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10 October 18, 2010 Technical AdvisoryRECORDS • TIME: DATE: LOCATION: TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA* 10:00 a.m. October 18, 2010 Beaumont City Hall Conference Room #2 550 East Sixth Street Beaumont, CA 92223 90043 *By request, agenda and minutes may be available in alternative format; i.e. large print, tape. COMMITTEE MEMBERS Don Allison, City of Menifee .ve Barakian, City of Palm Springs 11 Bayne, City of Cathedral City Tom Boyd, City of Riverside Duane Burk, City of Banning Greg Butler, City of Temecula Bo Chen, City of Palm Desert Kip Field, City of Corona Paul Goble, City of Indian Wells City of Hemet Bruce Harry, City of Rancho Mirage Tim Jonasson, City of La Quinta Michael Kashiwagi, City of Wildomar Savat Khamphou, Caltrans District 8 Habib Motlagh, Cities of Canyon Lake, Perris and San Jacinto • Juan Perez, County of Riverside Kishen Prathivadi, City of Beaumont Brenda Ramirez, SunLine Transit Agency Jim Rodkey, City of Blythe Ken Seumalo, City of Lake Elsinore Jim Smith, City of Indio Mark Stanley, Riverside Transit Agency Ruthanne Taylor -Berger, WRCOG Patrick Thomas, City of Murrieta Bill Thompson, City of Norco Paul Toor, City of Coachella Chris Vogt, City of Moreno Valley Allyn Waggle, CVAG Tim Wassil, City of Desert Hot Springs Carlos Zamano, City of Calimesa Commission Staff Anne Mayer, Executive Director Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager 11.36.02 • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda. TIME: 10:00 a.m. DATE: October 18, 2010 LOCATION: Beaumont City Hall Conference Room #2 550 East Sixth Street Beaumont, CA 92223 In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact Riverside County Transportation Commission at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. Ca11 to Order 2. Self -Introductions 3. Approval of August 16, 2010 Minutes 4. Public Comments (This is for comments on items not listed on agenda. Comments relating to an item on the agenda will be taken when the item is before the Committee.) 5. Election of Officers 6. Fiscal Year 2010/I1 State Budget (Attachment) 7. Transportation Enhancement Funding for the `B" Canyon Wildlife Connectivity Project (Attachment) 8. Federal Fiscal Year 2010/11 Obligation Delivery Plan (Attachment) 9. Regional Transportation Plan/Federal Transportation Improvement Plan (RTP/FTIP) Update (Attachment) 10. 2011 FTIP Report (Attachment) 11. RivTAM MOU (Attachment) 12. Annual Report and Ten -Year Delivery Plan (Attachment) • 13. Caltrans Local Assistance Report (Verbal Presentation) 14. October Commission Meeting Highlights (Verbal Presentation) Technical Advisory Committee Meeting October 18, 2010 Page 2 15. Proposed Change to TAC Meeting Schedule 16. Other Business 17. Adjournment (The next meeting will be November 15, 10:00 a.m., in Riverside.) • • TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES Monday, August 16, 2010 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) was called to order at 10:00 a.m. at Beaumont City Hall, Conference Room #2, 550 East Sixth Street, Beaumont, CA 92223. 2. SELF -INTRODUCTIONS Members Present: Others Present: Dave Barakian, City of Palm Springs Bill Bayne, City of Cathedral City Tom Boyd, City of Riverside Greg Butler, City of Temecula Mike Gow, City of Hemet Bruce Harry, City of Rancho Mirage Tim Jonasson, City of La Quinta Savat Khamphou, Caltrans Prem Kumar, City of Moreno Valley Robert Morin, City of Corona Diane Nguyen, City of Wildomar Kahono Oei, City of Banning Jim Rodkey, City of Blythe Patty Romo, County of Riverside Mike Shoberg, CVAG Mark Stanley, RTA Patrick Thomas, City of Murrieta Paul Toor, City of Coachella Tim Wassil, City of Desert Hot Springs Grace Alvarez, RCTC Mark Diercks, City of Palm Desert Shirley Gooding, RCTC Kevin Hughes, City of Beaumont Eric Lewis, City of Moreno Valley Shirley Medina, RCTC Roy Null, County of Riverside Alex Serena, WRCOG Chris Sunde, Cities of Canyon Lake, Perris, San Jacinto Andrea Zureick, RCTC 3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES June 21, 2010 minutes approved as submitted. Abstain: Wassil 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no public. comments. Technical Advisory Committee Meeting August 16, 2010 Page 2 5. STIP UPDATE Shirley Medina, RCTC, stated that about $3 billion of State Transportation Improvement Program projects are on hold waiting for allocations by the California Transportation Commission (CTC). Of that amount, about $937 million are projects that are delayed from FY 2009/10 due to lack of state funds. About $1.5 billion are deferred because the state budget has not been adopted. About $650 million of bond projects are waiting for the next bond sale, which will not occur until a state budget is in place. If a budget is not adopted soon, it could impact projects currently under contract. The state is estimating that state cash will run out sometime in September. It is possible that the state budget may not be adopted until after the November elections. She further stated that the I-215 CMIA bond project will be funded by the Commission (Measure A funds) so that it can get out to bid very soon. The Commission would then be reimbursed with state funds once the state budget is approved. 6. TEMECULA CETAP FUNDING REQUESTS Ms. Medina reported that the city of Temecula submitted a request for $20 million in funding for the I-15/French Valley Parkway Phase 1 interchange improvements and $5.4 million for the I-15/SR-79 South interchange improvement projects. The Commission's recommendation to the Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee on August 23 will be that TUMF CETAP funds be approved for those projects. 7. TOLL CREDITS Andrea Zureick, RCTC, stated that the Federal Transportation Act (ISTEA) included provisions for agencies that collect toll revenue and reinvest that revenue back into transportation projects to receive a like amount of credit towards the non-federal match requirement of federal funds. Toll credits are not new revenue; they are not a fund source and do not supplement the federal funding already on a project. They act as a waiver of the match requirement for federal funds. Caltrans has recently received authorization from FHWA for $5.7 billion of toll credits to be used throughout the state. The credits do not expire and are available until they are all used. The credits are available immediately. Ms. Zureick reviewed the main considerations for determining the criterion for using the credits and gave examples on the use of toll credits. 8. CMAQ MATCH REQUIREMENTS Ms. Zureick reported that the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 permitted increasing the federal share of CMAQ funded projects up to 100% of the project cost, which has been extended through December 31, 2010. 9. 2008 RTP-FTIP UPDATE Regarding the 2008 FTIP, Grace Alvarez, RCTC, reported that four FTIP amendments have been processed since the last TAC meeting of June 21. Two of the amendments, Amendment No. 47 and Amendment No. 48, included project changes associated to the new toll credits and 100% federal participation for CMAQ. Both amendments were approved subsequent to their July submittal. • • • Technical Advisory Committee Meeting August 16, 2010 Page 3 She further reported that Amendment No. 44 is one of the other two amendments submitted to SCAG — Amendment No. 44 included project changes associated to the 2010 STIP, 2010 Short Range Transit Plan Amendments; Amendment No. 44 just completed the public review comment period and the anticipated approval by the funding agencies is August 23`d. The most recent amendment submitted to SCAG was Amendment No. 49, which included minor changes to two state highway projects and three transit projects. The anticipated approval of amendment No. 49 is August 20. Amendment No. 50 is scheduled for submittal to SCAG on September 7. Project changes that need to be reflected in the current 2008 FTIP for federal obligations in FFY 2009/2010 and/or first quarter of FFY 2010/2011 should be forwarded to Andrea Zureick and/or Grace Alvarez by August 24. The obligation of the federal funds programmed for FFY 2009/10 will be extended until the new 2011 FTIP is approved, which is anticipated to be in December 2010. At the request of the city of Rancho Mirage, RCTC submitted one project for the 2008 RTP Amendment No. 4 for the widening of southbound Monterey Avenue from Dinah Shore Drive to Gerald Ford Drive. The draft release of the 2008 RTP Amendment No. 4 is scheduled for September 2010 and final adoption in November 2010. 10. 2011 FTIP REPORT Ms. Alvarez stated that RCTC included 404 projects for Riverside County in the 2011 FTIP. SCAG is on schedule for the approval of the 2011 FTIP in December 2010. As of today, SCAG has completed the analyses of the project submittals by the various Regional Transportation Planning Agencies, modeled the projects included in the FTIP, secured the approval of the draft FTIP by SCAG's Transportation Committee and Energy and Environmental Committee, and just ended the public review period on July 31. The following steps in the approval of the 2011 FTIP include responding to the public review comments, approval of the final FTIP by the Transportation Committee, and the Regional Council, and transmittal of the final document to the funding agencies for the conformity determination, which is on target for December 2010. 11. FFY 09/10 OA DELIVERY UPDATE Ms. Medina made reference to the updated FFY 09/10 Delivery Obligation Plan included in the TAC agenda, stating that the projects included in the report have been submitted to Caltrans and are expected to be obligated by the end of the federal fiscal year; the report includes the current status in the comment section. Some of the projects listed in the FFY 09/10 Delivery Plan are at Caltrans having the environmental document reviewed. Based on the fact that the environmental review is still in process, the local agencies said they would be unable to meet the required obligation deadline of September 30. FHWA typically closes its doors towards the end of August on projects from Caltrans headquarters that are ready to be obligated. This policy allows FHWA enough time to process the projects received from Caltrans headquarters and meet the obligation deadline of September 30h. 12. CALTRANS LOCAL ASSISTANCE REPORT Savat Khamphou, Caltrans Local Assistance, reminded the TAC that the quality assurance program (QAP) for each local agency must be submitted and approved/concurred by Caltrans on or before October 1. QAPs must be updated every five years. Technical Advisory Committee Meeting August 16, 2010 Page 4 Regarding the bridge programs, Ca(trans is trying to make it easier by funding 100% instead of applying toll credits. 13. JULY COMMISSION MEETING HIGHLIGHTS Shirley Medina thanked the TAC for its hard work on the Measure A methodology forthe2009 MOE base year calculation. The Measure A guidelines were approved by the Commission in July. The Commission's board also approved putting on the ballot a bond debt limit increase on the November ballot from $500 million to $975 million. Regarding the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project, there was a designation of a locally preferred alternative and authorization for issuance of toll revenue bonds related to design -build. Legislation for design -build did pass the assembly, with suggested amendments to help relieve Professional Engineers in California Government (PECG) concerns/opposition to the design -build legislation. The Commission has been working with other legislators to alleviate PECG's concerns. 14. OTHER BUSINESS Ms. Medina said that regarding project initiation documents, there are not enough resources to meet the demand for preparing these documents. Over the past year, Caltrans staff has worked with regional agencies to develop guidelines on streamlining PID requirements. Caltrans will circulate updated guidelines for developing PIDs, which may also include furnishing participation from local agencies in order to meet the demand for PID preparation. 15. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Technical Advisory Committee, the meeting adjourned at approximately 11:00 a.m. Respectfully submitted, ris2_,(4 a Shirley Medina Programming and Planning Manager • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager SUBJECT: 2010/11 State Budget - Transportation STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This is item is for the TAC to Receive and File the 2010/11 Transportation Budget report. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The long -overdue 2010/11 State Budget impacted many State Departments. RCTC's state lobbyist has provided the attached summary that highlights the Transportation portion of the State Budget. • • • 2010-11 Transportation Budget Summary Overview With the final action by the Governor late on October 8, approving the budget bill and line -item vetoing several items of interest, the 2010-11 State Budget Act is now law. The following is an overview summary of highlights from the transportation component of the budget act. Due to the fact the state budget, late by about 100 days, was developed serially over the past 9 months, since its introduction in January, the presentation that follows depicts actions taken at various points in the annual process, which culminated in a final product. The initial section which follows summarizes major actions in the transportation budget through the adoption by each house of their respective Subcommittee reports. Following this is a summary of actions taken by the Budget Conference Committee, which is followed by a discussion of what is contained in the final budget act, as adjusted by the governor's relevant line -item vetoes; this , then provides a complete picture of key budget decisions. ➢ MAJOR ACTION REPORT, Budget Subcommittee Reports of Actions through May, 2010 • TRANSPORTATION 1. State Transit Assistance Program As part of the Proposition 58 Special Session, the Legislature added funding of $400 million from the Public Transportation Account to restore state funding for transit agency operations. These funds were distributed in June, 2010. 2. PTMISEA Bond funds Augmented Proposition 1B (Prop 1B) Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funding to a total of $1.5 billion. The Governor had proposed $350 million, but additional projects were identified as ready for construction. 3. Transportation, Proposition 18 Approved a total of $4.0 billion in Prop 1B funds across multiple departments. Approved Prop 1B bond funding of $2.1 billion for the following bond categories that are budgeted directly in the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) budget (figures include state operations, local assistance, and capital outlay): # $578 million for Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA) • $525 million for the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) ♦ $294 million for Trade Corridors Improvement Fund ♦ $19 million for State Highway Protection and Preservation Program (SHOPP) * $241 million for State Local Partnership ♦ $217 million for Grade Separation IF $74 million for State Route 99 # $8 million for Local Bridge Seismic Retrofit i $182 million for Traffic Light Synchronization 4. Proposition IA, Connectivity Added an appropriation of $234 million from Proposition 1A bond funds for intercity rail and connector rail that will provide connectivity to the high-speed rail system. 5. Fuel Tax Swap Approved, as part of the Proposition 58 Special Session, the "Fuel Swap" proposal, which results in full funding for the "Proposition 42" allocations to highways and local streets and roads and additional funding for the SHOPP, as well. 6. General Fund Loan Approved a loan of $650 million from the new "Fuel Swap" revenue to the General Fund. This revenue is new revenue in addition to that needed to backfill for Proposition 42. The loan will be repaid within three fiscal years per the requirements of Article XIX of the State Constitution. 7. General Fund Loan Deferral Approved a loan repayment deferral of $230 million from various transportation special funds. The General Fund will repay these amounts in 2011-12 instead of 2010-11, which is still within the repayment requirements of Article XIX of the State Constitution. 8. P3 Modified the Administration's Capital Outlay Support staffing request to support the state agreement where the private partner initially funds construction on a highway project, operates the facility over many years, and the state compensates the private partner with fixed payments over many years. • • • • 9. Ca!trans Operations Savings Scored $100 million in operations savings in each of the 2009-10 and 2010-11 budgets. This savings is generated from reduced purchases, training, travel, and other operations costs. Directed $50 million of the savings in 2010-11 to additional pavement maintenance. High Speed Rail Authority 1. HSRA Appropriations Approved total funding of $221 million for the High -Speed Rail Authority (HSRA) from both Proposition 1A bond funds and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, with authority to augment that amount by up to $243 million if right-of-way purchases are ready to proceed in the budget year. 2. HSRA Technical Budget Display Revised and expanded the budget act scheduling of expenditures for the HSRA to increase transparency and improve oversight. 3. HSRA Reporting Approved budget bill language that requires the HSRA to report to the Legislature with information on fiscal, management, and planning issues. ➢ BUDGET CONFERENCE COMMITTEE HIGHLIGHTS, August 6, 2010 TRANSPORTATION 1. STATE TRANSIT ASSISTANCE As part of the Proposition 58 Special Session, added funding of $400 million from the Public Transportation Account to restore state funding for transit agency operations. 2. Proposition IB Augmented Proposition 113 (Prop 113) Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funding to a total of $1.5 billion. The Governor had proposed $350 million, but additional projects were identified as ready for construction. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 1. Proposition 18 Retained the $4.0 billion in Prop 1B funds appropriated across multiple departments, Including Prop 16 bond funding of $2.1 billion for bond categories that are budgeted directly in the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) 2. Proposition 1A Retained the appropriation of $234 million from Proposition 1A bond funds for intercity rail and connector rail that will provide connectivity to the high-speed rail system. 3. Fuel tax Swap Retained the provisions of the "Fuel Swap." 4. Loan to General fund Retained the earlier incorporated loan of $650 million from the new "Fuel Swap" revenue to the General Fund. 5. Loan Payment Deferral Retained the earlier approved loan repayment deferral of $230 million from various transportation special funds. 6. CT Capital Outlay support Modified the Administration's Capital Outlay Support staffing request such that the reduction in state positions is 225 instead of 723. These staff resources will prepare additional highway projects to be ready for construction, which could result in additional construction projects going forward in this favorable bid environment 7. Availability Payments for P3 Projects Rejected the $3.5 billion appropriation requested for availability payments, which are a type of lease agreement where the private partner initially funds construction on a highway project, operates the facility over many years, and the state compensates the private partner with fixed payments over many years. • 8. Ca!trans Operation Savings Retained the $100 million in operations savings "scored" each of the 2009-10 and 2010- 11 budgets. This savings is generated from reduced purchases, training, travel, and other operations costs. Directed $50 million of the savings in 2010-11 to additional pavement maintenance. HIGH SPEED RAIL AUTHORITY 1. Proposition 1A Retained earlier subcommittee approved funding of $221 million for the High -Speed Rail Authority (HSRA) from both Proposition 1A bond funds and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, with authority to augment that amount by up to $243 million if right -of- way purchases are ready to proceed in the budget year. 2. Technical Budget Requirements Retained new budget act scheduling of expenditures for the HSRA to increase transparency and improve oversight. 