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04 April 23, 2018 Budget & ImplementationComments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. MEETING AGENDA Budget and Implementation Committee Time: 9:30 a.m. Date: April 23, 2018 Location: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administration Center 4080 Lemon St, First Floor, Riverside CA 92501 COMMITTEE MEMBERS Rusty Bailey, Chair/ Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Linda Krupa, Vice Chair / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Lloyd White / Nancy Carroll, City of Beaumont Jim Hyatt / Linda Molina, City of Calimesa Randall Bonner / Vicki Warren, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis / Shelley Kaplan, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / To Be Appointed, City of Coachella Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Dana Reed / To Be Appointed, City of Indian Wells Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Rick Gibbs / Jonathan Ingram, City of Murrieta Jan Harnik / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Michael Naggar / Matt Rahn, City of Temecula John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside, District II Chuck Washington, County of Riverside, District III STAFF Anne Mayer, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY Annual Budget Development and Oversight Competitive Federal and State Grant Programs Countywide Communications and Outreach Programs Countywide Strategic Plan Legislation Public Communications and Outreach Programs Short Range Transit Plans COMM-BI-00048 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Monday, April 23, 2018 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor Riverside, California In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS – Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Committee may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Committee, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. Also, the Committee may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Committee shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Board should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda which are not listed on the agenda. Board members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. Budget and Implementation Committee April 23, 2018 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – MARCH 26, 2018 6. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) 7. CONSENT CALENDAR - All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 7A. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Page 1 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2018; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 7B. ADOPTION OF RESOLUTION NO. 18-005 FOR CALIFORNIA OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES DISASTER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Page 3 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 18-005, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Designating Commission Agents to Act on Behalf of the Commission for the Execution of Assurances and Agreements with the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Pertaining to State Disaster Financial Assistance”; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. Budget and Implementation Committee April 23, 2018 Page 3 8. PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018/19 Page 7 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Discuss, review, and provide guidance on the proposed Fiscal Year (FY) 2018/19 Budget; and 2) Forward to the Commission to open the public hearing in order to receive input and comments on the proposed FY 2018/19 Budget on May 9 and on June 13, 2018, and thereafter close the public hearing. 9. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 28 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation; 2) Adopt the following bill positions: a) AB 3027 (Chávez) – Support; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 10. QUARTERLY PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS REPORT Page 34 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for January – March, 2018; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. Budget and Implementation Committee April 23, 2018 Page 4 11. BUDGET ADJUSTMENT FOR SB 132 PROJECTS – JURUPA ROAD GRADE SEPARATION AND HAMNER AVENUE BRIDGE Page 38 Overview This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve an adjustment to the FY 2017/18 budget of an estimated $300,000 to increase SB 132 revenues and expenditures for the Jurupa Road Grade Separation and Hamner Avenue Bridge projects; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 12. COMMUTER RAIL GRANT RESOLUTION Page 40 Overview 1) Adopt Resolution No. 18-006, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding Authorization for the Execution of the Certifications and Assurances and Authorized Agent Forms for the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program for the Perris Valley Line FY 2018/19 Operations Project in the Amount of $861,106”; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 13. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 14. COMMISSIONERS / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and staff to report on attended and upcoming meeting/conferences and issues related to Commission activities. 15. ADJOURNMENT The next Budget and Implementation Committee meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Monday, June 25, 2018, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. AGENDA ITEM 5 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE Monday, March 26, 2018 MINUTES 1. CALL TO ORDER The meeting of the Budget and Implementation Committee was called to order by Vice Chair Linda Krupa at 9:35 a.m., in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Members/Alternates Present Members Absent Rusty Bailey* Jan Harnik Russell Betts Steven Hernandez Randall Bonner Greg Pettis Rick Gibbs Lloyd White Jim Hyatt Linda Krupa Bob Magee Michael Naggar Dana Reed John F. Tavaglione Chuck Washington *Arrived after the meeting was called to order 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Commissioner Bob Magee led the Budget and Implementation Committee in a flag salute. 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. RCTC Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes March 26, 2018 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – FEBRUARY 26, 2018 M/S/C (Hyatt/Bonner) to approve the minutes of February 26, 2018 meeting as submitted. Abstain: Betts 6. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 7. CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 2018 STATE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director, presented the details for the California Transportation Commission staff recommendations for the 2018 State Transportation Improvement Program that was adopted by the CTC on March 21 – 22, 2018. M/S/C to: 1) Receive and file the California Transportation Commission (CTC) staff recommendations for 2018 State Transportation Improvement Program(STIP); and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. 8. ADVANCE OF LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUNDS TO RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY IN SUPPORT OF CONTINUED BUS OPERATIONS Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager, provided details on the requested advancement of funds to Riverside Transit Agency in the amount of $15 million. M/S/C (Hyatt/Betts) to: 1) Approve an advance of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds in the amount of up to $15 million to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) until such time that the appropriation of the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2017/18 Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 funds are released to RTA; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. RCTC Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes March 26, 2018 Page 3 9. AMENDMENT TO RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY’S FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN At this time, Chairman Rusty Bailey arrived and assumed the role of Chair. Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager, provided an overview of the proposed changes to the Riverside Transit Agency’s 2017/18 Short Range transit Plan. M/S/C (Hyatt/Krupa) to: 1) Approve amendments to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) that total a $0 net impact to reflect the operational service changes on Routes 205, 49, 54F; personnel modifications; service contract provisions affecting purchased transportation and maintenance; and other changes; 2) Approve modification to RTA’s FY 2017/18 capital assistance program to reflect an additional $1,641,600 in FYs 2015/16 and 2016/17 Proposition 1B California Transit Security Grant Program (CTSGP) funds; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 10. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Jillian Guizado, Legislative Affairs Manager, provided an update on state and federal legislation as well as provided details on SB 1119 which staff is recommending the Commission adopt a support position. Chair Bailey stated Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program fund availability has tripled with this budget and the region has not won a TIGER grant in quite some time. He encouraged the Commission to seek out the available federal funding. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, noted the State of California only received one TIGER award recently, therefore the Commission will be tripling their efforts to secure federal funding from the TIGER program. Chair Bailey encouraged Commissioners to invite some of the new administration in Washington D.C., particularly the new Secretary of Transportation, to the region to show them the work that has been accomplished. M/S/C (Bonner/Reed) to: 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation; 2) Adopt the following bill positions: RCTC Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes March 26, 2018 Page 4 a) SB 1119 (Newman) - Support; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. 11. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT 11A. Commissioner Russell Betts stated he sits as the Chair of the Sunline Transit Agency and highlighted some of the great things the agency is accomplishing and noted its current budget shortfall. 11B. Commissioner Chuck Washington noted Vice Chair Linda Krupa did a fantastic job running the meeting prior to Chair Bailey’s arrival. He stated he is unable to see the vote results on his screen and requested IT staff and Clerk staff work to solve that issue so the vote results can be seen by Commissioners. 11C. Anne Mayer, Executive Director, provided an update on the Commission’s authorization of terminating the swap arrangement in an effort to move towards a fixed rate debt scenario, noting Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, is currently in New York to sell bonds in a currently favorable market. She expressed her appreciation to Ms. Trevino and the finance staff for continuing to stay ahead of financial conditions to ensure the Commission stays in a favorable financial position. She congratulated Michael Blomquist and David Thomas who traveled to San Francisco to accept the American Society of Civil Engineers Outstanding Transportation Project of the Year award for the 91 project. She announced it was an honor for the 91 project to be nominated as one of three finalists for the California Transportation Foundation Freeway/Highway Project of the Year award. The winner of this award will be announced at a ceremony held in Orange County in late May. 11D. Commissioner Jim Hyatt discussed his vote on item 10, asking for a correction to change his vote to a yes vote. The Clerk noted the change for the record. He discussed his opposition to ACA 5/Proposition 69 that was previously adopted as a support position by the Commission at its workshop in January. Commissioner Reed clarified the report presented on item 10 which included a list of positions taken on legislative items is a listing of positions voted on and adopted by the Commission in previous meetings. Commissioner Bob Magee stated there was significant discussion regarding ACA 5/Proposition 69 at the Commission’s workshop in January and noted his vote was one in opposition. RCTC Budget and Implementation Committee Minutes March 26, 2018 Page 5 12. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Budget and Implementation Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 10:07 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board AGENDA ITEM 7A Agenda Item 7A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2018; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Certain contracts are executed under single signature authority as permitted in the Commission’s Procurement Policy Manual adopted in December 2017. The Executive Director is authorized to sign services contracts that are less than $150,000 individually and in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1.5 million in any given fiscal year. Additionally, in accordance with Public Utilities Code Section 130323(c), the Executive Director is authorized to sign contracts for supplies, equipment, materials, and construction of all facilities and works under $50,000 individually. The attached report details all contracts that have been executed for the third quarter ended March 31, 2018 under the single signature authority granted to the Executive Director. The unused capacity of single signature authority for services at March 31, 2018 is $526,781. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of March 31, 2018 1 V:\2018\05 May\B&I\6A.JM.Att1.SingleSignQ3.xlsx CONSULTANT DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES ORIGINAL CONTRACT AMOUNT PAID AMOUNT REMAINING CONTRACT AMOUNT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2017 $1,500,000.00 Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates (FM3) Public opinion research services 150,000.00 76,450.00 73,550.00 BNSF Rail/station flagging services 150,000.00 11,291.05 138,708.95 Semilla Landscape Corporation Station and Toll Facilities Janitorial Services 48,000.00 47,294.30 705.70 TRC Solutions I-15 Express Lanes Project Groundbreaking Event 25,000.00 0.00 25,000.00 Joshua Grading Flagging services 100,000.00 0.00 100,000.00 Fitch Credit rating 110,000.00 0.00 110,000.00 Exigent IT Support services 150,000.00 59,608.83 90,391.17 Riverside Risk Advisors LLC Swap advisor regarding termination of BANA swap 42,000.00 0.00 42,000.00 Conrad LLP FTA subrecipient oversight monitoring services for FY 2017/18 29,000.00 0.00 29,000.00 Total Plan Business Interiors Furniture design, layout, and installation services for RCTC/Bechtel expansion area 114,219.16 0.00 114,219.16 Fibertronics CCTV services to complete County's Poarch Road project 55,000.00 0.00 55,000.00 AMOUNT USED 973,219.16 973,219.16 $526,780.84 None N/A $- $- $- Jose Mendoza Theresia Trevino Prepared by Reviewed by AMOUNT USED SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF March 31, 2018 Note: Shaded area represents new contracts listed in the third quarter. AMOUNT REMAINING through March 31, 2018 Agreements that fall under Public Utilities Code 130323 (C) 2 AGENDA ITEM 7B Agenda Item 7B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Gary Ratliff, Facilities Administrator THROUGH: Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director SUBJECT: Adoption of Resolution No. 18-005 for California Office of Emergency Services Disaster Financial Assistance STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 18-005, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Designating Commission Agents to Act on Behalf of the Commission for the Execution of Assurances and Agreements with the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Pertaining to State Disaster Financial Assistance”; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In January 2017, several winter storms rolled through the Inland Empire impacting roads, lands, and facilities owned and operated by various public agencies. The January storms impacted the Commission’s new Perris Valley Line station at Perris—South. Flooding caused the washing away of irrigation lines and plant material, blocked the entrances and exits of the station, displaced native material, and required reestablishment of drains and drainage flows within and around station grounds. Following the storms, the Governor of California declared a state of emergency that included the county of Riverside area. Staff immediately addressed the repair needs during and after the storms. Once the state of emergency was declared, staff applied for eligible grant funds related to storm damage. Over the last year, California Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) has reviewed the Commission’s application, made field visits to inspect the area, and approved a reimbursement grant to the Commission in the amount of $73,587 for the restitution of the storm damage to Perris—South station. As required by the Federal Aid and CalOES guidelines, staff recommends the approval of Resolution No. 18-005, authorizing the Executive Director, the Deputy Executive Director or the Facilities Administrator to act as the representative on behalf of the Commission with regard to CalOES and reimbursement funds. CalOES requires a resolution before payment can be released. 3 Agenda Item 7B Resolution No. 18-005 is a universal resolution, and applies to the specific disaster described above, and to all open and future disasters for up to three (3) years following the date of approval of the Resolution. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: 2018 Amount: $73,587 Source of Funds: Federal-Public Assistance, State- California Disaster Assistance Act Budget Adjustment: Yes GL/Project Accounting No.: 244022 414 41410 0000 103 24 41401 $58,038 (federal revenues) 244022 415 41510 0000 103 24 41501 $15,549 (state revenues) Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/16/2018 Attachment: Resolution 18-005 4 In compliance with Cal OES 130 (Rev.9/13) Page 1 of 2 STATE OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR’S OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES Cal OES ID No: Cal OES 130 RESOLUTION # 18-005 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DESIGNATING COMMISSION AGENTS TO ACT ON BEHALF OF COMMISSION FOR THE EXECUTION OF ASSURANCES AND AGREEMENTS WITH THE CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR’S OFFICE OF EMERGENCY SERVICES PERTAINING TO STATE DISASTER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BOARD OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (“COMMISSION”) THAT Anne Mayer, Executive Director, OR John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, OR Gary Ratliff, Facilities Administrator are hereby authorized to execute for and on behalf of the COMMISSION, a public entity established under the laws of the State of California, this application and to file it with the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services for the purpose of obtaining certain federal financial assistance under Public Law 93-288 as amended by the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act of 1988, and/or state financial assistance under the California Disaster Assistance Act. THAT the COMMISSION, a public entity established under the laws of the State of California, hereby authorizes its agent(s), following COMMISSION legal counsel review, to provide to the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services for all matters pertaining to such state disaster assistance the assurances and agreements required. This is a universal resolution and is effective for all open and future disasters up to three (3) years following the date of approval below. Passed and approved this ______ day of ______________, 2018. COMMISSION CHAIR COMMISSION VICE CHAIR BY: ___________________________ BY: ___________________ Dana W. Reed Chuck Washington [Certification on following page] 5 CERTIFICATION I, Lisa Mobley, duly appointed and Clerk of the Board of the COMMISSION, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct copy of Resolution 18-005 approved by the Governing Board of the COMMISSION on the ______ day of ______________, 2018. CLERK OF THE BOARD: BY: ______________________ Lisa Mobley In compliance with Cal OES 130 (Rev.9/13) Page 2 of 2 6 AGENDA ITEM 8 Agenda Item 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer SUBJECT: Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2018/19 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Discuss, review, and provide guidance on the proposed Fiscal Year (FY) 2018/19 Budget; and 2) Forward to the Commission to open the public hearing in order to receive input and comments on the proposed FY 2018/19 Budget on May 9 and on June 13, 2018, and thereafter close the public hearing. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Staff completed the initial budget preparation process, and attached is an executive summary for the proposed FY 2018/19 Budget. The policy goals and objectives approved by the Commission on March 14 were the basis of this budget. The long-term policy goals that support the Commission’s objectives considered during the preparation of the budget relate to promoting quality of life; achieving operational excellence; connecting the economy; being a responsible partner; and maintaining fiscal accountability. Staff will present highlights of significant items included in the budget and is seeking review of and input on the proposed FY 2018/19 Budget. Based on input received from Commissioners, staff will update the document, as necessary, and present the proposed budget for the opening of the public hearing and for the Commission’s review on May 9. As a result of input received from the public and the Commission, staff will make the necessary changes to the budget document for final review, close the public hearing, and adopt at its June 13 Commission meeting. The executive summary document contains a summary of all departmental budgets and summarizes the information for the Commission. The department budgets present the goals and objectives, the resources needed to accomplish the goals, and the appropriations required to accomplish the tasks. Staff also included the budgets by fund type, as this table provides a summary of the budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses from a fund perspective. Preliminary funding estimates for transit operating and capital expenditures have been included in the budget, although the draft Short Range Transit Plans are still under review. An adjustment for a 7 Agenda Item 8 revised estimate of these transit expenditures may be included in the final budget document presented in June 2018. At the June 13 Commission meeting, staff will present the entire budget document with detailed narratives. A summary of the proposed FY 2018/19 Budget is as follows: FY 2018/19 Budget Revenues and other financing sources: Sales taxes-Measure A and Local Transportation Funds $ 281,000,000 Reimbursements (federal, state, and other) 274,513,900 Transportation Uniform Mitigation Funds, including reimbursements 22,922,200 State Transit Assistance 23,203,600 Tolls, penalties, and fees 36,940,500 Other revenues 776,500 Interest on investments 3,566,400 Debt proceeds 106,081,000 Transfers in 178,899,300 Total revenues and other financing sources 927,903,400 Expenditures and other financing uses: Personnel salaries and fringe benefits 10,354,700 Professional services 19,576,200 Support services 11,276,900 Projects and operations 757,094,800 Capital outlay 6,026,200 Debt service (principal and interest) 96,675,600 Transfers out 178,899,300 Total expenditures and other financing uses 1,079,903,700 Excess (deficiency) of revenues and other financing sources over (under) expenditures and other financing uses (152,000,300) Beginning fund balance (projected) 796,155,700 Ending fund balance (projected) $ 644,155,400 Attachment: Executive Summary for the Proposed FY 2018/19 Budget 8 Executive Summary Introduction The budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018/19 is presented to the Board of Commissioners (Board) and the citizens of Riverside County. The budget outlines the projects the Commission plans to undertake during the year and appropriates expenditures to accomplish these tasks. The budget also shows the funding sources and fund balances for these projects. This document serves as the Commission’s monetary guideline for the fiscal year. To provide the reader a better understanding of the projects, staff has included descriptive information regarding each department and major projects. The discussion in each department includes a review of accomplishments, major initiatives, and key assumptions. Policy Goals and Objectives As approved at its March 9, 2018 meeting, the Commission is driven by four core goals and underlying objectives for the people of Riverside County and the transportation system upon which they rely: QUALITY OF LIFE RCTC is focused on improving life for the people of Riverside County and empowering them to live life at their pace. Choice RCTC empowers the residents of Riverside County to choose how to get safely to where they are going. Environmental Stewardship RCTC protects and preserves the County’s environment for our residents. Mobility RCTC provides access, equity, and choice in transportation; RCTC is a mobility partner. Access RCTC projects are the connection to employment, schools, community institutions, parks, medical facilities and shopping in the community. Goods Movement RCTC facilitates the funding and delivery of projects that mitigate the impact of increased goods movement flow through Riverside County OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE RCTC is a responsible and conservative steward of taxpayer dollars. State of Good Repair RCTC invests in road safety and maintenance in its residents’ neighborhoods. Promises Fulfilled Projects are completed on-time, on-budget; RCTC delivers on its promises as a steward of Riverside County residents’ investment. Innovation Program and project delivery innovations drive results, savings, and greater economic opportunities for Riverside County residents. Information RCTC operations are transparent; customers get fast, timely, quality service. CONNECTING THE ECONOMY RCTC is a driver of economic growth in Riverside County. Workforce Mobility RCTC improves the economy by creating a robust workforce to workplace system; RCTC helps moves the economy of Riverside County. Population Growth Since 1976, RCTC has been responsible for connecting our County’s economy as the County’s population has quadrupled from 550,000 to 2.3 million today. Economic Impact RCTC has invested $2.8 billion in the County’s economy thanks to Measure A, which has a multiplier impact in terms of jobs and economic opportunity throughout Riverside County. 9 RESPONSIBLE PARTNER RCTC partners with local, regional, and state governments to deliver road and transit projects. Streets and Roads RCTC invests in local priorities for maintaining streets and roads and fixing potholes. Transit RCTC is a partner with transit operators to provide residents mobility choices, flexibility, intercity and intercounty connectivity, and access. Active Transportation Facilities RCTC is a partner with agencies within the County to promote active transportation alternatives, including the building of regional trails and bicycle and pedestrian facilities in accordance with local general master and active transportation plans. Grants RCTC is a steward of state and federal grants to improve our communities. Local Measure A Value RCTC invests Measure A dollars into projects and programs that benefit local communities throughout the County. Staff used these core goals and objectives to prepare this budget and develop the following short- term objectives to guide further the development of the FY 2018/19 budget. Capital Project Development and Delivery  Continue design and construction of the Interstate (I) 15 Express Lanes and development of the 71/91 interchange improvements, SR-60 truck climbing lanes, Mid County Parkway, and SR-79 realignment projects included in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan.  