x 1.014 = 0.9882444 $ 322,761,463 X 0.9882444 = $ 318,967,208 2010-2011 Appropriations Limit $ 318,967,208 Source: California per capita income - California Department of Finance Population, Riverside County - California Department of Finance 349 • • 4HT GM m 11 n O nr DEPARTMENT DF ��•,na�1► F I N A N C E ARNOLD GCHWARZENEGGER, GOVERNOR - 915 L STREET r SACRAMENTO CA ■ 95E114-3706 ■ WWW.00F.CA.00V May 2010 Dear Fiscal Officer. Subject: Price and Population information Appropriations Limit The Califomia Revenue and Taxation Code, Section 2227, mandates the Department of Finance (Finance) to transmit an estimate of the percentage change in population to local govemments. Each local jurisdiction must use their percentage change in population factor for January 1, 2010, in conjunction with a change in the cost of living, or price factor, to calculate their appropriations limit for fiscal year 2010-2011. Enclosure 1 provides the change in California's per capita personal income and an example for utilizing the price factor and population percentage change factor to calculate the 2010-2011 appropriations limit. Enclosure 11 provides city and unincorporated county population percentage changes, and Enclosure IIA provides county's and incorporated area's summed population percentage changes. The population percentage change data excludes federal and state institutionalized populations and military populations. Population Percent Change for Special Districts Some special districts must establish an annual appropriations limit. Consult the Revenue and Taxation Code, Section 2228 for further information regarding the appropriation limit. You can access the Code from the following website:"http://www.leainfo.sa.aovicalaw.html" check box: "Revenue and Taxation Code" and enter 2228 for the search term to learn more about the various population change factors available to special districts to calculate their appropriations limit. Article XIII B, Section 9(C), of the State Constitution exempts certain special districts from the appropriations limit calculation mandate. Consult the following websile:"httoliVOwvi.leginfo,ca.povtconst ;article 13B" for additional information. Special districts required by law to calculate their appropriations limit must present the calculation as part of their annual audit. Any questions special districts have on this issue should be referred to their respective county for clarification, or to their legal representation, or to the law itself. No State agency reviews the local appropriations limits. Population Certification The population certification program applies only to cities and counties. Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11005.6 mandates Finance to automatically certify any population estimate that exceeds the current certified population with the State Controller's Office. Finance will certify the higher estimate to the State Controller by June 1, 2010. Please Note: Prior year's city population estimates may be revised. If you have any questions regarding this data, please contact the Demographic Research Unit at (916) 323-4086. 350 May 2010 Enclosure l A. Price Factor: Article XIII B specifies that local jurisdictions select their cost -of -living factor to compute their appropriation limit by a vote of their goveming body. The cost -of -living factor provided here is per capita personal income. If the percentage change in per capita personal income is selected, the percentage change to be used in setting the 2010-2011 appropriation limit is: Per Capita Personal Income Fiscal Year (FY) 2010-2011 Percentage change over prior year -2.54 B. Following is an example using sample population change and the change in California per capita personal income as growth factors in computing a 2010-2011 appropriation limit. 2010-2011: Per Capita Cost of Living Change = -2.54 percent Population Change = 1.03 percent Per Capita Cost of Living converted to a ratio: Population converted to a ratio: Calculation of factor for FY 2010-2011: -2.54 + 100 = .9746 100 1.03 + 100 = 1.0103 100 .9746 x 1.0103 = .9846 351 • • Enclosure it Annual Percent Change In Population Minus Exclusions January 1, 2008 to January 1, 2010 and Total Population, January 1, 2010 County percent Change - Population Minus Exclusions - Po�tlon City 2009-2010 1-1-09 1-1.10 1-1-2010 Riverside Banning 0.70 28,551 28,751 28,751 Beaumont 5.45 32,448 34.217 34,217 Blythe 0.74 13,988 14,092 21,812 Calmesa 0.68 7,504. 7,555 7,555 Canyon Lake 0.74 11,143 11,226 11,225 Cathedral City 0.63 52,455 52,788 52,841 Coachella 3.77 41,043 42,591 42,591 Corona 1.11 148,770 150.416 150,416 Desert Hot Springs 0.85 26,684 26,811 26.811. Hemet 1.19 74,931 75,820 75,820 Indian Wells 0.88 5,099 5,144 5,144 Indio 1.64 82,325 83,675 83,675 Lake Eleanore 1.31 60,324 50,983 50,983 La Quinta 1.35 43,830 - 44,421 44,421 Menifee 1.60 67,819 68,905 68,905 Moreno Valley 1.08 186,515 188,537 188,537 Munieta 0.65 100,835 101,487 101,487 Norco 0.69 22,820 22,977 27,370 Palm Desert 0.96 51,570 52.067 52,067 Palm Springs 0.81 47,653 48,040 48,040 Penis 1.37 54,387 55,133 55.133 Rancho Mirage 0.41 18,938 17,008 17,008 Riverside 1.09 300,769 304,051 304,051 San Jacinto 1.13 36,521 36.933 36,933 Temecula 2.25 102,713 105.029 105,029 Wldomar 1.70 31,374 31,907 31,007 Unincorporated 1.68 459,078 466,697 466,606 County Total 1.40 2,097,987 2,127,260 2,139,535 (') Exclusions include residents on federal miltary installations and group quarters residents in state mental institutions, state and federal correctional institutions end veteran homes: Page 1 352 County Enclosure IIa Annual Percent Change in Population Minus Exclusions CI January 1, 2009 to January 1, 2010 PerceM Chan0e — Paaulatdon Ni1tr1 Ex51u9lgns — 2009-10 1-1-09 1-1-10 Placer Incorporated 2.09 230,400 235,225 County Total 1.70 341.304 347,102 Plumas Incorporated -0.79 2,OI3 1,997 County Total -0.84 20,602 20,428 Riverside Incorporated 1.32 1.638.91)9 1,660,563 County Total 1.40 2,097,987 2.127,260 Sacramento Incorporated 1.08 860.949 870,280 County Total 0.92 1.424.873 1,437,980 San Benito Incorporated 0.81 38.880 39,196 County Total 0.81 57,920 58,388 San Bernardino incorporated 0.89 1,731,957 1,747,285 County Total 0.85 2,017,237 2,034,418 San Diego Incorporated 1.39 2,6136,654 2,703,643 County Total 1.41 3,118,143 3,159,951 San Francisco Incorporated 1.12 846,518 855,999 County Total 1.12 846,518 855,999 San Joaquin Incorporated 0.98 541.926 547,212 County Total 0.97 683,579 690,188 San Luis Obispo Incorporated 0.24 151,897 152,267 County Total 0.87 263,391 265,688 t..) Exclusions include residents on federal military installations and group quarters residents in slate mental instdutions, state end federal correctional Institutions and veteran tomes. Page 4 353 i RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Governmental Accounting Standards Board Statement Number 54 Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the Commission's new fund balance reporting policy; and 2) Approve the commitment of unexpended fund balance at June 30, 2010, in the Right of Way Management fund for right of way management services relating to rail and highway properties. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) has issued GASB Statement No. 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions, which will be effective for fiscal years beginning July 1, 2010. This statement sets out new standards of accounting and financial reporting intended to improve the clarity and consistency of the fund balance information provided to financial report users. As a result of the new financial system, staff elected an early implementation of this statement. GASB Statement No. 54 establishes five fund balance classifications, which are designed to show the level of constraint governing the use of funds: • Nonspendable - Fund balance includes amounts that are not in spendable form or are required to be maintained intact (e.g., loans receivable and endowments). • Restricted - Fund balance includes amounts that can be spent only for the specific purposes stipulated by external resource providers, constitutionally or through enabling legislations. • Committed - Fund balance includes amounts that can be used only for specific purposes determined by formal action of the government's highest level of decision -making authority. Agenda Item 9B 354 • Assigned - Fund balance comprises amounts intended to be used by the government for specific purposes. In governmental funds other than the general fund, assigned fund balance represents the amount that is not restricted or committed. • Unassigned - Fund balance is the residual classification for the general fund and includes all amounts not contained in the other classifications. The Commission's fund balance classifications will need to be adjusted to comply with the new definitions and guidelines covered in GASB Statement No. 54. Staff believes the requirements of GASB Statement No. 54 will improve the financial reporting by providing fund balance classifications that will be more easily understood. Elimination of the reserved classification of fund balance in favor of restricted fund balance will enhance the consistency between information reported in the government -wide statements and information in the governmental fund financial statements, and avoid confusion about the relationship between reserved fund balances and restricted net assets. The new fund balance classifications will require governments to classify amounts consistently, regardless of the fund type in which they are presented. Therefore, an amount cannot be classified as restricted in one fund, but unrestricted in another. The fund balance disclosures will give users information necessary to understand the processes under which limitations are imposed upon the use of resources and how those limitations may be modified or eliminated. Specific changes to the Commission's fund balance classifications have been discussed with the Commission's auditors, McGladrey and Pullen. Staff is proposing the new fund balance classifications: Fund General - Administration Rail Operations Right of Way Management Planning and Programming Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) SAFE Measure A Local Transportation Fund State Transit Assistance Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Capital Projects Bonds Capital Projects Commercial Paper Debt Service Agenda Item 9B Old Classification Unreserved, undesignated Reserved Reserved Reserved Unreserved, designated Unreserved, designated Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved New Classification Assigned Restricted Committed Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted Restricted • • 355 • • • An important secondary effect will be the limitation of the number of special revenue funds that local governments establish to encourage the use of the General Fund to account for routine government operations. The following are key phrases from GASB Statement No. 54 on fund type definitions, followed by staff's assessment of the potential impact, if any, on the Commission's fiscal reporting: • General Fund - "The General Fund is used to account for and report all financial resources not accounted for and reported in another fund." Staff does not believe that this definition will have any impact on current definitions and the reporting of the General Fund. • Special Revenue Funds - "Special revenue funds are used to account and report the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are restricted or committed to expenditures for specific purposes other than debt service or capital projects. GASB Statement No. 54 states that the Special Revenue Funds must have a specific revenue source that is the foundation for the fund. Funds that have only specific expenditures requirements but don't have a specific revenue source may no longer be classified as special revenue funds." Staff does not believe that this definition will have any significant impact on the current definitions and the reporting of the Special Revenue Funds. • Capital Projects Funds - "Capital projects fund are used to account for and report financial resources that are restricted, committed, or assigned to expenditures for capital outlays, including the acquisition or construction of capital facilities and other capital assets." Under the new definition, GASB allows for the purchase or construction of capital facilities as well as other capital assets and also allows for the accumulation of funds to either purchase or construct capital assets. Staff does not believe that this definition will have any significant impact on the current definitions and the reporting of the Capital Projects Fund. • Debt Service Funds - "Debt service funds are used to account for and report financial resources that are restricted, committed, or assigned to expenditures for principal and interest." Staff does not believe that this definition will have any impact on the current definitions and the reporting of the Debt Service Fund. Agenda Item 9B 356 Under the new statement, an action must be taken by the governing body before the close of the reporting period to impose a commitment of fund balance. Therefore, staff requests that the Commission commit the fund balance representing Right of Way Management for the management of rail and highway properties. Agenda Item 9B • • • 357 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Accounting and Human Resources Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the nine -month period ended March 31, 2010. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the last nine months of the fiscal year, staff has monitored the revenues and expenditures of the Commission. The attached financial statements present the revenues and expenditures for the first nine months of the fiscal year. Period closing accrual adjustments are not included for revenues earned but not billed, and expenditures incurred for goods and services received but not yet invoiced, as such adjustments are normally made during the year-end closing activities. The operating statement shows the sales tax revenues for the second quarter at 59% of the budget. This is a result of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 33. GASB 33 requires sales tax revenue to be accrued for the period in which it is collected at the point of sale. The State Board of Equalization collects the Measure A funds and remits them to the Commission after the reporting period for the businesses. This creates a two -month lag in the receipt of revenues by the Commission. Accordingly, these financial statements reflect the revenues related to collections through January 2010. On a cash basis, the Measure A and Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax revenues are 14% and 13% lower, respectively, than the same period last fiscal year due to the continued economic downturn regionally and nationally. Staff continues to monitor the trends in the sales tax receipts and will report to the Commission any necessary adjustments to the budget for sales tax revenue. Federal, state, and local government reimbursements are on a reimbursement basis, and the Commission will receive these revenues as the projects are completed and invoiced to the respective agencies. Agenda Item 9C 358 During the FY 2009/10 budget planning process, the Commission took a conservative approach in estimating the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) receipts as a result of the housing crisis. Additionally, the TUMF budgeted revenues include $6.475 million in reimbursements related to the 74/215 interchange. The operating statement shows the TUMF revenues for the third quarter at 46% of the budget. TUMF revenues remitted by the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) did not include $530,354 for March 2010, which were received in April 2010. TUMF reimbursements through the nine -month period are $665,900. Other revenues include a property transfer agreement with the city of Riverside for proposed access easement on the State Route 91 /Van Buren Boulevard interchange project. The expenditure categories are in line overall with the expectations of the budget with the following exceptions: Salaries and benefits include a prepayment for the FY 2009/10 employer retirement contribution, which provides a discount of half a year's interest. Operating transfer in and operating transfer out are significant as of the third quarter due to the one time transfers of bond proceeds in October 2009, from the Western County Capital Projects fund to the Debt Service fund and the Commercial Paper fund to establish a debt reserve fund and retire a portion of the commercial paper. In September 2009, the Commission issued $185 million of Series 2009 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds to refund the 2008 bonds and retire $53.716 million of commercial paper. In September 2009, the Commission issued $27 million in commercial paper notes. The Commercial Paper Capital Projects fund has a deficit fund balance of $18,360,666 as a result of recording $56.284 million of commercial paper notes as a current liability rather than as an other financing source (debt issuance proceeds) in the FY 2008/09 financial statements. Since the letter of credit supporting the commercial paper program has been extended from March 2010 to March 2012, the commercial paper notes are no longer a current liability and the amount is reflected as an other financing source in the third quarter financial statements. Agenda Item 9C • • 359 SR-91 HOV Project - Caltrans is performing design and is on schedule; expenditures are within budget although billings from the state are lagging. Commission staff is performing right of way acquisition work on schedule with consultant assistance; right of way capital expenditures should accelerate through the remainder of the year. Mid County Parkway Project - Right of way acquisitions have been curtailed as property development has subsided, and the critical need to acquire property for protection has been delayed due to the substantial rescoping of the project. SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (design -build) - A pre -award audit of the project and construction manager consultant was conducted during the first quarter of FY 2009/10. A limited notice to proceed was issued in October 2009; a second limited notice to proceed is not anticipated until the fourth quarter of FY 2009/10. A full notice to proceed is not anticipated until the second quarter of FY 2010/11. Updating the toll feasibility financial model as well as Commission approval of the locally preferred alternative is being sought before a full contract notice to proceed will be awarded. Right of way acquisition work was delayed pending Caltrans approval of open market acquisitions. 1-15 Corridor Improvement Project - Work in the environmental phase continues. An update of the toll feasibility model started in February. Results are expected by summer 2010, which will likely influence the project scope definition or result in a phased construction approach. 71 /91 Interchange Project - The preliminary engineering and environmental phase is scheduled to be completed in late FY 2010/1 1 . Rail Engineering/Construction/Right of Way/Land Perris Valley Line Project - The notice to proceed for engineering services was issued October 2009 and right of way acquisition has not occurred. Riverside Downtown Station Layover Facility Project - The consultant selection process was completed in March 2010, and a contract award for engineering was approved by the Commission in April 2010. A notice to proceed will be issued after a pre -award audit is completed during the first quarter of FY 2010/1 1. La Sierra Station Parking Expansion Project - Final design activities are in progress and the award for construction is scheduled for December 2010. Attachment: Quarterly Financial Statements - March 2010 Agenda Item 9C • • 361 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET VS ACTUAL 3RD QUARTER FOR NINE MONTHS ENDED 3/31/2010 Revenues Sales tax Federal reimbursements Slate reimbursements Local reimbursements Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Other revenues Interest Total revenues Expenditures Salaries and benefits Professional and support Professional services Support costs Total Professional and support costs Projects and operations Program operations - general Engineering Construction Design Build Right of way/land Operating and capital disbursements Special studies Local streets and roads Regional arterials Total projects and operations Debt service Principal Interest Cost of issuance Total debt service Capital outlay Total Expenditures Excess revenues over (under) expenditures Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in Operating transfer out Debt proceeds Total financing sources/(uses) Net change in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2009 Fund balance March 31, 2010 FY 2009/10 3RD QUARTER BUDGET ACTUAL $ 187,055,300 $ 109,468,454 40,835,000 4,695,362 36,906,800 4,658,384 2,273,800 863,324 11,475,000 5,230,196 506,100 562,442 3,419.100 3,544,352 282,471,100 129, 022, 514 6,063,300 4,596,573 16,949,400 5,683,722 5,107,800 2,842,504 22,057,200 8,526,226 12,834,300 6,457,296 61,250,050 22,778,902 65,772,300 7,716,754 21,425,000 476,810 122, 346,650 11, 207,139 117,475,500 60,133,122 2,317,800 1,208,495 31, 215, 900 19,546,313 13,761,400 4,045,740 448, 398,900 133,570,571 182,395,000 183,110,875 12,610,000 2,989,146 3,250,000 961,841 198, 255, 000 187, 061, 862 1,110,500 78,843 675.884,900 333,834,075 (393,413,800) (204,811,561) 244,211,600 220,153,126 (244,211,600) (220,153,126) 260.000,000 212.000,000 260,000,000 212,000,000 (133,413,800) 7,188,439 406,095,000 456,243,471 $ 272,681,200 $ 463,431,910 REMAINING BALANCE $ (77,586,846) (36,139,638) (32,248,416) (1,410,476) (6,244,804) 56,342 125.252 (153,448,586) 1,466,727 11,265,678 2,265,296 13,530,974 6,377,004 38,471,148 58,055,546 20,948,190 111,139,511 57,342,378 1,109,305 11,669,587 9,715,660 314,828,329 (715,875) 9,620,854 2,288,159 11,193,138 1,031,657 342,050,825 382,810,132 (24,058,474) 24,058,474 (48,000,000) 48,000,000 PERCENT UTILIZATION 59% 11% 13% 38% 46% 111 % 104% 46% 76% 34% 56% 39% 50% 37% 12% 2% 9% 51 °/o 52% 63°/o 29% 30% 100% 24% 30% 94% 7% 49/0 52% 90% 90% 82% 82% 430,810,132 50,148,471 $ 480,958,603 -5% 112% 170% 362 £9£ 016'leis OP S' 999 Z9Z'LP $ (999'09C'BO t BL9 $ 806991'98 4 LL6'9E6'n ! 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BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Attached are the quarterly investment and cash flow reports as required by state law and Commission policy. The county of Riverside's Investment Report for the month ended March 31, 2010, is also attached for review. Attachments: 1) Quarterly Investment Report for the Quarter ended March 31, 2010 2) County of Riverside Investment Report for the Month ended March 31, 2010 Agenda Item 9D 364 • • Nature of Investments Bond Projects 8.41 Oparating Funds 81.37 petit Reserve 0.73 Trust Funds l 1 .49 LAIF O 7214 County Pool/Gash An -IS Portfolio Investment Type Mutuni Funds 4.28 County Pool{Investment 2.85 Statement of Compliance All of the above investments and any investment decisions made for the quarter ended March 31, 2010 were in full 'compliance with the Commission's investment policy as adopted on May 12, 2010 The Commission has adequate cash flows for six months of operations. 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Aq paseaa -ul SJagwnu l!wAed wJel-uou :lauunl ay1 10 pus eyl le 146!I to iawwp6 a moils of anupuoo siagwnu o!wouooa gamin! nG�XaN 5��4Mn (loos 00000Z's^lenloe 000Z9TORus Hoaied(Awns %L'B 'd\frZO 'SA !me %L'B) slse luauu(oldweun (AaAlfS AeW-Oe Os'sn lenloe s'Zs) aouep;uo0.1awreuoo (Amnia %Ssnlenwe%s•O)siamsp000mama Jew-0Z The Fed maintained the target rate at a range of 0 to 25 bps. The 2 year T-Note was yielding 1.02% (up 21bps). while the 10 year T-Note was yielding 3.84% (up 23bps.) For March the Pool did not have a change in the average monthly yield. 3 Mo US Treasury Bill 6 Mo US Treasury Bill 2YrUS Treasury Note 5YrUS Treasury Note 10YrUS Treasury Note FED Fund Rate 0.16 0.03 0.24 0.05 1.02 0.21 2.55 0.25 3.84 0.23 0.25 0.00 Crude Oil (barrel) Gold (Ounce) 83.76 4.10 1,113.25 1.05 DJIA 10,856.60 531,30 S&P500 1,169.43 64.94 NASDAQ 2,397.96...159.70 Page 1 • Sector breakdown Negotiable CDs Municipal Bonds E1;s, &;af 4/aisle 6`dj, tr; E30 319,108,108 0.08 0.20 104,430,612 0.41 2.03 Bond - U.S. Treasury 1,061,114,372 TOTAL 1.05 0.92 5,499,942,293 1.07 0.99 A-1 / P-1 or • better, 0 91 % Federal Agency and U S_Treasu ry, ill,94b, .Maturity Distribution 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0 r, 30 days or 30 - 90 Days 90 Days - 1 1 - 2 Years 2 - 3 Years Over 3 Years Less Year 12 Month Gross Yield Trends' 4 3.5 3 2.6 2 1.6 1 0.6 0 Mar-09 Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Stp-09 Oat-09 Nov-09 Dea-09 Jan-10 Fab-10 Mar-10 Cash Flows? 04/2010 1,304.77 927.00 377.77 460.34 40642 06/2010 707.13 113100 (423.87) 423.87 559.00 O8/2010 716.41 839.69 (123.28) 123.28 242.01 12/2010 1,530.09 890.64 639.45 639.45 85.84 02/2011 560.00 946.97 (386.97) . 386.97 140.00 roTA 9 1 II, 8 i • 368 t Treasurer's Institutional Money Market index (TIMM!) is compiled and reported by the Riverside County Treas- urer's Capital Markets division. It is a composite index derived from the average of three multi -billion dollar AAA rated Prime (funds that invest in a diversified portfo- lio of U.S. dollar denominated money market instruments including U.S Treasuries, government agencies, bankers' acceptances, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, repurchase agreements, etc.) portfolios that the Treasurer tracks. Further details available upon request Current funds are ASTITGA, WELK (IVO), and MPFXX. t The Pooled Investment Fund cash flow requirements are based upon a 12 month historical cosh flow model. 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Investment Category AGENCY BONDS LOCAL AGENCY OBLIGATIONS i.% i li 1 BILLS OF EXCHANGE CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS Maximum Maturity 5 YEARS Authorized % Limit Quality S&P/ Moody's A/A2/A •g, :i Maximum Maturity 3 YEARS Authorized % Limit Quality S&P/ Moody's Actual Riverside Portfolio % 15%/ $150MM A/A2/A 1.90% 5 YEARS NO LIMIT 3 YEARS 2.50% INVESTMENT GRADE 0.28% 270 DAYS 40% (1) 180 DAYS 30% A1/P1/F1 5 YEARS 30% 1 YEAR 25% MAX A1/P1/F1 REVERSE REPOS 92 DAYS 20% 60 DAYS 10% MAX N/A N/A N/A N/A DAILY LIQUIDITY 1% I C SECURED BANK DEPOSITS 5 YEARS NO LIMIT 1 YEAR 2% CaITRUST SHORT TERM FUND LOCAL AGENCY INVESTMENT FUNDS ., N/A NO LIMIT 3YEARS 0%MAX BOARD APPROVED 0.98% + No more than 30% of this category may be Invested with any one commercial bank 3 Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as weighted average maturity not exceeding 90 days ' Or must have an Investment advisor with not less than 5 years experience and with assets under management of $500,000,000. • THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREM. OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE 53646 , Pages 376 e i • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Greg Moore, Procurement and Assets Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority Report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2010. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The attached report details all professional services and administrative contracts that have been executed for the third quarter ended March 31, 2010, under the Single Signature Authority granted to the Executive Director by the Commission. The unused capacity at March 31, 2010 is $327,588. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of March 31, 2010. Agenda Item 9E 377 • • SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF MARCH 31, 2010 ORIGINAL CONTRACT CONSULTANT DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES AMOUNT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2009 Next Insight I AT&T Mobility Verizon 'itdtr nb„Yh$,s Alv9t'aNm &Srtllth 3:04:41:400140..00. 0.,=,,,, .:,.,,. o-Ttl' l Preparation of Google Transit Feed Specifications Orrick Herrington ,'. AMOUNT USED State of California 511 Inland Empire Traveler Program 511 Routing Service hBond EounsA Servioes AMOUNT USED AMOUNT REMAINING through March 31, 2010 Matthew Walisca Tharefila Tra,dnn Prepared by Reviewed by `piste63had,0 areergpreaenta naw,,eentracin7lated In th#lhirdegirD li( PAID AMOUNT REMAINING CONTRACT AMOUNT $500,000.00 26,412.00 17,108.00 9,304.