3. HSRA Reporting Added new budget bill language and trailer bill language that requires the HSRA to report to the Legislature with information on fiscal, management, and planning issues. ➢ 2010 Budget Actions, October 7, 2010 SB 870, Budget Act (approved) and SB 854/AB 1614, Budget Trailer Bills (vetoed) Transportation Trailer Bills (Vetoed) Transportation 1. HUTA Extension The Trailer bills would have provided cities and counties a one-year extension to expend Proposition 1B Local Streets and Roads funds for any year in which Highway Users Tax Account (HUTA) funds for local transportation projects are borrowed, deferred, or shifted. 2. ZB appropriation for waterborne transit The Trailer Bills would have extended the expenditure period for recipients of Prop 1B bond funds for regional public waterborne transit from three years to four years. Proposition 1B provides $250 million to regional public waterborne transit agencies. 3. Captured Bond Savings The Trailer bills would have directed about $112 million in savings from lower bond debt service costs from transportation -related general obligation bonds in 2010-11 to the General Fund (GF) through a loan. 4. Fuel Tax Swap MOE The Trailer bills would have provided additional clarification that local governments are not subject to the same maintenance -of -effort and other requirements under Proposition 42 when they are apportioned under fuel excise tax revenues. High Speed Rail authority 1. HSRA Exempt Employees The Trailer bills would have authorized the Governor to appoint six management level exempt positions to the High Speed Rail Authority (HSRA) upon the recommendation of the executive director 2. HSRA Reporting The Trailer bills would have required the HSRA to report biannually to the Legislature, beginning March 1, 2011, on the status of development and implementation of intercity high-speed rail service. 3. HSRA Peer Review The Trailer bills would have required that the members of the High Speed Rail Independent Peer Review Group be designated by November 1, 2010, and requires that group to designate a chairperson. • • • • • SB 870, Budget Act Approvals 1. Presidio Parkway P3 SB 870 provides $1.1 billion from the State Highway Account (SHA) to fund availability payments for the implementation of the Presidio Parkway P3 project in San Francisco. This action was sustained by Governors approval of the budget act. 2. Proposition 1B, PTIMSEA The Budget provides a three-year, $1.5 billion appropriation from the Public Transportation Modernization and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) for transit capital and rolling stock purchases through FY 12-13. 3. New General Fund loan $80 million from SHA was provided as a loan to the GF. 4. PTA Loan A $29 million loan is provided from PTA to the GF in the final budget. The funds are "realized" savings from lower than required debt service payments mandated under the Fuel Tax Swap. S. GARVEE Bond Budget Act provides authority of up to $800 million for GARVEE — bond funded projects, but requires notification of intent to use. 6. Loan Repayment extensions Extends the repayment date of $231 million in loans which were made to the General Fund from the State Highway Account and other transportation funds in the 2008 Budget Act by an additional year, until June 30, 2012. 7. Proposition 18 Transit System Safety Program The Budget Act also contains $101 million appropriation to the Transit System Safety Security and Disaster Response Account (TSSSDRA), to help enhance safety on local transit and water ferry systems. SB 870, Gubernatorial Vetoes (blue-pencil) 1. Ca!trans Capital Outlay Support Augmentation The Governor eliminated the legislative augmentation of $20,307,000 and 296 personnel years for engineering, design, environmental studies, and other work done by the capital outlay support program, citing diminishing long-term workload. 2. Proposition 1A Appropriations The Governor reduced the legislative augmentation of $146 million by $107 million for the Prop 1A, Connectivity program element, which were funds made available from Proposition 1A bond proceeds for the purpose of enhancing local transit lines as feeder routes to the high-speed rail system. The Governor did sustain $38,500,000 to fund the implementation of positive train control safety projects in various local rail corridors 3. Proposition 1A Appropriations In addition, the Governor also reduced another Prop 1A appropriation by $25,812,000, leaving $62,490,000 to fund the implementation of positive train control technology on various state intercity rail corridors • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager SUBJECT: Transportation Enhancement Funding for the "B" Canyon Wildlife Connectivity Project STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to seek the TACs support of programming Transportation Enhancement funds for the "B" Canyon Wildlife Connectivity Project. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), in conjunction with the Regional Conservation Authority (RCA), the Califomia Department of Transportation (Caftans), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) are working to improve wildlife connectivity in the Green River CanyonlSR91 area in Corona. The proposed "B" Canyon Wildlife Connectivity Project would be undertaken to address the cumulative effects of multiple transportation projects on wildlife connectivity in the vicinity of the SR91 Corridor Improvement project. The estimated cost of constructing a wildlife corridor is $5.7 million. A scoping document is being prepared to further define the project scope, cost, and schedule. In reviewing available funds for a project such as this, staff feels that the project would qualify for TE funds under the category of "Environmental mitigation to reduce water pollution due to highway runoff or reduce vehicle -caused wildlife mortality while maintaining habitat connectivity". There is a $4.7 million balance of TE funds that have not been programmed in the STIP. We are requesting the support of the TAC to fund the project with the current balance of TE funds. Given that the federal transportation act is scheduled for authorization next year, a call for projects to program new TE funding is planned in 2011. Once the defined project scope is available, it is our intention to forward the scope to Ca!trans Headquarters for an eligibility determination. If they find the project eligible for TE funds, we will forward the project to the Commission for approval of these funds. • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Andrea Zureick, Senior Staff Analyst THROUGH: Shirley Medina, Program Manager SUBJECT: Federal Fiscal Year 2010/11 Obligation Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Receive and File. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Each year, states are allocated federal STP and CMAQ funds that are suballocated to the regions (or counties) based on the specific funding distributions for each fund source. Caltrans requires each region to prepare an obligation plan that identifies each project that is scheduled for obligation in the current fiscal year. This plan provides critical information to RCTC on the need to develop contingency plans, such as loans between regions or project substitution,. based on the target amount of federal funds that needs to be obligated during the fiscal year. Likewise, the plan allows Caltrans to monitor the rate of obligations and develop contingency plans for use of any funds that may not be obligated at a statewide level. The expectation is for each region to obligate 100% of its STP and CMAQ allocations or Obligation Authority (OA). Regions have until May 1st of each year to obligate their annual OA target, after which the OA becomes available for use by other regions within the state. If the state as a whole does not use all of the OA, then the unobligated balance will return to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) for redistribution to other states that have obligated 100% of the OA. This is an opportunity that allows states to obligate more federal funding than initially received. This is referred to as "August Redistribution". Therefore, while some projects simply can not obligate earlier than the schedule allows because of issues such as environmental or right of way certification requirements, staff encourages agencies 'to obligate as early as possible. This increases the likelihood that there will be OA available for the project in the current fiscal year and may even bring more OA for Riverside County agencies than originally anticipated. The attached FFY 2010/11 obligation plan is generally based on the Project Milestone Reports that were submitted to RCTC in August. Based on the plan, more OA is required than is expected to be available. However, Riverside County's SR-79 widening project is still in environmental approval and early R/W acquisition, and depending on the progress of those phases, it may slip into FFY2011/12. Because the current schedules show that most obligation requests will be submitted to Caltrans before May 1st, it is likely that all projects in the plan will receive obligation. If some of the planned obligations are delayed, there is a risk of losing any unobligated balances because of August Redistribution going to other states or even FHWA rescissions of unobligated balances. There have been a couple of fiscal years that Riverside County did not obligate 100% of its OA. In these instances, RCTC "loaned" OA to regions that could obligate above their OA levels. Per Ca!trans' OA Management policy, OA that is loaned is protected from being lost to the county as long as the state obligates 100% of the OA. Agencies are encouraged to notify RCTC when projects that are contained in the delivery plan begin to experience delay. This will allow staff the time necessary to develop contingency plans that ensure federal funds are not lost to the region. Any changes to the schedules shown in the attached plan can be made in the October Project Milestone Reports that are due to RCTC on October 22n4 Attachment: FFY2010l11 Obligation Delivery Plan • • FFY 2010/11 Delivery -Obligation Plan Status as of October 11, 2010 AQ Deliver • Agency Project Phase Remaining FFY10/11 Submit RFA to Dist 8 Date RFA sent to HQ Date RFA sent to FHWA Riverside County SR60Nalley Way IC R/W Transfer R/W $500 5/25/2010 Riverside County SR60Nalley Way IC PSE Transfer PS&E $100 5/25/2010 Ca[trans I-215/SR-60 East Junction Cons $6,219 6/22/2010 8/2/2010 9/24/2010 Indio Ave 48 TS and Interconnect Cons $790 7/15/2010 8/18/2010 Indio Clean Vehicle Acquisition Cons $233 7/15/2010 8/18/2010 La Quinta Adams/Miles/Dune Palms Synch Cons $354 8/11 /2010 9/2/2010 La Quinta Eisenhower Dr Interconnect Cons $310 8/11/2010 9/2/2010 Palm Desert WB Fred Waring Dr Rt Turn Lane R/W $111 9/13/2010 Palm Desert Interconnect System Cons $753 10/1/2010 Desert Hot Springs Palm/Camino Camp TS, Synch Cons $458 10/1/2010 CVAG PM10 Clean Vehicle Acquisition Cons $2,000 10/15/2010 Cathedral City Date Palm Dr. Signal Synch Cons $330 12/1/2010 Desert Hot Springs Western Ave -Scenic Dr. Paving Cons $315 12/1 /2010 Palm Desert 1-10 at Monterey Ave IC Cons $2,069 12/15/2010 Cathedral City East Palm Canyon Signal Synch Cons $192 12/15/2010 La Quinta Madison St. at Ave 54 TS Cons $285 12/15/2010 Riverside County Mecca Community Roundabout Cons $2,000 1/1/2011 Palm Desert Hwy 111 Improvements Cons $620 2/1/2011 Cathedral City Varner/Palm PM-10 Stabilization Cons $129 3/1/2011 Indio Jackson St. TS, Synch Cons $332 4/1/2011 Rancho Mirage Monterey Ave. Sand Fencing Cons $89 4/1/2011 RCTC SR-91 HOV Cons $34,546 4/1/2011 Riverside Third St Grade Separation PS&E $1,500 4/1/2011. Riverside Third St Grade Separation R/W $3,500 4/1/2011 Total STPL Delivery $57,735 Agency Project Phase Remaining FFY10/11 Submit RFA to Dist 8 Date RFA Sent to HQ Date RFA sent to FHWA Riverside Riverside Ave Grade Separation R/W $6,900 7/29/2010 9/2/2010 Palm Springs Gene Autry Tr Bridge (reobl) Cons $384 9/29/2010 Norco Second St Rehab Cons $234 10/1/2010 Palm Springs Indian Canyon Dr Widening Cons $1,936 10/1/2010 Riverside Victoria Ave Utilities Undergrnd Cons $76 11/1/2010 Cathedral City Ramon Rd Widening Cons $1,524 1/1/2011 Cathedral City Ramon Road Improvements Cons $408 2/1/2011 Riverside Iowa Ave Grade Separation Cons $3,550 4/1/2011 RCTC 1-215 Scott to Nuevo Widening R/W $3,754 6/1/2011 Indian Wells Cook St Rehab Cons $92 6/1/2011 Riverside County SR-79 Widening Cons $20,000 6/1/2011 "Tentative - likely 2011/12 Total $38,858 Total OA Required $96,593 Total OA Available (est) S81,890 Balance 014,703) (Balance w/o SR-79 this FYI $5,297 • • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Grace Alvarez, Staff Analyst Andrea Zureick, Senior Staff Analyst THROUGH: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager SUBJECT: 2008 Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) and 2008 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) Amendment No. 4 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Receive and File BACKGROUND INFORMATION: 2008 FTIP Update As we near the end of the 2008 FTIP cycle, SCAG has stopped processing 2008 FTIP amendments in anticipation of the new 2011 FTIP adoption by December 14, 2010. The following is a quick recap of recent 2008 FTIP emergency amendments submitted to SCAG subsequent to the August 16th TAC meeting. Formal Amendment No. 50 was submitted to SCAG on September 7, 2010; projects included in this amendment consisted of the 2010/2011 Short Range Transit Plans and Caltrans SHOPP projects. The 15-day public review period started on September 28, 2010 and ended October 12, 2010. The anticipated approval date by the funding agencies is early November 2010. Administrative Modification No. 51 was submitted to SCAG on August 26, 2010; two emergency transit projects were included in administrative modification No. 51, preventing funds from lapsing. The administrative modification was approved by Caltrans on August 26, 2010. Additionally, the two pending amendments mentioned in the August 16, 2010 TAC report, Formal Amendment No. 44 and Administrative Modification No. 49 were approved on August 11, 2010 and August 19, 2010, respectively. 2008 RTP Amendment No. 4 Update Amendment No. 4 to the 2008 RTP completed the 30-day public review period on October 7th. The anticipated approval by SCAG's Regional Council is November 4, 2010, with a subsequent conformity concurrence by FHWA/FTA in early December 2010. Attachments: 2008 FTIP Amendment Submittal and Approval Dates 2008 FTIP listing of projects included in Amendments 44, 49, 50, and 51 • 2008 Federal Transportation Improvement P - Amendment Submittals & Approval Dates • 2008 FTIP Purpose Due to RCTC Due to SCAG Approved by SCAG Approved by CT/FHWA Final 7/14/2008 1 1 /17/2008 Amendment 1 Consistency with 2008 RTP Amendment 1 - 50 projects submitted 7/18/2008 7/30/2008 12/8/2008 1 /14/2009 Amendment 2 Formal Amendment - 90 projects submitted 9/23/2008 10/22/2008 12/30/2008 2/2/2009 Amendment 3 Did not include Riverside County projects Amendment 4 Administrative Modification - 2 projects submitted 12/8/2008 1 /12/2009 1 /28/2009 1 /29/2009 Amendment 5 Economic Stimulus Revenue Amendment - Did not include projects Amendment 6 Formal Amendment - 15 projects submitted 01 /26/2009 02/02/2009 02/24/2009 03/25/2009 Amendment 7 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 8 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 9 Formal Amendment - 43 projects submitted 02/23/2009 03/04/2009 04/03/2009 04/23/2009 Amendment 10 Administrative Modification - 7 ARRA projects submitted 03/1 1 /2009 03/13/2009 03/18/2009 03/18/2009 Amendment 11 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 12 Formal Amendment - 14 ARRA projects 03/1 1 /2009 03/20/2009 04/20/2009 04/30/2009 • 2008 Federal Transportation Improvement Pram - Amendment Submittals & Approval Dates • 2008 FTIP Purpose Due to RCTC Due to SCAG Approved by SCAG Approved by CT/FHWA Amendment 26 Formal Amendment - 13 projects 10/01 /2009 10/22/2009 1 1 /24/2009 12/17/2009 Amendment 27 Administrative Modification - 4 projects 1 1 /02/2009 1 1 /12/2009 1 1 /18/2009 11 /19/2009 Amendment 28 Formal Amendment - 9 projects 1 1 /24/2009 12/1 /2009 12/24/2009 01 /27/2010 Amendment 29 Administrative Modification - 3 projects (ARRA funded) 12/02/2009 12/02/2009 12/02/2009 12/02/2009 Amendment 30 Did not include Riverside County projects Amendment 31 Formal Amendment - 6 projects 12/4/2009 12/1 1 /2009 12/31 /2009 01 /28/2010 Amendment 32 Administrative Modification - 6 projects 1 /4/2010 1 /1 1 /2010 01 /28/2010 02/01 /2010 Amendment 33 Formal Amendment - 8 projects 1 /4/2010 1 /1 1 /2010 2/19/2010 03/17/2010 Amendment 34 Formal Amendment - 4 projects (consistency amendment - 2008 RTP A-3) 01 /05/2010 01 /21 /2010 April 5, 2010 05/06/2010 Amendment 35 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 36 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 37 Did not include Riverside Co projects 2008 Federal Transportation Improvement Program - Amendment Submittals & Approval Dates 2008 FTIP Purpose Due to RCTC Due to SCAG Approved by SCAG Approved by CT/FHWA Amendment 38 Administrative Modification - 4 2/16/2010 2/16/2010 2/16/2010 2/17/2010 Amendment 39 Administrative Modification - SCAG's N/A N/A 03/19/2010 Amendment 40 Administrative Modification - 7 projects 03/01 /2010 03/19/2010 04/06/2010 04/07/2010 Amendment 41 Formal Amendment - 10 projects 03/01 /2010 03/19/2010 04/06/2010 05/03/2010 Amendment 42 Administrative Modification - 27 projects 05/03/2010 05/13/2010 05/26/2010 05/28/2010 Amendment 43 Did not include Riverside Co projects Amendment 44 Formal Amendment - 06/14/2010 06/21 /2010 08/05/2010 08/1 1 /2010 Amendment 45 Did not include Riverside County projects Amendment 46 Did not include Riverside County projects Amendment 47 Administrative Modification - 4 06/30/2010 07/01 /2010 07/06/2010 07/08/2010 Amendment 48 Administrative Modification - 6 projects 07/21 /2010 07/21 /2010 07/22/2010 07/23/2010 • O LOZ/9Z/80 O LOZ/9Z/80 O LOZ/9Z/80 O LOZ/9Z/80 spef wd Z — uoReo!PpoW eng.ea}slulwpy L g luawpuewy 0 LOZ/LO/60 0 LOZ/LZ/80 spafoad gg — luawpuawy lewaod Og luawpuawy 0 LOZ/6 L/80 0 LOZ/9 L/80 O IOZ/60/80 0 LOZ/Z0/80 sloafoad t - uogeowpoW anp.e4slulwpy 617 wewpuewy 11MHd/10 Aq panaddy OVOS Aq penoaddy 9yOS of ono 0101i w ena asodand dlld 800Z sa;ea lenoaddy slelmwgns zuawpuewy - w d ;uewenwdwl uol;epodsuwl leaaPed 800Z i Riverside County Tronsporlolion Commission 2008 FTIP - Formal Amendment No. 44 Approval Date: Aug 11, 2010 Agency Desert Hot Springs Riverside County Riverside County Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans RTA RCTC RCTC RCTC SCRRA Project ID Title Palm Dr. & Camino Campanero TS Install and RIV071237 Interconnect system RIV100103 Pigeon Pass Rd. Corridor RIV990701 SR-60Nalley Way Interchange RIV100605 1-10 Corridor Master Plan development (TE) RIV100606 1-215 Corridor Master Plan development (TE) RIV090902 Extend #4 lane on 1-215 from Blaine St to University Ave RIVLS01 SHOPP - Collision Reduction RIVLS02 SHOPP - Roadway Preservation RIVLS06 SHOPP - Bridge Preservation RIVLS08 Exempt Minor Program RIVLS10 SHOPP - Mobility RIVLS13 State Highway Maintenance RIV090603 2009/2010 SRTP Operating Assistance: Fixed Route and Dial -A -Ride RIV090601 SCRRA Rehabilitation and Renovation of track and rolling stock RIV100602 Grouped project listings for FTA 5310 FY 2008/2009, for purchase of office, shop, and operating equipment for existing facilities. RIV100604 Grouped project listings for FTA 5310 FY 2008/2009, for purchase of new buses and replacement of existing vehicles or for minor expansion of the fleet RIV100601 SCRRA rail car procurement Change Requested Cost increase New Project (RTP changes approved as part of the 2008 RTP A-3) Funding adjustments for final project costs New ITIP-TE project per CTC approval of 2010 STIP New ITIP-TE project per CTC approval of 2010 STIP Funding adjustments per FY 2010/11 Minor Program Incorporate 2010 SHOPP Incorporate 2010 SHOPP Incorporate 2010 SHOPP Incorporate FY 2010/11 projects Incorporate 2010 SHOPP Incorporate FY 2010/11 projects Funding adjustments - 2009/2010 SRTP for Operating Assistance Cost decrease per RCTC's Commuter Rail, 2009/2010 SRTP A-1. New project per CTC approval of April 7- 8, 2010 New project per CTC approval of April 7- 8, 2010 New project per RCTC's Commuter Rail 2009/2010 SRTP A-1. Riverside County Transportation Commission 2008 FTIP - Administrative Modification No. 49 Approval Date: 08M9/2010 Agency Moreno Valley Palm Desert RTA RTA RTA Project ID RIV090117 RIV031208 RIV090105 RIV090106 RIV091211 Title SR60/Nason St. IC - Widening 'of Nason ST. OC I-10/Monterey Ave. IC JARC & NF Lump Sum for Non -Profits (FY's 07 & 08) JARC - Extended Service Program and purchase of APC software (FY's 07 & 08) Purchase of three 40-foot CNG replacement buses Change Requested Technical Change - PM limits modified slightly to be consistent with final design Removal of Local AC - sufficient CMAQ capacity exists to fully fund the estimated construction cost Cost decrease Cost increase Description change to eliminate the purchase of the trolley replacement • RC�Cr+ Riverside County Transportation Commission 2008 FTIP - Formal Amendment No. 50 Aooraval Date: Agency Project ID Title Change Requested Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Caltrans Palo Verde Transit RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RTA RIV100605 RIV050102 RIV100606 RIVLS09 RIVLS10 RIVLSI2 RIVLS01 RIVLS02 RIVLS06 RIV0110112 RIV071284 RIV071286 RIV090106 RIV090603 RIV110113 RIV110114 RIV110115 RIV110117 RIV110118 RIV110119 RIV110120 RIV110121 San tsernaroino to Anzona State Line -Develop Corridor Master Plan for I-10 Green River Rd. Landscape enhancements 1-15/1-215 IN/NEAR Murrieta to San Bernardino County Line - Develop Corridor Master Plan for I- 215 SHOPP - Mandates Projects Lump Sum SHOPP - Mobility Projects Lump Sum SHOPP - Emergency Response Projects Lump Sum SHOPP - Collision Reduction Projects Lump Sum SHOPP - Roadway Preservation Projects Lump Sum SHOPP - Bridge Preservation Projects Lump Sum Fixed route and D-A-R operating assistance - FY 2010/2011 Operating Assistance Operating Assistance for the HOPE bus JARC Extended Service program Operating Assistance - FY 2009/2010 Operating Assistance - FY 2010/2011 Capitalized Preventative Maintenance - FY 2010/2011 Capital cost of contracting - FY 2010/2011 Purchase of 2-type VII replacement buses Capital maintenance spares Capitalized cost of tire lease - FY 2010/2011 Capital maintenance equipment - FY 2010/2011 RTA facility improvements -- FY 2010/2011 Fund source change Fund source change Fund source change Fund source change Cost decrease Cost Increase Cost decrease Fund source change Cost decrease New Project Cost increase Cost increase Cost decrease Minor change New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project Agency Project ID Title Change Requested Capitalized Preventative Maintenance - FY Riverside RIV110101 2010/2011 SunLine Transit RIV071266 Administrative Office/Transit Hub SunLine Transit RIV090103 JARC Operating Assistance SunLine Transit RIV090107 JARC & NF Projects Lump Sum - Non -Profits SunLine Transit RIV110102 One expansion paratransit vehicle SunLine Transit RIV110103 Fumiture replacement SunLine Transit RIV110104 Purchase of major replacement tools Fixed Route & D-A-R Operating Assistance - FY SunLine Transit RIV110105 2010/2011 Capitalized Preventative Maintenance - FY SunLine Transit RIV110106 2010/2011 SunLine Transit RIV110107 Rehabilitation of SunLine's fleet older buses Purchase of seven expansion paratransit D-A-R SunLine Transit RIV110108 buses Purchase of transit enhancement bus stop SunLine Transit RIV110109 amenities SunLine Transit RIV110110 Transit security enhancement project SunLine Transit RIV110111 Facility improvements New Project Cost increase Cost Increase Cost increase New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project New Project • Rivers de County Transportation Commission 2008 FTIP - Administrative Modification No.51 Approval Date: 08/26/2010 Agency RCTC RCTC Project ID RIV090601 RIV520109 Title SCRRA Rehabilitation & Renovation of track & rolling stock Perris Valley Line Extension Change Requested Reprogramming of funds - FTA 5307 replaced with FTA 5309(a) Cost increase to align engineering and right-of-way cost with approved federal funding • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Grace Alvarez, Staff Analyst Andrea. Zureick, Senior Staff Analyst THROUGH: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager SUBJECT: 2011 Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) Update — 2010/2011 through 2015/2016 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Receive and File BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As previously reported, the 2011 FTIP submittal was completed on January 29, 2010, which included 404 projects for Riverside County. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) anticipates the approval of the 2011 FTIP by the state and federal agencies on December 14, 2010. As of today, SCAG completed the analyses of the project submittals by the various Regional Transportation Planning Agencies (RTPAs), modeled the projects included in the FTIP, secured the approvals of the final FTIP by SCAG's Transportation Committee and Energy and Environmental Committee and Regional Council, and forwarded the 2011 FTIP to Caltrans and the federal agencies for approval. In anticipation of the December 14, 2010 approval of the 2011 FTIP, SCAG has opened up the opportunity for its member agencies to submit a formal modification (Amendment No. 1) on November 2, 2010, and an administrative modification (Administrative Modification No. 2) on December 1, 2010. RCTC's deadline for local agency submittals, for the formal amendment No. 1 was October 14th; project changes submittals for Administrative Modification No. 2 is November 4tn RCTC Programming Division has reviewed 2008 FTIP amendments that were made after submittal of the 2011 FTIP, for inclusion of these projects in the upcoming amendments. As of today, RCTC has 67 projects in Amendment No. 1 and eighteen projects for Administrative Modification No. 2. The anticipated approval date for Amendment No. 1 is late January 2011 and mid -January for Administrative Modification No. 2. As we move forward with the 2011 FTIP, we ask that you keep RCTC updated on the project completion dates so we can accordingly report these project completion dates in the 2011 FTIP. By following this process, we will reduce the number of projects that need to be updated in the 2011 FTIP and our region will accurately report on its project achievements. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRAFFIC ANALYSIS MODEL (RivTAM) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The County of Riverside Transportation Department (RCTD), with the cooperation of the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), The Coachella Valley Council of Governments (CVAG), the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), completedthe development of the Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RivTAM) in May 2009. RivTAM is a TransCAD model, based on SCAG's Regional Transportation Model that SCAG used in developing the 2035 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). TransCAD is the name of a commercially - available software package used for transportation system. modeling. TransCAD has very good graphic presentation and data retrieval capabilities due to its integration with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the associated capabilities. SCAG's Regional Transportation. Model encompasses alarge geographic area that consists of the Counties of Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura. Because of the size of the area, the SCAG model lacks the degree of detail, that is often necessary for transportation planning at the County and local jurisdiction levels. RivTAM incorporates a,great deal of detail in Riverside County, while maintaining consistency with the SCAG Regional Model. Listed below are the benefits the County and other entities will gain using RivTAM: RivTAM has been validated to a finer level of detail than the SCAG Regional. Model. The SCAG model has been validated for 2003 as the base year. Model validation is the process whereby traffic estimates for individual roadways are compared to actual ground counts on those roadways. For RivTAM, the validation base year was set at 2007. Traffic counts were made at over 300 locations late in 2007 and early 2008. These counts, supplemented by counts available from Caltrans and local jurisdictions, were used in the RivTAM validation process. The SCAG Regional Model validation within Riverside County addressed five traffic flow corridors and about 50 individual segments in these corridors. For RivTAM about 46 traffic flow corridors and about 350 individual roadway segments within these corridors were analyzed. The Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ) system in RivTAM is more detailed than the SCAG Regional Model. Within Riverside County, the SCAG model has 478 Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ). These 478 TAZs were subdivided into 1,807 in RivTAM. This finer level of TAZ disaggregation, coupled with a finer roadway network, yields to better traffic forecasts on individual roadway segments. t RivTAM has a more detailed roadway network than the SCAG Regional Model. RivTAM added 570 centerline miles of roadways to the network in the SCAG Regional Model. RivTAM incorporates all facilities in the Riverside County General Plan, classified as Secondary and above. In addition some Collectors are included, as necessary, to insure that all TAZs are connected to the network of General Plan roadways. RivTAM is fully consistent with the SCAG Regional Model in all technical and procedural aspects. RivTAM does not alter any of the SCAG Regional Model assumptions and parameters. Data inputs for areas outside of Riverside County are identical to the SCAG Regional Model. Within Riverside County more refined data is incorporated as described above. RivTAM is the product of a truly cooperative multi -agency effort. Staff of the participating agencies met at the policy and technical levelson over 30 occasions to review work products, provide direction to the project consultant, and to discuss a variety of matters. The agencies also collaborated by providing applicabledata, reports, and other information. The RIVTAM MOU was presented to the RCTC TAC in September of2009. The Committee concurred with the content of the document and the County of Riverside was to take the lead in getting the MOU executed by all agencies that participated in the development and acceptance of RIVTAM as the forecasting tool for Countywide transportation planning purposes. 2 • • • MOU FOR RIVTAM MODEL MAINTENANCE, UPDATE, AND USAGE WHEREAS the Riverside County Transportation Department (RCTD), the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), and the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) jointly funded the development of the Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RIVTAM) using TransCAD software, WHEREAS the Southern California Association of Governments (SLAG) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) participated actively in the development of RIVTAM by providing data, guidance, and reviewing RIVTAM materials and results, WHEREAS SCAG and Ca(trans have determined that RIVTAM has been developed in conformance with accepted modeling practices and standards, WHEREAS RCTD, RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caltrans wish to ensure that sub -area models developed for use in Riverside County be consistent with RIVTAM, WHEREAS RCTD, ROTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caltrans agree that RIVTAM will provide a consistent tool for cities and the County to evaluate their plans, programs and projects, WHEREAS RCTD, RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caltrans agree that RIVTAM should be used as the forecasting tool for countywide transportation planning purposes, WHEREAS RCTD, RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caltrans encourage -1- • • Use of RIVTAM by the AGENCIES RCTD; CVAG, Caltrans and SCAG have licensing agreements with Caliper Corporation and have the capability to use RIVTAM in-house; RCTC and WRCOG would need licensing agreements with Caliper should they desire to use RIVTAM in-house; Since the AGENCIES anticipate the need to engage the services of consultants from time to time to run RIVTAM, the AGENCIES will establish a list of three to five consulting firms qualified to perform such services and will use no consultants other than those on the listofqualified consultants; RCTD will lead the AGENCIES' joint effort to compile the list of qualified consultants, by issuing a Request for Qualifications and forming a selection committee; AGENCIES that need a consultant to run RIVTAM; will select a consultant from the AGENCIES' list of qualified consultants; Each AGENCY shall bear the cost for its own use and running of RIVTAM. Updating RIVTAM The AGENCIES agree that updates to RIVTAM may be necessary in response to changes in the plans and programs of the AGENCIES, or other reasons. Each AGENCY shall bear the cost of updating RIVTAM for its own purposes; RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caltrans will notify RCTD when they make changes in plans and programs that will necessitate updating the official version of RIVTAM; RCTD will make updates, as appropriate, and inform RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, SCAG, and Caftans, and other users of RivTAM when updates are made to the official version of RIVTAM; The AGENCIES, or their consultants, will not make any updates that are not consistent with RIVTAM modeling concepts and assumptions; Periodic updates of RIVTAM will be considered at such time as SCAG adopts new Socio-Economic forecasts, and only be made when the updates affect the RIVTAM consistency with SCAG's Regional Modeling assumptions. RCTC, WRCOG, CVAG, and RCTD will negotiate .the cost of such major updates and make a recommendation for funding. Use of RIVTAM by governmental jurisdictions other than the AGENCIES and by private entities RIVTAM was designed to address most city and county level modeling needs in Riverside County. The model inputs and zone system were designed with sufficient detail to support most city/county planning applications. The modeling methodology can support the evaluation of a range of highway, HOV and transit scenarios. The Agencies encourage the use of RIVTAM by Cities, other governmental jurisdictions, and private entities for their •own transportation planning purposes. Universal use of RIVTAM by the Agencies, Cities, other governmental jurisdictions, and private entities„ and their consultants will ensure that planning decisions in Riverside County are made based on accurate and consistent travel forecasts; Cities and other governmental jurisdictions in Riverside County would need - 4 - • • • licensing agreements with Caliper, appropriate computer equipment, and staff capabilities should they desire to use RivTAM in-house; Off -the -shelf modeling results and data, such as daily and peak hourly traffic volume forecasts from completed RIVTAM runs will be available to Cities and other governmental jurisdictions directly from RCTD at no cost. Private entities will be requested to pay a fee for such data retrieval and transmittal; Requests by Cities, other governmental jurisdictions, or private entities, entailing extensive data retrieval, or additional modeling analysis, and/or model runs will require the payment of a negotiated fee to RCTD or a contract directly with the consultants on the AGENCIES' list of qualified consultants to make the necessary RIVTAM runs; The full set of RIVTAIVI files (all files .needed to run RIVTAM) will be released only to the AGENCIES, to Cities in Riverside County, to other governmental jurisdictions in Riverside County and to the consultants on the AGENCIES' list of qualified consultants; Requests for the full set of RIVTAM files will be made directly to RCTD in a letter from the requesting City or other governmental jurisdiction. The request shall include a detailed list of the needed items, the model's scope of work, and intended uses of the model. Technical Guidelines The AGENCIES will require that any City or other governmental jurisdiction that develops a sub -area model based on RIVTAM for its own use must demonstrate, by submitting appropriate documentation, that the finished model is consistent with RIVTAM before the model can be used for any purpose that affects the AGENCIES; - 5 - Consistency documentation will be reviewed and a consistency determination will . be made jointly by an appointed committee of the AGENCIES; Consistency guidelines will be developed by a technical task force that may include representatives of the AGENCIES, Riverside County cities, and other governmental jurisdictions, as well as members of the consultant community, and others, Agreed to: Riverside County Transportation Depart rri nt (RCTD) By J�a C. �c- Print Narne Signature Date Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) By Print Name S' ature Date Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) -s- s./s040 • • Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) By Icf -. Vi+r17 Print Name Signat Southern California Association of Governments CAG) By RICH MAC14S Print fume Signature California Department of Transportation (C,altra By Ui i <<iAw, . t4 as • jf Print Name Signature • -7- Date Date Date 7 l t44 �f 9 0A) • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: RCTC's Annual Report and Ten -Year Delivery Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Receive and File. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: On an annual basis, RCTC develops a report called On the Move as well as Framework for a Journey, the 2009-2019 Delivery Plan. Following is a brief overview of both documents: On the Move: this document is RCTC's annual report and provides an easy -to -read synopsis of what RCTC has accomplished during the prior 12-month period and highlights current and future projects. The annual report has been prepared for more than 15 years and is part of RCTC's commitment to keeping voters informed of their investment in Measure A and is part of RCTC's ongoing outreach effort with the public. On the Move is published in the Desert Sun, the Press Enterprise, and the Californian. A copy of the 2010 annual report will be distributed at the meeting and can also be accessed at http://www.rctc.org/downloads/RCTC AR2010.pdf Framework for a Journey - 2009-2019 Delivery Plan: this hot -off -the -press document highlights projects that will be delivered within the first ten years of RCTC's Measure A Expenditure Plan. It provides an overview of RCTC's priority projects, funding sources and uses together with demographic and sales tax data. Originally, the brochure was developed to inform the financial industry about RCTC and is, used for the agency's bond rating meetings on Wall Street. The document has proven to be such a positive resource that RCTC expanded its distribution slightly to include local governments. Copies of the ten-year delivery plan will be distributed at the TAC meeting; it can also be downloaded at http://www.rctc.org/downloads/Journey 2010.pdf IE511.org and dialing 511 within the Inland Empire puts the travel information you want most at your fingertips. This partnership of RCTC and San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) delivers real-time traffic for all of Southern California, trip planning for bus and rail, and rideshare information including ridematching and Park and Ride lot locations. Since the launch of IE511, the system has helped more than 75,000 website users and more than 250,000 callers. Real-time traffic for all of Southern California is the most popular function on both the website and the telephone. Traffic information is generated from actual freeway speed detectors and is refreshed every seven minutes. The Real-Time Traffic section of the site also offers links to Caltrans construction information and CHP incident reporting. In addition, the website broadcasts notices of major incidents when they are reported by the CHP and also freeway construction closures. You can even sign up for a Twitter feed to get these notices sent to your phone by clicking the home page link or looking for IE511 on the Twitter website. Online Metrolink and bus trip planning is powered by Google transit and also provides information about how to get to the transit stop and how long your trip will take. Rideshare information online includes a link to a regional database of over 180,000 people who want to carpool or vanpool. In addition, there are Southern California wide carpool lane maps and interactive Pa rk and Ride information. Find out how much you can save using our commute cost calculators. The service is also set up to work on smart phones and other mobile devices. Yo u can also rely on the Inland Empire’s 511 telephone service anywhere in Southern California by calling 1-877-MYIE511 when you are outside the Inland Empire. Follow IE511.org on Facebook. Just click the link on the homepage at IE511.org. Now You Can Know BEFORE You Go with IE511.org I-10/Ramon/Bob