Aggressively pursue commencement of development of the I-15 Express Lanes—Southern Extension project.  Enhance corridor mobility and traveler choice with the operation of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, construction of the I-15 Express Lanes, and development of the next generation of toll feasible projects.  Collaborate with local jurisdictions to implement the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) regional arterial program projects and facilitate the delivery of eligible arterial improvements in western Riverside County (Western County).  Continue active engagement in state and federal efforts to streamline and modernize the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to improve the Commission’s ability to deliver critical projects. Regional Programs  Maintain an active involvement in state and federal legislative matters to ensure that the Commission receives proper consideration for transportation projects and funding.  Continue the development of a county-wide transportation plan and the first ten-year update of the 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plan, as required by the ordinance.  Subsidize SCRRA provision of reliable and cost-effective commuter rail service to and from Riverside County.  Provide leadership in the planning and development of the Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service.  Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders with special transit needs.  Promote cost controls and operating efficiency for transit operators.  Maintain effective partnerships among commuters, employers, and government to increase the efficiency of our transportation system by encouraging and promoting motorized and non- motorized transportation alternatives.  Provide a motorist aid system that ensures safety and convenience to freeway motorists. Management Services  Maintain close communication with Commissioners and educate policy makers on all issues of importance to the Commission.  Develop and execute a communications and public engagement strategy for the purposes of education, information, and customer service. 10  Maintain administrative program delivery costs below the policy threshold of 4% of Measure A revenues; the FY 2018/19 Management Services budget is 1.65% of Measure A revenues.  Maintain administrative salaries and benefits at less than 1% of Measure A revenues; the FY 2018/19 administrative salaries and benefits is .62% of Measure A revenues.  Maintain prudent cash reserves to provide some level of insulation for unplanned expenditures.  Maintain current strong bond ratings with rating agencies.  Establish and maintain revenues and reserves generated from toll operations to be available for debt service in accordance with toll supported debt agreements; maintenance, repair, rehabilitation, administration and operations; and capital projects within the corridor. Linking Commission Policy Goals and Departmental Goals and Objectives The following matrix (Table 1) illustrates the linkage of the Commission’s core policy goals described in this section to the individual departmental goals and objectives included in Section 5. Table 1 – Relationship between Commission and Departmental Goals Department Quality of Life Operational Excellence Connecting the Economy Responsibl e Partner Management Services Executive Management X X X X Administration X External Affairs X X X Finance X Regional Programs Planning and Programming X X X X Rail Maintenance and Operations X X X X Public and Specialized Transit X X X X Commuter Assistance X X X X Motorist Assistance X X X Toll Operations X X X X Capital Project Development and Delivery X X X X Budget Overview Total sources (Table 2) are budgeted at $927,903,400, a decrease of 40% over FY 2017/18 projected sources and a 41% decrease over the FY 2017/18 budget. Total sources are comprised of revenues of $642,923,100, transfers in of $178,899,300, and debt proceeds of $106,081,000. The projected fund balance at June 30, 2018 available for expenditures/expenses (excluding amounts restricted for debt service of $18,719,300, advances receivable of $25,039,500, and I-15 Express Lanes ramp- up reserve of $16,500,000) is $735,896,900. Accordingly, total funding available for the FY 2018/19 budget totals $1,663,800,300. 11 Table 2 – Sources FY 2017-2019 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Measure A Sales Tax 175,320,200$ 181,000,000$ 181,000,000$ 187,000,000$ 6,000,000$ 3% LTF Sales Tax 88,206,900 91,000,000 91,000,000 94,000,000 3,000,000 3% STA Sales Tax 6,432,600 10,469,000 20,204,800 23,203,600 12,734,600 122% Intergovernmental 32,467,600 101,992,400 127,761,400 274,513,900 172,521,500 169% TUMF Revenue 19,594,800 22,250,000 22,250,000 22,922,200 672,200 3% Tolls, Penalties, and Fees 10,125,300 16,835,800 42,812,600 36,940,500 20,104,700 119% Other Revenue 6,746,000 2,803,700 574,200 776,500 (2,027,200) -72% Investment Income 4,495,300 3,509,400 7,595,300 3,566,400 57,000 2% Transfers In 188,488,900 313,676,500 298,371,800 178,899,300 (134,777,200) -43% Debt Proceeds 257,912,100 837,782,000 752,488,800 106,081,000 (731,701,000) -87% TOTAL Sources 789,789,700$ 1,581,318,800$ 1,544,058,900$ 927,903,400$ (653,415,400)$ -41% Riverside County has specific competitive advantages over nearby coastal counties (Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego) including housing that is more available and affordable as well as plentiful commercial real estate and land available for development at lower costs. Riverside County’s economy is benefitting from employment gains that are a function of the County’s ability to attract businesses with lower commercial rents and a skilled labor force. Population migration to the Inland Empire (i.e., Riverside and San Bernardino counties) has occurred due to these employment opportunities and a lower cost of living compared to the coastal counties. Improvements in the local labor market and resurgence in home sales has increased economic activity contributing to stable sales tax revenue growth as noted on Chart 1. Chart 1 – Sources: Five-Year Trend $0 $100,000,000 $200,000,000 $300,000,000 $400,000,000 $500,000,000 $600,000,000 $700,000,000 $800,000,000 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax TUMF Federal, State, Local Revenues Toll Revenue Transfers In Debt Proceeds Sales tax revenues have continued to remain stable during the last five fiscal years. The Commission’s economic outlook for FY 2017/18 continues to be cautiously optimistic; however, the state and federal budget issues continue to affect funding of the Commission’s capital projects and programs. Should Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues fluctuate and the availability of federal and state revenues continue to be uncertain, the timing and scope of the Commission’s projects and programs may be impacted. Regardless of the future economic conditions, the Commission faces formidable ongoing challenges in terms of providing needed infrastructure enhancements to support a population and an economy that has outgrown the capacity of its existing infrastructure. Fortunately, the foundation of the regional economy continues to retain many of the fundamental positive attributes that fueled its earlier growth, including lower priced real estate with proximity to coastal communities, a large pool of skilled workers, and increasing wealth and education levels. 12 While the Commission’s primary revenues are the Measure A and LTF sales taxes, other revenues and financing sources are required to fund the Commission’s programs and projects as illustrated in Chart 2. Chart 2 – Sources: Major Categories Measure A Sales Tax 20% LTF Sales Tax 10% STA Sales Tax 3% Intergovernmental30% TUMF Rev enue 3% Tolls, Penalties, and Fees 4% Investment Income0% Transfers In19% Debt Proceeds 11% The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA), as statutorily created and authorized successor to the former California State Board of Equalization, recently provided to cities and other agencies its projections that statewide taxable sales over the next fiscal year will increase %. Continuing its conservative projection practices, the Commission considers short- and long-term sales tax projections from its consultants to estimate sales tax revenues. After taking the state of the local economy and recent revenue trends into consideration, staff projects Measure A sales tax revenues of $187,000,000 for FY 2018/19. This is a 3% increase from the FY 2017/18 revised projection of $181,000,000. At midyear the Commission will reassess sales tax revenue projections based on the economy and revenue trends. On behalf of the County, the Commission administers the LTF for public transportation needs, local streets and roads, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The majority of LTF funding received by the County and available for allocation is distributed to all public transit operators in the County, and the Commission receives allocations for administration, planning, and programming in addition to funding for Western County rail operations included in the commuter rail Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). The LTF sales tax revenue received from the State is budgeted at $94,000,000, an increase of 3% from the FY 2017/18 revised projection of $91,000,000. A statewide sales tax on motor vehicle fuel generates STA funds, which the State Controller allocates by formula to the Commission for allocations to the County’s public transit operators. The FY 2018/19 STA transit allocation, based on recent State estimates, is $23,203,600. 13 Intergovernmental revenues include reimbursement revenues from federal sources of $53,773,300, state sources of $196,702,700, and local agencies of $24,037,900 for highway and rail capital projects, rail operations and station maintenance, commuter assistance, and motorist assistance programs as well as planning and programming activities. The significant increase of 169% in FY 2018/19 compared to the FY 2017/18 budget is related to increases in state and local reimbursements offset by a decrease in federal reimbursements. Senate Bill (SB) 132 provides state funding for the 15/91 Express Lanes connector and pass-through funding to the County for the I- 15/Limonite interchange and to the County and city of Corona for grade separation projects. Local reimbursements from the Riverside County Regional Park and Open Space District (District) fund the Santa Ana River Trail projects. Reimbursement revenues vary from year to year depending on project activities and funding levels. Based on an amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), the Commission receives 45.7% of Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues (as updated by the most recent Nexus study). TUMF represents fees assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western County. The Commission projects FY 2018/19 TUMF fees will remain flat at $21,000,000 and expects additional TUMF zone reimbursements of $1,922,200 for the Lake Elsinore Railroad Canyon project. FY 2017/18 marked the first complete fiscal year of toll operations for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes following substantial completion of the 91 Project in March 2017. The Commission estimates FY 2018/19 toll revenues of $36,940,500 based on 2013 financing assumptions, including the Riverside County 91 Express Lanes Extension Investment Grade Traffic and Revenue Study completed in 2012. Other revenue of $776,500 includes property management generated from properties acquired in connection with various highway and rail properties. The Commission anticipates a $57,000 or 2% increase in FY 2018/19 investment income compared to the FY 2017/18 budget as the result of increasing investment yields and higher cash and investments balances. Transfers in of $178,899,300 relate primarily to the transfer of available debt proceeds for highway projects; LTF funding for general administration, planning and programming, rail operations and station maintenance, and grade separation project allocations; approved interfund allocations for specific projects and administrative cost allocations; and debt service requirements from highway, regional arterial, and local streets and roads funds. Debt proceeds consist of $106,081,000 in drawdowns from the federal Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan related to the I-15 Express Lanes project. Total uses (Table 3), including transfers out of $178,899,300, are budgeted at $1,079,903,700, a 35% decrease from the prior year budget amount of $1,670,674,300. Program expenditures and transfers out totaling $959,976,400 represent 89% of total budgeted uses in FY 2018/19. Program costs decreased by 2% from $980,602,200 in FY 2017/18 due to projects identified below. 