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06 June 21, 2018 Citizens advisory committee/ Social services transportation advisory councilRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL TIME: 11:00 a.m. DATE: Thursday, June 21, 2018 LOCATION: Riverside County Transportation Commission Conference Room A 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, CA 92502-2208  COMMITTEE MEMBERS  Pamela Brown, Retired Citizen, Riverside Joe Forgiarini, Riverside Transit Agency, Western Riverside County Laura Hernandez, T-Now, Western Riverside County Jack Marty, Retired Citizen, Banning Priscilla Ochoa, Blindness Support Services, Western Riverside County Linda Samulski, Guide Dogs of the Desert, Coachella Valley Richard Smith, Independent Living Partnership, Riverside County Mary Venerable, Retired Citizen, Perris Anita Petke, SunLine Transit Agency, Coachella Valley  RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSIT OPERATORS  City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Corona City of Riverside Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Riverside County Transportation Commission – Commuter Rail Riverside Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency  STAFF  Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager Monica Morales, Management Analyst Jennifer Anderson, Administrative Assistant COMM-CAC-00016 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIL www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 11:00 a.m. Thursday, June 21, 2018 Riverside County Transportation Commission Conference Room A 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside CA 92502-2208 In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Committee meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – November 16, 2017 5. ADDITIONS/REVISIONS (The Committee may add an item to the agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Committee. If there are less than 2/3 of the Committee members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda.) 6. FISCAL YEARS 2018/19 – 2020/21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS Overview This item is for the Committee to receive and file the Fiscal Years 2018/19 – 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agen cy (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission’s Western Riverside County Rail Program and Coachella Valley Rail Program. Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council June 21, 2018 Page 2 7. SPECIALIZED TRANSIT GRANT AWARDS FOR 2018 MEASURE A WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY SPECIALIZED TRANSIT CALL FOR PROJECTS Overview This item is for the Committee to receive and file the 2018 Measure A Western Riverside County Specialized Transit grants for a three-year period covering FY 2018/19 through FY 2020/21 8. COMMITTEE MEMBER / STAFF REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Committee Members and staff to report on attended and upcoming meetings/conferences and issues related to Committee activities. 9. ADJOURNMENT The next Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council meeting is to be determined. MINUTES RIVERS!DE COUNW TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION crTlzENs ADvrsoRY coMMTTTEE/ SOCIAL SERVICES TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COUNCIT Minutes November 16, 2017 1. CATLTO ORDER John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, called the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Servlces Transportation Advisory Council to order at 11:04 a.m. in Room 2 at the Chatigny Recreation Center/Civic Center, 1310 Oak Valley Parkway, Beaumont, CA 92223. 2. ROLTCALL Members Present Joe Forgia rini Jack Marty Priscilla Ochoa Anita Petke Linda Sa m u lski Richa rd Smith Mary Venera ble Members Absent Pamela Brown Maria De Los Santos Laura Hernandez 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no publlc comments. 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES The minutes for the May 18, 2017 meeting were approved as submitted. 5. ADD|TTONS/REV|S|ONS There were no additions/revisions to the agenda. 2018 WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY MEASURE A SPECIATIZED TRANSIT THREE.YEAR CATT FOR PROJECTS Monica Morales, RCTC Management Analyst, stated the 2OL8-2O2O Measure A Call for Projects release has been approved by the RCTC Commission and posted on the RCTC website. An email was sent out by AMMA with details. The deadline to submit proposals is January 9, 2018. RCTC will be having a workshop on December 5,7017 for anyone who is interested in attending. 5 Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council November 16,2017 Page 2 Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager, stated the Measure A funding available is about S8.2M for 3 years, and will end in June 2019. Approximately S2.6M will be available for each year. Monica stated that 17 grants were made available during the last call for projects. 7. BLYTHE WELTNESS EXPRESS PROJECT STATUS - POWERPOINT PRESENTATION Dennis Brooks & Valerie Mackintosh from AMMA Transit Planning and George Colangeli from Palo Verde Transit Agency provided a brief overview and early outcome statistics for the recently implemented Blythe wellness Express. George reported the Blythe Wellness Express shuttle operates 3 days per week, providing transportation to medical appointments from Blythe to the Coachella Valley area. The shuttle transports approximately 3-4 passengers each trip to non-emergency medical visits. The goal of the program is to provide access to medical care and improve the health outcomes of community members. Transportation is provided to 3 separate hospitals - John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital and Eisenhower Medical Center, both located in lndio, and Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, as well as specialty clinics in the area, pharmacies, and dental appointments. Dennis reported the following ridership statistics for the months of September 2017: 66 regular riders 119 one-way passenger trips completed 42 trip surveys completed 149 total revenue hours 7500 vehicle miles 294 service hours 29 actual service days out of 39 scheduled service days July, August, and Valerie reported that out of 66 total riders,42 surveys were completed during the months of July, August, and September 2017. She reported the following statistics from the completed su rveys: 85% of riders have health insurance; 8% have no health insurance;7yo no answet 66% female ridership; 44% male ridership 44o/o of riders do not drive; out of the individuals that do drive, 31% have access to a vehicle and 60% do not have a vehicle 64% of riders utilize a medical assistance device 92% of riders are uslng the service for healthcare related purposes 45% of riders reported visiting an emergency room within the past 12 months 31% of riders reported having been admitted by the hospital within the past 24 months Dennis and Valerie reported AMMA will be marketing to the Hispanac community and redesigning the website to increase ridership. Citizens Advisory Committee/ Social Services Transportation Advisory Council November 15,2017 Page 3 8. COMMITTEE MEMBER / STAFF REPORT Anita Petke from SunLine Transit Agency informed members SunLine will be introducing some proposed changes in January 2018. SunLine held 5 public hearings in 3 different locations last week and closed the public hearings for comment on tL/lO/ZOt7. The proposed changes include: interlining Routes 14 & 30, as they both operate within a 20-minute frequency; realigning 20 Express Line from Desert Hot Springs to Palm Desert; introducing new Route 21 service to replace the Route 53 in Palm Deseru there will be realignments to Routes 80 & 91; the frequency on Route 90 will be reduced from 40 minutes to 50 minutes. Cost savings for the proposed changes are estimated to be at 5442,000 for the first 6 months, and close to Stlvt for the entire year. There has been a 12.5% ridership loss, and the proposed changes will help offset dwindling ridership costs. Joe Forgiarini from Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) informed members RTA introduced their first Rapidlink route at the end of August. The route runs from Corona, along Sixth Street/Magnolia Avenue, to UCR. lt runs every 15 minutes, 5 days a week during peak hours. The route is servicing approximately 650 riders each day. The goal is to have at least 1,000 riders per day. He also stated the new route that will run from San Bernardino to Disneyland (Route 200) is still on track to start service on January 8, 2018. Max Calder from Banning Pass Transit announced that the Pass Area Veteran's Expo will take place on Saturday, January 27,2018 at the Beaumont Civic Center. lt is a regional focus for transportation, healthcare, and any other veteran need. Max stated he will email the details and flyer to Monica Morales. 9. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council, the meeting adjourned at 12:09 p.m. Respectf ully submitted, Fina Clemente Transit Manager Fina Clemente, Transit Manager, informed members the next meeting would take place in March/April 2018. The exact location is yet to be determined. AGENDA ITEM 6 Agenda Item RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 21, 2018 TO: Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Technical Advisory Council FROM: Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Shirley Medina, Director of Plans and Programming SUBJECT: Fiscal Years 2018/19 – 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plans STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive and file the Fiscal Years 2018/19 – 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission’s Commuter Rail Program. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County FYs 2018/19 – 2020/21 SRTPs cover the three apportionment areas of the county and are comprised of plans for the municipal operators, RTA, SunLine, PVVTA, and the Commission’s Commuter Rail Program in Western Riverside and Coachella Valley. The SRTPs serve as the county’s primary justification for federal and state grants for transit o perations and capital projects and provide a short-term vision of public transportation for the county including strategies that will help guide transportation decisions over the next three years. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze , and recommend potential productivity improvements to ensure federal, state, and local funds are allocated to transit operators to provide needed transit services for county residents. This year’s plan update is the culmination of a planning process that involves determination of transit needs in each service area and ability to meet those needs, analysis of current transportation services, a review of service performance measures and proposals for service initiatives aimed at improving service. The SRTP process also requires the transit operators to address recommendations made by regular performance audits. To meet county residents’ growing demand for more reliable transit service and stronger intercity and regional connectivity, operators are focusing on implementing modified routes, improved frequency, refined schedules and streamlined bus operations. For FY 2018/19, services are continuing on RapidLink Gold Line express (linking Corona, Downtown Riverside and University of California) and CommuterLink routes 200 and 205 (utilizing new SR-91 intercounty express lanes). Procurement of needed vehicles is also ongoing for both expansion and replacement of aging buses. Other capital projects such as operations and maintenance facilities, transit centers, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) facility upgrades, bus shelters and associated bus stop Agenda Item enhancements are planned for construction and installation to improve service quality and reliability. A sizable portion of each agency’s capital plan also includes software system network infrastructure upgrades and safety and security equipment such as security lighting, on-board camera system, and bus stop solar-powered lighting devices to help ensure safety of transit systems and passengers. In addition, necessary access and mobility improvements are also being implemented to better serve the county’s lower-income, elderly and disabled populations. While the SRTPs include projected financial needs, the actual allocation of funds will occur via the public hearing to be conducted at the July Commission meeting. City of Banning The city of Banning (Banning) works closely with the city of Beaumont (Beaumont) to provide a seamless transit system for the residents of Banning, Beaumont, and the unincorporated areas of Cabazon, Cherry Valley, and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians reservation. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Sustain and enhance service levels in Cabazon with Low Carbon Transit Operations (LCTOP) program funds;  Rebuild existing CNG facility to ensure a reliable, safe, and efficient fueling station in the Pass area;  Purchase and install passenger information signs at key stops to provide clients with next bus information; and  Evaluate strategies to increase revenue and service productivity. City of Beaumont Beaumont Transit provides both Dial-A-Ride and fixed route services and works closely with Banning to provide a seamless transit system in the Pass Area. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Launch a new Commuter Link 125 to connect Pass Area with Redlands;  Implement a Free Fare project funded with LCTOP program funds;  Conduct a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) in conjunction with but independent of Banning Pass Transit; and  Promote a beach train travel training opportunity for youth in the Pass Area. City of Corona The city of Corona (Corona) operates a fixed route system known as the Corona Cruiser and a Dial-A-Ride program for seniors and persons with disabilities. Corona closely coordinates all transfers with both RTA and the Commission ’s Commuter Rail services. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include: Agenda Item  Introduce additional morning peak service for Corona Cruiser;  Implement a Free Fare program and review feasibility of establishing an ADA Subscription Services Policy;  Release solicitation for a new contract for transit operations; and  Conduct a COA to identify strengths as well as opportunities for service improvements. City of Riverside – Special Services Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation Dial-A-Ride for seniors and persons with disabilities within the Riverside city limits. The program serves as an alternative to RTA’s transit service for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use fixed route service. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Conduct a comprehensive operations study to look at overall operations and staffing to identify strengths and potential areas of improving the current transit system;  Complete capital projects started in FY 2017/18 including electronic fare collection module, and bus procurement; and  Continue rebranding and marketing campaign. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency The PVVTA provides fixed route service and a transportation reimbursement program for individuals who cannot ride the public bus system. The fixed route service can deviate up to three-quarters of a mile away from the actual fixed route. Service is provided within the city of Blythe and surrounding unincorporated areas in the Palo Verde Valley. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Conclude the FTA Rides 2 Wellness demonstration service (Blythe Wellness Express) for non-emergency medical access to the Coachella Valley and start planning for continuance of service beyond the demonstration period;  Modify Route 3 service by eliminating two hours from the daily schedule and improve Route 4 by adding a return tripper at 4:00 p.m.; and  Continue service contract with Transportation Concepts through June 30, 2019, with an option to extend agreement for three additional one-year terms. Riverside Transit Agency RTA provides local, intercity, and regional transportation services. As the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) for Western Riverside County, RTA is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the service area and providing driver training and grant application assistance to operators in Western County. Service changes for FY 2018/19 include the following: Agenda Item  Split Routes 22 and 27 each into two separate routes to improve reliability and connectivity in Perris;  Improve Route 24 weekday service frequency from 80 to 60 minutes;  Extend Route 31 last weekday evening departure one hour later from Moreno Valley to Beaumont and Hemet; and  Expand Route 40 to provide more service in the city of Menifee, including Mount San Jacinto College Menifee campus, Heritage Lakes area and McCall Boulevard east of the Interstate 215. SunLine Transit Agency SunLine is the CTSA for the Coachella Valley and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the valley, which covers a service area of approximately 1,120 square miles. SunLine provides both local and regional transportation services with 15 fixed routes and demand response services known as SunDial. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Continue work with the jurisdictions to improve bus stops within the service area using Proposition 1B Safety and Security funds;  Purchase three replacement CNG fixed route buses and four support vehicles;  Continue planned improvements to SunLine’s operations facility; and  Conduct a planning study to determine transit needs in Coachella Val ley. Commission’s Rail Program Western County Commuter Rail The Southern California Regional Rail Authority operates seven commuter rail lines with 56 locomotives and 258 passenger rail cars. Three routes − the Riverside to Los Angeles Line, the Inland Empire to Orange County Line (IEOC), and the 91/Perris Valley Line (91/PV) − directly serve Western Riverside County with connecting service available to destinations on the other four Metrolink lines. Planned services for FY 2018/19 include:  Continue operations and target marketing of the Perris Valley Line Metrolink service extension;  Continue support of special trains including Festival of Lights, Ang els Express and Rams Trains;  Continue Next Generation Rail and Transit Study; and  Continue support of positive train control cost increase as well as contractual step increase with major Metrolink service vendors. Coachella Valley – San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Agenda Item The proposed 200-mile long rail corridor service in Coachella Valley will run from Los Angeles to Indio through the four Southern California counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside , and San Bernardino to provide a convenient scheduled link to the communities in the fast-growing Coachella Valley and Banning Pass areas. Financial support will come primarily from federal and state grant funds that are deposited and maintained in the Coachella Valley Rail Fund. Phase 1 of the project is completed and work is continuing on Phase 2 of the Federal Railroad Administration process. Planning efforts for FY 2018/19 include:  Continue efforts on Service Development Plan; and  Continue efforts on Environmental Impact Documentation. Attachments: FYs 2018/19 – 2020/21 Operator SRTPs (Enclosed on CD) 1) City of Banning 2) City of Beaumont 3) City of Corona 4) City of Riverside 5) PVVTA 6) RTA 7) SunLine 8) Western Riverside Rail Program 9) Coachella Valley Rail Program Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 B a n n i n g P a s s T r a n s i t 7 8 9 N . S a n G o r g o n i o A v e n u e B a n n i n g , C A 9 2 2 2 0 9 5 1 . 9 2 2 . 3 2 4 3 F Y 2 0 1 8 / 2 0 1 9 1 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 System Overview 1.1 Description of service area and system map 3 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections 4 1.3 Existing Service and Route Performance 6 1.4 Current and Proposed Fare Structure 6 1.5 Revenue Fleet 7 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities 7 1.7 Existing Coordination between Transit Agencies 8 2 Existing Services and Route Performance 2.1 Fixed Route Services 9 2.2 Dial-a-Ride Service 12 2.3 Key Performance Indicators 13 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts 14 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth 14 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs 15 3 Planned Service Changes and Implementation 3.1 Recent Service Changes 15 3.2 Recommended Local & Express Routes 17 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotions 17 3.4 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes 18 4 Financial and Capital Plans 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget Narrative 19 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Operating and Capital Program 19 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 19  ADA, DBE, EEO, Title VI  TDA Triennial Audit, FTA Triennial Audit, NTD  Alternative Fueled Vehicles 2 Short Range Transit Plan 5 Tables 1. Table 1 - Fleet Inventory a. Motor Bus (DO/PT) b. Demand Response (DO/PT) 2. Table 2 - SRTP Service Summary a. All Routes 3. Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Table 3A - Individual Route 4. Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 Table 4A - Capital Project Justification 5. Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2019/20 Table 5.1A - Capital Project Justification Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2020/21 Table 5.2A - Capital Project Justification 6. FY 2012 - 2015 TDA Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations 7. Table 7 - Performance Target Report 2017/18 8. Table 8 - Performance Report 2018/19 9. Table 9A - Highlights of FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Table 9B - Fare Revenue Calculation 3 Short Range Transit Plan 1 System Overview 1.1 – Description of Service Area The Banning Transit system serves several areas, including the commercial and residential areas of Banning and Cabazon, as well as the commercial areas of the Morongo Indian Reservation and limited commercial areas of Beaumont. The cities of Banning and Beaumont operate under a shared brand identity, “Pass Transit.” Pass Transit offers seamless transit by coordinating transportation services that cover approximately 40 square miles in the pass area with routes connecting to regional services. Within the service area, population is mixed with areas of both high and low densities. The current routes have been planned by taking advantage of this knowledge, allowing the system to operate more efficiently. Service Area Map 4 Short Range Transit Plan 1.2 – Population Profile and Area Demographics Riverside County covers 7,208 square miles with a population of over 2.2 million people in 2010, per the U.S. Census. The population density for Riverside County is 303.8 people per square mile, largely due to the vast desert areas that are not populated. The city of Banning covers 23 square miles with a population of 30,241 people in 2014, per the U.S. Census. The population density for Banning is 1,300 per square mile. The population of the service area covered by Banning Transit has grown by approximatel y 29% over the last ten years. The median household income in Banning is reported at $38,919, with 19.4% of the residents living below the federal poverty line. The racial makeup of the city is as follows: The average age of the population is the following:  65 or older 25.9 %  45-64 Years 21.6 %  25-44 Years 20.4 %  18-24 Years 9.2 %  Under 18 Years 22.9 % The median age of the population is 42.3 years old. 64.7 41.1 7.3 5.2 2.2 3.4 The six percentages add to more than 100 percent because individuals may report more than one race 5 Short Range Transit Plan Rider Demographics In 2013, a survey was conducted showing the demographics of the Pass Transit riders. The information gathered helped create a visual indication of the use of the system. The racial makeup of the ridership is as follows: Furthermore, 86% of respondents stated that they used the system’s fixed routes at least three times a week. 59% of the ridership used the bus service for local trips within the Banning/Beaumont/Cabazon area, and 49% use the transit to travel outside of P ass Transit’s service area. For 91% of ridership, the bus system is their only means of transportation. An unspecified amount of respondents stated that the transit service is readily available in their area, with a majority of riders living within a two -block radius of a bus stop. A majority of the users of the system share the commonality of being either underemployed or unemployed, with 88% of riders reporting an annual household income of $20,000 or less and 81% of respondents reporting a family of two or more. 87% of those completing the survey report English as their primary language while 13% speak Spanish. 47% 34% 12% 4% 2%1.00% Rider Ethnicity White/Caucasian Hispanic African American Other Native American Asian 6 Short Range Transit Plan 1.3 – Existing Service and Route Performance The Banning Transit System currently has three fixed route services which serve the main streets and neighborhood areas of Banning, the residential and business areas of Cabazon, and the main business and shopping area of Beaumont. Banning’s fixed route buses are accessible to people with disabilities; each bus has a wheelchair lift or ramp along with two wheelchair securement locations. Banning offers individualized travel training to assist new passengers in learning how to ride these buses. Banning Paratransit is an origin-to-destination shared ride transportation service for seniors age 60 and older and persons who are, due to their functional limitation(s), unable to use accessible fixed route bus service. Passengers must be certified eligible per guidelines established by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 1.4 – Current and Proposed Fare Structure The Pass Transit system has adopted a mutual service fare to make traveling more accessible to those who utilize the system. The chart below has a detailed breakdown of the current fares for available services: Fixed Route Fare Categories Base Fare Day Pass 10-Trip Punch Pass 10-Ticket Book Monthly Pass General $1.15 $3.00 N/A $10.35 $36.00 Youth (grades K-12) $1.00 $3.00 $10.00 N/A $10.00 Senior (60+) $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 Disabled $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 Military Veterans $.65 $1.80 N/A $5.85 $21.50 Child (46” tall or under. Must be accompanied by full fare paying passenger.) $.25 N/A N/A N/A N/A Zone Fare (Cabazon Residential Area) $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 N/A Deviations (Routes 3 & 4) $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 $.25 Active Military FREE N/A N/A N/A N/A GoPass (During school session only) FREE N/A N/A N/A N/A 7 Short Range Transit Plan Dial-A-Ride Fares Fare Categories Base Fare 10-Ride Punch Card One-Way $2.00 $18.00 Companion $3.00 N/A PCA (w/ I.D.)* FREE FREE No Show $2.00 N/A *Personal Care Attendant must show proper ID each time they board. 1.5 – Revenue Fleet Banning Transit System operates seven fixed route vehicles all of which are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). The vehicles are equipped with racks for two bicycles and are in compliance with the ADA with mobility device lifts and two tie-down stations per bus. The transit system also has four vehicles that are classified as Dial-A-Ride (two in revenue service and one as a spare). The one remaining is utilized as an alternate for the fixed - route if needed. All are in compliance with the ADA, with mobility device lifts and tie-down stations for four mobility devices. Banning Pass Transit also has four support vehicles which are used for driver relief or administrative errands. The most recent additions to the fleet are two 32’ El Dorado National EZ Rider II buses, with the most recent being delivered January of 2018. See the City of Banning Fleet Inventory Table 1 for individual vehicle characteristics. 1.6 – Existing Facility/Planned Facilities Banning Transit System functions as a department within the City and utilizes existing facilities. Transit Administrative staff is housed at the City’s Community Center located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue, where bus passes are sold, schedules are available and all ADA applications are processed. Dispatch and general telephone information is also provided at the transit office within the Community Center. 8 Short Range Transit Plan Banning Pass Transit Office Hours Monday – Thursday: 7:30am to 6:00pm Friday: 8:00am to 5:00 pm The maintenance, parking, fueling of the buses, and storage of bus stop amenities are performed at the City’s Corporation Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. Maintenance of the vehicles is performed by the Public Works Department, Fleet Maintenance Division. There are currently no plans to expand Banning Pass Transit System facilities. Meanwhile, there are plans to improve the CNG fueling station during the upcoming year. 1.7 – Existing Coordination between Transit Agencies The cities of Banning and Beaumont have operated under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which allows for each respective agency to cross jurisdictional boundary lines, allowing simplified travel for passengers throughout the Pass area, however this MOU will be ending and replaced with one that is equally beneficial to each respective agency. In addition, an MOU is held with the Morongo Band of Mission Indians allowing stops on their property. The ability to provide a stop at Casino Morongo allows passengers to make connections with Sunline Commuter Link 220, providing service from Palm Desert to Riverside. Also, services are also coordinated with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) by providing timed stops that meet with routes that provide travel to and from the areas of Hemet and Moreno Valley (i.e. Route 31 at either Sun Lakes or Walmart). Riders also have the opportunity to connect with the Amtrak Thruway Bus Service at Casino Morongo. 2 Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 – Fixed Route Service The Banning Transit System currently has three fixed route services which serve downtown and neighborhood areas of Banning, both the residential and business areas of Cabazon, and the main commercial area of Beaumont. The main service arterial is Ramsey, which is served by Beaumont’s route 2 and Banning’s route1; splitting frequency, ridership and fare revenues. As noted in prior years SRTP’s the level of service through Ramsey continues to be detrimentally impacting Banning’s fare box recovery and changes to existing service will begin in July 2018 to correct what has been an ongoing problem. 9 Short Range Transit Plan Route 1A & Route 1B – Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Pass Transit Route 1 is among the most used route in the system, operating primarily along Ramsey Street and 6th Street and serving the commercial areas of Cabazon and Casino Morongo. Ridership on Route 1 accounts for approximate ly 60% of the total use of the system. While the longest in distance, this route operates on one -hour headway from Beaumont to Casino Morongo. The major stops on this line include Albertsons, Wal-Mart, Banning City Hall, Mid-County Justice Center, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Casino Morongo and the Desert Hills Outlets in Cabazon. The second loop of Route 1 also runs on an hour headway departing from Casino Morongo and servicing the Cabazon Community Center and the residential areas of Cabazon. Two buses are operated on this route which allows for hourly service to the two respective areas. 10 Short Range Transit Plan Route 5 – Northern Banning Route 5 accounts for 25 percent of Pass Transit use, providing service to the areas that lie north of the I-10 Freeway in the City of Banning. Major stops on this route are the Mid- County Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Banning Community Center, Library, Medical Facilities, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital and the commercial area of Beaumont. Banning staff has evaluated how best to serve the northerly and southerly markets and will be changing this route to a clockwise pattern that will cover both the north and south sides of Banning. The information for the new service can be found in Section 3, Planned Service Changes and Implementation. 11 Short Range Transit Plan Route 6 – Southern Banning Accounting for 15% of Pass Transit use, Route 6 provides service to the southern area of Banning. Major stops on this route are the Mid-County Justice Center, Banning City Hall, the Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, Medical Facilities, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital and the commercial area of Beaumont. Banning staff has evaluated how best to serve the northerly and southerly markets and will be changing this route to a clockwise pattern that will cover both the north and south sides of Banning. The information for the new service can be found in Section 3, Planned Service Changes and Implementation. 12 Short Range Transit Plan Banning Pass Transit fixed route service hours are as follows: Days Route Hours Monday – Friday Route 1 Monday - Friday Route 5 Monday - Friday Route 6 4:30 A.M. – 10:45 P.M. 5:30 A.M. – 6:30 P.M. 6:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. Saturday & Sunday Route 1 Saturday & Sunday Routes 5 & 6 8:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M. 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Banning Pass Transit offers limited service hours, 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., on the following holidays: Martin Luther King Day, President’s Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, and the day after Thanksgiving. Banning Pass Transit offers no service on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. All aforementioned fixed routes are consistently monitored and will be modified as needed to better serve unmet transit needs. 2.2 – Dial-A-Ride Service Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride is a service offered to seniors, aged 60 and older, persons with disabilities and passengers eligible under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Limited service hours are available for non-ADA passengers. This category of passenger is also required to fill out a certification application to determine eligibility. If these terms are met, the applicant will receive a card certifying their eligibility to ride. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride is a service offered within the city limits of Banning and Beaumont as well as within a ¾ mile boundary of Routes 1 and 2 service areas (including Cabazon). The primary uses for the Dial-A-Ride system are transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, and employment. Dial-a- Ride services also provide connections to the Riverside Transit Agency and Pass Transit Fixed Routes. Additionally, demand for paratransit is expected to grow. This is a universal transit/paratransit theme nationwide and Banning is anticipated to continue to see growth in the paratransit program. Furthermore, demand for Saturday and Sunday paratransit is expected to grow from somewhat inconsequential from a budget / demand standpoint to significant in the coming fiscal years. 13 Short Range Transit Plan Hours for the Dial-A-Ride program are as follows: Days Hours Seniors (age 60 & older) & Persons without ADA Certification Monday - Friday 8:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. Saturday & Sunday No Service Persons with ADA Certification Monday - Friday 7:00 A.M. – 7:00 P.M. Saturday & Sunday Limited service when three or more persons request service. 2.3 – Key Performance Indicators The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) has adopted a Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) for the transit and commuter rail operators of Riverside County. The PIP sets forth efficiency and effectiveness standards that the transit operators are to meet. Progress towards these standards is reported quarterly to the Commission. The following table on the next page shows the operating performance indicators adopted in the PIP and this plan’s projections for the coming year. Banning Transit System / Pass Transit Performance Statistics FY 2016 Audited FY 2017 Actual FY 2018 Projected (Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) FY 2019 Planned Unlinked Passenger Trips 137,594 133,185 129,826 197,950 Operating Cost per Revenue Hours $56.03 $71.13 $55.50 $57.79 Farebox Recovery Ratio 13.05% 10.66% 10.11% 12.13% Subsidy per Passenger $7.28 $9.88 $8.35 $7.34 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.84 $3.84 $3.25 $1.29 Subsidy per Revenue Hour $48.72 $63.55 $49.89 $50.78 Subsidy per Revenue Mile $1.31 $1.69 $1.37 $1.75 Passengers per Revenue Mile 0.18 0.17 0.16 0.24 14 Short Range Transit Plan Projections are based on operating data through March 2018 and projected through June, 2018. Since these are only estimates, the performance indicators are subject to change. For Fiscal Year 2018/2019, the Banning Transit System expects to be in compliance with at least 4 of the 7 performance targets. Additional details on key indicators for demand responsive and fixed route services are shown in Table 2. The Banning Transit System does not receive any federal funding and is not required to report to the National Transit Database. 2.4 – Productivity Improvement Efforts In order to meet performance standards, routes are continually monitored and analyzed to insure that the service being provided runs as efficiently as possible. Banning Pass Transit completed a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) with Transportation Management & Design, Inc. in May of 2014, resulting in route changes for the entire system. Ultimately, to most effectively serve the Cabazon community it has been determined that including that segment of Route 1 is most prudent. With hourly frequency, Route 1 is able to service those residents more directly and sustain a better farebox recovery due to the Ramsey corridor. Banning Pass Transit has continued to experience a significant decrease in farebox revenue with the additional service of the Beaumont Route 2. While the additional bus allows for 30 minute service from Walmart in Beaumont to Casino Morongo, the growth in ridership that was projected for the route has not been realized. Thus, Banning had requested that beginning January 1, 2017 Beaumont reduce their trips through Banning by 50%. This did not occur and loss of fare revenue down the service arterial Ramsey continues to detrimentally impact farebox recovery and the Banning Transit Budget, along with oversaturating this corridor with disproportionately high frequency. As a result, the City of Banning will be terminating the 2002 agreement and no longer share service areas with the City of Beaumont. 2.5 – Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth over the next two years Major passenger trip destinations that the Banning Pass Transit services are the Sunlakes Plaza Shopping Center, the 2nd Street Marketplace in Beaumont, the Walmart Supercenter in Beaumont, the Banning Justice Center, San Gorgonio Pass Hospital, Beaver and Loma Linda Medical Plazas, the Cabazon Outlet Stores, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Casino Morongo, Smith Correctional Facility and the Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus. There is a high demand for service to these destinations whether for employment, necessities , or pleasure. Looking into FY 2019, Banning may look to request funding for reverse commute 15 Short Range Transit Plan service that connects the Pass area with the desert communities and Sunline. Staff will explore routing, service planning and the budget for service during FY 2019. Additionally, demand for paratransit is expected to grow. This is a universal tran sit/paratransit theme nationwide and Banning is anticipated to continue to see growth in the paratransit program. 2.6 – Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs It is the City of Banning’s goal to acquire, upgrade, and maintain equipment with the federal Transit Asset Management (TAMs) Business Model in mind to manage the nexus between State of Good Repair (SGR) and Safety Management System (SMS). All fixed route and Dial-A-Ride vehicles are equipped with security cameras and recording equipment. Two new fixed route buses were placed into service July, 2015. Grant funds have been received for two additional 32’ passenger coaches, one of which was delivered in September 2016 and another in December 2017. The standardization and enhancement for both fleet and facility security cameras has also been budgeted and will be implemented in Fiscal Year 2018. One staff vehicle was ordered and delivered in Fiscal Year 2018. This year funds are being requested for the replacement of a hydraulic lift at the fleet maintenance shop and for improvement to the Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling station. The former is being supplemented by FY 2017 funds, while the latter merges several 08/09 funding streams into a co nsolidated project along with additional FY 2018 STA capital funds. This project will be implemented in FY 18 and is estimated to be completed early in FY 2019. It will be a perennial SRTP request to ensure State of the Industry technology is maintained and State of Good Repair is achieved. 3 Planned Service Changes and Implementation 3.1 – Recent Service Changes The COA had called for a Cabazon Circulator route that would connect residents in that community to Morongo Casino, and thereby, the entire Pass Transit System. Operationally, such a circulator route is not feasible and leads to one additional vehicle (along with corresponding hours and miles) to serve no more than the same number of passengers best case scenario due to it also forcing a transfer. Therefore Banning operates two vehicles on route 1 resulting in hourly frequency, and for passengers on the Ramsey corridor, de facto 30 minute headways with Beaumont continuing status -quo with their Route 2. This has diffused ridership and continues to impede adequate farebox recovery for the Banning system, and as a result the City of Banning will be terminating the current agreement with the City of Beaumont and no longer share the Ramsey Street Corridor with Beaumont Pass Transit. Banning will continue to operate Route 1 on its current hourly schedule. 16 Short Range Transit Plan This reduction has been determined to be necessary due to oversaturation of service in Banning’s service area. While service has been increased over the past two years, Banning Pass Ridership and farebox revenue have both declined. Major growth projected for the downtown area which will generate a significant increase in ridership has not yet occurred (i.e. County Courthouse being fully operational, retail and office space being built and a substantial amount of county offices relocating to the area ). A new Memorandum of Understanding will be developed and will address transfer points, financial equity relative to monthly passes and other items as deemed necessary each respective agency. Routes 5 and 6, which are operated as circular loops that cover the northern and southern areas of town are being eliminated and will be replaced with Routes 10 and 11. Routes 10 and 11 will operate independently in a clockwise and counter clockwise pattern, having a 70-75 minute headway, with a combined 35-40 minute frequency for passengers. This will provide service that is more effective and efficient than the current alignment. Staff will outreach and market to the community to ensure awareness of the changes that are being made. 17 Short Range Transit Plan 3.2 – Recommend Local and Express Routes Banning is exploring the possibility of requesting funding for a reverse commuter and desert link route in fiscal year 2020. In the coming fiscal year 2019, staff will review estimated demand, service planning, and budgeting for this route. At this point, it is hypothetical pending due diligence research and review, but could mature into a service recommendation and request depending on the outcome of the analysis. 3.3 – Marketing Plans and Promotions Efforts have continued to be made to market the Pass Transit System over the past year and will continue in the coming year. These efforts include purchasing advertising on a map of the San Gorgonio Pass Area, distribution of route maps by delivery to the library, Chamber of Commerce, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, local hotels and other businesses. 18 Short Range Transit Plan The following marketing efforts will be undertaken to promote ridership growth: 1. Continue outreach programs to schools and at community events. 2. Attend senior community meetings to provide information. 3. Participation in the MSJC GO-PASS Program to encourage ridership of college students. Work with campus staff to maximize awareness of Banning Pass Transit. 4. Articles in local papers highlighting new transportation routes. 5. Incorporate and coordinate travel training opportunities for Pass Passengers with regional providers including Sunline, RTA and Beaumont. 6. Offer “Rider Appreciation Day” to raise awareness of benefits of public transportation. 7. Continue to participate with Transportation Now, Senior Transportation Assistance Group, Pass Area Senior Connections, Pass Area Veterans Assistance, Cabazon Community Resources and other efforts. The City of Banning’s website at www.ci.banning.ca.us provides basic Pass Transit route and schedule information, as well as links to route information for neighboring agencies. Customers can submit comments, complaints, concerns and suggestions through the city website. Banning Pass Transit strives to operate service in a manner that will maximize system productivity, efficiency, as well as the use of subsidies.  Develop an ongoing planning process with key agencies and organizations within the region.  Ensure that services are operated in a manner to maximize safety, to the riders, the public and the operators.  Develop a core group of services that connect key activity points and commit to providing service along those corridors.  Continually review all services to evaluate the efficiency and needs of the transit system. 3.4 – Budget Impact on Proposed Changes Banning transit farebox recovery and budget have been detrimentally impacted by Beaumont’s continued operation of Route 2 that serves the primary arterial of Ramsey Street. With a plan in place to have Beaumont discontinue said service beginning August 2018, and the realignment of routes 5 and 6, it is anticipated that farebox recovery will 19 Short Range Transit Plan improve significantly and the transit budget will be balanced. Banning will be using Low Carbon Operations Program (LCTOP) funds to eliminate a zone fare that is charged to passengers traveling into Cabazon. 4 FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 4.1 – Operating and Capital Budget For FY 18/19, operating funds needed to operate the Bannin g Pass Transit System are $1,878,500 for the Fixed Route and DAR. The operating funds consist of $ 1,653,957 Local Transportation Funds (LTF) and $35,443 in Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) funds. The projected farebox revenue for FY 18/19 is $188,000. Additional funding in the amount of $1,100 will come from interest income. Staff will continue to complete previously funded Capital projects in FY 18/19 and will continue to operate service in a manner that will maximize system productivity and efficiency. As previously reviewed, this year funds are being requested for the replacement of a hydraulic lift at the fleet maintenance shop and improvements to the existing CNG fueling station. The former is being supplemented by FY 2017 funds, while the latter merges several 08/09 funding streams into a consolidated project along with additional FY 2018/19 STA capital funds. 4.2 – Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program Capital projects are funded through STA funds, Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account Program and Proposition 1B Security grants for Banning Pass Transit. Operating costs will be fully funded through LTF funds, LCTOP, farebox revenue and interest. 4.3 – Regulatory and Compliance Requirements The City of Banning submitted an Americans with Disabilities Act Paratransit Plan to the FTA on January 26, 1992. Pass Transit fixed route buses are equipped with ADA compliant mobility device lifts and are accessible to persons with disabilities. A procedure is in place to provide service to a customer in a mobility device should a fixed route bus lift fail. Banning Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride services provide ADA complementary paratransit service for the fixed route services operated by Banning Transit System. Beaumont Transit System offers the same service through its Pass Transit Dial-a-Ride operation. The system uses a 20 Short Range Transit Plan self-certification process with professional verification. Banning Transit System staff processes ADA certifications for Pass Transit operations. Title VI Banning Transit System/Pass Transit does not utilize federal funds for operating expens es. As such, Title VI requirements do not currently apply to the transit system. Alternatively Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) Pass Transit fixed-route buses are CNG powered. Pass Transit Dial-A-Ride vehicles (which are less than 33,000 lbs. GVW and 15-passenger capacity), administrative and driver relief vehicles are gasoline-powered. Future vehicle purchases will be in compliance with the RCTC and South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) policies regarding alternative fuel transit vehicles. The CNG Fueling Station at the City of Banning Corporation Yard provides expanded CNG capacity and fast fueling capability. With increased capacity and redundant compressor units, having adequate and reliable CNG pumping capacity will not be an issue in the foreseeable future. 21 Short Range Transit Plan SECTION 5 SRTP TABLES 22 Short Range Transit Plan 23 Short Range Transit Plan Currently there are no excluded in the Banning Pass Transit System 24 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 3A – Individual Route Statistics Fixed Route Description Area/Service Site Route 1 Service from Beaumont to Cabazon via downtown Banning Walmart Shopping Center, Albertsons, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, medical facilities, shopping areas, and restaurants at Highland Springs Downtown Banning, Banning Justice Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Hills Outlet, Cabazon Community Center and residential areas of Cabazon Route 10 Residential areas of Northern and Southern Banning to Walmart Shopping Banning City Hall, Fox Cineplex, Banning Library, Banning Community Center, Mid- county Justice Center, Post Office, San Gorgonio Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility; medical facilities, shopping areas, and restaurants at Highland Springs Route 11 Residential areas of Southern and Northern Banning to Walmart Shopping Banning City Hall, Fox Cineplex, Banning Library, Banning Community Center, Mid- county Justice Center, Post Office, San Gorgonio Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility; medical facilities, shopping areas, and restaurants at Highland Springs City-Wide Demand response/reservation based service for seniors and disabled All areas of Banning and limited areas in Beaumont 25 Short Range Transit Plan Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID number) SRTP Project No 19-01: FTIP No: PROJECT NAME: CNG Facility PROJECT DESCRIPTION: (For Bus Purchase projects, indicate fuel type) This request for $400,000 will be combined with $308,058 of existing reprogrammed capital funds and will be used to construct a new CNG Facility. An engineering assessment of the facility resulted in a recommendation to replace all components of the facility due to age and condition and the fact that several components (i.e. compressor control system and dispensers) of the existing system are obsolete and replacement parts have become increasingly difficult to procure. The CNG Facility is used both by the City and the Banning Unified School District and the school district will be sharing in the cost of total cost of the project. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Given the condition of the existing CNG facility, constructing a new facility is necessary to ensure reliable, and cost-efficient service is provided. If the facility were to become non-operational, the City’s transit vehicles would have to travel to either Hemet, Moreno Valley, Redlands or Palm Springs to fuel. 26 Short Range Transit Plan PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA Funds $400,000 PROJECT SCHEDULE (if existing project in FTIP, indicate original start date and new completion date): RFP July 2018 BID AWARD September 2018 CONSTRUCTION October 2018 – February 2019 COMPLETION March 2019 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT #, FTIP ID # AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) 27 Short Range Transit Plan PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID number) SRTP Project No 19-02: FTIP No: PROJECT NAME: ADA Paratransit Mini-Bus Replacement PROJECT DESCRIPTION: (For Bus Purchase projects, indicate fuel type) This request for $75,000 will be used to purchase a CNG fueled ADA Paratransit Mini-Bus to provide service to Dial-A-Ride passengers. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Due to an aging fleet an additional paratransit vehicle will be needed to provide Dial-A-Ride service at the existing level. PROJECT SCHEDULE (if existing project in FTIP, indicate original start date and new completion date): Specs drawn & Issue Purchase Order: August 2019 Delivery: August 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA Funds $75,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT #, FTIP ID # AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) None PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID number) SRTP Project No 19-03: FTIP No: PROJECT NAME: State of Good Repair (FY 17/18) PROJECT DESCRIPTION: (For Bus Purchase projects, indicate fuel type) Rehabilitation of rolling stock PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: There are two buses in the current fleet that have a considerable amount of useful life, but are in need of some mechanical rehabilitation to allow for maximum operating efficiency and reliability. 28 Short Range Transit Plan PROJECT SCHEDULE (if existing project in FTIP, indicate original start date and new completion date): Specs drawn & Issue Purchase Order: August 2019 Completion of Work: December 2019 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): State of Good Repair Funds in the amount of $38,307. PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT #, FTIP ID # AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) None Table 5.1– Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID number) SRTP Project No: 20-01 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME: Heavy Duty Hydraulic Lift PROJECT DESCRIPTION: (For Bus Purchase projects, indicate fuel type) 29 Short Range Transit Plan PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: This project will enhance the capacity of the Fleet Maintenance Division and enable significantly more onsite repairs. This will reduce the cost of subcontracting out repairs that cannot be completed currently due to the lack of this essential piece of equipment. PROJECT SCHEDULE (if existing project in FTIP, indicate original start date and new completion date): Specs drawn: July and August 2018 (RFP on Street September – December 2019) Order: Award and Notice to Proceed January 2019 Delivery and Installation: Phased Implementation March – June 2019 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA FUNDS $75,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT #, FTIP ID # AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) None 30 Short Range Transit Plan Table 5.2 – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID number) SRTP Project No 21-01: FTIP No: PROJECT NAME: TYPE 7 Replacement Bus PROJECT DESCRIPTION: (For Bus Purchase projects, indicate fuel type) Table 5.2 – Capital Project Justification Due to an aging fleet, an additional bus is needed to maintain existing service and facilitate anticipated growth in our fixed-route bus system. In addition, the purchase of a new CNG fueled bus will provide increased reliability and passenger comfort, as well as replace an existing bus that it beyond its useful life and only being kept in service to meet demand. Banning Pass Transit has the goal of maintaining a State of Good Repair with the Transit Asset Management (TAM) Business Model in mind. PROJECT SCHEDULE (if existing project in FTIP, indicate original start date and new completion date): Specs drawn: Issue Purchase Order August 2020 Order: September 2020 Delivery: August 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA Funds $450,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT #, FTIP ID # AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) None 31 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 6- PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Audit Recommendations (Covering FY 2009/10 – FY 2011/12) Action(s) Taken And Results 1. Consider purchasing dispatching and scheduling software program Currently working with the City’s IT staff and evaluating software programs that will best meet our operational needs 2. Provide cross-training opportunities for City Transit Administrative Staff The Transit Department has been reorganized to allow for cross training of the dispatch and operations. 3. Update Local Bus Schedules to show connectivity with Other Transit Services New Bus Schedules have been designed and show connecting bus services and transfer points to and from Banning Transit with other transit providers. 4. Provide Weblink from Banning Transit to Beaumont Transit A Weblink to Beaumont Transit is now available on Banning Transit’s website. 32 Short Range Transit Plan 33 Short Range Transit Plan The City of Banning HIGHLIGHTS OF 2018/19 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN  Sustain and enhance service levels in Cabazon with Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Funding.  Existing CNG Facility will be rebuilt to ensure a reliable, safe, and efficient fueling station Is available for transit operations.  Purchase and install passenger information signs at key stops to inform individuals regarding next bus information.  Continue working with the City of Beaumont staff regarding the coordination of routes, schedules, passenger amenities, and fares to ensure that Pass Transit is seamless and offers an ease of use to Pass Area residents, while still maintaining the best service possible within our service area.  Evaluate strategies to increase revenue and service productivity. Table 9A BANNING TRANSIT SYSTEM/PASS TRANSIT FY 2014/15 Audited FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Estimate (Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) FY 2018/19 Planned System-wide Ridership 144,978 137,594 133,185 129,826 197,950 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hours $57.50 $56.03 $71.13 $55.50 $57.79 34 Short Range Transit Plan Table 9B - Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Revenue Sources included in Fare box Calculation Actual Amount from FY 16/17 Audit FY 17/18 (Plan) FY 18/19 (Plan) 1. Passenger Fares 157,157 121,982 200,720 2. Interest 3. General Fund Supplement 4. Measure A 5. Advertising Revenue 6. Gain on Sale of Capital Assets 7. CNG Revenue 8. Lease/ Other Revenue 9. Federal Excise Tax Refund 10. Investment Income 11. CalPers CERBT 12. Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes 13. Other Revenues TOTAL REVENUE for Farebox Calculation (1-13) 157,157 121,982 202,720 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES for Farebox Calculation 1,473,649 1,206,438 1,653,957 FAREBOX RECOVERY RATIO 10.66% 10.11% 12.25% RCTC Rail Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 Final 5/18/2018 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW ................................................................... 1 1.1 Description of Service Area .................................................................... 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections .................................... 2 1.3 Fixed Route Services.............................................................................. 2 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure ............................. 2 1.5 Revenue Fleet ........................................................................................ 5 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities .......................................................... 5 1.7 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies ................................... 9 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE ............... 10 2.1 Fixed Route Service – Route by Route Analysis .................................. 10 2.2 Dial-A-Ride Service – System Performance ......................................... 12 2.3 Key Performance Indicators ................................................................. 14 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts .......................................................... 15 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Two Years .... 16 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities, and Facility Needs ......................... 17 CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION ..... 20 3.1 Recent Service Changes ...................................................................... 20 3.2 Recommended Service Changes and Modifications ............................ 20 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotion ............................................................ 21 3.4 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes .................................................. 23 CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS .......................................... 24 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget .............................................................. 24 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program .. 24 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements .......................................... 24 Table 1 – Fleet Inventory .................................................................................. 26 Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary ................................................................... 26 Table 2A – Summary of Routes to Be Excluded in FY 2018/19 ..................... 26 Table 3 – SRTP Route Statistics ...................................................................... 26 Table 3A – Individual Route Descriptions ...................................................... 26 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 ............................... 27 Table 5.1 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2019/20 ............................. 29 ............................................................................................................................ 29 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification ....................................................... 29 Table 5.2 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2020/21 ............................. 30 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification ....................................................... 30 Table 6 – Update Actions Taken or To Be Implemented to Comply with the Most Recent Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations ..................... 31 Table 7 – Service Provider Performance Target Report ................................ 31 Table 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP Performance Report ........................................... 31 Table 9A – Highlights of FY 18/19 SRTP ......................................................... 31 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS BNSF BNSF Railways CETAP Community & Environmental Acceptability Process CMAQ Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality Funds CVAG Coachella Valley Association of Governments FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration IEOC Inland Empire-Orange County Line LAUS Los Angeles Union Station LOSSAN Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency LTF Local Transportation Funds Metro Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority MOW Maintenance-of-Way NTD National Transit Database OCTA Orange County Transportation Authority PTC Positive Train Control PVL Perris Valley Line RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission RTA Riverside Transit Agency RTIP Regional Transportation Improvement Program SB Senate Bill SBCTA San Bernardino County Transportation Authority SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SCRRA Southern California Regional Rail Authority SJBL San Jacinto Branch Line SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance Funds STIP State Transportation Improvement Program TVM Ticket Vending Machine UP Union Pacific Railroad VCTC Ventura County Transportation Commission RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 1 CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 Description of Service Area RCTC is a member of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) Joint Powers Authority (JPA) that operates the Metrolink commuter rail system. Three Metrolink lines serve Riverside County:  The Inland Empire-Orange County (IEOC) Line  The Riverside Line  The 91/Perris Valley (91/PV) Line On June 6, 2016, RCTC began service on the 24-mile extension of the Metrolink 91-Line from the Riverside – Downtown Station, through the Perris Valley to the city of Perris in western Riverside County (now rebranded as the 91/Perris Valley Line). RCTC owns and maintains nine of the 57 Metrolink stations, which are located in Western Riverside County. Four of these stations are part of the 91/Perris Valley Line extension.  Corona – West RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 2  Corona – North Main  Riverside – La Sierra  Riverside – Downtown  Jurupa Valley/Pedley  91/PV Line Extension Stations  Riverside – Hunter Park/UCR  Moreno Valley/March Field  Perris – Downtown  Perris – South 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections Whether traveling to work, school, or one of Southern California’s great recreational destinations, Metrolink trains provide a viable alternative to driving alone. Every day, thousands of Southern California residents park their cars and choose Metrolink to commute. The average Metrolink commute from Riverside County is 37 miles. Metrolink trains are also popular with schools throughout the region both transporting students to classes and for field trips. The Metrolink rider profiles are updated on a regular basis. The following is the latest socio-economic data included in the Metrolink FY2018/19 Budget Workshop: Line Riverside Line IEOC Line 91/PV Line Ethnicity: Black Hispanic Asian Caucasian (non- Hispanic) Other 13% 34% 30% 19% 4% 9% 44% 8% 33% 6% 21% 34% 13% 27% 6% Income Less than $20,000 $20,000 - $49,999 $50,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $99,999 $100,000 - $149,999 $150,000 - $199,999 $200,000 or more 5% 16.8% 23.6% 17.8% 20.5% 9.9% 6.5% 4.9% 23% 24.8% 16% 19.4% 8.2% 3.8% 9.7% 17% 19.2% 14.3% 19.6% 11.4% 8.7% 1.3 Fixed Route Services Metrolink regularly operates Monday through Friday. Weekend service operates on a reduced frequency on the IEOC and 91/PV lines. Metrolink will run a Sunday schedule on the days that New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day are observed. 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure Metrolink ticket prices are distance-based and calculated on the shortest driving miles between stations. Each station combination is uniquely priced, based on driving miles from one station to the other. A ride from Downtown Riverside to Los Angeles Union Station is a 59-mile one-way trip; a ride from Downtown Riverside to Irvine is a 40-mile trip. The distance charge is currently capped at 80 miles. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 3 This system-wide pricing program offers a fair and equitable pricing policy. Over time, Metrolink customers traveling the same distances will pay the same price, and short trips will cost less than longer trips. Metrolink is responsible for any Title VI issues related to fare structure and pricing. The Metrolink ticket price consists of three elements: a base boarding charge, an additional increment related to the number of miles traveled, and finally a modest increment to permit Metrolink passengers to transfer without requiring an additional fare on selected connecting transit operators and a reduced rate on others. Ticket Types There are three types of single-day use Metrolink tickets (One-Way, Round-Trip, and $10 Weekend Day) and two types of multi-day use Metrolink tickets (7-Day and Monthly). One-Way Tickets One-way tickets are valid for one trip only, defined as continuous travel away from the origin station to the destination station specified on the ticket. The trip must begin on the date and prior to expiration time printed on the front of the ticket. One-way trips must be completed within three hours from the time of purchase of ticket. The expiration time and date is displayed on the ticket. Round-Trip Tickets Round-Trip tickets are valid for two trips only, between the origin station and the destination station marked on the ticket. The first leg of a Round-Trip ticket is valid for three hours from purchase. The return ticket is valid for travel anytime on the same day as the first leg of the trip. $10 Weekend Day Pass Metrolink offers the Weekend Day Pass for only $10 per person. This pass is good for unlimited systemwide travel on either Saturday or Sunday only and expires at 3 A.M. following the date of purchase. The Weekend Day Pass is accepted for free transfers to connecting transit services, except Amtrak. Holiday Service Metrolink is proposing to run Sunday weekend service on holidays in FY2018-19 and offer a $10 day pass fare. 7-Day Pass Valid for unlimited travel during a consecutive seven-day period between station pairs starting on the day when the pass is purchased. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 4 Monthly Pass Monthly Passes are valid for unlimited travel between the origin and destination stations printed on the pass during the calendar month printed on the pass. Monthly Passes are also valid for unlimited systemwide travel after 7:00 p.m. on Friday until 11:59 p.m. Sunday. Multi-Line Option Some Metrolink tickets can be used on more than one line. Tickets for either the San Bernardino Line or Riverside Line are valid for travel between stations of equal or lesser distance on either line. Tickets on the Riverside Line, the 91/PV Line, or the IEOC Line are valid for travel between stations of equal or lesser distance on any of these routes if the origin or destination station is in Riverside County or San Bernardino County. There is discussion of a special discounted San Bernardino Line Promotion, these tickets would not be allowed to be used on the Riverside of 91/PV Line. Ticket Purchase Options Metrolink offers multiple options for purchasing tickets. Tickets and passes can be purchased from the self-serve ticket vending machines (TVMs) found at all Metrolink stations using payment cards or cash. Tickets can also be purchased via the Metrolink app, available on both Apple and Android devices. The Metrolink app only accepts payment cards and the ticket is scanned directly from your device. Lesser-used ticket purchase options include ticket outlets and Pass By Mail. Ticket outlets are available in various locations, but only available at LAUS for Riverside Metrolink lines. Two ticket windows at LAUS offer all ticket types as well as the option to purchase tickets with a personal check or TransitCheck. Pass By Mail forms must be received by the 15th of the month to receive a pass by the 1st of the following month. Advance Purchase Ticket Paper One-Way or Round-Trip tickets for a future date can be purchased up to one year in advance from a TVM. The Advance Purchase Ticket will not have an expiration time printed on it and can be used at any time on the day you chose to travel. Discounted Fares Everyday Discounts Student/Youth: 25% off Monthly Pass, 7-Day Pass, One-Way and Round-Trip tickets. Youths are ages 6 to 18. Students must present valid Student ID to the fare inspector upon request. Child: Three children (ages 5 and under) ride free with an adult using a valid ticket - each additional child pays youth fare. Senior / Disabled / Medicare: 25% off Monthly Pass and 7-Day Pass. 50% off One-Way and Round-Trip tickets. Seniors qualify for discount is age is 65 or over. Disabled or Medicare discount applies if you have the appropriate identification. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 5 Active Military: 10% off One-Way and Round-Trip tickets. Discount for the 91/PV Line The SCRRA Board approved a new set of 91/PV Line discounts to encourage ridership from the new stations. This discount is offered for trips connecting to stations outside of Riverside County or for trips connecting to stations within Riverside County. Fares connecting the 91/PV Line Extension stations to stations outside of Riverside County will be sold as though Riverside – Downtown is the origin or destination. For example, a trip between Perris – South and LAUS will be the same cost as a trip between Riverside – Downtown and LAUS. Fares connecting the 91/PV Line Extension stations to stations within Riverside County will be discounted 25%. Proposed Fare Structure Since Metrolink began operations in 1992, fares have varied year to year. With the decline in nationwide ridership, Metrolink fares have remained stable in retaining ridership. The table below shows how fares have changed from fiscal year (FY) 2005 to 2018: ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 ‘14 ‘15 ‘16 ‘17 ‘18 ‘19 4% 4.5% 5.5% 3.5% 5.5% 3% 6% 0% 7% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% The Metrolink 10-Year Strategic Plan 2015-2025 addresses fares as part of their Goal 2 to achieve fiscal sustainability. The strategy of increasing fare revenues is to be done by reducing fare evasion rates and increasing ticket sales, but not by increasing ticket fare prices. Fare increases are not being proposed as part of the FY18-19 Metrolink budget. 1.5 Revenue Fleet Metrolink has 39 revenue train sets in operation1. The Metrolink fleet is composed of 55 locomotives (including 3 expansion locomotives) and 258 passenger cars (90 cab cars and 168 coach cars)2. Metrolink is in the process of upgrading its fleet of locomotives to operate new locomotives with Tier 4 clean technology. 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities In planning for a successful commuter rail program in Western Riverside County, RCTC acquired properties for current and future passenger rail service. 1 Source: Metrolink 10-Year Strategic Plan 2015-2025 Technical Appendix 2 Source: Draft Metrolink Transit Asset Management Plan (May 2016) RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 6 Commuter Rail Station Management Unlike the other SCRRA member agencies, the Commission owns and operates nine rail stations serving Riverside County:  Corona – West  Corona – North Main  Riverside – La Sierra  Riverside – Downtown  Jurupa Valley/Pedley  Riverside – Hunter Park/UCR  Moreno Valley/March Field  Perris – Downtown  Perris – South Station operation and maintenance costs are included in the rail program budget with services coordinated by the Commission’s staff. Parking is currently free at the stations. The FY 2018-19 proposed operating budget member subsidy for RCTC is $8.5M in revenue and $28.2 in expenses for a total net subsidy of $19.7M. This is a 11% increase from the FY18 Operating Subsidy. Santa Fe Railroad’s San Jacinto Branch Line The Measure A program provides for Riverside County’s participation in the creation of a regional commuter rail system. Though the primary goal was to provide service from Riverside to Los Angeles and Orange counties, the Measure A map included a possible internal element along the former Santa Fe Railroad’s San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL). The SJBL corridor extends 38.3 miles between Highgrove and Hemet within Riverside County. The alignment roughly follows the Interstate 215 to Perris where it veers east, parallel to State Route 74 to Hemet and San Jacinto. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 7 As part of the regional acquisition of BNSF Railway (BNSF) properties and use rights, RCTC purchased the 38-mile SJBL and adjacent properties in 1993 for $26 million using Western County Rail Measure A and state rail bonds (Prop 108 of 1990). BNSF retained exclusive freight operating rights, serving its customers along the line and maintaining the right-of-way until such time as passenger service is implemented. Planned Facilities New facilities are not planned in the short-term. Facility and infrastructure improvements are currently being studied to accommodate mid- and long-term service growth, including the expansion of the Riverside – Downtown Station and the Moreno Valley/March Field Station. The Riverside-Downtown Station Track and Platform Project is necessary in the mid-term to accommodate connectivity and increase rail capacity and service reliability. This project will add a center platform and associated tracks on the south side of the station, and extend the existing RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 8 pedestrian bridge with an elevator to the new platform, effectively doubling passenger train capacity of the station. The Moreno Valley/March Field Station Upgrade Project is also necessary in the mid-term. This project will upgrade the station with an additional platform and a pedestrian overpass and rehabilitate the initial 2.7 miles of a double-track corridor that will eventually extend to Control Point (CP) Nuevo, for a total of about nine miles. This project will provide the capacity necessary for additional connectivity from 91/PV Line trains to other trains in the Metrolink system at the Riverside – Downtown Station. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 9 1.7 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN) Rail Corridor Agency The LOSSAN Rail Corridor is a 351-mile corridor between San Diego and San Luis Obispo and is the second busiest intercity passenger rail corridor in the nation supporting commuter, intercity, and freight rail services. The LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency is a Joint Powers Board established in 1989 to provide a forum for the transportation and regional agencies along the Corridor, including RCTC, to collaborate on ways to increase ridership, revenue, capacity, reliability, and safety on the LOSSAN Rail Corridor. In July of 2015, the Caltrans executed an Interagency Transfer Agreement (ITA) with the LOSSAN Joint Powers Authority (JPA) and officially transferred the administration and management of the Surfliner service to the LOSSAN JPA. The Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) became the Managing Agency for the LOSSAN Agency. The LOSSAN Agency continued its vision for the Corridor that focuses on:  Expanding and enhancing the integration of the Corridor’s passenger rail services  Identifying a Corridorwide capital improvement program  Enhancing local transit connections at both commuter and intercity stations  Developing an integrated fare policy  Providing better customer information The LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency does not pay for the operation of any of the passenger rail services within the corridor, but it is a means to help coordinate operations and planning. RCTC has been an active ex-officio member since 2011 and in 2014. With a revised Joint Powers Authority Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), RCTC is now a full voting member. RCTC is involved in the development of rail service in Southern California. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 10 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 2.1 Fixed Route Service – Route by Route Analysis The SCRRA operates seven commuter rail lines. As described in the previous chapter, three routes, the Riverside, 91/PV, and Inland IEOC Lines directly serve Western Riverside County. IEOC Line This line extends 100.1 miles between the City of San Bernardino, in San Bernardino County, and the cities of Irvine and San Juan Capistrano, in Orange County, with limited extensions to Oceanside. The alignment roughly follows the Riverside Freeway (SR91) along the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) San Bernardino Subdivision in Riverside and Orange County. This commuter rail service to Orange County provides a transportation alternative in one of the busiest corridors in Southern California. The Line is a jointly funded project of the RCTC, SBCTA, and the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA). When the service began in October 1995, it was the first suburb-to-suburb commuter rail line in the country. One station in San Bernardino County, four stations within Riverside County, eight stations within Orange County, and one station in San Diego County now serve the line. As of July 2016, the line operates 16 trains Monday through Friday, including five peak period roundtrips. Each train travels between the Riverside – Downtown Station and the Irvine Station, with a few trains originating and/or terminating at the San Bernardino – Downtown Station, the Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo Station, or the Oceanside Station. IEOC weekend service began on July 15, 2006. This route was modeled after the successful RCTC-chartered Beach Trains. The service includes two roundtrips leaving from San Bernardino to Oceanside in the morning and returning in the afternoon on Saturday and Sunday. The trains make all IEOC stops, plus the San Clemente Pier. The current running time between Riverside – Downtown and Irvine is approximately 68 minutes. RTA, SunLine, and the Corona Cruiser provide connecting transit service. IEOC Line Line Opening: October 1995 Route miles: 100.1 Avg Trip Length (miles): 33.8 Weekday Daily Trains: 16 Current Stations Served: San Bernardino – Downtown 599 W. Rialto Ave San Bernardino 1204 West 3rd St Riverside – Downtown 4066 Vine St Riverside – La Sierra 10901 Indiana Ave Corona – North Main 250 E Blaine St Corona – West 155 S Auto Center Dr Anaheim Canyon 1039 N Pacificenter Dr Orange 194 N Atchison St Santa Ana 1000 E Santa Ana Blvd Tustin 2975 Edinger Ave Irvine 15215 Barranca Pkwy Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo 28200 Forbes Rd San Juan Capistrano 26701 Verdugo St San Clemente 1850 Avenida Estacion San Clemente Pier* Avenida del Mar Oceanside 235 S Tremont Ave *Weekends only RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 11 Riverside Line This line extends 59.1 miles between the city of Riverside and LAUS along the Union Pacific (UP) Railroad alignment. The route roughly follows the Pomona Freeway corridor (SR60) through the cities and communities of Pedley, Mira Loma, Ontario, Pomona, Walnut, Industry, La Puente, Montebello, and Commerce. Existing stations include Riverside – Downtown, Jurupa Valley/Pedley, Ontario – East, Pomona – Downtown, Industry, Montebello/Commerce, and LAUS. RCTC, the San Bernardino Transportation Authority (SBCTA), and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) jointly fund the line. The Riverside Line offers 12 weekday trains between the Riverside – Downtown Station and LAUS, travelling westbound in the AM and eastbound in the PM and one roundtrip during the off- peak hours. The Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine, and Amtrak provide connecting transit service in Riverside County. The scheduled peak-direction trip time between Riverside – Downtown and LAUS varies between 83 and 88 minutes, including dwell time at intermediate stations. 91/ PV Line This route officially began operating peak period service on May 6, 2002, when it was called the 91 Line. With the completion of the Perris Valley Line extension in June 2016, the rebranded 91/PV Line now extends the route to 85.6 miles between Perris – South and LAUS. The alignment roughly follows the Riverside Freeways (SR215 and SR91) along the BNSF San Bernardino subdivision through Riverside County to Fullerton in Orange County where it continues northwest to Downtown Los Angeles. This line serves stations along this line including Riverside – Downtown, Riverside – La Sierra, Corona – North Main, Corona – West, Fullerton, Buena Park, Norwalk/Santa Fe Springs, Commerce, and LAUS. RCTC, OCTA, and Metro jointly fund the Line. With the Perris Valley extension, new stations were added at Perris – South, Perris – Downtown, Moreno Valley/March Field, and Riverside – Hunter Park/UCR. Riverside Line Line Opening: June 1993 Route miles: 59.1 Avg Trip Length (miles): 39.3 Weekday Daily Trains: 12 Current Stations Served Riverside – Downtown 4066 Vine St Jurupa Valley/Pedley 6001 Pedley Ontario – East 3330 E Francis St Pomona – Downtown 101 N Main Street Industry 600 S Brea Canyon Rd Montebello/Commerce 2000 Flotilla St LA Union Station 800 N Alameda St RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 12 The 91/PV Line offers 15 weekday trains between the Perris – South Station and LAUS. This service provides three roundtrips between Perris – South and LAUS during peak hours in the peak direction, six bounce back trips that go from Perris – South to Riverside – Downtown, and three trips between LAUS and the Riverside – Downtown Station. The 91 Line (now the 91/PV Line) weekend service started on July 5, 2014 and currently consists of two roundtrip trains that operate between LAUS and the Riverside – Downtown Station, travelling westbound in the AM and eastbound in the PM. The peak period running time between Perris – South, Riverside – Downtown, and LAUS is approximately 127 minutes. RTA, SunLine, and the Corona Cruiser provide connecting service in Riverside County. 