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05 May 24, 2007 Transit PolicyRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSIT POLICY COMMITTEE MEETING AGENDA TIME: 10:00 a.m. DATE: Thursday, May 24, 2007 LOCATIONS: Conference Room A, 3rd Floor Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside 4th District, Riverside County (Teleconference Site) 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 222 Palm Desert, CA 92260 *** COMMITTEE MEMBERS *** Frank West, City of Moreno Valley, Chairman Roger Berg, City of Beaumont, Vice-Chairman John Chlebnik, City of Calimesa Terry Henderson, City of La Quinta Frank Hall, City of Norco Daryl Busch, City of Perris Steve Adams, City of Riverside Jeff Stone, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside Roy Wilson, County of Riverside *** STAFF *** Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director Tanya Love, Program Manager *** AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY *** Review items and make recommendations to the Commission on the following: • Policy directions to prepare for transit vision and to bring regional perspective to transit • Monitor transit implementation • Performance of transit operators and its services The Committee welcomes comments. If you wish to provide comments to the Committee, please complete and submit a Testimony Card to the Clerk of the Board. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSIT POLICY COMMITTEE www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 10:00 a.m. Thursday, May 24, 2007 CONFERENCE ROOM A Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, 92501 and 4th District, Riverside County (Teleconference Site) 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 222, Palm Desert, 92260 In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS (Items not listed on the agenda) 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – FEBRUARY 15, 2007 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) Transit Policy Committee Agenda May 24, 2007 Page 2 6. CITY OF BEAUMONT TRANSIT SERVICES Page 1 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Based on approved Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), allocate $1,080,000 in Transportation Development Act (TDA) Local Transportation Funds (LTF) operating funds and $140,000 in State Transit Assistance (STA) capital funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2006/07; 2) Based on approved SRTP, allocate $951,300 in LTF operating funds and $11,000 in STA capital funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2005/06; 3) Due to excess operating expenses, allocate $28,957 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2005/06 (balance of required operating funds of $30,400 to be paid by the city of Beaumont as farebox revenue); 4) Due to excess operating expenses, allocate $350,801 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2004/05; 5) Due to excess operating expenses, allocate $14,200 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2003/04; 6) Amend the FY 2003/04, 2004/05, 2005/06, and 2006/07 city of Beaumont SRTP to reflect the additional funding; and 7) Forward to the Commission for final action. 7. TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDITS: FISCAL YEARS 2003/04 THROUGH 2005/06 Page 10 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Review and approve the FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06 Triennial Performance Audits for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona and Riverside Special Services together with Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA), Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); 2) Direct staff to seek formal responses from the audited agencies and incorporate the responses in the Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP); and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. Transit Policy Committee Agenda May 24, 2007 Page 3 8. STATUS REPORT: FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Page 203 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the third quarter status report on the FY 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP); 2) Direct staff to work with transit operator staff from the city of Banning, city of Beaumont, city of Corona and Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) to jointly develop an action plan to meet the Commission approved PIP; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 9. FISCAL YEAR 2007/08 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 2009/10 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS Page 216 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Review and approve, in concept, the FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the city of Riverside, Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the Commission’s Regional Commuter Rail Program, as presented; 2) Direct staff to obtain additional information from the RTA on its request for a Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) waiver on operating cost per revenue hour. Contingent on compliance with the PIP, review and approve, in concept, RTA’s SRTP; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. Transit Policy Committee Agenda May 24, 2007 Page 4 10. RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY’S REQUEST TO PRE-FUND RETIREE MEDICAL BENEFITS Page 221 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Allocate $2,668,182 in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to pre-fund post retirement medical benefits related to the implementation of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 45; 2) Reprogram $5,056,818 in previously allocated, unclaimed operating funds as additional funding for pre-funding the post retirement medical benefits; 3) Amend RTA’s FY 2006/07 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect the additional funding; 4) Amend the Commission’s FY 2006/07 budget to reflect the additional funding; 5) Direct staff to work with RTA on waiving the impact of the incremental costs to the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) as a result of the pre-funding the GASB 45 actuarial accrued liability; and 6) Forward to the Commission for final action. 11. PRESENTATION - TRANSIT VISIONING Overview This item is for the Committee to receive a presentation on the transit visioning process. 12. ADJOURNMENT The next Transit Policy Committee meeting is scheduled to be held at 10:00 a.m., Thursday, July 19, 2007, Conference Room C, County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, 5th Floor, Riverside, 92501. AGEN • • A ITEM 4 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSIT POLICY COMMITTEE February 15, 2007 Minutes 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Transit Policy Committee was called to order by Chair Terry Henderson at 10:03 a.m. in Conference Room C, County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Fifth Floor, Riverside, California, 92501 and the teleconference site at Riverside County 4th District Office, 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite 222, Palm Desert, California, 92260. No one was present at the teleconference site. 2. ROLL CALL Members Present Members Absent Steve Adams Daryl Busch Roger Berg John F. Tavaglione John Chlebnik Frank Hall Terry Henderson Jeff Stone Frank West Roy Wilson 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES M/S/C (Adams/Hall) to approve the October 19, 2006, minutes as submitted. 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS There was an addition to Agenda Item 7, “Compliance Status Report on the Fiscal Year 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program”. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 2 6. TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Susan DeSantis, consultant to Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), provided background information on the transit-oriented development (TOD) grant and study and presented the opportunities for TOD in Western Riverside County, addressing the following areas: • Partners supporting TOD; • Definition of TOD, TOD principles, and status of TOD; • Types of TOD; • New opportunities for TOD; • Study objectives; • Approved transit centers; • Demonstration project goals; • Reasons for joint development – generate maximum transit ridership, return on investment, visual impact of place making; • Opportunities and constraints analysis; • Vision for transit village – land use, circulation, and bus transit recommendations; • Developing Around Transit Symposium on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 from 7:45 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Eagle Glen Golf Course in Corona; and, • Products of the TOD study – station area site analysis, survey research, market assessment, and TOD best practices. In response to Chair Henderson’s inquiry for Commissioner attendance of the symposium, Commissioners Frank Hall and Frank West responded that they would attend contingent upon their availability. Chair Henderson requested that the attendees provide a briefing on the conference to the Committee. In response to Chair Henderson’s question regarding the city of Indio’s involvement in TOD, Tanya Love, Program Manager, replied that the city of Indio has retained a consultant and staff will forward the information from this presentation. At this time, the Commissioners viewed a video titled “Does Transit-Oriented Development Have a Future in Western Riverside County?”. Tanya Love noted that this video will be e-mailed to the Commissioners. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 3 Commissioner Roger Berg expressed interest in how this process will work and believes that this is a concept that needs to be incorporated county- wide. He expressed that there also needs to be an incentive built-in to construct TOD facilities near planned rail stations as economics will be the driving force of this program. Commissioner Jeff Stone concurred with Commissioner Berg’s comments. He asked if there is a long-term master rail plan protecting rail right-of-way and what steps need to be taken to preserve it. Sheldon Peterson, Program Manager, replied that the Commission’s Commuter Rail Department has been looking into this. In 2005, a commuter rail feasibility study was prepared and as a result, staff initiated two extensions for further studies; 1) Perris Valley Line (PVL) to the Hemet/ San Jacinto area, and 2) PVL south along the Interstate 215 corridor to Temecula. Additionally, an I-15 commuter rail feasibility study is being conducted to identify potential right-of-way, ridership, and costs. He provided additional information on next steps and right-of-way issues. Commissioner Stone suggested that the county of Riverside (County) with all the member cities should collectively put together a 50-year master rail plan for the future. Commissioner Berg suggested building public/private partnerships and creating incentives for private industry to develop TOD facilities. Chair Henderson asked Commissioner Stone if the County examined any of these issues when it prepared its general plan update. Commissioner Stone replied that he believes the County did not examine these issues as comprehensively as it could have. He suggested that the Commissioners endorse the idea of having a master rail plan for the County to cover the next 50 years where growth is predictable and start planning, as local jurisdictions, to work with the private sector and provide incentives to ensure that these right-of-ways are kept open to lay the foundation for building TOD. Commissioner Berg suggested examining inter-county transit. Commissioner Wilson identified that the studies that have been conducted have focused on existing rail lines and believes new rail lines should be considered such as along the Mid County Parkway. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 4 Chair Henderson requested staff agendize an item for the next Transit Policy Committee meeting on what the Commission envisions for future rail service and coordination with the cities in which rail service passes through. Commissioner Stone also suggested including an item on a 50-year master rail plan for Riverside County. Commissioner Frank Hall noted that as developers prepare plans in coordination with a city or county, local transit agencies need to be included. Commissioner Stone concurred with Commissioner Hall’s comments and added how he believes this could be addressed. Tanya Love replied that Agenda Item 8, “Status Report on Transit Visioning/Conceptual Planning”, will address some of these issues. She noted that she attended a meeting with Randall Lewis, Lewis Development, and Riverside Transit Agency in which Mr. Lewis agreed to come to the table and discuss setting aside land for transit purposes. Commissioner Steve Adams concurred with all Commissioner comments and expressed how essential this type of development is for the Inland Empire. Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Manager, in response to Commissioner Hall’s comments concerning lack of communication with local transit agencies, explained that in 2005, the Commission adopted joint development guidelines in conjunction with the cities and planning departments to inform the development community about the necessary parameters, at a minimum, that it would need to have as part of its development concept. She stated that staff will provide an update at the next committee meeting and include information on the exclusive negotiating agreement with the developer, BRE Properties, for the La Sierra Station in Riverside. Chair Henderson thanked Susan DeSantis for the TOD presentation. M/S/C (Stone/Berg) to receive and file the presentation on Transit Oriented Development. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 5 7. COMPLIANCE STATUS REPORT ON THE FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Tanya Love presented a compliance status report on the FY 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP), addressing the following areas: • The Commission’s role in transit - planning, funding and operator oversight/fiduciary responsibility; • FY 2006/07 operating and capital costs; • Triennial performance audits results; • PIP – mandatory targets and discretionary targets; • FY 2006/07 actual performance; • Mandatory and discretionary targets scorecards; • Scorecard summary; • Third quarter performance analysis and non-compliance; and • Annual review of transit operators’ activities. In response to Commissioner Wilson’s question regarding non-compliance, Tanya Love responded that when the PIP was initially reaffirmed, it was determined that two quarters of data would be used as a basis for planning. At this time, based on two quarters of data, staff would like to revisit the drawing board and look at third quarter actual data. She stated that the transit operators are taking hold and learning the PIP and TransTrack. In the case of non-compliance, the transit operator would identify the reasons for non-compliance. Staff and the transit operator would prepare a joint plan or action plan to come into compliance, present the plan to the policy board for approval, and if approved, incorporate the plan into the Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). She then provided additional scenarios if a transit operator continues to be out of compliance. Commissioner Wilson requested staff work with the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency to assist in achieving compliance. Chair Henderson asked if the transit operators had any comments on the report. There were no comments from the transit operators at this time. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 6 M/S/C (Wilson/Adams) to: 1) Receive and file the Compliance Status Report on the FY 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP); and 2) Direct staff to continue working with the transit operators on PIP compliance so that a third quarter analysis can be presented for approval and subsequent policy action. 8. STATUS REPORT ON TRANSIT VISIONING/CONCEPTUAL PLANNING Tanya Love presented a status report on the transit visioning and conceptual planning process and addressed the following areas: • Timeline and goals for creating a vision of transit service; • Maps of the proposed projects in Western Riverside County and Coachella Valley; • Financially unconstrained vision; • School districts meetings; • School transportation issues and concerns; • Assembly Bill No. 33 (Jeffries); • Partnership opportunities; • Funding and time line; and • Next steps. In response to Chair Henderson’s question regarding the types of transit included in this planning, Tanya Love replied that it includes bus and rail transit, as well as the development of facilities. Commissioner Stone added that this plan addresses the target population today and not long-term, noting that earlier discussions for a 50-year master rail plan would be an expansion of this existing plan. At Commissioner John Chlebnik’s request, Tanya Love responded that staff would verify that the Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District was included in the meetings with the school districts. Commissioner Adams requested staff inquire if the school districts have considered student parking permit programs. Commissioner Berg expressed support for the youth bus program and suggested exploring the possibility of providing day care facilities within TODs. Transit Policy Committee Minutes February 15, 2007 Page 7 Eric Haley, Executive Director, replied that the transit center in Montclair in San Bernardino County has a fully operational day care facility on site, paid for by Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC). Chair Henderson asked if the transit operators had any comments on the report. There were no comments from the transit operators at this time. M/S/C (Wilson/Adams) to receive and file the status report and subsequent presentation on the Transit Visioning/Conceptual Planning process. 9. ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND APPOINTMENT OF TRANSIT POLICY COMMITTEE MEMBERS Election of Chair and Vice Chair At the time, Chair Henderson opened nominations for the slate of officers. Commissioner Hall, seconded by Commissioner Adams, nominated Commissioner Frank West for the Chair position. Commissioner Adams, seconded by Commissioner Wilson, nominated Commissioner Berg for the Vice Chair position. No other nominations were received. Chair Henderson closed the nominations. Frank West was unanimously elected as the Transit Policy Committee’s Chair for 2007 and Roger Berg was unanimously elected as the Transit Policy Committee’s Vice Chair for 2007. 10. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Transit Policy Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 11:25 a.m. The next meeting is scheduled to be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, April 19, 2007, in Conference Room C, County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, 5th Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. Respectfully submitted, Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board AGENDA ITEM 6 Agenda Item 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH: Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: City of Beaumont Transit Services STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Based on approved Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), allocate $1,080,000 in Transportation Development Act (TDA) Local Transportation Funds (LTF) operating funds and $140,000 in State Transit Assistance (STA) capital funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2006/07; 2) Based on approved SRTP, allocate $951,300 in LTF operating funds and $11,000 in STA capital funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2005/06; 3) Due to excess operating expenses1, allocate $28,957 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2005/06 (balance of required operating funds of $30,400 to be paid by the city of Beaumont as farebox revenue); 4) Due to excess operating expenses, allocate $350,801 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2004/05; 5) Due to excess operating expenses, allocate $14,200 in LTF operating funds to the city of Beaumont for FY 2003/04; 6) Amend the FY 2003/04, 2004/05, 2005/06, and 2006/07 city of Beaumont SRTP to reflect the additional funding; and 7) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Under Public Utilities Code 99245, the Commission is responsible for ensuring that all claimants who receive an allocation of TDA submit an annual certified fiscal audit within 180 days after the end of the fiscal year or that an extension of up to 90 days be granted. The audit report shall include a certification that the TDA 1 Excess operating expense for FY 2005/06 is $59,357; staff recommendation is to allocate $28,957 in LTF operating funds; balance of $30,400 operating deficit to be paid by the City as farebox revenue. 1 Agenda Item 6 funds allocated to the claimant were expended in conformance with applicable laws and regulations. Furthermore, the California Code of Regulations Section 6664 specifies that “no allocation shall be made to any claimant that is delinquent in its submission of a fiscal and compliance audit report.” As previously reported, the Commission had not received the city of Beaumont’s (Beaumont) annual financial and compliance audits related to TDA for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2004 through 2006. As a result, no TDA allocations and/or disbursements related to fiscal 2005, 2006 and 2007 have been made since March 30, 2005. In October 2005, staff was directed to advise Beaumont to engage an audit firm to perform the financial and compliance audits of Beaumont’s transit TDA Article 4, Transportation TDA Article 3 and Measure A funds commencing with the fiscal year ended June 30, 2004. Since that time, Beaumont retained Moss, Levy and Hartzheim to perform the financial and compliance audits. Commission staff is pleased to report that the outstanding audits have been completed and submitted to the Commission; accordingly, staff will present these reports at the next Audit Ad Hoc Committee meeting, which Commission staff is in the process of scheduling. The following chart provides an overview of Beaumont’s ridership, operating expenses and passenger fares for FY 2003/04 through FY 2006/07: City of Beaumont: Ridership, Operating Expenses & Passenger Fares FY 2003/04 - FY 2006/07 0 200,000 400,000 600,000 800,000 1,000,000 1,200,000 Ridership (Actual)113,682 118,268 118,618 0 Ridership (Projected)125,000 121,000 120,152 107,367 Total Operating Expenses(Audited) $879,642 $1,042,453 $1,082,567 $1,065,608 Passenger Fares (Audited) $59,543 $69,576 $71,911 $77,178 FY 2003/04 (Actual) FY 2004/05 (Actual) FY 2005/06 (Actual) FY 2006/07 (Projected*) *Note: FY 2006/07 annualized based on third quarter actuals (July /06- March/07) 2 Agenda Item 6 State Mandated Farebox Recovery During FY 2003/04 through FY 2004/05, the transit service was exempt from the state-mandated farebox return of 10% due to restructuring its routes; however, in FY 2005/06, only the fixed route remained as an exempt service. Based on the FY 2005/06 financial audit results, Beaumont obtained a farebox recovery ratio of 3.7% and therefore did not meet the state mandate. Based on FY 2006/07 third quarter actual data (July 2006 through March 2007), it appears that Beaumont will again not meet the farebox requirement as data indicates that Beaumont’s transit services will obtain an 7.28% ratio. The TDA law (PUC Section 99268.9) holds that if an operator fails to meet the minimum fare ratio for two consecutive fiscal years, the second year becomes the non-compliance year and the operator’s eligibility for TDA funds is reduced in a future cycle by the difference between the fare revenues required to meet farebox and actual fares during the noncompliance year. The TDA statute graphically displays compliance with farebox as follows: One Time Grace Year (FY 2005/06) Non-compliance Year (FY 2006/07) Determination Year (FY 2007/08) Penalty Year (FY 2008/09) Missed minimum farebox Missed minimum farebox TDA manual assumes the recipient meets farebox, (if not, next year penalties sanctioned) Reduced TDA eligibility (funding) Commission staff will continue to monitor Beaumont’s compliance with the state-mandated farebox recovery. Based on the above table, Beaumont would therefore need to meet farebox in FY 2007/08 or, by statute, funding would be reduced in FY 2008/09. To avoid being out of compliance with the state farebox mandate, Commission staff recommends that Beaumont contribute $30,400 of its funds as its share of the farebox requirements for FY 2005/06. Productivity Improvement Program The Commission reaffirmed its commitment to the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) in September 2005. The PIP was designed to be used as a tool to review transit services to ensure compliance with farebox recovery ratio and to provide effective transit services. The PIP includes eight performance indicators; 3 Agenda Item 6 two of the indicators are mandatory for all operators and the remaining six are discretionary. The transit operators (bus) must meet at least three of the six discretionary targets2. Attachment 1 provides the Service Provider Performance Targets Report for FY 2006/07 for Beaumont. Per review of information submitted by Beaumont, it appears that it fails to meet two of the mandatory PIP targets for FY 2006/07. It is, however, on target to be in compliance with four of the six discretionary targets. For FY 2007/08, based on preliminary data contained in the draft SRTP, it appears that Beaumont plans to meet the mandatory target of operating cost per revenue hour but projects it will not meet the farebox recovery ratio. It is, however, on target with meeting three of the discretionary targets. Attachment 2 provides the FY 2007/08 SRTP performance report for Beaumont. Based on the adopted PIP policy, Commission staff will work with Beaumont staff to develop a plan to come into compliance with PIP targets as part of its FY 2007/08 SRTP. Short Range Transit Plans As a matter of practice, the Commission has a three-step process for operators to obtain TDA funds: apportionment, allocation and payment. The following chart provides a summary of allocations required based on Beaumont’s approved SRTPs for the last four fiscal periods: LTF STA Total FY 2003/04 935,000$ -$ 935,000$ FY 2004/05 621,481 212,000 833,481 FY 2005/06 951,300 11,000 962,300 FY 2006/07 1,080,000 140,000 1,220,000 Total: 3,587,781$ 363,000$ 3,950,781$ TDA Funding Required Based on Approved SRTPs Of the $3,950,781 funding, $3,427,781 was approved through the SRTP process for operating and $523,000 was approved for capital. 2 The Commuter Rail Program has two additional discretionary targets and must also meet three discretionary targets. 4 Agenda Item 6 Allocation of Funds Based on Approved Short Range Transit Plans and Compliance with TDA Previously the Commission approved LTF operating allocations in the amount of $775,000 for FY 2003/04 and $621,481 for FY 2004/05 in addition to the capital allocations of $160,000 in LTF for FY 2003/04 and $212,000 in STA for FY 2004/05. Although Beaumont’s SRTPs for FY 2005/06 and FY 2006/07 were approved, based on TDA, no additional allocations were made pending the completion of the outstanding audits. With the completion of the outstanding audits, a funding allocation needs to be made for FY 2005/06 and FY 2006/07. At this time, staff is requesting LTF operating allocations of $951,300 and $1.08 million for FY 2005/06 and FY 2006/07, respectively in addition to the STA capital allocations of $11,000 for FY 2005/06 and $140,000 for FY 2006/07. Actual Operating Expenses (Based on Financial Audits) Although the Commission was prohibited from allocating TDA funds to cover transit services in FY 2005/06 and FY 2006/07, Beaumont did continue to incur both operating and capital costs. Through review of the audited financial statements for FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06 and PIP information for FY 2006/07, the actual and estimated operating costs subject to TDA funding compared to planned SRTP operating expenses are as follows: TDA FUNDING REQUIRED BASED ON FINANCIAL AUDITS Fiscal Year Actual/Estimated Operating Expenses Planned Operating Expenses Operating Deficit Farebox Complianc e 2003/04 $ 789,200 $ 775,000 $ 14,200 Yes 2004/05 972,282 621,481 350,801 Yes 2005/06 1,010,657 951,300 59,357 No 2006/07 1,080,000 1,080,000 0 Not Likely Total $ 3,852,139 $ 3,427,781 $ 424,358 Less Recommended City Contribution Due to Lack of Farebox Compliance Additional Funds Required ($ 30,400) $ 393,958 The FY 2003/04 operating deficit of $14,200 was primarily related to farebox revenue shortfalls and vehicle maintenance and fuel cost increases; the FY 2004/05 operating deficit of $350,801 was due to underestimating operating expenses as well as increases to salaries based on negotiated memorandum of 5 Agenda Item 6 understanding (MOU) agreements, health benefits, and vehicle maintenance and fuel costs; the FY 2005/06 operating deficit was a result of farebox revenue shortfalls and salary and benefit increases. These operating deficits may be funded with additional LTF operating allocations and/or other local revenues such as Beaumont contributions. Staff recommends additional LTF funding of $393,958 with a contribution of $30,400 related to the FY 2005/06 amount that would be necessary to meet the farebox return. Additionally, staff recommends amendments of the respective SRTPs to reflect the additional funding. Staff further suggests that Beaumont staff be advised that future operating deficits may be the responsibility of Beaumont, especially when the transit services do not meet the farebox return requirement. City of Beaumont’s Escalating Costs Beaumont transit staff is requesting assistance from the Commission in reviewing its escalating operating costs. To provide this assistance, Commission staff is discussing various approaches that can be taken including the possibility of amending the contract with Pacific Municipal Consultants (PMC), the triennial performance auditor as audit staff is familiar with Beaumont’s operating environment. Pass Area Transit (City of Beaumont and City of Banning) Previously, the Commission approved funds to evaluate the development of a regionalized transit system in the Pass Area based on geographic rather than city boundaries. The concept was based on the idea that the Banning Municipal Transit System and the Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency (two independent transit systems) would be coordinated to present the appearance of a single transit system to customers and the public. The coordinated service area of Pass Area Transit includes the cities of Banning and Beaumont, the unincorporated areas of Cabazon and Cherry Valley, and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians Reservation. Both fixed route and dial-a-ride services are provided throughout the pass area. A result of the Pass Area Transit Study is the closer coordination of service between the Banning Municipal Transit System and the Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency. As the Pass Transit System continues to evolve, it is anticipated that adjustments intended to improve service will continue and be reflected in future plans. While the new Pass Transit System is a single seamless transit system to the public, it is two independent transit systems operated by two different 6 Agenda Item 6 administrators and overseen by two different policy boards. When the Pass Area Transit Plan was adopted, it was anticipated that at some future date, the two systems would combine into a single system (single administrator and single policy board). With the completion of the financial audits, during FY 2007/08, transit staffs will continue researching and developing the proposal to combine the two transit agencies into a single agency. During FY 2006/07, both transit managers retired and as a result, cities of Banning and Beaumont staffs have been managing the transit programs. Currently a request for proposal is being developed to hire a transit manager for both agencies. It is anticipated that the position will be filled on a contract basis as the potential merger continues to be reviewed. During FY 2007/08, Commission staff anticipates seeking additional funding to pay for the contract staff position as well as funds to pay for the transit study. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2006/07 Amount: $2,425,258 – LTF $ 151,000 – STA Source of Funds: Transportation Development Act FY 2006/07: $1,080,000 – LTF – Operating Funds $ 140,000 – STA – Capital Funds FY 2005/06: $ 951,300 – LTF – Operating Funds $ 11,000 – STA – Capital Funds FY 2005/06: $ 28,957 – LTF – Operating Funds FY 2004/05: $ 350,801 – LTF – Operating Funds FY 2003/04: $ 14,200 – LTF – Operating Funds Budget Adjustment: Yes GLA No.: $2,425,258 – 106 62 86101 P2210 $ 151,000 – 241 62 86102 P2201 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 05/17/07 Attachments: 1) Service Provider Performance Targets Report for FY 2006/07 for Beaumont 2) FY 2007/08 SRTP Performance Report for Beaumont 7 8 9 AGENDA ITEM 7 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH: Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Triennial Performance Audits: Fiscal Years 2003/04 Through 2005/06 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Review and approve the FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06 Triennial Performance Audits for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona and Riverside Special Services together with Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA), Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); 2) Direct staff to seek formal responses from the audited agencies and incorporate the responses in the Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP); and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In accordance with Public Utilities Code 99246, the Commission is required to designate an entity other than itself to conduct a performance audit of its activities and the activities of each transit operator to whom Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds are allocated. The audits are required to evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness and economy of the Commission and the public transit operators. The audits must be conducted in accordance with the guidelines set by the State Comptroller General’s Office. The audits are required every three years and this triennial audit must be completed by June 30, 2007. At its December 13, 2006 Commission meeting, approval was given to hire Pacific Municipal Consultants (PMC) to conduct the Triennial Performance Audits1. The audits covered FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06 and included the seven public transit operators consisting of the city of Banning, city of Beaumont, city of Corona, PVVTA, city of Riverside Special Services, RTA and SunLine. 1 The Commission’s Commuter Rail audit is part of SCRRA’s Triennial Performance Audit review. Agenda Item 7 10 Draft copies of the audits are provided to each of the public operators for their review prior to being finalized. That process enabled the operators to make factual corrections to their agency’s audit prior to the results presented to the Transit Policy Committee (TPC). If applicable, comments provided by the operators were incorporated into the audit prior to issuance of the final reports. Staff is requesting approval to distribute the final audit reports to the transit operators requesting that the agency provide written responses to each of the audit recommendations. For monitoring and compliance issues, transit operator responses will be incorporated into the annual SRTP process. Derek Wong, PMC will be at the TPC and Commission meeting to present the results and findings of the Triennial Performance Audits. Based on the TPC’s prior direction to transit staff, highlights of Mr. Wong’s presentation will include an analysis of ridership and operating costs covering FY 2000/01 through FY 2005/06 as detailed on the following tables: City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Corona City of Riverside PVVTA RTA SunLine Total FY 2001 240,318 83,866 88,146 141,561 21,814 6,827,695 3,872,553 11,275,953 FY 2002 244,974 91,704 109,381 156,306 27,337 7,102,762 3,830,999 11,563,463 FY 2003 222,183 97,690 170,236 160,472 30,085 7,146,680 3,552,536 11,379,882 FY 2004 222,764 113,682 210,200 157,828 36,046 7,588,864 3,561,765 11,891,149 FY 2005 201,964 118,268 228,904 152,752 43,173 7,357,581 3,422,896 11,525,538 FY 2006 189,421 118,618 205,875 145,223 51,071 7,381,949 3,552,860 11,645,017 Percent Change 2003- 2006 -15%21%21%-10%70%3%0%2% Percent Change 2001- 2006 -21%41%134%3%134%8%-8%3% Ridership: Transit Operators City of Banni ng City of Beaumont City of Corona City of Ri ver side PVVTA RTA SunLine Tot al FY 2001 $ 673,764 $ 537,626 $ 848,639 $ 1,428,965 $ 213,798 $ 28,248,626 $ 15,324,576 $ 47,275,994 FY 2002 $ 733,211 $ 621,787 $ 998,510 $ 1,529,206 $ 316,657 $ 30,325,078 $ 16,282,299 $ 50,806,748 FY 2003 $ 739,049 $ 745,181 $ 1,154,925 $ 1,856,404 $ 368,998 $ 32,456,317 $ 17,550,914 $ 54,871,788 FY 2004 $ 833,575 $ 879,642 $ 1,331,125 $ 1,955,439 $ 844,025 $ 37,073,869 $ 16,653,467 $ 59,571,142 FY 2005 $ 962,843 $ 1,042,453 $ 1,450,636 $ 2,259,550 $ 774,034 $ 38,565,612 $ 17,226,321 $ 62,281,449 FY 2006 $ 1,044,316 $ 1,082,568 $ 1,516,339 $ 2,511,251 $ 775,187 $ 41,489,354 $ 18,487,845 $ 66,906,860 Percent Change 2003-2006 41%45%31%35%110%28%5%22% Percent Change 2001-2006 55%101%79%76%263%47%21%42% Audi ted Oper ati ng Costs: Transi t Operat ors Attachments: Triennial Performance Audit Reports 1) City of Banning 5) Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 2) City of Beaumont 6) Riverside Transit Agency 3) City of Corona 7) SunLine Transit Agency 4) City of Riverside Special Services Agenda Item 7 11 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF CITY OF BANNING TRANSIT S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 12 Triennial Performance Audit i Banning Transit TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 5 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 5 Section III................................................................................................................. 8 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations................................. 8 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 11 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 11 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 14 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 14 Section V............................................................................................................... 15 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 15 Operations & Planning................................................................................ 15 Maintenance................................................................................................ 17 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 18 General Administration and Management............................................. 18 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 20 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 20 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 22 13 Triennial Performance Audit 1 Banning Transit Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the Banning Municipal Transit System (Banning) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City of Banning’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City of Banning’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether Banning Municipal Transit System is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Banning has provided public transportation service since April 1973, which expanded to two routes in September 1985. The current transit system is comprised of three fixed route services and a dial-a-ride system that is limited to seniors and persons with disabilities, including ADA certified riders. The newest of the three fixed routes, the Cabazon service, extends from Banning east to the unincorporated area of Cabazon and began in July 1995. This route was extended in January 2000 to provide a route deviation to serve a remote residential area in eastern Cabazon. The City provides transfer opportunities with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Beaumont Transit. RTA runs three intercity services that connect with the local transit system at a Kmart on Highland Springs Road. Connections with Beaumont Transit can be made at the Kmart and at San Gorgonio Hospital. 14 Triennial Performance Audit 2 Banning Transit Several Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) exist between Banning Transit and local transit agencies. The City has two MOUs with RTA. One provides support by RTA for Banning to operate the Cabazon service that extends beyond the city limits to reduce duplication of service. The second MOU concerns the transfer policy between the two systems. In addition, an MOU was established in December 2002 between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont to provide a conduit for integrating the two municipal systems in their joint efforts to develop a regional Pass Transit system. The Cities of Banning and Beaumont have continued their coordination efforts to implement the Pass Area Transit Plan, which would provide a seamless transit service to the residents of the two communities. The jointly developed service plan included the Cities of Banning and Beaumont, unincorporated areas of Cherry Valley and Cabazon, and commercial area of the Morongo Indian Reservation. The Pass Transit System consists of two independent, but well coordinated transit systems under a single brand identity and fare structure. The coordinated service area of Pass Transit includes the aforementioned cities and communities. This coordinated transit system allows for Dial- a-Ride vehicles to cross jurisdictions and a common trunk line that serves both cities and the Cabazon area east of Banning. Fleet Banning operates a fleet of five active and three reserve vehicles ranging from 12 to 33 passenger seating capacity. Three vehicles are operated for demand response service, and the remaining five are operated for fixed route service. All vehicles are lift equipped and are owned by the City. The vehicles are either Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or gasoline fueled. A detailed description of Banning’s transit fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 City of Banning PASS Transit Fleet Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/Wheelchair Space 1995 Ford Collins 1 Gasoline 12/1 1998 El Dorado Transmark 2 CNG 33/2 2001 El Dorado Transmark 1 CNG 33/2 2001 El Dorado Aerotech 1 Gasoline 12/1 2003 El Dorado Aerotech 1 Gasoline 12/1 2004 El Dorado Transmark 2 CNG 33/2 Total 8 Source: City of Banning FY 2005/06 – FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Banning operates three bus routes traverse the service area which encompasses the City of Banning and the unincorporated areas of Cabazon and the Morongo Indian Reservation. Each route runs along the main shopping and commercial corridors on Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Road where passenger demand is highest. The fixed-route service operates Monday through Friday between the hours of 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.; and Sunday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The fixed route does not operate on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. The fixed route operates the Saturday service schedule on the following holidays: Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veterans' Day, and the Day after Thanksgiving. 15 Triennial Performance Audit 3 Banning Transit A description of each route is presented in the table below: Table I-2 City of Banning PASS Transit Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations 1 Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Every Two Hours (Monday through Friday from 6:51 a.m. to 7:00 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m./Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) K-Mart; Banning City Hall; Outlet Malls; Cabazon Community Center; Casino Morongo; and Beaumont City Hall. 5 Banning Northern Route Hourly (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m./Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) Banning City Hall; Banning Library; Post Office; K-Mart; and San Gorgonio Hospital; 6 Banning Southern Route Hourly (Monday through Friday from 6:07 a.m. to 7:07 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m./Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) K-Mart; San Gorgonio Hospital; Banning High School; and Banning City Hall. Source: PASS Transit Ride Guide Dial-A-Ride Dial-A-Ride offers priority service to passengers certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), seniors (ages 60 years old and older) and persons with disabilities. Dial-a-ride service operates Monday through Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The policy on response time for Dial-A-Ride is 30 minutes of the call to dispatch. For Saturday dial-a-ride service, a 24 hour advanced reservation is required. The service for elderly and non-ADA certifications does not operate on Saturday or Sunday. ADA complementary paratransit operates every day to match the fixed route service. Fares The Banning Municipal Transit System’s fare structure is based the particular service utilized. There was a fare increase in FY 2005-06 that raised the one-way cash fare from $0.50 to $0.75. The fare schedule is presented in the following table: 16 Triennial Performance Audit 4 Banning Transit Table I-3 City of Banning PASS Transit Fare Schedule Cash Fares Fixed Route Dial-a-Ride Adult $0.75 $1.50 Senior (60+)/Disabled $0.50 $1.00 Children (Under Age 5/Limit 2 Children) Free N/A Student $0.75 N/A Transfer to Local Fixed Route Free Free Transfer to Other Operator Free Free 10-Ride $6.75 Senior/Disabled 10-Ride $4.50 $9.00 Source: PASS Transit Ride Guide 17 Triennial Performance Audit 5 Banning Transit Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City of Banning’s ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, eight are applicable to the transit system. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (internet filing): FY 2004: December 13, 2004 FY 2005: October 11, 2005 FY 2006: October 19, 2006 Conclusion: Complied The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: October 28, 2004 FY 2005: September 27, 2005 FY 2006: September 28, 2006 Conclusion: Complied 18 Triennial Performance Audit 6 Banning Transit The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 The City of Banning participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: April 3, 2003; April 1, 2004; April 8, 2005; and June 7, 2006. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Banning’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in the City of Banning’s operating budget: FY 2004: +12.79% FY 2005: + 21.51% FY 2006: + 3.11% Source: FYs 2004-2006 City of Banning Annual Financial Audit Reports. The increase in the operating budget was attributable to the expansion of the fixed route service in FY 2005, which included hourly headways and providing service to major local employers. The budget is tied to the service plan contained in the SRTP. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves a rural area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.4, 99268.5, 99405(c) The system’s fare ratios using audited data are as follows: FY 2004: 11.80% FY 2005: 10.10% FY 2006: 12.10% Conclusion: Complied The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 The employees of the City of Banning are part of the State Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Conclusion: Complied 19 Triennial Performance Audit 7 Banning Transit If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) The City employs part-time drivers. Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. The City of Banning has complied with all TDA compliance requirements. 2. The operating budget increased notably in the first two years of the audit period, then stayed relatively level the last year. The increase in the operating budget was attributable to several aspects of operations, including funding for the extension of the Cabazon route to provide deviated service to the eastern portions of Cabazon, increase service hours, and the implementation of Sunday service. The CNG fueling challenges of the past have been resolved with the construction of a new CNG fueling facility at the City of Banning corporation yard. Banning also acquired two new CNG vehicles. 3. CHP terminal inspections were all rated as satisfactory. There were minor violations noted relating to driver record retention and preventative maintenance inspections and reporting. 4. Banning has met the TDA required fare ratios for each of the audit years. As allowed by RCTC’s adopted farebox policy, the City includes gain on sale of property in the farebox calculation. Conclusion from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix: The Banning transit system has complied with all TDA compliance requirements while meeting the required farebox ratio of 10 percent in each of the audit years. While service expansion occurred in FY 2004-05, the farebox did not include any exemptions from the expansion. 20 Triennial Performance Audit 8 Banning Transit Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations The City of Banning’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Develop specific marketing strategies for the transit optional market. Actions taken by the City of Banning: In the FY 2006-2008 SRTP, the City had included a response to this prior recommendation that it had intended to conduct marketing strategies directed towards the transit optional market during the first quarter of FY 2006. However, the Community Service Director who also served as the transit manager retired before efforts to undertake such research occurred. The City’s Fleet Maintenance/Airport Manager, who is also interim transit manager, indicated there is no marketing plan. However, as part of promoting the new Pass Transit System, marketing efforts have included an expanded school outreach program, expanded distribution of the Pass Transit Ride Guide, and additional efforts to market the system to major employers and at community events. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Continue recruitment of drivers. Actions taken by the City of Banning: Recruitment of qualified drivers has been an on-going issue for the City, and continued to be during the audit period. The interim transit manager suggested the City could be more proactive in recruiting, such as attending job fairs. There is a current shortage of drivers for Banning, including full time employment. In addition, a qualified pool of part time hires would also be helpful. The City will continue to recruit drivers on an ongoing basis as needed. Conclusion: This recommendation is in progress and is carried forward for implementation until the driver shortage is filled. 21 Triennial Performance Audit 9 Banning Transit Prior Recommendation 3 Designate and develop a lead supervisor of drivers. Actions taken by the City of Banning: The Lead Bus Driver position was created and filled in FY 2005. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Provide incentives for drivers to maintain longevity. Actions taken by the City of Banning: In the FY 2006-2008 SRTP, the City had included a response to this prior recommendation that it had intended to develop a driver incentive program during the first quarter of FY 2006. However, the Community Service Director who also served as the transit manager retired before efforts to undertake such research occurred. The interim transit manager mentioned there is no current incentive program, although the City does recognize an employee of the month. The interim transit manager suggested an incentive program would be helpful and should be budgeted for. Conclusion: This recommendation has not been implemented, and is carried forward in this audit for implementation. Prior Recommendation 5 Identify schools and other destination areas on the bus schedule. Actions taken by the City of Banning: The City had addressed this recommendation in the FY 2004-06 SRTP, indicating that it would be implemented with the next revision of the Ride Guide no later than winter 2006. The Ride Guide bus schedule does now identify key destinations such as Banning and Beaumont High Schools on the route map contained within. Other destinations include community centers, hospitals and post offices. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 6 Perform alternative tracking of on-time performance for the fixed route service. 22 Triennial Performance Audit 10 Banning Transit Actions taken by the City of Banning: Alternative tracking of on-time performance for the fixed-route service was implemented in January 2004. Using the random number generator feature in Excel, an operating hour is selected for a fixed-route vehicle. Office staff rides the vehicle for that particular route. It was indicated other City vehicles have GPS tracking systems. Perhaps transit could share in the technology as part of a citywide implementation strategy. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 7 Provide passenger mile data in the Transit Operator Reports. Actions taken by the City of Banning: The prior transit manager indicated tracking and recording passenger mile data is a labor intensive activity. The City does not receive funding from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and therefore is not required to report passenger mileage to the National Transit Database. The City contends that the transit system is small enough to where passenger mile data would be of limited benefit. However, in the event that the City receives FTA funding at a future date, this data would be tracked and reported as required. The new TransTrack performance system implemented by RCTC includes passenger miles as one the performance measures. The current interim transit manager suggested this measure should be recorded by the transit system. Conclusion: This recommendation has not been implemented and is carried forward in this audit for implementation. 23 Triennial Performance Audit 11 Banning Transit Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Banning’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for Banning. Table IV-1 Banning Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $689,537 $833,575 $962,843 $1,044,316 51.5% Total Passengers 222,183 222,764 201,964 189,421 -14.7% Vehicle Service Hours 12,552.0 12,921.0 13,894.0 14,690.0 17.0% Vehicle Service Miles 187,870 200,521 229,390 239,718 27.6% Employee FTE's 13 13 14 14 7.7% Passenger Fares $104,362 $98,527 $98,252 $125,736 20.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $3.10 $3.74 $4.77 $5.51 77.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $54.93 $64.51 $69.30 $71.09 29.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.67 $4.16 $4.20 $4.36 18.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 17.7 17.2 14.5 12.9 -27.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.18 1.11 0.88 0.79 -33.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 965.5 993.9 992.4 1,049.3 8.7% Average Fare per Passenger $0.47 $0.44 $0.49 $0.66 41.3% Fare Recovery Ratio * 15.14% 11.82% 10.20% 12.10% -20.1% * Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per TDA and RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. Source: Annual Financial Audits, State Controller Operator Reports, RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 24 Triennial Performance Audit 12 Banning Transit Table IV-2 Banning Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $611,169 $746,365 $858,047 $932,893 52.6% Total Passengers 213,015 212,634 192,328 179,676 -15.7% Vehicle Service Hours 10,502.0 10,574.0 11,328.0 12,387.0 17.9% Vehicle Service Miles 151,915 157,231 182,359 193,658 27.5% Employee FTE's 11 11 12 12 9.1% Passenger Fares $96,937 $91,969 $89,999 $114,368 18.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $2.87 $3.51 $4.46 $5.19 81.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $58.20 $70.58 $75.75 $75.31 29.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.02 $4.75 $4.71 $4.82 19.7% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 20.3 20.1 17.0 14.5 -28.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.40 1.35 1.05 0.93 -33.8% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 954.7 961.3 944.0 1,032.3 8.1% Average Fare per Passenger $0.46 $0.43 $0.47 $0.64 39.9% Fare Recovery Ratio 15.86% 12.32% 10.49% 12.26% -22.7% Source: Annual Financial Audits, State Controller Operator Reports, RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 25 Triennial Performance Audit 13 Banning Transit Table IV-3 Banning Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $78,368 $87,210 $104,796 $111,423 42.2% Total Passengers 9,168 10,130 9,636 9,745 6.3% Vehicle Service Hours 2,050.0 2,347.0 2,566.0 2,303.0 12.3% Vehicle Service Miles 35,955 43,290 47,031 46,060 28.1% Employee FTE's 2 2 2 2 0.0% Passenger Fares $7,425 $6,558 $8,253 $11,368 53.1% Operating Cost per Passenger $8.55 $8.61 $10.88 $11.43 33.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $38.23 $37.16 $40.84 $48.38 26.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.18 $2.01 $2.23 $2.42 11.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 4.5 4.3 3.8 4.2 -5.4% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.25 0.23 0.20 0.21 -17.0% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,025.0 1,173.5 1,283.0 1,151.5 12.3% Average Fare per Passenger $0.81 $0.65 $0.86 $1.17 44.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 9.47% 7.52% 7.88% 10.20% 7.7% Source: Annual Financial Audits, State Controller Operator Reports, RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 26 Triennial Performance Audit 14 Banning Transit Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased by 51.5 percent from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. The average increase was 15 percent annually during the audit period, although the increases were more notable in the first two years, with a moderate increase the last year. The highest cost increase was in FY 2004 due to the initiation and expansion of fixed-route services and higher fuel costs. 2. Vehicle service hours exhibited an upward trend systemwide during the audit period increasing 17 percent. The average annual increase was 5.4 percent. 3. Systemwide ridership declined 14.7 percent between FYs 2003 and 2006. This decline was mainly attributed to the fixed-route, which declined 15.7 percent over the same period. The was offset by a modest increase in Dial-a-Ride ridership of 6.3 percent. The City indicated that passenger counts might be inaccurate due to manual input by the drivers and errors that occur. Fare revenues have not matched passenger counts. In response, the City instituted a triplicate form for passenger counts so that one copy is provided to the City, the driver and a backup. 4. Fare revenues increased an average of 20.5 percent, with the highest increase in FY 2006 of 28 percent. The fare increase in FY 2006 had some affect on the level of revenues generated. However, the farebox recovery ratio declined over the same period by 20.1 percent with an average annual decline of 5.7 percent. Higher operating costs are attributed to the lower farebox recovery ratio despite increases in revenues. The farebox recovery ratio requirement was met throughout the triennial period. 5. Operating cost per hour increased 29.4 percent systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006. However the operating cost per passenger exhibited an increase of 77.6 percent during the same period. This indicator might be skewed due to potential inaccuracies with passenger counts. 6. Passengers per vehicle service hour declined during the audit period by 27.2 percent. The passengers per vehicle service mile exhibited an overall decline systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006 of 33.2 percent. Again, inaccurate passenger counts might be the reason behind the trends shown. Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators Banning’s performance indicators that utilize passenger data might not be reflective of actual performance. While declining ridership may be the case, it is uncertain whether the magnitude of the decline is accurate. As a result, several indicators such as operating cost per passenger, passengers per hour and passengers per mile might be skewed. The farebox ratio trend shows a tight range of between 10 and 12 percent farebox recovery, which exceed the TDA threshold of 10 percent. The increase in operating costs could be attributed to the implementation of the new trunk line, the addition of Sunday service and maintenance issues associated with two fairly new CNG vehicles. It does not appear Banning exempts new or extended services from the farebox. 27 Triennial Performance Audit 15 Banning Transit Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the PVVTA. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the City: · Operations & Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Operations & Planning The Banning Municipal Transit System is part of the emerging Pass Transit System, which is a cooperative effort between the transit systems of the cities of Banning and Beaumont. The Pass Transit System operates a total of six fixed routes and demand response service under a common marketing brand. However, the two transit systems remain independently operated by each respective city. Banning operates a total of three fixed-routes as well as a demand response service. The City implemented Sunday service on the three fixed-routes in July 2004. Transfers are available to Beaumont Dial-A-Ride and to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) Route 31 to Hemet, Route 35 to Moreno Valley, and Route 36 to Calimesa. In FY 2005, Banning in conjunction with the City of Beaumont added complementing trunk lines (Pass Transit Routes 1 and 2) along the length of commercial corridors serving Banning, Beaumont, Cabazon and the Morongo Indian Reservation. This complementary service provides one-hour headways along the corridor, with each route operating on two-hour headways bi-directionally. Banning operates Route 1, which has been exempt from farebox recovery requirements since October 2004. As a result of this service enhancement, Banning has seen a shift in ridership from the Banning Northern (Route 5) and Banning Southern (Route 6) routes to Routes 1 and 2. This has made it easier for riders to travel throughout the commercial area in a more seamless manner without regard to a particular route. Regional connections with RTA are provided at the K-Mart stop on Highland Springs Road. Connections to Beaumont Transit service are also available at either the K-Mart or San Gorgonio Hospital. The system’s fixed route buses are equipped with passenger operated bicycle racks. All revenue vehicles are ADA-compliant with wheelchair lifts and tie-down stations. Bus stops in commercial areas are provided with benches and waste receptacles. In FY 2005, the City looked into increasing the number of shelters at bus stops. Flag stops are commonly utilized in the residential areas of Banning and Cabazon. 28 Triennial Performance Audit 16 Banning Transit Dial-A-Ride The City’s Dial-a-Ride consists of an ADA complimentary paratransit service to the fixed- routes. The system utilizes a self-certification process that includes profession verification by a doctor of the disability. The Banning Municipal Transit System processes ADA certifications and maintains its database of about 600 dial-a-ride passengers, including about 125 ADA riders. The transit manager reserves final determination of ADA eligibility. Subscription services are provided for several clients such as the Braille Institute and the Inland Regional Center. The dial-a-ride transit staff provide mobility training as needed to its clients. Dispatching of vehicles is conducted without the use of dispatching software. Driver manifests are recorded electronically on a spreadsheet by the dispatcher. Staff indicated that manual dispatching continues to serve the system adequately. Computer aided dispatch is being evaluated by the Transit Manager, but that the value of software needs to be determined given the size of the operation. Farebox equipment is also manual. When a “no show” occurs, dispatch staff call the passenger’s home to check on them. The driver will also knock on their door. If there is an emergency, dispatch will make the call and then to the police. If a “no show” is not excusable, the rider is charged for the missed trip on their next reservation. Cancellations can be made up to an hour before the scheduled trip. Bus Drivers Driver recruitment and vehicle reliability continued to be an issue for Banning during the audit period. It was indicated driver morale is generally low due to low wages despite a new MOU that increased compensation, and that prior management by Community Development had limited effectiveness. On occasion, when there are driver shortages, the available drivers on shift will operate the fixed route system to keep it fully functional, but cause disruption in providing Dial-A-Ride. This is noted as a serious consequence of the driver recruitment issue, as the agency is required by ADA law to provide complementary paratransit service during the same operating hours as the fixed route. A responsible lead driver was hired in FY 2005 which has helped to bridge the management structure between supervisor and drivers. The lead bus driver has been empowered to help manage the system and the drivers. Passengers have made complaints about inconsistent communication provided by drivers, as well as some drivers allowing certain activities to occur, such as a driver allowing a passenger to handle fare media. Drivers must use mechanical means to tally passenger boardings by using a hand counter. After the end of each run, the driver is required to fill in the boardings for the run and reset the counter. The transit manager indicated drivers might mistakenly not record the boardings from the prior run before resetting the counter. There should be standards developed and enforcement on driver conduct and fulfillment of responsibilities. Mandatory safety meetings are held eight times a year. The meetings are scheduled one year out in advance, given the meetings are held on the last Thursday of every month. The lead bus driver provides other training as needed. 29 Triennial Performance Audit 17 Banning Transit Passenger Fares A fare increase was adopted and implemented throughout the Pass Transit System in FY 2006. Fares for adults and students were raised from 50 cents per ride to 75 cents per ride. The 10-Ride Pass was increased from $4.50 to $6.75; whereas the 10-Ride Pass for senior and disabled riders was increased from $4.00 to $4.50. Senior and disabled fares remained unchanged at 50 cents per ride as well as the 25 cent zone fare for travel between Banning and Cabazon/Morongo Indian Reservation. Dial-a-Ride fares also remained unchanged during the audit period. Fare revenues are delivered daily to City Hall and counted by the Lead Bus Driver and finance staff personnel. The revenues are logged for each route, as well as trip tickets deposited in the farebox. The revenues are grouped and deposited about once a week. However, there is no reconciliation of fares and ridership during the process, despite ridership count issues identified by the transit manager. The transit system should consider reconciliation of fares against ridership at the time of counting the fare. Performance On-time performance remained fairly low during the audit period. Systemwide on-time performance was 75.32 percent in FY 2004 and 78.87 percent in FY 2005, as shown in the SRTP. The on-time performance averages were higher for Dial-a-Ride at 97.98 percent in FY 2004 and 96.57 percent in FY 2005. The on-time window is defined as a half hour for the pick up (15 minutes before and after the trip time), and one hour for the return trip. Fixed-route performance was lower at 72.98 percent in FY 2004 and 71.40 percent in FY 2005. A major bus stop on Highland Springs was moved from the service adjustments. The lead bus driver tracks on-time performance through following a bus, or recording the bus arrival time at a transfer point. Drivers are also required to call dispatch every 7 to 8 minutes. Complaints per 1,000 passengers was insignificant from a statistical perspective in each of the audit years, as reported in the Transit Operator Report. In FY 2004, there were 16 passenger complaints received for the fixed-route and three complaints received for the dial-a-ride service during the same fiscal year. The number of reported accidents were minimal. There were three collisions involving the fixed-route reported during FY 2004. Maintenance Maintenance of the vehicles is undertaken by one full time city mechanic dedicated to transit, plus 25 percent of the time for a new Lead Mechanic. The City’s fleet manager provides supervision and allocates part of his time and cost to transit maintenance. Banning’s newer fixed-route buses are CNG powered. Dial-a-Ride vehicles, which are under 33,000 pounds (gross vehicle weight), and support vehicles are gasoline powered. The fleet manager/interim transit manager indicated severe problems with the five CNG vehicles. The engine manufacturer of the newer vehicles no longer produces the CNG engines. In addition, the engine manufacturer of the older vehicles provided poor customer service to the City. The warranty on the older vehicles purchased in the year 2000 have expired, leaving the City with maintenance costs that could grow. 30 Triennial Performance Audit 18 Banning Transit Preventative maintenance inspections are conducted by the mechanic. Body damage repair is outsourced on a case by case basis, depending on the severity and type of repairs that are required. Additional shop equipment has been purchased to assist the Fleet Maintenance Division in expediting repairs to vehicles. One measure of vehicle maintenance is the number of vehicle breakdowns during revenue service as shown in the following table: Table V-1 Roadcalls Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Roadcalls 33 1 38 2 37 1 Source: Banning Transit SRTP Road calls for fixed route service have shown a downward trend since the previous triennial period. The replacement of two older CNG buses have helped to reduce the number of overall road calls, in spite of their problems with upkeep. Fixed-route road calls have averaged 36 annually over the past three years. Dial-a-ride vehicle failures have averaged 1.3 per year during the same period. The CNG fueling challenges of the past have been resolved with the construction of a new CNG fueling facility at the City of Banning corporation yard. Marketing During the triennial audit period, the Pass Transit System developed a multi-color design Ride Guide featuring fares, fixed-route schedules, system route map, and information about the paratransit services. The Ride Guide’s route map denotes places of interest such as government offices, hospitals, high schools and major shopping centers. In addition the City of Banning’s website contains general information regarding transit services offered by the City: http://www.ci.banning.ca.us/index.asp?nid=161. The website contains a link to the Pass Transit Ride Guide in PDF format. The City has recognized the need for increased marketing efforts. The branding efforts surrounding the creation of Pass Transit in FY 2004 and FY 2005 was a good first step that included new exterior bus livery, Ride Guide design and bus stop signage. In FY 2006 marketing efforts have included an expanded school outreach program, expanded distribution of the Pass Transit Ride Guide, and additional efforts to market the system to major employers and at community events. General Administration and Management Administrative services for the transit system are provided by staff from various City departments. Responsibility for overall administration of the transit system was previously provided by the City’s Director of Community Services Department until his retirement in 31 Triennial Performance Audit 19 Banning Transit the Fall of 2006. Responsibility for the operation of the system has since shifted on an interim basis to the Fleet Maintenance/Airport Manager within the Fleet Maintenance Division of the Public Works Department. With existing responsibilities for fleet maintenance and airport services, the fleet manager has limited time allocated to transit but has expressed interest in continuing to manage the system. The hiring of qualified drivers has been an on-going challenge for the last several years, dating back to the previous triennial audit. A Lead Bus Driver/Trainer position was created and filled in FY 2005, which has served to aid the transit system in training potential bus drivers who lack certain certifications and endorsements. Higher pay has been considered, but shortages with drivers continue. Some drivers have also retired. The hourly pay for fixed route drivers is in the range of $13.83 and $18.71 per hour, and $10.80 to $14.61 for dial-a-ride drivers. The lead bus driver receives between $16.85 and $22.79 per hour. Full time drivers receive benefits. With the senior population growing from new development in Banning, new drivers are needed. The Transit Manager is reviewing the potential of eventually establishing a ratio of full-time to part-time drivers at 5 to 1, based on his sampling of other transit agencies. Dispatch provides a monthly report to the transit manager summarizing key performance information. A sample report provided by dispatch includes the following data on a daily and monthly basis: number of elderly, disabled, and ADA certified passengers (each recorded separately and summed); number of scheduled trips; number of trips on-time; and revenue miles. Banning does not utilize FTA formula grant funding for operating and capital expenses. As such, Title VI requirements do not apply to the transit system. 32 Triennial Performance Audit 20 Banning Transit Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. Banning has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA, including the farebox recovery ratio. 2. Four of the seven prior audit recommendations have been implemented. The remaining recommendations are forwarded in this performance audit for implementation. 3. CHP terminal inspections were all rated as satisfactory. There were minor violations noted relating to driver record retention and preventative maintenance inspections and reporting. 4. The operating budget increased notably in the first two years of the audit period. The increase in the operating budget was attributable to several aspects of operations, including funding for the extension of the Cabazon route to provide deviated service to the eastern portions of Cabazon, increase service hours, and the implementation of Sunday service in 2004. 5. Total ridership declined 14.7 percent systemwide. The City indicated that passenger counts might be inaccurate due to manual input by the drivers and errors that occur. Fare revenues have not matched passenger counts. In response, the City instituted a triplicate form for passenger counts so that one copy is provided to the City, the driver and a backup. 6. A fare increase was adopted and implemented for the fixed-route in FY 2006. The fare increase was implemented as part of the Pass Transit system coordination effort between the Cities of Banning and Beaumont. 7. Fare revenues are delivered daily to City Hall and counted by the Lead Bus Driver and finance staff personnel. However, there is no reconciliation of fares and ridership during the process, despite ridership count issues identified by the transit manager. 8. On time performance remained fairly low during the audit period, averaging below 80 percent systemwide. Dial-a-ride on-time performance was higher than the fixed route. A major bus stop on Highland Springs was moved from the service adjustments. 9. The fleet manager/interim transit manager indicated severe problems with the five CNG vehicles. The warranty on the older vehicles purchased in the year 2000 have expired, leaving the City with maintenance costs that could grow. 10. Pass Area Transit developed and introduced a multi-color design Ride Guide featuring fares, fixed-route schedules, system route map, and information about paratransit services. 33 Triennial Performance Audit 21 Banning Transit 11. A Lead Bus Driver/Trainer position was created and filled in FY 2005, which has served to aid the transit system in training potential bus drivers who lack certain certifications and endorsements. A Classification and Compensation Study by the City resulted in MOU negotiations that increased compensation for both Bus Driver and Mechanic positions. However, it was indicated driver morale is generally low. 12. On occasion, as a result of driver shortages, the available drivers on shift will operate the fixed route system to keep it fully functional, but cause disruption in providing Dial-A-Ride. This is noted as a serious consequence of the driver recruitment issue, as the agency is required by ADA law to provide complementary paratransit service during the same operating hours as the fixed route. 34 Triennial Performance Audit 22 Banning Transit Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Banning Transit should implement the remaining three prior audit recommendations. · Provide passenger mile data in TransTrack. · Continue recruitment of drivers. · Provide incentives for drivers to maintain longevity. Passenger mile data is required for the new RCTC TransTrack performance program and should be provided. Driver recruitment and retention remains an issue, and these recommendations encourage on-going efforts to attract and retain qualified drivers. 2. Develop and enforce employee policies and rules specific to providing consistent transit service. It was indicated that drivers have been inconsistent with the information provided to passengers and the activities that occur on-board the vehicles. Complaints by riders have been made regarding this issue of variances between the drivers. The City should document and enforce policies that dictate consistent driver conduct and responsibilities by all drivers, including responses to customer questions, counting and recording of passengers, and handling of fare media. Additional training may be required to reinforce these policies. 3. Conduct daily reconciliation of farebox revenues with passenger counts. Fare revenue should be reconciled daily against ridership for each bus route and dial-a-ride vehicle. Daily reconciliation of fares with ridership can increase opportunities to uncover where discrepancies are occurring before they compound. 4. Consider prioritizing procurement of electronic fareboxes. Electronic fareboxes could reduce the inaccuracies being recorded on buses from current manual processes. As it appears the drivers have many duties to fulfill while operating in revenue service, electronic fareboxes could reduce some of the manual activities, such as counting and recording passengers by type after each bus run. This could also result in more accurate data being collected and reported. 35 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF CITY OF BEAUMONT TRANSIT S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 36 Triennial Performance Audit i Beaumont Transit TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 5 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 5 Section III................................................................................................................. 9 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations................................. 9 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 12 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 12 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 15 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 16 Section V............................................................................................................... 17 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 17 Operations & Planning................................................................................ 17 Maintenance................................................................................................ 19 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 19 General Administration and Management............................................. 20 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 21 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 21 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 23 37 Triennial Performance Audit 1 Beaumont Transit Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency (Beaumont) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City of Beaumont’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates City of Beaumont’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Beaumont has provided public transportation service since 1975. The current transit system is comprised of both fixed route and dial-a-ride services. Fixed route service began as a single 15-mile route in 1979 out of growing demand for its general public dial- a-ride service that could not meet the demand. This route served the City of Beaumont and the unincorporated community of Cherry Valley located to the north. Dial-A-Ride is limited to elderly and ADA passengers. However, a combination of dial-a-ride and fixed route deviations are available to the general public to provide passengers who are outside the ¼ mile border of each bus route connection to the fixed route system. The City coordinates scheduled service with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) which runs three intercity services in Beaumont. RTA formerly operated its buses through the City. However, RTA has modified its routes so that the buses travel along Interstate 10 (I-10) 38 Triennial Performance Audit 2 Beaumont Transit and only connect with local transit at a Kmart on Highland Springs Road. The intercity buses then return back onto I-10. Beaumont signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with RTA in January 1997 to provide complementary ADA paratransit to RTA’s intercity service. RTA at the time operated intercity fixed route service through the city, and Beaumont had not yet started its own fixed route system. ADA complementary paratransit continues to be provided for the Beaumont fixed route service, as well as for the limited RTA bus service in the city. The Cities of Beaumont and Banning have continued their coordination efforts to implement the Pass Area Transit Plan, which would provide a seamless transit service to the residents of the two communities. The jointly developed service plan included the Cities of Banning and Beaumont, unincorporated areas of Cherry Valley and Cabazon, and commercial area of the Morongo Indian Reservation. The Pass Transit System consists of two independent, but well coordinated transit systems under a single brand identity and fare structure. The coordinated service area of Pass Transit includes the aforementioned cities and communities. This coordinated transit system allows for Dial- a-Ride vehicles to cross jurisdictions and a common trunk line that serves both cities and the Cabazon area east of Banning. Fleet Beaumont operates a fleet of seven active and four reserve vehicles ranging from 14 to 32 passenger seating capacity. Five vehicles are operated for demand response service, and the remaining six are operated for fixed route service. All vehicles are lift equipped and are owned by the City. The vehicles are either CNG, diesel or gasoline fueled. A detailed description of Beaumont’s transit fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 City of Beaumont PASS Transit Fleet Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/Wheelchair Space 1991 Bluebird GM P-30 1 Diesel 17/1 1995 Bluebird GM P-30 2 Diesel 14/1 2000 Bluebird CSRE 3204 2 Diesel 30/2 2000 Goshen II Ford E-450 2 Diesel 16/1 2001 Goshen II Ford E-450 2 Gasoline 16/1 2004 Bluebird XCEL 102 2 CNG 32/2 Total 11 Source: City of Beaumont FY 2005/06 – FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Beaumont operates three bus routes that traverse the service area which encompasses the City of Beaumont and the unincorporated areas of Cherry Valley. Each route runs along the main shopping and commercial corridors on Beaumont Avenue, Sixth Street and Highland Springs Road where passenger demand is highest. The fixed-route service generally operates Monday through Friday between the hours of 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturday between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The fixed route does not operate on Sunday as well as on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Independence Day, 39 Triennial Performance Audit 3 Beaumont Transit Thanksgiving and Christmas. The fixed route operates the Saturday service schedule on the following holidays: Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Veterans' Day, and the Day after Thanksgiving. A description of each route is presented in the table below: Table I-2 City of Beaumont PASS Transit Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations 2 Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Every Two Hours (Monday through Friday from 5:45 a.m. to 6:59 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) Orchard Park; K-Mart; Banning City Hall; Outlet Malls; Cabazon Community Center; Casino Morongo; and Beaumont City Hall. 3 Beaumont/Cherry Valley Hourly (Monday through Friday from 5:45 a.m. to 6:45 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) Wells Fargo Bank; K-Mart; Hospital; Highland Spring Village; Cherry Valley Market; and Orchard Park. 4 Beaumont Hourly (Monday through Friday from 5:55 a.m. to 6:55 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) Beaumont Library; Orchard Park; Stater Bros./Food-4-Less; K-Mart/Carl’s Jr.; and Rangel Park. Source: PASS Transit Ride Guide Dial-A-Ride Dial-A-Ride offers priority service to passengers certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), seniors (ages 60 years old and older) and persons with disabilities. Dial-a-ride service operates Monday through Friday between the hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The policy on response time for Dial-A-Ride is 30 minutes of the call to dispatch. For Saturday dial-a-ride service, a 24 hour advanced reservation is required. The service does not operate on Sunday. Fares The Beaumont Municipal Transit Agency’s fare structure is based on the particular service utilized. There was a fare increase in FY 2005-06 that raised the one-way cash fare from $0.50 to $0.75. The current fare schedule is presented in the following table: 40 Triennial Performance Audit 4 Beaumont Transit Table I-3 City of Beaumont PASS Transit Fare Schedule Cash Fares Fixed Route Dial-a-Ride Adult $0.75 $1.50 Senior (60+)/Disabled $0.50 $1.00 Children (Under Age 5/Limit 2 Children) Free N/A Student $0.75 N/A Route Deviations* $0.25 N/A Transfer to Local Fixed Route Free Free Transfer to Other Operator Free Free 10-Ride $6.75 Senior/Disabled 10-Ride $4.50 $9.00 *Affects Route 3 and deviations within Cherry Valley 41 Triennial Performance Audit 5 Beaumont Transit Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City of Beaumont’s ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, eight are applicable to the transit system. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (internet filing): FY 2004: December 3, 2004 FY 2005: February 9, 2006 FY 2006: March 6, 2007 Conclusion: Not Complied for FYs 2005 and 2006. It should be noted the State Controller’s Office notified the City in a letter dated March 1, 2007 that the Controller was instructing the County auditor to withhold payment of LTF until the FY 2005-06 report was submitted. A reminder letter dated December 18, 2006 was sent to the City advising of the delinquency. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: June 28, 2006 FY 2005: February 14, 2007 FY 2006: February 14, 2007 Conclusion: Not Complied in any fiscal year. Under California Code of Regulations Section 6664, RCTC did not release TDA funding to the City. 42 Triennial Performance Audit 6 Beaumont Transit The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 The City of Beaumont participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: October 25, 2005, and October 4, 2006. The 2006 inspection was rated unsatisfactory due to violations in the Driver Records category. The City has indicated the issues were resolved by January 2007. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Beaumont’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in the City of Beaumont’s operating budget: FY 2004: +20.21% FY 2005: +26.53% FY 2006: - 1.33% Source: FYs 2004-2006 State Controller Operators’ Report. The increase in the operating budget was attributable to the expansion of the fixed route service in FYs 2004 & 2005, which included a new trunk route and modifications to two existing fixed routes. The budget is tied to the service plan contained in the SRTP. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves a rural area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.4, 99268.5, 99405(c) The Annual Financial Audits covering the triennial period indicated that all services were exempt for FYs 2004 and 2005. Dial- A-Ride ended its exemption in FY 2006. Using audited data, the farebox ratios are shown for the entire system including the exempt routes: FY 2004: 6.77% FY 2005: 6.67% FY 2006: 6.64% The FY 2006 fiscal audit began separating the farebox ratios 43 Triennial Performance Audit 7 Beaumont Transit between fixed route and dial-a- ride. The dial-a-ride farebox ratio was 3.65 percent. Conclusion: Not Complied. The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 The employees of the City of Beaumont are part of the State Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) The City employs part-time drivers. Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Beaumont has complied with five of the eight TDA compliance requirements. The three requirements that were not complied with included late submittal of the Annual State Controller Reports, late submittal of the Annual Fiscal Audits, and non- compliance with the farebox recovery ratio. Both RCTC and the State Controller have withheld TDA funds as a result of non-compliance with submission of required fiscal reports. 2. The State Controller’s Reports were not submitted on time for two of the three audit years, in FYs 2004-05 and 2005-06. The State Controller Reports provided by the city do not contain information on operating cost exclusions and exemptions for purposes of calculating the fare ratio. 3. The State Controller also requires separate reports to be filed for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled, as described in the General Information section of the State Controller Report. Given that Beaumont provides both types of services, the City should comply with this requirement. 4. The operating budget increased notably during the first two years of the audit period. The approved budget for FY 2004 was increased by 20 percent compared to FY 2003, while the approved budget for FY 2005 increased by more than 26 percent. The increases can be attributed primarily to the initiation and expansion of fixed-route services and higher fuel costs. The budget declined slightly in FY 2006 by just over one percent. 5. The 2006 CHP terminal inspection was rated unsatisfactory due to violations in the Driver Records category for failure to obtain DMV Pull Notice periodic printouts for all drivers. The inspecting officer found that two employees were not in the DMV Pull Notice Program. The City has indicated the issues were resolved by January 2007. 44 Triennial Performance Audit 8 Beaumont Transit 6. With expansion and adjustment of fixed route service, most of the transit service was exempt from the farebox. For FYs 2004 and 2005, no farebox ratio was calculated by the fiscal auditor. For FY 2006, the dial-a-ride farebox was calculated separately from the fixed route farebox, indicating the dial-a-ride was no longer exempt. The dial-a- ride farebox was 3.65 percent, which is below the 10 percent minimum TDA requirement. Given that the State Controller Reports and fiscal audits were submitted well past their respective statutory due dates, RCTC and the State Controller withheld TDA funds for these purposes. The performance auditor estimated farebox for the entire Beaumont transit system during the audit years to be 6.80 percent in FY 2004, 6.30 percent in FY 2005 and 6.91 percent in FY 2006. 45 Triennial Performance Audit 9 Beaumont Transit Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations The City of Beaumont’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Perform regular tracking of on-time performance. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The City has performed some manual checking for on-time performance through a review of dial-a-ride manifests and driver trip sheets. On fixed route, drivers can call in at time bus stops. Occasionally, if a bus is stopped at a railroad crossing, the vehicle might deviate from the route and travel to an open rail crossing. Staff indicated the new dispatch and scheduling software should be able to assist with documenting on-time performance. Also, according to the FY 2006-08 Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP), an on- time performance audit was completed in April 2005. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 List the fares on the Beaumont bus schedule. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The Pass Transit Ride Guide, which contains schedules for the City of Beaumont includes fare information for both the dial-a-ride and fixed-route services. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Submit annual State Controller’s Report on time. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The City has delegated this task to its Finance Department and that the submittal timeline is on the department’s calendar to ensure on-time completion. For FY 2004, the 46 Triennial Performance Audit 10 Beaumont Transit State Controller’s Report was submitted on schedule. However, for FYs 2005 and 2006, the City failed to submit the annual State Controller’s Report on-time. Conclusion: This recommendation has not been fully implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Provide missing farebox information in the State Controller’s Report. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The City has committed to including farebox information on all of its transit reporting documentation, which is checked by the Transit Services Manager before being released. The City does include farebox information in the Operating Revenue section of the State Controller’s Report; however, the report still does not include the Schedule of Operating Cost Exclusions and Exemptions that shows the farebox calculation. Conclusion: This recommendation has not been implemented. Prior Recommendation 5 Provide all actual operating and maintenance data in the Transit Operator Reports. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The City currently provides operating and maintenance data in its reporting, which is monitored by RCTC. The new TransTrack program should assist the City with complying with this recommendation. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 6 Develop benchmark performance measures for planned service. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: Through RCTC’s Productivity Improvement Program (PIP), the City has been able to develop benchmark of performance measures for current and planned service. The PIP includes eight performance measures of which the bus operators must comply with five of the measures (two mandated and three discretionary). A variance range is developed for each performance measure which becomes the benchmark for comparison against actual service. 47 Triennial Performance Audit 11 Beaumont Transit Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 7 Perform analysis of ridership and fare revenue trends. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: Management of the transit system was transferred to the Resource Management Department upon the retirement of the previous transit manager, who also was the lead mechanic for the system. The new administrators of the service utilize the PIP and TransTrack to perform analysis including for ridership and fare revenues. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 8 Develop capital grant tracking system. Actions taken by the City of Beaumont: The City developed and maintains a capital grant tracking program modeled after RCTC’s grant template. The grant tracking program includes key information about the status of grant projects and the expenditures of funds. The Finance Director maintains and updates the program on an on-going basis. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 48 Triennial Performance Audit 12 Beaumont Transit Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Beaumont’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for Beaumont. Table IV-1 Beaumont Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators** FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003-2006 Operating Cost $728,597 $879,642 $1,042,453 $1,082,567 48.6% Total Passengers 97,690 113,682 118,268 118,618 21.4% Vehicle Service Hours 14,575.0 17,869.0 18,599.0 18,346.3 25.9% Vehicle Service Miles 181,318 228,400 268,321 266,147 46.8% Employee FTE's 14 20 13 13 -7.1% Passenger Fares $51,465 $59,543 $69,576 $71,911 39.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $7.46 $7.74 $8.81 $9.13 22.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $49.99 $49.23 $56.05 $59.01 18.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.02 $3.85 $3.89 $4.07 1.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 6.7 6.4 6.4 6.5 -3.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.54 0.50 0.44 0.45 -17.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,041.1 893.5 1,430.7 1,411.3 35.6% Average Fare per Passenger $0.53 $0.52 $0.59 $0.61 15.1% Fare Recovery Ratio * 7.1% 6.8% 6.7% 6.6% -6.0% * Fare ratio includes all services, although fixed routes are exempt for a period of two full years from addition of new services. ** Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect audited data. Source: Annual Fiscal Audit, State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 49 Triennial Performance Audit 13 Beaumont Transit Table IV-2 Beaumont Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators* FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003-2006 Operating Cost $381,770 $431,997 $677,305 $600,107 57.2% Total Passengers 66,836 81,519 87,870 89,962 34.6% Vehicle Service Hours 8,112.0 10,396.0 11,536.0 11,615.0 43.2% Vehicle Service Miles 106,281 136,198 170,953 173,034 62.8% Employee FTE's 8 8 8 8 0.0% Passenger Fares $21,223 $28,510 $41,382 $54,283 155.8% Operating Cost per Passenger $5.71 $5.30 $7.71 $6.67 16.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $47.06 $41.55 $58.71 $51.67 9.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.59 $3.17 $3.96 $3.47 -3.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 8.2 7.8 7.6 7.7 -6.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.63 0.60 0.51 0.52 -17.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,014.0 1,299.5 1,442.0 1,451.9 43.2% Average Fare per Passenger $0.32 $0.35 $0.47 $0.60 90.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 5.6% 6.6% 6.1% 9.0% 62.7% * Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect unaudited data for FYs 2004 & 2005. FY 2006 figures reflect audited data. Source: Annual Fiscal Audit, State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 50 Triennial Performance Audit 14 Beaumont Transit Table IV-3 Beaumont Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators* FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003-2006 Operating Cost $346,827 $443,839 $430,865 $482,460 39.1% Total Passengers 30,854 32,163 30,398 28,656 -7.1% Vehicle Service Hours 6,463.0 7,473.0 7,063.0 6,731.3 4.2% Vehicle Service Miles 75,037 92,202 97,368 93,113 24.1% Employee FTE's 6 12 5 5 -16.7% Passenger Fares $30,242 $30,666 $28,193 $17,628 -41.7% Operating Cost per Passenger $11.24 $13.80 $14.17 $16.84 49.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $53.66 $59.39 $61.00 $71.67 33.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.62 $4.81 $4.43 $5.18 12.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 4.8 4.3 4.3 4.3 -10.8% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.41 0.35 0.31 0.31 -25.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,077.2 622.8 1,412.6 1,346.3 25.0% Average Fare per Passenger $0.98 $0.95 $0.93 $0.62 -37.2% Fare Recovery Ratio 8.7% 6.9% 6.5% 3.7% -58.1% * Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect unaudited data for FYs 2004 & 2005. FY 2006 figures reflect audited data. Source: Annual Fiscal Audit, State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 51 Triennial Performance Audit 15 Beaumont Transit Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs systemwide increased by 48.6 percent from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. The average increase was 14.4 percent annually during the audit period. The highest increases were in FYs 2004 and 2005 due to the initiation and expansion of fixed-route services and higher fuel costs. The fixed-route exhibited the highest increase in operating costs of 57.2 percent during the audit period. Fixed- route services were expanded from the creation of a trunk route stretching from Beaumont through Banning to the unincorporated area near the Morongo Indian Reservation. The two existing local fixed routes traversing through Beaumont were also modified. City staff also indicated that City overhead costs are one of the highest in the region. Non-management employees are part of the SEIU General Unit. The additional overhead costs (e.g. full health benefits at the family level) are included in the operations cost of the system. 