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06 June 11, 2014 Commission• Rive County Transportation Commission MEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, June 11, 2014 LOCATION: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside AO COMMISSIONERS .409 Chair— Marion Ashley Vice Chair — Daryl Busch Second Vice Chair — Scott Matas RECORDS COMM-COMM-00037 Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside Jeff Stone, County of Riverside John J. Benoit, County of Riverside Marion Ashley, County of Riverside Deborah Franklin / Art Welch, City of Banning Roger Berg / Jeff Fox, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / To Be Appointed, City of Blythe Ella Zanowic / Jeff Hewitt, City of Calimesa Mary Craton / Randy Bonner, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis / Kathleen DeRosa, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / Eduardo Garcia, City of Coachella Karen Spiegel / Eugene Montanez, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Adam Rush / Ike Bootsma, City of Eastvale Larry Smith / Robert Youssef, City of Hemet Douglas Hanson / Patrick Mullany, City of Indian Wells Glenn Miller / Michael Wilson, City of Indio Frank Johnston / Micheal Goodland, City of Jurupa Valley Terry Henderson / Don Adolph, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Scott Mann / Wallace Edgerton, City of Menifee Tom Owings / Jesse Molina, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs / Kelly Bennett, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Kathy Azevedo, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Susan Marie Weber, City of Palm Desert Ginny Foat / Paul Lewin, City of Palm Springs Daryl Busch / Al Landers, City of Perris Ted Weill / To Be Appointed, City of Rancho Mirage Steve Adams / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Scott Miller, City of San Jacinto Ron Roberts / Jeff Comerchero, City of Temecula Ben Benoit / Timothy Walker, City of Wildomar Basem Muallem, Governor's Appointee Comments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2014 3:14 PM To: Tara Byerly Cc: Jennifer Harmon Subject: RCTC June Commission Agenda - 06.11.2014 Importance: High Good afternoon Commissioners: The June Commission Agenda for the meeting scheduled for Wednesday, June 11, 2014 @ 9:30 a.m. is available. Please copy the link: http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media items/iune-11-2014.original.pdf In addition for your review is the attached conflict of interest memo and the form. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you. Conflict of Conflict of [nterest Memo.pdf Interest Form.pdf Respectfully, Tara S. Byerly Senior Administrative Assistant RCTC 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 787-7141 1 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2014 3:18 PM To: Tara Byerly Subject: RCTC June Commission Agenda - 06.11.2014 Importance: High Good afternoon Commission Alternates: The June Commission Agenda for the meeting scheduled for Wednesday, June 11, 2014 @ 9:30 a.m. is available: http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media itemshune-11-2014.original.pdf Respectfully, Tara S. Byerly Senior Administrative Assistant RCTC 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 (951)787-7141 1 e Riverside County Transportation Commission TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Office and Board Services Manager DATE: June 4, 2014 SUBJECT: Possible Conflicts of Interest — Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda of June 11, 2014 The June 11, 2014 agenda of the Riverside County Transportation Commission includes items that may raise possible conflicts of interest. A Commissioner may not participate in any discussion or action concerning a contract or amendment if a campaign contribution of more than $250 is received in the past 12 months or 3 months following the conclusion from any entity or individual listed. Agenda Item No. 9C — Recurring Contracts for Fiscal Year 2014/15 Consultant(s) AMMA Transit Planning Heather Menninger, Principal 393 Two Trees Road Riverside, CA 92507 Best Best and Kreiger, LLP Steven DeBaun, Partner 3390 University Avenue, 5th Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Bechtel Infrastructure Corporation George Nomura, Program Manager 3850 Vine Street, Suite 210 Riverside, CA 92507 Epic Land Solutions Holly Rockwell, President 3850 Vine Street, Suite 200 Riverside, CA 92507 RCTC Potential Conflicts of Interest June 4, 2014 Page 2 Fieldman, Rolapp and Associates Daniel L. Wiles, Principal 1990 MacArthur Boulevard, Suite 1100 Irvine, CA 92612 Fulbright and Jaworski LLP Victor Hsu, Partner SSS South Flower Street, 41st Floor Los Angeles, CA 90071 Geographics Lisa van Olden, Managing Partner 4178 Chestnut Street Riverside, CA 92501 Inland Transportation Services William C. McCaughey, President 7355 Magnolia Avenue Riverside, CA 92504 Orrick, Herrington and Sutcliffe LLP Mary A. Collins, Partner 405 Howard Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Ray Gorski Raymond J. Gorski, Principal 2871 Jed Road Escondido, CA 92027 RCTC Conflict of Interest Form Purpose: This form is provided to assist members of the RCTC Commissioners in meeting requirements of Government Code Section 84308 and 87100 in documenting conflict of interests as related to RCTC Commission/Committee agenda items. Instructions: Under certain circumstances, RCTC Commission may be required to disclose and disqualify themselves from participating in, influencing, or voting on an agenda item due to personal income, real property interests, investments, business positions, or receipt of campaign contributions. If applicable, Commissioners must personally state the following information, for entry into the public record, prior to consideration of the involved agenda item(s) and turn in the completed form to the Clerk of the Board ; prior to leaving the meeting. An RCTC member may not participate in any discussion or action j concerning a contract or amendment if a campaign contribution of more than $250 is received in the past 12 months or 3 months following the conclusion from any entity or individual. I I. Board Member Information Board Member Name City/County Name Meeting Date II. Campaign Contributions 1 . I have a disqualifying campaign contribution of over $250 from C Ai•-t) `^/! /1-- -A- to I (Identify the name of the company and/or Individual) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda item ...6, Subject: p V 6 L\ L-. ! AA � 2. I have a disqualifying campaign contribution of over $250 from 16 CIF t —%Z (Identify the name of the company and/or Individual) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda item , Subject: 3. I have a disqualifying campaign contribution of over $250 from (Identify the name of the company and/or Individual) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda item , Subject: i 4. I have a disqualifying campaign contribution of over $250 from , (Identify the name of the company and/or Individual) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda item , Subject: 1 III. Financial Interest 1. I have a financial interest of , from/in (State income, real property interest, investment or business position) (Identify name of company or property location) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda Item , Subject: 2. I have a financial interest of , from/in (State income, real property interest, investment or business position) (Identify name of company or property location) and therefore I am abstaining from participation on Agenda Item , Subject: IV. Signature Board Member Signature CAA.* Date: 6'- i 1-1) � Please remember you must state the information into the public record prior to consideration of the involved agenda item(s) and turn in the completed form to the Clerk of the Board prior to leaving the meeting. • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 11, 2014 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, CA In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission's website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. ROLL CALL 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS — Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES —APRIL 9 AND MAY 14, 2014 Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 2 6. PUBLIC HEARING — ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF 411) FEE, BUILDING ACCESS EASEMENT, BUILDING DEMOLITION EASEMENT, AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN PORTIONS OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NOS. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, AND 118-270-042 LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of a resolution of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolution of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity No. 14-022, "Resolution of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Building Access Easement, Building Demolition Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Portions of Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Nos. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, and 118-270-042 (CPNs 22218-1, 22218-2, 22218-3, 22218-4, 22218-5, 22218-6, and 22218-7) Located in Corona, Riverside County, California", for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), between Pierce Street on the East to the County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California. 7. PUBLIC HEARING — PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15; 2) Close the public hearing on the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15; and 3) Adopt the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15. Page 44 • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 3 8. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS — The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 9. CONSENT CALENDAR All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 9A. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page 47 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the nine months ended March 31, 2014. 9B. APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 Overview Page 53 This item is for the Commission to approve Resolution No. 14-020, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2014/15". 9C. RECURRING CONTRACTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 60 1) Approve the recurring contracts for Fiscal Year 2014/15; 2) Approve Agreement No. 07-31-164-11, Amendment No. 11 to Agreement 07-31-164-00, with Best Best & Krieger LLP (BB&K) for provide general legal services related to litigation in the amount of $550,000, including contingency of $50,000, for a total amount not to exceed $5,590,100 for FY 2013/14; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 4 9D. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Page 68 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended March 31, 2014. 9E. CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT WITH DALKE & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC. FOR STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT RIGHT OF WAY PROPERTY MITIGATION PACKAGE 4 Page 112 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 14-31-103-00 to Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. (Dalke & Sons) for the construction of State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP) Right of Way (ROW) Property Mitigation Package 4 in the amount of $2,868,480, plus a contingency amount of $286,848, for a total amount not to exceed $3,155,328; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount. 9F. STATE ROUTE 60 TRUCK CLIMBING/DESCENDING LANE PROJECT — PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS, AND ESTIMATE AND RIGHT OF WAY Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page121 1) Approve Agreement No. 12-31-092-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 12-31-092-00, with Caltrans to add the plans, specifications and estimate (PS&E) and right of way (ROW) roles and responsibilities for the State Route 60 truck climbing lane project, including current funding commitments; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute future agreements with Caltrans within approved funding amounts. • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 5 • 9G. PERRIS VALLEY LINE — RIVERSIDE HUNTER PARK STATION UTILITY EASEMENT Page 146 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the Easement Deed between the Commission and the city of Riverside, for Assessor Parcel Number (APN) 249-070-042, for underground utilities necessary for the future Riverside Hunter Park Station without any monetary compensation exchanged between the parties; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the deed on behalf of the Commission. 9H. RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY AND SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY FISCAL YEAR 2013/14 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS AMENDMENTS Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 157 1) Approve modifications to Riverside Transit Agency's (RTA) FY 2013/14 operating assistance program to cover additional costs for the following: 1) three new positions ($78,970); 2) new DAR contractor, Veolia Transportation (Veolia) ($505,162); and 3) Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) study ($144,432) for a total amount not to exceed $728,564 to be funded with a combination of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds, Measure A, and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Sections 5307, 5309, 5316 (Job Access Reverse Commute), 5317 (New Freedom), and 5309 carryover funds; 2) Approve modifications to SunLine Transit Agency's (SunLine) FY 2013/14 capital improvement program to reflect an additional $4,251,307 in FTA CalStart Section 5309 funds and $900,000 in California Energy Commission (CEC) matching funds for a new battery dominant fuel cell bus project; 3) Change the scope of SunLine's programmed four replacement paratransit vans funded with State Transit Assistance (STA) to two replacements and two expansion vehicles for the provision of paratransit service with no additional cost; 4) Allocate $60,583 in LTF funds to cover the needed funds resulting from the personnel and operating changes outlined above; and 5) Approve amendments to the RTA and SunLine FY 2013/14 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) to reflect the changes above. • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 6 91. FISCAL YEARS 2014/15 — 2016/17 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLANS Page 162 Overview This item is for the Commission to review and approve, in concept, the FYs 2014/15 — 2016/17 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission's Rail Program, as presented. 10. PROPOSED METROLINK BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 167 1) Adopt the preliminary FY 2014/15 Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operating and capital budget; 2) Approve the additional 91 Line service with two additional peak period round trips during the weekday and a new weekend service; 3) Allocate the Commission's funding commitment to the SCRRA in an amount not to exceed $9,817,000 in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for train operations and maintenance; and 4) Allocate the Commission's Section 5309 grant funds in an amount not to exceed $3,421,300 for SCRRA capital rehabilitation projects. 11. PRESENTATION — STATE ROUTE 91 HIGH OCCUPANCY VEHICLE LANES PROJECT Overview This item is for the Commission to receive an update on the State Route 91 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lanes Project from Basem Muallem, Caltrans District 8. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 13. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda June 11, 2014 Page 7 • 14. ADJOURNMENT The next Commission meeting and is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, July 9, 2014, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL JUNE 11, 2014 Present Absent County of Riverside, District I ,� 0 County of Riverside, District II 0 ,A, County of Riverside, District III 0 County of Riverside, District IV 0 0 County of Riverside, District V Z 0 City of Banning ,21" 0 City of Beaumont 0 0 City of Blythe " 0 City of Calimesa � 0 City of Canyon Lake � 0 City of Cathedral City � 0 City of Coachella ,r2' 0 City of Corona .;e 0 City of Desert Hot Springs ,,0' 0 City of Eastvale O O City of Hemet 0 City of Indian Wells ,re O City of Indio ,•17* 0 City of Jurupa Valley ;V' 0 City of La Quinta 2K 0 City of Lake Elsinore ..r2K O City of Menifee ..17r. 0 City of Moreno Valley . 0 City of Murrieta ,,2r 0 City of Norco 0 City of Palm Desert ,,A-* 0 City of Palm Springs ..RY. 0 City of Perris )21 0 City of Rancho Mirage 0 0 City of Riverside 0 0 City of San Jacinto ,0f 0 City of Temecula A: 0 City of Wildomar Xi 0 Governor's Appointee, Caltrans District 8 l 0 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET JUNE 11, 2014 NAME AGENCY E MAIL ADDRESS � jl0►e, reA-,tN/ ;') rablOirlidg cP6Fit_ /j.Gn1. /5 L)✓p'°k.S :3:5 55 L. / • M2 c.-/ /xt 4 07C _ND V x L� #@ Rug- t N '� � iti 11- /tI Co frri-v,dfz_ u�� Ved62- Joh vl S � 06a �ic-4_e� fib/44000-'rY- 0/ 6- 6 fb-db—S- /-/ ��A r.'#4) kGG-A 2...te t a: eii-e t ...s.e"Z A- 0.� /Eime Lic.R 0EZA 5 � � 6 AA H-11, 1-� trr c --- / C 1/1/*62_- A . , ,,tsL pisak4 fvf U x4 e4k-CrOc JS f C�c • V • Y -`� `I �� I zti _ b _ C 3. /fe>-•/,,, �/ 7se LS 7/ 61/1 "14.42, -:)e--/L.- �r ���1f , ^ A' < / d1- () i- Z6 Nz) < < �- // G -JANI 1-APNI 1 � �-At, m I) F=st-� i l bk,,c,.)-��,�so✓� -Fri �,'�(ens LA- �.�,w -4w 5 r e,,,aO ro,� ((a - taA16/--nt-c/--c-- e-/p AGENDA ITEM 5 • MINUTES • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MINUTES Wednesday, April 9, 2014 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Marion Ashley at 9:42 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Commissioner Scott Mann led the Commission in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Marion Ashley Roger Berg Ben Benoit John J. Benoit Daryl Busch Mary Craton Joseph DeConinck Kathleen DeRosa Ginny Foat Deborah Franklin Rick Gibbs Berwin Hanna Douglas Hanson Jan Harnik Terry Henderson Steven Hernandez Kevin Jeffries Frank Johnston Andrew Kotyuk Bob Magee Scott Mann Scott Matas Glenn Miller Jesse Molina* Basem Muallem Ron Roberts Adam Rush* Karen Spiegel Jeff Stone Ted Weill Ella Zanowic *Arrived after the meeting was called to order 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS There were no requests to speak from the public. Commissioners Absent Steve Adams Larry Smith John F. Tavaglione Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — JANUARY 8 AND JANUARY 31, 2014 M/S/C (Stone/Henderson) to approve the January 8 and January 31, 2014 minutes as submitted. Abstain: Miller 6. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 7. CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Stone/Busch) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. 7A. REVISED PROPOSED POLICY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 BUDGET Approve the proposed Commission Policy Goals and Objectives for the FY 2014/15 Budget. 7B. FISCAL YEAR 2012/13 TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT AND MEASURE A AUDIT RESULTS Receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for the FY 2012/13. 7C. CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY FOR THE INTERSTATE 15 EXPRESS LANES PROJECT Approve the Conflict of Interest (COI) Policy for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project (1-15 Express Lanes). 7D. AGREEMENT WITH JACOBS ENGINEERING GROUP INC. FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT/ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT AND PROJECT REPORT FOR THE MID COUNTY PARKWAY PROJECT 1) Approve Agreement No. 04-31-018-07, Amendment No. 7 to Agreement No. 04-31-018, with Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (Jacobs) to perform additional studies and design support for the completion of the final Recirculated Environmental Impact Report/Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (REIR/SEIS) and Project Report (PR) for the Mid County Parkway (MCP) project for an additional amount of $2,243,505, plus a • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 3 contingency amount of $224,350, for a total additional amount of $2,467,855, resulting in a total amount not'to exceed $45,511,717; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work as may be required for the project; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute non -funding related agreements for the environmental clearance and design of the project. 7E. AGREEMENTS FOR ON -CALL RIGHT OF WAY ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING SERVICES 1) Award the following agreements to provide on -call right of way engineering and surveying services for a three-year term, and two one-year options to extend the agreement, in an amount not to exceed an aggregate value of $750,000; a) Agreement No. 14-31-043-00 with Huitt-Zollars, Inc; b) Agreement No. 14-31-044-00 with Parsons Brinckerhoff; and c) Agreement No. 14-31-045-00 with RBF Consulting, a Company of Michael Baker Corporation (RBF); 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, including option years, on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to execute task orders awarded to contractors under the terms of the agreements. 7F. FISCAL YEAR 2009/10 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 2011/12 STATE TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS FOR THE COMMISSION AND THE TRANSIT OPERATORS 1) Receive and file the FY 2009/10 through FY 2011/12 state triennial performance audit results for the Commission; and 2) Receive and file the FY 2009/10 through FY 2011/12 state triennial performance audit results for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside, Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA), Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine). Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 4 7G. OPERATION OF THE FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL PROGRAM IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY 1) Approve Agreement No. 14-45-084-00with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for the operation of the Riverside County Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program in the amount of $1,547,104 in state funding for FY 2013/14; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 7H. SUPPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE APPLICATION FOR DESIGNATION AS A MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY AS PART OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE INVESTING IN MANUFACTURING COMMUNITIES PARTNERSHIP 1) Authorize the Executive Director to provide a letter of support for the University of California (UC) Riverside's application for designation as a manufacturing community (Manufacturing Community) as part of the U.S. Department of Commerce Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership (ICMP); 2) Adopt Resolution No. 14-014, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Certifying Support for the University of California Riverside's Application for Designation as a Manufacturing Community as Part of the U.S. Department of Commerce Investing and Manufacturing Communities Partnership"; and 3) Work in cooperation with UC Riverside and the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) in providing information and support for the application. 8. PRESENTATION FROM SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT EXECUTIVE OFFICER BARRY R. WALLERSTEIN Commissioner John Benoit introduced and welcomed Executive Officer Barry Wallerstein for the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and expressed appreciation for the SCAQMD's legislative proposal and for his commitment to Riverside County. Barry Wallerstein presented the draft MAP-21 legislative proposal from SCAQMD, highlighting the following areas: • MAP-21 reauthorization; • South Coast region nitrogen oxides emissions in 2023 with adopted standards; • Overview SCAQMD approach; • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 5 • Proposals 1-3 —Sustainable freight; • Proposals 4-5 — Federal involvement; • Proposals 6-7 - Passenger rail • Proposal 8 — Federal emission controls; and • Regional comments and funding. At this time, Commissioner Adam Rush joined the meeting. At Commissioner Terry Henderson's request for clarification regarding funding, Barry Wallerstein replied no specific funding is identified and suggested the Commission and the other agencies reach a joint recommendation and compete for new funding from a mobility and public health perspective. He also expressed it is incumbent on the federal government to assist. Additionally, under the Governor's budget proposal the Cap and Trade funds will be used for these efforts. He explained SCAQMD is trying to complement those funds with a contribution from the federal government to get more than the population share given the amount of freight traffic in this region. In response to Commissioner Henderson's concern for the Commission's Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds, Dr. Wallerstein explained there was a proposal to be more involved in the CMAQ decision making and he communicated to Executive Director Anne Mayer CMAQ funding is off the table. In response to Commissioner Roger Berg's question about the diesel truck emissions adopted as a federal standard, Barry Wallerstein stated there is a significant effort to change over the truck fleet and discussed the voter -approved Proposition 1B. He explained SCAQMD implements those funds including grants to truck owners to secure trucks with particulate filters and to control nitrogen emissions, which made a significant difference. He stated to reduce the key pollutant emissions by two-thirds to three-quarters, the next steps are all truck fleets are hybrid, advanced natural gas, or fuel cell; SCAQMD is not ruling out the possibility of diesel technology catching up. At this time, Commissioner Jesse Molina joined the meeting. In response to Chair Ashley's question for the Panama Canal widening program and the air quality impacts Long Beach and Los Angeles Ports (the Ports) will have on this region, Barry Wallerstein explained the latest projects from the Ports do not anticipate a significant diversion of traffic through the Panama Canal relative to continued growth and movement of containers; the Panama Canal cannot accommodate the super vessels being built. Anne Mayer expressed appreciation for Barry Wallerstein's presentation and for the collaboration with the Commission and other regional transportation agencies on these proposals. She discussed the importance of speaking with one voice in Southern Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page b California as this is a national program and other peers through the country are focused on similar objectives. She expressed if there are no new federal funds, the pressure needs to continue as there has to be a national freight policy and the successor of MAP-21 must contains provisions to maintain progress. She stated as these bills are written, it is important for the local agencies to regroup and staff is available to lend support. Chair Ashley expressed appreciation for Barry Wallerstein's presentation and for an excellent job working with the local agencies. Barry Wallerstein expressed appreciation to the Commission for its continued partnership with SCAQMD. 9. STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT PROPERTY ACQUISITION UPDATE Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager, expressed appreciation to the staffs of Arellano and Associates and Overland, Pacific, and Cutler for their hard work on the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP). He then presented the SR-91 CIP update for the right of way and acquisition, highlighting the following areas: • Right of way approach and goals; • Making contact with property owners; • Total rights of way interests; • Full, partial acquisitions, relocation, business/residential and storage units; • Resolutions of necessity adopted to date; At this time, Commissioner Kevin Jeffries left the meeting Eliza Echevarria, Community Relations Manager, presented the community outreach program for the SR-91 CIP, highlighting the following areas: • Buena Vista Mobile Manor — Acquisition and relocation, early identification, and impacts, mobile home park overview, research, demographics, action plan, communication, public meetings and follow up, resources, relocation process, and progression; and • Training opportunities — Corona Fire, Corona Police Departments, and other agencies invited. At this time, Commissioner Kathleen DeRosa left the meeting. • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 7 Eliza Echevarria played a video of the first training sessions the Corona Fire Department conducted at the Buena Vista Mobile Manor, which will serve the greater good of the community. Commissioner Jesse Molina apologized for arriving late and asked about the time frame for the Panama Canal. Chair Ashley replied staff will provide that information. Commissioner Karen Spiegel expressed appreciation to the Commission for allowing the use of the mobile home park and discussed why this training exercise was so appreciated by the city of Corona. At this time, Commissioner Jeff Stone left the meeting. Commissioner Henderson discussed the city of La Quinta's experience of closing down a mobile home park and expressed appreciation to staff for an excellent job and noted the process will work right if people are treated right. Anne Mayer expressed appreciation to staff and the consultants for doing an exceptional job and stated staff wanted to share how the Commission conducts business. At this time, Commissioner Bob Magee left the meeting. 10. STATE LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Aaron Hake, Government Relations Manager, presented the state legislation, highlighting the following areas: • AB 515 (Dickinson) — Seeks Amendments; • AB 2197 (Mullin) —Support; • AB 785 (Wolk — Support if Amended; • SB 969 (DeSaulnier) — Oppose Unless Amended; • SB 990 (Vidak) — Oppose; and In response to Commissioner Rush's question regarding AB 2197 and its potential costs, Aaron Hake replied a final cost has not been determined. He explained three years ago the Legislature required the Department of Motor Vehicles to establish an electronic vehicle registration system. He stated the vision from the proponents of the bill is the electronic registration system will allow auto dealers to print the vehicle registration immediately upon purchase. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 8 At Commissioner Rush's request regarding AB 990, Aaron Hake discussed the basis for a disadvantaged community. At this time, Commissioner Andrew Kotyuk left the meeting. Commissioner J. Benoit referred to H.R. 29 for contracting out and noted speaking at California State Association of Counties concerning this matter. He discussed his strong concern for this bill and recommended staff return to the Commission with a formal resolution to express its extreme angst for this potential change. He discussed attending the Annual American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) Conference and the concerns of the Professional Engineers Geologists and Geophysicists (PEGG) legislation and lawsuit. He asked staff to explain the ACEC/PEGG lawsuit. At this time, Commissioners Mary Craton and Jan Harnik left the meeting. Steve DeBaun, legal counsel, stated this matter was discussed in Closed Session. The lawsuit challenges AB 401, which is design -build legislation, and attacks provisions of the bill related to use of contracting out for construction inspection services.Mr. DeBaun expressed if the lawsuit is successful, the Commission may lose its ability to use the design -build legislation. At this time, Commissioner Spiegel left the meeting. M/S/C (Johnston/B. Benoit) to adopt the following bill positions: a) AB 515 (Dickinson) — Seek Amendments; b) AB 2197 (Mullin) — Support; c) SB 785 (Wolk) — Support if Amended; d) SB 969 (DeSaulnier) -Oppose Unless Amended; and e) SB 990 (Vidak) — Oppose. 11. CAP AND TRADE FUNDING PRINCIPLES Aaron Hake presented an overview for the Cap and Trade Program policy and its principles. M/S/C (B. Benoit/Hanna) to adopt principles for state cap and trade funding. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes April 9, 2014 Page 9 13. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT There were no reports from Commissioners or the Executive Director. At this time, Commissioners J. Benoit, Basem Muallem, and Rush left the meeting. 14. CLOSED SESSION 14A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Property Owner(s): See Below Item APN(s) Property Owner(s) 234-250-009 234-250-010 234-250-011 1 234-250-012 234-250-013 Yavitz Company, LLC 234-250-029 234-250-030 234-250-031 14B. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL: EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9 (d)(1) Case Nos. RIC 1106550 and RIC 1204820 There were no announcements from Closed Session items. 15. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, adjourned the meeting at 11:30 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, May 14, 2014, in the Board Room, at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California. Respectfully submitted, Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MINUTES Wednesday, May 14, 2014 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Marion Ashley at 9:42 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Commissioner Scott Matas led the Commission in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Steve Adams Marion Ashley Ben Benoit John J. Benoit Daryl Busch Mary Craton Kathleen DeRosa Deborah Franklin Rick Gibbs Berwin Hanna Douglas Hanson Jan Harnik Terry Henderson Steven Hernandez 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS Kevin Jeffries Frank Johnston Andrew Kotyuk Bob Magee Scott Mann Scott Matas Glenn Miller Jesse Molina Basem Muallem Adam Rush Karen Spiegel Jeff Stone Ted Weill Ella 2anowic Roger Berg Joseph DeConinck Ginny Foat Ron Roberts Larry Smith John F. Tavaglione Executive Director Anne Mayer presented Finance Manager/Controller Michele Cisneros and Accounting Supervisor Anne Marie Hallberg with 15-year service awards. Anne Mayer announced the Commission received the following awards: • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 2 • 2014 CAPIO Excellence in Communications Award for the SR-91 CIP Buena Vista Mobile Manor Right of Way; • 2014 Inland Empire Section American Planning Association Hard Won Victories Award for the Perris Valley Line project; and • Best Practices Award of Merit for the SR-91 CIP — Buena Vista Mobile Manor Right of Way Acquisition Outreach program. Chair Ashley expressed this is a tribute to the hard work staff, the Commission's consultants, and the Commissioners have done. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — MARCH 12, 2014 M/S/C (Mann/J. Benoit) to approve the March 12, 2014 minutes as submitted. Abstain: Franklin 6. PUBLIC HEARING — ADOPTION OF RESOLUTIONS OF NECESSITY AND AN AMENDED RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE, BUILDING ACCESS EASEMENT, BUILDING DEMOLITION EASEMENT, PERMANENT WALL FOOTING EASEMENT, TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT, AND POSSESSORY AND/OR LEASEHOLD INTERESTS IN ALL OR PORTIONS OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NOS. 102-050-002, 102-050-010, 102-050-013, 102-050-014, AND 102-050-018; 118-330-009; 102-101-001; AND 102-050-005 LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA At this time, Chair Ashley opened the public hearing and called upon legal counsel to explain the nature and scope of this hearing. Steve DeBaun, legal counsel, explained the purpose of this hearing is for the Board to consider the adoption of Resolution of Necessity Nos. 14-016, 14-017, 14-018, and Amended Resolution of Necessity No. 13-074 for the acquisition of various real properties for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP). He stated at the conclusion of this hearing, the Board will be asked to adopt the resolutions of necessity and he listed the findings. He explained the purpose of this hearing is to consider the need for acquisition of the property and not to consider the value of the property. Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board, verified proofs of mailing that certify the notices were sent to the property owners of said parcel numbers are on file with the Commission. The Commission has not received any written objections, protests, or requests to be heard from the owners or their representatives. • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 3 2 3 4 102-050-002 102-050-010 102-050-013 102-050-014 102-050-018 118-330-009 102-101-001 102-050-005 22128 22175 22135 22121 Serfas Service Station, Inc. Dvorak & Payne, Ltd. Giant Inland Empire RV Centers, Inc. Serfas Country Clubs Inc. 14-016 14-017 14-018 13-074 No No No Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager, presented the resolutions of necessity and an amended resolution of necessity for the SR-91 CIP and discussed the following areas: • Four findings required by the Board; • Project Map — Parcel locations in the project; • Parcel list; • Offers of just compensation and contact summary for each parcel; • Aerial views of parcels; and • Staff recommendation. At this time, Chair Ashley called on any persons who wish to be heard that have an interest in property. There were no requests to speak. In response to Commissioner Mary Craton's question as to why the Commission would purchase this land at Serfas Club Drive, Mark Lancaster replied it is a separate assessor parcel number'(APN) and is not part of the golf course. He explained it is a landlocked piece of property owned by the original golf course owners. With the size reduction, it is an uneconomic remnant. At Commissioner Adam Rush's request, Mark Lancaster clarified for the Dvorak & Payne, Ltd. Property, the building access easement lasts as long as the demolition of the cut and reface on the southerly portion of the property, which is six months. He explained there will be access and the ability to make adjustments to leave the property in a functioning condition when completed. Commissioner Jeff Stone expressed appreciation for staff's hard work and stated when the Commission goes through the eminent domain process, he needs to ask questions for i the record, which are: 1) is this publicly necessary; 2) are these properties appraised at the highest and best use; 3) has staff exhausted all administrative remedies for an acceptable transaction with the property owners; and 4) will negotiations continue if the Commission moves forward with eminent domain. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 4 Mark Lancaster replied yes to all. In response to Commissioner Stone's clarification if the property owners' appraisals were taken into consideration, Mark Lancaster replied absolutely. He explained the Commission does an appraisal and the property owners are offered $5,000 to perform their appraisal and a settlement is negotiated using both appraisals. Chair Ashley then called on any other persons who wish to be heard on this matter. There were no other requests to speak from the public. Chair Ashley closed the public hearing. M/S/C (Henderson/Busch) to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of resolutions of necessity, and amend one resolution of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolutions of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity Nos. 14=016, 14-017, 14-018, and Amended Resolution of Necessity No. 13-074, "Resolutions of Necessity, and Amended Resolution of Necessity, for the Acquisition of Fee, Building Access Easement, Building Demolition Easement, Permanent Wall Footing Easement, Temporary Construction Easement, and Possessory and/or Leasehold Interests in All or Portions of Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Nos. 102-050-002, 102-050-010, 102-050-013, 102-050-014, and 102-050-018; 118-330-009; 102-101-001; and 102-050-005 Located in Corona, Riverside County, California", for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), between Pierce Street on the east to the County line on the West, in Riverside County, California. 7. PUBLIC HEARING — PROPOSED BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 Michele Cisneros, Finance Manager/Controller, presented the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15 and discussed the following areas: • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 5 • Budget process; • FY 2014/15 Budget considerations and summary; • Sources and expenditure by breakdown and comparison; • Capital department expenditure highlights; • Functional expenditures breakdown and comparison; and • Next steps. In response to Commissioner Karen Spiegel's question regarding Metrolink's budgeted amount, Michele Cisneros replied $10.4 million is included in the Commission's budget for Metrolink subsidy. Sheldon Peterson clarified the amount is more than the proposed subsidy, which is $9.8 million, however, the Commission budgeted $10.4 million. M/S/C (Stone/Matas) to continue the public hearing for the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15 to the Commission meeting on June 11, 2014. At this time, Commissioner Stone left the meeting. 8. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 9. CONSENT CALENDAR Commissioner Douglas Hanson requested to pull Agenda Item 9C, "Construction and Maintenance Agreements with Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project" for further discussion. M/S/C (Adams/Busch) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. Abstain: Commissioners Kevin Jeffries and Bob Magee - Agenda Item 9G 9A. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 4 2013 (Q4 2013). 9B. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the third quarter ended March 31, 2014. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 6 9D. CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT WITH DALKE & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC. FOR STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT RIGHT OF WAY PROPERTY MITIGATION PACKAGE 3 1) Award Agreement No. 14-31-081-00 to Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. (Dalke & Sons) for the construction of State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP) Right of Way (ROW) Property Mitigation Package 3 in the amount of $5,147,846, plus a contingency amount of $514,785, for a total amount not to exceed $5,662,631; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount. 9E. ACTIVE- TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM — METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION REGIONAL PROGRAM GUIDANCE AND METHODOLOGY FOR ASSIGNING ADDITIONAL POINTS FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROJECT APPLICATIONS Approve the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Regional Program Guidance and Methodology for assigning an additional 10 points to Riverside County Active Transportation Program (ATP) project application scores, subsequent to the California Transportation Commission's (CTC) evaluation process. 9F. TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REVENUE PROJECTION 1) Approve the revised Fiscal Year 2013/14 Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenue projection of $7.4 million, comprised of $3.7 million related to regional arterials and $3.7 million to Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process (CETAP) corridors; and 2) Approve the budget decrease adjustments to TUMF revenues of $2.3 million related to regional arterials and $2.3 million to CETAP corridors. 9G. AMENDMENT TO TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REGIONAL ARTERIAL AGREEMENT FOR THE INTERSTATE 15/RAILROAD CANYON ROAD INTERCHANGE PROJECT IN THE CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-72-016-03, Amendment No. 3 to Agreement No. 10-72-016-00, with the city of Lake Elsinore (Lake Elsinore) for the Interstate 15/ Railroad Canyon Road interchange project to authorize additional scope to analyze a roundabout alternative as part of the project • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 7 approval and environmental document (PA&ED) phase with an additional $600,000 of TUMF funds to be allocated to this phase for a total amount not to exceed $2,205,000; 2) Approve Agreement No. 11-31-107-03, Amendment No. 3 to Agreement No. 11-31-107-00, with SC Engineering to add a roundabout alternative to the PA&ED services associated with the project in the amount of $500,009, plus an additional contingency amount of $25,000 for a total increase of $525,009, resulting in a total not to exceed amount of $1,230,009; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; 4) Authorize the Executive Director to approve release of contingency work up to the total authorized amount as may be required for the project; and 5) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute agreements with Caltrans to reflect non -funding changes related to the project on behalf of the Commission. 9H. PROPERTY CONVEYANCE AT PEDLEY STATION 1) Approve Agreement No. 14-33-104-00 between the Commission and Sergio Hernandez and Angela Avila, property owner of Assessor's Parcel Number (APN) 165-190-044, for property conveyances to perfect title at the Pedley Station without any monetary compensation exchanged between the parties; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 91. AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES, MATERIALS TESTING, AND CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING FOR RIVERSIDE DOWNTOWN STATION OPERATIONS CONTROL CENTER 1) Award Agreement No. 14-31-075-00 to Abacus Project Management, Inc. (Abacus) for construction management (CM), materials testing, and construction surveying services for the Riverside Downtown Station Operations Control Center (RDNOCC), in the amount of $165,253, plus a contingency amount of $16,525, for a total amount not to exceed $181, 778; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3). Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work as may be required for the project. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 8 9J. FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 MEASURE A COMMUTER ASSISTANCE BUSPOOL SUBSIDY FUNDING CONTINUATION REQUESTS 1) Authorize payment of $1,645/month maximum subsidy per buspool for the period July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015, to the existing Mira Loma, Riverside, and Riverside II buspools; and 2) Require subsidy recipients to meet monthly buspool reporting requirements as supporting documentation to receive payments. 9K. AMENDMENT TO FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL AGREEMENT 1) Approve Agreement No. 12-45-046-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 12-45-046-00 with Pepe's Towing (Pepe's) to provide freeway service patrol (FSP) services on the Commission's Interstate 215 Central widening project in the amount of $475,000; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 9L. AGREEMENTS FOR THE TRAFFIC SIGNAL COORDINATION PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM 1) Approve Agreement No. 14-65-106-00 with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) for $1.25 million to fund traffic flow improvements located within Riverside County; 2) Approve the following agreements for a total amount not to exceed $1.25 million: a) Agreement No. 14-65-107-00 with Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) in the amount not to exceed $310,375; b) Agreement No. 14-65-108-00 with the city of Eastvale in an amount not to exceed $74,625; c) Agreement No. 14-65-109-00 with the city of Moreno Valley in an amount not to exceed $490,000; d) Agreement No. 14-65-110-00 with the city of Riverside in an amount not to exceed $375,000; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Replace $939,625 in Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) funding previously allocated to the cities of Eastvale, Moreno Valley, and Riverside through the Commission's 2013 Multi -funding Call for Projects approved on January 8, 2014, with funding available through SCAQMD's Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) Program. • • • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 9 9M. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 1) Receive and file an update on MAP-21 reauthorization; 2) Adopt the following state bill positions: a) AB 2036 (Mansoor) — Oppose Unless Amended; b) AB 2651 (Linder) — Support; c) AB 2728 (Perea) — Support; and d) HR 29 (Gomez) - Oppose. 10. AGREEMENT FOR FORECASTING SERVICES FOR THE COACHELLA VALLEY-SAN GORGONIO PASS RAIL CORRIDOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager, presented the Coachella Valley — San Gorgonio Pass Corridor Rail Service Development Plan, highlighting the following areas: • Service development plan; • Phases 1 and 2 deliverables; • Project schedule and procurement process; and • Next steps. At this time, Commissioner Stone rejoined the meeting. Chair Ashley expressed appreciation for initiating this plan and moving it forward. Commissioner Douglas Hanson explained this plan was discussed at the Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee and he recommended this train be created using a hydrogen fuel cell. He discussed advocating the opportunity to put in the first full service hydrogen fuel cell operated passenger train service and suggested working with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Southern California Air Quality Management District, Amtrak, and Union Pacific Railroad to bring this opportunity to fruition. He expressed appreciation for staff's hard work in advocating for passenger train service to Coachella Valley. Commissioner Steven Hernandez expressed appreciation for staff's proposal as it lays out a comprehensive analysis of the feasibility of passenger train service into the San Gorgonio Pass area and the Coachella Valley. He explained it also helps preserve funding for SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) services in Coachella Valley and suggested the Commission needs to commence discussions on how to fund this project as well as the PVL extension into the San Jacinto Valley. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 10 Anne Mayer stated this is a key objective of the study to understand the project feasibility, costs, and potential funding sources. She explained this effort will require Commissioner involvement. She discussed its impact on the region and the outreach program. M/S/C (Hanson/J. Benoit) to 1) Award Agreement No. 14-25-072-00 to HDR Engineering, Inc. (HDR) for forecasting services for the Coachella Valley -San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor (Corridor) Service Development Plan (SDP) in the amount of $1,697,645, plus a contingency amount of $150,000 for a total amount not to exceed $1,847,645; 2) Authorize staff to proceed with the Phase 1 work, including Tasks 1 and 2 through a limited notice to proceed (NTP) in the amount of $1,847,645; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 4) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work as may be required for the project; and 5) Authorize staff to negotiate the scope and fee for Phase 2 (Tasks 3 and 4) and to bring back to the Commission, at a later date, a separate request for authorization to execute a separate contract amendment to proceed to the next phase of work, if warranted. At this time, Commissioners Steve Adams, Hernandez, and Rush left the meeting. 11. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION 9C. CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE AGREEMENTS WITH BURLINGTON NORTHERN AND SANTA FE RAILWAY FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT In response to Commissioner Hanson's request for clarification regarding the reimbursement for flagging services, Toll Project Manager David Thomas replied the design -build contract was structured to include flagging services as part of the contractor's bid. He explained the Commission does not have a mechanism for the contractor to pay BNSF Railway directly for the flagging service costs. Anne Mayer added BNSF Railway would not execute an agreement with a private entity for flagging services so funding must flow through the public agency. However, it is the contractor's responsibility to pay for these services. M/S/C (B. Benoit/Henderson) to: Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 11 1) Approve the construction and maintenance (C&M) agreements with Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) for the State. Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP) in the amount $7,321,341, plus a contingency amount of $732,134, for a total amount not to exceed $8,053,475; a) Agreement No. 14-31-115-00 for West Prado Overhead in the amount of $866,154; b) Agreement No. 14-31-113-00 for East Prado Overhead in the amount of $1,007,242; c) Agreement No. 14-31-114-00 for West Porphyry Overhead in the amount of $4,985,624; and d) Agreement No. 14-31-112-00 for East Porphyry Overhead in the amount of $462,321; Subject to any increases (not to exceed the authorized contingency) or reductions in final amounts, as described; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work up to the total not to exceed amount, as required for the agreements. At this time, Commissioner Rush rejoined the meeting. 12. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT There were no reports from Commissioners or the Executive Director. At this time, Commissioners J. Benoit, Kevin Jeffries, Glenn Miller, and Basem Muallem left the meeting. 13. CLOSED SESSION 13A. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL: EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9 (d)(1) Case No(s). RIC 1200336 and RIC 1204820 There were no announcements from the Closed Session items. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes May 14, 2014 Page 12 14. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, adjourned the meeting in memory of the Commission's former Deputy Executive Director Paul Blackwelder at 11:06 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, June 11, 2014, in the Board Room, at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California. Respectfully submitted, Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board • • DETACH AND SUBMIT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD L0/2.0N,�� DATE; /c� 'HECK IF SUBJECT OF • �� PUBLIC COMMENTS: O PUBLIC COMMENTS: `3`G1 ZA2l `4‘A "' " J a� AGENDA ITEM NO.:� SUBJECT OF (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) _ AGENDA ITEM: � ��� NAME: ," 1j� / PHONE NO... f�f�t7 ADDRESS: STREET // ��//JJ ��,,�� ��jj CITY ZIP CODE REPRESENTING: 6A,/y, 7'%" 0 PHONE NO.: NAME OF AGENCY / ORGANIZATION / GROUP BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE DETACH AND SUBMIT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD DATE: ( 1 I iu CHECK IF SUBJECT OF , 1 PUBLIC COMMENTS: CI PUBLIC COMMENTS:4kE5, a`'�-��.��"-�� T � y AGENDA ITEM NO.: SUBJECT OF �1A s "j-+^� / (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) AGENDA ITEM: V L/ NAME: ADDRESS: L"1/1, crra r-ere'vil)e-'c77 PHONE NO.: � 1 14a Lifn/0 hike .7 arec.vlce C,r03 STREET CITY REPRESENTING: ZIP CODE d� vi ev.17-44711 ) -e--) PHONE N00( �%-rtf2� NAME OF AGENCY / ORGANIZATION / GROUP BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE AGENDA ITEM 6 PUBLIC HEARING • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Adoption of a Resolution of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Building Access Easement, Building Demolition Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Portions of Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Nos. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, and 118-270-042 Located in Corona, Riverside County, California, for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project, Between Pierce Street on the East to the County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of a resolution of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolution of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity No. 14-022, "Resolution of Necessity for the Acquisition of Fee, Building Access Easement, Building Demolition Easement, and Temporary Construction Easement Interests in Portions of Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Assessor Parcel Nos. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, and 118-270-042 (CPNs 22218-1, 22218-2, 22218-3, 22218-4, 22218-5, 22218-6, and 22218-7) Located in Corona, Riverside County, California', for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), between Pierce Street on the East to the County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California. Agenda Item 6 1 BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is being asked to consider the adoption of a resolution of necessity for the interests in the parcels outlined in this agenda item. These interests are required for construction of the SR-91 CIP. The power of eminent domain is used by the Commission only as a last resort to obtain interests necessary for public highway projects after: 1) negotiations have stalled; or 2) the property owner has requested the Commission proceed directly to eminent domain for tax or other advantages; or 3) the eminent domain process is necessary to clear the title to the property. In this case, an offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner for the full Fair Market Value as determined by an appraisal. Commission staff attempted to negotiate amicable settlements in good faith, and will continue to do so throughout the process. Fair Market Value is defined by the state of California and is one of the most inclusive definitions in the United States. It requires the highest and best use of the property be considered. All of the Commission's appraisals must meet the California definition of Fair Market Value. One of the requirements for acquiring property for improvement projects is that an offer of just compensation be made to the owners of the property. The Commission makes these offers in person whenever possible. The amount of compensation is determined by appraisals prepared by independent appraisal firms licensed by the Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers. The content of these appraisals, what elements are considered in them, and the methodologies used in the preparation are all proscribed by various laws and the Uniform Standards of Appraisal Practice (USPAP), published by the Appraisal Foundation. The Federal Government recognizes the USPAP as generally accepted appraisal standards and requires USPAP compliance for appraisers in federally related transactions. Every appraisal calculates the market value of the acquisition as defined by the California Code of Civil Procedure, based on the highest and best use, as defined in USPAP, and includes consideration of severance damages and project benefits (also defined in the California Code of Civil Procedure). In every case, the property owner is invited to accompany the appraiser during the site visit so that as much information as possible is considered in the appraisal. A review appraisal prepared by a different certified appraiser is then conducted to ensure all proper procedures have been followed. Additionally, in accordance with state law, every property owner is offered up to $5,000 to reimburse the cost to have their own appraisal prepared. Staff will bring to the Commission those interests that meet one of the three criteria above. The timing of these resolutions will balance the need to give the property owners as much time as possible to reach an agreement, while at the same time allowing enough time for the Commission to go through the process to obtain possession in time to avoid delays to the design -build contractor. The legal process from adoption of the resolution of necessity to receiving legal possession of the properties takes approximately 150 days. Agenda Item 6 2 • California eminent domain law provides that a public entity may not commence with eminent domain proceedings until its governing body has adopted a resolution of necessity, which resolution may only be adopted after the governing body has given each party with an interest in the affected property, or their representatives, a reasonable opportunity to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4) The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. Since an agreement has not been reached with the property owner, it may be necessary to acquire necessary interests described by eminent domain. The initiation of the eminent domain process is accomplished by the Commission's adoption of a resolution of necessity for the affected property. Record property owners must be afforded an opportunity to appear at the hearing and lodge objections. A notice of this hearing was sent by first class mail to the property owner, and stated the Commission's intent to consider the adoption of a resolution, the right of the property owner to appear and be heard on these issues, and that failure to file a written request to appear would result in a waiver of the right to appear and be heard. The Commission scheduled this hearing at which all persons who filed a written request in compliance with applicable law may appear and be heard. An aerial view of the parcels subject to this staff report in relation to the SR-91 CIP is attached. Finding 1: Public Interest and Necessity Require the Prolect SR-91 in Riverside County ranks among the nation's worst commutes where most motorists experience significant delays. Stop -and -go traffic is the norm, especially during morning and late afternoon rush hours. Traffic congestion on eastbound SR-91 between the cities of Anaheim and Corona is routinely among the worst 15 areas in the nation. SR-91 is continuing to experience increased congestion as a result of population growth in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties and the increase in jobs in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Demographic projections for the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) region show population and employment in Orange and Riverside Counties are forecast to increase substantially by 2035. As a result, traffic volumes on SR-91 are expected to increase by approximately 50 percent by 2035, which would result in even greater congestion and delays on SR-91. The existing travel demand on SR-91 has led to a heavy directional commute pattern between Los Angeles/Orange and Riverside Counties that is projected to continue into the future. SR-91 is the only major highway that links Orange and Riverside Counties. Extending from the Orange County/Riverside County line in the city of Corona to Pierce Street in Riverside, the Agenda Item 6 SR-91 CIP will add mixed flow lanes, tolled express lanes, improve interchanges, bridges, ramps, and local streets. New freeway to freeway ramp connections between the SR-91 and Interstate 15 also will be made. The SR-91 CIP is designed to reduce delays, improve air quality, offer a choice between regular mixed flow lanes and express lanes, allow faster emergency response, relieve local street congestion, and provide better access to public transit and rails. Finding 2: The Proiect is Planned or Located in a Manner Most Compatible with Greatest Public Good and Least Private Iniury A thorough analysis was conducted to find the single best alternative for the SR-91 CIP. Environmental analyses and findings indicate the chosen alignment uniquely satisfies engineering, public health, and environmental issues, and is the most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury. To minimize private injury, a thorough analysis regarding the need for each property and each interest was conducted in the planning stages of the SR-91 CIP. Efforts during the planning stages included conducting public outreach meetings and seeking feedback about the SR-91 CIP alignment and potential impacts. Staff also met regularly with various local agencies and businesses to determine if modifications to the alignment were necessary to minimize impacts. These efforts continued over the course of years to ,ensure the alignment design achieved the greatest public good with the least private injury. As part of the acquisition process, unless settlement was reached within the first 30 days after an offer was made, every property owner was provided an opportunity to participate in meetings with project staff. The goal of these meetings was to minimize private injury not only on the basis of information staff obtained through the planning process, but also on the information provided by the property owners. As a result, staff has in some cases included mitigation measures to reduce and minimize impacts to the property. Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act has been satisfied by Caltrans' certification of an environmental impact report (EIR) in its role as lead agency on August 8, 2012, and the Commission's subsequent consideration of that certified EIR in its role as a responsible agency on November 14, 2012. Finding 3: The Real Property to be Acquired is Necessary for the Proiect The property interests sought below have been analyzed to determine if a feasible design alternative exists that would alleviate the need for the interest. As indicated above, the property owners of the interests were invited to meet with project staff and provide input to address any concerns the property owners may have with the design of the SR-91 CIP in the manner proposed and the necessity of the acquisition. To the extent the property owners Agenda Item 6 4 raised such concerns; staff took those concerns into consideration and attempted to make design modifications as feasible and possible. In the end, staff recommends the following interests in real property are necessary for the project. RON No. 14-022 — Owner: Carona Towne Center, LLC, a California limited liability company; APNs 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, and 118-270-042 (CPNs 22218-1, 22218-2, 22218-3, 22218-4, 22218-5, 22218-6, and 22218-7 The real property commonly known as APNs 118-270-034, ;118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, and 118-270-042 is owned in fee by Corona Towne Center, LLC, a California limited liability company (Corona Towne Center), and is located at 261-401 South Lincoln Avenue, in Corona, California. The subject property is roughly square in shape and is commonly known as the Corona Towne Center, a community shopping center containing 139,003 square feet of gross leasable area on a 10.42 acre (453889 square foot) site. The subject property is occupied by retail/commercial tenants including Cardenas market, Fallas clothing store, Dollar Tree, Yoshinoya restaurant, an animal hospital, and various other businesses. The property is bounded by a former RV sales business to the north, residential properties to the south, commercial businesses to the east, and South Lincoln Street to the west. The north and west sides of the subject property are impacted due to the widening of SR-91, the resulting realignment of the eastbound Lincoln Avenue on and off ramps, and the addition of a new frontage road. West 2nd Street will be extended west through the shopping center from the existing west 2nd Street/Vicentia Avenue intersection to the Lincoln Avenue/D Street intersection. The eastbound Lincoln Avenue on and off ramps will be realigned to intersect with the newly extended west 2nd Street. The Commission is seeking to acquire portions of the subject property including fee, building access easement, building demolition easement, and four temporary construction easement interests. An offer of just compensation for the property interests sought to be acquired was made to the record owner on January 7, 2014. A supplemental offer for additional improvements pertaining to realty was made on April 8, 2014. Accordingly, the Commission is seeing a resolution of necessity for the purpose of acquiring the property interests necessary for the project. Legal definition(s), legal description(s) and/or plat map(s) of the portions sought to be acquired are attached as an exhibit to Resolution of Necessity No. 14-022. An aerial view of the parcel and the parcel's relationship to the SR-91 CIP is also attached. The Notice of Hearing was mailed to the property owners on April 26, 2014. Agenda Item 6 5 Finding 4: Offers of Just Compensation Have Been Made to the Property Owners Litigation guarantees were obtained from Commonwealth Land Title Insurance Company to confirm and identify the parties with an interest in the parcels affected by the SR-91 CIP. The Commission then served the affected property owner and other interested parties as appropriate, with a notice of the Commission's decision to appraise the property. The Commission had the real property interests appraised by the real estate appraisal firm of Integra Realty Resource, and the fixtures and equipment interests were appraised by the appraisal firm of Desmond, Marcello &'Amster, LLC, to establish the Fair Market Value of the property interests the Commission its seeking to acquire from the parties identified herein. Offers of just compensation were made to the property owner to purchase the property interests based on the approved appraisals, as required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code. However, the Commission will acquire the fee, building access easement, building demolition easement, and: temporary construction easement interests including any improvements sought from the property owners and/or tenants through eminent domain, to ensure the property will be available to meet the time frames associated with the construction of the SR-91 CIP. Fiscal Impact' There is no fiscal impact .due to the adoption of the resolution of necessity. All property acquisition expenses are included in the SR-91 CIP budget. Attachment: Resolution No. 14-022 Agenda Item 6 6 RESOLUTION NO. 14-022 RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE, BUILDING ACCESS EASEMENT, BUILDING DEMOLITION EASEMENT, AND TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT INTERESTS IN CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NOS. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, AND 118-270-042, LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, WHICH COVERS THE AREA BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire fee, building access easement, building demolition easement and temporary construction easement interests in certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel Nos. 118-270-034, 118-270-035, 118-270-036, 118-270-038, 118-270-039, 118-270-042, and (CPNs 22218-1, 22218-2, 22218-3, 22218-4, 22218-5, 22218-6, and 22218-7) for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP) in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and the affected property owner and other interested parties were afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. • Section 2. Public Use. The public use for the fee, building access easement, building demolition easement and temporary construction easement interests in the property to be acquired is for the SR-91 CIP in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes the Commission to acquire, by eminent domain, property necessary for such purposes. Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "A" are the legal definitions, legal descriptions and plat maps of the portions of the parcel upon which the fee, building access easement, building demolition easement and temporary construction easement interests to be acquired by the Commission are located, and which describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property defined, described and/or depicted in Exhibit "A" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section S. Use Not Unreasonably interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights of way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights of way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than • 8 • • • said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of the Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non- material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 11th day ofJune, 2014. Marion Ashley, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission • 10 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: (The rights being acquired may be exercised mutually exclusive of each other.) "Fee" (as to 22218-1) also known as fee simple or fee simple absolute, grants to RCTC absolute ownership of the portion of the property to be acquired. "Temporary Construction Easement" (TCE) (as to 22218-2, 22218-3, 22218-4, and 22218-5) refers to the right of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to engage in constntction and related activities for the project. Such rights shall be exercised for a period of 6 consecutive months, beginning no fewer than 72 hours after the date that RCTC provides written notice of commencement of possession to the property owner. The duration of the rights under the TCEs shall not extend beyond November 6, 2017, or upon filing of a Notice of Completion, whichever is earlier. Property Owner shall not cause, directly, indirectly or negligently, any interference with or harm to the rights conveyed hereunder. "Building Demolition Easement" (as to 22218-6) refers to an exclusive temporary easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, its successors and assigns, for the purpose of demolition, construction, reconstruction, and repair of the building and improvements located therein, together with all necessary rights incidental thereto. Property Owner shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over, or under any portion of the easement, or plant trees or any other vegetation on any portion of the easement except with the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. No other easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. Such right shall be exercised for a period of 3 consecutive months, beginning no fewer than 72 hours after the date that RCTC provides written notice of commencement of possession to the property owner. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not extend beyond November 6, 2017, or upon filing of a Notice of Completion, whichever is earlier. Property Owner shall not cause, directly, indirectly or negligently, any interference with or harm to the rights conveyed hereunder. 17336.02100\8819430.1 EXHIBIT, PAGE 1 "Building Access Easement" (as to 22218-7) refers to a non-exclusive temporary easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, its successors and assigns, to use the area to disconnect and tie-in to the existing structure, utilities and mechanical systems, for inspection purposes, and to traverse an access way to access RCTC owned facilities and/or construction site, as determined necessary by RCTC, together with all necessary rights incidental thereto, on, over, under and across the property in connection with the exercise of any easement rights described herein. Property Owner shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over, or under any portion of the easement, or plant trees or any other vegetation on any portion of the easement except with the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. No other easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. Such right shall be exercised for a period of 3 consecutive months, beginning no fewer than 72 hours after the date that RCTC provides written notice of commencement of possession to the property owner. The duration of the rights under this easement shall not extend beyond November 6, 2017, or upon filing of a Notice of Completion, whichever is earlier. Property Owner shall not cause, directly, indirectly or negligently, any interference with or harm to the rights conveyed hereunder. 17336.02100\8819430.1 EXHIBIT, PAGE 2 • • • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 PSOMAS EXHIBIT 'Al' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22218-1 Fee Acquisition APN 118-270-034, 35, 36, 38, 39, and 42 Those portions of Parcels 1 through 6, inclusive, of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143,Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence along the northerly line of said Parcel 2 South 81 °57'20" East 288.27 feet to a point thereon; thence South 72°26'28" West 218.38 feet; thence South 73°45'06" West 161.02 feet to the beginning of a curve concave northerly' having a radius of 903.00 feet; thence westerly along said curve 405.45 feet through a central angle of 25°43'33"; thence South 50°04' 12 West 38.02 feet; thence South 09°13'38 West 145.98 feet to the beginning of a curve concave westerly having a radius of 168.00 feet; thence southwesterly along said curve 68.33 feet through a central angle of 23°18' 10" to the beginning of a reverse curve concave southeasterly having a radius of 146.00 feet; thence southwesterly along said curve 45.53 feet through a central angle of 17°52'05" to a point on the westerly line of said Parcel 6; thence along the westerly line of said Parcels 1 through 6, also being the easterly line of Lincoln Avenue as shown on said parcel map the following five (5) courses: 1. North 08°03'59" East 293.97 feet to the beginning of a curve concave southeasterly having a radius of 14.50 feet; 2. Northerly, northeasterly and easterly along said curve 22.78 feet through a central angle of 90°00'00' ; P:\2PTG010501 \SURVEY\LEGALS\22218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legals,22218-1-FEE. doc 12/10/2012 Pave 1 of 3 EXHIBIT, PAGE 3 I 2 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 3. North 08°03'59" East 65.00 feet to a point, said point being the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave northeasterly having a radius of 14.50 feet, to which point a radial line bears South 08°03'59" West; 4. Westerly, northwesterly and northerly along said curve 22.78 feet through a central angle of 90°00'00"; 5. North 08°03'59" East 82.16 feet to a point thereon, said point being the most southerly comer of Parcel 2070-107B as described in the Final Order of Condemnation, Case No. 217114, Superior Court of said County, a Certified Copy thereof being recorded October 5, 1995 as Instrument No. 333298 of Official Records of said County; thence along the southerly line of said Parcel 2070-107B the following two (2) courses: 1. North 66°09'06" East 12.61 feet and 2. North 86°05'56" East 64.11 feet to a point on the northerly line of said Parcel 1; thence along last said southerly line and the northerly line of said Parcel 1 the following four (4) courses: 1. South 81 °55'24" East 214.71 feet to the beginning of a curve concave northerly having a radius of 150.00 feet; 2. easterly along said curve 72.60 feet through a central angle of 27°43'49" to the beginning of a reverse curve concave southerly having a radius of 150.00 feet; 3. easterly along said curve 72.51 feet through a central angle of 27°41'53' ; and 4. South 81 °57'20" East 77.36 feet to the Point of Beginning. Contains 119,587 square feet. This conveyance is made for the purpose of a freeway and the Grantor hereby releases and relinquishes to the Grantee any and all abutter's rights or access, appurtenant to Grantor's remaining property, in and to said freeway. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476 PA2PTG010501 \S URV EY\LEGALS122218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_042\Le gals\22218-1-FEE.doc 12/10/2012 Page 2 of 3 EXHIBIT, PAGE 4 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS ©MAS See Exhibit `A2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 /2- 0 - /? Date P:12PTG 010501 \SURVEY\LEGALS\22218_APN_118-270-035_036_038_039_0421Legals\22218- I -FEE. doc 12/10/2012 Page 3 of 3 EXHIBIT, PAGE 5 16 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22218-1 FEE 119,587 S.F. 118-270-034,35,36,38,39,42 PARCEL 1 PARCEL 2 P M 8, I 1 / J2`J.j 118-270-023 N F- LU w N W W (!) C5 0 ° q3` 3 D,25 P,M, PJN ,B. POB 118-270-024 307.25' 581°57'20"E 288.27' S 118-270-035 DOC. #2000-033061 O.R. NO, 216)O 118-270-036 } L7 L8 3 v v- s- :v0 NO M M O N LINE TABLE BEARING DISTANCE L1 N08°03'59"E 65.00' L2 N08°03'59"E 82.16' L3 N66°09'06"E 12.61' L4 N86°05'56"E 64.11' L5 581°55'24"E 214.71' L6 S81°57'20"E 77.36' L7 S08°07'46"W 53.36' L8.581°52'14"E 10.00' CURVE TABLE DELTA RADIUS LENGTH C1 23°18'10" 168.00' 68.33' C2 17°52'05" 146.00' 45.53' C3 90°00'00" 14.50' 22.78' C4 90°00'00" 14.50' 22.78' C5 27°43'49" 150.00' 72.60' C6 27°41'53" 150.00' 72.51' I FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinotes and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distonces. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicotes Rodial Bearing )Title to State ) (( ( Access Prohibited C 222.18-1 FEE ACQUISITION PREPARED BY: P SOMA S 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Ste. 200 Santa Ano, California 92707 (7i4)751-73731(714)545-8883 (Fox) DATE:03-06-12 REV.:3; 12-10-12 EA: OF540 FAn: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS 8 RIV 91 5.5 1 2 EXHIBIT, PAGE 6 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL TITLE AREA APN 22218-1 FEE 119,587 S.F. 118-270-03,1,35,36,38,39,42 SEE SHEET 1 FOR LINE AND CURVE TABLES PARCEL 2070- 1 D 7 A -? D ST. LINCOLN AVE. PARCEL 1 Prl 1 PAll ..J1 ., 51 / 62-63 L3 ` —LA- N J ICA i i C3 N V N v 44' ti Cr) M s C,J 118-270-023 C5 S09°28'39"W (R) DOC. #2000- S50°04'12"W 38.02' co . rn co Mi cr) o I1.f; (3' I— O u)I PARCEL 5 118-270-039 118-270-038 C2 N75°20'16"W (R)- i P,N1, P,1 .9, C6 033061 NJ 1'13/ 91- L6 O.R. 21690 93 1— w w V) w w U0 118-270-035 PARCEL 3 PARCEL '1 118-270-036 FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtoin ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing ) Title to State t t l ) Access Prohibited 22218-1 FEE ACQUISITION PREPARED BY: PS O M A S 3 Ilvtion Centre Drive, Ste. 200 Sento Ana Coliforn4, 92707 (714)751-73734714)545-8883 (fox) DATE:03-06-12 REV.: 3; 2-10-12 EA: OF540 FAl* : DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS 8 RI 91 5.5 2 2 EXHIBIT PAGE 7 • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1.6 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT B1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22218-2 Temporary Construction Easement APN 118-270-034 That portion of Parcel 2 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence South 81 °57'20" East 288.27 feet along the northerly line of said parcel to a point thereon, said point being the True Point of Beginning; thence South 81 °57'20" East 10.41 feet continuing along said northerly line to a point thereon; thence South 17°33'32" East 13.50 feet; thence South 72°26'28" West 100.00 feet; thence North 17°33'32" West 18.00 feet; and thence North 72°26'28" East 90.62 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 1,779 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System. of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit 132' attached hereto and made a part hereof. PA2PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALS12221.8_APN_ 1 18-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legals122218-2-TCE.doc 12/ 10/2012 Page 1 of 2 EXHIBIT, PAGE 8 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Prepared under the direction of 27f../4,z_ /2-/toyz Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date P:12PTG010501'SUAVE YLEGALS122218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legals122218-2-TCE.doc 12/ 10/2012 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBITN PAGE 9 EXHIBIT B2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22218-2 TCE 1,779 S0. FT. 118-270-034 vs,P�1f�CrL 1 I \.9° P,M,g., VS \9_ PARCrL 2 51 / 62--63 rn \,� 1 18-270-023 1 18-270-024 TPOB O I \F` C2 POB ` . 30725" `� L3 O \ Cl � \�- 77.36' _ . S81 _ , � °57'20"E 365.63' 288 27' _ �,. - _• _- \ 1 L4 c\1 o0 — ._ PARCEL 1 L 1 � �`,,�. L2 118-270-042 I L6 cP r rr 2 P'�R I �v I p- i(�� ,r` O ) 1 18-270- 034 I N o 0 ra °o N 1 I o J I PARCEL 3 LINE TABLE BEARING DISTANCE 118-270-035 L1 508°07'46"W 53.36' !. - L2 581 °52'14"E 10.00' 1.-DOC, #2000-033061 O.R. L3 L4 S81°57'20"E 51 7° 33'32"E 10.41' 1 3.50' P I�11 1\1J21690 L5 L6 L7 572°26'28"W N1 7°33'32"W N72 26'28 E 100.00' 18.00' 90.62' T v) p.,N.s. 1 3/ 91— ).3 40 in o PARCEL 3 CURVE TABLE 1 DELTA RADIUS LENGTH L l 2C1 27°43'49" 150.00' 72.60' n' C2 27°41'53" 150.00' 72.51' C1 coPARDEI 1 118-270-036 FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicotes True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing I _ 1 TEMPORARY obtoin ground Title to State CONSTRUCTION distances. All distances are in feet IIII Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:03-06-12 REV.:2; 12-10-12 EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS 3 Huiton Centre Drive, Ste. 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS (714)751-7373/(714)545-8M (Fox) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT Al PAGE 10 22 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 • PS OMAS EXHIBIT `C1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Ca!trans Parcel No. 22218-3 Temporary Construction Easement APN 118-270-035 & 036 Those portions of Parcels 3 and 4 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of Califomia, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described. as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner of said Parcel 4; thence South 81°54'34" East 209.29 feet along the northerly line of said parcel to a point thereon; said point being the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave northerly having a radius of 903.00 feet, to which point a radial line bears South 00° 18'16" East; thence easterly along said curve 69.24 feet through a central angle of 04°23'35" to the True Point of Beginning; thence easterly, continuing along said curve 54.34 feet through a central angle of 03°26'53"; thence South 08°08'46" East 18.00 feet to the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave northerly having a radius of 921.00 feet, to which point a radial line bears South 08°08'46" East; thence westerly along said curve 55.43 feet through a central angle of 03°26'53"; thence North 04°41'53" West 18.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 988 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit `C2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. P: 2PTG0105011SUR V E YILEGAL S‘22218_APN_ 1 l 8-270-035_036_038_039_0,12\Legals122218-3-TCE.doc 12/10/2012 Page 1 of 2 EXHIBIT PAGE 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS Prepared under the direction of Z,ecief.‘ Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date 72-/d -/2 P:\2PTG010501\SURVEY\LEGALS\22218_AP14_118-270-035_036 038_039 042\Le gal s\22218-3-TCE.doc 12/10/201.2 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBIT,14PAGE 12 EXHIBIT C2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA A P N 22218-3 TCE 988 SO. FT. 118-270-035 & 036 PARCEL 1 P,M,g, 51 / 62-63 C4- - L6 S19°39'13"E (PRC) 2070- 1 0 7 A %? r; 1 18-270-023 " C 3 L5 L3 I j P, M, NO, 21 690 PARCEL 1 cv 1 18-270-042 P , NI ° S " 1 �}3/ 9 1 - 93 PARCEL 2 . 118-270-034 I C2� S08°03'59"W (R) "‘ j D STo r J N08°03'59"E (R) PARCEL 3 r— I C 5- C6, Cl S00°18'16"E (R) S81 °54'3411E 209.29' �"; °1 8.00' POB SO8 08 46'E(R) C/ TPOB � ko j cp � I - 1 8.00' '0 N04°41'53"W(R) 0 �( 0 o i 18-270-035 i Q Ni.O . j a- j 44' PARCEL 5 - i 1 LA �� N ( co PARCEL 3 j a, Q� 1 118-270-039 LINE TABLE I BEARING DISTANCE Z 1 w p I Ln I DOC. #2000-033061 O.R. _ L1 L2 N08°03'59"E N08°03'59"E 65.00' 82.16' (3 j i,-) 0 ,1 . � E o PARCEL b ( ( p ( L3 L4 L5 L6 N66°09'06"E N86°05"56"E 581 °55"24"E 581°57'20"E 12.61' 64.11' 214.71' 77.36' ( 1 118-270-038 oCURVE TABLE I N DELTA RADIUS LENGTH co - C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 90°00'00" 90°00'00" 27°43'49" 27°41'53" 04°23'35" 14.50' 14.50' 150.00' 150.00' 903.00' 22.78' 22.78' 72.60' 72.51' 69.24' - C6 03°26'53" 903.00' 54.34' I C7 03°26'53" 921.00' 55.43' FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True -Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 2 2 2 1 8 - 3 TEMPORARY obtoin ground ( )Title to State CONSTRUCTION distances. All distances are in feet )il( Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:09-05-12 REV.: 12-10-12 EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS 3 Hu++on Centre Drive, Ste. 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS Sonic Ana, COlifornio 92707 (714)751-7373/(714)545-8883 (Fox) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT kPAGE 13 • 26 • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `D1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 2221.8-4 Temporary Construction Easement APN 118-270-039 That portion of Parcel 5 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most westerly corner of said parcel; thence South 81 °56'01" East 27.23 feet along a portion of the southerly line of said parcel to a point thereon; thence North 09°13'38" East 15.90 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence North 09°13'38" East 56.43 feet; thence South 80°46'22" East 20.00 feet; thence South 09°13'38" West 56.43 feet; and thence North 80°46'22" West 20.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 1,129 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit `D2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. Prepared under the direction of / 2-1/) AO Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date PA2.PTGO10501\SURVEYILEGALS\22218_APN_118-270-035_036_038_039 042\Legals\22218-4-TCE.doc 12/10/2012 Page 1 of 1 EXHIBIT/VPAGE 14 • 28 EXHIBIT D2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA AP 22218-4 TCE 1,129 S0. FT, 118-270-039 P� 'PARCEL 1 P,M,g, 51 / 2-63 ca L6 PARCEL S19°39'1 3"E (PRC) — _: 2070 - 107 A A 5 1 18-270-023 LS. �3" L3 1 ! PARCEL 1 P,M, NO. Jl v 90 J 1 18-270-042 P, J�11 1 '1/ �1 1 fi PARCEL Crl 2 1 118-270-034 i s C2 S08°03'59"VJ (R) ! N08°03'59"E (R) D S To- r J PARCEL 3 C1 " `,� DOC. #2000-033061 O.R. o ;O I v ih �, 0 10 118-270-035 I N T� j(.0 in S80°46'22"E PARCEL 5 20.00' ) Ltl N PARCEL 3 � •sr0 118-270-039 col - z 1 44 < �L�°' 20.00' LINE TABLE 2 �56.43' BEARING DISTANCE 1 _-1 _n J S09° 1 3'38"W L1 N08°03'59"E 65.00' 0 I / L2 N08°03'59"E 82.16' QD o In\TPOB ` ( I L3 L4 N66°09'06"E N86°05'56"E 12.61' 64.11' o z a r t N80°46022'W L5 L6 S81°55'24"E 581°57'20"E 214.71' 77.36' 27,23' �o CURVE TABLE S81°56'01"E N DELTA RADIUS LENGTH I i PARCEL w - C C1 C2 C3 90°00'00" 90°00'00" 27°43'49" 14.50' 14.50' 150.00' 22.78' 22.78' 72.60' 1 18-270-038 C4 27°41 '53" 1 50.00' 72.51 ' iEmmimm pimmommommm FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 1 2 2 2 1 8 - 4 TEMPORARY obtain ground ( )Title to State CONSTRUCTION distances. All distances are in feet I I) I Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:09-05-12 REV.: 12-10-12 EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Ste. 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS Santo (714)751- 73734714)545-8883 (Fox) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT i1/49PAGE 15 • 30 • I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS 4MAS EXHIBIT `E1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22218-5 Temporary Construction Easement APN 118-270-038 That portion of Parcel 6 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the southwest corner of said parcel; thence North 08°03'59" East 71.55 feet along the westerly line of said parcel to a point thereon; thence South 81 °56'01" East 18.00 feet; thence South 08°03'59" West 71.51 feet to a point on the southerly line of said parcel; thence North 82°03'18" West 18.00 feet along said southerly line to the Point of Beginning. Containing 1,288 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit `E2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. Prepared under the direction of .c Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date P:QPTG010501\SURVEYIL.EGAL.S\22218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_0421Legals\22218-5-TCE.doc 12/10/2012 Page 1 of 1. EXHIBIT Al, PAGE 16 • 32 • EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA API 22218-5 TCE 1,288 SQ. FT. 118-270-038 I N` J; PARCEL 1 PARCEL 2 118-270-042 I 118-270-034 1C2 _S08°03"59"W (R) j. D sro N08°03'59"E (R) � r----- 118-270-035 Cl PARCEL 3 I / j ✓ - II rn rn ( .1 0 118-270-039 0 N I 0 1 Q P,M, ND, 21690 j i -1 P,1 ,8, J'J3/ Jl )3 _l tt1 ' co Q ( v 1 LINE TABLE (-1-1 € I BEARING DISTANCE Z --1I PARCEL 5 O L1 L2 N08°03'59"E N08°03'59"E 65.00' 82.16' - U I 44 ( i � CURVE TABLE --1 I DOC. #2000-033061 O.R. DELTA RADIUS LENGTH C1 C2 90°00'00" 90°00'00" 14.50' 14.50' 22.78' 22.78' w 'j" 118-270-041 I� !" PARCEL v M 0 118-270-040 o 118-270-038 z _ , r ... -� _. S81°56'01"E 1 8.0 0' I N82°02'33"W 644.64' a, , +'coin 118-270-012 M I S08°03'S9"W j -.na . • 71 .51' P0Bj in o TRACT NO, 21690 �°00 o M, , 154/ 92- )3 I ti C4:t 4::d2; 13 leis 91r H 18.100' � N82°0303'1 8"W I FEET o 40 so 160 zoo NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 2 2 2 1 8 - 5 TEMPORARY by 0.99997476 to obtain ground ( )Title to State CONSTRUCTION distances. All distances are in feet [lit Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:09-05-12 REV.: 12-10-12 EA: OF540 FAsc: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive Ste. 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS Santa Ana, Colifornlo 92707 (710751-73734714)545-8883 (Fax) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT PAGE 17 34 • • • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PSOMAS EXHIBIT `F1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22218-6 Building Demolition Easement APN 118-270-034 & 035 Those portions of Parcels 2 and 3 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence South 81 °57'20" East 288.27 feet along the northerly .line of said parcel to a point thereon; thence South 72°26'28" West 100.51 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence South 72°26'28" West 117.88 feet; thence South 73°45'06" West 159.62 feet to a point on the southerly line of said Parcel 2; thence South 81 °56'01 " East 251.74 feet along a portion of said southerly line and the prolongation of said portion of said southerly line; thence North 08°03'59" East 116.70 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 14,474 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit `F2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. PA\2PTG0105011S URVEY\LCGALS\22218_APN_118-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legal s122218-6-B D E. doc 12/ 10/2012 Page I of 2 EXHIBIT 11SPAGE 18 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date /Z-/o-/Z PA2 PTG010501 \S URV E Y\LEGALS\22218_APN_ 1 18-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legalsl22218-6-B DE. doe 12/10/20(2 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBITA6PAGE 19 EXHIBIT F2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22218-6 BDE 14,474 S0. FT. 118-270-034 & 035 \d' PARCEL 1 \` o P ,, IV1 .. B, \`/49 PARCEL ARCEL i 51 / 6 2- J 3 "n \� 118-270-023 [118-270-024 0 V' \cam CZ POB 307.25' 1 o N \-.0 ` Cl \--1 S81 \J 77 36 .---- °57'20"E 365.63' 288 27' �► co - PARCEL 2 TPoe L1 PARCEL1 1 18-270-034 ,2� -- ' / L2 118-270-042 S1 1\-1. w 'f 01 O lf) .1) i0 :Y o A56 2 o.r0n61. 0 v0 O 1 O S1 NP-. n ^00 roao z N i O 1tl) S81 ° 56'01 "E 251 .74' PARCEL 3 118-270-035 LINE TABLE -- ' BEARING DISTANCE DOC. #2000-033061 O.R. L1 L2 S08°07'46"W S81°52'14"E 53.36' 10.00' L3 572°26'28"W 100.51' P,M, P , N NO, 21t-) )0 , 8 , 1 43/ 91 - 93 PARCEL 3 CURVE TABLE DELTA RADIUS LENGTH Cl-i 27°43'49" 150.00' 72.60' C2 27°41'53" 150.00' 72.51' If) PARCEL L1 __11 118-270-036 U a 4 1.1-, I plim.mml immimmummi FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stotioning are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radio' Bearing 2 2 2 1 S - 6 BUILDING obtain ground )Title to State DEMOLITION distances. All distances ore in feet I) " Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:09-05-2012 REV.:2; 12-10-2012 EA: OF540 FAit: PSOMAS 3 Hutfon Cenfre Drive, Sfe. 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS - Santo Ana, C°!ifornia 92707 (714)751-7373/(714)545-8883 (Fax) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT A' PAGE 20 38 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `GI' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22218-7 Building Access Easement APN 118-270-034 & 035 Those portions of Parcels 2 and 3 of Parcel Map No. 21690 in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, as per the map filed in Book 143, Pages 91 through 93, inclusive, of Parcel Maps, Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most northerly corner of said Parcel 2; thence along the northerly line of said Parcel 2 and the general easterly lines of said Parcels 2 and 3 the following four (4) courses: 1) South 81 °57'20" East 307.25 feet to the northeasterly comer of said Parcel 2; 2) South 08°07'46" West 53.36 feet; 3) South 81 °52'14" East 10.00 feet; and 4) South 08°07'46" West 106.87 feet to a point thereon; thence North 81°54'03" West 97.18 feet to a corner of a commercial building, said comer being the True Point of Beginning; thence South 08°09'05" West 10.00 feet along the general easterly face of said building to a point thereon; thence North 81 °54'03" West 180.99 feet to a point on the general westerly face of said building; thence North 08°11'21" East 10.00 feet along said general westerly face to a corner of said building; thence South 81 °54'03" East 180.98 feet along the northerly face of said building to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 1,810 square feet. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. See Exhibit `G2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. PA2PTG0I0501,,S URVEY\LEGALS122218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_0421Legalsk22213-7-BAE.doc 12/10/2012 Pagel of 2 EXHIBIT A? PAGE 21 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1.1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS Prepared under the direction of ,,Z__6('sge."‘J Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date /Z-/Q-/Z PA2PTGO105011SURV ErtEGALS\22218_APN_ 118-270-035_036_038_039_042\Legalsk22218-7-RA E.doc 12/10/2012 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBIT A?PAGE 22 EXHIBIT G2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA A P N 22218-7 BAE 1810 S0. FT. 118-270-034 & 035 PARCEL 1 P,m,a, PARCEL 51 / 62-63 M 118-270-023 118-270-024 O 0 C2 POB 307.25' ( N. Cl S81 7 7.36' � °57'20"E 365.63' 288.27' _ o1 �- PARCEL 2 L1 �.( .::. PARCEL 1 1 18-270-039 �' L2 118-270-042 I w IN81 °54'03"W �' 1O . o e 97.18 I °54'03"E v o N S81 1$0,98' I r ( co _ Pr1RCEL 3 NOa� p.00 N81 ��4903"W ` � v 1 18-270-035 I SOS° 09'05"W J 1 0.00' o o —' ../ I m o v) P M P,M,8, DOC.I #2000-033061 O.R. NO, 2 1 �7C I 143/ 91- 3 I LINE TABLE PARCEL ;� I BEAR]NG DISTANCE L1 L2 S08°07'46"W S81°52'14"E 53.36' 10.00' l t7 _ _ _ 1 PARCEL 'r CURVE TABLE - _ — — _I DELTA RADIUS LENGTH �, al I C1 27°43'49" 150.00' 72.60' 0 118-270-036 C2 27°41'53" 150.00' 72.51' t.:: a- 1 FEET 0 40 80 160 240 NOTES LEGEND Coordinates and bearings ore on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to P013 Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 2 2 2 1 8 - 7 BUILDING obtoin ground %Title to State ACCESS distances. All distances are in feet (((( Access Prohibited EASEMENT unless otherwise noted. PREPARED BY: DATE:12-10-2012 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Sie, 200 DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS Sonio Ano, Colifornio 92707 (714)751 -73734714)545-8883 (Fox) 8 R I V 91 5.5 1 1 EXHIBIT PAGE 23 • • pia, Corona Towne Center LLC 118-270-034, 035, 036, 038, 039, 042 FEE 119,587 SF TCE (TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION) 5,184 SF BDE (BUILDING DEMOLITION 14,474 SF BAE (BUILDING ACCESS) 1,810 SF 43 6/11/2014 PI CM i:P 7 t ACiJ6CT 7 rA.rr0mv4aa THE COMMISSION IS REQUESTED TO MAKE THE FOLLOWING FINDINGS : 1. The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2. The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3. The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4. The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. �5• X.__ • � _ • _ COOK A wiime 90.10F 4011 w 1 6/11/2014 1. Corona Towne Center, LLC, a California limited liability company No. Ownership Offer Date 1 Corona Towne Center, LLC January 7, 2014 2 6/11/2014 ROJECT 71 msrmoymw \ f�: ;,.. ershi „, Carona Towne. i`enter;LL hOile Contacts. E-Mails 'These numbers do not include contacts made with legal counsel, which in some cases has been extensive. 3 6/11/2014 THE COMMISSION ADOPT A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY BASED ON THE FOLLOWING FINDINGS: 1. The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2. The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3. The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4. The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. 4 ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1928-1998) ROBERT F. WALDRON (1927-1998) ALAN H. WIENER' MICHAEL J. GREENE• DENNIS W. GHAN• DAVID D. PARR• CHARLES H. KANTER' PATRICK A. HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N. WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAMS JOHN R. LISTER MICHAEL H. LEIFER SCOTT R. CARPENTER RICHARD A. SALUS NORMAN J. RODICH RONALD M. COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. SCHECK DONNA L. SNOW W W W PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRON RYAN M. EASTER ELISE M. KERN MELISA R. PEREZ MICHAEL I. KEHOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH ANISH J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER BLAINE M. SEARLE ERIN BALSARA NADERI CANDICE L. LEE ERICA M. SOROSKY MICHAEL P. BURNS PETER MOSLEH JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS RRIAN GLICKLIN MICHAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IHRKE, OF COUNSEL JAMES E. WILHELM, OF COUNSEL DENNIS G. TYLER', RETIRED •A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949) 851-9400 www. ptwww. com May 7, 2014 DECE[i\YRE- MAY 09 2W TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Re: Dear Clerk: I P.O. BOX 19712 IRVINE, CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949) 851-7294 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949) 825-5412 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)851-1554 (949)757-1225 mleifer@ptwww.com REFER TO FILE NO. 36964-000 Corona Towne Center, LLC - Parcel No. 22218-1; 22218-2; 22218- 3; 22218-4; 22218-5; 22218-6; 22218-7; 22218-8 Our Clients: Cardenas Markets This office represents Cardenas Markets, the anchor tenant of Corona Towne Center, LLC. The purpose of this letter is to notify the Riverside County Transportation Commission that Cardenas Markets intends to appear and be heard at the Resolution of Necessity hearing scheduled for June 11, 2014. MHL:mp cc: Client 1216995A ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1926.1996) ROBERT F. WALORON (1927-199S) ALAN M. WIENER. MICHAEL J. GREENE' DENNIS W. OMAN' DAVID D. PARR' CHARLES M KANTER' PATRICK A. HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N. WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAMS JOHN R. LtSTER MICHAEL N. LEIFER SCOTT R. CARPENTER RICHARD A. SALUS NORMAN J RODICH RONALD M. COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. SCHECK OONNA L. SNOW PALMIERI, TYLER. WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRON= RYAN M EASTER ELISE M. KERN MELISA R. PEREZ MICHAEL I. KEHOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH ANION J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER BLAINE M. SEARLE ERIN BALSARA NADERI CANDICE L. LEE ERICA M. SOROSKY MICHAEL P. BURNS PETER MOSLEM JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS BRIAN OLICKLIN MICHAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IHRKE. OF COUNSEL JAMES E. WILHELM, OF COUNSEL DENNIS G. TYLER', RETIRED 'A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE. CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949)851-9400 www. ptwww. com May 7, 2014 VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 P.O. BOX 19712 IRWNE. CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949) 651-7294 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949) 825-5412 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949) 651-1554 (949) 757-1225 misitsrOptwww.eom REFER TO FILE NO. 36964-000 Re: Corona Towne Center, LLC - Parcel No. 22218-1; 22218-2; 22218- 3; 22218-4; 22218-5; 22218-6; 22218-7; 22218-8 Our Clients: Cardenas Markets Dear Clerk: This office represents Cardenas Markets, the anchor tenant of Corona Towne Center, LLC. The purpose of this letter is to notify the Riverside County Transportation Commission that Cardenas Markets intends to appear and be heard at the Resolution of Necessity hearing scheduled for June 11, 2014. MHL:mp cc: Client 1216995.1 ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1020 1E00) ROBERT F. WALDRON (102T-1000) ALAN N. WENER• MICHAEL J GREENE• DENNIS W GNAW' DAVID D. PARR* CHARLES H. KANTER• PATRICK A HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAMS JOHN R. LISTER MICHAEL N. LEIFER SCOTT R. CARPENTER RICHARD A SALUS NORMAN J. RODICM RONALD M COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. SCHECK DONNA L. SNOW W PA1 k1IERI, TYLER.WIENi R. WILWLM &WALDRON RYAN M EASTER ELISE M KERN MELtSA R. PEREZ MICHAEL I. KEMOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH AMISH J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER BLAINE M. SEARLE ERIN BALSARA NADERI CANDICE L. LEE ERICA M SOROBKY MICHAEL P. BURNS JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS KATHERINE M HARRISON BRIAN OLICKLIN MICHAEL C. CHO OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IMRKE, OF COUNSEL JAMES E. W,LMELM OF COUNSEL DENNIS G. TYLER', RETIRED 'A •nn.E51110M.1 CODA A.,- N VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949) 851-9400 www.ptwww.com June 10, 2014 I RIVERSIDE GOND' TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Members of the Board of the Riverside County Transportation Commission c/o Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Re: Taking of portions of Cardenas Markets' business location at Corona Towne Center Dear Board Members: P.O. 90x 19712 IRVINE, CA 92623.9712 WRITERS DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949) 851-7294 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949) 825.5412 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)851-1554 (949) 757-1225 mieHer®ptwww. com REFER TO FILE NO. 36964-000 Cardenas Markets ("Cardenas"), is the anchor tenant of Corona Towne Center retail center located on Lincoln Boulevard. Cardenas requests that this letter and its enclosures be made part of the administrative record on this matter. Additionally, Cardenas requests that RCTC's entire file, as it relates to this property, including, but not limited to, internal communications, reports, notes, correspondence and any submittals or communications with the City of Corona be included as part of the administrative record on this matter. Cardenas is a significant stakeholder in the City of Corona and the County of Riverside. Cardenas has been the anchor tenant in a synergistic retail center --Corona Towne Center --for approximately 10 years. Corona Towne Center was a great site for Cardenas. Because of the RCTC project that is changing. 1244391.2 PALMIERI. TYLER, WIENER. WILHELM be WALDRON Jennifer Harmon June 10, 2014 Page 2 Cardenas serves over one million customers at the location through the assistance of about 130 onsite employees (over 85 percent of the employees live in Corona). Cardenas wants to continue to operate from this site. Cardenas wants its many employees to continue to assist this family -owned business from this site for years to come. The RCTC project puts all that in significant question. Cardenas has so informed the City of Corona, RCTC senior staff and the property owner of its concerns about the viability of this center. What has Cardenas received in response from RCTC staff? Very little. Cardenas has largely been ignored. Its concerns have been ignored. For over two years the Cardenas ownership has expressed concern directly to the RCTC staff about proposed impacts to its business location caused by takings from the Cardenas -anchored center. What did Cardenas seek from RCTC staff? A plan and a commitment from RCTC that would put Cardenas in the same position as it was as if the project had not gone forward. That is, Cardenas sought to be made whole for the impacts to its business location. It is understood that the RCTC and Caltrans mission is to widen the 91. It must also be RCTC's mission to economically protect those in the path of the widening. How should Cardenas be put in the same position? Prior to the project, the Cardenas store was situated as an anchor to the Corona Towne Center. The Center was developed and configured to be accessed from Lincoln. Four entry points and four drive aisles from Lincoln led to an extremely visible anchor location. The parking field was situated in front of Cardenas. Cardenas is entitled to and has sought no more than what it had in terms of site configuration. Because of the numerous takings and the nature of the infrastructure, the remainder of Corona Towne Center is totally misconfigured and misoriented. The Corona Towne Center was developed to be a Lincoln Avenue -oriented development. All primary access points were from Lincoln Avenue. The building orientation was directed to the Lincoln Avenue orientation. The RCTC project flips the remainder of the property on its side. Effectively it will have no Lincoln Avenue access. The one driveway slated to remain, out of four, is the shortest possible drive aisle and creates the biggest bottleneck. RCTC staff is proposing more access from a new side road--2nd Street while all of the buildings will still be oriented towards Lincoln Avenue. Tens of thousands of square -feet of synergistic retail building will be demolished. The aesthetics of the Center and the presentation of the Cardenas Market business location are proposed "no shrift" or at best "short shrift." 1244391.2 PALMIERI. TYLER. WIENER. WILHELM &WALDRON. Jennifer Harmon June 10, 2014 Page 3 Despite all of those significant impacts, at this time, RCTC has ignored Cardenas requests to relocate the business to another location in the Center so that it will be re- oriented to its prior street orientation. Moreover, RCTC has not offered any amount of compensation for such damages to Cardenas, or as far as Cardenas is aware, to the property owner. Instead, RCTC has hired a company to come up with a hypothetical, "for litigation" study that concludes 1 + 1 = 5. RCTC has completely ignored the fact that the buildings are no longer oriented in the correct direction and that the site will be under the siege of construction for years to come. It is ignoring that it has an obligation to put Cardenas in a position in which it is or can be made whole. RCTC has ignored Cardenas and continues to do so. RCTC's elaborate scheme to avoid paying Cardenas its just compensation only works, in theory, if the someone else does what RCTC assumes under RCTC's precise timing. For certain, RCTC is not treating this significant stakeholder properly. 1. Mitigation and reconfiguration of the site is not part of the RCTC "public project." At the time of preparation of this objection letter, Cardenas Markets continue to get bits and pieces of information from RCTC. On Friday, June 5, 2014 and Monday June 9, 2014, RCTC's counsel, Mark Easter, advised this office that the RCTC proposed site reconfiguration plan was not part of the RCTC public project and was not being adopted as part of the Resolution of Necessity. The RCTC proposed site reconfiguration should not be part of the RCTC public project and should not be approved as part of the Resolution of Necessity. To the extent RCTC attempts to do so, Cardenas objects. The RCTC proposed site reconfiguration --the basis upon which the precondemnation appraisal and offer were based --is not suitable or desirable for Cardenas Markets. As discussed above, the RCTC proposed site reconfiguration plan requires the implementation by someone else (presumably the property owner) on a specific timetable in between RCTC activities on or around the property. Further, the RCTC proposed site reconfiguration plan only addresses one issue --parking. It does not address the fact that the buildings are no longer oriented towards the main access points/frontage. 1244391.2 PALMIERI. TYLER. WIENER. WILHELM &WALDRON Jennifer Harmon June 10, 2014 Page 4 The property would never have been developed, built or redeveloped in the way outlined in the RCTC proposed site reconfiguration. A private property owner would not get approved to develop the property in that way. That demonstrates that there is significant damage that is not being addressed. It is not being addressed to Cardenas and it is not being addressed to the property owner either (as far as we are informed). In discussions with the property owner, Cardenas has been advised that the property owner/landlord does not believe the RCTC proposed reconfiguration plan is viable. Cardenas has been in discussions with its landlord, Corona Towne Center, LLC and the City of Corona, relating to a site reconfiguration that would change the orientation of the buildings and parking in Corona Towne Center to fit with the proposed RCTC project that changes the on and off ramp to SR-91, adds a new frontage road, and changes the primary access to and from the Corona Towne Center to be from the new frontage road. A copy of the conceptual site reconfiguration being proposed by Cardenas Markets is attached hereto as Exhibit 2. 2. The project has not been located or planned in a manner compatible with the greatest public food and least private injury. The Design/Build project plans are not complete. Without the design being known, the Commission cannot make the required findings that any of the proposed takings are necessary for the project or that the project has been located or planned in a manner compatible with the greatest public good and greatest private injury. In fact, Cardenas Markets is still getting bits and pieces of information from RCTC just prior to the resolution of necessity hearing. Cardenas Markets does not have a complete understanding of the takings that are being proposed, including, but not limited to, the building demolition easement and the vaguely referenced "building access easement." Is not clear what portion of property the "building access easement" applies to, though it appears to be a small area. Further, the wording of the "building access easement" is very broad and does not appear to limit RCTC in any way. RCTC's proposed takings are either taking too little, in which case RCTC will likely exceed the scope of the takings improperly requiring the property owner and/or tenant to monitor the RCTC project and file an inverse condemnation case, or taking too much. 1244391.2 PALMIERI. TYLER. WIENER WILHELM � WALDRON - Jennifer Harmon June 10, 2014 Page 5 3. The proposed resolution is an invalid delegation of legislative authority. The proposed resolution gives RCTC's attorney the ability to change the taking at counsel's sole discretion. Such delegation is an invalid delegation of the Commission's authority. At each of the resolution hearings on this project, staff has repeated how the Commission must make certain fmdings to authorize the specific takings proposed. The Commission is in fact required by the Eminent Domain Law to make such findings as the legislative body for RCTC. (Code Civ. Proc., § 1245.210, subd.