2.2 Dial-A-Ride Service – System Performance RCTC has actively supported transit connections by establishing agreements with SCRRA and the Riverside County transit providers to provide free transfers for all connecting transit services at Riverside County stations. With the agreement, Metrolink ticket holders can ride both fixed route and Dial-A- Ride services for free as they travel to and from a station in Riverside County. RCTC subsidizes half the fare while Metrolink subsidizes the other half. Connecting transit to stations in Western Riverside County is provided by the Riverside Transit Authority (RTA), Sunline, Omnitrans, and the Corona Cruiser. In addition to its fixed routes, RTA developed CommuterLink to address commuter needs. This express service provides transit to and from Riverside Metrolink stations and transit centers during peak commuting periods. RTA has also added Routes 54, 52, and 26 to provide direct connections to the 91/PV Line and the Metrolink stations it serves. Route 54 provides a convenient 91/PVL Line 91 Line Opening: May 2002 PVL Line Extension Opening: June 2016 Route miles: 85.6 Avg Trip Length (miles): 36.6 Trains Operated/Day: 13 Current Stations Served: Perris – South 1304 Case Rd Perris – Downtown 121 South C. St Moreno Valley/March Field 14160 Meridian Pkwy Riverside – Hunter Park/UCR 1101 Marlborough Ave Riverside – Downtown 4066 Vine St Riverside – La Sierra 10901 Indiana Ave Corona – North Main 250 E Blaine St Corona – West 155 S Auto Center Dr Fullerton 120 E Santa Fe Ave Buena Park Lakeknoll Dr & Dale St Norwalk/Santa Fe Springs 12700 Imperial Highway Commerce 6433 26th St LA Union Station 800 N Alameda St RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 13 and critical last mile connection from the Riverside – Downtown Station to the Riverside County Administration services. The program aims to provide a viable transit alternative for commuters, helping mitigate congestion and pollution. The Corona Cruiser, operated by the City of Corona, provides a fixed route schedule but offers some route deviation with advance reservation. Buses run Monday through Saturday and serve the Corona – North Main Station as well as stops throughout Corona. SunLine’s commuter express service connects residents of the Coachella Valley with the Pass Area and Western Riverside County. The service addresses the transit service gap between the Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County, providing alternative transportation options to commuting residents of Coachella Valley. During FY2017, RCTC also included Omnitrans as an additional bus operator to our Riverside – Downtown Station. This service connects Metrolink riders to additional commuter rail service with a direct connection to the San Bernardino Line and the Downtown San Bernardino transit station. Feeder buses and transit services are also critically important at the destination end. For the IEOC route, dedicated OCTA shuttle buses meet all peak period trains at Anaheim Canyon, Orange, Santa Ana, Tustin, and Irvine. Some OCTA buses meet trains at all these stations as well as Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo, San Juan Capistrano, and San Clemente. Metrolink is proposing in their FY 2018-19 budget to establish co-marketing agreements with potential rideshare partners (i.e. Lyft and Uber) to provide riders with incentives to help resolve first mile/last mile connectivity issues. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 14 2.3 Key Performance Indicators The following performance indicators are taken from SCRRA’s Key Performance Indicators Quarterly Performance Report, FY17/18 2nd Quarter (October – December 2017) to measure the effectiveness of the Riverside, IEOC, and 91/PV Lines. Year to Date (YTD) Revenue (Thousands) FY17-18 Budget FY17-18 Estimates Variance IEOC Line 3,859 3,482 (377) Riverside Line 4,424 4,290 (134) 91/PV Line 2,573 2,628 55 Year to Date (YTD) Ridership (Thousands) FY17-18 Budget FY17-18 Estimates Variance IEOC Line 608 611 3 Riverside Line 495 499 4 91/PV Line 371 403 32 The following performance indicators were provided by SCRRA and show additional details per line. IEOC Line Indicator FY 16/17 AUDITED FY 17/18 Budgeted FY 18/19 Projected Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,372,287 1,458,133 1,362,807 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.36 $0.36 $0.42 Farebox Recovery Ratio 31.8% 30.0% 27.5% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.56 $0.54 $0.61 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $11.86 $12.31 $14.04 Operating Expense/Train Mile $78.87 $79.63 $81.89 Revenue Recovery 36.4% 34.2% 31.9% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 4 car set) 35.2 36.5 33.6 RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 15 Riverside Line Indicator FY 16/17 AUDITED FY 17/18 Budgeted FY 18/19 Projected Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,004,402 986,769 967,476 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.27 $0.33 $0.36 Farebox Recovery Ratio 47.2% 43.2% 40.5% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.53 $0.59 $0.62 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $9.37 $11.48 $12.43 Operating Expense/Train Mile $102.72 $104.24 $106.28 Revenue Recovery 49.1% 44.3% 42.1% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 4 car set) 48.6 44.1 43.0 91/PV Line Indicator FY 16/17 AUDITED FY 17/18 Budgeted FY 18/19 Projected Unlinked Passenger Trips 881,795 847,324 956,934 Subsidy/Passenger Mile $0.43 $0.51 $0.52 Farebox Recovery Ratio 26.5% 23.9% 24.6% Operating Expense/Passenger Mile $0.62 $0.70 $0.72 Operating Subsidy/Passenger $17.08 $20.08 $19.07 Operating Expense/Train Mile $89.63 $101.77 $110.02 Revenue Recovery 30.1% 27.1% 27.7% Passenger Miles per Revenue Car Mile (Assumes 4 car set) 36.3 36.5 38.3 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts In early 2017, RCTC completed a market assessment that looked at the commute market within and around the Perris Valley. The purpose of this market assessment was to help RCTC understand where residents of western Riverside County (i.e. Moreno Valley, Perris, Hemet, San Jacinto, Temecula, Murrieta, and Menifee) commute and travel in order to define the ridership needs and trends that allow the most useful integration of the 91/PV Line into the Metrolink and regional transit systems. The subsequent Service & Infrastructure Needs to Support 91/Perris Valley Line Market Assessment Technical Memorandum (May 2017) assesses the operational feasibility of addressing the forecast travel markets identified in the market assessment. This included evaluating the potential reverse commute options to service March Air Force Base and the businesses in the area in the near and long-term and defining the infrastructure projects necessary to support these service needs. RCTC is continuing efforts to pursue service and infrastructure improvements, such as the proposed improvements to the Riverside – Downtown and Moreno Valley/March Field stations. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 16 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Two Years Trip Generators Feeder services to stations are vital to the success of commuter rail in Western Riverside County. Coordination and consultation with transit providers and local agencies is an ongoing process. RTA, RCTC, and Metrolink continue to work together to increase awareness of the RTA bus connections at the RCTC Metrolink stations. Ads regularly appear in the RTA Ride Guide promoting free RTA transfers from Metrolink stations. The Ride Guide includes the Metrolink stations in its Route Directory Listing. Also, Metrolink occasionally helps promote the RTA CommuterLink service in materials at the stations. Projected Growth Over Next Two Years Short-term (two-year to five-year) service needs as identified in the market assessment are:  Enhancement of existing 91/PV and IEOC service between Riverside, Los Angeles, and Orange Counties.  Robust peak period, intra-county service between Perris – Downtown and Riverside – Downtown.  Introduction of reverse commute / peak service focused on the Hunter Park and Moreno Valley/March Field stations as employment centers. Service options were developed for the short-term as part of the Service & Infrastructure Needs to Support 91/Perris Valley Line Market Assessment Technical Memorandum (May 2017). One option assumes additional service increases along the BNSF San Bernardino Subdivision that allows for the expansion of peak and midday 91/PV Line trains. Assuming no additional increases in service, another option focuses on optimizing connectivity between trains at the Riverside-Downtown Station. Emphasis was given to connecting 91/PV Line trains to IEOC and Riverside Line trains to expand options for those traveling to / from the Perris Valley. No service increases were identified for the Riverside Line. This service, operated along the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) Los Angeles Subdivision, is fully subscribed at 12 trains per weekday due to track constraints. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 17 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities, and Facility Needs Commuters boarding at RCTC Metrolink stations are provided with amenities that assist with their daily travel needs. Vending machines stocked with beverages and snacks are available at each station. Station facilities also include wireless internet access, bike lockers, designated parking for motorcycles and carpools. Furthermore, all stations are staffed 24 hours by contracted security guards with patrol vehicles, closed circuit television (CCTV), and various safety and security enhancements such as fencing and gates. Amenities are also available onboard the train. All train cars are equipped with restrooms, and some of the newer cars contain hook-ups for laptop computers. Additionally, designated bike/surfboard cars and quiet cars have been added throughout the system. Metrolink has developed the website www.metrolinktrains.com. This site provides passengers with enhanced features allowing for greater content functionality. Improvements include regular service updates on the homepage, improved content management functions, enhanced usability, and a more consistent look and feel with features expected by our increasingly web savvy passengers. Additionally, passengers can subscribe through Twitter to obtain service updates and plan their trips using Google Transit. Metrolink also has an extensive social media presence on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and related sites. Major needs, which continue to be the focus of RCTC attention for the SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21, include the following:  Implementation of Positive Train Control (PTC);  Replacement of Ticket Vending Machines; and  Rehab/Renovation of passenger cars. Implementation of Positive Train Control (PTC) PTC has been a major technical undertaking and operating elements are currently available on multiple lines. PTC will continue to be a priority for Metrolink and RCTC to ensure the safety of the traveling public. The $215 million capital project was jointly funded by the member agencies and major components were in place prior to the initial federal deadline of 2015, this was later extended. Metrolink is making strides on this project and has implemented PTC into revenue service on lines it owns. Full implementation will continue to be a high priority. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 18 Station Improvements and Construction of New Facilities In order to meet the capacity needs of current and future system growth and expansio n, the following facilities will be completed or commenced in the upcoming fiscal year:  Construction of a covered passenger waiting and concession area at the Riverside – Downtown Metrolink Station.  Expand and enhance existing security and station surveillance at Metrolink Station operations.  Expand the parking at the Riverside – La Sierra Metrolink station. RCTC Station Maintenance The Commission fully funds and maintains all of the commuter rail stations in Riverside County, which is unique among the Metrolink member agencies. Since Metrolink service began along the Riverside Line in 1993, the Commission has been maintaining the Riverside – Downtown and Jurupa Valley/Pedley stations. When the IEOC Line began in 1995, the Riverside – La Sierra and Corona – West stations were added. Due to increasing demand, the Corona – North Main Station was added in 2002. Over the years, the stations show their age and require preventative maintenance. The Commission has always taken pride in the commuter rail stations and intends to invest significant resources to preserve the Commission’s assets. Anticipated improvements include:  Comprehensive painting of station structures  Resealing and renovation of station parking lots  Improved access for disabled patrons  Drought tolerant landscaping upgrades Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project In June 2016, RCTC & Metrolink began operating trains along the Perris Valley Line extension. This 24-mile extension of Metrolink further into Riverside County marked the first line expansion since 1994. The $248M project included a combination of federal FTA Small Starts, CMAQ funds, along with other state and local funds including a significant portion of local Measure A Sales Tax. The line includes four new stations and a layover facility. Initial service included 12 daily trips between Perris – South and Riverside – Downtown with six of those trips continuing through to Los Angeles. Major improvements were made to 15 at-grade crossing and an extensive public safety effort was conducted in coordination with Operation Lifesaver. Ridership on the new line has been growing. A comprehensive growth study has been undertaken that includes a market assessment to identify commute patterns, and a subsequent infrastructure and service needs assessment to identify service growth and capital projects needed to support that growth. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 19 Ticket Vending Machines and Mobile Ticketing Application Metrolink’s aging ticketing infrastructure will be getting replaced with new ticket vending machines and provide its customers with enhancements with the addition of the Mobile Ticketing application available to users with smart phones. The replacement and upgrade to the ticketing infrastructure will provide passengers a greater efficiency and ease when using the system. The Ticket Vending Machines will include a sleeker design and user friendly compatibilities. The timeline to replace and upgrade the legacy ticket vending machines (TVMs) may take up to twenty-four months from the date of notice-to-proceed (NTP). Metrolink has implemented a Mobile Ticketing Application systemwide. Usage is robust on the IEOC Line at 63%. Transferring compatibilities to the Metro light rail and subway system launched on December 30, 2017 to ensure customers continue the effortlessness connectivity to other transit providers. Rehab/Renovation and or Purchase of Locomotives Metrolink’s aging fleet is undergoing a revamp of its locomotive fleet to improve daily operation of the system. Tier 4 locomotives are compliant with the latest U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions standards and will reduce particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 85 percent, resulting in cleaner air for the region. Performance concerns have delayed the delivery of the new locomotives. SCRRA ordered 40 Tier 4 locomotives and as of February 5, 2018, SCRRA has received 16 locomotives. Fifteen of these are signed off as delivered and are undergoing final preparation for Conditional Acceptance. One arrived with damage and will be returned for repair. Thirteen additional locomotives are currently in production and six stored car bodies await entry into production. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 20 CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Recent Service Changes On October 9, 2017 and April 1, 2018, and an extra change in May 2018, Metrolink adjusted the schedules to improved efficiency and on time performance. The October changes to schedules on Metrolink’s Ventura County and Orange County lines were to improve service in response to rider feedback. Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner trains had schedule changes on multiple trains, which affected riders who use Amtrak service along the Orange County and Ventura County lines. This schedule change also included the departure and arrival times for the new San Bernardino – Downtown Station for all trains on the San Bernardino and IEOC lines. The April schedule change included service adjustments to shared Amtrak/Metrolink service trains (Amtrak Pacific Surfliner). No other changes were made on Metrolink lines. The extra May 2018 schedule change entails a full schedule change to commence service at the new Burbank Airport - North (Antelope Valley Line - AVL) station and for additional improvements are on other lines, including the San Bernardino Line, IEOC Line, Orange County Line, and Ventura County Line. 3.2 Recommended Service Changes and Modifications The RCTC rail program consists of planning, programming, advocacy, and implementation elements. This SRTP incorporates a variety of activities that support these elements. The FY 2018/19 Capital and Operating Plan reflects the efficiencies implemented since Metrolink’s inception. Proposed service maximizes the use of existing rolling stock to relieve overcrowding. The FY 2018/19 proposed budget is under review by all of the member agencies and concurrence is anticipated by June 2018. Service level changes are not expected on any of the Metrolink lines that serve Riverside County at this time. The Commission’s goal in participating in a regional commuter rail system is to provide useful transportation alternatives to its residents. To a large degree, this goal has already been achieved. Each morning, over 3,000 Riverside residents board one of Metrolink trains headed for jobs in Orange and Los Angeles counties. These rail commuters also contribute to a reduction in freeway traffic, removing more than 1.5 lanes of peak hour traffic each morning and each afternoon. Notwithstanding this success, a commuter rail service is unlike most of the projects funded by the Commission. The complete benefits of the project are not fully realized upon completion of construction or initial implementation of service. The commuter rail service must increase frequency as the demand increases over time. This increase in service is constrained by the availability of rail vehicles, capacity on the railroad, and available funding. Currently, not all of the Riverside County routes operate at optimal service levels. Two of the three Metrolink lines do not even offer minimum basic coverage during peak travel times. The IEOC and the 91/PV Line do not yet provide half-hourly headways and thus, their attractiveness to residents and ultimately their ridership and revenue performance are compromised. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 21 The infrastructure and service needs assessment associated with the Perris Valley Line Growth Study identified service expansions to be implemented in the short- (2-5 year), mid- (5-10 year), and long-term (10+ year) time frame. Overall, the proposed peak period service increases:  30% on the 91/PV Line in the short- and mid-term scenarios over existing conditions  70% on the 91/PV Line in the long-term scenario over existing conditions  36% on the IEOC Line in the mid- and long-term scenarios over existing conditions Proposed Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Rail Service The concept of developing an expanded passenger rail service from Los Angeles to Indio and the Coachella Valley has been discussed for many years. Since FY2015, a separate Short Range Transit Plan was developed for the service. A brief overview is provided in this document. The plan includes new daily roundtrip Amtrak trains to the Coachella Valley provided through the Amtrak/Caltrans state partnership. RCTC, in conjunction with the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG), Caltrans Division of Rail, and the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) will begin the first phase of detailed corridor planning with the initiation of the Service Development Plan (SDP). This SDP will be the first major study that will carefully design a viable service plan with appropriate ridership and service modeling plans. The effort along with completion of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the corridor will allow it to compete for future federal funding. RCTC worked closely with Caltrans to initiate the Alternatives Analysis that has been completed and shows promising ridership potential for the new route. RCTC is the lead on the Service Development Plan study and intends to use FRA grant funds to complete the project. In addition, there is local support for this effort from the CVAG Executive Committee who has directed staff to establish a 90% bus transit/10% passenger rail service funding allocation split for Coachella Valley TDA funds. In addition, an MOU will be established between RCTC and CVAG to develop a Coachella Valley Rail Fund that will use both the TDA funds and additional state and local funds to conduct station development studies and provide initial capital funding for station development. It has been determined through numerous studies over the years that the Amtrak intercity option is preferred over a Metrolink commuter option, because of the long trip length and added comfort and amenities on the Amtrak trains and Amtrak’s contractual rights to operate over freight railroads. 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotion Metrolink will continue outreach to new residents through direct-mail campaigns to homeowners within the system’s sphere of service in Riverside County. Additionally, Metrolink is developing a targeted marketing strategy with all its member agencies. RCTC has budgeted for targeted promotion of service during the summer months as well as building ridership for the 91/PV Line. RCTC has also enhanced its share of Marketing in-house by working with our marketing consultant Arellano and Metrolink. With their help, we have increased our Rail Safety awareness and overall rail service through a grass root campaign that includes participating at local events, reaching out to schools, senior centers and specialty groups. As our focus continues on increasing ridership on the Metrolink lines, we are looking on ways to promote what Metrolink has to offer to the residents of Riverside County. Some of the marketing efforts have been: new residential mail out campaigns, school trips, partnering with Field of Dreams in the City of Perris, social media, billboards, and attending local events to hand out promotional material. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 22 Metrolink Proposed Promotions and Marketing Campaigns Metrolink has included a marketing plan strategy in their FY2018-19 proposed budget to attract new riders, retain current riders, recapture former riders, and have customized line marketing campaigns. Loyalty Program Campaign Metrolink is proposing the development of a loyalty program to reward riders for their continued engagement with Metrolink. Loyalty programs can encompass enrollment incentives, deals and discounts, and referral rewards to name just a few. Corporate Partnerships Program (CPP) Metrolink is working with their technology partners to integrate the CPP into the Mobile App and is proposing a business-to-business marketing campaign to gain more corporate accounts. Line Awareness Marketing Campaign Metrolink is proposing marketing campaigns to attract ridership as part of their draft FY2018-19 budget. These marketing campaigns will use various marketing strategies, such as billboards, bus shelter advertising, radio spots, social media advertising, digital and mobile app advertising, and print advertising. A proposed 91/PV Line Awareness campaign is intended to attract new riders. A proposed IEOC Line Awareness campaign is intended to attract and recapture riders. Special Event Train Service In addition to the regular Fixed Route Service, RCTC has partnered with other agencies and Metrolink to provide our county’s residents access to special train services to events garnering high vehicle congestion such as sporting and holiday events. The service is contingent upon additional operation and grant funding. These type of promotional services have been highly successful in garnering ridership, so RCTC is planning on offering the following special train service provided the additional funding is acquired: Friday Angels Express Train Partnering with Orange County Transit Authority (OCTA) and Metrolink has allowed RCTC to fund some special trains on to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (Angels) baseball games. An “Angels Express” promotional service is offered for Friday night Angel baseball games for $7 roundtrip for adults, $6 for seniors and persons with disabilities, $4 for youths, and free for kids under 5 who are accompanied by a paying adult. This service is supported by Mobile Source Air Pollution Committee grant funds. The train leaves the Perris – South at 4:15 p.m. making all stops along the way and terminates at the Orange Station at 6:10 p.m. Riders will then transfer to an Orange County Line train that leaves at 6:16 p.m. and arrives at the train station located in the stadium parking lot, The Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC), at 6:20 p.m. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 23 The train departs the Orange Station to Riverside 45 minutes after the game, allowing fans to enjoy the fireworks show of Big Bang Fridays. Once again, riders will have to transfer to a Perris/Riverside-bound train at the Orange Station for the ride home. Festival of Lights Train Through the growing success and interest of the City of Riverside’s month long Festival of Lights (FOL), RCTC partnered with the City, Mission Inn Hotel & Spa, OCTA, Metro, RTA, and Metrolink to provide special train service on Friday and Saturday for four weekends of the FOL event. The special event trains started in 2016 and are planned to continue. The service’s objective is to help alleviate local traffic jams and provide a transportation to one of the most well know events in Riverside County. The service plan includes trains from Perris as well as Los Angeles and Orange County. The promotional fare for train riders is $7 roundtrip and it includes a free transfer to RTA’s FOL shuttle bus service that transports passengers from the Riverside – Downtown Station to the event center. Rams Train RCTC, along with Metrolink, was able to provide special train service to selected Rams football games during FY 16/17 and again in FY 17/18. The service that included promotional round trip fares of $10 were very successful and garnered interest throughout our county. The train runs along the 91/PV Line, which provides residents from as far south in Perris an alternative mode of transportation to Los Angeles. It is RCTC’s intent to participate once again in FY 18/19 to provide the service again. 3.4 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes Metrolink’s FY2018-19 proposed budget an increase overall marketing budget. This figure includes:  Focused on the Metrolink 91/PV Line.  Includes local grass roots outreach and promotion of Metrolink RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 24 CHAPTER 4– FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget This SRTP reflects the Commission’s commitment to the commuter rail goals in the FY 2018/19 RCTC Budget:  Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving Riverside County.  Promote commuter rail service along the new 91/PV Line corridor.  Maximize opportunities for public use of rail-related investments. Specific highlights of the FY 2018/19 Budget include:  Special Train services: Angels, Rams, and FOL trains.  Continuation of the implementation of Positive Train Control in the Metrolink network.  An additional increase in operating subsidy due to PTC costs and 91 Line expansion into Perris Valley. 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program With the passage of Measure A in 1988, $100 million was identified and committed to the development and implementation of a commuter rail system to serve Riverside County residents. The Rail Department uses LTF and Measure A funding for operations as well as federal 5307, 5309, 5337, State of Good Repair and LCTOP funds for capital. RCTC holds two voting positions on SCRRA’s eleven-member Board. RCTC staff members serve on the five-county Technical Advisory Committee which negotiates service and funding levels based upon the counties’ established priorities. Staff also provides technical assistance, coordination between various SCRRA and RCTC departments, and linkages to local communities. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements Public participation regarding service levels is largely garnered through the bi-annual on-board survey. Public hearings are held prior to any service changes. Daily receipt of feedback from the public is sought through Metrolink’s 1-800-371-LINK (5465) and website www.metrolinktrains.com. Additionally, RCTC maintains a customer service number (951) 778- 1092, provides service updates through Twitter and receives comments through the www.rctc.org website. Americans with Disabilities Act, Title VI SCRRA is responsible for the regulatory and compliance requirements governing the use of federal and state funds in accordance with ADA and Title VI. Accordingly, RCTC is responsible for additional compliance requirements as it relates to station facilities. All Metrolink trains and stations are accessible to persons with disabilities. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 25 TDA Triennial Audit, FTA Triennial Audit, NTD The RCTC TDA Triennial Audit was completed in September, 2016. The last audit resulted in no findings as pertained to the Rail Program. The FTA Triennial Audit was conducted in 2018 with no findings. NTD is reported annually by both SCRRA and RCTC. Alternative Fueled Vehicles RCTC POLICY Metrolink uses ultra-low sulfur diesel in its locomotives. It has initiated a procurement for state of the art Tier IV emissions level locomotives that should be placed in service in 2019. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 26 Table 1 – Fleet Inventory Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary See previous section. Table 2A – Summary of Routes to Be Excluded in FY 2018/19 Not Applicable. Table 3 – SRTP Route Statistics See section 2.3 Key Performance Indicators Table 3A – Individual Route Descriptions See previous section. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 27 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 Project DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Funds LTFSB1 SOGR(5)LCTOP(6)Measure AFare RevenuesOther(7)SCRRA Operating Subsidy(2)30,361,106$ 16,500,000$ 861,106$ 5,000,000$ 8,000,000$ Transit Connections300,000$ 300,000$ RCTC Rail Operations(3)4,348,500$ 4,348,500$ RCTC Station Maintenance and Security(4)6,452,700$ 5,300,000$ 1,152,700$ 41,462,306$ 21,148,500$ -$ 861,106$ 10,300,000$ 8,000,000$ 1,152,700$ SB1 State of Good Repair FY 17/18 Funds - Metrolink Capital FY 19 - 1752,084$ 752,084$ 752,084$ -$ 752,084$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 42,214,390$ 21,148,500$ 752,084$ 861,106$ 10,300,000$ 8,000,000$ 1,152,700$ (1) Number ties to Table 4A - Capital Project Justification(7) All PVL (including Security) CMAQ funding part of 1/11/17 SRTP Amendment(6) LCTOP: Approved FY 17/18 LCTOP Operation fund for PVL(5) SB 1 State of Good Repair Funds for Metrolink Rehab and Capital FY17/18Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 (Current Year Funding Only)Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: Capital(2) Based on initial Metrolink Budget, LTF & Measure A funds(4) This total is for the 9 Metrolink Stations(3) Includes General Management less Metrolink SubsidyTotal: Operating & Capital RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 28 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: FY 19 – 1 PROJECT NAME: Metrolink Rehabilitation Project SOGR FY17/18 Funds PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This Project will provide the following: Rehabilitation, reconstruction or replacement of Metrolink structures, track, trackbed, signals, communication systems, facilities, stations, platforms, signage, equipment, systems and rolling stock to ensure state of good repair. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: This project is funded by a SB1 State of Good Repair grant. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): SB1 State of Good Repair Grant $752,084 Total $752,084 RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 29 Table 5.1 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2019/20 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification N/A Project DescriptionCapital Project Number(1)Total Funds LTFSB1 SOGRLCTOPMeasure AFare RevenueOtherSCRRA Operating Expenses32,300,000 17,500,000 800,000 5,000,000 9,000,000 Transit Connections350,000 350,000 RCTC Rail Operations4,500,000 4,500,000 RCTC Station Maintenance and Security7,500,000 6,500,000 1,000,000 - 44,650,000 22,350,000 - 800,000 11,500,000 9,000,000 1,000,000 FY 20- - - - - - - - - Total: Operating & Capital44,650,000 22,350,000 - 800,000 11,500,000 9,000,000 1,000,000 Subtotal: CapitalSubtotal: Operating RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 30 Table 5.2 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2020/21 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification N/A Project DescriptionCapital Project Number(1)Total Funds LTFSB1 SOGRLCTOPMeasure AFare RevenueOtherSCRRA Operating Expenses33,800,000 18,000,000 800,000 5,500,000 9,500,000 Transit Connections350,000 350,000 RCTC Rail Operations4,750,000 4,750,000 RCTC Station Maintenance and Security7,500,000 6,500,000 1,000,000 - $46,400,000$23,100,000$0$800,000$12,000,000$9,500,000$1,000,000FY 21$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$0$46,400,000$23,100,000$0$800,000$12,000,000$9,500,000$1,000,000Subtotal: OperatingSubtotal: CapitalTotal: Operating & Capital RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 31 Table 6 – Update Actions Taken or To Be Implemented to Comply with the Most Recent Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations N/A Table 7 – Service Provider Performance Target Report Due to significant differences in the type and availability of performance data the Commuter Rail Program no longer reports into the RCTC PIP program. Table 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP Performance Report Due to significant differences in the type and availability of performance data the Commuter Rail Program no longer reports into the RCTC PIP program. Table 9A – Highlights of FY 18/19 SRTP Specific highlights of the FY 2018/19 Commuter Rail Plans include: o No fare increase; o Continued operations and target marketing of the Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension; o Continued support of special trains including Festival of Lights, Angels Express and Rams Trains; o Continued cost increase to support for positive train control and contractual step increases with major Metrolink service vendors; and o Continue Next Generation Rail and Transit Study. City of Corona Transit Service Page 0 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Fiscal Year 2018/19 - 2020/21 City of Corona Short Range Transit Plan Winner of 2018 Poetry & Art on the Bus – Michelle Pazz “A Flower for Every Tomorrow “ City of Corona Transit Service Page 1 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Table of Contents CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW .....................................................................................3 1.0 I NTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................3 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREA ..........................................................................................3 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND D EMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS .......................................................6 1.3 FIXED ROUTE T RANSIT SERVICES AND PARATRANSIT SERVICE ...................................................7 1.4 C URRENT FARE STRUCTURE AND PROPOSED F ARE STRUCTURE .................................................9 1.5 REVENUE FLEET ................................................................................................................9 1.6 EXISTING FACILITY/PLANNED FACILITIES ............................................................................. 10 1.7 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN T RANSIT AGENCIES ........................................................ 10 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE .................................... 10 2.1 FIXED ROUTE SERVICE – ROUTE BY ROUTE ANALYSIS ............................................................ 10 2.2 DIAL -A -R IDE SERVICE – SYSTEM PERFORMANCE .................................................................. 12 2.3 KEY PERFORMANCE I NDICATORS ....................................................................................... 12 2.4 PRODUCTIVITY I MPROVEMENT EFFORTS ............................................................................. 14 2.5 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS AND PROJECTED GROWTH ........................................................... 14 2.6 EQUIPMENT, PASSENGER AMENITIES, AND FACILITY NEEDS ................................................... 15 CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION .......................... 15 3.1 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES ............................................................................................... 15 3.2 RECOMMENDED LOCAL & EXPRESS ROUTE MODIFICATIONS .................................................. 15 3.3 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION ................................................................................ 16 3.4 BUDGET IMPACT AND PROPOSED CHANGES ........................................................................ 17 CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS ............................................................. 17 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET .................................................................................... 17 4.2 FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM ......................... 18 4.3 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ................................................................. 19 TABLES .............................................................................................................................. 22 T ABLE 1 – BUS FLEET I NVENTORY ............................................................................................. 23 T ABLE 1 – DAR FLEET I NVENTORY ............................................................................................. 24 T ABLE 2 – SYSTEMWIDE ........................................................................................................... 25 T ABLE 2 – BUS ....................................................................................................................... 26 T ABLE 2 – DAR ...................................................................................................................... 27 City of Corona Transit Service Page 2 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan T ABLE 3 – DATA ELEMENTS ..................................................................................................... 28 T ABLE 3 – PERFORMANCE I NDICATORS ....................................................................................... 29 T ABLE 3A – I NDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AND AREA SERVICED ............................................... 30 T ABLE 4 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2018/19 ...................................................... 31 T ABLE 4A – C APITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION .............................................................................. 32 T ABLE 5.1 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2019/20 ................................................... 36 T ABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION ........................................................................... 37 T ABLE 5.2 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2020/21 ................................................... 39 T ABLE 6 – PROGRESS IMPLEMENTING TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT (TDA) TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RECOMMENDATIONS* .............................................................................. 40 T ABLE 7 – FY 2017/18 PERFORMANCE TARGET REPORT ............................................................... 42 T ABLE 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT.................................................................. 43 T ABLE 9 – CCTS HIGHLIGHTS FY 2018/19 ................................................................................. 44 T ABLE 9A – OPERATING AND FINANCIAL DATA ............................................................................ 44 T ABLE 9B – FAREBOX R EVENUE CALCULATION ............................................................................. 45 City of Corona Transit Service Page 3 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Chapter 1 – System Overview 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) sets the objectives and strategies for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018/19 for the City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS) by evaluating current transit system performance, projected demographic changes, operating and capital funding needs, anticipated funding from federal, state and local sources, and other factors to create a reasonable projection of conditions over the next three years (FY 2018/19 – 2020/21). 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE AREA CCTS operates demand response Dial-A-Ride (DAR) and fixed route dubbed the Corona Cruiser. DAR service commenced in 1977 available to the general public until January 2, 2018. The service is now available only to the following rider groups: Seniors 60 and older; Persons with Disabilities; and Persons certified under Americans with Disability Act (ADA). DAR provides curb-to-curb service throughout the City of Corona and neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services, and Norco College). The complementary paratransit Dial-A-Ride service area extends beyond city limits to ensure compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act ¾ mile corridor from a Corona Cruiser fixed route. Door-to-door service is available upon request for Dial-A-Ride patrons certified under the ADA. Corona Cruiser fixed route began operating in 2001 and serves the city-center as well as commercial, retail, and residential areas on the eastern and southern portion of the city. See service maps on the following pages. City of Corona Transit Service Page 4 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Transit Service Page 5 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Transit Service Page 6 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS Based on the 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-year Estimate, CCTS serves a diverse population of 161,614 city residents. The city encompasses 39 square miles. That diversity is reflected in the table below. City Population and Diversity The table below lists passenger characteristics for Dial-A-Ride and Cruiser service. Passenger characteristic estimates are based on derived data compiled over the first nine months of FY 2017/18. Passenger Characteristics Population Estimate Percent Race Total population 161,614 100.0% One race 154,716 95.7% Two or more races 6,898 4.3% One race 154,716 95.7% White 113,020 69.9% Black or African American 7,818 4.8% American Indian and Alaska Native 821 0.5% Asian 18,525 11.5% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 759 0.5% Some other race 13,773 8.5% Two or more races 6,898 4.3% White and Black or African American 943 0.6% White and American Indian and Alaska Native 764 0.5% White and Asian 2,074 1.3% Black or African American and American Indian and Alaska Native 70 0.0% Demographic Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate Seniors/Persons with Disabilities 92.3%General Public 41.9% General Public*3.3%Students 27.2% Metrolink Transfers 2.0%Seniors/Persons with Disabilities 22.6% Personal Care Attendants 1.5%RTA Transfers 5.7% Children 0.9%Children 2.1% Metrolink Transfers 0.5% Dial-A-Ride Corona Cruiser *Effective january 2, 2018, no general public DAR; service only available to the following categories: Seniors 60 and older; Persons with Disabilities; and Perons certified under Americians with Disabilities Act (ADA). City of Corona Transit Service Page 7 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan 1.3 FIXED ROUTE TRANSIT SERVICES AND PARATRANSIT SERVICE City of Corona Transit Service(CCTS) provides both fixed route, Corona Cruiser and Dial-A-Ride (DAR) services. DAR service began in 1977, while the Corona Cruiser commenced in 2001. CCTS serves local business, retail stores, parks, school and entertainment venues. The City contracts with the private sector to provide a turn-key transit operation. Using passenger trips from the first nine months of FY 2017/18 as a basis for estimating fiscal year-end totals, system wide passenger trips are expected to decrease by 3.7 percent to 190,766 total passenger trips compared to 198,049 passenger trips in FY 2016/17. While it is difficult to pinpoint with certainty the cause of declining passenger trips, increased congestion due to construction projects throughout most of the CCTS’ service area is a factor in challenging buses to remain on schedule. When buses are less reliable, passengers will find better alternatives. However, the cause of the majority of the decline in ridership for FY 2017/18 is due to the change from General Public to Specialized Dial-A-Ride Services. CCTS staff is optimistic that the decrease in passenger trips will bottom-out and is projecting a 4.8% increase for overall system wide passenger trips to 200,304 for FY 2018/19. Staff will focus on efficiencies and additional marketing efforts. Corona Cruiser – Blue and Red Lines The Blue Line serves the McKinley Street retail area, then travels on to Magnolia Avenue and Main Street to the River Road area. This route passes by many trip generators such as hospitals, medical facilities, schools, public service agencies, library, civic center, and commercial/retail areas. This route also serves the unincorporated area of Home Gardens. The Blue Line operates every 60-67 minutes. The Red Line connects the residential areas of central Corona with commercial areas along Sixth Street and the Ontario Avenue/California Avenue retail area. The Red Line also covers South Corona along Ontario Avenue/Temescal Canyon Road to serve the county area of El Cerrito, The Crossings shopping complex at Cajalco Road/Temescal Canyon Road, and The Shops at Dos Lagos on Saturdays. The Red Line operates every 50-66 minutes. The Cruiser schedule is as follows: Blue Line Red Line Monday – Friday 6:30 a.m. – 7:09 p.m. 6:30 a.m. – 7:05 p.m. Saturday 8:52 a.m. – 3:50 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 5:09 p.m. Sunday no service no service The Cruiser does not operate on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. The Cruiser also serves the Corona Transit Center, owned and operated by the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). The Corona Transit Center provides a safe and efficient transfer point between local and regional bus lines as well as regional commuter trains serving Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties. Trains are accessible via a pedestrian bridge to the adjacent North Main Corona Metrolink commuter rail station. To incentivize multimodal City of Corona Transit Service Page 8 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan transportation, valid Metrolink pass-holders ride at no charge on Cruiser Blue and Red Lines to and from the Corona Transit Center/North Main Metrolink Station. CCTS and RTA have a reciprocal agreement that allows valid pass-holders a no cost, one-way transfer between the Cruiser and RTA buses at bus stops served by both Cruiser and RTA buses. Transfers between bus systems are an effective way to promote public transit as a low cost, eco- friendly, and stress-free alternative to automobile trips. Corona Dial-A-Ride Dial-A-Ride provided service to the general public until January 2, 2018. The service is now available to seniors (60 and older), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complementary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). City Council authorized the transition of the DAR program from General Public to Specialized Service on August 16, 2017. As part of the DAR services changes, CCTS has established an eligibility application process for the Specialized Service based on the following criteria: Seniors (age 60 or older) and persons with disabilities. The criteria are developed to ensure only the qualified patrons are utilizing the service. Those that are certified under ADA are not required to submit an eligibility application; they only need to provide their ADA ID as proof of eligibility. In addition to the change to the service, CCTS has also developed and implemented the No Show Policy. The No-Show Policy has been vetted through Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Civil Rights Office. Reservations for DAR service can be made from one to fourteen days in advance; however, same day service may be accommodated if space is available. Dial-A-Ride provides curb-to- curb service throughout the City of Corona and neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services and Norco College). Door-to-door assistance for ADA certified passengers is available upon request. Door-to-door service is available when: • Drivers can see the bus at all times; • The outermost door is within 150 feet from the bus; • Driver safety and security is maintained; and • Where a safe parking area is available. The ADA certification process in western Riverside County is administered by the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA). Additional information and application is available online at www.riversidetransit.com or by calling RTA at (951) 795-7887. For individuals certified for ADA complementary service, service hours are expanded to match Cruiser hours. Passengers certified under the ADA receive priority service. Voicemail message reservations are accepted for ADA clients on Sundays and Holidays for next day service. The Dial-A-Ride schedule is as follows: Non-ADA Complementary ADA Complementary Paratransit Paratransit Monday – Friday 6:42 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 6:30 a.m. – 7:09 p.m. Saturday 8:52 a.m. – 5:09 p.m. 8:52 a.m. – 5:09 p.m. Sunday no service no service City of Corona Transit Service Page 9 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Dial-A-Ride service does not operate on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 1.4 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE AND PROPOSED FARE STRUCTURE The below table depicts the current fare structure. Fare Structure Note: Fixed Route fare structure effective July 5, 2010; Dial-A-Ride fare structure effective January 2, 2018. To incentivize the use of public transit as a viable alternative to automobile trips, CCTS is using Air Quality Management District (AQMD) funds to subsidize multi-day passes (15 day and 31- day passes) on the Cruiser. The use of these funds allows CCTS to reduce the cost of multi- day passes by 30 percent for Cruiser riders, but enables CCTS to recover an adequate fare. 1.5 REVENUE FLEET The CCTS active fleet consists of 20 transit buses. All CCTS buses are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement for accessibility and wheelchair securement. The Fixed Route fleet consists of seven 2015 ElDorado National EZ Rider II heavy-duty/low-floor buses. EZ Rider II buses are powered with Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and were placed into Corona Cruiser service in February 2016. Fare Price Corona Cruiser Cash - General Public $1.50 Cash - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $0.70 Cash - Children (46" tall or under)$0.25 Day Pass - General Public $4.00 Day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $2.00 15-day Pass - General Public $17.50 15-day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $8.05 15-day Pass - Students $12.25 31-day Pass - General Public $35.00 31-day Pass - Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $16.10 31-day Pass - Students $24.50 Dial-A-Ride Seniors / Persons with Disabilities / Medicare Card Holders $2.50 Buddy Fare $1.25 Children $0.50 Fare Type City of Corona Transit Service Page 10 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Recently in April 2018, CCTS took delivery of eleven 2017 Glaval Universal vehicles to replace the 2012 (10) & 2006 (1) El Dorado National Aerotech vehicles. The new vehicles are Class C Ford Chasis CNG buses and are expected to be placed in service May 2018. CCTS will no longer have a need to continue leasing the 2008 ELDorado Starcraft from contractor as staff is considering to keep the best two of the older 2012 CNG vehicles. 1.6 EXISTING FACILITY/PLANNED FACILITIES CCTS operates from facility located at 735 Public Safety Way. Transportation Concepts, the vendor retained to operate transit service, provides administrative and dispatching service from this location, as well as fueling and vehicle parking. Maintenance is performed by the vendor at an off-site garage. 1.7 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES CCTS staff and Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) planning and operations staff work together to coordinate bus stop location/re-location, bus routing, layover areas/facilities, and transfer points where Cruiser and RTA passengers possessing valid day or multi-day passes can ride for free with a one-way transfer between systems. Chapter 2 – Existing Service and Route Performance 2.1 FIXED ROUTE SERVICE – ROUTE BY ROUTE ANALYSIS CCTS operates the Cruiser along two fixed routes – the Blue Line and Red Line. Passenger trips on the Cruiser totaled 132,469 in FY 2016/17. Using the number of passenger trips recorded during the first nine months of FY 2017/18 as a basis for estimating year-end totals, passenger trips on the Corona Cruiser are projected to decline by .7 percent, or 923 trips, compared to the previous fiscal year. Based on improving conditions outlined below, CCTS staff is cautiously projecting a 4.8 percent increase, or 6,577 more trips, in year-over-year passenger trips for a total of 138,123 passenger trips for FY 2018/19. See graphs on the following page of passenger breakdown by route. City of Corona Transit Service Page 11 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan * FY 2017/18 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2017-March 2018. ** FY 2018/19 projections are based on a 4.8 percent increase over estimated FY 2017/18 year-end totals. Passenger trips on the Blue Line are expected to decrease by 3.9 percent or 2,616 trips in FY 2017/18 when compared to the previous year. Passenger trips on the Red Line are estimated to increase by 2.6 percent or 1,693 trips when compared to the same period. The increase in the Red Line is mainly due to the change in the DAR services whereas some of the general public/student riders have migrated to the Fixed Route Service, in particular the Red Line. * FY 2017/18 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2017-March 2018. ** FY 2018/19 projections are based on a 4.8 percent increase over estimated FY 2017/18 year-end totals. - 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18*FY 18/19*Passenger TripsCorona Cruiser Passenger Trips - 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18*FY 18/19*PassengerTripsCorona Cruiser Passenger Trips by Route Blue Line Red Line City of Corona Transit Service Page 12 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan 2.2 DIAL-A-RIDE SERVICE – SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Dial-A-Ride provided 65,580 passenger trips in FY 2016/17. Using data collected from the first nine months of FY 2017/18 as a basis for estimating year-end totals, passenger trips may decrease by 9.7 percent, or 6,360 trips, as compared to FY 2016/17. The decrease in FY 2017/18 passenger trips are due to elimination of general-public DAR. (See Section 1.3 under DAR for details). General public accounted for about 10 percent of the riders; students account for many of the general public riders on DAR. It is expected that many of these riders may have transitioned to the Fixed Route service, in particular the Red Line. While staff is projecting a decline in ridership for FY 2017/8, FY 2018/19 is expected to see an increase of 4.8 percent, or 2,961 in year-over-year passenger trips. Staff has already seen an increase in DAR participants through the application process as many new patrons have been added. * FY 2017/18 year-end estimate is based on data collected from July 2017-March 2018. ** FY 2018/19 projections are based on a 4.8 percent increase over estimated FY 2017/18 year-end totals. During FY 2017/18, Senior citizens and people with disabilities represent 92.3% of total Dial-A- Ride passengers. General public and Metrolink riders make up another 5.5% of DAR riders. 2.3 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is the designated Regional Transportation Planning Agency (RTPA) with fiduciary and administrative oversight of transit operators in Riverside County. Each year, RCTC reviews and approves the Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) and allocates local, state and federal funding. RCTC developed and monitors eight performance indicators that measure productivity – these indicators and year-to-date performance are listed in the table on the next page. By statute, transit operators serving urban areas must recover a minimum of 20 percent of operating cost through fare revenue for fixed route and 10 percent for Dial-A-Ride Specialized Service with combined system-wide blended farebox recovery of 15 percent. Fare revenue includes passenger fares, interest on investments, advertising revenue, local contributions, and the proceeds from the sale of surplus vehicles. A 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18*FY 18/19*Passenger TripsDAR Passenger Trips City of Corona Transit Service Page 13 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan farebox recovery ratio below the system-side 15 percent endangers the receipt of state funding. The farebox recovery ratio is a mandatory performance indicator. Performance Indicators Combined Corona Cruiser fixed route and Dial-A-Ride Performance Based on data from RCTC TransTrack Table 7 for the period July 2017-March 2018 *System-wide farebox recovery ratio reduced from 20% to blended rate of 15% due to change from general public DAR to Specialized DAR. Through the third quarter of this fiscal year (July 2017-March 2018), CCTS has recorded a farebox recovery of 13.77 percent. A farebox recovery ratio in this range is anticipated at this point in the fiscal year. At the close of each fiscal year, the City contributes a sufficient amount of funding to bridge the gap between fare revenue received throughout the year and the amount required to meet the 15 percent farebox recover ratio. The contribution of funds is made only after all revenues and expenses are finalized following the close of the fiscal year. The size of the contribution varies each year depending on the final amount of revenues and expenses; however, the City’s year-end contribution has always ensured CCTS meets the mandatory farebox recovery ratio. In addition, CCTS expects to meet the target for Subsidy per Passenger upon close of the fiscal year as final revenues are recognized and subsidy is decreased. Table 7, Service Provider Performance Targets Report, appearing on page 43 of this plan, shows in greater detail on FY 2017/18 performance targets and actual performance by indicator. Table 8, SRTP Performance Report, appearing on page 44 of this plan, lists performance targets set by RCTC for FY 2018/19. Table 8 indicates CCTS meets the mandatory farebox recovery ratio and six of seven discretionary targets. The target for farebox recovery ratio is set for 15 percent. The target for operating costs per revenue hour for FY 2018/19 is calculated using operating costs accumulated during the first nine months of the current fiscal year (July 2017-March 2018 in this case), FY 2017/18 Target FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr. Performance Year-to-Date Performance Scorecard Mandatory: 1.Farebox recovery ratio*≥ 15.0%13.77%Fails to Meet Target Discretionary 1.Operating cost per revenue hour ≤ $72.17 $73.51 Fails to Meet Target 2.Subsidy per passenger ≥ $8.11 and ≤ $10.97 $9.97 Meets Target 3.Subsidy per passenger mile ≥ $1.89 and ≤ $2.55 $2.33 Meets Target 4.Subsidy per hour ≥ $51.19 and ≤ $69.25 $63.38 Meets Target 5.Subsidy per mile ≥ $4.11 and ≤ $5.55 $5.11 Meets Target 6.Passenger per revenue hour ≥ 5.36 and ≤ 7.25 6.40 Meets Target 7.Passengers per revenue mile ≥ 0.43 and ≤ 0.59 0.51 Meets Target Performance Indicators City of Corona Transit Service Page 14 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan increase in revenue hour cost for transit operating contract and adjustment by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Currently, CPI is 2.1 percent. Increased costs in materials, marketing and utility contributed to the increase in cost per hour. This is due to increase in advertising, equipment maintenance and office supplies. In addition, FY 18-19 budget includes consulting services for vehicle maintenance oversight program and fixed route planning, scheduling and run-cutting project. 2.4 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS Productivity, as measured by the number of passengers per revenue hour and revenue miles showed year-over-year between FY 2013/14 and FY 2017/18 on the Corona Cruiser and Dial- A-Ride. Productivity continue to drop through the current year. Productivity for Dial-A-Ride, however, showed an improvement between FY 2015/16 and FY 2016/17, but showed similar declines in productivity for FY 2017/18. Along with all other vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians, Corona Cruiser and Dial-A-Ride buses are impacted by increased traffic congestion resulting from construction work throughout City of Corona. Freeway lane reductions and ramp closures, local street and lane closures, detours, and the movement of heavy equipment all increase congestion and impact traffic flow, which slows buses. Slower speeds result in longer duration trips, thereby impacting productivity. FY 2018/19 will bring newer fleet to DAR, replacing the aging bus fleet. CCTS DAR experienced in-service breakdowns and longer duration repairs as buses aged. Similar to the impact of increasing congestion, buses breaking down in-service make using CCTS bus service less reliable - motivating passengers to find more reliable alternatives to using the service. As related previously in this plan, CCTS staff is optimistic that the decline in productivity, as well as the decrease in passenger trips, will start to bottom-out and begin to slowly improve throughout FY 2018/19. See productivity measures in the table on the following page. Productivity Measures *FY 2017/18 performance is measured covering the period July 2017 through March 2018. 2.5 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS AND PROJECTED GROWTH Major trip destinations within the city are the commercial/retail areas along McKinley Street and Sixth Street, The Crossings shopping area on Cajalco Road and Temescal Canyon, medical facilities along Magnolia Avenue, regional transit facilities off Main Street, the Corona Public Library, the Senior Center, and the Civic Center. El Cerrito Middle School and Centennial High are also major trip generators. Mode Productivity Measure FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18* Passengers per revenue hour 11.70 11.50 10.42 9.06 9.04 Passengers per revenue mile 0.99 0.97 0.89 0.77 0.76 Passengers per revenue hour 4.20 3.90 3.65 3.92 3.83 Passengers per revenue mile 0.31 0.29 0.28 0.30 0.30 Corona Cruiser Dial-A-Ride City of Corona Transit Service Page 15 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Cruiser patrons use the service for work, shopping trips, making stops at pharmacies and grocery stores, and accessing restaurants and movie theaters. Over the past three years, students have made up an increasing share of Corona Cruiser and Dial-A-Ride passengers. Many Dial-A-Ride passengers use the service to get to work and care centers, doctor visits, and Corona’s two Metrolink Stations. CCTS staff is cautiously optimistic that the decrease in passenger trips experienced in the current Fiscal Year (July 2017 - June 2018) will start to bottom-out, and slowly improve throughout FY 2018/19. As such, a 4.8 percent increase in passenger trips – to 200,304, or 9,538 more passenger trips (made up of 6,577 more passenger trips on the Corona Cruiser and 2,961 passenger trips on Dial-A-Ride) - is projected for FY 2018/19. 2.6 EQUIPMENT, PASSENGER AMENITIES, AND FACILITY NEEDS CCTS plans to continue upgrading bus stop accessibility and passenger amenities in FY 2018/19 and FY 2019/20; planned improvements are as follows: • Battery replacement on solar-powered lighting at various bus passenger shelters. • Relocate passenger shelter from Fullerton (adjacent to Centennial High School) to the corner of Magnolia and Fullerton to serve the Blue Line WB bus stop. • Replace existing passenger shelters that display advertising with new shelters. The design of the new shelters will be based on the existing design, but re-worked to include two panels for advertising; and, • Replace older blue fiberglass bus benches with metal benches. • Add, expand, and/or replace damaged concrete at bus stops to improve accessibility. CCTS staff anticipates completing this work by 2020. Chapter 3 – Planned Service Changes and Implementation 3.1 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES Dial-A-Ride services changes include transitioning from General Public to Specialized Service serving seniors (60& older), persons with Disabilities and persons certified under ADA. This change was approved by City Council on August 17, 2017 and implemented on January 2, 2018. Following are minor service changes to fixed route service implemented January 2018: • Removed the shadow bus that was following the Blue Line in the AM leaving Walmart at 6:46 AM to Mountain Gate Park. • Replaced the El Dorado bus with the EZ Rider on the Redline 6:30 am Eastbound trip to accommodate additional riders. 3.2 RECOMMENDED LOCAL & EXPRESS ROUTE MODIFICATIONS City of Corona Transit Service Page 16 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan CCTS staff is proposing the following service enhancements in FY 2018/19: • New weekday schedule – To be an effective and useful transportation option, buses need to consistently operate according to the published schedule. Bus passengers need to be able to rely on the bus to pick them up on schedule, and deliver them to their destination on schedule. An unreliable transit system will lose riders. Passenger trips peaked for the Corona Cruiser and Dial-A-Ride in FY 2013/14, and have declined since. Increased traffic congestion from a growing local and regional population, delays related to a myriad of construction projects, operational challenges, and a slow response by CCTS to adjust published schedules addressing these challenges have contributed to declining passenger trips. • Increase weekday bus frequency during morning peak hours by adding an additional bus on the Blue Line and the Red Line. This will reduce headway by 30 minutes, thereby improving transit service and opportunity to increase ridership. This will provide patrons with options to utilize Corona Cruiser with additional time intervals. • Implement a Free Fare Program to encourage use of public transit. CCTS staff is in the process of measuring individual trip times in an effort to devise a schedule that reflects actual trip times to assemble a new schedule. In addition, CCTS staff will release solicitation for a Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) to examine service delivery and efficiency. The COA will be used to formulate recommendations for service improvements that maximize ridership and service performance effectiveness in meeting the needs of the patrons. FY 18/19 budget also includes funds for planning, scheduling and run-cutting services. A new, reliable schedule, combined the completion of constructions projects, and upgrades in passenger amenities should go a long way in gaining back passengers that may have left the system for more reliable transportation alternatives. 3.3 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION Marketing strategies include: • Bus Shelter Program – CCTS plans to replace existing advertising shelters at 20-25 bus stops. Shelters provide bus patrons with relief from the sun during hot days , and protection from rain during inclement weather. These shelters will feature two-panels for advertising, a bench, an area for a person with a mobility device/wheelchair, and solar- powered security lighting. These new shelters will act as a destination for bus passengers, and as an ambassador as to how public transit can beautify a neighborhood and itself function as marketing tool inviting motorist to try public transit. • Poetry and Art on the Bus Program – in cooperation with Centennial High and Corona High, CCTS continues to conduct poetry and art contest inviting students to submit original poetry and artwork to be displayed on the interior of Cruiser buses. Selected poems and artwork are rotated each month. The program works as an outreach effort and marketing campaign at high schools while providing a creative outlet for students. Cruiser patrons are rewarded with expressive, introspective, and entertaining poems to read and artwork to ponder during their time on the bus. The program is in its tenth year with artwork and poetry totaling 119 entries in 2018. • Free Fare Program – Implement a free fare program which will include the following programs: special free fare days, such as Bike to Work Day, Dump the Pump Day, days for targeted passengers; Fixed Route Training Program; and Summer Student Program. Offering various free fare programs allows the riders to experience the service without City of Corona Transit Service Page 17 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan cost to them with the intent the rider will continue to use the service. Low Carbon Transit Operations Program Funds will be utilized to offset the costs for this project. 3.4 BUDGET IMPACT AND PROPOSED CHANGES CCTS relies on a contribution from the City’s general fund to meet the mandatory farebox recovery ratio (mandated to recover blended rate of 15 percent of operating costs through fare revenue). However, the City’s general fund continues to reflect a sluggish regional economy so CCTS is incrementally increasing service next Fiscal Year to not overburden the general fund. In addition, during FY 2017/18, CCTS eliminated general use Dial-A-Ride service to reduce the farebox recovery ratio requirement from 20% to a blended rate of 15% (for both Fixed Route & DAR) and introduced federal funds for operating in an effort to reduce the general fund contribution. In addition, current contractor for transit operations is in its last year of the 5-year contract. Staff released solicitation in March 2018 and new contract is expected to start September 1, 2018. It is estimated that the cost per revenue hour will increase by 21 percent from current rate. This increase in revenue hour cost is anticipated due to additional requirements set forth in the scope of work, including: increased data collection, reporting and monitoring requirements for both operations and maintenance; additional staffing requirements to include dedicated staff for road supervision; video surveillance for money counting area; and conducting oil sampling/analysis as a quality assurance measure for revenue vehicles. The additional requirements were necessary in monitoring the No-shows, ADA requirements (phone statistics), on-time performance, and ensure state of good repair of revenue vehicles by conducting oil sampling and using a Computerized Maintenance Management System that analyzes the trends of maintenance operation. Chapter 4 – Financial and Capital Plans 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET To continue to provide Corona Cruiser fixed route and Dial-A-Ride service, CCTS is proposing a balanced budget of $2.88 million for FY 2018/19, representing a 14.6 percent increase ($368,157) over the current year FY 17-18 budget. Year-over-year increases in operating costs are largely driven by increases in administrative, materials and contracted service costs. In addition, FY 2018/19 budget includes costs for Vehicle Maintenance Oversight Project and Fixed Route Planning, Scheduling and Run-cutting project. However, the majority of the cost increase is due to higher per revenue hour cost for contracted transit operations; see section 3.4 above for more information. FY 2017-18 budget had reflected increased cost of operating more service in order to update the fixed route bus schedule. Due to competing priorities, the changes to the bus schedule did not materialize. Therefore, FY 18-19 budget will continue to reflect costs for increased revenue hour service effective January 2019 and inclusion of a Vehicle Maintenance Oversight and Fixed Route Planning, Scheduling and Run-cutting project, increasing the contracting cost by 21 percent ($377,121). In addition, FY 18-19 budget reflects a 2.7 percent increase in the cost of City of Corona Transit Service Page 18 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan marketing, materials, and utilities due to increase in advertising and additional program costs including the free fare program. These costs however are partially offset by 4.4 percent decrease in the cost of fuel (-$10,000). The decrease in fuel costs are attributable to replacement of five gasoline-powered vehicles with compressed natural gas vehicles in May 2018. See Budget by Category and Mode as shown below: Budget by Category and Mode 4.2 FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM CCTS is proposing a funding plan that includes state funding (Local Transportation Fund), Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds and Low Carbon Transportation Operations Program) to support more than 80 percent of operating costs. The remaining 20 percent will be Category Mode FY 2017/18 SRTP FY 2018/19 Plan Variance $% 186,846$ 190,000$ 3,154$ 1.7% 227,041$ 223,000$ (4,041)$ -1.8% 413,887$ 413,000$ (887)$ -0.2% 38,475$ 41,201$ 2,726$ 7.1% 31,975$ 31,172$ (803)$ -2.5% 70,450$ 72,373$ 1,923$ 2.7% 100,000$ 90,000$ (10,000)$ -10.0% 126,000$ 126,000$ -$ 0.0% 226,000$ 216,000$ (10,000)$ -4.4% 963,000$ 995,449$ 32,449$ 3.4% 843,100$ 1,187,772$ 344,672$ 40.9% 1,806,100$ 2,183,221$ 377,121$ 20.9% 1,288,321$ 1,316,650$ 28,329$ 2.2% 1,228,116$ 1,567,944$ 339,828$ 27.7% 2,516,437$ 2,884,594$ 368,157$ 14.6% Fixed Route Total Contracted Services Dial-A-Ride Fixed Route Subtotal Total Dial-A-Ride Subtotal Salaries & Benefits Dial-A-Ride Fixed Route Subtotal Materials, Marketing and Utilities Dial-A-Ride Fixed Route Subtotal Fuel Dial-A-Ride Fixed Route City of Corona Transit Service Page 19 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan generated by passenger fares, bus shelter advertising, and local funds. CCTS will use State Transit Assistance, Proposition 1B/Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement & Service Enhancement Program and Proposition 1B/California Transit Security Grant Program funding to cover proposed capital purchases in FY 2018/19. 4.3 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS Half Fare During Non-Peak Hours According to federal statute, transit operators must allow 1) elderly persons, 2) persons with disabilities, and 3) Medicare card holders to ride fixed route service during off-peak hours for a fare that is not more than one-half the base fare charged to other persons during peak hours. The base fare for Cruiser service is $1.50 during peak and non-peak hours. The fare for an elderly person (60+), a person with disabilities, and Medicare cardholders is $0.70 throughout the service day. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) The ADA requires that complementary paratransit service be available to ADA certified persons during the same hours and days of operation available to Cruiser (fixed route) passengers. Complementary paratransit service must be provided within ¾ of a mile corridor from each side of a fixed route. CCTS operates a general public Dial-A-Ride that extends beyond the ¾ mile corridor to the city limits, into the county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito, and Home Gardens, as well as satellite locations in the City of Norco (Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services and Norco College). When demand exceeds capacity, requests for service from ADA certified passengers receive priority. As such, CCTS maintains zero denials for ADA certified passengers. Provision of Service - ADA complementary paratransit must be provided to an ADA eligible individual, including those with temporary eligibility, a personal care attendant (PCA) if necessary, and one other individual accompanying the ADA-eligible individual, if requested. Additional companions may be provided service, if space is available. Service also must be provided to visitors. Any visitor who presents ADA eligibility documentation from another jurisdiction must be provided service. Type of Service – The ADA specifies “origin to destination” service. In certain instances, this might require service beyond strict curb-to-curb. Door-to-door assistance for ADA certified passengers is available upon request. Door-to-door service is available when: • Drivers can see the bus at all times; • The outermost door is within 150 feet from the bus; • Driver safety and security is maintained; and • Where a safe parking area is available. Fares – The ADA complementary paratransit fare cannot exceed twice the fare for a trip of similar length, at a similar time of day, on the Cruiser (fixed route system). No fares may be charged for Personal Care Attendants (PCAs). ADA certified individuals are charged $2.50 per trip which City of Corona Transit Service Page 20 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan is less than twice the fare for a trip on the Cruiser ($1.50 x 2 = $3.00). A companion is charged $2.50 per trip as well. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Pursuant to Federal Regulation 49 CFR Part 26 - Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE); all public agencies receiving U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) funds, that anticipate awarding $250,000 or more in USDOT-assisted contracts, must establish a three-year (3) overall DBE goal for potential contracting opportunities for certified Suppliers. CCTS will continue using federal section FTA 5307 funds for future projects including the use of these funds for operating and capital projects. The City submitted it’s first DBE program and DBE triennial goal and methodology on December 12, 2017. The DBE goal & methodology is for federal Fiscal Years 2018-2020 (October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2020) and has received FTA concurrence on January 10, 2018. Title VI In compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, no person on the basis of race, color, or national origin, is excluded from participation in, or is denied the benefits of, or is subjected to discrimination within the scope of services offered by CCTS. The following notification to passengers of their right to file a complaint is included on the City of Corona website , service brochures, and posted on-board CCTS buses. No person shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity of the City of Corona Transit Service (CCTS). The Public Works Director is the CCTS Title VI Compliance Officer. For more information, or to file a Title VI Civil Rights complaint, contact the Corona Public Works Department by telephone at (951) 736-2266, by email at publwks@ci.corona.ca.us, or by visiting the Public Works Department at 400 S. Vicentia Avenue, Suite 210, Corona, CA 92882. The current CCTS 2018-2020 Title VI program received FTA concurrence on September 21, 2017. The next program is due on June 1, 2020. Transportation Development Act Triennial Audit CCTS underwent a Transportation Development Act (TDA) Triennial Performance Audit document review in September 2015 and site visit in October 2015 covering Fiscal Years 2012/13 through 2014/15. The triennial performance audits are administered and coordinated by RCTC. While the audit results reveal CCTS operations meeting the major goals and objectives of the TDA program, room for improvement is always paramount with the audit which suggests improvements in three areas as summarized in Table 6 Progress Implementing Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations. City of Corona Transit Service Page 21 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan Federal Transit Administration Triennial Review A Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Triennial Review field review for the period of 2014-2016 was completed in March 2017. The table on the following page describes the deficiencies and FTA’s recommended corrective action. CCTS staff has responded to and corrected all deficiencies mentioned above. City received closeout letter dated April 9, 2018. Review Area Deficiency Corrective Action Technical Capacity Late MPRs/FFRs Submit to the FTA Region IX Office procedures for submitting Milestone Progress Reports (MPRs) and Federal Financial Reports (FFRs) on time Title VI Title VI program not submitted or expired Upload the required Title VI program to the TrAMS and notify the FTA Region IX RCRO Satisfactory Continuing Control Real property use issues Submit to FTA Region IX Office the following items: • Excess Real Property Inventory and Utilization Plan for the FTA-funded contribution to the facility that is no longer needed for transit purposes, as stated in the City’s Grant Agreement, and that states how the recipient plans to use or dispose of the excess real property. • Identify which disposition method the City will pursue, along with a timeline, in compliance with FTA Circular 5010.1E, Chapter IV: Real Property, Section 2.j, “Real Estate Disposition” and Section 2.j. (2), “Disposition”. National Transit Database The National Transit Database (NTD) approved CCTS’ request to submit transit financial and performance data through a Small Systems Waiver starting in report year 2011; the waiver is available to transit providers operating 30 or fewer buses. The submission date for Report Year 2017 was October 30, 2017. CCTS staff provided responses and clarification to NTD reviewers following the initial review. The annual NTD report for 2017 was closed out in April 2018. Alternative Fueled Vehicles (RCTC Policy) The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) encourages all Riverside County transit operators to transition from diesel-powered transit buses to alternative fuel buses. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) are recognized as preferred options. CCTS currently runs a mixed fleet of gasoline and CNG-powered buses for Dial-A-Ride. However, the City recently purchased eleven (11) buses fueled by CNG to replace aging DAR vehicles. These buses are expected to go into service May 2018. CCTS Corona Cruiser (fixed route) service operates using seven CNG-powered buses which began service in February 2016. By May/June 2018, all of CCTS fleet will be CNG-powered. City of Corona Transit Service Page 22 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLES Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Bus (Motorbus) / Purchased Transportation Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2015 EDN 30 EZ RiderII 7 32 CN 7 0 243,971 377,054 53,864 7 0 7 Totals: 30 243,971 377,054 53,865 5/30/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan City of Corona Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2007 EDN 16 AeroTech 1 24 GA 1 0 242,878 242,895 242,895 2012 EDN 20 AEROTECH 6 26 GA 6 0 859,463 974,024 162,337 2012 EDN 20 AEROTECH 4 26 CN 4 0 506,296 568,328 142,082 2008 STR 18 Starcraft 1 25 GA 1 0 126,261 131,889 131,889 12 0 12 Totals: 74 1,734,898 1,917,136 159,761 5/30/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- City of Corona -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 14 14 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $2,884,594 $1,654,888 $2,516,437 $2,196,757 $2,151,722 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $422,153 $227,929 $368,916 $444,547 $373,850 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$2,462,441 $1,426,959 $2,147,521 $1,752,211 $1,777,873 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 200,305 143,075 201,841 198,049 215,890 Passenger Miles 858,360 613,114 864,369 853,120 920,980 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 32,456.0 22,513.2 33,118.0 31,358.0 31,969.8 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 381,425.0 279,310.0 397,754.0 392,383.0 394,918.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 425,811.0 312,013.0 446,082.0 439,496.0 444,317.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $88.88 $73.51 $75.98 $70.05 $67.30 Farebox Recovery Ratio 14.63% 13.77% 14.66% 20.24% 17.37% Subsidy per Passenger $12.29 $9.97 $10.64 $8.85 $8.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.87 $2.33 $2.48 $2.05 $1.93 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$75.87 $63.38 $64.84 $55.88 $55.61 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$6.46 $5.11 $5.40 $4.47 $4.50 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 6.2 6.4 6.1 6.3 6.8 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.53 0.51 0.51 0.50 0.55 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- Corona-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 5 5 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $1,567,944 $779,188 $1,228,116 $1,010,669 $987,358 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $226,087 $105,230 $240,084 $216,248 $187,521 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$1,341,857 $673,958 $988,032 $794,422 $799,837 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 138,124 98,660 139,715 132,469 152,728 Passenger Miles 545,590 389,707 551,874 523,253 603,276 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 16,681.0 10,908.4 16,344.0 14,626.2 14,660.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 182,186.0 130,103.0 176,912.0 172,070.0 171,379.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 198,602.0 141,870.0 192,204.0 186,901.0 188,192.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $94.00 $71.43 $75.14 $69.10 $67.35 Farebox Recovery Ratio 14.41% 13.51% 19.54% 21.40% 18.99% Subsidy per Passenger $9.71 $6.83 $7.07 $6.00 $5.24 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.46 $1.73 $1.79 $1.52 $1.33 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$80.44 $61.78 $60.45 $54.32 $54.56 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$7.37 $5.18 $5.58 $4.62 $4.67 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 8.3 9.0 8.5 9.1 10.4 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.76 0.76 0.79 0.77 0.89 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- Corona-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 9 9 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $1,316,650 $875,699 $1,288,321 $1,186,088 $1,164,365 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $196,066 $122,698 $128,832 $228,299 $186,329 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$1,120,584 $753,001 $1,159,489 $957,789 $978,036 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 62,181 44,415 62,126 65,580 63,162 Passenger Miles 312,770 223,407 312,495 329,867 317,705 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 15,775.0 11,604.8 16,774.0 16,731.8 17,309.8 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 199,239.0 149,207.0 220,842.0 220,313.0 223,539.