2. Vehicle service hours exhibited an upward trend systemwide during the audit period increasing 25.9 percent. The average annual increase was 8.4 percent. FY 2004 exhibited the highest increase in service hours as additional fixed route service was added. 3. Systemwide ridership increased 21.4 percent between FYs 2003 and 2006 with an average annual increase of 6.9 percent. Ridership exhibited the highest increase in FY 2004 of 16.4 percent. Fixed route ridership increased by 34.6 percent over the last three years. Dial-a-Ride exhibited a modest decline of 7.1 percent in ridership as possibly some dial-a-ride patrons switched to the modified fixed route service. The City dispatchers encourage passengers to take fixed route. 4. Fare revenues increased 39.7 percent, averaging 12 percent annually. There was a fare increase in FY 2005-06 that raised the one-way cash fare from $0.50 to $0.75. However, the farebox recovery ratio declined over the same period by six percent with an average annual decline of two percent, due to increases in operating costs. Farebox recovery ratios for the entire system remained in the six to seven percent range during the audit period. 5. Operating cost per hour increased 18 percent systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006. Dial-a-ride exhibited the highest increase of 33.6 percent. The systemwide operating cost per passenger exhibited an increase of 22.4 percent during the same period. 6. Passengers per vehicle service hour declined marginally during the audit period by 3.5 percent systemwide. For fixed route, passengers per hour decreased by 6 percent, and by nearly 11 percent on dial-a-ride. The passengers per vehicle service mile exhibited an overall decline systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006 of 17.3 percent. 52 Triennial Performance Audit 16 Beaumont Transit Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The performance data for Beaumont’s transit service shows growth in the provision of service. However, the cost to provide additional transit has increased substantially, especially for fixed route due to personnel cost, fuel and insurance. The City has made efforts to implement the Pass Transit services in conjunction with the City of Banning through implementing the new trunk line service to Cabazon. As the fixed routes get closer to losing their exemption status from the farebox, transit staff should be evaluating whether any modifications to the service are warranted should the farebox ratio fall below the TDA threshold of 10 percent. However, as the City has been providing local funding for the transit system for the past several years given RCTC has withheld TDA revenues for late submittal of the fiscal audits, Beaumont will have the option of continuing to supplement fare revenues with local funds to meet the farebox ratio. 53 Triennial Performance Audit 17 Beaumont Transit Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the PVVTA. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the City: · Operations & Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Operations & Planning During the audit period, Beaumont has assisted in planning, coordinating and implementing the emerging Pass Transit System, which is a cooperative effort between the transit systems of the cities of Banning and Beaumont. The City is part of an adhoc committee set up to develop a seamless service for both city transit programs. The Pass Transit System operates a total of six fixed routes and demand response service under a common marketing brand. However, the two transit systems remain independently operated by each respective city. The 2005-2007 and 2006-2008 Short Range Transit Plans combine the services and description of both cities to reflect the Pass Transit program. Beaumont operates a total of three fixed-routes as well as a demand response service. Transfers are available to Banning Dial-A-Ride and to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) Route 31 to Hemet, Route 35 to Moreno Valley, and Route 36 to Calimesa. In FY 2005, Beaumont in conjunction with the City of Banning added complementing trunk lines (Pass Transit Routes 1 and 2) along the length of commercial corridors serving Banning, Beaumont, Cabazon and the Morongo Indian Reservation. Beaumont operates Route 2. This complementary service provides one-hour headways along the corridor, with each route operating on two-hour headways bi-directionally. This route has been exempt from farebox recovery requirements since October 2004 due to a 25 percent increase in its geographical service area. The City’s other two fixed routes, Route 3 and Route 4, operate on one-hour headways connecting residential areas with the commercial corridors. Route 3 serves the residential areas of Beaumont north of I-10 and Cherry Valley. This route has been exempt from farebox recovery requirement since August 2003 due to an increase in service hours of more than 25 percent. Route 4 serves the residential area of Beaumont south of I-10 and has been rerouted off of Sixth Street between Xenia and Beaumont Avenues in an unserved area residential area of the city. In addition, it serves some commercial areas and includes a tripper service to Duraplastics, a major local employer. Like the other two fixed-routes, Route 4 has seen its service hours increase by more than 54 Triennial Performance Audit 18 Beaumont Transit 25 percent since August 2003, thus exempting it from farebox recovery requirements. Regional connections with RTA are provided at the K-Mart stop on Highland Springs Road. Connections to Banning Transit service are also available at either the K-Mart or San Gorgonio Hospital. The City’s Dial-a-Ride consists of an ADA complimentary paratransit service to the fixed- routes. Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) provides the ADA certification service for Beaumont and sends the city an updated list. City transit staff indicated ADA customers represent about 20 percent of the system’s riders. The Pass Transit program entails the crossing of city boundaries to transport dial-a-ride passengers between the two cities. A trip that originates in Beaumont is the responsibility of Beaumont Transit for the return trip as well if the destination is Banning or elsewhere outside the city limits. While the dial-a-ride is intended to provide complementary ADA services, as mandated by Federal law, it was not clear whether Beaumont dial-a-ride travels as far as the Cabazon, given the new trunk line fixed route services to Cabazon. This could present an ADA issue that should be clarified. In keeping with the City Manager’s practice of having a flat organizational hierarchy, there is no lead bus driver. As City employees, the transit operations staff is represented by the Service Employee’s International Union (SEIU) Local 1997. The current MOU between the City and SEIU has provided generous benefits to its members, including maintenance workers and drivers. City management has indicated this has significant cost implications for the transit system. The City is also concerned about the potential merger of the local SEIU unit with the larger chapter. A fare increase was adopted and implemented throughout the Pass Transit System in FY 2006. Fares for adults and students were raised from 50 cents per ride to 75 cents per ride. The 10-Ride Pass was increased from $4.50 to $6.75; whereas the 10-Ride Pass for senior and disabled riders was increased from $4.00 to $4.50. The increase also included a 25 cent supplement for Route 3 deviations into Cherry Valley. Senior and disabled fares remained unchanged at 50 cents per ride as well as the 25 cent zone fare for travel between Banning and Cabazon/Morongo Indian Reservation. Dial-a-Ride fares also remained unchanged during the audit period. Dispatching is conducted using new software named Schedule View which was recently purchased for $1,200, which is quite reasonable. There is no current use of GPS technology, although the CNG large buses are equipped for the technology. On time performance of the fixed route averaged 93 percent during the audit period. Systemwide on-time performance was 92.63 percent in FY 2004 and 93.23 percent in FY 2005. Complaints per 1,000 passengers was insignificant from a statistical perspective in each of the audit years, as reported in the Transit Operator Report. In FY 2004, there were 11 passenger complaints received for the fixed-route and four complaints received for the dial-a-ride service during the same fiscal year. The number of reported accidents were minimal. There were three collisions involving the fixed-route reported during FY 2004. Fares are collected and deposited into a collection bag on board each bus vehicle. The bags are each placed into a vault and secured in a safe on a daily basis. The mechanic is the one authorized to handle the bag from the vehicle to the safe. The Special Projects 55 Triennial Performance Audit 19 Beaumont Transit Manager from the Resource Management Department counts the fare revenue the following morning and provides the numbers to the Finance Department for recording into the general ledger for bank deposits. The funds are then picked up by armored vehicle as part of the City’s revenue deposits. The fares are separated by route and bus run. Bus transfers from RTA and Banning are now deposited into the collection bag as well to account for more consistent ridership counts. Prior, drivers used to simply tear up the transfer tickets upon passenger boarding. Bus drivers continue the practice of selling the 10-ride ticket books on the bus. Maintenance Maintenance of the vehicles is undertaken by two mechanics. The Senior Mechanic has over 15 years of experience with the transit program, and works with another trained mechanic. The Senior Mechanic is also a back up driver to the two on-call drivers. The city’s transit maintenance facility is too small to accommodate the large bus, so that maintenance is done outside. Two small bus bays are contained in the facility, along with a hoist to lift a vehicle. Staff indicated the maintenance cost for older buses in increasing. Through the SRTP process, the City has budgeted for new bus replacements. The two 2004 CNG buses that were purchased through a grant have had on-going problems that need to be addressed by Maintenance. Despite the vehicles both being under warranty for repairs, the outside vendors including the engine manufacturer and bus builder have not been cooperative when requests for technical assistance are made by the mechanics. Maintenance follows the federal/state A, B, C schedule of maintenance, including routine oil changes and other typical inspections/light repair as per mileage indicators when service is due. There are two maintenance bays in the facility. Training of mechanics at local community colleges like San Bernardino Valley College includes orientation and two days of troubleshooting. Maintenance that can not be done in-house, like transmission work, is outsourced to available dealers such as a Ford/Chevy dealer in Banning. Spare parts are kept at a minimum at the maintenance facility. The value of the spare parts like brake pads and headlights at any given time is between $5,000 and $10,000. One measure of vehicle maintenance is the number of vehicle breakdowns during revenue service. During FY 2004, there were six vehicle failures reported for the fixed- route and seven reported for the dial-a-ride during the same period. Marketing During the triennial audit period, the Pass Transit System developed a multi-color design Ride Guide featuring fares, fixed-route schedules, system route map, and information about the paratransit services. The Ride Guide’s route map denotes places of interest such as government offices, hospitals, high schools and major shopping centers. Both Beaumont and Banning shared the cost to fund the Ride Guide. 56 Triennial Performance Audit 20 Beaumont Transit In addition, the City of Beaumont’s website contains only general information regarding transit services offered by the City: http://www.ci.beaumont.ca.us/busroutes.htm. However, the website does not contain a link to the Pass Transit Ride Guide. The City has recognized the need for increased marketing efforts. The branding efforts surrounding the creation of Pass Transit in FY 2004 and FY 2005 was a good first step that included new exterior bus livery, Ride Guide design and bus stop signage. School outreaches have been held and were well received in the City of Beaumont. In FY 2006, the school outreach program was continued and expanded throughout the Pass Transit System area including additional efforts to market the system to major employers. Bus schedules are also placed at several locations such as at the library, and during promotions like including a schedule in Walmart shopping bags. The City also teams up with other local interest like the Chamber of Commerce and Parks District to promote the transit system. When the Pass Transit system was first promoted, the City did short radio spots. General Administration and Management Administrative and operational services for the transit system are currently provided by city staff from the Resource Management Department. The former transit manager was the lead bus mechanic who retired in the Fall of 2006. The Department’s manager and a Special Projects Manager provide day-to-day functions to support the system including dispatch, reservations and driver coordination. Finance related work, grants management and administration of TransTrack are handled by the City’s Director of Finance and a financial analyst. Dispatch responsibility was transferred from the maintenance division to the Resource Management Department between August and November 2006. By transferring dispatch responsibility to Resource Management, transit passengers calling the phone number on the bus brochure tap into one of 23 open lines, likely ensuring an answer by city staff. The City does not track trip denials although the service is same day reservations. Staff indicated most dial-a-ride reservations are 24 hour advanced. Late cancellations and no shows by dial-a-ride passengers result in the fare being charged and collected when the passenger receives their next ride. The City tracks this using the new scheduling software and reconciles against the driver manifest. The policy is fairly new and is stated on the Pass Transit brochure. 57 Triennial Performance Audit 21 Beaumont Transit Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. Beaumont has complied with five of the eight TDA compliance requirements. The three requirements that were not complied with included late submittal of the Annual State Controller Reports, late submittal of the Annual Fiscal Audits, and non- compliance with the farebox recovery ratio. Both RCTC and the State Controller have withheld TDA funds as a result of non-compliance with submission of required fiscal reports. 2. Six of the eight prior audit recommendations have been implemented. Two have not been implemented, including the timely submittal of the State Controller Reports, and inclusion of farebox ratio information in the State Controller Report. 3. Administrative and operational services for the transit system are currently provided by city staff from the Resource Management Department. The former transit manager was the lead bus mechanic who retired in the Fall of 2006. 4. The 2006 CHP terminal inspection was rated unsatisfactory due to violations in the Driver Records category. The City has indicated the issues were resolved by January 2007. 5. City staff indicated that City overhead costs are one of the highest in the region. Non-management employees are part of the SEIU General Unit. The additional overhead costs (e.g. full health benefits at the family level) are included in the operations cost of the system. 6. Total ridership increased 21.4 percent systemwide between FY 2003 and FY 2006. The introduction of a third fixed route service from Beaumont to Cabazon, along with modifications to the other two local routes, might have had an effect on ridership. 7. A fare increase was adopted and implemented for the fixed-route in FY 2006 which raised fixed route fares. Dial-a-ride fares were held constant. 8. With expansion and adjustment of fixed route service, most of the transit service was exempt from the farebox recovery ratio. However, the dial-a-ride service lost its exemption in FY 2005-06, as shown in the annual financial audit. 9. Pass Area Transit developed and introduced a multi-color design Ride Guide featuring fares, fixed-route schedules, system route map, and information about paratransit services. 10. During the audit period, Beaumont has assisted in planning, coordinating and implementing the emerging Pass Transit System, which is a cooperative effort 58 Triennial Performance Audit 22 Beaumont Transit between the transit systems of the cities of Banning and Beaumont. The City is part of an adhoc committee set up to develop a seamless service for both city transit programs. 11. While the dial-a-ride is intended to provide complementary ADA services, as mandated by Federal law, it was not clear whether Beaumont dial-a-ride travels as far as the Cabazon, given the new trunk line fixed route provides services to Cabazon. This could present an ADA issue that should be clarified. 59 Triennial Performance Audit 23 Beaumont Transit Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Consider in the SRTP the implementation of Sunday fixed-route service to be consistent with the Banning Transit System. The City of Banning implemented Sunday service on its three fixed routes in July 2004. Sunday service operates between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Although the transit systems of Banning and Beaumont operate separately, they both have a common brand identity as Pass Area Transit. Both systems have sought to compliment each other as well as provide seamless connections. 2. Consider providing ADA dial-a-ride to Cabazon where the main fixed route trunkline extends. It was not clear whether Beaumont dial-a-ride vehicles travel from Beaumont to Cabazon to support the fixed route buses. Given that Beaumont is responsible for a passenger whose trip begins in the City, the service area of dial-a-ride should be reviewed and service provided, if necessary. 3. Consider additional training with CNG engines. As the two CNG vehicles are the newest in the fleet, maintenance staff should be well-versed in being able to service alternative fuel vehicles. Local community colleges like College of the Desert and San Bernardino Valley College in Coachella Valley might have related classes regarding CNG engines. Beaumont may also consider collaborating with SunLine maintenance staff about CNG training and certifications. 4. Complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and specialized service for elderly and disabled. Separate annual State Controller Reports should be submitted for each type of service to be in compliance with State instructions. As Beaumont provides both general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled, separate reports should be filed for each service type. 5. The City should consider adding a link on its website to the Pass Transit System Ride Guide. The City of Beaumont’s website contains general information regarding transit services offered by the City. The webpage refers to a link to the Pass Transit System Map at the bottom of the page; however, no such link exists. It would be helpful to passengers to have direct access to this link. 6. The City should ensure that its Annual Financial Audit and State Controller Operator Reports are completed in full and submitted in a timely manner as per Public Utilities Code, Sections 99243 and 99245. Among the operator compliance requirements under TDA are the timely submittal of financial and operational data to the State Controller and RCTC. The State Controller Report is generally due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year, or 110 days 60 Triennial Performance Audit 24 Beaumont Transit if filed electronically. The City was out of compliance for two out of the past three years with regard to this requirement. The annual fiscal and compliance audits are required to be submitted to RCTC and the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year, unless a 90 day extension has been granted by RCTC as allowed by law. The audits for each of the fiscal years reviewed were submitted well after the 180 day period following the end of each fiscal year. The State Controller Reports should include all elements, including the exclusions for the farebox calculations. 61 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF CITY OF CORONA TRANSIT S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 62 Triennial Performance Audit i City of Corona TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 4 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 4 Section III................................................................................................................. 8 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations................................. 8 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 11 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 11 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 14 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 14 Section V............................................................................................................... 15 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 15 Operations & Planning................................................................................ 15 Maintenance................................................................................................ 18 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 19 General Administration and Management............................................. 19 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 21 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 21 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 22 63 Triennial Performance Audit 1 City of Corona Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the City of Corona Transit Services covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate the City of Corona’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates the City of Corona’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the City of Corona Transit Services is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Corona has provided general public dial-a-ride service since April 1977. In February 2001, the city began operating fixed route service under the brand “Corona Cruiser” in response to its rapid growth in population and to provide better connectivity to other transit services. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, the City of Corona had a population of 125,000 residents. Since that time, the City’s population has grown to approximately 145,000 residents in 2006 as estimated by the State Department of Finance. The city limits have also expanded to about 36.5 square miles. The service area for dial-a-ride is slightly larger at about 40.5 square miles since the service includes the adjacent unincorporated communities of Home Gardens, El Cerrito, Green River and Coronita. The City of Corona has had a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) since January 1994 to provide complementary ADA paratransit to 64 Triennial Performance Audit 2 City of Corona RTA’s buses that travel through the city. The City also has formal fare transfer agreements with RTA and Metrolink. Fleet The City of Corona Transit Services operates a fleet of 11 active and three reserve vehicles ranging from 16 to 20 passenger seating capacity. Nine vehicles are operated for demand response service, and the remaining five are operated for fixed route service. All vehicles are lift equipped and are owned by the City. The vehicles are either Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or gasoline fueled. A detailed description of Corona’s transit fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 City of Corona Transit Services Fleet Inventory Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/Wheelchair Space 1997 El Dorado Ford E-350 2 Gasoline 16/2 1998 Goshen Sentry 2 CNG 18/2 1999 Goshen Sentry 3 CNG 18/2 2001 Goshen Ford E-450 2 Gasoline 16/2 2004 Goshen Ford E-450 5 Gasoline 20/2 Total 14 Source: City of Corona FY 2005/06 – FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan The City operates a total of two deviated fixed routes that serve the major commercial corridors and nodes within the city Monday through Saturday. Buses serving these routes are allowed to deviate up to one-half mile on either side of the route with a two hour advance reservation. In addition, the Corona Cruiser fixed-routes connect with RTA regional bus routes, Metrolink commuter train services, and Park and Ride lots. The fixed route does not operate on Sunday as well as on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. A description of each route is presented in the table below: Table I-2 City of Corona Transit Services Fixed-Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations Blue Line Corona Cruiser Fixed- Route Hourly (Monday through Friday from 4:49 a.m. to 8:21 p.m./Saturday from 7:50 a.m. to 7:09 p.m.) Wal-Mart; Home Gardens; Santana Park Mountain Gate Park; Corona Library; North Main Corona Metrolink Station; and River Run Apartments Red Line Corona Cruiser Fixed- Route Every 54 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:04 a.m. to 9:00 p.m./Saturday from 8:07 a.m. to 7:05 p.m.) Target; Taber Park & Ride; Wal-Mart; North Main Corona Metrolink Station; and Corona Library Source: City of Corona Transit Services 65 Triennial Performance Audit 3 City of Corona Dial-A-Ride The Corona Dial-A-Ride is a general public demand-response designed to provide curb- to-curb transportation for area residents. The dial-a-ride service area encompasses the City of Corona, satellite locations in Norco and the unincorporated Riverside County communities of Home Gardens, Coronita and El Cerrito. Dial-a-Ride offers complementary and priority service to passengers certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Reservations are accepted from one to 14 days in advanced. Dial-a-ride service operates Monday through Friday between the hours of 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Saturday between the hours of 8:00 and 5:00 p.m. Dial-a-Ride does not operate on Sunday as well as on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Fares The City of Corona Transit Services’ fare structure is based the particular service utilized. The fare schedule is presented in the following table: Table I-3 City of Corona Transit Services Fare Schedule Cash Fares Fixed Route Dial-a-Ride Per Ride Day Pass 31-Day Pass Adult/General $1.25 $3.75 $43.00 $3.00 Student (K-12 Grade) $1.25 $3.75 $32.00 N/A Senior (60+)/Disabled $0.60 $1.85 $21.00 $1.50 ADA Certified $0.60 $1.85 $21.00 $1.50 Medicare Card Holders $0.60 $1.85 $21.00 $1.50 Children (46” tall or under) $0.25 N/A N/A $0.50 Source: City of Corona Transit Services 66 Triennial Performance Audit 4 City of Corona Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City of Corona Transit Services ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, eight apply to the City of Corona. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (paper filing): FY 2004: December 13, 2004 FY 2005: October 17, 2005 FY 2006: October 19, 2006 Conclusion: Complied The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: October 8, 2004 FY 2005: October 12, 2005 FY 2006: October 20, 2006 Conclusion: Complied 67 Triennial Performance Audit 5 City of Corona The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 The City of Corona participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: July 24, 2003; May 4, 2004; June 24, 2005; April 18, 2006. It should be noted that the 2005 inspection rated the facility as unsatisfactory. However, a reinspection was conducted on October 11, 2005 and the facility was rated satisfactory. Conclusion: Complied. The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the City of Corona’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in Corona’s operating budget: FY 2004: +15.06% FY 2005: + 9.60% FY 2006: + 3.01% The budget increased over 15% in FY 2004 due to realignment and implementation of new fixed route service in July 2003. Source: FYs 2004-2006 City of Corona Annual Financial Audit Reports. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-fifth (20 percent). Public Utilities Code, Section 99268.3 The system’s fare ratios using audited data are as follows: FY 2004: 25.1% FY 2005: 20.0% FY 2006: 20.3% Conclusion: Complied The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 The employees of the City of Corona are part of the State Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Conclusion: Complied 68 Triennial Performance Audit 6 City of Corona If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) The City of Corona contracts with a private carrier, Transportation Concepts, to provide drivers and operations support for fixed route and dial-a-ride services. There are no provisions in the service contracts that preclude the hiring of part-time drivers. The City employs part time drivers through its contract with the private operator. Of the contracted 20 drivers, about 10 percent, or 2 drivers, are part time employees. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) The City of Corona makes full use of federal funds available to it, as reported in the annual State Controller and National Transit Database reports. FY 2004: Operating ($128,000) Capital ($183,086) FY 2005: Operating ($132,000) Capital ($2,589) FY 2006: Operating ($139,000) Capital ($209,070) Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. Corona has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. 2. The city received an unsatisfactory rating for the 2005 CHP terminal inspection due to placing more than twenty percent of the city’s representative sample (two out of three buses) out of service for unsafe operating conditions, and due to the contractor’s ineffective preventative maintenance program. However, a reinspection was conducted by the CHP on October 11, 2005 and the facility was rated satisfactory. 3. The operating budget increased significantly in FY 2003-04 due to the introduction of Saturday service for the Red Line in August 2003, and in October 2003 for the Blue Line. Realignments of both the Blue and Red Lines also occurred in FY 2004 to serve the new North Main Corona Metrolink station. At the same time, service to the West Corona Metrolink station was discontinued. As a result, service hours increased during the audit period, averaging just under nine percent each year with the addition of Saturday service. 4. The City met its farebox requirement in the last three fiscal years. The minimum farebox requirement is 20 percent. Because the fixed route underwent significant changes during the audit period, these services are exempt from the farebox 69 Triennial Performance Audit 7 City of Corona calculation. The City has made a commitment to supplement fare revenues with local City contributions to ensure the farebox recovery ratio is met. 70 Triennial Performance Audit 8 City of Corona Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations The City of Corona’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Utilize the taxi program administered by RCTC to address capacity issues. Actions taken by the City of Corona: From March 2004 to October 2004, the City participated in the taxi demonstration program administered by RCTC. However, City staff indicated that the vehicles utilized for the taxi program were not properly equipped to handle ADA-certified passengers. In response to capacity issues, efforts were made to assist Dial-a-Ride passengers with trip planning to help reduce the number of cancellations and “No-Shows”. The transit manager indicated trip cancellations have decreased from 108 in FY 2004-05 to 67 in FY 2005-06. Dispatchers also educate passengers about the fixed route service. In addition, the realignment of the fixed route service has contributed to the relief of capacity issues on dial-a-ride. These efforts have started to reduce the number of trip denials. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Develop training program to transition dial-a-ride clients to the fixed route system. Actions taken by the City of Corona: Dial-a-Ride patrons who could complete their requested trips via Corona Cruiser are encouraged by the reservation agents as well as the bus drivers to take advantage of the fixed route. To further enhance this effort, group presentations have been made to those groups that make up Dial-a-Ride’s clientele such as senior citizen centers and housing complexes. During these presentations, complementary fixed-route Day-Passes have been distributed to encourage passengers to utilize the fixed-route service. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 71 Triennial Performance Audit 9 City of Corona Prior Recommendation 3 Raise the ADA dial-a-ride fare to match RTA’s fare. Actions taken by the City of Corona: RTA’s fare increase for dial-a-ride ADA passengers went from $1.00 to $2.50. The City of Corona also implemented a dial-a-ride fare increase in July 2005, raising the fare from $1.00 to $1.50. Corona stated that RTA’s dial-a-ride service was different in that the service area is much larger, and that the average trip length is longer than Corona’s. Conclusion: This recommendation no longer applied, as fares have been increased and justified. Prior Recommendation 4 Revise the SRTP to include a service plan that will achieve the farebox requirement. Actions taken by the City of Corona: Corona adjusted the fixed route in July 2003 to serve the North Main Metrolink Station as a way to increase productivity and ridership. The City also raised fares to increase revenue. In addition, based upon past practice, the City continues to be committed to contribute adequate local funds to make up any deficit in order to meet the farebox ratio requirement of 20 percent. The FY 2006-08 SRTP includes annual amount contribution from the local funding sources, based on the projected farebox ratio deficit. Such fund transfers will be formally carried out prior to closing of the books for each respective fiscal year. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 5 Improve the bus brochure with additional graphics identifying school sites. Actions taken by the City of Corona: The current Corona Cruiser brochure and system map has incorporated all intermediate and high schools served by Corona Cruiser fixed-routes. All subsequent brochures will continue to include school sites. The brochure is also bilingual in English and Spanish, and includes several phone numbers that go to the contract operator or City Hall. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 72 Triennial Performance Audit 10 City of Corona Prior Recommendation 6 Adjust bus schedule to improve on-time performance. Actions taken by the City of Corona: The Corona Cruiser’s on-time performance has consistently been between 97 and 99 percent on-time during the audit period. The dial-a-ride service has had some issues with meeting on-time performance goals in FY 2004 and 2005, but has steadily improved the service. On-time performance for dial-a-ride improved from 91 percent in FY 2004 to 93 percent in 2005, and to 95 percent in FY 2006. New dispatch software, Midas, was installed which has helped dispatch operations and communications with the drivers. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 7 Implement monthly pass program. Actions taken by the City of Corona: The 31-Day (Monthly) Pass was implemented effective May 2004 for the general public, students, seniors and the disabled. The City indicated is sells about 15 passes a month. The pass can be purchased on the City’s website, at the public library and at City Hall. The program is also advertised in stores and at the senior center. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 8 Ensure proper reporting in the State Controller’s Annual Report. Actions taken by the City of Corona: The City has been working to improve its reporting of data in the State Controller’s Report. It was indicated that the reporting of employee Full-Time Equivalents (FTEs) only includes the contract operator staff, and not city staff. This should be corrected to include an allocation of city staff who are associated with the transit service to comply with the TDA definition. Regarding other performance data, a comparison of sample data between the State Controller Report and the National Transit Database shows consistency. Conclusion: This recommendation is in progress of being fully implemented. 73 Triennial Performance Audit 11 City of Corona Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews Corona’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for Corona. Table IV-1 City of Corona Systemwide Transit Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003-2006 Operating Cost $1,154,923 $1,331,125 $1,450,636 $1,516,339 31.3% Total Passengers 170,236 210,200 228,904 205,875 20.9% Vehicle Service Hours 28,818.0 30,907.0 31,835.0 31,386.2 8.9% Vehicle Service Miles 410,077 421,505 424,029 397,179 -3.1% Employee FTE's 27 26 26 25 -7.4% Passenger Fares $142,265 $185,033 $190,448 $237,316 66.8% Operating Cost per Passenger $6.78 $6.33 $6.34 $7.37 8.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $40.08 $43.07 $45.57 $48.31 20.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.82 $3.16 $3.42 $3.82 35.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 5.9 6.8 7.2 6.6 11.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.42 0.50 0.54 0.52 24.9% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,067.3 1,188.7 1,224.4 1,255.4 17.6% Average Fare per Passenger $0.84 $0.88 $0.83 $1.15 37.9% Fare Recovery Ratio * 15.04% 25.13% 20.03% 20.26% 34.7% * Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per TDA and RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 74 Triennial Performance Audit 12 City of Corona Table IV-2 Corona Cruiser Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $588,788 $647,993 $799,461 $653,928 11.1% Total Passengers 102,777 142,062 162,423 146,983 43.0% Vehicle Service Hours 14,870.0 16,177.0 17,694.0 18,214.0 22.5% Vehicle Service Miles 191,053 197,050 208,168 206,974 8.3% Employee FTE's 8 10 10 12 50.0% Passenger Fares $57,032 $99,484 $105,732 $131,509 130.6% Operating Cost per Passenger $5.73 $4.56 $4.92 $4.45 -22.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $39.60 $40.06 $45.18 $35.90 -9.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.08 $3.29 $3.84 $3.16 2.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 6.9 8.8 9.2 8.1 16.8% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.54 0.72 0.78 0.71 32.0% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,858.8 1,617.7 1,769.4 1,517.8 -18.3% Average Fare per Passenger $0.55 $0.70 $0.65 $0.89 61.2% Fare Recovery Ratio 9.69% 15.35% 13.23% 20.11% 107.6% Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 75 Triennial Performance Audit 13 City of Corona Table IV-3 City of Corona Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $566,135 $683,132 $651,175 $862,411 52.3% Total Passengers 67,459 68,138 66,481 58,892 -12.7% Vehicle Service Hours 13,948.0 14,730.0 14,141.0 13,172.2 -5.6% Vehicle Service Miles 219,024 224,455 215,861 190,205 -13.2% Employee FTE's 19 16 16 13 -31.6% Passenger Fares $85,233 $85,549 $84,716 $105,807 24.1% Operating Cost per Passenger $8.39 $10.03 $9.79 $14.64 74.5% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $40.59 $46.38 $46.05 $65.47 61.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.58 $3.04 $3.02 $4.53 75.4% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 4.8 4.6 4.7 4.5 -7.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.31 0.30 0.31 0.31 0.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 734.1 920.6 883.8 1,013.2 38.0% Average Fare per Passenger $1.26 $1.26 $1.27 $1.80 42.2% Fare Recovery Ratio 15.06% 12.52% 13.01% 12.27% -18.5% Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 76 Triennial Performance Audit 14 City of Corona Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased by 31.3 percent systemwide from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. The service expanded in FY 2003-04 with the addition of Saturday service for the fixed route. The fixed route was also realigned to serve a new Metrolink Station. 2. Vehicle service hours exhibited an upward trend systemwide during the audit period. Fixed route hours increased significantly due to the expansion of service. In contrast, dial-a-ride hours decreased as the transit staff were making efforts to shift riders onto fixed route. This is a positive effectiveness measure. 3. Ridership on the fixed-route grew by 43 percent over the past three years due to the realignment of service to increase productivity, plus the efforts to shift dial-a-ride passengers to the fixed route. However, in the past year, when a fare increase was implemented in July 2005, fixed route ridership decreased by about 9.5 percent. Ridership decreased on dial-a-ride by almost 13 percent. 4. Operating cost per hour increased due to the faster rate of growth in cost when compared to growth in revenue hours. The contract with the private transit provider is on an annual renewal basis. With each renewal, the cost increased. Fuel, insurance and other materials also increased for the service which has been a transit industry- wide problem in the past several years. Cost per hour for the fixed route increased from $39.60 in FY 2003 to $45.18 in FY 2005, which later dropped to $35.90 in FY 2006. 5. Passengers per vehicle service hour shows an increase during the audit period, including 17 percent for fixed route. The growth in fixed route ridership exceeded growth in revenue hours, thus showing a positive trend. Dial-a-ride passengers per hour was level at about 4.5 riders per hour in FY 2006, a reduction of 7.6 percent from FY 2003. Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The service changes made by Corona during the audit period have been mostly positive, as indicated by the growth in ridership, and positive trends with several performance indicators. Corona’s efforts to shift dial-a-ride passengers to the fixed route have also been positive, which could account for part of the ridership increase on the Corona Cruiser, coupled with a decrease on dial-a-ride. Given the rather compact service area of the system, dial-a-ride has been able to sustain over 4 riders an hour throughout the audit period, while fixed route has increased its ridership from 7 passengers per hour to between 8 and 9 per hour. The newly acquired dispatch software procured by the City should help with creating additional efficiencies with group rides and maintaining on-time performance. New Automated Vehicle Locator (AVL) technology installed on the buses will also improve the provision of service. 77 Triennial Performance Audit 15 City of Corona Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the City of Corona Transit Services. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the City: · Operations & Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub-functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that fall under General Administration. Operations & Planning Since the City initiated fixed route service in 2001, it has been in the process of refining its transit services to become more efficient and responsive. The City has added Saturday service for both the fixed route Corona Cruiser and the demand-response Corona Dial-a- Ride. The Dial-a-Ride service continues to be operated as a general public service, with priority given to ADA-certified passengers. Approximately 65 percent of Dial-a-Ride users are senior and disabled. The list of Dial-a-Ride passengers has grown during the triennial audit period. From March 2004 to October 2004, the City participated in the taxi demonstration program, administered by RCTC. City staff indicated that the vehicles utilized for the taxi overflow program were not properly equipped to handle ADA- certified passengers. The City’s two fixed-routes, the Blue Line and Red Line, were exempt from farebox recovery requirements during the audit period. The Blue Line underwent a route modification in July 2002, which was exempt through June 2005. In addition, with the addition of Saturday service in October 2003, the Blue Line extended it exempt status through June 2006. The Red Line initiated service in July 2002 as the successor to the original Green Line. Like the Blue Line, its exemption from the farebox recovery requirement ran through June 2005. Saturday service was initiated on the Red Line in August 2003, which extended its exempt status through June 2006. Corona also had to distinguish between local and regional service with RTA. Since RTA runs routes through Corona, the timing of schedules at transfer points is required. The City has been working with RTA to resolve route issues relating to the duplication of service along major corridors in the city, including Magnolia Ave and Main Street. To ensure this standard, the City realigned the Corona Cruiser Blue Line and established timed-transfer points along the routes. 78 Triennial Performance Audit 16 City of Corona The City of Corona has a number of transfer agreements with neighboring transit agencies, including RTA, Riverside Special Transportation Services, and Metrolink. The City provides RTA’s complementary paratransit within the city boundaries during the hours of Corona’s bus service. RTA riders can transfer to Corona transit at selected locations at no cost; however, boarding at a different location would not be free of charge. In addition, riders connecting from Corona transit to Metrolink ride free on the Corona system. The City’s transit services have been delivered through a contract operator. Transportation Concepts, based in Irvine California, has operated the City’s transit service since 1999. The current operator contract covered one initial year from November 1, 2002, through October 31, 2003, with four, one-year option extensions. The City has renewed the contract annually including making two amendments covering the last two fiscal years of the contract. However, the contract extensions are scheduled to expire on October 31, 2007. As per the last contract amendment during the audit period, the contractor received $37.01 per vehicle service hour for normal fixed-route and demand- response service, and $22.00 per vehicle service hour for Special Service. Per the contract, all fare revenues collected by the contract operator are transferred to the City on a daily basis. Transportation Concepts’ Corona operation employs 20 drivers, four dispatchers, one administrator, one trainer and one service worker. Route assignments are allocated based on seniority. Employees are non-union. Half of the employees are cross-trained. All dispatchers are trained as drivers and have a Class “B” license. Fixed-route drivers are required to complete pre-trip and daily trip logs. Dial-a-Ride drivers are required to complete manifests. Drivers are recruited through classified advertisements, referrals, the Employment Development Department (EDD), and the GAIN program. About 75 percent of new drivers have a Class “C” license. New drivers undergo a minimum of 86 hours of training. This consists of eight hours of DMV Commercial Handbook training; 32 hours of pre-trip, defensive driving, empathy and wheelchair training; 30 hours of behind the wheel training; and an additional 16 hours route training. Supervisory ride checks are performed every six months. Transportation Concepts provides an employee handbook which contains the company’s drug and alcohol policy. The contract operator has developed an internal system of points for incidents. Drivers involved in accidents are retrained involving cadet oversight. Drivers cannot have more than three points in a six month period. In July 2005, the City implemented a systemwide fare increase, the first in the last five years. The fare increase was necessary to offset the growth in operating expenses including increases in fuel costs, Worker’s Compensation, other insurance and general inflation. Transit experienced a decline in ridership of about nine percent during the first six to eight months of the increase. Prior to the approval and implementation of the fare increase, the City introduced a 31-day pass in May 2004. The City utilizes the TransTrack software system for the purpose of tracking eight performance indicators for RCTC’s Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). An Excel spreadsheet had been utilized previously. City transit staff indicated that the software was user-friendly and that staff was able to track trends and make assumptions about transit services. In addition, staff thought it would be feasible to utilize the TransTrack modules to complete the Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP). 79 Triennial Performance Audit 17 City of Corona Transportation Concepts supplies performance data in its monthly report to the City. Both hardcopies and digital format of the data is provided. The contractor uses Microsoft Access to maintain the data. However, the transit manager uses Microsoft Excel, resulting in manual re-input of the performance data. The City should consider ways to receive the performance data in compatible format to reduce the need to re-input the information. Given that both the contractor and the transit manager use Microsoft products, there should be some solution to converting the information. The City is committed to maintaining a 95 percent on-time performance standard On- time performance is measured by both the dispatcher and driver. Drivers are required to call in at timed stops along the route. This procedure is followed up by random checks by dispatch and supervisory staff, including occasional ride alongs and shadow checking. The AVL program provides support to the checking of all vehicles at any given time. A summary of the agency’s on-time performance is presented in the following table: Table V-1 City of Corona On-Time Performance Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride On-Time Performance 99.17% 91.02% 98.85% 93.53% 97.92% 95.65% Source: City of Corona In June 2006, the City completed the successful implementation of Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) and Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) units in its transit fleet. This technology interfaces with the RouteMatch software program. RouteMatch allows for reservations to be received and scheduled up to 14 days in advance. The data is transmitted to the driver on the route. The information contained on RouteMatch is crossed-checked against the bus manifest. Operational data have been analyzed to determine the number of accidents, roadcalls, and complaints received during the audit period. A summary of operational indicators are presented in the following table: Table V-1 City of Corona Transit Services Operations Summary Year* 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Accidents 0 0 5 4 0 1 Roadcalls 19 17 15 0 2 1 Complaints 2 6 7 14 9 3 Source: City of Corona Based upon the operational data, the City has shown considerable improvement. Accidents, roadcalls, and complaints have been declining as the fixed-route system has become more efficient and responsive to the ridership. Driver safety has improved, as the number of reported accidents for dial-a-ride ranged from zero in FY 2004 to four in FY 80 Triennial Performance Audit 18 City of Corona 2005. Accidents involving fixed-route services were minimal, with none reported in FYs 2004 and 2006, and five reported in FY 2005. Pre-paid postage comment cards are available on the buses. Comments and complaints are directed through the City’s Transportation Planning Supervisor. A phone number and email address are provided on the rider brochures and comment cards. The City also conducts mobility training classes twice monthly at the Corona Senior Center that trains persons about public transportation, particularly seniors, persons with disabilities and the vision-impaired. These training classes involve hands-on training on the use of wheelchair lifts, bus schedules, and passes. Maintenance The operations contract with Transportation Concepts includes maintenance of vehicles. Transportation Concepts has subcontracted with a local vendor, Corona Fleet Services, to provide maintenance. Corona Fleet Services has been the subcontractor for Transportation Concepts since the original contract in 1999. Preventative maintenance is conducted according to Federal Transit Administration schedules of every 3,000 miles, or 45 days, whichever occurs first. CNG tank inspections are performed every 36,000 miles. The technician working on CNG vehicles is required to be certified in the inspection and repair of all components, such as the fuel system and storage tanks. The Transportation Planning Supervisor maintains a spreadsheet to track when preventative maintenance is conducted to provide early warnings of potential troubles from vehicle breakdowns. Maintenance spot checks as well as complete vehicle checks are performed at the subcontractor’s facility. Inspections are conducted using a checklist that organizes the inspection items by major category, including driver’s gauges, passenger area, visual inspection and road test. Repairs or adjustments are noted on the checklist, which are then elevated for maintenance and repair. Mileage and date of each inspection are recorded for each vehicle to provide an inspection history. Labor and parts for repairs are itemized and invoiced to Transportation Concepts by the subcontractor. As a State requirement, drivers are also trained to conduct daily pre-trip inspections prior to service. Maintenance reports are required as part of the monthly contractor report provided by Transportation Concepts to City staff. Maintenance costs per vehicle for the month are provided as a snapshot of each vehicle’s operating condition. More detailed information is also included in the monthly report, including the next scheduled check for each vehicle and the mile and time intervals between inspections. The City contracts with a private vendor, ClearChannel Outdoor Inc., to install, maintain and service many bus shelters. The City receives 15 percent of the advertising sales at $4,000 per quarter. This relationship relieves Corona from maintenance of these particular shelters, although the City continues to maintain other bus stops that it has installed. The City approved a seven-year extension to its agreement with ClearChannel for bus shelter maintenance in December 2005. The City has prepared a Purchasing Policy and Procedures, approved by the City Council in October 2005. The manual provides guidelines and protocols for any outside vendor purchases. A purchase requisition is required for any and all purchases over $5,000. 81 Triennial Performance Audit 19 City of Corona Marketing Marketing of transit services is provided through a variety of methods and outlets. The City’s marketing efforts include two glossy rider brochures. The Corona Cruiser brochure contains schedules for the two fixed routes, system map and fare information. The brochure also contains information regarding connecting transit services such as RTA and Metrolink. RTA connecting bus routes are shown on the system map. The Corona Dial-a- Ride brochure contains information about the demand response service and service area. Both brochures are bilingual in English and Spanish. The City also maintains a website, http://www.CoronaTransit.com, which contains rider brochures and system maps in PDF format as well as general information regarding transit options in the city with Spanish subtitles. Each of the 160 Corona Cruiser bus stops contains fare and systemwide schedule information. The City offers several types of fare media. The 31-Day Pass can be purchased at the Corona Public Library and Corona City Hall. On the first day of use, the 31-Day Pass is punched with the expiration date by the bus operator. Day Passes are purchased from the bus operator and are good for one day of unlimited use on the Corona Cruiser fixed route service. The City has an MOU with Metrolink, which allows Metrolink passengers free rides on both the Corona Cruiser and Corona Dial-a-Ride to or from the North Main Corona Metrolink Station. RTA accepts Corona Cruiser’s Day Pass or 31 Day Pass for one way transfers to RTA Routes 1 and 3. Corona Cruiser accepts RTA Day Pass or 31 Day Pass for one way transfers to Red Line and Blue Line. The City presented findings from a 2003 Corona Cruiser Onboard Survey in its FY 2005- 2007 SRTP. The survey found that 74 percent of riders were women, 30 percent were between the ages of 25 and 34 and that 68 percent were of Hispanic descent. In addition, the survey found that 90 percent of riders did not have access to a vehicle; thus a vast majority of Corona Cruiser’s ridership is transit dependent. Regarding overall satisfaction with the Corona Cruiser, 76 percent of riders rated the system a “7” or higher, with 32 percent rating the service a “10” on a 10-point scale, with “10” equated as “Excellent.” The City is planning another transit survey before July 2007. General Administration and Management Corona’s transit system is administered by Public Works Department staff comprised of the Transportation Planning Supervisor, who serves as the manager of the transit system, and a Project Manager (Contractor). Transit staff administers the contract with the private vendor for operations and maintenance of the transit system. The public works department moved into the new City Hall which is now away from the City’s relatively new Corporation Yard where the contractor’s management team is located. However, staff and the contractor have maintained close communications and oversight. The operator’s dispatchers are also next door to the Transportation Engineer. It was indicated that the contractor has good dispatchers who provide a personal touch with the transit clients. Monthly management reports from the contractor provide the formal tool for communicating performance of the transit system. The Transportation Planning Supervisor keeps her own set of performance data on spreadsheets that are based on these reports to review monthly and yearly trends, and to organize and store data for reporting to the State Controller and Federal Transit Administration. A set of performance data and spreadsheets are also used internally for reporting to RCTC. Regular meetings are held 82 Triennial Performance Audit 20 City of Corona with contract management to review the trends and detect any anomalies in the service. The Corona City Council oversees the operation of the transit service by serving the role of transit board. The City Council is responsible for approving the SRTP, major capital purchases (e.g. vehicles), fare increases, and budgetary cost thresholds. The Public Works Department provides oversight of performance indicators. The Public Works Director reports to the Council regarding the operation of the transit service. In addition, to Council oversight, there are two committees that review transit operations: Infrastructure Committee and the Transportation Committee. The Transportation Committee examines impacts to funding and is comprised of elected officials and engineers. Grants Administration The Public Works Department works closely with the Finance Department and RCTC in the management and allocation of grant funding. The transit staff within Public Works conducts a needs assessment for transit-related projects. Requests for project funding are programmed into the Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP), which is submitted to RCTC. All FTA funded projects are carried out in accordance with the requirement of various FTA clauses and under the guidance the Grant Management Handbook. Under satisfactory completion of projects or procurement of capital equipment and full payment, FTA allocation is claimed through the ECHO system on a reimbursement basis. Reporting is done through TEAM-Web system and through annual NTD reports. Quarterly reports are submitted to RCTC and are presented on an Excel spreadsheet. 83 Triennial Performance Audit 21 City of Corona Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. Corona has complied with the all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. 2. The city received an unsatisfactory rating for the 2005 CHP terminal inspection. However, a reinspection was conducted by the CHP on October 11, 2005 and the facility was rated satisfactory. 3. Six of the eight prior audit recommendations have been fully implemented. One recommendation no longer applied which was to increase the ADA fare to match the RTA fare. Another recommendation is in progress of being implemented, which is to ensure proper reporting in the State Controller’s Report. 4. The operating budget increased in FY 2003-04 due to the introduction of Saturday service for the Red Line in August 2003, and in October 2003 for the Blue Line. Realignments of both the Blue and Red Lines also occurred in FY 2004 to serve the new North Main Corona Metrolink station. 5. Ridership on the fixed-route grew overall during the audit period. However, in the past year, when a fare increase was implemented in July 2005, fixed route ridership decreased by about 9 percent. 6. The Corona Cruiser’s on-time performance has consistently been between 97 and 99 percent on-time during the audit period. The dial-a-ride service has had some issues with meeting on-time performance goals in FY 2004 and 2005, but has steadily improved the service. 7. The City utilizes the TransTrack software system for the purpose of tracking eight performance indicators for RCTC’s Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). An Excel spreadsheet had been utilized previously. City transit staff indicated that the software was user-friendly and that staff was able to track trends and make assumptions about transit services. 8. The City presented findings from a 2003 Corona Cruiser Onboard Survey in its FY 2005- 2007 SRTP. Regarding overall satisfaction with the Corona Cruiser, 76 percent of riders rated the system a “7” or higher, with 32 percent rating the service a “10” on a 10- point scale, with “10” equated as “Excellent.” 9. The City is completing the implementation of Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) and Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) units in its transit fleet. This will enhance tracking and communications between dispatchers and drivers. 84 Triennial Performance Audit 22 City of Corona Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Include City staff in the calculation of full time equivalents (FTE). Current reporting of FTE’s in the annual State Controller Report only includes the contract operator staff. Per TDA requirements, FTEs are defined by the total number of employee hours divided by 2,000, including transit administrative staff. Corona staff involved with the administration of the transit system should be included in the FTE calculation. 2. Explore developing a monthly pass outlet program. Sales of the monthly pass have been relative low. While the reason may be the upfront cost of the pass, it may also be its limited availability. Transit staff should consider a program to expand the number of outlets that could sell passes such as food stores, government buildings and other locations where riders might travel to. Marketing, outreach and a rider survey to determine the value of this program might be conducted first. 3. Work with the contract operator to electronically submit the monthly performance report that is compatible with the City computer system. An electronic copy of the monthly performance statistics by the contractor that is consistent with the City software system will save the City’s transit manager time and possibly reduce error from manual re-input of the data. A hardcopy version should continue to be sent which provides backup in case of mistakes in working with transferring data electronically. The common interface should also be compatible with TransTrack data requirements which is used in the development of the City’s PIP and SRTP. Given that the current operating contract expires in October 2007, the City might consider including this data compatibility provision in the new contract. 4. Conduct route by route analysis to evaluate service productivity and performance measures as the routes lose their farebox exemption. All fixed-route services will be counted toward the 20 percent farebox recovery threshold. While the City commits local revenue to supplement the farebox, the City should continue to evaluate service productivity. The RCTC PIP is one tool to enable this analysis. 85 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF CITY OF RIVERSIDE SPECIALIZED TRANSPORTATION SERVICES S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 86 Triennial Performance Audit i RSS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 4 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 4 Section III................................................................................................................. 8 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations................................. 8 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 11 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 11 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 12 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 13 Section V............................................................................................................... 14 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 14 Operations & Planning................................................................................ 14 Maintenance................................................................................................ 15 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 16 General Administration and Management............................................. 17 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 18 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 18 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 19 87 Triennial Performance Audit 1 RSS Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the City of Riverside Specialized Transportation Services (RSS) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate RSS’ effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates RSS’ compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether the City of Riverside Specialized Transportation Services is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System The City of Riverside has provided dial-a-ride service for the elderly and disabled since the summer of 1975. The service was initially conceived to provide seniors with transportation to nutrition programs. The dial-a-ride service has since grown, with rides being provided anywhere within the city limits encompassing close to 86 square miles. Seniors using the service are transported to a variety of destinations, including shopping, adult education, work, social activities and medical appointments. During the triennial audit period, RSS was administered under the City’s Park and Recreation Department. A reorganization by the City placed transit administration and operations currently under the direction of the City’s Community Services Department. The Community Services Department also encompasses senior centers and programs, youth opportunity centers, and BRIDGE – the gang prevention program. The transit 88 Triennial Performance Audit 2 RSS system continues to be a part of the social service programs offered by the city and which are administered by this department. In August 1992, the City entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to provide complementary paratransit service to RTA’s fixed route service within the city boundaries under the American with Disabilities Act. An amendment to the MOU was passed in September 1994 that eliminated RSS’ obligation for the provision of evening ADA service because of low ridership and transferring the hours to increase day service to meet growing demand. In April 2003, an MOU was executed between the City of Riverside and RTA which reaffirms the City’s agreement to provide ADA service and includes specific criteria for the provisions of service to comply with the ADA. Operating hours are from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Thursday; Fridays 7 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekends. RTA paratransit vehicles are used for ADA during the shoulder hours of RTA fixed route service through the city. RSS vehicles are used as backup to RTA’s paratransit fleet. Fleet RSS operates a fleet of 25 active vehicles that are 12 passenger-seated vans. All vehicles comply with the requirements of the Americans’ With Disabilities Act (ADA) by being equipped with wheelchair lifts. The vehicles are fueled by either Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). A detailed description of RSS’ fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 City of Riverside Specialized Services Fleet Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/Wheelchair Space 2002 Goshen Ford 9 CNG 12/2 2003 Goshen Ford 10 LPG 12/2 2005 Ford Aerotech 2 CNG 12/2 2005 Ford GCII 4 CNG 12/2 Total 25 Source: 2006 NTD The current Dial-a-Ride fare schedule is presented in the following table: 89 Triennial Performance Audit 3 RSS Table I-2 City of Riverside Specialized Services Fare Schedule Cash Fares General One-Way Fare $2.00 20-Ride Punch Card $40.00 Premium Service (Unlimited Monthly Rides) $175.00 A fare increase was phased in over a 16-month period beginning in May 2005. The one- way cash fare increased initially from $1.00 to $1.50 and Unlimited Premium Service to $125 per month through June 2006. Effective July1, 2006, the one-way cash fare increased to $2.00 and Unlimited Premium Service to $175 per month. The RSS fares were increased shortly after the fare increase by the Riverside Transit Agency. 90 Triennial Performance Audit 4 RSS Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the City of Riverside Specialized Transportation Services’ ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, nine are applicable to the City’s transit service. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (internet filing): FY 2004: November 19, 2004 FY 2005: August 29, 2005 FY 2006: September 22, 2006 Conclusion: Complied The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: October 2004 FY 2005: October 2005 FY 2006: October 2006 Conclusion: Complied 91 Triennial Performance Audit 5 RSS The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 RSS began participating in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in FY 2005-06. A copy of the certificate is attached to the TDA claim. The copy of the certificate was also submitted to the auditor for review. As of July 1, 2005, The City of Riverside Fleet Maintenance Department implemented the inspections and maintenance of vehicles. The CHP inspection date was June 6, 2006. Prior to this inspection, the City provided documentation that the transit service was exempt from the CHP Pull Notice program per Chapter 7 of the program. However, staff was uncertain why the service was exempt in prior years, given Vehicle Code Section 233 defines a bus as carrying more than 10 people. The maintenance of vehicles was brought in-house in July 2005, which also could have been a factor for the inspection. Conclusion: Complied. The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, RSS’ annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in RSS’ operating budget: FY 2004: + 5.33% FY 2005: +15.55% FY 2006: +11.14% Source: FYs 2004-2006 RSS Annual Financial Audit Reports. The increase above 15 percent in the operating budget for FY 2005 was attributable to the increase in liability insurance and the conversion of some part time staff to full time with benefits and a pay increase. Conclusion: Complied The operator has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Section 99268.5 The system’s fare ratios using audited data are as follows: FY 2004: 10.10% FY 2005: 9.90% FY 2006: 10.00% 92 Triennial Performance Audit 6 RSS Conclusion: Complied, except for FY 2005. The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 The employees of the City of Riverside are part of the State Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) The City employs part time drivers for RSS. Of the 32 drivers, about 45 percent, or 20 drivers, are part time employees. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) RSS makes full use of federal funds available to it, as reported in the annual State Controller and National Transit Database reports. FY 2004: Operating ($77,182) Capital ($11,719) FY 2005: Operating ($60,157) Capital ($128,130) FY 2006: Operating ($73,253) Capital ($368,449) Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. RSS has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. 2. RSS underwent a CHP terminal inspection in June 2006 at the city maintenance facility and was rated satisfactory for all inspection areas. 3. The operating budget increased as a result of increased liability insurance and the cost of providing ADA services from a conversion of part time employees to full time. Fuel prices at the City’s on-site alternative fuel fueling station also increased which affected the budget. 4. The fare ratios have met the minimum TDA requirement during the audit period, with the exception of FY 2005 in which the fare ratio was just slightly under 10 percent (9.9 percent). Several factors have played a part in the City meeting the farebox threshold. The fare ratio definition adopted by RCTC has allowed RSS to include local revenue such as gains on sale of capital assets, and other revenue. The fare change in May 2005 also increased operating revenues for the farebox calculation. State 93 Triennial Performance Audit 7 RSS legislation (AB 813) has helped RSS on the exclusion of ADA operating cost above annual inflation. 94 Triennial Performance Audit 8 RSS Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations RSS’ efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Continue utilizing the taxi program administered by RCTC to address capacity issues. Actions taken by RSS: The taxi program is no longer administered by RCTC and is now administered by RTA. The program has been renamed as the “Overflow Program.” RSS has an MOU with RTA for this program. However, RSS staff mentioned that the program is rarely used, but would continue to utilize it when necessary. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Raise the fare to at least match RTA’s ADA fare. Actions taken by RSS: A fare increase was adopted during a public hearing in April 2005 and became effective the following month. The rationale behind the fare increase was based upon meeting the farebox recovery ratio and increased operating costs. The fare was increased from $1.00 to $1.50 per ride in May 2005, and subsequently to $2.00 per ride in July 2006. RTA raised its ADA fare to $2.50 in January 2005. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Develop training program to transition dial-a-ride clients to the fixed route system. Actions taken by RSS: RSS has embarked upon a collaborative effort with RTA to transition riders from dial-a-ride services to RTA’s fixed-route system. Since all fixed-route buses are ADA-compliant, RSS’ senior clientele is being educated on the various transportation alternatives offered. City 95 Triennial Performance Audit 9 RSS staff hold a quarterly ADA meeting with the public to discuss issues and present information. RSS also works with the Mayor’s Council on Aging to introduce riders to the fixed-route service and offer transportation options. The Mayor’s office offers free bus tickets at meetings to try fixed route. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Revise the SRTP to include a service plan that will achieve the farebox. Actions taken by RSS: RSS implemented through its FY 2005-06 – FY 2007-08 Short Range Transit Plan a fare increase that was adopted by the Riverside City Council in April 2005. As a result of this increase, RCTC’s adopted fare policy and other efficiencies, RSS has been meeting its 10 percent farebox recovery ratio. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 5 Continue work on achieving consistent reporting of data between State Controller and Federal Transit Database Reports. Actions taken by RSS: The utilization of TransTrack and Route Match has improved data collection and reporting efforts. In addition, RSS has hired additional administrative staff, including a new Transit Manager, to replace the retired Special Transit Supervisor to monitor data more accurately and ensure consistency, provided the reports are due close to the same time. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 6 Update the planned number of vehicle failures to reflect current trends. Actions taken by RSS: More accurate projections regarding the number of vehicle failures have been reflected in the Transit Operator Report found in the FY 2005-06 – FY 2007-08 Short Range Transit Plan. 96 Triennial Performance Audit 10 RSS Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 97 Triennial Performance Audit 11 RSS Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews RSS’ performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Table IV-1 provides the Systemwide performance indicators for RSS. Table IV-1 RSS Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators** FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $1,782,290 $1,955,439 $2,259,550 $2,511,251 40.9% Total Passengers 160,472 157,828 152,752 145,223 -9.5% Vehicle Service Hours 39,177 39,494.0 36,503.0 36,738.0 -6.2% Vehicle Service Miles 665,783 642,845 598,951 578,196 -13.2% Employee FTE's 28 35 35 29 3.6% Passenger Fares $169,965 $185,332 $199,961 $238,118 40.1% Operating Cost per Passenger $11.11 $12.39 $14.79 $17.29 55.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $45.49 $49.51 $61.90 $68.36 50.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.68 $3.04 $3.77 $4.34 62.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 4.1 4.0 4.2 4.0 -3.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.25 4.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,399.2 1,128.4 1,042.9 1,266.8 -9.5% Average Fare per Passenger $1.06 $1.17 $1.31 $1.64 54.8% Fare Recovery Ratio * 9.5% 10.1% 9.9% 10.0% 4.9% *Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per TDA and RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. ** Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect audited data. Source: Annual Fiscal Audit, State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 98 Triennial Performance Audit 12 RSS Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased by 41 percent from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. In FY 2004-05 the City converted several part time positions to full time benefited positions because the part time workers were working the same hours as full time, but without benefits. This change in status for about 8 employees, plus increases in insurance liability costs, increased operating costs in the later years of the audit. 2. Vehicle service hours decreased by 6 percent from FY 2003 to 2006. The City indicated it was short on drivers, which might have had some impact on service delivery. The fare increase beginning in May 2005 also may have impacted ridership, which could have affected the level of revenue hours recorded. 3. Ridership on RSS decreased by close to 10 percent. Part of the decrease might be from the fare policy change. However, total passenger no shows have averaged over 300 per month from a sampling of monthly operations data in FY 2006, which equates to about 10 per day. This could have an effect on the system’s ability to maintain productivity. In response, a no show policy was implemented by the City in March 2007. 4. Passenger fares increased by 40 percent during the audit period. The fare increase was one of the significant factors for this trend. Another factor is the payment by the Inland Regional Center (IRC) for subscription services. Subsidy payments to RSS for IRC clients was $108,570 in 2004 (58.6 percent of total fare revenues); $102,410 in 2005 (51.2 percent); and $114,340 in 2006 (48.0 percent). Beginning in July 2006 which is outside the audit period, RSS increased the cost per IRC client to $90 per month for about 113 IRC customers. 5. Operating cost per hour and per passenger exhibited sharp increases during the audit period. Costs continued to increase at the same time that ridership and revenue hours decreased. Cost per hour increased by 50 percent, and cost per passenger by 56 percent. 6. The standard of 4.0 passengers per hour was met for each audit year, despite a decrease in ridership in the past three audit years. 7. The City has experienced a driver shortage during the audit period, as reflected in the decrease in FTE’s. The City has current vacancies for bus drivers and a bus trainer. 8. The farebox recovery ratio was essentially flat but bordering on the threshold of 10 percent. The RCTC adopted farebox definition allows local support revenue to supplement the fare revenues, which the City has recognized in its annual fiscal audit and farebox calculation. 99 Triennial Performance Audit 13 RSS Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators The fare increase has helped RSS to meet the farebox ratio, as fare revenues increased despite a drop in ridership. As cost continues to grow, the number of revenue hours should also increase by some similar proportion. RSS has increased its transit administrative staff since the retirement of the Special Transit Supervisor. Performance measures that include cost as a primary factor like the farebox ratio, and cost per hour, will account for the additional staff cost to administer the system. RSS will need to continue finding efficiencies to increase measures like passengers per hour as well as the farebox. 100 Triennial Performance Audit 14 RSS Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the RSS. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the City: · Operations & Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub-functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that fall under General Administration. Operations & Planning RSS is a demand-response service operated by the City of Riverside Community Services Department available to seniors, persons with disabilities and ADA-certified persons. Service is provided over an 87 square mile service area encompassing the city limits of Riverside and the unincorporated communities of Orange Crest and Home Gardens. In addition, RSS serves designated transfer points for travel into Corona, Loma Linda, Mira Loma, San Bernardino, and Woodcrest. Unlike RTA’s Dial-a-Ride service, RSS is not operated on a zone system. Space is reserved on a first-come, first-served basis from one week up to 1 p.m. the day before the scheduled ride. ADA-certified riders are allowed to reserve space up to 6:00 p.m. the day before a scheduled ride. Passengers are allowed to carry-on up to three packages weighing no more than 20 pounds each. RSS maintains a database of between 5,000 to 6,000 ADA-certified riders. Approximately 40 percent of RSS’ clientele is comprised of ADA-certified seniors age 70 and older. RTA performs the ADA certification for RSS and sends the certified list. RSS, in turn, submits to RTA a monthly report on ADA performance. Data in the report includes total ADA and non-ADA wheelchair riders by weekdays and weekends; cancellations, no shows, ADA trip denials, ADA related complaint, passengers per hour; and total revenue hours and miles. The monthly report was revised in April 2006 to include total ADA and non-ADA cancellations and no shows. The prior report only included ADA information. The monthly reports shows there were no ADA trip denials. However, RSS has been averaging a combined 1,200 No-Shows and cancellations monthly. In response, RSS recently adopted and implemented a written “No-Show” policy in March 2007, which is modeled after RTA’s. The policy is based on a point system, and no-shows are categorized as either “Excused” or “Unexcused”. 101 Triennial Performance Audit 15 RSS Comment cards in the form of a customer service survey are provided on the buses for client input. Complaints are handled by the schedulers or the Transit Supervisor. Staff reports that 95 percent of all complaints are due to misunderstandings over policy. More serious complaints are handled at a higher level for investigation. RSS has averaged very few complaints and credits good training and low turnover of staff. In light of the complaints process, RSS should document the steps for addressing a customer complaint, from the initial phone call taken by the dispatcher to follow up actions taken by transit staff. Standardizing and well-documenting the actions taken by staff ensures a transparent and consistent process for both the transit system and the public. The CNG vehicles have a 120 mile range, whereas the LPG vehicles can be operated throughout the day before refueling. The CNG fueling station in the City’s Corporation Yard has fast fill capabilities for daytime fills, and slow fills at night. RSS maintains a spare ratio of four vehicles to the 21 in operation, per FTA requirements. The Transportation Supervisor indicated that the dial-a-ride operations were running more efficiently due to the implementation of various technology upgrades. RSS has employed the Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) units in its transit fleet. This technology interfaces with the RouteMatch software program. RouteMatch allows for reservations to be received and scheduled as well as tracks on-time performance. The system went live in April 2006. RSS requires its drivers to have one-year’s driving experience with a Class “B” license certification to carry disabled passengers. A Vehicle for Developmentally Disabled Persons (VDDP) endorsement is also a requirement. Driver training can take anywhere from two weeks to a month, which consists of behind-the-wheel instruction with an experienced driver, wheelchair lift operation, pre-trip inspection procedures, and ride alongs with three designated experienced drivers. The training is performed in accordance with the CHP base guidelines. Safety training takes place monthly within the department. The City offers a variety of training classes such as defensive driving and customer service. A training calendar is posted monthly on the City’s Intranet system. Planning for services is conducted through the SRTP development process, where hours and miles are projected according to anticipated service demand and budget allocations. The SRTP for RSS is reviewed by the three-member Transportation Subcommittee of the City Council. Staff has found the SRTP process to be a valuable tool. Maintenance Since June 2005, RSS maintenance functions have been performed in-house by the City of Riverside. Prior to this, maintenance service and inspections were contracted with a local tire and auto center. This change was due to concerns over maintenance efficiency, quality and costs. RSS staff have indicated that since maintenance has come under the control of the City, the fleet is now better managed with better ADA compliance. Furthermore, there are dedicated mechanics that service the dial-a-ride fleet. The City’s Fleet Management Division utilizes standard Best Management Practices (BMPs) used by government fleets nationally. Repairs such as automatic transmission 102 Triennial Performance Audit 16 RSS overhauls, glass repair and replacement, upholstery, radiator repair, and towing are among the items still contracted out. For high cost repairs, such as engine replacements, competitive quotes are obtained for each individual repair. Mechanic staffing levels and vehicle downtime are also taken into consideration when comparing in-house repairs and contract servicing. These services are competitively bid on an annual basis. When invoices are processed, contract prices must match. Special department head approval would be required should there be more than a 10 percent cost difference from the original purchase order amount. Vehicle mileage is recorded during fueling times. The City of Riverside Fleet Maintenance Department oversees fueling tasks. Vehicles are slow fueled at night at the City corporation yard. There is a fast fueling station located across the street from the corporation yard. The first CHP inspection was performed in July 2006. Preventive Maintenance schedules are managed through the Fleet Management system provided by Maximus known as M4 Fleet Focus, which is used by governmental agencies worldwide. This system is fully integrated and encompasses asset tracking, work orders, work flow, PM scheduling, billing, and inventory management. Preventive Maintenance Inspections (PMI) are set up in the M4 system and scheduled according to time, mileage, usage or a combination of each. Usage is gathered either at fueling times, which are tracked in the M4 Fleet System, updated form work order entry, or from manual updates as needed. PMIs are performed every 5,000 miles. Vehicle parts are also managed and tracked by the M4 Fleet software. Stock part purchases are handled in several ways, some such as brakes, filters, and tires are competitively bid on an annual basis. Annual purchase orders are approved by the City Council, and then awarded by Finance Purchasing. State contract pricing is also utilized for items such as automotive and pickup tires. Other non-stock parts are either competitively bid on an as needed basis through Purchasing or quoted through vendors that the City already has annual purchase orders with. The number of roadcalls has remained relatively low and have shown a declining trend during the triennial period. A summary of roadcalls is presented in the following table: Table V-1 RSS Roadcalls Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 # of Roadcalls 32 20 20 Source: NTD Marketing RSS has undertaken a number of marketing initiatives designed to educate the community and reach the transit-dependent. The department has embarked upon raising its community profile through image branding. Examples of this include bus wraps as well as a more prominent logo with RSS’ phone number. The service is also marketed over the local cable access channel and through video presentations. Brochures are distributed at area senior centers and new tri-fold brochure is under development. The 103 Triennial Performance Audit 17 RSS Riverside Activity Guide, distributed by the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department, also contains information about the service. Information about RSS is made available through the City’s website: http://www.riversideca.gov/park_rec/seniors-transportation.asp. The RSS page contains general information regarding ridership eligibility, hours of operation, reservations, and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). The auditor found that the City’s special transportation services can be difficult to locate on the website and is not featured prominently on the City’s home web page. RSS staff also make educational presentations at local senior centers and before the City Council. Staff is involved with the Mayor’s Commission on Aging, which helps to raise awareness about senior issues. RTA also assists with advertising the transit service with handouts and brochures available at its location. Word of mouth has also been an effective marketing tool. In addition, there are Spanish language brochures and staff to assist customers. General Administration and Management During the audit period, RSS was operated under the direction of the City’s Parks and Recreation Department. The department recently underwent reorganization to include Community Services. RSS has since been placed under the administration of the Community Services Department, which manages the City’s senior centers and programs, youth opportunity centers and the BRIDGE gang prevention program. The Community Services Department is administered by a superintendent. Two full time staff in the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department administer the transit program, including a Transit Supervisor and an Administrative Analyst. RSS is budgeted for 41.23 FTE, but has only 27 filled FTE positions due to a driver shortage. Those filled positions include 22 Driver FTEs, 3 Driver/Scheduler FTEs and 2 Office Specialist FTEs. Drivers and dispatchers are both part-time and full-time staff employed by the City. Grants Administration Staff indicated it programs federal grants for a variety of uses, including procurement of vehicles, dispatch software, capitalization of preventative maintenance, and facility improvements. Vehicle procurement involves piggybacking with other agencies or from a state list of participants. This enables RSS to receive better pricing and keep from issuing its own separate RFP for only a few vehicles. Staff indicated that numerous new vehicles are being procured for fleet replacement. The preparation of a transit grant application follows the city adopted policies and procedures governing the preparation and submission of all grant applications and their acceptance. Detailed policies and procedures are outlined in the City of Riverside Administrative Manual under the subject “Grant Applications”. Responsible party and action is identified for submission and acceptance of the grant application by the City Council. 104 Triennial Performance Audit 18 RSS Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. Riverside Specialized Services has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. 2. RSS underwent a CHP terminal inspection in June 2006 at the city maintenance facility and was rated satisfactory for all inspection areas. This was the first inspection since vehicle maintenance was brought in-house. 3. The TDA farebox recovery ratio was met in two of the three years of the audit (FY 2005 was 9.90 percent, just below 10 percent requirement). The fare ratio definition adopted by RCTC has allowed RSS to include local revenue to supplement passenger fares. The fare increase in May 2005 also increased operating revenues for the farebox calculation. 4. RSS implemented each of the six prior audit recommendations. 5. Operating costs increased by over 15 percent in FY 2004-05 in part because the City converted several part time positions to full time benefited positions. Insurance costs also increased. 6. Ridership decreased by close to 10 percent. Part of the decrease might be from the fare policy change. However, total passenger no shows have averaged over 300 per month from a sampling of monthly operations data in FY 2006. This could have an effect on the system’s ability to maintain productivity. In response, a no show policy was implemented by the City in March 2007. 7. The City’s standard of transporting 4.0 passengers per hour was met for each audit year, despite the decrease in ridership. 8. Dial-a-ride operations were running more efficiently due to the implementation of various technology upgrades. RSS has installed communications and tracking technology in its transit fleet which interfaces with the dispatch software program. The system went live in April 2006. 9. Since June 2005, vehicle maintenance has been performed in-house by the City of Riverside. Prior to this, maintenance service and inspections were contracted with a local tire and auto center. This change was due to concerns over maintenance efficiency, quality and costs. 10. A new Transit Supervisor was hired during the audit period to replace the retired transit manager. The new supervisor conducts outreach by making educational presentations at local senior centers and before the City Council. Staff is also 105 Triennial Performance Audit 19 RSS involved with the Mayor’s Commission on Aging, which helps to raise awareness about senior issues and transportation. Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. RSS information should be more accessible and prominent on the City of Riverside’s website. Information about RSS can be difficult to locate on the City’s website and is not featured prominently on the City’s home web page. Perhaps a hot link could be added on the City’s homepage or the navigation of the City’s website made easier. 2. Consider advertising on vehicles to raise additional local revenue for the farebox. RCTC’s adopted fare recovery ratio policy allows local support revenue to count towards the farebox. Local revenue in the farebox calculation could include advertising revenues, which could contribute to the City’s mandated farebox ratio of 10 percent. Advertising content might be considered either in the interior or exterior of the vehicles. 3. Develop and document a standardized complaint handling process. RSS should develop a step-by-step flow chart that outlines the steps for addressing a customer complaint, from the initial phone call taken by the dispatcher, to follow up actions taken by transit staff. A standalone, standardized complaint form should be developed that has sections to be filled out by staff for each step, including the nature of the complaint, who was the complaint forwarded to, actions taken to address the complaint, and if there was follow up communication with the customer. Standardizing and documenting the complaint process ensures a transparent and consistent process for both the transit system and the public. 4. Track the effectiveness of the new “No Show” policy as it relates to changes in ridership and in the number of passenger no shows. RSS should conduct regular analysis of how the policy potentially improves productivity through additional ridership and the number of passengers per hour. Also, if the number of recorded “no shows” decreases in the monthly report to RTA, the trend might be correlated back in part to implementation and enforcement of the policy. 106 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSIT AGENCY S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 107 Triennial Performance Audit i PVVTA TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I ............................................................................................................................ 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II ........................................................................................................................... 6 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 6 Section III .......................................................................................................................... 9 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations................................. 9 Section IV ....................................................................................................................... 11 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 11 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 13 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 14 Section V ........................................................................................................................ 15 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 15 Operations & Planning................................................................................ 15 Maintenance................................................................................................ 17 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 18 General Administration and Management............................................. 18 Section VI ....................................................................................................................... 