HopeI-10/Palm DriveI-10/Palm DriveI-10/Ramon/Bob HopeI-10/Ramon/Bob HopeI-10/Palm DriveSR-91/County Line Creek BridgeSR-91 WideningIf you are in the Inland Empire, dial 511 and you’ll be connected to our service. Outside the IE, dial 1-877-MYIE511 to reach our service rather than a neighboring 511 system. The phone service operates using Interactive Vo ice Response, so speak slowly and try to minimize background noise. Tr affic Say you’re driving and stuck in traffic — call 511 and say “traffic” or “f reeway traffic.” The system will ask you to name your location and direction of travel and it will give you information for your route including travel times and any incidents or sig alerts. For incident information, say “incident.” Metrolink Say “Metrolink” and you’ll be transferred to Metrolink’s telephone information service. Once you are transferred, you will be out of the 511 system and must redial to get other 511 information. Buses Say “Transit” and yo u’ll access a menu of transit providers. Say “Riverside” for public bus providers in Riverside County or wait until yo u hear the menu for the transit provider you want. During business hours, you will be transferred to a live operator that can help you by planning your transit trip. Before or after hours, you will get the message services of each provider. Remember, you can always use IE511.org to plan a bus/rail trip 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Once you are transferred, you will be out of the 511 system and must redial to get other 511 information. Rideshare Say “Rideshare” from 7 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday, and you will be transferred to a live operator who can help you start ridesharing. You can get help with finding a ridematch for a carpool or vanpool or checking your eligibility for incentives to try ridesharing. After hours, you can leave a message for a call back. Guide to the 511 Phone Service This year, 89 Riverside County companies and organizations representing more than 65,000 employees will participate in Rideshare Week in the Inland Empire, October 4-8. Every year, RCTC encourages commuters to give ridesharing a try by offering a chance to win prizes to those willing to pledge to rideshare to wor k at least one day during Rideshare Week. Prizes include $250 Stater Bros or Vons gift cards, recliner, camcorders, folding bikes and more. You can pledge online at IE511.org. Need help finding a ridematch? Just call 1-866- RIDESHARE for assistance. How many people sign up? Last year over 6,700 Riverside County commuters participated in Rideshare Week. Rideshare Week is only one of the great benefits offered by participating in a rideshare program through RCTC. If you work at a participating employer, you may be eligible for a gift card incentive to try ridesharing. If your work doesn’t offer ridesharing as an employee benefit, you can still rideshare and RCTC will show its appreciation by enrolling you in Rideshare Plus, a rideshare club that offers an annual discount coupon booklet and also online member access to thousands of additional discounts. Ridesharing is an important part of RCTC’s strategy to reduce congestion in the region. Last year more than 8,800 people participated in the RCTC rideshare program. How much of a difference does it make? Last year, Western Riverside County and Coachella Valley ridesharers reduced one-way vehicle trips on regional roadways by almost 1.5 million, they saved 36.7 million miles of vehicle travel, and they reduced harmful air emission by 680,000 pounds. Rideshare We ek Ramps Up Freeway Service Patrol to the Rescue This year, two brand new transit centers are giving Riverside County commuters a better alternative to driving themselves to work. The Perris Station Transit Center, located on C Street between 4th Street and San Jacinto Avenue in Perris, serves Riverside Transit Agency routes 19, 27, 30, 74, 208, and 212. It also hosts a 141- space Park and Ride lot where carpoolers and vanpoolers can meet up to share the commute. The station is distinctively decorated with the art of Disney animator Wa rd Kimball who inspired the Disneyland Railroad and who donated his own rail collection to the Orange Empire Railroad Museum in Perris. Phase II of the Perris Station will be the development of a Metrolink station for the planned Perris Valley Line, programmed for completion in 2013. The new Corona Transit Center is located at the North Main Corona Metrolink station. As well as serving several local RTA bus routes and the Corona Cruiser, the new facility is also a stop for RTA’s Commuterlink bus service to Orange County. The transit center encourages commuters to ride the bus to the station and then take Metrolink, taking their cars out of their commutes completely. The transit center connects to the Metrolink station with an elevator and bridge. Transit centers support ridesharing, better air quality, and less congestion but are also becoming ever more important as cities must meet requirements of new legislation to reduce greenhouse gases. Making the Connection: New Transit Centers Serve Commuters “If this is what my tax dollars are going toward, I would be willing to pay more taxes to keep or expand this program.” How many public agencies have programs that regularly receive comments like this? Fortunately, Riverside County residents have one of the best-loved government agency programs anywhere. Called the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), the RCTC program helps motorists stranded by the side of the road along some of the busiest stretches of Inland Empire freeways. FSP operators can “jump start” your car if the battery is dead, change a flat tire, refill your radiator, tape hoses, and do other small repairs to get you going again. If they can’t get you started, they’ll tow your car off the freeway to a safe place. They will also offer additional assistance by calling a towing company or the Auto Club for you. The glowing comments about the free service keep rolling in, “If this program was not here, I don’t know what I would have done. At the time, I had no cell phone and it was 100 degrees. This service saved me and my child and I am extremely thankful and hope this program continues.” “A t this moment I cannot think of anything that may improve this service, it was great. I was pleasantly surprised to receive this type of service and very grateful for them helping me get off the freeway and into a safer location.” RC TC administers the FSP in partnership with Caltrans and the CHP. Currently, this service consists of 22 tow trucks which operate Monday through Friday during rush hour traffic. This year, the program broke its own record by providing more than 48,000 assists along the 81 miles of covered freeway in Riverside County. Since the beginning of the program almost 434,000 motorists have been served. Hydrogen Fuel Bus Corona Transit Center Freeway Service Patrol Transportation facilities often define locations. Whether it is Main Street in a small town, Route 66 through the Western United States, the freeways of Los Angeles, or New Yo rk’s subways, transportation facilities often shape one’s surroundings and the perception of various locations. Major freeway corridors such as the I-15 from Eastvale to Temecula, I-215 through the center of the county, SR-60 from Mira Loma to the San Gorgonio Pass, the I-10 in the Coachella Va lley, and SR-91 through Corona and Riverside help define our communities in Riverside County. Opening the 91 Gateway For thousands of motorists, SR-91 serves as the bridge between their homes and their jobs. It is also the route to Riverside County for shippers, business owners, and tourists and often generates people’s perceptions of the entire region. For too many people, however, the 91 freeway can seem to be a barrier rather than a gateway. The good news is that RCTC is working to improve the 91 freeway through $1.64 billion in projects that are either underway or starting construction next year. Currently Under Construction Caltrans and the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) are widening six miles of the eastbound SR-91 between the 241 Toll Road and SR-71. This $60 million, bi-county project is being paid for with ARRA funds and could open to traffic before the end of 2010. Downtown Riverside Section Begins Construction in 2011 Caltrans and RCTC are working together to widen another six miles of SR-91. This project will add a carpool lane, improve on and off ramps and widen streets that cross over the freeway between Adams Street and the 60/91/215 interchange. The $278 million project will start construction in 2011 and is funded through a combination of Measure A, federal and state bond funding. Fast Forward to a New 91 in Corona Environmental work is currently underway to widen 10 miles of the 91 freeway through the city of Corona. This mammoth $1.3 billion investment will add a regular lane in each direction between the Orange County line and I-15. Freeway interchanges will also be improved throughout the city. Finally, the 91 Express Lanes will be extended from Orange County to provide a congestion-free alternative to carpoolers and those who pay a toll. The toll component insures that a significant increase in freeway capacity can be completed sooner and also provides the infrastructure to increase express bus service along the corridor. Construction is expected to begin in 2012 and will be financed through toll road revenue bonds and Measure A revenue. In the Coachella Valley, three of six new interchanges are under construction on the I-10 freeway. The three interchanges qualified as shovel-ready under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Of a total $55.4 million in construction costs, 71% or $39.4 million is being funded through ARRA. The balance of the funding comes from Measure A, federal and state funds, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees paid to mitigate traffic caused by development. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) is the lead agency on these projects and is partnering with Riverside County, RCTC, and Caltrans as well as nine of the Coachella Valley cities and the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians to deliver the projects. Traffic on the I-10, which ranges from 79,000 to 96,000 cars per day in the Coachella Valley, will move more smoothly, eliminating long waits to enter the freeway and back-ups of drivers exiting the I-10. This $55.4 million investment in infrastructure means more jobs for the region, creating more than 700 from these three projects alone. 10/Bob Hope-Ramon Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Ne w bridges of four lanes each direction over I-10 and three lanes each direction over Union Pacific railroad tracks, new interchange with multi-lane on ramps and off ramps both east and westbound on the I-10 at Bob Hope. Realign Rio Del Sol, widen portions of Varner Road. Cost:$25.5 million, $23.5 in ARRA funds. Projected Completion:Late 2011. 10/Palm Drive-Gene Autry Trail Bridge and Interchange Improvements:New bridge of three lanes in each direction plus bike lanes, new and realigned on ramps and off ramps both eastbound and westbound, combined with widening of Gene Autry bridge over Union Pacific railroad tracks. Realign Micro Place and Salvia Road. Cost:$15.25 million, including ARRA funds of $10.4 million for construction and $1.85 million for landscaping. Projected Completion:Mid 2012. 10/Indian Canyon Drive Bridge and Interchange Improvements:New bridge with three lanes each side plus bike lanes, new and realigned on ramps and off ramps both eastbound and westbound, widen portions of Garnet Avenue and 20th Av enue. Cost:$16.5 million, $5.5 million in ARRA funds. Projected Completion:Mid 2012. In 2011, I-10 interchanges at Date Palm and Monterey will start construction. A new interchange at Jefferson will follow in 2012. For additional information, please see www.i10CVCprojects.com. Dear Riverside County Resident: The great automobile executive Lee Iacocca once said, “We are continually faced by opportunities brilliantly disguised as insolvable problems.” So it is with the state of the economy in Riverside County. During the last two years, most of us have been facing the most profound economic downturn that we have ever experienced. Economic indicators regarding unemployment, housing starts, and retail sales have all been discouraging, as a result now is the time to demonstrate leadership to inspire a recovery. One way to do that is in investing in ourselves and the foundation of our economic success – our transportation system. As this goes to print in October 2010, we are seeing the fruits of our investment. Freeway construction moves forward on a new eastbound lane on SR-91 in Corona, three freeway interchanges are under construction in the Coachella Valley and more are under development, yet another railroad grade separation is moving forward in the City of Riverside, and additional freeway interchanges are being expanded and improved in Murrieta, Perris, Riverside, and Mira Loma. More construction will begin in a few short months on the 60/215 East Junction Interchange in Moreno Valley, I-215 in Murrieta, and the SR-91 carpool lanes in Riverside. Funding for these projects come from a variety of sources including state and federal sources, but the lion’s share of financing is being made possible by local sources of dollars – most notably the voter-approved Measure A program. Measure A not only pays for construction of big projects, but also is returned to local cities for maintenance needs, funds Metrolink train service and specialized bus and van service for seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons with special needs. Why is all of this important? And what does it mean for our economy? In short it’s all about jobs. Jobs are being created both by the construction work and by businesses that support the construction industry. Jobs are created when employers move to our area because of a business-friendly approach and a commitment to better transportation. And it is jobs that will make a recovery from this current recession a reality. Although some of us may find the construction delays annoying, RCTC has no intention of slowing down. In the next few years, we will fund even more interchange projects, extend Metrolink commuter rail service to Moreno Valley and Perris, and make a $1.3 billion investment to widen and improve the 91 freeway in Corona. The goal is to provide opportunities for employment, fuel our local economy, get people out of congestion, and demonstrate to our region and the entire nation that Riverside County is open for business and is a promising destination for employers, tourists, and families. As we issue our Annual Report for 2010, we take a look back at our current accomplishments, but remain pointed toward our future. We welcome your interest and support and invite you to obtain additional information at www.rctc.org. Sincerely, Anne Mayer Executive Director A key component of the Measure A program is the principle that each region should benefit from revenues raised in that region. Near Term WESTERN COUNTY In Western Riverside County, projects are administered by RCTC. SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project – •Extend existing tolled express lanes on SR-91 between the Orange/Riverside County line and I-15 •Add one general purpose lane between SR-241 and Pierce Street •Improve six local interchanges and the 15/91 interchange SR-91 HOV Project – •Add HOV lanes from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange 15/91 Interchange – •Add new connector at interchange from I-15 north to SR-91 west linking the SR-91 and I-15 74/215 Interchange Project – •Improve 4th Street interchange at I-215 in Pe rris I-215 South Project – •Add one general purpose lane in each direction from 15/215 interchange to Scott Road I-215 Central Project – •Add one general purpose lane in each direction from Scott Road to Nuevo Road I-215 Bi-County HOV Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from 60/91/215 interchange to Orange Show Road in San Bernardino County 60/215 East Junction Interchange Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from Day Street to Box Springs Road/Fair Isle Drive •Modify and realign North I-215/ Box Springs ramp •Realign and widen Box Springs Road to four lanes Commuter Rail – •Extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris on the Perris Valley Line EASTERN COUNTY In the eastern portion of the county, CVAG determines the priority of transportation projects through its Transportation Project Prioritization Study. SR-111 – •Multiple projects including intersection improvements and street widening in the cities of Cathedral City, Indio and La Quinta Local interchanges – •Coachella Valley: 10/Date Palm; 10/Palm; 10/Bob Hope-Ramon, 10/Indian Longer Range I-15 Corridor Improvement Project – •Construct one high occupancy vehicle lane in each direction from the 15/215 interchange to SR-74 •Construct various auxiliary lanes and ancillary improvements where needed •Construct two tolled express lanes and one general purpose lane in each direction from SR-74 to SR-60 71/91 Interchange Project – •Replace eastbound to northbound loop connector with a direct fly-over connector and improve connection between eastbound Green River Road on ramp and 71/91 interchange SR-71 Corridor Improvement Project – •Widen to three lanes in each direction from SR-91 to the San Bernardino County line SR-74 Curve Widening – •Widen median, shoulders, and lanes between Calvert and California I-215 North Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from Nuevo Road to 60/215 interchange 10/60 Interchange – •Construct new interchange I-10 – •Add eastbound truck climbing lane, San Bernardino County line to SR-60 SR-60 – •Add truck climbing lane, Badlands area, east of Moreno Va lley SR-79 Realignment Project – •Realign highway, Ramona Expressway to Domenigoni Parkway L eading the Way to Re cover y CHAIR Bob Buster County of Riverside 1st VICE CHAIR Greg Pettis City of Cathedral City 2nd VICE CHAIR John J. Benoit County of Riverside COMMISSIONERS Marion Ashley County of Riverside Jeff Stone County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione County of Riverside Bob Botts City of Banning Roger Berg City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck City of Blythe Ray Quinto City of Calimesa Mary Craton City of Canyon Lake Eduardo Garcia City of Coachella Karen Spiegel City of Corona Scott Matas City of Desert Hot Springs To Be Appointed City of Eastvale Robin Lowe City of Hemet Patrick Mullany City of Indian Wells Glenn Miller City of Indio Terry Henderson City of La Quinta Bob Magee City of Lake Elsinore Wallace Edgerton City of Menifee Bonnie Flickinger City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs City of Murrieta Malcolm Miller City of Norco Jim Ferguson City of Palm Desert Steve Pougnet City of Palm Springs Daryl R. Busch City of Pe rris Scott Hines City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams City of Riverside Steve Di Memmo City of San Jacinto Ron Roberts City of Temecula Scott Farnam City of Wildomar Raymond Wolfe Caltrans, District 8 Over the next five years, RCTC is investing $2.5 billion in Riverside County’s future, creating about 30,700 jobs. * Western Riverside County Interchanges $145.6 million 1,800 jobs Coachella Valley Interchanges on the I-10 $55.4 million 700 jobs SR-91 Projects $1.64 billion 20,100 jobs Scott Road to 15/215 $68.5 million 800 jobs Grade Separations $600 million 7,300 jobs *Jobs estimates are specific to the California labor market and are based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and based on the I-O tables developed by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Five new interchanges in Western Riverside County are under construction, relieving congestion for more than 600,000 vehicles every day in Western Riverside County. But upgrading these interchanges has benefits in addition to better mobility. RCTC’s investments with its partners Caltrans, Riverside County, and the cities of Murrieta, Perris, and Riverside total approximately $145.6 million, $30.5 million of which was awarded to shovel-ready projects from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funds make it possible to free up money from other sources, putting more projects under construction immediately. In addition, building now means constructing the projects at a time when construction bids are lower as a result of the recession and local money can be leveraged to create almost 1,800 needed jobs. The rest of the funding came from a combination of Measure A, Riverside County’s half-cent sales tax for transportation, state and federal funds, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees paid to mitigate traffic caused by development. 