14 Table 3 – Uses FY 2017-2019 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials 463,475,000$ 695,898,200$ 536,273,600$ 617,082,000$ (78,816,200)$ -11% Capital Local Streets and Roads 51,864,000 55,037,500 55,037,500 56,951,500 1,914,000 3% Commuter Assistance 2,686,100 5,855,300 4,908,900 6,197,800 342,500 6% Debt Service 138,576,600 666,924,800 660,979,600 96,675,600 (570,249,200) -86% Management Services 16,634,800 23,147,300 21,159,600 23,251,700 104,400 0% Motorist Assistance 5,245,600 5,951,400 5,279,700 10,006,400 4,055,000 68% Planning and Programming 2,541,000 13,877,400 6,915,900 20,526,200 6,648,800 48% Public and Specialized Transit 104,585,200 147,653,300 129,691,400 188,418,700 40,765,400 28% Rail Maintenance and Operations 24,298,600 37,232,000 29,968,200 37,119,800 (112,200) 0% Toll Operations 4,431,900 19,097,100 13,561,200 23,674,000 4,576,900 24% TOTAL Uses 814,338,800$ 1,670,674,300$ 1,463,775,600$ 1,079,903,700$ (590,770,600)$ -35% Note: Management Services includes Executive Management, Administration, External Affairs, and Finance. Capital highway, rail, and regional arterials budgeted uses of $617,082,000 are 11% lower compared to the FY 2017/18 budget due to completion of the 91 Project. Local streets and roads expenditures of $56,951,500 reflect an increase of 3% over the FY 2017/18 budget and represent the disbursements to local jurisdictions for the construction, repair, and maintenance of local streets and roads. Commuter assistance budgeted expenditures of $6,197,800 are 6% higher than FY 2017/18 budget due to a new vanpool program. Debt service of $96,675,600 decreased 86% because of the refunding of $541,889,900 of sales tax revenue bonds, swap termination payment of $7,526,000, and retirement of $30,000,000 in commercial paper notes in FY 2017/18. Management services expenditures remained consistent with the FY 2017/18 budget; these services include information technology equipment upgrades, office space expansion, robust communication and engagement efforts, financial advisory services, and debt service contribution. Motorist assistance expenditures increased 68% or $4,055,000 from the FY 2017/18 budget due to increased FSP services for capital highway projects and additional FSP beats due to increased funding, including SB 132 revenues. Planning and programming budgeted expenditures of $20,526,200 reflect a 48% increase from the FY 2017/18 budget due to increased projects and operations activities in connection with LTF disbursements for planning and programming, grade separation and other agency projects, and special studies. Public and specialized transit budgeted expenditures of $188,418,700 are 28% higher than the FY 2017/18 budget due to increased capital expenditures for public transit. The rail maintenance and operation’s budgeted expenditures of $37,119,800 remain consistent with the FY 2017/18 budget and include commuter rail and station operations as well as planning and development for the Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service. Toll operations expenses are budgeted at $23,674,000 to manage the operations, maintenance, and capital support of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes and pay interest on toll revenue bonds. Total uses included in the FY 2018/19 budget by major categories are illustrated in Chart 3. 15 Chart 3 – Uses: Major Categories Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials 57% Capital Local Streets and Roads 5% Commuter Assistance 1% Debt Service 9% Management Services 2% Motorist Assistance 1% Planning and Programming 2% Public and Specialized Transit 18% Rail Maintenance and Operations 3% Toll Operations 2% Commission Personnel The Commission’s salaries and benefits total $10,354,700 for FY 2018/19. This represents an increase of $800,500 or 8% over the FY 2017/18 budget of $9,554,200 (Chart 4). The increase relates to an increase of one full-time equivalent (FTE) to include a new Capital Projects Manager, increase to the Commission’s contribution to employee health benefits, and a 4% pool for merit-based salary increases. The Commission’s salary schedule for FY 2018/19 is included in Appendix B and complies with Government Code §20636 “Compensation Earnable” and California Code of Register §570.5, “Requirements for a Publicly Available Pay Schedule.” Chart 4 – Salaries and Benefits Cost: Five-Year Comparison $- $2,000,000 $4,000,000 $6,000,000 $8,000,000 $10,000,000 $12,000,000 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 The FY 2018/19 full-time equivalents (FTE) of 51 positions is comparable to the FY 2017/18 level (Table 4) and reflects a 1.0 FTE increase for the recruitment of a Capital Construction Manager. The Commission accomplished significant organization changes, including the addition of toll operations, over the past few years related to various projects requiring substantial attention at many staff levels. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission’s enabling legislation requiring a lean organization. The Commission will continue providing staff the tools needed to ensure an efficient and productive work environment. However, small should not be viewed in an absolute context; it is relative to the required tasks and the demands to be met. 16 Table 4 – Full-Time Equivalents by Department FY 2017—2019 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Executive Management 0.6 0.4 0.6 Administration 4.7 5.2 5.6 External Affairs 4.9 3.8 3.7 Finance 7.0 7.6 8.3 Planning and Programming 4.9 5.2 5.3 Rail Maintenance and Operations 4.3 4.5 4.2 Public and Specialized Transit 2.6 2.3 2.5 Commuter Assistance 1.4 1.4 1.6 Motorist Assistance 0.8 1.4 1.2 Capital Project Development and Delivery 14.7 14.6 15.5 Toll Operations 1.1 3.6 2.5 TOTAL 47.0 50.0 51.0 The Commission provides a comprehensive package of benefits to employees. The package includes: health, dental, vision, life insurance, short and long-term disability, workers’ compensation, tuition assistance, sick and vacation leave, retirement benefits in the form of participation in the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), postretirement health care, deferred compensation, and employee assistance program. The compensation components are shown in Chart 5. Chart 5 – Personnel Salaries and Benefits Salaries 57%Retirement 21% Health 13% Other Fringes 9% Department Initiatives Staff prepared each department’s budget based on key assumptions, accomplishments in FY 2017/18, major initiatives for FY 2018/19, and department goals and related objectives. Following are the key initiatives and summary of expenditures/expenses for each department (Tables 5 through 15). Executive Management  Continue project development and delivery as the key Measure A priority.  Foster growth in usage of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes and ensure its financial success.  Monitor SR-91 corridor operations and effectiveness.  Continue planning efforts to advance passenger rail service in the Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass corridor. 17  Advocate for state and federal investments in transportation to fund needed transportation priorities in the County and stimulate the local economy.  Maintain regional cooperation and collaboration as a significant effort consistent with the philosophy and mission of the Commission.  Support a comprehensive social media outreach program to build awareness of the Commission and its role in the community.  Maintain an effective mid-sized transportation agency with dedicated staff. Table 5 – Executive Management FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 254,600$ 191,400$ 191,100$ 221,000$ 29,600$ 15% Professional (252,000) 225,000 120,000 230,000 5,000 2% Support 70,600 90,900 80,500 88,600 (2,300) -3% TOTAL 73,200$ 507,300$ 391,600$ 539,600$ 32,300$ 6% Administration  Provide high quality support services to the Commission and to internal and external customers.  Enhance the electronic records management system.  Provide timely communications to Commissioners.  Update technology to improve internal processes and interaction with the public.  Support and develop a motivated workforce with a framework of activities and practices that comply with employment laws and regulations.  Employ and recruit a dynamic and talented workforce. Table 6 – Administration FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 585,500$ 473,600$ 473,300$ 755,700$ 282,100$ 60% Professional 285,900 533,500 518,400 667,100 133,600 25% Support 656,800 977,300 763,500 986,800 9,500 1% Capital Outlay 87,400 635,000 525,000 530,000 (105,000) -17% Debt Service 24,900 - - - - N/A TOTAL 1,640,500$ 2,619,400$ 2,280,200$ 2,939,600$ 320,200$ 12% External Affairs  Develop effective partnerships with transportation providers to communicate a unified message to Congress regarding mobility needs.  Advocate positions in the State Legislature and in Congress that advance the County’s transportation interests.  Continue a leadership role in formulating a countywide direction on federal transportation policies.  Conduct a concerted outreach effort to new federal and state representatives on local transportation issues.  Utilize modern technology to support a robust public communication and engagement effort focusing on accessible and transparent communication of the Commission’s projects.  Develop marketing and communication plans for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes and commencement of construction of the I-15 Express Lanes project.  Continue the public outreach program, “Operation Lifesaver”, targeting schools in close proximity to railroad tracks on rail safety education, engineering, and enforcement. 18 Table 7 – External Affairs FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel 654,200$ 877,100$ 876,400$ 813,100$ (64,000)$ -7% Professional 686,900 1,135,500 1,105,500 1,003,400 (132,100) -12% Support 86,900 181,600 176,700 412,400 230,800 127% TOTAL 1,428,000$ 2,194,200$ 2,158,600$ 2,228,900$ 34,700$ 2% Finance  Continue appropriate uses of long- and short-term financing to advance 2009 Measure A projects of the Commission.  Apply the sales tax revenue forecast update to update a financing plan to support the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan.  Provide support to the 91 Express Lanes toll operations contractor’s back office to ensure the proper accounting of toll revenues and operations and maintenance costs.  Keep abreast of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) technical activities affecting the Commission’s accounting and financial reporting activities and implement new pronouncements.  Upgrade the ERP system to benefit all staff in the management of accounting and project information and automation of a paperless workflow system.  Manage a centralized procurements process in order to strengthen controls and ensure consistency in the application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations.  Support outreach activities to encourage disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) and small business enterprise (SBE) participation in various contracts. Table 8 – Finance FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 967,500$ 1,110,200$ 1,109,600$ 1,218,300$ 108,100$ 10% Professional 1,608,400 2,195,200 1,520,500 2,084,700 (110,500) -5% Support 941,500 964,000 227,900 543,500 (420,500) -44% Capital Outlay 600 280,000 271,300 513,700 233,700 83% Transfers Out 10,000,000 13,277,000 13,199,900 13,183,400 (93,600) -1% TOTAL 13,518,000$ 17,826,400$ 16,329,200$ 17,543,600$ (282,800)$ -2% Planning and Programming  Monitor funding authority and responsibility related to the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and impacts on the STIP caused by the state budget issues.  Ensure administration and implementation of STIP/Regional Improvement Program (RIP), Active Transportation Program (ATP), and other funded projects consistent with California Transportation Commission (CTC), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), and Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) policies.  Continue to strategically program projects for all local agencies countywide into the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP) and obligate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding, including monitoring the use of such funding to prevent from lapsing.  Monitor all projects programmed to receive 2009 Measure A, TUMF, state, and federal funds to ensure timely delivery and prevent funds from lapsing.  Focus on interregional concerns and maintain effective working relationships involving various multi-county transportation issues, including goods movement.  Coordinate planning efforts with regional and local agencies relating to the development of Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS) and greenhouse gas reduction (GHG) implementation guidelines.  Participate in the development of CTC’s ATP program guidelines to represent the County’s best interest in program funding.  Administer the SB821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program (SB821). 19  Continue the development of a countywide integrated long-range transportation plan consistent with local, regional, and state planning requirements. Table 9 – Planning and Programming FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 1,023,200$ 983,400$ 983,400$ 1,147,400$ 164,000$ 17% Professional 117,700 620,500 177,400 295,500 (325,000) -52% Support 27,400 18,300 14,500 19,100 800 4% Projects and Operations 1,372,700 11,384,900 4,978,000 18,046,800 6,661,900 59% Transfers Out - 870,300 762,600 1,017,400 147,100 17% TOTAL 2,541,000$ 13,877,400$ 6,915,900$ 20,526,200$ 6,648,800$ 48% Rail Maintenance and Operations  As a member of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), continue active participation in the governance and operations of the Metrolink commuter rail system.  Continue the planning and implementation of capital improvements at the commuter rail stations in the County, including security and rehabilitation projects and parking requirements.  Continue to support and evaluate activities related to the Perris Valley Line (PVL) service, such as promoting ridership.  Establish the best approach to build, maintain, and operate cost effective and environmentally sustainable facilities that meet the public’s transportation needs.  Lead the service development process and actively coordinate with all stakeholders along the Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass corridor for intercity passenger rail service.  Advance the next generation rail feasibility study to evaluate future growth opportunities for passenger rail in the County. Table 10 – Rail Maintenance and Operations FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel 755,400$ 732,700$ 728,300$ 820,900$ 88,200$ 12% Professional 1,463,200 4,404,000 2,407,700 3,224,000 (1,180,000) -27% Support 1,891,100 3,391,100 2,919,800 3,320,700 (70,400) -2% Projects and Operations 20,181,400 27,665,700 22,923,900 28,778,800 1,113,100 4% Capital Outlay 7,500 90,000 80,000 92,500 2,500 3% Transfers Out - 948,500 908,500 882,900 (65,600) -7% TOTAL 24,298,600$ 37,232,000$ 29,968,200$ 37,119,800$ (112,200)$ 0% Public and Specialized Transit  Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs and monitor funding of these programs.  