20 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 20 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 21 108 Triennial Performance Audit 1 PVVTA Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate PVVTA’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates PVVTA’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System Under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) between the County of Riverside and the City of Blythe executed on January 24, 1978, the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) provides both demand response and fixed-route transit service under the name Desert Roadrunner in the City of Blythe, the adjacent unincorporated areas of Riverside County and neighboring Ehrenberg, Arizona. Prior to the creation of PVVTA, there were no transit services in the Palo Verde Valley. PVVTA also administers a complementary specialized service called Desert RoadTRIP with the Partnership to Preserve Independent Living For Seniors and Persons With Disabilities. The service provides passengers who are seniors (60 years of age and older), persons with disabilities and those in need with mileage reimbursement transportation who do not live within the Desert Roadrunner service area. 109 Triennial Performance Audit 2 PVVTA Agriculturally-based and a winter “snow bird” destination, Blythe is located on the California-Arizona border along the Colorado River and serves as a commercial center for eastern Riverside County. The area’s population varies seasonally. The city’s permanent population is approximately 28,800 residents. Each winter, approximately 74,000 seasonal residents reside in the Palo Verde Valley. The area’s largest employer is the California State Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, which operates the Chuckawalla Valley and Ironwood State Prison facilities located approximately 20 miles west of Blythe. Growth in the Valley is expected to increase at an average annual rate of 2 percent. PVVTA’s ridership is expected to grow in concert with the population due to implementation and stability of new transit services. Fleet The PVVTA fleet consists of eight revenue service vehicles and two support vehicles. PVVTA’s revenue service fleet complies with the requirements of the Americans’ With Disabilities Act (ADA) by being equipped with wheelchair lifts. A detailed description of PVVTA’s fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 PVVTA Fleet Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/Wheelchair Space 1991 Chevrolet Van 1 Gasoline Support Vehicle 1997 El Dorado Aerotech 1 Diesel 16/1 1999 El Dorado Aerotech 1 Diesel 16/1 2001 Ford E350 1 Gasoline 15/1 2002 International 1 Diesel 22/2 2003 Freightliner Trolley 1 Diesel 28/2 2003 El Dorado Aerotech 2 CNG 18/1 2004 Chevrolet Venture 1 Gasoline Support Vehicle 2006 El Dorado Aerotech 1 Diesel 18/1 Total 10 PVVTA’s Desert Roadrunner service operates a total of three fixed routes that serve the City of Blythe and the surrounding unincorporated areas of eastern Riverside County, as well as limited service to Ehrenberg, Arizona. The fixed routes are deviated services which fulfill the ADA complementary service mandate. A description of each route is presented in the table below: Table I-2 PVVTA Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations Blue Route 1 City Circulator Hourly (Monday through Saturday) Monday-Friday from 6:40 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Big Kmart; Department of Public Social Services; Palo Verde Valley High School; Albertsons; Greyhound; 110 Triennial Performance Audit 3 PVVTA DMV; California Highway Patrol; Palo Verde Hospital; Blythe Post Office; Riverside County Administrative Center; and Blythe City Hall. Gold Route 2 Palo Verde College & Mesa Verde Every 85 to 90 minutes (Daily) Monday-Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. (7:30 p.m. on Friday) and Saturday & Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Blythe Airport; Blythe Energy; Palo Verde College; Big Kmart; ACE Hardware; Greyhound; All Stars Cinemas; Palo Verde College (Spring Street Campus); Blythe City Hall; Riverside County Administrative Center; Albertsons; Colorado River Fairgrounds (during fair events); and Blythe Marina Mobile Home Estates. Weekend/Holiday Deviated Service to: Ripley Migrant Center; Ehrenberg, Arizona Red Express 3 California State Prisons Two Westbound Morning Headways; Two Eastbound Afternoon Headways (Monday through Friday) Sears Park-N-Ride; All Star Cinemas Park-N- Ride; Greyhound Park-N-Ride; Big Kmart Park-N-Ride; Mesa Verde; and Chuckawalla Valley and Ironwood State Prisons. Blue Route 1 - City Circulator operates Monday through Friday from 6:40 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This route operates 60 minute headways, in a clockwise loop around the City of Blythe. This service does not operate on Sundays. Gold Route 2 - Palo Verde College/Mesa Verde/Hobsonway is offered Monday through Thursday (when Palo Verde College is open) from 7:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and weekends from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., every 85 to 90 minutes, in a bi-directional intercommunity route between Blythe Marina Mobile Home Estates and Palo Verde College via Hobsonway. Gold Route 2 also includes deviated service to the communities of Ripley and Ehrenberg, Arizona which operates weekends and some holidays. Express Red Route 3 operates Monday through Friday from the Chuckawalla Valley and Ironwood State Prisons with two morning and two afternoon trips. This route serves four Park-N-Ride lots traveling via Hobsonway and Interstate 10. This route does not operate on New Years Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day, weekends and on any State of California observed holidays. Park-N-Ride Lots The Desert Roadrunner serves commuters at five Park-N-Ride lots located in the City of Blythe at the following locations: 111 Triennial Performance Audit 4 PVVTA · Sears, Hobsonway at 7th Street · Spring Street Park-N-Ride, Spring Street at Hobsonway · Greyhound Depot, Rice Street at Solano Street · Big Kmart, Hobsonway near Carlton Street · Todd Park, Main Street at Barnard Street Dial-A-Ride Demand response services are also provided by Desert Roadrunner. Curb-to-curb service is available weekdays, Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The service area for Desert Roadrunner includes the City of Blythe, unincorporated county areas of Mesa Verde, Ripley, Hidden Beaches, California State Prisons, Mesa Bluffs and Riveria Drive. Those who live in the Palo Verde Valley, but not within the Dial-A-Ride service area can use Desert RoadTRIP. Desert Roadrunner Dial-A-Ride offers priority service to passengers certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Seniors (ages 60 years old and older) & persons with disabilities who use Desert Roadrunner Dial-A-Ride must be certified by the PVVTA. Applications are available at Blythe Senior Center, Blythe City Hall, Riverside County Administrative Center, Palo Verde Valley District Library, Palo Verde Hospital, Sheltering Wings, Palo Verde College, and the PVVTA. All Dial-A-Ride passengers are issued a Dial- A-Ride card valid for discounts on the fixed route system. Subscription service is available for those riders who need daily, weekly, monthly service. General public passengers traveling to/from or within areas that are beyond 3/4 of a mile of a fixed route (approximately 4 blocks) can use Dial-A-Ride without certification on a space available basis. These areas include the California State Prisons, Blythe Airport, Mesa Verde, Ripley and other unincorporated areas. Within 3/4 of a mile of a fixed route, general public passengers must use the fixed routes. Dial-a-Ride does not operate service on the following holidays: · New Year’s Day · Martin Luther King Jr’s Birthday · President’s Day · Memorial Day · Independence Day · Labor Day · Veteran’s Day · Thanksgiving Day · Christmas Eve · Christmas Day The PVVTA fare structure is based on the particular type of transit service utilized. The fare schedule is presented in the following table: 112 Triennial Performance Audit 5 PVVTA Table I-3 PVVTA Fare Schedule Cash Fares Fixed Route Expresso (Red Route) Dial-a-Ride Local* County** Adult $1.25 $2.75 $2.25 $2.75 Senior (60+)/Disabled $0.60 - $2.25 $2.75 Children (Under Age 5/Limit 3 Children) Free Free Free Free Additional Children $1.00 $2.75 $2.25 $2.75 Route Deviations $0.75 $0.75 - - Transfer to Local Fixed Route Free Free 10-Ride Go Pass $12.50 $27.50 $22.50 $27.50 20-Ride Go Pass $25.00 $55.00 - - 31-Day GoPass $35.00 $100.00 - - Senior/Disabled $20.00 - - - Summer Youth Pass $30.00 - - - Shop, Save & Get Home Free Free - $1.75 $2.00 *within one mile from the Fixed Route in City of Blythe **beyond one mile from the Fixed Route – Ripley and Mesa Verde Desert RoadTRIP Desert RoadTRIP is short for the Desert Road Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project, which is a partnership between the PVVTA and the Partnership to Preserve Independent Living for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities. Since 1995, the Desert RoadTRIP program has offered this specialized transit service for seniors 60 years of age and disabled persons living in isolated locations in the Palo Verde Valley and eastern Riverside County, who are unable to drive and do not have access to transportation. This service utilizes qualified volunteer drivers, who are reimbursed on a mileage basis. The volunteer drivers are required to have a valid driver’s license, a registered vehicle, and auto liability insurance. Each qualified rider identifies his/her own volunteer driver. The driver could be a family member, family friend, neighbor or some other trusted individual known to the rider. The eligible rider files a reimbursement claim based on the mileage traveled during the month with Desert RoadTRIP and after receiving the claim reimburses the driver. The reimbursement is paid at 32 cents ($0.32) per mile. An individual is allowed up to 460 miles per month, and an eligible family is entitled to 690 miles per month. 113 Triennial Performance Audit 6 PVVTA Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency’s ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the twelve measures, eight are applicable to PVVTA and are discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (internet filing): FY 2004: December 10, 2004 FY 2005: October 17, 2005 FY 2006: October 24, 2006 Conclusion: Complied The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: January 2004 FY 2005: November 2005 FY 2006: November 2006 Conclusion: Complied 114 Triennial Performance Audit 7 PVVTA The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 PVVTA participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: November 19, 2003; December 10, 2004; and August 14, 2006. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, the PVVTA’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in PVVTA’s operating budget: FY 2004: +131.11% FY 2005: - 6.82% FY 2006: + 0.26% Source: FYs 2004-2006 PVVTA Annual Financial Audit Reports. The increase in the operating budget was attributable to the expansion of the fixed route service in FY 2004, which included a deviated fixed route service to two state prisons. The budget is tied to the service plan contained in the SRTP. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves a rural area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.4, 99268.5, 99405(c) The system’s fare ratios using audited data are as follows: FY 2004: 8.8% FY 2005: 10.8% FY 2006: 11.0% Conclusion: Complied except for FY 2004. 115 Triennial Performance Audit 8 PVVTA The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 The employees of the City of Blythe are part of the State Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) PVVTA contracts with a private carrier, Transportation Concepts, to provide drivers and operations support for fixed route and dial-a- ride services. There are no provisions in the service contracts that preclude the hiring of part- time drivers. Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. PVVTA has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA, except for missing the minimum farebox ratio in FY 2004. The system has since met the farebox of 10 percent in each successive year. 2. PVVTA received “satisfactory” rating for each CHP terminal inspection during the audit period. There is a gap of about 20 months between the CHP inspection in December 2004 and August 2006. PVVTA noted that no CHP officer was able to provide the inspection until August 2006, despite attempts to make an appointment for an inspection around December 2005. PVVTA should coordinate with the transit contractor and CHP to schedule regular inspections, due about the same time every year. 3. The budget remained fairly stable the last two years of the audit period after the initiation of new fixed route service in FY 2004, which increased the budget substantially. 4. The trend in the fare recovery ratio shows an increase. The audited farebox ratio increased from 8.8 percent to 11.0 percent for PVVTA between FY 2003-2004 and FY 2005-2006. To meet the farebox in FYs 2004-05 and 2005-06, however, the City of Blythe was required to add general fund revenue to the transit system in the amount of $3,075 for FY 2005 and $12,800 for FY 2006. Fare revenues increased 7.2 percent over the past three years (from $48,526 to $63,051, which includes local support revenue), while operating expenses (minus depreciation) increased 110.1 percent due to service expansion that included a deviated fixed route service to two state prisons. The farebox recovery ratio each year exceeded the TDA minimum ratio of 10 percent except for FY 2004. The farebox ratios excluded fare revenue and operating costs for exempt new routes. 116 Triennial Performance Audit 9 PVVTA Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations PVVTA’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 PVVTA and the contract operator should work to coordinate the communication of customer complaints and accidents. Actions taken by the PVVTA: PVVTA staff is in the process of working with the contractor to have a central location for complaints. A customer complaint spreadsheet has been created to improve the tracking and management of complaints and accidents. The dispatcher who records the complaint over the phone forwards it to the contract transit manager and is matched against the incident report. The transit manager conducts an assessment and then follows up as appropriate. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Report on-time performance by route. Actions taken by the PVVTA: The contract transit manager conducts on-time performance checks and sends to PVVTA for review. PVVTA has begun analyzing each route on a monthly basis and randomly performs a weekly route survey. Staff will continue this process and work in conjunction with the contractor to accurately monitor the on-time performance by route through ride check surveys and analyzing trip sheets. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Provide all actual operating and maintenance data in the Transit Operator Ridership Reports. 117 Triennial Performance Audit 10 PVVTA Actions taken by the PVVTA: These reports have been updated to reflect actual operating data. The contractor provides PVVTA monthly reports that include actual operating and maintenance data. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Monitor performance trends closely. Actions taken by the PVVTA: The contractor submits a monthly report to PVVTA that summarizes key performance information that is monitored, both systemwide and by specific route. The systemwide data includes ridership, fare revenue by type, hours and miles, on-time performance, roadcalls, accidents and complaints. Route by route information includes most of the systemwide performance measures. Staff will continue this analysis and work in cooperation with the contractor to implement changes that improve the efficiency of the transit system. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 118 Triennial Performance Audit 11 PVVTA Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews PVVTA’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for the PVVTA. Table IV-1 PVVTA Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators** FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003-2006 Operating Cost $368,998 $844,025 $774,034 $775,187 110.1% Total Passengers 30,085 36,046 43,173 51,071 69.8% Vehicle Service Hours 8,694.0 12,364.0 11,652.0 11,098.0 27.7% Vehicle Service Miles 85,820 209,630 204,395 189,711 121.1% Employee FTE's 15 10 10 10 -33.3% Passenger Fares $35,059 $45,178 $52,821 $62,011 76.9% Operating Cost per Passenger $12.27 $23.42 $17.93 $15.18 23.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $42.44 $68.26 $66.43 $69.85 64.6% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.30 $4.03 $3.79 $4.09 -5.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3.5 2.9 3.7 4.6 33.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.35 0.17 0.21 0.27 -23.2% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 579.6 1,236.4 1,165.2 1,109.8 91.5% Average Fare per Passenger $1.17 $1.25 $1.22 $1.21 4.2% Fare Recovery Ratio * 10.01% 8.83% 10.79% 10.98% 9.7% * Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per TDA and RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. ** Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect audited data. Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, Annual Financial Audit & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 119 Triennial Performance Audit 12 PVVTA Table IV-2 PVVTA Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $79,435 $446,852 $560,884 $573,168 621.6% Total Passengers 8,613 28,450 37,276 46,274 437.3% Vehicle Service Hours 2,695.0 9,842.0 9,284.0 8,934.0 231.5% Vehicle Service Miles 48,061 172,869 173,689 162,901 238.9% Employee FTE's 10 8 8 8 -20.0% Passenger Fares $6,061 $21,785 $41,282 $57,881 855.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $9.22 $15.71 $15.05 $12.39 34.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $29.47 $45.40 $60.41 $64.16 117.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $1.65 $2.58 $3.23 $3.52 112.9% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3.2 2.9 4.0 5.2 62.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.18 0.16 0.21 0.28 58.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 269.5 1,230.3 1,160.5 1,116.8 314.4% Average Fare per Passenger $0.70 $0.77 $1.11 $1.25 77.7% Fare Recovery Ratio 7.63% 4.88% 7.36% 10.10% 32.3% * Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect unaudited data Source: State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 120 Triennial Performance Audit 13 PVVTA Table IV-3 PVVTA Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $289,563 $345,582 $165,821 $175,809 -39.3% Total Passengers 21,472 7,596 5,897 4,797 -77.7% Vehicle Service Hours 5,999.0 2,522.0 2,368.0 2,164.0 -63.9% Vehicle Service Miles 37,759 36,761 30,706 26,810 -29.0% Employee FTE's 5 2 2 2 -60.0% Passenger Fares $28,998 $26,742 $17,169 $17,973 -38.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $13.49 $45.50 $28.12 $36.65 171.8% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $48.27 $137.03 $70.03 $81.24 68.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $7.67 $9.40 $5.40 $6.56 -14.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 3.6 3.0 2.5 2.2 -38.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.57 0.21 0.19 0.18 -68.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,199.8 1,261.0 1,184.0 1,082.0 -9.8% Average Fare per Passenger $1.35 $3.52 $2.91 $3.75 177.4% Fare Recovery Ratio 10.01% 7.74% 10.35% 10.22% 2.1% * Operating Cost and Passenger Fares reflect unaudited data Source: State Controller Operator's Reports & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased by 110 percent from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. There was a notable increase in operating costs in FY 2004 due to the initiation and expansion of fixed-route services and higher fuel costs. 2. Vehicle service hours exhibited an upward trend systemwide during the audit period. There was a decline in Dial-a-Ride vehicle service hours due to initiation and growth of fixed-route service. 3. Ridership on the fixed-route service exhibited a sharp increase between FYs 2003 and 2006 due to new fixed route services. This increase coincided with a decline of 77 percent in the Dial-a-Ride ridership during the same period due mainly to the shifting of passengers to the fixed route. Overall systemwide ridership exhibited a nearly 70 percent increase in ridership, from 30,085 passengers in FY 2003 to 51,071 in FY 2006. 4. The farebox recovery ratio showed a slight increase systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006 of about 10 percent. The fixed route farebox declined, then increased, as the community became familiar with the new services implemented. However, when accounting for the exclusion of new services from the farebox, the City of Blythe was required to supplement the fare revenue to ensure that the minimum 10 percent farebox ratio was met. 121 Triennial Performance Audit 14 PVVTA 5. Operating cost per hour exhibited a sharp increase in FY 2004 due to the initiation and expansion of the fixed-route. A new contract operator also began operating the service during the same time the system was in transition. Because operating cost tended to grow faster than the increase in hours, the performance indicator results in a negative trend. 6. Passengers per vehicle service hour systemwide increased by 33 percent during the audit period, having increased by 62 percent for fixed route but decreasing by 38 percent for dial-a-ride. Passengers per vehicle service mile declined by 23 percent systemwide between FYs 2003 and 2006. This drop was due in part to the decrease in Dial-A-Ride passengers relative to the drop in service miles. 7. It was indicated that the full time equivalent (FTE) employee data does not include an allocation for city management staff that also serve as transit agency staff. This also includes a city mechanic who allocates about three-quarters of his time toward transit. The FTE count reported in the State Controller report should include all employee hours tied to the implementation of the transit system. Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators PVVTA has continued to transition from an exclusively dial-a-ride and trip reimbursement service to a full-service transit agency with the operation of three fixed-routes. From the time the fixed-routes were initiated in FY 2004, PVVTA made several modifications to foster efficiency and reduced costs. By eliminating unproductive routes and streamlining the remaining services, operating costs have started to level off from the highs of FY 2004. Given this adjustment, it is important to closely monitor the trends in performance resulting from the new services (fixed route) and their impacts on the existing service (dial-a-ride). Regular tracking of cost efficiency measures such as operating cost per passenger and per hour provides trends which are currently increasing at a rapid pace. The farebox should also be monitored closely as the new fixed route services lose their exemption from the fare box requirements in the near term. Given that Blythe has supplemented fare revenues with General Fund monies the last two fiscal years, there is reasonable concern for the farebox recovery ratio to be maintained without the need for supplemental revenues. 122 Triennial Performance Audit 15 PVVTA Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within the PVVTA. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the City: · Operations & Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub-functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that fall under General Administration. Operations & Planning The operation and planning of transit services is consistent with the mission statement, vision statement and goals and objectives adopted by the PVVTA Board of Directors during the audit period. The mission statement of PVVTA is to: “Provide the residents and visitors of the Palo Verde Valley with a public transportation system that maximizes passenger use, comfort, convenience, safety and satisfaction while efficiently using financial resources to benefit our community.” Clearly, PVVTA is currently operating in a mode that tests the practicality of this statement. The agency’s planning program by necessity is one based on various combinations of services. Combining service economics with service planning is a key strategy for the agency. Ultimately, the basic transit performance parameters of ridership and fare revenues will have to be used to judge the merits of the services. During the audit period, PVVTA restructured its delivery of transit services to maximize overall efficiency and to boost its fixed-route service. The prior audit period saw the initiation of three fixed-routes including one commuter route. The initial fixed-route served the campus of Palo Verde College located six miles northwest of central Blythe. The Valley Runner intercity route to the Coachella Valley was discontinued and realigned into Express Red Route 3 serving the State Prison facilities. In addition, Sunday service on the Blue Route was discontinued in July 2005. The current approach of the agency has been to have transit grow in concert with the city’s growth. There is a new emphasis on tailor fitting the fixed-route service to serve trip generators, such as employment centers, medical offices, Palo Verde College, and shopping centers. Palo Verde College, which is a growing campus and a major trip generator on the Gold Route, purchases GoPasses for its students. Transfer centers have 123 Triennial Performance Audit 16 PVVTA been established in front of the Greyhound Depot and the Blythe City Hall. The three deviated fixed-routes are configured to allow for time transfers between routes at these locations. PVVTA has also added benches and shelters throughout its system and works cooperatively with the City’s Planning and Public Works Department on the provision of bus pull-outs and shelters as conditions of approval for new development. As a result of these efforts, the fixed-route has gradually gained credibility and increased visibility. Transit operations are provided by contract with Transportation Concepts, an experienced transportation provider. The operator is familiar with the requirements of providing services in a small market setting. To date, the operator has been successful in providing transit services. Although PVVTA has seen the trend of more passengers transitioning from the dial-a-ride to the fixed-route service, the dial-a-ride service still faces a number of operational challenges. The Desert Roadrunner Dial-a-Ride encompasses a 26-mile wide service area characterized by long distances between stops and few trip generators in between. The service area is defined by 2nd Avenue to the north; 28th Avenue to the south; the Colorado River/Arizona border to the east; and the Chuckawala Valley and Ironwood State Prisons to the west. Ehrenberg, Arizona is not contained in the dial-a-ride service area. Given the low demand for dial-a-ride service on the weekends and holidays, the weekend service was discontinued in favor a deviated fixed-route serving the community of Ripley. Recovery time is built into the schedule to allow for deviations. It is not uncommon for regular dial-a-ride passengers to have standing appointments on the deviated fixed-route. Another challenge concerns the number of deadhead vehicle service hours being equal to the number of revenue vehicle service hours on Red Route 3. This route serves the State Correctional facilities located approximately 20 miles west of Blythe. The agency has considered timing the Red Route with the Gold Route 2 on its return from the prison. A closer analysis revealed that the timing would not be feasible as it would adversely affect the timepoints on the Gold Route. Nevertheless, the agency has started to see a reverse commute from Blythe during the afternoon. One of the agency’s transit planning tools is the Unmet Transit Needs hearing process. One public hearing is held annually. During the Unmet Transit Needs hearing in March 2005, comments were received from five individuals. Most of these comments were focused on providing more public outreach and information about the current fixed- route service. In addition, there are six open house events conducted in a town hall format. These public outreaches have resulted in recommendations for enhance Dial-a- Ride service to Ripley. Bus stop amenities are coordinated with other City departments. PVVTA implemented an across the board 25 cent fare increase that became effective in July 2006, slightly after the audit period. The increase was based upon the farebox recovery goals contained the Short-Range Transit Plan (SRTP). In addition, fixed-route day passes were phased out in lieu of the GoPass program. Further, Dial-a-Ride day passes were also phased out. PVVTA does not currently operate any alternative fuel vehicles. During FY 2003, PVVTA did briefly utilize a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) vehicle on loan from Sunline Transit Agency. Having explored other alternative fuel types, CNG seemed to be the best fit. 124 Triennial Performance Audit 17 PVVTA AB 2766 grant funding has been awarded to the City in the amount of $125,000 for the construction of a CNG fueling facility. PVVTA also submitted an application to the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) for grant funding in the amount of $250,000 to be applied towards this project. Operational data has been analyzed to determine the number of accidents, roadcalls, complaints and compliments received during the audit period. A summary of operational indicators are presented in the following table: Table V-1 PVVTA Operations Summary Year* 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Accidents 1 2 1 0 0 0 Roadcalls 12 7 16 7 5 0 Complaints 29 8 10 2 5 0 Compliments 3 6 4 4 2 4 *Based on Monthly Operations Reports, Calendar Year Source: PVVTA Based upon the operational data, PVVTA has shown considerable improvement. Accidents, roadcalls, and complaints have been declining as the fixed-route system has become more effective and responsive to the ridership. Maintenance Vehicle maintenance is provided under contract by the City of Blythe and performed at the City’s Public Works’ Department Central Garage located at West 14th Avenue and Main Street. PVVTA adheres to all Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and California Highway Patrol (CHP) mandated Preventive Maintenance Inspection criteria and is very proactive in maintenance efforts. Seventy-five percent of a City Mechanic’s time is devoted to transit. Transportation Concepts is satisfied with the maintenance services provided by the City. Preventive maintenance is tracked using Dossier maintenance software and by using service due stickers, which are placed in each vehicle. Each morning, the maintenance manager or one of the central garage staff reviews the driver’s inspection from the previous day. A bid inspection report is used for the 30-day inspection and an in-house inspection form is used for regular preventive maintenance. All maintenance work is performed by the City with the exception of tires and front end alignments on all medium duty buses. Occasionally, work is contracted out for special diagnostic testing or when the City garage schedule does not permit staff from performing repairs in a timely manner. When work is contracted out to vendors, the City would receive an estimate of repairs. The pricing and repair procedures are then compared against all data or a recognized labor standard. Vehicle parts are managed and tracked using the Dossier software program with a separate category for transit vehicles. Parts procurement consists of a vendor spot check utilizing data software that offers a comparison of list prices. Some parts are procured sole source due to limited availability. Filters are procured by bid or contract. 125 Triennial Performance Audit 18 PVVTA Marketing Marketing of transit services is provided through a variety of methods and outlets. The agency’s marketing efforts include a website, Rider’s Guide, advertisements in the Palo Verde Valley Times newspaper, bus shelters, TV and cable access channels, community transit fairs, participation in local events, and “grass roots” type of marketing. The agency’s website (http://www.paloverdevalleybus.com/) contains information about all routes, services, and fares. The agency’s Riders Guide containing the bus schedules was dated July 1, 2006. The Rider’s Guide also includes a Spanish language section. The GoPasses are sold at various outlets, including Palo Verde College and the Desert Roadrunner office. The Riders Guide is also available at pass outlets, City Hall and the contract operator’s office, among other locations. The agency also offers a Mobility Training program that trains persons about public transportation, including seniors and persons with disabilities. PVVTA has been involved in an innovative marketing program with Big K-Mart known as the “Shop, Save & Get Home FREE” program. This program provides a free ride on the fixed-route service with proof of purchase totaling $30 or more in merchandise. For Dial- a-Ride passengers, there is an additional charge of $1.75 within one mile (about four blocks) from a fixed-route and $2.00 beyond one mile. PVVTA collects and verifies the receipts as proof of payment, and then submits the receipts back to Big K-Mart for reimbursement of the fare. The reimbursement program had been initiated with Albertson’s grocery but was discontinued due to internal contractual issues. PVVTA is looking to expand the Shop, Save & Get Home FREE program with other local businesses. The agency conducted a passenger survey during FY 2005 to better monitor, market and serve its ridership. A total of 200 passengers were surveyed on all routes and services. A majority of passengers surveyed expressed an overall high satisfaction with the service, with 58 percent rating the system “Excellent” and 27 percent rating the system “Above Average”. The improvements most desired by the passengers included larger buses and more bus stop amenities. General Administration and Management PVVTA is administered by the City of Blythe which oversees the administration, marketing, planning and financial operations on behalf of the agency. The Blythe City Manager serves as the agency’s General Manager and is appointed by the PVVTA Board of Directors. Additional City staff involved with the administration of PVVTA includes the City’s Finance Director who serves in the capacity of Auditor-Controller & Treasurer and the City Attorney. The Board of Directors is comprised of five members made up of two members of the Blythe City Council, one public member appointed by the City of Blythe, one member from the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors from District 4, and one public member appointed by the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors. The Secretary to the Board is the City Clerk of the City of Blythe. Regular meetings of the PVVTA Board of Directors are held the first Wednesday of the month at 12:00 noon at the Blythe City Hall Council Chambers located at 235 North Broadway in Blythe. In 2005, there were two new representatives appointed to the Board from the Blythe City Council. In addition, the County-appointed public representative resigned after serving 20 years. 126 Triennial Performance Audit 19 PVVTA PVVTA’s contract operator, Transportation Concepts, is headquartered in Irvine, California. Transportation Concepts’ local facility is located at 125 West Murphy Street in Blythe. The contract operator has an on-site Operations Manager, who oversees the day-to-day transit functions. Transportation Concepts issues monthly ridership reports to General Manager that cover all timely performance indicators. 127 Triennial Performance Audit 20 PVVTA Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. PVVTA has complied with seven of eight compliance requirements of TDA. The one requirement not complied with was not meeting the minimum TDA farebox ratio for FY 2004. New fixed route services were exempt from the farebox ratio during the audit period. 2. Each of the four prior audit recommendations has been fully implemented. 3. Operating costs systemwide increased substantially from the base year of 2003 through 2006. Expansion of the transit system occurred over the last three years, including the addition and realignment of several new fixed route services. 4. Total ridership grew by nearly 70 percent systemwide from 30,085 passengers in FY 2003 to 51,071 passengers in FY 2006. The new fixed route system increased ridership by over 8,000 passengers during FY 2005 and by close to 9,000 passengers during FY 2006. 5. PVVTA discontinued the Valley Runner intercity route to the Coachella Valley, which was realigned into Express Red Route 3 serving the State Prison facilities. 6. PVVTA has embarked upon an innovative marketing program with Big K-Mart. This program provides a free ride with proof of purchase totaling $30 or more in merchandise. Big K-Mart reimburses PVVTA for the fare upon submittal of receipts back to the store. The agency is endeavoring to expand this reimbursement program with other potential retailers. 7. The transit management structure of the agency was changed with the resignation of the Transit Manager in October 2004. The position was left vacant in an effort to reduce operating costs. 8. AB 2766 grant funding was awarded to the City in the amount of $125,000 for the construction of a CNG fueling facility. PVVTA also submitted an application to the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) for a $250,000 matching grant to be applied towards the facility. 128 Triennial Performance Audit 21 PVVTA Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Continue building relationship with Palo Verde College to promote greater transit usage. As Palo Verde College continues to expand its campus and curriculum, PVVTA should continue strengthening its partnership with the college given enrollment is growing and the college campus is a scheduled timed end point on Route 2 as a major transit trip attractor. The college currently purchases GoPasses for sales to its students, which is a good start to building an on-going relationship. 2. Include an allocation of City staff and mechanic in the Full-time Equivalent count. The TDA statute requires that all employee hours devoted to transit be accounted for in the full-time equivalent count. PUC Section 99247(j) refers to Vehicle Service Hours per Employee, which “means the vehicle service hours divided by the number of employees employed in connection with the public transportation system, based on the assumption that 2,000 person-hours of work in one year constitute one employee.” It does not appear that city staff and mechanic are counted in the FTE calculation for the State Controller Report. 3. Consider charging a different fare for general public Dial-A-Ride from the senior/disabled fare. The current cash fare for general public passengers is the same as for seniors and those with disabilities. In general, seniors and the disabled typically pay a lower fare than the general public. However, given that the farebox ratio is just above the minimum TDA requirement, the senior/disabled fare could remain the same while the general public fare is increased to reflect the convenience factor from Dial-A-Ride. A higher fare for general public riders would be consistent with the current fixed-route fare structure in which seniors/disabled pay a lower fare than the general public. 4. Work with the contractor to include in the monthly operations report performance data that show “Year-to-Date”, as well as “Same Month One Year Ago”, information. This information should be shared with the Authority’s Board on a regular basis. The monthly operations report format compiled by the contractor should include running year-to-date totals for trend analysis purposes. This tracking would be consistent with the City’s operations reporting data provided to RCTC utilizing the TransTrack software program. Comparison of current monthly data with those from the same month a year ago also provides valuable trend information for service monitoring and improvements. These additional analytical tools could assist with evaluating performance as the fixed route service matures and the impact to the Dial-A-Ride service are further assessed. Year-To-Date information provides a rolling total as the current year progresses, while data from the same time one year ago (e.g. same month a year ago) provides a comparative measure under similar conditions and point in time. 129 Triennial Performance Audit 22 PVVTA Featuring prior year performance indicators for comparison purposes on the operations report could assist the Board of Directors in its analysis and decision making process. From the tremendous growth in transit operations, it is important to closely monitor the trends in performance resulting from the new services and their impacts on the existing service. Tracking of cost efficiency measures such as operating cost per passenger and cost per hour should be undertaken because they are increasing at a rapid pace. Other important data such as passenger loads and farebox should also be monitored closely, as the new fixed route services lose their exemption from the fare box requirements in the next few years. 5. PVVTA should coordinate with the transit contractor and CHP to schedule regular inspections, due about the same time every year. PVVTA, or the contractor operator, should schedule well in advance the terminal inspection with CHP to have the inspections completed about the same time every year. As TDA claims require evidence of a recent CHP inspection, it is important that the inspection is conducted on a regular annual basis. 130 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 131 Triennial Performance Audit i Riverside Transit Agency TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 9 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 9 Section III............................................................................................................... 13 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations............................... 13 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 17 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 17 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 20 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 21 Section V............................................................................................................... 22 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 22 Operations .................................................................................................... 22 Planning......................................................................................................... 27 Maintenance................................................................................................ 28 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 29 General Administration and Management............................................. 30 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 33 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 33 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 34 132 Triennial Performance Audit 1 Riverside Transit Agency Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate Riverside’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA funds to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these funds for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates RTA’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether RTA is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) was created through a Joint Powers Authority in 1975 that originally included nine cities and Riverside County, eventually expanding to the 14 cities located in western Riverside County. The agency currently serves a population base of over 1.2 million residents in a very large service area covering about 2,500 square miles, the second largest transit service area in the nation. Rapid population growth around the County spurred by relatively lower housing prices has fueled an on-going need for public transportation services. The JPA allows member jurisdictions to establish separate local municipal systems while RTA serves as the umbrella agency to coordinate regional service that links with the local systems. RCTC performs this task for the entire county including linking services in western Riverside County. Separate local systems within the service area are located in the cities of Corona, Banning and Beaumont. In addition, RTA coordinates with the Riverside 133 Triennial Performance Audit 2 Riverside Transit Agency Special Transportation Services which provides complementary ADA paratransit service to RTA’s fixed route bus in the City of Riverside. The RTA Board of Directors is comprised of 18 representatives from RTA’s constituent jurisdictions, including four county supervisorial district representatives. The Board generally meets every fourth Thursday of the month with the exception of November and December. Meetings during those months are scheduled for the third Thursday of the month due to the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. There are four Board committees comprised of an Executive Committee, Budget & Administration Committee, Operations Committee, as well as the Transportation Now Executive Committee. Fleet RTA’s fleet inventory is comprised of 263 revenue vehicles, of which 200 vehicles are utilized on fixed routes and the remaining 63 utilized for demand response services. Of the 200 fixed route vehicles, 196 are in active service. In addition, RTA has 49 administrative support vehicles and 13 maintenance support vehicles. The vehicles are fueled by either Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), gasoline, or diesel. Most of the CNG vehicles in service are fairly new (delivered in 2001, 2002, 2003 & 2004). A detailed description of RTA’s fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 RTA Fleet Inventory Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/ Wheelchair Space Fixed-Route Dial-a-Ride 1994 Chance AH28 4 CNG 25/2 1994 Chance AH28 1 Diesel 25/2 1995 Flexible Metro 40102 17 CNG 44/2 1996 Chance AH28 1 CNG 25/2 1997 New Flyer C40LF 3 CNG 38/2 1998 El Dorado Aerotech 240 1 Gasoline 12/2 1999 El Dorado Aerotech 220 4 Gasoline 16/2 1999 El Dorado Aerotech 240 3 Gasoline 19/2 1999 El Dorado E-Z Riders 30 3 Diesel 25/2 2000 El Dorado 220 10 25 Gasoline 12/2 2000 Goshen GCII 1 Gasoline 16/2 2001 NABI 40LW-15 47 CNG 40/2 2001 El Dorado Aerotech 220 1 13 Gasoline 12/2 2002 NABI 40LW-15 47 CNG 40/2 2002 El Dorado Aerotech 220 23 7 Gasoline 12/2 2003 Thomas SLF232G 10 CNG 27/2 2004 Thomas SLF232G 3 CNG 27/2 2004 El Dorado Aerotech 220 1 9 Gasoline 12/2 2005 El Dorado Aerotech 220 8 4 Gasoline 12/2 2005 El Dorado Amerivan 5 Gasoline 6 2006 El Dorado Aerotech 220 12 Gasoline 12/2 Total 200 63 Source: FY 2005/07 – FY 2007/09 Short Range Transit Plan, RTA 134 Triennial Performance Audit 3 Riverside Transit Agency RTA’s service is comprised of 38 fixed-routes, five commuter routes, a demand-response service and taxi “overflow” program to supplement the demand response service in case of excessive capacity demand. RTA directly operates 19 of its fixed-routes with the remaining 24 fixed and commuter routes operated by private contractors. RTA’s primary trunk route is Route 1, which runs between the University of California, Riverside (UCR) campus through Downtown Riverside to the West Corona Metrolink Station. This route is under consideration for a possible conversion to Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). All fixed-route and commuter services operate Monday through Friday. Weekend service days and hours vary according to the particular fixed-route. RTA operates its Sunday schedule on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day. There is no service provided on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. A description of each route is presented in the table below: Table I-2 RTA Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations JS – Jurupa Shuttle (Contract Operated) Jurupa, Norco, Rubidoux Every Hour (Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.) Swan Lake Mobile Home Park; Country Village; Eddie Smith Senior Center; and De Anza Plaza; 1 (Direct Operated) UCR/Downtown to West Corona Metrolink Every 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:30 a.m. to 9:43 p.m.) Every 30 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 6:15 a.m. to 9:07 p.m.) West Corona Metrolink Station; Galleria at Tyler; Riverside Community College; Downtown Terminal; and RTA Headquarters 3 (Contract Operated) Arlington & La Sierra to Magnolia & Fullerton Every 45 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 7:34 p.m.) Every 40 minutes (Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 6:24 p.m.) Norco Senior Center; Riverside Community College-Norco; North Main Plaza; North Main Metrolink; 7 (Contract Operated) Downtown Lake Elsinore to Outlet Center, Wal- Mart Every 35 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 10:18 p.m.) Every 50 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 6:00 a.m. to 10:33 p.m.) Lake Elsinore Outlet Center; DPSS; Downtown Lake Elsinore; Senior Center; and Wal-Mart 8 (Contract Operated) Lake Elsinore Every Hour (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 7:75 p.m.) Every 2 Hours (Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:57 p.m.) Stater Brothers; Lake Elsinore Recreation Center; Wal-Mart; and Inland Valley Medical Center 10 (Direct Operated) Main & Russell to Pierce & Sterling Every 55 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:50 a.m. to 8:24 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 6:55 a.m. to Downtown Terminal; Poly High School; California School for the Deaf; 135 Triennial Performance Audit 4 Riverside Transit Agency 7:55 p.m.) Arlington High School; and Galleria at Tyler 12 (Direct Operated) Stephens & Center to Pierce & Sterling Every 40 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:55 p.m. to 8:17 p.m.) Every 50 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 7:00 a.m. to 7:45 p.m.) Galleria at Tyler; DMV; Downtown Terminal; and Salvation Army 13 (Direct Operated) Chicago & Marlborough to Galleria at Tyler Every 55 to 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 8:02 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:30 a.m. to 7:50 p.m.) Galleria at Tyler; Social Security Office; DPSS; Riverside Airport; Riverside Community College; and RTA Headquarters 14 (Direct Operated) Blaine & Canyon Crest to Galleria at Tyler Every 50 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:20 a.m. to 8:13 p.m.) Every 55 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 7:45 a.m. to 7:33 p.m.) Galleria at Tyler; Riverside Auto Center; California School for the Deaf; Riverside Medical Clinic; Riverside Community College; Downtown Terminal; and UCR 15 (Direct Operated) Downtown Terminal to Galleria at Tyler Every 35 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:30 a.m. to 9:14 p.m.) Every 1 hour, 10 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:07 p.m.) Downtown Terminal; Hardman Center; Riverside Airport; La Sierra Metrolink; and Galleria at Tyler; 16 (Direct Operated) Main & Russell to March Air Reserve Base Every 30 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:15 a.m. to 10:12 p.m.) Every 42 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:50 a.m. to 9:53 p.m.) Downtown; UCR; Canyon Crest Town Center; Canyon Springs Plaza; Moreno Valley Mall; and Moreno Valley City Hall; 16E (Direct Operated) Main & Russell to March Air Reserve Base (Metrolink Express) Two Northbound A.M. Headways and Southbound P.M. Headways (Monday through Friday) Perris & Alessandro Perris & Sunnymead; and Marketplace Station 17 (Direct Operated) Moreno Valley Mall to Wal-Mart Hourly (Monday through Friday from 5:30 a.m. to 9:22 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:22 p.m.) Moreno Valley Mall; Moreno Valley City Hall; RCR Medical Center; and Wal-Mart 18 (Direct Operated) Moreno Valley Mall to RCC/Moreno Valley Campus Hourly (Monday through Friday from 5:30 a.m. to 8:17 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:47 p.m.) Moreno Valley Mall; Canyon Springs High School; Ironwood Plaza; Moreno Valley High School; and RCC Moreno Valley 18A (Direct Operated) Sunnymead Ranch to RCC/Moreno Valley Campus Every 55 to 60 minutes (Daily from 5:50 a.m. to 8:08 p.m.) Moreno Valley Mall; Sunnymead Ranch; Moreno Valley High School; Bayside Community High School; and RCC Moreno Valley 19 (Direct Operated) Moreno Valley Mall to Perris Every 40 to 50 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:50 a.m. to 10:12 p.m.) Moreno Valley Mall; Moreno Valley High School; March Mountain High 136 Triennial Performance Audit 5 Riverside Transit Agency Every 55 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:30 a.m. to 8:33 p.m.) School; RCC Moreno Valley; Valley Plaza Hospital; and Perris 20 (Direct Operated) Magnolia Center, RCR Medical Center, Moreno Valley Community Hospital, RCC/Moreno Valley Campus Every 50 to 60 minutes (Daily from 5:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Moreno Valley Community Hospital; Riverside County Regional Medical Center; Social Security Office; and RCC Moreno Valley 21 (Direct Operated) Galleria at Tyler to Country Village Every 55 to 60 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:20 a.m. to 8:35 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:25 a.m. to 7:25 p.m.) Country Village; Glen Avon Library; Pedley Station Metrolink; and Galleria at Tyler 22 (Direct Operated) Downtown Terminal to Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Hourly (Monday through Friday from 4:24 a.m. to 9:45 p.m.) Every 1 hour, 15 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 6:51 a.m. to 8:38 p.m. Lake Elsinore Outlet Center; Perris; Mead Valley; Mission Grove Plaza; and Downtown Terminal 23 (Contract Operated) Temecula, Murrieta Every 55 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:40 a.m. to 7:07 p.m.) Hourly (Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:52 p.m.) Inland Valley Regional Medical Center; Rancho Springs Medical Center; Chaparral High School; Temecula Stage; and Community Center 24 (Contract Operated) Temecula, Pechanga Resort Every 40 to 1 hour, 45 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:05 a.m. to 7:20 p.m.) Every 1 hour, 10 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:45 p.m.) County Center; Palomar Village; Temecula Old Town & Stage Stop; Pechanga Resort; and Temecula Wal-Mart 25 (Direct Operated) Downtown Terminal to VA Hospital, Loma Linda Medical Center – Highgrove, Loma Linda Every 1 hour, 10 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:50 a.m. to 7:41 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:50 a.m. to 6:11 p.m.) Downtown Terminal; University Town Center; Loma Linda Medical Center; and VA Hospital 27 (Direct Operated) Galleria at Tyler to Florida & Lincoln, Hemet – Riverside/Perris/Sun City/Hemet Hourly (approximately) (Monday through Friday from 4:02 a.m. to 9:06 p.m.) Every 1 hour, 15 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:53 a.m. to 8:05 p.m.) Galleria at Tyler; Riverside National Cemetery; Perris High School; Hemet Valley Mall; and Valle Vista 29 (Direct Operated) Downtown Terminal to Etiwanda & Bellegrave – Rubidoux Every 1 hour, 10 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 8:05 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:00 a.m. to 7:40 p.m.) Downtown Terminal; Belltown; Downtown Rubidoux; De Anza Shopping Center; Pedley Station Metrolink; and Jurupa Valley High School 30 (Contract Operated) Perris Every 50 minutes (Monday through Saturday from 7:00 a.m. to 9:12 p.m.) Mervyns; Wal-Mart; Perris High School; Valley Plaza Doctors Hospital; and Civic Center 31 (Contract Operated) Beaumont, Banning to San Jacinto & Hemet Valley Mall Every 1 hour, 15 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:15 a.m. to 7:21 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:15 a.m. to 7:11 p.m.) Hemet Valley Mall; K-Mart; Riverside City Administration Complex; and 137 Triennial Performance Audit 6 Riverside Transit Agency Mt. San Jacinto Community College 32 (Contract Operated) Hemet Valley Mall to Mount San Jacinto College, Hemet, San Jacinto Every 1 hour, 15 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 7:49 p.m./Saturday and Sunday from 7:50 a.m. to 7:34 p.m.) Hemet Valley Mall; Hemet Hospital; and Mt. San Jacinto College 33 (Contract Operated) Hemet – Ladybug Shuttle Hourly (Monday through Friday from 7:20 a.m. to 8:08 p.m./Saturday from 8:50 a.m. to 8:08 p.m.) Hemet Valley Mall; and Hemet mobile home parks 35 (Contract Operated) Beaumont, Banning to Moreno Valley Mall Every 1 hour, 40 minutes (Monday through Saturday from 7:45 a.m. to 7:17 p.m.) Carl’s Jr.; Riverside County Regional Medical Center; and Moreno Valley Mall 36 (Contract Operated) Beaumont, Banning to Calimesa & Redlands Mall Every 50 minutes (Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:22 p.m./Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:12 p.m.) Redlands Mall; Calimesa Senior Center; Crown Village; and Sun Lakes Village 38 (Contract Operated) Pedley Metrolink to RCC Norco Every 45 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.) Pedley Station Metrolink; Glen Avon Library; and RCC Norco 40 (Contract Operated) Lake Elsinore, Quail Valley, Canyon Lake, Sun City, Mount San Jacinto College/Menifee Hourly (Monday through Friday from 5:35 a.m. to 6:52 p.m.) Lake Elsinore; Quail Valley; Sun City; and Mt. San Jacinto College/Menifee 41 (Contract Operated) Mead Valley Community Center to RCRMC Four A.M. & P.M. Eastbound Headways and Three A.M. & Five P.M. Westbound Headways (Monday through Friday from 5:15 a.m. to 6:40 p.m.) Mead Valley Community Center; Rancho Verde High School; RCC/Moreno Valley; and Riverside County Regional Medical Center 42 (Contract Operated) San Jacinto Estudillo Express Every 1 hour, 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:05 p.m./Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 7:25 p.m.) Soboba Casino; Soboba Springs Mobile Home Estates; Caravana Mobile Home Park; and Valley Hi Mobile Home Park 49 (Direct Operated) Downtown Terminal to Country Village Every 55 minutes (Monday through Friday from 4:30 a.m. to 8:07 p.m.) Every 50 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:48 a.m. to 7:08 p.m.) Downtown Terminal; Rubidoux; Pedley; and Country Village 50 (Contract Operated) Jury Trolley Service Riverside County Courthouse Every 15 minutes (Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:56 p.m.) Riverside County Courthouse; Parking Lot #33; and Eden Lutheran Church Parking Lot 51 (Direct Operated) UCR to Canyon Crest Town Centre (Crest Cruiser) Every 30 minutes (Monday through Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 6:56 p.m.) UCR; Bannockburn Apartments; Village Towers Apartments; and Canyon Crest Town Centre 61 (Contract Operated) Sun City – Sun City Scooter Every 40 minutes (Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 6:05 p.m.) Cherry Hill Club; Sun City Center; Loma Linda Medical Building; and Menifee Valley Medical Center 138 Triennial Performance Audit 7 Riverside Transit Agency 74 (Contract Operated) San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Sun City, Perris Every 1 hour, 20 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:55 a.m. to 6:37 p.m.) Mt. San Jacinto College; Hemet Valley Mall; Mt. San Jacinto College/Menifee; and Sun City Center 79 (Contract Operated) Hemet-Winchester- Temecula Every 1 hour, 10 minutes – Northbound/Every 1 hour, 30 minutes - Southbound (Monday through Friday from 4:55 a.m. to 7:35 p.m.) Promenade Mall; Temecula City Hall; Hemet Valley Mall. 149 IEC (Jointly operated with OCTA) Downtown Terminal to Village at Orange Three A.M. Headways & Four P.M. Headways (Monday through Friday) Two A.M. Headways & Two P.M. Headways (Saturday and Sunday) Riverside Downtown Terminal; Galleria at Tyler Corona; Village at Orange 202 (Commuter Link- Contract Operated) Murrieta, Temecula, Oceanside Transit Center Four Bi-directional A.M. Trips/Three Bi-directional P.M. Trips (Monday through Friday) Murrieta Wal-Mart; Promenade Mall PNR Oceanside Transit Center 204 (Commuter Link- Contract Operated) Riverside to Montclair Transcenter Seven Bi-directional A.M. Trips/Six Bi-directional P.M. Trips (Monday through Friday) Downtown Terminal; Country Village; Ontario Mills Mall; and Montclair Transcenter 206 (Commuter Link- Contract Operated) Temecula-Murrieta-Lake Elsinore-Corona Metrolink Four Northbound A.M. Trips/Two Northbound P.M. Trips Three Southbound A.M. Trips/Three Southbound P.M. Trips (Monday through Friday) Promenade Mall; Murrieta Wal-Mart; Lake Elsinore Outlet Center; and N. Main/Corona Metrolink 208 (Commuter Link- Contract Operated) Temecula, Menifee, Sun City, Perris, Moreno Valley, Riverside Metrolink Seven Bi-directional A.M. Trips/Seven Bi-directional P.M. Trips (Monday through Friday) Promenade Mall; Mount San Jacinto College; Sun City Center; Moreno Valley Mall Riverside Metrolink 794 Express: Galleria at Tyler or Canyon Community Church – South Coast Metro Four Westbound A.M. Trips/Four Eastbound P.M. Trips (Monday through Friday) Galleria at Tyler; Canyon Community Church; Hutton Center; South Coast Metro Source: RideGuide, RTA Demand Response and Taxi Program RTA provides Dial-A-Ride services exclusively to seniors, persons with disabilities and ADA- certified individuals in parts of the service area that do not already have demand response provided by a local jurisdiction. Demand response is operated by contracts with private companies. Contracted services include the scheduling and dispatching functions. Dial-A-Ride service is provided in two forms: ADA service which covers all areas within ¾ of a mile of fixed-route boundaries, with connectivity throughout the 2,500 square mile service area; and non-ADA service, which provides local service to seniors and non-ADA disabled riders within individual cities or local regions. ADA service includes “after-hour” service that supplements the service hours of local jurisdictional providers to ensure ADA compliance. 139 Triennial Performance Audit 8 Riverside Transit Agency High demand for this service by ADA certified riders has impacted the agency’s ability to provide rides for non-ADA customers. ADA certified passengers comprise 71 percent of all dial-a-ride trips. As a result, a demonstration program using taxis has been implemented to accommodate the overflow of riders. RTA plans to continue utilizing taxi service provided it is financially viable. Fares The RTA fare structure is based on the particular service utilized. In April 2005, RTA increased the fares after five years since its last increase in January 2000. The fare schedule is presented in the following table: Table I-3 RTA Fare Schedule Fixed-Route Service Fare Categories Base Fare 31-Day Pass Day Pass Adult/General $1.25 $43.00 $3.75 Senior (60+)/Disabled/Medicare $0.60 $21.00 $1.85 Youth (Grades 1though 12) $1.25 $32.00 $3.75 Child (46” tall or under) $0.25 N/A N/A Commuter Link Service Base Fare 31-Day Pass Day Pass Adult/General $2.25 $43.00 $3.75 Senior (60+)/Disabled/Medicare $0.60 $21.00 $1.85 Youth (Grades 1though 12) $2.25 $32.00 $3.75 Child (46” tall or under) $0.25 N/A N/A Dial-a-Ride Service Base Fare Ticket Books Senior (60+)/Disabled/Medicare $2.50 $25.00 Child (46” tall or under) $0.50 N/A Route 149 Inland Empire Connection Any Point Within Riverside County Between Riverside and Orange Counties Adult/General $1.25 $2.90 Senior (60+)/Disabled/Medicare $0.60 $0.85 Youth (Grades 1though 12) $1.25 $2.90 Source: RideGuide, RTA 140 Triennial Performance Audit 9 Riverside Transit Agency Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the Riverside Transit Agency’s ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA funds. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, nine of the measures are applicable to RTA. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (internet filing): FY 2004: December 14, 2004 FY 2005: October 18, 2005 FY 2006: October 31, 2006 Conclusion: Complied Note: The State Controller requires separate reports to be submitted for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled, as stated on the General Information page. Provided that RTA provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. RTA should comply with this requirement. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: August 31, 2004 FY 2005: August 26, 2005 FY 2006: August 25, 2006 Conclusion: Complied 141 Triennial Performance Audit 10 Riverside Transit Agency The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 RTA participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: October 31, 2002; September 1, 2004; January 24, 2006. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s claim for TDA funds is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, RTA’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance are submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in RTA’s operating budget: FY 2004: 14.2% FY 2005: 4.0% FY 2006: 8.8% Source: FYs 2004-2006 Fiscal Audits. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three-twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. If the operator serves a rural area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.4, 99268.5, 99268.12, 99270.1. RTA provides service in both urbanized and non-urbanized areas of Riverside County. RCTC, under state law (PUC 99270.1, CCR 6645), is responsible for calculating an intermediate fare ratio. RCTC developed rules and regulations for determining the required ratio, including the methodology for calculating the ratio, which is approved annually by Caltrans. The required fare ratios calculated for RTA are as follows: FY 2004: 17.40% FY 2005: 17.68% FY 2006: 17.73% RTA’s fare ratios, using audited data, are as follows: FY 2004: 18.02% FY 2005: 20.01% FY 2006: 19.34% Conclusion: Complied The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 RTA contributes to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (PERS), an agent multiple- employer public employee 142 Triennial Performance Audit 11 Riverside Transit Agency transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. defined benefit pension plan. PERS provides retirement and disability benefits, annual cost-of-living adjustments, and death benefits to plan members and beneficiaries. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) RTA employs part-time drivers for its directly operated fixed route bus services. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) Riverside makes full use of federal funds available to it, as reported in annual State Controller and National Transit Database reports. FY 2004: Operations ($5,591,563) Capital ($2,266,777) FY 2005: Operations ($6,879,359) Capital ($2,894,602) FY 2006: Operations ($7,178,803) Capital ($3,397,159) Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. RTA has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. It is noted on the General Information page of the State Controller’s Report that the State requires separate reports to be filed for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled. Provided that RTA provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. RTA should comply with this requirement. 2. The State Controller Operator’s report information is based on fiscal audit data input by the fiscal auditor. The Human Resources Director is responsible for supplying the Full-time Equivalent (FTE) employee data. From our review of the State Controller Data, the FTE category was not filled in for dial-a-ride. It is recommended that RTA reflect the FTE for dial-a-ride, which include the contract operator staff and allocated RTA administrative staff. This could then impact the FTE reported for the fixed route, which appears to show the entire RTA organization. 3. RTA received “satisfactory” rating for each CHP terminal inspection during the audit period. The terminal inspections should be scheduled to allow for annual inspections around the same month each year. 4. The budget grew over the last three years, having increased the most (14 percent) in FY 2004. This is attributed to increases in staff wages and benefits, 143 Triennial Performance Audit 12 Riverside Transit Agency purchased transportation, and materials and supplies (fuel and lubricants) associated with service expansion. 5. The trend in the fare recovery ratio is overall positive. The audited farebox ratio increased from 18.02 percent to 19.34 percent between FY 2003-2004 and FY 2005-2006. The farebox reached a high of 20.01 percent in FY 2004-05 due in part to the inclusion of Measure “A” operating funds, and the fare increase implemented in April 2005. The farebox recovery ratio each year exceeded the blended fare ratio requirements established by RCTC. 144 Triennial Performance Audit 13 Riverside Transit Agency Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations RTA’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Develop and adopt policies aimed at creating budgetary goals that are linked to service productivity. Actions taken by RTA: RTA provides a mix of services, including some that are productive because they serve densely populated areas and have many trip generators along the route, and some that more coverage oriented. These coverage type services are deemed necessary given RTA is committed to sustaining transit service in urban, suburban and rural components of its service area. Financial resources are allocated as appropriate to these services. Staff regularly undertake review of individual routes. During FY 2005, five unproductive routes (Routes 3, 17, 36, 38, and 41) were targeted for modification to determine if productivity would increase should the routes be realigned. Two of the routes, Routes 17 and 38, were studied by a consultant who conducted demand modeling, with consideration of future growth that may be conducive to higher productivity, given time to develop. As an example of the consultant’s recommendation for productivity, it was stated that Route 38 should be discontinued unless it achieves a productivity of at least 5.0 passengers per revenue hour within the next two years. Through the Transit Policy Committee (TPC), created by RCTC in May 2004, policy directions related to transit matters are discussed, developed and submitted for Commission action. The TPC is comprised of 10 members and has four objectives; two of which relate directly to the audit recommendation of budgetary goals that are linked to service productivity. In addition, the Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) developed in conjunction with RCTC, has provided a framework for RTA to develop fiscal goals linked with service productivity. The recent Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) prepared for RTA also includes long term goals that could direct policies for the delivery of future transit services. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Explore potential alternative operating revenues, including advertising and contributions from unique beneficiaries of the service. 145 Triennial Performance Audit 14 Riverside Transit Agency Actions taken by RTA: The RTA Board of Directors had considered bus exterior and interior advertising at it October 2002 Board meeting. Issues raised included ad content control and potentially low revenue. It was determined by a majority vote of 16 to 1 not to provide advertising space on bus exteriors or interiors. However, RTA does provide bus shelter advertising in the cities of Corona, Hemet, Perris, and Moreno Valley and in the unincorporated areas including Glen Avon, Home Gardens, Pedley, Rubidoux, and Sun City. In addition, RTA had bus shelters with corresponding advertising agreements in Lake Elsinore and Norco; however, due to business decisions made by the media corporation that provided the shelters, they were removed. The City of Riverside has a strict advertising policy that currently prohibits commercial advertising of this nature. However, during the audit period, RTA staff have continued to work with the City’s administration to initiate a bus shelter advertising pilot program in certain commercial districts in the City. RTA has also pursued financial support from unique beneficiaries who receive direct bus service. Examples include Route 50, the Jury Trolley, which is subsidized 100 percent by the County of Riverside and Route 51, the Crest Cruiser, which provides transit service to and from the University of California, Riverside (UCR). Moreover, the U-Pass Program allows UCR students to use their student pass to ride any RTA fixed-route bus for free. RTA is reimbursed by UCR at $0.60 per ride up to $32.00 monthly per person (or student). In addition, RTA is working with the Riverside Community College (RCC) District to explore subsidized parking lot shuttle programs similar to the Jury Trolley to help relieve traffic and parking congestion in around RCC campus sites. RTA approached Native American tribes in its service in 2006 to discuss potential partnerships. The tribes included Pechanga and Soboba. At the time, the tribes declined to participate financially with RTA in the provision of existing transit to their casinos. RTA staff indicated they will make future attempts with the tribes. Other revenue generators include possible Chamber of Commerce membership assessments in exchange for bus passes; new development being required to purchase bus passes for household members; and businesses offering employee bus passes to mitigate traffic and parking congestion. The agency also receives lease revenue from MacDonald Transit’s use of its Hemet facility. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Develop short term operations plan that draws down on the remaining unclaimed LTF revenues shown in RCTC financial reports. 146 Triennial Performance Audit 15 Riverside Transit Agency Actions taken by RTA: RTA has found it feasible to fund certain capital projects with reserve funds, but not operations. Since operations costs are ongoing, RTA felt reserves do not provide a continuous revenue stream to sustain the project. Population and growth in western Riverside County continue to outpace most of the country. This growth results in the pressing need for expansion for all modes of transit. Multi-modal transit centers to facilitate the riding public’s needs will be essential in the coming years. Unlike the developed surrounding counties, Riverside County is in the processing of developing its transit infrastructure. General locations for multi-modal transit centers have been identified by both RCTC and RTA. These multi-modal transit centers will require minimum five acre parcels. In a fast moving real estate market, sellers demand short escrows for strategically located real property. Quick reaction time to secure such properties is critical. As real properties become available, a readily available reserve fund would assist in the procurement process. In April 2004, RTA was faced with a cash flow challenge due to the non-allocation of FTA Section 5307 funds. Coupled with RCTC’s 10 percent LTF reserve policy, this resulted in a $7.4 million operating revenue deficit, amounting to 20 percent of RTA’s operating budget. The availability of these funds allowed for the uninterrupted continuation of transit services for bus passengers in western Riverside County. Had the funds not been available, RTA might have been short of funds in May 2004. A similar cash flow issue occurred in FY 2005 due to the delay in receipt of FTA Section 5307 funds. LTF reserves amounting to $5.8 million were drawn down in order to offset an operating revenue deficit through June 2005. RTA adopted a fiscal reserve policy in FY 2002 that calls for LTF reserves to equal 1/12 of the total annual LTF allocated amount ($2.04 million for FY 2002), $800,000 for unforeseen capital expenditures, $2.04 million for anticipated vehicle acquisition, and $4 million for specific BRT capital projects. When the fiscal reserve policy was adopted in FY 2002, the agency’s FTA Section 5307 allocation was $938,000. However, in for FYs 2004 and 2005, the agency’s FTA Section 5307 budget was $5.4 million and $6.08 million respectively. Given the problems experienced with these federal formula grant funds being bottlenecked in Washington, RTA staff has recommended revisions to the reserve policy taking into account these variables. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Continue to work with dial-a-ride contractor(s) to separate vehicle revenue hours and miles from total vehicle hours and miles. 147 Triennial Performance Audit 16 Riverside Transit Agency Actions taken by RTA: RTA has required its Dial-a-Ride contractor since July 2004 to report both total vehicle hours and miles along with revenue hours and miles. A process has been established to enter the data received into the reports. This information shows both total hours and miles and revenue hours and miles in all performance reports for the National Transit Database, State Controller and RCTC. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 5 Provide a comprehensive systemwide map in the RiderGuide. Actions taken by RTA: RTA currently publishes a systemwide map of its fixed and commuter routes. The map is published independent of RTA’s RideGuide as a companion brochure and is available at all locations where the RideGuide is displayed. The RideGuide provides maps of each individual route. The RideGuide was previously published with the systemwide map included. However, it was determined that the labor and material costs to include a foldout system map in each RideGuide was too prohibitive. RTA is currently saving over $58,400 annually by not including the system map in the RideGuide by printing it separately. A systemwide map is also available on kiosks at Metrolink stations in western Riverside County. Conclusion: This recommendation is no longer applicable. 148 Triennial Performance Audit 17 Riverside Transit Agency Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews RTA’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for RTA. Table IV-1 RTA Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $32,335,070 $37,073,869 $38,565,612 $41,489,354 28.3% Total Passengers 7,143,958 7,588,864 7,357,581 7,381,949 3.3% Vehicle Service Hours 515,258 598,500.0 605,421.0 615,787.0 19.5% Vehicle Service Miles 8,209,320 9,659,793 9,787,848 9,918,965 20.8% Employee FTE's 554 562 638 601 8.5% Passenger Fares $5,366,542 $5,534,326 $6,004,812 $7,145,886 33.2% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.53 $4.89 $5.24 $5.62 24.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $62.76 $61.94 $63.70 $67.38 7.4% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.94 $3.84 $3.94 $4.18 6.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 13.9 12.7 12.2 12.0 -13.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.87 0.79 0.75 0.74 -14.5% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 930.1 1,064.9 948.9 1,024.6 10.2% Average Fare per Passenger $0.75 $0.73 $0.82 $0.97 28.9% Fare Recovery Ratio * 16.73% 18.02% 20.01% 19.34% 15.6% * Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per TDA and RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 149 Triennial Performance Audit 18 Riverside Transit Agency Table IV-2 RTA Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $27,930,242 $31,232,861 $32,308,405 $35,178,409 26.0% Total Passengers 6,925,559 7,362,203 7,139,831 7,155,588 3.3% Vehicle Service Hours 405,360 471,324 471,875 475,845 17.4% Vehicle Service Miles 6,200,885 7,325,942 7,424,945 7,570,984 22.1% Employee FTE's 416 496 493 459 10.3% Passenger Fares $5,210,069 $5,364,352 $5,727,235 $6,618,668 27.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.03 $4.24 $4.53 $4.92 21.9% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $68.90 $66.27 $68.47 $73.93 7.3% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $4.50 $4.26 $4.35 $4.65 3.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 17.1 15.6 15.1 15.0 -12.0% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.12 1.00 0.96 0.95 -15.4% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 974.4 950.3 957.2 1,036.7 6.4% Average Fare per Passenger $0.75 $0.73 $0.80 $0.92 23.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 18.65% 17.18% 17.73% 18.81% 0.9% Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 150 Triennial Performance Audit 19 Riverside Transit Agency Table IV-3 RTA Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $4,404,828 $5,841,008 $6,257,207 $6,310,945 43.3% Total Passengers 218,399 226,661 217,750 226,361 3.6% Vehicle Service Hours 109,898.0 127,176.0 133,546.0 139,942.0 27.3% Vehicle Service Miles 2,008,435 2,333,851 2,362,903 2,347,981 16.9% Employee FTE's * 138 66 145 142 2.9% Passenger Fares $156,473 $169,974 $277,577 $527,218 236.9% Operating Cost per Passenger $20.17 $25.77 $28.74 $27.88 38.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $40.08 $45.93 $46.85 $45.10 12.5% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $2.19 $2.50 $2.65 $2.69 22.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.6 -18.6% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.11 0.10 0.09 0.10 -11.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 796.4 1,926.9 921.0 985.5 23.8% Average Fare per Passenger $0.72 $0.75 $1.27 $2.33 225.1% Fare Recovery Ratio 3.55% 2.91% 4.44% 8.35% 135.2% * FY 2004 FTE count does not include Transportation Concepts whose contract expired in December 2003, and replaced with MV Transportation. FTE count shown in the table for MV Transportation, using data provided by RTA. Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC Transit Operator Performance Reports 151 Triennial Performance Audit 20 Riverside Transit Agency Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased by 28.3 percent from the baseline year of FY 2003 through FY 2006. This is attributed to increases in staff wages and benefits, purchased transportation, and materials and supplies (fuel and lubricants) associated with service expansion. It is also attributed to increases in employee pension, workers’ compensation, casualty/liability insurance, and medical insurance rates. Some cost savings with materials and supplies and other miscellaneous expenses were realized. Cost increases in FY 2005 and 2006 included Compressed Natural Gas fuel increases, and increases in purchased transportation expenses as RTA outsourced the Dial-A- Ride call center to the DAR service provider. A new labor union MOU was also ratified in June 2006 and was considered a “win win” for both sides. The previous MOU expired in September 2005. 2. Vehicle service hours increased by 19.5 percent which reflects the addition of new services. Fixed route revenue hours increased by 17.4 percent, and dial-a-ride by 27.3 percent to fulfill the ADA mandate for complementary service. 3. Ridership systemwide increased by over 3 percent, with both transit modes increasing at the same rate. The overall increase is positive given RTA raised the fixed route cash fares by 25 cents for the first time in five years in April 2005. The dial-a-ride fare was increased significantly from $1 to $2.50. As a result of the increase, the agency experienced a small drop in ridership, as shown in the performance tables. RTA expected such a decline, but has seen that ridership is rebounding. With the stability in ridership, fare revenues have grown for both services. 4. Operating cost per hour exhibited a moderate increase over the audit period. Both operating costs and revenue hours increased at about the same rate, with cost increasing slightly faster which resulted in the overall increase. However, this rate of increase is a positive sign of efficient service. 5. Operating cost per passenger increased significantly due to the growth in cost coupled with a leveling of ridership. Systemwide, the growth was 24 percent over the audit period. Fixed route growth in cost per passenger was 22 percent and 38 percent for dial-a-ride. 6. Passengers per vehicle service hour and per mile showed a downward trend, as ridership was level while revenue hours and miles increased. The rate of decrease systemwide was 13.5 percent for passengers per hour, and 14.5 percent for passengers per mile for the audit period. 7. The farebox recovery ratio for TDA purposes showed an average annual increase of 5.1 percent and an overall increase of over 15.6 percent between FYs 2003 and 2006. The increase in fare revenues helped to maintain the fare ratio. New service extensions have also been excluded from the farebox ratio. RTA uses a cost allocation methodology to allocate its administrative expenses between directly operated and contracted services as part of calculating the farebox ratio. The allocation basis is vehicle revenue hours. 152 Triennial Performance Audit 21 Riverside Transit Agency Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators RTA experienced a temporary decline in its ridership after implementing a fare increase, but fare revenues increased over the past three years. The provision of additional service, reflected in the growth in revenue hours and miles, generally supports the increase in operating costs. Other factors, such as staff compensation, fuel and insurance costs, also increased over the audit period. The farebox recovery ratio has been exceeding the blended ratio established by RCTC on an annual basis. Given that the farebox ratio excludes new services allowed by TDA, RTA should continue to monitor the performance of these new services as they reach closer to the end of their exemption status. 153 Triennial Performance Audit 22 Riverside Transit Agency Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within RTA. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were at reviewed at the agency: · Operations · Planning · Maintenance · Marketing · General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub-functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that fall under General Administration. Operations The operation and planning of transit services is consistent with the mission statement. The mission statement of RTA is to: “The Riverside Transit Agency, Riverside County’s multi-modal transportation provider, shall provide for a variety of transportation needs in a cost effective and efficient manner, for all the residents of our member communities. The Agency is committed to providing safe, reliable, courteous, accessible, and user-friendly transit services to our customers.” RTA operates from two facilities: Riverside and Hemet. The Riverside facility located at 1825 Third Street, serves as RTA’s main office and includes the Administration, Operations, and Maintenance Departments. Approximately 320 employees are currently located at this site including part-time and on-call employee of the Customer Information Center. The Hemet facility has been operational since June 2000 with 54 employees assigned to the Maintenance and Operations Departments. There are six directly operated routes and approximately 18 CNG vehicles that operated from this facility. An additional CNG fueling station was opened at the Riverside facility in February 2006. There were an average 270 contract employees during the triennial audit period involved with the operation of fixed-route, demand-response and taxi services. RTA encompasses a service area of 2,500 square miles of western Riverside County. The RTA service area covers 14 member cities and the unincorporated areas of Riverside County. Member jurisdictions include Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula, and the unincorporated portions of unincorporated western Riverside 154 Triennial Performance Audit 23 Riverside Transit Agency County. In addition, RTA offers intercounty commuter bus service between Riverside, Orange, San Bernardino and San Diego Counties. The agency’s operational strategy revolves around balancing farebox and high productivity goals with maintaining optimal coverage and lifeline service. This poses both a challenge and an opportunity. Traditional nodes for transit include the cities of Riverside, Corona and Moreno Valley. Given the rapid growth in the service area, RTA has identified additional nodes in the southwestern part of Riverside County, such as Temecula and Murrieta. Fixed-Route RTA currently operates 38 fixed-routes: 19 directly operated and the remaining contract operated. Directly operated services are provided in the core areas of Riverside, Moreno Valley, Perris, and adjacent areas. Contract operated services are provided in the outlying areas by two private vendors: Laidlaw Transit Services, Inc. and McDonald Transit Associates. The routes vary in service frequencies raging from 20 minute headways to over an hour. Due to improved farebox recovery, there have been fewer exempted routes. Four fixed-routes were exempt during the triennial audit period. Route 23 (Temecula- Murrieta) saw revenue hours increase by 39 percent and was extended to serve the Temecula Community Center in September 2003. The service area for Route 24 (Temecula) was classified as an Urbanized Area (UZA) by the U.S. Census Bureau and was granted a five year grace period to meet farebox recovery requirements by RCTC in July 2001. Route 36 (Beaumont-Banning-Calimesa) saw a change in its routing to reflect additional service to the Redlands Mall in July 2004. Route 41 (Mead Valley-Perris- Moreno Valley) saw a route change with the addition of Moreno Valley to its service area in July 2004. RTA is currently examining Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and enhanced bus service along Route One, which is the agency’s primary trunk route running from Downtown Riverside to Corona. In the run up to BRT implementation, the agency has proposed to add an additional eight additional trips along this route during peak periods. Dial-a-Ride RTA’s Dial-a-Ride service is configured over 12 travel zones and is contract operated by Southland Transit. Most trips occur within one zone. The dial-a-ride service is for ADA- certified passengers, persons with disabilities and seniors. RTA-owned dial-a-ride vehicles are gasoline powered and equipped with wheelchair lifts. RTA is the designated Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) for western Riverside County, which entails coordination of paratransit services throughout the agency’s service area, driver training, assistance with grant applications, and development of RTA’s Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). It is not common for Dial-a-Ride passengers to transfer to a fixed- route. During the audit period, there were several changes in RTA’s Dial-a-Ride contract operator. Transportation Concepts provided the service through December 2003, which was then provided by MV Transportation. However, in September 2005, MV Transportation personnel had been caught falsifying on-time performance data. The contract with MV Transportation called for a 90 percent on-time performance rate, but the contractor failed to meet that standard. Instead, it had an 80 percent on-time 155 Triennial Performance Audit 24 Riverside Transit Agency performance rate. The scheduled pick-up times were changed to show fewer late pickups. RTA notified the U.S. Department of Transportation Inspector General, the Riverside County District Attorney and other agencies regarding this matter. The agency was able to reach an out-of-court settlement of $1 million with MV Transportation. The service contract was re-bid in February 2006. In March 2006, the Dial-a-Ride contract was transferred to Southland Transit. RTA has reported no service disruptions since the change, and has indicated service has improved and customer complaints down. Southland is installing Mobile Data Terminals (MDTs) with Global Positioning System (GPS) capability and time-stamp verification in about 64 vehicles. The system will interface with Trapeze scheduling software. During FY 2006, RTA replaced 22 Dial-a-Ride vehicles according to FTA regulations. In addition to the Dial-a-Ride service, RTA operates a taxi program. The taxi program is contract operated through Network Paratransit Systems, Inc. and provides supplemental services for trip reservations that cannot be accommodated within RTA’s existing demand response service. The program covers the same service area as the existing Dial-a-Ride service. RTA plans to continue utilizing the taxi service as needed. Commuter Link While RTA’s services are for the general public, the agency has begun placing more emphasis on commuter services as a market niche with growth potential. RTA’s Commuter Link service is structured to provide connecting service to and from Metrolink trains in Riverside and Corona as well as direct commuter bus service between Riverside and Orange Counties. The service is marketed differently than the conventional fixed- route service and consists of five routes, which are contract operated. The service has seen a double-digit increase in ridership and consists of four branded routes plus the OCTA-operated Route 794, which began service in FY 2007. Four of the five commuter routes began service in September 2003 and have been exempt from farebox recovery requirements. U.C. Riverside – Crest Cruiser RTA has an agreement with the University of California, Riverside (UCR) to provide shuttle service to and from the campus. The service operates as Line 51 – The Crest Cruiser with 30-minute headways on weekdays during the school session. It connects student housing to the campus and connects with the on-campus shuttle system. The university’s U-Pass program allows UCR students to ride RTA’s fixed-route system free. RTA is reimbursed $0.60 per ride up to $32.00 monthly per person by UCR’s Parking and Services budget. RTA reports 32,000 boardings over a four month period and a five to seven percent monthly growth rate. Bus Driver Recruitment, Recognition and Training Human Resources conducts the hiring process for coach operators. Open positions are advertised through the local paper, mailing lists, community groups and job fairs. Prospective applicants go through job related tests including the BOSS integrity test to determine the applicant’s potential to succeed at the position. An interview and background check is then conducted. Two characteristics preferred for a new hire is safety awareness and customer service skills. 156 Triennial Performance Audit 25 Riverside Transit Agency Approximately 25 to 50 percent of new hires have a Class B license to operate a commercial vehicle, as many have been retired truck drivers. It was indicated that RTA hires about two new operators a month. Each new coach operator is given an employee manual, code of ethics and union handbook. Driver training is for six weeks, including classroom training and behind the wheel. Recognition programs are provided to the drivers, including a safe driver award and recognition for perfect attendance over a given time period. It was indicated that 10 drivers recently received recognition for perfect attendance. On-going safety training is provided at the required eight hours per year. A training manager is onsite to provide safety classes relating to topics such as pathogens, red light awareness, and wheelchair loading/unloading. The training manager logs in all training by the drivers. Should a vehicle accident occur, a drug test is administered for a preventive accident, and mandatory retraining is conducted. Fare Increase RTA adjusted the fare structure that was approved by the Board in April 2005 which increased the fares across the board. A consultant was retained to work with the Fare Policy Committee and develop a comprehensive fare study. A draft recommendation for fare structure modification was presented to the Board, accompanied by a series of 10 public hearings to allow for public comment. The public hearings were held from November 15, 2004 through November 18, 2004. The approved fare increase raised the fixed route cash fare by 25 cents, while the dial-a-ride cash fare increased from $1 to $2.50. Other increases were made to the 31-day pass and youth fares. A new buddy fare was also implemented that gives up to 10 dial-a-ride passengers riding at the same time an opportunity to pay only the individual cash fare of $2.50. RTA anticipates future fare increases to be more frequent and in smaller fare increments. Fare Deposit Passenger fares are deposited in the GFI Odyssey fareboxes during revenue service. Maintenance then probes the fareboxes for stored information. The coins are counted by two staff in a vault, with audits and reconciliations conducted by the RTA accounting staff independent of coin counters to ensure accurate reporting of fare revenues. A camera in the vault is located in the Controller’s office. On-Time Performance On-time performance is monitored at time points by three road supervisors and entered into an Excel spreadsheet. On-time monitoring also involves various sampling methods. RTA defines on-time as a bus arriving zero to five minutes after a scheduled timepoint, or if the bus arrives before the scheduled stop but does not leave until the scheduled time. DAR on-time performance is defined as a 30-minute window (15 minutes before and after the scheduled pick up time). There is a 90 percent on-time performance standard for RTA’s contract operators. Data for on-time performance by route, as well as late arrivals, is tracked and recorded in monthly reports. Table V-1 shows the on-time performance statistics which show a slight decline. 157 Triennial Performance Audit 26 Riverside Transit Agency Table V-1 RTA On-Time Performance Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride % On-Time 94.30% 93.20% 93.30% 86.10% 91.92% 87.25% Source: RTA Internal Reports Customer Complaints Complaints are made through the phone, mail or online. They are typically first routed through the Customer Information Center in the Marketing Department, which are then forwarded to the appropriate department for a response. The Marketing Department developed and documented a complaint process flow chart outlining the procedures for managing complaints from when it is received to closure. The Chief Operating Officer (COO) and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) also review each complaint and response. A letter of acknowledgment is sent to the customer, while the complaints are entered and maintained in an Access database for reference. The number of complaints received during the triennial audit period are summarized as follows: Table V-2 RTA Complaints Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride Fixed- Route Dial-a- Ride # of Complaints 724 119 978 204 1,123 193 Complaints per 1,000 passengers 0.09 0.53 0.14 0.94 0.16 0.85 Source: RTA Internal Reports Operations Data Organization Given the large amounts of data that is generated by in-house operations as well as by the various contractors, the Department is capable of organizing and summarizing detailed operations data for review and analysis. From samples provided by RTA, key measures like ridership, hours and miles are recorded by route by provider, either in- house or contracted, and by mode (bus and dial-a-ride). Complaints and on-time performance are also tracked using the same level of detail. Monthly reports submitted by the contractors also contain specific detailed performance data that enable RTA to carefully evaluate current services. The data is also used for reporting in the RCTC PIP as well for other internal and external reports to the RTA Board, and State and Federal governments. The reporting requirements of the PIP have assisted the agency to summarize the operations data. 158 Triennial Performance Audit 27 Riverside Transit Agency For SRTP purposes, PIP data is used to develop target performance measures for the next fiscal year. RCTC and the operators agreed to use nine months of actual data to develop the PIP targets that are then inserted into their respective SRTPs. From a review of RCTC PIP documentation and the RTA SRTP, it appears projected data is included with the actual data in the PIP calculation in the SRTP. To be consistent with the SRTP development guidelines, RTA should utilize only the actual data. For other additional analyses and on-going evaluation of its services, RTA could include projected data. Planning Planning Department personnel has increased and is currently staffed with four planners, including recruitment of a new Director of Planning during the audit period. This is an improvement for the agency from a few years ago in which adequate staffing of the Planning Department was identified as a high priority. Planning staff provides multiple planning services and analyses that are complementary to other RTA functions. With tremendous population and employment growth occurring in Western Riverside County, land use integration with transit has been one particular focus for the Planning Department. Mitigation fees are an incentive for developers to consider transit coordination and alternatives. RTA published and distributed transit design guidelines for new developments, which have proven to be quite helpful to local engineers. These design guidelines cover such elements as roadway design, bus shelters, and transit centers. As part of the intergovernmental review process, RTA routinely reviews and comments on development applications. Transit and land use coordination also involves RCTC and the Western Riverside County Council of Governments (WRCOG) as well as city managers and public works directors from constituent municipalities. Planning also collaborates with the Transportation Now (TNOW) Program, a coalition of local concerned citizens dedicated to promoting and expanding transportation alternatives. There are 3 chapters by geographic location, including Norco-Corona; the Banning/Beaumont Pass Area; and Murrieta-Temecula-Moreno Valley. Each TNOW chapter meets once a month and is attended by one Board of Supervisor, planning staff from the cities, and community members. The program provides a forum for public input and outreach about general transportation issues, including transit. With development occurring at one of the nation’s fastest pace, RTA should continue to be involved upfront during the planning phases of new development and be able to meet projected transit needs in the critical travel corridors. Additional transit/land use planning expertise and upfront marketing to the cities about transit were identified as on- going needs. Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) At the time of the auditor’s site visit, the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) was under development by RTA in consultation with the IBI Group. The agency anticipates that the draft document would be complete by May 2007. The COA will entail an analysis of each route, service area demographics as well as financial needs and projections. 