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 227,209.0 170,143.0 253,878.0 252,595.0 256,125.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $83.46 $75.46 $76.80 $70.89 $67.27 Farebox Recovery Ratio 14.89% 14.01% 9.99% 19.25% 16.00% Subsidy per Passenger $18.02 $16.95 $18.66 $14.60 $15.48 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.58 $3.37 $3.71 $2.90 $3.08 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$71.04 $64.89 $69.12 $57.24 $56.50 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$5.62 $5.05 $5.25 $4.35 $4.38 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.31 0.30 0.28 0.30 0.28 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Corona -- 3 Data Elements Route # Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2018/19 All Routes COR-BLUE All Days 68,100 268,996 3 8,690.0 85,627.0 93,343.0 $775,092 $111,763 $663,329 8,246.0 COR-DAR All Days 62,181 312,770 9 18,914.0 199,239.0 227,209.0 $1,316,650 $196,066 $1,120,584 15,775.0 COR-RED All Days 70,024 276,594 2 8,889.0 96,559.0 105,259.0 $792,852 $114,324 $678,528 8,435.0 Service Provider Totals $2,462,441 $422,153 $2,884,594 425,811.0 381,425.0 36,493.0 32,456.0 858,360 200,305 14 TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Corona -- 3 Performance Indicators Route # Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2018/19 All Routes COR-BLUE All Days $9.05 $11.38 $94.00 $9.74 $2.47 $80.44 $7.75 8.3 0.80 14.41% COR-DAR All Days $6.61 $21.17 $83.46 $18.02 $3.58 $71.04 $5.62 3.9 0.31 14.89% COR-RED All Days $8.21 $11.32 $94.00 $9.69 $2.45 $80.44 $7.03 8.3 0.73 14.41% Service Provider Totals 0.53 6.2 $6.46 $75.87 $2.87 $12.29 14.63%$14.40 $7.56 $88.88 TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 2 of 2 City of Corona Transit Service Page 30 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 3A – INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AND AREA SERVICED Mode Route Description Service Area/Sites WalMart at McKinley Street West to River Run Apartments via Mountain Gate Park and downtown/Civic Center McKinley Street shopping areas, Magnolia Avenue, Centennial High, Medical Facilities, Senior Center, Corona Library, Corona Transit Center/North Main Corona Metrolink Station, Circle City Center (Community Center), North Main Street shopping area and restaurants The Crossings shopping area at Cajalco Road and Temescal Canyon Road to the Walmart at Neighborhood Market at West Sixth Street via downtown/Civic Center The Crossings shopping area, Walmart, California Avenue Post Office, Centennial High, Corona Transit Center/North Main Corona Metrolink Station (selected AM & PM trip), Corona Library, Senior Center, Civic Center, Corona High and Walmart Neighborhood Market on West Sixth Street near Smith Avenue. Service is extended to The Shops at Dos Lagos on Saturdays. Demand Response / Reservation based service City-wide, neighboring county areas of Coronita, El Cerrito and Home Gardens as well as the following statellite locations in the City of Norco: Department of Motor Vehicles, Department of Public Social Services, Brunswick Classic Lanes, Target and Norco College Blue Line Red Line City-Wide Corona Cruiser Dial-A-Ride City of Corona Transit Service Page 31 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 4 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2018/19 Project Description Capital Project No. Total Amount of Funds LTF STA 5307 Funds 5339 Funds Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) FY 17-18 Funds LCTOP AQMD AB 2766 Subvention Funds Fare Box*Other ** FY 18 - Operating Revenues 1,892,306$ $ 1,400,153 100,000$ $ 15,000 $ 298,700 $ 78,453 Capital Cost of Operating for Fixed Route & Dial-A-Ride 792,288$ $ 158,458 $ 633,830 Vehicle Maintenance Oversight Project 50,000$ $ 50,000 Fixed Route Planning including scheduling and runcutting 150,000$ $ 120,000 $ 30,000 Subtotal: Operating 2,884,594$ 1,678,611$ -$ 633,830$ -$ -$ 50,000$ 100,000$ 15,000$ 298,700$ 108,453$ Intelligent Transportation System 19-01 500,000$ 100,000$ 400,000$ Route Development Buses (3)19-02 950,000$ 190,000$ 760,000$ Purchase ADA accessible Van 19-03 48,039$ 48,039$ Support Equipment and Software 19-04 10,000$ 10,000$ Subtotal: Capital 1,508,039$ -$ 300,000$ 1,160,000$ -$ -$ 48,039$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Total: Operating & Capital 4,392,633$ 1,678,611$ 300,000$ 1,793,830$ -$ -$ 98,039$ 100,000$ 15,000$ 298,700$ 108,453$ * Includes AB 2766 congestion and emission reduction funds to incentivize Cruiser multi-day passes $15,000. **Other revenues include City contribution $91,453; Bus Shelter Advertising $7,000; and local contribution $10,000. 298,700$ Pax Fares 15,000$ AB 2766 Subsidy 313,700$ 7,000$ Shelter advertising 91,453$ Gen'l Fund 10,000$ Local contribution 108,453$ Total 422,153$ Fare Box Other Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 City of Corona Transit Service Page 32 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FY 2018/19 SRTP Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 19-01 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)) PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Purchase and install an Intelligent Transportation System that will support the following GPS based components: 1) Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL); 2) Automated Vehicle Annunciator System (AVAS); 3) Computer Aided Dispatching (CAD) and; 4) Automated Passenger Count (APC). The system will improve performance monitoring, and reporting capabilities, and improve service quality and bus efficiency. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: The ITS is necessary as an effort to ensure customers are receiving the highest quality information on time as well as ensuring that CCTS is operating at optimal efficiency. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds with State Transit Assistance (STA) as match funds. (STA) capital funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount FTA FY 2018/19 $400,000 STA FY 2018/19 $100,000 Total $500,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/17) Not applicable City of Corona Transit Service Page 33 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 SRTP Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 19-02 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Route Development Buses PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This request provides funds to purchase two Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) buses to be used in Corona Cruiser Fixed Route Service. These buses will be wheelchair accessible, capable of carrying two bicycles and have up to twenty seats . PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Corona residents are requesting more fixed route service. Additional buses are required to operate more frequent services and/or additional bus routes. The buses proposed here will be used as route development vehicles. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date January 2019 June 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds with State Transit Assistance (STA) as match funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount FTA FY 2018/19 $760,000 STA FY 2018/19 $190,000 Total $950,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/18) 15-3 Purchase Cruiser Buses $65,000 City of Corona Transit Service Page 34 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 SRTP Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 19-03 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Purchase ADA accessible van PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Purchase an ADA accessible van to transport passengers/wheelchair to support the current Dial-A-Ride Program. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Transporting few passengers (or one wheelchair) may be more efficient using a smaller vehicle rather than a larger vehicle such as a cutaway. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date Jan 2019 June 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting State of Good Repair Funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR FY 2017/18 $48,039 Total $48,039 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/17) Not applicable City of Corona Transit Service Page 35 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 SRTP Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 19-04 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Support Equipment and Software PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Provide funding for miscellaneous support and office equipment as needed for operations and administrative functions. Support equipment may include office furniture, photocopier, computer equipment and other auxiliary equipment. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Much of the support equipment are in need of replacement as they are exceeding their useful life. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date July 2018 December 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting State Transit Assistance funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA FY 2018/19 $10,000 Total $10,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/17) Not applicable City of Corona Transit Service Page 36 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 5.1 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2019/20 Project Description Capital Project No. Total Amount of Funds LTF STA 5307 Funds 5339 Funds Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP*** AQMD AB 2766 Subvention Funds Fare Box*Other ** FY 18 - Operating Revenues 2,043,072$ $ 1,471,992 $ 150,000 $ 15,000 $ 304,914 $ 101,166 Capital Cost of Operating for Fixed Route & Dial-A-Ride 873,531$ $ 174,706 $ 698,825 Vehicle Maintenance Oversight Project 50,000$ $ 50,000 Subtotal: Operating 2,966,603$ 1,646,698$ -$ 698,825$ -$ -$ 50,000$ 150,000$ 15,000$ 304,914$ 101,166$ Route Development Bus (1)20-01 475,000$ 354,503$ 120,497$ Purchase ADA accessible Van 20-02 51,961$ Subtotal: Capital 475,000$ -$ 354,503$ -$ 120,497$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Total: Operating & Capital 3,441,603$ 1,646,698$ 354,503$ 698,825$ 120,497$ -$ 50,000$ 150,000$ 15,000$ 304,914$ 101,166$ Section 5339 Funds include FY 16/17 ($60,497) and estimated FY 17/18 funds ($60,000). * Includes AB 2766 congestion and emission reduction funds to incentivize Cruiser multi-day passes $15,000. **Other revenues include City contribution $84,166; Bus Shelter Advertising $7,000; and local contribution $10,000. 304,914$ Pax Fares 15,000$ AB 2766 Subsidy 319,914$ 7,000$ Shelter advertising 84,166$ Gen'l Fund 10,000$ Local contribution 101,166$ Total 421,080$ Fare Box Other Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2019/20 City of Corona Transit Service Page 37 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FY 2019/20 SRTP Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 20-01 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Route Development Bus PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This request provides funds to purchase one Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) bus to be used in Corona Cruiser Fixed Route Service. These buses will be wheelchair accessible, capable of carrying two bicycles and have up to twenty seats. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Corona residents are requesting more fixed route service. Additional buses are required to operate more frequent services and/or additional bus routes. The buses proposed here will be used as route development vehicles. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date January 2019 June 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting State Transit Assistance (STA) capital funds and FTA Section 5339 funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA FY 2019/20 $354,503 FTA 5339 FY 2016/17 $ 60,497 FTA 5339 FY 2017/18 $ 60,000 Total $475,000 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/18) City of Corona Transit Service Page 38 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan FY 2019/20 SRTP Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: SRTP Project No: 20-02 FTIP No: not assigned – new project PROJECT NAME: Purchase ADA accessible van PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Purchase an ADA accessible van to transport passengers/wheelchair to support the current Dial-A-Ride Program. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Transporting few passengers (or one wheelchair) may be more efficient using a smaller vehicle rather than a larger vehicle such as a cutaway. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date Jan 2019 June 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): CCTS is requesting State of Good Repair Funds. Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount SGR FY 2018/19 $51,961 Total $51,961 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED FTA Grant No. FTIP ID No. RCTC/SRTP Project No. Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/17) City of Corona Transit Service Page 39 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 5.2 – SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2020/21 Project Description Capital Project No. Total Amount of Funds LTF STA 5307 Funds 5339 Funds Toll Credits State of Good Repair (SGR) LCTOP*** AQMD AB 2766 Subvention Funds Fare Box*Other ** FY 18 - Operating Revenues 2,075,583$ $ 1,498,367 $ 150,000 $ 15,000 $ 310,946 $ 101,270 Capital Cost of Operating for Fixed Route & Dial-A-Ride 881,094$ $ 176,218.8 $ 704,875 Vehicle Maintenance Oversight Project 50,000$ $ 50,000 Subtotal: Operating 3,006,677$ 1,674,586$ -$ 704,875$ -$ -$ 50,000$ 150,000$ 15,000$ 310,946$ 101,270$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Subtotal: Capital -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Total: Operating & Capital 3,006,677$ 1,674,586$ -$ 704,875$ -$ -$ 50,000$ 150,000$ 15,000$ 310,946$ 101,270$ * Includes AB 2766 congestion and emission reduction funds to incentivize Cruiser multi-day passes $15,000. **Other revenues include City contribution $84,270; Bus Shelter Advertising $7,000; and local contribution $10,000. 310,946$ Pax Fares 15,000$ AB 2766 Subsidy 325,946$ 7,000$ Shelter advertising 84,270$ Gen'l Fund 10,000$ Local contribution 101,270$ Total 427,216$ Fare Box Other Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2020/21 City of Corona Transit Service Page 40 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 6 – PROGRESS IMPLEMENTING TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT (TDA) TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RECOMMENDATIONS* Audit Recommendations (Covering FY 2012/13 to FY 2014/15) Action/Remedy Revise the no-show policy in conformance with FTA findings The rate of no-shows has averaged over 8 percent on the Dial-A-Ride service which is above general industry norms (generally below 5 percent). The City’s Dial-A-Ride is open to the general public; general public rides comprise close to 20 percent and seniors and disabled individuals comprise slightly over 80 percent. No-shows affect the timeliness and efficiency of service delivery in the areas of service hours and on-time performance. The City and the FTA agreed that any future no-show policy would not take into account no-shows caused by reasons beyond the rider’s control, and would only suspend riders who truly had established a pattern or practice of no-shows. A pattern or practice involves intentional, repeated, or regular actions, not isolated, accidental, or singular incidents. The City should continue efforts to revise its no-show policy, which provides a deterrent for repeat violators. The City and the contract operator should take the necessary steps to revise the no-show policy in a way that addresses the FTA’s concern, and include the policy in transit brochures and on the website. The RTA no-show policy outlines example steps for evaluating patterns and the process for violations of the policy: It considers a customer's overall frequency of use, and establishes "a pattern of practice of abuse" that is relative to how often a person travels. The overall no-show rate for all customers is considered so that customers with average no-show records are not penalized. CCTS staff rolled out the No-Show policy and procedure during FY 2017/18. The policy was vetted through FTA Civil Rights Office. Review alternative farebox standards under the TDA The current farebox standard for Corona Transit is a 20 percent ratio system- wide. This ratio is met by the combination of both fixed route and Dial-A-Ride services. Other local contributions from the City have made up the difference between passenger fares and revenue needed to meet the required ratio. The local contributions have a cap on how much can be provided to transit. TDA allows alternative farebox recovery ratios for urban systems. One alternative is a split farebox standard: one for fixed route, and another for Dial- A-Ride. The fixed-route standard would still be 20 percent; however, the Dial- A-Ride standard could be reduced to 10 percent. The caveat with the alternative lower Dial-A-Ride standard is that it applies only to service for seniors and disabled. This means the Dial-A-Ride would need to switch from general public to a specialized service. As noted above, seniors and disabled individuals currently comprise slightly over 80 percent of the Dial-A-Ride ridership. By complying with a lower farebox standard for Dial-A-Ride, the City might be able to reallocate its transit funds to support enhanced and more City of Corona Transit Service Page 41 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan productive service and/or possibly reduce its reliance on the local contribution. The alternative farebox standard and the change from general public to specialized Dial-A-Ride should be evaluated by the City as a means to further strengthen its ability to maintain the farebox recovery. Any change to the farebox would need to be formally approved by RCTC as required by TDA. On August 17, 2017 City Council approved the transition of General Public Dial-A-Ride to Specialized Dial-A-Ride in an effort to reduce the farebox recovery ratio to a blended rate of 15 percent. The Specialize Service went into effect January 2, 2018. Review feasibility of implementing ADA Passengers certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) currently comprise about 25 percent of all Corona Dial-A-Ride passengers. Another 40 percent of riders are disabled but are not ADA-certified. A call must be made to schedule each ride on Corona Dial-A-Ride. Subscription service is a convenience offered to ADA paratransit passengers who take the same trip on a regular basis, as it reduces the need to make repeated calls for each ride. Many agencies have subscription service trips (i.e., having a standing reservation scheduled) that make up a portion of their trip requests. Subscription service trips generally are trips that a patron makes multiple times per month, often multiple times per week, and have a specific origin and destination that do not change. Most often, these types of trips are for employment, medical, and/or educational purposes. These trips can be prescheduled, thus reducing the burden on the scheduler/dispatcher and call in-take system. ADA subscription service is generally on a space-available basis, and scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis for a given time period (e.g., 14 or 30 days of subscription service). Federal ADA law permits the use of subscription service as long as it does not absorb more than 50 percent of the available trips at a given time of day, and does not result in next-day ADA trip denials. Subscription service is discretionary and not mandated under ADA, which allows the City to investigate its feasibility through a demonstration period to determine whether additional scheduling efficiencies through the new scheduling software can be made, as well as whether there is some reduced staff and cost burden from the number of calls for reservations. CCTS staff work with current contractor (provider of transportation services) and review feasibility of establishing an ADA Subscription Services Policy. After review and consideration, City will proceed with adopting the policy. *Recommendations from the FY 2013-FY 2015 Transportation Development Act (TDA) Triennial Performance Audit. Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2017/18 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Corona FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 Target FY 2017/18 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Data Elements 201,841 Unlinked Passenger Trips 864,369 Passenger Miles 33,118.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 397,754.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 446,082.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles $2,516,437 Total Operating Expenses $368,916 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $2,147,521 Net Operating Expenses Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio Fails to Meet Target>= 20.00% 14.66% 13.77% Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target<= $72.17 $75.98 $73.51 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Meets Target>= $8.11 and <= $10.97 $10.64 $9.97 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Meets Target>= $1.89 and <= $2.55 $2.48 $2.33 4. Subsidy Per Hour Meets Target>= $51.19 and <= $69.25 $64.84 $63.38 5. Subsidy Per Mile Meets Target>= $4.11 and <= $5.55 $5.40 $5.11 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 5.36 and <= 7.25 6.10 6.40 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.43 and <= 0.59 0.51 0.51 Note:Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: A farebox recovery ratio in this range is anticipated at this point in the fiscal year. At the close of each fiscal year, the City contributes a sufficient amount of funding to bridge the gap required to meet the farebox recovery ratio. This will also reduce subsidy per passenger, thereby meeting the target. The farebox recovery requirement has been reduced from 20 to a blended rate of 15 percent due to transitioning the Dial-A-Ride Program from General Public to Specialized Service. 5/24/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 FY 2018/19 - Table 8 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: City of Corona All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 Plan Plan Performance Scorecard (a)FY 2018/19 Target FY 2017/18 3rd Quarter Year-to-Date FY 2016/17 End of Year Actual Passengers None 143,075 200,305 198,049 Passenger Miles None 613,114 858,360 853,120 Revenue Hours None 22,513.2 32,456.0 31,358.0 Total Hours None 24,612.9 36,493.0 34,405.7 Revenue Miles None 279,310.0 381,425.0 392,383.0 Total Miles None 312,013.0 425,811.0 439,496.0 Operating Costs None$1,654,888 $2,884,594 $2,196,757 Passenger Revenue None$227,929 $422,153 $444,547 Operating Subsidy None$1,426,959 $2,462,441 $1,752,211 Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target<= $75.05$73.51 $88.88 $70.05 Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile None$5.92 $7.56 $5.60 Operating Costs Per Passenger None$11.57 $14.40 $11.09 Farebox Recovery Ratio Fails to Meet Target>= 15.0% 13.77% 14.63% 20.24% Subsidy Per Passenger Fails to Meet Target>= $8.47 and <= $11.47$9.97 $12.29 $8.85 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Fails to Meet Target>= $1.98 and <= $2.68$2.33 $2.87 $2.05 Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target>= $53.87 and <= $72.89$63.38 $75.87 $55.88 Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Fails to Meet Target>= $4.34 and <= $5.88$5.11 $6.46 $4.47 Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 5.44 and <= 7.36 6.40 6.20 6.30 Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.43 and <= 0.59 0.51 0.53 0.50 a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2018/19 Plan to the FY 2018/19 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager™ 5/24/2018 Page 1 of 1 City of Corona Transit Service Page 44 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 9 – CCTS HIGHLIGHTS FY 2018/19 Operations • Improve Fixed Route Service o Adjust Corona Cruiser bus schedule to reflect actual trip times. o Introduce additional morning peak service o Implement a Free Fare Program • Improve Dial-A-Ride Services o Eliminate general DAR o Review feasibility of establishing an ADA Subscription Services Policy • New contract for transit operations o Solicitation released March 17, 2018 • Work with the City’s contract transportation operator to improve: o Operations of Corona Cruiser and Dial-A-Ride service; o Bus maintenance and cleanliness/maintenance of bus stops; and o Monitoring and verifying contractor performance. • Conduct a Comprehensive Operational Analysis to identify strengths as well as opportunities for improvements • Seek services for fixed route planning, scheduling and run-cutting Capital Projects • Bus stop improvements – replace batteries on solar-powered lighting TABLE 9A – OPERATING AND FINANCIAL DATA Performance Measure FY 2013/14 FY 2014/15 FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Planned System-wide Passenger Trips 238,597 234,318 215,890 198,049 143,075 200,305 Cost per Service Hour $66.30 $68.55 $70.13 $70.07 $73.51 $88.88 City of Corona Transit Service Page 45 of 45 FY 2018-19 Short Range Transit Plan TABLE 9B – FAREBOX REVENUE CALCULATION (Consistent with Riverside County Transportation Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Farebox Recovery Ratio Revenues FY 2014/15 FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 Est. FY 2018/19 Plan Passenger Fares $372,165 $338,282 $323,593 $293,147 $298,700 Interest Income $4,214 $27,627 $0 $0 $0 General Fund Contribution $32,500 $54,001 $78,000 $59,616 $91,453 Measure A $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Passenger Shelter Advertising Revenue $10,426 $7,977 $7,421 $7,000 $7,000 Gain on Sale of Capital Assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 CNG Revenues $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Lease / Other Revenue $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Federal Excise Tax Refund $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Investment Income $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 CalPers CERBT $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Other Revenues $17,061 $27,008 $35,534 $12,500 $25,000 Total Farebox Revenues $436,366 $454,895 $444,548 $372,263 $422,153 Total Operating Expense $2,170,801 $2,242,025 $2,196,759 $2,255,208 $2,884,594 Farebox Recovery Ratio*20%20%20%17%15% *On August 17, 2017, City Council approved transition of General Public Dial-A-Ride to Specialized Service; Farebox recover ratio decreased from 20% to system wide blended rate of 15%. Coachella-San Gorgonio Pass Rail Short Range Transit Plan FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 Final 5/14/18 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW ................................................................... 1 1.1 Description of Service Area .................................................................... 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections .................................... 2 1.3 Fixed Route Services.............................................................................. 2 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure ............................. 2 1.5 Revenue Fleet ........................................................................................ 2 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities .......................................................... 2 1.7 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies ................................... 3 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE ................. 6 CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION ....... 6 CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS ............................................ 6 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget ................................................................ 6 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program .... 6 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements ............................................ 6 CHAPTER 5 – SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROCESS............................. 7 5.1 Task 1: Detailed Work Plan, Budget, and Outreach Plan ....................... 8 5.2 Task 2: Preliminary Service Planning and Alternatives .......................... 8 5.3 Task 3: Environmental Documentation ................................................... 9 5.4 Task 4: Service Development Plan ....................................................... 13 5.5 Project Management ............................................................................ 14 Table 1 – Fleet Inventory .................................................................................. 16 Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary ................................................................... 16 Table 2A – Summary of Routes to Be Excluded in FY 2018/19 ..................... 16 Table 3 – SRTP Route Statistics ...................................................................... 16 Table 3A – Individual Route Descriptions ...................................................... 16 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 ............................... 17 Table 5.1 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2019/20 ............................. 19 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification ....................................................... 20 Table 5.2 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2020/21 ............................. 21 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification ....................................................... 22 Table 6 – Update Actions Taken or To Be Implemented to Comply with the Most Recent Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations ..................... 22 Table 7 – Service Provider Performance Target Report ................................ 22 Table 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP Performance Report ........................................... 22 Table 9A – Highlights of FY 18/19 SRTP ......................................................... 23 Table 9B – Fare Revenue Calculation ............................................................. 23 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS BNSF BNSF Railways CEQ Council of Environmental Quality CEQA California Environmental Quality Act CETAP Community & Environmental Acceptability Process CMAQ Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality Funds CVAG Coachella Valley Association of Governments DEIS Draft Environmental Impact Statement EA Environmental Assessment EIR Environmental Impact Report EIS Environmental Impact Statement EOM Extra-Ordinary Maintenance FEIS Final Environmental Impact Statement FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HSIPR High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail IEOC Inland Empire-Orange County Line LAUS Los Angeles Union Station LOSSAN Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency LTF Local Transportation Funds Metro Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority MOW Maintenance-of-Way NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NOA Notice of Availability NOI Notice of Intent NTD National Transit Database OCTA Orange County Transportation Authority PA&ED Project Approval and Environmental Document PRCIP Passenger Rail Corridor Investment Plan PTC Positive Train Control PTMISEA Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account PVL Perris Valley Line RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission ROD Record of Decision RTA Riverside Transit Agency RTIP Regional Transportation Improvement Program SB Senate Bill SBCTA San Bernardino County Transportation Authority SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SCRRA Southern California Regional Rail Authority SDP Service Development Plan SJBL San Jacinto Branch Line SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance Funds STIP State Transportation Improvement Program STP Surface Transportation Program Funds TVM Ticket Vending Machine UP Union Pacific Railroad VCTC Ventura County Transportation Commission RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 1 CHAPTER 1 – SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 Description of Service Area The proposed Coachella Valley–San Gorgonio Rail Corridor (Corridor) runs from Los Angeles to Indio through four Southern California counties: Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino. The Corridor refers to the approximately 141-mile long rail corridor between Los Angeles Union Station (LAUS) and the city of Indio. The Corridor consists of two segments: the western 59-mile long segment between LAUS and Riverside/Colton, and the eastern approximately 82-mile segment between Riverside/Colton and Indio. It is anticipated that alternate routes between Los Angeles and the Riverside/Colton area be analyzed. This would include possible routes along the BNSF Railway (BNSF) San Bernardino Subdivision, the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) Alhambra or Los Angeles Subdivision, and the Metrolink San Gabriel Subdivision. To ensure that planning considers the interrelationships of the broader regional rail network, the following segment(s) and/or services beyond the Corridor shall be considered to the degree necessary to fully inform the service developm ent planning process and service environmental work for the Corridor: 1. Amtrak Sunset Limited (Los Angeles to New Orleans via Phoenix) 2. Amtrak Southwest Chief (Los Angeles to Chicago via Riverside) 3. Amtrak Pacific Surfliner Trains (San Diego to San Luis Obispo) 4. Commuter Rail Operations Metrolink (Serving Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura Counties) 5. Future daily intercity service between Los Angeles and Phoenix via Coachella Valley RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 2 6. Local and regional bus connections 7. High Speed Rail future plans 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections The proposed intercity passenger rail service would provide a conveniently scheduled link to the greater metropolitan areas of Southern California for the communities in the fast-growing Coachella Valley and Banning Pass areas. It will also provide Los Angeles and Orange County residents’ access to the world class Coachella Valley visitor destinations and festivals. In addition, it will provide lifeline access on routes not serviced by other means to key destinations such as the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Loma Linda. The market analysis performed as part of the Final Alternatives Analysis, July 25, 2016, identified a projected 47% increase in travel over the next 20 years between Los Angele s and Coachella Valley and a projected 23% population increase by 2035 for the four counties comprising the Corridor (Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino). Coachella Valley is expected to double its population and the population of the San Gorgonio Pass Area is projected to increase by 134% by 2035. Numerous disadvantaged communities exist within the Corridor that could benefit from a significant improvement in regional mobility and a health benefit from reduced vehicle emissions from an intercity passenger rail service. 1.3 Fixed Route Services Two daily roundtrips are proposed for initial service. The running time between Los Angeles and Indio is 3 – 3.5 hours, with a proposed maximum speed of the service is 79 miles per hour (mph). Connections will be provided to The Pacific Surfliner daily intercity service at the Fullerton Station, and Metrolink’s Inland Empire -Orange County (IEOC) Line at the Riverside – Downtown Station. Connections to Metrolink’s San Bernardino Line could also be made at the Riverside – Downtown Station with rail or bus transfers. 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure Proposed fares have not been determined at this time. 1.5 Revenue Fleet Fleet requirements have not been determined at this time. 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities The proposed Coachella Valley Corridor intercity service will stop at three existing Metrolink/Amtrak stations: LAUS, Fullerton, and Riverside – Downtown. Five additional existing or new stations are proposed between Riverside and Indio. Options include: RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 3  Redlands/Loma Linda (new station)  Banning/Beaumont/Cabazon (new station)  Palm Springs (existing Amtrak station)  Mid Valley (new station)  Indio (existing bus station and planned intermodal station) 1.7 Existing Coordination Between Transit Agencies A coordinated process will involve affected railroad owners, operators, and funding partners, including:  Major Partners: Divisions within the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), including Rail, Planning, Mass Transportation, and Transportation Systems Information; and Caltrans District 8  Project Partner: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)  Railroad Owners: UP, BNSF, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), and San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA)  Regional Transportation Planning Agencies: Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG), Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG)  Regulatory Agencies: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Regional Water Quality Control Board, Bureau of Land Management (potentially),  Intercity Rail Agency/Operator: (Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo) LOSSAN Joint Powers Authority/Amtrak  Commuter Rail Agency/Operator: Southern California Regional Rail Agency (SCRRA)/Metrolink Providing passenger rail service to the Coachella Valley has been a long-standing priority for more than two decades. The first studies for such a service were completed in the early 1990’s. Additional studies have been performed over time with one of the more recent efforts completed in April 2010. This study was completed through coordination by CVAG, the Commission, and Schiermeyer Consulting Services and adopted by the CVAG Executive Committee on October 25, 2010. On November 10, 2010, the Commission reaffirmed its formal support for implementation and expansion of intercity Amtrak rail service to the Coachella Valley and directed staff to coordinate wit h CVAG and local communities to advocate for the service. To follow up on that effort, the RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 4 Commission adopted a formal Resolution No. 11-001 in support of Amtrak’s plan to run the Sunset Limited daily through the Coachella Valley. On July 1, 2010, the FRA published its Interim Program Guidance for the High -Speed Intercity Passenger Rail (HSIPR) Program in the Federal Register Volume 75 No. 126 Notices. Caltrans was selected through this competitive grant program for planning funds to conduct the State Rail Plan, which includes the proposed service that is the subject of this scope. As part of its planning processes, Caltrans conducted the Coachella Valley Intercity Rail Corridor Planning Study, which examined the viability of the provision of intercity passenger rail service between Los Angeles and Indio and recommended the preparation of a Service Development Plan (SDP) to determine the range of, and ultimately, select a preferred service option for the corridor. The SDP entails the following requirements:  Clearly demonstrate the purpose and need  Analyze alternatives for the proposed passenger rail service  Identify the alternative that best meets the purpose and need  Identify the discrete capital projects required  Demonstrate the operational and financial feasibility Both Caltrans and FRA have been working to either develop or approve such SDP ’s for corridors throughout the country and offered some very helpful suggestions on how to conduct the planning effort. CVAG MOU and TDA Funding At its September 30, 2013 meeting, the CVAG Executive Committee approved a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Commission and CVAG to establish a funding split of Coachella Valley Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds. All of these TDA funds are currently allocated to SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the intent is to allocate 10 percent of the STA discretionary portion of the TDA funds, using a phased-in approach, in order to support a Coachella Valley Rail program . The intent of the MOU is to allow the Commission to set aside those State Transit Assistance (STA) funds into a Coachella Valley Rail fund to be used only for capital costs to improve stations, staff support, as well as funding for technical studies. This funding split is to be phased in as follows: FY 2014/15 5 percent of the STA portion of the TDA funds FY 2015/16 7 percent of the STA portion of the TDA funds FY 2016/17 and thereafter 10 percent of the STA portion of the TDA funds TDA funds are utilized on a wide variety of transportation programs throughout the state including Riverside County. These activities include planning and programming activities, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, community transit services, public transportation, and transit projects. Historically, TDA funds have not been set aside for passenger rail. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 5 However, technical work will continue on development of the Los Angeles to Coachella Valley corridor in the State Rail Plan. This work will demonstrate the Coachella Valley’s commitment toward implementing a robust rail program and, thereby, serve as a lever to unlock federal and state sources of funding and other support for necessary environmental work, as well as future operations funding. SunLine is the only designated public transit operator in the Coachella Valley currently authorized by the state to receive these funds. SunLine has been involved in the development of this plan and is working in partnership with the Commission and CVAG in order to promote close coordination of bus and rail needs so that both programs operate successfully. The MOU with CVAG will support a Coachella Valley Rail fund. These funds would be internally maintained at the Commission in a separate account while expenditures would be authorized by CVAG’s Executive Committee. This would be similar to current arrangements for the Coachella Valley Highway and Regional Arterial program where the Commission acts as a fiscal agent pursuant to Measure A, but actual expenditures are authorized by CVAG. CVAG Executive Committee decisions regarding the Coachella Valley Rail fund would only impact passenger rail projects within the Coachella Valley. The Coachella Valley Rail fund would initially be used to improve stations with projects that have independent utility, provide funding for technical stud ies, and limited project management staff support. These funds are currently being used as matching funds to the FRA grant that is completing the Service Development Plan and Environmental Documents. Annual Project Update and FRA Grant Status As the project has progressed, there have been many significant accomplishments including the award of a $2.9M FRA Planning Grant announced on April 16, 2015. This grant allowed the project to seamlessly continue from Phase 1 to Phase 2. As described below the project has many elements to complete for the overall Service Development Plan. As of the end of FY18 the following has been completed:  Initial Project Outreach and Scoping  Public Open House Meetings  Stakeholder TAC Meetings  Market Analysis  Purpose and Need Document  Alternatives Analysis  Phase 2 scoping and planning  FRA Grant Development  Initiated Tier 1 Environmental  Environmental Scoping Meetings and Report  Initiated Service Development Plan  Basis of Design Report RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 6 CHAPTER 2 – EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE Section not applicable. CHAPTER 3 – PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION Section not applicable. CHAPTER 4 – FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget An operating and capital budget does not exist at this time . 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program Potential sources of funding for capital and operational costs have not been identified at this time. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements Section not applicable. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 7 CHAPTER 5 – SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROCESS The Commission is leading the planning efforts for the SDP and environmental documents, utilizing a combination of state and local funds. A large portion of the funding is from the State Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) Program. Due to the complexity of service development programs, extensive pre-construction preparation is required, including service planning, environmental review, and conceptual engineering efforts. The first phase of this process, known as the Planning Phase, is the development of the Passenger Rail Corridor Investment Plan (PRCIP). The PRCIP provides information in support of a future decision whether to fund and implement a major investment in a passenger rail corridor. It consists of two components: 1) An environmental document and analysis of the proposed rail service, which in the case of the Corridor will either be an Environmental Assessment (EA) or a Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to satisfy both the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requirements . 2) A Service Development Plan. Together, the environmental document and SDP complete the PRCIP, which would provide information to support a potential future FRA decision whether to fund and implement a major investment in the Corridor. For the purposes of this scope of work, the term “Project” means the completion of the SDP and environmental work activities exclusively for initial planning of the Corridor. Also for the purposes of this scope of work, the term “Corridor Program” means final design, environmental clearance, and construction work activities required to implement service along the corridor. The period of performance for all work will be estimated by the Contractor selected for each task and approved by the Commission with key milestones identified. The anticipated deliverables associated with this scope are as follows: Task 1: Detailed Work Plan, Budget, and Outreach Plan  Detailed Project Work Plan (with budget) and Outreach Plan (Complete) Task 2: Preliminary Service Planning and Alternatives  Purpose and Need Statement (Complete)  Technical Memo on Criteria and Methodology (Complete)  Alternatives Analysis Report (Complete) Task 3: Environmental Documentation  Draft Notice of Intent (NOI)  Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan  Final Purpose and Need Statement RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 8  Scoping Report  Impact Analysis Methodology  Annotated Environmental Document Outline  Administrative Draft Environmental Document  Draft Environmental Document and Draft Notice of Availability (NOA)  Administrative Final Environmental Document  Final Environmental Document and Draft NOA  Draft Record of Decision (ROD) Task 4: Service Development Plan  Technical Memo on SDP Outline and Methodology  Draft SDP  Final SDP 5.1 Task 1: Detailed Work Plan, Budget, and Outreach Plan In May 2013, Caltrans completed the first phase of a planning study and initial alternatives analysis for the rail corridor. This planning study was very supportive of the potential for a viable service. The Stakeholder and Public Outreach plan was completed in August 2014. It outlined the outreach plan for agencies and elected officials, which included Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) meetings, briefings, conference calls, status updates, email communication, and one-on-one meetings. It also included project communication efforts, which resulted in:  Updated website with a new “Contact Us” section to facilitate feedback  Facebook page to allow ongoing upda tes and two-way communication with public  Updated fact sheets and ongoing status updates  Public meetings 5.2 Task 2: Preliminary Service Planning and Alternatives In July 2016, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) completed a final Alternatives Analysis that involved six elements:  A market analysis to understand the current and future travel demand in the Corridor  Project need and purpose  Service alternatives  Screening criteria  Two-step screening analysis RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 9  Alternatives to carry forward for additional study Results from Alternatives Analysis with alignment planned for Phase 2. 5.3 Task 3: Environmental Documentation The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA) or an environmental impact statement (EIS) may be completed either after or in parallel to the SDP process. The Commission staff has hired HDR (Contractor) to conduct both the SDP and the NEPA documentation to expedite project development. The EIS recommendation considers the various alternatives for implementing the proposed passenger rail service, the conceptual engineering for construction projects necessary to implement those service alternatives, and the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with those projects at a general level of detail appropriate for the Corridor Program. This effort will meet both NEPA and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requirements. Extensive coordination with the regulating agencies that will be reviewing and certifying these documents must be incorporated in all aspects of this task. This includes working with the FRA in scoping, reviews, publishing notices of intent (NOI), etc. NEPA/CEQA Scoping and Outreach In coordination with the Commission, the Contractor will conduct the scoping process to initiate the Environmental Documents, which will include:  Identification of the Corridor study area  Development of a NOI to prepare an EIS  Development of the Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 10  Holding scoping meetings with the public, stakeholders, and other agencies  Finalization of the Purpose and Need Statement  Preparation of a scoping report  Coordination with FRA and other approving authorities A draft NOI will need to be prepared to initiate the scoping process. As part of scoping, the Purpose and Need Statement, and the set of proposed alternatives detailed in the Alternatives Analysis Report will be refined through input from the public, government agencies, and other stakeholders. The Contractor, in coordination with the Commission, will develop the final Purpose and Need Statement for the Corridor Program and refine the set of proposed alternatives to be considered for further analysis in the environmental documents. To concurrently comply with CEQA requirements the scope of work needs to include preparation of a notice of preparation, draft and final environmental impact report (EIR), notice of completion, CEQA findings, statement of overriding considerations (if necessary), State Clearinghouse process, and related requirements. The Contractor will prepare and implement, in coordination with the Commission, the Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan. The plan will outline the public and agency involvement program and will identify key contacts within agencies, public officials, affected Native American Tribes, and other key stakeholder groups and the public. The plan will also identify key contacts with civic and business groups, relevant interest groups, present and potential riders/users, and private service providers/shippers. The plan will identify how involvement activities will be linked to key milestones in the planning and environmental analytic process, including public hearings on the draft EIS. This process will include all the elements to fulfill FRA’s Section 106 responsibilities inclu ding tribal coordination. The Contractor will submit the Draft Public Involvement Plan for the Commission review. The final plan will be revised based on received comments and resubmitted to the Commission for approval. In addition, the Contractor will initiate the scoping process, in cooperation with the Commission, and will invite participation from federal, state, and local agencies, Native American tribes, other interested parties, and the public, as identified in the Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan. The Contractor will record the process and provide a summary of comments, responses, and conclusions in a scoping report for the Commission review and approval. Deliverables:  Draft NOI; Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan for the Commission review and acceptance  Final Purpose and Need Statement for the Commission review and approval  Scoping report for Commission review and acceptance  Continued FRA coordination, review and approvals as necessary RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 11 Environmental Document & Section 4(f) Analysis The Contractor will prepare environmental document and focus on the likely environmental effects for the entire corridor relating to the type of service being proposed for the identified range of reasonable alternatives. The analysis of impacts will be based upon the conceptual engineering. The Contractor will prepare the environmental document as per NEPA, and comply with CEQA requirements. The Contractor will propose a methodology for impact analysis to the Commission for review and approval prior to commencing the work. The Contractor will include impacts at a general level of detail for the Corridor associated with:  Route alternatives  Cities and stations served  Train service levels and frequency  Train technology  Train operating speeds  Ridership projections  Major infrastructure components Studies to be conducted as part of the NEPA evaluation process for the Corridor Program may include the following (A final list will be determined in conjunction with the Commission in the work plan and estimated budget)  Air quality  Water quality  Noise and vibration  Solid waste disposal  Ecological systems  Impacts on wetlands areas  Impacts on endangered species or wildlife  Flood hazards and floodplain management  Coastal zone management  Use of energy resources  Use of other natural resources, such as water, minerals, or timber  Aesthetic and design quality impacts  Possible barriers to the elderly and handicapped  Land use, existing and planned  Environmental Justice  Public health  Public safety, including any impacts due to hazardous materials  Recreational opportunities  Socioeconomic  Historic, archeological, architectural, and cultural  Transportation  Potential impacts to Section 4(f)-protected properties RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 12  Construction period impacts The Contractor, in conjunction with Commission, will also identify strategies to avoid, minimize, or mitigate identified impacts. This will include coordination with appropriate resource agencies throughout the NEPA/CEQA process to manage any impacts identified during the development of the environmental document. Specific mitigation strategies will be developed and included in the environmental document as necessary by resource area, based on the following approaches:  Avoiding the impact altogether by not taking a certain action or parts of an action;  Minimizing impacts by limiting the degree or magnitude of the action and its implementation;  Rectifying the impact by repairing, rehabilitating, or restoring the affected environment;  Reducing or eliminating the impact over time by preservation and maintenance operations during the life of the action; and  Compensating for the impact by replacing or providing substitute resources or environments. This task will also include preparation of the environmental document. The Contractor will prepare an annotated outline of the proposed document for Commission review and approval. The Contractor will then prepare an administrative draft for Commission and FRA review and approval. Modifications to the administrative draft requested by Commission will be incorporated to produce a draft for circulation. The Contractor will prepare and submit to Commission a draft notice of availability (NOA) for the draft document. The Contractor will also distribute the draft document to agencies and stakeholders, as outlined in the Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan. In addition, the Contractor will coordinate with FRA and other respective agencies to publish the NOI, Draft EIS (DEIS), NOA, Final EIS (FEIS), and ROD in the Federal Register as required. The Contractor, in close coordination with Commission and FRA, will respond to comments from the draft document and prepare the final document. The Contractor will prepare an administrative final document for FRA review and approval. Modifications to the administrative final document requested by FRA will be incorporated to produce a final document for circulation. The Contractor will prepare and submit to FRA a draft NOA. The Contractor will also distribute the final document to agencies and stakeholders, as outlined in the Agency and Stakeholder Involvement Plan. Additionally, the Contractor, in coordination with FRA, will identify the next steps required in the environmental process, including identifying the necessary Tier -2 project-level NEPA documents required. The commitments agreed upon by the agencies throughout the NEPA process will be included in the draft ROD, which the Contractor will submit to FRA for review and consideration. A constant line of communication between the Contractor and Commission will be maintained throughout the entire NEPA process. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 13 Deliverables:  Impact analysis methodology for FRA review and acceptance  Annotated EIS outline for FRA review and acceptance  Administrative draft document for FRA review and comment  Draft document and draft NOA for FRA review and approval  Administrative final document for FRA review and comment  Final document and draft NOA for FRA review and approval  Draft ROD 5.4 Task 4: Service Development Plan The Contractor will produce a SDP for the final selected alternative in close coordination with the Commission and FRA. The SDP will lay out the overall scope and approach for the proposed service by clearly demonstrating the purpose and need for new rail service; analyzing alternatives for the proposed new service and identifying t he alternative that would best address the identified purpose and need; demonstrating the operational and financial feasibility of the alternative proposed to be pursued; and describing how the implementation of the SDP will be divided into discrete phases . Specifically, the Contractor will include within the SDP:  Purpose and need, including a description of the transportation challenges and opportunities faced in the markets to be served by the proposed service .  Service rationale to demonstrate how the proposed service can cost-effectively address transportation and other needs, based on current and forecasted travel demand and capacity condition.  Planning methodology used in developing the SDP.  Identification of alternatives, including rail improvements, improvements to other modes including bus, and a no-build alternative.  Operations modeling, including railroad operation simulations, equipment and crew scheduling analyses, and terminal, yard, and support operations, which in turn reflect such variables as travel demand and rolling stock configuration. If the proposed service shares facilities with rail freight, commuter rail, or other intercity passenger rail services, the existing and future characteristics of those services will be included.  Station access and analysis to address the location of the stations to be served by the proposed service, how these stations will accommodate the proposed service, how passengers will access the stations, and how the stations will be integrated with connections to other modes of transportation.  Demand and revenue forecasts, including the methods, assumptions, and outputs for travel demand forecasts, and the expected revenue from the service, including ridership/revenue forecasts that specify the number of passengers and boardings/disembarking at stations. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 14  Financial performance and projections for each phase of service, including operating costs and revenues, capital replacement costs, and other institutional arrangements affecting the system finances. The SDP will address the methods, assumptions and outputs for operating expenses for the train service including maintenance of way, maintenance of equipment, transportation (train movement), passenger traffic and services such as marketing, reservations/information, station, and on-board services, general/administrative expenses, cost-sharing arrangements, and access fees.  Capital programming at a level sufficient to identify necessary infrastructure improvements and to determine the cost estimates. This would include equipment, infrastructure improvements, facilities, and other investments required for each discrete phase of service implementation.  Cost-benefit analysis of the Project, which shall include such factors as the Project's estimated ridership and anticipated user and public benefits, relative to the proposed investment, and consideration of enhanced mobility, environmental, and economic benefits (both for the specific Project proposal and in terms of the costs and benefits generated by the specific Project withi n a network context).  Additional benefits should be analyzed such as job creation and retention, ‘‘green’’ environmental outcomes, potential energy savings, and effects on community livability. The Contractor will prepare a technical memo that includes the proposed annotated outline for the Corridor Program SDP and details the proposed methodology for analyzing the required SDP components. Contractor will submit the technical memo to the Commission for review and approval. Upon approval, the Contractor will develop a draft SDP for Commission review and approval utilizing the agreed upon outline and methodology. The Contractor will incorporate the Commission comments into the final SDP for the Corridor Program. Deliverables:  Technical memo on SDP Outline and Methodology for FRA review and acceptance  Draft SDP for FRA review and approval  Final SDP 5.5 Project Management The Contractor is responsible for facilitating the coordination of all activities among the Commission, relevant host railroads, and FRA for implementation of the Project. The Commission will monitor and evaluate the Project’s progress through the administration of regular progress meetings scheduled throughout the Project’s duration. As part of the Project’s administration, the Contractor will: RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 15  Hold regularly scheduled Project meetings with Commission.  Maintain the Administrative Record for the Project, to be submitted to FRA upon Project completion. A Project master file will contain copies of reports, correspondence, and other documents and will be compiled and recorded in the Administrative Record.  Perform periodic Project status reviews and meetings with relevant stakeholders at various locations within the Project area including the Coachella Valley.  Comply with Commission Project reporting requirements, including: o Status of Project by task breakdown and percent complete o Changes and reason for change in Project’s scope, schedule and/or budget o Description of unanticipated problems and any resolution since the immediately preceding progress report o Summary of work scheduled for the next progress period o Updated Project schedule RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 16 Table 1 – Fleet Inventory Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary Table 2A – Summary of Routes to Be Excluded in FY 2018/19 Not Applicable. Table 3 – SRTP Route Statistics Data is currently not available from SCRRA at this time. Table 3A – Individual Route Descriptions RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 17 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 Project Description Capital Project Number Total Funds Total Funds w/o Carryover LTF FRA Grant Prop 1B (PTMISEA)STA(1)Other CV General Rail Management FY 19-1 350,000 - - 350,000 - - - 350,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000 $0 $350,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $350,000 $0 (1) STA amount matches transfer amount in FY19 Budget Documents Subtotal: Capital Revised 3/19/18 Total: Operating & Capital Please list capitalized preventative maintenance as a separate RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 18 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: FY 19 - 1 PROJECT NAME: CV General Rail Management PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This Project will provide the following: Cover the PA&ED or Environmental Documentation that is separate from the SDP along with portions of the SDP. It will also cover additional planning and local match needed for the FRA Grant as we move forward. It will also cover any incidental RCTC agency costs related to the project salaries, etc. that are not eligible to be reimbursed through the Prop 1B or FRA grant. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: This project is funded by local funds subject to the Coachella Valley rail split to fund the environmental study. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA (Coachella Valley Rail Split) $350,000 Total $350,000 RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 19 Table 5.1 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2019/20 Project Description Capital Project Number(1) Total Funds Total Funds w/o Carryover LTF STA Transfer In Other CV General Rail Management 20-1 300,000 - - 300,000 300,000 - - 300,000 - - Total: Operating & Capital 300,000 - - 300,000 - - Subtotal: Capital RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 20 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: FY 20 - 1 PROJECT NAME: CV General Rail Management PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This Project will provide the following: Cover the PA&ED or Environmental Documentation that is separate from the SDP along with portions of the SDP. It will also cover additional planning and local match needed for the FRA Grant as we move forward. It will also cover any incidental RCTC agency costs related to the project salaries, etc. that are not eligible to be reimbursed through the Prop 1B or FRA grant. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: This project is funded by local funds subject to the Coachella Valley rail split to fund the environmental study. This project will not include Proposition 1B PTMISEA funding. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA (Coachella Valley Rail Split) $300,000 Total $300,000 RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 21 Table 5.2 – Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2020/21 Project Description Capital Project Number(1) Total Funds Total Funds w/o Carryover LTF STA Transfer In Other CV General Rail Management(2)21-1 300,000 - - 300,000 $300,000 $0 $0 $300,000 $0 $0 $300,000 $0 $0 $300,000 $0 $0 Subtotal: Capital Total: Operating & Capital RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 22 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER: FY 21 - 1 PROJECT NAME: CV General Rail Management PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This Project will provide the following: Cover the PA&ED or Environmental Documentation that is separate from the SDP along with portions of the SDP. It will also cover additional planning and local match needed for the FRA Grant as we move forward. It will also cover any incidental RCTC agency costs related to the project salaries, etc. that are not eligible to be reimbursed through the Prop 1B or FRA grant. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: This project is funded by local funds subject to the Coachella Valley rail split to fund the environmental study. This project will not include Proposition 1B PTMISEA funding. PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): STA (Coachella Valley Rail Split) $300,000 Total $300,000 Table 6 – Update Actions Taken or To Be Implemented to Comply with the Most Recent Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations Not Applicable. Table 7 – Service Provider Performance Target Report Not Applicable. Table 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP Performance Report Not Applicable. RCTC RAIL SRTP FY 2018/19 – 2020/21 23 Table 9A – Highlights of FY 18/19 SRTP  Continued efforts on Service Development Plan  Continued efforts on Environmental Impact Documents Table 9B – Fare Revenue Calculation Not Applicable. FY 2018/19‐FY 2020/21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN City of Riverside Special Transportation Services 4th DRAFT TABLE OF CONTENTS I. System Overview 1 1.1 Service Area 1 1.2 Population Profile 2 1.3 Paratransit Services 2 1.4 Fare Structure 3 1.5 Revenue Fleet 3 1.6 Existing Facility 3 II. Existing Service and Route Performance 4 2.1 Dial‐A‐Ride Services‐System Performance 4 2.2 Key Performance Indicators 5 2.3 Productivity Improvement Efforts 5 2.4 Major Trip Generators 6 III. Planned Service Changes and Implementation 7 3.1 Recent Service Changes 7 3.2 Recommended Modifications to Paratransit Services 8 3.3 Marketing Plans and Promotion 8 3.4 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes 9 IV. Financial and Capital Plans 9 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 9 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Operating and Capital Program 10 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 10 Tables Table 1 – Fleet Inventory 12 Table 2 – City of Riverside SRTP Service Summary 13 Table 3 – SRTP Route Statistics 14 Table 4 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2018/19 16 Table 4A – Capital Projects Justification 17 Table 5.1 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2019/20 18 Table 5.1A – Capital Justification of 5.1 19 Table 5.2 – Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2020/21 20 Table 5.2A – Capital Justification of 5.2 21 Table 6 – Progress to Implement TDA Triennial Performance Audit 22 Table 7 – Service Provider FY 2017/18 Performance Target Report 25 Table 8 – FY 2018/19 SRTP Performance Report 26 Table 9 – Highlights of 2018/19 – 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan 27 Table 9A – Operating and Financial Data for Previous Four Years 28 Table 9B – Fare Revenue Calculation 29 I. SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 Service Area Special Transportation (ST) is a division within the Community Services branch of the City of Riverside’s Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department that has been offering transportation services to seniors and disabled residents in the Riverside community since 1975. This paratransit transportation service is provided within the 81.54 square mile incorporated city limits of the City of Riverside, shown below in Figure 1. Figure 1 1 1.2 Population Profile The American Community Survey (ACS) data is a source of demographic information which is part of the 2010 Decennial Census Program. The ACS is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities with reliable and timely demographic, social, economic and housing data every year. Because the ACS is conducted annually, it serves as an interim source of up‐to‐date demographic data through the decade, until the next Census is conducted. According to the US Census Bureau, as of 2016, the population of the City of Riverside is 324,727 residents. The senior population within the City of Riverside (those 60 years of age and over) accounts for approximately 16% of the population. Riverside is below the national average of seniors age 60 and over which is 21%, however, due to the Baby Boomer generation aging into their sixties, the senior population will continue to rise. Ridership has been trending upward for the past several years and continues to increase. 1.3 Paratransit Services Owned and operated by the City of Riverside, Special Transportation is an origin‐to‐ destination rideshare transportation service. The service is limited to senior citizens (60 years of age and older) and persons with disabilities (disabilities require a physician documentation). Special Transportation operates 362 days per year, only suspending service on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Operating hours for ST are Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. ‐ 5:30 p.m. and on weekends and holidays from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. In order to reserve a ride, passengers must call ST’s reservation telephone number, during the business hours of 8:00 a.m. ‐ 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9:00 a.m. ‐ 3:00 p.m. on weekends and holidays. An answering machine is available before and after business hours for cancellations. 2 1.4 Fare Structure and New Fare Type The ST fare structure for a one‐way trip is $3.00 per passenger for a General Fare and $2.00 per passenger for a Medical Fare. Clients may pay their fare in cash at boarding time or with pre‐purchased tickets. General Fare and Medical Fare Ticket booklets can also be purchased in advance which contain 10 single trip tickets. On August 8, 2017, Special Transit received approval by the City Council to increase its fare increase from $2.00 per trip to $3.00 for General Fares. A new fare type, Medical Fares, was created for individuals using our service for “medical related trips” such as doctors appointments, physical therapy, pharmacy visits, etc. Medical Fares would remain at $2.00 per trip so that the general fare increase would not be a barrier to wellness for our customers on a fixed income. 1.5 Revenue Fleet Special Transportation has been operating with a fleet of 35 paratransit compressed natural gas (CNG), alternative fuel, Type III vehicles. 8 new replacement vehicles were purchased last year to replace 8 vehicles that have reached their useful life expectancy. Special Transportation also owns one paratransit van equipped to hold six passengers and one wheelchair and a hybrid Honda Civic that is used by administrative staff in supervising routes and responding to accidents. These vehicles are not assigned to routes but are used as backups for special services. 1.6 Existing Facility Special Transportation Offices are located at 8095 Lincoln Avenue within the City of Riverside Corporation Yard. Included in the facilities are an administration building consisting of administrative offices, a dispatch center, restrooms and a break room. Special 3 Transportation’s facilities also include a parking lot for the transit buses with each space equipped with a CNG slow fill station, and a CNG Maintenance Bay for maintenance and repair of the fleet. The facility includes five maintenance bays, an administrative office, and multiple storage compartments for vehicle parts and equipment. The facility is outfitted with state of the art safety equipment and machinery to maintain the CNG fueled vehicles. II. EXISTING SERVICES AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE 2.1 Dial‐A‐Ride Service‐System Performance ST served approximately 161,552 passengers during the 2016/17 fiscal year. ST averages between 400‐500 riders per day and had traveled 712,547 miles in FY2016/17. ST will embark in a rebranding campaign in the next fiscal year in the hopes of informing the residents of Riverside of the service and increasing the number of riders. We will continue to advertise in places such as Riverside’s senior centers and through the City of Riverside’s Activity Guide publication. We will also continue to market the programs at various Senior Fairs and events throughout the city. 2.2 Key Performance Indicators During fiscal year 2017/18, Special Transportation met its mandatory farebox recovery ratio target and met six of the seven discretionary performance indicators, as shown in Figure 2 below: Figure 2: Note: Must meet at least 6 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indictors 4 Key Performance Indicators Targets Scorecard Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio >=10% 14.93% Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour <=$72.95 $65.44 2. Subsidy Per Passenger >=$15.85 and <=$20.54 $16.16 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile >=$2.05 and <=$2.77 $3.11 4. Subsidy Per Revenue Hour >=$54.22 and <=$73.36 $55.67 5. Subsidy Per Revenue Mile >=$3.83 and <=$5.19 $4.07 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour >=$3.06 and <=4.14 3.40 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile >=0.21 and <=0.29 .25 2.3 Productivity Improvement Efforts ST strives to operate an efficient service and continues to seek ways to decrease costs while maintaining high productivity. ST Staff has been working on examining different staffing scenario’s to maximize route efficiency will meeting customer demands. The Operation Supervisor is constantly examining the route efficiencies of each driver and then meeting with them to provide constructive feedback to improve how each driver conducts his/her assigned reservations for that day. For FY 2018/19, ST will be increasing the number of full time drivers to help meet the current service demands as well as add a Lead Driver/Scheduler to the Operations staff. ST will also be recruiting for an additional Operations Supervisor to help oversee the 43 drivers employed. ST is currently working on procuring an electronic fare collection system that would allow customers to use a smartcard type media to electronically pay for trip fares when boarding. This system would allow ST to eventually go cashless and utilize current technology to provide our customers with scheduling and payment options. 5 2.4 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Several Years Several factors will lead to growth of ST operations over the next several years. The Baby Boomer generation, the largest generation in the last century, is aging and becoming eligible to use our services as senior citizens. This element alone makes growth virtually unavoidable. The seniors, age 60+ makes up approximately 16% of the total population of the City of Riverside. Currently, 84% of the residents of Riverside are 59 years old or younger as shown in Figure3, leading staff to anticipate a higher demand for Special Transportation services in the near future. Special Transportation falls under the auspices of the City of Riverside Parks, Recreation, and Community Service Department (PRCSD). PRCSD is also responsible for senior programs, three senior centers, as well as the Friendly Stars program for developmentally disabled adults. This relationship and the connection amongst department staff in these three areas make it possible to connect resources and advertise by word of mouth to their program participants. Figure3 US Census Bureau, ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2016 6 Major trip generators for the ST operations includes the various workshops around Riverside ST transport clients to and from and the Friendly Stars program on Friday evenings. During the week, a few primary locations ST frequents daily are workshops for mentally and physically disabled passengers that teach them to live independently. These passengers look forward to attending their workshops (work/school) to attain a sense of independence. Special Transportation transports over 169 passengers per day to their workshops, along with weekly transportation to Friendly Stars, which include holiday and unique programming. III. PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Recent Service Changes No service changes have been made this year. 3.1 Recommended Modifications to Paratransit Services No modification to the present routes are needed. 7 3.2 Marketing Plans and Promotion In FY 2018/19, we will continue our concerted effort to create a marketing plan for Special Transportation. Special Transportation has been working with the City of Riverside’s Marketing team to help develop a brand identity for the City’s paratransit service. This “Rebranding” effort will have a drastic new look to our fleet of Minibuses that will not only see a change in design but also colors used to identify our program. More importantly, this effort will also see a change in the name of our service that will better capture what we do for the senior and disabled residents of Riverside. ST will continue with its advertisements on the back of the minibuses to help promote the service. ST will prints out flyers and brochures to distribute to the City’s Community Centers and Senior Centers and also includes ads in other city publications such as the Activity Guide and Senior Guide. The Activity Guide is published three times per year, is mailed to over 55,000 residents and is available online at the city’s website. Special Transportation Staff will continue to be present at special events (wellness fairs, grand openings, concerts, etc.) to conduct outreach to the public and distribute promotional products. For 2018/19, ST will continue it outreach efforts by presenting at various city wide events such as Senior Day to help promote the services and answer any questions residents may have. We will also increase our presence at senior living facilities resident meetings within the city and the various ADA workshops that take place in Riverside. ST has also launched a new website for the Special Transportation Services Program which will give the residents of Riverside all of the information needed to sign up and use our services. 8 3.3 Budget Impact on Proposed Changes The largest budget impact to the program continues to be the cost of sustaining operations to meet service demands and the services rendered to ST by the City. These services include administrative oversight, procurement, human resources, payroll, etc. Increase in the cost of benefits and the costs for preventative maintenance has contributed to higher expenditures. The operational expense of running the program has increased over the past 10 years. Additional buses and increases in maintenance costs have contributed to the increase in operational expense. Also the increase of minimum wages in California has and will have lasting effects on the programs budget. Although ST has been able to maintain its farebox recovery ratio above the minimum 10%, the growing operational expense has forced the program to increase the fare from its current rate of $2.00 per ride to $3.00 per ride for General Fares and $2.00 per ride for Medical Fares. This increase has allowed the program to maintain a greater than 10% fare box recovery ratio. IV. FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget Special Transportation relies on Local Transportation Funds (LTF) to support its operating budget including 20% of the preventative maintenance funds needed for the fleet. The remaining 80% comes from federal section 5307 funds. ST’s overall operating budget for the 2018/19 fiscal year has decreased 0.7% in comparison to the 2017/18 fiscal year as shown in Figure A. 9 Figure A Budget Item FY 2017/18 FY 2018/19 Variance Plan Plan Percentage Salaries & Benefits $3,110,142 $3,003,849 ‐3.4% Materials & Supplies $34,000 $39,000 14.7% Fuel $220,000 $225,000 2.3% Maintenance $500,000 $400,000 ‐20.0% Contract Services $127,800 $197,000 54.1% Non‐Personnel Costs $538,745 $633,548 17.6% Total $4,530,687 $4,498,397 ‐0.7% For FY 2018/19, Special Transportation will be requesting Preventative Maintenance funds in to help maintain our fleet of 35 buses. ST is continuing to partially fund a contracted security guard for the FY 2018/19 in order to continue the security of the parking lot and CNG Vehicle Maintenance facilities. ST will continue to work on various projects from previous year’s funds that have been approved but not completed in this fiscal year. 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program ST will continue to take advantage of available grant opportunities as they come available through the State of California in order to support its capital programs. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements Special Transportation strives to remain compliant with all local, state and federal regulations. Staff stays abreast of legislative information and developments by attending workshops, trainings, and conferences which are frequently offered free of charge to transit operators. ST complies with FTA reporting requirements such as the submission of monthly and annual National Transit Database (NTD) reports. ST recently underwent an FTA Triennial Review on March 27 – 28, 2018. The Final report has been presented and only 1 audit find was noted in Technical Capacity ‐ Award Management due to a progress report that was submitted one day late. 10 There were no violations noted during the California Highway Patrol (CHP) Safety Compliance Terminal Inspection in the areas of maintenance, driver records or driver hours of services during this year’s CHP inspection that was conducted on March 6 ‐7, 2018. ST received a “satisfactory” rating in all areas. 11 Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan City of Riverside Demand Response / Directly Operated Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2010 FRD 16 BU 7 25 CN 7 0 1,758,832 1,263,871 180,553 2011 FRD 16 BU 4 25 CN 4 0 696,745 744,374 186,093 2013 GLV 16 BU 7 25 CN 7 0 706,695 821,882 117,411 2014 GLV 16 BU 9 25 CN 9 0 695,351 860,024 95,558 2017 GLV 16 BU 8 25 CN 8 0 158,731 19,841 35 0 35 Totals: 80 3,857,623 3,848,882 109,968 4/27/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- City of Riverside -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 27 27 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $4,498,397 $2,179,850 $4,530,687 $3,453,446 $3,323,668 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $504,990 $325,452 $567,000 $359,596 $376,960 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$3,993,407 $1,854,398 $3,963,687 $3,093,850 $2,946,708 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 180,000 114,720 189,000 161,552 167,439 Passenger Miles 1,250,500 596,544 1,304,979 1,195,485 1,239,049 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 62,800.0 33,310.0 52,000.0 45,462.0 47,951.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 780,100.0 455,471.0 775,080.0 640,085.0 661,302.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 801,500.0 518,005.0 825,500.0 712,547.0 741,113.