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 0.00 49,000.00 172,412.00 172,412.00 $327,588.00 0.00 49,000.00 • RIVERS/DE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Lisa DaSilva, Capital Projects Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreements with LSA Associates, Inc. and ICF International for On -Call Environmental Consulting Services WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call environmental consulting services for a three-year term in an aggregate amount of $1.2 million: a) Agreement No. 10-31-083-00 to LSA Associates, Inc; and b) Agreement No. 10-31-101-00 to ICF International; 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to execute task orders awarded to these consultants under the terms of the agreements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission has a requirement for the provision of comprehensive on -call consulting services related to various environmental and archaeological services including, but not limited to, coordination with resources agencies, review of NEPA and CEQA documents, permitting preparation, monitoring and documentation of environmental commitments, and support of the Western Riverside County Multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) projects. While the Commission typically has most of the environmental related consulting services described above accomplished through in contracts for the preliminary engineering/environmental phase (or PA/ED phase) of a project, there are occasions in which these services will be needed outside the environmental phase. Examples of this include the need for permitting prior to construction, or construction monitoring or mitigation. Agenda Item 9F 379 The purpose of this procurement is to provide the Commission with these comprehensive on -call professional environmental consulting services for a variety of Commission capital projects like 74/215 interchange project in the city of Perris, 1-215 widening projects between 1-15 and Nuevo Road, and 60/215 East Junction project to name a few. Selection Process A request for qualifications (RFQ) for on -call environmental consulting services was issued on March 10, 2010, and a pre -submittal conference was held on March 18, 2010, to describe the project to and respond to any questions from potential offerors. Ten firms — Michael Brandman Associates, RBF Consulting, UlstraSystems, PCR Services Corporation, STV, ICF International (ICF), LSA Associates, Inc. (LSA), Willdan Engineering, Chambers Group, Inc., and CES — submitted statements of qualification (SOQ) prior to the April 6, 2010 deadline. An evaluation committee was appointed to review the SOQs received and to conduct firm interviews. The evaluation committee members included representatives from the Commission staff, Bechtel, and Ca!trans. Based on the committee's evaluation of written SOQ submittals, and pursuant to the terms of the RFQ, the committee shortlisted four of the ten offerors and invited those firms to the interview portion of the evaluation and selection process. The short listed firms included: • LSA Associates, Inc. • ICF International • RBF Consulting • Michael Brandman Associates Interviews with the above referenced firms were conducted on April 29, 2010, and, after final scoring by the evaluation committee, LSA and ICF were ranked the two most qualified firms. Staff has determined that it is in the best interest of the Commission to award contracts to two qualified firms, in order to mitigate potential conflict of interest issues that may arise as a result of a selected consultant's prior participation on developing task order requirements. The third and fourth most qualified firms were RBF Consulting and Michael Brandman Associates respectively. Based on their respective rankings, Commission staff requested that both LSA and ICF submit a rate proposal for on -call environmental consulting services. Due to the broad scope and undetermined level of effort associated with on -call services contracts of this type, a schedule or definitive cost proposal was not requested of the firms. Staff received the firms' rate proposals on May 10, 2010. Staff initiated a cost/price analysis based on historical rates paid by the Commission for similar services, and pricing offered to other public agencies for comparable Agenda Item 9F • 380 • services. The purpose of the cost/price analysis is to ensure the proposed rates are fair and reasonable and comparable to rates offered by the firms to other public entities for similar types of work and that the proposed rates reflect current economic conditions. Recommendation Staff recommends Agreement No. 10-31-083-00 be awarded to LSA Associates and Agreement No. 10-31-101-00 be awarded to ICF International for on -call environmental consulting services for a three-year term and total aggregate amount that is not to exceed $1,200,000. Scope and cost for specific tasks will be negotiated based on the fixed labor rates that are currently being established under final negotiations with both LSA and ICF. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2010/11 FY 2011/12+ Amount: $250,000 $950,000 Source of Funds: Measure A, ARRA, RIP, STIP Budget Ad ustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 003015 81115 222 31 003022 81115 262 31 003023 81115 262 31 003999 81115 262 31 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \iXm,_ ,A, 4mn Date: 05/13/10 Attachments: 1) Sample Contract Form 2) Draft Cost Proposal - LSA Associates 3) Draft Cost Proposal - ICF International Agenda Item 9F 381 ATTACHMENT 1 EXHIBIT "A" SCOPE OF WORK ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES 1.0 GENERAL INFORMATION 1.1 Background 1.1.1 The RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Commission) is requesting Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) from qualified professionals for on -call consulting services relating to environmental and archaeological services. The Commission intends to contract with a qualified environmental consulting firm to provide comprehensive on -call professional environmental consulting services for Commission projects. Most on -call environmental services will be for projects that have completed the preliminary engineering phase including the environmental clearance. 1.1.2 The on -call contract, if awarded, will be for two years with an opportunity to extend the agreement for a one-year period at the Commission's sole discretion. 1.1.3 The Commission reserves the right to suspend consultant(s) at the project manager's sole discretion based on performance or underperformance. 1.1.4 Funding for the contract resulting from this RFP may come from federal, state and/or local funds. The Consultant will be required to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF WORK 2.1 Consultant Responsibilities shall include, but not be limited to the following: 2.1.1 Review and re-evaluation project specific environmental documents in accordance with NEPA and CEQA, including preparation of appropriate documentation (environmental re-evaluation, CEQA addenda, etc.) 2.1.2 Review and provide input on specific environmental documents, technical reports and studies as requested by COMMISSION staff (i.e., air quality, water quality, noise, cultural resources, biology, and Section 4(f)). 2.1.3 Permitting services including preparation of permit packages(s) and submittal to permitting agency(ies); coordination with permitting agency(ies); and shepherding permits(s) through their respective approval process(es). Exhibit A A-1 382 2.1.4 Monitoring and document implementation of the environmental commitments during construction (i.e., archaeological, paleontological, and biological commitments). 2.1.5 Support of Western Riverside County Multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) projects' compliances including preparation of documentation needed to support consistency determination process. 2.1.6 Coordination with the resources agencies on specific issues. 2.1.7 Other environmental services as requested by COMMISSION staff. 2.1.8 Consultant may be required to meet with and coordinate their efforts with Commission staff, Commission legal counsel, other consultants or Caltrans staff; participate in office or project site meetings. 2.1.9 If any legal issues exist during the course of the appraisal assignment, Appraiser shall request legal opinion. All legal opinions shall be rendered by Commission's legal counsel. 2.1.10 If hazardous waste is discovered on the property, Appraiser shall seek further direction from the Commission. 2.2 MATERIALS TO BE FURNISHED BY COMMISSION All software, data, reports, surveys, drawings, and other documents furnished to the OFFER by COMMISSION for the OFFER's use in the performance of services shall be made available only for use in performing the assignment and shall remain the property of COMMISSION. All such materials shall be returned to COMMISSION upon completion of services, termination of the agreement, or others such time as COMMISSION may determine. 2.3 PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES The quantity and qualifications of personnel to be assigned will be determined by the scope of the Task Order request and the degree of difficulty of required tasks to be performed. All personnel and personnel assignments shall be subject to approval by COMMISSION. Exhibit A A-2 383 • • 2.4 THIRD PARTY RELATIONSHIPS 2.4.1 This Contract is intended to provide on -call services for Plan projects. In the development of the Plan projects, COMMISSION has worked closely with various professional Offerors, agencies, and others in the development of the project documents and other project related materials. COMMISSION, however, is solely responsible for and will be the sole point of contact for all contractual matters related to the Task Orders. OFFEROR shall take direction only from COMMISSION and shall regularly inform only COMMISSION of Task Order progress, outstanding issues, and all related matters. 2.4.2 During the course of the contract, OFFEROR may find occasion to meet with resource agencies, local jurisdictions, or Caltrans representatives, the design engineer, or other third parties who have assisted with the various Plan projects. These entities may, from time to time, offer suggestions and/or recommendations regarding the Plan project or elements of the project. While COMMISSION enjoys a close relationship with and has considerable confidence in the capabilities of these other parties, OFFEROR shall not act on any suggestions, solicited or unsolicited, without obtaining specific direction from COMMISSION. All oral and written communication with outside agencies or Offerors related to the project shall be directed only to COMMISSION. Distribution of project related communications and information shall be at the sole discretion of COMMISSION representatives. 3.0 TASK ORDER PROCEDURES 3.1 DEFINITIONS 3.1.1 The term Consultant shall refer to the firm or firms that are awarded the contract for environmental consulting services. 3.1.2 A Task Order is utilized by the parties to establish, outline, and authorize a particular job or task. 3.2 INITIATING TASK ORDERS 3.2.1 The Commission's project manager will issue Task Orders to the Consultant. 3.2.2 The Commission's REQUEST FOR TASK ORDER SUBMITTALS. Upon a request for a Task Order Proposal by the designated Commission project manager, contractor shall develop a plan and SUBMIT A TASK ORDER proposal for the requested services. The Task Order shall include a time schedule, number of labor hours, and labor classification(s) to provide the requested services. Exhibit A A-3 384 • 3.2.3 Review and Award of Task Orders The Commission's designated project manager will review the submitted Task Order (TO) to ensure that the submittal is complete, consistent with the Commission's written or oral request for services, the personnel assigned are acceptable, the schedule is acceptable, that all costs proposed are appropriate, and that the item is in compliance with contractual requirements. The project manager will award the Task Order if it is determined to be fair and reasonable. If required, the Commission's project manager will conduct negotiations to address exceptions and clarify costs. The fully executed Task Order will serve as the record of negotiations. 3.2.4 Completion Schedule The contractors' performance of services shall commence under each Task Order only upon written authorization by the Commission's designated project manager. 3.2.5 Contractor shall complete the services within the time frame specified on a particular Task Order. The duration of a particular Task Order may not exceed 12 months, unless otherwise approved in writing, or extend beyond the terms of the governing agreement. Exhibit A A-4 385 • • • AGREEMENT NO. 10-31-083- 00 MODEL PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES WITH j CONSULTANT j 1. PARTIES AND DATE. This Agreement is made and entered into this _ day of , 200_, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("the Commission") and j NAME OF FIRM ] ("Consultant"), a LEGAL STATUS OF CONSULTANT e.g., CORPORATION j. 2. RECITALS. 2.1 Consultant desires to perform and assume responsibility for the provision of certain professional consulting services required by Commission on the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement. Consultant represents that it is a professional consultant, experienced in conducting studies specifically related to safety and security to public clients and is familiar with the scope of services of Commission. 2.2 Commission desires to engage Consultant to render certain consulting services for the conduct of Security, Surveillance and Emergency Response Study ('Project') as set forth herein. 3. TERMS. 3.1 General Scope of Services. Consultant promises and agrees to furnish to Commission all labor materials, tools, equipment, services, and incidental and customary work necessary to fully and adequately provide professional consulting services and advice on various issues affecting the decisions of Commission regarding the Project and on other programs and matters affecting Commission, hereinafter referred to as "Services". The Services are more particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. All Services shall be subject to, and performed in accordance with, this Agreement, the exhibits attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, and all applicable local, state, and federal laws, rules and regulations. 386 3.2 Term. The term of this Agreement shall be from to , unless earlier terminated as provided herein. Consultant shall complete the Services within the term of this Agreement and shall meet any other established schedules and deadlines. 3.3 Schedule of Services. Consultant shall perform the Services expeditiously, within the term of this Agreement, and in accordance with the Schedule of Services set forth in Exhibit "B" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. Consultant represents that it has the professional and technical personnel required to perform the Services in conformance with such conditions. In order to facilitate Consultant's conformance with the Schedule, the Commission shall respond to Consultant's submittals in a timely manner. Upon request of the Commission, Consultant shall provide a more detailed schedule of anticipated performance to meet the Schedule of Services. 3.4 Independent Contractor; Control and Payment of Subordinates. The Services shall be performed by Consultant under its supervision. Consultant will determine the means, method and details of performing the Services subject to the requirements of this Agreement. Commission retains Consultant on an independent contractor basis and Consultant is not an employee of Commission. Consultant retains the right to perform similar or different services for others during the term of this Agreement. Any additional personnel performing the Services under this Agreement on behalf of Consultant shall not be employees of Commission and shall at all times be under Consultant's exclusive direction and control. Consultant shall pay all wages, salaries, and other amounts due such personnel in connection with their performance of Services under this Agreement and as required by law. Consultant shall be responsible for all reports and obligations respecting such additional personnel, including, but not limited to: social security taxes, income tax withholding, unemployment insurance, and workers' compensation insurance. 3.5 Conformance to Applicable Requirements. All work prepared by Consultant shall be subject to the approval of Commission. 3.6 Substitution of Key Personnel or Sub -Consultants. Consultant has represented to Commission that certain key personnel and sub -consultants will perform and coordinate the Services under this Agreement. Should one or more of such personnel or sub - consultants become unavailable, Consultant may substitute other personnel or sub -consultants of at least equal competence and experience upon written approval of Commission. In the event that Commission and Consultant cannot agree as to the substitution of key personnel or sub -consultants, Commission shall be entitled to terminate this Agreement for cause, pursuant to provisions of Section 3.16 of this Agreement. The key personnel and sub -consultants for performance of this Agreement are as follows: 3.7 Commission's Representative. Commission hereby designates j INSERT NAME OR TITLE 1, or his or her designee, to act as its representative for the performance of this Agreement ("Commission's Representative"). Commission's representative shall have the power to act on behalf of Commission for all purposes under this Agreement. Consultant shall not accept direction from any person other than Commission's Representative or his or her designee. B-6 • • • 387 • • • 3.8 Consultant's Representative. Consultant hereby designates ( INSERT NAME OR TITLE ], or his or her designee, to act as its representative for the performance of this Agreement ("Consultant's Representative"). Consultant's Representative shall have full authority to represent and act on behalf of the Consultant for all purposes under this Agreement. The Consultant's Representative shall supervise and direct the Services, using his or her best skill and attention, and shall be responsible for all means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for the satisfactory coordination of all portions of the Services under this Agreement. 3.9 Coordination of Services. Consultant agrees to work closely with Commission staff in the performance of Services and shall be available to Commission's staff, consultants and other staff at all reasonable times. 3.10 Standard of Care; Licenses. Consultant shall perform the Services under this Agreement in a skillful and competent manner, consistent with the standard generally recognized as being employed by professionals in the same discipline in the State of California. Consultant represents and maintains that it is skilled in the professional calling necessary to perform the Services. Consultant warrants that all employees and subcontractors shall have sufficient skill and experience to perform the Services assigned to them. Finally, Consultant represents that it, its employees and subcontractors have all licenses, permits, qualifications and approvals of whatever nature that are legally required to perform the Services and that such licenses and approvals shall be maintained throughout the term of this Agreement. Consultant shall perform, at its own cost and expense and without reimbursement from Commission, any Services necessary to correct errors or omissions which are caused by the Consultant's failure to comply with the standard of care provided for herein, and shall be fully responsible to the Commission for all damages and other liabilities provided for in the indemnification provisions of this Agreement arising from the Consultant's errors and omissions. 3.11 Laws and Regulations. Consultant shall keep itself fully informed of and in compliance with all local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations in any manner affecting the performance of the Project or the Services, including all Cal/OSHA requirements, and shall give all notices required by law. Consultant shall be liable for all violations of such laws and regulations in connection with Services. If the Consultant performs any work knowing it to be contrary to such laws, rules and regulations and without giving written notice to Commission, Consultant shall be solely responsible for all costs arising therefrom. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its officials, directors, officers, employees and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, from any claim or liability arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with such laws, rules or regulations. 3.12 Insurance. 3.12.1 Time for Compliance. Consultant shall not commence work under this Agreement until it has provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that it has secured all insurance required under this section. In addition, Consultant shall not allow any subcontractor to commence work on any subcontract until it has secured all insurance required under this section. 3.12.2 Minimum Requirements. Consultant shall, at its expense, procure and maintain for the duration of the Agreement insurance against claims for injuries to persons B-7 388 or damages to property which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the Agreement by the Consultant, its agents, representatives, employees or subcontractors. Consultant shall also require all of its subcontractors to procure and maintain the same insurance for the duration of the Agreement. Such insurance shall meet at least the following minimum levels of coverage: (A) Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as the latest version of the following: (1) General Liability. Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability coverage (occurrence form CG 0001); (2) Automobile Liability: Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage form number CA 0001, code 1 (any auto); and (3) Workers' Compensation and Employer's Liability. Workers' Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer's Liability Insurance. (B) Minimum Limits of Insurance. Consultant shall maintain limits no less than: (1) General Liability: $1,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. If Commercial General Liability Insurance or other form with general aggregate limit is used, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this Agreement/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit; (2) Automobile Liability: $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury and property damage; and (3) if Consultant has an employees, Workers' Compensation and Employer's Liability: Workers' Compensation limits as required by the Labor Code of the State of California. Employer's Practices Liability limits of $1,000,000 per accident. 3.12.3 Professional Liability. Consultant shall procure and maintain, and require its sub -consultants to procure and maintain, for a period of five (5) years following completion of the Project, errors and omissions liability insurance appropriate to their profession. Such insurance shall be in an amount not less than $1,000,000 per claim. 3.12.4 Insurance Endorsements. The insurance policies shall contain the following provisions, or Consultant shall provide endorsements on forms approved by the Commission to add the following provisions to the insurance policies: (A) General Liability. The general liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the Services or operations performed by or on behalf of the Consultant, including materials, parts or equipment furnished in connection with such work; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant's scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant's insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (B) Automobile Liability. The automobile liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the ownership, operation, maintenance, use, loading or unloading of any auto owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Consultant or for which the Consultant is responsible; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and B-8 • • • 389 • • • agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant's scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant's insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (C) Workers' Compensation and Employers Liability Coverage. The insurer shall agree to waive all rights of subrogation against the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents for losses paid under the terms of the insurance policy which arise from work performed by the Consultant. (D) All Coverages. Each insurance policy required by this Agreement shall be endorsed to state that: (A) coverage shall not be suspended, voided or canceled except after thirty (30) days prior written notice by certified mail, retum receipt requested, has been given to the Commission; and, (B) any failure to comply with reporting or other provisions of the policies, including breaches of warranties, shall not affect coverage provided to the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents. 3.12.5 Deductibles and Self -Insurance Retentions. Any deductibles or self -insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the Commission. If the Commission does not approve the deductibles or self -insured retentions as presented, Consultant shall guarantee that, at the option of the Commission, either: (1) the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self -insured retentions as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents; or, (2) the Consultant shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigation costs, claims and administrative and defense expenses. 3.12.6 Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best's rating no less than A:VIII, licensed to do business in California, and satisfactory to the Commission. 3.12.7 Verification of Coverage. Consultant shall furnish Commission with original certificates of insurance and endorsements effecting coverage required by this Agreement on forms satisfactory to the Commission. The certificates and endorsements for each insurance policy shall be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. All certificates and endorsements must be received and approved by the Commission before work commences. The Commission reserves the right to require complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, at any time. 3.13 Safety. Consultant shall execute and maintain its work so as to avoid injury or damage to any person or property. In carrying out its Services, the Consultant shall at all times be in compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations, and shall exercise all necessary precautions for the safety of employees appropriate to the nature of the work and the conditions under which the work is to be performed. Safety precautions as applicable shall include, but shall not be limited to: (A) adequate life protection and life saving equipment and procedures; (B) instructions in accident prevention for all employees and subcontractors, such as safe walkways, scaffolds, fall protection ladders, bridges, gang planks, confined space procedures, trenching and shoring, equipment and other safety devices, equipment and wearing apparel as are necessary or lawfully required to prevent accidents or injuries; and (C) adequate facilities for the proper inspection and maintenance of all B-9 390 safety measures. 3.14 Fees and Payment. 3.14.1 Compensation. Consultant shall receive compensation, including authorized reimbursements, for all Services rendered under this Agreement at the rates set forth in Exhibit "C" attached hereto. The total compensation shall not exceed [ INSERT WRITTEN DOLLAR AMOUNT 1 ($[ INSERT NUMERICAL DOLLAR AMOUNT 1) without written approval of Commission's Executive Director ("Total Compensation"). Extra .Work may be authorized, as described below, and if authorized, will be compensated at the rates and manner set forth in this Agreement. 3.14.2 Payment of Compensation. Consultant shall submit to Commission a monthly statement which indicates work completed and hours of Services rendered by Consultant. The statement shall describe the amount of Services and supplies provided since the initial commencement date, or since the start of the subsequent billing periods, as appropriate, through the date of the statement. Commission shall, within 45 days of receiving such statement, review the statement and pay all approved charges thereon. 