159 Triennial Performance Audit 28 Riverside Transit Agency Maintenance During the audit period, RTA constructed a new CNG station at its Riverside facility. This allows for buses to be fueled during off-peak times when electric rates are lower and utilizes fast-fuel technology. Prior to the new facility coming on line, it took eight to ten hours to fuel the buses; whereas it now takes six hours. RTA directly operates 114 of its larger buses in the fleet. These buses are 40-foot with seating for 30 or more passengers. Other smaller fixed-route and dial-a-ride buses with seating for 30 passengers and fewer are operated and serviced by contractors. RTA inspects contractor-operated buses. RTA has contractual agreements with companies providing RTA transit services (aka Contractors) that include maintenance specifications. Contractors are required to participate in the California Highway Patrol’s (CHPs) pull inspection program, while the Human Resources Department maintains the pull notices for each driver. RTA contract managers conduct maintenance audits on a regular basis at the contractor sites. RTA’s Director of Maintenance reports that there have been no major maintenance issues involving its contract operators that have affected service delivery or safety. The number of system failures reported during the triennial audit period are presented as follows: Table V-3 RTA Fixed-Route Road Calls Summary Year 2004 2005 2006 # of Mechanical System Failures (major and other) 661 626 576 Source: Federal National Transit Database Reports RTA employs 25 mechanics in total. There are 50 maintenance employees including servicers and supervisors. There have been no issues with turnover involving the mechanics, although there is slightly more turnover involving the servicers. The Hemet facility contains three bus bays and supports of fleet of 10 to 11 buses. The facility is staffed with five maintenance employees comprised of two mechanics, two servicers and one supervisor. Manufacturers and vendors provide initial training, while on occasion mechanics are sent to off-site training classes. RTA has partnered with local community colleges to provide training at its Hemet facility. In addition, the Director of Maintenance is on the board of the San Bernardino College, where training classes are also held. Vehicle Maintenance The agency has developed a Preventive Maintenance Inspection (PMI) based upon an A-B-C mileage schedule. The Spear system automatically generates a print out based on vehicle mileage, which is recorded at fueling times both manually and electronically. Buses are not operated without first undergoing inspection which is quality-controlled by supervisors. While the age of the CNG vehicle fleet ranges from four to five years, engine controls on the alternative fueled vehicles are slightly more problematic. However, there have been no engine failures. Engine and transmission overhauls are contracted out as 160 Triennial Performance Audit 29 Riverside Transit Agency needed. Regarding its CNG fueling capabilities, RTA has a reciprocal agreement with the City of Riverside. Laidlaw operates 13 CNG Thomas buses. The remainder of the contract operator fleet is gasoline powered. There is tremendous capacity to increase the size of the fleet, as RTA owns property adjacent to its Riverside and Hemet facilities. Vehicle parts are inventoried and tracked by the Spear inventory control system. RTA maintains a parts inventory that ranges from $850,000 to $910,000 in value. Inventory control also involves the placement of cameras over the two doors located in the parts room. An aggressive cycle-count system precludes the need for a physical audit of the parts inventory. As a result, only minor discrepancies in the parts inventory count have been reported. Facility Maintenance Facility maintenance responsibilities fall under the direction of the Chief Procurement/Logistics Officer who oversees two employees. The more difficult tasks, including fueling facilities, are contracted out. RTA has a Procurement Policy Manual that is based on FTA’s Best Practices standards. Stop and Zones The department is responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of the bus stops and shelters within RTA’s service area. The agency is pursuing an aggressive program to improve bus stop amenities. Existing shelters are constantly undergoing refurbishment and new benches, receptacles and kiosks have also been placed at many bus stops. New bus benches are more graffiti-resistant and discourage loitering. This department employs nine groundskeepers and one supervisor, who coordinate with local jurisdictions regarding the placement of bus shelters. Local jurisdictions own the shelter locations since the stops are in their right-of-way. There are approximately 4,000 bus stops within the service area. Using the number of boardings and alightings per stop, bus shelters are placed at stops based on the number of daily boardings (minimum of 50) and at major trip generators such as senior centers and shopping malls. Marketing Marketing of transit services is provided through a variety of methods and outlets. Information is posted at bus stops and other major activity centers such as schools, senior centers, retail outlets and public facilities throughout the service area. Brochures and schedules are available on buses and at the various activity centers. The RTA “RideGuide” contains route maps and schedules for all fixed routes. A System Map of routes is published separately from the RideGuide, but is made available as a companion brochure at all locations where the RideGuide is displayed. The agency’s website, http://www.riversidetransit.com/home/index.htm, contains information about routes, schedules, services, and fares. There are also creative marketing promotions and a considerable newspaper presence in both English and Spanish. Target marketing is currently being conducted on the Hispanic community to attract a potential community segment to ride transit. 161 Triennial Performance Audit 30 Riverside Transit Agency Marketing measures its performance through ridership gains. If there is an increase in service, it reflects positively on marketing. The Department has triggers in place to initiate additional marketing and to conducts focus groups as needed. Marketing played a key role in implementing a new buddy fare program as part of the fare increase in April 2005. The buddy fare gives up to 10 dial-a-ride passengers riding at the same time an opportunity to pay only the individual cash fare of $2.50. The CommuterLink program has also grown significantly in part as a result of the marketing of its services and the convenience of DIRECTV and wireless internet. It was indicated that the commuter program is now self promoting from its successes. As per FTA guidelines, RTA conducted a Title VI on-board survey in October 2004 to determine the composition of its ridership. The survey found that the largest ethnic group represented to be Hispanic (34 percent) and the gender split to be 53 percent female and 47 percent male. The majority of riders are between the ages of 18 and 34 years old, with 35 percent using the system for two years or longer. The survey also found that 70 percent of the ridership has an annual income of less than $20,000. Most trips taken are for work, shopping, school and medical appointments. Marketing also works with the Transportation NOW (TNOW) coalition to help advocate for balanced federal, state and local policies for transportation alternatives, as well as educating individuals, businesses and local organizations about the community-wide importance of transportation. General Administration and Management Board members are each presented “The Board Book” containing pertinent information about RTA services and the organization. The board policies and procedures section includes conflict of interest documents, and various procedures for the Board to follow. Other information contained in the binder include the latest SRTP, most recent budget, human resource policies, and an overall of system performance information. Management develops an annual Agency and Departmental Goals Report outlining RTA’s goals for the year. The FY 2006 report highlights four goals, including increasing ridership, reducing job related injuries, providing excellent customer service, and reducing costs through improved efficiencies. Each department includes their own specific objectives, activities and measurements to achieve the goals. This internal document is monitored quarterly by management and provides measurable performance indicators of the agency. Industrywide issues like increases in fuel and insurance, plus workers compensation have placed pressure on RTA’s budget during the audit period. The agency has taken a pro- active approach in curbing costs. RTA is self-insured with a goal to contain costs by precluding incidents from occurring. A Risk Manager in the Human Resources Department is on staff to address these issues. Personnel turnover has been at a relatively consistent rate in each year of the audit. In FY 2004, the turnover rate was 14.24 percent (or 47 employees out of 330); 13.33 percent in FY 2005 (44 out of 330); and 12.46 percent in FY 2006 (44 out of 353). A large number of separations (25 of 47) occurred in May 2004. 162 Triennial Performance Audit 31 Riverside Transit Agency The Purchasing Department maintains a list of current and expired contracts and agreements. The list can by organized by contract type, including interagency agreements and contract services. The list shows the agreement/award date, department, supplier/client name, description of the agreement/contract, expiration date, contract type, and whether it is e-filed. The list provided shows numerous agreements and contracts for services like transit service provision, cost sharing, infrastructure sharing, and subrecipient agreements. The list demonstrates the level of complexity of the agency and its ability to forge agreements and procure services when necessary. Finance and Grants Administration Among RTA’s recruitment during the audit period was the hiring of a new Chief Financial Officer (CFO), which occurred in December 2005. The agency’s budgeting process commences in February. The agency’s fiscal budget process involves all department directors. The budget is developed using a zero-based method and encompasses both capital and operating expenditures. The agency’s service plan is the main driver of the budget process. The directors are given the prior fiscal year’s budget information, which includes spending trends, the nature of expenditures and any missing information. Once the directors have submitted their departments’ budgetary projections, there is a secondary review process. The final review includes a service profile and a pro-forma PIP. The draft budget is presented at the RTA Board of Directors’ meeting in May, which also includes a public hearing. Once comments are received, the budget is presented at the June Board meeting. Any changes are duly noted and the budget is formally adopted. RTA’s Governing Board has two committees that play a significant role in the budget process: the Budget and Administration Committee and the Operations Committee. These committees meet the first Wednesday of the month. There is an extensive financial review each month involving the directors and the executive team. The monthly Board agenda packet includes financial data containing a narrative of the agency’s financial performance, the PIP results, and quarterly farebox recovery trends. The financial management system is comprised of the Oracle enterprise reporting system. This system underwent an Oracle 11i upgrade, which included the addition of a capital projects module. In concert with PIP implementation, the agency participated in using the TransTrack software program. RTA has expressed satisfaction with the program and has found to be a helpful tool. TransTrack analyzes eight performance indicators for all transit services operated by RTA. Finance participates in providing key information in the development of ridership reports that incorporate financial data for each transit route. Data such as operating cost and fare revenue are integrated with operations data such as ridership, revenue hours and miles of service to show important performance indicators by route. This has allowed Planning to identify where adjustments in service are necessary and specific planning tasks that are required. The Finance Department coordinates with various grant Project Managers on outstanding grant funded projects. Spreadsheets were provided by staff that show the tracking and status of each outstanding project for different funding sources. Balance of 163 Triennial Performance Audit 32 Riverside Transit Agency funds and schedules for administering each project are also contained. The spreadsheets summarize grant information by project type and by year. A grant project status report is forwarded to RCTC on a quarterly basis. As of June 30, 2006, RTA had 84 open projects for a total of about $25.3 million. This is consistent with internal RTA grant project management documentation. RCTC has expressed regional concern regarding the number and amount of open projects, and is anticipating developing Commission policy that address its concern. According to both the RCTC quarterly Capital Projects Summary report ended June 2006, and internal RTA capital projects summary, twenty seven projects were older than three years with a value of about $4.5 million. Two million of this amount is programmed in a year 2000 grant for the Perris Multimodal Facility, and $1.8 million in 1997 and 2001 grants for ITS and communication systems. The remaining older projects are reprogrammed for bus vehicle purchases. RTA indicated that it is nearly completing a large ITS procurement program (total $4.3 million) that will drawdown from several grants, including the 1997 and 2001 grant. Some of the grants for ITS are then expected to be closed out in the summer of 2007. The largest share of open projects ($12.2 million) is for design and construction of transit centers in Corona, Riverside, Hemet, Temecula, Perris and Moreno Valley. Other more recent projects are for Bus Rapid Transit amenities ($1.6 million), vehicle procurement ($1.8 million), and debt service ($3.3 million). Each month, the RTA management team meet to review the status of capital grant projects and the capital improvement program. A report template is used to show the key information about the status of each grant program and milestones. While construction projects could take long periods of time to implement due to complexities involved with land development, other activities such as bus procurement and debt service could be completed in a relatively shorter time. The Grants section of the Finance Policy and Procedures Manual provides an overview of the funding sources that supplement fare revenue, including TDA, Measure “A” and FTA. This section of the manual describes the TDA claims process and outlines the federal grant process including timing of drawdowns using the FTA Electronic Clearinghouse (ECHO) system, reporting requirements and grant close out. The administration and implementation of capital grants is a team effort involving finance staff and project managers from the RTA departments that are awarded the grant. The project managers are responsible for certain aspects of the grant program, including coordinating that the funds are spent for the projects proposed in the grant, monitoring development of the project, and obtaining necessary approvals for changes in the grant program. The Finance Department collects the information from the individual project managers to prepare the quarterly FTA Financial Status Reports (FSR) and Milestone/Progress Narrative Reports (MPR) within 30 days after the end of the reporting quarter. As the administration and management of capital grants is a team effort, the roles and responsibilities, and communication channels between staff in the grant process should be clearly documented and communicated. By documenting the policies and procedures for managing grant programs using a step-by-step method, RTA can ensure it maximizes the use of available funds and provides accurate and timely grant information to those involved in the process. 164 Triennial Performance Audit 33 Riverside Transit Agency Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. RTA has complied with all applicable requirements of TDA. 2. Four of the five prior audit recommendations have been fully implemented. The fifth recommendation no longer applied, as it had recommended that RTA provide a systemwide map in the RiderGuide, which RTA found to be too costly and prohibitive. 3. The performance measures generally indicate an overall positive trend, as costs were offset by additional new services, ridership decreased temporarily due to the first fare increase in five years, and the farebox recovery ratio was met each year of the audit period. 4. RTA successfully secured an agreement with the University of California, Riverside (UCR) to provide shuttle service to and from the campus. The program is reimbursed by the University’s Parking and Services budget. 5. Given the large amounts of data that is generated by in-house operations as well as by the various contractors, RTA is capable of organizing and summarizing detailed operations data for review and analysis. While the reporting requirements of the RCTC Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) have assisted the agency to summarize the data, RTA should also be consistent with PIP policy in development of PIP targets. 6. With tremendous population and employment growth occurring in Western Riverside County, land use integration with transit has been one particular focus for the Planning Department. RTA published and distributed transit design guidelines and receives regular development plans from the member jurisdictions to review. 7. RTA constructed a new CNG fueling station at its Riverside Third Street facility. This allows for buses to be fueled during off-peak times when electric rates are lower and utilizes fast-fuel technology, thus improving the efficiencies for the bus fleet while resulting in some energy cost savings. 8. Marketing played a key role in implementing a new buddy fare program as part of the fare increase in April 2005. The CommuterLink program has also grown significantly in part as a result of the marketing of its services and the convenience of wireless internet. 9. Board members are each presented “The Board Book” containing pertinent information about RTA services and the organization. Management also develops an annual Agency and Departmental Goals Report outlining RTA’s goals for the year. This internal document is monitored quarterly by management and provides measurable performance indicators of the agency. 165 Triennial Performance Audit 34 Riverside Transit Agency 10. Capital projects are tracked and coordinated between the Finance Department and various grant Project Managers. According to the RCTC quarterly Capital Projects Summary report ended June 2006, RTA had 84 open projects for a total of $25.3 million. Close to half of the total ($12.2 million) is for design and construction of six transit centers, with the balance for ITS, vehicles, bus amenities and debt service. RCTC has expressed regional concern regarding the number and amount of open projects, and is anticipating developing Commission policy that addresses its concern. Each month, the RTA management team meets to review the status of capital grant projects and the capital improvement program. Some of the grant projects for ITS, for example, are expected to be closed out in the summer of 2007. Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and specialized service for elderly and disabled. Separate annual State Controller Reports should be submitted for each type of service to be in compliance with State instructions. It is noted on the General Information page of the State Controller’s Report that the State requires separate reports to be filed for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled. Provided that RTA provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. 2. Coordinate with CHP to schedule regular terminal inspections. RTA should schedule the terminal inspection with CHP well in advance to have the inspections completed about the same time every year. As TDA claims require evidence of a recent CHP inspection, it is important that the inspections are conducted on a regular annual basis. 3. Include contract operator employees in the calculation of Full-time Equivalents (FTE). A review of RTA’s State Controller Operator Reports for each year of the audit period showed that the FTE counts for demand response service were omitted. RTA utilizes contractors to operate its demand response services and about half of its fixed route service. To ensure a more accurate count, and to be in compliance with the TDA statute, the agency should include contract employee in its FTE calculations and properly assign them to either fixed route or dial-a-ride. 4. Consider enhancing the Finance Policy and Procedures Manual by developing step- by-step procedural guidelines for capital grant project management. As the administration and management of capital grants is a RTA team effort, the roles and responsibilities, and communication channels between staff in the grant process should be clearly documented and communicated. The guidelines should identify the steps from project initiation to close out, including each person’s responsibility, process flow for reporting and receiving information, and requirements for making any changes to the project scope. Documenting the grant project implementation process can facilitate the accurate and timely use of the funds. 166 Triennial Performance Audit 35 Riverside Transit Agency 5. Achieve consistency with PIP Policy in development of PIP targets. The development of PIP targets in the SRTP is based on the actual data reported for the first three quarters of the fiscal year, which follows the SRTP development timeline. This is the current agreed upon methodology by RCTC and the transit operators. While RTA could include projected data for other additional analyses and on-going evaluation of its services, the PIP analyses in the SRTP should be consistent with the methodology being employed throughout Riverside County. 6. Continue land use and transit coordination efforts with local jurisdictions. With tremendous development growth in Western Riverside County, RTA should continue to be an integral part of the upfront development process. Considerations of infrastructure needs and land use patterns supporting transit should be made during development review, which requires RTA to closely coordinate with local cities and the county, and be able to effective plan for transit services. 7. Work with RCTC to determine potential alternative funding for specific transit service. The Federal transportation law includes funding programs that provide additional resources for special projects that could meet anticipated demand. One revenue source is the Job Access and Reverse Commute Program (JARC) (FTA Section 5316) which became a formula program under SAFETEA-LU. JARC might be used for transit services to transport welfare recipients and other low-income individuals to employment. The New Freedom Program (FTA Section 5317) is a competitive grant program that could address transportation services and capital improvements that go beyond those required by the American with Disabilities Act (ADA). As RCTC is currently managing a Coordinated Public Transit/Human Services Plan for Riverside County, RTA should participate and help guide the development of the plan and whether these potential funding sources might be available. 167 FY 2004-2006 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT OF SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY S U B M I T T E D T O RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION S U B M I T T E D B Y PMC May 16, 2007 168 Triennial Performance Audit i SunLine Transit Agency TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1 Overview of the Transit System........................................................................1 Section II.................................................................................................................. 6 Operator Compliance Requirements ............................................................ 6 Section III............................................................................................................... 10 Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations............................... 10 Section IV.............................................................................................................. 14 TDA Performance Indicators.......................................................................... 14 Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.................... 16 Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators.............. 17 Section V............................................................................................................... 18 Review of Operator Functions....................................................................... 18 Operations .................................................................................................... 18 Planning......................................................................................................... 20 Maintenance................................................................................................ 23 Safety............................................................................................................. 26 Marketing ...................................................................................................... 27 General Administration and Management............................................. 27 Section VI.............................................................................................................. 31 Findings and Recommendations.................................................................. 31 Triennial Audit Recommendations................................................................ 32 169 Triennial Performance Audit 1 SunLine Transit Agency Section I Introduction California’s Transportation Development Act (TDA) requires that a triennial performance audit be conducted of public transit entities that receive TDA revenues. The performance audit serves to ensure accountability in the use of public transportation revenue. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has engaged the firm of PMC to conduct a performance audit of the SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) covering the most recent triennial period, Fiscal Years (FY) 2003-04 through 2005-06. The purpose of the performance audit is to evaluate SunLine’s effectiveness and efficiency in its use of TDA revenues to provide public transit in its designated service area. This is required as a condition for continued receipt of these revenues for public transportation purposes. In addition, the audit evaluates SunLine’s compliance with the conditions stipulated in the California Public Utilities Code (CPUC). This task involves ascertaining whether SunLine is meeting the CPUC’s reporting requirements and that it is endeavoring to implement prior performance audit recommendations made to the agency. Moreover, the audit includes calculations of transit service performance indicators and a detailed review of the agency’s departments and organizational functioning. From the analysis that has been undertaken, a set of recommendations has been made for the agency, which is intended to improve the performance of transit operations. In summary, this TDA audit affords the agency board and management the opportunity for an independent, constructive and objective evaluation of the organization and its operations that otherwise might not be available. The methodology for the audit included in-person interviews with transit management, telephone interviews, collection and review of agency documents, data analysis, and on-site observations. The Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities, published by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), was used to guide the development and direction of the audit. Overview of the Transit System SunLine was established under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) on July 1, 1977 between the County of Riverside and the cities of the Coachella Valley, which at the time included the City of Coachella, City of Desert Hot Springs, City of Indio, City of Palm Desert and the City of Palm Springs. The JPA was later amended to include the Cities of Cathedral City, Indian Wells, La Quinta, and Rancho Mirage. The JPA’s governing board is comprised of one elected official from each member entity and one county supervisor. SunLine is headquartered in Thousand Palms. SunLine’s service area encompasses 1,120 square miles of the Coachella Valley from the San Gorgonio Pass in the west to the Salton Sea in the southeast. The permanent population of the Coachella Valley is 411,997 (Southern California Association of Governments’ estimate) with an estimated seasonal influx of an additional 100,000 residents, and continues to grow at a rapid pace. According to the Coachella Valley Economic Partnership, the Valley’s population grows by about 53 new residents daily. 170 Triennial Performance Audit 2 SunLine Transit Agency Development is occurring predominately in the southeastern end of the Valley (Coachella and Indio), south of La Quinta, north of Interstate 10 (I-10) in Palm Desert and Cathedral City and Desert Hot Springs. Fleet The SunLine fixed-route SunBus fleet consists of 51 alternative fueled vehicles made up of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Hydrogen-blended Compressed Natural Gas (HCNG) and Hydrogen (H2). The dial-a-ride SunDial fleet consists of 23 CNG vehicles. In addition, there are 27 active support vehicles. SunLine has been compliant with the requirements of the Americans’ With Disabilities Act (ADA) since 1994. Its fleet of buses and vans are accessible to passengers using assistive devices and equipped with wheelchair lifts. A detailed description of SunLine’s fleet is presented in the following table: Table I-1 SunLine Revenue Fleet Year Manufacturer Quantity Fuel type Seat Capacity/ Wheelchair Space Fixed-Route Dial-a-Ride 1994 Orion V 34 CNG 43/2 1998 Ford Braun/pop-top 1 CNG 10/1 2002 El Dorado Aerotech 220 11 CNG 12/1 2004 New Flyer Low Floor 1 H2 42/2 2004 Ford Aerotech 220 9 CNG 12/1 2004 Ford Verashuttle 2 CNG 10/1 2004 Van Hool Low Floor 1 HCNG 35/2 2005 Orion V 15 CNG 45/2 Total 51 23 Source: 2006 National Transit Database, SunLine Transit Agency SunLine currently offers two distinct public transportation services: · SunBus – local fixed route bus system operating on 12 primary routes. The trunk route, Line 111, connects the west end of the valley in Palm Springs with the eastern terminus in Indio. Each of the other primary bus routes connect to the trunk line. SunLine operates the Shopper Hopper free bus between Palm Desert shopping centers. This service is operated under a contract with the City of Palm Desert, which provides reimbursement. Particularly heavy demand for transit has been building on the eastern end of the service area, as new development has been rapidly occurring in this area of the Coachella Valley. SunBus operates everyday of the year except on Thanksgiving and Christmas. A detailed description of each SunBus route is contained in Table I-2. · SunDial – ADA-only paratransit system providing demand response transportation to certified persons with disabilities. Same day reservations are accepted. The service is curb-to-curb and operates within zones for more efficient local circulation trips. Service is required to be provided on the same days as the fixed route. 171 Triennial Performance Audit 3 SunLine Transit Agency It should also be noted that during the audit period, SunLine discontinued the SunLink commuter express bus service linking the Coachella Valley with the Inland Empire due to low ridership and increased costs to provide the service. Table I-2 SunLine (SunBus) Route System Route Number Description Frequency/Operation Destinations 14 Desert Hot Springs/Palm Springs Community Feeder Route Every 50 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:20 a.m. to 11:25 p.m.) Every 75 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:24 a.m. to 11:51 p.m.) Desert Hot Springs High School; Desert Springs Middle School; Department of Motor Vehicles; Palm Springs Mall; Palm Springs High School; and Employment Development Department. 23 Palm Springs/Cathedral City Community Feeder Route Segment One (Sunrise Way): Two 19 minute round-trips (Monday through Friday) Segment Two (James Workman Middle School): One AM and one PM trip on school days. Segment Three (Desert Highland Community Center): Operates school days only – two headways. Coyote Run Apartments; Mizell Senior Center; James Workman Middle School; Raymond Cree Middle School; Palm Springs Mall; and Palm Springs High School. 24 Palm Springs Community Feeder Route Every 90 minutes (Daily from 6:30 a.m. to 9:28 p.m.) Desert Hospital; Palm Springs International Airport; Palm Springs City Hall; Desert Highland Community Center; Mesa Verde; and Palm Springs Mall; Palm Springs High School; and Raymond Cree Middle School. 30 Cathedral City/Palm Springs Community Feeder Route Every 30 minutes (Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 10:18 p.m.) Every 35 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 6:00 a.m. to 10:33 p.m.) Palm Springs Mall; Palm Springs Library; Palm Springs High School; Cathedral City Post Office Cathedral City High School; and Cathedral City Hall. 31 Thousand Palms/Cathedral City/Rancho Mirage Community Feeder Route Four AM trips and four PM trips (Monday through Friday from 5:50 a.m. to 9:23 p.m.) Palm Springs Air Museum; Mount San Jacinto High School; Cathedral City Post Office; Cathedral City Library; Cathedral City High School; Nellie Coffman Middle School; Agua Caliente Casino; Tri-Palm Club House. 172 Triennial Performance Audit 4 SunLine Transit Agency 50 Palm Desert/Rancho Mirage Community Feeder Route Every 55 minutes bi-directionally (Daily from 6:10 a.m. to 8:59 p.m.) Eisenhower Medical Center; College of the Desert; McCallum Theater; Palm Desert City Hall; Foundation for the Retarded of the Desert; Palm Desert High School; Westfield Shoppingtown; The River; Desert Crossing; and El Paseo. Shopper Hopper (Red Route) November through May Every 90 minutes (Daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) June through October Every 90 minutes (Wednesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) Marriott Shadow Ridge; Marriott Courtyard & Residence Inn; J.W. Marriott Desert Springs; COD Street Fair (Weekends); Westfield Palm Desert; The Gardens; El Paseo; and The Living Desert 51 Shopper Hopper (Blue Route) November through May Every 90 minutes (Daily from 10:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) June through October Every 90 minutes (Wednesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) Desert Crossing; One Eleven Town Center; Westfield Palm Desert; The Gardens; Holiday Inn Express; Embassy Suites; Hyatt Grand Champions Resort; and Indian Wells Resort. 70 La Quinta/Bermuda Dunes/Palm Desert Community Feeder Route Every 80 minutes (Daily from 6:06 a.m. to 8:36 p.m. with an AM and PM stop serving La Quinta High School on school days) La Quinta City Hall; La Quinta High School; La Quinta Resort La Quinta Senior Center 80 Indio Community Feeder Route Every 60 minutes bi-directionally (Daily from 4:30 a.m. to 9:45 p.m.) City of Indio; John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital; Riverside County Fair & National Date Festival; Employment Development Department; College of the Desert (East Valley campus); Indio High School Department of Motor Vehicles; Coachella Valley Cultural Museum; and Indio Senior Center. 90 Coachella/Indio Community Feeder Route Every 30 minutes (Daily from 4:30 a.m. to 9:47 p.m.) Employment Development Department; Coachella City Hall; Coachella Police Department; Coachella Library; Senior Center; Bobby Duke Middle School; and Jefferson Middle School. 173 Triennial Performance Audit 5 SunLine Transit Agency 91 Indio/Coachella/Thermal Mecca/Oasis Four AM trips and four PM trips (Daily) Fantasy Springs Casino; Trump 29 Casino; Coachella City Hall; Desert Mirage High School; Torres-Martinez Health Center; Mecca Post Office; La Familia High School; and Desert Resorts Regional Airport. 111 Palm Springs/Indio Trunk Line Every 25 minutes (Monday through Friday from 5:10 a.m. to 11:08 p.m.) Every 44 minutes (Saturday and Sunday from 5:00 a.m. to 11:03 p.m.) Palm Springs Desert Museum; Cathedral City; Rancho Mirage City Hall; Westfield Shoppingtown; College of the Desert; McCallum Theater; Indian Wells; La Quinta; and Indio Source: SunLine Transit Agency The SunLine fare structure is based on the particular service utilized. The fare schedule is presented in the following table: Table I-3 SunLine Transit Agency Fare Schedule Cash Fares SunBus (Fixed Route) SunDial (Dial-a-Ride) Same City Intercity Adult $1.00 - - Senior (60+)/Disabled/Medicare $0.50 $1.50 $2.00 Youth (Ages 5 to 17) $0.85 - - Children (Ages 4 and under) Free - - Transfer $0.25 - - 10-Ride Pass - $15.00 $20.00 Passes (Fixed-Route) Adult Senior/Disabled/ Medicare Youth (Ages 5 to 17) Monthly Pass $34.00 $17.00 $24.00 Day Pass $3.00 $1.50 $2.00 10-Ride Pass (No Transfer) $10.00 $5.00 $8.50 10-Ride Pass (With Transfer) $12.50 $6.00 $11.00 Employee Pass $24.00 - - Go Pass (Summer Months) - - $30.00 Source: SunLine Transit Agency 174 Triennial Performance Audit 6 SunLine Transit Agency Section II Operator Compliance Requirements This section of the audit report contains the analysis of the SunLine Transit Agency’s ability to comply with state requirements for continued receipt of TDA revenues. The evaluation uses the guidebook, “Performance Audit Guidebook for Transit Operators and Regional Transportation Planning Entities” which was developed by Caltrans to assess transit operators. The guidebook contains a checklist of twelve measures taken from relevant sections of the CPUC and the California Code of Regulations (CCR). Of the compliance measures, nine of the measures are applicable to SunLine. Each of these requirements is discussed in the table below, including a description of the system’s efforts to comply with the requirements. In addition, the findings from the compliance review are described in the text following the table. TABLE II-1 Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix Operator Compliance Requirements Reference Compliance Efforts The transit operator submitted annual reports to the RTPA based upon the Uniform System of Accounts and Records established by the State Controller. Report is due 90 days after the end of the fiscal year (Sept. 30), or 110 days (Oct. 20) if filed electronically (internet). During the audit period, the State Controller extended the submittal dates because the Controller’s Office was in the process of implementing a new updated electronic filing system. The extended dates were: FY 2004: November 24 for paper filing, December 14 for internet filing. FY 2005: September 28 for paper filing, October 18 for internet filing. FY 2006: October 12 for paper filing, November 1 for internet filing. Public Utilities Code, Section 99243 Completion/submittal dates (paper or internet filing): FY 2004: November 23, 2004 FY 2005: October 19, 2005 FY 2006: October 4, 2006 Conclusion: Complied Note: The State Controller requires separate reports to be submitted for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled, as stated on the General Information page. Provided that SunLine provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. SunLine should comply with this requirement. The operator has submitted annual fiscal and compliance audits to the RTPA and to the State Controller within 180 days following the end of the fiscal year (Dec. 27), or has received the appropriate 90 day extension by the RTPA allowed by law. Public Utilities Code, Section 99245 Completion/submittal dates: FY 2004: October 8, 2004 FY 2005: November 2, 2005 FY 2006: August 24, 2006 Conclusion: Complied 175 Triennial Performance Audit 7 SunLine Transit Agency The CHP has, within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim submitted by an operator, certified the operator’s compliance with Vehicle Code Section 1808.1 following a CHP inspection of the operator’s terminal. Public Utilities Code, Section 99251 SunLine participates in the CHP Driver Pull Notice Compliance Program in which the CHP has conducted inspections within the 13 months prior to each TDA claim. Copies of certificates are attached to TDA claims. Copies of certificates were also submitted to the auditor for review. Inspection dates were: Thousand Palms facility – March 28, 2003; March 19, 2004; March 15, 2005; and March 29, 2006. Indio facility – May 8, 2003; May 26, 2004; July 7, 2005; and June 13, 2006. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s claim for TDA revenues is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the RTPA for such claims. Public Utilities Code, Section 99261 As a condition of approval, SunLine’s annual claims for Local Transportation Funds and State Transit Assistance is submitted in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by RCTC. Conclusion: Complied The operator’s operating budget has not increased by more than 15% over the preceding year, nor is there a substantial increase or decrease in the scope of operations or capital budget provisions for major new fixed facilities unless the operator has reasonably supported and substantiated the change(s). Public Utilities Code, Section 99266 Percentage increase in SunLine’s operating budget: FY 2004: - 2.65% FY 2005: +3.44% FY 2006: +7.32% Source: FYs 2004-2006 Federal National Transit Database (NTD) Reports, SunLine Transit Agency. Conclusion: Complied If the operator serves an urbanized area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-fifth (20 percent), unless it is in a county with a population of less than 500,000, in which case it must maintain a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs of at least equal to three-twentieths (15 percent), if so determined by the RTPA. If the operator serves a rural area, it has maintained a ratio of fare revenues to operating costs at least equal to one-tenth (10 percent). Public Utilities Code, Sections 99268.2, 99268.3, 99268.4, 99268.5, 99268.12, 99270.1. SunLine provides service in both urbanized and non-urbanized areas of Riverside County. RCTC, under state law (PUC 99270.1, CCR 6645), is responsible for calculating an intermediate fare ratio. RCTC developed rules and regulations for determining the required ratio, including the methodology for calculating the ratio, which is approved annually by Caltrans. The required fare ratios calculated for SunLine are as follows: FY 2004: 16.11% FY 2005: 17.22% FY 2006: 17.22% SunLine’s fare ratios, using audited data, are as follows: FY 2004: 19.18% FY 2005: 17.74% 176 Triennial Performance Audit 8 SunLine Transit Agency FY 2006: 21.97% Conclusion: Complied The current cost of the operator’s retirement system is fully funded with respect to the officers and employees of its public transportation system, or the operator is implementing a plan approved by the RTPA which will fully fund the retirement system within 40 years. Public Utilities Code, Section 99271 SunLine contributes to the SunLine Employees Retirement System, a single-employer defined benefit public employee retirement system for non-bargaining unit employees, and to the SunLine Employee Retirement Income Plan for Bargaining Unit Personnel, a single- employer defined benefit pension plan. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator is not precluded by contract from employing part-time drivers or from contracting with common carriers. Public Utilities Code, Section 99314.5(c) SunLine employs part-time drivers for both dial-a-ride (3) and fixed route bus (16) services. Conclusion: Complied If the operator receives state transit assistance funds, the operator makes full use of funds available to it under the Urban Mass Transportation Act of 1964 before TDA claims are granted. California Code of Regulations, Section 6754(a)(3) SunLine makes full use of federal funds available to it, as reported in annual State Controller and National Transit Database reports. FY 2004: Operations ($500,000) Capital ($1,048,178) FY 2005: Operations ($2,067,713) Capital ($1,398,145) FY 2006: Operations ($1,086,357) Capital ($4,066,006) Conclusion: Complied Findings and Observations from Operator Compliance Requirements Matrix 1. SunLine has complied with all applicable compliance requirements of TDA. It is noted on the General Information page of the State Controller’s Report that the State requires separate reports to be filed for general public transit and specialized services for elderly and disabled. Provided that SunLine provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. SunLine should comply with this requirement. 2. SunLine received “satisfactory” rating for each CHP terminal inspection during the audit period for each of its maintenance facilities in Thousand Palms and Indio. 3. The budget remained fairly stable during the audit period, growing no more than 7 percent annually. The budget decreased in FY 2004 as services were streamlined and adjusted to be more efficient. However, SunLine encountered cost increases in operations including insurance, fuel, utilities, and maintenance in the latter part of the audit period. 177 Triennial Performance Audit 9 SunLine Transit Agency 4. The trend in the fare recovery ratio shows an increase. The audited farebox ratio increased from 19.18 percent to 21.97 percent for SunLine between FY 2003-2004 and FY 2005-2006. The farebox ratio did decrease in FY 2004-05 to 17.74 percent but was still over the minimum threshold. Fare revenues increased 2.87 percent over the past three years (from $2,768,698 in FY 2004 to $2,848,160 in FY 2006), while operating expenses (minus depreciation) increased 5.5 percent. The farebox recovery ratio each year exceeded the TDA blended fare ratio established by RCTC. It should be noted that SunLine’s revenue in FY 2005-06 included one-time local funds from settlement of a lawsuit, and reimbursement for the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA). These revenues were allowed under RCTC’s adopted definition of local support revenues that could be included in the farebox ratio. 178 Triennial Performance Audit 10 SunLine Transit Agency Section III Prior Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations SunLine’s efforts to implement the recommendations made in the prior triennial audit are examined in this section of the report. For this purpose, each prior recommendation for the agency is described, followed by a discussion of the agency’s efforts to implement the recommendation. Conclusions concerning the extent to which the recommendations have been adopted by the agency are then presented. Prior Recommendation 1 Report Employee Full Time Equivalents (FTE’s) according to State definitions. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: The State definition is referenced in PUC Section 99247(j), which equates one full-time employee at 2,000 person-hours annually. For FY 2004-05, SunLine had only been including drivers in its FTE count. In the FY 2005-06 State Controller’s Report, SunLine accurately reported all employees according to the TDA definition. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 2 Resume data collection and analysis of bus routes on a line by line basis. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: Driver trip sheets have been reinstated in order to provide better analysis of route performance. In addition, some capabilities already exist at the agency for generating data that allows for line by line analyses, including information downloaded from the farebox equipment and the customer concerns database. Other mechanisms, such as new rider and non-rider surveys, and additional field data collection have enhanced analysis efforts. The implementation of TransTrack by RCTC also provides another mechanism for showing data by route. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 3 Review the potential for bringing transit-related maintenance functions under one department. 179 Triennial Performance Audit 11 SunLine Transit Agency Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: Effective April 2004, all transit-related maintenance functions pertaining to vehicles and facility infrastructure have been consolidated under the Maintenance department. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 4 Review the allocation of budget and expenses among major departments, including operations, vehicle maintenance, facility maintenance and general administration. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: Executive management has made it a priority to streamline the operational functions of the agency and closely monitor expenditures and trends. Staff is researching alternatives for improving the cost allocation system. All maintenance functions pertaining to facilities and vehicles were consolidated under one department. Full-year costs are developed using cost estimates for the remainder of the year. The budget is tracked on a departmental basis by use of Fleet Net software for detail. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 5 Develop regional marketing efforts for SunLink service that is distinct from local transit. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: SunLine had discontinued the SunLink service due to high trip costs, which averaged $75.00 per passenger trip, effective July 2004. However, as an active member of the Pass Area Coalition, SunLine works to keep communication lines open throughout the region. SunLine rider information is published in neighboring agencies’ rider’s guides. SunLine also distributes the RCTC Free Guide to Transportation Freedom. Conclusion: This recommendation is no longer applicable. 180 Triennial Performance Audit 12 SunLine Transit Agency Prior Recommendation 6 Develop comprehensive bus replacement/expansion schedule. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: SunLine has reserved between $3 and $4 million in Local Transportation Funds towards replacement of the last 16 buses in FY 2007-08. In the last three years, SunLine has funded the replacement of over 30 other buses. SunLine mentioned that the older fleet has been quite reliable and attributes good maintenance practices to being able to use the fleet well beyond their useful lives. However, it is realized the older buses need to be replaced. The recent COA also outlines future expansion of the service and when additional buses will be required. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 7 Review the current mission statement and develop agency goals that promote customer oriented and cost-efficient public transportation. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: The Board of Directors adopted a new mission statement in March 2004, which emphasizes customer service, cost efficiency, and reliable transit service. The mission is as follows: “To keep the Coachella Valley moving with safe, reliable and accessible public transit and a commitment to balance our fiscal and environmental responsibilities.” In keeping with the mission statement, the agency has been restructured with a focus on becoming a more efficient and responsive transit operator. The recently developed COA also provides a road map for future provision of transit service in the Coachella Valley. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. Prior Recommendation 8 Develop formal contracts or agreements for all services exchanged between SunLine and SSG. Actions taken by SunLine Transit Agency: In April 2004, the General Manager created a formal agreement between SunLine and SSG regarding the exchange of services. A consultant is currently studying whether the 181 Triennial Performance Audit 13 SunLine Transit Agency remaining taxi program administered by SSG can be self funded through meter fees and annual permits. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 182 Triennial Performance Audit 14 SunLine Transit Agency Section IV TDA Performance Indicators This section reviews SunLine’s performance in providing transit service to the community in an efficient and effective manner. TDA requires that at least five specific performance indicators be reported, which are contained in the following tables. Farebox recovery ratio is not one of the five specific indicators, but is a requirement for continued TDA funding. Therefore, farebox calculation is also included. Two additional performance indicators, operating cost per mile and average fare per passenger, are included as well. Findings from the analysis are contained in the section following the tables. Tables IV-1 through IV-3 provide the Systemwide, Fixed-Route and Dial-a-Ride performance indicators for SunLine. Table IV-1 SunLine Transit Agency Systemwide Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $17,107,423 $16,653,467 $17,226,321 $18,487,875 8.1% Total Passengers 3,551,819 3,561,765 3,422,896 3,552,860 0.0% Vehicle Service Hours 194,060.0 197,558.0 187,604.0 176,052.0 -9.3% Vehicle Service Miles 3,094,328 3,035,088 2,671,743 2,374,661 -23.3% Employee FTE's 223 226 208 225 0.9% Passenger Fares $2,821,988 $2,768,697 $2,674,145 $2,848,160 0.9% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.82 $4.68 $5.03 $5.20 8.0% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $88.16 $84.30 $91.82 $105.01 19.1% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $5.53 $5.49 $6.45 $7.79 40.8% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 18.3 18.0 18.2 20.2 10.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.15 1.17 1.28 1.50 30.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 870.2 874.2 901.9 782.5 -10.1% Average Fare per Passenger $0.79 $0.78 $0.78 $0.80 0.9% Fare Recovery Ratio * 16.50% 19.18% 17.74% 21.97% 33.2% * Farebox recovery taken from Annual Financial Audit which reflects cost exclusions and revenue adjustments per RCTC’s adopted farebox definition. Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, Annual Fiscal Audit, NTD, and RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 183 Triennial Performance Audit 15 SunLine Transit Agency Table IV-2 SunLine Transit Agency Fixed-Route Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $14,401,876 $13,780,832 $14,311,430 $15,311,702 6.3% Total Passengers 3,448,011 3,455,798 3,334,540 3,474,361 0.8% Vehicle Service Hours 147,082.0 149,412.0 144,627.0 134,628.0 -8.5% Vehicle Service Miles 2,272,529 2,189,697 1,964,449 1,817,704 -20.0% Employee FTE's 177 173 159 172 -2.8% Passenger Fares $2,603,103 $2,547,632 $2,471,363 $2,630,306 1.0% Operating Cost per Passenger $4.18 $3.99 $4.29 $4.41 5.5% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $97.92 $92.23 $98.95 $113.73 16.2% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $6.34 $6.29 $7.29 $8.42 32.9% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 23.4 23.1 23.1 25.8 10.1% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 1.52 1.58 1.70 1.91 26.0% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 831.0 863.7 909.6 782.7 -5.8% Average Fare per Passenger $0.75 $0.74 $0.74 $0.76 0.3% Fare Recovery Ratio 18.07% 18.49% 17.27% 17.18% -5.0% Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports 184 Triennial Performance Audit 16 SunLine Transit Agency Table IV-3 SunLine Transit Agency Dial-a-Ride Performance Indicators Audit Years Performance Data and Indicators FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 % Change FY 2003- 2006 Operating Cost $2,705,547 $2,872,635 $2,914,891 $3,176,173 17.4% Total Passengers 103,808 105,967 88,356 78,499 -24.6% Vehicle Service Hours 46,978.0 48,146.0 42,977.0 41,424.0 -11.8% Vehicle Service Miles 821,799 845,391 707,294 556,957 -32.2% Employee FTE's 46 53 49 53 15.2% Passenger Fares $218,885 $221,065 $202,782 $217,854 -0.5% Operating Cost per Passenger $26.06 $27.11 $32.99 $40.46 55.7% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Hour $57.59 $59.67 $67.82 $76.67 33.1% Operating Cost per Vehicle Service Mile $3.29 $3.40 $4.12 $5.70 73.2% Passengers per Vehicle Service Hour 2.2 2.2 2.1 1.9 -14.5% Passengers per Vehicle Service Mile 0.13 0.13 0.12 0.14 11.3% Vehicle Service Hours per Employee 1,021.3 908.4 877.1 781.6 -23.4% Average Fare per Passenger $2.11 $2.09 $2.30 $2.78 32.0% Fare Recovery Ratio 8.09% 7.70% 6.96% 6.86% -15.2% Source: State Controller Operator's Reports, NTD & RCTC TransTrack Manager Reports Findings from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators 1. Operating costs increased slightly overall between the base year of FY 2003 and FY 2006, having decreased between FYs 2003 and 2004, then increasing between FYs 2004 through 2006. The new General Manager restructured internal programs and departments that resulted in cost savings. Previous non-transit related departments were either eliminated or reduced significantly. In addition, the agency streamlined routes to improve performance such as eliminating school tripper services. However, between FYs 2005 and 2006, costs increased by over seven percent. Similar to other transit agencies, SunLine encountered cost increases in operations including fuel, utilities, and maintenance. Administrative cost such as workers compensation and medical insurance also contributed to the cost increase. 2. Vehicle service hours decreased systemwide, with decreases for both fixed route and dial-a-ride. As a result, vehicle service miles also decreased for both modes. The Planning and Operations departments worked to reduce unproductive services and make service adjustments. 185 Triennial Performance Audit 17 SunLine Transit Agency 3. Systemwide ridership was stable, especially on the fixed-route, but declining on dial- a-ride. This indicates a fairly good trend relative to the reduction of service hours. Ridership was kept constant while service was reduced, but improved. 4. Passengers per hour and per mile indicate positive trends, as the performance indicators show increases. Fixed route passengers per hour increased by 10 percent during the audit period. 5. Operating cost per hour increased between FYs 2004 and 2006, although cost per hour decreased between FYs 2003 and 2004 due to cost savings measures. Fixed route cost per hour increased about 16 percent over the three year period, while dial-a-ride increased by 33 percent. Other cost indicators showed increases, although fixed route operating cost per passenger was fairly stable, which is a positive trend. On the other hand, the operating cost per passenger for dial-a-ride increased by about 56 percent. 6. The farebox recovery ratio showed an average annual increase of 11 percent and an overall increase of 33 percent between FYs 2003 and 2006. While the farebox ratio dropped in FY 2005, the ratio increased by nearly 24 percent in FY 2006 in part by following RCTC’s adopted farebox policy that allows local support funds to be included in the farebox calculation. In addition to some growth in fare revenues, SunLine’s revenue in FY 2005-06 included one-time local funds from settlement of a lawsuit, and reimbursement for the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA). These local support revenues increased the farebox. Conclusion from Verification of TDA Performance Indicators SunLine has exhibited positive change during the audit period. The new General Manager made significant policy and procedural changes internally and added new competent staff which have resulted in mostly positive performance trends. Ridership was essentially flat over the three year period, but its stability remained while using less revenue service, an indicator of more effective service. This is demonstrated in the positive trend with performance measures of passengers per hour and passengers per mile. 186 Triennial Performance Audit 18 SunLine Transit Agency Section V Review of Operator Functions This section provides an in-depth review of various functions within SunLine. The review highlights accomplishments, issues and/or challenges that were determined during the audit period. The following functions were reviewed at the agency: · Operations · Planning · Maintenance · Safety · Marketing · General Administration and Management Within some departments are sub-functions that require review as well, such as Grants Administration that fall under General Administration. Operations The operation and planning of transit services is consistent with the mission statement, vision statement and goals and objectives adopted by the SunLine Board of Directors during the audit period. The mission statement of SunLine is to: “To keep the Coachella Valley moving with safe, reliable and accessible public transit and a commitment to balance our fiscal and environmental responsibilities.” The Operations Department is responsible for the daily service provided by both SunBus and SunDial. SunBus provides timed transfer, fixed route service along 12 routes in the Coachella Valley from Desert Hot Springs in the northwest to Mecca in the southeast. SunBus is considered a modified pulse system because it combines traditional route planning with timed transfers. Pulse scheduling refers to the use of timed transfers to minimize the wait time between buses. SunLine phased out most tripper services operated by SunBus, which involved route deviations to local schools. In lieu of the tripper services, routes were streamlined and realigned to be more convenient to students. For instance, Lines 14, 50 and 70 were realigned to better serve local high school campuses without the need to deviate during peak hours. In addition, headways were improved on Lines 30 and 31. Charter services have been discontinued. SunDial is an ADA qualified complementary paratransit service and offers demand response curb-to-curb transportation with next-day scheduling capabilities. SunDial 187 Triennial Performance Audit 19 SunLine Transit Agency service is available within ¾ of a mile on either side of an existing SunBus fixed route. The only exception to the ¾ mile standard would be the communities of Desert Hot Springs and Sky Valley, where there is limited fixed-route service. SunLine instituted a new certification process for dial-a-ride users as part of overall community outreach process that transitions passengers from SunDial to SunBus. All passengers using the service have been recertified. The certification process involves a physician’s notification. According to the Director of Operations, there are 3,102 active riders in SunDial’s database. As a result of the new certification strategy, SunDial service has seen a decline in passenger counts during the audit period. Operations support functions include ADA certification, training, road supervision and dispatch. Operations functions comprise nearly 47 percent of SunLine’s budget. Fixed- route operations comprise 34.85 percent and dial-a-ride comprise 10.02 percent of the agency’s budget. Safety and security comprises two percent. SunDial provides persons with disabilities with curb-to-curb service. During FY 2004, SunBus transported 3,455,798 passengers and SunDial transported 105,967 passengers; for FY 2005, SunBus transported 3,334,540 passengers and SunDial transported 88,356 passengers; and for FY 2006, SunBus transported 3,474,361 passengers and SunDial transported 78,499 passengers. In addition to the provision of transportation services, the Operations Department ensures the highest level of customer service is achieved by being responsible for the Customer Service section. Customer Service provides passengers with route and schedule information while also responding to concerns and compliments. Operational data has been analyzed to determine the number of accidents, roadcalls, complaints and compliments received during the audit period. The on-time performance standard is 95 percent for all fixed-routes and dial-a-ride services. Supervisors conduct on-time checks (trail checks) and numbers are then entered into an Access database program. The Planning Department tracks and computes results, which are reported to the Board of Directors. A summary of operational indicators and performance measures are presented in the following table: Table V-1 SunLine Operations Summary YEAR 2004 2005 2006 FIXED ROUTE DIAL-A- RIDE FIXED ROUTE DIAL-A- RIDE FIXED ROUTE DIAL-A- RIDE Preventable Accidents 1 0 5 4 5 0 Complaints/Concerns 344 286 308 272 376 112 Complaints/Concerns per 1,000 passengers 0.18 0.150 0.090 3.08 0.11 1.33 Compliments 48 52 14 30 25 27 Compliments per 1,000 Passengers 0.014 0.491 0.004 0.340 0.007 0.322 On-time Performance 96.29% 90.86% 95.96% 90.40% 93.01% 92.60% Source: SunLine Transit Agency, RCTC Transit Operator Performance Improvement Program 188 Triennial Performance Audit 20 SunLine Transit Agency Ridership generally falls into four categories: workers, students, seniors, and visitors. According to the 2005/06-2007/08 RCTC Short-Range Transit Plan, 71 percent of the ridership is employed or students, 79 percent are low income and transit dependent using SunBus four or more days per week. Work and school are the dominant trip generators, followed by shopping, medical care and recreation. The agency has identified opportunities to increase ridership. There are two new college campuses in the Coachella Valley, College of the Desert-East Campus and California State University, San Bernardino Palm Desert campus. In addition, most of the affordable housing stock in the Valley is being constructed in the Coachella and Mecca areas. Much of this housing is being marketed to the service industry workers, which make up the bulk of SunLine’s ridership base. The Director of Operations has instituted a number of procedural changes and guidelines to the department to provide more structure. Employee qualifications are analyzed to determine that they match up with the job classification. In addition, testing is now required for promotional opportunities. Procedurally, an operator handbook and ride check manual were developed. A supervisor’s manual is currently in development. Policies and procedures are also communicated through Transportation Bulletins and memorandums. Daily bus check-in procedure involves the use of a vehicle condition report (VCR), which was revamped during the audit period. For several years, the Operations Department has had to grapple with deficiencies in its radio system. The topography of the Coachella Valley presented challenges in radio communications and necessitated an in-depth analysis to resolve this issue. In 2003, SunLine contracted to upgrade the entire radio system for all vehicles. In March 2004, hilltop repeaters were replaced and frequencies increased to allow full coverage. Radios with future Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capability were also installed in vehicles in the SunDial fleet and at each dispatch base. The department recently upgraded its Windows Trapeze software program intended to make dial-a-ride scheduling more efficient and user friendly. This upgrade is still in the process of implementation and is being monitored for its effectiveness. In addition, this upgrade involves the installation of mobile data terminals (MDTs) in the SunDial fleet. Newer buses are funded to include being fully equipped with Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) technology. SunLine will still need to procure the software and auxiliary equipment to activate the technology and interact with dispatch and other agency computers. Planning SunLine has taken a pro-active role in its route planning and coordination with constituent jurisdictions. The Planning Department provides multiple planning services that are complementary to other agency functions. The following tasks are examples of planning’s role within the agency: · Data collection and Analysis; · Long-Range Planning; · Service Planning and Route Development; · Short-Range Planning; (updates and develops five year capital and service improvement program, and overall work program); 189 Triennial Performance Audit 21 SunLine Transit Agency · Preparation and maintenance of data used in the transit process, including National Transit Data Bases and periodic route segment surveys; · Review of development projects and requests for provision of transit services, and amenities; · Updates and develops Title VI reports; · Research grant funding opportunities, applies and submits grant applications to funding agency, and monitors progress of applications and prepares reports and documents to ensure SunLine complies with various rules and regulations; · Oversight of State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and other federally required programs; and · Directs transit project development and implementation. During the audit period, the General Manager hired a new Director of Planning. The agency has developed several tools to analyze the current transit system and identify improvements. Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) In May 2005, the Board of Directors approved a staff request to conduct a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) of the existing route system as well as evaluate the potential for new route development and transit amenities. The main objectives of the COA were to: · Analyze fixed-route and paratransit services performance; · Examine the efficiency and effectiveness of the current system; · Understand the existing and potential markets for transit service that help increase ridership and market share; · Provide recommendations that will improve productivity; · Develop a service plan that best meets the needs of SunLine’s current and future customers. The COA was completed in December 2005 and presented to the Board in February 2006. The findings contained in the study indicated that after nearly ten years of no changes to the bus system there was a confirmed need to provide better transit service in the Coachella Valley. More specifically, the findings included key service concept and design guidelines that consist of recommendations to improve frequencies, increase the span of service, simplify service routes, improve access along major travel corridors that would distribute passengers more efficiently and avoid counter directional movements along the routes. Some of the specific route recommendations contained in the service concept and design guidelines include: · 15-minute frequencies on Lines 30 and 111; · Extension of Line 111 to Coachella; · Better service to Mecca/Thermal/Oasis; 190 Triennial Performance Audit 22 SunLine Transit Agency · Better connections to the College of the Desert; · Re-alignment of Thousand Palms service; and · Separation of Local and Regional Routes in Desert Hot Springs Current efforts entail working on planning activities to prepare for the implementation of improvements to the system. The Planning Staff has completed an evaluation and inventory of all bus stops in the system and has developed a Transit Facilities Design Manual as recommended in the COA. This manual contains guidance on the proper placement of bus shelters, bus turnouts, as well as protocol and communication regarding transit infrastructure and amenities. In addition, staff has been in the process of refining proposed route changes and plans to consult with local jurisdictions regarding initial concerns raised after the study’s completion. Staff will seek approval from the Board of Directors and conduct public hearings before the implementation of the changes during FY 2008. Development Review Program SunLine works routinely with local jurisdictions to identify residential, retail, office and industrial development proposals that may require transit services. Through its Development Review Program, staff review and provide comments on whether transit would be necessary or if transit already exists in the vicinity of the proposed development. It is through this process that SunLine works with local jurisdictions on ensuring that land use planning and transportation planning policies are coordinated. The agency generally receives development proposals from the Cities of Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indio, La Quinta, Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage and the County of Riverside. Proposals are received on occasion from the Cities of Indian Wells and Palm Desert. Comments provided to the jurisdictions include information about existing transit service and amenities, as well as future and/or proposed transit service along a specific corridor. In addition, the Planning Department is afforded the opportunity to review and comment on proposed street improvement projects and/or plans to ensure coordination with the jurisdictions to improve existing amenities if needed. One the challenges that SunLine has encountered in dealing with certain local jurisdictions has been the lack of coordination regarding the placement of bus shelters and turnouts. The Planning Staff indicated that some jurisdictions would arbitrarily install bus shelters without consideration given to ADA-accessibility, distance from the nearest intersection/right-turn lane or whether the shelter was situated on an established bus route. Another issue raised pertains to local jurisdictions allowing developers to construct bus turnouts adjacent to residential development where there is little or no demand for transit service. In light of these concerns, SunLine has made an effort to educate local officials and developers about the importance of transit planning and coordination. In particular, the Planning Department is committed to working closely with local municipal planners and engineers to understand the importance of working with SunLine prior to implementing transit-intensive projects. SunLine has emphasized the importance of having more developments with greater densities that would better sustain transit offered in the Coachella Valley. The COA, Transit Facilities Design Manual and Development Review Program have been useful tools in that effort. 191 Triennial Performance Audit 23 SunLine Transit Agency Public Hearings and Input The Board of Directors conduct public hearings before adopting and implementing route changes, service hour changes, and fare increases. The Board conducted a public hearing for the fare increase, which occurred in 2002; however no public hearing was required for the fare restructuring in January 2006 since none of the existing fares were increased. In concert with the COA implementation process, public hearings would be conducted during Board meetings regarding changes to existing routes, as well as modifications to the span of service. Public hearings would also be conducted for any proposed service route changes. Although there are no hearings held in the Coachella Valley regarding unmet transit needs, the RCTC Transit Program Manager ensures that all complaints and suggestions about transit service in the area are forwarded to SunLine’s Director of Planning. Each complaint is investigated thoroughly before findings are reported to RCTC. Depending on the issue raised, each case is resolved as quickly as possible and usually determined not to be an unmet transit need. Maintenance SunLine’s maintenance department has evolved into a multi-faced role over the course of the audit period. The agency has been receptive to a previous performance audit recommendation, which the called for the consolidation of all transit-related maintenance functions under one department. As a result, the maintenance department currently oversees the maintenance of vehicles, facilities and bus stop/shelters. Vehicle Maintenance The agency has developed a Preventive Maintenance Inspection (PMI) based upon an A-B-C-D mileage schedule. Fleet Net maintenance software is utilized for PMI tracking and forecasts each category of preventative maintenance scheduled. For instance, engine oil sample checks are taken every 6,000 miles and oil changes are performed every 12,000 miles. The PMI plan is detailed in the following table. All PMIs must be completed within a 10 percent plus or minus mileage window before they are due. Table V-2 SunLine Transit Agency Vehicle Preventative Maintenance Plan PM Type PM Due Mileage Forecast Mileage Completion Window A 6,000 5,400 5,400 to 6,600 B 12,000 11,400 11,400 to 12,600 C 24,000 23,400 23,400 to 24,600 D 48,000 47,400 47,400 to 48,600 Source: SunLine Transit Agency 192 Triennial Performance Audit 24 SunLine Transit Agency The majority of maintenance work is performed in-house; however, any outside repairs would fall under micro-purchases including alternators, smog testing, and wheel alignments. Some major mechanical failures have involved older buses, which has been one of the challenges facing SunLine. SunLine has recently implemented a vehicle replacement plan. The agency recently received 13 new Orion buses and retired the Bluebird and El Dorado buses acquired in FY 1994 from its fleet. In addition, an order for 16 more buses will be received in FY 2007-08. Newer buses in the fleet are under a two-year warranty. The majority of warranty repairs are performed by SunLine and reimbursed by the manufacturer. Table V-3 shows the number of roadcalls, as well as major and other system failures reported by SunLine in the National Transit Database. The trend shows an increase in major system failures, due primarily from the other buses. However, the number of roadcalls has decreased. Table V-3 Roadcalls and Major and Other Mechanical System Failures, Fixed Route Fiscal Year 2004 2005 2006 Total Roadcalls (Fixed Route/Dial-A-Ride) 226/41 220/35 186/42 632/118 Miles Between Roadcalls (Fixed Route/Dial-A-Ride) 9,689/ 20,619 8,929/ 20,208 9,773/ 13,261 9,449/ 17,878 System Failures Major System Failures 16 37 43 96 Other System Failures 210 183 143 536 Total Failures 226 220 186 632 Source: SunLine Transit Agency, NTD The newer buses in fleet are characterized by computer driven multiplex systems. This has necessitated more intensive training with the advent of this new technology. SunLine has an in-house trainer and is a member of the California Transit Training Consortium. The agency also utilizes training resources through the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), which includes a nine month training class that meet two day per week. FTA funding has been successfully secured for the consortium. There are 45 vehicle maintenance personnel, including 23 mechanics and one trainer. Non-revenue mechanics service dial-a-ride and support vehicles. Other vehicle maintenance personnel are cross-trained on the various vehicle types. The department boasts a high personnel retention rate and promotes from within. 193 Triennial Performance Audit 25 SunLine Transit Agency Parts Inventory and Management Small purchases exceeding $2,500 are performed with informal methods of procurement. Vehicle parts are managed and tracked using Fleet-Net. Fleet-Net keeps a perpetual inventory history of each item. This program is also utilized for cost pricing comparisons and most purchases are considered micro-purchases (less than $2,500). For items or services exceeding $100,000 in cost, an Invitation for Bid (IFB) or a Request for Proposals (RFP) is made. Routine cycle counts of parts are performed, including year-end inventory, and any deviations are noted. Staff noted deviations have been found to be under two percent. SunLine maintains $250,000 worth of parts inventory, of which $220,000 are stored at the Thousand Palms facility and $30,000 stored at the Indio facility. Parts are retrieved only by the floor supervisor and scanned by barcode in real time as the parts are moved out of the inventory room. Inventory tracking is done automatically through the Fleet Net system. There is an auto reorder function that is set up based on minimum-maximum levels. The Purchasing Manager in the Finance Department determines the minimum-maximum levels with input from Maintenance on projected usage. Maintenance Supervisors are approved to scan out (with a bar code reader) needed inventory parts for work orders. This is then verified by the Purchasing Manager by uploading the bar code unit (BCU) which enables the agency to achieve proper checks and balance between the two Departments. Facility Maintenance Facility maintenance involves the ongoing quality maintenance of SunLine’s physical plant and technical operations through the integration of preventative maintenance with proactive response to repairs and modifications. Performance and administration of all facility construction and maintenance is overseen by the Director of Maintenance, Facility Lead and Facility Technicians. SunLine operates two maintenance facilities, one located in Thousand Palms, and the other located in Indio. The Thousand Palms facility, identified as STA-1, is the primary and largest facility, housing the majority of the bus fleet along with other support and non- transit vehicles. The facility contains SunLine’s campus of modular administrative buildings, which houses the general administrative and operations personnel and a 15, 000 square foot maintenance building on 10 acres. The campus also boasts two multi- purpose conference rooms, a clean fuels demonstration area, clean fuel technology infrastructure, and a 24-hour public fueling station dispensing CNG, LNG and Hydrogen. Based here are 32 fixed route buses and 11 dial-a-ride vehicles. The facility is also home to the alternative fuel development program that is under the auspices of SunLine Services Group (SSG), a separate JPA organization that shares the facility with transit, and is part of the SunLine organization. The Indio facility, identified as STA-2, serves as a support center for light vehicle maintenance, fleet dispatch, public CNG refueling, as well as a transfer station for nearly one-third of the 10,000 daily SunBus riders. STA-2 also serves as a base for 15 fixed-route buses and 12 dial-a-ride vehicles. 194 Triennial Performance Audit 26 SunLine Transit Agency SunLine initiated work on a Facility Maintenance Plan in 2004 which has been recently finalized and approved by the General Manager and Director of Maintenance. The plan establishes priorities and tasks to be performed based on agency goals and objectives. It also outlines scenarios along with the appropriate procedures for correction. In addition, it is a training tool for new employees and offers the proper procedures to use in accomplishing their duties as well as provides an overview of the various departments and their interaction. Bus Stops/Shelter Maintenance There are approximately 600 bus stops within SunLine’s 1,120 square mile service area. This type of maintenance is known as “stops and zones” and involves the cleaning and maintenance of bus stops and shelters on a scheduled basis. Approximately 192 out of the 600 bus stops are sheltered. SunLine owns 140 bus shelters that generate advertising revenue that offset the costs of shelter maintenance. Bus stops in more rural locations have been equipped with solar-powered night lighting. Safety SunLine initiated a start up for a safety program in 2005. This initiative led to the development of the Safety Department and the creation of the Safety Director’s position. The agency’s philosophy towards safety revolves around a check and balance approach. All injuries and collisions are reported and investigated. The department has instituted a post injury and collision program to determine whether incidents could have been prevented as well as determine how injuries were occurring. Supervisors are trained how to investigate accidents. Those employees involved in accidents are required to undergo mandatory retraining. The retraining focuses on the particular incident to determine how it could have been prevented. The employee safety program was restructured to become more training focused. This involves one-hour structured safety program. The Safety Committee was also restructured and is made up of 10 employee representatives from each department within the agency, including the Safety Director and Trainer. Committee members serve a one-year term and meet every other month. There were 120 safety concerns noted during the first year of the committee and 86 of those concerns were corrected. A safety log is maintained and posted in public view. Incident data are forwarded to the state’s Public Entity Risk Management Authority (PERMA). The department is looking at creating an employee safety incentive program and encouraging the development of safety teams. The department is also responsible for coordination efforts with local first responders from various agencies to provide emergency transport during disasters. SunLine participates in the Coachella Valley Emergency Managers Association (CVEMA) and the Department of Homeland Security’s Highway Watch Program. Safety is also responsible for contracting security guards who patrol the SunLine facility for eight hours, seven days a week. This security patrol will eventually be increased 12 hours daily. Security cameras at both the Thousand Palms and Indio facilities have been upgraded. Buses are equipped with silent alarms and 15 new buses are equipped with cameras. The Safety Department is firmly committed to reducing the number of incidents and has established measurable goals. The short-term goal is to have fewer collisions each month 195 Triennial Performance Audit 27 SunLine Transit Agency as compared to the same month in the previous year. The long-term goal is to have zero preventable accidents. The department is seeing a downward trend, which helps to determine the frequency rate. Marketing Marketing of transit services is provided through a variety of methods and outlets. Information is posted at bus stops and other major activity centers such as schools, senior centers, retail outlets and public facilities. Brochures and schedules are available on buses and at the various activity centers. The agency’s website, http://www.sunline.org/, contains information about routes, schedules, services, and fares, including a systemwide map. There are also creative marketing promotions and a considerable newspaper presence in both English and Spanish. Individual timetables continue to be published for each route. However, SunLine does not publish a consolidated timetable or “rider’s guide” of its routes, nor is a systemwide map available at key transfer locations. As route modifications have been undertaken, staff has found it not cost effective to print systemwide brochures. However, limited systemwide maps printed and placed at strategic locations like at transfer stops should be provided to conveniently assist new and existing riders, as not all riders will have access to the internet. In addition, fare information is not printed in the published route schedules. Customer Service receives complaints and forwards them to the appropriate department for a response. They are logged by type of complaint. The General Manager also reviews each complaint and response. The FY 2006 budget contains an allocation for the contracting of a marketing consultant to help SunLine respond to the recommendations contained in the COA. Past marketing efforts have focused on the agency’s alternative fuels initiatives. The agency has since redirected its marketing efforts on its ridership and their transportation needs. General Administration and Management SunLine has experienced a notable transformation since the end of last triennial performance audit period. The current General Manager, who was hired in FY 2004, brings to SunLine 18 years of transit experience and previously served in the capacity of Assistant General Manager at the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) in the Boston area. Upon coming to SunLine, the General Manager found that the agency was not transit focused. A comprehensive overhaul of the agency’s administration and operations was undertaken during the audit period. In addition to the mission statement adopted during the audit period, the executive management restructured the goals of the agency in order to: 1. Promote a responsible transportation system supported by transit-oriented, safety- based, passenger-friendly strategies. 2. Work with the public and private sectors in support of economic development, which includes educating the public about the benefits of transit. 196 Triennial Performance Audit 28 SunLine Transit Agency 3. Pursue long-term capital and operating funding sources to leverage local resources, both public and private. 4. Establish a work environment that instills unity, teamwork, achievement and trust. 5. Pursue the latest transit technologies, including alternative fuels, which assist in providing transit to the Coachella Valley. The mission statement and goals are included at the front of the employee handbook handed to each employee. Each employee must acknowledge and sign receipt of the handbook. In keeping with the refocused transit-orientation of the agency, the executive management of SunLine eliminated all non-transit related programs and projects operated by the SunLine Services Group (SSG) except for the taxi program. In addition, the General Manager promoted the vision behind the COA, which was supported in-part financially by RCTC. Agency functions are divided amongst seven departments listed as follows: · Administrative Services · Finance · Human Resources · Maintenance · Operations · Planning · Safety The General Manager created two new departments and consolidated several functions under one existing department. With the creation of the Safety Department, a Director of Safety with 11 years of experience was hired and a Director of Planning was hired in conjunction with the creation of the Planning Department. Vehicle, Facility and Stops and Zones maintenance functions were consolidated under the Maintenance Department. Every Director except for the Director of Maintenance was replaced during the audit period. Weekly staff meetings involving the General Manager and department directors are held every Monday. In addition, there are one-on-one meetings between the General Manager and each director held weekly. The agency is currently in search of a permanent Human Resources Director. The position is currently administered by a consultant. The General Manager indicated that it was difficult to recruit from the local talent pool given the demographics of the Coachella Valley. Employee background checks were introduced utilizing the services of USIS, an information and security services company headquartered in Falls Church, Virginia. Management implemented an overhaul of the budgetary process. Such changes include a Board approved budget amendment process and improved oversight of 197 Triennial Performance Audit 29 SunLine Transit Agency expenditures. Farebox reconciliation procedures were also reformed during the audit period to ensure more accurate data. Farebox cash revenues are counted on a daily basis. Moreover, the money room where farebox receipts are counted has been remodeled with new security enhancements and protocols. SunLine’s executive management completed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the agency and the union representing the drivers and maintenance personnel, the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1277. This new MOU, effective from April 1, 2006 through March 31, 2009, allowed management to exert more control over labor matters. The General Manager brought in a transit labor negotiator to assist with the MOU. Incremental wage increases are made every six months for the three year period of the MOU. The Board of Directors is comprised of elected officials from each jurisdiction within SunLine’s service area. The Board meets 10 times each year on the fourth Wednesday of the month at noon. The July and August meeting are combined and usually held on the first Wednesday in August. The November and December meetings are also combined and are held on the first Wednesday in December. Special meetings may be convened by the chairman as needed. The Chair and Vice-Chair are elected for annual terms that commence on July 1st of each year. The Chair and Vice-Chair are selected from the Board. The relationship between SunLine’s management and its Board is characterized by a high level of trust. In addition, management enjoys a good relationship with every city manager within the service area. SunLine has exerted more influence over transit infrastructure improvements by educating its constituent cities about the appropriate placement of bus stops and turnouts. The General Manager also reports the relationship with RCTC to be close and transparent. Within that framework, both agencies have been able to expose problems and offer solutions. On the heels of the COA, SunLine has embarked on a strategic plan that will establish a baseline for operations. The plan would contain an outline for bus replacement and the construction of a new bus operations facility. During the audit period, the agency purchased 11 acres of land adjacent to the existing Thousand Palms campus. The existing campus is a 30 year old facility consisting of trailers that have been prone to termite infestation. The acquired acreage would allow for the relocation and development of SunLine’s administrative, operations, and maintenance departments. The agency has secured grant funding for the architectural and engineering design. SSG was created in part to commercialize alternative energy applications that will contribute to improved air quality. The board of directors of SSG is the same governing board responsible for SunLine. Some of SunLine’s vehicles are used as test beds for evaluating new fuels, such as hydrogen. SSG also administers the regional street sweeping program using CNG fueled street sweepers and leases out a fleet of 45 CNG taxis. The activities of SSG are only covered in this audit to the extent that its activities affect the performance of SunLine. Under the current management, all non-transit related programs involving SSG except the taxi program were eliminated. Grants Administration SunLine’s grant administration involves a coordinated effort between the Finance and Planning Departments. The Finance Department keeps the agency apprised of what 198 Triennial Performance Audit 30 SunLine Transit Agency grants are available and which grants require closing out. RCTC has expressed regional concern regarding the number and amount of open projects, and is anticipating developing Commission policy that addresses its concern. According to the RCTC quarterly Capital Project Summary ended June 2006, SunLine had 37 open projects with a total value of $13.6 million. Twelve of the projects were older than three years with a value of about $1.4 million. The value of the projects is primarily for bus purchases, ITS and communications systems, and facility improvements. Many of the projects involve the purchase of buses on order, and will be closed when the new buses are delivered, pass inspection and invoices paid. The Planning Department has compiled a grants binder, which includes all correspondence with the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), table of contents, concurrence with other agencies, a catalog of Federal formula grants (Section 5307, 5309, 5310, 5311, etc.) and the annual status of each grant. The agency has secured FTA Section 5310 funding for the acquisition of a replacement dial-a-ride vehicle. In addition, the agency has acquired new 40-foot fixed-route buses, made renovations to the maintenance facility and acquired land for expansion which have drawn down on some of the outstanding balance of open grants. While construction type projects could take long periods of time to implement due to complexities involved with land development, other activities such as bus procurement and debt service could be completed in a relatively shorter time. Settlement of Lawsuit In September 2005, SunLine filed a complaint in Riverside County Superior Court which names as defendants, Clean Energy, its President and the former SunLine General Manager. The compliant alleges various tort and contract-related causes of action arising out of public-private partnerships between SunLine and Clean Energy. These partnerships related to CNG fueling stations and were supposed to generate significant revenues for SunLine. In June 2006, SunLine settled its lawsuit against the defendants. The settlement included a payment to SunLine, cancellation of all contracts between the parties, cancellation of all payables and receivables between the parties, and transfer of certain capital assets related to CNG fueling stations. As part of a Joint Development Agreement with Clean Energy, SunLine was a co-owner with Clean Energy of several CNG fueling stations in the Coachella Valley. Included in the settlement was the transfer of all title and rights of the CNG fueling stations located on SunLine’s properties in Thousand Palms and Indio by Clean Energy. In return, SunLine transferred all title and rights of the remaining CNG fueling stations to Clean Energy. SunLine had a receivable from Clean Energy for utilities used by the CNG fueling stations totaling $121,978 and a payable to Clean Energy of $494,434 for CNG used by SunLine’s vehicles. As part of the settlement, both the payable and receivable and receivable were forgiven. Clean Energy also agreed to pay SunLine $150,000 as part of the settlement. As a result, SunLine recorded a settlement gain of $522,456. 199 Triennial Performance Audit 31 SunLine Transit Agency Section VI Findings and Recommendations The following material summarizes the major findings obtained from this Triennial Audit covering FY’s 2004 through 2006. A set of recommendations is then provided. 1. SunLine has complied with all transit operator compliance requirements of TDA. 2. Seven of the eight prior audit recommendations have been fully implemented. One recommendation no longer applied which was to market the SunLink commuter service, which was discontinued in July 2004 due to high operational costs. 3. The Board of Directors adopted a new mission statement in March 2004, which emphasizes customer service, cost efficiency, and reliable transit service. Agency goals were also restructured to reflect more of a transit orientation. 4. Management underwent significant change. Certain department directors were replaced, some resigned, and others retired. In addition, both the Planning Department and Safety Department were newly created with new directors hired. 5. Vehicle, Facility and Stops and Zones maintenance functions were consolidated under the Maintenance Department. 6. SunLine conducted a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) of the existing route system as well as evaluated the potential for new route development and transit amenities. 7. The executive management of SunLine eliminated all non-transit related programs and projects operated by SSG except for the taxi program. 8. SunLine implemented a bus replacement program and replaced 13 vehicles during the audit period with another 15 vehicles on order. The new vehicles are equipped with GPS-type technology. 9. SunLine advanced the use of hydrogen fuel technology with the acquisition of a hydrogen-powered bus and the opening of a hydrogen fueling station. 10. SunLine’s grant administration involves a coordinated effort between the Finance and Planning Departments. According to the RCTC quarterly Capital Projects Summary report ended June 2006, SunLine had 37 open projects with a total value of $13.6 million. RCTC has expressed regional concern regarding the number and amount of open projects, and is anticipating developing Commission policy to address its concern. SunLine has acquired new 40-foot fixed-route buses, made renovations to the maintenance facility and acquired land for expansion which have drawn down on some of the outstanding balance of grant projects. Many of the projects involve the purchase of buses on order, and will be closed when the new buses are delivered, pass inspection and invoices paid. 200 Triennial Performance Audit 32 SunLine Transit Agency 11. New SunLine management investigated the mismanagement of funds in previous years. In June 2006, SunLine settled its lawsuit which included a payment to SunLine, cancellation of all contracts between the parties, cancellation of all payables and receivables between the parties, and transfer of certain capital assets related to CNG fueling stations. Triennial Audit Recommendations 1. Complete and submit separate State Controller Reports for general public transit and specialized service for elderly and disabled. Separate annual State Controller Reports should be submitted for each type of service to be in compliance with State instructions. Provided that SunLine provides both types of services, the State requires separate filing for each service type. 2. Consider publishing a systemwide map of the service area and routes, and place at key bus transfer locations. SunLine should develop a limited amount of systemwide maps that show all routes and bus transfer locations, and placed at key transfer points of the service. Major destination points like schools, medical facilities, government services, and shopping centers could also be identified to provide the rider a sense of place and direction on how to reach such trip attractors by bus. As route modifications have been undertaken, staff has found it not cost effective to print systemwide brochures. There is currently a systemwide map on the website. However, limited systemwide maps printed and placed at strategic locations like at transfer stops should be provided to conveniently assist new and existing riders, as not all riders will have access to the internet. 3. Include bus fare information on the schedule. The current route schedules do not show the one-way bus cash fares or pass prices. As the schedules are updated, SunLine should include a listing of the fares as part of its marketing efforts. 4. Include, as a future priority, full procurement of Automated Vehicle Locator (AVL) technology to increase service efficiencies and tracking. SunLine has already begun moving towards using relatively new technology to enhance its service provision through equipping new buses with mobile bus terminal (MBT) type devices. It is recommended that the agency work to be fully equipped with AVL technology for SunBus and SunDial services as a mean to improve efficiencies. The technology has the potential to result in cost savings from manual processes such as on-time performance checks by road supervisors. 5. Work with RCTC to determine potential alternative funding for specific transit service. The Federal transportation law includes funding programs that provide additional resources for special projects that could meet anticipated demand. One revenue source is the Job Access and Reverse Commute Program (JARC) (FTA Section 5316) 201 Triennial Performance Audit 33 SunLine Transit Agency which became a formula program under SAFETEA-LU. JARC might be used for transit services to transport welfare recipients and other low-income individuals to employment. The New Freedom Program (FTA Section 5317) is a competitive grant program that could address transportation services and capital improvements that go beyond those required by the American with Disabilities Act (ADA). As RCTC is currently managing a Coordinated Public Transit/Human Services Plan for Riverside County, SunLine should continue its participation and help guide the development of the plan and whether these potential funding sources might be available. 