(a).) However, the proposed resolution provides that counsel, not the Commission, "is further authorized to reduce or modem the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired." (Proposed Resolution, Section 7, last sentence [emphasis added].) The Commission should know, and in fact must know, the taking it is approving. Likewise, when RCTC is authorizing its attorneys to take property, the property owner and tenant are entitled to know what property and property rights are being taken. The proposed resolution fails to provide the basic and fundamental information of what is being taken. The proposed resolution is an invalid delegation of legislative authority contrary to law. It violates my clients' rights to substantive and procedural due process. If adopted as proposed, the resolution is void. 4. RCTC is incapable of conducting a fair, legal and impartial hearing on the proposed adoption of the resolution of necessity. As a condition precedent to the exercise of the power of eminent domain, a public entity must hold a public hearing to determine whether a particular taking meets the public interest and necessity criteria articulated in Code of Civil Procedure section 1240.030. (Code Civ. Proc., § 1245.235.) If, after such public hearing, the public entity determines that the proposed taking meets that criteria, then it must adopt a resolution of necessity before proceeding to condemn the property. (Code Civ. Proc., §§ 1240.040, 1245.220.) Implicit in this requirement of a hearing and the adoption of a resolution of necessity is the concept that, in arriving at its decision to take, the public entity engages in a good faith and judicious consideration of the pros and cons of the issue and that the 1244391.2 PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRON Jennifer Harmon June 10, 2014 Page 6 decision to take be buttressed by substantial evidence of the existence of the three basic requirements set forth in Code of Civil Procedure section 1240.030. (Redevelopment Agency v. Norm's Slauson (1985) 173 Ca1.App.3d 1121, 1125-1126.) In the absence of a fair and impartial hearing, the resolution of necessity is void. Here, RCTC has already committed itself to the project and has contractually committed itself to the adoption of this resolution of necessity. The sole reason staff seeks authorization to acquire the property and property rights now is RCTC's contractual agreement to deliver the set right of way regardless of whether the proposed right of way is actually needed. This was again confirmed to me at a January 6th meeting with RCTC staff. Even so, RCTC has contracted away its ability to decide not to acquire or delay acquiring the right of way proposed. RCTC contractually committed to delivery of the right of way without actually knowing if the project as designed actually requires the proposed right of way. Adoption of the resolution under these facts is an abuse of discretion. MHL:mp Enclosures Exhibit 1: RCTC Before Condition Access Map and RCTC proposed site reconfiguration plan Exhibit 2: Cardenas existing site plan, Cardenas proposed site reconfiguration plan and renderings Exhibit 3: Correspondence with senior RCTC staff cc: Client 1244391.2 EXHIBIT m a U I 3m.3,v N1001V1 31S093oaamsOOcsollsri S• mo - --.::::..::-....-7..--'7•:4"tztz: Iflliiillitutiiir13 And 14111P1r1 ati li , wz J W w z k 0 1S YSSLI ViIIIR8 i 4l {` ��ivZ{�t\�S�R�4�S1�ti�������L • \l f =r-1 z M 411. The Parts Acquired 58 Before Condition Access Map Corona Towne Center - CPN 22218 C.7) EXHIBIT 2 It1 .�..�d-� —211➢, �� � =1,2 _ . ...T..• © NY •lYY : •Ir ... an/bAMAp _1/__T._._y :al=1 ._.__ _--,— ,r__._S _ _ •. ` --__.-_w _—_ s #___a • 1 •L _�_ ____' — % a 2Z mow.. r _ _..... . • w 7� .� i �' .. # i-_ KomO. wvtiev_y_ Alps d • ••81 Z8876 'uuoaoD ' 311V uloaui7 "S IO£ jayinv snuap va caaua� aumo,L vuoanJ II _ Pit pi 11-11 611 .._ —, —.e. 4 i.h rele 1— , , . ' . " ; .4.1.--, : , L - 1 I 4 li 1.1. I ....t i ; I ; i r.., I t » ; li1ft _ t $ ....,-. l'ilti II t, 6 ru` rfi'r111-71-fiTni-irr7T-f- _ , ‘ ' '''''\\..$.',N'k',..1111 1 Pl://h///i/f*,//://:/./../411 . V \%\\\\\\\s\\\\\\1 1 ' - — I I, 1 1 , - , .,- ' ' I ,1 Itt\t,V,.,\, ar J7*I. . 11——f,1` - , ///7/7/41 . 1i -- 1 _„ J; ,.„ ..„l._., 6. w.!: ,,V,-ii L.4 4V_f ln' i l. li 11 I r , Ii „ 1, , „ I' , '• lad- IIP , A4 1 !!iIji tmi 1 if; 0 crigb isioem -Amos Os ammo turnip 'we wan .sag w..o «wl wne3 awes w.ti a.4 MOOD 11110411 IOW nd mew NI ire - Nana woe �sme0114:48 elm it$ unra VD ttXX° ' +aV uPurl S lOf 1.944IIN SDlfapolla moo ?wool mono esiwimrsssig -1w116 em va ...eti..wNl ti N. "goo awl rinaq rpm.awrl+Ms ta t 0{I 'Y lu woIrmo w Rim Oft. mu VD vnom0 "74V Nimkrl 'S !Of jaVIVN SV1131111.0 Aapto a atoi aWACO if I j Is EXHIBIT 3 ANOELO J PALMJERI tU i.MOE) ROSERT F WALDRON it/21.11W ALARM WIENER' ROSERT C /HREE• MICHAEL J GREENE* DENNIS W ONAN- DAVID O PARR. CHARLES N KANTER• PATRICII A HENNEESEY DON FISHER GREGORY Al WEILER WARREN A SILVANS JOHN R LISTER MICNAEL H toren SCOTT R CARPENTER RICHARD A SAWS NORMAN J ROOICH RONALO SI COLE MICRAEL L 0 ANOELO STEPHEN A SCNECR W w PALM!ERI TYLER.WIENER WILHELM&WALDR.ON: DONNA L SNOW RYAN M EASTER Et : se M KERN MELJSII R PEREZ MICNAE(. • KENOS CNADYIMCA C SWIGS ANISH J RANKER ROURT N OARRETSON RYAN IS PRAOER SLAMS M SEARLE JERAD SELTZ ERIN SAIEAAA NADER ERICA M SOROEKY PETER MOILER JOSHUAJ NARA ERIN S OYAMA STORNI# GUESS JAMES E WILHELM OF COUNSEL DENINS O T..ER OF COUNSEL • n0AAAAA A.L COIODA.ncr VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL Mark LaBonte Overland, Pacific & Cutler 2280 Market Street, Suite 205 Riverside, CA 92501 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER - SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 82614-4281 (949) 851-9400 www plwww corn October 15. 2012 PO SOX 19T12 IRVINE CA 924234112 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUSISER NIP 851 2S4 WRITER'S DIRECT FACEIMILE MAMA 949 825.3412 RRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMEERS 104g UT 1554 • 944 T52• 1223 IIIISIIST®ptwww COT REFER TO PILE NO 36S64-DOD 3684E-00D Re: Riverside County Transportation Commission --Eminent Domain Acquisitions Dear Mark: Mike Kehoe and I attended the most recent RCTC open house on behalf of a number of clients last month. At the open house, one client (a principal of Corona Autoplex) was told by you, that RCTC was in the acquisition phase and that he needed to attempt to relocate his business at this time. At the same open house, you informed that another client, (Cardenas Markets), was in the RCTC planning phase and it did not have to attempt to relocate at this time. Nothing available at the open house or on display at the open house displayed that distinction. RCTC's position as to both was inconsistent and unsupported in various aspects. IfU PALMIERI TILER. WIENER WILHELM SL WALDRON Mark LaBonte October 15, 2012 Page 2 RCTC's position leaves both businesses currently subject to tremendous uncertainty. Both businesses seek further information from RCTC in the form of meetings with any or all applicable RCTC representatives. Please contact the undersigned to schedule the meetings. MHL:mp U ll 9 Indian Wells (760) 588-2811 Irvine (949) 263-2600 Los Angeles (213) 617 1100 Ontario (909)969-8564 Mona M. Nemat mona nematebbklaw corn I Si BEST BEST & KRIEGER 3 ATTORNEYS AT LAW 3390 University Avenue, 51h Floor, P.O. Box 1028, Riverside, CA 92502 Phone: (951) 686-1450 I Fax: (951) 686-3083 ! worn bbkiaw.com November 8, 2012 VIA EMAIL MLEIFERQPTWWW.COM Michael H, Leifer Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Dear Michael: Sauanrendo (918)325.4000 San Diego (819) 525-1300 Walnut Creek (925) 977-3300 Washington. DC (202) 765-0600 Re: Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) — Cardenas Market This responds to your October 15, 2012 letter to Mark LaBonte of Overland, Pacific and Cutler, Riverside County Transportation Commission's (RCTC) relocation consultant for the 91 Corridor Improvement Project (Project), regarding questions you raised on Cardenas Market's relocating. Your questions regarding Corona's Autoplex's possible relocation are addressed via separate letter. As you may be aware, the Project, which is still in the planning stages, is anticipated to be quite large and focuses on increasing capacity and reducing congestion for an existing 14-mile stretch of SR-91 and a 6-mile stretch along Interstate 15. Accordingly, given the scale of the Project, some businesses will need relocation assistance while others will not. RCTC does not anticipate relocation of Cardenas Market as a result of the Project at this time. We do understand your clients desire to meet and discuss the Project however. Accordingly, staff and consultants would be happy to meet with your clients, but we ask that the record owner be present at any such meeting for now. As you may know, there has been no offer made to buy any interests in the property yet. There is a concern that if RCTC were to meet with a tenant before an offer has been made, the owner may assert that RCTC interfered with the lease between the owner and the tenant. If having the owner present is not feasible, then it makes sense to have the meeting after the offer is made. We anticipate that an offer will be made in the next 60 days. 17336.0210017651199.1 Michael Liefer November 8, 2012 Page 2 I Mt BEST BEST & KRIEGEB 3 ATTORNEYS AT LAW Pleases let us know how you wish to proceed. If the owner is going to join in on the meeting, please provide dates and times when everyone is available. Please also provide a list of general discussion points so we can ensure the appropriate staff members attend. 17336.02100\7651199 1 Since Y, C...- Mona M. Nemat for BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP ANGELO 1 PALMIER ;112/•t111) ROBERTF WALDRON ,112f.IN1) ALAN t WIENER- ROEERT C DOKE' RNCHAEL J SWEETIE' DENNIS W CHAN' DAVID D PARR' CHARLES TI KANTER• PATRICK A NENNEIIEY CON Flutes GREGORY N WEILER WARREN A WILLIAMS JONN R L STER "mourn'. M LEVER BCOTT R CARPENTER RICMARD A SALUs NORMAN J RODICM RONALD M COLE MICHAEI I 0 ANGELO STEPHEN A SCNECK JAMES E WILNELM OF COUNSEL DENNIS G OF COUNSEL •a . ROII °IV 01a 11011 W w PA,MIERI TNLER. WIENER WILHELM& WALDRON DONNA L SNOW RYAN M EASTER ELISE M KERN MELIEA R ►ERE2 MICHAE► 1 KENO! CHADWICK C BUNCH AM1/t J BANKER ROBERTM GARRETSON RYAN M PRAGER ELAINE M 1EARLE ARAD 1ELT1 ERIN BALIARA NADERI ERICA M 10ROBK• PETER MOSLEM JOSHUA / MARK ERIN K OTAMA STEVEN R GUESS VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE CALIFORNIA 92614-4261 (949) 651-9400 www ptwww com Mona Nemat Best, Best & Krieger 3390 University Ave., 5th Floor PO Box 1028 Riverside, CA 92502 November 30, 2012 Re: Riverside County Transportation Commission - Cardenas Market Dear Ms. Nemat: Po BOx MU IRVINE CA 92E2141712 WRITER $ DIRECT DAL NUMBER (949' ES1.7294 wRRER'E DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949)925.5412 FIRM'$ DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER$ 1949) B5t.7554 (949) 757.1225 m1/111r®plwrr com REFER TO FILE NO 36964-D00 This responds to your letter earlier in November concerning Cardenas Market. Your letter responded to our letter to Mark LaBonte of OPC. We wrote to Mark LaBonte because he and the OPC team was holding itself out to the public as the point of contact relating to RCTC's ongoing and future acquisition activities for the 91 project. In fact, we were present at a meeting held by RCTC and staffed by OPC personnel in their team uniforms. The reason why the public and their representatives attended was to view the right-of-way acquisition maps to see whether and how they would be impacted by RCTC acquisition. The individual property owners were not there for the juice and cookies. Further, Mark LaBonte personally told another one of our clients at the meeting, the owner of Corona Autoplex, that his business was in the process of being acquired Mr. LaBonte also admonished the owner of the Corona Autoplex that he had an obligation to RCTC to attempt to relocate. 823983 1 PALMIERI,TYLER, WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRONS Mona Nemat November 30, 2012 Page 2 As you know OPC is most well-known for providing right of way acquisition and related services for public agencies. OPC has been actively working for RCTC concerning the widening project for some time. In fact, acquisition activities by RCTC and its agents like RCTC have been occurring for a period of years. At this point, RCTC has acquired properties for the 91 widening project. According to RCTC's latest statements to the media, the acquisitions are in the double digits. RCTC, through its agents, is currently negotiating to acquire properties/property interests for the project. Further, the environmental document has been approved and a Record of Decision issued by Caltrans on the selected alignment. Thus, this project has been planned. It has been and is being "done." Like the other property owners at the meeting trying to obtain full and transparent disclosure from RCTC, Cardenas has rights as a business and holder of property rights. Cardenas is affected by RCTC's project. Particularly because of the size of the business and number of its employees, Cardenas should be provided full and transparent disclosure early and on an ongoing basis. It has not been. RCTC has already met with the Cardenas' lessor without Cardenas present. It is believed that RCTC has met with City personnel and other consultants and officials about Cardenas' business location. Cardenas has not been present or informed about the nature and scope of the meetings. Why was Cardenas not invited to the discussions or the meetings? It is the anchor business on the affected property. Cardenas has leasehold rights that RCTC may have already interfered with by virtue of its exclusion. Cardenas has sincere concern that RCTC is negotiating with the lessor and communicating with other public agencies to its detriment either vis-i-vis the lease or the project impacts. We request all written communications and notes of same between RCTC (inclusive of its agents and consultants) and Cardenas Market's lessor concerning the 91 widening project (euphemistically labeled the Corridor Improvement Project by RCTC). We also request notes and documents pertaining to communications with the City and Caltrans that concern Cardenas' business location. Should it be necessary, please consider this request to be pursuant to the Public Records Act. As you are aware, all of the requested information is discoverable and will be obtained at some point. 823983 1 PALMIERI TYLER WIENER WILHELM & WALDRON Mona Nemat November 30, 2012 Page 3 As for the meeting that was requested some time ago, Cardenas wishes to receive full and transparent disclosure of the project's impacts on its site. It wants to receive this information on an on -going basis. RCTC should determine who to send to such meetings on its behalf. Please provide available dates for such a meeting. The sooner the better. How about next Wednesday or Thursday? MHL:mp cc: Client Michael I. Kehoe 823983 I W w w PALMIERI TYLER WIENER. WILHELM St WALDRON ANOELO J PALMIERI IIStU•sou, ROSERT F WALDRON I1527.L555, ALAN N MINER' DONNA L SNOW ROBERT C IMRRE' RYAN M EASTER MICHAEL J GREENE' ELME M KERN OENNIS W OMAN- MELMA R PEREZ DAVID D PARR' MICHAEL KEHOE CHARLES N KANTER* CMADWK:K C BUNCH PATRICK A NENNESSEY AMEN i BANKER DON FISHER ROBERT M 0RRRETSON GREGORY N WEILER RYAN M WARREN A WILLIAMS ELAINE M SEARLE JOHN R ASTER JERAD BELT= MICHAEL H LEwn* ERIN NA0E111 SCOTTR CARPENTER ERICA M SOROSKY RICHARD A SAIUU PETER MOSLEM NORMAN J ROOICH JOSHUA J MARX RONALOM COLE ERINK OYAMA MICHAEL L 0 ANOELO STEVEN R GUESS STEPHEN A UMBILICI( JAMES E WILHELM OF COUNSEL DENNIS O TYLER, OF COUNSEL •• WWI!MON*, GOKP011.11010 VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 ►RVINE:. CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949) 881-9400 www ptwww com Mona Nemat Best, Best & Krieger 3390 University Ave., 5th Floor PO Box 1028 Riverside, CA 92502 December 7, 2012 Re: Riverside County Transportation Commission - Cardenas Market Dear Ms. Nemat: PO EOK 19712 IRVINE. CA 92827-9712 YYIIITER E ORECT DIAL NUMBER NM, E5t-72E4 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (9419) 826.6412 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS 1949)B51.1564 1949) 767 1226 m1BrtBr®ptwww cam REFER TO FILE NO 989E4-000 The purpose of this letter is to again contact you on behalf of my client, Cardenas Markets, to obtain a response and a meeting scheduled with RCTC. Thank you for your attention to this matter. MHL:mp cc: Client 823983 1 RICHARD C. GREENBERG JOIDI D. WHIfCOMBEj March 9, 2013DERRICK K. TAKEUCHI MICHAELJ GIBSON SAMANTHA F. LAMBER.O LEONARD MANNER MICHAEL J. WEINBERGER JOEL L BENAVIDES jAbn Member of Diwics of Columbia Bar LAW OFFICES GREENBERG, WHITCOMBE & TAKEUCHI, LLP 2I515 HAWTHORNE BOULEVARD, SUITE 450 TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA 00S03a531 (3 10) 540-2000 FAX 010) 540fi609 • (310) 316-0505 E-MAR. GWTLLT®GWiLLP COM March 15, 2013 VIA E-MAIL FOLLOWED BY U.S. MAIL Jason Scott, Mayor (JScottaa,ci.corona.ca.us) Karen Spiegel, Mayor Pro Tem (KSpiegel(a)ci.corona.ca.us) Dick Haley, Council Member (DHaleyaci.corona.ca.us) Eugene Montanez, Council Member (EMontaneeaci.corona.ca.us) Stan Skipworth, Council Member (SSkipworth@ci.corona.ca.us) Corona City Hall 400 S. Vicentia Ave. Corona, CA 92882 Re: Corona Towne Center Dear Mayor Scott, Mayor Pro Tem Spiegel, and members of the Council: MICHAELE ADLER' 'OF COUNSEL SENDERS E-MAIL rpember`@Kwllp cam OUR FILE 100-2701 We represent the property owner of Corona Towne Center. As you likely know, Corona Towne Center (the "Center") fronts on Lincoln Avenue, and West 2`d Street and is immediately south of the 91 Freeway. We believe that City staff is aware that the Center is slated to be very significantly impacted by the RCTC 91 project ("Project"). The Project will require the acquisition of large portions of the Center. The remaining land will be left in a totally different shape. All aspects of the Center will be severely impacted by the Project. From my client's perspective, the Project will have an extremely adverse impact upon the size, shape, access, marketability, utility and other elements of the Center. The anchor tenant of the Center, Cardenas, feels just as strongly about the impacts to the Center. Both the property owner and Cardenas believe that the Center cannot continue to function as an anchored center with ancillary retail shop space as the acquisition for the Project is now configured. The anchor tenant's location in the Center would have to change for Cardenas or any anchor tenant to be viable in the Center in its reduced and altered shape. From what we understand, the Project leaves Corona Towne Center with no left-in/left-out turning movement. If that is the case, access to and from the Center will be extremely poor for this type of development. In addition to all of the other impacts, this will reduce rental rates for the retail space and make those spaces more difficult to lease. A signalized entrance on 2nd Street with a westbound turning movement must be included in this Project. The Center has thrived and has been a solid contributor to the City as a center for retailers small and large. It directly benefits the City and has done so for a long time. It has also been a very strong business location for its tenants. LAW OFFICES GREENBERG, WHITCOMBE & TAKEUCHI, LLP Council Board Members Corona City Hall March 15, 2013 Page 2 This Project is and has been a matter of great concem to the owners and to Cardenas. It should also be of great concern to the City because the 91 widening threatens the continued survival of a thriving Center. We understand that the City staff has had many discussions with RCTC personnel. Unfortunately, we were not included in those discussions. We are concerned that those discussions may not have taken into consideration the elements necessary, and we believe feasible, to minimize the adverse impact of the takings. We would like to meet at your earliest convenience to explore planning and design alternatives that would enable the Center to remain viable. Cardenas Markets joins in this request. We, our client, and representatives of Cardenas Markets look forward to meeting with you and the appropriate concerned members of your staff as soon as possible. Thank you for your anticipated cooperation. For the firm RCG:d cc: Michael Leifer, Esq. For Cardenas Markets Very truly yours, cziii)." Richard C. Greenberg ANOELO J. PALMIERI (1020.1000) ROBERT P. WALDRON (101T-1000) ALAN H WIENER• MCNAEL J. GREENE' DENNIS W OHAN' DAVID O. PARR' CHARLES N KANTER" PATRICK A HENNESSEY DON PI/HER GREGORY N. WEILER W A. WILLIAMS JOHN RLISTER MICNAEL H. LEIFER SCOTT R CARPENTER RICHARD A. SALVE NORMAN J. ROOICN RONALD M. COLE MICNAEL L. D'ANOELO STEPHEN A. /CHECK DONNA L. SNOW T PALMIERI. TYLER. WIENER. WILHELM &WALDRON RYAN M. ELI/E M KERN MELISA R. PERE2 MICNAEL I. R H M CHADWICN CBUNCH ANIEN J RANKER RYAN M ►RAOER ELAINE M SEARLE ERIN NACERI CANDICE L. LEE ERICA M SOROSKY MICNAEL P. BURNS JOSHUA J MARK ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS KATHERINE M. HARRISON SRIAN MACKLIN MICNAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL ROBERT C IHRKE, OF COUNSEL JAMES E WILHELM, OF COUNSEL DENNIS O. TYLER', RETIRED •A.ROMOI0A111 EOM VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2803 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA E121514-42651 (IMO) B51-9400 www.ptwww.com Mark Easter Best, Best & Krieger 3390 University Ave., 5th Floor P4 Box 1028 Riverside, CA 92502 June 9, 2014 P.O. SOX 19712 IRVINE. CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949)551-72114 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949)1325.5412 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)051-1564 (945)757-1225 mlEif/r®plwww.com REFER TO FILE NO. 35954.000 Re: Riverside County Transportation Commission - Cardenas Market and Corona Towne Center Dear Mark: To follow-up on our Friday emails, this is to confirm that the only work RCTC is proposing to do to the Corona Towne Center remainder is demolition of buildings and construction of new access points. Anything else discussed in RCTC's precondemnation appraisal (i.e., reconfiguration of the site, parking, etc.) is conceptual and is not part of the RCTC public project. PALMIERI. TYLER. WIENER. WILHELM &WALDRON Mark Easter June 9, 2014 Page 2 Please confirm prior to the resolution of necessity hearing. Very truly yours, MHL:mp 1197669.1 Erin Balsara Naderi From: Mark Easter <Mark.Easter@bbklaw.com> Sent; Monday, June 09, 2014 5:38 PM To: Michelle M. Pase Cc: Michael H. Leifer, Erin Balsara Naderi Subject: RE: RCTC - Cardenas Market and Corona Towne Center Responding to your letter, RCTC's offer to the owner included a severance damage component of $1,154,978, which was based on a Proactive mitigation plan for replacing the hardscape, landscaping, other improvements and re -configuring parking. This plan is conceptual and is neither something that RCTC itself will be doing as part of its project, or requiring the owner to do. RCTC's project DOES include the demolition of several buildings, including the property on the north end of the building, and the Dollar Tree building, as well as the construction of several new access points. I believe this is reflected in the Temporary Construction Easements that RCTC is acquiring as well. Feel free to call me if you have any questions. From: Michelle M. Pase [mailto:MPasePptwww.com] Sent: Monday, June 09, 2014 4:25 PM To: Mark Easter Cc: Michael H. Leifer; Erin Balsara Naderi; Michelle M. Pase Subject: RCTC - Cardenas Market and Corona Towne Center Dear Mr. Easter: At the request of Mr. Leifer, attached in PDF format is a correspondence of today's date regarding the above referenced matter. Please review. Thank you. Michelle Pase Assistant to Michael H. Leifer, Erin B. Naderi, and Steven R. Guess Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 13001 Irvine, CA 92614 Direct Dial (949) 851-7325 ( Facsimile (949) 851-1554 W PrUNIERt TtiaWItNih.%VIt. 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If you are not the intended recipient, or believe that you may have received this communication in error, please advise the sender via reply email and immediately delete the email you received. 2 AGENDA ITEM 7 PUBLIC HEARING • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Finance Manager/Controller THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2014/15 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive input on the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15; 2) Close the public hearing on the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15; and 3) Adopt the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The annual fiscal budget is the result of staff determining the operating and capital needs for FY 2014/15 and identifying the resources to fund those needs. The budget process began in December 2013. The goals and objectives approved by the Commission on April 9 were the basis of this budget. The goals and objectives considered during the preparation of the budget relate to mobility initiatives, goods movement, improved system efficiencies, environmental stewardship, economic development, intermodalism and accessibility, and public and agency communications, and financial and administrative policies. On May 14, staff presented the proposed budget to the Commission. Subsequent to that presentation, staff updated the document as a result of the following changes resulting in a net decrease of $6,044,900 to the projected fund balance at June 30, 2015: Adjustments to Fiscal Year 2013/14 Projected Amounts: • Net increase in state reimbursements and TUMF revenues of $6,654,900 and $1.1 million, respectively; net increase in operating and capital disbursements and regional arterials of $197,000 and $55,000, respectively. While some of the adjustments related to further review and analysis of department worksheets, significant adjustments related to the receipt of Proposition 1B grant funds received in May 2014 as opposed to July 2014, as originally projected. The total net increase in the projected ending fund balance at June 30, 2014 is $7,502,900. Agenda Item 7 44 Adiustments to Fiscal Year 2014/15 Budgeted Amounts: • A decrease of $215,100 in federal reimbursements related to federal sequestration cuts on the Build America Bond subsidy; • A decrease of $6.64 million in state reimbursements for the receipt of Proposition 1B grant funds received in May 2014 rather than July 2014, as originally projected; • A $16,100 decrease in investment income as a result of a net decrease in federal and state reimbursements; • An increase of $1,481,400 in State Transit Assistance expenditures based on review and analysis of Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) submissions; • An increase of $5,195,200 in Local Transportation Fund expenditures based on review and analysis of SRTP submissions; and • A net increase of $191.6 million in operating transfers related to the updated State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan draw down. A public hearing to allow for public comment on the proposed budget, as revised, is required prior to the adoption of the proposed budget. The public hearing was opened at its May 14 Commission meeting. After the public hearing is closed on June 11, adoption of the proposed budget for FY 2014/15 will follow. In accordance with the Commission's fiscal policies, the budget must be adopted no later than June 15 of each year. The proposed Budget for FY 2014/15 is attached. This document contains the executive summary, as revised, that was presented at the May 14 Commission meeting; the Gann Appropriations Limit; the guiding policies related to the preparation of the budget; a summary of the budget process; fund budgets, details of program revenues and other sources; debt; department budgets; a community profile; and appendices including a glossary of acronyms, funding definitions, and program/general terms. A summary of the proposed Budget for FY 2014/15 is as follows: Agenda Item 7 45 • • • FY 2014/15 Budget Revenues and other financing sources: Sales taxes -Measure A, LTF, and STA $ 261,444,700 Reimbursements (federal, state, and other) 182,065,400 TU M F 8,154,600 Other revenues 575,000 Interest on investments 2,450,900 Debt proceeds 191,600,000 Transfers in 526,034,700 Total revenues and other financing sources 1,172,325,300 Expenditures and other financing uses: Personnel salary and fringe benefits 8,280,300 Professional services 16,146,100 Support services 5,299,600 Projects and operations 934,126,000 Capital outlay 3,750,000 Debt service (principal, interest and costs of issuance) 54,696,200 Transfers out 526,034,700 Total expenditures and other financing uses 1,548,332,900 Excess of expenditures and other financing uses over revenues (376,007,600) and other financing sources Beginning fund balance 986,842,300 Ending fund balance $ 610,834,700 Attachment: FY 2014/15 Proposed Budget — (Posted on the Commission Website) Agenda Item 7 46 Riverside County Tsonsporiolion Commission Budget; Adjustments (Draft to Final FY 2014/15 Ending Fund Balance (as reported 5/14/14) Projected FY 2014 Adjustments: Increase in state reimbursements and other revenues Increase in project operations Budget FY 2015 Adjustments: Decrease in federal and state reimbursements Decrease in investment income Increase in operating transfers in Increase in transit operating and capital distributions Increase in operating transfers out FY 2014/15 Ending Fund Balance (per final budget 6/11/14) $ 616,879,600'; 7,754,90p" 1252,000j'. (6,855,100) (16400)' 191,600,000 (6,676,600) (191,600,00G) $ 610,834,700 1 Beginning, Fund 8 00 Total DORI •Revenues $454,690,600 •Debt Proceeds $191,600,000 •Transfers In $526,034,700 •Expenditures $967,602,000 •Debt Service $ 54,696,200 44.E 2 Funding sources 0 par.as.on Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal reimbursements State reimbursements Local reimbursements TUMF Other revenues Investment income Total Revenues Debt proceeds, net TIFIA loan proceeds Transfers in Total Revenues/Sources $ 149,428,100 $ 157,000,000 $ 157,000,000 72,828,800 76,500,000 76,500,000 14,170,200 13,298,000 13,298,000 14,230,000 94,389,000 50,267,900 22,875,500 137,891,200 94,640,500 1,711,900 2,364,000 3,048,800 12,421,100 7,823,400 7,530,100 1,540,600 1,090,400 639,100 1,769,900 4,026,500 5,292,000 290,976,100 494,382,500 408,216,400 454,690,600 -8% 60,000,000 698,340,700 674,750,100 -100% 110,000,000 191,600000 74% 133,065,300 637,010,600 485,301,700 ;516034' -17% $ 484,041,400 $ 1,939,733,800 $1,568,268,200 $ 1171325i900 -40% $ 167,000,000.. 500,000 12,944,700 s 83,351 A' 92,504,0 . 6% 7% -3 % -12% -33% 163% 4% -47% -39 % Management=: - Services Expenditures% 'Debt Service] Expenditures Regional progra'"$ Expend061 CaP14'1146jeet ' Deveigpment; and Delivery e Expef74i RF. 3 Ma na e Services Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance Debt Service Total Expenditures Transfers Out Total Management Services 201.3/14 ..p, FY: $ 244,000 $ 308,900 $ 331,900 $ 1,213,100 1,863,900 1,376,900 890,900 1,203,600 908,000I 4,364,500 5,209,000 4,982,300 25,300 - - FY 6,737,800 8,585,400 7,599,100 9,014MOill 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5 $ 11,737,800 $ 13,585,400 $ 12,599,100 $ 14, 7 Planning and Programming Services Rail Maintenance and Operations Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Total Expenditures Transfers Out Total Regional Programs 3,099,800 $ 5,767,000 $ 3,241,400 $ 5,88 - 11,265,800 15,800,500 15,042,500 18,054,6E t 57,246,500 106,994,100 79,511,300 11310146tM 2,868,400 4,411,700 4,455,600• 300900% 3,563,500 5,464,600 4,805,200 4'677,100 78,044,000 138,437,900 107,056,000 145729,900 $ 93,631,500 $ 154,256,000 $ 126,949,500 $ 163,737,700' 4 Salaries and benefits $ Z,669,100 $ 3,339,800 $ 3,914,500 $ 3,602,300, Professional costs 7,257,900 10,507,300 7,984,300 8,493,100 Support costs 277,700 879,300 215,200 852,400 Projects and operations: - Program operations 9,304,400 12,203,600 7,459,500 13,969,300 ,. Engineering 15,697,500 22,001,000 11,044,200 17,633110 Construction 37,487,700 238,243,900 112,801,000 238,444,900' Design build 26,232,500 217,750,000 165,800,000 254,803,500", Right of way and land 44,974,600 179,087,800 103,123,400 183,851,4t. Local streets and roads 44,594,900 46,865,900 46,911,900 49,882,OOQ Regional arterials 8,678,500 27,471,000 25,370,000 30,400,000< Other 207,100 2,386,000 52,800 10,920,000 Debt service 22,204,100 134,227,100 118,979,200 54,696,200 Total Expenditures Z19,586,000 594,962,700 603,656,000 867,SS4,10Q Transfers out 112,477,800 616,192,500 460,408,200 SOZ,979,200 Total Capital Project Development & Delivery $ 332,063,800 $ 1,511,155,200 $1,064,064,200 $ 1,370,533,30Q'S' s Capital Projects , rations Expen res 5 • -Capital Project ;Expenditure�ihlights R-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/21S Interchange j 74 Curve Widening ... SR-91, I-15 o I vements�5 Personnel $ 6,342,400 $ 7,949,400 $ 7,948,000 $ 8,280,300 Professional 12,100,400 17,911,700 14,701,900 16,146,100 Support 3,798,300 5,577,700 4,706,200 5,299,600 Projects and operations 259,676,800 875,533,900 571,842,500 934,126,000, Capital outlay 220,500 786,200 133,300 3,750,000 Debt service 22,229,400 134,227,100 118,979,200 54,696,200 Total Expenditures 304,367,800 1,041,986,000 718,311,100 1,022,298,200 Transfersout 133,065,300 637,010,600 485,301,700 526,034700 Total Expenditures/Uses $ 437,433,100 $ 1,678,996,600 $1,203,612,800 $ 1,548,332,9€ 6 Personnel, Professional, J Support, & Capital Outlay 6 Measure A Managemen Services Close public ,he ,eilleW xn� ii(t5�i��E� w,(,4 ring and adopt budget Continue monitoring revenues untiit�g �p�d���le tY.trpratt Sales tax and TUMF revenue tr etir ess of fe�t�rat aad state reifnb rse 11 7 Riverside County Transportation Commission June 11, 2014 Honorable Commissioners Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside, California FY 2014/15 Budget Introduction A County on the Move — Unprecedented Level of Investment Fuels an Exciting Future Thank you for your interest in the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014/15 budget for the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission or RCTC). This document provides an opportunity to evaluate and review the financial backbone of an innovative and successful public transportation agency. The upcoming fiscal year will be one of unprecedented investment and construction in Riverside County's transportation infrastructure — an investment that will undoubtedly improve the area's mobility and economic standing for decades to come. In the past year, RCTC began work on two high -profile projects with a combined value of $1.7 billion. The State Route (SR) corridor improvement project broke ground in December and is now in full swing. It is easily the most ambitious project in the Commission's history and will provide the most profound mobility improvements of any project of its kind in Southern California. The Perris Valley Line (PVL) Metrolink Extension project is comparatively smaller with an investment of $247 million, but it also represents the first expansion of the five -county Metrolink train system since the mid-1990's. For Riverside County, the PVL expands and revitalizes public transit service by establishing a transit backbone for Western Riverside County that includes more trains, enhanced bus service, new commuter options, and an allure for new employers to locate to Riverside County. Along with RCTC's own projects, the Commission is also funding other large scale projects with various partners such as California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), the Coachella Valley Association of Governments, county of Riverside (County), and local cities. Construction is moving at a rapid clip on the widening of SR-91 in Downtown Riverside, the bi-county widening of Interstate (1) 215 between Riverside and San Bernardino, improved interchanges on the 1-10 in the Coachella Valley, and a number of railroad grade separations throughout Riverside County. While high profile projects generate excitement and interest, infrastructure investments must also be dedicated to smaller projects that have positive benefits to local communities. To that end, the Commission recently approved $152 million of funding for 33 local projects ranging from arterial improvements, freeway interchanges, bike lanes, and transit projects. In the first part of this decade, more than $4 billion in construction spending will be devoted to transportation projects constructed by RCTC, the County, local cities, or Caltrans. The obvious reason for this commitment is to invest in a better transportation system resulting in better mobility, but we are also investing in Riverside County's future. It's a future that should include more local jobs, new businesses being formed, employers moving to the area, and making it easier to access numerous locales that will appeal to visitors throughout the world. The investments are being made to ensure and improve the quality of life of Riverside County's residents. Transportation interacts with a variety of human needs including a safe environment that includes better air quality, a reduction in water runoff, reducing the creation of greenhouse gases, and transportation alternatives that promote better health through walking or bicycling. By taking a more holistic approach, the importance of transportation actually grows larger and is valued as a vital necessity. People Working — Building a Better Future The Commission and its project partners at Caltrans, local jurisdictions, and transit agencies are investing in transportation using a variety of local, state, and federal sources to build projects, plan and design new improvements, and get people working and contributing to the local economy. The results of these effects are coming to fruition with improvements completed on the southern portion of 1-215, the 74/215 interchange, 1-10 interchanges in the Coachella Valley, and work speeding ahead on SR-91 in Riverside and the 60/215 interchange on the Riverside/Moreno Valley border. During FY 2014/15, the Commission will invest $751 million in capital projects that include highway, regional arterial, and rail projects. The Commission's overall budget will exceed $1 billion and includes funding of transit operations, payments to cities and the County for street and road improvements, and management of smaller programs such as motorist and commuter assistance. The Commission's status has become somewhat unique in Southern California. As many transportation agencies have consolidated functions and grown in size, the Commission remains true to the original intent of the state of California (State) legislation that first created it —now operating with a staff of 46 budgeted positions. This maintains the original vision of the Legislature when it created the Commission in 1976. By doing so, the Commission remains effective in its role as a transportation planning and funding agency by maintaining productive relationships with other agencies. For example, Measure A funds local transportation priorities and needs. In FY 2014/15, the Commission will return $49.9 million in funding to local cities and the County for local streets and roads needs. The Commission also receives and programs funding from state and federal sources. This includes the State's Transportation Development Act program dollars that are allocated primarily to the County's major public transit providers. Measure A also pays its share by funding transit fare discounts and programs for senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited means and by operating a commuter assistance program that provides traveler information and ridesharing assistance to employers and commuters. SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Corona: Full Speed Ahead In December 2013, the Commission broke ground on a $1.4 billion project to widen SR-91 through Corona. The project consists of two tolled express lanes and the addition of a general purpose lane in each direction of SR-91 between the Orange County line and 1-15. Additional project improvements include enhanced transit service along the corridor with express buses, a collector -distributor lane system near the 1-15 and Main Street, and better connections between SR-91 and 1-15 including a direct connector to the RCTC 91 Express Lanes from the northbound 1-15. The work will create 16,000 new jobs and will be the largest ever funded by the Commission. This year's budget also reflects an ongoing investment in project development work that includes the acquisition of needed right of way. The eventual completion of the project will culminate in a transformation of Riverside County's transportation system with reduced congestion, toll lane options, and enhanced transit service. The overall economic effect for the County will be significant and will aid economic development opportunities throughout the region. Perris Valley Line Proiect: Transit Options to Expand Yet another regionally significant project is the PVL, which has broken ground and is set to provide passenger service in December 2015. The project will extend Metrolink from Downtown Riverside to South Perris, enabling Metrolink to serve additional Riverside County residents and employers. It establishes a much stronger transit backbone that will complement existing and future bus service, pedestrian and active transportation improvements, and economic development efforts. Moreover transit operators throughout the county including the Riverside Transit Agency and SunLine Transit Agency are planning service expansions to address future growth and demand for increased bus service. Major Corridors Seeing Malor Investment 1-215: Construction crews completed a new lane in each direction along a six -mile stretch of the southern segment of I-215—a project which is being funded through Measure A and state bond funding. This is now being followed by a similar project along a 12.5-mile portion of the central segment of 1-215. At the northern edge of the 1-215 and SR-60, the East Junction HOV lanes connector project was completed in Spring 2014. The Commission completed the project development for this effort, and Caltrans is responsible for the construction activities. Additionally, construction continues to add a new carpool lane in each direction from the 60/91/215 interchange all the way into San Bernardino County. The lead agency for this bi-county project is SANBAG. 1-10: Construction has been completed on rebuilt and expanded freeway interchanges at Palm Drive, Indian Canyon Drive, Bob Hope Drive, and Date Palm Avenue in the Coachella Valley. The completed projects were funded through a combination of federal, state, Measure A, and Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee funding. Construction has begun on another interchange project at 1-10 and Monterey Avenue, and the I-10/Jefferson Street interchange will begin construction during FY 2014/15. Caltrans and the County are the lead agencies for these projects. SR-91: Construction is underway on the addition of a carpool lane along a six -mile stretch of SR-91 through Downtown Riverside. The project will not only widen SR-91 through Downtown Riverside but will also rebuild and improve a number of interchanges and local connections with the freeway. A Commitment to Riverside County Ensuring local funding for transportation will require ongoing outreach to the public and transparent oversight and management that ensures public confidence in the Commission's fiduciary, oversight, and visionary roles. This budget document is intended to demonstrate the Commission's commitment to the public as well as documenting the Commission's dedication to sound budget practices. This budget document is one of many ways the Commission works to ensure public accountability and full transparency of its actions. Yet another Commission priority is in customer service and is demonstrated in our investment in the 1E511 Traveler Information Service and other motorist service programs such as outreach to employers for ridesharing assistance, the establishment and maintenance of freeway call boxes, and the Freeway Service Patrol program. As the Commission adds more responsibilities to become a toll facility operator, it will increase RCTC's interaction with the public that will only strengthen our commitment to communicating in an effective and proactive manner. We welcome public input and participation and invite you to visit our website at www.rctc.org or to follow us on Twitter @RCTC. GFOA Distinguished Budget Award The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to RCTC for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, an operations guide, a financial plan, and a communications device. The award is valid for a period of one year only. The Commission believes this budget continues to conform to program requirements, and it will be submitted to GFOA to determine the Commission's eligibility for another award. Acknowledgements The preparation of this budget has been a collaborative effort of the Commission's staff. The budget reflects the Commission's desire to communicate the components of the budget in terms that are easily understandable and supportable for the general public. Staff acknowledges and appreciates the guidance and leadership of the Board of Commissioners and the sense of renewal and commitment it has and continues to inspire. Signature on file Signature on file Anne Mayer, Executive Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer TABLE OF CONTENTS COMMISSION INTRODUCTION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction Budget Overview Commission Personnel Department Initiatives Fund Balances Budget Comparative Operating and Capital Budget Budget by Governmental Fund Type Highway, Regional Arterial, and Rail Programs GANN APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT Section 1: GUIDING POLICIES Commission Policy Goals and Objectives Financial and Administration Policies Policy Matrix Section 2: BUDGET PROCESS SUMMARY Budget Process Functional Organization Chart Staff Organization Chart Section 3: FUND BUDGETS Budgetary Basis and Fund Structure General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Projects Funds Debt Service Fund Section 4: REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Revenues and Other Sources Program Revenues and Other Sources Section 5: COMMISSION DEBT Debt Debt Capacity Analysis Aggregate Debt Service Schedule Outstanding Debt and Debt Service Requirements Program and Geographic Debt Outstanding Legal Debt Margin Section 6: DEPARTMENT BUDGETS Budget Comparison by Department 6.1: MANAGEMENT SERVICES Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance 6.2: REGIONAL PROGRAMS Planning and Programming Rail Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Narrative discussion of the history of the Commission and list of principal officers Narrative overview of the operational and financial factors considered Summarized narrative overview, charts, and tables of sources and uses Personnel expenditures and full-time equivalents Major initiatives and summarized uses by department Projected fund balances by governmental fund type and program Schedule of budget by summarized line item Schedule of budget classified by operating and capital purposes Schedule of budget by governmental fund type Listing of budgeted capital project expenditures by program Narrative discussion of the appropriations limit Narrative description of policy goals and objectives Description of financial policies Linkage of policy goals to departmental goals and objectives Narrative description of various budget stages Organization chart by Commission functions Organization chart of budgeted staff Narrative description of budgetary basis and fund structure Overview; narrative and charts of sources and uses Overview; narrative and charts of sources and uses by Measure A and non -Measure A special revenue funds Overview; narrative and charts of sources and uses Overview; narrative and charts of sources and uses Narrative description of various revenues and other sources; schedule of funding sources by department/program; definitions and background Narratives of revenues by program Narrative discussion of debt programs Charts and accompanying narrative demonstrating debt capacity Schedule of debt maturities by year for sales tax bonds Description of outstanding debt and related debt service requirements as of June 30, 2014 Charts of debt service by program and geographic area Schedule of calculation of legal debt margin Schedule of revenues, expenditures, and other financing sources (uses) by department Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses 6.3: CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Project Development and Delivery Location of Capital Projects Capital Projects Summary Local Streets and Roads Summary Section 7: COMMUNITY PROFILE Riverside County Demographics Statistical Information Commission Facts Section 8: APPENDICES A —Glossary of Acronyms B—Salary Schedule C—Funding Definitions D—Program Terms E—General Terms Goals and objectives, key assumptions and budgeted uses Local map of major capital projects for current year Narrative description of each capital project Schedule of local streets and roads disbursements by local agency Narrative discussion of Riverside County's community profile Charts of various demographic data Charts and tables of various statistical information Narrative overview of the Commission's programs and services Explanation of commonly used abbreviations Schedule of salaries in accordance with state law Narrative description of various funding sources Description of Commission programs and related terms Commonly used terms in governmental accounting and finance Commission Introduction State of California (State) law created the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission or RCTC) in 1976 to oversee the funding and coordination of all public transportation services within Riverside County (County). The Commission's mission is to assume a leadership role in improving mobility in the County. The governing body consists of all five members of the County Board of Supervisors, one elected official from each of the County's 28 cities, and one non -voting member appointed by the Governor of California. The Commission is responsible for setting policies, establishing priorities, and coordinating activities among the County's various transit operators and other agencies. The Commission also programs and/or reviews the allocation of federal, state, and local funds for highway, transit, rail, non -motorized travel (bicycle and pedestrian), and other transportation activities. The Commission serves as the tax authority and implementation agency for the voter approved Measure A Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). Measure A was originally approved by the County's electorate in 1988 and imposed a one-half of one cent transaction and use tax (sales tax) to fund specific programs that commenced in July 1989 (1989 Measure A). The 1989 Measure A was approved for 20 years and expired on June 30, 2009. On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A beginning in July 2009 through June 2039 (2009 Measure A). Additionally, the Commission provides motorist aid services designed to expedite traffic flow. These services include the Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE), a program that provides call box service for motorists; the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), a roving tow truck service to assist motorists with disabled vehicles on the main highways of the County during peak rush hour traffic periods; and Inland Empire 511 (IE511), a traveler information system. These services are provided at no charge to motorists and are funded through a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations. The Commission is also legally responsible for allocating Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds, the major source of funds for transit in the County. The TDA provides two sources of funding: the Local Transportation Fund (LTF), which is derived from a one -quarter of one cent state sales tax, and State Transit Assistance (STA), which is now derived from the statewide sales tax on diesel fuel. Prior to 2010, STA revenues included the tax on gasoline. Finally, the Commission has been designated as the Congestion Management Agency (CMA) for the County. As the CMA, the Commission coordinates with local jurisdictions in the establishment of congestion mitigation procedures for the County's roadway system. Name Kevin Jeffries John F. Tavaglione Jeff Stone John J. Benoit Marion Ashley Deborah Franklin Roger Berg Joseph DeConinck Ella Zanowic Mary Craton Greg Pettis Steven Hernandez Karen Spiegel Scott Matas Adam Rush Larry Smith Douglas Hanson Glenn Miller Frank Johnston Terry Henderson Bob Magee Scott Mann Tom Owings Rick Gibbs Berwin Hanna Jan Harnik Ginny Foat Daryl Busch Ted Weill Steve Adams Andrew Kotyuk Ron Roberts Ben Benoit Basem Muallem Riverside County Transportation Commission List of Principal Officials Board of Commissioners Title Member Member Member Member Chair (Commission) Member Vice Chair (Budget and Implementation Committee) Member Member Member Member Member Member 2nd Vice Chair (Commission) and Vice Chair (Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Member Member Chair (Budget and Implementation Committee) Member Chair (Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Chair (Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Vice Chair (Commission) Member Member Member Member Vice Chair (Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee) Governor's Appointee Management Staff Anne Mayer, Executive Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer Robert Yates, Multimodal Services Director Agency County of Riverside, District 1 County of Riverside, District 2 County of Riverside, District 3 County of Riverside, District 4 County of Riverside, District 5 City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Blythe City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral City City of Coachella City of Corona City of Desert Hot Springs City of Eastvale City of Hemet City of Indian Wells City of Indio City of Jurupa Valley City of La Quinta City of Lake Elsinore City of Menifee City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Norco City of Palm Desert City of Palm Springs City of Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Riverside City of San Jacinto City of Temecula City of Wildomar Caltrans, District 8 Executive Summary Introduction The budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2014/15 is presented to the Board of Commissioners (Board) and the citizens of Riverside County. The budget outlines the projects the Commission plans to undertake during the year and appropriates expenditures to accomplish these tasks. The budget also shows the funding sources and fund balances that will be used for these projects. This document will serve as the Commission's monetary guideline. To provide the reader a better understanding of the projects, staff has included descriptive information regarding each department and major projects. The discussion in each department includes a review of accomplishments, major initiatives, and key assumptions. Staff used the goals and objectives approved at the Commission meeting on April 9, 2014, to prepare this budget. In addition to the Commission's long-term goals and strategic plan, the short-term factors listed below were used to guide the development of the budget: Operational • Aggressively pursue completion of the environmental, design, and construction processes on the State Route (SR) 91, Interstate (I) 15, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects; the SR-60 truck climbing lane project; and Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension (Perris Valley Line) included in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. • Enhance corridor mobility and traveler choice by continuing property acquisition and construction on the SR-91 corridor improvement project and continuing to develop tolled express lanes on 1-15. • Provide leadership in the planning and development of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to administer the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional Arterial Program and facilitate the delivery of eligible arterial improvements in western Riverside County (Western County). • Work closely with partners in the Coachella Valley to ensure the implementation of Measure A funding priorities. • Complete projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A ordinance and determine uses for any unexpended revenues. • Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental clearance for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. • Work with local and regional agencies in developing resources for preservation and maintenance of the highways and regional arterials. • Continue active engagement in state and federal efforts to streamline and reform the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). • Consider future rail expansion opportunities including the potential for extension of the Perris Valley Line to the Hemet/San Jacinto and Temecula areas. • Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders with special transit needs. • Support cost controls and promote operating efficiency for transit operators. • Maintain effective partnerships among commuters, employers, and government to increase the efficiency of our transportation system by encouraging and promoting motorized and non -motorized transportation alternatives. • Continue to provide a motorist aid system that ensures safety and convenience to freeway motorists. • Maintain an active involvement in state and federal legislative matters to ensure that the Commission receives proper consideration for transportation projects and funding. • Explore local options for sustainable funding in addressing long-term transportation and quality -of -life needs for Riverside County. • Maintain close communication with Commissioners and educate policy makers on all issues of importance to the Commission. Financial • Fund administrative costs with allocations from Measure A, LTF, FSP, SAFE, and TUMF funds. • Maintain administrative program delivery costs below the policy threshold of 4% of Measure A revenues; the FY 2014/15 Management Services budget is 2.37% of Measure A revenues. • Maintain administrative salaries and benefits at less than 1% of Measure A revenues; the FY 2014/15 administrative salaries and benefits is .88% of Measure A revenues. • Continue to maintain prudent cash reserves to provide some level of insulation for unplanned expenditures. • Maintain current strong bond ratings with rating agencies. • Move forward on Measure A projects for highways and regional arterials using sales tax revenues, TUMF revenues, and state and federal funding as well as financing alternatives such as commercial paper, sales tax revenue bonds, toll revenue bonds, and federal loans. • Establish and maintain reserves for toll operations, capital improvements, and debt service in accordance with toll supported debt agreements. • Conduct enhanced outreach to businesses and contractors located in Riverside County regarding opportunities to provide competitive and qualified goods and/or services to the Commission. • Leverage and protect past Measure A investments in rail with state and federal funding for additional rail improvements, including the Perris Valley Line. • Maintain the enterprise resource planning (ERP) system to integrate project accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. Budget Overview Total sources (Table 1) are budgeted at $1,172,325,300, which is a decrease of 25% over FY 2013/14 projected sources and a 40% decrease over the FY 2013/14 revised budget. Total sources are comprised of revenues of $454,690,600, transfers in of $526,034,700, and debt proceeds of $191,600,000. The projected fund balance at June 30, 2014 available for expenditures (excluding reserves for debt service of $144,250,800 and advances receivable of $34,456,400) is $808,135,100. Accordingly, total funding available for the FY 2014/15 budget totals $1, 980,460,400. Table 1— Sources FY 2013-2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Intergovernmental TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds TOTAL Sources 149,428,100 $ 157,000,000 $ 157,000,000 72,828,800 76,500,000 76,500,000 14,170,200 13,298,000 13,298,000 38,817,400 234,644,200 147,957,200 12,421,100 7,823,400 7,530,100 1,540,600 1,090,400 639,100 1,769,900 4,026,500 5,292,000 133,065,300 637,010,600 485,301,700 60,000,000 810,774,000 677,183,400 484,041,400 $ 1,942,167,100 $ 1,570,701,500 $ 167,000,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 182,065,400 8,154,600 575,000 2,450,900 526,034,700 191,600,000 $ 1,172,325,300 $ 10,000,000 6% 5,000,000 7% (353,300) -3% (52,578,800) -22% 331,200 4% (515,400) -47% (1,575,600) -39% (110,975,900) -17% (619,174,000) -76% $ (769,841,800) -40% Riverside County has specific competitive advantages over nearby coastal counties (Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego) including housing that was (and remains) more available and affordable and plentiful commercial real estate and land available for development at lower costs. Prior to the national recession, Riverside County's economy thrived, reflecting the area's competitive advantages over its neighboring counties, largely as a result of the County's continuing ability to draw jobs, residents, and affordable housing away from the Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego county areas. As a result, the County's employment and commercial base diversified and the County's share of the regional economy increased. During the nationwide recession, the County experienced high unemployment; reduced personal income, taxable sales, and residential building permits; a decrease in the rate of home sales and the median price of single-family residences; and high rates of notices of default on mortgage loans secured by single-family residences. The impact of the recession was amplified in the Inland Empire (i.e., Riverside and San Bernardino counties) due to its relatively greater growth and the relatively lower average income levels when compared to coastal areas. These factors resulted in fluctuating Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues and TUMF fees; however, as noted on Chart 1 the sales tax revenues appear to have stabilized following the recession. Chart 1— Commission Sources Trend $800,000,000 $700,000,000 $600,000,000 $500,000,000 $400,000,000 $300,000,000 $200,000,000 $100,000,000 $0 b FY 10/11 FY 11/12 FY12/13 FY13/14 FY 14/15 +MeasureASales Tax t LTF Sales Tax +STA Sales Tax +TU M F +Federal, State, Local Revenues i Operating Transfers In Debt Proceeds While recovery from the nationwide recession in the local Inland Empire economy has lagged the nation and other areas of California, the local economy is experiencing significant improvement. Sales tax revenues have rebounded from the recent economic downturn's low point in 2010. The Commission's Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues for FY 2013/14 are projected to approximate their highest annual level that was reached in FY 2005/06. The Commission's economic outlook for FY 2014/15 continues to be cautiously optimistic; however, the state and federal budget issues continue to affect funding of the Commission's capital projects and programs. Ongoing problems with funding of the Federal Highway Trust Fund could cause delays in receipt of federal funding. Should Measure A and LTF sales tax revenues continue to fluctuate and the availability of federal and state revenues continue to be uncertain, the timing and scope of the Commission's projects and programs may be impacted. While the Commission's primary revenues are the Measure A and LTF sales taxes, other revenues and financing sources are required to fund the Commission's programs and projects as illustrated in Chart 2. Chart 2 — Sources: Major Categories Measure A Sales Tax 14% Debt Proceeds 16% Operating Transfers In 45% Investment Income 0% LTF Sales Tax 7% STA Sales Tax 1% Intergovernmental 16% TUMF Revenue 1% Other Revenue 0% The State Board of Equalization (SBOE) recently provided to cities and other agencies its projections that statewide taxable sales over the next fiscal year will increase 6.5%. However, given the tenuous local economy, the Commission is not basing its estimate of revenues solely on the SBOE's projection and will continue its conservative projection practices. After taking the state of the local economy and recent revenue trends into consideration, staff projects Measure A sales tax revenues of $167,000,000 for FY 2014/15. This is a 6.4% increase from the FY 2013/14 revised projection of $157,000,000. At midyear the Commission will reassess sales tax revenue projections based on the economy and revenue trends. On behalf of the County, the Commission administers the LTF for public transportation needs, local streets and roads, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The majority of LTF funding received by the County and available for allocation is distributed to all public transit operators in the County, and the Commission receives allocations for administration, planning, and programming in addition to funding for Western County rail operations included in the commuter rail Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP). The LTF sales tax revenue received from the State is budgeted at $81,500,000; an increase of 6.5% from the FY 2013/14 revised projection of $76,500,000. STA funds generated from the statewide sales tax on motor vehicle fuel are allocated by formula by the State Controller to the Commission for allocations to the County's public transit operators; however, these funds have been subject to suspension in past years due to the State's budget issues. The STA transit allocation, which is based on recent State estimates, for FY 2014/15 is $12,944,700. Intergovernmental revenues include reimbursement revenues from federal sources of $83,351,400, state sources of $92,503,000, and local agencies of $6,211,000 for highway and rail capital projects, rail operations and station maintenance, commuter assistance, and motorist assistance programs as well as planning and programming activities. Reimbursement revenues vary from year to year depending on project activities and funding levels. As a result of an amended Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), the Commission will receive 48.7% of TUMF revenues (as updated by the most recent Nexus study). TUMF represents fees assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western County. FY 2014/15 TUMF fees are projected at $8,000,000 compared to the FY 2013/14 revised projection of $7,400,000 and reflect the slow but encouraging signs in the housing market in the Inland Empire. Additional TUMF zone reimbursements of $154,600 are expected for the 74/215 interchange project. Other revenue of $575,000 is projected to decrease 47% from the prior year's budget of $1,090,400 and is related to property management revenues from properties acquired in connection with the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Investment income is anticipated to decrease in FY 2014/15 as a result of increased activity with the Perris Valley Line and the SR-91 corridor improvement projects. Staff continues to actively manage its resources and make appropriate investments to maximize the return to the Commission without sacrificing security and affecting short- term cash requirements. Transfers in of $526,034,700 relate primarily to the transfer of available debt proceeds for highway projects; LTF funding for general administration, planning and programming, rail operations and station maintenance, and grade separation project allocations; approved interfund allocations for specific projects; and debt service requirements from highway, regional arterial, and local streets and roads projects. Debt proceeds consist of draw downs of $191,600,000 from the federal Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan related to the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Total uses (Table 2), including transfers out of $526,034,700, are budgeted at $1,548,332,900, a decrease of 8% from the prior year budget amount of $1,681,429,900. Program expenditures and transfers out totaling $1,534,271,000 represent 99% of total budgeted uses in FY 2014/15. Program costs have decreased by 8% from $1,667,844,500 in FY 2013/14. Table 2 — Uses FY 2013-2015 FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Percent Change Change Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials Capital Local Streets and Roads Commuter Assistance Debt Service Management Services Motorist Assistance Planning and Programming Public and Specialized Transit Rail Maintenance and Operations $ 265,264,800 44,594,900 3,019,700 22,229,400 11,712,500 4,889,300 3,099,800 71,344,100 11,278,600 $ 1,330,062,200 46,865,900 4,523,900 136,660,400 13,585,400 6,755,500 5,767,000 121,409,100 15,800,500 $ 898,173,100 46,911,900 4,567,800 121,412,500 12,599,100 5,695,200 3,241,400 98,402,600 15,042,500 TOTAL Uses $ 437,433,100 $ 1,681,429,900 $ 1,206,046,100 $ 1,265,955,100 49,882,000 3,460,400 54,696,200 14,061,900 5,578,800 6,383,300 130,260,600 18,054,600 $ 1,548,332,900 (64,107,100) 3,016,100 (1,063,500) (81,964,200) 476,500 (1,176,700) 616,300 8,851,500 2,254,100 -5 % 6% -24% -60% 4% -17% 11% 7% 14% (133,097,000) -8% Note: Management Services includes Executive Management, Administration, Legislative Affairs and Communications, and Finance. Capital highway, rail, and regional arterials budgeted uses of $1,265,955,100 are 5% lower compared to the FY 2013/14 budget due to decreased operating transfers out of debt proceeds from capital projects funds to special revenue funds to finance 2009 Measure A Western County highway projects costs. Local streets and roads expenditures of $49,882,000 reflect an increase of 6% over the FY 2013/14 budget and represent the disbursements to local jurisdictions for the construction, repair, and maintenance of local streets and roads. Debt Service of $54,696,200 has decreased 60% as a result of the retirement of $60,000,000 of outstanding commercial paper notes in FY 2013/14 from sales tax revenue bond proceeds issued in connection with the SR-91 corridor improvement project financing. Additionally, actual debt service requirements related to the SR-91 corridor improvement project current plan of finance are lower than estimated in the original plan of finance. Commuter Assistance budgeted expenditures of $3,460,400 are 24% lower than FY 2013/14 budget due to decreased expenditures related to completion of the new ridematching system and streamlined media outreach for projects and operations activities. Management Services expenditures have increased 4% from the FY 2013/14 budget due to information technology equipment upgrades and administration support. Motorist Assistance expenditures have decreased 17% or $1,176,700 from the FY 2013/14 budget as a result of decreased demand for freeway service patrol services supporting construction projects and streamlining media outreach for the 1E511 service. Planning and Programming budgeted expenditures of $6,383,300 reflect an 11% increase from the FY 2013/14 budget due to increased projects and operations activities in connection with LTF disbursements for planning and programming and grade separation projects. Public and Specialized Transit budgeted expenditures of $130,260,600 are 7% higher than FY 2013/14 budget due to increased transit capital expenditures for public transit. The 14% increase in Rail Maintenance and Operation's budgeted expenditures of $18,054,600 is primarily due to additional consultant work needed to perform planning and modeling for rail projects including the SR- 91/Perris Valley Line expansion and Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service. Total uses included in the FY 2014/15 budget by major categories are illustrated in Chart 3. Chart 3 — Uses: Major Categories Planning and Public and Rail Maintenance Programming Specialized Transit and Operations Motorist 0% 8% 1% Assistance 0% Management Services 1% Debt Service 4% , Commuter Assistance 0% Capital Local Streets and Roads 4% Commission Personnel Capital Highway, Rail, and Regional Arterials 82% The Commission's salary and benefits total $8,280,300 for FY 2014/15. This represents an increase of $330,900 or 4% over the FY 2013/14 budget of $7,949,400 (Chart 4). The increase relates to a 3% cost of living adjustment to offset the employee's contribution for their share of normal pension costs; a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases; an increase in the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CaIPERS) employer contribution rate and dental, vision, and workers' compensation premiums; and an increase in the annual required contribution for the postretirement health care costs based on a recent actuarial valuation. The Commission's salary schedule for FY 2014/15 is included in Appendix B and complies with Government Code §20636 "Compensation Earnable" and California Code of Register §570.5, "Requirements for a Publicly Available Pay Schedule". Beginning with FY 2013/14, the Commission implemented a phased approach over a three-year period requiring employees to pay their share of normal pension costs. The current 5% employer -paid member contribution by the Commission will be eliminated in FY 2015/16. Chart 4 — Salary and Benefits Costs: Five -Year Comparison $9,000,000 $8,000,000 $7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $- FY 10/11 FY 11/12 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 The FY 2014/15 FTE of 46 positions is comparable to the FY 2013/14 level (Table 3) as the Commission prepares for significant organization changes that include large transportation capital projects resulting in toll operations and the investment of billions of dollars requiring substantial attention at many staff levels. Management continues to be firmly committed to the intent of the Commission's enabling legislation that called for a small staff. Staff will continue to be provided the tools needed to ensure an efficient and productive work environment. However, it must be recognized that small is not viewed in an absolute context; it is relative to the required tasks to be performed and the demands to be met. Table 3 - Full -Time Equivalents by Department FY 2013-2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Executive Management 0.3 0.3 Administration 4.5 5.5 Legislative Affairs and Communications 2.2 2.4 Finance 6.8 6.9 Planning and Programming 4.7 5.3 Rail Maintenance and Operations 2.9 4.0 Public and Specialized Transit 2.5 2.4 Commuter Assistance 1.8 1.8 Motorist Assistance 0.9 1.2 Capital Project Development and Delivery 13.4 16.2 TOTAL 40.0 46.0 FY 14/15 0.4 5.2 2.2 7.0 5.1 3.9 2.4 1.6 1.2 17.0 46.0 The Commission provides a comprehensive package of benefits to all permanent, salaried employees. The package includes: health, dental, vision, and life insurance, short and long-term disability, workers' compensation, tuition assistance, sick and vacation leave, retirement benefits in the form of participation in CaIPERS, postretirement health care, deferred compensation, and employee assistance program. The compensation components are shown in Chart 5. Chart 5 - Personnel Salary and Benefits Other Fringes 6% Health 13% irement 18% Salary 63% Department Initiatives The preparation of each department's budget was based on key assumptions, accomplishments in FY 2013/14, major initiatives for FY 2014/15, and department goals and related objectives. Following are the key initiatives and summary of expenditures for each department (Tables 4 through 13). Executive Management • Continue project development and delivery as the key Measure A priority. • Continue construction on Riverside County's largest transportation project, the SR-91 corridor improvement project. • Advance public transit with the construction of the Perris Valley Line. • Launch a planning effort to advance passenger rail service in the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor. • Advocate for state investments in transportation and approval of a federal transportation bill to fund needed transportation priorities in the County and stimulate the local economy. • Maintain regional cooperation and collaboration as a significant effort consistent with the philosophy and mission of the Commission. • Enhance external communications with media, business and civic groups, and the community. • Maintain an effective mid -sized transportation agency with a small and dedicated staff. Table 4 - Executive Management FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel $ 129,300 $ 96,700 $ 114,400 Professional 69,200 155,000 165,000 Support 45,500 57,200 52,500 TOTAL $ 244,000 $ 308,900 $ 331,900 Administration $ 139,600 265,000 67,100 $ 471,700 $ 42,900 44% 110,000 71% 9,900 17% $ 162,800 53% • Provide high quality support services to the Commission and to internal and external customers. • Continue to enhance the electronic records management system. • Continue to provide timely communications to Commissioners with continued emphasis on the utilization of electronic mail. • Continue to update technology to streamline processes and provide easier access to Commission records. • Support and develop a motivated workforce with a framework of activities and practices that comply with employment laws and regulations. Table 5-Administration FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel $ 469,200 $ 628,600 $ 507,800 $ 606,600 $ (22,000) -3% Professional 133,100 200,200 180,100 363,000 162,800 81% Support 578,100 651,600 629,000 681,400 29,800 5% Capital Outlay 32,700 383,500 60,000 435,000 51,500 13% Debt Service 25,300 N/A TOTAL $ 1,238,400 $ 1,863,900 $ 1,376,900 $ 2,086,000 $ 222,100 12% Legislative Affairs and Communications • Continue efforts to protect and seek greater state and federal investment in transportation infrastructure and goods movement. • Develop effective partnerships with transportation providers to communicate a unified message to Congress regarding mobility needs. • Advocate positions in the State Legislature and in Congress that advance the County's transportation interests. • Continue a leadership role in formulating a countywide direction on federal transportation policies. • Take a leadership role on the modernization of CEQA. • Continue to develop a broad public information program regarding the Commission's responsibilities and accomplishments through a variety of media formats and presentation opportunities including expanding the use of social media and other emerging technologies. • Continue to place an emphasis on providing proactive public communications support related to major project development efforts. • Conduct a concerted outreach effort to new federal and state representatives on local transportation issues. • Provide new Commissioner -orientation meetings and other continuing education opportunities for Commissioners. Table 6 - Legislative Affairs and Communications FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel $ 364,900 $ 506,700 $ 367,400 Professional 383,800 507,700 396,000 Support 142,200 189,200 144,600 TOTAL $ 890,900 $ 1,203,600 $ 908,000 Finance $ 510,700 523,200 155,500 $ 1,189,400 $ 4,000 1% 15,500 3% (33,700) -18% $ (14,200) -1% • Continue appropriate uses of long- and short-term financing to advance 2009 Measure A projects of the Commission and the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). • Apply the sales tax revenue forecast update to update a financing plan to support the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan and CVAG highway and regional arterial projects. • Continue to keep abreast of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities and consider early implementation of new pronouncements. • Continue to strengthen the ERP system to benefit all staff in the management of accounting and project information and automation of a paperless workflow system. • Continue to implement a centralized procurements process in order to strengthen controls and ensure consistency in the application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations. • Conduct outreach activities to encourage disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) and small business enterprise (SBE) participation in various contracts. Table 7 - Finance FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Personnel $ 788,800 $ 840,300 $ 772,600 $ 921,400 $ 81,100 10% Professional 2,938,800 3,695,300 3,562,800 3,693,500 (1,800) 0% Support 637,300 665,900 639,400 627,200 (38,700) -6% Capital Outlay (400) 7,500 7,500 25,000 17,500 233% Transfers Out 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,047,700 47,700 1% TOTAL $ 9,364,500 $ 10,209,000 $ 9,982,300 $ 10,314,800 $ 105,800 1% Planning and Programming • Monitor funding authority and responsibility related to the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and impacts on the STIP caused by the state budget issues. • Ensure STIP and Proposition 1B funded projects are administered and implemented consistent with California Transportation Commission (CTC) and California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) policies. • Continue to strategically program projects and obligate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding, including monitoring the use of such funding to prevent funds from lapsing. • Focus on interregional concerns and maintain effective working relationships involving various multi -county transportation issues, including goods movement. • Coordinate planning efforts with regional and local agencies relating to the development of regional transportation plans (RTP) and green house gas reduction implementation guidelines. • Secure funding through the federal transportation bill for goods movement -related needs. • Monitor and track the TUMF regional arterial projects. • Work cooperatively with member agencies to continue the work efforts on the new Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process (CETAP) corridors. • Continue the Congestion Management Program (CMP) update and traffic monitoring along urban and rural highway systems. • Administer the SB821 Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Program. • Monitor the Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach's (Ports) projects for impacts on Riverside County. Table 8 - Planning and Programming FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL $ 782,400 $ 100,700 16,900 2,199,800 1,032,700 $ 409,400 23,400 4,301,500 749,700 270,900 16,000 2,204,800 $ 3,099,800 $ 5,767,000 $ 3,241,400 Rail Maintenance and Operations $ 983,700 356,500 20,600 4,522,500 500,000 $ 6,381300 $ (49,000) (52,900) (2,800) 221,000 500,000 $ 616,300 • As a member of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), continue active participation in the governance and operations of the Metrolink commuter rail system. • Continue the planning and implementation of capital improvements at the commuter rail stations in Riverside County, including the Perris Valley Line, security and rehabilitation projects, and parking requirements. • Continue to support activities related to the Perris Valley Line project and evaluate its operational impact. • Establish best approach to build, maintain, and operate cost effective and environmentally sustainable facilities that meet the public's transportation needs. • Lead the service development process and actively coordinate with all stakeholders along the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor for intercity passenger rail service. Table 9 - Rail Maintenance and Operations FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL $ 451,900 $ 233,500 1,202,800 9,334,700 42,900 12,800 $ 11,278,600 $ 636,500 $ 681,500 $ 662,500 $ 26,000 4% 588,000 351,200 1,230,400 642,400 109% 1,723,700 1,684,700 1,851,000 127,300 7% 12,804,100 12,280,100 14,175,700 1,371,600 11% 48,200 45,000 135,000 86,800 180% N/A 15,800,500 $ 15,042,500 $ 18,054,600 $ 2,254,100 14% Public and Specialized Transit • Support innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs and monitor funding of these programs. • Complete the first year of specialized transit funding allocations related to the 2013 universal call for projects and continue to monitor performance. • Continue long-range planning activities to ensure that anticipated revenues are in line with projected levels of service by transit operators. • Continue public transit operator oversight and fiduciary responsibilities to ensure that annual fiscal audits and a state triennial performance audits are conducted in accordance with TDA regulations. • Provide availability for local matching funds to Western County applicants seeking Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5310 federal capital grants. • Coordinate with operators on major capital purchases and investments into new rolling stock and other system improvements in order to maintain a viable on -hand reserve. Table 10 - Public and Specialized Transit FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Projected Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL $ 318,600 $ 167,300 10,500 56,750,100 14,097,600 $ 71,344,100 $ 380,100 266,500 24,500 106,323,000 14,415,000 121,409,100 $ 283,600 216,100 13,500 78,998,100 18,891,300 $ 98,402,600 Commuter Assistance $ 381,400 192,000 22,500 113,218,100 16,446,600 $ 130,260,600 $ 1,300 0% (74,500) -28% (2,000) -8% 6,895,100 6% 2,031,600 14% $ 8,851,500 7% • Improve the suite of services and outreach to rideshare participants and employer partners, including personalized information and electronic access and distribution. • Maintain and grow employer partnerships through value-added services and tools for ridesharing programs. • Continue to provide leadership to the ongoing operation, maintenance, and enhancement of the bi-county ridematching system with regional reach. • Maintain long-term partnership with San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) to manage and implement a "sister" Commuter Assistance program for residents and employers in San Bernardino County. • Optimize park and ride facilities to support car/vanpool/buspool arrangements and facilitate transit connections. Table 11- Commuter Assistance FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL $ 263,600 $ 300,800 $ 300,400 815,800 372,400 485,300 1,932,000 2,802,800 7,000 151,300 112,200 $ 3,019,700 $ 4,523,900 $ 394,100 $ 804,500 484,500 2,765,500 7,000 112,200 4,567,800 $ 270,900 $ 313,000 391,000 2,321,000 5,000 159,500 3,460,400 $ (29,900) (502,800) (94,300) (481,800) (2,000) 47,300 (1,063,500) -10% -62% -19% -17% -29% 42% -24% Motorist Assistance • Assess opportunities for efficiency related to the call box program operations. • Maintain a high benefit -to -cost ratio related to the performance of the FSP program. • Operate and maintain the 1E511 system in accordance with national 511 implementation standards in partnership with SANBAG. • Enhance the 1E511 with more personalized traffic information services. • Utilize the opportunity to enhance coordination between California Highway Patrol (CHP) and Caltrans on traveler information. Table 12 - Motorist Assistance FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL $ 104,600 $ 515,700 514,900 2,428,300 1,325,800 $ 4,889,300 $ 187,200 $ 766,500 877,600 3,633,300 1,290,900 6,755,500 $ 162,400 $ 771,000 826,800 3,045,000 890,000 5,695,200 $ 201,200 $ 716,400 630,900 3,128,600 901,700 5,578,800 $ 14,000 (50,100) (246,700) (504,700) (389,200) (1,176,700) 7% -7% -28% -14% -30% -17% Capital Project Development and Delivery • Continue project development, right of way, and construction activities on remaining 1989 Measure A projects including SR-74 curve widening, SR-91 high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange, and 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors. • Continue project activities on the 1-215 bi-county highway and Perris Valley Line rail projects, which were included in both the 1989 Measure A and 2009 Measure A programs. • Continue project work on the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan projects, including the 91/71 connectors; the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects; SR-60 truck climbing lane; SR-79 realignment; and Mid County Parkway. • Provide Western County Measure A regional arterial TUMF funding and support to local jurisdictions for regional arterial project engineering, right of way acquisition, and construction. • Provide 2009 Measure A funding to the incorporated cities, CVAG and the County for local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction. • Provide funding and support of 2009 Measure A highway and regional arterial projects. • Develop strategies to implement alternative financing structures including public toll roads. • Maintain a right of way acquisition and management program in support of capital projects. • Manage right of way acquisition in the most cost effective manner and within project schedules, while adhering to federal and state regulations. • Maintain and manage the access, use, safety, and security of Commission -owned properties including commuter rail stations, properties in acquisition process, and income -generating properties. Table 13 — Capital Project Development and Delivery FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Personnel Professional Support Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL $ 2,669,100 $ 3,339,800 $ 7,257,900 10,507,300 277,700 879,300 187,031,900 745,669,200 145,300 340,000 22,204,100 136, 660,400 112,477,800 616,192,500 $ 332,063,800 $ 1,513,588,500 $ 3,914,500 7,984,300 215,200 472,549,000 13,800 118,979,200 460,408,200 1,064,064,200 Fund Balances $ 3,602,300 8,493,100 852,400 796,760,100 3,150,000 54,696,200 502,979,200 $ 1,370,533,300 $ 262,500 (2,014,200) (26,900) 51,090,900 2,810,000 (81,964,200) (113,213,300) $ (143,055,200) 8% -19% -3% 7% 826% -60% -18% -9% The total fund balance as of June 30, 2014 is projected at $986,842,300. The Commission's budgeted activities for FY 2014/15 are expected to result in a $376,007,600 decrease of total fund balance at June 30, 2015 to $610,834,700. The primary cause of the decrease is related to the project activities in FY 2014/15 related to the SR- 91 corridor improvement project and the Perris Valley Line project. Table 14 presents the components of fund balance by governmental fund type and program at June 30, 2015. Table 14 — Projected Fund Balances by Governmental Fund Type and Program at June 30, 2015 Riverside County Transportation Commission 5610,834,700 General Fund $5,692,200 Management Services Planning and Programming Rail Maintenance and Operations Budget Summary Special Revenue Funds $381,841,200 $3,676,400 Measure A Western County: 1,470,000 Bond Financing $8,196,800 545,800 Commuter Assistance 14,584,800 Economic Development 5,370,800 Highways 30,406,500 Local Streets and Roads 1,000 New Corridors 69,401,200 Public and Specialized Transit 7,871,200 Rail 43,063,100 Regional Arterials 16,326,900 Measure A Coachella Valley: Highways and Regional Arterial 8,396,200 Local Streets and Roads 1,700 Specialized Transit 1,438,000 Measure A Palo Verde Valley Local Streets and Roads 600 Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass 2,816,900 Motorist Assistance 6,346,400 State Transit Assistance 38,684,300 Local Transportation Fund 102,784,200 TUMF: CETAP 17,067,600 Regional Arterials 9,083,000 Capital Projects Funds $103,433,700 Highways $ 103,433,700 Debt Service Fund $119,867,600 The overall budget for FY 2014/15 is presented in Table 15 by summarized line items, Table 16 by operating and capital classifications, and Table 17 by governmental fund type. Highway, rail, and regional arterial program expenditures by project are summarized in Table 18. Table 15 — Budget Comparative by Summarized Line Item FY 2013-2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Debt Proceeds TIFIA Loan Proceeds Bond Premium Bond Discount Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance $ 149,428,100 72,828,800 14,170,200 14,230,000 22,875,500 1,711,900 12,421,100 1,540,600 1,769,900 $ 157,000,000 76,500,000 13,298,000 94,389,000 137,891,200 2,364,000 7,823,400 1,090,400 4,026,500 $ 157,000,000 76,500,000 13,298,000 50,267,900 94,640,500 3,048,800 7,530,100 639,100 5,292,000 290,976,100 494,382,500 6,342,400 12,100,400 3,798,300 7,949,400 17,911,700 5,577,700 408,216,400 7,948,000 14,701,900 4,706,200 15,898,700 15,097,700 15,736,200 37,534,200 26,232,500 44,974,600 66,582,000 246,200 44,594,900 8,678,500 23,489,400 20,111,400 22,026,000 238,479,800 217,750,000 179,087,800 122,723,000 1,019,000 46,865,900 27,471,000 19,408,100 14,699,200 11,069,200 113,036,900 165,800,000 103,123,400 91,592,900 239,000 46,911,900 25,370,000 259,676,800 875,533,900 6,824,700 15,404,700 86,100,000 41,075,800 7,051,300 571,842,500 67,100,000 44,828,300 7,050,900 22,229,400 134,227,100 220,500 786,200 118,979,200 133,300 304,367,800 1,041,986,000 718,311,100 (13,391,700) (547,603,500) 133,065,300 (133,065,300) 60,000,000 637,010,600 (637,010,600) 632,158,000 110,000,000 68,616,000 (2,433,300) (310,094,700) 485,301,700 (485,301,700) 638,854,600 38,328,800 (2,433,300) 60,000,000 808,340,700 674,750,100 46,608,300 260,737,200 364,655,400 575,578,600 622,186,900 622,186,900 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 622,186,900 $ 882,924,100 $ 986,842,300 $ 167,000,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 83,351,400 92,503,000 6,211,000 8,154,600 575,000 2,450,900 454,690,600 8,280,300 16,146,100 5,299,600 21,445,700 21,204,600 17,849,000 240,344,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 134,720,600 1,070,000 49,882,000 30,400,000 934,126,000 7,400,000 47,296,200 54,696,200 3,750,000 1,022,298,200 (567,607,600) 526,034,700 (526,034,700) 191,600,000 191,600,000 (376,007,600) 986,842,300 $ 610,834,700 10,000,000 5,000,000 (353,300) (11,037,600) -12% (45,388,200) -33% 3,847,000 163% 331,200 4% (515,400) -47% (1,575,600) -39% 6% 7% -3% (39,691,900) -8% 330,900 4% (1,765,600) -10% (278,100) -5% (2,043,700) -9% 1,093,200 (4,177,000) 1,865,100 37,053,500 4,763,600 11,997,600 51,000 3,016,100 2,929,000 58,592,100 7% (78,700,000) -91% 6,220,400 15% (7,051,300) -100% (79,530,900) -59% 2,963,800 377% (19,687,800) -2% (20,004,100) 4% (110,975,900) -17% 110,975,900 -17% (632,158,000) -100% 81,600,000 74% (68,616,000) -100% 2,433,300 -100% (616,740,700) -76% (636,744,800) -244% 364,655,400 59% $ (272,089,400) -31% Table 16 — Operating and Capital Budget FY 2014/15 FY 14/15 Operating Budget FY 14/15 Capital Budget FY 14/15 TOTAL Budget Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way and Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments TOTAL Debt Service Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out TIFIA Loan Proceeds Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance $ 15,605,000 $ 151,395,000 81,500,000 - 12,944,700 - 396,900 82,954,500 4,859,000 87,644,000 3,185,500 3,025,500 - 8,154,600 575,000 449,500 2,001,400 118,940,600 4,678,000 5,003,000 4,429,500 335,750,000 3,602,300 11,143,100 870,100 9,432,500 7,235,300 210,000 1,900,000 127,220,600 800,000 12,013,200 13,969,300 17,639,000 238,444,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 7,500,000 270,000 49,882,000 30,400,000 137,365,900 796,760,100 7,400,000 47,296,200 600,000 54,696,200 3,150,000 152,076,400 870,221,800 (33,135,800) (534,471,800) 18,487,700 (18,055,500) 507,547,000 (507,979,200) 191,600,000 432,200 191,167,800 (32,703,600) (343,304,000) 212,921,600 773,920,700 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 180,218,000 $ 430,616,700 $ 167,000,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 83,351,400 92,503,000 6,211,000 8,154,600 575,000 2,450,900 454,690,600 8,280,300 16,146,100 5,299,600 21,445,700 21,204,600 17,849,000 240,344,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 134,720,600 1,070,000 49,882,000 30,400,000 934,126,000 7,400,000 47,296,200 54,696,200 3,750,000 1,022,298,200 (567,607,600) 526,034,700 (526,034,700) 191,600,000 191,600,000 (376,007,600) 986,842,300 $ 610,834,700 Table 17 — Budget by Governmental Fund Type FY 2014/15 General Fund Special Revenue Capital Projects Debt Service FY 14/15 TOTAL Budget Revenues Measure A Sales Tax $ 2,900,000 $ 164,100,000 $ $ LTF Sales Tax 81,500,000 STA Sales Tax 12,944,700 Federal Reimbursements 20,000 80,564,400 2,767,000 State Reimbursements 834,000 91,669,000 Local Reimbursements 1,378,500 4,832,500 TUMF Revenue - 8,154,600 Other Revenue 575,000 Investment Income 14,300 952,200 592,100 892,300 TOTAL Revenues 5,146,800 445,292,400 592,100 3,659,300 Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits 4,056,100 4,224,200 Professional and Support Professional Services 3,251,200 12,894,900 Support Costs 3,390,200 1,909,400 TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 6,641,400 14,804,300 Projects and Operations Program Operations - General 1,775,700 19,428,900 Engineering 10,000 17,839,000 Construction 1,250,000 239,094,900 Design Build 254,803,500 Right of Way/Land 183,851,400 Operating and Capital Disbursements 14,002,500 120,718,100 Special Studies 800,000 270,000 Local Streets and Roads 49,882,000 Regional Arterials 30,400,000 TOTAL Projects and Operations 17,838,200 916,287,800 Debt Service Principal Payments 7,400,000 Interest Payments 47,296,200 TOTAL Debt Service 54,696,200 Capital Outlay 595,000 3,155,000 TOTAL Expenditures 29,130,700 938,471,300 54,696,200 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures (23,983,900) (493,178,900) 592,100 (51,036,900) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 17,823,000 441,558,000 40,000,000 26,653,700 Transfers Out (547,700) (107,587,000) (417,900,000) TIFIA Loan Proceeds 191,600,000 Net Financing Sources (Uses) 17,275,300 333,971,000 (186,300,000) 26,653,700 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) (6,708,600) (159,207,900) (185,707,900) (24,383,200) Beginning Fund Balance 12,400,800 541,049,100 289,141,600 144,250,800 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 5,692,200 $ 381,841,200 $ 103,433,700 $ 119,867,600 S 167,000,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 83,351,400 92,503,000 6,211,000 8,154,600 575,000 2,450,900 454,690,600 8,280,300 16,146,100 5,299,600 21,445,700 21,204,600 17,849,000 240,344,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 134,720,600 1,070,000 49,882,000 30,400,000 934,126,000 7,400,000 47,296,200 54,696,200 3,750,000 1,022,298,200 (567,607,600) 526,034,700 (526,034,700) 191,600,000 191,600,000 (376,007,600) 986,842,300 $ 610,834,700 Table 18 — Highway, Regional Arterial, and Rail Programs FY 2014/15 Description Projects and operations Bechtel program management SCRRA program management Other TOTAL PROJECTS -GENERAL Highway engineering 91/71 interchange improvement project 1-15 corridor improvements 1-215 bi-county HOV interim project Mid County Parkway SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY ENGINEERING Regional arterial engineering Various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects, including SR-79 realignment Rail engineering La Sierra Station improvements Perris Valley Line and other rail projects Other- Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor General SUBTOTAL RAIL ENGINEERING TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL ENGINEERING Highway construction 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors 74/215interchange 1-215 corridor improvements/Scott Road to Nuevo Road I-215/Blaine Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard widening I-15/Los Alamos Road bridge replacement SR-74 curve widening SR-91 corridor improvements SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange Riverside quiet zones General (details presented in Section 6.3 Planning and Programming) SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION Regional arterial construction Various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects, including SR-79 widening/Thompson to Domenigoni Various Western County Measure A regional arterial projects SUBTOTAL REGIONAL ARTERIAL CONSTRUCTION Rail construction Riverside station pedestrian improvements CCTV operations center La Sierra station improvements Perris Valley Line and other rail projects North Main Corona station parking structure Perris Multimodal Facility Other- Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor SUBTOTAL RAIL CONSTRUCTION TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL CONSTRUCTION Highway design build SR-91 corridor improvements TOTAL HIGHWAY DESIGN BUILD Highway right of way and land 74/215interchange 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors 1-215 corridor improvements/Scott Road to Nuevo Road Mid County Parkway SR-74 curve widening 1-15 corridor improvements SR-74/1-15 to 7th Street 91/71 interchange improvement project SR-91 corridor improvements SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange Western County Multi -species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) General SUBTOTAL HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND Regional arterial right of way and land Various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects, including SR-79 realignment Rail right of way and land Perris Valley Line and other rail projects General SUBTOTAL RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL RIGHT OF WAY AND LAND GRAND TOTAL HIGHWAY, REGIONAL ARTERIAL, AND RAIL PROGRAMS $ 9,088,900 2,050,000 2,830,400 $ 13,969,300 $ 1,350,000 4,000,000 60,000 8,000,000 17,000 13,427,000 4,132,000 50,000 30,000 200,000 10,000 290,000 $ 17,849,000 $ 980,000 255,000 40,925,000 50,000 1,800,600 2,626,000 14,100,000 75,000 5,700,000 1,250,000 67,761,600 28,761,000 17,984,000 46,745,000 1,152,000 1,150,000 1,050,000 121,795,300 20,000 21,000 650,000 125,838,300 $ 240,344,900 $ 254,803,500 $ 254,803,500 $ 10,000 5,000 725,000 4,450,000 330,000 50,000 225,000 4,190,000 143,692,000 9,035,000 3,000,000 45,000 165,757,000 3,939,400 14,055,000 100,000 14,155,000 $ 183,851,400 $ 710,818,100 Gann Appropriations Limit In November 1979, the voters of the State approved Proposition 4, commonly known as the Gann Initiative. The Proposition created Article XIIIB of the State Constitution, placing limits on the amount of revenue that can be spent by public agencies from the "proceeds of taxes." In 1980, the State Legislature added Section 7910 to the Government Code, providing that the governing body of each local jurisdiction must establish, by resolution, an appropriations limit for the following year. The appropriations limit for any fiscal year is equal to the previous year's limit adjusted for population changes and changes in the California per capita income. The Commission is subject to the requirements of Article XIIIB. Gann appropriations limits are calculated for and applied to the Commission. In accordance with the requirements of Article XIIIB implementing legislation, the Board approved Resolution No. 14-020 on June 11, 2014, establishing appropriations limits for the Commission at $373,714,246. The FY 2014/15 budget appropriated $244,639,100 in taxes for the Commission, falling well within the limits set by the Gann Initiative. Based on historic trends and future projections, it appears the Commission's use of the proceeds of taxes, as defined by Article XIIIB, will continue to fall below the appropriations limit. The calculation for the FY 2014/15 appropriations limit is as follows: 2013-2014 Appropriations Limit $ 370,426,988 2014-2015 adjustment: Change in California per capita personal income Change in Population, Riverside County Per Capital Cost of Living converted to a ratio: -0.23 + 100 100 Population converted to a ratio: 1.12 + 100 100 -0.23% 1.12% 0.9977 1.0112 Calculation of factor for FY 2014-2015: 0.9977 x 1.0112 = 1.00887424 $370,426,988 x 1.00887424 = $373,714,246 2014-2015 Appropriations Limit $ 373,714,246 Source: California per capita income — California Department of Finance Population, Riverside County — California Department of Finance Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 1 GUIDING POLICIES Commission Policy Goals and Objectives In addition to financial and administration policies, the Commission has seven long-term policy goals: promote mobility, mitigate and address the impact of goods movement, encourage economic development, ensure improved system efficiencies, foster environmental stewardship, support transportation choices through intermodalism and accessibility, and prioritize public and agency communications. For each of these policy goals, the objectives and initiatives that were considered in the framework of the work plan for the FY 2014/15 budget are identified below. While Riverside County shows signs of economic recovery, the Commission remains cautious about revenue availability. The need for better transportation remains a top public priority, and the Commission is poised to address this challenge via the seven policy goals. In moving forward with an aggressive program of projects and services, the Commission may face fluctuating Measure A, TUMF, and TDA revenues and uncertainty regarding the availability of federal and state transportation revenues. Due to the long-term nature of many of the Commission's programs, many of the policy goals' objectives and initiatives are ongoing from year to year. Promote Mobility The Commission, in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies, will strive to create a transportation system that promotes efficient mobility both within the County and region. • Continue to aggressively pursue completion of the environmental, design, and construction processes on key components of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan, which includes the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects and the SR-60 truck climbing lane project. • Enhance corridor mobility and traveler choice by: o Continuing property acquisition and construction on the SR-91 corridor improvement project through Corona, which includes the extension of tolled express lanes (91 Express Lanes) into Riverside County; and o Continuing to develop a tolled express lane system on 1-15 between SR-60 and Cajalco Road. • Provide leadership in the planning and development of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service. • Work closely with partners in the Coachella Valley, including CVAG and SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) to ensure the implementation of Measure A funding priorities. • Complete projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A ordinance and determine use(s) for any unexpended revenues. • Continue the preliminary engineering and environmental clearance for the Mid County Parkway and SR- 79 realignment projects. • Continue to work with state and federal agencies to fund and construct projects programmed in the STIP, Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP), Proposition 18 bond programs, Active Transportation Program, and Measure A program as well as other high priority regional projects. • Maximize obtaining all available transportation funds and strategically program funds to meet funding deadlines and to prevent the lapse and loss of funds. • Leverage the effective application and use of Measure A Western County regional arterial and other state and federal funds to deliver eligible regional arterial projects. • Work closely with local jurisdictions to administer the TUMF Regional Arterial Program and facilitate the delivery of eligible arterial improvements in Western County. • Actively participate in the SR-91 Advisory Committee to facilitate near and long-term improvements to SR-91, enhance intercounty public transit options, and foster mobility improvements between the two counties. • Advocate streamlining efforts at the state and federal levels that will reduce costs, time, and delays currently associated with project delivery including, but not limited to, timely project reviews and approvals. • Continue active engagement in state and federal efforts to streamline and reform CEQA and NEPA to improve the ability to deliver critical projects that enhance mobility within the County and the region. • Continue to coordinate and provide public access to commuter information via the 1E511 system and focus commuter assistance and 1E511 outreach efforts under one brand. • Continue cooperation with the FTA regarding the Small Starts process to support the continuation of construction and initiation of the Perris Valley Line commuter rail service in 2015. • Continue to work with the public transit operators to control costs and increase system efficiencies in order to accommodate and adjust to fluctuating revenues from local, state and federal sources. • Continue to develop transit service to further promote seamless intracity, intercity and regional transit connectivity for County residents. • Commence consideration of future rail expansion opportunities including the potential for extension of the Perris Valley Line to the Hemet/San Jacinto and Temecula areas. Mitigate and Address the Impact of Goods Movement The Commission will work with federal, state, and local governments to facilitate the movement of goods and services to, within, and through the County, recognizing the vital role goods movement mobility plays in the economic health of the County, the State, and the nation. • Seek funding and local agency concurrence to implement the Commission's approved, high -priority railroad grade separation list to mitigate the impact of increased goods movement demands on the transportation system. • Encourage Congress to create a federal freight trust fund, or similar program with a dedicated and firewalled revenue structure, in order to treat the nation's multimodal national goods movement network as a system rather than individual projects. • Remain committed to a regional approach regarding goods movement issues in order to maximize funding from state and federal sources to goods movement needs in Southern California. • Continue working with the Ports and regional transportation commissions to develop a funding mechanism for needed projects and mitigation on a regional basis. • Provide input to the National Freight Advisory Committee regarding the establishment of a national freight network and California State Freight Advisory Committee regarding regional freight priorities. Encourage Economic Development Transportation decisions will consider the economic benefits derived from any improvement, and, where feasible and practical, will pursue transportation alternatives that enhance or complement economic development. • Commit to seek opportunities related to transportation projects that will create jobs and improve the economic base in the County. • Support local agencies in the design and construction of interchanges that are in proximity to regional economic centers and developments. • Support local projects, consistent with countywide transportation goals and Commission commitments, which enhance business development, local employment, and area tourism. Ensure Improved System Efficiencies The Commission will select projects and allocate funds in a manner that will improve safety and reduce congested traffic corridors. • Advocate the development and use of advanced technologies for transportation applications that are affordable and practical. • In partnership with SANBAG, implement enhancements to the 1E511 mobile application for improved deployment of real-time traffic information, real-time bus and rail transit trip planning information, and rideshare information available to commuters for the purpose of trip planning and reducing congestion. • Assure the effectiveness of transit planning through coordination with the County's eight transit operators, Citizens' Advisory Committee, and annual SRTP process with a goal toward promoting program productivity, efficiency, and effectiveness. • Provide innovative commuter rideshare programs to reduce single occupant vehicle trips and coordinate with other regional rideshare service providers to address intercounty commute trips. • Work with local jurisdictions, Caltrans, and the CHP to continue efficient delivery of a comprehensive motorist aid system which includes an 1E511 traveler information service, a call box program, and a FSP program, including temporary services in freeway construction zones. • Leverage resources to incorporate park and ride facilities and additional connecting bus service at Metrolink stations that may have available capacity. • Continue working with Caltrans to monitor traffic conditions for the purpose of focusing transportation funds on congested corridors and system deficiencies. • Work with Caltrans and regional agencies in developing resources for preservation and maintenance of the highways and regional arterials. • Support the implementation of active transportation facilities that support transportation alternatives. Foster Environmental Stewardship The Commission will achieve its mobility goals while promoting environmental stewardship and protecting the area's natural resources and quality of life. • Continue working with the Western Riverside County Regional Conservation Authority (RCA), Caltrans, and state/federal resource agencies to implement the MSHCP. • Work with the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), sub -regional agencies, and local jurisdictions to implement the current RTP and sustainable communities' strategy that meets regional air quality goals, conformity guidelines, and SB375 green house reduction targets for the SCAG region. • Support a variety of outreach channels and educational programs that promote the benefits of ridesharing, public and specialized transit, rail, and availability of commuter resources for the purposes of reducing vehicle trips, vehicle miles traveled, and emissions. • Facilitate private/public use of clean fuels technology. • Continue to develop sustainable and green commuter rail stations and provide upgrades and rehabilitation projects to reduce the environmental impact of the existing stations. Support Transportation Choices through Intermodalism and Accessibility County residents will be served, where economically feasible, through the development of transportation alternatives and travel options that consider the needs of a wide range of citizens. • Work with transit providers and local social service agencies to provide specialized transit service to meet a broad spectrum of socio-economic transit needs of seniors, veterans, persons with disabilities, and low income residents. • Leverage commuter and motorist assistance outreach channels in order to increase the awareness and use of alternative commuting modes. • Implement the Commission's commuter rail SRTPs and SCRRA's plan for Metrolink commuter rail services. • Continue to pursue the goals and objectives as outlined in the Coordinated Public Transit -Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan) for Riverside County related to a unified, comprehensive but flexible strategy for transportation service delivery to address transportation gaps and/or barriers focusing on unmet transportation needs of elderly individuals, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited income. • Enhance security, surveillance, and emergency response capabilities of County transit facilities and roadway infrastructure through proactive planning, interagency coordination, and investment. Prioritize Public and Agency Communications The Commission will provide timely, informative, and accurate reporting to encourage informed public and agency participation in the Commission's decision -making processes. • Promote a close working relationship with news and civic entities to increase interest and understanding of transportation and related issues. • Enhance the provision of public information through various forms of communication (e.g., website, annual report, monthly newsletter, television, Speakers Bureau, print media, radio, etc.). • Maintain an ongoing effort of informing Riverside County's Congressional and State Legislative delegations regarding transportation issues. • Develop an effective long-range legislative strategy regarding state and federal funding and policy. • Protect and enhance flexibility in the Commission's use of state and federal transportation revenue in addressing regional priorities and needs. • Explore local options for sustainable funding in addressing long-term transportation and quality -of -life needs for Riverside County. • Seek legislative flexibility for innovation in financing, construction, and maintenance of regional transportation projects. • Pursue policy objectives contained in the Commission's comprehensive adopted legislative platforms. • Maintain ongoing efforts to educate commuters, businesses, and the public regarding the Commission's toll planning efforts and specific project development efforts underway. • Keep the public informed about construction -related impacts from projects. Financial and Administration Policies Financial Planning Policies • Administrative costs, including salaries and