3.14.3 Reimbursement for Expenses. Consultant shall not be reimbursed for any expenses unless authorized in writing by Commission. 3.14.4 Extra Work. At any time during the term of this Agreement, Commission may request that Consultant perform Extra Work. As used herein, "Extra Work" means any work which is determined by Commission to be necessary for the proper completion of the Project, but which the parties did not reasonably anticipate would be necessary at the execution of this Agreement. Consultant shall not perform, nor be compensated for, Extra Work without written authorization from Commission's Executive Director. 3.15 Accounting Records. Consultant shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to all costs and expenses incurred and fees charged under this Agreement. All such records shall be clearly identifiable. Consultant shall allow a representative of Commission during normal business hours to examine, audit, and make transcripts or copies of such records and any other documents created pursuant to this Agreement. Consultant shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings, and activities related to the Agreement for a period of three (3) years from the date of final payment under this Agreement. 3.16 Termination of Agreement. 3.16.1 Grounds for Termination. Commission may, by written notice to Consultant, terminate the whole or any part of this Agreement at any time and without cause by giving written notice to Consultant of such termination, and specifying the effective date thereof. Upon termination, Consultant shall be compensated only for those services which have been fully and adequately rendered to Commission through the effective date of the termination, and Consultant shall be entitled to no further compensation. Consultant may not terminate this Agreement except for cause. 3.16.2 Effect of Termination. If this Agreement is terminated as provided herein, Commission may require Consultant to provide all finished or unfinished Documents and Data, as defined below, and other information of any kind prepared by Consultant in connection B-10 • • 391 • • • with the performance of Services under this Agreement. Consultant shall be required to provide such document and other information within fifteen (15) days of the request. 3.16.3 Additional Services. In the event this Agreement is terminated in whole or in part as provided herein, Commission may procure, upon such terms and in such manner as it may determine appropriate, services similar to those terminated. 3.17 Delivery of Notices. All notices permitted or required under this Agreement shall be given to the respective parties at the following address, or at such other address as the respective parties may provide in writing for this purpose: CONSULTANT: Attn: COMMISSION: Riverside County Transportation Commission ro 4080 Lemon Street, 3 Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Attn: Executive Director Such notice shall be deemed made when personally delivered or when mailed, forty-eight (48) hours after deposit in the U.S. Mail, first class postage prepaid and addressed to the party at its applicable address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred, regardless of the method of service. 3.18 Ownership of Materials/Confidentiality. 3.18.1 Documents & Data. This Agreement creates an exclusive and perpetual license for Commission to copy, use, modify, reuse, or sub -license any and all copyrights and designs embodied in plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data and other documents or works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or data magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer diskettes, which are prepared or caused to be prepared by Consultant under this Agreement ("Documents & Data"). Consultant shall require all subcontractors to agree in writing that Commission is granted an exclusive and perpetual license for any Documents & Data the subcontractor prepares under this Agreement. Consultant represents and warrants that Consultant has the legal right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Documents & Data. Consultant makes no such representation and warranty in regard to Documents & Data which were prepared by design professionals other than Consultant or provided to Consultant by the Commission. Commission shall not be limited in any way in its use of the Documents & Data at any time, provided that any such use not within the purposes intended by this Agreement shall be at Commission's sole risk. B-11 392 3.18.2 Intellectual Property. In addition, Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest (including copyright, patent, trade secret and other proprietary rights) in all plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data, computer programs or software and source code, enhancements, documents, and any and all works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium or expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or other data magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer media ("Intellectual Property") prepared or developed by or on behalf of Consultant under this Agreement as well as any other such Intellectual Property prepared or developed by or on behalf of Consultant under this Agreement. The Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest in Intellectual Property developed or modified under this Agreement whether or not paid for wholly or in part by Commission, whether or not developed in conjunction with Consultant, and whether or not developed by Consultant. Consultant will execute separate written assignments of any and all rights to the above referenced Intellectual Property upon request of Commission. Consultant shall also be responsible to obtain in writing separate written assignments from any subcontractors or agents of Consultant of any and all right to the above referenced Intellectual Property. Should Consultant, either during or following termination of this Agreement, desire to use any of the above -referenced Intellectual Property, it shall first obtain the written approval of the Commission. All materials and documents which were developed or prepared by the Consultant for general use prior to the execution of this Agreement and which are not the copyright of any other party or publicly available and any other computer applications, shall continue to be the property of the Consultant. However, unless otherwise identified and stated prior to execution of this Agreement, Consultant represents and warrants that it has the right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Intellectual Property as provided herein. Commission further is granted by Consultant a non-exclusive and perpetual license to copy, use, modify or sub -license any and all Intellectual Property otherwise owned by Consultant which is the basis or foundation for any derivative, collective, insurrectional, or supplemental work created under this Agreement. 3.18.3 Confidentiality. All ideas, memoranda, specifications, plans, procedures, drawings, descriptions, computer program data, input record data, written information, and other Documents and Data either created by or provided to Consultant in connection with the performance of this Agreement shall be held confidential by Consultant. Such materials shall not, without the prior written consent of Commission, be used by Consultant for any purposes other than the performance of the Services. Nor shall such materials be disclosed to any person or entity not connected with the performance of the Services or the Project. Nothing furnished to Consultant which is otherwise known to Consultant or is generally known, or has become known, to the related industry shall be deemed confidential. Consultant shall not use Commission's name or insignia, photographs of the Project, or any publicity pertaining to the Services or the Project in any magazine, trade paper, newspaper, television or radio production or other similar medium without the prior written consent of Commission. B-12 • • • 393 • • • 3.19 Cooperation; Further Acts.. The Parties shall fully cooperate with one another, and shall take any additional acts or sign any additional documents as may be necessary, appropriate or convenient to attain the purposes of this Agreement. 3.20 Attorney's Fees. If either party commences an action against the other party, either legal, administrative or otherwise, arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorney's fees and costs of such actions. 3.21 Indemnification. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents and volunteers free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of or incident to any alleged negligent acts, omissions or willful misconduct of Consultant, its officials, officers, employees, agents, consultants and contractors arising out of or in connection with the performance of the Services, the Project or this Agreement, including without limitation the payment of all consequential damages and attorney's fees and other related costs and expenses. Consultant shall defend, at Consultant's own cost, expense and risk, any and all such aforesaid suits, actions or other legal proceedings of every kind that may be brought or instituted against Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents and volunteers. Consultant shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents and volunteers, in any such suit, action or other legal proceeding. Consultant shall reimburse Commission and its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents and/or volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Consultant's obligation to indemnify shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents and volunteers. The indemnification language above shall apply except as to design professional services, as defined in Civil Code section 2782.8, including any architect, landscape architect, engineer or land surveyor services, provided pursuant to this Agreement. As to such Services, to the fullest extent permitted by law, Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, volunteers, and agents free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of or incident to any alleged negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct of Consultant, its officials, officers, employees, agents, consultants, and contractors arising out of or in connection with the performance of the Services, including without limitation the payment of all consequential damages, expert witness fees, and attorneys fees and other related costs and expenses. Consultant shall defend, at Consultant's own cost, expense and risk, any and all such aforesaid suits, actions or other legal proceedings of every kind that may be brought or instituted against the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, agents, consultants, employees and volunteers. Consultant shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against the Commission or its directors, officials, officers, agents, consultants, employees and volunteers, in any such suit, action or other legal proceeding. Consultant shall reimburse the Commission and its directors, officials, officers, agents, consultants, employees and volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs, B-13 394 • including reasonable attorney's fees, incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Consultant's obligation to indemnity shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by the Commission or its directors, officials, officers, agents, consultants, employees and volunteers. 3.22 Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains the entire Agreement of the parties with respect to the subject matter hereof, and supersedes all prior negotiations, understandings or agreements. This Agreement may only be modified by a writing signed by both parties. 3.23 Governing Law. This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. 3.24 Time of Essence. Time is of the essence for each and every provision of this Agreement. 3.25 Commission's Right to Employ Other Consultants. The Commission reserves the right to employ other consultants in connection with this Project. 3.26 Successors and Assigns. This Agreement shall be binding on the successors and assigns of the parties, and shall not be assigned by Consultant without the prior written consent of Commission. 3.27 Prohibited Interests. 3.27.1 Solicitation. Consultant maintains and warrants that it has not employed nor retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, to solicit or secure this Agreement. Further, Consultant warrants that it has not paid nor has it agreed to pay any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift or other consideration contingent upon or resulting from the award or making of this Agreement. For breach or violation of this warranty, Commission shall have the right to rescind this Agreement without liability. 3.27.2 Conflict of Interest. For the term of this Agreement, no member, officer or employee of Commission, during the term of his or her service with Commission, shall have any direct interest in this Agreement, or obtain any present or anticipated material benefit arising therefrom. 3.28 Equal Opportunity Employment. Consultant represents that it is an equal opportunity employer and it shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or age. Such non- discrimination shall include, but not be limited to, all activities related to initial employment, upgrading, demotion, transfer, recruitment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination. Consultant shall also comply with all relevant provisions of Commission's Disadvantaged Business Enterprise program, Affirmative Action Plan or other related Commission programs or guidelines currently in effect or hereinafter enacted. 3.29 Subcontracting. Consultant shall not subcontract any portion of the work or • B-14 395 • • • Services required by this Agreement, except as expressly stated herein, without prior written approval of the Commission. Subcontracts, if any, shall contain a provision making them subject to all provisions stipulated in this Agreement. 3.30 Prevailing Wages. By its execution of this Agreement, Consultant certified that it is aware of the requirements of California Labor Code Sections 1720 et seq. and 1770 et seq., as well as California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 16000 et seq. ("Prevailing Wage Laws"), which require the payment of prevailing wage rates and the performance of other requirements on certain "public works" and "maintenance" projects. If the Services are being performed as part of an applicable "public works" or "maintenance" project, as defined by the Prevailing Wage Laws, and if the total compensation is $1,000 or more, Consultant agrees to fully comply with such Prevailing Wage Laws. The Commission shall provide Consultant with a copy of the prevailing rate of per diem wages in effect at the commencement of this Agreement. Consultant shall make copies of the prevailing rates of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Services available to interested parties upon request, and shall post copies at the Consultant's principal place of business and at the project site. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its elected officials, officers, employees and agents free and harmless from any claims, liabilities, costs, penalties or interest arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with the Prevailing Wage Laws. 3.31 Employment of Apprentices. This Agreement shall not prevent the employment of properly indentured apprentices in accordance with the California Labor Code, and no employer or labor union shall refuse to accept otherwise qualified employees as indentured apprentices on the work performed hereunder solely on the ground of race, creed, national origin, ancestry, color or sex. Every qualified apprentice shall be paid the standard wage paid to apprentices under the regulations of the craft or trade in which he or she is employed and shall be employed only in the craft or trade to which he or she is registered. If California Labor Code Section 1777.5 applies to the Services, Consultant and any subcontractor hereunder who employs workers in any apprenticeable craft or trade shall apply to the joint apprenticeship council administering applicable standards for a certificate approving Consultant or any sub -consultant for the employment and training of apprentices. Upon issuance of this certificate, Consultant and any sub -consultant shall employ the number of apprentices provided for therein, as well as contribute to the fund to administer the apprenticeship program in each craft or trade in the area of the work hereunder. The parties expressly understand that the responsibility for compliance with provisions of this Section and with Sections 1777.5, 1777.6 and 1777.7 of the California Labor Code in regard to all apprenticeable occupations lies with Consultant. 3.32 No Waiver. Failure of Commission to insist on any one occasion upon strict compliance with any of the terms, covenants or conditions hereof shall not be deemed a waiver of such term, covenant or condition, nor shall any waiver or relinquishment of any rights or powers hereunder at any one time or more times be deemed a waiver or relinquishment of such other right or power at any other time or times. 3.33 Eight -Hour Law. Pursuant to the provisions of the California Labor Code, eight hours of labor shall constitute a legal day's work, and the time of service of any worker employed on the work shall be limited and restricted to eight hours during any one calendar day, B-15 396 • and forty hours in any one calendar week, except when payment for overtime is made at not less than one and one-half the basic rate for all hours worked in excess of eight hours per day ("Eight -Hour Law"), unless Consultant or the Services are not subject to the Eight -Hour Law. Consultant shall forfeit to Commission as a penalty, $50.00 for each worker employed in the execution of this Agreement by him, or by any sub -consultant under him, for each calendar day during which such workman is required or permitted to work more than eight hours in any calendar day and forty hours in any one calendar week without such compensation for overtime violation of the provisions of the California Labor Code, unless Consultant or the Services are not subject to the Eight -Hour Law. [signatures on following page] • • B-16 397 • SIGNATURE PAGE TO RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT FOR ON -CALL RIGHT OF WAY APPRAISAL SERVICES FOR RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, AGRICULTURAL AND RAILROAD PROPERTIES WITH [ CONSULTANT 1 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement was executed on the date first written above. RIVERSIDE COUNTY CONSULTANT TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION [INSERT NAME OF CONSULTANT] By: [INSERT NAME], Chairman Signature Name • APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best, Best & Krieger LLP General Counsel Exhibit "A" Scope of Services Exhibit'B" Schedule of Services Exhibit "C" Compensation • Title [ INSERT 1 [ INSERT 1 B-17 398 LSA • • • LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. 20 EXECUTIVE PARK, SUITE 200 949.553.0666 TEL IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614 949.553.8076 FAX May 10, 2010 Mr. Greg Moore Procurement and Assets Manager Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 BERKELEY CARLSBAD FORT COLLINS FRESNO PALM SPRINGS POINT RICHMOND DIECEUWEll MU 1 1 2215 RIVERSIDE NT i U I I,.; : y TRANSPORTATION CC'.11>Mi ION Subject: On -Call Environmental Consulting Services: Request for Cost Proposal (RFQ No. 10-31-083-00) Dear Mr. Moore: ATTACHMENT 2 RIVERSIDE ROCKLIN SAN LUIS OBISPO S. SAN FRANCISCO As requested, LSA Associates, Inc. (LSA) is providing its direct labor costs and rates and additional direct costs in accordance with the Riverside County Transportation Commission's (RCTC) Attachment "A" (Compensation and Payment) and Form 60. LSA has reviewed Attachment "A" and understands that it will become part of the agreement between RCTC and LSA. Also included are the equivalent documents for our two subconsultants: CH2MHill and GroupDelta. LSA looks forward to starting work on this contract. Please contact me at (949) 553-0666 if you need additional information. Sincerely, LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. isa Williams Project Manager Attachment: Attachment "A" (Compensation and Payment) for LSA Associates, Inc. Attachment "A" (Compensation and Payment) for CH2MHill "Form 60" for GroupDelta 05/10/10 «LAPROPOSAL1Z221777A1 - RCTC On -Call EnvironmentanCompensation and Payment.doca PLANNING I ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES I DESIGN 400 • • • ATTACHMENT"A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT LSA Associates, Inc. For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct labor costa shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as ioilows_ i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 2.6765 , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs (2) Payroll Additives 100% 88.67% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 401 • (3) Overhead Costs 78.980 The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consuftant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 9 To (addressed as a percentage) TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 2.917 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is ***Not applicable. On -cal contract), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shalt be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM Reproduction (8.5 x 11) B/W Reproduction (8.5 x 11) Color Reproduction (11 x 17) B/W Reproduction (11 x 17) Color CD Production Plotting Mileage On Road Mileage Off -Road GPS Unit Sound Meter Aerial Photos REIMBURSEMENT RATE $0. f 0 per page $1.00 per page $0.16 per page $2.50 per page $5.00 per CD $3.75 per sf $0.50 per mile $0.65 per mile $100.00 per day $75.00 per day $200.00 per photo Travel by air and travel in excess of too miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. • • • 402 • • • 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES Principal 42.30 86.72 Associate 32.66 47.03 Senior Plamrer/EnvironBiologist/Cultural/Air-Noise,/Trans/GIS 24.59 54.34 Plamrer/EnvironBiologisdCulturaUAir-Noise/Trans/GIS 23.75 35.97 Assistant Planner/Environ/Biologist/Cultural/Air-Noiseffrans/GIS 18.00 30.40 Senior Field Crew/Field Crew 15.00 24.59 Research Assistant/Technician 10.00 15.00 Graphics 21.58 40.95 Office Assistant 14.25 21.72 Word Processing/Technical Editing 20.19 27.57 c) The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be, in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. 403 c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: g) 1 hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees rested. Signed Title Date Invoice No. 4) PAYMENT a) The Commissiori shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. 404 • • • ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT CH2M HILL 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultants personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultants personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 2.363 , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs 1.0 (2) Payroll Additives included in overhead below The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 405 CH2M HILL 5/10/10 (3) Overhead Costs 1.363 The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 9% Total Multiplier b) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. 2.576 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2), and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Outside Reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. Page 2 of 3 406 • CH2M HILL 5/10/10 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES Senior Consultant/Technologist $57.02 - $103.98 Project Manager $57.02 - $103.98 Task Manager/Sr. Engineer/Scientist/Planner $40.58 - $91.57 Staff Engineer/Scientist/Planner $24.32 - $58.31 Jr. Engineer/Scientist/Planner $17.73 - $42.83 Staff Technician/CADD $15.71 - $54.11 Technical Editor $20.79 - $58.31 Office/Clerical/Accounting $15.85 - $38.98 Page 3 of 3 407 • • • CONTRACT PRICING PROPOSAL (Services) Name of Proposer GROUP DELTA CONSULTANTS, INC. MTA "FORM 611" PAGE 1 OF 2 Service to be Furnished Geotedmical Services And Hazardous Waste Studies Home Office Address 32 Mauchly, Sate 8 - Irvine, CA 92618 Division(s) / Location(s) Where Work Is to be Performer On -Call Environmental Consulting Services RFQ No. 10-31-083-00 Total Amount of Proposal $0 Contract No. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF COST ELEMENTS 1. Direct Labor (Specify) Principal Engineer Senior Pricier Staff Technician CADD Clerical Estimated Hours 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rate / Hour 80.53 43.99 37.82 21.63 27.62 28.85 17.10 Est. Cast ($) $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 Total Est. Cost ($) TOTAL HOURS 0 Total Direct 2. Labor Overhead OVERHEAD O.H. Rate 2.11 x Base = 0.00 Est. Cost $0.00 $0.00 3. Traver Total labor Overhead::: a. Transportation b. Per Diem or Subsistence Est. Cost $0.00 $0.00 Total Travel 4.Subcontractors /Subconsultants" Est. Cost 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Subcontractors 0 5. Other Direct Costs' TOTAL DIRECT COST AND OVERHEAD $0.00 $0.00 6. General 8 Admin. Expense ( of item nos. 7. Fee (9%) TOTAL ESTIMATED COST AND FEE ) $0.00 $0.00 • Itemize or second page Of "Fomn 60" •' Mat "Form 60" for all proposed subcontractors 408 CONTRACT PRICING PROPOSAL (Professional Services) "FORM 60" PAGE 2 OF 2 SUPPORTING SCHEDULE ITEM NO. ITEM DESCRIPTION Mileage Travel EST. COST ($) $0.50 at cost Postage, shipping Data search (EDR) Outside expenses at cost at cost at cost Outside subcontractor at cost Type name and Title Shah Ghanbari, President Signature _,.2) Q.�J Name of firm Group Delta Consultants, Inc. Date of submission 5/7/2010 • • • 409 ATTACHMENT 3 ICF INTERNATIONAL May 19, 2010 Mr. Greg Moore Procurement and Assets Manager Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, California 92501 Subject: RFQ No.10-31-083-00, Response to Request for Cost Proposal Dear Mr. Moore: 1CF International (previously )ones & Stokes Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of ICF International) is pleased to submit the attached materials to the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the Commission) to provide on -call environmental consulting services. At the Commission's request, we are submitting the completed "Compensation and Payment" provisions (Attachment A). The completed Attachment A form is also provided for each subconsuitant on our team. We look forward to completing negotiations regarding the abovementioned contract and are excited about this opportunity to continue our work with the Commission. Should you have any questions about the enclosed materials, please contact Brian Calvert, Project Manager/Director, 949-333-6600, or at bcalvert@icfi.com. Sincerely, Charles Smith, AICP Vice President ,-� Dr" Brian Calvert Project Manager/Director 1 Ada Parkway, Suite 100 irvine, CA 92616 949.333.6600 949.333.6601 fax icli.com 410 • • Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of ICF International ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultants personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultants personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 193.09% , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 37.42% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 411 Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of ICF International (3) Overhead Costs 155.67% The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 3.18 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not ' exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. (fates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel_ Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases insert charges j Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost $0.08 - 0.16/copy $0.16 - 0.32 /copy Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. 