202 AGENDA ITEM 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Status Report: Fiscal Year 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the third quarter status report on the FY 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP); 2) Direct staff to work with transit operator staff from the city of Banning, city of Beaumont, city of Corona and Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) to jointly develop an action plan to meet the Commission approved PIP; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission oversees transit service in Riverside County primarily through the approval of Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs), which details the operating and capital costs that are planned for transit services. Public Utilities Code Section 99244 requires the Commission to annually identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operations (public bus and commuter rail) through the SRTP process. This process requires the transit operators to: 1) Address recommendations made through the Triennial Performance Audit; and 2) Comply with state PUC requirements for state-mandated farebox recovery and cost efficiency. At the February 15, 2007 Transit Policy Committee, staff provided a status report on compliance with the FY 2006/07 PIP based on second quarter data. FY 2006/07 is the first full year for implementation of the PIP and TransTrack – the web based performance monitoring software system that the Commission purchased to assist with data analysis. Commission staff believes that both Agenda Item 8 203 systems will continue to assist with monitoring performance but recognizes that there is a learning curve associated with new program implementation. As such, staff was directed to continue working closely with the transit operators to analyze third quarter data to determine compliance. Productivity Improvement Program The SRTPs were developed to meet the Commission’s PIP that was adopted as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the Riverside County’s eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators. The process requires the transit operators to address recommendations that are made by regular performance audits. The performance indicators that are evaluated through the PIP consist of the following two mandatory targets: Mandatory Targets • Operating costs per revenue hour; and • Farebox recovery ratio. Additionally, there are six discretionary targets1: Discretionary Targets • Subsidy per passenger (+/- 15% Variance); • Subsidy per passenger mile (+/- 15% Variance); • Subsidy per revenue hour (+/- 15% Variance); • Subsidy per revenue mile (+/- 15% Variance); • Passengers per revenue hour (+/- 15% Variance); and • Passengers per revenue mile (+/- 15% Variance) Additional Discretionary Targets for Rail Program • Ridership growth: goal of 2% growth; and • Passenger miles per revenue car: goal of 30 passengers per revenue car mile. 1 Bus operators should meet a minimum of three of the six discretionary targets. Two additional performance targets were approved for the Commuter Rail program, and as a result, the rail program should meet tree of eight discretionary targets. Agenda Item 8 204 The performance indicators are critical in ensuring that service can be maximized in an efficient manner. More importantly, the PIP is a cooperative process between the Commission and the transit operators to work together on approaches to improve mobility in an environment fraught with rising costs for fuel, labor and insurance. Analyze Results of First Nine Months of Fiscal Year 2006/07 Productivity Improvement Program Targets Transit operator staff actively participated in the development of the FY 2006/07 PIP performance targets, which are based on FY 2005/06 third quarter actual performance data2. The PIP targets were subsequently approved by the Commission at its June 14, 2006 meeting. Attached to this agenda item is a system-wide performance report (scorecard), by operator, identifying the Commission approved mandatory and discretionary performance targets for FY 2006/07 together with a nine-month performance scorecard. The following provides a summary of the PIP analysis: Fiscal Year 2006/07 Mandatory Target Scorecard Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Based on the Service Provider Performance Targets Report (attached) five of eight operators meet the operating cost per revenue hour targets established for their agency. Operators that Fail to Meet Target The city of Beaumont’s target was approved at $58.28; however, the year-to-date performance indicates actual cost of $67.82, which represents an increase of 16.37%. The city of Corona’s target was approved at $53.65; however, the year to date performance indicates actual cost of $59.03, which represents an increase of 10.02%. PVVTA’s target was approved at $59.58; however, the year to date performance indicates actual cost of $65.07, which represents an increase of 9.21%. 2 Through this collaborative process, Banning, Corona, Commuter Rail and Riverside Transit Agency requested an increase in their Operating Cost per Revenue Hour calculation. The Commission approved increase ranged from 4.10% to 11.90%. The FY 2006/07 performance targets for these four agencies were subsequently increased. Agenda Item 8 205 Farebox Recovery Ratio Based on TransTrack data, five of eight transit operators are on target to meet the farebox recovery ratio targets. At the time of writing this staff report, the city of Beaumont, city of Corona and PVVTA’s year-to-date performance indicates that the agencies will not be in compliance with the state-mandated farebox recovery ratio; however, TransTrack’s calculation of farebox recovery does not take into consideration local revenues and other farebox exclusions3. In all likelihood, the city of Corona will meet the farebox recovery requirement as the city augments its farebox with general funds. Fiscal Year 2006/07 Discretionary Target Scorecard As previously stated, bus operators need to meet a minimum of three of the discretionary targets. Six of the eight operators are in compliance with the discretionary targets. The following operators fail to meet the discretionary targets: City of Banning Meets 2 discretionary targets PVVTA Meets 1 discretionary target Next Steps in the Productivity Improvement Program Analysis While reviewing and analyzing individual route productivity will remain with the transit operators and their governing boards, the Commission, as part of its oversight responsibilities, must ensure that transit operators are utilizing TDA funds efficiently and effectively. FY 2006/07 is the first full year for implementation of the PIP and TransTrack performance monitoring system. Commission staff believes that both systems will continue to assist with monitoring performance but recognizes that there is a learning curve associated with new program implementation. At this time, based upon the Commission’s approved PIP document, the following needs to occur prior to the following fiscal year’s SRTP being presented to the Commission for adoption: 3 The Commission approved PIP definition of Total Passenger Fare Revenues was based on PUC definition to support transit industry best practices. Agenda Item 8 206 1) A meeting will be scheduled with transit operator and Commission staff to jointly develop an action plan to meet the PIP targets; 2) The agreed upon action plan, together with the transit operator’s performance report, will be presented to the Commission for approval; and 3) The approved action plan/methodology to come into compliance with the PIP will be included as part of the following fiscal year’s SRTP4. Should the Commission approved action plan fail to achieve compliance with the PIP within 12 months of the approved plan, staff from the transit operator and the Commission will jointly develop a status report and identify progress as well as proposed modifications to the action plan. The revised action plan will be submitted to the Commission for approval. The worst-case scenario would be if a transit operator refused to take any action to improve performance relative to a specific PIP recommendation and performance continued to decline or remained well below that of similar services. In such instance, the Commission may determine that a “reasonable effort5” was not made. If this should occur, TDA funding increases would be set aside until such time that the transit operator took action deemed “reasonable” by the Commission. Attachment: Fiscal Year 2006/07 – Service Provider Performance Targets Report 4 FY 2007/08 SRTPs will include the action plan/methodology to come into compliance with the PIP. 5 Reasonable effort to include meeting(s) and open, continuous communication between the Commission and the transit agency to address concerns identified in the Triennial Performance Audit, or in the case of non-compliance with the PIP, development of an action plan to achieve compliance. Agenda Item 8 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 AGENDA ITEM 9 REVISION TO AGENDA ITEM 9 Additions are noted by Bold Italics, Deletions are noted by Strikethr-eagh RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Citizens' Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2007/08 Through Fiscal Year 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plans CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Review and approve, in concept, the FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the city of Riverside, Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the Commission's Regional Commuter Rail Program (Commuter Rail), as presented; 2) Direct staff to obtain additional information from the RTA and Commuter Rail on it-s their requests for a Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) waiver on operating cost per revenue hour. Contingent on compliance with the PIP, review and approve, in concept, RTA's and Commuter Rail's SRTPs; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10 SRTPs include plans for the city of Riverside, RTA, SunLine, and the Commission's Regional Commuter Rail Program. Staff is requesting that the SRTPs be approved in concept only as requests for financial allocations will be made at its July 11, 2007 Commission meeting. Additionally, RTA and Commuter. Rail is are requesting a waiver on operating cost per, revenue hour over and above the 5% increase based on the Consumer Price Index. As a result, staff is recommending that RTA's and Commuter Rail's SRTPs be approved contingent on obtaining additional information as to why the increase is necessary. As reported in a separate agenda item, the SRTPs for the city of Banning, city of Beaumont, city of Corona and Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) will be Agenda Item 9 presented at a later date due to third quarter non-compliance with the FY 2006/07 Commission approved PIP. The SRTPs provide detailed information about existing services and facilities, financial forecasts and plans, as well as planned and proposed improvements to be implemented in FY 2007/08. The Commission oversees transit service in Riverside County primarily through the approval of SRTPs which detail the operating and capital costs that are planned for transit services. Each operator adopts such a plan and then provides data to the Commission on performance. Productivity Improvement Program With the exception of RTA and Commuter Rail, the SRTPs were developed to meet the Commission's PIP, which was adopted as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the Riverside County's eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators. The process requires the transit operators to address recommendations that are made by regular performance audits. Operating, Capital and Ridership Data To assist the Transit Policy Committee (TPC) with review of the SRTPs, the following data is provided on operating, capital and ridership for all eight transit operators: AGENCY/APPORTIONMENT AREA Operating Capital City of Banning $ 1,192,294 $ 915,000 City of Beaumont $ 1,202,819 $ 125,000 City of Corona $ 1 928,813 $ 50,000 Riverside Special Services $ 3,116,719 $ 500,000 Riverside Transit Agency $ 54,272,469 $ 9,061,321 Western County: Bus $ 61,713,114 $ 10,641,321 Western County: Rail $ 8,678,550 $ 17,514,861 WESTERN COUNTY: TOTAL $ 70,391,664 $ 28,156,182 SunLine Transit Agency $ 20,397,567 $ 13,179,726 COACHELLA VALLEY: TOTAL $ 20,397,567 $ 13,179,726 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency $ 873,489 $ 538,259 PALO VERDE VALLEY: TOTAL $ 873,489 $ 538,259 TOTAL: ALL AREAS $ 91,662,720 $ 41,874,167 Total Costs $ 2,107,294 $ 1,327,819 $ 1,978,813 $ 3,616,719 $ 63,323,790 $ 72,354,435 $ 26,193,411 $ 98,547,846 $ 33,577,293 $ 33,577,293 $ 1,411748 $ 1,411,748 $ 133,536,887 'Commuter Rail's costs include RCTC's share of approximately $8.7M plus LA Metro, OCTA and SANBAG's share of approximately $31 M (consists of $12,471,400 - Additional Commuter Rail operating subsidy plus $18,541,000 - Commuter Rail Farebox) Ridership 178,500 103,020 210,000 163,750 7,231,939 7,887,209 2,996,389 10,883,598 3,979,324 3,979,324 52,772 52,772 14,915,694 Agenda Item 9 Fiscal Year 2007/08 Draft Short Range Transit Plans The following information is provided as a summary of each operator's proposed SRTP: City of Riverside — Special Services Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation dial -a -ride for seniors and persons with disabilities. Service is provided within the Riverside city limits. Thespecial services program functions as an alternative to RTA's fixed route system for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use fixed route service. All services operated by RSS are closely coordinated with RTA. Following are the highlights of services planned for FY 2007/08: • In an effort to market its program, a new brochure will be distributed educating and promoting service to senior centers and various housing complexes; • During the year, six new dial -a -ride vehicles will be received as part of the bus replacement program; and • Due to a shortage of drivers, the City of Riverside Human Resources and RSS have created a video titled "Live, Work, and Play". This video advertises the need for drivers. The video is displayed at all Council meetings and on the City's web page. Riverside Transit Agency The RTA provides both local and regional transportation services. RTA is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency for Western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the approximately 2,500 square mile service area, providing driver training, and assistance with grant applications. The following are highlights of RTA's proposed service for FY 2007/08: • RTA will continue to monitor ridership and projects an increase of 3% in FY 2007/08 based on service enhancements; • The agency's comprehensive operational analysis is projected to be completed within a couple of months. Once finalized, additional service enhancements may occur; • 7.4% increase in the use of the taxi over -flow program; • Operating budget reflects an 11.4% increase (excluding the GASB pre -fund); and • Capital budget of $9,051,321 has been identified. Agenda Item 9 SunLine Transit Agency SunLine provides both local and regional transportation services with 12 fixed routes and demand response dial -a -ride services known as SunDial. SunLine is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the Coachella Valley. SunLine's service area consists of approximately 1,120 square miles. Following are the highlights of SunLine's proposed FY 2007/08 SRTP: • Service improvements will be implemented as a result of the agency's completed comprehensive operational analysis; • SunLine will continue to replace and expand its fleet. During FY 2007/08, a total of 43 vehicles will be purchased through its capital program; • Additional bus shelters and bus benches will be installed throughout the service area to improve and enhance service; • Continue working with local jurisdictions on bus stop issues; • Continue work on environmental assessment, preliminary and final engineering for new administrative building; and • Examine the feasibility of conducting a site selection study to potentially select locations throughout the valley for a transit center, transfer locations and sites for park -and -ride lots. Regional Commuter Rail The Southern California Regional Rail Authority operates seven commuter rail lines with 39 locomotives and 155 commuter rail cars. Three routes, the Riverside to Los Angeles Line, .the Inland Empire to Orange County Line (IE0C), and the Riverside to Los Angeles via Fullerton Line (91 Line) directly serve Western Riverside County with connecting service available to destinations on the other four lines. Following are the highlights of the Commuter Rail's FY 2008/09 SRTP: • Continued implementation of the revised fare structure with an average 3.5% fare increase in FY 2008/09; • Preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside — Moreno Valley — Perris) Metrolink extension project;• • Construction of the Perris multimodal transit center; and • Construction of a parking structure at the North Main Corona Metrolink station to meet passenger demand. Agenda Item 9 The SRTPs were reviewed and approved by the Commission's Citizens' Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council at its May 15, 2007 meeting. Attachments: Short Range Transit Plans FY 2007/08 — FY 2009/10 1) Riverside Special Services 2) Riverside Transit Agency 3) SunLine Transit Agency 4) Commission's Regional Commuter Rail Agenda Item 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Citizens’ Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council Tanya Love, Program Manager THROUGH Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2007/08 Through Fiscal Year 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plans CITIZENS’ ADVISORY COMMITTEE/SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Review and approve, in concept, the FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the city of Riverside, Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the Commission’s Regional Commuter Rail Program, as presented; 2) Direct staff to obtain additional information from the RTA on its request for a Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) waiver on operating cost per revenue hour. Contingent on compliance with the PIP, review and approve, in concept, RTA’s SRTP; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10 SRTPs include plans for the city of Riverside, RTA, SunLine, and the Commission’s Regional Commuter Rail Program. Staff is requesting that the SRTPs be approved in concept only as requests for financial allocations will be made at its July 11, 2007 Commission meeting. Additionally, RTA is requesting a waiver on operating cost per revenue hour over and above the 5% increase based on the Consumer Price Index. As a result, staff is recommending that RTA’s SRTP be approved contingent on obtaining additional information as to why the increase is necessary. As reported in a separate agenda item, the SRTPs for the city of Banning, city of Beaumont, city of Corona and Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) will be presented at a later date due to third quarter non-compliance with the FY 2006/07 Commission approved PIP. Agenda Item 9 216 The SRTPs provide detailed information about existing services and facilities, financial forecasts and plans, as well as planned and proposed improvements to be implemented in FY 2007/08. The Commission oversees transit service in Riverside County primarily through the approval of SRTPs which detail the operating and capital costs that are planned for transit services. Each operator adopts such a plan and then provides data to the Commission on performance. Productivity Improvement Program With the exception of RTA, the SRTPs were developed to meet the Commission’s PIP, which was adopted as part of a comprehensive effort to work with the Riverside County’s eight public transit operators to provide better service and improve efficiency. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements for transit operators. The process requires the transit operators to address recommendations that are made by regular performance audits. Operating, Capital and Ridership Data To assist the Transit Policy Committee (TPC) with review of the SRTPs, the following data is provided on operating, capital and ridership for all eight transit operators: AGENCY/APPORTIONMENT AREA Operating Capital Total Costs Ridership City of Banning 1,192,294$ 915,000$ 2,107,294$ 178,500 City of Beaumont 1,202,819$ 125,000$ 1,327,819$ 103,020 City of Corona 1,928,813$ 50,000$ 1,978,813$ 210,000 Riverside Special Services 3,116,719$ 500,000$ 3,616,719$ 163,750 Riverside Transit Agency 54,272,469$ 9,051,321$ 63,323,790$ 7,231,939 Western County: Bus 61,713,114$ 10,641,321$ 72,354,435$ 7,887,209 Western County: Rail 8,678,550$ 17,514,861$ 26,193,411$ 2,996,389 WESTERN COUNTY: TOTAL 70,391,664$ 28,156,182$ 98,547,846$ 10,883,598 SunLine Transit Agency 20,397,567$ 13,179,726$ 33,577,293$ 3,979,324 COACHELLA VALLEY: TOTAL 20,397,567$ 13,179,726$ 33,577,293$ 3,979,324 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 873,489$ 538,259$ 1,411,748$ 52,772 PALO VERDE VALLEY: TOTAL 873,489$ 538,259$ 1,411,748$ 52,772 TOTAL: ALL AREAS 91,662,720$ 41,874,167$ 133,536,887$ 14,915,694 *Commuter Rail's costs include RCTC's share of approximately $8.7M plus LA Metro, OCTA and SANBAG's share of approximately $31 M (consists of $12,471,400 - Additional Commuter Rail operating subsidy plus $18,541,000 - Commuter Rail Farebox) Agenda Item 9 217 Fiscal Year 2007/08 Draft Short Range Transit Plans The following information is provided as a summary of each operator’s proposed SRTP: City of Riverside – Special Services Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation dial-a-ride for seniors and persons with disabilities. Service is provided within the Riverside city limits. The special services program functions as an alternative to RTA’s fixed route system for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use fixed route service. All services operated by RSS are closely coordinated with RTA. Following are the highlights of services planned for FY 2007/08: • In an effort to market its program, a new brochure will be distributed educating and promoting service to senior centers and various housing complexes; • During the year, six new dial-a-ride vehicles will be received as part of the bus replacement program; and • Due to a shortage of drivers, the City of Riverside Human Resources and RSS have created a video titled “Live, Work, and Play”. This video advertises the need for drivers. The video is displayed at all Council meetings and on the City’s web page. Riverside Transit Agency The RTA provides both local and regional transportation services. RTA is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency for Western Riverside County and is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the approximately 2,500 square mile service area, providing driver training, and assistance with grant applications. The following are highlights of RTA’s proposed service for FY 2007/08: • RTA will continue to monitor ridership and projects an increase of 3% in FY 2007/08 based on service enhancements; • The agency’s comprehensive operational analysis is projected to be completed within a couple of months. Once finalized, additional service enhancements may occur; • 7.4% increase in the use of the taxi over-flow program; • Operating budget reflects an 11.4% increase (excluding the GASB pre-fund); and • Capital budget of $9,051,321 has been identified. Agenda Item 9 218 SunLine Transit Agency SunLine provides both local and regional transportation services with 12 fixed routes and demand response dial-a-ride services known as SunDial. SunLine is the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the Coachella Valley. SunLine’s service area consists of approximately 1,120 square miles. Following are the highlights of SunLine’s proposed FY 2007/08 SRTP: • Service improvements will be implemented as a result of the agency’s completed comprehensive operational analysis; • SunLine will continue to replace and expand its fleet. During FY 2007/08, a total of 43 vehicles will be purchased through its capital program; • Additional bus shelters and bus benches will be installed throughout the service area to improve and enhance service; • Continue working with local jurisdictions on bus stop issues; • Continue work on environmental assessment, preliminary and final engineering for new administrative building; and • Examine the feasibility of conducting a site selection study to potentially select locations throughout the valley for a transit center, transfer locations and sites for park-and-ride lots. Regional Commuter Rail The Southern California Regional Rail Authority operates seven commuter rail lines with 39 locomotives and 155 commuter rail cars. Three routes, the Riverside to Los Angeles Line, the Inland Empire to Orange County Line (IEOC), and the Riverside to Los Angeles via Fullerton Line (91 Line) directly serve Western Riverside County with connecting service available to destinations on the other four lines. Following are the highlights of the Commuter Rail’s FY 2008/09 SRTP: • Continued implementation of the revised fare structure with an average 3.5% fare increase in FY 2008/09; • Preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside – Moreno Valley – Perris) Metrolink extension project; • Construction of the Perris multimodal transit center; and • Construction of a parking structure at the North Main Corona Metrolink station to meet passenger demand. Agenda Item 9 219 The SRTPs were reviewed and approved by the Commission’s Citizens’ Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council at its May 15, 2007 meeting. Attachments: Short Range Transit Plans FY 2007/08 – FY 2009/10 1) Riverside Special Services 2) Riverside Transit Agency 3) SunLine Transit Agency 4) Commission’s Regional Commuter Rail Agenda Item 9 220 CITY'OF STIDE ort ange EgERVE APR 05 2007 RIVERSIDE COUNTY RANSPORTATION COMMISSION s 20u) n.1 0 year*. Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................................2 SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS ...................................................................................................................................3 RIDER CHARCTERISTICS ..........................................................................................................................................4 PASSENGER AMENITIES ...........................................................................................................................................4 SERVICE RELATED ISSUES ......................................................................................................................................4 REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS ................................................................................5 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION .............................................................................................................................................5 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS ..........................................................................................................................6 NEW SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION ...........................................................................................7 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ..............................................................................................7 EXHIBIT A DIAL-A-RIDE SERVICE AREA ..................................................................................................................8 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY .....................................................................................................................................9 TABLE 2 RSS-DAR SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY .....................................................................................................10 TABLE 3 - SRTP ROUTE STATISTICS .....................................................................................................................11 TABLE 3A - SRTP ROUTE STATISTICS .................................................................................................................12 TABLE 4 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2007/08 ...........................................................................13 TABLE 4A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION - FY 2007/08 ...............................................................................14 TABLE 5 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2008/09-09/10 .................................................................15 TABLE 5A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION - FY 2008/09-09/10 ...............................................................16-17 TABLE 6 PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT ..................................................18-19 TABLE 7 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (PIP) REVIEW ..................................................................20 TABLE 8 HIGHLIGHTS OF SRTP…………………………………………………………………………………………..…21 Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 2 RIVERSIDE SPECIAL SERVICES 2007/2008 - FY 2009/10 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN INTRODUCTION The City of Riverside operates a 24-hour advance registration dial-a-ride for the elderly and persons with disabilities. The City has been operating this service since June 1975. Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates within the 85.6 service area miles of the City of Riverside. Please refer to Exhibit “A” for a map of the service area. Riverside Special Transportation serves as the umbrella for ADA complementary service to RTA’s fixed-route system. RSS provides not only dial-a-ride service, but also provides premium subscription services, which allows unlimited rides per month and Priority Services for ADA participants. Priority service allows bumping rights for ADA eligible participants over dial-a-rides for seniors. Premium “Subscription” services are also provided, but only within the specifications of the ADA guidelines (not to exceed 50% of service). RSS increased fares in July 1, 2006. The current rate for the City of Riverside Passenger fare is $2.00 per passenger one way. Subscription service is $175.00 per month which is included in the farebox recovery. These fares will allow the City to meet and/or exceed minimum farebox requirements established by the Transportation Development Act Funds administered by the Riverside County Transportation Commission. Farebox Requirements of 10% of total operating costs are mandated. The population of the City in 2005 was 300,351 residents, with more than 143,000 passengers utilizing our service. 2000 consensus reports state that senior population for the city is estimated at 24%. RSS operates 25 paratransit alternative fuel medium dial-a-ride vehicles, with only 21 paratransit vehicles in operation daily. Inventory allows for a 16 percent margin for maintenance and mechanical breakdowns. The vehicle inventory is shown in Table 1. During fiscal year, FY 2007-08, the City will be receiving an additional 8 replacement vehicles due to the heavy use. These vans were budgeted in FY 2006/07, and will replace existing vehicles with 100,000 miles and/or that exceeds excessive repairs. All vehicles are equipped with wheelchair lifts, and 8 have video surveillance cameras to give drivers and riders the newest technology to improve safety. All future equipment will have video surveillance cameras installed. Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 3 In Fiscal Year 2007-08 the City of Riverside will be requesting 5 replacement vehicles. These replacement vehicles will replace aging vehicles and relieve maintenance costs challenges. The City provides administrative offices for staff, facilities, training center, dispatching facilities, maintenance facility, and vehicle storage at its corporation yard at 8095 Lincoln Avenue, Riverside, CA 92504. The financial and accounting services are provided by the City’s Finance Department located at 3900 Main Street, Riverside, CA 92501. The Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department Superintendent oversees the program. The day-to-day operations is managed by the Transit Supervisor and the Administrative Analyst provides administrative technical support and budget oversight to maintain the program. SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS CURRENT LEVEL OF SERVICE: A. SERVICE INFORMATION – Dial-A-Ride Currently, the Riverside Special Services Program service hours are as follows: Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Saturday – Sunday 9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. No service is provided on the following holidays: Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. The system continues to operate 24-hour advance reservation service. However, same day service is available on a limited basis for those unable to schedule service 24 hours in advance. ADA eligible riders may book up to 7 days in advance. FY 2005/06 ridership averaged 12,100 passengers per month; 145,223 passengers were served. Of the total passengers served, 50 percent (50%) were represented by combined group of seniors, and ADA certified. Persons with disabilities comprised the remaining 50 percent (50%). Premium subscription services are provided on some trips within the specifications of the ADA guidelines (not to exceed 50%). Based on actual ridership for the first nine months, it is projected that during FY 2006/07, 144,000 passengers will be served, an increase from FY05/06. In FY 05/06 passenger riderhip figures were 145,223. Passenger increase in FY 06/07 reflects changes in marketing the program to senior centers and housing facilities. In fiscal year 2007/08 ridership is expected to increase due to an expanded marketing efforts, scheduling efficiencies, the new “No Show and Cancellation Policy”, and an increase in the City’s population. Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 4 RIDER CHARACTERISTICS Fifty (50%) percent of our riders are senior using the service for routine daily activities, medical appointments, shopping groups, recreational activities, and educational programs. The remaining 50 percent of ridership consists of ADA eligible participants. Of the 50% ADA participants, 17% are clients of the Inland Regional Center. Inland Regional Center clients are using the service primarily for participation in work-study programs, medical appointments and routine social activities. The census qualifies seniors at several brackets. For 62 years and older 27,081 or 10.6%; 65 years and over 23,054 or 9.5%; 75 years and over 11,243 or 4.4%; and 85 years and over 2,823 or 1.1%; for a total population percentage of 24%. RSS determines seniors at age 60. Therefore, based on latest figures and estimates our senior population is estimated at 24% of the City’s total population. PASSENGER AMENITIES No bus stop amenities are provided because we operate a demand response service. SERVICE RELATED ISSUES As one of the fastest growing areas in the State of California, RSS is always striving to achieve to its fullest potential. In reviewing our services issues such as; fleet maintenance, rising fuel costs, alternative fuel vehicles, changing demographics, and its scheduling of rides. Dispatch/scheduling software has been implemented to provide a more efficient and customer service friendly program. The following operational improvements have been achieved: ¾ Improve dispatch and scheduling capabilities ¾ Real time information ¾ Efficient use of resources – has the potential to increase vehicles productivity by facilitating more trip combinations reducing waiting time, by mapping trips together RSS has recently adopted a “No Show and Cancellation Policy” that is modeled after Riverside Transit’s Agency. This policy should increase efficiency and productivity of our services. Cancellations and No Shows reflect over 10% of our service deadhead due to passengers not cancelling or no shows. City staff will continue to be proactive in marketing the City’s transit program. The marketing priorities include: Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 5 ¾ Identify potential ridership ¾ Disseminate transit information to current and potential riders ¾ Explain our service area and new DAR brochure ¾ Provide transit information to schools, hospitals, community centers ¾ Advertise available transit services through various City publications REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS In the City limits of Riverside, service is coordinated with Riverside Transit Agency, which provides our after hours and holiday services in addition to RTA’S fixed-route services. RSS staff continues to participate in committees and tasks forces with a variety of public and private agencies. One member of the City Council is appointed as a member of the Riverside County Transportation Commission and to the Riverside Transit Agency Board of Directors, and the Commission on aging. City staff is represented on the Commission’s Technical Advisory Committee, which meets on a monthly basis to provide recommendations to the Commission on transportation related matters. RSS functions as an alternative to the RTA fixed-route system for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use the fixed route service. RSS provides callers with information on available services that may accommodate their needs and, provides back-up service when fixed-route vehicle lifts malfunction. Administrative staff participate in advisory meetings, such as Quarterly ADA meetings with RTA and other agencies to improve coordination and passenger connections to other service providers within our city boundaries. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Public participation is solicited and encouraged through the following: ¾ RCTC Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council meetings ¾ Riverside City Council meetings ¾ Mayor’s Commission on Aging ¾ City Councils Transportation Subcommittee which meets as necessary to make recommendations regarding transit services for the elderly and persons with disabilities. ¾ Americans Commission of Disability Issues (ACODI) ¾ ADA User Committee quarterly meetings Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 6 ¾ Parks, Recreation and Community Services Commission ¾ Presentations at Senior Housing and Senior Centers; and ¾ Special events sponsored by the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department The public is welcome to attend and encouraged to contact City staff with comments, and/or questions. Public comments serve as an important tool for gauging service improvements. All comments are logged, investigated and reviewed by the appropriate staff person. If requested, a response is provided. RSS recently distributed a customer survey card to all clients. Survey results will be reported monthly to the Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department Parks Commission. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Riverside Special Services adheres to RCTC Performance Standards and reports monthly to RCTC and to FTA. RSS tracks monthly Farebox Recovery Ratio and Passengers Per Hour Performance Criteria for the paratransit service. RSS is in compliance with the PIP mandatory requirements. FY 02/03 Actual FY 03/04 Actual FY 04/05 Actual FY05/06 Actual FY 06/07 Estimate Increase/ Decrease Annual Boardings 160,472 157,828 152,752 143,000 144,000 Increase Cost Per Revenue Hour $47.39 $46.68 $56.76 $65.72 $67.09 Increase Farebox Recovery Ratio 9.16% 10.2% 9.9% 10.0% 12.84% Meeting farebox. Subsidy per Passenger $10.51 $10.30 $12.22 $14.97 $14.08 Decrease Subsidy/Passenger Mile $2.48 $2.53 $3.10 $3.80 $3.52 Decrease Subsidy/Revenue Hour $43.05 $41.90 $51.15 $59.17 $58.47 Decrease Subsidy/Revenue Mile $2.53 $2.53 $3.12 $3.76 $4.22 Increase Passenger/Revenue Hour 4.10 4.07 4.2 4.0 4.2 Increase Passengers/Revenue Mile 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.25 0.30 Increase Riverside Special Services Short Range Transit Plan FY 07/08 04/30/2007 7 NEW SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION One concern has been the rising cost of operating on weekends and holidays. RSS is evaluating the feasibility of eliminating service on weekends and holidays. Weekend and holiday operating costs per revenue hour is substantially higher (100%-200%) on Sunday and major holidays. The reduction and/or elimination of these service hours may increase overall efficiency by reducing operating costs. Activities during the remaining of FY 2006/07 that will enhance ridership and improve efficiencies are ongoing and include: ¾ To provide a service which meets the mobility needs of the elderly and persons with disabilities throughout the City. ¾ To continue to meet or exceed ADA requirements for complementary paratransit in the City of Riverside. ¾ To provide an alternative transit service for persons with disabilities and seniors which is coordinated with services operated by Riverside Transit Agency. ¾ To provide an avenue for passengers to travel (via transfer) to other service areas. ¾ To increase ridership REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS Riverside Special Services Dial-A-Ride vehicles purchased are alternative fuel and lift equipped, and meets all Federal and State requirements, including ADA. Riverside offers priority service to ADA certified passengers and offers ADA complimentary paratransit service with service hours that match the fixed Route provided by Riverside Transit Agency. A zero denial policy to ADA certified passengers is maintained. In compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, no person, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, is excluded from participation in, or is denied of the benefits of, or is subjected to discrimination within the scope of services offered by the City. Exhibit A Riverside Dial-A-Ride Service Area City of Riverside Service Area: 85.6 square miles -RiversideCity Limits 2005 estimatedpopulation283,247 , ~ ~0 \~A ,~ ~ -4 ~1't-1't-~ov i>'GY "'t~ q~~ A~ ~\~ ., o ~4'\t~,~ DOWNTOWN UNIVERSITY AV RCC UCR CENTRAL AV ARL INGTON AV \~ ~-d ~ V'...l.~ ~~ ~ Scale 1"=7900' po N t Map Produced on December 20,2005 by rsmith City of Riverside Special Transportation Services FY 2007/08 -FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE1-FLEETINVENTORY *A -Active,R -Reserve,MR -Major Rehab. **Use NTD Data from prior year ***If year to replace has passed,need explanation of why vehicle was not replaced ****Indicate when vehicle ordered or when vehicle will be delivered Snt2007 Table 1 FleetInventory.xls Year Manufacturer Model Seats Lift-Type Own FR DAR Support Activel Total Total Asset Year to Vehicle Built Equip?of or Vehicle Vehicle Vehicle Reservel Vehicle Veh.Sys.Number Replace Ordered Fuel Lease Rehab*Miles**Failures ID ******* BUSES I I I I I I I I T T T I I I TOTAL:BUSES VANS AND MINI-BUSES 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 110001 1 H224 2006 ADr-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 116.113 2 H225 2006 ADr-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 114602 0 H226 2006 ADr-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 107521 1 H234 2006 ADr-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 108.043 3 H235 2006 Jun-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 116 897 1 H237 2007 Jun-07 2002 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 110379 0 H240 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 123.410 0 H241 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 124666 3 H242 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 111.319 1 H243 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 102919 3 H244 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 119240 3 H245 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 100021 6 H246 2007 Jun-07 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 105165 1 H247 2008 Feb-08 2003 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 100486 1 H248 2008 Feb-08 2004 Goschen Ford 12 Yes LPG Own X Active 115569 0 H249 2008 Feb-08 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 52 346 2 H257 2008 Feb-08 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 47 876 1 H258 2008 Feb-08 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 38031 0 H259 2009 Jan-09 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 34.519 2 H260 2009 Jan-09 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 34 523 0 H261 2009 Jan-09 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 36 345 0 H262 2009 Jan-09 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 34561 0 H263 2009 Jan-09 2005 Eldorado Aerotech 12 Yes CNG Own X Active 35 503 0 H264 2009 Jan-09 TOTAL:VANS AND MINI-BUSES 25 31 SUPPORT VEHICLES I I ***2007 Eldorado I Chevrolet I 6 Yes Gas Own X 2007 Mav-07 I I I ITOTAL:SUPPORT VEHICLES r--~I · -----------..... Imnidt eo...,TI1II5p8IDIiaI Cammissian Table 2 --RSS-DAR --SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes (a)Train Hoursfor Rail Modes.(b)Car Milesfor RailModes. TnlnsTrllck MlInllger"'" 4/4/2007 PlIge:l of :l FY 2004/05 FY 2005/06 FY 2006/07 FY 2006/07 FY 2007/08 Audited Audited Plan 3rd Qtr Actual Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 23 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $2,430,153 $2,626,840 $1,744,702 $3,116,719 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $235,601 $263,000 $224,028 $312,000 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$2,194,552 $2,363,840 $1,520,674 $2,804,719 Operating Characteristics UnlinkedPassenger Trips 152,752 145,223 156,899 107,965 163,750 Passenger Miles 601,843 572,179 647,955 431,860 673,873 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a)36,503.0 36,737.9 39,138.0 26,007.0 43,834.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles(b)598,951.0 578,196.0 662,706.0 360,422.0 755,485.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 654,684.0 667,481.0 692,925.0 423,267.0 784,323.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $66.15 $67.12 $67.09 $71.10 Farebox Recovery Ratio 9.69%10.01%12.84%10.01 % Subsidy per Passenger $15.11 $15.07 $14.08 $17.13 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.84 $3.65 $3.52 $4.16 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$59.74 $60.40 $58.47 $63.99 Subsidy per Revenue Mile(b)$3.80 $3.57 $4.22 $3.71 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a)4.2 4.0 4.0 4.2 3.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile(b)0.26 0.25 0.24 0.30 0.22 Table 3 -SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside --4 FY 2007/08 All Routes Data Elements - ('-J Tnln$Trllck MllnllgBl'''''' 4/30/2007 PlI/1B:t of 2 Peak Passenger Revenue Total Revenue Total Operating Passenger Net Route #Day Type Vehicles Passengers Miles Hours Hours MUes Miles Cost Revenue Subsidy RSS-DAR Total 23 163,750 673,873 43,834.0 46,930.0 755,485.0 784,323.0 $3,116,719 $312,000 $2,804,719 Service Provider Totals 23 163,750 673,873 43,834.0 46,930.0 755,485.0 784,323.0 $3,116,719 $312,000 $2,804,719 Table 3 -SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside --4 FY2007/08 All Routes Perfonnance Indicators Tl'lIn$Tr«k MllnllgBl'"" 4/30/2007 PII!IB2 of 2 Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy PerCostPerCostPerCostPerRecoverySubsidyPerPassengerRevenueRevenue Passengers PassengersRoute#Day Type Revenue Hour Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile Hour Mile Per Hour Per Mile RSS-DAR Total $71.10 $4.13 $19.03 10.01%$17.13 $4.16 $63.99 $3.71 3.7 0.22 Service Provider Totals $71.10 $4.13 $19.03 10.01%$17.13 $4.16 $63.99 $3.71 3.7 0.22 City of RiversideSpecial Transportation ServicesFY 2007/08Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 - Riv-San. BndoSection 5307 - Temecula/ MurrietaSection 5307 - Hemet/San JacintoSection 5307 - Los AngelesSection 5307 - Indo-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5311CMAQTUMFFare BoxOther (2)Local Transportation FundsOperating Assistance$3,016,7192,704,719$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$312,000$0Capitalized PreventativeMaintenance$100,000$0$20,000$0$80,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Subtotal: Operating$3,116,719$2,704,719$20,000$0$80,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$312,000$0Replacement of 5 (LPG)Alternative Fuel MediumDuty DAR VehiclesFY 08-1$500,000$0$85,000$0$415,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Subtotal: Capital$500,000$0$85,000$0$415,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Total: Operating & Capital$3,616,719$2,704,719$105,000$0$495,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$312,000$0(1) Number should tie to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification(2) Please identify source of "Other" funds. 5/7/2007Summary of FY 2007/08 Funds Requested.xls City of Riverside Special Transportation Services FY 07/08 – FY 09/10 Short Range Transit Plan Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 08-1 PROJECT NAME Paratransit Replacement Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (5) Paratransit, lift-equipped 12 passenger alternative fuel vehicles with fareboxes, radios, tiedowns and video cameras. RSS has made a serious commitment to using alternative fuel vehicles to enhance air quality benefits and help in the achievement of air quality goals in Riverside. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In accordance with FTA Circular 9300-1A, the estimated service life of light duty vehicles such as vans is four years or 100,000 miles whichever comes first. The funding split represents 83% Federal – 17% local match. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED Funding Source FY 2008 Section 5307 $ 415,000 STA $ 85,000 Total $500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant RCTC Grant #Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y409-00 RIV050518 Awarded April 2006 $77,000 CA-90-Y536-00 RiV050522 Awarded April 2007 $122,000 City of Riverside Special Transportation ServicesFY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 5 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 - Riv-San. BndoSection 5307 - Temecula/ MurrietaSection 5307 - Hemet/San JacintoSection 5307 - Los AngelesSection 5307 - Indo-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5311CMAQTUMFFare BoxOther (2)Local Transportation FundsOperating Assistance3,275,017$ $2,937,508$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$337,509$0Capitalized Preventative$100,000$020,000$080,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0MaintenanceSubtotal: Operating$3,375,017$2,937,508$20,000$0$80,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$337,509$0Replacement of 6 (CNG)Alternative Fuel MediumDuty DAR VehiclesFY 09-1$600,000$0$102,000$498,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Replacement of Xerox CopierFY 09-2$20,000$0$4,000$16,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Subtotal: Capital$620,000$0$106,000$0$514,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0Total: Operating & Capital$3,995,017$2,937,508$126,000$0$594,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$337,509$0(1) Number should tie to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification(2) Please identify source of "Other" funds. 5/7/2007Summary of Funds RequestedFY 2008/09 FY 2009/10 .xls RIVERSIDE SPECIAL SERVICESSystemwide Performance TargetsFY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan ReviewTable 7: Systemwide Performance TargetsData ElementsFY 2007/08 SRTP Plan (Proposed)FY 2007/08 Target*FY 2007/08 ScorecardProductivity Performance Summary Unlinked Passenger Trips163,750Passenger Miles673,873Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours43,834Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles755,485Total Actual Vehicle Miles784,323Total Operating Expenses$3,116,719Total Passenger Fare Revenue$312,000 Net Operating Expenses$2,804,719Performance IndicatorsMandatory: Operator Comments 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour$71.10√ Meets 2 of 2 mandatory 2. Farebox Recovery Ratio10.01%√ indicators Discretionary: 1. Subsidy Per Passenger$17.13 ØMeets RCTC PIP Program: 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile$4.16 ØMeets 4 of 6 discretionary 3. Subsidy Per Hour$63.99√ indicators 4. Subsidy Per Mile$3.71√ 5. Passengers Per Revenue Hour3.7√ 6. Passengers Per Revenue Mile0.22√ 7. Ridership Goal Increase of 2%**√ 8. Passenger Miles per Revenue CarMiles**Note: Must meet at least 3 out of 6 Discretionary Performance IndicatorLegend: √ = In Compliance Ø = Not in Compliance* Based on FY 2006/07 3rd quarter actuals**Additional Commuter Rail Discretionary TargetsAs of 5/7/2007PIP Performance Targets FY 2007/08 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2003/04 – FY 2005/06 Action(s) Taken And Results 1. Riverside Specialized Services should be more accessible and prominent on the City of Riverside’s website. Information about RSS can be difficult to locate on the City’s home web page. Perhaps a hot link could be added on the city’s homepage or the navigation of the City’s website made easier. Ongoing and scheduled for completion by 12/30/2007. 2. Include all City transit staff in the calculation of full time equivalents (FTE). Current reporting of FTE’s in the annual State Controller Report had only included the drivers and operational staff. Per TDA requirements, FTEs are defined by the total number of employees divided by 2,000 including transit administrative staff. Riverside staff involved with the administration of the transit system as well as the allocation of city mechanics should be included in the FTE calculation. Ongoing and will be discussed with our policy makers. Scheduled for completion by 12/30/2007. 3. Consider advertising on vehicles to raise additional local revenue for the farebox. RCTC’s adopted fare recovery ratio policy allows local support revenue to count towards the farebox. Local revenue in the farebox calculation could include advertising revenues, which could contribute to the City’s mandated farebox ratio of 10 percent. Advertising content might be considered either in the interior or exterior of the vehicles. Will be considered and addressed to our policy makers. TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2003/04 – FY 2005/06 Action(s) Taken And Results 4. Develop and document a standardized complaint handling process. RSS should develop a step-by-step flow chart that outlines the steps for addressing a customer complaint, from the initial phone call taken by the dispatcher, to follow up actions taken by transit staff. A standalone, standardized complaint form should be developed that has sections to be filled out by staff for each step, including the nature of the complaint, who was the complaint forwarded to, actions taken to address the complaint, and if there was follow up communication with the customer. Standardizing and documenting the complaint process ensures a transparent and consistent process for both the transit system and the public. Ongoing project. Scheduled for completion by 12/30/2007. 5. Track the effectiveness of the new “No Show” policy as it relates to changes in ridership and in the number of passenger no shows. RSS should conduct regular analysis of how the policy potentially improves productivity through additional ridership and the number of passengers per hour. Also, if the number of recorded “no shows” decreases in the monthly report to RTA, the trend might be correlated back in part to implementation and enforcement of the policy. Ongoing project. Scheduled for completion by 12/30/2007. City of Riverside Special Transportation Services FY 07/08 – FY 09/10 Short Range Transit Plan Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 09-1 PROJECT NAME Paratransit Replacement Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (6) Paratransit, lift-equipped 12 passenger alternative fuel vehicles with fareboxes, radios, tiedowns and video cameras. RSS has made a serious commitment to using alternative fuel vehicles to enhance air quality benefits and help in the achievement of air quality goals in Riverside. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In accordance with FTA Circular 9300-1A, the estimated service life of light duty vehicles such as vans is four years or 100,000 miles whichever comes first. The funding split represents 83% Federal – 17% local match. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED Funding Source FY 2009 Section 5307 $ 498,000 STA $ 102,000 Total $600,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant RCTC Grant #Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y409-00 RIV050518 Awarded April 2006 $77,000 CA-90-Y536-00 RiV050522 Awarded April 2007 $122,000 City of Riverside Special Transportation Services FY 07/08 – FY 09/10 Short Range Transit Plan Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY 09-2 PROJECT NAME – Purchase of Office Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase office equipment such as copier, cabinets, chairs, etc., for the use of the administrative office needs. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The funds will be used for expenses in keeping the office administration equipment up to standards. The need for a copier, cabinets, chairs, etc., for the use of the administrative staff in the Transit office. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) The copier and office equipment will replace older equipment at the Administration Office for the Transit facility. Funding Source FY 2009 Section 5307 $ 16,000 STA $ 4,000 Total $20,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCEOR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant #RCTC Grant #Description Unexpended balance TABLE 8 – HIGHLIGHTS OF SRTP FOR PRESENTATIONS Highlights of the FY2007-08 Short Range Transit Plan: ¾ Marketing Campaign New Brochure Distributed - Educating and Promoting service to senior centers and complexes Increase Ridership ¾ Equipment Receiving (6) New buses August 2007 and (1) Mini van Support Vehicle May 2007 ¾ Productivity Improvement Program Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour - Meeting Target Subsidy Per Passenger - Non Compliance Subsidy Per Passenger Mile - Non Compliance Subsidy Per Hour - Meeting Target Subsidy Per Hour- Meeting Target - Meeting Target Subsidy Per Mile - Meeting Target Passengers Per Revenue Hour - Meeting Target Passengers Per Revenue Mile - Meeting Target Total Operating Costs Increase high due to 9 month Comparison Between Projected FY06/07 and FY 07/08 – Personnel not at the Level of Staffing – Personnel Shortage Operating & Financial Data FY 2002/03 FY 2003/04 FY 2004/05 FY 2005/06 FY 2006/07 Projected FY 2008 Planned Systemwide Ridership 160,472 157,828 152,752 145,223 143,953 163,750 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hours $45.49 $46.99 $61.81 $68.36 $67.09 $71.10 - Also add summary of PIP analysis & request waiver (if necessary) 21 i i CONTENTS INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................ 1 Purpose of the Short Range Transit Plan........................................................1 SRTP Overview...............................................................................................2 ORGANIZATION............................................................................................................. 4 Service Area.................................................................................................................4 Current Fixed Route and Paratransit Services.............................................................4 System Map..................................................................................................................5 Line 14 - 111............................................................................................................6-18 SunDial Service ..........................................................................................................19 SunBus and SunDial Fare Structure ..........................................................................20 Student Pass for the College of the Desert................................................................21 Population of Coachella Valley...................................................................................22 Fleet Characteristics and Type Fuel Utilized..............................................................24 Existing and Proposed Facilities.................................................................................24 Service Characteristics...............................................................................................25 Rider Characteristics..................................................................................................26 Passenger Amenities..................................................................................................26 Service Related Issues...............................................................................................27 Regional Services and Adjacent Transit Systems......................................................29 Public Participation.....................................................................................................30 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements................................................................30 New Service Implementation and Evaluation.............................................................32 Proposed Service Plan for FY 2007/08 ......................................................................32 Summary of Proposed Service Improvements for FY 2007/08 -Option 1..................33 Summary of Proposed Service Improvements for FY 2007/08 -Option 2..................34 Summary of Revised Proposed Service with Current and New Route Maps ......35-41 Summary of Proposed Service Improvements for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10.......42 Consolidated Transportation Services Agency ..........................................................43 PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Table 1 – Fleet Inventory..........................................................................................44 Table 2 – Ridership Data SunLine SunBus – SRTP Service Summary ...........................................45 SunLine DAR – SRTP Service Summary.................................................46 SunLine Systemwide SRTP Service Summary........................................47 Table 3 – SRTP Individual Route Information and Description Data Elements..........................................................................................48 Performance Indicators ............................................................................49 Table 3A – Individual Route Description....................................................................50 PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL FUNDING REQUEST Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08........................................51 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification .................................................................52-67 Table 5 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 & FY 2009/10.................68 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification ...............................................................69 - 79 TABLE 6 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT.......................................................... 80 TABLE 7 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM............................................ 81 TABLE 8 HIGHLIGHTS OF SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN ................................... 82 INTRODUCTION The Fiscal Year (FY) 2008-2010 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) sets the objectives and strategies for FY 2008 for SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) transit services and capital transit facilities for the Coachella Valley. The SRTP is developed within the context of the regional planning process aimed at implementing SunLine’s participation in the Regional Transportation Plan. Development of the SRTP is an essential step by SunLine’s Board of Directors and staff to fulfill the agency’s mission. The FY 2008-2010 SRTP offers strategies for service and capital programs to achieve the objective of the mission statement. The SRTP will be submitted to the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) for approval and will be the framework for future federal grant applications as required by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). The FY 2008-2010 SRTP covers recommended changes in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) as approved by SunLine’s Board in February 2006. The COA, which was completed in 2005, is the first comprehensive look and analysis of the bus service since 1996. Discussions in later sections of the SRTP highlights recommended service improvements and proposed new routes that will be implemented in FY 2008 and subsequent years. PURPOSE OF THE SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN The SRTP is a three-year capital and operating plan and submitted to SunLine’s Board of Directors for approval and submitted to the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) for approval. RCTC is responsible for the oversight, funding and coordination of all public transportation services in Riverside County. Although the SRTP is a three-year plan, RCTC funds one year, with the remaining two-year of the Plan provided for planning purposes. The SRTP provides information on SunLine’s service and operating characteristics, including the annual budget, which is integrated as part of Riverside County’s portion of the Regional Transportation Improvement Plan (RTIP), State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP), and Federal Transportation Improvement Plan (FTIP). The SRTP also outlines anticipated changes in transit service levels through FY 2010. Over the last five years, the population of Coachella Valley has increased significantly and continues to grow based on recent population estimates released. Demographic profiles prepared from the 2000 census and updates to population figures indicate there are 411,997 permanent residents residing in the Coachella Valley. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) has projected that the population in Coachella Valley will increase to over one million residents by 2035. Additionally, SCAG has forecasted that employment estimates for the valley will double by the year 2035. Based on these projections, the Coachella Valley can expect its population and employment to increase significantly between 2000 and 2035. MISSION STATEMENT To keep the Coachella Valley moving with safe, reliable and accessible public transit and a commitment to balance our fiscal and environmental responsibilities. 1 With the continued growth in the valley, SunLine will continue to evaluate and monitor areas experiencing rapid growth and will need to continue providing transit services that serve regional, sub-regional and local markets. This ensures mobility needs are addressed to provide services connecting residents to major destination points in the valley, as well as other segments of Riverside County. The COA offered recommendations to improve existing routes, as well as provides a framework for future service expansion. SunLine will continue examining the best possible way to: a. Enhance and improve fixed route service (SunBus) b. Improve and expand paratransit service (SunDial) c. Ensure better connectivity between and among all existing and future service routes d. Continue coordination of land use planning and transportation planning policies with the jurisdictions to establish transit-friendly developments in the valley. SRTP OVERVIEW The SRTP offers detailed information about existing services and facilities, financial forecasts and plans, planned and proposed improvements to be implemented in FY 2007/08. SunLine’s fiscal year starts from July through the end of June of the following year. The SRTP consists of eight segments with a summary of each area presented below. Existing Conditions This section provides an overview of the history of public transit service provided in Coachella Valley and include a description of the service area, fare structure, current population, fleet size, and facilities. It also contains information on current service levels and outlines projected service levels for FY 2007/0. This section also includes system- wide ridership data for SunBus and SunDial, projected growth, equipment and other significant issues. It also offers information on rider characteristic; destinations served, trip purposes, and discusses existing amenities, recommended improvements in SunLine’s service area. It also discusses proposed plans to improve service related issues and how SunLine interacts with other regional agencies to improve coordination of and connections to other service providers in the valley. It also highlights SunLine’s public participation process and adherence to regulatory requirements. New Service Implementation and Evaluation This section provides a summary of recommended service improvements, which includes type of service, time-line for implementation, area of coverage, projected ridership, increased service hours and revenue miles, and how SunLine intends to evaluate performance of new service routes. Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) This section describes the agency’s coordinated efforts as a Coordinated Transportation Service Agency and activities undertaken to promote coordination of social service transportation in the valley. 2 Table 1 Fleet Inventory Information in the table provides a summary of vehicles in the fleet and planned purchases for replacements and expansion buses for fixed route and paratransit services, as well as replacement and expansion support vehicles. Table 2 Ridership Data Information in this table presents ridership data for fixed route and paratransit service. The information contains fleet characteristics, financial data, operating characteristics and performance characteristics for transit service offered in the valley. It also outlines SunLine’s performance indicators and trends, including SunBus and SunDial ridership, operating cost per revenue hour, farebox recovery ratio, subsidy per passenger, subsidy per passenger mile and hour, subsidy per revenue miles and hours, and passengers per revenue mile and hour. Table 3 and 3A Individual Route Information and Description Tables 3 and 3A highlights individual route information and provides a description on each route and areas that are served along various routes throughout the Coachella Valley. Table 4 Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08 Table four is a summary of operating and capital funding requested to operate transit services and implement capital transit projects proposed for FY 2007/08. Table 5 Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10 Information in this table provides a summary of projected estimates for operating and implementing capital transit projects for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10. Table 6 Triennial Performance Audit Table 6 discusses progress on SunLine’s performance on the State Triennial Audit conducted in FY 2006/07 and summarizes actions to be taken to address any findings during the audit. Table 7 Systemwide Performance Targets Table seven highlights result of system wide performance based on the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) reaffirmed by the Commission in 2006. Table 8 Highlights of Short Range Transit Plan Table provides highlights of the SRTP. 3 THE ORGANIZATION SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) is a Joint Powers Authority created in 1977 to provide public transit service to its member cities and unincorporated areas of Riverside County. Member cities consist of Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, Coachella; and the unincorporated communities of Thelma, Mecca, Oasis, Bermuda Dunes, and Thousand Palms. SunLine’s Board of Directors is made up of elected officials from the member cities and Riverside County, and provides policy direction to the General Manager and staff. The Board meets monthly on the fourth Wednesday of each month and may meet more than once during the month to address pressing operational and budgeting issues, if necessary. SERVICE AREA SunLine’s service area covers an area of 1,120 square miles and provides service throughout the Coachella Valley. The agency is located approximately 120 miles east of the Los Angeles Basin, 60 miles east of the Riverside/San Bernardino Inland Empire, between the San Gorgonio Pass on the west and the Salton Sea on the southeast. The System Map is shown on page 5. CURRENT FIXED ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICES Fixed Route Service SunLine’s fixed route service, SunBus, consists of 13 routes that connect the valley from Desert Hot Springs to Mecca over 1,120 square miles. Buses run 363 days a year depending on the route, with no service operated on Thanksgiving and Christmas. In addition to 11 regular fixed routes operated by SunLine, the agency also operates two other routes which are funded by the City of Palm Desert. Service Policies Generally, SunLine’s span of service starts from 4:30 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. seven days a week. Buses operate every 25 to 120 minutes, depending on the service and with the headways varying by time of day, as well as by route. SunBus is a modified pulse system and combines traditional route planning with timed transfers. Line 111 is the major trunk line and extends from Indio in the east to Palm Springs in the west, with 12 bus routes feeding into it. Service on each route is discussed on the next several pages, beginning on page 6. 4 5 LINE 14: DESERT HOT SPRINGS/PALM SPRINGS Line 14 serves the cities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs. The route connects to Line 24 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 30 (Cathedral City/Palm Springs), Line 23 (Palm Springs), Line 31(Thousand Palms/Rancho Mirage/Cathedral City/Palm Springs), and Line 111 (Highway 111). The route links riders with local shopping centers, middle and high schools, and other services within the community of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs. The route serves the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Employment Development Department, and various retail centers located along the route. Line 14 operates 21 round trips on a 50-minute headway, five days a week, and 14 round trips operated on weekends on a 75-minute headway. 6 LINE 23: PALM SPRINGS/CATHEDRAL CITY Line 23 is divided into two segments, with the first segment serving residences along Sunrise Way corridor, including the Coyote Run Apartments and the Mizell Senior Center on Ramon Road. This segment of the route operates round trips on a 19-minute headway, Monday through Friday on weekdays only. Service is also provided to the Desert Highland Community Center and connects with Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs/Palm Springs), Line 24 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 30 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), and Line 31 (Thousand Palms/Rancho Mirage/Cathedral City), and Line 111(Highway 111). Current route map of Line 23 is shown. 7 LINE 24: PALM SPRINGS/CATHEDRAL CITY Line 24 offers service to Palm Springs with passengers connecting to Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs/Cathedral City/Palm Springs), Line 23 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 30 (Cathedral City/Palm Springs), Line 31 (Thousand Palms/Cathedral City) and Line 111 (Highway 111). This route links riders to destinations such as the Desert Hospital, Palm Springs International Airport, Palm Springs City Hall, Desert Highland Community Center, middle and high schools, and a number of retail outlets. Line 24 operates 10 round trips on a 90-minute headway. Current route map is shown. 8 LINE 30: CATHEDRAL CITY/ PALM SPRINGS Line 30 is the system's most productive route, providing service to the cities of Cathedral City and Palm Springs. Within these two communities, riders may access the city libraries, city halls, senior centers, Palm Springs and Cathedral City high schools, and various commercial and industrial centers. Line 30 has connections to Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs/Palm Springs), Line 23 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 24 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 31 (Thousand Palms/Cathedral City/Rancho Mirage) and the trunk Line 111 (Highway 111). In April 2006, the Line 30 was modified to operate on a 30-minute headway on weekdays and on a 35-minute headway on weekends. The current route map is shown. 9 LINE 31: THOUSAND PALMS/CATHEDRAL CITY/ RANCHO MIRAGE Line 31 serves the communities of Thousand Palms, Cathedral City and a portion along the City of Rancho Mirage boundary with connections to SunBus Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs/Palm Springs), Line 24 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), and Line 30 (Cathedral City/Palm Springs). Riders are able to access the Cathedral City Library, Post Office, Cathedral City and Mt. San Jacinto High Schools, Palm Springs Air Museum, middle and elementary schools, and various retail centers along the Ramon Road corridor. Routing over the Monterey/I-10 Interchange provides passengers’ access to Costco, Home Depot, Regal Cinemas 16 theater complex and service to the Agua Caliente Casino on Ramon at Bob Hope Drive. Line 31 operates eight round trips weekdays, four in the morning and four in the afternoon. The current route map is shown. 10 LINE 50: PALM DESERT/ RANCHO MIRAGE Line 50 serves the cities of Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage and enables riders on the route to access the Eisenhower Medical Center, College of the Desert, the McCallum Theater, Palm Desert City Hall, Foundation for the Retarded of the Desert, Palm Desert High School, Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage libraries, major shopping centers, including Westfield Shoppingtown, The River, Desert Crossing and El Paseo. Line 50 connects with Line 111 at two locations; at the Westfield Shoppingtown and on Highway 111 at Deep Canyon. Line 50 also connects Line 51 (Shopper Hopper) at Town Center Way. Line 50 is a bi-directional route with a 55-minute headway and operates seven days a week. Both bi-directional trips serve the cities of Palm Desert and Rancho Mirage and operate 16 round trips daily. Current route map is shown. 11 LINE 51: SHOPPER HOPPER – BLUE ROUTE The Line 51 offers free bus service to residents and visitors of the City of Palm Desert to major shopping and retail businesses along Highway 111. The route provides service to the Westfield Shoppingtown, El Paseo, Desert Crossing and the hotels in Indian Wells. Line 51 operates between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. with transfers and connections on El Paseo at The Gardens and at the Westfield Shoppingtown. During the off-season, the route operates on a reduced schedule, five days a week on a 90-minute headway. Seasonal service from November through May offers increased daily service with two vehicles. The map for Line 51 is shown. 12 LINE 52: SHOPPER HOPPER – RED ROUTE Line 52 offers free bus service seven days a week during peak season to residents and visitors of the City of Palm Desert. The route serves the Palm Desert Marriott, College of the Desert Street Fair and the Living Desert, as well as the Westfield Shoppingtown and retail shops along El Paseo Drive. During the off-season, Line 52 operates on a reduced schedule, five days a week on a 90-minute headway. The current route map is shown. 13 LINE 70: LA QUINTA/ BERMUDA DUNES/PALM DESERT Line 70 offers bus service to the communities of La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and Bermuda Dunes. Riders are able to access the City Hall and senior center in La Quinta, local schools, and various retail shopping centers along Washington Street. Line 70 connects with Line 111 on Highway 111 at Washington Street. Line 70 operates 11 round trips on a 80-minute headway, seven days a week. 14 LINE 80: INDIO Serving the City of Indio, Line 80 provides riders access to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices: John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Riverside County Fair & National Date Festival, Employment Development Department, East Valley College of the Desert campus/Riverside County social services complex, Department of Motor Vehicles, Martha's Village & Kitchen, Coachella Valley Cultural Museum, Indio Senior Center and library, local schools, and various retail shopping centers within the community. Connections to the Line 90 (Coachella/Indio), Line 91 (Coachella/Thermal/ Mecca/Oasis) and the trunk Line 111 can be made at Division II located on Highway 111 and Flower Street in Indio. Line 80 operates bi-directionally on a 60 minute headway, seven days a week. Both bi-directional trips operate 17 round trips daily. The current map is shown. 15 LINE 90: COACHELLA/INDIO Line 90 serves the cities of Coachella and Indio, which allow passengers to access the Employment Development Department, the City of Coachella City Hall, library, Police Department, the senior center, Boys & Girls Club, local schools and shopping centers. Connections to the Line 80 (Indio), Line 91 (Coachella/Thermal/Mecca) and the Line 111 occur at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street in Indio. Line 90 operates 34 round trips, seven days a week on a 30-minute headway. The current route map is shown. 16 LINE 91: INDIO/COACHELLA/OASIS/MECCA/THERMAL The Line 91 links together the communities of Indio, Coachella, and the unincorporated areas of Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis. Riders on the Line 91 are able to make connections to Lines 80, 90, and 111 at the transfer location in Indio (Division II). This allows passengers to access employment sites, medical and shopping facilities, and service to the Trump 29 and Fantasy Springs Casinos. Line 91 operates 8 round trips seven days a week, with 4 trips in the morning and 4 trips in the afternoon. The current route map is shown. 17 LINE 111: PALM SPRINGS/INDIO Line 111 offers service along Highway 111 from Palm Springs to Indio, with service also provided to the cities of Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and La Quinta along the corridor. Line 111 is the main trunk route within the system and enables riders to travel to destinations along Highway 111. The route connects to Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs/Palm Springs), Line 23 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 24 (Palm Springs/Cathedral City), Line 30 (Palm Springs/ Cathedral City), Line 50 (Rancho Mirage/Palm Desert), Line 51 (Shopper Hopper), Line 70 (La Quinta/Bermuda Dunes/Palm Desert), Line 80 (Indio), Line 90 (Coachella/Indio), and Line 91 (Indio/Coachella/Thermal/Mecca/Oasis). This route links riders with major retail and commercial centers, recreational attractions, museums, educational facilities, medical institutions, municipal and county services. Line 111 operates 38 round trips Monday through Friday on a 25-minute headway and 23 round trips on Saturday and Sunday on a 44-minute headway. 18 SUNDIAL SERVICE SunLine paratransit service, SunDial, is a curb-to-curb service designed to meet requirements of the American Disabilities Act (ADA), signed into law in 1990. SunDial provides complementary demand-response next day service to those unable to use fixed route service. Certified riders who have the ADA Certification Identification Cards are eligible to use SunDial for their transportation needs, including medical appointments, shopping, and other social activities. SunDial service is available within ¾ miles on either side of the existing SunBus system. 19 SUNBUS AND SUNDIAL FARE STRUCTURE SunLine’s current fare structure consists of four fare groups: adult, youth, Senior (60+) and disabled. All SunLine fixed route passengers pay the adult fare unless they are eligible for discounted fares, which are only available to seniors, disabled and youth. SunLine offers two fare payment options: cash and passes. Fares are free for children 4 years and younger. SunLine’s current fare structure was adopted by the Board in December 2005. The table below represents SunLine’s current fare structure that was implemented in January 2006. SUNBUS FARE STRUCTURE TYPE OF FARE FARE CATEGORY FIXED-ROUTE FARES ADULT (18 YRS – 59 YRS) YOUTH (5 YRS – 17 YRS) SENIOR 60+/ DISABLED/MEDICAID Cash/Base Fare $1.00 $.85 $.50 Transfers $.25 $.25 $.25 Monthly Pass $34.00 $24.00 $17.00 Day Pass $3.00 $2.00 $1.50 10-Ride Pass (w/out transfers) $10.00 $8.50 $5.00 10-Ride Pass (with transfers) $12.50 $11.00 $6.00 GO Pass * (Summer Pass for Youths) $30.00 Employee Pass $24.00 *GO PASS is a Summer pass sold for travel on SunBus by youths during months of June, July and August SUNDIAL FARE STRUCTURE TYPE OF FARE SINGLE RIDE MULTIPLE RIDES (10-RIDE) SunDial 10-Ride Pass (fares w/in cities) $1.50 $2.00 SunDial 10-Ride Pass (fares between cities) $15.00 $20.00 *SunDial fares pertain to ADA Certified Clients 20 STUDENT PASS FOR THE COLLEGE OF THE DESERT To encourage more students at the College of the Desert (COD) to use the transit system, SunLine is considering implementing a Student Pass for COD students. SunLine Planning staff have met with senior management of COD to begin discussion on how best to proceed with implementing a student pass program that will benefit COD students. COD senior management have indicated that they are interested in working with SunLine staff to implement the pass program. In February 2007 both staff from SunLine and COD attended a workshop organized by the Riverside Transit Agency in Riverside on implementing student passes for college students. SunLine continues to research student pass programs throughout the nation and will utilize data compiled to implement a pilot project in conjunction with COD. SunLIne plans to continue working with COD senior management on how best to develop a new student pass program for COD students and hopes to implement the new program for Fall 2008. This will be in conjunction with providing direct transit service to the COD campus in Palm Desert in September 2008. Additionally, based on successful implementation of the COD student pass program, SunLine will consider a similar program for the Palm Desert branch of the University of California in Riverside and the California State University in San Bernardino branch also in Palm Desert. 21 POPULATION OF COACHELLA VALLEY According to recent data released by the State Department of Finance and published by Wheeler’s in a report titled “Demographic Profiles of the Coachella Valley”, the valley’s population grew by 4.3% over a one year period, from January 1, 2005 to January 1, 2006. The gain in population shows an increase of 29.5% since the 2000 census and a 78% increase since the 1990 census were conducted. The report also shows significant gains in population for all cities and the unincorporated communities in the valley. Coupled with the data released by Wheeler’s, projections by Riverside County and the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) in association with member cities indicates the population of Coachella Valley will increase to over one million people by 2035. Based on the report, Coachella Valley cities with the most gains are Coachella and Indio. The unincorporated areas will also see substantial increases in the number of people in their communities. Additionally, the report projects increases in the number of households and employment by the year 2035 with the growth of jobs in the valley expected to grow through 2035. The population figures listed below profiles the valley’s population estimates along with that of Riverside County. As shown, Coachella Valley will continue to grow and the demand for transit service will continue to increase especially in the eastern part of the valley, where most residents are dependent on public transit for their mobility needs. Population Profiles 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Riverside County 1,545,387 1,931,200 2,242,744 2,509,330 2,809,006 3,090,001 3,343,770 3,596,681 Valley Cities 259,468 330,358 393,470 448,464 496,628 540,744 581,561 620,031 Unincorp. 59,910 70,069 84,478 110,641 180,131 247,644 306,742 381,850 Coachella Valley 319,378 400,427 477,948 559,105 676,759 788,388 888,303 1,001,881 Source: Riverside County and Coachella Valley Association of Governments Individual Population Estimates for Cities in Coachella Valley and Unincorporated Communities POPULATION VALLEY CITIES 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Cathedral City 42,647 51,303 55,745 60,293 65,222 69,431 74,052 76,836 Coachella 22,781 33,268 46,981 60,759 75,540 90,121 104,703 119,303 Desert Hot Springs 16,682 20,874 39,539 50,836 55,894 60,817 65,723 70,311 Indian Wells 3,992 4,865 5,309 5,708 6,025 6,311 6,523 6,711 Indio 49,116 69,482 77,967 86,889 93,115 99,476 105,873 112,019 La Quinta 23,929 37,564 45,272 50,049 52,922 54,787 56,440 57,937 Palm Desert 44,265 49,843 54,435 59,588 64,860 67,206 70,303 73,131 Palm Springs 42,807 46,474 49,239 51,756 56,287 60,499 65,403 70,854 Rancho Mirage 13,249 16,685 18,983 22,586 26,763 32,096 32,541 32,847 Total 259,468 330,358 393,470 448,464 496,628 540,744 581,561 620,031 22 The Charts below show projected growth in population, households and employment in the Coachella Valley by 2035. Figure 1 represents population and employment projections while Figure 2 depicts projected population, households and employment together. Figure 1: Coachella Valley Population and Employment Growth Projections Figure 2: Coachella Valley Population, Households and Employment Growth Projections 0 200,000 400,000 600,000 800,000 1,000,000 1,200,000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Population Employment 0 200,000 400,000 600,000 800,000 1,000,000 1,200,000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Population Employment Households 23 FLEET CHARATERISTICS AND TYPE FUEL UTILIZED Currently, SunLine has 74 buses in its fleet, including 51 fixed route and 23 demand response vehicles. Additionally, there are 27 support vehicles that are used for various activities in support of services provided in the Coachella Valley. In 1994, SunLine purchased 34 buses to run bus service offered in the valley. The buses purchased in 1994 have met their useful lives as defined by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Regulation. Furthermore, the fuel tank on these buses will expire in 2009 and based on evaluation of existing fleet, it has been determined that there is a need to expedite the purchase of replacement buses to ensure SunLine meets both federal and state regulations. In 2004, SunLine implemented its Bus Replacement Program in order to begin replacing buses in the fleet that have met their useful life. FTA mandates replacing buses that have mileage in excess of 500,000 and/or are over 12 years for 40ft buses, and 30ft or smaller buses that have mileage in excess of 100,000 and over 4 years. As part of this process, SunLine ordered 15 fixed route buses in 2005 which were received in 2006. In 2006, staff ordered 16 additional fixed route buses to replace older vehicles in the fleet. In addition to replacing fixed route buses, SunLine will also begin ordering more demand response buses used for paratransit service. Funds were programmed in the FY 2005, 2006, and 2007 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) to purchase replacements buses used for both fixed route and paratransit services. In FY 2007/08, SunLine plans to request funding to purchase more replacement buses, as well as replacement vehicles for the support vehicles. Given the recommended Preferred Service Plan (PSP) in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA), staff will also request funds to purchase expansion buses for improved and new service routes that will be implemented in FY 2008 and FY 2009. This is in addition to expansion buses programmed for FY 2006/07. EXISTING AND PROPOSED FACILITIES With the projected growth to the system, as well as expansion of the current bus service, it was determined that the existing facility in Thousand Palms will not meet SunLine’s need as the system grows. In 2002, SunLine acquired property in Thousand Palms close to its current head office to expand its Administration, Operational and Maintenance (AOM) Building. The existing maintenance facility and garage will not be able to handle the additional vehicle capacity and maintenance equipment. SunLine is also requesting funding in the SRTP to make improvements to its facility in Indio. SunLine requested funding in the FY 2006/07 SRTP for the environmental, architectural, engineering services, as well as the development of a Master Plan for the proposed new facility in Thousand Palms. The new AOM Building, when completed, will be energy efficient and will include state-of-the-art equipment with the latest technology. The project will be phased and SunLine is requesting for additional state and local funding in this year’s SRTP and plans to request more funding in FY 2008/09 for construction of the facility. SunLine continues to work on getting more federal funds for construction of the building. SunLine is also proposing to conduct a site selection study to select sites in the Coachella Valley for transit centers and/or transfer locations, and Park and Ride Lots as recommended in the COA. The findings and results of the COA recommends extending 24 Line 111 to the City of Coachella, as such, SunLine will examine feasible locations for construction of a transit center. Staff will also look at the possibility of selecting potential sites for transfer locations throughout the valley or work with the jurisdictions on joint development opportunities. Staff may also undertake planning activities to examine the feasibility of selecting potential sites for Park and Ride Lots through the service area. SERVICE CHARACTERISTIECS SunLine operates 13 fixed routes which serve various segments of the valley, from the unincorporated areas of Mecca, Thermal and Oasis in the eastern part of the valley to Palm Springs and Desert Hot Springs. The total number of routes operated also includes two routes that are funded by the City of Palm Desert. Line 111 is the main trunk line with all routes feeding into and/or connecting to Line 111 at strategic points along the Highway 111 corridor. Current level of service is at the same level of service that has been offered for the last couple of years. SunLine plans to improve headways on selected bus routes with strong ridership demand, including Line 111 in FY 2007/08 and continue with these improvements in FY 2008/09. Additional discussion on the proposed service changes are provided on pages 69 and 70. Vehicle miles traveled in Coachella Valley are on the rise and will continue to rise as more development activities and construction projects are undertaken by local jurisdictions. Such activities impact daily service provision as it forces SunLine to detour buses to minimize impacts to bus service. Current service levels in the valley need to be improved to ensure that use of the system do not decline. Overall, the SRTP recommends improvements over the current service levels to ensure the relative share of transit usage improves. SunLine currently provides the same level of service as provided in FY 2005/06; although, minor headway changes were made during the second quarter of FY 2006/07 to Line 30, as well as modified the schedule for Line 31 to ensure schedule adherence and better connection to Line 30. In FY 2005/06, SunLine provided service to over 3.5 million passengers system-wide. For fixed route service, SunLine offered service to 3,474,361 riders, indicating an increase of 4.2% over ridership in FY 2004/05. Paratransit service ridership decreased by 5% in FY 2005/06 when compared to ridership in FY 2004/05. However, the combined system-wide ridership on both fixed route and paratransit was 3,558,317 indicating an increase of 4% when compared to system-wide ridership in FY 2004/05. The decrease in ridership for paratransit service could be attributed to staff’s effort to streamline the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Certification Process to ensure that only ADA Certified passengers use the paratransit service provided in the Coachella Valley. In February 2006, the Board of Directors approved recommendations in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) completed in December 2005. It was estimated that the Preferred Service Plan (PSP) in the COA will attract 64% more ridership after implementing the PSP. Overall, ridership is projected to increase on routes such as Lines 30 and 111. Additionally, it is estimated that ridership on Lines 32, 92 and 93 will increase based on the realignment of existing routes Lines 31 and 91. With the proposed service improvements, it is recommended that SunLine purchase expansion buses to implement the PSP. The number of buses needed will vary based on the level of service being implemented. The type of buses needed will entail a 25 combination of 30ft and 40ft buses depending on the type of service. Additional buses will also be purchased for expansion of paratransit service. In addition, SunLine will continue to purchase replacement buses for both fixed route and paratransit services. RIDER CHARACTERISTICS SunLine conducted a passenger survey as part of the COA to determine demographics of its ridership and also to assess passengers’ transit needs. The survey indicates SunLine riders fall into 4 categories: workers, students, seniors and visitors, of which seventy-one percent are employed or students. Seventy-nine percent are low income, transit dependent, and use SunBus five or more days. The results indicate the typical rider is an English speaking, Hispanic person between the ages of 23 to 65, with an average income of $20,000. Work and school are the overriding trip generators, followed by shopping, medical care and recreation. The COA indicates commute trips within Coachella Valley are concentrated in Palm Desert, with twenty-three percent of all work trips ending in the City of Palm Desert. Data compiled for trip purposes in the COA indicates that the commuting patterns are focused in Palm Desert with most passengers traveling from Cathedral City to Palm Desert, Palm Springs to Palm Desert, Indio to Palm Desert, and La Quinta to Palm Desert. The COA also suggests a strong commuting connection between La Quinta and Indio, and between Coachella and Indio. The COA results states that most commute trips occur along Highway 111 and with most destination served directly by Line 111. Desert Hot Springs is served with direct connection to Palm Springs on Line 14. PASSENGER AMENITIES Bus Shelters/Bus Stops With over 600 bus stops and 192 bus shelters located at bus stops throughout its service area, SunLine continues to examine ways to improve and enhance transit amenities in the system. Bus stops are cleaned and maintained on a regular basis with the cost of maintaining the bus shelters offset by revenue generated from the Bus Shelter Advertisement Program. Solar lights have been installed at remote bus shelter locations to address and improve upon safety concerns at bus shelters installed in rural and non-rural areas where electricity may not be readily available. Recommendations in the COA addressed the need to enhance existing bus stops by adding more bus shelters throughout the service area, as well as install more bus shelters along future transit service routes that will be offered in the valley. Staff is requesting funding in this year’s SRTP to purchase more bus shelters to continue the improvements of and enhancement to bus stops system-wide. As recommended in the COA, SunLine staff has completed the Transit Facilities Design Manual which was approved by the Board of Directors in December 2006. On-Board Passenger Amenities SunLine buses have electronic designation signs, which show the route number, route name, and destination. All buses have display racks for public announcements and notices and route schedules. Passengers can request the buses to stop by ringing bells located within their reach without leaving their seats. Air conditioning and heating are also provided for the passengers’ comfort. 26 Bicycle Facilities SunLine’s fixed route buses have bike racks mounted on the exterior of the buses which provide bicyclists the opportunity to use alternate mode for traveling by combining bicycling and riding the bus. By combining bicycling and riding the bus, riders can increase the range of options for using other modes of transportation for their mobility needs. SunLine has requested funding in the FY 2007/08 SRTP to purchase and install bicycle lockers and stationary bike racks at selected transfer locations to encourage more residents to bicycle and ride the bus. SERVICE RELATED ISSUES During the remaining period of FY 2006/07 and throughout FY 2007/08, SunLine will need to address service related issues that continue to impact public transportation provided in the Coachella Valley. Among issues to be addressed is continued communication and dialogue with the jurisdictions on how best to work together to curtail the impact of construction projects on transit service. Given the continued increase in population and vehicular traffic, some of the key issues that SunLine faces include need for improved frequencies of existing routes. This ensures that the service provided can move passengers as quickly as possible to get them to their destinations. To address this issue, SunLine staff continually evaluates the performance of bus service with respect to ridership, vehicle loadings, on-time performance and other measures of service quality. To better address this issue, SunLine’s Planning staff is considering implementing a Service Improvement Program (SIP) that will help identify routes and route segments that may need to be improved. Staff believes it will also help in verifying community areas that should be slated for route structuring, realignment and improvement that is identified in the SRTP. The SIP is intended to maximize the effectiveness of SunLine services and will serve two purposes. First, it will ensure that resources are used to produce the greatest amount of service possible by allocating unproductive service resources to new or improved service. Second, it will also ensure that adequate efforts are undertaken to improve performance before elimination of poor performing service routes. The keys to having the SIP are aggressive target marketing and market research. The SIP will allow SunLine staff to develop specific improvement plans for each targeted route or segment. SunLine’s Service Improvement Plan will include an annual review of existing service and identification of target routes. The target route identification will be based on the Productivity Improvement Program which ensures that a common standard is applied to all routes. On average, some routes will fall below this standard and will be identified as target routes for improvements. The process will entail using data in TransTrack to determine which routes are meeting the performance indicators and which routes are not performing. Based on the results, staff will begin ridership checks on the buses to determine which segments of the routes should be targeted for further marketing to encourage and increase ridership on the route. Although the COA analyzed ridership, demographic changes, growth trends and development in the valley, SunLine staff will need to evaluate and continue to improve routes as they fall below the established standards. 