91/Van Buren Boulevard Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen the Van Buren bridge to three lanes in each direction plus two left turn lanes from northbound Van Buren onto SR-91 westbound, new eastbound on ramp, and westbound ramps widened to three lanes. Cost:$34.5 million, construction is expected to cost 42% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:SR-91—186,000 cars per day, Van Buren—30,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Summer 2011. 215/Clinton Keith Road Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen bridge to three lanes in each direction, construct partial cloverleaf for eastbound traffic entering I-215 northbound and westbound traffic entering I-215 southbound, on ramps extended, and the addition of ramp meters. Cost:$20 million, construction is expected to cost 46% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:I-215—88,000 cars per day, Clinton Keith—40,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Summer 2011. 74/215 Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen the bridge to two lanes plus two left turn lanes in each direction, realign on and off ramps, add ramp meters. Widen 4th Street and Redlands Avenue. Cost:$35 million, substantial savings from lower construction costs. Traffic Affected:I-215—88,000 cars per day, 4th Street and Redlands Avenue—24,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Fall 2012. 60/Valley Way Interchange Improvements:Replace eastbound exit ramp with a new hook ramp, and reconstruct on ramp. Cost:$9.1 million, construction is expected to cost 48% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:SR-60—121,000 cars per day, Valley Way—approximately 8,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:End of 2010. 60/215 East Junction Improvements:Build two direct carpool connectors to close gap between westbound SR-60 carpool lane and eastbound 215/60 eastbound carpool lane, modify and realign Box Springs off ramp, widen Box Springs to four lanes. Cost:$47 million, construction is expected to cost 18% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:60/215—119,000 cars per day, Box Springs—13,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:2013. Building Infrastructure and the Economy Two projects now underway on the I-215 will ease congestion for the 81,000 to 93,000 commuters that travel the I-215 everyday between the 15/215 junction and Scott Road. The $60 million investment will add one lane in each direction from Murrieta Hot Springs Road in the south to Scott Road in the north. Engineering is complete and the project is scheduled to break ground in early 2011. Widening will take place primarily in the freeway median, reducing impacts to drivers during construction. A southbound lane will be added between Murrieta Hot Springs Road at the 15/215 interchange. This $8.5 million project will be funded with a combination of Measure A and state funds. Further north, the new 74/215 interchange is underway (see page 1). This $35 million project is widening the overcrossing to two lanes plus adding two left turn lanes in each direction. In addition, both on ramps and off ramps will be realigned and reconstructed with ramp meters added. Construction will be completed in Fall 2012. More improvements are in the planning stage. Studies to widen the 12.5-mile stretch of I-215 from Scott Road to Nuevo Road by adding one lane in each direction are underway and environmental documents should be available to the public for review by the end of 2010. In addition, the proposed Perris Valley Line project will extend Metrolink service 24 miles further into Riverside County, directly serving the communities of Riverside, Moreno Valley and Perris. Good News for I-215 Commuters RCTC has secured $162.5 million in state Proposition 1B money toward $600 million in grade separation projects to protect the quality of life in many Riverside County communities from the effects of freight traffic through Southern California. The ports of Southern California continue to be the nation’s largest and most important center for the movement of goods into the United States. In 2008, freight flowing through the ports totaled over $287 billion and generated more than $30 billion in tax revenues. More than one million California jobs depend on the movement of this freight. Nevertheless, the monetary costs and effects on quality of life of freight movement on Riverside County communities are substantial. In 2008, RCTC updated its funding strategy to construct grade separations that would alleviate congestion and mitigate the effects on air quality as a result of freight traffic. The latest success in that effort is the Proposition 1B contribution toward funding of 12 grade separations and a new 215/Van Buren Boulevard interchange that will be built over the next four years. Columbia Avenue, located in Riverside, was the first Proposition 1B project to be completed. Magnolia Avenue, also in Riverside, is underway. These projects join grade separations funded by other sources at Jurupa Avenue in Riverside and Avenue 48 and Av enue 50 in the Coachella Valley on the completed project list. Projects slated to begin in 2011 include Auto Center Drive in Corona, Iowa Avenue in Riverside, and the new interchange at I-215 and Van Buren Boulevard. Grade Separations Protect Quality of Life Transportation Creates Over 30,000 Jobs 2010 RCTC Commission Members91/Van Buren215/15 InterchangeDillon Avenue GradeSeparationColumbia Avenue Grade Separation2009-2039 Measure A Plan A Letter from the Executive Director I-215/Clinton KeithEvery area of Riverside County benefits from receiving Measure A local streets and roads revenues. Western County Area BANNING $ 9,587,482 BEAUMONT 5,795,943 CALIMESA 2,530,088 CANYON LAKE 3,352,565 CORONA 56,096,591 HEMET 24,851,826 LAKE ELSINORE 13,463,204 MENIFEE 900,437 MORENO VALLEY 53,258,995 MURRIETA 21,327,126 NORCO 11,371,407 PERRIS 14,548,496 RIVERSIDE 11 5,923,709 SAN JACINTO 8,732,671 TEMECULA 33,870,770 WILDOMAR 536,668 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 121,812,070 AREA TOTA L497,960,048 Coachella Valley Area CATH EDRAL CITY 20,454,383 COACHELLA 3,639,605 DESERT HOT SPRINGS 3,426,090 INDIAN WELLS 3,123,237 INDIO 18,341,624 LA QUINTA - PA LM SPRINGS 26,023,485 PA LM DESERT 32,336,999 RANCHO MIRAGE 11,262,711 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 20,717,399 CVAG 15,137,157 AREA TOTA L154,462,688 Palo Verde Valley Area BLYTHE 13,077,983 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 4,053,288 AREA TOTA L17,131,271 TOTA LS $669,554,007 1989-2009 Measure A Dollars for Local Projects SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010 • THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE • THE DESERT SUN • THE CALIFORNIAN IE511.org and dialing 511 within the Inland Empire puts the travel information you want most at your fingertips. This partnership of RCTC and San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) delivers real-time traffic for all of Southern California, trip planning for bus and rail, and rideshare information including ridematching and Park and Ride lot locations. Since the launch of IE511, the system has helped more than 75,000 website users and more than 250,000 callers. Real-time traffic for all of Southern California is the most popular function on both the website and the telephone. Traffic information is generated from actual freeway speed detectors and is refreshed every seven minutes. The Real-Time Traffic section of the site also offers links to Caltrans construction information and CHP incident reporting. In addition, the website broadcasts notices of major incidents when they are reported by the CHP and also freeway construction closures. You can even sign up for a Twitter feed to get these notices sent to your phone by clicking the home page link or looking for IE511 on the Twitter website. Online Metrolink and bus trip planning is powered by Google transit and also provides information about how to get to the transit stop and how long your trip will take. Rideshare information online includes a link to a regional database of over 180,000 people who want to carpool or vanpool. In addition, there are Southern California wide carpool lane maps and interactive Park and Ride information. Find out how much you can save using our commute cost calculators. The service is also set up to work on smart phones and other mobile devices. You can also rely on the Inland Empire’s 511 telephone service anywhere in Southern California by calling 1-877-MYIE511 when you are outside the Inland Empire. Follow IE511.org on Fa cebook. Just click the link on the homepage at IE511.org. Now You Can Know BEFORE You Go with IE511.org If you are in the Inland Empire, dial 511 and yo u’ll be connected to our service. Outside the IE, dial 1-877- MYIE511 to reach our service rather than a neighboring 511 system. The phone service operates using Interactive Vo ice Response, so speak slowly and try to minimize background noise. Tr affic Say you’re driving and stuck in traffic — call 511 and say “traffic” or “freeway traffic.” The system will ask you to name your location and direction of travel and it will give you information for your route including travel times and any incidents or sig alerts. For incident information, say “incident.” Metrolink Say “Metrolink” and you’ll be transferred to Metrolink’s telephone information service. Once you are transferred, you will be out of the 511 system and must redial to get other 511 information. Buses Say “Transit” and you’ll access a menu of transit providers. Say “Riverside” for public bus providers in Riverside County or wait until you hear the menu for the transit provider you want. During business hours, you will be transferred to a live operator that can help you by planning your transit trip. Before or after hours, you will get the message services of each provider. Remember, you can always use IE511.org to plan a bus/rail trip 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Once you are transferred, you will be out of the 511 system and must redial to get other 511 information. Rideshare Say “Rideshare” from 7 am to 5 pm Monday through Friday, and you will be transferred to a live operator who can help you start ridesharing. You can get help with finding a ridematch for a carpool or vanpool or checking your eligibility for incentives to try ridesharing. After hours, you can leave a message for a call back. Guide to the 511 Phone Service This year, 89 Riverside County companies and organizations representing more than 65,000 employees will participate in Rideshare Week in the Inland Empire, October 4-8. Every year, RCTC encourages commuters to give ridesharing a try by offering a chance to win prizes to those willing to pledge to rideshare to work at least one day during Rideshare Week. Prizes include $250 Stater Bros or Vons gift cards, recliner, camcorders, folding bikes and more. You can pledge online at IE511.org. Need help finding a ridematch? Just call 1-866-RIDESHARE for assistance. How many people sign up? Last year over 6,700 Riverside County commuters participated in Rideshare Week. Rideshare Week is only one of the great benefits offered by participating in a rideshare program through RCTC. If you work at a participating employer, you may be eligible for a gift card incentive to try ridesharing. If your work doesn’t offer ridesharing as an employee benefit, you can still rideshare and RCTC will show its appreciation by enrolling you in Rideshare Plus, a rideshare club that offers an annual discount coupon booklet and also online member access to thousands of additional discounts. Ridesharing is an important part of RCTC’s strategy to reduce congestion in the region. Last year more than 8,800 people participated in the RCTC rideshare program. How much of a difference does it make? Last year, Western Riverside County and Coachella Valley ridesharers reduced one-way vehicle trips on regional roadways by almost 1.5 million, they saved 36.7 million miles of vehicle travel, and they reduced harmful air emission by 680,000 pounds. Rideshare We ek Ramps Up Freeway Service Patrol to the Rescue This year, two brand new transit centers are giving Riverside County commuters a better alternative to driving themselves to work. The Perris Station Transit Center, located on C Street between 4th Street and San Jacinto Av enue in Perris, serves Riverside Transit Agency routes 19, 27, 30, 74, 208, and 212. It also hosts a 141- space Pa rk and Ride lot where carpoolers and vanpoolers can meet up to share the commute. The station is distinctively decorated with the art of Disney animator Wa rd Kimball who inspired the Disneyland Railroad and who donated his own rail collection to the Orange Empire Railroad Museum in Perris. Phase II of the Perris Station will be the development of a Metrolink station for the planned Perris Valley Line, programmed for completion in 2013. The new Corona Transit Center is located at the North Main Corona Metrolink station. As well as serving several local RTA bus routes and the Corona Cruiser, the new facility is also a stop for RTA’s Commuterlink bus service to Orange County. The transit center encourages commuters to ride the bus to the station and then take Metrolink, taking their cars out of their commutes completely. The transit center connects to the Metrolink station with an elevator and bridge. Transit centers support ridesharing, better air quality, and less congestion but are also becoming ever more important as cities must meet requirements of new legislation to reduce greenhouse gases. Making the Connection: New Transit Centers Serve Commuters “If this is what my tax dollars are going toward, I would be willing to pay more taxes to keep or expand this program.” How many public agencies have programs that regularly receive comments like this? Fortunately, Riverside County residents have one of the best-loved government agency programs anywhere. Called the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), the RC TC program helps motorists stranded by the side of the road along some of the busiest stretches of Inland Empire freeways. FSP operators can “jump start” your car if the battery is dead, change a flat tire, refill your radiator, tape hoses, and do other small repairs to get you going again. If they can’t get you started, they’ll tow your car off the freeway to a safe place. They will also offer additional assistance by calling a towing company or the Auto Club for you. The glowing comments about the service keep rolling in, “If this program was not here, I don’t know what I would have done. At the time, I had no cell phone and it was 100 degrees. This service saved me and my child and I am extremely thankful and hope this program continues.” “A t this moment I cannot think of anything that may improve this service, it was great. I was pleasantly surprised to receive this type of service and very grateful for them helping me get off the freeway and into a safer location.” RC TC administers the FSP in partnership with Caltrans and the CHP. Currently, this service consists of 22 tow trucks which operate Monday through Friday during rush hour traffic. This year, the program broke its own record by providing more than 48,000 assists along the 81 miles of covered freeway in Riverside County. Since the beginning of the program almost 434,000 motorists have been served. Perris Station Transit Center Corona Transit Center Freeway Service Patrol Five new interchanges in Western Riverside County are under construction, relieving congestion for more than 600,000 vehicles every day in Western Riverside County. But upgrading these interchanges has benefits in addition to better mobility. RCTC’s investments with its partners Caltrans, Riverside County, and the cities of Murrieta, Perris, and Riverside total approximately $145.6 million, $30.5 million of which was awarded to shovel-ready projects from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funds make it possible to free up money from other sources, putting more projects under construction immediately. In addition, building now means constructing the projects at a time when construction bids are lower as a result of the recession and local money can be leveraged to create almost 1,800 needed jobs. The rest of the funding came from a combination of Measure A, Riverside County’s half- cent sales tax for transportation, state and federal funds, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees paid to mitigate traffic caused by development. 91/Van Buren Boulevard Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen the Van Buren bridge to three lanes in each direction plus two left turn lanes from northbound Van Buren onto SR-91 westbound, new eastbound on ramp, and westbound ramps widened to three lanes. Cost:$34.5 million, construction is expected to cost 42% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:SR-91—186,000 cars per day, Van Buren—30,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Summer 2011. 215/Clinton Keith Road Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen bridge to three lanes in each direction, construct partial cloverleaf for eastbound traffic entering I-215 northbound and westbound traffic entering I-215 southbound, on ramps extended, and the addition of ramp meters. Cost:$20 million, construction is expected to cost 46% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:I-215—88,000 cars per day, Clinton Keith—40,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Summer 2011. 74/215 Bridge and Interchange Improvements:Reconstruct and widen the bridge to two lanes plus two left turn lanes in each direction, realign on and off ramps, add ramp meters. Widen 4th Street and Redlands Av enue. Cost:$35 million, substantial savings from lower construction costs. Traffic Affected:I-215—88,000 cars per day, 4th Street and Redlands Avenue—24,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:Fall 2012. 60/Valley Way Interchange Improvements:Replace eastbound exit ramp with a new hook ramp, and reconstruct on ramp. Cost:$9.1 million, construction is expected to cost 48% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected:SR-60—121,000 cars per day, Valley Way—approximately 8,000 cars per day. Projected Completion:End of 2010. 