Continue long-range planning activities to ensure that anticipated revenues are in line with projected levels of service by transit operators.  Continue public transit operator oversight and fiduciary responsibilities to ensure completion of annual fiscal audits and state triennial performance audits in accordance with TDA regulations.  Coordinate with operators for major capital purchases and investments into new rolling stock and other system improvements in order to maintain a viable on-hand reserve.  Coordinate with transit operators the provision of connecting bus service to PVL stations. Table 11 – Public and Specialized Transit FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 366,800$ 415,500$ 397,700$ 450,200$ 34,700$ 8% Professional 126,800 204,300 171,800 314,000 109,700 54% Support 39,400 88,700 53,800 63,900 (24,800) -28% Projects and Operations 82,265,500 122,010,600 104,281,700 159,303,300 37,292,700 31% Transfers Out 21,786,700 24,934,200 24,786,400 28,287,300 3,353,100 13% TOTAL 104,585,200$ 147,653,300$ 129,691,400$ 188,418,700$ 40,765,400$ 28% 20 Commuter Assistance  Improve the suite of services and outreach to rideshare participants and employer partners, including personalized information and electronic access and distribution.  Maintain and grow employer partnerships through value-added services and tools for ridesharing programs.  Maintain the long-term partnership with San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) to manage and implement a “sister” commuter assistance program for residents and employers in San Bernardino County.  Optimize park and ride facilities to support car/vanpool/buspool arrangements and facilitate transit connections.  Operate a cost-effective program within the County that results in reduction of single occupant vehicles. Table 12 – Commuter Assistance FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 257,000$ 264,800$ 264,400$ 288,200$ 23,400$ 9% Professional 359,000 799,700 707,200 449,700 (350,000) -44% Support 57,100 257,400 247,200 342,500 85,100 33% Projects and Operations 2,013,000 2,821,100 2,642,100 3,420,900 599,800 21% Transfers Out - 1,712,300 1,048,000 1,696,500 (15,800) -1% TOTAL 2,686,100$ 5,855,300$ 4,908,900$ 6,197,800$ 342,500$ 6% Motorist Assistance  Assess opportunities for efficiency related to the call box program operations.  Maintain a high benefit-to-cost ratio related to the performance of the FSP program and expand service if funding opportunities arise.  Transition from a locally provided IE511 system to a regional southern California 511 solution.  Continue the call box system program to serve as a “safe net” for stranded motorists in the County. Table 13 – Motorist Assistance FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel 126,000$ 154,000$ 153,000$ 200,000$ 46,000$ 30% Professional 405,500 518,000 460,200 528,200 10,200 2% Support 388,600 298,900 155,000 290,000 (8,900) -3% Projects and Operations 3,257,100 3,723,000 3,254,000 5,167,700 1,444,700 39% Transfers Out 1,068,400 1,257,500 1,257,500 3,820,500 2,563,000 204% TOTAL 5,245,600$ 5,951,400$ 5,279,700$ 10,006,400$ 4,055,000$ 68% Toll Operations  Manage the operations of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes adhering to the Commission’s 91 Express Lanes Toll Policy.  Manage toll operations using investment grade traffic and revenue studies and cost estimate assumptions specific to each express lane facility.  Continue I-15 Express Lanes toll planning through development of business rules and agency agreements.  Provide timely and effective reporting of toll operation metrics including revenue, transactions, carpool usage, and performance indicators.  Participate in the California Toll Operators Committee to advance regional and statewide tolling initiatives, technology, interoperability, and coordination among California toll agencies. 21 Table 14 – Toll Operations FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel 148,700$ 745,100$ 644,600$ 603,000$ (142,100)$ -19% Professional 99,500 1,436,100 1,200,200 2,061,000 624,900 44% Support and Maintenance 897,600 4,228,500 3,374,300 4,576,700 348,200 8% Projects and Operations 1,893,900 7,984,500 6,711,200 8,786,100 801,600 10% Capital Outlay - 650,000 921,000 1,340,000 690,000 106% Debt Service 2,021,200 7,119,900 7,119,900 27,119,900 20,000,000 281% Transfers Out 1,392,200 4,052,900 709,900 6,307,200 2,254,300 56% TOTAL 6,453,100$ 26,217,000$ 20,681,100$ 50,793,900$ 24,576,900$ 94% Capital Project Development and Delivery  Continue project work on the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan projects, including the I-15 Express Lanes project, SR-60 truck climbing lanes, SR-79 realignment, Mid County Parkway, and Pachappa underpass project.  Provide TUMF regional arterial funding and support to local jurisdictions for regional arterial project engineering, right of way acquisition, and construction.  Provide 2009 Measure A funding to the incorporated cities and the County for local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction and to the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for highways and regional arterials.  Develop strategies to implement alternative financing structures including public toll roads.  Maintain a right of way acquisition and management program in support of capital projects and in the most cost effective manner within project schedules, while adhering to federal and state regulations.  Maintain and manage the access, use, safety, and security of Commission-owned properties including commuter rail stations, properties in acquisition process, and income-generating properties. Table 15 – Capital Project Development and Delivery FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget ChangeChange Personnel 3,306,500$ 3,606,400$ 3,625,000$ 3,836,900$ 230,500$ 6% Professional 18,980,600 10,260,200 9,238,000 8,718,600 (1,541,600) -15% Support 710,500 951,500 614,000 632,700 (318,800) -34% Projects and Operations 310,863,200 464,272,500 319,135,100 533,591,200 69,318,700 15% Capital Outlay 5,574,900 5,221,300 3,000,000 3,550,000 (1,671,300) -32% Debt Service 136,530,500 659,804,900 653,859,700 69,555,700 (590,249,200) -89% Transfers Out 175,903,300 266,623,800 255,699,000 123,704,100 (142,919,700) -54% TOTAL 651,869,500$ 1,410,740,600$ 1,245,170,800$ 743,589,200$ (667,151,400)$ -47% Fund Balances The projected total fund balance as of June 30, 2018 is $796,155,700. The Commission’s expects the FY 2018/19 budgeted activities to result in a $152,000,300 decrease of total fund balance at June 30, 2019 to $644,155,400. The primary cause of the decrease is project activities in FY 2018/19 related to the I-15 Express Lanes project, Mid County Parkway project, toll operations, Riverside station layover facility, TUMF regional arterial projects, and public transit allocations. Table 16 presents the components of the projected fund balance by fund type and program at June 30, 2019. 22 Table 16 – Projected Fund Balances by Fund Type and Program at June 30, 2019 Management Services $3,879,400 Measure A Western County:Highways 90,819,193$ Planning and Programming 3,943,900 Bond Financing $4,478,800 Restricted for: Rail Maintenance and Operations 11,190,300 Commuter Assistance 12,408,900 I-15 Express Lanes TIFIA Reserve 16,500,000 Economic Development 10,616,800 Advances Receivable 21,033,707 Highways 55,983,500 Restricted for: I-15 Express Lanes TIFIA Reserve Intial Loan 3,000,000 Local Streets and Roads 1,000 New Corridors 4,057,100 Public and Specialized Transit 7,569,300 Rail 8,072,200 Regional Arterials 42,044,800 Measure A Coachella Valley:Restricted for Debt Service $18,859,700 Highways and Regional Arterial 37,340,200 Local Streets and Roads 1,300 Specialized Transit 2,510,600 Measure A Palo Verde Valley Local Streets and Roads 600 Other Agency Projects Fund 45,000 SB 132 40,531,800 Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass 33,800 Motorist Assistance 7,312,000 State Transit Assistance 54,508,300 Local Transportation Fund 75,497,200 TUMF: Riverside 91 Express Lanes $8,393,300 CETAP 51,958,000 Restricted for: Regional Arterials 31,564,700 91 Project TIFIA Reserve 20,000,000 $644,155,400 Riverside County Transportation Commission General Fund $19,013,600 Special Revenue Funds $449,535,900 Capital Projects Funds $128,352,900 Enterprise Fund $28,393,300 $18,859,700 Debt Service Fund The actual and projected trends in fund balances for each governmental and enterprise fund type from FY 2015/16 through FY 2018/19 are illustrated in Chart 6. Chart 6 – Projected Fund Balance Trends by Fund Type FY 2016 – 2019 $1,000,000 $101,000,000 $201,000,000 $301,000,000 $401,000,000 $501,000,000 $601,000,000 General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Projects Funds Debt Service Fund Enterprise Fund FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Budget Summary The overall budget for FY 2018/19 is presented in Table 17 by summarized line items, Table 18 by operating and capital classifications, and Table 19 by fund type, and highway, rail, and regional arterial program expenditures by project are summarized in Table 20. 23 Table 17 – Budget Comparative by Summarized Line Item FY 2017—2019    FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Revenues Measure A Sales Tax 175,320,200$ 181,000,000$ 181,000,000$ 187,000,000$ 6,000,000$ 3% LTF Sales Tax 88,206,900 91,000,000 91,000,000 94,000,000 3,000,000 3% STA Sales Tax 6,432,600 10,469,000 20,204,800 23,203,600 12,734,600 122% Federal Reimbursements 20,201,700 78,563,200 104,171,500 53,773,300 (24,789,900) -32% State Reimbursements 8,538,500 16,589,100 16,154,800 196,702,700 180,113,600 1086% Local Reimbursements 3,727,400 6,840,100 7,435,100 24,037,900 17,197,800 251% TUMF Revenue 19,594,800 22,250,000 22,250,000 22,922,200 672,200 3% Tolls, Penalties, and Fees 10,125,300 16,835,800 42,812,600 36,940,500 20,104,700 119% Other Revenue 6,746,000 2,803,700 574,200 776,500 (2,027,200) -72% Investment Income 4,495,300 3,509,400 7,595,300 3,566,400 57,000 2% TOTAL Revenues 343,388,700 429,860,300 493,198,300 642,923,100 213,062,800 50% Expenditures/Expenses Personnel Salaries and Benefits 8,445,400 9,554,200 9,446,800 10,354,700 800,500 8% Professional and Support Professional Services 23,881,500 22,332,000 17,626,900 19,576,200 (2,755,800) -12% Support Costs 5,767,500 11,448,200 8,627,200 11,276,900 (171,300) -1% TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 29,649,000 33,780,200 26,254,100 30,853,100 (2,927,100) -9% Projects and Operations Program Operations 15,528,100 28,156,000 24,474,400 25,940,100 (2,215,900) -8% Engineering 3,167,700 12,007,900 8,315,100 35,413,800 23,405,900 195% Construction 35,515,800 75,075,100 40,632,100 126,358,000 51,282,900 68% Design Build 170,452,800 192,599,700 145,452,500 188,565,500 (4,034,200) -2% Right of Way/Land 27,343,800 88,112,500 36,935,900 92,220,600 4,108,100 5% Operating and Capital Disbursements 103,163,800 154,505,600 130,653,500 199,973,300 45,467,700 29% Special Studies 213,800 3,952,000 2,425,000 1,672,000 (2,280,000) -58% Local Streets and Roads 51,864,000 55,037,500 55,037,500 56,951,500 1,914,000 3% Regional Arterials 14,597,000 30,416,000 20,000,000 30,000,000 (416,000) -1% TOTAL Projects and Operations 421,846,800 639,862,300 463,926,000 757,094,800 117,232,500 18% Debt Service Principal Payments 27,317,200 62,145,000 62,120,000 25,965,000 (36,180,000) -58% Interest Payments 46,705,400 54,712,600 54,712,600 50,710,600 (4,002,000) -7% Cost of Issuance 654,000 3,767,200 2,257,100 - (3,767,200) -100% TOTAL Debt Service 74,676,600 120,624,800 119,089,700 76,675,600 (43,949,200) -36% Capital Outlay 5,670,400 6,876,300 4,797,300 6,026,200 (850,100) -12% TOTAL Expenditures/Expenses 540,288,200 810,697,800 623,513,900 881,004,400 70,306,600 9% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses (196,899,500) (380,837,500) (130,315,600) (238,081,300) 142,756,200 -37% Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 188,488,900 313,676,500 298,371,800 178,899,300 (134,777,200) -43% Transfers Out (210,150,600) (313,676,500) (298,371,800) (178,899,300) 134,777,200 -43% Debt Proceeds 106,140,000 636,250,000 632,775,000 - (636,250,000) -100% TIFIA Loan Proceeds 143,358,100 81,810,000 - 106,081,000 24,271,000 30% Payment to Escrow Agent (63,900,000) (546,300,000) (541,889,900) (20,000,000) 526,300,000 -96% Bond Premium 8,414,000 119,722,000 119,713,800 - (119,722,000) -100% Net Financing Sources (Uses)172,350,400 291,482,000 210,598,900 86,081,000 (205,401,000) -70% Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses and Other Financing Sources (Uses)(24,549,100) (89,355,500) 80,283,300 (152,000,300) (62,644,800) 70% Beginning Fund Balance 740,421,500 715,872,400 715,872,400 796,155,700 80,283,300 11% ENDING FUND BALANCE 715,872,400$ 626,516,900$ 796,155,700$ 644,155,400$ 17,638,500$ 3% 24 Table 18 – Operating and Capital Budget FY 2018/19  FY 18/19 FY 18/19 FY 18/19 Operating Budget Capital Budget TOTAL Budget Revenues Measure A Sales Tax 25,827,000$ 161,173,000$ 187,000,000$ LTF Sales Tax 94,000,000 - 94,000,000 STA Sales Tax 23,203,600 - 23,203,600 Federal Reimbursements 5,978,000 47,795,300 53,773,300 State Reimbursements 7,029,600 189,673,100 196,702,700 Local Reimbursements 3,557,900 20,480,000 24,037,900 TUMF Revenue - 22,922,200 22,922,200 Tolls, Penalties, and Fees - 36,940,500 36,940,500 Other Revenue - 776,500 776,500 Investment Income 910,400 2,656,000 3,566,400 TOTAL Revenues 160,506,500 482,416,600 642,923,100 Expenditures/Expenses Personnel Salaries and Benefits 5,791,200 4,563,500 10,354,700 Professional and Support Professional Services 8,745,600 10,830,600 19,576,200 Support Costs 6,066,900 5,210,000 11,276,900 TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 14,812,500 16,040,600 30,853,100 Projects and Operations Program Operations 11,317,400 14,622,700 25,940,100 Engineering 1,650,000 33,763,800 35,413,800 Construction 4,200,000 122,158,000 126,358,000 Design Build - 