27 The next step in the SIP will be developing an improvement plan for each targeted route, which will be implemented and afforded ample time to show results. The results will be closely monitored and evaluated after a specific time frame. Targeted routes that meet the performance standard will be left unchanged and those that do meet the performance standard are analyzed further with additional improvement strategies pursued. If the targeted routes do not show any improvements, they may be considered for elimination. Through the SIP, SunLine will continue to refine its service planning process, which will have four main thrusts. • Engaging the public in building a public transportation system that meets their needs. • Continued evaluation of new and existing service performance • Implementing strategies for improved performance • Reinvesting resources of unsuccessful services which is consistent with SunLine’s overall service concept and goal to make service more efficient and cost effective. To that effect, SunLine is considering improving its Service Planning Process which will be managed by the Planning Department and reviewed and approved by the General Manager and the Board. This will provide the framework for a more coordinated and comprehensive review of existing and proposed service, as well as offer increased opportunities for community involvement in service development. Furthermore, it ensures that operating efficiency and cost effectiveness is maintained. To that end, SunLine Planning staff has begun the process of collecting ridership data by route and by bus stop that will be analyzed as part of the planning process. This is very important since it will help facilitate the development of service changes and also provides the ability to assess overall effectiveness of the system to deliver high quality and efficient service. Data collection will occur all year, with the compilation and analysis of data potentially completed throughout the year depending on the type of changes to be made. Currently, bus ridership is collected through the electronic fareboxes on buses; however, checking ridership by route and stop will help in our efforts to collect additional data to help with service improvements. SunLine plans to install Automated Passenger Counters (APC) on the buses to help with data collection on the routes and especially at bus stops. The benefit of implementing the SIP and the improved Service Planning Process helps to improve transit ridership by increasing headways on routes with strong ridership demand. Additionally, it assists staff in enhancing local and regional connectivity by integrating routes and mode connections with schedules that will facilitate service efficiency. Service Reliability and On-time Performance On time performance of the bus system is very important to SunLine’s passengers. Over the last several years, due to increased traffic congestion along some of the major arterials in the valley, bus schedule adherence has been impacted. If SunLine buses do not operate on schedule, many people will not choose to use them. Reliable service is the key to customer satisfaction and SunLine strives to provide service on time. To help 28 with this effort, SunLine is in the process of purchasing APC for installation on the buses. These devices will collect time and location data that SunLine can use to track on-time performance of the routes that an APC equipped travels during the day. The APC equipped buses will be rotated through the system so that each route SunLine operates has an APC equipped bus on it for at least one or two weeks of the month, and will have the ability to capture time point events for the specified time frame. The goal is to provide information on the routes by weekday and weekend, as well as collect data on ridership at each bus stop. The data collected by bus stop will help with SunLine’s effort in improving bus stops, and assist staff in selecting bus stop locations with high ridership for enhancement. Transit Security Other service related issues include improving the security and safety of SunLine employees and passengers. In August 2006, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient, Transportation Equity Act, A Legacy of Users (SAFETEA-LU) was passed into law, which continues to require that one percent of Section 5307 apportionments be spent on projects that improve transit security. These improvements may include items such as increased lighting at bus stops, installation of surveillance camera within or adjacent to the transit system, provision of emergency communication links, security analysis studies, salaries and contracts for personnel involved exclusively in security, and any other project intended to increase the security and safety of the transit system. SunLine will continue to purchase and install security equipment to improve the security and safety of employees, as well as passengers. Additional equipment will be purchased to improve bus stops throughout the service area. REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS SunLine participates in the regional planning process and works with other agencies and organizations in the region to ensure bus riders are aware of transit services provided throughout the region. SunLine rider information is published in neighboring agencies' rider's guides and also distributes the Riverside County Transportation Commission’s Free Guide Transportation Freedom Brochure. SunLine also examined the feasibility of providing transit service to other parts of the County but it was determined that there was not enough demand to start offering service outside the valley. Currently, Greyhound and other intercity bus companies provide service that connects Coachella Valley residents to areas beyond the valley. Amtrak also operates limited service that is geared toward connecting residents with trips to different parts of the nation. Although results from the COA outlined the need to provide service to areas outside the Coachella Valley, to places such as the Salton Sea, Cabazon, the cities of Banning and Beaumont; and the Counties Riverside and San Bernardino. It was determined that the proposed service would likely need to carry a large number of commuters for an interregional service to be successful. Providing transit service for shopping and tourist trips may be sufficient to maintain regular service that SunLine could operate successfully. SunLine continues to evaluate and monitor the need for transit service to these areas and based on funding availability, the agency may consider offering transit service to areas outside of the valley. 29 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION SunLine seeks public input for service changes, fare changes and related agency business. Public notices are published in local and regional newspapers, as well as placed in buses and at bus shelters, and posted on our website to make information more accessible to the community. Public comments are accepted at each Board meeting. Customer comments are accepted Monday through Friday by the Customer Service Department and on weekends by Dispatchers in the Operations Department. Comments are entered into a database and used in analyzing and responding to trends. SunLine gets additional input from the ACCESS Advisory Committee, through community outreaches and by active involvement in government and civic affairs. Staff continues to work on improving locally defined process for soliciting and considering public input for services provided in the valley. As SunLine continues to plan for service improvements in the next fiscal year and subsequent years, staff plans to work with the local jurisdictions and the community to ensure all input are considered before service changes are implemented. As part of this process, staff intends to work as diligently as possible with the public in the planning process through consideration of service requests and outreach. Currently, SunLine receives service request from private and governmental agencies, interest groups, and the general public, which reflects the fact that the Coachella Valley does not have enough transit service. Although most serious service requests are not implemented immediately because of financial and equipment constraints, staff makes every effort in responding to all request. SunLine responds to each service request, which are then categorized and filed for future reference during the service planning and change process. REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Consistent with ADA Regulations, SunLine is compliant with ADA guidelines. Buses and vans are accessible to passengers using assistive devices. Most Supervisors’ vans are equipped with wheelchair lifts. SunLine continues to work with public works departments in all jurisdictions to retrofit bus stops on a priority basis. SunDial developed an ADA Guidebook to inform passengers about mobility options and to help develop alternative travel skills. This Guidebook, both English and Spanish, is available upon request and is posted on the website. Staff has also updated the ADA Certification application process to clearly define rider’s needs. Audits SunLine has implemented recommendations made by the Macias Consulting Group in FY 2005/06. There are no outstanding findings from the audit conducted by Macias. In FY 2007, the Riverside County Transportation Commission commissioned Pacific Municipal Consultants to conduct a Triennial Performance Audit as part of the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A. The audit has been completed and SunLine is working on the responses to the recommendations provided by PMC. 30 Title VI Title VI Report was updated and submitted to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in July, 2004 for approval, and was approved by FTA. The current document will be updated to include recommendations detailed in the COA. Staff will update the current Title VI report in FY 2008. Charter Bus Service SunLine complies with federal mandate on using federally funded equipment and facilities to provide Charter service, as such, does not provide Charter service. 31 NEW SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION The Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) completed in December 2005 examined existing transit services and recommended restructuring service routes. Results of the market assessment indicate the valley is growing at an extremely accelerated rate and is forecasted to continue growing. Given the continued growth, the COA offers recommendations that will help improve public transportation in the Coachella Valley. The service analysis and public input resulted in a service design concept that will improve the existing service, including system performance, network connectivity, service quality, support of the regional transportation network and smart growth efforts in Coachella Valley. Findings from the COA calls for discontinuing segments of unproductive routes to improve system productivity. Recommended changes in the COA also outlines SunLine’s long range plan to provide transit service to more communities as the area continues to grow and more developments occur. PROPOSED SERVICE PLAN FOR FY 2007/08 Service improvements proposed for implementation in FY 2007/08 include service enhancements that will: • Improve efficiency of the most productive routes ► Frequency improvements on Line 111 for weekdays • Modify service on the least productive routes in the system ► Headway improvement on Lines 31, 70 and 91 • Implement Line 70 in January 2008 of FY 2007/08 • Implement Lines 24 and 32 in May 2008 of FY 2007/08 As part of the service improvements proposed for FY 2007/08, SunLine will implement changes to Lines 31, 70, 91, and 111 to improve frequency and ensure schedule adherence. Additionally, during the latter part of the year, staff will implement two new routes that are recommended in the COA. Although SunLine has ordered expansion buses to implement the new routes; and since it takes up to more than 12 months before the new buses are delivered, staff will have to wait until latter part of the year before implementing the new service routes. This allows staff to complete all necessary activities such as seeking the Board’s approval, holding public hearings, and bus stop enhancements. The information on the next pages provides a summary of proposed changes in FY 2007/08. In addition, staff has included maps of the current and recommended routes that show changes to Lines 24, 32 and 70 as presented in the COA. To ensure SunLine has available funding to implement the proposed changes, two options of the proposed service improvement have been developed and are shown. Option one include improvements to Lines 31, 91, and 111, in addition to implementation of two new routes, Lines 24 and 32. In option two, SunLine is proposing to implement service improvements to Lines 31, 91, and 111 and in addition to the new routes, Lines 24 and 32, we plan to implement improvements to Line 70 as well. However, this will depend on the availability of additional operating funding. 32 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS FOR FY 2007/2008 OPTION 1 A. Planned service improvements for September 2007. LINE CURRENT SERVICE & HEADWAY PROPOSED HEADWAY IMPROVEMENT ESTIMATED SERVICE HOURS ADDED ESTIMATED COST 111 Current headway is 25-minutes. Service provided along Highway 111 corridor. Improve headways on weekdays to 20- minutes. Will continue to operate along Highway 111. Added 985 hours Estimated cost is $632,419 31 Serves Thousand Palms, Rancho Mirage, Palm Springs and Cathedral Existing headway for the route is 125 minutes. Route will continue to operate on its current routing with more trips added. Headway improved to 60 minutes. Added 259 hours Estimated cost is $411, 255 91 Existing route offers four (4) trips in the morning and afternoon. Current headway is 85-minutes. Route will continue to operate on its current routing with more trips added. Headway improved to 60 minutes. Added 201 hours Estimated cost is $272,899 B. Proposed Service improvements for January 2008 and May 2008 in FY 2007/08. Line CURRENT SERVICE & HEADWAY PROPOSED HEADWAY IMPROVEMENT ESTIMATED SERVICE HOURS TO BE ADDED ESTIMATED COST 24 Combined Lines 23 & 24 into new Line 24. Current headway 135 minutes for Line 23. New route will operate on a 30 minutes headway Hours to be added are 150. Cost is estimated at $252,376. 32 Line 32 will replace existing Line 31, which has headway of 125 minutes. New route will operate on a 60 minutes headway Hours to be added are 458 Cost is estimated at $885,040 33 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS FOR FY 2007/2008 OPTION 2 B. Planned service improvements for September 2007. LINE CURRENT SERVICE & HEADWAY PROPOSED HEADWAY IMPROVEMENT ESTIMATED SERVICE HOURS ADDED ESTIMATED COST 111 Current headway is 25-minutes. Service provided along Highway 111 corridor. Improve headways on weekdays to 20- minutes. Will continue to operate along Highway 111. Added 985 hours Estimated cost is $632,419 31 Serves Thousand Palms, Rancho Mirage, Palm Springs and Cathedral Existing headway for the route is 100/125 minutes. Route will continue to operate on its current routing with more trips added. Headway improved to 60 minutes. Added 259 hours Estimated cost is $411, 255 91 Existing route offers four (4) trips in the morning and afternoon. Current headway is 85-minutes. Route will continue to operate on its current routing with more trips added. Headway improved to 60 minutes. Added 201 hours Estimated cost is $272,899 B. Proposed Service improvements for January 2008 and May 2008 in FY 2007/08. Line CURRENT SERVICE & HEADWAY PROPOSED HEADWAY IMPROVEMENT ESTIMATED SERVICE HOURS TO BE ADDED ESTIMATED COST 24 Combined Lines 23 & 24 into new Line 24. Current headway 135 minutes for Line 23. New route will operate on a 30 minutes headway Hours to be added are 150. Cost is estimated at $252,376 32 Line 32 will replace existing Line 31, which has100/125 minutes. New route will operate on a 60 minutes headway Hours to be added are 458 Cost is estimated at $885,040 70 Serves residents of La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and Bermuda Dunes. Current headway is 80 minutes. New route will be realigned to operate along Miles Avenue and Adams Street. Hours to be added are 30 Cost is estimated at $16,588 34 A. PROPOSED REVISED SERVICE ON LINE 24 The recommended service changes to Line 24 entails combining existing routes, Lines 23 and 24. Current service on Line 23 consist of two trips in the morning and two trips also in the afternoon to residents in Cathedral City and Palm Springs, in addition to public transit service to a number of schools along the route. Current Line 23 Map 35 Current Line 24 Map The existing Line 24 operates on a 90-minute headway and serves residents of Palms Springs. Additionally, service is provided to the Desert Regional Medical Hospital, Palm Springs International Airport, Desert Highland Community Center, the Mall, City Hall, and schools on the route. 36 Proposed Revised Line 24 The proposed revised service on the new Line 24 will be a Community-based service route and will operate in the City of Palm Springs. The frequency will be improved to 30 minutes and will provide bi-directional service on Rosa Parks Road, as well as continue to offer service to schools. The route will operate on a 60-minute headway and would require one vehicle. 37 B. CURRENT SERVICE ON LINE 31 The existing Line 31 serves the cities of Rancho Mirage, Cathedral City, and Thousand Palms. It operates four trips in the morning and four trips in the afternoon, with selected trips deviating to serve to schools in Cathedral City. Findings in the COA recommend discontinuing service on segments of the route as they are not productive. The map shown below is the current route, with the proposed route map shown on the next page. Current Line 31 Map 38 Proposed Line 32 Map Line 32 has been proposed to replace Line 31 and will operate as sub-regional route. The current frequency will be improved to 60 minutes, with service provided to the cities of Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Cathedral City and Rancho Mirage. The map below shows the proposed route realignment. The route will operate on a 60-minute headway and would require three vehicles. 39 C. CURRENT SERVICE ON LINE 70 Line 70 offers bus service to the communities of La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and Bermuda Dunes. Riders are able to access the City Hall and senior center in La Quinta, local schools, and various retail shopping centers along Washington Street. Line 70 connects with Line 111 on Highway 111 at Washington Street. The route operates on a 80-minute headway. 40 Proposed Revised Service on Line 70 Line 70 will continue on its current routing except for minor changes to deviate the bus to serve retail shops along Adam Street. Additionally, staff is considering realigning the route to serve residences on Miles Avenue, and La Quinta High School on Adam Street. The route will also be expanded to offer frequent service in Bermuda Dunes and Country Club Drive. The improved service will operate on a 60-minute headway and would require two vehicles. 41 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS FOR FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10 PROPOSED SERVICE PLAN FOR FY 2008/09 • Extend Line 111 to the City of Coachella and improve headways to 15 minutes • Improve frequency on Lines 14, 50, 80 and 90. • Implement Line 15 in the Desert Hot Springs, and Lines 92 and 93 in the eastern part of the valley PROPOSED SERVICE PLAN FOR FY 2009/10 • Continue with frequency improvements on all routes • Implement new service route, Line 53 in Palm Desert along Cook Street • Work with the jurisdictions on implementing community-based and market-based service routes throughout the valley. 42 CONSOLIDATED TRANSPORTATION SERVICE AGENCY (CTSA) As the local Coordinated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA), SunLine continues to work with local social service agencies to ensure that we coordinate transportation needs for their passengers. SunLine continues to work with local school districts to ensure that we are addressing special transportation needs of students attending local schools. Additionally, we continue to collaborate with other institutions to work on special projects to ensure that transit service offered in the community meets mobility needs of all residents in the valley. SunLine formally launched the mobility training program in FY 2006/07 to work with seniors and persons with disabilities that are interested in using the fixed route system instead of relying solely on paratransit service. As part of this effort, SunLine developed a brochure for mobility training to ensure residents in the valley are aware of this service. During the year, SunLine staff met with the Braille institute for training on providing better mobility training to SunLine passengers. In addition to these cooperative efforts, we continue to work with social service agencies in Coachella Valley to provide transportation service for their clients. In FY 2006/07, SunLine worked with Vista Cove to provide transportation service for their clients for medical appointments and other activities. This increases coordinated agreements to partnerships with three social service agencies. SunLine remains committed to working with the ACCESS Advisory Committee and continues to facilitate monthly meetings held at the Thousand Palms head office. We continue to work with the Committee on developing a better relationship with the community to address on going public transportation issues in the valley. Staff continues to participate in the regional transportation planning process through participation on the Riverside County Transportation Commission committees. These committees include the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council, the Technical Advisory Committee, and other planning related committees that will enhance coordination efforts undertaken by SunLine. To provide transportation service for residents in the valley that are unable to use fixed route and demand response services, SunLine is considering a new partnership with the Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project (TRIP) to offer transportation service to those who would otherwise be homebound and isolated. The TRIP Program provides transportation service to persons, old or young, and persons with or without disabilities. The Program staff through one-on-one consultation service will assess the needs of the population, through partnership with the County’s Office on Aging HelpLink. New applicants, if predetermined to have special needs, are referred to the TRIP Program for service evaluation. Based on their transportation needs, they sent brochures, route schedules and are instructed on how to apply for American with Disabilities Act Certification by public transportation agencies. 43 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY SunLine Transit AgencyFY 2006/07 - FY 2008/09 Short Range Transit PlanTABLE 1 - FLEET INVENTORYYear BuiltManufacturer Model SeatsLift-Equip?Type of FuelOwn or Lease FR VehicleDAR VehicleSupport VehicleActive/ Reserve/ Rehab*Total Vehicle Miles**Total Veh. Sys. FailuresYear to ReplaceVehicles Orderedqp1994 Orion Orion V 43 Yes CNG Own 18 A 2008/091994 Orion Orion V 43 Yes CNG Own 13 A 2007 131994 Orion Orion V 43 Yes CNG Own 3 R 2007 32004 New Flyer Low Floor 39 Yes HY Own 1 A 20162004 Van Hool Low Floor 30 Yes HY Own 1 A 20162005 Orion Orion V 44 Yes CNG Own 15 A 2017TOTAL: BUSES51161998 Ford Braun 10 Yes CNG Own 1 A 2007 92002 El Dorado Aerotech220 12 Yes CNG Own 9 A 2007 12002 El Dorado Aerotech220 12 Yes CNG Own 2 A 2007 12004 El Dorado Aerotech220 12 Yes CNG Own 9 A 2008/092004 Ford VersaShuttle 8 Yes CNG Own 2 A 2008/09TOTAL: VANS AND MINI-BUSES2311SUPPORT VEHICLES1996 Ford Crown Vic. 3 No CNG Own 1 A 2007/081996 Ford F-150 1 No CNG Own 1 A 20081997 Ford Crown Vic. 3 No CNG Own 1 A 20081998 Honda Civic 3 No CNG Own 1 A 2007/081999 Ford F-250 1 No CNG Own 2 A 20081999 Ford F-150 1 No CNG Own 1 A 20082000 Ford F-150 1 No CNG Own 2 A 20081997 Ford Club Wagon 10 No CNG Own 1 A 20081999 Ford Club Wagon 8 No CNG Own 2 A 20082000 Ford Braun 10 Yes CNG Own 1 A 2007/082002 Ford F-250 1 No CNG Own 3 A 20102003 Ford Crown Vic. 3 No CNG Own 1 A 20102003 GMC 3500 1 No CNG Own 1 A 20122004 Ford VersaShuttle 8 Yes CNG Own 2 A 20092004 Ford F-250 1 No CNG Own 3 A 20122007 Honda Civic 3 No CNG Own 4 A 2013TOTAL: SUPPORT VEHICLES27* A - Active, R - Reserve, MR - Major Rehab. ***If year to replace has passed, need explanation of why vehicle was not replaced**Use NTD Data from prior year ****Indicate when vehicle ordered or when vehicle will be deliveredVANS AND MINI-BUSESRevised 4/30/2007Table 1 Fleet Inventory.xls44 TABLE 2 RIDERSHIP DATA Table 2 -- SunLine-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 96 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $16,891,241 $10,935,739 $15,640,784 $14,863,978 $13,227,654 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,100,000 $1,968,248 $3,099,998 $2,632,212 $2,475,524 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$13,791,241 $8,967,492 $12,540,786 $12,231,766 $10,752,130 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 3,886,102 2,580,027 3,418,555 3,474,361 3,334,540 Passenger Miles 23,634,050 15,712,333 20,790,590 29,080,402 27,910,100 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 150,828.7 109,661.9 140,584.0 134,627.9 144,627.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 1,948,068.0 1,416,138.6 1,888,565.0 1,817,703.5 1,964,449.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 2,075,030.0 1,508,366.5 2,018,648.0 1,948,243.4 2,005,610.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $111.99 $99.72 $111.26 $110.41 $91.46 Farebox Recovery Ratio 18.35% 17.99% 19.81% 17.70% 18.71% Subsidy per Passenger $3.55 $3.48 $3.67 $3.52 $3.22 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.58 $0.57 $0.60 $0.42 $0.39 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$91.44 $81.77 $89.20 $90.86 $74.34 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$7.08 $6.33 $6.64 $6.73 $5.47 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 25.8 23.5 24.3 25.8 23.1 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.99 1.82 1.81 1.91 1.70 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/30/2007 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- SunLine-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 20 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $3,478,043 $2,480,465 $3,449,721 $3,164,200 $2,940,042 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $200,000 $153,580 $200,000 $217,853 $202,783 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$3,278,043 $2,326,885 $3,249,721 $2,946,347 $2,737,259 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 93,222 61,891 81,874 83,956 88,356 Passenger Miles 1,112,700 695,326 977,251 827,806 871,190 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 41,382.7 30,132.5 40,730.0 41,423.8 42,977.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 541,569.0 394,346.0 548,253.0 556,957.0 707,294.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 615,418.0 448,120.9 699,616.0 649,451.0 802,185.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $84.05 $82.32 $84.70 $76.39 $68.41 Farebox Recovery Ratio 5.75% 6.19% 5.79% 6.88% 6.89% Subsidy per Passenger $35.16 $37.60 $39.69 $35.09 $30.98 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.95 $3.35 $3.33 $3.56 $3.14 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$79.21 $77.22 $79.79 $71.13 $63.69 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.05 $5.90 $5.93 $5.29 $3.87 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.3 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.1 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.17 0.16 0.15 0.15 0.12 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/30/2007 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- SunLine Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 116 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $20,369,284 $13,416,204 $19,090,505 $18,028,178 $16,167,696 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,300,000 $2,121,828 $3,299,998 $2,850,065 $2,678,307 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$17,069,284 $11,294,376 $15,790,507 $15,178,113 $13,489,389 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 3,979,324 2,641,918 3,500,429 3,558,317 3,422,896 Passenger Miles 24,746,750 16,407,660 21,767,841 29,908,208 28,781,290 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 192,211.4 139,794.4 181,314.0 176,051.7 187,604.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 2,489,637.0 1,810,484.6 2,436,818.0 2,374,660.5 2,671,743.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 2,690,448.0 1,956,487.4 2,718,264.0 2,597,694.4 2,807,795.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $105.97 $95.97 $105.29 $102.40 $86.18 Farebox Recovery Ratio 16.20% 15.81% 17.28% 15.80% 16.56% Subsidy per Passenger $4.29 $4.28 $4.51 $4.27 $3.94 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.69 $0.69 $0.73 $0.51 $0.47 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$88.80 $80.79 $87.09 $86.21 $71.90 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.86 $6.24 $6.48 $6.39 $5.05 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 20.7 18.9 19.3 20.2 18.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.60 1.46 1.44 1.50 1.28 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/30/2007 Page 1 of 1 TABLES 3 & 3A INDIVIDUAL ROUTE INFORMATION AND DESCRIPTION Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics SunLine Transit Agency -- 8 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 All Routes SUN-111 Total 1,516,040 9,220,086 23 47,104.0 644,913.0 678,019.0 $5,519,235 $1,209,368 $4,309,867 45,725.1 SUN-14 Total 483,792 2,942,271 10 18,905.3 234,204.0 275,253.0 $2,240,626 $385,928 $1,854,698 17,788.8 SUN-23 Total 21,071 128,145 1 877.6 8,086.0 13,029.0 $106,058 $16,808 $89,250 729.2 SUN-24 Total 93,023 565,736 6 5,838.0 69,084.0 73,793.0 $600,695 $74,206 $526,489 5,623.8 SUN-30 Total 763,809 4,645,251 10 24,496.2 226,343.0 238,744.0 $1,943,436 $609,302 $1,334,134 23,989.4 SUN-31 Total 40,313 245,169 1 3,926.4 69,443.0 70,981.0 $577,800 $32,158 $545,642 3,822.0 SUN-50 Total 103,761 631,041 9 11,189.9 147,824.0 157,947.0 $1,285,727 $82,772 $1,202,955 10,695.5 SUN-51 Total 9,887 60,129 3 3,142.2 23,798.0 29,576.0 $240,757 $7,887 $232,870 2,857.9 SUN-52 Total 7,530 45,793 3 2,113.6 29,114.0 31,719.0 $258,199 $6,006 $252,193 1,974.5 SUN-70 Total 150,353 914,399 5 5,916.3 72,534.0 81,748.0 $665,446 $119,939 $545,507 5,501.6 SUN-80 Total 297,790 1,811,064 12 12,371.0 134,261.0 134,637.0 $1,095,981 $237,551 $858,430 12,324.3 SUN-90 Total 279,524 1,699,976 7 12,496.0 150,629.0 151,002.0 $1,229,193 $222,980 $1,006,213 12,449.3 SUN-91 Total 119,209 724,990 6 7,433.9 137,835.0 138,582.0 $1,128,088 $95,095 $1,032,993 7,347.3 SUN-DAR Total 93,222 1,112,700 20 46,188.0 541,569.0 615,418.0 $3,478,043 $200,000 $3,278,043 41,382.7 Service Provider Totals $17,069,284 $3,300,000 $20,369,284 2,690,448.0 2,489,637.0 201,998.2 192,211.4 24,746,750 3,979,324 116 TransTrack Manager™ 4/30/2007 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics SunLine Transit Agency -- 8 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 All Routes SUN-111 Total $8.56 $3.64 $120.70 $2.84 $0.47 $94.26 $6.68 33.2 2.35 21.91% SUN-14 Total $9.57 $4.63 $125.96 $3.83 $0.63 $104.26 $7.92 27.2 2.07 17.22% SUN-23 Total $13.12 $5.03 $145.44 $4.24 $0.70 $122.39 $11.04 28.9 2.61 15.84% SUN-24 Total $8.70 $6.46 $106.81 $5.66 $0.93 $93.62 $7.62 16.5 1.35 12.35% SUN-30 Total $8.59 $2.54 $81.01 $1.75 $0.29 $55.61 $5.89 31.8 3.37 31.35% SUN-31 Total $8.32 $14.33 $151.18 $13.54 $2.23 $142.76 $7.86 10.5 0.58 5.56% SUN-50 Total $8.70 $12.39 $120.21 $11.59 $1.91 $112.47 $8.14 9.7 0.70 6.43% SUN-51 Total $10.12 $24.35 $84.24 $23.55 $3.87 $81.48 $9.79 3.5 0.42 3.27% SUN-52 Total $8.87 $34.29 $130.77 $33.49 $5.51 $127.72 $8.66 3.8 0.26 2.32% SUN-70 Total $9.17 $4.43 $120.96 $3.63 $0.60 $99.15 $7.52 27.3 2.07 18.02% SUN-80 Total $8.16 $3.68 $88.93 $2.88 $0.47 $69.65 $6.39 24.2 2.22 21.67% SUN-90 Total $8.16 $4.40 $98.74 $3.60 $0.59 $80.83 $6.68 22.5 1.86 18.14% SUN-91 Total $8.18 $9.46 $153.54 $8.67 $1.42 $140.59 $7.49 16.2 0.86 8.42% SUN-DAR Total $6.42 $37.31 $84.05 $35.16 $2.95 $79.21 $6.05 2.3 0.17 5.75% Service Provider Totals 1.60 20.7 $6.86 $88.80 $0.69 $4.29 16.20%$5.12 $8.18 $105.97 TransTrack Manager™ 4/30/2007 Page 2 of 2 SunLine Transit AgencyFY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10Short Range Transit PlanTABLE 3A- INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONLine # Route Description (Areas Served)Line 14 Serves the Cities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm SpringsLine 23 Provides service to the Cities of Palm Springs and Cathedral CityLine 24 Serves the City of Palm SpringsLine 30 Serves the cities of Palm Springs and Cathedral CityLine 31 Offers service to the Cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, and Thousand PalmsLine 50 Service is provided to the Cities of Rancho Mirage and Palm DesertLine 51 (Blue Route) Provides service in the City of Palm Desert Line 52 (Red Route) Provides service in the City of Palm Desert Line 70 Service is offered to the Cities of La quinta, Palm Desert and Indian WellsLine 80 Provides service in the City of IndioLine 90 Offers service to the Cities of Indio and CoachellaLine 91 Serves the Cities of Coachella and Indio, and the unincorporated areas of Mecca, Thenla and OasisLine 111 Service is provided to Cities of Indio, La Quinta, Indian Wells, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Palm Springs, Cathedral CityRevised 4/30/2007Table 3A Individual Route Description50 TABLE 4 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2007/08 SunLine Tranist Agency FY 2007/08Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08Project DescriptionCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds LTF STA Measure ASection 5307 - Indio-Cathedral City-Palm Springs Section 5309Section 5310Section 5311Fuel Rebate Revenue Fare Box Other (2)Operating Assistance 18,815,284 10,689,338 4,064,000 261,946 500,000 3,050,000 250,000RIV050549 Preventive Maintenance 1,582,283 531,283 1,051,000RIV050550 $20,397,567 $11,220,621 $0 $4,064,000 $1,051,000 $261,946 $500,000 $3,050,000 $250,000Bus Replacement - 16 SL08-01 6,549,617 0 3,800,000 2,649,297 100,320Bus Expansion - 4 SL08-02 1,600,000 1,600,0003 Rep Support Vehicles SL08-03 180,000 80,000 100,0003 Exp Support Vehicles SL08-04 90,000 90,00014 Rep Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL08-05 1,148,000 1,148,0002 Exp Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL08-06 160,000 160,000Retrofit fuel station AQMD SL08-07 180,000 90,00090,000Proposed Transit Center A & E SL08-08 500,000 500,000Transit Enhancements SL08-09 400,000 250,000 100,710 49,290Tramway [FY 2006] SL08-10 742,500594,000 148,500CalStart/WestStart [FY 2006] SL08-11 228,809 $38,452 $190,357CalStart/WestStart [FY 2007] SL-08-12 250,800 $50,160 $200,640Office Equipment SL-08-13 75,000 $75,000Misc. Maint Equipment SL-08-14 75,000 $75,000Farebox SL-08-15 650,000 $650,000Facility Improvements SL-08-16 350,000 $200,000 $150,000$13,179,726 $4,856,612 $4,300,710 $0 $2,698,587 $1,085,317 $0 $0 $0 $0 $238,500Total: Operating & Capital $33,577,293 $16,077,233 $4,300,710 $4,064,000 $3,749,587 $1,085,317 $0 $261,946 $500,000 $3,050,000 $488,500OTHEROperating 250,000Fuel Station 90,000Tramway148,500Tramway fundsSubtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalShelter adv.AQMDRevised 4/30/2007Summary of Funds RequestedFY 2007/08 FY 2008/09 .xls51 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-01 PROJECT NAME Bus Replacement PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase sixteen (16) replacement CNG buses to replace existing vehicles in the fleet that have met their useful lives based on federal guidelines. In 2004, staff implemented a bus replacement plan to begin replacing buses in the fleet that have excess mileage of over 500,000 miles and are more than 10 years. The buses to be purchased will be a combination of 30ft and 40ft buses. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This is a continuation of SunLine’s goal to purchase replacement buses to replace buses purchased in 1994. As a result of the buses having excess mileage of over 500,000, SunLine began replacing the buses in 2004 to ensure the agency meets federal guidelines on the useful life expectancy of the vehicles. In 2005, SunLine purchased fifteen (15) replacement vehicles and in 2006, SunLine ordered an additional sixteen (16) buses to continue with the bus replacement program established in 2004. In FY 2007/08, SunLine plans to purchase an additional sixteen buses to make up for the bulk of buses that will be replaced, which are 13 years old and have over 800,000 miles. Additionally, the CNG cylinder tanks on the buses will expire in 2009 and will be taken out of service. The cost to replace the cylinders would be too expensive for the aging fleet. Purchasing the additional replacement buses during FY 2008/09 ensures that SunLine complies with federal and state laws. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $2,649,297 (Section 5307) FTA $ 100,320 (Section 5309) STA $3,800,000 TOTAL $6,549,617 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y497 (Pending approval by FTA) SL07-02 Replacement buses ( Not ordered) $4,095,960 CA-90-Y446 SL06-02 Replacement buses $5,884,767 CA-90-Y398 SL05-02 Replacement Buses $2,481,300 52 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-02 PROJECT NAME Bus Expansion PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase four (4) CNG 30ft and/or 40ft revenue buses for service expansion throughout the service area based on proposals in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis. The four buses will be used for recommended service improvement such as headway improvements on Line 111 and routes in the eastern part of the valley. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The expansion buses will be placed in service for headways improvements or on new expanded service routes. Because it takes up to two years to take delivery of new vehicles and to ensure SunLine begins the procurement process as early as possible, SunLine is requesting funding for the expansion vehicles in FY 2008/09. This enables staff to begin the procurement process to be able to take delivery of the vehicles as we implement new service routes. Anticipated delivery time is February 2008, which will ensure that the vehicles are placed in service on new routes in FY 2008-09 as part of the agency’s effort to expand service. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $1,600,000 TOTAL $1,600,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y497 (Pending approval by FTA) SL07-02 Expansion buses $2,025,000 53 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-03 PROJECT NAME Purchase three (3) replacement support vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Support vehicles are used primarily as relief vehicles for drivers beginning or ending their shifts in mid-route. SunLine’s procedures for replacing support vehicles comply with FTA regulations. SunLine uses alternate fueled vehicles (CNG) and will purchase regular cars and pick-ups manufactured by either the Ford Motor, Honda or Toyota Companies based on the scope of services developed to acquire the vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The support vehicles will replace current vehicles that have met their useful lives as required by federal guidelines. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $100,000 STA $ 80,000 TOTAL $180,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y497 (Pending approval by FTA) SL07-04 Purchase support vehicles $150,000 54 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-04 PROJECT NAME Purchase three (3) expansion support vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Support vehicles are used primarily as relief vehicles for drivers beginning or ending their shifts in mid-route. SunLine’s procedures support vehicles comply with FTA regulations and uses alternate fueled vehicles (CNG). SunLine plans to purchase regular cars and/or pick- ups manufactured by either the Ford Motor, Honda or Toyota Companies based on the scope of services developed to acquire the vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The expansion support vehicles will used by Operation Supervisors for road supervision. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $ 90,000 TOTAL $ 90,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 55 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-05 PROJECT NAME Purchase fourteen (14) replacement Dial-A-Ride (DAR) buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase fourteen (14) replacement CNG buses to replace existing DAR vehicles in the fleet that have met their useful lives based on federal guidelines. In 2004, staff implemented a bus replacement plan to begin replacing buses in the fleet that have excess mileage of over 100,000 miles and are more than 4 years. The buses to be purchased will be 30ft. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This continues SunLine’s goal of replacing buses in the fleet. As a result of the buses having excess mileage of over 100,000, SunLine will be replacing DAR buses 2004 to ensure the agency meets federal guidelines on the useful life expectancy of vehicles. In FY 2007/08, SunLine plans to purchase an additional fourteen DAR, which are over 4 years old and have over 100,000 miles. Purchasing the fourteen DAR replacement buses during this fiscal year ensures that SunLine replaces older vehicles in its fleet and complies with federal and state laws. In FY 2008/09, SunLine plans to purchase additional DAR replacement buses to make up for the bulk of buses that need to be replaced. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $1,148,000 TOTAL $1,148,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y446 SL06-07 Replacement DAR Vans $495,000 56 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-06 PROJECT NAME Purchase two (2) DAR expansion buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase two (2) DAR expansion CNG 30ft revenue buses for service expansion throughout the service area based on recommendations in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis. The twp buses will be used for expanding DAR complementary service recommended as part of the improvements to and expansion of fixed route service in the valley. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The expansion buses will be placed in service additional complementary demand response service for new expanded fixed routes. Because it takes up to two years to take delivery of new vehicles and to ensure SunLine begins the procurement process as early as possible, SunLine is requesting funding for the expansion vehicles in FY 2008/09. This enables staff to begin the procurement process to ensure we take delivery of the vehicles as we implement new service routes. Anticipated delivery time is February 2008, which will ensure that the vehicles are placed in service on new routes in FY 2008-09 as part of the agency’s effort to expand service. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $160,000 TOTAL $160,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y446 SL06-07 Expansion DAR Vans/Buses $110,000 57 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-07 PROJECT NAME Retrofit Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Station PROJECT DESCRIPTION In 2005, SunLine applied for and was awarded a $90,000 grant from the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) to upgrade existing CNG stations in Thousand Palms and in Indio. SunLine’s CNG station in Thousand Palms has had 5,300,000 GGE through-put since the facilities were constructed in 1997 and have averaged 700,000 GGE annually for over the last two years. The station at SunLine’s satellite facility in Indio which was build in 1998 averages 425,000 GGE over the last tow years. Both stations are used for transit purposes and by the public. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Customers using the public CNG stations have complained of short fills and have indicated that the 3,000 psig fueling island cannot fuel buses to 3,600 psig. This impacts SunLine’s ability to fuel the transit buses using the fuel island and may affect SunLine’s ability to fuel more buses at the two stations as SunLine adds more vehicles to its fleet. The improvement will enable SunLine to: • Add more dispensers at the fueling station • Modify public dispensers to address customers complaint • Relocate the existing public island and install a card reader • Improve landscaping around the fueling station • Construct new island and relocate CNG mechanical and electrical systems • Provide 24/7 service at the public fueling island PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) AQMD $90,000 LTF $90,000 TOTAL $180,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 58 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER Proposed Transit Center Site Selection Study and Preliminary Engineering SL 08-08 PROJECT NAME Conduct Site Selection Study, including environmental assessment and engineering for proposed Transit Center/Transfer Locations in Coachella Valley. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Preferred Service Plan proposed as part of the findings in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis recommendations to extend Line 111, which operates along Highway 111 be extended to the City of Coachella. This will extend service beyond the current terminus in the City of Indio to offer convenient bus service to residents traveling from the City of Coachella and the unincorporated areas to other parts of the valley. SunLine is requesting funding to conduct a study in selecting a suitable site for a proposed transit center in the eastern part of the valley. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The requested funding will enable SunLine to work with a consultant to conduct a site selection study to determine which areas within the eastern part of the valley would be best suited for the transit center and more conducive to providing transit service. Potentially, the site selected for the transit center will include a mix of uses to facilitate and foster an environment where alternate transportation modes are encouraged. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $500,000 TOTAL $500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 59 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-09 PROJECT NAME Transit Enhancements PROJECT DESCRIPTION Enhance existing bus stops as recommended in the COA. Funding requested for transit enhancements will address FTA requirement to utilize 1% of the Section 5307 apportionment on Safety and Security. Transit amenities requested will also utilize 1% of Section 5307 apportionment as required by FTA. Purchase 40 Benches $ 9,600 Purchase 40 trash containers $ 6,400 Purchase 80 kiosk lexan $ 8,000 Purchase lexan schedules $ 740 Purchase solar batteries $ 9,660 Purchase bus shelters $265,000 Purchase misc. supplies $ 600 Purchase safety related amenities $100,000 Total $400,000 PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Continued improvements to bus stops for passenger safety and comfort. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $250,000 (Section 5307) STA $100,710 FTA $ 49,290 TOTAL $400,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y497 (Pending) SL07-06 Transit Enhancement project $400,000 CA-90-Y446 SL06-05 Transit Enhancement project $35,000 CA-90-Y446 SL06-05 Bus Stop Relocation $29,154 60 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-10 PROJECT NAME Pass-through Grant for Palm Springs Aerial Tramway PROJECT DESCRIPTION Assist the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway with federal government earmark allocated in FY 2006 to purchase vehicles for transporting customers. The funds will be part of SunLine grant application process in TEAM. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Due to federal regulations on accessing federal funds in Team-Web, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Region 9 Office in San Francisco is requiring that the SunLine Transit Agency act as a pass-through grantee for Tramway. SunLine staff continues to work with Tramway’s General Manager on ensuring the agency meets all federal and state procurement guidelines for purchasing buses. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $594,000 (Section 5309) TRAMWAY $148,500 TOTAL $742,500 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 61 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-11 PROJECT NAME Joint Partnership with CalSTART/WestSTART For Fuel Cell Bus Research and Demonstration Project PROJECT DESCRIPTION Partner with WestStart-CalStart to develop and operate zero emission bus as part of SunLine’s fleet. This is continuation of on-going demonstration and research project currently being undertaken by SunLine, CalStart, New Flyer, UTC and ISE. The Federal Transit Administration earmarked funding to continue work on the manufacture of buses with zero emissions. This earmark was apportioned for FY 2006. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Due to federal regulations on accessing federal funds in Team-Web, the Federal Transit Administration Regional Office is requiring that the SunLine Transit Agency act as a pass- through grantee for the project. SunLine staff has had a partnership with CalStart regarding similar projects. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $190,357 (Section 5309) LTF $38,452 TOTAL $228,809 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 62 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-12 PROJECT NAME Joint Partnership with CalSTART/WestSTART For Fuel Cell Bus Research and Demonstration Project PROJECT DESCRIPTION Partner with WestStart-CalStart to develop and operate zero emission bus as part of SunLine’s fleet. This is continuation of on-going demonstration and research project currently being undertaken by SunLine, CalStart, New Flyer, UTC and ISE. The Federal Transit Administration earmarked funding to continue work on the manufacture of buses with zero emissions. This earmark was apportioned for FY 2007. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Due to federal regulations on accessing federal funds in Team-Web, the Federal Transit Administration Regional Office is requiring that the SunLine Transit Agency act as a pass- through grantee for the project. SunLine staff has had a partnership with CalStart regarding similar project. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $200,640 (Section 5309) LTF $50,160 TOTAL $250,800 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 63 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-13 PROJECT NAME Purchase Computer, Office Furniture and Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase new computer systems and software application, furniture replacement for staff in various departments. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Continuation of office equipment program to replace and add furniture and computer items as they reach end of their cycle life. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA $75,000 TOTAL $75,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 64 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-14 PROJECT NAME Purchase Miscellaneous Maintenance Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase major replacement tools, equipment and parts used in routine vehicle maintenance. The items to be purchased include multi meters, torque wrenches, impact sockets, software updates, service jacks, miscellaneous air tools and hand tools, and drill bits. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Equipment must be replaced to ensure proper maintenance of revenue service vehicles. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA $75,000 TOTAL $75,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y398 SL05-08 Misc. Maintenance Equipment $75,000 CA-90-Y446 SL06-09 Misc. Maintenance Equipment $100,000 CA-90-Y497 SL07-08 Misc. Maintenance Equipment $200,182 65 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-15 PROJECT NAME Purchase Odyssey Fareboxes for installation in buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase 25 new Odyssey to replace existing CENTSaBill fareboxes currently installed on the buses. The CENTSaBILL fareboxes were purchased in FY 2004/05 to upgrade the fareboxes, which were disintegrating after several years of use. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The Odyssey farebox provides more options than the CENTSaBill fareboxes and will offer SunLine the opportunity to install fare collection system that will enable staff to provide a better fare media system to the public. Odyssey farebox has these operational features: • Accepts, validates, counts and registers fares in U.S. coins and paper currency • Returns coins and bills that are not valid or acceptable to the system • Accepts, validates, and if necessary re-encoded magnetic card fare documents • Accept and process contactless smart cards and credit cards • Prints, encodes and issue a magnetic transfer, Day Pass or other agreed upon document from an internal supply of blank unencoded stock • Potentially provide change for fare over-payment PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $650,000 TOTAL $650,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 66 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 08-16 PROJECT NAME Facility Improvements PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funds requested in this fiscal year will enable SunLine to improve existing facilities, including repairing building roof, replacement of carpeting and blinds, and repair parking facilities for staff use. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Necessary building and ground improvements at Thousand Palms and Indio facilities. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA $150,000 LTF $200,000 TOTAL $350,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y497 (Pending approval) SL07-08 Facility Improvement $1,064,000 CA-90-Y398 SL05-07 Facility Improvement $365,000 67 TABLE 5 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2008/09 & FY 2009/10 SunLine Transit AgencyFY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 5 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09Project DescriptionCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds LTF STA Measure ASection 5307 - Indio-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5310 Section 5311Fuel Rebate Revenue Fare Box Other (2)Operating Assistance 20,223,317 11,758,272 4,267,200 275,043 500,000 3,172,802 250,000RIV050549 Preventive Maintenance 1,500,000 300,000 1,200,000RIV050550 $21,723,317 $12,058,272 $0 $4,267,200 $1,200,000 $275,043 $500,000 $3,172,802 $250,000Bus Expansion - 15 SL09-01 5,600,000 1,600,000 3,000,000 1,000,0003 Rep Support Vehicles SL09-02 180,000 36,000 144,0003 Exp Support Vehicles SL09-03 160,000 32,000 128,00010 Rep Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL09-04 800,000 800,0005 Exp Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL09-05 400,000 400,000Transit Center Preliminary Enginneering SL09-06 1,350,000 850,000 500,000Transit Enhancements SL09-07 500,000 350,000 150,000Office Equipment SL09-08 93,750 18,750 $75,000Misc. Maint Equipment SL09-09 100,000 20,000 $80,000Facility Improvements SL09-10 625,000 70,000 55,000 $500,000AOM Facility SL09-11 2,500,000 2,000,000 500,000$12,308,750 $6,070,000 $4,161,750 $0 $2,077,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $34,032,067 $18,128,272 $4,161,750 $4,267,200 $3,277,000 $0 $0 $275,043 $500,000 $3,172,802 $250,000Table 5 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2009/10Project DescriptionCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds LTF STA Measure ASection 5307 - Indio-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5310 Section 5311Fuel Rebate Revenue Fare Box Other (2)Operating Assistance 21,679,634 12,827,206 4,470,400 288,140 500,000 3,172,802 250,000RIV050549 Preventive Maintenance 1,500,000 300,000 1,200,000RIV050550 $23,008,548 $13,127,206 $0 $4,470,400 $1,200,000 $288,140 $500,000 $3,172,802 $250,000Bus Expansion - 10 SL10-01 5,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 1,000,0003 Rep Support Vehicles SL10-02 180,000 36,000 144,0003 Exp Support Vehicles SL10-03 160,000 32,000 128,0005 Rep Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL10-04 400,000 400,0005 Exp Dial-a-Ride Vehs SL10-05 400,000 400,000Transit Center Preliminary Engineering SL10-06 1,350,000 850,000 500,000Transit Enhancements SL10-07 500,000 350,000 150,000Office Equipment SL10-08 125,000 25,000 $100,000Misc. Maint Equipment SL10-09 100,000 20,000 $80,000Facility Improvements SL10-10 625,000 70,000 55,000 $500,000AOM Facility SL10-11 4,500,000 3,000,000 1,500,000$13,340,000 $6,070,000 $5,168,000 $0 $2,102,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $36,348,548 $19,197,206 $5,168,000 $4,470,400 $3,302,000 $0 $0 $288,140 $500,000 $3,172,802 $250,000OTHEROperating 250,000 Shelter adv.Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalSubtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalRevised 4/30/2007Summary of Funds RequestedFY 2007/08 FY 2008/09 .xls68 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-01 PROJECT NAME Bus Expansion PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase fifteen (15) CNG 30 ft and 40ft revenue buses for service expansion throughout the service area based on proposals in the recently completed Comprehensive Operational Analysis. This purchase is a continuation of SunLine’s plans to buy more expansion buses for service improvement implementation in FY 2008/09. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION SunLine has not made any changes to its service in several years. All service changes will be based on recommended guidelines in the COA and will relate to population and job growth in the Coachella Valley. Because it takes up to two years to take delivery of new vehicles and to ensure SunLine begins the procurement process as early as possible, SunLine decided to request funding for the expansion vehicles in FY 2007/08. As staff continues to implement recommended service improvements and new services from the COA, it is necessary to begin procuring the buses as early as possible in the process to ensure that we take delivery of the vehicles as we implement new service routes. As such, this continues with the process started in FY 2007/08. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $1,000,000 (Section 5307) STA $3,000,000 LTF $1,600,000 TOTAL $5,600,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 69 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-02 PROJECT NAME Purchase three (3) replacement support vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Support vehicles are used primarily as relief vehicles for drivers beginning or ending their shifts in mid route. SunLine’s procedures for replacing support vehicles comply with FTA regulations. SunLine uses alternate fuel vehicles (CNG) and will be purchasing regular cars and pick-ups manufactured by Ford Motor Company based on scope of services developed to acquire the vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The support vehicles are being replaced because they have met their useful lives as required by federal guidelines. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $144,000 STA $ 36,000 TOTAL $180,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 70 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-03 PROJECT NAME Purchase three (3) expansion support vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Support vehicles are used primarily as relief vehicles for drivers beginning or ending their shifts in mid route. SunLine’s procedures for replacing support vehicles comply with FTA regulations. SunLine uses alternate fuel vehicles (CNG) and will be purchasing regular cars and pick-ups manufactured by Ford Motor Company based on scope of services developed to acquire the vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The support vehicles are being replaced because they have met their useful lives as required by federal guidelines. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $128,000 STA $ 32,000 TOTAL $160,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 71 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-04 PROJECT NAME Purchase ten (10) replacement Dial-a-Ride (DAR) buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase five (5) replacement CNG buses to replace existing DAR vehicles in the fleet that have met their useful lives based on federal guidelines. In 2004, staff implemented a bus replacement plan to begin replacing buses in the fleet that have excess mileage of over 100,000 miles and are more than 4 years. The buses to be purchased will be 30ft. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This continues SunLine’s goal of replacing buses tin the fleet. As a result of the buses having excess mileage of over 100,000, SunLine will be replacing DAR buses 2004 to ensure the agency meets federal guidelines on the useful life expectancy of vehicles. In FY 2008/09, SunLine plans to purchase an additional ten DAR, which are over 4 years old and have over 100,000 miles. Purchasing the fourteen DAR replacement buses during this fiscal year ensures that SunLine replaces older vehicles in its fleet and complies with federal and state laws. In FY 2009/10, SunLine plans to purchase additional DAR replacement buses to make up for the bulk of buses that need to be replaced. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $800,000 TOTAL $800,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 72 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-05 PROJECT NAME Purchase five (5) DAR expansion buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase five (5) DAR expansion CNG 30ft revenue buses for service expansion throughout the service area based on recommendations in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis. The five buses will be used for expanding DAR complementary service recommended as part of the improvements to and expansion of fixed route service in the valley. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The expansion buses will be placed in service additional complementary demand response service for new expanded fixed routes. Because it takes up to two years to take delivery of new vehicles and to ensure SunLine begins the procurement process as early as possible, SunLine is requesting funding for the expansion vehicles in FY 2008/09. This enables staff to begin the procurement process to ensure we take delivery of the vehicles as we implement new service routes. Anticipated delivery time is February 2008, which will ensure that the vehicles are placed in service on new routes in FY 2008-09 as part of the agency’s effort to expand service. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) LTF $400,000 TOTAL $400,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 73 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-06 PROJECT NAME Conduct Site Selection Study and preliminary engineering for proposed Transit Center/Transfer Locations in Coachella Valley. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Preferred Service Plan proposed as part of the findings in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis recommendations to extend Line 111, which operates along Highway 111 be extended to the City of Coachella. This will extend service beyond the current terminus in the City of Indio to offer convenient bus service to residents traveling from the City of Coachella and the unincorporated areas to other parts of the valley. SunLine is requesting funding to conduct a study in selecting a suitable site for a proposed transit center in the eastern part of the valley. Additionally, staff will look at potential sites throughout the valley for suitable sites for transit centers, transfer locations, and or park and ride lots. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The requested funding will enable SunLine to work with a consultant to conduct a site selection study to determine which areas within the eastern part of the valley would be best suited for the transit center and more conducive to providing transit service. Potentially, the site selected for the transit center will include a mix of uses to facilitate and foster an environment where alternate transportation modes are encouraged. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA $500,000 LTF $850,000 TOTAL $1,350,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 74 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-07 PROJECT NAME Transit Enhancements PROJECT DESCRIPTION Enhance existing bus stops as recommended in the recently completed COA. This continues with improving the safety and security of the system using 1% of Section 5307 funds as mandated by FTA. Transit amenities requested will also utilize 1% of Section 5307 apportionment as required by FTA. Purchase 40 benches $ 9,600 Purchase 40 trash containers $ 6,400 Purchase 80 kiosk lexan $ 8,000 Purchase lexan schedules $ 740 Purchase solar batteries $ 9660 Purchase bus shelters $565,000 Purchase misc. supplies $ 600 Total $600,000 PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Continue improvements to bus stops for passenger safety and comfort. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $150,000 (Section 5307) LTF $350,000 TOTAL $500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 75 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-08 PROJECT NAME Purchase Computer, Office Furniture and Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase new computer systems and software application, furniture replacement for staff in various departments. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Continuation of office equipment program to replace and add furniture and computer items as they reach end of their cycle life. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $75,000 (Section 5307) STA $18,750 TOTAL $93,750 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 76 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-09 PROJECT NAME Purchase Miscellaneous Maintenance Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase major replacement tools, equipment and parts used in routine vehicle maintenance. The items to be purchased include multi meters, torque wrenches, impact sockets, software updates, service jacks, miscellaneous air tools and hand tools, and drill bits. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Equipment must be replaced to ensure proper maintenance of revenue service vehicles. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $80,000 STA $20,000 TOTAL $100,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 77 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-10 PROJECT NAME Facility Improvements PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funds requested in this fiscal year will enable SunLine to improve existing facilities, including repairing building roof, replacement of carpeting and blinds, and repair parking facilities for staff use. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Necessary building and ground improvements at Thousand Palms and Indio facilities. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) FTA $500,000 (Section 5307) STA $ 70,000 LTF $ 55,000 TOTAL $625,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 78 TABLE 5A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER SL 09-11 PROJECT NAME AOM Facility PROJECT DESCRIPTION Funds requested in this fiscal year will enable SunLine to complete the environmental analysis, engineering, and architectural services and development of the Master Plan for the new facility in Thousand Palms. SunLine began working on the environmental assessment in FY 2006/07 in order to develop the Master Plan for the property acquired in 2002. The property is located close to its current head office in Thousand Palms. The existing maintenance facility and garage will not be able to handle additional maintenance equipment and vehicle capacity. SunLine will seek more federal, state and local funding for construction of the facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This phase of the project is necessary to begin with local jurisdictions to obtain permits and approval of the building for construction. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA $500,000 LTF $2,000,000 TOTAL $2,500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER. FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance 79 TABLE 6 TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT TABLE 6 FY 2007 STATE TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Recommendations Actions Taken Report Full Time Equivalent (FTE) in the Annual State Controller Report. This recommendation was completed in the FY 2006 Report. Complete and submit separate State Controller reports for general public transit and specialized service for the elderly and disabled. The Finance Department will review the new process and will begin submitting separate reports to the State Controller’s Office. Publish a systemwide map of the service area and routes. SunLine currently has a system map in place that is distributed to the public. A new system map with key bus transfer locations, major transfer points, and shopping centers will be completed when all major changes to transit system have been completed. Include bus fare information on the schedule. Staff will include bus fare information on schedules as changes to the routes are implemented. Beginning September 2007, staff will publish new schedules with the bus fares, including half fares for seniors and the disabled. Develop flow chart or responsibilities and process for parts inventory management. Staff will develop a flow chart and process for parts inventory management. Consider prioritizing full procurement of Automated Vehicle Locator (AVL) technology to increase service efficiencies and tracking. Staff has prioritized capital transit projects and is currently working on procuring technology to increase service efficiencies and to track buses when in route. The procurement of technologies to increase service efficiencies is underway and includes acquiring Automatic Passenger Counters (APC). Consider alternative funding for specific transit service. The Planning Department has researched the JARC and the New Freedom funding program as potential source for funding specific transit services. However, FTA has stipulated that transit operators and social service agencies cannot apply for these funding programs until the Coordinated Transportation Plan is completed. SunLine’s Planning staff continues to work with RCTC and will participate as member of the Technical Advisory Committee for the development of the Coordinated Transportation Plan that will enable transit operators in Riverside County to utilize these new funding sources for specific transit services. The information shown are the recommendations provided by PMC and the actions taken or to be taken by SunLine to address any concerns raised during the review. Overall, there were 7 recommendations and SunLine will make every effort to address all recommendations. 80 TABLE 7 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 73TABLE 7 Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) Performance Targets Data ElementsFY 2007/08 SRTP Plan (Proposed)FY 2007/08 Revised TargetFY 2007/08 Revised ScorecardProductivity Performance Summary Unlinked Passenger TripsPassenger MilesTotal Actual Vehicle Revenue HoursTotal Actual Vehicle Revenue MilesTotal Actual Vehicle MilesTotal Operating ExpensesTotal Passenger Fare RevenueNet Operating ExpensesMandatory:Operator Comments 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour 2. Farebox Recovery RatioDiscretionary: 1. Subsidy Per Passenger 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile 3. Subsidy Per Hour 4. Subsidy Per Mile 5. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 6. Passengers Per Revenue MileBased on FY 2006/07 3rd quarter actuals Legend: ? = In Compliance Ø = Not in Compliance* Blended farebox calculation. This farebox ratio ties in to SRTP Table 3. Performance IndicatorsMeets 2 of 2 mandatory indicatorsMeets 5 of 6 discretionary indicators81 SECTION 8 HIGHLIGHTS OF SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN FOR PRESENTATION • Implement selected service improvements recommended in COA. • Implement Service Improvement program • Acquire replacements and expansion buses and support vehicles. „ Purchase 16 replacement fixed route buses „ Purchase 4 expansion fixed route buses „ Purchase 3 replacement support vehicles „ Purchase 3 expansion support vehicles „ Purchase 15 replacements paratransit vehicles with radio(s) „ Purchase 2 expansion paratransit vehicles • Install more bus shelters and bus benches throughout the service area to improve and enhance service provided in the Coachella Valley. • Continue working with local jurisdictions on bus stop issues. • Continue work on environmental assessment, preliminary and final engineering for new AOM building. • Continue working with College of the Desert on implementing a Student Pass • Examine feasibility of conducting a site selection study to potentially select locations throughout the valley for a transit center, transfer locations and sites for Park and Ride Lots. Comments: In addition to the mandatory targets for operating cost per revenue hour and farebox recovery ratio, SunLine has selected its discretionary targets for the Performance Improvement Program (PIP), which is: Operating & Financial Data FY 2004/05 FY 2005/06 FY 2006/07 PLANNED FY 2006/07 3RD QUARTER ACTUALS FY 2007/08 PLANNED System wide Ridership 3,422,896 3,558,317 3,500,429 3,487,460 3,979,324 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hours 82 Commuter Rail Short Range Transit Plan Update FY 2007/08-2009/10 May 4, 2007 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................2 Service Area ..........................................................................................................2 Services.................................................................................................................2 Fare Structure........................................................................................................2 Ticket Types ......................................................................................................3 Fare Increase.....................................................................................................4 Population Served..................................................................................................5 Number of Fleet Vehicles........................................................................................5 Facilities ................................................................................................................5 Commuter Rail Station Management....................................................................5 San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) ...........................................................................7 SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS.............................................................................8 Riverside Line ........................................................................................................8 Inland Empire-Orange County (IEOC) Line...............................................................8 91 Line................................................................................................................10 RIDER CHARACTERISTICS...............................................................................11 PASSENGER AMENITIES..................................................................................12 SERVICE RELATED ISSUES ..............................................................................13 Additional Station Parking to Meet Demand ...........................................................13 Increased Service Levels on the IEOC and 91 Lines................................................14 Train Equipment to Address Overcrowding ............................................................15 Riverside Line On-Time Performance Issues...........................................................15 Strategic Assessment and Operating Cost Allocation Formula..................................16 RCTC Station Rehabilitation and Preventative Maintenance Plan..............................16 REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS .............................18 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION .................................................................................19 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS...................................................................20 Riverside Line ......................................................................................................20 IEOC Line (exempt) ............................................................................................20 91 Line................................................................................................................21 NEW SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION.....................................22 Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project.........................................................22 REGULATORY & COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS..............................................24 TABLES .............................................................................................................25 Table 1................................................................................................................25 Table 2................................................................................................................26 Table 3................................................................................................................29 Table 4................................................................................................................35 Table 5................................................................................................................40 Table 6................................................................................................................46 Table 7................................................................................................................47 Table 8................................................................................................................48 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS BNSF Burlington Northern-Santa Fe Railroad CETAP Community & Environmental Acceptability Process CMAQ Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality Funds EOM Extra-Ordinary Maintenance FTA Federal Transit Administrationb IEOC Inland Empire-Orange County Line LACMTA Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority LAUS Los Angeles Union Station LTF Local Transportation Funds MOW Maintenance-of-Way OCTA Orange County Transportation Authority PVL Perris Valley Line RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission RTA Riverside Transit Agency RTIP Regional Transportation Improvement Program SANBAG San Bernardino Associated Governments SB Senate Bill SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SCRRA Southern California Regional Rail Authority SJBL San Jacinto Branch Line SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance Funds STIP State Transportation Improvement Program STP Surface Transportation Program Funds TVM Ticket Vending Machine UP Union Pacific Railroad VCTC Ventura County Transportation Commission EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) commuter rail program consists of planning, programming, advocacy and implementation elements. The Commuter Rail Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), FY2007/08-2009/10 incorporates a variety of activities which support these elements. Governing Authority With the passage of Measure A in 1988, $100 million was identified and committed to the development and implementation of a commuter rail system to serve Riverside County residents. The Commission participates in the ongoing funding and governance of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), known as “Metrolink.” SCRRA is a Joint Powers Authority consisting of RCTC, the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA), and the Ventura County Transportation Commission (VCTC). RCTC holds two voting positions on SCRRA’s eleven member Board. RCTC staff serve on the five-county Technical Advisory Committee which negotiates service and funding levels based upon the counties’ established priorities, and provides technical assistance, coordination between various SCRRA and RCTC departments, and linkages to local communities. FY2007/08 Proposed Budget Activity The Commuter Rail SRTP, FY2007/08-2009/10 reflects the Commission’s commitment to the commuter rail goals in the FY2007/08 RCTC Budget: • Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving Riverside County; • Extend commuter rail service to Moreno Valley and Perris via the San Jacinto Branch Line; and • Maximize opportunities for public use of rail-related investments. Specific highlights of the FY2007/08 Budget include: • Implementation of a new fare structure with an average 3.5% fare increase; • Preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside - Moreno Valley – Perris) Metrolink extension project; • A 15.39% increase in operating subsidy since last year’s SRTP. The increase is primarily due to an updated cost allocation formula that more evenly distributes the costs among member agencies as well as the full year costs for the year-round IEOC weekend service, an increase in fuel costs, operating expenses and mechanical contract costs. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 2 INTRODUCTION Service Area Today, five of the 54 Metrolink stations are located in western Riverside County. These five stations, Riverside-Downtown, Pedley, La Sierra, West Corona, and North Main Corona, are owned and maintained by RCTC. All Metrolink trains and stations are accessible to persons with disabilities. Services The SCRRA operates seven commuter rail lines Three routes, the Riverside, Inland Empire-Orange County (IEOC), and 91 Lines, directly serve western Riverside County, with connecting service available to destinations on the other four lines. Fare Structure Since July 2005, Metrolink ticket prices are distance-based and calculated on the shortest driving miles between stations. Each station combination is uniquely priced, based on how many driving miles it is from one station to the other. The distance charge is capped at 80 miles. This pricing program offers a fair and equitable pricing policy. Over time, Metrolink customers traveling the same distances will pay the same price, and short trips will cost less than longer trips. This year, the system-wide average RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 3 Weekday: Monday – Friday Weekend: Saturdays & Sundays Adult Fare: Ages 19 to 64 Weekend Fare: 25% off Weekday Fare Youth Fare: Ages 6 to 18; 50% off Adult Fare on one-way/round-trip tickets purchased and used during off-peak hours Children: One child, age 5 or under, rides free with an adult using a valid ticket Elderly: Age 65 and over with valid driver’s license or photo ID with date of birth; 50% off regular adult fare at all times Disabled: 50% off regular adult fare at all times with proper ID School Groups: Discount tickets for ages 6 to 18 in school or youth groups; restricted for non-rush hour travel only Group Discount: Discount tickets for groups of 10 or more persons, not to exceed 50 December Pass: 25% discount for a monthly pass in December only. fare increase is 3.5%. The combination of a 3.5% system-wide average fare increase and fare restructuring, results in varying impacts to customer’s ticket prices, however, no increase shall exceed more than 10%. Because of the incremental approach to restructuring, in years where there is no system-wide average fare increase, some station-pair ticket prices will nevertheless increase and some prices will decrease. The Metrolink ticket price consists of three elements: a base boarding charge, an additional increment related to the number of miles traveled, and finally a modest increment to permit Metrolink passengers to transfer without additional cost to connecting transit services. A ride from Downtown Riverside to Los Angeles Union Station is a 59 mile one- way trip; a ride from Riverside to Irvine is a 40 mile trip. Ticket Types There are six types of regular Metrolink tickets. One Way Tickets One-way tickets are valid for one trip only, defined as continuous travel away from the origin station to the destination station specified on the ticket. One- way trips must be completed within three hours after purchase of ticket on the day of purchase- the expiration time and date is displayed on the ticket. Types of One Way Tickets sold: Adult Weekday, Weekend, Senior/Disabled, Youth Weekday, and Youth Weekend. Round Trip Tickets Round Trip tickets are valid for two trips only, from and to the origin station and the destination station marked on the ticket. The first leg of a round trip ticket is valid for three hours from purchase. The return ticket is valid for travel anytime on the same day as the first leg of the trip. Types of Round Trip Tickets sold: Adult Weekday, Adult Weekend, Senior/Disabled, Youth Weekday, and Youth Weekend. Ten Trip Tickets Ten Trip Tickets are valid for ten one- way trips within 90 days of purchase for travel between the origin station RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 4 zone and the destination station zone printed on the ticket. The Ten Trip ticket is valid until the expiration date printed on the ticket and must be validated before each boarding. The trip must be completed within three hours of validation. Multiple riders may use the ten-trip ticket, provided there is one validation for each person who uses the ticket. Types of Ten Trip Tickets sold: Adult and Senior/Disabled (sold through the TVMs, the mail, and sales outlets) and Student (sold only to participating schools through Metrolink’s administrative office). Monthly Pass Monthly Passes are valid for unlimited travel between the origin station zone and destination station zone printed on the pass during the calendar month. Types of monthly passes: Adult, Senior/Disabled, and Student (sold only to participating schools through Metrolink’s administrative office). Group Tickets and Vouchers Group Tickets are sold through Metrolink administrative offices on a reservation basis for non-rush hour and weekend trains. Metrolink distributes either tickets or vouchers to the group traveling. Tickets/vouchers are valid for travel on the day printed on the ticket/voucher only, between the specified origin and destination stations. School Group Tickets School group tickets are available by reservation through the Metrolink administrative office. The tickets are provided to the school group in voucher form, indicating the boarding and alighting stations, the date, time and specific trains for the school group. Fare Increase Since Metrolink began operations in 1992, fares have increased as indicated in the following chart: 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007-08 4% 0% 4% 0% 5% 0% 4% 4.5% 5.5% 3.5% Historically, these fare increases have been across-the-board with all ticket types incurring the same price increase. For FY 2007 the fares are set to increase 3.5% on average. In addition to adjusting fares in 2004 to keep pace with inflation, member agencies, including RCTC, also sought a rationalization of the fares charged for travel between the existing Metrolink zones. Over the years unusual anomalies evolved where stations are placed into zones not necessarily based upon mileage issues but on other local issues. Until recently, the result was that over 50% of RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 5 Metrolink stations were not in correct zones (including the Riverside-Downtown, Pedley, and North Main Corona Stations). Some passengers that traveled greater actual distances than others paid less because of these anomalies. As an example, trips to and from West Corona and North Main Corona were priced exactly the same. However with the new mileage based system, a monthly pass from North Main Corona to Union Station is now priced $3.25 more than one from West Corona to Union Station. However with the new mileage based system, North Main Corona is priced only $1.00 more on monthly passes to Irvine or LA Union Station. As a result, the fare restructuring results in passengers being charged based upon the highway driving mileage between stations. Zone fares were eliminated in July 2005. The restructuring has been spread over 10 years to minimize financial impacts on individual riders whose particular trip may have been artificially kept low. Population Served Whether traveling to work, school, or one of Southern California’s great recreation destinations, Metrolink trains provide a viable alternative to driving alone. Every day, thousands of Southern California residents park their cars and choose Metrolink to commute. The average Metrolink commute from Riverside County is 37 miles. Metrolink trains are also popular with schools throughout the region both taking students to classes and for field trips. Number of Fleet Vehicles The Metrolink fleet is composed of 39 in service locomotives and 153 commuter rail cars. One locomotive and 18 passenger cars have been leased, the remaining equipment within the fleet is owned by SCRRA. Facilities In planning for a successful commuter rail program in Western Riverside County, RCTC has acquired properties for current and future passenger rail service. Commuter Rail Station Management Unlike the other SCRRA county agencies, the Commission owns and operates the five commuter rail stations serving Riverside County: • Riverside-Downtown • Pedley • Riverside-La Sierra • North Main Corona; and • West Corona RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 6 Station operation and maintenance costs are included in the rail program budget with services coordinated by the Commission’s Property Administrator. Parking is currently free at the stations. The station operating and maintenance FY07/08 budget includes security, grounds maintenance, cleaning, utilities, repairs, and other rail station maintenance costs. The average budget per station is $360,410.00 and is funded by Western Riverside County Rail Local Transportation Funds (LTF). FY 2007/08 RCTC Station Budget: $1,802,050 Security Guards 56% Station Cleaning 7% Utilities 10% Other (Maintenance, Supplies, etc) 14%Grounds Maintenance 7% Repairs 6% RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 7 San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) Measure A provided for Riverside County’s participation in the creation of a regional commuter rail system. Though the primary goal was service from Riverside to Los Angeles and Orange counties, the Measure A map included a possible internal element along Santa Fe’s San Jacinto Branch Line. The SJBL corridor extends 38.3 miles between Highgrove and Hemet within Riverside County. The alignment roughly follows the Interstate 215 to Perris where it veers east, parallel to State Route 74 to Hemet and San Jacinto. As part of the regional acquisition of Burlington Northern-Santa Fe (BNSF) properties and use rights, RCTC purchased the 38-mile SJBL and adjacent properties in 1993 for $26 million using Western County Rail Measure A and state rail bonds (Prop 108 of 1990). BNSF retained exclusive freight operating rights, serving its customers along the line and will continue to maintain the right-of- way until such time as passenger service is implemented. Planning is currently underway for the Initial Operating Segment (IOS) of the SJBL, the Perris Valley Line. This Line would provide a connection from Moreno Valley, March Air Reserve Base, and Perris to mainline rail services in downtown Riverside. (See New Service Implementation & Evaluation for more detail.) RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 8 Riverside Line Line Opening: June 1993 Route miles: 59.1 Avg Trip Length (miles): 36.3 Trains Operated/Day: 12.0 Avg FY06/07 Weekday Ridership: 4,328 FY07/08 Budget Operating Subsidy/Passenger Mile: $0.15 Farebox Recovery: 53.0% Revenue Recovery (MOW/ROW): 56.4% Current Stations Served Riverside-Downtown 4066 Vine Street Pedley 6001 Pedley Road East Ontario 3330 E Francis St Industry 600 S Brea Canyon Rd Montebello/Commerce 2000 Flotilla St Downtown-Pomona 101 N Main Street LA Union Station 800 N Alameda St SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS Metrolink regularly operates Monday through Friday. Reduced frequency weekend service operates on the San Bernardino Lines on Saturdays and Sundays with extensions to the Riverside-Downtown Station. New weekend service began on the IEOC line July 15, 2006. There is limited service on New Years Day for the Rose Parade on the San Bernardino and Orange County Lines. Trains do not normally operate on the following major holidays: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Christmas Day. Riverside Line (Riverside to Los Angeles) This line extends 59.1 miles between the city of Riverside and the Los Angeles Union Station (LAUS) along the Union Pacific (UP) Railroad alignment. The route roughly follows the Pomona Freeway corridor (SR60) through the cities and communities of Pedley, Mira Loma, Ontario, Pomona, Walnut, Industry, La Puente, Montebello, and Commerce. Existing stations include Riverside-Downtown, Pedley, East Ontario, Downtown Pomona, Industry, Montebello, and LAUS. RCTC, SANBAG, and the LACMTA jointly fund the Line. Currently, five peak-period round-trips and one off-peak round-trip operate Monday through Friday. Daily peak-period a.m. boardings have averaged 2,347 during February 2007. Approximately 25.3% of the morning boardings occur at Riverside County’s two stations on this line, Riverside-Downtown and Pedley.1 The Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) fixed routes, and Amtrak, provide connecting transit service in Riverside County. The scheduled peak-direction trip time between downtown Riverside and LAUS varies between 83 and 87 minutes, including dwell time at intermediate stations. Inland Empire-Orange County (IEOC) Line (San Bernardino/Riverside to Irvine/San Juan Capistrano/Oceanside) This line extends 70.9 miles between the City of San Bernardino, in San Bernardino County, and Irvine and San Juan Capistrano, in Orange County, with limited extensions in Oceanside. The alignment roughly follows the Riverside 1 Source: AM Peak-Period (Peak Direction) Boardings, February 2007 RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 9 IEOC Line Line Opening: October 1995 Route miles: 100.1 Avg Trip Length (miles): 31.6 Trains Operated/Day: 16 Avg FY06/07 Weekday Ridership: 4,014 FY07/08 Budget: Operating Subsidy/Passenger Mile: $0.24 Farebox Recovery: 42.6% Revenue Recovery (MOW/ROW): 45.8% Current Stations Served: San Bernardino 1204 West 3rd St Riverside-Downtown 4066 Vine Street Riverside-La Sierra 10901 Indiana Ave North Main Corona 250 E Blaine St West Corona 155 S Auto Center Dr Anaheim Canyon 1039 N Pacificenter Dr Orange 194 N Atchison St Santa Ana 1000 E Santa Ana Bl Tustin 2975 Edinger Ave Irvine 15215 Barranca Pkwy Laguna Niguel 28200 Forbes Rd San Juan Capistrano 26701 Verdugo St San Clemente 1850 Avenida Estacion San Clemente Pier* Avenida del Mar Oceanside 235 S Tremont Ave Freeway (SR91) along the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) San Bernardino Subdivision in Riverside and Orange County. This commuter rail service to Orange County provides a transportation alternative in one of the busiest corridors in Southern California. The Line is a jointly funded project of the RCTC, SANBAG, and OCTA. When the service began in October 1995, it was the first suburb-to-suburb commuter rail line in the country. One station in San Bernardino County, four stations within Riverside County, eight within Orange County, and one station in San Diego County now serve the line. Currently, four peak-period round- trips, and two off-peak round-trips now operate Monday through Friday from San Bernardino to Irvine (with limited extensions to San Juan Capistrano and Oceanside). Morning boardings averaged 2,078 during February 2007. Approximately 89.5% of the morning boardings occur at Riverside County’s four stations on this line, at Riverside-Downtown, Riverside-La Sierra, North Main Corona, and West Corona.2 IEOC weekend service began on July 15, 2006. This route was modeled after the successful RCTC chartered Beach Trains. The service includes two round trips leaving from San Bernardino to Oceanside in the morning and returning in the afternoon. On Saturdays only, there is a morning train out of Oceanside to Riverside that returns in the afternoon. The trains make all IEOC stops, plus the San Clemente Pier. The current running time between downtown Riverside and Irvine is approximately 68 minutes. RTA, Corona Dial-A-Ride, and the Corona Cruiser provide connecting transit in Riverside County. 2 Source: AM Peak-Period (Peak Direction) Boardings, February 2007 RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 10 91 Line Line Opening: May 2002 Route miles: 61.6 Avg Trip Length (miles): 35.4 Trains Operated/Day: 9.0 Avg FY06/07 Weekday Ridership: 2,005 FY07/08 Budget Operating Subsidy/Passenger Mile: $0.21 Farebox Recovery: 45.5% Revenue Recovery (MOW/ROW): 47.2% Current Stations Served Riverside-Downtown 4066 Vine St Riverside-La Sierra 10901 Indiana Ave North Main Corona 250 E Blaine St West Corona 155 S Auto Center Dr Fullerton 120 E Santa Fe Ave Buena Park(mid 2007) Lakeknoll Dr & Dale St Norwalk 12700 Imperial Highway Commerce 6433 26th St Union Station 800 N Alameda St 91 Line (Riverside to Los Angeles via Fullerton) This route officially began operating peak-period service on May 6, 2002. The route extends 61.6 miles between Riverside and Downtown Los Angeles. The alignment roughly follows the Riverside Freeway (SR91) along the BNSF San Bernardino subdivision through Riverside County to Fullerton in Orange County where it continues northwest to downtown Los Angeles. Existing stations that serve this line include Riverside-Downtown, Riverside-La Sierra, North Main Corona, West Corona, Fullerton, Norwalk, Commerce, and LAUS. RCTC, OCTA, and the LACMTA jointly fund the Line. The service levels on this route are still developing. Currently there are two AM peak-period trips from Riverside to Los Angeles with two PM peak period returns. There are two AM peak period trips from Los Angeles to Riverside with one PM peak period return and one mid day off-peak round-trip. This service operates Monday through Friday. Morning boardings averaged 944 during February 2007. Approximately 77.9% of the morning boardings occur at Riverside County’s four stations on this line, at Riverside-Downtown, Riverside-La Sierra, North Main Corona, and West Corona.3 The peak-period running time between downtown Riverside and Los Angeles is approximately 90 minutes. RTA, Corona Dial-A-Ride, and the Corona Cruiser provide connecting service in Riverside County. 3 Source: AM Peak-Period (Peak Direction) Boardings, February 2007 RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 11 RIDER CHARACTERISTICS The Metrolink rider profiles are updated every two years. The latest socio- economic data, collected in 2006, is listed below. Line Riverside Line IEOC Line 91 Line System-wide Gender: Male Female 43% 57% 52% 48% 50% 50% 49% 51% Ethnicity: Caucasian Latino/Hispanic African-American Asian/Pacific Islander Other 23% 25% 15% 35% 3% 52% 24% 10% 11% 4% 39% 25% 16% 17% 3% 41% 26% 13% 18% 4% % Household Income over $50,000 annually 76% 75% 69% 69% Full-Time Employed 90% 92% 82% 85% Personal Automobile Available 85% 84% 81% 79% RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 12 PASSENGER AMENITIES Commuters boarding at RCTC Metrolink stations are provided amenities that assist with their daily travel needs. Pay phones are available at all stations as well as vending machines stocked with cold beverages. Also available to Metrolink passengers are bike lockers, designated parking for motorcycles and carpools. Amenities are also available onboard the train. All train cars are equipped with restrooms, and some of the newer cars contain hook-ups for laptop computers. Plans are underway to provide state-of-the-art message signs at all stations that will alert passengers of train arrivals and delays. The Electronic Passenger Information System (EPIS) is expected to be operational in late 2010. Metrolink has developed a new website for www.metrolinktrains.com. This has replaced the original site and provides passengers with enhanced features allowing for greater content functionality. Improvements include regular service updates on the homepage, improved content management functions, enhanced usability and a more consistent look and feel with features expected by our increasingly web savvy passengers. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 13 SERVICE RELATED ISSUES The Commission’s goal in participating in a regional commuter rail system is to provide useful transportation alternatives to its residents. To a large degree this goal has already achieved great results. Each morning over 3,150 residents board one of 11 Metrolink trains headed for jobs in Orange and Los Angeles counties. These rail commuters also contribute to reduction in freeway traffic, removing more than 1.5 lanes of peak hour traffic each morning and each afternoon. Notwithstanding this success, a commuter rail service is unlike most of the projects funded by the Commission. The complete benefits of the project are not fully realized upon completion of construction or initial implementation of service. The commuter rail service must increase frequency as the demand increases over time. This increase in service is constrained due to the availability of rail vehicles, capacity on the railroad, and available funding. Currently, not all of the Riverside County routes are at optimal service levels. Two of the three Metrolink lines do not even offer minimum basic coverage during peak travel times. The IEOC and the 91 Line do not yet provide half- hourly headways and thus their attractiveness to residents and, ultimately, their ridership and revenue performance are handicapped. The Riverside Line, which provides the best peak-period coverage, is now recovering from the abysmal service provided by the host UP Railroad during the past few years. As on-time performance improves, ridership is now returning to prior levels. The major issues, which continue to be a focus of RCTC attention for the SRTP period FY2007/08–2009/10, include the following: • Additional Station Parking to Meet Demand • Increased Train Service on the IEOC and 91 Line • Train Equipment to Address Overcrowding • Riverside Line On-Time Performance Issues • Strategic Assessment and Operating Cost Allocation Formula; and • RCTC Station Rehabilitation and Preventative Maintenance Plan. Each of these issues are discussed in more detail below. Additional Station Parking to Meet Demand RCTC owns and operates the five commuter rail stations within the County. While costly compared to the alternative utilized in the five other counties in which individual cities own and operate each station, this has proven to be a significant advantage in responding to the growth in Riverside County boardings. Where parking expansion projects have been relatively rare in other counties, RCTC is aggressive at addressing parking needs. Over the past few years RCTC RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 14 built a new station at North Main Corona, expanded parking at La Sierra to over 1,000 spaces, and added a parking lot at Vine Street at the Riverside Downtown Station. RCTC recently completed construction of a new 321 space parking facility on the east side of the Riverside Downtown Station. The maintenance and security of this facility constitutes a portion of the 12.8% increase in the station budget over the previous fiscal year. The balance of which is largely attributed to added CCTV surveillance at both the downtown and La Sierra stations. RCTC has completed final design and obtained approval for state and CMAQ funding for a parking structure at the North Main Corona Station. With these actions, RCTC has kept pace with the growth in ridership with these parking additions. Despite this success, the commuter rail service is not static. Ridership forecasts show continued growth, particularly on the IEOC and the 91 Line. A recent review of previous parking assessments suggest that there may be as much as 1,000 more parking spaces needed by 2010, as follows: Riverside (400), La Sierra (200), and North Main Corona (400). The Riverside estimate assumes the availability of the additional 321 spaces now constructed on the south side of the station. Planning for additional parking will continue during the period covered by this SRTP. Now that funds have become available, the highest priority for parking is the North Main Corona Station as there is virtually no additional parking available to accommodate growth at this station. The recent approval of state grants will cover the projected construction costs for the parking structure. Increased Service Levels on the IEOC and 91 Lines Generally speaking commuter rail ridership is maximized when a full range of train schedules are available to its users. The more limited the service the less attractive it is to potential users. In concrete terms a minimum level of acceptable service during peak hours is service arriving at key work destination stations every half hour from the beginning of the peak-period until the end. This translates roughly into 5 peak-period trains in the morning and 5 in the evening, supplemented by at least one midday train in both directions. The IEOC currently has 4 peak-period trains with an hour gap between the 3rd and 4th trains. The 91 Line has 2 peak-period trains, separated by an hour. It is clear from this analysis that, despite the relative success of both lines, both are still deficient in terms of providing a minimally adequate coverage during the peak periods. By way of comparison, the San Bernardino Line, which has the highest ridership systemwide, provides twenty-minute headways during peak- periods. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 15 RCTC is not the sole source of funding of these two services. RCTC partners with SANBAG and OCTA on the IEOC and with OCTA and LACMTA on the 91 Line. In order to add service, RCTC requires the financial commitment from the relevant agencies. RCTC recently participated in the development of Metrolink’s 30-year Strategic Assessment project. This plan defines future service levels and the funding requirements for them. This plan was presented to the Commission in February and formally adopted. Currently, SCRRA lacks the equipment required to add the needed 5th IEOC a.m. peak-period round trip or any additional service on the 91 Line. Based upon the current financial performance of the two lines, the added revenue from new service will likely be sufficient to offset the direct train operating costs. Thus the primary obstacle to early implementation of new service is the availability of equipment. When the equipment procurement for new cars is complete in 2008- 09, the principal obstacle to needed additional service will be eliminated. Although the equipment has not been assigned to particular routes at this time, the 91 and IEOC lines demonstrate the greatest need for expansion. Train Equipment to Address Overcrowding Metrolink’s continued ridership growth and popularity puts a strain on equipment and leads to overcrowding on some peak trains. To address this, Metrolink is working on a number of alternatives to meet demand. Metrolink operates 39 in- service locomotives and 153 commuter rail cars. In addition, Metrolink has two older locomotives now overhauled for commuter use, resulting in 41 operational locomotives. In 2004, Metrolink leased 12 rail cars and 1 locomotive from Sounder Rail in Seattle, to ease overcrowding. In 2006, Metrolink awarded a contract to Rotem for 87 new rail cars. Delivery of this new equipment is expected in December, 2008. To make matters worse, train incidents over the past few years have damaged several cars beyond repair, requiring the lease of an additional 4 cars from the Altamont Corridor Express. Riverside Line On-Time Performance Issues The Riverside Line operates on the Union Pacific Railroad’s main line, Los Angeles Subdivision. Therefore, dispatching of these trains is controlled by UP. Since service began on this line in 1993, it has been plagued by recurring and severe delays along the route. Matters came to a head in 2002 and 2005 when Metrolink sent the UP a notice of non-performance. The letter triggered a contract enforcement process that required the UP to respond to Metrolink within 30 days. UP met with Metrolink and over a period of several months, both agencies crafted a solution to better integrate freight and passenger train movements on that line. Since that time service has improved significantly. For the year 2003 inbound trains averaged 92% on time while outbound trains also averaged 92%. This RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 16 improved trend continued the first half of 2004, but starting in September, the performance sharply dropped in the first half of FY 04/05 but improved in the second half of the year. However in February and March of 2006 a major track replacement project along the UP Los Angeles subdivision created significant delay and annulments along the route. Track repairs continued along the line and connecting UP subdivisions through March 2007. Metrolink staff worked hard to notify the riders and provided bus bridges to try to offset the inconvenience. Most riders were able to use the 91 Line or San Bernardino line during the construction. The UP has now concluded track repairs on its lines through Southern California. Riverside Line passenger trips and on-time performance has thus returned to previous levels with 4,826 passenger trips in February, reflecting a near full recovery of the route. The Riverside Line will continue to be a focus of attention during the SRTP period. To the extent that staff is confident that service is continually reliable, promotional and marketing activities will be initiated to re-introduce county residents to this service. With natural growth, the Riverside Line should already be carrying between 5,300 and 5,800 riders daily. Strategic Assessment and Operating Cost Allocation Formula In 2004, Metrolink began a Strategic Assessment process to develop a long-term growth plan with year 2010, 2020 and 2030 horizons. The key element of the plan is a very detailed ridership forecast to determine demand and increased service levels. From the service level projections, a comprehensive analysis of railroad capacity and equipment needs has been developed. This project has provided a definitive list of needed capital projects and prioritized them in sequence order to provide for continuing growth of the system. There is also a comprehensive cost analysis to forecast increases in operational and capital costs. With the recent completion of the Strategic Assessment in December, 2006, the process for determining the cost allocation is complete and comes into effect in FY 08. RCTC Station Rehabilitation and Preventative Maintenance Plan The Station Rehabilitation and Preventative Maintenance Plan will coordinate the station planning efforts with SCRRA’s 30 year Strategic Assessment. This plan will provide an organized approach to the short term and long term rehabilitation and maintenance needs of the commuter rail stations owned and operated by RCTC. As the stations are aging, it is important to ensure that there is a plan to keep them maintained to the excellent standard of safety and utility that RCTC expects. In addition, this plan will identify the current and future financial needs of the commuter rail stations in Riverside County. Elements of the plan will address parking capacity and future parking requirements, facility maintenance RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 17 issues, and a strategic assessment to analyze the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the rail station programs. The plan will evolve over time as more experience is gained with the long term station maintenance issues. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 18 REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS Feeder services to stations are vital to the success of commuter rail in Western Riverside County. Coordination and consultation with transit providers and local agencies is an ongoing process. Connecting transit to stations in Western Riverside County is provided by RTA, Omnitrans, Corona Dial-A-Ride, and the Corona Cruiser. Once again, RTA, RCTC, and Metrolink continued to work together to increase awareness of the RTA bus connections at the RCTC Metrolink stations. Ads regularly appear in the RTA Ride Guide promoting free RTA transfers from Metrolink stations and the Ride Guide includes the five Metrolink Stations in its Route Directory Listing. Additionally, Metrolink occasionally helps promote the RTA CommuterLink service in its monthly on-board newsletter and in a coordinated flyer. In addition to its fixed routes, RTA developed CommuterLink as a contracted service to address the needs of commuters. This express service provides transit to and from Riverside Metrolink stations and transit centers during peak commuting periods. The aim of the program is to provide a viable transit alternative for commuters, helping mitigate congestion and pollution. Developed by the City of Corona, the Corona Cruiser runs on a fixed route schedule but does offer some route deviation, with advance reservation. Buses run Monday through Sunday and serve most Metrolink trains at the North Main Corona Station as well as stops throughout Corona. In 2003, RCTC negotiated a master agreement with SCRRA covering all connecting transit services at Riverside County stations. Under the agreement, SCRRA agreed to reimburse connecting carriers up to $2 per rider for all arriving and departing Metrolink passengers using the connecting services. With the agreement, Metrolink ticket holders can ride transit for free as they travel to and from a station. Feeder buses and transit services are also critically important at the destination end. For the IEOC route, dedicated OCTA shuttle buses meet all peak-period trains at Anaheim Canyon, Orange, Santa Ana, Tustin, and Irvine. Additional OCTA buses meet trains at all these stations as well as Laguna Niguel, San Juan Capistrano, and San Clemente. In Los Angeles, commuters can choose from any of the 18 EZ Pass operators for free connections in both directions with a valid Metrolink ticket. These services include all of the Metro rail lines (Red, Blue, Green, and Gold), all Metro Rapid and Local buses, the City of Los Angeles DART buses, and a number of Municipal Operators. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 19 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Public participation regarding service levels is largely garnered through the bi- annual on-board survey. Public hearings are held prior to any service changes. Daily receipt of feedback from the public is sought through Metrolink’s 1-800- 371-LINK (5465) and website www.metrolinktrains.com. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 20 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Since the first three lines opened in October 1992, the system has experienced tremendous growth with operating levels and ridership greatly exceeding initial projections. Forecasts for the coming fiscal year show the system’s average daily ridership will have increased to 43,018, an increase of 7.7% from the current fiscal year budget. RCTC will use the following performance indicators under the PIP Program to measure the effectiveness of the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 Lines: Category Goal FY 07/08 Targets Farebox Recovery Ratio 40% or higher 40% Operating Cost per Revenue Hour CPI increase $530.96 Unlinked Passenger Trips Min 2% Annual Growth 2,240,822 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.20 or less 0.15 – 0.21 Passenger Miles per Rev Car Mile 30 or more 30 Riverside Line Indicator FY05/06 Audited FY06/07 Budget FY07/08 Proposed Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,250,348 1,199,883 1,174,127 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.13 $0.16 $0.15 Farebox Recovery Ratio 48.7% 46.5% 53.0% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.25 $0.31 $0.31 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $5.09 $6.06 $5.31 Operating Expense/Train Mile $61.58 $73.23 $71.12 Revenue Recovery 48.7% 50.0% 56.4% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 5 car set) 48.39 47.71 45.93 IEOC Line (exempt) Indicator FY05/06 Audited FY06/07 Budget FY07/08 Proposed Unlinked Passenger Trips 966,012 1,135,104 1,244,630 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.13 $0.24 $0.24 Farebox Recovery Ratio 52.9% 39.0% 42.6% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.28 $0.40 $0.41 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $4.44 $7.76 $7.53 Operating Expense/Train Mile $49.53 $41.43 $44.14 Revenue Recovery 52.9% 42.6% 45.8% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 4 car set) 40.56 25.89 28.21 RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 21 91 Line Indicator FY05/06 Audited FY06/07 Budget FY07/08 Proposed Unlinked Passenger Trips 501,001 539,499 577,632 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.0 $0.10 $0.21 Farebox Recovery Ratio 103.3% 61.6% 45.5% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.14 $0.23 $0.38 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $-0.16 $3.67 $7.30 Operating Expense/Train Mile $18.74 $36.67 $54.74 Revenue Recovery 103.3% 63.6% 47.2% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 4 car set) 34.57 33.81 36.30 RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 22 NEW SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION The FY2007/08 Capital and Operating Plan reflects the efficiencies implemented over Metrolink’s first fourteen years. Proposed service maximizes the use of existing rolling stock and 18 leased cars to relieve overcrowding. The FY2007/08 proposed budget is under review by all of the member agencies and concurrence is anticipated by June 2007. Riverside Line Service Level Changes No changes in regular weekday service. IEOC Line Service Level Changes Year round regular weekend service began on July 15, 2006. The service consists of two round trips from San Bernardino to Oceanside departing in the morning and returning in the afternoon on both Saturday and Sunday. In addition, on Saturdays there is one round trip departing Oceanside in the morning arriving in Riverside and returning in the afternoon. 91 Line Service Level Changes No changes in regular weekday service. OPERATING SERVICE ASSUMPTIONS FOR FY2007/08 Line/Route Weekday Trains Saturday Trains Sunday Trains Riverside 12 Riverside-LA (UP) 4 Riverside-LA* 4 Riverside-LA* IEOC 3 San Bernardino - Irvine 1 San Bernardino - Laguna Niguel 2 San Bernardino -San Juan Capistrano 2 San Bernardino - Oceanside 1 Riverside - Irvine 2 Riverside - Laguna Niguel 1 Riverside – San Juan Capistrano 4 Riverside - Oceanside 4 San Bernardino - Oceanside 2 Riverside - Oceanside 4 San Bernardino - Oceanside 91/Riv-Ful-LA 9 Riverside-LA (BNSF) *Trains run via the San Bernardino Line Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project From 1999 to 2000, funding commitments to the SJBL have been sporadic. Working with Congress, RCTC was successful in having the SJBL identified in the Federal Transportation Efficiency Act for the Twenty-First Century (TEA-21) as an eligible FTA New Start rail project. In 1998, Congress appropriated $500,000 to the SJBL. These funds have since been drawn down to conduct an Alternatives Analysis, “The San Jacinto Branch Line/I-215 Corridor Study.” Through prior action, the Commission has allocated $20 million for the implementation of passenger rail service between Riverside and Perris on the RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 23 SJBL. In June 2003, the Commission re-adopted the Locally Preferred Alternative as an IOS of the SJBL, the Perris Valley Line (Riverside-Moreno Valley-Perris) Metrolink extension of the 91 Line. This extension will consist of three peak-period round trips supplemented by a midday round trip. All trains will operate from Perris to Los Angeles via Riverside. The estimated cost to completely re-build the Branch Line, construct new stations and connection track is $189 Million for a start up of service by 2010. Staff is aggressively seeking additional federal, state, and private sources to fund this project. RCTC has submitted a formal application to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) for authorization to initiate preliminary engineering. This phase of the project will be funded 100% by funds available to RCTC. At the conclusion of final design RCTC will be seeking a Full Funding Grant Agreement (FFGA) from FTA to provide up to 50% of the total cost of the project. RCTC has identified sufficient local funds for its share of the project. The FY2007/08 capital activities associated with this project, estimated at $16,948,000, include initiation of preliminary engineering, right-of-way acquisition, and completion of the environmental assessment. Funding for additional rail capital projects for the SRTP period are outlined in Table 4 of this document. RCTC COMMUTER RAIL SRTP FY2007/08-2009/10 24 REGULATORY & COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS SCRRA is responsible for the regulatory and compliance requirements governing the use of federal and state funds in accordance with ADA and Title VI. For FY07/08, RCTC does not anticipate using State Transit Assistance Funds (STA) to fund operating expenses. STA is currently programmed as local match to rail capital projects. RCTC Commuter RailFY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit PlanTable 1 - Fleet InventoryYear Manufacturer Model Seats # Lifts/ Type Own FR Support # of Active/ Total Total Avg VehicleBuilt Ramps of or Vehicle Vehicle Vehicles Reserve/ Vehicle Veh. Sys. Lifetime OrderedFuel Lease Rehab* Miles** Failures *** ****2001 GMC F59PHI 0 0 04. DF Lease X 1 A 58,425 0 98,7511992 GMC F59PH 0 0 04. DF Own X 17 A 255,025 0 691,2541993 GMC F59PH 0 0 04. DF Own X 8 A 467,401 0 543,1281995 GMC F59PHI 0 0 04. DF Own X 8 A 350,551 0 641,8781995 GMC F59PHI 0 0 04. DF Own X 2 R 116,850 0 543,1282001 GMC F59PHI 0 0 04. DF Own X 4 A 233,701 0 246,8761985 GMC F40 0 0 04. DF Own X 1 A 58,425 0 148,126TOTAL: LOCOMOTIVES41 1,540,378 2,913,1411998 BOM BILEVEL6 140 4 Select Lease X 4 A 255025 58,3702001 BOM BILEVEL6 149 12 Select Lease X 12 A 765,076 116,7401992 BOM BILEVEL6 149 56 Select Own X 56 A 3570353 817,1781993 BOM BILEVEL6 149 30 Select Own X 30 A 1,912,689 758,8081997 BOM BILEVEL6 136 12 Select Own X 12 A 765,076 525,3282002 BOM BILEVEL6 140 26 Select Own X 26 A 1,657,664 233,4791994 BOM BILEVEL6 149 2 Select Own X 2 A 127,513 700,4381998 BOM BILEVEL6 136 11 Select Own X 11 A 701,319 466,959TOTAL: PASSENGER CARS153 5,164,261 3,677,300* A - Active, R - Reserve, MR - Major Rehab.**Use NTD Data from prior year***If year to replace has passed, need explanation of why vehicle was not replaced****Indicate when vehicle ordered or when vehicle will be deliveredLOCOMOTIVESPASSENGER CARSRevised 5/3/2007Table 1 Fleet Inventory.xls Table 2 -- RCTC Commuter Rail -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 0 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $37,352,000 $24,893,703 $33,191,600 $21,207,375 $23,261,100 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $17,522,700 $12,179,323 $15,121,400 $10,384,314 $12,483,409 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$19,829,300 $12,714,380 $18,070,200 $10,823,061 $10,777,691 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 2,996,389 2,196,884 2,874,486 1,969,864 2,541,574 Passenger Miles 102,399,288 72,073,572 99,416,313 64,820,531 84,381,671 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 71,800.0 52,753.0 54,858.0 45,367.0 54,679.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,006,960.0 2,210,944.0 2,885,249.0 1,875,260.0 2,253,944.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 3,006,960.0 2,210,914.0 1,875,260.0 0.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $520.22 $471.89 $605.05 $467.46 $425.41 Farebox Recovery Ratio 46.91% 48.92% 45.55% 48.96% 53.66% Subsidy per Passenger $6.62 $5.79 $6.29 $5.49 $4.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.19 $0.18 $0.18 $0.17 $0.13 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$276.17 $241.02 $329.40 $238.57 $197.11 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.59 $5.75 $6.26 $5.77 $4.78 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 41.7 41.6 52.4 43.4 46.5 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.00 0.99 1.00 1.05 1.13 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RCTC Commuter Rail -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Non-Excluded Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 0 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $21,020,000 $14,065,803 $18,754,400 $21,207,375 $23,261,100 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $10,563,400 $7,571,899 $9,497,600 $10,384,314 $12,483,409 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$10,456,600 $6,493,904 $9,256,800 $10,823,061 $10,777,691 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,751,759 1,294,667 1,739,382 1,969,864 2,541,574 Passenger Miles 63,068,988 46,486,698 63,320,006 64,820,531 84,381,671 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 35,233.0 25,743.0 33,302.0 45,367.0 54,679.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 1,554,030.0 1,115,110.0 1,491,217.0 1,875,260.0 2,253,944.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 1,554,030.0 1,115,080.0 1,875,260.0 0.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $596.60 $546.39 $563.16 $467.46 $425.41 Farebox Recovery Ratio 50.25% 53.83% 50.64% 48.96% 53.66% Subsidy per Passenger $5.97 $5.02 $5.32 $5.49 $4.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.17 $0.14 $0.15 $0.17 $0.13 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$296.78 $252.26 $277.97 $238.57 $197.11 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.73 $5.82 $6.21 $5.77 $4.78 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 49.7 50.3 52.2 43.4 46.5 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.13 1.16 1.17 1.05 1.13 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RCTC Commuter Rail -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 0 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $16,332,000 $10,827,900 $14,437,200 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $6,959,300 $4,607,424 $5,623,800 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$9,372,700 $6,220,476 $8,813,400 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,244,630 902,217 1,135,104 Passenger Miles 39,330,300 25,586,874 36,096,307 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 35,924.0 27,010.0 21,556.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 1,424,441.0 1,095,834.0 1,394,032.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 1,424,441.0 1,095,834.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $454.63 $400.88 $669.75 Farebox Recovery Ratio 42.61% 42.55% 38.95% Subsidy per Passenger $7.53 $6.89 $7.76 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.24 $0.24 $0.24 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$260.90 $230.30 $408.86 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.58 $5.68 $6.32 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 34.6 33.4 52.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.87 0.82 0.81 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/3/2007 Page 1 of 1 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 All Routes RCTC-91 Weekday 577,632 20,448,183 0 14,188.0 586,800.0 586,800.0 $7,746,900 $3,527,300 $4,219,600 14,188.0 RCTC-IEOC Total 1,244,630 39,330,300 0 36,567.0 1,452,930.0 1,452,930.0 $16,332,000 $6,959,300 $9,372,700 36,567.0 RCTC-UPRiv Weekday 1,174,127 42,620,805 0 21,045.0 967,230.0 967,230.0 $13,273,100 $7,036,100 $6,237,000 21,045.0 Service Provider Totals $19,829,300 $17,522,700 $37,352,000 3,006,960.0 3,006,960.0 71,800.0 71,800.0 102,399,288 2,996,389 0 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 All Routes RCTC-91 Weekday $13.20 $13.41 $546.02 $7.30 $0.21 $297.41 $7.19 40.7 0.98 45.53% RCTC-IEOC Total $11.24 $13.12 $446.63 $7.53 $0.24 $256.32 $6.45 34.0 0.86 42.61% RCTC-UPRiv Weekday $13.72 $11.30 $630.70 $5.31 $0.15 $296.36 $6.45 55.8 1.21 53.01% Service Provider Totals 1.00 41.7 $6.59 $276.17 $0.19 $6.62 46.91%$12.47 $12.42 $520.22 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 2 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RCTC-91 Weekday 577,632 20,448,183 0 14,188.0 586,800.0 586,800.0 $7,746,900 $3,527,300 $4,219,600 14,188.0 RCTC-UPRiv Weekday 1,174,127 42,620,805 0 21,045.0 967,230.0 967,230.0 $13,273,100 $7,036,100 $6,237,000 21,045.0 Service Provider Totals $10,456,600 $10,563,400 $21,020,000 1,554,030.0 1,554,030.0 35,233.0 35,233.0 63,068,988 1,751,759 0 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RCTC-91 Weekday $13.20 $13.41 $546.02 $7.30 $0.21 $297.41 $7.19 40.7 0.98 45.53% RCTC-UPRiv Weekday $13.72 $11.30 $630.70 $5.31 $0.15 $296.36 $6.45 55.8 1.21 53.01% Service Provider Totals 1.13 49.7 $6.73 $296.78 $0.17 $5.97 50.25%$12.00 $13.53 $596.60 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 2 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Excluded Routes RCTC-IEOC Total 1,244,630 39,330,300 0 36,567.0 1,452,930.0 1,452,930.0 $16,332,000 $6,959,300 $9,372,700 36,567.0 Service Provider Totals $9,372,700 $6,959,300 $16,332,000 1,452,930.0 1,452,930.0 36,567.0 36,567.0 39,330,300 1,244,630 0 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics RCTC Commuter Rail -- 6 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Excluded Routes RCTC-IEOC Total $11.24 $13.12 $446.63 $7.53 $0.24 $256.32 $6.45 34.0 0.86 42.61% Service Provider Totals 0.86 34.0 $6.45 $256.32 $0.24 $7.53 42.61%$13.12 $11.24 $446.63 TransTrack Manager™ 5/10/2007 Page 2 of 2 RCTC Commuter RailFY 2007/08Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit Plan-Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08 (Update 4/27/07)Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 Riv-San. BndoSection 5307 - Temecula/ MurrietaSection 5307 - Hemet/San JacintoSection 5307 - Los AngelesSection 5307 - Indo-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5311CMAQTUMFFare BoxOtherAdditional Rail CostsSCRRA Operating SubsidyFY 08 RCTC Share6,356,600$ 6,356,600$ RCTC Rail Operations2,338,950$ 2,338,950$ OCTA/Metro/SANBAG Share of RIV, IEOC, 91 Trains$17,522,700$12,295,800(2)(3)Subtotal: Operating$8,695,550$8,695,550$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$17,522,700$12,295,800$0SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY08 - RCTC ShareFY 08-1$1,452,661$1,452,661(7)Perris Valley Line - Preliminary Engineering FY 08FY 08-2$10,100,000$10,100,000(4)RCTC Station Capital Improvement Program FY 08FY 08-3$500,000$500,000Perris Multimodal Facility FY 08FY 08-4$5,462,200$1,050,000$4,412,200(5)(6)Subtotal: Capital$17,514,861$500,000$0$0$1,452,661$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$1,050,000$0$14,512,200$0Total: Operating & Capital$26,210,411$9,195,550$0$0$1,452,661$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$1,050,000$17,522,700$26,808,000$0(1) Numbers tie to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification(2) Reflects Total Revenue for the Riverside, IEOC and 91 Lines(3) Subsidies provided by partner agencies, may change based on service modification still under consideration(4) Property Revenue funds from surplus rail properties to be applied to Property Acquistion for the Perris Valley Line.(5) RTA passthrough TUMF Funds(6) RTA passthrough FTA 5309 funds, Transit Enhancement (TE) Grant, and $1,000,000 of Measure A Operating Transfer In from Commuter Assistance.(7) $72,209.00 of the Rehab/Renovation includes upgrades to station signage, canopies and ticket machines, qualifying as Transit Enhancements and exceeding 5307's 1% requirementRevised 5/3/2007Summary of FY 2007/08 Funds Requested.xls 36 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER 08-1 PROJECT NAME SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY 08 – RCTC Share (of Total Costs) The RCTC share of Rehab/Renovation Projects for FY08 include: • Rail Bridge Program – River Corridor • Rail Grinding Program - Systemwide • Passenger Signage Rehabilitation Program – Systemwide • MOW Facility – Systemwide • Augment On-Rail Equipment – Systemwide • R/W compliance with new PUC rule – Systemwide • Vehicles Non-Fed – Systemwide • Vehicles Fed – Systemwide • Rolling Stock – Systemwide • Complete Communication Plan – Systemwide • Pay half of lease for 4 cars to support Rehab Program – Systemwide • Rehab TVMs; plus related support and security systems – Systemwide PROJECT JUSTIFICATION SCRRA rehabilitation/renovation projects are those projects that replace worn out assets with like or improved assets and thus extend the useful life of these capital assets. These recommendations are based upon tolerating only the most minimal & manageable risk of failure. The total proposed FY08 SCRRA Rehab/Renovation budget is $28.5 million with RCTC’s share totaling $1,452,661. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) RCTC’s share of the total project cost is $1,452,661, FTA Section 5307 funding is requested to fund RCTC’s share of the project. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED SCRRA Rehabilitation/Renovation is an ongoing annual capital maintenance investment program. Some of these projects have been delayed. In addition there are excess funds allocated in the POP for previous years that will now be reconciled into this year request. Prior year projects with an unexpended balance include FY02 $34,310.00 FY05 $345,429.00 FY03 $129,905.00 FY06 $1,041,787.00 FY04 $92,807.00 FY07 $1,125,894.00 37 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER 08-2 PROJECT NAME Perris Valley Line Preliminary Engineering FY 08 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This New Start project seeks to extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Moreno Valley and Perris via the Commission-owned San Jacinto Branch Line. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In June 2003, the Commission re-adopted the Locally Preferred Alternative as an extension of Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris. This project cost is for Preliminary Engineering. Start up of the service is projected for 2010. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) A variety of funding sources is requested to fund this project. For this portion $10,100,00.00 in property revenue will be used during this year. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA grant $2.9 million Measure A allocation $15 million 38 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER 08- 3 PROJECT NAME RCTC Station Capital Improvement Program FY 08 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project provides for capital improvements at the stations, including shelters, kiosks, parking lot resurfacing, lighting improvements, etc. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The RCTC owned Metrolink stations are an element of pride within the communities and a fundamental aspect to the system. The clean, safe, and well maintained stations provide the first impression for users of the Metrolink system. Therefore, it is important to keep them in good condition to attract new riders and retain those already taking the trains. Most of the RCTC stations are over 10 years old and are showing signs of wear. The Station Capital Improvement Program provides the funding needed to complete the variety of projects needed to keep the stations safe and in a state of good repair. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) A variety of funding sources is requested to fund this project. For this portion $500,000 in LTF is requested. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 39 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER 08-4 PROJECT NAME Perris Multimodal Facility 08 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project is a cooperative undertaking with RTA on RCTC property located on the site immediately adjacent to the downtown Perris rail depot. This facility will serve as one of Riverside’s first transit centers providing both bus and eventually Metrolink service. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In 2002, RTA approached the Commission to determine the possibility of leveraging their FTA 5309 funds with RCTC to develop a facility. After extended negotiations and an agreement to utilize available Measure A Commuter Assistance funds, RTA will initially operate and maintain the facility, passing to RCTC upon commencement of Metrolink service on the Perris Valley Line. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Two funding sources are available to fund this project. $1,000,000 in Measure A Commuter Assistance, $1,050,000 in TUMF and $1,352,472 in FTA Transit Enhancement Grant funding is requested for this project, augmented by $1,009,728 of RTA’s 5309 passthrough funds. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A Agency NameFY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 5 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10 (Updated 4/27/07)Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsSTALTFMeasure ASection 5307 - Riv-San. BndoSection 5307 - Temecula/ MurrietaSection 5307 - Hemet/San JacintoSection 5307 - Los AngelesSection 5307 - Indo-Cathedral City-Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5311CMAQTUMFFare Box (3)Other (2)SCRRA Operating Subsidy FY 09 -RCTC Share$7,000,000$7,000,000SCRRA Operating Subsidy FY 10 -RCTC Share$7,500,000$7,500,000RCTC Rail Operations - FY09$2,500,000$2,500,000RCTC Rail Operations - FY10$2,750,000$2,750,000Subtotal: Operating$19,750,000$19,750,000SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY09 - RCTC Share09-1$1,000,000$1,000,000Perris Valley Line - Final Design & Construction FY 0909-2$90,000,000$20,000,000$70,000,000(5)Greenway Corridor Project Perris Valley Line FY 0909-3$2,948,000$1,835,000$1,113,000(4)SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY10 - RCTC Share10-1$1,100,000$1,100,000Perris Valley Line - Final Design & Construction FY 1010-2$70,000,000$15,000,000$60,000,000(6)Subtotal: Capital$165,048,000$0$0$16,835,000$22,100,000Total: Operating & Capital$184,798,000$0$19,750,000$16,835,000$22,100,000(1) Number should tie to Table 5A - Capital Project Justification(2) The other funds will come from a combination of STIP funds and FTA New Starts Funding.(3) Farebox funds are not included because they are already applied to the SCRRA Operating Subsidy.(4) TE Grant Project(5) FTA New Starts(6) FTARevised 5/3/2007Summary of Funds RequestedFY 2008/09 FY 2009/10 .xls 41 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER 09-1 PROJECT NAME SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY09 – RCTC Share (of Total Costs) PROJECT DESCRIPTION SCRRA rehabilitation/renovation projects are those projects that replace worn out assets with like or improved assets and thus extend the useful life of these capital assets. These recommendations are based upon tolerating only the most minimal & manageable risk of failure. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION These projects are important for the continued safety and efficient performance of equipment and track that RCTC has funded in the past. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Anticipate $1,000,000 in Rail FTA Section 5307 to fund this project cost. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 42 PROJECT NUMBER 09-2 PROJECT NAME FTA New Start Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension FY 07/08 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This New Start project seeks to extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Moreno Valley and Perris via the Commission-owned San Jacinto Branch Line. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In June 2003, the Commission re-adopted the Locally Preferred Alternative as an extension of Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris. An Alternatives Analysis and Preliminary Engineering has already been programmed and included in the SRTP. This project cost is for Final Design and subsequent Construction, both contingent upon FTA approval. Start up of the service is projected for 2010. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) A variety of funding sources is requested to fund this project. Principally, FTA New Starts (discretionary) is proposed to fund 50% of the project cost. The remainder of the funds is comprised of FTA 5307, Measure A, and other sources. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 43 PROJECT NUMBER 09-3 PROJECT NAME Greenway Corridor Project Perris Valley Line PROJECT DESCRIPTION The RCTC railroad corridor, known as the San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) is largely surrounded by undeveloped open land. With the proposed expansion of Metrolink commuter rail service (Perris Valley Line), the Greenway Corridor Project would improve three sections of the right of way with landscaping and pedestrian paths. The three sections are along Watkins Drive in Riverside, Meridian Parkway in Riverside and 4th Street in Perris, CA. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The current state of the SJBL rail corridor, is desolate and an eyesore for the local communities. The greenway Corridor Project will take these areas and transform them into green corridors that will complement the otherwise well maintained streets where the rail corridor parallels them. The project will dramatically improve the quality of life and community for those located along the PVL Corridor. By renovating these areas into a well maintained and landscaped corridor it will bring a greater sense of pride to the community. For example, the University Neighborhood Association is a long time proponent of landscape improvement along Watkins Drive and supports this project. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Two funding sources are requested to fund this project. $1,113,000 in Transit Enhancement Grant funds and $1,835,000 in Measure A Funds. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 44 PROJECT NUMBER 10-1 PROJECT NAME SCRRA Rehab/Renovation FY10 – RCTC Share (of Total Costs) PROJECT DESCRIPTION SCRRA rehabilitation/renovation projects are those projects that replace worn out assets with like or improved assets and thus extend the useful life of these capital assets. These recommendations are based upon tolerating only the most minimal & manageable risk of failure. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION These projects are important for the continued safety and efficient performance of equipment and track that RCTC has funded in the past. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Anticipate $1,100,000 in Rail FTA Section 5307 to fund this project cost. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 45 PROJECT NUMBER 10-2 PROJECT NAME FTA New Start Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension FY 10 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This New Start project seeks to extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Moreno Valley and Perris via the Commission-owned San Jacinto Branch Line. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In June 2003, the Commission re-adopted the Locally Preferred Alternative as an extension of Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris. An Alternatives Analysis and Preliminary Engineering has already been programmed and included in the SRTP. This project cost is for Final Design and subsequent Construction, both contingent upon FTA approval. Start up of the service is projected for 2010. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) A variety of funding sources is requested to fund this project. Principally, FTA New Starts (discretionary) is proposed to fund 50% of the project cost. The remainder of the funds is comprised of FTA 5307, Measure A, and other sources. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED N/A 46 Table 6 – Progress to Implement FTA Triennial Performance Audit Prior Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2003/04 – FY 2005/06) Action(s) Taken And Results Need to establish enhanced procurement procedures in line with FTA guidelines. Consultant was retained to develop new procurement procedures and a manual for RCTC. The plan was submitted and approved by FTA with some minor modifications. Need to update Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG). MOU has been completed and signed. A copy was forwarded to FTA. Table 7 - Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) ReviewRCTC Commuter Rail Systemwide Performance -- FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit PlanData ElementsFY 2008 PlanFY 2008 Performance Target *Performance ScorecardCommentsOperating DataUnlinked Passenger Trips2,996,389Passenger Miles102,399,288Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours7,180Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles2,885,249Total Actual Car Revenue Miles2,885,249 Total Operating Expenses$37,352,000 Total Passenger Fare Revenue$17,522,700 Net Operating Expenses$19,829,300Performance IndicatorsMandatory:Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour*$520.22$530.96Meets TargetFarebox Recovery Ratio*46.91%40.00%Meets TargetDiscretionary:Subsidy Per Passenger$6.62$4.92 - $6.66Meets TargetSubsidy Per Passenger Mile$0.19$0.15 - $0.21Meets TargetSubsidy Per Train Hour$276.17$204.87 - $277.17Meets TargetSubsidy Per Train Revenue Mile$6.59$4.89 - $6.61Meets TargetPassengers Per Train Revenue Hour41.735.4 - 47.8Meets TargetPassengers Per Train Revenue Mile1.84 - 1.14Meets TargetUnlinked Passenger Trips3,006,9602,987,762Meets TargetPassenger Miles per Revenue Car Miles35.4930 or moreMeets TargetNote: Must meet at least 3 out of 6 Discretionary Performance Indicators* Based on FY 2006/07 3rd quarter actuals 48 Table 8 – Highlights of SRTP for Presentations Specific highlights of the FY2007/08 Budget include: o Implementation of an average 3.5% fare increase; o Preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of the Perris Valley Line (Riverside - Moreno Valley – Perris) Metrolink extension project; o Construction of the Perris Multimodal transit center; o Final design and construction of the North Main Corona Parking Structure; o A 15.39% or $847,800 increase in RCTC’s operating subsidy primarily due to an updated cost allocation formula that more evenly distributes the costs among member agencies. Operating & Financial Data FY01/02 FY02/03 FY03/04 FY04/05 FY05/06 FY06/07 Projected FY07/08 Planned Systemwide- Riverside Ridership 1,893,595 2,248,269 2,458,920 2,541,574 2,700,117 2,874,486 2,996,389 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hours N/A $459 $425 $425 $459 $472 $531 M 2010 Short Range Transit Plan CONNECTING with opportunity Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................1 INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................2 A. Fixed-Route Services .....................................................................................3 B. Paratransit Services .......................................................................................3 C. Fare Structure ................................................................................................4 D. Vehicles in Fleet ............................................................................................4 E. Potential Population to Be Served .................................................................5 F. Facilities .......................................................................................................................6 SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS......................................................7 RIDER CHARACTERISTICS ..............................................................................7 PASSENGER AMENITIES..................................................................................7 SERVICE-RELATED ISSUES.............................................................................8 REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS........................8 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION...................................................................................9 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS .................................................................9 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS...................................11 CONSOLIDATED TRANSPORTATION SERVICES AGENCY.........................12 PROPOSED FY 2007/08 SERVICE CHANGES:...................13 Existing Service Changes..................................................................................13 Seasonal Service Changes ...............................................................................16 New Service Implementation and Evaluation ....................................................16 Tables: System Map 17 Comparative Statistics Summary 18 Table 1 Fleet Inventory 20 Table 2 Transit Service Summary 22 Table 3 Individual Route Information 25 Table 3A Route Descriptions 39 Table 4 Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08 42 Table 4A Capital Project Justification 43 Table 5 Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 & 2009/10 66 Table 5A Capital Project Justification 67 Table 6 Progress to Implement Triennial Performance Audit 90 Table 7 PIP Review 93 Table 8 Highlights of SRTP for Presentations 94 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) is celebrating thirty years of service in western Riverside County. When RTA first opened its doors on March 16, 1977, it had 60 employees, 6 routes, and 26 buses. By fiscal year 2007, it had grown to over 3501 employees, 48 fixed-routes, and nearly 200 buses. To mark RTA’s thirtieth anniversary, this Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) highlights RTA’s commitment to move forward with service improvements for the years to come. The service plan for FY 2008 will feature many enhancements over the previous year to meet the growing population within western Riverside County that continues to reshape and redefine travel patterns. RTA is proposing significant improvements and possible total restructuring based on recommendations that will result from the Agency’s service plan and the Agency’s completion of the Comprehensive Operational Analysis expected in early summer 2007. The service modifications set forth in FY 2008 will focus on three core areas of improvement: 1. Streamlining – To improve service to serve major streets and corridors; reduce circuitous routing; reduce duplication of service; and improve connectivity to other routes. 2. Headways – To improve clocked scheduling, frequencies, and connectivity to other routes. 3. Growing Communities – To improve routes in communities that have seen a significant increase in population and show a demand for added transit service. This will include a review of how more schools, community facilities, and housing developments can be better served. In FY 2008, RTA has planned to operate 653,225 revenue service hours and 10,505,058 revenue service miles. This is an increase of approximately 5% for both revenue service hours and miles over FY 2007. Ridership is also expected to increase over 3% for a total of about 7.2 million trips system-wide. Directly operated fixed-route ridership is expected to increase by 1%, contracted fixed- route ridership is estimated to increase 12%, and Dial-A-Ride is estimated to increase 11%. The operating budget covers service provided on directly operated fixed-routes, contracted fixed-routes, and DAR – including taxi overflow. Total Agency revenues for FY 2008 are budgeted at $63.3 million, with $54.2 million projected for operating expenses and over $9.0 projected for capital improvements. 1 Excludes 281contracted employees operating 47% of RTA service. 1 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 INTRODUCTION RTA’s service area is the second largest in the nation, covering approximately 2,500-square-miles of western Riverside County. Included in the service area are the incorporated cities of Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto and Temecula, and numerous unincorporated areas of the County of Riverside. Unlike other agencies its size, RTA is unique in that it provides service in both urban and rural areas. Urbanized and rural areas are defined by the Bureau of Census and are based on population size. The urbanized areas served by RTA are of Riverside/San Bernardino, Hemet/San Jacinto, and Temecula/Murrieta. The map shown below illustrates RTA’s service area and its neighboring counties. According to the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), from 2000 to 2005, the total population in the WRCOG region grew about 25 percent. With this significant growth in population, RTA is challenged by the changing demographics in various communities and continues to be proactive to plan routes that are customer oriented, viable, efficient, and cost effective. 2 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 A. Fixed-Route Services In FY 2008 RTA will have a total of 48 fixed-routes. A fixed-route is a route that provides regularly scheduled service, and can be categorized into three basic types: ƒ Express Routes: Routes designed to move more rapidly than a local route by limiting bus stops and taking advantage of High Occupancy Vehicle lanes and facilities. These routes are generally offered during peak commute periods to offer an alternative to driving solo. ƒ Regional Routes: Routes designed to travel a great distance to link travelers from one community to another, creating a network throughout the service area. These routes are generally offered throughout the day from the peak AM period and beyond the PM peak period on major corridors. ƒ Local Routes: Routes that primarily operate within urban communities. The routes generally offer service throughout the day and evening on major arterials and local streets and serve as feeder routes to regional and express routes. In FY 2008, RTA will operate 6 express routes and 42 regional and local routes. Depending on the level of ridership and density of an area, a fixed-route will either be directly operated or contract operated. A directly operated route is managed in- house and has cost that is fully burdened with the Agency’s overhead. A contract operated route is managed by a third party and carries only a portion of the Agency’s overhead. Generally, the cost of a directly operated fixed-route is nearly double than that of a contracted route. Refer to Table 3A for a complete list of the directly operated and contract operated routes. B. Paratransit Services RTA offers paratransit services known as “Dial-A-Ride,” to seniors and persons with disabilities. Dial-A-Ride is a demand-response service for qualified individuals who are provided transportation with advanced scheduling. A taxi overflow program is also used to supplement the demand response service in the event of capacity constraints. In the cities of Corona, Beaumont and Banning, RTA coordinates regional services with those cities’ municipal transit systems. In the City of Riverside, RTA coordinates with the City's Riverside Special Services, which provides Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) complementary service to RTA's fixed-route services. 3 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 C. Fare Structure In April 2005, RTA increased fares for the first time in over five years. The following is the current fare structure approved and adopted by the Board of Directors. Fare Category Cash Fares 1-Day Passes 7-Day Passes 10-Trip Passes 31-Day Passes General $1.25 $3.75 $12.00 $11.00 $43.00 Youth $1.25 $3.75 $32.00 Senior/Disabled $0.60 $1.85 $21.00 Child $0.25 Fixed Route Fares Fare Category Cash Fares 1-Day Passes 31-Day Passes General $2.25 $3.75 $43.00 Youth $2.25 $3.75 $32.00 Senior/Disabled $0.60 $1.85 $21.00 Fare Category Within Riverside County General $1.25 $2.90 ($1.65 additional fare) Youth $1.25 $2.90 ($1.65 additional fare) Senior/Disabled $0.60 $0.85 ($0.25 additional fare) Commuter Fares Travel to Orange County Routes 202, 204, 206, 208 Route 149 Dial-A-Ride Fares Senior/Disabled $2.50 Child $0.50 Senior/Disabled 10-trip ticket book $25.00 Personal Care Attendants No Charge Senior/Disabled Buddy Fare Program- Allows up to 10 individuals to share the cost of one fare $2.50 In FY 2007, the 7-Day and 10-Tripper passes were added to provide riders with a more affordable way to travel. The popularity of these new fare passes are growing and is expected to continue in FY 2008. D. Vehicles in Fleet RTA’s fleet of vehicles as of February 2007 consists of a total of 184 vehicles for its fixed-route services, which includes 111 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) 40-ft. buses; 13 CNG 30-ft.- 32-ft. buses; 51 mini-buses for contracted fixed-routes; 6 trolleys, and 3 30-ft. diesel buses which are used as spares and will retire in 2009. RTA also has an additional 64 vans that are used for paratransit services, for a 4 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 total of 248 revenue service vehicles. Refer to Table 1 for detailed list of the Fleet Inventory. The CNG 40-ft. buses are used for directly operated services that are generally in more densely populated areas such as Riverside, Moreno Valley, Perris and surrounding communities; while the 30-ft.-32-ft. CNG buses and 22-ft.-24-ft. mini- buses are typically used as Commuter Link vehicles on contracted fixed-routes. All RTA vehicles comply with clean fuel policies and come fully equipped with ADA accessible wheelchair lifts, including its paratransit vans. Additionally, all fixed- route service vehicles are equipped with bicycle racks. In FY 2007, RTA operated a total of 127 fixed-route peak-hour vehicles and 59 paratransit vehicles throughout the service area with a 33% spare ratio fleet-wide. In FY 2008, RTA will operate a total of 138 fixed-route peak-hour vehicles and 66 paratransit vehicles throughout the service area for a spare ratio of 26% fleet-wide. E. Potential Population to Be Served While RTA services are for the general public, the Agency has begun placing more emphasis on commuter services as a market segment with growth potential. Since their implementation in September 2003, four Commuter Link routes provide access to Oceanside, Montclair, Ontario, and to Metrolink stations in Riverside and Corona. In addition, two other express routes, Route 149 (Riverside to Orange County) and 16E (Moreno Valley to Riverside), were designed for commuter travel. Riders who utilize these routes are responding so well to the service that many customers perceive the branding of the Commuter Links to be an important facet of the service because of the exclusive amenities such as the upholstered seating, wireless internet, and cable service available on-board. To expand on this market base, RTA will explore funding opportunities for these routes under the Commuter Assistance Program administered by RCTC. Another growing group of customers that is highlighted in the service plan are students in grade school and college. RTA is committed to working with school districts and colleges and universities to provide public transit service. For grade schools, RTA maintains and updates a database containing information such as location, bell schedules, and school and district boundaries for routing and scheduling purposes. At the college level, RTA continues to develop and build relationships with college and university officials to improve transportation for their students. Most recently in September 2006, RTA and the University of California, Riverside (UCR) entered into a funding agreement to develop Route 51 (“Crest Cruiser”) and the UPASS, which allows UCR students complementary access to any of RTA’s fixed-routes. RTA will continue these types of efforts to improve service near school campuses where ridership is noticeably higher. 5 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 F. Facilities RTA’s main facility is located in Riverside and houses the Administration, Operations, and Maintenance departments with approximately 320 active employees at this site. RTA’s secondary facility is located in Hemet and was opened in June 2000 and has about 54 employees currently working in the Maintenance and Operations departments. The Hemet facility is utilized for routes in the southern portion of the service area and maintains 18 CNG vehicles out of the facility. RTA is very proactive in maintenance efforts, adhering to all Federal Transit Administration (FTA) mandated Preventive Maintenance Inspection criteria. FTA criteria are used as a guide for vehicle replacement. 6 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS In FY 2007, RTA is expected to operate 622,942 revenue hours and 10,022,379 revenue miles, with a total budget of just under $44 million. In FY 2007, ridership was up about 150,000 boardings from the previous year, approximately a 2% increase over FY 2006. In FY 2008, ridership is expected to increase by approximately 3% over FY 2007 to 7.2 million trips system-wide. Directly operated fixed-route ridership is expected to increase by 1% to approximately 5.8 million boardings, and contracted fixed- route ridership is estimated to increase 12% for over 1.0 million boardings. Overall, Dial-A-Ride ridership is projected to increase by 11%. ADA services continue to keep pace with existing demand and service expansion. RIDER CHARACTERISTICS Rider characteristics are accumulated from the Title VI on-board survey per Federal Transit Administration (FTA) guidelines. The 2007 Title VI on-board survey is expected to be completed by November 2007, however, the characteristics from the prior Title VI on-board survey conducted in October 2004 is still considered pertinent. The 2004 on-board surveys found that the largest ethnic group of RTA riders is Hispanic (34%), followed by White/Caucasian (30%). The gender split was determined at 53% for females and 47% for males. Of the total riders surveyed, the majority were found to be between the ages of 18 and 34 years old; 35% indicated that they have been using transit for more than two years, and 70% indicated incomes of less than $20,000 annually. The survey also concluded that most trips are for work, school, shopping, and medical purposes. PASSENGER AMENITIES In May 2007, RTA will mark the start of the innovative Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS), which relays real time arrival information to kiosks displayed at major transfer points. With ATIS comes the ability to determine the exact location of every 40-ft. bus, and in turn allows for schedule adherence to be greatly enhanced. The innovative technology is coupled with the plans to continue the aggressive program to improve transit amenities. Existing shelters are continuously refurbished and new benches, trash receptacles and kiosks have also been placed at many bus stops. New bus benches are more graffiti-resistant and discourage loitering. Furthermore, over 300 new bus turnouts have been constructed since 2003 as a result of staff coordination with local developers. Using the number of boardings and alightings per stop, bus stop shelters will be placed at stops based on the number of boardings per day (minimum of 50) and at major activity centers such as senior centers and retail centers. Bus stop signs, 7 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 benches, and trash receptacles will continue to be placed at as many of the approximate 4,000 stops as feasible. RTA staff will continue to work with jurisdictions to make as many bus stops ADA accessible as possible. SERVICE-RELATED ISSUES As one of the fastest growing areas in the State of California, on-time performance has become an issue overall as traffic has increased throughout Riverside County. Utilizing replacement equipment that arrived in FY 2006, RTA added vehicles to existing routes in an effort to ensure on-time performance, especially during peak hours. As part of RTA's participation in the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Project, and as a result of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) study findings, RTA hopes to gain participant cities’ backing to provide signal prioritization for buses in order to better adhere to schedules and for the foundation of BRT whose ultimate goal is faster service. The provision of ADA services remains a challenge as service requests continue to increase and the number of ADA eligible riders continues to grow. As of March 2007, the total year-to-date monthly variance showed a 15% growth. Much of this growth is attributed to the expanding “baby-boomer” generation requiring Dial-A- Ride services. To manage the growth as seen in Dial-A-Ride, RTA is now providing paratransit service exclusively for seniors, persons with disabilities and ADA certified riders. RTA plans to continue utilizing taxi overflow service only as needed. REGIONAL SERVICES AND ADJACENT TRANSIT SYSTEMS RTA coordinates regional service with its neighboring transit agencies in Riverside and adjacent cities and counties. Among the agencies that RTA partners with include RCTC, WRCOG, SCAG, Southern California Air Quality Management District (AQMD,); transit agencies such as Metrolink, SunLine, Omnitrans, OCTA, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), and the North County Transit District (NCTD); and local cities. Following is a summary of milestones and issues that are being addressed through RTA’s partnerships with these other agencies. ƒ In the northeast, RTA closely coordinates services with Omnitrans and currently provides transfer opportunities in Colton, Country Village, Grand Terrace, Loma Linda, Montclair, and Redlands. Transfers in Montclair and Redlands are currently being evaluated to identify possibilities to increase ridership. In addition, Route 204 is also scheduled to connect to the Omnitrans network in Montclair and Ontario. ƒ In the southwest, RTA coordinates Route 202 into Oceanside to connect with the NCTD service network and San Diego’s Coaster train. RTA is also a member of the I-15 Interregional Partnership with SANDAG and Caltrans to study and strategize how traffic flow between the two counties can be improved. 8 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 ƒ In the west, RTA has an Memorandum of Understanding with OCTA to share in the costs of RTA’s Route 149 and OCTA’s Route 794. Both routes provide commuter services between Orange and Riverside counties. ƒ Transfer agreements have been made with the City of Corona, Omnitrans, and Southern California Regional Railroad Authority (SCRRA) – more commonly known as Metrolink. ƒ In the cities of Corona, Beaumont and Banning, RTA coordinates regional services with each City’s municipal transit systems. ƒ In the City of Riverside, RTA coordinates with the City's Riverside Special Services, which provides ADA complementary service to RTA's fixed-route services. ƒ RTA staff also continues coordination efforts with social service agencies in scheduling paratransit trips especially during RTA peak service times. ƒ RTA has also engaged in private-public partnerships, such as the Harveston Shuttle to better utilize vehicles and reduce cost. The Harveston Shuttle, anticipated to commence September 2007 as Route 55, is a community route within a master planned community that provides connections to various activity centers and other routes, and is subsidized by the housing developer. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION RTA provides numerous ways for the public to communicate their concerns, suggestions and requests. These include public hearings held annually for the budget and SRTP adoption, opportunities at monthly Board of Director meetings for public comment, opportunities at quarterly ADA meetings held alternatively in Riverside and Hemet, postal mail, email, telephone (through the RTA telephone information center), in person at the RTA headquarters, RTA staff who attend numerous community meetings throughout the service area, and interactively through RTA’s website. All comments are logged and investigated or reviewed by the appropriate staff member, and, if requested, a response is provided. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS RCTC implemented the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) in September 2005 to monitor performance of each transit operator under their jurisdiction. Using the PIP as a basis, the transit operators develop their SRTP using the following performance indicators to establish targets: • Cost per Revenue Hour • Farebox Recovery Ratio • Subsidy Per Passenger 9 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 • Subsidy Per Passenger Mile • Subsidy Per Revenue Hour • Subsidy Per Revenue Mile • Passengers Per Revenue Hour • Passengers Per Revenue Mile It is mandatory that the first two targets be met plus a minimum of three of the six remaining indicators. For FY 2007, RTA will meet or exceed all eight performance indicators at the system-wide level. However, at the individual route level, performance results are not all 100% PIP compliant due to the population density and other factors that affect route productivity and service demand. System-wide performance results are as follows: Systemwide Systemwide FY07 FY08 PIP Indicators Estimate Proposed Low End High End Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour 72.33$ 76.54$ N/A 75.95$ Farebox Recovery Ratio (Full Up) 18.87% 18.04% 17.66% Subsidy Per Passenger 5.33$ 5.76$ 4.53$ 6.13$ Subsidy Per Passenger Mile 0.78$ 0.85$ 0.66$ 0.90$ Subsidy Per Revenue Hour 59.98$ 63.78$ 50.98$ 68.98$ Subsidy Per Revenue Mile 3.73$ 3.97$ 3.17$ 4.29$ Passengers Per Revenue Hour 11.25 11.07 9.56 12.94 Passengers Per Revenue Mile 0.70 0.69 0.60 0.81 * GASB ARC expense included in PIP indicator calculations. (1) The "full-up" farebox recovery ratio includes other revenues such as subsidizes, as approved by RCTC. Target * RTA’s proposed FY 2008 service profile and operating budget is in compliance with all PIP targets except Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour (OCRH). The FY 2008 target is based on the FY 2007 recurring operating expenses, plus the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) 43/45 Annual Required Contribution (ARC), plus 5.0% for a Consumer Price Index (CPI) adjustment. Costs for GASB 43/45 pre-fund above ARC are included in the Operating Budget but are exempt from PIP calculations. The FY 2007 total estimated OCRH is $72.33; therefore, the FY 2008 target is $75.95. The proposed FY 2008 OCRH is $76.54, a 5.8% increase in OCRH. The FY 2008 PIP figures include the GASB 43/45 Annual Required Contribution (ARC). A profile of growth in excess of CPI is shown below. 10 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 FY2007 Forecast (Recurring) 43,322,310$ GASB 43/45 ARC 1,734,921 Subtotal - PIP Target Setting 45,057,231$ GASB 43/45 Pre-Fund 7,217,779 FY2007 Forecast 52,275,010$ CPI Increase (5.0%) 2,252,862 FY2007 Forecast + CPI 54,527,872$ Growth in Excess of CPI GASB 43/45 ARC (60,135) GASB 43/45 Pre-Fund (2,944,445) Salaries & Benefits (open positions, fringe benefit) 387,770 Purchased Transportation (FY08 Rates & Service Growth) 1,196,556 Materials & Supplies (Parts & Fuel) 690,288 Advertising & Promotion 108,484 Other Expenses (Services, Utilities) 366,079 Growth In Excess of CPI (255,403)$ FY2008 Proposed Budget 54,272,469$ The increase in salaries and benefits is attributed to filling open budgeted positions and increased health benefit rates. Purchased transportation growth is attributed to the negotiated FY 2008 contract rates and planned increased service level on contracted routes. Other growth includes, but is not limited to, anticipated increases in CNG, unleaded gas, marketing, utilities, and facilities-related services. As stated above, there is a 5.8% increase in OCRH over estimated FY 2007. FY 2008 operating expenditures are forecasted to increase 11% over forecasted FY 2007 year-end. The change (increase) in Revenue Service Hours (RSH) from FY 2007 (622,942) to FY 2008 (653,225) is 4.9%. The additional percentage increase to OCRH over the Revenue Service Hours growth of 4.9% and CPI growth of 5.0% is due to expected additional costs as detailed above. RTA will request an OCRH waiver from the RCTC primarily based on cost growth over CPI for CNG, unleaded gas, and benefits. If approved, this waiver will reset the FY 2008 OCRH target to the proposed $76.54. REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS RTA complies with all ADA regulations and has had no ADA denials in FY 2007. RTA’s last Title VI report to the FTA was submitted in and approved November 2004. The next Title VI update submittal will be completed by November 2007. RTA’s Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program was approved in December 2001, and the goals are updated annually. Previous triennial audit findings have been resolved and recommendations have been implemented. The 2007 TDA Triennial Audit has been completed but findings have not been released as of the submittal date of this report. 11 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 CONSOLIDATED TRANSPORTATION SERVICES AGENCY RTA’s role as a Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) for western Riverside County is to coordinate paratransit services throughout the approximate 2,500-square-mile service area; provide driver training and technical workshops; assist with processing grant applications, and develop RTA’s SRTP. Also, RTA staff periodically meets with social service providers, bus riders, and advocacy agencies through forums such as the Riverside Transportation Commission Citizens Advisory Committee, RTA’s ADA Committee meetings, and quarterly regional transit operators’ meetings with other service providers. 12 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 PROPOSED FY 2007/08 SERVICE CHANGES: The service modifications set forth in FY 2008 will focus on three core areas of improvement: 4. Streamlining – To improve service to serve major streets and corridors; reduce circuitous routing; reduce duplication of service; and improve connectivity to other routes. 5. Headways – To improve clocked scheduling, frequencies, and connectivity to other routes. 6. Growing Communities – To improve routes in communities that have seen a significant increase in population and show a demand for added transit service. This will include a review of how more schools, community facilities, and housing developments can be better served. Following is a description of the service changes that will be implemented in FY 2008. For a comprehensive overview of the impact in ridership, hours, miles, and costs for each route below, refer to the Comparative Statistics table. Existing Service Changes Routes 1 & 1X: Route 1 is a regional route that currently has the highest number of boardings in the RTA system with over 122,000 boardings per month. It operates from Big Springs & Watkins in Riverside to the West Corona Metrolink Station and takes an average of 1.75 hours to complete one trip. Given the length and time that is required to complete one trip, the route will operate more effectively and efficiently by dividing the route into two, Route 1 and 1X. Ridership reports will be used to determine where the division point should occur and when the most passengers get on and off along the route. With this change, it is expected that improved headways, on-time performance, and increased ridership will result. This change is planned to take effect September 2007. Routes 7 & 8: Routes 7 and 8 will be changed concurrently since they are intertwined local routes in the City of Lake Elsinore. These routes serve the Outlet Center, Wal-Mart, the Inland Valley Regional Medical Center, and various retail centers and schools in the community. As a result of the significant growth in population in southwest Riverside County over the last five years, these routes have become two of the most productive contracted routes in the system with an average of 7,700 and 6,600 boardings per month, respectively. As a result of the growth, the routes will be modified to better serve more arterial streets, improve headways and frequencies, and provide better connectivity to other routes. This change is planned to take effect May 2008. Route 14: Route 14 is a local route that currently operates from the University of California, Riverside, to the Galleria at Tyler and has an average of 13,200 boardings per month. Customer comments and suggestions received show that a demand for additional service nearby the Hunter Business Park is needed. This 13 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 would extend Route 14 approximately 5 miles and add about 20 minutes to the AM and PM peak hours and will give customers access to the many employment centers at this location. This change is planned to take effect September 2007. Route 16E: Route 16E currently operates as an Express Route from Moreno Valley to the Riverside Marketplace Metrolink Station, with limited stops at Perris & Sunnymead and Perris & Alessandro. With the growing trend in commuter services, this route will be improved with 2 additional trips in the morning and evenings. This change is planned to take effect September 2007. Route 17: Route 17 currently operates in Moreno Valley between the Moreno Valley Mall and the Wal-Mart at Moreno Beach Drive. Route 17 has been restructured twice in the last two years due to low performance and will be realigned in September 2007 to better accommodate the local bell schedules of the middle and high schools along the route since students represent a high percentage of the ridership. In addition, the Transportation-NOW, Moreno Valley Chapter is also involved in the restructuring of this route and will provide suggestions on how the route can be improved to better serve its community. Route 18 & 18A: Routes 18 & 18A currently operate in the City of Moreno Valley. Route 18 travels from the Moreno Valley Mall to Riverside Community College (Moreno Valley Campus), and Route 18A travels from the Sunnymead Ranch community to the Moreno Valley Mall and to Riverside Community College (Moreno Valley Campus). Due to a service designed to compete for the same riders, these routes will be restructured to eliminate the duplication and reduce costs which may include service reductions. This change is planned to take effect May 2008. Route 23: Route 23 is a local route in the Murrieta/Temecula area and operates a circuitous alignment with stops at the Inland Valley Hospital, the Wal-Mart at Murrieta Hot Springs & Madison, City Hall, County Center Drive, and the Senior Center. In May 2008, this route will be broken up into at least two different routes that will serve the City of Murrieta. With the growing demand for service in this area, the new routes will travel to new office and commercial corridors along both sides of Interstate 15 between the new Murrieta Civic Center and the Promenade Mall area in Temecula. Places that will be served include the Hancock Ave Medical Corridor, Sam’s Club, County Offices on Ynez Road, a Transit Loop near the Promenade Mall, the new Town Center on Jefferson Avenue where City Hall is located, the Madison Avenue Shopping District as well as several of the middle schools and high schools. Route 24: Route 24 is a local route in the City of Temecula that operates from County Center Drive at the northern end of the City to the Wal-Mart on Highway 79 at the southern end of the City. Currently, this route has stops at County offices, the Temecula Library, shopping and retail centers on Rancho California Road and State Route Highway 79, Old Town Temecula, and Pechanga Resort. When this route is restructured in May 2008, it will be broken up into at least two routes that 14 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 will be more streamlined to include more shopping centers on Winchester Road that extend to the French Valley area, and provide service to more schools. Route 33: Route 33, known as the “Lady Bug Shuttle,” is a circulator route in Hemet that has stops at the Hemet Valley Mall, the Hemet Valley Hospital, and the major surface streets of Florida, Sanderson, and San Jacinto. With the growth in population and establishments of more housing developments in Hemet, the Route 33 will be streamlined and restructured to provide better connectivity in January 2008. Should the performance of the route not improve, this route will be subject to elimination. Route 36: Route 36 is a local route from Beaumont and Banning to Calimesa. Route 36 will be modified in September 2007 to provide better service in these cities. The route will be evaluated to determine if other trip generators are possible. If the evaluation concludes that ridership will not be enhanced, the route will be subject to elimination. Route 38: Route 38 currently operates from the Pedley Metrolink Station to the Riverside Community College- Norco Campus. Route 38 will be extended in September 2007 to provide better service in the Jurupa and Eastvale areas and to schools. Route 42: Route 42, known as the “Estudillo Express” is a local route for the City of San Jacinto. This route will be improved in May 2008 when it is restructured and extended to the Hemet Valley Mall and Wal-Mart. Route 50: Route 50, the “Red Line,” formally known as the “Jury Trolley” was restructured in May 2007 with the elimination of the Third St. & Market segment after it was determined that the Third St. Parking Lot would no longer be available for juror parking. The route will continue to serve the other juror designated parking lots at the Eden Lutheran Church and Calvary Presbyterian Church. Route 52: Route 52, the “Green Line,” started in May 2007 and is tailored to meet the needs of those traveling within downtown Riverside. This route has stops at the Hall of Justice, City Hall, the Convention Center, Mission Inn, employee parking garages, the County Administrative Building, Marketplace Metrolink Station, and easy access to various eateries. Route 61: Route 61, the “Scooter” is a local route for the community of Sun City that has stops at the Menifee Valley Medical Center, Cherry Hills Golf Club, Sun City Town Center, and Loma Linda Medical Building. The route will be evaluated to determine if other trip generators are possible. If the evaluation concludes that ridership will not be enhanced, the route will be subject to elimination. Route 206: Route 206 is a Commuter Link route that runs from Temecula to the North Main Street Metrolink Station in Corona. This service will be extended on the weekends as an express route, but instead of terminating at the North Main Street Metrolink Station, it will end at the Tyler Galleria in the City of Riverside. This change will provide customers with more options for travel across the service area. 15 Short Range Transit Plan • FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Jurupa Senior Shuttle: The Jurupa Senior Shuttle is a circulator route that operates 5 trips daily on weekdays and provides access between the Jurupa, Rubidoux, Mira Loma, and Norco communities. In September 2007, this route will be renumbered and restructured to travel on major surface streets. Seasonal Service Changes Route 202: Route 202 is a Commuter Link service from Temecula & Murrieta to the Oceanside Transit Center. During the summer, more midday trips will be added to attract customers, mainly students, to take advantage of the opportunity to go to the beach. This program will run in conjunction with RCTC’s summer beach trains that will be provided by Metrolink. This program will run from June 18 to August 31, 2007 on weekdays only. Holiday Trolley: The Holiday Trolley is a service offered in Corona and Norco for two consecutive weekends in December and provides the community with access to various shopping venues for the holiday season. This program will celebrate its sixth year anniversary in 2008 and will be operated in conjunction with the cities of Norco and Corona as well as the Corona Cruiser. Festival of Lights: The Festival of Lights is a service offered to numerous communities in the service area such as Hemet, Perris, Temecula, Murrieta, Calimesa, Banning, Beaumont, and Mead Valley and allows customers the opportunity to visit and celebrate in the holiday festivities in downtown Riverside on Main Street. New Service Implementation and Evaluation Route 55: Harveston Shuttle: The Harveston Shuttle is scheduled to be implemented in September 2007. This route will primarily serve the Harveston residential community in Temecula and will be funded by the developer, Lennar Communities. The Harveston Shuttle will operate five days a week during AM and PM peak hours. The schedules will connect to Commuter Links 202 and 208 in addition to nearby schools, community centers and to other RTA route transfer points. The route will be evaluated after the first year of operation to determine if projected ridership figures are being met. If the route does not meet ridership goals within the first year, ridership trends will also be evaluated to predict whether ridership is likely to reach a sufficient level within two years. 16 Rt 204 continues to Montclair Transit Center. 1 11 3 13 1820 20 35 35 3520 22 4141 4141 2222 22 30 3027 27 7474742727 2 7 27222240 406161 402222 2138 3838 49 4938 2 0212121 18 18A18A 18A191919 18A13 16 171716E16 E 16161414 14131212 12292929 121015 15 151025 25 10 1 149 149149733 3204204 206206204 206 208 208 20 8 208 208 208LincolnIndianaIndianaHolePierce SterlingMercedRiverwalkPiercePierceMagnoliaTylerTylerCaliforniaColoradoMagnoliaOlivewoodMainMarlborough Spruce Center BartonBarton University BentonVictoriaMagnoliaMagnolia6th St 6th St Sixth St Arlington Arlington Van BurenVan BurenVan B u r e n Missi o n B l v d Van Buren Van Arlington L a S i e r r a La SierraLa SierraCaliforniaMain StBelleHamnerSmithDetroit SierraRincon Jurupa Merrill RiversideC r e s t MonroeCentral Cridge Central Eucalyptus Eastridge FrederickCottonwood Cottonwood CactusCactus Cottonwood Towngate IronwoodOld Lake RdHemlock Manzanita HeacockHeacockPigeon PassIndianLasselleLasselleMoreno BeachKitchingNasonEucalyptus JFK Ramona Expwy Ra m o n a E x p w yIrisIris Krameri a Sunnymead Sunny m e ad Ranch Alessandro Orange Terrace Mission Grove Pkwy Ale s s a n d r o TrautweinAlessandro CenterpointCenterpointCenterpoint University Washin gt o n L o c h m o o r Fair IsleCentral BigSprings Box Springs Watk i n s MtVernonEucalyptusIowaMichiganCampusChicagoWoodOleander Rider Orange AvocadoMedical Center DrCajalco Cajalco Cajalco AlexanderClarkClarkBrown StCowieCentral Riverside ThedaMa r k h a m Old E ls inoreCyn CrestCynCrestDay StElsworth3rd/Blaine < Rt 149 to Villageat Orange < Rt 1 to W. CoronaMetrolink Station N. Main St.Metrolink Station 15 15 15 15 15 15 91 91 74 74 74 74 Co l l i e r Wa l n u t Chane yFraser Rus s e l l Cent e r Colu m b i aLa CadenaOrangeOrangeBrocktonBrocktonBrocktonBrocktonStreeterPhoenixHarrison14th ML King Horace91 60 60 60 60 60 Perris BlvdPerris B lvd MorrisonPerris BlvdEvans Rd215 215 215 215 215 215 215 Gentian Morgan San Jacinto San Jacinto Ellis Nichols Navajo Nuev o Nuevo WilkersonRedlands Av4th St Rider St 4th St 11th Ellis GoetzA StD StWeston La MoreMcCall McCall Ethanac Rd Shadel Cherry HillsSun CityEncantoBradleyLindenbergerValley BlvdConniePortsmouthMurrietaNewport Rd Simpson Chambers Sun City LaPiedraAntelope MenifeeNewport Rd Railroad Cyn Rd Go e t zWebsterIndianMarlay Philadelphia Mission Blvd Mis s i o n B l v d LimoniteLimonite 3rd Limonit e Santa Ana RiverRubidouxPacific42nd / T i l t o n Market24th Bellegr ave 50th MulberryCountryVillageCabernetFelsparPedleyClayEtiwandaMartinEclipseLucretiaJurupa The Pedley MetrolinkStation Buren PERRIS CANYON LAKE QUAIL VALLEY SUN CITY MENIFEE PERRIS MORENO VALLEY LOMA LINDA GRAND TERRACE RIVERSIDE WOODCREST CORONA NORCO JURUPA LAKE ELSINORE Wal-Mart RCC RTA Norco Library Swan LakeMHP Country Village Corona RegionalMedicalCenter Lake ElsinoreOutlet Center RCC Norco Galleria at Tyler BrocktonArcade Downtown Terminal MorenoValleyMall RCCMoreno Valley Starcrest Mead Valley Community Center Mt San Jacinto College-Menifee Fire Station Cherry HillsClub RCR MedicalCenter Moreno ValleyCommunityHospital Loma Linda Medical Center Pettis Memorial VAMedical Center City Hall Menifee Valley Medical Center Loma LindaMedical Center Wal-Mart Lake Perris LakeMathews Canyon Lake CityHall City Hall CityHall FullertonVintage TerraceSenior Community 35 35 36 3 6 36 31 31BEAUMONT BANNING CALIMESAREDLANDS 60 79 10 K-Mart Lamb CanyonCal imesa B lvd DesertLawn County Line Rd HighlandSpringsInset Map 1 < Rt35 continued on Main Map < Rt 31 continuedon Inset Map 2CityHallRedlandsMall City Hall 10 Redlands Blvd CitrusEureka 6th St36 74 74 272731 31424232 32 33 33 33 79 SAN JACINTO HEMET VALLE VISTA Fruitvale Menlo FloridaFlorida Main Ra m o n a E x p w y W 7th So b o b a De A n z a Esplanade La Entrada Lake Park DrKirbyKirbyLyonLyonSandersonGilbertGilmorePalmStateBuena VistaStateSan JacintoWarrenHewittMistletoeSantaFeDevonshire Devonshire Stetson Johnston Wentworth Mustang Scaramella Acacia San Marcos Acacia Oakland Acacia LathamLatham Mayberry Thornton RTA Mt. San Jacinto College Soboba Casino < Rt 27 continued on Main Map Rt 27 to Grant, Palm & Lincoln > < Rt74 continued on Main Map < Rt79 to Simpson and continued on Inset Map 4 Rt 31 continuedon Inset Map 1 >HemetMedicalCenter Inset Map 2 27 31 32 33 74 79 Hemet Valley Mall Hemet Valley Mall 74 79 City Hall City Hall T StetsonCawston 40 40 4023 23 232222 788 8 7 15 Riverside Dr Gra n d A v e Pal o m a r Prielipp W a s h i n g t o n Je f f e r s o n Ha y e s KalmiaJuniperNightHawk Nutmeg Clinton KeithClintonKeith TenajaCalif. OaksCentralSt BaxterRd Bundy Canyon Rd Mission TrailLakeshore Dr Railroad Cyn Rd Co l l i e r Wa l n u t Graha m Pottery MalagaDia m o n dCasino Chaney Centr al Fraser LAKE ELSINORE MURRIETA WILDOMAR Lake Elsinore OutletCenter SeniorCenter MissionTrailLibrary Wal-Mart Inland ValleyRegional MedicalCenter 74 CANYON LAKE Inset Map 3 Rt23, 206 continued on Inset Map 4 > Rt208 continuedon Inset Map 4 Rt22 continued on Main Map >Rt206 continuedon Main Map >Rt40 continued on Main Map > CherryHills Newport Rd RailroadCyn RdCity Hall Rt7 continued on Inset Map 3 > Rt206 continued on Inset Map 3 < Rt40 continued on Inset Map 3 2 0 6 20 6 2 0 6 797924 24 24 TEMECULA Murrieta Hot Springs MurrietaHot Springs YnezSolana Front Pe c h a n g a P k w y Ri d g e P a r k B u s i n e s s P a r k Margarita Rd Ma r g a r i t a R d Wolf Vall e y R dRancho Calif.Rancho Calif.Rancho VistaPaubaYnez RdDiaz MeadowsCounty CntrEquity D rLosAlamosAltaMurrietaWhitewood WinchesterWal- Mart PechangaResort Temecula Wal-Mart Vail Ranch &Camino Piedra Rojo TemeculaMid.Sch. Promenade Mall RanchoSpringsMedicalCenter 15 15 15 215 79 79 Inset Map 4 Rt79 to Simpsonand continued onInset Map 2 >Rt23 continuedon Inset Map 3 >Rt 202 co ntin ues t o Ocea nsi de. CityHall City Hall CommunityCenter 24 23 2 0 62082 0 2 2 0 2 1 10 12 20 13 14 15 Brockton Arcade 19 22 208 27 30 74 4th & Wilkerson 16 17 18 35 208 18A 19 Moreno Valley Mall 1 10 12 21 27 13 14 149 15 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 16 22 13 14 25 204 Omnitrans 15 49 14929 Downtown Terminal Rt35 continued on inset Map 1 > Rt74 continuedon Inset Map 2 > Rt27 continued on Inset Map 2 > T T T T T © 2006 Riverside Transit Agency. Effective Date: January 29, 2006 Route Number Route Path Transfer Points Metrolink Station Legend Points of Interest Medical Facility Alternate Routing City Boundaries 41 Main Roads Interstate State Highways Water Welcome aboard the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), your community transportation provider. The RTA operates 44 bus routes to provide you with safe, cost-effective and reliable service in western Riverside County. We hope that this System Map is useful to you in planning your trip. Should you need additional information, please call the Customer Information Center at 1-800-800-7821 or (951) 565-5002. 1-800-800-7821 or (951) 565-5002 www.RiversideTransit.com MAP NOT TO SCALE FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 D/O Routes: 1 1,461,319 1,056,043 55,987 40,667 609,063 443,773 1,528,865$ 1,096,006$ 5,101,728$ 3,999,986$ 1 Extension 401,999 15,479 168,926 417,213$ 1,522,507$ 10 238,438 239,267 15,423 15,608 178,145 184,519 241,042$ 239,942$ 1,405,385$ 1,535,195$ 12 228,638 228,638 15,024 15,157 186,021 191,878 213,563$ 211,853$ 1,369,004$ 1,490,835$ 13 262,905 267,563 14,401 14,741 170,971 176,062 250,977$ 253,377$ 1,312,286$ 1,449,918$ 14 158,474 189,748 10,148 11,937 99,054 121,704 156,925$ 186,388$ 924,739$ 1,174,118$ 15 416,061 416,061 18,432 18,544 206,621 215,559 416,286$ 412,952$ 1,679,541$ 1,823,979$ 16 1 624,415 651,826 38,819 39,198 353,301 368,300 593,886$ 614,991$ 3,537,306$ 3,855,496$ 17 53,433 53,433 9,201 9,230 116,067 120,090 49,446$ 49,050$ 838,402$ 907,858$ 18 125,037 125,037 9,816 9,860 109,630 113,001 129,083$ 128,050$ 894,508$ 969,825$ 18A 106,675 106,675 10,115 10,185 132,468 135,554 113,086$ 112,180$ 921,681$ 1,001,792$ 19 366,063 367,062 14,411 14,516 198,910 200,518 366,975$ 365,029$ 1,313,145$ 1,427,787$ 20 231,401 231,426 15,364 15,452 228,611 232,023 200,940$ 199,351$ 1,400,049$ 1,519,851$ 21 132,201 132,201 10,427 10,528 154,353 155,897 122,400$ 121,420$ 950,146$ 1,035,529$ 22 336,945 341,511 19,234 19,656 342,790 345,983 310,789$ 312,478$ 1,752,624$ 1,933,355$ 25 193,167 193,167 9,956 10,025 112,535 118,708 179,832$ 178,390$ 907,207$ 986,054$ 27 374,287 374,287 23,920 24,104 510,662 540,375 361,440$ 358,545$ 2,179,630$ 2,370,858$ 29 118,743 119,428 9,764 9,888 134,928 144,035 112,286$ 112,029$ 889,758$ 972,579$ 49 234,279 234,279 10,772 10,869 140,665 143,097 215,695$ 213,968$ 981,558$ 1,069,070$ 149 71,940 72,109 6,555 6,599 163,145 165,909 228,743$ 233,131$ 597,286$ 649,074$ 206 2 20,126 24,318 1,490 1,803 50,967 63,189 38,990$ 47,149$ 135,770$ 177,342$ Festival of Lights 918 918 60 60 793 793 914$ 884$ 5,467$ 5,902$ 5,755,463 5,826,996 319,317 324,106 4,199,700 4,349,892 5,832,163$ 5,864,376$ 29,097,220$ 31,878,910$ % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 1% 1% 4% 1% 10% Contracted Fixed Routes 3 55,459 55,590 11,429 11,558 147,345 148,422 51,670$ 51,377$ 557,280$ 565,986$ 7 94,190 96,373 7,472 7,675 129,564 130,996 95,093$ 96,517$ 364,962$ 375,839$ 8 78,727 86,051 7,640 7,987 167,244 170,698 74,698$ 80,994$ 373,289$ 391,117$ 23 75,893 92,749 13,422 15,634 193,361 224,384 74,003$ 89,715$ 659,933$ 765,585$ 24 47,592 62,822 9,431 11,940 127,008 168,889 47,788$ 62,575$ 461,837$ 584,693$ 30 72,607 72,730 8,281 8,300 121,983 122,019 66,037$ 65,619$ 402,903$ 406,445$ 31 71,273 71,432 7,447 7,508 161,145 162,141 65,666$ 65,285$ 365,099$ 367,661$ 32 69,633 72,266 5,919 6,172 81,289 81,869 63,454$ 65,327$ 291,730$ 302,238$ 33 26,271 26,311 10,617 10,640 144,275 144,514 21,511$ 21,370$ 516,640$ 521,033$ 35 18,790 18,956 3,508 3,540 107,520 108,270 12,921$ 12,931$ 171,650$ 173,351$ 36 15,365 15,399 5,862 5,880 142,632 144,303 11,417$ 11,351$ 285,292$ 287,939$ 38 19,106 21,903 6,010 6,575 112,993 115,100 19,266$ 21,910$ 292,337$ 321,973$ 40 33,415 33,583 6,721 6,765 123,855 124,823 32,520$ 32,422$ 326,763$ 331,277$ 41 35,710 43,985 3,815 4,501 68,095 68,850 38,194$ 46,667$ 188,694$ 220,411$ 42 15,067 16,989 3,713 3,990 33,515 36,906 9,560$ 10,694$ 180,557$ 195,387$ 50 3 32,917 24,407 3,110 2,156 24,947 16,240 115,584$ 90,000$ 128,198$ 105,578$ 51 3 18,148 24,082 3,535 3,990 38,454 43,344 29,576$ 39,278$ 144,153$ 231,557$ 52 3 10,062 61,381 839 5,115 7,035 51,096 35,331$ 210,000$ 37,816$ 250,478$ 55 3 14,305 5,423 20,579 301,100$ 405,212$ 61 7,889 7,933 2,679 2,698 48,940 49,150 5,784$ 5,770$ 212,227$ 227,128$ 74 51,883 54,975 6,488 6,816 149,007 149,249 47,289$ 49,707$ 514,824$ 577,486$ 79 40,065 41,515 7,322 7,551 168,975 171,165 36,182$ 37,191$ 572,823$ 627,756$ 202 17,727 19,262 4,295 4,678 130,391 141,315 23,959$ 25,824$ 211,819$ 242,024$ 204 30,346 30,504 6,151 6,197 180,413 181,560 26,747$ 26,671$ 483,859$ 523,677$ 206 2 29,347 29,347 2,984 3,103 110,041 103,245 58,564$ 58,095$ 203,169$ 267,806$ 208 36,773 36,773 6,987 7,014 198,692 200,430 59,061$ 58,588$ 341,407$ 361,926$ Jurupa Senior Shuttle 2,469 2,517 1,204 1,275 20,364 26,010 2,028$ 2,051$ 42,219$ 44,711$ Holiday Trolley 287 287 64 64 902 902 2,600$ 2,515$ 3,439$ 3,957$ 16 Bridge Service 5,049 1,148 17,263 -$ 55,504$ 794 120,000$ 150,000$ 120,000$ 150,000$ 1,012,059 1,134,427 158,092 174,743 2,957,248 3,106,466 1,246,503$ 1,791,544$ 8,510,423$ 9,830,231$ % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 12% 11% 5% 44% 16% TOTAL FIXED ROUTES 6,767,523 6,961,423 477,409 498,849 7,156,948 7,456,358 7,078,666 7,655,920 37,607,643 41,709,141 % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 3% 4% 4% 8% 11% Total Contracted Fixed Routes Total D/O Routes Riverside Transit Agency Comparative Statistics: Proposed FY2008 vs. FY2007 Actual FY 2008/09 - FY 2009/10 Summary Short Range Transit Plan Unlinked Passengers Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Operating Expenses (4)Fare Revenue 2:53 PM 5/7/2007 18 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 FY2007 FY2008 Riverside Transit Agency Comparative Statistics: Proposed FY2008 vs. FY2007 Actual FY 2008/09 - FY 2009/10 Summary Short Range Transit Plan Unlinked Passengers Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Operating Expenses (4)Fare Revenue Dial-a-ride Routes: Banning/Beaumont 217 242 214 282 5,569 6,709 491$ 542$ 11,350$ 14,456$ Calimesa 163 181 163 173 4,032 3,842 497$ 550$ 9,030$ 8,945$ Lake Elsinore 10,891 12,106 7,325 7,823 152,417 163,012 23,884$ 26,340$ 407,772$ 413,820$ Grand Terrace 3,700 4,113 2,887 2,904 63,961 66,456 8,023$ 8,848$ 142,576$ 155,226$ Hemet & Homeland 43,296 48,127 20,646 21,774 369,436 388,368 115,230$ 127,271$ 1,019,182$ 1,148,865$ Jurupa 7,309 8,125 4,915 5,227 92,630 97,304 20,041$ 22,142$ 241,921$ 274,422$ Moreno Valley 33,359 37,081 20,506 22,397 379,495 409,840 75,280$ 83,037$ 1,050,634$ 1,177,602$ Murrieta 22,303 24,791 15,011 15,991 304,602 323,548 52,374$ 57,789$ 739,200$ 843,398$ Norco 20,340 22,609 9,723 9,935 174,970 177,917 59,046$ 65,254$ 495,668$ 524,850$ Perris 22,809 25,354 14,201 15,091 310,740 329,548 58,117$ 64,166$ 700,966$ 796,510$ Riverside 51,749 57,523 33,804 35,567 662,982 697,696 131,002$ 144,634$ 1,662,507$ 1,874,977$ Sun City 12,833 14,265 7,814 8,274 150,005 160,473 31,551$ 34,828$ 389,266$ 437,689$ 228,969 254,517 137,211 145,438 2,670,839 2,824,711 575,536 635,401$ 6,870,072$ 7,670,760$ % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 11.2% 6.0% 5.8% 10.4% 11.7% Taxi Program: Banning/Beaumont 391 450 215 246 5,327 6,392 1,135$ 1,299$ 16,177$ 17,620$ Calimesa 204 235 116 118 3,326 3,490 517$ 593$ 9,095$ 9,528$ Lake Elsinore 1,087 1,251 692 696 17,682 18,621 2,894$ 3,311$ 49,326$ 51,215$ Grand Terrace 544 626 416 461 9,507 11,530 1,457$ 1,666$ 30,210$ 31,881$ Hemet & Homeland 1,815 2,089 1,076 1,177 25,742 30,626 5,073$ 5,805$ 77,535$ 84,414$ Jurupa 451 519 204 215 4,631 5,231 1,252$ 1,429$ 13,858$ 14,497$ Moreno Valley 1,279 1,472 759 786 15,956 17,668 3,479$ 3,980$ 47,800$ 49,300$ Murrieta 1,536 1,768 923 987 21,127 23,429 4,093$ 4,679$ 62,277$ 65,065$ Norco 1,119 1,288 636 646 14,803 16,897 3,159$ 3,614$ 42,438$ 46,555$ Perris 1,577 1,816 1,175 1,290 28,657 33,754 4,236$ 4,848$ 85,629$ 92,995$ Riverside 3,212 3,695 1,739 1,931 39,156 46,894 8,950$ 10,234$ 119,951$ 129,979$ Sun City 687 790 370 386 8,677 9,456 1,951$ 2,209$ 25,220$ 26,189$ 13,900 15,999 8,322 8,938 194,592 223,989 38,196$ 43,667$ 579,516$ 619,238$ 15.1% 7.4% 15.1% 14.3% 6.9% TOTAL DAR 242,869 270,516 145,533 154,376 2,865,431 3,048,700 613,732 679,068 7,449,588 8,289,998 11.4% 6.1% 6.4% 10.6% 11.3% GRAND TOTAL * 7,010,392 7,231,939 622,942 653,225 10,022,379 10,505,058 7,692,398$ 8,334,988$ 45,057,231$ 49,999,139$ 3.2% 4.9% 4.8% 8.4% 11.0% 1 Statistical data for Route 16E is consolidated with Route 16. 2 Route 206 has selected trips that are directly operated, with the majority remaining contract operated. 3 Exempt routes include Routes 50, 51,52 and 55. 4 Operating Expenses do not include GASB expenses, which are included as part of the total budget but are not used to calculate PIP targets. * Note: Totals shown above may be slightly different from Transtrack tables due to rounding. Total Dial-a-ride Routes Total Taxi Routes % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 % Change-FY08 vs. FY07 2:53 PM 5/7/2007 19 Riverside Transit AgencyFY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit PlanTABLE 1 - FLEET INVENTORYYear Manufacturer Model Seats Lift- TypeOwn FR DARSupportActive/Total TotalYear toVehicleBuilt Equip? of orVehicleVehicleVehicle Reserve/VehicleVeh. Sys. Replace OrderedFuel Lease Rehab* Miles** Failures *** ****1994 Chance Coach AH-28 25 Yes CNG Own 4 A 128,508 2004 1/1994 Chance Coach AH-28 25 Yes Diesel Own 1 A 205,810 2004 1/1995 Flxible Metro 40102 44 Yes CNG Own 4 R 325,152 20071995 Flxible Metro 40102 44 Yes CNG Own 10 A 313,544 20071996 Chance Coach AH-28 25 Yes CNG Own 1 A 157,076 2006 1/1997 New Flyer C40LF 44 Yes CNG Own 3 A 310,180 20091999 El Dorado National EZ Rider 30 25 Yes Diesel Own 3 A 259,494 20092001 NABI 40LFW-15 44 Yes CNG Own 47 A 263,726 20132002 NABI 40LFW-15 44 Yes CNG Own 47 A 238,344 20142003 Thomas SLF232G 27 Yes CNG Own 10 A 221,410 20132004 Thomas SLF232G 27 Yes CNG Own 3 A 103,632 2014TOTAL: BUSES 1331998 El Dorado National Aerotech 240 12 Yes Gas Own 1 A 279,584 2002 2/2000 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 6 9 A 290,823 2004 3/2000 Goshen Coach GCII 15 Yes Gas Own 1 A 315,346 2004 3/2001 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 9 A 282,179 2005 3/2002 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 22 6 A 271,140 2006 2/2004 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 10 A 175,498 20082005 El Dorado National Amerivan 5 Yes Gas Own 5 A 61,973 20092005 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 8 4 A 120,294 20092006 El Dorado National Amerivan 5 Yes Gas Own 1 21 A 51,827 20102006 El Dorado National Aerotech 220 12 Yes Gas Own 12 A 73,187 2010TOTAL: VANS AND MINI-BUSES 51 64BUSESVANS AND MINI-BUSESRevised 4/27/2007Table 1 Fleet Inventory.xls 20 Riverside Transit AgencyFY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit PlanTABLE 1 - FLEET INVENTORYYear Manufacturer Model Seats Lift- TypeOwn FR DARSupportActive/Total TotalYear toVehicleBuilt Equip? of orVehicleVehicleVehicle Reserve/VehicleVeh. Sys. Replace OrderedFuel Lease Rehab* Miles** Failures *** ****1998 Chevrolet 3500HD 3 No Gas Own 2 A 125,606 20021999 Chrysler Jeep Cherokee 5 No Gas Own 1 A 96,400 20031999 Chevrolet Astro 7 No Gas Own 1 A 108,161 20031999 Ford Taurus Wagon 5 No Gas Own 1 A 111,919 20032001 Chevrolet 3500HD 3 No Gas Own 2 A 101,779 20052001 Chevrolet Malibu 5 No Gas Own 5 A 82,764 20052002 Chevrolet 2500 3 No Gas Own 2 A 58,462 20062002 Ford Taurus Sedan 5 No Gas Own 5 A 86,007 20062003 Chevrolet C4500 3 No Gas Own 2 A 73,758 20072003 Ford Crown Victoria 5 No Gas Own 2 A 68,945 20072004 Ford Taurus Sedan 13 No Gas Own 13 A 56,618 20082004 Ford Crown Victoria 4 No Gas Own 4 A 78,183 20082004 Ford E-350 XLT 8 No Gas Own 1 A 10,765 20082005 Ford Focus ZXW Wagon 5 No Gas Own 3 A 23,135 20092006 Ford F250 Super Duty 3 No Gas Own 5 A 11,968 2010TOTAL: SUPPORT VEHICLES 49* A - Active, R - Reserve, MR - Major Rehab.