412 • • • Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of 1CF International 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specked in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES sample j Senior Project Director Project Director Sr Technical Analyst Managing Consultant Technical Director Senior Consultant III Senior Consultant II Senior Consultant I Associate Consultant III Associate Consultant II Associate Consultant I Assistant Consultant Administrative Tech $67.31 - $132.79/hr $46.49 - $81.20/hr $40.00 - $85.00/hr $39.36 - $62.54/hr $29.55 - $82.80/hr $38.46 - $75.00/hr $30.00 - $65.00/hr $19.00 - $60.00/hr $20.51 - $42.09/hr $16.87 - $38.70/hr $17.00 - $40.00/hr $20.00 - $36.00/hr $13.00 - $38.40/hr c) The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal 3) INVOICING. P a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the 413 Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of ICF International Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the fimi which reads as follows: g) I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • 414 • • • Arellano & Associates ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct tabor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 60%, and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 0% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 415 Arellano & Associates (3) Overhead Costs 60% The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) 1.74 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shalt be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Actual Cost Car mileage 0.50 Rental Car Actual Cost Travel Actual Cost Photocopies (Black & White) $.10 /copy Photocopies (Color) $.25 /copy Photographs/ other reprographic Services Actual Cost Postage/Shipping Actual Cost Courier Service Actual Cost Other Rentals, supplies, purchases Actual Cost Graphic Design/Website services Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. 416 • • • Mellan° & Associates 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. c) POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES Principal Outreach Director Outreach Manager — Senior Associate Outreach Specialist - Associate Outreach Specialist - Associate Outreach Specialist - Associate Staffing Assistant $125.00 - $131.25/hour $112.50- $118.13/hour $90.00 - $94.50/hour $61,00 - $64.05/hour $54.00 - $56.70/hour $51.00 - $53.55/hour $12.00 - 12.60/hour The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. 417 Arellano & Associates • The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. g) Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: 1 hereby certify that the tours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees Gsted. Signed Title Date Invoice No. N/A 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • 418 • • • Corridor Analysis ATTACHMENT"A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 150% and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives .31 The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 419 Corridor Analysis (3) Overhead Costs 1.22 The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. b) (4) Profit TOTAL MULTIPLIER FIXED FEE. 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) 1.68 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Actual Cost Postage/Shipping Actual Cost Courier Service Actual Cost Other Rentals, supplies, purchases Actual Cost Property Research ($250 per month times actual months used) REIMBURSEMENT RATE insert charges J Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost $0.03/copy $0.09/copy Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval 10 be reimbursed under this Agreement. • • • 420 • • • Corridor Analysis 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. c) POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES j sample Right of Way Project Manager Right of Way Technician Right of Way Agent Administrative Support $ 62.50 - $ 65.75/hour $ 13.00 - $ 15.00/hour $ 32.70 - $ 34.50/hour $ 19.25 - $ 20.25/hour The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. 421 Corridor Analysis d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. g) Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: 1 hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. N/A 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • • • 422 • Group Delta Consultants ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 211e/a , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 29% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 423 Group Delta Consultants • (3) Overhead Costs 182% The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant ffrm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 8.5 % (addressed as a oercentaae) TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. _3.37 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases REIMBURSEMENT RATE insert charges 1 Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost 0 0.10 /copy Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commissions prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. 424 • • • Group Delta Consultants 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES sample ) Principal Sr. Engineer/Geologist Project Engineer/Geologist Staff Engineer/Geologist Technician Drafter/CADD Operator Word Processor $ 57.69 - $ 96.15/hour $ 43.27 - $ 44.71/hour $ 35.58 - $ 40.38/hour $ 22.60 - $ 28.85/hour $ 27.50 - $ 33.00/hour $ 28.85 - $ 28.85./hour $ 18 .00 - $ 18.28/hour The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. 425 Group Delta Consultants c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. fl Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: g) I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged In this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. 426 • • • Iteris ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Casts and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is _292.70% , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs 100% (2) Payroll Additives 0% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 427 Iteris (3) Overhead Costs 169.77% The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant frm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) 2.93 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Addifional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost $ n/c $ n/c Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. • • 428 Iteris 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES Vice President $71.00 - 90.00 Associate Vice President $51.00 - 80.00 Senior Transportation Planner/Engineer $34.00 - 65.00 Transportation Planner/Engineer $32.00 - 45.00 Associate Transportation Planner/Engineer $27.00 - 35.00 Assistant Transportation Planner/Engineer $23.00 - 35.00 Graphics Support $24.00 - 35.00 Administrator $17.00 - 25.00 c) The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. 429 Iteris • Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. g) Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. N/A 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. 430 • • San Diego Natural History Museum ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: I) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is _1.68 , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 20% The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 431 San Diego Natural History Museum (3) Overhead Costs 35% The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2.. (4) Profit 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 1.68 (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed al the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases insert charges l $130.00 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost $0.10/copy $0.20/copy Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. • • • 432 • • • San Diego Natural History Museum 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION sample Project Manager Principal Investigator Field Manager Contract Manager Paleontological Field Monitor Collections Manager Fossil Lab Manager RANGE OF HOURLY RATES 1 $50.00/hour $27.00 - $50.00/hour $27.00lhour $22.00/hour $21.00 - $26.00/hour $18.90/hour $17.10/hour The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. 433 San Diego Natural History Museum c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: g) I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to to employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. N/A 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • • • 434 • • TRC Solutions, Inc. ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 1.8783 , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 0.481195 The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 435 TRC Solutions, Inc. (3) Overhead Costs 1.249969 The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant firm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) TOTAL MULTIPLIER _1.8783* (sum of (a)(ii)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) *Overhead Rate to apply to Direct Salary (Labor). Expected Total Multiplier is 2.8783 Including Direct Salary (Labor) b) FIXED FEE. i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE f. Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Company Vehicle Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases insert charges 1 Actual Cost current IRS rate Actual Cost $75.00/day Actual Cost $ 0.05 /copy $ 0.55/copy Actual Cost $25 $100 Actual Cost • • 436 • • • TRC Solutions, Inc. Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 rages from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(1) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES E sample j Principal $64.00 $74.00 Sr Project Manager $45.00 $63.00 Project Manager $36.00 $45.00 Sr Project Engineer/Scientist $41.00 $44.00 Project Engineer/Scientist $35.00 $41.00 Sr Staff Engineer/Scientist $25.00 $35.00 Staff Engineer/Scientist $22.00 $25.00 Technician $16.00 $31.00 Admin $18.00 $25.00 AutoCad $20.00 $27.00 c) The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the 437 TRC Solutions, Inc. Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. f) Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: g) t hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. NIA 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • • 438 • • • T.Y. Lin International ATTACHMENT "A" COMPENSATION AND PAYMENT For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Services under this Agreement, the Commission will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. 1) ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Services will be comprised of the following elements: a) Direct Labor Costs; b) Fixed Fee; and c) Additional Direct Costs. a) DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: i) DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Services under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) ii) MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is 1.6468 , and is the sum of the following components: (1) Direct Salary Costs N/A (2) Payroll Additives 0.5817 The decimal ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. 439 T.Y. Lin International (3) Overhead Costs 1.0651 The decimal ratio of allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant ffrm's total direct salary costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. (4) Profit 8.5 % (addressed as a percentage) TOTAL MULTIPLIER b) FIXED FEE. 2.8718 (sum of (a)(11)(1), (2) and (3) multiplied by the percentage of profit) i) The Fixed Fee is the Profit as determined in Section (a)(ii)(4). The Maximum Fixed Fee under this Agreement is N/A ($ ), and shall not exceed this amount without written approval of the Commission's Executive Director. c) ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE Per Diem Car mileage Rental Car Travel Photocopies (Black & White) Photocopies (Color) Photographs/ Other reprographic Services Postage/Shipping Courier Service Other Rentals, supplies, purchases insert charges J Actual Cost 0.50 or current IRS rate Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Actual Cost Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to the Commission's office must have the Commission's prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. • • • 440 • • T.Y. Lin International 2) DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section (a)(i) above, are given below and are subject to the following: a) Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph (1)(a) above. b) Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may, with prior approval from the Commission, be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. c) POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES sample, j Senior Principal Engineer Principal Engineer Supervising Engineer Senior Engineer II Senior Engineer I Engineer!! Engineer{ Assistant Engineer Engineer Intern Structural Design Tech III Structural Design Tech II Structural Design Tech I Project Administrator III Project Administrator II Project Administrator I $100.00 - $120.00lhour $79.00 - $100.00/hour $62.00 - $79.00/hour $54.00 - $62.00/hour $47.00 - $54.00/hour $42.00 - $47.00/hour $34.00 - $42.00/hour $25.00 - $34.00/hour $17.00 - $25.00/hour $41.00 - $52.00/hour $28.00 - $41.00/hour $20.00 - $28.00/hour $29.00 - $42.00/hour $19.00 - $29.00/hour $14.00 - $19.00/hour The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3) INVOICING. 441 g) T.Y. Lin International a) Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Services performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to the Commission's Executive Director with two (2) copies to the Commission's Project Coordinator. b) Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Commission's Representative. c) Base Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Services, shall be listed separately. The charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. d) A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to the Commission such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. e) Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. fl Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and pad to the employees listed. Signed Title Date Invoice No. N/A 4) PAYMENT a) The Commission shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by the Commission of an original invoice. Should the Commission contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. b) The final payment for Services under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. • • 442 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Henry Nickel, Staff Analyst Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Amendment to Commission's Commuter Rail Program Fiscal Year WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Amend the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2006/07 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect a reallocation of $4 million in Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 program funds originally approved for the North Main Corona parking structure to the Perris Valley Line (PVL) project; 2) Amend the Commission's Commuter Rail Program FY 2009/10 SRTP to reflect allocation of $9.975 million in FTA Section 5309 program funds and deobligation of $8.8 million in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds and $1.175 million in State Transit Assistance (STA) funds for the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) rail car procurement project and reduction of LTF Capital Improvement Program expenditures by $480,000; and 3) Approve reductions to budgeted revenues and expenditures in the LTF, STA, Rail Operations, and Rail Capital funds. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Rail Program is requesting amendments to its FY 2006/07 and FY 2009/10 Commuter Rail SRTPs as follows: FY 2006/07 SRTP Proposed Amendment At its September 14, 2006 meeting, the Commission approved building parking structure C at the North Main Corona Station as it yielded the highest number of spaces at 1,443 (1,098 structure + 345 east lot) to meet the demand indicated by the ridership forecast. To complete the funding plan for the parking structure, $16 million in federal Section 5307 funds were requested. The construction phase Agenda Item 9G 443 is now near completion and based on accounting of outstanding approved change orders, an estimated $4 million in Section 5307 funds remain. The Rail Program is now requesting approval to reallocate the remaining balance of $4 million in Section 5307 funds from the North Main Corona parking structure project to the PVL project to cover needed funds for construction management of the new rail line. Federal Sec 5307 Funding North Main Corona Parking Structure Perris Valley Line Project Total Original Plan $16, 000, 000 $ 2, 500, 000 $18,500,000 FY 2009/10 SRTP Proposed Amendment Request ($4, 000, 000) 4,000,000 $0 Modified Plan $12, 000, 000 6,500,000 $18,500,000 The approved FY 2009/10 SRTP included allocation of $8.8 million in LTF and $4.5 million in STA funds for the purchase of new rail cars for Metrolink, as well as $500,000 in LTF for the Capital Improvement Plan project. Currently, the Commission maintains significant reserve funds in federal Section 5309. Due to reduced LTF and STA revenues this year and given the need to make these fund sources available for future operating needs, the following modifications to the FY 2009/10 SRTP, as shown on Attachment 2, Tables 2a and 2b are requested: • Reflect allocation of $9.975 million in FTA Section 5309 and deobligate $8.8 million in LTF funds and $1.175 million in STA funds for the SCRRA rail car procurement project; and • Reduce LTF Capital Improvement Program expenditures by $480,000. These changes resulted in a combined decrease of $10.455 million in LTF and STA expenditures with the additional use of $9.975 million in Section 5309 funding, which will be accessed directly by SCRRA and will not flow through the Commission's account records. The net change in the Rail Program's capital expenditure plan is a decrease of $480,000 for FY 2009/10. There is no impact to the farebox recovery ratio and to other Productivity Improvement Program indicators since the monies are designated for capital expenditures only. Agenda Item 9G • • 444 • • Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2009/10 Amount: $10,455,000 Source of Funds: LTF - Western County Rail Budget Ad ustment: Yes 601 62 86102 $9,280,000 241 62 86102 $1,175,000 GLA No.: 004199 86102 103 25 86102 $9,975,000 004199 90701 221 33 90701 $480,000 004199 401 40102 103 25 40102 $8,800,000 004199 415 41510 103 25 41502 $1,175,000 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \Lliter a Date: 05/17/10 Attachments: 1) FY 2006/07 Operating and Capital Assistance by Funding Source 2) FY 2009/10 Operating and Capital Assistance by Funding Source Agenda Item 9G 445 • RCTC Commuter Rail ATTACHMENT 1 FY 2006/07 OPERATING and CAPITAL ASSISTANCE BY FUNDING SOURCE Table 1 - Operating Assistance Table 1a- Current y Approved Operating Funding Plan Project Description Total LTF STA Measure A Sec 5307 - Riv- San. Bernardino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Operating Subsidy $ 5,508,700.00 $ 5,508,700.00 RCTC Rail Operations $ 1,597,900.00 $ 1,597,900.00 Total: Operating $ 7,106,600.00 $ 7,106,600.00 0 0 0 0 0 Table 1b. Modified Operating Funding Plan SCRRA Operating Subsidy $ 5,508,700.00 $ 5,508,700.00 RCTC Rail Operations $ 1,597,900.00 $ 1,597,900.00 Total: Operating $ 7,106,600.00 $ 7,106,600.00 0 0 0 0 0 DIFFERENCE BET. CURRENTLY APPROVED & MODIFIED OPERATING PLAN Table 2 - Capital Assistance Table 2a. Current y Approved Capital Funding Plan Projed Description Total LTF STA Measure A Sec 5307 - Riv- San. Bernardino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY07 - RCTC Share $ 1,125.894 $ 405,986 $719,908 RCTC's share of OCTA's FY07 Rehab & Renovation 75,341 $ 75,341 astem Area Maintenance Facility - RCTC Share 2.2s1,000 $ 2.261,000 RRA Electronic Passenger Information System - TC Share 0 156,762 $ (156,762) Perris Valley Line - Preliminary Engineering FY 07 10,574,800 8,074,800 'i ,r Kt, t t, araubn L.apnai improvement rrograln rr 07 500,000 500,000 NMCorona Parking Structure(added per SRTP Amendment approved 5/9/07) 29,771,489 747,714 3,523,775 !rt� ,' , ,fpt 9,500,000 Total: Capital $ 44,308,524 $ 1,404,476 $ 3,523,775 $ 8,074,800 $ 21,085.565 $ - $ 10,219,908 Table 2b. Modified Capital Funding Plan Project Description Total LTF STA Measure A Sec 5307 - Riv- San. Bernardino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY07 - RCTC Share $ 1,125,894 $ 405,986 $719,908 RCTC's share of OCTA's FY07 Rehab & Renovation 75,341 $ 75,341 Eastern Area Maintenance Facility - RCTC Share 2,261,000 $ 2,261,000 SCRRA Electronic Passenger Information System - RCTC Share 0 156,762 $ (156,762) Perris Valley Line - Preliminary Engineering and Construction Management 14,574,800 8,074,800 $ 6,5ou001 Hu 11, Station La/Alai Improvement Program r Y 07 500,000 500,000 NMCorona Parking Structure(added per SRTP Amendment approved 5/9/07) 25,771,489 747,714 3,523,775 12,000,000 9,500,000 Total: Capital $ 44,308,524 $ 1,404,476 $ 3,523.775 $ 8.074,800 $ 21,085,565 $ - $10,219.908 DIFFERENCE BET. CURRENTLY APPROVED & 1110DIFIED CAPITAL PLAN $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 446 ATTACHMENT 2 RCTC Commuter Rail FY 2009110 OPERATING and CAPITAL ASSISTANCE BY FUNDING SOURCE Table 1 - Operating Assistance Table la. Currently Approved Operating Funding Plan Project Description Total LTF STA Prop 16 PTMISEA Measure A San. Bernardino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Operating Subsidy $ 7000.000 $ 7.000,000 Transit Connections 280,000 280,000 RCTC Rail Operations 1,093,000 1,093,000 RCTC Station Operating 2,610,600 2,610,600 Total: Operating 10,983,600 10,9133,600 0 0 0 0 0 0 Table 1b. Modified Operating Funding Plan SCRRA Operating Subsidy $ 7,000,000 $ 7,000,000 Transit Connections - 280,000 280,000 - RCTC Rail Operations 1,093,000 1,093,000 RCTC Station Operating 2,610.600 2,610,600 Total: Operating 10,983,600 10,983,600 0 0 0 0 0 DIFFERENCE BET. CURRENTLY APPROVED & MODIFIED OPERATING PLAN $ - $ - $ - $ - $ $ Table 2 - Capital Assistance Table 2a. Currently Approved Capital Funding Plan Project Description Total LTF STA Prop 1B PTMISEA Measure A San. Bernardino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Rehab - RCTC Share $ 1,396,600 $ 1,396.600 Perris Valley Line Engineering & Construction 15,000,000 5,000,000 10,000,000 Penis Valley Greenway TE Grant 2,358,000 1,245,000 1,113,000 SCRRA Rail Car Procurement 13,300,000 Riverside Layover Facility 11,000,000 11,000,000 RCTC Station Rehab and Renovation 900,000 216.000 684,000 La Sierra Parking Lot Expansion 2,050,537 1,670,637 379,900 Capital Improvement Program 500,000p Perris Mulilmodal Transit Center 1,300,000 800.000 500,000 BNSF 4th Main 5.000,000 5,000,000 Perris Valley Line - Development & Support (SRTP Amendment approved 8/24/09) 14,050,000 14,050,000 Total: Capital $ 66,855,137 $ 9,516,000 $ 4,500,000 $ 3,154,637 $ 37,174,900 $ 11,396,600 $ - $ 1,113,000 Table 26. Modified Capital Funding Plan Project Description Total LTF STA Prop 1B PTMISEA Measure A San. Berneroino Section 5309 Other SCRRA Rehab- RCTC Share $ 1,396,600 $ 1,396,600 Perris Valley Line Engineering & Construction 15000,000 5.000,000 10,000,000 Perris Valley Greenway TE Grant 2.358.000 1.245,000 1,113,000 SCRRA Rail Car Procurement 13,300000 ', 3,325,000-.9,A7S0 Riverside Layover Facility 11,000,000 11,000,000 RCTC Station Rehab and Renovation 900,000 216,000 684,000 La Sierra Parking Lot Expansion 2,050,537 1,670,637 379,900 Capital Improvement Program 20.000 ,:.... 20,000 Perris Mulitmodal Transit Center 1,300,000 800,000 500,000 BNSF 4th Main 5.000,000 5,000,000 Perris Valley Line - Development & Support (SRTP Amendment approved 6/24/09) 14,050,000 14,050,000 Total: Capital $ 66,375,137 $ 236,000 $ 3.325,000 $ 3,154,637 $ 37,174,900 $ 11,396,600 $ 9,975,000 $1.113,000 DIFFERENCE BET. CURRENTLY APPROVED& MODIFIED CAPITAL PLAN $ (480,000) $ (9,280,000) $ (1,175,000) $ - $ - $ - $ 9,975,000 $ - 447 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMM/SS/ON DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Greg Moore, Procurement and Assets Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreement with Elite Electric Inc. to Provide Lighting Maintenance Services for the Five Commission -Owned Commuter Rail Stations and the Perris Transit Center in Riverside County BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 10-24-082-00 to Elite Electric, Inc. (Elite) for lighting maintenance services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations and the Perris Transit Center for a three-year period, and two one-year options, for a total contract amount of $550,000; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement, including option years, on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission owns and operates five commuter rail stations in Riverside County. Station lighting maintenance services are essential to provide continued safety and security for Metrolink commuters, as well as preserving and maintaining the Commission's property. The Commission requires the services of a qualified contractor to provide both quarterly and on -call lighting maintenance services, which includes the cleaning of station lights and the repair or replacement of all defective lighting system components and fixtures. Components include blown lamps, fuses, defective ballasts, controllers, timers, connectors, conduits, circuit breakers, j-boxes, and damaged or unsafe wiring. Under Commission supervision, quarterly field inspections would be conducted at each station for a fixed price in order to indentify all necessary repairs. Based upon the successful contractor's proposed labor rates, equipment costs, material costs and associated markup, the contractor would then be required to clean, repair and/or replace all broken or defective lighting and remedy any electrical issues identified during the quarterly inspection. Alternatively, on -call services would be used on an as -needed basis to address repairs required between quarterly Agenda Item 9H 448 inspections. Pricing for work completed on an on -call basis would also be based upon fixed labor rates and a pre -established markup on materials. Procurement Process The Commission generally utilizes a low bid methodology for scopes of services that are clearly delineated and where price is the only relevant factor that could distinguish otherwise qualified firms. A low bid procurement precludes Commission staff from discussing a vendor's approach to performing the required services with any potential bidder. When the Commission must rely on a vendor to provide safety related services, however, factors other than price are considered. For these types of services a firm's capacity, performance history, qualifications, experience and other elements are relevant considerations in the procurement process. A negotiated procurement, or request for proposals (RFP), affords staff the opportunity to evaluate and discuss price and other technical factors with proposers. Accordingly, staff issued an RFP to secure services from a qualified firm to provide lighting maintenance services for Commission -owned commuter rail stations and the Perris Transit Center. The RFP was released by staff and advertised on March 15, 2010. The weighted factor method of source selection was determined by staff to be the most appropriate for this procurement, as it allows the Commission to identify the most advantageous proposal with price and other technical factors considered. Non -price factors used to evaluate the proposers under this RFP included elements such as experience, the relative qualifications of the firms, references, and the firms' relative ability to respond to the requirements set forth under the terms of the RFP. Price comprised 25% of the maximum possible points under the evaluation criteria. A pre -proposal conference was held at the downtown Riverside Metrolink station on March 23, 2010, and five firms attended. Commission staff responded to all questions submitted by potential proposers prior to the March 29, 2010, deadline date. Five firms submitted responsive and responsible proposals prior to the April 12, 2010 proposal deadline date. Utilizing the evaluation criteria set forth in the RFP, the firms' proposals were evaluated and scored by an evaluation committee comprised of Commission staff, Bechtel staff, and a representative from Metrolink. Elite earned the highest total evaluation score. The respective evaluation ranking, inclusive of pricing, and separate price rankings were as follows: Firm Overall Rank Price Rank Elite Electric, Inc. 151 3`d Republic Intelligent Transportation 2nd 2" IES Commercial, Inc. 3`d 4th Safeway Electric 4th 1" Playa Vista Property Management 5th 5th Agenda Item 9H • • 449 • • • Elite's recommended contract price is considered fair and reasonable due to adequate price competition. Elite earned the highest total evaluation score among the proposers, but offered the third lowest price among the five proposers. The technical, non -price factors that earned Elite the high score were related to its past performance based on reference checks, experience, qualifications and technical personnel. Pricing was evaluated based upon the firms' fixed labor rates, equipment rental rates and markup on materials, as applied to three hypothetical job scenarios included in the RFP, in addition to quarterly inspection fees. A description and summary of proposer pricing for each job scenario is attached hereto. Elite offered the second lowest pricing terms for two of the three job scenarios and also offered the lowest proposed markup on materials costs. Based on the stated criteria, Elite earned the highest total evaluation score. As a result, the evaluation committee recommends the award of Agreement No. 10-24-082-00 to Elite for lighting maintenance services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations and the Perris Transit Center for a three-year period, and two one-year options, for a total contract amount of $550,000. The total contract amount, i.e., 511O,O00/year, is based upon historical cost experience for lighting maintenance services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations plus anticipated costs for maintenance services at the Perris Transit Center. Elite's rates are considered fair and reasonable based upon adequate price competition. Elite has provided services for the Commission and performed satisfactorily. In addition, Elite has successfully performed similar work as described in the scope of services for the Jurupa Area Recreation and Parks District and the Orange County Public Works Department. This agreement will enable the Commission to control lighting maintenance costs by establishing fixed fees/rates for quarterly inspections and reports, labor, equipment, and a fixed materials mark up for quarterly and on -call repairs. It also allows the Commission to budget annually, make scheduled and emergency repairs, and provide optimal safety for visitors and Metrolink patrons. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes No Year: FY 2010/11 FY 2011/12+ Amount: $ 110,000 $ 440,000 Source of Funds: Local Transportation Fund Budget Ad ustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 004001 004002 004003 004004 004006 73315 103 24 73301 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \i/a4,,4,A, Date: 05/13/10 Attachment: Proposal Pricing Summary Agenda Item 9H 450 PROPOSAL PRICING SUMMARY A. JOB SCENARIOS (Pricing based upon proposer's fixed rates for labor and equipment relevant materials cost and proposed materials markup.) JOB SCENARIO NO. 1 - La Sierra Metrolink Station Replace five (5) parking lot lights on light poles up to 35' high (GARDCO CA-22-2-3-250H- 480-LUMBC-LF). Remove lenses, remove and replace bulb, clean lens, reinstall lens. Elite IES Playa Republic Safeway Scenario 1 $849.00 $702.01 $797.00 $286.50 $206.31 JOB SCENARIO NO. 2 - Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station Replace all fluorescent lights in two 121 canopies (PARAMOUNT X09-2X34823-EL-T8). Remove covers, remove and replace light tubes, clean covers, replace covers. Elite IES Playa Republic Safeway Scenario 2 $154.60 $393.26 $957.00 $301.75 $ 48.26 JOB SCENARIO NO. 3 - North Main Corona Metrolink Station Clean 25 platform light fixtures. Remove globes, clean, reinstall globes. Elite IES Playa Republic Safeway Scenario 3 $606.25 $786.71 $1,833.00 $792.00 $400.00 B. MATERIALS MARKUP Elite IES Playa Republic Safeway 10% 15% 15% 15% 15% C. FIELD SURVEY (Quarterly Site Visit) Elite IES Playa Republic Safeway La Sierra $340.00 $375.00 $225.00 $185.00 $143.00 North Main Corona $510.00 $375.00 $375.00 $185.00 $215.00 Pedley $300.00 $475.00 $225.00 $185.00 $143.00 Perris Transit Center $340.00 $475.00 $225.00 $185.00 $143.00 Riverside Downtown $420.00 $475.00 $225.00 $185.00 $143.00 West Corona $360.00 $375.00 $225.00 $185.00 $143.00 Total Annual Cost: $2,270.00 $2,550.00 $1,500.00 $1,110.00 $ 930.00 451 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Purchase of Right of Way for the State Route Improvement Project 91 Corridor STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Authorize the Executive Director to purchase right of way for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), pursuant to consultation with an ad hoc committee appointed by the Chair; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute all agreements related to the purchase of right of way for the SR-91 CIP. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The SR-91 CIP is a high -priority project within the region and is a major component of the Commission's 10-Year Western Riverside County Highway Delivery Plan (Delivery Plan). Th a SR-91 CIP focuses on increasing capacity and reducing congestion for a 14-mile stretch of SR-91 and a 6-mile stretch of Interstate 15. The project limits on SR-91 extend from SR-241 in Orange County to Pierce Street in the city of Riverside and on the 1-15 from Cajalco Road in the city of Corona to Hidden Valley Parkway in the city of Norco. At its meeting on April 7, 2010, the California Transportation Commission (CTC) approved best -value design -build as the project delivery method for the proposed project. This innovative project delivery method reduces the time to complete the project by overlapping the design and construction phases. However, the design -build method places greater emphasis on the timeliness of right of way acquisition. The benefit of the reduced time to complete the project may not be fully realized if delays result from acquiring right of way. Therefore, acquiring right of way in an expeditious and efficient manner is critical to the completion of the SR-91 CIP. Agenda Item 91 452 The SR-91 CIP project is currently in the environmental clearance phase with two build alternatives under consideration. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) clearances are anticipated to be achieved in late 2011. Prior to NEPA and CEQA clearance, limited opportunities to purchase right of way that is common to both build alternatives through advanced acquisition are available. Right of way may be purchased in advance of NEPA and CEQA clearance with concurrence from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the California Department of Transportation (Ca[trans) through open market transactions, hardship acquisitions, and protective buying. Properties that are listed or offered for sale by the owner may be purchased through an open market transaction. Property owners can request the Commission to purchase their property under hardship acquisition rules if owners meet certain hardship criteria. Property acquisitions under protective buying rules could apply to owners who are actively developing their property. Protective buying seeks to purchase the property before the development process is completed via a negotiated agreement. Due to current economic conditions a nd the project's visibility, staff is receiving significant interest from property owners offering their properties for sale. The Commission is in a unique position to acquire properties through advanced acquisition that helps meet the aggressive design build schedule. Both before and after NEPA and CEQA environmental clearance, staff will present properties eligible for acquisition to the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project Property Ad Hoc Committee to be appointed by the Chair. The Executive Director shall consult with this ad hoc committee prior to authorizing any purchases. Except for properties going through the eminent domain process, which are subject to Commission approval, staff is requesting that the Commission authorize the Executive Director to purchase all right of way for the SR-91 CIP. Acquisitions shall be made in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and the Commission's Right of Way Policies and Procedures. Staff further requests that the Commission authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal review, to execute all agreements related to the purchase of right of way for the SR-91 CIP project. Agenda Item 91 • • 453 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Min Saysay, Right of Way Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Amendments to Agreements with David Evans & Associates, Project Design Consultants, and Psomas for On -Call Right of Way Engineering and Surveying Services WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the following agreements for on -call right of way engineering and surveying services for the aggregate amount of $450,000; a1 Agreement No. 07-33-143-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-143-00, with David Evans & Associates; b) Agreement No. 07-33-145-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-145-00, with Project Design Consultants; and c) Agreement No. 07-33-144-02, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 07-33-144-00, with Psomas; and 2) Authorize the Chair, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its June 13, 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded agreements to David Evans & Associates, Project Design Consultants, and Psomas for on -call right of way engineering and surveying services. The consulting firms provide services to support current Commission projects and future Measure A projects. Right of way engineering and surveying companies provide boundary maps, monumentation maps, survey control maps, records of survey, parcel or appraisal maps, lot line adjustments, subdivision maps, legal descriptions and deeds. Current and anticipated right of way engineering and survey services allow staff the flexibility to respond in a timely manner to accommodate the Commission's capital projects program. Examples include projects such as the Perris Valley Line, Agenda Item 9J 454 various locations on railroad property where current activities may require the determination of property lines, and various other capital projects where survey and staking for individual properties are not included in the overall scope of services for the design. The contracts for these services and the awarding of the work on a rotating, as -needed basis, are in accordance with the terms of the Commission policies and state law. The original aggregate budget for the three agreements is $300,000, which was based on an estimate of the work that would be required for the past three years. At this time, $181,442 has been expended and $118,558 obligated. Staff has estimated that for the next fiscal year, $450,000 will be needed to cover anticipated engineering and survey work. This cost for the additional work noted above has been included in the annual budget for FY 2010/11. All three companies agreed to reduce their profit margin by 30% effective upon approval of the amendment to the agreement. Staff recommends approval of amendments with David Evans & Associates, Project Design Consultants, and Psomas for right of way engineering and surveying services. The total not to exceed amount for the three amendments is an aggregate of $450,000, which brings the total aggregate amount of the contracts to $750,000. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2010/11 Amount: $450,000 Source of Funds: 1989 Measure A Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 003800 81403 00066 0000 221 33 81401 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \„t40.14.uo Date: 05/18/10 Agenda Item 9J • • • 455 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 9, 2010 TO: Riverside. County Transportation Commission FROM: Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council Fina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2010/11 - Fiscal Year 2012/13 Short Range Transit Plans CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to review and approve, in concept, the FY 2010/11 - FY 2012/13 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, Riverside, Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA), Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the Commission's Commuter Rail Program. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County FY 2010/11 - FY 2012/13 SRTP cover the three apportionment areas of the county and are comprised of plans for the municipal operators, PVVTA, RTA, SunLine, and the Commission's Commuter Rail Program. This document is the master plan for the programming of transit service and operations and outlines future transit system development and the required capital projects that are necessary to implement the plans. Staff is requesting that the SRTPs be approved in concept only, as requests for financial allocations will be made at the July Commission meeting. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze, and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators. While reviewing and analyzing individual route productivity remains with the transit operators and their governing boards, the Commission has a fiduciary responsibility to ensure that transit operators are utilizing Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds efficiently and effectively with the need to provide high quality service. The SRTPs were developed to meet the Commission's Productivity Improvement Program (PIP), which was adopted as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the county's public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. The PIP indicators include operating costs per revenue hour, fare box 456 recovery ratio, subsidies, and passengers per revenue hour and revenue mile, which are critical in ensuring that service can be maximized in an efficient manner. The SRTP process also requires that transit operators address recommendations that are made by regular performance audits. The Riverside County transit operators, like all public transit systems across the country are impacted with the effects of economic recession. They continue to be severely challenged in their ability to meet growing demand for services. As a result of declining revenues from local, state, and federal sources, this year's SRTP documents are designed conservatively to meet this challenge. Several measures were considered by the public operators to reduce spending with minimum effect on transit service. These include fare increases, cuts in unproductive service, and staff reductions, as well as .reprogramming available carryover funds from previous years. The FY 2010/1 1 — FY 2012/13 plans by operator are summarized below. City of Banning The city of Banning (Banning) works closely with the city of Beaumont (Beaumont) to provide a seamless transit system for the residents of Banning, Beaumont, and the unincorporated areas of Cabazon, Cherry Valley, and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians reservation. Planned services for FY 2010/11 include: • Modify Fixed Routes 1, 5, and 6 to eliminate duplication and coverage; • Upgrade passenger amenities such as bus shelters, benches, and trash receptacles; • Procure an American Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible van, a install security cameras on existing fleet; • Possibly eliminate Sunday service; and • Continue coordination with the city of Beaumont schedules, transfers, and fares. City of Beaumont improve service bus stop signs, shop truck, and regarding routes, Beaumont Transit provides both dial -a -ride and fixed route services and works closely with the Banning to provide a seamless transit system in the Pass area. Planned services for FY 2010/1 1 include: • Perform systemwide route restructure studies and implement route changes necessary to improve productivity and customer service; • Install additional bus shelters and benches; • Purchase three replacement vehicles with radios and cameras; and • Continue to improve service coordination with Banning. 457 • • • • • City of Corona The city of Corona (Corona) operates a general public dial -a -ride program and operates two fixed routes known as the Corona Cruiser. Corona closely coordinates all transfers with both RTA and the Commission's Commuter Rail services. Planned services for FY 2010/11 include: • Implement a reduced span of service and a new fare structure in July 2010; • Implement a new multi -day pass incentive program for the Corona Cruiser; • Expand the Poetry on the Bus and Art on the Bus programs to additional schools; • Take delivery of up to eight replacement dial -a -ride buses; and • Install bus stop shelters, benches, and solar powered lighting. City of Riverside — Special Services Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation dial -a -ride for seniors and persons with disabilities within the Riverside city limits. The program serves as an alternative to RTA's transit service for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use fixed route service. All services operated by RSS are closely coordinated with RTA. Planned services for FY 2010/1 1 include: • Evaluate options to decrease operating expenses by adopting stringent procurement procedures and by renegotiating rates on purchase orders; • Adjust administrative activities to decrease operating costs; • Begin construction of the compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle maintenance facility; and • Procure new farebox system funded by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) program. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency PVVTA provides fixed route, dial -a -ride, and a transportation reimbursement program, for individuals that cannot ride the public bus system. The fixed route can deviate up to % of a mile away from the actual fixed route. Service is provided within the city of Blythe and surrounding unincorporated county areas in the Palo Verde Valley. Planned services for FY 2010/1 1 include: • Implement a modest fare increase; • Continue deviated service offered on fixed routes. Dial -a -ride service was terminated on April 1, 2010; • Complete the upgrades to the newly purchased transit facility to meet the needs of the agency; and • Install additional passenger amenities at strategic locations 458 Riverside Transit Agency RTA is the consolidated transportation service agency (CTSA) for Western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the service area, providing driver training and assistance with grant applications. RTA provides local, intercity, and regional transportation services. Planned services for FY 2010/11 include: • Continue refining existing service through improved scheduling and streamlining. No new services will be added unless fully funded by grant monies or agency sponsored revenues; • Begin procurement of revenue vehicle replacements; • Implemented a revised fare structure in June 2009 increasing base fare from $1.25 to $1.50; • Dial -a -ride policy changes took effect in January 2010, and implemented a new fare system based on comparable fixed route model; and • Operating budget increased approximately 3%, largely due to opening of two new transit centers in the cities of Corona and Perris. SunLine Transit Agency SunLine is the CTSA for Coachella Valley and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the valley, which covers a service area of approximately 1,120 square miles. SunLine provides both local and regional transportation services with 12 fixed routes and demand response dial -a -ride services known as SunDial.. Planned services for FY 2010/1 1 include: • Implement one new fixed route to improve service area coverage; • Realign two routes (Lines 14 and 50) to improve productivity and efficiency; • Conduct feasibility study to determine best use for Indio facility; • Continue working on ARRA funded capital transit projects; and • Finalize environmental assessment, preliminary, and final engineering for new administrative building. Regional Commuter Rail The Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operates seven commuter rail lines with 52 locomotives and 160 commuter rail cars. Three routes, the Riverside to Los Angeles Line, the Inland Empire to Orange County Line (IEOC), and the Riverside to Los Angeles via Fullerton Line (91 Line) directly serve Western Riverside County with connecting service available to destinations on the other four lines. Planned services for FY 2010/1 1 include: 459 • • • • • • • Maintain current Metrolink service levels in Riverside County; • Delivery of new rail coaches for future expansion of service; • Complete the environmental documentation, continue engineering and possibly start construction of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside - Moreno Valley - Perris) Metrolink extension project; and • Continue implementation of Commission's "Green" Station Rehabilitation Plan and engineering of an expanded Riverside Downtown Station layover facility. Attachments: Short Range Transit Plans - Posted on Commission Website 1) City of Banning 2) City of Beaumont 3) City of Corona 4) City of Riverside 5) PVVTA 6) RTA 7) SunLine 8) Commuter Rail Program 460 City of Banning Short Range Transit Plan FY 2010/11-2012/13 DRAFT 6/01/2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 – System Overview 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Description of service 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections 3 1.3 Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service 4 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure 6 1.5 Revenue Fleet 8 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities 9 Chapter 2 – Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 Fixed Route Service – Route by Route Analysis 10 2.2 Dial-A-Ride Service – System Performance 10 2.3 Key Performance Indicators 11 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts 11 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth 12 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs 12 Chapter 3 – Planned Service Changes and Implementation 3.1 Recent Service Changes 13 3.2 Recommended Local & Express Route 13 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotion 13 3.4 Budget Impact and Proposed Changes 13 Chapter 4 – Financial and Capital Plans 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 14 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program 14 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 14 TABLES Table 1 - Fleet Inventory 17 Table 2 - SRTP Service Summary 18 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics 20 Table 3A - Individual Route Description 22 Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2010/11 24 Table 4A - Capital Project Justification 25 Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2011/12 30 Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2012/13 31 Table 6 - FY 2007 Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations 32 Table 7 - Service Provider Performance Target Report Year to Date 33 Table 8 - FY 10/11 SRTP Performance Report 34 Table 9 - Highlights of Short Range Transit Plan 35 1 INTRODUCTION Banning Transit System began as one intercity fixed route in April 1973, and then expanded to two routes in September 1985. Fixed route service to Cabazon and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians Reservation began in July 1995, as the system’s third. Banning Dial-A-Ride service for seniors and persons with disabilities began in October 1985. Pass Transit as a combined effort between Banning Transit System and Beaumont Transit System started in November 2004. Routes 1 and 2 were modified from the previous Banning Transit System Cabazon Route and Beaumont Transit System Route 1. Banning’s Northern Route was renumbered Route 5 and Banning’s Southern Route was renumbered Route 6. Beaumont’s existing Routes 3 and 4 remained the same. A Memorandum of Understanding was developed to allow each city’s Dial-A-Ride services to cross jurisdictional boundary lines so that a passenger did not have to transfer. A new joint Rider’s Guide was developed, combined transfers and ten-ride ticket books were printed, buses and bus stop signs were decaled ‘Pass Transit’ and fares were established to be the same for the convenience of riders. In January 2009, monthly passes were offered for sale at the Banning Community Center Office, 789 N. San Gorgonio Avenue. The Banning Transit System functions as a department within the City. The city of Banning contracts a Transit Manager through Professional Transit Management (PTM). This transit contract is overseen by the Banning Community Services Director. The transit department is managed by the Transit Manager under the direction of the Community Services Director. Under the Transit Manager is a team of City of Banning employees, which include a Lead Bus Driver/Trainer, five full-time Bus Drivers, two part- time Dial-A-Ride drivers, one full-time Office Specialist, and one full-time Equipment Mechanic. This arrangement began in March 2009. CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERLAY 1.1 Description of Service Area The Banning Pass Transit serves the commercial and residential areas of Banning and residential and commercial areas in Cabazon with additional service to limited commercial areas in Beaumont. Transit service was implemented in Banning in April 1973. The Banning Dial-A-Ride service was implemented in Banning in October 1985. The Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride services the entire city limits of Banning and provides service to areas of Beaumont and Cabazon within ¼ mile of the fixed route bus service. 2 3 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections The residential population within the Banning Transit System’s service area has grown approximately 20% since 2000. Growth is anticipated to remain flat for the upcoming fiscal year. As of January 1, 2010, the California Department of Finance estimated that the City’s population was 28,751. Per the 2000 census there were 23,562 people, 8,923 households, and 6,237 families residing in the city. Population density was 1,022 people per square mile (395/km2). There were 9,761 housing units at an average density of 423/sq mi (164/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 64.19% White, 30.21% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 8.55% African-American, 2.52% Native American, 5.38% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 14.88% from other races, and 4.36% from two or more races. Of the 8,923 households, 26.3% had children under the age of 18. 53.2% were married couples living together. 12.5% had a female head of household, and 30.1% were non- families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.11. Twenty-six and four tenths of a percent of the city’s population was under 18 years of age, 7.4% was 18 to 24 years old, 20.95 was 25 to 44 years of age, 18.4% was 45 to 64 years old, and 26.8% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41. For every 100 females there were 90.9 males and for every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males. Data from a 2001 Pass Area Transit Study reported that more than two-thirds of the ridership (68%) is female. This number increases to 86% among riders age 62 to 79 years. Ridership ethnicity closely parallels the population ethnicity in the City of Banning. The breakdown of ridership ethnicity is derived from the 2001 Pass Area Transit Study. No review has been performed since 2001. • Caucasian Riders - 47% • Hispanic Riders - 34% • African American Riders - 12% • Asian Riders - 1% • Riders - 2% • Others - 4% The surveys further showed that 85% of the system’s fixed route ridership use transit services at least three times a week, 23% of the system’s Dial-A-Ride ridership use transit services at least three times a week, 67% of the ridership use transit services for local trips within the Banning/Beaumont/Cabazon area, 27% use transit for travel outside of the local service areas, and 91% of the system’s ridership do not have access to a car. 4 Respondents also indicated that transit services are readily available with the majority of riders walking five minutes or less to the bus stop. Eighty-seven percent of the rider households speak English as their primary language and 13% speak Spanish as their primary language. It would appear that the majority of regular Banning Transit System riders counted in the above percentages share the commonality of either being underemployed or unemployed. In spite of the flat economy, the demand for transit services appears to have remained at a fairly level rate, perhaps falling off slightly. 