benefits, shall be funded by allocations from Measure A, LTF, FSP, SAFE, and TUMF funds. • The Commission shall budget no more than one percent (1%) of Measure A sales tax revenues for administrative salaries and benefits. • Administrative program delivery costs will be budgeted at whatever is reasonable and necessary, but not to exceed four percent (4%) of Measure A sales tax revenues (inclusive of the one -percent salary limitation). The Commission shall budget 100% of the annual required contribution related to the postretirement health care benefits. • The Commission shall utilize unexpended 1989 Measure A funds only for projects and programs included in the 1989 Measure A. Sales tax revenues from the 2009 Measure A shall be expended only for projects and programs included in the 2009 Measure A. • Amounts will be budgeted by fiscal year for multi -year projects, based on best available estimates, with the understanding that, to the extent actuals vary from those estimates and the project is ongoing, adjustments will be made on a continual basis. • The fiscal capital budget should be consistent with the strategic plan and deviations appropriately noted, explained, and justified. • A balanced budget shall be adopted annually with operating and capital expenditures and other financing uses equal to or less than identified revenues and other financing sources as well as available fund balances. Revenue Policies • Sales tax revenue projections will be revised semi-annually to ensure use of current and relevant data. Staff may adjust annual amounts during the budget preparation process to reflect the most current economic trends. • A strategic application of local funding sources will be used to maximize federal and state funding of projects. • Fiduciary responsibility regarding Western County TUMF revenues shall be exercised, and revenues will be allocated pursuant to Commission direction and the approved 2009 Measure A. • Adopted toll revenue policies will establish congestion pricing in order to maximize throughput on toll facilities. Such pricing will be adjusted quarterly by pre -defined formulas. Debt Management Policies • Outstanding sales tax revenue bonds shall not exceed $975 million. • Toll revenue supported debt may be issued for specific highway projects and may comprise toll revenue bonds and federal loans. • The Commission will maintain 2.0x debt ratio coverage on all senior sales tax revenue debt and 1.3x debt ratio coverage on all toll revenue debt. • Debt issuance will be for major capital projects including engineering, right of way, and construction. Operating requirements, if any, must be paid from current ongoing revenues and may not be financed except for initial toll operations. • Costs of issuance, including the standard underwriter's discount, will not exceed two percent (2%). • The Commission may enter into interest rate swaps to better manage assets and liabilities and take advantage of market conditions to lower overall costs and reduce interest rate risk. • While it is the intent of the Commission to establish a cash debt reserve for long term bond issuance, as necessary, surety bonds can be obtained when beneficial to the Commission. • All sales tax revenue debt must mature prior to the termination of 2009 Measure A on June 30, 2039. • All toll revenue supported debt must mature prior to the expiration of toll facility agreements. Expenditure Accountability Policies • Established priorities for planning and programming of capital projects will be reviewed annually with the Commission. • Actual expenditures will be compared to the budget on at least a quarterly basis, and significant deviations will be appropriately noted, explained, and justified. • Operations and maintenance agreements for toll operations will be implemented, and related costs will be compared to toll financing assumptions. Reserve Policies • The Commission will maintain program reserves in accordance with Measure A and TDA policies and guidelines. • The Commission will establish and maintain a transit operator's reserve of ten percent (10%) for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley. Additionally, a ten percent (10%) reserve will be established and maintained for each of the Western County transit operators (public bus and commuter rail). • The Commission will establish and maintain reserves for toll operations, capital improvements, and debt service in accordance with toll supported debt agreements. Cash Management and Investment Policies • Where possible, the Commission will encourage receipt of funds by wire transfer to its accounts. • Balances in the bank operating account will be maintained at the amount necessary to meet monthly expenditures. • Construction and operating funds will be invested per the Commission's established investment policy emphasizing in order of priority: 1) safety, 2) liquidity, and 3) yield. • Cash disbursements to local jurisdictions and vendors/consultants will be completed in an expeditious and timely manner. Procurement Policies • The Commission will conduct enhanced outreach to businesses and contractors located in Riverside County regarding opportunities to provide the Commission with competitive and qualified goods and/or services. • The Commission will continuously evaluate its procurement program and policies to ensure competitive, transparent, objective, and fair selection processes. • The Commission will continue to expand and improve vendor access to contracting opportunities. Auditing, Accounting, and Financial Reporting Policies • The Commission will maintain its ERP system in order to integrate project and toll operations accounting needs and improve accounting efficiency. • The Commission will issue a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR); separate financial reports for the LTF, STA, Proposition 1B Rehabilitation and Security Project Accounts, and toll operations upon commencement of such operations; and State Controller's Transportation Planning Agency Financial Transactions Report as well as Government Compensation in California Report. • An audit is to be conducted annually on the Commission's accounting books and records. As long as the Commission has outstanding bonds and federal loans, an independent accounting firm must conduct the audit. • The Commission is responsible for ensuring that audits of Measure A and TDA funding recipients are completed and reviewed for compliance and other matters in a timely manner. Human Resources Management Policies • While accommodating the assumption of toll operation responsibilities, Commission staffing levels will be consistent with the intent of its enabling legislation, which envisioned a small, but effective staff. • Contract staff and consultants will be used to augment staff efforts as much as necessary to support programs or workloads, which do not appear to be of a permanent nature. Information Technology Management Policy • Significant effort will be made to maintain efficient and cost-effective technology infrastructure by continuously upgrading network equipment and software to ensure quality performance, productivity, and connectivity among staff, other agencies, toll operator, and the public. Network security will continue to be a top priority to maintain the integrity of the Commission's network and information. Linking Commission Policy Goals and Departmental Goals and Objectives The following matrix (Table 19) illustrates the linkage of the Commission's overall policy goals described in this section to the individual departmental goals and objectives included in Section 6. Table 19 — Relationship Between Commission and Departmental Goals Department Goods System Environmental Economic Intermodalism & Financial & Mobility Movement Efficiencies Stewardship Development Accessibility Communications Administration Management Services Executive Management X X X X X X Administration X X Legislative Affairs & Communications X X X X X Finance X Regional Programs Planning and Programming X X X X X X X X Rail Maintenance and Operations X X X X Public and Specialized Transit X X X X X Commuter Assistance X X X X X X Motorist Assistance X X X X X Capital Project Development & Delivery X X X X X X Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 2 BUDGET PROCESS SUMMARY Budget Process Summary The budget is the primary performance tool used to measure and control accountability of public agencies for taxpayer dollars. The budget communicates to all stakeholders (i.e., elected officials, regional agencies, and citizens) how the investment they made will be put to use by providing detailed information on the specifics of resource allocation and expenditures. Progress is monitored on a monthly basis, and revisions and updates are made as deemed necessary to reflect changing dynamics and accommodate unplanned requests. This results in a budget document that is useful and meaningful as a benchmark against which to evaluate government accomplishments and/or challenges and to assess compliance with fiscal accountability. Unlike many governments that provide direct services to the general public, the Commission has the overall responsibility of managing transportation planning and funding for Riverside County. As a result its budget, in terms of dollars, is comprised primarily of capital -related programs and projects; the operating component of the budget is related to multimodal programs (commuter and motorist assistance services, rail operations, and transit planning). Management services, which consist of executive management, administration, legislative affairs and communications, and finance, provide support to both capital and operating programs and projects. Chart 7 depicts the organization of the Commission's oversight and management functions. The budget process consists of six primary tasks conducted in phases throughout the fiscal year. Chart 6 illustrates the budget process for the development of the FY 2014/15 budget and monitoring of the FY 2013/14 budget. A summary of each task is described below. Chart 6— Budget Process ID Task Name Duration 2013 2014 J A SIOINDJ F M AMJ 1 Short Term Strategic Direction Phase 140 days y 2 Resource Identification and Allocation Phase 200 days y 3 Needs Assessment Phase 120 days 4 Development and Review Phase 150 days y 5 Adoption and Implementation Phase 60 days y _ 6 Budget Roles and Responsibilities 365 days y limminimmin Short -Term Strategic Direction Phase The first phase of the budget process is to determine the direction of the Commission in the short-term and to integrate this with the Commission's long-term goals and objectives, including the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan as discussed in Section 6.3. Annually a workshop is held for the Board to evaluate and determine where the Commission plans to be and what it desires to accomplish over the next five to ten years. Annual reviews allow for timely responsiveness to any significant political, legislative, or economic developments that may occur locally, statewide, or nationally. Staff then adjusts its course based on the long-term strategic direction of the policy makers. Staff convenes in early January to both assess actual results, compared to the current year budget, and map changes in strategy for the ensuing fiscal year by reviewing and, if necessary, redefining departmental mission statements and setting goals. Those goals, upon review by the Board, become the Commission's short-term strategic direction. Chart 7 — Functional Organization Chart FY 2014/15 Board of Commissioners Policy Committees •WRC Programs & Projects •ERC Programs & Projects •Budget & Implementation Advisory Committees •Technical Advisory •Citizens Advisory 1 Executive Committee Legal Counsel Executive Management Multimodal Programs • • Commuter Assistance Call Box Program Freeway Service Patrol Rail Operations Transit Planning Administration Clerk of the Board & Board Relations Office & Records Management Claims Administration Human Resources Legislative Affairs & Communications Legislative Advocacy & Analysis Public Information &I Communications Media Relations Goods Movement Capital Project Development & Delivery k Highway & Rail Capital Programs Iil ew Corridors r Property Management State Transportation Improvement Program Regional Transportation Plan Congestion Management TUMF Program Finance Financial Management Budget Development Contract Management & Procurement Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Insurance Administration Resource Identification and Allocation Phase Simultaneous with the short-term strategic direction phase, staff focuses on what funding sources are available and what monies are estimated as carryover from the current year. Additionally, the Commission's fund balances, that are the excess of fund assets over fund liabilities, are analyzed for available appropriation in the following fiscal year. In actuality, resource identification occurs throughout the year, but it is finalized in the upcoming fiscal year budget. Amounts to be borrowed are determined as parts of the long-term strategic planning process, but such amounts are adjusted in the annual budget to reflect more current information. Needs Assessment Phase Staff and consultants evaluate what projects and studies need to be accomplished. Project priority and sequencing set in the long-term strategic plan are the top candidates for budget submission. However, priorities may have changed due to economic necessities or political realities, resulting in projects being rescheduled by acceleration or postponement. New projects may be added or existing priorities deleted based on Commission direction. Development and Review Phase Using all the data and information gathered from the previously mentioned stages, department managers submit their desired budgets to the Finance Department. The information, along with staff and overhead allocations, is compiled into a preliminary or draft budget. After review by the Executive Director and inclusion of the desired changes, the draft budget is presented to the Board for input. Adoption and Implementation Phase The proposed budget is submitted to the Commission at its May meeting. A hearing is scheduled to allow for public comment on the proposed budget. The Commission may choose, after public hearing, to adopt the budget or to request additional information and/or changes to the budget. The budget must be adopted no later than June 15 of each year. Upon adoption by the Commission, the budget is entered into the ERP system effective July 1 for the next fiscal year. Budget Roles and Responsibilities Involvement in the budget permeates all staffing levels, as presented in Chart 8, at the Commission from clerical support staff to policy makers. Each program manager develops a detailed line item budget that consists of the operating and/or capital components. Those budgets, by program, are submitted to the department director for review and concurrence. The department managers submit their budgets to the Chief Financial Officer by mid -March. The Finance Department compiles the department budgets. Both the capital and operating budgets are combined into the draft budget for the entire Commission. The Chief Financial Officer and Executive Director review the entire budget for overall consistency with both the short- and long-term strategic direction of the Commission, appropriateness of funding sources for the identified projects and programs, and reasonableness of the operating and capital budget expenditures. Expenditure activities of the funds are controlled at the budgetary unit, which is the financial responsibility level (General, Measure A, Motorist Assistance, LTF, STA, TUMF, Capital Projects, and Debt Service Funds) for each function (i.e., administration, programs, intergovernmental distributions, debt service, capital outlay, and other financing uses). These functions provide the legal level of budgetary control (i.e., the level at which expenditures cannot legally exceed the appropriated amount). Budget -to -actual reports are available to program managers and directors on a real-time basis through the ERP system for informational and management purposes, including identification and evaluation of any significant budget variations. During the fiscal year management has the discretion to transfer budgeted amounts within the financial responsibility unit according to function or may provide support for supplemental budget appropriations requests. Supplemental budget requests require the authorization of the Commission. The Commission may take action at any monthly meeting to amend the budget. In some years, the Finance Department may compile miscellaneous requests and submit a budget appropriations adjustment at mid -year to the Commission for approval. Those budget amendments approved by the Commission are incorporated into the budget, as they occur, and are reflected in the CAFR in the final budget amounts reported in the budgetary schedules. Chart 8 —Staff Organization Chart FY 2014/15 Legal Counsel Human Resources Administrator Office & Board Services Manager Senior Administrative Assistant Administrative Assistant (3) Senior Office Assistant Board of Commissioners Chief Financial Officer Procurement Manager LProcurement Analyst I Finance Manager/ Controller Accounting 7 Supervisor Accounting Technician (2) Accounting Assistant (2) 1 Goods Movement 7 Manager Government Relations Manager JCommunity Multimodal Services Director f Planning & Programming Director Rail Manager L Planning & Programming Manager Senior Staff Analyst Staff Analyst Transit Manager L Staff Analyst smmuter & Motorist Assistance Manager LStaff Analyst E Project Delivery Dir ctor Toll Program Director Capital Projects Toll Project Manager (2) Manager(5) Right of Way Manager r Senior Staff Analyst (2) Staff Analyst Facilities Administrator Riverside County Transportation Commission 1M11, SECTION 3 FUND BUDGETS Fund Budgets Budgetary Basis The Commission accounts for its budgeted governmental funds using the modified accrual basis of accounting and the current financial resources measurement focus. The basis of accounting is the same as the basis of budgeting. Revenues are recognized as soon as they are both measurable and available to meet current year obligations. Revenues are considered to be available when they are guaranteed as to receipt, based on expenditure of funds (i.e., government matching funds), or certain to be received within 180 days of the end of the fiscal year. Expenditures are generally recorded when a liability is incurred; however, debt service expenditures are recorded when the payment is due. Total sources and uses by governmental fund type for the FY 2014/15 budget are shown in Chart 9. Chart 9 — Total Sources and Uses by Governmental Fund Type FY 2014/15 p Total Sources 2% N Total Uses 4% +A Total Sources 20% +1 Total Uses 27% Fund Structure Total Sources 2% pl Total Uses 2% A General Fund ■ Special Revenue Funds fI Capital Projects Funds Pi Debt Service Fund III Total Sources 76% II Total Uses 67% There are 30 funds (Chart 10) that account for the Commission's budgeted resources and are categorized into four governmental fund types: General fund, special revenue funds, capital projects funds, and debt service funds. All of the Commission's funds are budgeted. There are three funds reported in the General fund and 22 in the special revenue funds. Three capital projects funds are used to account for capital project expenditures financed with short- or long-term debt proceeds. In addition, the Commission has two debt service funds to account for debt - related activity. Chart 10 — Budgeted Funds Structure FY 2014/15 General Fund Administration Rail Operations Planning and Programming Special Revenue Funds 1939 MeasureA Western County Rail Capital 2009 Measure Western County Highways Local Streets& Roads Public Transit Specialized Transit Bus Transit Rail Transit Commuter Assistance Hew Corridors Bond Financing Regional Arterials Economic Development Coachella Valley Highways & Regional Arterials Local Streets& Roads Specialized Transit Pala Verde Valley Loral Streets & Roads FSP SAFE Local Transportation Funds State Transit Assistance TUMF Coachella Valley Rail Capital Projects Funds Commercial Paper Sales Tax Bands Tall Revenue Bands Debt Service Funds Sales Tax Bands Tall Revenue Bonds General Fund Overview The General fund of the Commission is used to account for all activities not legally required or designated by Board action to be accounted for separately. For many public agencies, the General fund is the largest fund; however, it is less significant for the Commission. The Commission's largest revenue source is Measure A, a locally levied sales tax that legally must be accounted for separately in special revenue funds. In addition to Commission administration and general operations, other General fund activities include commuter rail maintenance and operations as well as planning and programming. The FY 2014/15 budget for the General fund is presented in Table 20, followed by a discussion of significant components of the budget. Table 20 - General Fund FY 2013 - 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Revenues Measure A Sales Tax $ 2,700,000 $ 2,800,000 $ 2,800,000 Federal Reimbursements 11,900 25,000 16,500 State Reimbursements 405,200 819,000 80,000 Local Reimbursements 198,800 - 104,600 Other Revenue 31,000 224,800 - Investment Income (6,500) 20,200 20,500 TOTAL Revenues 3,340,400 3,889,000 3,021,600 Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits 3,173,800 3,991,700 3,401,100 Professional and Support Professional Services 1,658,900 2,965,400 2,360,400 Support Costs 2,632,000 3,301,400 3,174,100 TOTAL Professional and Support Costs 4,290,900 6,266,800 5,534,500 Projects and Operations Program Operations - General 1,479,500 1,471,700 1,429,200 Engineering 38,700 25,000 25,000 Construction - 235,900 235,900 Operating and Capital Disbursements 9,831,900 14,400,000 12,594,800 Special Studies 184,400 623,000 200,000 TOTAL Projects and Operations 11,534,500 16,755,600 14,484,900 Debt Service Principal Payments 24,700 Interest Payments 600 TOTAL Debt Service 25,300 Capital Outlay 75,200 439,200 112,500 TOTAL Expenditures 19,099,700 27,453,300 23,533,000 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures (15,759,300) (23,564,300) (20,511,400) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) Beginning Fund Balance ENDING FUND BALANCE 14,927,300 (12,800) 15,581,400 20,071,800 14,914,500 15,581,400 20,071,800 (844,800) 13,685,200 $ 12,840,400 $ (7,982,900) (439,600) 12,840,400 4,857,500 $ 12,840,400 12,400,800 $ 2,900,000 20,000 834,000 1,378,500 14,300 5,146,800 4,056,100 3,251,200 3,390,200 6,641,400 1,775,700 10,000 1,250,000 14,002,500 800,000 17,838,200 595,000 29,130,700 (23,983,900) 17,823,000 (547,700) 17,275,300 (6,708,600) 12,400,800 $ 5,692,200 $ 100,000 4% (5,000) -20% 15,000 2% 1,378,500 N/A (224,800) -100% (5,900) -29% 1,257,800 32% 64,400 2% 285,800 10% 88,800 3% 374,600 6% 304,000 21% (15,000) -60% 1,014,100 430% (397,500) -3% 177,000 28% 1,082,600 6% N/A N/A N/A 155,800 35% 1,677,400 6% (419,600) 2% 2,241,600 14% (547,700) N/A 1,693,900 11% 1,274,300 -16% (439,600) -3% $ 834,700 17% The sources for the General fund (Chart 11) consist of allocations from Measure A sales tax revenues; various other federal, state and local reimbursements for planning activities and commuter rail station maintenance; investment income; transfers from LTF, TUMF, and motorist assistance for administration; transfers of LTF sales tax revenues for planning, programming, and monitoring (PPM) activities; and transfers of LTF Article 4 allocations for commuter rail transit operations and capital. Chart 11— General Fund Sources FY 2014/15 Transfers In 77% Measure A Sales Tax 13% State Reimbursements 4% Local Reimbursements 6% Measure A sales tax revenues allocated for administration of $2,900,000 has increased 4% compared to the prior year to offset increased expenditures. The administrative allocation may be adjusted at mid -year based on required expenditures, but in no event will exceed four percent (4%) of total Measure A revenues (including administrative salaries and benefits). Federal reimbursements represent funding for interns. State reimbursements include STIP funds for PPM activities. Local reimbursements are from other local agencies related to traffic signal coordination. LTF sales tax revenues from the Local Transportation Fund, a special revenue fund, are allocated and transferred to the General fund for administration, planning and programming, and rail transit operations and capital for the following purposes: • Administration allocations from LTF sales tax revenues of $850,000 in FY 2014/15 have increased $50,000 compared to the prior year to offset increased expenditures. • Planning allocations are set by law at three percent (3%) of estimated LTF sales tax revenues. The FY 2013/14 revised budget of $2,623,800 includes the effect of the mid -year projection adjustment. This adjustment usually includes the unapportioned carryover amount, which is not determined until after the prior year's fiscal year end, and revised revenue projections. The FY 2014/15 budget for planning allocations is $2,445,000. • Transit funding for commuter rail, which is tied to sales tax revenues, is based on operating and capital needs to the extent that revenues and reserved fund balance are available. The FY 2014/15 budget includes $11,535,600 in LTF, $159,500 in Measure A commuter assistance, and $250,000 in PPM allocations primarily to fund operating contribution expenditures to SCRRA, rail station operations and maintenance, and rail studies. • Allocations aggregating $692,900 for local jurisdictions' grade separation projects were included in the FY 2013/14 General fund revised budget. The FY 2014/15 budget includes LTF allocations of $1,500,000 for grade separation projects. Administrative transfers in from TUMF and motorist assistance of $1,082,900 in FY 2014/15 increased slightly from $1,068,300 in FY 2013/14. Chart 12 — General Fund Uses FY 2014/15 Capital Outlay 2% Transfers Out 2% Projects and Operations 60% Personnel Salary and Benefits 14% i Professional Services 11% Support Costs 11% General fund uses are depicted in Chart 12. Personnel salary and benefits expenditures increased 2% because of a 3% for cost of living adjustments offset by the employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs increased 10% due to increased professional services for organizational training, information technology consultants, and rail planning and station development in the Coachella Valley. Support costs are comparable to the prior year's budget. Projects and operations expenditures increased 6% because of increased program operations expenditures related to station security and a traffic signal coordination project. The FY 2014/15 operating and capital disbursements budget includes no allocation for rail capital contributions and $1,500,000 for grade separation projects. Capital outlay expenditures increased 35% due to information technology upgrades to the Commission's data communication room and electronic document management system as well as station maintenance improvements. Transfers out include $500,000 related to organizational and rail studies and $47,700 for an allocation of personnel costs related to administration of the 2009 Measure A local streets and roads program. Special Revenue Funds Overview The Commission's special revenue funds are legally restricted as to use for Measure A projects and programs, TUMF projects, motorist assistance services, and funding transit operations and capital in the County. The special revenue funds' budgets are summarized in Table 21, and individual budgets are presented in Tables 22 through 29 along with respective discussions. Table 21— Special Revenue Funds FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Projected Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional and Support Professional Services Support Costs TOTAL Professional and Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Capital Outlay TOTAL Expenditures $ 146,728,100 $ 72,828,800 14,170,200 11,365,700 22,470,300 1,513,100 12,421,100 1,071,200 (357,100) 154,200,000 76,500,000 13,298,000 91,620,000 137,072,200 2,364,000 7,823,400 865,600 1,030,400 $ 154,200,000 76,500,000 13,298,000 47,507,400 94,560,500 2,944,200 7,530,100 639,100 917,800 282,211,400 484,773,600 398,097,100 3,168,600 3,957,700 4,546,900 10, 441, 500 13, 858, 000 12, 041, 500 1,166,300 2,276,300 1,532,100 11, 607, 800 16,134,300 13,618,200 15,697,500 37,534,200 26,232,500 44,974,600 56,750,100 61,800 44,594,900 8,678,500 18,639,700 22,001,000 238,243,900 217,750,000 179,087,800 108,323,000 396,000 46,865,900 27,471,000 13,573,600 13,270,000 11,044,200 112,801,000 165,800,000 103,123,400 78,998,100 39,000 46,911,900 25,370,000 248,142,300 145,300 858,778,300 557,357,600 347,000 20,800 263,064,000 879,217,300 575,498,900 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures 19,147,400 (394,443,700) (177,401,800) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) 97,662,600 387,406,200 223,924,000 (33,271,200) (66,760,000) (63,019,900) 64,391,400 320,646,200 160,904,100 83,538,800 (73,797,500) (16,497,700) Beginning Fund Balance 474,008,000 557,546,800 557,546,800 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 557,546,800 $ 483,749,300 $ 541,049,100 $ 164,100,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 80,564,400 91,669,000 4,832,500 8,154,600 575,000 952,200 445,292,400 4,224,200 12,894,900 1,909,400 14,804,300 19,428,900 17,839,000 239,094,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 120,718,100 270,000 49,882,000 30,400,000 916,287,800 3,155,000 938,471,300 (493,178,900) 441,558,000 (107,587,000) 333,971,000 (159,207,900) 541,049,100 $ 381,841,200 $ 9,900,000 5,000,000 (353,300) (11,055,600) (45,403,200) 2,468,500 331,200 (290,600) (78,200) (39,481,200) 6% 7% -3% -12% -33% 104% 4% -34% -8% -8% 266,500 7% (963,100) -7% (366,900) -16% (1,330,000) -8% 789,200 4% (4,162,000) -19% 851,000 0% 37,053,500 17% 4,763,600 3% 12,395,100 11% (126,000) -32% 3,016,100 6% 2,929,000 11% 57,509,500 7% 2,808,000 809% 59,254,000 7% (98,735,200) 25% 54,151,800 14% (40,827,000) 61% 13,324,800 4% (85,410,400) 116% (16,497,700) -3% $ (101,908,100) -21% Measure A and LTF sales taxes, STA allocations, Western County TUMF, state budgetary allocations, and vehicle registration fees are all accounted for in the 22 special revenue funds. Federal, state, and local reimbursements and transfers in consisting principally of debt proceeds are used to supplement the Measure A sales tax revenues. Chart 13 illustrates the various special revenue fund sources. Chart 13 — Special Revenue Funds Sources FY 2014/15 TUMF Revenue J 1% Measure A Sales Tax 19% LTF Sales Tax 9% STA Sales Tax 1% Federal Reimbursements 9% State Reimbursements 10% Local Reimbursements 1% The special revenue funds' resources are expended on County highway, rail, regional arterial, and new corridors engineering, right of way acquisition, construction, and design build; local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction; economic development incentives; bond financing; bicycle and pedestrian facilities; education and incentive programs to encourage use of alternate modes of transportation; special social service transportation programs; public transit operations and capital needs; and motorist towing and freeway call box assistance. As shown in Chart 14, projects and operations expenditures represent the primary use of special revenue fund resources. Chart 14 — Special Revenue Funds Uses FY 2014/15 Personnel Salary and Benefits 1% rProfessional Services Transfers Out 10% Measure A Special Revenue Funds 1% Support Costs 0% Projects ily a • Of the special revenue funds, 16 are funded primarily with Measure A sales tax revenue, which is allocated to the three geographic areas of the County (Chart 15). The Measure A funds are comprised of two 1989 Measure A and ten 2009 Measure A Western County operating funds, three 2009 Measure A Coachella Valley operating funds, and one 2009 Measure A Palo Verde Valley operating fund. Chart 15 — Measure A Sales Tax Revenues by Geographic Area Palo Verde Valley 1% 1 —4 or Coachella Valley 24% Western County 75% Since the 1989 Measure A terminated on June 30, 2009, the remaining 1989 Measure A Western County operating funds will be closed upon the completion of the specific highway and rail projects. With the commencement of the 2009 Measure A on July 1, 2009, the 14 operating funds will be in existence for the 30-year term. These funds account for all Measure A project and program expenditures and transfers of debt service for capital projects. The Measure A special revenue funds expend monies on capital construction and improvements to highways, commuter rail, regional arterials, new corridors, and local streets and roads. Funding is also reserved for commuter assistance, public and specialized transit, and economic development incentives programs as well as bond financing costs. The Commission is a self-help county, and, as such on major highway projects, the Commission supplements the State's spending. Upon completion of most highway projects, Caltrans takes over the maintenance and operations of the projects. All revenues from the Measure A sales tax have been pledged as security for the Commission's senior sales tax revenue bonds and commercial paper notes. Debt service on the bonds is recorded in the Sales Tax Bonds debt service fund, and most of the resources for the cash payments are provided through transfers out by the Measure A special revenue funds for the 2009 Measure A bonds. Western County Measure A Operating Funds The Western County Measure A Operating special revenue funds account for Western County's approximately 75% share of the Measure A sales tax. As demonstrated in Table 22, most of the Commission's reimbursements flow through these funds, since the sales tax leverages state and federal dollars. Table 22 - Western County Measure A Operating Funds FY 2013 - 2015 FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Sources Measure A Sales Tax Bond Financing Commuter Assistance Economic Development Incentives Highways Local Streets and Roads New Corridors Public Bus Transit Rail Regional Arterials Specialized Transit Total Measure A Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income Transfers In TOTAL Sources Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way/Land Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads TOTAL Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL Uses $ 8,863,500 1,641,400 1,313,100 33,484,300 31,842,900 12,146,300 1,674,100 6,696,900 9,848,300 2,790,400 $ 9,315,000 1,725,000 1,380,000 35,189,000 33,465,000 12,765,000 1,759,000 7,038,000 10,350,000 2,932,000 $ 9,315,000 1,725,000 1,380,000 35,189,000 33,465,000 12,765,000 1,759,000 7,038,000 10,350,000 2,932,000 110,301,200 11,365,000 18,719,900 1,059,500 526,800 924,700 (187,200) 95,856,900 115,918,000 91,620,000 128,392,200 1,872,000 423,400 855,000 621,800 354,136,700 115,918,000 47,504,800 86,232,600 2,441,600 130,100 639,100 447,700 211,173,200 238,566,800 693,839,100 2,891,100 3,467,000 9,233,400 12,404,200 651,000 1,394,600 10,851,700 14,646,600 12,895, 200 14,482,000 25,044,500 198,160,800 26,232,500 217,750,000 43, 465, 800 167, 870, 000 4,346,600 7,834,000 61,800 46,000 31,172,300 32,759,900 464,487,100 3,950,800 10,575,500 702,200 9,880,000 7,539,300 98,767,000 165,800,000 94,486,800 4,989,600 39,000 32,805,900 154,070,400 145,300 17,348,800 653,549,300 347,000 35,040,800 414,307,600 20,800 37,710,300 184,340,000 706,202,900 467,267,200 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 54,226,800 $ (12,363,800) $ (2,780,100) $ 9,956,000 1,844,000 1,475,000 37,613,000 35,769,000 13,644,000 1,881,000 7,523,000 11,063,000 3,134,000 123,902,000 80,560,400 87,644,000 4,449,100 154,600 575,000 486,800 419,233,800 717,005,700 3,624,800 11,216,800 1,258,700 15,844,200 5,507,000 209,683,900 254,803,500 175,462,000 13,649,800 270,000 35,018,000 710,238,400 3,155,000 83,974,400 813,468,100 $ (96,462,400) $ 641,000 119,000 95,000 2,424,000 2,304,000 879,000 122,000 485,000 713,000 202,000 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7,984,000 (11,059,600) (40,748,200) 2,577,100 (268,800) (280,000) (135,000) 65,097,100 7% -12 % -32% 138% - 63 % - 33 % - 22% 18% 23,166,600 3% 157,800 5% (1,187,400) -10% (135,900) -10% 1,197,600 8% (8,975,000) -62% 11,523,100 6% 37,053,500 17 % 7,592,000 5% 5,815,800 74% 224,000 487% 2,258,100 7% 56,689,100 9% 2,808,000 809% 48,933,600 140% 107, 265,200 15 % $ (84,098,600) 680% The budgeted Western County Measure A sales tax revenues reflect a 7% increase compared to the prior year due to Measure A sales tax projections. Taxable sales changes between jurisdictions within the County also periodically affect the geographic allocation formula from year to year. Federal reimbursements for highway and rail projects and the commuter assistance program, which are lower in the FY 2014/15 budget, relate to funding from the FTA, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ), Surface Transportation Program (STP), and earmarks. The 12% decrease in federal reimbursements is primarily attributable to allocations of federal funding for project activity on the I-215/Blaine Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard widening, 91/71 interchange improvement, and Perris Valley Line projects in the previous fiscal year. State reimbursements are lower by 32% compared to the FY 2013/14 budget and reflect funding from STIP and Proposition 1B funding for various highway and rail projects, particularly the 1-215 corridor improvement projects and the Perris Valley Line, in the previous fiscal year. Local reimbursement increases are attributable to the commuter assistance program and Perris Valley Line and other rail projects. TUMF revenue represents reimbursements from TUMF zone funds administered by WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange construction and right of way acquisition, and the decrease in these TUMF reimbursements reflects the substantial completion of the project. Other revenue is related to property management lease revenues, which reflects a decrease from the prior year and is related to properties acquired in connection with the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Investment income is lower compared to the previous year's budget due to lower ending projected cash balances resulting from the commencement of construction on the Perris Valley Line and the SR-91 corridor improvement project. As in prior years, a significant portion of transfers in consists of debt proceeds of $417,900,000 from sales tax revenue bonds, toll revenue bonds, and TIFIA loan to fund the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Other significant transfers in include $311,000 from 1989 Measure A Western County rail funds for rail capital projects; $250,000 from the General fund for toll organization planning; $21,800 from the General fund to the 2009 Measure A Western County local streets and roads fund for salaries and benefits; and $751,000 for regional arterials in accordance with the 2009 Measure A related to a city not eligible to receive the local street and roads funds. Personnel salary and benefits expenditures increased 5% resulting from a 3% for cost of living adjustments offset by the employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Measure A Western County professional services expenditures in FY 2014/15 consist of general legal services for the various programs and capital projects, specialized legal and financial advisory services related to the SR-91 and 1-15 corridor improvement projects, other professional services for rail capital and commuter assistance projects, and professional fees related to the Commission's debt programs. The decrease of 10% in FY 2014/15 reflects the previous year activity in advisory services and legal services related to the SR-91 corridor improvement project financing and rail service easement activities in preparation for the commencement of commuter rail service on the Perris Valley Line. Support costs comprise operations for the commuter assistance program and property management services. General program operations comprise the program management with outside consultants for the highway and rail capital and commuter assistance programs, permits required for capital projects, and subsidies and certificates for the commuter assistance program. Such levels of operations typically fluctuate as project activities transition to another phase. Many of the Commission's Western County rail and highway projects funded by Measure A have been in the project development phase for several years and are now near or in the construction phase. Accordingly, engineering expenditures are expected to decrease 62%, while construction and design -build activities are anticipated to increase 6%and 17%, respectively. Major projects still in the engineering and/or final design phase but at a decreased level of costs include the SR-15 improvements, 91/71 interchange improvements, and Mid County Parkway. The 1-215 central segment corridor improvements, which commenced construction in 2013, respectively, will continue through FY 2015/16. After many years of project development, the Perris Valley Line project commenced construction in FY 2013/14 and will continue through early FY 2015/16. Several Western County TUMF regional arterial projects will be under construction in FY 2014/15. In addition to the design and construction of the SR-91 corridor improvements, other related design -build activities during FY 2014/15 include utility and railroad relocations and the interagency, legal, financial, and other consultant staff to support these activities. Right of way acquisition is another major project activity for which the process can be lengthy. Significant right of way acquisitions will benefit the SR-91 corridor improvement, SR-91 HOV lanes, 91/71 interchange improvement, Mid County Parkway, Perris Valley Line, and various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects. Operating and capital disbursements are higher by 74% compared to the FY 2013/14 budget and relate to Western County intercity bus service and specialized transit expenditures funded by Measure A. Local streets and roads comprise turn back payments to local jurisdictions and increased as a result of the higher Measure A sales tax revenues. Capital outlay includes equipment and improvements for the rail and commuter assistance programs and reflects an 809% increase due to station rehabilitation projects. Significant transfers out include funding for debt service payments of $26,653,700; contribution of $40,000,000 from the 1989 Measure A Western County highway fund to the Sales Tax Bonds capital projects fund for the SR-91 corridor improvement project; reimbursements of $311,000 from the 1989 Measure A Western County rail fund to the 2009 Measure A Western County rail fund; funding for rail operating needs of $159,500 from 2009 Measure A Western County commuter assistance fund; 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterial fund contribution of $16,099,200 for various TUMF projects; and 2009 Measure A Western County local streets and roads fund allocation of $751,000 to 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterials fund. Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds These special revenue funds account for Coachella Valley's 24% share of the Measure A sales tax. Table 23 — Coachella Valley Measure A Operating Funds FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources Measure A Sales Tax Highways & Regional Arterials Local Streets and Roads Specialized Transit Total Measure A State Reimbursements Investment Income Transfers In TOTAL Sources Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Operating and Capital Disbursements Special Studies Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations TOTAL Uses $ 17,695,600 $ 18,597,000 $ 18,597,000 12, 386,900 13,017,000 13,017,000 5,308,700 5,579,000 5,579,000 35,391,200 (11,800) 200,300 37,193,000 4,500,000 14,100 37,193,000 50,600 35,579,700 41,707,100 37,243,600 1,100 7,500 400 3,500 3,500 1,500 17,000 17,000 4,500,000 5,500,000 5,217,000 350,000 12, 386,900 13,017,000 13,017,000 8,678,500 26,206,000 25,000,000 25,565,400 45,090,000 43,251,000 25,570,000 45,101,000 43,252,900 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 10,009,700 $ (3,393,900) $ (6,009,300) $ 19,488,000 13,642,000 5,846,000 38,976,000 24,500 21,900 39,022,400 21,800 4,000 7,400 6,858,300 13,642,000 30,000,000 50,507,700 50,533,500 $ (11,511,100) $ 891,000 5% 625,000 5% 267,000 5% 1,783,000 5% (4,500,000) -100% 10,400 74% 21,900 N/A (2,684,700) -6% 14,300 191% 500 14% (9,600) -56% 1,358,300 25% (350,000) -100% 625,000 5% 3,794,000 14% 5,417, 700 12 % 5,432, 500 12 % $ (8,117,200) 239% As shown in Table 23, overall budgeted Coachella Valley Measure A sales tax revenues increased 5% due to Measure A sales tax revenue projections. Taxable sales changes among the geographic areas also impact the geographic allocation formula from year to year. Personnel salary and benefits expenditure increase of $14,300 are based on FTE allocations for coordination of Coachella Valley project activities; 3% for cost of living adjustments offset by the employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs; and 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. The Coachella Valley operating and capital disbursements represent specialized transit funds distributed to SunLine for transit operations. Local streets and roads comprise turn back payments to local jurisdictions and are directly affected by changes in Measure A sales tax revenues. Regional arterial projects are highway and regional arterial projects managed by CVAG. Debt service funding for CVAG highway and regional arterial and the city of Indio local streets and roads projects under advance funding agreements is reflected in projects and operations in order to be consistent with the accounting in the financial system. Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund This special revenue fund accounts for Palo Verde Valley's 1% share of the Measure A sales tax. Table 24 — Palo Verde Valley Measure A Operating Fund FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources Measure A Sales Tax Local Streets and Roads Transfers In TOTAL Sources $ 1,035,700 $ 1,089,000 $ 1,089,000 1,035,700 1,089,000 1,089,000 Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Projects and Operations Local Streets and Roads 1,035,700 1,089,000 1,089,000 TOTAL Uses 1,035,700 1,089,000 1,089,000 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ $ 1,222,000 4,000 1,226,000 4,000 1,222,000 1,226,000 $ 133,000 12% 4,000 N/A 137,000 13% 4,000 N/A 133,000 12% 137,000 13% $ N/A The Measure A sales tax revenues are affected by the impact of shifts in taxable sales changes on the geographic allocation formula as well as revenue projections. In the Palo Verde Valley as noted in Table 24, expenditures are for local streets and roads. Debt service funding for the city of Blythe local streets and roads projects under an advance funding agreement is reflected in projects and operations in order to be consistent with the accounting in the financial system. Non -Measure A Special Revenue Funds The non -Measure A special revenue funds account for LTF disbursements; TUMF Western County project costs; motorist assistance expenditures for towing service, freeway call boxes, and 1E511 system operations; transit disbursements from STA; and Coachella Valley rail planning and development. These activities are budgeted in the LTF, TUMF, FSP and SAFE, STA, and Coachella Valley Rail special revenue funds, respectively. Local Transportation Fund The LTF special revenue fund derives its revenue from one quarter of one cent of the state sales tax that is returned to source and provides for funding of public transit operations in the County, bicycle and pedestrian facility projects, planning, and administration (Table 25). Table 25 — Local Transportation Fund FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources LTF Sales Tax $ 72,828,800 $ 76,500,000 $ 76,500,000 Local Reimbursements 107,000 Investment Income (84,200) 214,500 173,900 TOTAL Sources 72,851,600 76,714,500 76,673,900 Uses Projects and Operations Operating and Capital Disbursements Transfers Out TOTAL Uses 45,600,000 14,097,600 69,387,000 53,006,500 14,165, 000 18, 891, 300 59,697,600 83,552,000 71,897,800 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 13,154,000 $ (6,837,500) $ 4,776,100 $ 81,500,000 256,300 81,756,300 72,660,600 16,330,600 88,991,200 $ (7,234,900) $ 5,000,000 7% N/A 41,800 19% 5,041,800 7% 3,273,600 5% 2,165,600 15 % 5,439,200 7% $ (397,400) 6% The LTF sales tax revenue in FY 2014/15 is projected to increase 7% from the prior year. Investment income is expected to increase slightly. In FY 2014/15, approximately 87% and 13% of the LTF transit expenditures of $69,943,000 are for operating and capital purposes, respectively. LTF operating allocations are comprised of 80% to Western County, 19% to Coachella Valley, and 1% to Palo Verde Valley public bus operators. The actual allocations will not be approved until July 2014. Other operating and capital disbursements include allocations for SB821 bicycle and pedestrian projects of $2,094,300 and planning and administration allocations of $623,300 to the County Auditor -Controller and SCAG. Transfers out include allocations to the Commission's General fund for planning and administration of $3,295,000, rail operations and station maintenance of $11,535,600, and grade separation projects of $1,500,000. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund The TUMF fund accounts for the Commission's share of developer fee assessments on new residential and commercial developments in Western County for regional arterials and CETAP corridors (Table 26). TUMF revenue is projected to increase slightly based on the recovering housing market. The transfers in for FY 2014/15 relate to funding from the 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterials fund of $16,099,200 for TUMF regional arterial projects related to the cities of Corona, Moreno Valley, and San Jacinto and the County and from TUMF CETAP of $5,534,400 for the city of Temecula's regional arterial projects along 1-15. Table 26 — Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Fund FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources TUMF Revenue $ 11,894,300 $ 7,400,000 $ 7,400,000 $ 8,000,000 $ 600,000 8% Other Revenue 132,000 N/A Investment Income (42,900) 60,300 130,600 65,300 5,000 8% Transfers In 598,400 32,319,500 12,235,300 21,633,600 (10,685,900) -33% TOTAL Sources 12,581,800 39,779,800 19,765,900 29,698,900 (10,080,900) -25% Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction Right of Way/Land Regional Arterials TOTAL Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL Uses 171,800 296,000 433,300 688,800 683,800 693,500 600 4,100 3,100 338,100 342,800 328,000 2,802,300 7,519,000 3,504,900 12,489,700 40,083,100 14,034,000 1,508,800 11,217,800 8,636,600 - 1,265,000 370,000 17,138,900 60,427,700 26,873,500 499,000 16,013,300 5,528,300 18,499,100 77,424,900 33,531,700 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (5,917,300) $ (37,645,100) $ (13,765,800) 342,300 350,300 11,300 438,700 12,132,000 28,761,000 8,389,400 400,000 50,121,100 6,264,300 57,089,300 S (77.190.4nn) 46,300 16 % (333,500) -49% 7,200 176 % 95,900 28% 4,613,000 61% (11,322,100) -28% (2,828,400) -25% (865,000) -68% (10,306,600) -17% (9,749,000) -61% (20,335,600) -26% $ 10,254,700 -27% Personnel salary and benefits have increased 16% due to 3% cost of living adjustments offset by employees' contributions for their share of normal pension costs; a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases; and the allocation of FTEs. Professional services have decreased 49% due to property acquisition legal services activities in FY 2013/14. Projects and operations costs decreased 17%, as many regional arterial projects move into various stages of engineering, right of way acquisition and construction phases. Approximately 75% of the projects and operations costs are attributable to programmed regional arterial projects. The remaining 25% relates to CETAP projects such as the Mid County Parkway preliminary engineering and right of way acquisitions. Transfers out represent administrative allocations of $729,900 to the General fund and CETAP funding of $5,534,400 for two city of Temecula regional arterial projects along 1-15, which are within the CETAP Winchester to Temecula corridor limits. Freeway Service Patrol Fund The FSP fund accounts for the state and local resources provided to cover the costs of servicing stranded motorists in covered service areas and construction zones by means of towing, changing tires, and providing fuel (Table 27). The State's funding share of $2,425,000 has decreased 10% from the FY 2013/14 budget due to decreased CHP support needed for highway construction projects. Federal reimbursements of $2,000 are grant funds for interns. Transfers in represent Commission match funds of $548,700 from the SAFE special revenue fund. Table 27 — Freeway Service Patrol Fund FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Projected Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Sources Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements Other Revenue Investment Income Transfers In TOTAL Sources Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Transfers Out TOTAL Uses $ - $ 2,020,700 600 (1,700) 1,007,000 - $ 2,680,000 1,300 2,627,900 600 600 1,300 500 950,000 515,500 3,026,600 3,631,900 3,145,800 42,800 61,400 31,700 51,000 44,100 54,900 100,200 56,000 50,500 2,341,400 3,528,300 2,940,000 161,800 214,400 214,400 2,621,800 3,910,000 3,361,100 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 404,800 $ (278,100) $ (215,300) $ 2,000 2,425,000 600 1,400 548,700 2,977,700 101,600 56,000 54,400 3,028,600 194,200 3,434,800 $ (457,100) $ 2,000 (255,000) 600 (600) 100 (401,300) N/A -10% N/A -100% 8% -42% (654,200) -18% 40,200 5,000 (500) 65 % 10% -1% (499,700) -14% (20,200) -9% (475,200) -12% $ (179,000) 64% Personnel salary and benefits have increased 65% due to the allocation of FTEs between the Freeway Service Patrol fund and the Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies; 3% for cost of living adjustments offset by employee's contributions for their share of normal pension costs; and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional services and support costs are comparable to the prior year's budget. Operating costs for towing services in FY 2014/15 are lower than FY 2013/14 budget due to decreased support levels needed on highway construction projects. Transfers out are administrative allocations to the General fund. Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies Fund The SAFE fund accounts for the $1 per vehicle registration fee levied by the State on all registered vehicles within the County. It funds the installation and implementation of emergency aid call boxes located strategically on the highways throughout the County as well as the operations of the 1E511 system (Table 28). Table 28 - Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies Fund FY 2013 - 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources Federal Reimbursements $ 700 $ $ 1,300 State Reimbursements 1,729,700 1,500,000 1,500,000 Local Reimbursements 346,600 492,000 502,000 Other Revenue 13,900 10,000 - Investment Income (1,500) 11,700 12,500 TOTAL Sources 2,089,400 2,013,700 2,015,800 Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General TOTAL Projects and Operations Transfers Out TOTAL Uses 61,800 125,800 484,100 715,500 470,600 822,700 87,000 105,000 62,200 715,000 776,300 105,000 87,000 1,164,000 105,000 105,000 1,076,500 675,600 2,267,500 2,845,500 2,334,100 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ (178,100) $ (831,800) $ (318,300) $ 2,000 1,600,000 382,800 14,400 1,999,200 99,600 660,400 576,500 100,000 100,000 707,500 2,144,000 $ (144,800) $ 2,000 N/A 100,000 7% (109,200) -22% (10,000) -100% 2,700 23% (14,500) -1% (26,200) -21% (55,100) -8% (246,200) -30% (5,000) -5% (5,000) -5% (369,000) -34% (701,500) -25% 687,000 -83% Federal reimbursements of $2,000 are grant funds for interns. Local reimbursements represent the pass -through funds from SANBAG as its share of the 1E511 system operating costs and the recoveries from call box knockdowns, which service is provided by a collection agency. Personnel salaries and benefits have decreased due to the allocation of FTEs between the Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies fund and the Freeway Service Patrol fund. Professional services and support costs have decreased compared to FY 2013/14 due to decreased 1E511 operating and hosting costs and the streamlining of media outreach efforts with the Commuter Assistance program. Projects and operations costs are comparable to the previous year's budget. The transfers out reflect a matching contribution to the State's contribution for towing services of $548,700 to the FSP special revenue fund and administrative allocations to the General fund of $158,800. State Transit Assistance Fund The STA fund accounts for the state budgetary allocation of gas tax revenues designated for rail and bus transit operations and capital requirements (Table 29). The allocation is based on estimates of diesel fuel sales tax revenues provided by the Controller of the State of California, subject to an annual state budget appropriation. Table 29 - State Transit Assistance Fund FY 2013 - 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources STA Sales Tax Investment Income TOTAL Sources Uses Projects and Operations Operating and Capital Disbursements Transfers Out TOTAL Uses $ 14,170,200 $ 13,298,000 $ 13,298,000 (27,800) 106,700 102,000 14,142,400 13,404, 700 13,400,000 2,303,500 25,602,000 15,785,000 250,000 2,303,500 25,852,000 15, 785,000 Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ 11,838,900 $ (12,447,300) $ (2,385,000) $ 12,944,700 96,500 13,041,200 27,549,400 116,000 27,665,400 $ (14,624,200) $ (353,300) -3% (10,200) -10% (363,500) -3% 1,947,400 8% (134,000) -54% 1,813,400 7% $ (2,176,900) 17% Investment income is expected to decrease because of lower cash balances due to increased capital disbursements to operators. The operating and capital disbursements consist of allocations for bus capital purposes. In FY 2014/15, 64% of the allocations are in Western County, 34% in Coachella Valley, and 2% in Palo Verde Valley. Transfers out represent rail capital allocations to the Coachella Valley Rail fund. Similar to the LTF allocations, the actual STA allocations will not be approved until July 2014. Coachella Valley Rail Fund The Coachella Valley Rail fund accounts for state funding for the planning and development of the new Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service (Table 30). Table 30 — Coachella Valley Rail Fund FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Sources State Reimbursements $ $ $ 4,200,000 Investment Income Transfers In TOTAL Sources 4,200,000 Uses Personnel Salary and Benefits Professional Services Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations - General Engineering Construction TOTAL Projects and Operations TOTAL Uses Excess (deficiency) of Sources over (under) Uses $ $ 4,200,000 7,000 116,000 123,000 30,100 607,400 8,500 10,000 200,000 650,000 860,000 1,506,000 $ (1,383,000) N/A 7,000 N/A 116,000 N/A 123,000 N/A 30,100 N/A 607,400 N/A 8,500 N/A 10,000 N/A 200,000 N/A 650,000 N/A 860,000 N/A 1,506,000 N/A $ (1,383,000) N/A State reimbursements received in FY 2013/14 represent Proposition 1B grant funding for rail station planning and development. Transfers in of $116,000 reflect STA allocations. Professional services and projects and operations represent exploring passenger rail options and conducting detailed studies on the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass rail corridor. Capital Projects Funds Overview The capital projects funds account for all debt proceeds from commercial paper notes, sales tax and toll revenue bonds, and TIFIA loan drawdowns (Table 31). Table 31 - Capital Projects Funds FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Revenues Other Revenue $ 438,400 $ - $ - Investment Income 2,157,700 1,877,700 2,065,000 TOTAL Revenues 2,596,100 1,877,700 2,065,000 Expenditures Professional and Support Professional Services Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance TOTAL Debt Service TOTAL Expenditures 48,000 300,000 300,000 79,000,000 60,000,000 63,500 800 7,051,300 7,050,900 48,000 86,114,800 67,051,700 48,000 86,414,800 67,351,700 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures 2,548,100 (84,537,100) (65,286,700) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In - 80,000,000 60,002,000 Transfers Out (58,769,300) (560,250,600) (420,898,100) Debt Proceeds 60,000,000 632,158,000 638,854,600 TIFIA Loan Proceeds - 110,000,000 - Bond Premium 68,616,000 38,328,800 Bond Discount - (2,433,300) (2,433,300) Net Financing Sources (Uses) 1,230,700 328,090,100 313,854,000 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) 3,778,800 Beginning Fund Balance 36,795,500 243,553,000 248,567,300 40,574,300 40,574,300 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 40,574,300 $ 284,127,300 $ 289,141,600 592,100 592,100 592,100 40,000,000 (417,900,000) 191,600,000 (186,300,000) (185,707,900) 289,141,600 $ 103,433,700 N/A (1,285,600) -68% (1,285,600) -68% (300,000) -100% (79,000,000) -100% (63,500) -100% (7,051,300) -100% (86,114,800) -100% (86,414,800) -100% 85,129,200 -101% (40,000,000) -50% 142,350,600 -25% (632,158,000) -100% 81,600,000 74% (68,616,000) -100% 2,433,300 -100% (514,390,100) -157% (429,260,900) -176% 248,567,300 613% $ (180,693,600) -64% As illustrated in the following charts, capital projects funds sources primarily consist of debt proceeds (Chart 16), and the significant uses of the capital projects funds are transfers out (Chart 17). In 2005, a commercial paper program was established to advance project development and land and right of way acquisition related to the 2009 Measure A projects. In FY 2013/14, the Commission issued $462.2 million in sales tax revenue bonds (2013 Sales Tax Bonds) and $176.7 million in toll revenue bonds (2013 Toll Bonds) and executed a $421.1 million federal TIFIA loan to finance the SR-91 corridor improvement project. In FY 2013/14, a portion of the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds was used to retire $60 million of outstanding commercial paper notes and fund capitalized interest, while a portion of the 2013 Toll Bonds was used to fund capitalized interest and a debt service reserve. A significant portion of the remaining proceeds of the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds along with the 2013 Toll Bonds has and will be used to pay a portion of costs of the SR-91 corridor improvement project. The TIFIA loan will be used to pay eligible SR-91 corridor improvement project expenditures. Chart 16 — Capital Projects Funds Sources FY 2014/15 Transfers In 17% Debt Proceeds 83 Debt proceeds represent the drawdown of $191,600,000 from the federal TIFIA loan, and the transfer in of $40,000,000 is a contribution from the 1989 Measure A Western County highway fund for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Chart 17 — Capital Projects Funds Uses FY 2014/15 Transfers Out 100% In FY 2014/15, sales tax and toll revenue bond and TIFIA loan proceeds of $417,900,000 will be transferred out to the 2009 Measure A Western County Highway special revenue fund for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Debt Service Funds Overview Under the 2009 Measure A program, as amended by Measure K in November 2010, the Commission has the authority to issue sales tax revenue bonds subject to a debt limitation of $975,000,000. The Sales Tax Bonds debt service fund of the Commission is used to account for all activities related to the sales tax revenue bonds debt incurred by the Commission (Table 32). The Commission's largest single expenditure is debt service. The debt agreements require the trustees to hold all debt proceeds, a portion of the sales tax revenues and upon commencement of toll operations in FY 2016/17, the toll revenues from the RCTC 91 Express Lanes and to segregate all funds into separate amounts. These monies are included in the restricted investments held by trustee in the capital projects funds and the debt service funds. Under the sales tax indentures, the Commission may use sales tax revenues for any lawful purpose related to the Riverside County TIP after the trustee has satisfied debt service requirements. Under the toll indentures, which include the TIFIA loan, the use of toll revenues is prescribed by a flow of funds to be administered by the trustee. In order to advance project development activities, the Commission established a commercial paper program in 2005. Periodically a portion of the commercial paper notes issued has been retired with sales tax revenue bonds including those bonds issued in 2009 (2009 Bonds), 2010 (2010 Bonds), and 2013 (2013 Sales Tax Bonds). Table 32 — Debt Service Funds FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Revenues Federal Reimbursements Investment Income TOTAL Revenues Expenditures Professional and Support Professional Services Debt Service Principal Payments Interest Payments TOTAL Debt Service TOTAL Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures $ 2,852,400 $ (24,200) 2,744,000 $ 2,744,000 1,098,200 2,288,700 2,828,200 6,800,000 15,356,100 3,842,200 5,032,700 788,300 7,100,000 7,100,000 41,012,300 44,827,500 22,156,100 48,112,300 51,927,500 22,156,100 48,900,600 51,927,500 (19,327,900) (45,058,400) (46,894,800) Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In 20,475,400 154,023,000 181,303,900 Transfers Out (41,012,000) (10,000,000) (1,383,700) Net Financing Sources (Uses) (20,536,600) 144,023,000 179,920,200 Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) (39,864,500) Beginning Fund Balance 51,089,900 98,964,600 133,025,400 11,225,400 11, 225, 400 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 11,225,400 $ 110,190,000 $ 144,250,800 $ 2,767,000 892,300 3,659,300 7,400,000 47,296,200 54,696,200 54,696,200 (51,036,900) 26,653,700 26,653,700 (24,383,200) 144,250,800 $ 119,867,600 23,000 1 (205,900) -19% (182,900) -5% (788,300) -100% 300,000 6,283,900 4% 15% 6,583,900 14% 5,795,600 12% (5,978,500) 13% (127,369,300) -83% 10,000,000 -100% (117,369,300) -81% (123,347,800) -125% 133,025,400 1185 $ 9,677,600 9% Reimbursements consist of federal cash subsidy payments related to the 2010 Series B designated as build America bonds (BABs). The BABs subsidy payments reflect a reduction due to federal sequestration cuts. Investment income is significantly lower than the previous fiscal year due to lower cash reserve balances resulting from the use of sales tax and toll revenue bonds in FY 2014/15 for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Transfers in represent the primary source of funding for the debt service funds (Chart 18) and consist of funds from the 2009 Measure A Western County Highways and Bond Financing special revenue funds. In FY 2013/14, transfers in included proceeds from the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds and 2013 Toll Bonds related to funding for capitalized interest as well as a debt service reserve for the 2013 Toll Bonds. Chart 18 — Debt Service Funds Sources FY 2014/15 Federal Reimbursements 9% Investment Income 3% Debt Service fund uses (Chart 19) consist of debt service on the sales tax and toll revenue bonds. Chart 19 — Debt Service Funds Uses FY 2014/15 e-E Debt Service 100% Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 4 rill° REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Revenues and Other Sources Total revenues and other sources are budgeted at $1,172,325,300, and consist of Measure A sales tax of $167,000,000, (or 14% of total sources); LTF sales tax of $81,500,000 (or 7% of total sources); STA revenues of $12,944,700 (or 1% of total sources); federal revenues of $83,351,400 (or 7% of total sources); state revenues, including vehicle registration fees, of $92,503,000 (or 8% of total sources); TUMF of $8,154,600 (or less than 1% of total sources); debt proceeds of $191,600,000 (or 16% of total sources); transfers in of $526,034,700 (or 45% of total sources) and other revenues of $9,236,900 (or less than 1% of total sources). The specific revenue funding sources are shown in Table 33. Table 33 — Revenues and Other Sources FY 2014/15 Sales Tax Department/Program Measure LTF STA Federal State Local/Other Funding Sources Management Services $ 2,900,000 $ - $ $ 10,000 $ - $ 10,200 MEASURE A AND OTHER CAPITAL PROGRAMS Bond Financing 9,956,000 - - - - 20,400 CETAP - - - - - 4,042,600 Economic Development 1,475,000 - - 13,400 Highways 57,101,000 - - 9,700,000 40,676,000 2,300,700 Local Streets and Roads 50,633,000 - - - New Corridors 13,644,000 - - 173,100 Rail 7,523,000 - - 73,254,500 46,968,000 3,149,900 Regional Arterials 11,063,000 - - 4,063,400 REGIONAL PROGRAMS Public and Specialized Transit 10,861,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 13,900 376,000 Planning and Programming - 834,000 1,253,700 Rail Station Maintenance/Operations - - 10,000 128,900 Commuter Assistance 1,844,000 - - 359,000 1,460,000 Motorist Assistance - - 4,000 4,025,000 399,200 OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Debt Proceeds Transfers In TOTAL Funding Sources 191,600,000 526,034,700 $ 167,000,000 $ 81,500,000 $ 12,944,700 $ 83,351,400 $ 92,503,000 $ 735,026,200 Revenues —Definitions and Background $ 2,920,200 9,976,400 4,042,600 1,488,400 109,777,700 50,633,000 13,817,100 130,895,400 15,126,400 105,695,600 2,087,700 138,900 3,663,000 4,428,200 191,600,000 526,034,700 $ 1,172,325,300 Measure A: Measure A is a one-half of one percent transactions and use tax that was first approved by Riverside County voters in 1988 and expired on June 30, 2009 after a 20-year term. On November 5, 2002, the voters of Riverside County approved the renewal of Measure A through 2039. The 2009 Measure A is expected to raise more than $6.8 billion (in nominal dollars) during its lifespan. The amount raised by the Measure A levy has increased as the County and its economic base have grown during the past two decades, peaking in FY 2005/06 at $157 million. As a result of an economic slowdown, Measure A revenues decreased the subsequent five years but have since stabilized. Measure A revenues are projected to approximate $157,000,000 and $167,000,000 in FY 2013/14 and FY 2014/15, respectively. Measure A requires that all sales taxes collected may only be used for transportation purposes including administration and the construction, capital acquisition, maintenance, and operation of streets, roads, highways, including state highways and public transit systems and for related purposes. These purposes include expenditures for planning, environmental reviews, engineering and design costs, and related right of way acquisition. The Commission historically has obtained and updated Measure A revenue projections through a consultant for budget and strategic project planning purposes. The most recent economic forecast was completed in December 2012, and the Commission's sales tax services consultant provides Measure A revenue projections in connection with its quarterly sales tax analysis. Measure A revenue projections, based on such updates and other factors, for the next five fiscal years are presented in Chart 20 below. Chart 20 — Forecasted Measure A Sales Tax Revenues 2015 — 2019 $250, 000, 000 $200, 000, 000 $150, 000, 000 $100, 000, 000 $50, 000, 000 $- r1+ 2015 2016 2017 2018 y 2019 The following additional assumptions were used in the development of the Commission's revenue forecast for FY 2014/15: • The Inland Empire economy will continue its recovery through FY 2014/15. • The State does not change mix of items subject to the sales tax from what has been included historically. • The relative sales and property tax rates of Riverside and surrounding counties do not change from historical levels. • Internet sales will have minimal impact on revenue. The Measure A sales tax revenue projections are considered in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan financing strategy. Geographic Allocation - Riverside County is comprised of three geographic areas: Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. The percentage of Measure A revenues allocated to each of these areas based on return to source is approximately 75% for Western County, 24% for Coachella Valley, and 1% for Palo Verde Valley (Chart 21). These percentages will experience some variations from year to year based on changes in levels of taxable sales among the geographic areas. Chart 21— Geographic Allocation of Measure A Revenues Palo Verde Valley 1% Coachella Valley 24% Western County 75 % Program Allocation - The 2009 Measure A TIP defines the manner in which the sales tax revenues are to be spent, as presented in the Table 34. In Western County, public transit includes funding for specialized transit, commuter rail, intercity bus service, and commuter assistance. For the Coachella Valley, public transit includes specialized transit and public bus services. Table 34 - Program Allocation of 2009 Measure A Revenues Western County *Bond Financing - S% •Economic Development incentives - 1% •Highways - 30% • La: al Stre ets and Roads -29% •New Corridors - 11% *Public Transit - 12% •Regional Arterials - 9% Coachella Valley *Highways and Regional Arterials - 50% •Local Streets and Roads - 35% *Public Transit - 15% Palo Verde Valley •Local Streets and Roads - 100% Local streets and roads allocations to the local jurisdictions within each geographic area are based on population (in Western County and Palo Verde Valley) or dwelling units (in Coachella Valley) and taxable sales. Based on the projected Measure A sales tax revenues of $167,000,000 for FY 2014/15, the geographic and program allocations are presented in Table 35. Table 35 - Geographic Allocation of Measure A Revenues by Program FY 2014/15 Program Administration Bond Financing Economic Development Incentives Highways Highways and Regional Arterials Local Streets and Roads New Corridors Public Transit Regional Arterials TOTAL Administration Western County Coachella Valley $ 2,900,000 $ - $ 9,956,000 1,475,000 37,613,000 19,488,000 35,769,000 13,644,000 14,382,000 5,846,000 11,063,000 Palo Verde Valley Total 13,642,000 1,222,000 $ 2,900,000 9,956,000 1,475,000 37,613,000 19,488,000 50,633,000 13,644,000 20,228,000 11,063,000 $ 2,900,000 $ 123,902,000 $ 38,976,000 $ 1,222,000 $ 167,000,000 Local Transportation Fund: LTF, established in state law by the TDA, is funded through a one -quarter of one cent of the State's 8.00% sales tax. The intent of the legislation was to provide a dependable revenue stream for public transportation operations. Based upon an annual projection of LTF sales taxes that considers economic forecast revenue projections prepared by a consultant, local economic factors, and monthly receipt trends, the vast majority of LTF revenue in the County is allocated to the eight public transit operators, including the Commission for its share of Metrolink operations costs. Much like Measure A revenue, LTF had increased with the growth of the County and its economy until the recent economic recession and has stabilized in recent years. Revenues received from LTF are allocated for regional and local transportation planning, program administration, SB821 bicycle and pedestrian facilities projects, public bus transit, and rail transit, including the Commission for its share related to commuter rail operations in Western County. The Commission administers these funds on behalf of the County in a special revenue fund. State Transit Assistance: STA provides additional TDA state funding of transit operations and capital for urban counties, including the County's eight public transit operators. Due to the State's budgetary issues, it suspended the STA allocations for FY 2009/10 and FY 2010/11; however, allocations were made and funded at the end of FY 2009/10. Sales taxes on gasoline and diesel fuels have historically generated the STA funding; however, recent legislation eliminated the tax on gasoline. State Transportation Improvement Program: Administered by Caltrans, the STIP is funded through state and federal gas tax dollars and is California's primary transportation fund. Dollars are allocated to each county based on a formula that takes into consideration population and highway centerline miles. Actual programming decisions for 75% of STIP dollars are made by local transportation agencies such as the Commission. STIP reimbursement estimates are based on budgeted expenditures for specific projects with STIP allocations approved by the CTC. Proposition 1B: In November 2006, the voters in California approved Proposition 1B, which funds various transportation programs from bonds issued by the State. Programs that are funded include Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), transit capital, STIP supplement, and Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (TCIF). CMIA and transit capital revenues for certain highway and rail projects nominated by the Commission and approved by the CTC are included in state reimbursement revenues. Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Registration Fees: State law allows county SAFE agencies to impose a $1 surcharge on vehicle registrations within the County to pay for call box purchases and operations; excess SAFE revenues may be used for 511 operations and as a match for FSP operations. The call boxes enable motorists to summon help should they encounter mechanical or emergency problems while on the road, whereas the 1E511 system provides real-time traffic and transit trip information available via the internet or telephone. Caltrans Freeway Service Patrol Allocations: Caltrans is the primary sponsor of the FSP and provides the majority of funding for the program, including towing services in construction zones. The State provides nearly 80% of the funding for the FSP program based on population, freeway miles, and level of congestion throughout the State. The Commission administers and implements the program along with the CHP and Caltrans. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality: The CMAQ program is federally funded and is targeted for transportation improvements in areas with air quality problems. This program pays for improvements that reduce congestion while improving air quality. The Commission has also used CMAQ dollars to include commuter assistance programs, signal interconnects, HOV lanes, and transit projects. CMAQ reimbursement estimates are based on budgeted expenditures for specific projects with CMAQ allocations. Federal Transit Administration: FTA funding is generally allocated annually by the federal government to urbanized areas and is based on calculated miles of service. On a reimbursement basis, the federal government provides funding for qualified capital investments in rail facilities, track, and vehicles. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee: In connection with the 2009 Measure A, the TUMF program was established in the Western County to provide additional funding for regional arterial projects. TUMF is administered by WRCOG. As a result of a MOU with WRCOG, the Commission will receive 48.7% of the TUMF revenues, which are divided equally between the regional arterial and CETAP programs. TUMF revenues maintained by WRCOG are allocated for regional arterial zone improvements and regional transit facilities. TUMF revenue estimates are based on monthly receipt trends and consideration of local housing and commercial construction activity in the County. Rail and Highway Licenses: The Commission owns parcels of land and right of way for highway, rail, and regional arterial projects in selected areas throughout the County. The ownership provides licensing and leasing opportunities for fiber-optic cable, advertising signs, and business tenants. The amount of funding received from the licenses and leases provides revenue to partially support the cost of owning and maintaining the Commission's land and facilities. Investment Income: The Commission has established a prudent investment policy for cash on hand that is intended to maximize return while providing absolute safeguards on principal and liquidity, as noted in Section 1. Interest earnings on the State and County investment pools are estimated at an interest rate of 0.25%. The earnings on funds held by the trustee for debt service and projects are assumed to be at 0.75%. Program Revenues and Other Sources Revenues and other financing sources for FY 2014/15 are allocated to the various Commission programs as follows: Management Services The primary funding sources for management services are Measure A allocations of $2,900,000 as well as LTF allocation transfers in of $850,000 and administration funding transfers in of $1,082,900 from TUMF, SAFE, and FSP as well as a federal grant of $10,000 will fund interns. Other revenues include $1,000 for administrative activities. Interest revenues in FY 2014/15 are $9,200. Bond Financing Measure A Western County revenues of $9,956,000 will be used to support bond financing costs. Interest revenues are $20,400. CETAP The Western County CETAP program will receive $4,000,000 from TUMF for development of new CETAP corridors. Additionally, other local revenues include $42,600 representing investment income. Economic Development In order to attract commercial and industrial development and jobs to locate in the Western County area, Measure A Western County revenues of $1,475,000 will be used to create an infrastructure improvement bank to improve and construct interchanges, provide public transit linkages or stations, and make other improvements to the transportation system. Interest earnings are $13,400. Highways Funding for the highway program includes 2009 Measure A sales tax revenues of $57,101,000 for Western County highways and Coachella Valley highways and regional arterials programs. The 2009 Measure A Western County sales tax revenues will be used primarily for the SR-91, 1-15, and 1-215 corridor improvements. Unexpended 1989 Measure A Western County revenues from prior years will be used on remaining projects such as SR-74 widening from 1-15 to 7th Street and curve realignment, SR-91 HOV lanes, and 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors, and a contribution to the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Federal funds for highway projects include $140,000 in demonstration funds for the 74/215 interchange, $5,543,000 in CMAQ funds for the SR-91 HOV lanes, $50,000 in STP funds for the I-215/Blaine Street project, and $1,200,000 in demonstration funds for the 91/71 interchange improvements. Other federal funds include $2,767,000 for BABs subsidy payments related to the 2010 Bonds. State funds include STIP funding of $25,500,000 and Proposition 1B funding of $15,176,000 will be used on the 1- 215 corridor improvements. Additional local funding includes $154,600 in TUMF zone reimbursements from WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange, $500,000 in lease revenues, $65,000 in carpool violations, and interest revenue of $1,581,100. In FY 2014/15, the Commission anticipates the $191,600,000 in a federal TIFIA loan drawdown to fund the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Transfers in include $417,900,000 in sales tax and toll revenue bond and TIFIA loan proceeds to fund the SR-91 corridor improvement project; $26,653,700 to the Sales Tax Bonds debt service fund for Measure A Western County and Coachella Valley highways debt service; $40,000,000 to the Sales Tax Bonds capital projects fund for a contribution from the 1989 Measure A Western County highway fund to the SR-91 corridor improvement project; and $250,000 from the General fund for toll organization planning. Local Streets and Roads Measure A allocations of $50,633,000 for the local streets and roads program are distributed to the cities and the County for local street repairs, maintenance, and construction. Transfers in include $47,700 from the General Fund for 2009 Measure A local street and roads salary and benefit expenditures. New Corridors To leverage local, state, and federal funding for four new transportation corridors identified through CETAP, Measure A Western County revenues of $13,644,000 will be available for environmental clearance, right of way acquisition, and construction of these new corridors. Interest revenues of $173,100 are included in local revenues. Rail Unexpended 1989 Measure A Western County revenues will be used primarily for the Perris Valley Line and other rail capital projects. The 2009 Measure A Western County's public transit program allocated $7,523,000 for rail. Federal FTA funding for the Perris Valley Line project consists of $48,650,000 from FTA Small Starts, $21,002,500 from CMAQ, and $3,602,000 in federal allocations for other rail projects. STIP revenues of $45,668,000 will fund the Perris Valley Line. State Transportation Enhancements revenues of $1,300,000 will fund the Riverside station pedestrian improvement project. Local revenues include $2,000,000 for the sale of land, investment income of $114,400, reimbursements of $940,500 related to the Perris Transit Center, and property management revenues of $95,000. Transfers in of $116,000 and $311,000 from STA and 1989 Measure A Western County rail funds, respectively, are for Coachella Valley and Western County rail projects. Regional Arterials The Western County regional arterial program will receive funds from Measure A and TUMF in the amounts of $11,063,000 and $4,000,000, respectively. The new TUMF revenues along with unexpended TUMF revenues from prior years will be the primary source of funding TUMF regional arterial projects. Other local revenues also consist of investment income of $63,400. Transfers in consist of $21,633,600 from 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterials and TUMF CETAP as a match for TUMF regional arterial projects and $751,000 from 2009 Measure A Western County local streets and roads, in accordance with the 2009 Measure A, related to a city not eligible to receive those funds. Public and Specialized Transit LTF sales tax revenues of $81,500,000 are allocated primarily for public bus and rail transit operations and capital in the County. A small portion of these revenues is used for LTF planning and administration allocations as well as SB821 bicycle and pedestrian facilities grants. STA allocations of $12,944,700 are allocated to the County's public transit operators. For the FY 2014/15 budget, unexpended LTF and STA revenues from prior years will also be used to fund transit operations as well as bicycle and pedestrian facilities grants. Under the 2009 Measure A, public transit funding of $10,861,000 has been allocated for Western County specialized transit and intercity bus services and Coachella Valley specialized and public transit services. Federal revenues consist of $13,900 in FTA Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) Section 5316 funding. Local revenues represent investment income of $376,000. Planning and Programming Transportation planning studies are funded with a LTF off -the -top allocation transfer in of $2,445,000, or three percent of estimated LTF revenues. A LTF allocation transfer in of $1,500,000 will fund grade separation projects for the city of Corona. STIP in the amount of $834,000 will fund PPM activities of the Commission and CVAG. Local revenues consist of $1,250,000 for a traffic signal coordination project and investment income of $3,700. Rail Station Maintenance and Operations Rail operations, which include Metrolink operating and capital contributions, station maintenance, and support, will be funded with LTF allocation transfers in of $11,535,600; transfers in of $250,000 in PPM funds and $159,500 in 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Assistance funds are related to rail feasibility studies Perris Transit Center operations, respectively. A federal grant of $10,000 will fund interns. In addition to interest revenues of $1,400, local revenues include $115,000 in reimbursements primarily from SCRRA for security costs, $5,000 for Metrolink violator citations, and $7,500 for miscellaneous vending machine revenues. Commuter Assistance The Commuter Assistance program will receive funding of $1,844,000 from 2009 Measure A Western County public transit to assist in implementing services to commuters and employers in promoting use of alternate modes of transportation in Western County. The Commission will also receive CMAQ funds of $357,000 to support the commuter assistance program and a federal grant of $2,000 for interns. Local revenues consist of other agency reimbursements of $1,423,600 for support of the San Bernardino commuter assistance program and regional ridematching as well as investment income of $36,400. Motorist Assistance SAFE is funded from $1,600,000 in revenues received through DMV registration fees, while Caltrans will allocate $2,425,000 in State highway account funds to cover FSP services. A federal grant of $4,000 will fund interns. The Commission will also receive local revenues of $372,800 to support SANBAG's share of the 1E511 system operations. Local revenues represent investment income of $15,800 and cost recoveries of $10,600 from responsible parties related to call box knockdowns. The State's FSP contribution is matched with an operating transfer in from SAFE of $548,700. Riverside County Transportation Commission 111111111111111 SECTION 5 COMMISSION DEBT Commission Debt The Commission's current debt under the 2009 Measure A has been incurred for highway, regional arterial, and local streets and roads projects for which title usually vests or, upon completion, will vest with Caltrans or local jurisdictions for ongoing operations and maintenance. Future Measure A sales taxes are pledged to cover Measure A debt service payments on the sales tax revenue bonds and commercial paper notes. Future toll revenues generated on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, which is part of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, are pledged to pay debt service on the 2013 Toll Bonds and federal TIFIA loan. The Commission may also issue commercial paper notes for other 2009 Measure A projects. Since the financed projects are not assets of the Commission for which the Commission will have operating responsibilities, except for the intangible rights to operate the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, future operating costs related to these projects cannot be determined and are not applicable. However, for toll and rail assets, operating budget impacts are considered in future project development. Table 36 presents a summary of the anticipated changes in the Commission's debt during FY 2014/15. Table 36—Changes in Commission Debt July 1, 2014 Commercial Paper 2009 Sales Tax Bonds 2010 Sales Tax Bonds 2013 Sales Tax Bonds 2013 Toll Bonds TIFIA Loan Commercial Paper Additions (Reductions) June 30, 2015 $ - $ 154,300,000 150,000,000 462, 200, 000 176,654,600 - $ - 191,600,000 (7,400,000) $ 943,154,600 $ 191,600,000 $ (7,400,000) 146,900,000 150,000,000 462, 200, 000 176,654,600 191,600,000 $ 1,127,354,600 In March 2005 the Commission established a commercial paper program to advance project development and land and right of way acquisition under the 2009 Measure A TIP. In September 2013 the Commission reduced the commercial paper program from $120,000,000 to $60,000,000. Maturities of commercial paper notes are rolled over to new issuances of commercial paper. Regarding the commercial paper notes, the Commission currently maintains a P-1 and an A-1+ rating from Moody's Investors Service (Moody's) and Standard and Poor's Rating Service (S&P), respectively. Interest payments are made from available commercial paper proceeds or sales tax revenues. The Commission did not issue commercial paper notes in FY 2013/14 and does not anticipate the issuance of commercial paper notes in FY 2014/15. Accordingly, no commercial paper debt service expenditures are reflected in the Commercial Paper capital projects fund. The Commission has an irrevocable direct draw letter of credit and reimbursement agreement with Union Bank, N.A. (Union Bank) as credit and liquidity support for the commercial paper notes. A second letter of credit and reimbursement agreement with The Bank of Tokyo -Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., acting through its New York Branch (Bank of Tokyo) was terminated in July 2013 in connection with the reduction of the commercial paper program. The letter of credit in the amount of $60,750,000 expires in October 2014; however, the Commission anticipates renewing or replacing the letter of credit and reimbursement agreement. The costs for the liquidity support are reflected in the 2009 Measure A Western County Bond Financing special revenue fund. Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Under the provisions of the 2009 Measure A, the Commission has the authority to issue bonds subject to a bond debt limitation of $975,000,000, reflecting an increase from the original authorization of $500,000,000 as a result of the voter approval of Measure K in November 2010. The sales tax bonds are secured by a pledge of the 2009 Measure A revenues. All sales tax revenue bonds mature on or before June 2039, prior to the expiration of the 2009 Measure A. As a means to achieve a greater level of interest rate stability, the Commission entered into two interest rate swaps for a total notional amount of $185,000,000 at a fixed rate for 20 years effective October 2009; the counterparties pay the Commission a floating rate equal to 67% of the one -month London Interbank Offer Rate, or LIBOR. The counterparty for the first swap ($100,000,000 notional amount) at a fixed rate of 3.679% is Bank of America, N.A. (Bank of America), and the counterparty for the second swap ($85,000,000 notional amount) at a fixed of 3.206% is Deutsche Bank AG (Deutsche Bank). As of June 30, 2015, the projected notional amounts for the Bank of America and Deutsche Bank swaps are $79,400,000 and $67,500,000, respectively. In connection with the commencement of the interest rate swaps in October 2009, the Commission issued $185,000,000 in variable rate sales tax revenue bonds to retire outstanding commercial paper notes, refund bonds issued in 2008, fund a portion of the debt service reserve, and pay costs of issuance. The 2009 Bonds are secured by standby bond purchase agreements (SBPAs) with JP Morgan Chase Bank (JPMorgan), which expire in September 2014; the Commission anticipates renewing or replacing the SBPAs. In connection with the extension of the original SBPAs with JPMorgan in September 2011, the Commission obtained the release of the debt service reserve for capital project funding purposes. The costs for these liquidity facilities are accounted for in the 2009 Measure A Western County Bond Financing special revenue fund. For FY 2014/15, the Commission has budgeted debt service principal and interest payments of $7,400,000 and $6,604,700, respectively. In November 2010 the Commission issued $37,630,000 in fixed rate tax-exempt bonds (Series A Tax -Exempt) and $112,370,000 in fixed rate taxable bonds (Series B Taxable) designated as BABs under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The aggregate amount issued of $150,000,000 for the 2010 Bonds was used to retire approximately $103,300,000 of outstanding commercial paper notes, provide funds for 2009 Measure A Western County capital projects, and pay costs of issuance. A portion of the BABs was designated as recovery zone economic development bonds (RZEDBs). The Commission expects to receive a cash subsidy from the United States Treasury equal to 35% of the interest payable on the BABs or 45% of the interest payable on the Series B Taxable bonds additionally designated as RZEDBs; however, in FY 2013/14, the BABs subsidy was reduced approximately 7.2% due to federal sequestration cuts, similar to the prior year. If sequestration continues, the FY 2014/15 BABs subsidy is expected to also be reduced by approximately 7.2%. Estimated net debt service payments for the 2010 Bonds in FY 2014/15 are $0 for principal and $9,530,500 for interest payments, which are offset by the $2,767,000 cash subsidy payment. In July 2013 the Commission issued $462,200,000 in fixed rate sales tax revenue bonds in connection with the SR- 91 corridor improvement project. The proceeds of the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds were used to fund a portion of the costs of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, retire $60,000,000 in outstanding commercial paper notes, pay capitalized interest through December 2017, and pay costs of issuance. Estimated debt service payments for the 2013 Bonds in FY 2014/15 are $0 for principal and $24,041,100 for interest payments. The Commission has received long-term debt ratings of Aa2, AA+, and AA from Moody's, S&P, and Fitch Ratings (Fitch), respectively on its currently outstanding sales tax revenue bonds. Toll Revenue Bonds and TIFIA Loan In July 2010 the Commission authorized the issuance of up to $900,000,000 in toll revenue bonds in anticipation of the financing requirements for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. In July 2013 the Commission issued $176,654,600 in toll revenue bonds, at a discount of $2,433,300, that consist of $123,825,000 in current interest bonds (CIBs) and $52,829,600 in capital appreciation bonds (CABS). The CIBs have maturity dates through June 2048, while the CABS have maturity dates commencing June 2022 through June 2043 at the accreted value. Estimated debt service payments for the 2013 Toll Bonds in FY 2014/15 are $0 for principal and $7,119,900 for interest payments. The 2013 Toll Bonds are secured by a lien on the trust estate, which consists primarily of toll revenues and account revenues less operating and maintenance expenses of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes. As a result of an invitation in April 2012 from the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) and subsequent approval of the Commission's application, in July 2013 the Commission executed a federal TIFIA loan in an amount up to $421,054,400, which provided the final puzzle piece needed for the full funding of the SR-91 corridor improvement project. The TIFIA loan is a toll revenue bond that is subordinate to the 2013 Toll Bonds unless and until the occurrence of a bankruptcy related event. Proceeds of the TIFIA loan may be drawn upon after certain conditions have been met. Interest on outstanding disbursements is 3.47% and is compounded semiannually. The TIFIA loan matures on the earlier of June 2051 and the date that is 35 years after the substantial completion date of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, which is anticipated in January 2017. Interest payments commence on the fifth anniversary of the substantial completion date or the first interest payment date occurring prior to the fifth anniversary date. Accordingly, semiannual interest payments are anticipated to commence December 2021; principal payments commence annually in June 2030. The Commission is required to fund a $20,000,000 TIFIA debt service reserve no later than July 2019 from sale proceeds of excess land acquired for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. The TIFIA loan is also secured by the trust estate, similar to the 2013 Toll Bonds. The 2013 Toll Bonds and the TIFIA loan received long-term ratings from S&P and Fitch of BBB-. Debt Capacity Analysis The Commission is legally prohibited from issuing additional sales tax revenue debt if its debt coverage ratio is less than 1.5 to 1 on all senior sales tax revenue debt. The Commission has adopted a higher standard of 2 to 1 as part of its debt management policy. As Chart 22 and Table 37 indicate, the Commission has successfully met its policy standard for sales tax revenue debt issued under the 2009 Measure A, even in a fluctuating sales tax revenue environment. The 1989 Measure A related debt consistently exceeded the Commission's standard, and coverage for the 2009 Measure A related debt of 4.0 is anticipated for FY 2014/15. Any coverage less than 2 to 1 would necessitate using other program funding to cover all debt service expenditures. Chart 22 — Measure A Debt Capacity Analysis $180, 000, 000 $160, 000, 000 $140, 000, 000 $120, 000, 000 $100, 000, 000 $80, 000, 000 $60, 000, 000 $40, 000, 000 $20, 000, 000 $- E FY 2013/14 Table 37 — Measure A Debt Capacity Analysis FY 2014/15 14 Senior Debt Service ■ Available Revenues FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Sales Tax Revenues Senior Debt Service Coverage Ratio - Senior Debt Long -Term Debt Rating Commercial Paper Rating 157,000,000 $ 167,000,000 39,068,300 $ 44,809,300 4.0 4.0 Aa 2/AA+/AA Aa 2/AA+/AA P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ As to the toll -supported debt consisting of the 2013 Toll Bonds as senior debt and the TIFIA loan as subordinate debt, the Commission is required to establish and collect tolls in connection with the toll road to produce net revenues equal to or in excess of the following ratios: • 150% on senior lien debt; • 130%on senior lien, second lien, and subordinate debt; and • 100% on outstanding debt plus reserve deposits and certain other funds established under the indenture. Toll operations are anticipated to commence in January 2017 upon substantial completion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Aggregate Debt Service Schedule for Sales Tax Bonds Debt service requirements for the sales tax revenue bonds are based on amortization schedules for the 2009 Bonds; 2010 Bonds, including the BABs cash subsidy payments; and the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds. Since commercial paper is expected to be refinanced with sales tax revenue bonds, debt service requirements for commercial paper are not included in Table 38; the Commission does not anticipate any outstanding commercial paper notes during FY 2014/15. Table 38 — Commission Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Net Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Interest Subsidy Payments Net Debt Service 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020-2024 2025-2029 2030-2034 2035-2039 Total 7,400,000 7,800,000 8,100,000 31,460,000 20,990,000 120,830,000 153,065,000 183,255,000 233,600,000 40,176,300 39,398,000 39,077,600 38,759,300 37,277,400 171,159,900 140,223,500 99,464,700 41,948,300 (2,767,000) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (14,910,600) (14,910,600) (14,551,500) (7,385,900) $ 766,500,000 $ 647,485,000 $ (66,454,000) Outstanding Debt and Debt Service Requirements as of June 30, 2015 44,809,300 44,215,900 44,195,500 67,237,200 55,285,300 277,079,300 278,377,900 268,168,200 268,162,400 $ 1,347,531,000 The following is a summary of debt issued and secured by 2009 Measure A revenues, receipt of which began in FY 2009/10: 2005 Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A: In February 2005, the Commission authorized a $200,000,000 commercial paper program. In March 2005, the Commission established the program for $185,000,000 Commercial Paper Notes (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A and B. In October 2010, the program was reduced to $120,000,000; in September 2013, the program was further reduced to $60,000,000. The repayment of principal and interest on the commercial paper notes is secured by an irrevocable direct draw letter of credit issued by Union Bank, and the Measure A sales tax revenues secure such repayment. Maturities of the commercial paper notes may range from one to 270 days, and interest rates are variable and dependent on current market conditions. The note agreements require the trustee to hold all note proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. 