188,565,500 188,565,500 Right of Way and Land - 92,220,600 92,220,600 Operating and Capital Disbursements 184,223,300 15,750,000 199,973,300 Special Studies 1,622,000 50,000 1,672,000 Local Streets and Roads - 56,951,500 56,951,500 Regional Arterials - 30,000,000 30,000,000 TOTAL Projects and Operations 203,012,700 554,082,100 757,094,800 Debt Service Principal Payments - 25,965,000 25,965,000 Interest Payments - 50,710,600 50,710,600 TOTAL Debt Service - 76,675,600 76,675,600 Capital Outlay 1,136,200 4,890,000 6,026,200 TOTAL Expenditures/Expenses 224,752,600 656,251,800 881,004,400 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses (64,246,100) (173,835,200) (238,081,300) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 40,792,300 138,107,000 178,899,300 Transfers Out (48,421,400) (130,477,900) (178,899,300) TIFIA Loan Proceeds - 106,081,000 106,081,000 Payment to Escrow Agent - (20,000,000) (20,000,000) Net Financing Sources (Uses)(7,629,100) 93,710,100 86,081,000 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses and Other Financing Sources (Uses)(71,875,200) (80,125,100) (152,000,300) Beginning Fund Balance 255,207,700 540,948,000 796,155,700 ENDING FUND BALANCE 183,332,500$ 460,822,900$ 644,155,400$   25 Table 19 – Budget by Fund Type FY 2018/19  FY 18/19 General Fund Special Revenue Capital Projects Debt Service Enterprise TOTAL Budget Revenues Measure A Sales Tax -$ 187,000,000$ -$ -$ -$ 187,000,000$ LTF Sales Tax - 94,000,000 - - - 94,000,000 STA Sales Tax - 23,203,600 - - - 23,203,600 Federal Reimbursements 3,978,000 46,995,100 - 2,800,200 - 53,773,300 State Reimbursements 2,320,600 194,382,100 - - - 196,702,700 Local Reimbursements 1,113,100 14,424,800 - - 8,500,000 24,037,900 TUMF Revenue - 22,922,200 - - - 22,922,200 Tolls, Penalties, and Fees - - - - 36,940,500 36,940,500 Other Revenue - 776,500 - - - 776,500 Investment Income 94,600 2,234,700 955,400 140,400 141,300 3,566,400 TOTAL Revenues 7,506,300 585,939,000 955,400 2,940,600 45,581,800 642,923,100 Expenditures/Expenses Personnel Salaries and Benefits 5,069,600 4,682,100 - - 603,000 10,354,700 Professional and Support Professional Services 4,369,700 13,145,500 - - 2,061,000 19,576,200 Support Costs 5,415,400 1,284,800 - - 4,576,700 11,276,900 TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 9,785,100 14,430,300 - - 6,637,700 30,853,100 Projects and Operations Program Operations 2,728,800 14,425,200 - - 8,786,100 25,940,100 Engineering 1,650,000 33,763,800 - - - 35,413,800 Construction 1,800,000 124,558,000 - - - 126,358,000 Design Build - 188,565,500 - - - 188,565,500 Right of Way/Land - 92,220,600 - - - 92,220,600 Operating and Capital Disbursements 25,055,000 174,918,300 - - - 199,973,300 Special Studies 1,622,000 50,000 - - - 1,672,000 Local Streets and Roads - 56,951,500 - - - 56,951,500 Regional Arterials - 30,000,000 - - - 30,000,000 TOTAL Projects and Operations 32,855,800 715,452,900 - - 8,786,100 757,094,800 Debt Service Principal Payments - - - 25,965,000 - 25,965,000 Interest Payments - - - 43,590,700 7,119,900 50,710,600 TOTAL Debt Service - - - 69,555,700 7,119,900 76,675,600 Capital Outlay 1,136,200 3,550,000 - - 1,340,000 6,026,200 TOTAL Expenditures/Expenses 48,846,700 738,115,300 - 69,555,700 24,486,700 881,004,400 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses (41,340,400) (152,176,300) 955,400 (66,615,100) 21,095,100 (238,081,300) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 35,342,300 74,001,300 - 69,555,700 - 178,899,300 Transfers Out (1,265,600) (123,481,800) (45,044,500) (2,800,200) (6,307,200) (178,899,300) TIFIA Loan Proceeds - 106,081,000 - - - 106,081,000 Payment to Escrow Agent - - - - (20,000,000) (20,000,000) Net Financing Sources (Uses)34,076,700 56,600,500 (45,044,500) 66,755,500 (26,307,200) 86,081,000 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures/Expenses and Other Financing Sources (Uses)(7,263,700) (95,575,800) (44,089,100) 140,400 (5,212,100) (152,000,300) Beginning Fund Balance 26,277,300 545,111,700 172,442,000 18,719,300 33,605,400 796,155,700 ENDING FUND BALANCE 19,013,600$ 449,535,900$ 128,352,900$ 18,859,700$ 28,393,300$ 644,155,400$   26 Table 20 – Highway, Regional Arterial, and Rail Programs FY 2018/19  Description HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 71/91 connectors 3,950,000$ Ethanac SR-74 corridor 400,000 Grade separation projects 11,550,000 Hamner Bridge widening 180,000 I-15 Express Lanes 150,000 I-15 Express Lanes southern extension 4,000,000 Mid County Parkway (MCP)3,350,000 MCP I-215/Placentia interchange 1,600,000 MCP Sweeney mitigation 450,000 Pachappa underpass 388,000 Riverside County-Santa Ana River Trail (details presented in Sections 6.2 Planning and Programming and 6.4 Capital Proje 970,000 SR-60 truck climbing lanes 615,000 SR-79 Realignment 300,000 General (details presented in Section 6.2 Planning and Programming)1,650,000 General (details presented in Section 6.4 Capital Projects)324,500 SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY ENGINEERING 29,877,500 REGIONAL ARTERIAL ENGINEERING I-15 Railroad Canyon interchange 2,400,000 Various Western County MARA and TUMF regional arterial projects 364,300 SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL ENGINEERING 2,764,300 RAIL ENGINEERING Moreno Valley March Field station upgrade 1,100,000 Perris Valley Line and other related rail projects 22,000 Riverside Layover Facility 350,000 Riverside station track and platform 1,300,000 SUBTOTAL RAIL ENGINEERING 2,772,000 TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL ENGINEERING 35,413,800$ HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION 15/91 Express Lanes connector 5,772,000$ 91 Corridor Operations Project 1,000,000 91 Project 2,000,000 I-15 Express Lanes 9,350,000 I-15/Limonite interchange 30,000,000 I-215 corridor improvements (central segment)/Scott Road to Nuevo Road 925,000 MCP I-215/Placentia Interchange 2,600,000 MCP Sweeney mitigation 4,050,000 Mid County Parkway 650,000 Pachappa underpass 12,460,000 Riverside County-Santa Ana River Trail (details presented in Sections 6.2 Planning and Programming and 6.4 Capital Proje 10,208,000 SR-60 Truck Climbing Lanes 25,200,000 General (details presented in Section 6.2 Planning and Programming)500,000 General (details presented in Section 6.4 Capital Projects)1,950,000 SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION 106,665,000 REGIONAL ARTERIAL CONSTRUCTION Various Western County MARA and TUMF regional arterial projects 7,358,000 SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL CONSTRUCTION 7,358,000 RAIL CONSTRUCTION Perris Valley Line and other related rail projects 1,735,000 Riverside Layover Facility 5,110,000 Riverside-La Sierra station improvements 1,790,000 Other Riverside Downtown mobility improvements (details presented in Section 6.2 Rail)1,300,000 Other - Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass corridor (details presented in Section 6.2 Rail)2,400,000 SUBTOTAL RAIL CONSTRUCTION 12,335,000 TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL CONSTRUCTION 126,358,000$ HIGHWAY DESIGN BUILD 15/91 Express Lanes connector 47,982,600$ 91 Corridor Operations Project 4,500,000 91 Project 1,132,900 I-15 Express Lanes 134,950,000 TOTAL HIGHWAY DESIGN BUILD 188,565,500$ HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 60/215 East Junction high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane connectors 50,000$ 71/91 connectors 5,100,000 91 Project 24,000,000 Grade separation projects 20,000,000 I-15 Express Lanes 1,402,500 I-215 corridor improvements (central segment)/Scott Road to Nuevo Road 5,000 Mid County Parkway 1,100,000 MCP I-215/Placentia interchange 20,600,000 MCP Sweeney mitigation 25,000 MSHCP land acquisition in Western County 3,000,000 Pachappa underpass 625,000 Riverside County-Santa Ana River Trail (details presented in Sections 6.2 Planning and Programming and 6.4 Capital Proje 255,000 SR-60 truck climbing lanes 385,000 SR-74 curve widening 4,000 SR-74/I-15 to 7th Street 60,000 SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange 635,000 General (details presented in Section 6.4 Capital Projects)674,100 SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 77,920,600 REGIONAL ARTERIAL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND I-15 Railroad Canyon interchange 4,000,000 Various Western County MARA and TUMF regional arterial projects 10,020,000 SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 14,020,000 RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND Perris Valley Line and other related rail projects 25,000 Riverside Layover Facility 100,000 Riverside-La Sierra station improvements 5,000 General 150,000 SUBTOTAL RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 280,000 TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND 92,220,600$ GRAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL PROGRAMS 442,557,900$ 27 PROPOSED BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2018/19 Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Budget Process Budget Development Budget Compilation Budget Review and Adoption •Resource Estimation •Commission Goals •Department Goals and Budget Development •Analysis •Reconciliation •Initial: Executive summary •Final: Budget document FY 2018/19 Budget Considerations •Use of accumulated reserves for projects and programs, as necessary •Flexibility to change scope and timing of capital projects •Significant outsourcing of engineering and operations RCTC projects and programs •Impact on transit operations and capital project needs •Use of TUMF reserves for project expenditures Stabilized sales tax and TUMF revenues •Toll revenues based on historical data •Use of surplus revenues for 91 Corridor Operations Project, pending Commission approval RCTC 91 Express Lanes operations •TIFIA loan draw down on the I-15 Express Lanes project Financing needs and related costs Budget Summary FY 2018/19 Beginning Fund Balance (7/1/2018)796,155,700$ Revenues 642,923,100 Debt Proceeds 106,081,000 Transfers In 178,899,300 Total Estimated Sources 927,903,400 Expenditures/Expenses (804,328,800) Debt Service (96,675,600) Transfers Out (178,899,300) Total Estimated Uses (1,079,903,700) Uses Over Sources (offset by beginning fund balance)(152,000,300) Ending Fund Balance (6/30/2019)644,155,400$ Sources Breakdown FY 2017/18 FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 Revised Budget Projected Budget Measure A Sales Tax 181,000,000$ 181,000,000$ 187,000,000$ LTF Sales Tax 91,000,000 91,000,000 94,000,000 STA Sales Tax 10,469,000 20,204,800 23,203,600 Intergovernmental 101,992,400 127,761,400 274,513,900 TUMF Revenue 22,250,000 22,250,000 22,922,200 Tolls, Penalties, and Fees 16,835,800 42,812,600 36,940,500 Other Revenue 2,803,700 574,200 776,500 Investment Income 3,509,400 7,595,300 3,566,400 Transfers In 313,676,500 298,371,800 178,899,300 Debt Proceeds 837,782,000 752,488,800 106,081,000 TOTAL Sources 1,581,318,800$ 1,544,058,900$ 927,903,400$ Sources Comparison $- $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 MillionsFY 2017/18 Revised Budget FY 2017/18 Projected FY 2018/19 Budget Expenditures/Expenses by Department FY 2017/18 FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 Revised Budget Projected Budget Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials 695,898,200$ 536,273,600$ 617,082,000$ Capital Local Streets and Roads 55,037,500 55,037,500 56,951,500 Commuter Assistance 5,855,300 4,908,900 6,197,800 Debt Service 666,924,800 660,979,600 96,675,600 Management Services 23,147,300 21,159,600 23,251,700 Motorist Assistance 5,951,400 5,279,700 10,006,400 Planning and Programming 13,877,400 6,915,900 20,526,200 Public and Specialized Transit 147,653,300 129,691,400 188,418,700 Rail Maintenance and Operations 37,232,000 29,968,200 37,119,800 Toll Operations 19,097,100 13,561,200 23,674,000 TOTAL Expenditures/Expenses 1,670,674,300$ 1,463,775,600$ 1,079,903,700$ Expenditures/Expenses Comparison $- $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 $350 $400 $450 $500 $550 $600 $650 $700 $750 MillionsFY 2017/18 Revised Budget FY 2017/18 Projected Capital Development and Delivery Department Highlights 91 Project I-15 Express Lanes 15/91 Express Lanes Connector I-15/Limonite interchange Mid County Parkway SR-60 Truck Climbing Lanes Expenditures/Expenses by Function FY 2017/18 FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 Percent Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Salaries and Benefits 9,554,200$ 9,446,800$ 10,354,700$ 8% Professional Services 22,332,000 17,626,900 19,576,200 -12% Support Costs 11,448,200 8,627,200 11,276,900 -1% Projects and Operations 639,862,300 463,926,000 757,094,800 18% Debt Service 666,924,800 660,979,600 96,675,600 -86% Capital Outlay 6,876,300 4,797,300 6,026,200 -12% TOTAL Expenditures/Expenses 1,356,997,800$ 1,165,403,800$ 901,004,400$ -34% *Excludes transfers out Expenditures/Expenses by Function Comparison $- $100 $200 $300 $400 $500 $600 $700 $800 Salaries and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Debt Service Capital OutlayMillions *Excludes transfers out FY 2017/18 Revised Budget FY 2017/18 Projected Next Steps Close public hearing and adopt budget June 13, 2018 Review the final budget draft, close the public hearing, and adopt the final budget Open public hearing May 9, 2018 Receive input on the proposed budget and open the public hearing Continue monitoring revenues and costs Measure A administrative salaries and benefits Funding needs for projects and transit operations Sales Tax and TUMF revenue trends Timeliness of federal and state reimbursements AGENDA ITEM 9 Agenda Item 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Jillian Guizado, Legislative Affairs Manager THROUGH: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation; 2) Adopt the following bill positions: a) AB 3027 (Chávez) – Support; and 3) Forward to the Commission for final action. DISCUSSION: State Update AB 3027 (Chávez) – SUPPORT Under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the lead agency (such as RCTC) on a project is required to prepare, certify, and complete