1.3 Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service, Regional Express Bus Service The Banning Pass Transit System offers three routes, Routes 1, 5, and 6 as well as a Dial-A-Ride Service. Routes 5 and 6 operate on a 75 minute headway. The routes had their headways increased due to increased congestion and multiple stops being made. The prior 60 minute headway caused routes to operate late. Routes 1 and 2 (Route 2 provides the Beaumont Transit System’s Cabazon service) complement each other throughout the commercial areas of Beaumont, Banning, Cabazon, and the Morongo commercial development, with both Routes 1 and 2 operating every two hours. Route 1 is the only service that travels into eastern Cabazon, whereas Route 2 is the only service that travels into northeastern Beaumont. Approximately 75% of Routes 1 and 2 duplicate each other. Due to a recent schedule change, Route 1 trails behind Route 2 by 10 to 12 minutes causing a two hour frequency along this corridor. Pass Transit service into Cabazon is the result of a memorandum of understanding between RTA and the City of Banning in an effort to reduce duplicative transit service in the Pass Area and to satisfy an unmet transit need at the time. Routes will be modified as needed to better serve unmet transit needs. A summary of the Banning Transit System operated Pass Transit routes are shown below: Route 1 - Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon This route operates on a two-hour headway and is complimented by an overlap with Route 2 (Beaumont Pass Transit) along 75% of the route. Route 1 is the only service to the remote Esperanza & Elm area of southeastern Cabazon. The route also provides service to the residential areas of Cabazon, James Venable Cabazon Community Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Cabazon Outlets, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue in Banning, and the commercial areas along 6th Street and Beaumont Avenue in Beaumont. 5 Route 5 – Northern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas of the City of Banning that lie north of the I-10 freeway, Nicolet Middle School, Hoffer Elementary School, Banning Public Library, Coombs Intermediate School, Hemmerling Elementary School and the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue. Route 6 – Southern Banning The route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas south of the I-10 freeway, a small residential section north of Ramsey Street at the east end of the City of Banning, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, apartment complexes in the south, and the Banning Municipal Airport. Banning Pass Transit fixed route service hours are: Monday – Friday 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (subject to change) The Banning Transit System Pass Transit provides service hours from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on the following holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride provides service to seniors (60+), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complementary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Call Center hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and voice mail can be left anytime and will be responded to as soon as possible. Service hours for Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride are (next page): 6 Seniors (age 60 & older) and persons with disabilities without ADA certification Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday No Service Persons with ADA Complementary Paratransit Certification Monday – Friday 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday Service provided only if three (3) or more persons request service Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride provides service hours to ADA Certified passengers only from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday – Friday and on the following holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride is provided within the entire city limits of Banning and Beaumont and within a ¾ mile boundary of the Routes 1 and 2 service areas in Cabazon. The City of Banning provides the ADA certification for Pass Transit Dial-A- Ride services operated by the City of Banning. The primary uses of Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride are for transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment, and include connections to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Pass Transit fixed routes. Through a cooperative memorandum of understanding, Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride operated by the Beaumont Transit system will provide its residents with service in Banning and within a ¾ mile boundary of Route 2 in Cabazon. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride operated by the Banning Transit System will provide its residents with service in the city limits of Beaumont (excluding Cherry Valley). There are no direct connections between the Pass Area and the Coachella Valley on public transit. Greyhound Lines, Inc. through their Crucero subsidiary provides intercity bus service between Los Angeles, Banning, Palm Springs, Imperial County, and Mexicali four times each day. Caltrans Division of Rail, through Amtrak operates Amtrak California Thruway bus service between Indio, Beaumont City Hall and Bakersfield with connections to Amtrak California San Joaquin to Oakland or Sacramento via Central Valley cities. 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure The fare structure was adjusted in January 2009. Currently, the fixed route fare is $1.00/one way trip for general fare passengers. Fares for senior citizens age 60 years and older and persons with disabilities is $.60/one-way trip. A zone fare of $.25 exists for persons traveling between Banning/Beaumont and Cabazon/Morongo service areas. (The route is twice the length of any other route in the system. The zone fare helps to 7 recover operating costs for travel beyond the City limits.) Ten-ride ticket books are offered for $9.00 each; senior citizens and persons with disabilities can purchase Ten- Ride ticket books at a reduced cost of $5.40 each. Monthly passes became available in January 2009. General fare monthly passes are offered at $34.00 each and Senior/Disabled monthly passes are offered at $20.50 each. Ten-Ride Ticket Books can be purchased at Banning Transit System Administrative Offices located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue and Banning City Hall Finance Department located at 99 East Ramsey Street. Monthly Passes can be purchased at the Banning Community Center Office, 789 N. San Gorgonio Avenue. The City of Beaumont also offers the same Ten-Ride Ticket Book for sale onboard Routes 2, 3, and 4 or at Beaumont City Hall. Pass Transit tickets, monthly and day passes are honored by both the Banning and Beaumont Transit Systems. Transfers are no longer valid on the Pass Transit System. RTA accepts day and monthly passes where Pass Transit routes connect to RTA routes. The final increase of fares went into effect July 2009 to ensure that the City is in compliance with achieving a 10% farebox recovery ratio. PASS TRANSIT FIXED ROUTE FARE STRUCTURE Category Current Fare Full Fare in Banning or Beaumont $ 1.00 Zone Fare to/from/within $ .25 Cabazon Seniors (age 60 and up) $ . 60 Persons with Disabilities $ .60 Day Pass (general) $ 3.00 Day Pass (senior/disabled) $ 1.80 Monthly Pass $34.00 Monthly Pass (senior/disabled) $20.50 Other Transit Items 10-Ride Ticket Book/$9.00 Seniors/Persons With Disabilities 10-Ride Ticket Book/$5.40. Children (5 yrs. & younger) First two children ride free w/paying Adult – Additional children pay $ 1.00 8 A fixed route disability discount card is available from the Banning Transit System Administrative Office for those who have a disability, a Medicare card or ADA Certification. This card allows the eligible user to pay the fare of “Persons with Disabilities” when traveling on the Pass Transit system and RTA. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride is restricted to persons with disabilities and seniors age 60 years and older. The Dial-A-Ride fare is $1.35/one-way trip. PASS TRANSIT DIAL-A-RIDE FARE STRUCTURE Category Current Fare Full Fare $1.35/one-way trip Attendants Free if required with an ADA Certified Passenger No Show $1.35/no show* Zone Fares None 10 Tripper $12.15 (10 one-ride tickets) *No Shows are trips scheduled but not taken or cancelled There are currently no plans to change the current fare structure for either the fixed route or dial-a-ride systems. 1.5 Revenue Fleet Banning Transit System operates five fixed route vehicles (three in revenue service and two as spares), all of which are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG), are equipped with bicycle racks for two bicycles, and in compliance with the ADA with mobility device lifts and two tie-down stations per bus. The transit system also operates three Dial-A-Ride vehicles (two in revenue service and one as a spare) that are gasoline powered and in compliance with the ADA, with mobility device lifts and tie-down stations for four mobility devices. Banning Pass Transit also has three support vehicles that are used for driver relief or administrative errands. The City adheres to California Highway Patrol (CHP) mandated Preventive Maintenance Inspection criteria and is very proactive in maintenance efforts. The predicted replacement level for fixed route service buses is every 10 years. Currently, there are five fixed route buses of which three are in revenue service and two are rotation buses. Two new buses have been ordered and are expected to arrive in 9 July 2010. Upon the arrival of the two new buses, buses 217 and 218 will be retired from service. A replacement bus for the fixed route will be needed in FY 2012/13. The Dial-A-Ride buses should be replaced at 150,000 miles. A new Dial-A-Ride bus was delivered March 22, 2010. Currently, there are two Dial-a-Ride buses in revenue service and one rotation Dial-A-Ride. Dial-A-Ride buses 215 and 216 have been retired and buses 213 and 230 serve as backup vehicles for the Banning Pass Transit Fixed Route. See the City of Banning Fleet Inventory Table 1 for individual vehicle characteristics. 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities Banning Transit System functions as a department within the City and utilizes existing facilities. Transit Administrative staff is housed at the City’s Community Center located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue. The maintenance, parking, fueling of the buses, and storage of bus stop amenities are performed at the City’s Corporation Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. Maintenance of the vehicles is performed by the Public Works Department, Fleet Maintenance Division. City administrative staff, including Finance and Human Resources, is located at Banning City Hall, 99 East Ramsey Street. Banning Police, which provides security services for Pass Transit, is located at 125 East Ramsey Street. CNG vehicles for the transit system are fueled at the City of Banning Corporation Yard. The fueling station is the only CNG station in the City of Banning large enough to meet the demands of the transit system and Banning Unified School District. There are currently no plans to expand Banning Pass Transit System facilities. 10 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 2.1 Fixed Route Service – Route by Route Analysis Ridership for Banning Pass Transit Route 1 in 2008-09 was 42,335, Route 5 was 48,267, and Route 6 was 62,633 for a total of 153,235. These numbers were compiled from the Transtrack ridership data. Ridership numbers through February 2010 average 517 less per month compared to FY 2008-09. The loss in ridership can be directly attributed to higher unemployment rates and the subsequent drop in disposable income thereby reducing passengers commuting to work, running errands, shopping or taking pleasure trips. (Ridership numbers are still being calculated for FY 2009-10. When ridership fees were raised in January 2009 and monthly and daily passes became available the daily report format was changed and the data base was not compatible with these changes and did not record the sales of these passes.) Banning Transit System staff has available comment cards, a direct telephone line to the Banning Transit Office, e-mail, mail, fax-a-comment, complaint or suggestion for the public to communicate with the Transit Department. A Transit Advisory Committee was recently created to assist the City in monitoring transit services. Banning Transit System staff actively participates in community events with local organizations. The Pass Transit Information Center provides dial-a-ride information, reservations, cancellations, fixed route schedules and information. Hours of operation are Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Presently, the Transit Information Center is closed on Fridays, weekends, and on all major holidays. The Transit Information Center is located at the Banning Community Center, inside the Transit Administrative Offices, located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue in Banning. This center is also responsible for taking complaints and passing them to the appropriate party. The City has made a commitment to provide reliable, responsive information to the public and be proactive in responding to customer comments, complaints, and suggestions. The Transit General Manager utilizes transit services on a frequent basis to talk with riders and drivers to obtain comments. There are currently no plans to make any changes to the routes, however, due to the economic hardship and necessary budget cuts within the city, there is a possibility of eliminating Sunday service in FY 2010-11 as well as any unproductive routes. 2.2 Dial-A-Ride Service – System Performance Ridership for the Banning Dial-A-Ride in 2008-09 was 11,153. Ridership numbers through February 2010 average 129 less per month than for FY08-09 per Transtrack data. The loss in ridership can be directly attributed to a drop in disposable income, thereby reducing passengers running errands, shopping, or taking pleasure trips. Due to the economic hardship and necessary budget cuts within the city, there is a possibility of eliminating DAR Sunday service in FY 2010-11. 11 2.3 Key Performance Indicators The Riverside County Transportation Commission has adopted a Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) for the transit and commuter rail operators of Riverside County. The PIP sets forth efficiency and effectiveness standards that the transit operators are to meet. Progress towards these standards is reported quarterly to the Commission. Below are tables of the operating performance indicators adopted in the PIP and this plan’s projections for the coming year. Banning Transit System/Pass Transit Performance Measures The new projections are based upon operating data through March 2010, projected through June, 2010. Since these are only estimates, the performance indicators are subject to change. For Fiscal Year 2010/11, the Banning Transit System expects to be in compliance with at least 4 of the 7 performance targets. Additional details on key indicators for demand responsive and fixed route service are shown in Table 2. The Banning Transit System does not receive any federal funding and is not required to report to the National Transit Database. 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts In January 2009 Monthly and Day Passes were made available for purchase offering significant savings to the passengers utilizing the Fixed Route Service. A bus driver attended all of the Banning Unified School District’s Open Houses and Back to School Banning Transit System / Pass Transit FY 2007 Audited FY 2008 Audited FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Projected (Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) FY 2011 Projected Performance Statistics Unlinked Passenger Trips 157,253 133,939 173,351 140,000 131,748 Operating Cost per Revenue Hours $73.39 $80.30 $88.15 $88.40 $82.55 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.82% 12.34% 11.73% 11.80% 10.13% Subsidy per Passenger $6.00 $7.65 $6.48 $8.00 $8.17 Subsidy per Passenger Mile N/A N/A 2.54 3.40 $3.84 Subsidy per Revenue Hour $64.71 $70.47 $77.81 $73.87 $74.18 Subsidy per Revenue Mile $3.94 $4.23 $4.69 $4.57 $4.58 Passengers per Revenue Hour 10.8 9.2 12.0 9.0 9.10 Passengers per Revenue Mile 0.66 0.56 0.72 0.53 0.56 12 Nights providing written and verbal information about the Banning Pass Transit services. A Banning Pass Transit information booth was stationed at major community events throughout the City of Banning. The Transit Manager regularly visits the Banning Senior Center and Nutrition Site providing information on the Fixed Route and Dial-A-Ride and answering any questions or concerns that current and potential passengers may have. In order to meet the PIP staff will review all routes to make sure that service is warranted and will eliminate any unproductive areas. Analyzing of all routes and monitoring them for unproductive service areas will be an ongoing activity. 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Two Years Major passenger trip destinations that the Banning Pass Transit services are the Kmart Shopping Center, the 2nd Street Marketplace in Beaumont, the WalMart Supercenter in Beaumont, the Fox Cinema in Banning, the Cabazon Outlet Stores, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Casino Morongo. There is a high demand for service to these destinations whether for employment, necessities or pleasure. Requests for transit service to the Coachella Valley, Idyllwild, and the Morongo Basin have been made. Staff is aware of the desire and need for public transportation to these areas; however, the flat economic growth of the entire country currently makes any expansion of service to these areas impossible. Whether or not these destinations can ever be considered much less carried out is wholly dependent on a complete economic recovery and ridership large enough to support it. 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs Passenger amenities include 170 sign posted bus stops, 13 bus shelters with information panels, 6 benches, and 13 trash cans. Bus Schedule holders were ordered and installed in bus shelters throughout the fixed routes and route holders were purchased and installed in the fixed route buses. Much needed shop equipment for bus and dial-a-ride maintenance and repairs was purchased. Nine new benches and trash receptacles are being installed and more identical benches and trash receptacles will be purchased to complete the replacement of the old benches and trash receptacles throughout the fixed routes. Two new dial-a- rides were purchased and are in active revenue use and two new fixed route buses have been ordered and are scheduled for delivery in July 2010. A relief vehicle has been purchased and will be delivered in May 2010. An administrative vehicle was purchased and delivered in March 2010. A shop truck, new fareboxes, digital security cameras, and automated enunciator and display equipment are in the process of being purchased. A need for a replacement fixed route bus is anticipated for FY 2011-12. 13 CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Recent Service Changes Banning Pass Transit routes may be changed and service hours may change depending on the need for it. Staff consistently reviews the three service routes for any improvements needed. The bus fares remain at their July 2009 implemented level with no plans for any service increases at this time; possibly only decreases. 3.2 Recommended Local & Express Route With a rebounding economy it would be possible to expand service hours and routes to try and generate increased ridership. However, with the current depressed economy and necessary budget cuts, there is a possibility of eliminating the fixed route and dial- a-ride Sunday service. 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotions Providing Banning Pass Transit and Dial-A-Ride information on the local television channel, staff appearances at Banning Unified School District Back to School Nights and Open Houses, flyers and posters placed throughout the city and outside areas (Beaumont and Cabazon) serviced by the transit system and newspaper ads can all be utilized to educate the public about the Banning Pass Transit and Dial-A-Ride services available. The following marketing efforts will be undertaken to promote ridership growth. 1. Continue outreach programs to schools and at community events. 2. Attend senior community meetings to provide information. 3. Participation in the Mt. San Jacinto Jr. College GO-PASS Program to encourage ridership of college students. 4. Enclose flyers with transit information in city utility bills. The City of Banning’s website at www.ci.banning.ca.us provides basic Pass Transit route and schedule information. Transit staff is currently working to make information about routes and services more accessible. Customers can submit comments, complaints, concerns and suggestions through the city website. 3.4 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes With the necessity of making budget cuts, it would be impossible to expand service hours or routes for FY 2010-11. Cutting service hours may occur by eliminating Sunday service in order to meet budget constraints. 14 CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget For FY 10/11, operating funds needed to operate the Banning Pass Transit System are $1,197,537 for the Fixed Route and DAR. The operating funds consist of $1,068,537 local transportation funds (LTF). The projected farebox revenue for FY 10/11 is $124,500. Additional funding in the amount of $4,500 will originate from interest income and advertising revenues. In an effort to reduce administrative operating expenses, the consultant services agreement between the City of Banning and Professional Transit Management, LTD (PMT,LTD) will be cancelled effective June 30, 2010. 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program Capital projects for FY10/11 will be funded with $284,043 Prop 1B (PTMISEA) funds and $68,650 grant funds from Homeland Security program. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements The City of Banning submitted an Americans with Disabilities Act Paratransit Plan to the FTA on January 26, 1992. Pass Transit fixed route buses are equipped with ADA compliant mobility device lifts and are accessible to persons with disabilities. A procedure is in place to provide service to a customer in a mobility device should a fixed route bus lift fail. Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride services provide ADA complementary paratransit service for the fixed route services operated by Banning Transit System. Beaumont Transit System offers the same service through their operation of Pass Transit Dial-a- Ride. The system uses a self-certification process with professional verification. Banning Transit System staff will process ADA certifications for Pass Transit operations by Banning. Title VI Banning Transit System/Pass Transit does not utilize federal funds for operating expenses. As such, Title VI requirements do not currently apply to the transit system. Alternatively Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) Pass Transit fixed-route buses are CNG powered. Pass Transit Dial-a-Ride vehicles (which are less than 33,000 lbs. GVW and 15-passenger capacity) and administrative and driver relief vehicles are gasoline powered. 15 Future vehicle purchases will be in compliance with the RCTC and South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) policies regarding alternative fuel transit vehicles. The CNG Fueling Station at the City of Banning Corporation Yard provides expanded CNG capacity and fast fueling capability. With increased capacity and redundant compressor units, having adequate and reliable CNG pumping capacity will not be an issue in the foreseeable future. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program The City of Banning has adopted a DBE plan and methodology which is in compliance with the State of California’s requirements. The plan and goals will be updated on an as needed basis. 16 17 18 19 20 21 TABLE 3A: INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTION Route 1 – Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Pass Transit Route 1 provides service predominately along Ramsey Street & 6th Street between Beaumont City Hall, Banning and Cabazon, while serving the Casino Morongo, Cabazon neighborhoods and Cabazon shopping areas. This route operates on a two-hour headway and is complimented by an overlap with Route 2 (operated by Beaumont Transit System) along 75% of the route. It provides service to the remote Esperanza and Elm area of Cabazon. The route also provides service to the residential areas of Cabazon, James Venable Community Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Cabazon outlets, and the commercial areas along 6th Street and Beaumont Avenue in Beaumont. This route provides riders access to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices within the City of Banning and the unincorporated community of Cabazon. Destinations on Route 1 include: K-Mart, Albertsons, Wal-Mart Supercenter, Beaumont City Hall, Greyhound Crucero Agency, Amtrak California Thruway bus stop, Banning City Hall, The Gas Company, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Fox Cinemas, Banning Police Department, Desert Hills Premium Outlets, Cabazon Outlets, Casino Morongo and James Venable Community Center. Route 5 – Northern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas of the City of Banning that lie north of the I-10 Freeway, the Riverside County Courthouse, the Banning Municipal Library, the Coombs Intermediate School, and the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue. This neighborhood feeder route provides connections to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices, Banning City Hall, Fox Cinemas, K-Mart, Albertsons, Rite Aid Pharmacy, Walgreens Pharmacy, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Banning Chamber of Commerce, Riverside County Superior Court, Banning Public Library, Banning Community Center, Banning Senior Center, Repplier Park Aquatics Center, U.S. Post Office, and various other shopping and school locations within the community. Route 6 – Southern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas south of the I-10 Freeway, a small residential section north of Ramsey Street at the east end of the City of Banning, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue, Banning High School, apartment complexes, the Riverside County Smith Correctional Facility, and the Banning Municipal Airport. 22 This neighborhood feeder route provides connections to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices, Banning City Hall, Fox Cinemas, K-Mart, Albertsons, Rite Aid Pharmacy, Walgreens Pharmacy, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Banning High School, the Riverside County Smith Correctional Facility, The Banning Municipal Airport, U.S. Post Office, and various other shopping and school locations within the community. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride is provided within the entire city limits of Banning and Beaumont and within a ¾ mile boundary of Routes 1 and 2 services in Cabazon. The City of Banning provides the ADA certification for Pass Transit Dial-A-ride services operated by the cities of Banning and Beaumont. Seniors (age 60 years and older), persons with disabilities, and ADA eligible passengers are eligible for dial-a-ride throughout the entire service area. Service hours vary for non-ADA eligible passengers. These categories of passengers also are required to fill out a certification application to determine eligibility of service. Once certified, a card is issued to the applicant. General public passengers (ages 5 – 59 years) are not eligible for dial-a-ride service. The primary uses of Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride are for transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment, and connections with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Pass Transit Fixed Routes. 