2009 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A, B, and C: In October 2009, the Commission issued $185,000,000 principal amount of serial bonds to refinance the 2008 bonds, retire a portion of the outstanding principal amount of the commercial paper notes and a portion of accrued interest on the notes, and fund a reserve fund. In September 2011, the reserve fund was released to fund project costs in connection with the extension of the SBPAs by JPMorgan. The bonds mature in annual installments ranging from $6,500,000 to $13,700,000 on various dates through June 1, 2029 with variable interest rates set on a weekly basis. The 2009 Bonds are integrated with the interest rate swaps, thereby creating synthetic fixed rate debt. The 2009 Bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. Debt service requirements for the 2009 Bonds are summarized in Table 39. Table 39 — 2009 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total Debt Service 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020-2024 2025-2029 Total 7,400,000 7,800,000 8,100,000 8,500,000 8,900,000 50,700,000 62,900,000 6,604,700 $ 5,826,400 5,506,000 5,187,700 4,853,800 18,735,200 7,836,400 14, 004, 700 13,626,400 13,606,000 13,687,700 13,753,800 69,435,200 70,736,400 $ 154,300,000 $ 54,550,200 $ 208,850,200 2010 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A Tax -Exempt and Series B Taxable: In November 2010, the Commission issued $150,000,000 principal amount of serial bonds to retire all of the outstanding principal amount of the commercial paper notes and fund project costs. The bonds mature in annual installments ranging from $12,105,000 to $17,980,000 on various dates from June 1, 2030 through June 1, 2039. Interest rates for the Series A Tax -Exempt and Series B Taxable bonds are 5% and 6.807%, respectively. The Commission expects to receive cash subsidies from the U.S. Treasury related to the Series B Taxable bonds. The 2010 Bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. Debt service requirements, net of subsidy payments for the 2010 Bonds are summarized in Table 40. Table 40 — 2010 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Net Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020-2024 2025-2029 2030-2034 2035-2039 Total Principal 66,800,000 83,200,000 Interest 9,530,500 9,530,500 9,530,500 9,530,500 9,530,500 47,652,600 47,652,600 41, 017, 800 17,452,100 Subsidy (2,767,000) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (2,982,100) (14,910,600) (14,910,600) (14,551,500) (7,385,900) $ 150,000,000 $ 201,427,600 $ (66,454,000) Net Debt Service 6,763,500 6,548,400 6,548,400 6,548,400 6,548,400 32,742,000 32,742,000 93,266,300 93,266,200 $ 284,973,600 2013 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Limited Tax Bonds), Series A Tax -Exempt: In July 2013, the Commission issued $462,200,000 principal amount of serial bonds at a premium of $38,328,800 to retire all of the outstanding principal amount of commercial paper notes, fund a portion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project costs, pay capitalized interest during construction, and pay costs of issuance. The $286,065,000 of serial bonds mature in annual installments ranging from $12,090,000 to $24,450,000 on various dates from June 1, 2018 through June 1, 2033 at interest rates ranging from 5.00 to 5.25%. The $176,135,000 of term bonds are due on June 1, 2039 with annual sinking fund payments ranging from $25,735,000 to $33,235,000 on June 1, 2034 through June 1, 2039 at an interest rate of 5.25%. The 2013 Sales Tax Bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and a portion of sales tax revenues and to segregate all funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. Debt service requirements for the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds are summarized in Table 41. Table 41— 2013 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total Debt Service 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020-2024 2025-2029 2030-2034 2035-2039 Total $ - $ 24,041,100 $ 24,041,100 - 24,041,100 24,041,100 - 24,041,100 24,041,100 22,960,000 24,041,100 47,001,100 12,090,000 22,893,100 34,983,100 70,130,000 104,772,100 174,902,100 90,165,000 84,734,500 174,899,500 116,455,000 58,446,900 174,901,900 150,400,000 24,496,200 174,896,200 $ 462,200,000 $ 391,507,200 $ 853,707,200 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds, Series A (Current Interest Obligation): In July 2013, the Commission issued $123,825,000 principal amount of serial CIBs to fund a portion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, pay capitalized interest during construction, fund a debt service reserve fund, fund an initial amount for an Operations and Maintenance Fund, and pay costs of issuance. The CIBs consist of a serial bond maturing on June 1, 2044 in the amount of $39,315,000 at an interest rate of 5.75% and a term bond due on June 1, 2048 in the amount of $84,510,000 with annual sinking funds payments of $42,255,000 on June 1, 2047 and June 1, 2048 at an interest rate of 5.75%. The Toll Revenue Bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and segregate funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. Debt service requirements for the 2013 Toll Revenue CIBS are summarized in Table 42. Table 42 — 2013 Toll Revenue Current Interest Obligation Bonds Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total Debt Service 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020-2024 2025-2029 2030-2034 2035-2039 2040-2044 2045-2048 Total 39,315,000 84,510,000 - $ 7,119,900 7,119, 900 7,119, 900 7,119,900 7,119, 900 35,599,700 35,599,700 35,599,700 35,599,700 35,599,700 17,007,600 $ 123,825,000 $ 230,605,600 $ 7,119,900 7,119, 900 7,119, 900 7,119, 900 7,119, 900 35,599,700 35,599,700 35,599,700 35,599,700 74,914,700 101, 517, 600 $ 354,430,600 2013 Toll Revenue Bonds, Series A (Capital Appreciation Obligation): In July 2013, the Commission issued $52,829,600 principal amount of serial CABS to fund a portion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, pay capitalized interest during construction, fund a debt service reserve fund, fund an initial amount for an Operations and Maintenance Fund, and pay costs of issuance. The CABS will not pay current interest as interest will be compounded commencing December 2013 semiannually and paid at maturity. Therefore, the CABS will increase in value, or accrete, by the accumulation of such compounded interest from its initial principal amount to the maturity value in installments ranging from $3,440,000 to $34,220,000 on various dates from June 1, 2022 through June 1, 2043. Interest rates and yield to maturity range from 5.30%to 7.15%. The Toll Revenue Bond agreements require the trustee to hold all bond proceeds and segregate funds into separate accounts as required by the indentures. Debt service requirements for the 2013 Toll Revenue CABS are summarized in Table 43. Table 43 — 2013 Toll Revenue Capital Appreciation Obligation Bonds Debt Service Requirements Fiscal Year Principal Accreted Interest Total Debt Service 2022-2023 2024-2028 2029-2033 2034-2038 2039-2041 Total $ 5,494,800 18,364,700 15, 215, 000 1,963,300 11,791,800 $ 3,655,200 22,490,300 34,850,000 6,196,700 78,458,200 $ 52,829,600 $ 145,650,400 9,150,000 40,855,000 50,065,000 8,160,000 90,250,000 $ 198,480,000 TIFIA Loan Agreement: In July 2013, the Commission executed a TIFIA loan of up to $421,054,400 for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. In FY 2014/15, the Commission is expected to draw $191,600,000 principal amount of TIFIA loan proceeds for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. During construction and for a period of up to five years following substantial completion, interest is compounded and added to the initial TIFIA loan. The TIFIA loan requires mandatory debt service payments at a minimum and scheduled debt service payments to the extent additional funds are available. TIFIA debt service payments are expected to commence on December 1, 2021, which is five years after substantial completion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project, through June 1, 2051. The interest rate of the TIFIA loan is 3.47%. Based on a projected draw schedule, the following is an estimate of mandatory and scheduled debt service. Table 44 —TIFIA Debt Service Requirements Mandatory Scheduled Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total Interest Total 2019-2023 $ - $ 3,901,700 $ 3,901,700 $ 31,515,900 $ 35,417,600 2024-2028 23,937,700 23,937,700 64,630,500 88,568,200 2029-2033 167,600 74,772,800 74,940,400 13,736,400 88,676,800 2034-2038 98,847,100 82,933,400 181,780,500 181,780,500 2039-2043 100,579,100 62,230,000 162,809,100 162,809,100 2044-2048 179,828,300 41,881,800 221,710,100 221,710,100 2049-2051 130,917,900 6,628,000 137,545,900 137,545,900 Total 510,340,000 $ 296,285,400 $ 806,625,400 $ 109,882,800 $ 916,508,200 Accretion (89,285,600) Initial Loan $ 421,054,400 The allocation of the sales tax revenue bonds to the 2009 Measure A programs is presented in Chart 23. Chart 23 — Program Long -Term Debt Local Streets and Roads 0% Highways and Regional Arterials 100 The allocation of the sales tax revenue bonds by the benefiting geographic area is presented in Chart 24. Chart 24 — Long -Term Debt by Geographic Area Palo Verde Coachella Valley 1 Valley 0% r 2% Western County 98% Outstanding Debt and Legal Debt Margin at June 30, 2015 A summary of the Commission's outstanding debt secured by Measure A sales tax revenues and related legal debt margin projected at June 30, 2015 is presented in Table 45: Table 45 — Legal Debt Margin 2009 Measure A Authorized Sales Tax Revenue Debt 2005 Commercial Paper Notes 2009 Bonds 2010 Bonds 2013 Bonds Total Outstanding Debt Legal Debt Margin $ 975,000,000 146,900,000 150,000,000 462,200,000 759,100,000 $ 215,900,000 Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 6 DEPARTMENT BUDGETS Table 46 — Budget Comparison by Department FY 2013 — 2015 FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Revised Budget FY 13/14 Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Revenues Measure A Sales Tax LTF Sales Tax STA Sales Tax Federal Reimbursements State Reimbursements Local Reimbursements TUMF Revenue Other Revenue Investment Income Total Revenues Expenditures Management Services: Executive Management Administration Legislative Affairs and Communications Finance Total Management Services Regional Programs: Planning and Programming Services Rail Maintenance and Operations Public and Specialized Transit Commuter Assistance Motorist Assistance Total Regional Programs Capital Project Development and Delivery Debt Service: Principal Payments Interest Payments Cost of Issuance Total Debt Service Total Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers In Transfers Out Debt Proceeds TIFIA Loan Proceeds Bond Premium Bond Discount Net Financing Sources (Uses) Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over (under) Expenditures and Other Financing Sources (Uses) $ 149,428,100 $ 157,000,000 72,828,800 76,500,000 14,170, 200 13, 298,000 14,230,000 94,389,000 22,875, 500 137,891,200 1,711,900 2,364,000 12,421,100 7,823,400 1,540,600 1,090,400 1,769,900 4,026,500 290,976,100 494,382,500 244,000 1,213,100 890,900 4,364,500 6,712,500 3,099,800 11,265,800 57,246,500 2,868,400 3,563,500 78,044,000 197,381,900 6,824,700 15,404,700 308,900 1,863,900 1,203,600 5,209,000 8,585,400 5,767,000 15,800,500 106,994,100 4,411,700 5,464,600 138,437,900 760,735,600 86,100,000 41,075,800 7,051,300 22,229,400 134,227,100 304, 367, 800 1, 041, 986,000 $ 157,000,000 76,500,000 13,298,000 50,267,900 94,640,500 3,048,800 7,530,100 639,100 5,292,000 408,216,400 331,900 1,376,900 908,000 4,982,300 7,599,100 3,241,400 15,042,500 79,511,300 4,455,600 4,805,200 107,056,000 484,676,800 67,100,000 44,828,300 7,050,900 118,979,200 718,311,100 $ 167,000,000 81,500,000 12,944,700 83,351,400 92,503,000 6,211,000 8,154,600 575,000 2,450,900 454,690,600 471,700 2,086,000 1,189,400 5,267,100 9,014,200 5,883,300 18,054,600 113,814,000 3,300,900 4,677,100 145,729,900 812,857,900 7,400,000 47,296,200 54,696,200 1,022,298,200 $ 10,000,000 5,000,000 (353,300) (11,037,600) (45,388,200) 3,847,000 331,200 (515,400) (1,575,600) (39,691,900) 162,800 222,100 (14,200) 58,100 428,800 116,300 2,254,100 6,819,900 (1,110,800) (787,500) 7,292,000 52,122,300 (78,700,000) 6,220,400 (7,051,300) (79,530,900) (19,687,800) 6% 7% -3% - 12% - 33% 163% 4% -47% -39% -8% 53% 12% -1% 1% 5% 2% 14% 6% -25% -14% 5% 7% - 91% 15% -100% -59% -2% (13,391, 700) 133,065,300 (133,065,300) 60,000,000 60,000,000 (547,603,500) 637,010,600 (637,010,600) 632,158,000 110,000,000 68,616,000 (2,433,300) 808,340,700 (310,094,700) 485,301,700 (485,301,700) 638,854,600 38,328,800 (2,433,300) 674,750,100 (567,607,600) 526,034,700 (526,034,700) 191,600,000 (20,004,100) (110,975,900) 110,975,900 (632,158,000) 81,600,000 (68,616,000) 2,433,300 191,600,000 (616,740,700) 4% -17% -17% -100% 74% -100% -100% -76% 46,608,300 Beginning Fund Balance 575,578,600 Ending Fund Balance 260,737,200 622,186,900 364,655,400 622,186,900 (376,007,600) (636,744,800) -244% 986,842,300 364,655,400 59% $ 622,186,900 $ 882,924,100 $ 986,842,300 $ 610,834,700 $ (272,089,400) -31% Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 6.1 MANAGEMENT SERVICES Executive Management Mission Statement: "To maintain the highest level of achievement and professionalism possible while managing the activities of the Commission with a small staff complemented with consultants, to effectuate sound transportation policies and legislation compatible with environmental standards." Chart 25 - Executive Management Support Costs Salaries and 14% Benefits 30% Professional Costs 56% Expenditures Executive Management has a budget of $471,700 (Table 47) for oversight of all Commission functions. The 44% increase in salaries and benefits reflects the allocation of FTEs from other programs; 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs; and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $265,000 include legal fees to defend recently enacted design -build legislation and other matters and consulting services for organizational training. Support costs include various membership dues and staff -related travel costs of $67,100. Table 47 - Executive Management Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 129,300 $ 96,700 $ 114,400 Professional Costs Legal Services 69,200 65,000 75,000 Professional Services- General 90,000 90,000 Total Professional Costs 69,200 155,000 165,000 Support Costs 45,500 57,200 52,500 TOTAL Executive Management $ 244,000 $ 308,900 $ 331,900 $ 139,600 165,000 100,000 265,000 67,100 $ 471,700 Executive Management Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.01 0.01 Deputy Executive Director 0.07 0.10 Executive Director 0.19 0.15 Government Relations Manager 0.00 0.00 Senior Office Assistant 0.00 0.00 FT E 0.27 0.26 $ 42,900 44% 100,000 154% 10,000 11% 110,000 71% 9,900 17% $ 162,800 53% FY 14/15 0.00 0.05 0.25 0.05 0.05 0.40 Department Budget Overview Department Description The Executive Director is responsible for and provides strong leadership in developing and implementing new strategies at the local, regional, and statewide levels to assure delivery of transportation improvements and programs throughout the County. Furthermore, Executive Management is committed to fostering a positive and supportive work environment for staff that emphasizes quality work and encourages teamwork and open communication, with a commitment to serving the public. This is accomplished through a productive and collaborative effort with the members of the Commission and the oversight of the Commission's Executive Committee. Key Assumptions • The Executive Director will play a prominent role with external audiences with an emphasis on working with Congress, the California Legislature, Riverside County business organizations, and Southern California transportation agencies and local governments regarding advancing transportation policy in California. Policy concerns include the need for ongoing transportation investment, flexibility in project delivery methods, streamlining of environmental processes, and a renewed focus of the connection between transportation projects and the overall quality of life in Riverside County. • Project delivery will be a top priority in FY 2014/15 with construction proceeding on a number of capital projects. The Commission is serving as the lead agency on three notable, high -profile projects: the SR-91 corridor improvement project in Corona, the construction of the Perris Valley Line, and the 1-215 central segment corridor improvement project. The combined budget for these projects exceeds $1.6 billion. In addition to serving as the lead agency for the above -mentioned projects, the Commission is the primary funding agency of many other projects including the SR-91 HOV lane project in downtown Riverside, the 1-10 Jefferson interchange in the Coachella Valley, the SR-60 truck climbing/descending lane, and the SR-74 curve widening project near the city of Hemet. • Another component of project delivery will include the need to complete the environmental review process on a number of future projects including the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment. • There will be a continued focus on enhanced cost-effective Metrolink and Los Angeles -San Diego -San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN) Rail Corridor service along with continuing development of a Service Development Plan (SDP) and possible environmental document for intercity rail service for the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass. • The advancement of construction on a number of projects will require a requisite increase in public outreach to the media and local governments as well as the need for watchful oversight over construction and right of way costs. • A renewed emphasis, as part of a region wide effort, will be placed on working with local governments and stakeholders to advance active transportation projects such as bicycling, walking and transit use. • The Commission will remain an active participant as part of a concerted statewide effort to seek additional transportation funding while advocating for process improvements to ease project development. Accomplishments FY 2013/14 saw extraordinary accomplishments at the Commission, placing it in the top tier of California transportation organizations. In several areas, the Commission stood by itself in successful advocacy, innovation, and leadership. • Broke ground on the widening of SR-91 corridor improvement project in Corona which also includes the extension of the 91 Express Lanes from the Orange County Line to I-15. • Continued to implement components of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. • Allocated $152 million to local jurisdictions for a wide variety of arterial, interchange, bicycle facility, and highway projects. When combined with local matching funds, the combined investment in these projects exceeds $350 million. • Circulated and evaluated responses to revised Draft Environmental Impact Reports for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. • Guided the Commission through an uncertain economic environment with cost savings and successful adherence to limits on administrative salaries and expenditures and approved a salary resolution which requires Commission employees to pay their full share of CaIPERS contributions by FY 2015/16. • Funded the completion of the 60/215 East Junction interchange and the addition of an eastbound lane on SR- 60 between Martin Luther King Boulevard and Blaine Street. • Continued a successful partnership with SANBAG to construct the 1-215 bi-county project which adds a HOV lane in each direction of the I-215 from SR-60 to I-10. • Continued to fund the acquisition of needed habitat for the Western Riverside County MSHCP as outlined in the 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plan. • Completed project work to ensure the allocation of Proposition 1B TCIF funding for a number of railroad grade separation and trade corridor projects. During the past fiscal year, construction was completed on the Iowa Avenue grade separation and the I-215/Van Buren interchange; construction began on Auto Center Drive, Avenue 52, Avenue 56/Airport Boulevard, Clay Street, Magnolia Avenue, Streeter Avenue, Riverside Avenue and Sunset Avenue grade separation projects. • Participated in a statewide effort that led to the approval of AB 401, which provides authorization for the use of design -build projects on state highways. • Advocated for and successfully obtained inclusion of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass rail service into the State Intercity Rail Plan. Major Initiatives FY 2014/15 will be a year of constant activity and will feature efforts to manage a number of high profile projects. Chief among them will be the SR-91 corridor improvement project through Corona, a $1.4 billion dollar effort that will add general purpose and express lanes to a 10-mile stretch of one of southern California's most congested freeways. This will be Riverside County's largest transportation project and one of the most valuable, in terms of project cost, in the entire state. Along with the SR-91 corridor improvement project, the Commission will continue to serve as the lead agency on construction for the widening of the 1-215 central segment corridor improvement project, the SR-74 curve widening, and the Perris Valley Line. The Commission, through its partnership with Caltrans is funding construction to add HOV lanes on SR-91 through downtown Riverside and the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector project. Yet another partnership can be seen with SANBAG in the widening of the 1-215, known as the bi-county project. This effort adds a HOV lane in each direction to the 1-215 between SR-60 and 1-10. Caltrans and the Commission continue to partner on developing a truck climbing lane and shoulder widening project on SR-60 to improve safety and provide congestion relief. The Commission has approved significant state funding for the I- 10 Jefferson Street interchange which will begin construction in FY 2014/15. While the focus will certainly be on construction, project development work continues with the planned completion and approval of environmental documents for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment projects. A number of additional efforts are moving along in various stages of project development. For example, the Commission will be launching an alternatives analysis and planning effort to advance the goal of additional passenger rail service to serve the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass rail corridor. This line has been incorporated in the State's rail plan but more work must be done to ensure funding and facilities for regular and effective Amtrak service between Los Angeles and Phoenix. The Coachella Valley is also home to yet another innovative project known as the CV Link. This facility, primarily located along the Whitewater Wash, links the entire Coachella Valley with a trail to serve cyclists, pedestrians and Neighborhood Electric Vehicles. Likewise, the Commission is taking an active role throughout the county to advance active transportation projects for bicyclists and pedestrians. Projects that were funded by the Commission last year and set for implementation in the near future include a bike sharing program in Riverside, the Salt Creek Trail, and the Santa Ana River Bike Trail. The focus on these projects remains consistent with Southern California's Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and SB 375 which seeks to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In terms of advancing policy, a major concern in moving forward is the state of California's financial position and commitment to funding infrastructure and transportation. The Commission will continue to take an aggressive and active role in protecting existing transportation funding and advocating for State investments in transportation. The Commission is an active member of the Self -Help Counties Coalition (SHCC), California Association of Councils of Governments (CALCOG), and Mobility 21, and a major focus will be placed on advocacy for transportation in the State budget. Federal funding is also an important factor for the Commission's future, and the Commission will advocate strongly for the approval of a federal transportation bill. Congress' priorities will need to include funding for Positive Train Control and for goods movement and freight -related projects in Southern California. In Riverside County, goods movement investments will continue to focus on the need to complete highway/rail grade separation projects. The success of many of these efforts will rely on proactive external communications. Media relations will continue to be a priority, and press releases will remain a major effort along with social media and the Commission's On the Move monthly newsletter and annual report. An expanding and systematic outreach to business and civic groups, focusing on Commission efforts in terms of funding, construction, and services, will be the central feature of the communications program. Riverside County has also seen a major change in its federal and state legislative delegations which will require a concerted outreach effort to new representatives on local transportation issues. While actively participating in all of these major endeavors, the Executive Director will maintain and improve administrative efficiency and fiscally sound practices characteristic of the Commission. With a total of 46 budgeted staff positions, the Commission's organization remains consistent with the Commission's direction. The Commission must continue to be competitive in the employment market and retain capable staff as well as attract high quality applicants. Staff training and development will continue, enabling our small and dedicated staff to enhance skills, productivity, and value. Our goal is to maintain the most effective mid -sized transportation agency in California. Department Goals Focus on timely and effective completion of capital projects. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Continue construction and serve as lead agency on the SR-91 corridor improvement project in Corona. • Serve as the lead agency for the construction of the 1-215 corridor improvement projects. • Work closely with Caltrans on construction of the 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors project in Moreno Valley as well as the SR-91 HOV lanes project in downtown Riverside and 1-215 bi-county project. • Ensure effective communication with the public regarding construction and project details throughout the County. • Continue construction for the Perris Valley Line Metrolink extension. Maximize funding for transportation improvements in Riverside County through legislative advocacy. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Implement the Commission's early development project priorities outlined in the recent Commission workshops, focusing on the first ten years of the 2009 Measure A, which will include an emphasis on project development for the SR-91 corridor improvement project and the Perris Valley Line. • Place an emphasis on initiating federally authorized and funded projects included within the new federal transportation bill and the Commission's ongoing project priorities. • Advocate for passage of an effective, multi -year federal transportation bill. • Advocate federal appropriations for current projects and regional efforts to reduce the community impacts of rail goods movement. • Continue to advocate for federal investment in freight and goods movement infrastructure with the goal of mitigating community impacts while increasing capacity and local job creation and economic development. • Continue implementation of Transit Vision while addressing short- and long-term funding constraints. Support regional transportation solutions in cooperation with surrounding counties that are of benefit to Riverside County. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Continue work on grade separation and rail capacity projects funded through the TCIF as well as those called for in the Commission's $561 million Grade Separation Plan. • Work with neighboring counties regarding corridor improvements on SR-91, I-15 and 1-215. • Maintain an effective working relationship with the agencies that comprise Metrolink to ensure that Riverside County commuter rail needs are served in an efficient, effective, and safe manner. • Partner with SANBAG to enhance and publicize the 1E511 system and work with agencies in San Diego, Orange, and Los Angeles counties to provide effective, regional 511 traveler information services. • Work closely with SANBAG to develop a new program to provide ridematching services for employers in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. • Play an active role in the implementation of revamping the implementation of intercity rail and commuter rail service in the LOSSAN Rail Corridor. • Be an active participant in discussions involving high-speed rail, especially concerning connectivity investments in the overall rail system in Southern California. • Advocate for and take an active effort for additional intercity rail service to the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor. Maintain effective working relationships with Commissioners to strengthen and expand the Commission's leadership in transportation policy decision -making at all levels of government. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Facilitate Commissioner participation at the regional, state, and federal levels to raise the interests of the Commission and seek favorable action. • Continue regular communication between the Executive Director, senior staff, and the Commissioners. • Continue collaborative efforts with member agency staff regarding local priorities and funding challenges. • Work with other levels of local government such as the County Transportation Department, County Health Department, County Regional Park and Open Space District and local universities on quality of life issues that are connected to transportation such as air quality and the environment. • Provide assistance to Commissioners who serve on outside boards such as SCAG, Metrolink, LOSSAN, and the Mobile Sources Air Pollution Review Committee (MSRC) to assist their efforts to represent Riverside County. While maintaining a relatively small staff, promote the Commission's effectiveness by improving and developing staff skills, using state-of-the-art working tools, and fostering an environment that encourages and rewards individual and team effort. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Continue to maintain a well -documented employee appraisal process that provides clear, understandable, and measurable performance criteria for all employees. • Maintain and encourage staff morale and effectiveness. • Retain quality staff. Develop the framework for a Commission culture that enhances productivity, encourages regular and open communication among staff, and promotes the mutual achievement of individual and organizational goals and objectives. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Conduct a semi-annual review of organization accomplishments as measured against planned objectives to determine progress in meeting those objectives and action steps needed. • Facilitate open communications and coordination between management, professional staff, and support staff through regular meetings. Executive Management Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Expenditures $366,062,600 $304,367,800 $718,311,100 $1,022,298,200 Staffing levels 42 40 46 46 Administration costs as percentage of expenditures 1 89% 2.21/0 1.06/0 88% Administration Mission Statement: "To provide quality and efficient services to the Board of Commissioners, staff, and external customers and to comply with applicable federal and state requirements." Chart 26 - Administration Support Costs 33 % Expenditures Professional As noted in Table 48, the Administration Department's total budget is $2,086,000 for office operations including management of office space, lease, and equipment; records; Commission and committee meetings; and special events as well as for the clerk of the board and human resources functions. Salaries and benefits expenditures of $606,600 reflect a net decrease of 3% related to a reduction in FTE allocations and increases for a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $363,000 cover various services including, but not limited to, Commissioners' per diem, legal fees, and consultant and other professional services and reflects an increase of 81% due to information technology consultant services. Support costs of $681,400 cover administrative overhead including office maintenance; information technology updates, support, and maintenance; and recruitments. Capital outlay of $435,000 reflects an increase due to information technology support services and equipment upgrades. Table 48-Administration Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 469,200 $ 628,600 $ 507,800 $ 606,600 $ (22,000) -3% Professional Costs Commissioner Per Diem 60,900 65,000 65,000 65,000 0% Legal Services 15,100 25,200 30,100 37,000 11,800 47% Professional Services - General 57,100 110,000 85,000 261,000 151,000 137% Total Professional Costs 133,100 200,200 180,100 363,000 162,800 81% Support Costs 578,100 651,600 629,000 681,400 29,800 5% Capital Outlay 32,700 383,500 60,000 435,000 51,500 13% Debt Service 25,300 N/A TOTAL Administration $ 1,238,400 $ 1,863,900 $ 1,376,900 $ 2,086,000 $ 222,100 12% Administration Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Accounting Supervisor 0.02 0.01 Administrative Assistant 1.29 1.30 Executive Director 0.01 0.00 Finance Manager/Controller 0.25 0.30 Human Resources Administrator 0.00 1.00 Office and Board Services Manager 1.00 1.00 Procurement Analyst 0.00 0.00 Procurement Manager 0.00 0.00 Senior Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 Senior Office Assistant 0.95 0.95 FTE 4.52 5.56 Department Budget Overview - Office Operations Department Description FY 14/15 0.00 1.23 0.01 0.02 1.00 1.00 0.03 0.02 1.00 0.85 5.16 Office Operations oversees the daily maintenance needs of the Commission's office facility and staff; manages information technology and records management systems; oversees the office lease; purchases office supplies and equipment; posts public notices on the website and local newspaper and notices of project completion; maintains a safe working environment for Commission board members, staff, and consultants; and provides support services. Office Operations continues to operate with a small staff of six consisting of the Office and Board Services Manager, Senior Administrative Assistant, three Administrative Assistants, and Senior Office Assistant. Key Assumptions • Support is provided to 46 full-time Commission staff. • Requests for proposals and project notices of completion are posted in accordance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations. • Information technology systems are upgraded and maintained to ensure efficiency. • An accurate and efficient records management system is maintained. • Requests for public records are responded to in accordance with the California Public Records Act. Accomplishments • Updated the web page in a timely manner for the postings of public notices. • Maintained efficient information technology infrastructure. • Maintained the electronic records management system to ensure accurate and efficient processing of incoming and outgoing correspondence and documents. • Maintained a disaster recovery plan to ensure uninterrupted Commission operations. • Responded to public records requests in accordance with the California Public Records Act. Major Initiatives The Commission will work to enhance its electronic records management system in order to achieve greater efficiencies and strengthen the Commission's records management processes and procedures. The system pertains to the management, storage, and accessibility of the Commission's actions and documents and the retention capability for incoming and internally created records. This will be complemented by the Commission's new information technology support services contract. Office Operations will continue to provide high quality support services to the Board and to internal and external customers by providing a work environment that enhances the overall mission of the Commission. Department Goal — Office Operations Ensure quality service that demonstrates responsiveness and flexibility and provides services at the most reasonable cost. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Support 46 full-time staff. • Provide accessibility to meeting agendas, legal notices, requests for proposal, and employment opportunities through the Commission's web page. • Continue to improve administrative efficiency through automation of records processing. • Post legal notices and requests for proposals on the Commission's web page and in the newspapers on a timely basis. • Provide office supplies, equipment, and services consistent with intended quality and capabilities at the most advantageous price afforded in the market. • Manage the Commission's information technology systems. Department Budget Overview — Clerk of the Board Department Description The Clerk of the Board provides support services to the Board of Commissioners and its alternates and for Commission and committee meetings. It serves as an important resource for the Commission and has the responsibility for recording, publishing, preserving, and filing meeting proceedings of documents acted upon by the Commission and its committees; posting legal notices; processing claims against the Commission; fulfilling requirements of the Commission and the committees as it relates to the Conflict of Interest Code; serving as the Filing Officer for Economic Interest and Campaign Disclosure statements and legal claims against the Commission; coordinating Commission special events and meetings; and performing all duties required by law, rules, or order of the Board. As such, this department has a direct link and responsibility to serving local taxpayers and the public while supporting the actions of the Commission. The need to be accountable to the public at large is further amplified by the need to comply with federal and state law requiring prompt responses to California Public Records Act requests. Key Assumptions • Staff support and meeting services are provided to 34 Commissioners and their alternates, the Commission, four established committees, and a number of ad hoc committees. • Monthly agenda packets and supporting documents are published and distributed in accordance with the Brown Act. • Officers and members of the Commission are kept informed by providing them with the most current and accurate data to assist them and facilitate their decision making responsibilities. • Frequent communication with Commissioners continues to provide news and updates on Commission items and transportation -related meetings. • Available technology is used to provide simplified access of agenda items and Commission actions to the public, local agencies, and staff. Accomplishments • Updated the web page and the bulletin board for the agenda, minutes, and supporting documents. • Posted legal notices in local newspapers and on the Commission's web page. • Regularly advised officers and members of the Commission and their staff on changes to Commission meetings and other transportation -related meetings. • Arranged Commission and committee meetings and special events of the Commission. • Processed and transmitted Commission -approved resolutions to appropriate agencies in a timely manner. Major Initiatives Each year, local agencies make changes to their appointments regarding their representation on the Commission. Staff will continue to make every effort to ensure that the newly appointed representatives, as well as their respective staff, are aware of operational policies of the Commission and other transportation -related meetings. There will be continued emphasis on the utilization of electronic mail with Commissioners for more efficient communications. Clerk of the Board staff will continue to provide high quality support services to the Board. Staff will also continue to update technology to streamline processes and procedures for easier access to Commission actions, minutes, resolutions, and ordinances, including electronic agenda distribution. Department Goals — Clerk of the Board Ensure coordination and documentation of Commission and committee meetings and provide public accessibility to agenda items as required by state regulations. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Provide accurate, high quality agenda packets for Commission and committee meetings. • Continue to provide support to Commission members, staff, and attendees of Commission and committee meetings. • Post meeting agendas and supporting documents in compliance with Brown Act requirements. • Maintain an accurate list of Commissioners and alternates and submit membership roster changes to the Secretary of State. • Maintain and file all Commission and committee meetings and official records of the Commission. • Perform all duties within mandated deadlines. • Maintain and promote good Commission and staff relations. Facilitate access of information to Commission records. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Continue to respond to requests for records and information on a timely basis and in accordance with state law. • Continue to improve the Commission's recordkeeping practices by updating the electronic records management system. • Maintain Commission agreements, amendments, MOUs, resolutions, and ordinances. • Maintain a centralized database for Commissioners, agencies, and consultant contact information. • Coordinate special activities, meetings, events, and conferences as requested by the Executive Director and the Commission. Department Budget Overview — Human Resources Department Description Human Resources responsibilities include planning, administering, and implementing human resources programs, including the recruitment, selection, and appraisal process; employee training and development; classification and compensation studies; benefits administration; employee relations; and, recommending, implementing and maintaining personnel policies, procedures, and practices;. Key Assumptions • Quality service levels will be maintained in all human resources programs. • The assessment of Human Resources policies, practices and procedures will continue. • Continuous improvement in communication with employees regarding Human Resources information will be an ongoing process. • Compliance with state and federal labor law regulations is achieved. Accomplishments • Hired a full-time Human Resources Administrator. • Completed an audit of member earnings and retirement enrollments with CaIPERS. • Completed the biennial classification and compensation study. • Adopted a resolution in response to the Public Employees' Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA), requiring existing employees to begin paying and reporting the value of an equal share of the normal pension costs. Effective July 11, 2013 existing employees began to pay 3% toward the normal pension costs and thereafter will pay an additional 3% in FY 2014/15 and 2% in FY 2015/16 for a total annual normal pension cost contribution of 8%, offset by a corresponding salary increase. • Implemented PEPRA by creating a new defined benefit formula of 2% at age 62 for all new members hired as of January 1, 2013. • Provided the annual Benefit Statement to all employees. • Regularly provided information to employees on changes to health insurance, 401(a) defined contribution, and 457 deferred compensation plans and the personnel policies and procedures manual through the Commission's intranet and quarterly employee newsletter. • Recruited and filled two intern and six full-time positions. • Held training sessions on violence in the workplace, harassment -free workplace, and drug -free workplace. • Disclosed employees' compensation on the Commission's website in compliance with the State Controller's Office and CaIPERS. Major Initiatives Human Resources focuses on managing employees and consists of a framework of activities and practices that support and develop a motivated workforce while at the same time complying with legislation and regulations that govern the employer/employee relationship and ensuring parameters for fair and consistent decision -making and good workplace practices. Staff will use written position descriptions and performance expectations in order to obtain a clear and consistent understanding of what is expected. The Commission's practice is to conduct a classification and compensation review every two years to ensure fair compensation is established to attract and retain the most qualified employees. After the postponement of the biennial classification and compensation review program in 2009 due to the slowdown in the economy and declining sales tax revenues, the Commission reinstituted the biennial classification and compensation review program at the request of the Executive Committee in response to the implementation of the PEPRA provisions. The Commission will provide a one-time 3% cost of living adjustment to offset the employees' contribution to the normal pension costs and up to a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases based on the performance of staff in FY 2014/15. Department Goals — Human Resources Administer human resources policies, procedures, and programs in order to align personnel laws and the Commission's policies with continuous improvement principles. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Review and update personnel policies and procedures to comply with federal and state requirements. • Provide information to enhance the employee's knowledge of current personnel policies and procedures in various forms including electronic access, workshops, and printed information. • Ensure that employee personnel records are documented and updated timely for various personnel actions. Continue to employ and recruit a dynamic and talented workforce. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Maintain a compensation program that ensures internal equity and external competitiveness within the pay structure for Commission employees. • Begin the process of preparing and conducting a Request for Proposal for consultant services to be utilized in the biennial compensation study in spring 2015. • Exercise care in making high -quality, diverse appointments. Develop and implement a comprehensive new employee orientation program. Develop people to be their best in order to meet the needs of the organization. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Build and maintain an effective performance system to include timely performance evaluations, personal development, and a supportive work environment. • Provide appropriate and timely training to meet the demands of the organization and professional growth and development of all staff members. • Foster teamwork through cooperative efforts and support for shared success. Understand and consistently deliver excellent customer service to all employees. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Focus on "employee as customer" and consistently strive to exceed expectations by supporting and maintaining individual respect, appreciation, management accessibility, and communication. • Assist employees in utilizing employer -provided benefits to enhance their health, wellness, and quality of life. Improve the quality of the work culture. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Develop and maintain a safe and healthy working environment by retaining open lines of communication throughout the organization, compliance with established federal, state, and local regulations, and best practices in preventing safety and legal risk. • Provide a safe working environment with the maintenance of an injury and illness prevention program. • Maintain a proactive employee relations process by facilitating a collaborative, professional working environment with all staff members. • Promote a work/family balance. • Recognize and reward individual contributions, innovation, and learning from experience. Administration Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Employee rules/Benefits review sessions held 1 2 3 4 Recruitments 6 4 8 3 Positions filled 6 4 8 3 Legal notices 24 25 28 30 Commission/Committee/Ad Hoc meetings 72 47 60 70 Commissioners supported (including alternates) 61 61 62 62 Staff supported: Regular full-time Temporary/Seasonal 42 2 40 2 46 2 46 2 Legislative Affairs and Communications Mission Statement: "To improve the mobility of Riverside County residents by working through the legislative process and by maintaining effective community outreach. This is supported by facilitating interactive communications with the public and transportation stakeholders through various outreach and media efforts." Chart 27 — Legislative Affairs and Communications Support Costs 13% Professional Costs 44% Expenditures Salaries and Benefits 43% The Legislative Affairs and Communications Department has a total budget of $1,189,400 (Table 49). Salaries and benefits have increased 1% and reflect a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $523,200 include legislative advocacy, graphic design, and website updates. Support costs of $155,500 include various membership dues and staff -related travel costs. Table 49 — Legislative Affairs and Communications Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 364,900 $ 506,700 $ 367,400 Professional Costs Legal Services 1,900 6,500 6,000 Professional Services - General 381,900 501,200 390,000 Total Professional Costs 383,800 507,700 396,000 Support Costs 142,200 189,200 144,600 TOTAL Legislative Affairs and Communications $ 890,900 $ 1,203,600 $ 908,000 $ 510,700 7,000 516,200 523,200 155,500 $ 1,189,400 $ 4,000 1% 500 8% 15,000 3% 15,500 3% (33,700) -18% $ (14,200) -1% Legislative Affairs and Communications Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.26 0.24 Community Relations Manager 0.07 0.10 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.01 0.00 Deputy Executive Director 0.71 0.71 Executive Director 0.01 0.01 Goods Movement Manager 0.07 0.30 Government Relations Manager 1.00 1.00 Procurement Analyst 0.03 0.00 Procurement Manager 0.00 0.00 FY 14/15 FTE 2.16 2.36 Department Budget Overview Department Description Legislative Affairs 0.25 0.15 0.00 0.64 0.02 0.30 0.81 0.05 0.02 2.24 Transportation issues affect a number of jurisdictions and stakeholders. Through proactive participation, the Commission is able to play a stronger leadership role at all levels of government to advance its interests and policy goals. The importance of this is magnified when the Commission is seeking changes in law or needs legislative authorization to move forward with a specific project. The Commission's Legislative Affairs efforts focus on taking full advantage of opportunities at both the federal and state levels when there is a potential impact to Commission programs and projects. In doing so, the Commission maintains its role as a major legislative force and a statewide leader on a broad range of issues affecting transportation policy such as project delivery and financing. This requires the establishment and maintenance of ongoing communication with Riverside County's legislative delegations in Washington and Sacramento. The Commission accomplishes this via a combined effort that includes Commissioners, staff, and legislative consultants in the two capitals. The effort also requires working with other transportation agencies throughout the State in order to collaborate on issues of mutual concern. This cooperation takes place in a number of forums including a monthly meeting of transportation commission chief executive officers, a legislative roundtable of regional transportation advocates, Mobility 21, SHCC, CALCOG, the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association (IBTTA), and Coalition for America's Gateways and Trade Corridors (CAGTC). In the November 2012 election, Riverside County voters sent several new legislators to Washington and Sacramento. These new elected officials bring with them new staff members and new perspectives on government policy, requiring the Commission's legislative affairs team to increase its effort to educate and partner with its delegation in both capitals. Continuing to establish and build upon these relationships will be a major focus for the year. A chief concern continuing through FY 2014/15 is modernization of CEQA. Potential changes to this law could have significant benefits to the Commission's ability to deliver needed projects that improve mobility and benefit the environment. In Washington, it will be important to monitor the implementation of Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21sT Century (MAP-21) and prepare for the next surface transportation authorization in 2014. In terms of federal action on specific projects, the Commission was selected by the U.S. DOT to apply for a TIFIA loan in April 2012 related to the SR-91 corridor improvement project. After submitting the TIFIA application in August 2012, the Commission obtained approval in February 2013 for a TIFIA loan of up to $451,000,000. The federal TIFIA loan agreement for a maximum loan of $421,054,400 was executed July 2, 2013. The Commission's project was one of 26 letters of interest submitted for a total request exceeding $13 billion, and it was one of only five selected to submit a TIFIA loan application. In December 2013, these activities resulted in the Commission breaking ground on a $1.3 billion widening of the SR-91 freeway through Corona. The Commission will also seek to elevate its policy presence on matters pertaining to the tolling operations. In recent years, federal and state legislators have given significant attention to how tolling on highways is regulated. With the SR-91 corridor improvement project under construction and 1-15 corridor improvement project on the near -term horizon, the Commission has a newfound interest in participating in these discussions. Communications The Commission is committed to communicating with and educating a broad arena of interested parties on the roles and responsibilities of the agency. An emphasis will continue to be placed on informing Riverside County residents and businesses about transportation projects and services and maintaining open communication with other transportation stakeholders. Various forms of media and communication tools are used in these outreach efforts with the overall objectives to provide accurate, informative, and easily accessible information; facilitate public participation in the Commission processes; and maintain effective relationships. The Deputy Executive Director is responsible for communications with the news media and prepares text for Commission materials, presentations, and speeches. Along with the Executive Director, the Deputy Executive Director, Community Relations Manager, and individual project managers actively participate in public presentations at the local, regional, and state levels to represent the Commission's interests. Strong relationships with the news media are very important to ensure that the public is well informed regarding the Commission's progress in determining funding priorities, designing infrastructure improvements, and constructing projects. There are many points throughout these processes in which the public can and should play a role in shaping the future of the County's transportation network. Communications will expand its use of social media and utilize other emerging technologies that can be incorporated into the overall outreach effort of the Commission. Key Assumptions • The Government Relations Manager will oversee legislative affairs work efforts with guidance from the Executive Director and the Deputy Executive Director. • Communications will oversee the annual report to the public that will be distributed throughout the County and will be posted on the Commission's website in a printable format. • The On the Move newsletter will be published and distributed electronically and posted on the Commission website. • The Speakers Bureau effort will continue to seek local community opportunities to expand outreach regarding the Commission's activities. • The Commission's website will be updated and refreshed on a regular basis. • Additional communications tools and opportunities will be explored for incorporation into the ongoing program to help build public awareness of Commission activities including radio, television, and social media outlets such as Twitter, Facebook and other emerging technologies. • The Commission will continue to take a leadership role in formulating a countywide direction on federal transportation policy. • Public outreach will continue its policy priority for the Commission, and there will be an emphasis to ensure that Riverside County receives significant funding for this need from state and federal governments. • The Commission will monitor and influence the development of the national freight network required by MAP-21. • The Commission will play an active role in the reauthorization of MAP-21. • Government Relations will assist the Commission in taking a leadership role in Sacramento on modernization of CEQA. Accomplishments • Published a four -page annual report supplement in two major newspapers — The Press Enterprise and the Desert Sun — and posted the supplement on the Commission's website in a printable format. • Met with and provided project tours of the Perris Valley Line, 1-215/Van Buren interchange, 1-215 central segment corridor improvement, and other projects for Congressman Mark Takano, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, and key staff members to local legislators. • Continued to update the functionality of the Commission's website. • Continued effective relationships with the news media resulting in informative coverage regarding local and regional transportation issues and Measure A project delivery. • Provided extensive public outreach support as part of the project development process for the Mid County Parkway, Perris Valley Line, SR-91 corridor improvement, 60/215 East Junction HOV lane connectors, and 1-215 corridor improvement projects. • Conducted multiple public meetings as part of the environmental review process for a number of projects including the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment project. • Conducted an aggressive speaking outreach campaign on the active and preconstruction projects totaling over 30 presentations delivered to council meetings, community service groups, and transportation oriented groups. • Supported the Rail Department in the development of various marketing materials and advertisements including weekend and holiday train services. • Developed a new marketing campaign to encourage Metrolink ridership during the SR-91 freeway construction and the impending completion of the Perris Valley Line. • Continued to take a leadership role and collaborate with neighboring counties, local business leaders, Mobility 21, SHCC and CAGTC on many transportation policy issues in Sacramento and Washington. • Continued work with the Southern California National Freight Gateway collaboration to foster cooperation, coordination, and collaboration to facilitate the movement of goods through Southern California. • Revised collateral materials, which are often distributed at public events, for an overview of the Commission's programs and projects as well as construction projects planned for Western County. • Developed and distributed a Transportation Quick Reference Guide for Riverside County. The guide was designed for elected, appointed, and community leaders with an emphasis on Commission projects and funding issues. • Improved and maintained the Commission's photo library to assist with documenting the project delivery progress of the voter -approved Measure A sales tax programs. The photo library has been used to develop PowerPoint presentations, information brochures, TIFIA loan submissions and capital project collateral material. • Maintained a presence on the social networking site Twitter which can be accessed at http://twitter.com/RCTC. • Held widely attended events for the SR-91 corridor improvement project and Perris Valley Line groundbreaking events and the Perris Valley Line FTA Small Starts grant signing event. • Conducted a Small Business Forum on contracting opportunities with the Commission in conjunction with Caltrans, Riverside County Transportation Department, and Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) that attracted approximately 400 people. • Took an active role in providing comments and ensuring that Riverside County projects were included in the RTP. • Continued to provide a Commissioner -orientation program that bolsters Commissioner knowledge and participation regarding Commission projects and activities and was presented to every new Commissioner. Major Initiatives Legislative Affairs The Commission will continue to advocate strategically and effectively on the policy issues described above in Washington and Sacramento, utilizing its contract advocacy teams, coalitions, and partnerships. The Commission will seek to build on its recent successes in both capitals and continue to maintain a strong presence as a respected, knowledgeable and effective resource to policy leaders and decision -makers. Communications The Commission provides information to the public through various channels including: 1) participation at public meetings, chambers of commerce, industry associations, and service clubs; 2) production and provision of resource materials and fact sheets; 3) maintenance and enhancement of the Commission's website; and 4) development of newspaper press releases, radio and television interviews, cable television spots and project videos. The Commission's largest publication effort to provide widespread understanding of its projects and expenditures is its four -page annual report which has been published in two area newspapers throughout the County and is also posted on the Commission's website in a printable format. A continuing emphasis will be placed on providing communications support to major project development efforts including the Perris Valley Line, the Mid County Parkway and the SR-91, 1-15, and the 1-215 corridor improvement projects. The need for proactive public communication and outreach remains important, as the Commission continues to move forward with the delivery of the Measure A work program. This is an area of emphasis, as the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan places the Commission in a high -profile role to deliver large-scale highway projects. This will require continued contact with the public by the Community Relations Manager. The Commission's outreach will include a proactive effort to work closely with various media formats such as print, radio, internet, social media and television to increase their understanding and interest in transportation issues and to generate a higher level of media coverage. Toward that end, opportunities will be identified for live or taped interviews and presentations that speak to local residents and employers and their questions concerning transportation issues. Appropriate forums may include city council meetings, local cable television, radio, and regular SR-91 corridor improvement project videos posted to the project website via YouTube. Broad distribution of On the Move, an e-mail newsletter highlighting actions of the Commission and emerging topics, will continue as part of the Commission's communications. Efforts will continue to update and expand the Commission's contact database including e-mail addresses in order to support distribution of the Commission's public information materials. New Commissioner -orientation meetings will be provided by the Executive Director, Deputy Executive Director, and Office and Board Services Manager in individualized settings. To supplement individual Commissioner meetings with the Executive Director, continuing education opportunities at the small group level will also be provided to Commissioners that focus on timely issues. Department Goals Foster the Commission's full involvement and input in a broad range of local, regional, state, and federal government settings. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement, System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Participate in the SHCC; California Transit Association; Southern California Legislative Roundtable; League of Cities; CALCOG; Mobility 21; CAGTC; Southern California National Freight Gateway Collaboration; regional, state and federal transportation agencies; and community/business organizations to influence funding and policy decisions that impact Riverside County. • Maintain a leadership role in local and regional transportation venues related to project development efforts and current and emerging issues. • Provide leadership to the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the MSRC to ensure that funding for air quality -related transportation improvements is fully distributed to Riverside County jurisdictions. • Work with SCAG, WRCOG, and CVAG to monitor and respond to transportation issues involving the implementation of SB375 on smart growth planning. • Coordinate with other local agencies and business interests to modernize and reform CEQA to improve project delivery and deter frivolous lawsuits and challenges that delay projects. • Continue regular meetings at the Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer level with transportation agencies throughout the region. • Conduct ongoing meetings and communication with transit providers in Riverside County. Implement the Commission's state and federal legislative program to maximize flexibility in the use of existing transportation revenues by supporting legislation to protect and increase current funding levels, ensuring an equitable distribution of available resources, streamlining administrative procedures to reduce costs and time of project development, and accelerating the allocation and use of existing resources. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Coordinate legislative activities of federal and state legislative consultants and obtain monthly reports on activities performed. • Work with board members to establish policy positions, review and analyze legislation, visit with elected representatives in Sacramento and Washington, draft legislation, and maintain strong relationships with key decision -makers. • Provide regular updates to the Commission regarding state and federal government issues. • Effectively represent the Commission before the state and federal legislative bodies, CTC, and other agencies in funding, programming, and policy matters. • Convene meetings with state, federal, and legislative staff members. Support the continuing education of Commissioners to increase their understanding of transportation -related issues at local, state, and federal levels to maximize the effectiveness of the Commission in affecting policy and funding actions. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Provide orientation training for new Commissioners. • Produce and distribute a monthly e-mail newsletter, On the Move, highlighting actions and activities of the Commission. • Provide periodic educational workshops or study sessions for Commissioners. • Provide on -going up -dates to Commissioners, via e-mail, on topical issues including projects, funding and newsworthy events impacting the Commission. Develop and maintain an information program which educates the public and other stakeholders on the roles and responsibilities of the Commission as it relates to accomplishments achieved through Measure A or other funding sources controlled or administered by the Commission. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Expand, maintain, and update information on the Commission's website including individual project websites and social media. • Annually produce a report that informs the public regarding Measure A progress and other Commission programs. • Issue news releases to the local media announcing significant achievements and providing information on Commission actions and activities. • Develop and maintain open lines of communication with news reporters to facilitate adequate and accurate news coverage. • Schedule periodic media information briefings or news conferences when a particular issue warrants it. • Expand the stock of video footage for use in production of cable television spots that feature transportation projects funded and/or implemented by the Commission. • Periodically use cable television and other forms of media such as internet sites and blogs, if appropriate, to communicate information to the public regarding the Commission's activities and services. • Coordinate and oversee message content of all Commission publications and communications to provide uniformity of message and direction. • Support the development and planning of projects in regard to public outreach and communication efforts. • Require the use of Measure A project/program signage by funding recipients to increase public awareness of Measure A accomplishments. • Continue to administer and expand the use of the Speakers Bureau to reach community members in service and other organizations. • Monitor and distribute media coverage from various outlets in the County and throughout the region to Commissioners and staff to enable them to closely follow transportation policy trends. • Provide oversight and coordination to Commission departments in the development of communications' materials. Foster and maintain effective communications with other agencies to heighten their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the Commission and increase interagency coordination and cooperation. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Assign designated staff members to attend other agency meetings and require staff to provide written/verbal communication on topics of discussion during regular staff meetings. Legislative Affairs and Communications Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Speakers bureau presentations/events 55 107 118 125 Legislative action submittals to Commission 9 8 9 9 Southern California legislative staff roundtables 10 10 10 10 Finance Mission Statement: "To safeguard the Commission's assets and maintain strong and prudent fiscal controls in investing, accounting, budgeting, procurements, and financial reporting including ongoing disclosure to all interested parties. Seek financing alternatives that complement the Commission's strategic direction." Chart 28 - Finance Debt Service 49% Expenditures Salaries and Benefits 9% Professional Costs 36% I Support Costs 6% The Finance Department's total budget is $10,314,800 (Table 50) and reflects a 1% increase over the prior year's budget. Department staffing costs will total $921,400, reflecting an increase due to FTE allocations; 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs; and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $3,693,500 include various services related to general and specialized legal, financial and investment advisory, external and internal audits, debt management, CAFR and annual budget graphic design, and procurement. Support costs of $627,200 include insurance, printing, and staff training. Capital outlay of $25,000 includes ERP updates. A transfer out of $5,000,000 is related to funding a portion of the debt service interest payments from the 2009 Measure A Western County bond financing program and $47,700 funding for 2009 Measure A Western County local street and roads administration. Table 50 - Finance Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Actual Revised Budget FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Projected Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services Audit Services Financial Advisory Professional Services - General Total Professional Costs Support Costs Capital Outlay Transfers Out TOTAL Finance $ 788,800 $ 840,300 $ 772,600 22,700 280,000 362,100 480,000 10,000 280,000 2,544,000 2,655,300 2,938,800 3,695,300 637,300 665,900 (400) 7,500 5,000,000 5,000,000 $ 9,364,500 $ 10,209,000 $ 275,000 480,000 220,000 2,587,800 3,562,800 639,400 7,500 5,000,000 9,982,300 $ 921,400 255,000 528,000 260,000 2,650,500 3,693,500 627,200 25,000 5,047,700 $ 10,314,800 $ 81,100 10% (25,000) -9% 48,000 10% (20,000) -7% (4,800) O% (1,800) 0% (38,700) -6% 17,500 233% 47,700 1% $ 105,800 1% Finance Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Accounting Assistant 2.00 2.00 Accounting Supervisor 0.98 0.99 Accounting Technician 2.00 2.00 Administrative Assistant 0.35 0.39 Chief Financial Officer 0.37 0.48 Finance Manager/Controller 0.71 0.70 Procurement Analyst 0.31 0.16 Procurement Manager 0.08 0.13 Senior Office Assistant 0.05 0.05 FTE 6.85 6.90 Department Budget Overview Department Description Finance and Accounting FY 14/15 2.00 1.00 2.00 0.32 0.48 0.96 0.10 0.05 0.10 7.01 Commission resources are allocated to assure financial stability and fiscal accountability. Finance activities include investing the Commission's cash resources, planning and directing financial transactions, and subsequent monitoring of legal and regulatory requirements. Adequate cash flow must be maintained while at the same time prudently investing operating and capital funds. Borrowing needs are carefully planned using both short- and long- term debt. Once debt is issued, there are ongoing responsibilities including interaction with financial advisors, bankers, dealers and remarketing agents, underwriters, bond counsel, bond insurers, trustees, issuing and paying agents, arbitrage consultants, and rating agencies as well as providing regular and consistent information disclosure to investors. Fiscal accountability involves receiving all funds due the Commission, paying all Commission obligations, maintaining the general ledger, reporting regularly on the Commission's fiscal results, and preparing and monitoring the budget. Fiscal accountability requires the coordination of budget planning and monitoring and the accurate and timely accounting for all funding sources, including compliance with all applicable laws and regulations governing those funds. Accounting encompasses cash receipt and disbursement functions, maintenance of the general ledger including project cost accounting, payroll processing, quarterly and annual financial reporting, and retention of and coordination with independent auditors. The Commission also recognizes the importance of accountability for the organization. As a result, the Commission is highly regarded by individuals, peers, other organizations, and government officials at a local, regional, state, and national basis. A formal organizational accountability program was approved in January 2006 to address fraud risk, ethical conduct, financial and operational disclosure, and maintaining the public's confidence in the Commission. Accordingly, measures have been implemented based on a conceptual framework related to oversight, reporting, fraud, internal control, and ethics. Procurement Management In the management of the procurements and contracts process, the responsibility of the procurement management function is to ensure that the procurement policies approved by the Commission are followed and procurement procedures are updated as required. The function is responsible for the purchase of all goods and services, except for real property acquisition, in accordance with Commission policies and federal and state funding requirements to ensure the implementation of the Commission's projects and programs. This includes the administration of the Commission's DBE and SBE programs. Procuring goods and services for the Commission is a cooperative effort. All Commission staff involved in procurements for their projects and programs are responsible to employ sound judgment and appropriate standards of ethics and fairness to procure in a manner most advantageous to the Commission. The Procurement division also conducts a review of and updates insurance coverage for the Commission and its properties. Key Assumptions • The commercial paper letter of credit and sales tax revenue bond SBPAs facilities or alternative structure(s) will be maintained with the strong short-term ratings. • Proceeds from the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds, 2013 Toll Bonds, and TIFIA loan will be used to fund the SR-91 corridor improvement project. • Arbitrage calculations related to the outstanding debt issues will be performed by a consultant on an annual basis. • The Commission will pay 100% of the annual required contribution related to postretirement health care benefits based on a current actuarial valuation. • Directors and program managers will continue to have adequate project budget and accounting information to make informed decisions. • Construction fund bond proceeds will be invested in mid-term securities that mature in accordance with the construction draw schedule. Operating funds will be invested in state and local agency investment pools for short-term liquidity purposes and in mid-term treasury and federal agency securities as available funds are identified. The overall interest rate is conservatively projected to be 0.25% for state and County investment pools and 0.75% for debt service and construction funds managed by an investment management and advisory firm. • Procurements will be conducted in accordance with the Commission's procurement policy manual. • Procurement will continue to develop and implement a standardized procurement filing system and maintain centralized procurement files. • Procurement will conduct outreach activities to encourage DBE and SBE participation in various contracts. Accomplishments • Achieved financial close for the construction of the SR-91 corridor improvement project. The financing included the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and execution of a federal TIFIA loan with the U.S. DOT. • Terminated a letter of credit and reimbursement agreement with The Bank of Tokyo and reduced the commercial paper program authorization to $60,000,000. • Prepared and submitted to TIFIA the base case Financial Plan for the SR-91 corridor improvement project. • Prepared and submitted required continuing disclosure reports related to the SR-91 corridor improvement project financing to TIFIA and/or the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board's Electronic Municipal Market Access System, including the monthly construction progress report. • Updated the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan with the development of an interactive strategic planning financial model. • Conducted a presentation and tour of the SR-91 corridor improvement project for TIFIA and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) California Division staff. This was the first site visit in connection with the oversight and monitoring of the TIFIA loan. • Presented an update to the rating agencies of the Commission's sales tax and toll financing programs. • Received the Innovation Award from the California Society of Municipal Finance Officers for the development of an innovative rating presentation for the SR-91 corridor improvement project financing. The presentation included a commute video on YouTube, which allowed rating agency staff to avoid the expense and travel time to observe traffic on SR-91 through Corona and kept the financing on schedule. • Obtained financial reporting excellence award from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) (21st year) related to the CAFR for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. • Obtained GFOA distinguished budget award (18th year) for annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2013. • Generated approximately $4 million in additional Measure A sales tax revenue since the engagement of a firm in January 2008 to provide sales tax audit services in order to detect and correct sales tax reporting errors. • Participated in numerous small business networking activities and met with potential DBE and SBE vendors. • Hosted a small business forum for military veterans and DBE/SBEs to learn about contracting opportunities available through the Commission. • Participated in the Member Agency Advisory Committee to provide guidance and recommendations regarding Metrolink finances. Major Initiatives Finance and Accounting The commercial paper program has been in place for over eight years and has provided short-term, advance funding for projects included in the 2009 Measure A and related Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. Commission management will continue to consider appropriate uses of commercial paper to advance 2009 Measure A projects. The Commission terminated one of the two letters of credit and reimbursement agreements providing credit and liquidity support in order to reduce the commercial paper program to $60,000,000. The existing letter of credit and reimbursement agreement with Union Bank expires in October 2014. In connection with the 2009 variable rate bonds, the Commission entered into SBPAs with JPMorgan, which were extended through September 2014. The Commission will monitor the credit quality of the banks providing these liquidity facilities for any actions which may affect the short-term ratings of the commercial paper program and 2009 Bonds. The Commission will also conduct procurements to extend, replace, or substitute the letter of credit and reimbursement agreement for the commercial paper program and the SBPAs for the 2009 Bonds Staff maintains a comprehensive financing plan to support the highway and rail capital projects to be delivered through 2019 and to assess future financing requirements. This financing plan incorporates revised sales tax revenue forecasts as well as other potential federal, state, and local revenue sources, including tolls. Based on the updated cost estimates for these projects and identified revenues, potential project funding shortfalls may result in project deferrals or require alternative financing strategies. Financing alternatives to be considered include commercial paper, long-term bond issues to finance Measure A and toll projects, and federal loan programs. A significant accomplishment in FY 2013/14 was the financial close for the SR-91 corridor improvement project in July 2013 with the issuance of the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds and 2013 Toll Bonds and execution of a federal TIFIA loan. This project was a major component of the Western Riverside County Highway Delivery Plan. As a result of the significant financing proceeds received in connection with the SR-91 corridor improvement project plan of finance, the Commission has invested such funds with the advice and assistance of an investment management and advisory firm. Operating funds available for investment will be coordinated with the assistance of a second investment management and advisory firm. Investments will be made in accordance with the Commission's priorities of safety, liquidity, and then yield. The investment managers and advisors will continuously review the Commission's investment policy for any required updates and other recommendations. To ensure that the Commission receives the proper amount of Measure A sales taxes, the Commission will continue to engage a firm to conduct sales tax audit services. The firm will also provide quarterly sales tax analysis and reporting services, of which a summary report is presented to the Commission on a quarterly basis. The Commission will also continue to engage a consultant to provide semi-annual sales tax forecasts for use in the development of revenue projections for the annual budget process and comprehensive financing plan updates. The Finance Department will continue to keep abreast of GASB technical activities affecting the Commission's accounting and financial reporting activities. Various new standards, including pension plan accounting and financial reporting standards will be considered for implementation as part of the preparation of the CAFR for the year ended June 30, 2015. The Finance Department will also continue to consider changes to accounting and financial reporting related to the commencement of toll operations in FY 2016/17. The Finance Department will continue to update its ERP system that integrates data processing across the Commission, automate administrative processes, and embrace data integration. The continued ERP efficiency gains include an automated paperless workflow system, advanced project accounting, multi -year budgeting, multi -year contract management, grant tracking, and readily available scanned images that can be retrieved by all users. Procurement Management A centralized procurements process will continue to be implemented to manage requests for proposals, qualifications, invitations for bids, small purchases, and related contract administration issues. The Procurement Policy Manual was updated in December 2012 to reflect current best practices and applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Accordingly, the procurement system will strengthen controls to ensure consistency in the development and application of procurement policies and procedures and adherence to applicable laws and regulations, especially those related to federal and state grants. Procurement utilizes PlanetBids to assist staff in its efforts to administer and manage an efficient procurement process and conduct outreach to small businesses and DBEs for Commission projects and programs. PlanetBids is a web -based vendor and bid management software. The PlanetBids e-procurement application helps streamline the complete bidding process and enables the collection and analysis of all aspects of vendor data, purchasing activities, and corresponding history. PlanetBids has provided a better service and convenience to vendors and automatically notifies potential vendors of bid alerts. Procurement Management is responsible for developing, implementing, and monitoring DBE and SBE program requirements in coordination with contractors and other appropriate officials. Duties and responsibilities include establishing DBE attainment goals, monitoring reporting and utilization by contractors, gathering and reporting statistical data and other information as required, reviewing third party contracts and purchase requisitions for compliance with the program, ensuring that bid notices and requests for proposals are made available to DBEs and SBEs in a timely manner, reporting to and advising the Executive Director and Commission on DBE and SBE matters, and providing outreach to DBEs and SBEs to fully advise them of contracting opportunities. Additionally, the Commission recognizes the vital role that local businesses play in the County, and it strongly encourages, supports, and promotes the participation of local businesses in providing goods and services to the Commission. Procurement is committed to providing contracting opportunities to local businesses to strengthen the County's local economy and to promote the development of the small, local business community. During FY 2014/15 the Commission will participate in outreach events in order to acquaint potential local, small, and disadvantaged businesses with the Commission's procurement procedures and opportunities. Staff also consults with the Commission's insurance broker in procuring competitive quotes, on an annual basis, for various insurance coverages secured by the Commission in order to provide cost effective solutions to meet its diverse insurance needs. During FY 2014/15, the Commission will complete a risk study to determine if the Commission maintains adequate coverage for risk exposures. Department Goals Protect the Commission's cash resources by regular monitoring of investment practices to ensure consistency with established investment policy. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Utilize investment management and advisory services to prudently invest operating and capital funds in accordance with the Commission's investment policies. • Achieve a rate of return at least equal to the County of Riverside Treasury Pool rate for operating funds. • Establish an appropriate benchmark for the investment of debt proceeds. Manage the Commission's outstanding debt ensuring compliance with applicable laws and regulations and continued investor awareness and receptivity to the Commission's program. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Provide an annual update and review of the debt programs with one or more of the rating agencies no later than June 30, 2015. • Meet continuing disclosure requirements of the sales tax and toll revenue debt programs and comply with the TIFIA loan reporting requirements. • Prepare arbitrage calculations as required. Ensure the Commission and funding recipients comply with Measure A and TDA laws and regulations as they relate to the annual financial and compliance audits as well as close cooperation and coordination with independent auditors. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Minimize the number of substantive management letter comments and compliance findings requiring corrective action by the Commission. • Maintain appropriate fiduciary review and monitoring procedures for Measure A recipient and TDA claimant audits. Maintain fiscal and budgetary control through monitoring of periodic results and ensuring consistency with the Commission's strategic direction. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Obtain the GFOA Distinguished Budget Award for the FY 2014/15 budget. • Facilitate a comprehensive budgeting approach that effectively involves management staff, requiring full accountability for all department expenditures. • Fund 100% of the annual required contribution related to the postretirement health care benefits. Assure fiscal accountability for Commission funds with general ledger accounting and financial reporting consistent with generally accepted accounting principles. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Ensure proactive communication and timely responses to any noted errors, corrections, and budget transfers related to program management reviews of accounting and budget information. • Obtain an unmodified opinion on the basic financial statements. • Receive financial reporting excellence award from the GFOA related to the preparation and issuance of the CAFR. • Stay abreast of finance, accounting, and financial reporting developments by attending training and conferences in these general areas or in specialized areas applicable to job duties. • Commence planning for the implementation of the new GASB accounting and reporting standards for pension plans. • Update and maintain the fiscal policies and procedures manual. • Update and maintain complete accounting desk procedures manual for ERP system to facilitate cross training. • Assist local governments with Measure A funding by providing timely allocation of funds for eligible projects and financing opportunities to the extent funding does not impact other programs and is financially feasible and prudent. • Maintain ERP system to reflect technical updates and current technology. • Commence development of accounting and financial process with the RCTC 91 Express Lanes operator and the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) in preparation for start of toll operations in 2017. Develop and maintain an organizational accountability program encompassing financial and operational functions. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Establish and implement measures related to oversight, fraud, internal control, and ethics. • Issue annual disclosure statements related to financial and operational responsibilities. Procure goods and services from qualified consultants, contractors, and other vendors in accordance with laws and regulations at a competitive price. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Assist departments and programs to procure and obtain goods and services in a cost effective and efficient manner. • Ensure that procurements are conducted in accordance with a comprehensive Procurement Policy Manual. • Ensure that agreements, amendments, and MOUs are entered into with appropriate legal considerations. • Process agreements, amendments, and MOUs in a timely and efficient manner. • Ensure that consistent procedures, processes, and tools are used for procurements. Review existing procurement policies and procedures. (Policy Goal: Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Ensure that the procurement polices reflect Commission requirements and practices. • Segregate policies and procedures so that procedures can be easily updated without Commission approval. • Ensure that procurement policies and procedures reflect the requirements of the Commission's federal, state, and other funding sources. • Continue to provide an easy to read desktop quick procurement policies reference guide for use by Commission staff. • Maximize the value received for the Commission's expenditure of public funds. • Provide all vendors an equal opportunity to provide needed goods and/or services. Finance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Sales tax revenue bond rating Aa2/AA+/AA Aa2/AA+/AA Aa2/AA+/AA Aa2/AA+/AA Toll revenue bond rating N/A N/A BBB -/BBB- BBB-/BBB- TIFIA loan rating N/A N/A BBB- BBB - Commercial paper rating P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ P-1/A-1+ GFOA Certificate of Achievement Awarded Awarded Awarded Awarded GFOA Distinguished Budget Award Proficient Proficient Proficient Proficient Invoices processed 5,600 5,794 5,800 5,900 Checks processed 3,800 3,849 4,000 4,100 Audit adjustments 0 0 0 0 Average yield on investments 0.25% 0.39% operating/ 0.174% debt proceeds 0.25% operating/ 0.75% debt proceeds 0.25% operating/ 0.75% debt proceeds Payroll hours processed 87,300 84,295 89,000 95,000 Accounts receivable invoices processed 180 145 160 170 Agreements processed 150 210 220 230 Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 6.2 REGIONAL PROGRAMS Planning and Programming Mission Statement: "To exert leadership in transportation planning and the programming of funds to improve mobility, foster environmental stewardship, expedite project delivery, and form partnerships with regional, state, and federal agencies resulting in maximum returns on local investment. Support a coordinated regional approach to solving transportation funding issues." Chart 29 — Planning and Programming Transfers Out 8% Projects and Operations 71% Expenditures Professional Costs 6% Support Costs 0% Planning and Programming expenditures of $6,383,300 have increased 11% from last year's budget (Table 51). Salaries and benefits represent 15% of total expenditures and reflect a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional services totaling $356,500 have decreased 13% due to walkability grant activities and air quality assessments completed in FY 2013/14. Professional services include CMP implementation efforts, air quality analysis, project database management, local and regional planning activities, on -call goods movement consultants, and legal services. Projects and operations costs have increased 5% due to a traffic signal coordination project. Table 51— Planning and Programming Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 782,400 $ 1,032,700 $ 749,700 Professional Costs Legal Services 22,400 21,500 5,000 Professional Services - General 78,300 387,900 265,900 Total Professional Costs 100,700 409,400 270,900 Support Costs 16,900 23,400 16,000 Projects and Operations Construction Special Studies 184,400 614,000 200,000 Operating and Capital Disbursements 2,015,400 3,687,500 2,004,800 Total Projects and Operations 2,199,800 4,301,500 2,204,800 Transfers Out TOTAL Planning and Programming $ 3,099,800 $ 5,767,000 $ 3,241,400 $ 983,700 16,500 340,000 356,500 20,600 1,250,000 550,000 2,722,500 4,522,500 500,000 $ 6,383,300 $ (49,000) -5% (5,000) -23% (47,900) -12% (52,900) -13% (2,800) -12% 1,250,000 N/A (64,000) -10% (965,000) -26% 221,000 5% 500,000 N/A $ 616,300 11% Planning and Programming Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.17 0.17 Chief Financial Officer 0.01 0.04 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.00 0.00 Deputy Executive Director 0.07 0.05 Executive Director 0.45 0.47 Goods Movement Manager 0.93 0.70 Government Relations Manager 0.00 0.00 Planning & Programming Director 0.89 1.00 Planning & Programming Manager 1.00 0.85 Procurement Analyst 0.02 0.00 Project Development Director 0.10 0.10 Senior Staff Analyst 0.00 0.95 Staff Analyst 1.10 0.99 FTE 4.74 5.32 Department Budget Overview Department Description FY 14/15 0.33 0.03 0.05 0.11 0.42 0.70 0.04 0.77 0.69 0.01 0.00 0.94 1.00 5.09 The Commission is responsible for short- and long-range transportation planning and programming. Short-range planning and programming involves the development of the five-year STIP and preparation of the five-year FTIP for Riverside County. These programming documents identify projects and their respective funding and schedules. The Commission's involvement with long-range planning efforts includes the coordination and input into planning efforts throughout the County and southern California region. These efforts involve participation in local, bi- county, and regional corridor studies, including the continued development of the CETAP corridors. Regional planning efforts are incorporated in the RTP (a 30-year transportation plan) developed by SCAG in conjunction with county transportation commissions, sub -regional agencies, local agencies, transit operators, and other interested parties. The SCAG 2012 RTP incorporated a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) required under SB375. The SCS component establishes goals for projects, programs, and land -use designed to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. The Commission is responsible for approving projects for Regional Improvement Program (RIP) funds in Western County and coordinating with Caltrans on the selection of Interregional Improvement Program (IIP) funds as part of the STIP approved by the CTC every two years. The Commission has delegated the authority to nominate projects for RIP funds in the Coachella Valley to CVAG. A MOU between the city of Blythe, representing Palo Verde Valley, and the Commission allows the city to trade RIP funds for local Measure A sales tax funds. In November 2006, Proposition 1B was approved by the voters of California, which provided $20 billion in transportation infrastructure funding. Various program categories were established including a $2 billion infusion into the STIP. Other competitive program categories included CMIA and TCIF; Riverside County was successful in receiving CMIA funding for the SR-91 HOV lanes and 1-215 widening projects, which are currently under construction. TCIF funding was approved for 11 grade separation projects and a ground access improvement project at the I-215/Van Buren interchange. The Commission is a member of the Southern California Consensus Group that developed and submitted project proposals for the TCIF program. As with the RIP and IIP funds, Proposition 1B funds are administered and allocated by the CTC. Proposition 1B funds have been the most reliable state funding source for transportation projects, which provided funding to projects that otherwise would have been delayed as a result of the recession. The deadline to award Proposition 1B CMIA projects expired at the end of 2013. State Local Partnership Program (SLPP) funding is another program authorized by Proposition 1B. A formula program has been established for transportation agencies that administer self-help transportation sales tax programs. Riverside County's formula share over the five-year program was $58.941 million. SLPP funds were required to be programmed for construction and matched by the sales tax on a 50-50 basis. The Commission approved three projects in Western County, and CVAG selected six projects in the Coachella Valley. SLPP fund allocation requests were submitted and approved by the CTC at its June 2013 meeting. Programming specifically involves the development, review, and approval of projects for various funding programs. Additionally, programming involves the monitoring of projects from project selection through construction close- out. In order to receive federal funds and approvals, all projects funded with federal and state dollars, or local projects that are regionally significant, must be included in the RTP and FTIP. SCAG is responsible for incorporating all six county (Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura) transportation improvement programs into one regional programming document and conducting a conformity analysis with the adopted air plans to ensure compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The RTP/SCS is updated every four years, and the FTIP update effort is performed every 18 to 24 months. Multiple amendments occur within each RTP and FTIP cycle. FTIP amendments can occur for minor project changes that do not affect the conformity analysis. The Commission is responsible for allocating the following local, state, and federal funding sources: Local Sources: • 1989 and 2009 Measure A sales tax • Western County TUMF regional arterial program State Sources: • SB821 bicycle and pedestrian projects • RIP • Active Transportation Program (ATP) • Proposition 1B* Federal Sources: • Congressional discretionary programs, such as ARRA* • Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) (formerly Transportation Enhancements (TE)) • STP • CMAQ Fund sources denoted by (*) have expired with the exception of Proposition 1B TCIF funds that may be available for programming in 2014. The Commission also serves as the CMA for the County and is responsible for developing and updating the CMP. The CMP was developed to meet state legislation and federal Congestion Management System (CMS) requirements, which includes an enhanced traffic monitoring system. The CMP's highways and regional arterials are regularly monitored to ensure that they are operating at acceptable levels (above Level of Service (LOS) "F"). If a deficiency occurs along the CMP system, a deficiency plan must be prepared that identifies mitigation measures and/or projects that will improve the LOS to "E" or higher. Partnership development, public and private, is critical to the Commission's continued success in affecting positive transportation decisions to meet future demands. Commission staff works in close coordination with its partners to advocate for federal, state, and local funding to improve mobility and mitigate the impacts of goods movement. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue its efforts in working with transportation partners to streamline and improve project delivery. • Consultant contracts are maintained to provide assistance with the CMP, air quality analysis, project database management, and other related planning activities. • The Commission will utilize all available funding sources on transportation projects identified in the 1989 Measure A and the 2009 Measure A as well as other regional high priority projects, including TUMF regional arterial projects and grade separation projects. • The Commission will continue participation in local, bi-county, and regional planning efforts representing the interests of the County. • The Commission will work with the CTC, Caltrans, and local project sponsors to implement projects funded with STIP-RIP, ATP or other available fund sources to ensure that the programming and allocations are consistent with project schedules. • The Commission will continue to assist local project sponsors with the processing of state and federal funding approvals/obligations/allocations and overall project delivery. Accomplishments • Processed 33 STIP actions that consisted of, but were not limited to: allocations, financial allocation amendments, programming of funds, future consideration of funding, and baseline agreement amendments. • Submitted the 2014 STIP programming over $69 million of RIP funds. • Completed the multi -funding call for projects programming 34 projects totaling $164.5 million in CMAQ, STP and 2009 Measure A Regional Arterial (MARA) funding for Western County. • Completed the STP rehabilitation call for projects programming 29 projects totaling $13.7 million. • Received NEPA/MOU signatory agency concurrence for the Least Environmentally Damaging Practicable Alternative (LEDPA) for Mid County Parkway Alternative 9 Modified in February 2014. • Completed five local agency agreements and/or amendments for the implementation of TUMF regional arterial projects. • Processed over 70 project amendments into the 2013 FTIP. • Coordinated with Caltrans and project sponsors regarding the obligation of federal and state funding, met obligation deadlines, and prevented loss of funding to the County. • Monitored federal funding expenditures of inactive projects to ensure funds are not deobligated. • Advised local agencies and coordinated the use of toll credits and local match waiver for federally funded projects funded at the maximum reimbursement level, saving the Commission and local agencies up to $23.3 million in local match funds. Of the $23.3 million, $2.67 million accounts for toll credits programmed in FY 2013/14. • Reviewed and approved five-year capital improvement plans (CIP) for each local agency in the County. • Completed the 2015 FTIP update, which included the review and update of 382 projects totaling $5.6 billion. • Processed 23 RTP project amendments concurrently with the 2015 FTIP. • Worked with SCAG and Southern California agencies to develop ATP funding distribution recommendations for the metropolitan planning organization (MPO) region. • Monitored expansion projects for each of the Ports. • Monitored TCIF project development to ensure timely completion of the 11 grade separations and a ground access improvement project to improve the I-215/Van Buren interchange as required for the $162.7 million Proposition 1B TCIF funds. TCIF projects completed to date include grade separations at Columbia Avenue, Iowa Avenue and Magnolia Avenue. Eight additional grade separation projects are under construction: Auto Center Drive, Avenue 52, Avenue 56/Airport Blvd., Clay Street, Magnolia Avenue, Riverside Avenue, Streeter Avenue and Sunset Avenue. The I-215/Van Buren interchange project is also under construction. • Continued to take a leadership role and work collaboratively with the five -county consensus working group, Mobility 21, SCAG's Southern California National Freight Gateway Collaboration, and the CAGTC on goods movement issues. Major Initiatives Each county transportation commission throughout the State is responsible for programming RIP funds, which represents 75% of the total STIP funding available statewide for capital enhancement projects. The 75% funding level is then further distributed with 60% of the funds allocated to Southern California and 40% to Northern California. A population formula is then applied to determine county funding levels called "county shares." The Commission is responsible for ensuring that projects funded with STIP funding are administered and implemented consistent with CTC and Caltrans policies. It is the Commission's policy to set aside 2% off the top for staff support to carry out STIP PPM activities. The remaining RIP funds are further distributed geographically among Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley per the Commission's intra-county STIP formula. The Commission also may consider a call for projects for RIP discretionary funds. Federal TAP funds will be administered through the CTC similar to STIP funds under the State's new ATP that was created by SB99 and AB101 to encourage increased use of active modes of transportation, such as biking and walking. Federal TAP funds are not subject to general fund diversions; however, TAP funds are authorized each year by the passage of the state budget. TUMF funds are collected and administered by WRCOG. Approximately half of the TUMF funds collected are set aside for WRCOG's zone projects and regional transit facilities. After the deduction of an administrative fee, WRCOG provides the other half of the TUMF revenues to the Commission. These funds are further distributed to the Commission's TUMF CETAP corridors and regional arterial programs. In September 2004, the Commission established a five-year program and approved the programming of 24 regional arterial projects. To date, $100 million has been programmed for TUMF regional arterial projects. Due to fluctuating TUMF revenues over the past few years, $11.5 million in MARA funds and $25.5 million in TUMF CETAP funds were programmed on two projects to fulfill the TUMF commitment. Of the 24 TUMF regional arterial projects, eight projects have completed construction, six projects are currently under construction or will begin construction in FY 2014/15, six projects are in preliminary engineering, and four projects have been placed on hold at the request of the local agency. Planning and Programming also manages the 2009 Western County MARA program. A review of the remaining TUMF projects will be conducted to review the progress of these projects and priority for future programming. The expenditures for these regional arterial capital projects are included in the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department budget. Transportation Planning The Commission's role in planning throughout the year will involve working with FHWA, FTA, Caltrans, SCAG, sub - regional agencies, local agencies, and the other county transportation commissions in the region on various planning efforts relative to the implementation of the 2012 RTP/SCS, corridor studies, goods movement studies, and efforts to update transportation computer models and project databases. In FY 2014/15 the Commission will continue its work efforts on the intra-county CETAP corridors. An updated environmental document and project report has been prepared for the Mid County Parkway project to address changes made to the project limits, which are now between SR-79 and 1-215. The recirculated/supplemental draft environmental document was released for public review and comment in January 2013. Additional quantitative analysis for air quality, GHG emissions, and climate change effects for Mid County Parkway was released for public review in January 2014. Federal NEPA/MOU signatory agency concurrence for the LEDPA for Alternative 9 Modified was received in February 2014. Final project approval and conclusion of the environmental phase is expected by January 2015 with start of final design phase to begin summer 2015. Work on a portion of the north - south CETAP corridor is also underway with the Commission's 1-215 south widening project completed in November 2012, 1-215 central widening project in construction and 40% complete, and improvements to the French Valley Parkway interchange being led by the city of Temecula. Given funding constraints, work on the two inter -county CETAP corridors by the Commission is not expected in this fiscal year. The 2014 CMP update effort will involve updating the CMP (as required by federal CMS regulations). The update will involve an analysis of the level of service on the CMP system, review and incorporation of any new state and federal requirements, and aligning requirements for consistency with the RTP/SCS. Transportation Programming As mentioned above, the Commission is responsible for allocating various local, state and federal funds. These funds are monitored to ensure that regulations are adhered to in order to prevent funds from lapsing. The following summarizes the status of these funding programs: Local Funding Western County TUMF Regional Arterial Program Project monitoring of TUMF regional arterial projects by Planning and Programming staff will occur according to the agreements between local agencies and the Commission. In addition, Commission staff will work with local agencies regarding amendments to agreements and any issues regarding project delivery. To date, 24 project agreements have been executed totaling approximately $100 million of TUMF regional arterial funds. During FY 2014/15, a total of $37 million is anticipated to be reimbursed to local agencies for TUMF regional arterial projects. These project expenditures are included in the Capital Projects Development and Delivery Department. 2009 Measure A Western County Regional Arterial Program A call for projects was held for the MARA program. A total of $24 million of MARA funding was approved by the Commission for programming over the next three fiscal years. Prior to the call for projects, three TUMF regional arterial projects and two MARA projects were approved for these funds totaling $39.8 million. 2009 Measure A Local Streets and Roads In order to receive Measure A local streets and roads funding, each year local jurisdictions are required to submit their five-year CIP based on Measure A revenue projections. Additionally, the local jurisdictions are required to submit a Maintenance of Effort (MOE) certification consistent with adopted MOE guidelines and participate in the MSHCP and in the local agency's respective TUMF program, as applicable. Amendments to CIPs are processed administratively for minor changes that do not affect the total programmed amount or are within budget levels. Significant changes require Commission approval. State Funding STIP- RIP/IIP Proposition 1B provided funding for STIP projects and other bond program categories such as CMIA, TCIF, and SLPP. However, with the expiration of these programs the STIP remains unsteady without the identification of a new fund source dedicated to transportation improvements or an increase in the gasoline tax. This year Commission staff will continue to deliver projects programmed in the STIP and work with local agencies to ensure that bond funds are allocated and expended by the respective deadlines. Staff will also be involved with the development and implementation of the ATP working with the CTC, Caltrans, SCAG, and regional transportation planning agencies to ensure projects in Riverside County are successful in this new funding program. 58821 Annually, the Commission releases a call for bicycle and pedestrian projects in April. These projects are funded by 2% of LTF revenues, as required by SB821. The Commission establishes an evaluation committee to rank eligible projects that meet the established criteria. Project recommendations are approved by the Commission each year. The Commission approved twenty projects in the amount of $1.78 million for FY 2013/14. The FY 2014/15 call for projects will have new funding of approximately $1.55 million available for award. These expenditures are included in the LTF special revenue fund, which is reflected in the Public and Specialized Transit Department since this fund's activities relate primarily to transit funding. Federal Funding CMAQ STP, and TAP/ATP The Commission is responsible for allocating CMAQ and STP funds to transportation projects in the County. In 2003, the Commission directed staff to program Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) funds (CMAQ and STP) to projects that were impacted by the state budget crisis and/or the rise in construction material costs with the exception of the CMAQ funding that is apportioned to the Salton Sea Air Basin (SSAB). The Commission delegates the selection of projects for CMAQ funds apportioned to the SSAB to CVAG. In 2007, the Commission approved 25% of future CMAQ and STP funds for grade separation projects approved in the Proposition 1B TCIF program. With the decline in State revenues over the past few years, the Commission has focused funds toward high priority regional projects that are ready for construction. In January 2014, the Commission approved projects through a multi -funding call for projects, which included 18 CMAQ projects totaling $56 million and 10 STP projects totaling $63 million. MAP-21 restructured the former TE program, which was administered and programmed in the STIP by the CTC. Through SB99 and AB101 the State developed the ATP, which consolidated federal TAP and state funding that traditionally funded bicycle and pedestrian projects. Although TAP funds are federal, state budget authority must be granted in order for the funds to be allocated by the CTC. If the State budget approval is delayed, the TAP funds cannot be allocated until the State budget is passed. In FY 2011/12 the Commission partnered with Caltrans and wildlife agencies on a TE project in the Santa Ana Canyon. The Commission approved use of regional TE funds for the improvement of the B Canyon wildlife corridor, which is widely used by small to mid -sized mammals between the Cleveland National Forest, Santa Ana River, and the Puente -Chino Hills. Funding from the partner agencies is still being secured. However, the TE program was restructured in MAP-21 and no longer exists. Therefore, the Commission approved 2014 STIP funding for the pre -construction phases of the B Canyon wildlife corridor project and will continue to work with Caltrans on identifying funding for the construction phase, possibly through the 2016 STIP cycle. Project Monitoring The high demand for reporting and monitoring the progress of projects is essential to prevent funds from lapsing. The programming project database, Fundtrack, allows for efficient monitoring of project schedules and funding. Local agencies have been provided access to project information as well as the capability to update their respective project information in a timely manner. The Planning and Programming Department provides assistance to the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department and local agencies by participating in regular project delivery team meetings and preparing and submitting requests for authorization (RFA)/allocation of federal and state funding. In addition, staff monitors allocation and award deadlines, expenditures, project closeouts, and inactive projects of federal and state funded projects to prevent loss of funds. Regional Issues The Commission's work effort will remain focused on facilitating ongoing commitments as well as being responsive to various emerging issues. These include bi-county issues with the counties of San Bernardino, Orange, Imperial, and San Diego as well as goods movement. The Commission will continue working with partners from the Southern California Consensus Group (Ports, Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority, Alameda Corridor East Construction Authority, SANBAG, OCTA, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Ventura County Transportation Commission, SCAG, and SCRRA) regarding goods movement issues. A priority will be to coordinate with legislative staff and advocacy groups such as Mobility 21 and CAGTC to secure funding through the federal transportation bill for goods movement -related needs such as the funding of Alameda Corridor East grade separations in the County and/or the creation of a federal freight trust fund, or similar program with a dedicated and firewalled revenue structure, in order to treat the nation's multimodal national goods movement network as a system rather than individual projects. The Commission will continue to monitor the Ports' projects for possible impacts on Riverside County by reviewing agendas and requesting notices for projects under CEQA and the Brown Act. Department Goals Build upon relationships with local, state, and federal agencies to coordinate short- and long-range planning to ensure that transportation projects receive funding and approvals. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Work with CVAG, WRCOG, Caltrans, transit operators, local agencies, and SCAG to coordinate project amendments to the RTP and/or FTIP. • Provide the Commissioners information to assist in advocating Commission projects. • Continue CETAP intra-county corridor work. • Continue working with the RCA to implement the MSHCP. • Maintain maximum flexibility in project selection for MAP-21 fund sources to serve the diverse needs of Riverside County. Continue to seek a stronger role for county transportation commissions in state and regional transportation and air quality programs in order to direct funding for programs and projects that will improve air quality and mobility in Riverside County. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Support efforts to seek additional funding at the local, state, and federal levels for projects that improve air quality. • Support ongoing efforts to regulate federal emission sources. • Support efforts that allow more flexibility in funding transit operating and capital costs. Continue implementation of the CMP in cooperation with SCAG, WRCOG, CVAG, Caltrans, and local agencies and maintain federal certification for the CMP. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objectives: • Implement the CMP to meet federal CMS requirements cited under the metropolitan planning organization (i.e., SCAG) planning regulations, and consistency with the RTP/SCS. • Provide data collected on the CMP system to SCAG and Caltrans for reporting on the Highway Performance Monitoring System. • Provide data collected on the CMP system to local agencies and other interested parties. • Continue monitoring the CMP system to ensure the minimum adopted LOS threshold is met. Continue working with Caltrans to monitor traffic conditions for the purpose of focusing transportation funds on congested corridors and system deficiencies. (Policy Goal: System Efficiencies) Objectives: • Review Caltrans' Performance Monitoring System count data to infill segments that currently do not have Smart Call Boxes or loop detectors to monitor traffic. • Identify congested corridors for potential funding opportunities. Continue to advocate for jobs/housing balance and attracting high income jobs to Riverside County in addition to addressing intercounty congestion. (Policy Goal: Economic Development) Objectives: • Participate in ongoing studies and activities regarding the jobs/housing imbalance between Orange and Riverside counties and San Diego and Riverside counties. • Support the County interests pertaining to transportation planning as population, job, and housing forecasts are developed by SCAG and the State. Maintain Fundtrack project database to allow for efficient monitoring of projects and funding with the ability to share project information with local jurisdictions. (Policy Goals: Communications, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Maintain consultant contract to manage and host the Commission's web -based project management database. • Work with SCAG and other county transportation commissions to refine and maintain the SCAG regional database. Coordinate with Caltrans to assure database compatibility and promote information sharing including timely reporting of fund obligation information. Ensure maximum funding and flexibility for projects funded with STIP-RIP, Proposition 1B, ATP, and federal MAP-21 funds. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Goods Movement) Objectives: • Participate in statewide efforts to implement projects and fully utilize all available funds from Proposition 1B funding programs. • Work with Caltrans and the CTC to meet the intent of the Proposition 1B programs (including CMIA, TCIF, and SLPP) related to implementation of projects and monitoring expenditures within the timeframes specified in the allocation request or baseline project agreements. Advocate that regions that program local and federal funds to replace state funding or advance an allocation due to state budget issues (or limited allocation capacity) be given high priority for repayment when funds are available, or in future programming in the next STIP programming cycle. • Participate in various state and federal forums to increase funding levels, streamline programming and allocation processes, and provide flexibility in obligating funds. • Support efforts advocating the continuation and protection of state transportation funding and the payback of loans taken from state transportation accounts. • Advocate that RIP county share reserves receive priority programming over counties that advance shares. • Continue to strategically program and fund projects in an effort to obligate and/or allocate funds in an expeditious manner for the maximum use of all available funding. • Participate in Southern California Programming Roundtable meetings to ensure that 100% of federal Obligation Authority (OA) for CMAQ and STP funding is obligated within the SCAG region. • Participate at CTC and Caltrans forums in preparing and evaluating ATP projects for the statewide and MPO funding programs. • Continue to monitor project implementation through the use of milestone reporting on a quarterly basis to maintain maximum funding levels for projects and prevent loss of funds to Riverside County. • Monitor and influence the development of the National Freight Network required under MAP-21. Provide support to the Commission's Capital Project Development and Delivery and Finance departments to maintain project funding and schedules and minimize programming issues. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Provide input to the budget development process. • Attend regular meetings with the Capital Projects Development and Delivery Department. • Serve in an oversight role regarding project reporting, invoicing and close-outs. • Coordinate project RFA/OA packages. • Monitor progress of project milestones and RFAs as they are processed through Caltrans headquarters and FHWA. • Prepare CTC allocation requests, extensions, and amendments for STIP and Proposition 1B funded projects. Provide assistance to local agencies to facilitate and streamline project delivery. (Policy Goals: Mobility & Communications) Objectives: • Continue coordination of TAC meetings. • Provide information regarding project programming data, including funding status, to project sponsors on a quarterly basis. • Provide local agencies with recommendations on project programming to minimize unnecessary requirements and delays. • Upon request, attend local agency project delivery team meetings to provide advice on programming issues. • Meet regularly with Caltrans local assistance staff to monitor project submittals and resolve project implementation and obligation issues. • Assist local agencies in preparing RFAs, STIP submittals, and inactive reporting justifications. Continue to work with state and federal agencies to streamline processes for funding and project approvals. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship & Communications) Objectives: • Maintain relationships with key staff at regional, state and federal agencies. • Participate in SCAG's National Freight Gateway Collaboration to define a system that meets the region's long- term mobility, safety, environmental, and energy needs including developing a brand specific to goods movement projects in Southern California. • Identify problematic areas with project delivery and/or programming and work with federal lobbyists to develop solutions for streamlining and clarifying processes for the next federal transportation bill. • Participate in regional, state, and federal forums addressing issues related to project programming, implementation, and air quality conformity. Facilitate development of regional transportation solutions that benefit Riverside County, including implementation of Proposition 1B TCIF projects and the Commission's Grade Separation Plan. (Policy Goals: Goods Movement, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objective: • Monitor progress made in constructing the TCIF-funded projects through discussions with staff from partner agencies including Caltrans; cities of Banning, Coachella, Corona, and Riverside; and the County. Timely completion of the TCIF projects is required to demonstrate the region's ability to deliver projects consistent with the CTC's direction when the Proposition 1B funding was allocated. Determine where future efforts regarding addressing Riverside County goods movement issues would prove most effective. (Policy Goal: Goods Movement) Objectives: • Identify drivers of demand for goods movement services and performance of modal systems and services as well as public benefits, specific areas of inefficiency, and the impacts of goods movement on communities. • Implement the Commission's 2012 Grade Separation Funding Strategy through coordination of advocacy efforts with the Legislative Affairs and Communications Department. Facilitate public and private investments in clean air technology in support of the broader air quality programs for SCAG, SCAQMD, and Riverside County local entities. (Policy Goal: Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Monitor the impact of AB32 (GHG emission reduction) application to Commission transportation projects. • Monitor the impact of SB375 (GHG emission reduction) from light trucks and automobiles through the implementation of the 2012 RTP/SCS. • Actively participate on the MSRC's TAC to ensure equitable funding is available in support of capital projects within Riverside County. Planning and Programming Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Federal projects monitored for obligation authority delivery 17 21 44 40 TUMF Regional Arterial projects monitored 18 20 20 20 TUMF agreements/amendments 4 4 5 10 FTIP amended projects 200 211 160 180 STIP/Proposition 18 programming, allocations, amendments, and extensions for: Commission projects/local agency projects 33 33 10 10 Rail Mission Statement: "To develop and support passenger rail transportation options for increased mobility within Riverside County and the region." Chart 30 — Rail Capital Outlay 0% Salaries and Benefits 4% ipipProfessional Costs 7% Projects and Operations 79% Expenditures --Support Costs 10% Rail expenditures of $18,054,600 include Metrolink operations and capital support as well as maintenance and operations of the five Commission -owned and operated commuter rail stations and the Perris Transit Center (Table 52). Salaries and benefits reflect a 4% increase and is a result of a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs, which include legal and consultant services, have increased 109% due to on -call rail consultants who will be used to perform service planning and modeling for rail projects including 91 line/Perris Valley Line expansion and Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor service. Support costs, which reflect an increase of 7%, include station maintenance, media ads, printing services, and marketing incentives. Station maintenance includes property management, utilities, grounds maintenance, repairs, cleaning, and security services at the five Commission -owned commuter rail stations, adjacent parking structures, and the Perris Transit Center. Projects and operations expenditures of $14,175,700 increased 11% compared to the previous year's budget and include an operating contribution of up to $11,000,000 to SCRRA for Metrolink operations, which includes new service. The Commission's commuter rail program intends to utilize existing mechanisms within Metrolink to assess and monitor operations and budget performance. Program operations relate primarily to station operations, and engineering and construction expenditures relate to the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor. Capital outlay reflects a 180% increase and is related to property improvements at the Commission - owned commuter rail stations. Table 52 - Rail Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 451,900 $ 636,500 $ 681,500 Professional Costs Legal Services 83,700 152,000 107,200 Professional Services - General 149,800 436,000 244,000 Total Professional Costs 233,500 588,000 351,200 Support Costs 1,202,800 1,723,700 1,684,700 Projects and Operations Program Operations 1,479,500 1,471,700 1,429,200 Engineering 38,700 25,000 25,000 Construction 235,900 235,900 Special Studies 359,000 - Operating and Capital Disbursements 7,816,500 10,712,500 10,590,000 Total Projects and Operations 9,334,700 12,804,100 12,280,100 Capital Outlay 42,900 48,200 45,000 Transfers Out 12,800 TOTAL Rail Maintenance and Operations $ 11,278,600 $ 15,800,500 $ 15,042,500 $ 662,500 168,000 1,062,400 1,230,400 1,851,000 1,785,700 210,000 650,000 250,000 11,280,000 14,175,700 135,000 $ 18,054,600 $ 26,000 4% 16,000 11% 626,400 144% 642,400 109% 127,300 7% 314,000 21% 185,000 740% 414,100 176% (109,000) -30% 567,500 5% 1,371,600 11% 86,800 180% N/A $ 2,254,100 14% Rail Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Administrative Assistant 0.08 0.07 0.09 Capital Projects Manager 0.29 0.35 0.25 Chief Financial Officer 0.03 0.07 0.11 Community Relations Manager 0.01 0.00 0.00 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.00 0.04 0.00 Deputy Executive Director 0.02 0.00 0.04 Facilities Administrator 0.00 0.55 0.80 Finance Manager/Controller 0.01 0.00 0.00 Government Relations Manager 0.00 0.00 0.05 Multimodal Services Director 0.18 0.10 0.15 Procurement Analyst 0.12 0.32 0.16 Procurement Manager 0.08 0.30 0.15 Project Delivery Director 0.04 0.05 0.05 Rail Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 Staff Analyst 1.05 1.10 1.00 FTE 2.91 3.95 3.85 Department Budget Overview -Rail Operations Department Description The Commission has directed efforts in the areas of regional commuter rail, intercity passenger rail, high speed rail, and capital improvements to support enhanced passenger and freight rail service. The entire program includes elements of planning, programming, commuter and intercity rail development and support, station and corridor management, mitigation of community and environmental impacts, legislative and regulatory advocacy, and construction of capital projects. Many elements are managed or supported by other Commission departments, legal counsel, and consultants. Departmental efforts contributing to the rail program are found throughout the budget document. Coordination and consultation also occur with a variety of public and private entities including the CTC, Caltrans, California Public Utilities Commission, California High Speed Rail Authority (CHSRA), Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), FTA, Amtrak, environmental agencies, the University of California, transit providers, SCAG, WRCOG, CVAG, San Diego Association of Governments, LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency, local governments, private freight railroads, businesses, and property owners. The Commission participates in the ongoing funding and governance of Metrolink through SCRRA, a joint powers authority consisting of the county transportation commission's of Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange, Los Angeles, and Ventura counties. The Commission holds two voting positions on SCRRA's eleven member board. Commission staff serves on the five -county TAC which negotiates service and funding levels, based upon the County's established priorities. The TAC provides technical assistance, coordination between various SCRRA and Commission departments, and linkages to local communities. Of the seven commuter rail lines operated by Metrolink, three routes consisting of the Riverside, Inland Empire - Orange County (IE0C), and 91 Lines directly serve Western County. Unlike the other SCRRA member agencies, the Commission owns and operates the commuter rail stations serving Riverside County: Riverside Downtown, Pedley, La Sierra, West Corona, and North Main Corona (Chart 31). The Commission is also the owner of and the operating partner with RTA at the Perris Transit Center, a multimodal transportation facility. Station operation and maintenance costs are included in the Rail Department budget with services currently coordinated by the Capital Projects Development and Delivery Department. New and ongoing construction projects at these stations are described in the capital budget managed by the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department. Chart 31— Riverside County Metrolink Station Locations Riverside County Metrolink Service SAN BERNARDINO COUNT WENS PE COUNTY i NORTH MAIN CORONA STATION ' "! WESTCORONR`,,, RIVERSIDE - STATION .. LA SIERRA STATION CORONA !S EXISTING STATIONS 0 PROPOSED STATIONS METROLINK LINE rrrrrrrr+rrrrr PROPOSED PERRIS VALLEY LINE u MEM DOWNIDWN A RIVERSIDE RESIDE HUNTER K STATION MORENO VALLEY/ MARCH FIELD STATION G-.t En. MORENO Y„„.„, VALLEY RES EF PE Ee SE DOWNTOWN PERRIS S AT10N w a PERRIS bm Atm AN SOUTN PERRIS STATION Lake Perris In addition to Metrolink, the Commission participates in the governance of the LOSSAN Rail Corridor which is a 351-mile network through a six -county coastal region in Southern California and is the second busiest intercity passenger rail corridor in the United States. The LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency is a joint powers authority originally formed in 1989 that works to increase ridership, revenue, capacity, reliability, coordination and safety on the coastal rail line between San Diego, Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo. The Commission is the newest voting member of the 11-member Board of Directors composed of elected officials representing rail owners, operators, and planning agencies along the rail corridor. The LOSSAN has benefited from recent legislative action to establish more local control over the service. Currently the LOSSAN Rail Corridor Agency is in negotiations with Caltrans to develop a transfer agreement that will enable the transition of and allow LOSSAN to take a broader role in the management and coordination of the Southern California rail services. The Commission is involved to promote travel options and connections for our residents and to be engaged in decisions impacting the rail track rights the Commission purchased for commuter rail service. Commission staff also participates in the TAC that provides technical assistance, service planning, and coordination between various agencies to improve customer service. Chart 32 — Southern California Passenger Rail System Map PACIFIC OCEAN Passenger Roil Stelice 9 Ameak Pacik Surfliner © Metralink Q COASTER © SPRINTER {light Rail) Passenger Rail Service - Amhok Pacific Serfliner Merralink Ventera County Line - McRolink Antelope Valley Line - Mena link San Bernardino line - Melralink Riverside line -- Metrolink 91 Line - Metrolink Orange County Line Metrolink Inland Empire - Orange County Line - COASTER - SPRINTER ILighr Rail) 7 •I_'IIJ•.`• COUNTY ,.rwVrR. i—O STER METROLINIK. Amrokc.nl•= vn run GoNC nT. corn nwrolinktroin com Southern California Passenger Rail SYSTEM NEAP ,v LO5 ANGELES COUNTY Cr M* c O._ R Aw M l A4 AA ` °M w` Ln..Cf. o• • 9 5 10 15 20 30 40 Miles SAN DIEGO COUNTY of ode qf .40 Key Assumptions • Metrolink's preliminary FY 2014/15 budget is adopted by the Commission and SCRRA. In the event that additional funds are needed during the budget year, a mid -year budget adjustment will be presented to the Commission for approval. • Ridership and fare revenues continue to grow slightly on the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 Lines (Chart 33). • LOSSAN will continue on its path for local control, and the Commission will be an active voting member in the process. Chart 33 — Metrolink Average Daily Ridership 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 Accomplishments u 2013 1 2014 2015 eA 91 Line I■ IEOC MI Riverside/LA • Developed detailed operating plans to expand 91 and IEOC services; these led to the initiation of negotiations to develop a MOU with BNSF Railway (BNSF) to allow for this additional service. These discussions are still ongoing. • Initiated early marketing efforts to establish a ridership base for the Perris Valley Line and expanded Metrolink service. • Established voting membership on the LOSSAN board and continued support of efforts for local control for the Southern California intercity rail service. • Continued to implement the recommendations of the comprehensive safety and security assessment and emergency response plan at the Metrolink stations. This includes the planning of a new Operations Control Center for the Riverside Downtown Station. • Continued efforts to manage the security guard contractor to provide protection of Commission assets and a sense of safety and security for riders. Major Initiatives Over the last 21 years, more than $115 million in capital improvements have been made in developing stations and securing access to support the Commission's commuter rail services operations. The Perris Valley Line project is under construction, and the operations plan will be developed and finalized prior to revenue service in late 2015. The four Perris Valley Line stations (see Chart 31) are currently under construction and have been designed to minimize operating costs. In addition, continued efforts are underway to expand peak period rail service on the IEOC and 91 Lines to better meet the needs of Inland Empire commuters. Department Goals —Rail Operations Improve utilization and increase efficiency of commuter rail lines serving Riverside County. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Support improved Metrolink system safety and security initiatives. • Implement enhanced safety and security features at all stations. • Work with Metrolink staff to increase patronage on Riverside County lines. • Continue to expand service on Metrolink lines with increased train frequencies. • Coordinate with Metrolink staff and their current Strategic Plan Initiative to develop future service plans that best meet the needs of Riverside County residents. • Continue to monitor Metrolink's financial performance to ensure Riverside County transportation funds are used efficiently and responsibly. Maximize opportunities for public use of rail -related investment. (Policy Goal: Intermodalism & Accessibility) Objectives: • Support transit operator efforts to expand availability and use of connecting transit in order to improve access and reduce demand on parking capacity; costs associated with transfers are currently reimbursed to the transit operators by the Commission and are budgeted. • Explore track rights opportunities. • Expand opportunities with the Commuter Assistance Program's park and ride operations for the designation of specific car/vanpool/buspool parking at commuter rail stations with available capacity. • Expand opportunities for interline travel through coordination of schedules with LOSSAN and Amtrak intercity trains, such as the Sunset Limited, and other Metrolink lines, including encouraging joint ticketing options. Implement energy efficient systems and generate revenue to offset maintenance costs of rail properties. (Policy Goals: Environmental Stewardship, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Explore track rights opportunities and potential for joint development opportunities at stations. • Explore the installation of cell phone towers as a revenue source to offset operating costs; including the development of the Pedley station cell tower project. • Explore additional revenue potential at the rail stations. • Evaluate alternative and emergency power systems. Department Budget Overview — Rail Development In order to expand passenger rail options throughout the County, the Commission conducts feasibility studies to assess the viability of commuter rail expansion. In 2005, the Commission completed the commuter rail feasibility study that examined the viability of extending Metrolink commuter rail service largely within existing rail rights of way. The Commission approved the study and recommended advanced study of extensions on the San Jacinto Branch Line (SJBL) to Hemet/San Jacinto and Murrieta/Temecula. The next phase of Alternatives Analysis for these corridors will be pursued in future years as funding availability allows. Significant planning efforts are underway to explore intercity passenger rail service to the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass. San Jacinto Branch Line The Commission holds title to and manages the 38-mile SJBL (Chart 34) and several adjacent properties, preserved for future passenger rail service. BNSF holds the freight rights in the corridor, providing service to local shippers, and performs maintenance on the line. Chart 34 — San Jacinto Branch Line Perris Valley Line Small Starts Project In June 2000, the Commission allocated $20 million of Measure A sales tax funds for capital and operating expenditures related to the implementation of passenger rail service on the initial operating segment of the SJBL, known as the Perris Valley Line (see Chart 31). Project cost estimates have been revised and are now approximately $248 million. PERRIS VALLEY LINE Staff secured a small starts grant agreement from the FTA Small Starts Program to fund $75 million of the project cost with the balance to be funded by other federal, state, and local funding sources, as illustrated in Table 53 and Chart 35. Since 2008, $75 million in Small Starts funding has been federally appropriated. Details on this capital project are included in the Capital Project Development and Delivery section. Chart 35 — Perris Valley Line Funding Chart Measure A 23% Table 53 — Perris Valley Line Funding Plan Federal: STP CMAQ FTA 5309 Small Starts FTA 5307 State: STIP Local: Measure A sales tax Total $ 500,000 36,514,263 75,000,000 26,157,453 52,978,000 57,100,869 Total Perris Valley Line Project Estimate $ 248,250,585 The PVL has received the required FTA approvals and is currently under construction; the anticipated project completion is December 2015. The project is a 24-mile extension of the 512-mile of Metrolink commuter rail system. It will directly extend the existing Metrolink 91 Line, which provides service between Riverside and Downtown Los Angeles via Fullerton. The project includes the construction of four passenger stations at Riverside Hunter Park, Moreno Valley/March Field, Downtown Perris, and South Perris; construction of a park -and -ride lot at each of the four new stations, totaling approximately 2,250 parking spaces; and a layover facility at South Perris for vehicle storage and servicing. The hours of operation will be 3:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekdays with no scheduled service on weekends. The service headways will be 30-45 minutes in the weekday peak period, with four trains during the morning peak with reverse service in the evening, and two trains in each direction in the weekday off-peak period for a total of 12 trains per day. The project is expected to serve 4,300 weekday trips. The diversion from private car use to Perris Valley Line ridership is estimated to reduce vehicle miles traveled by approximately 34 million miles per year in the project area. This estimate includes vehicle miles traveled from private homes to the proposed stations. The GHG emission reduction benefits equal 146,600 pounds per day. Chart 36 — Passenger Rail to the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass COACHELLA VALLEY- SAN GORGONIO PASS CORRIDOR RAIL SERVICE In recent years the Commission has also focused attention on the creation of intercity passenger rail service between the Coachella Valley, the Pass Area, Riverside, and the Los Angeles basin through advocacy efforts with state, federal, and local government entities and negotiation with the freight railroads. The Commission was able to ensure the corridor was prominently featured in the updated 2013 California State Rail Plan. The Commission is now taking the lead on the service development process and actively coordinating with all the key stakeholders along the corridor and at the state and federal level with Caltrans and the FRA. In addition, the Commission has secured a letter of agreement with Caltrans for its cooperation and modeling support and is finalizing a MOU with CVAG for its cooperation on the planning as well as funding as part of a new TDA bus/rail split for the Coachella Valley. In May 2013 the Caltrans Division of Rail completed the first phase of a planning study and initial alternatives analysis for the rail corridor. This planning study was very supportive of the potential for a viable service, and future studies can expand on this by determining ridership demand and better cost estimates. Caltrans also included an updated project description and analysis of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor service in the latest state rail plan, which was approved on September 5, 2013 by the State Transportation Agency. The next update will take place in 2017. As the result of the past studies from both CVAG and the Commission, it was determined that using state - supported intercity trains presents the best alternative for developing service along the corridor. The 141-mile trip between Los Angeles and the Coachella Valley would cross four counties. Stops and station locations are yet to be determined. Due to the trip length and time of approximately three hours, Amtrak -style service with larger seats and food service would be more appealing to the riders. In addition, the service would operate over Union Pacific and BNSF tracks and, in general, Amtrak has a greater ability to initiate service over freight railroads based on a national agreement. The initial service plan would be for two daily round trips along the corridor. The next round of studies will look at various track alignments, routes, station alternatives and determine ridership forecasts. The primary effort for this will be the initiation of a SDP. The true success of this effort will be to develop comprehensive and convincing planning documents that will allow Coachella Valley rail to compete for limited state and federal rail funds. The project purpose and need will have to be compelling, and the ridership potential thoroughly demonstrated. The FRA staff already made it very clear that several rail alignments and alternatives must be studied and compared in order for the project to be viable. In the July 1, 2010 Federal Register notice on High -Speed Intercity Passenger Rail (HSIPR) program, it clearly outlines the planning process needed to be eligible for HSIPR funds. This process identifies the need for a SDP with the following requirements: • Clearly demonstrate the purpose and need; • Analyze alternatives for the proposed passenger rail service; • Identify the alternative that best meets the purpose and need; • Identify the discrete capital projects required; and • Demonstrate the operational and financial feasibility. The Commission will take the lead on the SDP using Proposition 1B grant funds. The environmental process needed for the NEPA documentation will be conducted and funded with local funds. Commission staff has solicited a highly qualified consulting firm capable of conducting both the SDP and the NEPA documentation in order to expedite project development. This project will be ongoing and is incorporated in the FY 2014/15 budget. The Commission will also create an annual SRTP for the project. Chart 37 — Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass Corridor Rail Service COACHELLA VALLEY- SAN GORGONIO PASS CClRRIDOR ROII SFRVICF LOS ANGELES COUNTY SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY y�L oriarcek- uirw &maw.. r,-. saw UMW .,- aurae SAM aEMwROrno notanalaw w_ ORANGE COUNTY - Burlington Northern Sonia Fe Railroad Tracks - Union Pacific Railroad Tracks - 5CRRA Alignment 'Son Gabriel Subl - UP Alignment (Allsambro 561 * * •*'* Existing 5ration wish Roil Connections ❑ ❑ D ❑ Porenlial5wrion' Cal6ment Areas 115 mile radiusl • Nat all pa:anral stations would 6e needed, consnuoti on and ali9nment alternatives wdE 6e determined in the h,rure High Speed Rail The Commission continues to play a proactive role in the development of a statewide, high speed passenger rail system, including routing of the backbone corridor through the Inland Empire with possible stations in the Riverside/Corona and Murrieta/Temecula areas. With the passage of Proposition 1A in November 2008, there is a proposed funding mechanism to move the state high speed rail project forward. The CHSRA has begun work on a project level environmental assessment and corridor alignment study for the section between Los Angeles and San Diego via the Inland Empire. The Commission has directed the review to include an alignment alternative along I- 15 for analysis. The Commission has entered into a MOU to be supportive in the development of this high speed rail project and is participating in the Southern California Inland Corridor Group meetings. The Commission actively contributed to the development of the supplemental Alternatives Analysis released in spring 2012 and continues to coordinate local participation at Technical Working Group meetings attended by local stakeholders. Work on this effort has slowed down with the release of the latest business plan that extends the development of this Phase II section from Los Angeles to San Diego via the Inland Empire to beyond 2030. The Commission signed a MOU along with the other Southern California transportation entities and SCAG to commit $1 billion in unallocated Proposition 1A funds for early investment to be spent locally for rail transportation improvement projects. Key Assumptions • Project construction on the Perris Valley Line will continue in FY 2014/15. • Progress on the development of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass rail corridor service will continue. Accomplishments • Cleared environmental process, executed grants, and initiated construction on the Perris Valley Line, which is set for revenue service to begin in late 2015. • Initiated Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor and secured grant funding to begin the planning effort. • Established a bus/rail split for TDA funding in the Coachella Valley to identify local funds to be used for the project. • Signed a letter agreement with Caltrans and a MOU with CVAG in support of the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio rail project. • Approved a Resolution of Support for the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass corridor rail service and solicited additional support and advocacy from other regional bodies. Major Initiatives As discussed above, project development and right of way acquisition related to the Perris Valley Line project is expected to continue. Department Goals —Rail Development Identify and plan for capital improvements necessary to increase the scope, appeal, and reliability of commuter rail operations. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Intermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Construct and initiate passenger service on the Perris Valley Line. • Explore passenger rail options and conduct detailed studies on the Coachella Valley/San Gorgonio Pass. • Evaluate high speed rail plans and programs and look for opportunities for early investment that benefit existing passenger rail services. • Continue to review parking requirements and develop plans to address projected parking deficiencies. Maintain efforts with local agencies, other Southern California counties, and the state and federal governments to expand intercity passenger rail service into Riverside County and the Coachella Valley. (Policy Goals: Mobility, lntermodalism & Accessibility) Continue to monitor the state efforts in the creation of a high speed passenger rail system along an Inland Empire alignment through coordination with state and local agencies. In addition, continue to identify and advocate for high speed rail funding to be spent on beneficial local rail projects in Riverside County. (Policy Goals: Mobility, lntermodalism & Accessibility) Rail ' Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Average daily ridership on existing commuter lines • Riverside Line 5,456 4,911 4,765 5,193 • IEOC Line 4,073 4,317 4,580 5,101 • 91 Line 2,465 2,388 2,337 3,169 Farebox recovery ratio • Riverside Line 60.9% 56.4% N/A 55.4% • IEOC Line 37.2% 34.8% N/A 33.6% • 91 Line 48.5% 41.9% N/A 43.2% Public and Specialized Transit Mission Statement: "To coordinate the operation of all public transportation services within the County with a goal toward promoting compliance and improving mobility as well as program efficiency and effectiveness between transit operators. To maintain and improve, as resources allow, mobility options for seniors, persons with disabilities, and persons of limited means to enhance quality of life through innovative solutions and better coordination of existing services." Chart 38 — Public and Specialized Transit Salaries and Benefits 0% Transfers Ou 13% Projects and Operations 87% Expenditures Public and specialized transit uses are budgeted at $130,260,600 for FY 2014/15, as presented in Table 54, and consist primarily of capital projects and operations costs as well as transfers out to Commission funds for administration, planning, and rail purposes. LTF disbursements consist of transit operating and capital allocations to public transit operators of $69,943,000, bicycle and pedestrian facilities allocations to cities and the County of $2,094,300, and planning and administration allocations to other agencies of $623,300. STA disbursements of $27,549,400 are for bus capital purposes in Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley. Transfers out comprise $11,651,600 for rail operations and capital, $1,500,000 for grade separation projects, $2,445,000 for planning, and $850,000 for administration. The LTF and STA transit allocations reflect the use of $7,234,900 and $14,624,200 in fund balances, respectively. Measure A disbursements include $2,815,000 for Western County specialized transit funding of the second year of the 2013 two-year call for projects. The majority of other Measure A disbursements relates to other Measure A public transit programs: $870,000 for Western County Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA) allocations, $6,858,300 for Coachella Valley public and specialized transit, and $2,464,800 for Western County intercity bus services. The Western County allocations are disbursed monthly to RTA, the major transit provider in the Western County, while the Coachella Valley allocation is disbursed monthly to SunLine, the major transit provider in the Coachella Valley. Table 54 - Public and Specialized Transit Expenditure Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 318,600 $ 380,100 $ 283,600 $ 381,400 $ 1,300 0% Professional Costs Legal Services 15,000 23,500 4,100 22,000 (1,500) -6% Audit Services 20,200 78,000 78,000 10,000 (68,000) -87% Professional Services - General 132,100 165,000 134,000 160,000 (5,000) -3% Total Professional Costs 167,300 266,500 216,100 192,000 (74,500) -28% Support Costs 10,500 24,500 13,500 22,500 (2,000) -8% Operating and Capital Disbursements 56,750,100 106,323,000 78,998,100 113,218,100 6,895,100 6% Total Projects and Operations 56,750,100 106,323,000 78,998,100 113,218,100 6,895,100 6% Transfers Out 14,097,600 14,415,000 18,891,300 16,446,600 2,031,600 14% TOTAL Public and Specialized Transit $ 71,344,100 $ 121,409,100 $ 98,402,600 $ 130,260,600 $ 8,851,500 7% Public and Specialized Transit Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.14 0.10 Chief Financial Officer 0.06 0.08 Executive Director 0.01 0.02 Government Relations Manager 0.00 0.00 Multimodal Services Director 0.23 0.20 Procurement Analyst 0.02 0.03 Program Manager 0.00 0.02 Staff Analyst 1.00 1.00 Transit Manager 1.00 1.00 FTE 2.46 2.45 Department Budget Overview Department Description FY 14/15 0.15 0.05 0.00 0.01 0.23 0.01 0.00 1.00 1.00 2.45 The Measure A specialized transit program provides a valuable service to the community by serving the needs of commuters, mainly seniors and persons with disabilities, whose transportation needs are not met by traditional services. Specialized transit operations are typically managed by social service and nonprofit agencies. The Commission awards Measure A funds for specialized transit through a competitive call for projects process. In addition, federal grant funds from JARC and New Freedom were approved by the Commission through the 2013 Universal Call for Projects and will continue to be utilized for projects until the end of June 2015. In July 2012, Congress passed the MAP-21 two-year reauthorization bill which authorized federal funding for public transportation programs. This recent legislation restructured existing funding under SAFETEA-LU by consolidating several grant programs, revising project eligibility, and amending funding allocation requirements from discretionary to a formula -based process. Significant changes in MAP-21 include the end of both JARC and New Freedom as distinct programs. Under MAP- 21, JARC-type projects are now eligible activities under the rural (Section 5311) and urban (Section 5307) funding provisions. New Freedom type projects for seniors and people with disabilities will now be allowable under Section 5310 program. JARC activities include transportation projects for finance planning, capital, and operating costs that support the development and maintenance of transportation services designed to transport welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from jobs and activities related to their employment. These include transportation projects that facilitate the provision of public transportation services from urbanized areas and rural areas to suburban employment locations. Vanpool vehicles are now included as permissible expenses. For the next Universal Call for Projects to be conducted in the spring of 2015, staff will work on a recommendation for setting a policy in place to allocate a percentage of Section 5307 funds for JARC-related projects. The Commission also allocates funding, following a competitive call for projects, through the FTA Section 5310 program that is administered by Caltrans. This program provides funding to nonprofit transportation and social service agencies and public operators under special circumstances for the purchase of capital equipment. Under MAP-21, Section 5310 will fund more eligible activities to enhance mobility for seniors and people with disabilities. These activities include: • Former New Freedom activities — improvements that exceed the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); • Public transportation projects to improve access to fixed -route transit; • Public transit projects expressly designed for seniors and people with disabilities, where transit is insufficient, inappropriate or unavailable; and • Alternatives to public transportation that assist seniors and people with disabilities. Eligibility for the above federal funds requires recipients to comply with all federal coordinated planning requirements in accordance with SAFETEA-LU and MAP-21 provisions. Under these programs, projects selected for funding must be derived from a locally -developed Coordinated Plan and must be developed through a process that includes representatives of the public, private, and nonprofit transportation and human service providers. Approval of Measure A and JARC/New Freedom grant awards under the 2013 Universal Call for Projects was obtained in April 2013 for the Western County and Coachella Valley applicants, and approved projects began provision of services on July 1, 2013 with expected project completion by June 2015. The Commission is responsible for short-range transportation planning and programming. Planning includes the development of the countywide SRTPs for eight public transit operators consisting of the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; SCRRA's Metrolink commuter rail; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency; RTA; and SunLine. The Commission assists in coordinating the annual development, review, and approval of the operator SRTPs and allocates Measure A, LTF, STA, and FTA Sections 5307, 5311, 5316, and 5317 transit funding resources to public transit programs including new federal funds, Section 5337 (State of Good Repair grant program) and 5339 (Bus and Bus Facilities). The Sections 5337 and 5339 funds will be administered directly by SCAG with the sub - allocation to individual agencies determined by the Commission through the SRTP process. The Commission is responsible for the disbursement of Measure A, LTF, and STA funds, while federal transit funds are administered by the FTA. In partnership with the County's transit operators, the Commission coordinates the allocation of available Proposition 1B transit (capital and security) funding and ensures that proposed projects meet the mobility needs of the County. Proposition 1B funds are annually appropriated by the legislature and used for transit related capital purchases, infrastructure/facility improvements, and security enhancements. The Riverside County operators annually apply for Proposition 1B funds; however, due to the state's ongoing financial condition, the release of funds is contingent upon available proceeds from future bond sales. The Commission has public transit operator oversight and fiduciary responsibilities to ensure that annual fiscal audits and a state triennial performance audit are conducted in accordance with TDA regulations. The Commission is also charged with annually reviewing public transit operator activities and recommending potential productivity improvements to lower operating costs. To ensure that specialized transit allocations are expended and required service goals are met in accordance with funding agreements, the Commission engages an audit firm to perform certain agreed -upon procedures for the Measure A specialized transit funding recipients, some of which also received Section 5310, JARC, and New Freedom funds. Key Assumptions • LTF, STA, and Measure A disbursements are based on projected budgetary allocations but may be adjusted after the Commission approves actual allocations in July 2014. • Fluctuating of LTF and Measure A sales tax revenues will continue to require efforts to streamline operating expenses by all operators while maintaining efficiency and quality of service. • Transit Vision, adopted by the Commission in June 2008, established a 25% allocation of 2009 Measure A Western County specialized transit funds to the RTA as the CTSA for Western County. Accomplishments • Oversaw the successful first -year implementation of the ongoing specialized transit services resulting from the 2013 Universal Call for Projects funding allocation process. • Received approval notification of 16 capital projects awarded to six successful Riverside County recipients of funding under the FY 2011/12 FTA Section 5310 program. Projects were derived from a locally -developed Coordinated Plan. • Incorporated FY 2010/11 Proposition 13 Public Transportation, Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account funds with transit capital funding sources following Caltrans' release of program funding covering a three-year period need for fiscal years 2010/11— 2012/13. • Approved allocation of FY 2013/14 Proposition 113 California Transit Security Grant Program —California Transit Assistance funds for eligible transit safety and security projects identified by transit operators following release of program funding and guidelines by the California Emergency Management Agency. • Completed the FY 2012/13 triennial performance audits of the Commission and the seven transit operators in Riverside County that receive TDA funds. • Issued the 2013 Call for Projects and awarded funding allocations for specialized transit services for FY 2013/14 and FY 2014/15. Major Initiatives The Commission has long demonstrated a strong commitment to assist in the mobility of those with specialized transit needs. Through its 1989 Measure A specialized transit program, the Commission provided millions of dollars to public and nonprofit transit operators for the provision of special transit services to improve the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. Along with support of traditional dial -a -ride services, the Commission supports innovative programs that provide transit assistance in hard to serve rural areas or for riders having very special transit needs. The riders, many frail and elderly, have come to depend on these services that provide a higher level of assistance than can be provided by the public transit providers and/or operate in areas not served by public transit. As a result of the 2009 Measure A, these specialized transit programs will continue through 2039. In June 2014, 17 programs in Western County and five programs in the Coachella Valley will complete their first year of specialized transit services under the 2013 Universal Call for Projects, including the non -emergency medical transportation component. Eleven of these projects are fully funded with Measure A funds, while the other eleven projects are funded by a mix of Measure A, JARC, and New Freedom (under SAFETEA-LU) funds. As identified in the Coordinated Plan, the specialized transit projects approved for funding will require implementation and yearlong performance monitoring during FY 2014/15. To maintain funding for future Universal Call for Projects, staff will present a recommendation to the Commission for policy language to continue funding JARC eligible projects by setting aside a percentage of MAP-21 Section 5307 funds and allocate to future Universal Call for Projects. Overall, the FY 2012/13 Section 5307 apportionment under MAP-21 increased by about seven percent compared to FY 2011/12 funding under SAFETEA-LU. All Section 5307 grantees will have to comply with new provisions under MAP-21 for transit management and transit safety and security. Department Goals Provide timely information to the public regarding Commission -implemented projects and support public relations activities of Measure A, JARC, and New Freedom funded programs by grant recipients. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Complete implementation of projects under the 2013 Universal Call for Projects and start preparation for application, evaluation, and selection process under the 2015 Universal Call for Projects beginning July 1, 2015. • Produce and distribute public information materials as needed including press releases, flyers, brochures, marketing materials, and newspaper ads. In addition, staff will also leverage the 1E511 traveler information system in order to more fully market the availability of specialized transit programs. Allocate Measure A Specialized Transit and federal funds to support services that will maintain and/or enhance mobility by alleviating transportation barriers for seniors, persons with disabilities, and the truly needy. (Policy Goals: Mobility, lntermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Monitor performance of specialized transit grant recipients through analysis of their monthly performance reports. • Support the FTA Section 5310, 5316, 5317 and 5307 (under SAFETEA-LU and MAP-21) grant processes to improve mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities and individuals of limited means by working with Caltrans, public operators, and social service agencies to ensure a competitive process statewide for the allocation of federal transportation dollars for social service programs. • Provide technical assistance and program support to agencies offering specialized transit programs to ensure the maximum benefit of funding for improved mobility for seniors, persons with disabilities, and individuals of limited means. • Seek Commission approval on funding allocations for the Universal Call for Projects every two years. Coordinate the operation of all public transportation services within the County with a goal toward promoting program efficiency and harmony between transit operators as outlined in state law. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, lntermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Review transit planning, resource allocation, and service implementation policy requirements including appropriate coordination of commuter rail, intercounty and intercity bus, local bus and paratransit, and social service transportation services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Implement recommendations resulting from the TDA-mandated triennial performance audits of the Commission and the seven Riverside County transit operators. • Assure the ongoing effectiveness of the SRTP process and work with the County's eight transit operators to assure productivity and efficiency as well as compliance with the productivity improvement program. • Coordinate regional transit connections among commuter rail, buses, and paratransit services to ensure convenient service for passengers. • Monitor transit operators' quarterly capital grants reports. • Monitor transit operators' performance through analysis of their quarterly performance reports using the TransTrack computer -based tracking program. Continue to provide staff resources to assist and support the coordination of transit services within the County and throughout the State. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, lntermodalism & Accessibility, Communications) Objectives: • Participate and influence intercounty discussions between Riverside, Orange, San Diego, and San Bernardino counties regarding the enhancement of intermodal options. This includes additional transit services (rail and express bus) and rideshare services. • Regularly participate in meetings that focus on the coordination of transit services, such as the California Association for Coordinated Transportation, SunLine's Access Committee, RTA's ADA Committee, the Riverside County Foundation on Aging Board of Directors, the Older Californian Traffic Safety Task Force, Riverside Regional Coalition and the Commission's Citizens Advisory Committee/Social Service Transportation Advisory Council. • Continue the development of a marketing and distribution network for communicating specialized transit mobility options to seniors, the disabled, and persons of limited means. Public and Specialized Transit Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected SRTPs submitted by operators and reviewed 8 8 8 8 SRTP amendments 3 2 2 2 Specialized Transit grants awarded 21 21 22 22 One-way trips provided by Measure A funded projects 152,000 150,350 152,700 153,000 One-way trips provided by JARC & New Freedom funded agencies 171,000 262,100 300,000 320,000 One-way trips reimbursed through the Western County Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project 83,700 83,830 90,000 95,000 Transit tickets provided through the Transportation Access Program 64,500 62,740 63,000 63,500 Clients served through Blindness Support Services 30 52 30 30 Commuter Assistance Mission Statement: "To encourage and promote transportation alternatives for commuters through employer partnerships, information services, technological innovation, and community outreach." Chart 39 — Commuter Assistance Transfers Out 5% 4 Projects and Operations 67 % Expenditures Salaries and Benefits 8% Professional Costs 9% y Support Costs 11% Commuter Assistance expenditures and transfers out total $3,460,400, which represents a 24% decrease from last year's budget (Table 55). Salaries and benefits of $270,900 reflect a 10% decrease due to FTE allocations and include a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $313,000 have decreased 62% over the prior year due to completion of the new ridematching system and restructuring of consultant and hosting services to operate and maintain the new system. Support costs totaling $391,000 include mail and printing services, computer and vehicle maintenance, communications, and other office expenditures. Projects and operations expenditures of $2,321,000 consist of park and ride lease payments of $150,000, regional transportation consultant services totaling $1,587,000 to manage and implement the program, and merchant vouchers valued at $584,000. Capital outlay expenditures include $5,000 to upgrade the hardware and network to enhance the equipment in the commuter exchange vehicle. Reimbursements from SANBAG for rideshare services provided by the Commission are included in revenues to offset these expenditures. Transfers out consist of $159,500 to the General fund for costs related to maintenance of the park and ride facility at the Perris Transit Center. Table 55 — Commuter Assistance Uses Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 263,600 $ 300,800 $ 394,100 Professional Costs Legal Services 23,300 25,000 25,000 Professional Services - General 277,100 790,800 779,500 Total Professional Costs 300,400 815,800 804,500 Support Costs 372,400 485,300 484,500 Projects and Operations Program Operations 1,885,500 2,802,800 2,765,500 Construction 46,500 Total Projects and Operations 1,932,000 2,802,800 2,765,500 Capital Outlay - 7,000 7,000 Transfers Out 151,300 112,200 112,200 TOTAL Commuter Assistance $ 3,019,700 $ 4,523,900 $ 4,567,800 $ 270,900 25,000 288,000 313,000 391,000 2,321,000 2,321,000 5,000 159,500 S 3.460.400 Commuter Assistance Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.10 0.20 Chief Financial Officer 0.00 0.01 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.53 0.54 Deputy Executive Director 0.04 0.04 MultimodaI Services Director 0.51 0.47 Procurement Analyst 0.01 0.02 Procurement Manager 0.00 0.02 Staff Analyst 0.59 0.54 FTE 1.78 1.84 Department Budget Overview Department Description $ (29,900) -10% 0% (502,800) -64% (502,800) -62% (94,300) -19% (481,800) -17% N/A (481,800) -17% (2,000) -29% 47,300 42% (1,063,500) -24% FY 14/15 0.10 0.01 0.50 0.02 0.43 0.03 0.00 0.50 1.59 While much of the Commission's work is focused on increasing transportation infrastructure and capacity, there is significant value in ensuring that the transportation systems are used efficiently. To help foster more efficient use of these systems, the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program seeks to encourage Riverside County constituents and commuters to make a mode -shift decision away from single occupancy vehicle commuting and into alternative modes of transportation such as a carpool, vanpool, buspool, public bus, Metrolink, walking, bicycling, or telecommuting. The Commuter Assistance Program seeks to efficiently influence driver behavior by fostering a mode -shifting decision at both the employer and commuter levels via the following methods: • The provision of employer services to foster the implementation of employer -based mode -shift and rideshare programs; • The use of incentives both for beginning and then maintaining a mode-shift/rideshare arrangement; • Public information services including the dissemination of personalized commute options and traveler information to educate commuters of all travel options available and to foster congestion avoidance behavior when traveling; and • Leverage technology to deliver easy to use online resources and tools to more efficiently serve employer partners, their employees, and all other commuters. The Commission's Commuter Assistance Program was implemented as a specific requirement under Measure A to address congestion mitigation. While ridesharing has a beneficial impact on air quality, first and foremost, it is a strategy to improve mobility through increased use of alternative travel modes. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue to contract with a consulting firm to administer an Inland Empire Commuter Assistance Program with regional reach. • Maintaining its long-term partnership with the Commission, SANBAG will contract with the Commission to manage and implement a "sister" Commuter Assistance Program for its residents and employers in San Bernardino County. Accomplishments • Developed and launched a new and more cost effective ridematching system. In addition, the new cloud - based ridematching system will no longer require hardware or a network administrator to maintain it. • Continued to operate the report card program for both program participants and employer partners which translates individual or worksite rideshare participation into money saved, congestion reduced, and emissions reduced. This outreach is intended to recognize rideshare efforts and to motivate participants to continue ridesharing and/or grow employer program participation. • Increased participation and use of on-line services by employer partners. • Continued use of the Program Measurement Tool to evaluate program performance. • Continued to provide rideshare services to employers and commuters in the Coachella Valley, leveraging JARC funds. • Renewed leases for park and ride facilities with the following locations: Canyon Community Church of the Nazarene (Corona), Living Truth Christian Fellowship (Corona), Corona Friends Church (Corona), Elsinore Naval Military School (Lake Elsinore), Lake Elsinore Outlets (Lake Elsinore), Revival Christian Fellowship (Menifee), Mount San Jacinto College (San Jacinto), Hope Lutheran Church (Temecula), Orchard Christian Fellowship (Temecula), and the United Methodist Church (Temecula). • Continued partnering with the Rail Department to provide park and ride spaces at the La Sierra station and a permitted section of park and ride spaces at the North Main Corona station. Major Initiatives A cornerstone of the Commuter Assistance Program is its continued partnership among commuters, employers, and government. The partnership, based on voluntary efforts, makes a collective difference in increasing the efficiency of the County's transportation system —local roads, freeways, commuter rail, and public bus. The combined effort results in less congestion, decreased vehicle miles traveled, and improved air quality. The major initiatives to continue these partnerships and efforts in FY 2014/15 are described below. Grow Employer Partnerships: Given that the highest percentage of rideshare arrangements is formed at work sites, voluntary employer participation is critical to address congestion and air quality goals; employers are the conduit to directly influence their employees' personal transportation choices. The ongoing success of the core Western County rideshare program and the explosive success of the now seven-year old Coachella Valley rideshare program demonstration is a testament to the significance of employer partnerships in the program's success. However, the current economic environment will pose challenges in terms of maintaining and/or growing these partnerships. Employer Transportation Coordinators (ETCs) have to do more with less. Delivery of value-added services and tools to make the ETC's job easier will be a critical motivation to continue the partnership. Support Multimodal Travel: In addition to ridematching, information services, and incentives to facilitate ridesharing, the Commuter Assistance Program also implements park and ride facilities to support ridesharing efforts. The last Caltrans park and ride facility in Riverside County was built in 1999. The Commission leases park and ride spaces from property owners to supplement the network of park and ride spaces in Riverside County. A continued focus for FY 2014/15 will be to increase the number of spaces leased and coordinate with ridesharers and transit and rail partners to identify areas where the lease program can help support car/vanpool/buspool arrangements as well as facilitate transit connections. Department Goals Operate a cost-effective Commuter Assistance Program within Riverside County that results in a demonstrable reduction in single occupant vehicle trips, thus assisting with congestion mitigation and improving air quality. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Environmental Stewardship) Objectives: • Continue to offer short-term incentives for commuters to try a transportation mode other than driving alone. • Continue to provide a rewards program for long-term ridesharers to encourage their continued use of alternative modes of transportation. • Ensure the effectiveness of the Commuter Assistance Program through program analysis and recurring assessments of participation and retention of ridesharers. The Commission will continue to look for ways to pare program costs without impacting service delivery or participation. • Explore opportunities to further enhance the 511 mobile application by integrating incentive enrollment and/or tracking. • Increase participation and use of on-line service by employer partners to reduce administrative costs. • Optimize the number of park and ride spaces leased and address park and ride gaps in the system. • Assess vanpool program funding opportunities. Ensure the coordination of ridesharing programs throughout the Inland Empire and the southern California region. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Intermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Continue to administer a "sister" Commuter Assistance Program in San Bernardino County on a contract basis, thus expanding the reach and effectiveness of commuter programs throughout the Inland Empire area. • Continue to provide leadership with regard to the ongoing operation, maintenance, and enhancement of bi- county ridematching system with regional reach. • Investigate the modification of the regional vanpool agreement with the regional partners in order to provide for more service availability and a revision to the current cost sharing formula. Strategically broaden the reach of the program to encourage the use of alternative transportation modes amongst all travelers and continue to grow the core target base of employers and their employees. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Communications) Objectives: • Develop and implement a rideshare brand strategy and streamlined communications plan anchored by the 1E511 system. • Develop and support on-line resources and tools for employers to more effectively manage and market their organizations' rideshare programs. • Continue the dissemination of the report card program for both program participants and employer partners that translate individual or worksite rideshare participation into money saved, congestion reduced, and emissions reduced. • Publicize the participation of local employers in the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program through various media options. • Continue the operation of the Commuter Exchange vehicle to include 50 site visits for the FY 2014/15. Commuter Assistance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Number of one-way single occupant vehicle trips reduced as a result of Rideshare Incentives 118,500 81,482 83,900 86,400 Number of Rideshare Plus Rewards Members 5,100 6,786 7,000 7,200 Number of incoming 1-866-RIDESHARE telephone calls 1,600 2,527 2,600 2,700 Number of services provided by Inland Empire Commuter Services to support employer trip reduction efforts at worksites: • Employer's requesting survey services 110 160 165 170 • RideGuides produced 16,400 14,813 15,300 15,700 Number of events participated in by the Commuter Exchange in total and as identified individually below: 50 55 50 50 • Public events 5 12 5 5 • Employer work sites 5 3 5 5 • Elementary schools 40 40 40 40 Motorist Assistance Mission Statement: "To improve safety, reduce congestion, and enhance access to traveler information for motorists through the provision of a comprehensive motorist aid system." Chart 40 — Motorist Assistance Salaries and Benefits 4% Projects and Operations 56% Expenditures Support Costs 11% Motorist Assistance expenditures and uses are budgeted at $5,578,800 FY 2014/15, or a decrease of 17% compared to the prior year budget (Table 56) due to decreased demand for FSP services supporting construction projects. Salaries and benefits reflect an increase of 7% due to a 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $716,400 decreased 7% and support costs of $630,900 decreased $246,700, or 28%, primarily due to the restructuring of 1E511 traveler information service operations and outreach. Reimbursement from SANBAG for half of all 1E511 related expenditures is included in revenues. Budgeted expenditures for project operations include $2,750,000 in towing contract costs for the FSP program. Projects and operations costs have decreased 14% due to anticipated completion of FSP construction services projects. Transfers out represent SAFE matching funds of $548,700 to state funding for FSP services and a $353,000 allocation for administrative costs. Table 56 — Motorist Assistance Uses Detail FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 Dollar Percent Actual Revised Budget Projected Budget Change Change Salaries and Benefits $ 104,600 $ 187,200 $ 162,400 Professional Costs Legal Services 11,500 29,000 34,000 Professional Services- General 504,200 737,500 737,000 Total Professional Costs 515,700 766,500 771,000 Support Costs 514,900 877,600 826,800 Projects and Operations Program Operations 2,428,300 3,633,300 3,045,000 Transfers Out 1,325,800 1,290,900 890,000 TOTAL Moto rist Assista nce $ 4,889,300 $ 6,755,500 $ 5,695,200 $ 201,200 31,000 685,400 716,400 630,900 3,128,600 901,700 $ 5,578,800 $ 14,000 7% 2,000 7% (52,100) -7% (50,100) -7% (246,700) -28% (504,700) -14% (389,200) -30% $ (1,176,700) -17% Motorist Assistance Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 FY 13/14 Administrative Assistant 0.01 0.04 Chief Financial Officer 0.00 0.01 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.46 0.42 Deputy Executive Director 0.00 0.00 Multimodal Services Director 0.08 0.23 Procurement Analyst 0.03 0.10 Procurement Manager 0.00 0.04 Staff Analyst 0.31 0.32 FTE 0.89 1.16 Department Budget Overview Department Description FY 14/15 0.00 0.02 0.40 0.05 0.09 0.15 0.08 0.40 1.19 As a SAFE, the Commission is responsible for providing a motorist aid system for Riverside County. This system is comprised of three components: 1) the 1E511 traveler information system, 2) FSP, and 3) call boxes. The 1E511 system is a telephone and web -based service that delivers real-time traffic information, including incidents and travel times, bus and rail trip planning, and rideshare information. The FSP clears small debris on freeways and assists stranded motorists on the most congested Riverside County freeways by towing, changing flat tires, and temporarily taping cooling system hoses at no charge to the motorists. FSP service is also provided in construction zones through separate funding agreements with Caltrans to help mitigate congestion. The call box system allows motorists to call for assistance in the event of a mechanical breakdown, accident, or other emergency on the freeway. Key Assumptions • In partnership with SANBAG, the Commission will maintain and operate the 1E511 system in accordance with national 511 implementation standards. • The Commission will maintain and operate an 1E511 system to be funded 50% by the Commission and 50% by SANBAG. The Commission's share of operating costs will be funded with SAFE revenues. • The Commission will enhance 1E511 with the roll -out of a more personalized traffic information service. • The FSP will continue as long as state funding support is available. • Tow truck contractor costs for the nine existing FSP beats are based on Commission -approved contracts. • Annual maintenance costs are based on a flat -fee contract based on the number of call boxes. • Current percentage levels of vandalism, knockdowns, and miscellaneous repairs to call boxes will remain consistent with the past year. Accomplishments • Grew the IE511.org web visits per month by 11% in FY 2013/14. • Incorporated additional freeway traffic data into the traveler information system to supplement Caltrans data and improve the availability and accuracy of traffic data throughout the Inland Empire. • Enhanced the 1E511 system with improved functionality and global positioning system capabilities for the 1E511 mobile application. • Maintained one of the highest benefit -to -cost ratios statewide for FSP in the latest statewide FSP Management Information System Report. • Performed a comprehensive assessment that identified additional call box reduction opportunities to improve program efficiencies and maintain an effective "safety -net" for stranded motorists. • Continued the "cost recovery" program for call box knockdowns in an effort to collect reimbursements from motorists involved in accidents that damage Commission property. Major Initiatives The Commission, along with its partner, SANBAG, will continue to operate, maintain, and enhance the 1E511 system. This system includes a website interface and an interactive voice response (IVR) telephone system that serves Riverside and San Bernardino county residents and commuters. While several enhancements have been made to the system since its launch, new enhancements will focus on the development of serving more personalized traffic information services specific to a commuter's location, route, and time of travel. Major Motorist Assistance initiatives will also focus on system efficiencies and evaluating and/or implementing enhanced program services or coverage. The call box system program has served as a "safety -net" for stranded motorists in Riverside County since 1991. However, call box usage has declined over the years with the proliferation of mobile phone use. In response, call box reductions have been made, additional reductions will be made based on call box removals identified in the call box reduction planning assessment. In addition, staff will focus on maintaining a high benefit -to -cost ratio and seek opportunities to maximize funding to not only improve the level of service but to potentially expand FSP coverage as well. Department Goals Provide efficient delivery of a comprehensive motorist aid system (IE511, FSP, Call Box) and an outstanding level of service to the traveling public. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Research new technologies to streamline FSP processes and develop new tools to automate the production of reports that track the performance of FSP tow operators. • Continue to evaluate opportunities to provide more efficient FSP coverage through changes in service days, service hours, or number of vehicles assigned to each beat; perform budget assessments to identify potential service expansion (i.e., holiday service, weekend service on select beats) opportunities that can be supported. • Review proposed construction projects with Caltrans and local cities and coordinate the use of temporary construction tow service to mitigate congestion. • Work in coordination with CHP and Caltrans to implement call box reductions identified in the planning assessment. Continue coordination with San Bernardino SAFE to monitor the operation of the call answering center contractor. Enhance access to real-time traveler information. (Policy Goals: System Efficiencies, Communications) Objectives: • Develop access to, or delivery of, more personalized traffic information services specific to a commuter's location, route, and time of travel. • Grow the number of users with more personalized offerings, services, and cost-effective marketing efforts. • Continue to refine and enhance 1E511 web content, applications, and outreach. • Continue to leverage existing resources, such as traffic data, provided by Caltrans District 8, existing IVR software, and Google Transit to minimize costs. • Continue coordination with Caltrans on expanding traffic detection and feeding that traffic data into the 1E511 system. • Utilize the opportunity at the new Caltrans District 8 Traffic Management Center to enhance coordination between CHP and Caltrans on traveler information. Motorist Assistance Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Number of call boxes 603 580 563 540 Number of call box calls 4,791 5,337 5,200 5,000 Number of vehicle assists 44,885 43,286 44,585 45,923 Number of 1E511 phone calls 344,809 351,161 361,700 372,500 Number of 1E511 web visits 358,802 399,730 411,700 424,000 Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 6.3 CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Project Development and Delivery Mission Statement: "To keep the Commission's contract with the voters of Riverside County by accelerating the planning, programming, and implementation of projects and programs in the Measure A Transportation Improvement Plan, as enhanced by the Toll Program, to the extent that funds are available. To ensure that capital projects are environmentally acceptable, expertly designed, and implemented in a cost effective manner. To acquire and manage required right of way in the most economical, efficient, and timely manner." Chart 41— Capital Project Development and Delivery Salaries and Professional Benefits Costs 0% � 1% 1..4* Transfers Out 37% Debt Service _/ 711111k 4% Capital Outlay 0% Expenditures Projects and Operations 58% The budgeted expenditures and transfers out total $1,370,533,300 to cover all of the Commission's major capital projects (Table 57). Personnel costs represent less than 1% of the budgeted uses. Salaries and benefits reflect an increase of 8% due to FTE allocations; 3% cost of living adjustment offset by employees' contribution for their share of normal pension costs; and a 3% pool for merit -based salary increases. Professional costs of $8,493,100 are primarily related to general legal costs, specialized legal and financial advisory services related to the toll program, and debt management services. Support costs of $852,400 consist primarily of services needed to maintain the Commission's real properties in a condition that complies with all local codes and regulations governing property maintenance. General project costs include $13,969,300 related to program management provided by Bechtel Infrastructure (Bechtel), SCRRA, and permits for highway and rail capital projects. Significant projects included in engineering expenditures of $17,639,000, are the 1-15 corridor improvements; 91/71 interchange improvement project; Mid County Parkway; SR-79 realignment; and various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects. Construction expenditures of $238,444,900, are primarily related to the 1-215 corridor improvements; SR-91 corridor improvement; SR-74 curve widening; I-15/Los Alamos Road bridge replacement; Riverside quiet zones; various Western County Measure A and TUMF regional arterial projects; and Perris Valley Line and other rail projects. Design -build costs of $254,803,500 pertain to the SR-91 corridor improvement project. Right of way expenditures of $183,851,400 on significant projects include the SR-91 corridor improvement project; SR-91 HOV lanes from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange; 91/71 interchange improvements; Mid County Parkway; various Western County TUMF regional arterial projects; and Perris Valley Line and other rail projects. Funding will also be provided for MSHCP land mitigation acquisitions. Local turn back payments to jurisdictions and the County for local streets and roads repair, maintenance, and construction amount to $49,882,000, net of an allocation of $751,000 to the 2009 Measure A Western County Regional Arterial special revenue fund related to the ineligibility of the city of Beaumont for its local streets and roads allocation. Disbursements to CVAG for the 2009 Measure A Coachella Valley highway and regional arterial program comprise substantially all of the regional arterial expenditures. Special studies of $270,000 are related to the toll operations and organizational planning. Operating and capital disbursements of $7,500,000 are related to RTA SR-91 express bus service capital funding and Metrolink station rehabilitation costs. Rail capital purchases for station rehabilitation project represent 87% of the capital outlay expenditures. Interest payments on outstanding 2009 Bonds, 2010 Bonds, 2013 Sales Tax Bonds, and 2013 Toll Bonds are approximately $47,296,200. Principal payments of $7,400,000 are related to the 2009 Bonds. Significant transfers out consist of the following: • $417,900,000 in sales tax and toll revenue bond proceeds to fund the SR-91 corridor improvement project; • $5,534,400 from the TUMF CETAP reserves for two city of Temecula regional arterial projects along 1-15 and the 1-215 corridor improvements project; • $21,653,700 from 2009 Measure A Western County highway funds to the Debt Service fund; • $729,900 from TUMF for administrative allocations to the General fund; • $751,000 from 2009 Measure A Western County local streets and roads to the 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterial program for the city of Beaumont's local streets and roads allocation; • $16,099,200 from 2009 Measure A Western County regional arterial program to TUMF regional arterial projects for the cities of Corona and San Jacinto; • $40,000,000 from 1989 Measure A Western County highway fund reserves to the 2009 Measure A Western County highway fund for a contribution to the SR-91 corridor improvement project per the plan of finance; and • $311,000 from the 1989 Measure A Western County rail fund to the 2009 Measure A Western County rail fund for the station rehabilitation project. Table 57 - Capital Project Development and Delivery Uses Detail FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 FY 13/14 Revised Budget Projected FY 14/15 Budget Dollar Change Percent Change Salaries and Benefits Professional Costs Legal Services Audit Services Financial Advisory Professional Services - General Total Professional Costs Support Costs Projects and Operations Program Operations Engineering Construction Design Build Right of Way and Land Local Streets and Roads Regional Arterials Special Studies Operating and Capital Disbursements Total Projects and Operations Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL Capital Project Development and $ 2,669,100 $ 3,339,800 $ 3,914,500 4,953,800 41,300 167,000 2,095,800 6,526,600 44,000 1,444,300 2,492,400 5,306,200 14,000 994,000 1,670,100 7,257,900 10,507,300 7,984,300 277,700 879,300 215,200 9,304,400 12,203,600 7,459,500 15,697,500 22,001,000 11,044,200 37,487,700 238,243,900 112,801,000 26 232 500 217,750,000 165,800,000 44,974,600 179,087,800 103,123,400 44,594,900 46,865,900 46,911,900 8,678,500 27,471,000 25,370,000 61,800 46,000 39,000 2,000,000 - 187,031,900 145,300 22,204,100 112,477,800 Delivery $ 332,063,800 745,669,200 340,000 136,660,400 616,192,500 $ 1,513,588,500 472,549,000 13,800 118,979,200 460,408,200 $ 1,064,064,200 Capital Project Development and Delivery Staffing Summary Position FY 12/13 Administrative Assistant 0.59 Capital Projects Manager 2.71 Chief Financial Officer 0.53 Community Relations Manager 0.92 Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 0.00 Deputy Executive Director 0.09 Executive Director 0.33 Facilities Administrator 0.00 Finance Manager/Controller 0.03 Government Relations Manager 0.00 Multimodal Services Director 0.00 Planning & Programming Director 0.11 Planning & Programming Manager 0.00 Procurement Analyst 0.46 Procurement Manager 0.84 Project Delivery Director 0.96 Project Development Director 0.90 Right of Way Manager 1.00 Senior Staff Analyst 1.00 Staff Analyst 0.95 Toll Program Director 1.00 Toll Project Manager 1.00 $ 3,602,300 5,806,900 60,500 345,000 2,280,700 8,493,100 852,400 13,969,300 17,639,000 238,444,900 254,803,500 183,851,400 49,882,000 30,400,000 270,000 7,500,000 796,760,100 3,150,000 54,696,200 502,979,200 $ 1,370,533,300 FY 13/14 0.48 4.65 0.31 0.90 0.00 0.10 0.35 0.45 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.15 0.37 0.49 0.95 0.90 1.00 1.05 1.05 1.00 2.00 $ 262,500 8% (719,700) -11% 16,500 38% (1,099,300) -76% (211,700) -8% (2,014,200) -19% (26,900) -3% 1,765,700 14% (4,362,000) -20% 201,000 0% 37,053,500 17% 4,763,600 3% 3,016,100 6% 2,929,000 11% 224,000 487% 5,500,000 275% 51,090,900 7% 2,810,000 826% (81,964,200) -60% (113,213,300) -18% $ (143,055,200) -9% FY 14/15 0.53 4.75 0.30 0.85 0.05 0.09 0.30 0.20 0.02 0.04 0.10 0.23 0.31 0.46 0.68 0.95 0.00 1.00 2.16 1.00 1.00 2.00 FTE 13.42 16.20 17.02 Department Budget Overview Department Description The primary responsibility of Capital Projects is the development and delivery of major highway and rail capital projects where the Commission is identified as the lead agency. The delivery of a capital project can include tasks such as feasibility studies, preliminary engineering, environmental clearance, final design, right of way acquisition, construction, and construction management. Funding is also provided through Capital Projects for local jurisdiction highway and regional arterial projects based on funding agreements with the Commission. Approximately 80% of the Commission's FY 2014/15 budgeted expenditures originates in this department managed by the Toll Program and Project Delivery Directors responsible for the capital program. Capital Projects accelerates delivery of the Measure A, toll, state, and federally funded highway, regional arterial, and rail capital improvement projects throughout the County. Highway improvements currently in progress include the addition of mixed flow, carpool, truck climbing, and tolled express lanes; widening and realignment projects; and interchange improvements as well as a new CETAP corridor. Regional arterial capital improvements include funding for Western County TUMF regional arterial projects. Commuter rail capital improvements include the expansion of commuter rail service in Riverside County. This department also provides the necessary coordination between the Commission and Caltrans for the development of scope, cost, and project delivery schedules for Measure A projects that are funded by the STIP and Proposition 1B CMIA. The 2009 Measure A program includes funding to the incorporated cities and the County for local streets and roads maintenance, repair, and construction. The budgeted amount is set by formula established in the Measure A TIP. To be eligible to receive these Measure A funds, each city in the Western County and Coachella Valley areas and the County must participate in the TUMF program, which is administered by WRCOG in Western County and by CVAG in Coachella Valley. Additionally, for Western County jurisdictions, they must also participate in the MSHCP. Annually all cities and the County are required to submit a five-year CIP and meet a MOE requirement. Each jurisdiction's respective allocation is based on population (Western County and Palo Verde Valley) or dwelling unit (Coachella Valley) and the amount of sales tax generated. The city of La Quinta had not participated in the Coachella Valley TUMF Program prior to February 2013 when the city adopted the TUMF ordinance and entered into an agreement with CVAG to reimburse CVAG for the shortfall of prior TUMF. Accordingly, the city of La Quinta began to receive 50% of its allocation in late FY 2012/13 until the shortfall is repaid and CVAG the remaining 50%. The city of Beaumont was determined to be in noncompliance with the Western County TUMF program. As a result, Beaumont's Measure A allocation is transferred to the Commission's MARA program. Given the support required to oversee and participate in the project development work, costs for Commission staff and related support have been included in this department budget. The projects identified in the FY 2014/15 budget funded by Measure A, TUMF, state, or federal funds as well as future toll revenues require the continued support of the Bechtel program management team which includes program managers, project engineers, construction engineers, inspectors, contracts administration, and support staff. Right of Way Acquisition and Support Services The primary goal of the Right of Way Management Division is to deliver right of way in the most cost-effective manner and within project schedules, while adhering to federal and state regulations. Commission staff required to supervise and manage right of way services and related support for individual projects are included in the Capital Project Development and Delivery Department budget. The Commission authorized the development of a Right of Way Acquisition Program in 2006. To implement the Commission's directive, staff procured the services of on -call right of way consultant services in the fields of right of way engineering and surveying, environmental assessment, appraisal and appraisal review, acquisition and relocation, feasibility studies and cost estimates, property management, and utility relocation. These consultants are managed and supervised by the Right of Way Management Division. Property Management The Commission strives to manage its real property with the objective of maximizing existing and future public transportation benefits, safety, and income by means of professional property management policies and procedures. This includes issuing licenses and rights of entry for authorized third -party uses, as well as investigating and resolving issues regarding uses that are not authorized by the Commission. On certain occasions, the Commission may also grant easements. General maintenance activities and security measures are also part of the property management scope of work on all Commission -owned properties. The demolition and clearance of structures and other improvements on acquired property, excluding commuter rail stations, is included in the property management function. Additionally, the Commission must manage real property acquired for a project until it is required for construction. Since 1990, the Commission has acquired property assets in the course of rail and highway project implementation. To date, the rail properties number over 225 parcels. The Commission acquired approximately 500 parcels for the SR-74 widening project (Segments 1 and 2), and most of these parcels, which were related to Segment 1, have been transferred to Caltrans. In addition approximately 125 properties have been acquired for the SR-91 HOV lanes, Mid County Parkway, SR-79 realignment, SR-74 curve widening, Perris Valley Line, 1-215 corridor improvements (central segment), and SR-60 HOV lanes/1-215 to Redlands Boulevard projects. Property acquisition for the SR-91 corridor improvement project began in 2010 with 110 properties acquired to date, legal possession of 16 parcels, and another 12 properties in escrow. These properties were acquired in fee, and will be transferred primarily to Caltrans upon completion of the projects. Upon project completion, all remaining portions of properties within every project are reassessed and deemed surplus when it has been determined that the continued retention of the property no longer supports the Commission's policy goals and objectives. In connection with the federal TIFIA loan for the SR-91 corridor improvement project, the Commission is required to establish a $20,000,000 TIFIA debt service reserve by June 2019. The Commission anticipates that proceeds from the sales of excess properties related to the project will be sufficient to fund the reserve. Long -Term Strategic Planning Several years ago, the strategic plan for the 1989 Measure A highway program was updated and provided the guidance for completion of the 1989 Measure A highway projects. A significant effort was completed in December 2006 to develop an implementation plan strategy for the 2009 Measure A state highway program, with a focus on the first 10 years of the program through 2019. An objective -based assessment of the Western County portion of the 2009 Measure A TIP was completed along with the prioritization of the program of projects. Four highway corridors, 1-215, 1-15, 1-10, and SR-91, were selected as the priority focus for the first 10 years of the 2009 Measure A program, and long-term development work was approved for large scale projects such as the development of the Mid County Parkway, realignment of SR-79, and the bi-county widening of 1-215 to San Bernardino County. Project development activities for these projects have been ongoing since an update and reprioritization was completed in most of January 2010. Since 2010, a scope reevaluation was completed on the 1-15 corridor improvement project and the Commission adopted a new scope of work which entails tolled express lanes on the northern 14 miles of 1-15 in Riverside County. The 1-10 truck climbing lanes project was deferred several years and has been replaced with added safety improvements on SR-60. For the strategic projects, preliminary engineering and environmental clearance will be completed for the Mid County Parkway and SR-79 realignment; right of way acquisition for Mid County Parkway will be considered for extraordinary acquisitions on a pay-as-you-go basis, while right of way acquisitions for SR-79 realignment will be suspended due to lack of available funding. Project costs and anticipated funding for these projects have been updated annually, and a status update has been included in each of the annual Commission workshops since 2011. Updated capital project implementation strategic plans are expected in 2019 and 2029, as required by the 2009 Measure A. CVAG has developed a strategic plan for Coachella Valley highway and regional arterial projects based upon a transportation project prioritization study that is updated periodically. The Perris Valley Line is the most significant rail capital project, and it was included in the 1989 and 2009 Measure A programs. Other rail capital projects are developed in coordination with SCRRA as well as the implementation of the Perris Valley Line. Four new Western County transportation corridors were identified through CETAP and are eligible for 2009 Measure A Western County new corridor and TUMF CETAP funding. Given the size and anticipated cost of these new corridors, they are moving forward on varied schedules with the work on the internal corridors, the Mid County Parkway and 1-215 corridor improvement project (south segment) to French Valley interchange, being the most advanced. Western County TUMF regional arterial projects were approved in 2004 based on a call for projects, which is discussed in the Planning and Programming Department in section 6.2 of this document. Additionally, the Commission will participate in the improvement of a wildlife corridor crossing under SR-91, B Canyon, in collaboration with Caltrans, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, U.S. National Forest, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Department of Parks and Recreation. The actual construction of this enhancement will be done subsequent to the construction on the SR-91 corridor improvement project. These strategic planning activities play a significant part of the Commission's annual budget process, in particular the capital budget. Key Assumptions • The Commission will continue its emphasis on the closeout of the 1989 Measure A program. • The Western Riverside County Delivery Plan serves as the basis for defining the 2009 Measure A project selection and prioritization. • Western County TUMF regional arterial projects are based on the list approved by the Commission in 2004. • Agreements for the advancement of 2009 Measure A funds have been obtained from CVAG and cities participating in the debt programs. The annual principal and interest payments for these loans will be deducted by the Commission from each agency's respective disbursements based on the terms of the loan agreements. • Highway project costs are based on engineers' estimates and scope agreements with Caltrans. • Construction projects are competitively bid to minimize costs. • Design -build projects are competitively procured using a best value selection process to maximize value to the Commission. • All projects will be built to required standards. • All highway projects, with the exception of tolled express lane facilities, are transferred upon completion to Caltrans; operation of these facilities is the responsibility of Caltrans. Tolled express lane facilities, when completed, will be operated and maintained by the Commission for the term agreed to by Caltrans and the Commission. • The Commission will develop strategies to implement alternative financing structures including public toll roads. • MARA projects had been selected and programmed in previous years when revenues were at a level that could sustain reasonable cash flow to fund the construction projects selected for this program, and a call for projects that combined available MARA funds with federal revenues was completed and approved in FY 2013/14. • Development of the SR-79 realignment and Mid County Parkway strategic projects through preliminary engineering and environmental clearance will continue. Accomplishments • Continued implementation of the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. • Completed construction phase for 1-215 corridor improvement project (south segment) widening from Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Scott Road and 1-215/Blaine Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard widening projects. • Continued construction for the 60/215 East Junction and SR-91 HOV lanes projects. • Completed final design, right of way acquisition, and utility relocations and procured a construction management team for the SR-74 curve realignment project. • Continued construction for the 1-215 corridor improvement project (central segment) widening from Scott Road to Nuevo Road. • Continued construction for the 1-215 bi-county HOV project. • Began the project report and preliminary engineering and environmental phase for the 1-215 corridor improvement project south connectors and the SR-60 truck climbing lane. • Continued to advance the development of the SR-91 corridor improvement project in numerous areas: • Completed financial close on the sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and final approval of a $421 million federal loan under the U.S. DOT's TIFIA program. • Started final design and construction. • Reached agreement with Cofiroute USA, LLC to provide design, procurement, installation, and testing of the Electronic Toll and Traffic Management system for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes. • Continued to acquire the necessary property along the corridor to construct the project. • Continued final design for the 91/71 interchange improvement project. • Continued preliminary engineering and environmental studies and updated toll feasibility work which lead to the adoption of the design -build method to deliver the 1-15 Express Lanes project. • Continued plant establishment phase for the 74/215 interchange project. • Completed the updated technical studies and engineering modifications to address the reduced project limits of the proposed Mid County Parkway project and released a recirculated environmental document for public review and comment. • Received comments on the draft environmental document for the SR-79 realignment project. • Completed successful negotiations with FTA related to the Small Starts funding authorization for the Perris Valley Line. • Began construction for the Perris Valley Line project. • Supported public outreach activities by providing graphics from the right of way project management database for Commission presentations to facilitate public understanding of project issues. • Continued to declare property no longer needed for transportation purposes as surplus and sold several surplus properties. Major Initiatives FY 2014/15 will mark the sixth year as the Commission closes out the 1989 Measure A programs and continues project activities related to the 2009 Measure A programs, of which the highway, rail, regional arterial, and local streets and roads programs represent the majority of the funding allocations. While most of the 1989 Measure A highway projects have been completed, a few projects will continue such as the SR-91 HOV lanes from Adams Street to 60/91/215 interchange, SR-74 curve widening, and 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes connector. The 1-215 bi-county HOV gap closure project and Perris Valley Line rail projects will continue, as both are also included in the 2009 Measure A. Various stages of project development work for projects included in the Western County Highway Delivery Plan will continue in FY 2014/15. Detailed descriptions of the capital projects, including local streets and roads funding, that are included in the FY 2014/15 budget follow the Performance/Workload Indicators. Department Goals Build upon and strengthen the partnership with Caltrans toward timely delivery of identified Measure A, CMIA, toll program, and STIP projects. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Environmental Stewardship, Economic Development) Objectives: • Develop agreements with Caltrans and FHWA, as may be required, to finalize project scoping and cost issues for the STIP, federal demonstration, toll, and Measure A funded highway projects in Riverside County. • Meet the project milestones identified in the CMIA agreements between Commission, Caltrans, and the CTC. To the extent permitted by law, pursue reasonable involvement of local DBE and SBE firms in contract work. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objective: • Maintain and monitor goal for a minimum DBE participation in all federally funded contracts. Provide effective communication of project progress to the Commission board members, city councils, the County Board of Supervisors, Caltrans, CTC, FTA and FHWA. (Policy Goal: Communications) Objectives: • Develop a strategy with Caltrans District 8 that would allow the Commission to advance specific projects identified in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan to take advantage of any unexpected state or federal funding which may become available through increased state or federal budget authorizations, federal stimulus, or potential loan programs to advance construction. • Conduct quarterly meetings with FTA and report on progress of Perris Valley Line project. Work with Caltrans and other agencies toward completion of preliminary engineering and environmental clearance of all projects. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objectives: • Work with Caltrans, the County, and the cities in Riverside County to complete preliminary design and environmental clearance for Measure A projects that could be eligible to receive additional or early funding from various sources that could become available if a project is sufficiently developed. • Release for public review and comment the NEPA and CEQA environmental documents for the 1-215 corridor improvement project southbound connector. • Prepare the final environmental document for the SR-79 realignment project. • Prepare and receive approval on the final environmental document for the modified Mid County Parkway project. • Complete the project approval and environmental document of the SR-60 truck climbing lane project. • Continue the project approval and environmental document for the 1-15 Express Lanes project. • Prepare and receive approval on the final environmental document for I-15/Railroad Canyon TUMF project. • Continue the project development and environmental document for 1-215 south connector to 1-15. Construct the highway projects identified in the budget. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Economic Development, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Complete closeout of the 74/215 interchange project. • Complete construction of the SR-74 curve widening project. • Continue construction on the 1-215 corridor improvement project (central segment) between Scott Road and Nuevo Road. • Complete construction of the 60/215 East Junction HOV lanes project and the SR-91 HOV lanes project. • Continue construction on the 1-215 bi-county HOV project. • Continue final design and construction of the SR-91 corridor improvement design -build project. • Complete preliminary engineering and environmental document and begin design on the SR-60 truck climbing lane project. In coordination with the Rail Program Manager, construct capital improvements at existing commuter rail stations as identified in the budget. (Policy Goals: Mobility, System Efficiencies, Environmental Stewardship, lntermodalism & Accessibility, Financial & Administration) Objective: • Continue construction for the Perris Valley Line. Acquire right of way for rail and highway projects identified in the budget. (Policy Goals: Mobility, Financial & Administration) Objectives: • Acquire right of way for the following projects: SR-91 corridor improvement project, SR-74 curve realignment project, 1-215 corridor improvement project (central segment), Perris Valley Line, and 91/71 interchange improvements project. • Protect and maintain properties acquired for future projects. • Dispose of Commission -approved excess land in a timely manner. Identify alternative financing strategies in order to fully fund projects identified in the Western Riverside County Delivery Plan. (Policy Goal: Mobility) Objective: • Continue the assessment and evaluation of available strategies. Location of FY 2014/15 Major Capital Projects within Riverside County INSERT MAP HERE 1) SR-74 2) 74/215 Construction for the curve widening on SR-74 from Calvert Avenue to California Avenue. Plant establishment of the interchange. 3) SR-79 Realignment between Gilman Springs Road and Domenigoni Parkway including project study report, project report, and environmental document. 4) SR-91 (A) Construction of HOV lanes from Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange. (B) Final design for the 91/71 interchange improvements. (C) Design -build toll and mixed flow lanes from the Orange County line to Pierce Street including tolled express lanes connectivity to 1-15 and improvements to the 15/91 interchange. 5) Mid County Parkway 6) Perris Valley Line 7) Local Streets and Roads 8) 60/215 Preliminary engineering, project report, and environmental documentation for the project. Construction for the Perris Valley Line (Riverside -Moreno Valley - Perris) along the SJBL. Allocation of Measure A revenues to each city and the County to improve, maintain, and repair high priority local streets and roads. Construction of the East Junction HOV lane connectors. 9) 1-215 Bi-County HOV Gap Closure Project Construction and utility relocations for HOV lanes on the 1-215 from the 60/91/215 interchange to Orange Show Road in San Bernardino County. 10) 1-215 Construction of the central segment from Scott Road to Nuevo Road. 11) 1-15 Preparation of engineering and environmental document for the addition of tolled express lanes from SR-60 to Cajalco Road in Corona. 12) SR-60 Truck Climbing Lane Continue preliminary engineering and environmental document of the truck climbing lane project. Capital Project Development & Delivery Performance/Workload Indicators FY 12/13 Estimated FY 12/13 Actual FY 13/14 Estimated FY 14/15 Projected Preliminary engineering (project reports and environmental documentation) contracts awarded 1 1 0 0 Plans, specifications, and estimate contracts awarded 1 1 0 1 Number of projects with active right of way acquisition 6 12 2 10 Construction awards 1 1 1 0 Highway and Rail project close-outs 0 1 1 2 License agreements managed 75 79 80 100 Appraisal and appraisal reviews completed 450 150 75 35 Capital Projects Summary The following is a summary of the capital projects included in the FY 2014/15 budget. Costs are generally categorized by preliminary engineering, final design, right of way, construction, and design -build phases in addition to other project -related costs such as salaries and benefits, Bechtel project management, and legal fees. Western County Highway and Regional Arterial Projects SR-74/1-15 to 7th Street (P003001) Complete right of way acquisition closeout for Segment 11 related to the realignment and widening of four -lane roadway between Wasson Canyon Road in the city of Lake Elsinore and 7th Street in the city of Perris. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 225,000 Right of way support services $ 76,900 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 74/215Interchange (P003015) Continue plant establishment until 2015. Preliminary engineering began in 2006 and was completed in 2009. Final design was completed in 2009. Construction began in mid-2010 and was completed in 2013. The total project cost is estimated at $30 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 255,000 Construction/construction management/support services 10,000 Right of way support services 29,600 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds, TUMF zone contributions, ARRA funds, and a federal earmark. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-74 Curve Widening (P003009) Completed right of way acquisition. Construction of the project began in May 2014. The total estimated project cost is $4.2 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact 2,626,000 Construction/construction management/support services $ 330,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 158,800 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-79 Realignment (P003003 & P005127) Perform realignment environmental and preliminary engineering services from Gilman Springs Road to Domenigoni Parkway. The project is expected to be completed with the environmental phase in 2016. The total estimated project cost is $1.2 billion. Initiation of subsequent phases will be dependent upon the availability of funding. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 2,500,000 Preliminary engineering $ 25,000 Right of way support services $ 181,400 Other project -related costs None; costs have been funded using TUMF regional arterial, federal earmarks, and SAFETEA-LU federal funds. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (P003028) Continue property acquisition and final design and construction for the tolled express and mixed flow lanes project from the Orange County line to Pierce Street, including tolled express lanes connectivity to 1-15 and improvements to the 15/91 interchange. Project development activities began in September 2007 and lanes are expected to be open to traffic in 2017. The SR-91 corridor improvement project cost is estimated at $1.3 billion. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 14,100,000 $ 143,692,000 $ 254,803,500 $ 13,839,800 Construction/support services Right of way acquisition/support services Design -build Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds, including sales tax revenue bonds, toll revenue bonds, a federal TIFIA loan, STIP, and SLPP funds. Operation and maintenance of future tolled express lanes facilities are the responsibility of the Commission, while all other state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Current estimates of annual operating and maintenance costs are $11,200,000. Such costs will be paid from the collection of toll revenues beginning in 2017. 91/71 Interchange Improvements Project (P003021) Continue final design for interchange improvements to the 91/71 interchange. Final design began in March 2012. The total estimated project cost is $123 million. FY 2014/15 Cost $ 1,350,000 Final design $ 4,190,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 295,800 Other project -related costs Measure A Budget Impact Costs for final design and right of way acquisition are primarily funded using Congressionally -designated federal funding remaining from previous area projects. The balance of funding will come from 2009 Measure A highway funds. Operating Budget Impact N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 Interchange (P003005) Begin construction and complete utility relocations. Preliminary engineering began in 2001. Construction of the project should be completed in the summer of 2015. The estimated total project cost is $273 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 17,000 Final design $ 75,000 Construction $ 9,035,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 347,400 Other project -related costs Final design costs will be funded using Letter of No Prejudice funds received and CMAQ with 1989 Measure A highway funds for local match. Right of way costs will be funded using STIP-RIP, Traffic Congestion Relief Program, CMAQ, and 1989 Measure A highway funds. CMAQ and CMIA funds generated by Proposition 1B will be used for construction activities. Caltrans is the lead agency. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 1-15 Corridor Improvement Project (P003027) Continue preliminary engineering and environmental work to add up to two tolled express lanes in each direction from SR-60 to Cajalco Road in Corona. The project will use the design -build method of project delivery. Project development activities began in April 2008 and lanes are expected to be open to traffic in 2020. The estimated total project cost is $415 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 4,000,000 Preliminary engineering $ 50,000 Right of way support services $ 2,558,700 Other project -related costs Project development costs and a portion of construction will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. It is anticipated that federal CMAQ funds will be used, toll revenue bonds will be issued and the Commission will secure a federal TIFIA loan to complete the project financing plan in the future. Operation and maintenance of future tolled express lanes facilities are the responsibility of the Commission, while all other federal and state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Preliminary estimates of annual operating and maintenance costs are $15 million. Such costs will be paid from the collection of toll revenues. 1-15/Los Alamos Road Bridge Replacement (PO03036) Provide funding and support to begin construction in 2013. Construction of the project is expected to be completed by 2014. The total project cost is estimated at $3.8 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 1,800,600 Construction 2009 Measure A highway funds will be used for construction. The Measure A funding commitment for this project was approximately $2.9 million. The city of Murrieta is the lead agency for construction. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 60/215 East Junction HOV Lane Connectors (PO03017) Complete construction of the project in 2014. Preliminary engineering began in 2006. Final design and right of way acquisition were completed in 2010. The total project cost is estimated at $42 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 980,000 Construction/support services $ 5,000 Right of way support services $ 80,400 Other project -related costs STP and CMAQ, with STIP-RIP and STIP-IIP for local match funds, will be used for construction. Caltrans is the lead agency for construction. N/A; state highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. 1-215 Corridor Improvements/Scott Road to Nuevo Road (PO03023) Continue to add one mixed flow lane in each direction. Preliminary engineering began in 2007 and was completed in 2011. Final design began in 2011 and was completed in December 2012; construction began in 2013. Construction of the project is expected to be completed by 2016. The total project cost is estimated at $120 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 40,925,000 Construction/construction management/support services $ 725,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 915,500 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using CMIA, STIP-RIP, and 2009 Measure A highway funds. N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. I-215/Blaine Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard Widening (P003035) Commence construction to widen the 1-215 from Blaine Street to Martin Luther King Boulevard. Construction is expected to be completed in 2013. Total project cost is $2.2 million. FY 2014/15 Cost $ 50,000 Construction Measure A Budget Impact Costs will be funded using 1989 Measure A highway funds and STP. Operating Budget Impact N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Mid County Parkway (P002302 & P005123) Perform activities related to the development of a recirculated project report and environmental document for a new corridor from 1-215 to SR-79. The environmental phase is anticipated to be completed in FY 2013/14. Construction of this new facility will be completed over many years as funding becomes available and is estimated to cost $1.3-1.6 billion. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 8,000,000 Preliminary engineering/final design $ 4,450,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 580,800 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded with TUMF CETAP funds and 2009 Measure A new corridor funds. N/A; responsibility for highway operations has not been determined. 1-215 Bi-county HOV Interim Project (P003030) Provide funding and support to SANBAG for the construction of one HOV lane in each direction from the 60/91/215 interchange in Riverside County to Orange Show Road in San Bernardino County. The total project cost is $185 million and is project completion is anticipated in late 2015. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact Riverside Quiet Zones (P003037) $ 60,000 Preliminary engineering $ 43,500 Other project -related costs RCTC's share of costs will be funded with federal RIP and Measure A funds in addition to other agency funds including federal RIP, CMAQ, Proposition 1B CMIA, STIP, and Measure 1 funds. N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Provide funding and support to the city of Riverside for the implementation of quiet zones to mitigate train horn noise impacts to Riverside neighborhoods and to optimize safety at 11 at -grade highway rail crossings and one pedestrian only at -grade crossing along the BNSF San Bernardino Subdivision. The project cost is $7.4 million and will be completed in December 2014. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 5,700,000 Construction Costs will be funded with STP and Measure A funds. N/A; the city of Riverside is the lead agency. Various Western County Highway Projects (P623999, 662402, 223999 & P312402) Provide funding and support for the engineering, construction, and right of way activities related to various Western County highway projects. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 45,000 Right of way support services $ 1,257,500 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. N/A; federal highway operations are the responsibility of Caltrans. Various Western County Measure A and TUMF Regional Arterial Projects (P005206, P005205, P005204, P005203, P005202, P005201, P005102, P005103, P005104, P005105, P005106, P005108, P005116, P005118, P005119, P005120, P005128, P005132 & P725000) Provide Western County Measure A and TUMF funding and support for the engineering, right of way, and construction activities related to various Western County Measure A and TUMF regional arterial projects approved by the Commission in September 2004 following a call for projects. Total project costs approved for TUMF regional arterial projects approximate $79 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 1,632,000 Engineering and design $ 46,745,000 Construction $ 3,914,400 Right of way acquisition $ 329,800 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using TUMF regional arterial and 2009 Measure A regional arterial funds with various local jurisdictions as lead agency for their respective projects. N/A; regional arterial operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdictions. MSHCP Land Acquisition in Western County (P002800) Provide funding and support for the acquisition of land as mitigation for the cumulative and indirect impacts associated with construction of future highway projects as required by 2009 Measure A. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact Rail Projects $ 3,000,000 Land acquisition Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A highway funds. N/A; land mitigation operations are the responsibility of RCA. North Main Corona Station Parking Structure (P003808) Complete construction close-out of a parking structure at the North Main Corona station. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 20,000 Construction management $ 110,200 Other project -related costs 1989 Measure A Western County Commuter Rail funds. Operations of this parking structure will be the responsibility of the Commission. Annual operating costs are estimated at $300,000 to be funded with LTF. Perris Multimodal Facility (P003816) Complete construction close-out of the Perris Transit Center. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 21,000 Construction support services $ 189,400 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using Proposition 1B PTMISEA and a contribution from the 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Assistance fund. Operations of this facility will be the responsibilities of the Commission and RTA, as defined in a cooperative agreement. Annual operating costs are estimated at $76,000. Perris Valley Line and Other Rail Projects (PO03800, PO03823, PO03824, PO03827, PO03829, PO03830, PO03831, PO03832, and PO03834) Continue construction of extension of commuter rail services to Perris. Project commenced in December 2007 when the Commission received approval from FTA to move into project development. Other rail projects include adding a fourth main track between the Riverside Downtown station to the connector to the SJBL branch line at Highgrove. Expected completion date of the Perris Valley Line is July 2015 for a total project cost of $248.3 million. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 30,000 $ 121,795,300 Engineering support services Construction/construction management/support services $ 14,055,000 Right of way acquisition/support services $ 5,101,000 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using FTA, CMAQ, STP, and 1989 Measure A rail funds as well as proceeds from sales of surplus properties. Subsequent year costs will also include STIP funding. Rail station operations related to this project, which will be the responsibility of the Commission upon completion of the project, will be funded with LTF and property management fees. Rail service and capital operations will be the responsibility of Metrolink and will be funded by the Commission with LTF and STA based on an allocation determined by Metrolink. Annual station operations approximate $300,000 per station, or $1,200,000 annually in the aggregate for four proposed stations. La Sierra Station Improvements (P653826) Improve the multimodal benefits of the station to serve the express bus network to be implemented upon completion of the SR-91 corridor improvement project and to provide a dedicated park and ride facility for carpools and vanpools along SR-91. Facility improvements would include the addition of 500 parking spaces, five new bus bays, a new street entrance, and dedicated bus stops and passenger loading area. Construction is estimated at $3 million, and the facility expansion is expected to be completed in FY 2015/16. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact 50,000 Preliminary engineering 1,050,000 Construction/construction management Costs will be funded with FTA Section 5309 funds. Operations of all commuter rail stations are the responsibility of the Commission and are funded using LTF. CCTV Operations Center (PO04018) Provide funding and support for a CCTV operations center at the Riverside downtown station. Final design began in August 2013 and construction will begin in 2014. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 1,150,000 Construction/construction management $ 50,000 Other project -related costs Costs will be funded using Proposition 1B funds and 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Rail funds. Operations will be the responsibility of the Commission. Annual operating costs are estimated at $20,000 to be funded with 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Rail funds. Riverside Station Pedestrian Improvements (PO04019) Provide funding and support for the Riverside downtown station pedestrian improvement project. Construction is expected to begin October 2013. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 1,152,000 Construction/construction management Costs will be funded using state TE grant funds and 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Rail funds. Operations of the Riverside downtown station are the responsibility of the Commission. Annual operating costs are estimated at $450,000 to be funded with LTF. Various Western County Rail Projects (P332402, P214199 & P654199) Provide Measure A funding and support for right of way activities related to various rail projects. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact Western County Area $ 100,000 Right of way support services $ 1,998,600 Other project -related costs 2009 Measure A Western County Commuter Rail funds. Costs will be funded using 2009 Measure A rail funds. Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Western County. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 530,000 149,000 169,000 3,707,000 1,088,000 1,611,000 1,802,000 1,137,000 1,438,000 3,586,000 2,065,000 599,000 1,353,000 6,655,000 718,000 2,744,000 555,000 5,112,000 751,000 Banning Beaumont Calimesa Canyon Lake Corona Eastvale Hemet Jurupa Valley Lake Elsinore Menifee Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco Perris Riverside San Jacinto Temecula Wildomar Riverside County Commission 35,769,000 Total Western County (751,000) Less: Allocation to Western County regional arterials (Beaumont allocation) $ 35,018,000 Total Western County, net All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. Coachella Valley Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Coachella Valley. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact Palo Verde Valley Area $ 1,401,000 Cathedral City 629,000 Coachella 494,000 Desert Hot Springs 244,000 Indian Wells 1,716,000 Indio 1,509,000 La Quinta 2,718,000 Palm Desert 2,048,000 Palm Springs 876,000 Rancho Mirage 2,007,000 Riverside County $ 13,642,000 Total Coachella Valley All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. Distribute local return funding for local streets and roads projects in Palo Verde Valley. FY 2014/15 Cost Measure A Budget Impact Operating Budget Impact $ 973,000 Blythe 249,000 Riverside County $ 1,222,000 Total Palo Verde Valley All costs will be distributed in accordance with 2009 Measure A local streets and roads funds. N/A; local streets and roads operations are the responsibility of the local jurisdiction. Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 7 COMMUNITY PROFILE Community Profile Riverside County is the fourth largest county in California, stretching westward nearly 200 miles from the Colorado River and comprising more than 7200 square miles that include 28 incorporated cities. Riverside County can trace its beginning back to 1893 when voters approved the formation of a new county. The area was carved from parts of San Bernardino and San Diego counties. In its 122 years of existence, the County's economy has diversified and prospered. Originally, Riverside County was a very agricultural area, known for a wide variety of crops grown on its fertile soils. The County remains a strong agricultural area, but it is increasingly becoming a leader in manufacturing, transportation, construction, and tourism. Demographics The success of the area has brought dramatic population growth to Riverside County (Chart 42). Since the 1980's, the County has been one of the fastest growing counties in the State. Chart 42 — Population — Last Ten Years 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 1 I1 Oa ,y0 Source: California Department of Finance 1,°°6 ti°°\ '0 6' ' 'L°°o' The available and affordable housing in Riverside County has attracted many people to the County (Chart 43); however, housing is gradually recovering from a slowdown due to the effect of the subprime mortgages, ensuing credit crisis, and recession. Chart 43 — Home Price Advantage Home Value Advantage Riverside County and Southern California Markets (March, 2014) ❑Median Home Values $450,000 $400,000 $350,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $- Source: DataQuick News ❑ Riverside County Advantage $430,000 $435,000 $427,000 $580,000 291,500 Riverside Los Angeles San Diego Ventura Orange County During the growth period, jobs also increased as many firms relocated to the area and moved away from older communities; however, the recent economic slowdown had caused the County's unemployment rate to rise from its near all-time lows (Chart 44). The unemployment rate has been decreasing. Chart 44 — Unemployment Rate (%) — Last Ten Years 16.0% 14.0% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0°% 2.0% 0.0% ti0 0� ti0 000 001 000 009 Oti0 ti ti ti ti ti Source: California Employment Development Department ti0ti� ti0ti� The overall economic outlook for Riverside County is expected to continue to improve in 2015 based on various economic forecasts. The area is preparing for its future as well in supporting better education. The County is home to a number of colleges and universities including University of California, Riverside. Statistical Information Retail Sales As a result of demographic changes and growth, retail sales in the County increased through 2007 (Chart 45 and Table 58); however, the effect of the recent recession on retail sales was noted in sales tax receipts beginning in 2008. Retail sales in 2012 have shown continued improvements from these previous years. Chart 45 — Retail Sales (%) - $28 Billion — 2012 Data Total all other services & outlets 28.76% Other Retail Sales 6.56% Source: State Board of Equalization Apparel Stores 5.88% I Automotive 24.95 % General Merchandise 11.30% Eating & Drinking 9.50% Food Stores 4.83% , Household & Electronics 3.31 % Building Materials 4.86% Table 58 -Riverside County Taxable Sales by Business Type (in 000's) - Last Five Years 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 $ 1,505,821 $ 1,391,174 $ 1,293,271 $ 1,121,543 3,051,709 2,947,905 2,855,733 3,389,936 1,304,731 1,267,758 1,251,220 1,254,366 2,473,339 2,317,486 2,266,853 2,340,554 914,888 883,109 858,098 816,379 1,303,073 1,232,145 1,237,518 1,435,337 6,311,272 5,306,408 4,749,994 6,126,512 1,711,453 1,480,601 1,442,875 3,250,335 7,065,212 6,326,196 6,272,315 6,268,633 Apparel Stores General Merchandise Food Stores Eating & Drinking Household & Electronics Building Materials Automotive Other Retail Sales Total all other services & outlets 1,672,482 3,174,022 1,356,148 2,668,324 930,068 1,364,513 7,009,138 1,841,973 8,079,341 $ 28,096,009 25,641,498 $ 23,152,782 $ 22,227,877 $ 26,003,595 The 2012 taxable sales generation by jurisdiction in the County, including ranking compared to 2003, is presented in Table 59. Table 59 -Taxable Sales Generation by Jurisdiction in Riverside County for 20121 Taxable Sales (in 000's) % of Total 2012 Rank 2003 Rank $ 4,238,975 15.2% 2 2 2,855,833 10.2% 3 3 2,535,380 9.0% 4 4 1,470,982 5.2% 5 5 1,275,922 4.5% 6 6 1,035,828 3.7% 7 11 955,731 3.4% 8 9 859,861 3.1% 9 8 726,309 2.6% 10 N/A 724,256 2.6% 11 10 710,127 2.5% 12 14 665,409 2.4% 13 13 648,817 2.3% 14 7 622,840 2.2% 15 15 490,881 1.7% 16 N/A 449,121 1.6% 17 N/A 429,119 1.5% 18 12 378,753 1.3% 19 16 334,876 1.2% 20 20 302,053 1.1% 21 18 202,402 0.7% 22 21 169,341 0.6% 23 19 165,579 0.6% 24 17 128,734 0.5% 25 22 122,891 0.4% 26 N/A 87,861 0.3% 27 23 60,894 0.2% 28 24 15,611 0.1% 29 25 City of Riverside City of Corona City of Temecula City of Palm Desert City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Palm Springs City of Hemet City of Jurupa Valley City of Indio City of La Quinta City of Lake Elsinore City of Cathedral City City of Perris City of Eastvale City of Menifee City of Norco City of Rancho Mirage City of Beaumont City of Coachella City of San Jacinto City of Blythe City of Banning City of Desert Hot Springs City of Wildomar City of Indian Wells City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake Incorporated Unincorporated county area Countywide California Source: California State Board of Equalization 1 Year represents most recent data available 22,664,386 5,431,623 80.7% 19.3% 1 1 28,096,009 100.0% $ 558,387,250 Measure A Sales Taxes Measure A is a one-half of one cent transaction and use tax for transportation improvements in Riverside County. The County had an 8.75% sales tax rate including the Measure A rate through June 2011, 7.75% from July 2011 through December 2012, and 8.00% thereafter (Table 60). Table 60 - Direct and Overlapping Sales Tax Rates - Last Five Years Fiscal Year Measure A Direct Rate County of Riverside 2014 0.50% 8.00% 2013 0.50% 8.00% 2012 0.50% 7.75% 2011 0.50% 8.75% 2010 0.50% 8.75% Source: Commission Finance Department and California State Board of Equalization Since the recent economic slowdown, changes have occurred in the economic categories in which the Measure A sales tax was generated (Table 61). General retail and transportation represent the two highest economic categories and approximately 56% of sales taxes generated. Transportation has improved in recent years due to high fuel prices and new auto purchases. Construction, which is comprised of the building materials wholesale and building materials retail segments, is a significant contributor and has shown slight improvement from previous years of declines due to the effects of the recession and housing slowdown. Table 61- Sales Tax by Economic Category Economic Category 2010/4 2011/4 2012/4 2013/4 % of Total % of Total % of Total % of Total General Retail 30.9% 29.9% 29.0% 28.7% Transportation 25.0% 27.1% 27.0% 27.0% Food Products 17.0% 16.4% 16.4% 16.1% Business to Business 14.5% 14.1% 14.7% 14.5% Construction 10.5% 10.5% 10.9% 11.8% Miscellaneous 2.1% 2.0% 2.0% 1.9% Total 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Source: MuniServices, LLC Each economic category consists of several economic segments, which provide additional information regarding economic activity in the County. In 2010 the top six economic segments consisted of department stores, service stations, restaurants, auto sales -new, miscellaneous retail, and building materials -wholesale. Over the next three calendar years, auto sales -new and building materials wholesale have improved. Service stations, department stores, and auto sales -new now comprise the top three economic segments. The top six economic segments in 2013 with comparisons to previous years are presented in Table 62. Table 62 - Sales Tax by Economic Segment Top Six Economic Segments (Category) 2010/4 2011/4 2012/4 2013/4 % of Total % of Total % of Total % of Total Service Stations (Transportation) Department Stores (General Retail) Auto Sales - New (Transportation) Restaurants (Food Products) Building Materials - Wholesale (Construction) Miscellaneous Retail (Miscellaneous) 11.6% 12.6% 8.4% 10.7% 5.5% 6.7% 12.9% 11.8% 9.1% 10.3% 6.1% 6.6% 11.9 % 11.2 % 10.0% 10.0% 6.5 % 6.3 % 11.1% 10.8% 10.7% 9.9% 7.3% 6.8% Source: MuniServices, LLC Commission Facts Programs and Services Measure A: The Commission administers Measure A, the local half -cent sales tax for new transportation projects in the County. Under Measure A, funding is used to improve highways, commuter rail, regional arterials, local streets and roads, transit and specialized transportation services including commuter assistance, economic development, new corridors, and Commission administration. Measure A expires in 2039. Transportation Development Act: The TDA is comprised of two elements: Local Transportation Fund and State Transit Assistance funding. The Commission administers the LTF one -quarter of one cent of the state sales tax on behalf of the County. STA is generated from the statewide sales tax on diesel fuel and is allocated by the State to the Commission on the basis of population and as a percentage of transit fare revenues. TDA funding is allocated primarily to bus and rail transit operators for transit operating and capital needs. Additionally, LTF funding is available for bicycle and pedestrian facilities, planning, and administration and allocated to the Commission and local jurisdictions in the County. Highways: The Commission assists with the planning and funding for highway improvements. Major current projects include: 60/215 East junction HOV lanes connector, SR-74 curve widening, 91/71 connectors, SR-91 corridor improvement project, SR-91 HOV lanes/Adams Street to the 60/91/215 interchange, 1-15 corridor improvement project, 1-215 corridor mobility improvement projects, and Mid County Parkway. State highway maintenance is generally the responsibility of Caltrans. Local Streets and Roads: The Commission administers funding to local jurisdictions to improve streets, intersections, signal coordination, and pavement. Local streets and roads maintenance is the responsibility of the local jurisdictions. Commuter Rail: The Commission funds and oversees Metrolink rail services within the County. The Commission's three Metrolink lines are the Riverside, IEOC, and 91 lines. The Commission owns and maintains five Metrolink stations and one transit center located at: ➢ Riverside Downtown Station, 4066 Vine Street, Riverside ➢ La Sierra Station, 10901 Indiana Avenue, Riverside ➢ Pedley Station, 6001 Pedley Road, Riverside ➢ North Main Corona Station, 250 E. Blaine Street, Corona ➢ West Corona Station, 155 S. Auto Center Drive, Corona ➢ Perris Multimodal Transit Center, 121 S. C Street, Perris Motorist Assistance: The Commission provides emergency call boxes and the 1E511 traveler information system through the SAFE and offers emergency towing services through the FSP. Commuter Assistance: The Commission provides a variety of rideshare services both to employers and commuters. Through voluntary participation, commuters and employers receive a direct benefit from their sales tax dollars, and the entire region benefits from reduced traffic congestion and improved air quality. Specialized Transit: The Commission maintains a strong commitment to assist in the mobility of those with specialized transit needs. Through its Specialized Transit Program, the Commission has provided millions of dollars to public and nonprofit transit operators to assist in the provisions of special transit services to improve the mobility of seniors and persons with disabilities. Riverside County Transportation Commission SECTION 811.1 APPENDICES Appendix A — Glossary of Acronyms ADA — Americans with Disabilities Act ARRA* — American Recovery and Reinvestment Act AT — Active Transportation BABs — Build America Bonds Bank of America — Bank of America, N.A. Bank of Tokyo — The Bank of Tokyo -Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., acting through its New York Branch Bechtel — Bechtel Infrastructure BNSF — Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad Board — Board of Commissioners for the Riverside County Transportation Commission CABS — Capitalized Appreciation Bonds CAFR — Comprehensive Annual Financial Report CaIPERS — California Public Employees Retirement System Caltrans — California Department of Transportation CAGTC — Coalition for America's Gateways and Trade Corridors CEQA — California Environmental Quality Act CETAP — Community Environmental Transportation Acceptability Process CHP — California Highway Patrol CHSRA — California High Speed Rail Authority CIBs — Current Interest Bonds CIP — Capital Improvement Plan CMA — Congestion Management Agency CMAQ* — Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality CMIA* — Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (Proposition 1B funding category) CMP — Congestion Management Program CMS — Congestion Management System Commission — Riverside County Transportation Commission Coordinated Plan — Coordinated Public Transit —Human Services Transportation Plan County — County of Riverside CTC — California Transportation Commission CTSA — Consolidated Transportation Service Agency CVAG — Coachella Valley Association of Governments Deutsche Bank — Deutsche Bank AG DBE — Disadvantaged Business Enterprise DMV — Department of Motor Vehicles ERP — Enterprise Resource Planning ETC — Employer Transportation Coordinators FHWA* — Federal Highway Administration FITCH — Fitch Ratings FSP — Freeway Service Patrol FTA* — Federal Transit Administration FTE — Full-time Equivalent FTIP — Federal Transportation Improvement Program FY — Fiscal Year GASB — Governmental Accounting Standards Board GFOA — Government Finance Officers Association GPS — Global Positioning System HOV — High Occupancy Vehicle (Carpool Lane) 1 — Interstate 1E511 — Inland Empire 511 IEOC — Inland Empire —Orange County Metrolink Service IIP* — Interregional Improvement Program Inland Empire — Region covering Riverside and San Bernardino counties IVR — Interactive Voice Response JARC — Jobs Access Reverse Commute (FTA Section 5316) JPMorgan — JP Morgan Chase Bank LIBOR — London Interbank Offer Rate LOS — Level of Service LOSSAN — Los Angeles -San Diego -San Luis Obispo, a rail corridor LTF* — Local Transportation Fund Measure K — Increase of sales tax revenue bonds debt limit to $975 million approved by voters in November 2010 Metrolink — Operating Name for SCRRA (see SCRRA) Moody's — Moody's Investors Service MOE — Maintenance of Effort MOU — Memorandum of Understanding MSHCP — Multi -Species Habitat Conservation Plan MSRC — Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Review Committee (AB 2766) NEPA — National Environmental Policy Act OA — Obligation Authority OCTA — Orange County Transportation Authority Perris Valley Line — Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension Project PM — Particulate Matter Ports — Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach PPM — Planning, Programming, and Monitoring PTMISEA* — Public Transportation, Modernization, Improvement, and Service Enhancement Account (Proposition 1B transit funding category) RCA — Regional Conservation Authority RCTC — Riverside County Transportation Commission RFA — Request for Authorization RIP* — Regional Improvement Program RTA — Riverside Transit Agency RTP — Regional Transportation Plan RTPA — Regional Transportation Planning Agency RZEDBs — Recovery Zone Economic Development Bonds S&P — Standard & Poor's Rating Service SAFE — Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies SAFETEA-LU* — Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users Sales Tax — Reference including transaction and use tax such as Measure A SANBAG — San Bernardino Associated Governments SB375 — Senate Bill 375 (Steinberg) California's Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act SB821 — Senate Bill 821 LTF Bicycle and Pedestrian Funds SBE — Small Business Enterprise SBOE — State Board of Equalization SBPAs — Standby Bond Purchase Agreements SCAG — Southern California Association of Governments SCAQMD — South Coast Air Quality Management District SCRRA — Southern California Regional Rail Authority SCS — Sustainable Communities Strategy Series A Tax -Exempt— Series of tax-exempt bonds issued under 2010 Bonds Series B Taxable — Series of taxable Build America Bonds issued under 2010 Bonds SHCC — Self -Help Counties Coalition SJBL — San Jacinto Branch Line SLPP* — State Local Partnership Program SR — State Route SRTP — Short Range Transit Plan SSAB — Salton Sea Air Basin STA* — State Transit Assistance State — State of California STIP* — State Transportation Improvement Program STP* — Surface Transportation Program SunLine — SunLine Transit Agency TAC — Technical Advisory Committee TAP — Transportation Alternatives Program TCIF* — Trade Corridors Improvement Fund (Proposition 1B funding category) TDA* — Transportation Development Act TE* — Transportation Enhancements TIFIA* — Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act TIGER — Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery TIP — Transportation Improvement Plan TUMF* — Transportation/Traffic Uniform Mitigation Fee (Western County/Coachella Valley) Union Bank — Union Bank, N.A. U.S. DOT — United States Department of Transportation Western County — Western area of Riverside County WRCOG — Western Riverside Council of Governments 1989 Measure A* — Original 1/2 cent transportation sales tax measure approved by voters in November 1988 2009 Measure A* — Extension of sales tax measure approved by voters in November 2002 which became effective upon expiration of original sales tax measure on July 1, 2009 2009 Bonds — Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, Series A, B and C issued in October 2009 2010 Bonds — Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, Series A Tax-exempt and Series B Taxable issued in November 2010 2013 Bonds — Sales Tax Revenue Bonds anticipated to be issued in July 2013 2013 Toll Bonds — Toll Revenue Bonds anticipated to be issued in July 2013 * Additional information provided in Funding Definitions. Appendix B - Salary Schedule Range Exempt/Non- Department/Position FTE No. $Minimum $Maximum Exempt ADMINISTRATION Administrative Assistant 3.0 17 $ 3,793 $ 5,120 NE Human Resources Administrator 1.0 45 $ 7,509 $ 10,138 E Office and Board Services Manager 1.0 45 $ 7,509 $ 10,138 E Senior Administrative Assistant 1.0 25 $ 4,610 $ 6,224 NE Senior Office Assistant 1.0 13 $ 3,440 $ 4,644 NE Administration Subtotal: 7.0 CAPITAL PROJECT DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY Capital Projects Manager 4.0 53 $ 9,128 $ 11,202 E Facilities Administrator 1.0 45 $ 7,509 $ 10,138 E Project Delivery Director 1.0 67 $ 12,844 $ 17,339 E Project Development Director 1.0 63 $ 11,650 $ 15,727 E Right of Way Manager 1.0 53 $ 9,128 $ 11,202 E Senior Staff Analyst 2.0 43 $ 7,152 $ 9,655 E Staff Analyst 1.0 35 $ 5,884 $ 7,943 E Toll Program Director 1.0 71 $ 14,160 $ 19,116 E Toll Project Manager 2.0 65 $ 12,232 $ 16,513 E Capital Project Development and Delivery Subtotal: 14.0 EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT Deputy Executive Director 1.0 75 $ 15,611 $ 21,075 E Executive Director 1.0 83 $ 18,976 $ 25,617 E Executive Management Subtotal: 2.0 FINANCE Accounting Assistant 2.0 17 $ 3,793 $ 5,120 NE Accounting Supervisor 1.0 33 $ 5,604 $ 7,565 E Accounting Technician 2.0 25 $ 4,610 $ 6,224 NE Chief Financial Officer 1.0 67 $ 12,844 $ 17,339 E Finance Manager/Controller 1.0 53 $ 9,128 $ 11,202 E Procurement Analyst 1.0 36 $ 6,027 $ 8,137 E Procurement Manager 1.0 53 $ 9,128 $ 12,322 E Finance Subtotal: 9.0 LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS AND COMMUNICATIONS Community Relations Manager 1.0 45 $ 7,509 $ 10,138 E Government Relations Manager 1.0 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Legislative Affairs and Communications Subtotal: 2.0 MULTIMODAL SERVICES Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager 1.0 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Multimodal Services Director 1.0 63 $ 11,650 $ 15,727 E Staff Analyst 2.0 35 $ 5,884 $ 7,943 E Transit Manager 1.0 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Multimodal Services Subtotal: 5.0 PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING SERVICES Goods Movement Manager 1.00 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Planning and Programming Director 1.00 63 $ 11,650 $ 15,727 E Planning and Programming Manager 1.00 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Senior Staff Analyst 1.00 43 $ 7,152 $ 9,655 E Staff Analyst 1.00 35 $ 5,884 $ 7,943 E Planning and Programming Services Subtotal: 5.00 RAIL MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS Rail Manager 1.00 51 $ 8,693 $ 11,736 E Staff Analyst 1.00 35 $ 5,884 $ 7,943 E Rail Maintenance and Operations Subtotal: 2.00 TOTAL AUTHORIZED POSITIONS Administration 7.00 Capital Project Development and Delivery 14.00 Executive Management 2.00 Finance 9.00 Legislative Affairs and Communications 2.00 Multimodal Services 5.00 Planning and Programming Services 5.00 Rail Maintenance and Operations 2.00 Total 46.00 Appendix C — Funding Definitions Federal Funding Sources Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act The TIFIA program provides credit assistance for qualified projects of regional and national significance that are critical improvements to the nation's surface transportation system. It is designed to fill market gaps and leverage substantial private and non-federal co -investment by providing supplemental and subordinate capital. TIFIA credit assistance is often available on more advantageous terms than in the financial market making it possible to obtain financing, in the form of a secured loan, loan guarantee, and/or standby line of credit, for needed projects when it might not otherwise be possible. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Commonly referred to as the Stimulus or The Recovery Act, ARRA is an economic stimulus package "intended to create jobs and promote investment and consumer spending" during the recent recession. It includes domestic spending in infrastructure with investment transportation, environmental protection, and other infrastructure providing long-term economic benefits. ARRA also created the Build America Bond program, which authorized state and local governments to issue in 2009 and 2010 such bonds as taxable bonds to finance capital expenditures for which would otherwise be financed with tax-exempt governmental bonds. State and local governments issuing BABs receive a direct federal subsidy payment for a portion of their borrowing costs on BABs equal to 35 to 45 percent of the total coupon interest paid to investors. The BAB program was intended to assist state and local governments finance capital projects at lower borrowing costs and to stimulate the economy and create jobs. Federal Transit Administration Section 5307 formula funds made available to urbanized areas for operating subsidies, capital projects and planning. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital and planning match is 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5309 discretionary funds generally provided to urbanized areas for funding new start rail projects, major bus fleet replacement, and transit facility construction. Matching ratios range from 50/50 to 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5310 funds made available to states for providing capital support to private non-profit and, in certain circumstances, public transit operators. This is a state administered discretionary program providing funds on an 88.53% federal and 11.47% local basis. Section 5311 funds provided to support rural transit operating subsidies and capital projects. Operating match is up to 50% of the net operating cost; capital match is 80% federal and 20% local. Section 5316 funds provided for the development and maintenance of jobs access projects to transport welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals to and from work during non -peak hours as well as supply reverse commute options for workers in suburban areas. Section 5317 funds made available for new public transportation services and alternatives for people with disabilities beyond the requirements of the ADA of 1990. Federal Highway Administration In 1991, the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) was approved by Congress to replace the former Federal Aid Urban/Federal Aid System funding programs. ISTEA was established as a six -year funding program and was reauthorized for another six years in 1997. This new transportation act was renamed as the Transportation Equity Act of the Twenty-first Century (TEA21) and was extended through August 10, 2005 when the President signed into law SAFETEA-LU. With guaranteed funding for highways, highway safety, and public transportation totaling $244.1 billion, SAFETEA-LU represents the largest surface transportation investment in our nation's history. Under these programs the following fund sources are allocated to each county, and the Commission further allocates these funds based on federal provisions. Surface Transportation Program Funds allocated by the Commission and administered by Caltrans that provide funding for local street and road improvements. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Funds allocated by the Commission for transportation related air quality improvement projects in air quality non -attainment areas. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. Safety projects can qualify for 100% of CMAQ funding. Transportation Enhancements The amount of funds made available under this program is 10% of the state apportionment of STP funds. Projects are qualified and prioritized by the Commission and submitted to the California Transportation Commission for inclusion in the State Transportation Improvement Program. The basic definition of a transportation enhancement project is an improvement that is over and above the base transportation project. Project categories are pedestrian and bicycle facilities, scenic or historic highways, scenic beautification, historic preservation, rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities, preservation of abandoned railway corridors, control/removal of outdoor advertising, archaeological planning and research, and mitigation of water pollution due to highway runoff. Current matching rate is 88.53% federal and 11.47% local. State Local Funding Sources State Transportation Improvement Program The STIP consists of RIP and IIP funds. The RIP and IIP programs are mainly supported by Proposition 42 funding. The RIP component represents 75% of STIP funds available for capacity projects. Regional Transportation Planning Agencies are responsible for selection of projects proposed for RIP funds. The IIP component represents the remaining 25% of STIP funds available for capacity projects and Caltrans is responsible for the selection of IIP-funded projects. The Commission and Caltrans District 8 work closely in coordinating projects for these fund sources. Proposition 1B Program In November 2006, the voters in California approved Proposition 1B, which will fund various transportation programs from bonds issued by the state of California. Programs to be funded include CMIA, transit capital (PTMISEA), transit security (CTSGP-CTAF), STIP supplement, goods movement (TCIF), SLPP funds, and cities and counties. Transportation Development Act The TDA is comprised of two elements: LTF and STA funds. LTF funds are derived from 1/4 of one cent of the state sales tax and are returned to source. There are three areas of apportionment within Riverside County comprised of Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley (Blythe). The Commission administers the LTF on behalf of the County of Riverside. Funds are provided for program administration, Southern California Association of Governments regional planning, local transportation planning, and transit services in Western County and the Coachella Valley. In the Palo Verde Valley, funds support transit services and local street and road improvements. Additionally, under SB 821, 2% of LTF funds are made available for bicycle and pedestrian projects. STA funds are generated from the statewide sales tax on diesel fuel and are allocated by the state to the Commission based on population and as a percentage of transit fare revenue. The Commission has generally used these funds to support capital purchases and improvements as these funds have been subject to state budgetary actions. Local Funding Sources Measure A Measure A is a half -cent local retail transaction and use tax that was initially approved by the voters in November 1988 for 20 years (Ordinance 88-1) and extended in November 2002 for an additional 30 years (Ordinance 02-001), through June 2039, to help fund key transportation improvements in Riverside County. It provides funds to improve highways, regional arterials, and local streets and roads; to develop new transportation corridors; to expand commuter rail, public transit, specialized transportation services, and commuter programs; develop a program of economic incentives to attract commercial and industrial development and jobs; and support bond financing. These types of improvements are needed to maintain and improve the quality of life in the County, reduce current congestion, and provide adequate transportation facilities to accommodate reasonable growth. Since existing state and federal sources provide only a limited amount of funding for a limited number of projects, Measure A will cover the shortfall for key projects with a funding source that is under local control. It will use the revenue generated in Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley to meet the unique transportation needs of each of those areas. Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee The TUMF program was adopted by all local jurisdictions in the Western County area of Riverside County in July 2003. Under this program, which is administered by the WRCOG, fees are assessed on new residential and commercial development in Western County to ensure that new development pays its fair share toward providing the needed infrastructure improvements on the regional system of highways and arterials. In accordance with the extension of Measure A in 2002 and an amended Memorandum of Understanding with WRCOG, the Commission shall receive 48.7% of the TUMF revenues to fund equally the regional arterial system and the development of new corridors. Appendix D — Program Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the various program terms used and discussed in the narrative. Bicycle and Pedestrian LTF provides revenues for the construction of bicycle and pedestrian facilities and related right-of-way costs. Bond Financing In order to accomplish the construction of the highway and rail projects and implementation of the local streets and roads and other programs identified in the Measure A TIP as soon as possible, some level of borrowing will be required. A portion of the revenues generated in the Western County will be made available for this purpose. Commuter Assistance The purpose of this program is to provide short-term incentives to encourage single occupant vehicle drivers to use alternate modes of transportation including carpools, vanpools, bus pools, public bus, commuter rail, walking, and bicycling. Commuter Rail Measure A provides operating and capital revenue for commuter rail service to Orange and Los Angeles counties. LTF provides revenue for commuter rail operations in Riverside County. These trains operate on existing railroad tracks parallel to major freeways. Commuter rail service provides a safe and reliable transit alternative to driving alone during the peak period. Plans to expand commuter rail service in Western Riverside County from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley are currently underway. Economic Development Measure A will be used to create an infrastructure improvement bank to improve existing interchanges, construct new interchanges, provide public transit linkages or stations, and make other improvements to the transportation system in Western County. These incentives are intended to attract commercial and industrial development and jobs to locate within the Western County area. Highways Measure A provides revenues to widen existing highways, expand interchanges, and improve remote freeways. These improvements are needed to control traffic congestion in Western County and improve access and safety in Coachella Valley. Costs of these improvements will be covered by funds from state and federal sources. Measure A revenue will be used to supplement —not replace —these other sources and to accelerate work on projects deferred for lack of funding. Local Streets and Roads Measure A provides revenues to local jurisdictions for the construction, repair, and maintenance of local streets and roads. The County and local cities are required to supplement those expenditures with other previously dedicated revenue sources to maintain road improvements at a level equal to or greater than the base year amount. LTF provides revenue for local street and road improvements in the Palo Verde Valley. Metrolink The Commission's commuter rail program is part of the regional network operated by SCRRA operating under the name of Metrolink, a five -county joint powers agency composed of the transportation commission's of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside, and Ventura. The purpose of this agency is to manage the operation and maintenance of commuter rail in the five -county metropolitan area. Motorist Assistance The Motorist Assistance program has three elements. The FSP is a special team of tow trucks that travel on selected Riverside County freeways during peak commute hours to assist drivers when their cars break down. Another element is the call box system, which installation and operation is made possible with revenue provided by the public. Call boxes are being provided by the Commission, which serves as the County's SAFE. The third element is the Inland Empire 511 traveler information system. One dollar per year from every motor vehicle registration pays for the call boxes and their operation and maintenance, 1E511 operations, and matching funds for FSP. New Corridors Four new transportation corridors were identified through the CETAP. Measure A and TUMF funds will be used for environmental clearance, right of way, and construction of these new corridors. Public Transit The Commission is the agency responsible for short-range transportation planning and programming and coordinating the operation of all public transportation service within the County. The Commission allocates and disburses TDA as well as Measure A funds to the transit operators for operating and capital purposes. Regional Arterials Measure A funds generated within the Western County and Coachella Valley areas are used for major regional road projects. The system is to be implemented with a mix of funding required from new development under a Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee to be paid by developers from new development and from Measure A funds returned to the Western County and Coachella Valley areas. The Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee schedule shall be established in order to generate at least the equivalent of Measure A funding toward the regional arterial system. Specialized Transit Measure A provides public transit revenues to improve transportation services for seniors, persons with disabilities and commuters. For seniors and persons with disabilities, it provides dial -a -ride cab service at night for emergency purposes, guarantees half-price bus fares, and assists centers with their transit programs. For commuters, it improves express bus service and expands ridesharing programs. In the Coachella Valley, revenues also are available for bus replacement and local bus service. Transportation Improvement Plan This plan also acts as the County's expenditure plan and was prepared by the Commission for the proposed 1/2% local retail transaction and use tax for transportation purposes to be collected. This was proposed by the Commission as a means to fill the funding shortfall to implement needed highway, regional arterial, economic development incentives, and new corridors; local street and road programs; commuter rail projects and operations; public bus transit and specialized transportation improvements; commuter assistance programs; and bond financing. Appendix E — General Terms The following explanations of terms are presented to aid in understanding the narrative discussions and illustrations included in this budget document and the terminology generally used in governmental accounting, auditing, financial reporting, and budgeting. Accountability The state of being obliged to explain one's actions, to justify what one does. Accountability requires a government to answer to its citizenry to justify the raising of public resources and the purposes for which they are used. Accounting System The methods and records established to identify, assemble, analyze, classify, record, and report a government's transactions and to maintain accountability for the related assets and liabilities. Accrual Basis of Accounting The accounting of the financial effects of transactions, events, and interfund activities when they occur, regardless of when cash is received or paid. Audit A systematic collection of the sufficient, competent evidential matter needed to attest to the fairness of management's assertions in the financial statements or to evaluate whether management has efficiently and effectively carried out its responsibilities. The auditor obtains this evidential matter through inspection, observation, inquiries, and confirmations with third parties. Balanced Budget The identification of revenues and other financing sources as well as available fund balances to fund operating and capital expenditures and other financing uses on an annual basis. Basis of Accounting A term used to refer to when the effects of transactions or events are recognized for financial reporting purposes. For example, the timing of recognition can be when the transaction or event occurs (accrual basis) or when cash is received or paid (cash basis). Bond A written promise to pay a specified sum of money (face or principal amount) at a specified date or dates in the future (maturity date), together with periodic interest at a specified rate. Bonds are primarily used to finance capital projects. Budget A plan of financial activity for a specified period indicating all planned revenues and expenditures for the budget period. Annual budgets are usually required by law and are essential to sound financial management. The Commission prepares an annual budget that is applicable to a single fiscal year. Budgetary Control The control or management of a government in accordance with an approved budget to keep expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and available revenues. Budget Document The instrument used by the budget -making authority to present a comprehensive financial program to the appropriating governing body. Capital Outlay Expenditures resulting in the acquisition of or addition to the government's capital assets or assets to be transferred to Caltrans, such as highway projects. Capital Project A long-term strategic project requiring relatively large sums of revenues, accumulated reserves, and/or financing to acquire, develop, construct, improve, and/or maintain a capital asset such as land, buildings, and infrastructure. Capital Projects Fund A governmental fund type created to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital projects. The Commission has two capital projects funds for Commercial Paper and Sales Tax Bonds to account for debt proceeds from 2009 Measure A commercial paper notes and sales tax revenue bonds related to highway, commuter rail, regional arterial, and local streets and roads projects. Commercial Paper An unsecured short-term promissory note issued primarily by corporations with maturities ranging from two to 270 days. The credit risk of almost all commercial paper is rated by a rating service. Comprehensive Annual Financial Report A financial report that encompasses all funds of the government. In the financial section of the CAFR are the basic financial statements and required supplementary information as well as combining and individual fund financial statements, as necessary. The CAFR also contains introductory information and statistical data. Current Financial Resources Measurement Focus A measurement focuses that reports on the near -term or current inflows, outflows, and balances of spendable financial resources. This focus is unique to accounting and financial reporting for state and local governments and is used for reporting the financial position and results of operations of governmental funds. Debt An obligation resulting from the borrowing of money or from the purchase of goods and services. Debts of governments include bonds, time warrants, and notes. Debt Coverage Ratio The ratio of pledged revenues to related debt service for a given year. Debt Limit The maximum amount of outstanding gross or net debt legally permitted. Debt Proceeds The difference between the face amount of debt and the issuance discount or the sum of the face amount and the issuance premium. Debt proceeds differ from cash receipts to the extent issuance costs, such as underwriters' fees, are withheld by the underwriter. Debt Service Fund A governmental fund type created to account for the accumulation of resources for and payment of general long-term debt principal and interest. The Commission has one debt service fund for its sales tax revenue bonds. Expenditures Represents decreases in net financial resources on the transfer of property or services for acquiring an asset, service, or settling a loss. Financial Advisor In the context of the issuance of debt, a consultant who advises the issuer on any of a variety of matters related to the issuance. The financial advisor sometimes also is referred to as the fiscal consultant. Financial Audit An audit made to provide independent assurance whether the financial statements of a government are presented fairly in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. Financial Resources Resources that are or will become available for spending and include cash, resources ordinarily expected to be converted to cash such as receivables, inventory, and prepaid assets. Fiscal Year For the Commission, the 12-month period that begins July 1 and ends June 30 of the designated fiscal or operating year for accounting and budgeting purposes. Fund A fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts in which cash and other financial resources, all related liabilities, and residual equities or balances, and changes therein, are recorded and segregated to carry on specific activities or attain certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Fund Balance The excess of a governmental fund's assets over its liabilities. Fund Type Any one of eleven classifications into which all funds are categorized in governmental accounting. Governmental fund types include general, special revenue, debt service, capital projects, and permanent funds. Proprietary fund types include enterprise and internal service funds. Fiduciary fund types include pension trust, investment trust, and private -purpose trust funds and agency funds. GASB 34 Statement No. 34 issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board that was implemented by the Commission in FY 2001/02. GASB 34 established new financial reporting standards for state and local governments. Under the new financial reporting model, governmental financial statements include basic financial statements that present both government -wide and fund financial statements and required supplementary information, including Management's Discussion and Analysis. GASB 45 Statement No. 45, Accounting for Other Postemployment Benefits (OPEB), issued by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board implemented by the Commission in FY 2007/08. GASB 45 requires recognition of postretirement health care costs on an accrual basis over a period approximating the employees' years of service and to provide information about actuarial accrued liabilities associated with these benefits and whether and to what extent progress is being made in funding the plan. General Fund The governmental fund type used to account for all financial resources, except those required to be accounted for in another fund. General Ledger A record containing the accounts needed to reflect the financial position and the results of operations of a government. In double -entry bookkeeping, debit balances equal the credit balances in the general ledger. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) Minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. GAAP encompasses the conventions, rules, and procedures that serve as the norm for the fair presentation of financial statements. The GASB is the primary authoritative accounting and financial reporting standard -setting body on the application of GAAP to state and local governments. Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) Rules and procedures established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) for the conduct of a financial audit. There are ten basic GAAS, classified into three broad categories: general standards, standards of fieldwork, and standards of reporting. The Auditing Standards Board of the AICPA publishes Statements on Auditing Standards (SAS) and related interpretations to comment and expand upon these basic standards. Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS) Standards established by the General Accounting Office (GAO) in its publication, Government Auditing Standards, for the conduct and reporting of both financial and performance audits in the public sector. GAGAS set forth general standards applicable to both types of audits and separate standards of fieldwork and reporting for financial and performance audits. The GAGAS standards of fieldwork and reporting for financial audits incorporate and build upon GAAS. Governmental Funds Funds generally used to account for tax -supported activities. The Commission's governmental funds are comprised of general, special revenue, debt service, and capital projects funds. Grant A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function or program. Independent Auditor An auditor meeting the independence criteria set forth in GAAS and GAGAS. Internal Audit An independent appraisal of the diverse operations and controls within a government entity to determine whether acceptable policies and procedures are followed, established standards are met, resources are used efficiently and economically, and the organization's objectives are being achieved. The term covers all forms of appraisal of activities undertaken by auditors working for and within an organization. Internal Control Policies and procedures established to provide reasonable assurance that specific government objectives will be achieved. Joint Venture A legal entity or other organization resulting from a contractual agreement and that is owned, operated, or governed by two or more participants as a separate and specific activity for the benefit of the public or service recipients and in which the government retains an ongoing financial interest or ongoing financial responsibility. The Commission is a member agency of Metrolink. Legal Level of Budgetary Control The level at which a government's management may not reallocate resources without special approval from the legislative body. Loans Receivable An asset account reflecting amounts loaned to individuals or organizations external to the Commission, including notes taken as security for such loans. Measurement Focus The objective of a measurement that is what is being expressed in reporting a government's financial performance and position. A particular measurement focus considers not only which resources are measured (financial or economic), but also when the effects of transactions or events involving those resources are recognized (basis of accounting). The measurement focus of the Commission's government - wide and fiduciary fund financial statements is economic resources, whereas the measurement focus of governmental fund financial statements is current financial resources. Modified Accrual Basis The accrual basis of accounting adapted to the governmental funds' measurement focus according to which revenues and other financial resource increments (e.g., bond issue proceeds) are recognized when they become susceptible to accrual, that is when they become both "measurable" and "available to finance expenditures of the current period." Expenditures are recognized when the fund liability is incurred except for unmatured interest on general long-term debt and certain similar accrued obligations when due. The Commission's governmental funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Other Financing Sources Amounts classified separately from revenues to avoid distorting revenue trends that represent an increase in current financial resources. Other financing sources generally include general long-term debt proceeds, amounts equal to the present value of minimum lease payments arising from capital leases, proceeds from the sale of capital assets, and transfers in. Other Financing Uses Amounts classified separately from expenditures to avoid distorting expenditure trends and represent a decrease in current financial resources. Other financing uses generally include transfers out and the amount of refunding bond proceeds deposited with the escrow agent. Overhead Indirect costs that cannot be specifically associated with a given service, program, or department and thus, cannot be clearly associated with a particular functional category. Principal In the context of bonds other than deep -discount debt, the face value or par value of a bond or issue of bonds payable on stated dates of maturity. Program Group activities, operations, or organizational units directed to attaining specific purposes or objectives. Program Budget A budget wherein expenditures are based primarily on the functions or activities of a government rather than to specific items of cost or to specific departments. Purchase Order A document authorizing the delivery of specified merchandise or the rendering of certain services and the making of a charge for them. Refunding Bonds Bonds issued to retire bonds already outstanding. The proceeds of refunding bonds may be used to repay the previously issued debt (current refunding) or to be placed with an escrow agent and invested until used to pay principal and interest on old debt at a future date (advance refunding). Reimbursement Grant A grant for which a potential recipient must first incur qualifying expenditures to be eligible. Restricted Fund Balance Those portions of fund balance which are restricted for specific purposes by third parties or enabling legislation. Special Revenue Fund A governmental fund type used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources (other than major capital projects) that are legally restricted to expenditure for specified purposes. The Commission maintains special revenue funds for Measure A Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley; Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee; Freeway Service Patrol; Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies; State Transit Assistance; and Local Transportation Fund. Transfers All interfund transfers representing flows of assets between funds of the government without equivalent flows of assets in return and without a requirement for repayments. Trustee A fiduciary holding property on behalf of another. AGENDA ITEM 9A • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Finance Manager/Controller THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the nine months ended March 31, 2014. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the last nine months of the fiscal year, staff monitored the revenues and expenditures of the Commission. The attached financial statements present the revenues and expenditures for the nine months of the fiscal year. Period closing accrual adjustments are not included for revenues earned but not billed and expenditures incurred for goods and services received but not yet invoiced, as such adjustments are normally made during the year-end closing activities. The operating statement shows the sales tax revenues for the third quarter at 56 percent of the budget. This is a result of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 33. GASB 33 requires sales tax revenues to be accrued for the period in which it is collected at the point of sale. The State Board of Equalization collects the Measure A funds and remits these funds to the Commission after the reporting period for the businesses. This creates a two - month lag in the receipt of revenues by the Commission. Accordingly, these financial statements reflect the revenues related to collections through January 2014. On a cash basis, the Measure A and Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax revenues are 6.30 percent and 6.83 percent higher, respectively, than the same period last fiscal year. At the January 8 Commission meeting, staff presented the revised FY 2013/14 revenue projections and increased the Measure A and LTF revenues by $10 million and $4 million, respectively. These increased projected revenues are included in the sales tax revenues budget for this quarterly report. State Transit Assistance Fund receipts of $3.4 million for second quarter were received in February 2014. Staff will continue to monitor the trends in the sales tax receipts and report to the Commission any necessary adjustments. Federal, state, and local revenues are on a reimbursement basis. The Commission will receive these revenues as eligible project costs are incurred and invoiced to the respective agencies. Agenda Item 9A 47 Significant federal and state reimbursements are related to the Perris Valley Line project and State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), which reimbursable costs are anticipated to continue through the last quarter of the fiscal year. During the FY 2013/14 budget process the Commission took a conservative approach in estimating the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues of $6.3 million passed through from Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). At the January 8 Commission meeting, staff presented the revised FY 2013/14 revenue projections and increased the TUMF revenues to $12 million. On May 14, the Commission approved a second revised projection of $7.4 million, as reflected in this -quarterly budget report. This represents a decrease of $4.6 million resulting from a slowdown of revenues in FY 2013/14. The,budgeted balance of $423,400 relates to TUMF zone reimbursements from WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange project of which the Commission received $50,708. Staff will invoice WRCOG for TUMF zone reimbursements as eligible expenditures are incurred in the fourth quarter. Other revenues include property management revenues generated from properties acquired in connection with the SR-91 CIP. The Commission took a conservative approach in estimating investment income for FY 2013/14 as a result of flat interest yields on investment balances. The investment losses reflected in the third quarter are related primarily to accrued interest due to sellers of investment securities purchased with SR-91 CIP financing proceeds. These amounts will be offset in future quarters when interest coupon payments are received. A portion of investment income related to the third quarter will be recorded in the fourth quarter. The expenditure categories are in line overall with the expectations of the budget with the following exceptions: • Professional services expenditures are under budget due to unused budget authority for rail and station development planning and SR-91 CIP activity. The unused budget authority will be used as the projects progress; • Support costs are under budget due to unused budget authority for the marketing of new service of the 91 Line commuter trains; • Program operations are under budget due to unused budget authority for SR-91 CIP permit activities. The unused budget authority will be used as the project progresses; • Special studies are under budget due to unused budget authority for project, planning, and monitoring and rail feasibility studies. The Commission will use the authority as the studies are developed; • Local streets and roads expenditures are related to the timing of Measure A sales tax revenues as previously explained. These financial statements reflect expenditures made to the local jurisdictions related to collections through January 2014; Agenda Item 9A 48 • Regional arterial expenditures primarily represent expenditures for the highways and regional arterial program administered by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). CVAG requests reimbursements from the Commission based on available funds and sufficient budget authority; and • Capital outlay expenditures are under budget due to unused budget authority for station security improvements and hardware and software improvements. In July 2013 the Commission completed the financing for the design and construction of the SR-91 CIP. The financing included the issuance of $462.2 million in sales tax revenue bonds and $176.7 million in toll revenue bonds, execution of a $421.1 million federal Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and contribution of $136.5 million from the Commission during construction. A portion of the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds was used to retire $60 million of outstanding commercial paper notes with remaining proceeds to be used to pay a portion of the costs of the SR-91 CIP; capitalized interest on 2013 Sales Tax Bonds through December 1, 2017; and costs of issuance for the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds. The proceeds of the 2013 Toll Bonds were used to pay a portion of the costs of the SR-91 CIP; capitalized interest on the 2013 Toll Bonds through December 1, 2017; and costs of issuance for the 2013 Toll Bonds in addition to funding a debt service reserve of $17.7 million. The TIFIA loan will be used to pay eligible SR-91 CIP costs. The loan is a toll revenue bond (TIFIA Bond) that is subordinate to the 2013 Toll Bonds. Proceeds of the TIFIA Bond may be drawn upon after certain conditions have been met. The following list discusses the significant capital projects (i.e., total budgeted costs in excess of $5 million) and related status. Capital project expenditures are generally affected by lags in invoices submitted by contractors and consultants, as well as issues encountered during certain phases of the projects. The capital projects budgets tend to be based on aggressive project schedules. HiRhwav Engineering/Construction/Design-Build/Right of Wav/Land SR-91 High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes Project — Caltrans completed design work and expenditures remain within the budget authority. Utility relocation continues and the submittal of invoices for expenditures incurred to date continues to lag. Staff oversees right of way acquisition, which has been certified; one acquisition is still pending settlement. Construction began in April 2012 and is managed by Caltrans. 71/91 Interchange Project — A contract for the final design consultant was awarded at the February 2012 Commission meeting. Notice to proceed (NTP) was issued in March 2012 starting the final design phase. Final design was delayed due to the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) requirement for a new environmental assessment on pot holing on federal property. The ACOE also required preparation of an additional environmental assessment to cover project construction impacts on federal property resulting from the eastbound SR-91 to Agenda Item 9A 49 northbound SR-71 flyover connector. Right of way acquisition is expected to begin in the fourth quarter of FY 2013/14 and final design is expected to be completed during the second quarter of FY 2014/15. The project is currently under budget due to the progress of final design. SR-91 CIP (Design -Build) — The Commission completed financing activities for this project including the issuance of sales tax and toll revenue bonds and execution of a TIFIA loan in July 2013. Right of way acquisition work is underway including eminent domain proceedings and is expected to peak in FY 2013/14 and FY 2014/15. A design -build contract was awarded in May 2013, and a limited NTP was issued concurrent with the contract award and included early deliverables and mobilization. Full NTP has been given and the contractor is proceeding. Construction progress is slightly slower than anticipated, therefore, Commission expenditures are less than budgeted. 1-15 Express Lanes —Staff continues to advance the project report and environmental document and is expected to be completed in FY 2015/16. Various methods of project delivery were analyzed in 2013, and ultimately staff received Commission approval in January 2014 to use the design -build method of project delivery and begin planning for the design -build phase of work. 1-215 Central Widening Project from Scott Road to Nuevo Road —The NTP for construction was issued December 10, 2012, with the first working day starting in January 2013. Construction is on schedule. Rail Engineering/Construction/Right of Way/Land Perris Valley Line Project — Final design is complete, and the Federal Transit Administration awarded the Small Starts grant agreement funds. Major outstanding right of way acquisition activity continues for the station and layover facility at south Perris. A lawsuit brought by the Friends of Riverside Hills challenging elements of the California Environmental Quality Act document was settled in July 2013,and recorded in the FY 2012/13 financial statements. The construction contract has been given full NTP and construction has commenced. Attachment: Quarterly Financial Statements — March 2013 Agenda Item 9A 50 • • • Revenues Sales tax Federal reimbursements State reimbursements Local reimbursements Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Other revenues Investment income (losses) Total revenues Expenditures Salaries and benefits Professional and support Professional services Support costs Total Professional and support costs Projects and operations Program operations - general Engineering Construction Design Build Right of way/land Operating and capital disbursements Special studies Local streets and roads Regional arterials Total projects and operations Debt service Principal Interest Cost of issuance Total debt service Capital outlay Total Expenditures Excess revenues over (under) expenditures Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in Operating transfer out TIFIA loan proceeds Debt proceeds Bond premium Bond discount Total financing sources/(uses) Net change in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2013 Fund balance March 31, 2014 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET VS ACTUAL 3RD QUARTER FOR NINE MONTHS ENDED 3/31/2014 FY 2013/14 BUDGET 3RD QUARTER ACTUAL $ 246,798,000 $ 138,221,904 94,389,000 6,241,760 137,891,241 50,280,435 2,954,400 372,388 7,823,400 4,991,831 500,000 601,362 4,026,500 2,919,022 494,382,541 7,949,400 17,966,700 5,571,300 203,628,702 5,432,176 7,921,198 2,566,063 23,538, 000 10,487,261 20,111,400 22,043,400 237,862,374 217,750,000 179,682,800 122,723,000 1,018,900 46,865,900 27,471,000 7,611,833 6,622,133 42,088,129 89,679,894 63,134,343 74,408,208 33,686 26,125, 387 9,367,893 875,528,774 319,071,506 86,100,000 41,075,800 7,051,300 60,000,000 18,759,735 9,977,940 134,227,100 88,737,675 792,700 52,555 1,042,035,974 423,781,173 (547,653,433) (220,152,471) 637,010,565 (637,010,565) 110,000,000 632,158,000 68,616,000 (2,433,300) 410,102,292 (410,102,292) 638,854,602 38,328,774 (2,433,315) 808,340,700 674,750,061 260,687,267 590,821,600 $ 851,508,867 454,597,590 622,186,895 $ 1,076,784,485 REMAINING BALANCE PERCENT UTILIZATION $ (108,576,096) 56% (88,147,240) 7% (87,610,806) 36% (2,582,012) 13°/u (2,831,569) 64% 101,362 120% (1,107,478) 72% (290,753,839) 41% 2,517,224 68% 10,045,502 44% 3,005,237 46% 13,050,739 45% 12,499,567 38% 15,421,267 30% 195,774,245 18% 128,070,106 41% 116,548,457 35% 48,314,792 61% 985,214 3% 20,740,513 56% 18,103,107 34% 556,457,268 36% 26,100,000 70% 22,316,065 46% (2,926,640) 142% 45,489,425 66% 740,145 7% 618,254,801 41% 630,749,428 40% (226,908,273) 64% 226,908,273 64% (110,000,000) N/A 6,696,602 101 % (30,287,226) 56% (15) 100% 133,590,639 83% 764,340,067 174% 31,365,295 105% $ 795,705,362 126% 51 • • • GENERAL FUND MEASURE A SALES TAX FSP/ WESTERN COACHELLA SAFE COUNTY VALLEY RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET VS ACTUALS BY FUND 3RD QUARTER FOR NINE MONTHS ENDED 3/31/2014 PALO LOCAL VERDE TRANSPORTATION VALLEY FUND TRANSPORTATION STATE TRANSIT UNIFORM COMMERCIAL SALES TAX TOLL REVENUE COMBINED ASSISTANCE MITIGATION FEE PAPER BONDS BONDS DEBT SERVICE TOTAL (TUMF) Revenues Sales tax $ 1,960,000 $ - $ 64,892,728 $ 20,413,234 $ 639,934 $ 43,451,320 $ 6,864,688 $ - $ - $ $ $ - $ 138,221,904 Federal reimbursements 7,641 122 4,850,297 - - - - - - - - 1,383,700 6,241,760 State reimbursements 158,769 2,174,740 47,946,926 - - - - - 50,280,435 Local reimbursements 105,968 6,152 260,268 - - - - - 372,388 Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee - - 50,708 - 4,941,123 - - - 4,991,831 Other revenues 9,580 862 590,920 - - - - - - - - - 601,362 Investment income (losses) 17,530 11 899 372,891 46,693 - 138,912 81,840 111,525 1,370,976 (679,479) (21,188) 1,467,423 2,919,022 Total revenues 2,259,488 2,193,775 118,964,738 20,459,927 639,934 43,590,232 6,946,528 5,052,648 1,370,976 (679,479) (21,188) 2,851,123 203,628,702 Expenditures Salaries and benefits 3,227,709 82,145 1,939,512 120 - - - 182,690 - - - 5,432,176 Professional and support Professional services 922,948 248,889 5,927,664 1,060 - - 520,637 300,000 - - - 7,921,198 Support costs 1,933,329 184,299 447,630 91 - - - 714 - - - 2,566,063 Total Professional and support costs 2,856,277 433,188 6,375,294 1,151 - - - 521,351 300,000 - 10,487,261 Projects and operations Program operations -general 995,010 1,548,147 4,807,234 12,985 - Engineering 750 - 4,695,247 - - Construction - 33,258,215 - - - Design Build - 89,679,894 Right of way/land - - 58,048,357 - - Operating and capital disbursements 8,132,116 - 3,597,641 3,912,750 Special studies - - 33,686 - Lacalstreets and roads - 18,340,821 7,144,632 639,934 Regional arterials - - - 8,702,893 - Total projects and operations 9,127,876 1,548,147 212,461,095 19,773,260 Debt service Principal Interest Cost of issuance Total debt service - 248,457 - - - - 7,611,833 1,926,136 - - - 6,622,133 8,829,914 - - - - 42,088,129 - - - - - - 89,679,894 5,085,986 - - - - 63,134,343 45,571,404 13,194,297 - - - - 74,408,208 33,686 - - - - 26,125,387 665,000 - - - - 9,367,893 639,934 45,571,404 13,194,297 16,755,493 - - - - 319,071,506 60,000,000 - - 60,000,000 789 - - 18,758,946 18,759,735 - 4,131,685 2,919,170 2,927,085 9,977,940 60,000,789 4,131,685 2,919,170 21,686,031 88,737675 Capital outlay 19,554 33,001 52,555 Total Expenditures 15,231,416 2,063,480 220,808,902 19,774,531 639,934 45,571,404 13,194,297 17,459,534 60,300,789 4,131,685 2,919,170 21,686,031 423,781,173 Excess revenues over (under) expenditures (12,971,928) 130,295 (101,844,164) 685,396 (1,981,172) (6,247,769) (12,406,886) (58,929,813) (4,811,164) (2,940,358) (18,834,908) (220,152,471) Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in 10,558,057 916,400 169,221,864 - - - 3,766,228 60,001,951 - - 165,637,792 410,102,292 Operating transfer out - (916,400) (16,341,129) - (10,558,056) - (1,690,282) (5,928,271) (249,741,758) (123,542,696) (1,383,700) (410,102,292) TIFIA loan proceeds - - - - - - - - - - - - Debtproceeds - - 462,200,000 176,654,602 - 638,854,602 Bond premium - - 38,328,774 - 38,328,774 Bond discount - - - - - - - - (2,433,315) - (2,433,315) Total financing sources/(uses) 10,558,057 - 152,880,735 - - (10,558,056) - 2,075,946 54,073,680 250,787,016 50,678,591 164,254,092 674,750,061 Net change in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2013 Fund balance March 31, 2014 (2,413,871) 130,295 51,036,571 685,396 - (12,539,228) (6,247,769) (10,330,940) (4,856,133) 245,975,852 47,738,233 145,419,184 454,597,590 12,840,351 7,482,078 294,464,723 27,356,273 556 105,242,957 55,693,488 67,306,789 36,097,201 4,477,116 - 11,225,363 622,186,895 $ 10,426,480 $ 7,612,373 $ 345,501,294 $ 28,041,669 $ 556 $ 92,703,729 $ 49,445,719 $ 56,975,849 $ 31,241,068 $ 250,452,968 $ 47,738,233 $ 156,644,547 $ 1,076,784,485 52 AGENDA ITEM 9B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Finance Manager/Controller THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2014/15 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve Resolution No. 14-020, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Establishing the Commission's Appropriations Limit for Fiscal Year 2014/15". BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Section 7910 of the California Government Code implements Article XIIIB of the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction to establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make documentation used to determine the appropriations limit available to the public 15 days prior to adoption of the resolution establishing the appropriations limit. Staff performed the calculations necessary to determine the limit. The resolution and documents supporting the calculation are attached. The Commission chose to use the percentage change in the California per capital personal income and the population change within Riverside County as the factors in determining the appropriations. limit. As required, the adoption of the Commission's FY 2014/15 Appropriations Limit was posted in the local newspaper. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 14-020 2) California Per Capital Income and Population, Riverside County — California Department of Finance Agenda Item 9B 53 • • RESOLUTION NO. 14-020 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ESTABLISHING THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 WHEREAS, Article XIIIB of the California Constitution places an annual limitation upon appropriations from proceeds of taxes by each local government of the State of California; and WHEREAS, in 1988, pursuant to Article XIIIB, section 4 of the California Constitution, the Riverside County Transportation Commission established its appropriations limit at $75 million for fiscal year 1988-1989 under ordinance No. 88-1; and WHEREAS, Section 7910 of the California Government Code implements Article XIIIB of the California Constitution by requiring each local jurisdiction to establish, by resolution, its appropriations limit for each fiscal year and to make the documentation used in determining the appropriations limit available to the public fifteen days prior to adoption of the resolution establishing the appropriations limit; and WHEREAS, in accordance with Senate Constitutional Amendment No. 1 approved by the voters of the State effective June 6, 1990, beginning with fiscal year 1990-1991 and for each fiscal year thereafter, the Commission's Board of Commissioners is required to select either the percentage change in California per capita personal income or the percentage change in the local assessment roll due to the addition of local non-residential construction, and either the population change within the Commission or the population change within Riverside County, as the two factors to be applied in calculating the appropriations limit for each fiscal year; and WHEREAS, this Board wishes to select, as factors in determining the Commission's appropriation limit for fiscal year 2014-2015 the percentage change in California per capita personal income and also the population change within Riverside County; and WHEREAS, this Commission has documented its calculations of the Commission's appropriations limit for fiscal year 2014-2015 and said calculations have been made available to the public at least fifteen days prior to the adoption of this resolution. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Riverside County Transportation Commission as follows: 1. For fiscal year 2014-2015, the factors selected for calculating the appropriations limit are (a) the percentage change in California per capita personal income, and (b) the population change within the County of Riverside. 2. The appropriations limit applicable to this Agency pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution for fiscal year 2014-2015 are hereby established and determined to be $373,714,246. 3. A copy of the documentation used in the determination of the appropriations limit for fiscal year 2014-2015 shall be affixed hereto and shall be available for public inspection. 4. Pursuant to Section 7910 of the California Government Code, any judicial action or proceeding to attack, review, set aside, void, or annul the establishment of the appropriations limit as set forth herein must be commenced within forty-five days of the adoption of this resolution. ADOPTED this 11th day of June, 2014. Marion Ashley, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 55 • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2014-2015 APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT 2013-2014 Appropriations Limit $ 370,426,988 2014-2015 adjustment: Change in California per capita personal income = -0.23% Change in Population, Riverside County = 1.12% Per Capital Cost of Living converted to a ratio: -0.23 + 100 = 0.9977 100 Population converted to a ratio: 1.12 + 100 = 1.0112 100 Calculation of factor for FY 2014-2015: 0.9977 x 1.0112 = 1.00887424 $370,426,988 x 1.00887424 = $373,714,246 2014-2015 Appropriations Limit $ 373,714,246 Source: California per capita income — California Department of Finance Population, Riverside County —California Department of Finance • • ��� O cs DEPARTMENT OF OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR May 2014 Dear Fiscal Officer: EDMUND G. BROWN JR. • GOVERNOR STATE CAPITOL ■ ROOM 1145 ■ SACRAMENTO CA ■ 9551 4-4998 • WWW.DOF.CA.GOV Subject: Price and Population Information Appropriations Limit The California Revenue and Taxation Code, section 2227, mandates the Department of Finance (Finance) to transmit an estimate of the percentage change in population to local governments. Each local jurisdiction must use their percentage change in population factor for January 1, 2014, in conjunction with a change in the cost of living, or price factor, to calculate their appropriations limit for fiscal year 2014-15. Attachment A provides the change in California's per capita personal income and an example for utilizing the price factor and population percentage change factor to calculate the 2014-15 appropriations limit. Attachment B provides city and unincorporated county population percentage change. Attachment C provides population percentage change for counties and their summed incorporated areas. The population percentage change data excludes federal and state institutionalized populations and military populations. Population Percent Change for Special Districts Some special districts must establish an annual appropriations limit. Consult the Revenue and Taxation Code section 2228 for further information regarding the appropriations limit. Article XIII B, section 9(C), of the State Constitution exempts certain special districts from the appropriations limit calculation mandate. The Code and the California Constitution can be accessed at the following website: http://leginfo.leoislature.ca.gov/faces/codes.xhtml. Special districts required by law to calculate their appropriations limit must present the calculation as part of their annual audit. Any questions special districts have on this issue should be referred to their respective county for clarification, or to their legal representation, or to the law itself. No state agency reviews the local appropriations limits. Population Certification The population certification program applies only to cities and counties. Revenue and Taxation Code section 11005.6 mandates Finance to automatically certify any population estimate that exceeds the current certified population with the State Controller's Office. Finance will certify the higher estimate to the State Controller by June 1, 2014. Please Note: Prior year's city population estimates may be revised. If you have any questions regarding this data, please contact the Demographic Research Unit at (916) 323-4086. MICHAEL COHEN Director By: KEELY M. BOSLER Chief Deputy Director Attachment 57 May 2014 Attachment A A. Price Factor: Article XIII B specifies that local jurisdictions select their cost of living factor to compute their appropriation limit by a vote of their governing body. The cost of living factor provided here is per capita personal income. If the percentage change in per capita personal income is selected, the percentage change to be used in setting the fiscal year 2014-15 appropriation limit is: Per Capita Personal Income Fiscal Year (FY) Percentage change over prior year 2014-15 -0.23 B. Following is an example using sample population change and the change in California per capita personal income as growth factors in computing a 2014-15 appropriation limit. 2014-15: Per Capita Cost of Living Change = -0.23 percent Population Change = 0.95 percent Per Capita Cost of Living converted to a ratio: Population converted to a ratio: Calculation of factor for FY 2014-15: -0.23 + 100 = 0.9977 100 0.95 + 100 = 1.0095 100 0.9977 x 1.0095 = 1.0072 58 • Fiscal Year 2014-15 County City Riverside Banning Beaumont Blythe Calimesa Canyon Lake Cathedral City Coachella Corona Desert Hot Springs Eastvale Hemet Indian Wells Indio Jurupa Valley Lake Elsinore La Quinta Menifee Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco Palm Desert Palm Springs Perris Rancho Mirage Riverside San Jacinto Temecula Wildomar Unincorporated County Total Attachment B Annual Percent Change in Population Minus Exclusions' January 1, 2013 to January 1, 2014 and Total Population, January 1, 2014 Total Percent Change --- Population Minus Exclusions - Population 2013-2014 1-1-13 1-1-14 1-1-2014 0.49 30,177 30,325 30,325 2.74 39,787 40,876 40,876 0.55 13,458 13,532 18,992 1.67 8,096 8,231 8,231 0.51 10,771 10,826 10,826 0.47 52,296 52,543 52,595 1.96 42,795 43,633 43,633 1.45 156,864 159,132 159,132 0.60 27,835 28,001 28,001 3.35 57,266 59,185 59,185 0.79 80,899 81,537 81,537 1,06 5,083 5,137 5,137 1.21 81,415 82,398 82,398 0.52 97,272 97,774 97,774 2.30 55,299 56,573 56,718 1.61 38,412 39,032 39,032 1.70 82,314 83,716 83,716 0.54 198,183 199,258 199,258 0.53 105,860 106,425 106,425 0.53 23,189 23,311 26,582 0.91 49,962 50,417 50,417 0,90 45,724 46,135 46,135 1.58 70,983 72,103 72,103 0.58 17,643 17,745 17,745 0.64 311,976 313,975 314,034. 0.74 45,229 45,563 45,563 1.32 104,907 106,289 106,289 1.62 33,182 33,718 33,718 1.29 358,570 363,186 363,590 1.12 2,245,447 2,270,576 2,279,967 °Exclusions include residents on federal military installations and group quarters residents in state mental institutions, state and federal correctional institutions and veteran homes. 59 AGENDA ITEM 9C • • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Marla Dye, Procurement Analyst Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Recurring Contracts for Fiscal Year 2014/15 STAFF RECOMMENDATION This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the recurring contracts for Fiscal Year 2014/15; 2) Approve Agreement No. 07-31-164-11, Amendment No. 11 to Agreement 07-31-164-00, with Best Best & Krieger LLP (BB&K) for provide general legal services related to litigation in the amount of $550,000, including contingency of $50,000, for a total amount not to exceed $5,590,100 for FY 2013/14; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As in previous years, the Commission annually evaluates existing contracts for professional services that are due to expire within the next fiscal year. These contracts may be placed on the calendar for a new procurement solicitation, allowed to expire because they are no longer required, or included in the annual recurring contracts list that is subject to Commission approval. Most contracts for professional services are subject to a competitive process. This year's list of recurring contracts includes consultants that are providing unique or specialized services and working closely with staff on long-term projects. Staff desires to retain a limited number of consultants on the recurring contracts list because of the consultant's historical knowledge, unique experience, and understanding of the Commission and specific Commission projects. Under limited circumstances, staff believes it is more efficient and cost effective to retain the consultants on the recurring contracts list rather than rebidding the services at this time. Approval of the recurring contracts list will allow the Commission to continue work on existing projects without interruptions and maintain consistency. The list of proposed recurring contracts for FY 2014/15, followed by a summary for each consultant supporting its inclusion on the recurring contracts list is as follows: Agenda Item 9C 60 Consultant Name Description of Services Budget FY 2013 14 / Increase (Decrease) ... k� lFY201 15 AMMA Transit Planning (AMMA) Support for administration of Specialized Transit Program under Measure A and federal programs $ 100,000 0 $ 20,000 12{3;0 Bartel Associates, LLC'Martel) Actuarial services 13,000 _ 5a000 „ 2,000 Bazilio Cobb & Associates (BCA) Internal audit services 10,000 10,000: ,. 0 Bechtel Infrastructure (Bechtel) Capital project program management services 8,200,900 .T :, �,� 61 (900) Best,Best & Krieger LLP BB&K General legal services 5,040,100 5` ,900 391,800 Best, Best & Krieger LLP (BB&K) Additional general legal service for FY 2013/14 related to litigation matters 550,000*!'' (550,000) BLX Group LLC (BLX) Arbitrage rebate compliance services 10,000 ' S;f?t?b 5,000 Epic Land Solutions, Inc. (Epic) Support services for property management� of Commission -owned properties and related contracts 637,500 atC. _ 2,000 Fieldman Rolapp & Associates (Fieldman) Financiafadvisory services 400,000 , 00, (150,000) Fulbright & Jaworski, LLP (Fulbright) Disclosure counsel services 125,000 (50,000) Geographics Graphic design for Multimodal Services Department 1,442,000 OW (537,000) Inland Transportation Services (ITS) Commuter Assistance Program management 1,810,000 1;": , t (225,000) McGladrey, LLP Audit services 200,000 20i;' 0 Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP (Orrick) Bond Counsel Services 350,000 0 0 � �1 ' 4' (150,000) Ray Gorski Air quality technical assessments 45,000 z� ff„:Yis.„as-t> :,QO$fa (20,000) Total $ 18,933,500 9. ($ 1,262,100) *Relates to staff recommendation to increase FY2013/14 contract amount. AMMA Transit Planning In February 2007, AMMA was selected under a competitive procurement process to provide consulting services for the development and implementation of the Coordinated Public Transit - Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan), as well as the required updates of the Coordinated Plan including monitoring of federal Jobs Access Reverse Commute and New Agenda Item 9C • • 61 • Freedom grant awards. AMMA also guides staff regarding the grant application process for the Federal Transit Administration Section 5310 Elderly and Disabled Specialized Transit program. Additionally, AMMA advises staff regarding the management of operator reporting for the current specialized transit universal call for projects and assists in the development of the application and eligibility guidelines for future specialized transit universal call for projects. Bartel Associates, LLC Bartel was selected as the Commission's actuary in March 2007, following a competitive procurement process. Bartel provides actuarial valuation services for post employment medical benefits under Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 45 and GASB Statement No. 57. As a participant in the California Employers' Retiree Benefit Trust (CERBT) for other post employment benefits (OPEB), the Commission is required to obtain valuations of such OPEB every two years. Bartel prepared the Commission's OPEB actuarial valuation as of June 30, 2013, for FYs 2013/14 — 2014/15. An OPEB actuarial valuation as of June 30, 2015, for FYs 2015/16 — 2016/17 will be required. Based on the current and evolving GASB and CERBT requirements and the changesrelated to the California Public Employee Pension Reform Act of 2013, staff determined it would be more efficient and cost effective to extend the contract for an additional one-year period -through June 30, 2015, rather than conducting a competitive procurement for OPEB actuarial valuation services prior to the next valuation. Bazilio Cobb & Associates In October 2007, the Commission selected Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio & Associates, P.C. (now BCA) as one of the firms to perform on -call internal audit services, including audits related to mandated pre -award audits and contract close outs, as well as other reviews and assistance on an as needed basis. The agreement, which the term was for a five-year period, was extended by the Commission for an additional year at its October 2012 meeting. BCA is the sole on -call internal audit services firm for the Commission at this time, and it has primarily performed the pre award and close-out audits. While the requirement for such audits decreased in recent years based on the level of activity, staff recommends the Commission retain BCA through June 30, 2015, should the need for such audits arise. BCA performed these audits in a timely and satisfactory manner. Staff intends to conduct a competitive procurement for internal audit services within the next year. Bechtel Infrastructure The Bechtel contract for FY 2014/15 reflects a minimal decrease from last year. Several of the Commission's larger projects, including the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), Perris Valley Line (PVL), and widening projects on the Interstate 215 are in the more labor-intensive design -build or construction phases, and Bechtel currently is staffed to support this work. Bechtel is continuing program management and construction management activities of highway and rail projects for the 2009 Measure A program, as well as the wrap up of delivery for the remaining projects for the 1989 Measure A program. Bechtel possesses the knowledge and background history of the Commission's capital projects, which is necessary to deliver the Agenda Item 9C 62 Commission's Measure A projects. The flexibility of obtaining additional support from Bechtel as needed for specific project requirements is also important and avoids the need to increase Commission staff. Best, Best & Krieger LLP The BB&K contract for FY 2013/14 was approved through the recurring contracts process last year and in an amendment in January 2014 for a total amount not to exceed $5,040,100. The amendment pertained to general legal services related to right of way acquisitions for the SR-91 CIP. In recent months, BB&K represented the Commission in four litigation cases that were tried in court as settlements could not be reached prior to trial. While the outcome of each case was favorable to the Commission, this required significant trial preparation and court time and, in two cases, significant expert witnesses costs. The costs related to these cases approximate $500,000 and were not included in the FY 2013/14 contract. Staff recommends the Commission approve an amendment to increase BB&K's FY 2013/14 contract $550,000, including a contingency of $50,000, related to litigation matters. This results in a total amount not to exceed $5,590,100 for FY 2013/14. Approximately $300,000 of this increase relates to a Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) regional arterial project and will be reimbursed to the Commission. There is sufficient budget authority in the FY 2013/14 budget; therefore, a budget adjustment is not required. The FY 2014/15 contract for BB&K reflects a net decrease in legal costs compared to the amended FY 2013/14 contract, primarily related to the conclusion of litigation offset by the continued need for specialized legal services for certain projects. A high level of general legal services is generally required from . BB&K for highway and rail capital project activities, especially right of way, and TUMf projects. BB&Kalso provides support related to procurements and contract development. The Commission engaged other legal firms for specific matters involving potential conflicts of interest, as well as other specialized legal services. BLX Group LLC In 2007, the Commission engaged BLX to perform arbitrage rebate compliance services for sales tax revenue debt issued under the 1989 Measure A and 2009 Measure A, as required by the Internal Revenue Service and the tax certificates executed for each debt issue. This includes commercial paper notes and sales tax revenue bonds. In order to ensure the Commission is complying with the complex arbitrage rebate regulations, it elected to have the required calculations performed more frequently than the minimum reporting requirements during the life of each debt issue. Accordingly, BLX maintains historical information and calculations that are considered in subsequent arbitrage rebate calculations. Therefore, staff determined it would be more efficient and cost effective to extend the contract for an additional one-year period through June 30, 2015. Furthermore, BLX is affiliated with Orrick, which results in additional efficiencies related to immediate access to bond documents and key staff. The FY 2014/15 costs reflect a $5,000 increase related to the two new debt issues from the SR-91 CIP financing. Agenda Item 9C 63 • • • Epic Land Solutions, Inc. Due to its accumulated knowledge and development of various property management projects, resources, and databases associated with the multitude of Commission -owned properties, including but not limited to those along the San Jacinto Branch Line, staff determined Epic can most efficiently and cost effectively provide property management services. The scope of services for FY 2014/15 includes upgrading private use and utility licenses to current Commission terms; evaluating fair market value of the uses of Commission -owned property; coordinating and assisting with activities related to the issuance of new licenses; maintaining and updating a database to capture all of the Commission's property and contract information; maintaining and updating mapping of all Commission properties and contracts; following up on delinquent rent payments; monitoring contractor activities, on Commission property to ensure compliance with right of entries; tracking insurance certifications; assisting with coordinating removal of debris and illegal occupants; marketing and selling excess land; and resolving complex title issues. The scope of work to be performed is largely consistent with the prior year with a slight increase in order to resolve long-term outstanding issues with utilities. Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Fieldman was selected as the Commission's financial advisor in fate 2003, following a procurement process, and provided financial advisory services on general finance matters and specific financing transactions related to the 2009 Measure A program. Fieldman played a significant role in the SR-91 CIP financing activities that achieved financial close in early July 2013. Fieldman continues to provide additional support related to the annual update of the financial model and Annual Financial Plan required by the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan agreement as well as other implementation matters related to the SR-91 CIP financing. Furthermore, the 2009 variable rate sales tax revenue bonds (2009 Bonds) and the commercial paper program liquidity facilities will expire in September and October 2014, respectively, and the Commission will require financial advisory services regarding the extension, replacement, or substitution of the these liquidity facilities. If either or both of the facilities are replaced with another financial institution or substituted with an alternative financing structure, a financing transaction may be necessary. Based on financing activities in progress and anticipated through FY 2014/15, as well as Fieldman's knowledge and understanding of the Commission, staff determined it would be more efficient and cost- effective for continuity purposes to retain Fieldman. Financial advisory services are expected to be lower than the FY 2013/14 budget, which included the SR-91 CIP financing. Fulbrieht & Jaworski, LLP In July 2009, the Commission awarded a professional services agreement to Fulbright for disclosure + counsel services in connection with the Commission's 2009 Bond issuance. The agreement has been periodically amended for the Commission's subsequent debt transactions, including the financing for the SR-91 CIP. Staff has been satisfied with Fulbright's high level of service and recommends Fulbright's agreement be amended to include disclosure counsel services that may be required if the 2009 Bonds and commercial paper program liquidity Agenda Item 9C 64 facilities are replaced with another financial institution or substituted with an alternative financing structure. Any costs incurred would be less than the FY 2013/14 budget, which included the SR-91 CIP financing. Geographics Upon the completion of a competitive procurement process in December 2006, Geographics was awarded a professional services contract to support the Commission with the provision of graphic design and communications services, including but not limited to advertising design and production, website development, collateral and publication design, and media buys. These services are especially critical as it relates to multimodal services programs for commuter assistance, motorist assistance, rail, and, transit that account for a significant portion of the Commission's outreach. Currently, the Commission's Commuter Assistance Program is repositioning its outreach efforts under the 1E511 'umbrella. This rebranding effort will help strengthen the 1E511 brand and rideshare program awareness while reducing overall marketing costs moving forward. As architect of the rebrand, Geographics is uniquely able to advance the Commission's goals for this program to completion. Based on these required services and its support of other multimodal programs, Geographics' services are critical to the delivery of these programs. Geographics' contract for FY 2014/15 reflects a reduction in the level of expenditures due to the completion of several projects and overall reduction in media buys. As the Commission manages both the Riverside and San Bernardino Counties Commuter Assistance and 1E511 programs, San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) will reimburse the Commission for all costs associated with the San Bernardino County programs. Inland Transportation Services Inland Transportation Services (ITS) was selected by the Commission to provide Commuter Assistance Program management services following a procurement process in FY 1999/00 and again in FY 2008/09. In both procurements, ITS was the only responsive and responsible firm to submit a proposal. Services provided by ITS include, but are not limited to, employer outreach and support, transportation surveys, ridematching assistance, fulfillment of commuter incentives and marketing materials, employer events, and guaranteed ride home administration. These services provide the Commission with an effective and comprehensive transportation demand management strategy to help extract more efficient operation out of the county's transportation system. Under the administration of the Commission, these services are replicated to provide an identical commuter assistance program for SANBAG. This model maximizes program efficiencies and outreach while delivering an Inland Empire based suite of programs and services to both Riverside and San Bernardino County employers and residents. SANBAG reimburses the Commission for services benefitting San Bernardino County, which equates to approximately half of the total contract value. Agenda Item 9C 65 • • • McGladrey, LLP In March 2008, following a procurement process, McGladrey was awarded a professional services agreement to perform the Commission's annual audits for a five-year period that concluded with the completion of the FY 2011/12 audit in November 2012. The audit contract with McGladrey has subsequently been extended twice through the recurring contracts process due to significant changes to the Commission's accounting and reporting as a result of the SR-91 CIP financing as well as to the accounting activities related to the toll operations that will commence in FY 2016/17. In FY 2014/15, the Commission will be required to implement GASB Statement No. 68 related to pension accounting and reporting; finance staff will begin planning for such implementation in June 2014. The Commission's debt indentures and agreements require the Commission to obtain a report and opinion of a nationally recognized public accounting firm, such as McGladrey. Based on McGladrey's knowledge and understanding of the Commission's operations, programs, and financings, staff recommends retaining McGladrey for an additional audit for FY 2013/14 through December 2014, as well as provide consulting services and assistance regarding accounting and financial reporting changes that will be necessary as a result of the SR-91 CIP, commencement of toll operations, and implementation of GASB Statement No. 68. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Orrick was selected as bond counsel in late 2004, following a competitive procurement process and provided bond counsel services in connection with the financings and other matters related to the 2009 Measure A program, including the SR-91 CIP. Orrick has a high level understanding of the Commission's 2009 Measure A program and related financings and complex toll supported debt agreements. It also has significant experience with other transportation agencies, especially self-help counties. Accordingly, staff determined it would be more efficient and cost-effective to continue to retain Orrick in connection with the extension, replacement, or substitution of the liquidity facilities that support the commercial paper program and the 2009 Bonds. Ray Gorski Ray Gorski provides air quality technical assessments, on an as needed basis, for the Commission's Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality and/or other funded projects that require air quality assessments. Mr. Gorski is a known expert in the field of emissions models that are developed by the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board. Mr. Gorski's air quality assessments/reports have never been questioned or challenged by Caltrans or Federal Highway Administration, which is a testament to his expert reputation. Mr. Gorski's services are invaluable to the Commission during the call for projects evaluations, as he provides his expertise for calculating the air quality benefits that in turn enables the Commission to make funding recommendations based on the funding criteria. He is extremely responsive to the Commission's timelines and always provides the Commission with thorough reports. Staff recommends extending Mr. Gorski's consultant services that enhance the Commission's ability to receive the required funding approvals without any issues or delays. Agenda Item 9C 66 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Yes Year: FY 2013/14 FY 2014/15 Amount: $ 550,000 $17,671,400 Source of Funds: Measure A, TDA, TUMF, FSP, SAFE Fees, Interest, and Other Reimbursements Budget Adjustment: No N/A GLA/Project Accounting No.: Various Fiscal Procedures Approved: \)/X1444441,n� Date: 05/21/14 Agenda Item 9C 67 AGENDA ITEM 9D • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Megan Kavand, Accounting Technician Anne Hallberg, Accounting Supervisor Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended March 31, 2014. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: For the past few years and as a result of a low interest rate environment, the Commission's quarterly investment reports reflected investments primarily concentrated in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund. Other investments included the state Local Agency Investment Fund and mutual funds. In connection with the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and the execution of Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), the Commission anticipated the need to engage an investment manager for the bond proceeds and other required funds. Additionally, the Commission desired to engage an investment manager to provide investment advisory and management services related to the Commission's operating funds. Accordingly, at its May 2013 meeting, the Commission awarded two investment management services agreements to Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (Logan) for SR-91 CIP funds and to Payden & Rygel Investment Management (Payden & Rygel) for Commission operating funds. Logan invested the SR-91 CIP debt proceeds during the first quarter of FY 2013/14 in the Short - Term Actively Managed Program (STAMP). Since most of the first quarter activity concentrated in the investment and accounting for the SR-91 CIP financing, Payden & Pygel has not been authorized to make specific investments for the Commission's operating funds. The quarterly investment report for the third quarter of FY 2013/14, as required by state law and Commission policy reflects the increased investment activities resulting from the SR-91 CIP. The quarterly investment report includes the following information: Agenda Item 9D 68 • Investment Portfolio Report • STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category • STAMP Portfolio by Account • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account • STAMP Portfolio Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector • County of Riverside Investment Report for the Quarter Ended March 31, 2013 The Commission's investments were in compliance with the Commission's investment policy adopted June 7, 2012. Additionally, the Commission has adequate cash flows for the next six months. Attachments: 1) Investment Portfolio Report 2) STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 3) STAMP Portfolio by Account 4) STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 5) STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 6) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments 7) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments 8) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 9) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 10) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 11) County of Riverside Investment Report Agenda Item 9D 69 • • • Riverside County Transportation Commission Investment Portfolio Report Period Ended: March 31, 2014 ATTACHMENT 1 RATING COUPON PAR PURCHASE MATURITY YIELD TO PURCHASE MARKET UNREALIZED FAIR VALUE MOODYS/FITCH/S&P RATE VALUE DATE DATE MATURITY COST VALUE GAIN (LOSS) OPERATING FUNDS City National Bank Deposits 39,309,683 A3/BBB+ N/A N/A County Treasurers Pooled Investment Fund 416,589,733 Aaa-bf/AAAN1 N/A 0.39 % Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 3,625,194 Not Rated N/A N/A Subtotal Operating Funds 459,524,610 FUNDS HELD IN TRUST County Treasurers Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund 92,955,956 Aaa-bf/AAAN1 N/A 0.39% Subtotal Funds Held in Trust 92,955,956 COMMISSION MANAGED PORTFOLIO US Bank Money Market First American Government Obligation Fund 9,654,621 Aaa-bf/AAAN1 N/A N/A Cost of Issuance Fund BNY Mellon Money Market - Subtotal Commission Managed Portfolio 9,654,622 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 91 CIP Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund 47,738,234 See attached report for details Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund 245,805,561 See attached report for details Series A & Series B Reserve Fund 17,848,146 See attached report for details Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund 28,835,072 See attached report for details Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund 94,730,325 See attached report for details Subtotal STAMP Portfolio TOTAL All Cash and Investments- $ 997,092,525 434,957,337 500,000,000 450,000,000 400,000,000 350,000,000 I 300,000,000 250,000,000 i 200,000,000 I 150,000,000 i 100,000,000 50,000,000 Nature of Investments ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Reserve ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Project Fund j ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Capitalized I Interest ■ Commission Managed Portfolio Debt Reserve ■ Trust Funds ■ Operating Funds i Portfolio Investment Type 43.54% Fixed Income 0.97% Mutual 0.06% Money Funds Market Funds 0.36% LAIF 55.05%County I Pool/Cash I 70 71 • ATTACHMENT 2 STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2014 • +n li 54 ter Cnriert F.na rtt i Ate 41,4,14, Ea41 4 All PaO,- \I.111.r1 H.+tea` 1,4 11441 1 in ratirvii Cant 1 11, t } rrdd t.'rortit Rating 347625 LC -Pro cct Fund-2 Senior lien 3130A0S92 A enc .era `ome .an :., i • o mane 08/14/2017 02/28/2014 2,000,000.00 2,002,800.00 05/14/2014 1,991,700.00 (9,972.22) 1.300 1.426 AAA 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 x3 3137EACA5 A-enc 3135GOKB8 A;en i mai Home Loan Mortgage Corporation e.eral anon Mortgage Association 03/27/2019 07/05/2013 04/16/2019 08/01/2013 800,000,00 175,000.00 875,900.00 17'7,2.57.50 04/16/2014 872,600.00 175,187.25 5,939.86 3.750 1.838 2.750A0 180 AAA AAA i 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GO1A2 A;enc Federal National Mortgage Association 04/27/2017 575,000.00 574,886.75 577,880.75 2,844.39 1.125 0.959 AAA • E 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 3133XC E6 Agency CMG •,eral Home Loan Banks Office o trance 97/28/2015 08/13/2013 157,978.64 166,272.51 165,984.52 1,340.07 5.250 0.735 AAA 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-t c 3137B03W2 A;enc CMO Fe. ral Home Loan Mortgage orporauon 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 31395MLT4 Agency CMO Fe. eml ., me Loan Mortgage orporanon 08/25/2017 07/31/2013 06/15/2019 07/15/2013 45,000.00 159,156.26 44,964.84 161,742.55 45 223.56 159,869.28 260.38 1.426 1.226 161.30) 4.500 0.617 AAA AAA .t 40492110M'`iit 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I :k t an Mortgage Corporation 3137AUPE3 A; CMO F ,m ai Home .an mortgage orporahon 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 `.4l%, 347623 e<r ..7. is A encv CMO LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ANLP8 A;enc CMO Federal Home loan ortgage .rporation era 'ome .an •ortgage orporatton g; 06/25/2022 07/03/2013 09/25/2021 08/15/2013 11/252016 07/09/2013 235,000.00 2 0.839 455,733.75 930,000.00 443,770.74 939,227.34 446,400.78 944,282.01 1,669.05 1.459 1.960 7,364.01 1.655 0.974 AAA AAA 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393EXC8 A; n CMO e. era show !ortgage •ssomahon 09/25/2018 07/242013 70,42334 74,450.67 74,233.66 198.92 4.500 0.842 AAA 3136A7M18 ,Agency CMO ederal atmnal Mortgage Association 12/25/2019 08/20/2013 175,000,00 172,402.34 174,57(138 1,839.78 1.520 1.565 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A C.. italized Interest 31392FPP6 Agenc CMO ,era ,aho mortgage ssomation 11/252017 07/15/2013 346,527.44 366,994.21 365,267.64 948.93 5.000 0.639 AAA 4.44 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca,' alized interest 31392F6C6 A; ncv CMO 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca italized Interest 3136A4M89 A;,, CMO 1 anon Mortgage Associ anonortgage omahon 01/25/2019 07/052013 665,965.82 670,206.15 56,626.45 670,20136 1,376.39 5.000 0.638 659.30 1.934 1.713 AAA AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Canalized Interest 3136ACGF2 A;enc CMO F•.era Nanona Mortgage Association 02/252016 07/152013 2,287 481.62 2,293,200.33 2,302,945.00 11,398.76 1.083 0.662 AAA 7 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376LE39 A;- CMO overnment ational Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass -Through Securities 12/20/2038 07/08/2013 42,248.19 42,789.50 43,254.12 646.27 4.000 -0.118 AAA 4, 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 A:en CMO The Government Nationa Mortgage Association Guaranteed REM1C Pass-Throagh Securities 04/20/2039 07/03/2013 156,512.39 160,229.56 161,234.37 1,246.52 3.000 2.120 AAA d 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CMO - c Goverment ationa ortgage Association Guaranteed REM1C Pass -Through Securities 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 285,121.81 285,164.80 284,883.17 222.90 2.500 2.500 AAA rl:%YAIF:i_cS1S9 S I:i.BlL: 196.08) 2.075 1.519 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Cap italized Interest 3128H4NR6 Aen MBS 205091001 -2013 A Ca. italized Interest 3132 AK7 A:enc MBS .'d ,13 11:=31 r11Sfr8711; ome .an •ort±race , ,or i 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31416YX12 A enc MBS ,era anon ortgage Association 08/01/2026 07/03/2013 81,558.80 85,394.61 85,591.07 304.38 3.500 2.072 AAA 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 h? 3136AEYG6 �S Agency MBS Federa ationa ortgage Association 06/252018 11/20/2013 170,000.00 171,341.41 170,066.81 (1,152.12) 1.825 1.790 AAA 72 Page 2 of 22 • STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2014 Source CCotr9t 4rcouru tdentiFier Secutity'I s{+e airtorY P.urrr tinat Current Fact. \i:rtrt0 't i:rd+• (late t nlur Oriental ('••YI Nitre Kase Net -root Nest 3..all liar \I.0 I.et I ntralia:4 Su ntuarirrri \'aloe (:3111:1u, Coupon 't Credit Eating 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 40428E1Q3 Conoratc Hsbc Bank 11 A 04/0J/2014 13,486,000.00 13,871,230.45 13,486,000.00 (0.01) 4.625 4.625 A r, 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 46625HHN3 Corporate 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 48121CYK6 Con orate 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 59156RAH1 Corporate e2 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 I ntemst 59217GAC3 4 �w Cor • orate 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 67021CAB3 Co •orate v� .LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Licn 693476BK8 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 74432QAE5 x, 1PMorgan Chase & o. JPMorgan hale :ank, National Association MetLife, Inc. Metropolitan Life Global Funding I ectrrc ompany 06/O1/2014 01/07/2014 1,500,000.00 1,525,320.00 10/01/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 341,424.00 O6/15/2014 07/08/2013 2,087,000.00 2,181,269.79 09/29/2015 07/03/2013 740,000.00 766,284.80 04/15/2014 07/10/2013 7,900,000.00 8,161,332.00 1,510,470.00 ri ;3 r (406.90) 4.650 0.452 341,736.00 7,120.52 6.000 1875 2,107,598.69 :• 760,024.40 366.71) 5.500 0.681 2,318.76 FE 2.500 0.677 7,911,613.00 (1,798.97) 4.875 1.069 AA A 1� Co •orate Prudentia Financial, Inc. 09/20/2014 07/09/2013 2,686,000.00 2,820,407.44 2,744,420.50 5,410.79 5.100 0.456 A 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 74977RBQ6 Corporate •abo•. Nederland 05/13/2014 02/212014 455,000.00 458,876.60 456,983.80 (158.53) 4.200 0.454 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca• italized Interest 74977RBQ6 Co •orate Rabobank Nederland 05/132014 1,220,000.00 1,232,554.40 1,225,319.20 389.15) 4.200 0.454 AA tw `x. .lu!2::.».:. :: 1 re..13.2: 5 .,._k 11 .`U..Ud...q .'g`.,r.' 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 21686CAD2 Corporate ts' Rabo • ank Neder and O1/192017 2,000,000.00 2,103,900.00 2,120,360.00 37,032.83 3.375 1.183 -1•2 AA 1 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca• italized Interest 78008K5V1 Co .orate •oy. tank Canada 04/192016 07/082013 2,000 000.00 2,099,900.00 2,084,820.00 10,679.49 2.875 0.785 AA 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38143HSC6 • •orate e o • an . c oup, • c. 02/072016 07/03/2013 600,000.00 627,936.00 628,368.00 8,152.86 3.625 1.038 A 347628 LC-PF-2 Sates Tax Revenue Bond 38141EA33 Co .orate The ol• :,, achs oup, Inc. 05/01/2014 07/092013 5 000 000,00 5,208,235.00 5,022,000.00 470.64 6.000 0.699 A 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 842587CE5 Co •orate -�e ou cm ompany 05/152014 07/102013 2,100,000.00 2,160,648.00 2,109,219.00 360.92 4.150 0.547 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca • orate Tote api Intetaa0on 06/28/2017 07/08/2013 160,000.00 157 203091001 LC-20I3 A Ca • italized Interest 89233P610 Co •orate 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca lurked Interest 90327aCW7 Co •orate oyota r otor re t orpor apna orp 2.250 1.423 •r.?lI11111111111111111111r14 7RF7i Y5'1C.n:11hYf1,1014 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 0533311DM9 Co •orate CP ens ergo ompany 'um •tie, no. 10/012014 07/03/2013 04/212014 03/2,72014 3,500,000.00 3,628,730.00 6,000,000.00 5,999,230.02 3,559,675.00 5,999,112.00 7,098.91 3.750 0.334 (154.69) AA 347628 LC-PF-2 Safes Tax Revenue Bond 05634CDG8 CP :acar• . .A., c. 04/16/2014 03/27/2014 8,000,000.00 7,999,217.76 7,999,056.00 (210.65) 0.000 0.283 AA 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 13638XD80 CP 'enaction Natural Resources Landed 04/08/2014 03/04/2014 1,500,000.00 1,499,617.50 1,499,878.50 (42.75) 0.000 0.417 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 1248C3D27 CP corporation 04/02/2014 03/25/2014 1,000,000.00 999,957.22 999,955.00 (38.89) 0.000 1.627 AA T 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 15103HE77 CP e gene orporotion 05/07/2014 03/182014 1,000,000.00 999,666.67 999,722.00 (38.00) 0.000 0.278 AA 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 262441/371 CP a nergy orporanon 04/072014 03/14/2014 250,000.00 249,965.00 249,981.25 (10.00 0.000 0.451 AA LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KDA5 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 27886ME66 CP cola, •e. 051062014 03/052014 1,500,000.00 1499, 64.59 1,499,596.50 (38.92 O.000 0.277 AA 347625 LC-Proeet Fund-2 Senior Lien 2925A3DR6 CP e ,ergy 'attnera, 04/252014 03/032014 . 1,500,000.00 1,499,328,33 1,499,722.50 32.50 0.000 0.278 AA 347625 LC-Proect Fu••-2 Senior Lien 44890N655 CP ' moat • pi 05 052014 03 12/2014 2,000,000,00 1,'99,381.67 1 999,4110.00 123.34) 0.000 0.276 AA 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 60920WE22 CP Monde ez Worn -tonal, c. 05/02/2014 03/03/2014 1,500,000.00 1 499:325.00 1,499,647.50 (3.75) 0.000 0.273 AA 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 78355BDVI CP Ry• ystem, nc. 04/292014 03/272014 200,000.00 199,963.33 199,957.80 (11.09) 0.000 0.271 AA 347625 LC -Project Fund-2 Senor Lien 8873111371 Time arm a•le Inc. 04/072014 03/04/2014 1,500,000.00 1,499,656.25 1,499,887.50 (50.00) t 0.000 0.451 AA 74 Page 4 of 22 STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2014 `�etr.r 5 r4 ouut tu•auu �eanill l y,t. ld.