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $71.63 $65.44 $87.13 $75.96 $69.31 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.22% 14.93% 12.51% 10.41% 11.34% Subsidy per Passenger $22.19 $16.16 $20.97 $19.15 $17.60 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.19 $3.11 $3.04 $2.59 $2.38 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$63.59 $55.67 $76.22 $68.05 $61.45 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$5.12 $4.07 $5.11 $4.83 $4.46 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.9 3.4 3.6 3.6 3.5 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.23 0.25 0.24 0.25 0.25 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 5/31/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside -- 4 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2018/19 All Routes RSS-DAR All Days 180,000 1,250,500 27 68,400.0 780,100.0 801,500.0 $4,498,397 $504,990 $3,993,407 62,800.0 Service Provider Totals $3,993,407 $504,990 $4,498,397 801,500.0 780,100.0 68,400.0 62,800.0 1,250,500 180,000 27 TransTrack Manager™ 5/31/2018 Page 1 of 2 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics City of Riverside -- 4 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2018/19 All Routes RSS-DAR All Days $5.77 $24.99 $71.63 $22.19 $3.19 $63.59 $5.12 2.9 0.23 11.22% Service Provider Totals 0.23 2.9 $5.12 $63.59 $3.19 $22.19 11.22%$24.99 $5.77 $71.63 TransTrack Manager™ 5/31/2018 Page 2 of 2 City of Riverside FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Project Description Capital Project Number (1) Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair Section 5339 Section 5307 - Riv- San. Bndo Fare Box Other Local Transportation Funds Operating Assistance $4,098,397 $3,593,407 $504,990 Capitalized Preventative Maintenance $400,000 $80,000 $320,000 Subtotal: Operating $4,498,397 $3,673,407 $320,000 $504,990 Video Surveillance Replacement (17/18)19-01 $96,794 $96,794 Subtotal Capital $96,794 $0 $0 $96,794 $0 $0 $0 $0 Total: Operating & Capital $4,595,191 $3,673,407 $0 $96,794 $0 $320,000 $504,990 $0 Table 4 - Summary of Funds Requested for 2018/19 Table 4A- Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID Number): SRTP Project No: FY 19-01 FTIP No: ____________ PROJECT NAME: State of Good Repair (2017/18) PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Riverside Special Transportation would like to use the funding to upgrade the camera systems in each of our 35 minibuses. The current DVR systems in our buses have been repurposed several times as new replacement buses have been order and put into service. The video surveillance system is become unreliable at times and is regularly being repaired or serviced. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Special Transportation relies on the video surveillance systems in each of the buses to investigate passenger complaints, incidents within the bus, vehicle accidents, etc. This project would replace all of the old videos systems with newer up to date systems with the capability to automatically download stored video content wirelessly onto a dedicated server for easier access and storage. This would eliminate the need to take a bus out of service or take a driver off route to pull the video for an investigation. A newer system would also improve the overall time it takes to investigate reported incidents. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date September 2018 June 2019 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount State of Good Repair FY17-18 FY 18-19 $96,794 Total $96,794 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT#, FTIP ID# AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) FTA Grant # FTIP ID # RCTC/SRTP Project # Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/17) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A City of Riverside FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Project Description Capital Project Number (1) Total Amount of Funds LTF STA State of Good Repair Section 5339 Section 5307 - Riv- San. Bndo Fare Box Other Local Transportation Funds Operating Assistance $4,203,477 $3,693,438 $510,039 Capitalized Preventative Maintenance $400,000 $80,000 $320,000 Subtotal: Operating $4,603,477 $3,773,438 $320,000 $510,039 CNG Minibus Replacement (1)FY 20-01 $121,895 $24,379 $97,516 Subtotal Capital $121,895 $0 $24,379 $0 $97,516 $0 $0 $0 Total: Operating & Capital $4,725,372 $3,773,438 $24,379 $0 $97,516 $320,000 $510,039 $0 Table 5.1 - Summary of Funds Requested for 2019/20 Table 5.1A- Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID Number): SRTP Project No: FY 20-01 FTIP No: ____________ PROJECT NAME: CNG Minibus Replacement (1) PROJECT DESCRIPTION: To replace 1 CNG Mini Buses that have accrued 150,000 miles or more. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Special Transportation replaces vehicles that have reached 5 Years or 150,000 miles, in accordance with Federal Transit Administration (FTA) guidelines. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date August 2019 May 2020 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 19-20 $24,379 Sec 5339 19-20 $97,516 Total $121,895 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT#, FTIP ID# AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) FTA Grant # FTIP ID # RCTC/SRTP Project # Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/19) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A City of RiversideFY 2018/19Short Range Transit PlanProject DescriptionCapital Project Number (1)Total Amount of FundsLTF STAProp 1B(PTMISEA)Section 5339Section 5307 - Riv-San. BndoFare Box OtherLocal Transportation FundsOperating Assistance$4,245,511 $3,730,371$515,140Capitalized Preventative Maintenance$400,000 $80,000 $320,000Subtotal: Operating$4,645,511 $3,810,371 $320,000 $515,140CNG Minibus Replacement (1)FY 21-01$121,895 $24,379 $97,516Subtotal Capital $121,895 $0 $24,379 $0 $97,516 $0 $0 $0Total: Operating & Capital $4,767,406 $3,810,371 $24,379 $0 $97,516 $320,000 $515,140 $0Table 5.2 - Summary of Funds Requested for 2020/21 Table 5.2A- Capital Project Justification PROJECT NUMBER (If existing project in FTIP, indicate FTIP ID Number): SRTP Project No: FY 21-01 FTIP No: ____________ PROJECT NAME: CNG Minibus Replacement (1) PROJECT DESCRIPTION: To replace CNG Mini Buses that have accrued 150,000 miles or more. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: Special Transportation replaces vehicles that have reached 5 Years or 150,000 miles, in accordance with Federal Transit Administration (FTA) guidelines. PROJECT SCHEDULE: Start Date Completion Date August 2020 May 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED): Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 20-21 $24,379 Sec 5339 20-21 $97,516 Total $121,895 PRIOR YEAR PROJECTS OF A SIMILAR NATURE WITH UNEXPENDED BALANCE INCLUDING PROJECTS APPROVED BUT NOT YET ORDERED (INCLUDE FTA GRANT#, FTIP ID# AND RCTC’S SRTP CAPITAL GRANT #) FTA Grant # FTIP ID # RCTC/SRTP Project # Description Unexpended Balance (as of 6/30/20) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A TABLE 6- PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TDA TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT Recent Audit Recommendation (Covering FY 2013-2015) Action (s) Taken and Results to Date 1.Implement the planned fare increase. The fare structure remained unchanged during the audit period with no adopted fare increases. The last fare increase was implemented in April 2005. STS analyzed its fare structure in order to sustain its required farebox recovery ratio, and cover increased operating and sick leave costs. One consideration in the analysis is to raise the one- way fare to $3.00, which is comparable to RTA’s Dial-A-Ride fare. Special Transportation received approval and has implemented a rate increase effective September 1, 2017. General transit fares are $3.00 and Medical fares are $2.00 per trip. In Progress 2. Include additional locally generated revenue in the farebox recovery. STS’s current farebox ratio is slightly above the TDA standard of 10 percent. The revenues in the farebox ratio are composed primarily of passenger fares. New state legislation (SB 508) reinforces current RCTC practice of allowing other locally generated revenues in the farebox ratio. These other revenues could include advertising generated by the transit system, bus wraps on the vehicles, and other local contributions from the City to the transit Special Transportation has looked into and the possibility of advertising on our buses. After consulting with other transit agencies and looking into what resources are needed to start a program such as this it was determined that cost of administering and maintaining this type of program far exceeded the monetary benefit it would generate. We will continue to look for and examine alternative revenues to enhance the farebox revenues. In Progress FY 18/19 - FY 2020/21 program. The annual TDA fiscal audit should calculate the farebox ratio inclusive of these additional revenue. STS should work with the City finance department to ensure other local transit revenues are included in the farebox ratio in the TDA fiscal audit for STS. 3. Track ridership trends for those using mobility devices. Industry trends show that passengers using mobility devices such as wheelchairs, mobility aids, and other mobility devices are on the rise. With growth in wheelchair-bound riders and those using mobility devices on transit, active tracking of ridership trends for these types of passengers will help with dispatching and proper deployment of vehicles. On monthly and annual performance reports, STS should add a column to include number of passengers using mobility devices. Daily trip sheets might also be able to identify wheelchair riders by vehicle by day so that trends can be developed on the impact of mobility devices on transit productivity. This information could be part of the statistics being developed by STS management. Special Transportation implemented a monthly report that tracks the number of wheelchair passengers we transport for that given month. This data will be used to provide a yearly analysis on the different types of riders for a given year to determine trends and also help STS in future project proposals. Completed 4. Provide Title VI Policy documentation in Spanish and on the STS brochure. Pursuant to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, the City of Riverside adopted a Title VI Program in July 2014. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requires that no person in the United States, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin be excluded from, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Program compliance includes a link on the STS web page that is directed to the Title VI policy on the General Services page along with a complaint form in English. A Spanish language form is still under development. Also, the auditor could not find Title VI information on the printed STS brochure. Special Transportation is currently revising its webpage and a link to Title VI information will be included on the new page in both English and Spanish. The Special Transit Brochures are also currently being revised and will also have Title VI information printed on the brochure as well as a web address where customers can find the Title VI information. In Progress Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2017/18 Short Range Transit Plan Review City of Riverside FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 Target FY 2017/18 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Data Elements 189,000 Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,304,979 Passenger Miles 52,000.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 775,080.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 825,500.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles $4,530,687 Total Operating Expenses $567,000 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,963,687 Net Operating Expenses Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio Meets Target>= 10.00% 12.51% 14.93% Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Meets Target<= $72.95 $87.13 $65.44 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Meets Target>= $15.18 and <= $20.54 $20.97 $16.16 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Fails to Meet Target>= $2.05 and <= $2.77 $3.04 $3.11 4. Subsidy Per Hour Meets Target>= $54.22 and <= $73.36 $76.22 $55.67 5. Subsidy Per Mile Meets Target>= $3.83 and <= $5.19 $5.11 $4.07 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 3.06 and <= 4.14 3.60 3.40 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.21 and <= 0.29 0.24 0.25 Note:Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: 5/31/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 FY 2018/19 - Table 8 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: City of Riverside All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 Plan Plan Performance Scorecard (a)FY 2018/19 Target FY 2017/18 3rd Quarter Year-to-Date FY 2016/17 End of Year Actual Passengers None 114,720 180,000 161,552 Passenger Miles None 596,544 1,250,500 1,195,485 Revenue Hours None 33,310.0 62,800.0 45,462.0 Total Hours None 45,160.0 68,400.0 60,836.0 Revenue Miles None 455,471.0 780,100.0 640,085.0 Total Miles None 518,005.0 801,500.0 712,547.0 Operating Costs None$2,179,850 $4,498,397 $3,453,446 Passenger Revenue None$325,452 $504,990 $359,596 Operating Subsidy None$1,854,398 $3,993,407 $3,093,850 Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target<= $66.81$65.44 $71.63 $75.96 Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile None$4.79 $5.77 $5.40 Operating Costs Per Passenger None$19.00 $24.99 $21.38 Farebox Recovery Ratio Meets Target>= 10.0% 14.93% 11.22% 10.41% Subsidy Per Passenger Fails to Meet Target>= $13.74 and <= $18.58$16.16 $22.19 $19.15 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Meets Target>= $2.64 and <= $3.58$3.11 $3.19 $2.59 Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= $47.32 and <= $64.02$55.67 $63.59 $68.05 Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Fails to Meet Target>= $3.46 and <= $4.68$4.07 $5.12 $4.83 Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 2.89 and <= 3.91 3.40 2.90 3.60 Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.21 and <= 0.29 0.25 0.23 0.25 a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2018/19 Plan to the FY 2018/19 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager™ 5/31/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 9 ‐ HIGHLIGHTS OF 2018/19 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN ● Comprehensive Transportation Study – In an effort to improve our continued service to the resident of the City of Riverside, ST will be conducting a comprehensive study to look at our operations, staffing, and overall program. This study will identify strengths and potential areas of improvement so that the program can continue to grow and serve the public. Capital Projects: ● No new capital projects for 2018/19. Special Transportation will complete the projects started in 2017/18 but were not able to complete prior to the end of the fiscal year. These projects include: • Electronic Fare Collection Module • Bus Procurement • Rebranding & Marketing Campaign Performance Target Report – ST plans to continue to meet the mandatory farebox recovery ratio target and has met four of the seven discretionary performance indicators in the FY 2018/19 (shown in Table 9 below.) Transit operators are required to meet at least four of the seven discretionary performance indicators. Table 9 Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Fails to Meet Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile Fails to Meet Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target Note: Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indictors Operating and Financial Data for the past four years and for the 2018/19 Fiscal Year are shown below. Table 9A Operating & Financial Data FY2014/15 FY2015/16 FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 (Projected) FY 2018/19 (Planned) System Wide Ridership 175,276 188,480 161,552 152,960 180,000 Operating Cost per Revenue Hours $67.57 $65.74 $75.96 $65.44 $71.63 Farebox is the only source of revenue for Special Transportation. Figure 9B below reflects the farebox revue and the operating costs since FY 2014/15. Table 9B Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Revenue Sources FY2014/15 FY2015/16 FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 (Estimate) FY 2018/19 (Plan) Passenger Fares $384,631 $376,960 $359,596 $ 433,990 $ 504,990 Total Revenue $384,631 $376,960 $359,596 $433,990 $504,990 Total Operating Expenses $3,749,768 $3,323,668 $3,453,446 $3,311,940 $4,498,397 Farebox Recovery Ratio 10.26% 11.34% 10.41% 13.10% 11.22% FY19-FY21 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 i Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY __________________________________________________________________________ 1 CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW __________________________________________________________________ 8 1.1 JURISDICTION __________________________________________________________________________ 8 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS ______________________________________ 9 Population Profile – Rider Characteristics ______________________________________________________ 9 Demographic Projections __________________________________________________________________ 10 1.3 FIXED-ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICES _________________________________________________ 11 Fixed-route Services _______________________________________________________________________ 12 Paratransit Services _______________________________________________________________________ 13 1.4 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE ______________________________________________________________ 13 Cooperative Fare and Subsidy Programs ______________________________________________________ 14 1.5 REVENUE FLEET ________________________________________________________________________ 15 1.6 EXISTING AND PLANNED FACILITIES ________________________________________________________ 16 Existing Facilities _________________________________________________________________________ 16 Planned Facilities _________________________________________________________________________ 16 1.7 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES _______________________________________ 17 Regional Coordination _____________________________________________________________________ 17 Interregional Coordination and Transfer Agreements ____________________________________________ 18 CHAPTER 2: ROUTE PERFORMANCE AND EXISTING SERVICE __________________________________________ 19 2.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS __________________________________________________________ 19 Service Standards and Warrants _____________________________________________________________ 19 Productivity vs. Coverage Target ____________________________________________________________ 20 Warrants for New Service __________________________________________________________________ 21 Annual State of Public Transit Report _________________________________________________________ 21 2.2 EXISTING FIXED-ROUTE AND DIAL-A-RIDE SERVICE _____________________________________________ 21 2.3 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS ___________________________________________________ 21 2.4 POTENTIAL GROWTH MARKETS ___________________________________________________________ 22 2.5 PASSENGER TRANSIT FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT AND PASSENGER AMENITIES ____________________ 23 Existing Passenger Transit Facilities __________________________________________________________ 23 Planned Passenger Transit Facilities __________________________________________________________ 25 Equipment and Passenger Amenities _________________________________________________________ 30 CHAPTER 3: RECENT AND PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES ______________________________________________ 32 3.1 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES _______________________________________________________________ 32 3.2 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES _____________________________________________________________ 32 3.3 MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE _________________________________________________ 35 3.4 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION _____________________________________________________ 35 3.5 BUDGET IMPACT ON PROPOSED CHANGES __________________________________________________ 37 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS _______________________________________________________ 39 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET ________________________________________________________ 39 4.2 FUNDING SOURCES FOR OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAMS _________________________________ 42 4.3 TUMF PROGRAM ______________________________________________________________________ 43 4.4 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ____________________________________________ 44 Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 ii Tables Comparative Statistics Table 1 Fleet Inventory 1) Motor Bus / Directly Operated 2) Motor Bus / Purchased Transportation 3) Commuter Bus / Directly Operated 4) Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Table 2 SRTP Service Summary 1) Routes: All Routes (System-wide Totals) 2) Routes: Non-Excluded Routes 3) Routes: Excluded Routes 4) Program: Directly Operated Fixed-Routes 5) Program: Contracted Operated Fixed-Routes 6) Program: Dial-A-Ride 7) Program: Taxi Table 2A Excluded Routes Table 3 SRTP Route Statistics Table 3A FY18/19 Individual Route Descriptions Table 4 Summary of Funds Requested for FY18/19 Table 4A Capital Project Justification for FY18/19 Table 5.1 Summary of Funds Requested for FY19/20 Table 5.1A Capital Project Justification for FY19/20 Table 5.2 Summary of Funds Requested for FY20/21 Table 5.2A Capital Project Justification for FY20/21 Table 6 FY16 FTA Triennial Review – Summary of Findings Table 7 Service Provider Performance Targets Report Table 8 FY18/19 SRTP Performance Report Table 9A Highlights of SRTP / Operating and Financial Data Table 9B Farebox Recovery Ratio Table 10 RTA FY19 – FY23 TUMF Transportation Improvement Program Appendix A RTA System Map and Fixed-Route Maps Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 iii Glossary of Acronyms 5304 Discretionary grants for statewide and non-metropolitan transportation planning 5307 Formula grants for urbanized areas 5309 Discretionary grants for fixed guideway capital investments 5310 Discretionary grants for enhanced mobility of seniors and individuals with disabilities 5311 Formula grants for rural areas 5316 Job Access and Reverse Commute Program 5317 New Freedom Program 5337 State of Good Repair 5339 Formula grants for bus and bus facilities ADA Americans with Disabilities Act A&E Architectural and Engineering AHSC Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program ATIS Advanced Traveler Information System BRT Bus Rapid Transit CMAQ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program CNG Compressed Natural Gas COA Comprehensive Operational Analysis CPUC California Public Utilities Code CTAF-CTSGP California Transit Assistance Fund – California Transit Security Grant Program CTSA Consolidated Transportation Services Agency DAR Dial-A-Ride paratransit services DBE Disadvantaged Business Enterprise EEO Equal Employment Opportunity EV Electric Vehicle FTA Federal Transit Administration FTIP Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY Fiscal Year GASB Government Accounting Standards Board GGRF Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund Go-Pass Community College Pass HSR California High-Speed Rail ITS Intelligent Transportation System JARC Job Access and Reverse Commute Program, also known as FTA § 5316 LCFS Low-Carbon Fuel Standard LCTOP Low Carbon Transit Operations Program LEP Limited English Proficiency LTF Local Transportation Fund MJPA March Joint Powers Authority MPO Metropolitan Planning Organization MSJC Mount San Jacinto College NF New Freedom Program, also known as FTA § 5317 OCTA Orange County Transportation Authority OPEB Other Post-Employment Benefits OPEB-ARC Other Post-Employment Benefits – Annual Required Contribution PEPRA Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2012 Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 iv PTMISEA Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account PVL Perris Valley Line RCC Riverside City College RCTC Riverside County Transportation Commission RINs Renewable Identification Numbers RTA Riverside Transit Agency RTPA Regional Transportation Planning Agency § Section SB1 Senate Bill 1 SCAG Southern California Association of Governments SGR State of Good Repair SR State Route SRTP Short Range Transit Plan STA State Transit Assistance TCM Transportation Control Measure TDA Transportation Development Act TIRCP Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program TMC Travel Management Company TNC Transportation Network Company T-NOW Transportation NOW TSP Transit Signal Priority TTS Timed Transfer System TUMF Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee UCR University of California, Riverside U-Pass University Pass U.S.C. United States Code UZA Urbanized Area as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau WRCOG Western Riverside Council of Governments Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), updated annually, covers FY19 – FY21. The plan provides a description of Riverside Transit Agency’s (RTA) services, regional transit needs, and a look ahead at RTA’s proposed service plans and capital projects. The plan will ultimately require approval by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) as mandated by California Public Utilities Code (CPUC) § 130303. Approval by RCTC allows the plan’s operating and capital projects to be programmed in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP). Approval also supports RTA’s claim for Local Transportation Funds (LTF), State Transit Assistance funds (STA), County Measure A funds, and the submittal of grant applications to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) including but not limited to 49 U.S.C. § 5304, 5307, 5310, 5311, 5339, and the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program (CMAQ). Similarly, RCTC administers Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds and with the approval of the SRTP, will issue allocation and disbursement instructions for LTF and STA funds to the county auditor and controller. RCTC also administers County Measure A funds and will process payments to RTA consistent with the SRTP. Furthermore, the SRTP also lists projects eligible for Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) funds administered by the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). The approval of the SRTP also approves RTA’s TUMF Project Expenditure Plan for FY19 – FY23. The State of California also offers several funding programs which focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. These cap-and-trade programs are funded by annual auction proceeds from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (GGRF). The Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) is administered by Caltrans and funds capital and operating expenses. In FY18, RTA was awarded LCTOP funds to provide increased frequency to one of the agency’s key corridors, Route 19, which links Perris to Moreno Valley. For FY19, RTA applied for funds for two projects, one to increase the frequency of Route 28 (formerly a portion of Route 27) daytime weekdays to 30 minutes between Perris and Hemet and the other to fund free rides on the RapidLink Gold Line from July 1 through September 3, 2018. Other applicable cap-and-trade programs offered by the State of California are the Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) and the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program (AHSC). Lastly, the SRTP allows RTA to develop business strategies and funding mechanisms to bring to fruition planned services, programs, and capital improvement projects that fall beyond the lifespan of the SRTP. These projects are included in RTA’s Ten-Year Transit Network Plan, which is designed to meet the future transit needs of western Riverside County. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 2 Continuous Improvement in Service: Over the past 40 plus years, RTA and the region’s transit network have evolved from a suburban transit system to a complex multimodal network of high-demand timed connections between buses, trains, paratransit services, and non-motorized modes of transit. RTA is challenged with maintaining on-time performance as running times grow larger and less predictable due to increased traffic congestion, major road construction projects, and population growth. With expanding services to emerging new communities and neighborhoods, being proactive and adaptable to change will ensure RTA’s ability to meet future mobility needs. In an effort to plan for those future mobility needs, RTA conducted a Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) study that concluded in early 2015. The study reviewed RTA’s entire transit network structure and performance to provide a comprehensive understanding of market conditions and service expectations. The findings led to the development of a phased set of service recommendations designed to build on market opportunities, performance strengths, and ridership growth while aiming to improve both overall passenger experience and financial sustainability. The recommendations were based on analysis of existing and future market conditions, service performance, and feedback from RTA Board members, passengers, and key stakeholders. The end product of the COA, the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan, was approved by the Board of Directors in January 2015 and remains a guide for preparing the SRTP. The primary recommendations of the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan are to streamline routes, improve frequencies, enhance connections, improve bus stop amenities, and adhere to bus stop spacing and service design standards to enhance RTA’s future services. Furthermore, the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan recommends enhanced service on popular routes to increase ridership and generate increased fare revenue. The plan also recommends maintaining appropriate transit service in lower potential ridership areas. The recommendations are designed to create a transit system that remains attractive to existing and potential new riders, while maintaining the delicate balance between efficiency, effectiveness, and fiscal restraints. Within this framework, the SRTP lays out a program of projects to accomplish the goals established in the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan. As outlined in the FY18 SRTP, RTA implemented several key service improvements to reduce overall travel time and attract new passengers: • In August 2017: o Implemented new RapidLink Gold Line (Route 101) service during peak periods weekdays linking Corona, downtown Riverside and University of California, Riverside (UCR). • In January 2018: o Improved Route 19 frequency between Perris and Moreno Valley to every 15 minutes (up from every 30 minutes) daytime weekdays. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 3 o Improved weekdays and weekend frequencies on routes 29 and 49 linking Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, and Riverside. Also service was extended to Amazon Eastvale (routes 3 and 29). o Implemented new CommuterLink Route 200 linking San Bernardino, Riverside, Village at Orange, and the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim seven days a week utilizing the new State Route (SR)-91 intercounty express lanes (expanded from former Route 216). o Implemented new CommuterLink Route 205 peak periods weekdays linking Temecula, Lake Elsinore, Corona, and Village at Orange utilizing the new SR-91 intercounty express lanes. Ridership Trend: Transit ridership is cyclical in nature and is substantially impacted by the economy, gas prices, automobile ownership, low interest rates on auto loans, and population and demographic changes. Therefore, understanding why recent declines in ridership are occurring and what actions the transit industry should take to combat them is a complex problem worthy of further investigation. In addition to the ongoing analysis of ridership trends by staff, RTA launched its Market Assessment and Strategic Direction Study in April 2018. Additionally, staff is participating in Transportation Research Board’s Analysis of Recent National Public Transit Ridership Trends, which is scheduled to begin in July 2018. As shown in the graph below, in FY11 through FY14, RTA fixed-route ridership grew from three percent to seven percent annually while neighboring transit agencies lost ridership or showed a lower rate of growth. After this initial growth and consistent with the regional and national ridership trends, RTA has experienced three straight years of ridership decline on its fixed-route services. As of April 30, 2018, the year to date decline in FY18 ridership is two percent. Fixed-route Ridership Trends since 2009 – Year over Year -15.00% -10.00% -5.00% 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Riverside Transit Agency Foothill Transit North County Transit District Omnitrans Orange County Transportation Authority SunLine Transit Agency Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 4 The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) November 2017 publication “Understanding Recent Ridership Changes: Trends and Adaptations” states that while current determinants of ridership decline can vary by community, there are four common themes: erosion of time competitiveness, reduced customer affinity and loyalty, erosion of cost competitiveness, and external factors such as parking supply, safety, and decentralized development. A separate study on transit ridership decline commissioned by the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) focused solely on Southern California, concluded that the rise in automobile access and ownership (including access for undocumented people to obtain a driver’s license and lower automobile and gasoline prices), particularly among traditional transit users, has played the most significant role in transit ridership decline. What APTA, SCAG, and other recent studies tell the transit industry is that the factors affecting ridership are myriad and complex, and that the solutions to addressing these factors and increasing ridership moving forward will be equally challenging. The Agency, in partnership with the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Department of Urban Planning, is also studying the impact of Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) and what role these providers may play in partnership with transit agencies. There is a range of public-private pilot partnerships between transit agencies and TNCs nationwide, which RTA is monitoring. These partnerships may be more cost effective, which would also create more competitive transportation options that were not possible under the traditional fixed-route and demand response transit service modes. In summary, RTA does understand that its transit services are one alternative in the market place for people’s local and regional travel needs. RTA must ensure it remains competitive by improving frequency and adding amenities. These were the key factors desired by RTA riders and potential riders, as strongly identified in the rider survey conducted as part of RTA’s COA study. The COA includes continued focus on improving service frequency and travel times on key transit corridors, making additional transit amenity improvements at bus stops and key transit centers, as well as managing safety and security issues. The goal is to influence new passengers to ride and encourage existing riders to ride more frequently. Future Service Plan – FY19 and Beyond: Moving forward, service plans for the next three years and beyond will continue to be shaped by the 10-Year Transit Network Plan’s proposed strategies and recommendations. For planning and programming purposes, the SRTP covers a rolling three-year span with a focus on FY19. The table and text below summarizes fixed-route service level changes suggested for FY19: Metric FY18 (Budget) FY19 (Budget) Difference Percent Difference Total Revenue Hours 662,102 684,063 21,961 3.32 % Total Revenue Miles 9,782,252 10,087,244 304,992 3.12 % Total Fixed-route Ridership 8,456,233 8,452,190 -4,043 -0.05 % Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 5 In FY19, RTA will enjoy a full year of ridership from improvements implemented in FY18 initiatives such as new RapidLink Gold Line, improved frequency on routes 19, 29, and 49, extension of service to Amazon Eastvale, and new CommuterLink routes 200 and 205. New service initiatives funded in FY19 are designed to help increase ridership, reliability, and financial sustainability: o Route 22 will be split into two separate routes to improve reliability and connectivity at Perris:  Route 22 (Perris – Riverside Downtown).  New Route 9 (Lake Elsinore – Perris). o Route 24 weekdays service frequency will be improved from every 80 to 60 minutes and the Temecula Library deviation will be discontinued due to low ridership. o Route 27 will be split into two separate routes to improve reliability and connectivity at Perris:  Route 27 (Perris – Galleria at Tyler mall in Riverside) – improved frequency from 60 minutes to 40 minutes.  Route 28 (Hemet – Perris) – improved frequency from 60 minutes to 30 minutes.  Route 61 - extend from Sun City (Menifee) to Perris in place of existing Route 27  Route 212 would be discontinued to avoid unnecessary duplication of service with new Route 28. o Route 31 from Moreno Valley to Beaumont and Hemet will have its last weekdays evening departure approximately an hour later. o Route 33 will have service weekdays expanded to serve Tahquitz High School in Hemet. o Route 40 will be streamlined and expanded to serve more of the City of Menifee, including Mount San Jacinto College (MSJC) Menifee Campus, the Heritage Lakes area, and McCall Blvd east of the I-215 freeway. o Route 200 will have additional trips added at peak times weekdays in response to high ridership on selected existing trips. o Routes 205/206: RTA will work to add a stop in the Indian Truck Trail / I-15 Freeway area of Temescal Valley. o RapidLink Gold Line will have its hours of service rearranged based on ridership demand. o A comprehensive revision of weekend service in the south and eastern areas of RTA’s service area will for the first time provide seven day service on all RTA local routes (excluding special weekday shuttle routes 26, 50, 51, 52, 54, and 55). Historically, it takes about two years to grow ridership on newly added service. With these service improvements, RTA aims to turn around the ridership decline experienced in FY16 through FY18. Taking a very conservative approach, the budgeted FY19 ridership projection and Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 6 the resulting passenger fare revenue estimate assume the agency will match budgeted FY18 ridership and passenger fare revenue estimates, while it is expected actual FY19 ridership could exceed actual FY18 ridership, turning around the downward trend of the last three years. Capital Improvement Program: The development of transit infrastructure (bus stops, mobility hubs, and operations and maintenance facilities) is essential to the safe, comfortable, and efficient operation of transit services. During FY18, the Agency completed new bus stops for the RapidLink Gold Line in time for commencement of this service in August 2017, as well as upgrades to 38 bus stops throughout the RTA service area with upgraded accessibility, enhanced safety, and new amenities such as shelters, benches, and trash receptacles. The Agency also coordinated with the City of Eastvale to complete a transit hub at Amazon Eastvale that commenced operation for RTA routes 3 and 29 in January 2018. FY19 will also see some significant progress in the development of new mobility hubs. To prepare for future expansion plans and accommodate recent growth, RTA is working with a variety of entities to develop new multi-modal mobility hubs. These hubs will be innovative, use emerging technologies and may involve multi-use facilities. The projects that will be moving forward in FY19 are: • Promenade Mall Mobility Hub: In partnership with the City of Temecula and the Promenade Mall, staff completed Architectural and Engineering (A&E) work. Construction is slated to start in May / June 2018 and will be completed in time for reopening in January 2019 (substantial construction will be completed by the end of October 2018 ahead of the peak holiday shopping season). • UCR Mobility Hub: In partnership with UC Riverside, RTA will construct a mobility hub on campus. Conceptual design was completed in early 2018 and A&E work is underway. Upon completion of environmental clearance and documentation, a project construction schedule will be established. • Hemet Mobility Hub: In partnership with the City of Hemet, staff completed a conceptual plan and it was adopted in concept by the Hemet City Council in September 2017. A&E work will commence upon Hemet City Council and RTA Board of Directors approval of the conceptual plan and the project development agreement between the city and RTA. It is expected that the project development agreement will be presented to the Hemet City Council in May and the RTA Board of Directors in June 2018. • Vine Street Mobility Hub: Staff is expected to commence development of a conceptual plan for a mobility hub at Vine Street in Downtown Riverside, located on land across the street from the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station. A bid for conceptual planning is expected to be released once the property ownership transfer from the city to RTA is completed. With the adoption of the Bus Stops Strategic Policy in June 2015, RTA launched the annual bus stop improvement program. Based on the implementation plan commenced in FY18, 25 bus Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 7 stops will be improved each calendar year throughout the service area with upgraded accessibility, enhanced safety, and amenities such as shelters, benches, and trash receptacles. The Agency’s administrative offices, operations and maintenance facilities have reached their maximum capacity. With this critical infrastructure at capacity, RTA is proactively taking steps to stretch the useful life of existing infrastructure and concurrently developing sufficient financial resources to initiate the preparation of a strategic plan, sketch plan, and land acquisition plan to construct future support infrastructure. To date, the Agency has secured $17,267,086 in grant funds to initiate the preparation of the facilities masterplan, implementation plan, and land acquisition plan. Since projects of this magnitude are delivered over multiple years, it is essential to have a long- range strategic plan and a service plan to identify infrastructure needs. Up-to-date infrastructure is essential to support future mobility needs of this region and embrace rapidly evolving mobility strategies and technologies. The Agency must upgrade its support infrastructure, which includes: maintenance and operating facilities, fueling infrastructure, and administrative facilities to meet the future mobility demands of our region. Without these improvements, the Agency will not be able to cost-effectively expand service. Hence, the objective is to develop a strategic facilities masterplan and an implementation plan to meet the Agency’s near and long-term responsibilities. Development of this plan is scheduled to commence in September 2018. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 8 CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 JURISDICTION RTA’s jurisdiction is among the largest in the nation for a transit system, encompassing approximately 2,500 square miles of western Riverside County. Included in the boundaries are eighteen (18) incorporated cities including Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula, and Wildomar, as well as the unincorporated areas of Riverside County supervisorial districts 1, 2, 3, and 5. Unlike other agencies of similar size, RTA is unique in that it provides service in both urban and rural areas. Urbanized and rural areas are defined by the United States Census Bureau (US Census) based on population size and revised every 10 years with each new Census. The urbanized zone areas (UZA) in the jurisdiction are Riverside-San Bernardino, Hemet, and Murrieta-Temecula-Menifee. Portions of RTA routes also connect to Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, and San Diego UZAs, providing interregional mobility options for RTA customers. Based on data from the 2010 US Census, over 90 percent of RTA’s services are located in UZAs. The map below illustrates RTA’s jurisdictional boundaries and highlights the portions of the region considered urbanized. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 9 1.2 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTIONS RTA is challenged by the changing demographics in various communities and continues to be proactive by planning routes that are customer-oriented and financially sustainable. By studying the characteristics of riders, a better understanding is gained to more appropriately plan for and meet the needs of the transit market. Rider characteristics, along with demographic and population changes, are used to shape and strategize how resources will be allocated in future years. Population Profile – Rider Characteristics Bus passenger characteristics were collected from on-board surveys conducted in spring 2013 as part of the COA study. A demographic summary of weekdays, RTA riders offered the following characteristics: SUMMARY OF RIDER CHARACTERISTICS 1 Average Age (Years) 33 Employed Average Travel Time (Minutes) 52 Bus Fare Categories Yes 70% How Long Using RTA Services General 57 % No 30 % First Time 5 % Passes 2 22 % Primary Language Less Than 6 Months 16 % Disabled / Senior 15 % English 95 % 6 Months-2 Years 29 % Youth 5 % Spanish 5 % 2 Years-5 Years 22 % Medicare 1 % Other <1 % More Than 5 Years 28 % Median Household Income Automobile Ownership Frequency Of Using RTA Buses Under $7,500 28 % Yes 67 % First Time 3 % $7,500-$14,999 19 % No 33 % Less Than Once A Month 4 % $15,000-$24,999 16 % Gender Less Than Once A Week 4 % $25,000-$34,999 12 % Female 52 % 1-2 Days Per Week 14 % $35,000-$49,999 10 % Male 48% 3-4 Days Per Week 25% $50,000-$74,999 8 % Veteran 5 Days Per Week 26% Over $75,000 6 % Yes 4% 6-7 Days Per Week 23% Highest Level Of Education No 96 % Ethnicity Less Than High School 16 % Customer Destinations Latino / Hispanic 37 % High School Diploma 28 % School 37 % White / Caucasian 22 % Some College 34 % Work 27 % Black / African American 20 % Associate’s Degree 8 % Shopping / Errands 11 % Mixed 10 % Bachelor’s Degree 6 % Social / Recreational 10 % Asian / Pacific Islander 5 % Some Graduate School 3 % Other 9 % Other 3 % Graduate Degree 4 % Medical / Social Services 6 % American Indian 2 % Source: RTA COA Study (2013-2014) 1 Totals may not add to 100 percent due to rounding. 2 Go-Pass, U-Pass, and City Pass. Short Range Transit Plan   •   FY19 – FY21         10    Demographic Projections    Deployment of future transit service will directly correspond to demographic and land use  changes within the RTA service area. Demographic data such as population and employment  density, income levels, age distributions, and land use development patterns are the primary  variables that shape public transit in a community. Growth projections for the region are  compiled by SCAG, the County of Riverside and WRCOG in collaboration with local jurisdictions.  At the local level, jurisdictions have the ability to plan and revise land use and transportation  characteristics to target a desired level of intensity for employment, housing, and commercial  areas.    On a regional scale, the highest population and employment densities in the RTA service area  are generally concentrated in a small number of areas. The region’s most populated area spans  from Corona to Riverside and Moreno Valley, encompassing more than one‐third of the  estimated 1.9 million residents in western Riverside County3 and around half of the estimated  400,000 jobs in western Riverside County4. Communities such as these have more diverse land  uses, making public transit a more viable option for travel. The majority of the jurisdictions in  western Riverside County, however, consist of lower density, single types of land uses.  Communities outside of the larger network centers are primarily suburban‐residential.  Employment‐to‐population ratios are lower in communities with a high concentration of single  family residential units, requiring residents to rely heavily on private automobiles to complete  daily trips.    A market assessment, including a demographic analysis was conducted with the COA and  identified the following trends:   By 2035, the population in western Riverside County is projected to reach 2.7 million  people, an increase of 28 percent from the 2020 projected baseline. The highest rates of  growth are expected to occur in areas that are currently suburban developments,  though a comparable volume of growth will occur in the more densely populated,  transit‐supportive urban communities.   Employment in the RTA service area is expected to grow by 34 percent compared to the  2020 projected baseline. The 250,000 new jobs will bring the 2035 employment total to  over one million. Similar to population, the rate of employment growth will be highest in  the suburban markets.   The northwest sub‐area (Corona, Eastvale, Home Gardens, Jurupa Valley, Norco, and  Riverside) has the highest concentrations of population and employment in the RTA  service area. However, outside of a few communities, future changes in density within  the sub‐area will remain moderate. Downtown Riverside is projected as an area of  concentrated growth that can foster more opportunities for transit. The suburban  communities in the City of Eastvale and along the Bellegrave Avenue corridor will be                                                          3 RCTC Estimate based on State of California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit (January 1, 2017)  4 SCAG RTP 2016‐2040 Growth Forecast.  Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 11 sites of larger population growth while employment increases are projected in Corona, Norco, and Eastvale along Hamner Avenue. The core of the sub-area will still be Downtown Riverside and the Magnolia Avenue-University Avenue corridor. Other residential communities in the northern portion of the sub-area will remain automobile- oriented communities because of the lack of mixed-use density. • In the Moreno Valley and Perris sub-area (Mead Valley, March Air Reserve Base, Moreno Valley, and Perris), growth will primarily occur outside of the existing core and in the outlying communities. Moreno Beach Drive and the areas south of the Lake Perris Reservoir will experience significant growth in population density. Most of the new employment is concentrated near the Riverside County Regional Medical Center. Serving the new residential areas would present a challenge for effective transit due to their distance from major corridors. Residential development will still be the dominant land use in the sub-area. Moreno Valley will remain a dense, residential community. Most of the population and employment density in Perris will remain focused around Perris Boulevard. • The Hemet, San Jacinto, and Pass sub-area (Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Hemet, and San Jacinto) is expected to undergo the highest rates of growth in the system. The increases are concentrated in the Beaumont and San Jacinto jurisdictions. The majority of the population growth in Beaumont will take place in the rural and suburban areas between Pennsylvania Avenue and Highland Springs Avenue. In San Jacinto, residential density will increase east of the State Street corridor. The sub-area employment growth is minimal and limited to a few key corridors, specifically along Sixth Street and Ramsey Street, Florida Avenue and State Street. Hemet will maintain transit-supportive densities and land uses in 2035. The Florida Avenue corridor is positioned to be the key corridor in the sub-area due to high levels of employment density. Although the rate of overall growth in the sub-area is significant, the future success of transit will largely depend on how the new development patterns interact with the existing ones to promote sustainable growth. • In the southwest sub-area (Canyon Lake, French Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar, and Winchester), the key change will be the large concentration of employment growth in Murrieta along the I-15 and I-215 freeways. The change in density is particularly intense east of the I-15 and will occur on currently undeveloped parcels. The only significant changes in population density occur in Winchester and Lake Elsinore, areas outside of the sub-area core. By 2035, Temecula and Murrieta are projected to have the highest density in the sub-area. More trip generators should be expected where higher population and employment densities are proposed. 1.3 FIXED-ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICES As of July 1, 2018, RTA will operate 36 regional, local, rural, and trolley service routes, one RapidLink limited stop route, and nine CommuterLink express routes. Routes in higher density Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 12 urban areas with greater peak ridership are usually operated with larger vehicles, while routes in suburban and rural areas with lower ridership are usually operated with smaller- to medium- sized vehicles. Table 3A contains a complete listing of both directly operated and contract operated routes. Fixed-route Services The service recommendations of the COA completed in 2015 classified all RTA fixed-route services under five service tiers. Each tier serves a different role in the network and has different expectations for service performance and frequencies. These tiers are: Frequent Key Corridor: Frequent key corridor routes form the core spine of the network and provide “lifestyle” transit options for riders. They have the highest ridership and performance in the system and the highest service frequencies (30 minute or better) to accommodate the high ridership. These routes have the most potential to support Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) services. The corridors identified in this tier are the RapidLink Gold Line and Route 1 corridor between UCR and Corona (primarily along University and Magnolia avenues) and the routes 16 and 19 corridor, with potential future RapidLink Blue Line service, between UCR and Perris Station Transit Center (though Riverside, Moreno Valley, and Perris). Supporting Local: Supporting local routes constitute the majority of the route network, providing connections to key employment centers, activity centers, and transfer hubs. They offer “lifeline” service for those dependent on transit while also providing connections to lifestyle services. Frequencies will vary depending on the market support for transit, but will be at least hourly. Regional Connectors: Regional connectors are longer distance routes that connect multiple urban centers separated by geographic gaps in density. These routes tend to have lower performance due to their longer distances and lower densities in the areas between the urban centers they connect. Frequencies are generally hourly. As their name suggests, these routes provide network connectivity between dispersed activity centers and between high and low density areas across the RTA service area. Community Feeders: Community feeders are shorter distance routes (including special trolley services) that connect key destinations within a community. They connect residents with local shopping centers, educational facilities, medical facilities or transit stations. CommuterLink: These routes are long-distance, peak-hour express services that provide both inter and intra county connections. They connect commuters directly with major employment centers or indirectly through connections at major multi-modal bus and rail hubs. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 13 Paratransit Services RTA offers demand-response paratransit services known as “Dial-A-Ride” (DAR) to seniors (age 65 and above) and persons with disabilities. DAR is an origin-to-destination, advanced- reservation transportation service that travels to areas within three-quarters of a mile of an RTA fixed-route, excluding express services. These areas are referred to as the “DAR service area” and trips must begin and end in the service area. DAR service is provided at times equivalent to local fixed-route bus service in the area. RTA has three types of DAR services: Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Priority DAR Service: RTA gives priority service to individuals who are certified under ADA law. Persons who are ADA-certified are eligible for trips throughout the RTA service area that are within three-quarters of a mile of fixed-route bus service, excluding express routes and during the hours of fixed-route bus service operation. Senior and Disabled DAR Service: Seniors age 65 and above and persons with disabilities are eligible for local DAR service within a single city and within three-quarters of a mile during the hours of fixed-route bus service operation, excluding express service. Transportation is provided only within the city in which the trip begins. DAR Plus Service: In an effort to provide service to those who live in rural areas that have no access to public transportation, RTA began a program in July of 2015, DAR Plus, RTA Lifeline Service. This program extends the DAR service boundary by an additional two miles to qualified applicants needing life-sustaining services. The program provides wheelchair accessible taxi service to seniors aged 65 and over and to persons with disabilities for lifeline services such as doctor’s appointments, dialysis and chemotherapy treatments, trips to the pharmacy, trips to the grocery store for food, and trips to the senior center to access hot meal service. 1.4 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE The most recent change to the fare structure was in July 2013 when the Board of Directors approved a revision to include the addition of discounted fares for veterans and active duty military, police, and fire personnel as shown in the table below. Other fare categories were established in June 2009 after the last fare study which was completed in March 2009. A review of the current fare structure is anticipated over the next two years. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 14 FIXED-ROUTE FARES Fare Categories Base Fares Day Pass* 7-Day Pass* 30-Day Pass* General $1.50 $4.00 $16.00 $50.00 Youth (grades 1-12)** $1.50 $4.00 $16.00 $35.00 Senior / Disabled** $0.70 $2.00 $16.00 $23.00 Medicare Card Holder $0.70 $2.00 $16.00 $23.00 Veteran** $0.70 $2.00 $16.00 $23.00 Child (46” tall or under) $0.25 N/A N/A N/A COMMUTERLINK FARES COMMUTERLINK + LOCAL Fare Categories Base Fares Day Pass 30-Day Pass General $3.00 $7.00 $75.00 Youth (grades 1-12)** $3.00 $7.00 $75.00 Senior / Disabled** $2.00 $5.00 $50.00 Medicare Card Holder $2.00 $5.00 $50.00 Veteran** $2.00 $5.00 $50.00 Child (46” tall or under) $2.00 N/A N/A DAR FARES | Not accepted on fixed-route buses Fare Categories Base Fares 10-Ticket Books Senior / Disabled $3.00 $30.00 Medicare Card Holder $3.00 $30.00 Child (46” tall or under) $0.50 N/A *Accepted as base fare. CommuterLink trips require an additional $1.30 (Senior, Disabled, Medicare, and Veteran) or $1.50 (General / Youth) per trip. **Proper identification is required at time of boarding. In addition to these fare categories, RTA also has U-Pass, Go-Pass, and City Pass programs. Cardholders of these programs get unlimited rides on any fixed-route, including CommuterLink, in the RTA network at no cost. Active duty military, police, and fire personnel in uniform with valid identification are also eligible for complimentary rides on RTA fixed-routes. Cooperative Fare and Subsidy Programs RTA makes every effort to create partnerships that will improve service for customers by developing fare programs that promote the use of public transit. In FY19, the following cooperative fare and subsidy programs are expected to continue: • California Baptist University – U-Pass Program • City of Riverside – City Pass for Employees • City of Temecula – Route 55 Temecula Trolley • County of Riverside – Route 50 Jury Trolley • La Sierra University – U-Pass Program • Moreno Valley College – Go-Pass Program • Mount San Jacinto College – Go-Pass Program • Norco College – Go-Pass Program Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 15 • Riverside City College (RCC) – Go-Pass Program • UCR – U-Pass Program, Route 51 Crest Cruiser • RCTC – Metrolink- Festival of Lights Shuttle College and university programs allow students with valid identification from these campuses to receive unlimited access to any of RTA’s fixed-routes. These programs are funded by the institution or students. The City of Riverside subsidizes the City Pass fare program for its employees to ride the bus for free and serves as a pass outlet (Riverside Go Transit) for its residents by discounting 20 percent to 30 percent off on 7-day and 30-day passes, respectively. The Festival of Lights shuttle is a free service subsidized by RCTC and Metrolink that transports people from the Riverside-Downtown Metrolink Station to Downtown Riverside on select weekends during the Festival of Lights. Other subsidized transit services include the trolley and circulator routes which are funded by UCR or local jurisdictions. 1.5 REVENUE FLEET As of March 2018, RTA has a total active fixed-route fleet size of 224 buses. The bus types consist of 145 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-powered 40-foot buses currently used for directly operated fixed-routes and 79 medium-sized buses for contracted fixed-routes. RTA also has an active fleet of 110 vehicles for operation of paratransit services, for a total of 334 revenue service vehicles. Table 1 shows a detailed inventory of the RTA fleet including all fleet vehicles active during FY18 and buses that are no longer in service. The RTA fleet is also California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions compliant. The heavy duty CNG 40-foot buses used on directly operated routes generally cover more densely populated areas such as Riverside, Corona, Moreno Valley, and Perris while the medium-sized buses are typically used as local and express vehicles on contract operated fixed- routes in less densely populated communities. In FY17 through FY18, with the implementation of RapidLink Gold Line and CommuterLink Route 200, the directly operated fixed-route fleet of 145 was fully deployed. The trolley fleet was reduced to five buses and it is expected to have five replacement trolleys delivered by the end of FY18. A further batch of four new medium-sized buses is expected to be delivered in summer 2018, allowing the replacement of the contingency fleet. Another batch of 37 new medium-sized buses and 39 paratransit vehicles will be delivered during FY19 to replace vehicles that have reached the end of their useful life. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 16 1.6 EXISTING AND PLANNED FACILITIES Existing Facilities RTA’s primary facility is located in the City of Riverside and RTA’s secondary facility is located in the City of Hemet. RTA’s Riverside facility is utilized for directly operated routes in the northern portion of the system network while RTA’s Hemet facility is utilized for directly operated routes in the southern portion of the system network. As an effort to better utilize the available office space at Riverside and Hemet, Contract Operations, IT, and Travel Training staff will be moving to Hemet in July / August 2018. After this move, the Riverside facility will have 393 active employees on site and the Hemet facility will have 100 active employees on site. In FY19, RTA’s contracted fixed-route service will continue to be provided by Empire Transportation, operating from a facility in Perris. DAR service is currently provided by Southland Transit, Inc. and is also based out of Perris. Both contractors are responsible for housing, operating, and maintaining RTA vehicles. The DAR facility in Perris also houses the DAR reservation call center. RTA offers taxi overflow through Network Paratransit. Planned Facilities The 2016-2040 Regional Transportation Plan and Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP / SCS) projects that by 2040 approximately 3.2 million people will live in Riverside County, compared to 2.3 million in 2016 5, and more than 1.1 million jobs will be located in Riverside County. As a result, RTA will need to expand transit service for the additional people expected to live in the county and provide transit access to the additional employment opportunities. RTA’s current operations and maintenance facility in Riverside is at capacity, and the outdated layout of this facility results in a long and inefficient maintenance process with vehicles having to drive in a loop on Third Street to be serviced and washed. This facility cannot accommodate additional vehicles, consequently prohibiting the Agency’s ability to expand transit service efficiently. Similarly, the Hemet facility has limitations, and in order to support RTA’s service expansion plans identified in the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan, additional maintenance infrastructure would be needed. The Hemet Facility also poses logistical challenges that result in increased deadhead miles. A new central operations and maintenance facility will allow RTA to implement the service goals identified in the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan, reduce costly deadhead miles, increase operating efficiency, and allow the agency to accommodate ridership growth in western Riverside County. Moreover, RTA will use this new facility to implement new and emerging technologies such as electric and hybrid vehicles, solar power generation, etc. These new 5 State of California, Department of Finance, Report E-1, Released May 1, 2016 Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 17 technologies will provide environmental benefits and promote sustainable business practices that will benefit the region and support the state’s goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This would also open the opportunity to house the two contract operations arms into an owned and managed Agency facility. Contractors currently amortize their facility lease expenses into their hourly rate charged to the Agency. Providing them with turnkey facilities within the new Maintenance and Operations Facility would reduce that hourly rate thus reducing operating expenses. This would have a positive effect on the farebox recovery ratio and allow RTA staff to have closer oversight of the contractors’ operations. RTA will conduct a needs analysis and produce a Facilities Masterplan and Implementation Plan for the new facility during FY19 – FY20. Site selection will evaluate a variety of locational factors such as lot size, distance to fixed- route service areas, comparison of reduced nonrevenue miles and operating cost, accessibility for Disadvantaged Communities, and Title VI compliance. The site selected will decrease deadhead hours and miles thus increase productivity and efficiency. The first phase of the project will include immediate-term improvements to allow RTA to use their current facilities until new location(s) can be built. Funding for site selection, land acquisition, and conceptual planning has been programmed and RTA has already secured over $12 million in Proposition 1B Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (PTMISEA) funds toward the A&E, land acquisition, and construction phases of this project. In addition, RTA has programmed approximately $1.5 million in FTA 5339 program funds with the required local match funds and $2.8 million of LTF, and identified funding from the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) TUMF 2016 Nexus Study which was approved in July 2017. 1.7 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES RTA is one of two designated Consolidated Transportation Services Agencies (CTSA) in Riverside County, the other being SunLine Transit Agency in the Coachella Valley. RTA’s role as a CTSA is to assist RCTC in coordinating public transit throughout RTA’s approximate 2,500-square-mile jurisdiction, support driver training and technical workshops, and assist with preparing grant applications. Regional Coordination RTA coordinates regional services with the Corona Cruiser and Pass Transit systems in the cities of Corona, Beaumont, and Banning. During FY17, Beaumont Pass Transit implemented new Route 136 which extended service into the City of Calimesa, though this arrangement will not continue beyond FY18 due to low ridership. In the City of Riverside, RTA coordinates with Riverside Special Services, which provides complementary ADA-compliant service to RTA’s fixed-routes. Additionally, RTA staff periodically meets with social service providers, bus riders, Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 18 and other advocates through forums such as RCTC’s Citizens Advisory Committee, RTA’s ADA meetings, Transportation NOW (T-NOW) chapters, and surrounding regional transit operators. As a CTSA and federal grantee, RTA receives FTA funds and is responsible for monitoring the compliance of sub-recipients receiving such funds to federal regulations and policies. RTA continues to assist other agencies throughout western Riverside County with applying for federal funds such as the FTA § 5310 program. The projects funded through the 5310 program improve mobility for seniors and individuals with disabilities by removing barriers to transportation services and expanding the transportation mobility options available. The remaining projects funded through these programs include specialized public transportation initiatives that are targeted to assist low-income individuals, seniors, and persons with disabilities who require support beyond conventional public transit services to maintain their independence and mobility. Interregional Coordination and Transfer Agreements While most trips are completed within RTA’s jurisdiction, there is a demand to provide connectivity to areas outside of this area. As such, RTA has collaborated with other transit agencies on agreements for funding splits and/or jurisdictional overlap, in order to further interregional connectivity via public transportation. As a result of these collaborations, RTA has transfer agreements with the following agencies: Metrolink, Omnitrans, Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), Corona Cruiser, SunLine, and Pass Transit. Metrolink tickets and passes are accepted on RTA fixed-routes that serve Metrolink stations during the period from one hour before to one hour after Metrolink service hours and are valid on the day of travel. Fare media from Omnitrans and Pass Transit are accepted at transfer locations at the equivalent base fare rate, excluding CommuterLink service, on the day of travel. Corona Cruiser fare media are accepted at transfer locations and adjacent stops. OCTA fare media is accepted for base fare on CommuterLink routes 200 and 205 at transfer locations in Orange County as well as La Sierra Metrolink between RTA routes 15, 200, and OCTA Route 794. Current and retired employees as well as dependents of Omnitrans and OCTA are eligible to ride at no cost any local fixed-route or CommuterLink in the RTA service area. In FY18, as part of the introduction of new CommuterLink Route 200, RTA and Omnitrans reached agreement to allow Route 200 to include a stop at Downtown San Bernardino Transit Center. RTA also reached agreement with OCTA and City of Anaheim to allow Route 200 to serve stops in Anaheim including Harbor Blvd at Disneyland, The two agencies also coordinated on developing a new transfer point in South Fontana for RTA routes 21 and 49, and Omnitrans Route 82, as well as make provision for space for future Omnitrans service at the new Amazon Eastvale transit hub. In FY19, RTA will continue to collaborate with these agencies to provide options for enhanced interregional connectivity via transfer and funding agreements and jurisdictional overlap. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 19 CHAPTER 2: ROUTE PERFORMANCE AND EXISTING SERVICE 2.1 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS RTA evaluates and plans for its services using the RTA Board-adopted Service Standards and Warrants metrics and those set by RCTC’s Annual State of Public Transit Report, which are both updated annually. Service Standards and Warrants The Service Standards and Warrants guidelines are design standards that set the requirements for a minimum level of service that respects service quality characteristics such as route structure, service area coverage, operating hours and on-time performance. There are several factors that are typically considered when objectively measuring service performance. These factors, used in conjunction with the Annual State of Public Transit Report, help determine whether service is cost effective. SUMMARY OF SERVICE STANDARDS AND WARRANTS Population Density Density is determined by the number of people housed per square mile or the number of employees per square mile. RTA aims to provide at least 85 percent of all residences, places of work, high schools, colleges, and shopping centers with access to bus service. Route Classifications RTA service can be classified into five fixed-route tiers; frequent key corridor, supporting local, regional connector, community feeder, and CommuterLink. Complementary to the fixed-route service is DAR. See Table 3A for the route classification of each route. Span of Service The span of service or the hours of operation refers to the start and end time of a route. The span of service will vary based on the demand in the community and the classification of the route. Bus Stop Spacing and Amenities Depending on the population density, bus stop spacing in urban areas usually averages about 1,500 ft. (.28 miles) to 2,500 ft. (.47 miles). As service approaches more suburban and rural areas, bus stop spacing may be limited to locations with accessible curb and gutters and sidewalks suitable for ADA compliance. The new bus stop spacing standards allows spacing of 0.25 to 0.33 miles for support local, regional, and community feeder routes; 0.25 to 0.5 miles for frequent key corridor local service; and 0.5 mile stop spacing for RapidLink service. Bus stops with 10 or more average weekday boardings may qualify for a shelter, and the stops with 5 or more boardings may qualify for a bench, subject to funding availability that is determined in the annual budget process. These standards were adopted in the Bus Stop Strategic Plan (2015) On-Time Performance RTA requires that no bus shall leave a time point early and should arrive at a time point no later than six minutes after the scheduled arrival time. This limit is appropriate for RTA’s service area due to the average distance traveled by each route and the combined rural and urban areas. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 20 Headways (Frequency) Headways are the timed intervals between each scheduled trip within a fixed-route bus (e.g., the bus runs every 30 minutes). Headways range anywhere from every 15 minutes to every 120 minutes depending on the density and are aimed at operating in 15 minute increments for frequent key corridors supporting local and regional connector tiers. Community feeders and CommuterLink routes may vary depending on demand. Transfer Wait Time Transfer Wait Time refers to the amount of time a passenger has to wait when transferring from one mode of transportation to the next, whether it is bus or rail. In more UZAs such as downtown Riverside, average transfer wait times should not be longer than approximately 20 minutes. In smaller urbanized and even in rural areas, the average transfer wait time can reach up to 30 to 45 minutes depending on the frequencies of the routes in the area. Load Factor (Maximum Vehicle Loads) Depending on the bus, the maximum number of passengers should not exceed 150 percent of the seating capacity or the legal weight limit of the bus. DAR vehicles should not exceed 100 percent of the seated capacity. Source: RTA’s Service Standards and Warrants (2012), Bus Stop Strategic Plan (2015) Productivity vs. Coverage Target To help improve effectiveness and efficiency of its operations, RTA sets a target for the productivity level of service to operate. In order to meet the productivity requirements and continue to provide coverage to the areas where the service performance is below the productivity standard but the transit service is needed by transportation disadvantaged people, RTA has adopted the standards requiring 60 percent of their fixed-route service to perform up to productivity standards while the remaining 40 percent of fixed-routes operate to maintain coverage. In this way, the service exceeding the performance standards enables a minimal level of operations in areas of need where the performance standards are not met. Given RTA’s diverse and widespread service area, the service is provided to the areas based on the need to provide coverage. The 60 / 40 split establishes a benchmark for the productive service to meet mandatory farebox recovery. Furthermore, it also allows for new service to be implemented following TDA guidelines for exemption based on performance standards within the year when the service was implemented and the two subsequent fiscal years. This objective also enables RTA to maintain highly productive service and still meet the requirements of Title VI. It is the policy of RTA to ensure compliance with Title VI so that no person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin under any transit program or activity. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 21 Warrants for New Service The Service Standards and Warrants are also used as a guide for the implementation of new service. New service is exempt from meeting the required criteria for up to two years plus the year of commencement. New service is evaluated during this initial period using the Service Standards and Warrants and the Annual State of Public Transit Report. The objective is to give a route time to perform up to standards, or it may be discontinued. Annual State of Public Transit Report RCTC’s Annual State of Public Transit Report is based on audited information of operators after the end of the preceding fiscal year. 2.2 EXISTING FIXED-ROUTE AND Dial-A-Ride SERVICE In FY18, RTA budgeted 874,095 revenue hours for the operation of 13.4 million revenue miles system-wide. Total revenue hours budgeted was 662,102 for fixed-routes and 211,992 for DAR and taxi service. Total revenue miles included 9,782,252 for fixed-routes and 3,596,554 million for DAR and taxi. Until 2014, passenger growth exceeded projections due to factors such as significant increases in pass programs, customer satisfaction, high gasoline prices, and a high unemployment rate. In FY16, ridership dipped due to continued improvements in the economy coupled with continued low gas prices have led a decline in system-wide ridership. In FY19, RTA will enjoy a full year of ridership from FY18 service improvements, including the addition of new RapidLink Gold Line service in August 2017, upgrading the Perris-Moreno Valley Route 19 frequency weekdays to every 15 minutes, and implementing new CommuterLink routes 200 (San Bernardino-Riverside-Anaheim) and 205 (Temecula-Corona-Village at Orange). These improvements have shown positive returns, and, together with a range of proposed new FY19 service improvements (see Section 3.2), are projected to help increase ridership for FY19 over FY18 actual ridership, while establishing a foundation for sustainable ridership in the long- term. 2.3 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS Improving productivity is a priority for service delivery. Performance measures, particularly farebox recovery and passengers per hour, are monitored regularly. These two measurements are key factors in evaluating the performance of individual routes and allow resources to be Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 22 reallocated from underperforming routes or trips to establish improved service on high- performing routes with more potential for ridership growth. For FY19, this process has led to more equitable weekend service across several routes, as well as greater investment in routes 19, 200, 205, and RapidLink Gold Line, while addressing low performing trips across the network. In order to identify underperforming trips and routes, the following metrics were used: • Trips (or sequence of trips) with less than six boardings were subject to discontinuation. • Less than 20 boardings per trips for peak trips above base service frequency where an additional vehicle and/or operator were deployed were subject to discontinuation. • Route service days with less than six passengers per revenue service hour were subject to reduction in frequency. 2.4 POTENTIAL GROWTH MARKETS The school-related and work-related trips are RTA’s traditional growth markets. Customer surveys conducted in 2013 during the COA indicated that approximately 35 percent of trips were to and from college or school. Similarly, over 27 percent of trips were for work purposes, while 21 percent were for retail or recreational purposes. These market segments will remain critical to ridership growth. Growth in the student market in the past has been attributable to new pass programs with local colleges and universities, outreach to schools, and reduced school district transportation programs at the secondary level. RTA continues to make every effort to reach out to schools to coordinate transit service with school bell schedules and attendance boundaries. At the college level, RTA continues to develop and build relationships with college and university officials to improve transportation for their students through pass programs and enhanced services that meet the needs of students, such as later evening trips. Pass usage for FY18 saw a small increase in activity over FY17, which is expected to continue in FY19 as new service improvements make it easier for students to get to and from their respective campuses. The CommuterLink market has been hit the hardest by the low gas prices as well as the increasing popularity of the 91 / Perris Valley passenger rail line, which has affected parallel RTA services. The amenities on the CommuterLink routes such as the high-back upholstered seating, reading lights, free Wi-Fi, and USB charging stations are added values to the service that attract and retain customers. This service type will continue to be monitored and service levels adjusted, in line with demand. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 23 The COA study completed in 2015 clearly pointed to the need for significant service improvements concentrated on four core themes: 1. Frequency of Service: Ridership and customer survey data strongly pointed to service frequency as the key improvement required for RTA services to be attractive and have the capacity to grow. 2. Connectivity: Surveys also pointed to the need to better coordinate RTA services at key connection points, especially where low frequency services meet. 3. Streamlining: Changes need to focus on routing on major streets and corridors to reduce circuitous routing, duplication of service, and to improve travel times and ease of understanding of the transit network. 4. Span of Service: Surveys pointed clearly to the need to accommodate demand for later service in areas near major employment centers, colleges, and universities. RTA will continue to explore service changes that address these key service attributes. Market conditions alone can no longer be relied upon to retain existing and attract new ridership. 2.5 PASSENGER TRANSIT FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT AND PASSENGER AMENITIES Existing Passenger Transit Facilities In addition to improvements to service frequency and expanding service, the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan recommends the creation of a Timed Transfer System (TTS) and improving support infrastructure such as transit hubs to meet the growing demand for transit service in the most efficient manner. It’s neither feasible nor cost effective to run direct service from every trip origin to destination; therefore, the only system that can meet the growing demand efficiently is one that enables timed transfer connections from one service or mode to another. Strategically placed transit hubs are essential to making a TTS work at its optimum. Furthermore, transit hubs are more than just a place to make bus connections. They can be community-centered, multi-modal facilities where bus and rail customers share a selection of mobility choices. These modes of travel can include single-occupancy vehicles, carpools, vanpools, bicycles, pedestrian walkways, local and commuter express buses, and light rail and regional rail networks. Transit hubs are generally owned by various public agencies and are well-situated for the advancement of public-private investment partnerships leading to transit- oriented commercial and residential development. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 24 The following is a summary of the existing transit facilities in the RTA service area: Perris Station Transit Center: This transit center is located in the City of Perris at C Street and 4th Street (SR-74) and has eight bus bays served by seven RTA routes. The facility handles multi- modal transfers between Metrolink; RTA local, regional, and express routes; and park-and-ride patrons in the southwest region. Corona Transit Center: This transit center is located in the City of Corona off Grand Boulevard and North Main Street and includes eight bus bays and a pedestrian bridge to trains at the North Main Corona Metrolink Station. Galleria at Tyler Bus Stop Improvements: The demand for enhanced connections and improved bus stop amenities prompted RTA to improve the stops at the Galleria Mall at Tyler, which serves ten routes. The upgrade was completed in October 2014 and nearly doubled the size of the facility, which now includes six bus bays with new passenger shelters equipped with solar lighting. The facility also includes real-time arrival and departure information and customer amenities that comply with ADA design standards. Reinforced concrete bus pads were installed to protect the roadway and increase the useful life of this facility. Further improvements were made in 2017 to add two additional stops on Magnolia Avenue to accommodate new RapidLink Gold Line service. Moreno Valley Mall Transfer Station: Similar to the Galleria at Tyler, the transit facility at Moreno Valley Mall is integral toward establishing transfers within RTA’s network. Completed in March 2015, the upgraded facility, which now serves eight RTA bus routes, has tripled in size to include six upgraded bus bays with pedestrian amenities that comply with ADA design standards. New bus shelters with solar lighting, information kiosks, benches, and trash receptacles were installed. Concrete bus pads were also installed to preserve the roadway and increase the useful life of the stop. On average, more than 1,500 boardings and alightings occur at this station every day. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 25 Downtown Riverside Stop Improvements: This project has facilitated an on-street grid system for transit in downtown Riverside and closure of the Riverside Downtown Transit Terminal. The operating plan, aimed at modernizing the service in downtown Riverside by creating an on- street grid system, was a key recommendation from the COA. The operating plan improved passenger transfers, consolidated routes to enhance service delivery and boosted productivity, and reduced the number of buses traveling to downtown thereby improving traffic circulation. The A&E phase for this project was completed in December 2015 and construction was completed in December 2016. This project was completed in time for the January 2017 service change and closure of the Riverside Downtown Transit Terminal. RapidLink Gold Line (Corona to UCR Corridor): RTA identified the corridor between UCR and Corona primarily along University and Market / Magnolia Avenues as a candidate for limited- stop service. More than 9,000 customers use bus services along this corridor on weekdays. RTA completed A&E and construction of the RapidLink Gold Line stops, and service launched in August 2017. Fifteen bus stops were upgraded to include bus shelters with solar lighting, benches and trash cans as well as new RapidLink signage on the shelter roof. Transit Enhancements: During FY18, thirty-eight stops were enhanced which included adding or replacing shelters, benches and trash cans. Examples of small scale transit enhancement projects completed during the last fiscal year are listed below: • The Los Alamos at Murrieta Gateway Enhancement Project enhanced a stop with a transit shelter and new passenger amenities to accommodate the growth in ridership at the stop. • The Mission Trail at Malaga Stop Improvement Project enhanced a stop with new civil improvements such as a shelter and passenger amenities to accommodate the growth in ridership at the stop. Planned Passenger Transit Facilities Bus Stops Improvement Program Implementation: The Bus Stop Strategic Policy was approved by RTA’s Board of Directors in June 2015. This program uses a two-tiered approach to the allocation of new bus stop amenities within the allocated funding of an annual Bus Stop Improvement Program. The two tiers focus on ridership and geographic equity respectively, providing a more balanced distribution of improvements across the service area compared to a methodology purely focused on ridership (which is biased towards more UZAs). Tier 1 is prioritized based on the ridership per stop across all RTA bus stops. This tier covers 50 percent of bus stops receiving improvements as part of the program and ensures the network’s busiest bus stops receive some priority. Tier 2 is prioritized on an equitable allocation based on each jurisdiction’s population and ridership. This approach to allocation of amenities will cover the remaining 50 percent of bus stops receiving improvements as part of the program and will Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 26 ensure a balance between need and geographic equity. In conjunction with the tiers, there are also a number of other criteria such as a limit per jurisdiction, ADA compliance, available space, and limited stop ridership threshold. RTA initiated bulk procurement of shelters, benches, and trash receptacles in fall 2016 in groups of 25. The first 25 locations have been completed in FY18 in accordance with the Bus Stop Strategic Policy. In addition to those locations, seven additional locations have been enhanced to address operations and safety related issues. RTA plans to complete the next 25 over the next year along with improvements to at least eight additional locations to address operations and safety issues. RapidLink Blue Line (UCR to Perris Corridor): The UCR to Perris Metrolink Station corridor through Moreno Valley and Perris has also been identified as a second candidate for limited- stop service due to its high ridership. Dubbed the RapidLink Blue Line, this service will be implemented once funding is secured. In the meantime, improvements to routes 16 and 19 have been implemented to build additional ridership along this busy corridor. University of California, Riverside Mobility Hub: Currently, 21 percent of UCR’s population ride RTA buses. UCR is one of the busiest transit destinations in the Agency’s transit network, with over 1,785 boardings and alightings reported on an average weekday. Planned service improvements, the popular U-Pass Program, parking price increases, increased congestion, and resulting environmental and sustainability challenges are projected to contribute toward positive ridership gains in the future. The current on-street bus stops at UCR located on Canyon Crest Drive are utilized by routes 1, 16, 51, 52, 204, and RapidLink Gold Line. This stop currently does not have the space, bus shelters or other amenities essential to effectively accommodate the current and planned service levels. The proposed UCR Mobility Hub would have an efficient bus turnaround to allow more direct routing, eliminating excess travel on local streets currently needed to turn the buses around. The estimated annual operating and capital cost savings through operational efficiencies gained by implementing the proposed UCR Mobility Hub are estimated at $600,000. In turn, these cost savings and buses will be reallocated to assist in implementing increased service as recommended in the Ten-Year Transit Network Plan. The proposed UCR Mobility Hub will have capacity for six buses and be utilized by current routes 1, 16, 51, 52, 204, and RapidLink Gold Line and proposed RapidLink Blue Line. The project will also add amenities such as, bus shelters, benches, trash receptacles, security features, drought-tolerant landscaping, traffic signalization, connectivity to UCR’s bicycle amenities, and better integration with the existing City of Riverside bike lanes and trails. This project reflects an ongoing partnership between UCR and RTA; these two agencies entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in June 2017 to deliver the project. In addition to the mobility hub, UCR is going to improve bicycle and pedestrian connections throughout the campus, making it easier for students and faculty to access the hub. UCR awarded a contract for Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 27 A&E work to Gruen Associates. A final conceptual plan was completed and initial A&E, as well as environmental clearance process, has been initiated. A construction schedule will be determined once the environmental clearance process is completed. Promenade Mall Mobility Hub: RTA and the City of Temecula worked together to identify a project site located at Promenade Mall in Temecula. Promenade Mall is a 1.1 million-square- foot shopping mall with more than 100 retail establishments, dozens of restaurants, and a movie theater complex. Since its inception in 1999, Promenade Mall has become a key shopping, dining, and entertainment venue in the City of Temecula. It is essential for RTA to expand its public transit infrastructure in order to accommodate the growing demand in service from the ever increasing number of people traveling to and from the Promenade. The Promenade Mall currently has a single bus stop that serves seven RTA bus routes: 55, 79, 202, 205, 206, 208, and 217. In partnership with RTA, Promenade Mall, and the City of Temecula completed the conceptual plan that outlines design recommendations for the proposed expansion of Promenade Mall’s current single bus stop. The Conceptual Plan for this project was approved by the RTA Board of Directors and the contract for A&E work was awarded in April 2017. A&E work was completed in December 2017. RTA has also completed the funding package for the construction phase of this project by securing approximately $1.7 million from the TUMF program. Construction bids were released in February 2018 and a contract was awarded to Environmental Construction, Inc. in April 2018. The upgraded facility is projected for completion in January 2019. Hemet Mobility Hub: Today, about 150,000 people reside in the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley, a rapidly growing area in western Riverside County. The City of Hemet has a projected population of 126,500 in 2040 6, a 58 percent increase from 80,070 in 2016 7. Population growth will result in an increased demand for transit service in the area. The City of Hemet developed a Downtown Specific Plan in April 2017. The City’s Downtown Specific Plan has identified a need for an intermodal mobility hub to meet the projected demand for local and regional transit services such as bus, rail, car, bike sharing, Uber, and Lyft. The intermodal mobility hub will also serve as a park-and-ride facility and include solar power and electric vehicle (EV) charging stations to support emerging EV technologies. Furthermore, the potential extension of commuter rail service from the City of Perris to Hemet / San Jacinto (currently being studied by RCTC in their rail feasibility study) could also benefit from the intermodal mobility hub. The plan identifies a city owned 14.5 acre site as the Transit Oriented District (TOD) and includes plans for a multi-modal mobility hub. The hub will be central to the Hemet Civic Center to the south, the County Administrative Center to the north, and the Hemet Valley Hospital complex to the east. A substantial portion of this site will be available to transit supportive land 6 SCG 2016-2040 RTP / SCS, Demographics and Growth Forecast 7 California Department of Finance, Report E-1 Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 28 uses that could be developed through public-private partnerships. The plan envisions a transit oriented development that will include housing, retail, office, public spaces, and entertainment venues that will include energy-efficient sustainable design features to fully activate the mobility hub to be a thriving community activity center. The vision for the project creates an opportunity to use cap-and-trade funding. The proposed Hemet Mobility Hub will address current and future mobility, sustainability, and efficiency needs of the City of Hemet and RTA. It will have the capacity to anchor RTA routes 27, 31, 32, 33, 42, 74, 79, 212, and 217 that currently serve the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley and other modes planned for this site (car and bike sharing, TNCs, EV charging, etc.). RTA will construct a mobility hub in partnership with the City of Hemet. On October 27, 2016, the RTA Board of Directors approved staff’s recommendation to enter into a MOU with the City of Hemet to prepare a conceptual plan. A contract was awarded for A&E in April 2017 to PSOMAS. Site selection, conceptual planning, and initial design were completed in April 2018. In FY18 into early FY19, RTA will complete environmental work and final design of the mobility hub. RTA is currently working on the funding plan for the construction phase of this project and intends to utilize a mix of funds from sources such as FTA 5339 and TUMF. Mount San Jacinto College Mobility Hub: Founded in 1963, MSJC is part of the California Higher Education System, one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation. MSJC has a student population of over 5,000. Currently, RTA provides both local and commuter fixed- route service to the college campus. RTA routes 31, 32, 74, 212, and 217 all serve MSJC San Jacinto campus and provide an opportunity for people living throughout western Riverside County to travel to and from the campus. There is a strong incentive for students to use transit as MSJC is a member of the Go-Pass Program which allows students to take unlimited rides on fixed-route service which is paid through student fees. The Go-Pass program has been successful in generating an average of 25,000 boardings per month at MSJC campus locations. MSJC projects that the student population will increase to 10,600 by 2020. In order to accommodate growth in ridership, RTA plans to improve the MSJC San Jacinto campus bus stop. The existing location accommodates only two buses to stop at a time for passenger drop-off and pick-up. The site has two bus shelters with passenger amenities that provide some level of comfort for those waiting for a bus and protection from inclement weather. RTA is planning to expand the facility to allow additional buses to stop at this location. The MSJC San Jacinto Mobility Hub will also include additional shelters, security features, and improved pedestrian access that is consistent with the ADA 2010 Standards for Accessibility Design guidelines. Such improvements will allow RTA to accommodate future ridership growth as the college and the surrounding areas continue to grow in the coming years. In addition, the Hemet-San Jacinto region is recognized in RTA’s Ten-Year Transit Network Plan as one of the fastest growing regions in the RTA service area. As part of an effort to improve service delivery in the region, RTA is examining opportunities to improve major destinations Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 29 and stops to help facilitate passenger connections. As transit ridership grows, the MSJC Mobility Hub in San Jacinto will become a focal point of transit services in the Hemet-San Jacinto area. Long-term plans indicate that passenger rail service may extend out to this area which would necessitate the need for an improved transfer interface between bus and rail. Until these long range projects are complete, the MSJC Mobility Hub will function as one of the key locations in the Hemet-San Jacinto for passengers to transfer between buses. Vine Street Mobility Hub: The City of Riverside’s General Plan 2025 identified Vine Street as one of the preferred locations within downtown Riverside for a new mobility hub due to its proximity to major employment centers, county and city government centers, UCR, Riverside Community College, the Convention Center, multiple entertainment venues, and urban housing complexes. Thus, the Vine Street Mobility Hub will function as a regional multi-modal transportation hub that supports connectivity between multiple transit agencies such as RTA and SunLine Transit Agency in Riverside County; Omnitrans, the public transit provider in San Bernardino County; and Metrolink, the commuter rail service provider for Southern California. The Vine Street Mobility Hub is to be located on land across from the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station on Vine Street. This project is essential to support a future multimodal transportation network that will address the future mobility, sustainability, quality of life needs of this region, and RTA’s long range transit plan. The mobility hub would be designed and developed with emerging technologies, renewable energy sources, and mobility solutions in mind. Nontraditional modes such as station cars, shared bikes, electric mobility units, etc., will play a pivotal role in addressing the first and last mile mobility challenges to the region. In the immediate term, RTA has constructed an interim on-street layover facility at Vine Street to accommodate the buses operating throughout downtown Riverside. Once funding is secured and the land is transferred, RTA will design and construct the hub in partnership with the City of Riverside, RCTC, downtown business owners, and various key stakeholder groups. RTA plans to initiate the procurement process for conceptual planning once land acquisition is completed. “First and Last Mile” Mobility Plan: In 2014, RTA was awarded a Federal § 5304 grant to develop a “First and Last Mile” Mobility Plan. In alignment with federal transportation goals, the objective of this project is to establish a plan that identifies cost-effective improvements to solve first and last mile barriers for commuters who could potentially take transit, but whose origin or destination cannot be conveniently accessed from the nearest transit facility due to distance, terrain, or real or perceived safety issues. This study began in January 2016 and was completed in the spring of 2017, providing templates for future “First and Last Mile” improvements with six pilot location types that are common throughout the RTA service area. This study runs concurrently with WRCOG’s Active Transportation study. RTA is working closely with WRCOG staff on coordinating the two plans. The end result will include recommended projects, cost estimates, suggested funding sources, and an outreach summary. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 30 La Sierra Metrolink Station Bus Stops: La Sierra Station is emerging as a major intermodal mobility hub with regional benefits and an opportunity of facilitating Timed Transfer connections (TTC). RCTC is expanding the parking area at Metrolink La Sierra Station. This station expansion project includes new bus bays with passenger amenities, which will support RTA’s goal of implementing timed transfer connections and intermodal connectivity between rail and bus. RTA and RCTC staff will work together to design a mobility hub that is truly intermodal and supports emerging technologies and shared mobility options such as bike and car sharing and TNCs. Perris Valley Line (PVL) Metrolink Stations: In June 2016, RTA commenced serving the multi- modal stations developed by RCTC along the new PVL. The new PVL stations are Hunter Park Station, Moreno Valley-March Station, Downtown Perris, and South Perris Station. Equipment and Passenger Amenities Intelligent Transportation System (ITS): The ITS network brings functionalities that improve the operational workflow, both internally and externally. Sophisticated automatic vehicle locator programs allow the bus dispatch center to track the location of every equipped bus for schedule adherence and passenger loads. This feature greatly enhances schedule performance and monitoring of ridership patterns. RTA is currently finalizing the replacement and expansion of the Agency’s ITS system. Installation of the new system began in December 2015 and the fixed-route fleet is fully equipped. New LED signs will be installed and the project completed by July of 2018. This new system has expanded ITS technology from the previous 97 buses to all 224 fixed-route buses, allowing for RTA personnel to have real-time visibility and control of all fixed-route vehicles. The system provides RTA’s planning and operations departments with essential historical data, related to on-time performance and passenger boardings and alightings, which allows the departments to make informed service modification decisions. For the Maintenance Department, this system monitors onboard vehicle components and reports performance measures and system faults to key maintenance personnel, reducing the likelihood that a mechanical or electrical issue continues unnoticed, resulting in more reliable vehicles and an improved passenger experience. Additionally, this new system will improve the security of passengers and personnel, providing the dispatch center and public safety personnel with the ability to view real-time onboard surveillance video during an emergency event. Finally, with this new ITS system, every fixed- route vehicle will be equipped to provide free Wi-Fi to passengers. Scheduling and Operations Software Project: RTA plans to begin procurement of the Transit Scheduling and Operations software in early 2019. This software will allow RTA to create its Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 31 own efficient schedules, vehicle blocking, run-cuts, and rosters without relying on a vendor to provide such services. It would also allow improved operations management by integrating the daily crew and vehicle rostering and other operational functions into one system to improve the efficiency and administration of these processes. Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS): RTA has also introduced the ATIS technology with LED signage, known as SmartStops, which relay real-time arrival information on display at major transfer points. As part of the ITS upgrade program, new SmartStops will be installed at transit centers in the cities of Perris and Corona. Passengers may also lookup real-time arrival information via RTA’s BusWatch website and mobile application. The next phase of the ATIS project included querying and alerting of bus arrivals via text messaging, which was recently completed with the upgraded ITS program. Mobile application development is also part of this project, which allows passengers to lookup real-time arrival information for all RTA fixed- routes. Transit Signal Priority (TSP): TSP is a tool that allows transit vehicles to travel through controlled intersections faster and more conveniently. Unlike signal pre-emption which is used on emergency vehicles, TSP technology on a bus utilizes a transmitter that allows the traffic signals along major streets to remain in “green” mode for several seconds longer, therefore allowing a late-running bus to advance more quickly along its route to maintain on-time performance. TSP is currently being used on Route 1 along the University Avenue and Magnolia Avenue corridors. RTA is working with other jurisdictions to deploy this technology to other corridors. Illuminated Bus Stops: In FY18 – FY19, RTA intends to purchase materials and supplies to expand and upgrade the bus stop system with a total of 50 (25 each year) security-enhancing illuminated bus stop devices which come equipped with down-lighting. These features are push-button activated by the customer and allow drivers to recognize when a person is waiting at a bus stop at night in areas with limited or no lighting. The down-lighting safety feature and illuminated schedule provides bus scheduling information for easy visibility in a night time environment. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 32 CHAPTER 3: RECENT AND PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES 3.1 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES Service expansions implemented in FY18 are listed below: • August 2017: a. New RapidLink Gold Line limited-stop service began in August 2017. • January 2018: a. Frequency improvements were made to routes 19, 29, and 49. b. Routes 3 and 29 were extended to serve the new Amazon fulfillment center in Eastvale. c. New CommuterLink Express routes 200 (San Bernardino, Riverside, Anaheim) and 205 (Temecula-Corona-Village at Orange) began operation. 3.2 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES In FY19, RTA will enjoy a full year of ridership from FY18 initiatives listed in section 3.1 above. The preparation of the FY19 service plan began with a performance review of fixed-route bus service and the resulting findings influenced adjustments to service levels on selected RTA routes to improve service reliability, increase ridership, and improve efficiency. Additional budget has been included in FY19 for the following service improvements to improve reliability, boost ridership, and improve financial sustainability: • Route 22, one of RTA’s longest local bus routes (35 miles long) will be split into two separate routes at Perris to improve reliability: a. Route 22 (Perris-Riverside Downtown) b. New Route 9 (Lake Elsinore-Perris) • Route 24: a. Weekday’s service frequency will be improved from every 80 to 60 minutes. b. RTA will work to expand this service east to better serve the SR-79 Temecula Parkway corridor. c. The Temecula Library deviation will be discontinued due to low ridership and the significant impact this has on service frequency and travel times for other riders. • Route 27, RTA’s longest existing local route (52 miles long) will be split into two separate routes at Perris to improve reliability: a. Route 27 (Perris-Riverside Galleria Mall) will operate daytime weekdays every 40 minutes (generally hourly now). Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 33 b. Route 28 (Hemet-Perris) will operate direct from Hemet to Perris with Route 61 extended from Sun City (Menifee) to Perris in place of the former Route 27. c. Route 28 daytime weekdays will be improved to operate every 30 minutes (generally hourly now). d. Both routes 27 and 28 will continue to operate hourly evenings and weekends. e. Route 61 will be extended from Sun City (Menifee) to Perris in place of existing Route 27. f. Route 212 would be discontinued to avoid unnecessary duplication of service. • Route 31 from Moreno Valley to Beaumont and Hemet will have its last weekdays evening departure an hour later at 8:42 p.m. • Route 33 will have service weekdays expanded to serve Tahquitz High School in Hemet with an additional westbound trip weekdays at 6.00 a.m. • Route 40 will be streamlined and expanded to serve more of the City of Menifee, including MSJC Menifee Valley Campus, the Heritage Lakes area, and McCall Blvd east of the I-215 freeway. • Route 200 will have additional trips added at peak times weekdays in response to high ridership on selected existing trips. • Routes 205/206: RTA will work to add a stop in the Indian Truck Trail / I-15 Freeway area of Temescal Valley. • RapidLink Gold Line morning service will begin at 6:30 a.m. instead of the current 5:30 a.m. due to low ridership prior to 6:30 a.m. Afternoon service will begin at 1:30 p.m. instead of the current 2:30 p.m. to meet peak demand times on Route 1, which the Gold Line supplements. • A comprehensive revision of weekend service in the south and eastern areas of RTA service area will for the first time in RTA history provide seven day service on all RTA local routes (excluding special weekday shuttle routes 26, 50, 51, 52, 54, and 55), adding Saturday and / or Sunday service on the following routes and route segments: a. Route 30 Perris East loop b. Route 31 Beaumont- Moreno Valley c. Route 33 East Hemet d. Route 40 Lake Elsinore-Menifee e. Route 42 Hemet-San Jacinto-Soboba Casino f. Route 61 Temecula-Murrieta-Menifee-Perris g. Route 74 San Jacinto-Hemet-Winchester-Menifee-Perris h. Route 79 Hemet-Winchester-Temecula Short Range Transit Plan   •   FY19 – FY21         34    This major initiative will be sustainably implemented through adjusted service frequencies  Saturdays and / or Sundays on routes 3, 8, 23, 31, 41, 61, 74, and 79, consistent with existing  weekends ridership per hour of service on these routes. Also, the Saturday Route 30 west loop,  weekends Route 19F Perris Fairgrounds shuttle, and Route 3 south of Corona Transit Center will  be discontinued due to very low ridership and available alternative routes.    With the availability of automatic passenger counting equipment on all fixed‐route buses since  May 2017, RTA has also reviewed ridership of all trips on all routes and a small number of trips  on all routes with very low ridership are planned to be discontinued in September 2018. This  approach minimizes the impact on existing riders while helping make the service overall more  financially sustainable and helping to avoid the need for a fare rise.    In partnership with Metrolink rail service, RTA plans to again operate Route 54 shuttle service  for Riverside’s Mission Inn Festival of Lights on four Friday / Saturday evenings in November /  December 2018. This shuttle provides sufficient capacity not available on regular Route 54  Downtown Riverside Metrolink Shuttle and is very well used, helping reduce traffic congestion  at this very popular event. This will be the third year RTA has provided such service.     To communicate the FY19 service plan proposed changes and to gather input from transit users  as well as the broader public, 10 community meetings were held in advance of the public  hearing at the RTA Board of Directors Meeting on May 24, 2018. In mid‐March RTA issued a  booklet summarizing the proposed changes (English and Spanish). The booklet was available to  the public on all fixed‐route buses as well as on line at RTA’s web site. Customers were invited  to comment on the proposals by phone, email, traditional mail or by attending any of the 10  community meetings conducted by RTA staff during the last week of March. Additionally, staff  provided briefings to five T‐NOW chapters.     A total of 53 comments on the FY19 service plan were received from 31 people. The comments  focused on support for proposed improvements (11), concern regarding proposed service  discontinuations (27), or other requests for service (15) that are beyond the scope of the FY19  service plan and may be considered in future years. Following a review of these comments and  the most recent ridership data, the proposed service plan was modified to retain eight  weekdays and three weekend trips originally proposed for deletion where ridership had  recently improved. To maintain the system efficiency and effectiveness, staff recommends  implementing the plan as modified following the public outreach efforts.    January 2019 will also see the opening of the improved passenger amenities and enhanced bus  stop area at the Temecula Promenade Mall, allowing routes 23, 24, and 61 to serve this facility  Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 35 in addition to routes 55, 79, and CommuterLink routes 202, 205, 206, 208, and 217 which already serve the mall. Development work continues for new mobility hubs at Hemet and UCR (see Pages 26-28 for more details). 3.3 MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE The provision of ADA services remains a challenge; it is costly both to RTA and to the passengers who use it. Efforts to mitigate the increasing expenses in DAR service included the launch of a senior and disabled Travel Training Program and the establishment of a Medi-Cal Reimbursement Program. The Freedom to Go Travel Training Program commenced in fall 2011 and covers all aspects of public transit from training on how to ride the bus, how to use a bus schedule and map, as well as help in overcoming physical and social barriers that may prevent passengers from using a fixed-route bus. Participants benefit by developing a greater level of independence and increased mobility, ultimately bringing significant financial savings to both customers and RTA. In FY17, more than 400 trainees actively participated in travel training. Program participants took nearly 96,000 trips on fixed-route buses. As of April 2018, more than 400 trainees actively participated in the program and have taken over 75,500 trips on fixed-route buses. Since the program’s inception, travel training has served more than 1,900 seniors and persons with disabilities, resulting in more than 455,000 trips on fixed-route buses through April 2018. RTA can save an estimated $8,600 a year for every five-day-a-week rider who makes the switch from DAR to fixed-route service. During FY17, the program saved RTA over $500,000 and since the program’s inception it has saved over $1.5 million. The Medi-Cal Reimbursement Program was implemented in early 2012 and was developed in cooperation with the State Medi-Cal Program for paratransit trips taken to and from qualifying medical facilities. This program provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the net expenses associated with these trips and provides access to alternative sources of state and federal funding for DAR services. Eligible expense reimbursement so far under this program is $4.4 million. 3.4 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION A marketing and communications plan is developed to support the annual goals of RTA, while advancing the mission and vision of the organization. The plan seeks to address the following focus areas: • Increasing ridership • Increasing awareness of RTA services Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 36 • Enhancing the image of RTA • Educating the public on the benefits of public transportation • Travel Training and ADA certification • Providing excellent customer service • Coordinating media and public relations • Enhancing government relations • Assisting with employee communications Addressing these areas is accomplished by executing marketing and communication programs or campaigns targeted at existing and potential riders, commuters, the general public, elected officials, students, the business community, the media, non-profit organizations, and employees. These programs and campaigns employ a mix of different media to reach the desired audiences. Marketing efforts aim to build on the existing base of awareness by educating the general public about what transit services are available and how and where to get more information. Service Adjustments: Marketing promotes information regarding service adjustments through a variety of advertising methods to reach customers including rider alerts, press releases, website information, and brochures distributed throughout the service area, newspaper ads, on-bus information, and social media. Customer Information Materials: RTA aims to make the transit system easier to understand and use through enhanced passenger information and signage. Materials are developed for both novice riders and experienced users to read and understand. Informational documents are readily available and designed to attractively promote RTA services to new users, while maintaining interest and engagement from existing riders. Public Speaking Opportunities: Presentations are customized for a variety of market segments. Outreach to business and community leaders is used to educate these groups about the economic benefits that transit provides to the RTA community, while presentations for social service agencies or other gatekeeper organizations are tailored to educate these groups on how transit can enhance personal mobility and how they can help to promote its usage. Presentations also occur at senior centers, colleges, and school orientation programs that focus on how those populations can use the bus to accomplish their various tasks. Community Relations: Many of RTA’s strategies rely on working through local organizations and businesses to direct specific promotional messages to constituencies with realistic potential for using RTA’s transit services. Community-based marketing and partnerships with local businesses and public agencies of this kind are cost-effective. One way RTA builds upon these relationships is by participating in community events such as expos and parades, which provides the opportunity to attract potential new users and also promote RTA as an active Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 37 community partner. In FY18, to strengthen these efforts, RTA hired a full-time Community Engagement Coordinator. Website and Social Media: RTA’s website is used to publish up-to-date information about Agency services, policies, and publications. RTA also utilizes social media, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and iAlerts. Social media is a relatively inexpensive advertising format that allows RTA to provide information quickly and easily to users while raising RTA’s profile and brand. Customer Information Center: The Customer Information Center provides phone information to customers seven days a week. As call volumes fluctuate, RTA maintains staffing levels to adequately meet its customers’ needs. Various resources such as Google Transit trip planners and BusWatch real-time bus tracking allow customer representatives to quickly and accurately answer customer inquiries. English and Spanish speaking clerks are always available to assist callers. For other language requirements, both written and verbal, RTA uses the service of LanguageLine Solutions which provide interpretation and translation in more than 200 languages. Travel Training: The Freedom to Go Travel Training Program is for people with disabilities and older adults who want to learn to travel safely and independently using public transportation. Travel training is a free, self-paced process where an individual, regardless of ability or age, can learn to ride RTA’s fixed-route system. Participants experience an increased sense of confidence and self-reliance as a result of learning to travel independently. Parents and care providers can benefit too. Providing a child or aging parent with the knowledge to use RTA buses provides independence, saves time, and lowers expenses. The community benefits too. With a newfound ability to travel with RTA, individuals will be able to visit family and friends, shop more often, and participate in recreational activities that enhance their quality of life. By transitioning from DAR to fixed-route bus service, both customers and RTA save money. Transportation NOW: T-NOW was formed in 1992 as a grassroots advocacy group comprised of public transit advocates. Members of T-NOW range from elected officials to community activists to everyday transit users who are committed not only to addressing regional transportation issues but meeting the needs of individual communities. There are six T-NOW chapters throughout the service area that include Greater Riverside, Hemet / San Jacinto Area, Northwest, Moreno Valley / Perris, San Gorgonio Pass Area, and Southwest. Each chapter meets monthly and sets goals and objectives relevant to their communities. 3.5 BUDGET IMPACT ON PROPOSED CHANGES The Agency’s FY19 budget reflects a strategy to grow current levels of safe, reliable, and effective fixed-route services by over three percent when compared to FY18 while considering the continued economic and systemic pressures that demand efficiency to the greatest extent Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 38 possible. To that end, the Agency is planning for a service level that balances forecasted fiscal constraints with the varied profile of the service area as well as delivering services aimed at preserving and growing ridership through exploiting existing and identifying emerging markets. Staff remains fully committed to exploring all service and financial alternatives necessary to meeting the public transit needs of the citizens who live and work in Western Riverside County. Public transportation helps alleviate congestion, ensures mobility, promotes more livable communities, and assists with meeting additional needs that arise as a result of the ADA. Planned service changes in FY19 and beyond are contingent upon economic conditions and available revenue. Therefore, should funding be unavailable for planned services and projects, the implementation and service improvements in conjunction with them will be delayed until sufficient revenue is available. In order to make the improvements more sustainable, RTA has also proposed rationalizing its lowest ridership trips network wide, resulting in the elimination of a small number of trips across all routes, and the elimination of Route 212 in its entirety. This approach will minimize the overall inconvenience to RTA riders while making available a large number of service improvements and avoiding the need for a fare increase in FY19. Any new service will also adhere to RTA’s Sustainable Funding Source Policy that was approved in September 2010. The enactment of the policy provides a framework that assures that funding sources, particularly temporary financial assistance or seed money, are utilized only on service that has a significant potential to be productive and financially sustainable when initial funding expires or is depleted. This encourages the use of new or expanded service to demonstrate that it is warranted by meeting productivity standards over an established period of time. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 39 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS RTA’s FY19 budget reflects a strategy to fit within current financial constraints. The year will feature four key service modifications over the FY18 service offering. First, in September 2018, Route 22 will be split at the Perris Transit Center thereby creating new Route 9. Second, in January 2019, Route 27 will be split at the Perris Transit Center thereby creating new Route 28. Third, CommuterLink Route 200 service will experience two additional weekday trips. Fourth, Saturday and / or Sunday service will be added to a number of routes. In addition, a reallocation of weekend bus service hours will see all RTA local bus routes offer 7-day service for the first time in RTA’s history. To make the above improvements sustainable, RTA has proposed to eliminate poor performing trips network-wide as well as the elimination of Route 212. As always, service adjustments to all routes may be made to maintain or improve on-time performance and connections within the system throughout the fiscal year. 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET The total budget for FY19 is $123,759,860, with $87,666,909 projected for operating expenses and $36,092,951 projected for capital projects. As currently budgeted, total operating expenses for FY19 are $87,666,909, an increase of $6,068,079 or seven percent over the FY18 budget. It should be noted that RTA is planning for an increase of over 3 percent in fixed-route revenue service hours. Significant cost drivers are new service, purchased transportation costs including fuel, and strategic staffing adjustments. The FY19 capital budget represents an increase of $29,058,783 or 413 percent over FY18 mid- year budget levels. The significant increase in the capital budget request is attributable to increased vehicle requirements, programming of new Senate Bill 1 (SB1) State of Good Repair (SGR) funds, and a reservation of funds for the new Central Operations and Maintenance Facility as well as replacement of the heavy-duty CNG fleet. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 40 Operating Budget Profile: The proposed operating budget totals $87,666,909. At 66 percent, Operations constitutes the largest component of the proposed budget while Maintenance makes up 13 percent of the total. Thus, combined Operations and Maintenance equate to 79 percent of the budget. Planning and Administration combined make up the remaining 21 percent of the budget. The operating budget contains five major cost elements. The elements are: • Salaries and benefits (49 percent), which are made up of wages and fringe benefits including medical, pension, worker’s compensation, and other post-employment benefits (OPEB) expenses. • Purchased transportation (36 percent), which represents the resources required for contracted transportation services for DAR / taxi overflow and certain fixed-route services. • Materials and supplies (5 percent), made up primarily of parts, fuel, lubricants, and supplies for the operation, repair, and maintenance of Agency vehicles and facilities. • Services (4 percent) include but are not limited to external auditing, legal, marketing, outside maintenance and custodial services, armored transport, actuarial services, legislative consulting, and towing. • Other expenses (6 percent) include but are not limited to insurance, utilities, printing and publications, advertising and promotion, dues and subscriptions, and other miscellaneous expenses. $57,673,294 $11,055,964 $1,273,415 $17,664,236 Operations Maintenance Planning Administration Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 41 Capital Budget Profile: The proposed FY19 capital budget totals $36,092,951. Capital funding will be used for the purchase of critical items to maintain existing operations and service levels, while positioning the agency for the future. The capital budget is a component of the comprehensive five-year Capital Improvement Plan including equipment and upgrade of Agency infrastructure. FY19 capital budget profile by project element is shown below: Notable capital projects included in the proposed FY19 budget include: • Revenue vehicles replacement (14 heavy-duty CNG, 33 mid-sized fixed-route, 29 DAR) • Non-revenue vehicles (8 cars, 1 truck) • Tire lease • IT, Vehicle, and Facilities maintenance and support equipment • Improvements for bus stops, transfer points, and transit facilities $43,099,527 $3,466,928 $3,954,575 $31,773,517 $5,372,362 Salaries & Benefits Services Materials & Supplies Purchased Transportation Other Expenses $1,247,571 $20,268,958 $266,726 $14,109,696 $200,000 Maintenance Revenue Vehicles Support Vehicles Facilities Shelters & Stops Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 42 4.2 FUNDING SOURCES FOR OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAMS Funding for the operating and capital budgets are generated from state, federal, and local revenue sources. The chart shown below summarizes the allocation of each revenue source. Total Operating and Capital Revenues $123,759,860 Operating Revenues Capital Revenues $87,666,909 $36,092,951 Passenger Fares Federal $10,802,010 $11,902,933 LTF Operating Assistance FTA § 5307 $46,997,836 $11,577,384 Federal Operating Assistance FTA § 5339 $20,353,313 $325,549 FTA § 5307 STA $18,215,072 $22,333,923 FTA § 5310 SB1 SGR $408,773 $1,856,095 FTA § 5311 $568,468 FTA CMAQ $1,161,000 (LCTOP) $1,474,453 Measure A $5,633,457 TUMF $0 Other Local Revenue $2,405,840 Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 43 4.3 TUMF PROGRAM The WRCOG TUMF Program ensures that a new development pays its fair share for the increased traffic that it creates. As identified in the WRCOG TUMF Administrative Plan, RTA is currently allocated three percent of every TUMF dollar collected for use on projects of regional significance located in the TUMF network. Below is the comprehensive list of RTA’s projects included in the 2016 TUMF Nexus Study: PROJECT NAME CATEGORY UNIT COST # OF UNITS COST TUMF SHARE Riverside Mobility Hub at Vine Street Transit Center 1 $6,000,000 1 $6,000,000 $3,630,000 Moreno Valley Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Jurupa Valley Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Banning Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Lake Elsinore / Canyon Lake Mobility Hub(s) Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Transit Enhancements in Temecula / Murrieta Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 Hemet Mobility Hub Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 San Jacinto Mobility Hub Transit Center 2 $9,000,000 1 $9,000,000 $5,445,000 MSJC Mobility Hub Transfer Facility $1,000,000 1 $1,000,000 $605,000 Regional Operations and Maintenance Facility O and M Facility $50,000,000 1 $50,000,000 $30,251,000 Annual Transit Enhancements Program Bus Stop $40,000 290 $11,600,000 $7,018,000 Central Corridor RapidLink Implementation BRT Service Capital $60,000 42 $2,520,000 $1,525,000 Vehicle Fleet Medium Buses Vehicle Fleet 1 $155,000 7 $1,085,000 $656,000 Vehicle Fleet Large Buses Vehicle Fleet 2 $585,000 29 $16,965,000 $10,264,000 COA Study COA Study $950,000 1 $950,000 $575,000 TOTALS: $153,120,000 $92,639,000 Source: TUMF Nexus Study – 2016 Program Update, Page 51. The Nexus Study is a planning document, and programming of TUMF funds is subject to funding availability and done through the TUMF Project Expenditure Plan. Table 10 contains RTA’s FY19 – FY23 TUMF Expenditure Plan effective July 1, 2018. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 44 4.4 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS As a recipient of state and federal funding, RTA is required to comply with regulatory policies and procedures that are reviewed and audited regularly. SUMMARY OF REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS TDA Triennial Audit: Under the State of California, TDA provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: LTF and STA funds. These funds are for the development and support of public transportation needs that exist in California and are allocated to areas of each county based on population, taxable sales, and transit performance. The last TDA Triennial Audit was completed in January 2014. See Table 6 for a summary of the recommendations and actions taken. FTA Triennial Review: The triennial review is a comprehensive review of compliance with FTA requirements that is conducted of § 5307 grantees at least every three years. Even though the review is conducted of § 5307 grantees, it addresses all FTA programs for which the grantee is the direct recipient of funds, including § 5304, 5307, 5310, 5311, and 5339. It addresses the grantee’s implementation of Federal requirements in 24 areas and its oversight of sub-recipients, operations contractors, or lessees funded by these programs. The last FTA Triennial Review was completed in April 2016 with three findings. RTA addressed and closed out all three findings in May 2016. ADA: The federal ADA Act of 1990 prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity and access for persons with disabilities. Under the ADA Act, public transit operators are required to provide complementary paratransit service to persons who are ADA certified and are within three-quarters of a mile of a local fixed-route bus during the hours of bus service operation. RTA remains fully compliant with all Federal ADA regulations and has had no ADA customers denied service on DAR. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program: The federal DBE Program seeks to ensure nondiscrimination in the award and administration of FTA’s Department of Transportation-assisted contracts in the Department’s highway, transit, and airport financial assistance programs and to create a level playing field on which DBEs can compete fairly for Department of Transportation-assisted contracts. RTA’s current DBE Program will remain in effect through September of 2018. In accordance with U.S. Department of Transportation regulations found at 49 C.F.R. § 26.45, a new 3-year DBE goal will be submitted for review by the FTA on August 1, 2018 to become effective upon October 1, 2018 through September 30, 2021. Short Range Transit Plan • FY19 – FY21 45 Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO): The Federal Transit Laws, 49 U.S.C. § 5332 (b), provide that "no person in the United States shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, or age be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any project, program or activity funded in whole or in part through financial assistance under this Act.” This applies to employment and business opportunities and is considered to be in addition to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The EEO Program is submitted to FTA every four years and RTA is in compliance. The last submission was March 2, 2018. Drug and Alcohol Testing: Per the Code of Federal Regulations (Title 49, Part 40 and 655), RTA established a Drug and Alcohol testing policy in an effort to deter drug and alcohol use in the workplace. The policy establishes the circumstances in which applicants and employees are tested for drugs and alcohol in the workplace and the consequences when they test positive. The purpose of the policy is to prevent accidents, injuries, and fatalities resulting from the misuse of alcohol and prohibited drugs by employees who perform safety-sensitive functions. The Drug and Alcohol Report is in compliance with FTA and was last updated in January 1, 2018. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides that "no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” (42 U.S.C. § 2000d). RTA submits Title VI Program to FTA every three years. The last report was submitted in October 2016. Limited English Proficiency (LEP): FTA issued regulations based on the Executive Order 13166 to all transit operators to establish LEP policies and procedures that ensures that RTA publications are issued in English and any other languages used by a significant number of the general population in the service area as determined by periodic demographic assessments. RTA’s updated LEP policy and plan was submitted with the Title VI Program in October 2016. Public Hearing Policy: U.S. Code Title 49 § 5307 under the Urbanized Area Formula Grant Program requires that transit systems maintain a process to solicit and consider public comments before raising fares or implementing major reductions in service. RTA’s Public Hearing Policy for Major Service and Fare Changes was last revised in October 2012. Alternative Fueled Vehicles: RCTC Resolution No. 00-018 established an emissions standards requirement for the acquisition of urban transit buses with federal, state, or local funds. All full-sized urban public transit buses purchased or leased with federal, state, or local funds granted or programmed by RCTC shall meet the urban bus optional, reduced-emissions standards set by the California Air Resources Board for oxides of nitrogen and non-methane hydrocarbons. RTA remains fully compliant with RCTC Resolution No. 00-0018 for vehicles purchased using federal, state, or local funds. 1:50 PM 5/16/2018 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 1 1,700,988 1,921,643 77,248 77,437 880,094 868,915 1,487,169$ 1,552,850$ 8,252,813$ 8,267,649$ 1 RL 192,010 147,001 16,824 16,750 208,507 240,386 171,429$ 106,000$ 1,798,739$ 1,788,375$ 3 141,674 144,194 16,586 12,296 204,455 156,133 107,134$ 110,222$ 1,771,316$ 1,312,759$ 10 180,947 162,376 14,086 13,893 160,907 157,779 158,383$ 146,398$ 1,504,964$ 1,483,351$ 11 135,816 118,045 10,461 10,495 118,309 115,787 123,823$ 108,743$ 1,117,720$ 1,120,525$ 12 237,078 219,779 15,937 15,887 187,941 186,850 201,895$ 191,691$ 1,703,011$ 1,696,237$ 13 244,508 220,292 16,614 16,169 194,620 186,569 200,056$ 184,769$ 1,775,160$ 1,726,353$ 14 210,128 207,365 14,429 14,179 187,469 184,963 182,349$ 180,864$ 1,541,760$ 1,513,871$ 15 502,749 472,093 31,241 30,749 354,256 341,585 435,732$ 401,013$ 3,337,792$ 3,282,951$ 16 595,781 449,937 28,271 27,977 340,032 362,495 509,214$ 378,964$ 3,020,376$ 2,987,007$ 18 147,631 130,778 11,422 10,710 144,760 135,209 123,198$ 111,501$ 1,220,582$ 1,143,508$ 19 815,354 722,491 39,909 50,247 503,987 614,178 754,447$ 628,800$ 4,245,189$ 5,364,653$ 20 303,822 306,326 27,245 24,020 404,800 366,138 264,538$ 270,182$ 2,910,657$ 2,564,507$ 21 108,348 117,420 10,557 10,088 144,631 132,138 103,657$ 113,921$ 1,128,084$ 1,077,093$ 22 335,242 287,781 25,904 20,695 447,967 332,911 313,854$ 276,385$ 2,767,811$ 2,209,498$ 27 492,396 370,316 38,395 29,202 744,158 558,608 487,078$ 368,797$ 4,102,258$ 3,117,809$ 28 178,191 12,554 223,829 -$ 179,866$ 1,340,364$ 29 144,779 133,888 10,611 15,835 141,365 196,356 131,170$ 120,962$ 1,133,802$ 1,690,696$ 41D 47,802 46,760 3,848 2,678 59,823 41,892 39,026$ 40,784$ 410,956$ 285,927$ 49 219,652 227,122 10,927 15,654 127,531 165,900 199,883$ 213,676$ 1,165,708$ 1,671,338$ 54F 7,033 10,828 280 455 1,400 2,275 42,232$ 74,757$ 30,790$ 48,579$ 200 136,584 155,068 11,382 27,335 276,381 649,096 128,448$ 325,000$ 1,191,588$ 2,918,461$ 202D 1,322 3,574 247 594 5,648 6,047 1,861$ 3,767$ 25,776$ 63,390$ 204 42,786 42,999 6,308 6,367 133,479 133,852 78,067$ 77,536$ 673,625$ 679,774$ 205 - 20,320 - 4,517 - 107,404 -$ 40,381$ -$ 482,260$ 206 53,179 36,830 6,947 5,046 170,230 124,070 140,212$ 97,452$ 741,891$ 538,704$ 208D 16,884 13,337 2,697 1,678 68,539 39,858 23,163$ 19,344$ 287,985$ 179,110$ 210D 3,690 2,339 605 389 7,620 4,405 9,353$ 6,579$ 64,559$ 41,566$ 216 45,799 - 4,796 - 109,604 - 98,939$ -$ 521,268$ -$ 217D 7,919 7,744 1,135 1,156 29,790 29,790 17,041$ 16,468$ 121,162$ 123,390$ 7,071,899 6,876,837 454,912 475,052 6,358,302 6,665,418 6,533,349$ 6,347,672$ 48,567,343$ 50,719,705$ % Change - FY19 vs. FY18 -2.76%4.43%4.83%-2.8%4.4% 3 10,257 9,360 2,781 1,667 37,789 22,334 11,468$ 9,540$ 236,518$ 149,448$ 8 208,908 213,108 20,791 19,747 293,241 279,730 206,589$ 210,200$ 1,768,584$ 1,770,475$ 9 66,669 5,164 113,325 66,949$ 463,022$ 19C 5,946 6,604 1,147 508 13,722 5,047 4,869$ 5,242$ 97,517$ 45,570$ 23 87,793 94,084 15,638 14,221 234,973 207,819 83,140$ 94,046$ 1,330,223$ 1,274,976$ 24 62,703 64,456 9,544 11,061 134,944 149,318 65,443$ 64,430$ 811,907$ 991,697$ 26 20,208 24,250 7,945 7,946 105,527 106,771 462,397$ 360,000$ 675,873$ 712,401$ 30 51,219 62,671 9,286 8,228 115,588 102,353 51,767$ 59,575$ 789,948$ 737,720$ 31 144,145 146,401 18,603 19,496 371,184 390,288 148,700$ 146,516$ 1,582,493$ 1,747,963$ 32 125,491 120,022 10,895 10,162 117,258 106,755 116,130$ 119,974$ 926,800$ 911,077$ 33 38,909 54,406 5,227 6,047 63,153 72,214 33,566$ 50,652$ 444,676$ 542,129$ 40 18,943 29,688 3,614 6,217 62,991 112,286 19,392$ 29,331$ 307,470$ 557,372$ 41C 31,054 27,537 5,948 5,432 104,876 90,492 26,806$ 24,018$ 505,953$ 487,051$ 42 56,290 53,182 5,376 5,759 80,544 85,278 49,327$ 45,991$ 457,360$ 516,362$ 50 2,375 2,767 2,352 2,340 15,138 15,062 197,606$ 202,499$ 200,100$ 209,767$ 51 29,973 32,397 1,845 1,790 19,652 19,070 148,383$ 153,072$ 157,322$ 160,513$ 52 41,255 42,245 3,683 3,742 27,333 23,762 240,437$ 642,000$ 313,304$ 335,515$ 54 1,451 2,570 1,392 1,367 6,864 6,864 88,931$ 85,000$ 118,408$ 122,592$ 55 17,954 19,329 1,144 1,196 15,597 15,372 19,455$ 20,332$ 97,427$ 107,213$ 61 68,778 124,142 16,391 19,695 273,328 332,214 73,633$ 124,475$ 1,394,336$ 1,765,758$ 74 177,760 200,365 21,953 21,619 376,710 372,783 183,981$ 200,957$ 1,867,452$ 1,938,275$ 79 99,353 108,211 13,573 14,261 236,544 240,865 98,072$ 108,168$ 1,154,611$ 1,278,546$ 202 13,945 13,741 5,862 4,453 148,453 123,637 28,465$ 25,451$ 498,322$ 399,256$ 208 15,068 14,699 7,145 6,209 170,435 146,265 31,940$ 31,259$ 607,811$ 556,681$ 210 2,385 2,885 706 707 14,085 14,103 5,969$ 6,983$ 60,068$ 63,384$ 212 26,683 6,585 7,800 3,254 189,299 75,238 53,120$ 11,874$ 663,557$ 291,713$ 217 25,488 32,979 6,548 6,723 194,723 192,581 54,216$ 64,224$ 557,034$ 602,713$ 1,384,334 1,575,353 207,190 209,011 3,423,950 3,421,826 2,503,802$ 2,962,758$ 17,625,073$ 18,739,189$ % Change - FY19 vs. FY18 13.80%0.88%-0.06%18.3%6.3% TOTAL FIXED ROUTES 8,456,233 8,452,190 662,102 684,063 9,782,252 10,087,244 9,037,151$ 9,310,430$ 66,192,416$ 69,458,894$ % Change - FY19 vs. FY18 -0.05%3.32%3.12%3.0%4.9% Riverside Transit Agency FY 2018/19 - FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Summary Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Operating ExpensesFare Revenue Total Contracted Fixed Routes Comparative Statistics: FY2018 Budget vs. Proposed FY2019 SRTP Total Directly Operated Routes Unlinked Passengers Direct Operated Routes Contracted Fixed Routes 1:50 PM 5/16/2018 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 FY2018 FY2019 Riverside Transit Agency FY 2018/19 - FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Summary Revenue Hours Revenue Miles Operating ExpensesFare Revenue Comparative Statistics: FY2018 Budget vs. Proposed FY2019 SRTP Unlinked Passengers Dial-a-ride Routes Riv-San UZA 262,671 261,183 130,459 126,489 2,174,755 2,134,861 959,794$ 918,013$ 9,353,854$ 11,074,739$ Murr-Tem-Men UZA 73,980 78,146 40,806 39,816 690,652 683,502 270,320$ 276,465$ 2,925,791$ 3,486,072$ Hemet UZA 68,233 67,555 30,148 29,184 457,925 448,777 249,321$ 238,996$ 2,161,620$ 2,555,172$ Non-UZA 6,166 2,045 4,110 3,990 67,823 67,017 22,530$ 7,235$ 294,720$ 349,306$ 411,049 408,929 205,524 199,479 3,391,154 3,334,157 1,501,966$ 1,440,709 14,735,984$ 17,465,289 % Change - FY19 vs. FY18 -0.52%-2.94%-1.68%-4.1%18.5% Taxi Program Riv-San UZA 6,699 7,860 3,903 4,383 125,879 125,681 26,671$ 31,432$ 410,652$ 456,252$ Murr-Tem-Men UZA 2,460 3,093 1,118 1,319 32,107 33,571 9,781$ 12,283$ 105,420$ 123,656$ Hemet UZA 1,593 1,646 1,318 1,351 43,306 41,021 6,359$ 6,708$ 140,950$ 147,934$ Non-UZA 169 114 129 144 4,108 4,087 673$ 448$ 13,408$ 14,884$ 10,920 12,713 6,468 7,197 205,400 204,360 43,483$ 50,871 670,430$ 742,726 16.42%11.27%-0.51%17.0%10.8% 421,969 421,642 211,992 206,676 3,596,554 3,538,517 1,545,449$ 1,491,580$ 15,406,414$ 18,208,015$ -0.08%-2.51%-1.61%-3.5%18.2% 8,878,202 8,873,832 874,095 890,739 13,378,806 13,625,761 10,582,601$ 10,802,010$ 81,598,830$ 87,666,909$ -0.05%1.90%1.85%2.1%7.4%% Change - FY19 vs. FY18 % Change - FY18 vs. FY17 TOTAL DAR and TAXI SERVICE Total Dial-a-ride Routes Total Taxi Routes % Change - FY19 vs. FY18 GRAND TOTAL Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Bus (Motorbus) / Directly Operated Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2013 GIL 38 G27D102N4 81 42 CN 81 17,436,387 21,025,110 259,569 2014 GIL 38 G27D102N4 9 42 CN 9 1,265,906 1,654,467 183,829 2016 GIL 38 G27D102N4 30 42 CN 30 990,444 1,756,400 58,546 2002 NAB 40 40LFW15 0 40 CN 1,290,355 120 120 Totals: 154 19,692,737 25,726,332 214,386 4/16/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 4 Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Bus (Motorbus) / Purchased Transportation Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 1994 CCI 25 AH28 2 29 CN 2 813,028 1,090,518 545,259 1996 CCI 25 AH28 1 29 CN 1 320,007 330,610 330,610 2009 EDN 26 EnAeroElit 4 29 GA 4 4,090,363 2,444,111 2012 EDN 28 EnAeroElit 10 33 CN 10 2,658,285 3,206,270 320,627 2013 EDN 28 EnAeroElit 11 33 CN 11 2,225,912 2,776,552 252,413 2015 EDN 26 EnAeroElit 1 33 CN 1 98,909 174,122 174,122 2016 EDN 26 EnAeroElit 10 33 GA 10 668,930 1,282,337 128,233 2016 EDN 26 EnAeroElit 25 33 GA 25 1,984,530 3,477,839 139,113 2011 SPC 21 SN28PLO 13 28 GA 13 4,625,102 4,818,042 370,618 2008 SVM 26 ClassAmSer 2 29 CN 2 550,366 583,922 291,961 2018 ZZZ 28 Villager 5 32 CN 5 12,345 2,469 80 4 84 Totals: 285 18,035,432 20,196,668 252,458 4/16/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 2 of 4 Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Commuter Bus / Directly Operated Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2013 GIL 38 G27D102N4 16 42 CN 16 2,734,211 3,352,854 209,553 2014 GIL 38 G27D102N4 2 42 CN 2 203,252 273,488 136,744 2016 GIL 38 G27D102N4 7 42 CN 7 57,921 208,766 29,823 25 25 Totals: 114 2,995,384 3,835,108 153,404 4/16/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 3 of 4 Table 1 - Fleet Inventory FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Riverside Transit Agency Demand Response / Purchased Transportation Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Year Built Mfg. Code Seating Capacity Model Code Fuel Type Code Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2016/17 Life to Date Vehicle Miles through March FY 2017/18 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year-To-Date (e.g., March) FY 2017/18 # of Active Vehicles FY 2017/ 18 # of Contingency Vehicles FY 2017/18 2008 EBC 12 Aerotech 0 24 GA 1,152,032 1,705,294 2009 EBC 12 Aerotech 6 24 GA 6 9,417,571 11,287,979 1,881,329 2016 EDN 12 EnAerotech 36 23 GA 36 1,704,340 3,080,094 85,558 2013 GCC 12 GCII 38 22 GA 38 7,591,259 8,604,987 226,447 2017 GLV 12 Universal 30 24 GA 30 1,117,255 37,241 110 110 Totals: 60 19,865,202 25,795,609 234,506 4/16/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 4 of 4 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 190 203 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $87,666,909 $57,410,901 $81,598,830 $55,023,788 $63,610,231 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $19,790,760 $12,306,493 $14,892,546 $11,535,605 $14,879,085 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$67,876,149 $45,104,408 $66,706,284 $43,488,183 $48,731,146 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 8,873,832 6,407,761 8,878,206 8,741,975 9,238,265 Passenger Miles 64,015,300 45,473,436 63,807,121 62,116,347 66,056,948 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 890,739.0 646,830.7 874,092.0 833,488.7 787,977.9 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 13,625,761.0 9,897,423.1 13,378,809.0 12,875,332.2 12,341,976.3 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 16,779,794.0 12,388,837.5 16,844,518.0 16,062,434.4 15,136,026.1 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $98.42 $88.76 $93.35 $66.02 $80.73 Farebox Recovery Ratio 22.57% 21.44% 18.25% 20.96% 23.39% Subsidy per Passenger $7.65 $7.04 $7.51 $4.97 $5.27 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.06 $0.99 $1.05 $0.70 $0.74 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$76.20 $69.73 $76.31 $52.18 $61.84 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.98 $4.56 $4.99 $3.38 $3.95 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 10.0 9.9 10.2 10.5 11.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.65 0.65 0.66 0.68 0.75 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Excluded Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 67 25 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $21,764,829 $11,774,224 $3,887,310 $2,363,356 $5,338,423 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,402,770 $1,188,290 $1,670,609 $165,689 $692,896 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$18,362,059 $10,585,934 $2,216,701 $2,197,667 $4,645,527 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 2,191,540 380,980 265,166 177,165 585,786 Passenger Miles 21,246,146 4,097,238 4,507,916 1,820,849 4,989,908 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 210,606.0 163,049.5 42,324.0 38,927.5 77,624.6 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,579,479.0 2,659,067.9 845,778.0 702,054.8 1,386,978.9 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,380,288.0 3,373,947.6 1,206,028.0 991,905.6 1,861,687.1 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $103.34 $72.21 $91.85 $60.71 $68.77 Farebox Recovery Ratio 15.63% 10.09% 42.97% 7.01% 12.98% Subsidy per Passenger $8.38 $27.79 $8.36 $12.40 $7.93 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.86 $2.58 $0.49 $1.21 $0.93 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$87.19 $64.92 $52.37 $56.46 $59.85 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$5.13 $3.98 $2.62 $3.13 $3.35 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 10.4 2.3 6.3 4.6 7.5 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.61 0.14 0.31 0.25 0.42 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- Riverside Transit Agency -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan Non-Excluded Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 123 178 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $65,902,080 $45,636,677 $77,711,520 $52,660,432 $58,271,808 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $16,387,990 $11,118,203 $13,221,937 $11,369,916 $14,186,189 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$49,514,090 $34,518,474 $64,489,583 $41,290,516 $44,085,619 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 6,682,292 6,026,781 8,613,040 8,564,810 8,652,479 Passenger Miles 42,769,154 41,376,198 59,299,205 60,295,498 61,067,040 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 680,133.0 483,781.2 831,768.0 794,561.2 710,353.3 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 10,046,282.0 7,238,355.2 12,533,031.0 12,173,277.4 10,954,997.4 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 12,399,506.0 9,014,889.8 15,638,490.0 15,070,528.8 13,274,339.1 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $96.90 $94.33 $93.43 $66.28 $82.03 Farebox Recovery Ratio 24.86% 24.36% 17.01% 21.59% 24.34% Subsidy per Passenger $7.41 $5.73 $7.49 $4.82 $5.10 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.16 $0.83 $1.09 $0.68 $0.72 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$72.80 $71.35 $77.53 $51.97 $62.06 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.93 $4.77 $5.15 $3.39 $4.02 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 9.8 12.5 10.4 10.8 12.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.67 0.83 0.69 0.70 0.79 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RTA-BUS -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 116 124 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $49,379,341 $34,414,778 $48,540,462 $33,011,502 $38,637,455 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $15,155,595 $9,041,308 $10,843,296 $8,615,070 $11,192,742 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$34,223,746 $25,373,470 $37,697,166 $24,396,432 $27,444,713 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 6,698,646 5,018,555 7,071,901 6,835,911 7,277,474 Passenger Miles 44,521,209 33,704,886 47,863,912 45,966,334 49,311,786 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 462,498.0 333,381.0 454,912.0 417,267.8 405,531.8 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 6,441,589.0 4,700,916.8 6,358,303.0 5,877,796.2 5,796,950.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 7,421,217.0 5,446,411.9 7,434,941.0 6,759,506.1 6,675,776.2 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $106.77 $103.23 $106.70 $79.11 $95.28 Farebox Recovery Ratio 30.69% 26.27% 22.33% 26.10% 28.97% Subsidy per Passenger $5.11 $5.06 $5.33 $3.57 $3.77 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $0.77 $0.75 $0.79 $0.53 $0.56 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$74.00 $76.11 $82.87 $58.47 $67.68 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$5.31 $5.40 $5.93 $4.15 $4.73 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 14.5 15.1 15.5 16.4 17.9 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 1.04 1.07 1.11 1.16 1.26 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RTA Bus (Contract) -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet 74 79 Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $20,079,553 $12,346,009 $17,616,410 $12,203,725 $12,701,748 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $3,143,585 $2,139,909 $2,503,802 $1,586,061 $1,959,235 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$16,935,968 $10,206,100 $15,112,608 $10,617,664 $10,742,513 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 1,753,544 1,078,519 1,384,334 1,479,687 1,534,671 Passenger Miles 14,224,600 7,943,993 10,677,797 10,901,312 11,499,625 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 221,565.0 153,964.0 207,189.0 205,842.0 187,377.6 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,645,655.0 2,575,744.0 3,423,951.0 3,470,583.5 3,186,129.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,919,837.0 3,628,502.0 4,897,411.0 4,832,766.5 4,324,157.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $90.63 $80.19 $85.03 $59.29 $67.79 Farebox Recovery Ratio 15.65% 17.33% 14.21% 13.00% 15.42% Subsidy per Passenger $9.66 $9.46 $10.92 $7.18 $7.00 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.19 $1.28 $1.42 $0.97 $0.93 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$76.44 $66.29 $72.94 $51.58 $57.33 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.65 $3.96 $4.41 $3.06 $3.37 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 7.9 7.0 6.7 7.2 8.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.48 0.42 0.40 0.43 0.48 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RTA-DAR -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $17,465,289 $10,160,868 $14,771,564 $9,285,361 $11,510,714 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $1,440,709 $1,084,679 $1,501,964 $1,152,520 $1,532,718 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$16,024,580 $9,076,189 $13,269,600 $8,132,841 $9,977,996 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 408,929 300,758 411,050 415,326 413,968 Passenger Miles 5,033,902 3,702,331 5,060,012 5,112,663 5,095,946 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 199,479.0 153,820.1 205,523.0 203,726.3 188,077.4 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 3,334,157.0 2,463,524.8 3,391,155.0 3,333,425.5 3,157,621.3 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 4,234,380.0 3,156,686.1 4,306,766.0 4,276,634.7 3,934,817.0 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $87.55 $66.06 $71.87 $45.58 $61.20 Farebox Recovery Ratio 8.24% 10.68% 10.16% 12.41% 13.32% Subsidy per Passenger $39.19 $30.18 $32.28 $19.58 $24.10 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $3.18 $2.45 $2.62 $1.59 $1.96 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$80.33 $59.01 $64.57 $39.92 $53.05 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$4.81 $3.68 $3.91 $2.44 $3.16 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.12 0.12 0.12 0.12 0.13 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 Table 2 -- RTA Taxi -- SRTP Service Summary FY 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan All Routes FY 2015/16 Audited FY 2016/17 Audited FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 3rd Qtr Actual FY 2018/19 Plan Fleet Characteristics Peak-Hour Fleet Financial Data Total Operating Expenses $742,726 $489,246 $670,394 $413,867 $614,615 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $50,871 $40,597 $43,484 $31,954 $48,691 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies)$691,855 $448,649 $626,910 $381,913 $565,924 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 12,713 9,929 10,921 11,051 12,152 Passenger Miles 235,589 122,226 205,400 136,038 149,591 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 7,197.0 5,665.6 6,468.0 6,652.5 6,991.1 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 204,360.0 157,237.4 205,400.0 193,527.1 201,275.9 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 204,360.0 157,237.4 205,400.0 193,527.1 201,275.9 Performance Characteristics Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $103.20 $86.35 $103.65 $62.21 $87.91 Farebox Recovery Ratio 6.84% 8.30% 6.48% 7.72% 7.92% Subsidy per Passenger $54.42 $45.19 $57.40 $34.56 $46.57 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.94 $3.67 $3.05 $2.81 $3.78 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a)$96.13 $79.19 $96.92 $57.41 $80.95 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b)$3.39 $2.85 $3.05 $1.97 $2.81 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.06 0.06 0.05 0.06 0.06 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 1 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2018/19 – FY 2020/21 Short Range Transit Plan Table 2A – Excluded Routes Route # Mode (FR/DR) Service Type (DO/CO) Route Description Date of Implementation Exemption End Date 101 FR DO New route. RapidLink GoldLine limited-stop service serving UCR, downtown Riverside, Galleria at Tyler and Corona primarily via University Ave and Magnolia Ave. August 27, 2017 June 30, 2020 9 FR CO New route. From the Lake Elsinore Outlet Mall to Perris Station Transit Center via Hwy 74. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 19 FR DO From Moreno Valley Mall to the Perris Station Transit Center via Perris Blvd and Sunnymead Blvd. January 14, 2018 June 30, 2020 22 FR DO From Perris Station Transit Center to Downtown Riverside via Hwy 74, Old Elsinore Rd, and Alessandro Blvd. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 26 FR CO New route. Local circulator serving Moreno Valley/March Field Metrolink Station and Moreno Valley Mall via Van Buren Blvd, Trautwein Rd, Alessandro Blvd, Sycamore Canyon Blvd, and Eucalyptus Ave. July 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 27 FR DO From Perris Station Transit Center to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Florida Ave, 215 Fwy, and Van Buren Blvd. January 13, 2019 June 30, 2021 28 FR DO New route. From Florida Ave and Lincoln Ave in East Hemet to Perris Station Transit Center. January 13, 2019 June 30, 2021 30 FR CO Perris local circulator serving the Perris Transit Center, Walmart, and central part of the community. July 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 31 FR CO Service from Hemet Valley Mall to Moreno Valley Mall via Banning with stops at Mt San Jacinto Community College, Sun Lakes Village, Walmart on Moreno Beach Dr, Moreno Valley Senior Center, and Riverside University Medical Center. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 33 FR CO From Super-Walmart on Sanderson Ave and the Hemet Valley Mall in western Hemet to Stanford St and Thornton Ave in east Hemet. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 40 FR CO From Walmart in Lake Elsinore to Cherry Hills Blvd in Menifee with stops in Canyon Lake, Quail Valley, MSJC Menifee, and Hertiage Lake. January 13, 2019 June 30, 2021 42 FR CO From the Hemet Valley Mall to Soboba Casino in San Jacinto via Kirby St, Cottonwood Ave, Santa Fe Ave, and East Main St. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 52 FR CO New route. Local circulator serving Hunter Park Metrolink Station and UCR via Iowa Ave, Blaine St, and University Ave July 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 54 FR CO New route. Local circulator serving the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station and downtown Riverside. October 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 54F FR DO New route. Circulator operating during Riverside Festival of Lights, serving Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station and downtown Riverside. November 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 61 FR CO From the Perris Station Transit Center to Cherry Hills Blvd and Bradley Rd in Menifee to the Promenade Mall area in Temecula with stops at MSJC Menifee campus, Loma Linda University Medical Center - Murrieta, and County Center Dr. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 74 FR CO From San Jacinto and Hemet to Menifee and Perris, serving MSJC San Jacinto campus, Hemet Valley Mall, Winchester, MSJC Menifee campus, and Perris Station Transit Center. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 79 FR CO From the Hemet Valley Mall to Old Town Temecula via Winchester Rd (State Hwy 79). Also serves County Center Dr, Promenade Mall, and Temecula City Hall. September 9, 2018 June 30, 2021 200 FR DO New route. From San Bernardino Transit Center to ARTIC via 91 and 55 Fwys with stops at Downtown Riverside and La Sierra Metrolink Stations, and Village at Orange. January 14, 2018 June 30, 2020 205 FR DO New route. From the Promenade Mall in Temecula to Village at Orange via 15 and 91 Fwys with stops in Murrieta, the Lake Elsinore Outlet Center, Temescal Canyon, and Corona Transit Center. January 29, 2018 June 30, 2020 208 FR CO/DO Serves the Promenade Mall in Temecula to the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station and downtown area via I-215 with stops in Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, and Moreno Valley. July 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 212 FR CO/DO Serves Hemet and San Jacinto to Downtown Riverside with stops at Perris and UCR. July 1, 2016 June 30, 2019 Note: Excluded routes are new routes or new service extensions that are eligible for exemption from the farebox recovery requirements. Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-0 All Days $8,988,750 ($8,988,750) RTA-1 All Days 1,921,643 10,807,700 16 81,280.0 868,915.0 992,029.0 $8,267,649 $1,551,889 $6,715,760 77,437.0 RTA-10 All Days 162,376 873,807 3 14,408.0 157,779.0 169,304.0 $1,483,351 $146,398 $1,336,953 13,893.0 RTA-101 All Days 147,001 480,657 12 19,743.0 240,386.0 318,836.0 $1,788,375 $106,000 $1,682,375 16,750.0 RTA-11 All Days 118,045 636,103 2 10,836.0 115,787.0 126,031.0 $1,120,525 $108,743 $1,011,782 10,495.0 RTA-12 All Days 219,779 1,182,716 3 16,516.0 186,850.0 204,165.0 $1,696,237 $191,691 $1,504,546 15,887.0 RTA-13 All Days 220,292 1,185,527 3 16,664.0 186,569.0 199,542.0 $1,726,353 $184,769 $1,541,584 16,169.0 RTA-14 All Days 207,365 1,116,746 3 14,802.0 184,963.0 200,421.0 $1,513,871 $180,864 $1,333,007 14,179.0 RTA-15 All Days 472,093 2,542,443 6 31,564.0 341,585.0 362,930.0 $3,282,951 $401,013 $2,881,938 30,749.0 RTA-16/16E All Days 449,937 2,423,435 6 28,757.0 362,495.0 386,773.0 $2,987,007 $378,964 $2,608,043 27,977.0 RTA-18 All Days 130,778 703,785 2 11,229.0 135,209.0 150,551.0 $1,143,508 $111,501 $1,032,007 10,710.0 RTA-19 All Days 722,491 3,890,786 11 53,460.0 614,178.0 726,317.0 $5,364,653 $628,800 $4,735,853 50,247.0 RTA-19C All Days 6,604 44,066 1 692.0 5,047.0 7,220.0 $45,570 $5,242 $40,328 508.0 RTA-20 All Days 306,326 1,649,882 6 25,539.0 366,138.0 409,690.0 $2,564,507 $270,182 $2,294,325 24,020.0 RTA-200 All Days 155,068 3,153,821 5 28,593.0 649,096.0 688,292.0 $2,918,461 $325,000 $2,593,461 27,335.0 RTA-202 All Days 13,741 325,532 2 6,192.0 123,637.0 192,459.0 $399,256 $25,451 $373,805 4,453.0 RTA-202D All Days 3,574 67,293 1 730.0 6,047.0 9,623.0 $63,390 $3,767 $59,623 594.0 RTA-204D All Days 42,999 809,664 3 6,706.0 133,852.0 138,835.0 $679,774 $77,536 $602,238 6,367.0 RTA-205 All Days 20,320 417,436 3 6,337.0 107,404.0 176,979.0 $482,260 $40,381 $441,879 4,517.0 RTA-206D All Days 36,830 693,511 5 7,878.0 124,070.0 223,153.0 $538,704 $97,452 $441,252 5,046.0 RTA-208 All Days 14,699 340,418 3 8,315.0 146,265.0 211,152.0 $556,681 $31,259 $525,422 6,209.0 RTA-208D All Days 13,337 251,140 2 2,554.0 39,858.0 64,153.0 $179,110 $19,344 $159,766 1,678.0 RTA-21 All Days 117,420 632,056 2 10,666.0 132,138.0 148,922.0 $1,077,093 $113,921 $963,172 10,088.0 RTA-210 All Days 2,885 66,830 1 1,384.0 14,103.0 37,522.0 $63,384 $6,983 $56,401 707.0 RTA-210D All Days 2,339 44,043 1 1,024.0 4,405.0 25,744.0 $41,566 $6,579 $34,987 389.0 RTA-212 All Days 6,585 152,508 4 4,653.0 75,238.0 111,936.0 $291,713 $11,874 $279,839 3,254.0 RTA-217 All Days 32,979 763,804 4 9,203.0 192,581.0 272,808.0 $602,713 $64,224 $538,489 6,723.0 RTA-217D All Days 7,744 145,808 1 1,304.0 29,790.0 32,770.0 $123,390 $16,468 $106,922 1,156.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 1 of 6 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-22 All Days 287,781 3,416,288 4 23,164.0 332,911.0 372,970.0 $2,209,498 $276,385 $1,933,113 20,695.0 RTA-23 All Days 94,084 645,795 5 18,097.0 207,819.0 332,889.0 $1,274,976 $94,046 $1,180,930 14,221.0 RTA-24 All Days 64,456 442,708 3 13,625.0 149,318.0 233,021.0 $991,697 $64,430 $927,267 11,061.0 RTA-26 All Days 24,250 169,508 2 9,326.0 106,771.0 136,489.0 $712,401 $360,000 $352,401 7,946.0 RTA-27 All Days 370,316 4,404,659 4 31,518.0 558,608.0 634,506.0 $3,117,809 $368,797 $2,749,012 29,202.0 RTA-28 All Days 178,191 2,119,459 4 13,582.0 223,829.0 247,288.0 $1,340,364 $179,866 $1,160,498 12,554.0 RTA-29 All Days 133,888 720,608 3 16,729.0 196,356.0 218,511.0 $1,690,696 $120,962 $1,569,734 15,835.0 RTA-3 All Days 9,360 59,167 2 2,251.0 22,334.0 40,053.0 $149,448 $9,540 $139,908 1,667.0 RTA-30 All Days 62,671 437,184 2 8,909.0 102,353.0 108,711.0 $737,720 $59,575 $678,145 8,228.0 RTA-31 All Days 146,401 1,014,102 4 23,798.0 390,288.0 504,678.0 $1,747,963 $146,516 $1,601,447 19,496.0 RTA-32 All Days 120,022 823,401 3 12,626.0 106,755.0 169,141.0 $911,077 $119,974 $791,103 10,162.0 RTA-33 All Days 54,406 380,294 2 7,124.0 72,214.0 97,446.0 $542,129 $50,652 $491,477 6,047.0 RTA-3D All Days 144,194 777,205 3 13,185.0 156,133.0 181,679.0 $1,312,759 $110,222 $1,202,537 12,296.0 RTA-40 All Days 29,688 207,519 2 6,996.0 112,286.0 131,863.0 $557,372 $29,331 $528,041 6,217.0 RTA-41C All Days 27,537 187,955 3 6,626.0 90,492.0 121,285.0 $487,051 $24,018 $463,033 5,432.0 RTA-41D All Days 46,760 252,036 2 3,631.0 41,892.0 72,464.0 $285,927 $40,784 $245,143 2,678.0 RTA-42 All Days 53,182 370,863 2 7,264.0 85,278.0 117,856.0 $516,362 $45,991 $470,371 5,759.0 RTA-49 All Days 227,122 1,222,239 3 16,349.0 165,900.0 183,492.0 $1,671,338 $213,676 $1,457,662 15,654.0 RTA-50 All Days 2,767 5,062 2 3,119.0 15,062.0 30,123.0 $209,767 $202,499 $7,268 2,340.0 RTA-51 All Days 32,397 59,287 1 2,206.0 19,070.0 28,697.0 $160,513 $154,037 $6,476 1,790.0 RTA-52 All Days 42,245 295,295 1 4,750.0 23,762.0 44,184.0 $335,515 $642,000 ($306,485) 3,742.0 RTA-54 All Days 10,828 19,815 1 477.0 2,275.0 2,535.0 $48,579 $74,757 ($26,178) 455.0 RTA-54C All Days 2,570 4,703 1 2,781.0 6,864.0 44,507.0 $122,592 $85,000 $37,592 1,367.0 RTA-55 All Days 19,329 35,373 2 2,358.0 15,372.0 53,010.0 $107,213 $20,328 $86,885 1,196.0 RTA-61 All Days 124,142 866,926 4 22,131.0 332,214.0 391,042.0 $1,765,758 $124,475 $1,641,283 19,695.0 RTA-74 All Days 200,365 1,398,993 4 24,839.0 372,783.0 444,497.0 $1,938,275 $200,957 $1,737,318 21,619.0 RTA-79 All Days 108,211 755,497 4 16,990.0 240,865.0 314,710.0 $1,278,546 $108,168 $1,170,378 14,261.0 RTA-8 All Days 213,108 1,460,912 5 23,077.0 279,730.0 358,833.0 $1,770,475 $210,200 $1,560,275 19,747.0 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 2 of 6 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Data Elements Route #Day Type Peak Vehicles Passengers Passenger Miles Revenue Hours Total Hours Revenue Miles Total Miles Operating Cost Passenger Revenue Net Subsidy FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-9 All Days 66,669 791,439 1 5,558.0 113,325.0 136,417.0 $463,022 $66,949 $396,073 5,164.0 RTA-HEMDAR All Days 67,555 831,600 36,042.0 448,777.0 569,947.0 $2,555,172 $238,996 $2,316,176 29,184.0 RTA-HemTax All Days 1,646 44,756 1,351.0 41,021.0 41,021.0 $147,934 $6,708 $141,226 1,351.0 RTA-MTMDAR All Days 78,146 961,975 49,172.0 683,502.0 868,048.0 $3,486,072 $276,465 $3,209,607 39,816.0 RTA-MTMTax All Days 3,093 40,373 1,319.0 33,571.0 33,571.0 $123,656 $12,283 $111,373 1,319.0 RTA-NonDAR All Days 2,045 25,169 4,927.0 67,017.0 85,112.0 $349,306 $7,235 $342,071 3,990.0 RTA-NonTax All Days 114 2,769 144.0 4,087.0 4,087.0 $14,884 $448 $14,436 144.0 RTA-RSBDAR All Days 261,183 3,215,158 156,214.0 2,134,861.0 2,711,273.0 $11,074,739 $918,013 $10,156,726 126,489.0 RTA-RSBTax All Days 7,860 147,691 4,383.0 125,681.0 125,681.0 $456,252 $31,432 $424,820 4,383.0 Service Provider Totals $67,876,149 $19,790,760 $87,666,909 16,779,794.0 13,625,761.0 1,017,667.0 890,739.0 64,015,300 8,873,832 190 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 3 of 6 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-0 All Days RTA-1 All Days $9.51 $4.30 $106.77 $3.49 $0.62 $86.73 $7.73 24.8 2.21 18.77% RTA-10 All Days $9.40 $9.14 $106.77 $8.23 $1.53 $96.23 $8.47 11.7 1.03 9.86% RTA-101 All Days $7.44 $12.17 $106.77 $11.44 $3.50 $100.44 $7.00 8.8 0.61 5.92% RTA-11 All Days $9.68 $9.49 $106.77 $8.57 $1.59 $96.41 $8.74 11.2 1.02 9.70% RTA-12 All Days $9.08 $7.72 $106.77 $6.85 $1.27 $94.70 $8.05 13.8 1.18 11.30% RTA-13 All Days $9.25 $7.84 $106.77 $7.00 $1.30 $95.34 $8.26 13.6 1.18 10.70% RTA-14 All Days $8.18 $7.30 $106.77 $6.43 $1.19 $94.01 $7.21 14.6 1.12 11.94% RTA-15 All Days $9.61 $6.95 $106.77 $6.10 $1.13 $93.72 $8.44 15.4 1.38 12.21% RTA-16/16E All Days $8.24 $6.64 $106.77 $5.80 $1.08 $93.22 $7.19 16.1 1.24 12.68% RTA-18 All Days $8.46 $8.74 $106.77 $7.89 $1.47 $96.36 $7.63 12.2 0.97 9.75% RTA-19 All Days $8.73 $7.43 $106.77 $6.55 $1.22 $94.25 $7.71 14.4 1.18 11.72% RTA-19C All Days $9.03 $6.90 $89.70 $6.11 $0.92 $79.39 $7.99 13.0 1.31 11.50% RTA-20 All Days $7.00 $8.37 $106.77 $7.49 $1.39 $95.52 $6.27 12.8 0.84 10.53% RTA-200 All Days $4.50 $18.82 $106.77 $16.72 $0.82 $94.88 $4.00 5.7 0.24 11.13% RTA-202 All Days $3.23 $29.06 $89.66 $27.20 $1.15 $83.94 $3.02 3.1 0.11 6.37% RTA-202D All Days $10.48 $17.74 $106.72 $16.68 $0.89 $100.38 $9.86 6.0 0.59 5.94% RTA-204D All Days $5.08 $15.81 $106.77 $14.01 $0.74 $94.59 $4.50 6.8 0.32 11.40% RTA-205 All Days $4.49 $23.73 $106.77 $21.75 $1.06 $97.83 $4.11 4.5 0.19 8.37% RTA-206D All Days $4.34 $14.63 $106.76 $11.98 $0.64 $87.45 $3.56 7.3 0.30 18.09% RTA-208 All Days $3.81 $37.87 $89.66 $35.75 $1.54 $84.62 $3.59 2.4 0.10 5.61% RTA-208D All Days $4.49 $13.43 $106.74 $11.98 $0.64 $95.21 $4.01 7.9 0.33 10.80% RTA-21 All Days $8.15 $9.17 $106.77 $8.20 $1.52 $95.48 $7.29 11.6 0.89 10.57% RTA-210 All Days $4.49 $21.97 $89.65 $19.55 $0.84 $79.78 $4.00 4.1 0.20 11.01% RTA-210D All Days $9.44 $17.77 $106.85 $14.96 $0.79 $89.94 $7.94 6.0 0.53 15.82% RTA-212 All Days $3.88 $44.30 $89.65 $42.50 $1.83 $86.00 $3.72 2.0 0.09 4.07% RTA-217 All Days $3.13 $18.28 $89.65 $16.33 $0.71 $80.10 $2.80 4.9 0.17 10.65% RTA-217D All Days $4.14 $15.93 $106.74 $13.81 $0.73 $92.49 $3.59 6.7 0.26 13.34% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 4 of 6 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-22 All Days $6.64 $7.68 $106.76 $6.72 $0.57 $93.41 $5.81 13.9 0.86 12.50% RTA-23 All Days $6.14 $13.55 $89.65 $12.55 $1.83 $83.04 $5.68 6.6 0.45 7.37% RTA-24 All Days $6.64 $15.39 $89.66 $14.39 $2.09 $83.83 $6.21 5.8 0.43 6.49% RTA-26 All Days $6.67 $29.38 $89.66 $14.53 $2.08 $44.35 $3.30 3.1 0.23 50.53% RTA-27 All Days $5.58 $8.42 $106.77 $7.42 $0.62 $94.14 $4.92 12.7 0.66 11.82% RTA-28 All Days $5.99 $7.52 $106.77 $6.51 $0.55 $92.44 $5.18 14.2 0.80 13.41% RTA-29 All Days $8.61 $12.63 $106.77 $11.72 $2.18 $99.13 $7.99 8.5 0.68 7.15% RTA-3 All Days $6.69 $15.97 $89.65 $14.95 $2.36 $83.93 $6.26 5.6 0.42 6.38% RTA-30 All Days $7.21 $11.77 $89.66 $10.82 $1.55 $82.42 $6.63 7.6 0.61 8.07% RTA-31 All Days $4.48 $11.94 $89.66 $10.94 $1.58 $82.14 $4.10 7.5 0.38 8.38% RTA-32 All Days $8.53 $7.59 $89.66 $6.59 $0.96 $77.85 $7.41 11.8 1.12 13.16% RTA-33 All Days $7.51 $9.96 $89.65 $9.03 $1.29 $81.28 $6.81 9.0 0.75 9.34% RTA-3D All Days $8.41 $9.10 $106.76 $8.34 $1.55 $97.80 $7.70 11.7 0.92 8.39% RTA-40 All Days $4.96 $18.77 $89.65 $17.79 $2.54 $84.94 $4.70 4.8 0.26 5.26% RTA-41C All Days $5.38 $17.69 $89.66 $16.81 $2.46 $85.24 $5.12 5.1 0.30 4.93% RTA-41D All Days $6.83 $6.11 $106.77 $5.24 $0.97 $91.54 $5.85 17.5 1.12 14.26% RTA-42 All Days $6.06 $9.71 $89.66 $8.84 $1.27 $81.68 $5.52 9.2 0.62 8.90% RTA-49 All Days $10.07 $7.36 $106.77 $6.42 $1.19 $93.12 $8.79 14.5 1.37 12.78% RTA-50 All Days $13.93 $75.81 $89.64 $2.63 $1.44 $3.11 $0.48 1.2 0.18 96.53% RTA-51 All Days $8.42 $4.95 $89.67 $0.20 $0.11 $3.62 $0.34 18.1 1.70 95.96% RTA-52 All Days $14.12 $7.94 $89.66 ($7.25)($1.04)($81.90)($12.90) 11.3 1.78 191.34% RTA-54 All Days $21.35 $4.49 $106.77 ($2.42)($1.32)($57.53)($11.51) 23.8 4.76 153.88% RTA-54C All Days $17.86 $47.70 $89.68 $14.63 $7.99 $27.50 $5.48 1.9 0.37 69.33% RTA-55 All Days $6.97 $5.55 $89.64 $4.50 $2.46 $72.65 $5.65 16.2 1.26 18.96% RTA-61 All Days $5.32 $14.22 $89.66 $13.22 $1.89 $83.34 $4.94 6.3 0.37 7.04% RTA-74 All Days $5.20 $9.67 $89.66 $8.67 $1.24 $80.36 $4.66 9.3 0.54 10.36% RTA-79 All Days $5.31 $11.82 $89.65 $10.82 $1.55 $82.07 $4.86 7.6 0.45 8.46% RTA-8 All Days $6.33 $8.31 $89.66 $7.32 $1.07 $79.01 $5.58 10.8 0.76 11.87% TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 5 of 6 Table 3 - SRTP Route Statistics Riverside Transit Agency -- 7 Performance Indicators Route #Day Type Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost Per Passenger Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Passengers Per Hour Passengers Per Mile FY 2018/19 All Routes RTA-9 All Days $4.09 $6.95 $89.66 $5.94 $0.50 $76.70 $3.50 12.9 0.59 14.45% RTA-HEMDAR All Days $5.69 $37.82 $87.55 $34.29 $2.79 $79.36 $5.16 2.3 0.15 9.35% RTA-HemTax All Days $3.61 $89.87 $109.50 $85.80 $3.16 $104.53 $3.44 1.2 0.04 4.53% RTA-MTMDAR All Days $5.10 $44.61 $87.55 $41.07 $3.34 $80.61 $4.70 2.0 0.11 7.93% RTA-MTMTax All Days $3.68 $39.98 $93.75 $36.01 $2.76 $84.44 $3.32 2.3 0.09 9.93% RTA-NonDAR All Days $5.21 $170.81 $87.55 $167.27 $13.59 $85.73 $5.10 0.5 0.03 2.07% RTA-NonTax All Days $3.64 $130.56 $103.36 $126.63 $5.21 $100.25 $3.53 0.8 0.03 3.00% RTA-RSBDAR All Days $5.19 $42.40 $87.55 $38.89 $3.16 $80.30 $4.76 2.1 0.12 8.28% RTA-RSBTax All Days $3.63 $58.05 $104.10 $54.05 $2.88 $96.92 $3.38 1.8 0.06 6.88% Service Provider Totals 0.65 10.0 $4.98 $76.20 $1.06 $7.65 22.57%$9.88 $6.43 $98.42 TransTrack Manager™ 4/26/2018 Page 6 of 6 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2017/18 - FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Route #Route Class Route Description Cities/Communities Served Connections Directly Operated Fixed Routes: 1 Regional From UCR and Downtown Riverside to Galleria at Tyler and Corona primarily via University Ave and Magnolia Ave Riverside, Home Gardens, Corona Metrolink, Corona Cruiser, Omnitrans, SunLine 101 Regional RapidLink limited stop service from UCR and Downtown Riverside to Galleria at Tyler and Corona primarily via University Ave and Magnolia Ave Riverside, Home Gardens, Corona Metrolink, Corona Cruiser, Omnitrans 3 1 Local 10th St and Belle Ave in Corona via Main St and Grand Ave to the Corona Transit Center, Norco College, Jurupa Valley and Eastvale via Hamner Ave and Limonite Aves to Amazon Eastvale Corona, Riverside, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley Metrolink, Corona Cruiser 10 Local From Big Springs St on Riverside's Northside to Galleria at Tyler primarily via Blaine St, Third St, Victoria Ave and Lincoln Ave Riverside Omnitrans 11 Local Circulator between Moreno Valley Mall and March Air Reserve Base primarily via Frederick St, Ironwood Ave, Heacock St and JFK Dr Moreno Valley, March Joint Powers Authority SunLine 12 Local From Stephens Ave and Center St on Riverside's Northside, through Downtown, then to Merced Dr at Magnolia Ave via Magnolia Ave, California Ave, and Jurupa Ave Riverside Omnitrans 13 Local From Hunter Park Metrolink Station to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Chicago Ave, MLK Blvd, Magnolia Ave, Central Ave, Arlington Ave, Colorado Ave, and Tyler St Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans 14 Regional From Galleria at Tyler to Downtown Riverside via Indiana Ave and Brockton Ave, then University Ave and Iowa Ave and Center St then to Loma Linda VA Hospital via Mount Vernon Ave and Barton Rd Riverside, Highgrove, Loma Linda Omnitrans 15 Local From Downtown Riverside to Galleria at Tyler to Magnolia Ave and Merced Dr via Magnolia Ave, Arlington Ave, La Sierra Ave, Tyler St, and Indiana Ave Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine, OCTA 16 Local From Moreno Valley Mall to UCR via Day St, Box Springs Rd, Sycamore Canyon Blvd, Central Ave, Canyon Crest Dr, Campus Dr, University Ave, Iowa Ave, and Blaine St Moreno Valley, Riverside SunLine 18 Local From Moreno Valley College to Moreno Valley Mall via Kitching St, Perris Blvd, Cottonwood St and Frederick St, then Pigeon Pass Rd to Sunnymead Ranch Moreno Valley SunLine 19 1 Regional From Moreno Valley Mall to Perris Station Transit Center via Sunnymead Blvd and Perris Blvd and Moreno Valley College with service to distribution centers at Indian St and Morgan St Moreno Valley, Perris Metrolink, SunLine 20 Regional From Magnolia Ave and Elizabeth Ln in Riverside to Moreno Valley College via Central Ave, Alessandro Blvd, Moreno Beach Dr, and Iris St with selected trips serving Moreno Valley March Field Metrolink Station weekdays Riverside, Moreno Valley 21 Local From Galleria at Tyler in Riverside to Fontana via Van Buren Blvd, Mission Blvd, and Country Village Jurupa Valley, Fontana, Riverside Omnitrans 22 Regional From Lake Elsinore Outlet Center and Perris Station Transit Center to Downtown Riverside via Hwy 74, Theda St, Ellis Ave, Old Elsinore Rd, Clarke St, Wood Rd, Alessandro Blvd, Chicago Ave, and University Ave Riverside, Woodcrest, Mead Valley, Perris, Good Hope, Meadowbrook, Lake Elsinore Metrolink, Omnitrans 27 Regional From Florida Ave and Lincoln Ave in East Hemet to Perris Station Transit Center then to Galleria at Tyler in Riverside via Florida Ave, I- 215 Fwy, and Van Buren Blvd Riverside, Woodcrest, March Joint Powers Authority, Perris, Romoland, Homeland, Hemet, East Hemet, Valle Vista Metrolink 29 Regional From Downtown Riverside to Amazon Eastvale via Rubidoux Blvd and Limonite Ave. Selected trips deviate via Jurupa Valley/Pedley station weekdays. Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 41 1 Regional From the Mead Valley Community Center to Moreno Valley with stops at Moreno Valley College and Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley, Perris, Mead Valley 49 Regional From Downtown Riverside to Country Village and Fontana via Mission Blvd Jurupa Valley, Riverside, Fontana Omnitrans, SunLine 54F Local Local circulator serving the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station and Downtown Riverside Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 200 Express From San Bernardino Transit Center to Anaheim via SR-91 and SR-55 Freeways with stops at Downtown Riverside and La Sierra Metrolink Stations, Village at Orange, and Anaheim Resort district Riverside, Corona, Orange, Anaheim Omnitrans, Metrolink, OCTA, SunLine 202 1 Express From Mulligans Murrieta and Promenade Mall Temecula to Oceanside Transit Center Murrieta, Temecula, Fallbrook, Bonsall, Oceanside Metrolink, NCTD 204 Express From UCR to Montclair TransCenter via Downtown Riverside, Country Village, and Ontario Mills Mall Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Ontario, Montclair Metrolink, Omnitrans, Foothill Transit 205 Express From the Promenade Mall in Temecula to Village at Orange via I-15 and SR-91 Fwys with stops in Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Dos Lagos, and Corona Transit Center Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Corona, Orange Metrolink, Corona Cruiser, OCTA 206 Express From Promenade Mall Temecula to Corona Transit Center via I-15 Freeway with stops in Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, and Dos Lagos Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Temescal Valley, Corona Metrolink, Corona Cruiser 208 1 Express From Promenade Mall Temecula to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station via I-215 with stops in Murrieta, Perris, Moreno Valley, and downtown Riverside Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, Riverside, Moreno Valley Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 210 1 Express From Beaumont to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station with stops in Moreno Valley and downtown Riverside Beaumont, Moreno Valley, Riverside Metrolink, Pass Transit, Omnitrans, SunLine 217 1 Express From San Jacinto and Hemet to Temecula and Escondido via Winchester Rd (State Hwy 79) and I-15 Hemet, San Jacinto, Temecula, Escondido NCTD, San Diego MTS 1 This route has selected trips that are/will be both directly operated and contract operated. TABLE 3A: FY 2018/19 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AS AT JULY 1, 2018 RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2017/18 - FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Route #Route Class Route Description Cities/Communities Served Connections TABLE 3A: FY 2018/19 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AS AT JULY 1, 2018 Contracted Fixed Routes: 3 1 Local 10th St and Belle Ave in Corona via Main St and Grand Ave to the Corona Transit Center, Norco College, Jurupa Valley and Eastvale via Hamner Ave and Limonite Aves to Amazon Eastvale Corona, Riverside, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley Metrolink, Corona Cruiser 8 Local Serving Lake Elsinore Outlet Center, Walmart on Railroad Canyon Rd, and Lakeland Village via Lakeshore Dr, Mission Trail, Grand Ave and Riverside Dr Lake Elsinore, Lakeland Village, Wildomar 19 1 Regional From Perris Station Transit Center to Exceed Facility on Trumble Rd Perris Metrolink 23 Local From Central & Palomar Sts Wildomar through Murrieta to County Center Dr in Temecula Wildomar, Murrieta, Temecula 24 Local Temecula service with stops at County Center Dr, Old Town, Pechanga Resort, and Temecula Valley Hospital Temecula 26 Local Local circulator serving Moreno Valley March Field Metrolink Station and Moreno Valley Mall via Van Buren Blvd, Trautwein Rd, Alessandro Blvd, Sycamore Canyon Blvd, and Eucalyptus Ave Moreno Valley, March Joint Powers Authority, Riverside Metrolink 30 Local Perris local circulator serving the Perris Transit Center, Walmart, May Ranch, and Weston Rd & Carter Dr Perris Metrolink 31 Regional Service from Hemet Valley Mall to Moreno Valley Mall via Banning and Beaumont with stops at Mt San Jacinto Community College, Sun Lakes Village, Walmart on Moreno Beach Dr, Moreno Valley Senior Center, and Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley, Banning, Beaumont, Gilman Hot Springs, San Jacinto, Hemet Pass Transit, SunLine 32 Local From Hemet Valley Mall to Mt. San Jacinto College via downtown San Jacinto and San Jacinto Ave San Jacinto, Hemet 33 Local From Super-Walmart on Sanderson Ave and the Hemet Valley Mall in west Hemet to Stanford St and Thornton Ave in east Hemet Hemet, East Hemet, Valle Vista 40 Regional From Walmart in Lake Elsinore to Cherry Hills Blvd in Menifee with stops in Canyon Lake, and Quail Valley Menifee, Canyon Lake, Lake Elsinore 41 1 Regional From the Mead Valley Community Center to Moreno Valley with stops at Moreno Valley College and Riverside University Medical Center Moreno Valley, Perris, Mead Valley 42 Local From the Hemet Valley Mall to Soboba Casino in San Jacinto via Kirby St, Cottonwood Ave, Santa Fe Ave, and East Main St Hemet, San Jacinto 50 Trolley Riverside downtown Jury Trolley service Riverside 51 Local Crest Cruiser UCR circulator to Canyon Crest Dr, Central Ave, Chicago Ave, University Ave, Iowa Ave Spruce St and Watkins Dr Riverside SunLine 52 Local Local circulator serving Hunter Park Metrolink Station and UCR via Iowa Ave, Blaine St, and University Ave Riverside Metrolink 54 Local Local circulator linking Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station and downtown Riverside Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans 55 Trolley Temecula Trolley route, connecting Harveston community to local middle and high schools, and Promenade Mall Temecula 61 Regional From the Perris Station Transit Center to Cherry Hills Blvd and Bradley Rd in Menifee and Temecula with stops at MSJC Menifee campus, Loma Linda University Medical Center - Murrieta, and County Center Dr Perris, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula Metrolink 74 Regional From San Jacinto and Hemet to Menifee and Perris, serving MSJC San Jacinto campus, Hemet Valley Mall, Winchester, MSJC Menifee campus, and Perris Station Transit Center San Jacinto, Hemet, Winchester, Menifee, Perris Metrolink 79 Regional From the Hemet Valley Mall to Old Town Temecula via Winchester Rd (State Hwy 79). Also serves County Center Dr, Promenade Mall, Temecula City Hall, French Valley, and Southwest Justice Center Hemet, Winchester, French Valley, Murrieta, Temecula 202 1 Express From Mulligans Murrieta and Promenade Mall Temecula to Oceanside Transit Center Murrieta, Temecula, Fallbrook, Bonsall, Oceanside Metrolink, NCTD 208 1 Express From Promenade Mall Temecula to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station via I-215 with stops in Murrieta, Perris, Moreno Valley, and downtown Riverside Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Perris, Riverside, Moreno Valley Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 210 1 Express From Beaumont to Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station with stops in Moreno Valley and downtown Riverside Beaumont, Moreno Valley, Riverside Metrolink, Pass Transit, Omnitrans, SunLine 212 ²Express From Hemet and San Jacinto to Downtown Riverside with stops at Perris and UCR San Jacinto, Hemet, Perris, Riverside Metrolink, Omnitrans, SunLine 217 1 Express From San Jacinto and Hemet to Temecula and Escondido via Winchester Rd (State Hwy 79) and I-15 Hemet, San Jacinto, Temecula, Escondido NCTD, San Diego MTS 1 This route has selected trips that are/will be both directly operated and contract operated. 2 Service is planned for discontinuation in January 2019. RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2017/18 - FY 2019/20 Short Range Transit Plan Route #Route Class Route Description Cities/Communities Served Connections TABLE 3A: FY 2018/19 INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS AS AT JULY 1, 2018 Contracted Paratransit Routes: Origin-to-Destination Banning, Beaumont, Corona, Eastvale, Good Hope, Highgrove, Jurupa Valley, Loma Linda, Mead Valley, Meadowbrook, Moreno Valley, Norco, Perris, Quail Valley, Riverside, Woodcrest Origin-to-Destination East Hemet, Gillman Springs, Green Acres, Hemet, Homeland, San Jacinto, Valle Vista, Winchester Origin-to-Destination Canyon Lake, French Valley, Lake Elsinore, Lakeland Village, Menifee, Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar, Romoland Origin-to-Destination March Joint Powers Authority Riverside-San Bernadino UZA Hemet UZA Murrieta-Temecula-Menifee UZA Non-UZA TABLE 6: Progress to Implement FTA Triennial Review FY19-FY21 SRTP Audit Recommendations (covering FY 2012/13 – 2014/15) Actions Taken and Results Inadequate oversight of subrecipient / third- party contractor / lessees. The grantee must submit approved procedures to the FTA regional office to monitor other entities with responsibility for meeting FTA requirements. The grantee must provide evidence of staff training. Closed: 5/17/2016 Lacking a language assistance plan. The grantee must provide the FTA RCRO with evidence of RTA and contractor staff training as outlined in the LAP as well as evidence that LAP training will be conducted in accordance with RTA’s Title VI program in the future. Closed: 5/17/2016 No contract administration system. The grantee must provide the FTA regional office with documentation of an adequate contract administration system. The grantee must submit to the FTA regional office revised contract administration procedures, evidence of board approval and documentation of staff training. Closed: 4/20/2016 Table 7 -- Service Provider Performance Targets Report FY 2017/18 Short Range Transit Plan Review Riverside Transit Agency FY 2017/18 Plan FY 2017/18 Target FY 2017/18 Year to Date Through 3rd Quarter Year to Date Performance Scorecard Data Elements 8,878,206 Unlinked Passenger Trips 63,807,121 Passenger Miles 874,092.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 13,378,809.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 16,844,518.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles $81,598,830 Total Operating Expenses $14,892,546 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $66,706,284 Net Operating Expenses Performance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio Meets Target>= 17.44% 18.25% 21.44% Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Meets Target<= $89.52 $93.35 $88.76 2. Subsidy Per Passenger Meets Target>= $5.61 and <= $7.59 $7.51 $7.04 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Meets Target>= $0.79 and <= $1.07 $1.05 $0.99 4. Subsidy Per Hour Meets Target>= $59.14 and <= $80.02 $76.31 $69.73 5. Subsidy Per Mile Meets Target>= $3.83 and <= $5.19 $4.99 $4.56 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 8.93 and <= 12.08 10.20 9.90 7. Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.58 and <= 0.78 0.66 0.65 Note:Must meet at least 4 out of 7 Discretionary Performance Indicators Productivity Performance Summary: Service Provider Comments: 4/25/2018 TransTrack Manager™Page 1 of 1 FY 2018/19 - Table 8 -- SRTP Performance Report Service Provider: Riverside Transit Agency All Routes Performance Indicators FY 2018/19 Plan Plan Performance Scorecard (a)FY 2018/19 Target FY 2017/18 3rd Quarter Year-to-Date FY 2016/17 End of Year Actual Passengers None 6,407,761 8,873,832 8,741,975 Passenger Miles None 45,473,436 64,015,300 62,116,347 Revenue Hours None 646,830.7 890,739.0 833,488.7 Total Hours None 745,178.3 1,017,667.0 959,993.5 Revenue Miles None 9,897,423.1 13,625,761.0 12,875,332.2 Total Miles None 12,388,837.5 16,779,794.0 16,062,434.4 Operating Costs None$57,410,901 $87,666,909 $70,437,592 Passenger Revenue None$12,306,493 $19,790,760 $14,538,806 Operating Subsidy None$45,104,408 $67,876,149 $55,898,786 Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour Fails to Meet Target<= $90.62$88.76 $98.42 $84.51 Operating Cost Per Revenue Mile None$5.80 $6.43 $5.47 Operating Costs Per Passenger None$8.96 $9.88 $8.06 Farebox Recovery Ratio Meets Target>= 16.7% 21.44% 22.57% 20.64% Subsidy Per Passenger Meets Target>= $5.98 and <= $8.10$7.04 $7.65 $6.39 Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Meets Target>= $0.84 and <= $1.14$0.99 $1.06 $0.90 Subsidy Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= $59.27 and <= $80.19$69.73 $76.20 $67.07 Subsidy Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= $3.88 and <= $5.24$4.56 $4.98 $4.34 Passengers Per Revenue Hour Meets Target>= 8.42 and <= 11.39 9.90 10.00 10.50 Passengers Per Revenue Mile Meets Target>= 0.55 and <= 0.75 0.65 0.65 0.68 a) The Plan Performance Scorecard column is the result of comparing the FY 2018/19 Plan to the FY 2018/19 Primary Target. TransTrack Manager™ 5/23/2018 Page 1 of 1 TABLE 9A – HIGHLIGHTS OF FY 18/19 SRTP Operating & Financial Data FY 14/15 Audited FY 15/16 Audited FY 16/17 Audited FY 17/18 Budget FY 18/19 Planned Systemwide Ridership 9,651,592 9,238,265 8,741,975 8,878,2021 8,873,832 Operating Costs Per Revenue Hour $83.23 $80.73 $88.99 $93.35 $98.42 Recent Trends: The trend since early 2015 and especially in 2016 and 2017 has been downward for ridership as gas prices and car ownership costs have remained relatively low and the economy continues to create more jobs leading to more people opting to purchase cars and lesser use of transit. FY18 saw the following service improvements: • In August 2017: o Implemented new RapidLink Gold Line (Route 101) service during peak periods weekdays linking Corona, downtown Riverside and University of California, Riverside (UCR). • In January 2018: o Improved Route 19 frequency between Perris and Moreno Valley to every 15 minutes (up from every 30 minutes) daytime weekdays. o Improved weekdays and weekend frequencies on routes 29 and 49 linking Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, and Riverside. Also service was extended to Amazon Eastvale (routes 3 and 29). o Implemented new CommuterLink Route 200 linking San Bernardino, Riverside, Village at Orange, and the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim seven days a week utilizing the new State Route (SR)-91 intercounty express lanes (expanded from former Route 216). o Implemented new CommuterLink Route 205 peak periods weekdays linking Temecula, Lake Elsinore, Corona, and Village at Orange utilizing the new SR-91 intercounty express lanes. • Riverside Festival of Lights special Route 54F shuttle. Proposed Service Changes for FY 2019: The FY19 service plan includes the following service changes: • Route 22 will be split into two separate routes to improve reliability and connectivity at Perris: o Route 22 (Perris – Riverside Downtown). o New Route 9 (Lake Elsinore – Perris). • Route 24 weekdays service frequency will be improved from every 80 to 60 minutes and the Temecula Library deviation will be discontinued due to low ridership. • Route 27 will be split into two separate routes to improve reliability and connectivity at Perris: o Route 27 (Perris – Galleria at Tyler mall in Riverside) – improved frequency from 60 minutes to 40 minutes. o Route 28 (Hemet – Perris) – improved frequency from 60 minutes to 30 minutes. o Route 61 - extend from Sun City (Menifee) to Perris in place of existing Route 27 o Route 212 would be discontinued to avoid unnecessary duplication of service with new Route 28. • Route 31 from Moreno Valley to Beaumont and Hemet will have its last weekdays evening departure approximately an hour later. • Route 33 will have service weekdays expanded to serve Tahquitz High School in Hemet. • Route 40 will be streamlined and expanded to serve more of the City of Menifee, including Mount 1 FY17/18 Ridership estimate is based on the budget. San Jacinto College (MSJC) Menifee Campus, the Heritage Lakes area, and McCall Blvd east of the I- 215 freeway. • Route 200 will have additional trips added at peak times weekdays in response to high ridership on selected existing trips. • Routes 205/206: RTA will work to add a stop in the Indian Truck Trail / I-15 Freeway area of Temescal Valley. • RapidLink Gold Line will have its hours of service rearranged based on ridership demand. • A comprehensive revision of weekend service in the south and eastern areas of RTA’s service area will for the first time provide seven day service on all RTA local routes (excluding special weekday shuttle routes 26, 50, 51, 52, 54, and 55). • Riverside Festival of Lights special Route 54F shuttle. Operating Budget ($87,666,909): • Increase of 7% over FY18 budget. Variance analysis by cost element is provided below: o Salaries – 6% increase due to headcount growth from service increases and administrative need. o Purchased Transportation – 10% increase due to contracted rates and fuel. o Benefits – 5% increase due to medical, pension and OPEB cost growth. o Services – 14% increase due to mobile ticketing implementation and increased security costs. o Materials & Supplies – 4% increase due to parts expense. Capital Budget ($36,092,951): • RTA’s 3-Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is updated to reflect the current economic outlook and service needs with a focus on items which are mandatory to support our current service offering while positioning the Agency future operations. FY18 CIP projects are funded with Federal Sections 5307 and 5339, State Transit Assistance (STA), and new SB1 SGR funds. A summary by project element for FY 2018 is shown below: o Revenue Vehicles - $20.2 million for (14) heavy-duty CNG, (39) Contracted Fixed Route, and (29) DAR vehicles o Non-Revenue Vehicles - $.3 million for (8) cars and (1) truck o Hemet Mobility Hub - $2.6 million o Central Operations & Maintenance Facility - $8.0 million o Facility Maintenance - $2.6 million for operations and facilities maintenance projects o Other - $2.2 million for tire lease and software o Associated Transit Improvements - $.2 million for bus stop enhancements. Revenue Sources included in Farebox Calculation Actual Amount from FY 2016/17 Audit FY 17/18 Budget FY 18/19 (Plan) 1. Passenger Fares 10,356,851 9,800,000 10,802,010 2. Interest - - - 3. General Fund Supplement - - - 4. Measure A 2,841,324 3,260,975 5,633,457 5. Advertising Revenue 18,274 15,000 15,000 6. Gain on Sale of Capital Assets 4,034 7. CNG Revenue 179,230 150,000 100,000 8. Lease/ Other Revenue 62,109 63,970 65,840 9. Federal Excise Tax Refund - - - 10. Investment Income 196,332 100,000 300,000 11. CalPers CERBT - - - 12. Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes (50,435) - - 13. Other Revenues 931,087 1,502,601 2,874,453 TOTAL REVENUE for Farebox Calculation (1-13)14,538,806 14,892,546 19,790,760 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES for Farebox Calculation 70,437,592 81,598,830 87,666,909 FAREBOX RECOVERY RATIO 20.64%18.25%22.57% Table 9B - Fare Revenue Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Fiscal Year Prior Years Expenditures FY 17-18 Expenditures through 6/30 (estimate) FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY22-23 Current Programmed Phase Balance Total Programmed Payments/Exp Original Programmed Phase Cost Forecast Revenues1 873,052$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 19,734,268$ 1,460,711$ 50,855,605$ Estimated Carryover (as of 6/30)15,261,216$ 14,846,038$ 7,673,234$ 2,191,426$ -$ -$ 5-Year Avail Forecast/Cash 5-Year Programmed 5-Year Delta Available Revenues 16,134,268$ 15,746,038$ 8,573,234$ 3,091,426$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 16,900,168$ 16,900,168$ -$ Funded Expenditures Phase Project Amount RTA-0001 Hemet Mobility Hub ALL $4,275,988 $92,709 71,322$ 1,876,431$ 1,500,000$ 735,526$ -$ -$ 4,111,957$ (164,031)$ 4,275,988$ RTA-0002 UCR Mobility Hub2 ALL $5,445,000 $0 138,000$ 3,660,642$ 1,646,358$ -$ -$ -$ 5,307,000$ (138,000)$ 5,445,000$ RTA-0003 Promenade Mobility Hub ALL $1,692,797 $978 734,774$ 957,045$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 957,045$ (735,752)$ 1,692,797$ RTA-0004 Associated Transit Enhancements Program ENH $1,940,437 $133,390 162,709$ 515,000$ 415,450$ 315,400$ 135,670$ 262,818$ 1,644,338$ (296,099)$ 1,940,437$ RTA-0005 Long Range Planning ENH $600,000 $293,967 161,314$ 88,686$ 20,000$ 20,000$ 16,033$ -$ 144,719$ (455,281)$ 600,000$ RTA-0006 Riveside Metrolink Station ENH ENH $75,000 $0 -$ 75,000$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 75,000$ -$ 75,000$ RTA-0007 Vine Street Mobility Hub ALL $3,886,905 $0 -$ 500,000$ 1,500,000$ 886,905$ 500,000$ 500,000$ 3,886,905$ -$ 3,886,905$ RTA-0008 RapidLink Gold Line ALL $988,478 $939,667 20,112$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ (959,779)$ 959,779$ RTA-0009 RapidLink Blue Line ENH $1,500,000 $0 -$ 200,000$ 800,000$ 500,000$ -$ -$ 1,500,000$ -$ 1,500,000$ RTA-0010 Regional Operations & Maintenance Facility3 ALL $30,251,000 $0 -$ -$ 500,000$ 633,595$ 248,297$ 137,182$ 1,519,074$ -$ 1,519,074$ RTA-0011 San Jacinto Mobility Hub4 ALL $200,000 -$ 200,000$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 200,000$ -$ 200,000$ Total Programmed Capital Improvements 19,346,038$ (2,748,942)$ 22,094,980$ Annual Capital Funded Expenditure $50,855,605 $1,460,711 1,288,230$ 8,072,804$ 6,381,808$ 3,091,426$ 900,000$ 900,000$ Projected Funded Balance carryover 14,846,038$ 7,673,234$ 2,191,426$ -$ -$ -$ FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 16,134,268$ 15,746,038$ 8,573,234$ 3,091,426$ 900,000$ 900,000$ 1,288,230$ 8,072,804$ 6,381,808$ 3,091,426$ 900,000$ 900,000$ $20,634,268 $20,634,268 $0 14,846,038$ 7,673,234$ 2,191,426$ -$ -$ -$ Notes: 1) Revenue increase to 3% for RTA due to Nexus Study, assume flat revenue for FY20 through FY22. 2) Project amount increased to maximum TUMF share due to increased construction costs and projected revenues. 3) Project added from approved 2016 TUMF Nexus Study and will cost more than max TUMF share. 4) Project added from approved 2016 TUMF Nexus Study, starting with Initial Project cost is for PA&ED. Programmed Phases Carryover Balance Programmed Phases Carryover Balance Table 10 Riverside Transit Agency FY 2019 - 2023 TUMF Expenditure Plan TIP Amended June 2017 Fiscal Year Available Revenue 5-Year Balance 5-Year Programmed 5-Year Avail Forecast/Cash Available Revenue Summary Table APPENDIX A: RTA SYSTEM MAP AND FIXED-ROUTE MAPS Lake Perris Lake Mathews Canyon Lake Lake ElsinoreSanta Ana RiverSanta Ana RiverSanta Ana R i v e r 215 UCR Canyon Crest Towne Centre Village TowersApartments UCR UniversityVillage Post Oce 60 MLK Blv d . MLK Blv d . University A v . Universit y A v . Blaine Monte Vis t a Vassar Spruce S t . Wa t k i n s D r . Central A v .Iowa Av.Chicago Av.Chicago Av.El CerritoCanyon Crest Dr.CanyonCrest Dr.W CampusCanyon Crest Dr.16 51 208 210 212 Canyon Crest & MLK (Lot 30) 10 52 14 51 Iowa & Blaine 22 51 Chicago & Central 16 51 Canyon Crest Towne Center RIVERSIDE SunLine 220 ROUTE 51 Crest Cruiser Trolley Stops Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 51 51 51 University Village & Village Towers Apts 1 14 16 51 52 Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn WINCHESTER RDYNE Z R D 15 15 ChaparralH.S. YsabelBarnettE.S. Abbott Extended StayAmerica BestWestern HARVESTON Palm PlazaShopping Center TEMECULA MOTORCARPKWY County Center 23 24 61 79 217 55 The Promenadeat Temecula OVERLAND DR WINCHESTER RDDATE STCOUNTY CENTER D R EQUITY DR YN E Z R D NICO L A S R D YNEZ RDY N E Z R D HARVESTON DRHARVESTONSCHOOL RDRUSTIC GLEN DR HARVESTON D RVILLAGE RDLA K E V I E W R D MA R G A R I T A R DMARGARITA RD« TOWNSHIP RD Trolley Stops Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale ROUTE 55 Temecula Trolley 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity Dr & Ynez Rd Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 Rt 202 continues to Oceanside Rt 202 continues to Oceanside Route 204 continues to Montclair Transit Center. Sunline 220 continues to Palm Desert « Route 200 to Anaheim « Route 205 to Village at Orange Route 200 to San BernardinoTransit Center Rt 217 continues to Escondido Transit Center « OCTA 794 to South Coast Metro MEAD VALLEY CANYON LAKE QUAIL VALLEY SUN CITY MENIFEE WINCHESTER PERRIS MORENO VALLEY LOMA LINDA GRAND TERRACE HIGHGROVE CANYON CREST MARCH JPARIVERSIDE WOODCREST CORONA HOME GARDENS TEMESCAL CANYON NORCO JURUPA VALLEY ONTARIO MIRA LOMA EASTVALE MEADOWBROOK BEAUMONT BANNING SAN JACINTO HEMET EAST HEMET VALLE VISTA LAKE ELSINORE MURRIETA WILDOMAR TEMECULA OLD TOWN REDHAWK FRENCH VALLEY 15 15 15 91 91 74 74 74 74 91 91 60 60 60 60 215 215 10 215 215 60 79 10 10 74 74 79 79 79 76 79 15 15 15 15 15 15 215 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 16 16 16 16 13 13 13 13 13 13 21 21 49 49 49 49 21 21 21 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 50 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 19 19 30 30 30 30 20 20 20 20 20 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 2727 27 27 31 32 32 32 32 32 32 33 33 42 42 42 42 42 74 74 74 74 74 74 7474 74 74 74 74 33 33 33 31 31 31 31 41 41 4141 41 41 27 26 26 26 26 40 40 40 40 40 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 29 29 29 29 29 29 20 20 11 11 11 10 10 10 10 10 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 52 52 23 23 23 23 55 55 23 23 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 24 24 24 24 24 24 200 200 200 200 200 200 794 794 794 GOLD LINE GOLD LINE GOLD LINE GOLD LINE 794 202 202 206 206 206 Sunline 220 210 210 210 210 210 210210 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 206 206 206 206 206 206 206 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 205 206 205 202 202 204 204 204 204 204 31 31 31 31 31RCCThe PedleyMetrolinkStation AmazonEastvale Hunter ParkMetrolink Station Moreno ValleyMarch FieldMetrolink Station South PerrisMetrolink Station La SierraMetrolinkStation CoronaTransitCenter SocialSecurityOce MLKHighSchool Citrus HillsHigh School RTA CountryVillage CoronaRegionalMedicalCenter KaiserHospital ParkviewHospital NorcoCollege Galleriaat Tyler CountyMentalHealth Cal Baptist Univ.La SierraUniversity Brockton Arcade MorenoValleyMall UCR MorenoValleyCollege PERRISFAIRGROUNDS Star-crest Mead ValleyCommunityCenter Mead ValleyLibrary EXCEED Mt. San JacintoCollege-Menifee SouthwestJusticeCenter FrenchValleyAirport FireStation RiversideUniversityMedicalCenter MorenoValleyCommunityHospital Walmart Loma Linda UniversityMedical Center Loma Linda VAHospital MenifeeCity HallWalmartCoronaCity Hall NorcoCity Hall NorcoSenior Center Vintage TerraceSenior Community Canyon CommunityChurch Park and Ride Walmart CityHall Mt. SanJacinto College SobobaCasino HemetValleyMall Walmart CityHall Canyon LakeCity Hall OutletCenter MissionTrailLibrary Walmart LEUSD Inland ValleyMedical Center WildomarCity Hall MurrietaCity Hall& SeniorCenter Walmart PechangaResort Temecula Walmart Vista MurrietaHS Great Oak HS Promenade Mall Rancho SpringsMedical Center TemeculaValleyHospital TemeculaCityHall CommunityCenter CityHall MarchARB CityHall 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 31 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 74 212 217 STAGECOACHPLAZA Loma Linda UniversityMedical Center Dos Lagos Tom’s Farms 68TH ST CITRUS PATS RANCH RDMISS I O N B L V D PACIFIC42ND TILTO N LINCOLNINDIANAINDIANAHOLEPIERCE STERLINGM E R C E D »RIVERWALKPI E R C E PI E R C E MAGNOLIAT Y L E R T Y L E R CALIFORNIACALIFORNIACOLORADOWELLS MAGNOLIAOLIVEWOODVICTORIAVICTORIAMAGNOLIA6TH ST « COMMERCE R A I L R O A D « BUSINESS CNTR6TH ST ARLINGTON ARLINGTON GOULD » V A N B U R E N V A N B U R E N MIS S I O N B L V D VAN BUREN VAN BU RE N ARLINGTONARLINGTON L A S I E R R A LA S I ERRA S I E R R A V I S T A »LA SIERRAMAIN STN MAIN STHAMNERHAMNERSUMNERSMITHAUTO CENTERPOMONA JURUPA TERR A C I N A RAM O N A CR E S T M O N R O E » CENTRALCENTRAL CHICAGOCHICAGOBROCKTONBROCKTONSTREETERPHOENIXHARRISON 14TH ML KING MLK H O R A C E MARLAY CHERRY JURUPA MISSION BLVD GRANITE HILLS LIMONITE LIMONITE 10TH RIVERVIEWLIMONITEMULBERRYBANANACOUNTRYVILLAGEFELSPARPEDLEYPEDLEYETIWANDAJURUPA RUBIDOUXMAINMARLBOROUGH SPRUCE « MASS. CENTER BARTON BARTON PROSPECT BENTONCENTRAL EUCALYPTUS TOWNGATE CAMPUS FREDERICKCACTUS CACTUS MEYER COTTONWOOD TOWNGATE IRONWOOD OLD LAKE RD HEMLOCK MANZANITA HEACOCKRIVERSIDEKITCHINGHEACOCKPIGEON PASSINDIANINDIANLASSELLELASSELLEMORENO BEACHMORENO BEACHKITCHINGNASONNASON« EUCALYPTUS EUCALYPTUS FIR JFK JFK RAMONA EXPWY RA M O N A E X P W YIRIS IRIS IRIS KRAMERIA SUNNYMEAD SUNNYME A D R A N C H ALESSANDRO ORANGE TERRACE ALE S S A N D R O TRAUTWEINALESSANDRO « CENTERPOINT UNIVERSITY LOCHMOOR SY C A M O R E C Y N SYCAMORE CYN« FAIR IS LE BOX SPRINGSCANYON CRESTCANYON CRESTMT VERNONIOWAIOWARUSTINKANSASMT VERNONANDERSONWOODOLEANDER RIDER OAKLAND CAJALCO CAJALCO CAJALCO ALEXANDERCLARKBROWN STHAINESTHEDAMA R K H A M OLD E L S INOR EDAY« MISSION GROVE BLAINE LINDEN RUSSE L L CENTE R GARN E RRIVERAALAM O COLU M B I A 1ST 3RD LA CADENAORANGEORANGEPERRIS BLVDPERRIS BLVDP E R R I S B L V D PERRIS BLVDPERRIS BLVDPERRISPERRIS BLVDEVANS RDEVANS RDGENTIAN MORGAN SAN JACINTO » ORANGEBARRETT SAN JACINTO ELLIS NAVAJO NUEVO NUEVO « W I L K E R S ONREDLANDS AVTRUMBLESHERMANRIDER ST MAY RANCH 4TH ST 7TH 11TH ELLIS GOETZA STC ST»G ST»WESTON CARTERDIANAMCCALL ETHANAC RD MATTHEWS BONNIE DR SUN CITYENCANTOBRADLEYCHERRY HILLS DOMENIGONI PKWY MURRIETAEVANSNEWPORT RD LA PIEDRA« ANTELOPEROHRABACHER »MENIFEENEWPORT RD RAILROAD CYN RD GO E T Z« WEBSTERINDIANMA R K E T 24THHALL BIG SPRINGSWATKINS BEAUMONT AVEHIGHLAND SPRINGS »SUNSET1ST 2ND FRUITVALE COTTONWOOD MENLO FLORIDA FLORIDA MAIN RA M O N A E X P W YGI LMAN SPR ING S RA M O N A E X P W Y RA M O N A E X P W Y RA M O N A B L V D W 7TH E 7TH EVANS SO B O B A DE A N Z A ESPLANADE MENLO COMMONWEALTH LAKE PARK DRLYONLYONSANDERSONSANDERSONGILBERT« GILMOREPALMPALMSTATESTATEBUENAVISTA »Juanita »STATESAN JACINTOSAN JACINTODARTMOUTHSTANFORDWARRENHEWITTMISTLETOEENTERPRISE VILLINESSANTAFEDEVONSHIRE » STETSON MUSTANG ACACIA CENTRAL OAKLAND OAKLAND SIMPSON LATHAM LATHAM MAYBERRY MAYBERRY THORNTON STETSON THORNTON THORNTONCAWSTONIDY L L W I L D KIRBYKIRBYGRANDDEVONSHIRE »RIVERSIDE DRRIVERSIDE D R GR A N D A V E GR A N D A V E PAL O M A R HI D D E N SP R I N G S PRIELIPPISLAND VALLEYW A S H I N G T O N M A D I S O N HAN C O C K LINC O L N H A Y E S JA C K S O N KALMIAJUNIPER« ARCONTENIGHTHAWKNUTMEGCLINTON KEITH SCOTT RD BUNDY CAN Y O N KEIT H CLINTONCATTVINEYARDCALIF. OAKSCENTRAL ST »« GRUWELLMISSION TRAILLAKESHORE D R MALAGA LA K E S H O R E RAILROAD CYN RD« RAILROADCYN RDCO L L I E R CO L L I E R LIN C O L N GRAHAM POTTERY MAINSU M M E R H I L L CA N Y O N ES T A T E SCHANEYNICHOLSCENTRALMACHADO ORTEGAHWYRAILROADCYN RDMURRIETA HOT SP R I N G S MURRIETA HOT SPRINGS YNEZSOLANA F R O N T P U J O L F R O N T PE C H A N G A P K W Y MARGARIT A R D MAR GA R I TA RD MAR G A R I T A R D DEER HOLLOWRE D H A W K P K W Y RANCHO VIS T A « TEMECULA P K W Y OVERLANDRANCHO CALIF.RANCHO CALIF.OVERLANDPAUBA 6TH »MAIN »1STY N E Z R D Y N E Z R DCOUNTY CNTREQUITY D RLOS ALAMOS ALTA MURRIETA WHITE W O O D W H I T E W O O D MARGARITA WINCHESTER3RD 6th 4TH LAMPTONCLARK COUNTY FARM MARIPOSA PARSONSPALM LINCOLNGRANTCOMMERCE WAY »DIAMONDMIS S I O N T R A I L » 3RD WINCHESTERWINCHESTERBENTON THOMPSON » AULD TECHNOLOGY SKY CANYONTEMEKUPOURROYCLOCHEMAGDAS COLORADOS BRIGGS« LINNEL MCELWAINANTELOPEANTELOPEKELLER P O I N S E T T I AMENIFEE PEPPERCORN »ME R C E D E S D O N A LY N O R A LA PIEDRA RD CHAMBERS AVEMURRIETA RDCASE R D « DOS LAGOS TEMESCAL CANYON » TE M E S C A L CA N Y O N GOODMAN GOODMANCANTU-GALLEANO RANCH HIDDEN VALLEY ME R I D I A N P KW YCLAY DUNLAP DRBRADLEYCITRUS AVE WALNUTSHERMAN EL NIDO« ALGRAVE « SKY VIEW Route Number Route Path Commuter Routing Transfer Point Metrolink Station Interstate State Highway Main Road Water Alternate Routing Point of Interest Medical Facility 41 Welcome aboard the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), your community transportation provider. The RTA operates 46 bus routes to provide you with safe, cost-eective and reliable service in western Riverside County. We hope that this System Map is useful to you in planning your trip. Should you need additional information, please call the Customer Information Center at (951) 565-5002. (951) 565-5002 | www.RiversideTransit.com 13 Hunter Park/UCR Metrolink Station 52 Metrolink SYSTEM MAP © 2018 Riverside Transit Agency. Eective Date: May 13, 2018 MAP NOT TO SCALE SEE DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE DETAIL 23 79 County Center Drive 24 55 61 27 Cherry Hills & Bradley 40 61 74 8 Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Park And Ride 22 205 206 11 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 26 Sunline 220 31 208 210 18 Moreno Valley College 19 4120 20 MVMF Metrolink Station 26 Metrolink 61 South Perris Metrolink Station 74 208 Metrolink Riverside University Medical Center 3120 41 19 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity Dr & Ynez Rd Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Gold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 32 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 23 Mulligan’s Murrieta 202 205 206 LEGEND Stop Location Number Route Numbers NB=Northbound | SB=Southbound EB=Eastbound | WB=Westbound CW=Clockwise 1 10 200 200 200 200 200 2041414 14 22 22 22 22 50 50 50 29 29 49 49 49 208 212 210/SunLine 220 GOLD LINE GOLD LINE GOLD LINE 208 212 210/SunLine 220 1 15 13 13 13 10 10 10 12 12 13 10 10 12 12 20429 12 1315 15 15 54 54 54 54 54 54 1 1 1 Omnitrans 215 Omnitrans 215 Omnitrans 215 Omnitrans 215 ONE WAYONE WAYI H GCHESTNUT STFOURTEENTH ST FIFTEENTH ST THIRTEENTH ST TWELFTH ST ELEVENTH ST TENTH ST SIXTH ST SECOND ST FIFTH ST FOURTH ST THIRD ST NINTH ST MISSION INN AV UNIVERSITY AVORANGE STLEMON STLIME STMULBERRY STALMOND STMAIN STMain St MallMARKET STMARKET STMAGNOLIA AVFAIRMOUNT BLVDBROCKTON AVVINE STA B F E C D Riverside Community Hospital White Park Fox Performing Arts Center Hall of Justice Court-house Detention Center City Hall Convention Center Main Library Mission Inn CountyAdministrationCenter Riverside-DowntownMetrolink Stationv17-0418_v08/chart_Stop_Location_Chart_17-1212 91 91 91 91 1791 1754 1081 1080 1149 4608 4609 1082 3287 1150 3502 3503 1147 3919 1148 3574 3490 3491 3501 3489 1002 1001 1446 1445 1444 3496 OMNI 3498 3577 3493 3494 1085 1085 1085 1498 3575 18303506 3265 3258 3504 1448 1449 3824 1606 1790 208 210 212 SunLine 220 208 210 212 208 212210 208 212210 BUS STOP NUMBER ROUTES SERVED & DIRECTION 1754 Brockton & 14th 14EB 1791 Brockton & 14th 14WB 1790 Brockton & 10th 14WB 3506 Brockton & University 14WB 1830 University & Brockton 14EB, 22NB/SB 3258 Mission Inn & Brockton 49EB 3265 Mission Inn & Brockton 49WB 1 151 Magnolia & 14th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB, 50WB 1080 Magnolia & 15th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB, 50EB 1149 Market & 12th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 1082 Market & 12th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB 1147 Market & 10th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 3503 Market & 10th 13EB, 15EB 3576 University & Market 14WB, 22NB, 29EB/WB, 49EB/WB 3575 Market & University 12EB, 204NB 3504 Market & 6th 12WB, 29EB 1448 Market & 6th 12EB, 29WB 1606 Market & 4th 12WB 1449 Market & 3rd 12EB, 29WB 3574 University & Market 1EB, 12WB, 13EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 54CW, 204SB 3491 University & Market 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 1150 Orange & 12th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 1148 Orange & 10th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3490 Orange & University 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3287 Main & 12th 50EB/WB 1498 14th & Orange Grove 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 1445 Lemon & 14th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW 1446 Lemon & 12th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, 216EB/WB, SunLine 220EB/WB 1001 University & Lemon 1EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 54CW, 204SB, Omnitrans 215 1002 University & Lemon 10WB, 14WB, 15WB, 22NB, 204NB 3489 Lemon & University 10EB, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, 216EB/WB 3501 University & Lemon 1WB 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay G 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay H 1EB/WB, 15WB 3498 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay D 1EB 3499 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay D 1WB 3577 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay C 15EB/WB 3496 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay F 216EB/WB OMNI Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay E Omnitrans 215 3494 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay A 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB 3493 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay B 212EB/WB 3824 Market & 4th 29EB 3502 Market & 10th 1EB 3919 10th & Main 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay I 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, SunLine 220EB/WB 1444 14th & Lime 10EB, 13WB, 54CW BUS STOP NUMBER ROUTES SERVED & DIRECTION 1754 Brockton & 14th 14EB 1791 Brockton & 14th 14WB 1790 Brockton & 10th 14WB 3506 Brockton & University 14WB 1830 University & Brockton 14EB, 22NB/SB 3258 Mission Inn & Brockton 49EB 3265 Mission Inn & Brockton 49WB 1081 Magnolia & 14th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB, 50WB 1080 Magnolia & 15th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB, 50EB 1149 Market & 12th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 1082 Market & 12th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB 4608 Market & 12th Gold Line EB 4609 Market & 11th Gold Line WB 1147 Market & 10th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 3503 Market & 10th 13EB, 15EB 3575 Market & University 12EB, 204NB 3504 Market & 6th 12WB, 29EB 1448 Market & 6th 12EB, 29WB 1606 Market & 4th 12WB 1449 Market & 3rd 12EB, 29WB 3574 University & Market 1EB, 12WB, 13EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 29EB, 49EB, 54CW, 204SB 3491 University & Market 1WB, 13WB, 14WB, 15WB, 22NB, 29WB, 49WB 1150 Orange & 12th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB, 50WB 1148 Orange & 10th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3490 Orange & University 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3287 Main & 10th 50EB/WB 1498 14th & Orange Grove 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 1445 Lemon & 14th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 1446 Lemon & 12th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW, 200EB/WB, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 1001 University & Lemon Gold Line EB, 1EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 29EB, 49EB, 54CW, 204SB, Omnitrans 215 1002 University & Lemon 10WB, 14WB, 12EB, 15WB, 22NB, 29WB, 49WB, 204NB 3489 Lemon & University 10EB, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, 200EB/WB 3501 University & Lemon Gold Line WB, 1WB 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay G 29WB, 49WB, 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay H 1EB/WB, 15WB 3498 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay D 29EB/WB, 49EB/WB 3577 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay C 15EB/WB 3496 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay F 200EB/WB OMNI Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay E Omnitrans 215 3494 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay A 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 3493 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay B 1EB/WB 3824 Market & 4th 29EB 3502 Market & 10th 1EB 3919 10th & Main 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay I 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, SunLine 220EB/WB 1444 14th & Lime 10EB, 13WB, 54CW BUS STOP NUMBER ROUTES SERVED & DIRECTION 1754 Brockton & 14th 14EB 1791 Brockton & 14th 14WB 1790 Brockton & 10th 14WB 3506 Brockton & University 14WB 1830 University & Brockton 14EB, 22NB/SB 3258 Mission Inn & Brockton 49EB 3265 Mission Inn & Brockton 49WB 1081 Magnolia & 14th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB, 50WB 1080 Magnolia & 15th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB, 50EB 1149 Market & 12th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 1082 Market & 12th 1EB, 13EB, 15EB 4608 Market & 12th Gold Line EB 4609 Market & 11th Gold Line WB 1147 Market & 10th 1WB, 13WB, 15WB 3503 Market & 10th 13EB, 15EB 3575 Market & University 12EB, 204NB 3504 Market & 6th 12WB, 29EB 1448 Market & 6th 12EB, 29WB 1606 Market & 4th 12WB 1449 Market & 3rd 12EB, 29WB 3574 University & Market 1EB, 12WB, 13EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 29EB, 49EB, 54CW, 204SB 3491 University & Market 1WB, 13WB, 14WB, 15WB, 22NB, 29WB, 49WB 1150 Orange & 12th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB, 50WB 1148 Orange & 10th 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3490 Orange & University 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 3287 Main & 10th 50EB/WB 1498 14th & Orange Grove 10WB, 12WB, 13EB 1445 Lemon & 14th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 1446 Lemon & 12th 10EB, 12EB, 13WB, 54CW, 200EB/WB, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 1001 University & Lemon Gold Line EB, 1EB, 14EB, 15EB, 22SB, 29EB, 49EB, 54CW, 204SB, Omnitrans 215 1002 University & Lemon 10WB, 14WB, 12EB, 15WB, 22NB, 29WB, 49WB, 204NB 3489 Lemon & University 10EB, 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, 200EB/WB 3501 University & Lemon Gold Line WB, 1WB 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay G 29WB, 49WB, 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay H 1EB/WB, 15WB 3498 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay D 29EB/WB, 49EB/WB 3577 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay C 15EB/WB 3496 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay F 200EB/WB OMNI Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay E Omnitrans 215 3494 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay A 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB 3493 Vine & Metrolink Station Board at Bay B 1EB/WB 3824 Market & 4th 29EB 3502 Market & 10th 1EB 3919 10th & Main 54CW 1085 Inside Metrolink Station Board at Bay I 208NB/SB, 210EB/WB, 212EB/WB, SunLine 220EB/WB 1444 14th & Lime 10EB, 13WB, 54CW DOWNTOWN RIVERSIDE DETAIL 32 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Downtown University Linden Canyon Crest DrMission Inn A v e Lemon St14th St 12th St 11th St Market StIowa AveChicago AveMadison S t Central Ave Adams St Van Buren B l v d Tyler St La Sierra A v e Hole Ave McKinley St Mai n S tGrand BlvdMagnolia AveMagnolia AveArlington Ave UCR Parkview Community Hospital Riverside Plaza Cesar ChavezCommunityCenter University Village Marcy Library Central M.S. Riverside Community Hospital Kaiser Medical Center Corona City Hall Galleria at Tyler Chemawa M.S. Arlington Library Villegas M.S. Home Gardens Library Sherman Indian H.S. California Baptist University Ramona H.S. Riverside City College RIVERSIDE CORONA Stop Location NOTE: RapidLink buses serve these stops only. Legend | Map not to scale No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. RapidLink Gold Line Corona - Magnolia Ave - UCR GOLDLINE Gold Line 1 6th & Belle Corona Cruiser Blue, RedSixth StRouting and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Corona Park- And-Ride 91 91 91 Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 Gold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 27 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink 1 Magnolia & McKinley Gold Line Corona Cruiser Blue Gold Line 1 15 Magnolia & La Sierra Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line Hours of Service: BUSES DEPART EVERY 15 MINUTES. Monday – Friday only. 5:30-8:30 a.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m. GOLD LINE FREE RIDES JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 3 34 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Downtown 10 University A v e Mission Inn A v e Lemon St14th St Market StVine StMulberryIowa AveChicago AveCanyon Crest DrBlaine St 3rd St 9th Madison St Central Ave Adams St Van Bure n B l v d Tyler St La Sierra A v e Hole Ave McKinley St Mai n S t Grand Blv d Magnolia AveMagnolia AveArlington Ave 21 4 5 6 9 UCR Parkview Community Hospital Riverside Plaza Cesar ChavezCommunityCenter University Village Marcy Library Central M.S. Riverside Community Hospital Kaiser Medical Center Corona City Hall Galleriaat Tyler Chemawa M.S. Arlington Library Villegas M.S. Home Gardens Library Sherman Indian H.S. California Baptist University Ramona H.S. RiversideCity College Smith AveRailroad Business CntrCommercePomonaAuto Center RIVERSIDE CORONA 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale RTA and Corona Cruiser honor each other’s Day and 30-Day passes at shared stops. Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. UCR - Downtown Riverside - Corona1 Gold Line 1 6th & Main Corona Cruiser Blue, Red 1 6th & Smith Corona Cruiser Red 1 Brockton Arcade 10 14 15 Sixth StRiverside -Downtown MetrolinkStation West CoronaMetrolink Station Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 3 Corona Park- And-Ride Long-term Detour Routing 91 91 91 8 7 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 1 Magnolia & 15th 13 15 50 1 10 14 51 52 Iowa & Blaine 11 Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 1 Magnolia & McKinley Gold Line Corona Cruiser Blue Gold Line 1 15 Magnolia & La Sierra Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 Gold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 27 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink 42 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 6th StHamner Ave5th St 4th St « Lampton Ln 3rd St 3rd St Clark2nd St Ontario Ave Main StBelleMagnolia Ave 10th St W. Grand NorcoCollege Post Oce Norco City Hall Norco CityHall Corona Senior Center DMV North Main Plaza CoronaTransitCenter Corona MallLibrary Corona Regional Medical Center DPSS Norco Library Eastvale Gateway Vernola Marketplace Eleanor Roosevelt H.S. Harada Heritage Park River Heights I.S. 15 15 91 91 NORCO EASTVALE CORONA Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Eastvale - Norco - Corona3 3 Main & Parkridge Corona Cruiser Blue 3 29 Limonite & Hamner 3 29 Amazon Eastvale 1 Main & 6th 3 68th St Goodman WayGoodman WayCitrus St Cantu-Galleano Ranch Sumner AvePats Ranch Rd« Limonite Ave Town & Country Dr 3 Belle & 10th Corona Cruiser Blue, Red 1 3 W Grand & 6th RTA and Corona Cruiser honor each other’s Day and 30-Day passes at shared stops. 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Weekdays Only Legend | Map not to scale Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Corona Park- And-RideW. Grand Blvd 8th St 6th St 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Hamner AveGold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 27 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink 46 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Lake Elsinore - Wildomar Loop Routes8 G r a n d A v e P a l om a r S t Central St »Corydon RdL a k e s h o r e D r C o l l i e r A v e Li n c o l n Lakes h o r e D r Chaney Main »Pot t e r y Gra h a m Summerhill DrMission TrMachado StRiverside DrOrtega Hwy G r a p e S t Malaga R d Baldwin Blvd 15 Chase Bank Chase Bank LAKE ELSINORE 15 8 Walmart 40 8 Palomar & Central 231Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Railroad Canyon Rd Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Lakeside Library David A Brown M.S. Lakeland Village M.S. Mission Trail Library Post Oce Lakeside H.S. Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Walmart LAKE ELSINORE WILDOMAR « C l o c k w i s e | C o u n t e r - c l o c k w i s e »« Clockwise | Counter-clockwise »Served first before Canyon Estate Dr loop 8 7 64 3 2 1 74 74 8 Outlet Center 22 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 5 50 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Vi c t o r i a A v e « WB Only EB » EB Onl y Mission Inn Ave University Ave 14th St10th St Van Bure n B l v d Jackson St Madison St Blaine StCentral AveArlington AveMagnol ia AveMagnolia AveLincoln AveVictor ia Ave3rd StUCR Fox Theater John North H.S. Riverside Sports Complex RTA M t V e r n o n A v e Io w a A v e Watkins « Big Springs RdHorac e Cridge StOrangeLemon Galleriaat Tyler Arlington H.S. Van Buren Drive-In Arlington Library Poly H.S. Notre Dame H.S. Marcy Library Riverside City College Riverside Plaza BrocktonArcade Calif. Sch. for Deaf Gage M.S. Casa Blanca Library RIVERSIDE Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Big Springs & Watkins - Downtown Riverside - Galleria at Tyler10 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 1 Brockton Arcade 10 14 15 Eu c a l y p t u s A v e Park Ave Ch i c a g o A v e 215 215 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Alternate Routing Target 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 7W 7E 60 91 9110 Orange & 10th 12 13 1 51 10 52 14 Iowa & Blaine Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 54 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY City Hall Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Moreno Valley Mall - March ARB Loop Route11 Ironwood Ave Sunnymead Blvd Eucalyptus Ave Cottonwood Ave « Counter-clockwise | Clockwise » « Clockwise | Counter-clockwise » Hemlock Ave JFK DrMeyer Dr Cactus Ave Alessandro Blvd Towngate BlvdTown Cir »He r i t a g e Heacock StPerris BlvdPerris BlvdIndian StFrederick StPigeon Pass RdRiverside Dr6th StCenterpoi n t D r Sunnymead M.S. Riverside County Superior Court Badger Springs M.S. Moreno Valley H.S. Post Oce Kaiser Medical Oces Moreno Valley Mall March ARB MORENO VALLEY 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 11 Heacock & Cottonwood 18 11 Alessandro & Heacock 20 11 Frederick & Alessandro 20 11 Heacock & Sunnymead 19 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 601 2 3 4 5 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 58 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Market StArlington Ave California AveHar r i son S tWells AveLa S i e r r a A v e Magnolia AveMagnoliaPi e r c e S t Sterling AveJurupa Ave Streeter AveEli z a b e t h S tMain S t Orange StOrange StColumbia Center St Garner Rd Alamo StRivera StStephens AveOrangeLemonLimeW La CadenaUniv. Ave 10th St Olivewood Ave14th St M e r c e d D r Janet Goeske Ctr. Juvenile Hall Kaiser Hospital SalvationArmy Riverside County Administrative Center Riverside Hall of Justice Fox Theater Ruth Lewis Community Center/Reid Park Galleria at Tyler CASA RiversideCounty Mental Health La Sierra University CountyFarm Rd Russell St Primer StInterchange 1st St Riverside City College » Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. La Cadena & Stephens - Downtown Riverside - Merced & Magnolia12 12 Streeter & Arlington 15 10 Orange & 10th 12 13 1 Merced & Magnolia 12 15 12 Van Buren & California 21 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale 1 Magnolia & Elizabeth 12 13 14 15 20 Pierce StTyl e r S t Ri v e r w a l k P kw y Hole Ave Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 9 10 1 3 2 4 5 6 7 8W 8E 60 91 91 91 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 62 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Magnolia AveMarket StMagnolia AveKidd StC h i c a g o A v e L em o n S t O r a n g e S t3rd St.Massachusetts Ave R u s t i n K a n s a s A v e Blaine St14th St / MLK Blvd 10th St Spruce StMarlborough V a n B u r e n B l v dColorado AveWells AveTy l e r S tGouldStCr e s t A v e M o n r o e S t Arlington AveArlington AveP h o e n i x A v eCentral AveUniversity AveGalleria at Tyler DPSS Sierra M.S. RTA Library Stratton Community CenterRiverside County Administrative Center Riverside City Hall Post Oce Norte Vista H.S. Wells M.S. Riverside City College Riverside Airport Walmart Riverside Community Hospital John North H.S. 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale RIVERSIDE Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hunter Park Metrolink Station - Downtown Riverside - Galleria at Tyler13 Riverside Plaza Central M.S. 1 Magnolia & 15th 13 15 50 1 Market & 10th 13 15 13 Iowa & Spruce 14 51 52 13 Hunter Park Metrolink Station 52 Metrolink 13 Arlington & Monroe 15 13 Colorado & Van Buren 21 13 Arlington & Tyler 15 Eastbound Westbound EBOnly WB Only Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Hunter Park Metrolink Station 5 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 10 Orange & 10th 12 13 Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 66 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY SAN BER NARDI N O COUNT YRIVERSIDE CO U NT Y Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Galleria at Tyler - Downtown Riverside - Loma Linda VA Hospital14 RIVERSIDE California School for the Deaf Riverside Community Hospital Riverside Medical Center Riverside Plaza DMV Madison St Galleria at Tyler 1 Brockton Arcade 10 14 15 Tyl e r S t Indiana AveBrockton AveBro c k t o nMagnolia Iowa Ave Center StBarton RdBarton Rd Mt Ve rnon AveAnder son BentonProspect G R A N D T E R R A C E H I G H G R O V E L O M A L I N D A Loma Linda University Hospital University Village Cesar Chavez Community Center VA Hospital Loma Linda VA Hospital Omnitrans 2, 19, 325, SBX14 3rd St/Blai n e St 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Loma Linda University Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios.RTA does not serve Mt Vernon Ave or Barton Rd except at Loma Linda hospitals. Omnitrans Route 325 serves Michigan Ave and Barton Rd. 14 Center & Michigan Omnitrans 325 4W4E Market StUniversity A v e 1 2 3 5 6 7 14 22 University & Brockton 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 Jurupa 1 51 10 52 14 Iowa & Blaine Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 70 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Downtown Riverside - Merced & Magnolia15 Hole Ave Sterling AvePierc e S t » Tyl e r S t Tyl e r S t V a n B u r e n B l v d Van B u r e n B l v d S t r e e t e r A v e Arlingto n Ave Arlingto n Ave Ma g n o l i a A v e 14th St Univ. Ave Sunnyside Dr » Mo n r o e S t Ad a m s S t Ma d i s o n S tMa r k e t S t V i n e S t California AveIndiana AveRiverside Airport Norte Vista H.S. La Sierra Senior Center Loma Vista M.S. La Sierra University La Sierra H.S. Arizona M.S. Hillcrest H.S. Kaiser Hospital Riverside Community Hospital Central M.S. Marcy Library La Sierra Metrolink Station Galleria at Tyler RIVERSIDE LA SIERRA Arlington Square 15 21 Arlington & Van Buren 12 La Sierra & Hole/Pierce 15 15 200 La Sierra Metrolink Station OCTA 794 12 Arlington & Streeter 15 13 15 Arlington & Monroe Riverside Plaza Riverside City Hall 1 Magnolia & 15th 13 15 50 1 Brockton Arcade 10 14 15 Mer c e d D r Riverside City College 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Alternate Routing Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios.Magnolia AveMagnolia AveLa S i e r r a A v e 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Riverside -Downtown MetrolinkStation 91 91 91 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 Gold Line 1 15 Magnolia & La Sierra Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 2 76 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY TOWN C IR SYCAM O R E C Y N B L V D 3 1 2 215 215 215 60 60 T O W N G AT E B L VD1 1 1 1 16 16 16 1 16 16 11 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 MorenoValley Mall CANYON CREST DR CANYON CREST DR BLAINE STLINDEN STUNIVERSITY AVECANYONCREST DR IOWA AVE IOWA AVEUNIVERSITY AVELINDEN STEUCALYPTUS AVEHERITAGE WAY CanyonSpringsPlaza Target Canyon CrestTowne Center UCR BannockburnVillage MobilGas Station C E N T R A L A V E DAY ST Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Moreno Valley Mall to UCR16 LOCHMOOR DR 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point Legend | Map not to scale Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 1 University at University Village 16 52 BOX SPRINGS RD1WB University Village 16WB 1EB UCR at Bannockburn 16EB WHERE TO TRANSFER BETWEEN ROUTES 1 & 16 MORENO VALLEY RIVERSIDE Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 84 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Sunnymead Ranch Pkwy NB ONLY SB ONLYManzanita Ave « Centerpoint Dr Towngate AveHe r i t a g e W y Perris BlvdPerris BlvdPigeon Pass RdFrederick StHeacock StHeacock StGraham StLasselle StLasselle StKitching StCottonwood Ave Cottonwood Ave JFK Dr Iris Ave » Gentian Ave Krameria » Canyon Springs H.S. Vista Heights M.S. Moreno Valley College Moreno Valley Mall Vista Verde M.S. Vista Del Lago H.S. Moreno Valley H.S. Badger Springs M.S. MORENO VALLEY 18 Perris & Alessandro 19 20 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Northbound Only Legend | Map not to scale 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 1 2 5 6 3 1A 4S4N 60 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Sunnymead Ranch - Moreno Valley Mall - Moreno Valley College18 11 18 Cottonwood & Frederick 11 18 Cottonwood & Heacock Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. SUNNYMEAD RANCH Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 88 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Alessandro Blvd Iris Ave Sunnymead BlvdTown Cir Frederick StC StE San Jacinto Ave W 4th St« Lasselle StKrameria Ave Orange Ave Nuevo Rd Jarvis StPerris BlvdPerris BlvdHeacock StWebster AveIndian AveMORENO VALLEY PERRIS Moreno Valley Mall March Mountain H.S. Badger Springs M.S. Perris Fairgrounds Moreno Valley College Perris Station Transit Center Perris H.S. Perris City Hall Val Verde H.S. Perris 10 Theater Perris Valley Spectrum1Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale Ramona Expy Morgan St Ross/Lowe’s / Starcrest 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 19 Perris & Ramona Expy 41 19 Perris & Nuevo 27 30 18 Moreno Valley College 2019 41 18 Perris & Alessandro 19 20 11 Sunnymead & Heacock 19 Centerpoint Dr Kindred Hospital Riverside Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Trumble Rd at EXCEED Trumbe RdWalmart 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 74 215 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Moreno Valley Mall to Perris Station Transit Center - Trumble Rd19 19 Ross/Lowe's/Starcrest 41 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 96 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Day St Mission Grove Pkwy Frederick St Trautwein Rd « Magnolia Ave « Brockton Ave Indian St Perris Blvd Kitching St Peninsula Ct Lasselle St Nason St Victoria Ave Alessandro BlvdJurupa AveCentral AveElizabeth StAlessandro BlvdMoreno Beach Dr RIVERSIDE MORENO VALLEY Mission Grove Plaza Moreno Valley City Hall Post Oce Moreno Valley School District Moreno Valley Library Poly H.S. Riverside Plaza DMV Kaiser Permanente Hospital Moreno Valley College Moreno Valley/March Field Metrolink Station Mission Grove at Social Security RUMC Krameria AveIris AveIris Ave215 18 Moreno Valley College 19 20 41 1 Magnolia & Elizabeth 12 13 14 15 20 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate routing Legend | Map not to scale 5 6 7 810 9 4 3 2 1 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Magnolia & Elizabeth - Metrolink - RUMC - Kaiser Permanente - MoVal College20 20 Mission Grove at Social Security 22 26 20 MVMF Metrolink Station 26 Metrolink 10 Central & Victoria 20 Riverside University Medical Center 3120 41 18 Perris & Alessandro 19 20 11 Alessandro & Frederick 20 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 102 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Marlay Ave San Sevaine Wy Ben Nevis Blvd Cherry Ave Tyler St »Etiwanda AveFelspar StMagnolia Av eCalifornia AveBanana AveMulberry AveCountryVillage RdV a n B u r e n B l v d RIVERSIDE PEDLEY GLEN AVON FONTANA JURUPA VALLEY Galleria at Tyler Pedley Metrolink Station Walmart Arlington Library Riverside County Animal Control Jurupa Valley H.S.Mira Loma M.S. Glen Avon Library Country Village 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Arlington Ave Limonite Ave Clay StJurupa Rd Mission Blvd SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY RIVERSIDE COUNTY 21 Etiwanda & Limonite 29 15 Arlington & Van Buren 21 12 California & Van Buren 21 21 Country Village 49 204 21 49 Banana & Cherry Omnitrans 82 Archer StCollins St1 2 4 3N3S 60 21 Limonite & Archer/Collins 29 Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 5 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Galleria at Tyler to Country Village / Fontana21 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 106 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY T r au tw e in RdWood RdParsonsChicago AveFairmountBrocktonTheda StAlexander StMarkham St Alessandro Blvd A l e s s a n d r o B l v d Mi s s i o n Gr o v e Pk w y Nichols Rd Oleander Ave Clark StOld Elsinore Rd Van Buren » Mariposa NB SB Cajalco Rd Rider St Central Ave Nav a j o R d C St4th St SanJacinto Ave Mission Inn Univ. Ave Ellis Ave 15 RIVERSIDE WOODCREST MEAD VALLEY PERRIS LAKE ELSINORE Martin Luther King H.S. Perris City Hall Senior Center Mead Valley LibraryCitrus Hill H.S. Target Social Security Oce Mission Grove Plaza Riverside City Hall Post Oce LakeElsinoreOutletCenter 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Meadowbrook Ave « Collier AveGreenwald Ave20 Mission Grove at Social Security 22 26 22 Trautwein & Van Buren 27 Perris Station Transit Center 14 22 University & Brockton 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 910 8 Outlet Center 22 Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Information Center Web Site 1-800-800-7821 www.RiversideTransit.com Downtown Riverside - Perris Station - Lake Elsinore Outlet Center22 22 41 Clark & Cajalco Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Metrolink 74 74 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. 22 51 Chicago & Central Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 110 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 15 15 15 Eq u i t y D r Whitewood Rd Whitewood Rd Je e r s o n A v eHayes AveMa d i s o n A v eWa s h i n g t o n A v e Priel i p p R d Jackson Ave Kalmia St Juniper St Night Hawk Wy Vineyard Pkwy Inland Valley DrYnez RdMargarita RdYnez RdHancockWinchester RdCountyCenter DrNutmeg St Li n c o l n A v e SkyviewRidgeAveArconteCalif. Oaks RdCalif. Oaks Rd Nicolas R d Mu r r i e t a H o t S p r i n g s R d Murrieta Hot Springs Rd 215 Grace Mellman Community Library Grace Mellman Community Library Alternate Routing 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Temecula - Murrieta - Wildomar23 Los Alamos Rd Murrieta City Hall & Senior Center Post Oce Murrieta Town Center Wildomar City Hall Rancho Springs Medical Center Walmart Promenade Mall Chaparral High School Rancho Temecula Town Center Vista Murrieta High School Murrieta Valley High School Inland Valley Medical Center 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 23 61 Hancock & Los Alamos 23 208 Los Alamos & Whitewood 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity & Ynez AltaMurrieta DrClinton Keith Rd Cli n t o n K e i t h R d Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. TEMECULA MURRIETA WILDOMARHidden Springs »Palomar »Grand»« Catt Gruwell « Central 8 23 Palomar & Central 10 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 79 9 23 Mulligan’s Murrieta 202 205 206 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 114 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY TEMECULA 15 15 Eq u i t y D rYnez RdYn e z R dYnez RdYnez RdMargarita RdMa r g a r i t a R d . Margarita RdCounty Center DrWinchester R d Solana Wy 6th St Old Town Front StPujol StJeerson AveMe r c e d e s S t Pauba Rd DePortola Temecula Pkwy Deer Hollo w Wy Pec h a n g a P k w y Rancho California Rd Rancho Vista 1st Main St Tower Plaza Chaparral HS Margarita M.S. Temecula Library Great Oak H.S. Birdsall Sports Park Palomar Village Temecula Valley H.S. Temecula E.S. Town Ctr.Target Pechanga Resort Walmart Temecula Valley Hospital Promenade MallPalm Plaza Riverside County Assessor Grace Mellman Community Library Post Oce Temecula Stage Stop Old Town Temecula City Hall Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. County Center - Pechanga Resort - Temecula Valley Hospital24 Overland TrlVail Ranch Pkwy Red Hawk Pkwy 24 Temecula Stage Stop 79 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale « Peppercorn Dr 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity Dr & Ynez Rd Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios.Do n a L y n o r a 79 79 791 2 3 4 5 6 7 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 118 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Moreno Valley Mall Walmart Supercenter Mission Grove Plaza MORENO VALLEY RIVERSIDE ORANGECREST No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Moreno Valley Metrolink Station to Orangecrest and Moreno Valley Mall26 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Alessandro Blvd Me r i d i a n P kw y Van B u r e n B l v d Orange Terrace PkwyTrautwein Rd « Mission Grove Pkwy Sycamore Canyon BlvdEucalyptus Ave Valley SpringsPkwyCorporateCentre PlCampus Pkwy Town Cir Day StTowngate AveHeritage Way » 215 215 Moreno Valley/March Field Metrolink Station20 Mission Grove at Social Security 22 26 26 Orange Terrace & Van Buren 27 20 MVMF Metrolink Station 26 Metrolink EAST LOOP WEST LOOP 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 3 2 1 60 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 120 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY NB ONLYSB ONLY215 215 Ramona Expy SUN CITY VALLE VISTA HEMET PERRIS ROMOLAND RIVERSIDE WOODCREST Galleria at Tyler MLK High School « Grant Ave « Lincoln Ave Leon Rd Lyon Ave Wood Rd Gilmore St Sun City Blvd « Bradley Rd Kirby St Sherman Rd Jackson AveEthanac Rd »MatthewsPerris Blvd « Trautwein Rd Washington St C St »FloridaCherryHills BlvdMcCall BlvdDevonshire4th StSan Jacinto »Nuevo RdVan Buren AveMagnoliaVan Buren AveVan Buren Blvd Tyler St OrangeTerracePkwyPalmAve »Hemet Valley Mall 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing when school is in session Legend | Map not to scale 22 27 Trautwein & Van Buren 26 27 Orange Terrace & Van Buren 27 Cherry Hills & Bradley 40 61 74 Perris High School Sun City Library Heritage High School Hemet City Hall Valle Vista Library Riverside National Cemetery Orange Terrace Community Center Van Buren Drive-In Theater California Citrus State Historic Park 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 2N 2S 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 91 74 19 Perris & Nuevo 27 30 SB SB» NB»NB»«NB «SB «SBGold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Galleria at Tyler - Perris Station - Hemet Valley Mall - Florida & Lincoln27 Perris Station Transit Center Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 126 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Hamner Ave Goodman Way« Goodman WayPedley Rd Camino Real Collins St Limonite AveL im o n i t e A v e Ri v e r v i e w D r Pacifi c A v e Van Buren Bl v d 42nd St/Tilton AveMission Bl v d 24th St24th StHa l l A v e Rubidou x B lvd RIVERSIDE PEDLEY EASTVALE JURUPA VALLEY Jurupa 14 Cinemas Rubidoux H.S. Post Oce Fairmount ParkFox Theater De Anza Plaza Eastvale Gateway Vernola Marketplace Jurupa Valley/ Pedley Metrolink Station 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Market St Vine StUniversity21 Limonite & Archer/Collins 29 3 Limonite & Hamner 29 21 Etiwanda & Limonite 29 29 Rubidoux & Mission 49 Alternate Routing Archer St Etiwanda Ave 2 1 4 5 6 7 3E 3W RUBIDOUX 3 29 Amazon EastvaleCantu-Galleano RanchSunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Downtown Riverside - Eastvale29 Eastbo u n d Westbo u n d Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 60 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 130 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 19 Perris & Nuevo 27 30 30 Evans & Rider 41 215 215Perris Blvd Perris Blvd Perris Blvd Redlands AveWi l k e r s o n A v e Ramona Expy Orange Ave Dunlap DrBradleyCitrus Ave Rider Walnut « ShermanMay Ranch Morgan St Evans RdEl NidoNuevo Rd Diana StCarter DrWeston Rd Na v a j o R d 4th St 4th St Redlands AveGoetz RdCase RdD StA StC StRuby Dr7th St 11th St Ellis Ave San Jacinto Ave San Jacinto PERRIS MAY RANCH Perris H.S. Perris Senior Center Perris City Hall Post Oce Library 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale No service on Sundays or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Perris Station - Weston & Carter (West Loop) - May Ranch (East Loop)30 Perris Blvd & Case Rd / 11th St 30 74 Walmart Orange Vista HS Lakeside MS Perris Station Transit Center WB WB ONLY EB WB Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Metrolink EASTLOOP WEST LOOP 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 1 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5A 5B 74 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 134 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FRUITVALE AVEBEAU M O N T A V E GILMAN SPRINGS RDHEMET SAN JACINTO MORENO VALLEY Mt. San JacintoCollege HemetValleyMall 31 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 74 212 217 31 Buena Vista & Devonshire 33 City Hall HemetUnifiedSchoolDistrictRiverside CountyCourthouseWorkforceDevelopmentSan Jacinto H.S.SuperWalmart27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 33 42 74 79 212 217 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 10 10 74 79 60 60 4 6 5 7 8 9 10 1 23STATE ST LYON AVE GILMORE ST » »DEVONSHIRE AVEFLORIDA AVEBUENAVISTA ST GILBERT LATHAM AVEACACIA AVEACACIA AVEMAYBERRYPALMAVECENTRAL AVERAMONA EXPY1ST ST2ND STSUNLAKE SBLVD HIGHLANDSPRINGS AVE « COMMERCE WAY «NB SB» Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Shared Stops: RTA and Pass Transit honor each others Day and 30-Day passes at shared stops. Hemet Valley Mall - San Jacinto - Beaumont / Banning - Moreno Valley Mall31 BEAUMONT/BANNINGMoreno Valley Mall Sun Lakes Village RUMC Senior Center Moreno Valley Senior Center 19 31 MOR E N O BEAC H D R Super Walmart Stoneridge Towne Centre 31 Sun Lakes at Village Pass Transit 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 31 210 Beaumont Walmart Pass Transit SunLine 220 Riverside University Medical Center 3120 41 FREDERICK ST PERRIS BLVD KITCHING STEUCALYPTUS AVEFIR AVENASON ST AUTO MALL PKWY CENTERPOINT DR11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 138 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Hewitt StMistletoe Ave »LasRosas RdVillines AveEvans St San Jacinto AveSan JacintoState StState StBuena Vista StLyon AveLyon AveKirby StCommonwealth Ave Esplanade Ave Devonshire Ave Latham Ave Florida Ave Mayberry Ave Central JuanitaMenlo Ave Stetson Thornton Ave 7th St Sagecrest Dr Main St Main St De A n z a D r Idyl l w i l d D r Acacia AveGilmore St« Gilbert StRa m o n a B l v d Ramona Expy HEMET SAN JACINTO Mt. San Jacinto College Acacia M.S. San Jacinto City HallMonte Vista M.S. San Jacinto Senior Center North Mountain M.S. San Jacinto H.S. Regal San Jacinto Metro 12 Super Walmart DPSSHemet Valley Medical Center Hemet Valley Mall Hemet City Hall Hemet Unified School District 32 San Jacinto & Latham 33 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hemet Valley Mall - Mt. San Jacinto College32 32 Esplanade & San Jacinto 42 74 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 31 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 74 212 217 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Alternate Routing Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 8 9 7 5 6 1 2 3 4 7474 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 142 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Hemet H.S. Hemet Valley Medical CenterDPSS Simpson Senior Center Dartmouth M.S. HemetValleyMall Super Walmart Target Social Security Oce Thornton AveAcacia AveW Johnston AveOakland AveOakland AveAcacia AveDevonshire Ave »Devonshire AveFlorida AveFlorida AveStetson AveStetson AveStetson AveThornton AveMayberry AveMenlo AveFruitvale AveWen tw o r th D r Cawston Ave Sanderson Ave San Jacinto StSan Jacinto St Columbia St Dartmouth St Stanford St Sanderson Ave S Lyon AveLyon Ave Gilbert St Lyon Ave State St Buena Vista St » State St Gilmore St Kirby St HEMET EAST HEMET 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 27 Florida & Stanford 33 27 Florida & San Jacinto 32 33 33 Sanderson & Thornton 74 79 32 San Jacinto & Oakland 33 74 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hemet Valley Mall - Sanderson & Thornton - Stanford & Stetson33 3E 3W 4 2 1 74 79 74 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 144 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 15 215 215 Railroad Canyon Rd « Murrieta Rd Bradley Rd Evans Rd La Piedra RdGoetz Rd Canyon Hills RdNewport RdCanyon Lake DrDiamond DrGrape St »Cherry HillsSun CityMcCall R a i l r o a d C a n y o n R d MENIFEE SUN CITY LAKE ELSINORE CANYON LAKE QUAIL VALLEY 8 Walmart 40 Quail Valley Fire Station Kay Ceniceros Senior Center Menifee City Hall Sun City Library Main Gate WalmartC A N Y O NL A K E 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Lake Elsinore - Canyon Lake - Quail Valley - Sun City/Menifee40 Canyon Lake City Hall Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 27 Cherry Hills & Bradley 40 61 74 4 3 2 1 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 146 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Ramona Expy Gentian Ave Iris Ave Krameria Ave Via De Anza JFK Dr Cactus Ave Rider St Oakwood St Rider St H a r v i l l A v e Evans RdCajalco Rd. MORENO VALLEY 215 Perris BlvdNason StLasselle StWebster AveIndian AveSeaton RdClark StDay StBrown StHaines StEvans RdPERRISCajalco ExpyMead Valley Community Center Ross/Lowe’s/ Starcrest RUMC Moreno Valley College Morgan St MEAD VALLEY Starcrest Rancho Verde H.S. Val Verde H.S. Vista Del Lago H.S. Ross Lowe's 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Mead Valley Community Center - Moreno Valley College - RUMC41 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 3 4 5 6 7 2 1 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 19 Perris & Ramona Expy 41 19 Ross/Lowe's/Starcrest 41 22 41 Cajalco & Clark 18 Moreno Valley College 2019 41 Lasselle StRiverside University Medical Center 3120 41 30 Evans & Rider 41 150 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Soboba Springs Mobile Home Estates No service on Sundays or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hemet Valley Mall - San Jacinto - Soboba Casino42 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Cottonwood AveEnterprise Ave »« Birch StRamona Expy Soboba Rd E Main StLake Park DrW Devonshire AveFlorida AveEsplanade AveSta t e S t Pal m A v eGrand AveN L y o n A v e Kir b y S t Sa n J a c i n t o A v e Sa n J a c i n t o A v e He w i t t S t Sa n t a F e A v e Mis t l e t o e A v e » Sta t e S t 7th St7th StMenlo AveSoboba Casino Hemet Valley Mall 32 San Jacinto & Esplanade 42 74 HEMET SAN JACINTO 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale San Jacinto Community Center Super Walmart Riverside County Child Support Services EXCEED San Jacinto City Hall 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 2E 2W 3 4 5 6 1 74 154 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Vi n e S t R u b i d o u x B l v d Pa c i fi c A v e M a r k e t Mission BlvdSan Sevaine WyBen Nevis BlvdMission BlvdMission InnUniversityPedley Rd Felspar S t Pyrite St Camino Real Valley W y Cr e s t m o r e R d Juru p a R d CountryVillage RdMarlay AveCherry AveMulberry Ave Banana Ave RIVERSIDE GLEN AVON JURUPA VALLEY Eddie Smith Senior Center Fox Theater Louis Robidoux Library The Cove Waterpark Glen Avon Heritage Park DPSS Patriot H.S. Country Village 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scaleSAN BERNARDINO COUNTYRIVERSIDE COUNTY29 Mission & Rubidoux 49 21 Country Village 49 204 21 49 Omnitrans 82 Banana & Cherry Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 1 2 3 4 RUBIDOUX 5 Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Downtown Riverside - Country Village / Fontana49 60 60 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 158 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 15th St 14th St. 10th St. 12th St. 11th St. Terracina Dr Ramona DrBrockton AveMagnolia AveMarket StMain St »RIVE R S IDE Riverside County Court House Riverside Community Hospital County Administration CenterRiverside Hall of Justice Riverside Family Law Courthouse Calvary Presbyterian Church Parking Lot (nearest stop 14th & Magnolia) Riverside City College Central M.S. Riverside City Hall Eden Lutheran Church First United Methodist Church of Riverside Jury Trolley50 1 13 15 50 Magnolia & Terracina E/B 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Bus Stop Legend | Map not to scale Runs Monday – Thursday Only. No service on Fridays, weekends or: New Year's Day, MLK Day, Lincoln's Birthday, President’s Day, Washington's Birthdays, Cesar Chavez Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day. Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 1 4 3 2 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 1 13 15 50 Magnolia & 14th W/B 1 13 15 50 Magnolia & 15th E/BOrange St 160 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day or days when school is not in session. Crest Cruiser UCR - Canyon Crest Towne Centre51 215 UCR Canyon CrestTowne Centre Village TowersApartments Riverside Sports Complex Lot 4 University Village Bannockburn Village Riverside County Workforce Center Stater Brothers Post Oce Food 4 Less Bank of America Library Rite-Aid Citibank Andulka Park Ralph's Rite-Aid Post Oce Allie's Hallmark 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Stop Legend | Map not to scale MLK Blv d MLK Blv d Vassar St Monte Vis t a D r Via Puebl o Blaine St Universit y A v . Spruce S t Wa t k i n s D r Central A v e Iowa AveChicago AveChicago AveEl Cerrito DrCanyon Crest DrCanyon Crest DrW Campus DrCanyon Crest Dr16 51 208 210 212 SunLine 220 UCR Lot 30 University Village & Village Towers Apts 1 14 16 51 52 22 51 Chicago & Central 16 51 Canyon Crest Towne Centre RIVERSIDE S S S S S S S S S S Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 1 2 3 5 6 7 60 4 1 51 10 52 14 Iowa & Blaine Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 162 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Regency Theatres University Plaza Apartments University Village Towers Riverside Sports Center RIVERSIDE No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hunter Park Metrolink Station to UCR52 Hunter Park Metrolink Station UCR Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Marlborough Ave Spruce St Blaine St Linden St Massachusetts Ave University Ave Rustin AveCanyon Crest DrIowa AveIowa Ave215 1 University at University Village 16 52 1 2 60 University Village & Village Towers Apts 1 14 16 51 52 13 Hunter Park Metrolink Station 52 Metrolink 1 51 10 52 14 Iowa & Blaine Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 164 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY No service on weekends or: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Downtown Riverside Metrolink Shuttle54 Lemon StOrange StMain StMarket StLime StVine StMiss i o n I n n A v e Univ e r s i t y A v e 14th S t 10th S t 9th S t 12th S t Riverside -Downtown Metrolink Station EVERYONE RIDESFREE Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas designadas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Riverside CountyAdministrationCenter 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 RIVERSIDEMission Inn Hotel & Spa Post Oce U.S. District Court S S S 91 91 1 2 3 4 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Stop Legend | Maps not to scale S 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 166 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. 55 Winchester RdOverland Dr 15 Chaparral H.S. Costco Rancho Temecula Town Center Ysabel Barnett E.S. Abbot Laboratories Extended Stay America Best Western HARVESTON Palm Plaza Shopping Center TEMECULA MotorCarPkwy The Promenade at Temecula Grace Mellman Community Library Overland Dr Winchester RdDate StCounty Center Dr Equity Dr Yn e z R d Nicol a s R d Ynez RdY n e z R d Harveston DrHarvestonSchool RdRustic Glen Dr Harveston D r Harveston WyVillage RdLa k e v i e w R d Ma r g a r i t a R d « Township Rd 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity Dr & Ynez Rd Stop Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Promenade Mall - Harveston EVERYONE RIDESFREE S S S S S S S S Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios.Does not operate June 11 through August 14, 2018. 