60/215 East Junction Improvements:Build two direct carpool connectors to close gap between westbound SR-60 carpool lane and eastbound 215/60 eastbound carpool lane, modify and realign Box Springs off ramp, widen Box Springs to four lanes. Cost:$47 million, construction is expected to cost 18% less than initial estimates. Traffic Affected: 60/215—119,000 cars per day, Box Springs— 13,000 cars per day. Projected Completion: 2013. I-215/Clinton Keith74/21591/Van Buren91/Van Buren60/215 (East Junction)60/Valley WayI-215/Clinton KeithSR-91/County Line Creek BridgeSR-91 WideningTransportation facilities often define locations. Whether it is Main Street in a small town, Route 66 through the Western Un ited States, the freeways of Los Angeles, or New Yo rk’s subways, transportation facilities often shape one’s surroundings and the perception of various locations. Major freeway corridors such as the I-15 from Eastvale to Temecula, I-215 through the center of the county, SR-60 from Mira Loma to the San Gorgonio Pass, the I-10 in the Coachella Valley, and SR-91 through Corona and Riverside help define our communities in Riverside County. Opening the 91 Gateway For thousands of motorists, SR-91 serves as the bridge between their homes and their jobs. It is also the route to Riverside County for shippers, business owners, and tourists and often generates people’s perceptions of the entire region. For too many people, however, the 91 freeway can seem to be a barrier rather than a gateway. The good news is that RCTC is working to improve the 91 freeway through $1.64 billion in projects that are either underway or starting construction next year. Currently Under Construction Caltrans and the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) are widening six miles of the eastbound SR-91 between the 241 Toll Road and SR-71. This $60 million, bi-county project is being paid for with ARRA funds and could open to traffic before the end of 2010. Downtown Riverside Section Begins Construction in 2011 Caltrans and RCTC are working together to widen another six miles of SR-91. This project will add a carpool lane, improve on and off ramps and widen streets that cross over the freeway between Adams Street and the 60/91/215 interchange. The $278 million project will start construction in 2011 and is funded through a combination of Measure A, federal and state bond funding. Fast Forward to a New 91 in Corona Environmental work is currently underway to widen 10 miles of the 91 freeway through the city of Corona. This mammoth $1.3 billion investment will add a regular lane in each direction between the Orange County line and I-15. Freeway interchanges will also be improved throughout the city. Finally, the 91 Express Lanes will be extended from Orange County to provide a congestion-free alternative to carpoolers and those who pay a toll. The toll component insures that a significant increase in freeway capacity can be completed sooner and also provides the infrastructure to increase express bus service along the corridor. Construction is expected to begin in 2012 and will be financed through toll road revenue bonds and Measure A revenue. Dear Riverside County Resident: The great automobile executive Lee Iacocca once said, “We are continually faced by opportunities brilliantly disguised as insolvable problems.” So it is with the state of the economy in Riverside County. During the last two years, most of us have been facing the most profound economic downturn that we have ever experienced. Economic indicators regarding unemployment, housing starts, and retail sales have all been discouraging, as a result now is the time to demonstrate leadership to inspire a recovery. One way to do that is in investing in ourselves and the foundation of our economic success – our transportation system. As this goes to print in October 2010, we are seeing the fruits of our investment. Freeway construction moves forward on a new eastbound lane on SR-91 in Corona, three freeway interchanges are under construction in the Coachella Valley and more are under development, yet another railroad grade separation is moving forward in the City of Riverside, and additional freeway interchanges are being expanded and improved in Murrieta, Perris, Riverside, and Mira Loma. More construction will begin in a few short months on the 60/215 East Junction Interchange in Moreno Valley, I-215 in Murrieta, and the SR-91 carpool lanes in Riverside. Funding for these projects come from a variety of sources including state and federal sources, but the lion’s share of financing is being made possible by local sources of dollars – most notably the voter-approved Measure A program. Measure A not only pays for construction of big projects, but also is returned to local cities for maintenance needs, funds Metrolink train service and specialized bus and van service for seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons with special needs. Why is all of this important? And what does it mean for our economy? In short it’s all about jobs. Jobs are being created both by the construction work and by businesses that support the construction industry. Jobs are created when employers move to our area because of a business-friendly approach and a commitment to better transportation. And it is jobs that will make a recovery from this current recession a reality. Although some of us may find the construction delays annoying, RC TC has no intention of slowing down. In the next few years, we will fund even more interchange projects, extend Metrolink commuter rail service to Moreno Valley and Perris, and make a $1.3 billion investment to widen and improve the 91 freeway in Corona. The goal is to provide opportunities for employment, fuel our local economy, get people out of congestion, and demonstrate to our region and the entire nation that Riverside County is open for business and is a promising destination for employers, tourists, and families. As we issue our Annual Report for 2010, we take a look back at our current accomplishments, but remain pointed toward our future. We welcome your interest and support and invite you to obtain additional information at www.rctc.org. Sincerely, Anne Mayer Executive Director A key component of the Measure A program is the principle that each region should benefit from revenues raised in that region. Near Term WESTERN COUNTY In Western Riverside County, projects are administered by RCTC. SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project – •Extend existing tolled express lanes on SR-91 between the Orange/Riverside County line and I-15 •Add one general purpose lane between SR-241 and Pierce Street •Improve six local interchanges and the 15/91 interchange SR-91 HOV Project – •Add HOV lanes from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange 15/91 Interchange – •Add new connector at interchange from I-15 north to SR-91 west linking the SR-91 and I-15 74/215 Interchange Project – •Improve 4th Street interchange at I-215 in Pe rris I-215 South Project – •Add one general purpose lane in each direction from 15/215 interchange to Scott Road I-215 Central Project – •Add one general purpose lane in each direction from Scott Road to Nuevo Road I-215 Bi-County HOV Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from 60/91/215 interchange to Orange Show Road in San Bernardino County 60/215 East Junction Interchange Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from Day Street to Box Springs Road/Fair Isle Drive •Modify and realign North I-215/Box Springs ramp •Realign and widen Box Springs Road to four lanes Commuter Rail – •Extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris on the Perris Valley Line EASTERN COUNTY In the eastern portion of the county, CVAG determines the priority of transportation projects through its Transportation Project Prioritization Study. SR-111 – •Multiple projects including intersection improvements and street widening in the cities of Cathedral City, Indio and La Quinta Local interchanges – •Coachella Valley: 10/Date Palm; 10/Palm; 10/Bob Hope-Ramon, 10/Indian Longer Range I-15 Corridor Improvement Project – •Construct one high occupancy vehicle lane in each direction from the 15/215 interchange to SR-74 •Construct various auxiliary lanes and ancillary improvements where needed •Construct two tolled express lanes and one general purpose lane in each direction from SR-74 to SR-60 71/91 Interchange Project – •Replace eastbound to northbound loop connector with a direct fly-over connector and improve connection between eastbound Green River Road on ramp and 71/91 interchange SR-71 Corridor Improvement Project – •Widen to three lanes in each direction from SR-91 to the San Bernardino County line SR-74 Curve Widening – •Widen median, shoulders, and lanes between Calvert and California I-215 North Project – •Add one HOV lane in each direction from Nuevo Road to 60/215 interchange 10/60 Interchange – •Construct new interchange I-10 – •Add eastbound truck climbing lane, San Bernardino County line to SR-60 SR-60 – •Add truck climbing lane, Badlands area, east of Moreno Va lley SR-79 Realignment Project – • Realign highway, Ramona Expressway to Domenigoni Pa rkway Leading the Wa y to Recovery CHAIR Bob Buster County of Riverside 1st VICE CHAIR Greg Pettis City of Cathedral City 2nd VICE CHAIR John J. Benoit County of Riverside COMMISSIONERS Marion Ashley County of Riverside Jeff Stone County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione County of Riverside Bob Botts City of Banning Roger Berg City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck City of Blythe Ray Quinto City of Calimesa Mary Craton City of Canyon Lake Eduardo Garcia City of Coachella Karen Spiegel City of Corona Scott Matas City of Desert Hot Springs Adam Rush City of Eastvale Robin Lowe City of Hemet Patrick Mullany City of Indian Wells Glenn Miller City of Indio Terry Henderson City of La Quinta Bob Magee City of Lake Elsinore Wallace Edgerton City of Menifee Bonnie Flickinger City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs City of Murrieta Malcolm Miller City of Norco Jim Ferguson City of Palm Desert Steve Pougnet City of Palm Springs Daryl R. Busch City of Pe rris Scott Hines City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams City of Riverside Steve Di Memmo City of San Jacinto Ron Roberts City of Temecula Scott Farnam City of Wildomar Raymond Wolfe Caltrans, District 8 Over the next five years, RCTC is investing $2.5 billion in Riverside County’s future, creating about 30,700 jobs. * Western Riverside County Interchanges $145.6 million 1,800 jobs Coachella Valley Interchanges on the I-10 $55.4 million 700 jobs SR-91 Projects $1.64 billion 20,100 jobs Scott Road to 15/215 $68.5 million 800 jobs Grade Separations $600 million 7,300 jobs *Jobs estimates are specific to the California labor market and are based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and based on the I-O tables developed by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the Coachella Valley, three of six new interchanges are under construction on the I-10 freeway. The three interchanges qualified as shovel-ready under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Of a total $55.4 million in construction costs, 71% or $39.4 million is being funded through ARRA. The balance of the funding comes from Measure A, federal and state funds, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fees paid to mitigate traffic caused by development. The Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) is the lead agency on these projects and is partnering with Riverside County, RCTC, and Caltrans as well as nine of the Coachella Valley cities and the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians to deliver the projects. Traffic on the I-10, which ranges from 79,000 to 96,000 cars per day in the Coachella Valley, will move more smoothly, eliminating long waits to enter the freeway and back-ups of drivers exiting the I-10. This $55.4 million investment in infrastructure means more jobs for the region, creating more than 700 from these three projects alone. 10/Bob Hope-Ramon Bridge and Interchange Improvements:New bridges of four lanes each direction over I-10 and three lanes each direction over Union Pacific railroad tracks, new interchange with multi-lane on ramps and off ramps both east and westbound on the I-10 at Bob Hope. Realign Rio Del Sol, widen portions of Varner Road. Cost:$25.5 million, $23.5 in ARRA funds. Projected Completion:Late 2011. 10/Palm Drive-Gene Autry Trail Bridge and Interchange Improvements:New bridge of three lanes in each direction plus bike lanes, new and realigned on ramps and off ramps both eastbound and westbound, combined with widening of Gene Autry bridge over Union Pacific railroad tracks. Realign Micro Place and Salvia Road. Cost:$15.25 million, including ARRA funds of $10.4 million for construction and $1.85 million for landscaping. Projected Completion:Mid 2012. 10/Indian Canyon Drive Bridge and Interchange Improvements:New bridge with three lanes each side plus bike lanes, new and realigned on ramps and off ramps both eastbound and westbound, widen portions of Garnet Avenue and 20th Avenue. Cost:$16.5 million, $5.5 million in ARRA funds. Projected Completion:Mid 2012. In 2011, I-10 interchanges at Date Palm and Monterey will start construction. A new interchange at Jefferson will follow in 2012. For additional information, please see www.i10CVCprojects.com. Coachella Valley Interchanges Underway Two projects now underway on the I-215 will ease congestion for the 81,000 to 93,000 commuters that travel the I-215 everyday between the 15/215 junction and Scott Road. The $60 million investment will add one lane in each direction from Murrieta Hot Springs Road in the south to Scott Road in the north. Engineering is complete and the project is scheduled to break ground in early 2011. Widening will take place primarily in the freeway median, reducing impacts to drivers during construction. A southbound lane will be added between Murrieta Hot Springs Road at the 15/215 interchange. This $8.5 million project will be funded with a combination of Measure A and state funds. Further north, the new 74/215 interchange is underway (see page 1). This $35 million project is widening the overcrossing to two lanes plus adding two left turn lanes in each direction. In addition, both on ramps and off ramps will be realigned and reconstructed with ramp meters added. Construction will be completed in Fall 2012. More improvements are in the planning stage. Studies to widen the 12.5-mile stretch of I-215 from Scott Road to Nuevo Road by adding one lane in each direction are underway and environmental documents should be available to the public for review by the end of 2010. In addition, the proposed Perris Valley Line project will extend Metrolink service 24 miles further into Riverside County, directly serving the communities of Riverside, Moreno Valley and Perris. Good News for I-215 Commuters RCTC has secured $162.5 million in state Proposition 1B money toward $600 million in grade separation projects to protect the quality of life in many Riverside County communities from the effects of freight traffic through Southern California. The ports of Southern California continue to be the nation’s largest and most important center for the movement of goods into the United States. In 2008, freight flowing through the ports totaled over $287 billion and generated more than $30 billion in tax revenues. More than one million California jobs depend on the movement of this freight. Nevertheless, the monetary costs and effects on quality of life of freight movement on Riverside County communities are substantial. In 2008, RCTC updated its funding strategy to construct grade separations that would alleviate congestion and mitigate the effects on air quality as a result of freight traffic. The latest success in that effort is the Proposition 1B contribution toward funding of 12 grade separations and a new 215/Van Buren Boulevard interchange that will be built over the next four years. Columbia Av enue, located in Riverside, was the first Proposition 1B project to be completed. Magnolia Av enue, also in Riverside, is underway. These projects join grade separations funded by other sources at Ju rupa Avenue in Riverside and Avenue 48 and Avenue 50 in the Coachella Valley on the completed project list. Projects slated to begin in 2011 include Auto Center Drive in Corona, Iowa Av enue in Riverside, and the new interchange at I-215 and Van Buren Boulevard. Grade Separations Protect Quality of Life Transportation Creates Over 30,000 Jobs Every area of Riverside County benefits from receiving Measure A local streets and roads revenues. Western County Area BANNING $ 9,587,482 BEAUMONT 5,795,943 CALIMESA 2,530,088 CANYON LAKE 3,352,565 CORONA 56,096,591 HEMET 24,851,826 LAKE ELSINORE 13,463,204 MENIFEE 900,437 MORENO VALLEY 53,258,995 MURRIETA 21,327,126 NORCO 11,371,407 PERRIS 14,548,496 RIVERSIDE 11 5,923,709 SAN JACINTO 8,732,671 TEMECULA 33,870,770 WILDOMAR 536,668 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 121,812,070 AREA TOTA L497,960,048 Coachella Valley Area CATH EDRAL CITY 20,454,383 COACHELLA 3,639,605 D ESERT HOT SPRINGS 3,426,090 INDIAN WELLS 3,123,237 INDIO 18 ,341,624 LA QUINTA - PA LM SPRINGS 26,023,485 PA LM DESERT 32,336,999 RANCHO MIRAGE 11,262,711 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 20,717,399 CVAG 15,137,15 7 AREA TOTA L154,462,688 Palo Verde Valley Area BLYTHE 13,077,983 RIVERSIDE COUNTY 4,053,288 AREA TOTA L17,131,271 TOTA LS $669,554,007 1989-2009 Measure A Dollars for Local Projects 2010 RCTC Commission MembersI-10/Palm DriveI-10/Ramon/Bob Hope215/15 InterchangeDillon Avenue GradeSeparationColumbia Avenue Grade Separation2009-2039 Measure A Plan A Letter from the Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside County Transportation Commission 2010 Edition Framework for a Journey 2009-2019 Delivery Plan A. Overview of RCTC ....................................................................................3 • Governance ............................................................................................3 • Management ..........................................................................................4 • Priorities .................................................................................................5 B. Funding ......................................................................................................6 C. Measure A .................................................................................................8 D. Plan to Address the Future ....................................................................11 • 91 Freeway Improvements .................................................................11 • Perris Valley Line Commuter Rail Extension .....................................13 • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ..........................14 • Coachella Valley Interchanges ............................................................15 • 215 Freeway Improvements ...............................................................16 • 15 Freeway Improvements .................................................................18 • Goods Movement ................................................................................19 • Multimodal Services ...........................................................................20 • Looking Ahead ......................................................................................22 E. Demographic and Sales Tax Data .........................................................23Table of ConTenTs2 3oVerView of rCTCCOLORADO RIVER BLYTHE RANCHO MIRAGE PALM SPRINGS CATHEDRAL CITY PALM DESERT DESERT HOT SPRINGS INDIAN WELLS LA QUINTA INDIO COACHELLA BANNINGBEAUMONT SAN JACINTO MTNS. S A N T A R O S A MTNS. HEMET CALIMESA Spr i n g s Ro a d Gil m a n Ramona Expressway Alessandro Blvd. MORENO VALLEY Cajalco Road Van Buren Blvd. PERRIS RIVERSIDE EASTVALE NORCO LAKE ELSINORE CANYONLAKE MENIFEE MURRIETA TEMECULA SAN JACINTO CORONA 10 78 958 R3 79 79 74 15 79 60 10 62 111 243 74 74 86 111 195371 WILDOMAR 74 215 91 Governance Management Priorities RCTC Board of CommissionersBob Buster, Chairman County of Riverside John J. Benoit, Second Vice Chairman County of Riverside Greg Pettis, First Vice Chairman City of Cathedral City Marion Ashley, County of Riverside Bob Buster, County of Riverside Jeff Stone, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside John J. Benoit, County of Riverside Bob Botts, City of Banning Roger Berg, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck, City of Blythe Ray Quinto, City of Calimesa Mary Craton, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis, City of Cathedral City Eduardo Garcia, City of Coachella Karen Spiegel, City of Corona Scott Matas, City of Desert Hot Springs Vacant, City of Eastvale Robin Lowe, City of Hemet Patrick Mullany, City of Indian Wells Glenn Miller, City of Indio Terry Henderson, City of La Quinta Bob Magee, City of Lake Elsinore Wallace Edgerton, City of Menifee Bonnie Flickinger, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs, City of Murrieta Malcolm Miller, City of Norco Vacant, City of Palm Desert Steve Pougnet, City of Palm Springs Daryl R. Busch, City of Perris Scott Hines, City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams, City of Riverside Steve Di Memmo, City of San Jacinto Ron Roberts, City of Temecula Scott Farnam, City of Wildomar Raymond Wolfe, Director, Caltrans District 8 Overview of RCTC State law created the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) in 1976 to oversee funding and coordination of all public transportation services within Riverside County. RCTC serves as the tax authority and implementation agency for Measure A, a voter-approved 1/2 cent sales tax, first passed in 1988 and in 2002 renewed by voters through 2039. Governance Commission Representation: One representative from each of the 27 listed cities • Newest city is Eastvale with October 2010 incorporation date Five members of the County Board of Supervisors Governor’s appointee (non-voting) 3 managemenTGovernance Management ManaGeMenT Led by the Executive Director, seven top managers have responsibilities that fall into seven major categories: Administration Capital Project Development and Delivery Finance Multimodal Services Regional Programs Toll Programs Transportation Planning & Programming OrganizatiOnal rOles Board of Commissioners Executive Director Legal Counsel Deputy Executive Director Procurement & AssetsAdministrator Accounting Supervisor Rail Manager Staff Analyst Transit Manager Staff Analyst Staff Analyst Multimodal ServicesManager Capital Projects Manager Community Relations Manager Programming & Planning Manager Senior Staff Analyst Staff Analyst