** Average vehicle miles as of 3/13/07***If year to replace has passed, need explanation of why vehicle was not replaced****Indicates when vehicle was ordered or when vehicle will be delivered____________________________*** All inventory as of February 28, 2007 and may be different as of July 2007 due to acquisition and disposal.1/ Currently being used for Route 50 (Jury Trolley) and Route 51 (UCR Trolley). These are Trolley type vehicles with historical value. 2/ Replacement vehicle will be ordered upon approval of FY2007 grant. Estimated approval by 9/30/07.3/ Twenty three (23) replacement vehicles have been delivered but not yet placed in service.SUPPORT VEHICLESRevised 4/27/2007Table 1 Fleet Inventory.xls 21 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 154 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $54,272,469$32,798,537$43,665,697$41,099,028$36,763,677 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $8,334,988$5,771,855$7,447,919$7,145,882$6,629,186 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$45,937,481$27,026,682$36,217,778$33,953,146$30,134,491 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,231,9395,245,5307,142,5896,849,1667,357,581 Passenger Miles 49,229,26335,471,08348,614,04646,014,92549,249,994 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a)653,228.0466,664.3600,414.0602,582.6603,425.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b)10,505,063.07,506,260.39,638,781.09,620,866.49,795,083.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,182,768.08,679,148.911,152,919.011,092,108.111,334,574.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $83.08$70.28$72.73$68.20$60.93 Farebox Recovery Ratio 15.35%17.59%17.05%17.38%18.03% Subsidy per Passenger $6.35$5.15$5.07$4.96$4.10 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.93$0.76$0.75$0.74$0.61 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$70.32$57.91$60.32$56.35$49.94 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.37$3.60$3.76$3.53$3.08 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a)11.111.211.911.412.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b)0.690.700.740.710.75 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 1 22 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 8 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $1,014,485$399,143$487,658$2,832,903$178,948 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $640,379$39,346$140,914$283,800$23,266 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$374,106$359,797$346,744$2,549,103$155,682 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 124,17545,86641,993242,898239,806 Passenger Miles 1,093,986404,079406,7542,139,9312,112,691 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a)16,684.08,405.49,659.053,081.151,469.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b)131,259.0175,308.0151,714.01,169,148.41,178,810.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 138,976.0190,994.0173,774.01,438,424.41,394,408.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $60.81$47.49$50.49$53.37$3.48 Farebox Recovery Ratio 63.12%9.85%28.89%10.01%13.00% Subsidy per Passenger $3.01$7.84$8.26$10.49$0.65 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.34$0.89$0.85$1.19$0.07 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$22.42$42.81$35.90$48.02$3.02 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$2.85$2.05$2.29$2.18$0.13 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a)7.45.54.34.64.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b)0.950.260.280.210.20 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 1 23 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit Plan Non-Excluded Routes FY 2004/05 Audited FY 2005/06 Audited FY 2006/07 Plan FY 2006/07 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2007/08 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 146 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $53,257,984$32,399,394$43,178,039$38,266,125$36,584,729 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $7,694,609$5,732,509$7,307,005$6,862,082$6,605,920 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$45,563,375$26,666,885$35,871,034$31,404,043$29,978,809 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,107,7645,199,6647,100,5966,606,2687,117,775 Passenger Miles 48,135,27735,067,00448,207,29243,874,99447,137,303 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a)636,544.0458,258.9590,755.0549,501.5551,956.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b)10,373,804.07,330,952.39,487,067.08,451,718.08,616,273.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,043,792.08,488,154.910,979,145.09,653,683.79,940,166.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $83.67$70.70$73.09$69.64$66.28 Farebox Recovery Ratio 14.44%17.69%16.92%17.93%18.05% Subsidy per Passenger $6.41$5.13$5.05$4.75$4.21 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.95$0.76$0.74$0.72$0.64 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$71.58$58.19$60.72$57.15$54.31 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.39$3.64$3.78$3.72$3.48 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a)11.211.312.012.012.9 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b)0.690.710.750.780.83 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 1 24 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-1 Total 1,056,043 6,579,1489 43,419.0 443,773.0 510,865.0 $4,482,562 $1,096,006 $3,386,55640,667.0 RTA-10 Total 239,267 1,490,6324 16,568.0 184,519.0 210,244.0 $1,720,407 $239,942 $1,480,46515,608.0 RTA-12 Total 228,638 1,424,4134 15,910.0 191,878.0 211,580.0 $1,670,696 $211,852 $1,458,84415,157.0 RTA-13 Total 267,563 1,666,9193 15,358.0 176,062.0 189,426.0 $1,624,842 $253,378 $1,371,46414,741.0 RTA-14 Total 189,748 1,182,1285 12,363.0 121,704.0 130,711.0 $1,315,768 $186,388 $1,129,38011,937.0 RTA-149 Total 72,109 449,2414 7,127.0 165,909.0 171,284.0 $727,381 $233,131 $494,2506,599.0 RTA-15 Total 416,061 2,592,0578 19,419.0 215,559.0 235,399.0 $2,044,031 $412,951 $1,631,08018,544.0 RTA-16/16E Total 651,826 4,060,87510 41,540.0 368,300.0 411,159.0 $4,320,639 $614,991 $3,705,64839,198.0 RTA-17 Total 53,433 332,8852 10,177.0 120,090.0 151,588.0 $1,017,386 $49,050 $968,3369,230.0 RTA-18 Total 125,037 778,9782 10,832.0 113,001.0 150,893.0 $1,086,828 $128,049 $958,7799,860.0 RTA-18A Total 106,675 664,5842 11,157.0 135,554.0 173,482.0 $1,122,652 $112,180 $1,010,47210,185.0 RTA-19 Total 367,062 2,286,7983 15,494.0 200,518.0 233,718.0 $1,600,041 $365,029 $1,235,01214,516.0 RTA-1X Total 401,999 2,504,4565 16,499.0 168,926.0 194,471.0 $1,706,188 $417,213 $1,288,97515,479.0 RTA-20 Total 231,426 1,441,7843 16,193.0 232,023.0 249,602.0 $1,703,212 $199,351 $1,503,86115,452.0 RTA-202 Total 19,262 169,6953 5,229.0 141,315.0 156,615.0 $248,098 $25,824 $222,2744,678.0 RTA-204 Total 30,504 268,7373 8,461.0 181,560.0 303,960.0 $531,723 $26,671 $505,0526,197.0 RTA-206 Total 53,665 410,0485 8,903.0 166,434.0 279,525.0 $470,572 $105,244 $365,3284,906.0 RTA-208 Total 36,773 323,9714 7,382.0 200,430.0 212,670.0 $371,033 $58,588 $312,4457,014.0 RTA-21 Total 132,201 823,6102 11,083.0 155,897.0 171,629.0 $1,160,459 $121,419 $1,039,04010,528.0 RTA-22 Total 341,511 2,127,6167 21,357.0 345,983.0 406,315.0 $2,166,602 $312,478 $1,854,12419,656.0 RTA-23 Total 92,749 817,1226 16,573.0 224,384.0 266,744.0 $785,884 $89,715 $696,16915,634.0 RTA-24 Total 62,822 553,4614 12,555.0 168,889.0 183,009.0 $600,196 $62,575 $537,62111,940.0 RTA-25 Total 193,167 1,203,4332 10,632.0 118,708.0 127,457.0 $1,105,016 $178,391 $926,62510,025.0 RTA-27 Total 374,287 2,331,8077 25,841.0 540,375.0 578,628.0 $2,656,888 $358,544 $2,298,34424,104.0 RTA-29 Total 119,428 744,0342 10,319.0 144,035.0 154,647.0 $1,089,915 $112,029 $977,8869,888.0 RTA-3 Total 55,590 489,7523 12,248.0 148,422.0 165,000.0 $580,993 $51,378 $529,61511,558.0 RTA-30 Total 72,730 640,7472 8,914.0 122,019.0 142,895.0 $417,221 $65,618 $351,6038,300.0 RTA-31 Total 71,432 629,3151 7,753.0 162,141.0 168,348.0 $377,409 $65,285 $312,1247,508.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 6 25 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-32 Total 72,266 636,6662 6,479.0 81,869.0 84,425.0 $310,252 $65,327 $244,9256,172.0 RTA-33 Total 26,311 231,7973 10,744.0 144,514.0 145,742.0 $534,848 $21,370 $513,47810,640.0 RTA-35 Total 18,956 167,0031 3,745.0 108,270.0 115,024.0 $177,947 $12,931 $165,0163,540.0 RTA-36 Total 15,399 135,6642 6,147.0 144,303.0 152,285.0 $295,574 $11,351 $284,2235,880.0 RTA-38 Total 21,903 192,9662 6,871.0 115,100.0 123,260.0 $330,510 $21,910 $308,6006,575.0 RTA-40 Total 33,583 295,8642 7,319.0 124,823.0 143,438.0 $340,061 $32,422 $307,6396,765.0 RTA-41 Total 43,985 387,5112 4,883.0 68,850.0 80,580.0 $226,255 $46,667 $179,5884,501.0 RTA-42 Total 16,989 149,6711 4,195.0 36,906.0 43,353.0 $200,568 $10,694 $189,8743,990.0 RTA-49 Total 234,279 1,459,5614 11,337.0 143,097.0 154,368.0 $1,198,046 $213,968 $984,07810,869.0 RTA-50 Total 24,407 215,0252 2,237.0 16,240.0 17,052.0 $108,377 $90,000 $18,3772,156.0 RTA-51 Total 24,082 212,1662 4,167.0 43,344.0 45,360.0 $236,737 $39,279 $197,4583,990.0 RTA-52 Total 61,381 540,7682 5,319.0 51,096.0 53,136.0 $257,119 $210,000 $47,1195,115.0 RTA-55 Total 14,305 126,0272 5,439.0 20,579.0 23,428.0 $412,252 $301,100 $111,1525,423.0 RTA-61 Total 7,933 69,8931 2,846.0 49,150.0 57,310.0 $230,631 $5,770 $224,8612,698.0 RTA-7 Total 96,373 849,0502 8,604.0 130,996.0 164,422.0 $385,804 $96,518 $289,2867,675.0 RTA-74 Total 54,975 484,3262 7,239.0 149,249.0 175,769.0 $586,336 $49,706 $536,6306,816.0 RTA-79 Total 41,515 365,7472 7,859.0 171,165.0 183,915.0 $637,560 $37,191 $600,3697,551.0 RTA-794 Total $150,000 $150,000 $0 RTA-8 Total 86,051 758,1084 9,044.0 170,698.0 208,768.0 $401,488 $80,994 $320,4947,987.0 RTA-Ba/Bea Total 242 2,606 402.0 6,709.0 9,917.0 $14,822 $542 $14,280282.0 RTA-Cal Total 181 1,949 238.0 3,842.0 4,869.0 $9,169 $550 $8,619173.0 RTA-FestLi Total 918 25,041 76.0 793.0 1,522.0 $6,614 $884 $5,73060.0 RTA-GT DAR Total 4,113 44,297 3,594.0 66,456.0 78,615.0 $158,997 $8,848 $150,1492,904.0 RTA-Hemet Total 48,127 518,328 27,286.0 388,368.0 479,684.0 $1,177,136 $127,271 $1,049,86521,774.0 RTA-HoliTr Total 287 2,530 83.0 902.0 1,121.0 $4,040 $2,517 $1,52364.0 RTA-JS Total 2,517 22,1761 1,729.0 26,010.0 34,129.0 $46,366 $2,051 $44,3151,275.0 RTA-Jurupa Total 8,125 87,506 6,619.0 97,304.0 118,831.0 $281,208 $22,142 $259,0665,227.0 RTA-LakeEl Total 12,106 130,382 9,836.0 163,012.0 195,168.0 $423,977 $26,340 $397,6377,823.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 2 of 6 26 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-MurDAR Total 24,791 266,999 19,760.0 323,548.0 386,576.0 $864,161 $57,789 $806,37215,991.0 RTA-MV DAR Total 37,081 399,362 27,510.0 409,840.0 481,111.0 $1,206,682 $83,037 $1,123,64522,397.0 RTA-No/Co Total 22,609 243,499 12,645.0 177,917.0 232,105.0 $537,750 $65,254 $472,4969,935.0 RTA-Perris Total 25,354 273,063 18,867.0 329,548.0 379,023.0 $816,105 $64,166 $751,93915,091.0 RTA-RivDAR Total 57,523 619,523 44,694.0 697,696.0 858,204.0 $1,921,158 $144,634 $1,776,52435,567.0 RTA-Sun Ci Total 14,265 153,634 10,400.0 160,473.0 184,406.0 $448,432 $34,828 $413,6048,274.0 RTA-TaxiBB Total 450 4,847 246.0 6,392.0 6,392.0 $17,940 $1,299 $16,641246.0 RTA-TaxiCa Total 235 2,531 118.0 3,490.0 3,490.0 $9,681 $593 $9,088118.0 RTA-TaxiGT Total 626 6,742 461.0 11,530.0 11,530.0 $32,480 $1,666 $30,814461.0 RTA-TaxiHe Total 2,089 22,499 1,177.0 30,626.0 30,626.0 $85,942 $5,805 $80,1371,177.0 RTA-TaxiJu Total 519 5,590 215.0 5,231.0 5,231.0 $14,776 $1,429 $13,347215.0 RTA-TaxiLE Total 1,251 13,473 696.0 18,621.0 18,621.0 $52,119 $3,311 $48,808696.0 RTA-TaxiMu Total 1,768 19,041 987.0 23,429.0 23,429.0 $66,346 $4,679 $61,667987.0 RTA-TaxiMV Total 1,472 15,853 786.0 17,668.0 17,668.0 $50,321 $3,980 $46,341786.0 RTA-TaxiNC Total 1,288 13,872 646.0 16,897.0 16,897.0 $47,393 $3,614 $43,779646.0 RTA-TaxiPe Total 1,816 19,558 1,290.0 33,754.0 33,754.0 $94,670 $4,848 $89,8221,290.0 RTA-TaxiRi Total 3,695 39,795 1,931.0 46,894.0 46,894.0 $132,486 $10,234 $122,2521,931.0 RTA-TaxiSC Total 790 8,508 386.0 9,456.0 9,456.0 $26,691 $2,209 $24,482386.0 Service Provider Totals $45,937,481$8,334,988$54,272,46912,182,768.010,505,063.0726,458.0653,228.049,229,2637,231,939154 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 3 of 6 27 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-1 Total $10.10 $4.24$110.23 $3.21 $0.51 $83.28 $7.63 26.0 2.3824.45% RTA-10 Total $9.32 $7.19$110.23 $6.19 $0.99 $94.85 $8.02 15.3 1.3013.94% RTA-12 Total $8.71 $7.31$110.23 $6.38 $1.02 $96.25 $7.60 15.1 1.1912.68% RTA-13 Total $9.23 $6.07$110.23 $5.13 $0.82 $93.04 $7.79 18.2 1.5215.59% RTA-14 Total $10.81 $6.93$110.23 $5.95 $0.96 $94.61 $9.28 15.9 1.5614.16% RTA-149 Total $4.38 $10.09$110.23 $6.85 $1.10 $74.90 $2.98 10.9 0.4332.05% RTA-15 Total $9.48 $4.91$110.23 $3.92 $0.63 $87.96 $7.57 22.4 1.9320.20% RTA-16/16E Total $11.73 $6.63$110.23 $5.69 $0.91 $94.54 $10.06 16.6 1.7714.23% RTA-17 Total $8.47 $19.04$110.23 $18.12 $2.91 $104.91 $8.06 5.8 0.444.82% RTA-18 Total $9.62 $8.69$110.23 $7.67 $1.23 $97.24 $8.48 12.7 1.1111.78% RTA-18A Total $8.28 $10.52$110.23 $9.47 $1.52 $99.21 $7.45 10.5 0.799.99% RTA-19 Total $7.98 $4.36$110.23 $3.36 $0.54 $85.08 $6.16 25.3 1.8322.81% RTA-1X Total $10.10 $4.24$110.23 $3.21 $0.51 $83.27 $7.63 26.0 2.3824.45% RTA-20 Total $7.34 $7.36$110.23 $6.50 $1.04 $97.32 $6.48 15.0 1.0011.70% RTA-202 Total $1.76 $12.88$53.04 $11.54 $1.31 $47.51 $1.57 4.1 0.1410.40% RTA-204 Total $2.93 $17.43$85.80 $16.56 $1.88 $81.50 $2.78 4.9 0.175.01% RTA-206 Total $2.83 $8.77$95.92 $6.81 $0.89 $74.47 $2.20 10.9 0.3222.36% RTA-208 Total $1.85 $10.09$52.90 $8.50 $0.96 $44.55 $1.56 5.2 0.1815.79% RTA-21 Total $7.44 $8.78$110.23 $7.86 $1.26 $98.69 $6.66 12.6 0.8510.46% RTA-22 Total $6.26 $6.34$110.23 $5.43 $0.87 $94.33 $5.36 17.4 0.9914.42% RTA-23 Total $3.50 $8.47$50.27 $7.51 $0.85 $44.53 $3.10 5.9 0.4111.41% RTA-24 Total $3.55 $9.55$50.27 $8.56 $0.97 $45.03 $3.18 5.3 0.3710.42% RTA-25 Total $9.31 $5.72$110.23 $4.80 $0.77 $92.43 $7.81 19.3 1.6316.14% RTA-27 Total $4.92 $7.10$110.23 $6.14 $0.99 $95.35 $4.25 15.5 0.6913.49% RTA-29 Total $7.57 $9.13$110.23 $8.19 $1.31 $98.90 $6.79 12.1 0.8310.27% RTA-3 Total $3.91 $10.45$50.27 $9.53 $1.08 $45.82 $3.57 4.8 0.378.84% RTA-30 Total $3.42 $5.74$50.27 $4.83 $0.55 $42.36 $2.88 8.8 0.6015.72% RTA-31 Total $2.33 $5.28$50.27 $4.37 $0.50 $41.57 $1.93 9.5 0.4417.29% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 4 of 6 28 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-32 Total $3.79 $4.29$50.27 $3.39 $0.38 $39.68 $2.99 11.7 0.8821.05% RTA-33 Total $3.70 $20.33$50.27 $19.52 $2.22 $48.26 $3.55 2.5 0.183.99% RTA-35 Total $1.64 $9.39$50.27 $8.71 $0.99 $46.61 $1.52 5.4 0.187.26% RTA-36 Total $2.05 $19.19$50.27 $18.46 $2.10 $48.34 $1.97 2.6 0.113.84% RTA-38 Total $2.87 $15.09$50.27 $14.09 $1.60 $46.94 $2.68 3.3 0.196.62% RTA-40 Total $2.72 $10.13$50.27 $9.16 $1.04 $45.48 $2.46 5.0 0.279.53% RTA-41 Total $3.29 $5.14$50.27 $4.08 $0.46 $39.90 $2.61 9.8 0.6420.62% RTA-42 Total $5.43 $11.81$50.27 $11.18 $1.27 $47.59 $5.14 4.3 0.465.33% RTA-49 Total $8.37 $5.11$110.23 $4.20 $0.67 $90.54 $6.88 21.6 1.6417.85% RTA-50 Total $6.67 $4.44$50.27 $0.75 $0.09 $8.52 $1.13 11.3 1.5083.04% RTA-51 Total $5.46 $9.83$59.33 $8.20 $0.93 $49.49 $4.56 6.0 0.5616.59% RTA-52 Total $5.03 $4.19$50.27 $0.77 $0.09 $9.21 $0.92 12.0 1.2081.67% RTA-55 Total $20.03 $28.82$76.02 $7.77 $0.88 $20.50 $5.40 2.6 0.7073.03% RTA-61 Total $4.69 $29.07$85.48 $28.35 $3.22 $83.34 $4.57 2.9 0.162.50% RTA-7 Total $2.95 $4.00$50.27 $3.00 $0.34 $37.69 $2.21 12.6 0.7425.01% RTA-74 Total $3.93 $10.67$86.02 $9.76 $1.11 $78.73 $3.60 8.1 0.378.47% RTA-79 Total $3.72 $15.36$84.43 $14.46 $1.64 $79.51 $3.51 5.5 0.245.83% RTA-794 Total 100.00% RTA-8 Total $2.35 $4.67$50.27 $3.72 $0.42 $40.13 $1.88 10.8 0.5020.17% RTA-Ba/Bea Total $2.21 $61.25$52.56 $59.01 $5.48 $50.64 $2.13 0.9 0.043.65% RTA-Cal Total $2.39 $50.66$53.00 $47.62 $4.42 $49.82 $2.24 1.0 0.055.99% RTA-FestLi Total $8.34 $7.20$110.23 $6.24 $0.23 $95.50 $7.23 15.3 1.1613.36% RTA-GT DAR Total $2.39 $38.66$54.75 $36.51 $3.39 $51.70 $2.26 1.4 0.065.56% RTA-Hemet Total $3.03 $24.46$54.06 $21.81 $2.03 $48.22 $2.70 2.2 0.1210.81% RTA-HoliTr Total $4.48 $14.08$63.13 $5.31 $0.60 $23.80 $1.69 4.5 0.3262.30% RTA-JS Total $1.78 $18.42$36.37 $17.61 $2.00 $34.76 $1.70 2.0 0.104.42% RTA-Jurupa Total $2.89 $34.61$53.80 $31.89 $2.96 $49.56 $2.66 1.6 0.087.87% RTA-LakeEl Total $2.60 $35.02$54.20 $32.85 $3.05 $50.83 $2.44 1.5 0.076.21% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 5 of 6 29 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 All Routes RTA-MurDAR Total $2.67 $34.86$54.04 $32.53 $3.02 $50.43 $2.49 1.6 0.086.68% RTA-MV DAR Total $2.94 $32.54$53.88 $30.30 $2.81 $50.17 $2.74 1.7 0.096.88% RTA-No/Co Total $3.02 $23.78$54.13 $20.90 $1.94 $47.56 $2.66 2.3 0.1312.13% RTA-Perris Total $2.48 $32.19$54.08 $29.66 $2.75 $49.83 $2.28 1.7 0.087.86% RTA-RivDAR Total $2.75 $33.40$54.02 $30.88 $2.87 $49.95 $2.55 1.6 0.087.52% RTA-Sun Ci Total $2.79 $31.44$54.20 $28.99 $2.69 $49.99 $2.58 1.7 0.097.76% RTA-TaxiBB Total $2.81 $39.87$72.93 $36.98 $3.43 $67.65 $2.60 1.8 0.077.24% RTA-TaxiCa Total $2.77 $41.20$82.04 $38.67 $3.59 $77.02 $2.60 2.0 0.076.12% RTA-TaxiGT Total $2.82 $51.88$70.46 $49.22 $4.57 $66.84 $2.67 1.4 0.055.12% RTA-TaxiHe Total $2.81 $41.14$73.02 $38.36 $3.56 $68.09 $2.62 1.8 0.076.75% RTA-TaxiJu Total $2.82 $28.47$68.73 $25.72 $2.39 $62.08 $2.55 2.4 0.109.67% RTA-TaxiLE Total $2.80 $41.66$74.88 $39.02 $3.62 $70.13 $2.62 1.8 0.076.35% RTA-TaxiMu Total $2.83 $37.53$67.22 $34.88 $3.24 $62.48 $2.63 1.8 0.087.05% RTA-TaxiMV Total $2.85 $34.19$64.02 $31.48 $2.92 $58.96 $2.62 1.9 0.087.90% RTA-TaxiNC Total $2.80 $36.80$73.36 $33.99 $3.16 $67.77 $2.59 2.0 0.087.62% RTA-TaxiPe Total $2.80 $52.13$73.39 $49.46 $4.59 $69.63 $2.66 1.4 0.055.12% RTA-TaxiRi Total $2.83 $35.86$68.61 $33.09 $3.07 $63.31 $2.61 1.9 0.087.72% RTA-TaxiSC Total $2.82 $33.79$69.15 $30.99 $2.88 $63.42 $2.59 2.0 0.088.27% Service Provider Totals 0.6911.1$4.37$70.32$0.93$6.3515.35%$7.50$5.17$83.08 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 6 of 6 30 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Excluded Routes RTA-50 Total 24,407 215,0252 2,237.0 16,240.0 17,052.0 $108,377 $90,000 $18,3772,156.0 RTA-51 Total 24,082 212,1662 4,167.0 43,344.0 45,360.0 $236,737 $39,279 $197,4583,990.0 RTA-52 Total 61,381 540,7682 5,319.0 51,096.0 53,136.0 $257,119 $210,000 $47,1195,115.0 RTA-55 Total 14,305 126,0272 5,439.0 20,579.0 23,428.0 $412,252 $301,100 $111,1525,423.0 Service Provider Totals $374,106$640,379$1,014,485138,976.0131,259.017,162.016,684.01,093,986124,1758 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 2 31 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Excluded Routes RTA-50 Total $6.67 $4.44$50.27 $0.75 $0.09 $8.52 $1.13 11.3 1.5083.04% RTA-51 Total $5.46 $9.83$59.33 $8.20 $0.93 $49.49 $4.56 6.0 0.5616.59% RTA-52 Total $5.03 $4.19$50.27 $0.77 $0.09 $9.21 $0.92 12.0 1.2081.67% RTA-55 Total $20.03 $28.82$76.02 $7.77 $0.88 $20.50 $5.40 2.6 0.7073.03% Service Provider Totals 0.957.4$2.85$22.42$0.34$3.0163.12%$8.17$7.73$60.81 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 2 of 2 32 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-1 Total 1,056,043 6,579,1489 43,419.0 443,773.0 510,865.0 $4,482,562 $1,096,006 $3,386,55640,667.0 RTA-10 Total 239,267 1,490,6324 16,568.0 184,519.0 210,244.0 $1,720,407 $239,942 $1,480,46515,608.0 RTA-12 Total 228,638 1,424,4134 15,910.0 191,878.0 211,580.0 $1,670,696 $211,852 $1,458,84415,157.0 RTA-13 Total 267,563 1,666,9193 15,358.0 176,062.0 189,426.0 $1,624,842 $253,378 $1,371,46414,741.0 RTA-14 Total 189,748 1,182,1285 12,363.0 121,704.0 130,711.0 $1,315,768 $186,388 $1,129,38011,937.0 RTA-149 Total 72,109 449,2414 7,127.0 165,909.0 171,284.0 $727,381 $233,131 $494,2506,599.0 RTA-15 Total 416,061 2,592,0578 19,419.0 215,559.0 235,399.0 $2,044,031 $412,951 $1,631,08018,544.0 RTA-16/16E Total 651,826 4,060,87510 41,540.0 368,300.0 411,159.0 $4,320,639 $614,991 $3,705,64839,198.0 RTA-17 Total 53,433 332,8852 10,177.0 120,090.0 151,588.0 $1,017,386 $49,050 $968,3369,230.0 RTA-18 Total 125,037 778,9782 10,832.0 113,001.0 150,893.0 $1,086,828 $128,049 $958,7799,860.0 RTA-18A Total 106,675 664,5842 11,157.0 135,554.0 173,482.0 $1,122,652 $112,180 $1,010,47210,185.0 RTA-19 Total 367,062 2,286,7983 15,494.0 200,518.0 233,718.0 $1,600,041 $365,029 $1,235,01214,516.0 RTA-1X Total 401,999 2,504,4565 16,499.0 168,926.0 194,471.0 $1,706,188 $417,213 $1,288,97515,479.0 RTA-20 Total 231,426 1,441,7843 16,193.0 232,023.0 249,602.0 $1,703,212 $199,351 $1,503,86115,452.0 RTA-202 Total 19,262 169,6953 5,229.0 141,315.0 156,615.0 $248,098 $25,824 $222,2744,678.0 RTA-204 Total 30,504 268,7373 8,461.0 181,560.0 303,960.0 $531,723 $26,671 $505,0526,197.0 RTA-206 Total 53,665 410,0485 8,903.0 166,434.0 279,525.0 $470,572 $105,244 $365,3284,906.0 RTA-208 Total 36,773 323,9714 7,382.0 200,430.0 212,670.0 $371,033 $58,588 $312,4457,014.0 RTA-21 Total 132,201 823,6102 11,083.0 155,897.0 171,629.0 $1,160,459 $121,419 $1,039,04010,528.0 RTA-22 Total 341,511 2,127,6167 21,357.0 345,983.0 406,315.0 $2,166,602 $312,478 $1,854,12419,656.0 RTA-23 Total 92,749 817,1226 16,573.0 224,384.0 266,744.0 $785,884 $89,715 $696,16915,634.0 RTA-24 Total 62,822 553,4614 12,555.0 168,889.0 183,009.0 $600,196 $62,575 $537,62111,940.0 RTA-25 Total 193,167 1,203,4332 10,632.0 118,708.0 127,457.0 $1,105,016 $178,391 $926,62510,025.0 RTA-27 Total 374,287 2,331,8077 25,841.0 540,375.0 578,628.0 $2,656,888 $358,544 $2,298,34424,104.0 RTA-29 Total 119,428 744,0342 10,319.0 144,035.0 154,647.0 $1,089,915 $112,029 $977,8869,888.0 RTA-3 Total 55,590 489,7523 12,248.0 148,422.0 165,000.0 $580,993 $51,378 $529,61511,558.0 RTA-30 Total 72,730 640,7472 8,914.0 122,019.0 142,895.0 $417,221 $65,618 $351,6038,300.0 RTA-31 Total 71,432 629,3151 7,753.0 162,141.0 168,348.0 $377,409 $65,285 $312,1247,508.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 1 of 6 33 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-32 Total 72,266 636,6662 6,479.0 81,869.0 84,425.0 $310,252 $65,327 $244,9256,172.0 RTA-33 Total 26,311 231,7973 10,744.0 144,514.0 145,742.0 $534,848 $21,370 $513,47810,640.0 RTA-35 Total 18,956 167,0031 3,745.0 108,270.0 115,024.0 $177,947 $12,931 $165,0163,540.0 RTA-36 Total 15,399 135,6642 6,147.0 144,303.0 152,285.0 $295,574 $11,351 $284,2235,880.0 RTA-38 Total 21,903 192,9662 6,871.0 115,100.0 123,260.0 $330,510 $21,910 $308,6006,575.0 RTA-40 Total 33,583 295,8642 7,319.0 124,823.0 143,438.0 $340,061 $32,422 $307,6396,765.0 RTA-41 Total 43,985 387,5112 4,883.0 68,850.0 80,580.0 $226,255 $46,667 $179,5884,501.0 RTA-42 Total 16,989 149,6711 4,195.0 36,906.0 43,353.0 $200,568 $10,694 $189,8743,990.0 RTA-49 Total 234,279 1,459,5614 11,337.0 143,097.0 154,368.0 $1,198,046 $213,968 $984,07810,869.0 RTA-61 Total 7,933 69,8931 2,846.0 49,150.0 57,310.0 $230,631 $5,770 $224,8612,698.0 RTA-7 Total 96,373 849,0502 8,604.0 130,996.0 164,422.0 $385,804 $96,518 $289,2867,675.0 RTA-74 Total 54,975 484,3262 7,239.0 149,249.0 175,769.0 $586,336 $49,706 $536,6306,816.0 RTA-79 Total 41,515 365,7472 7,859.0 171,165.0 183,915.0 $637,560 $37,191 $600,3697,551.0 RTA-794 Total $150,000 $150,000 $0 RTA-8 Total 86,051 758,1084 9,044.0 170,698.0 208,768.0 $401,488 $80,994 $320,4947,987.0 RTA-Ba/Bea Total 242 2,606 402.0 6,709.0 9,917.0 $14,822 $542 $14,280282.0 RTA-Cal Total 181 1,949 238.0 3,842.0 4,869.0 $9,169 $550 $8,619173.0 RTA-FestLi Total 918 25,041 76.0 793.0 1,522.0 $6,614 $884 $5,73060.0 RTA-GT DAR Total 4,113 44,297 3,594.0 66,456.0 78,615.0 $158,997 $8,848 $150,1492,904.0 RTA-Hemet Total 48,127 518,328 27,286.0 388,368.0 479,684.0 $1,177,136 $127,271 $1,049,86521,774.0 RTA-HoliTr Total 287 2,530 83.0 902.0 1,121.0 $4,040 $2,517 $1,52364.0 RTA-JS Total 2,517 22,1761 1,729.0 26,010.0 34,129.0 $46,366 $2,051 $44,3151,275.0 RTA-Jurupa Total 8,125 87,506 6,619.0 97,304.0 118,831.0 $281,208 $22,142 $259,0665,227.0 RTA-LakeEl Total 12,106 130,382 9,836.0 163,012.0 195,168.0 $423,977 $26,340 $397,6377,823.0 RTA-MurDAR Total 24,791 266,999 19,760.0 323,548.0 386,576.0 $864,161 $57,789 $806,37215,991.0 RTA-MV DAR Total 37,081 399,362 27,510.0 409,840.0 481,111.0 $1,206,682 $83,037 $1,123,64522,397.0 RTA-No/Co Total 22,609 243,499 12,645.0 177,917.0 232,105.0 $537,750 $65,254 $472,4969,935.0 RTA-Perris Total 25,354 273,063 18,867.0 329,548.0 379,023.0 $816,105 $64,166 $751,93915,091.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 2 of 6 34 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-RivDAR Total 57,523 619,523 44,694.0 697,696.0 858,204.0 $1,921,158 $144,634 $1,776,52435,567.0 RTA-Sun Ci Total 14,265 153,634 10,400.0 160,473.0 184,406.0 $448,432 $34,828 $413,6048,274.0 RTA-TaxiBB Total 450 4,847 246.0 6,392.0 6,392.0 $17,940 $1,299 $16,641246.0 RTA-TaxiCa Total 235 2,531 118.0 3,490.0 3,490.0 $9,681 $593 $9,088118.0 RTA-TaxiGT Total 626 6,742 461.0 11,530.0 11,530.0 $32,480 $1,666 $30,814461.0 RTA-TaxiHe Total 2,089 22,499 1,177.0 30,626.0 30,626.0 $85,942 $5,805 $80,1371,177.0 RTA-TaxiJu Total 519 5,590 215.0 5,231.0 5,231.0 $14,776 $1,429 $13,347215.0 RTA-TaxiLE Total 1,251 13,473 696.0 18,621.0 18,621.0 $52,119 $3,311 $48,808696.0 RTA-TaxiMu Total 1,768 19,041 987.0 23,429.0 23,429.0 $66,346 $4,679 $61,667987.0 RTA-TaxiMV Total 1,472 15,853 786.0 17,668.0 17,668.0 $50,321 $3,980 $46,341786.0 RTA-TaxiNC Total 1,288 13,872 646.0 16,897.0 16,897.0 $47,393 $3,614 $43,779646.0 RTA-TaxiPe Total 1,816 19,558 1,290.0 33,754.0 33,754.0 $94,670 $4,848 $89,8221,290.0 RTA-TaxiRi Total 3,695 39,795 1,931.0 46,894.0 46,894.0 $132,486 $10,234 $122,2521,931.0 RTA-TaxiSC Total 790 8,508 386.0 9,456.0 9,456.0 $26,691 $2,209 $24,482386.0 Service Provider Totals $45,563,375$7,694,609$53,257,98412,043,792.010,373,804.0709,296.0636,544.048,135,2777,107,764146 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 3 of 6 35 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-1 Total $10.10 $4.24$110.23 $3.21 $0.51 $83.28 $7.63 26.0 2.3824.45% RTA-10 Total $9.32 $7.19$110.23 $6.19 $0.99 $94.85 $8.02 15.3 1.3013.94% RTA-12 Total $8.71 $7.31$110.23 $6.38 $1.02 $96.25 $7.60 15.1 1.1912.68% RTA-13 Total $9.23 $6.07$110.23 $5.13 $0.82 $93.04 $7.79 18.2 1.5215.59% RTA-14 Total $10.81 $6.93$110.23 $5.95 $0.96 $94.61 $9.28 15.9 1.5614.16% RTA-149 Total $4.38 $10.09$110.23 $6.85 $1.10 $74.90 $2.98 10.9 0.4332.05% RTA-15 Total $9.48 $4.91$110.23 $3.92 $0.63 $87.96 $7.57 22.4 1.9320.20% RTA-16/16E Total $11.73 $6.63$110.23 $5.69 $0.91 $94.54 $10.06 16.6 1.7714.23% RTA-17 Total $8.47 $19.04$110.23 $18.12 $2.91 $104.91 $8.06 5.8 0.444.82% RTA-18 Total $9.62 $8.69$110.23 $7.67 $1.23 $97.24 $8.48 12.7 1.1111.78% RTA-18A Total $8.28 $10.52$110.23 $9.47 $1.52 $99.21 $7.45 10.5 0.799.99% RTA-19 Total $7.98 $4.36$110.23 $3.36 $0.54 $85.08 $6.16 25.3 1.8322.81% RTA-1X Total $10.10 $4.24$110.23 $3.21 $0.51 $83.27 $7.63 26.0 2.3824.45% RTA-20 Total $7.34 $7.36$110.23 $6.50 $1.04 $97.32 $6.48 15.0 1.0011.70% RTA-202 Total $1.76 $12.88$53.04 $11.54 $1.31 $47.51 $1.57 4.1 0.1410.40% RTA-204 Total $2.93 $17.43$85.80 $16.56 $1.88 $81.50 $2.78 4.9 0.175.01% RTA-206 Total $2.83 $8.77$95.92 $6.81 $0.89 $74.47 $2.20 10.9 0.3222.36% RTA-208 Total $1.85 $10.09$52.90 $8.50 $0.96 $44.55 $1.56 5.2 0.1815.79% RTA-21 Total $7.44 $8.78$110.23 $7.86 $1.26 $98.69 $6.66 12.6 0.8510.46% RTA-22 Total $6.26 $6.34$110.23 $5.43 $0.87 $94.33 $5.36 17.4 0.9914.42% RTA-23 Total $3.50 $8.47$50.27 $7.51 $0.85 $44.53 $3.10 5.9 0.4111.41% RTA-24 Total $3.55 $9.55$50.27 $8.56 $0.97 $45.03 $3.18 5.3 0.3710.42% RTA-25 Total $9.31 $5.72$110.23 $4.80 $0.77 $92.43 $7.81 19.3 1.6316.14% RTA-27 Total $4.92 $7.10$110.23 $6.14 $0.99 $95.35 $4.25 15.5 0.6913.49% RTA-29 Total $7.57 $9.13$110.23 $8.19 $1.31 $98.90 $6.79 12.1 0.8310.27% RTA-3 Total $3.91 $10.45$50.27 $9.53 $1.08 $45.82 $3.57 4.8 0.378.84% RTA-30 Total $3.42 $5.74$50.27 $4.83 $0.55 $42.36 $2.88 8.8 0.6015.72% RTA-31 Total $2.33 $5.28$50.27 $4.37 $0.50 $41.57 $1.93 9.5 0.4417.29% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 4 of 6 36 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-32 Total $3.79 $4.29$50.27 $3.39 $0.38 $39.68 $2.99 11.7 0.8821.05% RTA-33 Total $3.70 $20.33$50.27 $19.52 $2.22 $48.26 $3.55 2.5 0.183.99% RTA-35 Total $1.64 $9.39$50.27 $8.71 $0.99 $46.61 $1.52 5.4 0.187.26% RTA-36 Total $2.05 $19.19$50.27 $18.46 $2.10 $48.34 $1.97 2.6 0.113.84% RTA-38 Total $2.87 $15.09$50.27 $14.09 $1.60 $46.94 $2.68 3.3 0.196.62% RTA-40 Total $2.72 $10.13$50.27 $9.16 $1.04 $45.48 $2.46 5.0 0.279.53% RTA-41 Total $3.29 $5.14$50.27 $4.08 $0.46 $39.90 $2.61 9.8 0.6420.62% RTA-42 Total $5.43 $11.81$50.27 $11.18 $1.27 $47.59 $5.14 4.3 0.465.33% RTA-49 Total $8.37 $5.11$110.23 $4.20 $0.67 $90.54 $6.88 21.6 1.6417.85% RTA-61 Total $4.69 $29.07$85.48 $28.35 $3.22 $83.34 $4.57 2.9 0.162.50% RTA-7 Total $2.95 $4.00$50.27 $3.00 $0.34 $37.69 $2.21 12.6 0.7425.01% RTA-74 Total $3.93 $10.67$86.02 $9.76 $1.11 $78.73 $3.60 8.1 0.378.47% RTA-79 Total $3.72 $15.36$84.43 $14.46 $1.64 $79.51 $3.51 5.5 0.245.83% RTA-794 Total 100.00% RTA-8 Total $2.35 $4.67$50.27 $3.72 $0.42 $40.13 $1.88 10.8 0.5020.17% RTA-Ba/Bea Total $2.21 $61.25$52.56 $59.01 $5.48 $50.64 $2.13 0.9 0.043.65% RTA-Cal Total $2.39 $50.66$53.00 $47.62 $4.42 $49.82 $2.24 1.0 0.055.99% RTA-FestLi Total $8.34 $7.20$110.23 $6.24 $0.23 $95.50 $7.23 15.3 1.1613.36% RTA-GT DAR Total $2.39 $38.66$54.75 $36.51 $3.39 $51.70 $2.26 1.4 0.065.56% RTA-Hemet Total $3.03 $24.46$54.06 $21.81 $2.03 $48.22 $2.70 2.2 0.1210.81% RTA-HoliTr Total $4.48 $14.08$63.13 $5.31 $0.60 $23.80 $1.69 4.5 0.3262.30% RTA-JS Total $1.78 $18.42$36.37 $17.61 $2.00 $34.76 $1.70 2.0 0.104.42% RTA-Jurupa Total $2.89 $34.61$53.80 $31.89 $2.96 $49.56 $2.66 1.6 0.087.87% RTA-LakeEl Total $2.60 $35.02$54.20 $32.85 $3.05 $50.83 $2.44 1.5 0.076.21% RTA-MurDAR Total $2.67 $34.86$54.04 $32.53 $3.02 $50.43 $2.49 1.6 0.086.68% RTA-MV DAR Total $2.94 $32.54$53.88 $30.30 $2.81 $50.17 $2.74 1.7 0.096.88% RTA-No/Co Total $3.02 $23.78$54.13 $20.90 $1.94 $47.56 $2.66 2.3 0.1312.13% RTA-Perris Total $2.48 $32.19$54.08 $29.66 $2.75 $49.83 $2.28 1.7 0.087.86% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 5 of 6 37 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2007/08 Non-Excluded Routes RTA-RivDAR Total $2.75 $33.40$54.02 $30.88 $2.87 $49.95 $2.55 1.6 0.087.52% RTA-Sun Ci Total $2.79 $31.44$54.20 $28.99 $2.69 $49.99 $2.58 1.7 0.097.76% RTA-TaxiBB Total $2.81 $39.87$72.93 $36.98 $3.43 $67.65 $2.60 1.8 0.077.24% RTA-TaxiCa Total $2.77 $41.20$82.04 $38.67 $3.59 $77.02 $2.60 2.0 0.076.12% RTA-TaxiGT Total $2.82 $51.88$70.46 $49.22 $4.57 $66.84 $2.67 1.4 0.055.12% RTA-TaxiHe Total $2.81 $41.14$73.02 $38.36 $3.56 $68.09 $2.62 1.8 0.076.75% RTA-TaxiJu Total $2.82 $28.47$68.73 $25.72 $2.39 $62.08 $2.55 2.4 0.109.67% RTA-TaxiLE Total $2.80 $41.66$74.88 $39.02 $3.62 $70.13 $2.62 1.8 0.076.35% RTA-TaxiMu Total $2.83 $37.53$67.22 $34.88 $3.24 $62.48 $2.63 1.8 0.087.05% RTA-TaxiMV Total $2.85 $34.19$64.02 $31.48 $2.92 $58.96 $2.62 1.9 0.087.90% RTA-TaxiNC Total $2.80 $36.80$73.36 $33.99 $3.16 $67.77 $2.59 2.0 0.087.62% RTA-TaxiPe Total $2.80 $52.13$73.39 $49.46 $4.59 $69.63 $2.66 1.4 0.055.12% RTA-TaxiRi Total $2.83 $35.86$68.61 $33.09 $3.07 $63.31 $2.61 1.9 0.087.72% RTA-TaxiSC Total $2.82 $33.79$69.15 $30.99 $2.88 $63.42 $2.59 2.0 0.088.27% Service Provider Totals 0.6911.2$4.39$71.58$0.95$6.4114.44%$7.49$5.13$83.67 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2007 Page 6 of 6 38 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 3A: FY 2007/08 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS Line # Route Description Cities/Communities Served Directly Operated Routes: 1 From Downtown Riverside Terminal to Tyler Galleria Central spine of Riverside, & Arlington 1X From Tyler Galleria to W Corona Metrolink Station mostly via Magnolia Ave & 6th St. La Sierra, Home Gardens, & Corona 10 From Main & Russell on Riverside's Northside to Pierce & Sterling via Brockton St, and Victoria & Lincoln Aves Riverside, Casa Blanca, La Sierra, eastside of Riverside & Riverwalk area 12 From Stephens & Center on Riverside's Northside, through Downtown, then to Pierce at Magnolia via Magnolia & California Aves Riverside, La Sierra, and northside of Riverside 13 From the Social Security Office at Chicago & Marlborough to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via MLK Blvd, Arlington & Central Aves and Tyler St Riverside, Hunter Park-eastside, Arlanza & La Sierra 14 From Blaine St & Canyon Crest Dr to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via University Av, Brockton St & Indiana Ave Riverside, UC Riverside area & Casa Blanca 15 From Downtown Riverside Terminal to Galleria at Tyler via Magnolia, Arlington & La Sierra Aves Riverside, Arlanza & La Sierra 16 From Cactus & Elsworth in Moreno Val to Main & Russell in Riverside via Perris, Sunnymead & Sycamore Cyn Blvd, and University Ave Moreno Valley, Riverside-eastside, UC Riverside campus area 16E 1 Metrolink Express - From Perris & Alessandro in Moreno Valley to the Metrolink Station in Riverside via Frwys 60 & 215 Moreno Valley, Riverside 17 From Moreno Vall Mall to Wal*Mart via Eucalyptus Ave, the Riverside Co Regional Med Ctr & Nason St Moreno Valley 18 From RCC Moreno Valley campus to the Moreno Valley Mall via JFK Av, Heacock & Ironwood Sts Moreno Valley, March JPA area 18A From RCC Moreno Valley campus to Moreno Valley Mall via Sunnymead Ranch & Cottonwood St to serve various schools on Frederick, JFK, Perris, Pigeon Pass & Kitching. Moreno Valley 19 From 4th Av & Wilkerson St in Perris to Moreno Valley Mall via Perris Blvd & Cottonwood St Moreno Valley Perris 20 From Magnolia & Jurupa in Riverside to RCC Moreno Valley campus via Central Ave, Alessandro Blvd & Iris St Riverside, Moreno Valley, Mission Grove 21 From Galleria At Tyler in Riverside to Country Village in Mira Loma via Van Buren & Mission Blvds and the Pedley Metrolink Station Jurupa, Glen Avon, Pedley, Riverside 22 From the Lake Elsinore Outlet Mall to Downtown Riverside Terminal via Hwy 74, Old Elsinore Rd & Alessandro Blvd Riverside, Woodcrest, Mead Valley, Perris, Meadowbrook, Lake Elsinore 25 From the Downtown Riverside Terminal in Downtown to Veterans Admin Hospital in Loma Linda via University Ave, Iowa St & Barton Rd Riverside, Highgrove, Grand Terrace, Loma Linda 27 From Valle Vista area of East Hemet to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Florida Ave, 215 Frwy & Van Buren Blvd Riverside, Woodcrest, Perris, Sun City, Romoland, Hemet, Valle Vista 29 From the Downtown Riverside Terminal to Etiwanda & Bellegrave in Mira Loma via Rubidoux & Limonite Blvds and the Pedley Metrolink Station Mira Loma, Glen Avon, Pedley, Rubidoux, Riverside 49 From the Downtown Riverside Terminal to Country Village via Mission Blvd Mira Loma, Glen Avon, Rubidoux, Riverside, Jurupa 149 From the Downtown Riverside Terminal to Village at Orange via 91 Frwy Riverside, Corona, Orange 206 2 From Promenade Mall in Temecula to Corona Metrolink Sta via Fwy 15 with stops in Murrieta & Lake Elsinore Outlet Ctr Temecula, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Corona Festival of Lights A seasonal service offered from various communities to downtown Riverside Main Street. Riverside Revised 4/27/2007 Table 3A Individual Route Description 39 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 3A: FY 2007/08 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS Line # Route Description Cities/Communities Served Contracted Fixed Routes: 3 Arlington & La Sierra to Magnolia & Fullerton in Corona via Hamner and Main, stopping at N Main Metrolink Station and RCC Norco campus Riverside, La Sierra, Norco, Corona 7 Lake Elsinore circulator with stops at Lake Elsinore Outlet, Senior center, Downtown and Wal-mart shopping center Lake Elsinore 8 From Riverside & Lakeshore Drs in Lake Elsinore to Inland Valley Regional Med Ctr in Wildomar via Grand Ave, Wal*Mart on Railroad Canyon Rd Lake Elsinore, Wildomar 23 From Inland Vall Hosp in Wildomar through Murrieta to the Community Ctr in Old Town Temecula via a circuitous route Murrieta, Wildomar, Temecula 24 Temecula circulator with stops at the County Center, Old Town, the new Library, the Pechanga Resort and scattered schools & apartment areas. Temecula 30 Perris circulator serving the central part of the community. Perris 31 Service from Banning to Hemet Vall Mall via Lamb Canyon, State St, Mt San Jacinto Community College Banning, Beaumont, Gilman Hot Sprs, San Jacinto, Hemet 32 From Hemet Valley Mall to Mt. San Jacinto College via Downtown San Jacinto and San Jacinto Ave San Jacinto Hemet 33 Hemet circulator, or "Lady Bug Shuttle" serving mobile home parks and the Hemet Valley Mall Hemet 35 From Banning to Moreno Valley Mall with stops at K-Mart, Wal*Mart off Highland Springs & to Riverside Co Med Ctr via State Rte 60 Banning, Beaumont, Moreno Valley 36 From Wal Mart in Beaumont to Redlands Mall via Interstate 10 & Calimesa Blvd Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Redlands 38 From Pedley Metrolink Station to RCC Norco campus via Jurupa Rd, Limonite & Hamner Sts with stop at Swan Lake mobiles Jurupa, Glen Avon Pedley, Norco 40 From Mission Trail and Diamond Dr in Lake Elsinore to Mt San Jacinto College in Menifee via Railroad Cyn & Newport Rds. Menifee, Sun City, Quail Valley, Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore 41 From the Mead Valley Community Ctr to Moreno Valley with stops at RCC Moreno Vall campus & Riverside Co Med Ctr Moreno Valley, Perris, Mead Valley 42 Estudillo Express - San Jacinto circulator with major stops at Soboba Casino and various mobile home parks San Jacinto 50 Riverside Jury Trolley Service Downtown Riverside, RCC Campus area 51 Crest Cruiser, a UCR to Canyon Crest circulator via Chicago & Central Aves & Canyon Crest Dr Riverside 52 Downtown Riverside Trolley, serving courts, restaurants, arts and activity centers Downtown Riverside 55 Harveston Shuttle, new service starting Sept '07 to connect Harveston community to schools, shops & other RTA routes Temecula 61 Sun City Scooter with stops at Sun City Shop Ctr, gov't offices, Menifee Vall Med Ctr, & Loma Linda Med Bldg Sun City 74 From San Jacinto to Hemet, Sun City & Downtown Perris, starting at Mt San Jacinto College and serving Hemet Valley Mall and Mt San Jac College, Menifee campus, mostly via State St, Simpson & Newport Rds & Interstate 215 San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Sun City, Perris 79 From Hemet Valley Mall to Winchester & Ynez Rds in Temecula via Winchester Rd (State Hwy 79). Also serves the Promenade Mall & Temecula City Hall. Hemet, Winchester, French Valley, Murrieta & Temecula 202 From Wal Mart at Murrieta & Promenade Mall in Temecula to Oceanside Transit Ctr Murrieta, Temecula, Fallbrook, Bonsall, Oceanside 204 From Downtown Riverside terminal to Montclair Transit Ctr via Country Village & Ontario Mills Mall Riverside, Ontario, Glen Avon, Montclair Revised 4/27/2007 Table 3A Individual Route Description 40 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2007/08 - FY 2009/10 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 3A: FY 2007/08 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS Line # Route Description Cities/Communities Served 206 2 From Promenade Mall in Temecula to Corona Metrolink Sta via Fwy 15 with stops in Murrieta & Lake Elsinore Outlet Ctr Temecula, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Corona 208 From the Promenade Mall in Temecula to Riverside Metrolink Sta via Fwy 215 with stops in Menifee, Perris & Moreno Vall Temecula, Menifee, Sun City, Perris, Moreno Valley JS Jurupa Shuttle, a circulator between Swan Lake mobile homes and Eddie Smith Senior Ctr Mira Loma, Glen Avon, Rubidoux, Jurupa Holiday Trolley Seasonal service in Norco and Corona that provides transportation to retail and shopping centers during the holiday season. Norco, Corona Contracted Paratransit Routes: Banning/Beaumont Banning and Beaumont Calimesa Calimesa, Yucaipa (Redlands) Lake Elsinore Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore, Wildomar, Quail Valley Grand Terrace Grand Terrace, Highgrove, Loma Linda, Colton Hemet Hemet, Homeland, Romoland, San Jacinto, Valle Vista, Winchester Jurupa Glen Avon, Belltown, Jurupa, Pedley, Rubidoux, Pedley, Mira Loma (Country Village) Moreno Valley Moreno Valley Murrieta/Temecula Murrieta, Temecula Corona/Norco Corona, Norco Perris Perris, Mead Valley, Nuevo Riverside Riverside, Canyon Crest, Arnold Heights, Orangecrest, Woodcrest Sun City Sun City Taxicab within RTA service area 1 Statistical data for Route 16E is consolidated with Route 16. 2 Route 206 has selected trips that are directly operated, with the majority remaining contracted. Revised 4/27/2007 Table 3A Individual Route Description 41 Riverside Transit AgencyFY 2007/08Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2007/08Revised: 5/1/2007Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STA Measure ASection 5307 - Riv-San BernardinoSection 5307 - Temecula/ MurrietaSection 5307 - Hemet/San JacintoSection 5307 - Los AngelesSection 5307 - Indio-Cathedral City-Palm Springs Section 5309 Section 5311 CMAQ TUMFFare BoxOther (2)LTF Operating Assistance 31,875,954$ 31,875,954$ GASB 43/45 Pre-funding 5,555,555$ 5,555,555$ Measure A Operating Assistance (794) 150,000$ 150,000$ 5307 HSJ Operating Assistance 1,639,472$ 1,639,472$ 5307 TM Operating Assistance 322,908$ 322,908$ 5311 Operating Assistance 421,985$ 421,985$ Farebox 8,184,988$ 8,184,988$ Federal Excise Tax Credit 1,000,000$ 1,000,000$ Interest Income 362,458$ 362,458$ Advertising Revenue 20,000$ 20,000$ Lease Revenue 67,320$ 67,320$ Capitalized Preventative Maintenance 4,671,829$ 934,366$ 3,737,463$ Subtotal: Operating$54,272,469 $38,365,875 - 150,000.00 - $4,060,371 $1,639,472 $0 $0 - $421,985 - - $8,184,988 $1,449,778Paratransit Bus Procurement (42) Replacement & (5) ExpansionFY 08 -1 $3,090,800 $525,436 $2,565,364Refurbish 5 CNG Trolleys FY 08 -2 $570,225 $114,045 $456,180Support Vehicles Procurement FY 08 -3 $340,340 $68,068 $272,272Capital Maintenance Spares FY 08 -4 $445,822 $89,164 $356,658Bus Shelter Maintenance Equipment FY 08 -5 $38,650 $7,730 $30,920Bus Stop Shelters and Amenities FY 08 -6 $375,480 $75,096 $300,384Shop Tools & Equipment FY 08 -7 $26,409 $5,282 $21,127Capitalized Tire Lease FY 08 -8 $227,000 $45,400 $181,600AC/Heat units - Riverside FY 08 -9 $30,000 $6,000 $24,000Office Furniture FY 08 -10 $7,000 $1,400 $5,600Facilities Improvement - Hemet & Riverside FY 08 -11$137,500 $27,500 $110,000GFI Fareboxes (53) FY 08 -12 $796,237 $159,247 $636,990DirecTV & WiFi on CommuterLink buses FY 08 -13 $290,215 $58,043 $232,172Office Equipment - IT FY 08 -14 $185,783 $37,157 $148,626COP Debt Service FY 08 -15 $2,033,781 $406,756 $1,627,025Coin Counting Machine FY 08 -16 $9,905 $1,981 $7,924Calexico Bus FY 08 -17 $146,624$117,299$29,325Temecula Transit Center FY 08 -18 $125,400$100,320 $25,080Advanced Traveler Information System FY 08 -19 $125,400$100,320 $25,080(3) Trolleys (Local Match Transfer from Omnitrans)FY 08 -20 $48,750 $48,750Subtotal: Capital $9,051,321 $0 $1,677,055 $0 $6,976,842 $0 $0 $0 $0 $317,939 $0 $0 $50,160 $0 $29,325Total: Operating & Capital$63,323,790 $38,365,875$1,677,055$150,000 $6,976,842 $4,060,371 $1,639,472 $0 $0 $317,939 $421,985$0 $50,160 $8,184,988 $1,479,103Revised 5/7/2007Summary of FY 2007/08Funds Requested.xls 42 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-01 PROJECT NAME Paratransit Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (42) replacement and (5) expansion paratransit with 12-passenger capacity, fueled by unleaded gas and equipped with wheel chair lifts. The replacement vehicles consist of (38) Type II and (4) Type VII vehicles. RTA will purchase additional Type II vehicles for expansion. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The (42) vans will replace old units that have reached their service life as per FTA Circular 9300.1A – Vehicle Service Life Policy. The scheduled replacement of these types of vehicles is 4 years or 100,000 miles. The (5) additional vans will be used for service expansion to meet the increasing demand for dial-a-ride service. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source Replacement Expansion Sec 5307 $ 2,221,814 $250,826 STA $ 555,454 $ 62,706 Total $ 2,777,268 $313,532 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA/RCTC Grant # Description Amount FY06 LTF 22 DAR vans $ 1,780 FY06 STA 22 DAR vans $ 9,595 FY07 STA 23 DAR vans $ 226,780 CA-90-Y523 23 DAR vans $1,107,220 43 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-2 PROJECT NAME Refurbish CNG Trolleys PROJECT DESCRIPTION Refurbish (5) CNG Trolleys to improve condition of the vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The five Trolleys are over ten years old and have reached their estimated service life. However, due to their historical values they are used as circulators within downtown Riverside. The refurbishing project will improve the reliability and condition of these vehicles. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 $ 456,180 STA $ 114,045 Total $ 570,225 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 44 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-3 PROJECT NAME Replacement Support Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (4) trucks and (4) support cars with 5-passenger capacity. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new vehicles will replace old model units that have reached their estimated service life of four years or 100,000 miles per FTA Circular 9300.1A. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 272,272$ STA 68,068$ Total 340,340$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA /RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance FY07 STA (2) Trucks $ 19,600 CA-90-Y523 (2) Trucks $ 78,400 FY06 LTF (9) Support Vehicles $ 22,020 FY06 STA (9) Support Vehicles $ 88,083 FY07 STA Lease support vehicles $ 6,000 CA-90-Y523 Lease support vehicles $ 24,000 45 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-4 PROJECT NAME Capitalized Maintenance Spares PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of rolling stock capital parts to include alternator, manifolds, pumps, controller, transmission, compressor, etc. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Capital purchase of new bus parts based on projected needs whose individual costs meet the requirement for capital reimbursement. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 356,658$ STA 89,164$ Total 445,822$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA/RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Capitalized Maintenance Spares $ 58,039 FY07 STA Capitalized Maintenance Spares $ 21,165 46 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-5 PROJECT NAME Bus Shelter Maintenance Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of various equipment needed to maintain the bus shelters such as pressure washer, vacuum broom, rakes, shovels, airless paint sprayer, etc. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Maintenance equipment needed to maintain and keep the bus shelters clean, neat and presentable. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 30,920$ STA 7,730$ Total 38,650$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 47 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-6 PROJECT NAME Bus Stop Amenities PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of benches, poles and extensions, signs, trash receptacles and installation of bus shelters. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Purchase of materials and supplies to expand and upgrade the bus stop system. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 300,384$ STA 75,096$ Total 375,480$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA/RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Bus Stop Amenities $ 108,347 FY07 STA Bus Stop Amenities $ 27,087 CA-90-Y272 Bus Stop Amenities $ 3,711 FY04 STA Bus Stop Amenities 928$ CA-90-Y337 Kiosks 12,142$ FY05 STA Kiosks 3,035$ CA-90-Y403 Bus Stop Amenities $ 88,000 FY06 LTF Bus Stop Amenities $ 22,000 48 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-7 PROJECT NAME Shop Tools & Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of maintenance shop tools and equipment. Shop equipment includes (1) cut off saw, (2) brake drum dolly’s and (1) transmission jack for the shop. Shop tools include (4) impact wrenches, (2) lap top computers, Detroit diesel software, ZF testman kits and (1) Ecomat transmission software. This project also includes purchase and installation of push bumpers on the five maintenance truck #6101, 6102, 6103, 6104 and 6105. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new tools and equipment will aid Maintenance personnel in performing the bus preventive maintenance and repairs. The push bumpers on the maintenance trucks will provide Maintenance the capability to push down buses around the property as well as on the road. At times this will save the cost of a tow truck by pushing the dead bus to a safe place to perform the repair. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2007 Sec 5307 21,127$ STA 5,282$ Total 26,409$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA/RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Shop Equipment $ 123,692 FY07 STA Shop Equipment $ 14,509 49 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-8 PROJECT NAME Capitalized Tire Lease PROJECT DESCRIPTION Capitalized cost of leasing bus tires. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION As part of the Agency’s preventive maintenance, tires are inspected and replaced as needed based on tread and air pressure. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2007 Sec 5307 181,600$ STA 45,400$ Total 227,000$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER FTA/RCTC Grant Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Capitalized tire lease $ 63,023 FY07 STA Capitalized tire lease $ 15,755 50 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-9 PROJECT NAME AC/Heater Units PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of new air conditioning and heater units for the Riverside Maintenance Building. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Replacement of the current inefficient and poor working air- conditioning and heater units that are beyond repair and consist of parts that are obsolete and expensive. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 24,000$ STA 6,000$ Total 30,000$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 51 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-10 PROJECT NAME Office Furniture PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of new office furniture Agency-wide for Riverside and Hemet facilities to be utilized for new and existing employees. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Existing furniture is not ergonomically friendly. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 5,600$ STA 1,400$ Total 7,000$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *Fully Expended 52 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-11 PROJECT NAME Facilities Improvement PROJECT DESCRIPTION Riverside and Hemet facilities are to receive various improvements that will include: ƒ Concrete replacement (Riverside); ƒ Shop Floor Recoating (Riverside Parts Room & Hemet Maintenance); ƒ Replacement of Coin Room roll-up door; ƒ Interior and Exterior re-painting (Riverside and Hemet); and ƒ Roof repairs & seals (Riverside Buildings) PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Each project is needed for the following reasons: ƒ Concrete replacement (Riverside)- Existing concrete is damaging the foundation due to the water from the bus wash. ƒ Shop Floor Recoating (Riverside Parts Room & Hemet Maintenance)- Existing coating is not to RTA standards. ƒ Replacement of Coin Room roll-up door- Beyond repairable, needs to be replaced. ƒ Interior and Exterior re-painting (Riverside and Hemet)- Existing paint is not to RTA standards. ƒ Roof repairs & seals (Riverside Buildings)- Existing roof has constant leaks and needs to be repaired. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 130,000$ STA 32,500$ Total 162,500$ 53 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Supp Facil-Admin $ 44,800 FY07 STA Supp Facil-Admin $ 11,200 CA-90-Y523 Supp Facil-Maint $ 49,600 FY07 STA Supp Facil-Maint 12,400$ FY06 LTF Facility Imprvmts 2,964$ FY06 STA Facility Imprvmts 11,857$ CA-90-Y523 Supp Facil-Yard 121,484$ FY07 STA Supp Facil-Yard 30,371$ 54 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-12 PROJECT NAME (53) GFI Fareboxes PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (53) GFI fareboxes for remaining fixed route fleet which are currently not equipped. GFI fareboxes are an automated farebox system that collects cash and fare passes, and is used to validate and register ridership and accounting data. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION GFI fareboxes are necessary to ensure reliable ridership and accounting data. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 636,990$ STA 159,247$ Total 796,237$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance FY07-12S GFI Farebox $ 137,906 FY07 STA GFI Farebox $ 34,476 55 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-13 PROJECT NAME Direct TV & WiFi on Commuter Links PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase and subscription of Direct TV and Wi-Fi on Commuter Link vehicles. Direct TV is a cable system that will allow passengers to follow current events during the duration of their ride. Wireless internet is also to be purchased to enhance the express route service. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Direct TV and wireless internet (Wi-Fi) is necessary for the branding and marketing of the Commuter Link services. The Commuter Links have seen continued growth in ridership in the last year and recent market surveys indicate that current passengers would benefit from and utilize this service and new customers would see this as an incentive to ride. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 232,172$ STA 58,043$ Total 290,215$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 56 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-14 PROJECT NAME IT Office Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of IT office equipment will include: ƒ Replacement of PC and notebook computers; ƒ Replacement network equipment; and ƒ A color copier for Executive Admin/Board of Directors. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase IT office equipment is necessary for the following reasons: ƒ PCs & Notebook Computers- Existing PCs have reached their useful lifecycle and have exceeded their warranty. Newer computers will provide for higher performance and more reliable uptime. ƒ Network Equipment- Needed for installation of upgraded computers ƒ Color Copier- Needed by executive administration to prepare reports and presentations for the Board of Directors. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 148,626$ STA 37,157$ Total 185,783$ 57 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y523 Misc Equip $ 7,087 FY07 STA Misc Equip $ 1,772 CA-90-Y523 ADP Hardware $ 49,760 FY07 STA ADP Hardware $ 12,440 58 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-15 PROJECT NAME Annual Debt Service Payment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Annual debt service payment for the purchase of 57 CNG buses in 2001. The purchase of these buses was financed through bonds issued by the California Transit Finance Authority. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of the 57 CNG buses was part of RTA’s commitment to transition to a 100% CNG bus fleet. RTA has made a serious commitment to using alternative fuel vehicles to enhance air quality and help in the achievement of air quality goals in the County of Riverside. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 1,627,025$ TUMF 406,756$ Total 2,033,781$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *Fully Expended 59 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-16 PROJECT NAME Coin Counting Machine PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of a new coin counting machine for the Riverside facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Current coin counting machine has reached its useful life and is no longer economical to maintain. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5307 7,924$ STA 1,981$ Total 9,905$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 60 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-17 PROJECT NAME CNG Bus for the City of Calexico PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (1) full size (40-ft.) CNG bus for the City of Calexico. RTA has a signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City of Calexico to file a grant application on their behalf. RTA’s sole responsibility will be to reimburse the City of Calexico with the applicable federal funds in accordance with the MOU. The CNG bus will replace a 1980 model, 36 passenger capacity bus fueled by unleaded gasoline. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Since the City of Calexico cannot receive FTA funds directly, the City has asked RTA to complete the Sec 5309 grant application on their behalf. The City will provide the necessary local match. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5309 117,299$ City of Calexico 29,325$ Total 146,624$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-03-0763 Calexico Bus $ 291,262 FY 07 Calexico Calexico Bus $ 73,000 61 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-18 PROJECT NAME Temecula Transit Center PROJECT DESCRIPTION Construction of a transit center in the City of Temecula located SW of Jefferson Ave. and NW of the intersection of Jefferson and Winchester. The multi-modal transit center will have 10-15 bus bays, seating and adequate parking to complement the park and ride facility. RTA’s existing Routes 23, 24, 79, 202, 206 and 208 will most likely utilize this transit center. The estimated project cost for the transit center is $7.0M. The City of Temecula will be the Lead Agency for the development of the Temecula transit center. RTA’s participation is limited to the provision of grant funds for the design and construction portion of the project. Detailed schedules to be provided by the City of Temecula at the appropriate time. The new station will not result in new services or service expansion. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The transit center will become a hub to encourage community carpooling and facilitate regional commuter link services and transfers. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5309 100,320$ TUMF 25,080$ Total 125,400$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT 62 NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-03-0752 Temecula Transit Ctr $ 1,165,410 FY06 WRCOG Temecula Transit Ctr $ 315,388 FY07 5309 Temecula Transit Ctr $ 95,179 FY 07 WRCOG Temecula Transit Ctr $ 23,795 63 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-19 PROJECT NAME Automated Traveler Info. System (ATIS) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of ATIS on fixed route vehicles and about 60 bus stops in the service area that will notify customers of when the next bus will arrive and where its destination is. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The ATIS will provide real time information bus arrival information for stops throughout the system. Quick information to the rider lessens the ”perceived” out of vehicle wait time and in turn can generate greater ridership. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 Sec 5309 100,320$ TUMF 25,080$ Total 125,400$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance CA-90-Y272 ITS $ 8,231 FY00 LTF ITS $ 26,987 FY04 STA ITS $ 2,058 64 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-20 PROJECT NAME (3) Trolleys PROJECT DESCRIPTION RTA will acquire (3) Trolleys Model Year 2003 from Omnitrans through an asset transfer. Total transfer cost is $185,386.80 of federal funds (book transfer) and $48,750 local match. Funds requested will be used to reimburse Omnitrans for the local match funds. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION RTA’s existing Trolley fleet consists of (5) model year 1994 and (1) model year 1996. Four of the six Trolleys are currently being used exclusively by Routes 50 and 51. The two remaining vehicles are used as spares to support normal maintenance activities and are also used to cover special service requests. The three newly acquired Trolleys will allow RTA to keep pace with the service demands for the popular style vehicle. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2008 STA 48,750$ Total 48,750$ PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE – OR PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED – INCLUDE FTA GRANT NUMBER AND RCTC’S CAPITAL GRANT NUMBER Grant # Description Unexpended balance *New Project 65 Riverside Transit AgencyFY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Summary of Funds RequestedShort Range Transit PlanTable 5 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2008/09 and FY 2009/10Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1) Total Amount of Funds LTF STA Measure A Section 5307 - Riv-San. Bndo Section 5307 - Temecula/ Murrieta Section 5307 - Hemet/San Jacinto Section 5307 - Los Angeles Section 5307 - Indo-Cathedral City-Palm Springs Section 5309 Section 5311 CMAQ TUMF Fare Box Other (2)FY 2008/2009:Operating Assistance 48,738,478$ 37,265,113$ 160,500$ 1,754,235$ 451,524$ 7,660,850$ 1,446,256$ Capitalized Preventive Maintenance 3,999,085$ 3,999,085$ 52,737,563$ 37,265,113$ -$ 160,500$ -$ 3,999,085$ 1,754,235$ -$ -$ -$ 451,524$ -$ -$ 7,660,850$ 1,446,256$ Paratransit vehicles FY09-1 1,316,228$ 223,759$ 1,092,469$ Replacement CNG buses FY09-2 2,908,500$ 581,700$ 2,326,800$ EZ Rider retrofit FY09-3 50,000$ 10,000$ 40,000$ Replacement support vehicles FY09-4 395,590$ 79,118$ 316,472$ Capitized maintenance spares FY09-5 500,000$ 100,000$ 400,000$ Bus shelter maintenance equipment FY09-6 40,000$ 8,000$ 32,000$ Bus stop amenities FY09-7 394,260$ 78,852$ 315,408$ Shop tools & equipment FY09-8 3,296$ 659$ 2,637$ Capitalized tire lease FY09-9 231,000$ 46,200$ 184,800$ (2) Guard houses FY09-10 30,000$ 6,000$ 24,000$ Relocation of bus wash - Riverside FY09-11 250,000$ 50,000$ 200,000$ Relocation of coin room - Riverside FY09-12 150,000$ 30,000$ 120,000$ Facilities improvement FY09-13 395,000$ 79,000$ 316,000$ Geographic Information System (GIS) FY09-14 5,000$ 1,000$ 4,000$ Office equipment FY09-15 317,000$ 63,400$ 253,600$ Scheduling & runcutting software FY09-16 700,000$ 140,000$ 560,000$ Annual debt service payment FY09-17 2,032,356$ 406,471$ 1,625,885$ CNG bus for Calexico FY09-18 81,510$ 65,208$ 16,302$ Temecula transit center FY09-19 135,760$ 108,608$ 27,152$ Advanced Information System (ATIS) FY09-20 135,760$ 108,680$ 27,080$ 10,071,260$ -$ 1,904,159$ -$ 7,814,071$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 282,496$ -$ -$ 70,534$ -$ -$ Total: Operating & Capital FY08/09 62,808,823$ 37,265,113$ 1,904,159$ 160,500$ 7,814,071$ 3,999,085$ 1,754,235$ -$ -$ 282,496$ 451,524$ -$ 70,534$ 7,660,850$ 1,446,256$ FY 2009/2010:Operating Assistance 51,733,907$ 39,873,670$ 171,735$ -$ 1,877,031$ 483,131$ 7,737,459$ 1,590,881$ Capitalized Preventive Maintenance 4,279,021$ 4,279,021$ 56,012,928$ 39,873,670$ -$ 171,735$ -$ 4,279,021$ 1,877,031$ -$ -$ -$ 483,131$ -$ -$ 7,737,459$ 1,590,881$ Paratransit vehicles FY10-1 3,660,840$ 622,343$ 3,038,497$ Replacement CNG buses FY10-2 1,362,690$ 272,538$ 1,090,152$ Support vehicles FY10-3 72,930$ 14,586$ 58,344$ Capitalized maintenance spares FY10-4 550,000$ 110,000$ 440,000$ Bus shelter maintenance equipment FY10-5 40,000$ 8,000$ 32,000$ Bus stop amenities FY10-6 413,964$ 82,793$ 331,171$ Shop tools & equipment FY10-7 57,118$ 11,424$ 45,694$ Capitalized tire lease FY10-8 238,000$ 47,600$ 190,400$ Construction of Operations Bldg - Riverside FY10-9 5,000,000$ 1,000,000$ 4,000,000$ Video surveillance equipment - Riverside FY10-10 50,000$ 10,000$ 40,000$ Additional Access Card - Riverside FY10-11 20,000$ 4,000$ 16,000$ Geographic Information System (GIS) FY10-12 5,000$ 1,000$ 4,000$ Office equipment FY10-13 284,000$ 56,800$ 227,200$ Annual debt service payment FY10-14 2,023,600$ 404,720$ 1,618,880$ CNG bus for Calexico FY10-15 84,645$ 67,716$ 16,929$ Temecula transit center FY10-16 141,075$ 112,860$ 28,215$ Advance Traveller Information System (ATIS FY10-17 141,075$ 112,860$ 28,215$ 14,144,937$ -$ 2,645,804$ -$ 11,132,338$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 293,436$ -$ -$ 73,359$ -$ Total: Operating & Capital FY09/10 70,157,865$ 39,873,670$ 2,645,804$ 171,735$ 11,132,338$ 4,279,021$ 1,877,031$ -$ -$ 293,436$ 483,131$ -$ 73,359$ 7,737,459$ 1,590,881$ (1) Number should tie to Table 5A - Capital Project Justification(2) Please identify source of "Other" funds.Subtotal: FY08/09 OperatingSubtotal: FY 08/09 CapitalSubtotal: FY09/10 OperatingSubtotal: FY 09/10 CapitalRevised 4/27/2007Summary of Funds RequestedFY 2008/09 FY 2009/10 .xls 66 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-1/FY10-1 PROJECT NAME Replacement Paratransit Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (20) paratransit vans in FY 2009 and (53) paratranst vans in FY 2010. The vans will have 12-passenger capacity, will be fueled with unleaded gas and equipped with wheel chair lifts. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new vans will replace old units that have reached their service life per FTA Circular 9300.1A – Vehicle Service Life Policy. The scheduled replacement of these types of vehicles is 4 years or 100,000 miles. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 1,052,982$ 2,928,672$ STA 263,246$ 732,168$ Total 1,316,228$ 3,660,840$ 67 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-2/FY10-2 PROJECT NAME Replacement CNG Buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (8) 32-foot low floor CNG buses with 25-27 seating capacity. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new buses will replace (3) EZ Rider 30-foot buses and (5) Thomas 32-foot buses all fueled with compressed natural gas. The old units have reached their estimated service life of ten years or 350,000 miles per FTA Circular 930031A. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 2,326,800$ 1,090,152$ STA 581,700$ 272,538$ Total 2,908,500$ 1,362,690$ 68 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY08-3 PROJECT NAME EZ Rider Retrofit PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase and installation of exhaust treatment devices on (3) El Dorado EZ Rider diesel buses to comply with the California Air Resource Board (ARB)Transit Fleet Rule. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION In compliance with the ARB Transit Fleet Rule. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 Sec 5307 40,000$ STA 10,000$ Total 50,000$ 69 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-4/FY10-3 PROJECT NAME Replacement Support Vehicles PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (15) support cars and (1) van in FY 2009, and (3) support cars in FY 2010. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new vehicles will replace old model units that have reached their estimated service life of four years or 100,000 miles per FTA Circular 9300.1A. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 316,472$ 58,344$ STA 79,118$ 14,586$ Total 395,590$ 72,930$ 70 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-5/FY10-4 PROJECT NAME Capitalized Maintenance Spares PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of rolling stock capital parts to include alternator, manifolds, pumps, controller, transmission, compressor, etc. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Capital purchase of new bus parts based on projected needs whose individual costs meet the requirement for capital reimbursement. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 400,000$ 440,000$ STA 100,000$ 110,000$ Total 500,000$ 550,000$ 71 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-6/FY10-5 PROJECT NAME Bus Shelter Maintenance Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of various equipment needed to maintain the bus shelters such as pressure washer, vacuum broom, rakes, shovels, airless paint sprayer, etc. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Maintenance equipment needed to maintain and keep the bus shelters clean, neat and presentable. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 32,000$ 32,000$ STA 8,000$ 8,000$ Total 40,000$ 40,000$ 72 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-7/FY10-6 PROJECT NAME Bus Stop Amenities PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of benches, poles and extensions, signs, trash receptacles and installation of bus shelters. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Purchase of materials and supplies to expand and upgrade the bus stop system. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 315,408$ 331,171$ STA 78,852$ 82,793$ Total 394,260$ 413,964$ 73 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-8/FY10-7 PROJECT NAME Shop Tools and Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of various maintenance tools and equipment including brake lathe upgrade, pressure washer and chassis washer. Shop tools and equipment to be purchased include lap top computers and software for Maintenance Department, two brake drum dolly’s, (1) transmission jack and bus lift replacement. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The new tools and equipment will aid Maintenance personnel in performing the bus preventive maintenance and repairs. Upgrading of brake lathe includes purchase of one brake shoe fixture and two HEPA filters. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 2,637$ 45,694$ STA 659$ 11,424$ Total 3,296$ 57,118$ 74 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-9/FY10-8 PROJECT NAME Capitalized Tire Lease PROJECT DESCRIPTION Capitalized cost of leasing bus tires. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION As part of the Agency’s preventive maintenance, tires are inspected and replaced as needed based on tread and air pressure. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 184,800$ 190,400$ STA 46,200$ 47,600$ Total 231,000$ 238,000$ 75 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-10 PROJECT NAME (2) Guard Houses PROJECT DESCRIPTION Construction of guard house at the Hemet and Riverside facilities. Costs include concrete and electrical. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Contracting two security guards to be based in Hemet and Riverside to provide security and protection to Agency assets and employees. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 Sec 5307 24,000$ STA 6,000$ Total 30,000$ 76 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-11 PROJECT NAME Relocation of Bush Wash PROJECT DESCRIPTION The existing bush wash at the Riverside facility will be relocated to the vacant area adjacent to the Maintenance bus garage. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The current location of the bus wash does not allow sufficient water drainage and has damaged and deteriorated the sub-surface and concrete. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 Sec 5307 200,000$ STA 50,000$ Total 250,000$ 77 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-12 PROJECT NAME Relocation of Coin Room PROJECT DESCRIPTION The existing coin room at the Riverside facility will be relocated to the vacant lot adjacent to the Maintenance bus garage. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION For security and operational efficiency. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 Sec 5307 120,000$ STA 30,000$ Total 150,000$ 78 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY010-9 PROJECT NAME Construction of Operations Building PROJECT DESCRIPTION The construction of a new Operations building. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The Riverside Transit Agency has outgrown the existing facility. In order to provide efficient and effective transit service, a new Operations building needs to be constructed to meet the increased demands. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 20010 Sec 5307 4,000,000$ STA 1,000,000$ Total 5,000,000$ 79 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY010-10 PROJECT NAME Video Surveillance Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of additional video surveillance equipment such as camera and digital video recording system at the Riverside facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This project is requested as part of the Agency’s safety and security measures to protect its assets as well as its employees. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2010 Sec 5307 40,000$ STA 10,000$ Total 50,000$ 80 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY010-11 PROJECT NAME Additional Card Access Control PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of additional card access control at the Riverside facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This project is requested as part of the Agency’s safety and security measures to protect its assets as well as its employees. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2010 Sec 5307 16,000$ STA 4,000$ Total 20,000$ 81 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-13 PROJECT NAME Facilities Improvement PROJECT DESCRIPTION Replacement of asphalt at Hemet facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Current asphalt at Hemet facility does not meet RTA standards. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 316,000$ -$ STA 79,000$ -$ Total 395,000$ -$ 82 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-14/FY10-12 PROJECT NAME Geographic Information Systems PROJECT DESCRIPTION Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be purchased to enhance the mapping and planning capabilities of the Agency. GIS is a collection of computer hardware, software, and geographic data that is used to display different forms of geographic information. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION GIS capabilities is necessary for advanced mapping, analyzing, and planning projects. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 4,000$ 4,000$ STA 1,000$ 4,000$ Total 5,000$ 5,000$ 83 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-15/FY10-13 PROJECT NAME Office Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of replacement office equipment will include: ƒ Printers; ƒ Servers (including the installation and configuration); and ƒ Phone System (replacement of PBX system with VOIP system) PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of the above office equipment is necessary for the following: ƒ Printers - Current printers will have exceeded their warranty and have reached their useful life. ƒ Servers - Replacement is needed to provide for higher performance and more reliable uptime. ƒ Phone System - Current phone system will be over 8 years old and relies on technology that will be discontinued. The new phone system will be easier and less expensive to maintain and will be more user-friendly. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 253,600$ 227,200$ STA 63,400$ 227,200$ Total 317,000$ 284,000$ 84 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-16 PROJECT NAME Scheduling and Runcutting Software PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of scheduling and runcutting software will be used to collect, sort, and analyze schedule data. Various applications will be available to edit trip times, revenue hours, headways, operator pay sheets, and the like to calculate time and cost. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Scheduling and runcutting software is necessary to make operator paddles more efficient and cost effective. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 560,000$ -$ STA 140,000$ -$ Total 700,000$ -$ 85 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-17/FY10-14 PROJECT NAME Annual Debt Service Payment PROJECT DESCRIPTION Annual debt service payment for the purchase of 57 CNG buses in 2001. The purchase of these buses was financed through bonds issued by the California Transit Finance Authority. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of the 57 CNG buses was part of RTA’s commitment to transition to a 100% CNG bus fleet. RTA has made a serious commitment to using alternative fuel vehicles to enhance air quality and help in the achievement of air quality goals in the County of Riverside. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5307 1,626,685$ 1,618,880$ STA 406,671$ 404,720$ Total 2,033,356$ 2,023,600$ 86 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-18/FY10-15 PROJECT NAME CNG Bus for the City of Calexico PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of (1) full size (40-ft.) CNG bus for the City of Calexico. RTA has a signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City of Calexico to file a grant application on their behalf. RTA’s sole responsibility will be to reimburse the City of Calexico with the applicable federal funds in accordance with the MOU. The CNG bus will replace a 1980 model, 36 passenger capacity bus fueled by unleaded gasoline. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Since the City of Calexico cannot receive FTA funds directly, the City has asked RTA to complete the Sec 5309 grant application on their behalf. The City will provide the necessary local match. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5309 65,208$ 67,716$ City of Calexico 16,302$ 16,929$ Total 81,510$ 84,645$ 87 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-19/FY10-16 PROJECT NAME Temecula Transit Center PROJECT DESCRIPTION Construction of a transit center in the City of Temecula located SW of Jefferson Ave. and NW of the intersection of Jefferson and Winchester. The multi-modal transit center will have 10-15 bus bays, seating and adequate parking to complement the park and ride facility. RTA’s existing Routes 23, 24, 79, 202, 206 and 208 will most likely utilize this transit center. The new station will not result in new services or service expansion. The estimated project cost for the transit center is $7.0M. The City of Temecula will be the Lead Agency for the development of the Temecula transit center. RTA’s participation is limited to the provision of grant funds for the design and construction portion of the project. Detailed schedules to be provided by the City of Temecula at the appropriate time. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The transit center will become a hub to encourage community carpooling and facilitate regional commuter link services and transfers. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5309 108,608$ 112,860$ TUMF 27,152$ 28,215$ Total 135,760$ 141,075$ 88 Table 5A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER FY09-20/FY10-17 PROJECT NAME Automated Traveler Info. System (ATIS) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of ATIS on fixed route vehicles and about 60 bus stops in the service area that will notify customers of when the next bus will arrive and where its destination is. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The ATIS will provide real time information bus arrival information for stops throughout the system. Quick information to the rider lessens the ”perceived” out of vehicle wait time and in turn can generate greater ridership. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) Funding Source FY 2009 FY 2010 Sec 5309 108,608$ 112,860$ TUMF 27,152$ 28,215$ Total 135,760$ 141,075$ 89 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Prior Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2003/04 – FY 2005/061) Action(s) Taken And Results2 1. Develop and adopt policies aimed at creating budgetary goals that are linked to service productivity. RTA’s operates a mix of services, including productive routes in densely populated communities and routes that are coverage oriented serving lower density communities. The coverage service is deemed necessary given RTA’s commitment to sustaining transit service in urban, suburban, and rural service areas. Staff regular undertaking of evaluating service performance has help support decisions made to continue service or recommend service elimination. Staff has effectively used RCTC Transit Policy Committee (TPC) and the Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) to develop fiscal goals linked to service productivity. The Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) prepared for RTA also includes long term goals that could direct policies for the delivery of future transit services. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 2. Explore potential alternative operating revenues, including advertising and contributions from unique beneficiaries of the service. The RTA Board of Directors carefully considered in great length and detail bus exterior and interior advertising at its October 2002 Board meeting. Due to issues of ad content control, potentially low revenue due to low population densities, disrupting the RTA paint scheme/self marking package with advertisements, it was determined by a majority vote not to pursue bus advertising on bus exteriors and interiors. However, RTA does have bus shelter advertising in the cities of Corona, Hemet, Perris, and Moreno Valley as well as the unincorporated areas of Glen Avon, Home Gardens, Pedley, Rubidoux, and Sun City. RTA had bus shelters with corresponding advertising agreements in Lake Elsinore and Norco, but these were withdrawn by the media corporation that provided the shelters. For the City of Riverside, the City has a strict advertising policy that prohibits commercial 1 The FY 2006/07 Triennial Performance Audit for FY 2003/04 through FY 2005/06 will be conducted in FY 2006/07 and completed by 6/30/07. 2 If no action taken, provide schedule for implementation or explanation of why the recommendation is no longer relevant. 90 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT advertising of this nature. However, RTA staff has worked with the City’s administration to initiate a bus shelter advertising pilot program in certain commercial districts. The Cities of Temecula and Murrieta also have similar policies against commercial advertising. Staff has also met with the cities of Calimesa, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, San Jacinto, and Temecula to discuss a possible consortium to obtain bus shelters that are provided and supported by commercial advertising. The cities and County’s staff have been excellent partners in helping develop this program. This process is continuing with RTA staff as the lead. RTA has pursued financial support from unique beneficiaries who receive direct bus service. Examples are: Route 50, the “Red Line,” (formally known as the Jury Trolley) is subsidized by the County of Riverside; and the Route 51, the “Crest Cruiser.” RTA is also working with the Riverside Community College (RCC) District to explore subsidized parking lot shuttle programs similar to the Jury Trolley. RTA also approached the Pechanga and Soboba tribes in 2006 to discuss potential partnerships; however, the tribes declined to participate financially at this time. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 3. Develop a short term operation that draws down on the remaining unclaimed LTF revenues shown in RCTC financial reports. RTA has found that it is feasible to fund certain capital projects with reserve funds, but not operations. Since the life of the operations project would likely be ongoing, reserves do not provide a continuous revenue stream to sustain the project. The population and growth in Western Riverside County continue to outpace most of the County. This growth results in the pressing need for expansion for all modes of transit. Multi-modal transit centers to facilitate the riding public’s needs will be essential in the coming years. Unlike the built-out surrounding counties, Riverside County is in the process of developing its transit infrastructure. General locations for 91 TABLE 6 – PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT multi-modal transit centers have been identified by both RCTC and RTA. These multi-modal transit centers require minimum five-acre parcels. In a fast moving real estate market, sellers demand short escrows for strategically located real property. Quick reaction time to secure these properties will be critical. As real properties become available, a readily available reserve fund would assist in the procurement process. Every year, the Agency is facing with cash flow dilemma as a result of the delay in receipt of Federal Section 5307 funds. The reserves funds will serve as a back up for any shortfall of funds and allows for uninterrupted continuation of transit services in western Riverside County. Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 4. Continue to work with Dial-A-Ride contractor to separate vehicle revenue hours and miles from total vehicle hours and miles. RTA has required its Dial-a-Ride contractor since July 2004 to report both total vehicle hours and miles along with revenue hours and miles. A process has been established to enter the data received into the reports. This information shows both total hours & miles and revenue hours & miles in all performance reports for the National Transit Database, State Controller and RCTC. . Conclusion: This recommendation has been implemented. 5. Provide a comprehensive systemwide map in the Ride Guide. RTA currently produces a system map, which provides a comprehensive and graphical view of the entire fixed route bus system. The system map is produced as a companion brochure to the RideGuide and is available in all locations where the RideGuide is available. The audit suggestion of combining the two documents is exactly how the RTA previously produced the Ride Guides. However, it was determined that the labor and material costs to include the foldout system map in each Ride Guide was significant without offering much benefit to the customer. Conclusion: This recommendation is no longer applicable. 92 Table 7 - Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) ReviewRiverside Transit Agency Systemwide Performance - FY 2007/08 Short Range Transit PlanFY2008 PerformancePlan Scorecard CommentsOperating DataUnlinked Passenger Trips 7,231,939 Passenger Miles 49,229,263 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 653,228 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 10,505,063 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,182,768 Total Operating Expenses 149,999,135$ Total Passenger Fare Revenue 8,334,988$ Net Operating Expenses 41,664,147$ Performance IndicatorsMandatory:Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $76.54 Fails to Meet Target Request a waiver.Farebox Recovery Ratio 18.04% Meets TargetDiscretionary:Subsidy Per Passenger $5.76 $4.53 - $6.13 Meets TargetSubsidy Per Passenger Mile $0.85 $0.66 - $0.90 Meets TargetSubsidy Per Revenue Hour $63.78 $50.98 - $68.98 Meets TargetSubsidy Per Revenue Mile $3.97 $3.17 - $4.29 Meets TargetPassengers Per Revenue Hour 11.07 9.56 - 12.94 Meets TargetPassengers Per Revenue Mile 0.69 0.60 - 0.81 Meets Target* Target and FY08 proposed performance indicators are based on FY2007 estimated recurring operating expenses plus GASB 43/45 ARC.1 Total FY08 Operating Expense budget in this schedule includes GASB 43/45 ARC only for PIP calculation purposes. The addition pre-fund costs of $4.3M are not reflected above and are exempt from PIP calculations. RTA Board approval expected for Operating Expense Budget of $54.3M.17.66%FY2008 PerformanceTarget *Data Elements$75.95 93 TABLE 8 – HIGHLIGHTS OF SRTP FOR PRESENTATIONS Operating & Financial Data FY 02/03 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 Forecast FY 07/08 Planned Systemwide Ridership 7,146,680 7,588,864 7,357,581 6,849,166 7,010,392 7,231,939 Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $62.72 $61.95 $63.08 $68.20 $72.33 $75.95 Recent Trends: • From FY 2002 to FY 2004, RTA experienced a steady growth in ridership system- wide. • From FY 2004 to FY 2007, system-wide ridership declined approximately 8% from 7.6 million to 7.0 million. Various external and internal factors such as the fare increase, weather patterns, fuel rates, employment rates, and service levels are currently being studied by RTA staff. • Ridership is anticipated to grow by approximately 3% in FY 2008 based on service enhancements. Proposed Service Changes: Service for FY 2008 will feature enhancements of service operated in FY 2007. The growing population within western Riverside County continues to shape and redefine travel patterns. In response, a fresh look at the service area is on the way. RTA transit service is being proposed for significant enhancements based on recommendations that will result from the service plan element of the agency’s completion of the Comprehensive Operational Analysis in early spring of 2007. The following service improvements are included in the proposed fiscal year 2008 budget: 1. Route 1 to provide a higher level of core service and improved schedule adherence 2. Route 7 & 8 service restructuring in the Lake Elsinore area 3. Route 14 extension into Hunter Business Park 4. Route 16E service adjustments for enhanced connections to Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station 5. Route 17 restructuring to serve the community of Moreno Valley 6. Route 18 & 18A service adjustments to capture a broader ridership base 7. Route 23 & 24 service restructuring to provide more direct service in the Murrieta and Temecula area 8. Route 33 subject to elimination if non-PIP compliant 9. Route 36 subject to elimination if non-PIP compliant 10. Route 38 extension to provide enhanced service in the Jurupa area 11. Route 42 extension to additional trip generators 12. Route 50 modified service for the Jurors in downtown Riverside 13. Route 61 subject to elimination if non-PIP compliant 14. Route 206 service on weekends to Galleria at Tyler Mall 15. Route 202 service to Oceanside mid-day during summer months 16. Jurupa Senior Shuttle restructuring to travel on major surface streets These services, along with the Holiday Trolley and Festival of Lights routes operated in December, will be implemented throughout FY 2008. Each service change is proposed to 94 TABLE 8 – HIGHLIGHTS OF SRTP FOR PRESENTATIONS enhance ridership and farebox recovery. Operating Budget ($54,272,469): • Increase of 11.4% over YTD March estimated year-end actual (excluding GASB pre- fund). Variance analysis by cost element is provided below: o Salaries – 6.6% increase due to MOU increase and hiring of budgeted open positions. o Benefits – 4.1% increase due to increased health benefit rates. o Services – 14.8% increase due to security for downtown terminal and facilities related expenses. o Materials & Supplies – 18.9% increase due to anticipated increase in rate per therm for CNG fuel and price per gallon for unleaded fuel. Increase is also attributed to increased parts usage and postage. o Utilities – 11.8% increase attributed to addition of wireless devises for ITS and CommuterLink buses. o Insurance – 5.0% increase in insurance rates for property & other insurance premiums. o Taxes & Permits – 40.0% increase due to fuel taxes. o Advertising & Promotion – 34.7% increase attributed to promotion of new routes and more aggressive bus marketing program per RTA board of directors request. o Dues & Subscriptions – 20.9% increase. o Training – 58.7% increase due to timing. Training planned in 4th quarter. o Miscellaneous – 31.0% increase attributed to software maintenance contract increases. o Purchased Transportation – 15.5% increase attributed to negotiated increased contract rates over FY07 and planned service growth on contracted routes. Capital Budget ($9,051,321): • RTA’s 5-Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is updated to reflect the current outlook of service needs & infrastructure improvements with major emphasis on FY 2008. FY 2008 CIP projects are funded with Federal Section 5307, 5309, Transportation Uniform Mitigation Funds (TUMF) and matched with State Transit Assistance (STA) as necessary. A summary by project element for FY 2008 is shown below: o Revenue Vehicle Acquisition – $3.3 million for paratransit van replacements & expansion, and additional Calexico bus (pass through) funds. o Revenue Vehicle Upgrade - $0.6 million for refurbishment of 5 CNG Trolleys. o Non-Revenue Vehicle Acquisition - $0.3 million for support vehicles. o Maintenance - $1.1 million for maintenance spares, tire lease, bus stop amenities, & replacement of maintenance tooling. o Buildings, Land, & Facilities Upgrades - $0.3 million for transit centers & facility improvements at the Riverside & Hemet facilities. Funding for transit centers comes from discretionary Federal Section 5309 & TUMF. Federal Section 5309 funding is the direct result of the successful lobbying efforts of the RTA board of directors. o Revenue Vehicle Systems & Equipment - $0.9 million for Automated Traveler Information System (ATIS) and GFI fareboxes for both contracted and directly operated service vehicles. o Communication & Information Systems - $0.5 million for addition of DirecTV 95 TABLE 8 – HIGHLIGHTS OF SRTP FOR PRESENTATIONS and WiFi on CommuterLink buses, and replacement of computers and network systems. o Debt Service - $2.0 million for annual Certificate of Participation (COP) payment of principal & interest. 96 AGENDA ITEM 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: May 24, 2007 TO: Transit Policy Committee FROM: Tanya Love, Program Manager Theresa Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH Stephanie Wiggins, Regional Programs Director SUBJECT: Riverside Transit Agency’s Request to Pre-Fund Retiree Medical Benefits STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Allocate $2,668,182 in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) to pre-fund post retirement medical benefits related to the implementation of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 45; 2) Reprogram $5,056,818 in previously allocated, unclaimed operating funds as additional funding for pre-funding the post retirement medical benefits; 3) Amend RTA’s FY 2006/07 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) to reflect the additional funding; 4) Amend the Commission’s FY 2006/07 budget to reflect the additional funding; 5) Direct staff to work with RTA on waiving the impact of the incremental costs to the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) as a result of the pre-funding the GASB 45 actuarial accrued liability; and 6) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In addition to its retirement benefit plan administered through CalPERS, RTA has a retiree medical plan, which expenses on a pay-as-you-go basis approximate $453,000 for FY 2006/07. As RTA’s retiree population grows, the pay-as-you-go expenses also increase. GASB has issued Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Post retirement Benefits Other Than Pensions. As a result of GASB 45, RTA must recognize post retirement medical benefit costs on an accrual basis over a period approximating the employees’ years of service. It must also provide information about actuarial accrued liabilities associated with these benefits as well as Agenda Item 10 221 the extent of progress made in funding the plan, if any. GASB 45 does not require employers to pre-fund post retirement medical benefits. RTA would be permitted to continue reporting the costs on a pay-as-you-go basis; however, it would then be required to record a liability for the difference between its actuarially required contribution and costs paid. Based on an actuarial valuation completed in June 2006, RTA’s actuarial accrued liability is approximately $21.8 million using a 7% discount rate over a 30-year amortization period that assumes assets are pre-funded and invested in a separate trust in diversified investments. RTA is requesting funding to pre-fund its retiree medical plan, as this strategy would result in a reduction of the annual required contribution which currently approximates $1.75 million. The annual required contribution represents 3.9% of the projected FY 2006/07 operating expenses budget, while pay-as-you-go expenses represent 1.0% of the budget. RTA has applied for and received approval to request a credit from the Internal Revenue Service for Federal Excise Tax (FET). The credit is a result of the 2006 federal highway bill in which consumers of alternative fuels such as CNG can apply for a $.50 per gasoline gallon equivalent against the FET pool. Despite being a tax-exempt entity, RTA qualifies for this tax credit due to the utilization of CNG buses. The tax credit is currently legislated to cover the period of October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2009. This three-year span covers three-quarters of FY 2006/07, one-hundred percent of FY 2007/08 and 2008/09, and one-quarter of FY 2009/10. It is not known at this time whether the tax credit program will be extended beyond its current end date. Since RTA does not pay FET, the tax credit to be received under this program has been determined to be other local revenue versus being considered an offset against an expense. This determination is crucial as it has tremendous positive effects on RTA’s state-mandated farebox recovery ratio. Accordingly, RTA has an opportunity to pre-fund a significant portion of its actuarial accrued liability for its retiree medical plan without having a drastic impact on its farebox recovery ratio. Based on recent prior years’ CNG consumption, RTA is likely to generate $3 million of FET credit over the life of the program. Assuming an 18% farebox recovery ratio, the FET credit allows RTA to fund approximately $16.7 million of the $21.8 million actuarial accrued liability over the four affected fiscal years. RTA is requesting a FY 2006/07 budget adjustment for the pre-funding of a portion of the actuarial accrued liability in order to take advantage of the first nine months of the FET credit revenue. RTA estimates that the FET credit impact in FY 2006/07 will be $775,000 of additional local revenue. At a farebox recovery ratio target of 18%, RTA estimates that it can absorb a pre-funding expense of approximately $4.3 million in FY 2006/07 without an adverse impact on its farebox recovery ratio or a minimum three of six discretionary targets for the PIP. Focusing only on farebox recovery ratio compliance, RTA estimates that it can absorb as much as $8.5 million of pre-funding Agenda Item 10 222 expense in FY 2006/07 and still achieve its target ratio. Regardless of the pre-funding amount, RTA projects that it would not meet its mandatory PIP target for cost per revenue service hour. Since the impact of the implementation and pre-funding of GASB 45 is an unusual and infrequent event, RTA has requested that the incremental cost of pre-funding above the annual required contribution be an excluded expense from the PIP computation. The basis for this exclusion is a balance of the pre-funding strategy’s long-term positive impact on the financial condition of RTA with the basic intent of the PIP program. This approach provides an optimal short-term solution to a long-range issue by following the strategy of maximizing the pre-funding of the actuarial accrued liability of the retiree medical plan while still achieving the state-mandated farebox recovery ratio. Further, the strategy aims to maintain compliance with the other seven PIP metrics during this period by excluding the incremental pre-funding costs. This strategy also secures the future retiree medical benefits promised to RTA employees, both past and present, and minimizes the future cost outlay to provide for the retiree medical benefits. RTA can also maintain its focus on providing focused, productive service growth while containing costs when possible. Additionally RTA’s financial condition and credit worthiness is greatly bolstered by having mitigated the vast majority of this substantial liability within three years. RTA’s strategy and plan is supported by Commission staff as the Commission shares the goal of mitigating its actuarial accrued liability as rapidly as possible. Commission staff also supports RTA’s request that the incremental pre-funding cost be excluded from PIP compliance and, if approved by Commission action, will work with RTA to finalize the incremental exemptions to the PIP. RTA’s compliance with PIP continues its ability to bring much-needed bus transportation services to the citizens of Western Riverside County. The Commission’s support is contingent on RTA’s receipt of the first FET credit payment, which is anticipated approximately June 1, 2007. For FY 2006/07, staff recommends a funding allocation of $8.5 million as follows: RTA’s Allocated, Unclaimed LTF Operating Funds $ 5,056,818 Western Riverside LTF Apportionment (Bus) 2,668,182 Total LTF Funds 7,725,000 FET Credit 775,000 Total FET Credit and LTF funds $ 8,500,000 As part of the Commission’s fiduciary oversight responsibility, a 10% reserve policy was established in January 2005. For FY 2006/07, $4,200,960 was set aside as RTA’s 10% rainy day reserve and are not expected to be utilized through the end of the year. For FY 2007/08, RTA’s 10% rainy day reserve was established at $3,758,902. Agenda Item 10 223 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: N/A Year: FY 2006/07 Amount: $7,725,000 Source of Funds: Local Transportation Funds Budget Adjustment: N/A GLA No.: 601 62 86101 – P 2210 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 05/17/2007 Agenda Item 10 224 AGENDA ITEM 11 PRESENTATION TRANSIT POLICY COMMITTEE COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET MAY 24, 2007 NAME AGENCY E MAIL ADDRESS f fr/f,f � 4G � SY fin/ n4 ��0 //e6V--- 4 vaF X,?d het, P1-&' 60/3ga/ -� C s s , i— ,.l o CP& E0/0 c_ (1, At_ i� s� F.e4 NA, f74,1-Li- /lowez Roy 'w t_ s o N D I S i R [CT LI U.\ a -k-e1eeonfeizepaQ