1 2 3 4 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 « N General Kearny Rd « Campos Verdes Ln Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 168 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY 215 215 15 15 215 215 MSJC Menifee Menifee City Hall Sun City Library Countryside Marketplace Target Vista Murrieta H.S. Temecula Promenade Mall Rancho Springs Medical Center Loma Linda University Medical Center Newport RdEvans Rd »Bradley Rd »Los Alamos RdWhitewood RdLos Alamos RdMurrieta Hot Springs Rd Murrieta Hot Springs RdWinchester RdWinchester RdJe e r s o n A v eHancockAve Margarita R dMa r g a r i t a R d YnezRdCountyCenter Dr Scott Rd « Gladiolus Ave La Piedra Rd La Piedra Rd Keller Rd » Mapleton St » Clinton Keith Rd Linnel Ln McElwain RdPo i n s e t t i a S t Baxte r R d Domenigoni Pkwy McCall Blvd Bon n i e Murrieta RdAntelope RdMenifee RdWhitewood Rd« Encanto DrBradley Rd »Sun C ityBlvdSUN CITY MENIFEE MURRIETA TEMECULA 23 Los Alamos & Hancock 61 61 MSJC Menifee 74 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity & Ynez Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 27 Cherry Hills & Bradley 40 61 74 61 South Perris Metrolink Station 74 208 Metrolink 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 No service on Sundays or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. South Perris Metrolink Station, Sun City/Menifee - Murrieta - Temecula61 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 79 79 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 172 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY State St San Jacinto Ave Lyon Ave Gilmore St Warren Rd Sanderson Ave Winchester Rd Antelope Rd » Menifee Rd »RohrabacherBradley Rd Sun City Blvd Perris Blvd C St D om e n i g o n i P kw yDomenigoni PkwyKirby StRamona BlvdOakland AveDevonshire AveLatham AveMcCall BlvdChambers AveEthanac RdMurrieta RdCase Rd11th StEllis« Goetz San Jacinto AveCherry Hills BlvdNewport RdLa Piedra RdNewport RdFlorida AveMustang WySimpson RdMt. San Jacinto College Mt. San Jacinto College/ Menifee Hemet Valley Mall Sun City Library West Valley H.S. Post Oce Menifee Valley Medical Center Perris City HallMenifee Countryside Marketplace Menifee Community Center and Park Super Walmart DPSS San Jacinto H.S. San Jacinto Senior Center Super Walmart 215 SUN CITY MENIFEE HEMET WINCHESTER SAN JACINTO PERRIS Westbound only Eastbound only 61 MSJC Menifee 74 32 San Jacinto & Esplanade 42 74 74 Simpson & Winchester 79 33 Sanderson & Thornton 74 79 Perris Station Transit Center 27 Cherry Hills & Bradley 40 61 74 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Alternate Routing Legend | Map not to scale 61 South Perris Metrolink Station 74 208 Metrolink 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 No service on Sundays or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. San Jacinto - Hemet - Sun City - Perris74 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 4231 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 74 212 217 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 74 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 176 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Gilmore StKirby StWarren Rd« Temeku St Pourroy Rd C lo che D r Algrave Ave »Sky View Thompson Rd Sanderson AveWinchester RdWinchester RdAuld RdTech n o l o g y D r » Murr i e t a Hot S p r i n g s »Sky Canyon DrNicolas Rd SimpsonRd « Benton Rd « Magdas Coloradas St Mustang Wy « County Center DrYnez Rd Equity Dr » Overland Dr Florida Ave Devonshire Ave Promenade At Temecula County Center Dr Sheri Station Southwest Justice Center Winchester Rd & Pourroy Rd/Whispering » Heights Winchester Rd & Simpson Rd » West Valley H.S. Post Oce French Valley Airport Chaparral H.S. Grace Mellman Community Library HEMET FRENCH VALLEY WINCHESTER MURRIETA TEMECULA Hemet Valley Mall 15 15 Super Walmart Target 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale 23 24 55 79 217 61 Equity & Ynez Briggs Rd » No service on Sundays or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Hemet - Winchester - Temecula79 74 Simpson & Winchester 79 23 79 Winchester & Nicolas 24 79 Temecula Stage Stop 33 Sanderson & Thornton 74 79 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Moreno Rd 6th » 1stJeerson Ave Front S tPujo l St Temecula Stage Stop 6th & Front Mercede s S t 2 1 Main St 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 79 79 74 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 180 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Sunday service on: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. San Bernardino - Riverside - Anaheim200 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 60 60 15 215 10 5 91 91 71 57 55 241 Disneyland ANAHEIM AnaheimConventionCenter (Katella & Harbor)LincolnKatella & State CollegeTustin & Katella / Tustin & ChestnutMeats & TustinLemon & UniversityLemon & 12thMcKinley St RIVERSIDE Village At Orange La Sierra Metrolink Station(Indiana Ave)Galleria at Tyler Downtown Riverside Vine Street San Bernardino Transit Center SAN BERNARDINO Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 7 54 2 1 3 6W6E EB15 200 La Sierra Metrolink Station OCTA 794 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak S S 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Bus Stop Legend | Map not to scale S S S OCTA 24, 42, 46, 50, 71, 167, 213 Village at Orange 205200 Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 (Across from Riverside-DowntownMetrolink Station) University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line I n d i a n a A v e 184 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY MURRIETA FALLBROOK TEMECULA OCEANSIDE Murrieta - Temecula - Oceanside Transit Center Promenade At Temecula Town Center North Madison AveKalmia St Winchester Rd S C o a s t H w y Pala R dSan Luis ReyMission ExpyMichigan AveSeagaze DrTr e m o n t S t SB »NB »Old Hwy. 395« Ynez Rd Rancho California Rd » C a m i n o D e l R e y C o l l e g e B l v d To w n C n t r D r Abbott Vascular 15 RIVERSIDE COUNTY SAN DIEGO COUNTY No service on: Memorial Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Beach Bus Service: June 18 through September 3, including Sunday service Independence Day, Labor Day. 202 NCTD Town Center North Coaster NCTD Greyhound Amtrak California Sprinter/Metrolink Oceanside Transit Center 202 Margarita RdRoute may be deviated due to trac conditions. S S 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Stop Legend | Maps not to scale S Motor Car Pk w y Overland Rd Park-And-Ride Lot 19 Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 1 2 3 4 5 7676 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 Murrieta Hot Springs 23 Mulligan’s Murrieta 202 205 206 188 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY MONTCLAIR ONTARIO RIVERSIDEPark-And-RideUCR - Riverside - Ontario Mills Mall - Montclair Transcenter 10 15 Monte Vista Av e Market St Mission Blvd « Canyon Crest Dr « Iowa Ave Pedley Rd » Mulberry Ave Milliken Ave Central Ave Linden StUniversity AveGranite Hill Rd »Jurupa StMall DrArrow HwyRichton StUCR Ontario Mills Mall Montclair Plaza Montclair Transcenter 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Stop Legend | Maps not to scale No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.NorthboundSouthbound Route may be deviated due to trac conditions.RIVERSIDE COUNTYSAN BERNARDINO COUNTYCountry Village Park-And-Ride Stop NB at Country Village Rd & Country Club Dr. UCR Extension S S Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 1 3 4 5 204 Ontario Mills Mall Omnitrans 61, 81, 82, 290 60 2N 2S 1 Market & University 12 13 29 49 14 15 54 20422 Omnitrans 66, 85, 88, 290 Foothill Transit Metrolink 204 Montclair Transcenter Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 190 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Gold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 27 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink MARG A R I TA RD No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Temecula - Murrieta - Lake Elsinore - Corona Transit Center - Orange205 | 206 L A K E E L S I N O R E M U R R I E T A T E M E C U L A O R A N G E T E M E C U L A O R A N G E Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 15 15 15 215 55 55 91 74 91 55 1 1 2 3 45 6 8 8 7 7N TUSTIN ST CANAL STHEIM AVEMEATS AVEKATELLA AVEWI N C H E S T E R R D CE N T R A L Pr o m e n a d e at T e m e c u l a OCTA 24, 42, 46, 50, 71, 167, 213 Village at Orange 205200Orange Count yR iverside Count y Village at Orange Tom’s Farms CoronaTransitCenter Dos Lagos 8 Lake Elsinore Outlet Center Park & Ride Lake Elsinore OutletCenter Park & Ride 22 205 206 23 Mulligans Murrieta 202 205 206 COLLIERNI C H O L S = Stop MAINto GRAND « DOS LAGOS « CA JALCO TEMESCAL CANYON » « TEMESCALCANYON Madison »M u r r i e t a H o t S p r i n g s » Ka l m i a » Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 194 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Mapes Rd»15 MorenoValleyMall UCR Lot 30 Los Alamos Rd& Whitewood Rd PromenadeAt TemeculaLosAlamosRdPERRIS MURRIETA TEMECULA MORENO VALLEY RIVERSIDE MLK Blvd Day StPerris BlvdPerris BlvdC a s e R dNB/SB215 215 61 South Perris Metrolink Station 74 208 Metrolink 91 60 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink 15 SEE INSET SEE INSET Temecula - Murrieta - Perris - Moreno Valley - Downtown Riverside No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Bon n i e D rC StSan Jacinto AveD St23 Los Alamos & Whitewood 61 208 MLK Blvd14th St Mission Inn Ave Lemon StVine St89Vine St Layover 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Bus Stop Alternate Routing Legend | Maps not to scale Route may be deviated due to trac conditions. Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 2 3 4 5 7 6S 6N 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 1142249 10162774 1219302043152654212210111829200216 132131205208GOLD LINE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line MARG A R I TA RD 15 1 WI N C H E S T E R R D Pr o m e n a d e at T e m e c u l a 198 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Beaumont Walmart Casino Morongo Palm Desert Mall (Town Center Way & Hahn Rd) SunLine Transit Hub (Varner & Harry Oliver Trail) ZONE 1 CABAZON - RIVERSIDE ZONE 2 THOUSAND PALMS - PALM DESERT 60 MLK Blvd14th St Mission Inn Ave Lemon StVine St89Vine St Layover 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. UCR Lot 30 31 SunLine 220 Fir & Nason 210 Riverside - Beaumont - Palm Desert210|220SUNLINE Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 11 Boarding diagram | Page 29 Moreno Valley Mall 16 1918 31 208 210 SunLine 220 26 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 SEE INSET 1142249 10162774 1219302043152654212210111829200216 132131205208GOLD LINE Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Bus Stop Legend | Maps not to scale University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line RTA PASSES, AND GO-PASS, U-PASS AND CITY PASS PROGRAMS NOT ACCEPTED ON SUNLINE 220 For more information about Route 220, contact SunLine: (800) 347-8628 RTA ROUTE 210 / SUNLINE ROUTE 220 FARE GRID CATEGORIES CASH FARES PASSES 1-DAY 30-DAY WITHINZONE 1 OR ZONE 2 TRAVELINGBETWEENZONE 1 AND ZONE 2 WITHINZONE 1 OR ZONE 2 TRAVELINGBETWEENZONE 1 AND ZONE 2 WITHINZONE 1 OR ZONE 2 TRAVELINGBETWEENZONE 1 AND ZONE 2 GENERAL / YOUTH $3 $6 $7 $14 $75 $150 SENIOR / DISABLED / MEDICARE / CHILD $2 $4 $5 $10 $50 $100 ADDITIONAL CASH FARES REQUIRED WITH VALID MEDIA OR ACCEPTED ID CARDS WITHINZONE 1 WITHINZONE 2 TRAVELINGBETWEENZONE 1 AND ZONE 2 METROLINK TICKETS/PASSES FREE $3 $3 200 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY RIVERSIDE San Jacinto - Hemet - Perris -Riverside212 No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. 215 PERRIS MORENO VALLEY UCR Lot 30 M L K B l v d Mt San Jacinto College State StFlo r i d a A v e La t h a m A v e De v o n s h i r e A v e Fl o r i d a A v e SAN JACINTO HEMET Perris Station Transit Center 31 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 212 217 74 Es p l a n a d e A v e ROUTE MAY BE DEVIATED DUE TO TRAFFIC CONDITIONS S S Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Metrolink 1 3 4 91 60 74 19 Boarding diagram | Page 30 Perris Station Transit Center 22 27 30 74 208 212 Metrolink SEEINSETDevonshire AveFlorida AveKirby StGilmore StLatham AveHarvard StState StHemetTransitDepot S 2 Hemet Valley Mall SEE INSET 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Bus Stop Legend | Maps not to scale MLK Blvd14th St Mission Inn Ave Lemon StVine St65Vine St Layover 29 Boarding diagram | Page 31 Riverside - Downtown Metrolink Station 49 54 200 208 210 212 1 15 Omnitrans 215 SunLine 220 Metrolink Amtrak 10 County Administration Center 12 13 210 212 54 200 208 University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line 202 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY San Jacinto - Hemet - Temecula - Escondido217 No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. 215 15 15 Sanderson AveWinchester RdYnez RdMargariit a R d Y n e z R d Equity Dr Domenigoni Pkwy Esplanade Ave Stetson Ave HEMET Promenade At Temecula Escondido Transit Center Escondido City Hall CountyCenterDr MURRIETA TEMECULA ESCONDIDO 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Stop Alternate Routing Legend | Maps not to scale Escondido Transit Center NCTD217 MTS The Sprinter Greyhound Devonshire Ave Florida AveKirby StGilmoreStLatham Ave HarvardStState StMt. San Jacinto College State St31 Mt. San Jacinto College 32 74 212 217 HemetTransitDepot ROUTE MAY BE DEVIATED DUE TO TRAFFIC CONDITIONS232455 79 217 61 Equity & Ynez « Motor C ar P k wy Overland R d » S S S S S Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. 4 4 5 2 3 1 79 79 78 7474 23 County Center 24 55 61 79 217 SEE INSET Hemet Valley Mall 27 Hemet Valley Mall 31 32 74 79 212 217 33 42 Information Center (951) 565-5002 RiversideTransit.com RTABus.com Promenade Mall Temporary Stop 202 205 206 2087955 217 « Margariita Rd 204 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY RIVERSIDE La Sierra Metrolink Station South Coast Metro 794A connection from Corona 1 Time and/or Transfer Point Transfer Point and Information Legend | Map not to scale Route operated by OCTA. Runs Weekdays only. No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. La Sierra Metrolink or Canyon Community Church - South Coast Metro OCTA 794/ 794A Routing and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Canyon Community Church Park and Ride 15 5 405Orange Count yR iverside Count y ORANGE SANTA ANA COSTA MESA IRVINE ANAHEIM CORONA PR PR Park-And-RidePR Hutton Centre $6.00 15 La Sierra Metrolink Station OCTA 794 Main StOntario AveSouth Coast Plaza Park And Ride South Coast Plaza Park And Ride OCTA 55, 57, 76, 86,150, 211, 216, 463, 794 3 4 5 1 2 91 91 91 55 57 241 113 FY 2018/2019 | FY 2020/2021 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 1 BOARD OF DIRECTORS SunLine was established under a Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) on July 1, 1977 between the County of Riverside and the cities of the Coachella Valley, which at the time included the cities of Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indio, Palm Desert and of Palm Springs. The JPA was later amended to include the cities of Cathedral City, Indian Wells, La Quinta, and Rancho Mirage. The JPA’s governing board is comprised of one elected official from each member entity and one county supervisor. SunLine is headquartered in Thousand Palms, CA. Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Troy Strange, City of Indio Greg Pettis, City of Cathedral City Emmanuel Martinez, City of Coachella V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside District 4 Ty Peabody, City of Indian Wells Robert Radi, City of La Quinta Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Lisa Middleton, City of Palm Springs G. Dana Hobart, City of Rancho Mirage Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 2 SUNLINE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE The executive managers of SunLine Transit Agency are as follows: PREPARED BY SUNLINE STAFF Lauren Skiver, Chief Executive Officer/General Manager Rudy LeFlore, Chief Project Consultant Tommy Edwards, Chief Performance Officer Alton Hillis, Chief Financial Officer Peter Gregor, Chief Safety Officer Stephanie Buriel, Chief Administrative Officer Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS ........................................................................... 7 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................ 9 RELATIONSHIP OF THE SRTP TO OTHER PLANS, PROJECTS, AND ACTIONS ......................................... 10 Guiding Framework ...................................................................................................... 10 Financial Stability ......................................................................................................... 10 Ridership ....................................................................................................................... 10 Demographics ............................................................................................................... 11 OPERATING PLAN AND BUDGET ................................................................................................ 11 Fixed Route Bus ............................................................................................................ 11 Paratransit .................................................................................................................... 11 Capital Improvement Program ..................................................................................... 11 Looking Ahead: Planning Service Changes and New Initiatives .................................. 12 CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW ............................................................... 13 DESCRIPTION OF SUNLINE SERVICE AREA ................................................................................... 13 POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTION ................................................................ 13 FIXED ROUTE SERVICE OVERVIEW ............................................................................................. 16 SUNBUS SERVICE FREQUENCY AND SPAN ................................................................................... 18 PARATRANSIT SERVICE OVERVIEW............................................................................................. 19 Vanpool ........................................................................................................................ 20 Micro Transit ................................................................................................................ 20 CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE ..................................................................................................... 21 Proposed Fare Modifications and Plans for Promoting Ridership................................ 22 Taxi Voucher Program .................................................................................................. 22 PASS OUTLETS ...................................................................................................................... 23 REVENUE FLEET ..................................................................................................................... 23 Paratransit .................................................................................................................... 24 Support Vehicles ........................................................................................................... 24 EXISTING FACILITIES ............................................................................................................... 25 Administrative and Operating Facilities ....................................................................... 25 Stops and Facilities ....................................................................................................... 25 PLANNED FACILITIES ............................................................................................................... 26 Operations Facility ........................................................................................................ 26 BUS SHELTERS ....................................................................................................................... 26 FUTURE TRANSIT HUBS ........................................................................................................... 27 EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES AND PRIVATE PROVIDERS ............................. 27 COORDINATION WITH OTHER PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PROVIDERS ................................................ 28 PRIVATE TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................................................... 28 Taxi Administration ...................................................................................................... 28 CHAPTER 2: EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE........................ 30 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 30 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 4 FIXED ROUTE SERVICE – ROUTE BY ROUTE ANALYSIS .................................................................... 30 Service Efficiency and Effectiveness ............................................................................. 31 PARATRANSIT SERVICE – SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ......................................................................... 32 KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS ............................................................................................... 33 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS ..................................................................................... 34 Service Standards and Warrants .................................................................................. 35 Area Coverage .............................................................................................................. 35 Market Area Characteristics ......................................................................................... 35 Transit-Dependent Populations .................................................................................... 36 Special Market Needs ................................................................................................... 36 Service Standards of Evaluating New Services ............................................................. 36 MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS & PROJECTED GROWTH ...................................................................... 36 EQUIPMENT, PASSENGER AMENITIES AND FACILITY NEEDS ............................................................ 37 Passenger Amenities and Bus Stop Improvement Program ......................................... 37 Real-Time Signage Displays .......................................................................................... 37 On-Board Passenger Amenities .................................................................................... 37 Bicycle Facilities ............................................................................................................ 37 On-Board Security Cameras ......................................................................................... 37 Bus Replacement Program ........................................................................................... 38 Facility Needs ................................................................................................................ 38 CHAPTER 3: SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION ............................... 39 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 39 RECENT SERVICE CHANGES ...................................................................................................... 39 PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................... 40 MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE ................................................................................. 41 MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION ........................................................................................ 41 BUDGET IMPACTS ON PROPOSED CHANGES ................................................................................ 42 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS .............................................. 43 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET ............................................................................................ 43 FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM ................................. 43 OPERATING BUDGET .............................................................................................................. 44 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 45 Americans with Disability Act ....................................................................................... 45 Disadvantaged Business Enterprise .............................................................................. 45 Equal Employment Opportunity ................................................................................... 45 Title VI ........................................................................................................................... 45 Transportation Development Act ................................................................................. 45 Federal Transit Administration Triennial Audit ............................................................ 45 National Transit Database ........................................................................................... 46 Alternative Fuel Vehicles .............................................................................................. 46 FY 2018/2019 SRTP TABLES ........................................................................ 47 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 5 FIGURES & TABLES Figure 1.1 SunLine Service Area_____________________________________________________________ 13 Figure 1.2 Growth Projections for Jurisdictions in the SunLine Service Area __________________________ 15 Figure 1.3 Age Population _________________________________________________________________ 15 Figure 1.4 Summary of SunLine Fixed Route Transit Services, January 2018 _________________________ 18 Figure 1.5 SunBus Fare Structure ___________________________________________________________ 21 Figure 1.6 SunDial Fare Structure ___________________________________________________________ 21 Figure 1.7 Commuter Link Fare Structure ____________________________________________________ 22 Figure 1.8 Pass Outlet Locations ___________________________________________________________ 23 Figure 1.9 SunBus Fixed Route Fleet ________________________________________________________ 24 Figure 1.10 SunDial Paratransit Fleet ________________________________________________________ 24 Figure 1.11 SunLine Facilities ______________________________________________________________ 25 Figure 1.12 SunLine Park-and-Ride Locations _________________________________________________ 25 Figure 1.13 Weekday Service: Top 10 Stops Served _____________________________________________ 25 Figure 1.14 Weekend Service: Top 10 Stops Served ____________________________________________ 26 Figure 1.15 New Bus Shelters by Jurisdiction (2018) ____________________________________________ 27 Figure 1.16 Taxi Franchises _______________________________________________________________ 29 Figure 2.1 Annual Comparison of SunBus Ridership ____________________________________________ 30 Figure 2.2 Fixed Route Ridership ____________________________________________________________ 31 Figure 2.3 Analysis of Performance Statistics, FY 2016/2017 _____________________________________ 32 Figure 2.4 Annual Comparison of SunDial Ridership ____________________________________________ 32 Figure 2.5 Monthly Comparison of SunDial Ridership ___________________________________________ 33 Figure 2.6 Monthly Comparison of System Ridership ___________________________________________ 35 Figure 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET ________________________________________________ 44 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY – FIXED ROUTE ___________________________________________________ 48 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY – DEMAND RESPONSE _____________________________________________ 49 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – ALL ROUTES (SYSTEM TOTALS) _______________________________ 50 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – NON-EXCLUDED ROUTES____________________________________ 51 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – EXCLUDED ROUTES ________________________________________ 52 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY– PARATRANSIT _____________________________________________ 53 TABLE 2 _______________________________________________________________________________ 54 SERVICE SUMMARY – SUNBUS _____________________________________________________________ 54 TABLE 2A SRTP SUMMARY OF ROUTES TO BE EXCLUDED IN FY 2018/2019 _________________________ 55 TABLE 3 SRTP ROUTE STATISTICS – ALL ROUTES _______________________________________________ 56 TABLE 3A INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS _________________________________________________ 57 TABLE 4 SUMMARY OF FUNDS FOR FY 2018/2019 _____________________________________________ 58 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-01] _____________________________________________ 59 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-02] _____________________________________________ 60 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-03] _____________________________________________ 61 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-04] _____________________________________________ 62 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-05] _____________________________________________ 63 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-06] _____________________________________________ 64 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-07] _____________________________________________ 65 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-08] _____________________________________________ 66 TABLE 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-09] _____________________________________________ 67 Table 4A – Capital Project Justification [SL-19-10] ______________________________________________ 68 TABLE 5.1 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2019/2020 ___________________________________ 69 TABLE 5.1A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FOR FY 2019/2020 ___________________________________ 70 TABLE 5.1A – Capital Project Justification [SL-20-01] ____________________________________________ 70 TABLE 5.1A – Capital Project Justification [SL-20-02] ____________________________________________ 71 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification [SL-20-03] ____________________________________________ 72 Table 5.1A – Capital Project Justification [SL-20-04] ____________________________________________ 73 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 6 TABLE 5.2 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2020/2021 ___________________________________ 74 TABLE 5.2A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FOR FY 2020/2021 ___________________________________ 75 TABLE 5.2A – Capital Project Justification [SL-21-01] ____________________________________________ 75 TABLE 5.2A – Capital Project Justification [SL-21-02] ____________________________________________ 76 TABLE 5.2A – Capital Project Justification [SL-21-03] ____________________________________________ 77 Table 5.2A – Capital Project Justification [SL-21-04] ____________________________________________ 78 TABLE 6 PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT _______________________________ 79 TABLE 7 SERVICE PROVIDER PERFORMANCE TARGETS ____________________________________________ 80 TABLE 8 FY 2018/2019 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT ____________________________________________ 81 TABLE 9 HIGHLIGHTS OF FY 2018/2019 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN _______________________________ 82 TABLE 9B FAREBOX CALCULATION ___________________________________________________________ 83 Figure A-1 SunBus System Map, January 2018 _________________________________________________ 84 Route Profiles ___________________________________________________________________________ 85 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 7 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS ADA – Americans with Disabilities Act APTA – American Public Transit Association ARB – California Air Resources Board ATP – Active Transportation Plan AVL – Automated Vehicle Locator Caltrans – California Department of Transportation CARB – California Air Resources Board CMAQ – Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality CNG – Compressed Natural Gas COA - Comprehensive Operational Analysis DOT – United States Department of Transportation FAST Act – Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act FHWA – Federal Highway Administration FTA – Federal Transit Administration FTIP – Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY – Fiscal Year GFI – GFI Genfare GGE – Gas Gallon Equivalent GHG – Greenhouse Gases HVIP – Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project LCTOP – Low Carbon Transit Operations Program LTF – Local Transportation Fund Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 8 MOU – Memorandum of Understanding MPO – Metropolitan Planning Organization NTD – National Transit Database PMI – Preventive Maintenance Inspection PTMISEA – Public Transportation Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account RCTC – Riverside County Transportation Commission RTP – Regional Transportation Plan SCS – Sustainable Communities Strategy STA – State Transit Assistance Fund TDA – California’s Transportation Development Act TIP – Transportation Improvement Program TOD – Transit Oriented Development UZA – Urbanized Area ZEB – Zero Emission Bus Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 9 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP), updated annually, covers Fiscal Years 2019 to 2021. The SRTP is a mandatory fiscal, planning and regulatory document for SunLine Transit Agency. The SRTP is intended to serve three purposes: 1. Identifies the transit services and capital improvements required to meet the transit needs of SunLine Transit Agency over a three year period and the proposed sources of funding to carry out the plan. 2. Serves as a management tool to guide activities over the next year. 3. Provides justification for operating and capital assistance for grant applications to be submitted to state and federal funding agencies. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is responsible by statute for developing and approving a Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) for Riverside County (PUC 130303). SunLine and other Riverside County transit operators prepare the plans for their respective agency. Once RCTC approves and adopts the SRTP, the operators are charged with following through with implementation of the plans. Any deviation from the plan must be reported to RCTC (PUC 130057), and if the change is substantive, a plan amendment must be approved by RCTC. The allocation of funds for the upcoming fiscal year is based on approved SRTP. Beyond the requirements, the SRTP is an opportunity for SunLine Transit Agency to gather important data in a single document and develop strategic plans for the next three years. Mission Statement To provide safe and environmentally conscious public transportation services and alternate fuel solutions to meet the mobility needs of the Coachella Valley. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 10 RELATIONSHIP OF THE SRTP TO OTHER PLANS, PROJECTS, AND ACTIONS The SRTP provides a summary of and direction to other planning documents. It incorporates SunLine’s goals and service standards, operating and capital budgets, service plan, and facility plan. At the same time, it is designed to give direction to future service planning activities and capital projects. The SRTP will reflect the FY 2019 operating and capital budget adopted by the Board of Directors. Guiding Framework The Board and staff are seeking to make smart transit investments that will help SunLine expand the mobility options offered to the communities it serves. As SunLine looks to grow its ridership and make strategic investments, it must continue to manage its fiscal challenges, while investing in the overarching management of SunLine’s bus and paratransit system. In 2018, SunLine embarked on a process to rethink and reinvigorate transit services in the Coachella Valley. This process recognized SunLine’s role as a mobility manager for the Coachella Valley and expanded the Agency’s work to improve performance in the context of its fiscal and organizational health. Financial Stability The national decreasing ridership trend for fixed route transit continues to impact the Agency’s financial stability. The proposed operating and capital budgets for FY 2019 are $38,900,991 and $6,053,623, respectively, which represents an operating budget increase of 11.53% over the previous fiscal year. The majority of the costs associated with the increase can be attributed to wages and benefits associated with the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for represented employees under a collective bargaining agreement. In addition, SunLine is adding a Quick Bus to the Line 111 to help improve frequency and performance, and launching a SunRide ride share program. SunLine continues to identify ways to strengthen its overall financial position in order to continue to serve a diverse community of transit users. Ridership In Fiscal Year 2016/2017, SunLine Transit Agency served 4.1 million fixed route passenger boardings, a decrease of 4.8% from the previous year. In the same year, it operated over 3.4 million miles and 238,374 hours of revenue service. Customer growth on SunLine’s paratransit saw a small increase. In FY 2016/2017, SunLine served 164,802 passengers, a 0.5% increase from FY 2015/2016. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 11 Demographics As Riverside County continues to grow, more and more of that growth is expected to be concentrated in the Coachella Valley and eastern county. According to the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) projects there will be 581,300 people in the Coachella Valley in 2020, a 38% increase in population between 2008 and 2020. Seniors will see the highest percentage of growth. Increases in the senior population will continue to add a financial and resource cost for SunLin e, due to anticipated increases in Paratransit services. By modernizing and improving the current eligibility process, SunLine seeks to control increasing paratransit costs. OPERATING PLAN AND BUDGET The SRTP’s one-year operating plan includes a number of assumptions that drive proposed initiatives, described below. Fixed Route Bus Fixed route ridership is estimated to decline at a rate of 5.4 percent in FY 2018/2019. This assumption is based on recent ridership patterns. The ridership decrease in th is SRTP is conservative for the purposes of projecting the operational budget. In contrast, strategic planning initiatives launching in the first half of FY 2018/2019 will focus the organization to “move the needle” on key metrics that drive SunLine’s long-term success. Total passenger fare revenue is expected to reach $2.6M in FY 2018/2019 compared to the estimated $2.9M in FY 2017/2018. Paratransit Operating costs for paratransit services are expected to increase, the ultimate cost per passenger trip on these modes is higher than other transit modes . Service levels are expected to coincide with ridership decreases. These assumptions are based on recent ridership patterns, revised No-Show policy as well as changes to the certification process that are still ongoing. Capital Improvement Program The Capital Improvement Program for FY 2018/2019 focuses on continuing SunLine’s investment in an alternative fuel technology fleet, facilities and construction of a new operations building. The three-year plan assumes a $15,250,623 capital program dependent on internal and external funding from federal, state, regional, and local sources. Key components of the Capital Plan, beyond ongoing maintenance needs, include:  Vehicle replacement Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 12  Vehicle expansion  Facility and systems improvements  Operational improvements and enhancements  Information technology Looking Ahead: Planning Service Changes and New Initiatives In FY 2018/2019, SunLine will focus on strengthening its existing services and piloting new mobility services to invest in the development of advanced transit scheduling expertise in - house, to enhance SunLine’s ability to create efficient transit schedules to better serve customers without increasing operating costs. SunLine will also focus on improving its most successful trunk routes. Lines 14, 30, and 111 together account for 64% of all daily boardings. Improving these services will increase farebox revenue on the entire network. Additionally, SunLine is exploring the possibility of providing service to the Coachella Valley Art and Music Festival, Stagecoach Festival and realignment of Line 70 or 111 to stop near the BNP Paribas Open. The transportation industry is undergoing massive transformation, and SunLine is studying ways to improve and change its service model in order to remain competitive and continue to provide valued service to the community. In light of declining ridership and reduced funding, SunLine is undergoing a planning study to evaluate new service models that may enable SunLine to cost-effectively serve the Coachella Valley. SunLine will respond to declining ridership and development patterns, including shared, on -demand mobility services. SunLine will continue to evaluate existing services for modifications, reductions, and/or discontinuation. The planning study will help SunLine prepare for a range of uncertain funding scenarios and will include community and Board consultation throughout the process. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 13 CHAPTER 1: SYSTEM OVERVIEW This chapter outlines major features of SunLine’s system. The chapter describes the geography of the SunLine service area and outlines the bus service SunLine provides, population profile, current and proposed fare structure, revenue fleet, existing and planned facilities and coordination between agencies. DESCRIPTION OF SUNLINE SERVICE AREA SunLine’s service area encompasses 1,120 square miles of the Coachella Valley from the San Gorgonio Pass in the west to the Salton Sea in the southeast. The Agency’s service area is located approximately 120 miles east of downtown Los Angeles and 60 miles east of the Inland Empire cities of Riverside and San Bernardino. SunLine’s service area is shown in Figure 1.1. Service is provided to the cities of Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta, Palm Desert, Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage. Service is also provided to the unincorporated Riverside County communities of Bermuda Dunes, Desert Edge, Mecca, North Shore, Oasis, Thermal and Thousand Palms. FIGURE 1.1 SUNLINE SERVICE AREA POPULATION PROFILE AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROJECTION The population of the Coachella Valley is 443,401 and continues to grow at a healthy pace (U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates). A large population of seasonal residents visit the Coachella Valley in the winter season or longer and report a hometown outside of the area. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 14 The Coachella Valley is a high growth area. Riverside County is the tenth largest county in the nation in terms of population. Lower home prices and new job opportunities have fueled migration. A leading cause of the county’s growth in the last decade has been migration from elsewhere. Census data shows that approximately 38 percent of the population increase is from people moving to Riverside County. As Riverside County continues to grow, more and more of that growth is expected to be concentrated in the Coachella Valley and eastern county. Coachella Valley continues to develop to meet the needs of residents with a broad range of amenities, pub lic facilities and programs. From 2000 to 2014, the Coachella Valley population grew from 309,530 to 443,401, for a net gain of 133,871 people, or 43%, including adjustments based on the Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey. The Coachella Valley’s 43% increase in population from 2000 to 2014 was much faster than the Inland Empire (34%), the U.S. (12.5%) and California (13%). The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) projects there will be 581,300 people in the Coachella Valley in 2020, a 38% increase in population between 2008 and 2020. Projected growth rates vary significantly across SunLine’s service area and not all communities are anticipating significant growth. From 2000 to 2014, the city of Indio led the Coachella Valley in growth, followed by La Quinta and Desert Hot Springs. Each of these cities has land to develop. The unincorporated areas of the valley are expected to see half of all the population growth between 2008 and 2035. SCAG anticipates that much of this expansion in unincorporated areas will take place north of Interstate 10 and in the areas south and west of the city of Coachella. Growth within Palm Springs and Palm Desert is expected to occur at a rate that is less than half that of the Coachella Valley as a whole. Growth generates an increased demand for municipal services, including transit, and development patterns can significantly affect the cost and efficiency of providing those services. In areas where development includes low density or outlying communities, existing services can be impacted to a greater degree than if development occurs within a core service area. Figure 1.2 presents growth projections as forecast by SCAG in 2013 for jurisdictions within SunLine’s service area. The figure also illustrates the relative share of growth anticipated for each jurisdiction, in comparison to the Coachella Valley as a whole. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 15 FIGURE 1.2 GROWTH PROJECTIONS FOR JURISDICTIONS IN THE SUNLINE SERVICE AREA SOURCE: SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS 2013 State figures show that Riverside County will lead California in terms of growth rate. Between 2010 and 2060, Riverside County’s population is expected to expand by 92 percent, with the Coachella Valley growing at a higher rate than the rest of the county. Seniors will see the highest percentage of growth. In the Coachella Valley, 25.5 percent of residents are older than 60, while the state shows 17.5 percent. The senior population has different wants and needs than younger individuals. For example, an area of retirees typically requires more paratransit service than fixed route bus service. An increase in the senior population will greatly increase ADA paratransit costs, adding a financial and resource cost for SunLine. As shown in Figure 1.3 to the right, the blue line shows the percentage of the Coachella Valley population in different age brackets, divided into five-year increments, while the orange line shows the measurement for the entire state. In addition, SunLine experiences a high influx of seasonal residents. Seasonal roadway congestion is serious enough to impact transit-running times. 2008 Population 2020 Population 2035 Population % Growth in Pop. from 2008 to 2035 % of Total Pop. Growth in Coachella Valley Cathedral City 50,200 57,000 64,600 29%3% Coachella 38,200 70,200 128,700 237%21% Desert Hot Springs 25,200 43,500 58,100 131%8% Indian Wells 4,800 5,500 5,800 21%0% Indio 73,300 91,500 111,800 53%9% La Quinta 36,100 41,600 46,300 28%2% Palm Desert 47,100 52,100 56,800 21%2% Palm Springs 43,400 48,900 56,100 29%3% Rancho Mirage 16,900 18,800 22,900 36%1% Unincorporated Areas 87,500 152,200 308,600 253%51% Total:422,700 581,300 859,700 100% FIGURE 1.3 AGE POPULATION Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 16 FIXED ROUTE SERVICE OVERVIEW SunLine’s local fixed route network, SunBus, consists of sixteen (16) routes, including three (3) trunk routes, eleven (11) local routes connecting the Valley from Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs in the northwest to Mecca, Oasis, and North Shore in the east, one (1) express line from Desert Hot Springs to Palm Desert and one (1) Regional Commuter Route operating between Palm Desert and Riverside. The SunBus and Commuter Link 220 lines are summarized in Figure 1.4. The service is designed to meet an array of travel needs that connect neighborhoods to jobs, schools, shopping and other destinations. The amount of service available is limited by the level of funding available for transit in the local service area. In Fiscal Year 2016/2017, SunLine Transit Agency served 4.1 million fixed route passenger boardings, a decrease of 4.8% from the previous year. In the same year, it operated over 3.4 million miles and 238,374 hours of revenue service. SunLine updated the SunLine Service Standards Policy, with an adoption date of October 2017. The policy classifies each route in the SunLine transit network into three tiers that define the service level and performance expectation for each service. SunLine’s proposed principal service types are trunk routes, local routes, and market-based routes. Service types are defined in part operationally and in part by the land use characteristics of their corridors. Service effectiveness is evaluated by service type. Trunk Routes – These are highly traveled corridors serving a variety of trip purposes and connect a variety of regional destinations. Trunk routes comprise the backbone of the network linking major communities. Examples include Line 111 with a 20-minute headway seven days a week, which travels from Palm Springs to Coachella; Line 14 between Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs; and Line 30 between Cathedral City and Palm Springs. Lines 14 and 30 operate with 20-minute frequencies on weekdays. Local Routes – Local routes are secondary routes that connect to the trunk routes and supplement the SunBus network. These connector and feeder routes include Lines 15, 21, 24, 32, , 54, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, and 95. Local routes operate in areas with less density and lower demand. Local routes have consistent service throughout each day, frequencies of 60-minutes or better, and frequent stops for passengers to access as many destinations as possible. An exception to the above frequency is the North Shore Line 95 rural service that operates six round trips weekdays and weekends between Indio, Coachella, Mecca, and North Shore. Line 20 and 21 also has limited service that operates on weekdays only. Market-Based Services – Tailored to serve specific market segments at specific times of the day, including supplemental service such as school trip pers, market-based routes have flexible routing and schedules that may vary throughout the day and wee k, and are designed to meet specific market targets. Examples are the Commuter Link 220, operating three westbound trips from Palm Desert to Riverside with three return eastbound trips weekdays. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 17 Additionally, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) or express bus service is currently under study. Presently, Line 111 takes close to an hour and half to travel between Palm Springs and Indio, and close to two hours to travel between Palm Springs to Coachella. A BRT or express service would reduce travel time and operating costs and support increased ridership. SunLine’s existing Service Standards Policy also defines minimum service frequencies and spans deemed sustainable in the context of past funding levels. Due to the uncertain funding climate, declining ridership, and the emergence of promising new technologies, SunLine will revisit existing route alignments, including minimum service frequencies and spans, in consultation with the community and Board. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 18 FIGURE 1.4 SUMMARY OF SUNLINE FIXED ROUTE TRANSIT SERVICES, JANUARY 2018 SUNBUS SERVICE FREQUENCY AND SPAN SunLine fixed route bus services operate 363 days a year, with no service provided on Thanksgiving and Christmas. The system operates Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. and weekends from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Weekend service is operated on New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day. The Commuter Link 220, Line 20 and Line 21 service does not operate on weekends. Buses generally operate every 20 to 90 minutes, depending on the route and day of the week. Service span and frequency information by line is summarized in the route profiles. Route Route Classification Major Destinations Cities/Communities Served Connections 14 Trunk Shopping, Schools, DMV, Employment Center, Library, Senior Center Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs 15, 20, 24, 30 & 111 15 Local Shopping Centers, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, City Hall, Medical, and Schools Desert Hot Springs and Desert Edge 14 20 Local Shopping, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, Schools Desert Hot Springs, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert 14, 15, 32, 54, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 21 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, City Hall, School, College, and Mall Desert Hot Springs, Palm Desert 14, 15, 32, 54, & 111 24 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, Social Services, Theaters Palm Springs 14, 30, 32, 111 & MBTA 30 Trunk Shopping, Schools, Medical, Library, Senior Center, Airport, Court House, Social Security, Theaters, and Public Social Services Palm Springs and Cathedral City 14, 24, 32, 111 & MBTA 32 Local Shopping, School, College, Medical, Theaters, Mall and Hospital Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Thousand Palms 20, 24, 30, 54, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 54 Local Shopping, School, Tennis Gardens, Work Force Development, and College Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, Bermuda Dunes 20, 32, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 70 Local Shopping, Schools, Theaters and Medical La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, Bermuda Dunes 111 & Amtrak 80 Local Shopping, School, Workforce Development, Social Services, Senior Center, DMV, Hospital Indio 54, 81, 90, 91 & 111 81 Local Shopping, Schools, Medical, Community Center, College, DMV, Hospital, Work Force Development, Social Services and Employment Center Indio 54, 80, 90, 91, 111 & Greyhound 90 Local Shopping , Library, City Hall, Senior Center, Community Center, Social Services and Medical Indio and Coachella 54, 80, 81, 91 & 111 91 Local Shopping, College, Schools, Community Center, and Medical Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis 54, 80, 81, 90 & 111 95 Local Shopping, College, Community Center, Medical and Schools Indio, Coachella, Mecca and North Shore 90, 91 & 111 111 Trunk Hospital, Medical, Shopping, College, Mall and Schools Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio 14, 24, 20, 21, 30, 32, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90 & 91, 111, Amtrak & MBTA 220 Market-Based Mall, College, Shopping and University Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Cabazon Casino, Beaumont, Moreno Valley, Riverside 20, 32, 54, 111, Metrolink, Pass Transit, RTA & Greyhound Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 19 PARATRANSIT SERVICE OVERVIEW SunLine operates SunDial ADA paratransit to provide service to those certified under ADA, who cannot ride fixed route bus service. Paratransit SunDial services continue to be well utilized for client’s day to day activities, such as medical appointments and shopping. In FY 2016/2017, SunLine served 164,802 SunDial passenger boardings, a .5% increase from the previous year. In the same year, SunDial operated 1,031,486 miles and 68,941 hours of revenue service. SunDial operates within ¾ of a mile on either side of the SunBus route network, and is available by advanced reservation only. Reservations may be made based on the service hours of the fixed routes serving passengers’ origins and destinations, and may only be used at the same times, days and frequency as local fixed-route service. SunDial service is a curb- to-curb, shared ride transit service for persons who are functionally unable to use the fixed route service either permanently or under certain conditions. Eligibility is not solely based on having a disability. SunDial service is provided with a fleet of 37 vans seven days a week, 363 days a year during the same hours as the fixed route network. No service is provided on Thanksgiving and Christmas days. SunDial's Cancellation and No Show Policy went into effect on May 1, 2016. By implementing the policy revision, SunDial's late cancellation and no show rate decreased from 6.1% to 3.5% and from 5.8% to 3.3%, respectively. Since SunDial ADA paratransit service is not provided in the community of North Shore, Line 95 operates as a deviated fixed route. Curbside pick-ups and drop-offs are available on a reservation basis in North Shore. Riders may utilize this service with a 24 -hour advance notice for both pick-ups and drop-offs. SunDial service can be arranged to meet Line 95 in Coachella at 5th Street and Vine Avenue for qualifying Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) passengers to reach other qualifying destinations in the Coachella Valley. As an operator of bus service, SunLine is required under the ADA to ensure that paratransit service is provided to eligible individuals with disabilities. The level of service provided must be comparable, in terms of hours of service and area served, to the service provided by the fixed route bus system. To be eligible, all persons must complete an application, describing in detail the nat ure of their mental or physical disability that may prevent the individual from using regular fixed route service. Applicants must obtain an approved health care professional’s statement and signature verifying the disability. Each applicant is notified in writing of their application status within twenty-one days of the submission date. SunLine is currently revamping the eligibility process for SunDial in an effort to reduce costs to the Agency. Riders having the required ADA Certification Identification Card are eligible to use SunDial for their transportation needs, including medical appointments, shopping, and other social activities. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 20 SunLine Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Services SunLine Transportation Demand Management (TDM) services promote and facilitate alternative mode of transportation such as transit, vanpool, carpool, bicycling, and taxi. Vanpool A vanpool is a group of people who are coming to the same workplace or post -secondary education facility (college, trade school, etc.) from the same community, riding together in a van. Vanpools typically carry from six to fifteen passengers, and operate weekdays, traveling between pick-up locations and a place of work. Vanpools provide small-scale commuter ridership in scenarios where operator costs would otherwise be prohibitively high. Operating costs are very low, because the passengers drive themselves. Ridership per platform hour is healthy; the vanpool doesn’t run at all without a minimum of five regular riders. Vanpools are very demand-responsive; once ridership falls below a threshold, the service goes away and new routes can be added with a minimum of overhead. They can access office parking areas and other locations where scheduled SunLine service cannot reach, making for more convenient passenger drop-offs. Vanpool programs can be administered in a variety of ways, allowing the employer to be fully involved or simply promote it from the sidelines. Employers can help employees form vanpools through rideshare matching. Rideshare matching helps potential vanpoolers locate others nearby with similar schedules. With technology advancements, on-demand vanpooling may help reduce coordination costs and increase ridership. Traditional vanpool programs often have average ridership per trip at just above the minimum membership required for the vanpool. As the region develops unevenly, vanpools will be an increasingly effective means to serve trips from low-density places to employment and education centers. With new vanpool programs, SunLine may be able to pull back bus service from low-volume, coverage routes, and focus on more frequent, trunk routes and core services. SunLine’s Vanpool Program will provide a subsidy for qualified vans. The driver of the vanpool must be a participant in the vanpool program. Vanpool passengers will be responsible for paying the van lease cost minus the subsidy. They will also share the cost of gas, toll fees, and parking fees (if applicable). Passengers will not pay for the maintenance and insurance costs. Vehicles for this type of service will be leased by one of the pre - qualified vendors to one of the commuters in the group, a company, or by a third party representative. Micro Transit SunLine proposes a new approach to connect riders to mainline service by bridging the first mile, last mile gap. Many communities still experience a lack of transportation options that require innovative solutions. This flexible, on demand rideshare service is designed to connect riders to the fixed route system by providing point to point rides along identified fixed route corridors. SunLine has purchased the scheduling application and anticipates having this service in place by the fall of 2018. Work is already underway to determine a Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 21 pilot service area to test the attributes of the program before launching this service more widely within the transit service area. CURRENT FARE STRUCTURE The SunBus fare structure is summarized in Figure 1.5. SunBus passengers pay the adult fare unless eligible for discounted fares, which are available to seniors, people with disabilities, and youth. Children 4 years and under ride free with an adult fare. Fares may be paid using cash or passes. FIGURE 1.5 SUNBUS FARE STRUCTURE FIGURE 1.6 SUNDIAL FARE STRUCTURE Personal care attendants and service animals may accompany an eligible customer at no additional charge. The client must inform the reservationist when booking their trip that they will be accompanied by another person to determine if space is available . Clients may travel with up to three companions who will be charged the applicable fare. TYPE OF FARE ADULT YOUTH SENIOR 60+/ (18 YRS – 59 YRS)(5 YRS – 17 YRS)DISABLED/MEDICAID Cash/Base Fare $1.00 $0.85 $0.50 Transfers $0.25 $0.25 $0.25 Day Pass $3.00 $2.00 $1.50 10-Ride Pass $10.00 $8.50 $5.00 31-Day Pass $34.00 $24.00 $17.00 Coachella Valley Employer Pass $24.00 ---- FARE CATEGORY FIXED ROUTE FARES TYPE OF FARE (Only for ADA Certified Clients)SINGLE RIDE MULTIPLE RIDES Cash Fare - Same City $1.50 -- Cash Fare - City to City $2.00 -- 10-Ride Pass - Same City --$15.00 10-Ride Pass - City to City --$20.00 FARE CATEGORY Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 22 FIGURE 1.7 COMMUTER LINK FARE STRUCTURE Commuter Express fares are for trips between the Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County on the Riverside Commuter Link 220 Service. Proposed Fare Modifications and Plans for Promoting Ridership Fares and fare collection will be reviewed in FY 2018/2019 with a goal of sustaining the future level of transit operations in the Coachella Valley while also maximizing ridership. SunLine is exploring partnerships with local colleges throughout the Coachella Valley to provide an affordable transit haul pass program. Taxi Voucher Program In addition to SunDial , SunLine offers a Taxi Voucher Program providing half price taxi trips for seniors (60+ years) and the disabled. This card is easily obtained by eligible patrons submitting an application to SunLine. Once the application is reviewed and accepted, the patron is then mailed an activated payment card. When the patron receives that card th ey are able to call in an add a balance of up to $75 per month. SunLine provides matching funds in equal amount up to the $75. The total balance added for each month can be a maximum of $150. Leftover funds from previous months are carried over until utilized. To use the balance, the patrons simply order a cab and pay their fare with the Taxi Voucher payment card. This service assists with the economic development of the 3 taxi franchises of the Coachella Valley and provides some relief to the demands on the paratransit services. Community members are enjoying the service, and Taxi cab drivers and their franchises appreciate how this service keeps them competitive with other ride share services in the area. The Taxi Voucher Program has been funded with Section 5310 Transportation for Elderly Persons and Persons with Disabilities funding. TYPE OF FARE ADULT SENIOR 60+/ (18 YRS – 59 YRS)DISABLED/MEDICAID Commuter Express Single Ride $6.00 $4.00 Commuter Express Day Pass $14.00 $10.00 Commuter Express 30-Day Pass $150.00 $100.00 Zone 1 = Riverside - Cabazon Zone 2 = Palm Desert - Thousand Palms FARE CATEGORY COMMUTER ROUTE FARES Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 23 PASS OUTLETS SunLine currently has 19 pass outlet locations within the service area. They sell nine different pass types: day pass, 31-day pass, 10-ride pass, adult, senior and youth. Figure 1.8 lists pass outlet locations: FIGURE 1.8 PASS OUTLET LOCATIONS REVENUE FLEET SunLine currently has an active fleet of 76 fixed route buses. New vehicle purchases are included in SunLine’s fleet and facilities plan as seen in Figure 1.9. Pass Outlets City Routes Served Canyon Food Mart Cathedral City 30 & 111 Cardenas Cathedral City 30 & 32 Desert Market Desert Hot Springs 14 & 15 Desert Food Mart Desert Hot Springs 14 & 15 COD Bookstore - Indio Campus Indio 54 Indio City Hall Indio 54 & 81 U-Save Market Indio 80 & 90 Rancho Fresco Market Indio 80 & 81 Guerrero's Meat Market Indio 80, 81 & 111 Cardenas Indio 80, 81 & 111 La Quinta Wellness Center La Quinta 70 Cardenas Coachella 90 & 111 Carniceria Atoyac Palm Desert 111 COD Bookstore Palm Desert 20, 21, 32, & 111 Instant Cash Palm Desert 111 Mizell Senior Center Palm Springs 14, 24 & 30 Palm Springs Liquor Palm Springs 24 & 111 Don Carlos Meat Market Mecca 91 & 95 SunLine Transit Agency Thousand Palms 32 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 24 FIGURE 1.9 SUNBUS FIXED ROUTE FLEET All buses meet accessibility requirements of the ADA, and the emission mitigation standards mandated by the Federal Clean Air Act, and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). New vehicle models must proceed through the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) First Article Bus Durability Test Program in order for procurements to qualify for federal funding participation. FTA guidelines establish the useful life expectancy of a large, heavy- duty transit bus as at least 12 years of service, or an accumulation of at least 500,000 miles. SunLine is expected to receive four new BYD electric buses (3 replacement and 1 expansion vehicle) in the coming months. These buses will support cleaner and more frequent service on SunLine routes serving disadvantaged communities, accelerating SunLine’s efforts to transition to an all zero-emission fleet. Paratransit SunLine’s paratransit service presently operates with an active fleet of 37 ADA vehicles. The paratransit fleet is summarized in Figure 1.10. FTA guidelines establish the useful life expectancy of a paratransit vehicle as at least four years or an accumulation of 100,000 miles. FIGURE 1.10 SUNDIAL PARATRANSIT FLEET Support Vehicles SunLine currently utilizes 52 support vehicles including standard passenger cars and trucks as well as facility-specific golf carts and forklifts. The support fleet are used for various activities to support transit services provided throughout the Coachella Valley. Number of Vehicles Manufacturer Year Fuel Type Size (Fleet) 13 Orion V 2006 CNG 40 16 New Flyer A 2008 CNG 40 21 New Flyer B 2008 CNG 40 10 El Dorado 2009 CNG 32 0 FC 2/New Flyer 2010 Hydrogen 40 1 FC 3/El Dorado 2012 Hydrogen 40 3 BYD Electric 2014 Electric 40 2 FC4 & 5/El Dorado 2014 Hydrogen 40 1 FC6/El Dorado 2015 Hydrogen 40 6 New Flyer Excelsior 2016 CNG 40 4 FC7 - FC10 El Dorado 2018 Hydrogen 40 Number of Vehicles Manufacturer Year Fuel Type Size (Fleet) 6 FORD/Aerotech 220 2013 CNG 24 8 FORD/Aerotech 220 2013 CNG 24 8 FORD/Aerotech 220 2015 CNG 24 15 FORD/Aerotech 220 2016 CNG 24 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 25 EXISTING FACILITIES Administrative and Operating Facilities Figure 1.11 presents SunLine’s administrative and operations facilities. SunLine owns all facilities. FIGURE 1.11 SUNLINE FACILITIES Figure 1.12 represents SunLine’s park and ride facility which is owned by SunLine. FIGURE 1.12 SUNLINE PARK-AND-RIDE LOCATIONS Stops and Facilities SunLine’s bus system has 635 stops including 361 shelters and 19 inactive shelters, that staff maintains which are planned for relocation. There are 80 standalone benches and waste containers and 14 major transfer locations, where riders are able to make transfers connections between routes. Figures 1.13 and 1.14 indicate the top ten (10) stops served for weekday and weekend service respectively. FIGURE 1.13 WEEKDAY SERVICE: TOP 10 STOPS SERVED Location Name Address City SunLine Division 1 Facility 32-505 Harry Oliver Trail Thousand Palms SunLine Division 2 Facility 83255 Highway 111 Indio City Location Landmark Spaces Commuter Route Thousand Palms 72-480 Varner Road SunLine Transit Facility 22 220 Stop Name City Number of Riders per Day B St/Buddy Rodgers Cathedral City 682 Hwy 111/Flower Indio 493 Indian Canyon/Ramon Palm Springs 461 Palm Canyon/Stevens Palm Springs 391 Baristo/Farrell South Side of Street Palm Springs 353 West/Pierson Desert Hot Springs 317 Town Center/Hahn East Side Palm Desert 284 Palm Canyon/Baristo Palm Springs 216 Town Center/Hahn West Side Palm Desert 203 Ramon/San Luis Rey North Side Palm Springs 175 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 26 FIGURE 1.14 WEEKEND SERVICE: TOP 10 STOPS SERVED PLANNED FACILITIES SunLine contracted with HDR, Inc. to examine and understand the Agency’s current and planned future transit operations, and the roles and places of its existing transit facilities and vehicle maintenance and storage sites. From this review, SunLine developed an overall long range facilities master plan that identifies the bus storage and maintenance facility requirements, and potential locations for SunLine for the period of 2016 – 2035. This master plan is a guide for SunLine’s facilities future uses and associate d capital projects. Operations Facility SunLine’s Operations facility located in Thousand Palms is housed in a combination of five pre-fabricated units of various sizes (approximately 2,000 square feet in total) with drivers’ lunchroom, lounge and training area housed in two separate double pre-fabricated units (2,800 square feet in total). The operations center houses dispatch, transit control and the paratransit call center as well as the operations supervisors’ offices. The facility is undersized for its purpose and staff levels. Preliminary planning has begun for the design, demolition and removal of the facility, and construction of a new, accessible facility. BUS SHELTERS Twenty-five new bus shelters will be installed in fall 2018 in the jurisdictions indicated in Figure 1.15: Stop Name City Number of Riders per Day B St/Buddy Rodgers Cathedral City 488 Hwy 111/Flower Indio 380 Palm Canyon/Stevens Palm Springs 315 Indian Canyon/Ramon La Quinta 298 Town Center/Hahn East Side Palm Desert 216 5th/Vine Coachella 189 Town Center/Hahn West Side Palm Desert 157 Baristo/Farrell South Side Palm Springs 155 Palm Canyon/Baristo Palm Springs 150 West/Pierson Desert Hot Springs 150 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 27 FIGURE 1.15 NEW BUS SHELTERS BY JURISDICTION (2018) FUTURE TRANSIT HUBS SunLine is working with the City of Coachella, Department of Social Services and Affordable Housing on a proposed project to be developed east of Harrison Street south of 4th Street and north of 6th Street in the City of Coachella. EXISTING COORDINATION BETWEEN TRANSIT AGENCIES AND PRIVATE PROVIDERS As the designated Consolidated Transportation Services Agency (CTSA), SunLine coordinates public transportation services throughout its service area. Staff participates in meetings with social and human service agencies, consumers, and grassroots advocates through forums such as the RCTC Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council (CCAC), SunLine’s ACCESS Advisory Committee, San Gorgonio Pass Area - Transportation Now Coalition (T-NOW), and neighboring transit operators. SunLine remains committed to working with the ACCESS Advisory Committee. Staff hosts regular meetings at the Thousand Palms Administrative Office. SunLine applies input from the Committee to improve relationships with the community to address public transportation issues in the Valley. Additionally, staff members are actively involved in the regional transportation planning process through participation on RCTC and county committees. These committees include the CAC/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council, the Technical Advisory Committee, Aging & Disability Resource Connection ADRC of Riverside Long Term Services and Supports (LLTS) Coalition, Desert Valley Builders Association (DVBA), and related committees to enhance coordination efforts with SunLine. Jurisdictions Number of Shelters Cathedral City 2 Coachella 2 Desert Hot Springs 2 Indian Wells 0 Indio 4 La Quinta 2 Palm Desert 4 Palm Springs 4 Rancho Mirage 0 Riverside County Unincorporated Areas 5 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 28 COORDINATION WITH OTHER PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PROVIDERS In addition to providing transit service throughout the Coachella Valley, SunLine offers transit connections to a number of adjacent transit operators. SunLine and Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) collaborate to schedule the operation of Commuter Link 220 which connects Palm Desert and Thousand Palms with Morongo Band of Mission Indians, Beaumont, Banning, Moreno Valley, and Riverside Metrolink Station via Interstate 10 and State Route 60. In addition to providing connections to RTA routes, Commuter Link 220 joins rides to Pass Transit services in Beaumont and Metrolink’s Riverside and Inland Empire-Orange County lines. SunLine also hosts Morongo Basin Transit Authority (MBTA) Routes 12 and 15 through a cooperative service agreement at its stops in downtown Palm Springs. The collaboration offers connections to Yucca Valley, Landers, Joshua Tree, and Twentynine Palms. SunLine is collaborating with Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) on their Rides to Wellness demonstration project known as the Blythe Wellness Express service. This service, launched in July 2017, operates three days weekly and travels to the Coachella Valley’s three hospitals (Desert Regional Medical Center, Eisenhower Medical Center and J.F.K. Hospital) within SunLine’s service area. Amtrak California (operated by Amtrak bus contractors) transports rail passengers traveling between rail hubs at certain Amtrak stations using SunLine’s bus stops in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, and La Quinta, under an additional cooperative service agreement. Amtrak’s “Sunset Limited” inter-city train serves the Palm Springs Station on North Indian Canyon Drive. However, with rail service only serving Palm Springs three times a week in each direction, it is impractical for SunLine to offer transit service to the station at this time. SunLine has been collaborating with Imperial Valley Transportation Commission (IVTC) in an effort to find a future connection with Imperial Valley Transit (IVT). IVTC oversees the regional transportation services and programs provided by IVT in the southern California areas of Brawley, Calexico, Imperial, West Shores and El Centro. SunLine coordinates with Greyhound to enable Greyhound bus service to provide pick up and drop off services at the SunLine Thousand Palms Transit Hub located at 72 -480 Varner Road. Greyhound serves the hub with three westbound trips and three eastbound trips each day. PRIVATE TRANSPORTATION Taxi Administration The SunLine Regulatory Administration (SRA), is responsible for establishing and enforcing ethical standards maintained by the Franchising Board. In addition, SRA is charged with licensing and regulating taxicab franchises and drivers in the Coachella Valley, while also ensuring residents and visitors are charged a fair and reasonable price. Figure 1.16 represents the current operating taxi franchises in the Coachella Valley along with the number of vehicles operated by each franchise. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 29 FIGURE 1.16 TAXI FRANCHISES Franchises Vehicles American Cab 30 Desert City Cab 40 Yellow Cab of the Desert 53 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 30 CHAPTER 2: EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE INTRODUCTION In FY 2016/2017, SunLine served 4.1 million fixed route passenger boardings, a decrease of 4.8% from the previous year. In the same year, it operated over 3,467,182 miles and 238,374 hours of revenue service. SunLine’s ridership decline in fixed route bus service is consistent with national trends. Transit ridership has decreased in almost every major city and suburb. SunDial paratransit service continues to be well utilized for client’s day to day activities, such as medical appointments, shopping, or work. In FY 2016/2017, SunLine served almost 150,301 trips, a 2% increase from FY 2015/2016. FIXED ROUTE SERVICE – ROUTE BY ROUTE ANALYSIS Little data exists to corroborate which global causes are impacting SunLine most significantly. There has been much speculation about the effect of low gas prices, increased car ownership, ride-hailing services and services which offer delivery of groceries, fast food and goods as contributing factors to decreased fixed route ridership. Figure 2.1 displays the comparison in ridership from FY 2015/2016 to FY 2016/2017. FIGURE 2.1 ANNUAL COMPARISON OF SUNBUS RIDERSHIP SunLine is analyzing effects attributable to the quantity and quality of transit services. Ridership may be falling if service is getting slower due to congestion or if there are recurring, on-time performance issues. We also seek to understand why SunLine ridership has declined less steeply than other transit operators. Figure 2.2 presents ridership for five (5) years, from FY 2012/13 to FY 2016/17. Service Type FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17 Percent Change SunBus (Fixed Route)4,358,966 4,151,468 -4.8% Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 31 FIGURE 2.2 FIXED ROUTE RIDERSHIP Service Efficiency and Effectiveness To determine the efficiency and effectiveness of all routes, staff reviewed the performance statistics for FY 2016/2017 with data from the transit monitoring software TransTrack. Figure 2.3 below summarizes data by line. Data available includes passenger boardings, passengers per revenue hour, cost per passenger, passenger revenue per revenue hour, and the farebox recovery ratio. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 32 FIGURE 2.3 ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE STATISTICS, FY 2016/2017 PARATRANSIT SERVICE – SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Customer growth on SunLine’s paratransit services continues steadily. Like many transit systems across the country, SunLine faces challenges in providing cost-effective service for disabled customers who are unable to use traditional buses. In FY 2015/2016, SunLine served almost 153,183 trips, a 7% increase from FY 2014/2015. Overall ridership for the demand response and subscription services is expected to continue to grow. FIGURE 2.4 ANNUAL COMPARISON OF SUNDIAL RIDERSHIP LINES PASSENGER COUNT PASSENGERS PER REVENUE HOUR COST PER PASSENGER PASSENGER REVENUE PER REVENUE HOUR FAREBOX RECOVERY RATIO 14 629,697 21.4 $5.29 $31.01 27.35% 15 104,060 19.1 $5.95 $27.28 24.05% 20 25,062 10.3 $11.00 $14.87 13.11% 24 161,799 14.8 $7.67 $21.42 18.85% 30 686,776 24.5 $4.62 $35.68 31.46% 32 248,350 14.7 $7.71 $21.29 18.77% 53 48,901 6.5 $17.60 $9.41 8.19% 54 75,157 11.1 $10.21 $16.07 14.17% 70 180,326 18.3 $6.19 $26.23 23.15% 80 141,170 25.5 $4.45 $36.97 32.64% 81 89,266 15.1 $7.48 $21.67 19.13% 90 140,831 11.9 $9.51 $17.56 15.48% 91 181,092 10.8 $10.52 $15.49 13.64% 95 28,556 4.5 $25.32 $6.60 5.81% 111 1,396,966 19.7 $5.75 $28.73 25.34% 220 13,458 3.4 $33.63 $4.87 4.30% SunDial 164,802 2.4 $35.39 $9.94 11.74% Service Type FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17 Percent Change SunDial 164,025 164,802 0.5% Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 33 FIGURE 2.5 MONTHLY COMPARISON OF SUNDIAL RIDERSHIP KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS To ensure adherence to the Productivity Improvement Program (PIP) established by the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC), SunLine continues to monitor and evaluate routes to guarantee compliance with key performance indicators. The performance indicators are monitored using TransTrack software implemented by RCTC for all Riverside County transit operators. Over the past six years, SunLine has consistently met the compliance requirements for both mandatory and discretionary performance indicators. SunLine is on track to meet the following targets for FY 2017/2018: Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour Subsidy Per Passenger Mile Subsidy Per Hour Subsidy Per Mile Passengers Per Revenue Hour Passenger Per Revenue Mile SunLine has not yet met the following targets for FY 2017/2018: Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy Per Passenger SunLine will continue to work closely with RCTC to meet the key performance indicators and to ensure targets are set by a process in keeping with industry standards. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 34 PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT EFFORTS Since the 2015 update to the COA, SunLine has made improvements to all fixed routes, including realigning existing routes and improving frequency to enhance ridership. The following modifications were made in the past fiscal year to fixed route bus service:  Interlining of Lines 14 and 30, weekdays only.  Line 20 Express extended service from I-10 to Cook, Fred Waring to Town Center and removed service along Monterey between I-10 to Fred Waring. Express service operates during peak hours only on weekdays.  New to fixed route service is Line 21 which replaced Line 53. Line 21 serves Town Center, Fred Waring and Cook to Gerald Ford and provides limited service between 11:00 a.m. and 4 p.m. (in between Line 20 peak service in Palm Desert) on weekdays.  Line 53 was removed with ridership absorbed by Express Line 20 and Line 21.  Line 80 was realigned to serve Calhoun, Dr. Carreon, Van Buren and Ave. 48. Part of the Line 80 was removed along Jackson and Dr. Carreon between Calhoun and Jackson. In the May 2018 service change Line 80 was improved to add 30 minute frequency and realigned to serve the North Indio Walmart shopping center.  Line 90 and 91 were realigned to commence service at 5th and Vine in Coachella with the section of service from Highway 111 and Flower removed to reduce duplication of service. In May 2018, Line 91 added four (4) trips to commence at Highway 111 and Flower.  Improved frequency from forty (40) minutes to thirty (30) minutes before 6 a.m. and every twenty minutes past 6 p.m. on Line 111 for weekdays.  Afternoon school trippers have been absorbed by Lines 14, 30 and 111 (regularly scheduled routes). Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 35 FIGURE 2.6 MONTHLY COMPARISON OF SYSTEM RIDERSHIP Staff continues to coordinate with local jurisdictions to determine best practices in relation to transit services provided throughout the Coachella Valley. Staff will continue monitoring existing routes; applying service warrants to evaluate route performance. In addition to concentrating on modifying and adjusting existing routes, the review of underperforming routes will continue to determine if segment realignment, trip modifications or discontinuation of service should be considered due to low productivity. Service Standards and Warrants The factors listed below are considered when analyzing new service proposals and requests, as well as evaluating existing service. Area Coverage While most of the urbanized sections of SunLine’s service area are adequately served, there are some areas which are provided with more service than others. When servi ce is proposed, the new line will be evaluated based on its proximity to other lines and the necessity of its implementation based on area coverage and service productivity standards. Areas that are not currently served or are underserved, but warrant new or enh anced service will be evaluated to receive new transit service when funding becomes available or through efficiency improvements of the existing transit lines. Growth in the ADA paratransit service area must also be addressed as part of any new service pla nning. Funding of these types of services must be prioritized along with improvements to existing transit services, based on available funding. Market Area Characteristics Staff also considers the density and demographic characteristics of a given service area as an important determinant for providing transit success. In tying area coverage standards to population and employment densities, SunLine recognizes the need to provide more service within more highly developed areas, and often considers this factor as part of the service development process. 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000 400,000 450,000 500,000 Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun System Ridership Comparison -5 Years FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 36 Transit-Dependent Populations SunLine considers the effects of service changes on transit-dependent riders during service planning processes. While SunLine’s current network serves most transit-dependent populations and their destinations effectively, the agency continues to examine transit dependency when evaluating new service proposals. Special Market Needs Staff often receives requests for new service when existing routes do not adequately address unique market opportunities. Some examples include short routes such as shuttles that may better connect two or more high demand destinations, such as a transit center and an employment center, a senior center and a shopping complex, or student housing and a university campus. They may also provide local circulation between destinations in a single community with the service span and frequency tailored to these unique markets. Service Standards of Evaluating New Services Once a route is implemented, performance monitoring begins immediately to determine if the route is reaching its desired potential and performance standards. New service routes not meeting minimum standards are subject to the same remedial actions as existing services requiring evaluation at the eighteen to twenty-four month marks, may be truncated or eliminated if line productivity does not improve. MAJOR TRIP GENERATORS & PROJECTED GROWTH Many transit trips within the Coachella Valley are destined for the City of Palm Desert, with 23 percent of all work trips ending there. Data compiled for trip purposes show trip patterns to Palm Desert are mostly from the Cities of Cathedral City, Indio, La Quinta, and Palm Springs. There are also strong trip patterns from La Quinta and Coachella to Indio, and from Desert Hot Springs to Palm Springs. Most trips in the system occur along Highway 111, with nearly all destinations served directly by Line 111. Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs – Palm Springs) and Line 30 (Cathedral City – Palm Springs) are also key SunLine transit lines. With respect to school travel, Palm Desert continues to be a key destination as the location of the main campus of the College of the Desert (COD). SunLine also provides public transportation services for middle and high school students for school districts that are unable to provide transportation. SunLine schedules special school-tripper buses to accommodate the public transportation demand and school bell schedule for school districts including the Palm Springs Unified School District (PSUSD) and Desert Sands Unified School District (DSUSD). SunLine staff coordinates with local jurisdictions to provide recommendations for adequate transit considerations as new developments and construction projects are proposed. Through this process, SunLine attempts to reshape the community land use development patterns to support cost-effective transit, biking, and walking mobility in concert with both Smart Growth and the SB 375 GHG initiative. As the Coachella Valley flourishes, SunLine staff will continue to assess travel patterns and transit demands. Additionally, to assist Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 37 commuting students, SunLine will continue to coordinate public transit schedules with school bell times. EQUIPMENT, PASSENGER AMENITIES AND FACILITY NEEDS Passenger Amenities and Bus Stop Improvement Program As of January 2018, SunLine serves 635 bus stops, which are cleaned and maintained on a regular basis. Since completion of the 2005 COA and 2009 COA Update, SunLine has made significant improvements to bus stops in the Coachella Valley as part of its Bus Stop Improvement Program (BSIP). SunLine has successfully completed five phases of the BSIP. Presently, 361 bus stops have shelters. Funding was received in FY 2015/2016 to allow 25 new shelters to be placed at active stop locations as part of Phase 6 of the BSIP. In conjunction with the installation of new shelters, bus stops are also improved to meet guidelines set forth by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Additional funding has been requested for continual support of the BSIP in upcoming years. Real-Time Signage Displays SunLine introduced real-time arrival information display at the major transfer point located at Town Center at Hahn in Palm Desert. This new technology data combined with digital signage is creating new ways for SunLine to communicate with its riders. SunLine installed two real-time displays at major layovers located at Indian Canyon and Ramon in Palm Springs and Highway 111 at Flower in Indio. SunLine will also be exploring other potential locations for real-time displays. On-Board Passenger Amenities SunLine continues to offer free Wi-Fi on all fixed route buses. All SunLine buses have electronic destination signs. The signs indicate the route number, route name, and the destination of the bus. All of the buses have display racks for public announcements, notices and timetables. Passengers are able to request a stop by activating the stop request that is controlled by a plastic strip/pull cord located within each passenger’s reach. All buses are ADA compliant. Air conditioning and heating are provided on the buses for passenger comfort. Bicycle Facilities To provide bicyclists an alternate mode for traveling throughout the Coachella Valley, all of SunLine’s fixed route buses have exterior mounted bike racks. The combination of bicycling and riding the bus has increased the range of options for riders who utilize other modes of transportation. On-Board Security Cameras Cameras and the associated video recording equipment are installed on all SunLine fixed route buses. Video recording provides an invaluable asset when assessing the cause of collisions, investigating reports of improper behavior by SunLine staff and violations of SunLine rider rules by our passengers. Video from on-board cameras has also proven to be beneficial to law enforcement in the investigation of traffic incidents and criminal activity. Additionally, our paratransit vans are equipped with “SmartDrive” video monitoring. SmartDrive video recordings assist in determining the cause of collisions and Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 38 helps identify operator driving habits and tendencies. SmartDrive video is used to coach better driving habits and skills to our paratransit operators. Streaming live video links were added to vehicles in use on Commuter Link 220. Bus Replacement Program Approximately every three years, SunLine begins the replacement of ADA paratransit vans as they near 150,000 miles. In FY 2018, 13 replacement and three expansion vehicles were delivered to SunLine. The fixed route bus fleet began to be updated in 2017, as fifteen 2005 Orion buses become eligible for replacement under FTA guidelines (12-year lifespan or 500,000 miles). SunLine was awarded in FY 2013, by discretionary grant funding to expand the hydrogen fleet by five buses; the construction of these buses are set to commence in mid-2018. All SunLine vehicles, including non-revenue service vehicles, are powered with alternative fuels. Facility Needs CNG Station: The CNG station will be located at the Thousand Palms facility and will replace the existing station that has exceeded its useful life. Preliminary drawings have been completed. SunLine is in the process of procuring a design build firm that will provide a fully commissioned CNG station with the goal to have this project breaking ground in summer 2018. Hydrogen Station: SunLine is in the process of upgrading its existing hydrogen refueling station with a new electrolyzer. Preliminary drawings are complete for the hydrogen fueling station. Equipment for the fueling station is being built off-site. The hydrogen fueling station is expected to be commissioned by the fall of 2018. Thousand Palms Administration Building Solar Canopies: Preliminary drawings have been completed and approved with a Design Build firm being procured. This project is expected to be completed by the end of calendar year 2018. Operations Facility Replacement: The Operations Facility Replacement will allow SunLine to complete demolition, removal and rebuild an operations building in Thousand Palms. The architectural and engineering firm has been selected to provide preliminary engineering drawings that will be used for the selection of a design build firm. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 39 CHAPTER 3: SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION INTRODUCTION In July of 2017, SunLine Transit Agency adopted a Rethink Transit Campaign. The purpose of the campaign is to identify savings by reallocating resources to productive bus lines, and developing sustainable solutions to serve areas with fewer riders. By reallocating reso urces to productive services, ridership and passenger revenue will increase easing financial constraints that inhibit growth. The campaign was adopted in response to three consecutive years of declining passenger ridership and revenue. The decline was cau sed by a national trend in stagnate transit growth, fairly moderate motor fuel prices, an increase in automobile ownership by low income residents in Southern California, and increasing competition from the private sector that has resulted in more choices being made available to local transit passengers. Rethink Transit has led to a Transit Redesign that includes realigning or partially replacing existing services that consistently exhibited low productivity. Other services may be replaced in the future by alternative mobility formats such as vanpools, or demand response, shared ride services that use smaller, flexible vehicles that are suited for less densely populated areas. More productive services will be improved by faster running times and more frequencies that will encourage wider use of those services. HDR is facilitating a study for SunLine Transit Redesign and Network Analysis that will evaluate the current schedule modifications and make recommendations for longer term sustainability. The study will also consider unmet transit needs, and make recommendations for growth during the next 10 years. Further, the study will review fares and recommend adjustments. HDR will produce the study by the end of 2018. HDR is a national transportation firm that will employ comparisons of other transit properties of comparable size to SunLine to determine best practices for future growth. TransLoc will perform a micro-transit simulation that will enable SunLine to launch a pilot program for share ride services in areas of light density where traditional transit applications have demonstrated low productivity. RECENT SERVICE CHANGES SunLine implemented the first phase of Rethink Transit in January 2018 by making the following revisions to SunBus schedules:  Interlining - continue to increase operational efficiencies by interlining routes such as Line 14 and 30 for weekday service.  Line 20 Express - extends service from I-10 to Cook, Fred Waring to Town Center and removed service along Monterey between I-10 to Fred Waring. The Express Service operates only during peak hours on weekdays. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 40  Line 21 - new route that serves Town Center, Fred Waring, and Cook to Gerald Ford with limited service between 11:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on weekdays only.  Line 53 - replaced with Line 20 to absorb part of the line, and maintain mid-day service by implementing Line 21. Ended weekday/weekend service on Line 53 due to low ridership.  Line 80 - realigned to include service on Calhoun, Dr. Carreon, Van Buren and Avenue 48 in Indio. Removed service on Jackson and Dr. Carreon between Calhoun and Jackson.  Line 90 - commenced service at 5th/Vine in Coachella. Removed service from Jackson, Hwy 111/Flower and Calhoun in Indio. Removed service from Ave. 52, Van Buren and to Ave. 51 loop with frequency every 60 minutes.  Line 91 - commenced service at 5th/Vine in Coachella. Remove service from Hwy 111/Flower to 5th/Vine on Hwy 111, Indio Blvd., Van Buren, Ave. 49, Frederick, and Ave. 50 for both eastbound and westbound directions.  Line 111 - increased frequency from 40 to 30 minutes before 6:00 a.m. and every 20 minutes past 6:00 a.m. for early morning weekday service.  Absorbed unproductive afternoon trippers on Lines 14, 30 and 111 by regularly scheduled services. The May 2018 Service Change continued revision of fixed route schedules to maximize efficiencies and introduce service improvements.  Line 80 – Improved frequency from every 60 to every 30 minutes, and realigned the route to provide service closer to the Walmart Shopping Center in North Indio.  Line 111 – improved running times. PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION The strength of SunLine’s network lies in its frequent, regional trunk routes. Lines 14, 30, and 111 together account for 64% of all daily boardings. Improving these services will increase farebox revenue on the entire network. Rethink Transit will incorporate improvements, initially to Line 111 with other enhancements to follow. Future planned service changes include:  Realign Line 15 with service modifications to Desert Edge.  Replace Line 95 with a new Line 96 with a demand response micro transit service.  Introduce Quick Bus, a limited stop service to reduce running time on Line 111.  Add more frequency on Lines 14, 30 and 111.  Evaluate service span of lines to create efficiencies.  Collaborate with other service providers to create more regional mobility, such as service from the Coachella Valley to San Bernardino. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 41  Consideration is being made in the possibility of replacing the Palm Springs BUZZ with transit service.  Potential realignment of Lines 111 and 70 to serve the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, Stagecoach Festival and BNP Paribas Open respectively.  Staff will continue monitoring existing routes applying service warrants to evaluate route performance. In addition to concentrating on modifying and adjusting existing routes, the review of underperforming routes will continue to determine if segment realignment, trip modifications or discontinuation of service should be considered due to low productivity.  Introduction of micro-transit in lightly populated areas where traditional transit is not appropriate, for example, to replace Line 95 with smaller, more flexible vehicles with demand response services. Consideration is also being given with respect to micro-transit fulfilling first mile, last mile demand in the service area of Lines 20 and 21.  A veteran based service is in the early stages of planning. This service will be provided as an option to veterans who are seeking transportation for medical treatment.  Realignment of Lines 90, 91, 95 and 111 to serve the future Coachella Transit Hub facility. MODIFICATIONS TO PARATRANSIT SERVICE The provision of ADA services remains a challenge because it is costly. Efforts to mitigate the increasing expenses in demand-responsive service include revisions to the paratransit eligibility/certification process and continuing to monitor late cancellations and no -shows, which improves the availability of appointment time slots and makes SunDial service more efficient for customers. SunDial staff periodically measure (monthly) the system -wide average rate for that month to determine whether a particular customer has excessive late cancellations or no-shows. The Agency then considers the customer’s overall frequency of use and evaluates whether there is “a pattern of abuse” relative to how often that customer travels with SunDial. SunDial is moving forward with the paratransit eligibility/certification process to implement in‐person interviews to ensure paratransit riders qualify for the service. MTM, Inc. has been contracted as the consulting firm to help reform the current processes. They are evaluating the Agency’s current procedures and will be making recommendations to help implement changes. SunLine also plans to implement new technology in the near future to facilitate on‐line scheduling and cancelling of paratransit reservations. The new technology will provide a reminder call the day before to encourage cancelling when plans change and will also provide customers with notification 5 minutes prior to passenger pickup. MARKETING PLANS AND PROMOTION Marketing is an essential element of a cost-effective public transit service. A focused marketing effort using a modest budget is key in ensuring that the substantial public Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 42 resources used by a transit service are well utilized. SunLine will increase marketing in order to expand ridership through a cost -effective strategy using local media:  Enhance Ease of Use - pursued through a combination of streamlined routing and schedules, an improved passenger information program and a system-wide signage program.  Increase Awareness and Enhance Image of SunLine Transit Agency - will include strategies to increase overall visibility of the transit network and to make potential riders more aware of what services are available and how to access them.  Transit User Group Presentations – staff will continue to make personal presentations to local transit user groups, such as senior centers, disabled groups, schools, and civic groups and to educate about the destinations available through the service.  Expanded Pass Outlets - expanding the number of outlets to ease the ability of users to purchase monthly passes.  Implement Strategic Marketing Plan - SunLine proposes developing a marketing plan with long-range marketing goals and implementation strategies to assist with retaining and attracting customers. SunLine will continue to provide an Internet webpage that includes rider information, links to other cities, current schedules and routes, and bus stop locations. This marketing tool is updated as changes to the system are implemented. SunLine continues to follow its robust marketing and outreach campaign. Throughout FY 2018/2019 the Marketing and Planning teams will join community service events, seminars and conventions to spread the positive impact local transit service has in the Coachella Valley. The marketing efforts shall be conducted to ensure that all service area residents are aware of SunLine services. Targeted marketing efforts shall be conducted for high potential groups, including elderly, disabled, and low-income residents. BUDGET IMPACTS ON PROPOSED CHANGES Due to funding shortfalls and current economic conditions in the state of California and at the federal level, staff is currently scoping a planning study to evaluate service efficiencies and modifications to be implemented in January 2018. Existing funded projects are listed in Chapter 1, System Overview. Proposed service improvements without identified funding may be implemented as new funding opportunities become available. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 43 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET In FY 2018/2019, SunLine plans to have an operating budget of $38,900,991 and a capital project budget of $6,053,623. The operating budget will absorb cost increases in wages and benefits, some new operating and administrative staff positions, as well as other direct costs increases associated with operating service. SunLine utilizes funding from various sources to operate its fixed route and paratransit services. Additional revenue opportunities are pursued in order to reduce subsidy levels. These additional revenue sources include SunLine’s bus and shelter advertising, sales of emission credits, outside CNG fuel sales revenue, taxi voucher sales and funding from two jurisdictions for bus shelter maintenance. FUNDING PLANS TO SUPPORT PROPOSED OPERATING AND CAPITAL PROGRAM For FY 2018/2019, funding plans for the proposed operating and capital programs are as follows: Funding sources for the proposed operating budget includes FTA Section 5307 (Urban), 5311 (Rural), 5310 (Elderly and Disabled), Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ), and Low Carbon Operating Program (LCTOP) funds apportioned by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), State Local Transportation Funds (LTF), Local Measure A funding, farebox revenue and other revenue for operating assistance. Funding sources for capital projects include funds from FTA’s Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program (CMAQ), Section 5307, Section 5339, State Transit Assistance (STA), State of Good Repair Funds, and LTF. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 44 OPERATING BUDGET The estimated FY 2018/2019 operating and capital budget of $44,954,614 outlined in Table 4, is funded by: FIGURE 4.1 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET Total Operating Revenue Operating Revenues $38,900,991 Passenger Fares $2,643,828 LTF $20,621,864 Measure A $6,000,000 State of Good Repair $500,000 Estimated 5307 $3,437,436 Estimated 5309 $250,000 Carryover Section 5307 $935,963 Estimated 5310 $58,000 Estimated 5311 $352,874 Section 5311(f) Operating Assistance $204,721 Anticipated LCTOP $250,000 Carryover LCTOP $400,467 Carryover CMAQ $318,010 Estimated CMAQ $794,208 Other Revenue $1,851,574 Total Capital Revenue Capital Revenues $6,053,623 Estimated STA funds $3,783,879 State of Good Repair $253,623 Estimated Section 5307 $1,371,949 Section 5339 $644,172 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 45 REGULATORY AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS Americans with Disability Act SunLine complies with the guidelines set forth by the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) by providing a 100% accessible revenue service fleet for fixed route transit services and ADA paratransit service vans. Supervisor vans are also equipped with wheelchair lifts. As funding becomes available, the agency continues to provide bus stop improvements to ensure accessibility. Staff also coordinates with developers and contractors regarding construction projects to include bus stop improvements when the opportunity exists. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise SunLine’s most recent Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) program and goal was revised and submitted to FTA in July 2015. The DBE semiannual reports are kept current, with the most recent DBE report submitted in December 2016. The next DBE report will be submitted in June 2018. Equal Employment Opportunity SunLine complies with federal regulations pertaining to employment and submits its Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)-1 report annually to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) as well as its EEO/Affirmative Action Program every four years or as major changes occur in the workforce or employment conditions to the FTA. The most recent EEO-1 report was submitted to the EEOC and certified in September 2016. The most recent EEO/Affirmative Action Program was revised and submitted to the FTA in FY 2015/2016. Title VI Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects people from discrimination based on race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving federal financial assistance. SunLine’s Title VI Report was updated in FY 2016/2017 for use in the FY 2017/2018 to FY 2019/2020 period. The report is scheduled for update, submission and approval by October 1, 2019. Transportation Development Act Transportation Development Act (TDA) provides two major sources of funding for public transportation: The Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and the State Transit Assistance fund (STA). RCTC commissioned Pacific Management Consulting to conduct the Triennial Performance Audit as required by Transportation Development Act (TDA) and SunLine’s findings are referenced in Table 6. Federal Transit Administration Triennial Audit In accordance with regulations, SunLine Transit Agency completed a Federal Tr ansit Administration Triennial Audit site visit in March 2016. The Triennial Review focused on SunLine’s compliance in 17 areas. SunLine had no repeat deficiencies from the 2013 Triennial Review. SunLine met FTA requirements in fourteen (14) areas. Deficiencies were found in three (3) areas; Technical Capacity, Maintenance and Procurement. Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 46 The Audit recommends: 1) SunLine Transit Agency’s overall Technical Capacity and Office Procedures be improved to provide required information in progress reports. 2) Maintenance Department facility preventative maintenance checks be improved to meet an 80 percent minimum target. 3) Procurement Department pre-award and post- delivery processes be improved. National Transit Database To keep track of the industry and provide public information and statistics as it continues to grow, FTA’s National Transit Database (NTD) records the financial, operating a nd asset condition of transit systems. Staff are currently finalizing FY 2016/2017 NTD Section sampling. SunLine continues to perform parallel sampling using manual samples and Automatic Passenger Counter (APC) data in order to verify and gain approval to use APC data in future reporting. Alternative Fuel Vehicles SunLine conforms to RCTC’s Alternative Fuel Policy with all vehicles in the fleet using CNG , electric or hydrogen fuel. The current active fleet consists of fifty-eight (58) 40-foot CNG buses, five (5) 40-foot Hydrogen Fuel Cell buses, ten (10) 32-foot CNG buses, three (3) 40- foot Electric buses, thirty-seven (37) 22-foot paratransit vans, and forty-five (45) total non- revenue CNG and electric vehicles, including general support cars and trucks as well as facility-specific golf carts and forklifts. CNG Fuel Pump Hydrogen Fuel Station Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 47 FY 2018/2019 SRTP TABLES Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 48 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY – FIXED ROUTE Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 49 TABLE 1 FLEET INVENTORY – DEMAND RESPONSE Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 50 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – ALL ROUTES (SYSTEM TOTALS) Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 51 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – NON-EXCLUDED ROUTES Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 52 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY – EXCLUDED ROUTES Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 53 TABLE 2 SRTP SERVICE SUMMARY– PARATRANSIT Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 54 TABLE 2 SERVICE SUMMARY – SUNBUS Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 55 TABLE 2A SRTP SUMMARY OF ROUTES TO BE EXCLUDED IN FY 2018/2019 Route #Mode Service Type Route Description Date of Implementation Route Exemption End Date Line 20 Express Fixed Route Directly Operated Desert Hot Springs – Palm Desert January 2016 December 2019 Line 21 Fixed Route Directly Operated Palm Desert January 2018 December 2020 Line 111 Express Fixed Route Directly Operated Palm Springs – Coachella January 2019 December 2022 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 56 TABLE 3 SRTP ROUTE STATISTICS – ALL ROUTES Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 57 TABLE 3A INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTIONS Route Route Classification Major Destinations Cities/Communities Served Connections 14 Trunk Shopping, Schools, DMV, Employment Center, Library, Senior Center Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs 15, 20, 24, 30 & 111 15 Local Shopping Centers, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, City Hall, Medical, and Schools Desert Hot Springs and Desert Edge 14 20 Local Shopping, Senior Center, Library, Community Center, Schools Desert Hot Springs, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert 14, 15, 32, 54, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 21 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, City Hall, School, College, and Mall Desert Hot Springs, Palm Desert 14, 15, 32, 54, & 111 24 Local Shopping, Medical, Library, Social Services, Theaters Palm Springs 14, 30, 32, 111 & MBTA 30 Trunk Shopping, Schools, Medical, Library, Senior Center, Airport, Court House, Social Security, Theaters, and Public Social Services Palm Springs and Cathedral City 14, 24, 32, 111 & MBTA 32 Local Shopping, School, College, Medical, Theaters, Mall and Hospital Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Thousand Palms 20, 24, 30, 54, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 54 Local Shopping, School, Tennis Gardens, Work Force Development, and College Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, Bermuda Dunes 20, 32, 111, Link 220 & Amtrak 70 Local Shopping, Schools, Theaters and Medical La Quinta, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, Bermuda Dunes 111 & Amtrak 80 Local Shopping, School, Workforce Development, Social Services, Senior Center, DMV, Hospital Indio 54, 81, 90, 91 & 111 81 Local Shopping, Schools, Medical, Community Center, College, DMV, Hospital, Work Force Development, Social Services and Employment Center Indio 54, 80, 90, 91, 111 & Greyhound 90 Local Shopping , Library, City Hall, Senior Center, Community Center, Social Services and Medical Indio and Coachella 54, 80, 81, 91 & 111 91 Local Shopping, College, Schools, Community Center, and Medical Indio, Coachella, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis 54, 80, 81, 90 & 111 95 Local Shopping, College, Community Center, Medical and Schools Indio, Coachella, Mecca and North Shore 90, 91 & 111 111 Trunk Hospital, Medical, Shopping, College, Mall and Schools Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio 14, 24, 20, 21, 30, 32, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90 & 91, 111, Amtrak & MBTA 220 Market-Based Mall, College, Shopping and University Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Cabazon Casino, Beaumont, Moreno Valley, Riverside 20, 32, 54, 111, Metrolink, Pass Transit, RTA & Greyhound Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 58 TABLE 4 SUMMARY OF FUNDS FOR FY 2018/2019 Table 4 - Summary of Funding Request for FY 2018/1924-May-18Total Amount of Funds Total Carryover AmountLTFSTAState of Good RepairMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsCarryover Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPLCTOP CarryoverCarryover CMAQ CMAQOther RevenueFareboxOPERATINGOperating Assistance$36,201,539$935,963$20,621,864$6,000,000$3,437,436$935,963$250,000$352,874$250,000$1,709,574$2,643,828Taxi Voucher$232,000$0$58,000$58,000$116,000$296,170$0$91,449$204,721$26,000$0$26,000$357,315$318,010$39,305$318,010$400,467$400,467$400,467$500,000$0$500,000$490,000$0$53,900$436,100$397,500$0$39,392$358,108$38,900,991$1,654,440$20,903,910$0$500,000$6,000,000$3,437,436$935,963$250,000$58,000$352,874$204,721$0$250,000$400,467$318,010$794,208$1,851,574$2,643,828CAPITALCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds With CarryoverTotal Carryover AmountLTFSTAState of Good RepairMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsCarryover Section 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5309Section 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPLCTOP CarryoverCarryover CMAQ CMAQOther RevenueFareboxSL-19-01$2,100,000$0$420,000$1,035,828$644,172SL-19-02$200,000$0$143,879$56,121SL-19-03$350,000$0$70,000$280,000SL-19-04$200,000$0$200,000SL-19-05$1,000,000$0$1,000,000SL-19-06$1,350,000$0$1,350,000SL-19-07$125,000$0$125,000SL-19-08$50,000$0$50,000SL-19-09$78,623$0$78,623SL-19-10$600,000$0$600,000$6,053,623$0$0$3,783,879$253,623$0$1,371,949$0$0$0$0$0$644,172$0$0$0$0$0$0$44,954,614$1,654,440$20,903,910$3,783,879$753,623$6,000,000$4,809,385$935,963$250,000$58,000$352,874$204,721$644,172$250,000$400,467$318,010$794,208$1,851,574$2,643,828Project Funding DetailsTarget Budget$38,900,991Based on estimated FY19 budgetProjected FY18/19 LTF$20,903,910Based on FY19+unallocated carryover fundsProjected FY18/19 State of Good Repair$500,000Based on FY17/18 Estimated Apportionment 02-26-18Projected FY18/19 Measure A$6,000,000Based on revised RCTC Revenue Est. dated 02-26-18Projected FY18/19 Section 5307 Operating Funds$3,437,436FY19 based on the unknown status of future federal fundingProjected FY18/19 Carryover Section 5307 Operating Funds$935,963Based on remaining FY 17 operating funds. Projected FY18/19 Section 5309 Operating Funds$250,000Based on support funds associated with the transfer of FC6, Connecticut Transit TransferProjected FY18/19 Section 5310 Operating Funds$58,000Based on FY19 application to CalTrans. Projected FY18/19 Section 5311 Operating Funds$557,595Based on 5311 applications for regional and intercity apportionments. 5311 (f) from application submitted May 2017.Projected FY18/19 LCTOP Funds$650,467Based on new appropriation estimates from RCTC Revenue Est. Dated 2-26-18 plus estimated carryover FY18. $400,467 carryover is from existing projects which are still in progress.Projected FY18/19 CMAQ Carryover$318,010Based on estimated expenses for Van Pool contract utilizing grant # CA-95-X327.Projected FY 18/19 CMAQ$794,208Based on initial project approval through CVAGProjected FY18/19 Other Revenues$1,851,574Advertising revenue ($76K), shelter maintenance revenue ($112K), SRA overhead fee ($34K), fueling revenue (700K), emission credits ($750K), Taxi Voucher ($116K), & interest and other revenue ($37.5K), ($26K) FTA National Fuel Cell Bus ProgramProjected FY18/19 Farebox Revenue$2,643,828Based on the continued decrease of 5% ridership for Fixed Route and the 5% decrease in ridership for ParatransitTotal Estimated Operating Funding Request$38,900,991Projected FY18/19 STA Capital$3,783,879FY18/19 plus unallocated carryoverProjected FY18/19 State of Good Repair$253,623Based on FY17/18 Estimated Apportionment 02-26-18Projected FY18/19 5307 Capital$1,371,949Based on new appropriation estimates from RCTC Revenue Est. Dated 2-26-18Section 5339 $644,172Based on RCTC Revenue Est. dated 05-08-18Total Estimated Capital Funding Request$6,053,623Total Funding Request$44,954,614Radio System ReplacementReplacement of Paratransit Vans (10)Sub-total CapitalTotal Operating & CapitalReplacement Fixed Route Buses (3)Transit EnhancementsInformation Technology (IT) ProjectsExpansion of Inventory WarehouseRoof Repair Division 1 and 2Maintenance Tools and EquipmentInstall Electric Charger for Buses - Division 2Bus Simulator (2)Project DescriptionSub-total OperatingLine 80, 81, 95Vanpool ProgramUnplanned Maintenance SoftwareCommuter Link 220 Preventative Maintenance Revenue VehiclesQuick BusSunRide Ride Share and Desert Recreation District Rec Route Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 59 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-01] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-01 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement Fixed Route Buses (3) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of three (3) fixed route buses to replace existing CNG bus fleets that will have reached their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of three (3) fixed route buses will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain services reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $420,000 Section 5307 2019 $1,035,828 Section 5339 2019 $644,172 Total $2,100,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 60 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-02] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-02 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Transit Enhancements PROJECT DESCRIPTION The enhancements of bus stop systems to improve access for all customers through modernization of bus shelters, benches, kiosks, signage, and lighting to enhance security and safety. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The enhancement of transit facilities promotes safety and security for people throughout the Coachella Valley. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $143,879 5307 2019 $56,121 Total $200,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 61 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-03] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-03 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Information Technology (IT) Projects PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project supports the purchase of the Agency’s need for software, network infrastructure, computing resources, and business analytics. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The use of IT equipment is critical to the daily function and efficiency in providing safe, reliable and efficient transit services. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $70,000 Section 5307 2019 $280,000 Total $350,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 62 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-04] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-04 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Expansion of Inventory Warehouse PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project will be for the construction/expansion of the inventory warehouse. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION As the Agency grows its fleet, additional parts are required to properly prepare for both preventative maintenance and unforeseen repairs. Additional storage space is needed to stock parts for both current and incoming vehicles. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $200,000 Total $200,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 63 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-05] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-05 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Radio System Replacement PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project purchases Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) radio system to replace current system. The new system will have the ability to monitor VoIP calls between the dispatch center, mobile workforce and revenue vehicles. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION SunLine’s current radio system has met its useful life and is no longer a supported system, making repair parts difficult to purchase. Replacing this system with newer technology will enhance our communication. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $1,000,000 Total $1,000,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 64 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-06] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-06 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement of Paratransit Vans (10) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of 10 vans to replace existing SunDial paratransit vans that will have reached their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of 10 paratransit vans will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $1,350,000 Total $1,350,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 65 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-07] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-07 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Roof Repair Division 1 and 2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project will allow SunLine to repair and improve roofing of existing buildings at Thousand Palms and Indio divisions. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The project will allow for continued safety and security of staff and the general public. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount State of Good Repair 2019 $125,000 Total $125,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 66 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-08] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-08 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Maintenance Tools and Equipment PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project purchases major replacement tools, equipment and parts used in routine vehicle maintenance. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Equipment must be replaced to ensure proper maintenance of all SunLine vehicles. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount State of Good Repair 2019 $50,000 Total $50,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 67 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-09] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-09 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Install Electric Charger for Buses – Division 2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION Project will install electric charging stations at SunLine’s Indio division. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION By installing charging stations at Division 2, the Agency will increase efficiency by cutting down deadhead time and increase productivity of daily bus operations. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount State of Good Repair 2019 $78,623 Total $78,623 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 68 TABLE 4A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-19-10] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-19-10 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Bus Simulator (2) PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project will purchase two (2) bus simulators to provide realistic scenario driver training. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This equipment will provide realistic driving simulation in a controlled classroom environment. This allows the Agency to use minimal resources and provide a greater level of training and correct driving techniques to mitigate potential hazards. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2018 June 2021 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2019 $600,000 Total $600,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 69 TABLE 5.1 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2019/2020 Table 5.1 - Summary of Funding Request for FY 2019/2018-May-18Total Amount of Funds Total Carryover AmountLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPLCTOP CarryoverCMAQCMAQ CarryoverOther RevenueFareboxOPERATINGOperating Assistance$35,709,476$250,000$20,674,876$5,688,129$4,000,000$341,572$300,000$250,000$1,900,000$2,554,899Taxi Voucher$93,335$23,334$23,334$46,667Vanpool Program$537,148$478,062$59,086$478,062Line 80, 81, 95$238,135$190,508$47,627$190,508Commuter Link 220 $250,000$50,000$200,000Quick Bus$1,062,500$212,500$850,000$37,890,593$918,570$21,067,423$0$5,688,129$4,000,000$23,334$341,572$200,000$0$300,000$250,000$850,000$668,570$1,946,667$2,554,899CAPITALCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds With CarryoverTotal Carryover AmountLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPLCTOP CarryoverCMAQCMAQ CarryoverOther RevenueFareboxSL-20-01$4,032,000$0$2,532,000$1,000,000$500,000SL-20-02$350,000$0$350,000SL-20-03$540,000$0$540,000SL-20-04$150,000$0$150,000$5,072,000$0$0$3,572,000$0$1,000,000$0$0$0$500,000$0$0$0$0$0$0$42,962,593$918,570$21,067,423$3,572,000$5,688,129$5,000,000$23,334$341,572$200,000$500,000$300,000$250,000$850,000$668,570$1,946,667$2,554,899Project DescriptionSub-total OperatingReplacement Fixed Route Buses (6)Information Technology (IT) ProjectsReplacement Paratransit Buses (4)Security Cameras Division II and Coachella HubSub-total CapitalTotal Operating & Capital Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 70 TABLE 5.1A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FOR FY 2019/2020 TABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-20-01] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-20-01 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement Fixed Route Buses (6) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of six (6) fixed route buses to replace existing CNG bus fleets that will reach their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of six (6) fixed route buses will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2020 $2,532,000 Section 5307 2020 $1,000,000 Section 5339 2020 $500,000 Total $4,032,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 71 TABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-20-02] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-20-02 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Information Technology (IT) Projects PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project supports the purchase of the Agency’s need for software, network infrastructure, computing resources, and business analytics. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The use of IT equipment is critical to the daily function and efficiency in providing safe, reliable and efficient transit services. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2020 $350,000 Total $350,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 72 TABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-20-03] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-20-03 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement of Paratransit Vans (4) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of four (4) vans to replace existing SunDial paratransit vans that will have reached their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of four (4) paratransit vans will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2020 $540,000 Total $540,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 73 TABLE 5.1A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-20-04] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-20-04 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Security Cameras for Division II & Coachella Hub PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project will purchase and install transit security cameras at the Indio division and Coachella Hub. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This project is required to provide safe and secure transit facilities for staff, passengers, and vehicles. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2019 June 2022 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2020 $150,000 Total $150,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 74 TABLE 5.2 SUMMARY OF FUNDS REQUESTED FOR FY 2020/2021 TABLE 5.2Table 5.2 - Summary of Funding Request for FY 2020/212-May-18Total Amount of Funds Total Carryover AmountLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPCMAQ CarryoverOther RevenueFareboxOPERATINGOperating Assistance$37,622,906$20,256,500$5,955,493$4,152,000$341,572$500,000$3,951,370$2,465,970Taxi Voucher$93,334$23,334$23,334$46,667Vanpool Program$537,148$478,062$59,086$478,062Line 80, 81, 95$238,135$190,508$47,627$190,508Commuter Link 220 $250,000$50,000$200,000$38,741,523$668,570$20,436,547$0$5,955,493$4,152,000$23,334$341,572$200,000$0$500,000$668,570$3,998,037$2,465,970CAPITALCapital Project NumberTotal Amount of Funds With CarryoverTotal Carryover AmountLTFSTAMeasure ASection 5307 Indio/Cathedral City Palm SpringsSection 5310Section 5311Section 5311 (f) Section 5339 LCTOPCMAQ CarryoverOther RevenueFareboxSL-21-01$1,820,000$320,000$1,000,000$500,000SL-21-02$350,000$350,000SL-21-03$1,755,000$1,755,000SL-21-04$200,000$200,000$4,125,000$0$0$2,625,000$0$1,000,000$0$0$0$500,000$0$0$0$0$42,866,523$668,570$20,436,547$2,625,000$5,955,493$5,152,000$23,334$341,572$200,000$500,000$500,000$668,570$3,998,037$2,465,970Project DescriptionSub-total OperatingReplacement Fixed Route Buses (3)Information Technology (IT) ProjectsReplacement Paratransit Buses (13)Upgrade Division I Fence - Secure BaseSub-total CapitalTotal Operating & Capital Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 75 TABLE 5.2A CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION FOR FY 2020/2021 TABLE 5.2A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-21-01] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-21-01 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement Fixed Route Buses (3) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of three (3) fixed route buses to replace existing CNG bus fleets that will reach their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of three (3) fixed route buses will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2021 $320,000 Section 5307 2021 $1,000,000 Section 5339 2021 $500,000 Total $1,820,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 76 TABLE 5.2A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-21-02] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-21-02 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Information Technology (IT) Projects PROJECT DESCRIPTION The project supports the purchase of the Agency’s need for software, network infrastructure, computing resources, and business analytics. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The use of IT equipment is critical to the daily function and efficiency in providing safe, reliable and efficient transit services. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2021 $350,000 Total $350,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 77 TABLE 5.2A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-21-03] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-21-03 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Replacement of Paratransit Vans (13) PROJECT DESCRIPTION Purchase of thirteen (13) vans to replace existing SunDial paratransit vans that will have reached their useful life as outlined by FTA guidelines. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION The purchase of thirteen (13) paratransit vans will ensure SunLine replaces older fleet vehicles to maintain service reliability and reduce maintenance costs. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2021 $1,755,000 Total $1,755,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 78 TABLE 5.2A – CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION [SL-21-04] PROJECT NUMBER SRTP Project No: SL-21-04 FTIP No: PROJECT NAME Upgrade Division I Fence - Secure Base PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project is to secure the base of the perimeter fencing at SunLine’s Thousand Palms facility. PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This project is needed to ensure the safety and security of SunLine employees and passengers. PROJECT SCHEDULE Start Date Completion Date July 2020 June 2023 PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES Fund Type Fiscal Year Amount STA 2021 $200,000 Total $200,000 FTA Grant # RCTC Grant # Description Unexpended balance Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 79 TABLE 6 PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT SunLine completed a Transportation Development ACT (TDA) State Triennial Performance Audit in September 2016 for FY 2012/2013 through 2014/2015. The audit was performed by Michael Baker International. Table 6 “Progress to Implement the Triennial Performance Audit” summarizes the Performance Audit recommendations and actions taken by SunLine in response . Table 6 – Progress to Implement Triennial Performance Audit 1) Prepare and submit separate State Controller Tranist Operators Financial Transaction Report fo general public transit specialized service. (High Priority) This recommnedation has been addressed. The FY 2015/16 report has been submitted and this process has been added to the procedures. 2) Continue to pursue a fare revenue sharing agreement with College of the Desert. (High Priority) SunLine is collaborating with the College of the Desert, University of Califonia Riverside, and California State University San Bernardino Palm Desert Campus on a U- Pass. 3) Engage in long term planning. (Medium Priority) SunLine will be pursuing funds to implement a long range transit plan with a strategic marketing plan in FY 2017/18. Performance Audit Recommendation Action(s) Taken and Results Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 80 TABLE 7 SERVICE PROVIDER PERFORMANCE TARGETS Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 81 TABLE 8 FY 2018/2019 SRTP PERFORMANCE REPORT Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 82 TABLE 9 HIGHLIGHTS OF FY 2018/2019 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN TABLE 9 – HIGHLIGHTS OF FY 2018/2019 SRTP  SunLine continues planned improvements to its operations facility which is undergoing replacement.  Purchase three (3) replacement CNG fixed route buses and replacement non- revenue support vehicles (2 supervisor and 2 safety).  Continue to work with the jurisdictions to improve bus stops with in the service area using Prop 1B Safety and Security funds.  Purchase and implement use of software system network infrastructure upgrade, enterprise software implementation to improve efficiency of agency operations.  Increase revenue through the advertising program.  Conduct a planning study to determine the transit needs of the Coachella Valley. Fixed Route Ridership 4,674,654 4,358,966 4,203,003 3,968,496 3,719,598 SunDial Ridership 153,183 164,025 164,929 156,952 158,232 System Wide Ridership 4,827,837 4,827,627 4,190,436 4,125,448 3,877,830 Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $96.99 $106.92 $107.26 $110.99 $129.99 FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 Estimated FY 2018/19 Planned Operating & Financial Data FY 2014/15 FY 2015/16 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 83 TABLE 9B FAREBOX CALCULATION Revenue Sources included in Farebox Calculation Actual Amount from FY16/17 Audit FY17/18 (Estimate) FY18/19 (Plan) 1 Passenger Fares $ 3,055,021.54 $ 2,930,117.05 $ 2,643,828.00 2 Interest 3,963.54$ 1,491.25$ 1,100.00$ 3 General Fund Supplement -$ -$ -$ 4 Measure A -$ -$ -$ 5 Advertising Revenue 184,210.41$ 165,000.00$ 76,000.00$ 6 Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets -$ -$ -$ 7 CNG Revenue / Emission Credit 1,663,571.23$ 1,884,149.42$ 1,450,000.00$ 8 Lease / Other Revenue -$ -$ -$ 9 Federal Excise Tax Refund -$ -$ -$ 10 Investment Income -$ -$ -$ 11 CalPers CERBT -$ -$ -$ 12 Fare Revenues from Exempt Routes -$ -$ -$ 13 Other Revenues 1,884,907.48$ 1,910,784.75$ 1,024,525.00$ Total Revenue for Farebox Calculation (1-13)6,791,674.20$ 6,891,542.47$ 5,195,453.00$ Total Operating Expenses for Farebox Calculation 32,962,648.27$ 34,880,026.00$ 38,900,991.00$ Farebox Recovery Ratio 20.60%19.76%13.36% Table 9B - Farebox Calculation (consistent with Commission Farebox Recovery Policy) Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 84 FIGURE A-1 SUNBUS SYSTEM MAP, JANUARY 2018 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 85 ROUTE PROFILES LINE 14—DESERT HOT SPRINGS – PALM SPRINGS Line 14 is one of SunLine’s most successful routes. This tr unk route links the cities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs, connecting to Lines 15, 20, 24, 30, and 111 and linking riders with local shopping centers, schools, the Palm Springs Convention Center, Department of Motor Vehicles, the Employment Development Department, libraries, senior center, theaters, and other services within the communities of Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs. The Line 14 operates with 20-minute frequency during weekday peak periods and 30-minute frequency during weekday evenings. The last Line 14 trip serves Hacienda Avenue in Desert Hot Springs to meet passenger demand in this area. Additionally, one morning and one afternoon trip are provided to accommodate the volume of school students. Hours of Operation:Service Span 4:53 AM 11:20 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,827,026 5:48 AM 10:41 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $634,733 Frequency:Cost per Rider $2.90 20/30 MIN Weekdays (Peak/Off-Peak)Subsidy per Rider $5.46 40 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 7 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 2,006 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 1,085 87.1%Annual Passengers 629,697 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles):Passengers per Hour 22.2 Passengers per Mile 1.5 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 6,275 Annual Bicycle Boardings 20,866 Annual Revenue Hours Population within .5 mi of stop 31,971 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 14,162 430,595 28,365 Financial Ridership 17.7 mph 29.42 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 86 LINE 15—DESERT HOT SPRINGS – DESERT EDGE Line 15 serves the community of Desert Hot Springs and Desert Edge, a Riverside County unincorporated community located southeast of Desert Hot Springs. Line 15 connects to Lines 14 and 20, and links riders with local shopping centers, a neighborhood community center, Boys and Girls Club of Desert Hot Springs, schools, and other services within the City of Desert Hot Springs. Service is under study for Mission Lakes Boulevard and Two Bunch Palms Trail for this route, as well as service at Little Morongo Road west of West Drive and west of Dillon Road, Long Canyon Road and Desert Edge. Hours of Operation:Service Span 4:54 AM 8:49 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $726,857 7:00 AM 7:44 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $126,919 Frequency:Cost per Rider $6.98 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $5.86 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 1 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 338 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 165 Annual Passengers 104,060 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 19.1 Passengers per Mile 1.2 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 749 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,100 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 17,194 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 2,116 5,452 Financial Ridership 91.0% 87,415 21.5 mph 15.9 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 87 LINE 20—DESERT HOT SPRINGS – THOUSAND PALMS – PALM DESERT Line 20 provides limited stop service between the City of Desert Hot Springs and the City of Palm Desert. The Line 20 provides residents of Desert Hot Springs and surrounding communities improved access to resources and employment opportunities concentrated toward the center of the Coachella Valley, including the College of the Desert. Line 20 connects with Lines 14, 15, 32, 53, 54, 111 and Commuter Link 220 at Westfield Palm Desert Mall. Hours of Operation:Service Span 7:00 AM 7:55 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $288,104 No Weekend Service Annual Farebox Route Revenue $139,522 Frequency:Cost per Rider $11.50 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $21.78 No Weekend Service Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 98 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A Annual Passengers 25,062 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 7.03 48.5 Passengers per Mile 0.30 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 109 84,874 Annual Bicycle Boardings 854 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 11,229 3564 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 8,180 85.0% Financial Ridership 23.82 mph Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 88 LINE 21—GERALD FORD & COOK – PALM DESERT MALL Line 21 is a new route that provides service to the City of Palm Desert, enabling riders to access the College of the Desert, the McCallum Theater, Palm Desert City Hall, Kaiser Permanente, satellite campuses of California State University of San Bernadine, the University of California Riverside, Palm Desert High School, Palm Desert Library, major employment sites, medical and shopping centers. Line 21 connects with Lines 20, 32, 54, 111 and Commuter Line 222 at Westfield Palm Desert Mall. Hours of Operation:Service Span 11:00 AM 3:50 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $98,787 No Weekend Service Annual Farebox Route Revenue N/A Frequency:Cost per Rider N/A 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider N/A No Weekend Service Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 51 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A 86.9%Annual Passengers N/A Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 9.8 Passengers per Mile 1.40 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings N/A Annual Bicycle Boardings N/A Annual Revenue Hours:.Population within .5 mi of stop 20,157 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 18,379 19,992 1,435 Financial Ridership 25.8 mph 13.8 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 89 LINE 24—PALM SPRINGS In March 2017, Line 24 service was expanded to serve the Ramon/San Luis Rey retail area. Line 24 offers service in Palm Springs with connections to Lines 14, 30, 32, and 111. The Line 24 links riders to destinations such as the Desert Regional Hospital, Desert Highland Community Center, Social Security Administration, schools, medical facilities, theaters, and shopping outlets. Hours of Operation:Service Span 6:20 AM 8:25 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $799,337 6:18 AM 7:38 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $284,473 Frequency:Cost per Rider $4.94 40 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $7.49 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 4 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 544 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 211 82.5%Annual Passengers 161,799 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 12.4 Passengers per Mile 1.13 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,638 Annual Bicycle Boardings 4,143 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 22,374 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 10,955 13,070 Financial Ridership 14.66 mph 20.3 143,616 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 90 LINE 30—CATHEDRAL CITY – PALM SPRINGS Line 30 is one of SunLine’s most successful routes. In March 2017, Line 30 was realigned to serve Tahquitz Canyon Drive at El Cielo to provide riders with more freque ncy in this area. Line 30 is a Trunk line providing service between the cities of Cathedral City and Palm Springs. Riding the Line 30 provides customers access to the Palm Springs International Airport, Palm Springs City Hall, Social Security Administration, public libraries, city halls, senior centers, schools, shopping centers and various industrial parks. It operates with 20- minute frequency during weekday peak periods, connecting to Lines 14, 24, 32, and 111 The Line 30 also offers three afternoon supplementary trips to accommodate the high volume of student ridership. The most recent Operational Analysis proposed fifteen- minute frequency for this trunk route. Frequency changes are under study and are subject to available funding and Board approval. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:40 AM 10:44 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,423,353 6:15 AM 9:41 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $481,788 Frequency:Cost per Rider $2.07 20 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $3.30 40 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 9 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 2,176 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 1,212 Annual Passengers 686,776 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 27.1 19.3 Passengers per Mile 2.50 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 5,132 Annual Bicycle Boardings 23,891 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 34,329 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 16,652 25,356 93.1% Financial Ridership 12.7 mph 274,423 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 91 LINE 32—PALM SPRINGS – CATHEDRAL CITY – THOUSAND PALMS – RANCHO MIRAGE – PALM DESERT Line 32 links the cities of Palm Springs, Cathedral City, and the unincorporated community Thousand Palms, Rancho Mirage and Palm Desert. The route connects with Lines 14 , 20, 24, 30, 53, 54, 111, and Commuter Link 220. Riders can access schools and various retail centers along Ramon Road in the City of Cathedral City. Routing through the I-10 Interchange provides access to Costco, Home Depot, and the Regal Cinemas 16 theater complex, as well as service to the Agua Caliente Casino on Ramon Road at Bob Hope Drive. This route also provides service to Eisenhower Medical Center, College of the Desert, and Westfield Palm Desert Mall. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:00 AM 10:40 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,084,816 6:54 AM 10:48 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $343,351 Frequency:Cost per Rider $4.37 50 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $9.16 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 785 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 443 Annual Passengers 248,350 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 14.9 Passengers per Mile 0.9 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,344 Annual Bicycle Boardings 9,059 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 37,261 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 21,864 279,031 16,723 81.1% Financial Ridership 18.7 mph 40.4 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 92 LINE 54—PALM DESERT – INDIAN WELLS – LA QUINTA – BERMUDA DUNES – INDIO Line 54 operates between Palm Desert and Indio serving the cities of Indian Wells and La Quinta as well as the unincorporated community of Bermuda Dunes via Fred Waring Drive. This route was designed to provide direct service between Palm Desert and Indio, in addition to serving the length of Fred Waring Drive. Service is provided to the Indio Workforce Development, College of the Desert (Indio and Palm Desert), McCallum Theater, Civic Center, along with close proximity to Indian Wells Tennis Gardens. Line 54 connects with Lines 20, 32, 53, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, 95, 111, and Commuter Link 220 at Westfield Palm Desert Mall and Hwy 111 at Flower. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:55 AM 7:55 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $412,826 No Weekend Service Annual Farebox Route Revenue $183,908 Frequency:Cost per Rider $5.49 45 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $11.70 No Weekend Service Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 294 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A Annual Passengers 75,157 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 11.2 Passengers per Mile 0.7 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 337 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,478 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 37,729 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 13,900 24.3 113,426 6,731 84.1% Financial Ridership 21.34 mph Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 93 LINE 70—LA QUINTA – PALM DESERT – INDIAN WELLS – BERMUDA DUNES Line 70 offers bus service to the City of La Quinta and the edge of the cities of Palm Desert and Indian Wells and the unincorporated community of Bermuda Dunes. Riders are able to access the Indian Wells Tennis Gardens on Washington Street at Fred Waring Drive, city hall, the senior center, schools, and various shopping centers along Adams Street, Avenue 47, and Washington Street. Transfers from the Line 70 to the Line 111 can be made on Highway 111 at Adams Street. SunLine is evaluating extending service north of the I-10 Freeway if it can be done without increasing operating costs. The implementation of proposed changes are subject to available funding and Board approval. Hours of Operation:Service Span Weekdays Annual Route Cost $599,710 Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $236,728 Frequency:Cost per Rider $3.33 45 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $6.78 90 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 4 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 611 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 223 Annual Passengers 180,326 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 19.6 Passengers per Mile 1.4 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 574 Annual Bicycle Boardings 5,595 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 27,982 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 9,943 Financial Ridership 15.85 mph 19.5 131,688 9,941 8:45 PM 9:30 PM 5:15 AM 5:15 AM 87.2% Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 94 LINE 80 —INDIO Line 80 operates in a clockwise loop serving residents of the City of Indio, providing access to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, Social Security Administration, Employment Development Department, Indio Senior Center, Boys and Girls Club, Riverside County Social Services Offices, Department of Motor Vehicles, Martha's Village & Kitchen, community centers, schools, and shopping centers. Two afternoon trips to Shadow Hills High School on Jefferson Street at Avenue 39 are provided. Line 80 connects to Lines 54, 81, 90, 91, and 111 at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street. Hours of Operation:Service Span 6:00 AM 9:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $332,957 6:00 AM 9:00 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $196,575 Frequency:Cost per Rider $2.36 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $5.79 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 458 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 225 Annual Passengers 141,170 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 27.4 Passengers per Mile 2.0 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1124 Annual Bicycle Boardings 3,000 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 39,132 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 7,554 Financial Ridership 85.2% 11.2 mph 6,077 71,909 11.02 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 95 LINE 81—INDIO Line 81 is a loop route that operates counter-clockwise and provides transit service to residents of the City of Indio, enabling passengers access to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital, Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival, Employment Development Department, U.S. Social Security Administration, East Valley College of the Desert campus, Riverside County social services offices, Department of Motor Vehicles, Coachella Valley Cultural Museum, the Indio transportation center, community centers, library, schools, and a shopping centers. Two morning trips are provided to accommodate commuting students, service to Shadow Hills High School on Jefferson Street at Avenue 39 was implemented. Line 81 connects to Lines 54, 80, 90, 91 and 111 at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:30 AM 8:30 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $335,170 5:30 AM 8:30 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $111,775 Frequency:Cost per Rider $3.75 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $5.13 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 296 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 127 Annual Passengers 89,266 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 15.7 Passengers per Mile 1.6 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 777 Annual Bicycle Boardings 1,011 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 32,477 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 7,631 55,230 5,753 Financial Ridership 89.1% 10.69 mph 8.71 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 96 LINE 90—INDIO – COACHELLA Line 90 serves the cities of Coachella and Indio allowing passengers to access the Employment Development Department, Coachella City Hall, library, senior center, Boys & Girls Club, local schools, and shopping centers. Connections to Lines 54, 80, 81, 91, 95 and 111 occur at the transfer location on Highway 111 at Flower Street in the City of Indio. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:00 AM 10:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $347,828 5:00 AM 9:00 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $639,750 Frequency:Cost per Rider $2.47 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $14.49 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 430 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 287 Annual Passengers 140,831 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 16.0 Passengers per Mile 1.9 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 1,478 Annual Bicycle Boardings 2,838 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 44,655 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 7,051 72,891 6,012 Financial Ridership 84.2% 16.18 mph 12.96 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 97 LINE 91—INDIO – COACHELLA – THERMAL – MECCA – OASIS Line 91 links the cities of Indio and Coachella with the unincorporated communities of Thermal, Mecca, and Oasis. Riders on Line 91 are able to connect to Lines 54, 80, 81, 90, 95 and 111 at the transfer location on Highway 111 and Flower Street in Indio. Passengers have access to employment sites, medical, and shopping facilities. Line 91 also provides direct service to College of the Desert’s East Valley Campus in Mecca. Hours of Operation:Service Span 4:48 AM 10:21 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $1,145,415 5:30 AM 10:42 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $336,550 Frequency:Cost per Rider $6.33 60 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $17.28 60 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 3 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 548 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 380 Annual Passengers 181,092 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 12.60 Passengers per Mile 0.6 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 460 Annual Bicycle Boardings 4,423 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 41,181 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 8,996 315,922 17,300 Financial Ridership 85.7% 22.80 mph 51.11 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 98 LINE 95— COACHELLA – MECCA – NORTH SHORE Line 95 serves the cities of Coachella and the unincorporated communities of Mecca and North Shore. The Line 95 serves the College of the Desert’s East Valley Campus in Mecca. Passengers on Line 95 connect to Lines 90, 91 and 111 at the transfer location on 5th and Vine Avenue in Coachella. Service allows passengers to access employment sites, medical, and shopping facilities. Hours of Operation:Service Span 4:00 AM 10:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $430,014 4:00 AM 10:00 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $118,172 Frequency:Cost per Rider $15.06 180 MIN Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $32.11 180 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 1 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 89 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 55 Annual Passengers 28,556 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 7.0 Passengers per Mile 0.2 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 54 Annual Bicycle Boardings 679 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 19,050 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 6,710 114,938 6,339 Financial Ridership 87.9% 32.71 mph 52.49 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 201 8 -2019 99 LINE 111—PALM SPRINGS – CATHEDRAL CITY – RANCHO MIRAGE – PALM DESERT – INDIAN WELLS – LA QUINTA - INDIO Line 111 is SunLine’s highest ridership regional trunk route. Line 111 provides service along Highway 111 from Palm Springs to Coachella, linking with the Cities of Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta and Indio. Line 111 enables riders to travel to destinations along the Highway 111 corridor. The route links passengers with major retail and commercial centers, recreational attractions, museums, educational and medical institutions. Connecting routes include Lines 14, 20, 24, 30, 32, 53, 54, 70, 80, 81, 90, 91, 95 and Commuter Link 220 at transfer locations at Westfield Palm Desert Mall. Hours of Operation:Service Span 5:00 AM 11:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $4,360,905 5:30 AM 11:00 PM Weekends Annual Farebox Route Revenue $1,849,976 Frequency:Cost per Rider $3.12 20/30 MIN Weekdays (Peak/Off-Peak)Subsidy per Rider $5.63 20/30 MIN Weekends Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 13 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 4,209 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends 2,985 Annual Passengers 1,396,966 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 20.5 Passengers per Mile 1.4 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 9,425 Annual Bicycle Boardings 56,819 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 78,704 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 48,948 1,006,559 67,995 Financial Ridership 80.9% 17.64 mph 60.0 Short Range Transit Plan • F Y 2 0 1 8 /2 0 1 9 100 COMMUTER LINK 220 PALM DESERT – THOUSAND PALMS – CABAZON – BEAUMONT – MORENO VALLEY – RIVERSIDE Commuter Link 220 provides service between the Coachella Valley and western Riverside County. The route is 77 miles, with 2 stops in the Coachella Valley, located at Westfield Palm Desert Mall and Thousand Palms Transit Hub off Varner Road. The routes continues, stopping along Interstate 10 and State Route 60 serving the Casino Morongo, City of Beaumont at the Walmart Shopping Center, Moreno Valley at the Moreno Valley Mall, the University of California Riverside, and ending at Metrolink’s Riverside Station. Line 220 connects to SunLine’s Lines 20, 32, 53, 54, and 111, Pass Transit in Beaumont and Banning, Metrolink, RTA, and Omnitrans services in Riverside. Hours of Operation:Service Span 4:30 AM 10:00 PM Weekdays Annual Route Cost $323,700 Annual Farebox Route Revenue $161,548 Frequency:Cost per Rider $24.05 6 TRIPS Weekdays Subsidy per Rider $66.01 Average Speed:Peak Vehicles 2 Average Daily Passengers Weekday 53 On Time Performance:Average Daily Passengers Weekends N/A Annual Passengers 13,458 Route Total Bidirectional Length (Miles): Passengers per Hour 4.1 Passengers per Mile 0.1 Annual Revenue Miles:Annual Wheelchair Boardings 172 Annual Bicycle Boardings 337 Annual Revenue Hours:Population within .5 mi of stop 19,890 Jobs within .5 mi of stop 38,841 3,767 112,979 Financial Ridership 62.6% 29.51 mph 148.26 No Weekend Service No Weekend Service SunLine Transit Agency 32505 Harry Oliver Trail, Thousand Palms, CA 92276 | 760-343-3456 | sunline.org SRTP FY 2018/2019 | FY 2020/2021 AGENDA ITEM 7 Agenda Item RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 21, 2018 TO: Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Services Technical Advisory Council FROM: Monica M. Morales, Management Analyst THROUGH: Shirley Medina, Director of Plans and Programming SUBJECT: Specialized Transit Grant Awards for 2018 Measure A Western Riverside County Specialized Transit Call for Projects WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive and file the 2018 Measure A Western Riverside County Specialized Transit grants for a three-year period covering FY 2018/19 through FY 2020/21: 1) Award Agreement No. 18-26-107-00 to Blindness Support Services, Inc. for the provision of travel training services (Travel Training Program) in an amount not to exceed $220,000; 2) Award Agreement No. 18-26-108-00 to the Boys & Girls Club of Menifee Valley for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Before and After School Transportation Program) in an amount not to exceed $405,000; 3) Award Agreement No. 18-26-109-00 to the Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Before and After School Transportation Program) in an amount not to exceed $630,000; 4) Award Agreement No. 18-26-111-00 to Care-A-Van Transit, Inc. for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Care-A-Van Project) in an amount not to exceed $1,140,000; 5) Award Agreement No. 18-26-112-00 to Care Connexxus for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Adult Day Services Patients) in an amount not to exceed $765,000; 6) Award Agreement No. 18-26-113-00 to the City of Norco, Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Services for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Seniors on the Move-Senior Shuttle) in an amount not to exceed $281,000; 7) Award Agreement No. 18-26-114-00 to Community Connect 211-Vetlink (211 One Call/One Click) for the provision of transportation information services in an amount not to exceed $193,133; 8) Award Agreement No. 18-26-115-00 to Community Connect TAP (Transportation Access Program) for the provision of transportation pass or voucher services in an am ount not to exceed $360,000; Agenda Item 9) Award Agreement No. 18-26-116-00 to Valley Resource Center for the Retarded, Inc. dba Exceed for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Hemet Transportation) in an amount not to exceed $179,000; 10) Award Agreement No. 18-26-117-00 to Forest Folk, Inc. for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Idyllwild Area Shuttle) in an amount not to exceed $173,640; 11) Award Agreement No. 18-26-118-00 to Friends of Moreno Valley for the provision of directly operated transportation services (MoVAN) in an amount not to exceed $313,029; 12) Award Agreement No. 18-26-119-00 to Independent Living Partnership for the provision of mileage reimbursement of volunteer drivers (Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project – TRIP Western Riverside) in an amount not to exceed $1,318,000; 13) Award Agreement No. 18-26-120-00 to Michelle’s Place for the provision of travel assistance (Treatment Travel Assistance TTA) in an amount not to exceed $30,000; 14) Award Agreement No. 18-26-121-00 to Operation Safehouse for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Main Street Transitional Living Program) in an amount not to exceed $112,400; 15) Award Agreement No. 18-26-122-00 to Riverside University Health Medical Center (RUHS-MC) for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Transportation Program) in an amount not to exceed $960,000; 16) Award Agreement No. 18-26-124-00 to Riverside University Health System-Behavioral Health (RUHS-BH) for the provision of directly operated transportation services (Transportation Change) in an amount not to exceed $660,000; 17) Award Agreement No. 18-26-125-00 to United States Veterans Initiative for the provision of directly operated transportation services (US Vets Initiative Transportation – Riverside) in an amount not to exceed $129,000; 18) Award Agreement No. 18-26-126-00 to Voices for Children for the provision of mileage reimbursement of volunteer drivers (Volunteer Mileage Reimbursement Program) in an amount not to exceed $330,805; and BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Providing funding to non-profit providers of transit services for persons with disabilities, low income, and senior citizens has long been a priority of the Commission. The voter-approved 1989 and 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plans specify funding allocations for the provision of this type of service provided by transit operators and non -profit agencies. At the April 2018 Commission meeting, the commission unanimously approved the award of all 18 grantees indicated above. In April 2008, the Commission approved the Coordinated Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan) and adopted a strategy for developing and conducting a specialized transit call for projects program for Western County. The coordinated plan is updated in July every 3 years to identify additional qualified populations as well as underserved areas of Riverside County that would qualify for funding under the Specialized Transit Call for Projects. Agenda Item The fourth program cycle is set to expire on June 30, 2018. In November 2017, the Commission directed staff to develop the application and scoring criteria for the 2018 Measure A Western Riverside County Specialized Transit Call for Projects (2018 Call for Projects) and appr oved the fund allocation. The applications were released to the public on November 8, 2017, with the implementation term of three years. The due date for completed proposals was January 9, 2018, at which time 17 eligible proposals were received from various agencies. It should be noted that Care Connexxus did not submit a proposal by the deadline ; however, the Board President of Care Connexxus reached out to staff explaining recent management challenges and staff turnover. With this justification, Care Connexxus submitted its proposal by January 31 bringing the total eligible proposals received by the Commission to 18. Should the Commission approve an award to Care Connexxus, staff will monitor and assist Care Connexxus during this award term to ensure compliance with the specialized transit funds agreement. The following table is a summary for the fund allocation made available by the Commission for the 2018 Call for Projects covering FY 2018/19 to FY 2020/21: FISCAL YEARS 2018/19-2020/21 Funding Source Fiscal Year Total 2009 Measure A 2019 $2,700,000 2009 Measure A 2020 $2,700,000 2009 Measure A 2021 $2,800,000 TOTAL $8,200,000 As in the 2015 Call for Projects, the current 2018 Call for Projects was oversubscribed by $2,948,391 in terms of funds sought by applicants compared to funds actually available from the Commission. Evaluation and Scoring: To evaluate and score the projects, staff invited the Citizen’s Advisory Committee/Social Services Transportation Advisory Council (1 vote) to participate on the project ev aluation and scoring committee. Commission staff participated with one vote, staff from the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority participated with one vote, and an outside consultant for the Commission participated with one vote. Essentially, projects were evaluated by a group consisting of participants with no vested operational interest in the proposed projects. The intent of staff with this panel was to provide an unbiased scoring environment that would allow for the best projects to rise to the top. The scoring criteria used by the evaluation committee was developed from the goals and objectives analysis that were generated during the development of the 2008 Coordinated Plan and the 2012 and 2015 updates. The attachment outlines the results of this process identifying awarded amounts as well as scores and rankings. Agenda Item Process and Schedule: There is no financial impact on the current budget, thus, no budget action is needed nor requested at this time. Measure A Specialized Transit funds of $8.2 million for projects approved by the Commission will be programmed for FYs 2018/19, 2019/20, and 2020/21 through the regular budget process. Attachment: 2018 Project Request and Recommendation Funding Summary Attachment A 2018 PROJECT REQUEST AND RECOMMENDATION FUNDING SUMMARY Applicant Score Measure Yr 1 Request Measure Yr 1 Recommendation Minimum Local Match Total Year 1 Project Cost (Measure A + Match) Measure Yr 2 Request Measure Yr 2 Recommendation Minimum Local Match Total Year 2 Project Cost (Measure A + Match) Measure Yr 3 Request Measure Yr 3 Recommendation Minimum Local Match Total Year 3 Project Cost (Measure A + Match) Total 3 Year Project Cost Total 3 Year Measure A Award Required Match Blindness Support Services Inc 71 78,012.00$ 72,000$ 37,091$ 109,091$ 82,935.60$ 73,000$ 37,606$ 110,606$ 87,859.20$ 75,000$ 38,636$ 113,636$ 333,333$ 220,000$ 113,333$ Boys & Girls Club of Menifee Valley 68 205,306.20$ 130,000$ 66,970$ 196,970$ 238,508.82$ 135,000$ 69,545$ 204,545$ 388,434.00$ 140,000$ 72,121$ 212,121$ 613,636$ 405,000$ 208,636$ Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County 83 206,316.00$ 200,000$ 103,030$ 303,030$ 216,942.00$ 210,000$ 108,182$ 318,182$ 227,964.00$ 220,000$ 113,333$ 333,333$ 954,545$ 630,000$ 324,545$ Care A Van Transit Inc 96 $ 390,500.00 $ 370,000 190,606$ 560,606$ $ 409,563.00 $ 380,000 195,758$ 575,758$ $ 425,997.00 $ 390,000 200,909$ 590,909$ 1,727,273$ 1,140,000$ 587,273$ Care Connexxus 74 319,002.00$ 250,000$ 128,788$ 378,788$ 328,203.00$ 255,000$ 131,364$ 386,364$ 337,681.00$ 260,000$ 133,939$ 393,939$ 1,159,091$ 765,000$ 394,091$ City of Norco* (Cap Yr 1)91 125,191.00$ 116,000$ 79,152$ 195,152$ 81,314.00$ 81,000$ 41,727$ 122,727$ 84,288.00$ 84,000$ 43,273$ 127,273$ 445,152$ 281,000$ 164,152$ Community Connect 211-Vetlink 28 $ 63,243.00 $ 63,243 32,580$ 95,823$ $ 64,510.00 $ 64,510 33,232$ 97,742$ $ 65,380.00 $ 65,380 33,681$ 99,061$ 292,626$ 193,133$ 99,493$ Community Connect TAP 45 $ 172,200.00 $ 110,000 56,667$ 166,667$ $ 175,644.00 $ 120,000 61,818$ 181,818$ $ 180,035.00 $ 130,000 66,970$ 196,970$ 545,455$ 360,000$ 185,455$ EXCEED 80 $ 57,144.00 $ 57,000 29,364$ 86,364$ $ 59,990.00 $ 60,000 30,909$ 90,909$ $ 62,856.00 $ 62,000 31,939$ 93,939$ 271,212$ 179,000$ 92,212$ Forest Folk Inc 67 $ 53,250.00 $ 53,250 27,432$ 80,682$ $ 59,540.00 $ 59,540 30,672$ 90,212$ $ 60,850.00 $ 60,850 31,347$ 92,197$ 263,091$ 173,640$ 89,451$ Friends of Moreno Valley 70 $ 100,141.00 $ 100,141 51,588$ 151,729$ $ 103,979.00 $ 103,979 53,565$ 157,544$ $ 108,909.00 $ 108,909 56,105$ 165,014$ 474,286$ 313,029$ 161,257$ Independent Living Partnership 90 477,628.00$ 433,000$ 223,061$ 656,061$ 502,768.00$ 440,000$ 226,667$ 666,667$ 526,446.00$ 445,000$ 229,242$ 674,242$ 1,996,970$ 1,318,000$ 678,970$ Michelle's Place 83 12,000.00$ 8,000$ 4,121$ 12,121$ 15,000.00$ 10,000$ 5,152$ 15,152$ 16,000.00$ 12,000$ 6,182$ 18,182$ 45,455$ 30,000$ 15,455$ Operation Safehouse 84 37,017.58$ 37,000$ 19,061$ 56,061$ 37,727.02$ 37,700$ 19,421$ 57,121$ 37,727.02$ 37,700$ 19,421$ 57,121$ 170,303$ 112,400$ 57,903$ Riverside University health Medical Center (RUHS-MC)66 496,694.87$ 310,000$ 159,697$ 469,697$ 523,267.42$ 320,000$ 164,848$ 484,848$ 551,264.17$ 330,000$ 170,000$ 500,000$ 1,454,545$ 960,000$ 494,545$ Riverside University Health System - Behavioral Health (RUHS-BH)65 $ 414,609.40 $ 210,000 108,182$ 318,182$ $ 413,560.81 $ 220,000 113,333$ 333,333$ $ 433,459.79 $ 230,000 118,485$ 348,485$ 1,000,000$ 660,000$ 340,000$ U S Vets 70 $ 43,295.00 $ 43,000 22,152$ 65,152$ $ 43,295.00 $ 43,000 22,152$ 65,152$ $ 43,295.00 $ 43,000 22,152$ 65,152$ 195,455$ 129,000$ 66,455$ Voices for Children 92 $ 99,754.00 $ 99,754 51,388$ 151,142$ $ 109,565.00 $ 109,565 56,443$ 166,008$ $ 121,486.00 $ 121,486 62,584$ 184,070$ 501,220$ 330,805$ 170,415$ TOTALS 3,351,304.05$ 2,662,388$ 1,390,927$ 4,053,315$ 3,466,312.67$ 2,722,294$ 1,402,394$ 4,124,688$ 3,759,931.18$ 2,815,325$ 1,450,319$ 4,265,644$ 12,443,647$ 8,200,007$ 4,243,640$ 40,000 Capital *Includes capital request of $40,000 in year one which requires a 50% local match 8,160,007 Operating