Capital Projects Manager (2) Right of WayManager Senior Staff Analyst Staff Analyst Toll Project Manager (2) Senior Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant (3)Senior OfficeAssistant Office & Board Services Manager Procurement & AssetsManager Accounting & HumanResources Manager Accounting Technician (2) Accounting Clerk Chief Financial Officer Multimodal ServicesDirector Project DevelopmentDirector Project DeliveryDirector Toll ProgramsDirector Goods MovementManager Government RelationsManager Anne Mayer, Executive Director Cathy Bechtel, Project Development Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director Robert Yates, Multimodal Services Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director Michael Blomquist, Toll Programs DirectormanagemenTGovernance Management Priorities 4 PRiORiTies Promote Mobility Create a transportation system that promotes efficient mobility both within the County and the region Mitigate and address the impact of Goods Movement Facilitate the movement of goods and services throughout the County ensure improved system efficiencies Advocate affordable and advanced transportation technologies to improve safety and reduce congested corridors Foster environmental stewardship Promote environmental stewardship and protect the area’s natural resources and quality of life while achieving mobility goals support Transportation Choices Through intermodalism and accessibility Develop transportation alternatives including 511 traveler information program encourage economic Development Consider economic benefits of improvements and pursue transportation alternatives that enhance or complement economic development Prioritize Public and agency Communications Provide timely and informative information to encourage informed public and agency participation Governance Management Priorities 5 FunDinG sOuRCes RCTC’s funding sources are diverse and include the Measure A sales tax, the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax, the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF), reimbursements primarily from federal and state governments, investment and other revenues, and debt proceeds. The local economy has been significantly impacted by the housing, subprime mortgage, and credit crisis. Population growth has slowed down, there have been significant job losses, and consumers have decreased spending. These factors have resulted in declines in Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues and TUMF fees since their peak in FY 2005/06. The FY 2010/11 budget for Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues is comparable to FY 2009/10, as local economic forecasts indicate a slow recovery through 2011. Source: FY 2010/11 Budget Debt Proceeds 29% Operating Transfers In 33% LTF Sales Tax 11% Intergovernmental 10% TUMF Revenue 1% Investment Income 0% Measure A Sales Tax 16% $0 $500,000,00 $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000 $250,000,000 $300,000,000 Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax TUMF Fedaral, State, Local Revenues Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax TUMF Fedaral, State, Local Revenues Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds $0 $500,000,00 $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000 $250,000,000 $300,000,000 Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax TUMF Fedaral, State, Local Revenues Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax TUMF Fedaral, State, Local Revenues Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds Public and Specialized Transit 10% Planning and Programming 1% Rail Maintenance and Operations 1% Motorist Assistance 1% Management Services 1% Projects and Operations 76%fundingFunding sources Funding uses Source: FY 2010/11 Budget 6 FunDinG uses RCTC’s expenditures reflect its broad range of functional responsibilities related to personnel, professional and support, projects and operations, debt service, and capital outlay. Departmental uses include expenditures and transfers out for capital project development and delivery (highways, commuter rail, regional arterials and new corridors, and local streets and roads), public and specialized transit, commuter assistance, motorist assistance, rail operations and maintenance, planning and programming, management services (executive, administration, legislative, communications, and finance) and debt service. Source: FY 2010/11 Budget Public and Specialized Transit 10% Planning and Programming 1% Debt Service 14% Commuter Assistance 0% Capital Local Streets and Roads 4%Rail Maintenance and Operations 1% Motorist Assistance 1% Management Services 1% Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials 68% Source: FY 2010/11 Budget Capital Outlay 0% Debt Service 19% Personnel 1% Professional and Support 4% Projects and Operations 76% Funding sources Funding uses 7 MeasuRe a DeLiVeRinG On PROMises One of RCTC’s primary responsibilities is to administer the voter-approved Measure A ½ cent sales tax program for transportation projects. Measure A funds highway, regional arterial, street and road, new corridors, economic development, and transit projects throughout Riverside County. The transportation sales tax was first approved by voters in 1988 and was later extended in 2002, remaining in place until 2039. In voting for the Measure A extension, voters placed their confidence in the Commission’s ability to deliver much needed transportation projects. Over the thirty-year life of Measure A, it is projected that $4.6 billion in transportation funding will be generated. Of that amount, generally 75% of the funding will be allocated to Western Riverside, 24% to Coachella Valley, and 1% to Palo Verde Valley. The programs within each geographic area are shown on the following chart: Although the local economy has been negatively impacted by the recession and RCTC is experiencing a challenging economic climate, the agency’s focus continues to be on project delivery. In looking forward, RCTC is ready to enter a year that will be full of promise and activity, much of which will be funded through innovative thinking, careful management, and a commitment to effectively invest scarce resources in much needed and welcomed transportation projects and services. By using a combination of funding from sources that include the voter- approved Measure A sales tax, Proposition 1B, and other state and federal programs, RCTC will be active in construction, environmental, and engineering work for a number of projects. Construction will begin on three major freeway projects funded by the Commission, and environmental work will wrap up on the Perris Valley Line, a 24 mile extension of the Metrolink commuter rail service. Preliminary project work will also move forward for a dramatic expansion of State Route (SR) 91 in Corona which will feature new toll lanes, a general purpose lane in each direction, and a series of system improvements to include expanded interchange and improved access to and from what might be Southern California’s most congested freeway. RCTC is pleased to provide the 2010 edition of Framework for a Journey. It provides an overview of goals and objectives, financial resources and trends, as well as project development and delivery. Western County • Bond Financing - 8% • Economic Development Incentives - 1% • Highways - 30% • Local Streets and Roads - 29% • New Corridors - 11% • Public Transit - 12% • Regional Arterials - 9% Coachella Valley • Highways and Regional Arterials - 50% • Local Streets and Roads - 35% • Public Transit - 15% Palo Verde Valley • Local Streets and Roads - 100% Delivering on Promises enhancing Mobility in the Face of Growth Measure a Western County Highway Expenditure Plan Measure a 2009-2019 Western County Delivery Plan Priority List measure a8 Projects CMIA Revenue Costs P3 & To lls 10-YearDelivery Plan ENHANCINg MoBILITy IN THE FACE oF gRowTH RCTC is acting NOW to deliver mobility that will meet the challenges of growth. 10-Year Highway Delivery Plan approved December 2006 · Focus on priority corridors · Act on and deliver projects quickly · Seek to invest more than $3 billion in first 10 years of the new Measure · Major accomplishments include · Toll road authorizing legislation approved for SR-91 and I-15 · Received CMIA funding for I-215 · Design-build legislation (AB 2098 - Miller) approved Perris Valley Line Delivery Plan · Metrolink extension projected to open in 2013 · FTA “Small Starts” designation · $75 million in Small Starts funding anticipated Delivering on Promises enhancing Mobility in the Face of Growth Measure a Western County Highway Expenditure Plan (2009-2039) Measure a 2009-2019 Western County Delivery Plan Priority List 9 MEASuRE A wESTERN CouNTy HIgHwAy ExPENDITuRE PLAN (2009-2039) SR-91 Add one lane in each direction from Pierce Street to Orange County line SR-91/I-15 Interchange Add new connector at interchange from I-15 north to 91 west SR-91/71 Interchange Improve interchange SR-71 Widen to three lanes in each direction from SR-91 to San Bernardino County line I-215 Add two lanes in each direction from 60/91/215 to San Bernardino County line I-215 Add one lane in each direction from Eucalyptus Avenue to I-15 I-15 Add one lane in each direction from SR-60 to San Diego County line I-10 Add eastbound truck climbing lane, San Bernardino County line to Banning I-10/SR-60 Interchange Construct new interchange SR-60 Add truck climbing lane, Badlands area, east of Moreno Valley SR-79 Realign highway, Ramona Expressway to Domenigoni Parkway MEASuRE A 2009-2019 wESTERN CouNTy DELIvERy PLAN PRIoRITy LIST RCTC has identified priority projects and has an approved plan to achieve them between now and 2019. Immediately pursue construction: · SR-91 · 60-215 East Junction Interchange Project · I-215 · I-215 Bi-County Gap Closure Pursue environmental clearance: · Perris Valley Line · I-15 · Mid County Parkway · SR-79 Realignment Consider additional projects as opportunities arise Delivering on Promises enhancing Mobility in the Face of Growth Measure a Western County Highway Expenditure Plan (2009-2039) Measure a 2009-2019 Western County Delivery Plan Priority List 8/10 INDIO BANNING BEAUMONTMORENO VALLEYCALIMESARIVERSIDE CORONA MURRIETA TEMECULA NORCO PERRIS MENIFEE WILDOMAR EASTVALE HEMET COACHELLA LA QUINTA PALM DESERTRANCHO MIRAGE CATHEDRAL CITY PALM SPRINGS INDIANWELLS DESERT HOTSPRINGS SANJACINTO CANYONLAKELAKEELSINORE FREEWAYS/HIGHWAYS COMMUTER RAIL INTERCHANGE MAJOR ARTERIALS MEASURE A 78 10 BLYTHE CO LORAD O RIVER 95 10 PRO je CT s T a T us Preliminary engineering and environmental Work Expected Completion Fall 2011 Presents significant Right-of-way Needs Design-Build Legislation approved Started Design-Build Procurement 2010 91 CoRRIDoR IMPRovEMENTS March ARB Diamond ValleyLake Norco Riverside RIVERS IDE CO . ORANGE CO . RIVERSIDE CO. SAN BERNARDINO CO. Serfas Cl u b D r. 133 261 241 142 259 83 71 1 55 66 57 76 13 30 91 74 74 74 60 90 22 5 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 210 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 405 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 73 371 111 243 247 74 62 79 79 86 38 6 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 79 0 5 10 Miles N ToDAyPROPOseD Construct two tolled express lanes and a general purpose lane from Orange County line to I-15 and a general purpose lane to Pierce Street Build new direct connectors linking SR-91 and I-15 Cost: $1.3 Billion Build a new direct connector between eastbound SR-91 and northbound SR-71 and a separate eastbound road between Green River Road interchange and 71/91 interchange Cost: $124 Million SR-91 eastbound lane addition Lead agencies Caltrans District 12 and Orange County Transportation Authority Construction Start Date: 2012 Construction End Date: 2016 www.sr91project.infoplan To address The fuTureState Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 11 SR-91 Hov/ADAMS STREET To INTERCHANgE Add 1 HOV lane in each direction from Adams Street to the 60/215 interchange Improve ramps, bridges and freeway access Close 6 mile HOV gap CMIA state bond funding of $157 Million Cost: $278 Million PRO je CT s T a T us approved for CMia Funding Final Design Completed ROW acquisition and utility Relocation are underway Construction Start Date: 2011 Construction End Date: 2015 State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 12 Began Project Development per FTA Began NEPA SEA/CEQA EIR Began Adv. Preliminary Engineering Complete NEPA/CEQA Complete Final Design Release RFQ for CM Contract Receive PCGA Begin Construction Complete Construction Service Begins PRO je CT s T a T us approved FTa alternatives analysis advanced engineering and environmental Work underway Construction Start Date: 2011 Construction End Date: 2012 www.perrisvalleyline.info The proposed Perris Valley Line (PVL) project will extend Metrolink service 24 miles further into Riverside County, directly serving the communities of Riverside, Moreno Valley, and Perris. The service will extend the existing Metrolink 91 line and run to major employment centers such as Hunter Park, the Meridian Business Park as well as southern Riverside County. PvL PRojECT BENEFITS INCLuDE: increased safety: Safety is a priority for RCTC and Metrolink. The PVL will employ safety measures such as upgrading 15 at-grade crossings with features that could include flashing warning devices, gates, raised center medians, striping, signing, and pavement markings. Other safety measures include the implementation of Positive Train Control. Metrolink plans to have full implementation of this new technology on the PVL by opening day. increased Mobility: Most of the PVL parallels the I-215 which is expected to carry as many as 200,000 vehicles per day by 2020. The PVL will provide commuters with a safe and traffic free alternative to I-215, one of the fastest growing corridors in the county. Better Public Transit Service: Metrolink, combined with regional and local bus services, provides an environmentally-friendly and energy efficient alternative to driving alone. It is estimated that the PVL will attract 4,350 riders daily serving commuters from the cities of Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, Moreno Valley, Hemet and San Jacinto. job Creation: By extending Metrolink to more of the region, local residents can take the train to jobs within Riverside County. The success of Metrolink will make the area more attractive to potential employers who will want to locate near vibrant rail stations. station Development: A total of four new stations will be constructed to serve the PVL. They will be located in Downtown Perris, South Perris, Moreno Valley/March Field and the Hunter Park business area. 2009 2010 2012 20132007/ 2008 2011 PvL SCHEDuLE PERRIS vALLEy LINE CoMMuTER RAIL ExTENSIoN Marlborough Ave. Cajalco Rd. State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 13 AMERICAN RECovERy AND REINvESTMENT ACT oF 2009 In 2009, Congress approved the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); as a result, Caltrans and local governments in the County received federal stimulus funding for transportation projects. Although most of the ARRA funding did not go directly to the Commission, the investment in the area’s transportation system freed up dollars to build six important freeway projects in various locations including: In addition, a little over $2 million was provided for transportation enhancement projects: Project/Location Project Cost (millions) aRRa Funds (millions) status Lead agency I-10/Bob Hope Drive Interchange (Coachella Valley) $25.5 $23.5 Construction CVAG/County/ Caltrans I-10/Palm Drive Interchange (Coachella Valley) $13.4 $10.4 Construction CVAG/County I-10/Indian Canyon Interchange (Coachella Valley) $16.5 $5.5 Construction CVAG/County SR-60/Valley Way (Rubidoux area of western Riverside County) $3.9 $3.9 Construction County I-215/Clinton Keith Interchange (Murrieta) $12.6 $10.0 Construction City of Murrieta 74/215 (Perris) $35 $16.6 Construction RCTC Project/Location Project Cost (millions) aRRa Funds (millions) Palm Springs Gene Autry Trail Landscape $1.850 $1.850 Riverside Alessandro Blvd.$0.737 $0.348 State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 14 CoACHELLA vALLEy INTERCHANgES A key component of RCTC’s Measure A program is the return to source provision which provides that Measure A sales tax revenue is returned to the geographical regions where the revenue is generated. There are three primary geographical regions served in this manner: Western Riverside County, the Coachella Valley and the Palo Verde Valley. The Coachella Valley receives approximately 24% of the projected $4.6 billion in Measure A revenues. The Coachella Valley’s transportation priorities are defined in the Measure A Expenditure Plan, and much of the area’s funding is administered by RCTC’s partner in the Coachella Valley, the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). Currently, CVAG’s top priority is to complete construction on five interchanges on Interstate 10 and improve access for another. Three of the interchange projects are currently under construction: at Bob Hope Drive, at Palm Drive and at Indian Canyon Drive. The interchange project at Date Palm Drive is anticipated to be underway early in 2011, as will the access ramp improvements for the Monterey Avenue interchange. Construction of a new interchange for Jefferson Street is anticipated to begin in late 2012. The total estimated construction cost for these interchange improvements is over $120 million, with a total project cost of over $180 million. RANCHO MIRAGE PALM SPRINGS CATHEDRAL CITY PALM DESERT DESERT HOT SPRINGS INDIAN WELLS LA QUINTA INDIO COACHELLA S A N J A CIN T O M T N S. S ANTA ROSA MTNS. 10 62 111 74 74 86 86 111 195 86 5/05 JEFFERSON STWASHINGTON ST COOK ST GENE AUTRY TRINDIAN AVEPALM DRRAMON RD DATE PALM DR MONTEREY AV BOB HOPE DRMONROE ST MADISON ST State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 15 PRO je CT s T a T us I-215 CEnTRal PRoJECT Pa&eD underway I-215 SouTh PRoJECT Construction start 2010 approved for CMia Funding I-215 SouTh ConnECToR PRoJECT Begin PA&ED Fall 2010 74/215 InTERChangE PRoJECT Construction began july 2010 215 FREEwAy IMPRovEMENTS ToDAyPROPOseD215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA I-215 SouTh PRoJECT anD SouTh ConnECToR PRoJECT Construction Start Date: 2011 Construction End Date: 2016 www.i215project.info 74/215 InTERChangE PRoJECT Construction Start Date: 2010 Construction End Date: 2012 www.74-215project.info 74/215Interchange Project I-215South Connector Project I-215 Central Project Adds a mixed flow lane in each direction from Scott to Nuevo Road Cost: $173 million I-215 South Project Adds a mixed flow lane in each direction from Murrieta Hot Springs to Scott Road CMIA state bond funding of $27 million Cost: $60 million I-215 South Connector Project Adds a mixed flow lane in southbound direction between Murrieta Hot Springs Road and I-15 Cost: $8.5 million 74/215 Interchange Project Replaces two-lane over- crossing with an eight- lane structure Realigns freeway on and off ramps Constructs sound walls and retaining walls Cost: $35 million with $16.6 million in federal stimulus funds State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 16 PRO je CT s T a T us I-215 BI-CounTy gaP CloSuRE • Preliminary Engineering and environmental Work underway • Preliminary Design underway 60/215 EaST JunCTIon hov lanE ConnECToRS • Final Design Completed 215 FREEwAy IMPRovEMENTS I-215 BI-CounTy gaP CloSuRE Add one HOV lane in each direction from the 60/91/215 interchange to Orange Show Road in San Bernardino County Close 8 mile HOV gap Project will be built in partnership with SANBAG and Caltrans Cost: $178 Million 60/215 EaST JunCTIon hov lanE ConnECToRS Build two direct connectors closing the gap between SR-60 westbound HOV lane in Moreno Valley and the 60/215 eastbound HOV lane Modify and realign north I-215/Box Springs Road exit ramp Modify and realign Box Springs Road from two lanes to four lanes Cost: $47 Million Diamond Valley Lake Canyon Lake Murrieta Lake Elsinore Perris Moreno Valley Riverside Lake Perris March ARB Eucalyptus Ave. Box Springs Rd. Nuevo Rd. Scott Rd. SAN BERNARDINO CO.RIVERSIDE CO.RI V ER S ID E CO .ORANGE CO . RIV E R S I D E C O . SAN D I E G O C O . SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. 