23 CITY OF BANNING FY 10/11 Summary of Funds Requested Short Range Transit Plan Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2010/11Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B (PTMISEA)Prop 1B SecurityMeasure A Fare BoxOther (2)FY 2010/11 Operating Assistance $1,197,537 $1,068,537 $124,500 $4,500for Fixed Route and Dail-A-RideSubtotal: Operating$1,197,537 $1,068,537 $0 $0 $0 $0 $124,500 $4,5002 Dial-A-Ride Vehicles (08/09) FY 11-4 $178,536 $178,536Bus Rehabilitation (09/10) FY 11-5$35,000 $35,000Modernization of Bus Shelters (09/10) FY 11-6 $70,507 $70,507Security Cameras on Buses (08/09) FY 11-7 $50,000 $50,000Security Upgrades (09/10) FY 11-8 $18,650 $18,650Subtotal: Capital$352,693$0 $0 $284,043 $68,650 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital$1,550,230$1,068,537 $0$284,043 $68,650$0 $124,500 $4,500Note: Other (2) is from Interest Income and Advertising 24 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-1 PROJECT NAME 2 Dial-A-Ride Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project would replace the current 1998 (16 capacity) and 2003 (12 Capacity) Aerotech buses that are close to exceeding their useful life and mileage with two 24 foot vehicles with 16 capacity for each. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Replacing these buses would reduce maintenance costs and increase capacity. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B PTMISEA (08/09) $ 178,536 TOTAL $ 178,536 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. None 25 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-2 PROJECT NAME Bus Rehabilitation PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funding for this project is to replace engines, drivelines, and perform minor repairs of three busses that are currently in service. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Funding for this project will reduce operating and maintenance costs and increase the system reliability. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1 B PTMISEA (09/10) $ 35,000 TOTAL $ 35,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. None 26 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-3 PROJECT NAME Modernization of Bus Shelters PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funds are needed to improve and modernize the existing bus shelters. The improvements will provide shelter for customers as they await the bus. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This project will increase ridership as it will provide customers a comfortable and pleasing environment. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B PTMISEA (09/10) $ 70,507 TOTAL $ 70,507 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. None 27 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-4 PROJECT NAME Security Cameras on Buses (08/09) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funds for the project will be used to install on board surveillance systems into existing fixed route buses and dial-a-ride buses. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION On board security cameras would protect passengers and city staff. It will also help in deterring crime and effectively handling customers’ concerns and/or complaints. It will also eliminate vandalism and reduce the frequency and detrimental impact of fraudulent claims. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B Security (08/09) $ 50,000 TOTAL $ 50,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. None 28 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-5 PROJECT NAME Security Upgrades (09/10) PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project is intended to purchase radios and a security system for the cameras. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Radios would help in case of an emergency and fluid communication between bus drivers and the transit manager. The security system would help monitor what is being seen in the cameras. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B Security (09/10) $ 18,650 TOTAL $ 18,650 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. None 29 CITY OF BANNING FY 2011/12 Summary of Funds Requested Short Range Transit Plan Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2011/12Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B (PTMISEA)Measure A Fare BoxOther (2)FY 11/12 Operating Assitance $1,335,891 $1,204,391 $127,000 $4,500for Fixed Route and Dial-A-Ride$1,335,891 $1,204,391 $0 $0 $0 $127,000 $4,5001-35' Coach (replacement) F/Y 12-1 $200,000 $200,000$200,000 $0 $200,000 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $1,535,891 $1,204,391$200,000$0 $0 $127,000 $4,500Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: Capital 30 CITY OF BANNING FY 2012/13 Summary of Funds Requested Short Range Transit Plan Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2012/13Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B (PTMISEA)Measure A Fare BoxOther (2)FY 11/12 Operating Assitance $1,355,580 $1,223,980 $130,100 $1,500for Fixed Route and Dial-A-Ride$1,355,580 $1,223,980 $0 $0 $0 $130,100 $1,500No Capital Request$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $1,355,580 $1,223,980 $0 $0 $0 $130,100 $1,500Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: Capital 31 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Audit Recommendations (Covering FY 2003/04 – FY 2005/06) Action(s) Taken And Results 1. Banning Transit should implement the remaining three prior audit recommendations: ♦ Provide Passenger Mile data in TransTrack ♦ Continued Recruitment of Drivers ♦ Provide incentives for drivers to maintain longevity Passenger Mile data in TransTrack was implemented in 2006 The hiring process for drivers has been greatly improved through developing better communication with Human Resources. Employee Recognition program in place honoring employees at each 10 year mark. Excellent retirement package and recognized seniority for scheduling. 2. Develop and enforce employee policies and rules specific to providing consistent transit service. Development of a procedures manual is currently in progress with an estimated completion date of September, 2010. 3. Conduct daily reconciliation of farebox revenues with passenger counts. Working with our Finance Department on developing a procedure that can be used until purchase and installation of electronic fareboxes. 4. Considering prioritizing procurement of electronic farebox. Electronic fareboxes are a high priority. Proposed purchase will be taken to city council for approval in FY 2010/11. 32 33 34 TABLE 9 – HIGHLIGHTS OF 2010/11 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN ƒ Modify fixed routes 1, 5 and 6 to eliminate duplication and improve service coverage. ƒ Replace existing 13 bus shelters and add two new shelters. ƒ Add additional benches and trash receptacles. ƒ Purchase and install auto display and enunciator equipment in fixed route fleet. ƒ Purchase and install safety security cameras in existing fixed route fleet. ƒ Purchase ADA accessible van. ƒ Purchase shop truck to expedite repairs to buses experiencing breakdowns on route. ƒ Install additional bus stop signs along routes 1, 5, and 6, thereby, reducing the number of flag stops. ƒ Possible elimination of Sunday service. ƒ No longer provide service to Hathaway and Barbour stop as a major employer has reduced three shifts to a skeleton crew. ƒ Continue working with the City of Beaumont staff regarding the coordination of routes, schedules, passenger amenities, and fares to ensure that Pass Transit is seamless and simple to use by Pass Area residents. BANNING TRANSIT SYSTEM/PASS TRANSIT FY 2006/07 Audited FY 2007/08 Audited FY 2008/09 Audited FY 2009/10 Estimate FY 2010/11 Planned (Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) Systemwide Ridership 157,253 133,939 173,351 140,000 131,748 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hrs $73.39 $80.03 $88.15 $78.83 $82.55   City of Beaumont Short Range Transit Plan FY 2010/11-2012/13 DRAFT 6/01/2010 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW ..................................................................................................................... 1  POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS ..................................................................................... 1  RIDERSHIP DEMOGRAPHICS ..................................................................................................................................... 2  FIXED ROUTE TRANSIT SERVICES ........................................................................................................................... 4  PARATRANSIT SERVICES .......................................................................................................................................... 4  REGIONAL EXPRESS BUS SERVICE.......................................................................................................................... 5  FARE STRUCTURE .................................................................................................................................................... 5  FLEET CHARACTERISTICS ........................................................................................................................................ 6  FACILITIES ................................................................................................................................................................. 7  CHAPTER 2 - EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE ............................................................... 7  FIXED ROUTE SERVICE ............................................................................................................................................ 7  DIAL-A-RIDE SERVICE .............................................................................................................................................. 9  KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS............................................................................................................................. 9  PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS ............................................................................................................... 10  MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS AND PROJECTED GROWTH ........................................................................................ 10  EQUIPMENT, PASSENGER AMENITIES AND FACILITY NEEDS ................................................................................. 11  CHAPTER 3 - PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION .................................................. 12  RECENT SERVICE CHANGES .................................................................................................................................. 12  MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION .................................................................................................................... 12  BUDGET IMPACT ON PROPOSED CHANGES ........................................................................................................... 13  CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS .......................................................................................... 13  OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET ........................................................................................................................ 13  FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM ................................................ 13  REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................. 14  1 CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW The Pass Transit System is the result of a cooperative effort between the City of Banning (Banning Municipal Transit System) and the City of Beaumont (Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency). The Pass Transit System consists of two independent, but well coordinated, transit systems. The coordinated service area of Pass Transit includes the cities of Banning, Beaumont and Calimesa, the unincorporated areas of Cabazon and Cherry Valley, and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians Reservation. Both fixed route and dial-a-ride services are provided throughout the service area. There are three major thoroughfares passing through the City of Beaumont including Interstate 10, State Highway 60, and Route 79. Major employers within the area include the Casino Morongo, Lowe’s Distribution Center, Beaumont and Banning Unified School Districts, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, 2nd Street Marketplace which includes WalMart Supercenter, Desert Hills Premium Outlets, and several manufacturing and companies. Beaumont Pass Transit services one high school, two continuation schools, two middle schools, and five elementary schools. One adult school, one alternative school, two private schools, a community college and a private university are also located with the service area. Additionally, several routes and dial-a-ride service the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Beaver Medical Center, and Loma Linda University Hospital, many physicians’ offices, chiropractic offices, optometry offices and dental facilities. Finally, the Beaumont community has 10,640 housing units, seven mobile home parks and five motels, nineteen churches and one library, all located within the service area of Beaumont Pass Transit. It should be noted that this Short Range Transit Plan incorporates the elements of the Pass Area Transit Plan that addresses service within this system's service area, specifically focusing on Beaumont. The City of Banning will submit a separate SRTP addressing the Banning Municipal Transit System. Even though the two transit service providers operate closely in providing a seamless service to the residents of the Pass Area, the transit agencies are separate entities. Nothing in this document is intended to indicate anything more than a cooperative effort between the two transit systems. Population Profile and Demographic Projections The latest available statistics show residential population within Beaumont and the entire Pass Transit System's service area had a 13% increase from year 2007 (28,250) to year 2009 (32,500). In 2008, Beaumont was named the second fastest growing city 2 in the State of California with a 12% increase in population. Beaumont is anticipated to continue to grow over the next few years. The 2000 census indicated that the community is ethnically diverse with a makeup of: Caucasian (55%), Hispanic (36%), Black (3%), Asian and Pacific Islander (2%), and all other races (4%). Senior citizens (age 65+) make up 11% of the population, indicating a potential for considerable growth in the demand for Dial-A-Ride services and a slight growth in Fixed Route services. Youth (age 18 and under) also make up a substantial portion of the population (36%). As reported in previous SRTPs, the 2000 census showed the median household income within Beaumont was $34,254, well below the national average of $41,994. This indicated the potential of an exceptional need for transit services. However, in 2007, the average home price was $322,500 noting a high percentage of two-income families and a much higher median household income than reported at the 2000 census. This translates to less of a need for transit services today than in previous years on much of Beaumont’s system. Finally, it is important to note that Beaumont’s Route 2 stretches into Cabazon and the City of Banning, where 14% of households are below poverty level, according to the 2000 census, indicating the presence of a number of transit dependent individuals specifically on that route. Ridership Demographics This section provides demographic information that creates a passenger profile including the gender, age, ethnicity, and income of the riders. Data available is from the McDonald Transit Study of April 2008. The majority of riders are female (66%). Twenty-four percent (24%) of the riders are under 19 years of age. This suggests a robust student ridership. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of the riders are of working age (19 to 65). Finally, 7% of riders are over 65. The ethnic distribution of riders shows that a majority are Hispanic or Black with 40% of the ridership being Caucasian. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of riders are employed either full or part time and 15% are students. Retirees make up 12% of the ridership while the unemployed are 16% of total ridership. Income levels of bus riders are low. About 77% make less than $25,000 per year. Bus riders also are transit dependent. 88% do not have a car available for the trip they were taking. 3 Ridership Ethnicity Ridership Household Income Ridership Employment Status 4 Additional ridership statistics: • Eighty-Eight percent (88%) of riders do not own a car. • Ninety-three percent (93%) of riders walk 3 or fewer blocks to the bus stop. • Twenty-three percent (23%) of riders said they were using the bus to go to school. • Sixty-nine percent (69%) of the riders are of working age (19 to 65). • Twenty-eight percent (28%) of riders indicated they were using the bus to go to work. • Seven percent (7%) of riders are over 65. • Fifty-six percent (56%) ride at least four (4) days every week. Fixed Route Transit Services The Pass Transit System operates eight fixed routes, one alternative route and one express route. Routes 2, 3 Alternative Route 3, 4, 7, Express Route 8, and 9 are operated by the Beaumont Transit System. Routes 1, 5, and 6 are operated by the Banning Transit System. See "Appendix A" for the system route map. Routes 3 through 6 operate on one-hour headway. Routes 1 (Banning) and 2 complement each other offering a two-hour headway throughout the commercial areas of Beaumont, Banning, Cabazon, and the Morongo commercial development. Route 7 and Route 9 offer limited services in the mornings and afternoons. Express Route 8 offers limited service to the city of Calimesa. Fixed route service hours are: Monday – Friday 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Limited service (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) is provided on Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, Presidents’ Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veterans’ Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on New Year's Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Paratransit Services Dial-A-Ride provides service to seniors, persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complimentary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Service hours for the dial-a-ride service are: Elderly and Disabled without ADA certification Monday - Saturday 8:15 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Persons with ADA Complementary Paratransit Certification Monday - Friday 6.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 5 Limited service (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) is provided on Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on New Year's Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Regional Express Bus Service Passengers can use Day Passes to transfer between the Pass Transit System fixed routes and the RTA Line 31 to Hemet, Line 35 to Moreno Valley, and Line 36 to Calimesa. There is a latent demand for better connections into eastern Riverside County for medical and social services as well as westward to the Palm Desert area for employment purposes. Fare Structure The fare structure was adjusted in January 2009. The current fixed route fare is $1.00/one-way trip for general passengers. Student passengers pay $.75/one-way. The fare is $.55/one-way trip for senior citizens and persons with disabilities. A zone fare of $.25 exists for travel between Banning and Cabazon/Morongo Reservation service areas. (The route is twice the length of any other route in the system. The zone fare helps to recover operating costs.) Ten-ride ticket books are offered for $9.00 each; senior citizens and persons with disabilities can purchase the books at a reduced cost of $5.40/10-ride book. Day passes are sold for $3.00 each; senior citizens and persons with disabilities can purchase the passes for $1.80. Monthly passes are $34.00; youth, senior citizens and persons with disabilities are $20.50 each. In addition to those passes, a 10 tripper pass for $12.15 is offered on dial-a ride services. Staff is proposing a fare increase equal to approximately 15% effective July 1, 2010 for Fixed Route general passengers, students and passengers under 46” in height. A slight fare increase for Dial-A-Ride is also being proposed. Should Council approve this new fare structure, Pass Transit would have the following proposed fares: 6 FIXED ROUTE FARE STRUCTURE Category Current Fare Proposed Fare Full  Fare $1.00 $1.15 Student Fare $0.75 N/A Youth  (Grades 1 ‐12) N/A $0.85 Child under 46'' tall N/A $0.25 Elderly  /Disabled $0.55 $0.60 Zone(s) $0.25 $0.25 Ticket Books (10 one‐ride) Full Fare $9.00 $10.35 Ticket Books (10 one‐ride) Elderly/Disabled $5.40 $5.40 Day  Pass Full  Fare $3.00 $3.45 Day Pass Elderly/Disabled $1.80 $1.80 Monthly Pass Full  Fare $34.00 $39.00 Monthly Pass Youth N/A $23.50 Monthly Pass Student/Elderly/Disabled $20.50 $20.50 Express  Route General  Passengers $1.75 $2.05 Elderly/Disabled $1.25 $1.45 DIAL-A-RIDE FARE STRUCTURE Category Current Fare Proposed Fare Full Fare $1.35 $1.55 Attendants $1.70 $2.10 No show (collected during  the  next ride) $1.35 $1.55 10 Tripper (10 one‐ride) $12.15 $13.95 Fleet Characteristics The Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency operates eight fixed route vehicles (six in revenue service and two in reserve). Three of the vehicles are CNG powered, two are diesel-powered, and one is gasoline powered. All are equipped with bicycle racks and ADA compliant with wheelchair lifts and tie-down stations. The transit system also operates four Dial-A-Ride vehicles (three in revenue service and two in reserve). Two are diesel-powered and three are gasoline powered. Four of the five vehicles are ADA compliant with wheelchair lifts and tie-down stations (please see 7 City of Beaumont Table 1 for individual vehicle characteristics and replacement schedule). A new CNG bus was purchased in 2009 and put into service in January of this year. CNG vehicles are fueled at fueling stations located at the Beaumont Unified School District’s transportation yard and at the City of Banning corporate yard. The fueling stations are currently the only CNG stations in the Pass Area large enough to meet the transit system's demand. Three vehicles will be replaced this year with diesel-powered vehicles. Staff is working with vendors to piggy-back on the State of California’s bid to secure the vehicles within the next six months. Facilities Administrative services for the Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency are provided by staff from various City of Beaumont departments with the majority of operations located at the Transit Services yard. Responsibility for overall administration of the transit system is provided by the City Resources Director. Maintenance of the vehicles is provided by transit staff. CHAPTER 2 - EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE System-wide ridership in FY 2008 was 120,883. In FY 2009, ridership decreased by 18% to 98,039. The budgeted ridership for 2010 is 114,100. Estimated system-wide ridership for FY 2010 after 3rd quarter counts were tabulated is 139,528. The system- wide ridership budgeted for FY 2011 is 151,580, an 8% projected increase over the FY 2010 estimate. Fixed Route Service The Pass Transit System operates eight fixed routes, one alternative route and one express route. Routes 2, 3 Alternative Route 3, 4, 7, Express Route 8, and 9 are operated by the Beaumont Transit System. Routes 1, 5, and 6 are operated by the Banning Transit System. See "Appendix A" for the system route map. Routes 3 through 6 operate on one-hour headway. Routes 1 (Banning) and 2 complement each other offering a two-hour headway throughout the commercial areas of Beaumont, Banning, Cabazon, and the Morongo commercial development. Route 7 and Route 9 offer limited services in the mornings and afternoons. Express Route 8 offers limited service to the city of Calimesa. 8 Route 1 This route is operated by the City of Banning. Please refer to Banning’s Short Range Transit Plan. Route 2 This route operates on a two-hour headway and is complimented by an overlap with Route 1 that reduces headway on 75% of the route to one hour. The route provides service to the residential area along the western portion of Beaumont, the commercial areas along 6th Street, Beaumont Avenue, and Highland Springs Avenue in Beaumont, including the new Wal-Mart Supercenter shopping center, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street in Banning, the Cabazon Community Center, Casino Morongo, and Desert Hills and Cabazon Outlet Malls. Route 3 This route operates on a one-hour headway and serves the residential areas of Beaumont (north of 1-10 freeway). It also serves the commercial areas of Beaumont including the Oak Valley and Wal-Mart Supercenter shopping centers and Beaumont High School. In FY 07-08 Beaumont improved Route 3 by making the routing more direct, eliminating fixed route service to most of Cherry Valley in favor of deviated service on demand and by adding routing through the Sundance development. Sundance is just outside the zone for school bus service to the high school. Providing a direct link to the high school on Route 3 has increased ridership and has been a good service to the community. Route 3 Alternative This route operates on a one-hour headway during the hours of 11:00am – 12:00pm and then again between the hours of 2:00pm and 3:00pm. The route services the high school, two middle schools, Sundance, the Civic Center, Three Rings Ranch, community recreation centers and downtown. The route began service in July 2008 and provides a direct link to child care facilities in Beaumont. Route 4 This route operates on a one-hour headway and serves downtown Beaumont and the residential areas of the City of Beaumont including a small portion south of Interstate 10. In FY 07-08, Beaumont improved Route 4 by simplifying some routing while maintaining neighborhood coverage. It was determined that the best way to maintain the coverage is through a one-way loop which is not the most effective routing option for transit. Route 4 continues to serve the commercial and industrial areas of Beaumont. Route 5 This route is operated by the City of Banning. Please refer to Banning’s Short Range Transit Plan. Route 6 This route is operated by the City of Banning. Please refer to Banning’s Short Range Transit Plan. 9 Route 7 This route operates on half-hour headway between the hours of 6:30am and 7:30am and again between the hours of 2:45pm and 4:00pm. The route services the westerly portion of Interstate 10 more commonly referred to as the Tournament Hills area, Cherry Valley, the high school and commercial areas. Route 8 This route operates on a three-quarter hour headway as an express route between the 2nd Street Marketplace and the City of Calimesa via Interstate 10. Service is provided three times a day, Monday through Friday. Route 9 This route operates on half-hour headway between the hours of 6:30am and 7:30am and again between the hours of 2:45pm and 4:00pm. The route services the southerly portion of Interstate 10, Loma Linda Medical Center, the Seneca Springs community, downtown, the middle schools and the high school. Dial-A-Ride Service Dial-A-Ride ridership for FY 2009 was 22,641. Projected ridership for FY 2010 is 22,065. Ridership for FY 2011 is budgeted at 22,070. Internal procedures have been implemented to encourage eligible riders to ride fixed routes whenever possible. Key Performance Indicators The Riverside County Transportation Commission has adopted a Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) for the transit and commuter rail operators of Riverside County. The PIP sets forth efficiency and effectiveness standards that the transit operators are to meet. Progress towards these standards is reported quarterly to the Commission. Below is a table of the operating performance indicators adopted in the PIP and this plan's projections for FY 2010/11. Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency 10 Based on actual year to date revenues and weighted projections, the Beaumont Transit System estimates fare box recovery ratio of 9.65% for FY 2010. System wide fare box ratio is projected at 10.00% for FY 2011. With the changes to reporting policy and procedures at Beaumont Transit, the City of Beaumont is significantly more comfortable with the accuracy of reported data, allowing for more efficient management of the Beaumont system. It is anticipated that cost savings can be achieved through careful management of the available resources. In January 2010, the City terminated its contract with McDonald Transit Agency to save operating costs. Additionally, the generous salary and benefit rich package enjoyed by the current represented employees contributes significantly to overhead costs. As an example, Beaumont’s current contract with the bus drivers affords all benefits to be paid by the City up to the family level. This includes medical, dental, vision, life insurance, and retirement, to name a few. A typical bus driver receives up to $60.00 per hour in pay and benefits creating a significant expense for the Transit services. More efficient utilization of employee time has been identified as a critical element to controlling operating costs and is a priority for the City in FY 2011 as it was in FY 2010. The proposed fare adjustment may offset some of the operating expenses while still keeping it affordable to use the transit system. A system-wide fare increase is proposed for July 2010. The City of Beaumont is still actively pursuing the prospect of merging the Beaumont Transit services with the City of Banning. A combined system would offer certain economies of scale, guarantee of seamless service, continuity of fares and the potential of significant cost savings. Productivity Improvement Efforts Beaumont Transit has made a significant effort to improve productivity in the last fiscal year and will continue to do so in the future. Such notable improvements include fiscal responsibility, increasing passenger fares to meet more of the increased costs of operating the transit services, more efficient data compilation, and combining staffing assignments. The most significant improvement included successfully marketing local students to use transit as an alternative to transportation to and from school. Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Major trip destinations include the commercial areas along Beaumont Avenue, 6th Street, 2nd Street Marketplace, Oak Valley shopping center, Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue; the Super Wal-Mart transfer point; area elementary, intermediate and high schools; Desert Hills Outlet Malls, Cabazon Outlet Mall, and Casino Morongo; Beaver Medical and the Highland Springs medical offices adjacent to the San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital and thrift store; Riverside County Department of Public Social Services; Banning Mental Health and public health clinic; and H.E.L.P. 11 The 2008 Pass Area Transit Study identified that: • In this survey, 28% of riders reported errands as trip purpose compared to 40% in the last survey • In this survey, 28% of riders reported going to work as trip purpose compared to 25% in the last survey Ridership on the fixed route system is expected to remain constant in FY 2011. This projection is based (in part) on the rise in median household income that the City of Beaumont has experienced coupled with the recent growth and development within the City limits. Specifically, we have seen an increase in home prices exceeding $300,000 with associated travel patterns tending more towards commuter service rather than local service. Additionally, a proposed fare increase is expected to adversely affect ridership passenger trips. As the City of Beaumont grows, senior citizen and ADA qualified populations have increased along with the general population growth. However, the City of Beaumont currently has two major developments specifically for active adults with more planned in the near future. Because of the current and anticipated “adult developments” demand for Senior and ADA paratransit is expected to increase geometrically greater than the growth of the population as a whole. Providing service to major employers, including a Stater Brothers., Duraplastics, Wal- Mart Supercenter, Lowe’s Distribution Plant, and Home Depot, was anticipated to increase ridership. Ridership has increased to the Wal-Mart Supercenter. Ridership to Home Depot and the Oak Valley shopping center has not increased as anticipated. The service to these centers and its utilization will be part of an ongoing system evaluation and monitoring. In August 2009, the City of Beaumont was notified by the Beaumont Unified School District that school district bus routes to the two middle schools and senior school would be eliminated in FY 2010. This triggered adding two additional fixed routes to our system to meet the needs of the student population left without transportation. Finally, expanded outreach efforts to senior citizen organizations, schools and major employers are included in the plan for FY 2011. Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs The system's fixed route buses are equipped with passenger operated bicycle racks. All revenue service vehicles are equipped with wheelchair lifts and tie-down stations. Bus stops in commercial areas are equipped with benches. Waste containers are available at many of the commercial bus stops. Flag down stops are utilized in a few of the residential areas of Beaumont. 12 Currently, bus shelters are located at only five of the system's most heavily used stops with more bus shelters planned for FY 2011. A new bus shelter area, including three shelters, were installed using STAF capital funding at the Wal-Mart Supercenter on 2nd Street Marketplace in 2009. More shelters are scheduled to be installed at the high school, middle schools, and downtown in July 2010. CHAPTER 3 - PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION Recent Service Changes Day and Monthly Passes The transit system previously issued paper transfers to customers wishing to transfer between routes. Local service fixed-routes intersect in multiple locations, which created a challenge in developing and enforcing transfer policies that are fair and convenient to both the customer and the transit provider. During FY 2009, day and monthly passes were implemented offering the customer the maximum amount of flexibility in using the transit system and the ability to choose the most direct route for their chosen trips. Furthermore, the costs of the passes are a cost-savings to the passenger over the length of time of the pass. New Service Routes In August 2009, two new routes (Routes 7 and 9) were created to service student passengers traveling to and from area schools. The Calimesa Express Route (Route 8) was created in October 2009 to service passengers in the City of Calimesa. In May 2010, staff proposed modifying Routes 3 and 4 to eliminate service during periods of low ridership. Public hearings are being held to allow passengers the opportunity to comment on these changes. A decision has yet to be made but staff expects Council to support the proposals. Marketing Plans and Promotion Efforts have been made to market the Pass Transit System over the past year and will continue in the coming year. These efforts include purchasing advertising on a map of the San Gorgonio Pass Area, distribution of route maps through the utility bills, delivering route maps to the library, chamber of commerce, local businesses and shelters. Route maps have also been placed on all of the buses in map holders. A sub-committee of the Transportation Now Chapter was created in 2009 to address marketing efforts to students in the Pass Area. From that sub-committee, a co- sponsored event between Banning, Beaumont, RTA and the Mt. San Jacinto Community College will take place in August to market college students and encourage them to ride mass transit to and from the community college. 13 These and other efforts will continue in Fiscal Year 2011 and beyond. In addition, upgrades to bus stop amenities including additional route signs, the posting of bus schedules and maps at system bus stops, and new bus shelters are intended to make the transit system more attractive and easier to use. Budget Impact on Proposed Changes Beginning in June 2010, Routes 3 and 4 will be modified to eliminate passenger trips that fail to meet passenger needs. Although each route will only be reduced by less than one full trip, the savings associated with the reduction in staff costs will result in a significant savings to operating costs per year. By increasing passenger fares by an average of 15%, staff estimates that the farebox recovery ratio will meet or exceed the required 10% recovery rate. CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS Operating and Capital Budget Although the State reduction in funding has adversely impacted our operating budget, staff feels confident that all of the following will greatly improve our operations and we will be able to meet the budget limitations set by the State: • proposed increase of passenger fares • concentration on marketing the youth in the Pass area to increase ridership • re-organizing routes to better accommodate ridership and reduce overhead costs • purchase several new buses to reduce vehicle maintenance costs. All of the previous capital improvement projects are underway and will be completed in FY 2010/2011. The largest portion of the projects includes purchasing new buses. Quotes were received last week and are awaiting purchasing approval with delivery in 90 to 120 days. No new capital improvement projects are planned until the program is current and all past projects are completed. Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program The City of Beaumont receives a portion of its operating expenses from LTF funding. In prior years, staff requested that City Council fund the remaining balance of operating expenses from the general fund. As such, staff has requested that City Council fund the remaining balance of transit operating expenses for the FY 2011. Formal adoption of the FY 2011 budget is expected in June 2010. Capital projects are funded through STA funds and grants. 14 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements The American with Disabilities Act of 1990 The Dial-A-Ride services provide ADA complimentary paratransit service for the fixed route services. The system uses a self-certification process with professional verification. The City of Beaumont has allowed RTA to certify its ADA passengers and work under the umbrella of RTA's ADA policy as a provider of ADA paratransit. Title VI The Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency does not utilize federal funds for operating expenses. As such, Title VI requirements do not currently apply to the transit system. Alternatively Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) The Beaumont Municipal Transit System operates three CNG powered buses on its fixed routes. The balance of the system's revenue service vehicles is diesel and gasoline powered. Future vehicle purchases will be in compliance with the RCTC and SCAQMD policies regarding alternative fuel transit vehicles. STA Compliance Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency does not utilize State Transit Assistance (STA) funding for operating expenses. As such, compliance with the Public Utilities Commission requirement is not applicable. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Line Route Description Areas/Sites Serviced 2 Wal-Mart shopping center west to Beaumont then east to Cabazon via 6th Street/Ramsey St. 2nd Street Marketplace shopping center and transfer point to RTA, San Gorgonio hospital, Beaumont Civic Center, banks, downtown Beaumont, Wellwood Child Care, Three Rings Ranch, Noble Creek Park District, Stater Bros./Walgreens shopping center, Orchard Park Apartments, Sports Park, shopping/restaurants along 6th Street, Mt. View and San Gorgonio middle schools, Palm Elementary, Beaver Medical Clinic, DPSS, Banning City Hall, unincorporated Cabazon, Desert Hills outlet mall, Cabazon Outlet Mall, and Morongo Resort Casino 3 Wal-Mart shopping center then north through Sundance community to Beaumont High School with immediate return via the same route 2nd Street Marketplace shopping center and transfer to RTA, San Gorgonio hospital, Sundance elementary, Sundance Community, Orchard Park Apartments, Mt. View and San Gorgonio middle schools, Sports Park, Cherry Valley, and Beaumont High School Alternative Route 3 Beaumont High School south through Sundance, west on 6th Street to Three Rings and then north on Beaumont Ave through downtown Beaumont High School, Sports Park, Orchard Park Apartments, Mt. View and San Gorgonio middle schools, four elementary schools, Beaumont Civic Center, banks, downtown Beaumont, Noble Creek Park, restaurants and shopping, and Cherry Valley 4 Wal-Mart shopping center then north to hospital, west via 6th Street then north on Beaumont Ave., south on Pennsylvania 2nd Street Marketplace shopping center and transfer point to RTA, San Gorgonio hospital, Beaumont Civic Center, banks, downtown Beaumont, library, Stater Bros./Walgreens shopping center, Orchard Park Apartments, Sports Park, shopping/restaurants along 6th Street and Beaumont Ave, Mt. View and San Gorgonio middle schools, and various apartment complexes 7 Brookside Ave, Oak View Drive, Oak Valley Parkway, Desert Lawn Drive, return to Brookside, Beaumont Ave, and repeat loop Fairway Canyon, Tournament Hills, Tournament Hills elementary, Beaumont High, Mt. View Middle School, San Gorgonio Middle school, Oak Valley Greens, Oak Valley Shopping Center, Stetson community, and Cherry Valley 8 Express Route with minimal stops beginning at WalMart to downtown Beaumont, I-10 freeway to Calimesa City Hall and repeat loop WalMart and 2nd Street Marketplace, Beaumont Civic Center, Calimesa Civic Center and Library, Calimesa Stater Bros. 9 WalMart shopping center to Seneca Springs, north on Pennsylvania to Palm Ave. and continuing north on Beaumont Ave. WalMart and 2nd Street Marketplace, Seneca Springs community, Four Seasons Active Retirement community, Loma Linda Medical Center, San Gorgonio Middle School, Oak Valley Shopping Center, Mt. View Middle School, and Beaumont High School Fixed Route: Table 3A - Individual Route Descriptions 23 Beaumont SRTP 2010/11 Summary of Funds Requested Short Range Transit Plan Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STA Measure AProp 1B (PTMISEA)Prop 1B (Security)Fare Box Other (2)Operating Costs F/Y 10-11 $1,140,000 $1,018,000 $120,000 $2,000$1,140,000 $1,018,000 $0 $120,000 $2,000Security Cameras on Buses (08/09) FY 11-1 $148,500 $120,000 $28,500Passenger Amenities (09/10) FY 11-2 $102,877 $102,877Bus Shelter Upgrades (09/10) FY 11-3 $18,185 $18,185 $269,562 $0 $0 $222,877 $46,685Total: Operating & Capital $1,409,562 $1,018,000 $0 $222,877 $46,685 $120,000 $2,000(1) Number should tie to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification(2) Source of "Other" funds--Interest IncomeSubtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalTable 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2010/11 24 SRTP FY 10-11 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-1 PROJECT NAME Security Cameras on Buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Install security cameras on board buses. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Implementation of security cameras on buses will enhance the security for passengers and physical equipment. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B PTMISEA Funds $120,000 Prop 1B Security Funds $28,500 TOTAL $148,500 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER None 25 SRTP FY 10-11 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-2 PROJECT NAME Passenger Amenities PROJECT DESCRIPTION This ongoing project will add passenger amenities to existing buses, bus benches, bus shelters and bus stops. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Passenger amenities are necessary to maintain and increase ridership. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B PTMISEA Funds $102,877 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER None 26 SRTP FY 10-11 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 11-3 PROJECT NAME Bus Shelter Replacement PROJECT DESCRIPTION Upgrade existing bus shelters. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Bus shelter upgrades will protect riders from inclement weather and provide an area for safety. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Prop 1B Security Funds $18,185 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER None 27 City of Beaumont FY 2011/12 and FY 2012/13 Summary of Funds Requested Short Range Transit Plan Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2011/12Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B (PTMISEA)Measure A Fare BoxOther (2)Operating Expenses $1,350,000 $1,215,000 $135,000$1,350,000 $1,215,000 $0 $0 $0 $135,000 $0Passenger Amenities FY 12-1 $35,000 $35,000 $35,000 $0 $35,000 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $1,385,000 $1,215,000 $35,000 $0 $0 $135,000 $0Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2012/13Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B (PTMISEA)Measure A Fare BoxOther (2)Operating Expenses $1,417,500 $1,275,750 $0 $0 $0 $141,750$1,417,500 $1,275,750 $0 $0 $0 $141,750 $0Passenger Amenities FY 13-1 $35,000 $35,000$35,000 $0 $35,000 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $1,452,500 $1,275,750 $35,000 $0 $0 $141,750 $0Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalSubtotal: OperatingSubtotal: Capital 28 SRTP FY 11-12 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 12-1 PROJECT NAME Passenger Amenities PROJECT DESCRIPTION This ongoing project will add passenger amenities to existing buses, bus benches, bus shelters and bus stops. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Passenger amenities are necessary to maintain and increase ridership. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA Funds $35,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER None 29 SRTP FY 12-13 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 13-1 PROJECT NAME Passenger Amenities PROJECT DESCRIPTION This ongoing project will add passenger amenities to existing buses, bus benches, bus shelters and bus stops. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Passenger amenities are necessary to maintain and increase ridership. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA Funds $35,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER None 30 City of Beaumont Transit System SRTP 10-11 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Audit Recommendations (Covering FY 2004 – FY 2006) Action(s) Taken And Results (1) 1. Consider in the SRTP the implementation of Sunday fixed-route service to be consistent with the Banning Transit System. The City of Banning implemented Sunday service on its three fixed routes in July 2004. Sunday service operates between the hours of 9:00a.m. and 5:00p.m. Although the transit systems of Banning and Beaumont operate separately, they both have a common brand identity as Pass Transit. Both systems have sought to complement each other as well as provide seamless connections. COMPLETED. Sunday service is not feasible at this time. Operating costs are significant and will negatively affect the current budget. 2. Consider providing ADA dial-a-ride to Cabazon where the main fixed route trunkline extends. It was not clear whether Beaumont dial-a-ride vehicles travel from Beaumont to Cabazon to support the fixed routes buses. Given that Beaumont is responsible for a passenger whose trip begins in the City, the service area of dial-a- ride should be reviewed and service provided, if necessary. COMPLETED. Currently, ADA dial-a-ride to Cabazon is covered by the City of Banning through a cooperative agreement. 3. Consider additional training with CNG engines. As the two CNG vehicles are newest in the fleet, maintenance staff should be well-versed in being able to service alternative fuel vehicles. Local community colleges like College of the Desert and San Bernardino Valley College in Coachella Valley may have related classes regarding CNG engines. Beaumont may also consider collaborating with SunLine maintenance staff about CNG training and certifications. COMPLETED. Both mechanics have received preliminary CNG training and will continue to do so in the future. 4. Complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and specialized service for elderly and disabled. Separate annual State Controller Reports should be submitted for each type of service to be in COMPLETED. Separate reports will be submitted in the future. 31 compliance with State instructions. As Beaumont currently produces one consolidated report to the State, it is required that the financial and operations data contained in the report be divided by the respective services. 5. The City should consider adding a link on its website to the Pass Transit System Ride Guide. The City of Beaumont’s website contains general information regarding transit services offered by the City. The webpage refers to a link to the Pass Transit System Map at the bottom of the page; however, no such link exists. It would be helpful to passengers to have direct access to this link. COMPLETED. A fully informational website was brought online in November 2007 which included information regarding the transit services and a .pdf version of the Pass Transit System and Ride Guide. 6. The City should ensure that its Annual Financial Audit and State Controller Operator Reports are completed in full and submitted in a timely manner as per Public Utilities Code, Sections 99243 and 99245. Among the operator compliance requirements under TDA are the timely submittal of financial and operational data to the State Controller and RCTC. The State Controller Report is generally due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year, or 110 days if filed electronically. The City was out of compliance for two out of the past three years with regard to this requirement. The annual fiscal and compliance audits are supposed to be submitted to RCTC and the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year, unless a 90 day extension has been granted by RCTC as allowed by law. The audits for each of the fiscal years reviewed were submitted well after the 180 day period following the end of each fiscal year. The State Controller Reports should include all elements, including the exclusions for the farebox calculations. COMPLETED. All past audits and reports have been submitted. Procedures are in place to prevent further delays in completion of these important documents. (1) If no action taken, provide schedule for implementation or explanation of why the recommendation is no longer relevant. 32 33 34 Table 9 HIGHLIGHTS OF SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN • Perform ongoing system wide route re-structure studies • Implement route changes (as needed) to existing routes to increase service and improve customer service • Purchase three replacement vehicles with radios • Install more bus shelters and bus benches through service area to improve and enhance service provided with the city of Beaumont • Inventory all current bus stops and passenger amenities • Continue to work with the City of Banning to improve coordination of service in PASS Transit service area • The City has implemented plan review procedures for new construction to ensure the proper placement of bus pull outs and passenger amenities • Implementation of Route 7 as a commuter route between Beaumont and Calimesa • Implementation of Route 8 to provide a new route to service the west side of the I10 freeway Operating and Financial Data FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Audited FY 07/08 Audited FY 08/09 Audited FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Systemwide Ridership 118,618 105,824 120,883 98,4039 139,528 151,580 Operating Costs per Revenue Hour $59.01 $62.20 $68.63 $85.91 $78.42 $58.06 35 APPENDIX A 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 City of Corona Short Range Transit Plan FY 2010/11-2012/13 DRAFT 6/01/2010 Table of Contents Chapter 1 – System Overview Page 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Description of service area 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections 4 1.3 Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service 5 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure 6 1.5 Revenue Fleet 7 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities 7 Chapter 2 – Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 Fixed Route Service – Route by Route Analysis 8 2.2 Dial-A-Ride Service – System Performance 8 2.3 Key Performance Indicators 8 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts 10 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth 11 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs 11 Chapter 3 – Planned Service Changes and Implementation 3.1 Recent Service Changes 11 3.2 Recommended Local & Express Route 11 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotion 11 3.4 Budget Impact and Proposed Changes 12 Chapter 4 – Financial and Capital Plans 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 12 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program 13 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 13 Table 1 – Fleet Inventory 15 Table 2 – Service Summary 17 Table 3 – Route Statistics 20 Table 3A – Individual Route Descriptions and Area Served 22 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2010/11 23 Table 5A – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2011/12 26 Table 5B – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2012/13 28 Table 6 – Progress Implementing Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations 31 Table 7 – Service Provider Performance Targets 32 Table 8 – Performance Report 33 Table 9 – City of Corona Transit Service Highlights FY 2010/11 34 Chapter 1 – System Overview 1.0 Introduction The Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) sets the objectives and strategies for FY 2010/11 for the City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS) by evaluating current transit system performance, projected demographic changes, operating and capital funding needs, anticipated funding from federal, state and local sources, and other factors to create a reasonable projection of conditions over the next three years (FY 2010/11 – 2012/13). As with most sectors of the economy, the transit industry is facing an era where revenues are declining while operating costs continue to increase. Many transit operators have already seen the impacts and already addressed this dual pressure of decreasing revenue and increasing costs by either increasing fares or reducing service. Several transit operators have done both. For the CCTS, the full impact of declining revenue and increased cost will occur in FY 2010/11 and beyond. Balancing these opposing forces will not be easy and will impact our patrons but balancing revenues and expenses must be done. The CCTS looked at several options to achieve a balance budget; impacting the fewest number of passengers has been the guiding principle throughout the process. To achieve a balanced budget, the CCTS is proposing a fare increase and a reduction in service hours. Similar efforts have been undertaken by neighboring transit agencies in Riverside, San Bernardino and Orange counties. The CCTS last increased fares in July 2005. Over the last ten years, the CCTS has continued to increase transit services for our patrons by implementing a two-route fixed route system, Corona Cruiser, and extending the hours of operation on the Corona Dial-A-Ride. 1.1 Description of service area The CCTS operates a general public demand response Dial-A-Ride (DAR) service and fixed route dubbed the ‘Corona Cruiser.’ DAR service commenced in 1977 and provides curb-to-curb service throughout the city of Corona and neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito and Home Gardens as well as satellite locations in the city of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services and Riverside Community College/Norco Campus). Corona Cruiser fixed route began operations in 2001 and services the city-center as well as commercial, retail and residential areas on the eastern and southern portion of the city. See Maps Below: 1 3 2 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections The CCTS serves an ethnically diverse population of over 156,000 city residents. The city’s boundary encompasses 39 square miles. That diversity is reflected in Table 1. City Ethnicity Number 156,525 149,869 6,656 156,525 100,205 9,019