•uulira t.rtram� h.urr t 0n.a 7,.n. I1.0r t}r lom ;j t .. . hi 4 ";•ll Dutc t ttt,,,iit,a uvuev,:od i,:no 1 ,,,, t ..tq,mt 1 ti Stl [ rvdit R,um, 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 61747C715 MM Fund .. gan .., . : sututona mut.. ty un• s 03/31/2014 03/27/2014 0.00 1,850.11 1,850.11 0.00 0.040 0.040 AAA rgan t:• .3, sututtona Ltq • 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca •italized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund ♦ : r el ' count and 03/31/2014 0.00 98,996.42 98,996.42 0.00 0.000 0.000 ' NA iZ1IID'IISSIY�:i)'#tl�'1111.11.1111111111111111111111n1. LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 235219/52 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 407288YD5 Muni 'am ton, ounty . 12/01/2015 07/18/2013 6 r 000.00 630,000.00 632 545.20 2,545.20 0.803 0.559 AA li ,} g 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 407288YD5 Muni am ton, ounty o 12/01/2015 07/182013 6,645,000.00 6,645,000.00 6,671,845.80 26,845.80 0.803 0.559 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca • ita0zed Interest 64966H4E7 Muni .y ew ork, rty o 10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170,000.00 1,238,222.70 1,236,397.50 9,268.80 3.140 1.471 AA 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912833K110 US Gov Treasury, [rote• tales i•epartmento O5/152018 07/052013 380,000.00 353,517.80 357,401.40 14.71 0.000 1.492 AAA 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, Um,.• tates Department of 11/30/2017 07/052013 1,450,000.00 1,408,992,19 1,417,708.50 2,048.65 0.625 1.248 AAA 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828VG2 US Gov 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828SY7 US Gov reasury, nt fates s epartment o 06/15/2016 07/052013 2,200,000,00 2,188,398.44 1t7 0710l0 2,198,625.00 7,358.77 0.500 0.528 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 912828VK3 US Gov .reasury, irate. tales repartmento 06/302018 07/052013 3,500,000.00 3,483,730.47 3,483,595.50 (2,450.47) 1.375 1.489 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca •italized Interest 912828SY7 US Gov .. rcasury, TruE-i tea Department 05/31/2017 07/052013 12,000,000.00 11,780,156.25 11,861,280.00 40,544.12 0.625 0.997 47628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAY6 VRDN or, ew ' . .s me sepanment o 11/01/2020 11/04/2013 4,190,000,00 4,190,000,00 04/022014 4,190,000.00 0.00 0.150 0.150 430,992,145.49 *Difference due to rounding ($8.13) • 438,874,648.68 434,957,346,04 664,582.42 Pag of 22 • • STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2014 -P.-4. ..-� 7ir'x TO a-411-1t"-;117. f.a�s ate ATTACHMENT 3 76 Page 8 of 22 STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31. 2014 ' “—TEfil.=- . --- lx^Vncommu na sL—b:.- —Z=.,.+i'. —3 IM- •:,u0So a �r-=-fir—l" - ZZ 10 a 088d 8L b40Z pepu • Jepenb Jo;;un000y Aq oHo;Jod dLNYIS • • STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2014 Seam lcc•amt Ara nett Identifier loxta it} lipv Cd. _te, 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized lnteresI 31393EXC8 A.ency CMO anon Mortgage 'ssoeranon 7 in,1 l):ifiniir tl om1"�,rr )1 W)r)l.d+' YAW 09/25/2018 07/24/2013 633.810.01 Ut i lo.r (nii R3,, li a rFe+ + Mite t ,duo 670,056.03 668,103 4 Haw Net totrt ( nseap.ed t.atrrt +, +uuua cuued i 0141.1 1 icitt C Irdit Having 1,792.82 4.500 0.842 AAA 20309/001 LC-2013 A Ca•nahzed Interest 3136ACGF2 A e CMO a : ortgage Association 02/25/2016 07/15/2013 2,287,481.62 2 293 200.33 2,302 945.00 11398.76 1.083 0,662 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 3128MBTH0 e cy MBS t^,z Ages MBS ' ederal Federal ome Loan Mortgage Corpomnon ome Loan Mortgage Corporation 05/012018 07/16/2013 166,204.02 176,072.3'8 03/012019 07262013 202770.05 214,936.26 176,249.39 215,023.44 1,288.26 5.000 0.635 1,044.34 5.000 0.981 AAA AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalzed Interest 3132FEAK7 A, ncv MBS 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128GNR59 Ae. MBS 205091001 LC-2013 A C •italmed Interest 3140 ency mai •an ortraee prmmti Pg. 12/0 10/01 07/112013 525.151 10 7,252.93 567,327.30 559.585.26 (3 581.06) 6.000 1.558 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca naked Interest 31381QLL8 A_e MBS edeml Nation -mortgage Association 205091001 LC-2013 A . •italized Interest 36200AFG9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 03/012016 07/112013 935,771.87 - 970,705.80 11/152017 07/092013 103,130_69 109,898.6 The Government National Mortgage Association 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 38376GWZ9 A.e MBS Guaranteed REMIC Pass-M..8h Secunbes 08/162031 07/112013 2,593,967.69 2,595,791.58 05091001 LC-2013 A Ca•nalized'merest 44328MAL8 Co ••mte H3: Ba 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 59217GAV1 203091001 LC-2013 A Ca.taized Interest 74977RB6 Co "rate Metro"Man ife Global Flmding I 205091001 LC-2013 A ..itnlized Interest 21686CAD2 Corporate Rab••ank e. . ,. 05091001 LC-2013 A Ca•lalized Interest 822582AC6 Co ••rate 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest 89114AE8 Co ••rate She 1 creational Finance B.V. 05/24/2016 -- 3,625000.00 3,7 9,30 23 06292015 07/31/2013 545000.00 01/19/2017 553 763.60 2,000000.00 2,103,900.00 03/22/2017 07/08/2013 400 000.00 449,936.00 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89233P610 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 07/17/2015 07/03/2013 5,000,000.00 5 014,650.00 205091001 LC-20,,13 A Ca•italized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U. Bank oney M. Account F r.>a•.:xL:• a'.w�.-:-.`.'ens ub. i ... :Y 3 �1-,1>ak!:"�?&,' 203091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 2352191S2 Muni 203091001 LC-20i3 A Ca ambzed Interest 64966H4E7 Muni 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalzed Interest 912828UA6 US Gov 205091001 LC-2013 A Capialized interest x912828SY7 US Gov • 03/31/2014 0.00 98,996.42 956,182.85 2,603,902.59 3,792,982.50 552 183.10 2,120 360.00 446 924.00 5,028,550.00 (10,184.58) 3.295 3.224 10,229.58 36,765.97 1,427.25 1.864 0.978 3.1001 0.915 1.700 0.635 37,032.83 3.375 1.183 r 6,520.12 5.200 1.176 AA 19,139.88 0.875 0.432 AA 9: 996.42 0.00 0.000 0.000 i NA Dallas, ity of 02/152017 07/10/2013 2,135,000.00 2, 135,000.00 --- 2,178,916.95 43,916.95 1,589 0.862 AA N ) ork, ity • 10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170000.00 1,238,222.70 -•- 1,236,397.50 9,268.80 3.140 1.471 I AA Treasury, m fates Department o 11/302017 07/052013 2,250,000.00 2,18G,367.t9 -- 2,199,892.50 3, 178.94 0.625 1,248- AAA Treasury, nited tales Departmen of 05/31/2017 07/05/2013 1 000,000.00 11,780,156.25 --- 11,861,280.00 40,344.12 0.625 0.997 AAA - _ 94.730J25.35 • • Page 9 of 22 125 903.75 (43.94) (233.56) 125,626.25 I.7.1101...!.4.22STOTEritlEIMtriZZIMPARDEMEMIOdiliarrhEittRat1744541.1rg570411N.1{'.!7IMPliffiliin34'2171;3'10W71'MANIN152•?ilEPPRII°iF:4111M11111iMMOTW7'W 01',:1;17771.411111;1?-!tii1i111I:A74,11MigULAINSeja0317103 1347621 bo,44i oo GNR 2010-166 GP LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter. ended March 31, 2014 ATTACHMENT 4 • tts," 11..tse f t4110Vt. 1“ "41,-Iflt 0" II,Iimttots. it,is, It.tst" Ni.1(11v ite4., 'Lei i •11.1 Re dytuf %Alf."( tirlittto kr N,1 I ,,,,,fitof i n.tutp. ts,,... V. t 64.11 ‘4.41Mtli. Identlfrer le•St tlp.i.1 N441;111 NAM. 11,1s, PM 4 it,Ist, Itil,t. '...itt , .1.1 It( it. ittnttlIt$, It.,..' P.C. dux o, t,„flot 1, IA t flt.11 1,,,tol i 41,, ‘1,11,4t 1 Mut, r7,W. ..---7-'•-:', •--111.7F--, r.- 7.1',.-7, "':,,-,"7-7-`1'7•777,32--, •• Yr.'r' - • . - . 1347621 347621 1347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 61747C7I5 38376LE39 3137B03W2 PRIME -IN 948 13964 44655030 (1 392 839.83) 1,850.11 1 GNR 2011-104 BN "S"'"" stsr19:!•• ' • ••• .1„. • „ 60 110.03 (15 499 50) (154 22) (89 90) . . (111230) 43 254 12 1 , FHMS K502 A2 45 14130 (0.62) 82.88 45,223.56 1347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B6ZL8 FHMS K714 Al 61 199 32 '&12F,IIRIF:fttIARity,t5I27tr1.1.1,17,1"caI.A.1,ii40.4.114.1..II.'',..");..:).""Alakilitlitti.V.1IIA":..n.7.117:1,012.g,".1.",:nglIFIT,I111Itit.",1S14:,,,A,,,,,,JIIII1IIIIIIII111141:II:IkIII111'..1.',.17,1,I!,t,"S:!:,t',:,i...tiagitgAIgiAt.sp,w"...ttlfss.trrrrtrr, --r.",,,-----(.879.3°) 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 1347621 (17.48) (40.66) (196.08) 60,065.80 ! 85,591.07 FANNIE MAE 1347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135G0.1A2 31398AXJ6 31416Y)02 FN AB3380 FANNIE MAE 88,836.39 150,478.50 3,314.01) 166 281.70 (5 303.67) 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AQT24 FHMS K708 A2 169,304.70 7;i (154.86) 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOKB8 FANNIE MAE 176,016.75 '347621 347621 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 31395EZP5 31398VWC6 314I7YKF3 FHR 2835 MD FHR 3653 AT FN MA0293 FEDERAL HO 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 313381H24 BANK 1347621 LC SI: Reserve F dl 1347621 1347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 3128MMAK9 FG G18009 31418AFW3 912833KRO 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3I37A7E22 -Jrren Reserve Nun e- FN MAI080 STRIPS E LOAN 220 487 16 275,996.12 242 369 28 250 175.00 20 904 75) (61,831.65) (10 052.46) 286 346 75 21,373 54) -" (119.56) 144 88 (1,157.94) 365 676 52 355,159.40 FHR 3804 DA 414 286 (18,515.78) (9,986.51 77 39 (1 302.92 (579.84 512.10 (24.4'7) 95.38) (39.88) (82.93) 318.94 2.38 438.84 161 234 37 111"),''', • .1.I7.."'".:1ti-1t1i!T:;:•1t".,1";.1.".:1;.:071X..32KaillIC:raii 67.06 1,614.23 170,851.87 K"'"" -.SE::1!"-•'.:!?.•;31111PTIP.;,!'.;.1.7.71.0111r4Valigr4:11 792.31) 408 19) (1,174.86) (296.55) (41 42) 647.58) 341.60) / 308.83 (1,093.99 68.52) 64.96 347621 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOIA2 912828KQ2 NNIE US TREASURY NM 451 750.50 532 812 50 (1,629.60 (37.19 (556 83) 431.81 1,705.86 83.92 1 115.82 734.22 933.17 (582.12) 1,050.95 439.04 2,137.10 173 187.25 197 472 51 212263.49 233,148.74 ! 250,217.50 264 138 53 346,973.52 ! ' 357 401.40 1 396,758.04 433 893.07 432,254.50 533.320.00 1 543.41 12 398.09 538 719.50 1 len Reserve runa- i • , 47621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I Subtotal - 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 347623 LC -Sr fen Ob Fund -I Interest ••••--i • • •••1...,".:. ..„, 347623 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Ftmd- I Interest ' LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 912828VB3 23333GA61 • 65475MAF7 78355BRIO US TREASURY NB DTEEnerti Com. n Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation Ryder System, Inc. 3 154 655.00 17 652,656.42 599 964.00 749 910:00 5 564 71 82 202 29 3 242 421 00 ; 1,836,836.53 799,843.55 1 453,819.52 600 000.00 750 000 00) (800,000.00) (305,574.77) 10,251.82 (5,125.64) 15.00 78 75 156.45 133,426.13 2 .00 II 25 17,848,147.33 ' - MORGAN STANLEY LIQ 1347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 61747C715 PRIME -IN . . . 3,508,944.28 (3,630,816.55) 53,593.70 80 Page 10 of 22 STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2014 ',lit 4T L."OM(' A...font I44.0'1 6 Ito:ripa„n 347623 LC Sr Licn Ob Fund-1 Interest 314021.BG3 FN 735439 & en;u t4IT 1;.1.: him h, . l ;doh 186,993.81 13.1-4! tt 60rl4- 11.r..• h,1t,. .,u,l itr41w410i„414. 11.144! It.4 9 797.4 8.1..• Et:nr t haata 1u Ne+, i.•Int K. .,tined .t,ovuarnuou \. ♦rt t u 4.44<41 1,328.1 575.7 491.59 4 udi,te. R,t.,• 11;o 1,..4 l.thlc 165 784.01 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A4M89 FNA 2012-M3 2A1 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05565 CCO BP CAPITAL MARKETS PLC 1347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 48121CYK6 JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA • 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31385JLF3 FN 545826 347623 347623 {347623 047623 1347623 a i347623 ,yx4 1347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest ;347623 t347623 1347623 i347623 �yA ' i `347623 347623 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest LC -Sr Lien ObFund-1Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 rInterest +w LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 48I21CJM9 233851AT1 61746BDG8 928670AJ7 38143USC6 I72967FD8 59217GAC3 FHMS K019 AI JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA DAIMLER F WANCE NA LLC MORGAN STANLEY VOLKSWAGEN INTL FIN NV GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC T•; CITIGROUP INC it z LIFE GLOB FUNDING I Canadian Natural Resources 36162WAC1 GEET 2013-1 A3 3I37ANLP8 FHMS K501 Agg2, 263534BX6 E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS ABBEY NATL TREASURY LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 00279VCA1 SERV LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UA6 US TREASURY NM LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828SY7 >mJ •� a' ` 347623 LC -Pro 'ectFund-2Senior Lien 01854WB60 AlhanceBemeeinL,P, 347625 LC-Pro'cct Pund-2Semor Lien 01854WB78 MhanceB=stem L.P. 347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 05333UCS7 AutoZone, Inc. 347625 LC-Pro'e0t Fund-2 Senior Lien 05635NBS9 Bacardi Corporation 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien r 1248C3AA2 CBS Corporation 347625 t Fund-2 Senior Lien 17181 BANG CIGNA Corporation 974 997.29 7¢9;997.92 1 499 807.51 449 950,13 210 745.55 295,440.00 343,236.00 454 905.67 497,375.00 500,355,00 506,710.00 606 768.00 629,688.00 646,081.50 762,148.20 874.776.88 924,580.98 942,982.80 996,312.50 1,027,310.00 1 413 750.00 2 960,850.00 4 605.43) 51 158.00 9 064.69 25.7 3,245.13) 223.13 3 299,712.90 2,499,582.50 975 )00: 0. 1,500 000.00) 450 OOO) (3,300,000.00) (2,500,000.00) ( (69.43 434.46 2,324.52) 318.56) 370.72 611.71 197 47 301.85 (1,050.73 (2,645.54) (4,758.75) (2,92356) 177.18 383.67 801.39) (9,460.63) (6,527.61) 2,260.44 3,437.56 2.71 192.49 49,87 189.75 422.92 (167.10) 2 934.54 824.52 1,422.00 34.03 (546.71) 2,252.53 (5y61.85) 1,098.73 1,325.54 226.93) 799.76 (24.94) 366.30 2, 100.60 1.081 63 352.39) 1 698.06 1,026.44 97.35 205,877.83 298.809.00 341,736.00 364,059.97 446,400.78 497,440.00 502,805.00 306,450.00 606 816.00' 628,3(,8.00 641,0'5.82 .yr'x t 760,024.40 874,929,13 92e 510.95 944,282,0.,11^�I 987.933.50 1,020,430,00 i s 1417,708.50 I 2,963,3 4.00 »! Page 11 of 22 • STAMP Portfolio transactions Report by'Account Quarterindeci March 31, 2014 • m otitis Bent,tn if R:r�e Put t hake , R:wa gal Woe .4auo'tt1 deny! 13a Ea, Raac (tr:rur;e to Net lordf Reakied tuna tiaatlnnR. Nei lbrr,dind (s41'I.a=. rt 0401 htelina, Base at:trt.ts Value I �q 347625 347625 ,347625 !347625 347625 347625 347625 347625 347625 c emo LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lie LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ea Fund-2 Senior Lien LC Pro ec[ Fund-2 Senior Lien LC•Pro'ec[ Fund-2 Senior Lien Hm 20911UB40 Consolidated Edison, In 2574PIC34 23333GCX0 262441A66 27743KA34 27743KAV2 27743KC65 532457BE7 3134G31U5 Dominion Resources, Inc, DTE Energy Company Duke Energy Corporation Eastman Chemical Company Eastman Chemical Company Eastman Chemical Company ELI LILLY & CO FREDDIE MAC 1 999,880.00 1,799,928.00 2 152,623.00 1,999,930.00 2 299,620.50 1,149,750.20 1,999,816.66 1,799,933.99 1 005 690.00 2 000,000.00) (2 000 000.00) 2,300,000.00) 1,150,000.00) (2,000,000.00) 1,800,000.00) (2,000,000.00) 1,800,000.00) 1 000 000.0 (2,150,000.00) 0.00 293.34 70.00 379.50 249.80 61.11 29.00 183.34 66.01 690.00 2505.99) 58.89 43.00 (117.01) 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 3779013AM3 Glencore Fundin_ LLC 1,999,680.00 (2,000,000.00) 500.00 (180.00) 347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 37790BCC3 347625 347625 i347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 49455BAA0 ;try t 5716311A89 65475NAD0 Glencore Puna] LLC Kinder Morgan Energy Partners L.P. Marriott International, Inc. NALT 201I-B A3 3 999 652.00 1,299,905. 10 123,505.59 1,999,220.00 2,000,000.00 (4,000,000.00 (1,300 000.00 (123,472.38) (16.58) 780.00 249.99 63. 19 (18.79) 98.01 31.71 2.16 347625 LC-PrOecl Fund-2 Senior Lien 65475MAD2 Nissan Motor Acccvtan ce Corporation 3,999,572.00 (4,000,000.00) 333.33 94.67 347625 347625 47625 47625 47625 347625 347625 347625 347625 ro ccuna-emor mn LC -Pro et Fund -2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund -2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 74005PAS3 78573FAH2 90327BAB8 9255M3AD2 91842MBC5 929903AE2 89231NAC7 r*r 92867KAC8 ctat Corp. PRAXAIR INC Sa miller Holdings Inc. USAOT 2012-1 A2 Viacom Inc VW Credit, Inc. ACHOVIA CORP TAOT 2012-B A3 VWALT 2012-AYA3 a MORGAN STANLEY LIQ PRIME IN 3,999,468.00 1,513,275.00 135 408.80 949,947.22 1,999 661.66 60G 464.00 220,051.56 542 203.84 5,74 (40, 190,545.71) (1,500,000.00) (1 500,000.00) (4,000,000.00) 950,000.00 135,403.51) ' (105,766.23) (257.69) 0.00 3.28 27.08 (13,275.00) 480.00 2.01 52.78 338.34 0.00 (6,464.00 (I 1.31) (200.63) 52.00 (141.57) 435,837.72 466,928.41 j 82 Page 12 of 22 1347628 ,nutzc 1. fount 1. roust 1 Iintitirr 347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 844730AG6 1347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 1347625 LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 347625 347625 347625 Tri��,yTq• 347625 LC-Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 347625 1347625 ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien 25 LC- Proect Fund-2 Senior Lien 347625 347625 347623 347625 347625 ;347625 1347628 J.f_M 347628 1347628 1347628 1347628 347628 347628 347628 LC -Pro LC -Pro Irs LC -Pro LC -Pro cl Fund -2 Senior Lien ct Fund -2 Senior Lien �ct Fund-2 Senior Lien c[ Fund -2 Senior Lien LC -Pro ect Fund-2 Senior Lien LC -Project Fund-2 Senior len LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Saks Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Saks Tax Revemt • e Boo dnd LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond ales Tax Revenue Bond 26244/1371 14 NCI rpm” RUS Duke Ene - Corporation 15103HE77 Celgene Corporation s`.:4•c: 89231NAC7 025821FV7 AMXCA 2009-2 A 17308BAN8 27886ME66 05333UDM9 3 TAOT 2012-B A COMN12009-A 17 A I7 Ecolab Inc. minion Resources, Inc AutoZone Inc " astmanChemica l Company 88731JD71 Time Warner Cable Inc. 209111EW9 CONS EDISON CO OF NY 91159HGR5 US BANCORP 97689RAH7 WI HSG-VAR-TXB-B-MFH 44890NE55 36159LBN5 01854WB60 01854WB78 05333UCS7 05634FC56 1248C3AA2 Hyundai Capital America AlhanceBermstem L.P. AlhanceBernstem L.P. AutoZone, Inc. Bacardi -Martini B.V. CBS Corporation 2003A3AH7 , mcast Corporation 2091IUB40 CottsolidatedEdi 26244JA66 c. Duke Energy Corporation 27743KA67 Eastman Chemical Company 27743K1318 Eastman Chemical Company 3134G4FL7 FREDDIE MAC STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2014 Nt � innot:,• Nas,• 11 it Err l.dr,c 1 815 000.00 2 999 739.00 3 999468. 7.999.520.00 8,199,508.00 It.rve Pur, l� 749.895.00 999,666.67 1,000 664.06 1 006,992,19 1 393, 189.45 1,499,364.59 1,499,420.00 1499.807.51 1,499,656.25 1,516,470.00 1,520,655.0e 1 999 381.67 2,004,062.50 5,999 983.32 824,992.15 9,998 716.70 2 999,929.17 7,699. 105. 94 8,002,824.00 8 It `A it• I.; t• it at it t tt t• 6 000 000.00) 2,825 000.00 (10,000 f00.00 3 000 000.00 (3,000 000.00 1t 000,004,00 000,000.00) 200,000.00 (7,700,000.00) (8,000,000.00) 1.., , w:,,.: ;r.rne,• to t huut tir 4u,41 \. art 4 ut e,t4irt •t S nduw_ Kaffir Lit 3.rl,n 650,0, 8.72 (6,515.79 87.82) 78.75 (30.00) 93.33 (38.00) 83.20 (79.86 (2,609.99) 143.80 6,021.49) 270.83 280.00 9.17 281.25 281 25 (16,470.00) 2.94 (38.92) 749,943.75 999,722.00 l 1000,501.00 1,004,526.00 1.387.1 0.90 1,499.396.30 40.50) 1,499,659,50 (38.68) 1499,778.00 (45.73) 1,499 860 30 (50.00) 499 887 50 1,500.000.00 13,38444) (460.56) 1,506,810,00 221 67 (1,713.87) 16.68 7.85 1,283.30 70.83 172.50 444 45 - 350,00 244.45 330.27 894.06 (2,824.00) (123.34) (48.63) 88.50 8755 235.55 1,815.0t0.00 1 999.480,00 2,002,3 t0,00 Page 13 of 22 • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter --ended March 31, 2614 • Sour.e 347628 t+ LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bon I+icntitier 36162 Irr>i riptun+ Beuitntiaq Bast ttnrhet lallat Raw I B.tse 114 e 3 MM it., and Hetl+vuptr;xi3+n+ (126 923.90 B:+.. Base to No 1 okt itcalired , toorlirati++n'ir Net t nl eal-ved I salute Bake ;It ,.sa (17.58) rteiitut t.:tinTna, Market Valor 20.07) 26.19) 1347628 '347628 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 41282KBK3 581557AW5 59156RAW8 Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc. MCKESSON CORP METLIFE INC 47628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61747WAD1 MORGAN STANLEY Nissan Motor Acceptance 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 65475MC40 Co +oration 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 47628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 347628 1347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 73754MC38 88166DAA4 92343VBAI Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. TEVA PHARM FM III VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS 9255M3AD2 Viacom Inc 4 606 293.00 8 114.661.00 9 081,791.00 5 014,800.00 13,883,767.11 2,599,818.00 2,299,085.75 4 999 933.33 8,499,527.74 2,600,000.00) 4,575 000.00 9 070,000.00) 2,300,000.00) (5,000 000.00 5,000 000.00 (13,833,000.00) (8,500,000,00 182.00 (32,661.79) (14,891.7 (1 I,036.67) 914.25 66.67 14 122.28 0.01 0.00 0.00) (48,014.18) (2,752.92) 472.26 1,368.79 230.75 754.33) (677.72 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Rev ;�"; 9I842MC42 VW Credit, Inc. 7 999,848.88 8,000,000.00) 347628 347628 (347628 347628 347628 1347628 Yb ;347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond ..> � •ai PLC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 43814AAC7 36159LBN5 31395MLT4 26244.11371 40428EJQ3 025821FY I 17308BAN8 HAROT 2011-2 A3 GEDFT 2011-1 A FHA 2930 AN Duke Energy Corporation HSBC BANK USA AMXCA 2011-1 B COMNI 2009-A 17 A 17 58,604.40 135.182.25 275,645.77 708.220.30 1,002,341.00 1,035,937.50 35,312.07 114 192.83 (18.08 (977.49 (14.53) (96.29 (873.42) 26.25 (6 671.95 (374.35 (8,909.17 03.06) 319.47 18 161.92 (1,2,04.03) 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314ACI MMAF 2012-AA A3 1.155.692.92 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2925A3DR6 ':cot h kxL ..':; •. ",. ' p�1 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 17308BAL2 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Band 36I59JCS8 347628 347628 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 1347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 38141GCM4 842587CE5 74432QAE5 27743KDA5 Enbn ge energy Partners, L P. COMM 2009-A13 A l3 GEMNT 2012.1 A GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC SOUTHERN CO PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL 324 406.69 1 50 1 709,782.53 2 084 500,00 21 541.83) (34.93) 69.29 267.26 (10.00) (548.35) 9.35 505.67 468.80 28.71 927.91 2 876.63 23,224.80 135,155.25 159,869.28 . Y 249,981.25 701 000.00 1,001,976.00 1,027,534.00 6 :�1 1,155,458.66 1324,754.88 1,619, 114?49 1,711 455.13 (1,018.17 2,061,940.00 x,d,-; ,4:4,441:at INC Eastman Chemical Company 2 128,014.00 2,771,790.84 2,999,250.00 84 (18, 118.81) 28,031.52 562.50 (676.19) 661.18 (91.50) 2. 109.219.00 2,744,420.50 2,999,721.00 .................................. Page 14 of 22 STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2014 t Ln 1„ i l ;tEr„ 1 } Il,,-r• 51.10men-, .�nJ Krdr`uy,ti„rn }3.r.r i !i dox n• • K.,.,• B:t,4 t UMW, }u No. 4,•t.d Roatircd AftlOrtiLitton. l:' \ct t tu.,,tv:.} i n.lom Ba-.• f •xn, tr,., u,�i:a, t,.r n, },,., ilae bet 1Alt, • y LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314QACl MMAF 2012-AA A3 36962G4G6 GENERAL ELEC CAP CORP 1347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond I72967CK5 CITIGROUP INC 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 1347628 {347628 347628 3347628 347628 LC-PE-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PE-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Ta Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 929903A11 88731JEC9 693476BK8 38141EA33 36159JBT7 370334BL7 13638XD80 WACHOVIA CORP Time Warner Cable Inc. PNC FUNDING CORP GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC GEMNT 2009-4 A GENERAL MILLS MC ALLSTATECORP Canadian Natural Resources Limited 3 004 401.00 4 017,332.27 5.020,395.80 5,089,300,00 5, 135,395.00 4,298 452.00 5 998 470.00 (I 244.50) 70.64) 225.75 (30,921.14) 635.50 (2,094.06) (66.65) 1,831.16) (64588,08) (2,711.92) 4; 39,282.65) 3, 107.65 51,288.77) 5,753.77 (14,554,12) (I,974.66) (6,32r8.42) 1,215.00 (171.00 3,003,792.00 3,973,067.57 4,298,6 1.10 I 4,987,643.50 j 5,022,000.00 5 099,2 0.00 i j r 5,137,670,00.I 5,999,5 14, 00 C....:a :347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 46625HHN3 1PMORGAN CHASE 14 CO 6 105,060.00 6,041,810.00 i 47628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond s.j . 347628 !347628 347628 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sates Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond LC-PF-2.Sales Tax Revenue Bond Subtotal - 347628 LC-Pr-2381es Tax Revenue Bond 14912IAV0 407288YD5 05531FAA1 05634CDG8 19648CAC5 SE TERPILLAR FINANCIAL TON S •B-REF BB&T CORPORATION Bacardi U.S.A., Inc CO HSG & FIN 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest 205091001 31392HWL3 FNR 2003-3 BC k Catitalized )merest 3128H4NR6 FG E9700- 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italivod Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalzed Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca 205091001 1(11,1 .,` dalized Interest 31392BVM5 74977RBQ6 31410GS FNR 2002-3 PG RABOBANK NEDERLAND 7 FN 888927 TXB LC-2013 A Ca Inbred Interest 31294LPZ0 FG E02240 1205091001 A Capitalized Interest 3I28PGLY7 FG J04843 0 _ 6 470,135.50 6 655 698.45 7 588 610.40 9,860,145.50 368,565,634.56 28,594.77 92,792.48 " 2299223 337,474.09 413,763.17 473,811.40 7 999 217.76 474,609,211.95 (191,261 420 65 (348,168,000.00 (16 306.65) (94,105.68) (8,503,602.51) 3,027.39) (197.27) (86.69) 9,098.90)�• 458.74 (247.91 48.89 (9 059.44 (1,945.52) (1,679,678.18 473,73 771.11 443.49 18 + „'_ ( 03121 (517_93) 32 355,40) 1 558.65 (756.79 221874.40 - - (838.53) (33,718.97) (2,236.15) (1,277.98) (1,858.78) (43,183.54) (2,026.53) (1,638.39) (44,007 (2,36 323.05 6,147.35 (4,440.92) (210.6 3,838.94 (16,419.89) 293,543,799.77 ; 67.99 25,351.41. (205.76) 62,781.18 7.94) 705.26 (257.44) (76.63) 621,26 382.67 1,744.04 6 454,151.90 6,671,845. 80 7,490,063.80 7,999,056.00 9.854-9 5.00 109,709.40 176 24 .39 193 063.96 ) 220 909.20 300,862.26 365 917.99 706.97 Page 15 of 22 • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2014 • Bt 8inninet I. Sl.0 het V3Ine Bate Pntrh;nrt lia•A f Ba,t Itan,.nirr Redrrnpt ions Ita.r Base r-ha wr In Net r•,t,d Hr.dved Antor 6/36611' it N11 t [t.rniired (::,itt L,, ctariuu tJalrr't n.. "t 1 tt;rrhrt 1'dlnr zed Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.italized Interest ,20'091001 LC-2013 A Ca italiz r.:!.' Fy ;205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.itabzed Interest 203091001 LC-2013 A Ca talized Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca .italized Interest 3I402RBG3 31402QT68 FN 735439 FN 735073 FNA 2012-M3 2A1 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK RABOBANK NEDERLAND 613,368.78 621,009,94 64 938.65 (57,003 70) (4,356.68 (4,262.57) (I 051.99) (1,888.6 (1, 137.74) 1,989.92) (226.01) 800.64 1,612.50 129.49 1833.51 (541.32 478.466.40 i 343,797.34 .• - Y> , 552.183.10 559,585.26 i 120)091001 LC-2013 A Ca.nabzed Interest 21686CAD2 RABOBANK NEDERLAND 1,052,890.00 (3,844.78) 11,134.78 1,060,180.00 ! talized Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.ilabzed Interest fog 31393V2T7 FHA 2627 GY 1,453,291.03 1 236,39750 '205091001 LC-2013 A C talized Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest 21685WBL0 912828PE4 1. ;205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.italized Interest w 205091001 LC-2013 A 2i 91 -20 a.na4zed Inle a.na es nteres ;205091001 LC-2013 A Ca italized Interest 20)091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest i 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.itabzed Interest �r 1205091001 LC-2013 A Ca.1tahzed Interest 407288YD5 3136A8G38 3137ANLP8 89233P6J0 912828SY7 RABOBANK NEDERLAND US TREASURY NB HAMILTON S WR-B-REF R 2010-141 A FNA 2012-M13 ASQ2 It FHMS K301 A2 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORP ;a US TREASURY NB Subtotal - 205091001 LC-2013 A Ca. italized Interest !Grand Total 91 CIP Bonds (STAMP Portfolio) 1543,798.90 7 ' r 1,931,464.00 2,087,363.20 2,663,518.20 2,966,839.15 3, 112,857.20 (4, 182.07) (4,234.96) 1.157.02 2, 163.96 1,540,773.85 1,929,393.00 5,030,700.00 _t. 11,843,400..00 xr 96,379,672.63 511,304,567.97 59,599.63 (7,898.93) 0.28 103.92 3,541,628.65 (3,992,718.60) 487,125,085.23 (200,338,775.32) (1,174,921.20) (351,068,000.00) (10,445,303.12) (54,904.29) 3,507.57 etiY- 'y: (455.76) 2,608.71 (2,645.44) (1,791.83) 13 750.24 (89,816.47) (74,263.86) (1,821,151.24) 8, 153.60 2.634.93 440.06 r 7,255.24 6,943.44 (358.17) t 4,129.76 121,384.64 6:32irt':;;iG�a 275,186.39 2.095,516,80 ! 2.199.892 30 2,603,902.59 ! 2,968,908.09 3,117,153.20 5,028,530.00 11 861,280.00 1 94,730,325.35 434,957,346.04 86 Page 16 of 22 87 Mow, Marhot fond. (0.17894} • Case 1.1_ 4,4 Fixed lecome 1101 06494) at M 6-41er vuYW 4M:r i. Pe to .e, ATTACHMENT 5 STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 Outer (23.8064r.) moor eds. ISAtOald Auto PlanvN<tvear6. Kd.41'd%Y Vaedaae 13.741G41-*--", Cam mnrrepH MP.S 13A5714l-.^' Olwraxpect PMan Mry (a. Berko (21287147 Lav14.449. 116406M1 YR MonIcIpals (7.61Pe:1 .. Craa1P Can-A*6 1821754) C:AaN rxMt sye tyMxa Ater4nr S'+rs+ems = c✓r..:rn Other (2.01394) FNMA (1.366%1- remit CMO 61.820%1 �/r FPMA CMO (3:144%)-/ or/cream IVItWil MUNI (6.467%) US 40V 111..37640 APR (1 i.TnT%)J .--- CORP 141.611141 CP (18.883161 il.ket '.{steal hy. uals Y4v6: baler • Are rwel 'Cash difference due to unsettleded trade at the end of the reporting period Cash (`1.04614) A6aatcy 4e.).nte) Munsepel (T.f3P%)-`,� puffer teoe7W) Government 02.370%) Gem! Narked (1 ainwto .) `^ Pineedal p6.87e%4 %Ptonne) K1 a. SMC t lea0'C tAKu4VM 13Y: ewe. ADr,ft Witt. F a0,3APK' 88 • 89 • • ATTACHMENT 6 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 eket Value ± J14040d `.W J.WUaru Memey Market fords 10.07410 7 aelr 12.041W flwsd Income (101.07094) Brno MAi'[ r.Y-MI. h:<++rmI 'Cash difference due to unsettleded trade at the end of the reporting period • Other (34,153161 " Us NYelcipalm (8.7813 %) -oe' rNMn HMufYclw'cr. 14.17") 1.6e10e1 y77-,70 .-- tale Heel Plow ABS le IRWM) Saab 111107/0 - mhoctrlc 110.10 n4) 8vwvvllp 11.675%1 �-ArrtsrmObite MS 47.0.04) C,lu alwb 11320>SA osdit cere 1.5 MAO%) 4MaA r'k�. NMe* M3rYH YW Vw r >�x'z.w.n MgPUBe (0.976t4) CAS. 14,4%10 'AOCY GUNS 11013.14 �... GORP I30.1<ML) A85 (19.950%) CP tA.807%) t. nv+tMM. riy. vae4 d;h!rfr `IW1m .. mr+r+: ►/maselsl:fin. Oae.t C'm9t'to.... by, 00ea i0oi tp+ vaiws a .ku-+.ex+ 90 91 ATTACHMENT 7 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 Money MsAret N.Ws (0.08390 Cask 4 1.041%)^-- . Flayed Irrcame (101.710%) .. d C.Y,.'.1.�a2 'Cash difference due to unsettleded trade at the end of the reporting period • Mery rn,2621161 De..r.e.. (3.22110 Oscine (+ AM.; Aetaembite ABS 14.112.1 tmvrriacv ta.3.3%I caw mos Willa 49.l11%) Dads (E1.320%) SS Manlelyele t9.65641 Coed* Car. eileS 1-. Diversified Siam Sere O'Dell.) 11,xrrc dnB* pn, aW fiefs, Aviv urireit Other Otker.(.NP to nerd !MINE CNC 10.0f1%) -e„ AGCV enpn iSeefiel _d CAlH i•1.011%) ' vkttMle ll ritri•S) A ISOM 11.97410'-' t9 (13.11et61 -' ASS ilea17316) bAe9%).1 COMP (11.<1(46) Hari at,itlwn Ny:..OM N»•ks�'J»aw • rmrtpaye RPdrad N•1sMa5 Coat r1.r10t6) AVI.Cy {1-WM) FbaJNpal (9.66..%)�"� OtaHy (12 UNN. AtaateMCWd (1114yliki•''s �.� F1oee01.1 WAS IndaNrlal (11.3t1%) tarorl cet•Aaerni i•y. Oa. Vo.lxc Jaiae . a.�ci•x.. 92 • 93 • • ATTACHMENT 8 STAMP Portfolio Series A 81 Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 cw6 16.000504 Mcaoy Markel PPa+P (6.01054 Pined trams, (96.990%) CASI{ (0.900x1 -, M'MPON6 (0.010,41--- nlva 'AMA CA10 01.1.69413 PNa l . (9.310% PMlMC CMO T11..0ArAl AOCY eONO (17.33240 t -- US QOV IA5558%) (;teat <n Y3:1601U tro: tn. MarAvc YaAa! a Acrassi • am.enrk•A wl_ (SP,96.8). fqr tl-at> fJM (n...743 MLPI[ CvOPPreI (1.93146) ��.. 6gwcy. Cc14M 1 PAC CO (d,SAISO -"` PIMA celtvrlvat (5 oSsas, AD•otll Celtnt CYO,(® 78110 --`. Calraeertiial MSS (IS.16244) 99eeraism (03.99154) 94 • 95 • ATTACHMENT 9 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 • 7,1.110,00(.{r0 .. 3 2 i S z k2 C1at1 0..1100,1 YrrY alartet Fr Na (0.165141 _......_.._ Fixed Intone (80.81 i%1 A.,6get 2x,c:./atpo. 110a awetsK'e'nKee . t9lA f AA, Oawe 47.733%9 wNeoace (a.u>a) CtelMeeN'(7:4274) 0112Pl®. t4.069%1 � TaNCOmaWNketloaa (4.5513t41''-w. Otsea Aff (4.048%4 eY1n Mia4FJelLaen, Ia.1V71:1: Vf Pnrtetpw (t.t0099 . Cartneielal PM t0Antal 4a+rel'wtPn <28.004Y.) Paab (33.15Sl3/4) fM rAR,AVAH try' itrf➢ NAM,. Vwb.a .. are.. CASN (C-0071N N.!wao M 1M49R9 . F711e11: (1,685%) [P (I7t5%)—"`r FYM6 Cre11 (Ammo -'� Af9 (e-P4eMj / NIASC Cats) 55.1 M59p1 W8 BOY (20.852%1 — CORP I45.205%) ('Mrt rftle ntar toe...rYtrawl cash ro6185%1 WAIF (6.o8340 Mast Packed (4.O4091) Mu,Aclpel (7.10016i areeaFe eeaed (12. SSS%) lndePOtIN (.17.4,8%) �- FlaancNt R735T1! *warmest 120.092961 Yaw, rm4':dM«; ^4 My W rso. tid.r. « ar r::;n:v 96 • 97 • • ATTACHMENT 10 STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2014 a (1,OV(1.tMO 00 00 . _.. AAA Memm)' Mmrce[. pORS19 W.104%0 Cd91+ (0.100I% _._.._. Fl6ed Income (99.70010 ,E.Vt taktidtna Pry. Iin.Sfl • CRIMP ,m 014,6)1 POURC. Cmaura 1737318)-^- 1!%4444 60Wl y).(9.90)161 �.. nW6N0041 FIRMA Gem (a AW%) Adts 1/44404d'e0044044 (7,394% 1/a. Me 4004•1a 16,037%) CamR]mtCR) Mad (la 2% + amnmrvlan Von. 04/4/144, 112.72310) C.& r.r,..t.r. B"f: 14cc bm'Xai Yan... .. a. .. trl.er 01404%) uBw (0 %MG AGCY 00I90 WAWA) " 414490 (100)44)- /: MANG oFd' YONON) r GAGA (a rnwa) Mull, (00.037%) MMA CYO CORP .11..1,1.1 r UN GOV /40.7455%) r'RArt ,'Mr rainYmi d,� 4Wp NtarAtwf VeY M • YsvYwrl cast, 10.21r%) Ap®c7 I0.31i3%) 1Jl9I* t0.6,11%)-� Mwdelpal (041r41-"' inAua6101 (10.276%)- 11W644 117.406 NastF••• iftamd (27,000W r.-^ GFpern.nent 140.20310 rtwt rebobe®rl by 0..144,,,n, 98 • 99 • T CHM T 11 County of Riverside Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund "Volatility & the Return of the Russian Bear" The first quarter of this year has started out with an increase in market volatility with large swings in both equity and bond prices; several catalysts in- clude profit taking from the massive gains of 2013 and the statististical realization that the same per- formance isn't likely this year. Also, talk of .slower growth in China, a geopolitical crisis heating up in Eastern Europe between Ukraine and Russia, and, a more hawkish FED with its recent QE reduction and rate talk has weighed on the markets.: The ongoing concern among investors is whether the FED will be able to successfully engineer the with- drawal from current quantitative easing policies without disrupting their two primary goals of keeping prices stable and unemployment low. Sworn in on February 3"1 was the Federal Reserve's first Chairwoman in history, Janet Yellen It didn't take long for the power of the spoken words of a FED head to come to light after a flubbed continent at the March 19th FOMC meeting spooked the mar- kets...; Investors were caught off guard as to the reference of the timing of rate increases, but has since been rectified by tying the tightening to a broader range of economic data rather than just inflation and 6.5% unemployment (or better) as the primary driver for FED action. She definitely has her hands full as the slow U.S. economic' recovery converges with the $10 billion per month taper and the talk of increasing short- term rates, namely fed funds and the discount rate. At a recent speech in Washington D.C., she re- marked that many people still feel that the econo- my is in recession because they have yet to see improvement in their own employment and in- come situations. The sluggish speed of improve- ment in the employment numbers is evident in a variety of areas, including the large number of long -term unemployed and the much higher than usual number of folks working part time that would like full time employment. Yellen also stated "For the many reasons I have noted today, I think this extraordinary commit- ment is still needed and will be for some time, and I believe that view is widely shared by my fellow policy makers at the FED." Yellen made it very clear that they remain committed to providing extraordinary support for the economy for some time to come. However, she left the door open to a gradual tightening by stating, "In this context, recent steps by the FED to reduce the rate of new securities. purchases are not a lessening of this com- mitment, only a judgment that recent progress in the labor market means our aid for the recovery need not grow as quickly." Clearly, the next three quarters of this year will be a challenge for the markets; stocks will react to bonds and will see sector rotation, and bonds will .react to FED speak, headlines of Russian invasions. and the possibility of a NATO response, as well as the politics of U.S. mid-term elections. Folks, vola- tility is here to stay for a while, but will present opportunities for the TPIF and individual investors alike. We'll continue to monitor our dynamic mar- kets and invest accordingly. Don Kent Treasurer -Tax Collector Capital Markets Team Don Kent Treasurer -Tax Collector Jon Christensen Asst. Treasurer -Tax Collector Giovane Pizano Investment Manager Erika Clark Asst. Investment Manager Investment Objectives The primary objective of the treasurer shall be to safeguard the principal of the funds under the treasurer's control, meet the liquidity needs of the depositor, and achieve a return on the funds under his or her control. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER'S POOLED INVESTMENT FUND IS CURRENTLY RATED: Aaa-bf BY MOODY'S INVESTOR'S SERVICE AND AAA/V1 BY FITCH RATINGS February 5,163,904,049.52 5,166,397,97445 (2,493,924.93) (0.05) December 5,992,725,493.93 6,004,394,253.64 (11,668,759.71) October 4,703,816,806.01 4,708,007,227.09 (4,190,421.08) i. 1.28 (0.19) 0.39 0.33 1.31 1.14 (0.09) 0.39 1.39 1.37 The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is comprised of the County, Schools, Special Districts, and other Discretionary Depositors. 100 Current Market Data Economic Indicators Release Data Ir3cllr_,tlr�d 3/7/2014 a Employment Situation: Measures the number of unemployed as a percentage of the labor force. 6.6 % 6.7% 3/27/2014 3/6/2014 Real Gross Domestic Product - Q/Q change: The broadest measure of aggregate economic activity and encompasses every sector of the economy. GDP is the country's most comprehensive economic scorecard. -ti Factory Orders M/M change: Represents the dollar level of new orders for both durable and nondurable goods. 2.2% 2.6% 01. o -0.5 % -0.7% Stock Indices Commodities Gold (USD/OZ) USy Tr eawry Cu $ 1,284.01 $ (42.43) Fed Funds Target Rate Increase to 0.25% Increase to 0.75%' March 19 0.0 % 0-.25 % 0.0 % Risk to Growth 111 I25 03121/14 -s 02/23/14 125 (.03/31/ 14-02/'. 0/14) am • O.Os3 0.848 -1 5 lY 0 114 0.104 lA 2Y 0.424 0 11.-/ 10.1 3Y SY 0.054 1114 0.669 1.502: 20.0 217 2.200 2.122 17.0 2.714 2.540 7.0 :tUY 3e4: 33 -2.4 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 101 2 • TIMMI The Treasurer's Institutional Money Market Index (TIMMI) is compiled and reported by the Riverside County Treasurer's Capital Markets division. It is a composite index derived from four AAA rated prime institutional money market funds. Similar to the Treasurer's Office, prime money market funds invest in a diversified portfolio of U.S. dollar denominated money market instruments including U.S. Treasuries, government agencies, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, repurchase agreements, etc. TIMMI is currently comprised of the five multi billion dollar funds listed below. 'rime Ir stJl €cap :me 7-Nlarke` F ds Federated Prime Obligations Fund POIXX 0.02% Morgan Stanley Institutional Prime Liquidity Fund MPFXX 0.06% 1.00% - 0.80% - 0.60% - 0.40% - 0.20% - 0.00% - leigim Pool Yield goes.T1MME 0.38% 0.37% 0.38% 0.39% 0.37% 0.38% 0.38% 0.39% 0.38% 0 0.37% 0.39% 0A0% 0.33% 0.11% 0.10% 0.08% 0.07% 0.06% 0.06% 0.05% 0.05% 0.05% 0.05% 0.04% 0.04% 0.05% Mar-13 Cash Flows May -13 Jul-13 Sep-13 Nov-13 Jan-14 Mar-14 Monthly Monthly Month Receipts Disbursements 04/2014 Elaiured trrrerrt: Actual Available Investments to Invest > nce Maturing 1. Year 04/2014 1,320.00 738.06 581.94 895.20 1,039.11 06/2014 08/2014 Q p0.., 1,19004 ;, 542.82 4P00 00:; 600.00 1,124.81 (581.99) 950 00 725.41 50 00r (125.41) 326.83 75.41 ' 575.31 468.00 181:7U 125.00 10/2014 757.29 890.00 .0300 1304C (132.71) 132.71 58:80 151.64 MOO, 91 I5:5 64.36 12/2014 1,691.73 850,00 841.73 1,057.31 5.00 %no 02/2015 0.%21 6,50 650.00 1,toob QO 910.86 920.00, (639A0 (260.86) 00 ,.. 380.00 156.97 331.35 5.0Q TOTALS 10,380.85 11,122..09 (741.24) 664.95 12..65 % 3,598.28 3,385.27 4,591.35 64.40% 87.35% * All values reported in millions ($). - •The Pooled Investment Fund cash flow requirements are based upon a 12 month historical cash flow model. Based upon projected cash receipts and maturing investments, there are sufficient funds to meet future cash flow disbursements over the next 12 months. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 3 102 Asset Allocation M M 1C1' c�AisT iT T4$tDE 3 .p}ww. DDA/PASSBK US TEAS BONDS FHLMC BONDS FNhfA=B.ON'H ` FHLB DISC NOTES FFCB BONDS FARMER*pMAC iti#40.;6 A9.K COMM PAPER 445,000.00 t0� ii2 ; at 360,000.00 320,000.00 363,285.00 27,000.00 391,950.00 265,000.00 IDOE 964,419.00 Matt h I MIN Scheduled Book ail Market 445,000.00 445,000.00 S$OOTt p1J 360,000.00 36Q000.00 320,026.17 319,936.75 362,866.09 787,744 61 783,209 92 26,951.81 26,998.27 9W0":16 391,929.56 264,979.77 86,41155 964,080.13 363,259.43 392,035.51 265,033.25 86,411..g y 964,184.22 100.00% 0.04% .003 .003 ffr400:00%4P.046 4i� bC13 ifii 100.00 % 0.14 % .003 .003 99.97% 0.35"% 1.282 1.282 99.89% 1.16% .895 3.936 100.17% 0.18% 214 .214 100.03% 0.23%J .980 1.031 100.02% 0.25% .736 .736 ib0009L Q32!).'"L L 35 100.OPA 0.12% , .155 .155 SCHEDULED PAR % MIN MKT OALTRUST MD • sir DOA/PASSOK-7% i LOCAL AGM ORM-0% MI USTROISawns -co* am MAC MSC PIOUS .1% p PUDIC ROM -7% MN ROCA ROHM -1S% 11112 a. PFRAS NDS • lb% OMR PPCS BONDS • 7% a. r uconccMons • 2;► a� PAPJAER1lVC-S% OM NUM BONDS - 2% gm 00004 PAPER -111% p "COS • 3% • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 4 103 • Maturity Distribution MMKT -CALTii' DDA/PASSBK 445,000.00 rs�4� �0 Oa 360,000.00 Low US TREAS BONDS 275,000.00 445,000.00 54,000.00 360,000.00 15,000.00 455 00 30,000.00 455.00 320,000.00 WIVIC:DISC NOTES'I e FHLMC BONDS 5,000.00 46,000.00 44,625.00 5,000 00' 267,660.00 0,00000 363,285.00 87.00 r 456,927 0087,814.00 FHLB DISC NOTES 27,000.00 FFCB BONDS 198,800.00 173,150.00 27,000.00 150.74 `20r10500 150,00(1.00 0-2 NM II 111111111111 I� 1-3 aioa 3-12 ma, 1.2 Y YEAR IN MATURITY 2-1 Yr > Yr 20,000.00 391,950.00 ,-.140,9QU.00 NMXi-ser+ud w. Mar OILTRUSTRID-SrAeddad Rr WEIR DON ROM -SdealdefNr MN= LOCPL AGCY00LIG • Sdredred Par 11111111r US11110) ONDSNNW aescmares!•1 alb' Nur =semi dAittir � mom RINA woos -seam*PIr OOOPA• RAO MSC MaRf-ldadw4f Par W"-.5"� RILO OMER-Sdw/Mlf Par mem - PitD BONDS •Sdeadeded Par OM= ROC DISC NOTTS-Selaedded Par IMMO PARMAMAC -Sdroared Pa: ate NUM BONDS- Sdroiad Par mina WIYI PAPCR-SdeNiad Par MORa WEIS-SchadaladPar RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 104 5 Credit Quality Aa2 341,825.00 341,723.32 341,732.37 100.00 % 0.13 % Al AA+ 85,000.00 MOODY'S BOOK% illAr-$016 EMI NAa43/4 M14.10 1111b414 Min- 7% At-7M AA, Lo AA- 3,120,218.74 338,1 330 474,094.00 715,455,00 84,959A3 3,119,922.24 84,977A5 100.02 % S&P vs AM.,2lb IN AA • II% IMAM -9,11 MI LVVb 11111M411, 3,112,218.30 338,061.45` 473,961.23 474,003.83 0.14 % 99.75% 0.58% c ; 0,13°i6 100..01 % 0.13 % 715,344.17':! 715,484.70 100!0I 0.18 % RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 6 105 g o g g o g o 8 2 8.8 8`- 88 o O s s 0= O O O O O S $ $ $ S O O $ $ $ $ $ O $ o g&ggsS8 msrqd a a w v a O O SS888 8 8 S $ 8 Month End Portfolio Holdings 54,000,000.00 8 8 8 . g 54,000,000.00 s $ $ g O g o g O o O O 88 88 88 ogO N O^ 8 $ kg sg '45 ss s s 88 vmi,mmm mnnt°.,n�,mTrn � C N MmmMi H m p m N O b n$ U n PEPRPRnn��i AEK � a is roriis vi �y vi �: men $ 8 $ $ $ $ $ O $ $ $ $ $ $ N 00 N pOp pOo N [� (� ((N vv��S$ n o N N O vN O� O v O�n� O O v O�n� O O O O m m O O O O O O O 8s88888....... 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'2 m n m m n 2 m 2 m m m m m m m m m 2 m m mmmmmm m 2222222222222222222222 m mmmmm m m 00 0 ri Month End Portfolio Holdings Maturity Maturity Par Book hlarket Market Unrealized Modified Years To CORP Description Date Coupon To Mat Value Value Price Value Gain/Loss Duration Maturity tOWS8 OWS8 OWSS 1KJ7 3136G1KW8 3136G1LT4 3135GOWS8 3135GOWS8 3135GOWS8 3136G1LT4 3136G07B1 3136G1MU0 3136G1YU7 3136G1YU7 3135GOKM4 3135GOKM4. 3135GOPQ0 FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrE FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrE FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrE FNMA 5YrNc6MoB FNMA 5YrNc6MoB FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrB FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrB FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrB . FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrB FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrB FNMA 4YrNc6MoB FNMA 5YrNc6MoB FNMA 5YrNc6MoB FNMA 5YrNc6MoB FNMA 1Yr FNMA FNMA FHLB DISC NOTES 313385YE0 FHLB DISC NOTE 11/15/2016 11/15/2016 11/15/2016 04/30/2018 05/08/2018 11/28/2016 11/15/2016 11/15/2016 11/15/2016 11/28/2016. 11/27/2017 06/12/2018 01/30/2019 01/30/2019 05/27/2015 05/27/2015 10/26/2017 06/17/2014 FHLB BONDS 313372KE3 FHLB 4Yr 02/04/2015 313378AC5 FHLB 3Yr 05/22/2015 313378U58 FHLB 3Yr 05/04/2015 313378XS5 FHLB 3YrNc2YrE 04/30/2015 313380UF2 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 10/10/2017 313381H24 FHLB 3Yr 01/16/2015 313381SV8 FHLB 3YrNc6MoB 01/29/2016 313381YP4 FHLB 2Yr 02/20/2015 313381VK8 FHLB 3.5YrNc6MoB 07/29/2016 313381XU4 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/13/2018 313382PH0 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 04/25/2018 313382PP2 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 04/25/2018 373382LE1 FHLB 3.5YrNc3MoB 10/11/2016 313382SL8 ,FHLB 3.5YrNc3MoB 10/24/2016 313380557 FHLB 4YrNc3MoA 10/11/2016 313382Y31 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 05/21/2018 3133833M1 FHLB-5YrNC3MoB 05/23/2018 3133833J8 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 05/25/2018 3133834M0 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 05/29/2018 36N6 FHLB 5YrNc1YrB 6/12/2018 0 36N6 FHLB 5YrNc1YrB 6/12/2018 3CP4 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/19/2018 83CP4 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/19/2018 313383CP4 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/19/2018 313383CP4 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/19/2018 313383EM9. FHI.a, 5YrNc6MoB 06/20/2018 313383EN7 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/20/2018 313383EP2 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/20/2018 313383G62 FHLB 3.5YrNc1MoB - 12/19/2016 313383G62 FHLB 3.5YrNc1MoB 12/19/2016 313383HH7 FHLB 3.5YrNc1YtB 12/27/2016 313383KJ9 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/27/2018 313383KJ9 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/27/2018 313383KP5 FHLB 1Yr 06/30/2014 313383KJ9 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/27/2018 313383PZ8 FHLB 1Yr 07/10/2014 313383PY1 FHLB 1Yr 07/17/2014 313383Q79 FHLB 1Yr 07/25/2014 313383U E9 FHLB 1Yr 08/12/2014 313383W64 FHLB 1Yr 08/20/2014 313383X22 FHLB 1Yr 08/22/2014 313382LT8 FHLB 1.5Yr 09/22/2014 313383XP1 FHLB 1Yr 09/03/2014 3130A0A91 FHLB 1YrNc6MoE 10/30/2014 3130A0A91 FHLB1YrNc6MoE 10/30/2014 3130A0081 FHLB 1Yr 11/18/2014 3130A0E63 FHLB 1YrNc6MoE 01/02/2015 313381YP4 FHLB 1Yr 02/20/2015 3130A0FX3 FHLB 1.25Yr 02/18/2015 3130A0FX3 FHLB 1.25Yr 02/18/2015 3130A0H78 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 12/27/2018 3130A0JD3 FHLB1YrNc6MoB 01/21/2015 3130A0JV3 FHLB 1Yr 01/06/2015 3130A0MW7 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 01/30/2019 3130A0T26 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/21/2019 3130AORH5 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/13/2019 3130AOSG6 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/20/2019 3130AORQ5 FHLB 3.5YrNc3MoB 08/14/2017 3130A0UA6 FHLB 1YrNc6MoE 02/26/2015 3130A0T26 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/21/2019 3130A0S50 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/20/2019 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 02/20/2019 OYBO FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 03/12/2019 .0SG6 OYBO FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 03/12/2019 3130A13Y2 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 03/25/2019 3130A13Y2 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 03/25/2019 .600 .600 .600 .750 .800 .500 .600 .600 .600 .500 1.000 .800 1.650 1.650 .500 500 875 .180 .177 .500 .700 .650 .625 .250 .500 .250 .575 .600 .800 .850 .625 .550 .700 .750 .750 .750 .750 .800 .800 .875 .875 .875 .875 .900 1.000 1.250 .750 .750 .700 1.250 1,250 .160 1.250 .190 .190 .190 .170 .170 .125 .220 .125 .250 .250 .125 .200 .250 .210 .210 1.500 .240 .190 1.625 1.700 1.625 1.750 1.000 .210 1.700 1.625 1.750 1.625 1.625 1.625 1.625 600 .600 .600 .750 .800 .512 .600 .604 .600 1.009 1.031 1.000 1.650 1.650 .182 .157 1.141 .180 .177 .500 .700 .650 .625 .307 .500 .293 .636 .600 .800 .850 .625 .550 .700 .750 .750 .750 .750 .800 .800 .875 :875 .875 .875 .908 1.000 1.250 .750 .750 .700 1.250 1.250 .172 1.250 .202 .193 .177 .177 .170 .182 .188 .187 .250 .250 .170 .200 .189 .210 .215 1.500 .240 .190 1.625 1.700 1.625 1.750 1.000 .210 1.700 1.625 1.750 1.625 1.625 1.625 1.625 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 21,750,000.00 10,000,000.00 3,635,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 752,000.00 6,250,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 12,885,000.00 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 27 000 000,00 15,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 15,003,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 7,350,000.00 10,000,000.00 8,350,000.00 9,400,000.00 10,000,000.00 4,285,714.00 12,000,000.00 10,000,000,00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 13,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 - 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 26,700,000.00 25,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 15,000,060.00 15,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,550,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 9,555,000.00 7,090,000.00 25,000,000.00 4,800,000.00 7,250,000.00 6,050,000.00 6,500,000.00 5,000,000.00 4,400,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 21,750,000.00 9,996,000.00 3,635,000.00 9,998,500.00 10,000,000.00 739,216.00 6,242,375.00 9,911500.00 5,000,000.00 12,885,000.00 20,078,200.00 20,084,102.60 9,905,700.00 26,951,805.00 99.353000 99.353000 99.353000 99.020000 99.149000 99.189000 99.353000 99.353000 99.353000 99.189000 99.446000 99.076000 100.468000 100.468000 100.349000 100.349000 98.577000 99.993583 15,000,000.00 100.036000 5,000,000.00 100.276000 15,000,000.00 100.505000 5,000,000.00 100.042000 10,000,000.00 99.264000 4,994,000.00 100.087000 5,000,000.00 99.836000 4,995,550.00 100.084000 4,989,500.00 99.846000 7,350,000.00 99.511000 10,000,000.00 99.268000 8,350,000.00 98.928000 9,400,000.00 99.615000 10,000,000.00 99.390000 4,285,714.00 99.621000 12,000,000.00 98.222000 10,000,000.00 98.291000 10,003,000.00 98.429000 5,000,000.00 98.688000 10,000,000.00 98.546000 10,000,000.00 98.546000 5,000,000.00 98.268000 5,000,000.00 98.268000 5,000,000.00 98.268000 10,000,000.00 98.268000 4,998,000.00 98.613000 13,000,000.00 98.406000 10,000,000.00 98.158000 5,000,000.00 99,370000 10,000,000.00 99.370000 10,000,000.00 99.610000 5,000,000.00 99.193000 5,000,000.00 99.193000 24,996,750.00 100.020000 5,000,000.00 99.193000 24,996,925.00 100.031000 26,699,332.50 100.034000 25,003,150.00 100.037000 14,998,892.55 100.037000 10,000,000.00 100.038000 24,985,700.00 100.021000 15,005,250.00 100.057000 14,990,640.00 100.017000 50,000,000.00 100.006000 25,000,000.00 100.006000 24,988,764.33 100.028000 25,000,000.00 100.020000 25,018,500.00 100.084000 25,000,000.00 100.025000 24,998,500.00 100.025000 5,550,000.00 99.172000 25,000,000.00 100.025000 25,000,000.00 100.024000 5,000,000.00 99.307000 10,000,000.00 99.617000 10,000,000.00 100.166000 9,555,000.00 100.104000 7,090,000.00 100.103000 25,000,000.00 100.023000 4,800,000.00 99.617000 7,250,000.00 100.194000 6,050,000.00 100.104000 6,500,000.00 99.668000 5,000,000.00 99.668000 4,400,000.00 99.797000 5,000,000.00 99.797000 4,967,650.00 9,935,300.00 4,967,650.00 4,951,000.00 21,564,907.50 9,918,900.00 3,611,481.55 9,935,300.00 9,935,300.00 745,901.28 6,215,375.00 9,907,600.00 5,023,400.00 12,945,301.80 20,069,800.00 20,069,800.00 9,857,700.00 26,998,267.50 15,005,400.00 5,013,800.00 15,075,750.00 5,002,100.00 9,926,400.00 5,004,350.00 4,991,800.00 5,004,200.00 4,992,300.00 7,314,058.50 9,926,800.00 8,260,488.00 9,363,810.00 9,939,000.00 4,269,471.14 11,786,640.00 9,829,100.00 9,842,900.00 4,934,400.00 9,854,600.00 9,854,600.00 4,913,400.00 4,913,400.00 4,913,400.00 9,826,800.00 4,930,650.00 12,792,780.00 9,815,800.00 4,968,500.00 9,937,000.00 9,961,000.00 4,959,650.00 4,959,650.00 25,005,000.00 4,959,650.00 25,007,750.00 26,709,078.00 25,009,250.00 15,005,550.00 10,003,800.00 25,005,250.00 15,008,550.00 15,002,550.00 50,003,000.00 25,001,500.00 25,007,000.00 25,005,000.00 25,021,000.00 25,006,250.00 25,006,250.00 5,504,046.00 25,006,250.00 25,006,000.00 4,965,350.00 9,961,700.00 10,016,600.00 9,564,937.20 7,097,302.70 25,0135,750.00 4,781,616.00 7,264,065.00 6,056,292.00 6,478,420.00 4,983,400.00 4,391,068.00 4,989,850.00 -32,350.00 -64,700.00 -32,350.00 -49,000.00 -185,092.50 -77,100.00 -23,518.45 -63,200.00 -64,700.00 6,685.28 -27,000.00 -3,900.00 23,400.00 60,3[0.80 -8,400.00 -14,302.60 -48,000.00 46,462.50 5,400.00 13,800.00 75,750.00 2,100.00 -73,600.00 10,350.00 -8,200.00 8,650.00 2,800.00 -35,941.50 -73,200.00 -89,512.00 -36,190.00 -61,000.00 -16,242.86 -213,360.00 -170,900.00 -157,100.00 - 65,600.00 -145,400.00 -145,400.00 -86,600.00 -86,600.00 -86,600.00 -173,200.00 -67,350.00 -207,220.00 -184,200.00 -31,500.00 -63,000.00 -39,000.00 -40,350.00 - 40,350.00 8,250.00 -40,350.00 10,825.00 9,745.50 6,100.00 6,657.45 3,800.00 19,550.00 3,300.00 11,910.00 3,000.00 1,500.00 18,235.67 5,000.00 2,500.00 6,250.00 7,750.00 -45,954.00 6,250.00 6,000.00 -34,650.00 -38,300.00 16,600.00 9,937.20 7,302.70 5,750.00 -18,384.00 14,065.00 6,292.00 -21,580.00 -16,600.00 -8,932.00 -10,150.00 2.592 2.592 2.592 4.002 4.016 2.633 2.592 2.592 2.592 2.626 3.598 4.105 4.612 4.612 1.151 1.151 3.489 .213 .840 1.135 1.083 1.075 3.471 .790 1.816 .884 2.306 3.824 3.980 3.974 2.497 2.536 2A93 4.057 4.063 4.068. 4.079 4.110 4.110 4.121 4.121 4.121 4.121 4.121 4.110 4.084 2.679 2.679 2.703 4.103 4.103 .249 4.103 .276 .295 .317 .367 .388 .394 .479 .427 .582 .582 .630 .752 .885 .879 .879 4.541 .804 .763 4.616 4.664 4.651 4.655 3.301 .901 4.664 4.671 4.655 4.731 4.731 4.767 4.767 2.630 2.630 2.630 4.085 4.107 2.666 2.630 2.630 2.630 2.666 3.663 4.203 4.838 4.838 1.156 1.156 3.575 .214 .849 1.142 1.093 1.082 3.532 .797 1.833 .893 2.332 3.877 4.071 4.071 2.534 2.570 2.534 4.142 4.148 4.153 4.164 4.203 4.203 4.222 4222 4.222 4.222 4.225 4.225 4.225 2,723 2.723 2.745 4.244 4.244 .249 4.244 .277 .296 .318 .367 .389 .395 .479 A27 .584 .584 .636 .759 .893 .888 .888 4.745 .811 .770 4.838 4.899 4.877 4.896 3.375 .910 4.899 4.896 4.896 4.951 4.951 4.986 4.986 RIVERISIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 108 9 Month End Portfolio Holdings Maturity Maturity Par Bonk Market Market Unrealized Modified Years To CIISIP Description Dale COI) MI To Mat Value Value Price Value GA in/Loss Duration Maturity 3130M 3Y2 3130A16Y9 3130A16Y9 3130A15J3 3130AIAQ1 3130A17J1 3130A1C89 3130A1AZ1 3130A1DZ8 3130A1B98 3130A16Q6 3130A1BU1 3130A1DZ8 3130A1BU1 3130A1HR2 FHLB 5 rNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 3111,1c6MoB FHLB 3.5YrNc6MoE FHLB 3.25YrNc3MoB FHLB 3.25YrNc6MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNc3MoB FHLB 5YrNC3M0B FHLB 1YrNc6MoE FFCB BONDS.. 31331KHV5 FFCB 5Yr 3133EAHP6 FFCB 3Yr 3133EANJ3 FFCB 3Yr 3133EA2K3 FFCB 3YrNc3MoA 3133ECBA1 FFCB 2.5Yr 3133ECCE2 FFCB 2Yr 3133ECCE2 FFCB 2Yr 3133ECKZ6 FFCB 3YrNc1YrC 3133ECNW0 3133ECNW0 3133ECVH4 3133EAT81 3133ED7H9 3133ED7H9 3133EDAL6 3133ED7H9 3133EDBK7 3133EDDR0 3133EDDR0 3133EDEK4 3133EDFD9 3133EDG63 3133EDGB2 3133EANJ3 3133EDGB2 3133EDGB2 3133EDES7 FFCB 1.25 Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 1Yr FFCB 2Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 1.75Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 3YrNC1YrA FFCB 1Yr FFCB lYr FFCB 1Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 2Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 1.25Yr FFCB 1Yr FMAC DISC NOTES 31315LWV6 FAMCA DISC NOTE 3131513NR FAMCA DISC NOTE 313151XX1 FAMCA DISC NOTE 313151XQ6 FAMCA DISC NOTE FARMER MAC 31315PQK8 31315PWS4 31315PYL7 31315PYY9 31315PRT8 3131517M1 31315PIZ2 31315PA74 31315PX20 31315P6N4 31315PJ59 31315PW54 31315P2B4 FAMCA 3Yr FAMCA 2Yr FAMCA 15Mo FAMCA 3Yr FAMCA 5YrNc6MaB FAMCA 1.25Yr FAMCA 1.25Yr FAMCA 15Mo FAMCA 1Yr FAMCA 1Yr FAMCA 2Yr FAMCA 1Yr FAMCA 1Yr 03/25/2019 03/27/2019 03/27/2019 03/24/2017 09/26/2017 06/27/2017 06/26/2017 03/27/2019 03/27/2019 03/27/2019 03/27/2019 03/27/2019 03/27/21319 03/27/2019 04/24/2015 04/20/2016 03/16/2015 05/01/2015 09/28/2015 07/24/2015 01/07/2015 01/07/2015 04/11/2016 08/08/2014 08/08/2014 08/25/2014 09/11/2014 02/13/2015 02/13/2015 08/25/2015 02/13/2015 12/09/2016 01/16/2015 01/16/2015 09/10/2015 05/14/2015 03/03/2016- 06/04/2015 05/01/2015 06/04/2015 06/04/2015 06/10/2015 05/15/2014 05/01/2014 06/10/2014 06/03/2014 07/02/2015 01/23/2015 04/25/2014 01/28/2016 04/03/2018 06/10/2014 06/10/2014 08/11/2014 11/03/2014 10/10/2014 01/06/2015 01/15/2015 02/03/2015 1.625 1.550 1.550 .900 1.050 1.050 1.000 1.625 1.650 1.000 1.500 1.500 1.650 1.500 .200 .227 .520 .500 .450 .195 .250 .250 .430 .170 .170 .180 .250 .190 .190 .280 .190 .680 .160 .160 .250 .190 .375 .190 .500 .190 .190 .230 .180 .120 .120 .110 .550 .320 .220 .425 .750 .220 .220 .200 .230 .200 .185 .190 .185 1.625 1.550 1.550 .900 1.050 1.058 1.030 1.625 1.650 1.000 1.500 1.500 1.650 1500 .200 .251 .598 .520 .484 214 306 .281 .469 .170 .193 .180 J62 205 .203 .280 .203 .731 .160 .160 .270 .190 370 .193 .178 .188 .190 .225 .180 120 .120 .110 .587 .320 .220 .425 .750 .220 .220 .213 .230 .200 .190 .195 .190 5,600,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,030,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 6,000,000.00 10000000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 1,939,030.00 1,500,000.00 9;250,000.00 25,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 - 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,0300,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15,003,000.00 5;000,000.00 10,000,000.00 15000000.00 25,000,000.00 3,800,000.00 25A00,000.00 25;000,000.00 15,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5000000.00 25;000,000.00 15,000,000.00 103100,000.00 33,150,000.00 10,000000.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,0(10.00 25,000,000.00 40,000,000_00 10,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,00000 10,000,000,03 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 30,000,000.00 25A00,000.00 50,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 5,600,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,030.00 9,997,500.00 10,000,000.00 6,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 1,939,030.00 1,500,000.00 9,250,000.00 25,000,000.00 9,995,000.00 4,988,430.00 4,997,000:00 4,9'35,000.00 14,996,061.75 9,988,850.00 14,991,750.00 4,994,250.00 10,000,006.00 14,995,907.55 25,000,000.00 3,803,114.97 24,995,300.00 24,996,030.00 15,000,000.00 24,996,075.00 9,992,500.00 25,000,000.00 15,000,00000 9,996,800.00 33,150,000.00 1o,001;000A0 14,999,475.00 15,055,545.00 20,000,600.00 15,000,000.00 15,000,90U.00 24,959,750.00 39,968,266.67 9,990,966.67 14,990,421.00 9,989,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 24,995,975.00 30,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 49,992,294.50 24,998,750.00 24,998,750.00 99.797000 99.155000 99.155000 99.732000 99.314000 99.458030 99.585000 99.305030 99.518000 99.730000 99.129000 99.422000 99518030 99.422000 99.949000 100.140000 100.347000 100332000 100.004000 100.083000 100.042000 100.042000 99.775000 100.032000 100.032000 100.037000 100.064000 100.036000 100.036000 99.988000 100.036000 99.375000 100.015000 100.015000 9'3.938000 9'3.985000 99.780000 99.989000 100.332000 99.989000 99.989000 99.966000 99.996000 99.997000 99.991000 99.995000 100.258000 100.144000 100.010000 103.0,18000 99.076000 100.025000 100.025000 100.044000 100.065000 100.046000 100.036000 100.039000 100.033000 5,588,632.00 4,957,750.00 9,915,500.00 4,986,600.00 4,965,700.03 9,915,800.00 9,958,500.00 5,958,300.00 9,951,800.00 9,973,000.00 4,956,450.00 1,927,822.41 1,492,770.00 9,1%,535.00 24,987,250.00 10,014,000.00 5,017,350.00 5,016,600.00 5,003,200.00 15Al2,450.00 10,004,200.00 15,006,300.00 4,988,750.00 10,003,200.00 15,004,800.00 25,009,250.00 3,802,432.00 25A09A00.00 25,009A00.00 14,998,200.00 25,009,000.00 4,968,750.00 25,003,750.00 15,002,250.00 9,993,800.00 33,145,02750 9,978A00.00 14,998,350.00 15,049,800.00 19,997,800.00 14,998,350.00 14,994,900.00 24,999,000.00 39,998,800.00 9,999,400.00 14,999,250.00 10A25,800.00 5A07,200.00 10,001,000.00 5,002A00.00 9,907,600.00 25,006,250.00 20,005,000.00 25,011,000.00 30,019,500.00 25,011,500.00 SOA18A00.00 25A09,750.00 25,008,250.00 -11,368.00 4.767 -42,250.00 -84,500.00 -13,400.00 -34,300.00 -51,700.00 -41,500.00 -41,700.00 -48,200.00 -27,000.00 -43,550.00 -11,207.59 -7,230.00 -53,465.00 -12,750.00 19,000.00 28,920.00 19,600.00 5,200.00 16,388.25 15,350.00 14,550.00 -5,500.00 3,200.00 8,892.45 9,250.00 682.97 13,703.00 13,000.00 -1,800.00 12,925.00 -23,750.00 3,750.00 2,250.00 -3A00.00 -4,972.50 -23A00.00 -1,125.00 -5,745.00 -2,800.00 -1,650.00 -6,000.00 39,250.00 30,533.33 8,433.33 8,829.00 36,800.00 7,200.00 1,000.00 2,400.00 -92,400.00 6,250.00 5,000.00 15,025.00 19,500.00 11,500.00 20,70550 11,000.00 9,500.00 4.782 4.782 2.934 3.414 3.168 3.168 4.773 4.769 4.854 4.789 4.789 4.769 4.789 1.061 2.046 .954 1.077 1.485 1312 .765 .765 2.012 .356 .356 .402 .4.49 .865 .865 1.397 .865 2.654 .791 .791 1.439 1.117 1.913 1.172 1.079 1.173 1.173 1 189 .123 085 .194 .175 1.245 509 .068 1.815 3.927 394 .194 .364 .588 .524 .763 788 838 4. 4.9 2.984 3.493 3.244 3241 4.992 4.992 4.992 4.992 4.992 4.992 4.992 1.066 2.058 .959 1.085 1.4% 1.315 .773 .773 2.033 .356 .356 .403 .449 .874 .874 1.403 .874 2.696 .797 .797 1.447 1.121 1.926 1.178 1.085 1. 1. 1. 0 .123 .085 .195 .175 1.255 .816 -068 1.830 4.011 .195 .195 .364 .595 529 .770 .795 .847 MUNI BONDS 677521LH7 20772JED0 8827226W6 546415L73 6775212D7 76914AAE2 207721BT8 93974DDY1 546415527 OHIO STATE GO CONNECTICUT ST TEXAS ST GO LOUISIANA STATE OHIO STATE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE CONNECTICUT ST WASHINGTON STATE LOUISIANA STATE 05/01/2014 04/15/2014 04/01/2014 05/15/2016 11/01/2014 10/15/2014 05/15/2014 02/01/2015 02/01/2015 1.190 .448 300 540 280 .370 1.430 .200 .220 1.190 .448 .300 540 .280 370 .152 .200 .251 2,000,000.00 2,000,000.00 18,105,000.00 12,070,000.00 9,355,000.00 1,,635,000.00 4,890,000.00 11,590,000.00 24,755,000.00 2,000,000.00 2,000,000.00 18,105,000.00 12,070A00.00 9,355,000.00 1,635,000.00 4,908,728.70 11,590,000.00 24,747,821.05 ,•7 100.000000 100.000000 100.000000 100.000000 100.000000 100.000000 100.383000 100.000000 99.971000 2,000,000.00 2,000,000.00 18,105,000.00 12,070,000.00 9,355,000.00 105,000.00 4,908,728.70 11,590,000.00 24,747,821.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 084 041 .003 2.103 .582 .540 .123 .832 .832 .085 .041 .003 2.126 .589 .542 .123 .841 .841 COMM PAPER 91411UD44 UC REGENTS 04/04/2014 330 .130 15,000,000.00 14,993,716.67 99.9,38917 14,999,837.50 36959JD83 GE CAPITAL CORP 04/08/2014 .140 .140 20,000,000.00 19,990,666.67 99.997472 19,999,494.44 89233HDE1 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 04/14/2014 160 .160 25,000,000.00 24,9136,777.75 99.995306 24,998,826.39 89233HE91 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/09/2014 .170 .170 45,000,000.00 44,974,500.00 99.986278 44,993,825.00 36959JED1 GE CAPITAL CORP 05/13/2014 .140 .140 50,000,000.00 49,976,666.67 99.984833 49,992,416.67 91411UE84 UC REGENTS 05/08/2014 .120 .120 5,300,000.00 5,297,968.33 99.986639 5,299,291.86 30229BDB0 EXXON MOBIL 04/11/2014 .090 .090 25,000,000.00 24,994,500.00 99.9%389 24,999,097.22 91411UE92 UC REGENTS 05/09/2014 .120 .120 12,250,000.00 12,245,304.17 99.986278 12,248,319.03 64105HEK4 NESTLE 05/19/2014 .120 .120 20,000,000.00 19,991,866.67 99.982667 19,996533.33 6,120.83 8,827.77 12,048.64 19,325.00 15,750.00 1,323.53 4,597.22 3,014.86 4,666.66 .011 .022 .038 .107 .118 .104 .030 .107 .134 .011 .022 -038 107 1 1 .03 1111 .107 .134 RIVERISIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 109 10 Month End Portfolio Holdings Maturity Maturity Par Book Market Market Unrealized Modified Years To CUSIP Description Date Coupon To Mat Value Value Price Value Gain/Loss Duration Maturity 11UDM4 liBEN5 BEN5 pJEP4 89233HEU4 64105HEV0 64105HEN8 19121BEN5 93114FDP6 1912113E61 93114FEK5 93114FEK6 89233HEE0 91411UFJ9 89233HFJ8 36994E57 36959JG31 16677KEK5 64305HG71 89233HG99 91411UFR1 91411UEC5 16677KED1 1912113E95 64105HFC1 74271UEK2 19121BFQ7 19121 BGM5 74271UFP0 64105HFQ0 64105HFQ0 74271UFQ8 UC REGENTS 04/21/2014 COCA -COLA CO 05/22/2014 COCA -COLA CO 05/22/2014 GE CAPITAL CORP 05/23/2014 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/28/2014 NESTLE 05/29/2014 NESTLE 05/22/2014 COCA -COLA CO 05/22/2014 WAL-MART 04/23/2014 COCA -COLA CO 06/06/2014 WAL-MART 05/19/2014 WAL-MART 05/19/2014 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/14/2014 UC REGENTS 06/18/2014 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 06/16/2014 GE CAPITAL CORP 06/26/2014 GE CAPITA, L CORP 07/03/2014 CHEVRON 05/19/2014. NESTLE 07/07/2014 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 07/09/2014 UC REGENTS 06/25/2014 UC REGENTS 05/12/2014 _ CHEVRON 05/13/2014 COCA -COLA CO 06/09/2014 NESTLE - 06/12/2014. PROCTER&GAMBLE 05/19/2014 COCA -COLA CO 06/24/2014 COCA -COLA CO 07/21/2014 PROCTOR & GAMBLE 06/23/2014 NESTLE 06/24/2014 NESTLE 06/24/2014 PROCTER & GAMBLE 06/24/2014 .160 .160 50,000,000.00 49,980,000.00 .120 .120 9,250,000.00 9,246,330.83 .120 .120 25,000,000.00 24,990,083.33 .140 .140 25,000,000.00 24,988,430.56 .130 .130 10,000,000.00 9,995,702.78 .100 .100 15,000,000.00 14,995,041.67 100 .100 25,000,000.00 24,992,222.25 .120 .120 25,000,000.00 24,990,750.00 .090 .090 15,000,000.00 14,997,112.50 .140 .140 15,000,000.00 14,993,000.00 .110 .110 20,000,000.00 19,993,766.67 .110 .110 20,000,000.00 19,993,827.78 .160 .160 30,000,000.00 29,987,866.67 320 .120 10,000,000.00 9,995)300.00 .180 .180 20,000,000.00 19,988,000.00 .150 .150 30,000,000.00 29,985,000.00 .140 .140 10,000,000.00 9,995,333.30 .090 .090 50,000,000.00 49,990,625.00 .100 .100 35,000,000.00 34,988,138.89 .150 .150 10,000,000.00 9,995,000.00 .130 .130 15,000,000.00 24,990,4.50.56.. .130 .130 25,000,000.00 _ 24,994,493.06 .100 .100 22,775,00000 - 22,771,140.90 .110 .110 - 15,000,000.00 14,996;012.50 .110 .110 35,000,000.00 34,990,695.83 .080 .080 23,844,000.00 23,840,820.80 .100 .100 7,500,000.00 7,498,104.17 .130 .130 30,000,000.00 29,987,216.67 .090 .090 20,000,000.00 19,995,500.00 .080 .080 20,000,000.00 19,996,044.44 .080 .080 50,000,000.00 49,990,111.11 .080 .080 23,500,000.00 23,495,561.11 99.992778 99.981583 99.981583 99.981222 99.979417 9'3.979056 99.981583 99.981583 99.992056 99.968833 99.982667 99.982667 99.984472. 99.963167 99.963167 99.959389 99.948333 99.982667 99.946111 99.945000 99,959861 99.985194 99,984833 99.967417 99.966000 99.982667 99.960333 99.938333 99.960806 99.960333 99.960333 99.960333 49,996,388.89 9,248,296.46 24,995,395.83 24,995,305.56 9,997,941.67 14,996,858.33 24,995,395.83 24,995,395.83 14,998,808.33 14,995,325.00 19,996,533.33 19,996,533.33 29,995,341.67 9,996,316.67 19,992,633.33 29,987,816.67 9,994,833.33 49,991,333.33 34,981,138.89 9,994,500.00 24,989,965.28 24,996;298.61 22,771,545.79 14,995,11250 34,988,100.00 23,839,867.04 7,497,025.00 29,981,500.00 19,992,161.11 19,992,066.67 49,980,166.67 23,490,678.33 16,388.89 1,965.63 5,312.50 6,875.00 Z238.89 1,816.66 3,17358 4,645.83 1,695.83 2,325.00 2,766.66 2,705.55 7,475.00 516.67 4,633.33 2,816.67 -499.97 708.33 -7,000.00 -500.00 -465.28 1,80555 40189 -900.00 2,595.83 -953.76 -1,079.17 -5,716.67 -3,338.89 -3,977,77 -9,944.44 -4,882.78 .057 .142 .142 .145 .159 .161 .142 .142 .063 .183 .134 .134 .120 .216 216 .238 .257 .134 .268 .273 .235 .115 .118 .191 .200 .134 .232 .306 .230 .233 .233 .233 .058 .142 .142 .145 159 .162 .142 342 .063 .184 .134 .134 .121 .216 .216 .238 .258 .134 .268 .274 .236 115 118 .192 .200 .134 .233 .307 .230 .233 .233 .233 NCDS 891127D27 TORONTO DOMINION 05/19/2014 .130 89112TQ64 TORONTO DOMINION 06/12/2014 .140 891127/80 TORONTO DOMINION 05/16/2014 .130 8911273E2 TORONTO DOMINION 07/14/2014 .150 891127379 TORONTO DOMINION 06/20/2014 .150 .130 .140 .130 .150 20,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 - 100.000000 20,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 100.000000 20,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 50,1300,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 734 .200 126 .287 .221 .134 .200 .126 288 RIVERISIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 110 11 Full Compliance The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund was in FULL COMPLIANCE with the Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy. The County's Investment Policy is more restrictive than the Califor- nia Government Code. This policy is reviewed annually by the County's Investment Oversight Committee and approved by the County Board of Supervisors. U.S. TREASURIES FEDERAL AGENCIES CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS (NCD & TCD) A REVERSE REPOS CALTRUST SHORT TERM FUND GOVERNMENT NT COPE 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS NO LIMIT AAA 5 YEARS 30 % NA DAYS 20% NA LOCAL AGENCY NA INVESTMENT FUND (LAIF) NA NA NA NA NA couNTy INVESTMENT POLICY 5 YEARS 100% NA 100 % NA 1YEAR 25%Combined Al/Pl/Fl 60 DAYS 10 % NA DAILY 1.0% NA ;LIQUIDITY -' :DAILY . LIQUIDITY Tt Pi�17NG5 A DAILY Max $50 million NA LIQUIDITY NA 1 Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as weighted average maturity not exceeding 60 days. 2 Or must have an investment advisor with not less than 5 years experience and with assets under management of $500,000,000. 54.91% 2.66% 0.00% 1.03% 0.00% THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREMENTS OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE 53646 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR 111 13 AGENDA ITEM 9E • • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: David Thomas, Toll Project Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Construction Agreement with Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. for State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project Right of Way Property Mitigation Package 4 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 14-31-103-00 to Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. (Dalke & Sons) for the construction of State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP) Right of Way (ROW) Property Mitigation Package 4 in the amount of $2,868,480, plus a contingency amount of $286,848, for a total amount not to exceed $3,155,328; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its May 2013 meeting, the Commission approved the award of Agreement No. 12-31-113-00 to Atkinson/Walsh, a Joint Venture (AWJV), for the design and construction of the SR-91 CIP, which widens SR-91 through Corona, extends the existing 91 Express Lanes from the Orange County line to Interstate 15, and constructs other general purpose lane and toll express lane improvements within the corridor. Subsequent to this approval, AWJV has been issued the full Notice to Proceed (NTP), in accordance the design -build contract and is currently proceeding with final design and construction of the SR-91 CIP. Additionally at its May 2013 meeting, the Commission approved Agreement No. 09-31-081-03, Amendment No. 3 to Agreement No. 09-31-081-00, with Parsons Transportation Group, Inc. (Parsons) to further expand the project and construction management (PCM) services to support the SR-91 CIP design -build contract. This expanded scope included providing ROW mitigation design services for certain properties affected by the SR-91 CIP. ROW mitigation design services are needed to reconfigure partially acquired properties to maximize the utility and minimize business impacts to the property owner. Agenda Item 9E 112 Following the Commission's approval, Parsons was given authorization to begin ROW mitigation design in June 2013. The mitigation properties were divided into separate design packages, based on complexity of work and commitment dates set forth in the SR-91 CIP design -build' contract. Throughout the design process, staff offered property owners the opportunity to review and provide comments or concerns to the designs as they were developed. Input received from the property owners was taken into consideration and incorporated into the designs to the extent feasible. At its December 2013 meeting, the Commission authorized the Executive Director to award Agreement No. 14-31-022-00 to Dalke & Sons for the construction of ROW Property Mitigation Package 2. At its May 2014 meeting, the Commission authorized the Executive Director to award Agreement No. 14-31-081-00 to Dalke & Sons for the construction of ROW Property Mitigation Package 3. SR-91 CIP ROW Property Mitigation Package 4 consists of four properties: 4740 Green River Road (HGN Corona Partners); 2550 Wardlow Circle (Diller, Donnie Bernice); 200 South Main Street (Most Desert Rancho Save); and 1247 Pomona Road (Z Corona). The general scope of this property mitigation involves the partial removal and reconstruction of the existing building facades and reconfiguration of the sites to accommodate the additional ROW required for the SR-91 CIP. Individual NTPs will be given for construction on each of the four parcels within ROW Property Mitigation Package 4 in order to provide schedule flexibility throughout the acquisition process. Individual NTPs will only be given once full rights to the associated property are received. Staff is currently working through the acquisition process and anticipates receiving full rights for each of the four properties between June 2014 and September 2014. Procurement Process On April 4, 2014, the Commission advertised Invitation for Bids (IFB) No. 14-31-103-00 for ROW Property Mitigation Package 4. A public notice was advertised in the Press Enterprise, and the IFB was posted on the Commission's PlanetBids website, which is accessible through the Commission's website. Electronic mail messages were sent to vendors registered in the Commission's PlanetBids database that fit the IFB qualifications. Additionally, postcards were sent to firms who had expressed past interest in these services. Twenty-eight firms downloaded the Notice to Bidders. Eight are located in Riverside County. Eleven firms purchased the bid documents. Five of those are located in Riverside County. On May 8, 2014, four bids were received and publicly opened. A summary of the bids received is shown in Table A. Agenda Item 9E 113 • • Table A SR-91 CIP ROW Property Mitigation and Construction Services (Package 4) Bid Summary Firm (In order from low bid to high bid) Bid Amount Engineer's Estimate $3,366,387 1 JRH Construction, Inc. (Riverside) $2,488,619 2 Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. (Riverside) $2,868,480 3 American Integrated Services (Wilmington) $3,374,651 4 Paul C. Miller Construction (Rancho Cucamonga) $4,726,613 The basis for award for a public works contract is the lowest responsive and responsible bidder as defined by the Commission's procurement policy and state law. During staff's review of JRH's bid, the low bidder, it revealed JRH failed to fully complete and submit the Information Required of Bidders Form. The specifications under the IFB expressly require the bidder to complete the Information Required of Bidders Form. The Information Required of Bidders Form expressly provides that "[f]ailure to complete all information may render [the] bid non- responsive." Of the seven pages that make up the Information Required of Bidders Form, only two completed pages were submitted with JRH's bid. This omission is a material bid defect and renders JRH's bid nonresponsive. The Information Required of Bidders Form is used to determine a bidder's responsibility and, without the form, staff is unable to determine if JRH is a responsible bidder. Therefore, JRH's bid was determined to be nonresponsive and its bid was rejected. Staff proceeded to analyze the bid submitted by the second low bidder, Dalke & Sons, to determine Dalke & Sons' responsiveness to the specifications and its responsibility. After analyzing the bid per the Federal Highway Administration/Caltrans analysis process, staff and Parsons concluded the Dalke & Sons bid in the amount of $2,868,480, is the lowest responsible and responsive bid received for the project. The bid price submitted by Dalke & Sons was 14 percent lower than the engineer's estimate for construction. Federally -funded contracts administered by the Commission are subject to the requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 26, Title 49 entitled Participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) in Department of Transportation Financial Assistance Programs. Pursuant to the relevant federal DBE provisions, the Commission established a 6.8 percent DBE participation goal in the construction bid advertisement for this project. Only a bidder meeting the established DBE goal for this project can be considered fully responsive to the bid requirements. To meet this requirement, bidders must either achieve the DBE goal, or, alternatively, meet the good faith efforts (GFE) requirement set forth in the invitation for bid. Dalke & Sons could only meet 1.85 percent of the 6.8 percent DBE goal; however, its GFEs demonstrated adequate efforts were made to subcontract with DBE firms. Agenda Item 9E 114 Staff recommends award of Agreement No. 14-31-103-00 for the construction of the project to Dalke & Sons in the amount of $2,868,480, plus a contingency amount of $286,848 to fund potential change orders and supplemental work, for a total amount not to exceed $3,155,328. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2014/15 Amount: $3,155,328 Source of Funds: Sales Tax and Toll Bond Proceeds; TIFIA Loan Proceeds Budget Adjustment: No 6LA/Project Accounting No.: 003028 81402 00000 0000 262 3181402 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \Atbuti4.4,14 Date: 05/19/14 Attachment: Draft Agreement No. 14-31-103-00 Agenda Item 9E • 115 • CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION THIS CONTRACT is made this day of , 20_, in the County of , State of California, by and between the Riverside County Transportation Commission, hereinafter called Commission, and Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc., hereinafter called Contractor. The Commission and the Contractor for the considerations stated herein agree as follows: ARTICLE 1. SCOPE OF WORK. The Contractor shall perform all work within the time stipulated in the Contract and shall provide all labor, materials, equipment, tools, utility services, and transportation to complete all of the Work required in strict compliance with the Contract Documents as specified in Article 5 below for the following work: CONSTRUCTION SERVICES TO DEMOLISH, REPAIR, REMODEL, RE -CONSTRUCT AND/OR MITIGATE FIVE (5) RIGHT OF WAY (ROW) PROPERTIES FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT - PACKAGE 4 (hereinafter "Project"). The Contractor and its surety shall be liable to the Commission for any damages arising as a result of the Contractor's failure to comply with this obligation. ARTICLE 2. CONTRACT TIME. Time is of the essence in the performance of the Work. The Work shall be commenced on the dates stated in the Commission's Notices to Proceed 1 through 4, inclusive, as forth below. The Contractor shall complete all Work required by the Contract Documents in accordance with the Completion Dates set forth in the table below and within TWO HUNDRED SIXTY (260) calendar days from the commencement date stated in Notice to Proceed (NTP) 1, hereinafter Contract Time. Contractor will be provided access to begin work on each individual- parcel in accordance with the following intermediate NTP dates. No work shall be commenced on, or compensated for a parcel unless and until the Commission has issued an NTP for the relevant parcel. These dates are subject to revision by the Commission based on actual progress of pending parcel acquisitions. Revision of the NTP dates indicated below shall not constitute entitlement for additional compensation provided the overall contract period is not extended beyond 260 calendar days. NTP NO. PARCEL ANTICIPATED NTP DATE INTERIM MILESTONE DATE COMPLETION DATE 1 Diller, Donnie B. Family Trust (CPN 22113) 06/18/14 07/31/14 NTP 1 + 168 Days 2 HGN Corona Partners LLC (CPN 22089) 06/18/14 07/31/14 NTP 2 + 168 Days 3 Most Desert Rancho (CPN 22257) 07/03/14 08/14/14 NTP 3 + 168 Days 4 Z Corona (CPN 22178) 09/11/14 10/22/14 NTP 4 + 174 Days CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION 1 116 Contractor shall further complete elements of the work in accordance with the following interim milestones: Interim Milestone — Diller, Donnie B. Family Trust (CPN 22113): July 31, 2014 - Complete all contract work scope within the areas between the existing and proposed Caltrans Right of Way lines. Provide access to aforementioned areas for use by SR-91 CIP Design Build Contractor. Subsequent to the Interim Milestone date, Contractor's use of the area may be restricted in whole, or in part, by the Commission. Interim Milestone — HGN Corona Partners, LLC (CPN 22089): July 31, 2014 - Complete all contract work scope within the areas between the existing Caltrans Right of Way and the proposed City of Corona Right of Way lines. Provide access to aforementioned areas for use by SR-91 CIP Design -Build Contractor. Subsequent to the Interim Milestone date, Contractor's use of the area may be restricted in whole, or in part, by the Commission. Interim Milestone — Most Desert Rancho (CPN 22257): August 14, 2014 - Complete all contract work scope within the areas between the existing Caltrans Right of Way and the proposed City of Corona Right of Way lines. Provide access to "aforementioned areas for use by SR-91 CIP Design -Build Contractor. Subsequent to the Interim Milestone date, Contractor's use of the area maybe restricted in whole, or in part, by the Commission. Interim Milestone — Z Corona (CPN 22178): October 22, 2014 - Complete all contract work scope within the areas between the existing Caltrans Right of Way and the proposed City of Corona. Right of Way .lines. Provide access to aforementioned areas for use by SR-91 CIP Design -Build Contractor. Subsequent to the Interim Milestone date, Contractor's use of the area may be restricted in whole, or in part, by the Commission. The Commission reserves the right to withhold payment to the Contractor if the Contractor fails to complete the work under any of the Interim Milestones set forth above until such work is complete and accepted by the Commission. By its signature hereunder, Contractor agrees the time for completion set forth above is adequate and reasonable to complete the Work. ARTICLE 3. CONTRACT PRICE. The Commission shall pay to the Contractor as full compensation for the performance of the Contract, subject to any additions or deductions as provided in the - Contract Documents, and including all applicable taxes and costs, the sum of dollars ($ ), hereinafter, the Contract Price. Payment shall be made as set forth in the General Conditions. ARTICLE 4. LIQUIDATED DAMAGES. In accordance with Government Code Section 53069.85, it is agreed that the contractor will pay the Commission the sum of One Thousand Four Hundred Dollars ($1,400) for each and every calendar day of delay in completing the Work beyond each Completion Date set forth in Article 2 above, or beyond the Contract Time, as liquidated damages and not CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION 2 117 • • as a penalty or forfeiture. In the event the Contractor is assessed or incurs liquidated damages due to its delay of one or more Completion Dates or the Contract Time, such liquidated damages shall be cumulative. In the event this is not paid, the contractor agrees the Commission may deduct that amount from any money due or that may become due the Contractor under the Contract. This Article does not exclude recovery of other damages specified in the Contract Documents. In anticipation of, and compliance with, the provisions of California Public Contract Code § 7102 and because it is agreed by the Contractor and the Commission that actual damages are impracticable and extremely difficult to ascertain, if the Contractor is delayed in completing the work due solely to the fault of the Commission, and where such delay is unreasonable under the circumstances and not contemplated by the parties, the Contractor shall be entitled to the appropriate time extension and to payment of liquidated damages in the sum of One Thousand Four Hundred Dollars ($1,400) for each and every calendar day of delay. The Contractor expressly agrees to be limited solely to the liquidated damages for all such delays as defined in this subsection. ARTICLE 5. COMPONENT PARTS OF THE CONTRACT. The "Contract Documents" include only the following documents, each of which is incorporated into this Agreement by reference: ➢ Notice Inviting Bids ➢ Instructions to Bidders ➢ Contractor's Bid Forms ➢ Contractor's Certificate Regarding Workers' Compensation ➢ Bid Bond ➢ Designation of Subcontractors ➢ Information Required of Bidders ➢ Non -Collusion Declaration form ➢ Iran Contracting Act Certification ➢ Contract ➢ Performance Bond ➢ Payment (Labor and Materials) Bond ➢ General Conditions ➢ Special Provisions (or Special Conditions) ➢ Federal Requirements ➢ Technical Specifications prepared by Parsons Transportation Group and dated September 27, 2013 ➢ Greenbook Standard Specifications (Excluding Sections 1-9 in their entirety) ➢ City of Corona Public Works Department Standard Plans and Special Provisions ➢ Addenda ➢ Plans and Contract Drawings ➢ Approved and Fully Executed Change Orders The Contactor shall complete the Work in strict accordance with all of the Contract Documents. All of the Contract Documents are intended to be complementary. Work required by one of the Contract Documents and not by others shall be done as if required by all. This Contract shall supersede any prior CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION 3 118 agreement of the parties, whether written or oral. The Contract can be modified only by a written Change Order executed in accordance with the Contract Documents. ARTICLE 6. PROVISIONS REQUIRED BY LAW. Each and every provision of law required to be included in these Contract Documents shall be deemed to be included in these Contract Documents. The Contractor shall comply with all requirements of applicable federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations, including, but not limited to, the provisions of the California Labor Code and California Public Contract Code which are applicable to this Work. ARTICLE 7. INDEMNIFICATION. Contractor shall provide indemnification and defense as set forth in the General Conditions. ARTICLE 8. PREVAILING WAGES. Contractor shall be required to pay not less than the prevailing rate of wages in accordance with the Labor Code, which rates have been determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations and shall be made available at the Offices of the Commission or may be obtained online at http//www.dir.ca.gov/dlsr. The wage rates must be posted at the job site. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Contract has been duly executed by the above -named parties_, on the day and year above written. [SIGNATURES ON FOLLOWING PAGE] CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION • 4 119 • Riverside County Transportation Commission By: Signature Name Title Attest: Commission Clerk Approved as to form: Signature Name Title [NAME OF CONTRACTOR' By: Signature Name Title License Number Attest: By: Its: CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION 5 120 AGENDA ITEM 9F • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: _ June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Patricia Castillo, Capital Projects Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: State Route 60 Truck Climbing/Descending Lane Specifications, and Estimate and Right of Way Project — Plans, STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 12-31-092-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 12-31-092-00, with Caltrans to add the plans, specifications and estimate (PS&E) and right of way (ROW) roles and responsibilities for the State Route 60 truck climbing lane project, including current funding commitments; 2) Authorize the Chair or the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute future agreements with Caltrans within approved funding amounts. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The SR-60 truck climbing lane project is located east of Moreno Valley from Gilman Springs Road to Jack Rabbit Trail. The project scope includes an eastbound truck climbing lane and a westbound truck descending lane plus inside and outside standard shoulders. The project is a combination of a Caltrans sponsored safety project to construct shoulders, and the Commission's project to construct the truck lanes. At its February 2012 workshop, the Commission agreed to sponsor the project with Caltrans taking the lead on the project approval and environmental document (PA&ED) phase. PA&ED is scheduled for completion in September 2014. In November 2013, the Commission approved $27.6 million of State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) funds for construction. In January 2014, the Commission approved an additional $26.8 million in CMAQ funds to fund construction. Staff has been working with Caltrans to amend the cooperative agreement to define respective roles and responsibilities for the PS&E and ROW phases, which are expected to begin in the fall of 2014. In addition, the cooperative agreement is also being amended to reflect committed funds to date. Agenda Item 9F 121 Staff is proposing to reprogram and obligate $7 million of the current balance of CMAC1 funds for PS&E in order to meet the county's federal obligation target for this fiscal year. The $19.8 million of CMAC2 funds will remain available for construction. In addition, $0.6 million of STIP funds will be programmed for ROW with the balance of STIP funds programmed for construction. The reprogramming changes do not impact the overall project funding as the majority of the STIP and CMAC1 funds will remain in the construction phase. The revised funding is proposed as follows: $"(000's) CMAQ STIP-RIP Caltrans SHOPP Fed DEMO Total PA&ED 2,000 3,038 5,038 PS&E 7,000 1,500 8,500 ROW 550 450 1,000 CONS 19,800 27,050 28,700 75,550 Total 26,800 27,600 32,650 3,038 90,088 There is no fiscal impact as these expenditures and related funding do not pass through the Commission. Attachment: Draft Cooperative Agreement with Caltrans Agenda Item 9F • 122 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 EA ON69U 08-RIV-60-22.1/26.5 REPLACEMENT AGREEMENT (AMENDMENT NO.2) This AGREEMENT, effective on , is between the State of California, acting through its Department of Transportation, referred to as CALTRANS, and: Riverside County Transportation Commission, a public corporation/entity, referred to hereinafter as RCTC. RECITALS 1. PARTNERS are authorized to enter into a cooperative agreement for improvements to the state highway system (SHS) per the California Streets and Highways Code sections 114 and 130. 2. The PARTNERS hereto entered into Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) Agreement 08-1543 on July 26, 2012, said AGREEMENT defining the terms and conditions for addition of eastbound truck climbing lane and westbound truck descending lane, and upgrading existing inside and outside shoulder to current standards on State Route 60 (SR-60) between Gilman Springs Road (PM 22.2) and Jack Rabbit Trail (PM 26.5). 3. PARTNERS entered into Amendment No. 1 to AGREEMENT on October 23, 2012, to replace CMAQ funds with Earmark funds. 4. PARTNERS now have agreed to enter into this Replacement AGREEMENT in order to replace the terms of the old AGREEMENT (08-1543) in entirety with 08-1543 A/2 to reflect PA&ED, Plans, Specification and Estimates, Right of Way Support, Right of Way Capital, and to correct the post miles to 22.1/26.5. 5. For the purpose of this AGREEMENT, addition of eastbound truck climbing lane and westbound truck descending lane, and upgrading existing inside and outside shoulder to current standards on State Route 60 (SR-60) between Gilman Springs Road (PM 22.1) and Jack Rabbit Trail (PM 26.5) will be referred to hereinafter as PROJECT. This description only serves to identify the PROJECT. The project scope of work is defined in the appropriate authorizing documents for the PROJECT per the Project Development Procedures Manual. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014 02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 1 of 19 123 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 6. All responsibilities assigned in this AGREEMENT to complete the following PROJECT COMPONENTS will be referred to hereinafter as OBLIGATIONS: • Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) • Plans, Specifications, and Estimate (PS&E) • Right of Way Support (R/W SUPPORT) • Right of Way Capital (R/W CAPITAL) 7. This AGREEMENT is separate from and does not modify or replace any other cooperative agreement or memorandum of understanding between PARTNERS regarding the PROJECT. 8. The following work associated with this PROJECT has been completed or is in progress: • CALTRANS developed the Project Initiation Document (HID), relevant to the scope of the PROJECT under EA ON690, Project ID 0800000537 and under EA 0Q180, Project ID 0800020220. The Scope from both of these PIDs have been incorporated under this PROJECT. The SHOPP funds programmed under EA 0Q180 is available for this PROJECT. 9. In this AGREEMENT capitalized words represent either defined terms or acronyms. 10. PARTNERS hereby set forth the terms, covenants, and conditions of this AGREEMENT, under which they will accomplish OBLIGATIONS. RESPONSIBILITIES Sponsorship 11. RCTC is the SPONSOR for 100% of the PROJECT COMPONENTS included in this AGREEMENT. Funding 12. FUNDING PARTNERS, funding limits, spending limits, billing, and payment details are documented in the FUNDING SUMMARY. The FUNDING SUMMARY is incorporated and made an express part of this AGREEMENT. PARTNERS will execute a new FUNDING SUMMARY each time the funding, billing and payment details of the PROJECT change. The FUNDING SUMMARY will be executed by a legally authorized representative of the respective PARTNERS. The most current fully executed FUNDING SUMMARY supersedes any previous FUNDING SUMMARY created for this AGREEMENT. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 2 of 19 124 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 Replacement of the FUNDING SUMMARY will not require an amendment to the body of this AGREEMENT unless the funding changes require it. 13. All costs incurred for WORK except those that are specifically excluded in this AGREEMENT are OBLIGATIONS COSTS. OBLIGATIONS COSTS are to be paid from the funds shown in the FUNDING SUMMARY. Costs that are not OBLIGATIONS COSTS are to be paid by the PARTNER incurring the costs from funds that are outside the scope of this AGREEMENT. Implementing Agency 14. CALTRANS is IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for PA&ED. 15. CALTRANS is IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for PS&E. 16. CALTRANS is IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for RIGHT OF WAY. 17. The IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for a PROJECT COMPONENT will provide a Quality Management Plan (QMP) for that component as part of the PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN. 18. Any PARTNER responsible for completing WORK -shall make its personnel and consultants that prepare WORK available to help resolve WORK related problems and changes for the entire duration of the PROJECT including PROJECT COMPONENT work that may occur under separate agreements. Environmental Document Quality Control (EDQC) Program 19. Per NEPA assignment and CEQA statutes, CALTRANS will perform Environmental Document Quality Control and NEPA Assignment Review Procedures for environmental documentation. CEQA/NEPA Lead Agency 20. CALTRANS is the CEQA lead agency for the PROJECT. 21. CALTRANS is the NEPA lead agency for the PROJECT. Environmental Permits, Approvals and Agreements 22. PARTNERS will comply with the commitments and conditions set forth in the environmental documentation, environmental permits, approvals, and applicable agreements as those commitments and conditions apply to each PARTNER's responsibilities in this AGREEMENT. 23. Unless otherwise assigned in this AGREEMENT, the IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for a PROJECT COMPONENT is responsible for all PROJECT COMPONENT WORK associated with coordinating, obtaining, implementing, renewing, and amending the PROJECT permits. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 3 of 19 125 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 24. The PROJECT requires the following environmental requirements/approvals: 404, US Army Corps Of Engineers 401, Regional Water Quality Control Board National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), State Water Resources Control Board 1602 California Department of Fish and Wildlife FESA Section 7 USFWS Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) 25. As IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for PA&ED, CALTRANS is responsible for all PA&ED WORK except those PA&ED activities and responsibilities that are. assigned to another PARTNER in this AGREEMENT and those activities that may be specifically excluded. 26. The PARTNER preparing the environmental documentation, including the studies and reports, will ensure that qualified personnel remain available to help resolve environmental issues and perform any necessary work to ensure that the PROJECT remains in environmental compliance. California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) 27. CALTRANS will determine the type of environmental documentation required and will cause that documentation to be prepared in accordance with'CEQA requirements. 28. Any PARTNER involved in the preparation of CEQA environmental documentation will follow the CAL FRANS STANDARDS that apply to the CEQA process including the guidance provided in the Standard Environmental Reference (SER) available at www.dot.ca.gov/ser. 29. Any PARTNER preparing any portion of the CEQA environmental documentation, including any studies and reports, will submit that portion of the documentation to the CEQA Lead Agency for review, comment, and approval at appropriate stages of development prior to public availability. 30. CALTRANS will attend all CEQA-related public meetings. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 4 of 19 126 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 31. If a PARTNER who is not the CEQA lead agency holds a public meeting about the PROJECT, that PARTNER must clearly state its role in the PROJECT and the identity of the CEQA lead agency on all meeting publications. All meeting publications must also inform the attendees that public comments collected at the meetings are not part of the CEQA public review process. That PARTNER will submit all meeting advertisements, agendas, exhibits, handouts, and materials to the CEQA lead agency for review, comment, and approval at least ten (10) working days prior to publication or use. If that PARTNER makes any changes to the materials, it will allow the CEQA lead agency to review, comment on, and approve those changes at least three (3) working days prior to the public meeting date. The CEQA lead agency maintains final editorial control with respect to text or graphics that could lead to public confusion over CEQA-related roles and responsibilities. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) 32. Pursuant to Chapter 3 of Title 23, United States Code (23 U.S.C. 326) and 23 U.S.C. 327, CALTRANS is the NEPA lead agency for the PROJECT. CALTRANS is responsible for NEPA compliance and will prepare any needed NEPA environmental documentation or will cause that documentation to be prepared. CAL TRANS, as the NEPA lead agency for PROJECT, will review, comment, and approve all environmental documentation (including, but not limited to, studies, reports, public notices, and public meeting materials, determinations, administrative drafts, and final environmental documents) at appropriate stages of development prior to approval and public availability. When required as NEPA lead agency, CALTRANS will conduct consultation and coordination and obtain, renew, or amend approvals pursuant to the Federal Endangered Species Act, and Essential Fish Habitat, as required. When required as NEPA lead agency, CAL TRANS will conduct consultation and coordination approvals pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, as required. 33. Any PARTNER involved in the preparation of NEPA environmental documentation will follow FHWA and CALTRANS STANDARDS that apply to the NEPA process including, but not limited to, the guidance provided in the FHWA Environmental Guidebook (available at www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/index.htm) and the CALTRANS Standard Environmental Reference. 34. Any PARTNER preparing any portion of the NEPA environmental documentation (including, but not limited to, studies, reports, public notices, and public meeting materials, determinations, administrative drafts, and final environmental documents) will submit that portion of the documentation to CALTRANS for CALTRANS' review, comment, and approval prior to public availability. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02 12 (Created 05/12/14) 5 of 19 127 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 35. CALTRANS will prepare, publicize, and circulate all NEPA-related public notices. CALTRANS will work with the appropriate federal agency to publish notices in the Federal Register. 36. CAL TRANS will attend all NEPA-related public meetings. 37. If a PARTNER who is not the NEPA lead agency holds a public meeting about the PROJECT, that PARTNER must clearly state its role in the PROJECT and the identityof the NEPA lead agency on all meeting publications. All meeting publications must also inform the attendees that public comments collected at the meetings are not part of the NEPA public review process. That PARTNER will submit all meeting advertisements, agendas, exhibits, handouts, and materials to the NEPA lead agency for review, comment, and approval at least ten (10) working days prior to publication or use. If that PARTNER makes any changes to the materials, it will allow the NEPA lead agency to review, comment on, and approve those changes at least three (3) working days prior to the public meeting date. The NEPA lead agency has final approval authority with respect to text or graphics that could lead to public confusion over NEPA-related roles and responsibilities. Plans, Specifications, and Estimate (PS&E) 38. As IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for PS&E, CALTRANS is responsible for all PS&E WORK except those PS&E;activities and responsibilities that are assigned to another PARTNER in this AGREEMENT and those activities that may be specifically excluded. 39. CALTRANS will prepare Utility Conflict Maps identifying the accommodation, protection, relocation, or removal of any existing utility facilities that conflict with construction of the PROJECT or that violate CALTRANS' encroachment policy. Right of Way (R/W) 40. As IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for R/W, CALTRANS is responsible for all R/W SUPPORT WORK except those R/W SUPPORT activities and responsibilities that are assigned to another PARTNER in this AGREEMENT and those activities that may be specifically excluded. 41. The cost to perform R/W SUPPORT activities, whether inside or outside SHS right of way, will be determined in accordance with federal and California laws and regulations, and CALTRANS' policies, procedures, standards, practices, and applicable agreements. 42. CALTRANS will make all necessary arrangements with utility owners for the timely accommodation, protection, relocation, or removal of any existing utility facilities that conflict with construction of the PROJECT or that violate CALTRANS' encroachment policy. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 6 of 19 128 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 43. CALTRANS will determine the cost to positively identify and locate, protect, relocate, or remove any utility facilities whether inside or outside SHS right of way in accordance with federal and California laws and regulations, and CALTRANS' policies, procedures, standards, practices, and applicable agreements, including but not limited to Freeway Master Contracts. 44. CALTRANS will provide a land surveyor licensed in the State of California to be responsible for surveying and right of way engineering. All survey and right of way engineering documents will bear the professional seal, certificate number, registration classification, expiration date of certificate, and signature of the responsible surveyor. 45. CALTRANS will provide a Right of Way Certificate prior to PROJECT advertisement. 46. Physical and legal possession of right of way must be completed prior to construction advertisement, unless PARTNERS mutually agree to other arrangements in writing. Right of way conveyances must be completed prior to OBLIGATION COMPLETION, unless PARTNERS mutually agree to other arrangements in writing. 47. The California Transportation Commission will hear and may adopt Resolutions of Necessity. However, the authorization to hear and adopt Resolutions of Necessity may be assigned to RCTC if such assignment is approved in writing by CALTRANS. Schedule 48. PARTNERS will manage the schedule for OBLIGATIONS through the work plan included in the PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN. Additional Provisions 49. PARTNERS will perform all OBLIGATIONS in accordance with federal and California laws, regulations, and standards; FHWA STANDARDS; and CALTRANS STANDARDS. 50. Each PARTNER will ensure that personnel participating in OBLIGATIONS are appropriately qualified or licensed to perform the tasks assigned to them. 51. PARTNERS will invite each other to participate in the selection of any consultants who participate in OBLIGATIONS. 52. The IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for a PROJECT COMPONENT will coordinate, prepare, obtain, implement, renew, and amend any encroachment permits needed to complete the PROJECT COMPONENT WORK. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 7 of 19 129 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 53. If any PARTNER discovers unanticipated cultural, archaeological, paleontological, or other protected resources during WORK, all WORK in that area will stop and that PARTNER will notify all PARTNERS within 24 hours of discovery. WORK may only resume after a qualified professional has evaluated the nature and significance of the discovery and a plan is approved for its removal or protection. 54. PARTNERS will hold all administrative drafts and administrative final reports, studies, materials, and documentation relied upon, produced, created, or utilized for the PROJECT in confidence to the extent permitted by law and where applicable, the provisions of California Government Code section 6254.5(e) shall protect the confidentiality of such documents in the event that said documents are shared between PARTNERS. PARTNERS will not distribute, release, or share said documents with anyone other than employees,agents, and consultants who require access to complete the PROJECT without the written consent of the PARTNER authorized to release them, unless required or authorized to do so by law. 55. If a PARTNER receives a public records request pertaining to OBLIGATIONS, that PARTNER will notify PARTNERS within five (5) working days of receipt and make PARTNERS aware of any disclosed public documents. PARTNERS will consult with each other prior to the release of any public documents related to the PROJECT. 56. If HM-1 or HM-2 is found during a PROJECT COMPONENT, IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for that PROJECT COMPONENT will immediately notify PARTNERS. 57. CALTRANS, independent of the PROJECT, is responsible for any PIM-1 found within the existing SHS right of way. CALTRANS will undertake, or cause to be undertaken, HM MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES related to HM-1 with minimum impact to the PROJECT schedule. The cost for HM MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES related to HM-1 found within the existing SHS right of way is not an OBLIGATIONS COST and CALTRANS will pay, or cause to be paid, all costs for HM-1 ACTIVITIES. 58. If HM-1 is found within the PROJECT limits and outside the existing SHS right of way, responsibility for such HM-1 rests with the owner(s) of the parcel(s) on which the HM-1 is found. RCTC, in concert with the local agency having land use jurisdiction over the parcel(s), will ensure that HM MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES related to HM-1 are undertaken with minimum impact to PROJECT schedule. The costs for HM MANAGEMENT -ACTIVITIES related to HM-1 found within the PROJECT limits and outside the existing SHS right of way are not an OBLIGATIONS COST and will be the responsibility of the owner(s) of the parcel(s) where the 1-1M-1 is located. 59. If HM-2 is found within the PROJECT limits, the public agency responsible for the advertisement, award, and administration (AAA) of the PROJECT construction contract will be responsible for HM MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES related to HM-2. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 8 of 19 130 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 60. CALTRANS' acquisition or acceptance of title to any property on which any HM-1 or HM-2 is found will proceed in accordance with CALTRANS' policy on such acquisition. 61. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY for each PROJECT COMPONENT will furnish PARTNERS with written quarterly progress reports during the implementation of OBLIGATIONS in that component. 62. Any PARTNER that is responsible for completing OBLIGATIONS will accept, reject, compromise, settle, or litigate claims arising from those OBLIGATIONS. 63 PARTNERS will confer on any claim that may affect OBLIGATIONS or PARTNERS' liability or responsibility under this AGREEMENT in order to retain resolution possibilities for potential future claims. No PARTNER will prejudice the rights of another PARTNER until after PARTNERS confer on claim. 64. PARTNERS will maintain, and will ensure that any party hired by PARTNERS to participate in OBLIGATIONS will maintain, a financial management system that conforms to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), and that can properly accumulate and segregate incurred PROJECT costs and billings. 65. If FUNDING PARTNERS fund any part of OBLIGATIONS with state or federal funds, each PARTNER will comply, and will ensure that any party hired to participate in OBLIGATIONS will comply with the federal cost principles of 2 CFR, Part 225, and administrative requirements outlined in 49 CFR, Part 18. These principles and requirements apply to all funding types included in this AGREEMENT. 66. PARTNERS will maintain and make available to each other all OBLIGATIONS -related documents, including financial data, during the term of this AGREEMENT. PARTNERS will retain all OBLIGATIONS -related records for three (3) years after the final voucher. 67. PARTNERS have the right to audit each other in accordance with generally accepted governmental audit standards. CALTRANS, the state auditor, FHWA (if the PROJECT utilizes federal funds), and RCTC will have access to all OBLIGATIONS -related records of each PARTNER, and any party hired by a PARTNER to participate in OBLIGATIONS, for audit, examination, excerpt, or transcription. The examination of any records will take place in the offices and locations where said records are generated and/or stored and will be accomplished during reasonable hours of operation. The auditing PARTNER will be permitted to make copies of any OBLIGATIONS -related records needed for the audit. The audited PARTNER will review the draft audit, findings, and recommendations, and provide written comments within thirty (30) calendar days of receipt. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 9 of 19 131 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 Upon completion of the final audit, PARTNERS have thirty (30) calendar days to refund or invoice as necessary in order to satisfy the obligation of the audit. Any audit dispute not resolved by PARTNERS is subject to mediation. Mediation will follow the process described in the General Conditions section of this AGREEMENT. 68. If FUNDING PARTNERS fund any part of the PROJECT with state or federal funds, each FUNDING PARTNER will undergo an annual audit in accordance with the Single Audit Act and the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133. 69. If the PROJECT expends federal funds, any PARTNER that hires an A&E consultant to perform WORK on any part of the PROJECT will ensure that the procurefnent of the consultant and the consultant overhead costs are in accordance with Chapter 10 of the Local Assistance Procedures Manual. 70. PARTNERS will not incur costs beyond the funding commitments in this AGREEMENT. If IMPLEMENTING AGENCY anticipates that funding for WORK will be insufficient to complete WORK, IMPLEMENTING AGENCY will promptly notify SPONSOR. 71. If WORK stops for any reason, each PARTNER will continue to implement all of its applicable commitments and conditions included in the PROJECT environmental documentation, permits, agreements, or approvals that are in effect at the time that WORK stops, as they apply to each PARTNER's responsibilities in this AGREEMENT, in order to keep the PROJECT in environmental compliance until WORK resumes. 72. Unless otherwise documented in the FUNDING SUMMARY, all fund types contributed to a PROJECT COMPONENT will be spent proportionately within that PROJECT COMPONENT. 73. Unless otherwise documented in the FUNDING SUMMARY, any savings recognized within a PROJECT COMPONENT will be credited or reimbursed, when allowed by policy or law, in proportion to the amount contributed to that PROJECT COMPONENT by each fund type. 74. If FUNDING PARTNERS fund OBLIGATIONS with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, PARTNERS will adopt the terms, conditions, requirements, and constraints of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. 75. If FUNDING PARTNERS fund OBLIGATIONS with Proposition '1'B Bond funds, PARTNERS will meet the requirements of California Government Code Section 8879.20 et al. (Proposition 1 legislation), the governor's Executive Order 2007-S-02-07, and the California Transportation Commission (CTC) program guidelines for the applicable account. Right of way purchased using Proposition 1 B Bond funds will become the property of CALTRANS, and any revenue from the sale of excess lands originally purchased with bond funds will revert to CALTRANS. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 10 of 19 132 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 76. CALTRANS will administer any federal subvention funds shown in the FUNDING SUMMARY table. 77. The cost of awards, judgments, or settlements generated by OBLIGATIONS is an OBLIGATIONS COST. 78. The cost of legal challenges to the environmental process or documentation is an OBLIGATIONS COSTS. 79. The cost of coordinating, obtaining, complying with, implementing, renewing, and amending resource agency permits, agreements, and approvals is an OBLIGATIONS COST. 80. Fines, interest, or penalties levied against a PARTNER are not an OBLIGATIONS COST and will be paid, independent of OBLIGATIONS COST, by the PARTNER whose actions or lack of action caused the levy. 81. The cost of any engineering support performed by CAL'1'RANS includes all direct and applicable indirect costs. CAL TRANS calculates indirect costs based solely on the type of funds used to pay support costs. State and federal funds administered by CALTRANS are subject to the current Program Functional Rate. All other funds are subject to the current Program Functional Rate and the current Administration Rate. The Program Functional Rate and Administration Rate are adjusted periodically. 82. Travel, per diem, and third -party contract reimbursements are an OBLIGATIONS COST only after those hired by PARTNERS to participate in OBLIGATIONS incur and pay those costs. Payments for travel and per diem will not exceed the rates paid rank and file state employees under current California Department of Personnel Administration (DPA) rules current at the effective date of this AGREEMENT. If RCTC invoices for rates in excess of DPA rates, RCTC will fund the cost difference and reimburse CALTRANS for any overpayment. 83. If CALTRANS reimburses RCTC for any costs later determined to be unallowable, RCTC will reimburse those funds. 84. If there are insufficient funds available in this AGREEMENT to place PROJECT right of way in a safe and operable condition, the appropriate IMPLEMENTING AGENCY will fund these activities until such time as PARTNERS amend this AGREEMENT. That IMPLEMENTING AGENCY may request reimbursement for these costs during the amendment process. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 11 of 19 133 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 85. If there are insufficient funds in this AGREEMENT to implement applicable commitments and conditions included in the PROJECT environmental documentation, permits, agreements, and/or approvals that are in effect at a time that WORK stops, each PARTNER accepts responsibility to fund their respective OBLIGATIONS until such time as PARTNERS amend this AGREEMENT. Each PARTNER may request reimbursement for these costs during the amendment process. 86. After PARTNERS agree that all WORK is complete for a PROJECT COMPONENT, PARTNER(S) will submit a final accounting for all OBLIGATIONS COSTS. Based on the final accounting, PARTNERS will refund or invoice as necessary in order to satisfy the financial commitments of this AGREEMENT. GENERAL CONDITIONS 87. PARTNERS understand that this AGREEMENT is in accordance with and governed by the Constitution and laws of the State of California. This AGREEMENT will be enforceable in the State of California. Any PARTNER initiating legal action arising from this AGREEMENT will file and maintain that legal action in the Superior Court of the county in which the CALTRANS district office that is signatory to this AGREEMENT resides, or in the Superior Court of the county in which the PROJECT is physically located. 88. All OBLIGATIONS of CAL I BANS under the terms of this AGREEMENT are subject to the appropriation of resources by the Legislature, the State Budget Act authority, and the allocation of funds by the California Transportation Commission. 89. Neither RCTC nor any officer or employee thereof is responsible for any injury, damage or liability occurring by reason of anything done or omitted to be done by CALTRANS and/or its agents under or in connection with any work, authority, or jurisdiction conferred upon CALTRANS under this AGREEMENT. It is understood and agreed that CALTRANS, to the extent permitted by law, will defend, indemnify, and save harmless RCTC and all of its officers and employees from all claims, suits, or actions of every name, kind, and description brought forth under, but not limited to, tortious, contractual, inverse condemnation, or other theories and assertions of liability occurring by reason of anything done or omitted to be done by CALTRANS and/or its agents under this AGREEMENT. 90. Neither CALTRANS nor any officer or employee thereof is responsible for any injury, damage, or liability occurring by reason of anything done or omitted to be done by RCTC, its contractors, sub -contractors, and/or its agents under or in connection with any work, authority, or jurisdiction conferred upon RCTC under this AGREEMENT. It is understood and agreed that RCTC, to the extent permitted by law, will defend, indemnify, and save harmless CALTRANS and all of its officers and employees from all claims, suits, or actions of every name, kind, and description brought forth under, but not limited to, tortious, contractual, inverse condemnation, or other theories and assertions of liability occurring by reason of anything done or omitted to be done by RCTC, its contractors, sub -contractors, and/or its agents under this AGREEMENT. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 12 of 19 134 • AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 91. PARTNERS do not intend this AGREEMENT to create a third party beneficiary or define duties, obligations, or rights in parties not signatory to this AGREEMENT. PARTNERS do not intend this AGREEMENT to affect their legal liability by imposing any standard of care for fulfilling OBLIGATIONS different from the standards imposed by law. 92. PARTNERS will not assign or attempt to assign OBLIGATIONS to parties not signatory to this AGREEMENT without an amendment to this AGREEMENT. 93. RCTC will not interpret any ambiguity contained in this AGREEMENT against CAL 1 RANS. RCTC waives the provisions of California Civil Code section 1654. A waiver of a PARTNER's performance under this AGREEMENT will not constitute a continuous waiver of any other provision. 94. A delay or omission to exercise a right or power due to a default does not negate the use of that right or power in the future when deemed necessary. 95. If any PARTNER defaults in its OBLIGATIONS, a non -defaulting PARTNER will request in writing that the default be remedied within thirty (30) calendar days. If the defaulting PARTNER fails to do so, the non -defaulting. PARTNER may initiate dispute resolution. 96. • PARTNERS will first attempt to resolve AGREEMENT disputes at the PROJECT team level. If they cannot resolve the dispute themselves, the CALTRANS district director and the executive officer of RCTC will attempt to negotiate a resolution. If PARTNERS do not reach a resolution, PARTNERS' legal counsel will initiate mediation. PARTNERS agree to participate in mediation in good faith and will share equally in its costs. Neither the dispute nor the mediation process relieves PARTNERS from full and timely performance of OBLIGATIONS in accordance with the terms of this AGREEMENT. However, if any PARTNER stops fulfilling OBLIGATIONS, any other PARTNER may seek equitable relief to ensure that OBLIGATIONS continue. Except for equitable relief, no PARTNER may file a civil complaint until after mediation, or forty-five (45) calendar days after filing the written mediation request, whichever occurs first. PARTNERS will file any civil complaints in the Superior Court of the county in which the CALTRANS district office signatory to this AGREEMENT resides or in the Superior Court of the county in which the PROJECT is physically located. The prevailing PARTNER will be entitled to an award of all costs, fees, and expenses, including reasonable attorney fees as a result of litigating a dispute under this AGREEMENT or to enforce the provisions of this article including equitable relief. 97. PARTNERS maintain the ability to pursue alternative or additional dispute remedies if a previously selected remedy does not achieve resolution. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 13 of 19 135 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 98. If any provisions in this AGREEMENT are found by a court of competent jurisdiction to be, or are in fact, illegal, inoperative, or unenforceable, those provisions do not render any or all other AGREEMENT provisions invalid, inoperative, or unenforceable, and those provisions will be automatically severed from this AGREEMENT. 99. PARTNERS intend this AGREEMENT to be their final expression that supersedes any oral understanding or writings pertaining to the OBLIGATIONS. 100. If during performance of WORK additional activities or environmental documentation is necessary to keep the PROJECT in environmental compliance, PARTNERS will amend this AGREEMENT to include completion of those additional tasks. 101. Except as otherwise provided in the AGREEMENT, PARTNERS will execute a formal written amendment if there are any changes to OBLIGATIONS. 102. If the work performed on this Project is done under contract and falls within the Labor Code section 1720(a)(1) definition of "public works" in that it is construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair; or maintenance work under Labor Code section 1771 RCTC must conform to the provisions of Labor Code sections 1720 through 1815, and all applicable provisions of California Code of Regulations found in Title 8, Division 1, Chapter 8, Subchapter 3, Articles 1-7. RCTC agrees to include prevailing wage requirements in its contracts for public work. Work performed by RCTC's own forces is exempt from the Labor Code's Prevailing Wage requirements. RCTC shall require its contractors to include prevailing wage requirements in all subcontracts funded by this AGREEMENT when the work to be performed by the subcontractor is "public works" as defined in Labor Code Section 1720(a)(1) and Labor Code Section 1771. Subcontracts shall include all prevailing wage requirements set forth in RCTC contracts. 103. If WORK is paid for, in whole or part, with federal funds and is of the type of work subject to federal prevailing wage requirements, PARTNERS shall conform to the provisions' of the Davis - Bacon and Related Acts, 40 U.S.C. § 276(a). When applicable, PARTNERS shall include federal prevailing wage requirements in contracts for public work. WORK performed by a PARTNER's employees is exempt from federal prevailing wage requirements. 104. PARTNERS agree to sign a COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT CLOSURE STATEMENT to terminate this AGREEMENT. However, all indemnification, document retention, audit, claims, environmental commitment, legal challenge, maintenance and ownership articles will remain in effect until terminated or modified in writing by mutual agreement or expire by the statute of limitations. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 14 of 19 136 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 DEFINITIONS AGREEMENT — This agreement including any attachments, exhibits, and amendments. ARRA — The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. CALTRANS STANDARDS — CALTRANS policies and procedures, including, but not limited to, the guidance provided in the Project Development Procedures Manual (PDPM) and the CALTRANS Workplan Standards Guide for the Delivery of Capital Projects (WSG) [which contains the CALTRANS Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and was previously known as the WBS Guide] and is available at http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/projmgmt/guidance.htm. CEQA (California Environmental Quality Act) — The act (California Public Resources Code, sections 21000 et seq.) that requires state and local agencies to identify the significant environmental impacts of their actions and to avoid or mitigate those significant impacts, if feasible. CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) — The general and permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT CLOSURE STATEMENT —A document signed by PARTNERS that verifies the completion of all OBLIGATIONS included in this AGREEMENT and in all amendments to this AGREEMENT. EDQC (Environmental Document Quality Control) - CALTRANS quality control and quality assurance procedures for all environmental documents as described in the Jay Norvell Memos dated October 1, 2012 (available at http://www.dot.ca.gov/ser/memos.htm#LinkTarget_705). This also includes the independent judgment analysis and determination under CEQA that the environmental documentation meets CEQA Guideline requirements. FHWA — Federal Highway Administration. FHWA STANDARDS — FHWA regulations, policies and procedures, including, but not limited to, the guidance provided at www.fhwa.dot.gov/topics.htm. FUNDING PARTNER — A PARTNER, designated in the FUNDING SUMMARY, that commits a defined dollar amount to fulfill OBLIGATIONS. Each FUNDING PARTNER accepts responsibility to provide the funds it commits in this AGREEMENT. FUNDING SUMMARY — An executed document that names FUNDING PARTNER(S), includes a FUNDING TABLE, SPENDING SUMMARY, deposit amounts, and invoicing and payment methods. FUNDING TABLE — The table that designates funding sources, types of funds, and the PROJECT COMPONENT in which the funds are to be spent. Funds listed on the FUNDING TABLE are "not -to -exceed" amounts for each FUNDING PARTNER. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 15 of 19 137 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) — Uniform minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting issued by the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board that serve to achieve some level of standardization. See http://www.fasab.gov/accepted.html. HM-1— Hazardous material (including, but not limited to, hazardous waste) that may require removal and disposal pursuant to federal or state law whether it is disturbed by the PROJECT or not. HM-2 — Hazardous material (including, but not limited to; hazardous waste) that may require removal and disposal pursuant to federal or state law only if disturbed by the PROJECT. HM MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES _ Management activities related to either HM-1 or HM-2 including, without limitation, any necessary manifest requirements and disposal facility designations. IMPLEMENTING AGENCY — The PARTNER is responsible for managing the scope, cost, and schedule of a PROJECT COMPONENT to ensure the completion of that component. NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act of 1969) — This federal act establishes a national policy for the environment and a process to disclose the adverse impacts of projects with a federal nexus. OBLIGATIONS — All WORK responsibilities and their associated costs. OBLIGATION COMPLETION — PARTNERS have fulfilled all OBLIGATIONS included in this AGREEMENT, and all amendments to this AGREEMENT, and have signed a COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT CLOSURE STATEMENT. OBLIGATIONS COST(S) — The cost(s) to complete the responsibilities assigned in this AGREEMENT. Costs that are specifically excluded in this AGREEMENT or that are not incurred in the performance of the responsibilities in this AGREEMENT are not OBLIGATIONS COSTS. OBLIGATIONS COSTS are to be paid from the funds shown in the FUNDING SUMMARY. Costs that are not OBLIGATIONS COSTS are to be paid by the party that incurs the cost from funds that are outside the scope of this AGREEMENT. PA&ED (Project Approval and. Environmental Document) — See PROJECT COMPONENT. PARTNER — Any individual signatory party to this AGREEMENT. PARTNERS — The term that collectively references all of the signatory agencies to this AGREEMENT. This term only describes the relationship between these agencies to work together to achieve a mutually beneficial goal. It is not used in the traditional legal sense in which one PARTNER's individual actions legally bind the other PARTNER. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 16 of 19 138 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 PROJECT COMPONENT — A distinct portion of the planning and project development process of a capital project as outlined in California Government Code, section 14529(b). • PID (Project Initiation Document) — The work required to deliver the project initiation document for the PROJECT in accordance with CALTRANS STANDARDS. • PA&ED (Project Approval and Environmental Document) — The work required to deliver the project approval and environmental documentation for the PROJECT in accordance with CALTRANS STANDARDS. • PS&E (Plans, Specifications, and Estimate) — The work required to deliver the plans, specifications, and estimate for the PROJECT in accordance with CALTRANS STANDARDS. • R/W (Right of Way) —The project components for the purpose of acquiring real property interests for the PROJECT in accordance with CALTRANS STANDARDS. • R/W (Right of Way) SUPPORT —The work required to obtain all property interests for the PROJECT. • R/W (Right of Way) CAPITAL — The funds for acquisition of property rights for the PROJECT. • CONSTRUCTION — The project components for the purpose of completing the construction of the PROJECT in accordance with CALTRANS STANDARDS. • CONSTRUCTION SUPPORT — The work required for the administration, acceptance, and final documentation of the construction contract for the PROJECT. • CONSTRUCTION CAPITAL — The funds for the construction contract. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN — A group of documents used to guide the PROJECT's execution and control throughout that project's lifecycle. PS&E (Plans, Specifications, and Estimate) — See PROJECT COMPONENT. QMP (Quality Management Plan) — An integral part of the PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN that describes IMPLEMENTING AGENCY'S quality policy and how it will be used. R/W (Right of Way) CAPITAL — See PROJECT COMPONENT. R/W (Right of Way) SUPPORT — See PROJECT COMPONENT. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 17 of 19 139 AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 SHS (State Highway System) — All highways, right of way, and related facilities acquired, laid out, constructed, improved, or maintained as a state highway pursuant to constitutional or legislative authorization. SPENDING SUMMARY — A table that identifies the funds available for expenditure by each PARTNER. The table shows the maximum reimbursable expenditure for each PARTNER in each PROJECT COMPONENT. SPONSOR — Any PARTNER that accepts the responsibility to establish scope of the PROJECT and the obligation to secure financial resources to fund the PROJECT COMPONENTS in this AGREEMENT. SPONSOR is responsible for adjusting the PROJECT scope to match committed funds or securing additional funds to fully fund the PROJECT COMPONENTS in this AGREEMENT. If this AGREEMENT has more than one SPONSOR, funding adjustments will be made by percentage (as outlined in Responsibilities). Scope adjustments must be developed through the project development process and must be approved by CALTRANS as the owner/operator of the SHS. WORK - All efforts to complete the OBLIGATIONS included" in this AGREEMENT as described by the activities in the CALTRANS Workplan Standards Guide for the Delivery of Capital Projects (WSG). PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 18 of 19 140 • AGREEMENT 08-1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 SIGNATURES PARTNERS are empowered by California Streets and Highways Code Section 114 & 130 to enter into this AGREEMENT and have delegated to the undersigned the authority to execute this AGREEMENT on behalf of the respective agencies and covenants to have followed all the necessary legal requirements to validly execute this AGREEMENT. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION By: Basem E. Muallem, P.E. District Director CERTIFIED AS TO FUNDS: By: Lisa Pacheco Budget Manager RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: Anne Mayer Executive Director APPROVED AS TO FORM AND PROCEDURE: By: Best, Best, And Krieger General Counsel PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 19 of 19 141 FUNDINGOLIARY No. 01 PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) • FUNDING SUMMARY AGREEMENlik 1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 EA ON69U 08-RIV-60-22.1 /26.5 1 of 3 142 FUNDING SUMMARY No. 01 Note: Funds utilization will be based on: 40% SHOPP and 60% STP funds for PA&ED 26% SHOPP and 74% CMAQ funds for PS&E 64% RIP and 36% SHOPP for Right of Way support PACT Projeceelopment Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 101 AGREEMENT 08 - 1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 41) 2 of 3 FUNDING SUMMARY No. 1 AGREEMENT 08 - 1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 Invoicing and Payment 1. PARTNERS will invoice for funds where the SPENDING SUMMARY shows that one PARTNER provides funds for use by another PARTNER. PARTNERS will pay invoices within thirty (45) calendar days of receipt of invoice. 2. If RCTC has received Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) certification from CALTRANS then RCTC will use the EFT mechanism and follow all EFT procedures to pay all invoices issued from CALTRANS. RCTC will pay all invoices via EFT within 5 days of receipt of invoice. 3. When CALTRANS is to be reimbursed from state or federal funds that are provided by RCTC and CALTRANS administers those funds then CALTRANS will draw from those funds without invoicing RCTC. 4. When a PARTNER is reimbursed for actual costs from funds administered by another PARTNER, invoices will be submitted each month for the prior month's expenditures. Project Approval and Environmental Document (PA&ED) 5. No invoicing or reimbursement will occur for the PA&ED PROJECT COMPONENT. Plans, Specifications, and Estimate (PS&E) 6. No invoicing or reimbursement will occur for the PS&E PROJECT COMPONENT. Right of Way Support (R/W SUPPORT) 7. No invoicing or reimbursement will occur for the R/W SUPPORT PROJECT COMPONENT. Right of Way Capital (R/W CAPITAL) 8. CALTRANS will invoice and RCTC will reimburse for the accepted offer price of parcels. PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 3 of 4 144 Signatures STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION APPROVED By: Date: Basem E. Muallem, P.E. District Director By: District Budget Manager By: HQ Accounting FUNDING SUMMARY No. 1 AGREEMENT 08 - 1543 A/2 Project No. 0812000307 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION APPROVED By: Anne Mayer Executive Director Date: PACT Project Development Agreement 2014_02_12 (Created 05/12/14) 4 of 4 145 AGENDA ITEM 9G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Perris Valley Line — Riverside Hunter Park Station Utility Easement STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the Easement Deed between the Commission and the city of Riverside, for Assessor Parcel Number (APN) 249-070-042, for underground utilities necessary for the future Riverside Hunter Park Station without any monetary compensation exchanged between the parties; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the deed on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is the owner of a 14.47 acre vacant lot purchased on November 11, 2012 that will serve as the Riverside Hunter Park Station for the Perris Valley Line (PVL) project. The Riverside Hunter Park Station is located in the city of Riverside, also known as APN 249-070-042. On May 9, 2012 the Commission allocated funds for the share of utility relocation work necessary along the PVL. On March 7, 2013, the Commission agreed to Utility Agreement 398, executed between the Commission and city of Riverside Public Utilities -Electric Division that addressed the current 10-foot aerial easement at the Riverside Hunter Park Station (Instrument Number 1962.104176). Per the executed utility agreement, the 10-foot aerial easement was in conflict and would require encasement of the utilities at their current location. However, as utility relocations are taking place for the PVL project, it is evident a portion of the existing easement would need to be quitclaimed to the Commission in order to avoid a conflict with the proposed Riverside Hunter Park Station design and platform. Since all interests will be quitclaimed, a new 6,671 square feet easement would be necessary to accommodate the city of Riverside's underground utilities that include a transformer and junction cabinets. Staff is requesting approval of the new 6,671 square foot easement with the city of Riverside in order to move forward with the utility relocation at the Riverside Hunter Park Station. Since the Commission is only replacing an existing aerial easement to an underground easement, no monetary compensation will be exchanged between the parties. There is no fiscal impact related to this easement transaction. Attachment: Easement Deed Agenda Item 9G 146 RECORDING REQUESTED BY WHEN RECORDED RETURN TO: City Clerk's Office City of Riverside City Hall, 3900 Main Street Riverside, CA 92522 APN: 249-070-042 Above Space for Recorder's Use EXEMPT FROM RECORDING FEES PURSUANT TO GOV. CODE § 27383 NO DOCUMENTARY TRANSFER TAX PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA REVENUE & TAXATION CODE § 11922 ELECTRICAL EASEMENT AGREEMENT This Electrical Easement Agreement ("Easement Agreement") is entered into this day of , 20_ by and between RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION, a public agency of the state of California ("Grantor"), and the CITY OF RIVERSIDE, a municipal corporation of the state of California ("Grantee"). For valuable consideration, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, Grantor hereby grants and declares as follows: 1. Grant of Electrical Easement. Grantor is the owner of that certain real 'property located in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, more particularly described in Exhibit "1" attached hereto ("Grantor's Property"). Grantor hereby grants, reserves, and establishes for the benefit of Grantee an irrevocable, perpetual easement ("Electrical Easement") for the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, operation, inspection, repair, replacement, relocation, renewal and removal of underground electrical energy distribution facilities, together with all the necessary appurtenances, in, under, upon, over and along that certain portion of Grantor's Property as more particularly described and depicted in Exhibits "2" and "3" attached hereto ("Easement Area"). 2. The Electrical Easement. Grantee shall have the perpetual, non-exclusive right to use the Easement Area in accordance with the conditions and covenants as set forth herein. 3. Purpose of Electrical Easement. The purpose of this easement is to provide the right to clear and keep clear said easement and right of way from any structures or trees, to enter upon and pass and repass over and along said real property, and to deposit tools, implements and other material thereon by Grantee, its officers, agents and employees and by persons under contract with said Grantee and their officers, agents and employees, whenever and wherever necessary for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing, maintaining, operating, inspecting, repairing, replacing, relocating, renewing and removing said underground electrical energy distribution facilities. 17336.00603\7865303.1 1 147 4. Use of Electrical Easement. Grantor hereby covenants and agrees, by and for itself, and its successors and assigns, that Grantor shall not, without the express written consent of Grantee, erect, place or maintain any fence, building, structure or other obstruction on or near the Electrical Easement that may interfere with Grantee's use of the Electrical Easement or take any other action or grant any other privilege that may interfere with the reasonable exercise by Grantee of its rights and privileges under this Easement Agreement. Grantee hereby covenants and agrees, by and for itself, and its successors and assigns, that Grantee's use of the Electrical Easement shall not unnecessarily disrupt Grantor's use of the adjacent rail station. Grantee shall provide Grantor with such advance notice as may be reasonable prior to disrupting Grantor's use of the adjacent rail station. 5. Attorney Fees. In the event it becomes necessary to institute any action at law or in equity, whether pursued in a court of law, equity or by arbitration to enforce the terms of this Easement Agreement, the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorney fees and costs. 6. Electrical Easement Runs with the Land. The Electrical Easement, rights, and obligations herein shall be perpetual, shall run with the land of the respective parties hereto and shall be binding upon, and inure to the benefit of, the parties hereto and their respective successors and assigns. 7. Headings. Section headings contained in this Easement Agreement are for convenience only and shall have no effect in the construction or interpretation of any provision herein. 8. Severability. If any portion of this Easement Agreement is declared invalid, illegal, or otherwise unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 9. Counterparts. This Easement Agreement may be signed in counterparts, each of which shall constitute an original. 10. Governing Law. This Easement Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. 11. No Waiver. Failure of a party hereto to insist on any one occasion upon strict compliance with any of the terms, covenants or conditions hereof shall not be deemed a waiver of such term, covenant or condition, nor shall any waiver or relinquishment of any rights or powers hereunder at any one time or more times be deemed a waiver or relinquishment of such other right or power at any other time or times. 12. Entire Agreement. This Easement Agreement contains the entire agreement of the parties relating to the subject matter hereof and supersedes all prior negotiations, agreements or understandings. No supplement, modification, or amendment of this Easement Agreement shall be binding unless executed in writing and signed by both parties. 17336.00603\7865303.1 2 • • • 148 • • 13. Binding Effect. This Easement Agreement shall be binding on and shall inure to the benefit of the heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns of Grantors and Grantee. 17336.00603\7865303.1 [Signatures on following page] 3 149 SIGNATURE PAGE TO ELECTRICAL EASEMENT AGREEMENT IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned parties hereto have executed this Access Easement Agreement as of the date first written above. GRANTOR: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: Anne Mayer Its: Executive Director APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Steve DeBaun Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission GRANTEE: CITY OF RIVERSIDE By: Name: Its: ATTEST: By: Name: Its: Approved as to form: 17336.00603\7865303.1 4 • 150 • • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF On before me, , Notary Public, personally appeared who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or the entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal. Signature (Seal) 17336.00603\7865303.1 5 151 EXHIBIT "1" TO GRANT OF ELECTRICAL EASEMENT LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF GRANTOR'S PROPERTY All that certain real property situated in the County of Riverside, State of California, described as follows: Parcel 2 of Lot Line Adjustment No. LL-P06-1026, recorded September 28, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-0717818, of Official Records, being more particularly described as follows: That portion of Parcel C of City of Riverside Lot Line Adjustment LL-P05-0323, per Certificate of Compliance recorded June 30, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-0522960, Official Records, Records of Riverside County, California, said portion also being portions of Lots 17 and 18 of Twogood and Herrick's Subdivision, on file in Book 7, of Maps, Page 29 thereof, records of San Bernardino County, California, being described as a whole as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Parcel C, said corner also being on the Northerly line of Marlborough Avenue, said Northerly line being a line parallel with, and 33.00 feet Northerly of the centerline of said Marlborough Avenue; thence North 89°49'59" West, along the Southerly line of said Parcel C, a distance of 726.48 feet; Thence North 0°10'01" East, a distance of 551.99 feet, to the Northerly line of said Parcel C; Thence North 89°43'27" East, along the Northerly line, a distance of 741.41 feet, to the Northeast corner of said Parcel C; Thence South 01°41'51" West (recorded as South 01°41'52" West), along the Easterly line of said Parcel C, a distance of 557.92 feet, to the point of beginning. 17336.00603\7865303.1 Exhibit 1 152 EXHIBIT "2" TO GRANT OF ELECTRICAL EASEMENT LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF ELECTRICAL EASEMENT AREA Real property in the City of Riverside, County of Riverside, State of California, described as follows: 173 36.00603\7865303.1 (See Attached) Exhibit 2 153 • • 17 33 6.00603\7 8653 03.1 EXHIBIT "3" TO GRANT OF ELECTRICAL EASEMENT DEPICTION OF ELECTRICAL EASEMENT AREA [See Attached] Exhibit 3 154 EXHIBIT "A" PROPOSED EASEMENT: REAL PROPERTY IN THE COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL 2 OF LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT LL-P06-1026, PER CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE RECORDED SEPTEMBER 28, 2006 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2006-0717818 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, LAYING EASTERLY FROM THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF MALBOROUGH AVE BEING 66 FEET WIDE, SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEING 10 FEET WESTERLY, MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ATCHISON TOPECA AND SANTA FE RAILROAD 100 FEET WIDE; THENCE NORTHERLY 214.85 FEET ALONG A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT 10.00 FEET WESTERLY, MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES, FROM THE SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE WESTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES 11.00 FEET TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 21.00 FEET, MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES, FROM SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY 51.22 FEET ALONG SAID PARALLEL LINE; THENCE EASTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES 11.00 FEET TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 10.00 FEET FROM SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY 179.05 FEET ALONG THE LAST MENTIONED PARALLEL LINE; THENCE WESTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES 8.00 FEET TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 18.00 FEET FROM SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY 29.23 FEET ALONG THE LAST MENTIONED PARALLEL LINE; THENCE EASTERLY 7.00 FEET AT RIGHT ANGLES TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 11.00 FEET, MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES, FROM SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY 13.31 FEET ALONG THE LAST MENTIONED PARALLEL LINE; THENCE WESTERLY 7.00 FEET AT RIGHT ANGLES TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 18.00 FEET, MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES, FROM SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY 35.18 FEET ALONG THE LAST MENTIONED PARALLEL LINE; THENCE 8.00 FEET EASTERLY AT RIGHT ANGLES TO A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT WESTERLY 10.00 FEET FROM THE SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG SAID LAST MENTIONED PARALLEL LINE 34.74 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE END OF THIS DESCRIPTION. CONTAINING 6,671 SQUARE FEET, MORE OR LESS SEE EXHIBIT "B" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE PART HEREOF PREPARED UNDER MY SUPERVISION: BARBORA KONECNA L.S. 8498 EXP. 12-31-14 ate: May 22, 2014 CAL VADA SURVEYING, INC. 411 JENKS CIRCLE, SUITE 205, CORONA, CA. 92880 PHONE: 951-280-9960 FAX: 951-280-9746 www.calvada.com Job No. 14344 PAGE 1 OF 2 Los Angeles • Denver 1DD EXHIBIT "B" PLAT TO ACCOMPANY DESCRIPTION f_ COL UMB1A AVE a PORTION LOT 13 TWOGOOD AND HERRICK'S SUBDIVISION M. B. 7/29 SCALE: 1 "= 100' te: May 22, 2014 PARCEL 2 L.L.A. NO. LL-P06-9026 REC. SEPT. 28, 2006 INSTRUMENT NO. 2006-0717818 O.R. PROPOSED EASEMENT PORTION LOT / 8 TWOGOOD AND HERRICK'S SUBDIVISION M. B. 7/29 CAL VADA MALBOROUGH AVE SURVEYING, INC. 411 JENKS CIRCLE, SUITE 205, CORONA, CA. 92880 34.74 35.18' 29.23' I 11.°,„ 50.Oy v♦a �'a♦. 21.0' TOY JY.i t 11.00' Y a P.O.B. } 10.0' Job No. 14344 PAGE 2 OF 2 Los Angeles = Denver PHONE:951-280-9960 FAX:951-280-9746 www.calvada.com 1JU AGENDA ITEM 9H RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Riverside Transit Agency and SunLine Transit Agency Fiscal Year 2013/14 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve modifications to Riverside Transit Agency's (RTA) FY 2013/14 operating assistance program to cover additional costs for the following: 1) three new positions ($78,970); 2) new DAR contractor, Ve )lia Transportation (Veolia) ($505,162); and 3) Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA) study ($144,432) for a total amount not to exceed $728,564 to be funded with a combination of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds, Measure A, and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Sections 5307, 5309, 5316 (Job Access Reverse Commute), 5317 (New Freedom), and 5309 carryover funds; 2) Approve modifications to SunLine Transit Agency's (SunLine) FY '2013/14 capital improvement program to reflect an additional $4,251,307 in FTA CalStart Section 5309 funds and $900,000 in California Energy Commission (CEC) matching funds for a new battery dominant fuel cell bus project; 3) Change the scope of SunLine's programmed four replacement paratransit vans funded with State Transit Assistance (STA) to two replacements and two expansion vehicles for the provision of paratransit service with no additional cost; 4) Allocate $60,583 in LTF funds to cover the needed funds resulting from the personnel and operating changes outlined above; and 5) Approve amendments to the RTA and SunLine FY 2013/14 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) to reflect the changes above. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its July 2013 meeting, the Commission approved and adopted the FY 2013/14 operating and capital funding allocations for Riverside County based on the FY 2013/14 SRTP updates prepared by transit operators providing public transit services in the county. Since the inception of the fiscal year, a number of operating and capital funding changes occurred that necessitate amendments and modifications to the currently approved SRTP budgets for RTA and SunLine. Agenda Item 9H 157 RTA Operating Assistance As the first half of the FY 2013/14 unfolded, RTA needed to adjust the current fixed route service to enhance service capacity and improve service efficiency. In February 2013, RTA's previous purchased transportation contractor was replaced by Veolia for the provision of dial -a - ride service. As a result, the agency was impacted with a $505,162 additional expense based on the difference between Veolia's and the outgoing operator's contract rate. In addition, RTA amended its COA scope of work to include additional work on the Riverside Transit Center site selection and outreach activities. The requested operating amendment will reflect the following additional expenses: • $78,970 — additional operating cost to cover three new positions: one Travel Training Specialist, one Servicer, one Human Resources Manager. This amount will be funded mostly with the most recent FTA Section 5317 New Freedom grant funds; • $505,162 - additional operating cost resulting from the differential cost between the contract rates of the outgoing operator and the new operator (Veolia) for the provision of paratransit service. This amount will be funded with both LTF and federal Section 5307 funds; and • $144,432 — additional COA study amount to cover expanded scope of work for the Riverside Transit Center relocation site ($69,432) and for the additional outreach task and development of a proposed recommendations brochure ($75,000). SunLine's Capital Assistance In September 2013, SunLine received a grant award totaling $4,251,307 in Section 5309 federal funds, as a subrecipient of the CalStart pass through funding for a new battery dominant fuel cell bus. The bus will be built by a highly experienced team consisting of BAE System, Hydrogenics, and ElDorado National who submitted the project proposal to FTA and CEC for funding to develop alternative fuel vehicles. The CEC amount of $900,000 will be applied toward the required local matching funds to the FTA CalStart project. SunLine is also modifying the scope of the approved purchase of four vans for replacements programmed under Sunline's FY 2013/14 SRTP to two vans for replacements and two vans for expansion of paratransit service to meet the fast growing paratransit ridership in Coachella Valley. Modification requests are as follows: • Reflect an additional $4,251,307 in FTA 5309 CalStart funding for a new battery dominant fuel cell bus; • Reflect $900,000 amount allocated by CEC to provide the local match funds for the dominant fuel cell bus project; and • Modify the scope of the STA funded project from four replacement paratransit vans to two replacements and two for expansion vehicles to serve the Coachella Valley's growing paratransit ridership. • Agenda Item 9H 158 • • Financial Impact For RTA's amendment, the financial impact to the Commission is the allocation of $60,583 of additional LTF funds; however, the FY 2013/14 Commission budget is sufficient for the increased LTF expenditures and no budget amendment is required. RTA's operating increase will impact the agency's farebox recovery ratio slightly, however, its revised farebox recovery ratio remains compliant with the agency's established farebox ratio target for FY 2013/14. SunLine's battery dominant fuel cell bus project is fully funded through FTA and the matching funds will be provided by CEC; therefore, no additional local match funds are needed. The scope modification for the four vans will not change the approved budgeted amount of $440,000 for the project. There is no impact to the farebox recovery ratio and to other Productivity Improvement Program indicators since the added revenue sources are for capital purposes only. The attachments show a comparison of the original and modified FY 2013/14 SRTP Table 4, detailing changes and adjustments in funding sources for SunLine and RTA. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2013/14 Amount: $60,583 Source of Funds: LTF Budget Adjustment: No GLA No.: 002210 81601 601 62 81601 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \i/tzvaj Date: 05/19/14 Attachment: 1) RTA FY 2013/14 Operating Assistance by Funding Source 2) SunLine FY 2013/14 Capital Assistance by Funding Source Agenda Item 9H 159 • Table 1a. Currently Approved Operating Funding Plan • Riverside Transit Agency FY 2013/14 SRTP - Table 4 Amendment # 1 Operating Assistance by Funding Source Table 1 - Operating Assistance ATTACHMENT 1 • Project Description Total Amount of Funds LTF LTF Carryover Measure A Operating Assistance Measure A Operating Assistance RCTC Reserves Section 5307 - Riv-San Bemardino Section 5307 - Temecula/ Murrieta Section 5307 - Hemet/San Jacinto Section 5307 Carryover Section 5309 Carryover Section 5311 TUMF Carryover Section 5316 JARC Section 5317 New Freedom Farebox Other Revenue Operating Assistance Operating Assistance - CTSA GASB 43/45 ARC OCTA 794 JARC CommuterLink 212 8 217 JARC Fixed Route Service County Shuttle Route 54 Farebox (Cash, Tix, Passes) Travel Training COA/BRT Study Federal Excise Tax Credit Interest Income Advertising Revenue CNG Sales Medi-Cal Reimbursement Retiree Medical PAY Go Capitalized Preventive Maintenance Capital Cost of Contracting 32,998,975 686,000 1,350,000 124,000 975,399 773,651 111,007 10,265,742 162,068 430,000 400,000 20,000 15,000 50,000 400,000 200,000 7,020,000 5,200,000 29,228,975 1,350,000 447,506 568,451 45,068 200,000 1,420,000 740,000 1,645,000 686,000 124,000 130,001 43,200 111,007 13,000 107,500 4,200,000 2,200,000 1,200,000 1,500,000 1,700,000 200,000 760,000 161,250 425,000 161,250 235,000 135,000 52,000 52,000 162,892 27,000 10,265,742 400,000 20,000 15,000 50,000 200,000 200,000 Total: Operating $61,181,842 $34,000,000 $0 $2,752,208 $107,500 $6,400,000 $2,700,000 $1,700,000 $960,000 $161,250 $425,000 6161,250 $422,000 $52,000 $10,455,634 $885,000 Table lb. Modified Operating Funding Plan REVISED Operating Assistance Operating Assistance - CTSA GASB 43/45 ARC OCTA 794 REVISED JARC Fixed Rents Seri dmil Fee} County Shuttle Route 54 Farebox (Cash, Tix, Passes tdeS J4RC" Federal Excise Tax Credit Interest Income Advertising Revenue CNG Sales Medi-Cal Reimbursement Retiree Medical PAY Go Capitalized Preventive Maintenance Capital Cost of Contracting 32,870,702 686,000 1,350,000 124,000 Total: Operating 111,007 10,265,742 400,000 20,000 15,000 50,000 400,000 200,000 7,020,000 5,200,000 661,910,406 29,100,702 1,350,000 200,000 1,420,000 740,000 $34,060,583 $13,886 1.645.000 686.000 124,000 111.007 4.200,000 2.200.000 1.200.000 1.500.000 1.700,000 425.000 0,265,742 ■ 200.000 760.000 400,000 20,000 15,000 50,000 200,000 200,000 62,766,541 6107,500 66,579,970 62,700,000 $1,700,000 $960,000 $216 79s $425,000 $161,250 $661,317 $216,929 $10,455,634 $885,000 Net Change between Currently Approved and Modified Operating Plan 6728,564 660,583 613,886 614,333 $0 6179,970 $0 $0 $0 $55,546 $0 $0 $239,317 $164,929 $0 $0 160 • Table 1a: Currently Approved Capital Funding Plan • SUNLINE TRANSIT AGENCY FY 2013/14 SRTP - TABLE 4 AMENDMENT # 1 FY 2013/14 CAPITAL ASSISTANCE BY FUNDING SOURCE ATTACHMENT 2 • Project Description Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds With Carryover Total Amount of Funds Without Carryover Total Carryover Amount LTF STA Carryover STA Prop 1 B Transit Security CalStart/FTA Section 5307 Indio/Cathe dral City Palm Springs Carryover Section 5307 Indio/Cathed ral City Palm Springs Other Revenue Bus Rehabilitation (15 engines, trans) SL-14-01 $825,000 $615,000 $210,000 $123,000 $42,000 $492,000 $168,000 4 Paratransit replacement vans SL-14-02 $440,000 $120,000 $320,000 $24,000 $80,000 $96,000 $240,000 Transit Enhancement (38 bus shelters) + new stop signage SL-14-03 $531,870 $483,149 $48,721 $36,865 $13,135 $281,870 $164,414 $35,586 Camera System Update (10 El Dorados) SL-14-04 $90,000 $90,000 $0 $90,000 IT Projects SL-14-05 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $60,000 $240,000 New CNG Fueling Station Study and Construction in Thousand Palms SL-14-06 $2,700,000 $2,700,000 $0 $2,500,600 $200,000 Replacement & New Service Vehicles (6 trucks, 3 cars replace, 2 new cars) SL-14-07 $440,000 $440,000 $0 $88,000 $352,000 American Fuel Cell Bus Warranty SL-14-08 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $0 $1,200,000 Total: Capital $6,526,870 $5,948,149 $578,721 $0 $2,831,865 $135,135 $371,870 $1,200,000 $1,544,414 $443,586 $0 Table 1b: Modified Capital Funding Plan Project Description Capital Project Number Total Amount of Funds With Carryover Total Amount of Funds Without Carryover Total Carryover Amount LTF STA Carryover STA Prop 1 B Transit Security CalStart/FTA Section 5307 Indio/Cathe dral City Palm Springs Carryover Section 5307 Indio/Cathed ral City Palm Springs Other Revenue (CECfunds) Bus Rehabilitation (15 engines, trans) SL-14-01 $825,000 $615,000 $210,000 $123,000 $42,000 $492,000 $168,000 "I nencem BPentod� s SL-14-02 $440,000 $120,000 $320,000 $24,000 $80,000 $96,000 $240,000 ransil tp elter + new signage ( SL-14-03 $531,870 $483,149 $48,721 $36,865 $13,135 $281,870 $164,414 $35,586 Camera System Update (10 El Dorados) SL-14-04 $90,000 $90,000 $0 $90,000 IT Projects SL-14-05 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $60,000 $240,000 New CNG Fueling Station Study and Construction Thousand Palms SL-14-06 $2,700,000 $2,700,000 $0 $2,500,000 $200,000 Replacement & New Service Vehicles (6 trucks, 3 replacement cars, 2 new cars) SL-14-07 $440,000 $440,000 $0 $88,000 $352,000 American Fuel Cell Bus Warranty SL-14-08 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $0 $1,200,000 SL-14-09 $5,151,307 $5,151,307 $0 %r r �ei�1m3 Total: Capital $11,678,177 $11,099,456 $578,721 $0 $2,831,865 $135,135 $371,870 $5,451,307 $1,544,414 $443,586 $900,000 161 AGENDA ITEM 91 • RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: June 11, 2014 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Years 2014/15 — 2016/17 Short Range Transit Plans STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to review and approve, in concept, the FYs 2014/15 — 2016/17 Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) for the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and the Commission's Rail Program, as presented. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Riverside County FYs 2014/15 - 2016/17 SRTP's cover the three apportionment areas of the county and are comprised of plans for the municipal operators, RTA, SunLine, PVVTA, and the Commission's Commuter Rail Program in Western Riverside and Coachella Valley. Under state law, the Commission is tasked with the responsibility to identify, analyze, and recommend potential productivity improvements to ensure that federal, state, and local funds allocated to transit operators provide services needed by county residents and are used in an efficient and effective manner. Through the SRTP planning process, the Commission and transit agencies determine the transit needs of the community and analyze current transportation services and the ability to meet those needs in a three-year time frame. The SRTPs include service recommendations aimed at improving service delivery and meeting identified unmet transit needs. The SRTP process also requires the transit operators address recommendations made by regular performance audits. These recommendations that affect service and operations are then included in subsequent SRTP documents. In addition, the SRTP is used as documentation to support projects included in the regional transportation plan prepared by the Southern California Association of Governments, the region's metropolitan planning organization, which also serves as the primary justification for receipt of federal grants for transit operations and capital projects. To meet the growing demand for transit services, the operators are focusing on implementing new routes, improving frequency, and refining schedules to develop stronger intercity and regional network. Express bus route and CommuterLink route extensions to the proposed new trains along the 91 Line are planned for implementation this year. Procurement of needed Agenda Item 91 162 vehicles is ongoing for both expansion and replacement of aging buses. To ensure service quality and reliability, other capital facilities such as transit centers, bus shelters, additional slow fill stations, and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling dispensers are planned for construction and installation. In addition, necessary access and mobility improvements are also being implemented to better serve the county's disabled, elderly; and lower -income populations. Operators are also furthering efforts to develop and assess marketing plans to continue and introduce new transit options. This annual update aims to continue evaluating current transit service to keep up with increasing travel demand withintheregion. Each operator's performance data is incorporated into the SRTP preparation to provide context for potential service and new capital equipment and facility considerations for existing and next three year's investment. Staff is requesting the SRTPs be approved in concept only, as requests for financial allocations will be made at the July Commission meeting. City of Banning The city of Banning (Banning) works closely with the city of Beaumont (Beaumont) to provide a seamless transit system for the residents of Banning, Beaumont, and the unincorporated areas of Cabazon and Cherry Valley, and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians reservation. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • Implement new routes and schedules as recommended in the Comprehensive Operational Analysis (COA); • Purchase one Americans with Disabilities Act accessible van and two fixed route coaches; • Install auto display and enunciator equipment for fixed route fleet and purchase additional equipment for camera system to enable wireless download; and • Continue coordination with Beaumont staff regarding routes/schedules, passenger amenities, and fares to ensure Pass Transit provides a seamless connection and ease of use to the San Gorgonio Pass Area residents. City of Beaumont Beaumont Transit provides both dial -a -ride and fixed route services and works closely with Banning to provide a seamless transit system in the San Gorgonio Pass Area. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • Finalize a COA in coordination with the Banning, RTA, and SunLine; • Implement recommendations from the COA to increase service and improve customer service; • Install more bus shelters and bus benches throughout the service area; and • Continue collaborative efforts with Banning to improve coordination of routes, schedules, passenger amenities and fares for seamless transit service in the San Gorgonio Pass Area. Agenda Item 91 163 • • • City of Corona The city of Corona (Corona) operates a fixed route system known as the Corona Cruiser and a general public dial -a -ride program. Corona closely coordinates all transfers with both RTA and the Commission's Commuter Rail services. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • Implement additional morning and afternoon service for the Blue Line; • Conduct the first annual Corona Transit Month to solicit and prioritize fixed route service requests; • Purchase and install two CNG fueling dispensers; • Replace the current reservation and dispatch system and replace equipment for the CNG slow -fill facility; and • Continue to work with the Corona -Norco Unified School District in identifying times and locations to service commuting students. City of Riverside — Special Services Riverside Special Services (RSS) operates a 24-hour advance reservation dial -a -ride for seniors and persons with disabilities within the Riverside city limits. The program serves as an alternative to RTA's transit service for seniors and persons with disabilities unable to use fixed route service. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: •' Install additional slow -fill stations and resurface and repaint the Riverside Corporation Yard to meet fueling demands and increase visibility; • Procure nine paratransit vehicles for replacement using Federal Transit Administration and Proposition 1B funds; • Install additional lighting and cameras in the special transportation parking lot and in the newly constructed CNG vehicle maintenance facility; and • Finalize the design plan to expand and modernize the operations facility to include a larger dispatch center and a separate conference room. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency The PVVTA provides fixed route and a transportation reimbursement program for individuals who cannot ride the public bus system. The fixed route can deviate up to three-quarters of a mile away from the actual fixed route. Service is provided within the city of Blythe and surrounding unincorporated county areas in the Palo Verde Valley. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • Current transit service contract with Transportation Concepts will end September 30, 2014, and a request for proposals will be released in FY 2014/15 for a new contractor; Agenda Item 91 164 • Grant funds for the Mobility Management project expires on September 30, 2014. Staff is currently exploring other funding opportunities to continue the program; • Continue to place passenger amenities at strategic locations to promote new ridership through target marketing and partnerships; and • Continue to work toward completion of the new transit facility construction and upgrades in FY 2014/15. Riverside Transit Agency RTA provides local, intercity, and regional transportation services. As the Consolidated Transportation Service Agency (CTSA)-for Western Riverside County, RTA is responsible for coordinating transit services throughout the service area and providing driver training and grant applications assistance to operators in Western County. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • Focus on capacity building efforts to improve regional and community mobility, improving frequency and transfers, and developing a strong network regionally; • Prepare for major projects such as the Perris Valley Line (PVL) and: Route 1 Limited -Stop service; • Plan additional trips for CommuterLink Routes 206, 208, 210, and 212 for the proposed new trains along the 91 Line targeted for 2014. Additional changes during the fiscal year are contingent upon the finalization of the COA; • Continue refining existing service through improved scheduling, streamlining and better serving communities with the available resources; and • Increase operating budget by approximately 8.2 percent over FY 2013/14 budget. SunLine Transit Agency SunLine is the CTSA for Coachella Valley and is responsible for coordinating transit services in the valley, which covers a service area of approximately 1,120 square miles, SunLine provides both local and regional transportation services with 13 fixed routes and demand response Bial- a -ride services known as SunDial. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include; • Implement improved weekday service frequency for Line 14 (Desert Hot Springs to Palm Springs) and Line 30 (Cathedral City to Palm Springs); • Implement improved weekend service frequency for Line 111; • Continue operation of FY 2013/14 service improvements on Line 54 (Fred Waring Drive) and Line 95 (North Shore); • Complete construction and occupy the new administrative building project at Thousand Palms, as well as commence the new CNG fueling station project; and • Continue Taxi Voucher program in Coachella Valley. Agenda Item 91 • 165 Commission's Rail Program The Southern California Regional Rail Authority operates seven commuter rail lines with 52 locomotives and 150 commuter rail cars. Three routes - the Riverside to Los Angeles Line, the Inland Empire to Orange County Line (IEOC), and the Riverside to Los Angeles via Fullerton Line (91 Line) - directly serve Western Riverside County with connecting service available to destinations on the other four lines. Planned services for FY 2014/15 include: • No fare increase planned for FY 2014/15; • Continue construction of the PVL project; • Significant cost increase due to implementation of positive train control; • Potential service increase on 91 Line for both weekday and weekend; and • Support development of Coachella Valley commuter rail facilities. Attachments: FYs 2014/15 — 2016/17 Operator SRTPs — (Posted on the Commission Website) 1) City of Banning 2) City of Beaumont 3) City of Corona 4) City of Riverside 5) Coachella Valley Rail Program 6) PVVTA 7) RTA 8) SunLine 9) Western Riverside Rail Program Agenda Item 91 166 ATTACHMENT 1 PASSTRANSIT BANNING TRANSIT SYSTEM FY 2014/15- 2016/17 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN TAW I: 1, OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONn o v v v n o o o n n a n n a v e u o n a u v a u a v u n e e v n v e v o v n o o v o o n v v v o n v o v n v o a u a v u v u u a u e u n e c v e o n u c o n o v v e n n n n o o v u o o v e u e u e e v o u o v v v o e l CHAPTER ER 1 — SYSTEhli OVERVIEW.....vvvvv...vvevvvv..v.vnuuuvvuvvvvvvvvvvvanvnv..o aoouaunuusovvvvovvvonnnnov 1.1 Description of Service Area 1 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections 3 1.3 Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service, Regional Express [bus Service 4 1.4 Current Fare Structure and Proposed Fare Structure 7 1.5 Revenue Fleet 7 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities 8 CHAPTER. 2 e EXISTING SERVICE AND ROUTE PERFORMANCE n vuevvvvvovevvvv vv vv.00aaov•C9 2.1 Fixed Route Service — Route by Route Analysis 8 2.2 Dial -A -Ride Service — System Performance 9 2.3 Key Performance Indicators 10 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts 11 2.5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Two Years 12 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs 12 CHAPTER 3 u PLANNED SERVICE CHANGES AND IMPLEMENTATION 2 3.1 Recent Service Changes 12 3.2 Marketing Plans and Promotions 12 CHAPTER 4 m FINANCIAL AND CAPITAL PLANS 13 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 13 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Proposed Operating and Capital Program 13 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 14 TABLES Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 3A Table 4 Table 4A Table 5.1 Table 5.2 Table 6 Table 7 Table 3 Table 9 APPENDIX A - Fleet Inventory - SRTP Service Summary - SRTP Route Statistics - Individual Route Description - Summary of Funds Requested for FY 2014/15 - Capital Project Justification - Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2015/16 - Summary of Funds Requested in FY 2016/17 - FY 2012 Triennial Performance Audit Recommendations -- Service Provider Performance Target Report Year to Date - FY 14/15 SRTP Performance Report - Highlights of Short Range Transit Plan Route by Route Draft Recommendations INTRODUCTION Banning Transit System began as one intercity fixed route in April 1973, and then expanded to two routes in September 1985. Fixed route service Cabazon and the commercial area of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians Reservation began in July 1995, as the system's third route. Banning Dial -A -Ride service for seniors and persons with disabilities began in October 1985. In November 2004, Bass Transit System began as a result of a combined effort between Banning Transit System and Beaumont Transit System to provide more efficient public 'transportation throughout the Pass area. Routes 1 and 2 were modified from the previous Banning Transit System Cabazon Route and Beaumont Transit System Route 1. Banning's Northern Route was renumbered Route 5 and Banning's Southern Route was renumbered Route 6. Beaumont's existing Routes 3 and 4 remained the same. A Memorandum of Understanding(MOU) was developed to allow each city's Dial -A -Ride services to cross jurisdictional boundary lines so a passenger would not have to transfer A new joint Rider's Guide was developed, combined transfers and ten -ride ticket books were printed, buses and bus stop signs were decaled `Kass Transit' and fares were established to be the same for the convenience of riders. The Banning Transit System functions as a department within the city and is managed by and under the direction of the Community Services Director. The city of Banning Transit Department employs a Lead Bus Driver/Trainer, six full-time bus drivers, four part-time bus drivers, two part-time Dial -A -Ride drivers, 1.5 full-time equivalent Office Specialists, and one fleet mechanic. CHAPT R 1 o SYSTEM OVERVIEW 1.1 Description of Service Area Banning Transit serves the commercial and residential areas of Banning and residential and commercial areas in Cabazon and the commercial areas of the Morongo Indian Reservation, with additional service to limited commercial areas in Beaumont. The cities of Banning and Beaumont work together to provide a seamless transit service by operating under a single brand identity and fare structure and by coordinating routes that cover approximately 40 square miles Within the service area, high density areas are separated by significant areas of low density. The main transportation corridor is on Ramsey Street in Banning which becomes 6th Street Beaumont. Along the corridor there is a concentration of population, employment, minority, and poverty densities. 1 Z R1f epI .0 AyuaJadsgs z r a 0 m Q r _mop Nlunuiwo0 uoncre: !Q aaut414( 01.11510 D 41* lieYJ aana0 utrals, N OZVEIVD a a tS Anisam ap _S�fw41 �3uluurg } 04 �5 Ay Remisam agelvt saw uns RAH saln ur13 upon o� fafltrl 00044 SuuJas S£ M1b azu sas sut:nfuwq m 23auu03 tOtligt? pug tclionA 8u1.uas 9£ VJ.21 l�tiPJ�{ 2uWa; it vi :DI Japutt n `cD .s c a • s_ isassieglijs,..allralSMISISMIA'1 -- 1r go `. � • :, , ��N n tt ` 4�. al is 1 uostue8 .3 it °' �_.., x i, T I T. Ic.� �� IS tiarl� a , _ n T. a m - .p s 1S tin oit�o��s � s 1 ,r ' .r. .., S $ co n ea M CS CD D ate. 0) 0) ,. }5 c Los m g a u, � 31414 ? _ Cat; �tD � xi a a z saam) < < ► J y < a aquas = 1s aleeea�i, l ' L.__u�7'. <+ 2up uz 1 flp ` � a 18 � 01 Li }4��nug E 1 I 1=PS __ R � 0. � z � �C lL i{���1 1171 ; p i �agddex . 1 L39 Z pr. cal rL 1.2 Population Profile and Demographic Projections The residential population within the Banning Transit System's service area has grown approximately 29% since 2000. Per the 2010 census there were 29,603 people .Population density was 1,281.57 people per square mile. There were 12,144 housing units at an average density of 423 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 64.74% White, 4.1.15% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 8.55% African -American, 2.30% Native American, 5.23% Asian, 15.55% from other races (one race), and 4.87% from two or more races. Of the 10,838 households, 22.4% had children under the age of 18. 47.11 % were married couples living together, and 23.70% were non -families. 28.53% of all households were made up of individuals and 18 4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.19. The city's population under 19 years of age was 25.78%, 17.48% was 20 to 34 years old, 20.43% was 25 to 44 years of age, 21.57% was 45 to 64 years old, and 25.88% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.30 years. Data from the 2011 Pass Area Transit Study reported that female riders outnumber males nearly 2 to 1. Interestingly, while the highest amount of passengers reported to be between the ages of 20-29, this age group has the lowest percentage of Banning residents. Ridership ethnicity closely parallels the population ethnicity in the city of Banning. o Caucasian Riders 47% Hispanic Riders 34% • African American Riders 12% • Asian Riders 1 % Riders 2% Others 4% The surveys further showed that 86% of the system's fixed route ridership use transit services at least three times a week, 59% of the ridership use transit services for local trips within the Banning/Beaumont/Cabazon area, 49% use transit for travel outside of the local service areas, and 91 % of the system's ridership do not have access to a car. Respondents also indicated that transit services are readily available with the majority of riders living within two blocks or less of bus stop. Eighty-seven percent of the rider households speak English as their primary language and 13% speak Spanish as their primary language. 3 It would appear that the majority of regular Banning Transit System riders counted in the above percentages share the commonality of either being underemployed or unemployed, with 88% of riders reporting annual household incomes of $20,000 or less and 81 % reporting a household size greater than two. 1.3 Fixed Route Transit Services and Paratransit Service, Regional Express Bus Service The Banning Pass Transit System offers three routes, Routes 1, 5, and 6 as well as a Dial -A -Ride Service. Routes 5 and 6 operate on headway of 75 minutes Headways on the routes were increased due to increased congestion in the area of Highland Springs and Ramsey. The prior 60 minute headway caused routes to operate late. Routes 1 and 2 (Route 2 provides the Beaumont Transit System's Cabazon service) complement each other throughout the commercial areas of Beaumont, Banning, Cabazon, and the Morongo commercial development, with both Routes 1 and 2 operating every two hours. Route 1 is the only service that travels into eastern Cabazon, whereas Route 2 is the only service that travels into northeastern Beaumont. Approximately 75% of Routes 1 and 2 duplicate each other with a one hour frequency along the main corridor. Pass Transit service into Cabazon is the result of a MOU between RTA and the City of Banning in an effort to reduce duplicative transit service in the Pass Area and to satisfy an unmet transit need at the time. In November of 2012, Route 1 began operating extended service and now operates until 11 pm Monday through Friday. All routes are continually monitored and will be modified as needed to better serve unmet transit needs. A summary of Pass Transit routes operated by Banning Transit System are shown below: Route 1 o Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon This route operates on two-hour headway and is complemented by an overlap with Route 2 (Beaumont Pass Transit) along 75% of the route. Route 1 is the only service to the remote Esperanza & Elm area of southeastern Cabazon. The route also provides service to the residential areas of Cabazon, James Venable Cabazon Community Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Cabazon Outlets, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue in Banning, and the commercial areas along 6th Street and Beaumont Avenue in Beaumont. Cabazon Fvening Express - Banning/Cabazon The Evening Express Route began service in November of 2012 and offers service from Banning to Cabazon between the hours of 7:OOpm and 10.30pm and operates on a 65 minute headway. This route was developed in response to 4 a direct need for transportation from employees at both Casino Morongo and Desert Hills Shopping Center. The route makes limited stops and differs from the Route 1 in that it does not travel into the residential area of Cabazon or into Beaumont. Route 5 - Northern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas of the city of Banning that lie north of the 1--10 freeway, Nicolet Middle School, Hoffer Elementary School, Banning Public Library, Coombs Intermediate School, Hemmerling Elementary School, and the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue. Route 6 - Southern Banning The route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas south of the 1-10 freeway, a small residential section north of Ramsey Street at the east end of the City of Banning, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, apartment complexes in the south, and the Banning Municipal Airport. Banning Pass Transit fixed route service hours are: Monday through Friday Extended Service to Cabazon Saturday & Sunday 6:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. - 10A5 p.m. 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. The Banning Transit System Pass Transit provides service hours from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the following holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, President's Day, Labor Day, Veteran's Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays. New Year s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride provides service to seniors (60+), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complementary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Call Center hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 3 00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and voice mail can be left anytime and will be responded to as soon as possible. Service hours for Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride are: 5 Seniors (age 60 & older) and persons with disabilities without ADA certification Monday — Friday 8.00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday No Service Persons with ADA Complementary Paratransit Certification Monday — Friday 7:00 a m. - 7:00 p.m. Saturday & SundayService provided only if three (3) or more persons request service Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride provides service hours to ADA Certified passengers only from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday Friday and on the following holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, President's Day, Labor Day, Veteran's Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride is provided within the entire city limits of Banning and Beaumont and within a % mile boundary of the Routes 1 and 2 service areas in Cabazon. The City of Banning provides the ADA certification for Pass Transit Dial -A - Ride services operated by the City of Banning. The primary uses of Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride are for transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment, and include connections to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Pass Transit fixed routes. Through a cooperative memorandum of understanding, Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride operated by the Beaumont Transit system will provide its residents with service in Banning and within a 3/ mile boundary of Route 2 in Cabazon. Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride operated by the Banning Transit System will provide its residents with service in the city limits of Beaumont (excluding Cherry Valley). Re Tonal Bias Service Pass Transit passengers can use Day Passes to transfer between the Pass Transit System fixed routes and the RTA Line 31 to Hemet and Line 35 to Moreno Valley. The RTA 210 and the Sunline Commuter Line 220 provides service to and from Riverside to Palm Desert, offering stops in the Pass area. This service was created to help connect the eastern desert region to the City of Riverside while providing service to and from the Banning/Beaumont area as well. Beaumont Pass Transit now offers a commuter link, Route 120, which travels from Beaumont Walmart to Calimesa, San Bernardino MetroLink, and the Loma Linda VA Hospital Monday through Friday. Utilizing the available connections, there are multiple opportunities for Banning residents to access inter -regional travel. 6 1 A Fare Structure The fare structure was adjusted in April 2012 for the Pass Transit System. Currently, the fixed route fare is $1.15/one way trip for general fare passengers. Fares for senior citizens age 60 years and older and persons with disabilities is $.65/one-way trip. A zone fare of $.25 exists for persons traveling between Banning/Beaumont and Cabazon/IVlorongo service areas. (The route is twice the length of any other route in the system. The zone fare helps to recover operating costs for travel beyond the City limits.) Passengers under 46" in height pay $.25. Ten -ride ticket books are offered for 510.35 each; senior citizens and persons with disabilities can purchase Ten -Ride ticket books at a reduced cost of $5.85 per ten -ride book. Day passes are sold for 3.00 each; senior citizens and persons with disabilities can purchase the passes for $1.80. General fare monthly passes are $36.00, Senior/Disabled monthly passes are offered at $21.50 and monthly passes for students are 525.00. Revenue Teel Banning Transit System operates five fixed route vehicles (three in revenue service and two as spares), all of which are powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). The vehicles are equipped with bicycle racks for two bicycles, and are in compliance with the ADA with mobility device lifts and two tie -down stations per bus The transit system also operates three Dial -A -Ride vehicles (two in revenue service and one as a spare) that are gasoline powered and in compliance with the ADA, with mobility device lifts and tie - down stations for four mobility devices. Banning Pass Transit also has four support vehicles that are used for driver relief or administrative errands. The City adheres to California Highway Patrol (CHP) mandated Preventive Maintenance Inspection criteria and is very proactive in maintenance efforts. The predicted replacement level for fixed route service buses is every 10 years. Currently, there are five fixed route buses of which three are in revenue service and two are rotation buses. A replacement bus for the fixed route will be needed in FY 2014/15. See the City of Banning Fleet Inventory Table 1 for individual vehicle characteristics. The following is a Banning Transit fixed route bus: 7 1.6 Existing Facility/Planned Facilities Banning Transit System functions as a department within the City and utilizes existing facilities. Transit Administrative staff is housed at the City's Community Center located at 789 North San Gorgonio Avenue, where bus passes are sold, schedules are available and all ADA applications are processed. Dispatch and general telephone information is also provided at the transit office within the Community Center. Banning Transit Office Hours: Monday — Thursday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm Friday 8:00 am to 3:00 pm The maintenance, parking, fueling of the buses and storage of bus stop amenities are performed at the City's Corporation Yard located at 176 East Lincoln Street. Maintenance of the vehicles is performed by the Public Works Department, Fleet Maintenance Division. There are currently no plans to expand Banning Pass Transit System facilities. CHAP FEB 2 � �)CISTIN G SERVICE AND 0UTF '='EREH RMANCE. A summary of Pass Transit routes operated by Banning Transit System are shown below: Route I o Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon This route operates on a two-hour headway and is complemented by an overlap with Route 2 (Beaumont Pass Transit) along 75% of the route. Route 1 is the only service to the remote Esperanza & Elm area of southeastern Cabazon. The route also provides service to the residential areas of Cabazon, James Venable Cabazon Community Center, Casino Morongo, Desert HMIs Premium Outlets and Cabazon Outlets, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue in Banning, and the commercial areas along 6th Street and Beaumont Avenue in Beaumont. Cabazon Evening Express ® Banning/Cabazon The Evening Express Route began service in November of 2012 and offers service from Banning to Cabazon between the hours of 7:OOpm and 10.30pm and operates on a 65 minute headway. This route was developed in response to a direct need for transportation from employees at both Casino Morongo and Desert Hills Shopping Center. The route makes limited stops and differs from the 8 Route 1 in that it does not travel into the residential area of Cabazon or into Beaumont. Route 5 e Northern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas of the City of Banning that lie north of the 1-10 freeway, Nicolet IVliddle School, Hoffer Elementary School, Banning Public Library, Coombs Intermediate School, Hemmerling Elementary School and the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue. Route 6 Southern Banning The route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas south of the 1-10 freeway, a small residential section north of Ramsey Street at the east end of the City of Banning, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue, Banning High School, Smith Correctional Facility, apartment complexes in the south, and the Banning Municipal Airport. Banning Pass Transit fixed route service hours are: Monday — Friday Extended Service to Cabazon Saturday & Sunday 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. to 10:45 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Banning Transit System Pass Transit provides service hours from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on the following holidays: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, President's Day, Labor Day, Veteran's Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays- New Year s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride provides service to seniors (60+), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for complementary paratransit service under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Call Center hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and voice mail can be left anytime and will be responded to as soon as possible. Service hours for Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride are as follows: Seniors (age 60 & older) and persons with disabilities without ADA certification Monday — Friday 8:00 a.m. — 3:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday No Service 9 Persons with ADA Complementary Paratransit Certification Monday — Friday 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Saturday & SundayService provided only if three (3) or more persons request service Pass Transit Dial -A --Ride provides service hours to ADA Certified passengers only from 3:00 a.m. to 4 00 p.m., Monday -- Friday and on the following holidays. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, President's Day, Labor Day, Veteran's Day, and the day after Thanksgiving Day. No service is provided on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride is provided within the entire city limits of Banning and Beaumont and within a 3/4 mile boundary of the Routes 1 and 2 service areas in Cabazon. The City of Banning provides the ADA certification for Pass Transit Dial -A - Ride services operated by the City of Banning. The primary uses of Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride are for transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment, and include connections to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Pass Transit fixed routes. Through a cooperative memorandum of understanding, Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride operated by the Beaumont Transit system will provide its residents with service in Banning and within a % mile boundary of Route 2 in Cabazon. Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride operated by the Banning Transit System will provide its residents with service in the city limits of Beaumont (excluding Cherry Valley). Key Performance Indicators The Riverside County Transportation Commission (ROTC) has adopted a Productivity Improvement Plan (PIP) for the transit and commuter rail operators of Riverside County. The PIP sets forth efficiency and effectiveness standards that the transit operators are to meet. Progress towards these standards is reported quarterly to the Commission. The following tables show the operating performance indicators adopted in the PIP and this plan's projections for the coming year. 10 Banning `I r°ansit: System/Pass Transit Performance Measures Banning Transit System / Pass Transit FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Audited Actual Projected Planned (Based on 3rd Quarter Actuals) Performance Statistics Unlinked Passenger Trips 133,939 138,503 122,635 226,175 Operating Cost per Revenue $80.30 $88.15 $75.12 $85.73 Hours Farebox Recovery Ratio 12.34% 11.73% 12.15% 10.44% Subsidy per Passenger $7.65 $6.48 $6.42 $5.81 Subsidy per Passenger Mile N/A 2.54 2.59 $2.26 Subsidy per Revenue Hour $70.47 $77.81 $65.99 $76.78 Subsidy per Revenue Mile $4.23 $4.69 $2.88 $5.06 Passengers per Revenue Hour 9.2 12.0 10.3 13.2 Passengers per Revenue Mile 0.56 0.72 0.45 0.87 The FY 2014/15 projections are based on operating data through March 2014, projected through June, 2014. Since these are only estimates, the performance indicators are subject to change. For Fiscal Year 2014/15, the Banning Transit System expects to be in compliance with at least 4 of the 7 performance targets. Additional details on key indicators for demand responsive and fixed route services are shown in Table 2. The Banning Transit System does not receive any federal funding and is not required to report to the National Transit Database. 2.4 Productivity Improvement Efforts In order to meet performance standards, staff will continue to monitor and analyze all routes to make sure that service is warranted and will eliminate unproductive service areas. Banning Pass Transit is currently in the process of finishing a Comprehensive Operations Analysis with Transportation Management & Design, Inc. This project is anticipated to be completed concurrently with Beaumont Pass Transit and will provide recommendations for enhanced efficiency for each respective system, as well as the system as a whole. This project is nearing completion and recommendations for changes will be taken to City Council for approval with a projected implementation date of August 1, 2014. 1> 2. 5 Major Trip Generators and Projected Growth Over Next Two Years Major passenger trip destinations that the Banning Pass Transit services are the Kmari S hopping Center, the 2nd Street Marketplace in Beaumont, the WalMart Supercenter in Beaumont, the Fox Cinema in Banning, the Cabazon Outlet Stores, Desert Mills P remium Outlets and Casino Morongo and the Mt. San Jacinto College Pass Campus. There is a high demand for service to these destinations whether for employment, necessities or pleasure. 2.6 Equipment, Passenger Amenities and Facility Needs P assenger amenities include 170 sign posted bus stops, 14 bus shelters with solar lighting and information panels and trash receptacles, 8 benches, and 15 trash cans. A fully -equipped shop truck, tools and repair equipment were delivered in 2012. All fixed route and Dial -A -Ride vehicles had either new security cameras and recording equipment installed or existing new upgraded and a new paratransit vehicle will be ordered with expected delivery in August 2013. A need for a replacement fixed route bus is anticipated for FY 2013-14. CFilA 1='ILANNED 11±RVICH7 CHANG 3.1 Recent Service Changes tES AND IMPLEMEK A'H'ION As stated previously, Banning Pass Transit currently has a contract with Transportation Management & Design, Inc. for the purpose of having a Comprehensive Operations Analysis completed. This project is anticipated to be done concurrently with Beaumont Pass Transit and will provide recommendations for enhanced efficiency for each respective system as well as the system as a whole. This project is nearing completion and recommendations for route changes will be taken to the City Council for approval with a projected implantation date of August 1, 2014. See Appendix A for proposed route changes 3.2 Marketing Plans and Promotions Efforts have been made to market the Pass Transit System over the past year and will continue in the coming year. These efforts include purchasing advertising on a map of the San Gorgonio Pass Area, distribution of route maps by delivery to the library, chamber of commerce, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Mt. San Jacinto Pass Campus, local hotels and other businesses. 12 The following marketing efforts will be undertaken to promote ridership growth. 1. Continue outreach programs to schools and at community events. 2. Attend senior community meetings to provide information. 3. Participation in the Mt. San Jacinto Jr. College GO -PASS Program to encourage ridership of college students. 4. Enclose flyers with transit information in city utility bills. 5. Coordinate Travel Training through RTA The City of Banning's website at www.ci.banning.ca.us provides basic Pass Transit route and schedule information. Transit staff is currently working to make information about routes and services more accessible. Customers can submit comments, complaints, concerns and suggestions through the city website. C H A P T h il l F I N N C I A !! AN 4.1 Operating and Capital Budget 0 CAPITAL PLANS For FY 14/15 operating funds needed to operate the Banning Pass Transit System are $1,625,066 for the Fixed Route and DAR. The operating funds consist of S1,455,566 local transportation funds (LTF). The projected farebox revenue for FY 14/15 is 5169,000. Additional funding in the amount of $500.00 will come from interest income . In an effort to increase efficiencies in service, the requested funds will allow for the conversion of full-time equivalent hours to one full-time driver position and additional part-time hours allotted to maintain the proposed route changes. In addition to aggressively completing previously funded Capital projects, staff anticipates the need for two 35' passenger coaches in FY 14/15. Some funding from multiple projects that have not yet been started will be combined into one project and will fund the purchase of one of the two coaches that are needed. Additionally, requested funds will be used to fund a Transit Manager Position. The most recent audit validated the fact that Banning Pass Transit is in need of a management position to move the system forward by obtaining grants and maintaining necessary reports for grant funded projects, develop a plan for capital fund projects and to create a viable campaign to promote Banning Pass Transit. 4.2 Funding Plans to Support Operating and Capital Program Capital projects are funded through STA funds and Proposition 1 B grants for Banning Pass Transit. 4.3 Regulatory and Compliance Requirements 13 The City of Banning submitted an Americans with Disabilities Act Paratransit Plan to the FTA on January 26, 1992. Pass Transit fixed route buses are equipped with ADA compliant mobility device lifts and are accessible to persons with disabilities. A procedure is in place to provide service to a customer in a mobility device should a fixed route bus lift fail. Banning Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride services provide ADA complementary paratransit service for the fixed route services operated by Banning Transit System. Beaumont Transit System offers the same service through its Pass Transit Dial -a -Ride operation. The system uses a self -certification process with professional verification. Banning Transit System staff processes ADA certifications for Pass Transit operations. Title VI Banning Transit System/Pass Transit does not utilize federal funds for operating expenses. As such, Title VI requirements do not currently apply to the transit system. Alternatively Fueled Vehicles (ROTC Policy) Pass Transit fixed -route buses are CNG powered. Pass Transit Dial -a -Ride vehicles (which are less than 33,000 lbs. GVW and 15-passenger capacity) and administrative and driver relief vehicles are gasoline powered. Future vehicle purchases will be in compliance with the RCTC and South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQIVID) policies regarding alternative fuel transit vehicles. The CNG Fueling Station at the City of Banning Corporation Yard provides expanded CNG capacity and fast fueling capability. With increased capacity and redundant compressor units, having adequate and reliable CNG pumping capacity will not be an issue in the foreseeable future. STA Compliance The City of Banning does not utilize State Transit Assistance (STA) funding for operating expenses. As such, compliance with the Public Utilities Commission requirement is not applicable. 14 MN Now livf 9irTzztrka-:pxidiai4aeffitirn IBus (Motorbus) / Nrectly Operated Table L - Reef In yentory nt 204/15 Short Range Transit Plan City of Banning Brant Mfe�. Code Model Seating Capacil Lift and Ramp Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of Active Vehicles FY 201L3/14 #. of Contingency Vehicles EY 2013124 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FFY 2012/ 13 Life to Dame Vehicle Miles through March =Y 2013/14 Average Lifetime Moles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY2013,:L4 2012 2009 CMD Malibu 2001 EDN Transmark 2004 EDN Transmark 2010 EDN XHF 2002 FRD Ranger 2003 FRD Ranger 2010 FRD Ranger 2 5 33 33 31 2 2 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 35 35 34 12 12 GA HG CN CN CN GA GA GA 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11,322 489,170 693,467 211,992 60,915 53,944 26,294 1,803 143,112 492,792 414,397 278,911 63,789 60,134 34,580 _,803 143,112 492,792 207,199 139,456 63,789 60,134 34,580 TransTrack Managerrm 5/22/2014 110 5 C 1,547,104 1,489,518 148,952 Page 1 of 1 Demand Response / ®urectlay Operated Table 1 - Fleet Inventor/ 12014/15 Sia©rt Range Transit Plan City of Banning Year Mfg. Built Code Model Code Seat n g Capacity Lift and Ramp !Equipped Vehicle Length Fuel Type Code # of :fictive Vehicles FY 2013/14 # of Contingency Vehicles Lam' 2013/14 Life to Date Vehicle Miles Prior Year End FY 2012/13 Life to Date Vehicle Mies through March FY 2013/714 Average Lifetime Miles Per Active Vehicle As Of Year -To -Date (e.g., March) FY 2013/14 2010 2010 2001 2003 2013 2008 EBC EBC EDN EDN GLV ZZZ Aerotech EDN Aerotech Aerotech Universal Ford 16 16 12 12 18 14 1 1 1 1 i 1 25 25 25 25 26 GA GA GA GA CN GA 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 42,269 45,904 238,274 227,836 66,773 53,413 55,455 254,034 243,085 3,503 80,525 53,413 55,455 254,034 243,085 3,503 80,525 Totals: TransTrack Managerrm 5/22/2014 88 5 0 621,056 690,015 115,003 Page 1 of 1 NMI 1111IM 8irznalr to-7,y Ir-pstdim EY 2014 's 5 Short Range Trans P➢ain 2.2]11 Roytes FY 2011/12 Audited I, FY 2012/13 Audited FY 2013/14 Nan FY 2313/14 3rd QLr. Actual FY 201.4/1 S Nan Frieet ChariacteHstics I Peak -Hour Fleet 4 10 I' (FiITTari.daV Data I Total Operating Expenses Total Passenger Fare Revenue Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,156,840 $132,349 $1,024,491 _ $1,198,139 $107,550 $1,090,588 $856,810 $107,362 $749,448 $935,492 $112,322 $823,170 $1,625,066 $169,000 $1,456,066 Operati Characteristics I Unlinked Passenger Trips Passenger Miles Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) I Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) Total Actual Vehicle Miles 136,563 348,828 13,368.8 295,938.5 301,923.3 147,747 ;! 376,766 15,119.1 341,759.2 349,489.2 118,477 1 300,985 10,725.0 168,130.0 177,355.0 116,621 296,027 11,572.8 266,553.3 272,133.4 237,270 621,266 19,489.0 306,329.0 314,977.0 I Performance Characterusilcs I I Operating Cost per Revenue Hour Farebox Recovery Ratio Subsidy per Passenger Subsidy per Passenger Mile Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) li Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) $86.53 11.440/0 $7.50 $2.94 $76.63 $3.46 10.2 0.46 $79.25 , 8.98% $7.38 $2.89 $72.13 $3.19 9.8 0.43 $79.89 12.53% $6.33 $2.49 $69.88 $4.46 11.0 0.70 $80.84 I 12.01% $7.06 j $2.78 $71.13 $3.09 10.1 0.44 $83.38 10.39% , $6.14 $2.34 $74.71 $4.75 12.2 0.77 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager"' 5/23/2014 Page 1 of Min NM divtr-t: trr'^r 1=paldtim :amp -:ice Table 2 - - City of Fanning - - SR 7 l7 5311-d e UMME r y FAA 202 4/ 5 Sheri: Rance u ranso P]an Men-Exduded Routes FY 2011112 Audited) FY 2012/13 Audited I Pt 2013/24 Nan F° 2013/14 3r dl Qtr Actua 7Y 2014/S5 Nan Meet C:-,1.aracteristics I Peak -Hour Fleet I 6 , 1 i Filearocua0 Data 1 Total Operating Expenses $1,127,082 $1,127,726 $856,810 $878,516 $615,509 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $125,761 $105,438 $107,362 $109,753 $62,218 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $1,001,321 $1,022,289 $749,448 $768,763 1 - $553,291 Operating Characteristics i I Unlinked Passenger Trips 128,832 143,694 118,477 113,227 64,755 Passenger Miles 329,655 366,714 300,985 287,610 190,109 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 12,027.8 13,866.0 10,725.0 10,486.4 7,697.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 287,938.5 320,860.8 168,130.0 249,970.4 121,358.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 293,454.6 327,382.8 177,355.0 254,733.3 126,935.0 PeKormance Croarac't.eristics i Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $93.71 $81.33 $79.89 $83.78 h $79.97 1 Farebox Recovery Ratio 11.16% 9.35% 1 12.53% 12.49% 10.10% Subsidy per Passenger $7.77 $7.11 $6.33 $6.79 $8.54 Subsidyper Passenger Mile p 9 $3.04 $2.79 1 $2.49 1 $2.67 $2.91 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $83.25 $73.73 $69.88 $73.31 $71.88 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.48 $3.19 $4.46 $3.08 ll $4.56 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 10.7 10.4 11.0 10.8 I 8.4 PaccPnner ner RPvani IP MiIP (b) 0.45 0.45 I 0.70 0.45 0.53 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'^' 5/23/2014 Wage I of I Min MOM 4ia-rsdc iota-. f 1--,:pxldio, Taaije 2 -- C igy of Banning -- ER1717 err Lfice SummEry FM 20 4/ 25 Short. Range 7Fransk Nate Exc uded Routes FY 2011/12 Audited FY 20/2/13 Audited FY 2OT3/L'4 Nan FY 2013/14 3rd Qtr ActuM FY 2O14/L5 Nan Meet Character]s*Jcs � Peak -Hour Fleet 4 I=unanda` Data Total Operating Expenses $29,758 $70,412 $56,977 $1,009,557 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $6,588 $2,113 $2,570 $106,782 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $23,170 $68,299 1 $54,407 1 $902,775 Operatun) C,varacterist cs Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,731 4,053 3,394 172,515 Passenger Miles 19,173 10,051 8,417 431,157 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 1,341.0 1,253.2 1,086.4 1 11,792.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 8,000.0 20,898.4 16,582.9 11 184,971.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 8,468.7 22,106.4 17,400.1 188,042.0 Peffcrma:nce Characteristics I Operating Cost per Revenue Hour 1 $22.19 $56.19 $52.45 $85.61 Farebox Recovery Ratio 22.14% 3.000/0 4.510/0 10.57% Subsidy per Passenger $3.00 $16.85 $16.03 $5.23 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.21 $6.80 $6.46 $2.09 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $17.28 $54.50 $50.08 $76.56 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $2.90 $3.27 $3.28 $4.88 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 5.8 3.2 3.1 14.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.97 0.1.9 0.20 0.93 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager TM 5/23/2014 Page 1 of 1 7i�srzdt teer.fr'i.-aspxtctitn ,latrcizis uathie 2 -- EEnn n -EUE -- IRTp 0871:7 c0 LIMMa ref Q]ll Rouses 1 � 2011/12 Audiited FV 2012/13 Audited FY2013 / 14 Pfian F�4- !2013 % 3rd Qtr Adana[ :Y2014 15 � Pfau Fleet Characteristics � I i i Peak -Hour Fleet 2 8 Fuotanc'sa2 Data II Total Operating Expenses Total Passenger Fare Revenue $985,656 $119,052 $1,056,263 $90,076 $705,670 $91,246 $862,845 $98,548 $1,466,369 $153,100 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $866,604 $966,187 $614,424 $764,296 i $1,313,269 Operating Characterostks I Unlinked Passenger Trips 127,499 j 138,503 105,584 110,543 226,175 Passenger Miles 316,198 343,487 263,959 274,147 581,371 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 12,063.0 13,877.2 8,460.0 10,767.4 17,104.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 269,632.5 316,380.2 124,562.0 250,689.3 259,754.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 273,501.3 321,592.2 127,620.0 254,737.4 263,725.0 PeGformawce Characterustie:.s Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $81.71 $76.12 $83.41 $80.13 $85.73 Farebox Recovery Ratio 12.08% 8.53% 12.93% 11.42% 10.44% Subsidy per Passenger $6.80 $6.98 $5.82 $6.91 $5.81 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $2.74 $2.81 $2.33 $2.79 $2.26 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $71.84 $69.62 $72.63 $70.98 $76.78 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $3.21 $3.05 $4.93 $3.05 $5.06 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 10.6 10.0 12.5 10.3 13.2 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.47 0.44 0.85 0.44 0.87 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Manager'?" 5/23/2014 Page 1 of 1 �MUM iivtriir Carfy l-mtpxtrtim Canc:•� Tom,:%' ie 2 -- BEnn ng-EUS -_ ERTP SerfiCe SEMMarif 2011.4113 Short Rance T ransFt Nan E�duided Routes FY 2011/12 FY 2012/13 r' 2O3/1c FY 2013/14 FY 2014/15 Audited Audited Plan 3rEl Qt.- Actual Plan eet CharacteraS k:s a Peak -Hour Fleet II i,i 4 E=unanciaT, Data Total Operating Expenses $29,758 $70,412 $56,977 $1,009,557 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $6,588 $2,113 $2,570 $106,782 Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $23,170 '1 $68,299 $54,407 i $902,775 Operating Characteristics Unlinked Passenger Trips 7,731 4,053 3,394 172,515 Passenger Miles 19,173 10,051 8,417 431,157 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 1,341.0 1,253.2 1,086.4 11,792.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 8,000.0 20,898.4 16,582.9 184,971.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 8,468.7 22,106.4 i 17,400.1 188,042.0 i?egIormance C aracteriis ks l� Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $22.19 $56.19 $52.45 $85.61 Farebox Recovery Ratio 22.14% 3.000/0 4.51% 10.57% Subsidy per Passenger $3.00 $16.85 $16.03 $5.23 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $1.21 $6.80 $6.46 $2.09 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $17.28 $54.50 $50.08 $76.56 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $2.90 $3.27 l $3.28 $4.88 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 5.8 3.2 3.1 14.6 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.97 0.19 0.20 0.93 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Managern" 5/23/2014 Page 1 of 1 11111111 MEM Ii►artic tax:.7 t-mpalciim sim aisle 2 -- Banning-DAR -- R rTP Service Summar,,/Allll Routes FY 2011/12 Audited FY 2012/13 � Audited i FY 2013/14 FY 201.3/14 Pian 3rd Qtr Actuai FY 2014/15 Pian FVeet Characteristics - Peak -Hour Fleet 2 2 Financiai Data - i Total Operating Expenses i $171,184 $141,876 $151,140 $72,648 $158,697 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $13,297 $17,474 $16,116 $13,774 $15,900 I Net Operating Expenses (Subsidies) $157,887 $124,402 $135,024 $58,874 $142,797 perat rm Character]s.r :cs Unlinked Passenger Trips 9,064 9,244 12,893 6,078 11,095 Passenger Miles 32,630 33,278 37,026 21,881 39,895 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours (a) 1,305.8 1,242.0 2,265.0 805.4 2,385.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles (b) 26,306.0 25,379.0 43,568.0 15,864.0 46,575.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles 28,422.0 27,897.0 49,735.0 17,396.0 51,252.0 Performance Characirerislics i Operating Cost per Revenue Hour $131.09 ` $114.24 $66.73 $90.20 $66.54 Farebox Recovery Ratio 7.77% 12.32% 10.66% 18.96% 10.01% Subsidy per Passenger $17.42 $13.46 $10.47 $9.69 $12.87 Subsidy per Passenger Mile $4.84 $3.74 $3.65 $2.69 $3.58 Subsidy per Revenue Hour (a) $120.91 $100.17 $59.61 $73.10 $59.87 Subsidy per Revenue Mile (b) $6.00 $4.90 $3.10 $3.71 $3.07 Passenger per Revenue Hour (a) 6.9 7.4 5.7 7.5 4.7 Passenger per Revenue Mile (b) 0.34 0.36 0.30 0.38 0.24 (a) Train Hours for Rail Modes. (b) Car Miles for Rail Modes. TransTrack Managernw 5/23/2014 Page 1 of 1 ZJo r abed bioz/zz/s 4,1ziabeueN vea1suea1 990/95b1$ 000`693 990'5Z91T$ 0'LL6'17T£ 0'6Z£`90£ 017a/0Z 0'69V6T 99Z'IZ9 OLZ'LEZ Oi sle;olaapinoad 90inaag L6L'Ztit$ 006'53 L69'85T$ 0'ZSZ'i5 0'5L5`9b 0'098'z 0'58£'Z 568.6E S60'TT Z AeppaM 21V0-NV8 Lb6'£09$ 9Iti'bL$ E9E'8L9$ 0'8b6'9ET OtEZ'bET 0'LI6'L 0'6ib8'L OTE'LE£ bz6117£1 Z lelol WD-NV9 L9S106Z$ OZT'ZE$ L89'ZZE$ 0'50£16b 066170'617 O'S60$ 0'6£81£ ZSZ'£6 TOE'LE T lelol OD-NV8 T8VSZ$ STVZ$ 6681LZ$ 0'S8L`S 0'6175'S 079E 0'0SE LLT'OT Sb81Z T poi 9-NV9 89V6Z£$ L91'L£$ S£9199£$ 0.59Z'6s 0'b58'85 0'927'b o'TSZ`b 0170`81T 9IZ`Zb T lelol VS-NV9 58918Z$ 8L51E$ E9Z'ZE$ 017007 0'ZLE'17 0.89E 0'9SE SZO`TT OIZ`b T Poi S-NV9 T9Z18$ 9bZ$ LOS'8$ 0'68L'I 0'689'1 0'9LZ 0'170i S6S 06Z T AemeaM 3i-NV8 098'9Z$ SSI`E$ ST0`0£$ 0'6ZZ'9 0.80019 0.09£ 0.55E ZL6'0T 6907 I lewl T-NV8 Amsgns anuanaa ;sop ;aN aa6uessed 6uneaad0 sal! W sel! W anuanad sanol l sanoH sal!W le;ol anuanab aa6uessed saa6uassed sah!yan 'lead adAl Aea #x einoa swauieu elea sa4noli !iv ST /t1OZ Ad T -- 6uiuue8 3o AID sNiso;eis amodi &LYS - £ aim NUM Milli I _ r CCr77 lcp_ Idio Performance Indicators Table 3 - �I�rTP Route Statistics City of Banning -- 1 FY 2014/15 Ale Routes Route # Day Type Operating Operating Farebox Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Subsidy Per Cost Per Cost Per Cost Per Recovery Subsidy Per Passenger Revenue Revenue Passengers Passengers Revenue l-1our Revenue Mile Passenger Ratio Passenger Mile i-lour /ife Per Fou. Per Mile BAN-1 Total $84.55 $5.00 $6,84 10.51% $6.12 $2,45 $4 $75.66 .� a ,.47 12.4 0,73 BAN-1E Weekday $81.80 $5.04 $29.33 2.89% $28.49 $13.88 $79.43 $4.89 2.8 0.17 BAN-5 Total $90.63 $7.38 $7,66 11.09% $6.81 $2.60 $80.58 $6.56 11.8 0.96 BAN-5A Total $86.25 $6.23 $8,68 10.13% $7.80 $2.79 $77.50 $5.60 9.9 0.72 BAN-6 Total $79.71 $5,03 $9.81 8.66% r $8.96 $2.50 $72.80 .�4.59 8.1 0.51 BAN -CC Total $84.05 $6,58 $8.65 9.95% $3 7.79 r $ .��.12 ,�75.69 .p5.92 9.7 0.76 BAN -CM Total $86.43 $5,05 $5.03 10,96% $4.48 $1.79 $76.95 .p4.50 17.2 1.01 BAN-DAR Weekday $66.54 $3.41 $14.30 10.01% $12.87 $3.58 $59.87 $3.07 4.7 0,24 Service Provider Totals $83,38 $5.30 $6.85 10.39% $6.14 $2.34 $74.71 $4.75 12.2 0.77 TransTrack Manager '^ 5/22/2014 Page 2 of T ABLF 3A: INDIVIDUAL ROUTE DESCRIPTION Route 1 Beaumont/Banning/Cabazon Pass Transit Route 1 provides service predominately along Ramsey Street & 6th Street between Beaumont City Hall, Banning and Cabazon, while serving the Casino Morongo, Cabazon neighborhoods and Cabazon shopping areas. This route operates on a two- hour headway and is complemented by an overlap with Route 2 (operated by Beaumont Transit System) along 75% of the route. It provides service to the remote Bsperanza and Elm area of Cabazon. The route also provides service to the residential areas of Cabazon, James Venable Community Center, Casino Morongo, Desert Hills Premium Outlets and Cabazon outlets, and the commercial areas along 6th Street and Beaumont Avenue in Beaumont. This route provides riders access to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices within the City of Banning and the unincorporated community of Cabazon. Destinations on Route 1 include: K-Mart, Albertsons, Wal-Mart Supercenter, Beaumont City Hall, Greyhound Crucero Agency, Amtrak California Thruway bus stop, Banning City Hall, The Gas Company, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Fox Cinemas, Banning Police Department, Desert Hills Premium Outlets, Cabazon Outlets, Casino Morongo and James Venable Community Center. Route 6 v Northern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas of the City of Banning that lie north of the 1-10 Freeway, the Riverside County Courthouse, the Banning Municipal Library, the Coombs Intermediate School, and the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue. This neighborhood feeder route provides connections to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices, Banning City Hall, Fox Cinemas, K-Mart, Albertsons, Rite Aid Pharmacy, Walgreens Pharmacy, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Banning Chamber of Commerce, Riverside County Superior Court, Banning Public Library, Banning Community Center, Banning Senior Center, Repplier Park Aquatics Center, U.S. Post Office, and various other shopping and school locations within the community. Route 6 m Southern Banning This route operates on a 75 minute headway and provides service to the residential areas south of the 1-10 Freeway, a small residential section north of Ramsey Street at the east end of the City of Banning, the commercial areas along Ramsey Street and Highland Springs Avenue, Banning High School, apartment complexes, the Riverside County Smith Correctional Facility. 16 This neighborhood feeder route provides connections to many civic, educational and county sponsored public social service offices, Banning City Hall, Fox Cinemas, K-Mart, Albertsons, Rite Aid Pharmacy, Walgreens Pharmacy, San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Banning High School, the Riverside County Smith Correctional Facility, The Banning Municipal Airport, U.S. Post Office, and various other shopping and school locations within the community. Kass Transit Dial -A -Ride Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride is provided within the entire city limits of Banning and Beaumont and within a 3/ mile boundary of Routes 1 and 2 services in Cabazon. The City of Banning provides the ADA certification for Pass Transit Dial -A -ride services operated by the cities of Banning and Beaumont. Seniors (age 60 years and older), persons with disabilities, and ADA eligible passengers are eligible for dial -a -ride throughout the entire service area. Service hours vary for non-ADA eligible passengers. These categories of passengers also are required to fill out a certification application to determine eligibility of service. Once certified, a card is issued to the applicant. General public passengers (ages 5 — 59 years) are not eligible for dial -a -ride service. The primary uses of Pass Transit Dial -A -Ride are for transportation to medical appointments, workshop programs for persons with disabilities, shopping areas, employment, and connections with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) and Pass Transit Fixed Routes. 17 slx.palsenbad spund slip', Ad }o iGewwnS bLOZ/£Z/9 pasined %£LOZP.0 L awooul wo4 sl (Z) Jau}p :940N 009$ 0001693 0$ 69L161-$ 0$ 0$ 990'L9b`L$ 99L`9ti9`1.$ lemdeo ig 6uReaad° :ieiol 0$ 0$ 0$ 681'63 0$ 0$ 0$ 691'63 iepdeo :je;oignS 69 L'6 L$ 1-0-9 L NA L Ad fonoaS 81. dad 009$ 000'693 0$ 0$ O$ 0$ 9901L91/1-$ 99949Z9`3 6ui awk) :le}olgnS 009$ 0001693 990'1.917`1-$ 999`9Z9`L$ sesuadx3 6uRead0 t`) aau10 xo8 aged y amseaw A;unoaS En. doed OOSSIWld) 8 L dad `d1S dl1 sound to }unowy Ielol O.) JagwnN pefad Iepdeo u011d1JOSea peroad 1 9 L/417 40Z AA IN paisanbaa spun] jo fueuauans - °mei ueld a6ued 1-1ouS palsenbad sound jo tiewwnS 9L/PLOZ Ad 6wuue8 io f!o TABLE 4A - CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION P ROJECT NUMBER 1 5-01 P ROJECT NAME_ Wireless Communication Download System P ROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of a Wireless WIFI Communications system to allow automatic storage of video and audio files from all fixed route buses and dial -a -ride vehicles in the Banning Pass Transit fleet PROJECT JUSTIFICATION Having footage automatically downloaded and stored eliminates the need to remove hard drives for data retrieval, which virtually eliminates and chance of loss of recorded footage. The installation of a Wireless WIFI Communications system will dramatically increase the reliability of recovering recorded footage, thus enhancing passenger safety as well as reducing the possibility of fraudulent and insurance related claims. P ROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) P rop 1 B PTMISEA (13/14) $ 19,189.00 TOTAL $ 19.189.00 Prior year projects of a similar nature with unexpended balances or projects approved but not yet ordered. sirpalsanba?{ spund 9L/9LOZ Jed 10 kiewwnS tl0Z/ZZ/9 Paslna�d awooul IsaieTut woii sl (Z) Jau10 :a}oN Goes oonz . ®$ 0$ 0$ 'o$ 96t7t617` 9-$ 96 V999` 14 gaUcl E0 : pepi 1g Eugw.aed® 0$ 0$ 0$ 0$ 0$ 0$ 0$ os Rlodleo :ieloNns i o09S ootzzLS oS oS oS oS 96V£6t,`LS 96L`999`LS Bugendo :pe;olgns 009S OOZ'ZL LS 'I 96t/£6V LS 96 L'999' LS sasuadxd 6uReiad0 9 L/9 LOZ Ad z all0 x08 aged I y ainsean � AlpnoaS 8 L dold d1S dll jo spund Tunowy 1e101 (0 JagwnN 109f0-1d Ieilde0 UO01_10900 }OGrald (VESIWld) 8 L doid 9WS�0?AE101 ueld 4lsueul abuey 1101-IS paTsenbaspund fuewwns 9 L/9 LOZ Ad 6upuues Jo Apo sirpalsenbad sound LI./960Z Ad Jo tieumanS ti60Z/£Z/9 paslnad auaooul WOJJ sl (Z) Ja1410 :910N 009$ 909'9L1-$ f 0$ OS OS 0$ 8z8`o£9'6$ ££8`Z89`Z$ lemdeo ig BulieJedp :1eicu °oS 0$ OS 0$ OS 0$ OS 000`92.8$ lellde0 :levaigns 00019Z$ 000`098$ ZO-L I• I-0-L6 sayoeo0 aloNeA wauaaoelda loo} lalla2:1 C£ (Z) 009$ 909`9L6$ OS OS 0$ 0$ 8Z8`0£946$ ££8`2.02.16$ 6ugesiedo :plc:41:1ns 009S 90919LLS 8Z8`0£9`L$ ££8`LOL'1-$ sesuadxa 6uRelad0 L119I. Ad (z) J91410 xoe aced y ainseelN Awnoes 8 6 dad (VBSIWld) 81• dad dlS Al sound to wnowy lelol (i) JagwnN peroid 191090 uogdpasea pe[wd L1/910Z A,d Job paisenbeN spund i(JeuauunS - Z'9 alge1 ueld jlsueal a6ue2711-10118 palsenbasound Jo kieuaumS L 6/91.0Z Jed 6uiuuee }o Itmo TABLE 5B m CAPITA, PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER 17-01 PROJECT NAME 35' Coach Replacements PROJECT DESCRIPTION The purpose of this project is to replace the two 2001 El Dorado Transmarks that will have exceeded their useful lives PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This is part of the Pass Transit fleet inventory and replacement schedule PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA Prop 1B PTMISEA (13/14) 293,422 556,578 TOTAL 850,000 Prior year projects of a similar nature with unexpended balances or projects approved but not yet ordered. TABLE 513 CAPITAL PROJECT JUSTIFICATION PROJECT NUMBER 17-02 PROJECT NAME Relief Vehicle Replacement PROJECT DESCRIPTION The purpose of this project is to replace the 2002 Ford Ranger which will have exceeded its life PROJECT JUSTIFICATION This is part of the Pass Transit fleet inventory and replacement schedule PROJECT FUNDING SOURCES (REQUESTED) STA 25,000 TOTAL 25,000 Prior year projects of a similar nature with unexpended balances or projects approved but not yet ordered. TABLE 6 PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT TABLE 6 e PROGRESS TO IMPLEMENT TRIENNIAL PERFORIVIANCE AUDIT Action(s)Taken And Results Audit (Covering Recommendations F'Y 2010-2012) Consider software purchasing program and dispatching schedule Transit obtain with Viewer software use purchase by staff all software. August necessary will is be working and 2014. secured, It installation is information anticipated with installed City of IT for Schedule that staff and proceeding the put to into Provide Cross Training Opportunities for City Budgeted a will administrative within will appropriate stabilizing system. 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Mar Mr tart11=pztrtim Table 7 -- Service Proyider Performance Targets Report PI 20 3/14 Short Raroge Transit P'an Review Oty of Banning Data Elements FY 20' 3/14 PVaro lid 20/3/14 Target �J' 20 3/14 Year to Date I Through 3rd Quarter � Year to Daye Performance Scorecard Unlinked Passenger Trips 118,477 IPassenger Miles 300,985 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Hours 10,725.0 Total Actual Vehicle Revenue Miles 168,130.0 Total Actual Vehicle Miles j 177,355.0 Total Operating Expenses $856,810 Total Passenger Fare Revenue $107,362 Net Operating Expenses $749,448 ?ertormance Indicators Mandatory: 1. Farebox Recovery Ratio 12.53% 1 >= 10.00% 12.010/0 Meets Target Discretionary: 1. Operating Cost Per Revenue Hour $79.89 <_ $79.81 $80.84 Fails to Meet Target y 2. Subsidy Per Passenger $6.33 >_ $5.86 and <_ $7.92 $7.06 Meets Target 3. Subsidy Per Passenger Mile $2.49 >_ $2.30 and <_ $3.11 $2.78 Meets Target 4. Subsidy Per Hour $69.88 >_ $58.47 and <_ $79.11 $71.13 Meets Target 5. Subsidy Per Mile $4.46 >_ $2.47 and <_ $3.35 $3.09 Meets Target 6. Passengers Per Revenue Hour 1.1.00 >= 8.50 and <= 11.50 10.10 Meets Target 7. 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L=J SHORT RANGF, TRANIsllT pLAN L�= El Implement new routes and schedules as recommended in the Comprehensive Operation Analysis Purchase additional equipment for camera system to enable wireless download Purchase and install auto display and enunciator equipment in fixed route fleet Purchase A©A accessible van Purchase two fixed route coach u Purchase shop truck to expedite repairs to buses experiencing breakdowns on route. p Closely monitor service to the MSJC Pass Campus and address needs as necessary Continue working with the City of Beaumont staff regarding the coordination of routes, schedules, passenger amenities, and fares to ensure that Pass Transit is seamless and simple to use by Pass Area residents. BANNING TRANSIT SYSTEM/PASS 2010/11 FY 2011 Audited FY /12 2012/13 Audited FY 2013/14 Estimate (Based Quarter Actuals) FY on 3rd 2014/15 Planned FY TRANSIT Audited Systemwide Ridership 128,244 136,563 147,747 141,304 237,270 Operating Per Revenue Cost $86.53 579.24 $76.33 583.38 Hours $92.64 Route by Route Draft -corriaitn ndat ocoyn 1'ASSTRANSIT City of Banning Route by Route Draft Recommendations Prepared by: aTMD COMPREHENSIVE OPERATIONS ANALYSIS MBA DATIONS ctourie The new Route 1 will combine the resources of existing Routes 1 and 2 to create a strong transit corridor along 6th/Ramsey Street with a 30-minute service frequency. This corridor is currently served by Routes 1 and 2 which operate at 120 minute frequencies for a combined frequency of 60 minutes. The proposed changes will cut the out -of -vehicle wait time for a bus in half, greatly improving the customer experience. The proposed route will run along Beaumont Avenue, 6th Street, and Ramsey Street, connecting Mountain View Middle School, San Gorgonio Hospital, Wal-Mart, Casino Morongo, the Cabazon Outlet Mall, and key destinati