133 261 241 142 259 83 71 1 55 66 57 76 13 30 91 74 74 74 90 22 5 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 210 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 215 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 405 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 73 371 111 243 247 74 62 79 79 86 38 6 15 60 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 60 60 215 215 79 0 5 10 Miles N 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA I-215 BI-CounTy gaP CloSuRE Construction Start Date: 2012 Construction End Date: 2014 60/215 EaST JunCTIon hov lanE ConnECToRS Construction Start Date: 2010 Construction End Date: 2013 Box S p r i n g s R d Day StFair Isle Dr60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 Proposed HOV Lanes Existing HOV Lanes SR-60 I-215 N State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 17 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA PRO je CT s T a T us Preliminary engineering and environmental Work underway Received state Tolling authority Obtained agreement with Federal Highway administration for Federal Tolling authority www.i15project.info 15 FREEwAy IMPRovEMENTS French Valley Parkway Interchange (Phase 1) Construct a new southbound off-ramp from I-15 to French Valley Parkway Construct the western segment of French Valley Parkway from the off-ramp to Jefferson Avenue Widen the I-15 southbound off-ramp to Winchester Road (SR-79 North) 15/79 South Interchange Improvements An estimated $24.3 million will be spent to improve circulation, freeway access and service levels 15/91 Improvements Addition of a tolled express lane connector from eastbound SR-91 to southbound I-15 continuing as a southbound express lane in the median of I-15 terminating south of Magnolia Avenue interchange Addition of a northbound tolled express lane in the median of I-15 from south of the Magnolia Avenue interchange and continuing northbound as a tolled express lane connector to westbound SR-91 Working to improve traffic capacity and operations on I-15, RCTC and Caltrans District 8 are exploring widening I-15 from just north of the 15/215 separation near Murrieta, to SR-60 near Ontario. Environmental and feasibility studies and preliminary engineering are underway. Concepts being studied include the addition of regular, tolled express, and carpool lanes at various locations throughout this 44 mile corridor. A fuller understanding of the project alternatives are anticipated in 2011 as these studies progress. State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 18 PRO je CT s T a T us FouR AT-gRADE CRoSSINgS HAvE BEEN CoMPLETED: • Avenue 48/Dillon Road – City of Coachella • Avenue 50 – City of Coachella • Columbia Avenue – City of Riverside • jurupa Avenue – City of Riverside AN ADDITIoNAL AT-gRADE CROssinG is unDeR COnsTRuCTiOn: • Magnolia Avenue – City of Riverside – estimated completion july 2011 GOODs MOVeMenT Southern California is our nation’s largest and most important center for transferring and moving goods (freight and merchandise) from ships to people throughout the United States. The region’s extensive goods movement network is composed of ports, airports, rail yards and distribution centers, all connected by a highly developed system of highways and railways. In 2008, freight flowing through the ports totaled in excess of $287 billion and generated upwards of $30 billion in total tax revenues. Goods movement also provides much needed jobs. It is estimated that nearly one million jobs in California are sustained by Southern California’s freight movement activities and an additional two million jobs are sustained across the rest of the nation. Freight does not move for free. There are costs – both monetary and to quality of life – that must be paid to improve and maintain a viable regional freight movement system. Our infrastructure must grow to meet anticipated demand. In Riverside County, almost all freight rail traffic is from passing trains. For communities in Riverside County, the pressing need is to construct railroad grade separations to mitigate the effects of slow moving freight trains that often bisect communities and impact public safety. In the past this has often been seen as a local responsibility; however, Riverside County’s grade separation needs are unique and pervasive with rail crossing delays impacting the transportation system and the economy. There are currently 57 at-grade crossings in Riverside County that are located along the Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroads. The Commission has been proactive in mitigating the negative impacts of goods movement: • Twice adopted a Grade Separation Funding Strategy, a one-of-a-kind document in Southern California that provides a blueprint for delivering the 20 highest-priority grade separations in Riverside County. Available at www.rctc.org/downloads/GM_Funding_Strategy_2008.pdf • Secured $162 million in Proposition 1B bond funding to construct 12 grade separations in Riverside County and improve a freeway interchange at I-215 and Van Buren Blvd. The Proposition 1B funding will enable 12 of the 20 highest-priority grade separations to be constructed by 2014. • Identified Alameda Corridor East grade separations as its top legislative platform for the reauthorization of the federal transportation bill. State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 19 MuLTiMODaL seRViCes The Multimodal Services Department manages the commuter rail, bus transit, specialized transit, commuter assistance and motorist assistance programs on behalf of the Commission. COMMuTeR RaiL RCTC is a member of the five-county Joint Powers Authority that funds and operates Metrolink commuter rail services. Three Metrolink lines serve Riverside County. The Commission owns and operates the five existing rail stations serving these lines and the Perris Transit Center. The Commission is also working on the Perris Valley Line extension and is in the process of completing the advanced engineering and environmental planning phase of the project. PuBLIC TRANSIT The Commission is charged with coordinating the operation of all public transportation services within the county with a goal of promoting program efficiency and service cooperation between transit operators. Based on state law, RCTC is mandated to do the following: · Develop and approve the Short Range Transit Plan for Riverside County; · Evaluate, approve and program projects to be funded from federal, state and local sources; · Administer and allocate state and local transit funds; · Coordinate and monitor transit service and operations and identify, analyze and recommend potential improvements to improve efficiency and effectiveness; and · Ensure completion of financial and performance audits of transit operators. sPeCiaLizeD TRansiT In addition to public transit services, RCTC provides funding for specialized services that serve senior citizens and persons with disabilities. RCTC has long demonstrated a commitment to assisting in the mobility of those with special transit needs through its Measure A specialized transit program. With the approval of the Public Transit Human Services Transportation Coordinated Plan, RCTC became eligible to receive and disburse federal funds through the Jobs Access and Reverse Commute and New Freedom programs for specialized transit to augment its Measure A commitment. State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 20 COMMuTeR assisTanCe The focus of the Commuter Assistance Program is to improve mobility throughout the transportation system by encouraging commuters to make a mode-shift decision away from solo vehicle commuting. RCTC offers a comprehensive list of programs and outreach under the umbrella of commuter assistance, which helps foster more efficient use of the transportation system and reduces congestion and vehicle emissions. In order to promote ridesharing behavior, the Commuter Assistance Program provides free rideshare services to employers through its Inland Empire Commuter Services program which includes employee transportation surveys, air quality management district compliance assistance, ridematching, marketing materials, and offering various rideshare incentives and programs to employees. MOTORisT assisTanCe The Commission offers a number of services to motorists who travel along state highways in Riverside County. The Commission’s Call Box network and the Freeway Service Patrol combine to provide an important safety net when traveling in the County: · Freeway service Patrol: RCTC, in partnership with Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol, offers limited roadside assistance services that include jump starts, refilling radiators and taping hoses, changing a flat, and providing a gallon of gas. When these measures are not enough, the Freeway Service Patrol will tow the motorist to an approved location off of the freeway. · Call Boxes: In Riverside County, more than 500 miles of roadways are equipped with Call Boxes that can summon assistance for motorists with mechanical problems. The service is invaluable in many remote areas of the County and provides an important back up for drivers in cell phone dead zones and for those with no phones or dead cell phone batteries. INLAND EMPIRE 511 RCTC administers a 511 traveler information system (IE511), in partnership with the San Bernardino Associated Governments, to serve the Inland Empire. IE511 provides up to the minute traffic information for the entire Southern California region, comprehensive trip planning for transit users, and rideshare and alternative commute information. The system can be accessed 24/7 by dialing 511 within the Inland Empire or online at www.IE511.org. Users may also sign up for Twitter feeds of major incidents and planned construction closures. By providing commuters with timely travel information and commute options, the IE511 system benefits the region with improved highway efficiency and air quality. State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 21 LookINg AHEAD Highway Delivery Plan Reauthorization of federal transportation bill Continue environmental clearance process for multiple projects Start design-build procurement for SR-91 Foster ongoing communication and dialogue with communities and the public on upcoming construction projects on I-215 and SR-91 Perris Valley Line Delivery Plan Advanced engineering and environmental work underway Complete final design Start construction Financial implementation Measure A as primary source of financing · Utilization of commercial paper for short-term financing needs and project advancement · $500 million bond limitation under 2009 Measure A* Toll revenues as source of additional financing * Proposition K on November 2010 ballot to increase debt limit to $975 million Leisure and Hospitality 10.95% State Route 91 Perris Valley Line american Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Coachella Valley interchanges Interstate 215 Interstate 15 Goods Movement Multimodal services Looking ahead 22 DEMogRAPHIC DATA employment Diversity Employment across sectors demonstrates Riverside-San Bernardino diversified economy. unemployment The unemployment rate reflects the impact of the national recession. Source: California Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information Division demographiC daTaemployment Diversity Housing Advantage Population Growth Mining and Logging .11% Construction 5.43% Manufacturing 7.79% Trade, Transportation and Utilities 24.21%Information 1.33% Financial Activities 3.84% Professional and Business Services 11.5% Government 19.51% Education and Health Services 12.03%Leisure and Hospitality 10.95% Other 3.30% • Data as of July 2010, Source: California Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information Division unemployment Rate nation, state and County 0.00% 2.00% 4.00% 6.00% 8.00% 10.00% 12.00% 14.00% 16.00% 18.00% 2010*2009200820072006200520042003200220012000 US California Riverside County 23 employment Diversity Housing Advantage Population Growth Riverside County Housing Advantage Riverside County offers relatively affordable housing. Comparison of the Foreclosure activity in the Region Foreclosures in the region have declined significantly in the past year. $0 $50,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 $350,000 $400,000 $450,000 OrangeVenturaSan DiegoLos AngelesRiverside Median Home Values Riverside County Advantage $200,000 $340,000 $140,000 $335,000 $135,000 $370,000 $449,000 $249,000 $170,000 COUNTY Home Price Advantage Riverside County and Southern California Markets (July 2010) 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 San DiegoVenturaSan BernardinoRiversideLos AngelesOrange 8,261 -47.8% -47.0% -49.2% -45.2% -44.6% -44.7% 4,313 13,045 24,622 2009 Quarter 2 2010 Quarter 2 14,302 7,266 10,852 5,945 2,431 1,346 9,866 5,458 COUNTY Foreclosure Activity Source: DataQuick Source: DataQuick 24 RIvERSIDE CouNTy vS. CALIFoRNIA Population Growth Riverside County has outpaced the State in average annual population growth (3.31% vs. 1.33%). 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 20102009200820072006200520042003200220012000 31,000,000 32,000,000 33,000,000 34,000,000 35,000,000 36,000,000 37,000,000 38,000,000 39,000,000 40,000,000 Riverside County California YEARRiverside CountyCaliforniaSource: CA DOF: Population Estimates for County and State; data for January 1 of each year employment Diversity Housing Advantage Population Growth 25 SALES TAx DATA Riverside County Historical Taxable Transactions Diversification of taxable sales has occurred over time. $0 $5,000,000 $10,000,000 $15,000,000 $20,000,000 $25,000,000 $30,000,000 200820072006200520042003200220012000 All Other Outlets Business and Personal Services All Other Retail Automotive Building Material Household Eating and Drinking Food Specialty General Merchandise Apparel $0 $5,000,000 $10,000,000 $15,000,000 $20,000,000 $25,000,000 $30,000,000 200820072006200520042003200220012000 All Other Outlets Business and Personal Services All Other Retail Automotive Building Material Household Eating and Drinking Food Specialty General Merchandise Apparel Source: California Board of Equalization, www.boe.ca.gov/news/tsalescont.htm Riverside County Historical Taxable Transactions Sales Tax by economic Category sales Tax daTa26 SALES TAx By ECoNoMIC CATEgoRy SALES TAx By ECoNoMIC SEgMENT Source: MuniServices LLC economic Category 2006 2007 2008 2009 % of Total % of Total % of Total % of Total General Retail 25.5 26.8 28.2 30.9 Transportation 26.5 26.1 24.9 22.8 Food Products 13.3 14.4 16.0 17.8 Business To Business 15.3 15.9 16.4 15.2 Construction 16.9 14.4 12.3 11.1 Miscellaneous 2.5 2.4 2.2 2.2 Total 100 100 100 100 Source: MuniServices LLC Top Five economic Segments (Category) 2006 2007 2008 2009 % of Total % of Total % of Total % of Total Department Stores (General Retail) 10.2 10.7 11.6 12.9 Restaurants (Food Products) 8.4 9.0 9.9 11.0 Service Stations (Transportation) 8.5 9.4 11.2 10.0 Auto Sales - New (Transportation) 12.2 11.3 8.9 7.9 Miscellaneous Retail (Miscellaneous) 5.5 5.8 6.1 6.5 Riverside County Historical Taxable Transactions Sales Tax by economic Category During the recent economic slowdown, changes have occurred in the economic categories in which the Measure A sales tax was generated. For several calendar years transportation represented the highest economic category, and construction, which was comprised of the building materials wholesale and building materials retail segments, was a significant contributor. In 2009 general retail was the largest economic category, and transportation and construction experienced significant declines due to the recession and housing slowdown. Each economic category consists of several economic segments, which provide additional information regarding economic activity in the County. In 2006 the top five economic segments consisted of auto sales-new, department stores, building materials wholesale, service stations, and restaurants. Over the next three calendar years, auto sales-new fell from the leading economic segment to fourth and building materials dropped to sixth, while department stores and restaurants rose to the top two economic segments. The top five economic segments in 2009 with comparisons to previous years are presented below. 27 (951) 787-7141 • www.rctc.org 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor • P.o. Box 12008 • Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside County Transportation Commission • AGENDA ITEM 13 A presentation will be made but there is no attachment to the agenda for item 13. • • AGENDA ITEM 14 A presentation will be made but 0 there is no attachment to the agenda for item 14. 0 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: October 18, 2010 TO: Technical Advisory Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Programming and Planning Manager SUBJECT: Proposed Change to TAC Meeting Schedule STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is to seek input from the TAC on changing the TAC meetings from monthly to bi-monthly (every two months/odd months) meetings starting January'2011. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Staff has suggested changing the schedule for TAC meetings from monthly to bi-monthly meetings beginning January 2011. Holding bi-monthly TAC meetings should be sufficient to cover items concerning the TAC while lessening the impacts on local agency travel and time constraints. If urgent items arise that require TAC action prior to the next bi-monthly meeting, staff would hold a special meeting in addition to providing information to the TAC via email. TAC meetings could continue alternating locations between Riverside and Beaumont, or if preferred, the meetings can be held in Riverside only. Please provide suggestions, comments at the meeting or via email. .,,. • • • TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE October 18, 2010 AGENCY TAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME SIGNATURE BANNING DUANE BURK Kahana Oei Director of Public Works BEAUMONT I KISHEN PRATHIVADI Dee Moorjani ~v1#'.J J,./U~'1~ Assistant Director of Public Works BLYTHE IJIMRODKEY [Kevin Nelson Public Works Director Assistant Public Works J;1r.-1 .. 1 1' ,>"·~ Director K~df:o1 f CVAG I ALLYN WAGGLE Mike Shoberg 'A,10~ CALIMESA . -1CARLOS ZAMANO ---·1 Bob French City Engineer · Public Works Director CAL TRANS ISAVAT KHAMPHOU I Bill Mosby .-~ava CANYON LAKE I HABIB MOTLAGH City Engineer tf.tr81f!, CATHEDRAL IBILL BAYNE CITY I COACHELLA IPAUL TOOR IT any Lucero Public Works Director IKIP FIELD CORONA Robert Morin I~ Acting Public Works Director Principal Civil Engineer Mo~;..J DESERT HOT TIM WASSIL Daniel Porras SPRINGS Public Works Director 10/12/2010 • • • TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE October 18, 2010 AGENCY TAC MEMBER ALTERNATE PRINT NAME SIGNATURE EASTVALE I I I HEMET Victor Monz Principal Engineer INDIAN WELLS PAUL GOBLE Bondie Baker Public Works Director Assistant Engineer II INDIO JIM SMITH Tom Rafferty Director of Public Works Principal Civil Engineer LA QUINTA TIMOTHY JONASSON Nick Nickerson \\ v--.J ~> rv-d -(L. _, --Public Works Director/City Engineer ~()Vr--u"-' LAKE KEN SEUMALO .......... ELSINORE City Engineer --MENIFEE DON ALLISON Matt Simonetti Public Works Director/ City Engineer MORENO CHRIS VOGT Prem Kumar VALLEY Public Works Director/City Deputy Public Works Engineer Director/Assistant City Engineer /'\ MURRIETA PATRICK THOMAS Bob Moehling ~i.~t ~~ ~ Director of Public Works/City Engineering Manager ~~ Engineer NORCO BILL THOMPSON Lori Askew Director of Public Works Sr. Engineer /7 ~ PALM DESERT BO CHEN Mark Diercks tv'lA~ Uruc1~5 ~ 1J jl jJ _:_.-------Transportation Engineer ~--PALM DAVE BARAKIAN Marcus Fuller f)frvtp f3t11J..11. t< tlfP '~~~ SPRINGS Director of Public Works/City Engineer 10/12/2010 • • TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE AGENCY PVVTA PERRIS TAC MEMBER HABIB MOTLAGH City Engineer RTA I MARK STANLEY Director of Planning RANCHO MIRAGE RIVERSIDE BRUCE HARRY Director of Public Works TOM BOYD 1 Deputy Public Works Director/City Engineer ALTERNATE Randy Viegas Project Manager Siobhan Foster RIVERSIDE COUNTY JUAN PEREZ I Patty Romo Director of Transportation Deputy Director of Transportation SAN JACINTO I HABIB MOTLAGH SUN LINE TEMECULA WILDOMAR WRCOG City Engineer BRENDA RAMIREZ Assistant Transit Planner GREG BUTLER Director of Public Works I MICHAEL KASHIWAGI Director of Public Works RUTHANNE TAYLOR· BERGER Deputy Executive Director Amer Attar Principal Engineer Diane Nguyen Transportation Programs Manager October 18, 2010 PRINT NAME SIGNATURE /fA~16 '>Jl't. )-k~ p12,E?).l bi\ ~ M l (2.6=' 2. ~AV~ • 10/12/2010 ,,, . .... • AGENCY 1"1'012-€. J v VAL'-'e.Y 'l "' Cc? of {fl} ilo TECHNICAL AD.RY COMMITTEE October 18, 2010 NAME I I TELEPHONE OR E-MAIL ~tztc LE-W1S I t:-(2 i 0L ~ @tlloJAL-.orz..& ~4~ K:"~~-t ~\~~~ ~v"'\._ocn .-y;-/11 /la ff'er~ t::ra {'!l::t-6-y @ /,,vdto, '6r< • 10/11/2010