an environmental impact report or adopt a negative declaration if the project will not result in an environmental impact. Existing law allows parties to challenge the lead agency if it is believed the lead agency is not complying with CEQA. In certain cases, the court may award attorney’s fees to a prevailing party. AB 3027 specifies that attorney’s fees may be awarded only to a prevailing plaintiff or petitioner that is a homeowner, property owner, or business owner located within a specified mailing radius established by law or by the lead agency, or a nonprofit organization formed to protect the environment and whose membership exceeds 50,000. Staff believes AB 3027 has the potential to protect the Commission from unnecessarily paying attorney’s fees to parties not truly affected by the agency’s projects and that initiate or join in on suits brought against the Commission’s projects. Staff is recommending the Commission support AB 3027, which is aligned with a principle in the Commission’s 2018 State and Federal Legislative Platform: 1. Project Delivery Streamlining – Support efforts to modernize the CEQA. 28 Agenda Item 9 Federal Update One Federal Decision In August 2017, President Trump issued Executive Order (EO) 13807 for “Establishing Discipline and Accountability in the Environmental Review and Permitting Process for Infrastructure Projects.” The following month, the Council on Environmental Quality published a notice in the Federal Register announcing actions it would take to fulfill the President’s EO. On April 9, 2018, the One Federal Decision Memorandum of Understanding was signed by 12 federal agencies which commits them to a coordinated and timely process for environmental reviews on major infrastructure projects. One federal agency will be designated as the lead on each major project and will carry the project through the environmental review and permitting process with the ultimate goal of completing the process within two years. The Commission has supported a more streamlined approach to The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as reflected in the 2018 State and Federal Legislative Platform: “Support implementation of FAST Act reforms to accelerate project delivery including, but not limited to, the creation of a single NEPA document for all federal agencies; NEPA reciprocity; expediting and improving the federal permitting review process; and narrowing concurrence requirements.” Attachment: Legislative Matrix – May 2018 29 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION - POSITIONS ON STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION – MAY 2018 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 1189 (Garcia) Clarifying legislation that allows the Commission to implement a second self- help sales tax, subject to approval of two-thirds of the electorate in a future election. Enrolled and presented to the Governor. (September 13, 2017) SPONSOR 1/26/217 AB 91 (Cervantes) Requires Caltrans to convert existing HOV lanes in Riverside County to operate only during hours of heavy commuter traffic; during all other times the lanes would be open to all vehicles, including those with a single occupant. Ordered to inactive file. (September 15, 2017) OPPOSE Opposition removed 5/30/17 as a result of amendments 3/8/17 AB 351 (Melendez) Proposes to bring truck weight fees back to transportation accounts. Re-referred to Committee on Transportation. (January 4, 2018) SUPPORT 3/8/17 AB 179 (Cervantes) Changes the membership of the California Transportation Commission. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 13, 2017) OPPOSE 4/12/2017 AB 408 (Chen) Final offer of compensation in eminent domain cases. Died prior to going to committee pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a). (March 20, 2017) OPPOSE 4/12/2017 AB 697 (Fong) Exempts private ambulances from paying tolls when responding to emergency and urgent calls. Ordered to inactive file. (September 16, 2017) OPPOSE Opposition removed 6/14/2017 as a result of amendments 4/12/2017 SB 132 (Budget and Fiscal Review Committee) Amendment to the Budget Act of 2016. Creates the Riverside County Transportation Efficiency Corridor. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (April 28, 2017) SUPPORT 4/12/2017 30 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption SB 268 (Mendoza) Changes the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board of directors governance structure. Re-referred to Assembly Local Government Committee. (September 5, 2017) OPPOSE 5/9/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1523 (Obernolte) Authorizes the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) to use design-build for local agencies to reconstruct the Mt. Vernon Avenue Viaduct project in San Bernardino. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (July 31, 2017) SUPPORT 5/10/2017 SB 150 (Allen) Requires the state board to update and revise greenhouse gas emission reduction targets while considering vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reductions. Requires the state board to assess current and historic VMT. Requires the state to prepare a report every four years that assesses metropolitan planning organization progress toward meeting metrics. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 10, 2017) OPPOSE 5/10/2017 SB 264 (Nguyen) Requires net excess toll revenue from the Orange County Transportation Authority’s (OCTA) Interstate 405 Improvement Project to be allocated to OCTA and project corridor jurisdictions and requires the moneys to be spent on specified transportation improvement projects. Hearing in Transportation and Housing Committee scheduled for April 25; author cancelled hearing. (April 25, 2017) OPPOSE 5/10/2017 SB 477 (Cannella) Allows for the extension of an existing rail corridor to provide intercity rail service beyond the defined boundaries of the corridor, subject to approval by the joint powers authority board and Secretary of Transportation. Held in Assembly Appropriations Committee. (September 1, 2017) SUPPORT 5/10/2017 AB 686 (Santiago) Requires agencies to “affirmatively further fair housing” opportunity with all governmental actions. Amended and re-referred to Senate Transportation and Housing Committee. (July 17, 2017) OPPOSE 6/14/2017 SB 768 (Allen, Wiener) Extends authority to Caltrans and regional transportation agencies to enter into public private partnership agreements for transportation projects. Held in Senate Appropriations Committee. (May 25, 2017) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 H.R. 100 (Brownley) Increases the sub-allocation for local communities under the Surface Transportation Block Grant Program (STBG). Referred to House T&I subcommittee on Highways and Transit. (January 4, 2017) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 31 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 115 (Ting); SB 99 (Budget) Trailer bill containing elements that will streamline transportation project delivery. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (June 27, 2017) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 805 (Gonzalez Fletcher) Changes the San Diego Association of Governments board of directors governance and voting structure. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 11, 2017) OPPOSE 6/15/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1069 (Low) Requires ten countywide transportation agencies, including the Commission, to regulate taxicabs. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 13, 2017) OPPOSE 6/28/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1282 (Mullin) Requires the California State Transportation Agency Secretary to establish a Transportation Permitting Task Force. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 10, 2017) SUPPORT 7/12/2017 AB 135 (Budget) Trailer bill containing elements that allow agencies to request approval for letters of no prejudice to advance spending on SB 1 projects using local funding sources; authorizes the California State Transportation Agency to perform NEPA Assignment on transit, rail, and multimodal projects; and provides flexibility to cities and counties for adopting Local Streets and Roads project lists. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (September 16, 2017) SUPPORT 9/13/2017 Staff action based on platform H.R. 1 Amends the Internal Revenue Code to reduce tax rates and modify policies, credits, and deductions for individuals and businesses. Signed by President. (December 22, 2017) SEEK AMENDMENTS 12/13/2017 ACA 5 (Proposition 69) Assembly Constitutional Amendment passed by two-thirds of the California State Legislature and signed by Governor Brown. If passed by the voters, amends the California Constitution to protect SB 1 revenues from seizure to fund other programs and expenses. On June 5, 2018 Statewide Direct Primary Election ballot. SUPPORT 1/25/2018 California Voter Approval for Gas and Vehicle Taxes Initiative Repeals revenues raised by SB 1 that are dedicated to road repair and transportation funding. Henceforward, requires a majority vote of Californians to increase transportation revenues once passed by two-thirds of the California State Legislature. Proponents collecting signatures of registered voters. OPPOSE 1/25/2018 32 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption SCR 90 (Roth) Designates the 60/91/215 interchange in Riverside County as the Joseph Tavaglione Interchange. Referred to Senate Committee on Transportation and Housing. (February 1, 2018) SUPPORT 2/1/2018 Staff action based on platform AB 1759 (McCarty) Starting in Fiscal Year 2022/23, requires the State Controller to withhold local streets and roads funds provided under SB 1 from cities and counties not meeting their share of regional housing needs. Withheld funds would be placed in an escrow account until the non-compliant agency is deemed to be in compliance. Amended; re-referred to Assembly Committee on Rules. (April 9, 2018) OPPOSE 3/14/2018 AB 1905 (Grayson) Limits a court’s ability to stop projects with lawsuits against their environmental documents from moving forward if the project is in SCAG’s adopted SCS. Amended; re-referred to Assembly Committee on Natural Resources. (March 13, 2018) SUPPORT 3/14/2018 SB 1262 (Newman) Makes the Construction Manager / General Contractor (CM/GC) procurement and project delivery method a permanent tool available to Caltrans, removes the project cost minimums prescribed in the current pilot program, and eliminates the requirement for Caltrans to use its own employees or consultants to perform project design and engineering services on a CM/GC project. Amended; re-referred to Senate Committee on Transportation and Housing. (March 20, 2018) SUPPORT 3/14/2018 SB 1119 (Newman) Allows for the 50 percent requirement of Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) funding to be spent on projects or services that benefit disadvantaged communities to be met by transit agencies spending LCTOP funding on transit fare subsidies, transit connections, and/or technology improvements that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Referred to Senate Committees on Transportation and Housing and Environmental Quality. (February 22, 2018) SUPPORT 4/11/2018 33 AGENDA ITEM 10 REVISED AGENDA ITEM 10 Additions are noted by Bold Italics, Deletions are noted by Strikethrough Agenda Item 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager THROUGH: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for January – March, 2018; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the January 2018 Commission Workshop, staff and consultants provided information about public opinion and stakeholder research relating to transportation issues in Riverside County. The research revealed that although there is public support for many of the Commission’s projects and programs, there is low recognition and awareness of RCTC and the services it provides. The Commission directed staff to implement a public engagement program through 2020 supporting transportation funding and Commission programs, plans, and projects. As a precursor to this public engagement program, the Commission has gathered data of its existing efforts to compile its first Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report. This report will serve as a baseline for RCTC’s public engagement activities that will be continuing through late 2020 and will foster a data-driven approach for measuring progress toward public engagement goals. Analyzing this data will allow staff to assess the effectiveness of its public engagement efforts on an ongoing basis and to make adjustments, as needed. This data will also provide transparency into how the Commission’s resources are being used to engage and educate the public. The quarterly report includes two sets of data: 1) Metrics for RCTC’s overall public engagement activities, including website use and access; website top pages visited; email notifications; social media likes, engagement and reach; and public sentiment 2) Metrics for RCTC’s Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project public engagement activities, including email activity, website sessions, and social media. Note that although construction of this project began early this year, public outreach activities began in advance of construction, so additional data is available prior to 2018. 34 Agenda Item 10 The report may evolve as staff and consultants refine the approach to measuring success and in response to any Commissioner feedback. Report highlights for this quarter includes the following: RCTC Overall Public Engagement 1) Website: For the quarter, there were 17,750 website sessions, with 10,015 unique users. Most people access the website by using a direct search (keying in rctc.org), closely followed by those who use an organic search (using a search engine). Smaller numbers use links from other websites or social media to access RCTC’s website. Approximately three-quarters of the website visitors use a desktop computer; the remainder use a tablet or smart phone to visit the site. Most visit only the home page; other top visited pages include the Clerk of the Board and the Contact Us pages. Approximately 60 percent of the website visitors use a tablet or smart phone to visit the site; the remainder use a desktop computer. Most visited only the home page; other top visited pages included the blog about funding received for extending the I-15 Express Lanes and the blog about the 71/91 Interchange funding nomination. 2) Social Media: RCTC uses Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as its social media platforms. At the end of the quarter, the Facebook page had 7,677 likes, 21,158 forms of engagement, such as likes, comments and shares, and 227,678 impressions, which is the number of times that RCTC’s content was displayed to people in their news feed. The Twitter page had 996 followers, 407 forms of engagement, and 19,208 impressions. The Instagram page had 175 followers, 696 forms of engagement, and 9,277 impressions. 3) RCTC’s The Point: RCTC produces content for its online blog, The Point, and distributes this information via email to subscribers. RCTC has 815 subscribers, of which 35 percent opened The Point, and 7 percent clicked on links to learn more. I-15 Express Lanes Construction Public Engagement 1) Emails: There were a total of 305 new email sign-ups for the quarter, and 14 email inquiries received. The email sign-ups were higher than the previous quarter, but lower than the spring and summer 2017 quarters. 2) Website: There were 3,924 website sessions. This was the greatest number of sessions to date for the project. 3) Social Media: The project uses Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and is working to build its audiences. The Facebook page has 1,297 likes and is growing at a steady rate. Twitter and Instagram were launched on February 5, 2018, and have 148 and 52 followers, respectively. For both RCTC’s overall public engagement and the I-15 Express Lanes Project, the Commission is working to build its audiences and expects public engagement figures to continue to increase. Future Public Engagement Metrics Reports will be issued in July, October, and January for the quarters preceding these months and will include comparison data for each quarter. Attachments: 1) RCTC Overall Public Engagement Metrics 2) I-15 Express Lanes Public Engagement Metrics 35 RCTCPublic Engagement Metrics Jan – Mar 2018 RCTC Overall Social Media Sentiment Social Media Eblasts Web 17,750Number of Sessions 10,015Number ofUnique Users Mobile vs Desktop Desktop Users 3,860 Mobile Users 5,656 Followers 175 Facebook Page Likes 7,677 Engagement 21,158 Impressions 227,678 Followers 996 Engagement 407 Impressions 19,208 Engagement 696 Impressions 9,277 Twitter Avg Click 7% Avg Open% 35% Instagram Subscribers 815 Top Channels Social (40%) Direct (33%) Organic Search (21%) Referral (4%) Top Pages Visited 0.010 0.008 0.006 0.004 0.002 0 1/1 1/8 1/15 1/22 1/29 2/5 2/12 2/19 2/26 3/5 3/12 3/19 3/26 Spike on 1/27 after high positive engagement with a post about ADA compliant vehicles and services Messaging surrounding transit, family activities, and SB1 funding led to a large spike in engagement and sentiment 2/16 RCTC’s boosted post about the Santa Ana River Trail caused a third spike on 3/16 Homepage6,058 #1 Funding Received for Extension of I-15 Express Lanes2,897 #2 71/91 Interchange Nominated2,478 #3SentimentATTACHMENT 1 36 15 Express Lanes ProjectOutreach Metrics Dec 2016 – Mar 2018 0 300 600 900 1200 1500 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 20180 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 20180 100 200 300 400 500 600 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 20180 3 6 9 12 15 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 2018Number of Sign-UpsNumber of EmailsNumber of Likes/FollowsWebsite Visits45 845 2790 2145 3033 2243 3924 21 127 195 932 979 1297 69 589 537 161 305 7 13 12 8 8 14 Email List Sign-Ups Emails Received Website Visits Social Media Likes/Follows 52 148 Facebook Page Likes Instagram Followers (Account Opened 02/05/18) Twitter Followers (Account Opened 02/05/18) 37 ATTACHMENT 2 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS REPORT QUARTERLY REPORT: JANUARY-MARCH 2018 Budget & Implementation Committee April 23, 2018 Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager Why Measure? “If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.” –Peter Drucker Value of Reports •Data-Driven Approach •Baseline Data •Yardstick for Future Performance •Make Adjustments •Transparency What are we Measuring? “The Point” e-newsletter Facebook Twitter Instagram rctc.org I-15 Construction Updates Facebook Twitter Instagram Email Web Other Tools in the Toolbox Interpersonal Communication: •Presentations •Town Hall Meetings •Telephone Calls •Email Inquiries •Commission Meetings •Staff Engagement •“Grocery Store” Conversations Social Media Metrics Social Media What is this engagement stuff? Number of people who like, share or comment on a post Social Media Total number of times content was displayed to people Am I making a good impression? Facebook Sentiment Sentiment measures positive or negative reactions to posts Are we getting all sentimental now? •1/27: Post about ADA compliant vehicles, services •2/16: Post about transit, family activities, SB 1 funding •3/16: Post about Santa Ana River Trail Website Metrics Mobile vs. Desktop Website visitors favor their mobile devices, 60/40 split. Will these % change over time? How Do They Find Us? Sessions & Users •Sessions: Number of times people visit •Unique Users: Each person is counted once •Doesn’t include RCTC staff Most Frequent Visits E-Newsletter The Point E-Newsletter •Encouraging people to subscribe •Transportation industry: •Open rate: 17% •Click-through rate: 12% •Government: •Open rate: 23% •Click-through rate: 3.3% I-15 Express Lanes: Construction Outreach I-15 Social Media I-15 Email Sign-Ups I-15 Email Inquiries •15project@rctc.org •Most questions via social media I-15 Website Visits •Site visits growing; construction started •Adding new content frequently Next Steps Up Next… •April-June Report •Working to Increase Engagement: •Frequent Posts •Relevant Content •Responsiveness •Variety –More Videos! •Digital Advertising •Adjusting Content as Needed •Finalizing Website Makeover Commissioner Feedback Appreciated STAY CONNECTED rctc.org 951-787-7141 info@rctc.org theRCTC AGENDA ITEM 11 Agenda Item 11 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 24, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Budget Adjustment for SB 132 Projects – Jurupa Road Grade Separation and Hamner Avenue Bridge STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Approve an adjustment to the FY 2017/18 budget of an estimated $300,000 to increase SB 132 revenues and expenditures for the Jurupa Road Grade Separation and Hamner Avenue Bridge projects; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: SB 132 provides funding for five projects in Western Riverside County. At its November and December 2017 meetings, the Commission approved agreements with the County of Riverside (County) and cities of Norco, Jurupa Valley, and Eastvale for the Jurupa Road Grade Separation and Hamner Avenue Bridge projects, respectively. The County is the lead agency for these projects and notified staff that expenditures began for the environmental phases. Initially staff anticipated expenditures would commence in FY 2018/19. In order to pay current fiscal year invoices, a budget adjustment is necessary. Staff contacted the County to determine the estimated expenditures to be reimbursed in FY 2017/18 and will finalize the amount of the budget adjustment at the May Commission meeting. The current estimate is as follows: Project FY 2017/18 Estimated Expenditure Jurupa Road Grade Separation $200,000 Hamner Avenue Bridge $100,000 Staff recommends the approval of a budget adjustment totaling an estimated $300,000 to be reimbursed with SB 132 funds. The Commission executed a master agreement with Caltrans to streamline the processing of payments for the SB 132 projects through the Commission and Caltrans. As a result, the lead agency for each SB 132 project will submit invoices to the Commission for review, approval, and payment; the Commission will advance payment to the lead agency using available unrestricted 38 Agenda Item 11 Commission cash and investments. Commission staff will then submit lead agency invoices to Caltrans for SB 132 reimbursement as repayment for the advance. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2017/18 Amount: $300,000 Source of Funds: SB 132 state funds Budget Adjustment: Yes GL/Project Accounting No.: 003041 415 41510 0000 605 31 41501 $200,000 (revenues) 003041 81101 00000 0000 605 31 81101 $200,000 (expenditures) 003040 415 41510 0000 605 31 41501 $100,000 (revenues) 003040 81101 00000 0000 605 31 81101 $100,000 (expenditures) Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/17/2018 39 AGENDA ITEM 12 Agenda Item 12 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: April 23, 2018 TO: Budget and Implementation Committee FROM: Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager THROUGH: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director SUBJECT: Commuter Rail Grant Resolution STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to: 1) Adopt Resolution No. 18-006, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding Authorization for the Execution of the Certifications and Assurances and Authorized Agent Forms for the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program for the Perris Valley Line FY 2018/19 Operations Project in the Amount of $861,106”; and 2) Forward to the Commission for final action. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission’s Commuter Rail Program applies for various federal and state funds that are necessary to fund rail projects within Riverside County. There is also the need for grants to meet the Commission’s annual funding responsibility related to rail operations and capital passenger projects. The Commuter Rail Program is currently seeking approval to obtain grant funding which is available through the California Department of Transportation Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP). • Funding in the amount of $861,106 in LCTOP funds is available for Perris Valley Line (PVL) rail operations. Projects eligible for this funding need to reduce GHG emissions and support transit agencies in their effort to increase mode share. The Rail Program is seeking operation funding for the newly extended PVL commuter rail service. Funding for this grant is formula based. The application is a combination of funding allocated to Western County rail in the amount of $857,421 and $3,685 contributed by the city of Riverside. The city of Riverside is listed as the Contributing Sponsor on the attached resolution and has provided the Commission with supporting documentation for the use of these funds. As required by the LCTOP grant guidelines, Resolution No. 18-006 is needed to authorize use of the funds on PVL Operations and authorize the Executive Director to execute the Certifications and Assurances and Authorized Agent forms. The resolution is required to submit and file the 40 Agenda Item 12 grant; therefore, staff recommends approval of the resolution related to the FY 2017/18 LCTOP grant. Funding received from this grant will be included in the FY 2018/19 budget and will be reflected in Commission’s Commuter Rail FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2018/19 Amount: $861,106 Source of Funds: LCTOP Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 034198 415 41511 0000 103 25 41501 revenues Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 04/12/2018 Attachment: Resolution No. 18-006 41 RESOLUTION NO. 18-006 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION REGARDING AUTHORIZATION FOR THE EXECUTION OF THE CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES AND AUTHORIZED AGENT FORMS FOR THE LOW CARBON TRANSIT OPERATIONS PROGRAM FOR THE PERRIS VALLEY LINE FY 2018/19 OPERATIONS PROJECT IN THE AMOUNT OF $861,106 WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission is an eligible project sponsor and may receive state funding from the Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) for transit projects; and WHEREAS, the statutes related to state-funded transit projects require a local or regional implementing agency to abide by various regulations; and WHEREAS, Senate Bill 862 (2014) named the Department of Transportation (Department) as the administrative agency for the LCTOP; and WHEREAS, the Department has developed guidelines for the purpose of administering and distributing LCTOP funds to eligible project sponsors (local agencies); and WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission wishes to delegate authorization to execute these documents and any amendments thereto to Anne Mayer, Executive Director; and WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission wishes to implement the LCTOP project listed above, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission that the fund recipient agrees to comply with all conditions and requirements set forth in the Certification and Assurances and the Authorized Agent documents and applicable statutes, regulations and guidelines for all LCTOP funded transit projects. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Anne Mayer, Executive Director be authorized to execute all required documents of the LCTOP program and any Amendments thereto with the Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission that it hereby authorizes the submittal of 42 the following project nomination and allocation request to the Department in FY 2017-18 LCTOP funds: Project Name: Perris Valley Line Operations FY 2018/19 Amount of LCTOP funds requested: $861,106 Short description of project: Funding will be used for operating costs associated to the commuter rail Perris Valley Line. Contributing Sponsor: City of Riverside APPROVED AND ADOPTED this ____ day of May 2018. Dana W. Reed, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 43